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Sample records for absolute insulin deficiency

  1. Perpetuating Effects of Androgen Deficiency on Insulin-resistance

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, Judy L.; Jain, Ruhee; Rais, Maham; White, Ashley E.; Beer, Tomasz M.; Kievit, Paul; Winters-Stone, Kerri; Messaoudi, Ilhem; Varlamov, Oleg

    2016-01-01

    Background/Objectives Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) is commonly used for treatment of prostate cancer, but is associated with side effects such as sarcopenia and insulin resistance. The role of lifestyle factors such as diet and exercise on insulin sensitivity and body composition in testosterone-deficient males is poorly understood. The aim of the present study was to examine the relationships between androgen status, diet, and insulin sensitivity. Subjects/Methods Middle-aged (11–12-yo) intact and orchidectomized male rhesus macaques were maintained for two months on a standard chow diet, and then exposed for six months to a Western-style, high-fat/calorie-dense diet (WSD) followed by four months of caloric restriction (CR). Body composition, insulin sensitivity, physical activity, serum cytokine levels, and adipose biopsies were evaluated before and after each dietary intervention. Results Both intact and orchidectomized animals gained similar proportions of body fat, developed visceral and subcutaneous adipocyte hypertrophy, and became insulin resistant in response to the WSD. CR reduced body fat in both groups, but reversed insulin resistance only in intact animals. Orchidectomized animals displayed progressive sarcopenia, which persisted after the switch to CR. Androgen deficiency was associated with increased levels of interleukin-6 and macrophage-derived chemokine (CCL22), both of which were elevated during CR. Physical activity levels showed a negative correlation with body fat and insulin sensitivity. Conclusion Androgen deficiency exacerbated the negative metabolic side effects of the WSD, such that CR alone was not sufficient to improve altered insulin sensitivity, suggesting that ADT patients will require additional interventions to reverse insulin resistance and sarcopenia. PMID:27534842

  2. Paradoxical glucose-induced hyperkalemia. Combined aldosterone-insulin deficiency.

    PubMed

    Goldfarb, S; Strunk, B; Singer, I; Goldberg, M

    1975-11-01

    Severe hyperkalemia associated with spontaneous hyperglycemia as well as with the intravenous infusions of glucose occurred in an insulin-requiring diabetic patient in the absence of potassium administration, the use of diuretics which inhibit urinary potassium excretion or acidemia. Metabolic balance studies revealed, in addition to diabets, the presence of isolated aldosterone deficiency of the hyporeninemic type. Intravenous glucose infusions (0.5 g/kg body weight) produced significant hyperkalemia but desoxycortisone acetate (DOCA) therapy (10 mg/day) prevented the glucose-induced hyperkalemia. In this patient, the serum potassium concentration increases after the intravenous infusions of glucose because there is insufficient aldosterone and insulin to reverse the transfer of potassium to the extracellular fluid which normally occurs after hypertonic infusions of glucose. Although DOCA replacement modifies the distribution of potassium in the extracellular fluid and blunts the hyperkalemic effect of intravenous infusions of glucose, a rise in the insulin level is required for the usual hypokalemic response to intravenously administered glucose. These studies illustrate the risk of raising blood glucose levels in patients with combined aldosterone and insulin deficiency and the tendency towards hyperkalemia in diabetic patients under certain clinical conditions.

  3. The effect of insulin deficiency on tau and neurofilament in the insulin knockout mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Schechter, Ruben; E-mail: ruben.schechter@okstate.edu; Beju, Delia; Miller, Kenneth E.

    2005-09-09

    Complications of diabetes mellitus within the nervous system are peripheral and central neuropathy. In peripheral neuropathy, defects in neurofilament and microtubules have been demonstrated. In this study, we examined the effects of insulin deficiency within the brain in insulin knockout mice (I(-/-)). The I(-/-) exhibited hyperphosphorylation of tau, at threonine 231, and neurofilament. In addition, we showed hyperphosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and glycogen synthase kinase 3 {beta} (GSK-3 {beta}) at serine 9. Extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 (ERK 1) showed decrease in phosphorylation, whereas ERK 2 showed no changes. Ultrastructural examination demonstrated swollen mitochondria, endoplasmic reticulum, and Golgi apparatus, and dispersion of the nuclear chromatin. Microtubules showed decrease in the number of intermicrotubule bridges and neurofilament presented as bunches. Thus, lack of insulin brain stimulation induces JNK hyperphosphorylation followed by hyperphosphorylation of tau and neurofilament, and ultrastructural cellular damage, that over time may induce decrease in cognition and learning disabilities.

  4. Patterns and determinants of functional and absolute iron deficiency in patients undergoing cardiac rehabilitation following heart surgery.

    PubMed

    Tramarin, Roberto; Pistuddi, Valeria; Maresca, Luigi; Pavesi, Marco; Castelvecchio, Serenella; Menicanti, Lorenzo; de Vincentiis, Carlo; Ranucci, Marco

    2017-01-01

    Background Anaemia and iron deficiency are frequent following major surgery. The present study aims to identify the iron deficiency patterns in cardiac surgery patients at their admission to a cardiac rehabilitation programme, and to determine which perioperative risk factor(s) may be associated with functional and absolute iron deficiency. Design This was a retrospective study on prospectively collected data. Methods The patient population included 339 patients. Functional iron deficiency was defined in the presence of transferrin saturation <20% and serum ferritin ≥100 µg/l. Absolute iron deficiency was defined in the presence of serum ferritin values <100 µg/l. Results Functional iron deficiency was found in 62.9% of patients and absolute iron deficiency in 10% of the patients. At a multivariable analysis, absolute iron deficiency was significantly ( p = 0.001) associated with mechanical prosthesis mitral valve replacement (odds ratio 5.4, 95% confidence interval 1.9-15) and tissue valve aortic valve replacement (odds ratio 4.5, 95% confidence interval 1.9-11). In mitral valve surgery, mitral repair carried a significant ( p = 0.013) lower risk of absolute iron deficiency (4.4%) than mitral valve replacement with tissue valves (8.3%) or mechanical prostheses (22.5%). Postoperative outcome did not differ between patients with functional iron deficiency and patients without iron deficiency; patients with absolute iron deficiency had a significantly ( p = 0.017) longer postoperative hospital stay (median 11 days) than patients without iron deficiency (median nine days) or with functional iron deficiency (median eight days). Conclusions Absolute iron deficiency following cardiac surgery is more frequent in heart valve surgery and is associated with a prolonged hospital stay. Routine screening for iron deficiency at admission in the cardiac rehabilitation unit is suggested.

  5. Insulin-Like Growth Factor-1 Deficiency and Cirrhosis Establishment.

    PubMed

    de la Garza, Rocio G; Morales-Garza, Luis Alonso; Martin-Estal, Irene; Castilla-Cortazar, Inma

    2017-04-01

    Cirrhosis represents the final stage of chronic liver damage, which can be due to different factors such as alcohol, metabolic syndrome with liver steatosis, autoimmune diseases, drugs, toxins, and viral infection, among others. Nowadays, cirrhosis is an important health problem and it is an increasing cause of morbidity and mortality, being the 14th most common cause of death worldwide. The physiopathological pathways that lead to fibrosis and finally cirrhosis partly depend on the etiology. Nevertheless, some common features are shared in this complex mechanism. Recently, it has been demonstrated that cirrhosis is a dynamic process that can be altered in order to delay or revert fibrosis. In addition, when cirrhosis has been established, insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) deficiency or reduced availability is a common condition, independently of the etiology of chronic liver damage that leads to cirrhosis. IGF-1 deprivation seriously contributes to the progressive malnutrition of cirrhotic patient, increasing the vulnerability of the liver to establish an inflammatory and oxidative microenvironment with mitochondrial dysfunction. In this context, IGF-1 deficiency in cirrhotic patients can justify some of the common characteristics of these individuals. Several studies in animals and humans have been done in order to test the replacement of IGF-1 as a possible therapeutic option, with promising results.

  6. Insulin-Like Growth Factor-1 Deficiency and Cirrhosis Establishment

    PubMed Central

    de la Garza, Rocio G.; Morales-Garza, Luis Alonso; Martin-Estal, Irene; Castilla-Cortazar, Inma

    2017-01-01

    Cirrhosis represents the final stage of chronic liver damage, which can be due to different factors such as alcohol, metabolic syndrome with liver steatosis, autoimmune diseases, drugs, toxins, and viral infection, among others. Nowadays, cirrhosis is an important health problem and it is an increasing cause of morbidity and mortality, being the 14th most common cause of death worldwide. The physiopathological pathways that lead to fibrosis and finally cirrhosis partly depend on the etiology. Nevertheless, some common features are shared in this complex mechanism. Recently, it has been demonstrated that cirrhosis is a dynamic process that can be altered in order to delay or revert fibrosis. In addition, when cirrhosis has been established, insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) deficiency or reduced availability is a common condition, independently of the etiology of chronic liver damage that leads to cirrhosis. IGF-1 deprivation seriously contributes to the progressive malnutrition of cirrhotic patient, increasing the vulnerability of the liver to establish an inflammatory and oxidative microenvironment with mitochondrial dysfunction. In this context, IGF-1 deficiency in cirrhotic patients can justify some of the common characteristics of these individuals. Several studies in animals and humans have been done in order to test the replacement of IGF-1 as a possible therapeutic option, with promising results. PMID:28270882

  7. Adropin deficiency is associated with increased adiposity and insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Ganesh Kumar, K; Zhang, Jingying; Gao, Su; Rossi, Jari; McGuinness, Owen P; Halem, Heather H; Culler, Michael D; Mynatt, Randall L; Butler, Andrew A

    2012-07-01

    Adropin is a secreted peptide that improves hepatic steatosis and glucose homeostasis when administered to diet-induced obese mice. It is not clear if adropin is a peptide hormone regulated by signals of metabolic state. Moreover, the significance of a decline in adropin expression with obesity with respect to metabolic disease is also not clear. We investigated the regulation of serum adropin by metabolic status and diet. Serum adropin levels were high in chow-fed conditions and were suppressed by fasting and diet-induced obesity (DIO). High adropin levels were observed in mice fed a high-fat low carbohydrate diet, whereas lower levels were observed in mice fed a low-fat high carbohydrate diet. To investigate the role of adropin deficiency in metabolic homeostasis, we generated adropin knockout mice (AdrKO) on the C57BL/6J background. AdrKO displayed a 50%-increase in increase in adiposity, although food intake and energy expenditure were normal. AdrKO also exhibited dyslipidemia and impaired suppression of endogenous glucose production (EndoR(a)) in hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp conditions, suggesting insulin resistance. While homo- and heterozygous carriers of the null adropin allele exhibited normal DIO relative to controls, impaired glucose tolerance associated with weight gain was more severe in both groups. In summary, adropin is a peptide hormone regulated by fasting and feeding. In fed conditions, adropin levels are regulated dietary macronutrients, and increase with dietary fat content. Adropin is not required for regulating food intake, however, its functions impact on adiposity and are involved in preventing insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, and impaired glucose tolerance.

  8. Adropin Deficiency Is Associated With Increased Adiposity and Insulin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, K. Ganesh; Zhang, Jingying; Gao, Su; Rossi, Jari; McGuinness, Owen P.; Halem, Heather H.; Culler, Michael D.; Mynatt, Randall L.; Butler, Andrew A.

    2014-01-01

    Adropin is a secreted peptide that improves hepatic steatosis and glucose homeostasis when administered to diet-induced obese mice. It is not clear if adropin is a peptide hormone regulated by signals of metabolic state. Moreover, the significance of a decline in adropin expression with obesity with respect to metabolic disease is also not clear. We investigated the regulation of serum adropin by metabolic status and diet. Serum adropin levels were high in chow-fed conditions and were suppressed by fasting and diet-induced obesity (DIO). High adropin levels were observed in mice fed a high-fat low carbohydrate diet, whereas lower levels were observed in mice fed a low-fat high carbohydrate diet. To investigate the role of adropin deficiency in metabolic homeostasis, we generated adropin knockout mice (AdrKO) on the C57BL/6J background. AdrKO displayed a 50%-increase in increase in adiposity, although food intake and energy expenditure were normal. AdrKO also exhibited dyslipidemia and impaired suppression of endogenous glucose production (EndoRa) in hyperinsulinemic–euglycemic clamp conditions, suggesting insulin resistance. While homo- and heterozygous carriers of the null adropin allele exhibited normal DIO relative to controls, impaired glucose tolerance associated with weight gain was more severe in both groups. In summary, adropin is a peptide hormone regulated by fasting and feeding. In fed conditions, adropin levels are regulated dietary macronutrients, and increase with dietary fat content. Adropin is not required for regulating food intake, however, its functions impact on adiposity and are involved in preventing insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, and impaired glucose tolerance. PMID:22318315

  9. GADD34-deficient mice develop obesity, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, hepatic carcinoma and insulin resistance

    PubMed Central

    Nishio, Naomi; Isobe, Ken-ichi

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is increasing in parallel with the prevalence of obesity. DNA damage-inducible protein 34 (GADD34/Ppp1r15a), originally isolated from UV-inducible transcripts in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, dephosphorylates several kinases that function in important signaling cascades, including dephosphorylation of eIF2α. We examined the effects of GADD34 on natural life span by using GADD34-deficient mice. Here we observed for the first time that with age GADD34-deficient mice become obese, developing fatty liver followed by liver cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma, and insulin resistance. We found that myofibroblasts and immune cells infiltrated the portal veins of aged GADD34-deficient mouse livers. A high-fat diet (HFD) induced a higher level of steatosis in young GADD34-deficient mice compared with WT mice. Differentiation into fat is dependent on insulin signaling. Insulin signaling in young GADD34-deficient mice was higher than that in WT mice, which explained the higher fat differentiation of mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) observed in GADD34-deficient mice. Through aging or a HFD, insulin signaling in GADD34-deficient liver converted to be down regulated compared with WT mice. We found that a HFD or palmitate treatment converted insulin signaling by up-regulating TNF-α and JNK. PMID:26316333

  10. Interplay between insulin resistance and estrogen deficiency as co- activators in carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Suba, Zsuzsanna

    2012-04-01

    Both insulin resistance and estrogen deficiency result in complex metabolic disorder based mainly on defective cellular glucose uptake and on an atherogenic serum lipid profile. These alterations may be regarded as high risks for several life-threatening human diseases, such as type-2 diabetes, cardiovascular lesions and malignancies. Insulin resistance and estrogen deficiency are concomitant disorders with mutual interrelationship. Insulin resistance and the compensatory hyperinsulinemia provoke increased androgen synthesis at the expense of decreased estrogen production. Similarly, a moderate or severe decrease in serum estrogen levels enhances the prevalence of insulin resistant states both in men and women. Healthy premenopausal women enjoy the defensive effect of estrogens against metabolic and hormonal disorders. However, even a slight decrease in their circulatory estrogen levels associated with insulin resistance may increase the risk for cancers, particularly in the organs having high estrogen demand (breast, endometrium and ovary). On the other hand, postmenopausal state with profound estrogen deficiency confers high risk for cancers in different organs with either high or moderate estrogen demand. After menopause, hormone replacement therapy improves insulin sensitivity and decreases the enhanced inclination to malignancies in postmenopausal women. Recognition of the thorough interplay between insulin resistance and estrogen deficiency may illuminate many apparently controversial experimental and clinical findings concerning cancer development and therapeutic possibilities. Moreover, their interactions in the initiation and progression of human malignancies may supply new strategies in primary cancer prevention and cancer cure.

  11. Vitamin D deficiency is associated with insulin resistance in nondiabetics and reduced insulin production in type 2 diabetics.

    PubMed

    Esteghamati, A; Aryan, Z; Esteghamati, Ar; Nakhjavani, M

    2015-04-01

    It is not known whether the association of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] with glycemic measurements of individuals without diabetes is similar to those with diabetes or not. This study is aimed to investigate the association of serum 25(OH)D with glycemic markers of diabetics, nondiabetics, and prediabetics. A case-control study was conducted on age and sex matched 1,195 patients with type 2 DM, 121 prediabetics, and 209 healthy controls. Anthropometric variables, lipid profile, glycemic measurements, and serum 25(OH)D levels were recorded. Serum insulin and C-peptide levels were also measured. All glycemic measurements were compared between diabetics and nondiabetics and prediabetics at different vitamin D status. Patients with DM had lower serum 25(OH)D compared to prediabetics and healthy controls. Endogenous insulin production in response to food intake and in fasting was significantly lower in vitamin D deficient patients with DM compared to those with serum 25(OH)D>40 ng/ml. Diabetic women with serum 25(OH)D<20 ng/ml had lower beta cell function as estimated by lower HOMA-B compared to their counterparts with serum 25(OH)D>40 ng/ml. Healthy individuals with serum 25(OH)D<20 ng/ml had signs of insulin resistance as estimated by significant increase of HOMA-IR, HbA1c, and fasting plasma glucose (FPG). In addition, we found that serum 25(OH)D was inversely associated with insulin resistance. Vitamin D deficiency is associated with insulin resistance in nondiabetics, which is independent of obesity. Furthermore, vitamin D deficiency is associated with reduced insulin production in type 2 diabetics, which was mainly observed in men. Accordingly, a gender disparity also exists in association of serum 25(OH)D with glycemic measurements.

  12. Restoration of insulin secretion in pancreatic islets of protein-deficient rats by reduced expression of insulin receptor substrate (IRS)-1 and IRS-2.

    PubMed

    Araujo, E P; Amaral, M E C; Filiputti, E; De Souza, C T; Laurito, T L; Augusto, V D; Saad, M J A; Boschero, A C; Velloso, L A; Carneiro, E M

    2004-04-01

    Autocrine and paracrine insulin signaling may participate in the fine control of insulin secretion. In the present study, tissue distribution and protein amounts of the insulin receptor and its major substrates, insulin receptor substrate (IRS)-1 and IRS-2, were evaluated in a model of impaired glucose-induced insulin secretion, the protein-deficient rat. Immunoblot and RT-PCR studies showed that the insulin receptor and IRS-2 expression are increased, whilst IRS-1 protein and mRNA contents are decreased in pancreatic islets of protein-deficient rats. Immunohistochemical studies revealed that the insulin receptor and IRS-1 and -2 are present in the great majority of islet cells; however, the greatest staining was localized at the periphery, suggesting a co-localization with non-insulin-secreting cells. Exogenous insulin stimulation of isolated islets promoted higher insulin receptor and IRS-1 and -2 tyrosine phosphorylation in islets from protein-deficient rats, as compared with controls. Moreover, insulin-induced IRS-1- and IRS-2-associated phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase activity are increased in islets of protein-deficient rats. The reduction of IRS-1 and IRS-2 protein expression in islets isolated from protein-deficient rats by the use of antisense IRS-1 or IRS-2 phosphorthioate-modified oligonucleotides partially restored glucose-induced insulin secretion. Thus, the impairment of insulin cell signaling through members of the IRS family of proteins in isolated rat pancreatic islets improves glucose-induced insulin secretion. The present data reinforced the role of insulin paracrine and autocrine signaling in the control of its own secretion.

  13. Myostatin inhibition therapy for insulin-deficient type 1 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, Samantha K.; Rebalka, Irena A.; D’Souza, Donna M.; Deodhare, Namita; Desjardins, Eric M.; Hawke, Thomas J.

    2016-01-01

    While Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus (T1DM) is characterized by hypoinsulinemia and hyperglycemia, persons with T1DM also develop insulin resistance. Recent studies have demonstrated that insulin resistance in T1DM is a primary mediator of the micro and macrovascular complications that invariably develop in this chronic disease. Myostatin acts to attenuate muscle growth and has been demonstrated to be elevated in streptozotocin-induced diabetic models. We hypothesized that a reduction in mRNA expression of myostatin within a genetic T1DM mouse model would improve skeletal muscle health, resulting in a larger, more insulin sensitive muscle mass. To that end, Akita diabetic mice were crossed with MyostatinLn/Ln mice to ultimately generate a novel mouse line. Our data support the hypothesis that decreased skeletal muscle expression of myostatin mRNA prevented the loss of muscle mass observed in T1DM. Furthermore, reductions in myostatin mRNA increased Glut1 and Glut4 protein expression and glucose uptake in response to an insulin tolerance test (ITT). These positive changes lead to significant reductions in resting blood glucose levels as well as pronounced reductions in associated diabetic symptoms, even in the absence of exogenous insulin. Taken together, this study provides a foundation for considering myostatin inhibition as an adjuvant therapy in T1DM as a means to improve insulin sensitivity and blood glucose management. PMID:27581061

  14. FOXO1 Mediates Vitamin D Deficiency-induced Insulin Resistance in Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Songcang; Villalta, Armando; Agrawal, Devendra K.

    2015-01-01

    Prospective epidemiological studies have consistently shown a relationship between vitamin D deficiency, insulin resistance, and type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2). This is supported by recent trials showing that vitamin D supplementation in prediabetic or insulin-resistant patients with inadequate vitamin D levels improves insulin sensitivity. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying vitamin D deficiency-induced insulin resistance and DM2 remain unknown. Skeletal muscle insulin resistance is a primary defect in the majority of patients with DM2. While sustained activation of forkhead box O1 (FOXO1) in skeletal muscle causes insulin resistance, a relationship between vitamin D deficiency and FOXO1 activation in muscle is unknown. We generated skeletal muscle-specific vitamin D receptor (VDR)-null mice and discovered that these mice developed insulin resistance and glucose intolerance accompanied by increased expression and activity of FOXO1. We also found sustained FOXO1 activation in the skeletal muscle of global VDR-null mice. Treatment of C2C12 muscle cells with 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (VD3) reduced FOXO1 expression, nuclear translocation, and activity. The VD3-dependent suppression of FOXO1 activation disappeared by knockdown of VDR, indicating that it is VDR-dependent. Taken together, these results suggest that FOXO1 is a critical target mediating VDR-null signaling in skeletal muscle. The novel findings provide the conceptual support that persistent FOXO1 activation may be responsible for insulin resistance and impaired glucose metabolism in vitamin D signaling-deficient mice, as well as evidence for the utility of vitamin D supplementation for intervention in DM2. PMID:26462119

  15. FOXO1 Mediates Vitamin D Deficiency-Induced Insulin Resistance in Skeletal Muscle.

    PubMed

    Chen, Songcang; Villalta, S Armando; Agrawal, Devendra K

    2016-03-01

    Prospective epidemiological studies have consistently shown a relationship between vitamin D deficiency, insulin resistance, and type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2). This is supported by recent trials showing that vitamin D supplementation in prediabetic or insulin-resistant patients with inadequate vitamin D levels improves insulin sensitivity. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying vitamin D deficiency-induced insulin resistance and DM2 remain unknown. Skeletal muscle insulin resistance is a primary defect in the majority of patients with DM2. Although sustained activation of forkhead box O1 (FOXO1) in skeletal muscle causes insulin resistance, a relationship between vitamin D deficiency and FOXO1 activation in muscle is unknown. We generated skeletal muscle-specific vitamin D receptor (VDR)-null mice and discovered that these mice developed insulin resistance and glucose intolerance accompanied by increased expression and activity of FOXO1. We also found sustained FOXO1 activation in the skeletal muscle of global VDR-null mice. Treatment of C2C12 muscle cells with 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (VD3) reduced FOXO1 expression, nuclear translocation, and activity. The VD3-dependent suppression of FOXO1 activation disappeared by knockdown of VDR, indicating that it is VDR-dependent. Taken together, these results suggest that FOXO1 is a critical target mediating VDR-null signaling in skeletal muscle. The novel findings provide the conceptual support that persistent FOXO1 activation may be responsible for insulin resistance and impaired glucose metabolism in vitamin D signaling-deficient mice, as well as evidence for the utility of vitamin D supplementation for intervention in DM2.

  16. Decreased autophosphorylation of EGF receptor in insulin-deficient diabetic rats

    SciTech Connect

    Okamoto, M.; Kahn, C.R.; Maron, R.; White, M.F. )

    1988-04-01

    The authors have previously reported that despite an increase in receptor concentration, there is a decrease in autophosphorylation and tyrosine kinase activity of the insulin receptor in insulin-deficient diabetic rats. To determine if other tyrosine kinases might be altered, they have studied the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor kinase in wheat germ agglutinin-purified, Triton X-100-solubilized liver membranes from streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats and the insulin-deficient BB rat. They find that autophosphorylation of EGF receptor is decreased in proportion to the severity of the diabetic state in STZ rats with a maximal decrease of 67%. A similar decrease in autophosphorylation was observed in diabetic BB rats that was partially normalized by insulin treatment. Separation of tryptic phosphopeptides by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography revealed a decrease in labeling at all sites of autophosphorylation. A parallel decrease in EGF receptor phosphorylation was also found by immunoblotting with an antiphosphotyrosine antibody. EGF receptor concentration, determined by Scatchard analysis of {sup 125}I-labeled EGF binding, was decreased by 39% in the STZ rat and 27% in the diabetic BB rat. Thus autophosphorylation of EGF receptor, like that of the insulin receptor, is decreased in insulin-deficient rat liver. In the case of EGF receptor, this is due in part to a decrease in receptor number and in part to a decrease in the specific activity of the kinase.

  17. Effects of growth hormone and insulin-like growth factor 1 deficiency on ageing and longevity.

    PubMed

    Laron, Zvi

    2002-01-01

    Present knowledge on the effects of growth hormone (GH)/insulin-like growth hormone (IGF)1 deficiency on ageing and lifespan are reviewed. Evidence is presented that isolated GH deficiency (IGHD), multiple pituitary hormone deficiencies (MPHD) including GH, as well as primary IGE1 deficiency (GH resistance, Laron syndrome) present signs of early ageing such as thin and wrinkled skin, obesity, hyperglycemia and osteoporosis. These changes do not seem to affect the lifespan, as patients reach old age. Animal models of genetic MPHD (Ames and Snell mice) and GH receptor knockout mice (primary IGF1 deficiency) also have a statistically significant higher longevity compared to normal controls. On the contrary, mice transgenic for GH and acromegalic patients secreting large amounts of GH have premature death. In conclusion longstanding GH/IGF1 deficiency affects several parameters of the ageing process without impairing lifespan, and as shown in animal models prolongs longevity. In contrast high GH/IGF1 levels accelerate death.

  18. Lipodystrophy, Diabetes and Normal Serum Insulin in PPARγ-Deficient Neonatal Mice

    PubMed Central

    O’Donnell, Peter E.; Ye, Xiu Zhen; DeChellis, Melissa A.; Davis, Vannessa M.; Duan, Sheng Zhong; Mortensen, Richard M.; Milstone, David S.

    2016-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) is a pleiotropic ligand activated transcription factor that acts in several tissues to regulate adipocyte differentiation, lipid metabolism, insulin sensitivity and glucose homeostasis. PPARγ also regulates cardiomyocyte homeostasis and by virtue of its obligate role in placental development is required for embryonic survival. To determine the postnatal functions of PPARγ in vivo we studied globally deficient neonatal mice produced by epiblast-restricted elimination of PPARγ. PPARγ-rescued placentas support development of PPARγ-deficient embryos that are viable and born in near normal numbers. However, PPARγ-deficient neonatal mice show severe lipodystrophy, lipemia, hepatic steatosis with focal hepatitis, relative insulin deficiency and diabetes beginning soon after birth and culminating in failure to thrive and neonatal lethality between 4 and 10 days of age. These abnormalities are not observed with selective PPARγ2 deficiency or with deficiency restricted to hepatocytes, skeletal muscle, adipocytes, cardiomyocytes, endothelium or pancreatic beta cells. These observations suggest important but previously unappreciated functions for PPARγ1 in the neonatal period either alone or in combination with PPARγ2 in lipid metabolism, glucose homeostasis and insulin sensitivity. PMID:27505464

  19. Crif1 Deficiency Reduces Adipose OXPHOS Capacity and Triggers Inflammation and Insulin Resistance in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Min Jeong; Kim, Soung Jung; Kim, Yong Kyung; Choi, Min Jeong; Tadi, Surendar; Lee, Min Hee; Lee, Seong Eun; Chung, Hyo Kyun; Jung, Saet Byel; Kim, Hyun-Jin; Jo, Young Suk; Kim, Koon Soon; Lee, Sang-Hee; Kim, Jin Man; Kweon, Gi Ryang; Park, Ki Cheol; Lee, Jung Uee; Kong, Young Yun; Lee, Chul-Ho; Chung, Jongkyeong; Shong, Minho

    2013-01-01

    Impaired mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) has been proposed as an etiological mechanism underlying insulin resistance. However, the initiating organ of OXPHOS dysfunction during the development of systemic insulin resistance has yet to be identified. To determine whether adipose OXPHOS deficiency plays an etiological role in systemic insulin resistance, the metabolic phenotype of mice with OXPHOS–deficient adipose tissue was examined. Crif1 is a protein required for the intramitochondrial production of mtDNA–encoded OXPHOS subunits; therefore, Crif1 haploinsufficient deficiency in mice results in a mild, but specific, failure of OXPHOS capacity in vivo. Although adipose-specific Crif1-haploinsufficient mice showed normal growth and development, they became insulin-resistant. Crif1-silenced adipocytes showed higher expression of chemokines, the expression of which is dependent upon stress kinases and antioxidant. Accordingly, examination of adipose tissue from Crif1-haploinsufficient mice revealed increased secretion of MCP1 and TNFα, as well as marked infiltration by macrophages. These findings indicate that the OXPHOS status of adipose tissue determines its metabolic and inflammatory responses, and may cause systemic inflammation and insulin resistance. PMID:23516375

  20. Tissue kallikrein deficiency, insulin resistance, and diabetes in mouse and man.

    PubMed

    Potier, Louis; Waeckel, Ludovic; Fumeron, Fréderic; Bodin, Sophie; Fysekidis, Marinos; Chollet, Catherine; Bellili, Naima; Bonnet, Fabrice; Gusto, Gaëlle; Velho, Gilberto; Marre, Michel; Alhenc-Gelas, François; Roussel, Ronan; Bouby, Nadine

    2014-05-01

    The kallikrein-kinin system has been suggested to participate in the control of glucose metabolism. Its role and the role of angiotensin-I-converting enzyme, a major kinin-inactivating enzyme, are however the subject of debate. We have evaluated the consequence of deficiency in tissue kallikrein (TK), the main kinin-forming enzyme, on the development of insulin resistance and diabetes in mice and man. Mice with inactivation of the TK gene were fed a high-fat diet (HFD) for 3 months, or crossed with obese, leptin-deficient (ob/ob) mice to generate double ob/ob-TK-deficient mutants. In man, a loss-of-function polymorphism of the TK gene (R53H) was studied in a large general population cohort tested for insulin resistance, the DESIR study (4843 participants, 9 year follow-up). Mice deficient in TK gained less weight on the HFD than their WT littermates. Fasting glucose level was increased and responses to glucose (GTT) and insulin (ITT) tolerance tests were altered at 10 and 16 weeks on the HFD compared with standard on the diet, but TK deficiency had no influence on these parameters. Likewise, ob-TK⁻/⁻ mice had similar GTT and ITT responses to those of ob-TK⁺/⁺ mice. TK deficiency had no effect on blood pressure in either model. In humans, changes over time in BMI, fasting plasma glucose, insulinemia, and blood pressure were not influenced by the defective 53H-coding TK allele. The incidence of diabetes was not influenced by this allele. These data do not support a role for the TK-kinin system, protective or deleterious, in the development of insulin resistance and diabetes.

  1. Contribution of zinc deficiency to insulin resistance in patients with primary biliary cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Himoto, Takashi; Yoneyama, Hirohito; Kurokochi, Kazutaka; Inukai, Michio; Masugata, Hisashi; Goda, Fuminori; Haba, Reiji; Watanabe, Seishiro; Senda, Shoichi; Masaki, Tsutomu

    2011-12-01

    The relationship between metabolic abnormalities of trace elements and insulin resistance has been established. Recent studies have revealed that insulin resistance is associated with autoimmune responses. The purpose of this study was to examine the correlation between zinc or copper metabolism and insulin resistance in patients with primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC). Sixteen patients with PBC were divided into two groups: early and advanced stage disease. The overall value of the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) in patients with advanced stage PBC was significantly higher than that in patients with early stage PBC, although the mean value in advanced stage PBC was significantly lower than that in hepatitis C virus (HCV)-related liver cirrhosis. There was an inverse correlation between serum zinc concentrations and HOMA-IR values in patients with PBC, while we found no correlation between serum copper levels and HOMA-IR values. HOMA-IR values were inversely associated with peripheral platelet counts, indicating the relationship between insulin resistance and hepatic fibrosis. These results suggest that zinc deficiency plays important roles of insulin resistance and subsequent hepatic fibrosis in patients with PBC, although insulin resistance in advanced stage PBC was significantly milder than that in HCV-related liver cirrhosis.

  2. Zinc transporter 7 deficiency affects lipid synthesis in adipocytes by inhibiting insulin-dependent Akt activity and glucose uptake

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mice deficient for zinc transporter 7 (Znt7) are mildly zinc deficient, accompanied with low body weight gain and body fat accumulation. To investigate the underlying mechanism of Znt7 deficiency in body adiposity, we investigated fatty acid composition and insulin sensitivity in visceral (epididyma...

  3. Vitamin D supplementation has no effect on insulin resistance assessment in women with polycystic ovary syndrome and vitamin D deficiency.

    PubMed

    Ardabili, Hania R; Gargari, Bahram P; Farzadi, Laya

    2012-03-01

    Insulin resistance is one of the most common features of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Some studies suggest that vitamin D deficiency may have a role in insulin resistance; thus, the aim of the current study was to determine the effect of vitamin D supplementation on insulin resistance in women with PCOS and a vitamin D deficiency. We hypothesized that vitamin D supplementation would lower the glucose level and insulin resistance in women with PCOS and a vitamin D deficiency. The current study was a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blinded trial with 50 women with PCOS and a vitamin D deficiency, 20 to 40 years old, assigned to receive 3 oral treatments consisting of 50,000 IU of vitamin D₃ or a placebo (1 every 20 days) for 2 months (vitamin D, n = 24; placebo, n = 26). The fasting blood glucose, insulin, 25-hydroxyvitamin D, and parathyroid hormone levels, as well as the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance and quantitative insulin sensitivity check index were measured at baseline and after treatment. In the vitamin D group, the serum level of 25-hydroxyvitamin D increased (6.9 ± 2.8 to 23.4 ± 6.1 ng/mL, P < .0001), and the parathyroid hormone level decreased (70.02 ± 43.04 to 50.33 ± 21.99 μ IU/mL, P = .02). There were no significant changes in the placebo group. There was a significant increase in insulin secretion in the vitamin D group (P = .01), but this was not significant compared with the placebo group. The fasting serum insulin and glucose levels and the insulin sensitivity and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance did not change significantly by the end of the study. We were not able to demonstrate the effect of vitamin D supplementation on insulin sensitivity and insulin resistance in women with PCOS and vitamin D deficiency.

  4. 4PS/insulin receptor substrate (IRS)-2 is the alternative substrate of the insulin receptor in IRS-1-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Patti, M E; Sun, X J; Bruening, J C; Araki, E; Lipes, M A; White, M F; Kahn, C R

    1995-10-20

    Insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1) is the major cytoplasmic substrate of the insulin and insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1 receptors. Transgenic mice lacking IRS-1 are resistant to insulin and IGF-1, but exhibit significant residual insulin action which corresponds to the presence of an alternative high molecular weight substrate in liver and muscle. Recently, Sun et al. (Sun, X.-J., Wang, L.-M., Zhang, Y., Yenush, L. P., Myers, M. G., Jr., Glasheen, E., Lane, W.S., Pierce, J. H., and White, M. F. (1995) Nature 377, 173-177) purified and cloned 4PS, the major substrate of the IL-4 receptor-associated tyrosine kinase in myeloid cells, which has significant structural similarity to IRS-1. To determine if 4PS is the alternative substrate of the insulin receptor in IRS-1-deficient mice, we performed immunoprecipitation, immunoblotting, and phosphatidylinositol (PI) 3-kinase assays using specific antibodies to 4PS. Following insulin stimulation, 4PS is rapidly phosphorylated in liver and muscle, binds to the p85 subunit of PI 3-kinase, and activates the enzyme. Insulin stimulation also results in the association of 4PS with Grb 2 in both liver and muscle. In IRS-1-deficient mice, both the phosphorylation of 4PS and associated PI 3-kinase activity are enhanced, without an increase in protein expression. Immunodepletion of 4PS from liver and muscle homogenates removes most of the phosphotyrosine-associated PI 3-kinase activity in IRS-1-deficient mice. Thus, 4PS is the primary alternative substrate, i.e. IRS-2, which plays a major role in physiologic insulin signal transduction via both PI 3-kinase activation and Grb 2/Sos association. In IRS-1-deficient mice, 4PS/IRS-2 provides signal transduction to these two major pathways of insulin signaling.

  5. Insulin resistance and white adipose tissue inflammation are uncoupled in energetically challenged Fsp27-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Linkang; Park, Shi-Young; Xu, Li; Xia, Xiayu; Ye, Jing; Su, Lu; Jeong, Kyeong-Hoon; Hur, Jang Ho; Oh, Hyunhee; Tamori, Yoshikazu; Zingaretti, Cristina M; Cinti, Saverio; Argente, Jesús; Yu, Miao; Wu, Lizhen; Ju, Shenghong; Guan, Feifei; Yang, Hongyuan; Choi, Cheol Soo; Savage, David B; Li, Peng

    2015-01-07

    Fsp27 is a lipid droplet-associated protein almost exclusively expressed in adipocytes where it facilitates unilocular lipid droplet formation. In mice, Fsp27 deficiency is associated with increased basal lipolysis, 'browning' of white fat and a healthy metabolic profile, whereas a patient with congenital CIDEC deficiency manifested an adverse lipodystrophic phenotype. Here we reconcile these data by showing that exposing Fsp27-null mice to a substantial energetic stress by crossing them with ob/ob mice or BATless mice, or feeding them a high-fat diet, results in hepatic steatosis and insulin resistance. We also observe a striking reduction in adipose inflammation and increase in adiponectin levels in all three models. This appears to reflect reduced activation of the inflammasome and less adipocyte death. These findings highlight the importance of Fsp27 in facilitating optimal energy storage in adipocytes and represent a rare example where adipose inflammation and hepatic insulin resistance are disassociated.

  6. Insulin resistance and white adipose tissue inflammation are uncoupled in energetically challenged Fsp27-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Linkang; Park, Shi-Young; Xu, Li; Xia, Xiayu; Ye, Jing; Su, Lu; Jeong, Kyeong-Hoon; Hur, Jang Ho; Oh, Hyunhee; Tamori, Yoshikazu; Zingaretti, Cristina M.; Cinti, Saverio; Argente, Jesús; Yu, Miao; Wu, Lizhen; Ju, Shenghong; Guan, Feifei; Yang, Hongyuan; Choi, Cheol Soo; Savage, David B.; Li, Peng

    2015-01-01

    Fsp27 is a lipid droplet-associated protein almost exclusively expressed in adipocytes where it facilitates unilocular lipid droplet formation. In mice, Fsp27 deficiency is associated with increased basal lipolysis, ‘browning’ of white fat and a healthy metabolic profile, whereas a patient with congenital CIDEC deficiency manifested an adverse lipodystrophic phenotype. Here we reconcile these data by showing that exposing Fsp27-null mice to a substantial energetic stress by crossing them with ob/ob mice or BATless mice, or feeding them a high-fat diet, results in hepatic steatosis and insulin resistance. We also observe a striking reduction in adipose inflammation and increase in adiponectin levels in all three models. This appears to reflect reduced activation of the inflammasome and less adipocyte death. These findings highlight the importance of Fsp27 in facilitating optimal energy storage in adipocytes and represent a rare example where adipose inflammation and hepatic insulin resistance are disassociated. PMID:25565658

  7. Insulin deficiency alters the metabolic and endocrine responses to undernutrition in fetal sheep near term.

    PubMed

    Fowden, Abigail L; Forhead, Alison J

    2012-08-01

    Insulin deficiency affects the adult metabolic response to undernutrition, but its effects on the fetal response to maternal undernutrition remain unknown. This study examined the effects of maternal fasting for 48 h in late gestation on the metabolism of fetal sheep made insulin deficient by pancreatectomy (PX). The endocrine and metabolic responses to maternal fasting differed between intact, sham-operated and PX fetuses, despite a similar degree of hypoglycemia. Compared with intact fetuses, there was no increase in the plasma concentrations of cortisol or norepinephrine in PX fetuses during maternal fasting. In contrast, there was a significant fasting-induced rise in plasma epinephrine concentrations in PX but not intact fetuses. Umbilical glucose uptake decreased to a similar extent in both groups of fasted animals but was associated with a significant fall in glucose carbon oxidation only in intact fetuses. Pancreatectomized but not intact fetuses lowered their oxygen consumption rate by 15-20% during maternal fasting in association with increased uteroplacental oxygen consumption. Distribution of uterine oxygen uptake between the uteroplacental and fetal tissues therefore differed with fasting only in PX fetuses. Both groups of fetuses produced glucose endogenously after maternal fasting for 48 h, which prevented any significant fall in the rate of fetal glucose utilization. In intact but not PX fetuses, fasting-induced glucogenesis was accompanied by a lower hepatic glycogen content. Chronic insulin deficiency in fetal sheep therefore leads to changes in the counterregulatory endocrine response to hypoglycemia and an altered metabolic strategy in dealing with nutrient restriction in utero.

  8. Hypothalamic POMC Deficiency Improves Glucose Tolerance Despite Insulin Resistance by Increasing Glycosuria

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Jessica M.; Fagel, Brian; Lam, Daniel D.; Qi, Nathan; Rubinstein, Marcelo

    2016-01-01

    Hypothalamic proopiomelanocortin (POMC) is essential for the physiological regulation of energy balance; however, its role in glucose homeostasis remains less clear. We show that hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (Arc)POMC-deficient mice, which develop severe obesity and insulin resistance, unexpectedly exhibit improved glucose tolerance and remain protected from hyperglycemia. To explain these paradoxical phenotypes, we hypothesized that an insulin-independent pathway is responsible for the enhanced glucose tolerance. Indeed, the mutant mice demonstrated increased glucose effectiveness and exaggerated glycosuria relative to wild-type littermate controls at comparable blood glucose concentrations. Central administration of the melanocortin receptor agonist melanotan II in mutant mice reversed alterations in glucose tolerance and glycosuria, whereas, conversely, administration of the antagonist Agouti-related peptide (Agrp) to wild-type mice enhanced glucose tolerance. The glycosuria of ArcPOMC-deficient mice was due to decreased levels of renal GLUT 2 (rGLUT2) but not sodium–glucose cotransporter 2 and was associated with reduced renal catecholamine content. Epinephrine treatment abolished the genotype differences in glucose tolerance and rGLUT2 levels, suggesting that reduced renal sympathetic nervous system (SNS) activity is the underlying mechanism for the observed glycosuria and improved glucose tolerance in ArcPOMC-deficient mice. Therefore, the ArcPOMC-SNS-rGLUT2 axis is potentially an insulin-independent therapeutic target to control diabetes. PMID:26467632

  9. Hypothalamic POMC Deficiency Improves Glucose Tolerance Despite Insulin Resistance by Increasing Glycosuria.

    PubMed

    Chhabra, Kavaljit H; Adams, Jessica M; Fagel, Brian; Lam, Daniel D; Qi, Nathan; Rubinstein, Marcelo; Low, Malcolm J

    2016-03-01

    Hypothalamic proopiomelanocortin (POMC) is essential for the physiological regulation of energy balance; however, its role in glucose homeostasis remains less clear. We show that hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (Arc)POMC-deficient mice, which develop severe obesity and insulin resistance, unexpectedly exhibit improved glucose tolerance and remain protected from hyperglycemia. To explain these paradoxical phenotypes, we hypothesized that an insulin-independent pathway is responsible for the enhanced glucose tolerance. Indeed, the mutant mice demonstrated increased glucose effectiveness and exaggerated glycosuria relative to wild-type littermate controls at comparable blood glucose concentrations. Central administration of the melanocortin receptor agonist melanotan II in mutant mice reversed alterations in glucose tolerance and glycosuria, whereas, conversely, administration of the antagonist Agouti-related peptide (Agrp) to wild-type mice enhanced glucose tolerance. The glycosuria of ArcPOMC-deficient mice was due to decreased levels of renal GLUT 2 (rGLUT2) but not sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 and was associated with reduced renal catecholamine content. Epinephrine treatment abolished the genotype differences in glucose tolerance and rGLUT2 levels, suggesting that reduced renal sympathetic nervous system (SNS) activity is the underlying mechanism for the observed glycosuria and improved glucose tolerance in ArcPOMC-deficient mice. Therefore, the ArcPOMC-SNS-rGLUT2 axis is potentially an insulin-independent therapeutic target to control diabetes.

  10. Mitochondrial energy deficiency leads to hyperproliferation of skeletal muscle mitochondria and enhanced insulin sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Morrow, Ryan M; Picard, Martin; Derbeneva, Olga; Leipzig, Jeremy; McManus, Meagan J; Gouspillou, Gilles; Barbat-Artigas, Sébastien; Dos Santos, Carlos; Hepple, Russell T; Murdock, Deborah G; Wallace, Douglas C

    2017-03-07

    Diabetes is associated with impaired glucose metabolism in the presence of excess insulin. Glucose and fatty acids provide reducing equivalents to mitochondria to generate energy, and studies have reported mitochondrial dysfunction in type II diabetes patients. If mitochondrial dysfunction can cause diabetes, then we hypothesized that increased mitochondrial metabolism should render animals resistant to diabetes. This was confirmed in mice in which the heart-muscle-brain adenine nucleotide translocator isoform 1 (ANT1) was inactivated. ANT1-deficient animals are insulin-hypersensitive, glucose-tolerant, and resistant to high fat diet (HFD)-induced toxicity. In ANT1-deficient skeletal muscle, mitochondrial gene expression is induced in association with the hyperproliferation of mitochondria. The ANT1-deficient muscle mitochondria produce excess reactive oxygen species (ROS) and are partially uncoupled. Hence, the muscle respiration under nonphosphorylating conditions is increased. Muscle transcriptome analysis revealed the induction of mitochondrial biogenesis, down-regulation of diabetes-related genes, and increased expression of the genes encoding the myokines FGF21 and GDF15. However, FGF21 was not elevated in serum, and FGF21 and UCP1 mRNAs were not induced in liver or brown adipose tissue (BAT). Hence, increased oxidation of dietary-reducing equivalents by elevated muscle mitochondrial respiration appears to be the mechanism by which ANT1-deficient mice prevent diabetes, demonstrating that the rate of mitochondrial oxidation of calories is important in the etiology of metabolic disease.

  11. Mitochondrial energy deficiency leads to hyperproliferation of skeletal muscle mitochondria and enhanced insulin sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Morrow, Ryan M.; Picard, Martin; Derbeneva, Olga; Leipzig, Jeremy; McManus, Meagan J.; Gouspillou, Gilles; Barbat-Artigas, Sébastien; Dos Santos, Carlos; Hepple, Russell T.; Murdock, Deborah G.; Wallace, Douglas C.

    2017-01-01

    Diabetes is associated with impaired glucose metabolism in the presence of excess insulin. Glucose and fatty acids provide reducing equivalents to mitochondria to generate energy, and studies have reported mitochondrial dysfunction in type II diabetes patients. If mitochondrial dysfunction can cause diabetes, then we hypothesized that increased mitochondrial metabolism should render animals resistant to diabetes. This was confirmed in mice in which the heart–muscle–brain adenine nucleotide translocator isoform 1 (ANT1) was inactivated. ANT1-deficient animals are insulin-hypersensitive, glucose-tolerant, and resistant to high fat diet (HFD)-induced toxicity. In ANT1-deficient skeletal muscle, mitochondrial gene expression is induced in association with the hyperproliferation of mitochondria. The ANT1-deficient muscle mitochondria produce excess reactive oxygen species (ROS) and are partially uncoupled. Hence, the muscle respiration under nonphosphorylating conditions is increased. Muscle transcriptome analysis revealed the induction of mitochondrial biogenesis, down-regulation of diabetes-related genes, and increased expression of the genes encoding the myokines FGF21 and GDF15. However, FGF21 was not elevated in serum, and FGF21 and UCP1 mRNAs were not induced in liver or brown adipose tissue (BAT). Hence, increased oxidation of dietary-reducing equivalents by elevated muscle mitochondrial respiration appears to be the mechanism by which ANT1-deficient mice prevent diabetes, demonstrating that the rate of mitochondrial oxidation of calories is important in the etiology of metabolic disease. PMID:28223503

  12. An oily fish diet increases insulin sensitivity compared to a red meat diet in young iron-deficient women.

    PubMed

    Navas-Carretero, Santiago; Pérez-Granados, Ana M; Schoppen, Stefanie; Vaquero, M Pilar

    2009-08-01

    Beneficial effects of n-3 fatty acids on a variety of physiological functions have been reported, but information related to the effects of oily fish consumed within a varied diet on glucose metabolism and diabetes risk is scarce. The objective of the study was to compare the effects of a diet rich in oily fish to those of a diet rich in red meat on lipid profile, oxidative status, glucose metabolism and insulin sensitivity in young, iron-deficient women. The study was designed attending the CONSORT statement guidelines. It was a randomised crossover dietary intervention study with two 8-week periods. Two diets were designed differing only in their oily fish or red meat content (four portions per week). Twenty-five young iron-deficient women with normal lipid, glucose and insulin levels participated in the assay. Lipid profile (total, LDL- and HDL-cholesterol, TAG), fasting glucose, fasting insulin, and oxidation (lipoperoxides) and inflammation (soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule-1) biomarkers were analysed. Insulin sensitivity was assessed by the Homeostasis Model Assessment (HOMA) and Quantitative Insulin Sensitivity Check Index (QUICKI). Insulin levels significantly decreased and insulin sensitivity significantly increased with the oily fish diet. HDL-cholesterol significantly increased with the oily fish diet. Other parameters did not significantly differ between diets. An increase in oily fish consumption increases insulin sensitivity in young iron-deficient women. This outcome should be considered when giving dietary advice to this population.

  13. Brain Insulin Resistance and Deficiency as Therapeutic Targets in Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    de la Monte, Suzanne M

    2012-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease [AD] is the most common cause of dementia in North America. Despite 30+ years of intense investigation, the field lacks consensus regarding the etiology and pathogenesis of sporadic AD, and therefore we still do not know the best strategies for treating and preventing this debilitating and costly disease. However, growing evidence supports the concept that AD is fundamentally a metabolic disease with substantial and progressive derangements in brain glucose utilization and responsiveness to insulin and insulin-like growth factor [IGF] stimulation. Moreover, AD is now recognized to be heterogeneous in nature, and not solely the end-product of aberrantly processed, misfolded, and aggregated oligomeric amyloid-beta peptides and hyperphosphorylated tau. Other factors, including impairments in energy metabolism, increased oxidative stress, inflammation, insulin and IGF resistance, and insulin/IGF deficiency in the brain should be incorporated into all equations used to develop diagnostic and therapeutic approaches to AD. Herein, the contributions of impaired insulin and IGF signaling to AD-associated neuronal loss, synaptic disconnection, tau hyperphosphorylation, amyloid-beta accumulation, and impaired energy metabolism are reviewed. In addition, we discuss current therapeutic strategies and suggest additional approaches based on the hypothesis that AD is principally a metabolic disease similar to diabetes mellitus. Ultimately, our ability to effectively detect, monitor, treat, and prevent AD will require more efficient, accurate and integrative diagnostic tools that utilize clinical, neuroimaging, biochemical, and molecular biomarker data. Finally, it is imperative that future therapeutic strategies for AD abandon the concept of uni-modal therapy in favor of multi-modal treatments that target distinct impairments at different levels within the brain insulin/IGF signaling cascades. PMID:22329651

  14. Regulation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase activity in liver and muscle of animal models of insulin-resistant and insulin-deficient diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed Central

    Folli, F; Saad, M J; Backer, J M; Kahn, C R

    1993-01-01

    Insulin stimulates tyrosine phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS-1), which in turn binds to and activates phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase). In the present study, we have examined these processes in animal models of insulin-resistant and insulin-deficient diabetes mellitus. After in vivo insulin stimulation, there was a 60-80% decrease in IRS-1 phosphorylation in liver and muscle of the ob/ob mouse. There was no insulin stimulation of PI 3-kinase (85 kD subunit) association with IRS-1, and IRS-1-associated PI 3-kinase activity was reduced 90%. Insulin-stimulated total PI 3-kinase activity was also absent in both tissues of the ob/ob mouse. By contrast, in the streptozotocin diabetic rat, IRS-1 phosphorylation increased 50% in muscle, IRS-1-associated PI 3-kinase activity was increased two- to threefold in liver and muscle, and there was a 50% increase in the p85 associated with IRS-1 after insulin stimulation in muscle. In conclusion, (a) IRS-1-associated PI 3-kinase activity is differentially regulated in hyperinsulinemic and hypoinsulinemic diabetic states; (b) PI 3-kinase activation closely correlates with IRS-1 phosphorylation; and (c) reduced PI 3-kinase activity may play a role in the pathophysiology of insulin resistant diabetic states, such as that seen in the ob/ob mouse. Images PMID:7691886

  15. Carnitine Palmitoyltransferase 1b Deficiency Protects Mice from Diet-Induced Insulin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Teayoun; He, Lan; Johnson, Maria S.; Li, Yan; Zeng, Ling; Ding, Yishu; Long, Qinqiang; Moore, John F.; Sharer, Jon D.; Nagy, Tim R.; Young, Martin E.; Wood, Philip A.; Yang, Qinglin

    2014-01-01

    Background Carnitine Palmitoyl Transferase 1 (CPT1) is the rate-limiting enzyme governing long-chain fatty acid entry into mitochondria. CPT1 inhibitors have been developed and exhibited beneficial effects against type II diabetes in short-term preclinical animal studies. However, the long-term effects of treatment remain unclear and potential non-specific effects of these CPT1 inhibitors hamper in-depth understanding of the potential molecular mechanisms involved. Methods We investigated the effects of restricting the activity of the muscle isoform CPT1b in mice using heterozygous CPT1b deficient (Cpt1b+/−) and Wild Type (WT) mice fed with a High Fat Diet (HFD) for 22 weeks. Insulin sensitivity was assessed using Glucose Tolerance Test (GTT), insulin tolerance test and hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamps. We also examined body weight/composition, tissue and systemic metabolism/energetic status, lipid profile, transcript analysis, and changes in insulin signaling pathways. Results We found that Cpt1b+/− mice were protected from HFD-induced insulin resistance compared to WT littermates. Cpt1b+/− mice exhibited elevated whole body glucose disposal rate and skeletal muscle glucose uptake. Furthermore, Cpt1b+/− skeletal muscle showed diminished ex vivo palmitate oxidative capacity by ~40% and augmented glucose oxidation capacity by ~50% without overt change in whole body energy metabolism. HFD feeding Cpt1b+/− but not WT mice exhibited well-maintained insulin signaling in skeletal muscle, heart, and liver. Conclusion The present study on a genetic model of CPT1b restriction supports the concept that partial CPT1b inhibition is a potential therapeutic strategy. PMID:25309812

  16. Therapeutic Impact of Leptin on Diabetes, Diabetic Complications, and Longevity in Insulin-Deficient Diabetic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Naito, Masaki; Fujikura, Junji; Ebihara, Ken; Miyanaga, Fumiko; Yokoi, Hideki; Kusakabe, Toru; Yamamoto, Yuji; Son, Cheol; Mukoyama, Masashi; Hosoda, Kiminori; Nakao, Kazuwa

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The aim of the current study was to evaluate the long-term effects of leptin on glucose metabolism, diabetes complications, and life span in an insulin-dependent diabetes model, the Akita mouse. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We cross-mated Akita mice with leptin-expressing transgenic (LepTg) mice to produce Akita mice with physiological hyperleptinemia (LepTg:Akita). Metabolic parameters were monitored for 10 months. Pair-fed studies and glucose and insulin tolerance tests were performed. The pancreata and kidneys were analyzed histologically. The plasma levels and pancreatic contents of insulin and glucagon, the plasma levels of lipids and a marker of oxidative stress, and urinary albumin excretion were measured. Survival rates were calculated. RESULTS Akita mice began to exhibit severe hyperglycemia and hyperphagia as early as weaning. LepTg:Akita mice exhibited normoglycemia after an extended fast even at 10 months of age. The 6-h fasting blood glucose levels in LepTg:Akita mice remained about half the level of Akita mice throughout the study. Food intake in LepTg:Akita mice was suppressed to a level comparable to that in WT mice, but pair feeding did not affect blood glucose levels in Akita mice. LepTg:Akita mice maintained insulin hypersensitivity and displayed better glucose tolerance than did Akita mice throughout the follow-up. LepTg:Akita mice had normal levels of plasma glucagon, a marker of oxidative stress, and urinary albumin excretion rates. All of the LepTg:Akita mice survived for >12 months, the median mortality time of Akita mice. CONCLUSIONS These results indicate that leptin is therapeutically useful in the long-term treatment of insulin-deficient diabetes. PMID:21810600

  17. GH Receptor Deficiency in Ecuadorian Adults Is Associated With Obesity and Enhanced Insulin Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Rosenbloom, Arlan L.; Balasubramanian, Priya; Teran, Enrique; Guevara-Aguirre, Marco; Guevara, Carolina; Procel, Patricio; Alfaras, Irene; De Cabo, Rafael; Di Biase, Stefano; Narvaez, Luis; Saavedra, Jannette

    2015-01-01

    Context: Ecuadorian subjects with GH receptor deficiency (GHRD) have not developed diabetes, despite obesity. Objective: We sought to determine the metabolic associations for this phenomenon. Design: Four studies were carried out: 1) glucose, lipid, adipocytokine concentrations; 2) metabolomics evaluation; 3) metabolic responses to a high-calorie meal; and 4) oral glucose tolerance tests. Setting: Clinical Research Institute in Quito, Ecuador. Subjects: Adults homozygous for the E180 splice mutation of the GH receptor (GHRD) were matched for age, gender, and body mass index with unaffected control relatives (C) as follows: study 1, 27 GHRD and 35 C; study 2, 10 GHRD and 10 C; study 3, seven GHRD and 11 C; and study 4, seven GHRD and seven C. Results: Although GHRD subjects had greater mean percentage body fat than controls, their fasting insulin, 2-hour blood glucose, and triglyceride levels were lower. The indicator of insulin sensitivity, homeostasis model of assessment 2%S, was greater (P < .0001), and the indicator of insulin resistance, homeostasis model of assessment 2-IR, was lower (P = .0025). Metabolomic differences between GHRD and control subjects were consistent with their differing insulin sensitivity, including postprandial decreases of branched-chain amino acids that were more pronounced in controls. High molecular weight and total adiponectin concentrations were greater in GHRD (P = .0004 and P = .0128, respectively), and leptin levels were lower (P = .02). Although approximately 65% the weight of controls, GHRD subjects consumed an identical high-calorie meal; nonetheless, their mean glucose concentrations were lower, with mean insulin levels one-third those of controls. Results of the 2-hour oral glucose tolerance test were similar. Main Outcome Measures: Measures of insulin sensitivity, adipocytokines, and energy metabolites. Conclusions: Without GH counter-regulation, GHRD is associated with insulin efficiency and obesity. Lower leptin levels

  18. Direct Substrate Delivery into Mitochondrial-Fission Deficient Pancreatic Islets Rescues Insulin Secretion.

    PubMed

    Kabra, Uma D; Pfuhlmann, Katrin; Migliorini, Adriana; Keipert, Susanne; Lamp, Daniel; Korsgren, Olle; Gegg, Moritz; Woods, Stephen C; Pfluger, Paul T; Lickert, Heiko; Affourtit, Charles; Tschöp, Matthias H; Jastroch, Martin

    2017-02-07

    In pancreatic beta cells, mitochondrial bioenergetics control glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS). Mitochondrial dynamics are generally associated with quality control, maintaining the functionality of bioenergetics. By acute pharmacological inhibition of mitochondrial fission protein Drp1, we here demonstrate that mitochondrial fission is necessary for GSIS in mouse and human islets. We confirm that genetic silencing of Drp1 increases mitochondrial proton leak in MIN6 cells. However, our comprehensive analysis of pancreatic islet bioenergetics reveals that Drp1 does not control insulin secretion via its effect on proton leak but instead via modulation of glucose-fuelled respiration. Notably, pyruvate fully rescues the impaired insulin secretion of fission-deficient beta cells, demonstrating that defective mitochondrial dynamics solely impact substrate supply upstream of oxidative phosphorylation. The present findings provide novel insights in how mitochondrial dysfunction may cause pancreatic beta cell failure. In addition, the results will stimulate new thinking in the intersecting fields of mitochondrial dynamics and bioenergetics, as treatment of defective dynamics in mitochondrial diseases appears to be possible by improving metabolism upstream of mitochondria.

  19. Bif-1 deficiency impairs lipid homeostasis and causes obesity accompanied by insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying; Takahashi, Yoshinori; Desai, Neelam; Zhang, Jun; Serfass, Jacob M; Shi, Yu-Guang; Lynch, Christopher J; Wang, Hong-Gang

    2016-02-09

    Bif-1 is a membrane-curvature inducing protein that is implicated in the regulation of autophagy and tumorigenesis. Here, we report that Bif-1 plays a critical role in regulating lipid catabolism to control the size of lipid droplets and prevent the development of obesity and insulin resistance upon aging or dietary challenge. Our data show that Bif-1 deficiency promotes the expansion of adipose tissue mass without altering food intake or physical activities. While Bif-1 is dispensable for adipose tissue development, its deficiency reduces the basal rate of adipose tissue lipolysis and results in adipocyte hypertrophy upon aging. The importance of Bif-1 in lipid turnover is not limited to adipose tissue since fasting and refeeding-induced lipid droplet clearance is also attenuated by Bif-1 loss in the liver. Interestingly, obesity induced by a high fat-diet or Bif-1 deficiency downregulates the expression of proteins involved in the autophagy-lysosomal pathway, including Atg9a and Lamp1 in the adipose tissue. These findings thus identify Bif-1 as a novel regulator of lipid homeostasis to prevent the pathogenesis of obesity and its associated metabolic complications.

  20. Human conditions of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) deficiency

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) is a polypeptide hormone produced mainly by the liver in response to the endocrine GH stimulus, but it is also secreted by multiple tissues for autocrine/paracrine purposes. IGF-I is partly responsible for systemic GH activities although it possesses a wide number of own properties (anabolic, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and cytoprotective actions). IGF-I is a closely regulated hormone. Consequently, its logical therapeutical applications seems to be limited to restore physiological circulating levels in order to recover the clinical consequences of IGF-I deficiency, conditions where, despite continuous discrepancies, IGF-I treatment has never been related to oncogenesis. Currently the best characterized conditions of IGF-I deficiency are Laron Syndrome, in children; liver cirrhosis, in adults; aging including age-related-cardiovascular and neurological diseases; and more recently, intrauterine growth restriction. The aim of this review is to summarize the increasing list of roles of IGF-I, both in physiological and pathological conditions, underlying that its potential therapeutical options seem to be limited to those proven states of local or systemic IGF-I deficiency as a replacement treatment, rather than increasing its level upper the normal range. PMID:23148873

  1. Susceptibility to Apoptosis in Insulin-like Growth Factor-I Receptor-deficient Brown Adipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Valverde, Angela M.; Mur, Cecilia; Brownlee, Michael; Benito, Manuel

    2004-01-01

    Fetal brown adipocytes are insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) target cells. To assess the importance of the IGF-I receptor (IGF-IR) in brown adipocytes during fetal life, we have generated immortalized brown adipocyte cell lines from the IGF-IR-/- mice. Using this experimental model, we demonstrate that the lack of IGF-IR in fetal brown adipocytes increased the susceptibility to apoptosis induced by serum withdrawal. Culture of cells in the absence of serum and growth factors produced rapid DNA fragmentation (4 h) in IGF-IR-/- brown adipocytes, compared with the wild type (16 h). Consequently, cell viability was decreased more rapidly in fetal brown adipocytes in the absence of IGF-IR. Furthermore, caspase-3 activity was induced much earlier in cells lacking IGF-IR. At the molecular level, IGF-IR deficiency in fetal brown adipocytes altered the balance of the expression of several proapoptotic (Bcl-xS and Bim) and antiapoptotic (Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL) members of the Bcl-2 family. This imbalance was irreversible even though in IGF-IR-reconstituted cells. Likewise, cytosolic cytochrome c levels increased rapidly in IGF-IR-deficient cells compared with the wild type. A rapid entry of Foxo1 into the nucleus accompanied by a rapid exit from the cytosol and an earlier activation of caspase-8 were observed in brown adipocytes lacking IGF-IR upon serum deprivation. Activation of caspase-8 was inhibited by 50% in both cell types by neutralizing anti-Fas-ligand antibody. Adenoviral infection of wild-type brown adipocytes with constitutively active Foxol (ADA) increased the expression of antiapoptotic genes, decreased Bcl-xL and induced caspase-8 and -3 activities, with the final outcome of DNA fragmentation. Up-regulation of uncoupling protein-1 (UCP-1) expression in IGF-IR-deficient cells by transduction with PGC-1α or UCP-1 ameliorated caspase-3 activation, thereby retarding apoptosis. Finally, insulin treatment prevented apoptosis in both cell types. However, the survival

  2. Effect of fluoridated water on plasma insulin levels and glucose homeostasis in rats with renal deficiency.

    PubMed

    Lupo, Maela; Buzalaf, Marília Afonso Rabelo; Rigalli, Alfredo

    2011-05-01

    Glucose intolerance in fluorosis areas and when fluoride is administered for the treatment of osteoporosis has been reported. Controlled fluoridation of drinking water is regarded as a safe and effective measure to control dental caries. However, the effect on glucose homeostasis was not studied so far. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of the intake of fluoridated water supply on glucose metabolism in rats with normal and deficient renal function. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into eight groups of four rats. Renal insufficiency was induced in four groups (NX) which received drinking water containing 0, 1, 5, and 15 ppm F (NaF) for 60 days. Four groups with simulated surgery acted as controls. There were no differences in plasma glucose concentration after a glucose tolerance test between controls and NX rats and among rats with different intakes of fluoride. However, plasma insulin level increased as a function of fluoride concentration in drinking water, both in controls and in NX rats. It is concluded that the consumption of fluoridated water from water supply did not affect plasma glucose levels even in cases of animals with renal disease. However, a resistance to insulin action was demonstrated.

  3. Anti-diabetic activity of recombinant irisin in STZ-induced insulin-deficient diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Duan, Huikun; Ma, Baicheng; Ma, Xiaofeng; Wang, Haisong; Ni, Zaizhong; Wang, Bin; Li, Xiaodan; Jiang, Pingzhe; Umar, Muhammad; Li, Minggang

    2016-03-01

    In order to investigate the hypoglycemic effects and potential mechanism of recombinant irisin on diabetes, STZ-induced diabetic mice were established and treated with irisin. The results showed that daily water and food intake, and blood glucose significantly decreased after various concentrations of recombinant irisin treatment by intraperitoneal injection, of which 1.0 mg/kg was the optimal dose for lowering blood glucose. However, the body weight exhibited no significant difference during the treatment within groups, although the 0.9% NaCl treated group showed a trend of decreased body weight and the irisin treated groups showed a tendency of increasing weight. The oral glucose tolerance was improved, and serum insulin and circulating irisin content were significantly elevated in diabetic mice after 1.0 mg/kg irisin-injection treatment, compared to diabetic mice treated with 0.9% NaCl. 1.0 mg/kg irisin-injection also significantly increased the expression of energy and metabolism-related genes. In addition, oral administration of irisin lowered the blood glucose in diabetic mice. Our data suggested that irisin could lower blood glucose in insulin-deficient diabetic mice, to some extent, through irisin-mediated induction of energy and metabolic genes expression. These observations laid a foundation for the development of irisin-based therapy.

  4. Myeloid cell-restricted insulin receptor deficiency protects against obesity-induced inflammation and systemic insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Mauer, Jan; Chaurasia, Bhagirath; Plum, Leona; Quast, Thomas; Hampel, Brigitte; Blüher, Matthias; Kolanus, Waldemar; Kahn, C Ronald; Brüning, Jens C

    2010-05-06

    A major component of obesity-related insulin resistance is the establishment of a chronic inflammatory state with invasion of white adipose tissue by mononuclear cells. This results in the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines, which in turn leads to insulin resistance in target tissues such as skeletal muscle and liver. To determine the role of insulin action in macrophages and monocytes in obesity-associated insulin resistance, we conditionally inactivated the insulin receptor (IR) gene in myeloid lineage cells in mice (IR(Deltamyel)-mice). While these animals exhibit unaltered glucose metabolism on a normal diet, they are protected from the development of obesity-associated insulin resistance upon high fat feeding. Euglycemic, hyperinsulinemic clamp studies demonstrate that this results from decreased basal hepatic glucose production and from increased insulin-stimulated glucose disposal in skeletal muscle. Furthermore, IR(Deltamyel)-mice exhibit decreased concentrations of circulating tumor necrosis factor (TNF) alpha and thus reduced c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) activity in skeletal muscle upon high fat feeding, reflecting a dramatic reduction of the chronic and systemic low-grade inflammatory state associated with obesity. This is paralleled by a reduced accumulation of macrophages in white adipose tissue due to a pronounced impairment of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) 9 expression and activity in these cells. These data indicate that insulin action in myeloid cells plays an unexpected, critical role in the regulation of macrophage invasion into white adipose tissue and in the development of obesity-associated insulin resistance.

  5. Mechanisms underlying insulin deficiency-induced acceleration of β-amyloidosis in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Devi, Latha; Alldred, Melissa J; Ginsberg, Stephen D; Ohno, Masuo

    2012-01-01

    Although evidence is accumulating that diabetes mellitus is an important risk factor for sporadic Alzheimer's disease (AD), the mechanisms by which defects in insulin signaling may lead to the acceleration of AD progression remain unclear. In this study, we applied streptozotocin (STZ) to induce experimental diabetes in AD transgenic mice (5XFAD model) and investigated how insulin deficiency affects the β-amyloidogenic processing of amyloid precursor protein (APP). Two and half months after 5XFAD mice were treated with STZ (90 mg/kg, i.p., once daily for two consecutive days), they showed significant reductions in brain insulin levels without changes in insulin receptor expression. Concentrations of cerebral amyloid-β peptides (Aβ40 and Aβ42) were significantly increased in STZ-treated 5XFAD mice as compared with vehicle-treated 5XFAD controls. Importantly, STZ-induced insulin deficiency upregulated levels of both β-site APP cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1) and full-length APP in 5XFAD mouse brains, which was accompanied by dramatic elevations in the β-cleaved C-terminal fragment (C99). Interestingly, BACE1 mRNA levels were not affected, whereas phosphorylation of the translation initiation factor eIF2α, a mechanism proposed to mediate the post-transcriptional upregulation of BACE1, was significantly elevated in STZ-treated 5XFAD mice. Meanwhile, levels of GGA3, an adapter protein responsible for sorting BACE1 to lysosomal degradation, are indistinguishable between STZ- and vehicle-treated 5XFAD mice. Moreover, STZ treatments did not affect levels of Aβ-degrading enzymes such as neprilysin and insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) in 5XFAD brains. Taken together, our findings provide a mechanistic foundation for a link between diabetes and AD by demonstrating that insulin deficiency may change APP processing to favor β-amyloidogenesis via the translational upregulation of BACE1 in combination with elevations in its substrate, APP.

  6. Growth hormone concentration and disappearance rate, insulin-like growth factors I and II and insulin levels in iron-deficient veal calves.

    PubMed

    Ceppi, A; Mullis, P E; Eggenberger, E; Blum, J W

    1994-01-01

    In calves with severe iron (Fe) deficiency, insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I levels and IGF-I responses to exogenous growth hormone (GH) are reduced, while insulin-dependent glucose utilization is enhanced. Blood plasma concentrations of immunoreactive insulin (IRI), IGF-I, IGF-II and GH, and the half-life of blood plasma GH [after an i.v. injection of recombinant bovine GH (rbGH; 100 micrograms rbGH/kg body weight)] were measured in 20 calves at body weights between 160 and 190 kg. Calves were fed milk replacers containing 50 or 10 mg Fe/kg (groups Fe50 and Fe10, respectively). Daily weight gain and feed utilization were similar in both groups. Group Fe10 developed mild Fe deficiency anemia and blood plasma urea-nitrogen concentrations were higher (p < 0.05) than in group Fe50. IGF-I and IGF-II concentrations did not vary consistently over a 10-hour period and were not significantly influenced by different Fe intakes. The IRI concentration increased transiently (p < 0.05) after feed intake, but the total response was (not significantly) smaller in Fe-deficient calves. Plasma GH concentration changed episodically and was similar in both groups. Loss of GH from the circulation after i.v. rbGH injection, estimated by biexponential analysis, during the distribution or alpha phase (first 16 min) was similar in both groups, but during the beta phase was shorter (p < 0.05) in group Fe10 than in group Fe50 (29.9 and 34.2 min, respectively). The increased disappearance rate of GH, seen even in mild Fe deficiency, may contribute to reduced GH levels and IGF-I responses to GH in severe Fe deficiency.

  7. Methionine sulfoxide reductase B1 deficiency does not increase high-fat diet-induced insulin resistance in mice.

    PubMed

    Heo, Jung-Yoon; Cha, Hye-Na; Kim, Ki Young; Lee, Eujin; Kim, Suk-Jeong; Kim, Yong-Woon; Kim, Jong-Yeon; Lee, In-Kyu; Gladyshev, Vadim N; Kim, Hwa-Young; Park, So-Young

    2017-01-01

    Methionine-S-sulfoxide reductase (MsrA) protects against high-fat diet-induced insulin resistance due to its antioxidant effects. To determine whether its counterpart, methionine-R-sulfoxide reductase (MsrB) has similar effects, we compared MsrB1 knockout and wild-type mice using a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp technique. High-fat feeding for eight weeks increased body weights, fat masses, and plasma levels of glucose, insulin, and triglycerides to similar extents in wild-type and MsrB1 knockout mice. Intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test showed no difference in blood glucose levels between the two genotypes after eight weeks on the high-fat diet. The hyperglycemic-euglycemic clamp study showed that glucose infusion rates and whole body glucose uptakes were decreased to similar extents by the high-fat diet in both wild-type and MsrB1 knockout mice. Hepatic glucose production and glucose uptake of skeletal muscle were unaffected by MsrB1 deficiency. The high-fat diet-induced oxidative stress in skeletal muscle and liver was not aggravated in MsrB1-deficient mice. Interestingly, whereas MsrB1 deficiency reduced JNK protein levels to a great extent in skeletal muscle and liver, it markedly elevated phosphorylation of JNK, suggesting the involvement of MsrB1 in JNK protein activation. However, this JNK phosphorylation based on a p-JNK/JNK level did not positively correlate with insulin resistance in MsrB1-deficient mice. Taken together, our results show that, in contrast to MsrA deficiency, MsrB1 deficiency does not increase high-fat diet-induced insulin resistance in mice.

  8. Seipin deficiency alters brown adipose tissue thermogenesis and insulin sensitivity in a non-cell autonomous mode

    PubMed Central

    Dollet, L.; Magré, J.; Joubert, M.; Le May, C.; Ayer, A.; Arnaud, L.; Pecqueur, C.; Blouin, V.; Cariou, B.; Prieur, X.

    2016-01-01

    Loss-of-function mutations in BSCL2 are responsible for Berardinelli-Seip congenital lipodystrophy, a rare disorder characterized by near absence of adipose tissue associated with insulin resistance. Seipin-deficient (Bscl2−/−) mice display an almost total loss of white adipose tissue (WAT) with residual brown adipose tissue (BAT). Previous cellular studies have shown that seipin deficiency alters white adipocyte differentiation. In this study, we aimed to decipher the consequences of seipin deficiency in BAT. Using a brown adipocyte cell-line, we show that seipin knockdown had very little effect on adipocyte differentiation without affecting insulin sensitivity and oxygen consumption. However, when submitted to cold acclimation or chronic β3 agonist treatment, Bscl2−/− mice displayed altered thermogenic capacity, despite several signs of BAT remodeling. Under cold activation, Bscl2−/− mice were able to maintain their body temperature when fed ad libitum, but not under short fasting. At control temperature (i.e. 21 °C), fasting worsened Bscl2−/− BAT properties. Finally, Bscl2−/− BAT displayed obvious signs of insulin resistance. Our results in these lipodystrophic mice strongly suggest that BAT activity relies on WAT as an energetic substrate provider and adipokine-producing organ. Therefore, the WAT/BAT dialogue is a key component of BAT integrity in guaranteeing its response to insulin and cold-activated adrenergic signals. PMID:27748422

  9. Hormone-sensitive lipase deficiency suppresses insulin secretion from pancreatic islets of Lep{sup ob/ob} mice

    SciTech Connect

    Sekiya, Motohiro; Yahagi, Naoya; Tamura, Yoshiaki; Okazaki, Hiroaki; Igarashi, Masaki; Ohta, Keisuke; Takanashi, Mikio; Kumagai, Masayoshi; Takase, Satoru; Nishi, Makiko; Takeuchi, Yoshinori; Izumida, Yoshihiko; Kubota, Midori; Ohashi, Ken; Iizuka, Yoko; Yagyu, Hiroaki; Gotoda, Takanari; Nagai, Ryozo; Shimano, Hitoshi; Yamada, Nobuhiro; and others

    2009-09-25

    It has long been a matter of debate whether the hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL)-mediated lipolysis in pancreatic {beta}-cells can affect insulin secretion through the alteration of lipotoxicity. We generated mice lacking both leptin and HSL (Lep{sup ob/ob}/HSL{sup -/-}) and explored the role of HSL in pancreatic {beta}-cells in the setting of obesity. Lep{sup ob/ob}/HSL{sup -/-} developed elevated blood glucose levels and reduced plasma insulin levels compared with Lep{sup ob/ob}/HSL{sup +/+} in a fed state, while the deficiency of HSL did not affect glucose homeostasis in Lep{sup +/+} background. The deficiency of HSL exacerbated the accumulation of triglycerides in Lep{sup ob/ob} islets, leading to reduced glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. The deficiency of HSL also diminished the islet mass in Lep{sup ob/ob} mice due to decreased cell proliferation. In conclusion, HSL affects insulin secretary capacity especially in the setting of obesity.

  10. Absence of the dawn phenomenon and abnormal lipolysis in type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetic patients with chronic growth hormone deficiency.

    PubMed

    Boyle, P J; Avogaro, A; Smith, L; Shah, S D; Cryer, P E; Santiago, J V

    1992-04-01

    To determine the role of growth hormone in overnight insulin requirements and lipolysis, five patients with chronic growth hormone deficiency and Type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus and six control patients with diabetes were each studied on two separate nights. Insulin was infused at a variable rate throughout one night to maintain euglycaemia and fixed at 04.00 hours on another. During the variable infusion, euglycaemia was maintained in control patients by a 36% increase in insulin infusion rate between 03.00 and 08.00 hours while a 46% decrease in the rate was required in growth hormone deficient patients (p less than 0.02). Despite this difference, mean free insulin values were equivalent. This finding is suggestive of increased insulin clearance in growth hormone sufficient patients. Glucose levels rose in control and fell in growth hormone deficient patients when insulin infusion rates were fixed at 04.00 hours. Glycerol production and non-esterified fatty acid concentrations were significantly lower in the growth hormone deficient diabetic patients, p less than 0.001, and when normalized with a heparin infusion, had no effect on insulin requirements. We conclude that: (1) growth hormone contributes to the development of the "dawn phenomenon," possibly by increasing insulin clearance (2) growth hormone helps sustain nocturnal lipolysis in Type 1 diabetes and (3) non-esterified fatty acids are not involved in the dawn phenomenon.

  11. Do deficiencies in growth hormone and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) shorten or prolong longevity?

    PubMed

    Laron, Zvi

    2005-02-01

    Present knowledge on the effects of growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) deficiency on aging and lifespan are controversial. Studying untreated patients with either isolated GH deficiency due to GH gene deletion, patients with multiple pituitary hormone deficiency due to PROP-1 gene mutation and patients with isolated IGF-I deficiency due to deletions or mutations of the GH receptor gene (Laron syndrome); it was found, that these patients despite signs of early aging (wrinkled skin, obesity, insulin resistance and osteopenia) have a long life span reaching ages of 80-90 years. Animal models of genetic GH deficiencies such as Snell mice (Pit-1 gene mutations) the Ames mice (PROP-1 gene mutation) and the Laron mice (GH receptor gene knock-out) have a statistically significant higher longevity compared to normal controls. On the contrary, mice transgenic for GH and acromegalic patients secreting high amounts of GH have premature death. Those data raise the question whether pharmacological GH administration to adults is deleterious, in contrast to policies advocating such therapies.

  12. Prep1 deficiency induces protection from diabetes and increased insulin sensitivity through a p160-mediated mechanism.

    PubMed

    Oriente, Francesco; Fernandez Diaz, Luis Cesar; Miele, Claudia; Iovino, Salvatore; Mori, Silvia; Diaz, Victor Manuel; Troncone, Giancarlo; Cassese, Angela; Formisano, Pietro; Blasi, Francesco; Beguinot, Francesco

    2008-09-01

    We have examined glucose homeostasis in mice hypomorphic for the homeotic transcription factor gene Prep1. Prep1-hypomorphic (Prep1(i/i)) mice exhibit an absolute reduction in circulating insulin levels but normal glucose tolerance. In addition, these mice exhibit protection from streptozotocin-induced diabetes and enhanced insulin sensitivity with improved glucose uptake and insulin-dependent glucose disposal by skeletal muscle. This muscle phenotype does not depend on reduced expression of the known Prep1 transcription partner, Pbx1. Instead, in Prep1(i/i) muscle, we find normal Pbx1 but reduced levels of the recently identified novel Prep1 interactor p160. Consistent with this reduction, we find a muscle-selective increase in mRNA and protein levels of PGC-1alpha, accompanied by enhanced expression of the GLUT4 transporter, responsible for insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in muscle. Indeed, using L6 skeletal muscle cells, we induced the opposite effects by overexpressing Prep1 or p160, but not Pbx1. In vivo skeletal muscle delivery of p160 cDNA in Prep1(i/i) mice also reverses the molecular phenotype. Finally, we show that Prep1 controls the stability of the p160 protein. We conclude that Prep1 controls insulin sensitivity through the p160-GLUT4 pathway.

  13. The skeletal structure of insulin-like growth factor I-deficient mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bikle, D.; Majumdar, S.; Laib, A.; Powell-Braxton, L.; Rosen, C.; Beamer, W.; Nauman, E.; Leary, C.; Halloran, B.

    2001-01-01

    The importance of insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) for growth is well established. However, the lack of IGF-I on the skeleton has not been examined thoroughly. Therefore, we analyzed the structural properties of bone from mice rendered IGF-I deficient by homologous recombination (knockout [k/o]) using histomorphometry, peripheral quantitative computerized tomography (pQCT), and microcomputerized tomography (muCT). The k/o mice were 24% the size of their wild-type littermates at the time of study (4 months). The k/o tibias were 28% and L1 vertebrae were 26% the size of wild-type bones. Bone formation rates (BFR) of k/o tibias were 27% that of the wild-type littermates. The k/o bones responded normally to growth hormone (GH; 1.7-fold increase) and supranormally to IGF-I (5.2-fold increase) with respect to BFR. Cortical thickness of the proximal tibia was reduced 17% in the k/o mouse. However, trabecular bone volume (bone volume/total volume [BV/TV]) was increased 23% (male mice) and 88% (female mice) in the k/o mice compared with wild-type controls as a result of increased connectivity, increased number, and decreased spacing of the trabeculae. These changes were either less or not found in L1. Thus, lack of IGF-I leads to the development of a bone structure, which, although smaller, appears more compact.

  14. Key Role of STAT4 Deficiency in the Hematopoietic Compartment in Insulin Resistance and Adipose Tissue Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Kaiwen; Glenn, Lindsey M.; Hatcher, Margaret A.; Haynes, Bronson A.; Lehrer, Eric J.; Kaplan, Mark H.

    2017-01-01

    Visceral adipose tissue (AT) inflammation is linked to the complications of obesity, including insulin resistance (IR) and type 2 diabetes. Recent data from our lab showed that germline deficiency in STAT4 reduces inflammation and improves IR in obese mice. The objective of this study was to determine the contribution of selective STAT4 deficiency in subsets of hematopoietic cells to IR and AT inflammation. To determine the contribution of hematopoietic lineage, we sublethally irradiated Stat4−/−C57Bl6 mice and reconstituted them with bone marrow cells (BMC) from Stat4+/+C57Bl6 congenic donors. We also established the contribution of selective STAT4 deficiency in CD4+ or CD8+ T cells using adoptive transfer in Rag1−/− mice. All mice received a HFD for 15 weeks (n = 7–12 mice/group). BMC that expressed STAT4 induced increases in glucose intolerance and IR compared to STAT4-deficient cells. Also, AT inflammation was increased and the numbers of CD8+ cells infiltrating AT were higher in mice with STAT4 expressing BMC. Studies in Rag1−/− mice further confirmed the prominent role of CD8+ cells expressing STAT4 in insulin resistance and AT and islet inflammation. Collectively our results show specific and dominant contribution of STAT4 in the hematopoietic compartment to metabolic health and inflammation in diet-induced obesity.

  15. Insulin

    MedlinePlus

    ... container that can be closed like a laundry detergent bottle. Check the expiration date on the insulin ... in a hard container like an empty laundry detergent bottle or a metal coffee can. Make sure ...

  16. Superoxide and respiratory coupling in mitochondria of insulin-deficient diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Herlein, Judith A; Fink, Brian D; O'Malley, Yunxia; Sivitz, William I

    2009-01-01

    Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species have been implicated in both diabetic complications and the progression of the underlying diabetic state. However, it is not clear whether mitochondria of diabetic origin are intrinsically altered to generate excess reactive oxygen species independent of the surrounding diabetic milieu. Mitochondria were isolated from gastrocnemius, heart, and liver of 2-wk and 2-month streptozotocin diabetic rats and controls. We rigidly quantified mitochondrial superoxide, respiration and ATP production, respiratory coupling, the expression of several proteins with antioxidant properties, and the redox state of glutathione. Both fluorescent assessment and electron paramagnetic spectroscopy revealed that superoxide production was unchanged or reduced in the 2-month diabetic mitochondria compared with controls. Kinetic analysis of the proton leak showed that diabetic heart and muscle mitochondria were actually more coupled compared with control despite an approximate 2- to 4-fold increase in uncoupling protein-3 content. Adenine nucleotide translocator type 1 expression was reduced by approximately 50% in diabetic muscle mitochondria. Catalase was significantly up-regulated in muscle and heart tissue and in heart mitochondria, whereas glutathione peroxidase expression was increased in liver mitochondria of diabetic rats. We conclude that gastrocnemius, heart, and liver mitochondria of streptozotocin diabetic rats are not irrevocably altered toward excess superoxide production either by complex I or complex III. Moreover, gastrocnemius and heart mitochondria demonstrate increased, not decreased, respiratory coupling. Mitochondria of insulin-deficient diabetic rats do show signs of adaptation to antecedent oxidative stress manifested as tissue-specific enzyme and uncoupling protein expression but remain remarkably robust with respect to superoxide production.

  17. Insulin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The manipulation of organic materials--cells, tissues, and even living organisms--offers many exciting possibilities for the future from organic computers to improved aquaculture. Commercial researchers are using the microgravity environment to produce large near perfect protein crystals Research on insulin has yielded crystals that far surpass the quality of insulin crystals grown on the ground. Using these crystals industry partners are working to develop new and improved treatments for diabetes. Other researchers are exploring the possibility of producing antibiotics using plant cell cultures which could lead to both orbital production and the improvement of ground-based antibiotic production.

  18. Inhaled insulin: A “puff” than a “shot” before meals

    PubMed Central

    Brashier, Dick B. S.; Khadka, Anjan; Anantharamu, Tejus; Sharma, Ashok Kumar; Gupta, A. K.; Sharma, Sushil; Dahiya, N.

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes is a metabolic disorder characterized by relative or absolute deficiency of insulin, resulting in hyperglycemia. The main treatment of diabetes relies on subcutaneous insulin administration by injection or continuous infusion to control glucose levels, besides oral hypoglycemic agents for type 2 diabetes. Novel routes of insulin administration are an area of research in the diabetes field as insulin injection therapy is burdensome and painful for many patients. Inhalational insulin is a potential alternative to subcutaneous insulin in the management of diabetes. The large surface area, good vascularization, immense capacity for solute exchange and ultra-thinness of the alveolar epithelium facilitates systemic delivery of insulin via pulmonary administration. Inhaled insulin has been recently approved by Food and Drug Administration (FDA). It is a novel, rapid-acting inhaled insulin with a pharmacokinetic profile that is different from all other insulin products and comparatively safer than the previous failed inhaled insulin (Exubera). PMID:26311994

  19. Fibroblast growth factor receptor 4 (FGFR4) deficiency improves insulin resistance and glucose metabolism under diet-induced obesity conditions.

    PubMed

    Ge, Hongfei; Zhang, Jun; Gong, Yan; Gupte, Jamila; Ye, Jay; Weiszmann, Jennifer; Samayoa, Kim; Coberly, Suzanne; Gardner, Jonitha; Wang, Huilan; Corbin, Tim; Chui, Danny; Baribault, Helene; Li, Yang

    2014-10-31

    The role of fibroblast growth factor receptor 4 (FGFR4) in regulating bile acid synthesis has been well defined; however, its reported role on glucose and energy metabolism remains unresolved. Here, we show that FGFR4 deficiency in mice leads to improvement in glucose metabolism, insulin sensitivity, and reduction in body weight under high fat conditions. Mechanism of action studies in FGFR4-deficient mice suggest that the effects are mediated in part by increased plasma levels of adiponectin and the endocrine FGF factors FGF21 and FGF15, the latter of which increase in response to an elevated bile acid pool. Direct actions of increased bile acids on bile acid receptors, and other potential indirect mechanisms, may also contribute to the observed metabolic changes. The results described herein suggest that FGFR4 antagonists alone, or in combination with other agents, could serve as a novel treatment for diabetes.

  20. Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor 4 (FGFR4) Deficiency Improves Insulin Resistance and Glucose Metabolism under Diet-induced Obesity Conditions*

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Hongfei; Zhang, Jun; Gong, Yan; Gupte, Jamila; Ye, Jay; Weiszmann, Jennifer; Samayoa, Kim; Coberly, Suzanne; Gardner, Jonitha; Wang, Huilan; Corbin, Tim; Chui, Danny; Baribault, Helene; Li, Yang

    2014-01-01

    The role of fibroblast growth factor receptor 4 (FGFR4) in regulating bile acid synthesis has been well defined; however, its reported role on glucose and energy metabolism remains unresolved. Here, we show that FGFR4 deficiency in mice leads to improvement in glucose metabolism, insulin sensitivity, and reduction in body weight under high fat conditions. Mechanism of action studies in FGFR4-deficient mice suggest that the effects are mediated in part by increased plasma levels of adiponectin and the endocrine FGF factors FGF21 and FGF15, the latter of which increase in response to an elevated bile acid pool. Direct actions of increased bile acids on bile acid receptors, and other potential indirect mechanisms, may also contribute to the observed metabolic changes. The results described herein suggest that FGFR4 antagonists alone, or in combination with other agents, could serve as a novel treatment for diabetes. PMID:25204652

  1. Deficiency of monoclonal antibody (Leu 7) defined NK cells in newly diagnosed insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Chandy, K G; Charles, M A; Buckingham, B; Waldeck, N; Kershnar, A; Gupta, S

    1984-01-01

    Peripheral blood from 11 newly diagnosed patients with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) was studied for the proportion of monoclonal antibody (HNK 1, Leu 7) defined natural killer (NK) cells using a fluorescence-activated cell sorter analyzer. The proportion of Leu 7+ cells in patients with IDDM (7.0 +/- 4.0) was significantly (P less than 0.001) lower than in simultaneously studied healthy controls (16.8 +/- 7.0). A 2-yr-old boy with recent onset IDDM had a deficiency of Leu 7+ NK cells (6.1%), while his healthy identical twin had normal proportions of Leu 7+ cells (22.2%), when compared to a simultaneously studied healthy control. Two patients reexamined in remission and one other studied in remission alone, showed deficiency of Leu 7+ NK cells. This study demonstrates a quantitative deficiency of monoclonal antibody (Leu 7+) defined NK cells in newly diagnosed patients with IDDM that persists during remission of the disease and therefore appears to be independent of metabolic abnormality. The deficiency of NK cells may predispose genetically susceptible individuals to viral-induced islet cell injury, contributing to the pathogenesis of IDDM.

  2. Insulin-like growth factor 1 deficiency exacerbates hypertension-induced cerebral microhemorrhages in mice, mimicking the aging phenotype.

    PubMed

    Tarantini, Stefano; Valcarcel-Ares, Noa M; Yabluchanskiy, Andriy; Springo, Zsolt; Fulop, Gabor A; Ashpole, Nicole; Gautam, Tripti; Giles, Cory B; Wren, Jonathan D; Sonntag, William E; Csiszar, Anna; Ungvari, Zoltan

    2017-03-14

    Clinical and experimental studies show that aging exacerbates hypertension-induced cerebral microhemorrhages (CMHs), which progressively impair neuronal function. There is growing evidence that aging promotes insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) deficiency, which compromises multiple aspects of cerebromicrovascular and brain health. To determine the role of IGF-1 deficiency in the pathogenesis of CMHs, we induced hypertension in mice with liver-specific knockdown of IGF-1 (Igf1(f/f)  + TBG-Cre-AAV8) and control mice by angiotensin II plus l-NAME treatment. In IGF-1-deficient mice, the same level of hypertension led to significantly earlier onset and increased incidence and neurological consequences of CMHs, as compared to control mice, as shown by neurological examination, gait analysis, and histological assessment of CMHs in serial brain sections. Previous studies showed that in aging, increased oxidative stress-mediated matrix metalloprotease (MMP) activation importantly contributes to the pathogenesis of CMHs. Thus, it is significant that hypertension-induced cerebrovascular oxidative stress and MMP activation were increased in IGF-1-deficient mice. We found that IGF-1 deficiency impaired hypertension-induced adaptive media hypertrophy and extracellular matrix remodeling, which together with the increased MMP activation likely also contributes to increased fragility of intracerebral arterioles. Collectively, IGF-1 deficiency promotes the pathogenesis of CMHs, mimicking the aging phenotype, which likely contribute to its deleterious effect on cognitive function. Therapeutic strategies that upregulate IGF-1 signaling in the cerebral vessels and/or reduce microvascular oxidative stress, and MMP activation may be useful for the prevention of CMHs, protecting cognitive function in high-risk elderly patients.

  3. Intrauterine Growth Retardation (IUGR) as a Novel Condition of Insulin-Like Growth Factor-1 (IGF-1) Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Martín-Estal, I; de la Garza, R G; Castilla-Cortázar, I

    2016-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) is an anabolic hormone with several biological activities, such as proliferation, mitochondrial protection, cell survival, tissue growth and development, anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, antifibrogenic and antiaging. This hormone plays an important role in embryological and postnatal states, being essential for normal foetal and placental growth and differentiation. During gestation, the placenta is one of the major sources of IGF-1, among other hormones. This intrauterine organ expresses IGF-1 receptors and IGF-1 binding proteins (IGFBPs), which control IGF-1 activities. Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) is the second most frequent cause of perinatal morbidity and mortality, defined as the inability to achieve the expected weight for gestational age. Different studies have revealed that IUGR infants have placental dysfunction and low circulating levels of insulin, IGF-1, IGF-2 and IGFBPs. Such data suggest that IGF-1 deficiency in gestational state may be one of the major causes of foetal growth retardation. The aim of this review is to study the epidemiology, physiopathology and possible causes of IUGR. Also, it intends to study the possible role of the placenta as an IGF-1 target organ. The purpose is to establish if IUGR could be considered as a novel condition of IGF-1 deficiency and if its treatment with low doses of IGF-1 could be a suitable therapeutic strategy.

  4. A phosphatidylinositol-linkage-deficient T-cell mutant contains insulin-sensitive glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol.

    PubMed Central

    Avila, M A; Clemente, R; Varela-Nieto, I

    1992-01-01

    Glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol molecules, acting as both signal transduction elements and membrane protein anchors, have been proposed to play a role during T-cell activation. The MVB2 cell line is a mutant, derived from the wild-type T-T hybrid YH.16.33, which has a defect in the biosynthesis of PtdIns-protein linkages. As a consequence, MVB2 mutants are defective in activation through the T-cell receptor. Despite the lack of glycosyl-PtdIns anchors in the mutant MVB2 cells, a comparison of the levels and structural features of the insulin-sensitive glycosyl-PtdIns between the MVB2 and YH.16.33 lineages indicates that both cell lines are identical in this respect. The time course for insulin-responsiveness coincides in both cell lines, with maximal hydrolysis 30 s after insulin addition. The ultimate localization of insulin-regulated glycosyl-PtdIns at the outer surface of the cell membrane is also similar. These data indicate that the glycosyl-PtdIns whose hydrolysis is regulated by insulin is not anchoring proteins at the cell surface of T-lymphocytes. Images Fig. 2. PMID:1532490

  5. Association of Bactericidal Dysfunction of Paneth Cells in Streptozocin-Induced Diabetic Mice with Insulin Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Yu, Tao; Yang, Hong-Sheng; Lu, Xi-Ji; Xia, Zhong-Sheng; Ouyang, Hui; Shan, Ti-Dong; Huang, Can-Ze; Chen, Qi-Kui

    2016-08-30

    BACKGROUND Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is associated with increased risks of enteric infection. Paneth cells constitute the first line of the gut defense. Little is known about the impact of T1DM on the bactericidal function of intestinal Paneth cells. MATERIAL AND METHODS A T1DM mouse model was induced by intraperitoneal injection of streptozocin. The analysis of intestinal microbiota and the mucosal bactericidal assay were conducted to evaluate intestinal innate defense. Numbers of Paneth cells and their expression of related antimicrobial peptides were analyzed. Expression of total insulin receptor (IR) mRNA and relative levels of IR-A/IR-B were analyzed. The primary mouse small intestinal crypt culture was used to analyze the effect of insulin and glucose on the expression of related antimicrobial peptides of Paneth cells. RESULTS In T1DM mice, bacterial loads were increased and there was an alteration in the composition of the intestinal microflora. Exogenous bacteria had better survival in the small bowel of the T1DM mice. The expression of Paneth cell-derived antimicrobial peptides was significantly decreased in the T1DM mice, although the number of Paneth cells was increased. Relative levels of IR-A/IR-B in Paneth cells of diabetic mice were elevated, but the total IR mRNA did not change. Insulin treatment restored the expression of antimicrobial peptides and normalized the microbiota in the gut of T1DM mice. Subsequently, in vitro culture assay demonstrated that insulin rather than glucose was essential for the optimal expression of Paneth cell-derived antimicrobial peptides. CONCLUSIONS The bactericidal function of intestinal Paneth cells was impaired in STZ-induced diabetic mice, resulting in the altered intestinal flora, and insulin was essential for the optimal expression of Paneth cell-derived antimicrobial peptides.

  6. Influence of alimentary zinc deficiency on the concentration of growth hormone (GH), insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) and insulin in the serum of force-fed rats.

    PubMed

    Roth, H P; Kirchgessner, M

    1994-09-01

    The study described here investigates the influence of a specific alimentary Zn deficiency on the concentration of growth hormone (GH), insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) and insulin in the serum of force-fed rats. For this purpose 24 male Sprague-Dawley rats with an average bodyweight of 108 g were divided into 2 groups of 12 animals each. The Zn-deficient group and the control group received for 12 days a semi-synthetic casein diet with a Zn content of 1.3 and 25 ppm respectively. In order to prevent the reduced feed intake which occurs in Zn deficiency and the associated energy and protein shortage from interfering with the experimental parameters, all animals were fed 4 times daily by gastric tube. This made it possible to supply all animals with adequate-nutrients and to synchronise the feed intake exactly. After 12 days the depleted rats were in a severe state of Zn deficiency, as demonstrated by the reduction of Zn in the serum and the femur by 62% and 44% respectively and the 70% lower serum activity of alkaline phosphatase. In the Zn-deficient rats the concentration of GH in the serum was significantly increased by 78%, while IGF-1 and insulin were significantly reduced by 28% and 25% respectively. It is thought that the growth depression observed in the Zn-deficient rats in this study despite their identical feed intake is probably due to a reduced concentration of IGF-I and insulin and that the biological activity or the binding of GH to receptors is impaired in specific alimentary Zn deficiency.

  7. ‘Metabolic syndrome’ in the brain: deficiency in omega-3 fatty acid exacerbates dysfunctions in insulin receptor signalling and cognition

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Rahul; Gomez-Pinilla, Fernando

    2012-01-01

    We pursued studies to determine the effects of the metabolic syndrome (MetS) on brain, and the possibility of modulating these effects by dietary interventions. In addition, we have assessed potential mechanisms by which brain metabolic disorders can impact synaptic plasticity and cognition. We report that high-dietary fructose consumption leads to an increase in insulin resistance index, and insulin and triglyceride levels, which characterize MetS. Rats fed on an n-3 deficient diet showed memory deficits in a Barnes maze, which were further exacerbated by fructose intake. In turn, an n-3 deficient diet and fructose interventions disrupted insulin receptor signalling in hippocampus as evidenced by a decrease in phosphorylation of the insulin receptor and its downstream effector Akt. We found that high fructose consumption with an n-3 deficient diet disrupts membrane homeostasis as evidenced by an increase in the ratio of n-6/n-3 fatty acids and levels of 4-hydroxynonenal, a marker of lipid peroxidation. Disturbances in brain energy metabolism due to n-3 deficiency and fructose treatments were evidenced by a significant decrease in AMPK phosphorylation and its upstream modulator LKB1 as well as a decrease in Sir2 levels. The decrease in phosphorylation of CREB, synapsin I and synaptophysin levels by n-3 deficiency and fructose shows the impact of metabolic dysfunction on synaptic plasticity. All parameters of metabolic dysfunction related to the fructose treatment were ameliorated by the presence of dietary n-3 fatty acid. Results showed that dietary n-3 fatty acid deficiency elevates the vulnerability to metabolic dysfunction and impaired cognitive functions by modulating insulin receptor signalling and synaptic plasticity. PMID:22473784

  8. Easy Absolute Values? Absolutely

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Sharon E.; Mittag, Kathleen Cage

    2015-01-01

    The authors teach a problem-solving course for preservice middle-grades education majors that includes concepts dealing with absolute-value computations, equations, and inequalities. Many of these students like mathematics and plan to teach it, so they are adept at symbolic manipulations. Getting them to think differently about a concept that they…

  9. Protein C deficiency in insulin-dependent diabetes: a hyperglycemia-related phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Ceriello, A; Quatraro, A; Dello Russo, P; Marchi, E; Barbanti, M; Milani, M R; Giugliano, D

    1990-08-13

    In 30 insulin-dependent diabetic patients protein C (PC) antigen and PC activity were significantly lower than those of matched control healthy subjects. An inverse correlation between fasting plasma glucose and both PC concentration and activity was present in diabetics, while a direct correlation between PC concentration and PC activity was observed. Induced hyperglycemia in diabetic and normal subjects was able to decrease both PC antigen levels and PC activity, and heparin reversed in part this effect. In diabetic patients euglycemia obtained by insulin infusion restored to normal the depressed PC levels. Heparin did not alter both the basal PC concentration and activity in healthy controls. These data stress the major role of hyperglycemia in determining PC decrease in diabetics, and suggest that PC reduction is probably associated to hyperglycemia-enhanced thrombin formation.

  10. Glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase-4-deficient mice are protected from diet-induced insulin resistance by the enhanced association of mTOR and rictor.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chongben; Cooper, Daniel E; Grevengoed, Trisha J; Li, Lei O; Klett, Eric L; Eaton, James M; Harris, Thurl E; Coleman, Rosalind A

    2014-08-01

    Glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase (GPAT) activity is highly induced in obese individuals with insulin resistance, suggesting a correlation between GPAT function, triacylglycerol accumulation, and insulin resistance. We asked whether microsomal GPAT4, an isoform regulated by insulin, might contribute to the development of hepatic insulin resistance. Compared with control mice fed a high fat diet, Gpat4(-/-) mice were more glucose tolerant and were protected from insulin resistance. Overexpression of GPAT4 in mouse hepatocytes impaired insulin-suppressed gluconeogenesis and insulin-stimulated glycogen synthesis. Impaired glucose homeostasis was coupled to inhibited insulin-stimulated phosphorylation of Akt(Ser⁴⁷³) and Akt(Thr³⁰⁸). GPAT4 overexpression inhibited rictor's association with the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), and mTOR complex 2 (mTORC2) activity. Compared with overexpressed GPAT3 in mouse hepatocytes, GPAT4 overexpression increased phosphatidic acid (PA), especially di16:0-PA. Conversely, in Gpat4(-/-) hepatocytes, both mTOR/rictor association and mTORC2 activity increased, and the content of PA in Gpat4(-/-) hepatocytes was lower than in controls, with the greatest decrease in 16:0-PA species. Compared with controls, liver and skeletal muscle from Gpat4(-/-)-deficient mice fed a high-fat diet were more insulin sensitive and had a lower hepatic content of di16:0-PA. Taken together, these data demonstrate that a GPAT4-derived lipid signal, likely di16:0-PA, impairs insulin signaling in mouse liver and contributes to hepatic insulin resistance.

  11. Altered natural killer (NK) cell frequency and phenotype in latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (LADA) prior to insulin deficiency.

    PubMed

    Akesson, C; Uvebrant, K; Oderup, C; Lynch, K; Harris, R A; Lernmark, A; Agardh, C-D; Cilio, C M

    2010-07-01

    Approximately 10% of the patients diagnosed with type 2 diabetes (T2D) have detectable serum levels of glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 autoantibodies (GADA). These patients usually progress to insulin dependency within a few years, and are classified as being latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (LADA). A decrease in the frequency of peripheral blood natural killer (NK) cells has been reported recently in recent-onset T1D and in high-risk individuals prior to the clinical onset. As NK cells in LADA patients have been investigated scarcely, the aim of this study was to use multicolour flow cytometry to define possible deficiencies or abnormalities in the frequency or activation state of NK cells in LADA patients prior to insulin dependency. All patients were GADA-positive and metabolically compensated, but none were insulin-dependent at the time blood samples were taken. LADA patients exhibited a significant decrease in NK cell frequency in peripheral blood compared to healthy individuals (P=0.0018), as reported previously for recent-onset T1D patients. Interestingly, NKG2D expression was increased significantly (P<0.0001), whereas killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR)3DL1 expression was decreased (P<0.0001) within the NK cell population. These observations highlight a defect in both frequency and activation status of NK cells in LADA patients and suggest that this immunological alteration may contribute to the development of autoimmune diabetes by affecting peripheral tolerance. Indeed, recent evidence has demonstrated a regulatory function for NK cells in autoimmunity. Moreover, the decrease in NK cell number concords with observations obtained in recent-onset T1D, implying that similar immunological dysfunctions may contribute to the progression of both LADA and T1D.

  12. Adipocyte-specific CD1d-deficiency mitigates diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance in mice

    PubMed Central

    Satoh, Masashi; Hoshino, Miyuki; Fujita, Koki; Iizuka, Misao; Fujii, Satoshi; Clingan, Christopher S.; Van Kaer, Luc; Iwabuchi, Kazuya

    2016-01-01

    It has been shown that CD1d expression and glycolipid-reactive, CD1d-restricted NKT cells exacerbate the development of obesity and insulin resistance in mice. However, the relevant CD1d-expressing cells that influence the effects of NKT cells on the progression of obesity remain incompletely defined. In this study, we have demonstrated that 3T3-L1 adipocytes can present endogenous ligands to NKT cells, leading to IFN-γ production, which in turn, stimulated 3T3-L1 adipocytes to enhance expression of CD1d and CCL2, and decrease expression of adiponectin. Furthermore, adipocyte-specific CD1d deletion decreased the size of the visceral adipose tissue mass and enhanced insulin sensitivity in mice fed a high-fat diet (HFD). Accordingly, NKT cells were less activated, IFN-γ production was significantly reduced, and levels of adiponectin were increased in these animals as compared with control mice on HFD. Importantly, macrophage recruitment into the adipose tissue of adipocyte-specific CD1d-deficient mice was significantly blunted. These findings indicate that interactions between NKT cells and CD1d-expressing adipocytes producing endogenous NKT cell ligands play a critical role in the induction of inflammation and functional modulation of adipose tissue that leads to obesity. PMID:27329323

  13. Mfn1 Deficiency in the Liver Protects Against Diet-Induced Insulin Resistance and Enhances the Hypoglycemic Effect of Metformin.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Sameer S; Joffraud, Magali; Boutant, Marie; Ratajczak, Joanna; Gao, Arwen W; Maclachlan, Catherine; Hernandez-Alvarez, Maria Isabel; Raymond, Frédéric; Metairon, Sylviane; Descombes, Patrick; Houtkooper, Riekelt H; Zorzano, Antonio; Cantó, Carles

    2016-12-01

    Mitochondrial function can be influenced by mitochondrial shape and connectivity with other cellular organelles through fusion and fission processes. Disturbances in mitochondrial architecture and mitochondrial fusion-related genes are observed in situations of type 2 diabetes and obesity, leading to a highly fissioned mitochondrial network. To directly test the effect of reduced mitochondrial fusion on hepatic metabolism, we generated mice with a liver-specific deletion of the Mfn1 gene (Mfn1LKO) and monitored their energy homeostasis, mitochondrial function, and susceptibility to diet-induced insulin resistance. Livers from Mfn1LKO mice displayed a highly fragmented mitochondrial network. This was coupled to an enhanced mitochondrial respiration capacity and a preference for the use of lipids as the main energy source. Although Mfn1LKO mice are similar to control mice fed a low-fat diet, they are protected against insulin resistance induced by a high-fat diet. Importantly, Mfn1 deficiency increased complex I abundance and sensitized animals to the hypoglycemic effect of metformin. Our results suggest that targeting Mfn1 could provide novel avenues to ameliorate glucose homeostasis in obese patients and improve the effectiveness of metformin.

  14. Smad3 deficiency protects mice from obesity-induced podocyte injury that precedes insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yu B Y; Qu, Xinli; Howard, Victor; Dai, Lie; Jiang, Xiaoyun; Ren, Yi; Fu, Ping; Puelles, Victor G; Nikolic-Paterson, David J; Caruana, Georgina; Bertram, John F; Sleeman, Mark W; Li, Jinhua

    2015-08-01

    Signaling by TGF-β/Smad3 plays a key role in renal fibrosis. As obesity is one of the major risk factors of chronic and end-stage renal disease, we studied the role of Smad3 signaling in the pathogenesis of obesity-related renal disease. After switching to a high fat diet, the onset of Smad3 C-terminal phosphorylation, increase in albuminuria, and the early stages of peripheral and renal insulin resistance occurred at 1 day, and 4 and 8 weeks, respectively, in C57BL/6 mice. The loss of synaptopodin, a functional marker of podocytes, and phosphorylation of the Smad3 linker region (T179 and S213) appeared after 4 weeks of the high fat diet. This suggests a temporal pattern of Smad3 signaling activation leading to kidney injury and subsequent insulin resistance in the development of obesity-related renal disease. In vivo, Smad3 knockout attenuated the high fat diet-induced proteinuria, renal fibrosis, overall podocyte injury, and mitochondrial dysfunction in podocytes. In vitro palmitate caused a rapid activation of Smad3 in 30 min, loss of synaptopodin in 2 days, and impaired insulin signaling in 3 days in isolated mouse podocytes. Blockade of either Smad3 phosphorylation by SIS3 (a Smad3 inhibitor) or T179 phosphorylation by flavopiridol (a CDK9 inhibitor) prevented the palmitate-induced loss of synaptopodin and mitochondrial function in podocytes. Thus, Smad3 signaling plays essential roles in obesity-related renal disease and may be a novel therapeutic target.

  15. Attenuation of high sucrose diet–induced insulin resistance in tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase deficient Drosophila melanogaster vermilion mutants

    PubMed Central

    Navrotskaya, Valeriya; Oxenkrug, Gregory; Vorobyova, Lyudmila; Summergrad, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to high sugar diet (HSD) serves as an experimental model of insulin resistance (IR) and type 2 diabetes (T2D) in mammals and insects. Peripheral IR induced by HSD delays emergence of pupae from larvae and decreases body weight of Drosophila imago. Understanding of mechanisms of IR/T2D is essential for refining T2D prevention and treatment strategies. Dysregulation of tryptophan (TRP) – kynurenine (KYN) pathway was suggested as one of the mechanisms of IR development. Rate-limiting enzyme of TRP – KYN pathway in Drosophila is TRP 2,3-dioxygenase (TDO), an evolutionary conserved ortholog of human TDO. In insects TDO is encoded by vermilion gene. TDO is not active in vermilion mutants. In order to evaluate the possible impact of deficient formation of KYN from TRP on the inducement of IR by HSD, we compared the effect of HSD in wild type (Oregon) and vermilion mutants of Drosophila melanogaster by assessing the time of white pupae emergence from larva and body weight of imago. Delay of emergence of pupae from larvae induced by high sucrose diet was less pronounced in vermilion (1.4 days) than in Oregon flies (3.3 days) in comparison with flies maintained on standard diet. Exposure to high sucrose diet decreased body weight of Oregon (but not vermilion) imago. Attenuation of high sucrose diet–induced IR/T2D in vermilion flies might depend on deficiency of TRP – KYN pathway. Besides IR/T2D, HSD induces obesity in Drosophila. Future studies of HSD-induced obesity and IR/T2D in TDO deficient vermilion mutants of Drosophila might help to understand the mechanisms of high association between IR/T2D and obesity. Modulation of TRP – KYN metabolism might be utilized for prevention and treatment of IR/T2D. PMID:26191458

  16. Hypoxia-inducible factor prolyl hydroxylase 1 (PHD1) deficiency promotes hepatic steatosis and liver-specific insulin resistance in mice

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Amandine; Belaidi, Elise; Aron-Wisnewsky, Judith; van der Zon, Gerard C.; Levy, Patrick; Clement, Karine; Pepin, Jean-Louis; Godin-Ribuot, Diane; Guigas, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is associated with local tissue hypoxia and elevated hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha (HIF-1α) in metabolic tissues. Prolyl hydroxylases (PHDs) play an important role in regulating HIF-α isoform stability. In the present study, we investigated the consequence of whole-body PHD1 gene (Egln2) inactivation on metabolic homeostasis in mice. At baseline, PHD1−/− mice exhibited higher white adipose tissue (WAT) mass, despite lower body weight, and impaired insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance when compared to age-matched wild-type (WT) mice. When fed a synthetic low-fat diet, PHD1−/− mice also exhibit a higher body weight gain and WAT mass along with glucose intolerance and systemic insulin resistance compared to WT mice. PHD1 deficiency led to increase in glycolytic gene expression, lipogenic proteins ACC and FAS, hepatic steatosis and liver-specific insulin resistance. Furthermore, gene markers of inflammation were also increased in the liver, but not in WAT or skeletal muscle, of PHD1−/− mice. As expected, high-fat diet (HFD) promoted obesity, hepatic steatosis, tissue-specific inflammation and systemic insulin resistance in WT mice but these diet-induced metabolic alterations were not exacerbated in PHD1−/− mice. In conclusion, PHD1 deficiency promotes hepatic steatosis and liver-specific insulin resistance but does not worsen the deleterious effects of HFD on metabolic homeostasis. PMID:27094951

  17. Commercial assays available for insulin-like growth factor I and their use in diagnosing growth hormone deficiency.

    PubMed

    Clemmons, D R

    2001-01-01

    Radioimmunoassays of insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) are commonly used for screening adults and children for growth hormone (GH) deficiency or excess. There are, however, many problems with such assays. Attempts to resolve these problems have focused on methods of separating IGF-I from its binding proteins, and on reducing inter- and intra-assay variability. In particular, the collection of sufficient high-quality normative data is a major difficulty in many laboratories. Clinical evaluation of assays is also problematic. IGF-I levels vary with age after puberty, and this is complicated by the maintenance of IGF-binding protein 3 levels by IGF-II. Generally, studies have shown that IGF-I is sensitive and specific for the diagnosis of acromegaly, but screening for GH deficiency (GHD) is less precise. The most commonly used commercial assays are immunoradiometric (IRMA) sandwich assays, using antibodies specific to IGF-I. IRMA assays are quick and accurate, and the two-site antibody reactivity produces a high degree of specificity. Additional techniques such as acid-ethanol extraction or saturation with IGF-II can improve reliability. More recently, the introduction of chemiluminescence has provided enhanced speed and sensitivity. The clinical use of these assays has provided a wealth of information regarding the diagnosis of GHD, and it may be possible to reduce the number of patients who require provocative GH testing. IGF-I assays are also of great use in monitoring GH replacement therapy. Despite the problems, IGF-I measurement is currently the best indirect method available for screening and monitoring patients with GHD.

  18. Immune deficiency could be an early risk factor for altered insulin sensitivity in antiretroviral-naive HIV-1-infected patients: the ANRS COPANA cohort

    PubMed Central

    Boufassa, Faroudy; Goujard, Cécile; Viard, Jean-Paul; Carlier, Robert; Lefebvre, Bénédicte; Yeni, Patrick; Bouchaud, Olivier; Capeau, Jacqueline; Meyer, Laurence; Vigouroux, Corinne

    2012-01-01

    Background The relationships between immunovirological status, inflammatory markers, insulin resistance and fat distribution have not been studied in recently diagnosed (<1 year) antiretroviral-naïve HIV-1-infected patients. Methods We studied 214 antiretroviral-naïve patients at enrolment in the metabolic sub-study of the ANRS COPANA cohort. We measured clinical, immunovirological and inflammatory parameters, glucose/insulin during oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), adipokines, subcutaneous and visceral fat surfaces (SAT and VAT, assessed by computed tomography) and the body fat distribution based on dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA). Results Median age was 36 years; 28% of the patients were female and 35% of sub-Saharan origin; 20% had low CD4 counts (≤200/mm3). Patients with low CD4 counts were older and more frequently of sub-Saharan Africa origin, had lower BMI but not different SAT/VAT ratio and fat distribution than other patients. They also had lower total, LDL- and HDL-cholesterolemia, higher triglyceridemia and post-OGTT glycemia, higher markers of insulin resistance (insulin during OGTT and HOMA-IR) and of inflammation (hsCRP, IL-6, TNFα, sTNFR1 and sTNFR2). After adjustment for age, sex, geographic origin, BMI and waist circumference, increased insulin resistance was not related to any inflammatory marker. In multivariate analysis, low CD4 count was an independent risk factor for altered insulin sensitivity (β-coefficient for HOMA-IR: +0.90; p=0.001; CD4>500/mm3 as the reference), in addition to older age (β: +0.26 for a 10-year increase; p=0.01) and higher BMI (β: +0.07 for a 1-kg/m2 increase; p=0.003). Conclusions In ART-naive patients, severe immune deficiency but not inflammation could be an early risk factor for altered insulin sensitivity. PMID:22267473

  19. Molecular mechanisms underlying fasting modulated liver insulin sensitivity and metabolism in male lipodystrophic Bscl2/Seipin-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Weiqin; Zhou, Hongyi; Saha, Pradip; Li, Luge; Chan, Lawrence

    2014-11-01

    Bscl2(-/-) mice recapitulate many of the major metabolic manifestations in Berardinelli-Seip congenital lipodystrophy type 2 (BSCL2) individuals, including lipodystrophy, hepatomegly, hepatic steatosis, and insulin resistance. The mechanisms that underlie hepatic steatosis and insulin resistance in Bscl2(-/-) mice are poorly understood. To address this issue, we performed hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp on Bscl2(-/-) and wild-type mice after an overnight (16-h) fast, and found that Bscl2(-/-) actually displayed increased hepatic insulin sensitivity. Interestingly, liver in Bscl2(-/-) mice after a short term (4-h) fast had impaired acute insulin signaling, a defect that disappeared after a 16-hour fast. Notably, fasting-dependent hepatic insulin signaling in Bscl2(-/-) mice was not associated with liver diacylglyceride and ceramide contents, but could be attributable in part to the expression of hepatic insulin signaling receptor and substrates. Meanwhile, increased de novo lipogenesis and decreased β-oxidation led to severe hepatic steatosis in fed or short-fasted Bscl2(-/-) mice whereas liver lipid accumulation and metabolism in Bscl2(-/-) mice was markedly affected by prolonged fasting. Furthermore, mice with liver-specific inactivation of Bscl2 manifested no hepatic steatosis even under high-fat diet, suggesting Bscl2 does not play a cell autonomous role in regulating liver lipid homeostasis. Overall, our results offered new insights into the metabolic adaptations of liver in response to fasting and uncovered a novel fasting-dependent regulation of hepatic insulin signaling in a mouse model of human BSCL2.

  20. Soluble epoxide hydrolase deficiency alters pancreatic islet size and improves glucose homeostasis in a model of insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Luria, Ayala; Bettaieb, Ahmed; Xi, Yannan; Shieh, Guang-Jong; Liu, Hsin-Chen; Inoue, Hiromi; Tsai, Hsing-Ju; Imig, John D; Haj, Fawaz G; Hammock, Bruce D

    2011-05-31

    Visceral obesity has been defined as an important element of the metabolic syndrome and contributes to the development of insulin resistance and cardiovascular disease. Increasing endogenous levels of epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) are known for their analgesic, antihypertensive, and antiinflammatory effects. The availability of EETs is limited primarily by the soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH, EPHX2), which metabolizes EETs to their less active diols. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that EETs are involved in glucose regulation and in retarding the development of insulin resistance. To address the role of EETs in regulating glucose homeostasis and insulin signaling, we used mice with targeted gene deletion of sEH (Ephx2-null mice) and a subsequent study with a selective sEH inhibitor. When wild-type mice are fed a high fat diet, insulin resistance develops. However, knockout or inhibition of sEH activity resulted in a significant decrease in plasma glucose. These findings are characterized by enhancement of tyrosyl phosphorylation of the insulin receptor, insulin receptor substrate 1, and their downstream cascade. In addition, pancreatic islets were larger when sEH was disrupted. This effect was associated with an increase in vasculature. These observations were supported by pharmacological inhibition of sEH. These data suggest that an increase in EETs due to sEH-gene knockout leads to an increase in the size of islets and improved insulin signaling and sensitivity.

  1. Adult-onset deficiency in growth hormone and insulin-like growth factor-I alters oligodendrocyte turnover in the corpus callosum.

    PubMed

    Hua, Kun; Forbes, M Elizabeth; Lichtenwalner, Robin J; Sonntag, William E; Riddle, David R

    2009-08-01

    Growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) provide trophic support during development and also appear to influence cell structure, function and replacement in the adult brain. Recent studies demonstrated effects of the GH/IGF-I axis on adult neurogenesis, but it is unclear whether the GH/IGF-I axis influences glial turnover in the normal adult brain. In the current study, we used a selective model of adult-onset GH and IGF-I deficiency to evaluate the role of GH and IGF-I in regulating glial proliferation and survival in the adult corpus callosum. GH/IGF-I-deficient dwarf rats of the Lewis strain were made GH/IGF-I replete via twice daily injections of GH starting at postnatal day 28 (P28), approximately the age at which GH pulse amplitude increases in developing rodents. GH/IGF-I deficiency was initiated in adulthood by removing animals from GH treatment. Quantitative analyses revealed that adult-onset GH/IGF-I deficiency decreased cell proliferation in the white matter and decreased the survival of newborn oligodendrocytes. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that aging-related changes in the GH/IGF-I axis produce deficits in ongoing turnover of oligodendrocytes, which may contribute to aging-related cognitive changes and deficits in remyelination after injury.

  2. Clinical utility of insulin and insulin analogs

    PubMed Central

    Sanlioglu, Ahter D.; Altunbas, Hasan Ali; Balci, Mustafa Kemal; Griffith, Thomas S.; Sanlioglu, Salih

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes is a pandemic disease characterized by autoimmune, genetic and metabolic abnormalities. While insulin deficiency manifested as hyperglycemia is a common sequel of both Type-1 and Type-2 diabetes (T1DM and T2DM), it does not result from a single genetic defect—rather insulin deficiency results from the functional loss of pancreatic β cells due to multifactorial mechanisms. Since pancreatic β cells of patients with T1DM are destroyed by autoimmune reaction, these patients require daily insulin injections. Insulin resistance followed by β cell dysfunction and β cell loss is the characteristics of T2DM. Therefore, most patients with T2DM will require insulin treatment due to eventual loss of insulin secretion. Despite the evidence of early insulin treatment lowering macrovascular (coronary artery disease, peripheral arterial disease and stroke) and microvascular (diabetic nephropathy, neuropathy and retinopathy) complications of T2DM, controversy exists among physicians on how to initiate and intensify insulin therapy. The slow acting nature of regular human insulin makes its use ineffective in counteracting postprandial hyperglycemia. Instead, recombinant insulin analogs have been generated with a variable degree of specificity and action. Due to the metabolic variability among individuals, optimum blood glucose management is a formidable task to accomplish despite the presence of novel insulin analogs. In this article, we present a recent update on insulin analog structure and function with an overview of the evidence on the various insulin regimens clinically used to treat diabetes. PMID:23584214

  3. The Islet Estrogen Receptor-α Is Induced by Hyperglycemia and Protects Against Oxidative Stress-Induced Insulin-Deficient Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Kilic, Gamze; Alvarez-Mercado, Ana I.; Zarrouki, Bader; Opland, Darren; Liew, Chong Wee; Alonso, Laura C.; Myers, Martin G.; Jonas, Jean-Christophe; Poitout, Vincent; Kulkarni, Rohit N.; Mauvais-Jarvis, Franck

    2014-01-01

    The female steroid, 17β-estradiol (E2), is important for pancreatic β-cell function and acts via at least three estrogen receptors (ER), ERα, ERβ, and the G-protein coupled ER (GPER). Using a pancreas-specific ERα knockout mouse generated using the Cre-lox-P system and a Pdx1-Cre transgenic line (PERαKO−/−), we previously reported that islet ERα suppresses islet glucolipotoxicity and prevents β-cell dysfunction induced by high fat feeding. We also showed that E2 acts via ERα to prevent β-cell apoptosis in vivo. However, the contribution of the islet ERα to β-cell survival in vivo, without the contribution of ERα in other tissues is still unclear. Using the PERαKO−/− mouse, we show that ERα mRNA expression is only decreased by 20% in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus, without a parallel decrease in the VMH, making it a reliable model of pancreas-specific ERα elimination. Following exposure to alloxan-induced oxidative stress in vivo, female and male PERαKO−/− mice exhibited a predisposition to β-cell destruction and insulin deficient diabetes. In male PERαKO−/− mice, exposure to E2 partially prevented alloxan-induced β-cell destruction and diabetes. ERα mRNA expression was induced by hyperglycemia in vivo in islets from young mice as well as in cultured rat islets. The induction of ERα mRNA by hyperglycemia was retained in insulin receptor-deficient β-cells, demonstrating independence from direct insulin regulation. These findings suggest that induction of ERα expression acts to naturally protect β-cells against oxidative injury. PMID:24498408

  4. The obese growth hormone (GH)-deficient dwarf rat: body fat responses to patterned delivery of GH and insulin-like growth factor-I.

    PubMed

    Clark, R G; Mortensen, D L; Carlsson, L M; Carlsson, B; Carmignac, D; Robinson, I C

    1996-05-01

    We describe a new animal model of obesity and GH deficiency and report the effects on body fat of administering (GH) and insulin-like growth factor (IGF-I) in the model. Female GH-deficient dwarf rats fed a high-fat diet became obese and insulin-resistant compared with chow-fed controls. They were treated with recombinant human GH (rhGH 100-500 micrograms/day, s.c. for 14 days) by daily injection or minipump infusion with or without rhIGF-I (200 micrograms/day, sc infusion). Injections of rhGH increased body weight; infusions of rhGH caused weight loss. RhIGF-I by itself, or rhIGF-I plus GH injections had little effect, whereas rhGH infusions plus rhIGF-I caused a weight loss equivalent to the weight gained during the high-fat feeding and a decrease in fat pad weight. For some responses (serum IGF-1 and GHBP), the obese rats were GH resistant. Fat was lost from the internal fat pads when obese rats were returned to a chow diet, and injections of rhGH surprisingly attenuated this loss of fat. In obese dwarf rats, the lipolytic effects of rhGH are dose-regime dependent. By itself IGF-I is not insulin-like, but in the presence of GH it has antiinsulin actions causing a powerful net lipolysis. If GH plus IGF-I have similar effects in humans they may be useful for reducing body fat.

  5. Deficiency of the leukotriene B4 receptor, BLT-1, protects against systemic insulin resistance in diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Spite, Matthew; Hellmann, Jason; Tang, Yunan; Mathis, Steven P; Kosuri, Madhavi; Bhatnagar, Aruni; Jala, Venkatakrishna R; Haribabu, Bodduluri

    2011-08-15

    Chronic inflammation is an underlying factor linking obesity with insulin resistance. Diet-induced obesity promotes an increase in circulating levels of inflammatory monocytes and their infiltration into expanding adipose tissue. Nevertheless, the endogenous pathways that trigger and sustain chronic low-grade inflammation in obesity are incompletely understood. In this study, we report that a high-fat diet selectively increases the circulating levels of CD11b(+) monocytes in wild-type mice that express leukotriene B(4) receptor, BLT-1, and that this increase is abolished in BLT-1-null mice. The accumulation of classically activated (M1) adipose tissue macrophages (ATMs) and the expression of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines (i.e., IL-6 and Ccl2) was largely blunted in adipose tissue of obese BLT-1(-/-) mice, whereas the ratio of alternatively activated (M2) ATMs to M1 ATMs was increased. Obese BLT-1(-/-) mice were protected from systemic glucose and insulin intolerance and this was associated with a decrease in inflammation in adipose tissue and liver and a decrease in hepatic triglyceride accumulation. Deletion of BLT-1 prevented high fat-induced loss of insulin signaling in liver and skeletal muscle. These observations elucidate a novel role of chemoattractant receptor, BLT-1, in promoting monocyte trafficking to adipose tissue and promoting chronic inflammation in obesity and could lead to the identification of new therapeutic targets for treating insulin resistance in obesity.

  6. Higher prevalence of metformin-induced vitamin B12 deficiency in sulfonylurea combination compared with insulin combination in patients with type 2 diabetes: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Kang, Donghoon; Yun, Jae-Seung; Ko, Sun-Hye; Lim, Tae-Seok; Ahn, Yu-Bae; Park, Yong-Moon; Ko, Seung-Hyun

    2014-01-01

    Long-term and high-dose treatment with metformin is known to be associated with vitamin B12 deficiency in patients with type 2 diabetes. We investigated whether the prevalence of B12 deficiency was different in patients treated with different combination of hypoglycemic agents with metformin during the same time period. A total of 394 patients with type 2 diabetes treated with metformin and sulfonylurea (S+M group, n = 299) or metformin and insulin (I+M group, n = 95) were consecutively recruited. The vitamin B12 and folate levels were quantified using the chemiluminescent enzyme immunoassay. Vitamin B12 deficiency was defined as vitamin B12≤300 pg/mL without folate deficiency (folate>4 ng/mL). The mean age of and duration of diabetes in the subjects were 59.4±10.5 years and 12.2±6.7 years, respectively. The mean vitamin B12 level of the total population was 638.0±279.6 pg/mL. The mean serum B12 levels were significantly lower in the S+M group compared with the I+M group (600.0±266.5 vs. 757.7±287.6 pg/mL, P<0.001). The prevalence of vitamin B12 deficiency in the metformin-treated patients was significantly higher in the S+M group compared with the I+M group (17.4% vs. 4.2%, P = 0.001). After adjustment for various factors, such as age, sex, diabetic duration, duration or daily dose of metformin, diabetic complications, and presence of anemia, sulfonylurea use was a significant independent risk factor for B12 deficiency (OR = 4.74, 95% CI 1.41-15.99, P = 0.012). In conclusion, our study demonstrated that patients with type 2 diabetes who were treated with metformin combined with sulfonylurea require clinical attention for vitamin B12 deficiency and regular monitoring of their vitamin B12 levels.

  7. Higher Prevalence of Metformin-Induced Vitamin B12 Deficiency in Sulfonylurea Combination Compared with Insulin Combination in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Donghoon; Yun, Jae-Seung; Ko, Sun-Hye; Lim, Tae-Seok; Ahn, Yu-Bae; Park, Yong-Moon; Ko, Seung-Hyun

    2014-01-01

    Long-term and high-dose treatment with metformin is known to be associated with vitamin B12 deficiency in patients with type 2 diabetes. We investigated whether the prevalence of B12 deficiency was different in patients treated with different combination of hypoglycemic agents with metformin during the same time period. A total of 394 patients with type 2 diabetes treated with metformin and sulfonylurea (S+M group, n = 299) or metformin and insulin (I+M group, n = 95) were consecutively recruited. The vitamin B12 and folate levels were quantified using the chemiluminescent enzyme immunoassay. Vitamin B12 deficiency was defined as vitamin B12≤300 pg/mL without folate deficiency (folate>4 ng/mL). The mean age of and duration of diabetes in the subjects were 59.4±10.5 years and 12.2±6.7 years, respectively. The mean vitamin B12 level of the total population was 638.0±279.6 pg/mL. The mean serum B12 levels were significantly lower in the S+M group compared with the I+M group (600.0±266.5 vs. 757.7±287.6 pg/mL, P<0.001). The prevalence of vitamin B12 deficiency in the metformin-treated patients was significantly higher in the S+M group compared with the I+M group (17.4% vs. 4.2%, P = 0.001). After adjustment for various factors, such as age, sex, diabetic duration, duration or daily dose of metformin, diabetic complications, and presence of anemia, sulfonylurea use was a significant independent risk factor for B12 deficiency (OR = 4.74, 95% CI 1.41–15.99, P = 0.012). In conclusion, our study demonstrated that patients with type 2 diabetes who were treated with metformin combined with sulfonylurea require clinical attention for vitamin B12 deficiency and regular monitoring of their vitamin B12 levels. PMID:25299054

  8. Long-term deficiency of circulating and hippocampal insulin-like growth factor I induces depressive behavior in adult mice: A potential model of geriatric depression

    PubMed Central

    Mitschelen, Matthew; Yan, Han; Farley, Julie A.; Warrington, Junie P.; Han, Song; Hereñú, Claudia B.; Csiszar, Anna; Ungvari, Zoltan; Bailey-Downs, Lora C.; Bass, Caroline E.; Sonntag, William E.

    2011-01-01

    Numerous studies support the hypothesis that deficiency of insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-1) in adults contributes to depression, but direct evidence is limited. Many psychological and pro-cognitive effects have been attributed to IGF-1, but appropriate animal models of adult-onset IGF-1 deficiency are lacking. In this study, we use a viral-mediated Cre-loxP system to knockout the Igf1 gene in either the liver, neurons of the CA1 region of the hippocampus, or both. Knockout of liver Igf1 reduced serum IGF-1 levels by 40% and hippocampal IGF-1 levels by 26%. Knockout of Igf1 in CA1 reduced hippocampal IGF-1 levels by 13%. The most severe reduction in hippocampal IGF-1 occurred in the group with knockouts in both liver and CA1 (36% reduction), and was associated with a 3.5-fold increase in immobility in the forced swim test. Reduction of either circulating or hippocampal IGF-1 levels did not alter anxiety measured in an open field and elevated plus maze, nor locomotion in the open field. Furthermore, local compensation for deficiencies in circulating IGF-1 did not occur in the hippocampus, nor were serum levels of IGF-1 upregulated in response to the moderate decline of hippocampal IGF-1 caused by the knockouts in CA1. We conclude that adult-onset IGF-1 deficiency alone is sufficient to induce a depressive phenotype in mice. Furthermore, our results suggest that individuals with low brain levels of IGF-1 are at increased risk for depression and these behavioral effects are not ameliorated by increased local IGF-1 production or transport. Our study supports the hypothesis that the natural IGF-1 decline in aging humans may contribute to geriatric depression. PMID:21524689

  9. Absolute Zero

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnelly, Russell J.; Sheibley, D.; Belloni, M.; Stamper-Kurn, D.; Vinen, W. F.

    2006-12-01

    Absolute Zero is a two hour PBS special attempting to bring to the general public some of the advances made in 400 years of thermodynamics. It is based on the book “Absolute Zero and the Conquest of Cold” by Tom Shachtman. Absolute Zero will call long-overdue attention to the remarkable strides that have been made in low-temperature physics, a field that has produced 27 Nobel Prizes. It will explore the ongoing interplay between science and technology through historical examples including refrigerators, ice machines, frozen foods, liquid oxygen and nitrogen as well as much colder fluids such as liquid hydrogen and liquid helium. A website has been established to promote the series: www.absolutezerocampaign.org. It contains information on the series, aimed primarily at students at the middle school level. There is a wealth of material here and we hope interested teachers will draw their student’s attention to this website and its substantial contents, which have been carefully vetted for accuracy.

  10. Muscle force and endurance in untreated and human growth hormone or insulin-like growth factor-I-treated patients with growth hormone deficiency or Laron syndrome.

    PubMed

    Brat, O; Ziv, I; Klinger, B; Avraham, M; Laron, Z

    1997-01-01

    Muscle force and endurance of four muscle groups (biceps, triceps, hamstrings and quadriceps) were measured by a computerized device in three groups: (A) 4 boys with isolated growth hormone deficiencies (IGHD) examined before at 10 and 24 months of hGH treatment; (B) 5 children (2 F, 3 M) with Laron syndrome were examined 3.5-4 years after initiation of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) treatment, and (C) comprised 8 untreated adults (5 F, 3 M) with Laron syndrome. For each patient, 2 matched controls, by age, sex, physical activity and height below the 50th percentile, were examined. GH- or IGF-I-deficient patients before treatment revealed reduced muscle force and endurance. GH treatment (0.6 U/kg/week) restored muscle force and endurance, progressively, mainly in the boys with puberty. Three to 4 years of IGF-I treatment (150 micrograms/kg/day) in patients with Laron syndrome proved to have a weaker effect than GH in restoring muscle force. The difference in effectiveness between hGH and IGF-I in restoring muscle force may be due to either the more marked muscle underdevelopment in Laron syndrome patients than in patients with IGHD or a difference in action potential between the two hormones.

  11. Absolute Summ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Alfred, Jr.

    Summ means the entirety of the multiverse. It seems clear, from the inflation theories of A. Guth and others, that the creation of many universes is plausible. We argue that Absolute cosmological ideas, not unlike those of I. Newton, may be consistent with dynamic multiverse creations. As suggested in W. Heisenberg's uncertainty principle, and with the Anthropic Principle defended by S. Hawking, et al., human consciousness, buttressed by findings of neuroscience, may have to be considered in our models. Predictability, as A. Einstein realized with Invariants and General Relativity, may be required for new ideas to be part of physics. We present here a two postulate model geared to an Absolute Summ. The seedbed of this work is part of Akhnaton's philosophy (see S. Freud, Moses and Monotheism). Most important, however, is that the structure of human consciousness, manifest in Kenya's Rift Valley 200,000 years ago as Homo sapiens, who were the culmination of the six million year co-creation process of Hominins and Nature in Africa, allows us to do the physics that we do. .

  12. Absolute Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartig, George

    1990-12-01

    The absolute sensitivity of the FOS will be determined in SV by observing 2 stars at 3 epochs, first in 3 apertures (1.0", 0.5", and 0.3" circular) and then in 1 aperture (1.0" circular). In cycle 1, one star, BD+28D4211 will be observed in the 1.0" aperture to establish the stability of the sensitivity and flat field characteristics and improve the accuracy obtained in SV. This star will also be observed through the paired apertures since these are not calibrated in SV. The stars will be observed in most detector/grating combinations. The data will be averaged to form the inverse sensitivity functions required by RSDP.

  13. In vivo high-resolution magic angle spinning magnetic resonance spectroscopy of Drosophila melanogaster at 14.1 T shows trauma in aging and in innate immune-deficiency is linked to reduced insulin signaling

    PubMed Central

    RIGHI, VALERIA; APIDIANAKIS, YIORGOS; MINTZOPOULOS, DIONYSSIOS; ASTRAKAS, LOUKAS; RAHME, LAURENCE G.; TZIKA, A. ARIA

    2010-01-01

    In vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), a non-destructive biochemical tool for investigating live organisms, has yet to be used in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, a useful model organism for investigating genetics and physiology. We developed and implemented a high-resolution magic-angle-spinning (HRMAS) MRS method to investigate live Drosophila at 14.1 T. We demonstrated, for the first time, the feasibility of using HRMAS MRS for molecular characterization of Drosophila with a conventional MR spectrometer equipped with an HRMAS probe. We showed that the metabolic HRMAS MRS profiles of injured, aged wild-type (wt) flies and of immune deficient (imd) flies were more similar to chico flies mutated at the chico gene in the insulin signaling pathway, which is analogous to insulin receptor substrate 1–4 (IRS1–4) in mammals and less to those of adipokinetic hormone receptor (akhr) mutant flies, which have an obese phenotype. We thus provide evidence for the hypothesis that trauma in aging and in innate immune-deficiency is linked to insulin signaling. This link may explain the mitochondrial dysfunction that accompanies insulin resistance and muscle wasting that occurs in trauma, aging and immune system deficiencies, leading to higher susceptibility to infection. Our approach advances the development of novel in vivo non-destructive research approaches in Drosophila, suggests biomarkers for investigation of biomedical paradigms, and thus may contribute to novel therapeutic development. PMID:20596596

  14. Absolute Reticulocyte Count and Reticulocyte Hemoglobin Content as Predictors of Early Response to Exclusive Oral Iron in Children with Iron Deficiency Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Parodi, Emilia; Giraudo, Maria Teresa; Ricceri, Fulvio; Aurucci, Maria Luigia; Mazzone, Raffaela; Ramenghi, Ugo

    2016-01-01

    We report data regarding kinetic of response to oral iron in 34 iron deficiency anemia children. Twenty-four/34 patients (70.5%) reached reference value of hemoglobin (Hb) concentration for age and sex at day + 30 from the beginning of treatment (complete early responders (CERs)), and 4/34 (12%) reached an Hb concentration at least 50% higher than the original (partial early responders (PERs)). CHr at T1 (within 7 days from the beginning of treatment) was significantly different in the different groups (22.95 in CERs versus 18.41 in other patients; p = 0.001; 22.42 in early responders versus 18.07 in NERs; p = 0.001). Relative increase of CHr from T0 to T1 resulted significantly higher in CERs than in other patients (0.21 versus 0.11, p = 0.042) and in early responders than in NERs (0.22 versus 0.004, p = 0.006). Multivariate logistic models revealed a higher probability of being a complete early responder due to relative increase of ARC from T0 to T1 [OR (95% CI) = 44.95 (1.54–1311.98)] and to CHr at T1 [OR (95% CI) =3.18 (1.24–8.17)]. Our preliminary data confirm CHr as early and accurate predictor of hematological response to oral iron. PMID:27092272

  15. Effects of cysteamine and antibody to somatostatin on islet cell function in vitro. Evidence that intracellular somatostatin deficiency augments insulin and glucagon secretion

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, Y.C.; Pierzchala, I.; Amherdt, M.; Orci, L.

    1985-04-01

    In this study the authors have characterized the effects of cysteamine (CHS) on the cellular content and release of immunoreactive somatostatin (S-14 LI), insulin (IRI), and glucagon (IRG) from monolayer cultures of neonatal rat islets. Incubation of cultures with 0.1-10 mM CHS for 1 h led to an apparent, dose-dependent reduction of cellular S-14 LI that was 50% of control at 0.3 mM, 87% at 1 mM, and 95% at 10 mM. IRI content was unaffected by CHS up to 1 mM, but at 10 mM 90% loss of IRI occurred. All concentrations were without effect on IRG content. The loss of S-14 LI and IRI was completely reversible with time, but with different recovery rates for the two hormones. Cultures rendered S-14 LI deficient with both CHS and anti-S-14 LI exhibited threefold and 2.3-fold potentiation of IRG and IRI secretions, respectively, greater than that expected from the separate effects of the two agents. Increasing medium glucose from 2.8 mM to 16.7 mM stimulated IRI release by 86% and suppressed IRG by 53%. These results suggest that CHS induces an apparent loss of islet S-14 LI, and at high doses, of IRI as well, but has no effect on A cells. Complete islet S-14 LI deficiency augments IRI and IRG secretion over a wide range of glucose concentrations, suggesting a physiological role of D cells on B cell and A cell regulation.

  16. Pharmacogenomics of insulin-like growth factor-I generation during GH treatment in children with GH deficiency or Turner syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, A; Clayton, P; Tatò, L; Yoo, H W; Rodriguez-Arnao, M D; Skorodok, J; Ambler, G R; Zignani, M; Zieschang, J; Della Corte, G; Destenaves, B; Champigneulle, A; Raelson, J; Chatelain, P

    2014-01-01

    Individual responses to growth hormone (GH) treatment are variable. Short-term generation of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) is recognized as a potential marker of sensitivity to GH treatment. This prospective, phase IV study used an integrated genomic analysis to identify markers associated with 1-month change in IGF-I (ΔIGF-I) following initiation of recombinant human (r-h)GH therapy in treatment-naïve children with GH deficiency (GHD) (n=166) or Turner syndrome (TS) (n=147). In both GHD and TS, polymorphisms in the cell-cycle regulator CDK4 were associated with 1-month ΔIGF-I (P<0.05). Baseline gene expression was also correlated with 1-month ΔIGF-I in both GHD and TS (r=0.3; P<0.01). In patients with low IGF-I responses, carriage of specific CDK4 alleles was associated with MAPK and glucocorticoid receptor signaling in GHD, and with p53 and Wnt signaling pathways in TS. Understanding the relationship between genomic markers and early changes in IGF-I may allow development of strategies to rapidly individualize r-hGH dose. PMID:23567489

  17. The Effects of Calcium, Vitamins D and K co-Supplementation on Markers of Insulin Metabolism and Lipid Profiles in Vitamin D-Deficient Women with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Karamali, Maryam; Ashrafi, Mahnaz; Razavi, Maryamalsadat; Jamilian, Mehri; Kashanian, Maryam; Akbari, Maryam; Asemi, Zatollah

    2017-04-13

    Data on the effects of calcium, vitamins D and K co-supplementation on markers of insulin metabolism and lipid profiles among vitamin D-deficient women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) are scarce. This study was done to determine the effects of calcium, vitamins D and K co-supplementation on markers of insulin metabolism and lipid profiles in vitamin D-deficient women with PCOS. This randomized double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was conducted among 55 vitamin D-deficient women diagnosed with PCOS aged 18-40 years old. Subjects were randomly assigned into 2 groups to intake either 500 mg calcium, 200 IU vitamin D and 90 µg vitamin K supplements (n=28) or placebo (n=27) twice a day for 8 weeks. After the 8-week intervention, compared with the placebo, joint calcium, vitamins D and K supplementation resulted in significant decreases in serum insulin concentrations (-1.9±3.5 vs. +1.8±6.6 µIU/mL, P=0.01), homeostasis model of assessment-estimated insulin resistance (-0.4±0.7 vs. +0.4±1.4, P=0.01), homeostasis model of assessment-estimated b cell function (-7.9±14.7 vs. +7.0±30.3, P=0.02) and a significant increase in quantitative insulin sensitivity check index (+0.01±0.01 vs. -0.008±0.03, P=0.01). In addition, significant decreases in serum triglycerides (-23.4±71.3 vs. +9.9±39.5 mg/dL, P=0.03) and VLDL-cholesterol levels (-4.7±14.3 vs. +2.0±7.9 mg/dL, P=0.03) was observed following supplementation with combined calcium, vitamins D and K compared with the placebo. Overall, calcium, vitamins D and K co-supplementation for 8 weeks among vitamin D-deficient women with PCOS had beneficial effects on markers of insulin metabolism, serum triglycerides and VLDL-cholesterol levels.

  18. Insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-2 levels in pediatric patients with growth hormone deficiency, eating disorders and acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Barrios, V; Buño, M; Pozo, J; Muñoz, M T; Argente, J

    2000-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-binding protein-2 (IGFBP-2) is altered in different diseases and might be used as an indication of its severity. The aims of our study were to investigate: (1) the developmental pattern of the serum IGFBP-2 concentration at birth and during childhood and adolescence; (2) whether the serum IGFBP-2 level could be a marker for the diagnosis and evolution of diseases where the growth hormone (GH)-IGF axis is altered, and (3) whether this binding protein shows a relationship with IGF-I, its free fraction, IGFBP-1 and -3. We report reference values for 55 normal full-term newborns and 221 normal children who were divided into 5 groups according to their Tanner stage. Serum levels were higher in newborns when compared with Tanner stages I-V (p < 0.001, ANOVA), with no further changes throughout development. Furthermore, we studied IGFBP-2 levels in 24 children with congenital GH deficiency (GHD), 26 with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), 75 obese children, and 60 girls with anorexia nervosa (AN) at diagnosis and during a follow-up period. IGFBP-2 at diagnosis was increased in GHD, ALL and AN, and decreased in obesity (p < 0.05, ANOVA). During the follow-up, IGFBP-2 concentrations tended to normalize. IGFBP-2 correlated positively with IGFBP-1 and negatively with IGF-I and IGFBP-3 in normal subjects and at diagnosis of the pathologies studied. Although IGFBP-2 functions are not well understood, these results suggest a possible role for this protein in diseases where the GH-IGF axis is altered.

  19. Stimulation of glycogen synthesis by insulin in human erythroleukemia cells requires the synthesis of glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol.

    PubMed Central

    Lazar, D F; Knez, J J; Medof, M E; Cuatrecasas, P; Saltiel, A R

    1994-01-01

    Although the insulin-dependent hydrolysis of glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol (GPI) may play an important role in insulin action, an absolute requirement for this glycolipid has not been demonstrated. Human K562 cells were mutated to produce a cell line (IA) incapable of the earliest step in PI glycosylation, the formation of PI-GlcNAc. Another cell line (IVD) was deficient in the deacetylation of PI-GlcNAc to form PI-GlcN and subsequent mannosylated species. Each line was transfected with wild-type human insulin receptors. Similar insulin-stimulated receptor autophosphorylation was observed in all three lines, along with a nearly identical increase in the association of phosphorylated insulin receptor substrate 1 with endogenous PI 3-kinase. Both normal and GPI-defective lines also displayed a similar 2- to 3-fold increase in phosphorylation of the Shc protein and its association with growth factor receptor-bound protein 2 in response to insulin. In contrast to these results, striking differences were noted in insulin-stimulated glycogen synthesis. In normal cells, glycogen synthesis was significantly increased by insulin, whereas no insulin stimulation was observed in GPI-deficient IA cells, and only a trace of stimulation was detected in IVD cells. These results indicate that tyrosine phosphorylation produced by insulin is not dependent on GPI synthesis, and this effect is not sufficient to elicit at least some of the metabolic effects of the hormone. In contrast, GPI synthesis is required for the stimulation of glycogen synthesis by insulin in these cells. These findings support the existence of divergent pathways in the action of insulin. Images PMID:7524086

  20. Insulin and Insulin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    As obesity and diabetes reach epidemic proportions in the developed world, the role of insulin resistance and its consequences are gaining prominence. Understanding the role of insulin in wide-ranging physiological processes and the influences on its synthesis and secretion, alongside its actions from the molecular to the whole body level, has significant implications for much chronic disease seen in Westernised populations today. This review provides an overview of insulin, its history, structure, synthesis, secretion, actions and interactions followed by a discussion of insulin resistance and its associated clinical manifestations. Specific areas of focus include the actions of insulin and manifestations of insulin resistance in specific organs and tissues, physiological, environmental and pharmacological influences on insulin action and insulin resistance as well as clinical syndromes associated with insulin resistance. Clinical and functional measures of insulin resistance are also covered. Despite our incomplete understanding of the complex biological mechanisms of insulin action and insulin resistance, we need to consider the dramatic social changes of the past century with respect to physical activity, diet, work, socialisation and sleep patterns. Rapid globalisation, urbanisation and industrialisation have spawned epidemics of obesity, diabetes and their attendant co-morbidities, as physical inactivity and dietary imbalance unmask latent predisposing genetic traits. PMID:16278749

  1. Teaching Absolute Value Meaningfully

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wade, Angela

    2012-01-01

    What is the meaning of absolute value? And why do teachers teach students how to solve absolute value equations? Absolute value is a concept introduced in first-year algebra and then reinforced in later courses. Various authors have suggested instructional methods for teaching absolute value to high school students (Wei 2005; Stallings-Roberts…

  2. Insulin Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... 3 hours and lasts 12 to 16 hours.Long-acting insulin (such as insulin glargine and insulin detemir) ... hard to time their meals around regular insulin injections. Sometimes they end up eating too soon or ...

  3. Adult-onset deficiency in growth hormone and insulin-like growth factor-I decreases survival of dentate granule neurons: insights into the regulation of adult hippocampal neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Lichtenwalner, Robin J; Forbes, M Elizabeth; Sonntag, William E; Riddle, David R

    2006-02-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I), long thought to provide critical trophic support during development, also has emerged as a candidate for regulating ongoing neuronal production in adulthood. Whether and how IGF-I influences each phase of neurogenesis, however, remains unclear. In the current study, we used a selective model of growth hormone (GH) and plasma IGF-I deficiency to evaluate the role of GH and IGF-I in regulating cell proliferation, survival, and neuronal differentiation in the adult dentate gyrus. GH/IGF-I-deficient dwarf rats of the Lewis strain were made GH/IGF-I replete throughout development via twice daily injections of GH, and then GH/IGF-I deficiency was initiated in adulthood by removing animals from GH treatment. Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) labeling revealed no effect of GH/IGF-I deficiency on cell proliferation, but adult-onset depletion of GH and plasma IGF-I significantly reduced the survival of newly generated cells in the dentate gyrus. Colabeling for BrdU and markers of immature and mature neurons revealed a selective effect of GH/IGF-I deficiency on the survival of more mature new neurons. The number of BrdU-labeled cells expressing the immature neuronal marker TUC-4 did not differ between GH/IGF-I-deficient and -replete animals, but the number expressing only the marker of maturity NeuN was lower in depleted animals. Taken together, results from the present study suggest that, under conditions of short-term GH/IGF-I deficiency during adulthood, dentate granule cells continue to be produced, to commit to a neuronal fate, and to begin the process of neuronal maturation, whereas survival of the new neurons is impaired.

  4. Effects of cysteamine and antibody to somatostatin on islet cell function in vitro. Evidence that intracellular somatostatin deficiency augments insulin and glucagon secretion.

    PubMed

    Patel, Y C; Pierzchala, I; Amherdt, M; Orci, L

    1985-04-01

    In this study we have characterized the effects of cysteamine (CHS) on the cellular content and release of immunoreactive somatostatin (S-14 LI), insulin (IRI), and glucagon (IRG) from monolayer cultures of neonatal rat islets. Incubation of cultures with 0.1-10 mM CHS for 1 h led to an apparent, dose-dependent reduction of cellular S-14 LI that was 50% of control at 0.3 mM, 87% at 1 mM, and 95% at 10 mM. IRI content was unaffected by CHS up to 1 mM, but at 10 mM 90% loss of IRI occurred. All concentrations were without effect on IRG content. The loss of S-14 LI and IRI was completely reversible with time, but with different recovery rates for the two hormones (48 h for S-14 LI, and 72 h for IRI). Released S-14 LI rose progressively with increasing doses of CHS from 21 +/- 2.5 pg/ml per hour to 41 +/- 1.4 pg/ml per hour at CHS concentrations of 5 mM and 10 mM. IRI and IRG secretion were both also significantly enhanced (by 55% and 88%, respectively), despite the elevated medium S-14 LI. Since CHS reduced cellular S-14 LI but augmented medium S-14 LI, the relative effects of CHS (1 mM) and immunoneutralization with antibody to S-14 LI on IRI and IRG secretion were tested. Anti S-14 LI alone stimulated basal IRG (67%) but not IRI. Cultures rendered S-14 LI deficient with both CHS and anti-S-14 LI exhibited threefold and 2.3-fold potentiation of IRG and IRI secretions, respectively, greater than that expected from the separate effects of the two agents. Increasing medium glucose from 2.8 mM to 16.7 mM stimulated IRI release by 86% and suppressed IRG by 53%. CHS (1 mM) and anti-S-14 LI further augmented stimulated IRI release, by 30%; although 16.7 mM glucose suppression of IRG was still maintained under these conditions, the quantitative IRG response was significantly greater. These results suggest that CHS induces an apparent loss of islet S-14 LI, and at high doses, of IRI as well, but has no effect on A cells. Complete islet S-14 LI deficiency augments IRI and IRG

  5. Effects of Combined Calcium and Vitamin D Supplementation on Insulin Secretion, Insulin Sensitivity and β-Cell Function in Multi-Ethnic Vitamin D-Deficient Adults at Risk for Type 2 Diabetes: A Pilot Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Gagnon, Claudia; Daly, Robin M.; Carpentier, André; Lu, Zhong X.; Shore-Lorenti, Catherine; Sikaris, Ken; Jean, Sonia; Ebeling, Peter R.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To examine whether combined vitamin D and calcium supplementation improves insulin sensitivity, insulin secretion, β-cell function, inflammation and metabolic markers. Design 6-month randomized, placebo-controlled trial. Participants Ninety-five adults with serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] ≤55 nmol/L at risk of type 2 diabetes (with prediabetes or an AUSDRISK score ≥15) were randomized. Analyses included participants who completed the baseline and final visits (treatment n = 35; placebo n = 45). Intervention Daily calcium carbonate (1,200 mg) and cholecalciferol [2,000–6,000 IU to target 25(OH)D >75 nmol/L] or matching placebos for 6 months. Measurements Insulin sensitivity (HOMA2%S, Matsuda index), insulin secretion (insulinogenic index, area under the curve (AUC) for C-peptide) and β-cell function (Matsuda index x AUC for C-peptide) derived from a 75 g 2-h OGTT; anthropometry; blood pressure; lipid profile; hs-CRP; TNF-α; IL-6; adiponectin; total and undercarboxylated osteocalcin. Results Participants were middle-aged adults (mean age 54 years; 69% Europid) at risk of type 2 diabetes (48% with prediabetes). Compliance was >80% for calcium and vitamin D. Mean serum 25(OH)D concentration increased from 48 to 95 nmol/L in the treatment group (91% achieved >75 nmol/L), but remained unchanged in controls. There were no significant changes in insulin sensitivity, insulin secretion and β-cell function, or in inflammatory and metabolic markers between or within the groups, before or after adjustment for potential confounders including waist circumference and season of recruitment. In a post hoc analysis restricted to participants with prediabetes, a significant beneficial effect of vitamin D and calcium supplementation on insulin sensitivity (HOMA%S and Matsuda) was observed. Conclusions Daily vitamin D and calcium supplementation for 6 months may not change OGTT-derived measures of insulin sensitivity, insulin secretion and

  6. Absolutely classical spin states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohnet-Waldraff, F.; Giraud, O.; Braun, D.

    2017-01-01

    We introduce the concept of "absolutely classical" spin states, in analogy to absolutely separable states of bipartite quantum systems. Absolutely classical states are states that remain classical (i.e., a convex sum of projectors on coherent states of a spin j ) under any unitary transformation applied to them. We investigate the maximal size of the ball of absolutely classical states centered on the maximally mixed state and derive a lower bound for its radius as a function of the total spin quantum number. We also obtain a numerical estimate of this maximal radius and compare it to the case of absolutely separable states.

  7. Insulin Basics

    MedlinePlus

    ... long insulin continues to lower blood glucose. Insulin Strength All insulins come dissolved or suspended in liquids. The standard and most commonly used strength in the United States today is U-100, ...

  8. Absolute nuclear material assay

    DOEpatents

    Prasad, Manoj K [Pleasanton, CA; Snyderman, Neal J [Berkeley, CA; Rowland, Mark S [Alamo, CA

    2012-05-15

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  9. Absolute nuclear material assay

    DOEpatents

    Prasad, Manoj K.; Snyderman, Neal J.; Rowland, Mark S.

    2010-07-13

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  10. Growth hormone (GH)-transgenic insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1)-deficient mice allow dissociation of excess GH and IGF1 effects on glomerular and tubular growth.

    PubMed

    Blutke, Andreas; Schneider, Marlon R; Wolf, Eckhard; Wanke, Rüdiger

    2016-03-01

    Growth hormone (GH)-transgenic mice with permanently elevated systemic levels of GH and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) reproducibly develop renal and glomerular hypertrophy and subsequent progressive glomerulosclerosis, finally leading to terminal renal failure. To dissociate IGF1-dependent and -independent effects of GH excess on renal growth and lesion development in vivo, the kidneys of 75 days old IGF1-deficient (I(-/-)) and of IGF1-deficient GH-transgenic mice (I(-/-)/G), as well as of GH-transgenic (G) and nontransgenic wild-type control mice (I(+/+)) were examined by quantitative stereological and functional analyses. Both G and I(-/-)/G mice developed glomerular hypertrophy, hyperplasia of glomerular mesangial and endothelial cells, podocyte hypertrophy and foot process effacement, albuminuria, and glomerulosclerosis. However, I(-/-)/G mice exhibited less severe glomerular alterations, as compared to G mice. Compared to I(+/+) mice, G mice exhibited renal hypertrophy with a significant increase in the number without a change in the size of proximal tubular epithelial (PTE) cells. In contrast, I(-/-)/G mice did not display significant PTE cell hyperplasia, as compared to I(-/-) mice. These findings indicate that GH excess stimulates glomerular growth and induces lesions progressing to glomerulosclerosis in the absence of IGF1. In contrast, IGF1 represents an important mediator of GH-dependent proximal tubular growth in GH-transgenic mice.

  11. Insulin signaling and insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Beale, Elmus G

    2013-01-01

    Insulin resistance or its sequelae may be the common etiology of maladies associated with metabolic syndrome (eg, hypertension, type 2 diabetes, atherosclerosis, heart attack, stroke, and kidney failure). It is thus important to understand those factors that affect insulin sensitivity. This review stems from the surprising discovery that interference with angiotensin signaling improves insulin sensitivity, and it provides a general overview of insulin action and factors that control insulin sensitivity.

  12. Does Insulin Like Growth Factor-1 (IGF-1) Deficiency Have a “Protective” Role in the Development of Diabetic Retinopathy in Thalassamia Major Patients?

    PubMed Central

    De Sanctis, Vincenzo; Incorvaia, Carlo; Soliman, Ashraf T; Candini, Giancarlo; Pepe, Alessia; Kattamis, Christos; Soliman, Nada A.; Elsedfy, Heba; Kholy, Mohamed El

    2015-01-01

    Rationale Both insulin and IGF-1 have been implicated in the control of retinal endothelial cell growth, neovascularization and diabetic retinopathy. Recent findings have established an essential role for IGF-1 in angiogenesis and demonstrated a new target for control of retinopathy that explains why diabetic retinopathy initially increases with the onset of insulin treatment Objective This cross-sectional study was designed to give insights into relationship between Insulin-Growth-Factor 1 (IGF-1) levels and diabetic retinopathy (DR) in a sample of thalassemia major (TM) patients with insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM). This relation was not previously evaluated, despite the fact that both diseases co-exist in the same patient. The study also describes the clinical and biochemical profile of the associated complications in TM patients with and without IDDM. Design A population-based cross-sectional study. Participants The study includes 19 consecutive TM patients with IDDM and 31 age- and sex-matched TM patients without IDDM who visited our out-patient clinics for an endocrine assessment Methods An extensive medical history, with data on associated complications and current medications, was obtained. Blood samples were drawn in the morning after an overnight fast to measure the serum concentrations of IGF-1, glucose, fructosamine, free thyroxine (FT4), thyrotropin (TSH) and biochemical analysis. Serologic screening assays for hepatitis C virus seropositivity (HCVab and HCV-RNA) were also evaluated; applying routine laboratory methods. Plasma total IGF-1 was measured by a chemiluminescent immunometric assay (CLIA) method. Ophthalmology evaluation was done by the same researcher using stereoscopic fundus biomicroscopy through dilated pupils. DR was graded using the scale developed by the Global Diabetic Retinopathy Group. Iron stores were assessed by direct and indirect methods. Results Eighteen TM patients with IDDM (94.7 %) and ten non-diabetic patients

  13. Novel Faces of Fibroblast Growth Factor 23 (FGF23): Iron Deficiency, Inflammation, Insulin Resistance, Left Ventricular Hypertrophy, Proteinuria and Acute Kidney Injury.

    PubMed

    Kanbay, Mehmet; Vervloet, Marc; Cozzolino, Mario; Siriopol, Dimitrie; Covic, Adrian; Goldsmith, David; Solak, Yalcin

    2017-03-01

    FGF23 is a hormone that appears as the core regulator of phosphate metabolism. Great deal of data has accumulated to demonstrate increased FGF23 secretion from the bone to compensate for even subtle increases in serum phosphorus long before intact PTH. However, recent evidence points to the fact that actions and interactions of FGF23 are not limited solely to phosphate metabolism. FGF23 may be implicated in iron metabolism and erythropoiesis, inflammation, insulin resistance, proteinuria, acute kidney injury and left ventricular hypertrophy. In this review, we will summarize latest experimental and clinical data examining impact of FGF23 on aforementioned pathophysiologic pathways/disorders.

  14. LC–MS Proteomics Analysis of the Insulin/IGF-1-Deficient Caenorhabditis elegans daf-2(e1370) Mutant Reveals Extensive Restructuring of Intermediary Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The insulin/IGF-1 receptor is a major known determinant of dauer formation, stress resistance, longevity, and metabolism in Caenorhabditis elegans. In the past, whole-genome transcript profiling was used extensively to study differential gene expression in response to reduced insulin/IGF-1 signaling, including the expression levels of metabolism-associated genes. Taking advantage of the recent developments in quantitative liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC–MS)-based proteomics, we profiled the proteomic changes that occur in response to activation of the DAF-16 transcription factor in the germline-less glp-4(bn2);daf-2(e1370) receptor mutant. Strikingly, the daf-2 profile suggests extensive reorganization of intermediary metabolism, characterized by the upregulation of many core intermediary metabolic pathways. These include glycolysis/gluconeogenesis, glycogenesis, pentose phosphate cycle, citric acid cycle, glyoxylate shunt, fatty acid β-oxidation, one-carbon metabolism, propionate and tyrosine catabolism, and complexes I, II, III, and V of the electron transport chain. Interestingly, we found simultaneous activation of reciprocally regulated metabolic pathways, which is indicative of spatiotemporal coordination of energy metabolism and/or extensive post-translational regulation of these enzymes. This restructuring of daf-2 metabolism is reminiscent to that of hypometabolic dauers, allowing the efficient and economical utilization of internal nutrient reserves and possibly also shunting metabolites through alternative energy-generating pathways to sustain longevity. PMID:24555535

  15. LC–MS Proteomics Analysis of the Insulin/IGF-1-Deficient Caenorhabditis elegans daf-2(e1370) Mutant Reveals Extensive Restructuring of Intermediary Metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Depuydt, Geert; Xie, Fang; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Smolders, Arne; Brewer, Heather M.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Braeckman, Bart P.

    2014-04-04

    The insulin/IGF-1 receptor is a major known determinant of dauer formation, stress resistance, longevity, and metabolism in Caenorhabditis elegans. In the past, whole-genome transcript profiling was used extensively to study differential gene expression in response to reduced insulin/IGF-1 signaling, including the expression levels of metabolism-associated genes. Taking advantage of the recent developments in quantitative liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC–MS)-based proteomics, we profiled the proteomic changes that occur in response to activation of the DAF-16 transcription factor in the germline-less glp-4(bn2);daf-2(e1370) receptor mutant. Strikingly, the daf-2 profile suggests extensive reorganization of intermediary metabolism, characterized by the upregulation of many core intermediary metabolic pathways. These include glycolysis/gluconeogenesis, glycogenesis, pentose phosphate cycle, citric acid cycle, glyoxylate shunt, fatty acid β-oxidation, one-carbon metabolism, propionate and tyrosine catabolism, and complexes I, II, III, and V of the electron transport chain. Interestingly, we found simultaneous activation of reciprocally regulated metabolic pathways, which is indicative of spatiotemporal coordination of energy metabolism and/or extensive post-translational regulation of these enzymes. Finally, this restructuring of daf-2 metabolism is reminiscent to that of hypometabolic dauers, allowing the efficient and economical utilization of internal nutrient reserves and possibly also shunting metabolites through alternative energy-generating pathways to sustain longevity.

  16. LC-MS Proteomics Analysis of the Insulin/IGF-1 Deficient Caenorhabditis elegans daf-2(e1370) Mutant Reveals Extensive Restructuring of Intermediary Metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Depuydt, Geert G.; Xie, Fang; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Smolders, Arne; Brewer, Heather M.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Braeckman, Bart P.

    2014-02-20

    The insulin/IGF-1 receptor is a major known determinant of dauer formation, stress resistance, longevity and metabolism in C. elegans. In the past, whole-genome transcript profiling was used extensively to study differential gene expression in response to reduced insulin/IGF-1 signaling, including expression levels of metabolism-associated genes. Taking advantage of the recent developments in quantitative liquid chromatography mass-spectrometry (LC-MS) based proteomics, we profiled the proteomic changes that occur in response to activation of the DAF-16 transcription factor in the germline-less glp-4(bn2); daf-2(e1370) receptor mutant. Strikingly, the daf-2 profile suggests extensive reorganization of intermediary metabolism, characterized by the up-regulation of many core intermediary metabolic pathways. These include, glycolysis/gluconeogenesis, glycogenesis, pentose phosphate cycle, citric acid cycle, glyoxylate shunt, fatty acid β-oxidation, one-carbon metabolism, propionate and tyrosine catabolism, and complex I, II, III and V of the electron transport chain. Interestingly, we found simultaneous activation of reciprocally regulated metabolic pathways, which is indicative for spatio-temporal coordination of energy metabolism and/or extensive post-translational regulation of these enzymes. This restructuring of daf-2 metabolism is reminiscent to that of hypometabolic dauers, allowing the efficient and economical utilization of internal nutrient reserves, possibly also shunting metabolites through alternative energy-generating pathways, in order to sustain longevity.

  17. A Comparative Study of Age-Related Hearing Loss in Wild Type and Insulin-Like Growth Factor I Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Riquelme, Raquel; Cediel, Rafael; Contreras, Julio; Lourdes, Rodriguez-de la Rosa; Murillo-Cuesta, Silvia; Hernandez-Sanchez, Catalina; Zubeldia, Jose M.; Cerdan, Sebastian; Varela-Nieto, Isabel

    2010-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) belongs to the family of insulin-related peptides that fulfils a key role during the late development of the nervous system. Human IGF1 mutations cause profound deafness, poor growth and mental retardation. Accordingly, Igf1−/− null mice are dwarfs that have low survival rates, cochlear alterations and severe sensorineural deafness. Presbycusis (age-related hearing loss) is a common disorder associated with aging that causes social and cognitive problems. Aging is also associated with a decrease in circulating IGF-I levels and this reduction has been related to cognitive and brain alterations, although there is no information as yet regarding the relationship between presbycusis and IGF-I biodisponibility. Here we present a longitudinal study of wild type Igf1+/+ and null Igf1−/− mice from 2 to 12 months of age comparing the temporal progression of several parameters: hearing, brain morphology, cochlear cytoarchitecture, insulin-related factors and IGF gene expression and IGF-I serum levels. Complementary invasive and non-invasive techniques were used, including auditory brainstem-evoked response (ABR) recordings and in vivo MRI brain imaging. Igf1−/− null mice presented profound deafness at all the ages studied, without any obvious worsening of hearing parameters with aging. Igf1+/+ wild type mice suffered significant age-related hearing loss, their auditory thresholds and peak I latencies augmenting as they aged, in parallel with a decrease in the circulating levels of IGF-I. Accordingly, there was an age-related spiral ganglion degeneration in wild type mice that was not evident in the Igf1 null mice. However, the Igf1−/− null mice in turn developed a prematurely aged stria vascularis reminiscent of the diabetic strial phenotype. Our data indicate that IGF-I is required for the correct development and maintenance of hearing, supporting the idea that IGF-I-based therapies could contribute to prevent or

  18. Insulin Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... ovarian syndrome (PCOS) , prediabetes or heart disease , or metabolic syndrome . A health practitioner also may order insulin and ... such as appears in type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome Decreased insulin levels are seen with: Diabetes Hypopituitarism ...

  19. High-fat diet-induced deregulation of hippocampal insulin signaling and mitochondrial homeostasis deficiences contribute to Alzheimer disease pathology in rodents.

    PubMed

    Petrov, Dmitry; Pedrós, Ignacio; Artiach, Gonzalo; Sureda, Francesc X; Barroso, Emma; Pallàs, Mercè; Casadesús, Gemma; Beas-Zarate, Carlos; Carro, Eva; Ferrer, Isidro; Vazquez-Carrera, Manuel; Folch, Jaume; Camins, Antoni

    2015-09-01

    Global obesity is a pandemic status, estimated to affect over 2 billion people, that has resulted in an enormous strain on healthcare systems worldwide. The situation is compounded by the fact that apart from the direct costs associated with overweight pathology, obesity presents itself with a number of comorbidities, including an increased risk for the development of neurodegenerative disorders. Alzheimer disease (AD), the main cause of senile dementia, is no exception. Spectacular failure of the pharmaceutical industry to come up with effective AD treatment strategies is forcing the broader scientific community to rethink the underlying molecular mechanisms leading to cognitive decline. To this end, the emphasis is once again placed on the experimental animal models of the disease. In the current study, we have focused on the effects of a high-fat diet (HFD) on hippocampal-dependent memory in C57/Bl6 Wild-type (WT) and APPswe/PS1dE9 (APP/PS1) mice, a well-established mouse model of familial AD. Our results indicate that the continuous HFD administration starting at the time of weaning is sufficient to produce β-amyloid-independent, hippocampal-dependent memory deficits measured by a 2-object novel-object recognition test (NOR) in mice as early as 6months of age. Furthermore, the resulting metabolic syndrome appears to have direct effects on brain insulin regulation and mitochondrial function. We have observed pathological changes related to both the proximal and distal insulin signaling pathway in the brains of HFD-fed WT and APP/PS1 mice. These changes are accompanied by a significantly reduced OXPHOS metabolism, suggesting that mitochondria play an important role in hippocampus-dependent memory formation and retention in both the HFD-treated and AD-like rodents at a relatively young age.

  20. Absolute and relative blindsight.

    PubMed

    Balsdon, Tarryn; Azzopardi, Paul

    2015-03-01

    The concept of relative blindsight, referring to a difference in conscious awareness between conditions otherwise matched for performance, was introduced by Lau and Passingham (2006) as a way of identifying the neural correlates of consciousness (NCC) in fMRI experiments. By analogy, absolute blindsight refers to a difference between performance and awareness regardless of whether it is possible to match performance across conditions. Here, we address the question of whether relative and absolute blindsight in normal observers can be accounted for by response bias. In our replication of Lau and Passingham's experiment, the relative blindsight effect was abolished when performance was assessed by means of a bias-free 2AFC task or when the criterion for awareness was varied. Furthermore, there was no evidence of either relative or absolute blindsight when both performance and awareness were assessed with bias-free measures derived from confidence ratings using signal detection theory. This suggests that both relative and absolute blindsight in normal observers amount to no more than variations in response bias in the assessment of performance and awareness. Consideration of the properties of psychometric functions reveals a number of ways in which relative and absolute blindsight could arise trivially and elucidates a basis for the distinction between Type 1 and Type 2 blindsight.

  1. Practical Classification Guidelines for Diabetes in patients treated with insulin: a cross-sectional study of the accuracy of diabetes diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Hope, Suzy V; Wienand-Barnett, Sophie; Shepherd, Maggie; King, Sophie M; Fox, Charles; Khunti, Kamlesh; Oram, Richard A; Knight, Bea A; Hattersley, Andrew T; Jones, Angus G; Shields, Beverley M

    2016-01-01

    Background Differentiating between type 1 and type 2 diabetes is fundamental to ensuring appropriate management of patients, but can be challenging, especially when treating with insulin. The 2010 UK Practical Classification Guidelines for Diabetes were developed to help make the differentiation. Aim To assess diagnostic accuracy of the UK guidelines against ‘gold standard’ definitions of type 1 and type 2 diabetes based on measured C-peptide levels. Design and setting In total, 601 adults with insulin-treated diabetes and diabetes duration ≥5 years were recruited in Devon, Northamptonshire, and Leicestershire. Method Baseline information and home urine sample were collected. Urinary C-peptide creatinine ratio (UCPCR) measures endogenous insulin production. Gold standard type 1 diabetes was defined as continuous insulin treatment within 3 years of diagnosis and absolute insulin deficiency (UCPCR<0.2 nmol/mmol ≥5 years post-diagnosis); all others classed as having type 2 diabetes. Diagnostic performance of the clinical criteria was assessed and other criteria explored using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. Results UK guidelines correctly classified 86% of participants. Most misclassifications occurred in patients classed as having type 1 diabetes who had significant endogenous insulin levels (57 out of 601; 9%); most in those diagnosed ≥35 years and treated with insulin from diagnosis, where 37 out of 66 (56%) were misclassified. Time to insulin and age at diagnosis performed best in predicting long-term endogenous insulin production (ROC AUC = 0.904 and 0.871); BMI was a less strong predictor of diabetes type (AUC = 0.824). Conclusion Current UK guidelines provide a pragmatic clinical approach to classification reflecting long-term endogenous insulin production; caution is needed in older patients commencing insulin from diagnosis, where misclassification rates are increased. PMID:27080317

  2. Diabetes mellitus, a complex and heterogeneous disease, and the role of insulin resistance as a determinant of diabetic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Karalliedde, Janaka; Gnudi, Luigi

    2016-02-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is increasingly recognized as a heterogeneous condition. The individualization of care and treatment necessitates an understanding of the individual patient's pathophysiology of DM that underpins their DM classification and clinical presentation. Classical type-2 diabetes mellitus is due to a combination of insulin resistance and an insulin secretory defect. Type-1 diabetes is characterized by a near-absolute deficiency of insulin secretion. More recently, advances in genetics and a better appreciation of the atypical features of DM has resulted in more categories of diabetes. In the context of kidney disease, patients with DM and microalbuminuria are more insulin resistant, and insulin resistance may be a pathway that results in accelerated progression of diabetic kidney disease. This review summarizes the updated classification of DM, including more rarer categories and their associated renal manifestations that need to be considered in patients who present with atypical features. The benefits and limitations of the tests utilized to make a diagnosis of DM are discussed. We also review the putative pathways and mechanisms by which insulin resistance drives the progression of diabetic kidney disease.

  3. Absolute neutrino mass scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capelli, Silvia; Di Bari, Pasquale

    2013-04-01

    Neutrino oscillation experiments firmly established non-vanishing neutrino masses, a result that can be regarded as a strong motivation to extend the Standard Model. In spite of being the lightest massive particles, neutrinos likely represent an important bridge to new physics at very high energies and offer new opportunities to address some of the current cosmological puzzles, such as the matter-antimatter asymmetry of the Universe and Dark Matter. In this context, the determination of the absolute neutrino mass scale is a key issue within modern High Energy Physics. The talks in this parallel session well describe the current exciting experimental activity aiming to determining the absolute neutrino mass scale and offer an overview of a few models beyond the Standard Model that have been proposed in order to explain the neutrino masses giving a prediction for the absolute neutrino mass scale and solving the cosmological puzzles.

  4. The absolute path command

    SciTech Connect

    Moody, A.

    2012-05-11

    The ap command traveres all symlinks in a given file, directory, or executable name to identify the final absolute path. It can print just the final path, each intermediate link along with the symlink chan, and the permissions and ownership of each directory component in the final path. It has functionality similar to "which", except that it shows the final path instead of the first path. It is also similar to "pwd", but it can provide the absolute path to a relative directory from the current working directory.

  5. Growth hormone (GH) therapy markedly increases the motility of spermatozoa and the concentration of insulin-like growth factor-I in seminal vesicle fluid in the male GH-deficient dwarf rat.

    PubMed

    Breier, B H; Vickers, M H; Gravance, C G; Casey, P J

    1996-09-01

    There is increasing evidence for an important role of the somatotropic axis in male reproductive function. We investigated the effect of recombinant bovine GH (rbGH) treatment for 21 days on semen characteristics in post-pubertal GH-deficient dwarf (dw/dw) rats. Male dw/dw rats at an age of 75-80 days were divided into two groups (n = 10 per group) and injected twice per day with either rbGH (2 micrograms/g/day) or saline. While the concentration (96.4 +/- 51.3 x 10(6) per ml) and morphology of spermatozoa (spermatozoa with normal morphology 73.5 +/- 6.3%) in the dw/dw rat were within the normal range, the motility of spermatozoa was very low (27.5 +/- 11.7%), establishing a state of sub-fertility. The rbGH treatment markedly increased (p < 0.01) motility of spermatozoa (44.5 +/- 10.7%) but did not change the concentration (144 +/- 80.3 x 10(6) per ml) and morphology (spermatozoa with normal morphology 79.5 +/- 6.0%). The rbGH treatment also significantly increased the concentration of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) in blood plasma (control 389.1 +/- 65 ng/ml, rbGH 813.9 ng/ml, p < 0.001) and in seminal vesicle fluid (control 11.3 +/- 3.0 ng/ml, rbGH 16.1 +/- 5.4 ng/ml, p < 0.05). We conclude that rbGH therapy markedly increases motility of spermatozoa in sub-fertile male GH-deficient dw/dw rats. Thus, GH therapy may offer considerable potential for the treatment of impaired male reproductive performance.

  6. Insulin-Like Growth Factor-Type 1 Receptor Inhibitor NVP-AEW541 Enhances Radiosensitivity of PTEN Wild-Type but Not PTEN-Deficient Human Prostate Cancer Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Isebaert, Sofie F.; Swinnen, Johannes V.; McBride, William H.; Haustermans, Karin M.

    2011-09-01

    Purpose: During the past decade, many clinical trials with both monoclonal antibodies and small molecules that target the insulin-like growth factor-type 1 receptor (IGF-1R) have been launched. Despite the important role of IGF-1R signaling in radioresistance, studies of such agents in combination with radiotherapy are lagging behind. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the effect of the small molecule IGF-1R kinase inhibitor NVP-AEW541 on the intrinsic radioresistance of prostate cancer cells. Methods and Materials: The effect of NVP-AEW541 on cell proliferation, cell viability, IGF-1R signaling, radiosensitivity, cell cycle distribution, and double strand break repair was determined in three human prostate cancer cell lines (PC3, DU145, 22Rv1). Moreover, the importance of the PTEN pathway status was explored by means of transfection experiments with constitutively active Akt or inactive kinase-dead Akt. Results: NVP-AEW541 inhibited cell proliferation and decreased cell viability in a time-and dose-dependent manner in all three cell lines. Radiosensitization was observed in the PTEN wild-type cell lines DU145 and 22Rv1 but not in the PTEN-deficient PC3 cell line. NVP-AEW541-induced radiosensitization coincided with downregulation of phospho-Akt levels and high levels of residual double strand breaks. The importance of PTEN status in the radiosensitization effect was confirmed by transfection experiments with constitutively active Akt or inactive kinase-dead Akt. Conclusions: NVP-AEW541 enhances the effect of ionizing radiation in PTEN wild-type, but not in PTEN-deficient, prostate cancer cells. Proper patient selection based on the PTEN status of the tumor will be critical to the achievement of optimal results in clinical trials in which the combination of radiotherapy and this IGF-1R inhibitor is being explored.

  7. A Role for Insulin in Diabetic Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Grote, Caleb W.; Wright, Douglas E.

    2016-01-01

    The peripheral nervous system is one of several organ systems that are profoundly affected in diabetes. The longstanding view is that insulin does not have a major role in modulating neuronal function in both central and peripheral nervous systems is now being challenged. In the setting of insulin deficiency or excess insulin, it is logical to propose that insulin dysregulation can contribute to neuropathic changes in sensory neurons. This is particularly important as sensory nerve damage associated with prediabetes, type 1 and type 2 diabetes is so prevalent. Here, we discuss the current experimental literature related to insulin's role as a potential neurotrophic factor in peripheral nerve function, as well as the possibility that insulin deficiency plays a role in diabetic neuropathy. In addition, we discuss how sensory neurons in the peripheral nervous system respond to insulin similar to other insulin-sensitive tissues. Moreover, studies now suggest that sensory neurons can also become insulin resistant like other tissues. Collectively, emerging studies are revealing that insulin signaling pathways are active contributors to sensory nerve modulation, and this review highlights this novel activity and should provide new insight into insulin's role in both peripheral and central nervous system diseases. PMID:28066166

  8. Insulin allergy.

    PubMed

    Ghazavi, Mohammad K; Johnston, Graham A

    2011-01-01

    Insulin reactions occur rarely but are of tremendous clinical importance. The first was reported in 1922 as a callus reaction at the injection site of insufficiently purified bovine insulin. Porcine insulin was subsequently found to be less allergenic than bovine insulin. Increasingly pure insulins have decreased the risk of adverse reactions, and the production of recombinant insulin with the same amino sequence as human insulin saw a large decrease in adverse reactions. Currently, the prevalence of allergic reactions to insulin products appears to be approximately 2%, and less than one-third of these events have been considered related to the insulin itself. Other reactions occur due to the preservatives added to insulin, including zinc, protamine, and meta-cresol. Allergic reactions can be type I or immunoglobulin E-mediated, type III or Arthus, and type IV or delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions. Type I reactions are the most common and can, rarely, cause anaphylaxis. In contrast, type IV reactions can occur after a delay of several days. Investigations include skin prick testing, patch testing, intradermal testing, and occasionally, skin biopsy.

  9. JNK1 Deficient Insulin-Producing Cells Are Protected against Interleukin-1β-Induced Apoptosis Associated with Abrogated Myc Expression.

    PubMed

    Prause, Michala; Mayer, Christopher Michael; Brorsson, Caroline; Frederiksen, Klaus Stensgaard; Billestrup, Nils; Størling, Joachim; Mandrup-Poulsen, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The relative contributions of the JNK subtypes in inflammatory β-cell failure and apoptosis are unclear. The JNK protein family consists of JNK1, JNK2, and JNK3 subtypes, encompassing many different isoforms. INS-1 cells express JNK1α1, JNK1α2, JNK1β1, JNK1β2, JNK2α1, JNK2α2, JNK3α1, and JNK3α2 mRNA isoform transcripts translating into 46 and 54 kDa isoform JNK proteins. Utilizing Lentiviral mediated expression of shRNAs against JNK1, JNK2, or JNK3 in insulin-producing INS-1 cells, we investigated the role of individual JNK subtypes in IL-1β-induced β-cell apoptosis. JNK1 knockdown prevented IL-1β-induced INS-1 cell apoptosis associated with decreased 46 kDa isoform JNK protein phosphorylation and attenuated Myc expression. Transient knockdown of Myc also prevented IL-1β-induced apoptosis as well as caspase 3 cleavage. JNK2 shRNA potentiated IL-1β-induced apoptosis and caspase 3 cleavage, whereas JNK3 shRNA did not affect IL-1β-induced β-cell death compared to nonsense shRNA expressing INS-1 cells. In conclusion, JNK1 mediates INS-1 cell death associated with increased Myc expression. These findings underline the importance of differentiated targeting of JNK subtypes in the development of inflammatory β-cell failure and destruction.

  10. Consistent thermostatistics forbids negative absolute temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunkel, Jörn; Hilbert, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Over the past 60 years, a considerable number of theories and experiments have claimed the existence of negative absolute temperature in spin systems and ultracold quantum gases. This has led to speculation that ultracold gases may be dark-energy analogues and also suggests the feasibility of heat engines with efficiencies larger than one. Here, we prove that all previous negative temperature claims and their implications are invalid as they arise from the use of an entropy definition that is inconsistent both mathematically and thermodynamically. We show that the underlying conceptual deficiencies can be overcome if one adopts a microcanonical entropy functional originally derived by Gibbs. The resulting thermodynamic framework is self-consistent and implies that absolute temperature remains positive even for systems with a bounded spectrum. In addition, we propose a minimal quantum thermometer that can be implemented with available experimental techniques.

  11. Electronic Absolute Cartesian Autocollimator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leviton, Douglas B.

    2006-01-01

    An electronic absolute Cartesian autocollimator performs the same basic optical function as does a conventional all-optical or a conventional electronic autocollimator but differs in the nature of its optical target and the manner in which the position of the image of the target is measured. The term absolute in the name of this apparatus reflects the nature of the position measurement, which, unlike in a conventional electronic autocollimator, is based absolutely on the position of the image rather than on an assumed proportionality between the position and the levels of processed analog electronic signals. The term Cartesian in the name of this apparatus reflects the nature of its optical target. Figure 1 depicts the electronic functional blocks of an electronic absolute Cartesian autocollimator along with its basic optical layout, which is the same as that of a conventional autocollimator. Referring first to the optical layout and functions only, this or any autocollimator is used to measure the compound angular deviation of a flat datum mirror with respect to the optical axis of the autocollimator itself. The optical components include an illuminated target, a beam splitter, an objective or collimating lens, and a viewer or detector (described in more detail below) at a viewing plane. The target and the viewing planes are focal planes of the lens. Target light reflected by the datum mirror is imaged on the viewing plane at unit magnification by the collimating lens. If the normal to the datum mirror is parallel to the optical axis of the autocollimator, then the target image is centered on the viewing plane. Any angular deviation of the normal from the optical axis manifests itself as a lateral displacement of the target image from the center. The magnitude of the displacement is proportional to the focal length and to the magnitude (assumed to be small) of the angular deviation. The direction of the displacement is perpendicular to the axis about which the

  12. Absolute airborne gravimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumann, Henri

    This work consists of a feasibility study of a first stage prototype airborne absolute gravimeter system. In contrast to relative systems, which are using spring gravimeters, the measurements acquired by absolute systems are uncorrelated and the instrument is not suffering from problems like instrumental drift, frequency response of the spring and possible variation of the calibration factor. The major problem we had to resolve were to reduce the influence of the non-gravitational accelerations included in the measurements. We studied two different approaches to resolve it: direct mechanical filtering, and post-processing digital compensation. The first part of the work describes in detail the different mechanical passive filters of vibrations, which were studied and tested in the laboratory and later in a small truck in movement. For these tests as well as for the airborne measurements an absolute gravimeter FG5-L from Micro-G Ltd was used together with an Inertial navigation system Litton-200, a vertical accelerometer EpiSensor, and GPS receivers for positioning. These tests showed that only the use of an optical table gives acceptable results. However, it is unable to compensate for the effects of the accelerations of the drag free chamber. The second part describes the strategy of the data processing. It is based on modeling the perturbing accelerations by means of GPS, EpiSensor and INS data. In the third part the airborne experiment is described in detail, from the mounting in the aircraft and data processing to the different problems encountered during the evaluation of the quality and accuracy of the results. In the part of data processing the different steps conducted from the raw apparent gravity data and the trajectories to the estimation of the true gravity are explained. A comparison between the estimated airborne data and those obtained by ground upward continuation at flight altitude allows to state that airborne absolute gravimetry is feasible and

  13. Impact of micronutrient deficiencies on obesity.

    PubMed

    García, Olga P; Long, Kurt Z; Rosado, Jorge L

    2009-10-01

    Micronutrient deficiencies have been found in obese individuals across age groups worldwide. While the effects of micronutrient deficiencies on human functions have been studied widely in different populations, there is limited information on how these micronutrient deficiencies affect obese populations. An examination of the available literature suggests associations exist between micronutrient deficiencies and obesity in different populations. These associations and possible mechanisms of the deficiencies' metabolic effects, such as their influence on leptin and insulin metabolism, are discussed here. Further studies are needed to clarify the roles of the different micronutrient deficiencies with respect to obesity and its comorbid conditions.

  14. Absolute-structure reports.

    PubMed

    Flack, Howard D

    2013-08-01

    All the 139 noncentrosymmetric crystal structures published in Acta Crystallographica Section C between January 2011 and November 2012 inclusive have been used as the basis of a detailed study of the reporting of absolute structure. These structure determinations cover a wide range of space groups, chemical composition and resonant-scattering contribution. Defining A and D as the average and difference of the intensities of Friedel opposites, their level of fit has been examined using 2AD and selected-D plots. It was found, regardless of the expected resonant-scattering contribution to Friedel opposites, that the Friedel-difference intensities are often dominated by random uncertainty and systematic error. An analysis of data collection strategy is provided. It is found that crystal-structure determinations resulting in a Flack parameter close to 0.5 may not necessarily be from crystals twinned by inversion. Friedifstat is shown to be a robust estimator of the resonant-scattering contribution to Friedel opposites, very little affected by the particular space group of a structure nor by the occupation of special positions. There is considerable confusion in the text of papers presenting achiral noncentrosymmetric crystal structures. Recommendations are provided for the optimal way of treating noncentrosymmetric crystal structures for which the experimenter has no interest in determining the absolute structure.

  15. Selective Insulin Resistance in the Kidney

    PubMed Central

    Horita, Shoko; Nakamura, Motonobu; Suzuki, Masashi; Satoh, Nobuhiko; Suzuki, Atsushi; Seki, George

    2016-01-01

    Insulin resistance has been characterized as attenuation of insulin sensitivity at target organs and tissues, such as muscle and fat tissues and the liver. The insulin signaling cascade is divided into major pathways such as the PI3K/Akt pathway and the MAPK/MEK pathway. In insulin resistance, however, these pathways are not equally impaired. For example, in the liver, inhibition of gluconeogenesis by the insulin receptor substrate (IRS) 2 pathway is impaired, while lipogenesis by the IRS1 pathway is preserved, thus causing hyperglycemia and hyperlipidemia. It has been recently suggested that selective impairment of insulin signaling cascades in insulin resistance also occurs in the kidney. In the renal proximal tubule, insulin signaling via IRS1 is inhibited, while insulin signaling via IRS2 is preserved. Insulin signaling via IRS2 continues to stimulate sodium reabsorption in the proximal tubule and causes sodium retention, edema, and hypertension. IRS1 signaling deficiency in the proximal tubule may impair IRS1-mediated inhibition of gluconeogenesis, which could induce hyperglycemia by preserving glucose production. In the glomerulus, the impairment of IRS1 signaling deteriorates the structure and function of podocyte and endothelial cells, possibly causing diabetic nephropathy. This paper mainly describes selective insulin resistance in the kidney, focusing on the proximal tubule. PMID:27247938

  16. Absolute Equilibrium Entropy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shebalin, John V.

    1997-01-01

    The entropy associated with absolute equilibrium ensemble theories of ideal, homogeneous, fluid and magneto-fluid turbulence is discussed and the three-dimensional fluid case is examined in detail. A sigma-function is defined, whose minimum value with respect to global parameters is the entropy. A comparison is made between the use of global functions sigma and phase functions H (associated with the development of various H-theorems of ideal turbulence). It is shown that the two approaches are complimentary though conceptually different: H-theorems show that an isolated system tends to equilibrium while sigma-functions allow the demonstration that entropy never decreases when two previously isolated systems are combined. This provides a more complete picture of entropy in the statistical mechanics of ideal fluids.

  17. Absolute multilateration between spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muelaner, Jody; Wadsworth, William; Azini, Maria; Mullineux, Glen; Hughes, Ben; Reichold, Armin

    2017-04-01

    Environmental effects typically limit the accuracy of large scale coordinate measurements in applications such as aircraft production and particle accelerator alignment. This paper presents an initial design for a novel measurement technique with analysis and simulation showing that that it could overcome the environmental limitations to provide a step change in large scale coordinate measurement accuracy. Referred to as absolute multilateration between spheres (AMS), it involves using absolute distance interferometry to directly measure the distances between pairs of plain steel spheres. A large portion of each sphere remains accessible as a reference datum, while the laser path can be shielded from environmental disturbances. As a single scale bar this can provide accurate scale information to be used for instrument verification or network measurement scaling. Since spheres can be simultaneously measured from multiple directions, it also allows highly accurate multilateration-based coordinate measurements to act as a large scale datum structure for localized measurements, or to be integrated within assembly tooling, coordinate measurement machines or robotic machinery. Analysis and simulation show that AMS can be self-aligned to achieve a theoretical combined standard uncertainty for the independent uncertainties of an individual 1 m scale bar of approximately 0.49 µm. It is also shown that combined with a 1 µm m‑1 standard uncertainty in the central reference system this could result in coordinate standard uncertainty magnitudes of 42 µm over a slender 1 m by 20 m network. This would be a sufficient step change in accuracy to enable next generation aerospace structures with natural laminar flow and part-to-part interchangeability.

  18. Insulin Oedema in Newly Diagnosed Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Çetinkaya, Semra; Yılmaz Ağladıoğlu, Sebahat; Peltek Kendirici, Havva Nur; Bilgili, Hatice; Yıldırım, Nurdan; Aycan, Zehra

    2010-01-01

    Despite the essential role of insulin in the management of patients with insulin deficiency, insulin use can lead to adverse effects such as hypoglycaemia and weight gain. Rarely, crucial fluid retention can occur with insulin therapy, resulting in an oedematous condition. Peripheral or generalised oedema is an extremely rare complication of insulin therapy in the absence of heart, liver or renal involvement. It has been reported in newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes, in poorly controlled type 2 diabetes following the initiation of insulin therapy, and in underweight patients on large doses of insulin. The oedema occurs shortly after the initiation of intensive insulin therapy. We describe two adolescent girls with newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes, who presented with oedema of the lower extremities approximately one week after the initiation of insulin treatment; other causes of oedema were excluded. Spontaneous recovery was observed in both patients. Conflict of interest:None declared. PMID:21274337

  19. Vitamin D deficiency and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Berridge, Michael J

    2017-03-24

    Vitamin D deficiency has been linked to the onset of diabetes. This review summarizes the role of Vitamin D in maintaining the normal release of insulin by the pancreatic beta cells (β-cells). Diabetes is initiated by the onset of insulin resistance. The β-cells can overcome this resistance by releasing more insulin, thus preventing hyperglycaemia. However, as this hyperactivity increases, the β-cells experience excessive Ca(2+) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) signalling that results in cell death and the onset of diabetes. Vitamin D deficiency contributes to both the initial insulin resistance and the subsequent onset of diabetes caused by β-cell death. Vitamin D acts to reduce inflammation, which is a major process in inducing insulin resistance. Vitamin D maintains the normal resting levels of both Ca(2+) and ROS that are elevated in the β-cells during diabetes. Vitamin D also has a very significant role in maintaining the epigenome. Epigenetic alterations are a feature of diabetes by which many diabetes-related genes are inactivated by hypermethylation. Vitamin D acts to prevent such hypermethylation by increasing the expression of the DNA demethylases that prevent hypermethylation of multiple gene promoter regions of many diabetes-related genes. What is remarkable is just how many cellular processes are maintained by Vitamin D. When Vitamin D is deficient, many of these processes begin to decline and this sets the stage for the onset of diseases such as diabetes.

  20. Differential effects of central and peripheral administration of growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor on hypothalamic GH-releasing hormone and somatostatin gene expression in GH-deficient dwarf rats.

    PubMed

    Sato, M; Frohman, L A

    1993-08-01

    The roles of GH and insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) in the regulation of hypothalamic GH-releasing hormone (GRH) and somatostatin (SRIH) gene expression were investigated in the GH-deficient dwarf (dw) rat, in which endogenous feedback signals are lacking. Adult male and female dw rats were treated with GH or IGF-I by systemic (sc) administration or intracerebroventricular (icv) infusion, and hypothalamic GRH and SRIH mRNA were determined by Northern blotting and densitometric analysis. Systemic sc injection of rGH (75 micrograms every 12 h for 3 days) decreased GRH mRNA levels in both sexes. However, systemic sc injection of human IGF-I (150 micrograms every 12 h for 3 days) did not affect GRH mRNA levels in either sex despite significant stimulation of body weight gain. The use of a continuous sc infusion, which normalized serum IGF-I levels, and prolongation of the treatment period to 7 days also failed to change GRH mRNA levels. SRIH mRNA was unaffected by systemic administration of either GH or IGF-I. Continuous icv infusion of GH (1 microgram/h for 7 days) decreased GRH mRNA levels in both sexes, but did not alter SRIH mRNA levels. Continuous icv infusion of IGF-I (100 ng/h for 7 days) decreased GRH mRNA in both sexes. In contrast, SRIH mRNA levels were increased in both sexes. IGF-I decreased GRH mRNA levels at icv infusion rates of 100 and 300 ng/h and stimulated SRIH mRNA levels at infusion rates of 30 and 100 ng/h. Food intake was unaffected at these infusion rates. Changes in GRH and SRIH mRNA levels in response to systemic or central GH and IGF-I administration were similar in both sexes, except that the decrease in GRH mRNA levels produced by the icv infusion of IGF-I was greater in female than in male rats. The results provide evidence for a direct inhibitory feedback effect of GH in the central nervous system on the regulation of hypothalamic GRH gene expression that is independent of peripheral IGF-I. IGF-I feedback, in contrast, appears to

  1. Insulin Lispro Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... unless it is used in an external insulin pump. In patients with type 2 diabetes, insulin lispro ... also can be used with an external insulin pump. Before using insulin lispro in a pump system, ...

  2. CCL5/RANTES contributes to hypothalamic insulin signaling for systemic insulin responsiveness through CCR5

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Szu-Yi; Ajoy, Reni; Changou, Chun Austin; Hsieh, Ya-Ting; Wang, Yang-Kao; Hoffer, Barry

    2016-01-01

    Many neurodegenerative diseases are accompanied by metabolic disorders. CCL5/RANTES, and its receptor CCR5 are known to contribute to neuronal function as well as to metabolic disorders such as type 2 diabetes mellitus, obesity, atherosclerosis and metabolic changes after HIV infection. Herein, we found that the lack of CCR5 or CCL5 in mice impaired regulation of energy metabolism in hypothalamus. Immunostaining and co-immunoprecipitation revealed the specific expression of CCR5, associated with insulin receptors, in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC). Both ex vivo stimulation and in vitro tissue culture studies demonstrated that the activation of insulin, and PI3K-Akt pathways were impaired in CCR5 and CCL5 deficient hypothalamus. The inhibitory phosphorylation of insulin response substrate-1 at Ser302 (IRS-1S302) but not IRS-2, by insulin was markedly increased in CCR5 and CCL5 deficient animals. Elevating CCR5/CCL5 activity induced GLUT4 membrane translocation and reduced phospho-IRS-1S302 through AMPKα-S6 Kinase. Blocking CCR5 using the antagonist, MetCCL5, abolished the de-phosphorylation of IRS-1S302 and insulin signal activation. In addition, intracerebroventricular delivery of MetCCL5 interrupted hypothalamic insulin signaling and elicited peripheral insulin responsiveness and glucose intolerance. Taken together, our data suggest that CCR5 regulates insulin signaling in hypothalamus which contributes to systemic insulin sensitivity and glucose metabolism. PMID:27898058

  3. CCL5/RANTES contributes to hypothalamic insulin signaling for systemic insulin responsiveness through CCR5.

    PubMed

    Chou, Szu-Yi; Ajoy, Reni; Changou, Chun Austin; Hsieh, Ya-Ting; Wang, Yang-Kao; Hoffer, Barry

    2016-11-29

    Many neurodegenerative diseases are accompanied by metabolic disorders. CCL5/RANTES, and its receptor CCR5 are known to contribute to neuronal function as well as to metabolic disorders such as type 2 diabetes mellitus, obesity, atherosclerosis and metabolic changes after HIV infection. Herein, we found that the lack of CCR5 or CCL5 in mice impaired regulation of energy metabolism in hypothalamus. Immunostaining and co-immunoprecipitation revealed the specific expression of CCR5, associated with insulin receptors, in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC). Both ex vivo stimulation and in vitro tissue culture studies demonstrated that the activation of insulin, and PI3K-Akt pathways were impaired in CCR5 and CCL5 deficient hypothalamus. The inhibitory phosphorylation of insulin response substrate-1 at Ser302 (IRS-1(S302)) but not IRS-2, by insulin was markedly increased in CCR5 and CCL5 deficient animals. Elevating CCR5/CCL5 activity induced GLUT4 membrane translocation and reduced phospho-IRS-1(S302) through AMPKα-S6 Kinase. Blocking CCR5 using the antagonist, (Met)CCL5, abolished the de-phosphorylation of IRS-1(S302) and insulin signal activation. In addition, intracerebroventricular delivery of (Met)CCL5 interrupted hypothalamic insulin signaling and elicited peripheral insulin responsiveness and glucose intolerance. Taken together, our data suggest that CCR5 regulates insulin signaling in hypothalamus which contributes to systemic insulin sensitivity and glucose metabolism.

  4. Estimating Absolute Site Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Malagnini, L; Mayeda, K M; Akinci, A; Bragato, P L

    2004-07-15

    The authors use previously determined direct-wave attenuation functions as well as stable, coda-derived source excitation spectra to isolate the absolute S-wave site effect for the horizontal and vertical components of weak ground motion. They used selected stations in the seismic network of the eastern Alps, and find the following: (1) all ''hard rock'' sites exhibited deamplification phenomena due to absorption at frequencies ranging between 0.5 and 12 Hz (the available bandwidth), on both the horizontal and vertical components; (2) ''hard rock'' site transfer functions showed large variability at high-frequency; (3) vertical-motion site transfer functions show strong frequency-dependence, and (4) H/V spectral ratios do not reproduce the characteristics of the true horizontal site transfer functions; (5) traditional, relative site terms obtained by using reference ''rock sites'' can be misleading in inferring the behaviors of true site transfer functions, since most rock sites have non-flat responses due to shallow heterogeneities resulting from varying degrees of weathering. They also use their stable source spectra to estimate total radiated seismic energy and compare against previous results. they find that the earthquakes in this region exhibit non-constant dynamic stress drop scaling which gives further support for a fundamental difference in rupture dynamics between small and large earthquakes. To correct the vertical and horizontal S-wave spectra for attenuation, they used detailed regional attenuation functions derived by Malagnini et al. (2002) who determined frequency-dependent geometrical spreading and Q for the region. These corrections account for the gross path effects (i.e., all distance-dependent effects), although the source and site effects are still present in the distance-corrected spectra. The main goal of this study is to isolate the absolute site effect (as a function of frequency) by removing the source spectrum (moment-rate spectrum) from

  5. Insulin phosphorylates calmodulin in preparations of solubilized rat hepatocyte insulin receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Sacks, D.B.; McDonald, J.M.

    1987-05-01

    It has previously been shown that insulin stimulates the phosphorylation of calmodulin in adipocyte insulin receptor preparations. Here they demonstrate that insulin also stimulates the phosphorylation of calmodulin in wheat germ lectin-enriched insulin receptor preparations obtained from rat hepatocytes. Standard phosphorylation assays were performed at 30C in the presence of 50mM Tris-HCl (pH 7.5), 0.1% (v/v) Triton X-100, 1mM EGTA, 50 M (el-TSP)ATP, 5mM MgCl2, 0.25 M polylysine, 1.2 M calmodulin and various CaS and insulin concentrations. The phosphorylation of calmodulin was determined by SDS-PAGE and autoradiography. Phosphorylation of calmodulin had an absolute requirement for insulin receptors, insulin and certain basic proteins. Phosphorylation was maximal above 13 nM insulin and at submicromolar CaS concentrations, whereas supramicromolar CaS concentrations were inhibitory. As was observed in the adipocyte insulin receptor system, calmodulin phosphorylation was dependent upon the presence of co-factors, such as polylysine, histone H/sub f/2b and protamine sulfate. The role played by these co-factors has not yet been established. These data suggest that both CaS and calmodulin participate in post receptor insulin events in hepatocytes.

  6. [Selenium deficiency and infertility. Andrologic aspects].

    PubMed

    Szöllosi, János; Závaczki, Zoltán; Pál, Attila

    2008-09-14

    Absolute selenium deficiency in human is very rare, although suboptimal daily selenium intake may lead to an unrecognized relative deficiency. Among the many consequences ascribed to decreased selenium level, the effect on male fertility is summarised by the authors. Implications from biochemical, animal experimental and human research are discussed.

  7. [Molecular mechanisms of the alternative lipogenic function of insulin].

    PubMed

    Pankov, Iu A

    2013-01-01

    The proposed hypothesis suggests that major function of insulin is stimulation of triglyceride accumulation in adipose tissue and glycogen synthesis in liver and muscles. The impairment of insulin functioning diminishes triglyceride storage in adipose tissue, elevates the level of its metabolite in periphery and suppresses glucose intake by cells. Leptin disturbs direct insulin action on adipocytes, and prevents fat accumulation. Leptin deficiency or impairment of its functioning facilitate lipogenic effect of insulin, and induce obesity. Lipodystrophy decreases leptin secretion and enhances triglyceride production activated by insulin. Triglycerides are not accumulated in adipose tissue because of its deficiency, and overwhelm peripheral tissues. Lipid metabolites decrease glucose consumption and induce lipoatrophic diabetes. The hypothesis on the lipogenic insulin functioning is confirmed by specific knockout of Insr gene in only tissue: muscles, adipose tissue and other, and by the restoration of its expression in transgenic mice.

  8. Anti-insulin antibody test

    MedlinePlus

    Insulin antibodies - serum; Insulin Ab test; Insulin resistance - insulin antibodies; Diabetes - insulin antibodies ... Normally, there are no antibodies against insulin in your blood. ... different laboratories. Some labs use different measurements or ...

  9. Chromium and Polyphenols From Cinnamon Improve Insulin Sensitivity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Naturally occurring compounds that have been shown to improve insulin sensitivity include chromium and polyphenols found in cinnamon. These compounds also have similar effects on insulin signaling and glucose control. The signs of chromium deficiency are similar to those for the metabolic syndrome ...

  10. Administration of growth hormone (GH), but not insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I), by continuous infusion can induce the formation of the 150-kilodalton IGF-binding protein-3 complex in GH-deficient rats.

    PubMed

    Gargosky, S E; Tapanainen, P; Rosenfeld, R G

    1994-05-01

    In the adult circulation, 70-90% of the serum insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) are carried by IGF-binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3), which exists as part of a 150-kilodalton (kDa) ternary complex including IGF and an acid-labile subunit (ALS). We have examined the hormonal regulation and molecular distribution of IGFBP-3 in the circulation of a uniquely GH-deficient (GHD) rat model. For 7 days, GHD rats were given GH by either twice daily injections (1 mg/kg) or continuous infusion (2.4 mg/kg.day) or IGF-I by continuous infusion (1.4 mg/kg.day). Each day, weight and feed and water intake were monitored, and on day 7, liver, kidney, spleen, heart, and lung were weighted, and sera were collected. Serum IGF-I was analyzed by immunoassay, and the molecular distribution of the IGFBPs was determined by neutral size-exclusion chromatography combined with Western ligand blot and Western immunoblot. The GHD rats were 40-60% lighter than their normal littermates, and all organs examined were proportionately smaller. Serum IGF-I and IGFBP-3 levels were less than 10% of those in normal rats. Incubation of serum from GHD rats with [125I]IGF-II showed that radiolabel was incorporated only into a 44-kDa IGFBP region that contained the smaller IGFBPs. IGFBP-3 eluted around 60 kDa. No 150-kDa IGFBP region was detected. The administration of GH or IGF-I to GHD rats resulted in significant increases in weight gained, although food and water intake remained unaltered. Weight gain was observed in all three treatments groups. Both GH treatment regimens significantly increased liver, spleen, and lung weight, whereas IGF-I therapy increased spleen, kidney, and heart. Administration of GH twice daily did not increase serum IGF-I or IGFBP-3 concentrations, and the molecular distribution of IGFBP-3 remained unchanged. In contrast, continuous infusion of GH resulted in 5-fold increases in serum IGF-I and increases in IGFBP-3 levels. Size-exclusion chromatography combined with Western ligand blot

  11. Vitamin D deficiency: a new risk factor for type 2 diabetes?.

    PubMed

    Mezza, T; Muscogiuri, G; Sorice, G P; Prioletta, A; Salomone, E; Pontecorvi, A; Giaccari, A

    2012-01-01

    Recent compelling evidence suggests a role of vitamin D deficiency in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance and insulin secretion derangements, with a consequent possible interference with type 2 diabetes mellitus. The mechanism of this link is incompletely understood. In fact, vitamin D deficiency is usually detected in obesity in which insulin resistance is also a common finding. The coexistence of insulin resistance and vitamin D deficiency has generated several hypotheses. Some cross-sectional and prospective studies have suggested that vitamin D deficiency may play a role in worsening insulin resistance; others have identified obesity as a risk factor predisposing individuals to exhibit both vitamin D deficiency and insulin resistance. The available data from intervention studies are largely confounded, and inadequate considerations of seasonal effects on 25(OH)D concentrations are also a common design flaw in many studies. On the contrary, there is strong evidence that obesity might cause both vitamin D deficiency and insulin resistance, leaving open the possibility that vitamin D and diabetes are not related at all. Although it might seem premature to draw firm conclusions on the role of vitamin D supplementation in reducing insulin resistance and preventing type 2 diabetes, this manuscript will review the circumstances leading to vitamin D deficiency and how such a deficiency can eventually independently affect insulin sensitivity.

  12. Cryogenic, Absolute, High Pressure Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, John J. (Inventor); Shams. Qamar A. (Inventor); Powers, William T. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A pressure sensor is provided for cryogenic, high pressure applications. A highly doped silicon piezoresistive pressure sensor is bonded to a silicon substrate in an absolute pressure sensing configuration. The absolute pressure sensor is bonded to an aluminum nitride substrate. Aluminum nitride has appropriate coefficient of thermal expansion for use with highly doped silicon at cryogenic temperatures. A group of sensors, either two sensors on two substrates or four sensors on a single substrate are packaged in a pressure vessel.

  13. Disaccharidase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Bayless, T M; Christopher, N L

    1969-02-01

    This review of the literature and current knowledge concerning a nutritional disorder of disaccharidase deficiency discusses the following topics: 1) a description of disorders of disaccharide digestion; 2) some historical perspective on the laboratory and bedside advances in the past 10 years that have helped define a group of these digestive disorders; 3) a classification of conditions causing disaccharide intolerance; and 4) a discussion of some of the specific clinical syndromes emphasizing nutritional consequences of these syndromes. The syndromes described include congenital lactase deficiency, acquired lactase deficiency in teenagers and adults, acquired generalized disaccharidase deficiency secondary to diffuse mucosal damage, acquired lactose intolerance secondary to alterations in the intestinal transit, sucrase-isomaltase deficiencies, and other disease associations connected with lactase deficiency such as colitis.

  14. Giving an insulin injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... want. Put the needle into and through the rubber top of the insulin bottle. Push the plunger ... longer-acting insulin. Put the needle into the rubber top of that insulin bottle. Push the plunger ...

  15. Altered glucagon release in biotin deficiency.

    PubMed

    Klandorf, H; Clarke, B L; Brown, J

    1987-01-01

    Classical biotin deficiency in young chickens is characterized by a reduction in the activity of liver biotin-dependent enzymes which thus impairs gluconeogenesis during periods of food withdrawal. Because the normal bird maintains an elevated fasting blood glucose level, the ability of the classically biotin-deficient animal to resist changes induced by fasting has not been established. Whether the release of insulin and/or glucagon is affected by biotin deficiency has not been investigated and so determining the importance of these hormones in maintaining fasting glucose levels as well as their ability to respond to a challenge is the objective of the present study. Experimental animals (15-week-old cockerels) were fed a biotin-deficient diet for 9 weeks while control animals (n = 8) were pair-fed biotin-supplemented diets. Before fasting, concentrations of plasma glucose, insulin, and glucagon were not different between the two groups. After 72 h of fasting basal glucose levels remained the same in both groups and concentrations of plasma insulin were equally suppressed but concentrations of glucagon were significantly elevated in biotin-deficient animals (P less than 0.025). Ten minutes after an iv glucose challenge the magnitude of the increase in plasma insulin concentrations was equivalent for both groups of animals whereas the magnitude of the decline in plasma glucagon concentrations was greater for biotin-deficient birds. Twenty minutes after a protein challenge (purified casein diet) the levels of plasma glucagon in both groups were maximally increased although the concentrations remained elevated only in control animals. In conclusion the release of insulin and glucagon is not impaired in biotin-deficient animals.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. Database applicaton for absolute spectrophotometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bochkov, Valery V.; Shumko, Sergiy

    2002-12-01

    32-bit database application with multidocument interface for Windows has been developed to calculate absolute energy distributions of observed spectra. The original database contains wavelength calibrated observed spectra which had been already passed through apparatus reductions such as flatfielding, background and apparatus noise subtracting. Absolute energy distributions of observed spectra are defined in unique scale by means of registering them simultaneously with artificial intensity standard. Observations of sequence of spectrophotometric standards are used to define absolute energy of the artificial standard. Observations of spectrophotometric standards are used to define optical extinction in selected moments. FFT algorithm implemented in the application allows performing convolution (deconvolution) spectra with user-defined PSF. The object-oriented interface has been created using facilities of C++ libraries. Client/server model with Windows Socket functionality based on TCP/IP protocol is used to develop the application. It supports Dynamic Data Exchange conversation in server mode and uses Microsoft Exchange communication facilities.

  17. Absolute classification with unsupervised clustering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeon, Byeungwoo; Landgrebe, D. A.

    1992-01-01

    An absolute classification algorithm is proposed in which the class definition through training samples or otherwise is required only for a particular class of interest. The absolute classification is considered as a problem of unsupervised clustering when one cluster is known initially. The definitions and statistics of the other classes are automatically developed through the weighted unsupervised clustering procedure, which is developed to keep the cluster corresponding to the class of interest from losing its identity as the class of interest. Once all the classes are developed, a conventional relative classifier such as the maximum-likelihood classifier is used in the classification.

  18. Absolute transition probabilities of phosphorus.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, M. H.; Roig, R. A.; Bengtson, R. D.

    1971-01-01

    Use of a gas-driven shock tube to measure the absolute strengths of 21 P I lines and 126 P II lines (from 3300 to 6900 A). Accuracy for prominent, isolated neutral and ionic lines is estimated to be 28 to 40% and 18 to 30%, respectively. The data and the corresponding theoretical predictions are examined for conformity with the sum rules.-

  19. Relativistic Absolutism in Moral Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vogt, W. Paul

    1982-01-01

    Discusses Emile Durkheim's "Moral Education: A Study in the Theory and Application of the Sociology of Education," which holds that morally healthy societies may vary in culture and organization but must possess absolute rules of moral behavior. Compares this moral theory with current theory and practice of American educators. (MJL)

  20. Absolute Standards for Climate Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leckey, J.

    2016-10-01

    In a world of changing climate, political uncertainty, and ever-changing budgets, the benefit of measurements traceable to SI standards increases by the day. To truly resolve climate change trends on a decadal time scale, on-orbit measurements need to be referenced to something that is both absolute and unchanging. One such mission is the Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO) that will measure a variety of climate variables with an unprecedented accuracy to definitively quantify climate change. In the CLARREO mission, we will utilize phase change cells in which a material is melted to calibrate the temperature of a blackbody that can then be observed by a spectrometer. A material's melting point is an unchanging physical constant that, through a series of transfers, can ultimately calibrate a spectrometer on an absolute scale. CLARREO consists of two primary instruments: an infrared (IR) spectrometer and a reflected solar (RS) spectrometer. The mission will contain orbiting radiometers with sufficient accuracy to calibrate other space-based instrumentation and thus transferring the absolute traceability. The status of various mission options will be presented.

  1. Increased Clearance and Degradation of [3H]Insulin in Streptozotocin Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Philippe, Jacques; Halban, Philippe A.; Gjinovci, Asllan; Duckworth, William C.; Estreicher, Jurek; Renold, Albert E.

    1981-01-01

    The role of the insulin-receptor compartment in the pharmacokinetics of intravenously injected insulin in rats was studied. Since streptozotocin-diabetes in rats results in increased insulin binding to tissues in vitro, insulin pharmacokinetics in streptozotocin-diabetic rats were compared to controls, using semisynthetic [3H]insulin as the tracer. The initial distribution volume for [3H]insulin was elevated by 60% in diabetic rats. By contrast, no difference in initial distribution volume for [14C]inulin was observed, and the absolute values were lower than those found for [3H]insulin. The metabolic clearance rate of [3H]insulin was elevated by 44% in diabetic rats. That these differences were the result of increased binding of insulin to a specific receptor compartment in diabetic rats was shown by three additional experiments. The first involved receptor saturation by injection of 10 U native insulin 2 min before the tracer injection, resulting in identical [3H]insulin disappearance rates in the two groups of rats. The second consisted of displacing [3H]insulin from receptors by injecting 10 U unlabeled insulin 6 min after the tracer injection. Displacement of intact [3H]insulin from receptors and subsequent reappearance in the circulation occurred in both control and diabetic animals; however, such displacement was 25% greater in the diabetic rats. Finally, treatment of diabetic rats with insulin for 8 d normalized [3H]insulin clearance even though the tracer was injected at a time when the animals were again hyperglycemic and hypoinsulinemic. This suggests that down-regulation of insulin receptors had occurred during insulin therapy. These results confirm that a specific compartment for insulin exists (the insulin-receptor compartment) and that this compartment plays an important role in insulin clearance. PMID:6451633

  2. Insulin-loaded alginic acid nanoparticles for sublingual delivery.

    PubMed

    Patil, Nilam H; Devarajan, Padma V

    2016-01-01

    Alginic acid nanoparticles (NPs) containing insulin, with nicotinamide as permeation enhancer were developed for sublingual delivery. The lower concentration of proteolytic enzymes, lower thickness and enhanced retention due to bioadhesive property, were relied on for enhanced insulin absorption. Insulin-loaded NPs were prepared by mild and aqueous based nanoprecipitation process. NPs were negatively charged and had a mean size of ∼200 nm with low dispersity index. Insulin loading capacities of >95% suggested a high association of insulin with alginic acid. Fourier Transform Infra-Red Spectroscopy (FTIR) spectra and DSC (Differential Scanning Calorimetry) thermogram of insulin-loaded NPs revealed the association of insulin with alginic acid. Circular dichroism (CD) spectra confirmed conformational stability, while HPLC analysis confirmed chemical stability of insulin in the NPs. Sublingually delivered NPs with nicotinamide exhibited high pharmacological availability (>100%) and bioavailability (>80%) at a dose of 5 IU/kg. The high absolute pharmacological availability of 20.2% and bioavailability of 24.1% in comparison with subcutaneous injection at 1 IU/kg, in the streptozotocin-induced diabetic rat model, suggest the insulin-loaded alginic acid NPs as a promising sublingual delivery system of insulin.

  3. AMPK and Exercise: Glucose Uptake and Insulin Sensitivity.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Hayley M

    2013-02-01

    AMPK is an evolutionary conserved sensor of cellular energy status that is activated during exercise. Pharmacological activation of AMPK promotes glucose uptake, fatty acid oxidation, mitochondrial biogenesis, and insulin sensitivity; processes that are reduced in obesity and contribute to the development of insulin resistance. AMPK deficient mouse models have been used to provide direct genetic evidence either supporting or refuting a role for AMPK in regulating these processes. Exercise promotes glucose uptake by an insulin dependent mechanism involving AMPK. Exercise is important for improving insulin sensitivity; however, it is not known if AMPK is required for these improvements. Understanding how these metabolic processes are regulated is important for the development of new strategies that target obesity-induced insulin resistance. This review will discuss the involvement of AMPK in regulating skeletal muscle metabolism (glucose uptake, glycogen synthesis, and insulin sensitivity).

  4. Syndromic insulin resistance: Models for the therapeutic basis of the metabolic syndrome and other targets of insulin resistance

    PubMed Central

    Gorden, Phillip; Zadeh, Elika Safar; Cochran, Elaine; Brown, Rebecca J.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Insulin resistance is the key feature of the “metabolic syndrome,” a cluster of risk factors for cardiovascular disease and diabetes that includes hypertension, dyslipidemia, obesity, and hyperglycemia. Existing treatments target individual metabolic syndrome components, and act non-specifically with respect to disease pathophysiology. Our goal is to understand the link between insulin resistance and the metabolic syndrome, and how to develop treatment approaches. Methods We present three cases of extreme, syndromic insulin resistance: lipodystrophy, autoantibodies to the insulin receptor, and mutations of the insulin receptor, with discussion of pathophysiology and treatment. Results In lipodystrophy, insulin resistance is a direct consequence of leptin deficiency, and thus leptin replacement reverses metabolic syndrome abnormalities, including diabetes and hypertriglyeridemia. The insulin “receptoropathies”, including autoantibodies to the insulin receptor and insulin receptor mutations, are characterized by extreme insulin resistance and ovarian hyperandrogenism, without dyslipidemia or fatty liver disease. Autoantibodies to the insulin receptor can be treated using an immunosuppressive paradigm adapted from treatment of other autoimmune and neoplastic conditions. Leptin treatment has shown some success in treating hyperglycemia in insulin receptor mutations. Treatment for this condition remains inadequate, and novel therapies that bypass insulin receptor signaling, such as enhancers of brown adipose tissue, are needed. Conclusion We presented a clinical approach to treatment of syndromic insulin resistance. The study of rare diseases that replicate the metabolic syndrome, with clear-cut pathophysiology, allows the opportunity to understand novel physiology, and develop targeted therapies that may be applicable to the broader population with obesity, insulin resistance, and diabetes. PMID:23047930

  5. Absolute calibration of optical flats

    DOEpatents

    Sommargren, Gary E.

    2005-04-05

    The invention uses the phase shifting diffraction interferometer (PSDI) to provide a true point-by-point measurement of absolute flatness over the surface of optical flats. Beams exiting the fiber optics in a PSDI have perfect spherical wavefronts. The measurement beam is reflected from the optical flat and passed through an auxiliary optic to then be combined with the reference beam on a CCD. The combined beams include phase errors due to both the optic under test and the auxiliary optic. Standard phase extraction algorithms are used to calculate this combined phase error. The optical flat is then removed from the system and the measurement fiber is moved to recombine the two beams. The newly combined beams include only the phase errors due to the auxiliary optic. When the second phase measurement is subtracted from the first phase measurement, the absolute phase error of the optical flat is obtained.

  6. The Absolute Spectrum Polarimeter (ASP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kogut, A. J.

    2010-01-01

    The Absolute Spectrum Polarimeter (ASP) is an Explorer-class mission to map the absolute intensity and linear polarization of the cosmic microwave background and diffuse astrophysical foregrounds over the full sky from 30 GHz to 5 THz. The principal science goal is the detection and characterization of linear polarization from an inflationary epoch in the early universe, with tensor-to-scalar ratio r much greater than 1O(raised to the power of { -3}) and Compton distortion y < 10 (raised to the power of{-6}). We describe the ASP instrument and mission architecture needed to detect the signature of an inflationary epoch in the early universe using only 4 semiconductor bolometers.

  7. Physics of negative absolute temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, Eitan; Penrose, Oliver

    2017-01-01

    Negative absolute temperatures were introduced into experimental physics by Purcell and Pound, who successfully applied this concept to nuclear spins; nevertheless, the concept has proved controversial: a recent article aroused considerable interest by its claim, based on a classical entropy formula (the "volume entropy") due to Gibbs, that negative temperatures violated basic principles of statistical thermodynamics. Here we give a thermodynamic analysis that confirms the negative-temperature interpretation of the Purcell-Pound experiments. We also examine the principal arguments that have been advanced against the negative temperature concept; we find that these arguments are not logically compelling, and moreover that the underlying "volume" entropy formula leads to predictions inconsistent with existing experimental results on nuclear spins. We conclude that, despite the counterarguments, negative absolute temperatures make good theoretical sense and did occur in the experiments designed to produce them.

  8. Optomechanics for absolute rotation detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davuluri, Sankar

    2016-07-01

    In this article, we present an application of optomechanical cavity for the absolute rotation detection. The optomechanical cavity is arranged in a Michelson interferometer in such a way that the classical centrifugal force due to rotation changes the length of the optomechanical cavity. The change in the cavity length induces a shift in the frequency of the cavity mode. The phase shift corresponding to the frequency shift in the cavity mode is measured at the interferometer output to estimate the angular velocity of absolute rotation. We derived an analytic expression to estimate the minimum detectable rotation rate in our scheme for a given optomechanical cavity. Temperature dependence of the rotation detection sensitivity is studied.

  9. Hypokalaemia occurring during insulin-induced hypoglycaemia.

    PubMed

    Strakosch, C R; Stiel, J N; Györy, A Z

    1976-08-01

    Insulin-induced hypoglycaemia was used to test pituitary function in six patients with suspected pituitary deficiency. In each, a fall in serum potassium concentration of from 0-63 to 1-48 mEq/litre (mean fall 1-10 mEq/litre +/- 0-30 SEM) was observed during the two hour period following administration of 1-15 units of insulin per kilogram body weight. In several patients the resulting hypokalaemia was at a level which has been associated with cardiac complications.

  10. Insulin use in NIDDM.

    PubMed

    Genuth, S

    1990-12-01

    The effects of insulin treatment on the pathophysiology of non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) are reviewed herein. Short-term studies indicate variable and partial reduction in excessive hepatic glucose output, decrease in insulin resistance, and enhancement of beta-cell function. These beneficial actions may be due to a decrease in secondary glucose toxicity rather than a direct attack on the primary abnormality. Insulin should be used as initial treatment of new-onset NIDDM in the presence of ketosis, significant diabetes-induced weight loss (despite residual obesity), and severe hyperglycemic symptoms. In diet-failure patients, prospective randomized studies comparing insulin to sulfonylurea treatment show approximately equal glycemic outcomes or a slight advantage to insulin. A key goal of insulin therapy is to normalize the fasting plasma glucose level. In contrast to the conventional use of morning injections of intermediate- and long-acting insulin, preliminary studies suggest potential advantages of administering the same insulins only at bedtime. Obese patients may require several hundred units of insulin daily and still not achieve satisfactory control. In some, addition of a sulfonylurea to insulin may reduce hyperglycemia, the insulin dose, or both. However, long-term benefits from such combination therapy remain to be demonstrated conclusively. Established adverse effects of insulin treatment in NIDDM are hypoglycemia, particularly in the elderly, and weight gain. Self-monitoring of blood glucose can identify patients in whom excessive weight gain is caused by subtle hypoglycemia. Whether insulin causes weight gain by direct effects on appetite or energy utilization remains controversial. A potential adverse effect of insulin has been suggested by epidemiological studies showing associations between hyperinsulinemia or insulin resistance and increased risk for coronary artery disease, stroke, and hypertension. Although potential mechanisms

  11. Human insulin genome sequence map, biochemical structure of insulin for recombinant DNA insulin.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Chiranjib; Mungantiwar, Ashish A

    2003-08-01

    Insulin is a essential molecule for type I diabetes that is marketed by very few companies. It is the first molecule, which was made by recombinant technology; but the commercialization process is very difficult. Knowledge about biochemical structure of insulin and human insulin genome sequence map is pivotal to large scale manufacturing of recombinant DNA Insulin. This paper reviews human insulin genome sequence map, the amino acid sequence of porcine insulin, crystal structure of porcine insulin, insulin monomer, aggregation surfaces of insulin, conformational variation in the insulin monomer, insulin X-ray structures for recombinant DNA technology in the synthesis of human insulin in Escherichia coli.

  12. CDK4 is an essential insulin effector in adipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Lagarrigue, Sylviane; Lopez-Mejia, Isabel C.; Denechaud, Pierre-Damien; Escoté, Xavier; Castillo-Armengol, Judit; Jimenez, Veronica; Chavey, Carine; Giralt, Albert; Lai, Qiuwen; Zhang, Lianjun; Martinez-Carreres, Laia; Delacuisine, Brigitte; Annicotte, Jean-Sébastien; Blanchet, Emilie; Huré, Sébastien; Abella, Anna; Tinahones, Francisco J.; Vendrell, Joan; Dubus, Pierre; Bosch, Fatima; Kahn, C. Ronald; Fajas, Lluis

    2015-01-01

    Insulin resistance is a fundamental pathogenic factor that characterizes various metabolic disorders, including obesity and type 2 diabetes. Adipose tissue contributes to the development of obesity-related insulin resistance through increased release of fatty acids, altered adipokine secretion, and/or macrophage infiltration and cytokine release. Here, we aimed to analyze the participation of the cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4) in adipose tissue biology. We determined that white adipose tissue (WAT) from CDK4-deficient mice exhibits impaired lipogenesis and increased lipolysis. Conversely, lipolysis was decreased and lipogenesis was increased in mice expressing a mutant hyperactive form of CDK4 (CDK4R24C). A global kinome analysis of CDK4-deficient mice following insulin stimulation revealed that insulin signaling is impaired in these animals. We determined that insulin activates the CCND3-CDK4 complex, which in turn phosphorylates insulin receptor substrate 2 (IRS2) at serine 388, thereby creating a positive feedback loop that maintains adipocyte insulin signaling. Furthermore, we found that CCND3 expression and IRS2 serine 388 phosphorylation are increased in human obese subjects. Together, our results demonstrate that CDK4 is a major regulator of insulin signaling in WAT. PMID:26657864

  13. Suppression of Insulin Production and Secretion by a Decretin Hormone

    PubMed Central

    Alfa, Ronald W.; Park, Sangbin; Skelly, Kathleen-Rose; Poffenberger, Gregory; Jain, Nimit; Gu, Xueying; Kockel, Lutz; Wang, Jing; Liu, Yinghua; Powers, Alvin C.; Kim, Seung K.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Decretins, hormones induced by fasting that suppress insulin production and secretion, have been postulated from classical human metabolic studies. From genetic screens, we identified Drosophila Limostatin (Lst), a peptide hormone that suppresses insulin secretion. Lst is induced by nutrient restriction in gut-associated endocrine cells. limostatin deficiency led to hyperinsulinemia, hypoglycemia and excess adiposity. A conserved 15-residue polypeptide encoded by limostatin suppressed secretion by insulin-producing cells. Targeted knockdown of CG9918, a Drosophila orthologue of Neuromedin U receptors (NMUR), in insulin-producing cells phenocopied limostatin deficiency, and attenuated insulin suppression by purified Lst, suggesting CG9918 encodes an Lst receptor. NMUR1 is expressed in islet β-cells, and purified NMU suppresses insulin secretion from human islets. A human mutant NMU variant that co-segregates with familial early-onset obesity and hyperinsulinemia fails to suppress insulin secretion. We propose Lst as an index member of an ancient hormone class called decretins, which suppress insulin output. PMID:25651184

  14. Suppression of insulin production and secretion by a decretin hormone.

    PubMed

    Alfa, Ronald W; Park, Sangbin; Skelly, Kathleen-Rose; Poffenberger, Gregory; Jain, Nimit; Gu, Xueying; Kockel, Lutz; Wang, Jing; Liu, Yinghua; Powers, Alvin C; Kim, Seung K

    2015-02-03

    Decretins, hormones induced by fasting that suppress insulin production and secretion, have been postulated from classical human metabolic studies. From genetic screens, we identified Drosophila Limostatin (Lst), a peptide hormone that suppresses insulin secretion. Lst is induced by nutrient restriction in gut-associated endocrine cells. limostatin deficiency led to hyperinsulinemia, hypoglycemia, and excess adiposity. A conserved 15-residue polypeptide encoded by limostatin suppressed secretion by insulin-producing cells. Targeted knockdown of CG9918, a Drosophila ortholog of Neuromedin U receptors (NMURs), in insulin-producing cells phenocopied limostatin deficiency and attenuated insulin suppression by purified Lst, suggesting CG9918 encodes an Lst receptor. NMUR1 is expressed in islet β cells, and purified NMU suppresses insulin secretion from human islets. A human mutant NMU variant that co-segregates with familial early-onset obesity and hyperinsulinemia fails to suppress insulin secretion. We propose Lst as an index member of an ancient hormone class called decretins, which suppress insulin output.

  15. Stimulation of urinary acidification by insulin in the turtle bladder.

    PubMed

    Arruda, J A

    1983-07-01

    Addition of insulin to the substrate-containing serosal solution of freshly excised bladders or to that of bladders incubated overnight in substrate-enriched media increases the rate of H+ secretion to a greater extent in the latter (overnight group) than in the former. This effect can be blocked by pretreatment with anti-insulin antibody, suggesting that the stimulation of H+ secretion is a specific effect of insulin. The effect of insulin is concentration dependent with half-maximal stimulation of H+ secretion at 100 mU/ml and maximal stimulation at 250 mU/ml. Other characteristics of the insulin-induced stimulation of H+ secretion were its independence of any effect of Na transport and its absolute requirement for the presence of substrate (glucose or pyruvate) under aerobic conditions only. The proton-secreting action of insulin is associated with an increase in the proton-selective conductance in series with the proton pump while the estimated electromotive force of the proton pump remains constant. Finally, the insulin-induced and aldosterone-induced stimulations of proton secretion are mutually independent, as shown by the additivity of these events and by the fact that the effect of insulin was not blocked by pretreatment with cycloheximide. These data suggest that endogenous insulin modulates the rate of H+ secretion by the in vivo turtle bladder.

  16. [Testosterone deficiency, metabolic syndrome and diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Fernández-Miró, Mercè; Chillarón, Juan J; Pedro-Botet, Juan

    2016-01-15

    Testosterone deficiency in adult age is associated with a decrease in libido, energy, hematocrit, muscle mass and bone mineral density, as well as with depression. More recently, testosterone deficiency has also been associated with various components of the metabolic syndrome, which in turn is associated with a five-fold increase in the risk of cardiovascular disease. Low testosterone levels are associated with increased insulin resistance, increase in fat mass, low HDL cholesterol, higher triglyceride levels and hypertension. Testosterone replacement therapy in patients with testosterone deficiency and type 2 diabetes mellitus and/or metabolic syndrome has shown reductions in insulin resistance, total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol and triglycerides and improvement in glycemic control and anthropometric parameters.

  17. [Chromium and insulin resistance].

    PubMed

    Kleefstra, N; Bilo, H J; Bakker, S J; Houweling, S T

    2004-01-31

    Since as early as the 50s of the last century, it has been known that chromium is essential for normal glucose metabolism. Too little chromium in the diet may lead to insulin resistance. However, there is still no standard against which chromium deficiency can be established. Nevertheless, chromium supplements are becoming increasingly popular. Various systematic reviews have been unable to demonstrate any effects of chromium on glycaemic regulation (possibly due partly to the low dosages used), but there is a slight reduction in body weight averaging 1 kg. In a double-blind randomised placebo-controlled trial in a Chinese population with type-2 diabetes mellitus, supplementation with 1000 micrograms of chromium led to a fall in the glycosylated haemoglobin level (HbA1c) by 2%. Toxic effects of chromium are seldom seen; recently, however, the safety of one of the dosage forms of chromium, chromium picolinate, has been questioned. One should be aware that individual patients with type-2 diabetes mellitus may have an increased risk of hypoglycaemic episodes when taking chromium supplements as self-medication.

  18. Absolute calibration of optical tweezers

    SciTech Connect

    Viana, N.B.; Mazolli, A.; Maia Neto, P.A.; Nussenzveig, H.M.; Rocha, M.S.; Mesquita, O.N.

    2006-03-27

    As a step toward absolute calibration of optical tweezers, a first-principles theory of trapping forces with no adjustable parameters, corrected for spherical aberration, is experimentally tested. Employing two very different setups, we find generally very good agreement for the transverse trap stiffness as a function of microsphere radius for a broad range of radii, including the values employed in practice, and at different sample chamber depths. The domain of validity of the WKB ('geometrical optics') approximation to the theory is verified. Theoretical predictions for the trapping threshold, peak position, depth variation, multiple equilibria, and 'jump' effects are also confirmed.

  19. SH2B1 in β-cells promotes insulin expression and glucose metabolism in mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zheng; Morris, David L; Jiang, Lin; Liu, Yong; Rui, Liangyou

    2014-05-01

    Insulin deficiency drives the progression of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Pancreatic β-cell insulin expression and secretion are tightly regulated by nutrients and hormones; however, intracellular signaling proteins that mediate nutrient and hormonal regulation of insulin synthesis and secretion are not fully understood. SH2B1 is an SH2 domain-containing adaptor protein. It enhances the activation of the Janus tyrosine kinase 2 (JAK2)/signal transducer and activator of transcription and the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase pathways in response to a verity of hormones, growth factors, and cytokines. Here we identify SH2B1 as a new regulator of insulin expression. In rat INS-1 832/13 β-cells, SH2B1 knockdown decreased, whereas SH2B1 overexpression increased, both insulin expression and glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. SH2B1-deficent islets also had reduced insulin expression, insulin content, and glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Heterozygous deletion of SH2B1 decreased pancreatic insulin content and plasma insulin levels in leptin-deficient ob/ob mice, thus exacerbating hyperglycemia and glucose intolerance. In addition, overexpression of JAK2 increased insulin promoter activity, and SH2B1 enhanced the ability of JAK2 to activate the insulin promoter. Overexpression of SH2B1 also increased the expression of Pdx1 and the recruitment of Pdx1 to the insulin promoter in INS-1 832/13 cells, whereas silencing of SH2B1 had the opposite effects. Consistently, Pdx1 expression was lower in SH2B1-deficient islets. These data suggest that the SH2B1 in β-cells promotes insulin synthesis and secretion at least in part by enhancing activation of JAK2 and/or Pdx1 pathways in response to hormonal and nutritional signals.

  20. Diabetes and Insulin

    MedlinePlus

    ... you have. There are three main types of diabetes: • Type 1 occurs when the pancreas stops making insulin. It ... but may occur later in life. People with type 1 diabetes need insulin to survive. Treatment includes changes in ...

  1. Insulin pump (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The catheter at the end of the insulin pump is inserted through a needle into the abdominal ... with diabetes. Dosage instructions are entered into the pump's small computer and the appropriate amount of insulin ...

  2. All about Insulin Resistance

    MedlinePlus

    Toolkit No. 2 All About Insulin Resistance Insulin resistance is a condition that raises your risk for type 2 diabetes and heart disease. ... Diabetes Association, Inc. 1/15 Toolkit No. 2: All About Insulin Resistance continued J Order the smallest ...

  3. Cosmology with negative absolute temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieira, J. P. P.; Byrnes, Christian T.; Lewis, Antony

    2016-08-01

    Negative absolute temperatures (NAT) are an exotic thermodynamical consequence of quantum physics which has been known since the 1950's (having been achieved in the lab on a number of occasions). Recently, the work of Braun et al. [1] has rekindled interest in negative temperatures and hinted at a possibility of using NAT systems in the lab as dark energy analogues. This paper goes one step further, looking into the cosmological consequences of the existence of a NAT component in the Universe. NAT-dominated expanding Universes experience a borderline phantom expansion (w < -1) with no Big Rip, and their contracting counterparts are forced to bounce after the energy density becomes sufficiently large. Both scenarios might be used to solve horizon and flatness problems analogously to standard inflation and bouncing cosmologies. We discuss the difficulties in obtaining and ending a NAT-dominated epoch, and possible ways of obtaining density perturbations with an acceptable spectrum.

  4. Oral Insulin Reloaded

    PubMed Central

    Heinemann, Lutz; Plum-Mörschel, Leona

    2014-01-01

    Optimal coverage of insulin needs is the paramount aim of insulin replacement therapy in patients with diabetes mellitus. To apply insulin without breaking the skin barrier by a needle and/or to allow a more physiological provision of insulin are the main reasons triggering the continuous search for alternative routes of insulin administration. Despite numerous attempts over the past 9 decades to develop an insulin pill, no insulin for oral dosing is commercially available. By way of a structured approach, we aim to provide a systematic update on the most recent developments toward an orally available insulin formulation with a clear focus on data from clinical-experimental and clinical studies. Thirteen companies that claim to be working on oral insulin formulations were identified. However, only 6 of these companies published new clinical trial results within the past 5 years. Interestingly, these clinical data reports make up a mere 4% of the considerably high total number of publications on the development of oral insulin formulations within this time period. While this picture clearly reflects the rising research interest in orally bioavailable insulin formulations, it also highlights the fact that the lion’s share of research efforts is still allocated to the preclinical stages. PMID:24876606

  5. Berberine reduces insulin resistance through protein kinase C-dependent up-regulation of insulin receptor expression.

    PubMed

    Kong, Wei-Jia; Zhang, Hao; Song, Dan-Qing; Xue, Rong; Zhao, Wei; Wei, Jing; Wang, Yue-Ming; Shan, Ning; Zhou, Zhen-Xian; Yang, Peng; You, Xue-Fu; Li, Zhuo-Rong; Si, Shu-Yi; Zhao, Li-Xun; Pan, Huai-Ning; Jiang, Jian-Dong

    2009-01-01

    Natural product berberine (BBR) has been reported to have hypoglycemic and insulin-sensitizing activities; however, its mechanism remains unclear. This study was designed to investigate the molecular mechanism of BBR against insulin resistance. Here, we identify insulin receptor (InsR) as a target of BBR to increase insulin sensitivity. In cultured human liver cells, BBR increased InsR messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein expression in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Berberine increased InsR expression in the L6 rat skeletal muscle cells as well. Berberine-enhanced InsR expression improved cellular glucose consumption only in the presence of insulin. Silencing InsR gene with small interfering RNA or blocking the phosphoinositol-3-kinase diminished this effect. Berberine induced InsR gene expression through a protein kinase C (PKC)-dependent activation of its promoter. Inhibition of PKC abolished BBR-caused InsR promoter activation and InsR mRNA transcription. In animal models, treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus rats with BBR lowered fasting blood glucose and fasting serum insulin, increased insulin sensitivity, and elevated InsR mRNA as well as PKC activity in the liver. In addition, BBR lowered blood glucose in KK-Ay type 2 but not in NOD/LtJ type 1 diabetes mellitus mice that were insulin deficient. Our results suggest that BBR is a unique natural medicine against insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes mellitus and metabolic syndrome.

  6. Deconvolution of insulin secretion, insulin hepatic extraction post-hepatic delivery rates and sensitivity during 24-hour standardized meals: time course of glucose homeostasis in leptin replacement treatment.

    PubMed

    Andreev, V P; Paz-Filho, G; Wong, M-L; Licinio, J

    2009-02-01

    Minimally invasive methodology, mathematical model, and software for analysis of glucose homeostasis by deconvolution of insulin secretion, hepatic extraction, post-hepatic delivery, and sensitivity from 24-hour standardized meals test have been developed and illustrated by the study of glucose homeostasis of a genetically based leptin-deficient patient before and after leptin replacement treatment. The only genetically leptin-deficient adult man identified in the world was treated for 24 months with recombinant methionyl human leptin. Blood was collected every 7 minutes for 24 hours, with standardized meals consumed during the 4 visits: at baseline, one-week, 18-months, and 24-months after initiation of the treatment. Concentrations of insulin, C-peptide, and plasma glucose were measured. Insulin secretion was obtained by deconvolution of C-peptide data. Hepatic insulin extraction was determined based on our modifications of the insulin kinetics model . Insulin sensitivity for each of the four meals was calculated by using the minimal glucose model approach. Hepatic extraction of insulin was the first element of glucose homeostasis to respond to leptin replacement treatment and increased 2-fold after one week of treatment. Insulin secretion and delivery rates decreased more than 2-fold and insulin sensitivity increased 10-fold after 24 months of treatment. Computer programs for analysis of 24-hour insulin secretion, extraction, delivery, and action are available upon request.

  7. Inhaled human insulin.

    PubMed

    Strack, Thomas R

    2006-04-01

    The benefit of subcutaneous insulin therapy in patients with diabetes is frequently limited due to difficulty in convincing patients of the importance of multiple daily insulin injections to cope effectively with meal-associated glycemic changes. Thus, the aim of achieving tight glycemic control, which is critical for reducing the risk of long-term diabetes-related complications, frequently remains elusive. The successful development of an inhalable insulin as a noninvasive alternative promises to change the management of diabetes. The first product to become available to patients is inhaled human insulin, a dry-powder formulation packaged into discrete blisters containing 1 or 3 mg of dry-powder human insulin and administered via a unique pulmonary inhaler device. It has recently been approved in both the United States and the European Union for the control of hyperglycemia in adult patients with type 1 or type 2 diabetes. The pharmacokinetic profile of inhaled human insulin closely mimics the natural pattern of insulin secretion, and resembles that of rapid-acting subcutaneous analogs. Similarly to rapid-acting subcutaneous analogs, inhaled human insulin has a more rapid onset of glucose-lowering activity compared to subcutaneous regular insulin, allowing it to be administered shortly before meals. It has a duration of glucose-lowering activity comparable to subcutaneous regular insulin and longer than rapid-acting insulin analogs. Inhaled human insulin effectively controls postprandial glucose concentrations in patients with type 1 or type 2 diabetes without increasing the risk of hypoglycemia, and even improves fasting glucose levels compared to subcutaneous insulin. Inhaled human insulin has an overall favorable safety profile. There are small reductions in lung function (1-1.5% of total lung forced expiratory volume in the first second [FEV1] capacity) after onset of treatment that are reversible in most patients if treatment is discontinued. Inhaled human

  8. Basal insulin: beyond glycemia.

    PubMed

    Niswender, Kevin D

    2011-07-01

    Insulin is a pleiotropic hormone with numerous effects at the cellular, tissue, and organismal levels. Clinicians are familiar with physiological effects of insulin on carbohydrate metabolism, including stimulation of glucose uptake in skeletal muscle and the suppression of glucose production from the liver. Other metabolic effects of insulin include inhibiting the release of free fatty acids from adipose tissue and stimulating the incorporation of amino acids into proteins. Indeed, every organ in the body, including the brain, is a target for insulin action. Insulin resistance, typically defined with respect to glucose metabolism, is a condition in which normal levels of insulin do not trigger the signal for glucose disposition. The effects of insulin resistance and impaired insulin signaling have profound pathophysiologic effects, such as hyperglycemia-induced tissue damage, hypertension, dyslipidemia, metabolic syndrome, and cardiovascular and renal disease. An integrated view of insulin action in all of these tissues may yield improved therapeutic insight and possibly even illuminate new therapeutic opportunities. With the increase in the number of patients diagnosed with prediabetes and diabetes, an updated understanding of the disease and the pharmacologic armamentarium used to treat it is needed to improve outcomes. To help expand the clinical care provider's perspective, this article will provide a provocative discussion about the pathophysiology of diabetes, the role of insulin and insulin resistance, and the clinical efficacy potential of insulin. Understanding the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the effects of insulin and how these translate into clinical consequences beyond glycemia will assist primary care physicians in the care of their patients with diabetes and metabolic syndrome.

  9. Glucose tolerance factor extracted from yeast: oral insulin-mimetic and insulin-potentiating agent: in vivo and in vitro studies.

    PubMed

    Weksler-Zangen, Sarah; Mizrahi, Tal; Raz, Itamar; Mirsky, Nitsa

    2012-09-01

    In search for an effective oral treatment for diabetes, we examined the capacity of glucose tolerance factor (GTF) extracted from yeast and administered orally to reduce hyperglycaemia in rat models exhibiting insulin deficiency. The cellular effect of GTF on the insulin signalling pathway was investigated in vitro. GTF (oral bolus), insulin (intraperitoneal) or their combination was administered to streptozotocin-diabetic (STZ) or hyperglycaemic Cohen diabetic-sensitive (hyp-CDs) rats. Blood glucose (BG) and insulin levels were measured in the postprandial (PP) state and during an oral glucose tolerance test. Deoxy-glucose transport and insulin signal transduction were assessed in 3T3-L1 adipocytes and myoblasts incubated with the GTF. Low dose of insulin produced a 34 and 12·5 % reduction in the PP-BG levels of hyp-CDs and STZ rats, respectively. GTF induced a 33 and 17 % reduction in the PP-BG levels of hyp-CDs and STZ rats, respectively. When combined with insulin, a respective decrease (58 and 42 %) in BG levels was observed, suggesting a partially additive (hyp-CDs) or synergistic (STZ rats) effect of the GTF and insulin. GTF did not induce insulin secretion in hyp-CDs rats, yet it lowered their BG levels, proposing an effect on glucose clearance by peripheral tissues. GTF induced a dose-dependent increase in deoxy-glucose transport into myoblasts and fat cells similar to insulin, while the combined treatment resulted in augmented transport rate. GTF induced a dose- and time-dependent phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate 1, Akt and mitogen-activated protein kinase independent of insulin receptor phosphorylation. GTF exerts remarkable insulin-mimetic and insulin-potentiating effects, both in vivo and in vitro. It produces an insulin-like effect by acting on cellular signals downstream of the insulin receptor. These results demonstrate a potential source for a novel oral medication for diabetes.

  10. Plasminogen deficiency.

    PubMed

    Celkan, Tiraje

    2017-01-01

    Plasminogen plays an important role in fibrinolysis as well as wound healing, cell migration, tissue modeling and angiogenesis. Congenital plasminogen deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive disorder that leads to the development of thick, wood-like pseudomembranes on mucosal surfaces, mostly seen in conjunctivas named as ''ligneous conjunctivitis''. Local conjunctival use of fresh frozen plazma (FFP) in combination with other eye medications such as cyclosporin and artificial tear drops may relieve the symptoms. Topical treatment with plasminogen eye drops is the most promising treatment that is not yet available in Turkey.

  11. Regulation of insulin-like growth factor II receptors by growth hormone and insulin in rat adipocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Loennroth, P.; Assmundsson, K.; Eden, S.; Enberg, G.; Gause, I.; Hall, K.; Smith, U.

    1987-06-01

    The acute and long-term effects of growth hormone (GH) on the binding of insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) were evaluated in adipose cells from hypophysectomized rats given replacement therapy with thyroxine and hydrocortisone and in cells from their sham-operated littermates. After the cells were incubated with insulin and/or GH, the recycling of /sup 125/I-labeled IGF-II receptors was metabolically inhibited by treating the cells with KCN. IGF-II binding was 100 +/- 20% higher in cells from GH-deficient animals when compared with sham-operated controls. These GH-deficient cells also showed an increased sensitivity for insulin as compared with control cells (the EC/sub 50/ for insulin was 0.06 ng/ml in GH-deficient cells and 0.3 ng/ml in control cells.). However, the maximal incremental effect of insulin on IGH-II binding was reduced approx. = 27% by hypophysectomy. GH added to the incubation medium increased the number of IGF-II binding sites by 100 +/- 18% in cells from hypophysectomized animals. This increase was rapidly induced, but the time course was slower than that for the stimulatory effect of insulin. Half-maximal effect of GH on IGF-II binding was obtained at approx. = 30 ng/ml. Thus, GH added in vitro exerted a rapid insulin-like effect on the number of IGH-II receptors. GH also appears to play a regulating role for maintaining the cellular number of IGH-II receptors and, in addition, modulates the stimulatory effect of insulin on IGF-II binding.

  12. Biosimilar Insulin and Costs

    PubMed Central

    Heinemann, Lutz

    2015-01-01

    The costs for insulin treatment are high, and the steady increase in the number of patients with diabetes on insulin presents a true challenge to health care systems. Therefore, all measures to lower these costs are welcomed by patients, physicians, and health care providers. The market introduction of biosimilar insulins presents an option to lower treatment costs as biosimilars are usually offered at a lower price than the originator product. However, the assumption that a drastic reduction in insulin prices will take place, as was observed with many generic drugs, is most probably not realistic. As the first biosimilar insulin has now been approved in the EU, this commentary discusses a number of aspects that are relevant when it comes to the potential cost reduction we will see with the use of biosimilar insulins. PMID:26350722

  13. Adipokines and insulin action

    PubMed Central

    Knights, Alexander J; Funnell, Alister PW; Pearson, Richard CM; Crossley, Merlin; Bell-Anderson, Kim S

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is a major public health concern and a strong risk factor for insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), and cardiovascular disease. The last two decades have seen a reconsideration of the role of white adipose tissue (WAT) in whole body metabolism and insulin action. Adipose tissue-derived cytokines and hormones, or adipokines, are likely mediators of metabolic function and dysfunction. While several adipokines have been associated with obese and insulin-resistant phenotypes, a select group has been linked with insulin sensitivity, namely leptin, adiponectin, and more recently, adipolin. What is known about these insulin-sensitizing molecules and their effects in healthy and insulin resistant states is the subject of this review. There remains a significant amount of research to do to fully elucidate the mechanisms of action of these adipokines for development of therapeutics in metabolic disease. PMID:24719781

  14. [Iron deficiency in elderly patients: use of biomarkers].

    PubMed

    Le Petitcorps, Hélène; Monti, Alexandra; Pautas, Éric

    2015-01-01

    Iron deficiency, due to blood loss or malabsorption, is commonly observed in geriatric practice. In elderly people, association of inflammatory diseases to iron loss makes diagnosis of absolute iron deficiency sometimes difficult. In case of inflammation, the interpretation of usual biomarkers of iron deficiency (serum ferritin, transferrin saturation, serum iron) may be difficult. The recent discovery of the role of hepcidine in the iron homeostasis, in physiological and pathological situation, contributes to better understanding of the iron regulation. The aim of this short paper is to underline some specificities of elderly iron physiology, to explain hepcidine's role in physiological and pathological situations and to propose a diagnostic approach for a better interpretation of usual biomarkers, in order to differentiate absolute iron deficiency and functional iron deficiency.

  15. Immunologic insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Davidson, J K; DeBra, D W

    1978-03-01

    The efficacy of sulfated beef insulin for plasma glucose control in 35 patients with immunologic insulin resistance was studied. Patients were on a mean dose of 550 U./day (range 200--2,000) of U-500 regular beef insulin. Mean maximum 125I-insulin-binding capacity was 191 mU./ml. serum (range 13--1,080). Mean in vivo half-life (T 1/2) of 125I-regular beef insulin was 614 minutes (range 114--1,300), as against a mean T 1/2 of 13.9 minutes (range 11.8--16.5) in normal controls. Treatment was successful in 34 patients and unsuccessful in one with lipoatrophic diabetes. The mean initial dose of sulfated insulin was 89 U./day (range 15--400) and at three months was 66 U./day (range 20--400). Twenty-eight patients who responded and survived have been on sulfated insulin for a mean of 39 months (range 2-66) and are on a mean dose of 25 U./day (range 0--100). The mean maximum binding capacity fell to 9 mU./ml. (range 0--34) during therapy (p less than 0.01). Mean 125I-insulin T 1/2 fell from 614 to 249 minutes after sulfated insulin therapy (p less than 0.001). A comparative study of 15 patients on consecutive days showed a 35 sulfated insulin T 1/2 of 60 minutes (range 15--94) and a mean 125I-regular insulin T 1/2 of 246 minutes (range 62--560, p less than 0.001). These results indicate that sulfated insulin is less antigenic than regular beef insulin and combines less avidly with human antibodies to regular beef insulin. The response to sulfated insulin therapy was significantly better than the response reported by other investigators to pork insulin or to steroid therapy in similar patients.

  16. Insulin resistance and atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Semenkovich, Clay F.

    2006-01-01

    Considerable evidence supports the association between insulin resistance and vascular disease, and this has led to wide acceptance of the clustering of hyperlipidemia, glucose intolerance, hypertension, and obesity as a clinical entity, the metabolic syndrome. While insulin resistance, by promoting dyslipidemia and other metabolic abnormalities, is part of the proatherogenic milieu, it is possible that insulin resistance itself in the vascular wall does not promote atherosclerosis. Recent findings suggest that insulin resistance and atherosclerosis could represent independent and ultimately maladaptive responses to the disruption of cellular homeostasis caused by the excess delivery of fuel. PMID:16823479

  17. Roles of mitochondrial fragmentation and reactive oxygen species in mitochondrial dysfunction and myocardial insulin resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, Tomoyuki; Saotome, Masao; Nobuhara, Mamoru; Sakamoto, Atsushi; Urushida, Tsuyoshi; Katoh, Hideki; Satoh, Hiroshi; Funaki, Makoto; Hayashi, Hideharu

    2014-05-01

    Purpose: Evidence suggests an association between aberrant mitochondrial dynamics and cardiac diseases. Because myocardial metabolic deficiency caused by insulin resistance plays a crucial role in heart disease, we investigated the role of dynamin-related protein-1 (DRP1; a mitochondrial fission protein) in the pathogenesis of myocardial insulin resistance. Methods and Results: DRP1-expressing H9c2 myocytes, which had fragmented mitochondria with mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨ{sub m}) depolarization, exhibited attenuated insulin signaling and 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-DG) uptake, indicating insulin resistance. Treatment of the DRP1-expressing myocytes with Mn(III)tetrakis(1-methyl-4-pyridyl)porphyrin pentachloride (TMPyP) significantly improved insulin resistance and mitochondrial dysfunction. When myocytes were exposed to hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}), they increased DRP1 expression and mitochondrial fragmentation, resulting in ΔΨ{sub m} depolarization and insulin resistance. When DRP1 was suppressed by siRNA, H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and insulin resistance were restored. Our results suggest that a mutual enhancement between DRP1 and reactive oxygen species could induce mitochondrial dysfunction and myocardial insulin resistance. In palmitate-induced insulin-resistant myocytes, neither DRP1-suppression nor TMPyP restored the ΔΨ{sub m} depolarization and impaired 2-DG uptake, however they improved insulin signaling. Conclusions: A mutual enhancement between DRP1 and ROS could promote mitochondrial dysfunction and inhibition of insulin signal transduction. However, other mechanisms, including lipid metabolite-induced mitochondrial dysfunction, may be involved in palmitate-induced insulin resistance. - Highlights: • DRP1 promotes mitochondrial fragmentation and insulin-resistance. • A mutual enhancement between DRP1 and ROS ipromotes insulin-resistance. • Palmitate increases DRP1 expression and induces insulin

  18. The role of insulin pump therapy for type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Landau, Zohar; Raz, Itamar; Wainstein, Julio; Bar-Dayan, Yosefa; Cahn, Avivit

    2017-01-01

    Many patients with type 2 diabetes fail to achieve adequate glucose control despite escalation of treatment and combinations of multiple therapies including insulin. Patients with long-standing type 2 diabetes often suffer from the combination of severe insulin deficiency in addition to insulin resistance, thereby requiring high doses of insulin delivered in multiple injections to attain adequate glycemic control. Insulin-pump therapy was first introduced in the 1970s as an approach to mimic physiological insulin delivery and attain normal glucose in patients with type 1 diabetes. The recent years have seen an increase in the use of this technology for patients with type 2 diabetes. This article summarizes the clinical studies evaluating insulin pump use in patients with type 2 diabetes and discusses the benefits and shortcomings of pump therapy in this population. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Absolute optical metrology : nanometers to kilometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dubovitsky, Serge; Lay, O. P.; Peters, R. D.; Liebe, C. C.

    2005-01-01

    We provide and overview of the developments in the field of high-accuracy absolute optical metrology with emphasis on space-based applications. Specific work on the Modulation Sideband Technology for Absolute Ranging (MSTAR) sensor is described along with novel applications of the sensor.

  20. ON A SUFFICIENT CONDITION FOR ABSOLUTE CONTINUITY.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The formulation of a condition which yields absolute continuity when combined with continuity and bounded variation is the problem considered in the...Briefly, the formulation is achieved through a discussion which develops a proof by contradiction of a sufficiently theorem for absolute continuity which uses in its hypothesis the condition of continuity and bounded variation .

  1. Introducing the Mean Absolute Deviation "Effect" Size

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorard, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    This paper revisits the use of effect sizes in the analysis of experimental and similar results, and reminds readers of the relative advantages of the mean absolute deviation as a measure of variation, as opposed to the more complex standard deviation. The mean absolute deviation is easier to use and understand, and more tolerant of extreme…

  2. Monolithically integrated absolute frequency comb laser system

    SciTech Connect

    Wanke, Michael C.

    2016-07-12

    Rather than down-convert optical frequencies, a QCL laser system directly generates a THz frequency comb in a compact monolithically integrated chip that can be locked to an absolute frequency without the need of a frequency-comb synthesizer. The monolithic, absolute frequency comb can provide a THz frequency reference and tool for high-resolution broad band spectroscopy.

  3. Identification and validation of N-acetyltransferase 2 as an insulin sensitivity gene

    PubMed Central

    Knowles, Joshua W.; Xie, Weijia; Zhang, Zhongyang; Chennemsetty, Indumathi; Assimes, Themistocles L.; Paananen, Jussi; Hansson, Ola; Pankow, James; Goodarzi, Mark O.; Carcamo-Orive, Ivan; Morris, Andrew P.; Chen, Yii-Der I.; Mäkinen, Ville-Petteri; Ganna, Andrea; Mahajan, Anubha; Guo, Xiuqing; Abbasi, Fahim; Greenawalt, Danielle M.; Lum, Pek; Molony, Cliona; Lind, Lars; Lindgren, Cecilia; Raffel, Leslie J.; Tsao, Philip S.; Schadt, Eric E.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Sinaiko, Alan; Reaven, Gerald; Yang, Xia; Hsiung, Chao A.; Groop, Leif; Cordell, Heather J.; Laakso, Markku; Hao, Ke; Ingelsson, Erik; Frayling, Timothy M.; Weedon, Michael N.; Walker, Mark; Quertermous, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Decreased insulin sensitivity, also referred to as insulin resistance (IR), is a fundamental abnormality in patients with type 2 diabetes and a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. While IR predisposition is heritable, the genetic basis remains largely unknown. The GENEticS of Insulin Sensitivity consortium conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) for direct measures of insulin sensitivity, such as euglycemic clamp or insulin suppression test, in 2,764 European individuals, with replication in an additional 2,860 individuals. The presence of a nonsynonymous variant of N-acetyltransferase 2 (NAT2) [rs1208 (803A>G, K268R)] was strongly associated with decreased insulin sensitivity that was independent of BMI. The rs1208 “A” allele was nominally associated with IR-related traits, including increased fasting glucose, hemoglobin A1C, total and LDL cholesterol, triglycerides, and coronary artery disease. NAT2 acetylates arylamine and hydrazine drugs and carcinogens, but predicted acetylator NAT2 phenotypes were not associated with insulin sensitivity. In a murine adipocyte cell line, silencing of NAT2 ortholog Nat1 decreased insulin-mediated glucose uptake, increased basal and isoproterenol-stimulated lipolysis, and decreased adipocyte differentiation, while Nat1 overexpression produced opposite effects. Nat1-deficient mice had elevations in fasting blood glucose, insulin, and triglycerides and decreased insulin sensitivity, as measured by glucose and insulin tolerance tests, with intermediate effects in Nat1 heterozygote mice. Our results support a role for NAT2 in insulin sensitivity. PMID:25798622

  4. Identification and validation of N-acetyltransferase 2 as an insulin sensitivity gene.

    PubMed

    Knowles, Joshua W; Xie, Weijia; Zhang, Zhongyang; Chennamsetty, Indumathi; Chennemsetty, Indumathi; Assimes, Themistocles L; Paananen, Jussi; Hansson, Ola; Pankow, James; Goodarzi, Mark O; Carcamo-Orive, Ivan; Morris, Andrew P; Chen, Yii-Der I; Mäkinen, Ville-Petteri; Ganna, Andrea; Mahajan, Anubha; Guo, Xiuqing; Abbasi, Fahim; Greenawalt, Danielle M; Lum, Pek; Molony, Cliona; Lind, Lars; Lindgren, Cecilia; Raffel, Leslie J; Tsao, Philip S; Schadt, Eric E; Rotter, Jerome I; Sinaiko, Alan; Reaven, Gerald; Yang, Xia; Hsiung, Chao A; Groop, Leif; Cordell, Heather J; Laakso, Markku; Hao, Ke; Ingelsson, Erik; Frayling, Timothy M; Weedon, Michael N; Walker, Mark; Quertermous, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Decreased insulin sensitivity, also referred to as insulin resistance (IR), is a fundamental abnormality in patients with type 2 diabetes and a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. While IR predisposition is heritable, the genetic basis remains largely unknown. The GENEticS of Insulin Sensitivity consortium conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) for direct measures of insulin sensitivity, such as euglycemic clamp or insulin suppression test, in 2,764 European individuals, with replication in an additional 2,860 individuals. The presence of a nonsynonymous variant of N-acetyltransferase 2 (NAT2) [rs1208 (803A>G, K268R)] was strongly associated with decreased insulin sensitivity that was independent of BMI. The rs1208 "A" allele was nominally associated with IR-related traits, including increased fasting glucose, hemoglobin A1C, total and LDL cholesterol, triglycerides, and coronary artery disease. NAT2 acetylates arylamine and hydrazine drugs and carcinogens, but predicted acetylator NAT2 phenotypes were not associated with insulin sensitivity. In a murine adipocyte cell line, silencing of NAT2 ortholog Nat1 decreased insulin-mediated glucose uptake, increased basal and isoproterenol-stimulated lipolysis, and decreased adipocyte differentiation, while Nat1 overexpression produced opposite effects. Nat1-deficient mice had elevations in fasting blood glucose, insulin, and triglycerides and decreased insulin sensitivity, as measured by glucose and insulin tolerance tests, with intermediate effects in Nat1 heterozygote mice. Our results support a role for NAT2 in insulin sensitivity.

  5. Absolute instability of the Gaussian wake profile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hultgren, Lennart S.; Aggarwal, Arun K.

    1987-01-01

    Linear parallel-flow stability theory has been used to investigate the effect of viscosity on the local absolute instability of a family of wake profiles with a Gaussian velocity distribution. The type of local instability, i.e., convective or absolute, is determined by the location of a branch-point singularity with zero group velocity of the complex dispersion relation for the instability waves. The effects of viscosity were found to be weak for values of the wake Reynolds number, based on the center-line velocity defect and the wake half-width, larger than about 400. Absolute instability occurs only for sufficiently large values of the center-line wake defect. The critical value of this parameter increases with decreasing wake Reynolds number, thereby indicating a shrinking region of absolute instability with decreasing wake Reynolds number. If backflow is not allowed, absolute instability does not occur for wake Reynolds numbers smaller than about 38.

  6. Protein Crystal Bovine Insulin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The comparison of protein crystal, Bovine Insulin space-grown (left) and earth-grown (right). Facilitates the incorporation of glucose into cells. In diabetics, there is either a decrease in or complete lack of insulin, thereby leading to several harmful complications. Principal Investigator is Larry DeLucas.

  7. Absolute quantitation of protein posttranslational modification isoform.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhu; Li, Ning

    2015-01-01

    Mass spectrometry has been widely applied in characterization and quantification of proteins from complex biological samples. Because the numbers of absolute amounts of proteins are needed in construction of mathematical models for molecular systems of various biological phenotypes and phenomena, a number of quantitative proteomic methods have been adopted to measure absolute quantities of proteins using mass spectrometry. The liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) coupled with internal peptide standards, i.e., the stable isotope-coded peptide dilution series, which was originated from the field of analytical chemistry, becomes a widely applied method in absolute quantitative proteomics research. This approach provides more and more absolute protein quantitation results of high confidence. As quantitative study of posttranslational modification (PTM) that modulates the biological activity of proteins is crucial for biological science and each isoform may contribute a unique biological function, degradation, and/or subcellular location, the absolute quantitation of protein PTM isoforms has become more relevant to its biological significance. In order to obtain the absolute cellular amount of a PTM isoform of a protein accurately, impacts of protein fractionation, protein enrichment, and proteolytic digestion yield should be taken into consideration and those effects before differentially stable isotope-coded PTM peptide standards are spiked into sample peptides have to be corrected. Assisted with stable isotope-labeled peptide standards, the absolute quantitation of isoforms of posttranslationally modified protein (AQUIP) method takes all these factors into account and determines the absolute amount of a protein PTM isoform from the absolute amount of the protein of interest and the PTM occupancy at the site of the protein. The absolute amount of the protein of interest is inferred by quantifying both the absolute amounts of a few PTM

  8. B-1a Lymphocytes Attenuate Insulin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Lei; Chng, MH; Alonso, Michael N.; Yuan, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Obesity-associated insulin resistance, a common precursor of type 2 diabetes, is characterized by chronic inflammation of tissues, including visceral adipose tissue (VAT). Here we show that B-1a cells, a subpopulation of B lymphocytes, are novel and important regulators of this process. B-1a cells are reduced in frequency in obese high-fat diet (HFD)-fed mice, and EGFP interleukin-10 (IL-10) reporter mice show marked reductions in anti-inflammatory IL-10 production by B cells in vivo during obesity. In VAT, B-1a cells are the dominant producers of B cell–derived IL-10, contributing nearly half of the expressed IL-10 in vivo. Adoptive transfer of B-1a cells into HFD-fed B cell–deficient mice rapidly improves insulin resistance and glucose tolerance through IL-10 and polyclonal IgM-dependent mechanisms, whereas transfer of B-2 cells worsens metabolic disease. Genetic knockdown of B cell–activating factor (BAFF) in HFD-fed mice or treatment with a B-2 cell–depleting, B-1a cell–sparing anti-BAFF antibody attenuates insulin resistance. These findings establish B-1a cells as a new class of immune regulators that maintain metabolic homeostasis and suggest manipulation of these cells as a potential therapy for insulin resistance. PMID:25249575

  9. Chromium and insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Richard A

    2003-12-01

    Insulin resistance leads to the inability of insulin to control the utilization and storage of glucose. It is associated initially with elevated levels of circulating insulin followed by glucose intolerance which may progress to type 2 diabetes, hyperlipidaemia, hypertension, obesity and cardiovascular diseases. While the causes of these diseases are multifactorial, one nutrient that is associated with all of these abnormalities is Cr. In the presence of Cr, in a biologically active form, much lower levels of insulin are required. Modern diets, which are often high in refined carbohydrates, are not only low in Cr, but lead to enhanced Cr losses. In response to the consumption of refined carbohydrates, there is a rapid rise in blood sugar leading to elevations in insulin that cause a mobilization of Cr. Once mobilized, Cr is not reabsorbed but lost via the urine leading to decreased Cr stores. Several studies involving both human subjects and experimental animals have reported improvements in insulin sensitivity, blood glucose, insulin, lipids, haemoglobin A1c, lean body mass and related variables in response to improved Cr nutrition. However, not all studies have reported beneficial effects associated with improved Cr nutrition. Well-controlled human studies are needed to document an unequivocal effect of Cr on insulin sensitivity in human subjects. Studies need to involve a significant number of subjects with insulin resistance, glucose intolerance or early stages of diabetes, who have not been taking supplements containing Cr for at least 4 months, and involve at least 400 to 600 microg supplemental Cr daily or more. Studies should be at least 4 months to document sustained effects of supplemental Cr on insulin resistance and related variables. Cr is a nutrient and not a therapeutic agent and therefore will only be of benefit to those whose problems are due to suboptimal intake of Cr.

  10. Absolute realization of low BRDF value

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zilong; Liao, Ningfang; Li, Ping; Wang, Yu

    2010-10-01

    Low BRDF value is widespread used in many critical domains such as space and military fairs. These values below 0.1 Sr-1 . So the Absolute realization of these value is the most critical issue in the absolute measurement of BRDF. To develop the Absolute value realization theory of BRDF , defining an arithmetic operators of BRDF , achieving an absolute measurement Eq. of BRDF based on radiance. This is a new theory method to solve the realization problem of low BRDF value. This theory method is realized on a self-designed common double orientation structure in space. By designing an adding structure to extend the range of the measurement system and a control and processing software, Absolute realization of low BRDF value is achieved. A material of low BRDF value is measured in this measurement system and the spectral BRDF value are showed within different angles allover the space. All these values are below 0.4 Sr-1 . This process is a representative procedure about the measurement of low BRDF value. A corresponding uncertainty analysis of this measurement data is given depend on the new theory of absolute realization and the performance of the measurement system. The relative expand uncertainty of the measurement data is 0.078. This uncertainty analysis is suitable for all measurements using the new theory of absolute realization and the corresponding measurement system.

  11. Vitamin Deficiency Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    Vitamin deficiency anemia Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Vitamin deficiency anemia is a lack of healthy red blood ... normal amounts of certain vitamins. Vitamins linked to vitamin deficiency anemia include folate, vitamin B-12 and vitamin ...

  12. Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... 1 antitrypsin (an-tee-TRIP-sin) deficiency, or AAT deficiency, is a condition that raises your risk ... and other diseases. Some people who have severe AAT deficiency develop emphysema (em-fi-SE-ma)—often ...

  13. Natural killer T cells in adipose tissue prevent insulin resistance

    PubMed Central

    Schipper, Henk S.; Rakhshandehroo, Maryam; van de Graaf, Stan F.J.; Venken, Koen; Koppen, Arjen; Stienstra, Rinke; Prop, Serge; Meerding, Jenny; Hamers, Nicole; Besra, Gurdyal; Boon, Louis; Nieuwenhuis, Edward E.S.; Elewaut, Dirk; Prakken, Berent; Kersten, Sander; Boes, Marianne; Kalkhoven, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Lipid overload and adipocyte dysfunction are key to the development of insulin resistance and can be induced by a high-fat diet. CD1d-restricted invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells have been proposed as mediators between lipid overload and insulin resistance, but recent studies found decreased iNKT cell numbers and marginal effects of iNKT cell depletion on insulin resistance under high-fat diet conditions. Here, we focused on the role of iNKT cells under normal conditions. We showed that iNKT cell–deficient mice on a low-fat diet, considered a normal diet for mice, displayed a distinctive insulin resistance phenotype without overt adipose tissue inflammation. Insulin resistance was characterized by adipocyte dysfunction, including adipocyte hypertrophy, increased leptin, and decreased adiponectin levels. The lack of liver abnormalities in CD1d-null mice together with the enrichment of CD1d-restricted iNKT cells in both mouse and human adipose tissue indicated a specific role for adipose tissue–resident iNKT cells in the development of insulin resistance. Strikingly, iNKT cell function was directly modulated by adipocytes, which acted as lipid antigen-presenting cells in a CD1d-mediated fashion. Based on these findings, we propose that, especially under low-fat diet conditions, adipose tissue–resident iNKT cells maintain healthy adipose tissue through direct interplay with adipocytes and prevent insulin resistance. PMID:22863618

  14. Natural killer T cells in adipose tissue prevent insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Schipper, Henk S; Rakhshandehroo, Maryam; van de Graaf, Stan F J; Venken, Koen; Koppen, Arjen; Stienstra, Rinke; Prop, Serge; Meerding, Jenny; Hamers, Nicole; Besra, Gurdyal; Boon, Louis; Nieuwenhuis, Edward E S; Elewaut, Dirk; Prakken, Berent; Kersten, Sander; Boes, Marianne; Kalkhoven, Eric

    2012-09-01

    Lipid overload and adipocyte dysfunction are key to the development of insulin resistance and can be induced by a high-fat diet. CD1d-restricted invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells have been proposed as mediators between lipid overload and insulin resistance, but recent studies found decreased iNKT cell numbers and marginal effects of iNKT cell depletion on insulin resistance under high-fat diet conditions. Here, we focused on the role of iNKT cells under normal conditions. We showed that iNKT cell-deficient mice on a low-fat diet, considered a normal diet for mice, displayed a distinctive insulin resistance phenotype without overt adipose tissue inflammation. Insulin resistance was characterized by adipocyte dysfunction, including adipocyte hypertrophy, increased leptin, and decreased adiponectin levels. The lack of liver abnormalities in CD1d-null mice together with the enrichment of CD1d-restricted iNKT cells in both mouse and human adipose tissue indicated a specific role for adipose tissue-resident iNKT cells in the development of insulin resistance. Strikingly, iNKT cell function was directly modulated by adipocytes, which acted as lipid antigen-presenting cells in a CD1d-mediated fashion. Based on these findings, we propose that, especially under low-fat diet conditions, adipose tissue-resident iNKT cells maintain healthy adipose tissue through direct interplay with adipocytes and prevent insulin resistance.

  15. Insulin receptor phosphorylation, insulin receptor substrate-1 phosphorylation, and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase activity are decreased in intact skeletal muscle strips from obese subjects.

    PubMed Central

    Goodyear, L J; Giorgino, F; Sherman, L A; Carey, J; Smith, R J; Dohm, G L

    1995-01-01

    To determine whether the impaired insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in obese individuals is associated with altered insulin receptor signaling, we measured both glucose uptake and early steps in the insulin action pathway in intact strips of human skeletal muscle. Biopsies of rectus abdominus muscle were taken from eight obese and eight control subjects undergoing elective surgery (body mass index 52.9 +/- 3.6 vs 25.7 +/- 0.9). Insulin-stimulated 2-deoxyglucose uptake was 53% lower in muscle strips from obese subjects. Additional muscle strips were incubated in the basal state or with 10(-7) M insulin for 2, 15, or 30 min. In the lean subjects, tyrosine phosphorylation of the insulin receptor and insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1), measured by immunoblotting with anti-phosphotyrosine antibodies, was significantly increased by insulin at all time points. In the skeletal muscle from the obese subjects, insulin was less effective in stimulating tyrosine phosphorylation (maximum receptor and IRS-1 phosphorylation decreased by 35 and 38%, respectively). Insulin stimulation of IRS-1 immunoprecipitable phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase) activity also was markedly lower in obese subjects compared with controls (10- vs 35-fold above basal, respectively). In addition, the obese subjects had a lower abundance of the insulin receptor, IRS-1, and the p85 subunit of PI 3-kinase (55, 54, and 64% of nonobese, respectively). We conclude that impaired insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in skeletal muscle from severely obese subjects is accompanied by a deficiency in insulin receptor signaling, which may contribute to decreased insulin action. Images PMID:7537758

  16. Tagging insulin in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dobeck, Michael; Nelson, Ronald S.

    1992-01-01

    Knowing the exact subcellular sites of action of insulin in the body has the potential to give basic science investigators a basis from which a cause and cure for this disease can be approached. The goal of this project is to create a test reagent that can be used to visualize these subcellular sites. The unique microgravity environment of the Shuttle will allow the creation of a reagent that has the possibility of elucidating the subcellular sites of action of insulin. Several techniques have been used in an attempt to isolate the sites of action of items such as insulin. One of these is autoradiography in which the test item is obtained from animals fed radioactive materials. What is clearly needed is to visualize individual insulin molecules at their sites of action. The insulin tagging process to be used on G-399 involves the conjugation of insulin molecules with ferritin molecules to create a reagent that will be used back on Earth in an attempt to elucidate the sites of action of insulin.

  17. Infliximab and insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Ursini, Francesco; Naty, Saverio; Grembiale, Rosa Daniela

    2010-06-01

    Insulin resistance is the most important pathophysiologic feature of obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus and prediabetic states. TNF-alpha, a proinflammatory cytokine, plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of inflammation-associated insulin resistance during the course of rheumatic diseases. Therapies aimed at neutralizing TNF-alpha, such as the monoclonal antibody infliximab, represent a novel approach for the treatment of rheumatic diseases and allow to obtain significant results in terms of control of the inflammatory process. In this article we reviewed the scientific evidence published in the literature about a potential role of TNF-alpha blockade in improving insulin resistance in non-diabetic rheumatic patients.

  18. A New Gimmick for Assigning Absolute Configuration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ayorinde, F. O.

    1983-01-01

    A five-step procedure is provided to help students in making the assignment absolute configuration less bothersome. Examples for both single (2-butanol) and multi-chiral carbon (3-chloro-2-butanol) molecules are included. (JN)

  19. Magnifying absolute instruments for optically homogeneous regions

    SciTech Connect

    Tyc, Tomas

    2011-09-15

    We propose a class of magnifying absolute optical instruments with a positive isotropic refractive index. They create magnified stigmatic images, either virtual or real, of optically homogeneous three-dimensional spatial regions within geometrical optics.

  20. The Simplicity Argument and Absolute Morality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mijuskovic, Ben

    1975-01-01

    In this paper the author has maintained that there is a similarity of thought to be found in the writings of Cudworth, Emerson, and Husserl in his investigation of an absolute system of morality. (Author/RK)

  1. [Vitamin D deficiency and cardiovascular diseases].

    PubMed

    Ciccone, Marco Matteo; Zito, Annapaola; Dentamaro, Ilaria; Vestito, Domenico; Scicchitano, Pietro; Iacoviello, Massimo; De Pergola, Giovanni; Devito, Fiorella

    2015-01-01

    Vitamin D deficiency is a condition that affects a high percentage of individuals of all ages. Considerable attention has been paid recently to the possible role of deficiency of this vitamin in the development of several chronic diseases, including cardiovascular and metabolic diseases. In particular, vitamin D deficiency is associated with an increase in conditions such as obesity, insulin-resistance, hypertension, diabetes, and an increased risk of death from these pathologies. There is also a significant correlation with mortality for major cardiovascular events such as heart failure, myocardial infarction, sudden cardiac death, stroke, atrial fibrillation, and peripheral vascular disease. The pathophysiological mechanisms of these correlations are yet to be determined, but hyperactivity of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system seems to play a leading role. The role of therapy with vitamin D supplements in improving cardiovascular outcome in patients with low levels of vitamin D remains to be determined.

  2. Experimental models of melatonin-deficient hypertension.

    PubMed

    Simko, Fedor; Reiter, Russel J; Pechanova, Olga; Paulis, Ludovit

    2013-01-01

    Melatonin secreted by the pineal gland plays an important role in the regulation of blood pressure (BP) and its administration reduces hypertension both in animals and humans. There are two experimental models of melatonin-deficient hypertension: one induced by pinealectomy and another by continuous 24 hour exposure to light. Both models cause melatonin deficiency and prevent darkness-mediated nocturnal melatonin secretion and are associated with increased BP and myocardial, vascular and renal dysfunction. These models also lead to neurohumoral activation of the renin-angiotensin system, sympathetic nervous system, adrenocorticotrophin-glucocorticoid axis and cause insulin resistance. Together, these alterations contribute to rise in blood pressure by vasoconstrictive or circulatory fluid volume overload. The light induced hypertension model mimics the melatonin deficiency in patients with insufficient nocturnal BP decline, in those who have night shift or who are exposed to environmental light pollution. For this reason, this model is useful in development of anti-hypertensive drugs.

  3. Absolute cross sections of compound nucleus reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capurro, O. A.

    1993-11-01

    The program SEEF is a Fortran IV computer code for the extraction of absolute cross sections of compound nucleus reactions. When the evaporation residue is fed by its parents, only cumulative cross sections will be obtained from off-line gamma ray measurements. But, if one has the parent excitation function (experimental or calculated), this code will make it possible to determine absolute cross sections of any exit channel.

  4. Kelvin and the absolute temperature scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erlichson, Herman

    2001-07-01

    This paper describes the absolute temperature scale of Kelvin (William Thomson). Kelvin found that Carnot's axiom about heat being a conserved quantity had to be abandoned. Nevertheless, he found that Carnot's fundamental work on heat engines was correct. Using the concept of a Carnot engine Kelvin found that Q1/Q2 = T1/T2. Thermometers are not used to obtain absolute temperatures since they are calculated temperatures.

  5. Bioactives from Artemisia dracunculus L. Enhance Insulin Sensitivity via Modulation of Skeletal Muscle Protein Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Kheterpal, Indu; Scherp, Peter; Kelley, Lauren; Wang, Zhong; Johnson, William; Ribnicky, David; Cefalu, William T.

    2014-01-01

    A botanical extract from Artemisia dracunculus L., termed PMI 5011, has been shown previously to improve insulin sensitivity by increasing cellular insulin signaling in in vitro and in vivo studies. These studies suggest that PMI 5011 effects changes in phosphorylation levels of proteins involved in insulin signaling. To explore effects of this promising botanical extract on the human skeletal muscle phosphoproteome, changes in site-specific protein phosphorylation levels in primary skeletal muscle cultures from obese, insulin resistant individuals were evaluated with and without insulin stimulation. Insulin resistance is a condition in which a normal or elevated insulin level results in an abnormal biologic response, e.g., glucose uptake. Using isobaric tagging for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ™) followed by phosphopeptide enrichment and liquid chromatography – tandem mass spectrometry, 125 unique phosphopeptides and 159 unique phosphorylation sites from 80 unique proteins were identified and quantified. Insulin stimulation of primary cultured muscle cells from insulin resistant individuals resulted in minimal increase in phosphorylation, demonstrating impaired insulin action in this condition. Treatment with PMI 5011 resulted in significant up regulation of 35 phosphopeptides that were mapped to proteins participating in the regulation of transcription, translation, actin cytoskeleton signaling, caveolae translocation and GLUT4 transport. These data further showed that PMI 5011 increased phosphorylation levels of specific amino acids in proteins in the insulin resistant state that are normally phosphorylated by insulin (thus, increasing cellular insulin signaling) and PMI 5011 also increased the abundance of phosphorylation sites of proteins regulating anti-apoptotic effects. Thus, the phosphoproteomics analysis demonstrated conclusively that PMI 5011 effects changes in phosphorylation levels of proteins and identified novel pathways by which

  6. Effect of Growth Hormone Deficiency on Brain Structure, Motor Function and Cognition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webb, Emma A.; O'Reilly, Michelle A.; Clayden, Jonathan D.; Seunarine, Kiran K.; Chong, Wui K.; Dale, Naomi; Salt, Alison; Clark, Chris A.; Dattani, Mehul T.

    2012-01-01

    The growth hormone-insulin-like growth factor-1 axis plays a role in normal brain growth but little is known of the effect of growth hormone deficiency on brain structure. Children with isolated growth hormone deficiency (peak growth hormone less than 6.7 [micro]g/l) and idiopathic short stature (peak growth hormone greater than 10 [micro]g/l)…

  7. Intranasal Insulin Prevents Cognitive Decline, Cerebral Atrophy and White Matter Changes in Murine Type I Diabetic Encephalopathy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Francis, George J.; Martinez, Jose A.; Liu, Wei Q.; Xu, Kevin; Ayer, Amit; Fine, Jared; Tuor, Ursula I.; Glazner, Gordon; Hanson, Leah R.; Frey, William H., II; Toth, Cory

    2008-01-01

    Insulin deficiency in type I diabetes may lead to cognitive impairment, cerebral atrophy and white matter abnormalities. We studied the impact of a novel delivery system using intranasal insulin (I-I) in a mouse model of type I diabetes (streptozotocin-induced) for direct targeting of pathological and cognitive deficits while avoiding potential…

  8. Insulin Resistance and Prediabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... especially sleep apnea; and cigarette smoking. Does sleep matter? Yes. Studies show that untreated sleep problems, especially ... a severe form of insulin resistance may have dark patches of skin, usually on the back of ...

  9. Insulin Delivery System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    When Programmable Implantable Medication System (PIMS) is implanted in human body, it delivers precise programmed amounts of insulin over long periods of time. Mini-Med Technologies has been refining the Technologies since initial development at APL. The size of a hockey puck, and encased in titanium shell, PIMS holds about 2 1/2 teaspoons of insulin at a programmed basal rate. If a change in measured blood sugar level dictates a different dose, the patient can vary the amount of insulin delivered by holding a small radio transceiver over the implanted system and dialing in a specific program held in the PIMS computer memory. Insulin refills are accomplished approximately 4 times a year by hypodermic needle.

  10. Biosimilar Insulins: How Similar is Similar?

    PubMed Central

    Heinemann, Lutz; Hompesch, Marcus

    2011-01-01

    Biosimilar insulins (BIs) are viewed as commercially attractive products by a number of companies. In order to obtain approval in the European Union or the United States, where there is not a single BI currently on the market, a manufacturer needs to demonstrate that a given BI has a safety and efficacy profile that is similar to that of the “original” insulin formulation that is already on the market. As trivial as this may appear at first glance, it is not trivial at all for a good number of reasons that will be discussed in this commentary. As with protein manufacturing, modifications in the structure of the insulin molecule can take place (which can have serious consequences for the biological effects induced), so a rigid and careful assessment is absolutely necessary. The example of Marvel's failed application with the European Medicines Agency provides insights into the regulatory and clinical challenges surrounding the matter of BI. Although a challenging BI approval process might be regarded as a hurdle to keep companies out of certain markets, it is fair to say that the potential safety and efficacy issues surrounding BI are substantial and relevant and do warrant a careful and evidence-driven approval process. PMID:21722590

  11. Vitamin D insufficiency and insulin resistance in obese adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Tosh, Aneesh K.; Belenchia, Anthony M.

    2014-01-01

    Obese adolescents represent a particularly vulnerable group for vitamin D deficiency which appears to have negative consequences on insulin resistance and glucose homeostasis. Poor vitamin D status is also associated with future risk of type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome in the obese. The biological mechanisms by which vitamin D influences glycemic control in obesity are not well understood, but are thought to involve enhancement of peripheral/hepatic uptake of glucose, attenuation of inflammation and/or regulation of insulin synthesis/secretion by pancreatic β cells. Related to the latter, recent data suggest that the active form of vitamin, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D, does not impact insulin release in healthy pancreatic islets; instead they require an environmental stressor such as inflammation or vitamin D deficiency to see an effect. To date, a number of observational studies exploring the relationship between the vitamin D status of obese adolescents and markers of glucose homeostasis have been published. Most, although not all, show significant associations between circulating 25-hydroxyvitamn D concentrations and insulin sensitivity/resistance indices. In interpreting the collective findings of these reports, significant considerations surface including the effects of pubertal status, vitamin D status, influence of parathyroid hormone status and the presence of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. The few published clinical trials using vitamin D supplementation to improve insulin resistance and impaired glucose tolerance in obese adolescents have yielded beneficial effects. However, there is a need for more randomized controlled trials. Future investigations should involve larger sample sizes of obese adolescents with documented vitamin D deficiency, and careful selection of the dose, dosing regimen and achievement of target 25-hydroxyvitamn D serum concentrations. These trials should also include clamp-derived measures of in vivo sensitivity and

  12. Moving toward the ideal insulin for insulin pumps.

    PubMed

    Cengiz, Eda; Bode, Bruce; Van Name, Michelle; Tamborlane, William V

    2016-01-01

    Advances in insulin formulations have been important for diabetes management and achieving optimal glycemic control. Rapid-acting insulin analogs provide a faster time-action profile than regular insulin and are approved for use in pumps. However, the need remains for therapy to deliver a more physiologic insulin profile. New insulin formulations and delivery methods are in development, with the aim of accelerating insulin absorption to accomplish ultra-fast-acting insulin time-action profiles. Furthermore, the integration of continuous glucose monitoring with insulin pump therapy enables on-going adjustment of insulin delivery to optimize glycemic control throughout the day and night. These technological and pharmacological advances are likely to facilitate the development of closed-loop pump systems (i.e., artificial pancreas), and improve glycemic control and quality of life for patients with diabetes.

  13. CD36-deficient congenic strains show improved glucose tolerance and distinct shifts in metabolic and transcriptomic profiles.

    PubMed

    Šedová, L; Liška, F; Křenová, D; Kazdová, L; Tremblay, J; Krupková, M; Corbeil, G; Hamet, P; Křen, V; Šeda, O

    2012-07-01

    Deficiency of fatty acid translocase Cd36 has been shown to have a major role in the pathogenesis of metabolic syndrome in the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR). We have tested the hypothesis that the effects of Cd36 mutation on the features of metabolic syndrome are contextually dependent on genomic background. We have derived two new congenic strains by introgression of limited chromosome 4 regions of SHR origin, both including the defective Cd36 gene, into the genetic background of a highly inbred model of insulin resistance and dyslipidemia, polydactylous (PD) rat strain. We subjected standard diet-fed adult males of PD and the congenic PD.SHR4 strains to metabolic, morphometric and transcriptomic profiling. We observed significantly improved glucose tolerance and lower fasting insulin levels in PD.SHR4 congenics than in PD. One of the PD.SHR4 strains showed lower triglyceride concentrations across major lipoprotein fractions combined with higher levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol compared with the PD progenitor. The hepatic transcriptome assessment revealed a network of genes differentially expressed between PD and PD.SHR4 with significant enrichment by members of the circadian rhythmicity pathway (Arntl (Bmal1), Clock, Nfil3, Per2 and Per3). In summary, the introduction of the chromosome 4 region of SHR origin including defective Cd36 into the PD genetic background resulted in disconnected shifts of metabolic profile along with distinct changes in hepatic transcriptome. The synthesis of the current results with those obtained in other Cd36-deficient strains indicates that the eventual metabolic effect of a deleterious mutation such as that of SHR-derived Cd36 is not absolute, but rather a function of complex interactions between environmental and genomic background, upon which it operates.

  14. Role of insulin in the growth of fetal rat tissues.

    PubMed

    Cooke, P S; Nicoll, C S

    1984-02-01

    The effect of insulin on the growth of fetal rat tissues was investigated using a transplant system. Paws from 15-day-old fetal rats were transplanted under the kidney capsule of 1-month-old syngeneic hosts, where they grew and differentiated normally. After 11 days of incubation, growth of transplants in hosts made diabetic by streptozotocin injection was reduced by 37% compared to growth in nondiabetic controls, but tissue differentiation and bone formation were normal in the absence of insulin. Injections of insulin (2 U, twice daily) into diabetic hosts restored paw growth to normal. Growth of transplants in hypophysectomized (HX) and in HX-diabetic hosts was reduced to the same degree (i.e. by 65%). Thus, the growth decrements produced by host hypophysectomy and diabetes are not additive. In contrast to the results with insulin-deficient hosts, the transplants failed to differentiate normally in the HX hosts. Injections of exogenous insulin (3 U, twice daily) to produce transient hyperinsulinemia failed to increase transplant growth in intact hosts over 11 days of incubation. The transplants were exposed to frequent periods of hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia by injecting 0.66 g glucose/100 g BW four times per day into intact hosts during 6 days of incubation. This treatment also failed to stimulate transplant growth. These results indicate that normal growth of transplanted fetal paw tissue is partially dependent on insulin, but whether the insulin acts directly or indirectly to support growth is not known. Supranormal insulin levels or frequent periods of hyperglycemia with hyperinsulinemia are not capable of producing overgrowth of the fetal paws. The HX, diabetic, and HX-diabetic host rats did not grow, as judged by tail length increase, and they lost weight. Accordingly, the juvenile host tissues have an obligatory dependence on insulin and GH for normal growth, but the fetal tissue is only partially dependent, because the paw transplants continued to

  15. [Interactions of insulin and estrogen in the regulation of cell proliferation and carcinogenesis].

    PubMed

    Suba, Zsuzsanna; Kásler, Miklós

    2012-01-29

    Equilibrium of sexual steroids and metabolic processes has close correlations. Insulin is a potent regulator of human sexual steroid hormone production and modulates their signals at receptor level. Insulin resistance and excessive insulin production provoke hyperandrogenism and estrogen deficiency in women resulting not only in anovulatory dysfunction but also a high risk for cardiovascular diseases and cancer. Physiologic functions of all female organs have higher estrogen demand as compared with men. In healthy women estrogen predominance against androgens is a favor in their reproductive period, which means a strong defense against insulin resistance and its complications. However, in postmenopausal cases the increasing prevalence of insulin resistance and type-2 diabetes associated with estrogen deficiency and androgen excess, result in a gender specific higher risk for precancerous lesions and cancer as compared with men. Estrogen has beneficial effect on the energy metabolism, glucose homeostasis and on the lipid metabolism of liver and of peripheral tissues as well. A moderate or severe decrease in serum estrogen level enhances the prevalence of insulin resistant states. In premenopausal women long or irregular menstrual cycles are predictors for the risk of insulin resistance and type-2 diabetes. Moreover, in postmenopausal estrogen deficient cases elevated fasting glucose, increased body weight and abdominal fat deposition are often observed progressively with age in correlation with an impaired glucose tolerance. In the rare cases of estrogen deficient men severe type-2 diabetes seems to be a characteristic complication. Upon becoming familiar with the cancer risk of insulin resistance and estrogen deficiency, there would be plenty of possibilities for primary cancer prevention. In patients with cancer the treatment of hormonal and metabolic disturbances may become effective adjuvant therapy.

  16. Apelin is necessary for the maintenance of insulin sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Yue, Patrick; Jin, Hong; Aillaud, Marissa; Deng, Alicia C; Azuma, Junya; Asagami, Tomoko; Kundu, Ramendra K; Reaven, Gerald M; Quertermous, Thomas; Tsao, Philip S

    2010-01-01

    The recently discovered peptide apelin is known to be involved in the maintenance of insulin sensitivity. However, questions persist regarding its precise role in the chronic setting. Fasting glucose, insulin, and adiponectin levels were determined on mice with generalized deficiency of apelin (APKO). Additionally, insulin (ITT) and glucose tolerance tests (GTT) were performed. To assess the impact of exogenously delivered apelin on insulin sensitivity, osmotic pumps containing pyroglutamated apelin-13 or saline were implanted in APKO mice for 4 wk. Following the infusion, ITT/GTTs were repeated and the animals euthanized. Soleus muscles were harvested and homogenized in lysis buffer, and insulin-induced Akt phosphorylation was determined by Western blotting. Apelin-13 infusion and ITTs/GTTs were also performed in obese diabetic db/db mice. To probe the underlying mechanism for apelin's effects, apelin-13 was also delivered to cultured C2C12 myotubes. 2-[3H]deoxyglucose uptake and Akt phosphorylation were assessed in the presence of various inhibitors. APKO mice had diminished insulin sensitivity, were hyperinsulinemic, and had decreased adiponectin levels. Soleus lysates had decreased insulin-induced Akt phosphorylation. Administration of apelin to APKO and db/db mice resulted in improved insulin sensitivity. In C2C12 myotubes, apelin increased glucose uptake and Akt phosphorylation. These events were fully abrogated by pertussis toxin, compound C, and siRNA knockdown of AMPKalpha1 but only partially diminished by LY-294002 and not at all by L-NAME. We conclude that apelin is necessary for the maintenance of insulin sensitivity in vivo. Apelin's effects on glucose uptake and Akt phosphorylation are in part mediated by a G(i) and AMPK-dependent pathway.

  17. Vitamin D deficiency in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Soliman, Ashraf T; De Sanctis, Vincenzo; Elalaily, Rania; Bedair, Said; Kassem, Islam

    2014-11-01

    The prevalence of severe vitamin D deficiency (VDD) in adolescents is variable but considerably high in many countries, especially in Middle-east and Southeast Asia. Different factors attribute to this deficiency including lack of sunlight exposure due to cultural dress codes and veiling or due to pigmented skin, and less time spent outdoors, because of hot weather, and lower vitamin D intake. A potent adaptation process significantly modifies the clinical presentation and therefore clinical presentations may be subtle and go unnoticed, thus making true prevalence studies difficult. Adolescents with severe VDD may present with vague manifestations including pain in weight-bearing joints, back, thighs and/or calves, difficulty in walking and/or climbing stairs, or running and muscle cramps. Adaptation includes increased parathormone (PTH) and deceased insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) secretion. PTH enhances the tubular reabsorption of Ca and stimulates the kidneys to produce 1, 25-(OH) 2D3 that increases intestinal calcium absorption and dissolves the mineralized collagen matrix in bone, causing osteopenia and osteoporosis to provide enough Ca to prevent hypocalcaemia. Decreased insulin like growth factor-I (IGF-I) delays bone growth to economize calcium consumption. Radiological changes are not uncommon and include osteoporosis/osteopenia affecting long bones as well as vertebrae and ribs, bone cysts, decalcification of the metaphysis of the long bones and pseudo fractures. In severe cases pathological fractures and deformities may occur. Vitamin D treatment of adolescents with VDD differs considerably in different studies and proved to be effective in treating all clinical, biochemical, and radiological manifestations. Different treatment regiments for VDD have been discussed and presented in this mini-review for practical use. Adequate vitamin D replacement after treating VDD, improving calcium intake (milk and dairy products), encouraging adequate exposure

  18. Jasminum flexile flower absolute from India--a detailed comparison with three other jasmine absolutes.

    PubMed

    Braun, Norbert A; Kohlenberg, Birgit; Sim, Sherina; Meier, Manfred; Hammerschmidt, Franz-Josef

    2009-09-01

    Jasminum flexile flower absolute from the south of India and the corresponding vacuum headspace (VHS) sample of the absolute were analyzed using GC and GC-MS. Three other commercially available Indian jasmine absolutes from the species: J. sambac, J. officinale subsp. grandiflorum, and J. auriculatum and the respective VHS samples were used for comparison purposes. One hundred and twenty-one compounds were characterized in J. flexile flower absolute, with methyl linolate, benzyl salicylate, benzyl benzoate, (2E,6E)-farnesol, and benzyl acetate as the main constituents. A detailed olfactory evaluation was also performed.

  19. Farnesoid X Receptor Deficiency Improves Glucose Homeostasis in Mouse Models of Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Prawitt, Janne; Abdelkarim, Mouaadh; Stroeve, Johanna H.M.; Popescu, Iuliana; Duez, Helene; Velagapudi, Vidya R.; Dumont, Julie; Bouchaert, Emmanuel; van Dijk, Theo H.; Lucas, Anthony; Dorchies, Emilie; Daoudi, Mehdi; Lestavel, Sophie; Gonzalez, Frank J.; Oresic, Matej; Cariou, Bertrand; Kuipers, Folkert; Caron, Sandrine; Staels, Bart

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Bile acids (BA) participate in the maintenance of metabolic homeostasis acting through different signaling pathways. The nuclear BA receptor farnesoid X receptor (FXR) regulates pathways in BA, lipid, glucose, and energy metabolism, which become dysregulated in obesity. However, the role of FXR in obesity and associated complications, such as dyslipidemia and insulin resistance, has not been directly assessed. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Here, we evaluate the consequences of FXR deficiency on body weight development, lipid metabolism, and insulin resistance in murine models of genetic and diet-induced obesity. RESULTS FXR deficiency attenuated body weight gain and reduced adipose tissue mass in both models. Surprisingly, glucose homeostasis improved as a result of an enhanced glucose clearance and adipose tissue insulin sensitivity. In contrast, hepatic insulin sensitivity did not change, and liver steatosis aggravated as a result of the repression of β-oxidation genes. In agreement, liver-specific FXR deficiency did not protect from diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance, indicating a role for nonhepatic FXR in the control of glucose homeostasis in obesity. Decreasing elevated plasma BA concentrations in obese FXR-deficient mice by administration of the BA sequestrant colesevelam improved glucose homeostasis in a FXR-dependent manner, indicating that the observed improvements by FXR deficiency are not a result of indirect effects of altered BA metabolism. CONCLUSIONS Overall, FXR deficiency in obesity beneficially affects body weight development and glucose homeostasis. PMID:21593203

  20. [Vitamin D deficiency associated with insulin resistance in medical residents].

    PubMed

    Noyola-García, Maura Estela; Díaz-Romero, Alberto; Arce-Quiñones, Mariana; Chong-Martínez, Blanca Alicia; Anda-Garay, Juan Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Introducción: diversos estudios han reportado una correlación entre la deficiencia de vitamina D y la resistencia a la insulina; sin embargo, algunos ensayos clínicos demuestran que la suplementación con vitamina D no normaliza las cifras de glucosa ni las de insulina. Por lo tanto, el objetivo es buscar si existe correlación entre las concentraciones séricas de vitamina D y la resistencia a la insulina a partir de la utilización del índice homeostatic model assessment 2 (HOMA 2). Método: estudio transversal, descriptivo y analítico que incluyó a residentes a los que se les aplicó un cuestionario para conocer su tiempo de exposición al sol. Se tomaron medidas antropométricas como peso, talla y circunferencia de cintura, niveles séricos de vitamina D, insulina sérica, glucosa de ayuno, triglicéridos y colesterol de alta densidad. Se determinó la correlación entre las concentraciones séricas de vitamina D y HOMA 2 mediante el coeficiente de correlación de Pearson; se consideró significativa una p < 0.05. Resultados: la disminución sérica de vitamina D no se correlacionó con concentraciones elevadas del HOMA 2 (r = −0.11, p = 0.34). Se observó una correlación negativa entre las concentraciones de vitamina D y el índice cintura-talla (r = −0.27, p = 0.025). El HOMA 2 se correlacionó positivamente con el índice cintura-talla (r = 0.23, p = 0.05) y los triglicéridos (r = 0.61, p = 0.01) y de forma negativa con el colesterol de alta densidad (r = −0.26, p = 0.02). Conclusión: no observamos la correlación esperada entre hipovitaminosis D y resistencia a la insulina.

  1. Toll-like Receptor 4 Deficiency Decreases Atherosclerosis but Does Not Protect against Inflammation in Obese LDL Receptor-Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Yilei; Subramanian, Savitha; Montes, Vince N.; Goodspeed, Leela; Wang, Shari; Han, Chang Yeop; Teresa, Antonio Sta.; Kim, Jinkyu; O’Brien, Kevin D.; Chait, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Objective Obesity is associated with insulin resistance, chronic low-grade inflammation and atherosclerosis. Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) participates in the cross-talk between inflammation and insulin resistance, being activated by both lipopolysaccharide and saturated fatty acids. This study was undertaken to determine whether TLR4 deficiency has a protective role in inflammation, insulin resistance and atherosclerosis induced by a diabetogenic diet. Methods and Results TLR4 and LDL receptor double knockout (Tlr4−/−Ldlr−/−) mice and Ldlr−/− mice were fed either a normal chow or a diabetogenic diet for 24 weeks. Tlr4−/−Ldlr−/− mice fed a diabetogenic diet showed improved plasma cholesterol and triglyceride levels but developed obesity, hyperinsulinemia and glucose intolerance equivalent to obese Ldlr−/− mice. Adipocyte hypertrophy, macrophage accumulation and local inflammation were not attenuated in intra-abdominal adipose tissue in Tlr4−/−Ldlr−/− mice. However, TLR4 deficiency led to markedly decreased atherosclerosis in obese Tlr4−/−Ldlr−/− mice. Compensatory up-regulation of TLR2 expression was observed both in obese TLR4 deficient mice and in palmitate-treated TLR4-silenced 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Conclusions TLR4 deficiency decreases atherosclerosis without affecting obesity-induced inflammation and insulin resistance in LDL receptor deficient mice. Alternative pathways may be responsible for adipose tissue macrophage infiltration and insulin resistance that occurs in obesity. PMID:22580897

  2. New insights into iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia.

    PubMed

    Camaschella, Clara

    2017-02-13

    Recent advances in iron metabolism have stimulated new interest in iron deficiency (ID) and its anemia (IDA), common conditions worldwide. Absolute ID/IDA, i.e. the decrease of total body iron, is easily diagnosed based on decreased levels of serum ferritin and transferrin saturation. Relative lack of iron in specific organs/tissues, and IDA in the context of inflammatory disorders, are diagnosed based on arbitrary cut offs of ferritin and transferrin saturation and/or marker combination (as the soluble transferrin receptor/ferritin index) in an appropriate clinical context. Most ID patients are candidate to traditional treatment with oral iron salts, while high hepcidin levels block their absorption in inflammatory disorders. New iron preparations and new treatment modalities are available: high-dose intravenous iron compounds are becoming popular and indications to their use are increasing, although long-term side effects remain to be evaluated.

  3. Universal Cosmic Absolute and Modern Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostro, Ludwik

    The official Sciences, especially all natural sciences, respect in their researches the principle of methodic naturalism i.e. they consider all phenomena as entirely natural and therefore in their scientific explanations they do never adduce or cite supernatural entities and forces. The purpose of this paper is to show that Modern Science has its own self-existent, self-acting, and self-sufficient Natural All-in Being or Omni-Being i.e. the entire Nature as a Whole that justifies the scientific methodic naturalism. Since this Natural All-in Being is one and only It should be considered as the own scientifically justified Natural Absolute of Science and should be called, in my opinion, the Universal Cosmic Absolute of Modern Science. It will be also shown that the Universal Cosmic Absolute is ontologically enormously stratified and is in its ultimate i.e. in its most fundamental stratum trans-reistic and trans-personal. It means that in its basic stratum. It is neither a Thing or a Person although It contains in Itself all things and persons with all other sentient and conscious individuals as well, On the turn of the 20th century the Science has begun to look for a theory of everything, for a final theory, for a master theory. In my opinion the natural Universal Cosmic Absolute will constitute in such a theory the radical all penetrating Ultimate Basic Reality and will substitute step by step the traditional supernatural personal Absolute.

  4. Mouse models of insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Hribal, Marta Letizia; Oriente, Francesco; Accili, Domenico

    2002-05-01

    The hallmarks of type 2 diabetes are impaired insulin action in peripheral tissues and decreased pancreatic beta-cell function. Classically, the two defects have been viewed as separate entities, with insulin resistance arising primarily from impaired insulin-dependent glucose uptake in skeletal muscle, and beta-cell dysfunction arising from impaired coupling of glucose sensing to insulin secretion. Targeted mutagenesis and transgenesis involving components of the insulin action pathway have changed our understanding of these phenomena. It appears that the role of insulin signaling in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes has been overestimated in classic insulin target tissues, such as skeletal muscle, whereas it has been overlooked in liver, pancreatic beta-cells, and brain, which had been thought not to be primary insulin targets. We review recent progress and try to reconcile areas of apparent controversy surrounding insulin signaling in skeletal muscle and pancreatic beta-cells.

  5. Reduced serotonin reuptake transporter (SERT) function causes insulin resistance and hepatic steatosis independent of food intake.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaoning; Margolis, Kara J; Gershon, Michael D; Schwartz, Gary J; Sze, Ji Y

    2012-01-01

    Serotonin reuptake transporter (SERT) is a key regulator of serotonin neurotransmission and a major target of antidepressants. Antidepressants, such as selectively serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), that block SERT function are known to affect food intake and body weight. Here, we provide genetic evidence that food intake and metabolism are regulated by separable mechanisms of SERT function. SERT-deficient mice ate less during both normal diet and high fat diet feeding. The reduced food intake was accompanied with markedly elevated plasma leptin levels. Despite reduced food intake, SERT-deficient mice exhibited glucose intolerance and insulin resistance, and progressively developed obesity and hepatic steatosis. Several lines of evidence indicate that the metabolic deficits of SERT-deficient mice are attributable to reduced insulin-sensitivity in peripheral tissues. First, SERT-deficient mice exhibited beta-cell hyperplasia and islet-mass expansion. Second, biochemical analyses revealed constitutively elevated JNK activity and diminished insulin-induced AKT activation in the liver of SERT-deficient mice. SERT-deficient mice exhibited hyper-JNK activity and hyperinsulinemia prior to the development of obesity. Third, enhancing AKT signaling by PTEN deficiency corrected glucose tolerance in SERT-deficient mice. These findings have potential implications for designing selective SERT drugs for weight control and the treatment of metabolic syndromes.

  6. II - Insulin processing in mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Camberos, María Del Carmen; Pérez, Adriana A; Passicot, Gisel A; Martucci, Lucía C; Wanderley, María I; Udrisar, Daniel P; Cresto, Juan C

    2016-10-01

    Our objective was to know how insulin is processing in mitochondria; if IDE is the only participant in mitochondrial insulin degradation and the role of insulin degradation on IDE accumulation in mitoplasts. Mitochondria and its fractions were isolated as described by Greenwalt. IDE was purified and detected in immunoblot with specific antibodies. High insulin degradation was obtained through addition to rat's diet of 25 g/rat of apple and 10 g/rat of hard-boiled eggs, 3 days a week. Mitochondrial insulin degradation was assayed with 5 % TCA, insulin antibody or Sephadex G50 chromatography. Degradation was also assayed 60 min at 37 °C in mitochondrial fractions (IMS and Mx) with diet or not and without IDE. Degradation in fractions precipitated with ammonium sulfates (60-80 %) were studied after mitochondrial insulin incubation (1 ng. insulin during 15 min, at 30 °C) or with addition of 2.5 mM ATP. Supplementary diet increased insulin degradation. High insulin did not increase mitoplasts accumulation and did not decrease mitochondrial degradation. High insulin and inhibition of degradation evidence insulin competition for a putative transport system. Mitochondrial incubation with insulin increased IDE in matrix as observed in immunoblot. ATP decreased degradation in Mx and increased it in IMS. Chromatography of IMS demonstrated an ATP-dependent protease that degraded insulin, similar to described by Sitte et al. Mitochondria participate in insulin degradation and the diet increased it. High insulin did not accomplish mitochondrial decrease of degradation or its accumulation in mitoplasts. Mitochondrial incubation with insulin increased IDE in matrix. ATP suggested being a regulator of mitochondrial insulin degradation.

  7. Essential role of chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter-transcription factor II in insulin secretion and insulin sensitivity revealed by conditional gene knockout.

    PubMed

    Bardoux, Pascale; Zhang, Pili; Flamez, Daisy; Perilhou, Anaïs; Lavin, Tiphaine Aguirre; Tanti, Jean-François; Hellemans, Karine; Gomas, Emmanuel; Godard, Cécile; Andreelli, Fabrizio; Buccheri, Maria Antonietta; Kahn, Axel; Le Marchand-Brustel, Yannick; Burcelin, Rémy; Schuit, Frans; Vasseur-Cognet, Mireille

    2005-05-01

    Chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter-transcription factor II (COUP-TFII) has been implicated in the control of blood glucose by its potent effect on expression and signaling of various nuclear receptors. To understand the role of COUP-TFII in glucose homeostasis, conditional COUP-TFII-deficient mice were generated and crossed with mice expressing Cre under the control of rat insulin II gene promoter, resulting in deletion of COUP-TFII in pancreatic beta-cells. Homozygous mutants died before birth for yet undetermined reasons. Heterozygous mice appeared healthy at birth and showed normal growth and fertility. When challenged intraperitoneally, the animals had glucose intolerance associated with reduced glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Moreover, these heterozygous mice presented a mild increase in fasting and random-fed circulating insulin levels. In accordance, islets isolated from these animals exhibited higher insulin secretion in low glucose conditions and markedly decreased glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Their pancreata presented normal microscopic architecture and insulin content up to 16 weeks of study. Altered insulin secretion was associated with peripheral insulin resistance in whole animals. It can be concluded that COUP-TFII is a new, important regulator of glucose homeostasis and insulin sensitivity.

  8. Quantitative standards for absolute linguistic universals.

    PubMed

    Piantadosi, Steven T; Gibson, Edward

    2014-01-01

    Absolute linguistic universals are often justified by cross-linguistic analysis: If all observed languages exhibit a property, the property is taken to be a likely universal, perhaps specified in the cognitive or linguistic systems of language learners and users. In many cases, these patterns are then taken to motivate linguistic theory. Here, we show that cross-linguistic analysis will very rarely be able to statistically justify absolute, inviolable patterns in language. We formalize two statistical methods--frequentist and Bayesian--and show that in both it is possible to find strict linguistic universals, but that the numbers of independent languages necessary to do so is generally unachievable. This suggests that methods other than typological statistics are necessary to establish absolute properties of human language, and thus that many of the purported universals in linguistics have not received sufficient empirical justification.

  9. Enhanced insulin signaling in density-enhanced phosphatase-1 (DEP-1) knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Krüger, Janine; Brachs, Sebastian; Trappiel, Manuela; Kintscher, Ulrich; Meyborg, Heike; Wellnhofer, Ernst; Thöne-Reineke, Christa; Stawowy, Philipp; Östman, Arne; Birkenfeld, Andreas L.; Böhmer, Frank D.; Kappert, Kai

    2015-01-01

    Objective Insulin resistance can be triggered by enhanced dephosphorylation of the insulin receptor or downstream components in the insulin signaling cascade through protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs). Downregulating density-enhanced phosphatase-1 (DEP-1) resulted in an improved metabolic status in previous analyses. This phenotype was primarily caused by hepatic DEP-1 reduction. Methods Here we further elucidated the role of DEP-1 in glucose homeostasis by employing a conventional knockout model to explore the specific contribution of DEP-1 in metabolic tissues. Ptprj−/− (DEP-1 deficient) and wild-type C57BL/6 mice were fed a low-fat or high-fat diet. Metabolic phenotyping was combined with analyses of phosphorylation patterns of insulin signaling components. Additionally, experiments with skeletal muscle cells and muscle tissue were performed to assess the role of DEP-1 for glucose uptake. Results High-fat diet fed-Ptprj−/− mice displayed enhanced insulin sensitivity and improved glucose tolerance. Furthermore, leptin levels and blood pressure were reduced in Ptprj−/− mice. DEP-1 deficiency resulted in increased phosphorylation of components of the insulin signaling cascade in liver, skeletal muscle and adipose tissue after insulin challenge. The beneficial effect on glucose homeostasis in vivo was corroborated by increased glucose uptake in skeletal muscle cells in which DEP-1 was downregulated, and in skeletal muscle of Ptprj−/− mice. Conclusion Together, these data establish DEP-1 as novel negative regulator of insulin signaling. PMID:25830095

  10. Absolute Distance Measurement with the MSTAR Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lay, Oliver P.; Dubovitsky, Serge; Peters, Robert; Burger, Johan; Ahn, Seh-Won; Steier, William H.; Fetterman, Harrold R.; Chang, Yian

    2003-01-01

    The MSTAR sensor (Modulation Sideband Technology for Absolute Ranging) is a new system for measuring absolute distance, capable of resolving the integer cycle ambiguity of standard interferometers, and making it possible to measure distance with sub-nanometer accuracy. The sensor uses a single laser in conjunction with fast phase modulators and low frequency detectors. We describe the design of the system - the principle of operation, the metrology source, beamlaunching optics, and signal processing - and show results for target distances up to 1 meter. We then demonstrate how the system can be scaled to kilometer-scale distances.

  11. Absolutely relative or relatively absolute: violations of value invariance in human decision making.

    PubMed

    Teodorescu, Andrei R; Moran, Rani; Usher, Marius

    2016-02-01

    Making decisions based on relative rather than absolute information processing is tied to choice optimality via the accumulation of evidence differences and to canonical neural processing via accumulation of evidence ratios. These theoretical frameworks predict invariance of decision latencies to absolute intensities that maintain differences and ratios, respectively. While information about the absolute values of the choice alternatives is not necessary for choosing the best alternative, it may nevertheless hold valuable information about the context of the decision. To test the sensitivity of human decision making to absolute values, we manipulated the intensities of brightness stimuli pairs while preserving either their differences or their ratios. Although asked to choose the brighter alternative relative to the other, participants responded faster to higher absolute values. Thus, our results provide empirical evidence for human sensitivity to task irrelevant absolute values indicating a hard-wired mechanism that precedes executive control. Computational investigations of several modelling architectures reveal two alternative accounts for this phenomenon, which combine absolute and relative processing. One account involves accumulation of differences with activation dependent processing noise and the other emerges from accumulation of absolute values subject to the temporal dynamics of lateral inhibition. The potential adaptive role of such choice mechanisms is discussed.

  12. Molecular Mechanisms of Insulin Secretion and Insulin Action.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flatt, Peter R.; Bailey, Clifford J.

    1991-01-01

    Information and current ideas on the factors regulating insulin secretion, the mechanisms underlying the secretion and biological actions of insulin, and the main characteristics of diabetes mellitus are presented. (Author)

  13. Insulin Aspart (rDNA Origin) Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... unless it is used in an external insulin pump. In patients with type 2 diabetes, insulin aspart ... also can be used with an external insulin pump. Before using insulin aspart in a pump system, ...

  14. Models of GH deficiency in animal studies.

    PubMed

    Gahete, Manuel D; Luque, Raul M; Castaño, Justo P

    2016-12-01

    Growth hormone (GH) is a peptide hormone released from pituitary somatotrope cells that promotes growth, cell division and regeneration by acting directly through the GH receptor (GHR), or indirectly via hepatic insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) production. GH deficiency (GHD) can cause severe consequences, such as growth failure, changes in body composition and altered insulin sensitivity, depending of the origin, time of onset (childhood or adulthood) or duration of GHD. The highly variable clinical phenotypes of GHD can now be better understood through research on transgenic and naturally-occurring animal models, which are widely employed to investigate the origin, phenotype, and consequences of GHD, and particularly the underlying mechanisms of metabolic disorders associated to GHD. Here, we reviewed the most salient aspects of GH biology, from somatotrope development to GH actions, linked to certain GHD types, as well as the animal models employed to reproduce these GHD-associated alterations.

  15. PPAR gamma mediates high-fat diet-induced adipocyte hypertrophy and insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Kubota, N; Terauchi, Y; Miki, H; Tamemoto, H; Yamauchi, T; Komeda, K; Satoh, S; Nakano, R; Ishii, C; Sugiyama, T; Eto, K; Tsubamoto, Y; Okuno, A; Murakami, K; Sekihara, H; Hasegawa, G; Naito, M; Toyoshima, Y; Tanaka, S; Shiota, K; Kitamura, T; Fujita, T; Ezaki, O; Aizawa, S; Kadowaki, T

    1999-10-01

    Agonist-induced activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR gamma) is known to cause adipocyte differentiation and insulin sensitivity. The biological role of PPAR gamma was investigated by gene targeting. Homozygous PPAR gamma-deficient embryos died at 10.5-11.5 dpc due to placental dysfunction. Quite unexpectedly, heterozygous PPAR gamma-deficient mice were protected from the development of insulin resistance due to adipocyte hypertrophy under a high-fat diet. These phenotypes were abrogated by PPAR gamma agonist treatment. Heterozygous PPAR gamma-deficient mice showed overexpression and hypersecretion of leptin despite the smaller size of adipocytes and decreased fat mass, which may explain these phenotypes at least in part. This study reveals a hitherto unpredicted role for PPAR gamma in high-fat diet-induced obesity due to adipocyte hypertrophy and insulin resistance, which requires both alleles of PPAR gamma.

  16. Comparative vs. Absolute Judgments of Trait Desirability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hofstee, Willem K. B.

    1970-01-01

    Reversals of trait desirability are studied. Terms indicating conservativw behavior appeared to be judged relatively desirable in comparative judgement, while traits indicating dynamic and expansive behavior benefited from absolute judgement. The reversal effect was shown to be a general one, i.e. reversals were not dependent upon the specific…

  17. New Techniques for Absolute Gravity Measurements.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-01-07

    Hammond, J.A. (1978) Bollettino Di Geofisica Teorica ed Applicata Vol. XX. 8. Hammond, J. A., and Iliff, R. L. (1979) The AFGL absolute gravity system...International Gravimetric Bureau, No. L:I-43. 7. Hammond. J.A. (1978) Bollettino Di Geofisica Teorica ed Applicata Vol. XX. 8. Hammond, J.A., and

  18. An Absolute Electrometer for the Physics Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Straulino, S.; Cartacci, A.

    2009-01-01

    A low-cost, easy-to-use absolute electrometer is presented: two thin metallic plates and an electronic balance, usually available in a laboratory, are used. We report on the very good performance of the device that allows precise measurements of the force acting between two charged plates. (Contains 5 footnotes, 2 tables, and 6 figures.)

  19. Stimulus Probability Effects in Absolute Identification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kent, Christopher; Lamberts, Koen

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of stimulus presentation probability on accuracy and response times in an absolute identification task. Three schedules of presentation were used to investigate the interaction between presentation probability and stimulus position within the set. Data from individual participants indicated strong effects of…

  20. Absolute Positioning Using the Global Positioning System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-04-01

    Global Positioning System ( GPS ) has becom a useful tool In providing relativ survey...Includes the development of a low cost navigator for wheeled vehicles. ABSTRACT The Global Positioning System ( GPS ) has become a useful tool In providing...technique of absolute or point positioning involves the use of a single Global Positioning System ( GPS ) receiver to determine the three-dimenslonal

  1. [Management of type 1 diabetes (insulin, diet, sport): "Dorchy's recipes"].

    PubMed

    Dorchy, Harry

    2010-01-01

    The principal aims of therapeutic management of the child, adolescent and adult with type 1 diabetes are to allow good quality of life and to avoid long-term complications by maintaining blood glucose concentrations close to the normal range and an HbA1c level under 7%. The number of daily insulin injections, 2 or > or = 4, by itself does not necessarily give better results, but the 4-injection regimen allows greater freedom, taking into account that the proper insulin adjustment is difficult before adolescence. Successful glycemic control in young patients depends mainly on the quality and intensity of diabetes education. Any dogmatism must be avoided. Due to their pharmakokinetic characteristics, fast-acting and long-acting insulin analogues have specific indications in both the twice-daily injection regimen and the basal-bolus insulin therapy. They improve quality of life, without necessarily reducing HbA1c. Dietary recommendations issued over the last few years are the same for diabetic and non-diabetic individuals in order to avoid degenerative diseases. In the twice-daily free-mix regimen, the allocation of carbohydrates throughout the day is essential. There is no linear correlation between the metabolization of x grams of glucose by y units of insulin and carbohydrate counting is a piece of nonsense. Glycamic changes during exercise depend largely on blood insulin levels. In the young diabetic, during insulin deficiency, and therefore in a poor degree of metabolic control, i.e. hyperglycemic and ketotic, exercise accentuates hyperglycemia and ketosis, leading to extreme fatigue. If the insulin dosage is too high, the increase in muscular assimilation, combined with the shutdown of liver glucose production, may result in a severe hypoglycemia. During the recovery period, the repletion of muscular and hepatic glycogen stores may also provoke an hypoglycemia during hours after the cessation of muscular work.

  2. Mice Deficient in GEM GTPase Show Abnormal Glucose Homeostasis Due to Defects in Beta-Cell Calcium Handling

    PubMed Central

    Gunton, Jenny E.; Sisavanh, Mary; Stokes, Rebecca A.; Satin, Jon; Satin, Leslie S.; Zhang, Min; Liu, Sue M.; Cai, Weikang; Cheng, Kim; Cooney, Gregory J.; Laybutt, D. Ross; So, Trina; Molero, Juan-Carlos; Grey, Shane T.; Andres, Douglas A.

    2012-01-01

    Aims and Hypothesis Glucose-stimulated insulin secretion from beta-cells is a tightly regulated process that requires calcium flux to trigger exocytosis of insulin-containing vesicles. Regulation of calcium handling in beta-cells remains incompletely understood. Gem, a member of the RGK (Rad/Gem/Kir) family regulates calcium channel handling in other cell types, and Gem over-expression inhibits insulin release in insulin-secreting Min6 cells. The aim of this study was to explore the role of Gem in insulin secretion. We hypothesised that Gem may regulate insulin secretion and thus affect glucose tolerance in vivo. Methods Gem-deficient mice were generated and their metabolic phenotype characterised by in vivo testing of glucose tolerance, insulin tolerance and insulin secretion. Calcium flux was measured in isolated islets. Results Gem-deficient mice were glucose intolerant and had impaired glucose stimulated insulin secretion. Furthermore, the islets of Gem-deficient mice exhibited decreased free calcium responses to glucose and the calcium oscillations seen upon glucose stimulation were smaller in amplitude and had a reduced frequency. Conclusions These results suggest that Gem plays an important role in normal beta-cell function by regulation of calcium signalling. PMID:22761801

  3. Neonatal nucleated red blood cells in G6PD deficiency.

    PubMed

    Yeruchimovich, Mark; Shapira, Boris; Mimouni, Francis B; Dollberg, Shaul

    2002-05-01

    The objective of this study is to study the absolute number of nucleated red blood cells (RBC) at birth, an index of active fetal erythropoiesis, in infants with G6PD deficiency and in controls. We tested the hypothesis that hematocrit and hemoglobin would be lower, and absolute nucleated RBC counts higher, in the G6PD deficient and that these changes would be more prominent in infants exposed passively to fava bean through maternal diet. Thirty-two term infants with G6PD deficiency were compared with 30 term controls. Complete blood counts with manual differential counts were obtained within 12 hours of life. Absolute nucleated RBC and corrected leukocyte counts were computed from the Coulter results and the differential count. G6PD deficient patients did not differ from controls in terms of gestational age, birth weight, or Apgar scores or in any of the hematologic parameters studied, whether or not the mother reported fava beans consumption in the days prior to delivery. Although intrauterine hemolysis is possible in G6PD deficient fetuses exposed passively to fava beans, our study supports that such events must be very rare.

  4. Absolute Radiation Thermometry in the NIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bünger, L.; Taubert, R. D.; Gutschwager, B.; Anhalt, K.; Briaudeau, S.; Sadli, M.

    2017-04-01

    A near infrared (NIR) radiation thermometer (RT) for temperature measurements in the range from 773 K up to 1235 K was characterized and calibrated in terms of the "Mise en Pratique for the definition of the Kelvin" (MeP-K) by measuring its absolute spectral radiance responsivity. Using Planck's law of thermal radiation allows the direct measurement of the thermodynamic temperature independently of any ITS-90 fixed-point. To determine the absolute spectral radiance responsivity of the radiation thermometer in the NIR spectral region, an existing PTB monochromator-based calibration setup was upgraded with a supercontinuum laser system (0.45 μm to 2.4 μm) resulting in a significantly improved signal-to-noise ratio. The RT was characterized with respect to its nonlinearity, size-of-source effect, distance effect, and the consistency of its individual temperature measuring ranges. To further improve the calibration setup, a new tool for the aperture alignment and distance measurement was developed. Furthermore, the diffraction correction as well as the impedance correction of the current-to-voltage converter is considered. The calibration scheme and the corresponding uncertainty budget of the absolute spectral responsivity are presented. A relative standard uncertainty of 0.1 % (k=1) for the absolute spectral radiance responsivity was achieved. The absolute radiometric calibration was validated at four temperature values with respect to the ITS-90 via a variable temperature heatpipe blackbody (773 K ...1235 K) and at a gold fixed-point blackbody radiator (1337.33 K).

  5. Pyruvate kinase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... the second most common cause, after glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency . PKD is found in people ... Read More Anemia Autosomal recessive Enzyme Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency Hemolytic anemia Review Date 10/27/ ...

  6. Vitamin D Deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    Vitamin D Deficiency A Patient’s Guide Vitamin D helps the body absorb calcium. Along with calcium, it is vital ... for physicians about testing for, treating, and preventing vitamin D deficiency. These guidelines do not apply to people who ...

  7. Folate-deficiency anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000551.htm Folate-deficiency anemia To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Folate-deficiency anemia is a decrease in red blood cells (anemia) ...

  8. Pancreatic beta-cell-specific targeted disruption of glucokinase gene. Diabetes mellitus due to defective insulin secretion to glucose.

    PubMed

    Terauchi, Y; Sakura, H; Yasuda, K; Iwamoto, K; Takahashi, N; Ito, K; Kasai, H; Suzuki, H; Ueda, O; Kamada, N

    1995-12-22

    Mice carrying a null mutation in the glucokinase (GK) gene in pancreatic beta-cells, but not in the liver, were generated by disrupting the beta-cell-specific exon. Heterozygous mutant mice showed early-onset mild diabetes due to impaired insulin-secretory response to glucose. Homozygotes showed severe diabetes shortly after birth and died within a week. GK-deficient islets isolated from homozygotes showed defective insulin secretion in response to glucose, while they responded to other secretagogues: almost normally to arginine and to some extent to sulfonylureas. These data provide the first direct proof that GK serves as a glucose sensor molecule for insulin secretion and plays a pivotal role in glucose homeostasis. GK-deficient mice serve as an animal model of the insulin-secretory defect in human non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus.

  9. [Treatment by external insulin pump].

    PubMed

    Clavel, Sylvaine

    2010-12-01

    Since the recent recommendations by the French speaking association for research on diabetes and metabolic illnesses (Alfediam), treatment by insulin pump has found itself in competition with basal-bolus, a procedure using similar injections of insulin which has become a benchmark treatment. The latest Alfediam guidelines focus on defining ways of treating diabetics with an external insulin pump.

  10. Insulin Resistance in Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Dineley, Kelly T; Jahrling, Jordan B; Denner, Larry

    2014-01-01

    Insulin is a key hormone regulating metabolism. Insulin binding to cell surface insulin receptors engages many signaling intermediates operating in parallel and in series to control glucose, energy, and lipids while also regulating mitogenesis and development. Perturbations in the function of any of these intermediates, which occur in a variety of diseases, cause reduced sensitivity to insulin and insulin resistance with consequent metabolic dysfunction. Chronic inflammation ensues which exacerbates compromised metabolic homeostasis. Since insulin has a key role in learning and memory as well as directly regulating ERK, a kinase required for the type of learning and memory compromised in early Alzheimer's disease (AD), insulin resistance has been identified as a major risk factor for the onset of AD. Animal models of AD or insulin resistance or both demonstrate that AD pathology and impaired insulin signaling form a reciprocal relationship. Of note are human and animal model studies geared toward improving insulin resistance that have led to the identification of the nuclear receptor and transcription factor, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) as an intervention tool for early AD. Strategic targeting of alternate nodes within the insulin signaling network has revealed disease-stage therapeutic windows in animal models that coalesce with previous and ongoing clinical trial approaches. Thus, exploiting the connection between insulin resistance and AD provides powerful opportunities to delineate therapeutic interventions that slow or block the pathogenesis of AD. PMID:25237037

  11. Loss of CTRP5 improves insulin action and hepatic steatosis.

    PubMed

    Lei, Xia; Rodriguez, Susana; Petersen, Pia S; Seldin, Marcus M; Bowman, Caitlyn E; Wolfgang, Michael J; Wong, G William

    2016-06-01

    The gene that encodes C1q/TNF-related protein 5 (CTRP5), a secreted protein of the C1q family, is mutated in individuals with late-onset retinal degeneration. CTRP5 is widely expressed outside the eye and also circulates in plasma. Its physiological role in peripheral tissues, however, has yet to be elucidated. Here, we show that Ctrp5 expression is modulated by fasting and refeeding, and by different diets, in mice. Adipose expression of CTRP5 was markedly upregulated in obese and diabetic humans and in genetic and dietary models of obesity in rodents. Furthermore, human CTRP5 expression in the subcutaneous fat depot positively correlated with BMI. A genetic loss-of-function mouse model was used to address the metabolic function of CTRP5 in vivo. On a standard chow diet, CTRP5-deficient mice had reduced fasting insulin but were otherwise comparable with wild-type littermate controls in body weight and adiposity. However, when fed a high-fat diet, CTRP5-deficient animals had attenuated hepatic steatosis and improved insulin action. Loss of CTRP5 also improved the capacity of chow-fed aged mice to respond to subsequent high-fat feeding, as evidenced by decreased insulin resistance. In cultured adipocytes and myotubes, recombinant CTRP5 treatment attenuated insulin-stimulated Akt phosphorylation. Our results provide the first genetic and physiological evidence for CTRP5 as a negative regulator of glucose metabolism and insulin sensitivity. Inhibition of CTRP5 action may result in the alleviation of insulin resistance associated with obesity and diabetes.

  12. Chromium deficiency during total parenteral nutrition.

    PubMed

    Freund, H; Atamian, S; Fischer, J E

    1979-02-02

    Chromium is required for maintenance of normal glucose tolerance. After complete bowel resection and five months of total parenteral nutrition, severe glucose intolerance, weight loss, and a metabolic encephalopathy-like confusional state developed in a patient. Serum chromium levels were at the lowest normal level. Supplementation of 150 microgram of chromium per day reversed the glucose intolerance, reduced insulin requirements, and resulted in weight gain and the disappearance of encephalopathy. The low levels of chromium and response to chromium supplementation suggest that chromium deficiency can arise in long-term total parenteral nutrition.

  13. Protean manifestations of vitamin D deficiency, part 3: association with cardiovascular disease and disorders of the central and peripheral nervous systems.

    PubMed

    Bell, David S H

    2011-05-01

    Vitamin D deficiency is associated with the risk factors of inflammation, insulin resistance and endothelial dysfunction, and left ventricular hypertrophy. As a result there is an increase in cardiovascular events (CVEs) associated with vitamin D deficiency. Vitamin D deficiency itself or secondary hyperparathyroidism or both may be responsible for the increase in CVEs. Correction of vitamin D deficiency may decrease the incidence of CVEs. Vitamin D deficiency is also associated with Alzheimer disease, schizophrenia, depression, and chronic pain and muscle weakness. Vitamin D deficiency is early treated with oral vitamin D supplements which may improve the manifestations of the diseases associated with vitamin D deficiency.

  14. Globular adiponectin controls insulin-mediated vasoreactivity in muscle through AMPKα2.

    PubMed

    de Boer, Michiel P; Meijer, Rick I; Richter, Erik A; van Nieuw Amerongen, Geerten P; Sipkema, Pieter; van Poelgeest, Erik M; Aman, Jurjan; Kokhuis, Tom J A; Koolwijk, Pieter; van Hinsbergh, Victor W M; Smulders, Yvo M; Serné, Erik H; Eringa, Etto C

    2016-03-01

    Decreased tissue perfusion increases the risk of developing insulin resistance and cardiovascular disease in obesity, and decreased levels of globular adiponectin (gAdn) have been proposed to contribute to this risk. We hypothesized that gAdn controls insulin's vasoactive effects through AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), specifically its α2 subunit, and studied the mechanisms involved. In healthy volunteers, we found that decreased plasma gAdn levels in obese subjects associate with insulin resistance and reduced capillary perfusion during hyperinsulinemia. In cultured human microvascular endothelial cells (HMEC), gAdn increased AMPK activity. In isolated muscle resistance arteries gAdn uncovered insulin-induced vasodilation by selectively inhibiting insulin-induced activation of ERK1/2, and the AMPK inhibitor compound C as well as genetic deletion of AMPKα2 blunted insulin-induced vasodilation. In HMEC deletion of AMPKα2 abolished insulin-induced Ser(1177) phosphorylation of eNOS. In mice we confirmed that AMPKα2 deficiency decreases insulin sensitivity, and this was accompanied by decreased muscle microvascular blood volume during hyperinsulinemia in vivo. This impairment was accompanied by a decrease in arterial Ser(1177) phosphorylation of eNOS, which closely related to AMPK activity. In conclusion, globular adiponectin controls muscle perfusion during hyperinsulinemia through AMPKα2, which determines the balance between NO and ET-1 activity in muscle resistance arteries. Our findings provide a novel mechanism linking reduced gAdn-AMPK signaling to insulin resistance and impaired organ perfusion.

  15. Safety of continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion: metabolic deterioration and glycaemic autoregulation after deliberate cessation of infusion.

    PubMed

    Pickup, J C; Viberti, G C; Bilous, R W; Keen, H; Alberti, K G; Home, P D; Binder, C

    1982-03-01

    To assess the rate of metabolic deterioration and potential risks of failure of continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion during basal insulin delivery, we deliberately stopped infusion in nine insulin dependent diabetics. Plasma glucose, blood 3-hydroxybutyrate and plasma free insulin were measured for 9 h whilst the patients remained supine and fasting. Mean plasma glucose remained unchanged at normal fasting levels for the first hour, then rose to plateau at about 10 mmol/l until the end of the experiment. The final plateau level of glucose varied from patient to patient; two C-peptide secreting diabetics plateaued at low glucose levels. In contrast, blood 3-hydroxybutyrate rose progressively, without plateauing. PLasma free insulin concentrations fell during the withdrawal period and there was a highly significant negative correlation between free insulin and 3-hydroxybutyrate. No patient was more than mildly unwell after 9 h of insulin deprivation. We conclude that under these experimental conditions there is glycaemic autoregulation and that ketones may sometimes be a more appropriate monitor of insulin deficiency or loss of diabetic control than is glucose. Accidental failure of continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion and interruption of basal delivery in resting and fasting diabetics will probably not cause dangerous metabolic or clinical deterioration.

  16. Increased insulin translation from an insulin splice-variant overexpressed in diabetes, obesity, and insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Minn, Alexandra H; Lan, Hong; Rabaglia, Mary E; Harlan, David M; Peculis, Brenda A; Attie, Alan D; Shalev, Anath

    2005-03-01

    Type 2 diabetes occurs when pancreatic beta-cells become unable to compensate for the underlying insulin resistance. Insulin secretion requires beta-cell insulin stores to be replenished by insulin biosynthesis, which is mainly regulated at the translational level. Such translational regulation often involves the 5'-untranslated region. Recently, we identified a human insulin splice-variant (SPV) altering only the 5'-untranslated region and conferring increased translation efficiency. We now describe a mouse SPV (mSPV) that is found in the cytoplasm and exhibits increased translation efficiency resulting in more normal (prepro)insulin protein per RNA. The RNA stability of mSPV is not increased, but the predicted secondary RNA structure is altered, which may facilitate translation. To determine the role of mSPV in insulin resistance and diabetes, mSPV expression was measured by quantitative real-time RT-PCR in islets from three diabetic and/or insulin-resistant, obese and nonobese, mouse models (BTBRob/ob, C57BL/6ob/ob, and C57BL/6azip). Interestingly, mSPV expression was significantly higher in all diabetic/insulin-resistant mice compared with wild-type littermates and was dramatically induced in primary mouse islets incubated at high glucose. This raises the possibility that the mSPV may represent a compensatory beta-cell mechanism to enhance insulin biosynthesis when insulin requirements are elevated by hyperglycemia/insulin resistance.

  17. Tequila Regulates Insulin-Like Signaling and Extends Life Span in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Huang, Cheng-Wen; Wang, Horng-Dar; Bai, Hua; Wu, Ming-Shiang; Yen, Jui-Hung; Tatar, Marc; Fu, Tsai-Feng; Wang, Pei-Yu

    2015-12-01

    The aging process is a universal phenomenon shared by all living organisms. The identification of longevity genes is important in that the study of these genes is likely to yield significant insights into human senescence. In this study, we have identified Tequila as a novel candidate gene involved in the regulation of longevity in Drosophila melanogaster. We have found that a hypomorphic mutation of Tequila (Teq(f01792)), as well as cell-specific downregulation of Tequila in insulin-producing neurons of the fly, significantly extends life span. Tequila deficiency-induced life-span extension is likely to be associated with reduced insulin-like signaling, because Tequila mutant flies display several common phenotypes of insulin dysregulation, including reduced circulating Drosophila insulin-like peptide 2 (Dilp2), reduced Akt phosphorylation, reduced body size, and altered glucose homeostasis. These observations suggest that Tequila may confer life-span extension by acting as a modulator of Drosophila insulin-like signaling.

  18. Epidemiology of iodine deficiency.

    PubMed

    Vanderpump, Mark P

    2017-04-01

    Iodine is an essential component of the thyroid hormones thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3) produced by the thyroid gland. Iodine deficiency impairs thyroid hormone production and has adverse effects throughout life, particularly early in life as it impairs cognition and growth. Iodine deficiency remains a significant problem despite major national and international efforts to increase iodine intake, primarily through the voluntary or mandatory iodization of salt. Recent epidemiological data suggest that iodine deficiency is an emerging issue in industrialized countries, previously thought of as iodine-sufficient. International efforts to control iodine deficiency are slowing, and reaching the third of the worldwide population that remains deficient poses major challenges.

  19. From Hubble's NGSL to Absolute Fluxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heap, Sara R.; Lindler, Don

    2012-01-01

    Hubble's Next Generation Spectral Library (NGSL) consists of R-l000 spectra of 374 stars of assorted temperature, gravity, and metallicity. Each spectrum covers the wavelength range, 0.18-1.00 microns. The library can be viewed and/or downloaded from the website, http://archive.stsci.edu/prepds/stisngsll. Stars in the NGSL are now being used as absolute flux standards at ground-based observatories. However, the uncertainty in the absolute flux is about 2%, which does not meet the requirements of dark-energy surveys. We are therefore developing an observing procedure that should yield fluxes with uncertainties less than 1 % and will take part in an HST proposal to observe up to 15 stars using this new procedure.

  20. Absolute measurement of length with nanometric resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apostol, D.; Garoi, F.; Timcu, A.; Damian, V.; Logofatu, P. C.; Nascov, V.

    2005-08-01

    Laser interferometer displacement measuring transducers have a well-defined traceability route to the definition of the meter. The laser interferometer is de-facto length scale for applications in micro and nano technologies. However their physical unit -half lambda is too large for nanometric resolution. Fringe interpolation-usual technique to improve the resolution-lack of reproducibility could be avoided using the principles of absolute distance measurement. Absolute distance refers to the use of interferometric techniques for determining the position of an object without the necessity of measuring continuous displacements between points. The interference pattern as produced by the interference of two point-like coherent sources is fitted to a geometric model so as to determine the longitudinal location of the target by minimizing least square errors. The longitudinal coordinate of the target was measured with accuracy better than 1 nm, for a target position range of 0.4μm.

  1. Asteroid absolute magnitudes and slope parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tedesco, Edward F.

    1991-01-01

    A new listing of absolute magnitudes (H) and slope parameters (G) has been created and published in the Minor Planet Circulars; this same listing will appear in the 1992 Ephemerides of Minor Planets. Unlike previous listings, the values of the current list were derived from fits of data at the V band. All observations were reduced in the same fashion using, where appropriate, a single basis default value of 0.15 for the slope parameter. Distances and phase angles were computed for each observation. The data for 113 asteroids was of sufficiently high quality to permit derivation of their H and G. These improved absolute magnitudes and slope parameters will be used to deduce the most reliable bias-corrected asteroid size-frequency distribution yet made.

  2. Computer processing of spectrograms for absolute intensities.

    PubMed

    Guttman, A; Golden, J; Galbraith, H J

    1967-09-01

    A computer program was developed to process photographically recorded spectra for absolute intensity. Test and calibration films are subjected to densitometric scans that provide digitally recorded densities on magnetic tapes. The nonlinear calibration data are fitted by least-squares cubic polynomials to yield a good approximation to the monochromatic H&D curves for commonly used emulsions (2475 recording film, Royal-X, Tri-X, 4-X). Several test cases were made. Results of these cases show that the machine processed absolute intensities are accurate to within 15%o. Arbitrarily raising the sensitivity threshold by 0.1 density units above gross fog yields cubic polynomial fits to the H&D curves that are radiometrically accurate within 10%. In addition, curves of gamma vs wavelength for 2475, Tri-X, and 4-X emulsions were made. These data show slight evidence of the photographic Purkinje effect in the 2475 emulsion.

  3. An absolute measure for a key currency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oya, Shunsuke; Aihara, Kazuyuki; Hirata, Yoshito

    It is generally considered that the US dollar and the euro are the key currencies in the world and in Europe, respectively. However, there is no absolute general measure for a key currency. Here, we investigate the 24-hour periodicity of foreign exchange markets using a recurrence plot, and define an absolute measure for a key currency based on the strength of the periodicity. Moreover, we analyze the time evolution of this measure. The results show that the credibility of the US dollar has not decreased significantly since the Lehman shock, when the Lehman Brothers bankrupted and influenced the economic markets, and has increased even relatively better than that of the euro and that of the Japanese yen.

  4. Probing absolute spin polarization at the nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Eltschka, Matthias; Jäck, Berthold; Assig, Maximilian; Kondrashov, Oleg V; Skvortsov, Mikhail A; Etzkorn, Markus; Ast, Christian R; Kern, Klaus

    2014-12-10

    Probing absolute values of spin polarization at the nanoscale offers insight into the fundamental mechanisms of spin-dependent transport. Employing the Zeeman splitting in superconducting tips (Meservey-Tedrow-Fulde effect), we introduce a novel spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy that combines the probing capability of the absolute values of spin polarization with precise control at the atomic scale. We utilize our novel approach to measure the locally resolved spin polarization of magnetic Co nanoislands on Cu(111). We find that the spin polarization is enhanced by 65% when increasing the width of the tunnel barrier by only 2.3 Å due to the different decay of the electron orbitals into vacuum.

  5. Absolute and relative dosimetry for ELIMED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cirrone, G. A. P.; Cuttone, G.; Candiano, G.; Carpinelli, M.; Leonora, E.; Lo Presti, D.; Musumarra, A.; Pisciotta, P.; Raffaele, L.; Randazzo, N.; Romano, F.; Schillaci, F.; Scuderi, V.; Tramontana, A.; Cirio, R.; Marchetto, F.; Sacchi, R.; Giordanengo, S.; Monaco, V.

    2013-07-01

    The definition of detectors, methods and procedures for the absolute and relative dosimetry of laser-driven proton beams is a crucial step toward the clinical use of this new kind of beams. Hence, one of the ELIMED task, will be the definition of procedures aiming to obtain an absolute dose measure at the end of the transport beamline with an accuracy as close as possible to the one required for clinical applications (i.e. of the order of 5% or less). Relative dosimetry procedures must be established, as well: they are necessary in order to determine and verify the beam dose distributions and to monitor the beam fluence and the energetic spectra during irradiations. Radiochromic films, CR39, Faraday Cup, Secondary Emission Monitor (SEM) and transmission ionization chamber will be considered, designed and studied in order to perform a fully dosimetric characterization of the ELIMED proton beam.

  6. Transdermal Insulin Delivery Using Microdermabrasion

    PubMed Central

    Andrews, Samantha; Lee, Jeong Woo; Choi, Seong-O

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Transdermal insulin delivery is an attractive needle-free alternative to subcutaneous injection conventionally used to treat diabetes. However, skin’s barrier properties prevent insulin permeation at useful levels. Methods We investigated whether microdermabrasion can selectively remove skin’s surface layers to increase skin permeability as a method to administer insulin to diabetic rats. We further assessed the relative roles of stratum corneum and viable epidermis as barriers to insulin delivery. Results Pretreatment of skin with microdermabrasion to selectively remove stratum corneum did not have a significant effect on insulin delivery or reduction in blood glucose level (BGL). Removal of full epidermis by microdermabrasion significantly reduced BGL, similar to the positive control involving subcutaneous injection of 0.1U insulin. Significant pharmacokinetic differences between microdermabrasion and subcutaneous injection were faster time to peak insulin concentration after injection and larger peak insulin concentration and area-under-the-curve after microdermabrasion. Conclusions Microdermabrasion can increase skin permeability to insulin at levels sufficient to reduce BGL. Viable epidermis is a barrier to insulin delivery such that removal of full epidermis enables significantly more insulin delivery than removal of stratum corneum alone. PMID:21499837

  7. Insulin Signalling: The Inside Story.

    PubMed

    Posner, Barry I

    2017-02-01

    Insulin signalling begins with binding to its cell surface insulin receptor (IR), which is a tyrosine kinase. The insulin receptor kinase (IRK) is subsequently autophosphorylated and activated to tyrosine phosphorylate key cellular substrates that are essential for entraining the insulin response. Although IRK activation begins at the cell surface, it is maintained and augmented following internalization into the endosomal system (ENS). The peroxovanadium compounds (pVs) were discovered to activate the IRK in the absence of insulin and lead to a full insulin response. Thus, IRK activation is both necessary and sufficient for insulin signalling. Furthermore, this could be shown to occur with activation of only the endosomal IRK. The mechanism of pV action was shown to be the inhibition of IRK-associated phosphotyrosine phosphatases (PTPs). Our studies showed that the duration and intensity of insulin signalling are modulated within ENS by the recruitment of cellular substrates to ENS; intra-endosomal acidification, which promotes dissociation of insulin from the IRK; an endosomal acidic insulinase, which degrades intra-endosomal insulin; and IRK-associated PTPs, which dephosphorylate and, hence, deactivate the IRK. Therefore, the internalization of IRKs is central to insulin signalling and its regulation.

  8. Adipocyte lipolysis and insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Morigny, Pauline; Houssier, Marianne; Mouisel, Etienne; Langin, Dominique

    2016-06-01

    Obesity-induced insulin resistance is a major risk factor for the development of type 2 diabetes. Basal fat cell lipolysis (i.e., fat cell triacylglycerol breakdown into fatty acids and glycerol in the absence of stimulatory factors) is elevated during obesity and is closely associated with insulin resistance. Inhibition of adipocyte lipolysis may therefore be a promising therapeutic strategy for treating insulin resistance and preventing obesity-associated type 2 diabetes. In this review, we explore the relationship between adipose lipolysis and insulin sensitivity. After providing an overview of the components of fat cell lipolytic machinery, we describe the hypotheses that may support the causality between lipolysis and insulin resistance. Excessive circulating fatty acids may ectopically accumulate in insulin-sensitive tissues and impair insulin action. Increased basal lipolysis may also modify the secretory profile of adipose tissue, influencing whole body insulin sensitivity. Finally, excessive fatty acid release may also worsen adipose tissue inflammation, a well-known parameter contributing to insulin resistance. Partial genetic or pharmacologic inhibition of fat cell lipases in mice as well as short term clinical trials using antilipolytic drugs in humans support the benefit of fat cell lipolysis inhibition on systemic insulin sensitivity and glucose metabolism, which occurs without an increase of fat mass. Modulation of fatty acid fluxes and, putatively, of fat cell secretory pattern may explain the amelioration of insulin sensitivity whereas changes in adipose tissue immune response do not seem involved.

  9. Silicon Absolute X-Ray Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Seely, John F.; Korde, Raj; Sprunck, Jacob; Medjoubi, Kadda; Hustache, Stephanie

    2010-06-23

    The responsivity of silicon photodiodes having no loss in the entrance window, measured using synchrotron radiation in the 1.75 to 60 keV range, was compared to the responsivity calculated using the silicon thickness measured using near-infrared light. The measured and calculated responsivities agree with an average difference of 1.3%. This enables their use as absolute x-ray detectors.

  10. Negative absolute temperature for mobile particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, Simon; Ronzheimer, Philipp; Schreiber, Michael; Hodgman, Sean; Bloch, Immanuel; Schneider, Ulrich

    2013-05-01

    Absolute temperature is usually bound to be strictly positive. However, negative absolute temperature states, where the occupation probability of states increases with their energy, are possible in systems with an upper energy bound. So far, such states have only been demonstrated in localized spin systems with finite, discrete spectra. We realized a negative absolute temperature state for motional degrees of freedom with ultracold bosonic 39K atoms in an optical lattice, by implementing the attractive Bose-Hubbard Hamiltonian. This new state strikingly revealed itself by a quasimomentum distribution that is peaked at maximum kinetic energy. The measured kinetic energy distribution and the extracted negative temperature indicate that the ensemble is close to degeneracy, with coherence over several lattice sites. The state is as stable as a corresponding positive temperature state: The negative temperature stabilizes the system against mean-field collapse driven by negative pressure. Negative temperatures open up new parameter regimes for cold atoms, enabling fundamentally new many-body states. Additionally, they give rise to several counterintuitive effects such as heat engines with above unity efficiency.

  11. Measurement of absolute gravity acceleration in Firenze

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Angelis, M.; Greco, F.; Pistorio, A.; Poli, N.; Prevedelli, M.; Saccorotti, G.; Sorrentino, F.; Tino, G. M.

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports the results from the accurate measurement of the acceleration of gravity g taken at two separate premises in the Polo Scientifico of the University of Firenze (Italy). In these laboratories, two separate experiments aiming at measuring the Newtonian constant and testing the Newtonian law at short distances are in progress. Both experiments require an independent knowledge on the local value of g. The only available datum, pertaining to the italian zero-order gravity network, was taken more than 20 years ago at a distance of more than 60 km from the study site. Gravity measurements were conducted using an FG5 absolute gravimeter, and accompanied by seismic recordings for evaluating the noise condition at the site. The absolute accelerations of gravity at the two laboratories are (980 492 160.6 ± 4.0) μGal and (980 492 048.3 ± 3.0) μGal for the European Laboratory for Non-Linear Spectroscopy (LENS) and Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, respectively. Other than for the two referenced experiments, the data here presented will serve as a benchmark for any future study requiring an accurate knowledge of the absolute value of the acceleration of gravity in the study region.

  12. System for absolute measurements by interferometric sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norton, Douglas A.

    1993-03-01

    The most common problem of interferometric sensors is their inability to measure absolute path imbalance. Presented in this paper is a signal processing system that gives absolute, unambiguous reading of optical path difference for almost any style of interferometric sensor. Key components are a wide band (incoherent) optical source, a polychromator, and FFT electronics. Advantages include no moving parts in the signal processor, no active components at the sensor location, and the use of standard single mode fiber for sensor illumination and signal transmission. Actual absolute path imbalance of the interferometer is determined without using fringe counting or other inferential techniques. The polychromator extracts the interference information that occurs at each discrete wavelength within the spectral band of the optical source. The signal processing consists of analog and digital filtering, Fast Fourier analysis, and a peak detection and interpolation algorithm. This system was originally designed for use in a remote pressure sensing application that employed a totally passive fiber optic interferometer. A performance qualification was made using a Fabry-Perot interferometer and a commercially available laser interferometer to measure the reference displacement.

  13. Chemical composition of French mimosa absolute oil.

    PubMed

    Perriot, Rodolphe; Breme, Katharina; Meierhenrich, Uwe J; Carenini, Elise; Ferrando, Georges; Baldovini, Nicolas

    2010-02-10

    Since decades mimosa (Acacia dealbata) absolute oil has been used in the flavor and perfume industry. Today, it finds an application in over 80 perfumes, and its worldwide industrial production is estimated five tons per year. Here we report on the chemical composition of French mimosa absolute oil. Straight-chain analogues from C6 to C26 with different functional groups (hydrocarbons, esters, aldehydes, diethyl acetals, alcohols, and ketones) were identified in the volatile fraction. Most of them are long-chain molecules: (Z)-heptadec-8-ene, heptadecane, nonadecane, and palmitic acid are the most abundant, and constituents such as 2-phenethyl alcohol, methyl anisate, and ethyl palmitate are present in smaller amounts. The heavier constituents were mainly triterpenoids such as lupenone and lupeol, which were identified as two of the main components. (Z)-Heptadec-8-ene, lupenone, and lupeol were quantified by GC-MS in SIM mode using external standards and represents 6%, 20%, and 7.8% (w/w) of the absolute oil. Moreover, odorant compounds were extracted by SPME and analyzed by GC-sniffing leading to the perception of 57 odorant zones, of which 37 compounds were identified by their odorant description, mass spectrum, retention index, and injection of the reference compound.

  14. Constrained Least Absolute Deviation Neural Networks

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhishun; Peterson, Bradley S.

    2008-01-01

    It is well known that least absolute deviation (LAD) criterion or L1-norm used for estimation of parameters is characterized by robustness, i.e., the estimated parameters are totally resistant (insensitive) to large changes in the sampled data. This is an extremely useful feature, especially, when the sampled data are known to be contaminated by occasionally occurring outliers or by spiky noise. In our previous works, we have proposed the least absolute deviation neural network (LADNN) to solve unconstrained LAD problems. The theoretical proofs and numerical simulations have shown that the LADNN is Lyapunov-stable and it can globally converge to the exact solution to a given unconstrained LAD problem. We have also demonstrated its excellent application value in time-delay estimation. More generally, a practical LAD application problem may contain some linear constraints, such as a set of equalities and/or inequalities, which is called constrained LAD problem, whereas the unconstrained LAD can be considered as a special form of the constrained LAD. In this paper, we present a new neural network called constrained least absolute deviation neural network (CLADNN) to solve general constrained LAD problems. Theoretical proofs and numerical simulations demonstrate that the proposed CLADNN is Lyapunov stable and globally converges to the exact solution to a given constrained LAD problem, independent of initial values. The numerical simulations have also illustrated that the proposed CLADNN can be used to robustly estimate parameters for nonlinear curve fitting, which is extensively used in signal and image processing. PMID:18269958

  15. Insulin secretion in the hibernating edible dormouse (Glis glis): in vivo and in vitro studies.

    PubMed

    Castex, C; Tahri, A; Hoo-Paris, R; Sutter, B C

    1984-01-01

    Plasma glucose and insulin have been studied during lethargy and spontaneous arousal of hibernating edible dormouse. During lethargy blood glucose was low while plasma insulin remained at the same level as in other seasons. Plasma glucose and insulin did not fluctuate along the phase of lethargy. During spontaneous arousal plasma insulin rose strongly from the 17 degrees C stage, reaching the higher values at 26 degrees C while blood glucose was only 85 mg/100 ml, then decreased at 37 degrees C. The effect of glucose and temperature on insulin secretion was studied using perfused pancreas preparation from hibernating edible dormice. During the rewarming of the edible dormouse pancreas the insulin release did not occur in response to the absolute extracellular glucose level but occurred in response to a B cell membrane phenomenon which was dependent on the changing rate of glucose level. The effect of glucose and temperature on insulin secretion from perfused pancreas was compared between edible dormouse and homeotherm permanent, the rat. The B cell response to glucose of the dormouse pancreas increased up to 15 degrees C whereas that of the rat only from 25 degrees C. The dormouse insulin secretion reached a peak value at the 30 degrees C of temperature, whereas that of the rat progressively increased until 37 degrees C. These results showed that some biochemical adjustment or process of acclimatization took place in the B cells of the hibernators.

  16. Fine-mapping diabetes-related traits, including insulin resistance, in heterogeneous stock rats.

    PubMed

    Solberg Woods, Leah C; Holl, Katie L; Oreper, Daniel; Xie, Yuying; Tsaih, Shirng-Wern; Valdar, William

    2012-11-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is a disease of relative insulin deficiency resulting from both insulin resistance and beta cell failure. We have previously used heterogeneous stock (HS) rats to fine-map a locus for glucose tolerance. We show here that glucose intolerance in the founder strains of the HS colony is mediated by different mechanisms: insulin resistance in WKY and an insulin secretion defect in ACI, and we demonstrate a high degree of variability for measures of insulin resistance and insulin secretion in HS rats. As such, our goal was to use HS rats to fine-map several diabetes-related traits within a region on rat chromosome 1. We measured blood glucose and plasma insulin levels after a glucose tolerance test in 782 male HS rats. Using 97 SSLP markers, we genotyped a 68 Mb region on rat chromosome 1 previously implicated in glucose and insulin regulation. We used linkage disequilibrium mapping by mixed model regression with inferred descent to identify a region from 198.85 to 205.9 that contains one or more quantitative trait loci (QTL) for fasting insulin and a measure of insulin resistance, the quantitative insulin sensitivity check index. This region also encompasses loci identified for fasting glucose and Insulin_AUC (area under the curve). A separate <3 Mb QTL was identified for body weight. Using a novel penalized regression method we then estimated effects of alternative haplotype pairings under each locus. These studies highlight the utility of HS rats for fine-mapping genetic loci involved in the underlying causes of T2D.

  17. Insulin treatment of type 2 diabetes: considerations when converting from human insulin to insulin analogs.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Stacy

    2013-03-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a highly prevalent disease characterized by insulin resistance, hyperglycemia, and diminished pancreatic β-cell function. Conventional insulin products used to manage this disease include regular human insulin and intermediate-acting human insulin. However, due to several limitations imposed by human insulins, such as onset and duration of action that do not coincide with physiologic needs and increased risk of hypoglycemia, insulin analogs were developed. Because they more closely mimic the physiologic action of endogenous insulin, insulin analogs are associated with more effective glucose control, a lower risk of hypoglycemia, greater convenience, and, in some instances, less weight gain. Switching from human insulin to insulin analogs is easily accomplished. Several studies have demonstrated a high rate of success with patient-initiated, self-adjusted dosing algorithms compared to investigator/clinician-initiated dose adjustments. These studies and several other published guidelines on insulin analogs provide patients and clinicians with information pertaining to better treatment options and can help increase overall patient satisfaction.

  18. Insulin resistance in chronic kidney disease: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Spoto, Belinda; Pisano, Anna; Zoccali, Carmine

    2016-12-01

    Insulin resistance (IR) is an early metabolic alteration in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients, being apparent when the glomerular filtration rate is still within the normal range and becoming almost universal in those who reach the end stage of kidney failure. The skeletal muscle represents the primary site of IR in CKD, and alterations at sites beyond the insulin receptor are recognized as the main defect underlying IR in this condition. Estimates of IR based on fasting insulin concentration are easier and faster but may not be adequate in patients with CKD because renal insufficiency reduces insulin catabolism. The hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp is the gold standard for the assessment of insulin sensitivity because this technique allows a direct measure of skeletal muscle sensitivity to insulin. The etiology of IR in CKD is multifactorial in nature and may be secondary to disturbances that are prominent in renal diseases, including physical inactivity, chronic inflammation, oxidative stress, vitamin D deficiency, metabolic acidosis, anemia, adipokine derangement, and altered gut microbiome. IR contributes to the progression of renal disease by worsening renal hemodynamics by various mechanisms, including activation of the sympathetic nervous system, sodium retention, and downregulation of the natriuretic peptide system. IR has been solidly associated with intermediate mechanisms leading to cardiovascular (CV) disease in CKD including left ventricular hypertrophy, vascular dysfunction, and atherosclerosis. However, it remains unclear whether IR is an independent predictor of mortality and CV complications in CKD. Because IR is a modifiable risk factor and its reduction may lower CV morbidity and mortality, unveiling the molecular mechanisms responsible for the pathogenesis of CKD-related insulin resistance is of importance for the identification of novel therapeutic targets aimed at reducing the high CV risk of this condition.

  19. The Unexplored Crossroads of the Female Athlete Triad and Iron Deficiency: A Narrative Review.

    PubMed

    Petkus, Dylan L; Murray-Kolb, Laura E; De Souza, Mary Jane

    2017-03-13

    Despite the severity and prevalence of iron deficiency in exercising women, few published reports have explored how iron deficiency interacts with another prevalent and severe condition in exercising women: the 'female athlete triad.' This review aims to describe how iron deficiency may interact with each component of the female athlete triad, that is, energy status, reproductive function, and bone health. The effects of iron deficiency on energy status are discussed in regards to thyroid function, metabolic fuel availability, eating behaviors, and energy expenditure. The interactions between iron deficiency and reproductive function are explored by discussing the potentially impaired fertility and hyperprolactinemia due to iron deficiency and the alterations in iron metabolism due to menstrual blood loss and estrogen exposure. The interaction of iron deficiency with bone health may occur via dysregulation of the growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor-1 axis, hypoxia, and hypothyroidism. Based on these discussions, several future directions for research are presented.

  20. Insulin receptor in Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    Petruzzelli, L.; Herrera, R.; Rosen, O.

    1986-05-01

    A specific, high affinity insulin receptor is present in both adult Drosophila and in Drosophila embryos. Wheat germ lectin-enriched extracts of detergent-solubilized membranes from embryos and adults bind insulin with a K/sub d/ of 15 nM. Binding is specific for insulin; micromolar concentrations of proinsulin, IGFI, and IGFII are required to displace bound /sup 125/I-insulin. Insulin-dependent protein tyrosine kinase activity appears during embryogenesis. It is evident between 6 and 12 hours of development, peaks between 12 and 18 hours and falls in the adult. During 0-6 hours of embryogenesis, and in the adult, a specific protein band (Mr = 135,000) is crosslinked to /sup 125/I-insulin. During 6-12 and 12-18 hours of embryogenesis stages in which insulin-dependent protein tyrosine kinase is high, an additional band (Mr = 100,000) becomes crosslinked to /sup 125/I-insulin. Isolation and DNA sequence analysis of genomic clones encoding the Drosophila insulin receptor will be presented as will the characterization of insulin receptor mRNA's during development.

  1. Variability of NPH insulin preparations.

    PubMed

    Belmonte, M M; Colle, E; DeBelle, R; Murthy, D Y

    1971-01-23

    In 1968-69 certain juvenile diabetics receiving NPH insulin began having pre-breakfast glucosuria and mid-morning hypoglycemic reactions. A mail survey of our clinic population and a study done at the Quebec camp for diabetic children in 1969 revealed that certain lot numbers were associated with poor control and that a change to new lot numbers or alternate insulin preparations resulted in better control. "Suspect" insulin preparations and non-suspect insulins were given to newly diagnosed diabetics, and plasma insulin and glucose levels were measured over a 24-hour period. The data confirmed that the "suspect" insulins were causing early hypoglycemia and failing to control hyperglycemia during the latter hours of the 24-hour period. The lower glucose levels were associated with higher plasma insulin levels. The "suspect" insulins were further found to have elevated levels of free insulin in the supernatant fluid.The requirements for quality control of modified insulin preparations are reviewed and suggestions are offered for their improvement.

  2. Pitfalls of Insulin Pump Clocks

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Amy J.

    2014-01-01

    The objective was to raise awareness about the importance of ensuring that insulin pumps internal clocks are set up correctly at all times. This is a very important safety issue because all commercially available insulin pumps are not GPS-enabled (though this is controversial), nor equipped with automatically adjusting internal clocks. Special attention is paid to how basal and bolus dose errors can be introduced by daylight savings time changes, travel across time zones, and am-pm clock errors. Correct setting of insulin pump internal clock is crucial for appropriate insulin delivery. A comprehensive literature review is provided, as are illustrative cases. Incorrect setting can potentially result in incorrect insulin delivery, with potential harmful consequences, if too much or too little insulin is delivered. Daylight saving time changes may not significantly affect basal insulin delivery, given the triviality of the time difference. However, bolus insulin doses can be dramatically affected. Such problems may occur when pump wearers have large variations in their insulin to carb ratio, especially if they forget to change their pump clock in the spring. More worrisome than daylight saving time change is the am-pm clock setting. If this setting is set up incorrectly, both basal rates and bolus doses will be affected. Appropriate insulin delivery through insulin pumps requires correct correlation between dose settings and internal clock time settings. Because insulin pumps are not GPS-enabled or automatically time-adjusting, extra caution should be practiced by patients to ensure correct time settings at all times. Clinicians and diabetes educators should verify the date/time of insulin pumps during patients’ visits, and should remind their patients to always verify these settings. PMID:25355713

  3. Impairment of the peripheral lymphoid compartment in iron-deficient piglets.

    PubMed

    Svoboda, M; Drabek, J; Krejci, J; Rehakova, Z; Faldyna, M

    2004-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of neonatal iron deficiency on immune functions in young piglets. While control piglets were not given any iron preparation until the age of 21 days, another group of piglets was given 200 mg of Fe(3+)-dextran i.m. on day 3. Red blood cell parameters in the former, iron-deficient group were characteristic of hypochromic anaemia. In addition, the total leucocyte count (P < 0.01), relative and absolute neutrophil count (P < 0.01) and absolute lymphocyte count (P < 0.05) in peripheral blood were found significantly lower in iron-deficient piglets than in their iron-supplemented counterparts. Lymphocyte activity as measured by in vitro lymphocyte transformation test was impaired in iron-deficient piglets. A statistically significant decrease in circulating B-lymphocyte numbers was found in non-supplemented animals. Iron deficiency apparently negatively influenced the immunocompetence in piglets.

  4. Excessive Refined Carbohydrates and Scarce Micronutrients Intakes Increase Inflammatory Mediators and Insulin Resistance in Prepubertal and Pubertal Obese Children Independently of Obesity

    PubMed Central

    López-Alarcón, Mardia; Perichart-Perera, Otilia; Rodríguez-Cruz, Maricela; Armenta-Álvarez, Andrea; Bram-Falcón, María Teresa; Mayorga-Ochoa, Marielle

    2014-01-01

    Background. Low-grade inflammation is the link between obesity and insulin resistance. Because physiologic insulin resistance occurs at puberty, obese pubertal children are at higher risk for insulin resistance. Excessive diets in refined carbohydrates and saturated fats are risk factors for insulin resistance, but calcium, magnesium, vitamin-D, and the omega-3 fatty acids likely protect against inflammation and insulin resistance. Objective. To analyze interactions among dietary saturated fat, refined carbohydrates, calcium, magnesium, vitamin D, and omega-3 fatty acids on the risk of inflammation and insulin resistance in a sample of prepubertal and pubertal children. Methods. A sample of 229 children from Mexico City was analyzed in a cross-sectional design. Anthropometric measurements, 24 h recall questionnaires, and blood samples were obtained. Serum insulin, glucose, calcium, magnesium, 25-OHD3, C-reactive protein, leptin, adiponectin, and erythrocytes fatty acids were measured. Parametric and nonparametric statistics were used for analysis. Results. While mean macronutrients intake was excessive, micronutrients intake was deficient (P < 0.01). Inflammation determinants were central obesity and magnesium-deficient diets. Determinants of insulin resistance were carbohydrates intake and circulating magnesium and adiponectin. Conclusions. Magnesium-deficient diets are determinants of inflammation, while high intake of refined carbohydrates is a risk factor for insulin resistance, independently of central adiposity. PMID:25477716

  5. Comparison of high fibre diets, basal insulin supplements, and flexible insulin treatment for non-insulin dependent (type II) diabetics poorly controlled with sulphonylureas.

    PubMed Central

    Scott, A. R.; Attenborough, Y.; Peacock, I.; Fletcher, E.; Jeffcoate, W. J.; Tattersall, R. B.

    1988-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To compare high fibre diet, basal insulin supplements and a regimen of insulin four times daily in non-insulin dependent (type II) diabetic patients who were poorly controlled with sulphonylureas. DESIGN--Run in period lasting 2-3 months during which self monitoring of glucose concentration was taught, followed by six months on a high fibre diet, followed by six months' treatment with insulin in those patients who did not respond to the high fibre diet. SETTING--Teaching hospital diabetic clinics. PATIENTS--33 patients who had had diabetes for at least two years and had haemoglobin A1 concentrations over 10% despite receiving nearly maximum doses of oral hypoglycaemic agents. No absolute indications for treatment with insulin. INTERVENTIONS--During the high fibre diet daily fibre intake was increased by a mean of 16 g (95% confidence interval 12 to 20 g.) Twenty five patients were then started on once daily insulin. After three months 14 patients were started on four injections of insulin daily. ENDPOINT--Control of diabetes (haemoglobin A1 concentration less than or equal to 10% and fasting plasma glucose concentration less than or equal to 6 mmol/l) or completion of six months on insulin treatment. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS-- No change in weight, diet, or concentrations of fasting glucose or haemoglobin A1 occurred during run in period. During high fibre diet there were no changes in haemoglobin A1 concentrations, but mean fasting glucose concentrations rose by 1.7 mmol/l (95% confidence interval 0.9 to 2.5, p less than 0.01). With once daily insulin mean concentrations of fasting plasma glucose fell from 12.6 to 7.6 mmol/l (p less than 0.001) and haemoglobin A1 from 14.6% to 11.2% (p less than 0.001). With insulin four times daily concentrations of haemoglobin A1 fell from 11.5% to 9.6% (p less than 0.02). Lipid concentrations were unchanged by high fibre diet. In patients receiving insulin the mean cholesterol concentrations fell from 7.1 to 6

  6. A two year observation of the process of applying recombinant IGF-1 to treat short stature in children with primary IGF-1 deficiency -- case reports of 3 patients.

    PubMed

    Petriczko, Elżbieta; Wikiera, Beata; Horodnicka-Józwa, Anita; Marcinkiewicz, Katarzyna; Szmit-Domagalska, Justyna; Kędzia, Andrzej; Durzyńska, Julia; Broniarczyk, Justyna; Gabryelczyk, Bartosz; Noczyńska, Anna; Walczak, Mieczysław

    2011-01-01

    Growth deficiency is one of the most frequent causes of referral to Endocrinology Outpatient Clinic. IGF-1 (insulin-like growth factor 1) deficiency is one of the rarest causes of short stature. In 2009 in Poland a therapeutic programme was set up for children with severe primary IGF-1 deficiency. The authors present the data of three first polish patients qualified for the rhIGF-1 (recombinant human insulin-like growth factor 1) - mecasermin. The authors conclude that the treatment with rhIGF-1 significantly improves growth velocity in patients with IGF-1 deficiency. During two years of mecasermin treatment no serious side effects were noted.

  7. Colour vision deficiency.

    PubMed

    Simunovic, M P

    2010-05-01

    Colour vision deficiency is one of the commonest disorders of vision and can be divided into congenital and acquired forms. Congenital colour vision deficiency affects as many as 8% of males and 0.5% of females--the difference in prevalence reflects the fact that the commonest forms of congenital colour vision deficiency are inherited in an X-linked recessive manner. Until relatively recently, our understanding of the pathophysiological basis of colour vision deficiency largely rested on behavioural data; however, modern molecular genetic techniques have helped to elucidate its mechanisms. The current management of congenital colour vision deficiency lies chiefly in appropriate counselling (including career counselling). Although visual aids may be of benefit to those with colour vision deficiency when performing certain tasks, the evidence suggests that they do not enable wearers to obtain normal colour discrimination. In the future, gene therapy remains a possibility, with animal models demonstrating amelioration following treatment.

  8. Acquired color vision deficiency.

    PubMed

    Simunovic, Matthew P

    2016-01-01

    Acquired color vision deficiency occurs as the result of ocular, neurologic, or systemic disease. A wide array of conditions may affect color vision, ranging from diseases of the ocular media through to pathology of the visual cortex. Traditionally, acquired color vision deficiency is considered a separate entity from congenital color vision deficiency, although emerging clinical and molecular genetic data would suggest a degree of overlap. We review the pathophysiology of acquired color vision deficiency, the data on its prevalence, theories for the preponderance of acquired S-mechanism (or tritan) deficiency, and discuss tests of color vision. We also briefly review the types of color vision deficiencies encountered in ocular disease, with an emphasis placed on larger or more detailed clinical investigations.

  9. Neuronal Androgen Receptor Regulates Insulin Sensitivity via Suppression of Hypothalamic NF-κB–Mediated PTP1B Expression

    PubMed Central

    Yu, I-Chen; Lin, Hung-Yun; Liu, Ning-Chun; Sparks, Janet D.; Yeh, Shuyuan; Fang, Lei-Ya; Chen, Lumin; Chang, Chawnshang

    2013-01-01

    Clinical investigations highlight the increased incidence of metabolic syndrome in prostate cancer (PCa) patients receiving androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). Studies using global androgen receptor (AR) knockout mice demonstrate that AR deficiency results in the development of insulin resistance in males. However, mechanisms by which AR in individual organs coordinately regulates insulin sensitivity remain unexplored. Here we tested the hypothesis that functional AR in the brain contributes to whole-body insulin sensitivity regulation and to the metabolic abnormalities developed in AR-deficient male mice. The mouse model selectively lacking AR in the central nervous system and AR-expressing GT1-7 neuronal cells were established and used to delineate molecular mechanisms in insulin signaling modulated by AR. Neuronal AR deficiency leads to reduced insulin sensitivity in middle-aged mice. Neuronal AR regulates hypothalamic insulin signaling by repressing nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB)–mediated induction of protein-tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B). Hypothalamic insulin resistance leads to hepatic insulin resistance, lipid accumulation, and visceral obesity. The functional deficiency of AR in the hypothalamus leads to male mice being more susceptible to the effects of high-fat diet consumption on PTP1B expression and NF-κB activation. These findings suggest that in men with PCa undergoing ADT, reduction of AR function in the brain may contribute to insulin resistance and visceral obesity. Pharmacotherapies targeting neuronal AR and NF-κB may be developed to combat the metabolic syndrome in men receiving ADT and in elderly men with age-associated hypogonadism. PMID:23139353

  10. Autism and Folate Deficiency

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-01

    W81XWH-09-1-0246 TITLE: Autism and Folate Deficiency PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Richard H. Finnell, Ph.D...5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-09-1-0246 Autism and Folate Deficiency 5b. GRANT NUMBER AR080064-Concept Award 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER...risk factor for autism : alterations in m ethionine metabolism in autistic patients may be due to a functional folate deficiency, and folate receptor

  11. Clock time is absolute and universal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Xinhang

    2015-09-01

    A critical error is found in the Special Theory of Relativity (STR): mixing up the concepts of the STR abstract time of a reference frame and the displayed time of a physical clock, which leads to use the properties of the abstract time to predict time dilation on physical clocks and all other physical processes. Actually, a clock can never directly measure the abstract time, but can only record the result of a physical process during a period of the abstract time such as the number of cycles of oscillation which is the multiplication of the abstract time and the frequency of oscillation. After Lorentz Transformation, the abstract time of a reference frame expands by a factor gamma, but the frequency of a clock decreases by the same factor gamma, and the resulting multiplication i.e. the displayed time of a moving clock remains unchanged. That is, the displayed time of any physical clock is an invariant of Lorentz Transformation. The Lorentz invariance of the displayed times of clocks can further prove within the framework of STR our earth based standard physical time is absolute, universal and independent of inertial reference frames as confirmed by both the physical fact of the universal synchronization of clocks on the GPS satellites and clocks on the earth, and the theoretical existence of the absolute and universal Galilean time in STR which has proved that time dilation and space contraction are pure illusions of STR. The existence of the absolute and universal time in STR has directly denied that the reference frame dependent abstract time of STR is the physical time, and therefore, STR is wrong and all its predictions can never happen in the physical world.

  12. Absolute Radiometric Calibration of EUNIS-06

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, R. J.; Rabin, D. M.; Kent, B. J.; Paustian, W.

    2007-01-01

    The Extreme-Ultraviolet Normal-Incidence Spectrometer (EUNIS) is a soundingrocket payload that obtains imaged high-resolution spectra of individual solar features, providing information about the Sun's corona and upper transition region. Shortly after its successful initial flight last year, a complete end-to-end calibration was carried out to determine the instrument's absolute radiometric response over its Longwave bandpass of 300 - 370A. The measurements were done at the Rutherford-Appleton Laboratory (RAL) in England, using the same vacuum facility and EUV radiation source used in the pre-flight calibrations of both SOHO/CDS and Hinode/EIS, as well as in three post-flight calibrations of our SERTS sounding rocket payload, the precursor to EUNIS. The unique radiation source provided by the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) had been calibrated to an absolute accuracy of 7% (l-sigma) at 12 wavelengths covering our bandpass directly against the Berlin electron storage ring BESSY, which is itself a primary radiometric source standard. Scans of the EUNIS aperture were made to determine the instrument's absolute spectral sensitivity to +- 25%, considering all sources of error, and demonstrate that EUNIS-06 was the most sensitive solar E W spectrometer yet flown. The results will be matched against prior calibrations which relied on combining measurements of individual optical components, and on comparisons with theoretically predicted 'insensitive' line ratios. Coordinated observations were made during the EUNIS-06 flight by SOHO/CDS and EIT that will allow re-calibrations of those instruments as well. In addition, future EUNIS flights will provide similar calibration updates for TRACE, Hinode/EIS, and STEREO/SECCHI/EUVI.

  13. Achieving Climate Change Absolute Accuracy in Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wielicki, Bruce A.; Young, D. F.; Mlynczak, M. G.; Thome, K. J; Leroy, S.; Corliss, J.; Anderson, J. G.; Ao, C. O.; Bantges, R.; Best, F.; Bowman, K.; Brindley, H.; Butler, J. J.; Collins, W.; Dykema, J. A.; Doelling, D. R.; Feldman, D. R.; Fox, N.; Huang, X.; Holz, R.; Huang, Y.; Jennings, D.; Jin, Z.; Johnson, D. G.; Jucks, K.; Kato, S.; Kratz, D. P.; Liu, X.; Lukashin, C.; Mannucci, A. J.; Phojanamongkolkij, N.; Roithmayr, C. M.; Sandford, S.; Taylor, P. C.; Xiong, X.

    2013-01-01

    The Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO) mission will provide a calibration laboratory in orbit for the purpose of accurately measuring and attributing climate change. CLARREO measurements establish new climate change benchmarks with high absolute radiometric accuracy and high statistical confidence across a wide range of essential climate variables. CLARREO's inherently high absolute accuracy will be verified and traceable on orbit to Système Internationale (SI) units. The benchmarks established by CLARREO will be critical for assessing changes in the Earth system and climate model predictive capabilities for decades into the future as society works to meet the challenge of optimizing strategies for mitigating and adapting to climate change. The CLARREO benchmarks are derived from measurements of the Earth's thermal infrared spectrum (5-50 micron), the spectrum of solar radiation reflected by the Earth and its atmosphere (320-2300 nm), and radio occultation refractivity from which accurate temperature profiles are derived. The mission has the ability to provide new spectral fingerprints of climate change, as well as to provide the first orbiting radiometer with accuracy sufficient to serve as the reference transfer standard for other space sensors, in essence serving as a "NIST [National Institute of Standards and Technology] in orbit." CLARREO will greatly improve the accuracy and relevance of a wide range of space-borne instruments for decadal climate change. Finally, CLARREO has developed new metrics and methods for determining the accuracy requirements of climate observations for a wide range of climate variables and uncertainty sources. These methods should be useful for improving our understanding of observing requirements for most climate change observations.

  14. Iron deficiency: new insights into diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Camaschella, Clara

    2015-01-01

    Iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia are common conditions worldwide affecting especially children and young women. In developing countries, iron deficiency is caused by poor iron intake and/or parasitic infection, whereas vegetarian dietary choices, poor iron absorption, and chronic blood loss are common causes in high-income countries. Erythropoiesis stimulating agents can result in functional iron deficiency for erythropoiesis even when stores are iron-replete. Diagnosis of iron deficiency is straightforward, except when it occurs in the context of inflammatory disorders. Oral iron salts correct absolute iron deficiency in most patients, because low hepcidin levels facilitate iron absorption. Unfortunately frequent side effects limit oral iron efficacy. Intravenous iron is increasingly utilized, because currently available preparations allow rapid normalization of total body iron even with a single infusion and are effective also in functional iron deficiency and in iron deficiency associated with inflammatory disorders. The evidence is accumulating that these preparations are safe and effective. However, long-term safety issues of high doses of iron need to be further explored.

  15. Brownian motion: Absolute negative particle mobility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ros, Alexandra; Eichhorn, Ralf; Regtmeier, Jan; Duong, Thanh Tu; Reimann, Peter; Anselmetti, Dario

    2005-08-01

    Noise effects in technological applications, far from being a nuisance, can be exploited with advantage - for example, unavoidable thermal fluctuations have found application in the transport and sorting of colloidal particles and biomolecules. Here we use a microfluidic system to demonstrate a paradoxical migration mechanism in which particles always move in a direction opposite to the net acting force (`absolute negative mobility') as a result of an interplay between thermal noise, a periodic and symmetric microstructure, and a biased alternating-current electric field. This counterintuitive phenomenon could be used for bioanalytical purposes, for example in the separation and fractionation of colloids, biological molecules and cells.

  16. Arbitrary segments of absolute negative mobility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ruyin; Nie, Linru; Chen, Chongyang; Wang, Chaojie

    2017-01-01

    In previous research work, investigators have reported only one or two segments of absolute negative mobility (ANM) in a periodic potential. In fact, many segments of ANM also occur in the system considered here. We investigate transport of an inertial particle in a gating ratchet periodic potential subjected to a constant bias force. Our numerical results show that its mean velocity can decrease with the bias force increasing, i.e. ANM phenomenon. Furthermore, the ANM can take place arbitrary segments, even up to more than thirty. Intrinsic physical mechanism and conditions for arbitrary segments of ANM to occur are discussed in detail.

  17. Absolute quantification of myocardial blood flow.

    PubMed

    Yoshinaga, Keiichiro; Manabe, Osamu; Tamaki, Nagara

    2016-07-21

    With the increasing availability of positron emission tomography (PET) myocardial perfusion imaging, the absolute quantification of myocardial blood flow (MBF) has become popular in clinical settings. Quantitative MBF provides an important additional diagnostic or prognostic information over conventional visual assessment. The success of MBF quantification using PET/computed tomography (CT) has increased the demand for this quantitative diagnostic approach to be more accessible. In this regard, MBF quantification approaches have been developed using several other diagnostic imaging modalities including single-photon emission computed tomography, CT, and cardiac magnetic resonance. This review will address the clinical aspects of PET MBF quantification and the new approaches to MBF quantification.

  18. An absolute radius scale for Saturn's rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicholson, Philip D.; Cooke, Maren L.; Pelton, Emily

    1990-01-01

    Radio and stellar occultation observations of Saturn's rings made by the Voyager spacecraft are discussed. The data reveal systematic discrepancies of almost 10 km in some parts of the rings, limiting some of the investigations. A revised solution for Saturn's rotation pole has been proposed which removes the discrepancies between the stellar and radio occultation profiles. Corrections to previously published radii vary from -2 to -10 km for the radio occultation, and +5 to -6 km for the stellar occultation. An examination of spiral density waves in the outer A Ring supports that the revised absolute radii are in error by no more than 2 km.

  19. Absolute Rate Theories of Epigenetic Stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walczak, Aleksandra M.; Onuchic, Jose N.; Wolynes, Peter G.

    2006-03-01

    Spontaneous switching events in most characterized genetic switches are rare, resulting in extremely stable epigenetic properties. We show how simple arguments lead to theories of the rate of such events much like the absolute rate theory of chemical reactions corrected by a transmission factor. Both the probability of the rare cellular states that allow epigenetic escape, and the transmission factor, depend on the rates of DNA binding and unbinding events and on the rates of protein synthesis and degradation. Different mechanisms of escape from the stable attractors occur in the nonadiabatic, weakly adiabatic and strictly adiabatic regimes, characterized by the relative values of those input rates.

  20. Absolute rate theories of epigenetic stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walczak, Aleksandra M.; Onuchic, José N.; Wolynes, Peter G.

    2005-12-01

    Spontaneous switching events in most characterized genetic switches are rare, resulting in extremely stable epigenetic properties. We show how simple arguments lead to theories of the rate of such events much like the absolute rate theory of chemical reactions corrected by a transmission factor. Both the probability of the rare cellular states that allow epigenetic escape and the transmission factor depend on the rates of DNA binding and unbinding events and on the rates of protein synthesis and degradation. Different mechanisms of escape from the stable attractors occur in the nonadiabatic, weakly adiabatic, and strictly adiabatic regimes, characterized by the relative values of those input rates. rate theory | stochastic gene expression | gene switches

  1. Absolute method of measuring magnetic susceptibility

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorpe, A.; Senftle, F.E.

    1959-01-01

    An absolute method of standardization and measurement of the magnetic susceptibility of small samples is presented which can be applied to most techniques based on the Faraday method. The fact that the susceptibility is a function of the area under the curve of sample displacement versus distance of the magnet from the sample, offers a simple method of measuring the susceptibility without recourse to a standard sample. Typical results on a few substances are compared with reported values, and an error of less than 2% can be achieved. ?? 1959 The American Institute of Physics.

  2. Absolute Priority for a Vehicle in VANET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirani, Rostam; Hendessi, Faramarz; Montazeri, Mohammad Ali; Sheikh Zefreh, Mohammad

    In today's world, traffic jams waste hundreds of hours of our life. This causes many researchers try to resolve the problem with the idea of Intelligent Transportation System. For some applications like a travelling ambulance, it is important to reduce delay even for a second. In this paper, we propose a completely infrastructure-less approach for finding shortest path and controlling traffic light to provide absolute priority for an emergency vehicle. We use the idea of vehicular ad-hoc networking to reduce the imposed travelling time. Then, we simulate our proposed protocol and compare it with a centrally controlled traffic light system.

  3. Absolute peptide quantification by lutetium labeling and nanoHPLC-ICPMS with isotope dilution analysis.

    PubMed

    Rappel, Christina; Schaumlöffel, Dirk

    2009-01-01

    The need of analytical methods for absolute quantitative protein analysis spurred research on new developments in recent years. In this work, a novel approach was developed for accurate absolute peptide quantification based on metal labeling with lutetium diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (Lu-DTPA) and nanoflow high-performance liquid chromatography-inductively coupled plasma isotope dilution mass spectrometry (nanoHPLC-ICP-IDMS). In a two-step procedure peptides were derivatized at amino groups with diethylenetriamine pentaacetic anhydride (DTPAA) followed by chelation of lutetium. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI MS) of the reaction product demonstrated highly specific peptide labeling. Under optimized nanoHPLC conditions the labeled peptides were baseline-separated, and the excess labeling reagent did not interfere. A 176Lu-labeled spike was continuously added to the column effluent for quantification by ICP-IDMS. The recovery of a Lu-DTPA-labeled standard peptide was close to 100% indicating high labeling efficiency and accurate absolute quantification. The precision of the entire method was 4.9%. The detection limit for Lu-DTPA-tagged peptides was 179 amol demonstrating that lutetium-specific peptide quantification was by 4 orders of magnitude more sensitive than detection by natural sulfur atoms present in cysteine or methionine residues. Furthermore, the application to peptides in insulin tryptic digest allowed the identification of interfering reagents decreasing the labeling efficiency. An additional advantage of this novel approach is the analysis of peptides, which do not naturally feature ICPMS-detectable elements.

  4. Protein Crystal Recombinant Human Insulin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The comparison of protein crystal, Recombiant Human Insulin; space-grown (left) and earth-grown (right). On STS-60, Spacehab II indicated that space-grown crystals are larger and of greater optical clarity than their earth-grown counterparts. Recombiant Human Insulin facilitates the incorporation of glucose into cells. In diabetics, there is either a decrease in or complete lack of insulin, thereby leading to several harmful complications. Principal Investigator is Larry DeLucas.

  5. Mechanism of insulin production in canine bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Takemitsu, Hiroshi; Zhao, Dongwei; Ishikawa, Shingo; Michishita, Masaki; Arai, Toshiro; Yamamoto, Ichiro

    2013-08-01

    Insulin is a critical hormone in the regulation of blood glucose levels and is produced exclusively by pancreatic islet beta-cells. Insulin deficiency due to reduced pancreatic islet beta-cell number underlies the progression of diabetes mellitus, prompting efforts to develop beta-cell replacement therapies. However, precise information on beta-cell replacement and differentiation in canines is limited. In this study, we established insulin-producing cells from bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells transiently expressing canine pancreatic and duodenal homeobox 1 (Pdx1), beta cell transactivator 2 (Beta2) and V-maf avian musculoaponeurotic fibrosarcoma oncogene homolog A (Mafa) using a gene transfer technique. Real-time PCR analysis revealed an increase in insulin mRNA expression of transfected cells. And ELISA revealed that insulin protein expressed was detected in cytoplasmic fraction. Insulin immunostaining analysis was performed and observed in cytoplasmic fraction. These results suggest that co-transfection of Pdx1, Beta2 and Mafa induce insulin production in canine BMSCs. Our findings provide a clue to basic research into the mechanisms underlying insulin production in the canines.

  6. Vitamin D, Insulin Secretion, Sensitivity, and Lipids

    PubMed Central

    Grimnes, Guri; Figenschau, Yngve; Almås, Bjørg; Jorde, Rolf

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Vitamin D deficiency is associated with an unfavorable metabolic profile in observational studies. The intention was to compare insulin sensitivity (the primary end point) and secretion and lipids in subjects with low and high serum 25(OH)D (25-hydroxyvitamin D) levels and to assess the effect of vitamin D supplementation on the same outcomes among the participants with low serum 25(OH)D levels. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Participants were recruited from a population-based study (the Tromsø Study) based on their serum 25(OH)D measurements. A 3-h hyperglycemic clamp was performed, and the participants with low serum 25(OH)D levels were thereafter randomized to receive capsules of 20,000 IU vitamin D3 or identical-looking placebo twice weekly for 6 months. A final hyperglycemic clamp was then performed. RESULTS The 52 participants with high serum 25(OH)D levels (85.6 ± 13.5 nmol/L [mean ± SD]) had significantly higher insulin sensitivity index (ISI) and lower HbA1c and triglycerides (TGs) than the 108 participants with low serum 25(OH)D (40.3 ± 12.8 nmol/L), but the differences in ISI and TGs were not significant after adjustments. After supplementation, serum 25(OH)D was 142.7 ± 25.7 and 42.9 ± 17.3 nmol/L in 49 of 51 completing participants randomized to vitamin D and 45 of 53 randomized to placebo, respectively. At the end of the study, there were no statistically significant differences in the outcome variables between the two groups. CONCLUSIONS Vitamin D supplementation to apparently healthy subjects with insufficient serum 25(OH)D levels does not improve insulin sensitivity or secretion or serum lipid profile. PMID:21911741

  7. IGF-1 and insulin as growth hormones.

    PubMed

    Laron, Zvi

    2004-01-01

    IGF-1 generated in the liver is the anabolic effector and linear growth promoting hormone of the pituitary growth hormone (GH). This is evidenced by dwarfism in states of congenital IGF-1 deficiency, Igf1 gene mutation/deletions or knockouts, and in Laron syndrome (LS), due to GH receptor gene mutations/deletions or IGF-1 receptor blocking. In a positive way, daily IGF-1 administration to stunted patients with LS or hGH gene deletion accelerates linear growth velocity. IGF-1 acts on the proliferative cells of the epiphyseal cartilage. IGF-1 also induces organ and tissue growth; its absence causing organomicria. Insulin shares a common ancestry with IGF-1 and with 45% amino acid homology, as well as very close relationships in the structure of its receptors and post-receptor cascade, also acts as a growth hormone. It has protein anabolic activity and stimulates IGF-1 synthesis. Pancreas agenesis causes short babies, and obese children with hyperinsulinism, with or without pituitary GH, have an accelerated growth rate and skeletal maturation; so do babies with macrosomia. Whether the insulin growth effect is direct, or mediated by IGF-1 or leptin is controversial.

  8. Insulin signal transduction pathways and insulin-induced gene expression.

    PubMed

    Keeton, Adam B; Amsler, Maggie O; Venable, Derwei Y; Messina, Joseph L

    2002-12-13

    Insulin regulates metabolic activity, gene transcription, and cell growth by modulating the activity of several intracellular signaling pathways. Insulin activation of one mitogen-activated protein kinase cascade, the MEK/ERK kinase cascade, is well described. However, the effect of insulin on the parallel p38 pathway is less well understood. The present work examines the effect of inhibiting the p38 signaling pathway by use of specific inhibitors, either alone or in combination with insulin, on the activation of ERK1/2 and on the regulation of gene transcription in rat hepatoma cells. Activation of ERK1/2 was induced by insulin and was dependent on the activation of MEK1, the kinase upstream of ERK in this pathway. Treatment of cells with p38 inhibitors also induced ERK1/2 activation/phosphorylation. The addition of p38 inhibitors followed by insulin addition resulted in a greater than additive activation of ERK1/2. The two genes studied, c-Fos and Pip92, are immediate-early genes that are dependent on the ERK1/2 pathway for insulin-regulated induction because the insulin effect was inhibited by pretreatment with a MEK1 inhibitor. The addition of p38 inhibitors induced transcription of both genes in a dose-dependent manner, and insulin stimulation of both genes was enhanced by prior treatment with p38 inhibitors. The ability of the p38 inhibitors to induce ERK1/2 and gene transcription, both alone and in combination with insulin, was abolished by prior inhibition of MEK1. These data suggest possible cross-talk between the p38 and ERK1/2 signaling pathways and a potential role of p38 in insulin signaling.

  9. Lipid mediators of insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Holland, William L; Knotts, Trina A; Chavez, Jose A; Wang, Li-Ping; Hoehn, Kyle L; Summers, Scott A

    2007-06-01

    Lipid abnormalities such as obesity, increased circulating free fatty acid levels, and excess intramyocellular lipid accumulation are frequently associated with insulin resistance. These observations have prompted investigators to speculate that the accumulation of lipids in tissues not suited for fat storage (e.g., skeletal muscle and liver) is an underlying component of insulin resistance and the metabolic syndrome. We review the metabolic fates of lipids in insulin-responsive tissues and discuss the roles of specific lipid metabolites (e.g., ceramides, GM3 ganglioside, and diacylglycerol) as antagonists of insulin signaling and action.

  10. Plerocercoid growth factor (PGF), a human growth hormone (hGH) analogue produced by the tapeworm Spirometra mansonoides, has direct insulin-like action in adipose tissue of normal rats in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Salem, M.A.M.; Phares, C.K.

    1986-03-01

    The metabolic actions of GH can be divided into acute (insulin-like) and chronic (lipolytic/anti-insulin). The insulin-like actions of GH are most readily elicited in GH-deficient animals as GH induces resistance to its own insulin-like action. Like GH, PGF stimulates growth and cross-reacts with anti-hGH antibodies. Independent experiments were conducted comparing the direct actions of PGF to insulin or hGH in vitro. Insulin-like effects were determined by the ability of PGF, insulin or hGH to stimulate (U-/sup 14/C)glucose metabolism in epidydimal fat pads from normal rats and by inhibition of epinephrine-stimulated lipolysis. Direct stimulation of lipolysis was used as anti-insulin activity. To determine if PGF competes for insulin or GH receptors, adipocytes (3 x 10/sup 5/ cells/ml) were incubated with either (/sup 125/I)insulin or (/sup 125/I)hGH +/- PGF, +/- insulin or +/- hGH. PGF stimulated glucose oxidation and /sup 14/C-incorporation into lipids. Insulin, hGH and PGF inhibited lipolysis (33%, 29% and 34%, respectively). Adipose tissue was very sensitive to the lipolytic effect of hGH but PGF was neither lipolytic nor did it confer refractoriness to its insulin-like action. PGF bound to GH but not to insulin receptors. Therefore, PGF had direct insulin-like effects but did not stimulate lipolysis in tissue from normal rats in vitro.

  11. Aldosterone decreases glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in vivo in mice and in murine islets

    PubMed Central

    Luo, P.; Kreger, M. T.; Brissova, M.; Dai, C.; Whitfield, T. T.; Kim, H. S.; Wasserman, D. H.; Powers, A. C.; Brown, N. J.

    2011-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis Aldosterone concentrations increase in obesity and predict the onset of diabetes. We investigated the effects of aldosterone on glucose homeostasis and insulin secretion in vivo and in vitro. Methods We assessed insulin sensitivity and insulin secretion in aldosterone synthase-deficient (As [also known as Cyp11b2]−/−)and wild-type mice using euglycaemic-hyperinsulinaemic and hyperglycaemic clamps, respectively. We also conducted studies during high sodium intake to normalise renin activity and potassium concentration in As−/− mice. We subsequently assessed the effect of aldosterone on insulin secretion in vitro in the presence or absence of mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists in isolated C57BL/6J islets and in the MIN6 beta cell line. Results Fasting glucose concentrations were reduced in As−/−mice compared with wild-type. During hyperglycaemic clamps, insulin and C-peptide concentrations increased to a greater extent in As−/− than in wild-type mice. This was not attributable to differences in potassium or angiotensin II, as glucose-stimulated insulin secretion was enhanced in As−/− mice even during high sodium intake. There was no difference in insulin sensitivity between As−/− and wild-type mice in euglycaemic-hyperinsulinaemic clamp studies. In islet and MIN6 beta cell studies, aldosterone inhibited glucose and isobutylmethylxanthine-stimulated insulin secretion, an effect that was not blocked by mineralocorticoid receptor antagonism, but was prevented by the superoxide dismutase mimetic tempol. Conclusions/interpretation We demonstrated that aldosterone deficiency or excess modulates insulin secretion in vivo and in vitro via reactive oxygen species and in a manner that is independent of mineralocorticoid receptors. These findings provide insight into the mechanism of glucose intolerance in conditions of relative aldosterone excess. PMID:21519965

  12. Absolute Spectrophotometry of 237 Open Cluster Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clampitt, L.; Burstein, D.

    1994-12-01

    We present absolute spectrophotometry of 237 stars in 7 nearby open clusters: Hyades, Pleiades, Alpha Persei, Praesepe, Coma Berenices, IC 4665, and M 39. The observations were taken using the Wampler single-channel scanner (Wampler 1966) on the Crossley 0.9m telescope at Lick Observatory from July 1973 through December 1974. 21 bandpasses spanning the spectral range 3500 Angstroms to 7780 Angstroms were observed for each star, with bandwiths ranging from 32Angstroms to 64 Angstroms. Data are standardized to the Hayes--Latham (1975) system. Our measurements are compared to filter colors on the Johnson BV, Stromgren ubvy, and Geneva U V B_1 B_2 V_1 G systems, as well as to spectrophotometry of a few stars published by Gunn, Stryker & Tinsley and in the Spectrophotometric Standards Catalog (Adelman; as distributed by the NSSDC). Both internal and external comparisons to the filter systems indicate a formal statistical accuracy per bandpass of 0.01 to 0.02 mag, with apparent larger ( ~ 0.03 mag) differences in absolute calibration between this data set and existing spectrophotometry. These data will comprise part of the spectrophotometry that will be used to calibrate the Beijing-Arizona-Taipei-Connecticut Color Survey of the Sky (see separate paper by Burstein et al. at this meeting).

  13. Linear ultrasonic motor for absolute gravimeter.

    PubMed

    Jian, Yue; Yao, Zhiyuan; Silberschmidt, Vadim V

    2017-02-01

    Thanks to their compactness and suitability for vacuum applications, linear ultrasonic motors are considered as substitutes for classical electromagnetic motors as driving elements in absolute gravimeters. Still, their application is prevented by relatively low power output. To overcome this limitation and provide better stability, a V-type linear ultrasonic motor with a new clamping method is proposed for a gravimeter. In this paper, a mechanical model of stators with flexible clamping components is suggested, according to a design criterion for clamps of linear ultrasonic motors. After that, an effect of tangential and normal rigidity of the clamping components on mechanical output is studied. It is followed by discussion of a new clamping method with sufficient tangential rigidity and a capability to facilitate pre-load. Additionally, a prototype of the motor with the proposed clamping method was fabricated and the performance tests in vertical direction were implemented. Experimental results show that the suggested motor has structural stability and high dynamic performance, such as no-load speed of 1.4m/s and maximal thrust of 43N, meeting the requirements for absolute gravimeters.

  14. Why to compare absolute numbers of mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Sabine; Schulz, Sabine; Schropp, Eva-Maria; Eberhagen, Carola; Simmons, Alisha; Beisker, Wolfgang; Aichler, Michaela; Zischka, Hans

    2014-11-01

    Prompted by pronounced structural differences between rat liver and rat hepatocellular carcinoma mitochondria, we suspected these mitochondrial populations to differ massively in their molecular composition. Aiming to reveal these mitochondrial differences, we came across the issue on how to normalize such comparisons and decided to focus on the absolute number of mitochondria. To this end, fluorescently stained mitochondria were quantified by flow cytometry. For rat liver mitochondria, this approach resulted in mitochondrial protein contents comparable to earlier reports using alternative methods. We determined similar protein contents for rat liver, heart and kidney mitochondria. In contrast, however, lower protein contents were determined for rat brain mitochondria and for mitochondria from the rat hepatocellular carcinoma cell line McA 7777. This result challenges mitochondrial comparisons that rely on equal protein amounts as a typical normalization method. Exemplarily, we therefore compared the activity and susceptibility toward inhibition of complex II of rat liver and hepatocellular carcinoma mitochondria and obtained significant discrepancies by either normalizing to protein amount or to absolute mitochondrial number. Importantly, the latter normalization, in contrast to the former, demonstrated a lower complex II activity and higher susceptibility toward inhibition in hepatocellular carcinoma mitochondria compared to liver mitochondria. These findings demonstrate that solely normalizing to protein amount may obscure essential molecular differences between mitochondrial populations.

  15. The absolute threshold of cone vision

    PubMed Central

    Koeing, Darran; Hofer, Heidi

    2013-01-01

    We report measurements of the absolute threshold of cone vision, which has been previously underestimated due to sub-optimal conditions or overly strict subjective response criteria. We avoided these limitations by using optimized stimuli and experimental conditions while having subjects respond within a rating scale framework. Small (1′ fwhm), brief (34 msec), monochromatic (550 nm) stimuli were foveally presented at multiple intensities in dark-adapted retina for 5 subjects. For comparison, 4 subjects underwent similar testing with rod-optimized stimuli. Cone absolute threshold, that is, the minimum light energy for which subjects were just able to detect a visual stimulus with any response criterion, was 203 ± 38 photons at the cornea, ∼0.47 log units lower than previously reported. Two-alternative forced-choice measurements in a subset of subjects yielded consistent results. Cone thresholds were less responsive to criterion changes than rod thresholds, suggesting a limit to the stimulus information recoverable from the cone mosaic in addition to the limit imposed by Poisson noise. Results were consistent with expectations for detection in the face of stimulus uncertainty. We discuss implications of these findings for modeling the first stages of human cone vision and interpreting psychophysical data acquired with adaptive optics at the spatial scale of the receptor mosaic. PMID:21270115

  16. [Estimation of absolute risk for fracture].

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Saeko

    2009-03-01

    Osteoporosis treatment aims to prevent fractures and maintain the QOL of the elderly. However, persons at high risk of future fracture cannot be effectively identified on the basis of bone density (BMD) alone, although BMD is used as an diagnostic criterion. Therefore, the WHO recommended that absolute risk for fracture (10-year probability of fracture) for each individual be evaluated and used as an index for intervention threshold. The 10-year probability of fracture is calculated based on age, sex, BMD at the femoral neck (body mass index if BMD is not available), history of previous fractures, parental hip fracture history, smoking, steroid use, rheumatoid arthritis, secondary osteoporosis and alcohol consumption. The WHO has just announced the development of a calculation tool (FRAX: WHO Fracture Risk Assessment Tool) in February this year. Fractures could be prevented more effectively if, based on each country's medical circumstances, an absolute risk value for fracture to determine when to start medical treatment is established and persons at high risk of fracture are identified and treated accordingly.

  17. Absolute stereochemistry of altersolanol A and alterporriols.

    PubMed

    Kanamaru, Saki; Honma, Miho; Murakami, Takanori; Tsushima, Taro; Kudo, Shinji; Tanaka, Kazuaki; Nihei, Ken-Ichi; Nehira, Tatsuo; Hashimoto, Masaru

    2012-02-01

    The absolute stereochemistry of altersolanol A (1) was established by observing a positive exciton couplet in the circular dichroism (CD) spectrum of the C3,C4-O-bis(2-naphthoyl) derivative 10 and by chemical correlations with known compound 8. Before the discussion, the relative stereochemistry of 1 was confirmed by X-ray crystallographic analysis. The shielding effect at C7'-OMe group by C1-O-benzoylation established the relative stereochemical relationship between the C8-C8' axial bonding and the C1-C4/C1'-C4' polyol moieties of alterporriols E (3), an atropisomer of the C8-C8' dimer of 1. As 3 could be obtained by dimerization of 1 in vitro, the absolute configuration of its central chirality elements (C1-C4) must be identical to those of 1. Spectral comparison between the experimental and theoretical CD spectra supported the above conclusion. Axial stereochemistry of novel C4-O-deoxy dimeric derivatives, alterporriols F (4) and G (5), were also revealed by comparison of their CD spectra to those of 2 and 3.

  18. Absolute Electron Extraction Efficiency of Liquid Xenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamdin, Katayun; Mizrachi, Eli; Morad, James; Sorensen, Peter

    2016-03-01

    Dual phase liquid/gas xenon time projection chambers (TPCs) currently set the world's most sensitive limits on weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs), a favored dark matter candidate. These detectors rely on extracting electrons from liquid xenon into gaseous xenon, where they produce proportional scintillation. The proportional scintillation from the extracted electrons serves to internally amplify the WIMP signal; even a single extracted electron is detectable. Credible dark matter searches can proceed with electron extraction efficiency (EEE) lower than 100%. However, electrons systematically left at the liquid/gas boundary are a concern. Possible effects include spontaneous single or multi-electron proportional scintillation signals in the gas, or charging of the liquid/gas interface or detector materials. Understanding EEE is consequently a serious concern for this class of rare event search detectors. Previous EEE measurements have mostly been relative, not absolute, assuming efficiency plateaus at 100%. I will present an absolute EEE measurement with a small liquid/gas xenon TPC test bed located at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.

  19. Standardization of the cumulative absolute velocity

    SciTech Connect

    O'Hara, T.F.; Jacobson, J.P. )

    1991-12-01

    EPRI NP-5930, A Criterion for Determining Exceedance of the Operating Basis Earthquake,'' was published in July 1988. As defined in that report, the Operating Basis Earthquake (OBE) is exceeded when both a response spectrum parameter and a second damage parameter, referred to as the Cumulative Absolute Velocity (CAV), are exceeded. In the review process of the above report, it was noted that the calculation of CAV could be confounded by time history records of long duration containing low (nondamaging) acceleration. Therefore, it is necessary to standardize the method of calculating CAV to account for record length. This standardized methodology allows consistent comparisons between future CAV calculations and the adjusted CAV threshold value based upon applying the standardized methodology to the data set presented in EPRI NP-5930. The recommended method to standardize the CAV calculation is to window its calculation on a second-by-second basis for a given time history. If the absolute acceleration exceeds 0.025g at any time during each one second interval, the earthquake records used in EPRI NP-5930 have been reanalyzed and the adjusted threshold of damage for CAV was found to be 0.16g-set.

  20. Swarm's Absolute Scalar Magnetometers Burst Mode Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coisson, P.; Vigneron, P.; Hulot, G.; Crespo Grau, R.; Brocco, L.; Lalanne, X.; Sirol, O.; Leger, J. M.; Jager, T.; Bertrand, F.; Boness, A.; Fratter, I.

    2014-12-01

    Each of the three Swarm satellites embarks an Absolute Scalar Magnetometer (ASM) to provide absolute scalar measurements of the magnetic field with high accuracy and stability. Nominal data acquisition of these ASMs is 1 Hz. But they can also run in a so-called "burst mode" and provide data at 250 Hz. During the commissioning phase of the mission, seven burst mode acquisition campaigns have been run simultaneously for all satellites, obtaining a total of ten days of burs-mode data. These campaigns allowed the identification of issues related to the operations of the piezo-electric motor and the heaters connected to the ASM, that do not impact the nominal 1 Hz scalar data. We analyze the burst mode data to identify high frequency geomagnetic signals, focusing the analysis in two regions: the low latitudes, where we seek signatures of ionospheric irregularities, and the high latitudes, to identify high frequency signals related to polar region currents. Since these campaigns have been conducted during the initial months of the mission, the three satellites where still close to each other, allowing to analyze the spatial coherency of the signals. Wavelet analysis have revealed 31 Hz signals appearing in the night-side in the equatorial region.

  1. Extracting infrared absolute reflectance from relative reflectance measurements.

    PubMed

    Berets, Susan L; Milosevic, Milan

    2012-06-01

    Absolute reflectance measurements are valuable to the optics industry for development of new materials and optical coatings. Yet, absolute reflectance measurements are notoriously difficult to make. In this paper, we investigate the feasibility of extracting the absolute reflectance from a relative reflectance measurement using a reference material with known refractive index.

  2. A Conceptual Approach to Absolute Value Equations and Inequalities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Mark W.; Bryson, Janet L.

    2011-01-01

    The absolute value learning objective in high school mathematics requires students to solve far more complex absolute value equations and inequalities. When absolute value problems become more complex, students often do not have sufficient conceptual understanding to make any sense of what is happening mathematically. The authors suggest that the…

  3. 5-HT2CRs expressed by pro-opiomelanocortin neurons regulate insulin sensitivity in liver

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mice lacking 5-HT 2C receptors displayed hepatic insulin resistance, a phenotype normalized by re-expression of 5-HT2CRs only in pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons. 5-HT2CR deficiency also abolished the anti-diabetic effects of meta-chlorophenylpiperazine (a 5-HT2CR agonist); these effects were re...

  4. Iron induced nickel deficiency

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It is increasingly apparent that economic loss due to nickel (Ni) deficiency likely occurs in horticultural and agronomic crops. While most soils contain sufficient Ni to meet crop requirements, situations of Ni deficiency can arise due to antagonistic interactions with other metals. This study asse...

  5. Cerebral Folate Deficiency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Neil

    2009-01-01

    Cerebral folate deficiency (CFD) is associated with low levels of 5-methyltetrahydrofolate in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) with normal folate levels in the plasma and red blood cells. The onset of symptoms caused by the deficiency of folates in the brain is at around 4 to 6 months of age. This is followed by delayed development, with deceleration…

  6. MENTAL DEFICIENCY. SECOND EDITION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    HILLIARD, L.T.; KIRMAN, BRIAN H.

    REVISED TO INCLUDE LEGISLATIVE AND ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURES NEW IN BRITAIN SINCE THE 1957 EDITION, THE TEXT INCLUDES RECENT ADVANCES IN ETIOLOGY, PATHOLOGY, AND TREATMENT OF MENTAL DEFICIENCY. CONSIDERATION OF THE BACKGROUND OF MENTAL DEFICIENCY INCLUDES HISTORICAL AND LEGAL ASPECTS, THE SOCIAL BACKGROUND OF MENTAL DEFECT, PRENATAL CAUSES OF…

  7. Intensive Insulin Therapy: Tight Blood Sugar Control

    MedlinePlus

    ... insulin therapy can help you achieve desired blood sugar control and what intensive insulin therapy requires of ... aggressive treatment approach designed to control your blood sugar levels. Intensive insulin therapy requires close monitoring of ...

  8. Insulin pumps: Beyond basal-bolus.

    PubMed

    Millstein, Richard; Becerra, Nancy Mora; Shubrook, Jay H

    2015-12-01

    Insulin pumps are a major advance in diabetes management, making insulin dosing easier and more accurate and providing great flexibility, safety, and efficacy for people who need basal-bolus insulin therapy. They are the preferred treatment for people with type 1 diabetes and many with type 2 diabetes who require insulin. This article reviews the basics of how insulin pumps work, who benefits from a pump, and how to manage inpatients and outpatients on insulin pumps.

  9. Use of Absolute and Comparative Performance Feedback in Absolute and Comparative Judgments and Decisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Don A.; Klein, William M. P.

    2008-01-01

    Which matters more--beliefs about absolute ability or ability relative to others? This study set out to compare the effects of such beliefs on satisfaction with performance, self-evaluations, and bets on future performance. In Experiment 1, undergraduate participants were told they had answered 20% correct, 80% correct, or were not given their…

  10. Role of insulin and insulin receptor in learning and memory.

    PubMed

    Zhao, W Q; Alkon, D L

    2001-05-25

    As one of the most extensively studied protein hormones, insulin and its receptor have been known to play key roles in a variety of important biological functions. Until recent years, the functions of insulin and insulin receptor (IR) in the central nervous system (CNS) have largely remained unclear. IR is abundantly expressed in several specific brain regions that govern fundamental behaviors such as food intake, reproduction and high cognition. The IR from the periphery and CNS exhibit differences in both structure and function. In addition to that from the peripheral system, locally synthesized insulin in the brain has also been identified. Accumulated evidence has demonstrated that insulin/IR plays important roles in associative learning, as suggested by results from both interventive and correlative studies. Interruption of insulin production and IR activity causes deficits in learning and memory formation. Abnormal insulin/IR levels and activities are seen in Alzheimer's dementia, whereas administration of insulin significantly improves the cognitive performance of these patients. The synaptic bases for the action of insulin/IR include modifying neurotransmitter release processes at various types of presynaptic terminals and modulating the activities of both excitatory and inhibitory postsynaptic receptors such as NMDA and GABA receptors, respectively. At the molecular level, insulin/IR participates in regulation of learning and memory via activation of specific signaling pathways, one of which is shown to be associated with the formation of long-term memory and is composed of intracellular molecules including the shc, Grb-r/SOS, Ras/Raf, and MEK/MAP kinases. Cross-talk with another IR pathway involving IRS1, PI3 kinase, and protein kinase C, as well as with the non-receptor tyrosine kinase pp60c-src, may also be associated with memory processing.

  11. Effect of ovarian suppression with gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist on glucose disposal and insulin secretion.

    PubMed

    Toth, Michael J; Cooper, Brian C; Pratley, Richard E; Mari, Andrea; Matthews, Dwight E; Casson, Peter R

    2008-06-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that ovarian hormones influence glucose homeostasis, although their exact role in humans has not been clearly defined. In the present study, we sought to test the hypothesis that ovarian hormones regulate glucose homeostasis by examining the effect of pharmacologically induced ovarian hormone deficiency on glucose disposal and insulin secretion. Young, healthy women with regular menstrual patterns were studied during the follicular and luteal phases of their cycle at baseline and after 2 mo of treatment with gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist (GnRHa; n = 7) or placebo (n = 6). Using hyperglycemic clamps, in combination with stable isotope-labeled (i.e., (13)C and (2)H) glucose tracers, we measured glucose disposal and insulin secretion. Additionally, we assessed body composition and regional fat distribution using radiologic imaging techniques as well as glucoregulatory hormones. Ovarian hormone suppression with GnRHa did not alter body composition, abdominal fat distribution, or thigh tissue composition. There was no effect of ovarian suppression on total, oxidative, or nonoxidative glucose disposal expressed relative to plasma insulin level. Similarly, no effect of ovarian hormone deficiency was observed on first- or second-phase insulin secretion or insulin clearance. Finally, ovarian hormone deficiency was associated with an increase in circulating adiponectin levels but no change in leptin concentration. Our findings suggest that a brief period of ovarian hormone deficiency in young, healthy, eugonadal women does not alter glucose disposal index or insulin secretion, supporting the conclusion that ovarian hormones play a minimal role in regulating glucose homeostasis. Our data do, however, support a role for ovarian hormones in the regulation of plasma adiponectin levels.

  12. Absolute nonlocality via distributed computing without communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czekaj, Ł.; Pawłowski, M.; Vértesi, T.; Grudka, A.; Horodecki, M.; Horodecki, R.

    2015-09-01

    Understanding the role that quantum entanglement plays as a resource in various information processing tasks is one of the crucial goals of quantum information theory. Here we propose an alternative perspective for studying quantum entanglement: distributed computation of functions without communication between nodes. To formalize this approach, we propose identity games. Surprisingly, despite no signaling, we obtain that nonlocal quantum strategies beat classical ones in terms of winning probability for identity games originating from certain bipartite and multipartite functions. Moreover we show that, for a majority of functions, access to general nonsignaling resources boosts success probability two times in comparison to classical ones for a number of large enough outputs. Because there are no constraints on the inputs and no processing of the outputs in the identity games, they detect very strong types of correlations: absolute nonlocality.

  13. In vivo absorption spectroscopy for absolute measurement.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Hiromitsu; Fukuda, Takashi

    2012-10-01

    In in vivo spectroscopy, there are differences between individual subjects in parameters such as tissue scattering and sample concentration. We propose a method that can provide the absolute value of a particular substance concentration, independent of these individual differences. Thus, it is not necessary to use the typical statistical calibration curve, which assumes an average level of scattering and an averaged concentration over individual subjects. This method is expected to greatly reduce the difficulties encountered during in vivo measurements. As an example, for in vivo absorption spectroscopy, the method was applied to the reflectance measurement in retinal vessels to monitor their oxygen saturation levels. This method was then validated by applying it to the tissue phantom under a variety of absorbance values and scattering efficiencies.

  14. Determining Absolute Zero Using a Tuning Fork

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldader, Jeffrey D.

    2008-04-01

    The Celsius and Kelvin temperature scales, we tell our students, are related. We explain that a change in temperature of 1°C corresponds to a change of 1 Kelvin and that atoms and molecules have zero kinetic energy at zero Kelvin, -273°C. In this paper, we will show how students can derive the relationship between the Celsius and Kelvin temperature scales using a simple, well-known physics experiment. By making multiple measurements of the speed of sound at different temperatures, using the classic physics experiment of determining the speed of sound with a tuning fork and variable-length tube, they can determine the temperature at which the speed of sound is zero—absolute zero.

  15. MAGSAT: Vector magnetometer absolute sensor alignment determination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acuna, M. H.

    1981-01-01

    A procedure is described for accurately determining the absolute alignment of the magnetic axes of a triaxial magnetometer sensor with respect to an external, fixed, reference coordinate system. The method does not require that the magnetic field vector orientation, as generated by a triaxial calibration coil system, be known to better than a few degrees from its true position, and minimizes the number of positions through which a sensor assembly must be rotated to obtain a solution. Computer simulations show that accuracies of better than 0.4 seconds of arc can be achieved under typical test conditions associated with existing magnetic test facilities. The basic approach is similar in nature to that presented by McPherron and Snare (1978) except that only three sensor positions are required and the system of equations to be solved is considerably simplified. Applications of the method to the case of the MAGSAT Vector Magnetometer are presented and the problems encountered discussed.

  16. An estimate of global absolute dynamic topography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tai, C.-K.; Wunsch, C.

    1984-01-01

    The absolute dynamic topography of the world ocean is estimated from the largest scales to a short-wavelength cutoff of about 6700 km for the period July through September, 1978. The data base consisted of the time-averaged sea-surface topography determined by Seasat and geoid estimates made at the Goddard Space Flight Center. The issues are those of accuracy and resolution. Use of the altimetric surface as a geoid estimate beyond the short-wavelength cutoff reduces the spectral leakage in the estimated dynamic topography from erroneous small-scale geoid estimates without contaminating the low wavenumbers. Comparison of the result with a similarly filtered version of Levitus' (1982) historical average dynamic topography shows good qualitative agreement. There is quantitative disagreement, but it is within the estimated errors of both methods of calculation.

  17. Micron Accurate Absolute Ranging System: Range Extension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalley, Larry L.; Smith, Kely L.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to investigate Fresnel diffraction as a means of obtaining absolute distance measurements with micron or greater accuracy. It is believed that such a system would prove useful to the Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST) as a non-intrusive, non-contact measuring system for use with secondary concentrator station-keeping systems. The present research attempts to validate past experiments and develop ways to apply the phenomena of Fresnel diffraction to micron accurate measurement. This report discusses past research on the phenomena, and the basis of the use Fresnel diffraction distance metrology. The apparatus used in the recent investigations, experimental procedures used, preliminary results are discussed in detail. Continued research and equipment requirements on the extension of the effective range of the Fresnel diffraction systems is also described.

  18. Absolute measurements of fast neutrons using yttrium.

    PubMed

    Roshan, M V; Springham, S V; Rawat, R S; Lee, P; Krishnan, M

    2010-08-01

    Yttrium is presented as an absolute neutron detector for pulsed neutron sources. It has high sensitivity for detecting fast neutrons. Yttrium has the property of generating a monoenergetic secondary radiation in the form of a 909 keV gamma-ray caused by inelastic neutron interaction. It was calibrated numerically using MCNPX and does not need periodic recalibration. The total yttrium efficiency for detecting 2.45 MeV neutrons was determined to be f(n) approximately 4.1x10(-4) with an uncertainty of about 0.27%. The yttrium detector was employed in the NX2 plasma focus experiments and showed the neutron yield of the order of 10(8) neutrons per discharge.

  19. Measured and modelled absolute gravity in Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, E.; Forsberg, R.; Strykowski, G.

    2012-12-01

    Present day changes in the ice volume in glaciated areas like Greenland will change the load on the Earth and to this change the lithosphere will respond elastically. The Earth also responds to changes in the ice volume over a millennial time scale. This response is due to the viscous properties of the mantle and is known as Glaical Isostatic Adjustment (GIA). Both signals are present in GPS and absolute gravity (AG) measurements and they will give an uncertainty in mass balance estimates calculated from these data types. It is possible to separate the two signals if both gravity and Global Positioning System (GPS) time series are available. DTU Space acquired an A10 absolute gravimeter in 2008. One purpose of this instrument is to establish AG time series in Greenland and the first measurements were conducted in 2009. Since then are 18 different Greenland GPS Network (GNET) stations visited and six of these are visited more then once. The gravity signal consists of three signals; the elastic signal, the viscous signal and the direct attraction from the ice masses. All of these signals can be modelled using various techniques. The viscous signal is modelled by solving the Sea Level Equation with an appropriate ice history and Earth model. The free code SELEN is used for this. The elastic signal is modelled as a convolution of the elastic Greens function for gravity and a model of present day ice mass changes. The direct attraction is the same as the Newtonian attraction and is calculated as this. Here we will present the preliminary results of the AG measurements in Greenland. We will also present modelled estimates of the direct attraction, the elastic and the viscous signals.

  20. Absolute bioavailability of quinine formulations in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Babalola, C P; Bolaji, O O; Ogunbona, F A; Ezeomah, E

    2004-09-01

    This study compared the absolute bioavailability of quinine sulphate as capsule and as tablet against the intravenous (i.v.) infusion of the drug in twelve male volunteers. Six of the volunteers received intravenous infusion over 4 h as well as the capsule formulation of the drug in a cross-over manner, while the other six received the tablet formulation. Blood samples were taken at predetermined time intervals and plasma analysed for quinine (QN) using reversed-phase HPLC method. QN was rapidly absorbed after the two oral formulations with average t(max) of 2.67 h for both capsule and tablet. The mean elimination half-life of QN from the i.v. and oral dosage forms varied between 10 and 13.5 hr and were not statistically different (P > 0.05). On the contrary, the maximum plasma concentration (C(max)) and area under the curve (AUC) from capsule were comparable to those from i.v. (P > 0.05), while these values were markedly higher than values from tablet formulation (P < 0.05). The therapeutic QN plasma levels were not achieved with the tablet formulation. The absolute bioavailability (F) were 73% (C.l., 53.3 - 92.4%) and 39 % (C.I., 21.7 - 56.6%) for the capsule and tablet respectively and the difference was significant (P < 0.05). The subtherapeutic levels obtained from the tablet form used in this study may cause treatment failure during malaria and caution should be taken when predictions are made from results obtained from different formulations of QN.

  1. Absolute GPS Positioning Using Genetic Algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramillien, G.

    A new inverse approach for restoring the absolute coordinates of a ground -based station from three or four observed GPS pseudo-ranges is proposed. This stochastic method is based on simulations of natural evolution named genetic algorithms (GA). These iterative procedures provide fairly good and robust estimates of the absolute positions in the Earth's geocentric reference system. For comparison/validation, GA results are compared to the ones obtained using the classical linearized least-square scheme for the determination of the XYZ location proposed by Bancroft (1985) which is strongly limited by the number of available observations (i.e. here, the number of input pseudo-ranges must be four). The r.m.s. accuracy of the non -linear cost function reached by this latter method is typically ~10-4 m2 corresponding to ~300-500-m accuracies for each geocentric coordinate. However, GA can provide more acceptable solutions (r.m.s. errors < 10-5 m2), even when only three instantaneous pseudo-ranges are used, such as a lost of lock during a GPS survey. Tuned GA parameters used in different simulations are N=1000 starting individuals, as well as Pc=60-70% and Pm=30-40% for the crossover probability and mutation rate, respectively. Statistical tests on the ability of GA to recover acceptable coordinates in presence of important levels of noise are made simulating nearly 3000 random samples of erroneous pseudo-ranges. Here, two main sources of measurement errors are considered in the inversion: (1) typical satellite-clock errors and/or 300-metre variance atmospheric delays, and (2) Geometrical Dilution of Precision (GDOP) due to the particular GPS satellite configuration at the time of acquisition. Extracting valuable information and even from low-quality starting range observations, GA offer an interesting alternative for high -precision GPS positioning.

  2. Insulin Signaling and Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Riehle, Christian; Abel, E Dale

    2016-04-01

    Heart failure is associated with generalized insulin resistance. Moreover, insulin-resistant states such as type 2 diabetes mellitus and obesity increases the risk of heart failure even after adjusting for traditional risk factors. Insulin resistance or type 2 diabetes mellitus alters the systemic and neurohumoral milieu, leading to changes in metabolism and signaling pathways in the heart that may contribute to myocardial dysfunction. In addition, changes in insulin signaling within cardiomyocytes develop in the failing heart. The changes range from activation of proximal insulin signaling pathways that may contribute to adverse left ventricular remodeling and mitochondrial dysfunction to repression of distal elements of insulin signaling pathways such as forkhead box O transcriptional signaling or glucose transport, which may also impair cardiac metabolism, structure, and function. This article will review the complexities of insulin signaling within the myocardium and ways in which these pathways are altered in heart failure or in conditions associated with generalized insulin resistance. The implications of these changes for therapeutic approaches to treating or preventing heart failure will be discussed.

  3. Insulin and the Burned Patient

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    glucose utili- zation in muscle. J Clin Invest 1984; 74: 888–897 10. Watson RT, Pessin JE: Intracellular organi- zation of insulin signaling and GLUT4 ...regulated fusion of GLUT4 -containing vesicles with the plasma membrane. Mol Membr Biol 2001; 18:237–245 15. Nystrom FH, Quon MJ: Insulin signalling

  4. Abnormal insulin levels and vertigo.

    PubMed

    Proctor, C A

    1981-10-01

    Fifty patients with unexplained vertigo (36) or lightheadedness (14) are evaluated, all of whom had abnormal ENGs and normal audiograms. Five hour insulin glucose tolerance tests were performance on all patients, with insulin levels being obtained fasting and at one-half, one, two, and three hours. The results of this investigation were remarkable. Borderline or abnormal insulin levels were discovered in 82% of patients; 90% were found to have either an abnormal glucose tolerance test or at least borderline insulin levels. The response to treatment in these dizzy patients was also startling, with appropriate low carbohydrate diets improving the patient's symptoms in 90% of cases. It is, therefore, apparent that the earliest identification of carbohydrate imbalance with an insulin glucose tolerance test is extremely important in the work-up of the dizzy patients.

  5. Betaine deficiency in maize

    SciTech Connect

    Lerma, C. ); Rich, P.J.; Ju, G.C.; Yang, Wenju; Rhodes, D. ); Hanson, A.D. )

    1991-04-01

    Maize (Zea mays L.) is a betaine-accumulating species, but certain maize genotypes lack betaine almost completely; a single recessive gene has been implicated as the cause of this deficiency. This study was undertaken to determine whether betaine deficiency in diverse maize germplasm is conditioned by the same genetic locus, and to define the biochemical lesion(s) involved. Complementation tests indicated that all 13 deficient genotypes tested shared a common locus. One maize population (P77) was found to be segregating for betaine deficiency, and true breeding individuals were used to produce related lines with and without betaine. Leaf tissue of both betaine-positive and betaine-deficient lines readily converted supplied betaine aldehyde to betaine, but only the betaine-containing line was able to oxidize supplied choline to betaine. This locates the lesion in betaine-deficient plants at the choline {r arrow} betaine aldehyde step of betaine synthesis. Consistent with this location, betaine-deficient plants were shown to have no detectable endogenous pool of betaine aldehyde.

  6. Linking insulin with Alzheimer's disease: emergence as type III diabetes.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Sara; Mahmood, Zahra; Zahid, Saadia

    2015-10-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) has characteristic neuropathological abnormalities including regionalized neurodegeneration, neurofibrillary tangles, amyloid beta (Aβ) deposition, activation of pro-apoptotic genes, and oxidative stress. As the brain functions continue to disintegrate, there is a decline in person's cognitive abilities, memory, mood, spontaneity, and socializing behavior. A framework that sequentially interlinks all these phenomenons under one event is lacking. Accumulating evidence has indicated the role of insulin deficiency and insulin resistance as mediators of AD neurodegeneration. Herein, we reviewed the evidence stemming from the development of diabetes agent-induced AD animal model. Striking evidence has attributed loss of insulin receptor-bearing neurons to precede or accompany initial stage of AD. This state seems to progress with AD such that, in the terminal stages, it worsens and becomes global. Oxidative stress, tau hyperphosphorylation, APP-Aβ deposition, and impaired glucose and energy metabolism have all been linked to perturbation in insulin/IGF signaling. We conclude that AD could be referred to as "type 3 diabetes". Moreover, owing to common pathophysiology with diabetes common therapeutic regime could be effective for AD patients.

  7. Gene Therapy for Diabetes Mellitus in Rats by Hepatic Expression of Insulin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolodka, Tadeusz M.; Finegold, Milton; Moss, Larry; Woo, Savio L. C.

    1995-04-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus is caused by severe insulin deficiency secondary to the autoimmune destruction of pancreatic β cells. Patients need to be controlled by periodic insulin injections to prevent the development of ketoacidosis, which can be fatal. Sustained, low-level expression of the rat insulin 1 gene from the liver of severely diabetic rats was achieved by in vivo administration of a recombinant retroviral vector. Ketoacidosis was prevented and the treated animals exhibited normoglycemia during a 24-hr fast, with no evidence of hypoglycemia. Histopathological examination of the liver in the treated animals showed no apparent abnormalities. Thus, the liver is an excellent target organ for ectopic expression of the insulin gene as a potential treatment modality for type 1 diabetes mellitus by gene therapy.

  8. Mechanisms of amino acid-stimulated insulin secretion in congenital hyperinsulinism.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tingting; Li, Changhong

    2013-01-01

    The role of amino acids in the regulation of insulin secretion in pancreatic beta-cells is highlighted in three forms of congenital hyperinsulinism (HI), namely gain-of-function mutations of glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH), loss-of-function mutations of ATP-dependent potassium channels, and a deficiency of short-chain 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase. Studies on disease mouse models of HI suggest that amino acid oxidation and signaling effects are the major mechanisms of amino acid-stimulated insulin secretion. Amino acid oxidation via GDH produces ATP and triggers insulin secretion. The signaling effect of amino acids amplifies insulin release after beta-cell depolarization and elevation of cytosolic calcium.

  9. Iodine deficiency: Clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Niwattisaiwong, Soamsiri; Burman, Kenneth D; Li-Ng, Melissa

    2017-03-01

    Iodine is crucial for thyroid hormone synthesis and fetal neurodevelopment. Major dietary sources of iodine in the United States are dairy products and iodized salt. Potential consequences of iodine deficiency are goiter, hypothyroidism, cretinism, and impaired cognitive development. Although iodine status in the United States is considered sufficient at the population level, intake varies widely across the population, and the percentage of women of childbearing age with iodine deficiency is increasing. Physicians should be aware of the risks of iodine deficiency and the indications for iodine supplementation, especially in women who are pregnant or lactating.

  10. AAS, growth hormone, and insulin abuse: psychological and neuroendocrine effects

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Michael R; Evans, Peter; Davies, Bruce; Baker, Julien S

    2008-01-01

    The nontherapeutic use of prescription medicines by individuals involved in sport is increasing. Anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS) are the most widely abused drug. Much of our knowledge of the psychological and physiological effects of human growth hormone (hGH) and insulin has been learned from deficiency states. As a consequence of the Internet revolution, previously unobtainable and expensive designer drugs, particularly recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) and insulin, have become freely available at ridiculously discounted prices from countries such as China and are being abused. These drugs have various physiological and psychological effects and medical personnel must become aware that such prescription medicine abuse appears to be used not only for performance and cosmetic reasons, but as a consequence of psychological pre-morbidity. PMID:18827854

  11. Context-dependent regulation of feeding behaviour by the insulin receptor, DAF-2, in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Dillon, James; Holden-Dye, Lindy; O'Connor, Vincent; Hopper, Neil A

    2016-06-01

    Insulin signalling plays a significant role in both developmental programmes and pathways modulating the neuronal signalling that controls adult behaviour. Here, we have investigated insulin signalling in food-associated behaviour in adult C. elegans by scoring locomotion and feeding on and off bacteria, the worm's food. This analysis used mutants (daf-2, daf-18) of the insulin signalling pathway, and we provide evidence for an acute role for insulin signalling in the adult nervous system distinct from its impact on developmental programmes. Insulin receptor daf-2 mutants move slower than wild type both on and off food and showed impaired locomotory responses to food deprivation. This latter behaviour is manifest as a failure to instigate dispersal following prolonged food deprivation and suggests a role for insulin signalling in this adaptive response. Insulin receptor daf-2 mutants are also deficient in pharyngeal pumping on food and off food. Pharmacological analysis showed the pharynx of daf-2 is selectively compromised in its response to 5-HT compared to the excitatory neuropeptide FLP-17. By comparing the adaptive pharyngeal behaviour in intact worms and isolated pharyngeal preparations, we determined that an insulin-dependent signal extrinsic to the pharyngeal system is involved in feeding adaptation. Hence, we suggest that reactive insulin signalling modulates both locomotory foraging and pharyngeal pumping as the animal adapts to the absence of food. We discuss this in the context of insulin signalling directing a shift in the sensitivity of neurotransmitter systems to regulate the worm's response to changes in food availability in the environment.

  12. Iron deficiency anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... GM. Disorders of iron homeostasis: iron deficiency and overload. In: Hoffman R, Benz EJ Jr, Silberstein LE, ... to achieve this important distinction for online health information and services. Learn more about A.D.A. ...

  13. [Selenium deficiency in pregnancy?].

    PubMed

    Lechner, W; Jenewein, I; Ritzberger, G; Sölder, E; Waitz-Penz, A; Schirmer, M; Abfalter, E

    1990-07-15

    Selenium content was investigated by atomic absorbtion spectroscopy in 32 normal pregnant women in the 38th-42, week of pregnancy. In congruence with other investigations from middle and northern Europe, selenium deficiency was stated in all of the patients.

  14. Adenine phosphoribosyltransferase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Bollée, Guillaume; Harambat, Jérôme; Bensman, Albert; Knebelmann, Bertrand; Daudon, Michel; Ceballos-Picot, Irène

    2012-09-01

    Complete adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (APRT) deficiency is a rare inherited metabolic disorder that leads to the formation and hyperexcretion of 2,8-dihydroxyadenine (DHA) into urine. The low solubility of DHA results in precipitation of this compound and the formation of urinary crystals and stones. The disease can present as recurrent urolithiasis or nephropathy secondary to crystal precipitation into renal parenchyma (DHA nephropathy). The diagnostic tools available-including stone analysis, crystalluria, and APRT activity measurement-make the diagnosis easy to confirm when APRT deficiency is suspected. However, the disease can present at any age, and the variability of symptoms can present a diagnostic challenge to many physicians. The early recognition and treatment of APRT deficiency are of crucial importance for preventing irreversible loss of renal function, which still occurs in a non-negligible proportion of cases. This review summarizes the genetic and metabolic mechanisms underlying stone formation and renal disease, along with the diagnosis and management of APRT deficiency.

  15. Factor V deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... as many as 20 different proteins in blood plasma. These proteins are called blood coagulation factors. Factor ... You will be given fresh blood plasma or fresh frozen plasma infusions ... These treatments will correct the deficiency temporarily.

  16. Factor VII deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... if one or more of these factors are missing or are not functioning like they should. Factor VII is one such coagulation factor. Factor VII deficiency runs in families (inherited) and is very rare. Both parents must ...

  17. Factor II deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... if one or more of these factors are missing or are not functioning like they should. Factor II is one such coagulation factor. Factor II deficiency runs in families (inherited) and is very rare. Both parents must ...

  18. Vitamin D deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Gani, Linsey Utami; How, Choon How

    2015-01-01

    Vitamin D deficiency is common and may contribute to osteopenia, osteoporosis and falls risk in the elderly. Screening for vitamin D deficiency is important in high-risk patients, especially for patients who suffered minimal trauma fractures. Vitamin D deficiency should be treated according to the severity of the deficiency. In high-risk adults, follow-up serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentration should be measured 3–4 months after initiating maintenance therapy to confirm that the target level has been achieved. All patients should maintain a calcium intake of at least 1,000 mg for women aged ≤ 50 years and men ≤ 70 years, and 1,300 mg for women > 50 years and men > 70 years. PMID:26311908

  19. Correction of diabetic pattern of insulin release from islets of the spiny mouse (Acomys cahirinus) by glucose priming in vitro.

    PubMed

    Nesher, R; Abramovitch, E; Cerasi, E

    1985-04-01

    Insulin release kinetics were studied in perifused islets of Langerhans, isolated from mildly hyperglycaemic and from normoglycaemic spiny mice (Acomys cahirinus), a rodent predisposed to develop spontaneously non-ketotic diabetes. In both groups, insulin response to glucose (16.7 mmol/l) was delayed in comparison with that of rat islets, the release kinetics being analogous to that of human Type 2 (non-insulin-dependent) diabetes. Thirty min priming of the isolated Acomys islets with glucose (16.7 mmol/l) resulted in potentiation of the insulin release to a second stimulation. The degree of potentiation decreased exponentially with the time interval between stimulations, showing a t1/2 of 18 min. Induction of potentiation by glucose was time-dependent, giving a maximal effect after 20 min of priming. In addition to overall amplification of the insulin response, priming with glucose accelerated markedly the initial release rates, correcting the dynamics of the response. We conclude that: (1) decreased and delayed insulin secretion is found in Acomys cahirinus before the development of hyperglycaemia; (2) induction of time-dependent potentiation in the islet by priming with glucose corrects the diabetic-type dynamics of insulin release; (3) therefore the deficient insulin release of Acomys is of a functional nature, the mechanism of potentiation bypassing the defect; (4) since insulin release in Acomys resembles that in prediabetic and diabetic man, similar conclusions might apply to the islet dysfunction in Type 2 diabetes.

  20. Exposure to excess insulin (glargine) induces type 2 diabetes mellitus in mice fed on a chow diet.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xuefeng; Mei, Shuang; Gu, Haihua; Guo, Huailan; Zha, Longying; Cai, Junwei; Li, Xuefeng; Liu, Zhenqi; Cao, Wenhong

    2014-06-01

    We have previously shown that insulin plays an important role in the nutrient-induced insulin resistance. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that chronic exposure to excess long-acting insulin (glargine) can cause typical type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in normal mice fed on a chow diet. C57BL/6 mice were treated with glargine once a day for 8 weeks, followed by evaluations of food intake, body weight, blood levels of glucose, insulin, lipids, and cytokines, insulin signaling, histology of pancreas, ectopic fat accumulation, oxidative stress level, and cholesterol content in mitochondria in tissues. Cholesterol content in mitochondria and its association with oxidative stress in cultured hepatocytes and β-cells were also examined. Results show that chronic exposure to glargine caused insulin resistance, hyperinsulinemia, and relative insulin deficiency (T2DM). Treatment with excess glargine led to loss of pancreatic islets, ectopic fat accumulation in liver, oxidative stress in liver and pancreas, and increased cholesterol content in mitochondria of liver and pancreas. Prolonged exposure of cultured primary hepatocytes and HIT-TI5 β-cells to insulin induced oxidative stress in a cholesterol synthesis-dependent manner. Together, our results show that chronic exposure to excess insulin can induce typical T2DM in normal mice fed on a chow diet.

  1. Vitamin D3 supplementation improves insulin sensitivity in subjects with impaired fasting glucose

    PubMed Central

    Nazarian, Shaban; Peter, John V St; Boston, Raymond C; Jones, Sidney A; Mariash, Cary N

    2011-01-01

    Vitamin D has in vitro and in vivo effects on β-cells and insulin sensitivity. Vitamin D deficiency (VDD) has been associated with onset and progression of type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM-2). However, studies involving supplementation of vitamin D in subjects with previously established diabetes have demonstrated inconsistent effects on insulin sensitivity. The aim of this open-label study was to assess the effects of high dose vitamin D3 supplementation on insulin sensitivity in subjects with VDD and impaired fasting glucose. We studied 8 subjects with VDD and pre-diabetes with the modified frequently sampled intravenous glucose tolerance (mFSIGT) test before and after vitamin D supplementation. Vitamin D3 was administered as 10,000 IU daily for 4 weeks. The mFSIGT was analyzed with MinMod Millennnium to obtain estimates of Acute Insulin Response to Glucose (AIRg), Insulin Sensitivity (SI), and Disposition Index (DI). We found that AIRg decreased (p = 0.011) and insulin sensitivity, expressed as SI, increased (p = 0.012) after a intervention with vitamin D. If these findings are repeated in a randomized, double-blind, sudy the results indicate that orally administered high dose vitamin D3 supplementation improves insulin sensitivity in subjects with impaired fasting glucose and suggests that high dose vitamin D3 supplementation might provide an inexpensive public health measure in preventing, or at least delaying, the progression from impaired fasting glucose to diabetes. PMID:22005267

  2. Glut4 expression defines an insulin-sensitive hypothalamic neuronal population.

    PubMed

    Ren, Hongxia; Yan, Shijun; Zhang, Baifang; Lu, Taylor Y; Arancio, Ottavio; Accili, Domenico

    2014-07-01

    Insulin signaling in the CNS modulates satiety and glucose metabolism, but insulin target neurons are poorly defined. We have previously shown that ablation of insulin receptors (InsR) in Glut4-expressing tissues results in systemic abnormalities of insulin action. We propose that Glut4 neurons constitute an insulin-sensitive neuronal subset. We determined their gene expression profiles using flow-sorted hypothalamic Glut4 neurons. Gene ontology analyses demonstrated that Glut4 neurons are enriched in olfacto-sensory receptors, M2 acetylcholine receptors, and pathways required for the acquisition of insulin sensitivity. Following genetic ablation of InsR, transcriptome profiling of Glut4 neurons demonstrated impairment of the insulin, peptide hormone, and cAMP signaling pathways, with a striking upregulation of anion homeostasis pathway. Accordingly, hypothalamic InsR-deficient Glut4 neurons showed reduced firing activity. The molecular signature of Glut4 neurons is consistent with a role for this neural population in the integration of olfacto-sensory cues with hormone signaling to regulate peripheral metabolism.

  3. Diabetes beyond insulin: review of new drugs for treatment of diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Modi, Pankaj

    2007-06-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a progressive disease characterized by insulin deficiency and insulin resistance or both. The fasting and post-prandial blood glucose is elevated, exposing the patient to acute and chronic complications (micro- and macro-vascular) leading to blindness, kidney failure, heart disease, stroke and amputations. Improving glycemic control has been demonstrated to lower the risk of these complications. Owing to the progressive nature of the disease, an evolving treatment strategy is necessary to maintain glycemic control. Varieties of new pharmacologic interventions are developed in past 5 years to treat people with diabetes. Several studies have been carried out covering different aspects of pharmacological interventions (newer and old drugs) along with the effects of weight loss, diet and exercise. Two categories of drugs have been used for the treatment of Diabetes Mellitus: the insulin and oral agents. Insulin analogues are molecules that differ from human insulin in amino acid sequence but bind to the insulin receptors and act similarly in function. This article provides an update of pharmacologic interventions for diabetes with practical overview of the new drug options, new insulin analogues, pharmacology, clinical efficacy, safety, dosing, cost, with specific examples of each and their background and side effects used to achieve tight glucose control. These agents have distinct characteristics that help in their selection for the treatment of type 1 and type 2 diabetes.

  4. Ecscr regulates insulin sensitivity and predisposition to obesity by modulating endothelial cell functions.

    PubMed

    Akakabe, Yoshiki; Koide, Masahiro; Kitamura, Youhei; Matsuo, Kiyonari; Ueyama, Tomomi; Matoba, Satoaki; Yamada, Hiroyuki; Miyata, Keishi; Oike, Yuichi; Ikeda, Koji

    2013-01-01

    Insulin resistance is closely associated with obesity and is one of the earliest symptoms of type-2 diabetes. Endothelial cells are involved in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance through their role in insulin delivery and adipose tissue angiogenesis. Here we show that Ecscr (endothelial cell surface expressed chemotaxis and apoptosis regulator; also known as ARIA), the transmembrane protein that regulates endothelial cell signalling, is highly expressed in white and brown adipose tissues, and regulates energy metabolism and glucose homeostasis by modulating endothelial cell functions. Ecscr-deficient mice fed a normal chow show improved glucose tolerance and enhanced insulin sensitivity. We demonstrate that Ecscr deletion enhances the insulin-mediated Akt/endothelial nitric oxide synthase activation in endothelial cells, which increases insulin delivery into the skeletal muscle. Ecscr deletion also protects mice on a high-fat diet from obesity and obesity-related metabolic disorders by enhancing adipose tissue angiogenesis. Conversely, targeted activation of Ecscr in endothelial cells impairs glucose tolerance and predisposes mice to diet-induced obesity. Our results suggest that the inactivation of Ecscr enhances insulin sensitivity and may represent a new therapeutic strategy for treating metabolic syndrome.

  5. Reduced Graphene Oxide Modified the Interdigitated Chain Electrode for an Insulin Sensor.

    PubMed

    Yagati, Ajay Kumar; Park, Jinsoo; Cho, Sungbo

    2016-01-15

    Insulin is a key regulator in glucose homeostasis and its deficiency or alternations in the human body causes various types of diabetic disorders. In this paper, we present the development of a reduced graphene oxide (rGO) modified interdigitated chain electrode (ICE) for direct capacitive detection of insulin. The impedance properties of rGO-ICE were characterized by equivalent circuit modeling. After an electrochemical deposition of rGO on ICE, the electrode was modified with self-assembled monolayers and insulin antibodies in order to achieve insulin binding reactions. The impedance spectra and capacitances were measured with respect to the concentrations of insulin and the capacitance change (ΔC) was analyzed to quantify insulin concentration. The antibody immobilized electrode showed an increment of ΔC according to the insulin concentration in human serum ranging from 1 ng/mL to 10 µg/mL. The proposed sensor is feasible for label-free and real-time measuring of the biomarker and for point-of-care diagnosis.

  6. The Relationship between Serum 25-Hydroxyvitamin D Concentration, Cardiorespiratory Fitness, and Insulin Resistance in Japanese Men

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiaomin; Cao, Zhen-Bo; Tanisawa, Kumpei; Ito, Tomoko; Oshima, Satomi; Higuchi, Mitsuru

    2014-01-01

    Here, we aim to investigate the independent and combined associations of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) and cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) with glucose metabolism. Fasting blood samples of 107 men aged 40–79 years were analyzed for 25(OH)D, glucose, insulin, glycated hemoglobin, and lipid profile. Homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance index (HOMA-IR) was calculated from the fasting concentrations of glucose and insulin. Visceral fat area (VFA) was determined by magnetic resonance imaging and CRF by measuring maximal oxygen uptake. Median 25(OH)D concentration was 36.3 nmol/L, while the prevalence of 25(OH)D deficiency was 74.8%. Participants with high CRF had significantly lower HOMA-IR, glycated hemoglobin, and insulin values than participants with low CRF (p < 0.05). Higher 25(OH)D concentration was strongly correlated with lower HOMA-IR and insulin values independent of VFA (p < 0.01) but significantly affected by CRF. In the high CRF group, participants with higher 25(OH)D concentration had lower HOMA-IR values than participants with low 25(OH)D concentration (p < 0.05). Higher 25(OH)D and CRF are crucial for reducing insulin resistance regardless of abdominal fat. In addition, higher 25(OH)D concentration may strengthen the effect of CRF on reducing insulin resistance in middle-aged and elderly Japanese men with high CRF. PMID:25551248

  7. Fas (CD95) expression in myeloid cells promotes obesity-induced muscle insulin resistance

    PubMed Central

    Wueest, Stephan; Mueller, Rouven; Blüher, Matthias; Item, Flurin; Chin, Annie S H; Wiedemann, Michael S F; Takizawa, Hitoshi; Kovtonyuk, Larisa; Chervonsky, Alexander V; Schoenle, Eugen J; Manz, Markus G; Konrad, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Low-grade inflammation in adipose tissue and liver has been implicated in obesity-associated insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Yet, the contribution of inflammatory cells to the pathogenesis of skeletal muscle insulin resistance remains elusive. In a large cohort of obese human individuals, blood monocyte Fas (CD95) expression correlated with systemic and skeletal muscle insulin resistance. To test a causal role for myeloid cell Fas expression in the development of skeletal muscle insulin resistance, we generated myeloid/haematopoietic cell-specific Fas-depleted mice. Myeloid/haematopoietic Fas deficiency prevented the development of glucose intolerance in high fat-fed mice, in ob/ob mice, and in mice acutely challenged by LPS. In vivo, ex vivo and in vitro studies demonstrated preservation of muscle insulin responsiveness with no effect on adipose tissue or liver. Studies using neutralizing antibodies demonstrated a role for TNFα as mediator between myeloid Fas and skeletal muscle insulin resistance, supported by significant correlations between monocyte Fas expression and circulating TNFα in humans. In conclusion, our results demonstrate an unanticipated crosstalk between myeloid cells and skeletal muscle in the development of obesity-associated insulin resistance. PMID:24203314

  8. Cell factories for insulin production.

    PubMed

    Baeshen, Nabih A; Baeshen, Mohammed N; Sheikh, Abdullah; Bora, Roop S; Ahmed, Mohamed Morsi M; Ramadan, Hassan A I; Saini, Kulvinder Singh; Redwan, Elrashdy M

    2014-10-02

    The rapid increase in the number of diabetic patients globally and exploration of alternate insulin delivery methods such as inhalation or oral route that rely on higher doses, is bound to escalate the demand for recombinant insulin in near future. Current manufacturing technologies would be unable to meet the growing demand of affordable insulin due to limitation in production capacity and high production cost. Manufacturing of therapeutic recombinant proteins require an appropriate host organism with efficient machinery for posttranslational modifications and protein refolding. Recombinant human insulin has been produced predominantly using E. coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae for therapeutic use in human. We would focus in this review, on various approaches that can be exploited to increase the production of a biologically active insulin and its analogues in E. coli and yeast. Transgenic plants are also very attractive expression system, which can be exploited to produce insulin in large quantities for therapeutic use in human. Plant-based expression system hold tremendous potential for high-capacity production of insulin in very cost-effective manner. Very high level of expression of biologically active proinsulin in seeds or leaves with long-term stability, offers a low-cost technology for both injectable as well as oral delivery of proinsulin.

  9. Relationship between insulin release, antinatriuresis and hypokalaemia after glucose ingestion in normal and hypertensive man.

    PubMed

    Natali, A; Quiñones Galvan, A; Santoro, D; Pecori, N; Taddei, S; Salvetti, A; Ferrannini, E

    1993-09-01

    1. Insulin simultaneously causes hypokalaemia and antinatriuresis, and it has been suggested that the two effects are tightly coupled. Whether these actions are preserved in patients with essential hypertension is not known. 2. Eight hypertensive patients and eight normotensive control subjects were studied before and after the ingestion of 75 g of glucose. Despite similar glycaemic profiles, the patients showed a hyperinsulinaemic response incremental area 49 +/- 8 versus 27 +/- 6 nmol l-1 3 h, P < 0.04) but a blunted hypokalaemic response (-7 +/- 1 versus -16 +/- 1%, P < 0.001). Both absolute and fractional urinary excretion of sodium and potassium were significantly decreased during glucose-induced hyperinsulinaemia in hypertensive patients as well as in normotensive subjects (P < 0.05 for all changes). 3. To test whether hypokalaemia is required for insulin-induced antinatriuresis, each hypertensive patient received another oral glucose load during which enough potassium chloride was given to clamp the plasma potassium concentration at baseline. Under these conditions, significant insulin-induced antinatriuresis still occurred. In addition, whereas the glycaemic profile was superimposable, the response of the plasma insulin concentration was significantly greater with than without maintenance of the plasma potassium concentration (total area 79 +/- 14 versus 63 +/- 8 nmol l-1 3 h, P < 0.04). 4. We conclude that (a) insulin causes antinatriuresis, antikaliuresis and hypokalaemia under physiological conditions; (b) in hyperinsulinaemic (insulin-resistant) patients with essential hypertension, the antinatriuretic action of insulin is quantitatively preserved; and (c) clamping plasma potassium levels prevents insulin-induced antikaliuresis but not antinatriuresis, and potentiates the insulin secretory response to glucose.

  10. Isolation and determination of absolute configurations of insect-produced methyl-branched hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Bello, Jan E; McElfresh, J Steven; Millar, Jocelyn G

    2015-01-27

    Although the effects of stereochemistry have been studied extensively for volatile insect pheromones, little is known about the effects of chirality in the nonvolatile methyl-branched hydrocarbons (MBCHs) used by many insects as contact pheromones. MBCHs generally contain one or more chiral centers and so two or more stereoisomeric forms are possible for each structure. However, it is not known whether insects biosynthesize these molecules in high stereoisomeric purity, nor is it known whether insects can distinguish the different stereoisomeric forms of MBCHs. This knowledge gap is due in part to the lack of methods for isolating individual MBCHs from the complex cuticular hydrocarbon (CHC) blends of insects, as well as the difficulty in determining the absolute configurations of the isolated MBCHs. To address these deficiencies, we report a straightforward method for the isolation of individual cuticular hydrocarbons from the complex CHC blend. The method was used to isolate 36 pure MBCHs from 20 species in nine insect orders. The absolute stereochemistries of the purified MBCHs then were determined by digital polarimetry. The absolute configurations of all of the isolated MBCHs were determined to be (R) by comparison with a library of synthesized, enantiomerically pure standards, suggesting that the biosynthetic pathways used to construct MBCHs are highly conserved within the Insecta. The development of a straightforward method for isolation of specific CHCs will enable determination of their functional roles by providing pure compounds for bioassays.

  11. Isolation and determination of absolute configurations of insect-produced methyl-branched hydrocarbons

    PubMed Central

    Bello, Jan E.; McElfresh, J. Steven; Millar, Jocelyn G.

    2015-01-01

    Although the effects of stereochemistry have been studied extensively for volatile insect pheromones, little is known about the effects of chirality in the nonvolatile methyl-branched hydrocarbons (MBCHs) used by many insects as contact pheromones. MBCHs generally contain one or more chiral centers and so two or more stereoisomeric forms are possible for each structure. However, it is not known whether insects biosynthesize these molecules in high stereoisomeric purity, nor is it known whether insects can distinguish the different stereoisomeric forms of MBCHs. This knowledge gap is due in part to the lack of methods for isolating individual MBCHs from the complex cuticular hydrocarbon (CHC) blends of insects, as well as the difficulty in determining the absolute configurations of the isolated MBCHs. To address these deficiencies, we report a straightforward method for the isolation of individual cuticular hydrocarbons from the complex CHC blend. The method was used to isolate 36 pure MBCHs from 20 species in nine insect orders. The absolute stereochemistries of the purified MBCHs then were determined by digital polarimetry. The absolute configurations of all of the isolated MBCHs were determined to be (R) by comparison with a library of synthesized, enantiomerically pure standards, suggesting that the biosynthetic pathways used to construct MBCHs are highly conserved within the Insecta. The development of a straightforward method for isolation of specific CHCs will enable determination of their functional roles by providing pure compounds for bioassays. PMID:25583471

  12. Insulin receptor substrates Irs1 and Irs2 coordinate skeletal muscle growth and metabolism via the Akt and AMPK pathways.

    PubMed

    Long, Yun Chau; Cheng, Zhiyong; Copps, Kyle D; White, Morris F

    2011-02-01

    Coordination of skeletal muscle growth and metabolism with nutrient availability is critical for metabolic homeostasis. To establish the role of insulin-like signaling in this process, we used muscle creatine kinase (MCK)-Cre to disrupt expression of insulin receptor substrates Irs1 and Irs2 in mouse skeletal/cardiac muscle. In 2-week-old mice, skeletal muscle masses and insulin responses were slightly affected by Irs1, but not Irs2, deficiency. In contrast, the combined deficiency of Irs1 and Irs2 (MDKO mice) severely reduced skeletal muscle growth and Akt→mTOR signaling and caused death by 3 weeks of age. Autopsy of MDKO mice revealed dilated cardiomyopathy, reflecting the known requirement of insulin-like signaling for cardiac function (P. G. Laustsen et al., Mol. Cell. Biol. 27:1649-1664, 2007). Impaired growth and function of MDKO skeletal muscle were accompanied by increased Foxo-dependent atrogene expression and amino acid release. MDKO mice were resistant to injected insulin, and their isolated skeletal muscles showed decreased insulin-stimulated glucose uptake. Glucose utilization in MDKO mice and isolated skeletal muscles was shifted from oxidation to lactate production, accompanied by an elevated AMP/ATP ratio that increased AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)→acetyl coenzyme A carboxylase (ACC) phosphorylation and fatty acid oxidation. Thus, insulin-like signaling via Irs1/2 is essential to terminate skeletal muscle catabolic/fasting pathways in the presence of adequate nutrition.

  13. Absolute calibration of forces in optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutra, R. S.; Viana, N. B.; Maia Neto, P. A.; Nussenzveig, H. M.

    2014-07-01

    Optical tweezers are highly versatile laser traps for neutral microparticles, with fundamental applications in physics and in single molecule cell biology. Force measurements are performed by converting the stiffness response to displacement of trapped transparent microspheres, employed as force transducers. Usually, calibration is indirect, by comparison with fluid drag forces. This can lead to discrepancies by sizable factors. Progress achieved in a program aiming at absolute calibration, conducted over the past 15 years, is briefly reviewed. Here we overcome its last major obstacle, a theoretical overestimation of the peak stiffness, within the most employed range for applications, and we perform experimental validation. The discrepancy is traced to the effect of primary aberrations of the optical system, which are now included in the theory. All required experimental parameters are readily accessible. Astigmatism, the dominant effect, is measured by analyzing reflected images of the focused laser spot, adapting frequently employed video microscopy techniques. Combined with interface spherical aberration, it reveals a previously unknown window of instability for trapping. Comparison with experimental data leads to an overall agreement within error bars, with no fitting, for a broad range of microsphere radii, from the Rayleigh regime to the ray optics one, for different polarizations and trapping heights, including all commonly employed parameter domains. Besides signaling full first-principles theoretical understanding of optical tweezers operation, the results may lead to improved instrument design and control over experiments, as well as to an extended domain of applicability, allowing reliable force measurements, in principle, from femtonewtons to nanonewtons.

  14. Elevation correction factor for absolute pressure measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panek, Joseph W.; Sorrells, Mark R.

    1996-01-01

    With the arrival of highly accurate multi-port pressure measurement systems, conditions that previously did not affect overall system accuracy must now be scrutinized closely. Errors caused by elevation differences between pressure sensing elements and model pressure taps can be quantified and corrected. With multi-port pressure measurement systems, the sensing elements are connected to pressure taps that may be many feet away. The measurement system may be at a different elevation than the pressure taps due to laboratory space or test article constraints. This difference produces a pressure gradient that is inversely proportional to height within the interface tube. The pressure at the bottom of the tube will be higher than the pressure at the top due to the weight of the tube's column of air. Tubes with higher pressures will exhibit larger absolute errors due to the higher air density. The above effect is well documented but has generally been taken into account with large elevations only. With error analysis techniques, the loss in accuracy from elevation can be easily quantified. Correction factors can be applied to maintain the high accuracies of new pressure measurement systems.

  15. What is Needed for Absolute Paleointensity?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valet, J. P.

    2015-12-01

    Many alternative approaches to the Thellier and Thellier technique for absolute paleointensity have been proposed during the past twenty years. One reason is the time consuming aspect of the experiments. Another reason is to avoid uncertainties in determinations of the paleofield which are mostly linked to the presence of multidomain grains. Despite great care taken by these new techniques, there is no indication that they always provide the right answer and in fact sometimes fail. We are convinced that the most valid approach remains the original double heating Thellier protocol provided that natural remanence is controlled by pure magnetite with a narrow distribution of small grain sizes, mostly single domains. The presence of titanium, even in small amount generates biases which yield incorrect field values. Single domain grains frequently dominate the magnetization of glass samples, which explains the success of this selective approach. They are also present in volcanic lava flows but much less frequently, and therefore contribute to the low success rate of most experiments. However the loss of at least 70% of the magnetization at very high temperatures prior to the Curie point appears to be an essential prerequisite that increases the success rate to almost 100% and has been validated from historical flows and from recent studies. This requirement can easily be tested by thermal demagnetization while low temperature experiments can document the detection of single domain magnetite using the δFC/δZFC parameter as suggested (Moskowitz et al, 1993) for biogenic magnetite.

  16. Gyrokinetic Statistical Absolute Equilibrium and Turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Jian-Zhou Zhu and Gregory W. Hammett

    2011-01-10

    A paradigm based on the absolute equilibrium of Galerkin-truncated inviscid systems to aid in understanding turbulence [T.-D. Lee, "On some statistical properties of hydrodynamical and magnetohydrodynamical fields," Q. Appl. Math. 10, 69 (1952)] is taken to study gyrokinetic plasma turbulence: A finite set of Fourier modes of the collisionless gyrokinetic equations are kept and the statistical equilibria are calculated; possible implications for plasma turbulence in various situations are discussed. For the case of two spatial and one velocity dimension, in the calculation with discretization also of velocity v with N grid points (where N + 1 quantities are conserved, corresponding to an energy invariant and N entropy-related invariants), the negative temperature states, corresponding to the condensation of the generalized energy into the lowest modes, are found. This indicates a generic feature of inverse energy cascade. Comparisons are made with some classical results, such as those of Charney-Hasegawa-Mima in the cold-ion limit. There is a universal shape for statistical equilibrium of gyrokinetics in three spatial and two velocity dimensions with just one conserved quantity. Possible physical relevance to turbulence, such as ITG zonal flows, and to a critical balance hypothesis are also discussed.

  17. Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leckey, John P.

    2015-01-01

    The Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO) is a mission, led and developed by NASA, that will measure a variety of climate variables with an unprecedented accuracy to quantify and attribute climate change. CLARREO consists of three separate instruments: an infrared (IR) spectrometer, a reflected solar (RS) spectrometer, and a radio occultation (RO) instrument. The mission will contain orbiting radiometers with sufficient accuracy, including on orbit verification, to calibrate other space-based instrumentation, increasing their respective accuracy by as much as an order of magnitude. The IR spectrometer is a Fourier Transform spectrometer (FTS) working in the 5 to 50 microns wavelength region with a goal of 0.1 K (k = 3) accuracy. The FTS will achieve this accuracy using phase change cells to verify thermistor accuracy and heated halos to verify blackbody emissivity, both on orbit. The RS spectrometer will measure the reflectance of the atmosphere in the 0.32 to 2.3 microns wavelength region with an accuracy of 0.3% (k = 2). The status of the instrumentation packages and potential mission options will be presented.

  18. Absolute flux measurements for swift atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fink, M.; Kohl, D. A.; Keto, J. W.; Antoniewicz, P.

    1987-01-01

    While a torsion balance in vacuum can easily measure the momentum transfer from a gas beam impinging on a surface attached to the balance, this measurement depends on the accommodation coefficients of the atoms with the surface and the distribution of the recoil. A torsion balance is described for making absolute flux measurements independent of recoil effects. The torsion balance is a conventional taut suspension wire design and the Young modulus of the wire determines the relationship between the displacement and the applied torque. A compensating magnetic field is applied to maintain zero displacement and provide critical damping. The unique feature is to couple the impinging gas beam to the torsion balance via a Wood's horn, i.e., a thin wall tube with a gradual 90 deg bend. Just as light is trapped in a Wood's horn by specular reflection from the curved surfaces, the gas beam diffuses through the tube. Instead of trapping the beam, the end of the tube is open so that the atoms exit the tube at 90 deg to their original direction. Therefore, all of the forward momentum of the gas beam is transferred to the torsion balance independent of the angle of reflection from the surfaces inside the tube.

  19. Insulin Receptor Signaling in Normal and Insulin-Resistant States

    PubMed Central

    Boucher, Jérémie; Kleinridders, André; Kahn, C. Ronald

    2014-01-01

    In the wake of the worldwide increase in type-2 diabetes, a major focus of research is understanding the signaling pathways impacting this disease. Insulin signaling regulates glucose, lipid, and energy homeostasis, predominantly via action on liver, skeletal muscle, and adipose tissue. Precise modulation of this pathway is vital for adaption as the individual moves from the fed to the fasted state. The positive and negative modulators acting on different steps of the signaling pathway, as well as the diversity of protein isoform interaction, ensure a proper and coordinated biological response to insulin in different tissues. Whereas genetic mutations are causes of rare and severe insulin resistance, obesity can lead to insulin resistance through a variety of mechanisms. Understanding these pathways is essential for development of new drugs to treat diabetes, metabolic syndrome, and their complications. PMID:24384568

  20. Effect of inulin and oligofructose enrichment of the diet on rats suffering thiamine deficiency.

    PubMed

    Dębski, B; Kurył, T; Gralak, M A; Pierzynowska, J; Drywień, M

    2011-06-01

    Thiamine deficiency resulted in inhibition of two main pathways supplying energy to the tissues: glycolysis and β-oxidation. Glycolysis was found to be inhibited to 40% of initial value calculated on the basis of RBC trans-membrane transport of glucose. Prolongation of experiment cause lowering of uptake of this sugar. In rats, energy production from fatty acids (FA) seems to be less sensitive to thiamine deficiency than glycolysis. After 30 days of feeding, utilization of FA in rats was depressed to the 61% of initial value. Thiamine deficiency suppressed insulin secretion, and the changes were statistically significant. Feeding of rats with thiamine restricted diet for 1 month caused the reduction of serum insulin by 14%. In the same animals, trans-membrane glucose transport was reduced over two-times, what might suggest a decreased efficiency of insulin action in such conditions. The kind and concentration of non-digestible fructo-oligosaccharides (FOS) did not affect significantly serum insulin concentration in animals fed thiamine restricted diet. Substitution of a part of wheat starch with FOS has only insignificant compensatory effect on the uptake of glucose. A partial amelioration of the β-oxidation inhibition caused by feeding rats with thiamine deficient diet was observed in animals supplemented with FOS. However, this effect was statistically significant only in rats receiving diet containing 10% of inulin. The effect of supplemented FOS and their concentration on trans-membrane glucose transport in RBC was statistically significant, when pulled supplementation groups were used for statistical evaluation.

  1. New ways of insulin delivery.

    PubMed

    Heinemann, L

    2010-02-01

    When Exubera (EXU), the first inhaled insulin formulation to make it through the clinical development process, was introduced to the market some years ago it was hoped that this would be the first in a series of novel insulin formulations applied by this route. In addition, it was hoped that inhaled insulin would pave the way for other alternative routes of insulin administration (ARIA), i.e. oral insulin, nasal insulin or transdermal insulin to mention only some of the different attempts that have been studied in the last 90 years. The failure of EXU, i.e. its withdrawal from the market due to insufficient market success, was followed by the cessation of nearly all other attempts to develop inhaled insulin formulations. Currently there is only one company (MannKind) which moves sturdily ahead with their Technosphere insulin. This company has submitted an NDA for their product recently and hopes to bring it to the market by the end of 2010 or early 2011. Even if the product is able to pass the approval hurdles in the USA and Europe, this does not guarantee that it will become a market success. Many diabetologists were sceptical about the need/advantages of inhaled insulin/EXU from the start and the introduction of this product has raised even more scepticism. Reports about 'side effects' (development of lung cancer in patients treated with EXU) of inhaled insulin are also not helpful, even if the causality of the appearance of cancer with this type of insulin therapy is not proven. One of the very negative consequences of stopping EXU are the huge financial losses to Pfizer. The managers in charge in other pharmaceutical companies and also most venture capitalists are reluctant to invest in ARIA nowadays. This in turn means that many of the small companies that try to develop new forms of insulin administration have issues when they try to find a big brother and/or sufficient financial support. Clearly the economic crisis has further aggravated this issue. One can

  2. ENPP1 Affects Insulin Action and Secretion: Evidences from In Vitro Studies

    PubMed Central

    Di Paola, Rosa; Caporarello, Nunzia; Marucci, Antonella; Dimatteo, Claudia; Iadicicco, Claudia; Del Guerra, Silvia; Prudente, Sabrina; Sudano, Dora; Miele, Claudia; Parrino, Cristina; Piro, Salvatore; Beguinot, Francesco; Marchetti, Piero

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to deeper investigate the mechanisms through which ENPP1, a negative modulator of insulin receptor (IR) activation, plays a role on insulin signaling, insulin secretion and eventually glucose metabolism. ENPP1 cDNA (carrying either K121 or Q121 variant) was transfected in HepG2 liver-, L6 skeletal muscle- and INS1E beta-cells. Insulin-induced IR-autophosphorylation (HepG2, L6, INS1E), Akt-Ser473, ERK1/2-Thr202/Tyr204 and GSK3-beta Ser9 phosphorylation (HepG2, L6), PEPCK mRNA levels (HepG2) and 2-deoxy-D-glucose uptake (L6) was studied. GLUT 4 mRNA (L6), insulin secretion and caspase-3 activation (INS1E) were also investigated. Insulin-induced IR-autophosphorylation was decreased in HepG2-K, L6-K, INS1E-K (20%, 52% and 11% reduction vs. untransfected cells) and twice as much in HepG2-Q, L6-Q, INS1E-Q (44%, 92% and 30%). Similar data were obtained with Akt-Ser473, ERK1/2-Thr202/Tyr204 and GSK3-beta Ser9 in HepG2 and L6. Insulin-induced reduction of PEPCK mRNA was progressively lower in untransfected, HepG2-K and HepG2-Q cells (65%, 54%, 23%). Insulin-induced glucose uptake in untransfected L6 (60% increase over basal), was totally abolished in L6-K and L6-Q cells. GLUT 4 mRNA was slightly reduced in L6-K and twice as much in L6-Q (13% and 25% reduction vs. untransfected cells). Glucose-induced insulin secretion was 60% reduced in INS1E-K and almost abolished in INS1E-Q. Serum deficiency activated caspase-3 by two, three and four folds in untransfected INS1E, INS1E-K and INS1E-Q. Glyburide-induced insulin secretion was reduced by 50% in isolated human islets from homozygous QQ donors as compared to those from KK and KQ individuals. Our data clearly indicate that ENPP1, especially when the Q121 variant is operating, affects insulin signaling and glucose metabolism in skeletal muscle- and liver-cells and both function and survival of insulin secreting beta-cells, thus representing a strong pathogenic factor predisposing to insulin resistance

  3. Fatty Acid Oxidation Defects and Insulin Sensitivity

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-26

    Very Long-chain Acyl-CoA Dehydrogenase Deficiency; Trifunctional Protein Deficiency; Long-chain 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA Dehydrogenase Deficiency; Medium-chain Acyl-CoA Dehydrogenase Deficiency; Normal Volunteers

  4. Absolute nuclear material assay using count distribution (LAMBDA) space

    DOEpatents

    Prasad, Mano K.; Snyderman, Neal J.; Rowland, Mark S.

    2015-12-01

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  5. Absolute nuclear material assay using count distribution (LAMBDA) space

    DOEpatents

    Prasad, Manoj K [Pleasanton, CA; Snyderman, Neal J [Berkeley, CA; Rowland, Mark S [Alamo, CA

    2012-06-05

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  6. Positioning, alignment and absolute pointing of the ANTARES neutrino telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fehr, F.; Distefano, C.; Antares Collaboration

    2010-01-01

    A precise detector alignment and absolute pointing is crucial for point-source searches. The ANTARES neutrino telescope utilises an array of hydrophones, tiltmeters and compasses for the relative positioning of the optical sensors. The absolute calibration is accomplished by long-baseline low-frequency triangulation of the acoustic reference devices in the deep-sea with a differential GPS system at the sea surface. The absolute pointing can be independently verified by detecting the shadow of the Moon in cosmic rays.

  7. Intentional overdose with insulin glargine and insulin aspart.

    PubMed

    Tofade, Toyin S; Liles, E Allen

    2004-10-01

    Reports of intentional massive overdoses of insulin are infrequent. A review of the literature revealed no reports of overdose attempts with either insulin glargine or insulin aspart. We report the case of a 33-year-old woman without diabetes mellitus who intentionally injected herself with an overdose of both products, which belonged to her husband. She arrived at the emergency department 15 hours after her suicide attempt, which took place the night before. Her husband had checked her blood glucose level throughout the night and had given her high-carbohydrate drinks and foods. The patient had a history of obsessive-compulsive disorder, major depression, and numerous suicide attempts. She recovered from the resulting hypoglycemia after 40 hours of dextrose infusion and was transferred to a mental health facility. The main danger associated with insulin overdose is the resultant hypoglycemia and its effects on the central nervous system; hypokalemia, hypophosphatemia, and hypomagnesemia also can develop with excess insulin administration. Dextrose infusion, with liberal oral intake when possible, and monitoring for electrolyte changes, making adjustments as needed, are recommended for the treatment of intentional insulin overdose.

  8. Absolute and Convective Instability of a Liquid Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, S. P.; Hudman, M.; Chen, J. N.

    1999-01-01

    The existence of absolute instability in a liquid jet has been predicted for some time. The disturbance grows in time and propagates both upstream and downstream in an absolutely unstable liquid jet. The image of absolute instability is captured in the NASA 2.2 sec drop tower and reported here. The transition from convective to absolute instability is observed experimentally. The experimental results are compared with the theoretical predictions on the transition Weber number as functions of the Reynolds number. The role of interfacial shear relative to all other relevant forces which cause the onset of jet breakup is explained.

  9. Protein quality and quantity and insulin control of mammary gland glucose utilization during lactation

    SciTech Connect

    Masor, M.L.

    1987-01-01

    Virgin Sprague-Dawley rats were bred, and fed laboratory stock (STOCK), 13% casein plus methionine, 13% wheat gluten, or 5% casein plus methionine through gestation and 4 days of lactation. Diets were switched at parturition to determine the effects of dietary protein quality and quantity fed during gestation and/or lactation on insulin stimulation of mammary glucose utilization. On day 20 of gestation (20G) and day 4 of lactation (4L) the right inguinal-abdominal mammary glands were removed, and acini and tissue slices were incubated in Krebs buffer with or without insulin containing (U-/sup 14/C)-glucose and 5mM glucose for 1 hour at 37/degrees/C. Glucose incorporation into CO/sub 2/, lipid and lactose was determined. Glucose incorporation into CO/sub 2/ and lipid, but not lactose was stimulated by insulin in mammary slices. Diet effects on glucose utilization in acini were confirmed in slices for basal and insulin stimulated levels. Treatment affected the absolute increase of insulin stimulation. Regression analysis significantly correlated pup weight gain with total glucose utilization. Poor dietary protein quality and quantity fed during gestation impaired both overall response of mammary glucose utilization to insulin stimulation, and mammary development during pregnancy. Improving protein value at parturition did not overcome those deficits by 4L.

  10. In vivo evaluation of thiolated chitosan tablets for oral insulin delivery.

    PubMed

    Millotti, Gioconda; Laffleur, Flavia; Perera, Glen; Vigl, Claudia; Pickl, Karin; Sinner, Frank; Bernkop-Schnürch, Andreas

    2014-10-01

    Chitosan-6-mercaptonicotinic acid (chitosan-6-MNA) is a thiolated chitosan with strong mucoadhesive properties and a pH-independent reactivity. This study aimed to evaluate the in vivo potential for the oral delivery of insulin. The comparison of the nonconjugated chitosan and chitosan-6-MNA was performed on several studies such as mucoadhesion, release, and in vivo studies. Thiolated chitosan formulations were both about 80-fold more mucoadhesive compared with unmodified ones. The thiolated chitosan tablets showed a sustained release for 5 h for the polymer of 20 kDa and 8 h for the polymer of 400 kDa. Human insulin was quantified in rats' plasma by means of ELISA specific for human insulin with no cross-reactivity with the endogenous insulin. In vivo results showed thiolation having a tremendous impact on the absorption of insulin. The absolute bioavailabilities were 0.73% for chitosan-6-MNA of 20 kDa and 0.62% for chitosan-6-MNA 400 kDa. The areas under the concentration-time curves (AUC) of chitosan-6-MNA formulations compared with unmodified chitosan were 4.8-fold improved for the polymer of 20 kDa and 21.02-fold improved for the polymer of 400 kDa. The improvement in the AUC with regard to the most promising aliphatic thiomer was up to 6.8-fold. Therefore, chitosan-6-MNA represents a promising excipient for the oral delivery of insulin.

  11. New ways of insulin delivery.

    PubMed

    Heinemann, L

    2011-02-01

    The predominant number of papers published from the middle of 2009 to the middle of 2010 about alternative routes of insulin administration (ARIA) were still about inhaled insulin. Long-term experience with Exubera was the topic of a number of publications that are also of relevance for inhaled insulin in general. The clinical trials performed with AIR insulin by Eli Lilly were published in a supplement issue of one diabetes technology journal and most of these will be presented. A number of other publications (also one in a high ranked journal) about their inhaled insulin were from another company: MannKind. The driving force behind Technosphere insulin (TI) - which is the only one still in clinical development - is Al Mann; he has put a lot of his personal fortune in this development. We will know the opinion of the regulatory authorities about TI in the near future; however, I am personally relatively confident that the Food and Drug Administration will provide TI with market approval. The more critical question for me is: will diabetologists and patients jump on this product once it becomes commercially available? Will it become a commercial success? In view of many negative feelings in the scientific community about inhaled insulin, it might be of help that MannKind publish their studies with TI systematically. Acknowledging being a believer in this route of insulin administration myself, one has to state that Exubera and AIR insulin had not offered profound advantages in terms of pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) properties in comparison with subcutaneously (SC) applied regular human insulin (RHI) and rapid-acting insulin analogues. The time-action profiles of these inhaled insulins were more or less comparable with that of rapid-acting insulin analogues. This is clearly different with TI which exhibits a strong metabolic effect shortly after application and a rapid decline in the metabolic effect thereafter; probably the duration of action is

  12. Insulin resistance and hypertension: new insights.

    PubMed

    Soleimani, Manoocher

    2015-03-01

    Insulin resistance is associated with hypertension. Nakamura et al. demonstrate in rodents and humans with insulin resistance that while the stimulatory effect of insulin on glucose uptake in adipocytes, mediated via insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1), was severely diminished, its effect on salt reabsorption in the kidney proximal tubule, mediated via IRS2, was preserved. Compensatory hyperinsulinemia in individuals with insulin resistance may enhance salt absorption in the proximal tubule, resulting in a state of salt overload and hypertension.

  13. Absolute Plate Velocities from Seismic Anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreemer, Corné; Zheng, Lin; Gordon, Richard

    2015-04-01

    The orientation of seismic anisotropy inferred beneath plate interiors may provide a means to estimate the motions of the plate relative to the sub-asthenospheric mantle. Here we analyze two global sets of shear-wave splitting data, that of Kreemer [2009] and an updated and expanded data set, to estimate plate motions and to better understand the dispersion of the data, correlations in the errors, and their relation to plate speed. We also explore the effect of using geologically current plate velocities (i.e., the MORVEL set of angular velocities [DeMets et al. 2010]) compared with geodetically current plate velocities (i.e., the GSRM v1.2 angular velocities [Kreemer et al. 2014]). We demonstrate that the errors in plate motion azimuths inferred from shear-wave splitting beneath any one tectonic plate are correlated with the errors of other azimuths from the same plate. To account for these correlations, we adopt a two-tier analysis: First, find the pole of rotation and confidence limits for each plate individually. Second, solve for the best fit to these poles while constraining relative plate angular velocities to consistency with the MORVEL relative plate angular velocities. The SKS-MORVEL absolute plate angular velocities (based on the Kreemer [2009] data set) are determined from the poles from eight plates weighted proportionally to the root-mean-square velocity of each plate. SKS-MORVEL indicates that eight plates (Amur, Antarctica, Caribbean, Eurasia, Lwandle, Somalia, Sundaland, and Yangtze) have angular velocities that differ insignificantly from zero. The net rotation of the lithosphere is 0.25±0.11° Ma-1 (95% confidence limits) right-handed about 57.1°S, 68.6°E. The within-plate dispersion of seismic anisotropy for oceanic lithosphere (σ=19.2° ) differs insignificantly from that for continental lithosphere (σ=21.6° ). The between-plate dispersion, however, is significantly smaller for oceanic lithosphere (σ=7.4° ) than for continental

  14. Blocking CD40-TRAF6 signaling is a therapeutic target in obesity-associated insulin resistance

    PubMed Central

    Chatzigeorgiou, Antonios; Seijkens, Tom; Zarzycka, Barbara; Engel, David; Poggi, Marjorie; van den Berg, Susan; van den Berg, Sjoerd; Soehnlein, Oliver; Winkels, Holger; Beckers, Linda; Lievens, Dirk; Driessen, Ann; Kusters, Pascal; Biessen, Erik; Garcia-Martin, Ruben; Klotzsche-von Ameln, Anne; Gijbels, Marion; Noelle, Randolph; Boon, Louis; Hackeng, Tilman; Schulte, Klaus-Martin; Xu, Aimin; Vriend, Gert; Nabuurs, Sander; Chung, Kyoung-Jin; Willems van Dijk, Ko; Rensen, Patrick C. N.; Gerdes, Norbert; de Winther, Menno; Block, Norman L.; Schally, Andrew V.; Weber, Christian; Bornstein, Stefan R.; Nicolaes, Gerry; Chavakis, Triantafyllos; Lutgens, Esther

    2014-01-01

    The immune system plays an instrumental role in obesity and insulin resistance. Here, we unravel the role of the costimulatory molecule CD40 and its signaling intermediates, TNF receptor-associated factors (TRAFs), in diet-induced obesity (DIO). Although not exhibiting increased weight gain, male CD40−/− mice in DIO displayed worsened insulin resistance, compared with wild-type mice. This worsening was associated with excessive inflammation of adipose tissue (AT), characterized by increased accumulation of CD8+ T cells and M1 macrophages, and enhanced hepatosteatosis. Mice with deficient CD40-TRAF2/3/5 signaling in MHCII+ cells exhibited a similar phenotype in DIO as CD40−/− mice. In contrast, mice with deficient CD40-TRAF6 signaling in MHCII+ cells displayed no insulin resistance and showed a reduction in both AT inflammation and hepatosteatosis in DIO. To prove the therapeutic potential of inhibition of CD40-TRAF6 in obesity, DIO mice were treated with a small-molecule inhibitor that we designed to specifically block CD40-TRAF6 interactions; this compound improved insulin sensitivity, reduced AT inflammation, and decreased hepatosteatosis. Our study reveals that the CD40-TRAF2/3/5 signaling pathway in MHCII+ cells protects against AT inflammation and metabolic complications associated with obesity whereas CD40-TRAF6 interactions in MHCII+ cells aggravate these complications. Inhibition of CD40-TRAF6 signaling by our compound may provide a therapeutic option in obesity-associated insulin resistance. PMID:24492375

  15. Extreme hypertriglyceridemia managed with insulin.

    PubMed

    Thuzar, Moe; Shenoy, Vasant V; Malabu, Usman H; Schrale, Ryan; Sangla, Kunwarjit S

    2014-01-01

    Extreme hypertriglyceridemia can lead to acute pancreatitis and rapid lowering of serum triglycerides (TG) is necessary for preventing such life-threatening complications. However, there is no established consensus on the acute management of extreme hypertriglyceridemia. We retrospectively reviewed 10 cases of extreme hypertriglyceridemia with mean serum TG on presentation of 101.5 ± 23.4 mmol/L (8982 ± 2070 mg/dL) managed with insulin. Serum TG decreased by 87 ± 4% in 24 hours in those patients managed with intravenous insulin and fasting and 40 ± 8.4% in those managed with intravenous insulin alone (P = .0003). The clinical course was uncomplicated in all except 1 patient who subsequently developed a pancreatic pseudocyst. Thus, combination of intravenous insulin with fasting appears to be an effective, simple, and safe treatment strategy in immediate management of extreme hypertriglyceridemia.

  16. Insulin C-peptide test

    MedlinePlus

    ... level may be normal if you have not eaten recently. Your blood sugar and insulin levels would ... having blood drawn are slight but may include: Bleeding Fainting or feeling lightheaded Hematoma (blood buildup under ...

  17. Orion Absolute Navigation System Progress and Challenge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holt, Greg N.; D'Souza, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    The absolute navigation design of NASA's Orion vehicle is described. It has undergone several iterations and modifications since its inception, and continues as a work-in-progress. This paper seeks to benchmark the current state of the design and some of the rationale and analysis behind it. There are specific challenges to address when preparing a timely and effective design for the Exploration Flight Test (EFT-1), while still looking ahead and providing software extensibility for future exploration missions. The primary onboard measurements in a Near-Earth or Mid-Earth environment consist of GPS pseudo-range and delta-range, but for future explorations missions the use of star-tracker and optical navigation sources need to be considered. Discussions are presented for state size and composition, processing techniques, and consider states. A presentation is given for the processing technique using the computationally stable and robust UDU formulation with an Agee-Turner Rank-One update. This allows for computational savings when dealing with many parameters which are modeled as slowly varying Gauss-Markov processes. Preliminary analysis shows up to a 50% reduction in computation versus a more traditional formulation. Several state elements are discussed and evaluated, including position, velocity, attitude, clock bias/drift, and GPS measurement biases in addition to bias, scale factor, misalignment, and non-orthogonalities of the accelerometers and gyroscopes. Another consideration is the initialization of the EKF in various scenarios. Scenarios such as single-event upset, ground command, and cold start are discussed as are strategies for whole and partial state updates as well as covariance considerations. Strategies are given for dealing with latent measurements and high-rate propagation using multi-rate architecture. The details of the rate groups and the data ow between the elements is discussed and evaluated.

  18. Evaluation of the Absolute Regional Temperature Potential

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shindell, D. T.

    2012-01-01

    The Absolute Regional Temperature Potential (ARTP) is one of the few climate metrics that provides estimates of impacts at a sub-global scale. The ARTP presented here gives the time-dependent temperature response in four latitude bands (90-28degS, 28degS-28degN, 28-60degN and 60-90degN) as a function of emissions based on the forcing in those bands caused by the emissions. It is based on a large set of simulations performed with a single atmosphere-ocean climate model to derive regional forcing/response relationships. Here I evaluate the robustness of those relationships using the forcing/response portion of the ARTP to estimate regional temperature responses to the historic aerosol forcing in three independent climate models. These ARTP results are in good accord with the actual responses in those models. Nearly all ARTP estimates fall within +/-20%of the actual responses, though there are some exceptions for 90-28degS and the Arctic, and in the latter the ARTP may vary with forcing agent. However, for the tropics and the Northern Hemisphere mid-latitudes in particular, the +/-20% range appears to be roughly consistent with the 95% confidence interval. Land areas within these two bands respond 39-45% and 9-39% more than the latitude band as a whole. The ARTP, presented here in a slightly revised form, thus appears to provide a relatively robust estimate for the responses of large-scale latitude bands and land areas within those bands to inhomogeneous radiative forcing and thus potentially to emissions as well. Hence this metric could allow rapid evaluation of the effects of emissions policies at a finer scale than global metrics without requiring use of a full climate model.

  19. Absolute determination of local tropospheric OH concentrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armerding, Wolfgang; Comes, Franz-Josef

    1994-01-01

    Long path absorption (LPA) according to Lambert Beer's law is a method to determine absolute concentrations of trace gases such as tropospheric OH. We have developed a LPA instrument which is based on a rapid tuning of the light source which is a frequency doubled dye laser. The laser is tuned across two or three OH absorption features around 308 nm with a scanning speed of 0.07 cm(exp -1)/microsecond and a repetition rate of 1.3 kHz. This high scanning speed greatly reduces the fluctuation of the light intensity caused by the atmosphere. To obtain the required high sensitivity the laser output power is additionally made constant and stabilized by an electro-optical modulator. The present sensitivity is of the order of a few times 10(exp 5) OH per cm(exp 3) for an acquisition time of a minute and an absorption path length of only 1200 meters so that a folding of the optical path in a multireflection cell was possible leading to a lateral dimension of the cell of a few meters. This allows local measurements to be made. Tropospheric measurements have been carried out in 1991 resulting in the determination of OH diurnal variation at specific days in late summer. Comparison with model calculations have been made. Interferences are mainly due to SO2 absorption. The problem of OH self generation in the multireflection cell is of minor extent. This could be shown by using different experimental methods. The minimum-maximum signal to noise ratio is about 8 x 10(exp -4) for a single scan. Due to the small size of the absorption cell the realization of an open air laboratory is possible in which by use of an additional UV light source or by additional fluxes of trace gases the chemistry can be changed under controlled conditions allowing kinetic studies of tropospheric photochemistry to be made in open air.

  20. Absolute Radiometric Calibration of KOMPSAT-3A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, H. Y.; Shin, D. Y.; Kim, J. S.; Seo, D. C.; Choi, C. U.

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents a vicarious radiometric calibration of the Korea Multi-Purpose Satellite-3A (KOMPSAT-3A) performed by the Korea Aerospace Research Institute (KARI) and the Pukyong National University Remote Sensing Group (PKNU RSG) in 2015.The primary stages of this study are summarized as follows: (1) A field campaign to determine radiometric calibrated target fields was undertaken in Mongolia and South Korea. Surface reflectance data obtained in the campaign were input to a radiative transfer code that predicted at-sensor radiance. Through this process, equations and parameters were derived for the KOMPSAT-3A sensor to enable the conversion of calibrated DN to physical units, such as at-sensor radiance or TOA reflectance. (2) To validate the absolute calibration coefficients for the KOMPSAT-3A sensor, we performed a radiometric validation with a comparison of KOMPSAT-3A and Landsat-8 TOA reflectance using one of the six PICS (Libya 4). Correlations between top-of-atmosphere (TOA) radiances and the spectral band responses of the KOMPSAT-3A sensors at the Zuunmod, Mongolia and Goheung, South Korea sites were significant for multispectral bands. The average difference in TOA reflectance between KOMPSAT-3A and Landsat-8 image over the Libya 4, Libya site in the red-green-blue (RGB) region was under 3%, whereas in the NIR band, the TOA reflectance of KOMPSAT-3A was lower than the that of Landsat-8 due to the difference in the band passes of two sensors. The KOMPSAT-3Aensor includes a band pass near 940 nm that can be strongly absorbed by water vapor and therefore displayed low reflectance. Toovercome this, we need to undertake a detailed analysis using rescale methods, such as the spectral bandwidth adjustment factor.

  1. Aromatase Inhibition Reduces Insulin Sensitivity in Healthy Men

    PubMed Central

    Homer, Natalie Z. M.; Faqehi, Abdullah M. M.; Upreti, Rita; Livingstone, Dawn E.; McInnes, Kerry J.; Andrew, Ruth; Walker, Brian R.

    2016-01-01

    Context: Deficiency of aromatase, the enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of androgens to estrogens, is associated with insulin resistance in humans and mice. Objective: We hypothesized that pharmacological aromatase inhibition results in peripheral insulin resistance in humans. Design: This was a double-blind, randomized, controlled, crossover study. Setting: The study was conducted at a clinical research facility. Participants: Seventeen healthy male volunteers (18–50 y) participated in the study. Intervention: The intervention included oral anastrozole (1 mg daily) and placebo, each for 6 weeks with a 2-week washout period. Main Outcome Measure: Glucose disposal and rates of lipolysis were measured during a stepwise hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp. Data are mean (SEM). Results: Anastrozole therapy resulted in significant estradiol suppression (59.9 ± 3.6 vs 102.0 ± 5.7 pmol/L, P = < .001) and a more modest elevation of total T (25.8 ± 1.2 vs 21.4 ± 0.7 nmol/L, P = .003). Glucose infusion rate, during the low-dose insulin infusion, was lower after anastrozole administration (12.16 ± 1.33 vs 14.15 ± 1.55 μmol/kg·min, P = .024). No differences in hepatic glucose production or rate of lipolysis were observed. Conclusion: Aromatase inhibition reduces insulin sensitivity, with respect to peripheral glucose disposal, in healthy men. Local generation and action of estradiol, at the level of skeletal muscle, is likely to be an important determinant of insulin sensitivity. PMID:26967690

  2. Insulin delivery methods: Past, present and future

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Rima B.; Patel, Manhar; Maahs, David M.; Shah, Viral N.

    2016-01-01

    Many patients with advanced type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and all patients with T1DM require insulin to keep blood glucose levels in the target range. The most common route of insulin administration is subcutaneous insulin injections. There are many ways to deliver insulin subcutaneously such as vials and syringes, insulin pens, and insulin pumps. Though subcutaneous insulin delivery is the standard route of insulin administration, it is associated with injection pain, needle phobia, lipodystrophy, noncompliance and peripheral hyperinsulinemia. Therefore, the need exists for delivering insulin in a minimally invasive or noninvasive and in most physiological way. Inhaled insulin was the first approved noninvasive and alternative way to deliver insulin, but it has been withdrawn from the market. Technologies are being explored to make the noninvasive delivery of insulin possible. Some of the routes of insulin administration that are under investigation are oral, buccal, nasal, peritoneal and transdermal. This review article focuses on the past, present and future of various insulin delivery techniques. This article has focused on different possible routes of insulin administration with its advantages and limitation and possible scope for the new drug development. PMID:27014614

  3. Congenital prothrombin deficiency.

    PubMed

    Lancellotti, Stefano; De Cristofaro, Raimondo

    2009-06-01

    Prothrombin deficiency is among the rarest inherited coagulation disorders, with a prevalence of approximately 1:2,000,000. Two main phenotypes can be distinguished: (1) hypoprothrombinemia (type I deficiency), characterized by concomitantly low levels of activity and antigen; and (2) dysprothrombinemia (type II deficiency), characterized by the normal or near-normal synthesis of a dysfunctional protein. In some cases, hypoprothrombinemia associated with dysprothrombinemia was also described in compound heterozygous defects. No living patient with undetectable plasma prothrombin has been reported to date. Prothrombin is encoded by a gene of approximately 21 kb located on chromosome 11 and containing 14 exons. Forty different mutations have been identified and characterized in prothrombin deficiency. Many of them surround the catalytic site, whereas another "hot spot" is localized in the recognition domain called anion binding exosite I, also called fibrinogen recognition site. Recently, mutations were identified also in the Na (+)-binding loop and in the light A-chain of thrombin. Most hypoprothrombinemia-associated mutations are missense, but there are also nonsense mutations leading to stop codons and one single nucleotide deletion. Finally, the main aspects of clinical manifestations and therapy of congenital prothrombin deficiency are presented and discussed.

  4. Iron deficiency anaemia.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Anthony; Cacoub, Patrice; Macdougall, Iain C; Peyrin-Biroulet, Laurent

    2016-02-27

    Anaemia affects roughly a third of the world's population; half the cases are due to iron deficiency. It is a major and global public health problem that affects maternal and child mortality, physical performance, and referral to health-care professionals. Children aged 0-5 years, women of childbearing age, and pregnant women are particularly at risk. Several chronic diseases are frequently associated with iron deficiency anaemia--notably chronic kidney disease, chronic heart failure, cancer, and inflammatory bowel disease. Measurement of serum ferritin, transferrin saturation, serum soluble transferrin receptors, and the serum soluble transferrin receptors-ferritin index are more accurate than classic red cell indices in the diagnosis of iron deficiency anaemia. In addition to the search for and treatment of the cause of iron deficiency, treatment strategies encompass prevention, including food fortification and iron supplementation. Oral iron is usually recommended as first-line therapy, but the most recent intravenous iron formulations, which have been available for nearly a decade, seem to replenish iron stores safely and effectively. Hepcidin has a key role in iron homoeostasis and could be a future diagnostic and therapeutic target. In this Seminar, we discuss the clinical presentation, epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and acute management of iron deficiency anaemia, and outstanding research questions for treatment.

  5. FoxO6 Integrates Insulin Signaling With Gluconeogenesis in the Liver

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dae Hyun; Perdomo, German; Zhang, Ting; Slusher, Sandra; Lee, Sojin; Phillips, Brett E.; Fan, Yong; Giannoukakis, Nick; Gramignoli, Roberto; Strom, Stephen; Ringquist, Steven; Dong, H. Henry

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Excessive endogenous glucose production contributes to fasting hyperglycemia in diabetes. This effect stems from inept insulin suppression of hepatic gluconeogenesis. To understand the underlying mechanisms, we studied the ability of forkhead box O6 (FoxO6) to mediate insulin action on hepatic gluconeogenesis and its contribution to glucose metabolism. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We characterized FoxO6 in glucose metabolism in cultured hepatocytes and in rodent models of dietary obesity, insulin resistance, or insulin-deficient diabetes. We determined the effect of FoxO6 on hepatic gluconeogenesis in genetically modified mice with FoxO6 gain- versus loss-of-function and in diabetic db/db mice with selective FoxO6 ablation in the liver. RESULTS FoxO6 integrates insulin signaling to hepatic gluconeogenesis. In mice, elevated FoxO6 activity in the liver augments gluconeogenesis, raising fasting blood glucose levels, and hepatic FoxO6 depletion suppresses gluconeogenesis, resulting in fasting hypoglycemia. FoxO6 stimulates gluconeogenesis, which is counteracted by insulin. Insulin inhibits FoxO6 activity via a distinct mechanism by inducing its phosphorylation and disabling its transcriptional activity, without altering its subcellular distribution in hepatocytes. FoxO6 becomes deregulated in the insulin-resistant liver, accounting for its unbridled activity in promoting gluconeogenesis and correlating with the pathogenesis of fasting hyperglycemia in diabetes. These metabolic abnormalities, along with fasting hyperglycemia, are reversible by selective inhibition of hepatic FoxO6 activity in diabetic mice. CONCLUSIONS Our data uncover a FoxO6-dependent pathway by which the liver orchestrates insulin regulation of gluconeogenesis, providing the proof-of-concept that selective FoxO6 inhibition is beneficial for curbing excessive hepatic glucose production and improving glycemic control in diabetes. PMID:21940782

  6. Thiamine Deficiency and Delirium

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Shahid; Freeman, C.; Barker, Narviar C.; Jabeen, Shagufta; Maitra, Sarbani; Olagbemiro, Yetunde; Richie, William; Bailey, Rahn K.

    2013-01-01

    Thiamine is an essential vitamin that plays an important role in cellular production of energy from ingested food and enhances normal neuronal actives. Deficiency of this vitamin leads to a very serious clinical condition known as delirium. Studies performed in the United States and other parts of the world have established the link between thiamine deficiency and delirium. This literature review examines the physiology, pathophysiology, predisposing factors, clinical manifestations (e.g., Wernicke’s encephalopathy, Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome, structural and functional brain injuries) and diagnosis of thiamine deficiency and delirium. Current treatment practices are also discussed that may improve patient outcome, which ultimately may result in a reduction in healthcare costs. PMID:23696956

  7. [Vitamin deficiencies and hypervitaminosis].

    PubMed

    Mino, M

    1999-10-01

    There have recently been very few deficiencies with respect to fat soluble and water soluble vitamins in Japan All-trans-retinoic acid as induction or maintenance treatment improves disease free and overall survival against acute promyelocytic leukemia. In the isolated vitamin E deficiencies gene mutation has been cleared for alpha-tocopherol transferprotein. Recently, a relation of nutritional vitamin K intake and senile osteoporosis in women was epidemiologically demonstrated on a prospective study. Thiamin was yet noticed as development of deficiency in alcoholism, while the importance of supplemental folic acid during pregnancy has become especially clear in light of studies showing that folic acid supplements reduce the risk of neural tube defects in the fetus. With respect to hypervitaminosis, the Council for Responsible Nutrition (CRN), USA, has established safe intakes by identifying the NOAEL (No Observed Adverse Effect Level) and LOAEL (Lowest Observed Adverse Effect Level). Summaries of NOAEL and LOAEL for individual vitamins were shown.

  8. Antepartum ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Hitoshi; Sasaki, Yosuke; Maeda, Tadashi; Takeda, Masako; Hara, Noriko; Nakanishi, Kazushige; Urita, Yoshihisa; Hattori, Risa; Miura, Ken; Taniguchi, Tomoko

    2014-01-01

    Ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency (OTCD) is the most common type urea cycle enzyme deficiencies. This syndrome results from a deficiency of the mitochondrial enzyme ornithine transcarbamylase, which catalyzes the conversion of ornithine and carbamoyl phosphate to citrullin. Our case was a 28-year-old female diagnosed with OTCD following neurocognitive deficit during her first pregnancy. Although hyperammonemia was suspected as the cause of the patient's mental changes, there was no evidence of chronic liver disease. Plasma amino acid and urine organic acid analysis revealed OTCD. After combined modality treatment with arginine, sodium benzoate and hemodialysis, the patient's plasma ammonia level stabilized and her mental status returned to normal. At last she recovered without any damage left.

  9. Natural killer cell deficiency.

    PubMed

    Orange, Jordan S

    2013-09-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are part of the innate immune defense against infection and cancer and are especially useful in combating certain viral pathogens. The utility of NK cells in human health has been underscored by a growing number of persons who are deficient in NK cells and/or their functions. This can be in the context of a broader genetically defined congenital immunodeficiency, of which there are more than 40 presently known to impair NK cells. However, the abnormality of NK cells in certain cases represents the majority immunologic defect. In aggregate, these conditions are termed NK cell deficiency. Recent advances have added clarity to this diagnosis and identified defects in 3 genes that can cause NK cell deficiency, as well as some of the underlying biology. Appropriate consideration of these diagnoses and patients raises the potential for rational therapeutic options and further innovation.

  10. Determination of Absolute Zero Using a Computer-Based Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amrani, D.

    2007-01-01

    We present a simple computer-based laboratory experiment for evaluating absolute zero in degrees Celsius, which can be performed in college and undergraduate physical sciences laboratory courses. With a computer, absolute zero apparatus can help demonstrators or students to observe the relationship between temperature and pressure and use…

  11. A Global Forecast of Absolute Poverty and Employment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopkins, M. J. D.

    1980-01-01

    Estimates are made of absolute poverty and employment under the hypothesis that existing trends continue. Concludes that while the number of people in absolute poverty is not likely to decline by 2000, the proportion will fall. Jobs will have to grow 3.9% per year in developing countries to achieve full employment. (JOW)

  12. Absolute Humidity and the Seasonality of Influenza (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaman, J. L.; Pitzer, V.; Viboud, C.; Grenfell, B.; Goldstein, E.; Lipsitch, M.

    2010-12-01

    Much of the observed wintertime increase of mortality in temperate regions is attributed to seasonal influenza. A recent re-analysis of laboratory experiments indicates that absolute humidity strongly modulates the airborne survival and transmission of the influenza virus. Here we show that the onset of increased wintertime influenza-related mortality in the United States is associated with anomalously low absolute humidity levels during the prior weeks. We then use an epidemiological model, in which observed absolute humidity conditions temper influenza transmission rates, to successfully simulate the seasonal cycle of observed influenza-related mortality. The model results indicate that direct modulation of influenza transmissibility by absolute humidity alone is sufficient to produce this observed seasonality. These findings provide epidemiological support for the hypothesis that absolute humidity drives seasonal variations of influenza transmission in temperate regions. In addition, we show that variations of the basic and effective reproductive numbers for influenza, caused by seasonal changes in absolute humidity, are consistent with the general timing of pandemic influenza outbreaks observed for 2009 A/H1N1 in temperate regions. Indeed, absolute humidity conditions correctly identify the region of the United States vulnerable to a third, wintertime wave of pandemic influenza. These findings suggest that the timing of pandemic influenza outbreaks is controlled by a combination of absolute humidity conditions, levels of susceptibility and changes in population mixing and contact rates.

  13. Novalis' Poetic Uncertainty: A "Bildung" with the Absolute

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mika, Carl

    2016-01-01

    Novalis, the Early German Romantic poet and philosopher, had at the core of his work a mysterious depiction of the "absolute." The absolute is Novalis' name for a substance that defies precise knowledge yet calls for a tentative and sensitive speculation. How one asserts a truth, represents an object, and sets about encountering things…

  14. Activation of Proteinase 3 Contributes to Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease and Insulin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Toonen, Erik JM; Mirea, Andreea-Manuela; Tack, Cees J; Stienstra, Rinke; Ballak, Dov B; van Diepen, Janna A; Hijmans, Anneke; Chavakis, Triantafyllos; Dokter, Wim H; Pham, Christine TN; Netea, Mihai G; Dinarello, Charles A; Joosten, Leo AB

    2016-01-01

    Activation of inflammatory pathways is known to accompany development of obesity-induced nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. In addition to caspase-1, the neutrophil serine proteases proteinase 3, neutrophil elastase and cathepsin G are able to process the inactive proinflammatory mediators interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-18 to their bioactive forms, thereby regulating inflammatory responses. In this study, we investigated whether proteinase 3 is involved in obesity-induced development of insulin resistance and NAFLD. We investigated the development of NAFLD and insulin resistance in mice deficient for neutrophil elastase/proteinase 3 and neutrophil elastase/cathepsin G and in wild-type mice treated with the neutrophil serine proteinase inhibitor human α-1 antitrypsin. Expression profiling of metabolically relevant tissues obtained from insulin-resistant mice showed that expression of proteinase 3 was specifically upregulated in the liver, whereas neutrophil elastase, cathepsin G and caspase-1 were not. Neutrophil elastase/proteinase 3-deficient mice showed strongly reduced levels of lipids in the liver after being fed a high-fat diet. Moreover, these mice were resistant to high–fat–diet-induced weight gain, inflammation and insulin resistance. Injection of proteinase 3 exacerbated insulin resistance in caspase-1–/– mice, indicating that proteinase 3 acts independently of caspase-1. Treatment with α-1 antitrypsin during the last 10 d of a 16-wk high-fat diet reduced hepatic lipid content and decreased fasting glucose levels. We conclude that proteinase 3 is involved in NAFLD and insulin resistance and that inhibition of proteinase 3 may have therapeutic potential. PMID:27261776

  15. Activation of proteinase 3 contributes to Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD) and insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Toonen, Erik J M; Mirea, Andreea-Manuela; Tack, Cees J; Stienstra, Rinke; Ballak, Dov B; van Diepen, Janna A; Hijmans, Anneke; Chavakis, Triantafyllos; Dokter, Wim H; Pham, Christine T N; Netea, Mihai G; Dinarello, Charles A; Joosten, Leo A B

    2016-05-24

    Activation of inflammatory pathways is known to accompany development of obesity-induced non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. In addition to caspase-1, the neutrophil serine proteases proteinase 3, neutrophil elastase and cathepsin G are able to process the inactive pro-inflammatory mediators IL-1β and IL-18 to their bioactive forms, thereby regulating inflammatory responses. In the present study, we investigated whether proteinase 3 is involved in obesity-induced development of insulin resistance and NAFLD. We investigated the development of NAFLD and insulin resistance in mice deficient for neutrophil elastase/proteinase 3 and neutrophil elastase/cathepsin G and in wild-type mice treated with the neutrophil serine proteinase inhibitor human alpha-1 antitrypsin. Expression profiling of metabolically relevant tissues obtained from insulin resistant mice showed that expression of proteinase 3 was specifically upregulated in the liver, whereas neutrophil elastase, cathepsin G and caspase-1 were not. Neutrophil elastase/proteinase 3 deficient mice showed strongly reduced levels of lipids in the liver after fed a high fat diet. Moreover, these mice were resistant to high fat diet-induced weight gain, inflammation and insulin resistance. Injection of proteinase 3 exacerbated insulin resistance in caspase-1(-/-) mice, indicating that proteinase 3 acts independently of caspase-1. Treatment with alpha-1 antitrypsin during the last 10 days of a 16 week high fat diet reduced hepatic lipid content and decreased fasting glucose levels. We conclude that proteinase 3 is involved in NAFLD and insulin resistance and that inhibition of proteinase 3 may have therapeutic potential.

  16. Multiple sulfatase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Soong, B W; Casamassima, A C; Fink, J K; Constantopoulos, G; Horwitz, A L

    1988-08-01

    Multiple sulfatase deficiency is an inherited disorder characterized by a deficiency of several sulfatases and the accumulation of sulfatides, glycosaminoglycans, sphingolipids, and steroid sulfates in tissues and body fluids. The clinical manifestations represent the summation of two diseases: late infantile metachromatic leukodystrophy and mucopolysaccharidosis. We present a 9-year-old girl with a phenotype similar to a mucopolysaccharidosis: short stature, microcephaly, and mild facial dysmorphism, along with dysphagia, retinal degeneration, developmental arrest, and ataxia. We discuss the importance of measuring the sulfatase activities in the leukocytes, and the instability of sulfatases in the cultured skin fibroblasts.

  17. Laboratory diagnosis of multiple pituitary hormone deficiencies: issues with testing of the growth and thyroid axes.

    PubMed

    Nakamoto, Jon

    2009-01-01

    Clinical manifestations of hypopituitarism are variable and depend on the severity of hormone deficiency, creating a diagnostic challenge for diagnosis of the non-classical patient who may have a less severe growth hormone (GH) deficiency and only a suggestion of possible hypothyroidism. Laboratory tests contribute to the diagnostic process, but the tests for growth and thyroid dysfunction, two of the most common manifestations of multiple pituitary hormone deficiency, are some of the most problematic from a methodological perspective. Patients in the "grey zone" of diagnosis, for whom there is no distinct dividing line or gold standard diagnostic test, are the focus of this article. Issues relating to the use of laboratory tests involving GH, insulin-like growth factor-I, and free thyroxine in the diagnosis of GH and thyroid deficiency are reviewed. Assay harmonization initiatives are required before clinical research studies are performed to establish diagnostic thresholds for GH and thyroid hormone deficiencies.

  18. Absolute radiometric calibration of advanced remote sensing systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, P. N.

    1982-01-01

    The distinction between the uses of relative and absolute spectroradiometric calibration of remote sensing systems is discussed. The advantages of detector-based absolute calibration are described, and the categories of relative and absolute system calibrations are listed. The limitations and problems associated with three common methods used for the absolute calibration of remote sensing systems are addressed. Two methods are proposed for the in-flight absolute calibration of advanced multispectral linear array systems. One makes use of a sun-illuminated panel in front of the sensor, the radiance of which is monitored by a spectrally flat pyroelectric radiometer. The other uses a large, uniform, high-radiance reference ground surface. The ground and atmospheric measurements required as input to a radiative transfer program to predict the radiance level at the entrance pupil of the orbital sensor are discussed, and the ground instrumentation is described.

  19. A developmental study of latent absolute pitch memory.

    PubMed

    Jakubowski, Kelly; Müllensiefen, Daniel; Stewart, Lauren

    2017-03-01

    The ability to recall the absolute pitch level of familiar music (latent absolute pitch memory) is widespread in adults, in contrast to the rare ability to label single pitches without a reference tone (overt absolute pitch memory). The present research investigated the developmental profile of latent absolute pitch (AP) memory and explored individual differences related to this ability. In two experiments, 288 children from 4 to12 years of age performed significantly above chance at recognizing the absolute pitch level of familiar melodies. No age-related improvement or decline, nor effects of musical training, gender, or familiarity with the stimuli were found in regard to latent AP task performance. These findings suggest that latent AP memory is a stable ability that is developed from as early as age 4 and persists into adulthood.

  20. Human insulin prepared by recombinant DNA techniques and native human insulin interact identically with insulin receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Keefer, L M; Piron, M A; De Meyts, P

    1981-01-01

    Human insulin synthesized from A and B chains separately produced in Escherichia coli from cloned synthetic genes (prepared by the Eli Lilly Research Laboratories, Indianapolis, IN) was characterized by examining its interaction with human cultured lymphocytes, human circulating erythrocytes in vitro, and isolated rat fat cells. The binding behavior of the biosynthetic insulin with human cells was indistinguishable from that of native human or porcine insulins, with respect to affinity, association and dissociation kinetics, negative cooperativity, and the down-regulation of lymphocyte receptors. Similarly, the biosynthetic insulin was as potent as the native insulins in stimulating lipogenesis in isolated rat fat cells. We also examined the receptor binding characteristics of 125I-labeled human and porcine insulins monoiodinated solely at Tyr-A14, which were obtained by means of high-performance liquid chromatography of the iodination reaction mixture (this material was prepared by B. Frank, Eli Lilly Research Laboratories). In all aspects studied, the pure [TyrA14-125I]iodoinsulins were superior as tracers to the monoiodoinsulin purified by the more conventional method of gel filtration. PMID:7015337

  1. Severe alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency and pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Dempsey, O J; Godden, D J; Martin, P D; Danielian, P J

    1999-06-01

    This case study describes a successful pregnancy in a 27-yr-old patient with severe emphysema, secondary to alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency, genotype PiZZ. Despite significant respiratory compromise, more severe than previously reported, no complications ensued. Maternal pulmonary function did not deteriorate significantly until the 32nd week of pregnancy, with an elective Caesarean section being performed during the 37th week. This experience suggests that even severe maternal airflow obstruction is, in itself, not an absolute contra-indication to pregnancy. Pre-pregnancy multidisciplinary counselling is likely to be helpful in these patients, including frank discussion on the risks of pregnancy, the prospects of successful completion and the mother's future prognosis in relation to caring for the child.

  2. Insulin therapy--role beyond glucose control.

    PubMed

    Pandit, Kaushik; Mukhopadhyay, Pradip

    2004-10-01

    Larger studies had shown improved patient outcome and lower probability of coronary artery disease in insulin treated groups. The classical lipid abnormalities associated with type 2 diabetes are low HDL-cholesterol concentration and high triglyceride concentration. Insulin usage leads to a decrease in triglyceride concentration, primarily by its effect on the enzyme adipose tissue lipoprotein lipase. Insulin suppresses the enzyme, thereby controlling lipolysis in uncontrolled diabetes. Insulins therapy also improves the endothelial dysfunction especially in people with evident macrovascular complications. Though insulin is noted to increase adrenergic tone and may cause elevation of blood pressure, still patients with insulinoma do not have high blood pressure. Some studies suggest weight gain with insulin therapy, others contradict it. One study suggests that insulin does not affect treatment satisfaction. Insulin is known to improve the glycaemic scenario and also the insulin secretory pattern by reducing the glucotoxicity.

  3. Molecular mechanisms of insulin resistance in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Soumaya, Kouidhi

    2012-01-01

    Molecular components of impaired insulin signaling pathway have emerged with growing interest to understand how the environment and genetic susceptibility combine to cause defects in this fundamental pathway that lead to insulin resistance. When insulin resistance is combined with beta-cell defects in glucose-stimulated insulin secretion, impaired glucose tolerance, hyperglycemia, or Type 2 diabetes can result. The most common underlying cause is obesity, although primary insulin resistance in normal-weight individuals is also possible. The adipose tissue releases free fatty acids that contribute to insulin resistance and also acts as a relevant endocrine organ producing mediators (adipokines) that can modulate insulin signalling. This chapter deals with the core elements promoting, insulin resistance, associated with impaired insulin signalling pathway and adipocyte dysfunction. A detailed understanding of these basic pathophysiological mechanisms is critical for the development of novel therapeutic strategies to treat diabetes.

  4. The role of transplanted visceral fat from the long-lived growth hormone receptor knockout mice on insulin signaling.

    PubMed

    Bennis, Mohammed T; Schneider, Augusto; Victoria, Berta; Do, Andrew; Wiesenborn, Denise S; Spinel, Lina; Gesing, Adam; Kopchick, John J; Siddiqi, Shadab A; Masternak, Michal M

    2017-02-01

    Growth hormone receptor knockout mice (GHRKO) are characterized by high insulin sensitivity and extended lifespan. Interestingly, the secretory activity of visceral fat in GHRKO mice is altered, stimulating whole body insulin sensitivity. In this study, we transplanted normal (N) mice with visceral fat pads from GHRKO or N mice to determine the role of visceral fat on the insulin signaling. We found that the transplant of visceral fat from GHRKO mice to N mice (N-GHRKO) improved whole body insulin sensitivity when comparing with sham-operated mice (N-S) and with mice that received visceral fat from N mice (N-N). This was associated with increased hepatic insulin sensitivity as observed by the increased phosphorylated insulin receptor and increased hepatic expression of Pparα and Pparγ. In conclusion, we demonstrated that visceral fat transplant from GHRKO mice into normal mice enhanced insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance. These results further confirm the differential physiological role played by visceral adipose tissue from GH receptor deficient mice, indicating that the increase of this fat depot can be associated with beneficial effects on insulin signaling and longevity.

  5. The G Protein-coupled Receptor P2Y14 Influences Insulin Release and Smooth Muscle Function in Mice*

    PubMed Central

    Meister, Jaroslawna; Le Duc, Diana; Ricken, Albert; Burkhardt, Ralph; Thiery, Joachim; Pfannkuche, Helga; Polte, Tobias; Grosse, Johannes; Schöneberg, Torsten; Schulz, Angela

    2014-01-01

    UDP sugars were identified as extracellular signaling molecules, assigning a new function to these compounds in addition to their well defined role in intracellular substrate metabolism and storage. Previously regarded as an orphan receptor, the G protein-coupled receptor P2Y14 (GPR105) was found to bind extracellular UDP and UDP sugars. Little is known about the physiological functions of this G protein-coupled receptor. To study its physiological role, we used a gene-deficient mouse strain expressing the bacterial LacZ reporter gene to monitor the physiological expression pattern of P2Y14. We found that P2Y14 is mainly expressed in pancreas and salivary glands and in subpopulations of smooth muscle cells of the gastrointestinal tract, blood vessels, lung, and uterus. Among other phenotypical differences, knock-out mice showed a significantly impaired glucose tolerance following oral and intraperitoneal glucose application. An unchanged insulin tolerance suggested altered pancreatic islet function. Transcriptome analysis of pancreatic islets showed that P2Y14 deficiency significantly changed expression of components involved in insulin secretion. Insulin secretion tests revealed a reduced insulin release from P2Y14-deficient islets, highlighting P2Y14 as a new modulator of proper insulin secretion. PMID:24993824

  6. Immunological demonstration of the accumulation of insulin, but not insulin receptors, in nuclei of insulin-treated cells

    SciTech Connect

    Soler, A.P.; Thompson, K.A.; Smith, R.M.; Jarett, L. )

    1989-09-01

    Although insulin is known to regulate nuclear-related processes, such as cell growth and gene transcription, the mechanisms involved are poorly understood. Previous studies suggested that translocation of insulin or its receptor to cell nuclei might be involved in some of these processes. The present investigation demonstrated that intact insulin, but not the insulin receptor, accumulated in nuclei of insulin-treated cells. Cell fractionation studies demonstrated that the nuclear accumulation of {sup 125}I-labeled insulin was time-, temperature-, and insulin-concentration-dependent. Electron microscopic immunocytochemistry demonstrated that the insulin that accumulated in the nucleus was immunologically intact and associated with the heterochromatin. Only 1% of the {sup 125}I-labeled insulin extracted from isolated nuclei was eluted from a Sephadex G-50 column as {sup 125}I-labeled tyrosine. Plasma membrane insulin receptors were not detected in the nucleus by immuno electron microscopy or when wheat germ agglutinin-purified extracts of the nuclei were subjected to PAGE, electrotransfer, and immunoblotting with anti-insulin receptor antibodies. These results suggested that internalized insulin dissociated from its receptor and accumulated in the nucleus without its membrane receptor. The authors propose that some of insulin's effects on nuclear function may be caused by the translocation of the intact and biologically active hormone to the nucleus and its binding to nuclear components in the heterochromatin.

  7. Ablation of ghrelin receptor in leptin-deficient ob/ob mice has paradoxical effects on glucose homeostasis when compared with ablation of ghrelin in ob/ob mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The orexigenic hormone ghrelin is important in diabetes because it has an inhibitory effect on insulin secretion. Ghrelin ablation in leptin-deficient ob/ob (Ghrelin(-/-):ob/ob) mice increases insulin secretion and improves hyperglycemia. The physiologically relevant ghrelin receptor is the growth ...

  8. Diagnosing oceanic nutrient deficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, C. Mark

    2016-11-01

    The supply of a range of nutrient elements to surface waters is an important driver of oceanic production and the subsequent linked cycling of the nutrients and carbon. Relative deficiencies of different nutrients with respect to biological requirements, within both surface and internal water masses, can be both a key indicator and driver of the potential for these nutrients to become limiting for the production of new organic material in the upper ocean. The availability of high-quality, full-depth and global-scale datasets on the concentrations of a wide range of both macro- and micro-nutrients produced through the international GEOTRACES programme provides the potential for estimation of multi-element deficiencies at unprecedented scales. Resultant coherent large-scale patterns in diagnosed deficiency can be linked to the interacting physical-chemical-biological processes which drive upper ocean nutrient biogeochemistry. Calculations of ranked deficiencies across multiple elements further highlight important remaining uncertainties in the stoichiometric plasticity of nutrient ratios within oceanic microbial systems and caveats with regards to linkages to upper ocean nutrient limitation. This article is part of the themed issue 'Biological and climatic impacts of ocean trace element chemistry'.

  9. Color vision deficiencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vannorren, D.

    1982-04-01

    Congenital and acquired color vision defects are described in the context of physiological data. Light sources, photometry, color systems and test methods are described. A list of medicines is also presented. The practical social consequences of color vision deficiencies are discussed.

  10. Myo1c binding to submembrane actin mediates insulin-induced tethering of GLUT4 vesicles.

    PubMed

    Boguslavsky, Shlomit; Chiu, Tim; Foley, Kevin P; Osorio-Fuentealba, Cesar; Antonescu, Costin N; Bayer, K Ulrich; Bilan, Philip J; Klip, Amira

    2012-10-01

    GLUT4-containing vesicles cycle between the plasma membrane and intracellular compartments. Insulin promotes GLUT4 exocytosis by regulating GLUT4 vesicle arrival at the cell periphery and its subsequent tethering, docking, and fusion with the plasma membrane. The molecular machinery involved in GLUT4 vesicle tethering is unknown. We show here that Myo1c, an actin-based motor protein that associates with membranes and actin filaments, is required for insulin-induced vesicle tethering in muscle cells. Myo1c was found to associate with both mobile and tethered GLUT4 vesicles and to be required for vesicle capture in the total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) zone beneath the plasma membrane. Myo1c knockdown or overexpression of an actin binding-deficient Myo1c mutant abolished insulin-induced vesicle immobilization, increased GLUT4 vesicle velocity in the TIRF zone, and prevented their externalization. Conversely, Myo1c overexpression immobilized GLUT4 vesicles in the TIRF zone and promoted insulin-induced GLUT4 exposure to the extracellular milieu. Myo1c also contributed to insulin-dependent actin filament remodeling. Thus we propose that interaction of vesicular Myo1c with cortical actin filaments is required for insulin-mediated tethering of GLUT4 vesicles and for efficient GLUT4 surface delivery in muscle cells.

  11. The role of interleukins in insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Fève, Bruno; Bastard, Jean-Philippe

    2009-06-01

    In the past few years, several interleukins (ILs) attracted considerable attention as potential effectors in the pathology and physiology of insulin resistance associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and obesity. IL-1, a major proinflammatory cytokine, is present at increased levels in patients with diabetes mellitus, and could promote beta-cell destruction and alter insulin sensitivity. The effects of IL-1 are likely to be counteracted by IL-1 receptor antagonist protein (IL-1ra), as suggested by interventional studies in patients with T2DM who were treated with a recombinant form of this protein. However, studies in IL-1ra-deficient mice provided controversial results on the exact effect of the IL-1 signaling pathway on insulin secretion, insulin sensitivity and accumulation of adipose tissue. Likewise, IL-6 has been suggested to be involved in the development of obesity-related and T2DM-related insulin resistance. The action of IL-6 on glucose homeostasis is also complex and integrates central and peripheral mechanisms. Both experimental and clinical studies now converge to show that several ILs contribute to the pathology and physiology of T2DM through their interaction with insulin signaling pathways and beta-cell function.

  12. Role of Myotonic Dystrophy Protein Kinase (DMPK) in Glucose Homeostasis and Muscle Insulin Action

    PubMed Central

    Marti, Luc; Liesa, Marc; Camps, Marta; Ciaraldi, Theodore P.; Kondo, Richard; Reddy, Sita; Dillmann, Wolfgang H.; Palacin, Manuel; Zorzano, Antonio; Ruiz-Lozano, Pilar; Gomis, Ramon; Kaliman, Perla

    2007-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy 1 (DM1) is caused by a CTG expansion in the 3′-unstranslated region of the DMPK gene, which encodes a serine/threonine protein kinase. One of the common clinical features of DM1 patients is insulin resistance, which has been associated with a pathogenic effect of the repeat expansions. Here we show that DMPK itself is a positive modulator of insulin action. DMPK-deficient (dmpk−/−) mice exhibit impaired insulin signaling in muscle tissues but not in adipocytes and liver, tissues in which DMPK is not expressed. Dmpk−/− mice display metabolic derangements such as abnormal glucose tolerance, reduced glucose uptake and impaired insulin-dependent GLUT4 trafficking in muscle. Using DMPK mutants, we show that DMPK is required for a correct intracellular trafficking of insulin and IGF-1 receptors, providing a mechanism to explain the molecular and metabolic phenotype of dmpk−/− mice. Taken together, these findings indicate that reduced DMPK expression may directly influence the onset of insulin-resistance in DM1 patients and point to dmpk as a new candidate gene for susceptibility to type 2-diabetes. PMID:17987120

  13. Insulin analogues: action profiles beyond glycaemic control.

    PubMed

    Eckardt, Kristin; Eckel, Jürgen

    2008-02-01

    A variety of studies have documented significant improvements in the treatment of type 1 and 2 diabetes after the introduction of artificial insulins. This review gives an overview of insulin analogues which are currently approved for therapeutical use. Clinical data regarding the efficiency to control blood glucose level as well as improving HbA1c level in comparison to conventional insulin preparations in type 1 and 2 diabetic patients are summarized. Furthermore, special features of insulin analogues regarding their signalling properties are discussed with focus on the proliferative effects of insulin glargine as well as some recent data of insulin detemir.

  14. Insulin therapy in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Tamborlane, William V; Sikes, Kristin A

    2012-03-01

    Insulin therapy is the mainstay of treatment in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes (T1D) and is a key component in the treatment of type 2 diabetes (T2D) in this population as well. A major aim of current insulin replacement therapy is to simulate the normal pattern of insulin secretion as closely as possible. This aim can best be achieved with basal-bolus therapy using multiple daily injections (MDI) or continuous insulin infusion (CSII) pump therapy. Only a few years ago, options for insulin formulations were limited. There are now more than 10 varieties of biosynthetic human and analogue insulin.

  15. Protamine-containing insulin but not analog insulin and duration of insulin use are risk factors for the production of insulin autoantibodies in insulin-treated patients with diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Hidenao; Iizuka, Katsumi; Takeda, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Insulin autoantibodies can be produced by insulin injections but rarely cause severe side effects such as glucose instability and insulin allergy. We study the characteristics of insulin autoantibody-positive diabetic patients with a medical history of insulin therapy using single and multiple (adjusted for age, sex, type of diabetes) logistic regression analyses. Associations between insulin autoantibodies and age, sex, type of diabetes, HbA1c, and serum creatinine were not significant, but the association between insulin autoantibodies and duration of insulin use was significant. Unadjusted and adjusted odds ratios were 1.08 (1.02-1.14) and 1.07 (1.01-1.14), respectively. Unadjusted and adjusted odds ratios for protamine-containing insulin were 3.08 (1.49-6.34) and 4.27 (1.90-9.58), respectively. The adjusted odds ratios for premixed biphasic insulin and intermediate-acting insulin were 2.21 (1.03-4.73) and 2.35 (1.01-5.49), respectively. Associations between insulin autoantibodies and any insulin analog were not significant. These results suggest that protamine-containing insulin and duration of insulin use are risk factors for the production of insulin autoantibodies. If patients with poorly controlled diabetes have a history of protamine-containing insulin therapy over a long time, the appearance of insulin autoantibodies should be monitored.

  16. Insulin tolerance test causes hypokalaemia and can provoke cardiac arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Binder, Gerhard; Bosk, Axel; Gass, Matthias; Ranke, Michael B; Heidemann, Peter H

    2004-01-01

    We report the observation and analysis of a new adverse event during the insulin tolerance test (ITT) and propose additional safety procedures. An 8-year-old girl with growth hormone insufficiency had a cardiac arrest due to ventricular flutter when she was tested for growth hormone deficiency by the ITT. Severe hypokalaemia (K+ 2.6 mmol/l) was observed after resuscitation. Ergometry ECG revealed catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia, a hereditary arrhythmogenic disease. Consecutive measurements of serum potassium during ITT in 29 short children (21 boys) with growth failure revealed a mean decrease of serum potassium by 1.1 +/- 0.4 mmol/l with the nadir at 30 min after the insulin bolus. Hypokalaemia (serum potassium < 3.5 mmol/l) occurred in all but one child; severe hypokalaemia (serum potassium < 2.9 mmol/l) was measured in every third child. This observation indicates that acute hypokalaemia which is induced by insulin and catecholamine excess occurs frequently in ITT. The case shows that the combination of acute hypokalaemia and the adrenergic counterregulation in ITT is a strong trigger of cardiac arrhythmias, which can become life-threatening if the child has an arrhythmogenic disease. Therefore, we recommend ECG monitoring during ITT to enhance the detection of cardiac arrhythmias. In addition, in the case of a comatose child during ITT the determination of the glucose and potassium level as well as adequate treatment are necessary.

  17. Hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia associated with insulin antibodies caused by exogenous insulin analog

    PubMed Central

    Su, Chih-Ting

    2016-01-01

    Summary Insulin antibodies (IA) associated with exogenous insulin administration seldom caused hypoglycemia and had different characteristics from insulin autoantibodies (IAA) found in insulin autoimmune syndrome (IAS), which was first described by Dr Hirata in 1970. The characteristic of IAS is the presence of insulin-binding autoantibodies and related fasting or late postprandial hypoglycemia. Here, we report a patient with type 1 diabetes mellitus under insulin glargine and insulin aspart treatment who developed recurrent spontaneous post-absorptive hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia with the cause probably being insulin antibodies induced by exogenous injected insulin. Examinations of serial sera disclosed a high titre of insulin antibodies (33%, normal <5%), high insulin concentration (111.9 IU/mL) and undetectable C-peptide when hypoglycemia occurred. An oral glucose tolerance test revealed persistent high serum levels of total insulin and undetectable C-peptide. Image studies of the pancreas were unremarkable, which excluded the diagnosis of insulinoma. The patient does not take any of the medications containing sulfhydryl compounds, which had been reported to cause IAS. After administering oral prednisolone for 3 weeks, hypoglycemic episodes markedly improved, and he was discharged smoothly. Learning points: Insulin autoimmune syndrome (IAS) or IAS-like situation should be one of the differential diagnosis in patients with hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia. Although less reported, insulin antibodies (IA) caused by exogenous insulin analog should be considered as the cause of hypoglycemia. Patients with suspected insulin autoimmune syndrome (IAS) should be screened for drugs related to autoimmunity to endogenous insulin. PMID:27933175

  18. Leptin rapidly suppresses insulin release from insulinoma cells, rat and human islets and, in vivo, in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, R N; Wang, Z L; Wang, R M; Hurley, J D; Smith, D M; Ghatei, M A; Withers, D J; Gardiner, J V; Bailey, C J; Bloom, S R

    1997-01-01

    Obesity is associated with diabetes, and leptin is known to be elevated in obesity. To investigate whether leptin has a direct effect on insulin secretion, isolated rat and human islets and cultured insulinoma cells were studied. In all cases, mouse leptin inhibited insulin secretion at concentrations within the plasma range reported in humans. Insulin mRNA expression was also suppressed in the cultured cells and rat islets. The long form of the leptin receptor (OB-Rb) mRNA was present in the islets and insulinoma cell lines. To determine the significance of these findings in vivo, normal fed mice were injected with two doses of leptin. A significant decrease in plasma insulin and associated rise in glucose concentration were observed. Fasted normal and leptin receptor-deficient db/db mice showed no response to leptin. A dose of leptin, which mimicked that found in normal mice, was administered to leptin-deficient, hyperinsulinemic ob/ob mice. This caused a marked lowering of plasma insulin concentration and a doubling of plasma glucose. Thus, leptin has a powerful acute inhibitory effect on insulin secretion. These results suggest that the action of leptin may be one mechanism by which excess adipose tissue could acutely impair carbohydrate metabolism. PMID:9389736

  19. Characterization of the chicken muscle insulin receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Adamo, M.; Simon, J.; Rosebrough, R.W.; McMurtry, J.P.; Steele, N.C.; LeRoith, D.

    1987-12-01

    Insulin receptors are present in chicken skeletal muscle. Crude membrane preparations demonstrated specific /sup 125/I-insulin binding. The nonspecific binding was high (36-55% of total binding) and slightly lower affinity receptors were found than are typically observed for crude membrane insulin binding in other chicken tissues. Affinity crosslinking of /sup 125/I-insulin to crude membranes revealed insulin receptor alpha-subunits of Mr 128K, intermediate between those of liver (134K) and brain (124K). When solubilized and partially purified on wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) affinity columns, chicken muscle insulin receptors exhibited typical high affinity binding, with approximately 10(-10) M unlabeled insulin producing 50% inhibition of the specific /sup 125/I-insulin binding. WGA purified chicken muscle insulin receptors also exhibited insulin-stimulated autophosphorylation of the beta-subunit, which appeared as phosphorylated bands of 92- and 81K. Both bands were immunoprecipitated by anti-receptor antiserum (B10). WGA purified membranes also demonstrated dose-dependent insulin-stimulated phosphorylation of the exogenous substrate poly(Glu,Tyr)4:1. However, unlike chicken liver, chicken muscle insulin receptor number and tyrosine kinase activity were unaltered by 48 hr of fasting or 48 hr of fasting and 24 hr of refeeding. Thus, despite the presence of insulin receptors in chicken muscle showing normal coupling to receptor tyrosine kinase activity, nutritional alterations modulate these parameters in a tissue-specific manner in chickens.

  20. Insulin receptors in the mammary gland

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.H.

    1986-01-01

    Insulin binding studies were conducted using mammary membrane preparations to further the authors understanding of insulin's role in regulating mammary metabolism, particularly ruminant mammary metabolism. Specific objectives were to: (1) characterize insulin binding to bovine mammary microsomes and determine if the specificity and kinetics of binding indicate the presence of insulin receptors in bovine mammary gland; (2) examine and compare insulin binding by liver and mammary microsomes of the pig and dairy cow; (3) examine insulin binding to bovine milk fat globule membranes (MFGM) and evaluate this model's usefulness in assessing insulin receptor regulation in the mammary gland of the cow; (4) examine the effect of dietary fat in insulin binding by rat mammary and liver microsomes. The specificity and kinetics of /sup 125/I-insulin binding of bovine mammary microsomes indicated the presence of insulin receptors in bovine mammary gland. Bovine liver and mammary microsomes specifically bound less /sup 125/I-insulin than did the corresponding porcine microsomes, and mammary microsomes, regardless of species, specifically bound less /sup 125/I-insulin than did liver microsomes. These differences in binding suggest differences in insulin responsiveness between pigs and cattle, as well as between the liver and mammary glands.

  1. Transplacental passage of insulin complexed to antibody.

    PubMed Central

    Bauman, W A; Yalow, R S

    1981-01-01

    The passage of plasma proteins across the placental barrier in humans is known to be highly selective. Thus, free maternal insulin has been reported not to cross the normal maternofetal barrier, although insulin-binding antibodies have been detected in newborn infants whose diabetic mothers received insulin therapy. In this report we demonstrate, with the use of a human antiserum that permits distinction between human and animal insulins, that insulin in the cord blood of each of two neonates of insulin-treated diabetic mothers was, in part, animal insulin. The higher the antibody titer of the mother the greater was the total insulin in the cord plasma and the greater was the fraction that was animal insulin. In case 1 cord plasma insulin was 0.7 unit/liter, of which 10% was animal insulin; in case 2 cord plasma insulin was 3.5 units/liter, of which 25% was animal insulin. The demonstration that antigen restricted from transplacental passage can be transferred while complexed to antibody raises the question whether such fetal exposure would induce partial or total immunologic unresponsiveness subsequently if the fetus were rechallenged with the same antigen. PMID:7027265

  2. Genetics Home Reference: isolated growth hormone deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... Isolated growth hormone deficiency Educational Resources (10 links) Boston Children's Hospital CLIMB: Growth Hormone Deficiency Information Sheet (PDF) Disease InfoSearch: Isolated growth hormone deficiency ...

  3. Mini-implants and miniplates generate sub-absolute and absolute anchorage.

    PubMed

    Consolaro, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    The functional demand imposed on bone promotes changes in the spatial properties of osteocytes as well as in their extensions uniformly distributed throughout the mineralized surface. Once spatial deformation is established, osteocytes create the need for structural adaptations that result in bone formation and resorption that happen to meet the functional demands. The endosteum and the periosteum are the effectors responsible for stimulating adaptive osteocytes in the inner and outer surfaces. Changes in shape, volume and position of the jaws as a result of skeletal correction of the maxilla and mandible require anchorage to allow bone remodeling to redefine morphology, esthetics and function as a result of spatial deformation conducted by orthodontic appliances. Examining the degree of changes in shape, volume and structural relationship of areas where mini-implants and miniplates are placed allows us to classify mini-implants as devices of subabsolute anchorage and miniplates as devices of absolute anchorage.

  4. Evaluation of erythrocyte and reticulocyte parameters as indicative of iron deficiency in patients with anemia of chronic disease

    PubMed Central

    Torino, Ana Beatriz Barbosa; Gilberti, Maria de Fátima Pererira; da Costa, Edvilson; de Lima, Gisélia Aparecida Freire; Grotto, Helena Zerlotti Wolf

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of mature red cell and reticulocyte parameters to identify three conditions: iron deficiency anemia, anemia of chronic disease, and anemia of chronic disease associated with absolute iron deficiency. Methods Peripheral blood cells from 117 adult patients with anemia were classified according to iron status, inflammation, and hemoglobinopathies as: iron deficiency anemia (n = 42), anemia of chronic disease (n = 28), anemia of chronic disease associated with iron deficiency anemia (n = 22), and heterozygous β-thalassemia (n = 25). The percentage of microcytic erythrocytes, hypochromic erythrocytes, and the levels of hemoglobin in both reticulocytes and mature red cells were determined. Receiver operating characteristic analysis was used to evaluate the accuracy of the parameters in differentiating anemia. Results There was no difference between the groups of iron deficiency and anemia of chronic disease associated with absolute iron deficiency for any of the parameters. The percentage of hypochromic erythrocytes was the best parameter to identify absolute iron deficiency in patients with anemia of chronic disease (area under curve = 0.785; 95% confidence interval: 0.661–0.909 with sensitivity of 72.7%, and specificity of 70.4%; cut-off value 1.8%). The formula microcytic erythrocyte count minus hypochromic erythrocyte count was very accurate to differentiate iron deficiency anemia from heterozygous β-thalassemia (area under curve = 0.977; 95% confidence interval: 0.950–1.005 with a sensitivity of 96.2%, and specificity of 92.7%; cut-off value 13.8). Conclusion The erythrocyte and reticulocyte indices are moderately good to identify absolute iron deficiency in patients with anemia of chronic disease. PMID:25818816

  5. Evaluation of red cell and reticulocyte parameters as indicative of iron deficiency in patients with anemia of chronic disease

    PubMed Central

    Torino, Ana Beatriz Barbosa; Gilberti, Maria de Fátima Pererira; da Costa, Edvilson; de Lima, Gisélia Aparecida Freire; Grotto, Helena Zerlotti Wolf

    2014-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of mature red cell and reticulocyte parameters under three conditions: iron deficiency anemia, anemia of chronic disease, and anemia of chronic disease associated with absolute iron deficiency. Methods Peripheral blood cells from 117 adult patients with anemia were classified according to iron status, and inflammatory activity, and the results of a hemoglobinopathy investigation as: iron deficiency anemia (n = 42), anemia of chronic disease (n = 28), anemia of chronic disease associated with iron deficiency anemia (n = 22), and heterozygous β thalassemia (n = 25). The percentage of microcytic red cells, hypochromic red cells, and levels of hemoglobin content in both reticulocytes and mature red cells were determined. Receiver operating characteristic analysis was used to evaluate the accuracy of the parameters in differentiating between the different types of anemia. Results There was no significant difference between the iron deficient group and anemia of chronic disease associated with absolute iron deficiency in respect to any parameter. The percentage of hypochromic red cells was the best parameter to discriminate anemia of chronic disease with and without absolute iron deficiency (area under curve = 0.785; 95% confidence interval: 0.661–0.909, with sensitivity of 72.7%, and specificity of 70.4%; cut-off value 1.8%). The formula microcytic red cells minus hypochromic red cells was very accurate in differentiating iron deficiency anemia and heterozygous β thalassemia (area under curve = 0.977; 95% confidence interval: 0.950–1.005; with sensitivity of 96.2%, and specificity of 92.7%; cut-off value 13.8). Conclusion The indices related to red cells and reticulocytes have a moderate performance in identifying absolute iron deficiency in patients with anemia of chronic disease. PMID:25453653

  6. Genetics Home Reference: proopiomelanocortin deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... Open All Close All Description Proopiomelanocortin (POMC) deficiency causes severe obesity that begins at an early age. In addition ... and severe obesity. POMC deficiency is a rare cause of obesity; POMC gene mutations are not frequently associated with ...

  7. Sanitary Surveys & Significant Deficiencies Presentation

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Sanitary Surveys & Significant Deficiencies Presentation highlights some of the things EPA looks for during drinking water system site visits, how to avoid significant deficiencies and what to do if you receive one.

  8. Genetics Home Reference: biotinidase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... links) Children Living With Inherited Metabolic Diseases (CLIMB) (UK): Biotinidase Deficiency (PDF) Disease InfoSearch: Biotinidase Deficiency Illinois ... Group Children Living with Inherited Metabolic Diseases (CLIMB) (UK) National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD) GeneReviews (1 ...

  9. Absolute dose verifications in small photon fields using BANGTM gel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheib, S. G.; Schenkel, Y.; Gianolini, S.

    2004-01-01

    Polymer gel dosimeters change their magnetic resonance (MR) and optical properties with the absorbed dose when irradiated and are suitable for narrow photon beam dosimetry in radiosurgery. Such dosimeters enable relative and absolute 3D dose verifications in order to check the entire treatment chain from imaging to dose application during commissioning and quality assurance. For absolute 3D dose verifications in radiosurgery using Gamma Knife B, commercially available BANGTM Gels (BANG 25 Gy and BANG 3 Gy) together with dedicated phantoms were chosen in order to determine the potential of absolute gel dosimetry in radiosurgery.

  10. Measuring the absolute magnetic field using high-Tc SQUID

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, D. F.; Itozaki, H.

    2006-06-01

    SQUID normally can only measure the change of magnetic field instead of the absolute value of magnetic field. Using a compensation method, a mobile SQUID, which could keep locked when moving in the earth's magnetic field, was developed. Using the mobile SQUID, it was possible to measure the absolute magnetic field. The absolute value of magnetic field could be calculated from the change of the compensation output when changing the direction of the SQUID in a magnetic field. Using this method and the mobile SQUID, we successfully measured the earth's magnetic field in our laboratory.

  11. Absolute Antenna Calibration at the US National Geodetic Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mader, G. L.; Bilich, A. L.

    2012-12-01

    Geodetic GNSS applications routinely demand millimeter precision and extremely high levels of accuracy. To achieve these accuracies, measurement and instrument biases at the centimeter to millimeter level must be understood. One of these biases is the antenna phase center, the apparent point of signal reception for a GNSS antenna. It has been well established that phase center patterns differ between antenna models and manufacturers; additional research suggests that the addition of a radome or the choice of antenna mount can significantly alter those a priori phase center patterns. For the more demanding GNSS positioning applications and especially in cases of mixed-antenna networks, it is all the more important to know antenna phase center variations as a function of both elevation and azimuth in the antenna reference frame and incorporate these models into analysis software. Determination of antenna phase center behavior is known as "antenna calibration". Since 1994, NGS has computed relative antenna calibrations for more than 350 antennas. In recent years, the geodetic community has moved to absolute calibrations - the IGS adopted absolute antenna phase center calibrations in 2006 for use in their orbit and clock products, and NGS's CORS group began using absolute antenna calibration upon the release of the new CORS coordinates in IGS08 epoch 2005.00 and NAD 83(2011,MA11,PA11) epoch 2010.00. Although NGS relative calibrations can be and have been converted to absolute, it is considered best practice to independently measure phase center characteristics in an absolute sense. Consequently, NGS has developed and operates an absolute calibration system. These absolute antenna calibrations accommodate the demand for greater accuracy and for 2-dimensional (elevation and azimuth) parameterization. NGS will continue to provide calibration values via the NGS web site www.ngs.noaa.gov/ANTCAL, and will publish calibrations in the ANTEX format as well as the legacy ANTINFO

  12. Insulin Secretion in Response to Glycemic Stimulus: Relation of Delayed Initial Release to Carbohydrate intolerance in Mild Diabetes Mellitus*

    PubMed Central

    Seltzer, Holbrooke S.; Allen, E. William; Herron, Arthur L.; Brennan, Mildred T.

    1967-01-01

    Insulin secretory responses to paired intravenous and oral glucose loads were determined in 38 nonobese individuals classified as normal (nondiabetic) subjects, “mild” diabetics (fasting blood glucose below 105 mg per 100 ml), or “moderate” diabetics (fasting glucose below 192 mg per 100 ml). Studies were also performed in 29 obese persons who were similarly grouped. The intravenous load was given to assess the alacrity of hormonal release after glycemic stimulus, and the oral glucose to determine how the speed of initial insulinogenesis modifies the disposition of ingested carbohydrate. In the nonobese group, normal subjects responded to massive hyperglycemia after rapid injection of glucose with immediate and maximal outpouring of insulin, in contrast to a desultory insulinogenic response in patients with mild diabetes, and no initial response at all in moderate diabetics. During oral glucose tolerance tests, the much faster clearance of blood sugar in nondiabetic subjects was actually associated with lower absolute insulin output than was found in mildly diabetic patients, since the latter exhibited delayed hyperinsulinemia in concert with prolonged hyperglycemia. Moderate diabetics never showed excessive insulin release despite even greater hyperglycemia. An empirical “insulinogenic index,” the ratio relating enhancement of circulating insulin to magnitude of corresponding glycemic stimulus, was used to compare the secretory capacities of respective groups. Despite the higher absolute hormonal output after oral glucose in mild diabetics, the index revealed that insulin release in normal subjects was proportionally more than twice as great. This relatively greater normal secretory response declared itself shortly after the administration of glucose by either route, and was maintained throughout both tests. In the 29 obese individuals, differences among groups were essentially the same as in persons of normal weight. Obese nondiabetics did show much

  13. Global burden of maternal and child undernutrition and micronutrient deficiencies.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Tahmeed; Hossain, Muttaquina; Sanin, Kazi Istiaque

    2012-01-01

    Maternal and child undernutrition and micronutrient deficiencies affect approximately half of the world's population. These conditions include intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR), low birth weight, protein-energy malnutrition, chronic energy deficit of women, and micronutrient deficiencies. Although the rates of stunting or chronic protein-energy malnutrition are increasing in Africa, the absolute numbers of stunted children are much higher in Asia. The four common micronutrient deficiencies include those of iron, iodine, vitamin A, and zinc. All these conditions are responsible directly or indirectly for more than 50% of all under-5 deaths globally. According to more recent estimates, IUGR, stunting and severe wasting are responsible for one third of under-5 mortality. About 12% of deaths among under-5 children are attributed to the deficiency of the four common micronutrients. Despite tremendous progress in different disciplines and unprecedented improvement with many health indicators, persistently high undernutrition rates are a shame to the society. Human development is not possible without taking care to control undernutrition and micronutrient deficiencies. Poverty, food insecurity, ignorance, lack of appropriate infant and young child feeding practices, heavy burden of infectious illnesses, and poor hygiene and sanitation are factors responsible for the high levels of maternal and child undernutrition in developing countries. These factors can be controlled or removed by scaling up direct nutrition interventions and eliminating the root conditions including female illiteracy, lack of livelihoods, lack of women's empowerment, and poor hygiene and sanitation.

  14. Treatment Approach to Patients With Severe Insulin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Church, Timothy J.

    2016-01-01

    In Brief Patients with severe insulin resistance require >2 units/kg of body weight or 200 units/day of insulin. Yet, many patients do not achieve glycemic targets despite using very high doses of insulin. Insulin can cause weight gain, which further contributes to worsening insulin resistance. This article describes the pharmacological options for managing patients with severe insulin resistance, including the use of U-500 insulin and newer agents in combination with insulin. PMID:27092020

  15. Emerging Trends in Noninvasive Insulin Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Arun; Kumar, Nitin; Malviya, Rishabha; Sharma, Pramod Kumar

    2014-01-01

    This paper deals with various aspects of oral insulin delivery system. Insulin is used for the treatment of diabetes mellitus, which is characterized by the elevated glucose level (above the normal range) in the blood stream, that is, hyperglycemia. Oral route of administration of any drug is the most convenient route. Development of oral insulin is still under research. Oral insulin will cause the avoidance of pain during the injection (in subcutaneous administration), anxiety due to needle, and infections which can be developed. Different types of enzyme inhibitors, like sodium cholate, camostat, mesilate, bacitracin, leupeptin, and so forth, have been used to prevent insulin from enzymatic degradation. Subcutaneous route has been used for administration of insulin, but pain and itching at the site of administration can occur. That is why various alternative routes of insulin administration like oral route are under investigation. In this paper authors summarized advancement in insulin delivery with their formulation aspects. PMID:26556194

  16. Insulin Detemir (rDNA Origin) Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... insulin and therefore cannot control the amount of sugar in the blood). It is also used to ... normally and, therefore, cannot control the amount of sugar in the blood) who need insulin to control ...

  17. Insulin signaling meets mitochondria in metabolism.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Zhiyong; Tseng, Yolanda; White, Morris F

    2010-10-01

    Insulin controls nutrient and metabolic homeostasis via the IRS-PI3K-AKT signaling cascade that targets FOXO1 and mTOR. Mitochondria, as the prime metabolic platform, malfunction during insulin resistance in metabolic diseases. However, the molecular link between insulin resistance and mitochondrial dysfunction remains undefined. Here we review recent studies on insulin action and the mechanistic association with mitochondrial metabolism. These studies suggest that insulin signaling underpins mitochondrial electron transport chain integrity and activity by suppressing FOXO1/HMOX1 and maintaining the NAD(+)/NADH ratio, the mediator of the SIRT1/PGC1α pathway for mitochondrial biogenesis and function. Mitochondria generate moderately reactive oxygen species (ROS) and enhance insulin sensitivity upon redox regulation of protein tyrosine phosphatase and insulin receptor. However, chronic exposure to high ROS levels could alter mitochondrial function and thereby cause insulin resistance.

  18. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    G6PD deficiency; Hemolytic anemia due to G6PD deficiency; Anemia - hemolytic due to G6PD deficiency ... Gallagher PG. Hemolytic anemias. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine . 25th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap 161. Janz ...

  19. Adipose triglyceride lipase is implicated in fuel- and non-fuel-stimulated insulin secretion.

    PubMed

    Peyot, Marie-Line; Guay, Claudiane; Latour, Martin G; Lamontagne, Julien; Lussier, Roxane; Pineda, Marco; Ruderman, Neil B; Haemmerle, Guenter; Zechner, Rudolf; Joly, Erik; Madiraju, S R Murthy; Poitout, Vincent; Prentki, Marc

    2009-06-19

    Reduced lipolysis in hormone-sensitive lipase-deficient mice is associated with impaired glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS), suggesting that endogenous beta-cell lipid stores provide signaling molecules for insulin release. Measurements of lipolysis and triglyceride (TG) lipase activity in islets from HSL(-/-) mice indicated the presence of other TG lipase(s) in the beta-cell. Using real time-quantitative PCR, adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL) was found to be the most abundant TG lipase in rat islets and INS832/13 cells. To assess its role in insulin secretion, ATGL expression was decreased in INS832/13 cells (ATGL-knockdown (KD)) by small hairpin RNA. ATGL-KD increased the esterification of free fatty acid (FFA) into TG. ATGL-KD cells showed decreased glucose- or Gln + Leu-induced insulin release, as well as reduced response to KCl or palmitate at high, but not low, glucose. The K(ATP)-independent/amplification pathway of GSIS was considerably reduced in ATGL-KD cells. ATGL(-/-) mice were hypoinsulinemic and hypoglycemic and showed decreased plasma TG and FFAs. A hyperglycemic clamp revealed increased insulin sensitivity and decreased GSIS and arginine-induced insulin secretion in ATGL(-/-) mice. Accordingly, isolated islets from ATGL(-/-) mice showed reduced insulin secretion in response to glucose, glucose + palmitate, and KCl. Islet TG content and FFA esterification into TG were increased by 2-fold in ATGL(-/-) islets, but glucose usage and oxidation were unaltered. The results demonstrate the importance of ATGL and intracellular lipid signaling for fuel- and non-fuel-induced insulin secretion.

  20. Adipose Triglyceride Lipase Is Implicated in Fuel- and Non-fuel-stimulated Insulin Secretion*

    PubMed Central

    Peyot, Marie-Line; Guay, Claudiane; Latour, Martin G.; Lamontagne, Julien; Lussier, Roxane; Pineda, Marco; Ruderman, Neil B.; Haemmerle, Guenter; Zechner, Rudolf; Joly, Érik; Madiraju, S. R. Murthy; Poitout, Vincent; Prentki, Marc

    2009-01-01

    Reduced lipolysis in hormone-sensitive lipase-deficient mice is associated with impaired glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS), suggesting that endogenous β-cell lipid stores provide signaling molecules for insulin release. Measurements of lipolysis and triglyceride (TG) lipase activity in islets from HSL−/− mice indicated the presence of other TG lipase(s) in the β-cell. Using real time-quantitative PCR, adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL) was found to be the most abundant TG lipase in rat islets and INS832/13 cells. To assess its role in insulin secretion, ATGL expression was decreased in INS832/13 cells (ATGL-knockdown (KD)) by small hairpin RNA. ATGL-KD increased the esterification of free fatty acid (FFA) into TG. ATGL-KD cells showed decreased glucose- or Gln + Leu-induced insulin release, as well as reduced response to KCl or palmitate at high, but not low, glucose. The KATP-independent/amplification pathway of GSIS was considerably reduced in ATGL-KD cells. ATGL−/− mice were hypoinsulinemic and hypoglycemic and showed decreased plasma TG and FFAs. A hyperglycemic clamp revealed increased insulin sensitivity and decreased GSIS and arginine-induced insulin secretion in ATGL−/− mice. Accordingly, isolated islets from ATGL−/− mice showed reduced insulin secretion in response to glucose, glucose + palmitate, and KCl. Islet TG content and FFA esterification into TG were increased by 2-fold in ATGL−/− islets, but glucose usage and oxidation were unaltered. The results demonstrate the importance of ATGL and intracellular lipid signaling for fuel- and non-fuel-induced insulin secretion. PMID:19389712

  1. Obesity, diabetes and cancer: insight into the relationship from a cohort with growth hormone receptor deficiency.

    PubMed

    Guevara-Aguirre, Jaime; Rosenbloom, Arlan L

    2015-01-01

    Obesity with insulin-resistant diabetes and increased cancer risk is a global problem. We consider the alterations of metabolism attendant on the underlying pathogenic overnutrition and the role of the growth hormone (GH)-IGF-1 axis in this interaction. Obesity-induced insulin resistance is a determinant of diabetes. Excess glucose, and an elevated concentration of insulin acting through its own receptors along with complex interactions with the IGF-1 system, will add extra fuel and fuel signalling for malignant growth and induce anti-apoptotic activities, permitting proliferation of forbidden clones. In Ecuador there are ~100 living adults with lifelong IGF-1 deficiency caused by a GH receptor (GHR) mutation who, despite a high percentage of body fat, have markedly increased insulin sensitivity compared with age- and BMI-matched control relatives, and no instances of diabetes, which is present in 6% of unaffected relatives. Only 1 of 20 deceased individuals with GHR deficiency died of cancer vs 20% of ~1,500 relatives. Fewer DNA breaks and increased apoptosis occurred in cell cultures exposed to oxidant agents following addition of serum from GHR-deficient individuals vs serum from control relatives. These changes were reversible by adding IGF-1 to the serum from the GHR-deficient individuals. The reduction in central regulators of pro-ageing signalling thus appears to be the result of an absence of GHR function. The complex inter-relationship of obesity, diabetes and cancer risk is related to excess insulin and fuel supply, in the presence of heightened anti-apoptosis and uninhibited DNA damage when GHR function is normal.

  2. Language deficiency in children.

    PubMed

    Morehead, D M; Morehead, K E; Morehead, W A

    1980-01-01

    Research in cognition and language has provided useful constructs which suggests that specific deficits underlie language deficiencies in children. In addition, this research has provided procedures that the determine what a child knows about language at a particular level of development and has established a sequence of linguistic development that maps the specific content and structure of training programs. Two new areas of research offer additional approaches to assessment and remediation. One approach focuses on the actual principles and strategies that normal children use to learn language, making it possible to determine which methods are most efficient. The second research approach looks at the contextual conditions adults and children provide the first language learner. Preliminary work suggests that the natural conditions found universally in first language learning may be the best indicators of how to proceed with language-deficient children.

  3. Zinc in Pancreatic Islet Biology, Insulin Sensitivity, and Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Maret, Wolfgang

    2017-01-01

    About 20 chemical elements are nutritionally essential for humans with defined molecular functions. Several essential and nonessential biometals are either functional nutrients with antidiabetic actions or can be diabetogenic. A key question remains whether changes in the metabolism of biometals and biominerals are a consequence of diabetes or are involved in its etiology. Exploration of the roles of zinc (Zn) in this regard is most revealing because 80 years of scientific discoveries link zinc and diabetes. In pancreatic β- and α-cells, zinc has specific functions in the biochemistry of insulin and glucagon. When zinc ions are secreted during vesicular exocytosis, they have autocrine, paracrine, and endocrine roles. The membrane protein ZnT8 transports zinc ions into the insulin and glucagon granules. ZnT8 has a risk allele that predisposes the majority of humans to developing diabetes. In target tissues, increased availability of zinc enhances the insulin response by inhibiting protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B, which controls the phosphorylation state of the insulin receptor and hence downstream signalling. Inherited diseases of zinc metabolism, environmental exposures that interfere with the control of cellular zinc homeostasis, and nutritional or conditioned zinc deficiency influence the patho-biochemistry of diabetes. Accepting the view that zinc is one of the many factors in multiple gene-environment interactions that cause the functional demise of β-cells generates an immense potential for treating and perhaps preventing diabetes. Personalized nutrition, bioactive food, and pharmaceuticals targeting the control of cellular zinc in precision medicine are among the possible interventions.

  4. Monochromator-Based Absolute Calibration of Radiation Thermometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keawprasert, T.; Anhalt, K.; Taubert, D. R.; Hartmann, J.

    2011-08-01

    A monochromator integrating-sphere-based spectral comparator facility has been developed to calibrate standard radiation thermometers in terms of the absolute spectral radiance responsivity, traceable to the PTB cryogenic radiometer. The absolute responsivity calibration has been improved using a 75 W xenon lamp with a reflective mirror and imaging optics to a relative standard uncertainty at the peak wavelength of approximately 0.17 % ( k = 1). Via a relative measurement of the out-of-band responsivity, the spectral responsivity of radiation thermometers can be fully characterized. To verify the calibration accuracy, the absolutely calibrated radiation thermometer is used to measure Au and Cu freezing-point temperatures and then to compare the obtained results with the values obtained by absolute methods, resulting in T - T 90 values of +52 mK and -50 mK for the gold and copper fixed points, respectively.

  5. Gibbs Paradox Revisited from the Fluctuation Theorem with Absolute Irreversibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murashita, Yûto; Ueda, Masahito

    2017-02-01

    The inclusion of the factor ln (1 /N !) in the thermodynamic entropy proposed by Gibbs is shown to be equivalent to the validity of the fluctuation theorem with absolute irreversibility for gas mixing.

  6. Absolute Value Boundedness, Operator Decomposition, and Stochastic Media and Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adomian, G.; Miao, C. C.

    1973-01-01

    The research accomplished during this period is reported. Published abstracts and technical reports are listed. Articles presented include: boundedness of absolute values of generalized Fourier coefficients, propagation in stochastic media, and stationary conditions for stochastic differential equations.

  7. Transcription factor Sp1 is necessary for basal calmodulin gene transcription and for its selective stimulation by insulin.

    PubMed

    Solomon, S S; Palazzolo, M R; Takahashi, T; Raghow, R

    1997-11-01

    Insulin positively regulates transcription of rat calmodulin (CaM) I gene and activates the low Km cyclic AMP (cAMP) phosphodiesterase (PDE). To elucidate the mechanism of transcriptional regulation, rat hepatoma (H-411E) cells were transfected with DNA constructs containing the putative CaM promoters coupled to a luciferase reporter and challenged with insulin. Activation of the full length 1835 bp rat CaM I promoter containing all three Sp1 sites or truncated promoters with combinations of one to three of the Sp1 sites was studied in Sp1 deficient Drosophilia SL2 cells and in SL2 cells co-transfected with an Sp1 expression vector and re-challenged with insulin. Our results demonstrate that Sp1 is obligatory for basal activation of the CaM promoter. The maximal insulin stimulation of CaM promoter is elicited only if it contains at least two Sp1 sites.

  8. [A21-Asparaginimide] insulin. Saponification of insulin hexamethyl ester, I.

    PubMed

    Gattner, H G; Schmitt, E W

    1977-01-01

    [Asn A21]Insulin is formed as the main product during alkaline saponification of insulin hexamethyl ester. Purification was achieved by gel chromatography followed by ion-exchange chromatography on carboxymethyl cellulose at pH 4 or by preparative isoelectric focusing in a granulated gel over a narrow pH range. Two main products could be isolated. One of them showed the electrophoretic behaviour of insulin (A), whilst the other corresponded to insulin with a blocked carboxyl function (B). Incubation of this product B with carboxypeptidase A liberated only the C-terminal alanine of the B-chain, but not the asparagine of the C-terminus of the A-chain. Chymotryptic digestion of the isolated S-sulfonate A-chain derivative (C) followed by high-voltage electrophoresis confirmed that the carboxyl function of asparagine A21 was blocked. In order to determine the free carboxyl functions of the A-chain derivative C, it was coupled with glycine methyl ester yielding D. Amino acid analysis of the chymotryptic peptides of D showed that the carboxyl functions of glutamic acid A4 and A17 had been free prior to coupling. The amino acid analysis of the enzymatic hydrolysate (subtilisin, aminopeptidase M) of the A-chain derivative C showed an additional peak with an elution position identical to the model compound aminosuccinimide. The biological activity of the [Asm A21[insulin was found to be about 40% in the fat cell test and 13.2 units/mg measured by the mouse convulsion method.

  9. Nitrosative stress and pathogenesis of insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Kaneki, Masao; Shimizu, Nobuyuki; Yamada, Daisuke; Chang, Kyungho

    2007-03-01

    Insulin resistance is a major causative factor for type 2 diabetes and is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Despite intense investigation for a number of years, molecular mechanisms underlying insulin resistance remain to be determined. Recently, chronic inflammation has been highlighted as a culprit for obesity-induced insulin resistance. Nonetheless, upstream regulators and downstream effectors of chronic inflammation in insulin resistance remain unclarified. Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), a mediator of inflammation, has emerged as an important player in insulin resistance. Obesity is associated with increased iNOS expression in insulin-sensitive tissues in rodents and humans. Inhibition of iNOS ameliorates obesity-induced insulin resistance. However, molecular mechanisms by which iNOS mediates insulin resistance remain largely unknown. Protein S-nitrosylation, a covalent attachment of NO moiety to thiol sulfhydryls, has emerged as a major mediator of a broad array of NO actions. S-nitrosylation is elevated in patients with type 2 diabetes, and increased S-nitrosylation of insulin signaling molecules, including insulin receptor, insulin receptor substrate-1, and Akt/PKB, has been shown in skeletal muscle of obese, diabetic mice. Akt/PKB is reversibly inactivated by S-nitrosylation. Based on these findings, S-nitrosylation has recently been proposed to play an important role in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance.

  10. Lysosomal proteolysis: effects of aging and insulin.

    PubMed

    Gromakova, I A; Konovalenko, O A

    2003-07-01

    Age-related characteristics of the effect of insulin on the activity of lysosomal proteolytic enzymes were studied. The relationship between the insulin effect on protein degradation and insulin degradation was analyzed. The effect of insulin on the activities of lysosomal enzymes was opposite in young and old rats (inhibitory in 3-month-old and stimulatory in 24-month-old animals). The activities of proteolytic enzymes were regulated by insulin in a glucose-independent manner: similar hypoglycemic effects of insulin in animals of different ages were accompanied by opposite changes in the activities of lysosomal enzymes. The inhibition of lysosomal enzymes by insulin in 3-month-old rats is consistent with a notion on the inhibitory effect of insulin on protein degradation. An opposite insulin effect in 24-month-old rats (i.e., stimulation of proteolytic activity by insulin) may be partly associated with attenuation of the degradation of insulin, resulting in disturbances in signaling that mediates the regulatory effects of insulin on protein degradation.

  11. Insulin pump safety meeting: summary report.

    PubMed

    Klonoff, David C; Reyes, Juliet S

    2009-03-01

    Diabetes Technology Society convened a panel of insulin pump experts in Bethesda, Maryland, on November 12, 2008, at the request of the Food and Drug Administration. The group consisted of physicians, nurses, diabetes educators, and engineers from across the United States. The panel members (1) discussed safety features of insulin pump therapy and (2) recommended adjustments to current insulin pump design and use to enhance overall safety. Software and hardware features of insulin pumps were analyzed from engineering, medical, nursing, and pump-user perspectives. The meeting was divided into four sections: (1) Engineering Safety-Designing Software and Hardware for Insulin Pump Therapy; (2) Patient Safety-Selecting Patients and Clinical Settings for Insulin Pump Use; (3) Clinical Safety-Determining and Delivering Insulin Dosages Using Insulin Pump Therapy; and (4) Personal Experiences-A Panel Discussion about Insulin Pump Safety. Six aspects of insulin pump technology were noted to present potential safety problems: (1) software, (2) wireless communication, (3) hardware, (4) alarms, (5) human factors, and (6) bolus-dose calculation. There was consensus among meeting participants that insulin pump therapy is beneficial in patients of all ages and that insulin pump safety must be assured through careful regulation.

  12. Absolute flux calibration of optical spectrophotometric standard stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colina, Luis; Bohlin, Ralph C.

    1994-01-01

    A method based on Landolt photometry in B and V is developed to correct for a wavelength independent offset of the absolute flux level of optical spectrophotometric standards. The method is based on synthetic photometry techniques in B and V and is accurate to approximately 1%. The correction method is verified by Hubble Space Telescope Faint Object Spectrograph absolute fluxes for five calibration stars, which agree with Landolt photometry to 0.5% in B and V.

  13. Leptin's Role in Lipodystrophic and Nonlipodystrophic Insulin-Resistant and Diabetic Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Hyun-Seuk; Dalamaga, Maria; Kim, Sang-Yong; Polyzos, Stergios A.; Hamnvik, Ole-Petter; Magkos, Faidon; Paruthi, Jason

    2013-01-01

    Leptin is an adipocyte-secreted hormone that has been proposed to regulate energy homeostasis as well as metabolic, reproductive, neuroendocrine, and immune functions. In the context of open-label uncontrolled studies, leptin administration has demonstrated insulin-sensitizing effects in patients with congenital lipodystrophy associated with relative leptin deficiency. Leptin administration has also been shown to decrease central fat mass and improve insulin sensitivity and fasting insulin and glucose levels in HIV-infected patients with highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART)-induced lipodystrophy, insulin resistance, and leptin deficiency. On the contrary, the effects of leptin treatment in leptin-replete or hyperleptinemic obese individuals with glucose intolerance and diabetes mellitus have been minimal or null, presumably due to leptin tolerance or resistance that impairs leptin action. Similarly, experimental evidence suggests a null or a possibly adverse role of leptin treatment in nonlipodystrophic patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. In this review, we present a description of leptin biology and signaling; we summarize leptin's contribution to glucose metabolism in animals and humans in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo; and we provide insights into the emerging clinical applications and therapeutic uses of leptin in humans with lipodystrophy and/or diabetes. PMID:23475416

  14. Current concepts about chromium supplementation in type 2 diabetes and insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhong Q; Cefalu, William T

    2010-04-01

    Chromium has been established to be an essential trace element in mammals in regard to maintenance of normal carbohydrate metabolism. Studies that provided chromium to human subjects in documented deficiency states noted improved glucose levels. However, controversy exists as to whether dietary supplementation with chromium should be routinely recommended in subjects without documented deficiencies. Over the recent past, several well-designed clinical trials have provided evidence in favor of and against a beneficial effect of chromium. It appears that across all subject phenotypes (eg, lean and obese, insulin sensitive and insulin resistant), a consistent significant and beneficial effect of chromium may not be observed. Specifically, recent data fail to demonstrate significant improvement in carbohydrate metabolism in individuals with metabolic syndrome, impaired glucose tolerance, or consistently in individuals with type 2 diabetes. However, patient selection may be an important factor in determining clinical response, as it was concluded that a clinical response to chromium (ie, decreased glucose and improved insulin sensitivity) may be more likely in insulin-resistant individuals with type 2 diabetes who have more elevated fasting glucose and hemoglobin A(1c) levels.

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Iron-Deficiency Anemia KidsHealth > For Parents > Iron-Deficiency Anemia Print A ... common nutritional deficiency in children. About Iron-Deficiency Anemia Every red blood cell in the body contains ...

  16. How Is Iron-Deficiency Anemia Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Iron-Deficiency Anemia Treated? Treatment for iron-deficiency anemia will depend ... may be advised. Treatments for Severe Iron-Deficiency Anemia Blood Transfusion If your iron-deficiency anemia is ...

  17. Phenylalanine hydroxylase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, John J; Trakadis, Yannis J; Scriver, Charles R

    2011-08-01

    Phenylalanine hydroxylase deficiency is an autosomal recessive disorder that results in intolerance to the dietary intake of the essential amino acid phenylalanine. It occurs in approximately 1:15,000 individuals. Deficiency of this enzyme produces a spectrum of disorders including classic phenylketonuria, mild phenylketonuria, and mild hyperphenylalaninemia. Classic phenylketonuria is caused by a complete or near-complete deficiency of phenylalanine hydroxylase activity and without dietary restriction of phenylalanine most children will develop profound and irreversible intellectual disability. Mild phenylketonuria and mild hyperphenylalaninemia are associated with lower risk of impaired cognitive development in the absence of treatment. Phenylalanine hydroxylase deficiency can be diagnosed by newborn screening based on detection of the presence of hyperphenylalaninemia using the Guthrie microbial inhibition assay or other assays on a blood spot obtained from a heel prick. Since the introduction of newborn screening, the major neurologic consequences of hyperphenylalaninemia have been largely eradicated. Affected individuals can lead normal lives. However, recent data suggest that homeostasis is not fully restored with current therapy. Treated individuals have a higher incidence of neuropsychological problems. The mainstay of treatment for hyperphenylalaninemia involves a low-protein diet and use of a phenylalanine-free medical formula. This treatment must commence as soon as possible after birth and should continue for life. Regular monitoring of plasma phenylalanine and tyrosine concentrations is necessary. Targets of plasma phenylalanine of 120-360 μmol/L (2-6 mg/dL) in the first decade of life are essential for optimal outcome. Phenylalanine targets in adolescence and adulthood are less clear. A significant proportion of patients with phenylketonuria may benefit from adjuvant therapy with 6R-tetrahydrobiopterin stereoisomer. Special consideration must be

  18. The Addition of Liquid Fructose to a Western-Type Diet in LDL-R(-/-) Mice Induces Liver Inflammation and Fibrogenesis Markers without Disrupting Insulin Receptor Signalling after an Insulin Challenge.

    PubMed

    Sangüesa, Gemma; Baena, Miguel; Hutter, Natalia; Montañés, José Carlos; Sánchez, Rosa María; Roglans, Núria; Laguna, Juan Carlos; Alegret, Marta

    2017-03-15

    A high consumption of fat and simple sugars, especially fructose, has been related to the development of insulin resistance, but the mechanisms involved in the effects of these nutrients are not fully understood. This study investigates the effects of a Western-type diet and liquid fructose supplementation, alone and combined, on insulin signalling and inflammation in low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor-deficient mice (LDL-R(-/-)). LDL-R(-/-) mice were fed chow or Western diet ±15% fructose solution for 12 weeks. Plasma glucose and insulin, and the expression of genes related to inflammation in the liver and visceral white adipose tissue (vWAT), were analysed. V-akt murine thymoma viral oncogene homolog-2 (Akt) activation was measured in the liver of the mice after a single injection of saline or insulin. None of the dietary interventions caused inflammation in vWAT, whereas the Western diet induced hepatic inflammation, which was further enhanced by liquid fructose, leading also to a significant increase in fibrogenesis markers. However, there was no change in plasma glucose or insulin, or insulin-induced Akt phosphorylation. In conclusion, hepatic inflammation and fibrogenesis markers induced by a Western diet supplemented with liquid fructose in LDL-R(-/-) mice are not associated with a significant impairment of hepatic insulin signalling.

  19. The Addition of Liquid Fructose to a Western-Type Diet in LDL-R−/− Mice Induces Liver Inflammati