Science.gov

Sample records for absolute humidity conditions

  1. Absolute Humidity and the Seasonality of Influenza (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaman, J. L.; Pitzer, V.; Viboud, C.; Grenfell, B.; Goldstein, E.; Lipsitch, M.

    2010-12-01

    Much of the observed wintertime increase of mortality in temperate regions is attributed to seasonal influenza. A recent re-analysis of laboratory experiments indicates that absolute humidity strongly modulates the airborne survival and transmission of the influenza virus. Here we show that the onset of increased wintertime influenza-related mortality in the United States is associated with anomalously low absolute humidity levels during the prior weeks. We then use an epidemiological model, in which observed absolute humidity conditions temper influenza transmission rates, to successfully simulate the seasonal cycle of observed influenza-related mortality. The model results indicate that direct modulation of influenza transmissibility by absolute humidity alone is sufficient to produce this observed seasonality. These findings provide epidemiological support for the hypothesis that absolute humidity drives seasonal variations of influenza transmission in temperate regions. In addition, we show that variations of the basic and effective reproductive numbers for influenza, caused by seasonal changes in absolute humidity, are consistent with the general timing of pandemic influenza outbreaks observed for 2009 A/H1N1 in temperate regions. Indeed, absolute humidity conditions correctly identify the region of the United States vulnerable to a third, wintertime wave of pandemic influenza. These findings suggest that the timing of pandemic influenza outbreaks is controlled by a combination of absolute humidity conditions, levels of susceptibility and changes in population mixing and contact rates.

  2. The relationship between indoor and outdoor temperature, apparent temperature, relative humidity, and absolute humidity.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, J L; Schwartz, J; Dockery, D W

    2014-02-01

    Many studies report an association between outdoor ambient weather and health. Outdoor conditions may be a poor indicator of personal exposure because people spend most of their time indoors. Few studies have examined how indoor conditions relate to outdoor ambient weather. The average indoor temperature, apparent temperature, relative humidity (RH), and absolute humidity (AH) measured in 16 homes in Greater Boston, Massachusetts, from May 2011 to April 2012 was compared to measurements taken at Boston Logan airport. The relationship between indoor and outdoor temperatures is nonlinear. At warmer outdoor temperatures, there is a strong correlation between indoor and outdoor temperature (Pearson correlation coefficient, r = 0.91, slope, β = 0.41), but at cooler temperatures, the association is weak (r = 0.40, β = 0.04). Results were similar for outdoor apparent temperature. The relationships were linear for RH and AH. The correlation for RH was modest (r = 0.55, β = 0.39). Absolute humidity exhibited the strongest indoor-to-outdoor correlation (r = 0.96, β = 0.69). Indoor and outdoor temperatures correlate well only at warmer outdoor temperatures. Outdoor RH is a poor indicator of indoor RH, while indoor AH has a strong correlation with outdoor AH year-round.

  3. Effects of Absolute Humidity on Flashover Voltage of Insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Osamu; Hidaka, Kazuhiro; Mizuno, Yukio; Naito, Katsuhiko; Irie, Takashi; Nishikawa, Morio

    Effect of humidity on flashover voltage of three kinds of insulators is experimentally studied for about three years under natural humidity condition. It is found that the existing IEC humidity correction seems to be proper for most insulators regardless of the kinds of applied voltage but that change may be necessary for a cap and pin insulator unit under the application of positive and negative lightning impulse voltages.

  4. The relationship between indoor and outdoor temperature, apparent temperature, relative humidity, and absolute humidity

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Jennifer L.; Schwartz, Joel; Dockery, Douglas W.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Many studies report an association between outdoor ambient weather and health. Outdoor conditions may be a poor indicator of personal exposure because people spend most of their time indoors. Few studies have examined how indoor conditions relate to outdoor ambient weather. Methods and Results The average indoor temperature, apparent temperature, relative humidity (RH), and absolute humidity (AH) measured in 16 homes in Greater Boston, Massachusetts, from May 2011 - April 2012 was compared to measurements taken at Boston Logan airport. The relationship between indoor and outdoor temperatures is non-linear. At warmer outdoor temperatures, there is a strong correlation between indoor and outdoor temperature (Pearson correlation coefficient, r = 0.91, slope, β = 0.41), but at cooler temperatures, the association is weak (r = 0.40, β = 0.04). Results were similar for outdoor apparent temperature. The relationships were linear for RH and AH. The correlation for RH was modest (r = 0.55, β = 0.39). AH exhibited the strongest indoor-to-outdoor correlation (r = 0.96, β = 0.69). Conclusions Indoor and outdoor temperatures correlate well only at warmer outdoor temperatures. Outdoor RH is a poor indicator of indoor RH, while indoor AH has a strong correlation with outdoor AH year-round. PMID:23710826

  5. System for controlling absolute humidity in a work area

    SciTech Connect

    Norris, P.K.; Oliver, P.S.

    1987-05-05

    A system is described for controlling absolute humidity of air which is removed from an area, passed through an air washer and returned through a duct to the area. The system comprises: a first sensor located within the area for generating a first signal representative of the absolute humidity of air within the area; a second sensor located in a discharge air plenum portion of the washer for generating a second signal representative of the dry bulb temperature of air discharged from the washer; and control means responsive to the first and second signals for producing a third signal which is applied to the washer to control the dry bulb temperature of air discharged from the washer.

  6. Surface Characterization of pNIPAM Under Varying Absolute Humidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chhabra, Arnav; Kanapuram, Ravitej; Leva, Harrison; Trejo, Juan; Kim, Tae Jin; Hidrovo, Carlos

    2012-11-01

    Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) has become ubiquitously known as a ``smart'' polymer, showing many promising applications in tissue engineering and drug delivery systems. These applications are particularly reliant on its trenchant, thermally induced hydrophilic-hydrophobic transition that occurs at the lower critical solution temperature (LCST). This feature imparts the pNIPAM programmable adsorption and release capabilities, thus eliminating the need for additional enzymes when removing cells from pNIPAM coated surfaces and leaving the extracellular matrix proteins of the cells largely untouched. The dependence of the LCST on molecular weight, solvent systems, and various salts has been studied extensively. However, what has not been explored is the effect of humidity on the characteristic properties of the polymer, specifically the LCST and the magnitude of the hydrophilic-hydrophobic transition. We studied the surface energy variation of pNIPAM as a function of humidity by altering the absolute humidity and keeping the ambient temperature constant. Our experiments were conducted inside a cuboidal environmental chamber with control over the temperature and humidity inside the chamber. A controlled needle was employed to dispense size-regulated droplets. Throughout this process, a CCD camera was used to image the droplet and the static contact angle was determined using image processing techniques. The behavior of pNIPAM as a function of humidity is presented and discussed.

  7. Using Absolute Humidity and Radiochemical Analyses of Water Vapor Samples to Correct Underestimated Atmospheric Tritium Concentrations

    SciTech Connect

    Eberhart, C.F.

    1999-06-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) emits a wide variety of radioactive air contaminants. An extensive ambient air monitoring network, known as AIRNET, is operated on-site and in surrounding communities to estimate radioactive doses to the public. As part of this monitoring network, water vapor is sampled continuously at more than 50 sites. These water vapor samples are collected every two weeks by absorbing the water vapor in the sampled air with silica gel and then radiochemically analyzing the water for tritium. The data have consistently indicated that LANL emissions cause a small, but measurable impact on local concentrations of tritium. In early 1998, while trying to independently verify the presumed 100% water vapor collection efficiency, the author found that this efficiency was normally lower and reached a minimum of 10 to 20% in the middle of summer. This inefficient collection was discovered by comparing absolute humidity (g/m{sup 3}) calculated from relative humidity and temperature to the amount of water vapor collected by the silica gel per cubic meter of air sampled. Subsequent experiments confirmed that the elevated temperature inside the louvered housing was high enough to reduce the capacity of the silica gel by more than half. In addition, their experiments also demonstrated that, even under optimal conditions, there is not enough silica gel present in the sampling canister to absorb all of the moisture during the higher humidity periods. However, there is a solution to this problem. Ambient tritium concentrations have been recalculated by using the absolute humidity values and the tritium analyses. These recalculated tritium concentrations were two to three times higher than previously reported. Future tritium concentrations will also be determined in the same manner. Finally, the water vapor collection process will be changed by relocating the sampling canister outside the housing to increase collection efficiency and, therefore

  8. ON A SUFFICIENT CONDITION FOR ABSOLUTE CONTINUITY.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The formulation of a condition which yields absolute continuity when combined with continuity and bounded variation is the problem considered in the...Briefly, the formulation is achieved through a discussion which develops a proof by contradiction of a sufficiently theorem for absolute continuity which uses in its hypothesis the condition of continuity and bounded variation .

  9. Ground-based lidar and microwave radiometry synergy for high vertical resolution absolute humidity profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrera-Verdejo, María; Crewell, Susanne; Löhnert, Ulrich; Orlandi, Emiliano; Di Girolamo, Paolo

    2016-08-01

    Continuous monitoring of atmospheric humidity profiles is important for many applications, e.g., assessment of atmospheric stability and cloud formation. Nowadays there are a wide variety of ground-based sensors for atmospheric humidity profiling. Unfortunately there is no single instrument able to provide a measurement with complete vertical coverage, high vertical and temporal resolution and good performance under all weather conditions, simultaneously. For example, Raman lidar (RL) measurements can provide water vapor with a high vertical resolution, albeit with limited vertical coverage, due to sunlight contamination and the presence of clouds. Microwave radiometers (MWRs) receive water vapor information throughout the troposphere, though their vertical resolution is poor. In this work, we present an MWR and RL system synergy, which aims to overcome the specific sensor limitations. The retrieval algorithm combining these two instruments is an optimal estimation method (OEM), which allows for an uncertainty analysis of the retrieved profiles. The OEM combines measurements and a priori information, taking the uncertainty of both into account. The measurement vector consists of a set of MWR brightness temperatures and RL water vapor profiles. The method is applied to a 2-month field campaign around Jülich (Germany), focusing on clear sky periods. Different experiments are performed to analyze the improvements achieved via the synergy compared to the individual retrievals. When applying the combined retrieval, on average the theoretically determined absolute humidity uncertainty is reduced above the last usable lidar range by a factor of ˜ 2 with respect to the case where only RL measurements are used. The analysis in terms of degrees of freedom per signal reveal that most information is gained above the usable lidar range, especially important during daytime when the lidar vertical coverage is limited. The retrieved profiles are further evaluated using

  10. Predictors of indoor absolute humidity and estimated effects on influenza virus survival in grade schools

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Low absolute humidity (AH) has been associated with increased influenza virus survival and transmissibility and the onset of seasonal influenza outbreaks. Humidification of indoor environments may mitigate viral transmission and may be an important control strategy, particularly in schools where viral transmission is common and contributes to the spread of influenza in communities. However, the variability and predictors of AH in the indoor school environment and the feasibility of classroom humidification to levels that could decrease viral survival have not been studied. Methods Automated sensors were used to measure temperature, humidity and CO2 levels in two Minnesota grade schools without central humidification during two successive winters. Outdoor AH measurements were derived from the North American Land Data Assimilation System. Variability in indoor AH within classrooms, between classrooms in the same school, and between schools was assessed using concordance correlation coefficients (CCC). Predictors of indoor AH were examined using time-series Auto-Regressive Conditional Heteroskedasticity models. Classroom humidifiers were used when school was not in session to assess the feasibility of increasing indoor AH to levels associated with decreased influenza virus survival, as projected from previously published animal experiments. Results AH varied little within classrooms (CCC >0.90) but was more variable between classrooms in the same school (CCC 0.81 for School 1, 0.88 for School 2) and between schools (CCC 0.81). Indoor AH varied widely during the winter (range 2.60 to 10.34 millibars [mb]) and was strongly associated with changes in outdoor AH (p < 0.001). Changes in indoor AH on school weekdays were strongly associated with CO2 levels (p < 0.001). Over 4 hours, classroom humidifiers increased indoor AH by 4 mb, an increase sufficient to decrease projected 1-hour virus survival by an absolute value of 30% during winter months

  11. Effects of Temperature, Relative Humidity, Absolute Humidity, and Evaporation Potential on Survival of Airborne Gumboro Vaccine Virus

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yang; Dijkman, Remco; Fabri, Teun; de Jong, Mart C. M.; Groot Koerkamp, Peter W. G.

    2012-01-01

    Survival of airborne virus influences the extent of disease transmission via air. How environmental factors affect viral survival is not fully understood. We investigated the survival of a vaccine strain of Gumboro virus which was aerosolized at three temperatures (10°C, 20°C, and 30°C) and two relative humidities (RHs) (40% and 70%). The response of viral survival to four metrics (temperature, RH, absolute humidity [AH], and evaporation potential [EP]) was examined. The results show a biphasic viral survival at 10°C and 20°C, i.e., a rapid initial inactivation in a short period (2.3 min) during and after aerosolization, followed by a slow secondary inactivation during a 20-min period after aerosolization. The initial decays of aerosolized virus at 10°C (1.68 to 3.03 ln % min−1) and 20°C (3.05 to 3.62 ln % min−1) were significantly lower than those at 30°C (5.67 to 5.96 ln % min−1). The secondary decays at 10°C (0.03 to 0.09 ln % min−1) tended to be higher than those at 20°C (−0.01 to 0.01 ln % min−1). The initial viral survival responded to temperature and RH and potentially to EP; the secondary viral survival responded to temperature and potentially to RH. In both phases, survival of the virus was not significantly affected by AH. These findings suggest that long-distance transmission of airborne virus is more likely to occur at 20°C than at 10°C or 30°C and that current Gumboro vaccination by wet aerosolization in poultry industry is not very effective due to the fast initial decay. PMID:22156417

  12. Instrument uncertainty effect on calculation of absolute humidity using dewpoint, wet-bulb, and relative humidity sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Slayzak, S.J.; Ryan, J.P.

    1998-04-01

    As part of the US Department of Energy`s Advanced Desiccant Technology Program, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is characterizing the state-of-the-art in desiccant dehumidifiers, the key component of desiccant cooling systems. The experimental data will provide industry and end users with independent performance evaluation and help researchers assess the energy savings potential of the technology. Accurate determination of humidity ratio is critical to this work and an understanding of the capabilities of the available instrumentation is central to its proper application. This paper compares the minimum theoretical random error in humidity ratio calculation for three common measurement methods to give a sense of the relative maximum accuracy possible for each method assuming systematic errors can be made negligible. A series of experiments conducted also illustrate the capabilities of relative humidity sensors as compared to dewpoint sensors in measuring the grain depression of desiccant dehumidifiers. These tests support the results of the uncertainty analysis. At generally available instrument accuracies, uncertainty in calculated humidity ratio for dewpoint sensors is determined to be constant at approximately 2%. Wet-bulb sensors range between 2% and 6% above 10 g/kg (4%--15% below), and relative humidity sensors vary between 4% above 90% rh and 15% at 20% rh. Below 20% rh, uncertainty for rh sensors increases dramatically. Highest currently attainable accuracies bring dewpoint instruments down to 1% uncertainty, wet bulb to a range of 1%--3% above 10 g/kg (1.5%--8% below), and rh sensors between 1% and 5%.

  13. Challenges to Cabin Humidity Removal Presented by Intermittent Condensing Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    vonJouanne, Roger G.; Williams, David E.

    2007-01-01

    On-orbit temperature and humidity control (THC) is more easily accomplished when the THC hardware is either consistently dry (i.e., no humidity control is occurring), or consistently wet. The system is especially challenged when intermittent wet/dry conditions occur. The first six years of on-orbit ISS operations have revealed specific concerns within the THC system, specifically in the condensing heat exchanger and the downstream air/water separator. Failed or degraded hardware has been returned to ground and investigated. This paper presents the investigation findings, and the recommended hardware and procedural revisions to prevent and recover from the effects of intermittent condensing conditions.

  14. Comparison of absolute and relative air humidity sensors fabricated with inkjet printing technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selma, R.; Tarapata, G.; Marzecki, M.

    2015-09-01

    This paper describes design, manufacturing and testing of novelty humidity sensors manufactured in inkjet printing technology. Two types of sensors were produced - sensor for dew point hygrometer, along with heater and thermistor, and a relative humidity sensor. Both were tested and proven to be functional, with both advantages and disadvantages described further in the article.

  15. Absolute gain measurement by the image method under mismatched condition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Richard Q.; Baddour, Maurice F.

    1987-01-01

    Purcell's image method for measuring the absolute gain of an antenna is particularly attractive for small test antennas. The method is simple to use and utilizes only one antenna with a reflecting plane to provide an image for the receiving antenna. However, the method provides accurate results only if the antenna is matched to its waveguide. In this paper, a waveguide junction analysis is developed to determine the gain of an antenna under mismatched condition. Absolute gain measurements for two standard gain horn antennas have been carried out. Experimental results agree closely with published data.

  16. The Weathering of Rocks Under Humid Tropical Conditions.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    kaolinitic clay, the formation of gibbsite from the kaolinite , and the leaching of silica and iron-oxides. (Modified author abstract)...rhyolitic to andesitic lavas, tuffs and granophyre, under warm humid climatic conditions. The dominant minerals in the bauxite deposits are gibbsite ... kaolinite , quartz (also chalcedony), goethite, and hematite. The occurrence of bauxite is determined primarily by the parent rocks, which are typically fine

  17. Adapting wood hydrolysate barriers to high humidity conditions.

    PubMed

    Yaich, Anas Ibn; Edlund, Ulrica; Albertsson, Ann-Christine

    2014-01-16

    The incorporation of layered silicates in bio-based barrier films resulted in lower water vapor permeability, and significantly lowered oxygen permeability at a relative humidity (RH) as high as 80%, with reduced moisture sensitivity of the wood hydrolysate (WH) based films. The applicability of WH based films was accordingly extended over a wider relative humidity condition range. Crude aqueous process liquor, the WH, was extracted from hardwood and utilized as a feed-stock for films without any upgrading pretreatment, yet producing superior oxygen barrier performance compared to partially upgraded WH and highly purified hemicelluloses. Films composed of crude WH and either one of two types of naturally occurring layered silicates, montmorillonite (MMT) or talc, as mineral additives, were evaluated with respect to oxygen and water vapor permeability, morphological, tensile and dynamic thermo-mechanical properties. Films with an oxygen permeability as low as 1.5 (cm(3)μm)/(m(2)daykPa) at 80% RH was achieved.

  18. 40 CFR 89.326 - Engine intake air humidity measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Engine intake air humidity measurement... Test Equipment Provisions § 89.326 Engine intake air humidity measurement. (a) Humidity conditioned air supply. Air that has had its absolute humidity altered is considered humidity- conditioned air. For...

  19. 40 CFR 89.326 - Engine intake air humidity measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Engine intake air humidity measurement... Test Equipment Provisions § 89.326 Engine intake air humidity measurement. (a) Humidity conditioned air supply. Air that has had its absolute humidity altered is considered humidity- conditioned air. For...

  20. 40 CFR 89.326 - Engine intake air humidity measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Engine intake air humidity measurement... Test Equipment Provisions § 89.326 Engine intake air humidity measurement. (a) Humidity conditioned air supply. Air that has had its absolute humidity altered is considered humidity- conditioned air. For...

  1. 40 CFR 89.326 - Engine intake air humidity measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Engine intake air humidity measurement... Test Equipment Provisions § 89.326 Engine intake air humidity measurement. (a) Humidity conditioned air supply. Air that has had its absolute humidity altered is considered humidity- conditioned air. For...

  2. 40 CFR 89.326 - Engine intake air humidity measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Engine intake air humidity measurement... Test Equipment Provisions § 89.326 Engine intake air humidity measurement. (a) Humidity conditioned air supply. Air that has had its absolute humidity altered is considered humidity- conditioned air. For...

  3. Humidity-corrected Arrhenius equation: The reference condition approach.

    PubMed

    Naveršnik, Klemen; Jurečič, Rok

    2016-03-16

    Accelerated and stress stability data is often used to predict shelf life of pharmaceuticals. Temperature, combined with humidity accelerates chemical decomposition and the Arrhenius equation is used to extrapolate accelerated stability results to long-term stability. Statistical estimation of the humidity-corrected Arrhenius equation is not straightforward due to its non-linearity. A two stage nonlinear fitting approach is used in practice, followed by a prediction stage. We developed a single-stage statistical procedure, called the reference condition approach, which has better statistical properties (less collinearity, direct estimation of uncertainty, narrower prediction interval) and is significantly easier to use, compared to the existing approaches. Our statistical model was populated with data from a 35-day stress stability study on a laboratory batch of vitamin tablets and required mere 30 laboratory assay determinations. The stability prediction agreed well with the actual 24-month long term stability of the product. The approach has high potential to assist product formulation, specification setting and stability statements.

  4. Absolute Radiation Measurements in Earth and Mars Entry Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruden, Brett A.

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on the measurement of radiative heating for shock heated flows which simulate conditions for Mars and Earth entries. Radiation measurements are made in NASA Ames' Electric Arc Shock Tube at velocities from 3-15 km/s in mixtures of N2/O2 and CO2/N2/Ar. The technique and limitations of the measurement are summarized in some detail. The absolute measurements will be discussed in regards to spectral features, radiative magnitude and spatiotemporal trends. Via analysis of spectra it is possible to extract properties such as electron density, and rotational, vibrational and electronic temperatures. Relaxation behind the shock is analyzed to determine how these properties relax to equilibrium and are used to validate and refine kinetic models. It is found that, for some conditions, some of these values diverge from non-equilibrium indicating a lack of similarity between the shock tube and free flight conditions. Possible reasons for this are discussed.

  5. Developmental acclimation to low or high humidity conditions affect starvation and heat resistance of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Parkash, Ravi; Ranga, Poonam; Aggarwal, Dau Dayal

    2014-09-01

    Several Drosophila species originating from tropical humid localities are more resistant to starvation and heat stress than populations from high latitudes but mechanistic bases of such physiological changes are largely unknown. In order to test whether humidity levels affect starvation and heat resistance, we investigated developmental acclimation effects of low to high humidity conditions on the storage and utilization of energy resources, body mass, starvation survival, heat knockdown and heat survival of D. melanogaster. Isofemale lines reared under higher humidity (85% RH) stored significantly higher level of lipids and showed greater starvation survival hours but smaller in body size. In contrast, lines reared at low humidity evidenced reduced levels of body lipids and starvation resistance. Starvation resistance and lipid storage level were higher in females than males. However, the rate of utilization of lipids under starvation stress was lower for lines reared under higher humidity. Adult flies of lines reared at 65% RH and acclimated under high or low humidity condition for 200 hours also showed changes in resistance to starvation and heat but such effects were significantly lower as compared with developmental acclimation. Isofemale lines reared under higher humidity showed greater heat knockdown time and heat-shock survival. These laboratory observations on developmental and adult acclimation effects of low versus high humidity conditions have helped in explaining seasonal changes in resistance to starvation and heat of the wild-caught flies of D. melanogaster. Thus, we may suggest that wet versus drier conditions significantly affect starvation and heat resistance of D. melanogaster.

  6. Volatilization modeling of two herbicides from soil in a wind tunnel experiment under varying humidity conditions.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Martina; Goss, Kai-Uwe

    2012-11-20

    Volatilization of pesticides from the bare soil surface is drastically reduced when the soil is under dry conditions (i.e., water content lower than the permanent wilting point). This effect is caused by the hydrated mineral surfaces that become available as additional sorption sites under dry conditions. However, established volatilization models do not explicitly consider the hydrated mineral surfaces as an independent sorption compartment and cannot correctly cover the moisture effect on volatilization. Here we integrated the existing mechanistic understanding of sorption of organic compounds to mineral surfaces and its dependence on the hydration status into a simple volatilization model. The resulting model was tested with reported experimental data for two herbicides from a wind tunnel experiment under various well-defined humidity conditions. The required equilibrium sorption coefficients of triallate and trifluralin to the mineral surfaces, K(min/air), at 60% relative humidity were fitted to experimental data and extrapolated to other humidity conditions. The model captures the general trend of the volatilization in different humidity scenarios. The results reveal that it is essential to have high quality input data for K(min/air), the available specific surface area (SSA), the penetration depth of the applied pesticide solution, and the humidity conditions in the soil. The model approach presented here in combination with an improved description of the humidity conditions under dry conditions can be integrated into existing volatilization models that already work well for humid conditions but still lack the mechanistically based description of the volatilization process under dry conditions.

  7. CVEN 6960 master's project, investigation of a cooling coil in high humidity conditions. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Sloop, R.E.

    1993-12-10

    The primary purpose of this project is to validate the HVAC*2 Toolkit calculations for a cooling coil in high humidity conditions. A total of 19 experimental runs at different entering air temperature and humidity conditions were performed at the Joint Center for Energy Management HVAC Laboratory that exposed a cooling coil to temperature and humidity conditions that are typically found in the southern United States. The inlet conditions and manufacturer's coil rating data was used as input to the HVAC*2 Toolkit simple cooling coil subroutine (CCSIM). The predicted results from the toolkit were then compared to the experimental results.

  8. Modeling Validation and Control Analysis for Controlled Temperature and Humidity of Air Conditioning System

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jing-Nang; Lin, Tsung-Min

    2014-01-01

    This study constructs an energy based model of thermal system for controlled temperature and humidity air conditioning system, and introduces the influence of the mass flow rate, heater and humidifier for proposed control criteria to achieve the controlled temperature and humidity of air conditioning system. Then, the reliability of proposed thermal system model is established by both MATLAB dynamic simulation and the literature validation. Finally, the PID control strategy is applied for controlling the air mass flow rate, humidifying capacity, and heating, capacity. The simulation results show that the temperature and humidity are stable at 541 sec, the disturbance of temperature is only 0.14°C, 0006 kgw/kgda in steady-state error of humidity ratio, and the error rate is only 7.5%. The results prove that the proposed system is an effective controlled temperature and humidity of an air conditioning system. PMID:25250390

  9. Modeling validation and control analysis for controlled temperature and humidity of air conditioning system.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jing-Nang; Lin, Tsung-Min; Chen, Chien-Chih

    2014-01-01

    This study constructs an energy based model of thermal system for controlled temperature and humidity air conditioning system, and introduces the influence of the mass flow rate, heater and humidifier for proposed control criteria to achieve the controlled temperature and humidity of air conditioning system. Then, the reliability of proposed thermal system model is established by both MATLAB dynamic simulation and the literature validation. Finally, the PID control strategy is applied for controlling the air mass flow rate, humidifying capacity, and heating, capacity. The simulation results show that the temperature and humidity are stable at 541 sec, the disturbance of temperature is only 0.14 °C, 0006 kg(w)/kg(da) in steady-state error of humidity ratio, and the error rate is only 7.5%. The results prove that the proposed system is an effective controlled temperature and humidity of an air conditioning system.

  10. Encapsulation of Perovskite Solar Cells for High Humidity Conditions.

    PubMed

    Dong, Qi; Liu, Fangzhou; Wong, Man Kwong; Tam, Ho Won; Djurišić, Aleksandra B; Ng, Annie; Surya, Charles; Chan, Wai Kin; Ng, Alan Man Ching

    2016-09-22

    We examined different encapsulation strategies for perovskite solar cells by testing the device stability under continuous illumination, elevated temperature (85 °C) and ambient humidity of 65 %. The effects of the use of different epoxies, protective layers and the presence of desiccant were investigated. The best stability (retention of ∼80 % of initial efficiency on average after 48 h) was obtained for devices protected by a SiO2 film and encapsulated with a UV-curable epoxy including a desiccant sheet. However, the stability of ZnO-based cells encapsulated by the same method was found to be inferior to that of TiO2 -based cells. Finally, outdoor performance tests were performed for TiO2 -based cells (30-90 % ambient humidity). All the stability tests were performed following the established international summit on organic photovoltaic stability (ISOS) protocols for organic solar cell testing (ISOS-L2 and ISOS-O1).

  11. Humidity-conditioned gravimetric method to measure the water content of hydrogel contact lens materials.

    PubMed

    Galas, S L; Enns, J B

    1993-07-01

    A method to determine the humidity-conditioned gravimetric water content of hydrogel contact lens materials has been developed, in which errors due to blotting have been eliminated by conditioning the lens in a series of relative humidity (RH) environments before measuring the water content gravimetrically, and then extrapolating the water content to 100% RH. This method has been used to determine the water contents of representative materials from each of the four FDA lens groups, which were compared with their labeled values, as well as with values obtained from refractive index measurements. The deviation of the water content of soft contact lenses as measured by refractive index from that obtained gravimetrically increased as the water content decreased. The humidity-conditioned gravimetric method to determine water content of hydrophilic contact lenses is being proposed as an International Organization for Standardization (ISO) standard, as an improvement over the gravimetric and refractive index methods.

  12. Humidity effect on organic semiconductor NiPc films deposited at different gravity conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatima, N.; Ahmed, M. M.; Karimov, Kh. S.; Ahmedov, Kh.

    2016-08-01

    In this study, thin films of Nickel Phthalocyanine (NiPc) were deposited by centrifugation at high gravity (70g), and also at normal gravity (1g) conditions to fabricate humidity sensors. Ceramic alumina sheet, coated with silver electrodes, having interelectrode distance of 0.2l mm were used to assess the electrical properties of the sensors. Room temperature capacitance and impedance variations were measured as a function of relative humidity ranging from 25% ∼⃒ 95% at 1 kHz frequency. It was observed that sensors fabricated at 70g were more sensitive compared to sensors fabricated at 1g. Sensors fabricated at 70g exhibited 1.8 times decrease in their impedance and1.5 times increase in their capacitance at peak ambient humidity. SEM images showed more roughness for the films deposited at 70g compared to films deposited at 1g. It was assumed that surface irregularities might have increased active surface area of 70g sensors hence changed the electrical response. Impedance-humidity and capacitance-humidity relationships were modeled and a good agreement was observed between experimental and modeled data. Experimental data showed that NiPc films could be useful for instrumentation industry to fabricate organic humidity sensors.

  13. Single cell stiffness measurement at various humidity conditions by nanomanipulation of a nano-needle.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yajing; Nakajima, Masahiro; Yang, Zhan; Tajima, Hirotaka; Najdovski, Zoran; Homma, Michio; Fukuda, Toshio

    2013-04-12

    This paper presents a method for single cell stiffness measurement based on a nano-needle and nanomanipulation. The nano-needle with a buffering beam was fabricated from an atomic force microscope cantilever by the focused ion beam etching technique. Wild type yeast cells (W303) were prepared and placed on the sample stage inside an environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM) chamber. The nanomanipulator actuated the nano-needle to press against a single yeast cell. As a result, the deformation of the cell and nano-needle was observed by the ESEM system in real-time. Finally, the stiffness of the single cell was determined based on this deformation information. To reveal the relationship between the cell stiffness and the environmental humidity conditions, the cell stiffness was measured at three different humidity conditions, i.e. 40, 70 and 100%, respectively. The results show that the stiffness of a single cell is reduced with increasing humidity.

  14. Single cell stiffness measurement at various humidity conditions by nanomanipulation of a nano-needle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yajing; Nakajima, Masahiro; Yang, Zhan; Tajima, Hirotaka; Najdovski, Zoran; Homma, Michio; Fukuda, Toshio

    2013-04-01

    This paper presents a method for single cell stiffness measurement based on a nano-needle and nanomanipulation. The nano-needle with a buffering beam was fabricated from an atomic force microscope cantilever by the focused ion beam etching technique. Wild type yeast cells (W303) were prepared and placed on the sample stage inside an environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM) chamber. The nanomanipulator actuated the nano-needle to press against a single yeast cell. As a result, the deformation of the cell and nano-needle was observed by the ESEM system in real-time. Finally, the stiffness of the single cell was determined based on this deformation information. To reveal the relationship between the cell stiffness and the environmental humidity conditions, the cell stiffness was measured at three different humidity conditions, i.e. 40, 70 and 100%, respectively. The results show that the stiffness of a single cell is reduced with increasing humidity.

  15. Temperature and Humidity Independent Control Research on Ground Source Heat Pump Air Conditioning System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, G.; Wang, L. L.

    Taking green demonstration center building air conditioning system as an example, this paper presents the temperature and humidity independent control system combined with ground source heat pump system, emphasis on the design of dry terminal device system, fresh air system and ground source heat pump system.

  16. Tensile testing of nylon and Kevlar parachute materials under Federal specified temperature and relative humidity conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Botner, W.T.

    1980-01-01

    A small 10-ft x 12-ft temperature and relative humidity controlled room for tensile testing of parachute materials is presented. Tensile tests of nylon and Kevlar parachute materials indicate there is a negligible change in break strength of test samples soaked in the controlled environment vs samples soaked in ambient conditions.

  17. Long-term corrosion/oxidation studies under controlled humidity conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Gdowski, G.

    1997-10-13

    Independent of thermal loading scenarios, the waste packages at the potential repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada will be exposed to environmental conditions where there is the possibility of significant water film formation occurring on the waste packages. Water films can cause aggressive aqueous film electrochemical corrosion on susceptible metals or alloys. Water film formation will be facilitated when relative humidities are high, when hygroscopic salts are present on the surfaces, when corrosion products are hygroscopic, and when particles form crevices with the surfaces (capillary effect). Also certain gaseous contaminants, such as, NO{sub x} and SO{sub 2}, can facilitate water film formation. It should be noted that water film formation can occur at isolated spots (e.g. surface defects and salt particles) and need not cover the entire surface for electrochemical corrosion to occur. This activity will characterize the long term corrosion of metal specimens at two nominal relative humidities (50 and 85%) and at 80 C. Under the low relative humidity (50%) condition, water film formation is expected to be limited and therefore aqueous film electrochemical corrosion is expected also to be limited. Under the high relative humidity (85%) condition, significant water film formation is expected to occur under some test conditions, and subsequently aqueous film electrochemical corrosion will occur on susceptible materials.

  18. Change in thermoluminescence of irradiated paprika powder during storage under various temperature and humidity conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitai, Satoshi; Furuta, Masakazu

    2009-07-01

    The change in the thermoluminescence (TL) of mineral grains extracted from irradiated paprika powder was monitored for 6 months after irradiation. The samples were irradiated with 60Co gamma rays at doses of 1, 5, and 10 kGy and stored under various temperature and humidity conditions. It was found that 10-kGy irradiation was sufficient to achieve the decontamination level required by the Japanese Food Sanitation Law. A significant decrease in thermoluminescence was observed in the irradiated samples stored at high-temperatures and humidity conditions, conditions similar to real shipping conditions at countries where they are produced. The thermoluminescence method was found to be effective for the identification of samples irradiated with a dose of 10 kGy after 6 months of storage. However, samples irradiated with a dose of 1 kGy and stored under the same conditions could not be identified by this method.

  19. Molecular formula composition of β-caryophyllene ozonolysis SOA formed in humid and dry conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundu, Shuvashish; Fisseha, Rebeka; Putman, Annie L.; Rahn, Thom A.; Mazzoleni, Lynn R.

    2017-04-01

    We studied the molecular formula composition of six β-caryophyllene SOA samples using ultrahigh resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry under various reaction conditions. The SOA samples were generated in dry or low relative humidity (RH) chamber conditions with or without cyclohexane. All of the studied SOA mass spectra have three distinct clusters of hundreds of negative ions referred to as Group I (100 < m/z < 400), Group II (400 < m/z < 700) and Group III (700 < m/z < 1 000) compounds. C14-16H22-28O2-11, C28-29H42-48O6-16 and C42-43H68-70O14-16 were observed as highly abundant organic compounds in the compound class of Group I, II and III, respectively. The relative intensities of most analytes were higher in humid conditions compared to those in dry conditions, indicating the importance of water-dependent reactions and the catalytic role of water both in the presence and absence of cyclohexane. In addition, molecular formulas with higher average carbon numbers were observed in humid SOA than in dry SOA in the absence of cyclohexane, suggesting a decrease of cleavage reactions in humid condition. This study characterizes β-caryophyllene ozonolysis SOA based on ultrahigh mass resolution and demonstrates the significance of humidity in terms of the molecular distributions and relative abundances of the analytes. We also discuss the possible mechanism for the formation of Group I-III compounds based on the current understanding of SOA formation in the atmosphere.

  20. Evaluation of measurement errors of temperature and relative humidity from HOBO data logger under different conditions of exposure to solar radiation.

    PubMed

    da Cunha, Antonio Ribeiro

    2015-05-01

    This study aimed to assess measurements of temperature and relative humidity obtained with HOBO a data logger, under various conditions of exposure to solar radiation, comparing them with those obtained through the use of a temperature/relative humidity probe and a copper-constantan thermocouple psychrometer, which are considered the standards for obtaining such measurements. Data were collected over a 6-day period (from 25 March to 1 April, 2010), during which the equipment was monitored continuously and simultaneously. We employed the following combinations of equipment and conditions: a HOBO data logger in full sunlight; a HOBO data logger shielded within a white plastic cup with windows for air circulation; a HOBO data logger shielded within a gill-type shelter (multi-plate prototype plastic); a copper-constantan thermocouple psychrometer exposed to natural ventilation and protected from sunlight; and a temperature/relative humidity probe under a commercial, multi-plate radiation shield. Comparisons between the measurements obtained with the various devices were made on the basis of statistical indicators: linear regression, with coefficient of determination; index of agreement; maximum absolute error; and mean absolute error. The prototype multi-plate shelter (gill-type) used in order to protect the HOBO data logger was found to provide the best protection against the effects of solar radiation on measurements of temperature and relative humidity. The precision and accuracy of a device that measures temperature and relative humidity depend on an efficient shelter that minimizes the interference caused by solar radiation, thereby avoiding erroneous analysis of the data obtained.

  1. Storage conditions for stability testing of pharmaceuticals in hot and humid regions.

    PubMed

    Bott, Rubiana F; Oliveira, Wanderley P

    2007-04-01

    A review of the methodology for determination of the storage conditions for stability testing according to Schumacher/Grimm is presented in this paper. The purpose is to provide scientific information useful for the definition of storage conditions for stability testing of pharmaceuticals suitable to the region where the product will be dispensed. Special attention is given to stability testing in the new markets located in developing countries with very hot and humid climates. Finally, storage conditions for stability testing in the Brazilian regions were derived and examined comparatively with the guidelines of the world health organization (WHO) and regulatory bodies. The storage conditions were derived from the calculated values of the mean kinetic temperature and the relative humidity (RH). These parameters were estimated from daily values of dry and dew point temperatures of all Brazilian capitals from 1998 to 2002; collected in the morning (9 a.m.), in the afternoon (3 p.m.), and at night (9 p.m.). The Brazilian Center of Weather Forecast and Climatic Studies of the National Institute of Spatial Research (CPTEC/INPE) kindly furnished these data. Significant differences of the mean kinetic temperature (MKT) and relative humidity (RH) for Brazilian regions were observed. These results indicate the existence of a high climatic diversity between the Brazilian regions, making challenging the definition of a single storage condition for the stability testing. Some regions present RH values higher than 80%, giving support to the concerns of the WHO, indicating the necessity of revision of existing guidelines for stability testing mainly for very hot and humid regions.

  2. Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning Design Strategy for a Hot-Humid Production Builder

    SciTech Connect

    Kerrigan, P.

    2014-03-01

    Building Science Corporation (BSC) worked directly with the David Weekley Homes - Houston division to develop a cost-effective design for moving the HVAC system into conditioned space. In addition, BSC conducted energy analysis to calculate the most economical strategy for increasing the energy performance of future production houses in preparation for the upcoming code changes in 2015. This research project addressed the following questions: 1. What is the most cost effective, best performing and most easily replicable method of locating ducts inside conditioned space for a hot-humid production home builder that constructs one and two story single family detached residences? 2. What is a cost effective and practical method of achieving 50% source energy savings vs. the 2006 International Energy Conservation Code for a hot-humid production builder? 3. How accurate are the pre-construction whole house cost estimates compared to confirmed post construction actual cost?

  3. Fungal induced corrosion of wire rope exposed in humid atmospheric conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Little, B.; Ray, R.; Hart, K.; Wagner, P.

    1995-03-01

    Localized corrosion of carbon steel wire rope stored in a humid environment on wooden spools was caused by organic acid and carbon dioxide production by fungi growing directly on the wood. Fungal growth was observed on the interiors of wooden spools and corrosion was most severe on the wrap of wire in direct contact with the wood. Laboratory experiments were designed to demonstrate a causal relationship between storage conditions, fungal growth, and localized corrosion.

  4. Hygroscopic aerosol deposition in the human upper respiratory tract under various thermo-humidity conditions.

    PubMed

    Xi, Jinxiang; Kim, Jongwon; Si, Xiuhua A; Zhou, Yue

    2013-01-01

    The deposition of hygroscopic aerosols is highly complex in nature, which results from a cumulative effect of dynamic particle growth and the real-time size-specific deposition mechanisms. The objective of this study is to evaluate hygroscopic effects on the particle growth, transport, and deposition of nasally inhaled aerosols across a range of 0.2-2.5 μm in an adult image-based nose-throat model. Temperature and relative humidity fields were simulated using the LRN k-ω turbulence model and species transport model under a spectrum of thermo-humidity conditions. Particle growth and transport were simulated using a well validated Lagrangian tracking model coupled with a user-defined hygroscopic growth module. Results of this study indicate that the saturation level and initial particle size are the two major factors that determine the particle growth rate (d/d0), while the effect of inhalation flow rate is found to be not significant. An empirical correlation of condensation growth of nasally inhaled hygroscopic aerosols in adults has been developed based on a variety of thermo-humidity inhalation conditions. Significant elevated nasal depositions of hygroscopic aerosols could be induced by condensation growth for both sub-micrometer and small micrometer particulates. In particular, the deposition of initially 2.5 μm hygroscopic aerosols was observed to be 5-8 times that of inert particles under warm to hot saturated conditions. Results of this study have important implications in exposure assessment in hot humid environments, where much higher risks may be expected compared to normal conditions.

  5. A microscopy study of hyphal growth of Penicillium rubens on gypsum under dynamic humidity conditions.

    PubMed

    van Laarhoven, Karel A; Huinink, Hendrik P; Adan, Olaf C G

    2016-05-01

    To remediate indoor fungal growth, understanding the moisture relations of common indoor fungi is crucial. Indoor moisture conditions are commonly quantified by the relative humidity (RH). RH is a major determinant of the availability of water in porous indoor surfaces that fungi grow on. The influence of steady-state RH on growth is well understood. Typically, however, the indoor RH constantly changes so that fungi have to endure frequent periods of alternating low and high RH. Knowledge of how common indoor fungi survive and are affected by the low-RH periods is limited. In particular, the specific effects of a drop in RH on the growth of the mycelium remain unclear. In this work, video microscopy was used to monitor hyphal growth of Penicillium rubens on gypsum substrates under controlled dynamic humidity conditions. The effect of a single period of low RH (RH = 50-90%) interrupting favourable conditions (RH = 97%) was tested. It was found that hyphal tips ceased to extend when exposed to any tested decrease in RH. However, new hyphal growth always emerges, seemingly from the old mycelium, suggesting that this indoor fungus does not rely only on conidia to survive the humidity patterns considered. These findings are a fundamental step in unravelling the effect of RH on indoor fungal growth.

  6. Long-term behavior of ionic electroactive polymer actuators in variable humidity conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vunder, V.; Punning, A.; Aabloo, A.

    2015-04-01

    Ionic electroactive polymers or IEAPs are considered as an attractive actuators and sensors in various applications. Many of these polymer composites are designed to be used in an ambient environment. However, the ambient conditions may significantly vary depending on the seasonal or the geographical irregularities generated by the power of nature. Taking the advantage of the fluctuating weather conditions of Estonia, different IEAP materials were continuously monitored for about 6 weeks. During this time the temperature and relative humidity of the ambient environment varied between 30-58 % and 23-29 °C respectively. The experiment was conducted in a non-air-conditioned lab facility where the parameters such as temperature, humidity, atmospheric pressure were registered. Concurrently the electromechanical impedance of 12 actuators of different types was registered. This setup brings out the degradation as well as the impact of the environment to the IEAP actuators. The analysis reveals that the performance of the actuators under research is highly correlated with the ambient relative humidity level which can increase or decrease their performance more than 2 times. Naturally, this issue needs to be addressed in characterization, modeling and control areas. In contrast, the changes of pressure and temperature appeared to have no significant influence on the performance of the actuators investigated

  7. Study of aerosol radiative properties under different relative humidity conditions in the thermal infrared region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, C. P.; Yang, P.; Nasiri, S. L.; Liu, X.

    2014-12-01

    In the aerosol transport process, the optical properties of aerosol particles can vary due to humidification or mixing with other kinds of aerosols. Previous studies have shown mixing dust with other types of aerosol tends to make the aerosol more spectrally absorptive, but the degree of impact of relative humidity (RH) along the transport path is not clear. To investigate this effect, we conduct a numerical study to estimate the radiative sensitivity of aerosols under various relative humidity conditions. Specifically, the OPAC (Optical Properties of Aerosols and Clouds) database is used, which provides the optical properties (i.e., the extinction, scattering and absorption coefficient, single-scattering albedo, asymmetry factor and phase function) of ten types of aerosols under various relative humidity conditions. Lookup tables (LUTs) of the bidirectional reflectivity, transmissivity and effective emissivity will be computed for the ten aerosol types for input to the high-spectral-resolution radiative transfer model (HRTM). Using these LUTs, the HTRM can calculate top-of-atmospheric brightness temperatures, which we can use to determine the degree of radiative sensitivity in the infrared spectral region. Furthermore, comparisons between simulations and MODIS observations will be presented.

  8. Pressure and Humidity Measurements at the MSL Landing Site Supported by Modeling of the Atmospheric Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harri, A.; Savijarvi, H. I.; Schmidt, W.; Genzer, M.; Paton, M.; Kauhanen, J.; Atlaskin, E.; Polkko, J.; Kahanpaa, H.; Kemppinen, O.; Haukka, H.

    2012-12-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) called Curiosity Rover landed safely on the Martian surface at the Gale crater on 6th August 2012. Among the MSL scientific objectives are investigations of the Martian environment that will be addressed by the Rover Environmental Monitoring Station (REMS) instrument. It will investigate habitability conditions at the Martian surface by performing a versatile set of environmental measurements including accurate observations of pressure and humidity of the Martian atmosphere. This paper describes the instrumental implementation of the MSL pressure and humidity measurement devices and briefly analyzes the atmospheric conditions at the Gale crater by modeling efforts using an atmospheric modeling tools. MSL humidity and pressure devices are based on proprietary technology of Vaisala, Inc. Humidity observations make use of Vaisala Humicap® relative humidity sensor heads and Vaisala Barocap® sensor heads are used for pressure observations. Vaisala Thermocap® temperature sensors heads are mounted in a close proximity of Humicap® and Barocap® sensor heads to enable accurate temperature measurements needed for interpretation of Humicap® and Barocap® readings. The sensor heads are capacitive. The pressure and humidity devices are lightweight and are based on a low-power transducer controlled by a dedicated ASIC. The transducer is designed to measure small capacitances in order of a few pF with resolution in order of 0.1fF (femtoFarad). The transducer design has a good spaceflight heritage, as it has been used in several previous missions, for example Mars mission Phoenix as well as the Cassini Huygens mission. The humidity device has overall dimensions of 40 x 25 x 55 mm. It weighs18 g, and consumes 15 mW of power. It includes 3 Humicap® sensor heads and 1 Thermocap®. The transducer electronics and the sensor heads are placed on a single multi-layer PCB protected by a metallic Faraday cage. The Humidity device has measurement range

  9. Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning Design Strategy for a Hot-Humid Production Builder

    SciTech Connect

    Kerrigan, P.

    2014-03-01

    BSC worked directly with the David Weekley Homes - Houston division to redesign three floor plans in order to locate the HVAC system in conditioned space. The purpose of this project is to develop a cost effective design for moving the HVAC system into conditioned space. In addition, BSC conducted energy analysis to calculate the most economical strategy for increasing the energy performance of future production houses. This is in preparation for the upcoming code changes in 2015. The builder wishes to develop an upgrade package that will allow for a seamless transition to the new code mandate. The following research questions were addressed by this research project: 1. What is the most cost effective, best performing and most easily replicable method of locating ducts inside conditioned space for a hot-humid production home builder that constructs one and two story single family detached residences? 2. What is a cost effective and practical method of achieving 50% source energy savings vs. the 2006 International Energy Conservation Code for a hot-humid production builder? 3. How accurate are the pre-construction whole house cost estimates compared to confirmed post construction actual cost? BSC and the builder developed a duct design strategy that employs a system of dropped ceilings and attic coffers for moving the ductwork from the vented attic to conditioned space. The furnace has been moved to either a mechanical closet in the conditioned living space or a coffered space in the attic.

  10. Functionalization of Metal-Organic Frameworks for Enhanced Stability under Humid Carbon Dioxide Capture Conditions.

    PubMed

    Andirova, Dinara; Lei, Yu; Zhao, Xiaodan; Choi, Sunho

    2015-10-26

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) have been highlighted recently as promising materials for CO2 capture. However, in practical CO2 capture processes, such as capture from flue gas or ambient air, the adsorption properties of MOFs tend to be harmed by the presence of moisture possibly because of the hydrophilic nature of the coordinatively unsaturated sites (CUSs) within their framework. In this work, the CUSs of the MOF framework are functionalized with amine-containing molecules to prevent structural degradation in a humid environment. Specifically, the framework of the magnesium dioxybenzenedicarboxylate (Mg/DOBDC) MOF was functionalized with ethylenediamine (ED) molecules to make the overall structure less hydrophilic. Structural analysis after exposure to high-temperature steam showed that the ED-functionalized Mg/DOBDC (ED-Mg/DOBDC) is more stable under humid conditions, than Mg/DOBDC, which underwent drastic structural changes. ED-Mg/DOBDC recovered its CO2 adsorption capacity and initial adsorption rate quite well as opposed to the original Mg/DOBDC, which revealed a significant reduction in its capture capacity and kinetics. These results suggest that the amine-functionalization of the CUSs is an effective way to enhance the structural stability of MOFs as well as their capture of humid CO2 .

  11. Relative humidity preference and survival of starved Formosan subterranean termites (Isoptera: Rhinotermitidae) at various temperature and relative humidity conditions.

    PubMed

    Gautam, Bal K; Henderson, Gregg

    2011-10-01

    Foraging groups of Formosan subterranean termites, Coptotermes formosanus Shiraki were tested for their relative humidity (RH) preference in a humidity gradient arena in the laboratory at a constant temperature of 26°C. Five RH levels (9%, 33%, 53%, 75%, and 98%) were maintained in the test arena comprising of a series of closed containers by using dry silica gel, saturated salt solutions, or distilled water alone. Termites gradually aggregated to the highest RH chamber in the arena. After 1 h, a significantly greater percentage of termites (≈46%) aggregated to the highest RH chamber (98%) than to the lower RH chambers (≤75%). After 12 h, > 97% of the termites aggregated to the 98% RH chamber. In survival tests, where termites were exposed to 15 combinatorial treatments of five RH levels (9%, 33%, 53%, 75%, and 98%) and three temperatures (20°C, 28°C, and 36°C) for a week, the survival was significantly influenced by RH, temperature, and their interaction. A significantly higher mortality was observed on termites exposed to ≤75% RH chambers than to 98% RH chamber at the three temperatures and significantly lower survival was found at 36°C than at 28°C or 20°C. The combination of temperature and RH plays an important role in the survival of C. formosanus.

  12. Absolute protein quantification of the yeast chaperome under conditions of heat shock

    PubMed Central

    Mackenzie, Rebecca J.; Lawless, Craig; Holman, Stephen W.; Lanthaler, Karin; Beynon, Robert J.; Grant, Chris M.; Hubbard, Simon J.

    2016-01-01

    Chaperones are fundamental to regulating the heat shock response, mediating protein recovery from thermal‐induced misfolding and aggregation. Using the QconCAT strategy and selected reaction monitoring (SRM) for absolute protein quantification, we have determined copy per cell values for 49 key chaperones in Saccharomyces cerevisiae under conditions of normal growth and heat shock. This work extends a previous chemostat quantification study by including up to five Q‐peptides per protein to improve confidence in protein quantification. In contrast to the global proteome profile of S. cerevisiae in response to heat shock, which remains largely unchanged as determined by label‐free quantification, many of the chaperones are upregulated with an average two‐fold increase in protein abundance. Interestingly, eight of the significantly upregulated chaperones are direct gene targets of heat shock transcription factor‐1. By performing absolute quantification of chaperones under heat stress for the first time, we were able to evaluate the individual protein‐level response. Furthermore, this SRM data was used to calibrate label‐free quantification values for the proteome in absolute terms, thus improving relative quantification between the two conditions. This study significantly enhances the largely transcriptomic data available in the field and illustrates a more nuanced response at the protein level. PMID:27252046

  13. Age-related differences in heat loss capacity occur under both dry and humid heat stress conditions

    PubMed Central

    Larose, Joanie; Boulay, Pierre; Wright-Beatty, Heather E.; Sigal, Ronald J.; Hardcastle, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the progression of impairments in heat dissipation as a function of age and environmental conditions. Sixty men (n = 12 per group; 20–30, 40–44, 45–49, 50–54, and 55–70 yr) performed four intermittent exercise/recovery cycles for a duration of 2 h in dry (35°C, 20% relative humidity) and humid (35°C, 60% relative humidity) conditions. Evaporative heat loss and metabolic heat production were measured by direct and indirect calorimetry, respectively. Body heat storage was measured as the temporal summation of heat production and heat loss during the sessions. Evaporative heat loss was reduced during exercise in the humid vs. dry condition in age groups 20–30 (−17%), 40–44 (−18%), 45–49 (−21%), 50–54 (−25%), and 55–70 yr (−20%). HE fell short of being significantly different between groups in the dry condition, but was greater in age group 20–30 yr (279 ± 10 W) compared with age groups 45–49 (248 ± 8 W), 50–54 (242 ± 6 W), and 55–70 yr (240 ± 7 W) in the humid condition. As a result of a reduced rate of heat dissipation predominantly during exercise, age groups 40–70 yr stored between 60–85 and 13–38% more heat than age group 20–30 yr in the dry and humid conditions, respectively. These age-related differences in heat dissipation and heat storage were not paralleled by significant differences in local sweating and skin blood flow, or by differences in core temperature between groups. From a whole body perspective, combined heat and humidity impeded heat dissipation to a similar extent across age groups, but, more importantly, intermittent exercise in dry and humid heat stress conditions created a greater thermoregulatory challenge for middle-aged and older adults. PMID:24812643

  14. Measuring mixed cellulose ester (MCE) filter mass under variable humidity conditions.

    PubMed

    Bogen, Kenneth T; Brorby, Greg; Berman, D Wayne; Sheehan, Pat; Floyd, Mark

    2011-06-01

    Mixed cellulose ester (MCE) filters, used routinely to collect dust samples from air for fiber analysis, are the only filter type that can be prepared for both phased contrast microscopy and transmission electron microscopy analyses. However, whenever fiber counts require collecting dust masses <100 μg on a single filter under variable relative humidity (RH) conditions, historically noted effects of humidity on MCE filter mass can hinder accurate estimates of dust mass, measured as loaded minus unloaded filter mass (M). In this study, a baseline set of hundreds of paired measures of change in RH versus M over different time intervals were obtained over a 5-day period for replicate series of 40 unloaded 37-mm MCE filters under varying RH conditions at a nearly constant temperature. Similar baseline data were obtained for 25-mm MCE filters. Linear regressions fit to these data allow improved estimates of dust mass loaded onto MCE filters from measures of M and RH made before and after loading occurs. Using established theory, these relationships were generalized to address temperature variation as well, and examples of numerical applications are provided.

  15. Partitioning MOF-5 into Confined and Hydrophobic Compartments for Carbon Capture under Humid Conditions.

    PubMed

    Ding, Nan; Li, Haiwei; Feng, Xiao; Wang, Qianyou; Wang, Shan; Ma, Li; Zhou, Junwen; Wang, Bo

    2016-08-17

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), by virtue of their remarkable uptake capability, selectivity, and ease of regeneration, hold great promise for carbon capture from fossil fuel combustion. However, their stability toward moisture together with the competitive adsorption of water against CO2 drastically dampens their capacity and selectivity under real humid flue gas conditions. In this work, an effective strategy was developed to tackle the above obstacles by partitioning the channels of MOFs into confined, hydrophobic compartments by in situ polymerization of aromatic acetylenes. Specifically, polynaphthylene was formed via a radical reaction inside the channels of MOF-5 and served as partitions without altering the underlying structure of the framework. Compared with pristine MOF-5, the resultant material (PN@MOF-5) exhibits a doubled CO2 capacity (78 vs 38 cm(3)/g at 273 K and 1 bar), 23 times higher CO2/N2 selectivity (212 vs 9), and significantly improved moisture stability. The dynamic CO2 adsorption capacity can be largely maintained (>90%) under humid conditions during cycles. This strategy can be applied to other MOF materials and may shed light on the design of new MOF-polymer materials with tunable pore sizes and environments to promote their practical applications.

  16. Absolute Depth Sensitivity in Cat Primary Visual Cortex under Natural Viewing Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Pigarev, Ivan N.; Levichkina, Ekaterina V.

    2016-01-01

    Mechanisms of 3D perception, investigated in many laboratories, have defined depth either relative to the fixation plane or to other objects in the visual scene. It is obvious that for efficient perception of the 3D world, additional mechanisms of depth constancy could operate in the visual system to provide information about absolute distance. Neurons with properties reflecting some features of depth constancy have been described in the parietal and extrastriate occipital cortical areas. It has also been shown that, for some neurons in the visual area V1, responses to stimuli of constant angular size differ at close and remote distances. The present study was designed to investigate whether, in natural free gaze viewing conditions, neurons tuned to absolute depths can be found in the primary visual cortex (area V1). Single-unit extracellular activity was recorded from the visual cortex of waking cats sitting on a trolley in front of a large screen. The trolley was slowly approaching the visual scene, which consisted of stationary sinusoidal gratings of optimal orientation rear-projected over the whole surface of the screen. Each neuron was tested with two gratings, with spatial frequency of one grating being twice as high as that of the other. Assuming that a cell is tuned to a spatial frequency, its maximum response to the grating with a spatial frequency twice as high should be shifted to a distance half way closer to the screen in order to attain the same size of retinal projection. For hypothetical neurons selective to absolute depth, location of the maximum response should remain at the same distance irrespective of the type of stimulus. It was found that about 20% of neurons in our experimental paradigm demonstrated sensitivity to particular distances independently of the spatial frequencies of the gratings. We interpret these findings as an indication of the use of absolute depth information in the primary visual cortex. PMID:27547179

  17. Absolute Depth Sensitivity in Cat Primary Visual Cortex under Natural Viewing Conditions.

    PubMed

    Pigarev, Ivan N; Levichkina, Ekaterina V

    2016-01-01

    Mechanisms of 3D perception, investigated in many laboratories, have defined depth either relative to the fixation plane or to other objects in the visual scene. It is obvious that for efficient perception of the 3D world, additional mechanisms of depth constancy could operate in the visual system to provide information about absolute distance. Neurons with properties reflecting some features of depth constancy have been described in the parietal and extrastriate occipital cortical areas. It has also been shown that, for some neurons in the visual area V1, responses to stimuli of constant angular size differ at close and remote distances. The present study was designed to investigate whether, in natural free gaze viewing conditions, neurons tuned to absolute depths can be found in the primary visual cortex (area V1). Single-unit extracellular activity was recorded from the visual cortex of waking cats sitting on a trolley in front of a large screen. The trolley was slowly approaching the visual scene, which consisted of stationary sinusoidal gratings of optimal orientation rear-projected over the whole surface of the screen. Each neuron was tested with two gratings, with spatial frequency of one grating being twice as high as that of the other. Assuming that a cell is tuned to a spatial frequency, its maximum response to the grating with a spatial frequency twice as high should be shifted to a distance half way closer to the screen in order to attain the same size of retinal projection. For hypothetical neurons selective to absolute depth, location of the maximum response should remain at the same distance irrespective of the type of stimulus. It was found that about 20% of neurons in our experimental paradigm demonstrated sensitivity to particular distances independently of the spatial frequencies of the gratings. We interpret these findings as an indication of the use of absolute depth information in the primary visual cortex.

  18. Physiological measurements in horses after strenuous exercise in hot, humid conditions.

    PubMed

    Art, T; Votion, D; Lekeux, P

    1995-11-01

    The purpose of this study was 1) to measure and compare some physiological parameters in horses during a standardised treadmill exercise performed either in temperate atmospheric conditions (TC) (ambient temperature: 15 degrees C; relative humidity: 55%), or in hot and humid conditions (HHC) (ambient temperature: 30 degrees C; relative humidity: 75%) and 2) to follow the recovery of the same horses during 1 h after both tests. Five healthy fit Standardbred horses were investigated twice at 8 days interval, in TC and in HHC. Some measurements were made during a standardised treadmill exercise test (SET), others during a 1 h recovery period. The SET consisted of 8 min warm-up and 8 min exercise. During the SET, respiratory airflow and O2 and CO2 fraction in the respiratory gases were continuously recorded, using 2 ultrasonic pneumotachographs connected to a face mask and a mass spectrometer. Oxygen uptake (VO2), carbon dioxide output, respiratory quotient and expired minute volume (VE) were obtained on a breath-by-breath basis. The maximal values obtained during the highest intensity of the SET and the values obtained 2 min after the end of the test were used for the comparison between both tests. Heart rate (HR) and skin temperature were continuously recorded, using a heart rate recording system and a real time infrared thermographic unit, respectively. After both SETs in TC and HHC, the horses recovered in TC. Heart rate, respiratory frequency (f) and rectal temperature were regularly measured during 1 h after the test. Venous blood was sampled after the completion of the test for biochemical analysis, namely plasma electrolytes and enzymatic activities. Exercising in HHC induced a reduction of the aerobic metabolism to the total energy requirement, i.e. a 20% decrease of VO2 and 55% increase in lactate, as well as a decrease in VE. The increase in rectal and skin temperature, the dehydration and the weight loss were higher in HHC than in TC. During the recovery

  19. The influence of menthol on thermoregulation and perception during exercise in warm, humid conditions.

    PubMed

    Gillis, D Jason; House, James R; Tipton, Michael J

    2010-10-01

    Menthol has recently been added to various cooling products that claim to enhance athletic performance. This study assessed the effect of two such solutions during exercise in warm, humid conditions. Twelve participants (22 ± 2.9 years; VO2peak 47.4 ± 6.2 mL kg(-1) min(-1)) completed a peak power (PO(peak)) test and three separate exercise bouts in 30°C and 70% relative humidity after being sprayed with 100 mL of water containing either 0.05 or 0.2% l-menthol, or a control spray. During each trial, participants underwent 15 min of rest, spraying, 15 min of rest and 45 min of exercise at 45% of PO(peak). The following variables were measured: rectal temperature (T (re)), sweat rate (SR), skin blood flow (SBF), heart rate (HR), thermal comfort (TC) and sensation (TS) votes, irritation (IRR) and rating of perceived exertion (RPE). Mean skin (MST) and body temperatures (Tbody) were calculated. There was no significant difference in MST, Tbody SR, SBF, HR, TC or RPE between conditions. Spraying with 0.2% menthol significantly (P < 0.05) elevated T (re) by 0.2°C compared to the other conditions. Both menthol sprays caused participants to feel significantly cooler than control spraying (P = 0.001), but 0.2% spraying induced significantly cooler sensations (P = 0.01) than 0.05% spraying. Both menthol sprays induced greater irritation (P < 0.001) than control spraying. These findings suggest that 0.05% menthol spraying induced cooler upper body sensations without measurable thermoregulatory impairment. T (re) was significantly elevated with 0.2% spraying. Irritation persisted with both menthol sprays while TC remained unchanged, suggesting a causal relationship. The use in sport of a spray similar to those tested here remains equivocal.

  20. Effect of drink temperature on core temperature and endurance cycling performance in warm, humid conditions.

    PubMed

    Burdon, Catriona; O'Connor, Helen; Gifford, Janelle; Shirreffs, Susan; Chapman, Phillip; Johnson, Nathan

    2010-09-01

    The aims of this study were to determine the effect of cold (4 °C) and thermoneutral (37 °C) beverages on thermoregulation and performance in the heat and to explore sensory factors associated with ingesting a cold stimulus. Seven males (age 32.8 ± 6.1 years, [V(.)]O(2peak) 59.4 ± 6.6 ml x kg(-1) x min(-1)) completed cold, thermoneutral, and thermoneutral + ice trials in randomized order. Participants cycled for 90 min at 65%[V(.)]O(2peak) followed by a 15-min performance test at 28 °C and 70% relative humidity. They ingested 2.3 ml x kg(-1) of a 7.4% carbohydrate-electrolyte solution every 10 min during the 90-min steady-state exercise including 30 ml ice puree every 5 min in the ice trial. Absolute changes in skin temperature (0.22 ± 1.1 °C vs. 1.14 ± 0.9 °C; P = 0.02), mean body temperature (1.2 ± 0.3 vs. 1.6 ± 0.3 °C; P = 0.03), and heat storage were lower across the 90-min exercise bout for the cold compared with the thermoneutral trial. Significant improvements (4.9 ± 2.4%, P < 0.01) in performance were observed with cold but no significant differences were detected with ice. Consumption of cold beverages during prolonged exercise in the heat improves body temperature measures and performance. Consumption of ice did not reveal a sensory response, but requires further study. Beverages consumed by athletes exercising in the heat should perhaps be cold for performance and safety reasons.

  1. Temporal variability of soil water repellency in field conditions under humid Mediterranean climate (South of Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez-Murillo, Juan F.; Gabarron-Galeote, Miguel A.; Ruiz-Sinoga, Jose D.

    2013-04-01

    Soil water repellency (SWR) has become an important field of scientific study because of its effects on soil hydrological behavior, including reduced matrix infiltration, development of fingered flow in structural or textural preferential flow paths, irregular wetting fronts, and increased runoff generation and soil erosion. The aim of this study is to evaluate the temporal variability of SWR in Mediterranean rangeland under humid Mediterranean climatic conditions (Tª=14.5 °C; P=1,010 mm y-1) in South of Spain. Every month from September 2008 to May 2009 (rainy season), soil moisture and SWR was measured in field conditions by means of gravimetric method and Water Drop Penetration Test, respectively. The entire tests were performed in differente eco-geomorphological conditions in the experimental site: North and South aspect hillslopes and beneath shrub and bare soil in every of them. The results indicate that: i) climatic conditions seem to be more transcendent than the vegetal cover for explaining the temporal variability of SWR in field conditions; ii) thus, SWR appears to be controlled by the antecedent rainfall and soil moisture; iii) more severity SWR were observed in patches characterized by sandier soils and/or greater organic matter contents; and iv) the factor 'hillslope aspect' was not found very influential in the degree of SWR.

  2. Localized Surface Plasmon Resonance Dew Sensor for Use Under Low Humidity Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagasaki, Hideaki; Kaneko, Sin; Iwami, Kentaro; Umeda, Norihiro

    2012-02-01

    We fabricated a localized surface plasmon resonance dew sensor and examined its optical characteristics under low humidity conditions. The sensor consists of a silver film (100 nm thick) deposited on a self-assembled monolayer of variously sized silica particles. The sensor measures dew condensation by determining two parameters: absorbance at 900.3 nm and wavelength shift of an absorbance spectrum peak. A sensor fabricated with 400-nm-diameter silica particles exhibits a high optical refractive index sensitivity of 462.6 nm/RIU. In the cooling experiments at the dew point of -13.04 °C, the sensor exhibits an absorbance changing temperature equivalent to the dew point as well as a chilled mirror dew sensor and an absorbance peak wavelength shift at -7.50 °C. Thus, the proposed sensor can detect micro-dew condensation, which is undetectable by a conventional chilled mirror dew sensor.

  3. Adaptations to daily exercise in hot and humid ambient conditions in trained thoroughbred horses.

    PubMed

    Geor, R J; McCutcheon, L J; Lindinger, M I

    1996-07-01

    The objectives of this study were to: 1) determine the effects of heat and high relative humidity (RH) on the clinical and physiological responses of horses during and after daily exercise training and 2) determine whether repeated exposure to, and exercise in, the heat would result in improved thermal tolerance (heat acclimation). Six trained Thoroughbred horses completed 1 h of submaximal exercise in cool, dry conditions (CD) and during a daily 4 h period of exposure to high heat and humidity (HH, room temperature = 33-35 degrees C, RH = 80-85%) for 22 days. Rectal temperature (Tre) and heart rate (HR) were measured before, during and after exercise and respiratory rate (RR) was measured before exercise and during a 2 h recovery. In HH, the rate of rise in Tre was significantly higher than in CD. However, by HH Day 5, Tre before, during and after exercise was significantly lower than on HH Day 1. The day-to-day decrease in Tre during exercise was reflected in significant decreases in heat storage following exercise by HH Day 10 (910 +/- 47 kcal) when compared to HH Day 1 (1211 +/- 75 kcal). At rest, RR was initially higher in HH than CD, and a further increase in pre-exercise RR from HH Day 1 to Day 10 may have contributed to the lower pre-exercise Tre. Recovery RR was higher after HH Day 1 and was associated with a lower end-of-exercise HR did not change in the 1 h before exercise in CD and did not differ from HH Days 1-22. By HH Day 10, mean HR during the latter part of exercise was lower than HH Day 1 and was not different from pre-exercise by 60 min of recovery. Pre-exercise body mass did not change during the 3 wk period and the decrease in body mass that occurred during the 4 h training period was significantly attenuated by HH Day 15 (9.8 +/- 0.8 kg) when compared to HH Day 1 (12.5 +/- 0.8 kg). Over the 3 week period of HH, mean 24 h water consumption increased from 26.0 +/- 2.1 litres to 39.5 +/- 3.2 litres, largely reflecting a 2-fold increase in water

  4. Influence of temperature and relative humidity conditions on the pan coating of hydroxypropyl cellulose molded capsules.

    PubMed

    Macchi, Elena; Zema, Lucia; Pandey, Preetanshu; Gazzaniga, Andrea; Felton, Linda A

    2016-03-01

    In a previous study, hydroxypropyl cellulose (HPC)-based capsular shells prepared by injection molding and intended for pulsatile release were successfully coated with 10mg/cm(2) Eudragit® L film. The suitability of HPC capsules for the development of a colon delivery platform based on a time dependent approach was demonstrated. In the present work, data logging devices (PyroButton®) were used to monitor the microenvironmental conditions, i.e. temperature (T) and relative humidity (RH), during coating processes performed under different spray rates (1.2, 2.5 and 5.5g/min). As HPC-based capsules present special features, a preliminary study was conducted on commercially available gelatin capsules for comparison purposes. By means of PyroButton data-loggers it was possible to acquire information about the impact of the effective T and RH conditions experienced by HPC substrates during the process on the technological properties and release performance of the coated systems. The use of increasing spray rates seemed to promote a tendency of the HPC shells to slightly swell at the beginning of the spraying process; moreover, capsules coated under spray rates of 1.2 and 2.5g/min showed the desired release performance, i.e. ability to withstand the acidic media followed by the pulsatile release expected for uncoated capsules. Preliminary stability studies seemed to show that coating conditions might also influence the release performance of the system upon storage.

  5. Morphology of U3O8 materials following storage under controlled conditions of temperature and relative humidity

    DOE PAGES

    Tamasi, Alison L.; Cash, Leigh J.; Mullen, William Tyler; ...

    2016-07-05

    Changes in the visual characteristics of uranium oxide surfaces and morphology following storage under different conditions of temperature and relative humidity may provide insight into the history of an unknown sample. Sub-samples of three α-U3O8 materials—one that was phase-pure and two that were phase-impure—were stored under controlled conditions for two years. We used scanning electron microscopy to image the oxides before and after storage, and a morphology lexicon was used to characterize the images. Finally, temporal changes in morphology were observed in some sub-samples, and changes were greatest following exposure to high relative humidity.

  6. Durability of PEMFC under Low-humidity and Load Cycle Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakayama, Hiroshi; Tsugane, Takahide; Hori, Michio; Sakiyama, Yoko; Katagiri, Gen

    Proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) are one of the most promising technologies for use as power sources for fuel cell vehicles and residential power applications. However, it is recognized that durability is critical issues for commercialization. Generally, PEMFC for automobile use are exposed to low relative humidity and load cycle condition that cause significant degradation of membrane and catalyst. The focus of this research is to investigate the influence of the load cycle pattern on the cell degradation. Single cell tests were performed for several load cycles and the degradation of the cell performances were evaluated by monitoring of the cell voltage, internal resistance, gas crossover rate and ionic content in effluent. Also, in order to investigate the gas diffusion layer (GDL) and the membrane/ionomer degradation, contact angle measurement were made for the GDL and solid 19F-NMR measurement were conducted as the post analyses. In the load cycle conditions, the activation and diffusion polarization are remarkably increased during the test, and inadequate water content accelerates membrane/ionomer chemical degradation.

  7. Thermal and cardiorespiratory responses of horses to submaximal exercise under hot and humid conditions.

    PubMed

    Geor, R J; McCutcheon, L J; Ecker, G L; Lindinger, M I

    1995-11-01

    The objective of this study is to determine the effects of heat, and heat and high relative humidity (RH) on the thermal and cardiorespiratory responses to exercise and recovery. Five Thoroughbred horses (age 3 to 6) completed exercise tests under each of 3 environmental conditions: cool, dry (CD, room temperature (T) = 20 degrees C, RH = 45-55%), hot, dry (HD, T = 32-34 degrees C, RH = 45-55%) and hot, humid (HH, T = 32-34 degrees C, RH = 80-85%). Horses were exercised at a workload equal to 50% of VO2max on a treadmill set at a 10% slope until attainment of a pulmonary artery blood (PA) temperature of 41.5 degrees C followed by a 30 min walking recovery (0% slope), and a further 30 min standing recovery in the same environmental conditions. Blood (PA), rectal, skin (dorsal aspect of the thorax) and muscle (middle gluteal muscle) temperatures and heart rate were measured before, during and after exercise. Respiratory rate was measured before exercise and during the 60 min recovery period. Exercise duration for HD (mean +/- s.e. 28 +/- 2 min) and HH (16.5 +/- 1 min) was significantly (P < 0.05) decreased when compared with CD (37 +/- 2 min). The rate of increase in PA blood temperature was significantly higher in HH (0.26 +/- 0.03 degrees C/min) than in HD (0.17 +/- 0.04 degrees C/min) and CD (0.12 +/- 0.05 degrees C/min). Temperature in the middle gluteal muscle after 15 min of exercise was significantly higher in HH (41.9 +/- 0.3 degrees C) than in HD (40.7 +/- 0.25 degrees C) and CD (40.15 +/- 0.35 degrees C); whereas rectal temperature at the end of exercise was significantly lower in HH (39.1 +/- 0.3 degrees C) than in HD (40.1 +/- 0.3 degrees C) and CD (40 +/- 0.2 degrees C). The PA blood:skin temperature difference was significantly smaller in HD and HH than in CD. When compared with CD, temperatures at all sites were higher in HD and HH during the 60 min of recovery. Throughout exercise and recovery, heart rate was significantly higher in HH when compared

  8. Breaking The Enzymatic Latch: Do Anaerobic Conditions Constrain Decomposition In Humid Tropical Forest Soil?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, S. J.; Silver, W. L.

    2011-12-01

    Anaerobic conditions have been proposed to impose a "latch" on soil organic matter decomposition by inhibiting the activity of extracellular enzymes that catalyze the transformation of organic polymers into monomers for microbial assimilation. Here, we tested the hypothesis that anaerobiosis inhibits soil hydrolytic enzyme activity in a humid tropical forest ecosystem in Puerto Rico. We sampled surface and sub-surface soil from each of 59 plots (n = 118) stratified across distinct topographical zones (ridges, slopes, and valleys) known to vary in soil oxygen (O2) concentrations, and measured the potential activity of five hydrolytic enzymes that decompose carbon (C), nitrogen (N), and phosphorus (P) substrates. We measured reduced iron (Fe (II)) concentrations in soil extractions to provide a spatially and temporally integrated index of anaerobic microbial activity, since iron oxides constitute the dominant anaerobic terminal electron acceptor in this ecosystem. Surprisingly, we observed positive relationships between Fe (II) concentrations and the activity of all enzymes that we assayed. Linear mixed effects models that included Fe (II) concentration, topographic position, and their interaction explained between 30 to 70 % of the variance of enzyme activity of β-1,4-glucosidase, β-cellobiohydrolase, β-xylosidase, N-acetylglucosaminidase, and acid phosphatase. Soils from ridges and slopes contained between 10 and 800 μg Fe (II) g-1 soil, and exhibited consistently positive relationships (p < 0.0001) between Fe (II) and enzyme activity. Valley soils did not display significant relationships between enzyme activity and Fe (II), although they displayed variation in soil Fe (II) concentrations similar to ridges and slopes. Overall, valleys exhibited lower enzyme activity and lower Fe (II) concentrations than ridges or slopes, possibly related to decreased root biomass and soil C. Our data provide no indication that anaerobiosis suppresses soil enzyme activity, but

  9. Volatile compounds originating from mixed microbial cultures on building materials under various humidity conditions.

    PubMed

    Korpi, A; Pasanen, A L; Pasanen, P

    1998-08-01

    We examined growth of mixed microbial cultures (13 fungal species and one actinomycete species) and production of volatile compounds (VOCs) in typical building materials in outside walls, separating walls, and bathroom floors at various relative humidities (RHs) of air. Air samples from incubation chambers were adsorbed on Tenax TA and dinitrophenylhydrazine cartridges and were analyzed by thermal desorption-gas chromatography and high-performance liquid chromatography, respectively. Metabolic activity was measured by determining CO2 production, and microbial concentrations were determined by a dilution plate method. At 80 to 82% RH, CO2 production did not indicate that microbial activity occurred, and only 10% of the spores germinated, while slight increases in the concentrations of some VOCs were detected. All of the parameters showed that microbial activity occurred at 90 to 99% RH. The microbiological analyses revealed weak microbial growth even under drying conditions (32 to 33% RH). The main VOCs produced on the building materials studied were 3-methyl-1-butanol, 1-pentanol, 1-hexanol, and 1-octen-3-ol. In some cases fungal growth decreased aldehyde emissions. We found that various VOCs accompany microbial activity but that no single VOC is a reliable indicator of biocontamination in building materials.

  10. Study of gastrointestinal parasites in water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) reared under Mexican humid tropical conditions.

    PubMed

    Ojeda-Robertos, Nadia Florencia; Torres-Chablé, Oswaldo Margarito; Peralta-Torres, Jorge Alonso; Luna-Palomera, Carlos; Aguilar-Cabrales, Aguilar; Chay-Canul, Alfonso Juventino; González-Garduño, Roberto; Machain-Williams, Carlos; Cámara-Sarmiento, Ramón

    2017-03-01

    The objective was to determine the frequency of gastrointestinal parasites (GP) genera affecting water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) reared under humid tropical conditions of Mexico. Three hundred eighty-three Munrah breed water buffalo were included, 251 adult females and 132 calves. Feces were directly collected form the rectum of the animals and processed by the McMaster technique. Coprocultures were made to identify the genera of the nematodes. The frequency of GP in B. bubalis was 42%, independently of their age, 60% of calves resulted parasitized. Age had a strong association with the presence of GP (Xi(2) = 77.4014, d.f. = 1, p = 0.001). The family Trichostrongylidae was found in both age groups. The genera identified were Strongyloides sp. (47.2%), Cooperia sp. (33.9%), and Haemonchus sp. (10.4%), as well as Eimeria sp., Moniezia sp., Trichuris sp., and Strongyloides sp. The highest parasite burden corresponded to the genus Strongyloides sp. with 1108.9 EPG. There is a need to carry out further studies in order to know the prevalence and incidence of nematode affecting to B. bubalis as an introduced animal species to Mexican tropics.

  11. Demonstration of Aerosol Property Profiling by Multi-wavelength Lidar Under Varying Relative Humidity Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whiteman, D.N.; Veselovskii, I.; Kolgotin, A.; Korenskii, M.; Andrews, E.

    2008-01-01

    The feasibility of using a multi-wavelength Mie-Raman lidar based on a tripled Nd:YAG laser for profiling aerosol physical parameters in the planetary boundary layer (PBL) under varying conditions of relative humidity (RH) is studied. The lidar quantifies three aerosol backscattering and two extinction coefficients and from these optical data the particle parameters such as concentration, size and complex refractive index are retrieved through inversion with regularization. The column-integrated, lidar-derived parameters are compared with results from the AERONET sun photometer. The lidar and sun photometer agree well in the characterization of the fine mode parameters, however the lidar shows less sensitivity to coarse mode. The lidar results reveal a strong dependence of particle properties on RH. The height regions with enhanced RH are characterized by an increase of backscattering and extinction coefficient and a decrease in the Angstrom exponent coinciding with an increase in the particle size. We present data selection techniques useful for selecting cases that can support the calculation of hygroscopic growth parameters using lidar. Hygroscopic growth factors calculated using these techniques agree with expectations despite the lack of co-located radiosonde data. Despite this limitation, the results demonstrate the potential of multi-wavelength Raman lidar technique for study of aerosol humidification process.

  12. Porous structures of polymer films prepared by spin coating with mixed solvents under humid condition.

    PubMed

    Park, Min Soo; Joo, Wonchul; Kim, Jin Kon

    2006-05-09

    We investigate the effects of interfacial energy between water and solvent as well as polymer concentration on the formation of porous structures of polymer films prepared by spin coating of cellulose acetate butyrate (CAB) in mixed solvent of tetrahydrofuran (THF) and chloroform under humid condition. The interfacial energy between water and the solvent was gradually changed by the addition of chloroform to the solvent. At a high polymer concentration (0.15 g/cm3 in THF), porous structures were limited only at the top surfaces of CAB films, regardless of interfacial energies, due to the high viscosity of the solution. At a medium concentration (approximately 0.08 g/cm3 in THF), CAB film had relatively uniform pores at the top surface and very small pores inside the film because of the mixing of the water droplets with THF solution. When chloroform was added to THF, pores at the inner CAB film had a comparable size with those at the top surface because of the reduced degree of the mixing between the water droplets and the mixed solvent. A further decrease in polymer concentration (0.05 g/cm3 in THF) caused the final films to have a two-layer porous structure, and the size of pores at each layer was almost the same.

  13. Energy-Efficient Supermarket Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning in Humid Climates in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, J.

    2015-03-01

    Supermarkets are energy-intensive buildings that consume the greatest amount of electricity per square foot of building of any building type in the United States and represent 5% of total U.S. commercial building primary energy use (EIA 2005). Refrigeration and heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems are responsible for a large proportion of supermarkets’ total energy use. These two systems sometimes work together and sometimes compete, but the performance of one system always affects the performance of the other. To better understand these challenges and opportunities, the Commercial Buildings team at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory investigated several of the most promising strategies for providing energy-efficient HVAC for supermarkets and quantified the resulting energy use and costs using detailed simulations. This research effort was conducted on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Commercial Building Partnerships (CBP) (Baechler et al. 2012; Parrish et al. 2013; Antonopoulos et al. 2014; Hirsch et al. 2014). The goal of CBP was to reduce energy use in the commercial building sector by creating, testing, and validating design concepts on the pathway to net zero energy commercial buildings. Several CBP partners owned or operated buildings containing supermarkets and were interested in optimizing the energy efficiency of supermarket HVAC systems in hot-humid climates. These partners included Walmart, Target, Whole Foods Market, SUPERVALU, and the Defense Commissary Agency.

  14. Differences in heat sensitivity between Japanese honeybees and hornets under high carbon dioxide and humidity conditions inside bee balls.

    PubMed

    Sugahara, Michio; Nishimura, Yasuichiro; Sakamoto, Fumio

    2012-01-01

    Upon capture in a bee ball (i.e., a dense cluster of Japanese honeybees forms in response to a predatory attack), an Asian giant hornet causes a rapid increase in temperature, carbon dioxide (CO₂), and humidity. Within five min after capture, the temperature reaches 46°C, and the CO₂ concentration reaches 4%. Relative humidity gradually rises to 90% or above in 3 to 4 min. The hornet dies within 10 min of its capture in the bee ball. To investigate the effect of temperature, CO₂, and humidity on hornet mortality, we determined the lethal temperature of hornets exposed for 10 min to different humidity and CO₂/O₂ (oxygen) levels. In expiratory air (3.7% CO₂), the lethal temperature was ≥ 2° lower than that in normal air. The four hornet species used in this experiment died at 44-46°C under these conditions. Hornet death at low temperatures results from an increase in CO₂ level in bee balls. Japanese honeybees generate heat by intense respiration, as an overwintering strategy, which produces a high CO₂ and humidity environment and maintains a tighter bee ball. European honeybees are usually killed in the habitat of hornets. In contrast, Japanese honeybees kill hornets without sacrificing themselves by using heat and respiration by-products and forming tight bee balls.

  15. Reflective Blankets Do Not Effect Cooling Rates after Running in Hot, Humid Conditions.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Kory A; Evanich, John J; Eberman, Lindsey E

    Reflective blankets (RB) are often provided at the conclusion of endurance events, even in extreme environments. The implications could be dangerous if increased core body temperature (CBT) is exacerbated by RB. To evaluate the effect of RB on cooling rate for individuals walking or sitting after intense running. Pilot, randomized control trial experimental design. Environmental chamber. Recreational runners (age=25±5y; mass=76.8±16.7kg; height=177±9cm) completed an 8km (actual mean distance=7.5±1.1km). We randomly assigned participants into one of four groups: walking with blanket (WB=5), walking without blanket (WNB=5), sitting with blanket (SB=5), or sitting without blanket (SNB=4). Participants ran on a treadmill at their own pace until volitional exhaustion, achieving the 8km distance, or experiencing CBT=40°C. Every three minutes during the running (time determined by pace) and cooling protocol (62 min in chamber), we measured CBT, HR, and Borg scale, and environmental conditions. We evaluated cooling rate, peak physiological variables, pace, and environment by condition using a Kruskal-Wallis non-parametric one-way ANOVAs. We identified similar exercise sessions (df=3; CBT χ(2)=0.921, p=0.82; HR χ(2)=7.446, p=0.06; Borg χ(2)= 5.732, p=0.13; pace χ(2)=0.747, p=0.86) and similar environmental characteristics between conditions (df=3; Wet Bulb Globe Temperature=26.18±2.78°C, χ(2)=1.552, p=0.67). No significant differences between conditions on cooling rate (df=3, χ(2)=2.301, p=0.512) were found, suggesting RBs neither cool nor heat the body, whether seated (SB=0.021±0.011deg/min; SNB=0.029±0.002deg/min) or walking (WB=0.015±0.025deg/min; WNB=0.021±0.011deg/min) in a hot, humid environment. CBT in distance runners is not altered by the use of a RB during a seated or walking cool down after a strenuous run.

  16. Tribological Evaluation of Candidate Gear Materials Operating Under Light Loads in Highly Humid Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dellacorte, Christopher; Thomas, Fransua; Leak, Olivia Ann

    2015-01-01

    A series of pin-on-disk sliding wear tests were undertaken to identify candidate materials for a pair of lightly loaded timing gears operating under highly humid conditions. The target application involves water purification and thus precludes the use of oil, grease and potentially toxic solid lubricants. The baseline sliding pair is austenitic stainless steel operating against a carbon filled polyimide. The test load and sliding speed (4.9 N, 2.7 m/s) were chosen to represent average contact conditions of the meshing gear teeth. In addition to the baseline materials, the hard superelastic NiTiNOL 60 (60NiTi) was slid against itself, against the baseline polyimide, and against 60NiTi onto which a commercially deposited dry film lubricant (DFL) was applied. The alternate materials were evaluated as potential replacements to achieve a longer wear life and improved dimensional stability for the timing gear application. An attempt was also made to provide solid lubrication to self-mated 60NiTi by rubbing the polyimide against the disk wear track outside the primary 60NiTi-60NiTi contact, a method named stick or transfer-film lubrication. The selected test conditions gave repeatable friction and wear data and smooth sliding surfaces for the baseline materials similar to those in the target application. Friction and wear for self-mated stainless steel were high and erratic. Self-mated 60NiTi gave acceptably low friction (approx. 0.2) and modest wear but the sliding surfaces were rough and potentially unsuitable for the gear application. Tests in which 60NiTi pins were slid against DFL coated 60NiTi and DFL coated stainless steel gave low friction and long wear life. The use of stick lubrication via the secondary polyimide pin provided effective transfer film lubrication to self-mated 60NiTi tribological specimens. Using this approach, friction levels were equal or lower than the baseline polyimide-stainless combination and wear was higher but within data scatter observed

  17. Tribological Evaluation of Candidate Gear Materials Operating Under Light Loads in Highly Humid Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DellaCorte, Christopher; Thomas, Fransua; Leak, Olivia Ann

    2015-01-01

    A series of pin-on-disk sliding wear tests were undertaken to identify candidate materials for a pair of lightly loaded timing gears operating under highly humid conditions. The target application involves water purification and thus precludes the use of oil, grease and potentially toxic solid lubricants. The baseline sliding pair is austenitic stainless steel operating against a carbon filled polyimide. The test load and sliding speed (4.9N, 2.7ms) were chosen to represent average contact conditions of the meshing gear teeth. In addition to the baseline materials, the hard superelastic NiTiNOL 60 (60NiTi) was slid against itself, against the baseline polyimide, and against 60NiTi onto which a commercially deposited dry film lubricant (DFL) was applied. The alternate materials were evaluated as potential replacements to achieve a longer wear life and improved dimensional stability for the timing gear application. An attempt was also made to provide solid lubrication to self-mated 60NiTi by rubbing the polyimide against the disk wear track outside the primary 60NiTi-60NiTi contact, a method named stick or transfer-film lubrication. The selected test conditions gave repeatable friction and wear data and smooth sliding surfaces for the baseline materials similar to those in the target application. Friction and wear for self-mated stainless steel were high and erratic. Self-mated 60NiTi gave acceptably low friction (0.2) and modest wear but the sliding surfaces were rough and potentially unsuitable for the gear application. Tests in which 60NiTi pins were slid against DFL coated 60NiTi and DFL coated stainless steel gave low friction and long wear life. The use of stick lubrication via a secondary polyimide pin provided effective transfer film lubrication to self-mated 60NiTi tribological specimens. Using this approach, friction levels were equal or lower than the baseline polyimide-stainless combination and wear was higher but within data scatter observed in these

  18. Co-effect of increased humidity and meteorological conditions on greenhouse gas fluxes in a young hybrid aspen forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Raili; Mander, Ülo; Kupper, Priit; Soosaar, Kaido; Maddison, Martin; Sõber, Jaak; Lõhmus, Krista

    2014-05-01

    Due to the climate change, higher precipitation and an increase in air humidity is expected in northern Europe in the near future (IPCC 2007). There are some studies about irrigation, elevated CO2 and O3 etc., but still we have too little knowledge about the humidity effect on the deciduous forest ecosystem. In 2006 a free-air humidity manipulation (FAHM) facility was established in Estonia and in 2008 we started to artificially increase the air humidity in young hybrid aspen (Populus tremula L. x P. tremuloides Michx.) forest trials on an Endogleyic Planosol of former arable land. Air humidity was raised on average about 7% compared to ambient condition (Tullus et al., 2012). We measured the carbon dioxide, methane and nitrous oxide fluxes from the FAHM system using closed static chamber and gas-chromatograph techniques from July 2009 to November 2012 during snow free periods. Flux measurements were done once a month in three humidification (h) plots and in three control (c) plots. We monitored soil temperature, soil water potential (SWP), precipitation and relative humidity. The vegetation period was rainy in 2009, droughty in 2010 and 2011 (according to SWP the drought was severe in 2011) and cold in 2012. Soil respiration was the lowest in 2011 both in c and h plots; however it was significantly higher in h. Most of the time the soil was a sink for methane, but less CH4 was oxidized in the soil of h plots. Emission of N2O did not have good correlation with air humidity, although one could observe a clear tendency of bigger N2O fluxes when soil was continuously water-saturated. Expectedly, soil respiration had strong positive correlations with soil temperature and CH4 emission demonstrated strong positive correlation with SWP. Hence, interaction of humidification and precipitation affected greenhouse gas fluxes. IPCC, Climate Change 2007: The Physical Science Basis. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge. 2007. Tullus A, Kupper P, Sellin A, Parts L, Sõber J

  19. Drying characteristics and modeling of yam slices under different relative humidity conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The drying characteristics of yam slices under different 23 constant relative humidity (RH) and step-down RH levels were studied. A mass transfer model was developed based on Bi-Di correlations containing a drying coefficient and a lag factor to describe the drying process. It was validated using ex...

  20. Temperature/Humidity Conditions in Stacked Flexible Intermediate Bulk Containers for Shelled Peanuts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Shelled peanuts are loaded into flexible intermediate bulk containers, or totes. After loading, the 1000-kg totes are placed directly into cold storage at 3ºC and 65% relative humidity until shipment to the customer domestically in the United States or internationally requiring transport overseas. ...

  1. Evaluation of the Survivability of Microorganisms Deposited on Filtering Respiratory Protective Devices under Varying Conditions of Humidity

    PubMed Central

    Majchrzycka, Katarzyna; Okrasa, Małgorzata; Skóra, Justyna; Gutarowska, Beata

    2016-01-01

    Bioaerosols are common biological factors in work environments, which require routine use of filtering respiratory protective devices (FRPDs). Currently, no studies link humidity changes in the filter materials of such devices, during use, with microorganism survivability. Our aim was to determine the microclimate inside FRPDs, by simulating breathing, and to evaluate microorganism survivability under varying humidity conditions. Breathing was simulated using commercial filtering facepiece respirators in a model system. Polypropylene melt-blown nonwoven fabrics with moisture contents of 40%, 80%, and 200%, were used for assessment of microorganisms survivability. A modified AATCC 100-2004 method was used to measure the survivability of ATCC and NCAIM microorganisms: Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, Candida albicans and Aspergillus niger. During simulation relative humidity under the facepiece increased after 7 min of usage to 84%–92% and temperature increased to 29–30 °C. S. aureus survived the best on filter materials with 40%–200% moisture content. A decrease in survivability was observed for E. coli and C. albicans when mass humidity decreased. We found that B. subtilis and A. niger proliferated for 48–72 h of incubation and then died regardless of the moisture content. In conclusion, our tests showed that the survivability of microorganisms on filter materials depends on the amount of accumulated moisture and microorganism type. PMID:26742049

  2. Evaluation of the Survivability of Microorganisms Deposited on Filtering Respiratory Protective Devices under Varying Conditions of Humidity.

    PubMed

    Majchrzycka, Katarzyna; Okrasa, Małgorzata; Skóra, Justyna; Gutarowska, Beata

    2016-01-04

    Bioaerosols are common biological factors in work environments, which require routine use of filtering respiratory protective devices (FRPDs). Currently, no studies link humidity changes in the filter materials of such devices, during use, with microorganism survivability. Our aim was to determine the microclimate inside FRPDs, by simulating breathing, and to evaluate microorganism survivability under varying humidity conditions. Breathing was simulated using commercial filtering facepiece respirators in a model system. Polypropylene melt-blown nonwoven fabrics with moisture contents of 40%, 80%, and 200%, were used for assessment of microorganisms survivability. A modified AATCC 100-2004 method was used to measure the survivability of ATCC and NCAIM microorganisms: Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, Candida albicans and Aspergillus niger. During simulation relative humidity under the facepiece increased after 7 min of usage to 84%-92% and temperature increased to 29-30 °C. S. aureus survived the best on filter materials with 40%-200% moisture content. A decrease in survivability was observed for E. coli and C. albicans when mass humidity decreased. We found that B. subtilis and A. niger proliferated for 48-72 h of incubation and then died regardless of the moisture content. In conclusion, our tests showed that the survivability of microorganisms on filter materials depends on the amount of accumulated moisture and microorganism type.

  3. Organic particulate material levels in the atmosphere: conditions favoring sensitivity to varying relative humidity and temperature.

    PubMed

    Pankow, James F

    2010-04-13

    This study examines the sensitivity in predicted levels of atmospheric organic particulate matter (M(o), microg m(-3)) as those levels may potentially be affected by changes in relative humidity and temperature. In a given system, for each partitioning compound, f(g) and f(p) represent the gaseous and particulate fractions (f(g) + f(p) = 1). Sensitivity in the M(o) levels becomes dampened as the compounds contributing significantly to M(o) are increasingly found in the particle phase (f(p) --> 1). Thus, although local maxima in sensitivity can be encountered as M(o) levels increase, because as M(o) increases each f(p) --> 1, then increasing M(o) levels generally tend to reduce sensitivity in M(o) levels to changes in relative humidity and temperature. Experiments designed to elucidate the potential magnitudes of the effects of relative humidity and temperature on M(o) levels must be carried out at M(o) levels that are relevant for the ambient atmosphere: The f(p) values for the important partitioning compounds must not be elevated above ambient-relevant values. Systems in which M(o) levels are low (e.g., 1-2 microg m(-3)) and/or composed of unaged secondary organic aerosol are the ones most likely to show sensitivity to changing relative humidity and temperature. Results from two published chamber studies are examined in the above regard: [Warren B, et al. (2009) Atmos Environ 43:1789-1795] and [Prisle NL, et al. (2010) Geophys Res Lett 37:L01802].

  4. Structural stability of a colloidal solution of Ca(OH)2 nanocrystals exposed to high relative humidity conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez-Villalba, L. S.; López-Arce, P.; Alvarez de Buergo, M.; Fort, R.

    2011-09-01

    The effect of high relative humidity (90% and 75% RH) on phase transformation and stability of CaCO3 polymorphs has been studied based on the structural and morphological changes from a colloidal solution based on Ca(OH)2 nanocrystals. Carbonation process has been confirmed indicating differences in nucleation and stability of CaCO3 polymorphs as a function of RH. Local fluctuations in the water/alcohol ratio significantly affect the precipitation/dissolution of anhydrous and hydrated polymorphs that are reflected in the particle size. Changes in lattice parameters and particle size are related to surface tension fluctuations, release of residual water and time of exposure. These results highly contribute to evaluate the stability of the Ca(OH)2 nanoparticles in high humidity conditions.

  5. Measurement of the absolute hohlraum wall albedo under ignition foot drive conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Suter, L J; Wallace, R J; Hammel, B A; Weber, F A; Landen, O L; Campbell, K M; DeWald, E L; Glenzer, S H; Rosen, M D; Jones, O S; Turner, R E; Kauffmann, R L; Hammer, J H

    2003-11-25

    We present the first measurements of the absolute albedos of hohlraums made from gold or from high-Z mixtures. The measurements are performed over the range of radiation temperatures (70-100 eV) expected during the foot of an indirect-drive temporally-shaped ignition laser pulse, where accurate knowledge of the wall albedo (i.e. soft x-ray wall re-emission) is most critical for determining capsule radiation symmetry. We find that the gold albedo agrees well with calculations using the super transition array opacity model, potentially providing additional margin for ICF ignition.

  6. Utilization of rice husk silica as adsorbent for BTEX passive air sampler under high humidity condition.

    PubMed

    Areerob, Thanita; Grisdanurak, Nurak; Chiarakorn, Siriluk

    2016-03-01

    Selective adsorbent of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX) was developed based on mesoporous silica materials, RH-MCM-41. It was synthesized from rice husk silica and modified by silane reagents. The silane reagents used in this study were trimethylchlorosilane (TMS), triisopropylchlorosilane (TIPS), and phenyldimethylchlorosilane (PDMS). Physiochemical properties of synthesized materials were characterized by small-angle X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier-transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and surface area analysis. Materials packed in passive air sampler were tested for BTEX uptake capacity. The tests were carried out under an influence of relative humidity (25 to 99 %). Overall, RH-MCM-41 modified by TMS outperformed compared to those modified by other silane agents. The comparative BTEX adsorption on this material and commercial graphitized carbon black was reported.

  7. Impact of Different Elastomer Formulations on Moisture Permeation through Stoppers Used for Lyophilized Products Stored under Humid Conditions.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Hitoshi; Kikuchi, Jun; Maeda, Terutoshi; Kuboniwa, Hitoshi

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of moisture permeability of different elastomer formulation stoppers, which had different moisture absorption abilities, on the increase of moisture content inside lyophilized vials during long-term storage under humid conditions. Two different elastomer formulation stoppers (high-moisture and low-moisture uptake stoppers) were compared. The increased amount of moisture content inside lyophilized vials fitted with high-moisture stoppers was higher than those fitted with low-moisture stoppers during the early stage of storage. However, this trend was reversed during the later stage of storage. Our data show that the moisture increase inside the lyophilized vials at the early stage was caused by moisture transfer from the stoppers, whereas the later moisture increase was caused by external moisture permeation through the stoppers. Results indicate that the difference in the moisture uptake profile inside the lyophilized vials at each period of storage was caused by the moisture absorption ability and moisture permeation ability of the two elastomer formulation stoppers. In terms of long-term storage stability under humid conditions, our data indicate that external moisture permeating through the stopper into the lyophilized vial during the late stage was the more important factor. In addition, the increase in moisture content at the early stage was controlled by stopper drying time. Furthermore, stopper drying time did not have an effect on moisture permeation at the late stage. Moisture permeation during the storage period appears to be dependent on the different elastomer formulations of the stoppers. The moisture permeation of different elastomer stoppers was an important factor in terms of the increased moisture content inside the lyophilized vials during the late stage of long-term storage under humid conditions. For lyophilized products stored at room temperature, the moisture permeation ability of the

  8. Analysis of a PEMFC durability test under low humidity conditions and stack behaviour modelling using experimental design techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahdame, Bouchra; Candusso, Denis; Harel, Fabien; François, Xavier; Péra, Marie-Cécile; Hissel, Daniel; Kauffmann, Jean-Marie

    A polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) stack has been operated under low humidity conditions during 1000 h. The fuel cell characterisation is based both on polarisation curves and electrochemical impedance spectra recorded for various stoichiometry rates, performed regularly throughout the ageing process. Some design of experiment (DoE) techniques, and in particular the response surface methodology (RSM), are employed to analyse the results of the ageing test and to propose some numerical/statistical laws for the modelling of the stack performance degradation. These mathematical relations are used to optimise the fuel cell operating conditions versus ageing time and to get a deeper understanding of the ageing mechanisms. The test results are compared with those obtained from another stack operated in stationary regime at roughly nominal conditions during 1000 h (reference test). The final objective is to ensure for the next fuel cell systems proper operating conditions leading to extended lifetimes.

  9. Easy Absolute Values? Absolutely

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Sharon E.; Mittag, Kathleen Cage

    2015-01-01

    The authors teach a problem-solving course for preservice middle-grades education majors that includes concepts dealing with absolute-value computations, equations, and inequalities. Many of these students like mathematics and plan to teach it, so they are adept at symbolic manipulations. Getting them to think differently about a concept that they…

  10. Growth of microorganisms on HVAC filters under controlled temperature and humidity conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Kemp, S.J. |; Kuehn, T.H.; Pui, D.Y.H.; Vesley, D.; Streifel, A.J.

    1995-08-01

    A recirculating duct system was used to challenge a glass fiber media filter, a polymer fiber media filter, and a two-stage electrostatic precipitator (electronic air cleaner) with generated Cladosporium fungal spores and Flavobacterium bacteria. Over a period of a year, the continuous airflow in the ducts was maintained at 70 F (21 C) and 90% relative humidity (RH), but ambient loading was minimal. Filtration efficiency measurements were made, as well as microbial sampling on the surfaces of the filters, to determine filter removal and potential growth of the generated bioaerosols. The electrostatic precipitator demonstrated greater than 90% effectiveness on the fungal and bacterial bioaerosols. The media filters demonstrated initially lower efficiencies, which rose to more than 90% as the filters loaded. At the end of the first year, observable microbial growth took place only on the upstream side of the glass fiber filter. With subsequent nutrient loading and wetting, however, significant microbial growth was found on the downstream side as well as the upstream side of the fiber media filters.

  11. Sensor drift and predicted calibration intervals of handheld temperature and relative humidity meters under residential field-use conditions.

    PubMed

    Johnston James D; Magnusson, Brianna M; Eggett, Dennis; Mumford, Kyle; Collingwood, Scott C; Bernhardt, Scott A

    2014-10-01

    Handheld temperature and relative humidity (T/RH) meters are commonly used in residential indoor air surveys. Although popular, T/RH meters are prone to sensor drift and consequent loss of accuracy, and thus instrument manufacturers often recommend annual calibration and adjustment. Field-use conditions, however, have been shown to accelerate electronic sensor drift in outdoor applications, resulting in out-of-tolerance measurements in less than one year. In the study described in this article, sensor drift was evaluated under residential field use for 30 handheld T/RH meters to predict needed calibration intervals based on hierarchical linear modeling. Instruments were used in 43 home visits over a 93-day period and were calibrated (without adjustment) 49 times over the study period with a laboratory standard. Analysis of covariance showed significant drift among temperature sensors for all three instrument types (p < .0001) and among humidity sensors in two instruments. The authors' study suggests calibration frequency should be based on instrument performance under specific sampling conditions rather than on predetermined time intervals.

  12. Thermal comfort in air-conditioned buildings in hot and humid climates--why are we not getting it right?

    PubMed

    Sekhar, S C

    2016-02-01

    While there are plenty of anecdotal experiences of overcooled buildings in summer, evidence from field studies suggests that there is indeed an issue of overcooling in tropical buildings. The findings suggest that overcooled buildings are not a consequence of occupant preference but more like an outcome of the HVAC system design and operation. Occupants' adaptation in overcooled indoor environments through additional clothing cannot be regarded as an effective mitigating strategy for cold thermal discomfort. In the last two decades or so, several field studies and field environmental chamber studies in the tropics provided evidence for occupants' preference for a warmer temperature with adaptation methods such as elevated air speeds. It is important to bear in mind that indoor humidity levels are not compromised as they could have an impact on the inhaled air condition that could eventually affect perceived air quality. This review article has attempted to track significant developments in our understanding of the thermal comfort issues in air-conditioned office and educational buildings in hot and humid climates in the last 25 years, primarily on occupant preference for thermal comfort in such climates. The issue of overcooled buildings, by design intent or otherwise, is discussed in some detail. Finally, the article has explored some viable adaptive thermal comfort options that show considerable promise for not only improving thermal comfort in tropical buildings but are also energy efficient and could be seen as sustainable solutions.

  13. Stochastic Overland Flow Models for Humid and Semi-arid Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkby, M. J.; Gao, J.; Holden, J.

    2013-12-01

    Over time, climate and hydrology modify the soil environment, creating the characteristic vegetation, organic matter and weathering horizons that, in turn, modify the partition of precipitation into overland flow, subsurface flow and evapotranspiration. These interactions also determine whether overland flow is generated primarily by saturation excess or infiltration excess mechanisms. Here we focus on overland flow generation and re-infiltration. Measurements of overland flow velocity suggest that travel times may be of the same order as subsurface flow response times, arguing for improved overland flow routing in both saturation excess and infiltration excess contexts. A distributed cellular model is proposed in which overland flow is generated locally from incoming rainfall and flow from upslope cells. The overland flow is routed stochastically, following multiple realisations of the flow sourced from each cell. Each realisation is a parcel of water that follows a path chosen at random according to the probabilities of flow in each downslope direction, using a power law allocation rule. Mean flow velocity is estimated as a power law of runoff depth and local gradient, using values based on field measurements, and converted to a probability of stopping in each cell along the path of the water parcel. The distribution of the parcels at the end of a time step provides the overland flow inputs to downslope cells for the succeeding time step. For humid settings, overland flow runoff is generated by applying TOPmodel for each cell, although alternative functional dependence of runoff on soil water deficit is equally applicable. For semi-arid settings, runoff is generated using a modified Green-Ampt infiltration equation, with spatially varying parameters based on field measurements. Initial conclusions are that this explicit overland flow routing substantially changes the hydrograph form, particularly for large events where overland flow is connected from the upper

  14. A 1-D variational retrieval of temperature, humidity, and liquid cloud properties: Performance under idealized and real conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebell, K.; Löhnert, U.; Päschke, E.; Orlandi, E.; Schween, J. H.; Crewell, S.

    2017-02-01

    An extended version of the Integrated Profiling Technique (IPT) is presented. The IPT combines measurements from cloud radar and microwave radiometer (MWR) with prior information in a 1D-Var approach in order to retrieve physically consistent atmospheric profiles of temperature, absolute humidity, liquid water content (LWC), and recently also cloud droplet effective radius (REF). Physical consistency implies the reproducibility of the measurements within the uncertainties. Results based on synthetic observations revealed a good retrieval performance with a high convergence rate of 98%. Retrieval uncertainties are typically around 0.06 g m-3 for LWC and 0.6 μm for REF. For the application to real measurements, quality-controlled, bias-free observations are crucial. A newly developed MWR spectral consistency check, which was applied to the measurements at the Jülich Observatory for Cloud Evolution (JOYCE), revealed strongly bias-affected channels. The IPT itself can serve as a further quality check: particularly in clear-sky cases, nonconvergence or physically inconsistent solutions may hint at measurement offset errors. Based on sensitivity studies, the final set of MWR frequencies was identified and the retrieval applied to 1 year of data. Physically consistent solutions could be found in 62% of all processed cases. A focus was put on the analysis of nondrizzling single-layer water clouds which typically have small geometrical thicknesses (<300 m), low liquid water paths (<50 g m-2), and small REF (<5 μm). The retrieved data product contains a high potential for the analysis of warm cloud characteristics and, in combination with auxiliary information from the JOYCE instrumentation, of associated boundary layer processes.

  15. Responses of sap flow, leaf gas exchange and growth of hybrid aspen to elevated atmospheric humidity under field conditions.

    PubMed

    Niglas, Aigar; Kupper, Priit; Tullus, Arvo; Sellin, Arne

    2014-05-15

    An increase in average air temperature and frequency of rain events is predicted for higher latitudes by the end of the 21st century, accompanied by a probable rise in air humidity. We currently lack knowledge on how forest trees acclimate to rising air humidity in temperate climates. We analysed the leaf gas exchange, sap flow and growth characteristics of hybrid aspen (Populus tremula × P. tremuloides) trees growing at ambient and artificially elevated air humidity in an experimental forest plantation situated in the hemiboreal vegetation zone. Humidification manipulation did not affect the photosynthetic capacity of plants, but did affect stomatal responses: trees growing at elevated air humidity had higher stomatal conductance at saturating photosynthetically active radiation (gs sat) and lower intrinsic water-use efficiency (IWUE). Reduced stomatal limitation of photosynthesis in trees grown at elevated air humidity allowed slightly higher net photosynthesis and relative current-year height increments than in trees at ambient air humidity. Tree responses suggest a mitigating effect of higher air humidity on trees under mild water stress. At the same time, trees at higher air humidity demonstrated a reduced sensitivity of IWUE to factors inducing stomatal closure and a steeper decline in canopy conductance in response to water deficit, implying higher dehydration risk. Despite the mitigating impact of increased air humidity under moderate drought, a future rise in atmospheric humidity at high latitudes may be disadvantageous for trees during weather extremes and represents a potential threat in hemiboreal forest ecosystems.

  16. Comparing the phenotypic susceptibility of Pelibuey and Katahdin female lambs against natural gastrointestinal nematode infections under hot humid tropical conditions.

    PubMed

    Palomo-Couoh, J G; Aguilar-Caballero, A J; Torres-Acosta, J F J; González-Garduño, R

    2017-04-01

    This study compared the phenotypic susceptibility of Pelibuey and Katahdin female lambs against gastrointestinal nematodes (GINs) under grazing conditions in the hot humid tropics of Mexico. The study was performed during the rainy season (August to October, 2014). It included 27 Pelibuey and 12 Katahdin female lambs from 6 months of age and live weight of 21.0 ± 3.7 and 23.3 ± 3.6 kg, respectively. Lambs were reared free of GIN infection before the study. The study lasted 91 days. Animals were weighed and sampled (blood and feces) on days 0 and 28 and every 7 days onwards. Fecal samples were obtained to determine fecal eggs of GIN per gram (EPG), and blood samples were used to determine the packed cell volume (PCV), the peripheral eosinophil counts (PECs), and optical densities (ODs) for IgA. The EPG counts were significantly lower for Pelibuey lambs compared to Katahdin throughout the study (P < 0.001). Similarly, Pelibuey lambs had higher mean PCV (P < 0.01) and PEC (P < 0.05) than Katahdin lambs during the study. The total weight gain and OD for IgA were similar between breeds (P > 0.05). Negative associations (P < 0.05) between EPG and PCV or PEC were moderate to strong for the lambs of both breeds. No association was found between EPG and IgA. In conclusion, Pelibuey lambs showed phenotypic evidence of higher resistance to natural GIN infections compared to Katahdin lambs sharing the same grazing conditions in the hot humid tropics. The most accurate phenotypic markers to identify a difference in susceptibility were EPG and PEC.

  17. Human thermal comfort conditions and urban planning in hot-humid climates—The case of Cuba

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez Algeciras, José Abel; Coch, Helena; De la Paz Pérez, Guillermo; Chaos Yeras, Mabel; Matzarakis, Andreas

    2016-08-01

    Climate regional characteristics, urban environmental conditions, and outdoors thermal comfort requirements of residents are important for urban planning. Basic studies of urban microclimate can provide information and useful resources to predict and improve thermal conditions in hot-humid climatic regions. The paper analyzes the thermal bioclimate and its influence as urban design factor in Cuba, using Physiologically Equivalent Temperature (PET). Simulations of wind speed variations and shade conditions were performed to quantify changes in thermal bioclimate due to possible modifications in urban morphology. Climate data from Havana, Camagüey, and Santiago of Cuba for the period 2001 to 2012 were used to calculate PET with the RayMan model. The results show that changes in meteorological parameters influence the urban microclimate, and consequently modify the thermal conditions in outdoors spaces. Shade is the predominant strategy to improve urban microclimate with more significant benefits in terms of PET higher than 30 °C. For climatic regions such as the analyzed ones, human thermal comfort can be improved by a wind speed modification for thresholds of PET above 30 °C, and by a wind speed decreases in conditions below 26 °C. The improvement of human thermal conditions is crucial for urban sustainability. On this regards, our study is a contribution for urban designers, due to the possibility of taking advantage of results for improving microclimatic conditions based on urban forms. The results may enable urban planners to create spaces that people prefer to visit, and also are usable in the reconfiguration of cities.

  18. Human thermal comfort conditions and urban planning in hot-humid climates-The case of Cuba.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez Algeciras, José Abel; Coch, Helena; De la Paz Pérez, Guillermo; Chaos Yeras, Mabel; Matzarakis, Andreas

    2016-08-01

    Climate regional characteristics, urban environmental conditions, and outdoors thermal comfort requirements of residents are important for urban planning. Basic studies of urban microclimate can provide information and useful resources to predict and improve thermal conditions in hot-humid climatic regions. The paper analyzes the thermal bioclimate and its influence as urban design factor in Cuba, using Physiologically Equivalent Temperature (PET). Simulations of wind speed variations and shade conditions were performed to quantify changes in thermal bioclimate due to possible modifications in urban morphology. Climate data from Havana, Camagüey, and Santiago of Cuba for the period 2001 to 2012 were used to calculate PET with the RayMan model. The results show that changes in meteorological parameters influence the urban microclimate, and consequently modify the thermal conditions in outdoors spaces. Shade is the predominant strategy to improve urban microclimate with more significant benefits in terms of PET higher than 30 °C. For climatic regions such as the analyzed ones, human thermal comfort can be improved by a wind speed modification for thresholds of PET above 30 °C, and by a wind speed decreases in conditions below 26 °C. The improvement of human thermal conditions is crucial for urban sustainability. On this regards, our study is a contribution for urban designers, due to the possibility of taking advantage of results for improving microclimatic conditions based on urban forms. The results may enable urban planners to create spaces that people prefer to visit, and also are usable in the reconfiguration of cities.

  19. Dropwise condensation dynamics in humid air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castillo Chacon, Julian Eduardo

    Dropwise condensation of atmospheric water vapor is important in multiple practical engineering applications. The roles of environmental factors and surface morphology/chemistry on the condensation dynamics need to be better understood to enable efficient water-harvesting, dehumidication, and other psychrometric processes. Systems and surfaces that promote faster condensation rates and self-shedding of condensate droplets could lead to improved mass transfer rates and higher water yields in harvesting applications. The thesis presents the design and construction of an experimental facility that allows visualization of the condensation process as a function of relative humidity. Dropwise condensation experiments are performed on a vertically oriented, hydrophobic surface at a controlled relative humidity and surface subcooling temperature. The distribution and growth of water droplets are monitored across the surface at different relative humidities (45%, 50%, 55%, and 70%) at a constant surface subcooling temperature of 15 °C below the ambient temperature. The droplet growth dynamics exhibits a strong dependency on relative humidity in the early stages during which there is a large population of small droplets on the surface and single droplet growth dominates over coalescence effects. At later stages, the dynamics of droplet growth is insensitive to relative humidity due to the dominance of coalescence effects. The overall volumetric rate of condensation on the surface is also assessed as a function of time and ambient relative humidity. Low relative humidity conditions not only slow the absolute rate of condensation, but also prolong an initial transient regime over which the condensation rate remains significantly below the steady-state value. The current state-of-the-art in dropwise condensation research indicates the need for systematic experimental investigations as a function of relative humidity. The improved understanding of the relative humidity

  20. Transfer Efficiency of Bacteria and Viruses from Porous and Nonporous Fomites to Fingers under Different Relative Humidity Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Gerba, Charles P.; Tamimi, Akrum H.; Kitajima, Masaaki; Maxwell, Sheri L.; Rose, Joan B.

    2013-01-01

    Fomites can serve as routes of transmission for both enteric and respiratory pathogens. The present study examined the effect of low and high relative humidity on fomite-to-finger transfer efficiency of five model organisms from several common inanimate surfaces (fomites). Nine fomites representing porous and nonporous surfaces of different compositions were studied. Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus thuringiensis, MS2 coliphage, and poliovirus 1 were placed on fomites in 10-μl drops and allowed to dry for 30 min under low (15% to 32%) or high (40% to 65%) relative humidity. Fomite-to-finger transfers were performed using 1.0 kg/cm2 of pressure for 10 s. Transfer efficiencies were greater under high relative humidity for both porous and nonporous surfaces. Most organisms on average had greater transfer efficiencies under high relative humidity than under low relative humidity. Nonporous surfaces had a greater transfer efficiency (up to 57%) than porous surfaces (<6.8%) under low relative humidity, as well as under high relative humidity (nonporous, up to 79.5%; porous, <13.4%). Transfer efficiency also varied with fomite material and organism type. The data generated can be used in quantitative microbial risk assessment models to assess the risk of infection from fomite-transmitted human pathogens and the relative levels of exposure to different types of fomites and microorganisms. PMID:23851098

  1. Transfer efficiency of bacteria and viruses from porous and nonporous fomites to fingers under different relative humidity conditions.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Gerardo U; Gerba, Charles P; Tamimi, Akrum H; Kitajima, Masaaki; Maxwell, Sheri L; Rose, Joan B

    2013-09-01

    Fomites can serve as routes of transmission for both enteric and respiratory pathogens. The present study examined the effect of low and high relative humidity on fomite-to-finger transfer efficiency of five model organisms from several common inanimate surfaces (fomites). Nine fomites representing porous and nonporous surfaces of different compositions were studied. Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus thuringiensis, MS2 coliphage, and poliovirus 1 were placed on fomites in 10-μl drops and allowed to dry for 30 min under low (15% to 32%) or high (40% to 65%) relative humidity. Fomite-to-finger transfers were performed using 1.0 kg/cm(2) of pressure for 10 s. Transfer efficiencies were greater under high relative humidity for both porous and nonporous surfaces. Most organisms on average had greater transfer efficiencies under high relative humidity than under low relative humidity. Nonporous surfaces had a greater transfer efficiency (up to 57%) than porous surfaces (<6.8%) under low relative humidity, as well as under high relative humidity (nonporous, up to 79.5%; porous, <13.4%). Transfer efficiency also varied with fomite material and organism type. The data generated can be used in quantitative microbial risk assessment models to assess the risk of infection from fomite-transmitted human pathogens and the relative levels of exposure to different types of fomites and microorganisms.

  2. Thermal comfort in naturally ventilated and air-conditioned buildings in humid subtropical climate zone in China.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wei; Zhang, Guoqiang

    2008-05-01

    A thermal comfort field study has been carried out in five cities in the humid subtropical climate zone in China. The survey was performed in naturally ventilated and air-conditioned buildings during the summer season in 2006. There were 229 occupants from 111 buildings who participated in this study and 229 questionnaire responses were collected. Thermal acceptability assessment reveals that the indoor environment in naturally ventilated buildings could not meet the 80% acceptability criteria prescribed by ASHRAE Standard 55, and people tended to feel more comfortable in air-conditioned buildings with the air-conditioned occupants voting with higher acceptability (89%) than the naturally ventilated occupants (58%). The neutral temperatures in naturally ventilated and air-conditioned buildings were 28.3 degrees C and 27.7 degrees C, respectively. The range of accepted temperature in naturally ventilated buildings (25.0-31.6 degrees C) was wider than that in air-conditioned buildings (25.1-30.3 degrees C), which suggests that occupants in naturally ventilated buildings seemed to be more tolerant of higher temperatures. Preferred temperatures were 27.9 degrees C and 27.3 degrees C in naturally ventilated and air-conditioned buildings, respectively, both of which were 0.4 degrees C cooler than neutral temperatures. This result suggests that people of hot climates may use words like "slightly cool" to describe their preferred thermal state. The relationship between draught sensation and indoor air velocity at different temperature ranges indicates that indoor air velocity had a significant influence over the occupants' comfort sensation, and air velocities required by occupants increased with the increasing of operative temperatures. Thus, an effective way of natural ventilation which can create the preferred higher air movement is called for. Finally, the indoor set-point temperature of 26 degrees C or even higher in air-conditioned buildings was confirmed as making

  3. Thermal comfort in naturally ventilated and air-conditioned buildings in humid subtropical climate zone in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wei; Zhang, Guoqiang

    2008-05-01

    A thermal comfort field study has been carried out in five cities in the humid subtropical climate zone in China. The survey was performed in naturally ventilated and air-conditioned buildings during the summer season in 2006. There were 229 occupants from 111 buildings who participated in this study and 229 questionnaire responses were collected. Thermal acceptability assessment reveals that the indoor environment in naturally ventilated buildings could not meet the 80% acceptability criteria prescribed by ASHRAE Standard 55, and people tended to feel more comfortable in air-conditioned buildings with the air-conditioned occupants voting with higher acceptability (89%) than the naturally ventilated occupants (58%). The neutral temperatures in naturally ventilated and air-conditioned buildings were 28.3°C and 27.7°C, respectively. The range of accepted temperature in naturally ventilated buildings (25.0˜31.6°C) was wider than that in air-conditioned buildings (25.1˜30.3°C), which suggests that occupants in naturally ventilated buildings seemed to be more tolerant of higher temperatures. Preferred temperatures were 27.9°C and 27.3°C in naturally ventilated and air-conditioned buildings, respectively, both of which were 0.4°C cooler than neutral temperatures. This result suggests that people of hot climates may use words like “slightly cool” to describe their preferred thermal state. The relationship between draught sensation and indoor air velocity at different temperature ranges indicates that indoor air velocity had a significant influence over the occupants’ comfort sensation, and air velocities required by occupants increased with the increasing of operative temperatures. Thus, an effective way of natural ventilation which can create the preferred higher air movement is called for. Finally, the indoor set-point temperature of 26°C or even higher in air-conditioned buildings was confirmed as making people comfortable, which supports the regulation

  4. Characterization of seeds of selected wild species of rice (Oryza) stored under high temperature and humidity conditions.

    PubMed

    Das, Smruti; Nayak, Monalisa; Patra, B C; Ramakrishnan, B; Krishnan, P

    2010-06-01

    Wild progenitors of rice (Oryza) are an invaluable resource for restoring genetic diversity and incorporating useful traits back into cultivars. Studies were conducted to characterize the biochemical changes, including SDS-PAGE banding pattern of storage proteins in seeds of six wild species (Oryza alta, O. grandiglumis, O. meridionalis, O. nivara, O. officinalis and O. rhizomatis) of rice stored under high temperature (45 degrees C) and humidity (approixmately 100%) for 15 days, which facilitated accelerated deterioration. Under the treated conditions, seeds of different wild rice species showed decrease in per cent germination and concentrations of protein and starch, but increase in conductivity of leachate and content of sugar. The SDS-PAGE analysis of seed proteins showed that not only the total number of bands, but also their intensity in terms of thickness differed for each species under storage. The total number of bands ranged from 11 to 22, but none of the species showed all the bands. Similarity index for protein bands between the control and treated seeds was observed to be least in O. rhizomatis and O. alta, while the indices were 0.7 and 0.625 for O. officinalis and O. nivara, respectively. This study clearly showed that seed deterioration led to distinctive biochemical changes, including the presence or absence as well as altered levels of intensity of proteins. Hence, SDS-PAGE protein banding pattern can be used effectively to characterize deterioration of seeds of different wild species of rice.

  5. Evaluation of the response of tritium-in-air instrumentation to HT in dry and humid conditions and to HTO vapor

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, H.; Dean, J.; Privas, E.

    2015-03-15

    Nuclear plant operators (power generation, decommissioning and reprocessing operations) are required to monitor releases of tritium species for regulatory compliance and radiation protection purposes. Tritium monitoring is performed using tritium-in-air gas monitoring instrumentation based either on flow-through ion chambers or proportional counting systems. Tritium-in-air monitors are typically calibrated in dry conditions but in service may operate at elevated levels of relative humidity. The NPL (National Physical Laboratory) radioactive gas-in-air calibration system has been used to study the effect of humidity on the response to tritium of two tritium-in-air ion chamber based monitors and one proportional counting system which uses a P10/air gas mixture. The response of these instruments to HTO vapour has also been evaluated. In each case, instrument responses were obtained for HT in dry conditions (relative humidity (RH) about 2%), HT in 45% RH, and finally HTO at 45% RH. Instrumentation response to HT in humid conditions has been found to slightly exceed that in dry conditions. (authors)

  6. Acute acetaminophen ingestion does not alter core temperature or sweating during exercise in hot-humid conditions.

    PubMed

    Coombs, G B; Cramer, M N; Ravanelli, N M; Morris, N B; Jay, O

    2015-06-01

    Acute acetaminophen (ACT) ingestion has been reported to reduce thermal strain during cycling in the heat. In this study, nine active participants ingested 20 mg of ACT per kg of total body mass (ACT) or a placebo (PLA), 60 min prior to cycling at a fixed rate of metabolic heat production (ACT: 8.3 ± 0.3 W/kg; PLA: 8.5 ± 0.5 W/kg), which was equivalent to 55 ± 6% VO2max , for 60 min at 34.5 ± 0.1 °C, 52 ± 1% relative humidity. Resting rectal temperature (Tre ; ACT: 36.70 ± 0.17 °C; PLA: 36.80 ± 0.16 °C, P = 0.24), esophageal temperature (Tes ; ACT: 36.54 ± 0.22 °C; PLA: 36.61 ± 0.17 °C, P = 0.50) and mean skin temperature (Tsk ; ACT: 34.00 ± 0.14 °C; PLA: 33.96 ± 0.20 °C, P = 0.70) were all similar among conditions. At end-exercise, no differences in ΔTre (ACT: 1.12 ± 0.15 °C; PLA: 1.11 ± 0.21 °C, P = 0.92), ΔTes (ACT: 0.90 ± 0.28 °C; PLA: 0.88 ± 0.23 °C, P = 0.84), ΔTsk (ACT: 0.80 ± 0.39 °C; PLA: 0.70 ± 0.46 °C, P = 0.63), mean local sweat rate (ACT: 1.02 ± 0.15 mg/cm(2) /min; PLA: 1.02 ± 0.13 mg/cm(2) /min, P = 0.98) and whole-body sweat loss (ACT: 663 ± 83 g; PLA: 663 ± 77 g, P = 0.995) were evident. Furthermore, ratings of perceived exertion and thermal sensation and thermal comfort were not different between ACT and PLA conditions. In conclusion, ACT ingested 60 min prior to moderate intensity exercise in hot-humid conditions does not alter physiologic thermoregulatory control nor perceived strain.

  7. Viability of Ascaris and other helminth genera non larval eggs in different conditions of temperature, lime (pH) and humidity.

    PubMed

    Maya, C; Ortiz, M; Jiménez, B

    2010-01-01

    Helminth eggs are the pathogens most resistant to inactivation during sludge and wastewater treatment. For this reason, in several regulations and the WHO guidelines for wastewater and excreta reuse for agriculture and aquaculture they are considered as indicators of the performance of the treatment process. Conditions required to inactivate helminth eggs, notably Ascaris lumbricoides, are recommended in the literature, but in practice these have not always proven effective, not only for Ascaris but also other genera of helminth eggs. The objective of this research was to study the inactivation of a high total content of non larval Ascaris and other genera of helminth eggs of medical importance to developing countries under controlled conditions of (a) temperature (30 °C to 80 °C) and humidity (80, 90 and 95%) and (b) lime doses (15 and 20% of CaO w/w dry basis) and humidity (90 and 80%), using different contact times in both cases. The inactivation data obtained for different genera of non larval helminth eggs is presented. Results showed that there is a combination of conditions (temperature, pH and humidity) that is optimal for inactivation. To completely inactivate any genera of non larval helminth eggs: (a) a temperature above 70 °C and 80% humidity for a duration of 120 min; and, (b) a 20% CaO dose (pH 12.5) and a humidity level of 80% for a duration of 8 months are needed. With regard to the resistance of different genera of helminth eggs, Ascaris, Toxocara and Taenia, in that order, were the most resistant, while the most sensitive were Trichuris and Hymenolepis. For most of the conditions tested Ascaris showed the highest resistance, probably due to the chemical arrangement of its membrane.

  8. Life cycle and reproductive patterns of Triatoma rubrovaria (Blanchard, 1843) (Hemiptera: Reduviidae) under constant and fluctuating conditions of temperature and humidity.

    PubMed

    Damborsky, Miryam P; Bar, María E; Gorla, David

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the temperature and relative humidity influence in the life cycle, mortality and fecundity patterns of Triatoma rubrovaria. Four cohorts with 60 recently laid eggs each were conformed. The cohorts were divided into two groups. In the controlled conditions group insects were maintained in a dark climatic chamber under constant temperature and humidity, whereas triatomines of the ambiental temperature group were maintained at room temperature. Average incubation time was 15.6 days in the controlled conditions group and 19.1 days in the ambiental temperature. In group controlled conditions the time from egg to adult development lasted 10 months while group ambiental temperature took four months longer. Egg eclosion rate was 99.1% and 98.3% in controlled conditions and ambiental temperature, respectively. Total nymphal mortality in controlled conditions was 52.6% whereas in ambiental temperature was 51.8%. Mean number of eggs/female was 817.6 controlled conditions and 837.1 ambiental temperature. Fluctuating temperature and humidity promoted changes in the life cycle duration and in the reproductive performance of this species, although not in the species mortality.

  9. Rheological behaviors of edible casein-based packaging films under extreme environmental conditions, using humidity-controlled dynamic mechanical analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Thin casein films for food packaging applications possess good strength and low oxygen permeability but low water-resistance and elasticity. Customizing the mechanical properties of the films to target specific behaviors depending on temperature and humidity changes would enable a variety of commerc...

  10. Nucleation of CaCO3 polymorphs from a colloidal alcoholic solution of Ca(OH)2 nanocrystals exposed to low humidity conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez-Villalba, L. S.; López-Arce, P.; Fort, R.

    2012-01-01

    A study of the stability of calcium carbonate polymorphs formed as a result of the carbonation process from an alcoholic colloidal solution of nanocrystals of Ca(OH)2 in low relative humidity (RH) conditions (33% and 54% RH) is presented in this research. The crystalline behavior, the time dependence of nucleation and the phases' transformations as a result of exposure to low humidity conditions are evaluated. The carbonation process is slow, starting with the nucleation of amorphous calcium carbonate, associated to an amorphization process that affects both the portlandite (Ca(OH)2) and the initial unstable CaCO3 polymorphs. The excess of alcohol in the solution decreases the surface tension and the nucleation is accelerated by the fast evaporation of the solvent, which avoids the particles to diffuse to their lowest energy sites, giving smaller particles with lower crystallinity as RH decreases.

  11. Morphology of U3O8 materials following storage under controlled conditions of temperature and relative humidity

    SciTech Connect

    Tamasi, Alison L.; Cash, Leigh J.; Mullen, William Tyler; Pugmire, Alison L.; Ross, Amy R.; Ruggiero, Christy E.; Scott, Brian L.; Wagner, Gregory L.; Walensky, Justin R.; Wilkerson, Marianne P.

    2016-07-05

    Changes in the visual characteristics of uranium oxide surfaces and morphology following storage under different conditions of temperature and relative humidity may provide insight into the history of an unknown sample. Sub-samples of three α-U3O8 materials—one that was phase-pure and two that were phase-impure—were stored under controlled conditions for two years. We used scanning electron microscopy to image the oxides before and after storage, and a morphology lexicon was used to characterize the images. Finally, temporal changes in morphology were observed in some sub-samples, and changes were greatest following exposure to high relative humidity.

  12. Effects of Varroa destructor on temperature and humidity conditions and expression of energy metabolism genes in infested honeybee colonies.

    PubMed

    Hou, C S; Li, B B; Deng, S; Diao, Q Y

    2016-09-23

    Varroa destructor mites pose an increasing global threat to the apicultural industry and agricultural ecology; however, the issue of whether certain environmental factors reflect the level of mite infection is far from resolved. Here, a wireless sensor network (WSN) system was used to examine how V. destructor, which has vital impacts on honeybee (Apis mellifera) health and survival, affects the temperature and humidity of honeybee hives in a field experiment. This approach may facilitate early identification of V. destructor in hives, and thus enable timely remedial action. Using quantitative PCR, we also evaluated the expression of two genes, adipokinetic hormone (AKH) and adipokinetic hormone receptor (AKHR).The results showed that temperature in highly infested broods was higher than that in broods with low infestation. Moreover, mite infection in honeybee colonies was positively correlated with temperature but negatively correlated with humidity (P < 0.05). Similar to previous observations, quantitative analysis suggested that the expression levels of AKH and AKHR from honeybees with low infection were significantly higher than those from bees with high infection (P < 0.01). These results showed that the expression levels of these genes in colonies with high mite infestation were closely associated with changes in hive temperature and humidity. This study demonstrates that Varroa infection not only causes changes in temperature inside honeybee colonies, but also affects the expression of honeybee energy metabolism genes.

  13. EDITORIAL: Humidity sensors Humidity sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regtien, Paul P. L.

    2012-01-01

    All matter is more or less hygroscopic. The moisture content varies with vapour concentration of the surrounding air and, as a consequence, most material properties change with humidity. Mechanical and thermal properties of many materials, such as the tensile strength of adhesives, stiffness of plastics, stoutness of building and packaging materials or the thermal resistivity of isolation materials, all decrease with increasing environmental humidity or cyclic humidity changes. The presence of water vapour may have a detrimental influence on many electrical constructions and systems exposed to humid air, from high-power systems to microcircuits. Water vapour penetrates through coatings, cable insulations and integrated-circuit packages, exerting a fatal influence on the performance of the enclosed systems. For these and many other applications, knowledge of the relationship between moisture content or humidity and material properties or system behaviour is indispensable. This requires hygrometers for process control or test and calibration chambers with high accuracy in the appropriate temperature and humidity range. Humidity measurement methods can roughly be categorized into four groups: water vapour removal (the mass before and after removal is measured); saturation (the air is brought to saturation and the `effort' to reach that state is measured); humidity-dependent parameters (measurement of properties of humid air with a known relation between a specific property and the vapour content, for instance the refractive index, electromagnetic spectrum and acoustic velocity); and absorption (based on the known relation between characteristic properties of non-hydrophobic materials and the amount of absorbed water from the gas to which these materials are exposed). The many basic principles to measure air humidity are described in, for instance, the extensive compilations by Wexler [1] and Sonntag [2]. Absorption-type hygrometers have small dimensions and can be

  14. Changes in Meteorological Parameters (i.e. UV and Solar Radiation, Air Temperature, Humidity and Wind Condition) during the Partial Solar Eclipse of 9 March 2016

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paramitha, B.; Zaen, R.; Nandiyanto, A. B. D.

    2017-03-01

    Solar eclipse is a spectacular phenomenon, which occurs when the position of the moon is between the sun and the earth. This phenomenon affects to the meteorological parameters, such as solar radiation, temperature, and humidity. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of partial solar eclipse of 9 March 2016 to the change of several meteorological parameters. In the experimental procedure, we used automatic weather station (AWS) in one of building in Universitas Pendidikan Indonesia in Bandung. Bandung was selected because this place experienced partial (88.89%) solar eclipse on 9 March 2016. The result showed that compared to normal day, meteorological parameters changed during the solar eclipse, such as decreases in the UV and solar radiation, increases in relative humidity, and changes in air temperature and wind condition.

  15. Solid State Humidity Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Song-Lin

    There are only a few solid state humidity sensors available today. Most of those sensors use a porous oxide material as a principal part of the device. The devices work on the basis of a change in resistance as the moisture in the air varies. In this experiment, two solid state humidity sensors have been developed for use under practical conditions. One is a Polymer Oxide Semiconductor device with a POLYOX film that absorbs the moisture from the air. The amount of water dipoles absorbed by the polymer is a function of relative humidity. This sensor can measure relative humidity from 20% to 90%. The other is a Dew Point sensor. The sensor is in contact with the upper surface of a miniature Peltier cooler. Water molecules deposited on the sensor surface cause the electrical current through the sensor to increase. The operator adjusts the temperature of the Peltier cooler until a saturated current through the sensor is reached. About one min. is required to measure low relative humidities. The Dew Point sensor can measure a range of relative humidities of 30% to 80%.

  16. Twin-cuvette measurement technique for investigation of dry deposition of O3 and PAN to plant leaves under controlled humidity conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Shang; Moravek, Alexander; von der Heyden, Lisa; Held, Andreas; Sörgel, Matthias; Kesselmeier, Jürgen

    2016-02-01

    We present a dynamic twin-cuvette system for quantifying the trace-gas exchange fluxes between plants and the atmosphere under controlled temperature, light, and humidity conditions. Compared with a single-cuvette system, the twin-cuvette system is insensitive to disturbing background effects such as wall deposition. In combination with a climate chamber, we can perform flux measurements under constant and controllable environmental conditions. With an Automatic Temperature Regulated Air Humidification System (ATRAHS), we are able to regulate the relative humidity inside both cuvettes between 40 and 90 % with a high precision of 0.3 %. Thus, we could demonstrate that for a cuvette system operated with a high flow rate (> 20 L min-1), a temperature-regulated humidification system such as ATRAHS is an accurate method for air humidification of the flushing air. Furthermore, the fully automatic progressive fill-up of ATRAHS based on a floating valve improved the performance of the entire measurement system and prevented data gaps. Two reactive gas species, ozone (O3) and peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN), were used to demonstrate the quality and performance of the twin-cuvette system. O3 and PAN exchange with Quercus ilex was investigated over a 14 day measurement period under controlled climate chamber conditions. By using O3 mixing ratios between 32 and 105 ppb and PAN mixing ratios between 100 and 350 ppt, a linear dependency of the O3 flux as well as the PAN flux in relation to its ambient mixing ratio could be observed. At relative humidity (RH) of 40 %, the deposition velocity ratio of O3 and PAN was determined to be 0.45. At that humidity, the deposition of O3 to the plant leaves was found to be only controlled by the leaf stomata. For PAN, an additional resistance inhibited the uptake of PAN by the leaves. Furthermore, the formation of water films on the leaf surface of plants inside the chamber could be continuously tracked with our custom built leaf wetness sensors

  17. Twin-cuvette measurement technique for investigation of dry deposition of O3 and PAN to plant leaves under controlled humidity conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, S.; Moravek, A.; von der Heyden, L.; Held, A.; Sörgel, M.; Kesselmeier, J.

    2015-11-01

    We present a dynamic twin-cuvette system for quantifying the trace gas exchange fluxes between plants and the atmosphere under controlled temperature, light and humidity conditions. Compared with a single cuvette system, the twin-cuvette system is insensitive for disturbing background effects such as wall deposition. In combination with a climate chamber we can perform flux measurements under constant and controllable environmental conditions. With an Automatic Temperature Regulated Air Humidification System (ATRAHS) we are able to regulate the relative humidity inside both cuvettes between 40 to 90 % with a high precision of 0.3 %. Thus, we could demonstrate that for a cuvette system operated with a high flow rate (> 20 L min-1) such a temperature regulated humidification system as ATRAHS is an accurate method for air humidification of the flushing air. Furthermore, the fully automatic progressive fill-up of ATRAHS based on a floating valve improved the performance of the entire measurement system and prevented data gaps. Two reactive gas species, ozone (O3) and peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN), were used to demonstrate the quality and performance of the twin-cuvette system. O3 and PAN exchange with Quercus ilex was investigated over a 14 day measurement period under controlled climate chamber conditions. By using O3 mixing ratios between 32-105 ppb and PAN mixing ratios between 100-350 ppt a linear dependency of the O3 flux as well as the PAN flux in relation to its ambient mixing ratio could be observed. At relative humidity (RH) of 40 %, the deposition velocity ratio of O3 and PAN was determined to be 0.45. At that humidity, the deposition of O3 to the plant leaves was found to be only controlled by the leaf stomata. For PAN an additional resistance inhibited the uptake of PAN by the leaves. Furthermore, the formation of water films on the leaf surface of plants inside the chamber could be continuously tracked with our custom built leaf wetness sensors. Using this

  18. Investigation of charge compensation in indium-doped tin dioxide by hydrogen insertion via annealing under humid conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, Ken; Ohsawa, Takeo; Ross, Emily M. Adachi, Yutaka; Haneda, Hajime; Sakaguchi, Isao; Takahashi, Ryosuke; Bierwagen, Oliver; White, Mark E.; Tsai, Min-Ying; Speck, James S.; Ohashi, Naoki

    2014-03-31

    The behavior of hydrogen (H) as an impurity in indium (In)-doped tin dioxide (SnO{sub 2}) was investigated by mass spectrometry analyses, with the aim of understanding the charge compensation mechanism in SnO{sub 2}. The H-concentration of the In-doped SnO{sub 2} films increased to (1–2) × 10{sup 19} cm{sup −3} by annealing in a humid atmosphere (WET annealing). The electron concentration in the films also increased after WET annealing but was two orders of magnitude less than their H-concentrations. A self-compensation mechanism, based on the assumption that H sits at substitutional sites, is proposed to explain the mismatch between the electron- and H-concentrations.

  19. In-situ characterization of free-volume holes in polymer thin films under controlled humidity conditions with an atmospheric positron probe microanalyzer

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Wei; Oshima, Nagayasu; O'Rourke, Brian E.; Kuroda, Ryunosuke; Suzuki, Ryoichi; Chen Zhe; Ito, Kenji; Yanagishita, Hiroshi; Tsutsui, Takuro; Uedono, Akira; Hayashizaki, Noriyosu

    2012-07-02

    A pulsed, slow positron beam, with a diameter of 200 {mu}m, was extracted into air through a thin SiN window of an atmospheric positron probe microanalyzer (PPMA), and used to measure the ortho-positronium lifetimes {tau} in polyvinyl alcohol and polycaprolactam sub-{mu}m-thick films. By measuring the variation of {tau} as a function of relative humidity, the effect of water molecules on the hole sizes, deduced from {tau}, was examined for the films with consideration to the chain mobility. The results demonstrate the usefulness of the atmospheric PPMA to the in-situ characterization of nanoscopic holes in thin films under practical conditions.

  20. Sealed Attics Exposed to Two Years of Weathering in a Hot and Humid Climate

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, William A; Railkar, Sudhir; Shiao, Ming C; Desjarlais, Andre Omer

    2016-01-01

    Field studies in a hot, humid climate were conducted to investigate the thermal and hygrothermal performance of ventilated attics and non-ventilated semi-conditioned attics sealed with open-cell and with closed-cell spray polyurethane foam insulation. Moisture pin measurements made in the sheathing and absolute humidity sensor data from inside the foam and from the attic air show that moisture is being stored in the foam. The moisture in the foam diffuses to and from the sheathing dependent on the pressure gradient at the foam-sheathing interface which is driven by the irradiance and night-sky radiation. Ventilated attics in the same hot, humid climate showed less moisture movement in the sheathing than those sealed with either open- or closed-cell spray foam. In the ventilated attics the relative humidity drops as the attic air warms; however, the opposite was observed in the sealed attics. Peaks in measured relative humidity in excess of 80 90% and occasionally near saturation (i.e., 100%) were observed from solar noon till about 8 PM on hot, humid days. The conditioned space of the test facility is heated and cooled by an air-to-air heat pump. Therefore the partial pressure of the indoor air during peak irradiance is almost always less than that observed in the sealed attics. Field data will be presented to bring to light the critical humidity control issues in sealed attics exposed to hot, humid climates.

  1. Absolute Zero

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnelly, Russell J.; Sheibley, D.; Belloni, M.; Stamper-Kurn, D.; Vinen, W. F.

    2006-12-01

    Absolute Zero is a two hour PBS special attempting to bring to the general public some of the advances made in 400 years of thermodynamics. It is based on the book “Absolute Zero and the Conquest of Cold” by Tom Shachtman. Absolute Zero will call long-overdue attention to the remarkable strides that have been made in low-temperature physics, a field that has produced 27 Nobel Prizes. It will explore the ongoing interplay between science and technology through historical examples including refrigerators, ice machines, frozen foods, liquid oxygen and nitrogen as well as much colder fluids such as liquid hydrogen and liquid helium. A website has been established to promote the series: www.absolutezerocampaign.org. It contains information on the series, aimed primarily at students at the middle school level. There is a wealth of material here and we hope interested teachers will draw their student’s attention to this website and its substantial contents, which have been carefully vetted for accuracy.

  2. Report Card on Humidity Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fischer, John C.; Bayer, Charlene

    2003-01-01

    Reports on an investigation of the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) Standard 62-1999 on outdoor ventilation rates and space humidity levels for schools. Examined conventional cooling versus desiccant-based systems designed to control indoor humidity levels. Discusses the effectiveness of systems…

  3. Effect of storage conditions (relative humidity, duration, and temperature) on the germination time of Aspergillus carbonarius and Penicillium chrysogenum.

    PubMed

    Lattab, Nadia; Kalai, Safaa; Bensoussan, Maurice; Dantigny, Philippe

    2012-11-01

    Fungal conidia are disseminated, often in the air, for a certain period of time, prior to contaminating food products. The objective of this study was to examine the effects of the relative humidity, RH (%), time (day), and temperature (°C) during this period of time, called "storage", on the germination time, τ (h), of Aspergillus carbonarius and Penicillium chrysogenum. A Doehlert design was used in the range, 20-100% RH, 2-28 days, and 5-25 °C. As compared to un-stored conidia, the germination time of conidia stored at 60% RH, 15 days, 5 °C was increased by 23 and 28%, for A. carbonarius and P. chrysogenum, respectively. Stored conidia exhibited a minimum τ value at 60% RH, and 100% RH for A. carbonarius and P. chrysogenum, respectively. For these species, τ was minimum for 2 days of storage. The effect of temperature was RH dependent for A. carbonarius. The germination time of stored conidia was clearly greater than that of fresh conidia obtained in the laboratory. This result should be taken into account to determine the mould free shelf-life of food products.

  4. Effects of drying conditions of corn kernels and storage at an elevated humidity on starch structures and properties.

    PubMed

    Setiawan, Stephen; Widjaja, Hany; Rakphongphairoj, Vinai; Jane, Jay-lin

    2010-12-08

    The objective of this study was to understand effects of sun drying (35 °C) and machine drying (80 °C) of corn kernels followed by storage at 27 °C and 85-90% relative humidity for up to 6 months on starch structures and properties. The peak viscosity and starch hydrolysis rate using porcine pancreatic α-amylase of finely ground samples decreased with storage of both sun-dried and machine-dried corn kernels. The rate of enzymatic hydrolysis of the isolated starch obtained from the sun-dried corn increased with storage time, but that from the machine-dried corn decreased. The gelatinization temperature, pasting temperature, and percentage crystallinity of the isolated starch increased but the gelatinization enthalpy-change and peak viscosity of the starch decreased with storage time. Numbers of damaged starch granules and starch granules with pinholes increased but the molecular weight of starch and long branch-chains of amylopectin decreased with storage time. The results indicated that endogenous enzyme activity remained after sun drying, which hydrolyzed starch and reduced viscosity.

  5. Comparison of single-point and continuous sampling methods for estimating residential indoor temperature and humidity

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, James D.; Magnusson, Brianna M.; Eggett, Dennis; Collingwood, Scott C.; Bernhardt, Scott A.

    2016-01-01

    Residential temperature and humidity are associated with multiple health effects. Studies commonly use single-point measures to estimate indoor temperature and humidity exposures, but there is little evidence to support this sampling strategy. This study evaluated the relationship between single-point and continuous monitoring of air temperature, apparent temperature, relative humidity, and absolute humidity over four exposure intervals (5-min, 30-min, 24-hrs, and 12-days) in 9 northern Utah homes, from March – June 2012. Three homes were sampled twice, for a total of 12 observation periods. Continuous data-logged sampling was conducted in homes for 2-3 wks, and simultaneous single-point measures (n = 114) were collected using handheld thermo-hygrometers. Time-centered single-point measures were moderately correlated with short-term (30-min) data logger mean air temperature (r = 0.76, β = 0.74), apparent temperature (r = 0.79, β = 0.79), relative humidity (r = 0.70, β = 0.63), and absolute humidity (r = 0.80, β = 0.80). Data logger 12-day means were also moderately correlated with single-point air temperature (r = 0.64, β = 0.43) and apparent temperature (r = 0.64, β = 0.44), but were weakly correlated with single-point relative humidity (r = 0.53, β = 0.35) and absolute humidity (r = 0.52, β = 0.39). Of the single-point RH measures, 59 (51.8%) deviated more than ±5%, 21 (18.4%) deviated more than ±10%, and 6 (5.3%) deviated more than ±15% from data logger 12-day means. Where continuous indoor monitoring is not feasible, single-point sampling strategies should include multiple measures collected at prescribed time points based on local conditions. PMID:26030088

  6. Comparison of Single-Point and Continuous Sampling Methods for Estimating Residential Indoor Temperature and Humidity.

    PubMed

    Johnston, James D; Magnusson, Brianna M; Eggett, Dennis; Collingwood, Scott C; Bernhardt, Scott A

    2015-01-01

    Residential temperature and humidity are associated with multiple health effects. Studies commonly use single-point measures to estimate indoor temperature and humidity exposures, but there is little evidence to support this sampling strategy. This study evaluated the relationship between single-point and continuous monitoring of air temperature, apparent temperature, relative humidity, and absolute humidity over four exposure intervals (5-min, 30-min, 24-hr, and 12-days) in 9 northern Utah homes, from March-June 2012. Three homes were sampled twice, for a total of 12 observation periods. Continuous data-logged sampling was conducted in homes for 2-3 wks, and simultaneous single-point measures (n = 114) were collected using handheld thermo-hygrometers. Time-centered single-point measures were moderately correlated with short-term (30-min) data logger mean air temperature (r = 0.76, β = 0.74), apparent temperature (r = 0.79, β = 0.79), relative humidity (r = 0.70, β = 0.63), and absolute humidity (r = 0.80, β = 0.80). Data logger 12-day means were also moderately correlated with single-point air temperature (r = 0.64, β = 0.43) and apparent temperature (r = 0.64, β = 0.44), but were weakly correlated with single-point relative humidity (r = 0.53, β = 0.35) and absolute humidity (r = 0.52, β = 0.39). Of the single-point RH measures, 59 (51.8%) deviated more than ±5%, 21 (18.4%) deviated more than ±10%, and 6 (5.3%) deviated more than ±15% from data logger 12-day means. Where continuous indoor monitoring is not feasible, single-point sampling strategies should include multiple measures collected at prescribed time points based on local conditions.

  7. Absolute Summ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Alfred, Jr.

    Summ means the entirety of the multiverse. It seems clear, from the inflation theories of A. Guth and others, that the creation of many universes is plausible. We argue that Absolute cosmological ideas, not unlike those of I. Newton, may be consistent with dynamic multiverse creations. As suggested in W. Heisenberg's uncertainty principle, and with the Anthropic Principle defended by S. Hawking, et al., human consciousness, buttressed by findings of neuroscience, may have to be considered in our models. Predictability, as A. Einstein realized with Invariants and General Relativity, may be required for new ideas to be part of physics. We present here a two postulate model geared to an Absolute Summ. The seedbed of this work is part of Akhnaton's philosophy (see S. Freud, Moses and Monotheism). Most important, however, is that the structure of human consciousness, manifest in Kenya's Rift Valley 200,000 years ago as Homo sapiens, who were the culmination of the six million year co-creation process of Hominins and Nature in Africa, allows us to do the physics that we do. .

  8. Rates of fluid ingestion alter pacing but not thermoregulatory responses during prolonged exercise in hot and humid conditions with appropriate convective cooling.

    PubMed

    Dugas, J P; Oosthuizen, U; Tucker, R; Noakes, T D

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the effects of fluid replacement on thermoregulation and cycling performance in hot, humid conditions. Six male cyclists (PPO = 426 +/- 39 W) performed six 80 km time trials. Subjects replaced 0% (0); 33% (33); 66% (66); or 100% (100) of the weight lost during an "ad libitum" trial (Ad Lib). In another condition (WET), subjects rinsed their mouths at 10 km intervals. There was no trial effect on any thermoregulatory variables or on performance. When WET, 0, 33 ("LO") were compared to Ad Lib; 66, 100 ("HI"), power output was higher in HI (209 +/- 22 vs. 193 +/- 22 W, p < 0.05). Restricting fluid below ad libitum rates impaired performance (LO group). Rates greater than ad libitum did not result in further improvements. Ad libitum fluid ingestion is optimal as it prevents athletes from ingesting too little or too much fluid.

  9. Effect of High Temperature Storage in Vacuum, Air, and Humid Conditions on Degradation of Gold/Aluminum Wire Bonds in PEMs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teverovsky, Alexander

    2006-01-01

    Microcircuits encapsulated in three plastic package styles were stored in different environments at temperatures varying from 130 C to 225 C for up to 4,000 hours in some cases. To assess the effect of oxygen, the parts were aged at high temperatures in air and in vacuum chambers. The effect of humidity was evaluated during long-term highly accelerated temperature and humidity stress testing (HAST) at temperatures of 130 C and 150 C. High temperature storage testing of decapsulated microcircuits in air, vacuum, and HAST chambers was carried out to evaluate the role of molding compounds in the environmentally-induced degradation and failure of wire bonds (WB). This paper reports on accelerating factors of environment and molding compound on WB failures. It has been shown that all environments, including oxygen, moisture, and the presence of molding compounds reduce time-to-failures compared to unencapsulated devices in vacuum conditions. The mechanism of the environmental effect on KB degradation is discussed.

  10. Absolute Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartig, George

    1990-12-01

    The absolute sensitivity of the FOS will be determined in SV by observing 2 stars at 3 epochs, first in 3 apertures (1.0", 0.5", and 0.3" circular) and then in 1 aperture (1.0" circular). In cycle 1, one star, BD+28D4211 will be observed in the 1.0" aperture to establish the stability of the sensitivity and flat field characteristics and improve the accuracy obtained in SV. This star will also be observed through the paired apertures since these are not calibrated in SV. The stars will be observed in most detector/grating combinations. The data will be averaged to form the inverse sensitivity functions required by RSDP.

  11. Absolute and relative blindsight.

    PubMed

    Balsdon, Tarryn; Azzopardi, Paul

    2015-03-01

    The concept of relative blindsight, referring to a difference in conscious awareness between conditions otherwise matched for performance, was introduced by Lau and Passingham (2006) as a way of identifying the neural correlates of consciousness (NCC) in fMRI experiments. By analogy, absolute blindsight refers to a difference between performance and awareness regardless of whether it is possible to match performance across conditions. Here, we address the question of whether relative and absolute blindsight in normal observers can be accounted for by response bias. In our replication of Lau and Passingham's experiment, the relative blindsight effect was abolished when performance was assessed by means of a bias-free 2AFC task or when the criterion for awareness was varied. Furthermore, there was no evidence of either relative or absolute blindsight when both performance and awareness were assessed with bias-free measures derived from confidence ratings using signal detection theory. This suggests that both relative and absolute blindsight in normal observers amount to no more than variations in response bias in the assessment of performance and awareness. Consideration of the properties of psychometric functions reveals a number of ways in which relative and absolute blindsight could arise trivially and elucidates a basis for the distinction between Type 1 and Type 2 blindsight.

  12. Humidity data for 9975 shipping packages with cane fiberboard

    SciTech Connect

    Daugherty, W. L.

    2016-05-01

    The 9975 surveillance program is developing a technical basis to support extending the storage period of 9975 packages in K-Area Complex beyond the currently approved 15 years. A key element of this effort is developing a better understanding of degradation of the fiberboard assembly under storage conditions. This degradation is influenced greatly by the moisture content of the fiberboard, which is not well characterized on an individual package basis. Direct measurements of humidity and fiberboard moisture content have been made on two test packages with cane fiberboard and varying internal heat levels from 0 up to 19W. With an internal heat load, a temperature gradient in the fiberboard assembly leads to varying relative humidity in the air around the fiberboard. However, the absolute humidity tends to remain approximately constant throughout the package. The moisture content of fiberboard varies under the influence of several phenomena. Changes in local fiberboard temperature (from an internal heat load) can cause fiberboard moisture changes through absorption or evaporation. Fiberboard degradation at elevated temperature will produce water as a byproduct. And the moisture level within the package is constantly seeking equilibrium with that of the surrounding room air, which varies on a daily and seasonal basis. One indicator of the moisture condition within a 9975 package might be obtained by measuring the relative humidity in the upper air space, by inserting a humidity probe through a caplug hole. However, the data indicate that for the higher internal heat loads (15 and 19 watts), a large variation in internal moisture conditions produces little or no variation in the air space relative humidity. Therefore, this approach does not appear to be sensitive to fiberboard moisture variations at the higher heat loads which are of most interest to maintaining fiberboard integrity.

  13. Thermal comfort in the humid tropics: Field experiments in air conditioned and naturally ventilated buildings in Singapore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Dear, R. J.; Leow, K. G.; Foo, S. C.

    1991-12-01

    Thermal comfort field experiments were conducted in Singapore in both naturally ventilated highrise residential buildings and air conditioned office buildings. Each of the 818 questionnaire responses was made simultaneously with a detailed set of indoor climatic measurements, and estimates of clothing insulation and metabolic rate. Results for the air conditioned sample indicated that office buildings were overcooled, causing up to one-third of their occupants to experience cool thermal comfort sensations. These observations in air conditioned buildings were broadly consistent with the ISO, ASHRAE and Singapore indoor climatic standards. Indoor climates of the naturally ventilated apartments during the day and early evening were on average three degrees warmer than the ISO comfort standard prescriptions, but caused much less thermal discomfort than expected. Discrepancies between thermal comfort responses in apartment blocks and office buildings are discussed in terms of contemporary perceptual theory.

  14. Effect of Practical Precooling on Neuromuscular Function and 5-km Time-Trial Performance in Hot, Humid Conditions Among Well-Trained Male Runners.

    PubMed

    Randall, Carla A; Ross, Emma Z; Maxwell, Neil S

    2015-07-01

    This study investigated whether torso and thigh precooling during a warm-up effects neuromuscular function and 5-km time-trial performance in hot, humid conditions. Eight well-trained male runners completed 3 randomized time-trials in 32.2 ± 0.8° C and 48.6 ± 6.7% relative humidity. A 30-minute warm-up was completed with no cooling (Control), precooling by an ice vest (Vest), or ice packs covering the thighs (Packs). Before the warm-up and after the time-trial, supramaximal femoral nerve stimulation was delivered during and following maximal isometric contractions. Core and skin temperature, heart rate, and perceptual ratings were recorded before and during the warm-up and time-trial. Overall performance time was improved in Packs compared with Control (1,407 ± 80 seconds vs. 1,492 ± 88 seconds; p ≤ 0.05) but not in Vest (1,444 ± 71 seconds; p > 0.05). In Packs, a higher exercise intensity (p ≤ 0.05) and less cumulative time (p < 0.01) were evident during the last kilometer compared with Control. Maximum voluntary force, voluntary activation, muscle contractility, and membrane excitability were not different after exercise or between conditions. Ten minutes after the warm-up, skin temperature was lower in Vest and Packs compared with Control (p < 0.01). Thermal strain and body heat content change was lower in Vest and Packs, respectively (p ≤ 0.05). Findings indicate that torso and thigh precooling during a warm-up reduces thermoregulatory strain. However, thigh opposed to torso precooling provides greater performance improvements. Neuromuscular function did not aid performance, indicating that transient changes in afferent feedback and muscle recruitment may enhance endurance trial performance.

  15. Effective microorganism - X attenuates circulating superoxide dismutase following an acute bout of intermittent running in hot, humid conditions.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Lee; Lee, Ben J; Gibson, Oliver R; Midgley, Adrian W; Watt, Peter; Mauger, Alexis; Castle, Paul

    2016-01-01

    This study determined the effectiveness of antioxidant supplementation on high-intensity exercise-heat stress. Six males completed a high-intensity running protocol twice in temperate conditions (TEMP; 20.4°C), and twice in hot conditions (HOT; 34.7°C). Trials were completed following7 days supplementation with 70 ml·day(-1) effective microorganism-X (EM-X; TEMPEMX or HOTEMX) or placebo (TEMPPLA or HOTPLA). Plasma extracellular Hsp72 (eHsp72) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) were measured by ELISA. eHsp72 and SOD increased pre-post exercise (p < 0.001), with greater eHsp72 (p < 0.001) increases observed in HOT (+1.5 ng·ml(-1)) compared to TEMP (+0.8 ng·ml(-1)). EM-X did not influence eHsp72 (p > 0.05). Greater (p < 0.001) SOD increases were observed in HOT (+0.22 U·ml(-1)) versus TEMP (+0.10 U·ml(-1)) with SOD reduced in HOTEMX versus HOTPLA (p = 0.001). Physiological and perceptual responses were all greater (p < 0.001) in HOT versus TEMP conditions, with no difference followed EM-X (p > 0.05). EM-X supplementation attenuated the SOD increases following HOT, potentiating its application as an ergogenic aid to ameliorate oxidative stress.

  16. Evaluation of wet bulb globe temperature index for estimation of heat strain in hot/humid conditions in the Persian Gulf

    PubMed Central

    Dehghan, Habibolah; Mortazavi, Seyed Bagher; Jafari, Mohammad J.; Maracy, Mohammad R.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Heat exposure among construction workers in the Persian Gulf region is a serious hazard for health. The aim of this study was to evaluate the performance of wet bulb globe temperature (WBGT) Index for estimation of heat strain in hot/humid conditions by the use of Physiological Strain Index (PSI) as the gold standard. Material and Methods: This cross-sectional study was carried out on 71 workers of two Petrochemical Companies in South of Iran in 2010 summer. The WBGT index, heart rate, and aural temperature were measured by Heat Stress Monitor (Casella Microtherm WBGT), Heart Rate Monitor (Polar RS100), and Personal Heat Strain Monitor (Questemp II), respectively. The obtained data were analyzed with descriptive statistics and Pearson correlation analysis. Results: The mean (SD) of WBGT values was 33.1 (2.7). The WBGT values exceed from American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) standard (30°C) in 96% work stations, whereas the PSI values were more than 5.0 (moderate strain) in 11% of workstations. The correlation between WBGT and PSI values was 0.61 (P = 0.001). When WBGT values were less and more than 34°C, the mean of PSI was 2.6 (low strain) and 5.2 (moderate strain), respectively. Conclusion: In the Persian Gulf weather, especially hot and humid in the summer months, due to the WBGT values exceeding 30°C (in 96% of cases) and weak correlation between WBGT and PSI, the work/rest cycles of WBGT Index is not suitable for heat stress management. Therefore, in Persian Gulf weather, heat stress evaluation based on physiologic variables may have higher validity than WBGT index. PMID:23853626

  17. Effects of azadirachtin, abamectin, and spinosad on sweetpotato whitefly (Homoptera: Aleyrodidae) on tomato plants under laboratory and greenhouse conditions in the humid tropics.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Prabhat; Poehling, H M

    2007-04-01

    Direct and residual toxicity of NeemAzal-T/S (azadirachtin), Success (spinosad), and abamectin was tested against different life stages of sweetpotato whitefly, Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) (Homoptera: Aleyrodidae), under air-conditioned laboratory conditions and in a tropical net greenhouse. NeemAzal-T/S and abamectin deterred the settling of adults on tomato, Lycopersicon esculentum Mill (Solanaceae), plants and consequently reduced egg deposition. No such effect was detected for Success. All three pesticides influenced egg hatch. Effects of NeemAzal-T/ S were significantly altered if applied to different-aged eggs (1, 3, and 5 d old). In contrast, abamectin-treated eggs failed to hatch at any given age class. All three products caused heavy mortality of the three nymphal stages of B. tabaci, with the first instars being most susceptible, abamectin-treated nymphs died within 24 h postapplication. In contrast, 100% nymphal mortality with NeemAzal-T/S and Success was reached 6-9 d postapplication. abamectin caused 100% immature mortality at all residue ages (1, 5, 10, and 15 d) in the laboratory and greenhouse as well. Persistence of Success was comparably high in the laboratory, but in the greenhouse a faster decline of activity was evident by increased egg deposition, egg hatch, and reduced rates of immature mortality. Toxicity of NeemAzal-T/S however gradually declined under greenhouse conditions with time (5 d) postapplication. The findings are discussed within the context of integrated management of whitefly under protected cultivation in the humid tropics.

  18. NFLUX PRE: Validation of New Specific Humidity, Surface Air Temperature, and Wind Speed Algorithms for Ascending/Descending Directions and Clear or Cloudy Conditions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-18

    Validation of New Specific Humidity, Surface Air Temperature , and Wind Speed Algorithms for Ascending/ Descending Directions and Clear or Cloudy...LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT NFLUX PRE: Validation of New Specific Humidity, Surface Air Temperature , and Wind Speed Algorithms for Ascending/Descending...satellite retrieval algorithms. In addition to data from the Special Sensor Microwave Imager/Sounder (SSMIS) and the Advanced Microwave Sounding

  19. The effects of single versus twice daily short term heat acclimation on heat strain and 3000m running performance in hot, humid conditions.

    PubMed

    Willmott, A G B; Gibson, O R; Hayes, M; Maxwell, N S

    2016-02-01

    Endurance performances are impaired under conditions of elevated heat stress. Short term heat acclimation (STHA) over 4-6 days can evoke rapid adaptation, which mitigate decrements in performance and alleviate heat strain. This study investigated the efficacy of twice daily heat acclimation (TDHA) compared to single session per day heat acclimation (SDHA) and normothermic training, at inducing heat acclimation phenotype and its impact upon running performance in hot, humid conditions. Twenty one, moderately trained males were matched and assigned to three groups; SDHA (mean±SD) (peak oxygen consumption [V̇O2peak] 45.8±6.1mLkg(-1)min(-1), body mass 81.3±16.0kg, stature 182±3cm), TDHA (46.1±7.0mLkg(-1)min(-1), 80.1±11.9kg, 178±4cm) or control (CON) (47.1±3.5mLkg(-1)min(-1), 78.6±16.7kg, 178±4cm). Interventions consisted of 45min cycling at 50% V̇O2peak, once daily for 4d (SDHA) and twice daily for 2d (TDHA), in 35°C, 60% relative humidity (RH), and once daily for 4 days (CON) in 21°C, 40% RH. Participants completed a pre- and post-intervention 5km treadmill run trial in 30°C, 60% RH, where the first 2km were fixed at 40% V̇O2peak and the final 3km was self-paced. No statistically significant interaction effects occurred within- or between-groups over the 2-4 days intervention. While within-group differences were found in physiological and perceptual measures during the fixed intensity trial post-intervention, they did not statistically differ between-groups. Similarly, TDHA (-36±34s [+3.5%]) and SDHA (-26±28s [+2.8%]) groups improved 3km performances (p=0.35), but did not differ from CON (-6±44s [+0.6%]). This is the first study to investigate the effects of HA twice daily and compare it with traditional single session per day STHA. These STHA protocols may have the ability to induce partial adaptive responses to heat stress and possibly enhance performance in environmentally challenging conditions, however, future development is warranted to

  20. Diffusion of counterfeit drugs in developing countries and stability of galenics stored for months under different conditions of temperature and relative humidity

    PubMed Central

    Baratta, Francesca; Germano, Antonio; Brusa, Paola

    2012-01-01

    Aim To investigate the diffusion of counterfeit medicines in developing countries and to verify the stability of galenic dosage forms to determine the stability of galenics prepared and stored in developing countries. Methods We purchased 221 pharmaceutical samples belonging to different therapeutic classes both in authorized and illegal pharmacies and subjected them to European Pharmacopoeia, 7th ed. quality tests. An UV-visible spectrophotometric assay was used to determine the galenics stability under different conditions of temperature (T) and relative humidity (RH). Results A substantial percentage of samples was substandard (52%) and thus had to be considered as counterfeit. Stability tests for galenics showed that the tested dosage forms were stable for 24 months under “standard” (t = 25 ± 2°C, RH = 50 ± 5%) conditions. Under “accelerated” (t = 40 ± 2°C, RH = 50 ± 5%) conditions, samples were stable for 3 months provided that they were stored in glass containers. Stability results of samples stored in “accelerated” conditions were similar to those obtained by on site in tropical countries and could so supply precious information on the expected stability of galenics in tropical countries. Conclusion This study gives useful information about the presence of counterfeit medicinal products in the pharmacies of many developing countries. This should serve as an alarm bell and an input for the production of galenics. We recommend setting up of galenic laboratories in developing countries around the globe. PMID:22522996

  1. Optimization of heat and relative humidity conditions to reduce Escherichia coli O157:H7 contamination and maximize the germination of radish seeds.

    PubMed

    Song, M K; Kim, H W; Rhee, M S

    2016-06-01

    We previously reported that a combination of heat and relative humidity (RH) had a marked bactericidal effect on Escherichia coli O157:H7 on radish seeds. Here, response surface methodology with a Box-Behnken design was used to build a model to predict reductions in E. coli O157:H7 populations based on three independent variables: heating temperature (55 °C, 60 °C, or 65 °C), RH (40%, 60%, and 80%), and holding time (8, 15, or 22 h). Optimum treatment conditions were selected using a desirability function. The predictive model for microbial reduction had a high regression coefficient (R(2) = 0.97), and the accuracy of the model was verified using validation data (R(2) = 0.95). Among the three variables examined, heating temperature (P < 0.0001) and RH (P = 0.004) were the most significant in terms of bacterial reduction and seed germination, respectively. The optimum conditions for microbial reduction (6.6 log reduction) determined by ridge analysis were as follows: 64.5 °C and 63.2% RH for 17.7 h. However, when both microbial reduction and germination rate were taken into consideration, the desirability function yielded optimal conditions of 65 °C and 40% RH for 8 h (6.6 log reduction in the bacterial population; 94.4% of seeds germinated). This study provides comprehensive data that improve our understanding of the effects of heating temperature, RH, and holding time on the E. coli O157:H7 population on radish seeds. Radish seeds can be exposed to these conditions before sprouting, which greatly increases the microbiological safety of the products.

  2. Survival of foodborne pathogens at different relative humidities and temperatures and the effect of sanitizers on apples with different surface conditions.

    PubMed

    Tian, Jun-Qi; Bae, Young-Min; Lee, Sun-Young

    2013-08-01

    We investigated the effects of factors such as relative humidity (RH) and temperature on pathogen survival on apples with different surface conditions. Apples with different surface conditions (unblemished, bruised, or cut) were inoculated with three pathogens (Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella Typhimurium, and Staphylococcus aureus) and stored at different RH levels (RH 100, 85, or 68%) at 4 °C or 15 °C for 2 days. S. aureus survived most readily on apple surfaces; it had no significant reduction on any of the apple surfaces for any of the three RH levels after 2 days of storage. The reduction levels of E. coli O157:H7 and S. Typhimurium on unblemished and bruised apple surfaces were higher at RH of 85% and 68% than at RH of 100% at 15 °C; and reduction levels were approximately 3 log(10) CFU/apple at 4 °C in RH of 68%. No significant reduction in any of the three pathogens on cut apple surfaces was observed for any RH level. The effectiveness of chemical sanitizers (chlorine sanitizer and 2% lactic acid) in reducing pathogens (E. coli O157:H7, S. Typhimurium, and S. aureus) on apple surfaces (unblemished, bruised, or cut) was also evaluated. Treatment with chlorine sanitizer and 2% lactic acid for 5 min significantly reduced pathogen levels on unblemished and bruised apple surfaces but not on cut apple surfaces. In conclusion, the surface conditions of the apple significantly affected pathogen survival and the effectiveness of sanitizing methods.

  3. Heterogeneous reaction of peroxyacetic acid and hydrogen peroxide on ambient aerosol particles under dry and humid conditions: kinetics, mechanism and implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Q. Q.; Huang, L. B.; Liang, H.; Zhao, Y.; Huang, D.; Chen, Z. M.

    2015-06-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and organic peroxides play important roles in the cycle of oxidants and the formation of secondary aerosols in the atmosphere. Recent field observations have suggested that the budget of peroxyacetic acid (PAA, CH3C(O)OOH) is potentially related to the aerosol phase processes, especially to secondary aerosol formation. Here, we present the first laboratory measurements of the uptake coefficient of gaseous PAA and H2O2 onto ambient fine particulate matter (PM2.5) as a function of relative humidity (RH) at 298 K. The results show that the PM2.5, which was collected in an urban area, can take up PAA and H2O2 at the uptake coefficient (γ) of 10-4, and both γPAA and γH2O2 increase with increasing RH. The value of γPAA at 90 % RH is 5.4 ± 1.9 times that at 3 % RH, whereas γH2O2 at 90 % RH is 2.4 ± 0.5 times that at 3 % RH, which suggests that PAA is more sensitive to the RH variation than H2O2 is. Considering the larger Henry's law constant of H2O2 than that of PAA, the smaller RH sensitivity of the H2O2 uptake coefficient suggests that the enhanced uptake of peroxide compounds on PM2.5 under humid conditions is dominated by chemical processes rather than dissolution. Considering that mineral dust is one of the main components of PM2.5 in Beijing, we also determined the uptake coefficients of gaseous PAA and H2O2 on authentic Asian Dust storm (ADS) and Arizona Test Dust (ATD) particles. Compared to ambient PM2.5, ADS shows a similar γ value and RH dependence in its uptake coefficient for PAA and H2O2, while ATD gives a negative dependence on RH. The present study indicates that, in addition to the mineral dust in PM2.5, other components (e.g., soluble inorganic salts) are also important to the uptake of peroxide compounds. When the heterogeneous reaction of PAA on PM2.5 is considered, its atmospheric lifetime is estimated to be 3.0 h on haze days and 7.1 h on non-haze days, values that are in good agreement with the field observations.

  4. Heterogeneous reaction of peroxyacetic acid and hydrogen peroxide on ambient aerosol particles under dry and humid conditions: kinetics, mechanism and implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Q. Q.; Huang, L. B.; Liang, H.; Zhao, Y.; Huang, D.; Chen, Z. M.

    2015-02-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and organic peroxides play important roles in the cycle of oxidants and the formation of secondary aerosols in the atmosphere. Recent field observations suggest that peroxyacetic acid (PAA, CH3C(O)OOH) is one of the most important organic peroxides in the atmosphere, whose budget is potentially related to the aerosols. Here we present the first laboratory measurements of the uptake coefficient of gaseous PAA and H2O2 onto the ambient fine particulate matter (PM2.5) as a function of relative humidity (RH) at 298 K. The results show that the PM2.5, which was collected in an urban area, can take up PAA and H2O2 at the uptake coefficient (γ) of 10-4, and both γPAA and γH2O2 increase with increasing RH. However, γPAA is more sensitive to the RH variation than is γH2O2, which indicates that the enhanced uptake of peroxide compounds on PM2.5 under humid conditions is dominated by chemical processes rather than dissolution. Considering that mineral dust is one of the main components of PM2.5, we also determined the uptake coefficients of gaseous PAA and H2O2 on authentic Asian Dust Storm (ADS) and Arizona Test Dust (ATD) particles. Compared to ambient PM2.5, ADS shows a similar γ value and RH dependence in its uptake coefficient for PAA and H2O2, while ATD gives a negative dependence on RH. The present study indicates that in addition to the mineral dust in PM2.5, other components (e.g., inorganic soluble salts) are also important to the uptake of peroxide compounds. When the heterogeneous reaction of PAA on PM2.5 is considered, its atmospheric lifetime is estimated to be 3.3 h on haze days and 7.6 h on non-haze days, values which agree well with the field observed result.

  5. Response to dietary supplementation of L-glutamine and L-glutamate in broiler chickens reared at different stocking densities under hot, humid tropical conditions.

    PubMed

    Shakeri, M; Zulkifli, I; Soleimani, A F; O'Reilly, E L; Eckersall, P D; Anna, A A; Kumari, S; Abdullah, F F J

    2014-11-01

    A study was conducted to determine whether supplementing AminoGut (a commercial dietary supplement containing a mixture of l-glutamine and l-glutamic acid) to broiler chickens stocked at 2 different densities affected performance, physiological stress responses, foot pad dermatitis incidence, and intestinal morphology and microflora. A randomized design in a factorial arrangement with 4 diets [basal diet, basal diet + 0.5% AminoGut from d 1 to 21, basal diet + 0.5% AminoGut from d 1 to 42, and basal diet + virginiamycin (0.02%) for d 1 to 42] and 2 stocking densities [0.100 m(2)/bird (23 birds/pen; LD) or 0.067 m(2)/bird (35 birds/pen; HD)]. Results showed that villi length and crypt depth were not changed by different dietary treatments. However, birds in the HD group had smaller villi (P = 0.03) compared with those of the LD group. Regardless of diet, HD consistently increased the serum concentrations of ceruloplasmin, α-1 acid glycoprotein, ovotransferin, and corticosterone (P = 0.0007), and elevated heterophil to lymphocyte ratio (0.0005). Neither AminoGut supplementation nor stocking density affected cecal microflora counts. In conclusion, under the conditions of this study, dietary supplementation of AminoGut, irrespective of stocking density, had no beneficial effect on growth performance, intestinal morphology, and physiological adaptive responses of broiler chickens raised under hot and humid tropical conditions. However, AminoGut supplementation from d 1 to 42 was beneficial in reducing mortality rate. Also, the increased serum concentrations of a wide range of acute phase proteins together with elevated corticosterone and heterophil to lymphocyte ratio suggested that high stocking density induced an acute phase response either indirectly as a result of increased incidence of inflammatory diseases such as foot pad dermatitis or possibly as a direct physiological response to the stress of high stocking density.

  6. 40 CFR 91.310 - Engine intake air humidity measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Engine intake air humidity measurement... Provisions § 91.310 Engine intake air humidity measurement. This section refers to engines which are supplied... air, the ambient testcell humidity measurement may be used. (a) Humidity conditioned air supply....

  7. 40 CFR 91.310 - Engine intake air humidity measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Engine intake air humidity measurement... Provisions § 91.310 Engine intake air humidity measurement. This section refers to engines which are supplied... air, the ambient testcell humidity measurement may be used. (a) Humidity conditioned air supply....

  8. 40 CFR 91.310 - Engine intake air humidity measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Engine intake air humidity measurement... Provisions § 91.310 Engine intake air humidity measurement. This section refers to engines which are supplied... air, the ambient testcell humidity measurement may be used. (a) Humidity conditioned air supply....

  9. 40 CFR 91.310 - Engine intake air humidity measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Engine intake air humidity measurement... Provisions § 91.310 Engine intake air humidity measurement. This section refers to engines which are supplied... air, the ambient testcell humidity measurement may be used. (a) Humidity conditioned air supply....

  10. To Evaluate the Effect of Solvents and Different Relative Humidity Conditions on Thermal and Rheological Properties of Microcrystalline Cellulose 101 Using METHOCEL™ E15LV as a Binder.

    PubMed

    Jagia, Moksh; Trivedi, Maitri; Dave, Rutesh H

    2016-08-01

    The solvent used for preparing the binder solution in wet granulation can affect the granulation end point and also impact the thermal, rheological, and flow properties of the granules. The present study investigates the effect of solvents and percentage relative humidity (RH) on the granules of microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) with hydroxypropyl methyl cellulose (HPMC) as the binder. MCC was granulated using 2.5% w/w binder solution in water and ethanol/water mixture (80:20 v/v). Prepared granules were dried until constant percentage loss on drying, sieved, and further analyzed. Dried granules were exposed to different percentage RH for 48 h at room temperature. Powder rheometer was used for the rheological and flow characterization, while thermal effusivity and differential scanning calorimeter were used for thermal analysis. The thermal effusivity values for the wet granules showed a sharp increase beginning 50% w/w binder solution in both cases, which reflected the over-wetting of granules. Ethanol/water solvent batches showed greater resistance to flow as compared to the water solvent batches in the wet granule stage, while the reverse was true for the dried granule stage, as evident from the basic flowability energy values. Although the solvents used affected the equilibration kinetics of moisture content, the RH-exposed granules remained unaffected in their flow properties in both cases. This study indicates that the solvents play a vital role on the rheology and flow properties of MCC granules, while the different RH conditions have little or no effect on them for the above combination of solvent and binder.

  11. Measuring Relative Humidity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinkham, Chester A.; Barrett, Kristin Burrows

    1992-01-01

    Describes four experiments that enable students to explore the phenomena of evaporation and condensation and determine the relative humidity by measuring air temperature and dew point on warm September days. Provides tables to calculate saturation points and relative humidity. (MDH)

  12. Technology Solutions Case Study: Impact of Infiltration and Ventilation on Measured Space Conditioning Energy and Moisture Levels in the Hot-Humid Climate

    SciTech Connect

    2014-04-01

    Air infiltration and ventilation in residential buildings is a very large part of the heating loads, but empirical data regarding the impact on space cooling has been lacking. Moreover, there has been little data on how building tightness might relate to building interior moisture levels in homes in a hot and humid climate. To address this need, BA-PIRC conducted research to assess the moisture and cooling load impacts of airtightness and mechanical ventilation in two identical laboratory homes in the hot-humid climate over the cooling season.

  13. Impact of Infiltration and Ventilation on Measured Space Conditioning Energy and Moisture Levels in the Hot-Humid Climate, Cocoa, Florida (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2014-04-01

    Air infiltration and ventilation in residential buildings is a very large part of the heating loads, but empirical data regarding the impact on space cooling has been lacking. Moreover, there has been little data on how building tightness might relate to building interior moisture levels in homes in a hot and humid climate. To address this need, BA-PIRC has conducted research to assess the moisture and cooling load impacts of airtightness and mechanical ventilation in two identical laboratory homes in the hot-humid climate over the cooling season. ​

  14. Teaching Absolute Value Meaningfully

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wade, Angela

    2012-01-01

    What is the meaning of absolute value? And why do teachers teach students how to solve absolute value equations? Absolute value is a concept introduced in first-year algebra and then reinforced in later courses. Various authors have suggested instructional methods for teaching absolute value to high school students (Wei 2005; Stallings-Roberts…

  15. Effect of temperature and relative humidity on ultraviolet (UV 254) inactivation of airborne porcine respiratory and reproductive syndrome virus.

    PubMed

    Cutler, Timothy D; Wang, Chong; Hoff, Steven J; Zimmerman, Jeffrey J

    2012-09-14

    The objective of this research was to estimate the effects of temperature and relative humidity on the inactivation of airborne porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) virus by ultraviolet light (UV(254)). Aerosols of PRRS virus were exposed to one of four doses of UV(254) under nine combinations of temperature (n=3) and relative humidity (n=3). Inactivation constants (k), defined as the absolute value of the slope of the linear relationship between the survival fraction of the microbial population and the UV(254) exposure dose, were estimated using the random coefficient model. The associated UV(254) half-life dose for each combination of environmental factors was determined as (log(10)2/k) and expressed as UV(254) mJ per unit volume. The effects of UV(254) dose, temperature, and relative humidity were all statistically significant, as were the interactions between UV(254) dose × temperature and UV(254) dose × relative humidity. PRRS virus was more susceptible to ultraviolet as temperature decreased; most susceptible to ultraviolet inactivation at relative humidity between 25% and 79%, less susceptible at relative humidity ≤ 24%, and least susceptible at ≥ 80% relative humidity. The current study allows for calculating the dose of UV(254) required to inactivate airborne PRRS virus under various laboratory and field conditions using the inactivation constants and UV(254) half-life doses reported therein.

  16. Reproductive and health traits among Boer, Kiko, and Spanish meat goat does under humid, subtropical pasture conditions of the southeastern United States.

    PubMed

    Browning, R; Leite-Browning, M L; Byars, M

    2011-03-01

    Boer (n = 132), Kiko (n = 92), and Spanish (n = 79) straightbred does were studied across 6 yr to assess doe fitness on southeastern US pastures. Does were exposed to Boer, Kiko, and Spanish bucks in a complete 3-breed diallel mating scheme each fall for spring kidding in March or May. A total of 1,041 doe-yr units were observed with does (ranging from 2 to 8 yr of age) managed together in a semi-intensive manner. The proportion of buck-exposed does delivering at least 1 live kid was less (P < 0.01) for Boer does (80%) than for Kiko (96%) and Spanish does (94%). Litter size and litter weight at birth were not affected (P > 0.15) by breed of dam. By weaning at 3 mo, the proportion of available does weaning at least 1 kid was less (P < 0.01) for Boer does (53%) than for Kiko (84%) and Spanish does (82%). For does weaning kids, litter size at weaning was greater (P = 0.01) for Spanish does (1.74 kids) than for Kiko (1.59 kids) and Boer does (1.47 kids). Litter weaning weight was lighter (P < 0.01) for Boer dams (23.0 kg) than for Kiko (27.2 kg) and Spanish dams (26.5 kg). The efficiency ratio of litter weight to dam weight at weaning differed (P < 0.05) among all 3 dam breeds: Boer = 51%; Kiko = 62%; Spanish = 68%. Annual rates of lameness, endoparasitism, and attrition, respectively, were greater (P < 0.01) for Boer does (69, 53, and 28%) than for Kiko (32, 24, and 10%) and Spanish does (42, 22, and 11%). Postpartum fecal egg counts for endoparasite loads were less (P < 0.05) for Spanish dams (346 eggs/g) than for Kiko (524 eggs/g) and Boer does (675 eggs/g). Whole-herd annual doe productivity based on all available does was less (P < 0.01) for Boer does (11.7 kg weaned/doe) compared with Kiko (22.0 kg weaned/doe) and Spanish does (21.1 kg weaned/doe). Boer does expressed substantially decreased levels of fitness compared with Kiko and Spanish does when semi-intensively managed on humid, subtropical pasture. Kiko and Spanish should be preferred as maternal breeds in

  17. A Humidity-Driven Prediction System for Influenza Outbreaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thrastarson, H. T.; Teixeira, J.

    2015-12-01

    Recent studies have highlighted the role of absolute (or specific) humidity conditions as a leading explanation for the seasonal behavior of influenza outbreaks in temperate regions. If the timing and intensity of seasonal influenza outbreaks can be forecast, this would be of great value for public health response efforts. We have developed and implemented a SIRS (Susceptible-Infectious-Recovered-Susceptible) type numerical prediction system that is driven by specific humidity to predict influenza outbreaks. For the humidity, we have explored using both satellite data from the AIRS (Atmospheric Infrared Sounder) instrument as well as ERA-Interim re-analysis data. We discuss the development, testing, sensitivities and limitations of the prediction system and show results for influenza outbreaks in the United States during the years 2010-2014 (modeled in retrospect). Comparisons are made with other existing prediction systems and available data for influenza outbreaks from Google Flu Trends and the CDC (Center for Disease Control), and the incorporation of these datasets into the forecasting system is discussed.

  18. Absolutely classical spin states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohnet-Waldraff, F.; Giraud, O.; Braun, D.

    2017-01-01

    We introduce the concept of "absolutely classical" spin states, in analogy to absolutely separable states of bipartite quantum systems. Absolutely classical states are states that remain classical (i.e., a convex sum of projectors on coherent states of a spin j ) under any unitary transformation applied to them. We investigate the maximal size of the ball of absolutely classical states centered on the maximally mixed state and derive a lower bound for its radius as a function of the total spin quantum number. We also obtain a numerical estimate of this maximal radius and compare it to the case of absolutely separable states.

  19. Sensitivity of Honeybee Hygroreceptors to Slow Humidity Changes and Temporal Humidity Variation Detected in High Resolution by Mobile Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Tichy, Harald; Kallina, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    The moist cell and the dry cell on the antenna of the male honeybee were exposed to humidities slowly rising and falling at rates between –1.5%/s and +1.5%/s and at varying amplitudes in the 10 to 90% humidity range. The two cells respond to these slow humidity oscillations with oscillations in impulse frequency which depend not only on instantaneous humidity but also on the rate with which humidity changes. The impulse frequency of each cell was plotted as a function of these two parameters and regression planes were fitted to the data points of single oscillation periods. The regression slopes, which estimate sensitivity, rose with the amplitude of humidity oscillations. During large-amplitude oscillations, moist and dry cell sensitivity for instantaneous humidity and its rate of change was high. During small-amplitude oscillations, their sensitivity for both parameters was low, less exactly reflecting humidity fluctuations. Nothing is known about the spatial and temporal humidity variations a honeybee may encounter when flying through natural environments. Microclimatic parameters (absolute humidity, temperature, wind speed) were measured from an automobile traveling through different landscapes of Lower Austria. Landscape type affected extremes and mean values of humidity. Differences between peaks and troughs of humidity fluctuations were generally smaller in open grassy fields or deciduous forests than in edge habitats or forest openings. Overall, fluctuation amplitudes were small. In this part of the stimulus range, hygroreceptor sensitivity is not optimal for encoding instantaneous humidity and the rate of humidity change. It seems that honeybee's hygroreceptors are specialized for detecting large-amplitude fluctuations that are relevant for a specific behavior, namely, maintaining a sufficiently stable state of water balance. The results suggest that optimal sensitivity of both hygroreceptors is shaped not only by humidity oscillation amplitudes but also

  20. Sensitivity of honeybee hygroreceptors to slow humidity changes and temporal humidity variation detected in high resolution by mobile measurements.

    PubMed

    Tichy, Harald; Kallina, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    The moist cell and the dry cell on the antenna of the male honeybee were exposed to humidities slowly rising and falling at rates between -1.5%/s and +1.5%/s and at varying amplitudes in the 10 to 90% humidity range. The two cells respond to these slow humidity oscillations with oscillations in impulse frequency which depend not only on instantaneous humidity but also on the rate with which humidity changes. The impulse frequency of each cell was plotted as a function of these two parameters and regression planes were fitted to the data points of single oscillation periods. The regression slopes, which estimate sensitivity, rose with the amplitude of humidity oscillations. During large-amplitude oscillations, moist and dry cell sensitivity for instantaneous humidity and its rate of change was high. During small-amplitude oscillations, their sensitivity for both parameters was low, less exactly reflecting humidity fluctuations. Nothing is known about the spatial and temporal humidity variations a honeybee may encounter when flying through natural environments. Microclimatic parameters (absolute humidity, temperature, wind speed) were measured from an automobile traveling through different landscapes of Lower Austria. Landscape type affected extremes and mean values of humidity. Differences between peaks and troughs of humidity fluctuations were generally smaller in open grassy fields or deciduous forests than in edge habitats or forest openings. Overall, fluctuation amplitudes were small. In this part of the stimulus range, hygroreceptor sensitivity is not optimal for encoding instantaneous humidity and the rate of humidity change. It seems that honeybee's hygroreceptors are specialized for detecting large-amplitude fluctuations that are relevant for a specific behavior, namely, maintaining a sufficiently stable state of water balance. The results suggest that optimal sensitivity of both hygroreceptors is shaped not only by humidity oscillation amplitudes but also

  1. Laboratory evaluation of 10 heat and moisture exchangers using simulated aeromedical evacuation conditions.

    PubMed

    Suliman, Huda S; Fecura, Stephen E; Baskin, Jonathan; Kalns, John E

    2011-06-01

    Heat and moisture exchangers (HMEs) are used for airway humidification in mechanically ventilated patients and have been evaluated only under hospital conditions. U.S. Air Force aeromedical evacuation transports are performed under rugged conditions further complicated by the cold and dry environment in military aircrafts, and HMEs are used to provide airway humidification for patients. This study evaluated 10 commercial HMEs using a test system that simulated aeromedical evacuation conditions. Although the American National Standards Institute recommends inspired air to be at an absolute humidity value of > or = 30 mg/L for mechanically ventilated patients, the highest absolute humidity by any HME was approximately 20 mg/L. Although none of the HMEs were able to maintain a temperature high enough to achieve the humidity standard of the American National Standards Institute, the clinical significance of this standard may be less important than the relative humidity maintained in the respired air, especially on evacuation flights of short duration.

  2. Low-temperature oxidation of magnetite - a humidity sensitive process?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appel, Erwin; Fang, Xiaomin; Herb, Christian; Hu, Shouyun

    2015-04-01

    Extensive multi-parameter palaeoclimate records were obtained from two long-term lacustrine archives at the Tibetan Plateau: the Qaidam basin (2.69-0.08 Ma) and Heqing basin (0.90-0.03 Ma). At present the region of the Qaidam site has an arid climate (<100 mm mean annual precipitation) while the Heqing site is located in the sub-tropical region with monsoonal rainfall. Magnetic properties play a prominent role for palaeoclimate interpretation in both records. Several parameters show a 100 kyr eccentricity cyclicity; in the Qaidam record also the Mid-Pleistocene Transition is seen. Both magnetic records are controlled by different absolute and relative contributions of magnetite and its altered (maghemitized) phases as well as hematite. Weathering conditions likely cause a systematic variation of magnetic mineralogy due to low-temperature oxidation (LTO). Maghemitization is well recognized as an alteration process in submarine basalts but about its relevance for climate-induced weathering in continental environments little is known. Various factors i.e., humidity, temperature, seasonality, duration of specific weathering conditions, and bacterial activity could be responsible for maghemitization (LTO) and transformation to hematite (or goethite) when a critical degree of LTO is reached. These factors may lead to a complex interplay, but one has to note that water acts as an electrolyte for Fe(II) to Fe(III) oxidation at the crystal surface and due to maghemitization-induced lattice shrinking a larger internal particle surface area becomes exposed to oxidation. We suggest that humidity is the most crucial driver for the two studied archives - for the following reasons: (1) The overall parameter variations and catchment conditions are well in agreement with an LTO scenario. (2) In the Qaidam record we observe a direct relationship of a humidity sensitive pollen Ratio with magnetic susceptibility (reflecting the degree of alteration by LTO). (3) In the Heqing record

  3. Pharmacokinetics and adhesion of a transdermal patch containing ethinyl estradiol and gestodene under conditions of heat, humidity, and exercise: A single-center, open-label, randomized, crossover study.

    PubMed

    Zurth, Christian; Schuett, Barbara; Casjens, Manuela; Ludwig, Matthias; Waellnitz, Katrin

    2015-07-01

    In this open-label, randomized study, 36 women (18-45 years) applied an ethinyl estradiol/gestodene contraceptive patch once-weekly for 3 weeks followed by a 1-week, patch-free interval, in 3 treatment periods. The primary objective was to evaluate the pharmacokinetics of ethinyl estradiol and gestodene under conditions of heat, humidity, and exercise. The secondary objective was to evaluate patch adhesion under the same conditions. Weeks 1 and 2 of each period comprised "standardized normal activity" (SNA); in week 3, SNA continued or women used a sauna, whirlpool, swimming pool, or performed an exercise combination. Thirty-one women completed the study; 23 yielded evaluable pharmacokinetic data. Analyses were exploratory and conducted using an analysis of variance. Area under the concentration-time curve from 0 to 168 hours (AUC0-168 ) for gestodene and ethinyl estradiol during sauna, swimming, and whirlpool was equivalent to previous SNA recordings. For exercise combination, the gestodene AUC0-168 was 12% lower compared with SNA, albeit not considered clinically relevant. Two women lost a total of 3 patches during sporting activities; other detachments during this week were not correlated with sporting activity. Overall, hormone delivery using the ethinyl estradiol/gestodene patch under conditions of heat, humidity, and exercise corresponded to delivery under normal conditions.

  4. Absolute nuclear material assay

    DOEpatents

    Prasad, Manoj K [Pleasanton, CA; Snyderman, Neal J [Berkeley, CA; Rowland, Mark S [Alamo, CA

    2012-05-15

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  5. Absolute nuclear material assay

    DOEpatents

    Prasad, Manoj K.; Snyderman, Neal J.; Rowland, Mark S.

    2010-07-13

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  6. Humidity without Mystification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Staver, Allen E.

    1977-01-01

    Demonstrates how a simple graph can be effectively used in teaching the concept, measurement, and use of humidity. Science activities for upper elementary, secondary, and higher education students are suggested and definitions of terms are presented. (Author/DB)

  7. Daily indoor-to-outdoor temperature and humidity relationships: a sample across seasons and diverse climatic regions

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Jennifer L.; Dockery, Douglas W.

    2015-01-01

    The health consequences of heat and cold are usually evaluated based on associations with outdoor measurements at the nearest weather reporting station. However, people in the developed world spend little time outdoors, especially during extreme temperature events. We examined the association between indoor and outdoor temperature and humidity in a range of climates. We measured indoor temperature, apparent temperature, relative humidity, dew point, and specific humidity (a measure of moisture content in air) for one calendar year (2012) in a convenience sample of eight diverse locations ranging from the equatorial region (10°N) to the Arctic (64°N). We then compared the indoor conditions to outdoor values recorded at the nearest airport weather station. We found that the shape of the indoor-to-outdoor temperature and humidity relationships varied across seasons and locations. Indoor temperatures showed little variation across season and location. There was large variation in indoor relative humidity between seasons and between locations which was independent of outdoor, airport measurements. On the other hand, indoor specific humidity, and to a lesser extent dew point, tracked with outdoor, airport measurements both seasonally and between climates, across a wide range of outdoor temperatures. Our results suggest that, depending on the measure, season, and location, outdoor weather measurements can be reliably used to represent indoor exposures and that, in general, outdoor measures of actual moisture content in air better capture indoor exposure than temperature and relative humidity. Therefore, absolute measures of water vapor should be examined in conjunction with other measures (e.g. temperature, relative humidity) in studies of the effect of weather and climate on human health. PMID:26054827

  8. Investigation of microbial safety of a full-scale ozonation and biological activated carbon process under high humidity and temperature conditions.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Tiejun; Zhang, Xihui; Wu, Guangxue; Au, Doris W T

    2011-01-01

    Microbial safety of a full-scale ozonation and biological activated carbon (BAC) process was investigated by examining pathogens, microbial community and particle counts, with emphasis on the BAC effluent. The process is located at South China, where the average humidity and air temperature were 70-80% and 22-24 °C, respectively. A high diversity of microbial community existed on the BAC media. Three types of dominant bacteria were identified, including Chryseobacterium indologenes, Bacillus brevis and Pseudomonas stutzeri, accounting for 90-95% of total bacteria number. As to pathogenic bacteria and viruses, an opportunistic pathogen, Bacillus cereus, was detected on the BAC. Six types of invertebrates were also observed on the medium, including rotifer, cyclops, nematode, clodecera, nauplius and blood worm. Diversity and number of invertebrates in the BAC effluent were higher than those in the BAC influent. Particle counts were generally less than 50 CNT/mL, with the maximum of 500 CNT/mL during the initial filtration stage after backwashing.

  9. Desiccant Humidity Control System Using Waste Heat of Water Source Heat Pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wada, Kazuki; Mashimo, Kouichi; Takahashi, Mikio; Tanaka, Kitoshi; Toya, Saburo; Tateyama, Ryotaro; Miyamoto, Kazuhiro; Yamaguchi, Masahiro

    The authors hope to develop an air-conditioning system that processes the latent heat load and the sensible heat load separately. This would enable the efficiency of the chilling unit to be improved because the temperature of the chilled water used for cooling would be higher than normal. However, if lukewarm water is used, there is insufficient cooling and dehumidification. Therefore, a dehumidifier such as a desiccant air-conditioning system is needed. Using the waste heat generated when the desiccant air-conditioning system is in operation increases efficiency. The authors are developing a prototype desiccant humidity control system that makes use of the waste heat generated by a water source heat pump. This paper describes the results of an experiment that was conducted for this prototype based on the assumption that it would be installed in an office building. The dehumidification performance achieved was sufficient to process the indoor latent heat load. The prototype was able to adjust the indoor relative humidity from 40% to 60% under conditions in which the indoor latent heat load varied. Humidification without the use of water was possible even in the absence of an indoor latent heat load when the outdoor absolute humidity was 3.5 g/kg' or more.

  10. The effect of environmental humidity and temperature on skin barrier function and dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Engebretsen, K A; Johansen, J D; Kezic, S; Linneberg, A; Thyssen, J P

    2016-02-01

    Physicians are aware that climatic conditions negatively affect the skin. In particular, people living in equator far countries such as the Northern parts of Europe and North America are exposed to harsh weather during the winter and may experience dry and itchy skin, or deterioration of already existing dermatoses. We searched the literature for studies that evaluated the mechanisms behind this phenomenon. Commonly used meteorological terms such as absolute humidity, relative humidity and dew point are explained. Furthermore, we review the negative effect of low humidity, low temperatures and different seasons on the skin barrier and on the risk of dermatitis. We conclude that low humidity and low temperatures lead to a general decrease in skin barrier function and increased susceptible towards mechanical stress. Since pro-inflammatory cytokines and cortisol are released by keratinocytes, and the number of dermal mast cells increases, the skin also becomes more reactive towards skin irritants and allergens. Collectively, published data show that cold and dry weather increase the prevalence and risk of flares in patients with atopic dermatitis.

  11. Heat or humidity, which triggers tree phenology?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laube, Julia; Sparks, Tim H.; Estrella, Nicole; Menzel, Annette

    2014-05-01

    An overwhelming number of studies confirm that temperature is the main driver for phenological events such as leafing, flowering or fruit ripening, which was first discovered by Réaumur in 1735. Since then, several additional factors which influence onset dates have been identified, such as length of the chilling period, photoperiod, temperature of the previous autumn, nutrient availability, precipitation, sunshine and genetics (local adaptations). Those are supposed to capture some of the remaining, unexplained variance. But our ability to predict onset dates remains imprecise, and our understanding of how plants sense temperature is vague. From a climate chamber experiment on cuttings of 9 tree species we present evidence that air humidity is an important, but previously overlooked, factor influencing the spring phenology of trees. The date of median leaf unfolding was 7 days earlier at 90% relative humidity compared to 40% relative humidity. A second experiment with cuttings shows that water uptake by above-ground tissue might be involved in the phenological development of trees. A third climate chamber experiment suggests that winter dormancy and chilling might be linked to dehydration processes. Analysis of climate data from several meteorological stations across Germany proves that the increase in air humidity after winter is a reliable signal of spring, i.e. less variable or susceptible to reversal compared to temperature. Finally, an analysis of long-term phenology data reveals that absolute air humidity can even be used as a reliable predictor of leafing dates. Current experimental work tries to elucidate the involved foliar uptake processes by using deuterium oxide marked water and Raman spectroscopy. We propose a new framework, wherein plants' chilling requirements and frost tolerance might be attributed to desiccation processes, while spring development is linked to re-humidification of plant tissue. The influence of air humidity on the spring

  12. Optical humidity sensor

    DOEpatents

    Tarvin, Jeffrey A.

    1987-01-01

    An optical dielectric humidity sensor which includes a dielectric mirror having multiple alternating layers of two porous water-adsorbent dielectric materials with differing indices of refraction carried by a translucent substrate. A narrow-band polarized light source is positioned to direct light energy onto the mirror, and detectors are positioned to receive light energy transmitted through and reflected by the mirror. A ratiometer indicates humidity in the atmosphere which surrounds the dielectric mirror as a function of a ratio of light energies incident on the detectors.

  13. Optical humidity sensor

    DOEpatents

    Tarvin, J.A.

    1987-02-10

    An optical dielectric humidity sensor is disclosed which includes a dielectric mirror having multiple alternating layers of two porous water-adsorbent dielectric materials with differing indices of refraction carried by a translucent substrate. A narrow-band polarized light source is positioned to direct light energy onto the mirror, and detectors are positioned to receive light energy transmitted through and reflected by the mirror. A ratiometer indicates humidity in the atmosphere which surrounds the dielectric mirror as a function of a ratio of light energies incident on the detectors. 2 figs.

  14. Effect of Ag on the Microstructure of Sn-8.5Zn- xAg-0.01Al-0.1Ga Solders Under High-Temperature and High-Humidity Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, T. K.; Lin, K. L.; Mohanty, U. S.

    2013-04-01

    The effect of Ag on the microstructure and thermal behavior of Sn-Zn and Sn-8.5Zn- xAg-0.01Al-0.1Ga solders ( x from 0.1 wt.% to 1 wt.%) under high-temperature/relative humidity conditions (85°C/85% RH) for various exposure times was investigated. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) studies revealed that, in all the investigated solders, the primary α-Zn phases were surrounded by eutectic β-Sn/α-Zn phases, in which fine Zn platelets were dispersed in the β-Sn matrix. SEM micrographs revealed that increase of the Ag content to 1 wt.% resulted in coarsening of the dendritic plates and diminished the Sn-9Zn eutectic phase in the microstructure. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) studies revealed that the melting temperature of Sn-8.5Zn- xAg-0.01Al-0.1Ga solder decreased from 199.6°C to 199.2°C with increase of the Ag content in the solder alloy. Both ZnO and SnO2 along with Ag-Zn intermetallic compound (IMC) were formed on the surface when Sn-8.5Zn-0.5Ag-0.01Al-0.1Ga solder was exposed to high-temperature/high-humidity conditions (85°C/85% RH) for 100 h. The thickness of the ZnO phase increased as the Ag content and exposure time were increased. Sn whiskers of various shapes and lengths varying from 2 μm to 5 μm were extruded from the surface when the investigated five-element solder with Ag content varying from 0.5 wt.% to 1 wt.% was exposed to similar temperature/humidity conditions for 250 h. The length and density of the whiskers increased with further increase of the exposure time to 500 h and the Ag content in the solder to 1 wt.%. The Sn whisker growth was driven by the compressive stress in the solder, which was generated due to the volume expansion caused by ZnO and Ag-Zn intermetallic compound formation at the grain boundaries of Sn.

  15. Hands-on Humidity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pankiewicz, Philip R.

    1992-01-01

    Presents five hands-on activities that allow students to detect, measure, reduce, and eliminate moisture. Students make a humidity detector and a hygrometer, examine the effects of moisture on different substances, calculate the percent of water in a given food, and examine the absorption potential of different desiccants. (MDH)

  16. Desiccant humidity control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amazeen, J. (Editor)

    1973-01-01

    A regenerable sorbent system was investigated for controlling the humidity and carbon dioxide concentration of the space shuttle cabin atmosphere. The sorbents considered for water and carbon dioxide removal were silica gel and molecular sieves. Bed optimization and preliminary system design are discussed along with system optimization studies and weight penalites.

  17. Absolute neutrino mass scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capelli, Silvia; Di Bari, Pasquale

    2013-04-01

    Neutrino oscillation experiments firmly established non-vanishing neutrino masses, a result that can be regarded as a strong motivation to extend the Standard Model. In spite of being the lightest massive particles, neutrinos likely represent an important bridge to new physics at very high energies and offer new opportunities to address some of the current cosmological puzzles, such as the matter-antimatter asymmetry of the Universe and Dark Matter. In this context, the determination of the absolute neutrino mass scale is a key issue within modern High Energy Physics. The talks in this parallel session well describe the current exciting experimental activity aiming to determining the absolute neutrino mass scale and offer an overview of a few models beyond the Standard Model that have been proposed in order to explain the neutrino masses giving a prediction for the absolute neutrino mass scale and solving the cosmological puzzles.

  18. Humidity effects on wire insulation breakdown strength.

    SciTech Connect

    Appelhans, Leah

    2013-08-01

    Methods for the testing of the dielectric breakdown strength of insulation on metal wires under variable humidity conditions were developed. Two methods, an ASTM method and the twisted pair method, were compared to determine if the twisted pair method could be used for determination of breakdown strength under variable humidity conditions. It was concluded that, although there were small differences in outcomes between the two testing methods, the non-standard method (twisted pair) would be appropriate to use for further testing of the effects of humidity on breakdown performance. The dielectric breakdown strength of 34G copper wire insulated with double layer Poly-Thermaleze/Polyamide-imide insulation was measured using the twisted pair method under a variety of relative humidity (RH) conditions and exposure times. Humidity at 50% RH and below was not found to affect the dielectric breakdown strength. At 80% RH the dielectric breakdown strength was significantly diminished. No effect for exposure time up to 140 hours was observed at 50 or 80%RH.

  19. The absolute path command

    SciTech Connect

    Moody, A.

    2012-05-11

    The ap command traveres all symlinks in a given file, directory, or executable name to identify the final absolute path. It can print just the final path, each intermediate link along with the symlink chan, and the permissions and ownership of each directory component in the final path. It has functionality similar to "which", except that it shows the final path instead of the first path. It is also similar to "pwd", but it can provide the absolute path to a relative directory from the current working directory.

  20. Humidity: A review and primer on atmospheric moisture and human health.

    PubMed

    Davis, Robert E; McGregor, Glenn R; Enfield, Kyle B

    2016-01-01

    Research examining associations between weather and human health frequently includes the effects of atmospheric humidity. A large number of humidity variables have been developed for numerous purposes, but little guidance is available to health researchers regarding appropriate variable selection. We examine a suite of commonly used humidity variables and summarize both the medical and biometeorological literature on associations between humidity and human health. As an example of the importance of humidity variable selection, we correlate numerous hourly humidity variables to daily respiratory syncytial virus isolates in Singapore from 1992 to 1994. Most water-vapor mass based variables (specific humidity, absolute humidity, mixing ratio, dewpoint temperature, vapor pressure) exhibit comparable correlations. Variables that include a thermal component (relative humidity, dewpoint depression, saturation vapor pressure) exhibit strong diurnality and seasonality. Humidity variable selection must be dictated by the underlying research question. Despite being the most commonly used humidity variable, relative humidity should be used sparingly and avoided in cases when the proximity to saturation is not medically relevant. Care must be taken in averaging certain humidity variables daily or seasonally to avoid statistical biasing associated with variables that are inherently diurnal through their relationship to temperature.

  1. Humidity Dependent Extinction of Clay Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenslade, M. E.; Attwood, A. R.

    2010-12-01

    Aerosols play an important role in the Earth’s radiative balance by directly scattering and absorbing radiation. The magnitude of aerosol forcing can be altered by changes in relative humidity which cause aerosol size, shape and refractive index to vary. To quantify these effects, a custom cavity ring down instrument operated at 532 nm with two sample channels measures aerosols extinction under dry conditions and at elevated humidity. The optical growth, fRH(ext), is determined as a ratio of the extinction cross section at high relative humidity to that under dry conditions. Three key clay components of mineral dust and mixtures of clay components with ammonium sulfate are investigated using this method. Experimentally obtained optical growth is compared with physical growth factors from the literature and our work determined using several different techniques. Further, Mie theory calculations based on published optical constants are compared with experimental results. Differences between theory and experiment will be discussed.

  2. beta-Glucocerebrosidase activity in the stratum corneum of house sparrows following acclimation to high and low humidity.

    PubMed

    Cox, Robert M; Munoz-Garcia, Agusti; Jurkowitz, Marianne S; Williams, Joseph B

    2008-01-01

    Skin is an important avenue of water loss in terrestrial birds, so environmental conditions that necessitate water conservation should favor physiological mechanisms that reduce cutaneous water loss (CWL). Skin resistance to CWL is conferred by a barrier of lipid molecules located in the stratum corneum (SC), the outer layer of the epidermis. In mammals, SC barrier function depends on the conversion of cerebrosides to ceramides by the enzyme beta -glucocerebrosidase ( beta -GlcCer'ase). Avian SC contains both cerebrosides and ceramides, suggesting that observed plasticity in CWL may be mediated by changes in beta -GlcCer'ase activity and resultant SC lipid composition. We tested the hypothesis that changes in ambient humidity would alter beta -GlcCer'ase activity by acclimating house sparrows (Passer domesticus) to either dry (6.5 g H(2)O m(-3) absolute humidity) or humid (31 g H(2)O m(-3)) conditions for 5 and 21 d at 30 degrees C and then measuring beta -GlcCer'ase activity from SC homogenates. Our results provide the first characterization of beta -GlcCer'ase activity in any nonmammalian vertebrate. Relative to nonacclimated controls, both dry- and humid-acclimated sparrows had significantly elevated beta -GlcCer'ase activity at 21 d postacclimation. Across individuals, we observed negative correlations between beta -GlcCer'ase activity and both CWL and SC ceramide content. Although dry- and humid-acclimated sparrows did not differ in beta -GlcCer'ase activity, these results are consistent with our findings that both humidity treatments caused a reduction in CWL and similar changes in SC lipid composition. Our results demonstrate physiological plasticity in CWL and provide tentative support for a role of beta -GlcCer'ase in mediating this response.

  3. Poly(arlyene ether sulfone) based semi-interpenetrating polymer network membranes containing cross-linked poly(vinyl phosphonic acid) chains for fuel cell applications at high temperature and low humidity conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kihyun; Heo, Pilwon; Ko, Taeyun; Kim, Ki-hyun; Kim, Sung-Kon; Pak, Chanho; Lee, Jong-Chan

    2015-10-01

    Semi-interpenetrating polymer network (semi-IPN) membranes are prepared by in-situ casting and thermal-initiated radical polymerization of vinyl phosphonic acid (VPA) and bis(2-(methacryloyloxy)ethyl) phosphate (BMAEP) in N,N-dimethylacetamide solutions of sulfonated poly(arylene ether sulfone) (SPAES). The incorporation of VPA units into the SPAES membranes improves proton conductivity especially at high temperature and low humidity conditions. In addition the cross-linker, BMAEP, prevents the decrease of the mechanical and chemical stabilities by the aliphatic linear poly(vinyl phosphonic acid) chains in the semi-IPN membranes, and furthermore the phosphonic acid group in BMAEP can prevent the decrease of the proton conductivity by the formation of cross-linked structures. Therefore, the resulting semi-IPN membranes show high proton conductivities up to 15 mS cm-1 at 120 °C and 40% RH. The fuel cell performance (187 mW cm-2 at 120 °C and 40% RH) of membrane-electrode assembly (MEA) from the semi-IPN membrane is found to be superior to that (145 mW cm-2 at 120 °C and 40% RH) of MEA from the SPAES membrane. The durability test result at the operating conditions indicates that the semi-IPN membrane is electrochemically very stable maintaining the low hydrogen cross-over and high power densities.

  4. Influence of humidity on the initial emittable concentration of formaldehyde and hexaldehyde in building materials: experimental observation and correlation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Shaodan; Xiong, Jianyin; Cai, Chaorui; Xu, Wei; Zhang, Yinping

    2016-01-01

    Humidity is one of the main environmental factors affecting the emission rate and key parameters of formaldehyde and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from building materials. Meanwhile, the initial emittable concentration (Cm,0) is proved to be the most sensitive key parameter to the emission behaviours. However, there is no report on the relationship between humidity and Cm,0. In this paper, Cm,0 of formaldehyde and hexaldehyde from a type of medium density fiberboard in absolute humidity (AH) range of 4.6–19.6 g/m3 at 25 °C were tested by virtue of a C-history method. Experimental results indicate that Cm,0 is dramatically dependent on AH, increased by 10 and 2 times for formaldehyde and hexaldehyde when AH rising from 4.6 g/m3 to 19.6 g/m3. A linear relationship between the logarithm of Cm,0 and AH is obtained based on the measured results. In addition, a correlation characterizing the association of emission rate and AH is derived. The effectiveness of the correlation is verified with our experimental results as well as data from literature. With the correlations, the Cm,0 or emission rate different from the test AH conditions can be conveniently obtained. This study should be useful for predicting the emission characteristics of humidity changing scenarios and for source control. PMID:27025353

  5. Influence of humidity on the initial emittable concentration of formaldehyde and hexaldehyde in building materials: experimental observation and correlation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shaodan; Xiong, Jianyin; Cai, Chaorui; Xu, Wei; Zhang, Yinping

    2016-03-30

    Humidity is one of the main environmental factors affecting the emission rate and key parameters of formaldehyde and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from building materials. Meanwhile, the initial emittable concentration (Cm,0) is proved to be the most sensitive key parameter to the emission behaviours. However, there is no report on the relationship between humidity and Cm,0. In this paper, Cm,0 of formaldehyde and hexaldehyde from a type of medium density fiberboard in absolute humidity (AH) range of 4.6-19.6 g/m(3) at 25 °C were tested by virtue of a C-history method. Experimental results indicate that Cm,0 is dramatically dependent on AH, increased by 10 and 2 times for formaldehyde and hexaldehyde when AH rising from 4.6 g/m(3) to 19.6 g/m(3). A linear relationship between the logarithm of Cm,0 and AH is obtained based on the measured results. In addition, a correlation characterizing the association of emission rate and AH is derived. The effectiveness of the correlation is verified with our experimental results as well as data from literature. With the correlations, the Cm,0 or emission rate different from the test AH conditions can be conveniently obtained. This study should be useful for predicting the emission characteristics of humidity changing scenarios and for source control.

  6. Electronic Absolute Cartesian Autocollimator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leviton, Douglas B.

    2006-01-01

    An electronic absolute Cartesian autocollimator performs the same basic optical function as does a conventional all-optical or a conventional electronic autocollimator but differs in the nature of its optical target and the manner in which the position of the image of the target is measured. The term absolute in the name of this apparatus reflects the nature of the position measurement, which, unlike in a conventional electronic autocollimator, is based absolutely on the position of the image rather than on an assumed proportionality between the position and the levels of processed analog electronic signals. The term Cartesian in the name of this apparatus reflects the nature of its optical target. Figure 1 depicts the electronic functional blocks of an electronic absolute Cartesian autocollimator along with its basic optical layout, which is the same as that of a conventional autocollimator. Referring first to the optical layout and functions only, this or any autocollimator is used to measure the compound angular deviation of a flat datum mirror with respect to the optical axis of the autocollimator itself. The optical components include an illuminated target, a beam splitter, an objective or collimating lens, and a viewer or detector (described in more detail below) at a viewing plane. The target and the viewing planes are focal planes of the lens. Target light reflected by the datum mirror is imaged on the viewing plane at unit magnification by the collimating lens. If the normal to the datum mirror is parallel to the optical axis of the autocollimator, then the target image is centered on the viewing plane. Any angular deviation of the normal from the optical axis manifests itself as a lateral displacement of the target image from the center. The magnitude of the displacement is proportional to the focal length and to the magnitude (assumed to be small) of the angular deviation. The direction of the displacement is perpendicular to the axis about which the

  7. Absolute airborne gravimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumann, Henri

    This work consists of a feasibility study of a first stage prototype airborne absolute gravimeter system. In contrast to relative systems, which are using spring gravimeters, the measurements acquired by absolute systems are uncorrelated and the instrument is not suffering from problems like instrumental drift, frequency response of the spring and possible variation of the calibration factor. The major problem we had to resolve were to reduce the influence of the non-gravitational accelerations included in the measurements. We studied two different approaches to resolve it: direct mechanical filtering, and post-processing digital compensation. The first part of the work describes in detail the different mechanical passive filters of vibrations, which were studied and tested in the laboratory and later in a small truck in movement. For these tests as well as for the airborne measurements an absolute gravimeter FG5-L from Micro-G Ltd was used together with an Inertial navigation system Litton-200, a vertical accelerometer EpiSensor, and GPS receivers for positioning. These tests showed that only the use of an optical table gives acceptable results. However, it is unable to compensate for the effects of the accelerations of the drag free chamber. The second part describes the strategy of the data processing. It is based on modeling the perturbing accelerations by means of GPS, EpiSensor and INS data. In the third part the airborne experiment is described in detail, from the mounting in the aircraft and data processing to the different problems encountered during the evaluation of the quality and accuracy of the results. In the part of data processing the different steps conducted from the raw apparent gravity data and the trajectories to the estimation of the true gravity are explained. A comparison between the estimated airborne data and those obtained by ground upward continuation at flight altitude allows to state that airborne absolute gravimetry is feasible and

  8. A CMOS Smart Temperature and Humidity Sensor with Combined Readout

    PubMed Central

    Eder, Clemens; Valente, Virgilio; Donaldson, Nick; Demosthenous, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    A fully-integrated complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) sensor for combined temperature and humidity measurements is presented. The main purpose of the device is to monitor the hermeticity of micro-packages for implanted integrated circuits and to ensure their safe operation by monitoring the operating temperature and humidity on-chip. The smart sensor has two modes of operation, in which either the temperature or humidity is converted into a digital code representing a frequency ratio between two oscillators. This ratio is determined by the ratios of the timing capacitances and bias currents in both oscillators. The reference oscillator is biased by a current whose temperature dependency is complementary to the proportional to absolute temperature (PTAT) current. For the temperature measurement, this results in an exceptional normalized sensitivity of about 0.77%/°C at the accepted expense of reduced linearity. The humidity sensor is a capacitor, whose value varies linearly with relative humidity (RH) with a normalized sensitivity of 0.055%/% RH. For comparison, two versions of the humidity sensor with an area of either 0.2 mm2 or 1.2 mm2 were fabricated in a commercial 0.18 μm CMOS process. The on-chip readout electronics operate from a 5 V power supply and consume a current of approximately 85 μA. PMID:25230305

  9. A CMOS smart temperature and humidity sensor with combined readout.

    PubMed

    Eder, Clemens; Valente, Virgilio; Donaldson, Nick; Demosthenous, Andreas

    2014-09-16

    A fully-integrated complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) sensor for combined temperature and humidity measurements is presented. The main purpose of the device is to monitor the hermeticity of micro-packages for implanted integrated circuits and to ensure their safe operation by monitoring the operating temperature and humidity on-chip. The smart sensor has two modes of operation, in which either the temperature or humidity is converted into a digital code representing a frequency ratio between two oscillators. This ratio is determined by the ratios of the timing capacitances and bias currents in both oscillators. The reference oscillator is biased by a current whose temperature dependency is complementary to the proportional to absolute temperature (PTAT) current. For the temperature measurement, this results in an exceptional normalized sensitivity of about 0.77%/°C at the accepted expense of reduced linearity. The humidity sensor is a capacitor, whose value varies linearly with relative humidity (RH) with a normalized sensitivity of 0.055%/% RH. For comparison, two versions of the humidity sensor with an area of either 0.2 mm2 or 1.2 mm2 were fabricated in a commercial 0.18 μm CMOS process. The on-chip readout electronics operate from a 5 V power supply and consume a current of approximately 85 µA.

  10. Clinical observations made in nonheat acclimated horses performing treadmill exercise in cool (20 degrees C/40%RH), hot, dry (30 degrees C/40%RH) or hot, humid (30 degrees C/80%RH) conditions.

    PubMed

    Harris, P A; Marlin, D J; Mills, P C; Roberts, C A; Scott, C M; Harris, R C; Orme, C E; Schroter, R C; Marr, C M; Barrelet, F

    1995-11-01

    Four horses (H, J, N and M) undertook a treadmill competition exercise test (CET), designed to simulate the physiological and metabolic stresses of the Speed and Endurance phase of a 3-day-event, under 3 different environmental conditions: 20 degrees C/40% relative humidity (RH) (cool, dry [CD]: 2 sessions); 30 degrees C/40%RH (hot, dry [HD]) and 30 degrees C/80%RH (hot, humid [HH]) (Marlin et al. 1995). A number of subjective clinical observations were made at designated time points throughout the exercise test and initial recovery period including buccal mucous membrane colouration, capillary refill time, neck and point of shoulder skin pinch recovery time, grade of abdominal sounds; anal sphincter tone as well as the presence or absence of fatigue and ataxia. The aim was to investigate their value in predicting performance in the final canter phase of the CET equivalent to the cross-country or Phase D of a field competition. In addition, the use of a more objective assessment, the cardiac recovery index (CRI), was investigated together with the heart rate, rectal temperature and respiratory frequency at the end of Phase C and at the 8 min point of the 10 Minute Box (8'X). The CRI was calculated according to the formula CRI = P2-P1 where P2 = the heart rate in beats/min at the 8 min point of the '10 Minute Box' (Phase X) of the CET. P1 = the heart rate (beats/min) at the 7 min point just before the horse was made to trot over a distance of 80 m at a speed of 3.7 m/s (at a 3 degrees incline) before returning to a walk. The study suggested that the subjective tests carried out at the 'End-C' and/or '8'X' time points were not useful in predicting subsequent performance in the final canter phase (Phase D) and neither were heart rate, rectal temperature or respiratory frequency. However, the only horse (Horse H) to complete the full CET under HH conditions was the only animal to show a decrease in respiratory frequency between the End-C and 8'X time points. All others

  11. Absolute-structure reports.

    PubMed

    Flack, Howard D

    2013-08-01

    All the 139 noncentrosymmetric crystal structures published in Acta Crystallographica Section C between January 2011 and November 2012 inclusive have been used as the basis of a detailed study of the reporting of absolute structure. These structure determinations cover a wide range of space groups, chemical composition and resonant-scattering contribution. Defining A and D as the average and difference of the intensities of Friedel opposites, their level of fit has been examined using 2AD and selected-D plots. It was found, regardless of the expected resonant-scattering contribution to Friedel opposites, that the Friedel-difference intensities are often dominated by random uncertainty and systematic error. An analysis of data collection strategy is provided. It is found that crystal-structure determinations resulting in a Flack parameter close to 0.5 may not necessarily be from crystals twinned by inversion. Friedifstat is shown to be a robust estimator of the resonant-scattering contribution to Friedel opposites, very little affected by the particular space group of a structure nor by the occupation of special positions. There is considerable confusion in the text of papers presenting achiral noncentrosymmetric crystal structures. Recommendations are provided for the optimal way of treating noncentrosymmetric crystal structures for which the experimenter has no interest in determining the absolute structure.

  12. Improving irrigation management for humid and sub-humid climates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This project includes studies led by both USDA-ARS and University of Missouri scientists, with a goal to develop solutions to broad water management problems with application to humid and sub-humid areas in the USA and the world. Our interdisciplinary team optimizes production systems for irrigated ...

  13. Improving irrigation management for humid and sub-humid climates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This project includes studies led by both USDA-ARS and University of Missouri scientists, with a goal to develop solutions to broad water management problems with application to humid and sub-humid areas in the USA and the world. Our interdisciplinary team evaluates and optimizes production systems ...

  14. Absolute and relative emissions analysis in practical combustion systems—effect of water vapor condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, J. P.; Mollendorf, J. C.; DesJardin, P. E.

    2016-11-01

    Accurate knowledge of the absolute combustion gas composition is necessary in the automotive, aircraft, processing, heating and air conditioning industries where emissions reduction is a major concern. Those industries use a variety of sensor technologies. Many of these sensors are used to analyze the gas by pumping a sample through a system of tubes to reach a remote sensor location. An inherent characteristic with this type of sampling strategy is that the mixture state changes as the sample is drawn towards the sensor. Specifically, temperature and humidity changes can be significant, resulting in a very different gas mixture at the sensor interface compared with the in situ location (water vapor dilution effect). Consequently, the gas concentrations obtained from remotely sampled gas analyzers can be significantly different than in situ values. In this study, inherent errors associated with sampled combustion gas concentration measurements are explored, and a correction methodology is presented to determine the absolute gas composition from remotely measured gas species concentrations. For in situ (wet) measurements a heated zirconium dioxide (ZrO2) oxygen sensor (Bosch LSU 4.9) is used to measure the absolute oxygen concentration. This is used to correct the remotely sampled (dry) measurements taken with an electrochemical sensor within the remote analyzer (Testo 330-2LL). In this study, such a correction is experimentally validated for a specified concentration of carbon monoxide (5020 ppmv).

  15. Absolute Equilibrium Entropy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shebalin, John V.

    1997-01-01

    The entropy associated with absolute equilibrium ensemble theories of ideal, homogeneous, fluid and magneto-fluid turbulence is discussed and the three-dimensional fluid case is examined in detail. A sigma-function is defined, whose minimum value with respect to global parameters is the entropy. A comparison is made between the use of global functions sigma and phase functions H (associated with the development of various H-theorems of ideal turbulence). It is shown that the two approaches are complimentary though conceptually different: H-theorems show that an isolated system tends to equilibrium while sigma-functions allow the demonstration that entropy never decreases when two previously isolated systems are combined. This provides a more complete picture of entropy in the statistical mechanics of ideal fluids.

  16. Absolute multilateration between spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muelaner, Jody; Wadsworth, William; Azini, Maria; Mullineux, Glen; Hughes, Ben; Reichold, Armin

    2017-04-01

    Environmental effects typically limit the accuracy of large scale coordinate measurements in applications such as aircraft production and particle accelerator alignment. This paper presents an initial design for a novel measurement technique with analysis and simulation showing that that it could overcome the environmental limitations to provide a step change in large scale coordinate measurement accuracy. Referred to as absolute multilateration between spheres (AMS), it involves using absolute distance interferometry to directly measure the distances between pairs of plain steel spheres. A large portion of each sphere remains accessible as a reference datum, while the laser path can be shielded from environmental disturbances. As a single scale bar this can provide accurate scale information to be used for instrument verification or network measurement scaling. Since spheres can be simultaneously measured from multiple directions, it also allows highly accurate multilateration-based coordinate measurements to act as a large scale datum structure for localized measurements, or to be integrated within assembly tooling, coordinate measurement machines or robotic machinery. Analysis and simulation show that AMS can be self-aligned to achieve a theoretical combined standard uncertainty for the independent uncertainties of an individual 1 m scale bar of approximately 0.49 µm. It is also shown that combined with a 1 µm m‑1 standard uncertainty in the central reference system this could result in coordinate standard uncertainty magnitudes of 42 µm over a slender 1 m by 20 m network. This would be a sufficient step change in accuracy to enable next generation aerospace structures with natural laminar flow and part-to-part interchangeability.

  17. Long-Term Formaldehyde Emissions from Medium-Density Fiberboard in a Full-Scale Experimental Room: Emission Characteristics and the Effects of Temperature and Humidity.

    PubMed

    Liang, Weihui; Yang, Shen; Yang, Xudong

    2015-09-01

    We studied formaldehyde emissions from the medium-density fiberboard (MDF) in a full-scale experimental room to approximate emissions in actual buildings. Detailed indoor formaldehyde concentrations and temperature and humidity data were obtained for about 29 months. Temperature, relative humidity (RH), and absolute humidity (AH) ranged over -10.9-31.4 °C, 46.5-83.6%, and 1.1-23.1 g/kgair, respectively. Annual cyclical seasonal variations were observed for indoor formaldehyde concentrations and emission rates, exhibiting entirely different characteristics than those in an environmental chamber under constant environmental conditions. The maximum concentration occurred in summer rather than at initial introduction of the material. The concentrations in summer could be a few up to 20 times higher than that in winter, depending on the indoor temperature and humidity conditions. Concentrations decreased by 20-65% in corresponding months of the second year. Indoor formaldehyde concentrations were positively correlated with temperature and AH but were poorly correlated with RH. The combined effects of temperature and AH on formaldehyde emissions from MDF in actual buildings were verified. These detailed long-term experimental results could be used with environmental chamber measurement data to scale up and validate emission models from chambers held at constant conditions to actual buildings.

  18. Humidity Graphs for All Seasons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Esmael, F.

    1982-01-01

    In a previous article in this journal (Vol. 17, p358, 1979), a wet-bulb depression table was recommended for two simple experiments to determine relative humidity. However, the use of a graph is suggested because it gives the relative humidity directly from the wet and dry bulb readings. (JN)

  19. Humidity assay for studying plant-pathogen interactions in miniature controlled discrete humidity environments with good throughput.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhen; Jiang, Huawei; Sahu, Binod Bihari; Kambakam, Sekhar; Singh, Prashant; Wang, Xinran; Wang, Qiugu; Bhattacharyya, Madan K; Dong, Liang

    2016-05-01

    This paper reports a highly economical and accessible approach to generate different discrete relative humidity conditions in spatially separated wells of a modified multi-well plate for humidity assay of plant-pathogen interactions with good throughput. We demonstrated that a discrete humidity gradient could be formed within a few minutes and maintained over a period of a few days inside the device. The device consisted of a freeway channel in the top layer, multiple compartmented wells in the bottom layer, a water source, and a drying agent source. The combinational effects of evaporation, diffusion, and convection were synergized to establish the stable discrete humidity gradient. The device was employed to study visible and molecular disease phenotypes of soybean in responses to infection by Phytophthora sojae, an oomycete pathogen, under a set of humidity conditions, with two near-isogenic soybean lines, Williams and Williams 82, that differ for a Phytophthora resistance gene (Rps1-k). Our result showed that at 63% relative humidity, the transcript level of the defense gene GmPR1 was at minimum in the susceptible soybean line Williams and at maximal level in the resistant line Williams 82 following P. sojae CC5C infection. In addition, we investigated the effects of environmental temperature, dimensional and geometrical parameters, and other configurational factors on the ability of the device to generate miniature humidity environments. This work represents an exploratory effort to economically and efficiently manipulate humidity environments in a space-limited device and shows a great potential to facilitate humidity assay of plant seed germination and development, pathogen growth, and plant-pathogen interactions. Since the proposed device can be easily made, modified, and operated, it is believed that this present humidity manipulation technology will benefit many laboratories in the area of seed science, plant pathology, and plant-microbe biology, where

  20. Simplified limited data Penman's ET0 formulas adapted for humid locations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valiantzas, John D.

    2015-05-01

    New reference evapotranspiration formulas based on simplifications of Penman's equation were developed applicable to humid areas, where wind speed and/or relative humidity data are missing. The new formulas were obtained by empirical calibration adjustments using meteorological data obtained from the humid locations of the CLIMWAT global data base. The performance of the new derived formulas was tested under various climatic conditions using data set monthly and daily data obtained from 16 weather stations at humid locations of California, Florida, and Greece. Comparisons indicated that the suggested formulas performed better than other empirical methods not requiring wind and/or humidity data for the majority of humid locations.

  1. Humidity micro switch based on humidity-sensitive polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellmann, C.; Steinke, A.; Frank, T.; Gerlach, G.

    2015-04-01

    We present recent results on a binary threshold sensor based on the binary zero-power sensor (BIZEPS) platform which is able to use the energy provided directly from the measured relative humidity of the ambient air to mechanically switch an electrical micro contact. This zero-power switch behavior is realized by using the humidity-sensitive volume swelling of a polymer layer as the detection element deflecting a mechanically deformable silicon boss structure, thus closing the electrical contacts of the switch. For the humidity-sensitive sensor switch considered here, a humidity-sensitive hydrogel blend of poly(vinyl alcohol) and poly(acryl acid) was used. The sensitive part affected by the measurand is completely separated from the electrical part, thus providing long-term stability. By using an inverse silicone stamping technique the polymer layer with a thickness of about 15 μm was patterned on test structures possessing a thin silicon flexure plate of 5 mm x 5 mm in size and 20 μm in thickness. Reproducible deformations of up to 15 … 24 μm has been measured. Investigations of the swelling kinetics showed for several discrete relative humidity values a saturation of the water load. The time to reach this saturation state is reduced from 5 hours down to approx. 20 min by increasing the relative humidity beyond the threshold value of 70% r.H. A significant influence of the temperature to the humidity load could not be observed.

  2. Reconstructing the vertical profile of humidity on the basis of the vertical profile of temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bazlova, T. I.

    1974-01-01

    The vertical profile of humidity in the atmosphere is developed on the basis of the vertical profile of temperature using an empirical formula linking changes in humidity with changes in temperature and altitude. The atmosphere is divided into three layers by altitude, since the condition for the formation of humidity varies with altitude.

  3. Effect of temperature and relative humidity on variola virus in crusts*

    PubMed Central

    Huq, Farida

    1976-01-01

    The viability of variola virus in crusts under different conditions of temperature and relative humidity was studied for 16 weeks. At the ambient temperature of 25.8-26.4°C and 85-90% relative humidity, the virus survived only 8 weeks but at lower temperatures and relative humidities the survival time was considerably prolonged. PMID:196779

  4. Determination of equilibrium humidities using temperature and humidity controlled X-ray diffraction (RH-XRD).

    PubMed

    Linnow, Kirsten; Steiger, Michael

    2007-01-30

    Confined growth of crystals in porous building materials is generally considered to be a major cause of damage. We report on the use of X-ray diffraction under controlled conditions of temperature and relative humidity (RH-XRD) for the investigation of potentially deleterious phase transition reactions. An improved procedure based on rate measurements is used for the accurate and reproducible determination of equilibrium humidities of deliquescence and hydration reactions. The deliquescence humidities of NaCl (75.4+/-0.5% RH) and Ca(NO3)2 x 4 H2O (50.8+/-0.7% RH) at 25 degrees C determined with this improved RH-XRD technique are in excellent agreement with available literature data. Measurement of the hydration of anhydrous Ca(NO3)2 to form Ca(NO3)2 x 2 H2O revealed an equilibrium humidity of 10.2+/-0.3%, which is also in reasonable agreement with available data. In conclusion, dynamic X-ray diffraction measurements are an appropriate method for the accurate and precise determination of equilibrium humidities with a number of interesting future applications.

  5. Gas and humidity sensing element

    SciTech Connect

    Komine, Y.; Sawada, T.

    1984-06-26

    A gas and humidity sensing element in a single integral structure made of a base plate of apatite ceramics, on which a particular metal oxide such as tin oxide, zinc oxide, or composite oxide of titanium and niobium is provided. The sensing element has a function of sensing gas and humidity with outstanding sensitivity to bad smell gas and alcoholic gas, in which the humidity is sensed and measured by variations in electrical resistance of the apatite ceramic base plate and the bad smell gas such as hydrogen sulfide, methyl mercaptan, etc. is sensed and measured by variations in electrical resistance of the metal oxide.

  6. Estimating Absolute Site Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Malagnini, L; Mayeda, K M; Akinci, A; Bragato, P L

    2004-07-15

    The authors use previously determined direct-wave attenuation functions as well as stable, coda-derived source excitation spectra to isolate the absolute S-wave site effect for the horizontal and vertical components of weak ground motion. They used selected stations in the seismic network of the eastern Alps, and find the following: (1) all ''hard rock'' sites exhibited deamplification phenomena due to absorption at frequencies ranging between 0.5 and 12 Hz (the available bandwidth), on both the horizontal and vertical components; (2) ''hard rock'' site transfer functions showed large variability at high-frequency; (3) vertical-motion site transfer functions show strong frequency-dependence, and (4) H/V spectral ratios do not reproduce the characteristics of the true horizontal site transfer functions; (5) traditional, relative site terms obtained by using reference ''rock sites'' can be misleading in inferring the behaviors of true site transfer functions, since most rock sites have non-flat responses due to shallow heterogeneities resulting from varying degrees of weathering. They also use their stable source spectra to estimate total radiated seismic energy and compare against previous results. they find that the earthquakes in this region exhibit non-constant dynamic stress drop scaling which gives further support for a fundamental difference in rupture dynamics between small and large earthquakes. To correct the vertical and horizontal S-wave spectra for attenuation, they used detailed regional attenuation functions derived by Malagnini et al. (2002) who determined frequency-dependent geometrical spreading and Q for the region. These corrections account for the gross path effects (i.e., all distance-dependent effects), although the source and site effects are still present in the distance-corrected spectra. The main goal of this study is to isolate the absolute site effect (as a function of frequency) by removing the source spectrum (moment-rate spectrum) from

  7. Humidity profiles over the ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, W. T.; Tang, Wenqing; Niiler, Pearn P.

    1991-01-01

    The variabilities of atmospheric humidity profile over oceans from daily to interannual time scales were examined using 9 years of daily and semidaily radiosonde soundings at island stations extending from the Arctic to the South Pacific. The relative humidity profiles were found to have considerable temporal and geographic variabilities, contrary to the prevalent assumption. Principal component analysis on the profiles of specific humidity were used to examine the applicability of a relation between the surface-level humidity and the integrated water vapor; this relation has been used to estimate large-scale evaporation from satellite data. The first principal component was found to correlate almost perfectly with the integrated water vapor. The fractional variance represented by this mode increases with increasing period. It reaches approximately 90 percent at two weeks and decreases sharply, below one week, down to approximately 60 percent at the daily period. At low frequencies, the integrated water vapor appeared to be an adequate estimator of the humidity profile and the surface-level humidity. At periods shorter than a week, more than one independent estimator is needed.

  8. Simultaneous temperature and humidity measurements in a mechanical ventilator using an optical fibre sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez, F. U.; Correia, R.; Morgan, S. P.; Hayes-Gill, B.; Evans, D.; Sinha, R.; Norris, A.; Harvey, D.; Hardman, J. G.; Korposh, S.

    2016-05-01

    An optical fibre sensor for simultaneous temperature and humidity measurements consisting of one fibre Bragg grating (FBG) to measure temperature and a mesoporous film of bilayers of Poly(allylamine hydrochloride)(PAH) and silica (SiO2) nanoparticles deposited onto the tip of the same fibre to measure humidity is reported. The hygroscopic film was created using the layer-by-layer (LbL) method and the optical reflection spectra were measured up to a maximum of 23 bilayers. The temperature sensitivity of the FBG was 10 pm/°C while the sensitivity to humidity was (-1.4x10-12 W / %RH) using 23 bilayers. The developed sensor was tested in the mechanical ventilator and temperature and humidity of the delivered artificial air was simultaneously measured. Once calibrated, the optical fibre sensor has the potential to control the absolute humidity as an essential part of critical respiratory care.

  9. Physiological responses in nonheat acclimated horses performing treadmill exercise in cool (20 degrees C/40% RH), hot dry (30 degrees C/40% RH) and hot humid (30 degrees C/80% RH) conditions.

    PubMed

    Marlin, D J; Scott, C M; Schroter, R C; Mills, P C; Harris, R C; Harris, P A; Orme, C E; Roberts, C A; Marr, C M; Dyson, S J; Barrelet, F

    1996-07-01

    HD, the increase in VE was achieved mainly through an increase in frequency, whilst in HH it was achieved through an increase in tidal volume (VT). The horses demonstrated a high degree of tolerance to environmental heat load, suggesting a high thermoregulatory capacity. However, for unacclimatised animals exercising in severely hot and humid conditions, performance may be limited.

  10. Modeling of the influence of humidity on H1N1 flu in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    PEI, Y.; Tian, H.; Xu, B.

    2015-12-01

    In 2009, a heavy Flu hit the whole world. It was caused by the virus H1N1. The influenza first broke out in Mexico in March and the United States in April, 2009. The World Health Organization (WHO) announced that the H1N1 influenza became pandemic, alert to a warning phase of six. By the end of 2011, 181302 H1N1 cases were reported in mainland China. To improve our understanding on the impact of environmental factors on the disease transmission, we constructed an SIR (Susceptible - Infectious - Recovered) model incorporating environmental factors. It was found that the absolute humidity was a dominant environmental factor. The study interpolated the humidity data monitored with 340 weather stations from 1951 to 2011 in mainland China. First, the break point of the trend for the absolutely humidity was detected by the BFAST (Break For Additive Season and Trend) method. Then, the SIR model with and without the absolutely humidity incorporated in the model was built and tested. Finally, the results with the two scenarios were compared. Results indicate that lower absolutely humidity may promote the transmission of the H1N1 cases. The calculated basic reproductive number ranges from 1.65 to 3.66 with a changing absolute humidity. This is consistent with the former study result with basic reproductive number ranging from 2.03 to 4.18. The average recovery duration was estimated to be 5.7 days. The average duration to get immunity from the influenza is 399.02 days. A risk map is also produced to illustrate the model results.

  11. Is Obsidian Hydration Dating Affected by Relative Humidity?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Friedman, I.; Trembour, F.W.; Smith, G.I.; Smith, F.L.

    1994-01-01

    Experiments carried out under temperatures and relative humidities that approximate ambient conditions show that the rate of hydration of obsidian is a function of the relative humidity, as well as of previously established variables of temperature and obsidian chemical composition. Measurements of the relative humidity of soil at 25 sites and at depths of between 0.01 and 2 m below ground show that in most soil environments, at depths below about 0.25 m, the relative humidity is constant at 100%. We have found that the thickness of the hydrated layer developed on obsidian outcrops exposed to the sun and to relative humidities of 30-90% is similar to that formed on other portions of the outcrop that were shielded from the sun and exposed to a relative humidity of approximately 100%. Surface samples of obsidian exposed to solar heating should hydrate more rapidly than samples buried in the ground. However, the effect of the lower mean relative humidity experiences by surface samples tends to compensate for the elevated temperature, which may explain why obsidian hydration ages of surface samples usually approximate those derived from buried samples.

  12. Screening in humid air plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippov, Anatoly; Derbenev, Ivan; Dyatko, Nikolay; Kurkin, Sergey

    2016-09-01

    Low temperature air plasmas containing H2O molecules are of high importance for atmospheric phenomena, climate control, biomedical applications, surface processing, and purification of air and water. Humid air plasma created by an external ionization source is a good model of the troposphere where ions are produced by the galactic cosmic rays and decay products of air and soil radioactive elements such as Rn222. The present paper is devoted to study the ionic composition and the screening in an ionized humid air at atmospheric pressure and room temperature. The ionization rate is varied in the range of 101 -1018 cm-3s-1. The humid air with 0 - 1 . 5 % water admixture that corresponds to the relative humidity of 0 - 67 % at the air temperature equal to 20°C is considered. The ionic composition is determined on the analysis of more than a hundred processes. The system of 41 non-steady state particle number balance equations is solved using the 4th order Runge-Kutta method. The screening of dust particle charge in the ionized humid air are studied within the diffusion-drift approach. The screening constants are well approximated by the inverse Debye length and characteristic lengths of recombination and attachment processes. This work was supported by the Russian Science Foundation, Project No. 16-12-10424.

  13. Fiberboard humidity data for 9975 shipping packages

    SciTech Connect

    Daugherty, W. L.

    2015-07-31

    The 9975 surveillance program is identifying a technical basis to support extending the storage period of 9975 packages in KAC beyond the currently approved 15 years. A key element of this effort is developing a better understanding of degradation of the fiberboard assembly under storage conditions. This degradation is influenced greatly by the moisture content of the fiberboard, which is not well characterized on an individual package basis.Two efforts have been undertaken to better understand the levels and behavior of moisture within the fiberboard assemblies of the 9975 shipping package. In the first effort, an initial survey of humidity and temperature in the upper air space of 26 packages stored in KAC was made. The data collected within this first effort help to illustrate how the upper air space humidity varies with the local ambient temperature and package heat load. In the second effort, direct measurements of two test packages are providing a correlation between humidity and fiberboard moisture levels within the package, and variations in moisture throughout the fiberboard assembly. This effort has examined packages with cane fiberboard and internal heat levels of 5 and 10W to date. Additional testing is expected to include 15 and 19W heat levels, and then repeat the same four heat levels with softwood fiberboard assemblies. This report documents the data collected to date within these two efforts.

  14. Fiberboard Humidity Data for 9975 Shipping Packages

    SciTech Connect

    Daugherty, W.

    2015-07-31

    The 9975 surveillance program is identifying a technical basis to support extending the storage period of 9975 packages in KAC beyond the currently approved 15 years. A key element of this effort is developing a better understanding of degradation of the fiberboard assembly under storage conditions. This degradation is influenced greatly by the moisture content of the fiberboard, which is not well characterized on an individual package basis. Two efforts have been undertaken to better understand the levels and behavior of moisture within the fiberboard assemblies of the 9975 shipping package. In the first effort, an initial survey of humidity and temperature in the upper air space of 26 packages stored in KAC was made. The data collected within this first effort help to illustrate how the upper air space humidity varies with the local ambient temperature and package heat load. In the second effort, direct measurements of two test packages are providing a correlation between humidity and fiberboard moisture levels within the package, and variations in moisture throughout the fiberboard assembly. This effort has examined packages with cane fiberboard and internal heat levels of 5 and 10W to date. Additional testing is expected to include 15 and 19W heat levels, and then repeat the same four heat levels with softwood fiberboard assemblies. This report documents the data collected to date within these two efforts

  15. Data Center Economizer Contamination and Humidity Study

    SciTech Connect

    Shehabi, Arman; Tschudi, William; Gadgil, Ashok

    2007-03-06

    Data centers require continuous air conditioning to address high internal heat loads (heat release from equipment) and maintain indoor temperatures within recommended operating levels for computers. Air economizer cycles, which bring in large amounts of outside air to cool internal loads when weather conditions are favorable, could save cooling energy. There is reluctance from many data center owners to use this common cooling technique, however, due to fear of introducing pollutants and potential loss of humidity control. Concerns about equipment failure from airborne pollutants lead to specifying as little outside air as permissible for human occupants. To investigate contamination levels, particle monitoring was conducted at 8 data centers in Northern California. Particle counters were placed at 3 to 4 different locations within and outside of each data center evaluated in this study. Humidity was also monitored at many of the sites to determine how economizers affect humidity control. Results from this study indicate that economizers do increase the outdoor concentration in data centers, but this concentration, when averaged annually, is still below current particle concentration limits. Study results are summarized below: (1) The average particle concentrations measured at each location, both outside and at the servers, are shown in Table 1. Measurements show low particle concentrations at all data centers without economizers, regardless of outdoor particle concentrations. Particle concentrations were typically an order of magnitude below both outside particle concentrations and recently published ASHRAE standards. (2) Economizer use caused sharp increases in particle concentrations when the economizer vents were open. The particle concentration in the data centers, however, quickly dropped back to pre-economizer levels when the vents closed. Since economizers only allow outside air part of the time, the annual average concentrations still met the ASHRAE

  16. Photogated humidity-driven motility

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lidong; Liang, Haoran; Jacob, Jolly; Naumov, Panče

    2015-01-01

    Hygroinduced motion is a fundamental process of energy conversion that is essential for applications that require contactless actuation in response to the day–night rhythm of atmospheric humidity. Here we demonstrate that mechanical bistability caused by rapid and anisotropic adsorption and desorption of water vapour by a flexible dynamic element that harnesses the chemical potential across very small humidity gradients for perpetual motion can be effectively modulated with light. A mechanically robust material capable of rapid exchange of water with the surroundings is prepared that undergoes swift locomotion in effect to periodic shape reconfiguration with turnover frequency of <150 min−1. The element can lift objects ∼85 times heavier and can transport cargos ∼20 times heavier than itself. Having an azobenzene-containing conjugate as a photoactive dopant, this entirely humidity-driven self-actuation can be controlled remotely with ultraviolet light, thus setting a platform for next-generation smart biomimetic hybrids. PMID:26067649

  17. Photogated humidity-driven motility.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lidong; Liang, Haoran; Jacob, Jolly; Naumov, Panče

    2015-06-11

    Hygroinduced motion is a fundamental process of energy conversion that is essential for applications that require contactless actuation in response to the day-night rhythm of atmospheric humidity. Here we demonstrate that mechanical bistability caused by rapid and anisotropic adsorption and desorption of water vapour by a flexible dynamic element that harnesses the chemical potential across very small humidity gradients for perpetual motion can be effectively modulated with light. A mechanically robust material capable of rapid exchange of water with the surroundings is prepared that undergoes swift locomotion in effect to periodic shape reconfiguration with turnover frequency of <150 min(-1). The element can lift objects ∼85 times heavier and can transport cargos ∼20 times heavier than itself. Having an azobenzene-containing conjugate as a photoactive dopant, this entirely humidity-driven self-actuation can be controlled remotely with ultraviolet light, thus setting a platform for next-generation smart biomimetic hybrids.

  18. Photogated humidity-driven motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lidong; Liang, Haoran; Jacob, Jolly; Naumov, Panče

    2015-06-01

    Hygroinduced motion is a fundamental process of energy conversion that is essential for applications that require contactless actuation in response to the day-night rhythm of atmospheric humidity. Here we demonstrate that mechanical bistability caused by rapid and anisotropic adsorption and desorption of water vapour by a flexible dynamic element that harnesses the chemical potential across very small humidity gradients for perpetual motion can be effectively modulated with light. A mechanically robust material capable of rapid exchange of water with the surroundings is prepared that undergoes swift locomotion in effect to periodic shape reconfiguration with turnover frequency of <150 min-1. The element can lift objects ~85 times heavier and can transport cargos ~20 times heavier than itself. Having an azobenzene-containing conjugate as a photoactive dopant, this entirely humidity-driven self-actuation can be controlled remotely with ultraviolet light, thus setting a platform for next-generation smart biomimetic hybrids.

  19. Dropwise Condensation Experiments with Humid Air at a Polymer Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Götze, P.; Philipp, Ch; Gross, U.

    2012-11-01

    A new test facility has been developed to investigate dropwise condensation heat transfer in a humid air environment. It is designed as a closed loop system in which air is circulated by a fan, enabling investigations in the following parameter ranges: velocity up to 20 m/s; Reynolds number up to 20,000; temperature 20 to 100 °C relative humidity up to 100 %. Heat transfer measurements are done with a specifically designed micro sensor which is flush mounted at one of the vertical surfaces of a horizontal flow channel 12 mm × 32 mm (inner width and height, respectively) and covered at its air-side surface by a newly developed polymer layer containing 20 % of carbon nanotubes for improvement of the thermal conductivity. A total of 8 thermocouples is embedded inside the sensor. Their readings serve as input data to a numerical model which enables consideration of heat losses and evaluation of surface temperature and heat flux. The measuring system allows to analyse the effects of heat flux, air-to-wall temperature difference, absolute and relative humidity, and Reynolds number on the heat transfer coefficient. Single phase heat transfer results show excellent agreement with well established correlations for turbulent air flow. The onset of dropwise condensation was detected with very good repeatability. This paper covers details of the experimental device, measuring system and data evaluation including accuracy considerations. Single phase and preliminary dropwise condensation results with humid air are reported.

  20. Cryogenic, Absolute, High Pressure Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, John J. (Inventor); Shams. Qamar A. (Inventor); Powers, William T. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A pressure sensor is provided for cryogenic, high pressure applications. A highly doped silicon piezoresistive pressure sensor is bonded to a silicon substrate in an absolute pressure sensing configuration. The absolute pressure sensor is bonded to an aluminum nitride substrate. Aluminum nitride has appropriate coefficient of thermal expansion for use with highly doped silicon at cryogenic temperatures. A group of sensors, either two sensors on two substrates or four sensors on a single substrate are packaged in a pressure vessel.

  1. Ultrafast graphene oxide humidity sensors.

    PubMed

    Borini, Stefano; White, Richard; Wei, Di; Astley, Michael; Haque, Samiul; Spigone, Elisabetta; Harris, Nadine; Kivioja, Jani; Ryhänen, Tapani

    2013-12-23

    Sensors allow an electronic device to become a gateway between the digital and physical worlds, and sensor materials with unprecedented performance can create new applications and new avenues for user interaction. Graphene oxide can be exploited in humidity and temperature sensors with a number of convenient features such as flexibility, transparency and suitability for large-scale manufacturing. Here we show that the two-dimensional nature of graphene oxide and its superpermeability to water combine to enable humidity sensors with unprecedented response speed (∼30 ms response and recovery times). This opens the door to various applications, such as touchless user interfaces, which we demonstrate with a 'whistling' recognition analysis.

  2. Increased Air Velocity Reduces Thermal and Cardiovascular Strain in Young and Older Males during Humid Exertional Heat Stress.

    PubMed

    Wright Beatty, Heather E; Hardcastle, Stephen G; Boulay, Pierre; Flouris, Andreas D; Kenny, Glen P

    2015-01-01

    Older adults have been reported to have a lower evaporative heat loss capacity than younger adults during exercise when full sweat evaporation is permitted. However, it is unclear how conditions of restricted evaporative and convective heat loss (i.e., high humidity, clothing insulation) alter heat stress. to the purpose of this study was to examine the heat stress responses of young and older males during and following exercise in a warm/humid environment under two different levels of air velocity. Ten young (YOUNG: 24±2 yr) and 10 older (OLDER: 59±3 yr) males, matched for body surface area performed 4×15-min cycling bouts (15-min rest) at a fixed rate of heat production (400 W) in warm/humid conditions (35°C, 60% relative humidity) under 0.5 (Low) and 3.0 (High) m·s(-1) air velocity while wearing work coveralls. Rectal (Tre) and mean skin (MTsk) temperatures, heart rate (HR), local sweat rate, % max skin blood flow (SkBF) (recovery only), and blood pressure (recovery only) were measured. High air velocity reduced core and skin temperatures (p < 0.05) equally in YOUNG and OLDER males (p > 0.05) but was more effective in reducing cardiovascular strain (absolute and % max HR; p < 0.05) in YOUNG males (p < 0.05). Greater increases in local dry heat loss responses (% max SkBF and cutaneous vascular conductance) were detected across time in OLDER than YOUNG males in both conditions (p < 0.05). Local dry heat loss responses and cardiovascular strain were attenuated during the High condition in YOUNG compared to OLDER (p < 0.05). High air velocity reduced the number of males surpassing the 38.0°C Tre threshold from 90% (Low) to 50% (High). Despite age-related local heat loss differences, YOUNG and OLDER males had similar levels of heat stress during intermittent exercise in warm and humid conditions while wearing work coveralls. Increased air velocity was effective in reducing heat stress equally, and cardiovascular strain to a greater extent, in YOUNG and OLDER

  3. Absolute Value Boundedness, Operator Decomposition, and Stochastic Media and Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adomian, G.; Miao, C. C.

    1973-01-01

    The research accomplished during this period is reported. Published abstracts and technical reports are listed. Articles presented include: boundedness of absolute values of generalized Fourier coefficients, propagation in stochastic media, and stationary conditions for stochastic differential equations.

  4. Influenza and humidity--Why a bit more damp may be good for you!

    PubMed

    Metz, Jane A; Finn, Adam

    2015-06-01

    Influenza viruses cause much winter-time morbidity and death in temperate regions. We still do not understand why 'flu is more common in winter. Since the 1960s, investigators have studied the role of relative humidity and temperature on viral survival, transmission and infection rates but results have demonstrated only inconclusive trends. Over the past few years however, a series of exciting studies have instead focussed on absolute humidity and demonstrated highly significant correlations with viral survival and transmission rates in both laboratory and epidemiological models. Here we review the evidence for a causal association between absolute humidity and 'flu transmission and outline how this could lead to a new approach to curbing this and perhaps other viral epidemics in the winter months.

  5. Effect of humidity and temperature on the survival of Listeria monocytogenes on surfaces.

    PubMed

    Redfern, J; Verran, J

    2017-04-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a pathogenic bacterium, with human disease and infection linked to dairy products, seafood, ready-to-eat meat and raw & undercooked meats. Stainless steel is the most common food preparation surface and therefore, it is important to understand how food storage conditions such as surface materials, temperature and relative humidity can affect survival of L. monocytogenes. In this study, survival of L. monocytogenes on stainless steel was investigated at three temperatures (4, 10 and 21°C), each approx. 11, 50 and 85% humidity. Results indicate that the lower the temperature, the more cells were recovered in all three humidity environments, while medium humidity enhances survival, irrespective of temperature. Lower humidity decreases recovery at all temperatures. These data support the guidance noted above that humidity control is important, and that lower humidity environments are less likely to support retention of viable L. monocytogenes on a stainless steel surface.

  6. Thermal Comfort in the Hot Humid Tropics of Australia

    PubMed Central

    Wyndham, C. H.

    1963-01-01

    Day and night comfort votes were recorded from Caucasian residents at Weipa, a mission station in the hot humid tropics of North Queensland, Australia. The limit of day comfort for more than 50% of the men was 81·5°F. (27·5°C.) “normal” corrected effective temperature; the night limit was 78·0°F. (25·5°C.). Day comfort limits correlated well with air conditions at which sweat was apparent: night limits correlated with the amount of bed covering. Evidence of a change over 14 days in day comfort limit was found. Limitations in the effective temperature scale for expressing the “oppressive nature” of night air conditions are pointed out. Criticism is voiced of the use of dry bulb temperature instead of the effective temperature scale in conditions of high wet bulb temperatures with high relative humidity, such as in the hot humid tropics. PMID:14002126

  7. Room-temperature study of iron gall ink impregnated paper degradation under various oxygen and humidity conditions: time-dependent monitoring by viscosity and X-ray absorption near-edge spectrometry measurements.

    PubMed

    Rouchon, Véronique; Duranton, Maroussia; Burgaud, Cédric; Pellizzi, Eleonora; Lavédrine, Bertrand; Janssens, Koen; de Nolf, Wout; Nuyts, Gert; Vanmeert, Frederik; Hellemans, Kevin

    2011-04-01

    Many western manuscripts were written using iron gall inks. These inks can damage the paper via two major mechanisms: (a) acid hydrolysis, enhanced by humidity, and (b) oxidative depolymerization provoked by the presence of oxygen and free iron(II) ions. The degradation of unsized Whatman paper impregnated with different combinations of iron sulfate, gallic acid, and gum arabic was studied at room temperature in order to assess the relative importance of each mechanism. The samples were stored in various environments including a dry and/or an oxygen-free atmosphere. The cellulose depolymerization was monitored by viscometry and related to changes in the oxidation state of iron, determined by X-ray absorption near-edge spectrometry. The results indicate that residual amounts of oxygen (less than 0.1%) promote cellulose depolymerization, whereas the level of relative humidity has no impact. The cellulose depolymerization also appears closely correlated to oxidative mechanisms. Regarding the oxidation of iron, it only occurs in the simultaneous presence of oxygen and moisture, suggesting the occurrence of rustlike oxidative mechanisms. Finally, the presence of gallic acid has a strong influence, which is only partially explained by its capacity to reduce iron(III) to iron(II).

  8. Variations of relative humidity in relation to meningitis in Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seefeldt, M. W.; Hopson, T. M.

    2011-12-01

    The meningitis belt is a region covering Sub-Saharan Africa from the Sahel of West Africa eastward to western Ethiopia. The region is prone to meningitis epidemics during the dry season extending from approximately January to May, depending on the region. Relative humidity has been found to be a critical environmental factor indicating the susceptibility of a region to meningitis epidemics. This study evaluates the variation of relative humidity across West Africa over 30 dry-seasons (1979 - 2009) using the NASA-MERRA dataset. The method of self-organizing maps is employed to characterize the changes in relative humidity patterns across the region within a given dry season as well as changes over the 30 years. A general pattern of changes in relative humidity is indicated as the rainbelt retreats to the south at the onset of the dry season and then returns to the region at the end of the dry season. Within each dry season there is a unique pattern. The climatological conditions of relative humidity at the onset of the dry season provide an indication of the moisture environment for the entire dry season. Year to year variation in the relative humidity patterns are found to be gradual. Future applications involve using the results from the SOM evaluation to be used for future decisions involving prevention of meningitis epidemics.

  9. Noncontact Measurement of Humidity and Temperature Using Airborne Ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akihiko Kon,; Koichi Mizutani,; Naoto Wakatsuki,

    2010-04-01

    We describe a noncontact method for measuring humidity and dry-bulb temperature. Conventional humidity sensors are single-point measurement devices, so that a noncontact method for measuring the relative humidity is required. Ultrasonic temperature sensors are noncontact measurement sensors. Because water vapor in the air increases sound velocity, conventional ultrasonic temperature sensors measure virtual temperature, which is higher than dry-bulb temperature. We performed experiments using an ultrasonic delay line, an atmospheric pressure sensor, and either a thermometer or a relative humidity sensor to confirm the validity of our measurement method at relative humidities of 30, 50, 75, and 100% and at temperatures of 283.15, 293.15, 308.15, and 323.15 K. The results show that the proposed method measures relative humidity with an error rate of less than 16.4% and dry-bulb temperature with an error of less than 0.7 K. Adaptations of the measurement method for use in air-conditioning control systems are discussed.

  10. Database applicaton for absolute spectrophotometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bochkov, Valery V.; Shumko, Sergiy

    2002-12-01

    32-bit database application with multidocument interface for Windows has been developed to calculate absolute energy distributions of observed spectra. The original database contains wavelength calibrated observed spectra which had been already passed through apparatus reductions such as flatfielding, background and apparatus noise subtracting. Absolute energy distributions of observed spectra are defined in unique scale by means of registering them simultaneously with artificial intensity standard. Observations of sequence of spectrophotometric standards are used to define absolute energy of the artificial standard. Observations of spectrophotometric standards are used to define optical extinction in selected moments. FFT algorithm implemented in the application allows performing convolution (deconvolution) spectra with user-defined PSF. The object-oriented interface has been created using facilities of C++ libraries. Client/server model with Windows Socket functionality based on TCP/IP protocol is used to develop the application. It supports Dynamic Data Exchange conversation in server mode and uses Microsoft Exchange communication facilities.

  11. Application for temperature and humidity monitoring of data center environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albert, Ş.; Truşcǎ, M. R. C.; Soran, M. L.

    2015-12-01

    The technology and computer science registered a large development in the last years. Most systems that use high technologies require special working conditions. The monitoring and the controlling are very important. The temperature and the humidity are important parameters in the operation of computer systems, industrial and research, maintaining it between certain values to ensure their proper functioning being important. Usually, the temperature is maintained in the established range using an air conditioning system, but the humidity is affected. In the present work we developed an application based on a board with own firmware called "AVR_NET_IO" using a microcontroller ATmega32 type for temperature and humidity monitoring in Data Center of INCDTIM. On this board, temperature sensors were connected to measure the temperature in different points of the Data Center and outside of this. Humidity monitoring is performed using data from integrated sensors of the air conditioning system, thus achieving a correlation between humidity and temperature variation. It was developed a software application (CM-1) together with the hardware, which allows temperature monitoring and register inside Data Center and trigger an alarm when variations are greater with 3°C than established limits of the temperature.

  12. Humidity sensation requires both mechanosensory and thermosensory pathways in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Russell, Joshua; Vidal-Gadea, Andrés G.; Makay, Alex; Lanam, Carolyn; Pierce-Shimomura, Jonathan T.

    2014-01-01

    All terrestrial animals must find a proper level of moisture to ensure their health and survival. The cellular-molecular basis for sensing humidity is unknown in most animals, however. We used the model nematode Caenorhabditis elegans to uncover a mechanism for sensing humidity. We found that whereas C. elegans showed no obvious preference for humidity levels under standard culture conditions, worms displayed a strong preference after pairing starvation with different humidity levels, orienting to gradients as shallow as 0.03% relative humidity per millimeter. Cell-specific ablation and rescue experiments demonstrate that orientation to humidity in C. elegans requires the obligatory combination of distinct mechanosensitive and thermosensitive pathways. The mechanosensitive pathway requires a conserved DEG/ENaC/ASIC mechanoreceptor complex in the FLP neuron pair. Because humidity levels influence the hydration of the worm’s cuticle, our results suggest that FLP may convey humidity information by reporting the degree that subcuticular dendritic sensory branches of FLP neurons are stretched by hydration. The thermosensitive pathway requires cGMP-gated channels in the AFD neuron pair. Because humidity levels affect evaporative cooling, AFD may convey humidity information by reporting thermal flux. Thus, humidity sensation arises as a metamodality in C. elegans that requires the integration of parallel mechanosensory and thermosensory pathways. This hygrosensation strategy, first proposed by Thunberg more than 100 y ago, may be conserved because the underlying pathways have cellular and molecular equivalents across a wide range of species, including insects and humans. PMID:24843133

  13. Humidity sensation requires both mechanosensory and thermosensory pathways in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Russell, Joshua; Vidal-Gadea, Andrés G; Makay, Alex; Lanam, Carolyn; Pierce-Shimomura, Jonathan T

    2014-06-03

    All terrestrial animals must find a proper level of moisture to ensure their health and survival. The cellular-molecular basis for sensing humidity is unknown in most animals, however. We used the model nematode Caenorhabditis elegans to uncover a mechanism for sensing humidity. We found that whereas C. elegans showed no obvious preference for humidity levels under standard culture conditions, worms displayed a strong preference after pairing starvation with different humidity levels, orienting to gradients as shallow as 0.03% relative humidity per millimeter. Cell-specific ablation and rescue experiments demonstrate that orientation to humidity in C. elegans requires the obligatory combination of distinct mechanosensitive and thermosensitive pathways. The mechanosensitive pathway requires a conserved DEG/ENaC/ASIC mechanoreceptor complex in the FLP neuron pair. Because humidity levels influence the hydration of the worm's cuticle, our results suggest that FLP may convey humidity information by reporting the degree that subcuticular dendritic sensory branches of FLP neurons are stretched by hydration. The thermosensitive pathway requires cGMP-gated channels in the AFD neuron pair. Because humidity levels affect evaporative cooling, AFD may convey humidity information by reporting thermal flux. Thus, humidity sensation arises as a metamodality in C. elegans that requires the integration of parallel mechanosensory and thermosensory pathways. This hygrosensation strategy, first proposed by Thunberg more than 100 y ago, may be conserved because the underlying pathways have cellular and molecular equivalents across a wide range of species, including insects and humans.

  14. Absolute classification with unsupervised clustering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeon, Byeungwoo; Landgrebe, D. A.

    1992-01-01

    An absolute classification algorithm is proposed in which the class definition through training samples or otherwise is required only for a particular class of interest. The absolute classification is considered as a problem of unsupervised clustering when one cluster is known initially. The definitions and statistics of the other classes are automatically developed through the weighted unsupervised clustering procedure, which is developed to keep the cluster corresponding to the class of interest from losing its identity as the class of interest. Once all the classes are developed, a conventional relative classifier such as the maximum-likelihood classifier is used in the classification.

  15. Energy-Efficient Management of Mechanical Ventilation and Relative Humidity in Hot-Humid Climates

    SciTech Connect

    Withers, Jr., Charles R.

    2016-12-01

    In hot and humid climates, it is challenging to energy-efficiently maintain indoor RH at acceptable levels while simultaneously providing required ventilation, particularly in high performance low cooling load homes. The fundamental problem with solely relying on fixed capacity central cooling systems to manage moisture during low sensible load periods is that they are oversized for cooler periods of the year despite being 'properly sized' for a very hot design cooling day. The primary goals of this project were to determine the impact of supplementing a central space conditioning system with 1) a supplemental dehumidifier and 2) a ductless mini-split on seasonal energy use and summer peak power use as well as the impact on thermal distribution and humidity control inside a completely furnished lab home that was continuously ventilated in accordance with ASHRAE 62.2-2013.

  16. Measurement of absolute gravity acceleration in Firenze

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Angelis, M.; Greco, F.; Pistorio, A.; Poli, N.; Prevedelli, M.; Saccorotti, G.; Sorrentino, F.; Tino, G. M.

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports the results from the accurate measurement of the acceleration of gravity g taken at two separate premises in the Polo Scientifico of the University of Firenze (Italy). In these laboratories, two separate experiments aiming at measuring the Newtonian constant and testing the Newtonian law at short distances are in progress. Both experiments require an independent knowledge on the local value of g. The only available datum, pertaining to the italian zero-order gravity network, was taken more than 20 years ago at a distance of more than 60 km from the study site. Gravity measurements were conducted using an FG5 absolute gravimeter, and accompanied by seismic recordings for evaluating the noise condition at the site. The absolute accelerations of gravity at the two laboratories are (980 492 160.6 ± 4.0) μGal and (980 492 048.3 ± 3.0) μGal for the European Laboratory for Non-Linear Spectroscopy (LENS) and Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, respectively. Other than for the two referenced experiments, the data here presented will serve as a benchmark for any future study requiring an accurate knowledge of the absolute value of the acceleration of gravity in the study region.

  17. Polyimide-coated fiber Bragg grating for relative humidity sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yao; Gong, Yuan; Wu, Yu; Wu, Huijuan

    2015-03-01

    A fiber-optic humidity sensor has been fabricated by coating a moisture sensitive polymer film to the fiber Bragg grating (FBG). The Bragg wavelength of the polyimide-coated FBG changes while it is exposed to different humidity conditions due to the volume expansion of the polyimide coating. The characteristics of sensors, including sensitivity, temporal response, and hysteresis, were improved by controlling the coating thickness and the degree of imidization during the thermal curing process of the polyimide. In the relative humidity (RH) condition ranging from 11.3% RH to 97.3% RH, the sensitivity of the sensor was about 13.5 pm/% RH with measurement uncertainty of ±1.5% RH.

  18. Miniature environmental chambers for temperature humidity bias testing of microelectronics.

    PubMed

    Hook, Michael David; Mayer, Michael

    2017-03-01

    Environmental chambers are commonly used for reliability testing of microelectronics and other products and materials. These chambers are large, expensive, and limit electrical connectivity to devices under test. In this paper, we present a collection of ten small, low-cost environmental chambers, with humidity control based on mixtures of water and glycerol placed inside the chambers. We demonstrate relative humidities from 44% to 90%, at temperatures from 30 to 85 °C, enabling industry-standard testing at 85% humidity and 85 °C. The division of samples between ten separate chambers allows different conditions to be applied to each sample, in order to quickly characterize the effects of the environment on device reliability, enabling extrapolation to estimate lifetimes in working conditions.

  19. Absolute transition probabilities of phosphorus.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, M. H.; Roig, R. A.; Bengtson, R. D.

    1971-01-01

    Use of a gas-driven shock tube to measure the absolute strengths of 21 P I lines and 126 P II lines (from 3300 to 6900 A). Accuracy for prominent, isolated neutral and ionic lines is estimated to be 28 to 40% and 18 to 30%, respectively. The data and the corresponding theoretical predictions are examined for conformity with the sum rules.-

  20. Relativistic Absolutism in Moral Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vogt, W. Paul

    1982-01-01

    Discusses Emile Durkheim's "Moral Education: A Study in the Theory and Application of the Sociology of Education," which holds that morally healthy societies may vary in culture and organization but must possess absolute rules of moral behavior. Compares this moral theory with current theory and practice of American educators. (MJL)

  1. Absolute Standards for Climate Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leckey, J.

    2016-10-01

    In a world of changing climate, political uncertainty, and ever-changing budgets, the benefit of measurements traceable to SI standards increases by the day. To truly resolve climate change trends on a decadal time scale, on-orbit measurements need to be referenced to something that is both absolute and unchanging. One such mission is the Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO) that will measure a variety of climate variables with an unprecedented accuracy to definitively quantify climate change. In the CLARREO mission, we will utilize phase change cells in which a material is melted to calibrate the temperature of a blackbody that can then be observed by a spectrometer. A material's melting point is an unchanging physical constant that, through a series of transfers, can ultimately calibrate a spectrometer on an absolute scale. CLARREO consists of two primary instruments: an infrared (IR) spectrometer and a reflected solar (RS) spectrometer. The mission will contain orbiting radiometers with sufficient accuracy to calibrate other space-based instrumentation and thus transferring the absolute traceability. The status of various mission options will be presented.

  2. Comparisons of Upper Tropospheric Humidity Retrievals from TOVS and METEOSAT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Escoffier, C.; Bates, J.; Chedin, A.; Rossow, W. B.; Schmetz, J.

    1999-01-01

    Two different methods for retrieving Upper Tropospheric Humidities (UTH) from the TOVS (TIROS Operational Vertical Sounder) instruments aboard NOAA polar orbiting satellites are presented and compared. The first one, from the Environmental Technology Laboratory, computed by J. Bates and D. Jackson (hereafter BJ method), estimates UTH from a simplified radiative transfer analysis of the upper tropospheric infrared water vapor channel at wavelength measured by HIRS (6.3 micrometer). The second one results from a neural network analysis of the TOVS (HIRS and MSU) data developed at, the Laboratoire de Meteorologie Dynamique (hereafter the 3I (Improved Initialization Inversion) method). Although the two methods give very similar retrievals in temperate regions (30-60 N and S), an absolute bias up to 16% appears in the convective zone of the tropics. The two datasets have also been compared with UTH retrievals from infrared radiance measurements in the 6.3 micrometer channel from the geostationary satellite METEOSAT (hereafter MET method). The METEOSAT retrievals are systematically drier than the TOVS-based results by an absolute bias between 5 and 25%. Despite the biases, the spatial and temporal correlations are very good. The purpose of this study is to explain the deviations observed between the three datasets. The sensitivity of UTH to air temperature and humidity profiles is analysed as are the clouds effects. Overall, the comparison of the three retrievals gives an assessment of the current uncertainties in water vapor amounts in the upper troposphere as determined from NOAA and METEOSAT satellites.

  3. Humidity and Buildings. Technical Paper No. 188.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutcheon, N. B.

    Modified and controlled relative humidity in buildings for certain occupancies is discussed. New criteria are used in determining the needs, desirability and problems associated with humidities in a building. Severe winter climate requires that special attention be given to the problems associated with increased indoor humidities during cold…

  4. The Effect of Humidity and Temperature Variations on the Behavior of Wire-to-Plane Coronas.

    PubMed

    Gallo, C F; Germanos, J E; Courtney, J E

    1969-01-01

    The effect of temperature and humidity on the current-voltage relationship and uniformity of positive and negative air coronas has been studied. Variations in temperature and absolute humidity seem to have a comparatively small effect on the behavior of coronas. By contrast, variations in the relative humidity have readily noticeable effects on the current-voltage relationship. At high voltages (positive or negative) the corona current decreases as the relative humidity increases due to ion and electron hydration effects. By contrast, both positive and negative coronas are initiated at lower voltages at high relative humidities, presumably due to the formation of miniscule water droplets with low ionization potential. The relative humidity also affects the uniformity of negative corona but not positive corona. Presumably the electron emitting properties of a negative wire are altered by moisture adsorbed on the wire surface at high relative humidities. By contrast, positive corona is not grossly affected because it is primarily a gas phase phenomena while negative corona is also sensitive to the electron emitting properties of the wire.

  5. The Coefficient of Restitution of Baseballs as a Function of Relative Humidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kagan, David; Atkinson, David

    2004-09-01

    The only published scientific data on the effect of humidity on baseballs known to the authors is contained in Robert Adair's book The Physics of Baseball: "long flies hit with balls stored under conditions of extreme humidity could be expected to fall as much as 30 feet short of the distance expected for normal balls." In this paper we report on our measurements of the coefficient of restitution of baseballs as a function of the humidity at which they have been stored.

  6. Study of dew water collection in humid tropical islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clus, O.; Ortega, P.; Muselli, M.; Milimouk, I.; Beysens, D.

    2008-10-01

    SummaryAn assessment of the potential for dew water to serve as a potable water source during a rainless season in a humid tropical climate was carried out in the Pacific islands of French Polynesia. The climate of these islands, in terms of diurnal and seasonal variations, wind and energy balance, is representative of the climate of the tropical Atlantic and Pacific oceans. Measurements were obtained at two characteristic sites of this region; a mountainous island (Punaauia, Tahiti Island) and an atoll (Tikehau, Tuamotu Archipelago). Dew was measured daily on a 30° tilted, 1 m 2 plane collector equipped with a thermally insulated radiative foil. In addition, an electronic balance placed at 1 m above the ground with a horizontal 0.16 m 2 condensing plate made of PolyTetraFluoroEthylene (Teflon) was used in Tahiti. Dew volume data, taken during the dry season from 16/5/2005 to 14/10/2005, were correlated with air temperature and relative humidity, wind speed, cloud cover and visible plus infrared radiometer measurements. The data were also fitted to a model. Dew formation in such a tropical climate is characterized by high absolute humidity, weak nocturnal temperature drop and strong Trade winds. These winds prevent dew from forming unless protected e.g. by natural vegetal windbreaks. In protected areas, dew can then form with winds as large as 7 m/s. Such strong winds also hamper at night the formation near the ground of a calm and cold air layer with high relative humidity. As the cooling power is lower than in the Mediterranean islands because of the high absolute humidity of the atmosphere, both effects combine to generate modest dew yields. However, dew events are frequent and provide accumulated amounts of water attractive for dew water harvesting. Slight modifications of existing rain collection devices on roofs can enhance dew formation and collection. Dew harvesting thus appears as an attractive possibility to provide the local population with a

  7. Arbitrary segments of absolute negative mobility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ruyin; Nie, Linru; Chen, Chongyang; Wang, Chaojie

    2017-01-01

    In previous research work, investigators have reported only one or two segments of absolute negative mobility (ANM) in a periodic potential. In fact, many segments of ANM also occur in the system considered here. We investigate transport of an inertial particle in a gating ratchet periodic potential subjected to a constant bias force. Our numerical results show that its mean velocity can decrease with the bias force increasing, i.e. ANM phenomenon. Furthermore, the ANM can take place arbitrary segments, even up to more than thirty. Intrinsic physical mechanism and conditions for arbitrary segments of ANM to occur are discussed in detail.

  8. The effects of excessive humidity.

    PubMed

    Williams, R B

    1998-06-01

    Humidification devices and techniques can expose the airway mucosa to a wide range of gas temperatures and humidities, some of which are excessive and may cause injury. Humidified gas is a carrier of both water and energy. The volume of water in the gas stream depends on whether the water is in a molecular form (vapor), particulate form (aerosol), or bulk form (liquid). The energy content of gas stream is the sum of the sensible heat (temperature) of the air and any water droplets in it and the heat of vaporization (latent energy) of any water vapor present. Latent heat energy is much larger than sensible heat energy, so saturated air contains much more energy than dry air. Thus every breath contains a water volume and energy (thermal) challenge to the airway mucosa. When the challenge exceeds the homeostatic mechanisms airway dysfunction begins, starting at the cellular and secretion level and progressing to whole airway function. A large challenge will result in quick progression of dysfunction. Early dysfunction is generally reversible, however, so large challenges with short exposure times may not cause irreversible injury. The mechanisms of airway injury owing to excess water are not well studied. The observation of its effects lends itself to some general conclusions, however. Alterations in the ventilation-perfusion ratio, decrease in vital capacity and compilance, and atelectasis are suggestive of partial or full occlusion of small airways. Changes in surface tension and alveolar-arterial oxygen gradient are consistent with flooding of alveoli. There also may be osmotic challenges to mucosal cell function as evidenced by the different reaction rates with hyper- and hypotonic saline. The reaction to nonisotonic saline also may partly explain increases in specific airway resistance. Aerosolized water and instilled water may be hazardous because of their demonstrated potential for delivering excessive water to the airway. Their use for airway humidification or

  9. Humidity Testing for Human Rated Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Gary B.

    2009-01-01

    Determination that equipment can operate in and survive exposure to the humidity environments unique to human rated spacecraft presents widely varying challenges. Equipment may need to operate in habitable volumes where the atmosphere contains perspiration, exhalation, and residual moisture. Equipment located outside the pressurized volumes may be exposed to repetitive diurnal cycles that may result in moisture absorption and/or condensation. Equipment may be thermally affected by conduction to coldplate or structure, by forced or ambient air convection (hot/cold or wet/dry), or by radiation to space through windows or hatches. The equipment s on/off state also contributes to the equipment s susceptibility to humidity. Like-equipment is sometimes used in more than one location and under varying operational modes. Due to these challenges, developing a test scenario that bounds all physical, environmental and operational modes for both pressurized and unpressurized volumes requires an integrated assessment to determine the "worst-case combined conditions." Such an assessment was performed for the Constellation program, considering all of the aforementioned variables; and a test profile was developed based on approximately 300 variable combinations. The test profile has been vetted by several subject matter experts and partially validated by testing. Final testing to determine the efficacy of the test profile on actual space hardware is in the planning stages. When validation is completed, the test profile will be formally incorporated into NASA document CxP 30036, "Constellation Environmental Qualification and Acceptance Testing Requirements (CEQATR)."

  10. Influence of fine water droplets to temperature and humidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafidzal, M. H. M.; Hamzah, A.; Manaf, M. Z. A.; Saadun, M. N. A.; Zakaria, M. S.; Roslizar, A.; Jumaidin, R.

    2015-05-01

    Excessively dry air can cause dry skin, dry eyes and exacerbation of medical conditions. Therefore, many researches have been done in order to increase humidity in our environment. One of the ways is by using water droplets. Nowadays, it is well known in market stand fan equipped with water mister in order to increase the humidity of certain area. In this study, the same concept is applied to the ceiling fan. This study uses a model that combines a humidifier which functions as cooler, ceiling fan and scaled down model of house. The objective of this study is to analyze the influence of ceiling fan humidifier to the temperature and humidity in a house. The mechanism of this small model uses batteries as the power source, connected to the fan and the humidifier. The small water tank's function is to store and supply water to the humidifier. The humidifier is used to cool the room by changing water phase to fine water droplets. Fine water droplets are created from mechanism of the humidifier, which is by increasing the kinetic energy of water molecule using high frequency vibration that overcome the holding force between water molecules. Thus, the molecule of water will change to state of gas or mist. The fan is used to spread out the mist of water to surrounding of the room in order to enhance the humidity. Thermocouple and humidity meter are used to measure temperature and humidity in some period of times. The result shows that humidity increases and temperature decreases with time. This application of water droplet can be applied in the vehicles and engine in order to decrease the temperature.

  11. The effect of humidity on samples of microcrystalline cellulose taken from the extrusion/marumerization process.

    PubMed

    Mayville, F C; Atassi, F; Wigent, R J; Schwartz, J B

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to examine the sorption and desorption of water by various samples of microcrystalline cellulose, MCC (Avicel PH-101), taken from the extrusion/marumerization process, and to provide data that may explain how water affects the MCC polymer matrix during the formation of beads. Two isopiestic (humidity) studies were conducted: the first used samples exposed directly to controlled humidity conditions, whereas the second used samples that were freeze-dried before being exposed to controlled humidity conditions. Water sorption and desorption were determined gravimetrically. When both sets of samples were initially exposed to low-humidity conditions, they reached equilibrium by desorbing water. When these samples were initially exposed to high-humidity conditions, the high moisture content samples desorbed water, whereas the low moisture content and the freeze-dried samples sorbed water to reach equilibrium. When the first set of samples was initially exposed to high- and then to low-humidity conditions, they reached the same water content achieved by being equilibrated directly at the low-humidity condition. However, samples that were initially exposed to low- and then to high-humidity conditions had equilibrium water contents that were lower than those achieved by being equilibrated directly at the high-humidity condition. The original MCC systems exhibit a hysteretic effect above 85%, whereas the freeze-dried systems have a broader range hysteretic effect starting at 20% relative humidity. The results suggest that the internal structure of the MCC polymer fibers must change with the sorption and desorption of water, supporting the autohesion theory.

  12. Absolute calibration of optical flats

    DOEpatents

    Sommargren, Gary E.

    2005-04-05

    The invention uses the phase shifting diffraction interferometer (PSDI) to provide a true point-by-point measurement of absolute flatness over the surface of optical flats. Beams exiting the fiber optics in a PSDI have perfect spherical wavefronts. The measurement beam is reflected from the optical flat and passed through an auxiliary optic to then be combined with the reference beam on a CCD. The combined beams include phase errors due to both the optic under test and the auxiliary optic. Standard phase extraction algorithms are used to calculate this combined phase error. The optical flat is then removed from the system and the measurement fiber is moved to recombine the two beams. The newly combined beams include only the phase errors due to the auxiliary optic. When the second phase measurement is subtracted from the first phase measurement, the absolute phase error of the optical flat is obtained.

  13. The Absolute Spectrum Polarimeter (ASP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kogut, A. J.

    2010-01-01

    The Absolute Spectrum Polarimeter (ASP) is an Explorer-class mission to map the absolute intensity and linear polarization of the cosmic microwave background and diffuse astrophysical foregrounds over the full sky from 30 GHz to 5 THz. The principal science goal is the detection and characterization of linear polarization from an inflationary epoch in the early universe, with tensor-to-scalar ratio r much greater than 1O(raised to the power of { -3}) and Compton distortion y < 10 (raised to the power of{-6}). We describe the ASP instrument and mission architecture needed to detect the signature of an inflationary epoch in the early universe using only 4 semiconductor bolometers.

  14. Physics of negative absolute temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, Eitan; Penrose, Oliver

    2017-01-01

    Negative absolute temperatures were introduced into experimental physics by Purcell and Pound, who successfully applied this concept to nuclear spins; nevertheless, the concept has proved controversial: a recent article aroused considerable interest by its claim, based on a classical entropy formula (the "volume entropy") due to Gibbs, that negative temperatures violated basic principles of statistical thermodynamics. Here we give a thermodynamic analysis that confirms the negative-temperature interpretation of the Purcell-Pound experiments. We also examine the principal arguments that have been advanced against the negative temperature concept; we find that these arguments are not logically compelling, and moreover that the underlying "volume" entropy formula leads to predictions inconsistent with existing experimental results on nuclear spins. We conclude that, despite the counterarguments, negative absolute temperatures make good theoretical sense and did occur in the experiments designed to produce them.

  15. Optomechanics for absolute rotation detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davuluri, Sankar

    2016-07-01

    In this article, we present an application of optomechanical cavity for the absolute rotation detection. The optomechanical cavity is arranged in a Michelson interferometer in such a way that the classical centrifugal force due to rotation changes the length of the optomechanical cavity. The change in the cavity length induces a shift in the frequency of the cavity mode. The phase shift corresponding to the frequency shift in the cavity mode is measured at the interferometer output to estimate the angular velocity of absolute rotation. We derived an analytic expression to estimate the minimum detectable rotation rate in our scheme for a given optomechanical cavity. Temperature dependence of the rotation detection sensitivity is studied.

  16. Whey protein concentrate storage at elevated temperature and humidity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dairy processors are finding new export markets for whey protein concentrate (WPC), a byproduct of cheesemaking, but they need to know if full-sized bags of this powder will withstand high temperature and relative humidity (RH) levels during unrefrigerated storage under tropical conditions. To answ...

  17. Direct condensation by humid air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwab, S.; Schiebelsberger, B.

    1980-12-01

    The practicability of direct condensation with humid air (DKFL) for waste heat removal from thermal power plants was investigated with regard to technical, economical and environmental aspects. The adjustment of a uniform trickling-water film was examined. A vertical test tube was erected to study the phenomenon of a trickling-water film. A pilot plant with a vertical tube-bundle was installed to evaluate the main process parameters. The applicability of the cooling system is judged. A theoretical model was derived for the design of a DKFL apparatus. A vertical geometry for the test tube has essential operational and economical advantages in comparison with a horizontal one.

  18. Morphology Controlled Electrospun Nanofibers for Humidity Sensor Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munir, Muhammad Miftahul; Iskandar, Ferry; Djamal, Mitra; Okuyama, Kikuo

    2011-12-01

    Development of various morphologies such as beads, beaded fibers, and pure fibers, and their potential application for humidity sensor by electrospinning of polymer/composites was described. In order to produce uniform nanofibers with high reproducibility, a controlled current electrospinning system was utilized. It was found that the solution concentration plays a significant role in bead/fiber formation. Furthermore, it can be observed that fiber diameter of beaded-fiber was smaller than pure fiber. It is hopes that by controlling morphology of composites fiber, the optimal condition for obtaining the high performance humidity sensor could be attained.

  19. Temperature, Humidity, Wind and Pressure Sensors (THWAPS) Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Ritsche, MT

    2011-01-17

    The temperature, humidity, wind, and pressure system (THWAPS) provide surface reference values of these measurements for balloon-borne sounding system (SONDE) launches. The THWAPS is located adjacent to the SONDE launch site at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Central Facility. The THWAPS system is a combination of calibration-quality instruments intended to provide accurate measurements of meteorological conditions near the surface. Although the primary use of the system is to provide accurate surface reference values of temperature, pressure, relative humidity (RH), and wind velocity for comparison with radiosonde readings, the system includes a data logger to record time series of the measured variables.

  20. Fabrication and Characterization of Nanoporous Silicon Relative Humidity Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aytekin, S. Oguz; Ince, R.

    2015-12-01

    This work describes a porous, silicon-based humidity sensor operating under the capacitive transduction principle. One of the aims of this work is to determine the main parameters such as sensitivity, linearity, hysteresis, and time response to step humidity changes of four samples via measurements of their capacitance. The parameters gauged by capacitance measurements were used to explain the dynamics of its operation. The most sensitive sample caused changes in relative humidity of 74 nF{\\cdot }% rh^{-1}. Hysteresis of at least 3.6 % to 4.6 % was found to occur. Humidity sensor samples synthesized from nanoporous silicon were also analyzed by scanning electron microscopy, image processing, and Raman spectra red shifts. As a result of these measurement and analysis of this work, the best synthesis conditions and nanopore surface and sub-surface diameters for producing high performing humidity sensors were identified. Another aim of this work is to find the optimal pore size from the analysis of image processing and Raman spectra. The optimal porous sizes in relation to the analyzed sensor's characteristics were found to be between 4 nm and 26 nm. The novelty of this work is to establish the relationship between the capacitance measurements with image processing of SEM images and Raman spectral measurements. The mechanical stability of the samples was also gauged over 3 months utilizing both capacitance and Raman spectral measurements.

  1. Uncertainty Analysis in Humidity Measurements by the Psychrometer Method

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jiunyuan; Chen, Chiachung

    2017-01-01

    The most common and cheap indirect technique to measure relative humidity is by using psychrometer based on a dry and a wet temperature sensor. In this study, the measurement uncertainty of relative humidity was evaluated by this indirect method with some empirical equations for calculating relative humidity. Among the six equations tested, the Penman equation had the best predictive ability for the dry bulb temperature range of 15–50 °C. At a fixed dry bulb temperature, an increase in the wet bulb depression increased the error. A new equation for the psychrometer constant was established by regression analysis. This equation can be computed by using a calculator. The average predictive error of relative humidity was <0.1% by this new equation. The measurement uncertainty of the relative humidity affected by the accuracy of dry and wet bulb temperature and the numeric values of measurement uncertainty were evaluated for various conditions. The uncertainty of wet bulb temperature was the main factor on the RH measurement uncertainty. PMID:28216599

  2. Uncertainty Analysis in Humidity Measurements by the Psychrometer Method.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiunyuan; Chen, Chiachung

    2017-02-14

    The most common and cheap indirect technique to measure relative humidity is by using psychrometer based on a dry and a wet temperature sensor. In this study, the measurement uncertainty of relative humidity was evaluated by this indirect method with some empirical equations for calculating relative humidity. Among the six equations tested, the Penman equation had the best predictive ability for the dry bulb temperature range of 15-50 °C. At a fixed dry bulb temperature, an increase in the wet bulb depression increased the error. A new equation for the psychrometer constant was established by regression analysis. This equation can be computed by using a calculator. The average predictive error of relative humidity was <0.1% by this new equation. The measurement uncertainty of the relative humidity affected by the accuracy of dry and wet bulb temperature and the numeric values of measurement uncertainty were evaluated for various conditions. The uncertainty of wet bulb temperature was the main factor on the RH measurement uncertainty.

  3. Humidity Testing of PME and BME Ceramic Capacitors with Cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teverovsky, Alexander A.; Herzberger, Jaemi

    2014-01-01

    Cracks in ceramic capacitors are one of the major causes of failures during operation of electronic systems. Humidity testing has been successfully used for many years to verify the absence of cracks and assure quality of military grade capacitors. Traditionally, only precious metal electrode (PME) capacitors were used in high reliability applications and the existing requirements for humidity testing were developed for this type of parts. With the advance of base metal electrode (BME) capacitors, there is a need for assessment of the applicability of the existing techniques for the new technology capacitors. In this work, variety of different PME and BME capacitors with introduced cracks were tested in humid environments at different voltages and temperatures. Analysis of the test results indicates differences in the behavior and failure mechanisms for BME and PME capacitors and the need for different testing conditions.

  4. Exposure of Bed Bugs to Metarhizium anisopliae at Different Humidities.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, Kevin R; Feldlaufer, Mark F; Kramer, Matthew; St Leger, Raymond J

    2014-12-01

    Bed bugs Cimex lectularius L. were exposed to conidia (spores) of the entomopathogenic fungus Metarhizium anisopliae by feeding, aerosol spray, or contact with a treated surface. Feeding experiments demonstrated that bed bugs were innately susceptible to this fungus. However, only at 98% humidity were mortality rates high, regardless of whether bed bugs were sprayed with a fungal solution or contacted a treated surface. Mortality in treated bed bugs at ambient humidity did not increase when these bed bugs were kept in aggregation with other bed bugs that had recently blood fed to repletion. Based on these laboratory studies, we conclude that M. anisopliae is a poor pathogen for use in control of bed bugs, particularly at humidities that would likely be encountered under field conditions.

  5. Bacterial survival responses to extreme desiccation and high humidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yinjie; Yokobori, Shinichi; Yamagishi, Akihiko

    The presence of water is thought to be essential for life and strongly considered in life searching operation on extraterrestrial planets. In this study we show different survival responses of bacterial species to water availability and temperatures (25, 4 and - 70 o C). At these temperatures, E.coli lost viability much faster under extreme desiccation than under high humidity. Deinococcus radiodurans exhibited much higher survival rate under desiccation than under high humidity at 25 o C, while its survivals under desiccation and high humidity increased to the same level at 4 and - 70 o C. Bacillus pumilus spores generally survived well under all tested conditions. Water is favorable for the survival of most microorganisms but not a "safeguard" for all microorganisms. Microbial survival at low temperatures may not be affected by water availability. Water absence should not preclude us from seeking life on other planets.

  6. Characterization of spacecraft humidity condensate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muckle, Susan; Schultz, John R.; Sauer, Richard L.

    1994-01-01

    When construction of Space Station Freedom reaches the Permanent Manned Capability (PMC) stage, the Water Recovery and Management Subsystem will be fully operational such that (distilled) urine, spent hygiene water, and humidity condensate will be reclaimed to provide water of potable quality. The reclamation technologies currently baselined to process these waste waters include adsorption, ion exchange, catalytic oxidation, and disinfection. To ensure that the baseline technologies will be able to effectively remove those compounds presenting a health risk to the crew, the National Research Council has recommended that additional information be gathered on specific contaminants in waste waters representative of those to be encountered on the Space Station. With the application of new analytical methods and the analysis of waste water samples more representative of the Space Station environment, advances in the identification of the specific contaminants continue to be made. Efforts by the Water and Food Analytical Laboratory at JSC were successful in enlarging the database of contaminants in humidity condensate. These efforts have not only included the chemical characterization of condensate generated during ground-based studies, but most significantly the characterization of cabin and Spacelab condensate generated during Shuttle missions. The analytical results presented in this paper will be used to show how the composition of condensate varies amongst enclosed environments and thus the importance of collecting condensate from an environment close to that of the proposed Space Station. Although advances were made in the characterization of space condensate, complete characterization, particularly of the organics, requires further development of analytical methods.

  7. VAB Temperature and Humidity Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lane, John E.; Youngquist, Robert C.; Muktarian, Edward; Nurge, Mark A.

    2014-01-01

    In 2012, 17 data loggers were placed in the VAB to measure temperature and humidity at 10-minute intervals over a one-year period. In 2013, the data loggers were replaced with an upgraded model and slight adjustments to their locations were made to reduce direct solar heating effects. The data acquired by the data loggers was compared to temperature data provided by three wind towers located around the building. It was found that the VAB acts as a large thermal filter, delaying and reducing the thermal oscillations occurring outside of the building. This filtering is typically more pronounced at higher locations in the building, probably because these locations have less thermal connection with the outside. We surmise that the lower elevations respond more to outside temperature variations because of air flow through the doors. Temperatures inside the VAB rarely exceed outdoor temperatures, only doing so when measurements are made directly on a surface with connection to the outside (such as a door or wall) or when solar radiation falls directly on the sensor. A thermal model is presented to yield approximate filter response times for various locations in the building. Appendix A contains historical thermal and humidity data from 1994 to 2009.

  8. Seasonal changes in humidity impact drought resistance in tropical Drosophila leontia: testing developmental effects of thermal versus humidity changes.

    PubMed

    Parkash, Ravi; Ranga, Poonam

    2014-03-01

    Drosophila leontia is native to highly humid equatorial tropical habitats but its desiccation sensitivity (~10h) is not consistent with its abundance during the drier autumn season in the subtropical regions. We have tested the effects of developmental acclimation on desiccation resistance and water balance related traits of D. leontia collected during rainy and autumn seasons. The isofemale lines of seasonal populations were reared under ecologically relevant growth temperatures (18 or 26 °C) or humidity conditions (35 or 85% RH) but tested at different times under identical experimental conditions. The larvae as well as flies reared under two thermal conditions (18 or 26 °C) showed no effect on desiccation related traits as well as storage and utilization of energy metabolites. In contrast, for D. leontia reared under low humidity (35% RH), significant changes at larval as well adult stages include increase in the desiccation resistance as well as cuticular lipid quantity, reduced levels of rate of body water loss, higher storage of carbohydrates but lower rate of utilization of carbohydrates as compared with flies reared at high humidity (85% RH). D. leontia has responded to rearing under low humidity conditions by increasing its desiccation resistance but not due to changes in the growth temperatures. These laboratory observations on seasonal populations highlight differences due to rearing conditions but not due to seasons. Further, direct analysis of wild-caught seasonal populations has shown trends similar to developmental acclimation effects. For wild caught flies, there are significant seasonal differences i.e. higher desiccation resistance as well as cuticular lipid quantity but reduced rate of water loss for autumn than rainy season flies. Thus, our laboratory observations are relevant for understanding seasonal adaptations of natural populations of tropical D. leontia to wet-dry conditions in the wild.

  9. Absolute Position of Targets Measured Through a Chamber Window Using Lidar Metrology Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kubalak, David; Hadjimichael, Theodore; Ohl, Raymond; Slotwinski, Anthony; Telfer, Randal; Hayden, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Lidar is a useful tool for taking metrology measurements without the need for physical contact with the parts under test. Lidar instruments are aimed at a target using azimuth and elevation stages, then focus a beam of coherent, frequency modulated laser energy onto the target, such as the surface of a mechanical structure. Energy from the reflected beam is mixed with an optical reference signal that travels in a fiber path internal to the instrument, and the range to the target is calculated based on the difference in the frequency of the returned and reference signals. In cases when the parts are in extreme environments, additional steps need to be taken to separate the operator and lidar from that environment. A model has been developed that accurately reduces the lidar data to an absolute position and accounts for the three media in the testbed air, fused silica, and vacuum but the approach can be adapted for any environment or material. The accuracy of laser metrology measurements depends upon knowing the parameters of the media through which the measurement beam travels. Under normal conditions, this means knowledge of the temperature, pressure, and humidity of the air in the measurement volume. In the past, chamber windows have been used to separate the measuring device from the extreme environment within the chamber and still permit optical measurement, but, so far, only relative changes have been diagnosed. The ability to make accurate measurements through a window presents a challenge as there are a number of factors to consider. In the case of the lidar, the window will increase the time-of-flight of the laser beam causing a ranging error, and refract the direction of the beam causing angular positioning errors. In addition, differences in pressure, temperature, and humidity on each side of the window will cause slight atmospheric index changes and induce deformation and a refractive index gradient within the window. Also, since the window is a

  10. The absolute threshold of cone vision

    PubMed Central

    Koeing, Darran; Hofer, Heidi

    2013-01-01

    We report measurements of the absolute threshold of cone vision, which has been previously underestimated due to sub-optimal conditions or overly strict subjective response criteria. We avoided these limitations by using optimized stimuli and experimental conditions while having subjects respond within a rating scale framework. Small (1′ fwhm), brief (34 msec), monochromatic (550 nm) stimuli were foveally presented at multiple intensities in dark-adapted retina for 5 subjects. For comparison, 4 subjects underwent similar testing with rod-optimized stimuli. Cone absolute threshold, that is, the minimum light energy for which subjects were just able to detect a visual stimulus with any response criterion, was 203 ± 38 photons at the cornea, ∼0.47 log units lower than previously reported. Two-alternative forced-choice measurements in a subset of subjects yielded consistent results. Cone thresholds were less responsive to criterion changes than rod thresholds, suggesting a limit to the stimulus information recoverable from the cone mosaic in addition to the limit imposed by Poisson noise. Results were consistent with expectations for detection in the face of stimulus uncertainty. We discuss implications of these findings for modeling the first stages of human cone vision and interpreting psychophysical data acquired with adaptive optics at the spatial scale of the receptor mosaic. PMID:21270115

  11. Kinetic Stability of MOF-5 in Humid Environments: Impact of Powder Densification, Humidity Level, and Exposure Time.

    PubMed

    Ming, Yang; Purewal, Justin; Yang, Jun; Xu, Chunchuan; Soltis, Rick; Warner, James; Veenstra, Mike; Gaab, Manuela; Müller, Ulrich; Siegel, Donald J

    2015-05-05

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are an emerging class of microporous, crystalline materials with potential applications in the capture, storage, and separation of gases. Of the many known MOFs, MOF-5 has attracted considerable attention because of its ability to store gaseous fuels at low pressure with high densities. Nevertheless, MOF-5 and several other MOFs exhibit limited stability upon exposure to reactive species such as water. The present study quantifies the impact of humid air exposure on the properties of MOF-5 as a function of exposure time, humidity level, and morphology (i.e., powders vs pellets). Properties examined include hydrogen storage capacity, surface area, and crystallinity. Water adsorption/desorption isotherms are measured using a gravimetric technique; the first uptake exhibits a type V isotherm with a sudden increase in uptake at ∼50% relative humidity. For humidity levels below this threshold only minor degradation is observed for exposure times up to several hours, suggesting that MOF-5 is more stable than generally assumed under moderately humid conditions. In contrast, irreversible degradation occurs in a matter of minutes for exposures above the 50% threshold. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy indicates that molecular and/or dissociated water is inserted into the skeletal framework after long exposure times. Densification into pellets can slow the degradation of MOF-5 significantly, and may present a pathway to enhance the stability of some MOFs.

  12. Absolute calibration of optical tweezers

    SciTech Connect

    Viana, N.B.; Mazolli, A.; Maia Neto, P.A.; Nussenzveig, H.M.; Rocha, M.S.; Mesquita, O.N.

    2006-03-27

    As a step toward absolute calibration of optical tweezers, a first-principles theory of trapping forces with no adjustable parameters, corrected for spherical aberration, is experimentally tested. Employing two very different setups, we find generally very good agreement for the transverse trap stiffness as a function of microsphere radius for a broad range of radii, including the values employed in practice, and at different sample chamber depths. The domain of validity of the WKB ('geometrical optics') approximation to the theory is verified. Theoretical predictions for the trapping threshold, peak position, depth variation, multiple equilibria, and 'jump' effects are also confirmed.

  13. A preliminary study of the application of HCMM satellite data to define initial and boundary conditions for numerical models: A case study in St. Louis, Missouri

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vukovich, F. M. (Principal Investigator)

    1982-01-01

    Infrared and visible HCMM data were used to examine the potential application of these data to define initial and boundary conditions for mesoscale numerical models. Various boundary layer models were used to calculate the distribution of the surface heat flux, specific humidity depression (the difference between the specific humidity in the air at approxmately the 10 m level and the specific humidity at the ground), and the eddy vicosity in a 72 km by 72 km area centered about St. Louis, Missouri. Various aspects of the implications of the results on the meteorology of St. Louis are discussed. Overall, the results indicated that a reasonable estimate of the surface heat flux, urban albedo, ground temperature, and specific humidity depression can be obtained using HCMM satellite data. Values of the ground-specific humidity can be obtained if the distribution of the air-specific humidity is available. More research is required in estimating the absolute magnitude of the specific humidity depression because calculations may be sensitive to model parameters.

  14. Influence of Quaternary Benzophenantridine and Protopine Alkaloids on Growth Performance, Dietary Energy, Carcass Traits, Visceral Mass, and Rumen Health in Finishing Ewes under Conditions of Severe Temperature-humidity Index.

    PubMed

    Estrada-Angulo, A; Aguilar-Hernández, A; Osuna-Pérez, M; Núñez-Benítez, V H; Castro-Pérez, B I; Silva-Hidalgo, G; Contreras-Pérez, G; Barreras, A; Plascencia, A; Zinn, R A

    2016-05-01

    Twenty Pelibuey×Katahdin ewes (35±2.3 kg) were used to determine the effects of the consumption of standardized plant extract containing a mixture of quaternary benzophenanthridine alkaloids and protopine alkaloids (QBA+PA) on growth performance, dietary energetics, visceral mass, and ruminal epithelial health in heat-stressed ewes fed with a high-energy corn-based diet. The basal diet (13.9% crude protein and 2.09 Mcal of net energy [NE] of maintenance/kg of dry matter) contained 49.7% starch and 15.3% neutral detergent fiber. Source of QBA+PA was Sangrovit RS (SANG) which contains 3 g of quaternary benzophenathridine and protopine alkaloids per kg of product. Treatments consisted of a daily consumption of 0 or 0.5 g SANG/ewe. Ewes were grouped by weight and assigned to 10 pens (5 pens/treatment), with two ewes per pen. The experimental period lasted 70 days. The mean temperature humidity index during the course of this experiment was 81.7±1.0 (severe heat stress). There were no treatment effects on water intake. Dry matter intake was not affected (p = 0.70) by treatments, but the group fed SANG had a numerically (11.2%) higher gain in comparison to the control group, SANG improved gain efficiency (8.3%, p = 0.04), dietary NE (5.2%, p<0.01) and the observed-to-expected NE (5.9%, p<0.01). Supplemental SANG did not affect (p≥0.12) carcass characteristics, chemical composition of shoulder, and organ weights (g/kg empty body weight) of stomach complex, intestines, and heart/lung. Supplemental SANG decreased liver weight (10.3%, p = 0.02) and increased visceral fat (16.9%, p = 0.02). Rumen epithelium of ewes fed SANG had lower scores for cellular dropsical degeneration (2.08 vs 2.34, p = 0.02), parakeratosis (1.30 vs 1.82, p = 0.03) and neutrophil infiltration (2.08 vs 2.86, p = 0.05) than controls. It is concluded that SANG supplementation helped ameliorate the negative effects of severe heat on growth performance of feedlot ewes fed high-energy corn-based diets

  15. University of the humid tropics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The creation of a foundation called the University of the Humid Tropics (UNITROP) was announced by Brazilian atmospheric scientist Luiz Carlos Molion at the AGU Chapman Conference on Global Biomass Burning, held March 23 in Williamsburg, Va. The headquarters for UNITROP is in Manaus, Amazonia, Brazil. UNITROP is not a university in a narrow sense, but an institution created and run by scientists with the purpose of understanding Amazonia and developing it socio-economically in harmony with its environment, Molion said.The scientific objectives of UNITROP are: Research: Promote, organize and fund researchers and research in Amazonia, encompassing all branches of science, from social and aboriginal issues to biogeophysicalchemical processes, and leading to an integrated understanding of the tropical forest environment and its transformation.

  16. Frost Growth and Densification on a Flat Surface in Laminar Flow with Variable Humidity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandula, M.

    2012-01-01

    Experiments are performed concerning frost growth and densification in laminar flow over a flat surface under conditions of constant and variable humidity. The flat plate test specimen is made of aluminum-6031, and has dimensions of 0.3 mx0.3 mx6.35 mm. Results for the first variable humidity case are obtained for a plate temperature of 255.4 K, air velocity of 1.77 m/s, air temperature of 295.1 K, and a relative humidity continuously ranging from 81 to 54%. The second variable humidity test case corresponds to plate temperature of 255.4 K, air velocity of 2.44 m/s, air temperature of 291.8 K, and a relative humidity ranging from 66 to 59%. Results for the constant humidity case are obtained for a plate temperature of 263.7 K, air velocity of 1.7 m/s, air temperature of 295 K, and a relative humidity of 71.6 %. Comparisons of the data with the author's frost model extended to accommodate variable humidity suggest satisfactory agreement between the theory and the data for both constant and variable humidity.

  17. Technical Highlight: Evaluation of Humidity Control Options in Hot-Humid Climate Homes

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2011-12-01

    This technical highlight describes NREL research to analyze the indoor relative humidity in three home types in the hot-humid climate zone, and examine the impacts of various dehumidification equipment and controls.

  18. Surface diffusivity of cleaved NaCl crystals as a function of humidity: Impedance spectroscopy measurements and implications for crack healing in rock salt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koelemeijer, Paula J.; Peach, Colin J.; Spiers, Christopher J.

    2012-01-01

    Rock salt offers an attractive host rock for geological storage applications, because of its naturally low permeability and the ability of excavation-induced cracks to heal by fluid-assisted diffusive mass transfer. However, while diffusive transport rates in bulk NaCl solution are rapid and well characterized, such data are not directly applicable to storage conditions where crack walls are coated with thin adsorbed water films. To reliably predict healing times in geological storage applications, data on mass transport rates in adsorbed films are needed. We determined the surface diffusivity in such films for conditions with absolute humidities (AH) ranging from 1 to 18 g/m3 (relative humidities (RH) of 4%-78%) by measuring the surface impedance of single NaCl crystals. We use the impedance results to calculate the effective surface diffusivity S = DδCusing the Nernst-Einstein equation. TheS values obtained lie in the range 1 × 10-27 m3 s-1 at very dry conditions to 1 × 10-19 m3 s-1 for the deliquescence point at 296 K, which is in reasonable agreement with existing values for grain boundary diffusion under wet conditions. Estimates for the diffusivity D made assuming a film thickness δ of 50-90 nm and no major effects of thickness on the solubility C lie in the range of 1 × 10-14 to 8 × 10-12 m2 s-1 for the highest humidities studied (14-18 g/m3 AH, 60%-78% RH). For geological storage systems in rock salt, we predict S values between 1 × 10-22 - 8 × 10-18 m3 s-1. These imply crack healing rates 6 to 7 orders of magnitude lower than expected for brine-filled cracks.

  19. Cosmology with negative absolute temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieira, J. P. P.; Byrnes, Christian T.; Lewis, Antony

    2016-08-01

    Negative absolute temperatures (NAT) are an exotic thermodynamical consequence of quantum physics which has been known since the 1950's (having been achieved in the lab on a number of occasions). Recently, the work of Braun et al. [1] has rekindled interest in negative temperatures and hinted at a possibility of using NAT systems in the lab as dark energy analogues. This paper goes one step further, looking into the cosmological consequences of the existence of a NAT component in the Universe. NAT-dominated expanding Universes experience a borderline phantom expansion (w < -1) with no Big Rip, and their contracting counterparts are forced to bounce after the energy density becomes sufficiently large. Both scenarios might be used to solve horizon and flatness problems analogously to standard inflation and bouncing cosmologies. We discuss the difficulties in obtaining and ending a NAT-dominated epoch, and possible ways of obtaining density perturbations with an acceptable spectrum.

  20. MAGSAT: Vector magnetometer absolute sensor alignment determination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acuna, M. H.

    1981-01-01

    A procedure is described for accurately determining the absolute alignment of the magnetic axes of a triaxial magnetometer sensor with respect to an external, fixed, reference coordinate system. The method does not require that the magnetic field vector orientation, as generated by a triaxial calibration coil system, be known to better than a few degrees from its true position, and minimizes the number of positions through which a sensor assembly must be rotated to obtain a solution. Computer simulations show that accuracies of better than 0.4 seconds of arc can be achieved under typical test conditions associated with existing magnetic test facilities. The basic approach is similar in nature to that presented by McPherron and Snare (1978) except that only three sensor positions are required and the system of equations to be solved is considerably simplified. Applications of the method to the case of the MAGSAT Vector Magnetometer are presented and the problems encountered discussed.

  1. Taxonomy and remote sensing of leaf mass per area (LMA) in humid tropical forests.

    PubMed

    Asner, Gregory P; Martin, Roberta E; Tupayachi, Raul; Emerson, Ruth; Martinez, Paola; Sinca, Felipe; Powell, George V N; Wright, S Joseph; Lugo, Ariel E

    2011-01-01

    Leaf mass per area (LMA) is a trait of central importance to plant physiology and ecosystem function, but LMA patterns in the upper canopies of humid tropical forests have proved elusive due to tall species and high diversity. We collected top-of-canopy leaf samples from 2873 individuals in 57 sites spread across the Neotropics, Australasia, and Caribbean and Pacific Islands to quantify environmental and taxonomic drivers of LMA variation, and to advance remote-sensing measures of LMA. We uncovered strong taxonomic organization of LMA, with species accounting for 70% of the global variance and up to 62% of the variation within a forest stand. Climate, growth habit, and site conditions are secondary contributors (1-23%) to the observed LMA patterns. Intraspecific variation in LMA averages 16%, which is a fraction of the variation observed between species. We then used spectroscopic remote sensing (400-2500 nm) to estimate LMA with an absolute uncertainty of 14-15 g/m2 (r2 = 0.85), or approximately 10% of the global mean. With radiative transfer modeling, we demonstrated the scalability of spectroscopic remote sensing of LMA to the canopy level. Our study indicates that remotely sensed patterns of LMA will be driven by taxonomic variation against a backdrop of environmental controls expressed at site and regional levels.

  2. [Heat and moisture exchangers for conditioning of inspired air of intubated patients in intensive care. The humidification properties of passive air exchangers under clinical conditions].

    PubMed

    Rathgeber, J; Züchner, K; Kietzmann, D; Weyland, W

    1995-04-01

    Heat and moisture exchangers (HME) are used as artificial noses for intubated patients to prevent tracheo-bronchial or pulmonary damage resulting from dry and cold inspired gases. HME are mounted directly on the tracheal tube, where they collect a large fraction of the heat and moisture of the expired air, adding this to the subsequent inspired breath. The effective performance depends on the water-retention capacity of the HME: the amount of water added to the inspired gas cannot exceed the stored water uptake of the previous breath. This study evaluates the efficiency of four different HME under laboratory and clinical conditions using a new moisture-measuring device. METHODS. In a first step, the absolute efficiency of four different HME (DAR Hygrobac, Gibeck Humid-Vent 2P, Pall BB 22-15 T, and Pall BB 100) was evaluated using a lung model simulating physiological heat and humidity conditions of the upper airways. The model was ventilated with tidal volumes of 500, 1,000, and 1,500 ml and different flow rates. The water content of the ventilated air was determined between tracheal tube and HME using a new high-resolution humidity meter and compared with the absolute water loss of the exhaled air at the gas outlet of a Siemens Servo C ventilator measured with a dew-point hygrometer. Secondly, the moisturizing efficiency was evaluated under clinical conditions in an intensive care unit with 25 intubated patients. Maintaining the ventilatory conditions for each patient, the HME were randomly changed. The humidity data were determined as described above and compared with the laboratory findings. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION. The water content at the respirator outlet is inversely equivalent to the humidity of the inspired gases and represents the water loss from the respiratory tract if the patient is ventilated with dry gases. Moisture retention and heating capacity decreased with higher volumes and higher flow rates. These data are simple to obtain without affecting the

  3. The design of an embedded system for controlling humidity and temperature room

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwi Teguh, R.; Didik Eko, S.; Laksono, Pringgo D.; Jamaluddin, Anif

    2016-11-01

    The aim of the system is to design an embedded system for maintenance confortable room. The confortable room was design by controlling temperature (on range 18 - 34 °C) and humidity (on range 40% - 70%.) of room condition. Temperature and humidity of room were maintained using four variable such as lamp for warm, water pump for distributing water vapour, a fan for air circullation and an exhaust-fan for air cleaner. The system was constucted both hardware (humidity sensor, microcontroller, pump, lamp, fan) and software (arduino IDE). The result shows that the system was perfectly performed to control room condition.

  4. A Roadmap for Humidity and Moisture Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, S.; Benyon, R.; Böse, N.; Heinonen, M.

    2008-10-01

    An initial roadmap for humidity and related measurements was developed in Spring 2006 as part of the EUROMET iMERA activity toward increasing impact from national investment in European metrology R&D. The conclusions address both humidity (for which standards and traceability methodologies exist, but need to be developed) and moisture content of materials (for which measurement traceability is more problematic and is not so well developed in general). The roadmap represents a shared vision of how humidity and moisture measurements and standards should develop over the next 15 years to meet future needs, open to revision as needs and technologies evolve. The roadmap identifies the main social and economic triggers that drive developments in humidity and moisture measurements and standards—notably, global warming and advanced manufacturing processes. Stemming from these triggers, key targets that require improved humidity and moisture measurements are identified. In view of global warming, one key target is the development of improved models of climate through improved measurements of atmospheric water vapor. A further target is the reduction of carbon emissions through humidity measurement to optimize industrial heat treatment and combustion processes, and through humidity and moisture measurements to achieve energy-efficient buildings. For high-performance manufacturing, one key target is improved precision control of manufacturing processes through better humidity and moisture measurements. Another key target is contaminant-free manufacture in industries such as microelectronics, through high-purity gases of known moisture content at the parts-per-trillion level. To enable these outcomes, the roadmap identifies the advances needed in measurement standards. These include the following: improved trace humidity standards; new humidity standards to cover high temperatures and pressures, steam, and non-air gases; and improved standards for moisture content of

  5. Stable and Selective Humidity Sensing Using Stacked Black Phosphorus Flakes.

    PubMed

    Yasaei, Poya; Behranginia, Amirhossein; Foroozan, Tara; Asadi, Mohammad; Kim, Kibum; Khalili-Araghi, Fatemeh; Salehi-Khojin, Amin

    2015-10-27

    Black phosphorus (BP) atomic layers are known to undergo chemical degradation in humid air. Yet in more robust configurations such as films, composites, and embedded structures, BP can potentially be utilized in a large number of practical applications. In this study, we explored the sensing characteristics of BP films and observed an ultrasensitive and selective response toward humid air with a trace-level detection capability and a very minor drift over time. Our experiments show that the drain current of the BP sensor increases by ∼4 orders of magnitude as the relative humidity (RH) varies from 10% to 85%, which ranks it among the highest ever reported values for humidity detection. The mechanistic studies indicate that the operation principle of the BP film sensors is based on the modulation in the leakage ionic current caused by autoionization of water molecules and ionic solvation of the phosphorus oxoacids produced on moist BP surfaces. Our stability tests reveal that the response of the BP film sensors remains nearly unchanged after prolonged exposures (up to 3 months) to ambient conditions. This study opens up the route for utilizing BP stacked films in many potential applications such as energy generation/storage systems, electrocatalysis, and chemical/biosensing.

  6. Age and forgetfulness: absolute versus comparison decisions about capability.

    PubMed

    Erber, J T; Prager, I G

    1997-01-01

    Perceivers were assigned to one of two decision conditions. In an absolute decision condition, perceivers rated how likely they would be to allow a young or old highly forgetful, slightly forgetful, or nonforgetful target to perform a challenging task. In a comparison decision condition, perceivers rated two targets, one young and one old, who had a similar level of forgetfulness. Separate Decision Type x Target Forgetfulness analyses of variance were conducted on ratings of the two target age groups. Young targets received higher ratings in the comparison than in the absolute condition, whereas old targets were rated the same in the two conditions. There was some preference for young targets in a comparison situation, but it was concluded that forgetfulness was a more important factor than age in perceivers' ratings.

  7. Roller compaction: Effect of relative humidity of lactose powder.

    PubMed

    Omar, Chalak S; Dhenge, Ranjit M; Palzer, Stefan; Hounslow, Michael J; Salman, Agba D

    2016-09-01

    The effect of storage at different relative humidity conditions, for various types of lactose, on roller compaction behaviour was investigated. Three types of lactose were used in this study: anhydrous lactose (SuperTab21AN), spray dried lactose (SuperTab11SD) and α-lactose monohydrate 200M. These powders differ in their amorphous contents, due to different manufacturing processes. The powders were stored in a climatic chamber at different relative humidity values ranging from 10% to 80% RH. It was found that the roller compaction behaviour and ribbon properties were different for powders conditioned to different relative humidities. The amount of fines produced, which is undesirable in roller compaction, was found to be different at different relative humidity. The minimum amount of fines produced was found to be for powders conditioned at 20-40% RH. The maximum amount of fines was produced for powders conditioned at 80% RH. This was attributed to the decrease in powder flowability, as indicated by the flow function coefficient ffc and the angle of repose. Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) was also applied to determine the velocity of primary particles during ribbon production, and it was found that the velocity of the powder during the roller compaction decreased with powders stored at high RH. This resulted in less powder being present in the compaction zone at the edges of the rollers, which resulted in ribbons with a smaller overall width. The relative humidity for the storage of powders has shown to have minimal effect on the ribbon tensile strength at low RH conditions (10-20%). The lowest tensile strength of ribbons produced from lactose 200M and SD was for powders conditioned at 80% RH, whereas, ribbons produced from lactose 21AN at the same condition of 80% RH showed the highest tensile strength. The storage RH range 20-40% was found to be an optimum condition for roll compacting three lactose powders, as it resulted in a minimum amount of fines in the

  8. Effects of Aging Structures and Humidity on Fatigue Properties of Maraging Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Kousuke; Nagano, Takanori; Moriyama, Michihiko; Wang, Xishu; Kawagoishi, Norio

    Effects of aging structures and humidity on fatigue properties of 350 grade 18% Ni maraging steel were investigated under rotating bending in relative humidity of 25% and 85%. Aging conditions tested were a conventional single aging and a double one which was aged at low temperature after the conventional aging. In each aging, under and peak aged steels were prepared. Tensile strength was increased by the double aging without reduction of the ductility. Proportional relation between fatigue limit and Vickers hardness held until 750HV in low humidity. However fatigue strength was largely decreased by high humidity, especially in the peak aged steel at the single aging. The decrease in fatigue strength by high humidity was mainly caused by the acceleration of a crack initiation due to the anodic dissolution. The acceleration of a crack initiation was larger in the steel peak aged at the single aging with larger precipitated particles.

  9. Analysis of building envelope insulation performance utilizing integrated temperature and humidity sensors.

    PubMed

    Hung, San-Shan; Chang, Chih-Yuan; Hsu, Cheng-Jui; Chen, Shih-Wei

    2012-01-01

    A major cause of high energy consumption for air conditioning in indoor spaces is the thermal storage characteristics of a building's envelope concrete material; therefore, the physiological signals (temperature and humidity) within concrete structures are an important reference for building energy management. The current approach to measuring temperature and humidity within concrete structures (i.e., thermocouples and fiber optics) is limited by problems of wiring requirements, discontinuous monitoring, and high costs. This study uses radio frequency integrated circuits (RFIC) combined with temperature and humidity sensors (T/H sensors) for the design of a smart temperature and humidity information material (STHIM) that automatically, regularly, and continuously converts temperature and humidity signals within concrete and transmits them by radio frequency (RF) to the Building Physiology Information System (BPIS). This provides a new approach to measurement that incorporates direct measurement, wireless communication, and real-time continuous monitoring to assist building designers and users in making energy management decisions and judgments.

  10. Analysis of Building Envelope Insulation Performance Utilizing Integrated Temperature and Humidity Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Hung, San-Shan; Chang, Chih-Yuan; Hsu, Cheng-Jui; Chen, Shih-Wei

    2012-01-01

    A major cause of high energy consumption for air conditioning in indoor spaces is the thermal storage characteristics of a building's envelope concrete material; therefore, the physiological signals (temperature and humidity) within concrete structures are an important reference for building energy management. The current approach to measuring temperature and humidity within concrete structures (i.e., thermocouples and fiber optics) is limited by problems of wiring requirements, discontinuous monitoring, and high costs. This study uses radio frequency integrated circuits (RFIC) combined with temperature and humidity sensors (T/H sensors) for the design of a smart temperature and humidity information material (STHIM) that automatically, regularly, and continuously converts temperature and humidity signals within concrete and transmits them by radio frequency (RF) to the Building Physiology Information System (BPIS). This provides a new approach to measurement that incorporates direct measurement, wireless communication, and real-time continuous monitoring to assist building designers and users in making energy management decisions and judgments. PMID:23012529

  11. Absolute Stability Analysis of a Phase Plane Controlled Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jang, Jiann-Woei; Plummer, Michael; Bedrossian, Nazareth; Hall, Charles; Jackson, Mark; Spanos, Pol

    2010-01-01

    Many aerospace attitude control systems utilize phase plane control schemes that include nonlinear elements such as dead zone and ideal relay. To evaluate phase plane control robustness, stability margin prediction methods must be developed. Absolute stability is extended to predict stability margins and to define an abort condition. A constrained optimization approach is also used to design flex filters for roll control. The design goal is to optimize vehicle tracking performance while maintaining adequate stability margins. Absolute stability is shown to provide satisfactory stability constraints for the optimization.

  12. Kinetics of the humid aging of magnetic recording tape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bertram, H. N.; Cuddihy, E. F.

    1982-01-01

    The kinetics of the hydrolysis of polyester urethane binders of magnetic recording tape is described. Kinetic data were generated from measurements of acetone-extractable hydrolyzed binder products versus time for various humidity-temperature environments. These data can be described by a linear, single product, reversible rate equation. This equation, coupled with measurements on the effect of hydrolysis on recorded tape performance, is used to predict proper environmental storage conditions for magnetic tape.

  13. Humidity and illumination organic semiconductor copper phthalocyanine sensor for environmental monitoring.

    PubMed

    Karimov, K S; Qazi, I; Khan, T A; Draper, P H; Khalid, F A; Mahroof-Tahir, M

    2008-06-01

    In this investigation properties of organic semiconductor copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) capacitive humidity and illumination sensors were studied. Organic thin film was deposited by vacuum evaporation on a glass substrate with silver surface-type electrodes to form the Ag/CuPc/Ag sensor. The capacitance of the samples was evaluated at room temperature in the relative humidity range of 35-92%. It was observed that capacitance of the Ag/CuPc/Ag sensor increases with increase in humidity. The ratio of the relative capacitance to relative humidity was about 200. It is assumed that in general the capacitive response of the sensor is associated with polarization due to absorption of water molecules and transfer of charges (electrons and holes). It was observed that under filament lamp illumination of up to 1,000 lx the capacitance of the Ag/CuPc/Ag photo capacitive detectors increased continuously by 20% as compared to dark condition. It is assumed that photo capacitive response of the sensor is associated with polarization due to transfer of photo-generated electrons and holes. An equivalent circuit of the Ag/CuPc/Ag capacitive humidity and illumination sensor was developed. Humidity and illumination dependent capacitance properties of this sensor make it attractive for use in humidity and illumination multi-meters. The sensor may be used in instruments for environmental monitoring of humidity and illumination.

  14. Humidity trends imply increased sensitivity to clouds in a warming Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Christopher J.; Walden, Von P.; Rowe, Penny M.; Shupe, Matthew D.

    2015-12-01

    Infrared radiative processes are implicated in Arctic warming and sea-ice decline. The infrared cloud radiative effect (CRE) at the surface is modulated by cloud properties; however, CRE also depends on humidity because clouds emit at wavelengths that are semi-transparent to greenhouse gases, most notably water vapour. Here we show how temperature and humidity control CRE through competing influences between the mid- and far-infrared. At constant relative humidity, CRE does not decrease with increasing temperature/absolute humidity as expected, but rather is found to be approximately constant for temperatures characteristic of the Arctic. This stability is disrupted if relative humidity varies. Our findings explain observed seasonal and regional variability in Arctic CRE of order 10 W m-2. With the physical properties of Arctic clouds held constant, we calculate recent increases in CRE of 1-5 W m-2 in autumn and winter, which are projected to reach 5-15 W m-2 by 2050, implying increased sensitivity of the surface to clouds.

  15. Humidity trends imply increased sensitivity to clouds in a warming Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Christopher; Walden, Von; Rowe, Penny; Shupe, Matthew

    2016-04-01

    Infrared radiative processes are implicated in Arctic warming and sea-ice decline. The infrared cloud radiative effect (CRE) at the surface is modulated by cloud properties, but CRE also depends on humidity because clouds emit at wavelengths that are semi-transparent to greenhouse gases, most notably water vapour. Here we show how temperature and humidity control CRE through competing influences between the mid- and far-infrared. At constant relative humidity, CRE does not decrease with increasing temperature/absolute humidity as expected, but rather is found to be approximately constant for temperatures characteristic of the Arctic. This stability is disrupted if relative humidity varies. Our findings explain observed seasonal and regional variability in Arctic CRE of order 10 W m-2. With the physical properties of Arctic clouds held constant, we calculate recent increases in CRE of 1-5 W m-2 in autumn and winter, which are projected to reach 5-15 W m-2 by 2050, implying increased sensitivity of the surface to clouds.

  16. Humidity trends imply increased sensitivity to clouds in a warming Arctic.

    PubMed

    Cox, Christopher J; Walden, Von P; Rowe, Penny M; Shupe, Matthew D

    2015-12-10

    Infrared radiative processes are implicated in Arctic warming and sea-ice decline. The infrared cloud radiative effect (CRE) at the surface is modulated by cloud properties; however, CRE also depends on humidity because clouds emit at wavelengths that are semi-transparent to greenhouse gases, most notably water vapour. Here we show how temperature and humidity control CRE through competing influences between the mid- and far-infrared. At constant relative humidity, CRE does not decrease with increasing temperature/absolute humidity as expected, but rather is found to be approximately constant for temperatures characteristic of the Arctic. This stability is disrupted if relative humidity varies. Our findings explain observed seasonal and regional variability in Arctic CRE of order 10 W m(-2). With the physical properties of Arctic clouds held constant, we calculate recent increases in CRE of 1-5 W m(-2) in autumn and winter, which are projected to reach 5-15 W m(-2) by 2050, implying increased sensitivity of the surface to clouds.

  17. Humidity trends imply increased sensitivity to clouds in a warming Arctic

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Christopher J.; Walden, Von P.; Rowe, Penny M.; Shupe, Matthew D.

    2015-01-01

    Infrared radiative processes are implicated in Arctic warming and sea-ice decline. The infrared cloud radiative effect (CRE) at the surface is modulated by cloud properties; however, CRE also depends on humidity because clouds emit at wavelengths that are semi-transparent to greenhouse gases, most notably water vapour. Here we show how temperature and humidity control CRE through competing influences between the mid- and far-infrared. At constant relative humidity, CRE does not decrease with increasing temperature/absolute humidity as expected, but rather is found to be approximately constant for temperatures characteristic of the Arctic. This stability is disrupted if relative humidity varies. Our findings explain observed seasonal and regional variability in Arctic CRE of order 10 W m−2. With the physical properties of Arctic clouds held constant, we calculate recent increases in CRE of 1–5 W m−2 in autumn and winter, which are projected to reach 5–15 W m−2 by 2050, implying increased sensitivity of the surface to clouds. PMID:26657324

  18. Humidity trends imply increased sensitivity to clouds in a warming Arctic

    DOE PAGES

    Cox, Christopher J.; Walden, Von P.; Rowe, Penny M.; ...

    2015-12-10

    Infrared radiative processes are implicated in Arctic warming and sea-ice decline. The infrared cloud radiative effect (CRE) at the surface is modulated by cloud properties; however, CRE also depends on humidity because clouds emit at wavelengths that are semi-transparent to greenhouse gases, most notably water vapour. Here we show how temperature and humidity control CRE through competing influences between the mid- and far-infrared. At constant relative humidity, CRE does not decrease with increasing temperature/absolute humidity as expected, but rather is found to be approximately constant for temperatures characteristic of the Arctic. This stability is disrupted if relative humidity varies. Ourmore » findings explain observed seasonal and regional variability in Arctic CRE of order 10Wm 2. With the physical properties of Arctic clouds held constant, we calculate recent increases in CRE of 1–5Wm 2 in autumn and winter, which are projected to reach 5–15Wm 2 by 2050, implying increased sensitivity of the surface to clouds.« less

  19. Humidity trends imply increased sensitivity to clouds in a warming Arctic

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, Christopher J.; Walden, Von P.; Rowe, Penny M.; Shupe, Matthew D.

    2015-12-10

    Infrared radiative processes are implicated in Arctic warming and sea-ice decline. The infrared cloud radiative effect (CRE) at the surface is modulated by cloud properties; however, CRE also depends on humidity because clouds emit at wavelengths that are semi-transparent to greenhouse gases, most notably water vapour. Here we show how temperature and humidity control CRE through competing influences between the mid- and far-infrared. At constant relative humidity, CRE does not decrease with increasing temperature/absolute humidity as expected, but rather is found to be approximately constant for temperatures characteristic of the Arctic. This stability is disrupted if relative humidity varies. Our findings explain observed seasonal and regional variability in Arctic CRE of order 10Wm 2. With the physical properties of Arctic clouds held constant, we calculate recent increases in CRE of 1–5Wm 2 in autumn and winter, which are projected to reach 5–15Wm 2 by 2050, implying increased sensitivity of the surface to clouds.

  20. Effects of Temperature and Humidity on Major League Baseballs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerstman, Victoria; Raue, Brian

    2003-11-01

    In a study inspired by the famous humidor of the Colorado Rockies of Major League Baseball, we have measured the effects of temperature and humidity on the elasticity of official Major League baseballs. The elasticity, e, also referred to as the coefficient of restitution (COR), of the baseballs was determined by dropping the balls from a fixed height onto a concrete floor and determining the speed of the ball after the initial impact. Corrections for air drag were made to the measured COR. Measurements were done for baseballs stored under a wide variety of conditions that included storage in the freezer compartment of a household refrigerator, storage in an 80^rcC oven with varying humidity conditions, and storage in a crude humidor. The balls were tested over a period of several hours after removal to nominal conditions. Our results show a linear increase of the COR with increasing temperature, as well as a nearly linear decrease in the COR as water mass is increased. Using the results of our measurements, we have determined the effects of temperature and humidity on batted-ball speeds and flight distances at the Rockies' home field.

  1. Changing rainfall and humidity within Southeast Texas.

    PubMed

    Smith, Robert Kennedy

    2015-01-01

    Southeast Texas houses a precipitation transition zone between drier conditions to the North and West and some of the wettest parts of the continental U.S. to the East. The Region has seen an increase in its reported normal annual precipitation totals in recent decades. In order to determine if the additional rainfall has been influenced by warming temperatures or is within the variability of the State's long-term drought cycles, several analyses were performed on historical climate data. The analyses answered several questions: Have global and regional climate change models predicted precipitation increases in Southeast Texas and are future increases expected? Do historical monthly precipitation totals at various sites in the region provide clear trends of wetter conditions that can be discerned from long-term drought cycles? Are rainfall patterns changing with less frequent, heavier rain events? Do the reported increases in annual rainfall actually lead to wetter conditions in the region? Climate models have not predicted larger annual average precipitation totals nor do they forecast increases for Southeast Texas. While recent decades may have seen more rain relative to earlier periods, a combined analysis of observation stations across different parts of the Region shows that long-term trends are dependent on when the data is selected relative to a drought cycle. While some stations show larger amounts of rain falling during fewer days, these trends do not hold across all periods. An examination of hourly data does not show an increase in extreme rainfall events or a decrease in the number of hours during which rain has fallen. Even though rainfall has not decreased, average relative humidity has fallen. This suggests that the area is drying even with steady or increasing amounts of rain.

  2. [Influence of temperature and humidity on physico-pharmaceutical characteristics of Rasilez(®) tablets].

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Yuki; Nakajima, Takanori; Iwata, Masanori; Hayashi, Yoshihiro; Takayama, Kozo; Saito, Hiroshi; Sako, Ken-ichi; Matsuda, Yoshikazu; Kimura, Masayuki

    2014-01-01

    Rasilez(®) tablets (RTs) contain the active ingredient aliskiren, which is a direct renin inhibitor of the renin-angiotensin system and used for the treatment of hypertension. We examined the influence of temperature and humidity on the physico-pharmaceutical characteristics (mass, volume, hardness, elution) of RTs. The RTs were preserved under conditions in which the temperature and humidity were altered using the second-order spherical composite experimental design for multi-objective problems. The characteristics of RTs were influenced more by the humidity than temperature, and differed markedly with over 55% relative humidity (RH). The mass and volume were increased with increasing humidity, and the tablets swelled. The hardness after vacuum-drying of the tablets, which preserved moisture conditions, was increased. Semitransparent particles were observed in the cross-section of the drying tablets in which aliskiren crystal forms were changed to amorphous forms. The mean dissolution time (MDT) of tablets was reduced with increasing humidity. The critical relative humidity (CRH) of the tablets was 36.1%RH at 30°C. These results suggest that RTs, on moisture absorption, showed changes in not their appearance and hardness, but also in crystal forms and the elution characteristics of aliskiren.

  3. EFFECT OF TEMPERATURE AND HUMIDITY ON FORMALDEHYDE EMISSIONS IN TEMPORARY HOUSING UNITS

    SciTech Connect

    Parthasarathy, Srinandini; Maddalena, Randy L.; Russell, Marion L.; Apte, Michael G.

    2010-04-01

    The effect of temperature and humidity on formaldehyde emissions from samples collected from temporary housing units (THUs) was studied. The THUs were supplied by the U.S Federal Emergency Management Administration (FEMA) to families that lost their homes in Louisiana and Mississippi during the Hurricane Katrina and Rita disasters. Based on a previous study 1, 2, four of the composite wood surface materials that dominated contributions to indoor formaldehyde were selected to analyze the effects of temperature and humidity on the emission factors. Humidity equilibration experiments were carried out on two of the samples to determine how long the samples take to equilibrate with the surrounding environmental conditions. Small chamber experiments were then conducted to measure emission factors for the four surface materials at various temperature and humidity conditions. The samples were analyzed for formaldehyde via high performance liquid chromatography. The experiments showed that increases in temperature or humidity contributed to an increase in emission factors. A linear regression model was built using natural log of percentage relative humidity (RH) and inverse of temperature (in K) as predictor variables, and natural log of emission factors as the target variable. The coefficients of both inverse temperature and log relative humidity with log emission factor were found to be statistically significant for all the samples at the 95percent confidence level. This study should assist to retrospectively estimate indoor formaldehyde exposures of occupants of temporary housing units (THUs).

  4. Reversible Humidity Sensitive Clothing for Personal Thermoregulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Ying; Zhang, Fenghua; Wang, Meng; Gardner, Calvin J.; Kim, Gunwoo; Liu, Yanju; Leng, Jinsong; Jin, Sungho; Chen, Renkun

    2017-03-01

    Two kinds of humidity-induced, bendable smart clothing have been designed to reversibly adapt their thermal insulation functionality. The first design mimics the pores in human skin, in which pre-cut flaps open to produce pores in Nafion sheets when humidity increases, as might occur during human sweating thus permitting air flow and reducing both the humidity level and the apparent temperature. Like the smart human sweating pores, the flaps can close automatically after the perspiration to keep the wearer warm. The second design involves thickness adjustable clothes by inserting the bent polymer sheets between two fabrics. As the humidity increases, the sheets become thinner, thus reducing the gap between the two fabrics to reduce the thermal insulation. The insulation layer can recover its original thickness upon humidity reduction to restore its warmth-preservation function. Such humidity sensitive smart polymer materials can be utilized to adjust personal comfort, and be effective in reducing energy consumption for building heating or cooling with numerous smart design.

  5. How factoring in humidity adds value

    SciTech Connect

    Berlin, G. )

    1994-09-01

    Humidity plays a major role in health, comfort, and production. This article is a brief overview of the technologies available and a detailed explanation of how to calculate humidification loads. The problems caused by dry air vary from one building to another and from one area to another. But basically, there are three major problem types: static electricity, poor moisture stability, health and comfort problems. In today's business offices, static electricity can disrupt operations and increase operating costs. In printing facilities, low humidity causes poor ink registration. Also, sheets of paper stick together and jam machines, wasting time and paper. In computer rooms and data processing areas, dry air leads to static electric discharges that cause circuit board failure, dust buildup on heads, and storage tape breakage. Moisture stability impacts industrial processes and the materials they use. In many cases, product and material deterioration is directly related to moisture fluctuations and lack of humidity control. Books, antiques, paper, wood and wood products, and fruits and vegetables are a few items that can be ruined by low or changing humidity. The health impact of low humidity shows up in dry nasal and thread membranes, dry and itchy skin, and irritated eyes. For employees, this means greater susceptibility to colds and other viral infections. The results is higher absenteeism when humidity is low, which translates into lost productivity and profits.

  6. Apparatus and methods for humidity control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dinauer, William R. (Inventor); Otis, David R. (Inventor); El-Wakil, Mohamed M. (Inventor); Vignali, John C. (Inventor); Macaulay, Philip D. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    Apparatus is provided which controls humidity in a gas. The apparatus employs a porous interface that is preferably a manifolded array of stainless steel tubes through whose porous surface water vapor can pass. One side of the porous interface is in contact with water and the opposing side is in contact with gas whose humidity is being controlled. Water vapor is emitted from the porous surface of the tubing into the gas when the gas is being humidified, and water vapor is removed from the gas through the porous surfaces when the gas is being dehumidified. The temperature of the porous interface relative to the gas temperature determines whether humidification or dehumidification is being carried out. The humidity in the gas is sensed and compared to the set point humidity. The water temperature, and consequently the porous interface temperature, are automatically controlled in response to changes in the gas humidity level above or below the set point. Any deviation from the set point humidity is thus corrected.

  7. Reversible Humidity Sensitive Clothing for Personal Thermoregulation

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Ying; Zhang, Fenghua; Wang, Meng; Gardner, Calvin J.; Kim, Gunwoo; Liu, Yanju; Leng, Jinsong; Jin, Sungho; Chen, Renkun

    2017-01-01

    Two kinds of humidity-induced, bendable smart clothing have been designed to reversibly adapt their thermal insulation functionality. The first design mimics the pores in human skin, in which pre-cut flaps open to produce pores in Nafion sheets when humidity increases, as might occur during human sweating thus permitting air flow and reducing both the humidity level and the apparent temperature. Like the smart human sweating pores, the flaps can close automatically after the perspiration to keep the wearer warm. The second design involves thickness adjustable clothes by inserting the bent polymer sheets between two fabrics. As the humidity increases, the sheets become thinner, thus reducing the gap between the two fabrics to reduce the thermal insulation. The insulation layer can recover its original thickness upon humidity reduction to restore its warmth-preservation function. Such humidity sensitive smart polymer materials can be utilized to adjust personal comfort, and be effective in reducing energy consumption for building heating or cooling with numerous smart design. PMID:28281646

  8. Reversible Humidity Sensitive Clothing for Personal Thermoregulation.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Ying; Zhang, Fenghua; Wang, Meng; Gardner, Calvin J; Kim, Gunwoo; Liu, Yanju; Leng, Jinsong; Jin, Sungho; Chen, Renkun

    2017-03-10

    Two kinds of humidity-induced, bendable smart clothing have been designed to reversibly adapt their thermal insulation functionality. The first design mimics the pores in human skin, in which pre-cut flaps open to produce pores in Nafion sheets when humidity increases, as might occur during human sweating thus permitting air flow and reducing both the humidity level and the apparent temperature. Like the smart human sweating pores, the flaps can close automatically after the perspiration to keep the wearer warm. The second design involves thickness adjustable clothes by inserting the bent polymer sheets between two fabrics. As the humidity increases, the sheets become thinner, thus reducing the gap between the two fabrics to reduce the thermal insulation. The insulation layer can recover its original thickness upon humidity reduction to restore its warmth-preservation function. Such humidity sensitive smart polymer materials can be utilized to adjust personal comfort, and be effective in reducing energy consumption for building heating or cooling with numerous smart design.

  9. Regulation of Stomatal Defense by Air Relative Humidity1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Chitrakar, Reejana; Thompson, Blaine K.; Obulareddy, Nisita; Hambright, W. Sealy

    2016-01-01

    It has long been observed that environmental conditions play crucial roles in modulating immunity and disease in plants and animals. For instance, many bacterial plant disease outbreaks occur after periods of high humidity and rain. A critical step in bacterial infection is entry into the plant interior through wounds and natural openings, such as stomata, which are adjustable microscopic pores in the epidermal tissue. Several studies have shown that stomatal closure is an integral part of the plant immune response to reduce pathogen invasion. In this study, we found that high humidity can effectively compromise Pseudomonas syringae-triggered stomatal closure in both Phaseolus vulgaris and Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), which is accompanied by early up-regulation of the jasmonic acid (JA) pathway and simultaneous down-regulation of salicylic acid (SA) pathway in guard cells. Furthermore, SA-dependent response, but not JA-dependent response, is faster in guard cells than in whole leaves, suggesting that the SA signaling in guard cells may be independent from other cell types. Thus, we conclude that high humidity, a well-known disease-promoting environmental condition, acts in part by suppressing stomatal defense and is linked to hormone signaling in guard cells. PMID:27702841

  10. Brood comb as a humidity buffer in honeybee nests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, Michael B.; Nicolson, Sue W.; Crewe, Robin M.; Dietemann, Vincent

    2010-04-01

    Adverse environmental conditions can be evaded, tolerated or modified in order for an organism to survive. During their development, some insect larvae spin cocoons which, in addition to protecting their occupants against predators, modify microclimatic conditions, thus facilitating thermoregulation or reducing evaporative water loss. Silk cocoons are spun by honeybee ( Apis mellifera) larvae and subsequently incorporated into the cell walls of the wax combs in which they develop. The accumulation of this hygroscopic silk in the thousands of cells used for brood rearing may significantly affect nest homeostasis by buffering humidity fluctuations. This study investigates the extent to which the comb may influence homeostasis by quantifying the hygroscopic capacity of the cocoons spun by honeybee larvae. When comb containing cocoons was placed at high humidity, it absorbed 11% of its own mass in water within 4 days. Newly drawn comb composed of hydrophobic wax and devoid of cocoons absorbed only 3% of its own mass. Therefore, the accumulation of cocoons in the comb may increase brood survivorship by maintaining a high and stable humidity in the cells.

  11. Influence of humidity on the nanoadhesion between a hydrophobic and a hydrophilic surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ptak, A.; Gojzewski, H.; Kappl, M.; Butt, H.-J.

    2011-02-01

    The adhesion force between a silicon nitride tip and a 1-dodecanethiol monolayer have been measured at different loading rates and different humidity. A way to extract the kinetic and interaction potential parameters for a single molecule interaction is demonstrated. The effect of the increase of van der Waals interaction strength per molecule with increasing humidity is explained by assuming a gradual adsorption of water into the tip surface hollows. The study should help in better understanding of the humidity effect on molecular level and in avoiding the underestimation of adhesion forces in micro- and nano-engineering in ambient conditions.

  12. Humidity dependence of charge transport through DNA revealed by silicon-based nanotweezers manipulation.

    PubMed

    Yamahata, Christophe; Collard, Dominique; Takekawa, Tetsuya; Kumemura, Momoko; Hashiguchi, Gen; Fujita, Hiroyuki

    2008-01-01

    The study of the electrical properties of DNA has aroused increasing interest since the last decade. So far, controversial arguments have been put forward to explain the electrical charge transport through DNA. Our experiments on DNA bundles manipulated with silicon-based actuated tweezers demonstrate undoubtedly that humidity is the main factor affecting the electrical conduction in DNA. We explain the quasi-Ohmic behavior of DNA and the exponential dependence of its conductivity with relative humidity from the adsorption of water on the DNA backbone. We propose a quantitative model that is consistent with previous studies on DNA and other materials, like porous silicon, subjected to different humidity conditions.

  13. Absolute optical metrology : nanometers to kilometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dubovitsky, Serge; Lay, O. P.; Peters, R. D.; Liebe, C. C.

    2005-01-01

    We provide and overview of the developments in the field of high-accuracy absolute optical metrology with emphasis on space-based applications. Specific work on the Modulation Sideband Technology for Absolute Ranging (MSTAR) sensor is described along with novel applications of the sensor.

  14. Introducing the Mean Absolute Deviation "Effect" Size

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorard, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    This paper revisits the use of effect sizes in the analysis of experimental and similar results, and reminds readers of the relative advantages of the mean absolute deviation as a measure of variation, as opposed to the more complex standard deviation. The mean absolute deviation is easier to use and understand, and more tolerant of extreme…

  15. Monolithically integrated absolute frequency comb laser system

    SciTech Connect

    Wanke, Michael C.

    2016-07-12

    Rather than down-convert optical frequencies, a QCL laser system directly generates a THz frequency comb in a compact monolithically integrated chip that can be locked to an absolute frequency without the need of a frequency-comb synthesizer. The monolithic, absolute frequency comb can provide a THz frequency reference and tool for high-resolution broad band spectroscopy.

  16. Application of nano-structured conducting polymers to humidity sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Pilyeon

    moisture levels because even low humidity levels saturate the sample surface within a few minutes. Because of this, it was not perfect to distinguish the effects of etching the PEDOT film for humidity detection and difficult to apply nano-columned PEDOT films as a humidity sensors under continuously changing humidity conditions. However, nano-columned PEDOT films showed excellent performance in simulated breath tests, i.e., an area where the medical needs sensors for pulmonary monitoring. Since the polymers are sensitive to heat, it was important to characterize the influence of temperature on the sensor performance. PANI nanowires and nano-columned PEDOT sensors were tested in the environmental chamber developed in this work as a function of temperature with the humidity fixed, and only the temperature was varied. The PANI nanowires showed very fast degradation at temperatures above room temperature, while the nano-columned PEDOT film performed up to 50 °C. The influence of other gases was also tested for the potential of gas sensing, selectivity, and chemical stability. In order to exclude the moisture effect during the measurement, the samples were characterized under the lowest humidity condition, RH 14% preserved in the system. Under these conditions the PANI nanowires responded to the gases (hydrogen and carbon monoxide were used), but the moisture inside the PANI nanowire was forced to influence the gas detection. Therefore, samples were dried overnight under a nitrogen environment and tested again. With this careful control of the moisture present, it was found that PANI nanowires respond to both hydrogen and carbon monoxide gases, however, there is no selectivity between gases. Nano-columned PEDOT films were also tested under the same experimental moisture-controlling conditions. It was shown that there was little response to other gases. Any response that may have been presented was buried in the electrical noise. Finally, both samples were tested for long

  17. Absolute instability of the Gaussian wake profile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hultgren, Lennart S.; Aggarwal, Arun K.

    1987-01-01

    Linear parallel-flow stability theory has been used to investigate the effect of viscosity on the local absolute instability of a family of wake profiles with a Gaussian velocity distribution. The type of local instability, i.e., convective or absolute, is determined by the location of a branch-point singularity with zero group velocity of the complex dispersion relation for the instability waves. The effects of viscosity were found to be weak for values of the wake Reynolds number, based on the center-line velocity defect and the wake half-width, larger than about 400. Absolute instability occurs only for sufficiently large values of the center-line wake defect. The critical value of this parameter increases with decreasing wake Reynolds number, thereby indicating a shrinking region of absolute instability with decreasing wake Reynolds number. If backflow is not allowed, absolute instability does not occur for wake Reynolds numbers smaller than about 38.

  18. Compact Buried Ducts in a Hot-Humid Climate House

    SciTech Connect

    Mallay, Dave

    2016-01-07

    "9A system of compact, buried ducts provides a high-performance and cost-effective solution for delivering conditioned air throughout the building. This report outlines research activities that are expected to facilitate adoption of compact buried duct systems by builders. The results of this research would be scalable to many new house designs in most climates and markets, leading to wider industry acceptance and building code and energy program approval. The primary research question with buried ducts is potential condensation at the outer jacket of the duct insulation in humid climates during the cooling season. Current best practices for buried ducts rely on encapsulating the insulated ducts with closed-cell spray polyurethane foam insulation to control condensation and improve air sealing. The encapsulated buried duct concept has been analyzed and shown to be effective in hot-humid climates. The purpose of this project is to develop an alternative buried duct system that performs effectively as ducts in conditioned space - durable, energy efficient, and cost-effective - in a hot-humid climate (IECC warm-humid climate zone 3A) with three goals that distinguish this project: 1) Evaluation of design criteria for buried ducts that use common materials and do not rely on encapsulation using spray foam or disrupt traditional work sequences; 2) Establishing design criteria for compact ducts and incorporate those with the buried duct criteria to further reduce energy losses and control installed costs; 3) Developing HVAC design guidance for performing accurate heating and cooling load calculations for compact buried ducts.

  19. Humidity control of an incubator using the microcontroller-based active humidifier system employing an ultrasonic nebulizer.

    PubMed

    Güler, I; Burunkaya, M

    2002-01-01

    Relative humidity levels of an incubator were measured and controlled. An ultrasonic nebulizer system as an active humidifier was used to humidify the incubator environment. An integrated circuit-type humidity sensor was used to measure the humidity level of the incubator environment. Measurement and control processes were achieved by a PIC microcontroller. The high-performance and high-speed PIC provided the flexibility of the system. The developed system can be used effectively for the intensive care of newborns and/or premature babies. Since the humidifier generates an aerosol in ambient conditions, it is possible to provide the high relative humidity level for therapeutic and diagnostic purposes in medicine.

  20. Building America Case Study: Energy Efficient Management of Mechanical Ventilation and Relative Humidity in Hot-Humid Climates, Cocoa, Florida

    SciTech Connect

    2017-01-01

    In hot and humid climates, it is challenging to energy-efficiently maintain indoor RH at acceptable levels while simultaneously providing required ventilation, particularly in high performance low cooling load homes. The fundamental problem with solely relying on fixed capacity central cooling systems to manage moisture during low sensible load periods is that they are oversized for cooler periods of the year despite being 'properly sized' for a very hot design cooling day. The primary goals of this project were to determine the impact of supplementing a central space conditioning system with 1) a supplemental dehumidifier and 2) a ductless mini-split on seasonal energy use and summer peak power use as well as the impact on thermal distribution and humidity control inside a completely furnished lab home that was continuously ventilated in accordance with ASHRAE 62.2-2013.

  1. Hydrochloric acid aerosol formation by the interaction of hydrogen chloride with humid air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhein, R. A.

    1973-01-01

    The conditions in which hydrochloric acid aerosol is predicted by the interaction of hydrogen chloride gas with the water vapor in humid air are analyzed. The liquid gas phase equilibrium for the HCL-H2O system is expressed in terms of relative humidity and hydrogen chloride concentration as parts per million, units commonly used in pollution studies. Presented are the concentration (wt %) of HC1 in the aerosol and the concentration of aerosol (ppm) predicted.

  2. Absolute quantitation of protein posttranslational modification isoform.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhu; Li, Ning

    2015-01-01

    Mass spectrometry has been widely applied in characterization and quantification of proteins from complex biological samples. Because the numbers of absolute amounts of proteins are needed in construction of mathematical models for molecular systems of various biological phenotypes and phenomena, a number of quantitative proteomic methods have been adopted to measure absolute quantities of proteins using mass spectrometry. The liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) coupled with internal peptide standards, i.e., the stable isotope-coded peptide dilution series, which was originated from the field of analytical chemistry, becomes a widely applied method in absolute quantitative proteomics research. This approach provides more and more absolute protein quantitation results of high confidence. As quantitative study of posttranslational modification (PTM) that modulates the biological activity of proteins is crucial for biological science and each isoform may contribute a unique biological function, degradation, and/or subcellular location, the absolute quantitation of protein PTM isoforms has become more relevant to its biological significance. In order to obtain the absolute cellular amount of a PTM isoform of a protein accurately, impacts of protein fractionation, protein enrichment, and proteolytic digestion yield should be taken into consideration and those effects before differentially stable isotope-coded PTM peptide standards are spiked into sample peptides have to be corrected. Assisted with stable isotope-labeled peptide standards, the absolute quantitation of isoforms of posttranslationally modified protein (AQUIP) method takes all these factors into account and determines the absolute amount of a protein PTM isoform from the absolute amount of the protein of interest and the PTM occupancy at the site of the protein. The absolute amount of the protein of interest is inferred by quantifying both the absolute amounts of a few PTM

  3. A comparison of THI indices leads to a sensible heat-based heat stress index for shaded cattle that aligns temperature and humidity stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berman, A.; Horovitz, Talia; Kaim, M.; Gacitua, H.

    2016-10-01

    The combined temperature-humidity heat stress is estimated in farm animals by indices derived of an index based on human thermal comfort sensation. The latter index consists of temperature and humidity measures that sum to form the temperature-humidity index (THI). The hitherto unknown relative contribution of temperature and humidity to the THI was examined. A temperature-humidity data set (temperature 20-42 °C and relative humidity 10-70 %) was used to assess by regression procedures the relative weights of temperature and humidity in the variance of THI values produced by six commonly used heat stress indices. The temperature (Ta) effect was predominant (0.82-0.95 of variance) and humidity accounted for only 0.05 to 0.12 of THI variance, half of the variance encountered in animal responses to variable humidity heat stress. Significant difference in THI values was found between indices in the relative weights of temperature and humidity. As in THI indices, temperature and humidity are expressed in different physical units, their sum has no physical attributes, and empirical evaluations assess THI relation to animal responses. A sensible heat THI was created, in which at higher temperatures humidity reaches 0.25 of sensible heat, similarly to evaporative heat loss span in heat stressed animals. It relates to ambient temperature-humidity similarly to present THI; its values are similar to other THI but greater at higher humidity. In warm conditions, mean animal responses are similar in both indices. The higher sensitivity to humidity makes this index preferable for warm-humid conditions.

  4. Adjustment of web-building initiation to high humidity: a constraint by humidity-dependent thread stickiness in the spider Cyrtarachne.

    PubMed

    Baba, Yuki G; Kusahara, Miki; Maezono, Yasunori; Miyashita, Tadashi

    2014-07-01

    Cyrtarachne is an orb-weaving spider belonging to the subfamily Cyrtarachninae (Araneidae) which includes triangular-web-building Pasilobus and bolas spiders. The Cyrtarachninae is a group of spiders specialized in catching moths, which is thought to have evolved from ordinary orb-weaving araneids. Although the web-building time of nocturnal spiders is in general related to the time of sunset, anecdotal evidence has suggested variability of web-building time in Cyrtarachne and its closely related genera. This study has examined the effects of temperature, humidity, moonlight intensity, and prey (moths) availability on web-building time of Cyrtarachne bufo, Cyrtarachne akirai, and Cyrtarachne nagasakiensis. Generalized linear mixed model (GLMM) have revealed that humidity, and not prey availability, was the essential variable that explained the daily variability of web-building time. Experiments measuring thread stickiness under different humidities showed that, although the thread of Cyrtarachne was found to have strong stickiness under high humidity, low humidity caused a marked decrease of thread stickiness. By contrast, no obvious change in stickiness was seen in an ordinary orb-weaving spider, Larinia argiopiformis. These findings suggest that Cyrtarachne adjusts its web-building time to favorable conditions of high humidity maintaining strong stickiness, which enables the threads to work efficiently for capturing prey.

  5. Adjustment of web-building initiation to high humidity: a constraint by humidity-dependent thread stickiness in the spider Cyrtarachne

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baba, Yuki G.; Kusahara, Miki; Maezono, Yasunori; Miyashita, Tadashi

    2014-07-01

    Cyrtarachne is an orb-weaving spider belonging to the subfamily Cyrtarachninae (Araneidae) which includes triangular-web-building Pasilobus and bolas spiders. The Cyrtarachninae is a group of spiders specialized in catching moths, which is thought to have evolved from ordinary orb-weaving araneids. Although the web-building time of nocturnal spiders is in general related to the time of sunset, anecdotal evidence has suggested variability of web-building time in Cyrtarachne and its closely related genera. This study has examined the effects of temperature, humidity, moonlight intensity, and prey (moths) availability on web-building time of Cyrtarachne bufo, Cyrtarachne akirai, and Cyrtarachne nagasakiensis. Generalized linear mixed model (GLMM) have revealed that humidity, and not prey availability, was the essential variable that explained the daily variability of web-building time. Experiments measuring thread stickiness under different humidities showed that, although the thread of Cyrtarachne was found to have strong stickiness under high humidity, low humidity caused a marked decrease of thread stickiness. By contrast, no obvious change in stickiness was seen in an ordinary orb-weaving spider, Larinia argiopiformis. These findings suggest that Cyrtarachne adjusts its web-building time to favorable conditions of high humidity maintaining strong stickiness, which enables the threads to work efficiently for capturing prey.

  6. Climatology of free-tropospheric humidity: extension into the SEVIRI era, evaluation and exemplary analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröder, M.; Roca, R.; Picon, L.; Kniffka, A.; Brogniez, H.

    2014-10-01

    A new free-tropospheric humidity (FTH) data record is presented. It is based on observations from the Meteosat Visible and Infrared Imager (MVIRI) onboard Meteosat-2-Meteosat-5, as well as Meteosat-7, and the Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI) onboard Meteosat-8 and Meteosat-9 at the water absorption band near 6.3 μm. The data set is available under clear-sky and low-level cloud conditions. With the extension to SEVIRI observations, the data record covers the period 1983-2009 with a spatial resolution of 0.625° × 0.625° and a temporal resolution of 3 h. The FTH is the mean relative humidity (RH) in a broad layer in the free troposphere. The relation between the observed brightness temperature (BT) and the FTH is well established. Previous retrievals are refined by taking into account the relative humidity Jacobians in the training process of the statistical retrieval. The temporal coverage is extended into the SEVIRI period, the homogenization of the BT record is improved, and the full archive is reprocessed using updated regression coefficients. The FTH estimated from the Meteosat observations is compared to the FTH computed from the RH profiles of the Analyzed RadioSoundings Archive (ARSA). An average relative bias of -3.2% and a relative root-mean-square difference (RMSD) of 16.8% are observed. This relative RMSD agrees with the outcome of an analysis of the total uncertainty of the FTH product. The decadal stability of the FTH data record is 0.5 ± 0.45% per decade. As exemplary applications, the interannual standard deviation, the differences on decadal scales, and the linear trend in the FTH data record and in the frequency of occurrence of FTH < 10% (FTHp10) are analyzed per season. Interannual standard deviation maxima and maxima in absolute decadal differences are featured in gradient areas between dry and wet regions, as well as in areas where FTH reaches minima and FTHp10 reaches maxima. An analysis of the FTH linear trends and of

  7. Biomass and energy productivity of Leucaena under humid subtropical conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Othman, A.B.; Prine, G.M.

    1984-01-01

    A table shows the amount and energy content of above-ground biomass produced in 1982 and 1983 by the 12 most productive of 62 accessions of Leucanena spp. established in 1979 at the University of Florida. Mean annual biomass production of the 12 accessions was 29.3 and 24.7 Mg/ha, with energy contents of 19,690 and 19,820 J/g, in 1982 and 1983 respectively.

  8. The Russian National Standard of Gases Humidity and Traceability System of Humidity Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubovikov, N. I.; Podmurnaya, O. A.; Skryabikov, N. P.; Sokov, I. A.; Vinge, A. F.

    2016-05-01

    The Russian national humidity standard of gases has been modernized in order to increase the number of reproducible quantities of humidity (relative humidity, dew/frost-point temperature, mole fraction) and to extend the humidity and operating temperature ranges. The basis of the standard comprises two humidity generators with operating temperature ranges from 5 ^{circ }hbox {C} to 90 ^{circ }hbox {C} and from -60 ^{circ }hbox {C} to 15 ^{circ }hbox {C}. The common working range (from 5 ^{circ }hbox {C} to 15 ^{circ }hbox {C}) allows comparison of the generators. The generators use the two-pressure method to generate humid gas defined in terms of the relative humidity (from 5 %rh to 98 %rh at temperatures from 90 ^{circ }hbox {C} to -60 ^{circ }hbox {C}) and the one-pressure (or phase equilibrium) method to generate humid gas defined in terms of the vapor mole fraction (from 0.6 ppm to 700× 103 ppm) and dew/frost-point temperature (from -79 ^{circ }hbox {C} to 90 ^{circ }hbox {C}). The expanded uncertainty in the relative humidity is no more than 0.2 %rh, no more than 1.2 % in the vapor mole fraction, and no more than 0.12 ^{circ }hbox {C} in the dew/frost-point temperature. The ordinary hygrometers are traceable to the national primary standard in accordance with the state hierarchical chain for measuring means of gas humidity. The state hierarchical chain consists of three branches for means of measurements: (a) mole fraction, (b) dew/frost-point temperature, and (c) relative humidity with each branch represented as the scheme: primary standard-secondary standard-working standard-ordinary hygrometer. Calibration and verification of working standards and ordinary hygrometers, and their traceability to the primary standard use methods of (i) direct measurements, (ii) direct comparison, or (iii) comparison with a comparator.

  9. Absolute realization of low BRDF value

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zilong; Liao, Ningfang; Li, Ping; Wang, Yu

    2010-10-01

    Low BRDF value is widespread used in many critical domains such as space and military fairs. These values below 0.1 Sr-1 . So the Absolute realization of these value is the most critical issue in the absolute measurement of BRDF. To develop the Absolute value realization theory of BRDF , defining an arithmetic operators of BRDF , achieving an absolute measurement Eq. of BRDF based on radiance. This is a new theory method to solve the realization problem of low BRDF value. This theory method is realized on a self-designed common double orientation structure in space. By designing an adding structure to extend the range of the measurement system and a control and processing software, Absolute realization of low BRDF value is achieved. A material of low BRDF value is measured in this measurement system and the spectral BRDF value are showed within different angles allover the space. All these values are below 0.4 Sr-1 . This process is a representative procedure about the measurement of low BRDF value. A corresponding uncertainty analysis of this measurement data is given depend on the new theory of absolute realization and the performance of the measurement system. The relative expand uncertainty of the measurement data is 0.078. This uncertainty analysis is suitable for all measurements using the new theory of absolute realization and the corresponding measurement system.

  10. The effect of ambient humidity on the foraging behavior of the hawkmoth Manduca sexta.

    PubMed

    Contreras, Heidy L; Goyret, Joaquin; von Arx, Martin; Pierce, Clayton T; Bronstein, Judith L; Raguso, Robert A; Davidowitz, Goggy

    2013-11-01

    The foraging decisions of flower-visiting animals are contingent upon the need of an individual to meet both energetic and osmotic demands. Insects can alter their food preferences to prioritize one need over the other, depending on environmental conditions. In this study, preferences in nectar sugar concentrations (0, 12, 24 %) were tested in the hawkmoth Manduca sexta, in response to different levels of ambient humidity (20, 40, 60, and 80 % RH). Moths altered their foraging behavior when placed in low humidity environments by increasing the volume of nectar imbibed and by consuming more dilute nectar. When placed in high humidity environments the total volume imbibed decreased, because moths consumed less from dilute nectars (water and 12 % sucrose). Survivorship was higher with higher humidity. Daily foraging patterns changed with relative humidity (RH): moths maximized their nectar consumption earlier, at lower humidities. Although ambient humidity had an impact on foraging activity, activity levels and nectar preferences, total energy intake was not affected. These results show that foraging decisions made by M. sexta kept under different ambient RH levels allow individuals to meet their osmotic demands while maintaining a constant energy input.

  11. Crystallization speed of salbutamol as a function of relative humidity and temperature.

    PubMed

    Zellnitz, Sarah; Narygina, Olga; Resch, Christian; Schroettner, Hartmuth; Urbanetz, Nora Anne

    2015-07-15

    Spray dried salbutamol sulphate and salbutamol base particles are amorphous as a result of spray drying. As there is always the risk of recrystallization of amorphous material, the aim of this work is the evaluation of the temperature and humidity dependent recrystallization of spray dried salbutamol sulphate and base. Therefore in-situ Powder X-ray Diffraction (PXRD) studies of the crystallization process at various temperature (25 and 35 °C) and humidity (60%, 70%, 80%, 90% relative humidity) conditions were performed. It was shown that the crystallization speed of salbutamol sulphate and base is a non-linear function of both temperature and relative humidity. The higher the relative humidity the higher is the crystallization speed. At 60% relative humidity salbutamol base as well as salbutamol sulphate were found to be amorphous even after 12 h, however samples changed optically. At 70% and 90% RH recrystallization of salbutamol base is completed after 3 h and 30 min and recrystallization of salbutamol sulphate after 4h and 1h, respectively. Higher temperature (35 °C) also leads to increased crystallization speeds at all tested values of relative humidity.

  12. Elevation correction factor for absolute pressure measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panek, Joseph W.; Sorrells, Mark R.

    1996-01-01

    With the arrival of highly accurate multi-port pressure measurement systems, conditions that previously did not affect overall system accuracy must now be scrutinized closely. Errors caused by elevation differences between pressure sensing elements and model pressure taps can be quantified and corrected. With multi-port pressure measurement systems, the sensing elements are connected to pressure taps that may be many feet away. The measurement system may be at a different elevation than the pressure taps due to laboratory space or test article constraints. This difference produces a pressure gradient that is inversely proportional to height within the interface tube. The pressure at the bottom of the tube will be higher than the pressure at the top due to the weight of the tube's column of air. Tubes with higher pressures will exhibit larger absolute errors due to the higher air density. The above effect is well documented but has generally been taken into account with large elevations only. With error analysis techniques, the loss in accuracy from elevation can be easily quantified. Correction factors can be applied to maintain the high accuracies of new pressure measurement systems.

  13. Thick-film humidity sensor based on porous ? material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Wenmin; Meyer, Jörg-Uwe

    1997-06-01

    A new compact, robust, yet fast and highly sensitive ceramic humidity sensor based on the semiconducting metal oxide 0957-0233/8/6/002/img2 has been developed using thick-film technology. The sensor element possesses a novel `sandwich' configuration with a 0957-0233/8/6/002/img3 porous 0957-0233/8/6/002/img2 ceramic layer sandwiched by two 0957-0233/8/6/002/img5 polarity-reversed interdigitated metal films. Instead of traditional glass frits, LiCl powders were used as adhesion promoters. The sintered ceramic layer exhibits a porous structure. The degree of the porosity is controlled by the amount of LiCl added and by the firing conditions for the ceramic. The surfaces of ceramic grains behave like electrolytes and easily adsorb water vapour through the pores. The novel electrode arrangement combines the advantages of humidity sensors in the form of a parallel capacitor with those in the form of an interdigital capacitor. The influence of temperature on the sensor characteristics has been compensated for by integrating a thick-film NTC resistor. The results of studies on the material processing, the fabrication and the characterization of this novel thick-film humidity sensor are described.

  14. Lanthanide-halide based humidity indicators

    DOEpatents

    Beitz, James V.; Williams, Clayton W.

    2008-01-01

    The present invention discloses a lanthanide-halide based humidity indicator and method of producing such indicator. The color of the present invention indicates the humidity of an atmosphere to which it is exposed. For example, impregnating an adsorbent support such as silica gel with an aqueous solution of the europium-containing reagent solution described herein, and dehydrating the support to dryness forms a substance with a yellow color. When this substance is exposed to a humid atmosphere the water vapor from the air is adsorbed into the coating on the pore surface of the silica gel. As the water content of the coating increases, the visual color of the coated silica gel changes from yellow to white. The color change is due to the water combining with the lanthanide-halide complex on the pores of the gel.

  15. Ultrasonic detection of atmospheric humidity variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, R. Giles

    2001-03-01

    The small variation of the speed of sound in air with water vapor concentration is evaluated as a method of measuring atmospheric humidity. Laboratory acoustic phase measurements were made, using inexpensive piezoelectric transducers and electret microphones with dew point temperature independently monitored in the same enclosure. Phase variations from an acoustic path gave fair agreement with the measured humidity variations, when temperature and cross-wind variations were removed. Thermal stabilization and filtering were necessary to reduce the random phase noise contributions from the detectors, leading to errors in mean vapor pressure of ˜5 mbar at 20 °C. The approach is therefore more suited to determine turbulent humidity fluctuations, for meteorological latent heat flux measurements.

  16. Effects of ambient humidity on the optimum annealing time of mixed-halide Perovskite solar cells.

    PubMed

    Cronin, Harry M; Jayawardena, K D G Imalka; Stoeva, Zlatka; Shkunov, Maxim; Silva, S Ravi P

    2017-03-17

    Mixed halide Perovskite solar cells (PSCs) are commonly produced by depositing PbCl2 and CH3NH3I from a common solvent followed by thermal annealing, which in an up-scaled manufacturing process is likely to take place under ambient conditions. However, it has been reported that, similar to the effects of thermal annealing, ambient humidity also affects the crystallisation behaviour and subsequent growth of the Perovskite films. This implies that both of these factors must be accounted for in solar cell production. In this work, we report for the first time the correlation between the annealing time, relative humidity (RH) and device performance for inverted, mixed halide CH3NH3PbI(3-x)Cl x PSCs with active area ≈1 cm(2). We find a trade-off between ambient humidity and the required annealing time to produce efficient solar cells, with low humidities needing longer annealing times and vice-versa. At around 20% RH, device performance weakly depends on annealing time, but at higher (30%-40% RH) or lower (0%-15% RH) humidities it is very sensitive. Processing in humid environments is shown to lead to the growth of both larger Perovskite grains and larger voids; similar to the effect of thermal annealing, which also leads to grain growth. Therefore, samples which are annealed for too long under high humidity show loss of performance due to low open circuit voltage caused by an increased number of shunt paths. Based on these results it is clear that humidity and annealing time are closely interrelated and both are important factors affecting the performance of PSCs. The findings of this work open a route for reduced annealing times to be employed by control of humidity; critical in roll-to-roll manufacture where low manufacturing time is preferred for cost reductions.

  17. Effects of ambient humidity on the optimum annealing time of mixed-halide Perovskite solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cronin, Harry M.; Imalka Jayawardena, K. D. G.; Stoeva, Zlatka; Shkunov, Maxim; Silva, S. Ravi P.

    2017-03-01

    Mixed halide Perovskite solar cells (PSCs) are commonly produced by depositing PbCl2 and CH3NH3I from a common solvent followed by thermal annealing, which in an up-scaled manufacturing process is likely to take place under ambient conditions. However, it has been reported that, similar to the effects of thermal annealing, ambient humidity also affects the crystallisation behaviour and subsequent growth of the Perovskite films. This implies that both of these factors must be accounted for in solar cell production. In this work, we report for the first time the correlation between the annealing time, relative humidity (RH) and device performance for inverted, mixed halide CH3NH3PbI(3‑x)Cl x PSCs with active area ≈1 cm2. We find a trade-off between ambient humidity and the required annealing time to produce efficient solar cells, with low humidities needing longer annealing times and vice-versa. At around 20% RH, device performance weakly depends on annealing time, but at higher (30%–40% RH) or lower (0%–15% RH) humidities it is very sensitive. Processing in humid environments is shown to lead to the growth of both larger Perovskite grains and larger voids; similar to the effect of thermal annealing, which also leads to grain growth. Therefore, samples which are annealed for too long under high humidity show loss of performance due to low open circuit voltage caused by an increased number of shunt paths. Based on these results it is clear that humidity and annealing time are closely interrelated and both are important factors affecting the performance of PSCs. The findings of this work open a route for reduced annealing times to be employed by control of humidity; critical in roll-to-roll manufacture where low manufacturing time is preferred for cost reductions.

  18. Floral humidity as a reliable sensory cue for profitability assessment by nectar-foraging hawkmoths.

    PubMed

    von Arx, Martin; Goyret, Joaquín; Davidowitz, Goggy; Raguso, Robert A

    2012-06-12

    Most research on plant-pollinator communication has focused on sensory and behavioral responses to relatively static cues. Floral rewards such as nectar, however, are dynamic, and foraging animals will increase their energetic profit if they can make use of floral cues that more accurately indicate nectar availability. Here we document such a cue--transient humidity gradients--using the night blooming flowers of Oenothera cespitosa (Onagraceae). The headspace of newly opened flowers reaches levels of about 4% above ambient relative humidity due to additive evapotranspirational water loss through petals and water-saturated air from the nectar tube. Floral humidity plumes differ from ambient levels only during the first 30 min after anthesis (before nectar is depleted in wild populations), whereas other floral traits (scent, shape, and color) persist for 12-24 h. Manipulative experiments indicated that floral humidity gradients are mechanistically linked to nectar volume and therefore contain information about energy rewards to floral visitors. Behavioral assays with Hyles lineata (Sphingidae) and artificial flowers with appropriate humidity gradients suggest that these hawkmoth pollinators distinguish between subtle differences in relative humidity when other floral cues are held constant. Moths consistently approached and probed flowers with elevated humidity over those with ambient humidity levels. Because floral humidity gradients are largely produced by the evaporation of nectar itself, they represent condition-informative cues that facilitate remote sensing of floral profitability by discriminating foragers. In a xeric environment, this level of honest communication should be adaptive when plant reproductive success is pollinator limited, due to intense competition for the attention of a specialized pollinator.

  19. Floral humidity as a reliable sensory cue for profitability assessment by nectar-foraging hawkmoths

    PubMed Central

    von Arx, Martin; Goyret, Joaquín; Davidowitz, Goggy; Raguso, Robert A.

    2012-01-01

    Most research on plant–pollinator communication has focused on sensory and behavioral responses to relatively static cues. Floral rewards such as nectar, however, are dynamic, and foraging animals will increase their energetic profit if they can make use of floral cues that more accurately indicate nectar availability. Here we document such a cue—transient humidity gradients—using the night blooming flowers of Oenothera cespitosa (Onagraceae). The headspace of newly opened flowers reaches levels of about 4% above ambient relative humidity due to additive evapotranspirational water loss through petals and water-saturated air from the nectar tube. Floral humidity plumes differ from ambient levels only during the first 30 min after anthesis (before nectar is depleted in wild populations), whereas other floral traits (scent, shape, and color) persist for 12–24 h. Manipulative experiments indicated that floral humidity gradients are mechanistically linked to nectar volume and therefore contain information about energy rewards to floral visitors. Behavioral assays with Hyles lineata (Sphingidae) and artificial flowers with appropriate humidity gradients suggest that these hawkmoth pollinators distinguish between subtle differences in relative humidity when other floral cues are held constant. Moths consistently approached and probed flowers with elevated humidity over those with ambient humidity levels. Because floral humidity gradients are largely produced by the evaporation of nectar itself, they represent condition-informative cues that facilitate remote sensing of floral profitability by discriminating foragers. In a xeric environment, this level of honest communication should be adaptive when plant reproductive success is pollinator limited, due to intense competition for the attention of a specialized pollinator. PMID:22645365

  20. Reactive species in humidity containing atmospheric pressure plasma jets - Numerical and experimental investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroeter, Sandra; Bredin, J.; Wijaikhum, A.; West, A.; Dedrick, J.; Niemi, K.; Gibson, A. R.; Foucher, M.; Booth, J.-P.; de Oliveira, N.; Joyeux, D.; Nahon, L.; Gorbanev, Y.; Chechik, V.; Wagenaars, E.; Gans, T.; O'Connell, D.

    2016-09-01

    The formation and absolute densities of oxygen and hydrogen containing reactive species such as atomic oxygen (O), hydrogen (H), hydroxyl radicals (OH) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in an atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) are investigated as a function of the humidity content in the helium feed gas. APPJs are effective sources for these species, which are known to be biologically active and form a central role in their potential for biomedical applications. To develop and tailor APPJs for therapeutics, quantification of the reactive species produced is necessary. In this work, different diagnostic techniques, such as UV and VUV absorption spectroscopy and picosecond two-photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence (ps-TALIF) and a 0-dimensional chemical kinetics model are applied. We find that the densities of hydrogen containing species increase non-linearly with increasing feed gas humidity. The trend of atomic oxygen depends strongly on impurities present in the APPJ. The model results show that the dominant formation and destruction mechanisms of the species of interest are strongly influenced by the humidity content with different processes dominating at high and low humidity. Supported by UK EPSRC (EP/K018388/1, EP/H003797/1), the York-Paris CIRC and LABEX Plas@par (ANR11-IDEX-0004-02).

  1. A New Gimmick for Assigning Absolute Configuration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ayorinde, F. O.

    1983-01-01

    A five-step procedure is provided to help students in making the assignment absolute configuration less bothersome. Examples for both single (2-butanol) and multi-chiral carbon (3-chloro-2-butanol) molecules are included. (JN)

  2. Magnifying absolute instruments for optically homogeneous regions

    SciTech Connect

    Tyc, Tomas

    2011-09-15

    We propose a class of magnifying absolute optical instruments with a positive isotropic refractive index. They create magnified stigmatic images, either virtual or real, of optically homogeneous three-dimensional spatial regions within geometrical optics.

  3. The Simplicity Argument and Absolute Morality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mijuskovic, Ben

    1975-01-01

    In this paper the author has maintained that there is a similarity of thought to be found in the writings of Cudworth, Emerson, and Husserl in his investigation of an absolute system of morality. (Author/RK)

  4. Absolute cross sections of compound nucleus reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capurro, O. A.

    1993-11-01

    The program SEEF is a Fortran IV computer code for the extraction of absolute cross sections of compound nucleus reactions. When the evaporation residue is fed by its parents, only cumulative cross sections will be obtained from off-line gamma ray measurements. But, if one has the parent excitation function (experimental or calculated), this code will make it possible to determine absolute cross sections of any exit channel.

  5. Kelvin and the absolute temperature scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erlichson, Herman

    2001-07-01

    This paper describes the absolute temperature scale of Kelvin (William Thomson). Kelvin found that Carnot's axiom about heat being a conserved quantity had to be abandoned. Nevertheless, he found that Carnot's fundamental work on heat engines was correct. Using the concept of a Carnot engine Kelvin found that Q1/Q2 = T1/T2. Thermometers are not used to obtain absolute temperatures since they are calculated temperatures.

  6. Theoretical modeling of relative humidity on contact electrification of sand particles

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, XiaoJing; Zhang, Rui; Huang, HaoJie

    2014-01-01

    Contact electrification of identical insulating particles has crucial significance for industrial and environmental science, especially in wind-blown granular systems. At the same time, the experimental phenomena of charge transfer first increased and then decreased with the increase of relative humidity has attracted the interest of many researchers. Humidity can affect the charge transfer has been early observed in the experiment, but the reason always puzzles researchers. In this study, based on trapped high-energy electron transfer mechanism, we introduce the effect of the water film in the charge transfer model and consider the actual situations of the sand particles in the collision process. Furthermore, charge transfer between sand particles in a single collision under different humidity conditions is investigated. The predicted results agree well with the law obtained in existing experiments qualitatively and thereby a possible explanation why humidity can affect the charge transfer is given. PMID:24637964

  7. An XPS study on the impact of relative humidity on the aging of UO2 powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donald, Scott B.; Dai, Zurong R.; Davisson, M. Lee; Jeffries, Jason R.; Nelson, Art J.

    2017-04-01

    High resolution x-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) was used to characterize the chemical speciation of high purity uranium dioxide (UO2) powder samples following aging for periods of up to one year under controlled conditions with relative humidity ranging from 34% to 98%. A systematic shift to higher uranium oxidation states, and thus an increase in the mean uranium valence, was found to directly correlate with the dose of water received (i.e. the product of exposure time and relative humidity). Exposure duration was found to have a greater impact on sample aging than relative humidity. The sample aged at 98% relative humidity was found to have unique structural differences for exposure time beyond 180 days when observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM).

  8. Influence of ambient humidity on the attachment ability of ladybird beetles (Coccinella septempunctata)

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Summary Many insects possess adhesive foot pads, which enable them to scale smooth vertical surfaces. The function of these organs may be highly affected by environmental conditions. Ladybird beetles (Coccinellidae) possess dense tarsal soles of tenent setae, supplemented with an adhesive fluid. We studied the attachment ability of the seven-spotted ladybird beetle (Coccinella septempunctata) at different humidities by horizontal traction experiments. We found that both low (15%) and high (99%) relative humidities lead to a decrease of attachment ability. The significantly highest attachment forces were revealed at 60% humidity. This relationship was found both in female and male beetles, despite of a deviating structure of adhesive setae and a significant difference in forces between sexes. These findings demonstrate that not only dry adhesive setae are affected by ambient humidity, but also setae that stick due to the capillarity of an oily secretion. PMID:27826506

  9. Influence of ambient humidity on the attachment ability of ladybird beetles (Coccinella septempunctata).

    PubMed

    Heepe, Lars; Wolff, Jonas O; Gorb, Stanislav N

    2016-01-01

    Many insects possess adhesive foot pads, which enable them to scale smooth vertical surfaces. The function of these organs may be highly affected by environmental conditions. Ladybird beetles (Coccinellidae) possess dense tarsal soles of tenent setae, supplemented with an adhesive fluid. We studied the attachment ability of the seven-spotted ladybird beetle (Coccinella septempunctata) at different humidities by horizontal traction experiments. We found that both low (15%) and high (99%) relative humidities lead to a decrease of attachment ability. The significantly highest attachment forces were revealed at 60% humidity. This relationship was found both in female and male beetles, despite of a deviating structure of adhesive setae and a significant difference in forces between sexes. These findings demonstrate that not only dry adhesive setae are affected by ambient humidity, but also setae that stick due to the capillarity of an oily secretion.

  10. Damp housing and childhood asthma; respiratory effects of indoor air temperature and relative humidity.

    PubMed Central

    Strachan, D P; Sanders, C H

    1989-01-01

    In a questionnaire survey of a random sample of 1000 children aged 7 years, a significantly greater proportion of those living in homes reported as damp were affected by wheeze (22% v 11%), day cough, night cough, and chesty colds. Simultaneous estimation of relative humidity in the bedrooms of 778 children and continuous 7 day recordings of ambient temperature and humidity in a stratified sample of 317 bedrooms showed no association with the same respiratory symptoms. No correlation was found between bedroom conditions and baseline ventilatory function or exercise induced reduction in FEV1. These results run counter to the widely held belief that indoor temperature and humidity are important determinants of respiratory ill health, although they do not directly exclude effects due to mites or moulds, whose survival is determined by the humidity of their respective microenvironments. PMID:2592894

  11. An XPS study on the impact of relative humidity on the aging of UO2 powders

    DOE PAGES

    Donald, Scott B.; Dai, Zurong R.; Davisson, M. Lee; ...

    2017-02-10

    High resolution x-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) was used to characterize the chemical speciation of high purity uranium dioxide (UO2) powder samples following aging for periods of up to one year under controlled conditions with relative humidity ranging from 34% to 98%. A systematic shift to higher uranium oxidation states, and thus an increase in the mean uranium valence, was found to directly correlate with the dose of water received (i.e. the product of exposure time and relative humidity). Exposure duration was found to have a greater impact on sample aging than relative humidity. Lastly, the sample aged at 98% relativemore » humidity was found to have unique structural differences for exposure time beyond 180 days when observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM).« less

  12. Model, Proxy and Isotopic Perspectives on the East African Humid Period

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tierney, Jessica E.; Lewis, Sophie C.; Cook, Benjamin I.; LeGrande, Allegra N.; Schmidt, Gavin A.

    2011-01-01

    Both North and East Africa experienced more humid conditions during the early and mid-Holocene epoch (11,000-5000yr BP; 11-5 ka) relative to today. The North African Humid Period has been a major focus of paleoclimatic study, and represents a response of the hydrological cycle to the increase in boreal summer insolation and associated ocean, atmosphere and land surface feedbacks. Meanwhile, the mechanisms that caused the coeval East African Humid Period are poorly understood. Here, we use results from isotopeenabled coupled climate modeling experiments to investigate the cause of the East African Humid Period. The modeling results are interpreted alongside proxy records of both water balance and the isotopic composition of rainfall. Our simulations show that the orbitally-induced increase in dry season precipitation and the subsequent reduction in precipitation seasonality can explain the East African Humid Period, and this scenario agrees well with regional lake level and pollen paleoclimate data. Changes in zonal moisture flux from both the Atlantic and Indian Ocean account for the simulated increase in precipitation from June through November. Isotopic paleoclimate data and simulated changes in moisture source demonstrate that the western East African Rift Valley in particular experienced more humid conditions due to the influx of Atlantic moisture and enhanced convergence along the Congo Air Boundary. Our study demonstrates that zonal changes in moisture advection are an important determinant of climate variability in the East African region.

  13. Effect of temperature and humidity on formaldehyde emissions in temporary housing units.

    PubMed

    Parthasarathy, Srinandini; Maddalena, Randy L; Russell, Marion L; Apte, Michael G

    2011-06-01

    The effect of temperature and humidity on formaldehyde emissions from samples collected from temporary housing units (THUs) was studied. The THUs were supplied by the U.S. Federal Emergency Management Administration (FEMA) to families that lost their homes in Louisiana and Mississippi during the Hurricane Katrina and Rita disasters. On the basis of a previous study, four of the composite wood surface materials that dominated contributions to indoor formaldehyde were selected to analyze the effects of temperature and humidity on the emission factors. Humidity equilibration experiments were carried out on two of the samples to determine how long the samples take to equilibrate with the surrounding environmental conditions. Small chamber experiments were then conducted to measure emission factors for the four surface materials at various temperature and humidity conditions. The samples were analyzed for formaldehyde via high-performance liquid chromatography. The experiments showed that increases in temperature or humidity contributed to an increase in emission factors. A linear regression model was built using the natural log of the percent relative humidity (RH) and inverse of temperature (in K) as independent variables and the natural log of emission factors as the dependent variable. The coefficients for the inverse of temperature and log RH with log emission factor were found to be statistically significant for all of the samples at the 95% confidence level. This study should assist in retrospectively estimating indoor formaldehyde exposure of occupants of THUs.

  14. HUMID AIR TURBINE CYCLE TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect

    Richard Tuthill

    2002-07-18

    The Humid Air Turbine (HAT) Cycle Technology Development Program focused on obtaining HAT cycle combustor technology that will be the foundation of future products. The work carried out under the auspices of the HAT Program built on the extensive low emissions stationary gas turbine work performed in the past by Pratt & Whitney (P&W). This Program is an integral part of technology base development within the Advanced Turbine Systems Program at the Department of Energy (DOE) and its experiments stretched over 5 years. The goal of the project was to fill in technological data gaps in the development of the HAT cycle and identify a combustor configuration that would efficiently burn high moisture, high-pressure gaseous fuels with low emissions. The major emphasis will be on the development of kinetic data, computer modeling, and evaluations of combustor configurations. The Program commenced during the 4th Quarter of 1996 and closed in the 4th Quarter of 2001. It teamed the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) with P&W, the United Technologies Research Center (UTRC), and a subcontractor on-site at UTRC, kraftWork Systems Inc. The execution of the program started with bench-top experiments that were conducted at UTRC for extending kinetic mechanisms to HAT cycle temperature, pressure, and moisture conditions. The fundamental data generated in the bench-top experiments was incorporated into the analytical tools available at P&W to design the fuel injectors and combustors. The NETL then used the hardware to conduct combustion rig experiments to evaluate the performance of the combustion systems at elevated pressure and temperature conditions representative of the HAT cycle. The results were integrated into systems analysis done by kraftWork to verify that sufficient understanding of the technology had been achieved and that large-scale technological application and demonstration could be undertaken as follow-on activity. An optional program extended the

  15. The use of X-ray crystallography to determine absolute configuration.

    PubMed

    Flack, H D; Bernardinelli, G

    2008-05-15

    Essential background on the determination of absolute configuration by way of single-crystal X-ray diffraction (XRD) is presented. The use and limitations of an internal chiral reference are described. The physical model underlying the Flack parameter is explained. Absolute structure and absolute configuration are defined and their similarities and differences are highlighted. The necessary conditions on the Flack parameter for satisfactory absolute-structure determination are detailed. The symmetry and purity conditions for absolute-configuration determination are discussed. The physical basis of resonant scattering is briefly presented and the insights obtained from a complete derivation of a Bijvoet intensity ratio by way of the mean-square Friedel difference are exposed. The requirements on least-squares refinement are emphasized. The topics of right-handed axes, XRD intensity measurement, software, crystal-structure evaluation, errors in crystal structures, and compatibility of data in their relation to absolute-configuration determination are described. Characterization of the compounds and crystals by the physicochemical measurement of optical rotation, CD spectra, and enantioselective chromatography are presented. Some simple and some complex examples of absolute-configuration determination using combined XRD and CD measurements, using XRD and enantioselective chromatography, and in multiply-twinned crystals clarify the technique. The review concludes with comments on absolute-configuration determination from light-atom structures.

  16. Mars MetNet Mission Pressure and Humidity Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haukka, H.; Harri, A.-M.; Schmidt, W.; Genzer, M.; Polkko, J.; Kemppinen, O.; Leinonen, J.

    2012-09-01

    A new kind of planetary exploration mission for Mars is being developed in collaboration between the Finnish Meteorological Institute (FMI), Lavochkin Association (LA), Space Research Institute (IKI) and Institutio Nacional de Tecnica Aerospacial (INTA). The Mars MetNet mission [1] is based on a new semi-hard landing vehicle called MetNet Lander (MNL). MetBaro and MetHumi are part of the scientific payload of the MNL. Main scientific goal of both devices is to measure the meteorological phenomena (pressure and humidity) of the Martian atmosphere and complement the previous Mars mission atmospheric measurements (Viking and Phoenix) for better understanding of the Martian atmospheric conditions.

  17. Application of artificial intelligence to estimate the reference evapotranspiration in sub-humid Doon valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nema, Manish K.; Khare, Deepak; Chandniha, Surendra K.

    2017-03-01

    Estimation of evapotranspiration (ET) is an essential component of the hydrologic cycle, which is also requisite for efficient irrigation water management planning and hydro-meteorological studies at both the basin and catchment scales. There are about twenty well-established methods available for ET estimation which depends upon various meteorological parameters and assumptions. Most of these methods are physically based and need a variety of input data. The FAO-56 Penman-Monteith method (PM) for estimating reference evapotranspiration (ET0) is recommend for irrigation scheduling worldwide, because PM generally yields the best results under various climatic conditions. This study investigates the abilities of artificial neural networks (ANN) to improve the accuracy of monthly evaporation estimation in sub-humid climatic region of Dehradun. In the first part of the study, different ANN models, comprising various combinations of training function and number of neutrons were developed to estimate the ET0 and it has been compared with the Penman-Monteith (PM) ET0 as the ideal (observed) ET0. Various statistical approaches were considered to estimate the model performance, i.e. Coefficient of Correlation (r), Sum of Squared Errors, Root Mean Square Error, Nash-Sutcliffe Efficiency Index (NSE) and Mean Absolute Error. The ANN model with Levenberg-Marquardt training algorithm, single hidden layer and nine number of neutron schema was found the best predicting capabilities for the study station with Coefficient of Correlation (r) and NSE value of 0.996 and 0.991 for calibration period and 0.990 and 0.980 for validation period, respectively. In the subsequent part of the study, the trend analysis of ET0 time series revealed a rising trend in the month of March, and a falling trend during June to November, except August, with more than 90% significance level and the annual declining rate was found to 1.49 mm per year.

  18. Group 3: Humidity, Temperature and Voltage (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Wohlgemuth, J.

    2013-09-01

    This is a summary of the work of Group 3 of the International PV QA Task Force. Group 3 is chartered to develop accelerated stress tests that can be used as comparative predictors of module lifetime versus stresses associated with humidity, temperature and voltage.

  19. Low Relative Humidity in the Atmosphere

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-01

    comparable magnitude can occur with chinook ( foehn ) winds. iiI TABLE OF CONTENTS Page LIST OF TABLES ................................ ......... 1. INTRODUCTION...very low relative humidities. occasionally occur in association with strong winds in the lee of most mountain ranges. These winds are called foehns in

  20. [Relative humidity and acari. An intervention study].

    PubMed

    Pascual Izaola, A; Sánchez Milla, J J; Mateo Garmilla, J I; Antépara, I

    1995-01-01

    In this work we collect the results of the variation of the variable "rechange of the wind with the exterior" in the three possibilities of a bedroom: --close window, semi close and totally open. And we unite the relation that we already know between the prevail of acariens (Dermatophagoides) and the relative humidity of the wind in a Bilbao city's house.

  1. Grape anthocyanin altered by absolute sunlight exclusion

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This research was conducted to clarify anthocyanin accumulation within ‘Merlot’ grapes in response to microclimate, specifically to light incidence, temperature, and humidity. Treatment grape clusters were light-excluded during ripening by opaque white polypropylene enclosures, during which light in...

  2. Absolute determination of local tropospheric OH concentrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armerding, Wolfgang; Comes, Franz-Josef

    1994-01-01

    Long path absorption (LPA) according to Lambert Beer's law is a method to determine absolute concentrations of trace gases such as tropospheric OH. We have developed a LPA instrument which is based on a rapid tuning of the light source which is a frequency doubled dye laser. The laser is tuned across two or three OH absorption features around 308 nm with a scanning speed of 0.07 cm(exp -1)/microsecond and a repetition rate of 1.3 kHz. This high scanning speed greatly reduces the fluctuation of the light intensity caused by the atmosphere. To obtain the required high sensitivity the laser output power is additionally made constant and stabilized by an electro-optical modulator. The present sensitivity is of the order of a few times 10(exp 5) OH per cm(exp 3) for an acquisition time of a minute and an absorption path length of only 1200 meters so that a folding of the optical path in a multireflection cell was possible leading to a lateral dimension of the cell of a few meters. This allows local measurements to be made. Tropospheric measurements have been carried out in 1991 resulting in the determination of OH diurnal variation at specific days in late summer. Comparison with model calculations have been made. Interferences are mainly due to SO2 absorption. The problem of OH self generation in the multireflection cell is of minor extent. This could be shown by using different experimental methods. The minimum-maximum signal to noise ratio is about 8 x 10(exp -4) for a single scan. Due to the small size of the absorption cell the realization of an open air laboratory is possible in which by use of an additional UV light source or by additional fluxes of trace gases the chemistry can be changed under controlled conditions allowing kinetic studies of tropospheric photochemistry to be made in open air.

  3. Highly sensitive humidity sensing properties of carbon quantum dots films

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xing; Ming, Hai; Liu, Ruihua; Han, Xiao; Kang, Zhenhui; Liu, Yang; Zhang, Yonglai

    2013-02-15

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: ► A humidity sensing device was fabricated based on carbon quantum dots (CQDs) films. ► The conductivity of the CQDs films shows a linear and rapid response to atmosphere humidity. ► The humidity sensing property was due to the hydrogen bonds between the functional groups on CQDs. -- Abstract: We reported the fabrication of a humidity sensing device based on carbon quantum dots (CQDs) film. The conductivity of the CQDs film has a linear and rapid response to relative humidity, providing the opportunity for the fabrication of humidity sensing devices. The mechanism of our humidity sensor was proposed to be the formation of hydrogen bonds between carbon quantum dots and water molecules in the humidity environment, which significantly promote the electrons migration. In a control experiment, this hypothesis was confirmed by comparing the humidity sensitivity of candle soot (i.e. carbon nanoparticles) with and without oxygen containing groups on the surfaces.

  4. Jasminum flexile flower absolute from India--a detailed comparison with three other jasmine absolutes.

    PubMed

    Braun, Norbert A; Kohlenberg, Birgit; Sim, Sherina; Meier, Manfred; Hammerschmidt, Franz-Josef

    2009-09-01

    Jasminum flexile flower absolute from the south of India and the corresponding vacuum headspace (VHS) sample of the absolute were analyzed using GC and GC-MS. Three other commercially available Indian jasmine absolutes from the species: J. sambac, J. officinale subsp. grandiflorum, and J. auriculatum and the respective VHS samples were used for comparison purposes. One hundred and twenty-one compounds were characterized in J. flexile flower absolute, with methyl linolate, benzyl salicylate, benzyl benzoate, (2E,6E)-farnesol, and benzyl acetate as the main constituents. A detailed olfactory evaluation was also performed.

  5. Physical and chemical changes in whey protein concentrate stored at elevated temperature and humidity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The chemistry of whey protein concentrate (WPC) under adverse storage conditions was monitored to provide information on shelf life in hot, humid areas. WPC34 (34.9 g protein/100 g) and WPC80 (76.8 g protein/100 g) were stored for up to 18 mo under ambient conditions and at elevated temperature and...

  6. Preliminary examination of the effects of relative humidity on the fracture morphology of cotton flat bundles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects of the relative humidity (RH) of testing conditions on stelometer cotton flat bundle strength and elongation measurements, and on the morphology of fiber fractures are presented herein. A trend is observed for stelometer strength and elongations measurements; testing in conditions with h...

  7. Understanding the Temperature and Humidity Environment Inside a PV Module (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Kempe, M.

    2013-06-01

    This presentation addresses moisture-driven degradation processes in PV modules and the conditions to use for accelerated stress testing. Here we show that by choosing humidity conditions that more closely match the use environment, one can minimize the uncertainty associated with moisture induced degradation modes.

  8. Analysis of absolute flatness testing in sub-stitching interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Xin; Xu, Fuchao; Xie, Weimin; Xing, Tingwen

    2016-09-01

    Sub-aperture stitching is an effective way to extend the lateral and vertical dynamic range of a conventional interferometer. The test accuracy can be achieved by removing the error of reference surface by the absolute testing method. When the testing accuracy (repeatability and reproducibility) is close to 1nm, in addition to the reference surface, other factors will also affect the measuring accuracy such as environment, zoom magnification, stitching precision, tooling and fixture, the characteristics of optical materials and so on. In the thousand level cleanroom, we establish a good environment system. Long time stability, temperature controlled at 22°+/-0.02°.The humidity and noise are controlled in a certain range. We establish a stitching system in the clean room. The vibration testing system is used to test the vibration. The air pressure testing system is also used. In the motion system, we control the tilt error no more than 4 second to reduce the error. The angle error can be tested by the autocollimator and double grating reading head.

  9. Universal Cosmic Absolute and Modern Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostro, Ludwik

    The official Sciences, especially all natural sciences, respect in their researches the principle of methodic naturalism i.e. they consider all phenomena as entirely natural and therefore in their scientific explanations they do never adduce or cite supernatural entities and forces. The purpose of this paper is to show that Modern Science has its own self-existent, self-acting, and self-sufficient Natural All-in Being or Omni-Being i.e. the entire Nature as a Whole that justifies the scientific methodic naturalism. Since this Natural All-in Being is one and only It should be considered as the own scientifically justified Natural Absolute of Science and should be called, in my opinion, the Universal Cosmic Absolute of Modern Science. It will be also shown that the Universal Cosmic Absolute is ontologically enormously stratified and is in its ultimate i.e. in its most fundamental stratum trans-reistic and trans-personal. It means that in its basic stratum. It is neither a Thing or a Person although It contains in Itself all things and persons with all other sentient and conscious individuals as well, On the turn of the 20th century the Science has begun to look for a theory of everything, for a final theory, for a master theory. In my opinion the natural Universal Cosmic Absolute will constitute in such a theory the radical all penetrating Ultimate Basic Reality and will substitute step by step the traditional supernatural personal Absolute.

  10. Coastal geoindicators of environmental change in the humid tropics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morton, R.A.

    2002-01-01

    The primary geoindicators appropriate for monitoring environmental changes in the humid tropics are transitory surface water levels, shoreline position, wetlands distribution, coral reefs, landforms, and sediment sequence and composition. Lateral zonations and temporal successions of vegetation also can be used as geoindicators of riverine and shoreline changes. All of these coastal geoindicators are sensitive to regional tectonic processes and anthropogenic alterations and they typically reflect significant changes in coastal conditions such as fluvial processes, coastal energy, water quality, relative sea level, and sediment supply. Where humid tropical coasts coincide with active tectonic margins, indicators of seismic activity are critical to understanding Coastal changes associated with co-seismic subsidence or uplift, tsunamis, and liquefaction of coastal sediments. Coastal landforms and sedimentary deposits that record late Quaternary environmental changes include perched fluvial and marine terraces, delta-plain morphologies, crevassesplay deposits, peats and other paleosols, beach ridges, mud capes, and mud volcanoes. Although these features and deposits typically reflect environmental changes spanning more than 100 years, they are relevant to modern processes, management of coastal lands and resources, and prediction of future conditions. In some regions of the humid tropics, large coastal areas are unaffected by hurricanes or typhoons. Nevertheless, these tropical coasts are vulnerable to other non-storm processes, such as El Nin??o events, tsunamis, and monsoons that increase water levels, and cause widespread flooding and beach erosion. The environmental and political significance of coastal geoindicators increases when they are integrated and applied to issues of human safety and health such as hazards mapping, risk assessment, and dispersion of contaminated sediments. However, to be relevant, those socio-environmental applications demand accurate

  11. Evaluation of Humidity Control Options in Hot-Humid Climate Homes (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-12-01

    This technical highlight describes NREL research to analyze the indoor relative humidity in three home types in the hot-humid climate zone, and examine the impacts of various dehumidification equipment and controls. As the Building America program researches construction of homes that achieve greater source energy savings over typical mid-1990s construction, proper modeling of whole-house latent loads and operation of humidity control equipment has become a high priority. Long-term high relative humidity can cause health and durability problems in homes, particularly in a hot-humid climate. In this study, researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) used the latest EnergyPlus tool equipped with the moisture capacitance model to analyze the indoor relative humidity in three home types: a Building America high-performance home; a mid-1990s reference home; and a 2006 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC)-compliant home in hot-humid climate zones. They examined the impacts of various dehumidification equipment and controls on the high-performance home where the dehumidification equipment energy use can become a much larger portion of whole-house energy consumption. The research included a number of simulated cases: thermostat reset, A/C with energy recovery ventilator, heat exchanger assisted A/C, A/C with condenser reheat, A/C with desiccant wheel dehumidifier, A/C with DX dehumidifier, A/C with energy recovery ventilator, and DX dehumidifier. Space relative humidity, thermal comfort, and whole-house source energy consumption were compared for indoor relative humidity set points of 50%, 55%, and 60%. The study revealed why similar trends of high humidity were observed in all three homes regardless of energy efficiency, and why humidity problems are not necessarily unique in the high-performance home. Thermal comfort analysis indicated that occupants are unlikely to notice indoor humidity problems. The study confirmed that supplemental

  12. Determination of partition and diffusion coefficients of formaldehyde in selected building materials and impact of relative humidity (journal)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The partition and effective diffusion coefficients of formaldehyde were measured for three materials (conventional gypsum wallboard, "green" gypsum wallboard, and "green" carpet) under three relative humidity (RH) conditions (20%, 50% and 70% RH). A dynamic dual-chamber test meth...

  13. Determination of partition and diffusion coefficient of formaldehyde in selected building materials and impact of relative humidity

    EPA Science Inventory

    The partition and effective diffusion coefficients of formaldehyde were measured for three materials (conventional gypsum wallboard, "green" gypsum wallboard, and "green" carpet) under three relative humidity (RH) conditions (20%, 50% and 70% RH). A dynamic dual-chamber test meth...

  14. Relation of temperature and humidity to the risk of recurrent gout attacks.

    PubMed

    Neogi, Tuhina; Chen, Clara; Niu, Jingbo; Chaisson, Christine; Hunter, David J; Choi, Hyon; Zhang, Yuqing

    2014-08-15

    Gout attack risk may be affected by weather (e.g., because of volume depletion). We therefore examined the association of temperature and humidity with the risk of recurrent gout attacks by conducting an internet-based case-crossover study in the United States (in 2003-2010) among subjects with a diagnosis of gout who had 1 or more attacks during 1 year of follow-up. We examined the association of temperature and humidity over the prior 48 hours with the risk of gout attacks using a time-stratified approach and conditional logistic regression. Among 632 subjects with gout, there was a significant dose-response relationship between mean temperature in the prior 48 hours and the risk of subsequent gout attack (P = 0.01 for linear trend). Higher temperatures were associated with approximately 40% higher risk of gout attack compared with moderate temperatures. There was a reverse J-shaped relationship between mean relative humidity and the risk of gout attacks (P = 0.03 for quadratic trend). The combination of high temperature and low humidity had the greatest association (odds ratio = 2.04, 95% confidence interval: 1.26, 3.30) compared with moderate temperature and relative humidity. Thus, high ambient temperature and possibly extremes of humidity were associated with an increased risk of gout attack, despite the likelihood that individuals are often in climate-controlled indoor environments.

  15. Quantitative standards for absolute linguistic universals.

    PubMed

    Piantadosi, Steven T; Gibson, Edward

    2014-01-01

    Absolute linguistic universals are often justified by cross-linguistic analysis: If all observed languages exhibit a property, the property is taken to be a likely universal, perhaps specified in the cognitive or linguistic systems of language learners and users. In many cases, these patterns are then taken to motivate linguistic theory. Here, we show that cross-linguistic analysis will very rarely be able to statistically justify absolute, inviolable patterns in language. We formalize two statistical methods--frequentist and Bayesian--and show that in both it is possible to find strict linguistic universals, but that the numbers of independent languages necessary to do so is generally unachievable. This suggests that methods other than typological statistics are necessary to establish absolute properties of human language, and thus that many of the purported universals in linguistics have not received sufficient empirical justification.

  16. Uncertainties in climatological tropical humidity profiles: Some implications for estimating the greenhouse effect

    SciTech Connect

    Gutzler, D.S. )

    1993-05-01

    The vertical profile of water vapor, the principal infrared-absorbing gas in the atmosphere, is an important factor in determining the energy balance of the climate system. This study examines uncertainties in calculating a climatological humidity profile: specifically one derived from radiosonde data representative of the moist and highly convective region over the western tropical Pacific Ocean. Uncertainties in the humidity data are large in conditions of low temperature or low humidity in the mid- and upper troposphere. Results derived from a single United States station (Koror) and from an average of four United States-operated stations (all near the equator west of the date line) yield nearly identical results. No humidity measurements are reported in fully the upper third of the troposphere. The implications of these uncertainties for determining the climatological humidity profile are quantitatively assessed by bracketing the range of plausible assumptions for unreported humidity to produce extreme estimates of the climatological profile. These profiles, together with the observed climatological temperature profile, are used as input to a radiative transfer model to ascertain the uncertainty in clear-sky outgoing infrared radiance due to water vapor uncertainties. The radiance uncertainty is shown to be comparable in magnitude to the purely radiative response of the tropical atmosphere to doubling carbon dioxide. The uncertainty associated with unmeasured upper-tropospheric humidity is approximately equal to that arising from incompletely measured midtropospheric humidity. Clear-sky radiative uncertainties, however, are modest relative to the uncertainty associated with variations of infrared absorption due to clouds, as demonstrated by introducing citrus ice particles into the radiative transfer calculations.

  17. Testing the effects of temperature and humidity on printed passive UHF RFID tags on paper substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linnea Merilampi, Sari; Virkki, Johanna; Ukkonen, Leena; Sydänheimo, Lauri

    2014-05-01

    This article is an interesting substrate material for environmental-friendly printable electronics. In this study, screen-printed RFID tags on paper substrate are examined. Their reliability was tested with low temperature, high temperature, slow temperature cycling, high temperature and high humidity and water dipping test. Environmental stresses affect the tag antenna impedance, losses and radiation characteristics due to their impact on the ink film and paper substrate. Low temperature, temperature cycling and high humidity did not have a radical effect on the measured parameters: threshold power, backscattered signal power or read range of the tags. However, the frequency response and the losses of the tags were slightly affected. Exposure to high temperature was found to even improve the tag performance due to the positive effect of high temperature on the ink film. The combined high humidity and high temperature had the most severe effect on the tag performance. The threshold power increased, backscattered power decreased and the read range was shortened. On the whole, the results showed that field use of these tags in high, low and changing temperature conditions and high humidity conditions is possible. Use of these tags in combined high-humidity and high-temperature conditions should be carefully considered.

  18. Relationship between humidity and influenza A viability in droplets and implications for influenza's seasonality.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wan; Elankumaran, Subbiah; Marr, Linsey C

    2012-01-01

    Humidity has been associated with influenza's seasonality, but the mechanisms underlying the relationship remain unclear. There is no consistent explanation for influenza's transmission patterns that applies to both temperate and tropical regions. This study aimed to determine the relationship between ambient humidity and viability of the influenza A virus (IAV) during transmission between hosts and to explain the mechanisms underlying it. We measured the viability of IAV in droplets consisting of various model media, chosen to isolate effects of salts and proteins found in respiratory fluid, and in human mucus, at relative humidities (RH) ranging from 17% to 100%. In all media and mucus, viability was highest when RH was either close to 100% or below ∼50%. When RH decreased from 84% to 50%, the relationship between viability and RH depended on droplet composition: viability decreased in saline solutions, did not change significantly in solutions supplemented with proteins, and increased dramatically in mucus. Additionally, viral decay increased linearly with salt concentration in saline solutions but not when they were supplemented with proteins. There appear to be three regimes of IAV viability in droplets, defined by humidity: physiological conditions (∼100% RH) with high viability, concentrated conditions (50% to near 100% RH) with lower viability depending on the composition of media, and dry conditions (<50% RH) with high viability. This paradigm could help resolve conflicting findings in the literature on the relationship between IAV viability in aerosols and humidity, and results in human mucus could help explain influenza's seasonality in different regions.

  19. Quantitative analysis for a color-change of humidity indicator by microscopic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Tomoko; Mitsumura, Yoko; Miyamoto, Miyuki; Matsumoto, Jin; Shiragami, Tsutomu; Fueda, Yoshiyuki; Nobuhara, Kazunori; Yasuda, Masahide

    2011-01-01

    A sensitive and easily distinguishable cobalt-free humidity indicator of porphyrin-silica gel-MgCl(2) composite was prepared from pH-induced spectra changeable tetraarylporphyrin, silica gel (SiO(2)), and MgCl(2). The pH change arose from proton release under dry conditions, and proton capture under humid conditions by a reversible reaction between MgCl(2) and a silanol group of SiO(2). A pink-orange porphyrin-Si(OH)(2)-MgCl(2) composite was dried to give a green protonated porphyrin-SiO(2)Mg composite. The optimized concentrations of MgCl(2) to make the concentrations of protonated porphyrin maximum under dry conditions were determined by absorption spectrometry of the green composite using a confocal laser scanning microscope as a microscopic spectrometer. Moreover, the green composite was prepared by heating dichloro(tetraarylporphyrinato)phosphorus chloride with MgCl(2) and SiO(2). The humidity-sensitivity of the green composite was evaluated by the absorption spectra under controlled humidity. A distinguishable color change of the green composite took place below 30% of relative humidity.

  20. Absolute Distance Measurement with the MSTAR Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lay, Oliver P.; Dubovitsky, Serge; Peters, Robert; Burger, Johan; Ahn, Seh-Won; Steier, William H.; Fetterman, Harrold R.; Chang, Yian

    2003-01-01

    The MSTAR sensor (Modulation Sideband Technology for Absolute Ranging) is a new system for measuring absolute distance, capable of resolving the integer cycle ambiguity of standard interferometers, and making it possible to measure distance with sub-nanometer accuracy. The sensor uses a single laser in conjunction with fast phase modulators and low frequency detectors. We describe the design of the system - the principle of operation, the metrology source, beamlaunching optics, and signal processing - and show results for target distances up to 1 meter. We then demonstrate how the system can be scaled to kilometer-scale distances.

  1. Effect of Humidity on the Composition of Isoprene Photooxidation Secondary Organic Aerosol

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Tran B.; Roach, Patrick J.; Laskin, Julia; Laskin, Alexander; Nizkorodov, Serguei

    2011-07-18

    The effect of relative humidity (RH) on the composition and concentrations of gas-phase products and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) generated from the photooxidation of isoprene under high-NOx conditions was investigated. The yields of most gas-phase products were the same regardless of initial water vapor concentration with exception of hydroxyacetone and glycolaldehyde, which were considerably affected by RH. A significant change was observed in the SOA composition, with many unique condensed-phase products formed under humid (90% RH) vs. dry (<2% RH) conditions, without any observable effect on the rate and extent of the SOA mass growth.

  2. Absolutely relative or relatively absolute: violations of value invariance in human decision making.

    PubMed

    Teodorescu, Andrei R; Moran, Rani; Usher, Marius

    2016-02-01

    Making decisions based on relative rather than absolute information processing is tied to choice optimality via the accumulation of evidence differences and to canonical neural processing via accumulation of evidence ratios. These theoretical frameworks predict invariance of decision latencies to absolute intensities that maintain differences and ratios, respectively. While information about the absolute values of the choice alternatives is not necessary for choosing the best alternative, it may nevertheless hold valuable information about the context of the decision. To test the sensitivity of human decision making to absolute values, we manipulated the intensities of brightness stimuli pairs while preserving either their differences or their ratios. Although asked to choose the brighter alternative relative to the other, participants responded faster to higher absolute values. Thus, our results provide empirical evidence for human sensitivity to task irrelevant absolute values indicating a hard-wired mechanism that precedes executive control. Computational investigations of several modelling architectures reveal two alternative accounts for this phenomenon, which combine absolute and relative processing. One account involves accumulation of differences with activation dependent processing noise and the other emerges from accumulation of absolute values subject to the temporal dynamics of lateral inhibition. The potential adaptive role of such choice mechanisms is discussed.

  3. Diagnosis of MEA degradation under accelerated relative humidity cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vengatesan, S.; Fowler, Michael W.; Yuan, Xiao-Zi; Wang, Haijiang

    The objective of this work is to identify the failure mode diagnosis protocols for polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells with the use of accelerated testing conditions. The single cells used in this work were constructed using commercial Ion Power ® membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) and the performance degradation was studied under accelerated dynamic reactant relative humidity (RH) conditions. The influence of RH on cell performance was investigated, and a strong dependence of degradation with respect to relative humidity was found. RH cycling was seen to not only cause the gradual decrease in performance at the beginning of cell operation, but it was also related to the rapid decline in performance observed after 330 h operation. This change in degradation rate is seen a change in the material degradation failure mechanism at this point in the operational history of the cell. The increase in cell resistance, membrane crossover, fluoride release rate and decrease in electrochemical surface area (ESA) were also observed with time, and these results were correlated to change in degradation rate. Infra-Red (IR) imaging of an aged MEA was utilized to show varying temperature profiles and outline the possibility of cracks, tears or pinholes in the membrane.

  4. Resistance of Aerosolized Bacterial Viruses to Relative Humidity and Temperature.

    PubMed

    Verreault, Daniel; Marcoux-Voiselle, Mélissa; Turgeon, Nathalie; Moineau, Sylvain; Duchaine, Caroline

    2015-10-01

    The use of aerosolized bacteriophages as surrogates for hazardous viruses might simplify and accelerate the discovery of links between viral components and their persistence in the airborne state under diverse environmental conditions. In this study, four structurally distinct lytic phages, MS2 (single-stranded RNA [ssRNA]), ϕ6 (double-stranded RNA [dsRNA]), ϕX174 (single-stranded DNA [ssDNA]), and PR772 (double-stranded DNA [dsDNA]), were nebulized into a rotating chamber and exposed to various levels of relative humidity (RH) and temperature as well as to germicidal UV radiation. The aerosolized viral particles were allowed to remain airborne for up to 14 h before being sampled for analysis by plaque assays and quantitative PCRs. Phages ϕ6 and MS2 were the most resistant at low levels of relative humidity, while ϕX174 was more resistant at 80% RH. Phage ϕ6 lost its infectivity immediately after exposure to 30°C and 80% RH. The infectivity of all tested phages rapidly declined as a function of the exposure time to UVC radiation, phage MS2 being the most resistant. Taken altogether, our data indicate that these aerosolized phages behave differently under various environmental conditions and highlight the necessity of carefully selecting viral simulants in bioaerosol studies.

  5. Resistance of Aerosolized Bacterial Viruses to Relative Humidity and Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Verreault, Daniel; Marcoux-Voiselle, Mélissa; Turgeon, Nathalie; Moineau, Sylvain

    2015-01-01

    The use of aerosolized bacteriophages as surrogates for hazardous viruses might simplify and accelerate the discovery of links between viral components and their persistence in the airborne state under diverse environmental conditions. In this study, four structurally distinct lytic phages, MS2 (single-stranded RNA [ssRNA]), ϕ6 (double-stranded RNA [dsRNA]), ϕX174 (single-stranded DNA [ssDNA]), and PR772 (double-stranded DNA [dsDNA]), were nebulized into a rotating chamber and exposed to various levels of relative humidity (RH) and temperature as well as to germicidal UV radiation. The aerosolized viral particles were allowed to remain airborne for up to 14 h before being sampled for analysis by plaque assays and quantitative PCRs. Phages ϕ6 and MS2 were the most resistant at low levels of relative humidity, while ϕX174 was more resistant at 80% RH. Phage ϕ6 lost its infectivity immediately after exposure to 30°C and 80% RH. The infectivity of all tested phages rapidly declined as a function of the exposure time to UVC radiation, phage MS2 being the most resistant. Taken altogether, our data indicate that these aerosolized phages behave differently under various environmental conditions and highlight the necessity of carefully selecting viral simulants in bioaerosol studies. PMID:26253683

  6. Building America Top Innovations 2012: Unvented, Conditioned Crawlspaces

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2013-01-01

    This Building America Top Innovations profile describes Building America research which influenced code requirements by demonstrating that unvented, conditioned crawlspaces use 15% to 18% less energy for heating and cooling while reducing humidity over 20% in humid climates.

  7. The new Absolute Quantum Gravimeter (AQG): first results and perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonvalot, Sylvain; Le Moigne, Nicolas; Merlet, Sebastien; Desruelle, Bruno; Lautier-Gaud, Jean; Menoret, Vincent; Vermeulen, Pierre

    2016-04-01

    Cold atom gravimetry represents one of the most innovative evolution in gravity instrumentation since the last 20 years. The concept of measuring the gravitational acceleration by dropping atoms and the development of the first instrumental devices during this last decade quickly revealed the promising perspectives of this new generation of gravity meters enabling accurate and absolute measurements of the Earth's gravity field for a wide range of applications (geophysics, geodesy, metrology, etc.). The Absolute Quantum Gravimeter (AQG) gravity meter, developed by MUQUANS (Talence, France - http://www.muquans.com/) with the support of RESIF, the French Seismologic and Geodetic Network (http://www.resif.fr/) belongs to this new generation of instruments. It also represents the first commercial device based on the utilization of advanced matter-wave interferometry techniques, which allow to characterize precisely the vertical acceleration experienced by a cloud of cold atoms. Recently, the first operational unit (AQG01) has been achieved as a compact transportable gravimeter with the aim of satisfying absolute gravity measurements in laboratory conditions under the following specifications: measurements the μGal level at a few Hz cycling frequency, sensitivity of 50μGal/√Hz, immunity to ground vibrations, easy and quickness of operation, automated continuous data acquisition for several months, etc. In order to evaluate the current performances of the AQG01, several experiments are carried out in collaboration between RESIF user's teams and the MUQUANS manufacturer on different reference gravity sites and laboratories in France. These measurements performed in indoor conditions including simultaneous observations with classical reference gravity instruments (corner-cube absolute gravity meters, relative superconducting meters) as well with the Cold Atom Gravity meter (CAG) developed by LNE-SYRTE, lead to a first objective characterization of the performances of

  8. Wireless sensor for temperature and humidity measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drumea, Andrei; Svasta, Paul

    2010-11-01

    Temperature and humidity sensors have a broad range of applications, from heating and ventilation of houses to controlled drying of fruits, vegetables or meat in food industry. Modern sensors are integrated devices, usually MEMS, factory-calibrated and with digital output of measured parameters. They can have power down modes for reduced energy consumption. Such an integrated device allows the implementation of a battery powered wireless sensor when coupled with a low power microcontroller and a radio subsystem. A radio sensor can work independently or together with others in a radio network. Presented paper focuses mainly on measurement and construction aspects of sensors for temperature and humidity designed and implemented by authors; network aspects (communication between two or more sensors) are not analyzed.

  9. Residential Dehumidification Systems Research for Hot-Humid Climates

    SciTech Connect

    2005-02-01

    Twenty homes were tested and monitored in the hot-humid climate of Houston, Texas, to evaluate the humidity control performance and operating cost of six integrated dehumidification and ventilation systems.

  10. Potato growth in response to relative humidity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, R. M.; Tibbitts, T. W.; Fitzpatrick, A. H.

    1989-01-01

    Potato plants (Solanum tuberosum L. cvs. Russet Burbank, Norland, and Denali) were grown for 56 days in controlled-environment rooms under continuous light at 20C and 50% or 85% RH. No significant differences in total plant dry weight were measured between the humidity treatments, but plants grown under 85% RH produced higher tuber yields. Leaf areas were greater under 50% RH and leaves tended to be larger and darker green than at 85% RH.

  11. Absolute gravity acceleration measurement in atomic sensor laboratories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Angelis, M.; Greco, F.; Pistorio, A.; Poli, N.; Prevedelli, M.; Saccorotti, G.; Sorrentino, F.; Tino, G. M.

    2012-03-01

    This paper reports the results from the accurate measurement of the acceleration of gravity g taken at two separate premises in the Polo Scientifico of the Florence University (Italy). In these laboratories, two separate experiments aiming at measuring the Newtonian constant and testing the measurement of forces with high spatial resolution are in progress. Both experiments require an independent knowledge on the local value of g. Gravity measurements were conducted using an FG5 absolute gravimeter, and accompanied by seismic recordings for evaluating the noise condition at the site. The absolute accelerations of gravity at the two laboratories are ( 980 492 160.6 ± 4.0) μGal and ( 980 492 048.3 ± 3.0) μGal for the European Laboratory for Non-Linear Spectroscopy (LENS) and Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, respectively. Other than for the two referenced experiments, the data here presented will serve as a benchmark for any future study requiring an accurate knowledge of the absolute value of the acceleration of gravity in the study region.

  12. Comparative vs. Absolute Judgments of Trait Desirability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hofstee, Willem K. B.

    1970-01-01

    Reversals of trait desirability are studied. Terms indicating conservativw behavior appeared to be judged relatively desirable in comparative judgement, while traits indicating dynamic and expansive behavior benefited from absolute judgement. The reversal effect was shown to be a general one, i.e. reversals were not dependent upon the specific…

  13. New Techniques for Absolute Gravity Measurements.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-01-07

    Hammond, J.A. (1978) Bollettino Di Geofisica Teorica ed Applicata Vol. XX. 8. Hammond, J. A., and Iliff, R. L. (1979) The AFGL absolute gravity system...International Gravimetric Bureau, No. L:I-43. 7. Hammond. J.A. (1978) Bollettino Di Geofisica Teorica ed Applicata Vol. XX. 8. Hammond, J.A., and

  14. An Absolute Electrometer for the Physics Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Straulino, S.; Cartacci, A.

    2009-01-01

    A low-cost, easy-to-use absolute electrometer is presented: two thin metallic plates and an electronic balance, usually available in a laboratory, are used. We report on the very good performance of the device that allows precise measurements of the force acting between two charged plates. (Contains 5 footnotes, 2 tables, and 6 figures.)

  15. Stimulus Probability Effects in Absolute Identification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kent, Christopher; Lamberts, Koen

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of stimulus presentation probability on accuracy and response times in an absolute identification task. Three schedules of presentation were used to investigate the interaction between presentation probability and stimulus position within the set. Data from individual participants indicated strong effects of…

  16. Absolute Positioning Using the Global Positioning System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-04-01

    Global Positioning System ( GPS ) has becom a useful tool In providing relativ survey...Includes the development of a low cost navigator for wheeled vehicles. ABSTRACT The Global Positioning System ( GPS ) has become a useful tool In providing...technique of absolute or point positioning involves the use of a single Global Positioning System ( GPS ) receiver to determine the three-dimenslonal

  17. Time lapse imaging of water content with geoelectrical methods: on the interest of working with absolute water content data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumont, Gaël; Pilawski, Tamara; Robert, Tanguy; Hermans, Thomas; Garré, Sarah; Nguyen, Frederic

    2016-04-01

    The electrical resistivity tomography is a suitable method to estimate the water content of a waste material and detect changes in water content. Various ERT profiles, both static data and time-lapse, where acquired on a landfill during the Minerve project. In the literature, the relative change of resistivity (Δρ/ρ) is generally computed. For saline or heat tracer tests in the saturated zone, the Δρ/ρ can be easily translated into pore water conductivity or underground temperature changes (provided that the initial salinity or temperature condition is homogeneous over the ERT panel extension). For water content changes in the vadose zone resulting of an infiltration event or injection experiment, many authors also work with the Δρ/ρ or relative changes of water content Δθ/θ (linked to the change of resistivity through one single parameter: the Archie's law exponent "m"). This parameter is not influenced by the underground temperature and pore fluid conductivity (ρ¬w) condition but is influenced by the initial water content distribution. Therefore, you never know if the loss of Δθ/θ signal is representative of the limit of the infiltration front or more humid initial condition. Another approach for the understanding of the infiltration process is the assessment of the absolute change of water content (Δθ). This requires the direct computation of the water content of the waste from the resistivity data. For that purpose, we used petrophysical laws calibrated with laboratory experiments and our knowledge of the in situ temperature and pore fluid conductivity parameters. Then, we investigated water content changes in the waste material after a rainfall event (Δθ= Δθ/θ* θ). This new observation is really representatives of the quantity of water infiltrated in the waste material. However, the uncertainty in the pore fluid conductivity value may influence the computed water changes (Δθ=k*m√(ρw) ; where "m" is the Archie's law exponent

  18. 40 CFR 90.310 - Engine intake air humidity measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Engine intake air humidity measurement... Emission Test Equipment Provisions § 90.310 Engine intake air humidity measurement. This section refers to... for the engine intake air, the ambient test cell humidity measurement may be used. (a)...

  19. 40 CFR 90.310 - Engine intake air humidity measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Engine intake air humidity measurement... Emission Test Equipment Provisions § 90.310 Engine intake air humidity measurement. This section refers to... for the engine intake air, the ambient test cell humidity measurement may be used. (a)...

  20. 40 CFR 90.310 - Engine intake air humidity measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Engine intake air humidity measurement... Emission Test Equipment Provisions § 90.310 Engine intake air humidity measurement. This section refers to... for the engine intake air, the ambient test cell humidity measurement may be used. (a)...

  1. 40 CFR 90.310 - Engine intake air humidity measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Engine intake air humidity measurement... Emission Test Equipment Provisions § 90.310 Engine intake air humidity measurement. This section refers to... for the engine intake air, the ambient test cell humidity measurement may be used. (a)...

  2. 7 CFR 28.301 - Measurement: humidity; temperature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Measurement: humidity; temperature. 28.301 Section 28... for Length of Staple § 28.301 Measurement: humidity; temperature. The length of staple of any cotton... its fibers under a relative humidity of the atmosphere of 65 percent and a temperature of 70 °F....

  3. 7 CFR 28.301 - Measurement: humidity; temperature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Measurement: humidity; temperature. 28.301 Section 28... for Length of Staple § 28.301 Measurement: humidity; temperature. The length of staple of any cotton... its fibers under a relative humidity of the atmosphere of 65 percent and a temperature of 70 °F....

  4. 7 CFR 28.301 - Measurement: humidity; temperature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Measurement: humidity; temperature. 28.301 Section 28... for Length of Staple § 28.301 Measurement: humidity; temperature. The length of staple of any cotton... its fibers under a relative humidity of the atmosphere of 65 percent and a temperature of 70° F....

  5. 7 CFR 28.301 - Measurement: humidity; temperature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Measurement: humidity; temperature. 28.301 Section 28... for Length of Staple § 28.301 Measurement: humidity; temperature. The length of staple of any cotton... its fibers under a relative humidity of the atmosphere of 65 percent and a temperature of 70 °F....

  6. 7 CFR 28.301 - Measurement: humidity; temperature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Measurement: humidity; temperature. 28.301 Section 28... for Length of Staple § 28.301 Measurement: humidity; temperature. The length of staple of any cotton... its fibers under a relative humidity of the atmosphere of 65 percent and a temperature of 70 °F....

  7. Absolute Radiation Thermometry in the NIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bünger, L.; Taubert, R. D.; Gutschwager, B.; Anhalt, K.; Briaudeau, S.; Sadli, M.

    2017-04-01

    A near infrared (NIR) radiation thermometer (RT) for temperature measurements in the range from 773 K up to 1235 K was characterized and calibrated in terms of the "Mise en Pratique for the definition of the Kelvin" (MeP-K) by measuring its absolute spectral radiance responsivity. Using Planck's law of thermal radiation allows the direct measurement of the thermodynamic temperature independently of any ITS-90 fixed-point. To determine the absolute spectral radiance responsivity of the radiation thermometer in the NIR spectral region, an existing PTB monochromator-based calibration setup was upgraded with a supercontinuum laser system (0.45 μm to 2.4 μm) resulting in a significantly improved signal-to-noise ratio. The RT was characterized with respect to its nonlinearity, size-of-source effect, distance effect, and the consistency of its individual temperature measuring ranges. To further improve the calibration setup, a new tool for the aperture alignment and distance measurement was developed. Furthermore, the diffraction correction as well as the impedance correction of the current-to-voltage converter is considered. The calibration scheme and the corresponding uncertainty budget of the absolute spectral responsivity are presented. A relative standard uncertainty of 0.1 % (k=1) for the absolute spectral radiance responsivity was achieved. The absolute radiometric calibration was validated at four temperature values with respect to the ITS-90 via a variable temperature heatpipe blackbody (773 K ...1235 K) and at a gold fixed-point blackbody radiator (1337.33 K).

  8. Absolute exponential stability of recurrent neural networks with Lipschitz-continuous activation functions and time delays.

    PubMed

    Cao, Jinde; Wang, Jun

    2004-04-01

    This paper investigates the absolute exponential stability of a general class of delayed neural networks, which require the activation functions to be partially Lipschitz continuous and monotone nondecreasing only, but not necessarily differentiable or bounded. Three new sufficient conditions are derived to ascertain whether or not the equilibrium points of the delayed neural networks with additively diagonally stable interconnection matrices are absolutely exponentially stable by using delay Halanay-type inequality and Lyapunov function. The stability criteria are also suitable for delayed optimization neural networks and delayed cellular neural networks whose activation functions are often nondifferentiable or unbounded. The results herein answer a question: if a neural network without any delay is absolutely exponentially stable, then under what additional conditions, the neural networks with delay is also absolutely exponentially stable.

  9. Humid microclimates within the plumage of mallard ducks (Anas platyrhynchos) can potentially facilitate long distance dispersal of propagules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coughlan, Neil E.; Kelly, Tom C.; Davenport, John; Jansen, Marcel A. K.

    2015-05-01

    Birds as carriers of propagules are major agents in the dispersal of plants, animals, fungi and microbes. However, there is a lack of empirical data in relation to bird-mediated, epizoochorous dispersal. The microclimate found within the plumage likely plays a pivotal role in survival during flight conditions. To investigate the potential of epizoochory, we have analysed the microclimatic conditions within the plumage of mallard ducks (Anas platyrhynchos). Under similar ambient conditions of humidity and temperature, a sample of mallards showed a consistent microclimatic regime with variation across the body surface. The highest (mean) temperature and specific humidity occurred between feathers of the postpatagium. The lowest humidity was found between feathers of the centre back and the lowest temperature in the crissum. Observed differences in plumage depth and density, and distance from the skin, are all likely to be determining factors of microclimate condition. Specific humidity found within the plumage was on average 1.8-3.5 times greater than ambient specific humidity. Thus, the plumage can supply a microclimate buffered from that of the exterior environment. Extrapolating survival data for Lemna minor desiccation at various temperature and humidity levels to the measured plumage microclimatic conditions of living birds, survival for up to 6 h can be anticipated, especially in crissum, crural and breast plumage. The results are discussed in the context of potential long distance epizoochorous dispersal by A. platyrhynchos and similar species.

  10. Low environmental humidity induces synthesis and release of cortisol in an epidermal organotypic culture system.

    PubMed

    Takei, Kentaro; Denda, Sumiko; Kumamoto, Junichi; Denda, Mitsuhiro

    2013-10-01

    Dry environmental conditions induce a variety of skin pathologies and a recent report indicating that cortisol synthesis in epidermis was increased during wound healing led us to hypothesize that environmental dryness might induce increased cortisol secretion in epidermis. Therefore, we incubated a skin equivalent model under dry (relative humidity: less than 10%) and humid (relative humidity: approximately 100%) conditions for 48 hours and evaluated cortisol secretion and mRNA levels of cortisol-synthesizing enzyme (steroid 11β-hydroxylase, CYP11B1) and IL-1β. Cortisol secretion was increased threefold, and CYP11B1 and IL-1β mRNAs were increased 38-fold and sixfold, respectively, in the dry condition versus the humid condition. Occlusion with a water-impermeable plastic membrane partially blocked the increases in cortisol secretion and CYP11B1 and IL-1β mRNA expression in the dry condition. Thus, environmental dryness might induce increased cortisol secretion in epidermis of diseased skin characterized by epidermal barrier dysfunction, potentially influencing mental state and systemic physiology.

  11. Thermal environment assessment reliability using temperature--humidity indices.

    PubMed

    d'Ambrosio Alfano, Francesca Romana; Palella, Boris Igor; Riccio, Giuseppe

    2011-01-01

    A reliable assessment of the thermal environment should take into account the whole of the six parameters affecting the thermal sensation (air temperature, air velocity, humidity, mean radiant temperature, metabolic rate and thermo-physical properties of clothing). Anyway, the need of a quick evaluation based on few measurements and calculations has leaded to like best temperature-humidity indices instead of rational methods based on the heat balance on the human body. Among these, Canadian Humidex, preliminarily used only for weather forecasts, is becoming more and more widespread for a generalized assessment of both outdoor and indoor thermal environments. This custom arouses great controversies since using an index validated in outdoor conditions does not assure its indoor reliability. Moreover is it really possible to carry out the thermal environment assessment ignoring some of variables involved in the physiological response of the human body? Aiming to give a clear answer to these questions, this paper deals with a comparison between the assessment carried out according to the rational methods suggested by International Standards in force and the Humidex index. This combined analysis under hot stress situations (indoor and outdoor) has been preliminarily carried out; in a second phase the study deals with the indoor comfort prediction. Obtained results show that Humidex index very often leads to the underestimation of the workplace dangerousness and a poor reliability of comfort prediction when it is used in indoor situations.

  12. The Influence of Humidity on Assessing Irritation Threshold of Ammonia

    PubMed Central

    Sucker, Kirsten; Jettkant, Birger; Berresheim, Hans; Brüning, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    A large number of occupational exposure limit values (OELs) are based on avoiding of sensory irritation of the eyes and the upper respiratory tract. In order to investigate the chemosensory effect range of a chemical, odor and sensory irritation thresholds (lateralization thresholds, LTs) can be assessed. Humidity affects olfactory function and thus influences odor thresholds; however, a similar effect has not been shown for sensory irritation thresholds. The purpose of the present study was to explore whether LTs for ammonia vapor vary depending on the water vapor content of the inspired stimulus. Eight healthy nonsmoking volunteers were simultaneously exposed to ammonia vapor through one nostril and clean air through the other and were asked to determine which nostril received the chemical. Within experimental runs, ascending ammonia concentrations (60–350 ppm) that were either dry or humidified were administered at fixed time intervals. Geometric mean LTs obtained at wet (181 ppm) or dry (172 ppm) conditions did not differ significantly (P = 0.19) and were within the range of those reported by previous studies. These results suggest that humidity is not a critical factor in determining sensory irritation thresholds for ammonia, and future studies will examine if these findings are transferable to sensory irritation thresholds for other chemicals. PMID:27379250

  13. The Influence of Humidity on Assessing Irritation Threshold of Ammonia.

    PubMed

    Monsé, Christian; Sucker, Kirsten; Hoffmeyer, Frank; Jettkant, Birger; Berresheim, Hans; Bünger, Jürgen; Brüning, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    A large number of occupational exposure limit values (OELs) are based on avoiding of sensory irritation of the eyes and the upper respiratory tract. In order to investigate the chemosensory effect range of a chemical, odor and sensory irritation thresholds (lateralization thresholds, LTs) can be assessed. Humidity affects olfactory function and thus influences odor thresholds; however, a similar effect has not been shown for sensory irritation thresholds. The purpose of the present study was to explore whether LTs for ammonia vapor vary depending on the water vapor content of the inspired stimulus. Eight healthy nonsmoking volunteers were simultaneously exposed to ammonia vapor through one nostril and clean air through the other and were asked to determine which nostril received the chemical. Within experimental runs, ascending ammonia concentrations (60-350 ppm) that were either dry or humidified were administered at fixed time intervals. Geometric mean LTs obtained at wet (181 ppm) or dry (172 ppm) conditions did not differ significantly (P = 0.19) and were within the range of those reported by previous studies. These results suggest that humidity is not a critical factor in determining sensory irritation thresholds for ammonia, and future studies will examine if these findings are transferable to sensory irritation thresholds for other chemicals.

  14. Effects of relative humidity on development, fecundity and survival of three storage mites.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Ramos, Ismael; Alvarez-Alfageme, Fernando; Castañera, Pedro

    2007-01-01

    The developmental rate of immature stages and the reproduction of adults of Tyrophagus putrescentiae (Schrank), T. neiswanderi Johnston and Bruce and Acarus farris (Oudemans) were examined at 70, 80 and 90% r.h. and a constant temperature of 25 degrees C. At 70% r.h., T. putrescentiae and A. farris immature stages failed to reach the protonymph stage as 100% of the larvae died, whereas T. neiswanderi was able to complete development. The developmental time of all immature stages for the three species was significantly increased as relative humidity was reduced. The mobile stages were particularly susceptible, as the time needed to complete their development at lower relative humidities suffered greater increases than the egg stage. At 70% r.h., T. putrescentiae and A. farris were not able to lay eggs and only 24% of T. neiswanderi pairs were fertile. The reproductive parameters of the three species at the relative humidities at which they were able to lay eggs showed significant differences, except for the percentage of fertile mating at 80 and 90% r.h. As relative humidity increased, preoviposition period was reduced and fecundity and daily fecundity was increased, whereas the oviposition period showed different patterns for the three species. The intrinsic rate of increase (r ( m )) of T. neiswanderi at 70% r.h. was negative indicating that, at these conditions, mite populations of this species will diminish until they disappear. As relative humidity increased from 80 to 90% r.h. this parameter was almost twofold for both Tyrophagus species. The r ( m ) obtained for A. farris at 90% r.h. was similar to that of T. neiswanderi at the same humidity while at 80% r.h. it was very small so that the population doubling time was more than 84 days. The influence of relative humidity on biology of these mites and its practical application as control measure are discussed.

  15. Evaluation of humidity sensing properties of TMBHPET thin film embedded with spinel cobalt ferrite nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zafar, Qayyum; Azmer, Mohamad Izzat; Al-Sehemi, Abdullah G.; Al-Assiri, Mohammad S.; Kalam, Abul; Sulaiman, Khaulah

    2016-07-01

    In this study, we report the enhanced sensing parameters of previously reported TMBHPET-based humidity sensor. Significant improved sensing performance has been demonstrated by coupling of TMBHPET moisture sensing thin film with cobalt ferrite nanoparticles (synthesized by eco-benign ultrasonic method). The mean size of CoFe2O4 nanoparticles has been estimated to be 6.5 nm. It is assumed that the thin film of organic-ceramic hybrid matrix (TMBHPET:CoFe2O4) is a potential candidate for humidity sensing utility by virtue of its high specific surface area and porous surface morphology (as evident from TEM, FESEM, and AFM images). The hybrid suspension has been drop-cast onto the glass substrate with preliminary deposited coplanar aluminum electrodes separated by 40 µm distance. The influence of humidity on the capacitance of the hybrid humidity sensor (Al/TMBHPET:CoFe2O4/Al) has been investigated at three different frequencies of the AC applied voltage ( V rms 1 V): 100 Hz, 1 kHz, and 10 kHz. It has been observed that at 100 Hz, under a humidity of 99 % RH, the capacitance of the sensor increased by 2.61 times, with respect to 30 % RH condition. The proposed sensor exhibits significantly improved sensitivity 560 fF/ % RH at 100 Hz, which is nearly 7.5 times as high as that of pristine TMBHPET-based humidity sensor. Further, the capacitive sensor exhibits improved dynamic range (30-99 % RH), small hysteresis ( 2.3 %), and relatively quicker response and recovery times ( 12 s, 14 s, respectively). It is assumed that the humidity response of the sensor is associated with the diffusion kinetics of water vapors and doping of the semiconductor nanocomposite by water molecules.

  16. Positive impedance humidity sensors via single-component materials

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Jingwen; Peng, Zhijian; Shen, Zhenguang; Zhao, Zengying; Zhang, Guoliang; Fu, Xiuli

    2016-01-01

    Resistivity-type humidity sensors have been investigated with great interest due to the increasing demands in industry, agriculture and daily life. To date, most of the available humidity sensors have been fabricated based on negative humidity impedance, in which the electrical resistance decreases as the humidity increases, and only several carbon composites have been reported to present positive humidity impedance. However, here we fabricate positive impedance humidity sensors only via single-component WO3−x crystals. The resistance of WO3−x crystal sensors in response to relative humidity could be tuned from a negative to positive one by increasing the compositional x. And it was revealed that the positive humidity impedance was driven by the defects of oxygen vacancy. This result will extend the application field of humidity sensors, because the positive humidity impedance sensors would be more energy-efficient, easier to be miniaturized and electrically safer than their negative counterparts for their lower operation voltages. And we believe that constructing vacancies in semiconducting materials is a universal way to fabricate positive impedance humidity sensors. PMID:27150936

  17. Effect of ambient humidity on the strength of the adhesion force of single yeast cell inside environmental-SEM.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yajing; Nakajima, Masahiro; Ahmad, Mohd Ridzuan; Kojima, Seiji; Homma, Michio; Fukuda, Toshio

    2011-07-01

    A novel method for measuring an adhesion force of single yeast cell is proposed based on a nanorobotic manipulation system inside an environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM). The effect of ambient humidity on a single yeast cell adhesion force was studied. Ambient humidity was controlled by adjusting the chamber pressure and temperature inside the ESEM. It has been demonstrated that a thicker water film was formed at a higher humidity condition. The adhesion force between an atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilever and a tungsten probe which later on known as a substrate was evaluated at various humidity conditions. A micro-puller was fabricated from an AFM cantilever by use of focused ion beam (FIB) etching. The adhesion force of a single yeast cell (W303) to the substrate was measured using the micro-puller at the three humidity conditions: 100%, 70%, and 40%. The results showed that the adhesion force between the single yeast cell and the substrate is much smaller at higher humidity condition. The yeast cells were still alive after being observed and manipulated inside ESEM based on the result obtained from the re-culturing of the single yeast cell. The results from this work would help us to understand the ESEM system better and its potential benefit to the single cell analysis research.

  18. Tribology of Si/SiO2 in humid air: transition from severe chemical wear to wearless behavior at nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lei; He, Hongtu; Wang, Xiaodong; Kim, Seong H; Qian, Linmao

    2015-01-13

    Wear at sliding interfaces of silicon is a main cause for material loss in nanomanufacturing and device failure in microelectromechanical system (MEMS) applications. However, a comprehensive understanding of the nanoscale wear mechanisms of silicon in ambient conditions is still lacking. Here, we report the chemical wear of single crystalline silicon, a material used for micro/nanoscale devices, in humid air under the contact pressure lower than the material hardness. A transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis of the wear track confirmed that the wear of silicon in humid conditions originates from surface reactions without significant subsurface damages such as plastic deformation or fracture. When rubbed with a SiO2 ball, the single crystalline silicon surface exhibited transitions from severe wear in intermediate humidity to nearly wearless states at two opposite extremes: (a) low humidity and high sliding speed conditions and (b) high humidity and low speed conditions. These transitions suggested that at the sliding interfaces of Si/SiO2 at least two different tribochemical reactions play important roles. One would be the formation of a strong "hydrogen bonding bridge" between hydroxyl groups of two sliding interfaces and the other the removal of hydroxyl groups from the SiO2 surface. The experimental data indicated that the dominance of each reaction varies with the ambient humidity and sliding speed.

  19. From Hubble's NGSL to Absolute Fluxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heap, Sara R.; Lindler, Don

    2012-01-01

    Hubble's Next Generation Spectral Library (NGSL) consists of R-l000 spectra of 374 stars of assorted temperature, gravity, and metallicity. Each spectrum covers the wavelength range, 0.18-1.00 microns. The library can be viewed and/or downloaded from the website, http://archive.stsci.edu/prepds/stisngsll. Stars in the NGSL are now being used as absolute flux standards at ground-based observatories. However, the uncertainty in the absolute flux is about 2%, which does not meet the requirements of dark-energy surveys. We are therefore developing an observing procedure that should yield fluxes with uncertainties less than 1 % and will take part in an HST proposal to observe up to 15 stars using this new procedure.

  20. Consistent thermostatistics forbids negative absolute temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunkel, Jörn; Hilbert, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Over the past 60 years, a considerable number of theories and experiments have claimed the existence of negative absolute temperature in spin systems and ultracold quantum gases. This has led to speculation that ultracold gases may be dark-energy analogues and also suggests the feasibility of heat engines with efficiencies larger than one. Here, we prove that all previous negative temperature claims and their implications are invalid as they arise from the use of an entropy definition that is inconsistent both mathematically and thermodynamically. We show that the underlying conceptual deficiencies can be overcome if one adopts a microcanonical entropy functional originally derived by Gibbs. The resulting thermodynamic framework is self-consistent and implies that absolute temperature remains positive even for systems with a bounded spectrum. In addition, we propose a minimal quantum thermometer that can be implemented with available experimental techniques.

  1. Absolute measurement of length with nanometric resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apostol, D.; Garoi, F.; Timcu, A.; Damian, V.; Logofatu, P. C.; Nascov, V.

    2005-08-01

    Laser interferometer displacement measuring transducers have a well-defined traceability route to the definition of the meter. The laser interferometer is de-facto length scale for applications in micro and nano technologies. However their physical unit -half lambda is too large for nanometric resolution. Fringe interpolation-usual technique to improve the resolution-lack of reproducibility could be avoided using the principles of absolute distance measurement. Absolute distance refers to the use of interferometric techniques for determining the position of an object without the necessity of measuring continuous displacements between points. The interference pattern as produced by the interference of two point-like coherent sources is fitted to a geometric model so as to determine the longitudinal location of the target by minimizing least square errors. The longitudinal coordinate of the target was measured with accuracy better than 1 nm, for a target position range of 0.4μm.

  2. Asteroid absolute magnitudes and slope parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tedesco, Edward F.

    1991-01-01

    A new listing of absolute magnitudes (H) and slope parameters (G) has been created and published in the Minor Planet Circulars; this same listing will appear in the 1992 Ephemerides of Minor Planets. Unlike previous listings, the values of the current list were derived from fits of data at the V band. All observations were reduced in the same fashion using, where appropriate, a single basis default value of 0.15 for the slope parameter. Distances and phase angles were computed for each observation. The data for 113 asteroids was of sufficiently high quality to permit derivation of their H and G. These improved absolute magnitudes and slope parameters will be used to deduce the most reliable bias-corrected asteroid size-frequency distribution yet made.

  3. Computer processing of spectrograms for absolute intensities.

    PubMed

    Guttman, A; Golden, J; Galbraith, H J

    1967-09-01

    A computer program was developed to process photographically recorded spectra for absolute intensity. Test and calibration films are subjected to densitometric scans that provide digitally recorded densities on magnetic tapes. The nonlinear calibration data are fitted by least-squares cubic polynomials to yield a good approximation to the monochromatic H&D curves for commonly used emulsions (2475 recording film, Royal-X, Tri-X, 4-X). Several test cases were made. Results of these cases show that the machine processed absolute intensities are accurate to within 15%o. Arbitrarily raising the sensitivity threshold by 0.1 density units above gross fog yields cubic polynomial fits to the H&D curves that are radiometrically accurate within 10%. In addition, curves of gamma vs wavelength for 2475, Tri-X, and 4-X emulsions were made. These data show slight evidence of the photographic Purkinje effect in the 2475 emulsion.

  4. An absolute measure for a key currency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oya, Shunsuke; Aihara, Kazuyuki; Hirata, Yoshito

    It is generally considered that the US dollar and the euro are the key currencies in the world and in Europe, respectively. However, there is no absolute general measure for a key currency. Here, we investigate the 24-hour periodicity of foreign exchange markets using a recurrence plot, and define an absolute measure for a key currency based on the strength of the periodicity. Moreover, we analyze the time evolution of this measure. The results show that the credibility of the US dollar has not decreased significantly since the Lehman shock, when the Lehman Brothers bankrupted and influenced the economic markets, and has increased even relatively better than that of the euro and that of the Japanese yen.

  5. Probing absolute spin polarization at the nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Eltschka, Matthias; Jäck, Berthold; Assig, Maximilian; Kondrashov, Oleg V; Skvortsov, Mikhail A; Etzkorn, Markus; Ast, Christian R; Kern, Klaus

    2014-12-10

    Probing absolute values of spin polarization at the nanoscale offers insight into the fundamental mechanisms of spin-dependent transport. Employing the Zeeman splitting in superconducting tips (Meservey-Tedrow-Fulde effect), we introduce a novel spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy that combines the probing capability of the absolute values of spin polarization with precise control at the atomic scale. We utilize our novel approach to measure the locally resolved spin polarization of magnetic Co nanoislands on Cu(111). We find that the spin polarization is enhanced by 65% when increasing the width of the tunnel barrier by only 2.3 Å due to the different decay of the electron orbitals into vacuum.

  6. Absolute and relative dosimetry for ELIMED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cirrone, G. A. P.; Cuttone, G.; Candiano, G.; Carpinelli, M.; Leonora, E.; Lo Presti, D.; Musumarra, A.; Pisciotta, P.; Raffaele, L.; Randazzo, N.; Romano, F.; Schillaci, F.; Scuderi, V.; Tramontana, A.; Cirio, R.; Marchetto, F.; Sacchi, R.; Giordanengo, S.; Monaco, V.

    2013-07-01

    The definition of detectors, methods and procedures for the absolute and relative dosimetry of laser-driven proton beams is a crucial step toward the clinical use of this new kind of beams. Hence, one of the ELIMED task, will be the definition of procedures aiming to obtain an absolute dose measure at the end of the transport beamline with an accuracy as close as possible to the one required for clinical applications (i.e. of the order of 5% or less). Relative dosimetry procedures must be established, as well: they are necessary in order to determine and verify the beam dose distributions and to monitor the beam fluence and the energetic spectra during irradiations. Radiochromic films, CR39, Faraday Cup, Secondary Emission Monitor (SEM) and transmission ionization chamber will be considered, designed and studied in order to perform a fully dosimetric characterization of the ELIMED proton beam.

  7. Thermal Comfort: An Index for Hot, Humid Asia. Educational Building Digest 12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Bangkok (Thailand). Regional Office for Education in Asia and Oceania.

    The sensation of thermal comfort is determined by a combination of air temperature, humidity of the air, rate of movement of the air, and radiant heat. This digest is intended to assist architects to design educational facilities that are as thermally comfortable as is possible without recourse to mechanical air conditioning. A nomogram is…

  8. Cotton properties: relative humidity and its effect on flat bundle strength elongation and fracture morphology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects of the relative humidity (RH) of testing conditions on stelometer cotton flat bundle strength and elongation measurements, and on the morphology of fiber fractures will be discussed in this talk. We observed a trend for stelometer strength and elongations measurements. Testing in conditi...

  9. Equipment for Measuring Air Flow, Air Temperature, Relative Humidity, and Carbon Dioxide in Schools. Technical Bulletin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Bruce W.

    Information on equipment and techniques that school facility personnel may use to evaluate IAQ conditions are discussed. Focus is placed on the IAQ parameters of air flow, air temperature, relative humidity, as well as carbon dioxide and the equipment used to measure these factors. Reasons for measurement and for when the measurement of these…

  10. Silicon Absolute X-Ray Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Seely, John F.; Korde, Raj; Sprunck, Jacob; Medjoubi, Kadda; Hustache, Stephanie

    2010-06-23

    The responsivity of silicon photodiodes having no loss in the entrance window, measured using synchrotron radiation in the 1.75 to 60 keV range, was compared to the responsivity calculated using the silicon thickness measured using near-infrared light. The measured and calculated responsivities agree with an average difference of 1.3%. This enables their use as absolute x-ray detectors.

  11. Negative absolute temperature for mobile particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, Simon; Ronzheimer, Philipp; Schreiber, Michael; Hodgman, Sean; Bloch, Immanuel; Schneider, Ulrich

    2013-05-01

    Absolute temperature is usually bound to be strictly positive. However, negative absolute temperature states, where the occupation probability of states increases with their energy, are possible in systems with an upper energy bound. So far, such states have only been demonstrated in localized spin systems with finite, discrete spectra. We realized a negative absolute temperature state for motional degrees of freedom with ultracold bosonic 39K atoms in an optical lattice, by implementing the attractive Bose-Hubbard Hamiltonian. This new state strikingly revealed itself by a quasimomentum distribution that is peaked at maximum kinetic energy. The measured kinetic energy distribution and the extracted negative temperature indicate that the ensemble is close to degeneracy, with coherence over several lattice sites. The state is as stable as a corresponding positive temperature state: The negative temperature stabilizes the system against mean-field collapse driven by negative pressure. Negative temperatures open up new parameter regimes for cold atoms, enabling fundamentally new many-body states. Additionally, they give rise to several counterintuitive effects such as heat engines with above unity efficiency.

  12. System for absolute measurements by interferometric sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norton, Douglas A.

    1993-03-01

    The most common problem of interferometric sensors is their inability to measure absolute path imbalance. Presented in this paper is a signal processing system that gives absolute, unambiguous reading of optical path difference for almost any style of interferometric sensor. Key components are a wide band (incoherent) optical source, a polychromator, and FFT electronics. Advantages include no moving parts in the signal processor, no active components at the sensor location, and the use of standard single mode fiber for sensor illumination and signal transmission. Actual absolute path imbalance of the interferometer is determined without using fringe counting or other inferential techniques. The polychromator extracts the interference information that occurs at each discrete wavelength within the spectral band of the optical source. The signal processing consists of analog and digital filtering, Fast Fourier analysis, and a peak detection and interpolation algorithm. This system was originally designed for use in a remote pressure sensing application that employed a totally passive fiber optic interferometer. A performance qualification was made using a Fabry-Perot interferometer and a commercially available laser interferometer to measure the reference displacement.

  13. Chemical composition of French mimosa absolute oil.

    PubMed

    Perriot, Rodolphe; Breme, Katharina; Meierhenrich, Uwe J; Carenini, Elise; Ferrando, Georges; Baldovini, Nicolas

    2010-02-10

    Since decades mimosa (Acacia dealbata) absolute oil has been used in the flavor and perfume industry. Today, it finds an application in over 80 perfumes, and its worldwide industrial production is estimated five tons per year. Here we report on the chemical composition of French mimosa absolute oil. Straight-chain analogues from C6 to C26 with different functional groups (hydrocarbons, esters, aldehydes, diethyl acetals, alcohols, and ketones) were identified in the volatile fraction. Most of them are long-chain molecules: (Z)-heptadec-8-ene, heptadecane, nonadecane, and palmitic acid are the most abundant, and constituents such as 2-phenethyl alcohol, methyl anisate, and ethyl palmitate are present in smaller amounts. The heavier constituents were mainly triterpenoids such as lupenone and lupeol, which were identified as two of the main components. (Z)-Heptadec-8-ene, lupenone, and lupeol were quantified by GC-MS in SIM mode using external standards and represents 6%, 20%, and 7.8% (w/w) of the absolute oil. Moreover, odorant compounds were extracted by SPME and analyzed by GC-sniffing leading to the perception of 57 odorant zones, of which 37 compounds were identified by their odorant description, mass spectrum, retention index, and injection of the reference compound.

  14. Constrained Least Absolute Deviation Neural Networks

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhishun; Peterson, Bradley S.

    2008-01-01

    It is well known that least absolute deviation (LAD) criterion or L1-norm used for estimation of parameters is characterized by robustness, i.e., the estimated parameters are totally resistant (insensitive) to large changes in the sampled data. This is an extremely useful feature, especially, when the sampled data are known to be contaminated by occasionally occurring outliers or by spiky noise. In our previous works, we have proposed the least absolute deviation neural network (LADNN) to solve unconstrained LAD problems. The theoretical proofs and numerical simulations have shown that the LADNN is Lyapunov-stable and it can globally converge to the exact solution to a given unconstrained LAD problem. We have also demonstrated its excellent application value in time-delay estimation. More generally, a practical LAD application problem may contain some linear constraints, such as a set of equalities and/or inequalities, which is called constrained LAD problem, whereas the unconstrained LAD can be considered as a special form of the constrained LAD. In this paper, we present a new neural network called constrained least absolute deviation neural network (CLADNN) to solve general constrained LAD problems. Theoretical proofs and numerical simulations demonstrate that the proposed CLADNN is Lyapunov stable and globally converges to the exact solution to a given constrained LAD problem, independent of initial values. The numerical simulations have also illustrated that the proposed CLADNN can be used to robustly estimate parameters for nonlinear curve fitting, which is extensively used in signal and image processing. PMID:18269958

  15. Effect of production microclimate on female thermal state with increased temperature and air humidity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Machablishvili, O. G.

    1980-01-01

    The thermal state of women during the effect of high air temperature and relative humidity with a varying degree of physical loads was studied. Parameters for air temperature, relative humidity, and air movement were established. It was established that in women the thermo-regulatory stress occurs at lower air temperatures and with lower physical loads than in men. The accumulation of heat in women was revealed with lower air temperature than in men. It is concluded that to preserve the normal physiological state of the female organism it is necessary to create more favorable microclimate conditions and decrease the physical loads.

  16. Physicochemical bases of autonomous maintenance of humidity and temperature in closed spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aristov, Yu. I.; Vasiliev, L. L.; Glaznev, I. S.; Gordeeva, L. G.; Zhuravlev, A. S.; Kovaleva, M. N.

    2012-09-01

    An inexpensive adsorption humidistat working in the static and dynamic regimes is proposed. This humidistat is designed for maintenance of the relative humidity and temperature in a closed space at levels (15-18%, 20-25°C) necessary for reliable storage of rare books, manuscripts, pictures, and museum valuables and for their safe transportation in the process of visiting exhibitions. Principles of maintenance of the relative humidity in a closed space with the use of chemical substances and autonomous thermostatting of this space are considered. Results of testing of some new moisture buffers under laboratory and real conditions are presented.

  17. Effect of relative humidity and temperature on PVC degradation under gamma irradiation: Evolution of HCl production Yields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labed, V.; Obeid, H.; Ressayre, K.

    2013-03-01

    The separate and combined effects of the relative humidity and temperature were investigated on the HCl production yields arising from two types of PVC subjected to gamma irradiation (pure PVC and PVC formulated with plasticizing additives). The test procedure developed included experiments performed at different dose rates (400 Gy h-1 and 4 kGy h-1), temperatures (room temperature and 70 °C) and relative humidity values (<10%, 70-75%, and 100%), for irradiation doses ranging from 0.1 to 4 MGy. These operating conditions are representative of applications in a nuclear environment. For the plasticized PVC at low dose rates, raising the temperature increases the HCl production by a factor of about 1.3, with either low or high relative humidity. For pure PVC, depending on the humidity and dose rate, G(HCl) varies differently with the temperature: at low humidity and low dose rates, G(HCl) increases by a factor of 1.7 for a 45 °C temperature increase; at high humidity, the same temperature increase does not result in a significant increase of G(HCl). The influence of the relative humidity on HCl production has not been clearly identified and interpreted. The relative humidity appears to be a factor limiting the effects of temperature on the formation of HCl from pure PVC at high dose rates. The G values remain constant and even diminish under some experimental conditions. For plasticized PVC, the relative humidity has no influence on the HCl production yields.

  18. Effects of humidity and surfaces on the melt crystallization of ibuprofen.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong-Joo; Lee, Suyang; Kim, Il Won

    2012-01-01

    Melt crystallization of ibuprofen was studied to understand the effects of humidity and surfaces. The molecular self-assembly during the amorphous-to-crystal transformation was examined in terms of the nucleation and growth of the crystals. The crystallization was on Al, Au, and self-assembled monolayers with -CH(3), -OH, and -COOH functional groups. Effects of the humidity were studied at room temperature (18-20 °C) with relative humidity 33%, 75%, and 100%. Effects of the surfaces were observed at -20 °C (relative humidity 36%) to enable close monitoring with slower crystal growth. The nucleation time of ibuprofen was faster at high humidity conditions probably due to the local formation of the unfavorable ibuprofen melt/water interface. The crystal morphologies of ibuprofen were governed by the nature of the surfaces, and they could be associated with the growth kinetics by the Avrami equation. The current study demonstrated the effective control of the melt crystallization of ibuprofen through the melt/atmosphere and melt/surface interfaces.

  19. Spatially resolved resistance of NiO nanostructures under humid environment

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, Christopher B; Ievlev, Anton; Collins, Liam F; Muckley, Eric S; Joshi, Pooran C; Ivanov, Ilia N

    2016-01-01

    The spatially resolved electrical response of polycrystalline NiO films composed of 40 nm crystallites was investigated under different relative humidity levels (RH). The topological and electrical properties (surface potential and resistance) were characterized with sub 25nm resolution using Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) and conductive scanning probe microscopy under argon atmosphere at 0%, 50%, and 80% relative humidity. The dimensionality of surface features obtained through autocorrelation analysis of topological maps increased linearly with increased relative humidity, as water was adsorbed onto the film surface. Surface potential decreased from about 280mV to about 100 mV and resistance decreased from about 5 G to about 3 G , in a nonlinear fashion when relative humidity was increased from 0% to 80%. Spatially resolved surface potential and resistance of the NiO films was found to be heterogeneous throughout the film, with distinct domains that grew in size from about 60 nm to 175 nm at 0% and 80% RH levels, respectively. The heterogeneous character of the topological, surface potential, and resistance properties of the polycrystalline NiO film observed under dry conditions decreased with increased relative humidity, yielding nearly homogeneous surface properties at 80% RH, suggesting that the nanoscale potential and resistance properties converge with the mesoscale properties as water is adsorbed onto the NiO film.

  20. An investigation of the causes of cocrystal dissociation at high humidity.

    PubMed

    Eddleston, Mark D; Thakuria, Ranjit; Aldous, Barry J; Jones, William

    2014-09-01

    The dissociation at high humidity of cocrystals formed between caffeine and theophylline with a series of dicarboxylic acids is investigated and found to be driven by the partial dissolution of the acid, rather than by the formation of caffeine/theophylline hydrate. It is shown that partial dissociation occurs under all humidity conditions, and that cocrystals of compounds which do not form hydrates also dissociate by this mechanism. The observations made in this study indicate that cocrystal instability at high humidity will be a widespread issue, especially for cocrystals where the two coformers have widely differing aqueous solubilities, as is likely for systems where cocrystallisation is being used as means of improving the aqueous solubility, or dissolution rate, of a compound.

  1. Retrieval of relative humidity profiles and its associated error from Megha-Tropiques measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivira, R.; Brogniez, H.; Mallet, C.; Oussar, Y.

    2013-05-01

    The combination of the two microwave radiometers, SAPHIR and MADRAS, on board the Megha-Tropiques platform is explored to define a retrieval method that estimates not only the relative humidity profile but also the associated confidence intervals. A comparison of three retrieval models was performed, in equal conditions of input and output data sets, through their statistical values (error variance, correlation coefficient and error mean) obtaining a profile of seven layers of relative humidity. The three models show the same behavior with respect to layers, mid-tropospheric layers reaching the best statistical values suggesting a model-independent problem. Finally, the study of the probability density function of the relative humidity at a given atmospheric pressure further gives insight of the confidence intervals.

  2. Study on variability of modal parameters of concrete structure: humidity and moisture effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, W.; Li, H.; Nasser, H.

    2008-03-01

    The complex external environment for civil engineering structures results in the structural vibration properties varying with external conditions, such as humidity and temperature. For the vibration-based structural health monitoring techniques, for example damage identification, modal updating etc., above characteristics will result in the vibration-based techniques invalid. Other researchers have reported that modal frequencies varied significantly due to temperature change, but the humidity affect structural vibration properties in another manner. This paper discusses the variation of frequencies and mode shapes with respect to humidity and temperature changes for concrete structures, for which the changing of moisture will affect the density of materials, and the changing of temperature will affect the stiffness of structures. This paper models these two factors with finite element model approach based on the theoretical analysis, and numerical results obtained on the FE model of a concrete bridge deck are reported.

  3. Characterization of Polymer-Coated MEMS Humidity Sensors for Flight Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shams, Qamar A.; Burkett, Cecil G., Jr.; Daniels, Taumi S.; Tsoucalas, George; Comeaux, Toby; Sealey, Bradley S.; Fox, Melanie L.

    2005-01-01

    Under NASA's Aviation Safety Program (AvSP), in addition to wind velocity and temperature, water vapor is considered one key factor in determining aviation weather, which is a substantial contributor to many general aviation (GA) accidents. The conventional and reliable humidity measuring methods such as radiation reflection or absorption have relatively high cost in addition to highly specialized operating and maintenance characteristics. This paper presents characterizations of inexpensive MEMS and capacitance type humidity sensors for their potential use on aircraft. If installed, these sensors are subjected to ambient environmental conditions as well as to different chemicals and deicing fluids used on aircraft. This paper reports the effect of different deicing fluids and chemicals on these inexpensive humidity sensors.

  4. Design and implementation of temperature and humidity monitoring system for poultry farm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purnomo, Hindriyanto Dwi; Somya, Ramos; Fibriani, Charitas; Purwoko, Angga; Sadiyah, Ulfa

    2016-10-01

    Automatic monitoring system gains significant interest in poultry industry due to the need of consistent environment condition. Appropriate environment increase the feed conversion ratio as well as birds productivity. This will increase the competitiveness of the poultry industry. In this research, a temperature and humidity monitoring system is proposed to observer the temperature and relative humidity of a poultry house. The system is intended to be applied in the poultry industry with partnership schema. The proposed system is equipped with CCTV for visual monitoring. The measured temperature and humidity implement wireless sensor network technology. The experiment results reveals that proposed system have the potential to increase the effectiveness of monitoring of poultry house in poultry industry with partnership schema.

  5. How important is tropospheric humidity for coastal rainfall in the tropics?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergemann, Martin; Jakob, Christian

    2016-06-01

    Climate models show considerable rainfall biases in coastal tropical areas, where approximately 33% of the overall rainfall received is associated with coastal land-sea interaction. Building on an algorithm to objectively identify rainfall that is associated with land-sea interaction we investigate whether the relationship between rainfall in coastal regions and atmospheric humidity differs from that over the open ocean or over inland areas. We combine 3-hourly satellite estimates of rainfall with humidity estimates from reanalyses and investigate if coastal rainfall reveals the well-known relationship between area-averaged precipitation and column-integrated moisture. We find that rainfall that is associated with coastal land-sea effects occurs under much drier midtropospheric conditions than that over the ocean and does not exhibit a pronounced critical value of humidity. In addition, the dependence of the amount of rainfall on midtropospheric moisture is significantly weaker when the rainfall is coastally influenced.

  6. A Decrease in Temperature and Humidity Precedes Human Rhinovirus Infections in a Cold Climate.

    PubMed

    Ikäheimo, Tiina M; Jaakkola, Kari; Jokelainen, Jari; Saukkoriipi, Annika; Roivainen, Merja; Juvonen, Raija; Vainio, Olli; Jaakkola, Jouni J K

    2016-09-02

    Both temperature and humidity may independently or jointly contribute to the risk of human rhinovirus (HRV) infections, either through altered survival and spread of viruses in the environment or due to changes in host susceptibility. This study examined the relationship between short-term variations in temperature and humidity and the risk of HRV infections in a subarctic climate. We conducted a case-crossover study among conscripts (n = 892) seeking medical attention due to respiratory symptoms during their military training and identified 147 HRV cases by real-time PCR. An average temperature, a decline in daily ambient temperature and absolute humidity (AH) during the three preceding days of the onset (hazard period) and two reference periods (a week prior and after the onset) were obtained. The average daily temperature preceding HRV infections was -9.9 ± 4.9 °C and the average AH was 2.2 ± 0.9 g/m³. An average (odds ratios (OR) 1.07 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.00-1.15)) and maximal (OR 1.08 (1.01-1.17)) change in temperature increased the risk of HRV infections by 8% per 1 °C decrease. An average (OR 1.20 (CI 1.03-1.40)) and maximal decrease (OR 1.13 (CI 0.96-1.34)) in AH increased the risk of HRV infection by 13% and 20% per 0.5 g/m³ decrease. A higher average temperature during the three preceding days was positively associated with HRV infections (OR 1.07 (CI 1.00-1.15)). A decrease rather than low temperature and humidity per se during the preceding few days increases the risk of HRV infections in a cold climate. The information is applicable to populations residing in cold climates for appropriate personal protection and prevention of adverse health effects.

  7. 15 years of upper tropospheric relative humidity in-situ measurements by the MOZAIC programme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neis, Patrick; Smit, Herman G. J.; Alteköster, Lukas; Rohs, Susanne; Wahner, Andreas; Spichtinger, Peter; Petzold, Andreas

    2015-04-01

    Water vapour is a major parameter in weather prediction and climate research. However, the interaction between water vapour in the upper troposphere and lowermost stratosphere (UT/LS) and tropopause dynamics are not well understood. Furthermore, the knowledge about potential trends and feedback mechanisms of upper troposphere/lower stratosphere water vapour is low because of the large variability of observations and relatively short data records. A continuous measurement of upper tropospheric humidity (UTH) is still difficult because the abundance of UTH is highly variable on spatial and temporal scales, which cannot be resolved, neither by the global radiosondes network nor by satellites. Since 1994, UTH data with high spatial and temporal resolution are provided by the in-situ measurements aboard civil passenger aircraft from the MOZAIC/IAGOS-programme (www.iagos.org). The measurement system is based on a capacitive hygrometer with a simultaneous temperature measurement installed in a conventional Rosemount housing. In recent studies the MOZAIC Capacitive Hygrometer (MCH) and its improved successor IAGOS Capacitive Hygrometer (ICH) are compared against research-grade water vapour instruments during airborne field studies. The qualification of the Capacitive Hygrometer for the use in long-term observation programmes is successfully demonstrated and the continuation of high data quality is confirmed for the transition from MCH to ICH. After the reanalysis of the relative humidity data from 1994 to 2009, this extensive and unique data set is examined by criteria of continuity, homogeneity and quantity of data coverage, to identify global regions suitable for UTH climatology and trend analyses. For the identified target regions time series and climatologies of, e.g., relative humidity with respect to ice, temperature, and absolute humidity are investigated. First results of this study will be presented.

  8. Extension of Humidity Standards to Frost Point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, B. I.; Lee, S.-W.; Kim, J. C.; Woo, S. B.

    2015-08-01

    The KRISS low frost-point humidity generator which has been operated by the two-temperature method in the frost-point range from to since 2006 is reformed to a two-temperature, two-pressure type, in order to extend the calibration capability to a frost point of . The temperature and pressure of the saturator were controlled to and 1 MPa, respectively. The water-vapor mole ratio generated by the upgraded humidity generator reached . The uncertainty of the generator was estimated by calculations as well as a series of experiments including the stability of the generated frost point, the saturation efficiency with a varied gas flow rate, and the change of water-vapor mole ratio in the tubing line. The standard uncertainty of the generator is less than at the frost point of and is increased to at the frost point of . The increase in uncertainty is mainly due to the water adsorption/desorption on the internal surface of tubing from the saturator to the hygrometer.

  9. Breadboard CO2 and humidity control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boehm, A. M.

    1976-01-01

    A regenerable CO2 and humidity control system is being developed for potential use on shuttle as an alternate to the baseline lithium hydroxide (LiOH)/condensing heat exchanger system. The system utilizes a sorbent material, designated HS-C, to adsorb CO2 and water vapor from the cabin atmosphere. The material is regenerated by exposing it to space vacuum. A half-size breadboard system, utilizing a flight representative HS-C canister, was designed, built, and performance tested to shuttle requirements for total CO2 and total humidity removal. The use of a new chemical matrix material allowed significant optimization of the system design by packing the HS-C chemical into the core of a heat exchanger which is manifolded to form two separate and distinct beds. Breadboard system performance was proven by parametric testing and simulated mission testing over the full range of shuttle crew sizes and metabolic loadings. Vacuum desorption testing demonstrated considerable savings in previously projected shuttle vacuum duct sizing.

  10. Absolute versus temporal anomaly and percent of saturation soil moisture spatial variability for six networks worldwide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brocca, L.; Zucco, G.; Mittelbach, H.; Moramarco, T.; Seneviratne, S. I.

    2014-07-01

    The analysis of the spatial-temporal variability of soil moisture can be carried out considering the absolute (original) soil moisture values or relative values, such as the percent of saturation or temporal anomalies. Over large areas, soil moisture data measured at different sites can be characterized by large differences in their minimum, mean, and maximum absolute values, even though in relative terms their temporal patterns are very similar. In these cases, the analysis considering absolute compared with percent of saturation or temporal anomaly soil moisture values can provide very different results with significant consequences for their use in hydrological applications and climate science. In this study, in situ observations from six soil moisture networks in Italy, Spain, France, Switzerland, Australia, and United States are collected and analyzed to investigate the spatial soil moisture variability over large areas (250-150,000 km2). Specifically, the statistical and temporal stability analyses of soil moisture have been carried out for absolute, temporal anomaly, and percent of saturation values (using two different formulations for temporal anomalies). The results highlight that the spatial variability of the soil moisture dynamic (i.e., temporal anomalies) is significantly lower than that of the absolute soil moisture values. The spatial variance of the time-invariant component (temporal mean of each site) is the predominant contribution to the total spatial variance of absolute soil moisture data. Moreover, half of the networks show a minimum in the spatial variability for intermediate conditions when the temporal anomalies are considered, in contrast with the widely recognized behavior of absolute soil moisture data. The analyses with percent saturation data show qualitatively similar results as those for the temporal anomalies because of the applied normalization which reduces spatial variability induced by differences in mean absolute soil moisture

  11. Ultrafast response humidity sensor using supramolecular nanofibre and its application in monitoring breath humidity and flow.

    PubMed

    Mogera, Umesha; Sagade, Abhay A; George, Subi J; Kulkarni, Giridhar U

    2014-02-17

    Measuring humidity in dynamic situations calls for highly sensitive fast response sensors. Here we report, a humidity sensor fabricated using solution processed supramolecular nanofibres as active resistive sensing material. The nanofibres are built via self- assembly of donor and acceptor molecules (coronene tetracarboxylate and dodecyl methyl viologen respectively) involved in charge transfer interactions. The conductivity of the nanofibre varied sensitively over a wide range of relative humidity (RH) with unprecedented fast response and recovery times. Based on UV-vis, XRD and AFM measurements, it is found that the stacking distance in the nanofibre decreases slightly while the charge transfer band intensity increases, all observations implying enhanced charge transfer interaction and hence the conductivity. It is demonstrated to be as a novel breath sensor which can monitor the respiration rate. Using two humidity sensors, a breath flow sensor was made which could simultaneously measure RH and flow rate of exhaled nasal breath. The integrated device was used for monitoring RH in the exhaled breath from volunteers undergoing exercise and alcohol induced dehydration.

  12. Ultrafast response humidity sensor using supramolecular nanofibre and its application in monitoring breath humidity and flow

    PubMed Central

    Mogera, Umesha; Sagade, Abhay A.; George, Subi J.; Kulkarni, Giridhar U.

    2014-01-01

    Measuring humidity in dynamic situations calls for highly sensitive fast response sensors. Here we report, a humidity sensor fabricated using solution processed supramolecular nanofibres as active resistive sensing material. The nanofibres are built via self- assembly of donor and acceptor molecules (coronene tetracarboxylate and dodecyl methyl viologen respectively) involved in charge transfer interactions. The conductivity of the nanofibre varied sensitively over a wide range of relative humidity (RH) with unprecedented fast response and recovery times. Based on UV-vis, XRD and AFM measurements, it is found that the stacking distance in the nanofibre decreases slightly while the charge transfer band intensity increases, all observations implying enhanced charge transfer interaction and hence the conductivity. It is demonstrated to be as a novel breath sensor which can monitor the respiration rate. Using two humidity sensors, a breath flow sensor was made which could simultaneously measure RH and flow rate of exhaled nasal breath. The integrated device was used for monitoring RH in the exhaled breath from volunteers undergoing exercise and alcohol induced dehydration. PMID:24531132

  13. Moisture performance of sealed attics in the mixed-humid climate

    SciTech Connect

    Boudreaux, Philip R.; Pallin, Simon B.; Jackson, Roderick K.

    2013-12-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory studied 8 homes in the mixed-humid climate, 4 with vented attics and 4 with sealed attics. ORNL wanted to understand the moisture performance of the sealed attic and how it affected the interior environment. We found that the attic and interior of sealed attic homes were more humid than the attic and interior observed in vented attic homes. This is due to the lack of ventilation in the sealed attic. Historically attics have been vented to dehumidify the attic and interior of the home. A sealed attic design greatly reduces the venting potential and thus this drying pathway and can cause elevated interior moisture over a vented attic home. Despite the elevated attic and interior moisture in the sealed attic homes, so far no mold or material degradation has been found. The roof sheathing moisture content has stayed below 20%, indicating low potential for material degradation. Also the relative humidity at the roof sheathing has stayed within the ASHRAE 160 design criteria except for a short time during the 2011/2012 winter. This was due to a combination of the sealed attic design (minimal venting to the outside) and the duct work not being operated in the attic which usually provides a dehumidification pathway. It was also found that when the humidity was controlled using the HVAC system, it resulted in 7% more cooling energy consumption. In the mixed-humid climate this reduces the cost effectiveness of the sealed attic design as a solution for bringing ducts into a semi-conditioned space. Because of this we are recommending the other alternatives be used to bringing ducts into the conditioned space in both new construction and retrofit work in the mixed-humid climate.

  14. Humidity affects the morphology of particles emitted from beclomethasone dipropionate pressurized metered dose inhalers.

    PubMed

    Ivey, James W; Bhambri, Pallavi; Church, Tanya K; Lewis, David A; McDermott, Mark T; Elbayomy, Shereen; Finlay, Warren H; Vehring, Reinhard

    2017-03-30

    The effects of propellant type, cosolvent content, and air humidity on the morphology and solid phase of the particles produced from solution pressurized metered dose inhalers containing the corticosteroid beclomethasone dipropionate were investigated. The active ingredient was dissolved in the HFA propellants 134a and 227ea with varying levels of the cosolvent ethanol and filled into pressurized metered dose inhalers. Inhalers were actuated into an evaporation chamber under controlled temperature and humidity conditions and sampled using a single nozzle, single stage inertial impactor. Particle morphology was assessed qualitatively using field emission scanning electron microscopy and focused ion beam-helium ion microscopy. Drug solid phase was assessed using Raman microscopy. The relative humidity of the air during inhaler actuation was found to have a strong effect on the particle morphology, with solid spheroidal particles produced in dry air and highly porous particles produced at higher humidity levels. Air humidification was found to have no effect on the solid phase of the drug particles, which was predominantly amorphous for all tested formulations. A critical level of air relative humidity was required to generate porous particles for each tested formulation. This critical relative humidity was found to depend on the amount of ethanol used in the inhaler, but not on the type of propellant utilized. The results indicate that under the right circumstances water vapor saturation followed by nucleated water condensation or ice deposition occurs during particle formation from evaporating propellant-cosolvent-BDP droplets. This finding reveals the importance of condensed water or ice as a templating agent for porosity when particle formation occurs at saturated conditions, with possible implications on the pharmacokinetics of solution pMDIs and potential applications in particle engineering for drug delivery.

  15. Humidity versus photo-stability of metal halide perovskite films in a polymer matrix.

    PubMed

    Manshor, Nurul Ain; Wali, Qamar; Wong, Ka Kan; Muzakir, Saifful Kamaluddin; Fakharuddin, Azhar; Schmidt-Mende, Lukas; Jose, Rajan

    2016-08-21

    Despite the high efficiency of over 21% reported for emerging thin film perovskite solar cells, one of the key issues prior to their commercial deployment is to attain their long term stability under ambient and outdoor conditions. The instability in perovskite is widely conceived to be humidity induced due to the water solubility of its initial precursors, which leads to decomposition of the perovskite crystal structure; however, we note that humidity alone is not the major degradation factor and it is rather the photon dose in combination with humidity exposure that triggers the instability. In our experiment, which is designed to decouple the effect of humidity and light on perovskite degradation, we investigate the shelf-lifetime of CH3NH3PbI3 films in the dark and under illumination under high humidity conditions (Rel. H. > 70%). We note minor degradation in perovskite films stored in a humid dark environment whereas upon exposure to light, the films undergo drastic degradation, primarily owing to the reactive TiO2/perovskite interface and also the surface defects of TiO2. To enhance its air-stability, we incorporate CH3NH3PbI3 perovskite in a polymer (poly-vinylpyrrolidone, PVP) matrix which retained its optical and structural characteristics in the dark for ∼2000 h and ∼800 h in room light soaking, significantly higher than a pristine perovskite film, which degraded completely in 600 h in the dark and in less than 100 h when exposed to light. We attribute the superior stability of PVP incorporated perovskite films to the improved structural stability of CH3NH3PbI3 and also to the improved TiO2/perovskite interface upon incorporating a polymer matrix. Charge injection from the polymer embedded perovskite films has also been confirmed by fabricating solar cells using them, thereby providing a promising future research pathway for stable and efficient perovskite solar cells.

  16. Effects of Temperature and Humidity on Wilethane 44 Cure

    SciTech Connect

    John C. Weigle

    2006-10-01

    Wilethane 44 is a polyurethane adhesive developed by the Materials Team within ESA-MEE at Los Alamos National Laboratory as a replacement for Hexcel Corporation Urethane 7200. Urethane 7200 is used in numerous weapon systems, but it was withdrawn from the market in 1989. The weapons complex requires a replacement material for use in the W76-1 LEP and the W88, as well as for assembly of JTAs for other warheads. All polyurethane systems are susceptible to moisture reacting with unreacted isocyanate groups. This side reaction competes with the curing reaction and results in CO{sub 2} formation. Therefore, a polyurethane adhesive can exhibit foaming if appropriate environmental controls are not in place while it cures. A designed experiment has been conducted at TA-16-304 to determine the effects of ambient conditions on the properties of cured Wilethane 44. Temperature was varied from 15 C to 30 C and relative humidity from 15% to 40%. The density, hardness at 24 hours, and butt tensile strength on aluminum substrates were measured and fitted to quadratic equations over the experimental space. Additionally, the loss and storage moduli during cure were monitored as a function of cure temperature. These experiments provide a stronger basis for establishing appropriate environmental conditions and cure times when using Wilethane 44. The current guidelines are a working time of 90 minutes, a cure time of 18 hours, and a relative humidity of less than 25%, regardless of ambient temperature. Viscosity measurements revealed that the working time is a strong function of temperature and can be as long as 130 minutes at 15 C or as short as 90 minutes at 30 C. The experiments also showed that the gel time is much longer than originally thought, as long as 13 hours at 15 C. Consequently, it may be necessary to extend the required cure time at temperatures below 20 C. Allowable humidity varies as a function of temperature from 34% at 15 C to 15% at 30 C.

  17. Physiological responses during continuous work in hot dry and hot humid environments in Indians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen Gupta, J.; Swamy, Y. V.; Pichan, G.; Dimri, G. P.

    1984-06-01

    Studies have been conducted on six young healthy heat acclimatised Indians to determine the physiological changes in prolonged continuous work in thermally neutral and in hot dry and hot humid environments. Physiological responses in maximal efforts i.e. Vo2 max, VE max and Cf max were noted. In addition, duration in continuous work at three sub-maximal rate of work in three simulated environments were also noted. Physiological responses like Vo2, VE and Cf were noted every 15 minutes of work. Besides these responses, rectal temperature (Tre), mean skin temperature (Ts) and mean sweat rate were also recorded during continuous work. Results indicated a significant decrease in maximum oxygen uptake capacity (Vo2 max) in heat with no change in maximum exercise ventilation (VE max) and maximum cardiac frequency. However, the fall in Vo2 max was more severe in the hot humid environment than in the hot dry climate. Cardiac frequency at fixed oxygen consumption of 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 l/min was distinctly higher in the hot humid environment than in the hot dry and comfortable temperature. The duration in continuous physical effort in various grades of activities decreased in hot dry environment from that in the-comfortable climate and further decreased significantly in hot humid environment. The highest rate of sweating was observed during work in humid heat. The mean skin temperature (Ts) showed a fall in all the three rates of work in comfortable and hot dry conditions whereas in hot humid environment it showed a linear rise during the progress of work. The rectal temperature on the other hand maintained a near steady state while working at 65 and 82 watts in comfortable and hot dry environments but kept on rising during work in hot humid environment. At the highest work rate of 98 watts, the rectal temperature showed a steady increase even in the hot dry condition. It was thus concluded from the study that a hot humid climate imposes more constraints on the

  18. Room temperature degradation of YBa2Cu3O(7-x) superconductors in varying relative humidity environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hooker, M. W.; Wise, S. A.; Carlberg, I. A.; Stephens, R. M.; Simchick, R. T.; Farjami, A.

    1993-01-01

    An aging study was performed to determine the stability of YBa2Cu3O(7-x) ceramics in humid environments at 20 C. In this study, fired ceramic specimens were exposed to humidity levels ranging from 30.5 to 100 percent for 2-, 4-, and 6-week time intervals. After storage under these conditions, the specimens were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and electrical resistance measurements. At every storage condition evaluated, the fired ceramics were found to interact with H2O present in the surrounding environment, resulting in the decomposition of the YBa2Cu3O(7-x) phase. XRD data showed that BaCO3, CuO, and Y2BaCuO5 were present after aging and that the peak intensities of these impurity phases increased both with increasing humidity level and with increasing time of exposure. Additionally, SEM analyses of the ceramic microstructures after aging revealed the development of needle-like crystallites along the surface of the test specimens after aging. Furthermore, the superconducting transition temperature T(sub c) was found to decrease both with increasing humidity level and with increasing time of exposure. All the specimens aged at 30.5, 66, and 81 percent relative humidity exhibited superconducting transitions above 80 K, although these values were reduced by the exposure to the test conditions. Conversely, the specimens stored in direct contact with water (100 percent relative humidity) exhibited no superconducting transitions.

  19. Indirect health effects of relative humidity in indoor environments.

    PubMed Central

    Arundel, A V; Sterling, E M; Biggin, J H; Sterling, T D

    1986-01-01

    A review of the health effects of relative humidity in indoor environments suggests that relative humidity can affect the incidence of respiratory infections and allergies. Experimental studies on airborne-transmitted infectious bacteria and viruses have shown that the survival or infectivity of these organisms is minimized by exposure to relative humidities between 40 and 70%. Nine epidemiological studies examined the relationship between the number of respiratory infections or absenteeism and the relative humidity of the office, residence, or school. The incidence of absenteeism or respiratory infections was found to be lower among people working or living in environments with mid-range versus low or high relative humidities. The indoor size of allergenic mite and fungal populations is directly dependent upon the relative humidity. Mite populations are minimized when the relative humidity is below 50% and reach a maximum size at 80% relative humidity. Most species of fungi cannot grow unless the relative humidity exceeds 60%. Relative humidity also affects the rate of offgassing of formaldehyde from indoor building materials, the rate of formation of acids and salts from sulfur and nitrogen dioxide, and the rate of formation of ozone. The influence of relative humidity on the abundance of allergens, pathogens, and noxious chemicals suggests that indoor relative humidity levels should be considered as a factor of indoor air quality. The majority of adverse health effects caused by relative humidity would be minimized by maintaining indoor levels between 40 and 60%. This would require humidification during winter in areas with cold winter climates. Humidification should preferably use evaporative or steam humidifiers, as cool mist humidifiers can disseminate aerosols contaminated with allergens. PMID:3709462

  20. Indirect health effects of relative humidity in indoor environments

    SciTech Connect

    Arundel, A.V.; Sterling, E.M.; Biggin, J.H.; Sterling, T.D.

    1986-03-01

    A review of the health effects of relative humidity in indoor environments suggests that relative humidity can affect the incidence of respiratory infections and allergies. Experimental studies on airborne-transmitted infectious bacteria and viruses have shown that the survival or infectivity of these organisms is minimized by exposure to relative humidities between 40 and 70%. Nine epidemiological studies examined the relationship between the number of respiratory infections or absenteeism and the relative humidity of the office, residence, or school. The incidence of absenteeism or respiratory infections was found to be lower among people working or living in environments with mid-range versus low or high relative humidities. The indoor size of allergenic mite and fungal populations is directly dependent upon the relative humidity. Mite populations are minimized when the relative humidity is below 50% and reach a maximum size at 80% relative humidity. Most species of fungi cannot grow unless the relative humidity exceeds 60%. Relative humidity also affects the rate of offgassing of formaldehyde from indoor building materials, the rate of formation of acids and salts from sulfur and nitrogen dioxide, and the rate of formation of ozone. The influence of relative humidity on the abundance of allergens, pathogens, and noxious chemicals suggests that indoor relative humidity levels should be considered as a factor of indoor air quality. The majority of adverse health effects caused by relative humidity would be minimized by maintaining indoor levels between 40 and 60%. This would require humidification during winter in areas with cold winter climates. Humidification should preferably use evaporative or steam humidifiers, as cool mist humidifiers can disseminate aerosols contaminated with allergens.

  1. The effect of temperature and humidity on dengue virus propagation in Aedes aegypti mosquitos.

    PubMed

    Thu, H M; Aye, K M; Thein, S

    1998-06-01

    The effect of temperature and relative humidity on dengue virus propagation in the mosquito as one of the possible contributing factors to dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) outbreaks was studied. Ae. aegypti mosquitos were reared under standard conditions and inoculated intrathoracically with dengue virus. Virus propagation in the mosquitos was determined at the temperature and relative humidity of all 3 seasons of Yangon and for the simulated temperature and relative humidity of Singapore. The virus propagation was detected by direct fluorescent antibody technique (DFAT) with mosquito head squash and the virus titer was determined by plaque forming unit test (PFUT) in baby hamster kidney-21 cells. The results show that the infected mosquitos kept under the conditions of the rainy season and under the simulated conditions of Singapore had a significantly higher virus titer (p=<0.05) when compared with the other 2 seasons of Yangon. So it is thought that the temperature and relative humidity of the rainy season of Yangon and that of Singapore favors dengue virus propagation in the mosquito and is one of the contributing factors to the occurence of DHF outbreaks.

  2. The effect of structures on indoor humidity--possibility to improve comfort and perceived air quality.

    PubMed

    Simonson, C J; Salonvaara, M; Ojanen, T

    2002-12-01

    The research presented in this paper shows that moisture transfer between indoor air and hygroscopic building structures can generally improve indoor humidity conditions. This is important because the literature shows that indoor humidity has a significant effect on occupant comfort, perceived air quality (PAQ), occupant health, building durability, material emissions, and energy consumption. Therefore, it appears possible to improve the quality of life of occupants when appropriately applying hygroscopic wood-based materials. The paper concentrates on the numerical investigation of a bedroom in a wooden building located in four European countries (Finland, Belgium, Germany, and Italy). The results show that moisture transfer between indoor air and the hygroscopic structure significantly reduces the peak indoor humidity. Based on correlations from the literature, which quantify the effect of temperature and humidity on comfort and PAQ for sedentary adults, hygroscopic structures can improve indoor comfort and air quality. In all the investigated climates, it is possible to improve the indoor conditions such that, as many as 10 more people of 100 are satisfied with the thermal comfort conditions (warm respiratory comfort) at the end of occupation. Similarly, the percent dissatisfied with PAQ can be 25% lower in the morning when permeable and hygroscopic structures are applied.

  3. Raoult’s law revisited: accurately predicting equilibrium relative humidity points for humidity control experiments

    PubMed Central

    Bowler, Michael G.

    2017-01-01

    The humidity surrounding a sample is an important variable in scientific experiments. Biological samples in particular require not just a humid atmosphere but often a relative humidity (RH) that is in equilibrium with a stabilizing solution required to maintain the sample in the same state during measurements. The controlled dehydration of macromolecular crystals can lead to significant increases in crystal order, leading to higher diffraction quality. Devices that can accurately control the humidity surrounding crystals while monitoring diffraction have led to this technique being increasingly adopted, as the experiments become easier and more reproducible. Matching the RH to the mother liquor is the first step in allowing the stable mounting of a crystal. In previous work [Wheeler, Russi, Bowler & Bowler (2012). Acta Cryst. F68, 111–114], the equilibrium RHs were measured for a range of concentrations of the most commonly used precipitants in macromolecular crystallography and it was shown how these related to Raoult’s law for the equilibrium vapour pressure of water above a solution. However, a discrepancy between the measured values and those predicted by theory could not be explained. Here, a more precise humidity control device has been used to determine equilibrium RH points. The new results are in agreement with Raoult’s law. A simple argument in statistical mechanics is also presented, demonstrating that the equilibrium vapour pressure of a solvent is proportional to its mole fraction in an ideal solution: Raoult’s law. The same argument can be extended to the case where the solvent and solute molecules are of different sizes, as is the case with polymers. The results provide a framework for the correct maintenance of the RH surrounding a sample. PMID:28381983

  4. Raoult's law revisited: accurately predicting equilibrium relative humidity points for humidity control experiments.

    PubMed

    Bowler, Michael G; Bowler, David R; Bowler, Matthew W

    2017-04-01

    The humidity surrounding a sample is an important variable in scientific experiments. Biological samples in particular require not just a humid atmosphere but often a relative humidity (RH) that is in equilibrium with a stabilizing solution required to maintain the sample in the same state during measurements. The controlled dehydration of macromolecular crystals can lead to significant increases in crystal order, leading to higher diffraction quality. Devices that can accurately control the humidity surrounding crystals while monitoring diffraction have led to this technique being increasingly adopted, as the experiments become easier and more reproducible. Matching the RH to the mother liquor is the first step in allowing the stable mounting of a crystal. In previous work [Wheeler, Russi, Bowler & Bowler (2012). Acta Cryst. F68, 111-114], the equilibrium RHs were measured for a range of concentrations of the most commonly used precipitants in macromolecular crystallography and it was shown how these related to Raoult's law for the equilibrium vapour pressure of water above a solution. However, a discrepancy between the measured values and those predicted by theory could not be explained. Here, a more precise humidity control device has been used to determine equilibrium RH points. The new results are in agreement with Raoult's law. A simple argument in statistical mechanics is also presented, demonstrating that the equilibrium vapour pressure of a solvent is proportional to its mole fraction in an ideal solution: Raoult's law. The same argument can be extended to the case where the solvent and solute molecules are of different sizes, as is the case with polymers. The results provide a framework for the correct maintenance of the RH surrounding a sample.

  5. Temperature and humidity dependence of secondary organic aerosol yield from the ozonolysis of β-pinene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenby, C.; Pöschl, U.; von Hessberg, P.; Bilde, M.; Nielsen, O. J.; Moortgat, G. K.

    2007-02-01

    The temperature dependence of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation from ozonolysis of β-pinene was studied in a flow reactor at 263 K-303 K and 1007 hPa under dry and humid conditions (0% and 26%-68% relative humidity, respectively). The observed SOA yields were of similar magnitude as predicted by a two-product model based on detailed gas phase chemistry (Jenkin, 2004), reaching maximum values of 0.18-0.39 at high particle mass concentrations (Mo). Under dry conditions, however, the measurement data exhibited significant oscillatory deviations from the predicted linear increase with inverse temperature (up to 50% at high Mo). Under humid conditions the SOA yield exhibited a linear decrease with inverse temperature, which is opposite to modelled temperature dependence and implies that the model substantially overestimates the yield at low temperatures and underestimates it at high temperatures (deviations up to 80% at high Mo). For the atmospherically relevant concentration level of Mo=10 μg m-3 and temperature range 263 K-293 K, the results from humid experiments in this study indicate that the SOA yield of β-pinene ozonolysis may be well represented by an average value of 0.15 with an uncertainty estimate of ±0.05. When fitting the measurement data with a two-product model, both the partitioning coefficients (Kom,i) and the stoichiometric yields (αi) of the low-volatile and semi-volatile model species were found to vary with temperature. The results indicate that not only the reaction product vapour pressures but also the relative contributions of different gas-phase or multiphase reaction channels are strongly dependent on temperature and the presence of water vapour. In fact, the oscillatory positive temperature dependence observed under dry conditions and the negative temperature dependence observed under humid conditions indicate that the SOA yield is governed much more by the temperature and humidity dependence of the involved chemical reactions

  6. Temperature and humidity dependence of secondary organic aerosol yield from the ozonolysis of β-pinene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Hessberg, C.; von Hessberg, P.; Pöschl, U.; Bilde, M.; Nielsen, O. J.; Moortgat, G. K.

    2009-06-01

    The temperature dependence of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation from ozonolysis of β-pinene was studied in a flow reactor at 263 K-303 K and 1007 hPa under dry and humid conditions (0% and 26%-68% relative humidity, respectively). The observed SOA yields reached maximum values of 0.18-0.39 at high particle mass concentrations (Mo). Under dry conditions, the measurement data showed an overall increase in SOA yield with inverse temperature, but significant oscillatory deviations from the predicted linear increase with inverse temperature (up to 50% at high Mo) was observed. Under humid conditions the SOA yield exhibited a linear decrease with inverse temperature. For the atmospherically relevant concentration level of Mo=10 μg m-3 and temperature range 263 K-293 K, the results from humid experiments in this study indicate that the SOA yield of β-pinene ozonolysis may be well represented by an average value of 0.15 with an uncertainty estimate of ±0.05. When fitting the measurement data with a two-product model, both the partitioning coefficients (Kom,i) and the stoichiometric yields (αi) of the low-volatile and semi-volatile model species were found to vary with temperature. The results indicate that not only the reaction product vapour pressures but also the relative contributions of different gas-phase or multiphase reaction channels are strongly dependent on temperature and the presence of water vapour. In fact, the oscillatory positive temperature dependence observed under dry conditions and the negative temperature dependence observed under humid conditions indicate that the SOA yield is governed much more by the temperature and humidity dependence of the involved chemical reactions than by vapour pressure temperature dependencies. We suggest that the elucidation and modelling of SOA formation need to take into account the effects of temperature and humidity on the pathways and kinetics of the involved chemical reactions as well as on the gas

  7. Clock time is absolute and universal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Xinhang

    2015-09-01

    A critical error is found in the Special Theory of Relativity (STR): mixing up the concepts of the STR abstract time of a reference frame and the displayed time of a physical clock, which leads to use the properties of the abstract time to predict time dilation on physical clocks and all other physical processes. Actually, a clock can never directly measure the abstract time, but can only record the result of a physical process during a period of the abstract time such as the number of cycles of oscillation which is the multiplication of the abstract time and the frequency of oscillation. After Lorentz Transformation, the abstract time of a reference frame expands by a factor gamma, but the frequency of a clock decreases by the same factor gamma, and the resulting multiplication i.e. the displayed time of a moving clock remains unchanged. That is, the displayed time of any physical clock is an invariant of Lorentz Transformation. The Lorentz invariance of the displayed times of clocks can further prove within the framework of STR our earth based standard physical time is absolute, universal and independent of inertial reference frames as confirmed by both the physical fact of the universal synchronization of clocks on the GPS satellites and clocks on the earth, and the theoretical existence of the absolute and universal Galilean time in STR which has proved that time dilation and space contraction are pure illusions of STR. The existence of the absolute and universal time in STR has directly denied that the reference frame dependent abstract time of STR is the physical time, and therefore, STR is wrong and all its predictions can never happen in the physical world.

  8. Absolute Radiometric Calibration of EUNIS-06

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, R. J.; Rabin, D. M.; Kent, B. J.; Paustian, W.

    2007-01-01

    The Extreme-Ultraviolet Normal-Incidence Spectrometer (EUNIS) is a soundingrocket payload that obtains imaged high-resolution spectra of individual solar features, providing information about the Sun's corona and upper transition region. Shortly after its successful initial flight last year, a complete end-to-end calibration was carried out to determine the instrument's absolute radiometric response over its Longwave bandpass of 300 - 370A. The measurements were done at the Rutherford-Appleton Laboratory (RAL) in England, using the same vacuum facility and EUV radiation source used in the pre-flight calibrations of both SOHO/CDS and Hinode/EIS, as well as in three post-flight calibrations of our SERTS sounding rocket payload, the precursor to EUNIS. The unique radiation source provided by the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) had been calibrated to an absolute accuracy of 7% (l-sigma) at 12 wavelengths covering our bandpass directly against the Berlin electron storage ring BESSY, which is itself a primary radiometric source standard. Scans of the EUNIS aperture were made to determine the instrument's absolute spectral sensitivity to +- 25%, considering all sources of error, and demonstrate that EUNIS-06 was the most sensitive solar E W spectrometer yet flown. The results will be matched against prior calibrations which relied on combining measurements of individual optical components, and on comparisons with theoretically predicted 'insensitive' line ratios. Coordinated observations were made during the EUNIS-06 flight by SOHO/CDS and EIT that will allow re-calibrations of those instruments as well. In addition, future EUNIS flights will provide similar calibration updates for TRACE, Hinode/EIS, and STEREO/SECCHI/EUVI.

  9. Achieving Climate Change Absolute Accuracy in Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wielicki, Bruce A.; Young, D. F.; Mlynczak, M. G.; Thome, K. J; Leroy, S.; Corliss, J.; Anderson, J. G.; Ao, C. O.; Bantges, R.; Best, F.; Bowman, K.; Brindley, H.; Butler, J. J.; Collins, W.; Dykema, J. A.; Doelling, D. R.; Feldman, D. R.; Fox, N.; Huang, X.; Holz, R.; Huang, Y.; Jennings, D.; Jin, Z.; Johnson, D. G.; Jucks, K.; Kato, S.; Kratz, D. P.; Liu, X.; Lukashin, C.; Mannucci, A. J.; Phojanamongkolkij, N.; Roithmayr, C. M.; Sandford, S.; Taylor, P. C.; Xiong, X.

    2013-01-01

    The Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO) mission will provide a calibration laboratory in orbit for the purpose of accurately measuring and attributing climate change. CLARREO measurements establish new climate change benchmarks with high absolute radiometric accuracy and high statistical confidence across a wide range of essential climate variables. CLARREO's inherently high absolute accuracy will be verified and traceable on orbit to Système Internationale (SI) units. The benchmarks established by CLARREO will be critical for assessing changes in the Earth system and climate model predictive capabilities for decades into the future as society works to meet the challenge of optimizing strategies for mitigating and adapting to climate change. The CLARREO benchmarks are derived from measurements of the Earth's thermal infrared spectrum (5-50 micron), the spectrum of solar radiation reflected by the Earth and its atmosphere (320-2300 nm), and radio occultation refractivity from which accurate temperature profiles are derived. The mission has the ability to provide new spectral fingerprints of climate change, as well as to provide the first orbiting radiometer with accuracy sufficient to serve as the reference transfer standard for other space sensors, in essence serving as a "NIST [National Institute of Standards and Technology] in orbit." CLARREO will greatly improve the accuracy and relevance of a wide range of space-borne instruments for decadal climate change. Finally, CLARREO has developed new metrics and methods for determining the accuracy requirements of climate observations for a wide range of climate variables and uncertainty sources. These methods should be useful for improving our understanding of observing requirements for most climate change observations.

  10. Brownian motion: Absolute negative particle mobility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ros, Alexandra; Eichhorn, Ralf; Regtmeier, Jan; Duong, Thanh Tu; Reimann, Peter; Anselmetti, Dario

    2005-08-01

    Noise effects in technological applications, far from being a nuisance, can be exploited with advantage - for example, unavoidable thermal fluctuations have found application in the transport and sorting of colloidal particles and biomolecules. Here we use a microfluidic system to demonstrate a paradoxical migration mechanism in which particles always move in a direction opposite to the net acting force (`absolute negative mobility') as a result of an interplay between thermal noise, a periodic and symmetric microstructure, and a biased alternating-current electric field. This counterintuitive phenomenon could be used for bioanalytical purposes, for example in the separation and fractionation of colloids, biological molecules and cells.

  11. Absolute quantification of myocardial blood flow.

    PubMed

    Yoshinaga, Keiichiro; Manabe, Osamu; Tamaki, Nagara

    2016-07-21

    With the increasing availability of positron emission tomography (PET) myocardial perfusion imaging, the absolute quantification of myocardial blood flow (MBF) has become popular in clinical settings. Quantitative MBF provides an important additional diagnostic or prognostic information over conventional visual assessment. The success of MBF quantification using PET/computed tomography (CT) has increased the demand for this quantitative diagnostic approach to be more accessible. In this regard, MBF quantification approaches have been developed using several other diagnostic imaging modalities including single-photon emission computed tomography, CT, and cardiac magnetic resonance. This review will address the clinical aspects of PET MBF quantification and the new approaches to MBF quantification.

  12. An absolute radius scale for Saturn's rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicholson, Philip D.; Cooke, Maren L.; Pelton, Emily

    1990-01-01

    Radio and stellar occultation observations of Saturn's rings made by the Voyager spacecraft are discussed. The data reveal systematic discrepancies of almost 10 km in some parts of the rings, limiting some of the investigations. A revised solution for Saturn's rotation pole has been proposed which removes the discrepancies between the stellar and radio occultation profiles. Corrections to previously published radii vary from -2 to -10 km for the radio occultation, and +5 to -6 km for the stellar occultation. An examination of spiral density waves in the outer A Ring supports that the revised absolute radii are in error by no more than 2 km.

  13. Absolute Rate Theories of Epigenetic Stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walczak, Aleksandra M.; Onuchic, Jose N.; Wolynes, Peter G.

    2006-03-01

    Spontaneous switching events in most characterized genetic switches are rare, resulting in extremely stable epigenetic properties. We show how simple arguments lead to theories of the rate of such events much like the absolute rate theory of chemical reactions corrected by a transmission factor. Both the probability of the rare cellular states that allow epigenetic escape, and the transmission factor, depend on the rates of DNA binding and unbinding events and on the rates of protein synthesis and degradation. Different mechanisms of escape from the stable attractors occur in the nonadiabatic, weakly adiabatic and strictly adiabatic regimes, characterized by the relative values of those input rates.

  14. Absolute rate theories of epigenetic stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walczak, Aleksandra M.; Onuchic, José N.; Wolynes, Peter G.

    2005-12-01

    Spontaneous switching events in most characterized genetic switches are rare, resulting in extremely stable epigenetic properties. We show how simple arguments lead to theories of the rate of such events much like the absolute rate theory of chemical reactions corrected by a transmission factor. Both the probability of the rare cellular states that allow epigenetic escape and the transmission factor depend on the rates of DNA binding and unbinding events and on the rates of protein synthesis and degradation. Different mechanisms of escape from the stable attractors occur in the nonadiabatic, weakly adiabatic, and strictly adiabatic regimes, characterized by the relative values of those input rates. rate theory | stochastic gene expression | gene switches

  15. Absolute method of measuring magnetic susceptibility

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorpe, A.; Senftle, F.E.

    1959-01-01

    An absolute method of standardization and measurement of the magnetic susceptibility of small samples is presented which can be applied to most techniques based on the Faraday method. The fact that the susceptibility is a function of the area under the curve of sample displacement versus distance of the magnet from the sample, offers a simple method of measuring the susceptibility without recourse to a standard sample. Typical results on a few substances are compared with reported values, and an error of less than 2% can be achieved. ?? 1959 The American Institute of Physics.

  16. Absolute Priority for a Vehicle in VANET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirani, Rostam; Hendessi, Faramarz; Montazeri, Mohammad Ali; Sheikh Zefreh, Mohammad

    In today's world, traffic jams waste hundreds of hours of our life. This causes many researchers try to resolve the problem with the idea of Intelligent Transportation System. For some applications like a travelling ambulance, it is important to reduce delay even for a second. In this paper, we propose a completely infrastructure-less approach for finding shortest path and controlling traffic light to provide absolute priority for an emergency vehicle. We use the idea of vehicular ad-hoc networking to reduce the imposed travelling time. Then, we simulate our proposed protocol and compare it with a centrally controlled traffic light system.

  17. Increased molecular mobility in humid silk fibers under tensile stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seydel, Tilo; Knoll, Wiebke; Greving, Imke; Dicko, Cedric; Koza, Michael M.; Krasnov, Igor; Müller, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Silk fibers are semicrystalline nanocomposite protein fibers with an extraordinary mechanical toughness that changes with humidity. Diffusive or overdamped motion on a molecular level is absent in dry silkworm silk, but present in humid silk at ambient temperature. This microscopic diffusion distinctly depends on the externally applied macroscopic tensile force. Quasielastic and inelastic neutron-scattering data as a function of humidity and of tensile strain on humid silk fibers support the model that both the adsorbed water and parts of the amorphous polymers participate in diffusive motion and are affected by the tensile force. It is notable that the quasielastic linewidth of humid silk at 100% relative humidity increases significantly with the applied force. The effect of the tensile force is discussed in terms of an increasing alignment of the polymer chains in the amorphous fraction with increasing tensile stress which changes the geometrical restrictions of the diffusive motions.

  18. A CMOS humidity sensor for passive RFID sensing applications.

    PubMed

    Deng, Fangming; He, Yigang; Zhang, Chaolong; Feng, Wei

    2014-05-16

    This paper presents a low-cost low-power CMOS humidity sensor for passive RFID sensing applications. The humidity sensing element is implemented in standard CMOS technology without any further post-processing, which results in low fabrication costs. The interface of this humidity sensor employs a PLL-based architecture transferring sensor signal processing from the voltage domain to the frequency domain. Therefore this architecture allows the use of a fully digital circuit, which can operate on ultra-low supply voltage and thus achieves low-power consumption. The proposed humidity sensor has been fabricated in the TSMC 0.18 μm CMOS process. The measurements show this humidity sensor exhibits excellent linearity and stability within the relative humidity range. The sensor interface circuit consumes only 1.05 µW at 0.5 V supply voltage and reduces it at least by an order of magnitude compared to previous designs.

  19. A CMOS Humidity Sensor for Passive RFID Sensing Applications

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Fangming; He, Yigang; Zhang, Chaolong; Feng, Wei

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a low-cost low-power CMOS humidity sensor for passive RFID sensing applications. The humidity sensing element is implemented in standard CMOS technology without any further post-processing, which results in low fabrication costs. The interface of this humidity sensor employs a PLL-based architecture transferring sensor signal processing from the voltage domain to the frequency domain. Therefore this architecture allows the use of a fully digital circuit, which can operate on ultra-low supply voltage and thus achieves low-power consumption. The proposed humidity sensor has been fabricated in the TSMC 0.18 μm CMOS process. The measurements show this humidity sensor exhibits excellent linearity and stability within the relative humidity range. The sensor interface circuit consumes only 1.05 μW at 0.5 V supply voltage and reduces it at least by an order of magnitude compared to previous designs. PMID:24841250

  20. EPIC Simulations of Jovian Specific Humidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowling, T. E.

    1998-09-01

    The Explicit Planetary Isentropic-Coordinate (EPIC) atmospheric model has been expanded to include the specific humidities of H_2O, NH_3, NH_4SH, and CH_4 as optional prognostic variables. This permits us to study the thermodynamical effects of clouds in a global model of the gas-giant atmospheres (active ortho-para hydrogen conversion was already part of the model). We present a report on the effects of including clouds in the Jupiter EPIC model. On the hardware front, the simulations use a new 8-processor Beowulf parallel computer (2600 MHz total CPU). On the software front, the EPIC model's data format has been switched to the netCDF (Network Common Data Format) standard, for which tools exist in IDL, Matlab, and AVS, which makes it easier to analyze results and exchange files.

  1. The Canopy Conductance of a Humid Grassland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, C. T.; Hsieh, C. I.

    2015-12-01

    Penman-Monteith equation is widely used for estimating latent heat flux. The key parameter for implementing this equation is the canopy conductance (gc). Recent research (Blaken and Black, 2004) showed that gc could be well parameterized by a linear function of An/ (D0* X0c), where An represents net assimilation, D0 is leaf level saturation deficit, and X0c is CO2 mole fraction. In this study, we tried to use the same idea for estimating gcfor a humid grassland. The study site was located in County Cork, southwest Ireland (51o59''N 8o46''W), and perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) was the dominant grass species in this area. An eddy covariance system was used to measure the latent heat flux above this humid grassland. The measured gc was calculated by rearranging Penman-Monteith equation combined with the measured latent heat flux. Our data showed that the gc decreased as the vapor pressure deficit and temperature increased. And it increased as the net radiation increased. Therefore, we found out that the best parameterization of gc was a linear function of the product of the vapor deficit, temperature, and net radiation. Also, we used the gc which was estimated by this linear function to predict the latent heat flux by Penman-Monteith equation and compared the predictions with those where the gc was chosen to be a fixed value. Our analysis showed that this simple linear function for gc can improve the latent heat flux predictions (R square increased from 0.48 to 0.66).

  2. Homogenization of global radiosonde humidity data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaschek, Michael; Haimberger, Leopold

    2016-04-01

    The global radiosonde network is an important source of upper-air measurements and is strongly connected to reanalysis efforts of the 20th century. However, measurements are strongly affected by changes in the observing system and require a homogenization before they can be considered useful in climate studies. In particular humidity measurements are known to show spurious trends and biases induced by many sources, e.g. reporting practices or freezing of the sensor. We propose to detect and correct these biases in an automated way, as has been done with temperature and winds. We detect breakpoints in dew point depression (DPD) time series by employing a standard normal homogeneity test (SNHT) on DPD-departures from ERA-Interim. In a next step, we calculate quantile departures between the latter and the earlier part near the breakpoints of the time series, going back in time. These departures adjust the earlier distribution of DPD to the latter distribution, called quantile matching, thus removing for example a non climatic shift. We employ this approach to the existing radiosonde network. In a first step to verify our approach we compare our results with ERA-Interim data and brightness temperatures of humidity-sensitive channels of microwave measuring radiometers (SSMIS) onboard DMSP F16. The results show that some of the biases can be detected and corrected in an automated way, however large biases that impact the distribution of DPD values originating from known reporting practices (e.g. 30 DPD on US stations) remain. These biases can be removed but not corrected. The comparison of brightness temperatures from satellite and radiosondes proofs to be difficult as large differences result from for example representative errors.

  3. Badlands in humid regions - redbed desertification in Nanxiong Basin, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Luobin; Hua, Peng; Simonson, Scott

    2016-04-01

    The redbed badlands in Nanxiong City, China, well represent badlands in humid regions. The erosion rate in humid regions is much higher than that in arid regions and can reach 1 cm per month during the summer. The purpose of this study is to introduce the research of badlands in China, which have not been extensively studied so far, and to compare the badlands between arid and humid regions. Furthermore, the aim is to study the impact of mineralogical and chemical composition on the disintegration of soft rock in Nanxiong Basin badlands. For the purpose of this study field observations, sampling, and digging profiles were done. The mineralogical and chemical compositions of the Nanxiong Basin badland lithologies were determined by XRD, XRF and thin sections. Weathering resistance, process of weathering, and disintegration features were studied by weathering experiments under natural conditions. Weathering profiles can be easily divided into four layers: regolith, a strongly weathered layer, a poorly weathered layer, and an unweathered sediment. The depth of the weathering profile is influenced by the weathering resistance of the soft rock. Weathering resistance affects the erosion rate and evolution of landforms in badlands by influencing the rate from unweathered rock to regolith. Analyzed sediments have high content of illite and illite-smectite interstratifications. This composition of clay minerals together with poor sediment consolidation jointly leads to weathering prone sediment. The weathering and disintegration of soft rock in Nanxiong Basin badlands has a close relationship with rainfall. Sheet erosion, a kind of solid-liquid phase flow, formed in the regolith of the badland during rainfall events and can be the most instrumental to erosion. The mineral composition and liquidity plasticity index were also analyzed, and the results show that the regolith are low liquid limit silts with liquid limit of 21%-25%, plastic limit of 13%-18% and plasticity index

  4. Software Compensates Electronic-Nose Readings for Humidity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, Hanying

    2007-01-01

    A computer program corrects for the effects of humidity on the readouts of an array of chemical sensors (an "electronic nose"). To enable the use of this program, the array must incorporate an independent humidity sensor in addition to sensors designed to detect analytes other than water vapor. The basic principle of the program was described in "Compensating for Effects of Humidity on Electronic Noses" (NPO-30615), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 28, No. 6 (June 2004), page 63. To recapitulate: The output of the humidity sensor is used to generate values that are subtracted from the outputs of the other sensors to correct for contributions of humidity to those readings. Hence, in principle, what remains after corrections are the contributions of the analytes only. The outputs of the non-humidity sensors are then deconvolved to obtain the concentrations of the analytes. In addition, the humidity reading is retained as an analyte reading in its own right. This subtraction of the humidity background increases the ability of the software to identify such events as spills in which contaminants may be present in small concentrations and accompanied by large changes in humidity.

  5. Do honeybees, Apis mellifera scutellata, regulate humidity in their nest?

    PubMed

    Human, Hannelie; Nicolson, Sue W; Dietemann, Vincent

    2006-08-01

    Honeybees are highly efficient at regulating the biophysical parameters of their hive according to colony needs. Thermoregulation has been the most extensively studied aspect of nest homeostasis. In contrast, little is known about how humidity is regulated in beehives, if at all. Although high humidity is necessary for brood development, regulation of this parameter by honeybee workers has not yet been demonstrated. In the past, humidity was measured too crudely for a regulation mechanism to be identified. We reassess this issue, using miniaturised data loggers that allow humidity measurements in natural situations and at several places in the nest. We present evidence that workers influence humidity in the hive. However, there are constraints on potential regulation mechanisms because humidity optima may vary in different locations of the nest. Humidity could also depend on variable external factors, such as water availability, which further impair the regulation. Moreover, there are trade-offs with the regulation of temperature and respiratory gas exchanges that can disrupt the establishment of optimal humidity levels. As a result, we argue that workers can only adjust humidity within sub-optimal limits.

  6. Humidity control and hydrophilic glue coating applied to mounted protein crystals improves X-ray diffraction experiments

    PubMed Central

    Baba, Seiki; Hoshino, Takeshi; Ito, Len; Kumasaka, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    Protein crystals are fragile, and it is sometimes difficult to find conditions suitable for handling and cryocooling the crystals before conducting X-ray diffraction experiments. To overcome this issue, a protein crystal-mounting method has been developed that involves a water-soluble polymer and controlled humid air that can adjust the moisture content of a mounted crystal. By coating crystals with polymer glue and exposing them to controlled humid air, the crystals were stable at room temperature and were cryocooled under optimized humidity. Moreover, the glue-coated crystals reproducibly showed gradual transformations of their lattice constants in response to a change in humidity; thus, using this method, a series of isomorphous crystals can be prepared. This technique is valuable when working on fragile protein crystals, including membrane proteins, and will also be useful for multi-crystal data collection. PMID:23999307

  7. Humidity control and hydrophilic glue coating applied to mounted protein crystals improves X-ray diffraction experiments.

    PubMed

    Baba, Seiki; Hoshino, Takeshi; Ito, Len; Kumasaka, Takashi

    2013-09-01

    Protein crystals are fragile, and it is sometimes difficult to find conditions suitable for handling and cryocooling the crystals before conducting X-ray diffraction experiments. To overcome this issue, a protein crystal-mounting method has been developed that involves a water-soluble polymer and controlled humid air that can adjust the moisture content of a mounted crystal. By coating crystals with polymer glue and exposing them to controlled humid air, the crystals were stable at room temperature and were cryocooled under optimized humidity. Moreover, the glue-coated crystals reproducibly showed gradual transformations of their lattice constants in response to a change in humidity; thus, using this method, a series of isomorphous crystals can be prepared. This technique is valuable when working on fragile protein crystals, including membrane proteins, and will also be useful for multi-crystal data collection.

  8. Absolute Spectrophotometry of 237 Open Cluster Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clampitt, L.; Burstein, D.

    1994-12-01

    We present absolute spectrophotometry of 237 stars in 7 nearby open clusters: Hyades, Pleiades, Alpha Persei, Praesepe, Coma Berenices, IC 4665, and M 39. The observations were taken using the Wampler single-channel scanner (Wampler 1966) on the Crossley 0.9m telescope at Lick Observatory from July 1973 through December 1974. 21 bandpasses spanning the spectral range 3500 Angstroms to 7780 Angstroms were observed for each star, with bandwiths ranging from 32Angstroms to 64 Angstroms. Data are standardized to the Hayes--Latham (1975) system. Our measurements are compared to filter colors on the Johnson BV, Stromgren ubvy, and Geneva U V B_1 B_2 V_1 G systems, as well as to spectrophotometry of a few stars published by Gunn, Stryker & Tinsley and in the Spectrophotometric Standards Catalog (Adelman; as distributed by the NSSDC). Both internal and external comparisons to the filter systems indicate a formal statistical accuracy per bandpass of 0.01 to 0.02 mag, with apparent larger ( ~ 0.03 mag) differences in absolute calibration between this data set and existing spectrophotometry. These data will comprise part of the spectrophotometry that will be used to calibrate the Beijing-Arizona-Taipei-Connecticut Color Survey of the Sky (see separate paper by Burstein et al. at this meeting).

  9. Linear ultrasonic motor for absolute gravimeter.

    PubMed

    Jian, Yue; Yao, Zhiyuan; Silberschmidt, Vadim V

    2017-02-01

    Thanks to their compactness and suitability for vacuum applications, linear ultrasonic motors are considered as substitutes for classical electromagnetic motors as driving elements in absolute gravimeters. Still, their application is prevented by relatively low power output. To overcome this limitation and provide better stability, a V-type linear ultrasonic motor with a new clamping method is proposed for a gravimeter. In this paper, a mechanical model of stators with flexible clamping components is suggested, according to a design criterion for clamps of linear ultrasonic motors. After that, an effect of tangential and normal rigidity of the clamping components on mechanical output is studied. It is followed by discussion of a new clamping method with sufficient tangential rigidity and a capability to facilitate pre-load. Additionally, a prototype of the motor with the proposed clamping method was fabricated and the performance tests in vertical direction were implemented. Experimental results show that the suggested motor has structural stability and high dynamic performance, such as no-load speed of 1.4m/s and maximal thrust of 43N, meeting the requirements for absolute gravimeters.

  10. Why to compare absolute numbers of mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Sabine; Schulz, Sabine; Schropp, Eva-Maria; Eberhagen, Carola; Simmons, Alisha; Beisker, Wolfgang; Aichler, Michaela; Zischka, Hans

    2014-11-01

    Prompted by pronounced structural differences between rat liver and rat hepatocellular carcinoma mitochondria, we suspected these mitochondrial populations to differ massively in their molecular composition. Aiming to reveal these mitochondrial differences, we came across the issue on how to normalize such comparisons and decided to focus on the absolute number of mitochondria. To this end, fluorescently stained mitochondria were quantified by flow cytometry. For rat liver mitochondria, this approach resulted in mitochondrial protein contents comparable to earlier reports using alternative methods. We determined similar protein contents for rat liver, heart and kidney mitochondria. In contrast, however, lower protein contents were determined for rat brain mitochondria and for mitochondria from the rat hepatocellular carcinoma cell line McA 7777. This result challenges mitochondrial comparisons that rely on equal protein amounts as a typical normalization method. Exemplarily, we therefore compared the activity and susceptibility toward inhibition of complex II of rat liver and hepatocellular carcinoma mitochondria and obtained significant discrepancies by either normalizing to protein amount or to absolute mitochondrial number. Importantly, the latter normalization, in contrast to the former, demonstrated a lower complex II activity and higher susceptibility toward inhibition in hepatocellular carcinoma mitochondria compared to liver mitochondria. These findings demonstrate that solely normalizing to protein amount may obscure essential molecular differences between mitochondrial populations.

  11. [Estimation of absolute risk for fracture].

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Saeko

    2009-03-01

    Osteoporosis treatment aims to prevent fractures and maintain the QOL of the elderly. However, persons at high risk of future fracture cannot be effectively identified on the basis of bone density (BMD) alone, although BMD is used as an diagnostic criterion. Therefore, the WHO recommended that absolute risk for fracture (10-year probability of fracture) for each individual be evaluated and used as an index for intervention threshold. The 10-year probability of fracture is calculated based on age, sex, BMD at the femoral neck (body mass index if BMD is not available), history of previous fractures, parental hip fracture history, smoking, steroid use, rheumatoid arthritis, secondary osteoporosis and alcohol consumption. The WHO has just announced the development of a calculation tool (FRAX: WHO Fracture Risk Assessment Tool) in February this year. Fractures could be prevented more effectively if, based on each country's medical circumstances, an absolute risk value for fracture to determine when to start medical treatment is established and persons at high risk of fracture are identified and treated accordingly.

  12. Absolute stereochemistry of altersolanol A and alterporriols.

    PubMed

    Kanamaru, Saki; Honma, Miho; Murakami, Takanori; Tsushima, Taro; Kudo, Shinji; Tanaka, Kazuaki; Nihei, Ken-Ichi; Nehira, Tatsuo; Hashimoto, Masaru

    2012-02-01

    The absolute stereochemistry of altersolanol A (1) was established by observing a positive exciton couplet in the circular dichroism (CD) spectrum of the C3,C4-O-bis(2-naphthoyl) derivative 10 and by chemical correlations with known compound 8. Before the discussion, the relative stereochemistry of 1 was confirmed by X-ray crystallographic analysis. The shielding effect at C7'-OMe group by C1-O-benzoylation established the relative stereochemical relationship between the C8-C8' axial bonding and the C1-C4/C1'-C4' polyol moieties of alterporriols E (3), an atropisomer of the C8-C8' dimer of 1. As 3 could be obtained by dimerization of 1 in vitro, the absolute configuration of its central chirality elements (C1-C4) must be identical to those of 1. Spectral comparison between the experimental and theoretical CD spectra supported the above conclusion. Axial stereochemistry of novel C4-O-deoxy dimeric derivatives, alterporriols F (4) and G (5), were also revealed by comparison of their CD spectra to those of 2 and 3.

  13. Absolute Electron Extraction Efficiency of Liquid Xenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamdin, Katayun; Mizrachi, Eli; Morad, James; Sorensen, Peter

    2016-03-01

    Dual phase liquid/gas xenon time projection chambers (TPCs) currently set the world's most sensitive limits on weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs), a favored dark matter candidate. These detectors rely on extracting electrons from liquid xenon into gaseous xenon, where they produce proportional scintillation. The proportional scintillation from the extracted electrons serves to internally amplify the WIMP signal; even a single extracted electron is detectable. Credible dark matter searches can proceed with electron extraction efficiency (EEE) lower than 100%. However, electrons systematically left at the liquid/gas boundary are a concern. Possible effects include spontaneous single or multi-electron proportional scintillation signals in the gas, or charging of the liquid/gas interface or detector materials. Understanding EEE is consequently a serious concern for this class of rare event search detectors. Previous EEE measurements have mostly been relative, not absolute, assuming efficiency plateaus at 100%. I will present an absolute EEE measurement with a small liquid/gas xenon TPC test bed located at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.

  14. Standardization of the cumulative absolute velocity

    SciTech Connect

    O'Hara, T.F.; Jacobson, J.P. )

    1991-12-01

    EPRI NP-5930, A Criterion for Determining Exceedance of the Operating Basis Earthquake,'' was published in July 1988. As defined in that report, the Operating Basis Earthquake (OBE) is exceeded when both a response spectrum parameter and a second damage parameter, referred to as the Cumulative Absolute Velocity (CAV), are exceeded. In the review process of the above report, it was noted that the calculation of CAV could be confounded by time history records of long duration containing low (nondamaging) acceleration. Therefore, it is necessary to standardize the method of calculating CAV to account for record length. This standardized methodology allows consistent comparisons between future CAV calculations and the adjusted CAV threshold value based upon applying the standardized methodology to the data set presented in EPRI NP-5930. The recommended method to standardize the CAV calculation is to window its calculation on a second-by-second basis for a given time history. If the absolute acceleration exceeds 0.025g at any time during each one second interval, the earthquake records used in EPRI NP-5930 have been reanalyzed and the adjusted threshold of damage for CAV was found to be 0.16g-set.

  15. Swarm's Absolute Scalar Magnetometers Burst Mode Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coisson, P.; Vigneron, P.; Hulot, G.; Crespo Grau, R.; Brocco, L.; Lalanne, X.; Sirol, O.; Leger, J. M.; Jager, T.; Bertrand, F.; Boness, A.; Fratter, I.

    2014-12-01

    Each of the three Swarm satellites embarks an Absolute Scalar Magnetometer (ASM) to provide absolute scalar measurements of the magnetic field with high accuracy and stability. Nominal data acquisition of these ASMs is 1 Hz. But they can also run in a so-called "burst mode" and provide data at 250 Hz. During the commissioning phase of the mission, seven burst mode acquisition campaigns have been run simultaneously for all satellites, obtaining a total of ten days of burs-mode data. These campaigns allowed the identification of issues related to the operations of the piezo-electric motor and the heaters connected to the ASM, that do not impact the nominal 1 Hz scalar data. We analyze the burst mode data to identify high frequency geomagnetic signals, focusing the analysis in two regions: the low latitudes, where we seek signatures of ionospheric irregularities, and the high latitudes, to identify high frequency signals related to polar region currents. Since these campaigns have been conducted during the initial months of the mission, the three satellites where still close to each other, allowing to analyze the spatial coherency of the signals. Wavelet analysis have revealed 31 Hz signals appearing in the night-side in the equatorial region.

  16. Effects of Temperature and Humidity on the Characterization of C-4 Explosive Threats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, C. J.; Yoder, T. S.

    2012-06-01

    Both the quantity and the amount of time that an explosive is present on the surface of a material is dependent upon the amount of explosive originally deposited on the surface, the adhesive forces, temperature and humidity, as well as other environmental factors. This laboratory study focused on evaluating RDX crystal morphology changes resulting from variations in temperature and humidity conditions of the sample. The temperature and humidity conditions were controlled using a Tenney THRJ environmental chamber and a Tenney T11RC-1.5 environmental chamber. These chambers allow the temperature and humidity to be held within ±3 °C and ±5 % RH. The temperature and humidity conditions used for this test series were: 4 °C/40 %RH, 21 °C/20 %RH (samples left on benchtop), 21 °C/70 %RH, 21 °C/95 %RH, 35 °C/40 %RH, 35 °C/70 %RH, and 35 °C/95 %RH. These temperature and humidity set points were chosen to represent a wide range of conditions that may be found in real world scenarios. C-4 (RDX crystals and binder material) was deposited on the surface of one of six substrates by placing a fingerprint from the explosive block onto the matrix surface. The substrates were chosen to provide a range of items that are commonly used. Six substrate types were used during these tests: 50 % cotton/50 % polyester as found in T-shirts, 100 % cotton with a smooth surface such as that found in a cotton dress shirt, 100 % cotton on a rough surface such as that found on canvas or denim, suede leather such as might be found on jackets, purses, or shoes, painted metal obtained from a car hood, and a computer diskette. The samples were not pre-cleaned prior to testing and contained sizing agents, and in the case of the metal: oil, dirt, scratches, and rust spots. The substrates were photographed at various stages of testing, using a Zeiss Discover V12 stereoscope with Axiocam ICc1 3 megapixel digital camera, to determine any changes in the crystalline morphology. Some of the samples

  17. Effects of humid heat exposure in later sleep segments on sleep stages and body temperature in humans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto-Mizuno, Kazue; Tsuzuki, Kazuyo; Mizuno, Koh

    2005-03-01

    This study sought to investigate the effects of humid heat exposure in later sleep segments on sleep stages and body temperature in humans. The subjects were eight healthy males, from whom informed consent had been obtained. The experiments were carried out under three different sets of conditions: a control climate [air temperature (Ta)=26°C, relative humidity (RH)=50%] (C); a humid heat climate (Ta=32°C, RH=80%) (H); and a humid heat exposure in later sleep segments (C for the first 3 h 45 min, followed by a 30-min transition to H, which was then maintained for the last 3 h 45 min) (C H). Electroencephalogram, EOG, and mental electromyogram, rectal temperature (Tre), and skin temperature (Tsk) were continuously measured. The total amount of wakefulness was significantly increased in H compared to C H or C. Compared to C, wakefulness in C H and H was significantly increased during later sleep segments. Tre and mean Tsk were significantly higher in H than in C H or C. In C H, Tsk and Tre increased to levels equal to those observed in H after Ta and RH increase. Whole body sweat loss was significantly lower in C H and C than in H. These results suggest that humid heat exposure in the later sleep segment reduces thermal load as compared to full-night humid heat exposure. In daily life, the use of air conditioning in the initial sleep hours can protect sleep and thermoregulation.

  18. Investigating the effect of humidity on the α-relaxations of low-density polyethylene using dielectric spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Amin, Aeshna; Dantuluri, Ajay Kumar Raju; Bansal, Arvind Kumar

    2012-01-17

    A previous work from our lab reported the higher sorption of lipophilic preservatives in LDPE form-fill-seal packs that were stored at 75% relative humidity (RH) as against 25% RH. The aim of the present work was to investigate structural changes taking place in LDPE on exposure to higher humidity. The crystallinity of LDPE, determined by differential scanning calorimetry, was found to be similar for the packs charged at both humidity conditions. Dielectric spectroscopy (1.0E-02 Hz to 1.0E02 Hz in the temperature range of 75-87°C), however, showed faster α relaxation of LDPE films exposed to higher humidity. The activation energy of α relaxations was lower at 75% RH (99.735 kJ/mol) than at 25% RH (113.112 kJ/mol) after two weeks of storage. This work presents previously unreported evidence of the plasticization effect of water on LDPE, using dielectric spectroscopy. Furthermore, changes in α relaxation on exposure to humidity support the latest theory of its origin to be from the constrained amorphous regions. The authors suggest the employment of extreme humidity conditions (low and high), during accelerated stability studies of aqueous products in plastic packs to track the sorption loss of formulation components.

  19. HSP70 as a marker of heat and humidity stress in Tarai buffalo.

    PubMed

    Manjari, Rao; Yadav, Mrigakshi; Ramesh, Kandasamy; Uniyal, Sarveshwa; Rastogi, Sunil Kumar; Sejian, Veerasamy; Hyder, Iqbal

    2015-01-01

    Heat and humidity stress is a constant challenge to buffalo rearing under tropical climatic conditions. Heat shock proteins (HSPs) constitute a ubiquitous class of highly conserved proteins that contribute to cell survival during different conditions of stress. The present study was carried out in Tarai buffaloes to study the expression of HSP70 in their peripheral blood mononuclear cells during different seasons and establish it as a marker of heat and humidity stress in buffaloes. Blood samples were collected from each healthy, non-lactating and non-pregnant buffalo above 2 years of age, once in the month of January (temperature-humidity index (THI) < 72) and in the month of May (THI > 72). Blood samples were also collected during October (THI = 72) to be used as calibrator/control. Real-time PCR was used to profile the HSP70 gene expression in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). The relative expression values of HSP70 in Tarai buffalo was found to be significantly higher (P < 0.05) during summer season (2.37 ± 0.12) as compared to winter season (0.29 ± 0.04). The expression positively correlated with changes in physiological parameters like respiration rate (RR), pulse rate (PR) and rectal temperature (RT). In conclusion, it can be said that RR and HSP70 may act as characteristic physiological and cellular markers of heat and humidity stress in buffaloes.

  20. Measuring Humidity in Methane and Natural Gas with a Microwave Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavioso, R. M.; Madonna Ripa, D.; Benyon, R.; Gallegos, J. G.; Perez-Sanz, F.; Corbellini, S.; Avila, S.; Benito, A. M.

    2014-04-01

    The results of microwave measurements with a quasi-spherical resonator in humid methane samples realized under laboratory conditions at the Istituto Nazionale di Ricerca Metrologica (INRiM) and under industrial conditions in a natural gas sample made available at the facilities of the Technical Manager of the Spanish Gas System and main supplier of natural gas in Spain (ENAGAS) are reported. Measurements at INRiM included vapor phase and condensation tests on methane samples prepared with amount fractions of water between 600 ppm and 5000 ppm at temperatures between 273 K and 295 K and pressures between 150 kPa and 1 MPa. ENAGAS measurements were performed at ambient temperature, 750 kPa on natural gas sampled from the pipeline and successively humidified at amount fractions of water between 140 ppm and 250 ppm for completeness of the comparison with several humidity sensors and instrumentation based on different technologies. To enhance the sensitivity of the microwave method at low humidity, an experimental procedure based on the relative comparison of the dielectric permittivity of the humid gas sample before and after being subject to a chemical drying process was conceived and implemented. The uncertainty budget and the final sensitivity of this procedure are discussed.