Science.gov

Sample records for absolute leak rate

  1. Variable gas leak rate valve

    DOEpatents

    Eernisse, Errol P.; Peterson, Gary D.

    1976-01-01

    A variable gas leak rate valve which utilizes a poled piezoelectric element to control opening and closing of the valve. The gas flow may be around a cylindrical rod with a tubular piezoelectric member encircling the rod for seating thereagainst to block passage of gas and for reopening thereof upon application of suitable electrical fields.

  2. Experiences with leak rate calculations methods for LBB application

    SciTech Connect

    Grebner, H.; Kastner, W.; Hoefler, A.; Maussner, G.

    1997-04-01

    In this paper, three leak rate computer programs for the application of leak before break analysis are described and compared. The programs are compared to each other and to results of an HDR Reactor experiment and two real crack cases. The programs analyzed are PIPELEAK, FLORA, and PICEP. Generally, the different leak rate models are in agreement. To obtain reasonable agreement between measured and calculated leak rates, it was necessary to also use data from detailed crack investigations.

  3. Probabilistic pipe fracture evaluations for leak-rate-detection applications

    SciTech Connect

    Rahman, S.; Ghadiali, N.; Paul, D.; Wilkowski, G.

    1995-04-01

    Regulatory Guide 1.45, {open_quotes}Reactor Coolant Pressure Boundary Leakage Detection Systems,{close_quotes} was published by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in May 1973, and provides guidance on leak detection methods and system requirements for Light Water Reactors. Additionally, leak detection limits are specified in plant Technical Specifications and are different for Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs) and Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs). These leak detection limits are also used in leak-before-break evaluations performed in accordance with Draft Standard Review Plan, Section 3.6.3, {open_quotes}Leak Before Break Evaluation Procedures{close_quotes} where a margin of 10 on the leak detection limit is used in determining the crack size considered in subsequent fracture analyses. This study was requested by the NRC to: (1) evaluate the conditional failure probability for BWR and PWR piping for pipes that were leaking at the allowable leak detection limit, and (2) evaluate the margin of 10 to determine if it was unnecessarily large. A probabilistic approach was undertaken to conduct fracture evaluations of circumferentially cracked pipes for leak-rate-detection applications. Sixteen nuclear piping systems in BWR and PWR plants were analyzed to evaluate conditional failure probability and effects of crack-morphology variability on the current margins used in leak rate detection for leak-before-break.

  4. Compact Instruments Measure Helium-Leak Rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stout, Stephen; Immer, Christopher

    2003-01-01

    Compact, lightweight instruments have been developed for measuring small flows of helium and/or detecting helium leaks in solenoid valves when the valves are nominally closed. These instruments do not impede the flows when the valves are nominally open. They can be integrated into newly fabricated valves or retrofitted to previously fabricated valves. Each instrument includes an upstream and a downstream thermistor separated by a heater, plus associated analog and digital heater-control, signal- conditioning, and data-processing circuits. The thermistors and heater are off-the-shelf surface mount components mounted on a circuit board in the flow path. The operation of the instrument is based on a well-established thermal mass-flow-measurement technique: Convection by the flow that one seeks to measure gives rise to transfer of heat from the heater to the downstream thermistor. The temperature difference measured by the thermistors is directly related to the rate of flow. The calibration curve from temperature gradient to helium flow is closely approximated via fifth-order polynomial. A microprocessor that is part of the electronic circuitry implements the calibration curve to compute the flow rate from the thermistor readings.

  5. Evaluation and refinement of leak-rate estimation models

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, D.D.; Ahmad, J.; Scott, P.M.; Flanigan, L.F.; Wilkowski, G.M. )

    1991-04-01

    Leak-rate estimation models are important elements in developing a leak-before-break methodology in piping integrity and safety analyses. Existing thermal-hydraulic and crack-opening-area models used in current leak-rate estimations have been incorporated into a single computer code for leak-rate estimation. The code is called SQUIRT, which stands for Seepage Quantification of Upsets In Reactor Tubes. The SQUIRT program has been validated by comparing its thermal-hydraulic predictions with the limited experimental data that have been published on two-phase flow through slits and cracks, and by comparing its crack-opening-area predictions with data from the Degraded Piping Program. In addition, leak-rate experiments were conducted to obtain validation data for a circumferential fatigue crack in a carbon steel pipe girth weld. 56 refs., 30 figs., 4 tabs.

  6. The concepts of leak before break and absolute reliability of NPP equipment and piping

    SciTech Connect

    Getman, A.F.; Komarov, O.V.; Sokov, L.M.

    1997-04-01

    This paper describes the absolute reliability (AR) concept for ensuring safe operation of nuclear plant equipment and piping. The AR of a pipeline or component is defined as the level of reliability when the probability of an instantaneous double-ended break is near zero. AR analysis has been applied to Russian RBMK and VVER type reactors. It is proposed that analyses required for application of the leak before break concept should be included in AR implementation. The basic principles, methods, and approaches that provide the basis for implementing the AR concept are described.

  7. 40 CFR 1065.644 - Vacuum-decay leak rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Vacuum-decay leak rate. 1065.644 Section 1065.644 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Calculations and Data Requirements § 1065.644 Vacuum-decay leak...

  8. 40 CFR 1065.644 - Vacuum-decay leak rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Vacuum-decay leak rate. 1065.644 Section 1065.644 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Calculations and Data Requirements § 1065.644 Vacuum-decay leak...

  9. 40 CFR 1065.644 - Vacuum-decay leak rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Vacuum-decay leak rate. 1065.644 Section 1065.644 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Calculations and Data Requirements § 1065.644 Vacuum-decay leak...

  10. 40 CFR 1065.644 - Vacuum-decay leak rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Vacuum-decay leak rate. 1065.644 Section 1065.644 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Calculations and Data Requirements § 1065.644 Vacuum-decay leak...

  11. 40 CFR 1065.644 - Vacuum-decay leak rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Vacuum-decay leak rate. 1065.644 Section 1065.644 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Calculations and Data Requirements § 1065.644 Vacuum-decay leak...

  12. Absolute rates of hole transfer in DNA.

    PubMed

    Senthilkumar, Kittusamy; Grozema, Ferdinand C; Guerra, Célia Fonseca; Bickelhaupt, F Matthias; Lewis, Frederick D; Berlin, Yuri A; Ratner, Mark A; Siebbeles, Laurens D A

    2005-10-26

    Absolute rates of hole transfer between guanine nucleobases separated by one or two A:T base pairs in stilbenedicarboxamide-linked DNA hairpins were obtained by improved kinetic analysis of experimental data. The charge-transfer rates in four different DNA sequences were calculated using a density-functional-based tight-binding model and a semiclassical superexchange model. Site energies and charge-transfer integrals were calculated directly as the diagonal and off-diagonal matrix elements of the Kohn-Sham Hamiltonian, respectively, for all possible combinations of nucleobases. Taking into account the Coulomb interaction between the negative charge on the stilbenedicarboxamide linker and the hole on the DNA strand as well as effects of base pair twisting, the relative order of the experimental rates for hole transfer in different hairpins could be reproduced by tight-binding calculations. To reproduce quantitatively the absolute values of the measured rate constants, the effect of the reorganization energy was taken into account within the semiclassical superexchange model for charge transfer. The experimental rates could be reproduced with reorganization energies near 1 eV. The quantum chemical data obtained were used to discuss charge carrier mobility and hole-transport equilibria in DNA. PMID:16231945

  13. LEAK: A source term generator for evaluating release rates from leaking vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Clinton, J.H.

    1994-09-01

    An interactive computer code for estimating the rate of release of any one of several materials from a leaking tank or broken pipe leading from a tank is presented. It is generally assumed that the material in the tank is liquid. Materials included in the data base are acetonitrile, ammonia, carbon tetrachloride, chlorine, chlorine trifluoride, fluorine, hydrogen fluoride, nitric acid, nitrogen tetroxide, sodium hydroxide, sulfur hexafluoride, sulfuric acid, and uranium hexafluoride. Materials that exist only as liquid and/or vapor over expected ranges of temperature and pressure can easily be added to the data base file. The Fortran source code for LEAK and the data file are included with this report.

  14. Code System to Calculate Reactor Coolant System Leak Rate.

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, Pat

    1999-10-19

    Version 00 RCSLK9 was developed to analyze the leak tightness of the primary coolant system for any pressurized water reactor (PWR). From given system conditions, water levels in tanks, and certain system design parameters, RCSLK9 calculates the loss of water from the reactor coolant system (RCS) and the increase of water in the leakage collection system during an arbitrary time interval. The program determines the system leak rates and displays or prints a report of the results. During the initial application to a specific reactor, RCSLK9 creates a file of system parameters and saves it for future use.

  15. Measurements of True Leak Rates of MEMS Packages

    PubMed Central

    Han, Bongtae

    2012-01-01

    Gas transport mechanisms that characterize the hermetic behavior of MEMS packages are fundamentally different depending upon which sealing materials are used in the packages. In metallic seals, gas transport occurs through a few nanoscale leak channels (gas conduction) that are produced randomly during the solder reflow process, while gas transport in polymeric seals occurs through the bulk material (gas diffusion). In this review article, the techniques to measure true leak rates of MEMS packages with the two sealing materials are described and discussed: a Helium mass spectrometer based technique for metallic sealing and a gas diffusion based model for polymeric sealing. PMID:22736994

  16. Code System to Calculate Reactor Coolant System Leak Rate.

    1999-10-19

    Version 00 RCSLK9 was developed to analyze the leak tightness of the primary coolant system for any pressurized water reactor (PWR). From given system conditions, water levels in tanks, and certain system design parameters, RCSLK9 calculates the loss of water from the reactor coolant system (RCS) and the increase of water in the leakage collection system during an arbitrary time interval. The program determines the system leak rates and displays or prints a report ofmore » the results. During the initial application to a specific reactor, RCSLK9 creates a file of system parameters and saves it for future use.« less

  17. QUANTIFICATION OF LEAK RATES THROUGH HOLES IN LANDFILL LINERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A study was undertaken to evaluate the rate at which liquids leak through flaws in the flexible membrane liner (FML) component of composite FML-soil liners. The variables studied were: flaw size and shape, FML type and thickness, the influence of a geotextile between the compacte...

  18. Leak testing in parenteral packaging: establishment of direct correlation between helium leak rate measurements and microbial ingress for two different leak types.

    PubMed

    Morrical, Bradley D; Goverde, Marcel; Grausse, Jean; Gerwig, Tanja; Vorgrimler, Lothar; Morgen, Rachel; Büttiker, Jean-Pierre

    2007-01-01

    A direct test method using helium leak detection was developed to determine microbial ingress in parenteral vial/rubber closure systems. The purpose of this study was to establish a direct correlation between the helium leak rate and the presence of ingress when vials were submersed under pressure in a broth of bacteria. Results were obtained for two different types of leaks: microholes that have been laser-drilled into thin metal plates, and thin copper wire that was placed between the rubber closure and the glass vial's sealing surface. The results from the microholes showed that the helium leak rate was a function of the square of the hole diameter and fit well with theoretical calculations. The relationship with the wire gave a far more complex dependence and was not modeled theoretically. Comparison with the microbial challenge showed that for microholes a lower size limit was found to be 2 microm with a corresponding leak rate of 1.4 x 10(-3) mbarl/s. For the fine wire experiment the lower limit was 15-microm wire and a corresponding leak rate of 1.3 x 10(-5) mbarl/s. From these tests a safe, lower limit, leak rate was established. PMID:17933206

  19. Leak rate analysis of the Westinghouse Reactor Coolant Pump

    SciTech Connect

    Boardman, T.; Jeanmougin, N.; Lofaro, R.; Prevost, J.

    1985-07-01

    An independent analysis was performed by ETEC to determine what the seal leakage rates would be for the Westinghouse Reactor Coolant Pump (RCP) during a postulated station blackout resulting from loss of ac electric power. The object of the study was to determine leakage rates for the following conditions: Case 1: All three seals function. Case 2: No. 1 seal fails open while Nos. 2 and 3 seals function. Case 3: All three seals fail open. The ETEC analysis confirmed Westinghouse calculations on RCP seal performance for the conditions investigated. The leak rates predicted by ETEC were slightly lower than those predicted by Westinghouse for each of the three cases as summarized below. Case 1: ETEC predicted 19.6 gpm, Westinghouse predicted 21.1 gpm. Case 2: ETEC predicted 64.7 gpm, Westinghouse predicted 75.6 gpm. Case 3: ETEC predicted 422 gpm, Westinghouse predicted 480 gpm. 3 refs., 22 figs., 6 tabs.

  20. The Absolute Rate of LGRB Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, J. F.; Schady, P.

    2016-06-01

    We estimate the long-duration gamma-ray burst (LGRB) progenitor rate using our recent work on the effects of environmental metallically on LGRB formation in concert with supernovae (SNe) statistics via an approach patterned loosely off the Drake equation. Beginning with the cosmic star formation history, we consider the expected number of broad-line Type Ic events (the SNe type associated with LGRBs) that are in low-metallicity host environments adjusted by the contribution of high-metallicity host environments at a much reduced rate. We then compare this estimate to the observed LGRB rate corrected for instrumental selection effects to provide a combined estimate of the efficiency fraction of these progenitors to produce LGRBs and the fraction of which are beamed in our direction. From this we estimate that an aligned LGRB occurs for approximately every 4000 ± 2000 low-metallically broad-lined SNe Ic. Therefore, if one assumes a semi-nominal beaming factor of 100, then only about one such supernova out of 40 produce an LGRB. Finally, we propose an off-axis LGRB search strategy of targeting only broad-line Type Ic events that occur in low-metallicity hosts for radio observation.

  1. Steam generator tube integrity program leak rate tests. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, R.A.; Bickford, R.L.

    1984-01-01

    This interim report presents preliminary results on leak rate tests performed on through-wall defected Inconel 600 steam generator tubing. Tube defects included an EDM (electro-discharge machine) notch and IGSCC (intergranular stress corrosion cracks) of various lengths. Tests were conducted at PWR operating temperatures with leakage of hot water/steam into air. A number of IGSCC cracks were unstable under the experiment conditions of these initial tests, continuing to grow until system capacity limitations resulted in decreased pressure differential. However, initial tesing also pointed to a need for reconfiguration of the test apparatus to sustain increased flow and, more importantly, alter the mode of control. The initial test configuration is based on flow control, with pressure differential across the specimen an independent variable. This often results in pressure increases too rapid to establish the initiation of crack instability. A reconfigured system based on pressure control with flow as an independent parameter is being recommended for future tests.

  2. Development of a General Method for Determining Leak Rates from Limiting Enclosures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zografos, A. I.; Blackwell, C. C.; Harper, Lynn D. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    This paper discusses the development of a general method for the determination of very low leak rates from limiting enclosures. There are many methods that can be used to detect and repair leaks from enclosures. Many methods have also been proposed that allow the estimation of actual leak rates, usually expressed as enclosure volume turnover. The proposed method combines measurements of the state variables (pressure, temperature, and volume) as well as the change in the concentration of a tracer gas to estimate the leak rate. The method was applied to the containment enclosure of the Engineering Development Unit of the CELSS Test Facility, currently undergoing testing at the NASA Ames Research Center.

  3. Temperature and Atomic Oxygen Effects on Helium Leak Rates of a Candidate Main Interface Seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penney, Nicholas; Wasowski, Janice L.; Daniels, Christopher C.

    2011-01-01

    Helium leak tests were completed to characterize the leak rate of a 54 in. diameter composite space docking seal design in support of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration s (NASA's) Low Impact Docking System (LIDS). The evaluated seal design was a candidate for the main interface seal on the LIDS, which would be compressed between two vehicles, while docked, to prevent the escape of breathable air from the vehicles and into the vacuum of space. Leak tests completed at nominal temperatures of -30, 20, and 50 C on untreated and atomic oxygen (AO) exposed test samples were examined to determine the influence of both test temperature and AO exposure on the performance of the composite seal assembly. Results obtained for untreated seal samples showed leak rates which increased with increased test temperature. This general trend was not observed in tests of the AO exposed specimens. Initial examination of collected test data suggested that AO exposure resulted in higher helium leak rates, however, further analysis showed that the differences observed in the 20 and 50 C tests between the untreated and AO exposed samples were within the experimental error of the test method. Lack of discernable trends in the test data prevented concrete conclusions about the effects of test temperature and AO exposure on helium leak rates of the candidate seal design from being drawn. To facilitate a comparison of the current test data with results from previous leak tests using air as the test fluid, helium leak rates were converted to air leak rates using standard conversion factors for viscous and molecular flow. Flow rates calculated using the viscous flow conversion factor were significantly higher than the experimental air leakage values, whereas values calculated using the molecular flow conversion factor were significantly lower than the experimentally obtained air leak rates. The difference in these sets of converted flow rates and their deviation from the

  4. Evaluation and refinement of leak-rate estimation models. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, D.D.; Ahmad, J.; Scott, P.M.; Flanigan, L.F.; Wilkowski, G.M.

    1994-06-01

    Leak-rate estimation models are important elements in developing a leak-beforebreak methodology in piping integrity and safety analyses. Existing thermalhydraulic and crack-opening-area models used in current leak-rate estimations have been incorporated into a single computer code for leak-rate estimation. The code is called SQUIRT, which stands for Seepage Quantification of Upsets In Reactor Tubes. The SQUIRT program has been validated by comparing its thermalhydraulic predictions with the limited experimental data that have been published on two-phase flow through slits and cracks, and by comparing its crack-opening-area predictions with data from the Degraded Piping Program. In addition, leak-rate experiments were conducted to obtain validation data for a circumferential fatigue crack in a carbon steel pipe girth weld.

  5. Phylogenetic differences of mammalian basal metabolic rate are not explained by mitochondrial basal proton leak

    PubMed Central

    Polymeropoulos, E. T.; Heldmaier, G.; Frappell, P. B.; McAllan, B. M.; Withers, K. W.; Klingenspor, M.; White, C. R.; Jastroch, M.

    2012-01-01

    Metabolic rates of mammals presumably increased during the evolution of endothermy, but molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying basal metabolic rate (BMR) are still not understood. It has been established that mitochondrial basal proton leak contributes significantly to BMR. Comparative studies among a diversity of eutherian mammals showed that BMR correlates with body mass and proton leak. Here, we studied BMR and mitochondrial basal proton leak in liver of various marsupial species. Surprisingly, we found that the mitochondrial proton leak was greater in marsupials than in eutherians, although marsupials have lower BMRs. To verify our finding, we kept similar-sized individuals of a marsupial opossum (Monodelphis domestica) and a eutherian rodent (Mesocricetus auratus) species under identical conditions, and directly compared BMR and basal proton leak. We confirmed an approximately 40 per cent lower mass specific BMR in the opossum although its proton leak was significantly higher (approx. 60%). We demonstrate that the increase in BMR during eutherian evolution is not based on a general increase in the mitochondrial proton leak, although there is a similar allometric relationship of proton leak and BMR within mammalian groups. The difference in proton leak between endothermic groups may assist in elucidating distinct metabolic and habitat requirements that have evolved during mammalian divergence. PMID:21632624

  6. USING AN ADAPTER TO PERFORM THE CHALFANT-STYLE CONTAINMENT VESSEL PERIODIC MAINTENANCE LEAK RATE TEST

    SciTech Connect

    Loftin, B.; Abramczyk, G.; Trapp, D.

    2011-06-03

    Recently the Packaging Technology and Pressurized Systems (PT&PS) organization at the Savannah River National Laboratory was asked to develop an adapter for performing the leak-rate test of a Chalfant-style containment vessel. The PT&PS organization collaborated with designers at the Department of Energy's Pantex Plant to develop the adapter currently in use for performing the leak-rate testing on the containment vessels. This paper will give the history of leak-rate testing of the Chalfant-style containment vessels, discuss the design concept for the adapter, give an overview of the design, and will present results of the testing done using the adapter.

  7. Flow rate calibration for absolute cell counting rationale and design.

    PubMed

    Walker, Clare; Barnett, David

    2006-05-01

    There is a need for absolute leukocyte enumeration in the clinical setting, and accurate, reliable (and affordable) technology to determine absolute leukocyte counts has been developed. Such technology includes single platform and dual platform approaches. Derivations of these counts commonly incorporate the addition of a known number of latex microsphere beads to a blood sample, although it has been suggested that the addition of beads to a sample may only be required to act as an internal quality control procedure for assessing the pipetting error. This unit provides the technical details for undertaking flow rate calibration that obviates the need to add reference beads to each sample. It is envisaged that this report will provide the basis for subsequent clinical evaluations of this novel approach. PMID:18770842

  8. Failure Pressure and Leak Rate of Steam Generator Tubes With Stress Corrosion Cracks

    SciTech Connect

    Majumdar, S.; Kasza, K.; Park, J.Y.; Bakhitiari, S.

    2002-07-01

    This paper illustrates the use of an 'equivalent rectangular crack' approach to predict leak rates through laboratory generated stress corrosion cracks. A comparison between predicted and observed test data on rupture and leak rate from laboratory generated stress corrosion cracks are provided. Specimen flaws were sized by post-test fractography in addition to pre-test advanced eddy current technique. The test failure pressures and leak rates are shown to be closer to those predicted on the basis of fractography than on NDE. However, the predictions based on NDE results are encouraging, particularly because they have the potential to determine a more detailed geometry of ligamentous cracks from which more accurate predictions of failure pressure and leak rate can be made in the future. (authors)

  9. Influence of Preoperative Radiation Field on Postoperative Leak Rates in Esophageal Cancer Patients after Trimodality Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Juloori, Aditya; Tucker, Susan L.; Komaki, Ritsuko; Liao, Zhongxing; Correa, Arlene M.; Swisher, Stephen G.; Hofstetter, Wayne L.; Lin, Steven H.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Postoperative morbidities, such as anastomotic leaks, are common after trimodality therapy (chemoradiation followed by surgery) for esophageal cancer. We investigated for factors associated with an increased incidence of anastomotic leaks. Methods Data from 285 esophageal cancer patients treated from 2000–2011 with trimodality therapy was analyzed. Anastomotic location relative to preoperative radiation field was assessed using postoperative computed tomographic imaging. Logistic regression was used to evaluate for factors associated with any or clinically relevant (CR) (≥ grade 2) leaks. Results Overall anastomotic leak rate was 11% (31/285), and CR leak rate was 6% (17/285). Multivariable analysis identified body mass index (BMI) (OR 1.09, 95%CI 1.00–1.17; OR 1.11, 95%CI 1.01–1.22), three-field surgery (OR 10.01, 95%CI 3.83–26.21; OR 4.83, 95%CI 1.39–16.71), and within radiation field (“in-field”) anastomosis (OR 5.37, 95%CI 2.21–13.04; OR 8.63, 95%CI 2.90–25.65) as independent predictors of both all grade and CR leaks, respectively. While patients with distal esophageal tumors and Ivor-Lewis surgery had the lowest incidence of all grade (6.5%) and CR leaks (4.2%), most of the leaks were associated with the anastomosis constructed within the field of radiation (in-field: 39% and 30% versus out-of-field: 2.6% and 1.0%, respectively, for total and CR leaks, p<0.0001, Fisher’s Exact test). Conclusions Esophagogastric anastomosis placed within the preoperative radiation field was a very strong predictor for anastomotic leaks in esophageal cancer patients treated with trimodality therapy, among other factors. Surgical planning should include a critical evaluation of the preoperative radiation fields to ensure proper anastomotic placement after chemoradiation therapy. PMID:24736077

  10. Using airborne measurements and modelling to determine the leak rate of the Elgin platform in 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mobbs, Stephen D.; Bauguitte, Stephane J.-B.; Wellpott, Axel; O'Shea, Sebastian

    2013-04-01

    On the 25th March 2012 the French multinational oil and gas company Total reported a gas leak at the Elgin gas field in the North Sea following an operation on well G4 on the wellhead platform. During operations to plug and decommission the well methane leaked out which lead to the evacuation of the platform. Total made immense efforts to quickly stop the leak and on the 16th May 2012 the company announced the successful "Top kill". The UK's National Centre for Atmospheric Science (NCAS) supported the Total response to the leak with flights of the Facility for Airborne Atmospheric Measurements (FAAM) BAe-146 aircraft. Between the 3rd of April and the 4th of May five missions were flown. The FAAM aircraft was equipped with a Fast Greenhouse Gas Analyser (FGGA, Model RMT-200, Los Gatos Research Inc., US) to measure CH4 mixing ratios with an accuracy of 0.07±2.48 ppbv. The measurement strategy used followed closely NOAA's during the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) spill in the Gulf of Mexico in 2010. The basis of the method is to sample the cross-wind structure of the plume at different heights downwind of the source. The measurements were then fitted to a Gaussian dispersion model which allowed the calculation of the leak rate. The first mission was flown on the 30th March 2012 only 5 days after Total reported the leak. On this day maximum CH4 concentrations exceeded 2800 ppbv. The plume was very distinct and narrow especially near the platform (10km) and it showed almost perfect Gaussian characteristics. Further downwind the plume was split up into several filaments. On this day the CH4 leak rate was estimated to be 1.1 kg/s. Between the 1st and 2nd mission (03/04/2012) the leak rate decreased significantly to about 0.5 kg/s. From the 2nd flight onwards only a minor decrease in leak rate was calculated. The last mission - while the platform was still leaking - was flown on the 4th of May, when the leak rate was estimated to be 0.3 kg/s. The FAAM aircraft measurements

  11. An Experimental Investigation of Leak Rate Performance of a Subscale Candidate Elastomer Docking Space Seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garafolo, Nicholas G.; Daniels, Christopher C.

    2011-01-01

    A novel docking seal was developed for the main interface seal of NASA s Low Impact Docking System (LIDS). This interface seal was designed to maintain acceptable leak rates while being exposed to the harsh environmental conditions of outer space. In this experimental evaluation, a candidate docking seal assembly called Engineering Development Unit (EDU58) was characterized and evaluated against the Constellation Project leak rate requirement. The EDU58 candidate seal assembly was manufactured from silicone elastomer S0383-70 vacuum molded in a metal retainer ring. Four seal designs were considered with unique characteristic heights. The leak rate performance was characterized through a mass point leak rate method by monitoring gas properties within an internal control volume. The leakage performance of the seals were described herein at representative docking temperatures of -50, +23, and +50 C for all four seal designs. Leak performance was also characterized at 100, 74, and 48 percent of full closure. For all conditions considered, the candidate seal assemblies met the Constellation Project leak rate requirement.

  12. Pharmaceutical container/closure integrity. II: The relationship between microbial ingress and helium leak rates in rubber-stoppered glass vials.

    PubMed

    Kirsch, L E; Nguyen, L; Moeckly, C S; Gerth, R

    1997-01-01

    Helium leak rate measurements were quantitatively correlated to the probability of microbial ingress for rubber-stoppered glass vials subjected to immersion challenge. Standard 10-mL tubing glass vials were modified by inserting micropipettes of various sizes (0.1 to 10 microns nominal diameter) into a side wall hole and securing them with epoxy. Butyl rubber closures and aluminum crimps were used to seal the vials. The test units were sealed in a helium-filled glove bag, then the absolute helium leak rates were determined. The test units were disassembled, filled with media, resealed, and autoclaved. The test units were thermally treated to eliminate airlocks within the micropipette lumen and establish a liquid path between microbial challenge media and the test units' contents. Microbial challenge was performed by immersing the test units in a 35 degrees C bath containing magnesium ion and 8 to 10 logs of viable P. diminuta and E. coli for 24 hours. The test units were then incubated at 35 degrees C for an additional 13 days. Microbial ingress was detected by turbidity and plating on blood agar. The elimination of airlocks was confirmed by the presence of magnesium ions in the vial contents by atomic absorption spectrometry. A total of 288 vials were subjected to microbial challenge testing. Those test units whose contents failed to show detectable magnesium ions were eliminated from further analysis. At large leak rates, the probability of microbial ingress approached 100% and at very low leak rates microbial ingress rates were 0%. A dramatic increase in microbial failure occurred in the leak rate region 10(-4.5) to 10(-3) std cc/sec, which roughly corresponded to leak diameters ranging from 0.4 to 2 microns. Below a leak rate of 10(-4.5) std cc/sec the microbial failure rate was < 10%. The critical leak rate in our studies, i.e. the value below which microbial ingress cannot occur because the leak is too small, was observed to be between 10(-5) and 10(-5.8) std

  13. Assessment of crack opening area for leak rates

    SciTech Connect

    Sharples, J.K.; Bouchard, P.J.

    1997-04-01

    This paper outlines the background to recommended crack opening area solutions given in a proposed revision to leak before break guidance for the R6 procedure. Comparisons with experimental and analytical results are given for some selected cases of circumferential cracks in cylinders. It is shown that elastic models can provide satisfactory estimations of crack opening displacement (and area) but they become increasingly conservative for values of L{sub r} greater than approximately 0.4. The Dugdale small scale yielding model gives conservative estimates of crack opening displacement with increasing enhancement for L{sub r} values greater than 0.4. Further validation of the elastic-plastic reference stress method for up to L{sub r} values of about 1.0 is presented by experimental and analytical comparisons. Although a more detailed method, its application gives a best estimate of crack opening displacement which may be substantially greater than small scale plasticity models. It is also shown that the local boundary conditions in pipework need to be carefully considered when evaluating crack opening area for through-wall bending stresses resulting from welding residual stresses or geometry discontinuities.

  14. Leak Rate Quantification Method for Gas Pressure Seals with Controlled Pressure Differential

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniels, Christopher C.; Braun, Minel J.; Oravec, Heather A.; Mather, Janice L.; Taylor, Shawn C.

    2015-01-01

    An enhancement to the pressure decay leak rate method with mass point analysis solved deficiencies in the standard method. By adding a control system, a constant gas pressure differential across the test article was maintained. As a result, the desired pressure condition was met at the onset of the test, and the mass leak rate and measurement uncertainty were computed in real-time. The data acquisition and control system were programmed to automatically stop when specified criteria were met. Typically, the test was stopped when a specified level of measurement uncertainty was attained. Using silicone O-ring test articles, the new method was compared with the standard method that permitted the downstream pressure to be non-constant atmospheric pressure. The two methods recorded comparable leak rates, but the new method recorded leak rates with significantly lower measurement uncertainty, statistical variance, and test duration. Utilizing this new method in leak rate quantification, projects will reduce cost and schedule, improve test results, and ease interpretation between data sets.

  15. Ultra-low Leak Rate of Hybrid Compressive Mica Seals for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, Y S.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Chick, Lawrence A.

    2002-10-24

    A novel hybrid compressive mica seal was developed that showed a reduction of leak rate about 4300 times (compared to simple mica seals) at 800 C. The hybrid compressive mica seal is composed of 2 compliant glass layers and a mica layer. Three commercially available micas were tested in hybrid compressive seals for solid oxide fuel cell applications. The best results were obtained using Muscovite single crystal mica. The normalized leak rate for this seal at 800 C was only 1.55x10-4 sccm/cm at a stress of 100 psi and a pressure gradient of 2 psi. Seals based on the other commercial micas (Muscovite and Phlogopite mica papers), also exhibited superior leak rates ({approx}0.011 sccm) compared to simple mica seals without the compliant glass layer (about 6 {approx} 9 sccm/cm). The microstructure of the mica was examined before and after the 800 C leak tests using scanning electron microscopy. The cause for the substantial reduction of the leak rate was discussed. In addition, the effect of the compressive stresses was also investigated.

  16. Estimation of Leak Rate from the Emergency Pump Well in L-Area Complex Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Duncan, A

    2005-12-19

    This report provides an estimate of the leak rate from the emergency pump well in L-basin that is to be expected during an off-normal event. This estimate is based on expected shrinkage of the engineered grout (i.e., controlled low strength material) used to fill the emergency pump well and the header pipes that provide the dominant leak path from the basin to the lower levels of the L-Area Complex. The estimate will be used to provide input into the operating safety basis to ensure that the water level in the basin will remain above a certain minimum level. The minimum basin water level is specified to ensure adequate shielding for personnel and maintain the ''as low as reasonably achievable'' concept of radiological exposure. The need for the leak rate estimation is the existence of a gap between the fill material and the header pipes, which penetrate the basin wall and would be the primary leak path in the event of a breach in those pipes. The gap between the pipe and fill material was estimated based on a full scale demonstration pour that was performed and examined. Leak tests were performed on full scale pipes as a part of this examination. Leak rates were measured to be on the order of 0.01 gallons/minute for completely filled pipe (vertically positioned) and 0.25 gallons/minute for partially filled pipe (horizontally positioned). This measurement was for water at 16 feet head pressure and with minimal corrosion or biofilm present. The effect of the grout fill on the inside surface biofilm of the pipes is the subject of a previous memorandum.

  17. Influence of wetting effect at the outer surface of the pipe on increase in leak rate - experimental results and discussion

    SciTech Connect

    Isozaki, Toshikuni; Shibata, Katsuyuki

    1997-04-01

    Experimental and computed results applicable to Leak Before Break analysis are presented. The specific area of investigation is the effect of the temperature distribution changes due to wetting of the test pipe near the crack on the increase in the crack opening area and leak rate. Two 12-inch straight pipes subjected to both internal pressure and thermal load, but not to bending load, are modelled. The leak rate was found to be very susceptible to the metal temperature of the piping. In leak rate tests, therefore, it is recommended that temperature distribution be measured precisely for a wide area.

  18. Leak Rate Performance of Silicone Elastomer O-Rings Contaminated with JSC-1A Lunar Regolith Simulant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oravec, Heather Ann; Daniels, Christopher C.

    2014-01-01

    Contamination of spacecraft components with planetary and foreign object debris is a growing concern. Face seals separating the spacecraft cabin from the debris filled environment are particularly susceptible; if the seal becomes contaminated there is potential for decreased performance, mission failure, or catastrophe. In this study, silicone elastomer O-rings were contaminated with JSC- 1A lunar regolith and their leak rate performance was evaluated. The leak rate values of contaminated O-rings at four levels of seal compression were compared to those of as-received, uncontaminated, O-rings. The results showed a drastic increase in leak rate after contamination. JSC-1A contaminated O-rings lead to immeasurably high leak rate values for all levels of compression except complete closure. Additionally, a mechanical method of simulant removal was examined. In general, this method returned the leak rate to as-received values.

  19. Verification of International Space Station Component Leak Rates by Helium Accumulation Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Underwood, Steve D.; Smith, Sherry L.

    2003-01-01

    Discovery of leakage on several International Space Station U.S. Laboratory Module ammonia system quick disconnects (QDs) led to the need for a process to quantify total leakage without removing the QDs from the system. An innovative solution was proposed allowing quantitative leak rate measurement at ambient external pressure without QD removal. The method utilizes a helium mass spectrometer configured in the detector probe mode to determine helium leak rates inside a containment hood installed on the test component. The method was validated through extensive developmental testing. Test results showed the method was viable, accurate and repeatable for a wide range of leak rates. The accumulation method has been accepted by NASA and is currently being used by Boeing Huntsville, Boeing Kennedy Space Center and Boeing Johnson Space Center to test welds and valves and will be used by Alenia to test the Cupola. The method has been used in place of more expensive vacuum chamber testing which requires removing the test component from the system.

  20. Determination of crack morphology parameters from service failures for leak-rate analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkowski, G.; Ghadiali, N.; Paul, D.

    1997-04-01

    In leak-rate analyses described in the literature, the crack morphology parameters are typically not well agreed upon by different investigators. This paper presents results on a review of crack morphology parameters determined from examination of service induced cracks. Service induced cracks were found to have a much more tortuous flow path than laboratory induced cracks due to crack branching associated with the service induced cracks. Several new parameters such as local and global surface roughnesses, as well as local and global number of turns were identified. The effect of each of these parameters are dependent on the crack-opening displacement. Additionally, the crack path is typically assumed to be straight through the pipe thickness, but the service data show that the flow path can be longer due to the crack following a fusion line, and/or the number of turns, where the number of turns in the past were included as a pressure drop term due to the turns, but not the longer flow path length. These parameters were statistically evaluated for fatigue cracks in air, corrosion-fatigue, IGSCC, and thermal fatigue cracks. A refined version of the SQUIRT leak-rate code was developed to account for these variables. Sample calculations are provided in this paper that show how the crack size can vary for a given leak rate and the statistical variation of the crack morphology parameters.

  1. On the probability of exceeding allowable leak rates through degraded steam generator tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Cizelj, L.; Sorsek, I.; Riesch-Oppermann, H.

    1997-02-01

    This paper discusses some possible ways of predicting the behavior of the total leak rate through the damaged steam generator tubes. This failure mode is of special concern in cases where most through-wall defects may remain In operation. A particular example is the application of alternate (bobbin coil voltage) plugging criterion to Outside Diameter Stress Corrosion Cracking at the tube support plate intersections. It is the authors aim to discuss some possible modeling options that could be applied to solve the problem formulated as: Estimate the probability that the sum of all individual leak rates through degraded tubes exceeds the predefined acceptable value. The probabilistic approach is of course aiming at reliable and computationaly bearable estimate of the failure probability. A closed form solution is given for a special case of exponentially distributed individual leak rates. Also, some possibilities for the use of computationaly efficient First and Second Order Reliability Methods (FORM and SORM) are discussed. The first numerical example compares the results of approximate methods with closed form results. SORM in particular shows acceptable agreement. The second numerical example considers a realistic case of NPP in Krsko, Slovenia.

  2. Pressure Decay Testing Methodology for Quantifying Leak Rates of Full-Scale Docking System Seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunlap, Patrick H., Jr.; Daniels, Christopher C.; Wasowski, Janice L.; Garafolo, Nicholas G.; Penney, Nicholas; Steinetz, Bruce M.

    2010-01-01

    NASA is developing a new docking system to support future space exploration missions to low-Earth orbit and the Moon. This system, called the Low Impact Docking System, is a mechanism designed to connect the Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle to the International Space Station, the lunar lander (Altair), and other future Constellation Project vehicles. NASA Glenn Research Center is playing a key role in developing the main interface seal for this docking system. This seal will be relatively large with an outside diameter in the range of 54 to 58 in. (137 to 147 cm). As part of this effort, a new test apparatus has been designed, fabricated, and installed to measure leak rates of candidate full-scale seals under simulated thermal, vacuum, and engagement conditions. Using this test apparatus, a pressure decay testing and data processing methodology has been developed to quantify full-scale seal leak rates. Tests performed on untreated 54 in. diameter seals at room temperature in a fully compressed state resulted in leak rates lower than the requirement of less than 0.0025 lbm, air per day (0.0011 kg/day).

  3. Planned delay of oral intake after esophagectomy reduces the cervical anastomotic leak rate and hospital length of stay.

    PubMed

    Bolton, John S; Conway, William C; Abbas, Abbas E

    2014-02-01

    Cervical anastomotic leak rates are high after esophagectomy. We examined the effect of a purposeful delay in institution of oral diet after esophagectomy on the leak rate and hospital length of stay. A retrospective analysis of 120 patients submitted to esophagectomy with cervical esophagogastric anastomosis was conducted. Eighty-seven resumed diet within 7 days of surgery (early eaters), and 33 had delayed diet until a mean of 12 days after surgery (late eaters). Mean age was 62.3 years; 98 patients were male. One hundred one resections were for cancer, and 49 % of cancer patients received neoadjuvant therapy. The overall leak rate was 17.5 %, and hospital length of stay was 10.9 days. Anastomotic leak rate was 3 % for late eaters versus 23 % for early eaters (OR of 9.57, p = 0.010). Hospital length of stay was 6 days for late eaters versus 11.8 days for early eaters (p < 0.001). Anastomotic leak was significantly associated with increased length of stay (p < 0.001), adding an average of 7.6 days to hospital stay. Respiratory complications (p < 0.001) and delayed gastric emptying (p = 0.014) were also independent predictors of increased length of stay, but early eater status was not. Delayed resumption of oral diet after esophagectomy significantly reduces cervical anastomotic leak rate and avoids the increased length of stay associated with leak. PMID:24002761

  4. Assessments of fluid friction factors for use in leak rate calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Chivers, T.C.

    1997-04-01

    Leak before Break procedures require estimates of leakage, and these in turn need fluid friction to be assessed. In this paper available data on flow rates through idealized and real crack geometries are reviewed in terms of a single friction factor k It is shown that for {lambda} < 1 flow rates can be bounded using correlations in terms of surface R{sub a} values. For {lambda} > 1 the database is less precise, but {lambda} {approx} 4 is an upper bound, hence in this region flow calculations can be assessed using 1 < {lambda} < 4.

  5. Payload and Components Real-Time Automated Test System (PACRATS), Data Acquisition of Leak Rate and Pressure Data Test Procedure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinehart, Maegan L.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this activity is to provide the Mechanical Components Test Facility (MCTF) with the capability to obtain electronic leak test and proof pressure data, Payload and Components Real-time Automated Test System (PACRATS) data acquisition software will be utilized to display real-time data. It will record leak rates and pressure/vacuum level(s) simultaneously. This added functionality will provide electronic leak test and pressure data at specified sampling frequencies. Electronically stored data will provide ES61 with increased data security, analysis, and accuracy. The tasks performed in this procedure are to verify PACRATS only, and are not intended to provide verifications for MCTF equipment.

  6. Full-Scale System for Quantifying Loads and Leak Rates of Seals for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunlap, Patrick H., Jr.; Steinetz, Bruce M.; Daniels, Christopher C.; Wasowski, Janice L.; Robbie, Malcolm G.; Erker, Arthur H.; Drlik, Gary J.; Mayer, John J.

    2010-01-01

    NASA is developing advanced space-rated vacuum seals in support of future space exploration missions to low-Earth orbit and other destinations. These seals may be 50 to 60 in. (127 to 152 cm) in diameter and must exhibit extremely low leak rates to ensure that astronauts have sufficient breathable air for extended missions to the International Space Station or the Moon. Seal compression loads must be below prescribed limits so as not to overload the mechanisms that compress them during docking or mating, and seal adhesion forces must be low to allow two mated systems to separate when required. NASA Glenn Research Center has developed a new test apparatus to measure leak rates and compression and adhesion loads of candidate full-scale seals under simulated thermal, vacuum, and engagement conditions. Tests can be performed in seal-on-seal or seal-on-flange configurations at temperatures from -76 to 140 F (-60 to 60 C) under operational pressure gradients. Nominal and off-nominal mating conditions (e.g., incomplete seal compression) can also be simulated. This paper describes the main design features of the test apparatus as well as techniques used to overcome some of the design challenges.

  7. Crack shape developments and leak rates for circumferential complex-cracked pipes

    SciTech Connect

    Brickstad, B.; Bergman, M.

    1997-04-01

    A computerized procedure has been developed that predicts the growth of an initial circumferential surface crack through a pipe and further on to failure. The crack growth mechanism can either be fatigue or stress corrosion. Consideration is taken to complex crack shapes and for the through-wall cracks, crack opening areas and leak rates are also calculated. The procedure is based on a large number of three-dimensional finite element calculations of cracked pipes. The results from these calculations are stored in a database from which the PC-program, denoted LBBPIPE, reads all necessary information. In this paper, a sensitivity analysis is presented for cracked pipes subjected to both stress corrosion and vibration fatigue.

  8. Space Station Freedom seal leakage rate analysis and testing summary: Air leaks in ambient versus vacuum exit conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, P. I.; Markovitch, R.

    1992-01-01

    This report is intended to reveal the apparent relationship of air seal leakage rates between 2 atmospheres (atm) to 1 atm and 1 atm to vacuum conditions. Gas dynamics analysis is provided as well as data summarizing the MSFC test report, 'Space Station Freedom (S.S. Freedom) Seal Flaw Study With Delta Pressure Leak Rate Comparison Test Report'.

  9. Leak rate measurements for satellite subsystems and residual gas analysis during space environment tests. [thermal vacuum and solar simulation tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nuss, H. E.

    1975-01-01

    The measuring and evaluation procedure for the determination of leak rates of satellite subsystems with a quadrupole mass spectrometer, and the results of the residual gas analysis are described. The method selected for leak rate determination was placing the system into a vacuum chamber and furnishing the chamber with a mass spectrometer and calibrated leaks. The residual gas of a thermal vacuum test facility, in which the thermal balance test radiation input was simulated by a heated canister, was analyzed with the mass spectrometer in the atomic mass unit range up to 300 amu. In addition to the measurements during the space environment tests, mass spectrometric studies were performed with samples of spacecraft materials. The studies were carried out during tests for the projects HELIOS, AEROS B and SYMPHONIE.

  10. Greenhouse gas impacts of natural gas: Influence of deployment choice, methane leak rate, and methane GWP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohan, D. S.

    2015-12-01

    Growing supplies of natural gas have heightened interest in the net impacts of natural gas on climate. Although its production and consumption result in greenhouse gas emissions, natural gas most often substitutes for other fossil fuels whose emission rates may be higher. Because natural gas can be used throughout the sectors of the energy economy, its net impacts on greenhouse gas emissions will depend not only on the leak rates of production and distribution, but also on the use for which natural gas is substituted. Here, we present our estimates of the net greenhouse gas emissions impacts of substituting natural gas for other fossil fuels for five purposes: light-duty vehicles, transit buses, residential heating, electricity generation, and export for electricity generation overseas. Emissions are evaluated on a fuel cycle basis, from production and transport of each fuel through end use combustion, based on recent conditions in the United States. We show that displacement of existing coal-fired electricity and heating oil furnaces yield the largest reductions in emissions. The impact of compressed natural gas replacing petroleum-based vehicles is highly uncertain, with the sign of impact depending on multiple assumptions. Export of liquefied natural gas for electricity yields a moderate amount of emissions reductions. We further show how uncertainties in upstream emission rates for natural gas and in the global warming potential of methane influence the net greenhouse gas impacts. Our presentation will make the case that how natural gas is deployed is crucial to determining how it will impact climate.

  11. Sensitivity to relative reinforcer rate in concurrent schedules: independence from relative and absolute reinforcer duration.

    PubMed Central

    McLean, A P; Blampied, N M

    2001-01-01

    Twelve pigeons responded on two keys under concurrent variable-interval (VI) schedules. Over several series of conditions, relative and absolute magnitudes of reinforcement were varied. Within each series, relative rate of reinforcement was varied and sensitivity of behavior ratios to reinforcer-rate ratios was assessed. When responding at both alternatives was maintained by equal-sized small reinforcers, sensitivity to variation in reinforcer-rate ratios was the same as when large reinforcers were used. This result was observed when the overall rate of reinforcement was constant over conditions, and also in another series of concurrent schedules in which one schedule was kept constant at VI ached 120 s. Similarly, reinforcer magnitude did not affect the rate at which response allocation approached asymptote within a condition. When reinforcer magnitudes differred between the two responses and reinforcer-rate ratios were varied, sensitivity of behavior allocation was unaffected although response bias favored the schedule that arranged the larger reinforcers. Analysis of absolute response rates ratio sensitivity to reinforcement occurrred on the two keys showed that this invariance of response despite changes in reinforcement interaction that were observed in absolute response rates on the constant VI 120-s schedule. Response rate on the constant VI 120-s schedule was inversely related to reinforcer rate on the varied key and the strength of this relation depended on the relative magnitude of reinforcers arranged on varied key. Independence of sensitivity to reinforcer-rate ratios from relative and absolute reinforcer magnitude is consistent with the relativity and independence assumtions of the matching law. PMID:11256865

  12. Absolute and Relative Reliability of Percentage of Syllables Stuttered and Severity Rating Scales

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karimi, Hamid; O'Brian, Sue; Onslow, Mark; Jones, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Percentage of syllables stuttered (%SS) and severity rating (SR) scales are measures in common use to quantify stuttering severity and its changes during basic and clinical research conditions. However, their reliability has not been assessed with indices measuring both relative and absolute reliability. This study was designed to provide…

  13. FFTF (Fast Flux Test Facility) Reactor Characterization Program: Absolute Fission-rate Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Fuller, J.L.; Gilliam, D.M.; Grundl, J.A.; Rawlins, J.A.; Daughtry, J.W.

    1981-05-01

    Absolute fission rate measurements using modified National Bureau of Standards fission chambers were performed in the Fast Flux Test Facility at two core locations for isotopic deposits of {sup 232}Th, {sup 233}U, {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U, {sup 237}Np, {sup 239}Pu, {sup 240}Pu, and {sup 241}Pu. Monitor chamber results at a third location were analyzed to support other experiments involving passive dosimeter fission rate determinations.

  14. FFTF (FAST FLUX TEST FACILITY) REACTOR CHARACTERIZATION PROGRAM ABSOLUTE FISSION RATE MEASUREMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    FULLER JL; GILLIAM DM; GRUNDL JA; RAWLINS JA; DAUGHTRY JW

    1981-05-01

    Absolute fission rate measurements using modified National Bureau of Standards fission chambers were performed in the Fast Flux Test Facility at two core locations for isotopic deposits of {sup 232}Th, {sup 233}U, {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U, {sup 237}Np, {sup 239}Pu, {sup 240}Pu, and {sup 241}Pu. Monitor chamber results at a third location were analyzed to support other experiments involving passive dosimeter fission rate determinations.

  15. Guidelines to achieve seals with minimal leak rates for HWR-NPR coolant system components

    SciTech Connect

    Finn, P.A.

    1991-03-01

    Seal design practices that are acceptable in pressurized-water and boiling-water reactors in the United States are not usable for the Heavy Water Reactor-New Production Reactor (HWR-NPR) because of the stringent requirement on tritium control for the atmosphere within its containment building. To maintain an atmosphere in which workers do not need protective equipment, the components of the coolant system must have a cumulative leak rate less than 0.00026 L/s. Existing technology for seal systems was reviewed with regard to flange, elastomer, valve, and pump design. A technology data base for the designers of the HWR-NPR coolant system was derived from operating experience and seal development work on reactors in the United States, Canada, and Europe. This data base was then used to generate guidelines for the design of seals and/or joints for the HWR-NPR coolant system. Also discussed are needed additional research and development, as well as the necessary component qualification tests for an effective quality control program. 141 refs., 21 figs., 14 tabs.

  16. Effective light absorption and absolute electron transport rates in the coral Pocillopora damicornis.

    PubMed

    Szabó, Milán; Wangpraseurt, Daniel; Tamburic, Bojan; Larkum, Anthony W D; Schreiber, Ulrich; Suggett, David J; Kühl, Michael; Ralph, Peter J

    2014-10-01

    Pulse Amplitude Modulation (PAM) fluorometry has been widely used to estimate the relative photosynthetic efficiency of corals. However, both the optical properties of intact corals as well as past technical constrains to PAM fluorometers have prevented calculations of the electron turnover rate of PSII. We used a new Multi-colour PAM (MC-PAM) in parallel with light microsensors to determine for the first time the wavelength-specific effective absorption cross-section of PSII photochemistry, σII(λ), and thus PAM-based absolute electron transport rates of the coral photosymbiont Symbiodinium both in culture and in hospite in the coral Pocillopora damicornis. In both cases, σII of Symbiodinium was highest in the blue spectral region and showed a progressive decrease towards red wavelengths. Absolute values for σII at 440 nm were up to 1.5-times higher in culture than in hospite. Scalar irradiance within the living coral tissue was reduced by 20% in the blue when compared to the incident downwelling irradiance. Absolute electron transport rates of P. damicornis at 440 nm revealed a maximum PSII turnover rate of ca. 250 electrons PSII(-1) s(-1), consistent with one PSII turnover for every 4 photons absorbed by PSII; this likely reflects the limiting steps in electron transfer between PSII and PSI. Our results show that optical properties of the coral host strongly affect light use efficiency of Symbiodinium. Therefore, relative electron transport rates do not reflect the productivity rates (or indeed how the photosynthesis-light response is parameterised). Here we provide a non-invasive approach to estimate absolute electron transport rates in corals. PMID:25146689

  17. Leak Rate Test for a Fiber Beam Monitor Contained in a Vacuum for the Muon g-2 Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Mara, Bridget; Lane, Noel; Gross, Eisen; Gray, Frederick; Muon g-2 Collaboration

    2014-09-01

    The muon g-2 experiment at Fermilab aims to measure the muon anomalous magnetic moment with a precision of 0.14 parts per million (ppm). The measurement will build on the Brookhaven-based E821 experiment, which yielded results suggesting new physics such as supersymmetry. The Fiber Beam Monitors (FBMs) are used in the experiment to determine the position and observe the motion of a muon beam and monitor the properties of the beam over time. The FBMs support a 9 cm × 8 cm ``harp'' with 7 scintillating fibers separated from each other by 13 mm, each with a diameter of 0.5 mm. The experiment requires a vacuum of less than 1 ×10-6 Torr to prevent trapping of electrons ionized from the residual gas by the electrostatic quadrupoles. To meet this requirement the FBMs must have a leak rate of less than 5 ×10-5 Torr L/s. We have constructed a vacuum system to simulate these conditions and have determined the leak rate of the FBMs within the constructed vacuum apparatus. This leak rate will be reported, along with preliminary results from tests of the light output from the scintillating fibers. The muon g-2 experiment at Fermilab aims to measure the muon anomalous magnetic moment with a precision of 0.14 parts per million (ppm). The measurement will build on the Brookhaven-based E821 experiment, which yielded results suggesting new physics such as supersymmetry. The Fiber Beam Monitors (FBMs) are used in the experiment to determine the position and observe the motion of a muon beam and monitor the properties of the beam over time. The FBMs support a 9 cm × 8 cm ``harp'' with 7 scintillating fibers separated from each other by 13 mm, each with a diameter of 0.5 mm. The experiment requires a vacuum of less than 1 ×10-6 Torr to prevent trapping of electrons ionized from the residual gas by the electrostatic quadrupoles. To meet this requirement the FBMs must have a leak rate of less than 5 ×10-5 Torr L/s. We have constructed a vacuum system to simulate these conditions

  18. Chlorofluorocarbon leak detection technology

    SciTech Connect

    Munday, E.B.

    1990-12-01

    There are about 590 large coolant systems located at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) and the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) leaking nearly 800,000 lb of R-114 refrigerant annually (1989 estimate). A program is now under way to reduce the leakage to 325,000 lb/year -- an average loss of 551 lb/year (0.063 lb/h) per coolant system, some of which are as large as 800 ft. This report investigates leak detection technologies that can be used to locate leaks in the coolant systems. Included are descriptions, minimum leak detection rate levels, advantages, disadvantages, and vendor information on the following technologies: bubbling solutions; colorimetric leak testing; dyes; halogen leak detectors (coronea discharge detectors; halide torch detectors, and heated anode detectors); laser imaging; mass spectroscopy; organic vapor analyzers; odorants; pressure decay methods; solid-state electrolytic-cell gas sensors; thermal conductivity leak detectors; and ultrasonic leak detectors.

  19. Absolute rate of the reaction of hydrogen atoms with ozone from 219-360 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, J. H.; Michael, J. V.; Payne, W. A.; Stief, L. J.

    1978-01-01

    Absolute rate constants for the reaction of atomic hydrogen with ozone were obtained over the temperature range 219-360 K by the flash photolysis-resonance fluorescence technique. The results can be expressed in Arrhenius form by K = (1.33 plus or minus 0.32)x10 to the minus 10 power exp (-449 plus or minus 58/T) cu cm/molecule/s (two standard deviations). The present work is compared to two previous determinations and is discussed theoretically.

  20. Determining Methane Leak Locations and Rates with a Wireless Network Composed of Low-Cost, Printed Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, C. J.; Kim, B.; Zhang, Y.; Ng, T. N.; Beck, V.; Ganguli, A.; Saha, B.; Daniel, G.; Lee, J.; Whiting, G.; Meyyappan, M.; Schwartz, D. E.

    2015-12-01

    We will present our progress on the development of a wireless sensor network that will determine the source and rate of detected methane leaks. The targeted leak detection threshold is 2 g/min with a rate estimation error of 20% and localization error of 1 m within an outdoor area of 100 m2. The network itself is composed of low-cost, high-performance sensor nodes based on printed nanomaterials with expected sensitivity below 1 ppmv methane. High sensitivity to methane is achieved by modifying high surface-area-to-volume-ratio single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with materials that adsorb methane molecules. Because the modified SWNTs are not perfectly selective to methane, the sensor nodes contain arrays of variously-modified SWNTs to build diversity of response towards gases with adsorption affinity. Methane selectivity is achieved through advanced pattern-matching algorithms of the array's ensemble response. The system is low power and designed to operate for a year on a single small battery. The SWNT sensing elements consume only microwatts. The largest power consumer is the wireless communication, which provides robust, real-time measurement data. Methane leak localization and rate estimation will be performed by machine-learning algorithms built with the aid of computational fluid dynamics simulations of gas plume formation. This sensor system can be broadly applied at gas wells, distribution systems, refineries, and other downstream facilities. It also can be utilized for industrial and residential safety applications, and adapted to other gases and gas combinations.

  1. Absolute Density Calibration Cell for Laser Induced Fluorescence Erosion Rate Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Domonkos, Matthew T.; Stevens, Richard E.

    2001-01-01

    Flight qualification of ion thrusters typically requires testing on the order of 10,000 hours. Extensive knowledge of wear mechanisms and rates is necessary to establish design confidence prior to long duration tests. Consequently, real-time erosion rate measurements offer the potential both to reduce development costs and to enhance knowledge of the dependency of component wear on operating conditions. Several previous studies have used laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) to measure real-time, in situ erosion rates of ion thruster accelerator grids. Those studies provided only relative measurements of the erosion rate. In the present investigation, a molybdenum tube was resistively heated such that the evaporation rate yielded densities within the tube on the order of those expected from accelerator grid erosion. This work examines the suitability of the density cell as an absolute calibration source for LIF measurements, and the intrinsic error was evaluated.

  2. Leak detection/verification

    SciTech Connect

    Krhounek, V.; Zdarek, J.; Pecinka, L.

    1997-04-01

    Loss of coolant accident (LOCA) experiments performed as part of a Leak Before Break (LBB) analysis are very briefly summarized. The aim of these experiments was to postulate the leak rates of the coolant. Through-wall cracks were introduced into pipes by fatigue cycling and hydraulically loaded in a test device. Measurements included coolant pressure and temperature, quantity of leaked coolant, displacement of a specimen, and acoustic emission. Small cracks were plugged with particles in the coolant during testing. It is believed that plugging will have no effect in cracks with leak rates above 35 liters per minute. The leak rate safety margin of 10 is sufficient for cracks in which the leak rate is more than 5 liters per minute.

  3. Development and verification of methods for predicting flow rates through leaks in valves and couplings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, John M.

    1993-01-01

    This is the final report of a research effort which addresses the title problem. The report discusses two broad models of flows, which represent the following extreme cases: (1) inertia-dominated flow, where friction is relatively insignificant; and (2) friction-dominated flow where inertia is insignificant. In class (2), the leak channel might consist of the gap between a scratch in a plastic seal and a polished metal plate against which the seal is pressed. Here, the cross section of the leak channel is modeled as a flat bottomed crescent. A publication generated under the present grant period presents an exact solution of the equations of fully-developed laminar pipe flow of a liquid in the case of a crescent beneath a hyperbolic arc. A Master's thesis project supported by the present grant presents the corresponding solution beneath a circular arc. A second publication reviews the flow of a gas through the same channel, which may be analyzed by a standard one-dimensional model (Fanno flow) for an engineering approximation. Finally, the report discusses the design and progress in the fabrication of a leak-test cell, in which one may measure the flow of fluid through a controlled flaw in a seal. The aim of such measurements is to furnish data for comparison with the predictions of the theory.

  4. Absolute rate parameters for the reaction of atomic hydrogen with hydrazine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stief, L. J.; Payne, W. A.

    1976-01-01

    Absolute rate parameters for the reaction of atomic hydrogen with hydrazine H + N2H4 yields H2 + N2H3 have been determined in a direct manner using flash photolysis of dilute mixtures of hydrazine in helium and time dependent observation of H via resonance fluorescence. By measuring the H-atom decay under pseudo-first-order conditions, the bimolecular rate constant K sub 1 was obtained over the temperature range 228-400 K. The data were fitted with good linearity to the Arrhenius expression K sub 1 = (9.87 plus or minus 1.17) x 10 to the -12th exp(-2380 plus or minus 100/RT) cu cm/molecule/s. The data were shown to be free of any contributions from secondary reactions involving H as a reactant or product.

  5. Membrane electroporation: The absolute rate equation and nanosecond time scale pore creation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasilkoski, Zlatko; Esser, Axel T.; Gowrishankar, T. R.; Weaver, James C.

    2006-08-01

    The recent applications of nanosecond, megavolt-per-meter electric field pulses to biological systems show striking cellular and subcellular electric field induced effects and revive the interest in the biophysical mechanism of electroporation. We first show that the absolute rate theory, with experimentally based parameter input, is consistent with membrane pore creation on a nanosecond time scale. Secondly we use a Smoluchowski equation-based model to formulate a self-consistent theoretical approach. The analysis is carried out for a planar cell membrane patch exposed to a 10ns trapezoidal pulse with 1.5ns rise and fall times. Results demonstrate reversible supraelectroporation behavior in terms of transmembrane voltage, pore density, membrane conductance, fractional aqueous area, pore distribution, and average pore radius. We further motivate and justify the use of Krassowska’s asymptotic electroporation model for analyzing nanosecond pulses, showing that pore creation dominates the electrical response and that pore expansion is a negligible effect on this time scale.

  6. Results and evaluation of key comparison CCM.P-K12.1 for very low helium flow rates (leak rates)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šetina, Janez; Vičar, Martin; Pražák, Dominik

    2015-01-01

    The Czech Metrology Institute (CMI) took part and failed to prove equivalence in the Key Comparison CCM.P-K12 of helium leak artefacts (leak rates) into vacuum. After identifying and eliminating the cause of the failure, the Institute of Metals and Technology (IMT) of Slovenia, a successful participant in CCM.P-K12, volunteered to serve as pilot and link in a following bilateral comparison of IMT and CMI that obtained designation CCM.P-K12.1 in June 2012. It was decided to perform the comparison with a glass permeation helium leak artefact at nominally 3.10-11 mol/s (7.4.10-7 mbar.L.s-1) at 23 °C. Both the laboratory standards took part in CCM.P-K12 and were considered as primary. The comparison measurements were performed in October 2012. CMI proved equivalence both with IMT and with the reference value of the key comparison CCM.P-K12. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by CCM, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  7. Bayesian belief network for CO2 leak detection by near-surface flux rates for CO2 and perfluorocarbon (PFC) tracer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Y.; Small, M. J.; Ogretim, E.; Gray, D. D.; Bromhal, G. S.; Strazisar, B. R.; Wells, A. W.

    2010-12-01

    To incorporate the use of multiple geologic sequestration monitoring techniques, a Bayesian Belief Network (BBN) for leak detection inference is applied to integrate the information provided by different techniques deployed at a site. In this study, two monitoring methods, near-surface soil CO2 flux and perfluorocarbon (PFC) tracer concentration, are included in the BBN. First, possible near-surface flux rates for CO2 and PFC tracer as a function of distance from a leakage point are simulated by TOUGH2, given different leakage rates and permeabilities. Then, the natural near-surface CO2 flux and background PFC tracer concentration measured at the Zero Emission Research and Technology (ZERT) site are used to determine critical values for leak inference and to calculate the probabilities of leak detection given a monitoring network. A BBN of leak detection is established by combing the TOUGH2 simulations and the background characterization of near-surface CO2 flux and PFC tracer at the sequestration site. The results show a positive correlation between the detection abilities of PFC tracer and soil CO2 flux, but the PFC tracer is more sensitive for detecting a leak in most cases. The BBN of leak detection including both soil CO2 flux and PFC tracer concentration gives an integrated probability estimation of leak detection for different permeability and leakage rates for a given monitoring network. A BBN developed using the proposed methodology can be used to help site engineers and decision makers to evaluate leakage signals and the risk of undetected leakage, given a suite of monitoring techniques and site conditions.

  8. Subjective evaluation of HDTV stereoscopic videos in IPTV scenarios using absolute category rating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, K.; Barkowsky, M.; Cousseau, R.; Brunnström, K.; Olsson, R.; Le Callet, P.; Sjöström, M.

    2011-03-01

    Broadcasting of high definition (HD) stereobased 3D (S3D) TV are planned, or has already begun, in Europe, the US, and Japan. Specific data processing operations such as compression and temporal and spatial resampling are commonly used tools for saving network bandwidth when IPTV is the distribution form, as this results in more efficient recording and transmission of 3DTV signals, however at the same time it inevitably brings quality degradations to the processed video. This paper investigated observers quality judgments of state of the art video coding schemes (simulcast H.264/AVC or H.264/MVC), with or without added temporal and spatial resolution reduction of S3D videos, by subjective experiments using the Absolute Category Rating method (ACR) method. The results showed that a certain spatial resolution reduction working together with high quality video compressing was the most bandwidth efficient way of processing video data when the required video quality is to be judged as "good" quality. As the subjective experiment was performed in two different laboratories in two different countries in parallel, a detailed analysis of the interlab differences was performed.

  9. Acceptance test procedure for the 105-KW isolation barrier leak rate

    SciTech Connect

    McCracken, K.J.

    1995-05-19

    This acceptance test procedure shall be used to: First establish a basin water loss rate prior to installation of the two isolation barriers between the main basin and the discharge chute in K-Basin West. Second, perform an acceptance test to verify an acceptable leakage rate through the barrier seals. This Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) has been prepared in accordance with CM-6-1 EP 4.2, Standard Engineering Practices.

  10. Simultaneous estimation of lithospheric uplift rates and absolute sea level change in southwest Scandinavia from inversion of sea level data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, Lars; Hansen, Jens Morten; Hede, Mikkel Ulfeldt; Clemmensen, Lars B.; Pejrup, Morten; Noe-Nygaard, Nanna

    2014-11-01

    Relative sea level curves contain coupled information about absolute sea level change and vertical lithospheric movement. Such curves may be constructed based on, for example tide gauge data for the most recent times and different types of geological data for ancient times. Correct account for vertical lithospheric movement is essential for estimation of reliable values of absolute sea level change from relative sea level data and vise versa. For modern times, estimates of vertical lithospheric movement may be constrained by data (e.g. GPS-based measurements), which are independent from the relative sea level data. Similar independent data do not exist for ancient times. The purpose of this study is to test two simple inversion approaches for simultaneous estimation of lithospheric uplift rates and absolute sea level change rates for ancient times in areas where a dense coverage of relative sea level data exists and well-constrained average lithospheric movement values are known from, for example glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA) models. The inversion approaches are tested and used for simultaneous estimation of lithospheric uplift rates and absolute sea level change rates in southwest Scandinavia from modern relative sea level data series that cover the period from 1900 to 2000. In both approaches, a priori information is required to solve the inverse problem. A priori information about the average vertical lithospheric movement in the area of interest is critical for the quality of the obtained results. The two tested inversion schemes result in estimated absolute sea level rise of ˜1.2/1.3 mm yr-1 and vertical uplift rates ranging from approximately -1.4/-1.2 mm yr-1 (subsidence) to about 5.0/5.2 mm yr-1 if an a priori value of 1 mm yr-1 is used for the vertical lithospheric movement throughout the study area. In case the studied time interval is broken into two time intervals (before and after 1970), absolute sea level rise values of ˜0.8/1.2 mm yr-1 (before

  11. Superfluid helium leak sealant study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vorreiter, J. W.

    1981-01-01

    Twenty-one leak specimens were fabricated in the ends of stainless steel and aluminum tubes. Eighteen of these tubes were coated with a copolymer material to seal the leak. The other three specimens were left uncoated and served as control specimens. All 21 tubes were cold shocked in liquid helium 50 times and then the leak rate was measured while the tubes were submerged in superfluid helium at 1.7 K. During the cold shocks two of the coated specimens were mechanically damaged and eliminated from the test program. Of the remaining 16 coated specimens one suffered a total coating failure and resulting high leak rate. Another three of the coated specimens suffered partial coating failures. The leak rates of the uncoated specimens were also measured and reported. The significance of various leak rates is discussed in view of the infrared astronomical satellite (IRAS) Dewar performance.

  12. Absolute rate constant of the reaction between chlorine /2P/ atoms and hydrogen peroxide from 298 to 424 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keyser, L. F.

    1980-01-01

    The absolute rate constant of the reaction between chlorine (2P) atoms and hydrogen peroxide was determined from 298 to 424 K, using the discharge flow resonance fluorescence technique. Pseudo-first-order conditions were used with hydrogen peroxide in large excess. A fast flow-sampling procedure limited hydrogen peroxide decomposition to less than 5% over the temperature range studied. At 298 K, the rate constant is (4.1 plus or minus 0.2) x 10 to the minus 13th cu cm/molecule-sec.

  13. Absolute Rate Constants for the Reaction of OH with [|#11#|]Cyclopentane and Cycloheptane from 230-350 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dransfield, T. J.; Gennaco, M. M.; Huang, Y.; Hannun, R. A.

    2011-12-01

    We report absolute measurements of the rate constants of the reaction of hydroxyl radical (OH) with cyclopentane and cycloheptane in 6-8 Torr of nitrogen from 230-350 K using Harvard's High Pressure Flow System. Ethane's reactivity was simultaneously measured as a test of experimental performance. Hydroxyl concentrations were measured using Laser-Induced Fluorescence, and alkane concentrations were measured using Fourier-Transform Infrared Spectroscopy. Recent work on this flow system has suggested that cyclohexane has a significantly higher activation energy to reaction with OH than does cyclo-octane, a result which is not suggested by our understanding of hydrocarbon reactivity nor predicted by structure-activity relationships. This work examines the temperature dependent rates for two other similarly-sized cycloalkanes to determine whether they behave as cyclohexane or as cyclooctane. While several previous experiments have studied the reaction with cyclopentane, there is significant scatter in the room temperature rates, and only four absolute rate measurements are available at non-ambient temperatures. There are only two absolute rate measurements available for the reaction with cycloheptane; only one of these reports a temperature dependence, and that study is limited to temperatures above 298 K. Thus, this work significantly expands the available data set for both reactions. The data for the reactions of OH with ethane, cyclopentane, cyclohexane, and cycloheptane are all modeled using a simple Arrhenius fit, and also with a modified Arrhenius equation based on transition state theory, ignoring tunneling. Results from the latter fit indicate that the activation barriers for both title reactions are greater than that of OH + cyclo-octane. The measured activation energy for OH + cyclopentane actually exceeds that of OH + cyclohexane.

  14. Easy Absolute Values? Absolutely

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Sharon E.; Mittag, Kathleen Cage

    2015-01-01

    The authors teach a problem-solving course for preservice middle-grades education majors that includes concepts dealing with absolute-value computations, equations, and inequalities. Many of these students like mathematics and plan to teach it, so they are adept at symbolic manipulations. Getting them to think differently about a concept that they…

  15. Sensitivities of Soap Solutions in Leak Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stuck, D.; Lam, D. Q.; Daniels, C.

    1985-01-01

    Document describes method for determining minimum leak rate to which soap-solution leak detectors sensitive. Bubbles formed at smaller leak rates than previously assumed. In addition to presenting test results, document discusses effects of joint-flange configurations, properties of soap solutions, and correlation of test results with earlier data.

  16. Semi-analytical solution for pressure change and leakage rate through aquifer leaks or fractures considering both Darcy and non-Darcy phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, J.; Zhan, H.

    2013-12-01

    Study of potential leakage of hazardous liquid waste into deep aquifer or abandoned wells is very important research work in recent days. CO2 sequestration into the brine media is not an exception of that. The saline aquifer is always overlain by a leaky aquitard or seal which may allow the migration of the injected CO2 or any kind of hazardous liquid waste to the upper aquifer through some leaks or fractures. The scope of study includes how the migration through the seal or aquitard causes the pressure change in the upper aquifer because of that injection into the target storage aquifer. Such pressure change is used to infer the leakage pathway location and characteristics of the leak or fractures. In this complex issue both Darcian and non-Darcian flow has been taken care of combindly. The Izbash equation has been used to describe the non-Darcian flow in the aquifer. A semi-analytical solution is obtained in Laplace domain and finally it has been solved numerically. Afterwards different parameters have been evaluated (leak or fracture size, injection rate, conductivity) to see how they directly affect the upper aquifer pressure and leakage rate independently.

  17. Detecting absolute human knee angle and angular velocity using accelerometers and rate gyroscopes.

    PubMed

    Williamson, R; Andrews, B J

    2001-05-01

    Knee joint angle and angular velocity were calculated in real time during standing up and sitting down. Two small modules comprising rate gyroscopes and accelerometers were attached to the thigh and shank of two able-bodied volunteers and one T5 ASIA(A) paraplegic assisted by functional electrical stimulation (FES). The offset and drift of the rate gyroscopes was compensated for by auto-resetting and auto-nulling algorithms. The tilt of the limb segments was calculated by combining the signals of the accelerometer and the rate gyroscope. The joint angle was calculated as the difference in tilt of the segments. The modules were also tested on a two-dimensional model. The mean differences between the rate gyroscope-accelerometer system and the reference goniometer for the model, able-bodied and paraplegic standing trials were 2.1 degrees, 2.4 degrees and 2.3 degrees respectively for knee angle and 2.3 degrees s(-1), 5.0 degrees s(-1) and 11.8 degrees s(-1) respectively for knee velocity. The rate gyroscope-accelerometer system was more accurate than using the accelerometer as a tilt meter, possibly due to the greater bandwidth of the rate gyroscope-accelerometer system. PMID:11465883

  18. Noninvasive optical quantification of absolute blood flow, blood oxygenation, and oxygen consumption rate in exercising skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Gurley, Katelyn; Shang, Yu; Yu, Guoqiang

    2012-07-01

    This study investigates a method using novel hybrid diffuse optical spectroscopies [near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) and diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS)] to obtain continuous, noninvasive measurement of absolute blood flow (BF), blood oxygenation, and oxygen consumption rate (V̇O(2)) in exercising skeletal muscle. Healthy subjects (n=9) performed a handgrip exercise to increase BF and V̇O(2) in forearm flexor muscles, while a hybrid optical probe on the skin surface directly monitored oxy-, deoxy-, and total hemoglobin concentrations ([HbO(2)], [Hb], and THC), tissue oxygen saturation (S(t)O(2)), relative BF (rBF), and relative oxygen consumption rate (rV̇O(2)). The rBF and rV̇O(2) signals were calibrated with absolute baseline BF and V̇O(2) obtained through venous and arterial occlusions, respectively. Known problems with muscle-fiber motion artifacts in optical measurements during exercise were mitigated using a novel gating algorithm that determined muscle contraction status based on control signals from a dynamometer. Results were consistent with previous findings in the literature. This study supports the application of NIRS/DCS technology to quantitatively evaluate hemodynamic and metabolic parameters in exercising skeletal muscle and holds promise for improving diagnosis and treatment evaluation for patients suffering from diseases affecting skeletal muscle and advancing fundamental understanding of muscle and exercise physiology. PMID:22894482

  19. Noninvasive optical quantification of absolute blood flow, blood oxygenation, and oxygen consumption rate in exercising skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Gurley, Katelyn; Shang, Yu

    2012-01-01

    Abstract. This study investigates a method using novel hybrid diffuse optical spectroscopies [near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) and diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS)] to obtain continuous, noninvasive measurement of absolute blood flow (BF), blood oxygenation, and oxygen consumption rate (V˙O2) in exercising skeletal muscle. Healthy subjects (n=9) performed a handgrip exercise to increase BF and V˙O2 in forearm flexor muscles, while a hybrid optical probe on the skin surface directly monitored oxy-, deoxy-, and total hemoglobin concentrations ([HbO2], [Hb], and THC), tissue oxygen saturation (StO2), relative BF (rBF), and relative oxygen consumption rate (rV˙O2). The rBF and rV˙O2 signals were calibrated with absolute baseline BF and V˙O2 obtained through venous and arterial occlusions, respectively. Known problems with muscle-fiber motion artifacts in optical measurements during exercise were mitigated using a novel gating algorithm that determined muscle contraction status based on control signals from a dynamometer. Results were consistent with previous findings in the literature. This study supports the application of NIRS/DCS technology to quantitatively evaluate hemodynamic and metabolic parameters in exercising skeletal muscle and holds promise for improving diagnosis and treatment evaluation for patients suffering from diseases affecting skeletal muscle and advancing fundamental understanding of muscle and exercise physiology. PMID:22894482

  20. Noninvasive optical quantification of absolute blood flow, blood oxygenation, and oxygen consumption rate in exercising skeletal muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurley, Katelyn; Shang, Yu; Yu, Guoqiang

    2012-07-01

    This study investigates a method using novel hybrid diffuse optical spectroscopies [near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) and diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS)] to obtain continuous, noninvasive measurement of absolute blood flow (BF), blood oxygenation, and oxygen consumption rate (\\Vdot O2) in exercising skeletal muscle. Healthy subjects (n=9) performed a handgrip exercise to increase BF and \\Vdot O2 in forearm flexor muscles, while a hybrid optical probe on the skin surface directly monitored oxy-, deoxy-, and total hemoglobin concentrations ([HbO2], [Hb], and THC), tissue oxygen saturation (StO2), relative BF (rBF), and relative oxygen consumption rate (r\\Vdot O2). The rBF and r\\Vdot O2 signals were calibrated with absolute baseline BF and \\Vdot O2 obtained through venous and arterial occlusions, respectively. Known problems with muscle-fiber motion artifacts in optical measurements during exercise were mitigated using a novel gating algorithm that determined muscle contraction status based on control signals from a dynamometer. Results were consistent with previous findings in the literature. This study supports the application of NIRS/DCS technology to quantitatively evaluate hemodynamic and metabolic parameters in exercising skeletal muscle and holds promise for improving diagnosis and treatment evaluation for patients suffering from diseases affecting skeletal muscle and advancing fundamental understanding of muscle and exercise physiology.

  1. Mitochondrial proton and electron leaks

    PubMed Central

    Jastroch, Martin; Divakaruni, Ajit S.; Mookerjee, Shona; Treberg, Jason R.; Brand, Martin D.

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondrial proton and electron leak have a major impact on mitochondrial coupling efficiency and production of reactive oxygen species. In the first part of this chapter, we address the molecular nature of the basal and inducible proton leak pathways, and their physiological importance. The basal leak is unregulated, and a major proportion can be attributed to mitochondrial anion carriers, while the proton leak through the lipid bilayer appears to be minor. The basal proton leak is cell-type specific and correlates with metabolic rate. The inducible leak through the adenine nucleotide translocase (ANT) and uncoupling proteins (UCPs) can be activated by fatty acids, superoxide, or peroxidation products. The physiological role of inducible leak through UCP1 in mammalian brown adipose tissue is heat production, whereas the roles of non-mammalian UCP1 and its paralogous proteins, in particular UCP2 and UCP3, are not yet resolved. The second part of the chapter focuses on the electron leak that occurs in the mitochondrial electron transport chain. Exit of electrons prior to the reduction of oxygen to water at cytochrome c oxidase causes the production of superoxide. As the mechanisms of electron leak are crucial to understanding their physiological relevance, we summarize the mechanisms and topology of electron leak from Complex I and III in studies using isolated mitochondria. We also highlight recent progress and challenges of assessing electron leak in the living cell. Finally, we emphasise the importance of proton and electron leak as therapeutic targets in body weight regulation and insulin secretion. PMID:20533900

  2. Absolute rate coefficients for photorecombination of beryllium-like and boron-like silicon ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernhardt, D.; Becker, A.; Brandau, C.; Grieser, M.; Hahn, M.; Krantz, C.; Lestinsky, M.; Novotný, O.; Repnow, R.; Savin, D. W.; Spruck, K.; Wolf, A.; Müller, A.; Schippers, S.

    2016-04-01

    We report measured rate coefficients for electron-ion recombination of Si10+ forming Si9+ and of Si9+ forming Si8+, respectively. The measurements were performed using the electron-ion merged-beams technique at a heavy-ion storage ring. Electron-ion collision energies ranged from 0 to 50 eV for Si9+ and from 0 to 2000 eV for Si10+, thus, extending previous measurements for Si10+ (Orban et al 2010 Astrophys. J. 721 1603) to much higher energies. Experimentally derived rate coefficients for the recombination of Si9+ and Si10+ ions in a plasma are presented along with simple parameterizations. These rate coefficients are useful for the modeling of the charge balance of silicon in photoionized plasmas (Si9+ and Si10+) and in collisionally ionized plasmas (Si10+ only). In the corresponding temperature ranges, the experimentally derived rate coefficients agree with the latest corresponding theoretical results within the experimental uncertainties.

  3. Mitochondrial proton leak rates in the slow, oxidative myotomal muscle and liver of the endothermic shortfin mako shark (Isurus oxyrinchus) and the ectothermic blue shark (Prionace glauca) and leopard shark (Triakis semifasciata).

    PubMed

    Duong, Cindy A; Sepulveda, Chugey A; Graham, Jeffrey B; Dickson, Kathryn A

    2006-07-01

    Mitochondrial proton leak was assessed as a potential heat source in the slow, oxidative (red) locomotor muscle and liver of the shortfin mako shark (Isurus oxyrinchus), a regional endotherm that maintains the temperature of both tissues elevated above ambient seawater temperature. We hypothesized that basal proton leak rates in red muscle and liver mitochondria of the endothermic shortfin mako shark would be greater than those of the ectothermic blue shark (Prionace glauca) and leopard shark (Triakis semifasciata). Respiration rate and membrane potential in isolated mitochondria were measured simultaneously at 20 degrees C using a Clark-type oxygen electrode and a lipophilic probe (triphenylmethylphosphonium, TPMP(+)). Succinate-stimulated respiration was titrated with inhibitors of the electron transport chain, and the non-linear relationship between respiration rate and membrane potential was quantified. Mitochondrial densities of both tissues were measured by applying the point-contact method to electron micrographs so that proton leak activity of the entire tissue could be assessed. In all three shark species, proton leak occurred at a higher rate in red muscle mitochondria than in liver mitochondria. For each tissue, the proton leak curves of the three species overlapped and, at a membrane potential of 160 mV, mitochondrial proton leak rate (nmol H(+) min(-1) mg(-1) protein) did not differ significantly between the endothermic and ectothermic sharks. This finding indicates that red muscle and liver mitochondria of the shortfin mako shark are not specialized for thermogenesis by having a higher proton conductance. However, mako mitochondria did have higher succinate-stimulated respiration rates and membrane potentials than those of the two ectothermic sharks. This means that under in vivo conditions mitochondrial proton leak rates may be higher in the mako than in the ectothermic species, due to greater electron transport activity and a larger proton gradient

  4. Absolute depth-dose-rate measurements for an {sup 192}Ir HDR brachytherapy source in water using MOSFET detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Zilio, Valery Olivier; Joneja, Om Parkash; Popowski, Youri; Rosenfeld, Anatoly; Chawla, Rakesh

    2006-06-15

    Reported MOSFET measurements concern mostly external radiotherapy and in vivo dosimetry. In this paper, we apply the technique for absolute dosimetry in the context of HDR brachytherapy using an {sup 192}Ir source. Measured radial dose rate distributions in water for different planes perpendicular to the source axis are presented and special attention is paid to the calibration of the R and K type detectors, and to the determination of appropriate correction factors for the sensitivity variation with the increase of the threshold voltage and the energy dependence. The experimental results are compared with Monte Carlo simulated dose rate distributions. The experimental results show a good agreement with the Monte Carlo simulations: the discrepancy between experimental and Monte Carlo results being within 5% for 82% of the points and within 10% for 95% of the points. Moreover, all points except two are found to lie within the experimental uncertainties, confirming thereby the quality of the results obtained.

  5. Hermetic Seal Leak Detection Apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, Anthony R. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    The present invention is a hermetic seal leak detection apparatus, which can be used to test for hermetic seal leaks in instruments and containers. A vacuum tight chamber is created around the unit being tested to minimize gas space outside of the hermetic seal. A vacuum inducing device is then used to increase the gas chamber volume inside the device, so that a slight vacuum is pulled on the unit being tested. The pressure in the unit being tested will stabilize. If the stabilized pressure reads close to a known good seal calibration, there is not a leak in the seal. If the stabilized pressure reads closer to a known bad seal calibration value, there is a leak in the seal. The speed of the plunger can be varied and by evaluating the resulting pressure change rates and final values, the leak rate/size can be accurately calculated.

  6. Absolute rate constant for the O plus NO chemiluminescence in the near infrared

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golde, M. F.; Roche, A. E.; Kaufman, F.

    1973-01-01

    Infrared chemiluminescence from the process O + NO (+M) NO2 + hv (+M) has been studied between 1.3 and 4.1 micrometer. The wavelength dependence of the continuum between 1.3 and 3.3 micrometer is in fair agreement with previous studies and the measured radiative rate constant at 1.51 micrometer establishes the NO-O glow in this spectral range as a secondary emission standard. Comparison with previous studies of the visible region of the glow implies that the overall radiative rate constant lies in the range (9.4 to 11.2) x 10 to the minus 17 power cu cm sec/1. In the region 3.3 to 4.1 micrometer, the previously observed broad band, peaking at 3.7 micrometer, shows a complex kinetic dependence on O and M.

  7. Absolute rate of the reaction of bromine atoms with ozone from 200-360 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michael, J. V.; Lee, J. H.; Payne, W. A.; Stief, L. J.

    1978-01-01

    The rate constant for the reaction Br + O3 yields BrO + O2 was measured from 200 to 360 K by the technique of flash photolysis coupled to time resolved detection of bromine atoms by resonance fluorescence (FP-RF). Br atoms were produced by the flash photolysis of CH3Br at lambda 165nm.O3 was monitored continuously under reaction conditions by absorption at 253.7 nm. At each of five temperatures the results were independent of substantial variations in O3, total pressure and limited variations in flash intensity. The measured rate constants obeyed the Arrhenius expression, where the error quoted is two standard deviations. Results are compared with previous determinations which employed the discharge flow-mass spectrometric technique.

  8. Absolute rate constants for the reaction of atomic hydrogen with ketene from 298 to 500 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michael, J. V.; Nava, D. F.; Payne, W. A.; Stief, L. J.

    1979-01-01

    Rate constants for the reaction of atomic hydrogen with ketene have been measured at room temperature by two techniques, flash photolysis-resonance fluorescence and discharge flow-resonance fluorescence. The measured values are (6.19 + or - 1.68) x 10 to the -14th and (7.3 + or - 1.3) x 10 to the -14th cu cm/molecule/s, respectively. In addition, rate constants as a function of temperature have been measured over the range 298-500 K using the FP-RF technique. The results are best represented by the Arrhenius expression k = (1.88 + or - 1.12) x 10 to the -11th exp(-1725 + or - 190/T) cu cm/molecule/s, where the indicated errors are at the two standard deviation level.

  9. Absolute rate of the reaction of bromine atoms with ozone from 200 to 360 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michael, J. V.; Lee, J. H.; Payne, W. A.; Stief, L. J.

    1978-01-01

    The rate constant for the reaction Br + O3 yields BrO + O2 has been measured from 200 to 360 K by the technique of flash photolysis coupled to time resolved detection of bromine atoms by resonance fluorescence (FP-RF). Br atoms were produced by the flash photolysis of CH3Br at a wavelength of 165 nm. O3 concentration was monitored continuously under reaction conditions by absorption at 253.7 nm. At each of five temperatures the results were independent of substantial variations in O3 concentration, total pressure (Ar), and limited variations in flash intensity (i.e., initial Br concentration). The measured rate constants obey the Arrhenius expression, k = (7.74 plus or minus 0.50) x 10 to the -12th exp(-603 plus or minus 16/T) cu cm/molecule/sec, where the error quoted is two standard deviations.

  10. Absolute vertical uplift rates in western Washington inferred from historical leveling and tide gauge data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alba, S.; Weldon, R.; Livelybrooks, D.; Schmidt, D. A.

    2009-12-01

    We present a new uplift rate map for western Washington based on reanalysis of water levels from the 12 major NOAA tide gauges, three new water level series that combine NOAA’s historical records and our temporarily deployed gauges (at Cape Disappointment, Olympia, and Point Grenville), and reinterpretation of repeated 1st and 2nd order NGS leveling lines. As previous studies have concluded, EW gradients in the vertical deformation field are consistent with strain accumulation across the Cascadia subduction zone interface; however, uplift rates are highly variable along the outer Washington coast, ranging from approximately +4 to -2 mm/yr, suggesting significant changes in the depth of locking along strike. Improved measure of uplift rates from water level changes are accomplished by aggressively editing available hourly data and applying a transfer function approach to better remove tides, ocean and atmospheric “noise”. The analysis allows uplift to be determined from shorter and less complete records and in some cases permits the identification of transients like slow earthquakes. As we found in a similar study in Oregon (Burgette et al, JGR, 2009), releveled lines need to be anchored to as many tide gauges as possible to remove systematic error, and repeated releveling (especially of tidal benchmarks) is required to identify the few stable benchmarks that link water levels at the tidal stations to each other through time and to the regional NGS leveling lines. A portion of the westernmost Washington coast, from an approximate latitude of 47.4 to 47.9 N, is subsiding, and tilts suggest that the peak in uplift rate is well onshore, indicating that the locked zone extends onshore, in contrast to most previous studies. To the north, the peak in uplift approximately passes through Neah Bay (the NW corner of the Olympic Peninsula, lat. 48.3 N), and to the south the peak is offshore from Grays Harbor (lat. 47 N) to the Columbia River (lat. 46.2 N). A north

  11. Absolute rate parameters for the reaction of ground state atomic oxygen with dimethyl sulfide and episulfide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, J. H.; Timmons, R. B.; Stief, L. J.

    1976-01-01

    It is pointed out that the investigated reaction of oxygen with dimethyl sulfide may play an important role in photochemical smog formation and in the chemical evolution of dense interstellar clouds. Kinetic data were obtained with the aid of the flash photolysis-resonance fluorescence method. The photodecomposition of molecular oxygen provided the oxygen atoms for the experiments. The decay of atomic oxygen was studied on the basis of resonance fluorescence observations. Both reactions investigated were found to be fast processes. A negative temperature dependence of the rate constants for reactions with dimethyl sulfide was observed.

  12. Absolute rate constants of alkoxyl radical reactions in aqueous solution. [Tert-butyl hydroperoxide

    SciTech Connect

    Erben-Russ, M.; Michel, C.; Bors, W.; Saran, M.

    1987-04-23

    The pulse radiolysis technique was used to generate the alkoxyl radical derived from tert-butyl hydroperoxide (/sup t/BuOOH) in aqueous solution. The reactions of this radical with 2,2'-azinobis(3-ethyl-6-benzothiazolinesulfonate) (ABTS) and promethazine were monitored by kinetic spectroscopy. The unimolecular decay rate constant of the tert-butoxyl radical (/sup t/BuO) was determined to be 1.4 x 10/sup 6/ s/sup -1/. On the basis of this value, the rate constants for /sup t/BuO attack on quercetin, crocin, crocetin, ascorbate, isoascorbate, trolox c, glutathione, thymidine, adenosine, guanosine, and unsaturated fatty acids were determined. In addition, the reaction of /sup t/BuO with the polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) was observed by directly monitoring the formation of the fatty acid pentadienyl radicals. Interestingly, the attack of /sup t/BuO on PUFA was found to be faster by about one order of magnitude as compared to the same reaction in a nonpolar solvent.

  13. Temperature and pressure dependence of the absolute rate constant for the reactions of NH2 radicals with acetylene and ethylene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bosco, S. R.; Nava, D. F.; Brobst, W. D.; Stief, L. J.

    1984-01-01

    The absolute rate constants for the reaction between the NH2 free radical and acetylene and ethylene is measured experimentally using a flash photolysis technique. The constant is considered to be a function of temperature and pressure. At each temperature level of the experiment, the observed pseudo-first-order rate constants were assumed to be independent of flash intensity. The results of the experiment indicate that the bimolecular rate constant for the NH2 + C2H2 reaction increases with pressure at 373 K and 459 K but not at lower temperatures. Results near the pressure limit conform to an Arrhenius expression of 1.11 (+ or -) 0.36 x 10 to the -13th over the temperature range from 241 to 459 K. For the reaction NH2 + C2H4, a smaller rate of increase in the bimolecular rate constant was observed over the temperature range 250-465 K. The implications of these results for current theoretical models of NH2 + C2H2 (or H4) reactions in the atmospheres of Jupiter and Saturn are discussed.

  14. Solid-state track recorder dosimetry device to measure absolute reaction rates and neutron fluence as a function of time

    DOEpatents

    Gold, Raymond; Roberts, James H.

    1989-01-01

    A solid state track recording type dosimeter is disclosed to measure the time dependence of the absolute fission rates of nuclides or neutron fluence over a period of time. In a primary species an inner recording drum is rotatably contained within an exterior housing drum that defines a series of collimating slit apertures overlying windows defined in the stationary drum through which radiation can enter. Film type solid state track recorders are positioned circumferentially about the surface of the internal recording drum to record such radiation or its secondary products during relative rotation of the two elements. In another species both the recording element and the aperture element assume the configuration of adjacent disks. Based on slit size of apertures and relative rotational velocity of the inner drum, radiation parameters within a test area may be measured as a function of time and spectra deduced therefrom.

  15. Aerospace Payloads Leak Test Methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lvovsky, Oleg; Grayson, Cynthia M.

    2010-01-01

    Pressurized and sealed aerospace payloads can leak on orbit. When dealing with toxic or hazardous materials, requirements for fluid and gas leakage rates have to be properly established, and most importantly, reliably verified using the best Nondestructive Test (NDT) method available. Such verification can be implemented through application of various leak test methods that will be the subject of this paper, with a purpose to show what approach to payload leakage rate requirement verification is taken by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The scope of this paper will be mostly a detailed description of 14 leak test methods recommended.

  16. Indirectly estimated absolute lung cancer mortality rates by smoking status and histological type based on a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background National smoking-specific lung cancer mortality rates are unavailable, and studies presenting estimates are limited, particularly by histology. This hinders interpretation. We attempted to rectify this by deriving estimates indirectly, combining data from national rates and epidemiological studies. Methods We estimated study-specific absolute mortality rates and variances by histology and smoking habit (never/ever/current/former) based on relative risk estimates derived from studies published in the 20th century, coupled with WHO mortality data for age 70–74 for the relevant country and period. Studies with populations grossly unrepresentative nationally were excluded. 70–74 was chosen based on analyses of large cohort studies presenting rates by smoking and age. Variations by sex, period and region were assessed by meta-analysis and meta-regression. Results 148 studies provided estimates (Europe 59, America 54, China 22, other Asia 13), 54 providing estimates by histology (squamous cell carcinoma, adenocarcinoma). For all smoking habits and lung cancer types, mortality rates were higher in males, the excess less evident for never smokers. Never smoker rates were clearly highest in China, and showed some increasing time trend, particularly for adenocarcinoma. Ever smoker rates were higher in parts of Europe and America than in China, with the time trend very clear, especially for adenocarcinoma. Variations by time trend and continent were clear for current smokers (rates being higher in Europe and America than Asia), but less clear for former smokers. Models involving continent and trend explained much variability, but non-linearity was sometimes seen (with rates lower in 1991–99 than 1981–90), and there was regional variation within continent (with rates in Europe often high in UK and low in Scandinavia, and higher in North than South America). Conclusions The indirect method may be questioned, because of variations in definition of smoking and

  17. The reaction H + C4H2 - Absolute rate constant measurement and implication for atmospheric modeling of Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nava, D. F.; Mitchell, M. B.; Stief, L. J.

    1986-04-01

    The absolute rate constant for the reaction H + C4H2 has been measured over the temperature (T) interval 210-423 K, using the technique of flash photolysis-resonance fluorescence. At each of the five temperatures employed, the results were independent of variations in C4H2 concentration, total pressure of Ar or N2, and flash intensity (i.e., the initial H concentration). The rate constant, k, was found to be equal to 1.39 x 10 to the -10th exp (-1184/T) cu cm/s, with an error of one standard deviation. The Arrhenius parameters at the high pressure limit determined here for the H + C4H2 reaction are consistent with those for the corresponding reactions of H with C2H2 and C3H4. Implications of the kinetic carbon chemistry results, particularly those at low temperature, are considered for models of the atmospheric carbon chemistry of Titan. The rate of this reaction, relative to that of the analogous, but slower, reaction of H + C2H2, appears to make H + C4H2 a very feasible reaction pathway for effective conversion of H atoms to molecular hydrogen in the stratosphere of Titan.

  18. Pressure dependence of the absolute rate constant for the reaction OH + C2H2 from 228 to 413K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michael, J. V.; Nava, D. F.; Borokowski, R. P.; Payne, W. A.; Stief, L. J.

    1980-01-01

    The pressure dependence of absolute rate constants for the reaction of OH + C2H2 yields products has been examined at five temperatures ranging from 228 to 413 K. The experimental techniques which was used is flash photolysis-resonance fluoresence. OH was produced by water photolysis and hydroxyl resonance fluorescent photons were measured by multiscaling techniques. The results indicate that the low pressure bimolecular rate constant is 4 x 10 the the minus 13th power cu cm molecule (-1) s(-1) over the temperature range studied. A substantial increase in the bimolecular rate constant with an increase in pressure was observed at all temperatures except 228 K. This indicates the importance of initial adduct formation and subsequent stablization. The high pressure results are well represented by the Arrhenius expression (k sub bi) sub infinity = (6.83 + or - 1.19) x 10 to the minus 12th power exp(-646 + or - 47/T)cu cm molecule (-1) s(-1). The results are compared to previous investigated and are theoretically discussed. The implications of these results on modeling of terrestrial and planetary atmospheres and also in combustion chemistry are discussed.

  19. A rare gas optics-free absolute photon flux and energy analyzer to provide absolute photoionization rates of inflowing interstellar neutrals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Judge, Darrell L.

    1994-01-01

    A prototype spectrometer has been developed for space applications requiring long term absolute EUV photon flux measurements. The energy spectrum of the incoming photons is transformed directly into an electron energy spectrum by taking advantage of the photoelectric effect in one of several rare gases at low pressures. Using an electron energy spectrometer, followed by an electron multiplier detector, pulses due to individual electrons are counted. The overall efficiency of this process can be made essentially independent of gain drifts in the signal path, and the secular degradation of optical components which is often a problem in other techniques is avoided. A very important feature of this approach is its freedom from the problem of overlapping spectral orders that plagues grating EUV spectrometers. An instrument with these features has not been flown before, but is essential to further advances in our understanding of solar EUV flux dynamics, and the coupled dynamics of terrestrial and planetary atmospheres. The detailed characteristics of this optics-free spectrometer are presented in the publications section.

  20. Continuous, online measurement of the absolute plasma refill rate during hemodialysis using feedback regulated ultrafiltration: preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Brummelhuis, Walter J; van Schelven, Leonard J; Boer, Walther H

    2008-01-01

    Methods to continuously measure absolute refill during dialysis are not available. It would be useful to have such a method because it would allow investigating the mechanism of refill the effect of interventions. We designed a feedback algorithm that adjusts ultrafiltration rate (QUF) according to hemoglobin (Hb) concentration changes in such a way that relative blood volume (BV) remains constant within a narrow target range. In this situation, the generated QUF quantitatively reflects refill. Refill patterns were studied in five hypotension prone patients. In addition, on separate occasions, we studied the effect of antiembolism stockings (AES) and infusion of hydroxy-ethylated starch (HAES) on refill in these patients. Refill during the first hour fell significantly from 21 +/- 3 ml/min to 9 +/- 2 ml/min (p < 0.05). In the second hour, refill decreased further and became zero in four out of five patients. Neither AES nor HAES measurably affected refill. The marked and rapid fall in refill in the early stages of dialysis suggests untimely depletion of the interstitial compartment and underestimation of dry weight. We propose that continuous, online measurement of refill patterns may be of value for accurate estimation of dry weight in dialysis patients. PMID:18204322

  1. Cyclosporin A does not affect the absolute rate of cortical bone resorption at the organ level in the growing rat.

    PubMed

    Klein, L; Lemel, M S; Wolfe, M S; Shaffer, J

    1994-10-01

    The weanling rat, an animal model of rapid bone turnover, was used to evaluate the effects of various doses of cyclosporin A (CsA) on various bones during different time periods. Sprague-Dawley male rats were extensively prelabeled with 3H-tetracycline during 1-3 weeks of age. At 4 weeks of age, four groups of rats were given daily subcutaneous injections: vehicle or CsA--low dose (10 mg/kg), intermediary dose (20 mg/kg), or high dose (30 mg/kg) for 7, 14, or 28 days. Three different whole bones--the femur (low turnover), scapula (moderate turnover), and lumbar-6 vertebra (high turnover) were harvested intact at 4, 5, 6, and 8 weeks of age. The whole bones were assayed weekly for total dry defatted weight, calcium mass (formation), and loss of 3H-tetracycline (bone resorption) following treatment with CsA. Serum CsA levels, calcium creatinine, and alkaline phosphatase were measured weekly. Significant decreases in serum calcium and alkaline phosphatase were observed at 1 and 2 weeks, and were normalized by 4 weeks of treatment. No significant changes in serum creatinine were noted. For all three doses of CsA, no effect was observed on the absolute rate of cortical bone resorption of three different, whole bones over three time periods. Body weight and bone formation in treated animals was significantly smaller in a dose- and time-related fashion compared with control animals at sacrifice. However, compared with the initial control animals, body weights and bone masses of the final treated animals were much larger, suggesting that the smaller bone masses were due to insufficient growth and slow gain in bone mass.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7820781

  2. Leak detection capability in CANDU reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Azer, N.; Barber, D.H.; Boucher, P.J.

    1997-04-01

    This paper addresses the moisture leak detection capability of Ontario Hydro CANDU reactors which has been demonstrated by performing tests on the reactor. The tests confirmed the response of the annulus gas system (AGS) to the presence of moisture injected to simulate a pressure tube leak and also confirmed the dew point response assumed in leak before break assessments. The tests were performed on Bruce A Unit 4 by injecting known and controlled rates of heavy water vapor. To avoid condensation during test conditions, the amount of moisture which could be injected was small (2-3.5 g/hr). The test response demonstrated that the AGS is capable of detecting and annunciating small leaks. Thus confidence is provided that it would alarm for a growing pressure tube leak where the leak rate is expected to increase to kg/hr rapidly. The measured dew point response was close to that predicted by analysis.

  3. Long-life leak standard assembly

    DOEpatents

    Basford, James A.; Mathis, John E.; Wright, Harlan C.

    1982-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a portable leak standard assembly which is capable of providing a stream of high-purity reference gas at a virtually constant flow rate over an extensive period of time. The leak assembly comprises a high pressure reservoir coupled to a metal leak valve through a valve-controlled conduit. A reproducible leak valve useful in this assembly is provided by a metal tube crimped with a selected pressure loading for forming an orifice in the tube with this orifice being of a sufficient size to provide the selected flow rate. The leak valve assembly is formed of metal so that it can be "baked-out" in a vacuum furnace to rid the reservoir and attendent components of volatile impurities which reduce the efficiency of the leak standard.

  4. Sealing Nitrogen Tetroxide Leaks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrard, George G.; Houston, Donald W.; Scott, Frank D.

    1990-01-01

    Use of Furmanite FSC-N-6B sealant in clam-shell sealing device makes it possible to stop leaks of nitrogen tetroxide through defective or improperly-seated plumbing fittings. Devised to stop leaks in vent line of small rocket motor on Space Shuttle. Also used on plumbing containing hydrazine and other hazardous fluids, and repair withstands severe temperature, vibration, and shock. Leaks stopped in place, without draining or replacement of leaking parts.

  5. 40 CFR 86.328-79 - Leak checks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... checks. (a) Vacuum side leak check. (1) Any location within the analysis system where a vacuum leak could affect the test results must be checked. (2) The maximum allowable leakage rate on the vacuum side is...

  6. 40 CFR 86.328-79 - Leak checks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... checks. (a) Vacuum side leak check. (1) Any location within the analysis system where a vacuum leak could affect the test results must be checked. (2) The maximum allowable leakage rate on the vacuum side is...

  7. 40 CFR 86.328-79 - Leak checks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... checks. (a) Vacuum side leak check. (1) Any location within the analysis system where a vacuum leak could affect the test results must be checked. (2) The maximum allowable leakage rate on the vacuum side is...

  8. 40 CFR 86.328-79 - Leak checks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... checks. (a) Vacuum side leak check. (1) Any location within the analysis system where a vacuum leak could affect the test results must be checked. (2) The maximum allowable leakage rate on the vacuum side is...

  9. Leak detector uses ultrasonics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heisman, R. M.; Iceland, W. F.; Keir, A. R.

    1978-01-01

    Probe located on outer wall of vacuum-jacketed fluid lines detects leaks on inner wall. Probe picks up and amplifies vibrations that occur when gas rushes through leak and converts them to audible signal or CRT display. System is considerably simpler to use than helium leak detectors and allows rapid checks to be made as part of routine maintenance.

  10. Measuring Pinhole Leaks - A Novel Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunn, Carol Anne

    2009-01-01

    Both of the shuttle pads have one of these large liquid hydrogen tanks and the Shuttle program is currently using both pads. However, just recently, there has been increasing concerns over possible air leaks from the outside into the evacuated region. A method to detect leaks involving measuring the change in the boil-off rate of the liquid hydrogen in the tank.

  11. Determination of subjective similarity for pairs of masses and pairs of clustered microcalcifications on mammograms: Comparison of similarity ranking scores and absolute similarity ratings

    SciTech Connect

    Muramatsu, Chisako; Li Qiang; Schmidt, Robert A.; Shiraishi, Junji; Suzuki, Kenji; Newstead, Gillian M.; Doi, Kunio

    2007-07-15

    The presentation of images that are similar to that of an unknown lesion seen on a mammogram may be helpful for radiologists to correctly diagnose that lesion. For similar images to be useful, they must be quite similar from the radiologists' point of view. We have been trying to quantify the radiologists' impression of similarity for pairs of lesions and to establish a ''gold standard'' for development and evaluation of a computerized scheme for selecting such similar images. However, it is considered difficult to reliably and accurately determine similarity ratings, because they are subjective. In this study, we compared the subjective similarities obtained by two different methods, an absolute rating method and a 2-alternative forced-choice (2AFC) method, to demonstrate that reliable similarity ratings can be determined by the responses of a group of radiologists. The absolute similarity ratings were previously obtained for pairs of masses and pairs of microcalcifications from five and nine radiologists, respectively. In this study, similarity ranking scores for eight pairs of masses and eight pairs of microcalcifications were determined by use of the 2AFC method. In the first session, the eight pairs of masses and eight pairs of microcalcifications were grouped and compared separately for determining the similarity ranking scores. In the second session, another similarity ranking score was determined by use of mixed pairs, i.e., by comparison of the similarity of a mass pair with that of a calcification pair. Four pairs of masses and four pairs of microcalcifications were grouped together to create two sets of eight pairs. The average absolute similarity ratings and the average similarity ranking scores showed very good correlations in the first study (Pearson's correlation coefficients: 0.94 and 0.98 for masses and microcalcifications, respectively). Moreover, in the second study, the correlations between the absolute ratings and the ranking scores were also

  12. Detecting Methane Leaks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, W. B.; Hinkley, E. D.

    1984-01-01

    Remote sensor uses laser radiation backscattered from natural targets. He/Ne Laser System for remote scanning of Methane leaks employs topographic target to scatter light to receiver near laser transmitter. Apparatus powered by 1.5kW generator transported to field sites and pointed at suspected methane leaks. Used for remote detection of natural-gas leaks and locating methane emissions in landfill sites.

  13. Absolute Zero

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnelly, Russell J.; Sheibley, D.; Belloni, M.; Stamper-Kurn, D.; Vinen, W. F.

    2006-12-01

    Absolute Zero is a two hour PBS special attempting to bring to the general public some of the advances made in 400 years of thermodynamics. It is based on the book “Absolute Zero and the Conquest of Cold” by Tom Shachtman. Absolute Zero will call long-overdue attention to the remarkable strides that have been made in low-temperature physics, a field that has produced 27 Nobel Prizes. It will explore the ongoing interplay between science and technology through historical examples including refrigerators, ice machines, frozen foods, liquid oxygen and nitrogen as well as much colder fluids such as liquid hydrogen and liquid helium. A website has been established to promote the series: www.absolutezerocampaign.org. It contains information on the series, aimed primarily at students at the middle school level. There is a wealth of material here and we hope interested teachers will draw their student’s attention to this website and its substantial contents, which have been carefully vetted for accuracy.

  14. Recombination of W19 + ions with electrons: Absolute rate coefficients from a storage-ring experiment and from theoretical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badnell, N. R.; Spruck, K.; Krantz, C.; Novotný, O.; Becker, A.; Bernhardt, D.; Grieser, M.; Hahn, M.; Repnow, R.; Savin, D. W.; Wolf, A.; Müller, A.; Schippers, S.

    2016-05-01

    Experimentally measured and theoretically calculated rate coefficients for the recombination of W19 +([Kr ] 4 d10 4 f9 ) ions with free electrons (forming W18 +) are presented. At low electron-ion collision energies, the merged-beam rate coefficient is dominated by strong, mutually overlapping, recombination resonances as already found previously for the neighboring charge-state ions W18 + and W20 +. In the temperature range where W19 + is expected to form in a collisionally ionized plasma, the experimentally derived recombination rate coefficient deviates by up to a factor of about 20 from the theoretical rate coefficient obtained from the Atomic Data and Analysis Structure database. The present calculations, which employ a Breit-Wigner redistributive partitioning of autoionizing widths for dielectronic recombination via multi-electron resonances, reproduce the experimental findings over the entire temperature range.

  15. Absolute rate of the reaction of atomic hydrogen with ethylene from 198 to 320 K at high pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, J. H.; Michael, J. V.; Payne, W. A.; Stief, L. J.

    1978-01-01

    The rate constant for the H+C2H4 reaction has been measured as a function of temperature. Experiments were performed with high pressures of Ar heat bath gas at seven temperatures from 198 to 320 K with the flash photolysis-resonance fluorescence (FP-RF) technique. Pressures were chosen so as to isolate the addition rate constant k1. The results are well represented by an Arrhenius expression. The results are compared with other studies and are theoretically discussed.

  16. Absolute rate of the reaction of Cl(p-2) with molecular hydrogen from 200 - 500 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whytock, D. A.; Lee, J. H.; Michael, J. V.; Payne, W. A.; Stief, L. J.

    1976-01-01

    Rate constants for the reaction of atomic chlorine with hydrogen are measured from 200 - 500 K using the flash photolysis-resonance fluorescence technique. The results are compared with previous work and are discussed with particular reference to the equilibrium constant for the reaction and to relative rate data for chlorine atom reactions. Theoretical calculations, using the BEBO method with tunneling, give excellent agreement with experiment.

  17. Apparatus for detecting leaks

    DOEpatents

    Booth, Eugene T.

    1976-02-24

    A method and apparatus for determining the position of and estimating the size of leaks in an evacuating apparatus comprising the use of a testing gas such as helium or hydrogen flowing around said apparatus whereby the testing gas will be drawn in at the site of any leaks.

  18. Absolute Summ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Alfred, Jr.

    Summ means the entirety of the multiverse. It seems clear, from the inflation theories of A. Guth and others, that the creation of many universes is plausible. We argue that Absolute cosmological ideas, not unlike those of I. Newton, may be consistent with dynamic multiverse creations. As suggested in W. Heisenberg's uncertainty principle, and with the Anthropic Principle defended by S. Hawking, et al., human consciousness, buttressed by findings of neuroscience, may have to be considered in our models. Predictability, as A. Einstein realized with Invariants and General Relativity, may be required for new ideas to be part of physics. We present here a two postulate model geared to an Absolute Summ. The seedbed of this work is part of Akhnaton's philosophy (see S. Freud, Moses and Monotheism). Most important, however, is that the structure of human consciousness, manifest in Kenya's Rift Valley 200,000 years ago as Homo sapiens, who were the culmination of the six million year co-creation process of Hominins and Nature in Africa, allows us to do the physics that we do. .

  19. Absolute rate constant of the reaction OH + H2O2 yields HO2 + H2O from 245 to 423 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keyser, L. F.

    1980-01-01

    The absolute rate constant of the reaction between the hydroxyl radical and hydrogen peroxide was measured by using the discharge-flow resonance fluorescence technique at total pressure between 1 and 4 torr. At 298 K the result is (1.64 + or - 0.32) x 10 to the -12th cu cm/molecule s. The observed rate constant is independent of pressure, surface-to-volume ratio, the addition of vibrational quenchers, and the source of OH. The temperature dependence has also been determined between 245 and 423 K; the resulting Arrhenius expression is k cu cm/molecule s is equal to (2.51 + or - 0.6) x 10 to the -12th exp(-126 + or - 76/T).

  20. Leak detection aid

    DOEpatents

    Steeper, T.J.

    1989-12-26

    A leak detection apparatus and method for detecting leaks across an O-ring sealing a flanged surface to a mating surface is an improvement in a flanged surface comprising a shallow groove following O-ring in communication with an entrance and exit port intersecting the shallow groove for injecting and withdrawing, respectively, a leak detection fluid, such as helium. A small quantity of helium injected into the entrance port will flow to the shallow groove, past the O-ring and to the exit port. 2 figs.

  1. Leak detection aid

    DOEpatents

    Steeper, Timothy J.

    1989-01-01

    A leak detection apparatus and method for detecting leaks across an O-ring sealing a flanged surface to a mating surface is an improvement in a flanged surface comprising a shallow groove following O-ring in communication with an entrance and exit port intersecting the shallow groove for injecting and withdrawing, respectively, a leak detection fluid, such as helium. A small quantity of helium injected into the entrance port will flow to the shallow groove, past the O-ring and to the exit port.

  2. Blind Leak Detection for Closed Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oelgoetz, Peter; Johnson, Ricky; Todd, Douglas; Russell, Samuel; Walker, James

    2003-01-01

    exact leak source position to within a very small axial distance. Many of the factors that influence the inspectability of the nozzle are addressed; including pressure rate, peak pressure, gas type, ambient temperature and surface preparation. Other applications for this thermographic inspection system are the Reinforced-Carbon-Carbon (RCC) leading edge of the Space Shuttle orbiter and braze joint integrity.

  3. Absolute rate constants for O + NO + M /= He, Ne, Ar, Kr/ yields NO2 + M from 217-500 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michael, J. V.; Payne, W. A.; Whytock, D. A.

    1976-01-01

    Rate constants for the reaction O + NO + M yields NO2 + M have been obtained at temperatures from 217-500 K in four different rare gases by a method combining flash photolysis with time resolved detection of O(3-P) by resonance fluorescence. The measured rate constants in Arrhenius form are (10.8 plus or minus 1.2) x 10 to the -33rd exp(1040 plus or minus 60/1.987 T) for helium; (9.01 plus or minus 1.16) x 10 to the -33rd exp(1180 plus or minus 70/1.987 T) for argon; (9.33 plus or minus 1.10) x 10 to the -33rd exp(1030 plus or minus 60/1.987 T) for neon; and (9.52 plus or minus 1.10) x 10 to the -33rd exp(1140 plus or minus 70/1.987 T) for krypton in units of cm to the 6th/sq molecule/s.

  4. Detection of interstate liquids pipeline leaks: Feasibility evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Dietz, R.N.; Senum, G.I.

    1998-10-20

    The approximately 200,000-mile fuel pipeline system in the US operates at flow rates up to 2.5 {times} 10{sup 6} gallons per hour (GPH). Most commercial technologies only provide on-line leak detection at about 0.3% of flow rate, i.e., about 7,500 GPH or larger. Detection of leaks at about 1 GPH or so is desirable both from a regulatory and leak-prevention standpoint. Brookhaven`s commercially-accepted perfluorocarbon tracer (PFT) technology for underground leak detection of utility industry dielectric fluids at leak rates less than 0.1 GPH, with new enhancements, will be able to cost-effectively detect fuel pipeline system leaks to about 1 GPH--3 orders-of-magnitude better than any on-line system. The magnitude of detected leaks would be calculable as well. Proposed mobile surveys (such as those used periodically in the gas pipeline industry) at about 110 to 120 miles per day would allow such small leaks to be detected at 10-ppb tagging levels (less than $1,500 of PFT for a 48-hour tag at the maximum transport rate) under worst-case meteorological dispersion conditions. Smaller leaks could be detected by proportionately larger tagging concentrations. Leaks would be pinpointed by subsequent conventional barholing and vapor analyses. There are no health nor safety issues associated with the use of the proposed technological approach nor any consequential environmental impacts associated with the proposed magnitudes of PFT tagging.

  5. DETECTION OF INTERSTATE LIQUIDS PIPELINE LEAKS: FEASIBILITY EVALUATION.

    SciTech Connect

    DIETZ,R.N.

    1998-10-20

    The approximately 200,000-mile fuel pipeline system in the U.S. operates at flow rates up to 2.5 x 10{sup 6}gallons per hour (GPH). Most commercial technologies only provide on-line leak detection at about 0.3% of flow rate, i.e., about 7,500 GPH or larger. Detection of leaks at about 1 GPH or so is desirable both from a regulatory and leak-prevention standpoint. Brookhaven's commercially-accepted perfluorocarbon tracer (PFT) technology for underground leak detection of utility industry dielectric fluids at leak rates less than 0.1 GPH, with new enhancements, will be able to cost-effectively detect fuel pipeline system leaks to about 1 GPH--3 orders-of-magnitude better than any on-line system. The magnitude of detected leaks would be calculable as well. Proposed mobile surveys (such as those used periodically in the gas pipeline industry) at about 110 to 120 miles per day would allow such small leaks to be detected at 10-ppb tagging levels (less than $1,500 of PFT for a 48-hour tag at the maximum transport rate) under worst-case meteorological dispersion conditions. Smaller leaks could be detected by proportionately larger tagging concentrations. Leaks would be pinpointed by subsequent conventional barholing and vapor analyses. There are no health nor safety issues associated with the use of the proposed technological approach nor any consequential environmental impacts associated with the proposed magnitudes of PFT tagging.

  6. Optically based quantification of absolute cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) with high spatial resolution in rodents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaseen, Mohammad A.; Srinivasan, Vivek J.; Sakadžić, Sava; Vinogradov, Sergei A.; Boas, David A.

    2010-02-01

    Measuring oxygen delivery in brain tissue is important for identifying the pathophysiological changes associated with brain injury and various diseases such as cancer, stroke, and Alzheimer's disease. We have developed a multi-modal imaging system for minimally invasive measurement of cerebral oxygenation and blood flow in small animals with high spatial resolution. The system allows for simultaneous measurement of blood flow using Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography, and oxygen partial pressure (pO2) using either confocal or multiphoton phosphorescence lifetime imaging with exogenous porphyrin-based dyes sensitive to dissolved oxygen. Here we present the changes in pO2 and blood flow in superficial cortical vessels of Sprague Dawley rats in response to conditions such as hypoxia, hyperoxia, and functional stimulation. pO2 measurements display considerable heterogeneity over distances that cannot be resolved with more widely used oxygen-monitoring techniques such as BOLD-fMRI. Large increases in blood flow are observed in response to functional stimulation and hypoxia. Our system allows for quantification of cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) with high spatial resolution, providing a better understanding of metabolic dynamics during functional stimulation and under various neuropathologies. Ultimately, better insight into the underlying mechanisms of neuropathologies will facilitate the development of improved therapeutic strategies to minimize damage to brain tissue.

  7. Pressure dependence of the absolute rate constant for the reaction Cl + C2H2 from 210-361 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brunning, J.; Stief, L. J.

    1985-01-01

    In recent years, considerable attention has been given to the role of chlorine compounds in the catalytic destruction of stratospheric ozone. However, while some reactions have been studied extensively, the kinetic data for the reaction of Cl with C2H2 is sparse with only three known determinations of the rate constant k3. The reactions involved are Cl + C2H2 yields reversibly ClC2H2(asterisk) (3a) and ClC2H2(asterisk) + M yields ClC2H2 + M (3b). In the present study, flash photolysis coupled with chlorine atomic resonance fluorescence have been employed to determine the pressure and temperature dependence of k3 with the third body M = Ar. Room temperature values are also reported for M = N2. The pressure dependence observed in the experiments confirms the expectation that the reaction involves addition of Cl to the unsaturated C2H2 molecule followed by collisional stabilization of the resulting adduct radical.

  8. Improved gaseous leak detector

    DOEpatents

    Juravic, F.E. Jr.

    1983-10-06

    In a short path length mass-spectrometer type of helium leak detector wherein the helium trace gas is ionized, accelerated and deflected onto a particle counter, an arrangement is provided for converting the detector to neon leak detection. The magnetic field of the deflection system is lowered so as to bring the nonlinear fringe area of the magnetic field across the ion path, thereby increasing the amount of deflection of the heavier neon ions.

  9. Gaseous leak detector

    DOEpatents

    Juravic, Jr., Frank E.

    1988-01-01

    In a short path length mass-spectrometer type of helium leak detector wherein the helium trace gas is ionized, accelerated and deflected onto a particle counter, an arrangement is provided for converting the detector to neon leak detection. The magnetic field of the deflection system is lowered so as to bring the non linear fringe area of the magnetic field across the ion path, thereby increasing the amount of deflection of the heavier neon ions.

  10. Computerized leak training

    SciTech Connect

    Parella, C.; Monroe, A.

    1985-11-01

    Niagara Mohawk Power Corporation's computerized leak detection training system is discussed. The system is able to simulate gas leak situations by means of a computer. The training setup includes actual visual display via slides of houses represented on a plotting board; computer with plotter board in front that simulates an area and various leakage situations; a typical handheld CGI; and a control pad for the computer. The training system has filled a valuable need in the area of emergency training.

  11. Low Level Leaks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    NASA has transferred the improved portable leak detector technology to UE Systems, Inc.. This instrument was developed to detect leaks in fluid systems of critical launch and ground support equipment. This system incorporates innovative electronic circuitry, improved transducers, collecting horns, and contact sensors that provide a much higher degree of reliability, sensitivity and versatility over previously used systems. Potential commercial uses are pipelines, underground utilities, air-conditioning systems, petrochemical systems, aerospace, power transmission lines and medical devices.

  12. WRSS jumper leak assessment

    SciTech Connect

    BAILEY, J.W.

    1999-06-23

    The purpose of this assessment is: (1) to assemble and document the facts associated with three recently installed jumpers which have leaked either during actual process operation or during post installation testing; (2) to describe the corrective actions taken and to identify any process improvements which need to be implemented in the Hanford jumper design and installation activities; and (3) to document WRSS jumper leak lessons learned for use by future projects and other jumper design, fabrication, and installation activities.

  13. Leak Testing and Implications of Operations to Locate Leak Horizons at West Hackberry Well 108

    SciTech Connect

    SATTLER, ALLAN R.; EHGARTNER, BRIAN L.; PIECHOCKI, ALAN

    2002-06-01

    The Strategic Petroleum Reserve site at West Hackberry, Louisiana has historically experienced casing leaks. Numerous West Hackberry oil storage caverns have wells exhibiting communication between the interior 10 3/4 x 20-inch (oil) annulus and the ''outer cemented'' 20 x 26-inch annulus. Well 108 in Cavern 108 exhibits this behavior. It is thought that one, if not the primary, cause of this communication is casing thread leaks at the 20-inch casing joints combined with microannuli along the cement casing interfaces and other cracks/flaws in the cemented 20 x 26-inch annulus. An operation consisting of a series of nitrogen leak tests, similar to cavern integrity tests, was performed on Cavern 108 in an effort to determine the leak horizons and to see if these leak horizons coincided with those of casing joints. Certain leaky, threaded casing joints were identified between 400 and 1500 feet. A new leak detection procedure was developed as a result of this test, and this methodology for identifying and interpreting such casing joint leaks is presented in this report. Analysis of the test data showed that individual joint leaks could be successfully identified, but not without some degree of ambiguity. This ambiguity is attributed to changes in the fluid content of the leak path (nitrogen forcing out oil) and possibly to very plausible changes in characteristics of the flow path during the test. These changes dominated the test response and made the identification of individual leak horizons difficult. One consequence of concern from the testing was a progressive increase in the leak rate measured during testing due to nitrogen cleaning small amounts of oil out of the leak paths and very likely due to the changes of the leak path during the flow test. Therefore, careful consideration must be given before attempting similar tests. Although such leaks have caused no known environmental or economic problems to date, the leaks may be significant because of the potential

  14. Absolute level-to-level rate constants for inelastic collisions and exchange reactions in lithium + gaseous lithium(v,j) going to gaseous lithium(v',j') + lithium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coppage, Steven Danforth

    We report 644 absolute level-to-level inelastic and reactive constants for the L7i*2 A1S+u (nui, ji) + 7Li → L7i*2 A1S+u (nu', j') + 7Li system with initial molecular quantum numbers nui = 2 and ji = 3, 11, and 19. We collected 87 rate constants for rotationally inelastic and vibrationally elastic collisions, 281 rate constants for vibrationally inelastic collisions, and 276 constants for exchange reactions with final vibrational levels from nu f = 0 to nuf = 3. Inelastic collisions are characterized by even changes in rotational quantum number, j , and exchange reactions are identified by odd Deltaj. Level-to-level rate constants for even Deltaj inelastic collisions show distributions similar to those in rare gas collisions with the excited Li2 molecule. The ECS (energy corrected sudden) scaling law of DePristo, et al., fit the vibrationally elastic data well. Reactive rate constant results are characterized by a statistical distribution for Deltanu of 0, -1, and -2 at a substantially reduced effective temperature consistent with a kinematic model proposed by Picconatto et al. Fitting quasiclassical trajectory studies to the data using a modified LEPS potential surface provide first insights into the parameters of the excited-state Li3* three-body potential.

  15. Leaking chaotic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altmann, Eduardo G.; Portela, Jefferson S. E.; Tél, Tamás

    2013-04-01

    There are numerous physical situations in which a hole or leak is introduced in an otherwise closed chaotic system. The leak can have a natural origin, it can mimic measurement devices, and it can also be used to reveal dynamical properties of the closed system. A unified treatment of leaking systems is provided and applications to different physical problems, in both the classical and quantum pictures, are reviewed. The treatment is based on the transient chaos theory of open systems, which is essential because real leaks have finite size and therefore estimations based on the closed system differ essentially from observations. The field of applications reviewed is very broad, ranging from planetary astronomy and hydrodynamical flows to plasma physics and quantum fidelity. The theory is expanded and adapted to the case of partial leaks (partial absorption and/or transmission) with applications to room acoustics and optical microcavities in mind. Simulations in the limaçon family of billiards illustrate the main text. Regarding billiard dynamics, it is emphasized that a correct discrete-time representation can be given only in terms of the so-called true-time maps, while traditional Poincaré maps lead to erroneous results. Perron-Frobenius-type operators are generalized so that they describe true-time maps with partial leaks.

  16. Leaks in pipe networks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pudar, Ranko S.; Liggett, James A.

    1992-01-01

    Leak detection in water-distribution systems can be accomplished by solving an inverse problem using measurements of pressure and/or flow. The problem is formulated with equivalent orifice areas of possible leaks as the unknowns. Minimization of the difference between measured and calculated heads produces a solution for the areas. The quality of the result depends on number and location of the measurements. A sensitivity matrix is key to deciding where to make measurements. Both location and magnitude of leaks are sensitive to the quantity and quality of pressure measurements and to how well the pipe friction parameters are known. The overdetermined problem (more measurements than suspected leaks) gives the best results, but some information can be derived from the underdetermined problem. The variance of leak areas, based on the quality of system characteristics and pressure data, indicates the likely accuracy of the results. The method will not substitute for more traditional leak surveys but can serve as a guide and supplement.

  17. Single-Shell Tanks Leak Integrity Elements/ SX Farm Leak Causes and Locations - 12127

    SciTech Connect

    Girardot, Crystal; Harlow, Don; Venetz, Theodore; Washenfelder, Dennis; Johnson, Jeremy

    2012-07-01

    leak detection. In-tank parameters can include temperature of the supernatant and sludge, types of waste, and chemical determination by either transfer or sample analysis. Ex-tank information can be assembled from many sources including design media, construction conditions, technical specifications, and other sources. Five conditions may have contributed to SX Farm tank liner failure including: tank design, thermal shock, chemistry-corrosion, liner behavior (bulging), and construction temperature. Tank design did not apparently change from tank to tank for the SX Farm tanks; however, there could be many unknown variables present in the quality of materials and quality of construction. Several significant SX Farm tank design changes occurred from previous successful tank farm designs. Tank construction occurred in winter under cold conditions which could have affected the ductile to brittle transition temperature of the tanks. The SX Farm tanks received high temperature boiling waste from REDOX which challenged the tank design with rapid heat up and high temperatures. All eight of the leaking SX Farm tanks had relatively high rate of temperature rise. Supernatant removal with subsequent nitrate leaching was conducted in all but three of the eight leaking tanks prior to leaks being detected. It is possible that no one characteristic of the SX Farm tanks could in isolation from the others have resulted in failure. However, the application of so many stressors - heat up rate, high temperature, loss of corrosion protection, and tank design working jointly or serially resulted in their failure. Thermal shock coupled with the tank design, construction conditions, and nitrate leaching seem to be the overriding factors that can lead to tank liner failure. The distinction between leaking and sound SX Farm tanks seems to center on the waste types, thermal conditions, and nitrate leaching. (authors)

  18. SINGLE-SHELL TANKS LEAK INTEGRITY ELEMENTS/SX FARM LEAK CAUSES AND LOCATIONS - 12127

    SciTech Connect

    VENETZ TJ; WASHENFELDER D; JOHNSON J; GIRARDOT C

    2012-01-25

    leak detection. In-tank parameters can include temperature of the supernatant and sludge, types of waste, and chemical determination by either transfer or sample analysis. Ex-tank information can be assembled from many sources including design media, construction conditions, technical specifications, and other sources. Five conditions may have contributed to SX Farm tank liner failure including: tank design, thermal shock, chemistry-corrosion, liner behavior (bulging), and construction temperature. Tank design did not apparently change from tank to tank for the SX Farm tanks; however, there could be many unknown variables present in the quality of materials and quality of construction. Several significant SX Farm tank design changes occurred from previous successful tank farm designs. Tank construction occurred in winter under cold conditions which could have affected the ductile to brittle transition temperature of the tanks. The SX Farm tanks received high temperature boiling waste from REDOX which challenged the tank design with rapid heat up and high temperatures. All eight of the leaking SX Farm tanks had relatively high rate of temperature rise. Supernatant removal with subsequent nitrate leaching was conducted in all but three of the eight leaking tanks prior to leaks being detected. It is possible that no one characteristic of the SX Farm tanks could in isolation from the others have resulted in failure. However, the application of so many stressors - heat up rate, high temperature, loss of corrosion protection, and tank design - working jointly or serially resulted in their failure. Thermal shock coupled with the tank design, construction conditions, and nitrate leaching seem to be the overriding factors that can lead to tank liner failure. The distinction between leaking and sound SX Farm tanks seems to center on the waste types, thermal conditions, and nitrate leaching.

  19. Ammonia Leak Locator Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dodge, Franklin T.; Wuest, Martin P.; Deffenbaugh, Danny M.

    1995-01-01

    The thermal control system of International Space Station Alpha will use liquid ammonia as the heat exchange fluid. It is expected that small leaks (of the order perhaps of one pound of ammonia per day) may develop in the lines transporting the ammonia to the various facilities as well as in the heat exchange equipment. Such leaks must be detected and located before the supply of ammonia becomes critically low. For that reason, NASA-JSC has a program underway to evaluate instruments that can detect and locate ultra-small concentrations of ammonia in a high vacuum environment. To be useful, the instrument must be portable and small enough that an astronaut can easily handle it during extravehicular activity. An additional complication in the design of the instrument is that the environment immediately surrounding ISSA will contain small concentrations of many other gases from venting of onboard experiments as well as from other kinds of leaks. These other vapors include water, cabin air, CO2, CO, argon, N2, and ethylene glycol. Altogether, this local environment might have a pressure of the order of 10(exp -7) to 10(exp -6) torr. Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) was contracted by NASA-JSC to provide support to NASA-JSC and its prime contractors in evaluating ammonia-location instruments and to make a preliminary trade study of the advantages and limitations of potential instruments. The present effort builds upon an earlier SwRI study to evaluate ammonia leak detection instruments [Jolly and Deffenbaugh]. The objectives of the present effort include: (1) Estimate the characteristics of representative ammonia leaks; (2) Evaluate the baseline instrument in the light of the estimated ammonia leak characteristics; (3) Propose alternative instrument concepts; and (4) Conduct a trade study of the proposed alternative concepts and recommend promising instruments. The baseline leak-location instrument selected by NASA-JSC was an ion gauge.

  20. Assessment of historical leak model methodology as applied to the REDOX high-level waste tank SX-108

    SciTech Connect

    JONES, T.E.

    1999-09-22

    Using the Historical Leak Model approach, the estimated leak rate (and therefore, projected leak volume) for Tank 241-SX-108 could not be reproduced using the data included in the initial document describing the leak methodology. An analysis of parameters impacting tank heat load calculations strongly suggest that the historical tank operating data lack the precision and accuracy required to estimate tank leak volumes using the Historical Leak Model methodology.

  1. Primary Spontaneous Cerebrospinal Fluid Leaks and Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Pérez, Mario A.; Bialer, Omer Y.; Bruce, Beau B.; Newman, Nancy J.; Biousse, Valérie

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is increasingly recognized as a cause of spontaneous cerebrospinal (CSF) leak in the ENT and neurosurgical literature. The diagnosis of IIH in patients with spontaneous CSF leaks is classically made a few weeks after surgical repair of the CSF leak when symptoms and signs of elevated intracranial pressure (ICP) appear. Methods Case reports and literature review. Two young obese women developed spontaneous CSF rhinorrhea related to an empty sella in one, and a cribriform plate encephalocele in the other. Both patients underwent surgical repair of the CSF leak. A few weeks later, they developed chronic headaches and bilateral papilledema. Lumbar punctures showed elevated CSF-opening pressures with normal CSF contents, with temporary improvement of headaches. A man with a three-year history of untreated IIH developed spontaneous CSF rhinorrhea. He experienced improvement of his headaches and papilledema after a CSF shunting procedure, and the rhinorrhea resolved after endoscopic repair of the leak. Results These cases and the literature review confirm a definite association between IIH and spontaneous CSF leak based on: 1) similar demographics; 2) increased ICP in some patients with spontaneous CSF leak after leak repair; 3) higher rate of leak recurrence in patients with raised ICP; 4) patients with intracranial hypertension secondary to tumors may develop CSF leak, confirming that raised ICP from other causes than IIH can cause CSF leak. Conclusions CSF leak may occasionally keep IIH patients symptom-free; however, classic symptoms and signs of intracranial hypertension may develop after the CSF leak is repaired, exposing these patients to a high risk of recurrence of the leak unless an ICP-lowering intervention is performed. PMID:24042170

  2. Gas Leak from Vinyl Taped Stainless Steel Dressing Jars

    SciTech Connect

    Tim Hayes

    1999-03-01

    The leak rates of nitrogen gas from stainless steel dressing jars taped with 2 inch vinyl tape were measured. These results were used to calculate hydrogen leak rates from the same jars. The calculations show that the maximum concentration of hydrogen buildup in this type of container configuration will beat least 3 orders of magnitude below the lower explosion limit for hydrogen in air.

  3. Long-life leak standard assembly. [Patent application

    DOEpatents

    Basford, J.A.; Mathis, J.E.; Wright, H.C.

    1980-11-12

    The present invention is directed to a portable leak standard assembly which is capable of providing a stream of high-purity reference gas at a virtually constant flow rate over an extensive period of time. The leak assembly comprises a high pressure reservoir coupled to a metal leak valve through a valve-controlled conduit. A reproducible leak valve useful in this assembly is provided by a metal tube crimped with a selected pressure loading for forming an orifice in the tube with this orifice being of a sufficient size to provide the selected flow rate. The leak valve assembly is formed of metal so that it can be baked-out in a vacuum furnace to rid the reservoir and attendent components of volatile impurities which reduce the efficiency of the leak standard.

  4. A full-dimensional model of ozone forming reaction: the absolute value of the recombination rate coefficient, its pressure and temperature dependencies.

    PubMed

    Teplukhin, Alexander; Babikov, Dmitri

    2016-07-28

    Rigorous calculations of scattering resonances in ozone are carried out for a broad range of rotational excitations. The accurate potential energy surface of Dawes is adopted, and a new efficient method for calculations of ro-vibrational energies, wave functions and resonance lifetimes is employed (which uses hyper-spherical coordinates, the sequential diagonalization/truncation approach, grid optimization and complex absorbing potential). A detailed analysis is carried out to characterize distributions of resonance energies and lifetimes, their rotational/vibrational content and their positions with respect to the centrifugal barrier. Emphasis is on the contribution of these resonances to the recombination process that forms ozone. It is found that major contributions come from localized resonances at energies near the top of the barrier. Delocalized resonances at higher energies should also be taken into account, while very narrow resonances at low energies (trapped far behind the centrifugal barrier) should be treated as bound states. The absolute value of the recombination rate coefficient, its pressure and temperature dependencies are obtained using the energy-transfer model developed in the earlier work. Good agreement with experimental data is obtained if one follows the suggestion of Troe, who argued that the energy transfer mechanism of recombination is responsible only for 55% of the recombination rate (with the remaining 45% coming from the competing chaperon mechanism). PMID:27364351

  5. Use of a steam leak simulator in EBR-II

    SciTech Connect

    McKee, J.M.; Osterhout, M.M. Batten, R.L.

    1984-01-01

    A steam leak simulator has been installed on EBR-II to periodically test and calibrate the steam-generator leak detection system. Measured amounts of molten anhydrous sodium hydroxide are injected at controlled rates simulating leaks in the range of 0.024 to 0.16 g H/sub 2/O/s. Experience with 11 injections over an 18 month period is described.

  6. SEALING SIMULATED LEAKS

    SciTech Connect

    Michael A. Romano

    2004-09-01

    This report details the testing equipment, procedures and results performed under Task 7.2 Sealing Simulated Leaks. In terms of our ability to seal leaks identified in the technical topical report, Analysis of Current Field Data, we were 100% successful. In regards to maintaining seal integrity after pigging operations we achieved varying degrees of success. Internal Corrosion defects proved to be the most resistant to the effects of pigging while External Corrosion proved to be the least resistant. Overall, with limitations, pressure activated sealant technology would be a viable option under the right circumstances.

  7. Absolute Determination for the Sodium-22(p,gamma)Magnesium-23 Reaction Rate: Consequences for Nucleosynthesis of Sodium-22 in Novae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sallaska, Anne L.

    2010-11-01

    Hydrodynamic simulations of classical novae on ONe white dwarfs predict substantial production of 22Na. Observation of 22Na decay should be correlated with the corresponding nova because the half life of 22Na is only 2.6 years. The 1275-keV gamma ray from the beta decay of 22Na is, therefore, an excellent diagnostic for the nova phenomenon and a long-sought target of gamma-ray telescopes. Nova simulations determine the maximum 22Na-detection distance to be < 1 kpc for the INTEGRAL spectrometer SPI, consistent with its non-observation to date. However, model estimates are strongly dependent on the thermonuclear rate of the 22Na(p, gamma)23Mg reaction, which is the main destruction mechanism of 22Na in novae. The 22Na(p,gamma)23Mg rate is expected to be dominated by narrow, isolated resonances with Ep < 300 key. The currently employed rate is based on a single set of absolute resonance-strength measurements with Ep ≥ 290 keV, and one relative measurement of resonances with Ep ≥ 214 keV. Recently, a new level has been found in 23Mg which would correspond to a resonance at Ep = 198 keV that might dominate the reaction rate at nova temperatures. We have measured the 22Na(p, gamma) 23Mg resonance strengths directly and absolutely, in addition to resonance energies and branches. Proton beams were produced at the University of Washington and delivered to a specially designed beam line that included rastering and cold vacuum protection of the 22Na-implanted targets (fabricated at TRIUMF-ISAC). Two high-purity germanium detectors were employed and surrounded by anticoincidence shields to reduce cosmic backgrounds. Measurements were made on known 22Na+p resonances, which we observed at laboratory energies Ep = 213, 288, 454, 610 keV and on proposed resonances at Ep = 198, 209, and 232 key. The proposed resonances were not observed, and the upper limit placed on the 198-keV resonance strength indicates that the resonance at Ep = 213 keV still dominates the reaction rate

  8. Sensitive hydrogen leak detector

    DOEpatents

    Myneni, G.R.

    1999-08-03

    A sensitive hydrogen leak detector system is described which uses passivation of a stainless steel vacuum chamber for low hydrogen outgassing, a high compression ratio vacuum system, a getter operating at 77.5 K and a residual gas analyzer as a quantitative hydrogen sensor. 1 fig.

  9. Refrigerant leak detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byrne, E. J.

    1979-01-01

    Quantitative leak detector visually demonstrates refrigerant loss from precision volume of large refrigeration system over established period of time from single test point. Mechanical unit is less costly than electronic "sniffers" and is more reliable due to absence of electronic circuits that are susceptible to drift.

  10. Sensitive hydrogen leak detector

    DOEpatents

    Myneni, Ganapati Rao

    1999-01-01

    A sensitive hydrogen leak detector system using passivation of a stainless steel vacuum chamber for low hydrogen outgassing, a high compression ratio vacuum system, a getter operating at 77.5 K and a residual gas analyzer as a quantitative hydrogen sensor.

  11. Margins in high temperature leak-before-break assessments

    SciTech Connect

    Budden, P.J.; Hooton, D.G.

    1997-04-01

    Developments in the defect assessment procedure R6 to include high-temperature mechanisms in Leak-before-Break arguments are described. In particular, the effect of creep on the time available to detect a leak and on the crack opening area, and hence leak rate, is discussed. The competing influence of these two effects is emphasized by an example. The application to Leak-before-Break of the time-dependent failure assessment diagram approach for high temperature defect assessment is then outlined. The approach is shown to be of use in assessing the erosion of margins by creep.

  12. Intelligent Leak Detection System

    2014-10-27

    apability of underground carbon dioxide storage to confine and sustain injected CO2 for a very long time is the main concern for geologic CO2 sequestration. If a leakage from a geological CO2 sequestration site occurs, it is crucial to find the approximate amount and the location of the leak in order to implement proper remediation activity. An overwhelming majority of research and development for storage site monitoring has been concentrated on atmospheric, surface or nearmore » surface monitoring of the sequestered CO2. This study aims to monitor the integrity of CO2 storage at the reservoir level. This work proposes developing in-situ CO2 Monitoring and Verification technology based on the implementation of Permanent Down-hole Gauges (PDG) or “Smart Wells” along with Artificial Intelligence and Data Mining (AI&DM). The technology attempts to identify the characteristics of the CO2 leakage by de-convolving the pressure signals collected from Permanent Down-hole Gauges (PDG). Citronelle field, a saline aquifer reservoir, located in the U.S. was considered for this study. A reservoir simulation model for CO2 sequestration in the Citronelle field was developed and history matched. The presence of the PDGs were considered in the reservoir model at the injection well and an observation well. High frequency pressure data from sensors were collected based on different synthetic CO2 leakage scenarios in the model. Due to complexity of the pressure signal behaviors, a Machine Learning-based technology was introduced to build an Intelligent Leakage Detection System (ILDS). The ILDS was able to detect leakage characteristics in a short period of time (less than a day) demonstrating the capability of the system in quantifying leakage characteristics subject to complex rate behaviors. The performance of ILDS was examined under different conditions such as multiple well leakages, cap rock leakage, availability of an additional monitoring well, presence of pressure drift

  13. Intelligent Leak Detection System

    SciTech Connect

    Mohaghegh, Shahab D.

    2014-10-27

    apability of underground carbon dioxide storage to confine and sustain injected CO2 for a very long time is the main concern for geologic CO2 sequestration. If a leakage from a geological CO2 sequestration site occurs, it is crucial to find the approximate amount and the location of the leak in order to implement proper remediation activity. An overwhelming majority of research and development for storage site monitoring has been concentrated on atmospheric, surface or near surface monitoring of the sequestered CO2. This study aims to monitor the integrity of CO2 storage at the reservoir level. This work proposes developing in-situ CO2 Monitoring and Verification technology based on the implementation of Permanent Down-hole Gauges (PDG) or “Smart Wells” along with Artificial Intelligence and Data Mining (AI&DM). The technology attempts to identify the characteristics of the CO2 leakage by de-convolving the pressure signals collected from Permanent Down-hole Gauges (PDG). Citronelle field, a saline aquifer reservoir, located in the U.S. was considered for this study. A reservoir simulation model for CO2 sequestration in the Citronelle field was developed and history matched. The presence of the PDGs were considered in the reservoir model at the injection well and an observation well. High frequency pressure data from sensors were collected based on different synthetic CO2 leakage scenarios in the model. Due to complexity of the pressure signal behaviors, a Machine Learning-based technology was introduced to build an Intelligent Leakage Detection System (ILDS). The ILDS was able to detect leakage characteristics in a short period of time (less than a day) demonstrating the capability of the system in quantifying leakage characteristics subject to complex rate behaviors. The performance of ILDS was examined under different conditions such as multiple well leakages, cap rock leakage, availability of an additional monitoring well, presence of pressure drift and noise

  14. Improved Portable Ultrasonic Leak Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Youngquist, Robert C.; Moerk, John S.; Haskell, William D.; Cox, Robert B.; Polk, Jimmy D.; Strobel, James P.; Luaces, Frank

    1995-01-01

    Improved portable ultrasonic leak detector features three interchangeable ultrasonic-transducer modules, each suited for operation in unique noncontact or contact mode. One module equipped with ultrasound-collecting horn for use in scanning to detect leaks from distance; horn provides directional sensitivity pattern with sensitivity multiplied by factor of about 6 in forward direction. Another module similar, does not include horn; this module used for scanning close to suspected leak, where proximity of leak more than offsets loss of sensitivity occasioned by lack of horn. Third module designed to be pressed against leaking vessel; includes rugged stainless-steel shell. Improved detectors perform significantly better, smaller, more rugged, and greater sensitivity.

  15. Automated hydrostatic testing for pipeline leaks

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, B. ); Musilli, M. )

    1994-11-01

    Leaks in pipelines carrying such products as crude oil and crude oil by-products lead not only to loss of product, but present the prospect of blowouts in the future that can cause millions of dollars in property damage and costly EPA-mandated cleanups. These leaks are considered sufficiently serious that the US Department of Transportation, which is charged with regulating the safety of pipelines throughout the country, may at times require pipeline operators to hydrostatically test their pipelines. One fully automated pipeline leak locating method based on computer analysis of dynamic pressure signals uses three IBM-compatible personal computers and two 16-channel high-speed analog-to-digital interfaces. The system detects leaks by means of dynamic pressure changes sampled at a high rate and locates them precisely by means of pressure signal velocity. In this way, leaks as small as 3--13mm (0.125--0.5 in.) can be located with an accuracy of a single pipe length in a pipeline section of 160 km (100 mi). This article describes the instrumentation needed and the test procedure used.

  16. Single-Shell Tank Leak Integrity Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Harlow, D. G.; Girardot, C. L.; Venetz, T. J.

    2015-03-26

    This document summarizes and evaluates the information in the Hanford Tri-Party Agreement Interim Milestone M-045-91F Targets completed between 2010 and 2015. 1) Common factors of SST liner failures (M-045-91F-T02), 2) the feasibility of testing for ionic conductivity between the inside and outside of SSTs (M-045-91F-T03, and 3) the causes, locations, and rates of leaks from leaking SSTs (M-045-91F-T04).

  17. Leaking underground storage tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Dowd, R.M.

    1984-10-01

    The problems associated with leaking underground storage tanks are discussed. An estimated 10-30% of the 3.5 million or more underground tanks now used to store petroleum products and other liquids may be leaking their contents to the surrounding environment. The EPA is initiating a national field survey of tanks used for the storing of engine fuels. The first phase of the survey will cover a representative sample of 1050 facilities and approximately 2800 tanks. EPA will analyze the questionnaires and then select a sub-sample of about 500 tanks to examine leakage problems in more detail. In the absence of specific groundwater protection legislation or regulation, EPA is planning to use the Toxic Substances Control Act to regulate underground tanks.

  18. Natural gas leak mapper

    DOEpatents

    Reichardt, Thomas A.; Luong, Amy Khai; Kulp, Thomas J.; Devdas, Sanjay

    2008-05-20

    A system is described that is suitable for use in determining the location of leaks of gases having a background concentration. The system is a point-wise backscatter absorption gas measurement system that measures absorption and distance to each point of an image. The absorption measurement provides an indication of the total amount of a gas of interest, and the distance provides an estimate of the background concentration of gas. The distance is measured from the time-of-flight of laser pulse that is generated along with the absorption measurement light. The measurements are formated into an image of the presence of gas in excess of the background. Alternatively, an image of the scene is superimosed on the image of the gas to aid in locating leaks. By further modeling excess gas as a plume having a known concentration profile, the present system provides an estimate of the maximum concentration of the gas of interest.

  19. Hazardous fluid leak detector

    DOEpatents

    Gray, Harold E.; McLaurin, Felder M.; Ortiz, Monico; Huth, William A.

    1996-01-01

    A device or system for monitoring for the presence of leaks from a hazardous fluid is disclosed which uses two electrodes immersed in deionized water. A gas is passed through an enclosed space in which a hazardous fluid is contained. Any fumes, vapors, etc. escaping from the containment of the hazardous fluid in the enclosed space are entrained in the gas passing through the enclosed space and transported to a closed vessel containing deionized water and two electrodes partially immersed in the deionized water. The electrodes are connected in series with a power source and a signal, whereby when a sufficient number of ions enter the water from the gas being bubbled through it (indicative of a leak), the water will begin to conduct, thereby allowing current to flow through the water from one electrode to the other electrode to complete the circuit and activate the signal.

  20. Aspects of leak detection

    SciTech Connect

    Chivers, T.C.

    1997-04-01

    A requirement of a Leak before Break safety case is that the leakage from the through wall crack be detected prior to any growth leading to unacceptable failure. This paper sets out to review some recent developments in this field. It does not set out to be a comprehensive guide to all of the methods available. The discussion concentrates on acoustic emission and how the techniques can be qualified and deployed on operational plant.

  1. Vacuum leak detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazokas, G. P. (Inventor)

    1975-01-01

    A leak detector for use with high vacuum seals as used in feedthroughs and hatch covers for manned spacecraft and vacuum systems is described. Two thermistors are used, one exposed directly to vacuum and the other exposed to a secondary chamber formed by the seal being monitored and a second auxiliary seal. Leakage into the secondary chamber causes an unbalance of an electrical bridge circuit in which the thermistors are connected.

  2. Reliability evaluation of the Savannah River reactor leak detection system

    SciTech Connect

    Daugherty, W.L.; Sindelar, R.L. ); Wallace, I.T. )

    1991-01-01

    The Savannah River Reactors have been in operation since the mid-1950's. The primary degradation mode for the primary coolant loop piping is intergranular stress corrosion cracking. The leak-before-break (LBB) capability of the primary system piping has been demonstrated as part of an overall structural integrity evaluation. One element of the LBB analyses is a reliability evaluation of the leak detection system. The most sensitive element of the leak detection system is the airborne tritium monitors. The presence of small amounts of tritium in the heavy water coolant provide the basis for a very sensitive system of leak detection. The reliability of the tritium monitors to properly identify a crack leaking at a rate of either 50 or 300 lb/day (0.004 or 0.023 gpm, respectively) has been characterized. These leak rates correspond to action points for which specific operator actions are required. High reliability has been demonstrated using standard fault tree techniques. The probability of not detecting a leak within an assumed mission time of 24 hours is estimated to be approximately 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} per demand. This result is obtained for both leak rates considered. The methodology and assumptions used to obtain this result are described in this paper. 3 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  3. Teaching Absolute Value Meaningfully

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wade, Angela

    2012-01-01

    What is the meaning of absolute value? And why do teachers teach students how to solve absolute value equations? Absolute value is a concept introduced in first-year algebra and then reinforced in later courses. Various authors have suggested instructional methods for teaching absolute value to high school students (Wei 2005; Stallings-Roberts…

  4. Validation of absolute axial neutron flux distribution calculations with MCNP with 197Au(n,γ)198Au reaction rate distribution measurements at the JSI TRIGA Mark II reactor.

    PubMed

    Radulović, Vladimir; Štancar, Žiga; Snoj, Luka; Trkov, Andrej

    2014-02-01

    The calculation of axial neutron flux distributions with the MCNP code at the JSI TRIGA Mark II reactor has been validated with experimental measurements of the (197)Au(n,γ)(198)Au reaction rate. The calculated absolute reaction rate values, scaled according to the reactor power and corrected for the flux redistribution effect, are in good agreement with the experimental results. The effect of different cross-section libraries on the calculations has been investigated and shown to be minor. PMID:24316530

  5. Assessment of Remote Sensing Technologies for Location of Hydrogen and Helium Leaks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sellar, R. Glenn; Wang, Danli

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this initial phase of this research effort is to: 1) Evaluate remote sensing technologies for location of leaks of gaseous molecular hydrogen (H2) and gaseous helium (He) in air, for space transportation applications; and 2) Develop a diffusion model that predicts concentration of H2 or He gas as a function of leak rate and distance from the leak.

  6. Leak test fitting

    DOEpatents

    Pickett, P.T.

    A hollow fitting for use in gas spectrometry leak testing of conduit joints is divided into two generally symmetrical halves along the axis of the conduit. A clip may quickly and easily fasten and unfasten the halves around the conduit joint under test. Each end of the fitting is sealable with a yieldable material, such as a piece of foam rubber. An orifice is provided in a wall of the fitting for the insertion or detection of helium during testing. One half of the fitting also may be employed to test joints mounted against a surface.

  7. Leak test fitting

    DOEpatents

    Pickett, Patrick T.

    1981-01-01

    A hollow fitting for use in gas spectrometry leak testing of conduit joints is divided into two generally symmetrical halves along the axis of the conduit. A clip may quickly and easily fasten and unfasten the halves around the conduit joint under test. Each end of the fitting is sealable with a yieldable material, such as a piece of foam rubber. An orifice is provided in a wall of the fitting for the insertion or detection of helium during testing. One half of the fitting also may be employed to test joints mounted against a surface.

  8. Variable leak gas source

    DOEpatents

    Henderson, Timothy M.; Wuttke, Gilbert H.

    1977-01-01

    A variable leak gas source and a method for obtaining the same which includes filling a quantity of hollow glass micro-spheres with a gas, storing said quantity in a confined chamber having a controllable outlet, heating said chamber above room temperature, and controlling the temperature of said chamber to control the quantity of gas passing out of said controllable outlet. Individual gas filled spheres may be utilized for calibration purposes by breaking a sphere having a known quantity of a known gas to calibrate a gas detection apparatus.

  9. 105 K-West isolation barrier leak recovery plan

    SciTech Connect

    Wiborg, J.C.

    1995-03-02

    Leak testing is being performed in 105 KW to verify the performance of the isolation barriers which have been recently installed. When an 11 inch differential head is established between the main basin and the discharge chute, a leak-rate of approximately 30 - 35 gpm is observed. The leak-rate would be achieved by a 1.65`` - 2`` diameter hole (or equivalent). Analyses suggest that the flow is turbulent/laminar transitional (dominantly turbulent), which would be indicative of a single point leak, typical of a pipe or large opening. However, local vortex rotation is observed in the entry to the West transfer chute while no observable motion was seen in the East transfer chute: this may be an indication of seal leakage in the East isolation barrier. The potential for leakage had been considered during the design and field work planning stages. Review of potential leak detection technologies had been made; at the planning stage it was determined that location specific leak detection could be established relatively quickly, applying existing K Basins technology (dye or ultrasonics). The decision was made not to pre-stage leak detection since the equipment development is highly dependent on the nature and location of the leak, and the characteristics of the leak rate provides data which guides leak characterization technology. The expense could be deferred and potentially avoided without risk to critical path activity. Consistent with the above, a systematic recovery plan has been developed utilizing phased activities to provide for management discipline combined with timely diagnosis and correction. Because this activity is not critical path at this time, activities will be coordinated with other plant activity to optimize overall plant work. Particular care will be exercised in assuring that information gained from this recovery can be utilized in the more critical work in 105 KE.

  10. Catheter-based treatment of paravalvular leaks.

    PubMed

    Taramasso, Maurizio; Maisano, Francesco; Pozzoli, Alberto; Alfieri, Ottavio; Meier, Bernhard; Nietlispach, Fabian

    2016-05-17

    The incidence of paravalvular leaks after surgical valve replacement is estimated to be 2-17%. Paravalvular leaks (PVL) can be asymptomatic and not require treatment or can cause haemolysis or heart failure. If symptomatic or if the severity of the leak is moderate or severe, redo surgery is a therapeutic option, but this is accompanied by a high perioperative risk and a high recurrence rate. A lower risk alternative is percutaneous PVL closure, with a 1-2% risk of periprocedural death or need for reoperation. These procedures are often intricate, which is reflected by a rather modest rate of procedural success (reported to be around 80%). This requires that better technical solutions become available in the future. Today, only two dedicated devices for PVL closure exist, the AMPLATZER Vascular Plug III and the paravalvular leak device. Besides, many non-dedicated devices are used, such as atrial septal occluders, ventricular septal occluders and a variety of vascular plugs. While aortic PVL are approached with a retrograde transarterial approach, mitral PVL can be approached using either an antegrade transvenous approach (transseptal), a retrograde transapical approach or, rarely, a retrograde transaortic approach. PMID:27174113

  11. Greater absolute rates of N2O production and consumption with soil warming dwarf variations in denitrification enzyme temperature sensitivities across seasons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiemann, L. K.; Billings, S. A.

    2010-12-01

    Investigators appreciate the important role that nitrate (NO3-) and soil moisture availability can play in governing net N2O production from soils. However, a large knowledge gap remains surrounding the drivers of soil N2O consumption and the role of microbial adaptation to changing environmental conditions in governing both N2O production and consumption. Net N2O soil efflux can be correlated with temperature, but little is known about the influence of temperature on gross rates of N2O production vs. consumption. Further, we do not understand how microbial communities responsible for these processes adapt or acclimate to soil warming. To investigate whether temperature alters the denitrifier-mediated fate of NO3- lost via N2O or N2, and if any such effect changes across seasons, we incubated soil collected in three seasons at four temperatures with and without 15N-enriched nitrate for 26 hours. Incubations were conducted in an anaerobic environment flushed with helium to permit detection of N2O and N2, and those gases’ δ15N. Temperature positively influenced CO2 production resulting from anaerobic processes. Maximum values of net N2O production were positively influenced by incubation and seasonal temperature, and the maximum rate of net N2O production occurred relatively early at warmer incubation temperatures. We also observed greater N2O:N2 ratios early in the incubations at warmer incubation temperatures. Isotope data are consistent with these trends. For those soils receiving the 15N label, differences in δ15N2O between early and late in the incubations were increasingly negative, and differences in δ15N2 increasingly positive, as temperature increased. Q10 values for N2O production and consumption exhibited increasing similarities as seasons progressed, with June N2O production and consumption Q10 values being nearly identical. These data provide convincing evidence that: a) increasing temperatures can induce denitrifying communities to perform complete

  12. Eosinophil count - absolute

    MedlinePlus

    Eosinophils; Absolute eosinophil count ... the white blood cell count to give the absolute eosinophil count. ... than 500 cells per microliter (cells/mcL). Normal value ranges may vary slightly among different laboratories. Talk ...

  13. Optimization of the leak conductance in the squid giant axon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seely, Jeffrey; Crotty, Patrick

    2010-08-01

    We report on a theoretical study showing that the leak conductance density, GL , in the squid giant axon appears to be optimal for the action potential firing frequency. More precisely, the standard assumption that the leak current is composed of chloride ions leads to the result that the experimental value for GL is very close to the optimal value in the Hodgkin-Huxley model, which minimizes the absolute refractory period of the action potential, thereby maximizing the maximum firing frequency under stimulation by sharp, brief input current spikes to one end of the axon. The measured value of GL also appears to be close to optimal for the frequency of repetitive firing caused by a constant current input to one end of the axon, especially when temperature variations are taken into account. If, by contrast, the leak current is assumed to be composed of separate voltage-independent sodium and potassium currents, then these optimizations are not observed.

  14. CSNI specialist meeting on leak-before-break in nuclear reactor piping: proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-08-01

    On September 1 and 2, 1983, the CSNI subcommittee on primary system integrity held a special meeting in Monterey, California, on the subject of leak-before-break in nuclear reactor piping systems. The purpose of the meeting was to provide an international forum for the exchange of ideas, positions, and research results; to identify areas requiring additional research and development; and to determine the general attitude toward acceptance of the leak-before-break concept. The importance of the leak-before-break issue was evidenced by excellent attendance at the meeting and through active participation by the meeting attendees. Approximately 125 people representing fifteen different nations attended the meeting. The meeting was divided into four technical sessions addressing the following areas: Application of Piping Fracture Mechanics to Leak-Before Break, Leak Rate and Leak Detection, Leak-Before-Break Studies, Methods and Results, Current and Proposed Positions on Leak-Before-Break.

  15. Chemochromic Hydrogen Leak Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberson, Luke; Captain, Janine; Williams, Martha; Smith, Trent; Tate, LaNetra; Raissi, Ali; Mohajeri, Nahid; Muradov, Nazim; Bokerman, Gary

    2009-01-01

    At NASA, hydrogen safety is a key concern for space shuttle processing. Leaks of any level must be quickly recognized and addressed due to hydrogen s lower explosion limit. Chemo - chromic devices have been developed to detect hydrogen gas in several embodiments. Because hydrogen is odorless and colorless and poses an explosion hazard, there is an emerging need for sensors to quickly and accurately detect low levels of leaking hydrogen in fuel cells and other advanced energy- generating systems in which hydrogen is used as fuel. The device incorporates a chemo - chromic pigment into a base polymer. The article can reversibly or irreversibly change color upon exposure to hydrogen. The irreversible pigment changes color from a light beige to a dark gray. The sensitivity of the pigment can be tailored to its application by altering its exposure to gas through the incorporation of one or more additives or polymer matrix. Furthermore, through the incorporation of insulating additives, the chemochromic sensor can operate at cryogenic temperatures as low as 78 K. A chemochromic detector of this type can be manufactured into any feasible polymer part including injection molded plastic parts, fiber-spun textiles, or extruded tapes. The detectors are simple, inexpensive, portable, and do not require an external power source. The chemochromic detectors were installed and removed easily at the KSC launch pad without need for special expertise. These detectors may require an external monitor such as the human eye, camera, or electronic detector; however, they could be left in place, unmonitored, and examined later for color change to determine whether there had been exposure to hydrogen. In one type of envisioned application, chemochromic detectors would be fabricated as outer layers (e.g., casings or coatings) on high-pressure hydrogen storage tanks and other components of hydrogen-handling systems to provide visible indications of hydrogen leaks caused by fatigue failures or

  16. ISS Ammonia Leak Detection Through X-Ray Fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Camp, Jordan; Barthelmy, Scott; Skinner, Gerry

    2013-01-01

    Ammonia leaks are a significant concern for the International Space Station (ISS). The ISS has external transport lines that direct liquid ammonia to radiator panels where the ammonia is cooled and then brought back to thermal control units. These transport lines and radiator panels are subject to stress from micrometeorites and temperature variations, and have developed small leaks. The ISS can accommodate these leaks at their present rate, but if the rate increased by a factor of ten, it could potentially deplete the ammonia supply and impact the proper functioning of the ISS thermal control system, causing a serious safety risk. A proposed ISS astrophysics instrument, the Lobster X-Ray Monitor, can be used to detect and localize ISS ammonia leaks. Based on the optical design of the eye of its namesake crustacean, the Lobster detector gives simultaneously large field of view and good position resolution. The leak detection principle is that the nitrogen in the leaking ammonia will be ionized by X-rays from the Sun, and then emit its own characteristic Xray signal. The Lobster instrument, nominally facing zenith for its astrophysics observations, can be periodically pointed towards the ISS radiator panels and some sections of the transport lines to detect and localize the characteristic X-rays from the ammonia leaks. Another possibility is to use the ISS robot arm to grab the Lobster instrument and scan it across the transport lines and radiator panels. In this case the leak detection can be made more sensitive by including a focused 100-microampere electron beam to stimulate X-ray emission from the leaking nitrogen. Laboratory studies have shown that either approach can be used to locate ammonia leaks at the level of 0.1 kg/day, a threshold rate of concern for the ISS. The Lobster instrument uses two main components: (1) a microchannel plate optic (also known as a Lobster optic) that focuses the X-rays and directs them to the focal plane, and (2) a CCD (charge

  17. CALIFORNIA LEAKING UNDERGROUND STORAGE TANKS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Points represent Leaking Underground Storage Tanks (LUST) for the State of California. This database was developed and is maintained by the California State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB). Point locations represent tanks where leak events have occurred. Tank latitude-long...

  18. HAWAII LEAKING UNDERGROUND STORAGE TANKS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Point coverage of leaking underground storage tanks(LUST) for the state of Hawaii. The original database was developed and is maintained by the State of Hawaii, Dept. of Health. The point locations represent facilities where one or more leaking underground storage tank exists. ...

  19. Leaking underground storage tanks

    SciTech Connect

    McLearn, M.E.; Miller, M.J.; Kostecki, P.T.; Calabrese, E.J.; Presio, L.M.; Suyama, W.; Kucharski, W.A.

    1988-04-01

    Remedial options for leaking underground storage tanks were investigated in a joint project of the Electric Power Research Institute and the Underground Storage Tank Committee of the Utility Solid Waste Activities Group. Both existing and emerging technologies were examined. Thirteen remedial techniques were identified and initially characterized as in situ or non-in situ. In situ methods include volatilization, biodegradation, leaching and chemical reaction, vitrification, passive remediation, and isolation or containment. Non-in situ techniques include land treatment, thermal treatment, asphalt incorporation, solidification and stabilization, groundwater extraction and treatment, chemical extraction, and excavation. Soil and groundwater remediation problems have many site-specific consideration which must be considered in choosing an appropriate remedial option; these include cleanup goals, site and contaminant characteristics, cost, exposures pathways, and others. Appropriate remedial techniques are chosen by assessing technical, implementational, environmental and economic consideration of each available option to achieve the desired cleanup goal at the specified site.

  20. Ultrasonic Leak Detection System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Youngquist, Robert C. (Inventor); Moerk, J. Steven (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A system for detecting ultrasonic vibrations. such as those generated by a small leak in a pressurized container. vessel. pipe. or the like. comprises an ultrasonic transducer assembly and a processing circuit for converting transducer signals into an audio frequency range signal. The audio frequency range signal can be used to drive a pair of headphones worn by an operator. A diode rectifier based mixing circuit provides a simple, inexpensive way to mix the transducer signal with a square wave signal generated by an oscillator, and thereby generate the audio frequency signal. The sensitivity of the system is greatly increased through proper selection and matching of the system components. and the use of noise rejection filters and elements. In addition, a parabolic collecting horn is preferably employed which is mounted on the transducer assembly housing. The collecting horn increases sensitivity of the system by amplifying the received signals. and provides directionality which facilitates easier location of an ultrasonic vibration source.

  1. Dialysate leaks in peritoneal dialysis.

    PubMed

    Leblanc, M; Ouimet, D; Pichette, V

    2001-01-01

    Dialysate leakage represents a major noninfectious complication of peritoneal dialysis (PD). An exit-site leak refers to the appearance of any moisture around the PD catheter identified as dialysate; however, the spectrum of dialysate leaks also includes any dialysate loss from the peritoneal cavity other than via the lumen of the catheter. The incidence of dialysate leakage is somewhat more than 5% in continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) patients, but this percentage probably underestimates the number of early leaks. The incidence of hydrothorax or pleural leak as a complication of PD remains unclear. Factors identified as potentially related to dialysate leakage are those related to the technique of PD catheter insertion, the way PD is initiated, and weakness of the abdominal wall. The pediatric literature tends to favor Tenckhoff catheters over other catheters as being superior with respect to dialysate leakage, but no consensus on catheter choice exists for adults in this regard. An association has been found between early leaks (< or =30 days) and immediate CAPD initiation and perhaps median catheter insertion. Risk factors contributing to abdominal weakness appear to predispose mostly to late leaks; one or more of them can generally be identified in the majority of patients. Early leakage most often manifests as a pericatheter leak. Late leaks may present more subtly with subcutaneous swelling and edema, weight gain, peripheral or genital edema, and apparent ultrafiltration failure. Dyspnea is the first clinical clue to the diagnosis of a pleural leak. Late leaks tend to develop during the first year of CAPD. The most widely used approach to determine the exact site of the leakage is with computed tomography after infusion of 2 L of dialysis fluid containing radiocontrast material. Treatments for dialysate leaks include surgical repair, temporary transfer to hemodialysis, lower dialysate volumes, and PD with a cycler. Recent recommendation propose

  2. Measurement of Submerged Oil/Gas Leaks using ROV Video

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaffer, Franklin; de Vera, Giorgio; Lee, Kenneth; Savas, Ömer

    2013-11-01

    Drilling for oil or gas in the Gulf of Mexico is increasing rapidly at depths up to three miles. The National Commission on the Deepwater Horizon Oil Leak concluded that inaccurate estimates of the leak rate from the Deepwater Horizon caused an inadequate response and attempts to cap the leak to fail. The first response to a submerged oil/gas leak will be to send a Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV) down to view the leak. During the response to the Deepwater Horizon crisis, the authors Savas and Shaffer were members of the Flow Rate Technical Group's Plume Team who used ROV video to develop the FRTG's first official estimates of the oil leak rate. Savas and Shaffer developed an approach using the larger, faster jet features (e.g., turbulent eddies, vortices, entrained particles) in the near-field developing zone to measure discharge rates. The authors have since used the Berkeley Tow Tank to test this approach on submerged dye-colored water jets and compressed air jets. Image Correlation Velocimetry has been applied to measure the velocity of visible features. Results from tests in the Berkeley Tow Tank and submerged oil jets in the OHMSETT facility will be presented.

  3. Underground tank leak detection methods

    SciTech Connect

    Niaki, Shahzad; Broscious, J.A.

    1987-01-01

    In recent years, the increase in leaks from underground gasoline storage tanks has had a significant adverse environmental impact on the US. Current estimates from government and industry sources are that between 1.5 to 3.5 million underground storage tanks exist in the nation. Estimates of the number of leaking tanks range from 75,000 to 100,000; and 350,000 others may develop leaks within the next five years. The 1983 National Petroleum News Factbook Issue forecasts the existence of approximately 140,000 gasoline service stations in the US at the end of 1983. New York State estimates that 19% of its 83,000 active underground gasoline tanks are now leaking. Maine estimates that 25% of its 1,600 retail gasoline underground tanks are leaking approximately 11 million gallons yearly. In Michigan 39% of ground water contamination incidents are attributed to storage tanks. One of the primary causes of tank leakage is corrosion of the storage tanks. Product loss from leaking tanks may cause an adverse effect on the environment, endanger lives, reduce income, and require the expenditure of millions of dollars for cleanup. To prevent or reduce the adverse effects of gasoline leakage, an accurate method must be used to determine whether or not an underground tank is leaking.

  4. Absolute nuclear material assay

    DOEpatents

    Prasad, Manoj K.; Snyderman, Neal J.; Rowland, Mark S.

    2012-05-15

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  5. Absolute nuclear material assay

    DOEpatents

    Prasad, Manoj K.; Snyderman, Neal J.; Rowland, Mark S.

    2010-07-13

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  6. A Leak Monitor for Industry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    GenCorp Aerojet Industrial Products, Lewis Research Center, Marshall Space Flight Center, and Case Western Reserve University developed a gas leak detection system, originally for use with the Space Shuttle propulsion system and reusable launch vehicles. The Model HG200 Automated Gas Leak Detection System has miniaturized sensors that can identify extremely low concentrations of hydrogen without requiring oxygen. A microprocessor-based hardware/software system monitors the sensors and displays the source and magnitude of hydrogen leaks in real time. The system detects trace hydrogen around pipes, connectors, flanges and pressure tanks, and has been used by Ford Motor Company in the production of a natural gas-powered car.

  7. Management of low colorectal anastomotic leak: Preserving the anastomosis.

    PubMed

    Blumetti, Jennifer; Abcarian, Herand

    2015-12-27

    Anastomotic leak continues to be a dreaded complication after colorectal surgery, especially in the low colorectal or coloanal anastomosis. However, there has been no consensus on the management of the low colorectal anastomotic leak. Currently operative procedures are reserved for patients with frank purulent or feculent peritonitis and unstable vital signs, and vary from simple fecal diversion with drainage to resection of the anastomosis and closure of the rectal stump with end colostomy (Hartmann's procedure). However, if the patient is stable, and the leak is identified days or even weeks postoperatively, less aggressive therapeutic measures may result in healing of the leak and salvage of the anastomosis. Advances in diagnosis and treatment of pelvic collections with percutaneous treatments, and newer methods of endoscopic therapies for the acutely leaking anastomosis, such as use of the endosponge, stents or clips, have greatly reduced the need for surgical intervention in selected cases. Diverting ileostomy, if not already in place, may be considered to reduce fecal contamination. For subclinical leaks or those that persist after the initial surgery, endoluminal approaches such as injection of fibrin sealant, use of endoscopic clips, or transanal closure of the very low anastomosis may be utilized. These newer techniques have variable success rates and must be individualized to the patient, with the goal of treatment being restoration of gastrointestinal continuity and healing of the anastomosis. A review of the treatment of low colorectal anastomotic leaks is presented. PMID:26730283

  8. Management of low colorectal anastomotic leak: Preserving the anastomosis

    PubMed Central

    Blumetti, Jennifer; Abcarian, Herand

    2015-01-01

    Anastomotic leak continues to be a dreaded complication after colorectal surgery, especially in the low colorectal or coloanal anastomosis. However, there has been no consensus on the management of the low colorectal anastomotic leak. Currently operative procedures are reserved for patients with frank purulent or feculent peritonitis and unstable vital signs, and vary from simple fecal diversion with drainage to resection of the anastomosis and closure of the rectal stump with end colostomy (Hartmann’s procedure). However, if the patient is stable, and the leak is identified days or even weeks postoperatively, less aggressive therapeutic measures may result in healing of the leak and salvage of the anastomosis. Advances in diagnosis and treatment of pelvic collections with percutaneous treatments, and newer methods of endoscopic therapies for the acutely leaking anastomosis, such as use of the endosponge, stents or clips, have greatly reduced the need for surgical intervention in selected cases. Diverting ileostomy, if not already in place, may be considered to reduce fecal contamination. For subclinical leaks or those that persist after the initial surgery, endoluminal approaches such as injection of fibrin sealant, use of endoscopic clips, or transanal closure of the very low anastomosis may be utilized. These newer techniques have variable success rates and must be individualized to the patient, with the goal of treatment being restoration of gastrointestinal continuity and healing of the anastomosis. A review of the treatment of low colorectal anastomotic leaks is presented. PMID:26730283

  9. Modern halogen leak detectors /Review/

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evlampiev, A. I.; Karpov, V. I.; Levina, L. E.

    1981-04-01

    The halogen method is one of the basic techniques of leak detection for monitoring airtightness in such objects as refrigeration equipment and aerosol containers. Sensitivity has been improved by heated platinum emitters which stabilize background currents. Methods for protecting the region in which the gas is selected include placing the sensitive element in a new flow gauge and keeping the chamber at a certain distance from the tested surface. Chromatograph separating columns both increase sensitivity and distinguish test materials on a background of extraneous halogen-containing materials. Solid-state platinum diodes have been used as the sensitive elements of halogen leak detectors. Leak detectors based on electron-capture practically eliminate the effect of contamination of the surrounding atmosphere on leak detector sensitivity. A technique of vacuum testing is based on the high affinity of halogen-containing materials for electrons.

  10. Modern halogen leak detectors /Review/

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evlampiev, A. I.; Karpov, V. I.; Levina, L. E.

    1980-09-01

    The halogen method is one of the basic techniques of leak detection for monitoring airtightness in such objects as refrigeration equipment and aerosol containers. Sensitivity has been improved by heated platinum emitters which stabilize background currents. Methods for protecting the region in which the gas is selected include placing the sensitive element in a new flow gauge and keeping the chamber at a certain distance from the tested surface. Chromatograph separating columns both increase sensitivity and distinguish test materials on a background of extraneous halogen-containing materials. Solid-state platinum diodes have been used as the sensitive elements of halogen leak detectors. Leak detectors based on electron-capture practically eliminate the effect of contamination of the surrounding atmosphere on leak detector sensitivity. A technique of vacuum testing is based on the high affinity of halogen-containing materials for electrons.

  11. Leak test adapter for containers

    DOEpatents

    Hallett, Brian H.; Hartley, Michael S.

    1996-01-01

    An adapter is provided for facilitating the charging of containers and leak testing penetration areas. The adapter comprises an adapter body and stem which are secured to the container's penetration areas. The container is then pressurized with a tracer gas. Manipulating the adapter stem installs a penetration plug allowing the adapter to be removed and the penetration to be leak tested with a mass spectrometer. Additionally, a method is provided for using the adapter.

  12. Factors predicting the occurrence of a gastrojejunal anastomosis leak following gastric bypass

    PubMed Central

    Sufi, Pratik; Heath, Dugal

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Occurrence of anastomotic leaks following Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB), arising principally from the gastro-jejunal anastomosis, is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Their early detection and treatment is essential. However, a significant number of postoperative oral contrast studies fail to identify leaks, and a negative study providing false reassurance can lead to a delay in diagnosis and treatment. Physiological features including tachycardia, increased respiratory rate and pyrexia or elevations in C-reactive protein and white cell count are seen in patients with leaks. In this study we examine physiological and laboratory parameters in patients with and without anastomotic leaks following RYGB to try and improve the detection of leaks. Aim To evaluate clinical signs and laboratory tests in determination of the development of gastrojejunal leaks after gastric bypass surgery. Material and methods The study examined 116 consecutive patients undergoing laparoscopic RYGB. Clinical signs and laboratory results were reviewed retrospectively. Results Four gastrojejunostomy leaks in our series were identified after RYGB surgery. All these patients were treated successfully. Leak patients’ in-hospital stay was longer. Tachycardia among leak patients occurs from day 1 with 100% sensitivity and 87% specificity at a cut-off point of 90 bpm. A temperature difference appears on day 2 in leak patients. The CRP was higher on day 2 and 3 in leak patients. Higher intravenous fluid requirements were observed in patients with leaks. Conclusions Gastrojejunal anastomosis leak is associated with longer in-hospital treatment. The earliest significant indicators of a leak are tachycardia and positive fluid balance. A temperature spike and CRP rise occur on day 2. Leak patients matched SIRS WBC count criteria on day 3. PMID:25337170

  13. 225-B Pool Cell 5 Liner Leak Investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Rasmussen, J.H., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-06-07

    This document describes the actions taken to confirm and respond to a very small (0.046 ml/min) leak in the stainless steel liner of Hanford`s Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility (WESF) storage pool cell 5 in Building 225-B. Manual level measurements confirmed a consistent weekly accumulation of 0.46 liters of water in the leak detection grid sump below the pool cell 5 liner. Video inspections and samples point to the capsule storage pool as the source of the water. The present leak rate corresponds to a decrease of only 0.002 inches per week in the pool cell water level, and consequently does not threaten any catastrophic loss of pool cell shielding and cooling water. The configuration of the pool cell liner, sump system, and associated risers will limit the short-term consequences of even a total liner breach to a loss of 1 inch in pool cell level. The small amount of demineralized pool cell water which has been in contact with the concrete structure is not enough to cause significant structural damage. However, ongoing water-concrete interaction increases. The pool cell leak detection sump instrumentation will be modified to improve monitoring of the leak rate in the future. Weekly manual sump level measurements continue in the interim. Contingency plans are in place to relocate the pool cell 5 capsules if the leak worsens.

  14. Evaluation of methods for leak detection in reactor primary systems and NDE of cast stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Kupperman, D.S.; Claytor, T.N.; Prine, D.W.; Mathieson, T.A.

    1984-01-01

    Six cracks, including two field-induced IGSCC specimens and two thermal-fatigue cracks, have been installed in a laboratory acoustic leak detection facility. The IGSCC specimens produce stronger acoustic signals than the thermal-fatigue cracks at equivalent leak rates. Despite significant differences in crack geometry, the acoustic signals from the two IGSCC specimens, tested at the same leak rate, are virtually identical in the frequency range from 200 to 400 kHz. Thus, the quantitative correlations between the acoustic signals and leak rate in the 300 to 400 kHz band are very similar for the two IGSCC specimens. Also, acoustic background data have been acquired during a hot functional sensitivity of acoustic leak detection techniques. In addition, cross-correlation techniques have been successfully used in the laboratory to locate the source of an electronically simulated leak signal.

  15. Hydrogen leak detection in the Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barile, Ronald G

    1992-01-01

    This study focuses on a helium gas jet flowing into room air. Measurements of helium concentration and velocity in the jet-air mixture are reported. The objective is to learn about jet characteristics so that dynamically similar hydrogen leaks may be located in the Space Shuttle. The hazardous gas detection system (HGDS) in the mobile launch pad uses mass spectrometers to monitor the shuttle environment for leaks. The mass spectrometers are fed by long sample tubes which draw gas from the payload bay, mid body, aft engine compartment and external tank. The overall purpose of this study is to improve the HGDS especially in its potential for locating hydrogen leaks. A rapid-response leak detection experiment was designed, built, and tested, following on the work done in this program last summer. The apparatus included a Perkin Elmer MGA-1200 mass spectrometer and air velocity transducer, both monitored by a Macintosh IIFX computer using LabVIEW software. A jet of helium flowing into the lab air simulated a gas leak. Steady helium or hydrogen-nitrogen jets were logged for concentration and velocity, and the power spectral density of each was computed. Last year, large eddies and vortices were visually seen with Schlieren imaging, and they were detected in the time plots of the various instruments. The response time of the MGA-1200 was found in the range of 0.05 to 0.1 sec. Pulsed concentration waves were clearly detected at 25 cycles per sec by spectral analysis of MGA data. No peaks were detected in the power spectrum, so in the present study, 10 Hz bandwidth-averaged power levels were examined at regular frequency intervals. The practical consequences of last year's study are as follows: sampling frequency should be increased above the present rate of 1 sample per second so that transients could be observed and analyzed with frequency response methods. Many more experiments and conditions were observed in this second summer, including the effects of orifice diameter

  16. Hydrogen leak detection in the Space Shuttle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barile, Ronald G.

    1992-09-01

    This study focuses on a helium gas jet flowing into room air. Measurements of helium concentration and velocity in the jet-air mixture are reported. The objective is to learn about jet characteristics so that dynamically similar hydrogen leaks may be located in the Space Shuttle. The hazardous gas detection system (HGDS) in the mobile launch pad uses mass spectrometers to monitor the shuttle environment for leaks. The mass spectrometers are fed by long sample tubes which draw gas from the payload bay, mid body, aft engine compartment and external tank. The overall purpose of this study is to improve the HGDS especially in its potential for locating hydrogen leaks. A rapid-response leak detection experiment was designed, built, and tested, following on the work done in this program last summer. The apparatus included a Perkin Elmer MGA-1200 mass spectrometer and air velocity transducer, both monitored by a Macintosh IIFX computer using LabVIEW software. A jet of helium flowing into the lab air simulated a gas leak. Steady helium or hydrogen-nitrogen jets were logged for concentration and velocity, and the power spectral density of each was computed. Last year, large eddies and vortices were visually seen with Schlieren imaging, and they were detected in the time plots of the various instruments. The response time of the MGA-1200 was found in the range of 0.05 to 0.1 sec. Pulsed concentration waves were clearly detected at 25 cycles per sec by spectral analysis of MGA data. No peaks were detected in the power spectrum, so in the present study, 10 Hz bandwidth-averaged power levels were examined at regular frequency intervals. The practical consequences of last year's study are as follows: sampling frequency should be increased above the present rate of 1 sample per second so that transients could be observed and analyzed with frequency response methods. Many more experiments and conditions were observed in this second summer, including the effects of orifice diameter

  17. Space Shuttle Main Engine Propellant Path Leak Detection Using Sequential Image Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, L. Montgomery; Malone, Jo Anne; Crawford, Roger A.

    1995-01-01

    Initial research in this study using theoretical radiation transport models established that the occurrence of a leak is accompanies by a sudden but sustained change in intensity in a given region of an image. In this phase, temporal processing of video images on a frame-by-frame basis was used to detect leaks within a given field of view. The leak detection algorithm developed in this study consists of a digital highpass filter cascaded with a moving average filter. The absolute value of the resulting discrete sequence is then taken and compared to a threshold value to produce the binary leak/no leak decision at each point in the image. Alternatively, averaging over the full frame of the output image produces a single time-varying mean value estimate that is indicative of the intensity and extent of a leak. Laboratory experiments were conducted in which artificially created leaks on a simulated SSME background were produced and recorded from a visible wavelength video camera. This data was processed frame-by-frame over the time interval of interest using an image processor implementation of the leak detection algorithm. In addition, a 20 second video sequence of an actual SSME failure was analyzed using this technique. The resulting output image sequences and plots of the full frame mean value versus time verify the effectiveness of the system.

  18. Mitigated Transfer Line Leaks that Result in Surface Pools and Spray Leaks into Pits

    SciTech Connect

    HEY, B.E.

    1999-12-07

    This analysis provides radiological and toxicological consequence calculations for postulated mitigated leaks during transfers of six waste compositions. Leaks in Cleanout Boxes equipped with supplemental covers and leaks in pits are analyzed.

  19. Absolute biological needs.

    PubMed

    McLeod, Stephen

    2014-07-01

    Absolute needs (as against instrumental needs) are independent of the ends, goals and purposes of personal agents. Against the view that the only needs are instrumental needs, David Wiggins and Garrett Thomson have defended absolute needs on the grounds that the verb 'need' has instrumental and absolute senses. While remaining neutral about it, this article does not adopt that approach. Instead, it suggests that there are absolute biological needs. The absolute nature of these needs is defended by appeal to: their objectivity (as against mind-dependence); the universality of the phenomenon of needing across the plant and animal kingdoms; the impossibility that biological needs depend wholly upon the exercise of the abilities characteristic of personal agency; the contention that the possession of biological needs is prior to the possession of the abilities characteristic of personal agency. Finally, three philosophical usages of 'normative' are distinguished. On two of these, to describe a phenomenon or claim as 'normative' is to describe it as value-dependent. A description of a phenomenon or claim as 'normative' in the third sense does not entail such value-dependency, though it leaves open the possibility that value depends upon the phenomenon or upon the truth of the claim. It is argued that while survival needs (or claims about them) may well be normative in this third sense, they are normative in neither of the first two. Thus, the idea of absolute need is not inherently normative in either of the first two senses. PMID:23586876

  20. Hazardous Gas Leak Analysis in the Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barile, Ronald G.

    1991-01-01

    Helium tests of the main propulsion system in the Space Shuttle and on hydrogen leaks are examined. The hazardous gas detection system (HGDS) in the mobile launch pad uses mass spectrometers (MS) to monitor the shuttle environment for leaks. The mass spectrometers are fed by long tubes to sample gas from the payload bay, mid-body, aft engine compartment, and external tank. The purpose is to improve the HGDS, especially in its potential for locating cryogen leaks. Pre-existing leak data was analyzed for transient information to determine if the leak location could be pinpointed from test data. A rapid response leak detection experiment was designed, built, and tested. Large eddies and vortices were visually seen with Schlieren imaging, and they were detected in the time plots of the various instruments. The response time of the MS was found in the range of 0.05 to 0.1 sec. Pulsed concentration waves were clearly detected at 25 cycles per sec by spectral analysis of MS data. One conclusion is that the backup HGDS sampling frequency should be increased above the present rate of 1 sample per second.

  1. Passive vapor monitoring of underground storage tanks for leak detection.

    PubMed

    Weber, D; Schwille, F

    1991-02-01

    Passive vapor monitoring of underground storage tanks (USTs) containing volatile hydrocarbons at locations external to the tank (an external system) is touted as a fast and effective method of leak detection. However, major gaps remain in our knowledge of the physical processes that relate a measured vapor concentration to the leak rate, thus making network design according to a quantitative design criterion nearly impossible, and differentiation between surface spills and a leaking UST requires certain levels of sophistication in the leak detection system and in the analysis that are not usually available. Heavier-than-air vapors from the constituents of stored hydrocarbons could result in a density-driven convective propagation component that complicates the design of leak detection systems, and finally, detection times are highly sensitive to concentration detection threshold levels set by the system. The use of inadequate systems and analyses can lead to either wasted efforts or excessive subsurface contamination. This paper discusses the physical processes involved, explores the above aspects of external passive vapor leak detection design, and suggests some alternatives as they pertain to gasoline service stations. PMID:24241886

  2. Absolute rate constant for the reaction of atomic chlorine with hydrogen peroxide vapor over the temperature range 265-400 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michael, J. V.; Whytock, D. A.; Lee, J. H.; Payne, W. A.; Stief, L. J.

    1977-01-01

    Rate constants for the reaction of atomic chlorine with hydrogen peroxide were measured from 265-400 K using the flash photolysis-resonance fluorescence technique. Analytical techniques were developed to measure H2O2 under reaction conditions. Due to ambiguity in the interpretation of the analytical results, the data combine to give two equally acceptable representations of the temperature dependence. The results are compared to previous work at 298 K and are theoretically discussed in terms of the mechanism of the reaction. Additional experiments on the H + H2O2 reaction at 298 and 359 K are compared with earlier results from this laboratory and give a slightly revised bimolecular rate constant.

  3. Optomechanics for absolute rotation detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davuluri, Sankar

    2016-07-01

    In this article, we present an application of optomechanical cavity for the absolute rotation detection. The optomechanical cavity is arranged in a Michelson interferometer in such a way that the classical centrifugal force due to rotation changes the length of the optomechanical cavity. The change in the cavity length induces a shift in the frequency of the cavity mode. The phase shift corresponding to the frequency shift in the cavity mode is measured at the interferometer output to estimate the angular velocity of absolute rotation. We derived an analytic expression to estimate the minimum detectable rotation rate in our scheme for a given optomechanical cavity. Temperature dependence of the rotation detection sensitivity is studied.

  4. The ISS 2B PVTCS Ammonia Leak: An Operational History

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vareha, Anthony

    2014-01-01

    In 2006, the Photovoltaic Thermal Control System (PVTCS) for the International Space Station's 2B power channel began leaking ammonia at a rate of approximately 1.5lbm/year (out of a starting approximately 53lbm system ammonia mass). Initially, the operations strategy was "feed the leak," a strategy successfully put into action via Extra Vehicular Activity during the STS-134 mission. During this mission the system was topped off with ammonia piped over from a separate thermal control system. This recharge was to have allowed for continued power channel operation into 2014 or 2015, at which point another EVA would have been required. Without these periodic EVAs to refill the 2B coolant system, the channel would eventually leak enough fluid as to risk pump cavitation and system failure, resulting in the loss of the 2B power channel - the most critical of the Space Station's 8 power channels. In mid-2012, the leak rate increased to approximately 5lbm/year. Once discovered, an EVA was planned and executed within a 5 week timeframe to drastically alter the architecture of the PVTCS via connection to a dormant thermal control system not intended to be utilized as anything other than spare components. The purpose of this rerouting of the TCS was to increase system volume and to isolate the photovoltaic radiator, thought to be the likely leak source. This EVA was successfully executed on November 1st, 2012 and left the 2B PVTCS in a configuration where the system was now being adequately cooled via a totally different radiator than what the system was designed to utilize. Unfortunately, data monitoring over the next several months showed that the isolated radiator was not leaking, and the system itself continued to leak steadily until May 9th, 2013. It was on this day that the ISS crew noticed the visible presence of ammonia crystals escaping from the 2B channel's truss segment, signifying a rapid acceleration of the leak from 5lbm/year to 5lbm/day. Within 48 hours of the

  5. Transcatheter closure of paravalvular leaks using a paravalvular leak device – a prospective Polish registry

    PubMed Central

    Pysz, Piotr; Kozłowski, Michał; Jasiński, Marek; Gocoł, Radosław; Roleder, Tomasz; Kargul, Agnieszka; Ochała, Andrzej; Wojakowski, Wojciech

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Transcatheter paravalvular leak closure (TPVLC) has become an established treatment option but is mostly performed with off-label use of different non-dedicated occluders. The first one specifically designed for TPVLC is the paravalvular leak device (PLD – Occlutech). Aim We present initial short-term results of a prospective registry intended to assess the safety and efficacy of TPVLC with PLD. Material and methods We screened patients with paravalvular leak (PVL) after surgical valve replacement (SVR). Heart failure symptoms and/or hemolytic anemia were indications for TPVLC. Patients were selected according to PVL anatomy by RT 3D TEE. Only those considered appropriate for closure with a single PLD were enrolled. The procedures were performed via transvascular or transapical access using type W (waist) PLDs only. Results Thirty patients with 34 PVLs (18 aortic, 16 mitral) were included. We implanted 35 PLDs with a total device success rate of 94.3% (100% for aortic, 88.2% for mitral). The procedural success rate, encompassing device success without in-hospital complications, was 94.1% (100% for aortic, 93.8% for mitral). During the follow-up period we recorded an increase of hemoglobin concentration (3.9 to 4.1 g/dl), red blood count (11.6 to 12.2 M/mm3) and functional improvement by NYHA class. Conclusions Paravalvular leak device type W is a promising TPVLC device, but meticulous preselection of patients based on imaging of PVL anatomy is a prerequisite. A PLD should only be chosen for channels shorter than 5 mm. Size of the device should match the PVL cross-sectional area without any oversizing. Such an approach facilitates high device and procedural success rates. PMID:27279872

  6. Location and repair of air leaks in the ATF (Advanced Toroidal Facility) vacuum vessel

    SciTech Connect

    Schwenterly, S.W.; Gabbard, W.A.; Schaich, C.R.; Yarber, J.L. )

    1989-01-01

    On the basis of partial pressure rate-of-rise and base pressure measurements, it was determined that the Advanced Toroidal Facility (ATF) vacuum vessel had an air leak in the low 10{sup -4} mbar-{ell}/s range. Pinpointing this leak by conventional helium leak-checking procedures was not possible, because large portions of the outside of the vessel are covered by the helcial field coils and a structural shell. Various alternative leak-detection schemes that were considered are summarized and their advantages and disadvantages noted. In the method ultimately employed, gun-rubber patches of various sizes ranging from 12.7 by 12.7 cm to 20.3 by 30.5 cm were positioned on the inside surfaces of the vessel and evacuated by the leak detector (LD). After roughly 5% of the surface was inspected in this way, a leak of > 10{sup -5} mbar-{ell}/s was discovered and localized to an area of 5 by 5 cm. Dye penetrant applied to this area disclosed three pinholes. Two small slag pockets were discovered while these points were being ground out. After these were rewelded, no furthered leakage could be found in the repaired area. Global leak rates measured after the machine was reevacuated indicated that this leak was about 30% of the overall leak rate. 1 ref., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Surgical challenge: endoscopic repair of cerebrospinal fluid leak

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Cerebrospinal fluid leaks (CSF) result from an abnormal communication between the subarachnoid space and the extracranial space. Approximately 90% of CSF leak at the anterior skull base manifests as rhinorrhea and can become life-threatening condition. Endoscopic sinus surgery (ESS) has become a common otolaryngologist procedure. The aim of this article is to consider our experience and to evaluate the outcomes in patients who underwent a purely endoscopic repair of CSF leaks of the anterior skull base. Findings Retrospective chart review was performed of all patients surgically treated for CSF leaks presenting to the Section of Nasal and Sinus Disorders at the Service of ENT–Head and Neck Surgery, University Hospital Complex of Santiago de Compostela (CHUS), between 2004 and 2010. A total of 30 patients who underwent repair CSF leak by ESS. The success rate was 93.4% at the first attempt; only two patients (6.6%) required a second surgical procedure, and none of it was necessary to use a craniotomy for closure. Follow-up periods ranged from 4 months to 6 years. Conclusion Identifying the size, site, and etiology of the CSF leak remains the most important factor in the surgical success. It is generally accepted that the ESS have made procedures minimally invasive, and CSF leak is now one of its well-established indications with low morbidity and high success rate, with one restriction for fistulas of the posterior wall of the frontal sinus should be repaired in conjunction with open techniques. PMID:22925201

  8. Pipe Leak Detection Technology Development

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has determined that one of the nation’s biggest infrastructural needs is the replacement or rehabilitation of the water distribution and transmission systems. The institution of more effective pipe leak detection technology will im...

  9. Optical Detection Of Cryogenic Leaks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wyett, Lynn M.

    1988-01-01

    Conceptual system identifies leakage without requiring shutdown for testing. Proposed device detects and indicates leaks of cryogenic liquids automatically. Detector makes it unnecessary to shut equipment down so it can be checked for leakage by soap-bubble or helium-detection methods. Not necessary to mix special gases or other materials with cryogenic liquid flowing through equipment.

  10. Leak prevention critical for ASTs

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, B.

    1994-08-01

    Aboveground storage tanks can be crafted to prevent leaks caused by vandalism, overfill accidents and faulty valves. New designs and safety devices available in aboveground storage tanks (ASTs) have made ASTs viable option for owners of commercial, institutional and governmental facilities with storage needs of less than 20,000 gallons.

  11. The absolute path command

    2012-05-11

    The ap command traveres all symlinks in a given file, directory, or executable name to identify the final absolute path. It can print just the final path, each intermediate link along with the symlink chan, and the permissions and ownership of each directory component in the final path. It has functionality similar to "which", except that it shows the final path instead of the first path. It is also similar to "pwd", but it canmore » provide the absolute path to a relative directory from the current working directory.« less

  12. The absolute path command

    SciTech Connect

    Moody, A.

    2012-05-11

    The ap command traveres all symlinks in a given file, directory, or executable name to identify the final absolute path. It can print just the final path, each intermediate link along with the symlink chan, and the permissions and ownership of each directory component in the final path. It has functionality similar to "which", except that it shows the final path instead of the first path. It is also similar to "pwd", but it can provide the absolute path to a relative directory from the current working directory.

  13. Quantitative risk assessment & leak detection criteria for a subsea oil export pipeline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Fang-Yuan; Bai, Yong; Badaruddin, Mohd Fauzi; Tuty, Suhartodjo

    2009-06-01

    A quantitative risk assessment (QRA) based on leak detection criteria (LDC) for the design of a proposed subsea oil export pipeline is presented in this paper. The objective of this QRA/LDC study was to determine if current leak detection methodologies were sufficient, based on QRA results, while excluding the use of statistical leak detection; if not, an appropriate LDC for the leak detection system would need to be established. The famous UK PARLOC database was used for the calculation of pipeline failure rates, and the software POSVCM from MMS was used for oil spill simulations. QRA results revealed that the installation of a statistically based leak detection system (LDS) can significantly reduce time to leak detection, thereby mitigating the consequences of leakage. A sound LDC has been defined based on QRA study results and comments from various LDS vendors to assist the emergency response team (ERT) to quickly identify and locate leakage and employ the most effective measures to contain damage.

  14. Rapid leak detection with liquid crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heisman, R. M.; Iceland, W. F.; Ruppe, E. P.

    1978-01-01

    Small leaks in vacuum lines are detected by applying liquid-crystal coating, warming suspected area, and observing color change due to differential cooling by leak jet. Technique is used on inside or outside walls of vacuum-jacketed lines.

  15. Stochastic Consequence Analysis for Waste Leaks

    SciTech Connect

    HEY, B.E.

    2000-05-31

    This analysis evaluates the radiological consequences of potential Hanford Tank Farm waste transfer leaks. These include ex-tank leaks into structures, underneath the soil, and exposed to the atmosphere. It also includes potential misroutes, tank overflow

  16. Anaerobic polymers as high vacuum leak sealants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kendall, B. R. F.

    1982-01-01

    Anaerobic polymers are useful as solventless leak sealants with good vacuum properties at moderate temperatures. Loctite 290 can seal leaks in a range generally encountered in carefully constructed ultrahigh vacuum and high vacuum systems. It was found that small leaks are sealed best under vacuum, whereas large leaks should be sealed at atmospheric pressure. The high-temperature behavior of Loctite 290 is limited by its fast cure, which prevents deep penetration into small leaks; cracking eventually occurs at the entrance to the leak. Repeated thermal cycling to about 300 C is possible, however, provided viscosity, curing time, and leak size are properly matched to ensure penetration into the body of the leak. This may require special formulations for high temperature vacuum applications.

  17. Helium Mass Spectrometer Leak Detection: A Method to Quantify Total Measurement Uncertainty

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mather, Janice L.; Taylor, Shawn C.

    2015-01-01

    In applications where leak rates of components or systems are evaluated against a leak rate requirement, the uncertainty of the measured leak rate must be included in the reported result. However, in the helium mass spectrometer leak detection method, the sensitivity, or resolution, of the instrument is often the only component of the total measurement uncertainty noted when reporting results. To address this shortfall, a measurement uncertainty analysis method was developed that includes the leak detector unit's resolution, repeatability, hysteresis, and drift, along with the uncertainty associated with the calibration standard. In a step-wise process, the method identifies the bias and precision components of the calibration standard, the measurement correction factor (K-factor), and the leak detector unit. Together these individual contributions to error are combined and the total measurement uncertainty is determined using the root-sum-square method. It was found that the precision component contributes more to the total uncertainty than the bias component, but the bias component is not insignificant. For helium mass spectrometer leak rate tests where unit sensitivity alone is not enough, a thorough evaluation of the measurement uncertainty such as the one presented herein should be performed and reported along with the leak rate value.

  18. Detecting Leaks With An Infrared Camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Easter, Barry P.; Steffins, Alfred P., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    Proposed test reveals small leak in gas pipe - for example, leak through fatigue crack induced by vibration - even though insulation covers pipe. Infrared-sensitive video camera aimed at part(s) containing suspected leak(s). Insulated pipe pressurized with gas that absorbs infrared light. If crack were present, escaping gas travels along outside of pipe until it reached edge of insulation. Gas emerging from edge of insulation appears as dark cloud in video image.

  19. STS-35 scrub 3 hydrogen leak analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seymour, Dave

    1991-01-01

    During the summer of 1990, space shuttle Columbia experienced both an external tank/orbiter disconnect hydrogen leak and multiple internal aft compartment hydrogen leaks. After the third scrub of STS-35, a leak investigation team was organized. In support of this team, an analysis of the data obtained during scrub 3 was performed. Based on this analysis, the engine 2 prevalve was concluded to be the most likely leak location and to account for most of the observed leakage.

  20. Helium leak test for sterility assurance of a sealed bag. I: Relationship of helium leak and pinhole diameter.

    PubMed

    Miyako, Yasuhiro; Tai, Hideaki; Saitoh, Izumi

    2002-01-01

    Described herein is an attempt to establish a simpler, more reliable method to maintain the aseptic condition of bulk materials of drug substances. The method would be used in the manufacturing process of our "double-bag" kit system for infusion, which has two compartments, one for the infusion liquid and another for the drug product. To manufacture the kit system, we used a flexible inner container to enclose the bulk under aseptic conditions and a method for ensuring sterility of the container. We used an aluminum laminate bag as the inner container, which was then enclosed in a polyethylene bag. To detect tears or pinholes in the bag, a helium leak test was evaluated. First, a simple experimental model of helium leakage from bags was established. In the model, a pinhole was made in a film disk of the aluminum laminate or polyethylene material used for the inner and outer bags. A helium leak detector was used to measure the escape of helium through the pinhole, and the leak could be detected from a pinhole from 10 microns in diameter. As the bulk product was doubly sealed in an aluminum bag and a polyethylene bag in the manufacturing process to maintain an aseptic condition, we also checked for helium leak from pinholes of film disks after connecting two film disks. The results showed that helium leak was detectable when the pinhole diameters of both film disks were more than 20 microns. Clearly, helium leak is strongly affected by pinhole diameter in both experimental models. We have calculated, for the pinhole geometries studied, helium leak rates by using the Poiseuille Equation. Calculated values were in agreement with experimental values. PMID:12181802

  1. The Absolute Rates of the Solution Phase Addition of Atomic Hydrogen to a Vinyl Ether and a Vinyl Ester. The Effect of Oxygen Substitution on Hydrogen Atom Reactivity with Olefins

    SciTech Connect

    Tanner, D. D.; Kandanarachchi, P.; Das, N. C.; Franz, James A.

    2003-04-08

    The reactions of vinyl butyl ether and vinyl butyrate with atomic hydrogen and deuterium lead to addition of atomic hydrogen to the terminal position of the olefins. This observation is consistent with the reactions carried out earlier with other olefins. Both the absolute rates of addition to vinylbutyl ether and vinyl butyrate in acetone and hexane were carried out at several temperatures. The relative rates are consistent with only modest stabilization of the transition state of the radical adduct by the ??-o substituent compared with hydrogen atom addition to 1-octene. The relative rates measured in acetone and hexane indicate no significant differential solvation of ground state relative to the transition structures of the hydrogen atom addition. The kinetics reveal that the early transition states of hydrogen atom addition exhibit little selectivity (vinyl ether versus simple olefin) in either abstraction of hydrogen ??- to the oxygen or by terminal addition to the olefinic ether, reflecting the modest influence of the increased enthalpy of reaction associated with resonance stabilization by the oxygen substituent at the developing radical site.

  2. Absolute Rates of the Solution-Phase Addition of Atomic Hydrogen to a Vinyl Ether and a Vinyl Ester: Effect of Oxygen Substitution on Hydrogen Atom Reactivity with Olefins

    SciTech Connect

    Tanner, D D.; Kandanarachchi, P; Das, N. C.; Franz, James A.

    2003-04-08

    The reactions of vinyl butyl ether and vinyl butyrate with atomic hydrogen and deuterium lead to addition at the terminal position of the olefins. This observation is consistent with the reactions carried out earlier with other olefins. Both of the absolute rates of addition to vinylbutyl ether and vinyl butyrate, in acetone and hexane, were measured at several temperatures. The relative rates are consistent with only modest stabilization of the transition state of the radical adduct by the R-O substituent compared with that of hydrogen atom addition to 1-octene. The relative rates measured in acetone and hexane indicate no significant differential solvation of the ground state relative to the transition structures of the hydrogen atom addition. The kinetics reveal that the early transition states for hydrogen atom addition exhibit little selectivity (vinyl ether versus simple olefin) in either the abstraction of hydrogen R to the oxygen or by terminal addition to the olefinic ether and reflects the modest influence of the increased enthalpy of reaction associated with resonance stabilization by the oxygen substituent at the developing radical site.

  3. About the leak microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lombardi, M.; Guoxiang, H. Huo-J.; Lombardi, F. S.

    2001-04-01

    The capabilities of a new microstructure, anode point based, for the detection of gas ionizing radiations are presented. For every single detected ionizing radiation it gives a pair of "induced" charges (anodic and cathodic) of the same amount (pulses of the same amplitudes), of opposite sign, with the same collection time and essentially in time coincidence, that are proportional to the primary ionization collected. Each pulse of a pair gives the same energy and timing information, thus one can be used for these information and the other for the position. The complete lack of insulating materials in the active volume of this microstructure avoids problems of charging-up and makes its behaviour stable and repeatable. Primary avalanches with a size of more than 2.5×10 7 electrons (4 pC) giving current pulses with a peak of more than 0.26 mA on 100 Ω and about 30 ns duration are possible with 5.9 keV X-rays of 55Fe working in proportional region and in isobutane gas. Single electrons emitted by a heated filament ( Ec<1 eV) were detected in 760 Torr of isobutane; with an estimated gas gain of 1.2×10 6 a counting rate of up to 800 kpulses/s per single microstructure was achieved. Three different types of sensitive-position two-dimensional read-out detectors, based on these microstructures, in development, as well as the best geometry (height of the tip with respect to the cathode) and the shapes and strengths of the electric field in the active volume of these microstructures, evaluated with Poison Superfish and Mafia programs, are presented.

  4. Prediction of Gas Leak Tightness of Superplastically Formed Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snippe, Corijn H. C.; Meinders, T.

    2010-06-01

    In some applications, in this case an aluminium box in a subatomic particle detector containing highly sensitive detecting devices, it is important that a formed sheet should show no gas leak from one side to the other. In order to prevent a trial-and-error procedure to make this leak tight box, a method is set up to predict if a formed sheet conforms to the maximum leak constraint. The technique of superplastic forming (SPF) is used in order to attain very high plastic strains before failure. Since only a few of these boxes are needed, this makes, this generally slow, process an attractive production method. To predict the gas leak of a superplastically formed aluminium sheet in an accurate way, finite element simulations are used in combination with a user-defined material model. This constitutive model couples the leak rate with the void volume fraction. This void volume fraction is then dependent on both the equivalent plastic strain and the applied hydrostatic pressure during the bulge process (backpressure).

  5. Leak detection by acoustic emission monitoring. Phase 1: Feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lichtenstein, Bernard; Winder, A. A.

    1994-05-01

    This investigation was conducted to determine the feasibility of detecting leaks from underground storage tanks or pipelines using acoustic emissions. An extensive technical literature review established that distinguishable acoustic emission signals will be generated when a storage tank is subjected to deformation stresses. A parametric analysis was performed which indicated that leak rates less than 0.1 gallons per hour can be detected for leak sizes less than 1/32 inch with 99% probability if the transient signals were sensed with an array of accelerometers (cemented to the tank or via acoustic waveguides), each having a sensitivity greater than 250 mv/g over a frequency range of 0.1 to 4000 Hz, and processed in a multi-channel Fourier spectrum analyzer with automatic threshold detection. An acoustic transient or energy release processor could conceivably detect the onset of the leak at the moment of fracture of the tank wall. The primary limitations to realizing reliable and robust acoustic emission monitoring of underground fluid leaks are the various masking noise sources prevalent at Air Force bases, which are attributed to aircraft, motor traffic, pump station operation, and ground tremors.

  6. Leak detection method and apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Fries, B.A.

    1982-05-11

    A method and apparatus are described for using sulfur hexafluoride to detect leaks in fluid processing systems. Leak detection can be performed with the processing system continuing in operation. This apparatus detects leakage through a partition separating a portion of a first path from portion of a second path in a fluid processing system, while operation of the system is continued. The apparatus comprises a combination of 1) means for introducing a known quantity of sulfur hexafluoride into fluid flowing in the first path upstream of a partition; 2) means for continuously removing a sample of fluid flowing in the second path at a locus downstream of the partition; 3) means for removing normally liquid components from the sample; 4) means for testing the sample to determine the presence of sulfur hexafluoride; and 5) means for indicating the amount of sulfur hexafluoride in the sample. 2 claims.

  7. Leaking electricity in domestic appliances

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, Alan; Rosen, Karen

    1999-05-01

    Many types of home electronic equipment draw electric power when switched off or not performing their principal functions. Standby power use (or ''leaking electricity'') for most appliances ranges from 1 - 20 watts. Even though standby use of each device is small, the combined standby power use of all appliances in a home can easily exceed 50 watts. Leaking electricity is already responsible for 5 to 10 percent of residential electricity use in the United States and over 10 percent in Japan. An increasing number of white goods also have standby power requirements. There is a growing international effort to limit standby power to around one watt per device. New and existing technologies are available to meet this target at little or no extra cost.

  8. Using Decision Trees to Detect and Isolate Simulated Leaks in the J-2X Rocket Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwabacher, Mark A.; Aguilar, Robert; Figueroa, Fernando F.

    2009-01-01

    The goal of this work was to use data-driven methods to automatically detect and isolate faults in the J-2X rocket engine. It was decided to use decision trees, since they tend to be easier to interpret than other data-driven methods. The decision tree algorithm automatically "learns" a decision tree by performing a search through the space of possible decision trees to find one that fits the training data. The particular decision tree algorithm used is known as C4.5. Simulated J-2X data from a high-fidelity simulator developed at Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne and known as the Detailed Real-Time Model (DRTM) was used to "train" and test the decision tree. Fifty-six DRTM simulations were performed for this purpose, with different leak sizes, different leak locations, and different times of leak onset. To make the simulations as realistic as possible, they included simulated sensor noise, and included a gradual degradation in both fuel and oxidizer turbine efficiency. A decision tree was trained using 11 of these simulations, and tested using the remaining 45 simulations. In the training phase, the C4.5 algorithm was provided with labeled examples of data from nominal operation and data including leaks in each leak location. From the data, it "learned" a decision tree that can classify unseen data as having no leak or having a leak in one of the five leak locations. In the test phase, the decision tree produced very low false alarm rates and low missed detection rates on the unseen data. It had very good fault isolation rates for three of the five simulated leak locations, but it tended to confuse the remaining two locations, perhaps because a large leak at one of these two locations can look very similar to a small leak at the other location.

  9. 40 CFR 53.52 - Leak check test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Leak check test. (a) Overview. In section 7.4.6 of 40 CFR part 50, appendix L, the sampler is required..., NIST-traceable. (2) Flow rate measurement adaptor (40 CFR part 50, appendix L, figure L-30) or... CFR part 50, appendix L. (d) Calibration of test measurement instruments. Submit documentation...

  10. 40 CFR 53.52 - Leak check test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Leak check test. (a) Overview. In section 7.4.6 of 40 CFR part 50, appendix L, the sampler is required..., NIST-traceable. (2) Flow rate measurement adaptor (40 CFR part 50, appendix L, figure L-30) or... CFR part 50, appendix L. (d) Calibration of test measurement instruments. Submit documentation...

  11. 40 CFR 53.52 - Leak check test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Leak check test. (a) Overview. In section 7.4.6 of 40 CFR part 50, appendix L, the sampler is required..., NIST-traceable. (2) Flow rate measurement adaptor (40 CFR part 50, appendix L, figure L-30) or... CFR part 50, appendix L. (d) Calibration of test measurement instruments. Submit documentation...

  12. 40 CFR 1065.345 - Vacuum-side leak verification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... zero flow, or by detecting the dilution of a known concentration of span gas when it flows through the... bypass flows as an approximation of the system's normal in-use flow rate. (d) Dilution-of-span-gas leak... recommend using only analyzers that have a repeatability of 0.5% or better at the span gas...

  13. 40 CFR 1065.345 - Vacuum-side leak verification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... zero flow, or by detecting the dilution of a known concentration of span gas when it flows through the... bypass flows as an approximation of the system's normal in-use flow rate. (d) Dilution-of-span-gas leak... recommend using only analyzers that have a repeatability of 0.5% or better at the span gas...

  14. 40 CFR 53.52 - Leak check test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Leak check test. (a) Overview. In section 7.4.6 of 40 CFR part 50, appendix L, the sampler is required..., NIST-traceable. (2) Flow rate measurement adaptor (40 CFR part 50, appendix L, figure L-30) or... CFR part 50, appendix L. (d) Calibration of test measurement instruments. Submit documentation...

  15. Low-Leak, High-Flow Poppet Valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tervo, John N.

    1995-01-01

    Valve with conical poppet modified to incorporate smooth transition to segment of sphere at upstream end of cone. Constitutes sealing surface of poppet; results in leak rate equivalent to ball-type poppet, and extremely low flow losses. Also enables use of loose fit for guiding poppet, with resulting lower manufacturing cost, high reliability, and long operating life.

  16. Hydrogen Leak Detection Sensor Database

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, Barton D.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the characteristics of the Hydrogen Sensor database. The database is the result of NASA's continuing interest in and improvement of its ability to detect and assess gas leaks in space applications. The database specifics and a snapshot of an entry in the database are reviewed. Attempts were made to determine the applicability of each of the 65 sensors for ground and/or vehicle use.

  17. Schlieren optics for leak detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peale, Robert E.; Ruffin, Alranzo B.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to develop an optical method of leak detection. Various modifications of schlieren optics were explored with initial emphasis on leak detection of the plumbing within the orbital maneuvering system of the space shuttle (OMS pod). The schlieren scheme envisioned for OMS pod leak detection was that of a high contrast pattern on flexible reflecting material imaged onto a negative of the same pattern. We find that the OMS pod geometry constrains the characteristic length scale of the pattern to the order of 0.001 inch. Our experiments suggest that optical modulation transfer efficiency will be very low for such patterns, which will limit the sensitivity of the technique. Optical elements which allow a negative of the scene to be reversibly recorded using light from the scene itself were explored for their potential in adaptive single-ended schlieren systems. Elements studied include photochromic glass, bacteriorhodopsin, and a transmissive liquid crystal display. The dynamics of writing and reading patterns were studied using intensity profiles from recorded images. Schlieren detection of index gradients in air was demonstrated.

  18. Comprehensive quantitative analysis on privacy leak behavior.

    PubMed

    Fan, Lejun; Wang, Yuanzhuo; Jin, Xiaolong; Li, Jingyuan; Cheng, Xueqi; Jin, Shuyuan

    2013-01-01

    Privacy information is prone to be leaked by illegal software providers with various motivations. Privacy leak behavior has thus become an important research issue of cyber security. However, existing approaches can only qualitatively analyze privacy leak behavior of software applications. No quantitative approach, to the best of our knowledge, has been developed in the open literature. To fill this gap, in this paper we propose for the first time four quantitative metrics, namely, possibility, severity, crypticity, and manipulability, for privacy leak behavior analysis based on Privacy Petri Net (PPN). In order to compare the privacy leak behavior among different software, we further propose a comprehensive metric, namely, overall leak degree, based on these four metrics. Finally, we validate the effectiveness of the proposed approach using real-world software applications. The experimental results demonstrate that our approach can quantitatively analyze the privacy leak behaviors of various software types and reveal their characteristics from different aspects. PMID:24066046

  19. Comprehensive Quantitative Analysis on Privacy Leak Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Lejun; Wang, Yuanzhuo; Jin, Xiaolong; Li, Jingyuan; Cheng, Xueqi; Jin, Shuyuan

    2013-01-01

    Privacy information is prone to be leaked by illegal software providers with various motivations. Privacy leak behavior has thus become an important research issue of cyber security. However, existing approaches can only qualitatively analyze privacy leak behavior of software applications. No quantitative approach, to the best of our knowledge, has been developed in the open literature. To fill this gap, in this paper we propose for the first time four quantitative metrics, namely, possibility, severity, crypticity, and manipulability, for privacy leak behavior analysis based on Privacy Petri Net (PPN). In order to compare the privacy leak behavior among different software, we further propose a comprehensive metric, namely, overall leak degree, based on these four metrics. Finally, we validate the effectiveness of the proposed approach using real-world software applications. The experimental results demonstrate that our approach can quantitatively analyze the privacy leak behaviors of various software types and reveal their characteristics from different aspects. PMID:24066046

  20. Detection of leaks in a water-cooled generator stator bar using perfluorocarbon tracers

    SciTech Connect

    Loss, W.M.; Dietz, R.N.; Senum, G.I.

    1989-12-01

    A generator stator bar with a suspected leak was removed from the ConEdison Ravenswood power plant and shipped to an independent laboratory for hydraulic pressure testing. The test failed to demonstrate the location and magnitude of leaks. The stator bar was subsequently investigated at Brookhaven's Tracer Technology Center. Pressurization with 3 ppM PMCP (perfluoromethylcyclopentane) in hydrogen as carrier gas revealed a leak close to the turbine end of the generator. The equivalent water leak rate was calculated to be about 1/2 mL per day at 30 psi water pressure. A series of tests was designed to first verify the existence of potential leaks and then to locate these leaks as accurately as possible. Enclosing the bar in a flexible hose, introducing nitrogen gas into the hose and analyzing the hose exhaust with Brookhaven's Dual Trap Analyzer successfully identified the existence of leaks. However, the technique failed to locate the approximation position of the suspected leaks. It was found that diffusion and the existence of a laminar flow regime inside the hose prevented the formation of uniform concentration levels and, hence, consistent readings. Successful leak pinpointing was accomplished by wrapping short sections of the bar in plastic bags. This approach with some suggested improvements is also recommended for future experiments with stator bars. 6 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Sealant provides economical solution to subsurface leaks

    SciTech Connect

    Silverman, S.

    1999-02-01

    A series of unique field-tested leak sealants have been developed that can withstand the extreme pressure and temperature conditions found in the oilfield. The unique quality of the sealants is that the sealing mechanism is activated by the differential pressure created through a leak site. The sealants are comparable with oil- and glycol-based hydraulic fluids and are particularly useful for sealing leaks in subsurface safety valves, wellhead tubing and casing hanger seals, PBR seal joints, umbilical leaks and subsea well control systems. The chemical remains fluid until it is released through a leak site. The sealant mimics platelets in the human body by forming deposits on leak walls. This process creates a matrix across the leak similar to coagulating blood on a cut. Leak sites can be metal-to-metal seals, elastomer seals, pinhole leaks, or connection leaks. The pressure-activated sealant is stable at high pressures and temperatures up to 15,000 psi and 320 F and does not react with elastomers. The sealant will not plug valves because any pressure from that occurs while opening and closing the valve only lasts for a few seconds, and it is a sustained pressure drop that is required to activate the chemical.

  2. Electronic Absolute Cartesian Autocollimator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leviton, Douglas B.

    2006-01-01

    An electronic absolute Cartesian autocollimator performs the same basic optical function as does a conventional all-optical or a conventional electronic autocollimator but differs in the nature of its optical target and the manner in which the position of the image of the target is measured. The term absolute in the name of this apparatus reflects the nature of the position measurement, which, unlike in a conventional electronic autocollimator, is based absolutely on the position of the image rather than on an assumed proportionality between the position and the levels of processed analog electronic signals. The term Cartesian in the name of this apparatus reflects the nature of its optical target. Figure 1 depicts the electronic functional blocks of an electronic absolute Cartesian autocollimator along with its basic optical layout, which is the same as that of a conventional autocollimator. Referring first to the optical layout and functions only, this or any autocollimator is used to measure the compound angular deviation of a flat datum mirror with respect to the optical axis of the autocollimator itself. The optical components include an illuminated target, a beam splitter, an objective or collimating lens, and a viewer or detector (described in more detail below) at a viewing plane. The target and the viewing planes are focal planes of the lens. Target light reflected by the datum mirror is imaged on the viewing plane at unit magnification by the collimating lens. If the normal to the datum mirror is parallel to the optical axis of the autocollimator, then the target image is centered on the viewing plane. Any angular deviation of the normal from the optical axis manifests itself as a lateral displacement of the target image from the center. The magnitude of the displacement is proportional to the focal length and to the magnitude (assumed to be small) of the angular deviation. The direction of the displacement is perpendicular to the axis about which the

  3. Vacuum leak detector and method

    DOEpatents

    Edwards, Jr., David

    1983-01-01

    Apparatus and method for detecting leakage in a vacuum system involves a moisture trap chamber connected to the vacuum system and to a pressure gauge. Moisture in the trap chamber is captured by freezing or by a moisture adsorbent to reduce the residual water vapor pressure therein to a negligible amount. The pressure gauge is then read to determine whether the vacuum system is leaky. By directing a stream of carbon dioxide or helium at potentially leaky parts of the vacuum system, the apparatus can be used with supplemental means to locate leaks.

  4. Pressure Change Measurement Leak Testing Errors

    SciTech Connect

    Pryor, Jeff M; Walker, William C

    2014-01-01

    A pressure change test is a common leak testing method used in construction and Non-Destructive Examination (NDE). The test is known as being a fast, simple, and easy to apply evaluation method. While this method may be fairly quick to conduct and require simple instrumentation, the engineering behind this type of test is more complex than is apparent on the surface. This paper intends to discuss some of the more common errors made during the application of a pressure change test and give the test engineer insight into how to correctly compensate for these factors. The principals discussed here apply to ideal gases such as air or other monoatomic or diatomic gasses; however these same principals can be applied to polyatomic gasses or liquid flow rate with altered formula specific to those types of tests using the same methodology.

  5. ABSOLUTE POLARIMETRY AT RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    OKADA; BRAVAR, A.; BUNCE, G.; GILL, R.; HUANG, H.; MAKDISI, Y.; NASS, A.; WOOD, J.; ZELENSKI, Z.; ET AL.

    2007-09-10

    Precise and absolute beam polarization measurements are critical for the RHIC spin physics program. Because all experimental spin-dependent results are normalized by beam polarization, the normalization uncertainty contributes directly to final physics uncertainties. We aimed to perform the beam polarization measurement to an accuracy Of {Delta}P{sub beam}/P{sub beam} < 5%. The absolute polarimeter consists of Polarized Atomic Hydrogen Gas Jet Target and left-right pairs of silicon strip detectors and was installed in the RHIC-ring in 2004. This system features proton-proton elastic scattering in the Coulomb nuclear interference (CNI) region. Precise measurements of the analyzing power A{sub N} of this process has allowed us to achieve {Delta}P{sub beam}/P{sub beam} = 4.2% in 2005 for the first long spin-physics run. In this report, we describe the entire set up and performance of the system. The procedure of beam polarization measurement and analysis results from 2004-2005 are described. Physics topics of AN in the CNI region (four-momentum transfer squared 0.001 < -t < 0.032 (GeV/c){sup 2}) are also discussed. We point out the current issues and expected optimum accuracy in 2006 and the future.

  6. Leak detection using structure-borne noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holland, Stephen D. (Inventor); Chimenti, Dale E. (Inventor); Roberts, Ronald A. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A method for detection and location of air leaks in a pressure vessel, such as a spacecraft, includes sensing structure-borne ultrasound waveforms associated with turbulence caused by a leak from a plurality of sensors and cross correlating the waveforms to determine existence and location of the leak. Different configurations of sensors and corresponding methods can be used. An apparatus for performing the methods is also provided.

  7. Design of oil pipeline leak detection and communication system based on optical fiber technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Yaqing; Chen, Huabo

    1999-08-01

    The integrity of oil pipeline is always a major concern of operators. Pipeline leak not only leads to loss of oil, but pollutes environment. A new pipeline leak detection and communication system based on optical fiber technology to ensure the pipeline reliability is presented. Combined direct leak detection method with an indirect one, the system will greatly reduce the rate of false alarm. According, to the practical features of oil pipeline,the pipeline communication system is designed employing the state-of-the-art optic fiber communication technology. The system has such feature as high location accuracy of leak detection, good real-time characteristic, etc. which overcomes the disadvantages of traditional leak detection methods and communication system effectively.

  8. NDE of stainless steel and on-line leak monitoring of LWRs

    SciTech Connect

    Kupperman, D.S.; Claytor, T.N.; Mathieson, T.; Prine, D.W.

    1985-10-01

    The GARD/ANL acoustic leak detection system is under evaluation in the laboratory. Results of laboratory tests with simulated acoustic leak signals and acoustic signals from field-induced intergranular stress corrosion cracks (IGSCCs) indicate that cross-correlation techniques can be used to locate the position of a leak. Leaks from a 2-in. ball valve and a flange were studied and compared with leaks from IGSCCs and fatigue cracks. The dependence of acoustic signal on flow rate and frequency for the valve and the flange was comparable to that of fatigue cracks (thermal and mechanical) and different from that of IGSCCs. Two pipe-to-endcap weldments with overlays were examined. Because the amount of cracking in the specimens was limited, the emphasis was on trying understand the nature of crack overcalling. Four 60-mm-thick cast stainless steel plates with microstructures ranging from equiaxed to primarily columnar grains have been examined with ultrasonic waves. 13 refs., 23 figs.

  9. High sensitivity leak detection method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Myneni, G.R.

    1994-09-06

    An improved leak detection method is provided that utilizes the cyclic adsorption and desorption of accumulated helium on a non-porous metallic surface. The method provides reliable leak detection at superfluid helium temperatures. The zero drift that is associated with residual gas analyzers in common leak detectors is virtually eliminated by utilizing a time integration technique. The sensitivity of the apparatus of this disclosure is capable of detecting leaks as small as 1 [times] 10[sup [minus]18] atm cc sec[sup [minus]1]. 2 figs.

  10. High sensitivity leak detection method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Myneni, Ganapatic R.

    1994-01-01

    An improved leak detection method is provided that utilizes the cyclic adsorption and desorption of accumulated helium on a non-porous metallic surface. The method provides reliable leak detection at superfluid helium temperatures. The zero drift that is associated with residual gas analyzers in common leak detectors is virtually eliminated by utilizing a time integration technique. The sensitivity of the apparatus of this disclosure is capable of detecting leaks as small as 1.times.10.sup.-18 atm cc sec.sup.-1.

  11. Biphasic decay of the Ca transient results from increased sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca leak

    PubMed Central

    Sankaranarayanan, Rajiv; Li, Yatong; Greensmith, David J.; Eisner, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Key points Ca leak from the sarcoplasmic reticulum through the ryanodine receptor (RyR) reduces the amplitude of the Ca transient and slows its rate of decay.In the presence of β‐adrenergic stimulation, RyR‐mediated Ca leak produces a biphasic decay of the Ca transient with a fast early phase and a slow late phase.Two forms of Ca leak have been studied, Ca‐sensitising (induced by caffeine) and non‐sensitising (induced by ryanodine) and both induce biphasic decay of the Ca transient.Only Ca‐sensitising leak can be reversed by traditional RyR inhibitors such as tetracaine.Ca leak can also induce Ca waves. At low levels of leak, waves occur. As leak is increased, first biphasic decay and then slowed monophasic decay is seen. The level of leak has major effects on the shape of the Ca transient. Abstract In heart failure, a reduction in Ca transient amplitude and contractile dysfunction can by caused by Ca leak through the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca channel (ryanodine receptor, RyR) and/or decreased activity of the SR Ca ATPase (SERCA). We have characterised the effects of two forms of Ca leak (Ca‐sensitising and non‐sensitising) on calcium cycling and compared with those of SERCA inhibition. We measured [Ca2+]i with fluo‐3 in voltage‐clamped rat ventricular myocytes. Increasing SR leak with either caffeine (to sensitise the RyR to Ca activation) or ryanodine (non‐sensitising) had similar effects to SERCA inhibition: decreased systolic [Ca2+]i, increased diastolic [Ca2+]i and slowed decay. However, in the presence of isoproterenol, leak produced a biphasic decay of the Ca transient in the majority of cells while SERCA inhibition produced monophasic decay. Tetracaine reversed the effects of caffeine but not of ryanodine. When caffeine (1 mmol l−1) was added to a cell which displayed Ca waves, the wave frequency initially increased before waves disappeared and biphasic decay developed. Eventually (at higher caffeine concentrations), the

  12. Endotherapy of leaks and fistula

    PubMed Central

    Goenka, Mahesh Kumar; Goenka, Usha

    2015-01-01

    Perforations, leaks and fistula involving gastrointestinal (GI) tract are increasing encountered in clinical practice. There is a changing paradigm for their management with surgical approach being replaced by conservative approach including endoscopic therapy. Clips (through the scope and over the scope) and covered stent are front runners for endotherapy for GI leaks and fistula. Over the scope clips introduced recently, can treat larger defects compared to through the scope clips. Covered stents are suited for larger defects and those associated with luminal narrowing. However cervical esophagus, gastro-esophageal junction, stomach and right colonic lesions may be better for clip therapy rather than stenting. Recent developments in this field include use of endovac therapy which consists of a sponge with suction device, biodegradable stent, use of fibrin glue and some endo-suturing device. Conservative therapy with no surgical or endoscopic intervention, may be suitable for a small subset of patients. An algorithm based on location, size of defect, associated stricture, infection and available expertise needs to be developed to reduce the mortality and morbidity of this difficult clinical problem. PMID:26140097

  13. Intermediate-Scale Laboratory Experiments of Subsurface Flow and Transport Resulting from Tank Leaks

    SciTech Connect

    Oostrom, Martinus; Wietsma, Thomas W.

    2014-09-30

    Washington River Protection Solutions contracted with Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to conduct laboratory experiments and supporting numerical simulations to improve the understanding of water flow and contaminant transport in the subsurface between waste tanks and ancillary facilities at Waste Management Area C. The work scope included two separate sets of experiments: •Small flow cell experiments to investigate the occurrence of potential unstable fingering resulting from leaks and the limitations of the STOMP (Subsurface Transport Over Multiple Phases) simulator to predict flow patterns and solute transport behavior under these conditions. Unstable infiltration may, under certain conditions, create vertically elongated fingers potentially transporting contaminants rapidly through the unsaturated zone to groundwater. The types of leak that may create deeply penetrating fingers include slow release, long duration leaks in relatively permeable porous media. Such leaks may have occurred below waste tanks at the Hanford Site. •Large flow experiments to investigate the behavior of two types of tank leaks in a simple layered system mimicking the Waste Management Area C. The investigated leaks include a relatively large leak with a short duration from a tank and a long duration leak with a relatively small leakage rate from a cascade line.

  14. Implants as absolute anchorage.

    PubMed

    Rungcharassaeng, Kitichai; Kan, Joseph Y K; Caruso, Joseph M

    2005-11-01

    Anchorage control is essential for successful orthodontic treatment. Each tooth has its own anchorage potential as well as propensity to move when force is applied. When teeth are used as anchorage, the untoward movements of the anchoring units may result in the prolonged treatment time, and unpredictable or less-than-ideal outcome. To maximize tooth-related anchorage, techniques such as differential torque, placing roots into the cortex of the bone, the use of various intraoral devices and/or extraoral appliances have been implemented. Implants, as they are in direct contact with bone, do not possess a periodontal ligament. As a result, they do not move when orthodontic/orthopedic force is applied, and therefore can be used as "absolute anchorage." This article describes different types of implants that have been used as orthodontic anchorage. Their clinical applications and limitations are also discussed. PMID:16463910

  15. Absolute Equilibrium Entropy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shebalin, John V.

    1997-01-01

    The entropy associated with absolute equilibrium ensemble theories of ideal, homogeneous, fluid and magneto-fluid turbulence is discussed and the three-dimensional fluid case is examined in detail. A sigma-function is defined, whose minimum value with respect to global parameters is the entropy. A comparison is made between the use of global functions sigma and phase functions H (associated with the development of various H-theorems of ideal turbulence). It is shown that the two approaches are complimentary though conceptually different: H-theorems show that an isolated system tends to equilibrium while sigma-functions allow the demonstration that entropy never decreases when two previously isolated systems are combined. This provides a more complete picture of entropy in the statistical mechanics of ideal fluids.

  16. Leaks in nuclear grade high efficiency aerosol filters

    SciTech Connect

    Scripsick, R.C.

    1994-07-01

    Nuclear grade high efficiency aerosol filters, also known as high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters, are commonly used in air cleaning systems for removal of hazardous aerosols. Performance of the filter units is important in assuring health and environmental protection. The filter units are constructed from pleated packs of fiberglass filter media sealed into rigid frames. Results of previous studies on such filter units indicate that their performance may not be completely predicted by ideal performance of the fibrous filter media. In this study, departure from ideal performance is linked to leaks existing in filter units and overall filter unit performance is derived from independent performance of the individual filter unit components. The performance of 14 nuclear grade HEPA filter units (size 1, 25 cfm) with plywood frames was evaluated with a test system that permitted independent determination of penetration as a function of particle size for the whole filter unit, the filter unit frame, and the filter media pack. Tests were performed using a polydisperse aerosol of di-2-ethylhexyl phthalate with a count median diameter of 0.2 {mu}m and geometric standard deviation of 1.6. Flow rate and differential pressure were controlled from 1% to 100% of design values. Particle counts were made upstream and downstream of the filter unit with an optical particle counter (OPC). The OPC provided count information in 28 size channels over the particle diameter range from 0.1 to 0.7 {mu}m. Results provide evidence for a two component leak model of filler unit performance with: (1) external leaks through filter unit frames, and (2) internal leaks through defects in the media and through the seal between the media pack and frame. For the filter units evaluated, these leaks dominate overall filter unit performance over much of the flow rate and particle size ranges tested.

  17. 40 CFR 63.1005 - Leak repair.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... successful repair of the leak. (3) Maximum instrument reading measured by Method 21 of 40 CFR part 60... replacing the existing seal design with a new system that the owner or operator has determined will provide... delayed” and the reason for the delay if a leak is not repaired within 15 calendar days after discovery...

  18. 40 CFR 63.1024 - Leak repair.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... reading measured by Method 21 of 40 CFR part 60, appendix A at the time the leak is successfully repaired...) Repair requires replacing the existing seal design with a new system that the owner or operator has... repaired within 15 calendar days after discovery of the leak as specified in paragraphs (f)(4)(i) and...

  19. LEAKING UNDERGROUND STORAGE TANKS IN NEVADA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Points represent Leaking Underground Storage Tanks (LUST) for the State of Nevada. This database was developed and is maintained by the Nevada Department of Environmental Quality (NDEP), Bureau of Corrective Actions. Each point represents a tank where a leak event has occurred. ...

  20. Capacitive system detects and locates fluid leaks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Electronic monitoring system automatically detects and locates minute leaks in seams of large fluid storage tanks and pipelines covered with thermal insulation. The system uses a capacitive tape-sensing element that is adhesively bonded over seams where fluid leaks are likely to occur.

  1. Remote rocket engine leak detection techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maram, J. M.

    1993-06-01

    Optical imaging techniques have been successfully used for detection of leaks in rocket engine components using introduced gases such as sulfur hexafluoride and nitrous oxide. The approach used and past applications of the technology are described. The potential for direct detection of launch system propellant leaks is discussed.

  2. Distributed fiber optic fuel leak detection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza, Edgar; Kempen, C.; Esterkin, Yan; Sun, Sonjian

    2013-05-01

    With the increase worldwide demand for hydrocarbon fuels and the vast development of new fuel production and delivery infrastructure installations around the world, there is a growing need for reliable fuel leak detection technologies to provide safety and reduce environmental risks. Hydrocarbon leaks (gas or liquid) pose an extreme danger and need to be detected very quickly to avoid potential disasters. Gas leaks have the greatest potential for causing damage due to the explosion risk from the dispersion of gas clouds. This paper describes progress towards the development of a fast response, high sensitivity, distributed fiber optic fuel leak detection (HySenseTM) system based on the use of an optical fiber that uses a hydrocarbon sensitive fluorescent coating to detect the presence of fuel leaks present in close proximity along the length of the sensor fiber. The HySenseTM system operates in two modes, leak detection and leak localization, and will trigger an alarm within seconds of exposure contact. The fast and accurate response of the sensor provides reliable fluid leak detection for pipelines, tanks, airports, pumps, and valves to detect and minimize any potential catastrophic damage.

  3. Distributed fiber optic fuel leak detection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza, Edgar; Kempen, C.; Esterkin, Yan; Sun, Sunjian

    2013-05-01

    With the increase worldwide demand for hydrocarbon fuels and the vast development of new fuel production and delivery infrastructure installations around the world, there is a growing need for reliable fuel leak detection technologies to provide safety and reduce environmental risks. Hydrocarbon leaks (gas or liquid) pose an extreme danger and need to be detected very quickly to avoid potential disasters. Gas leaks have the greatest potential for causing damage due to the explosion risk from the dispersion of gas clouds. This paper describes progress towards the development of a fast response, high sensitivity, distributed fiber optic fuel leak detection (HySensTM) system based on the use of an optical fiber that uses a hydrocarbon sensitive fluorescent coating to detect the presence of fuel leaks present in close proximity along the length of the sensor fiber. The HySenseTM system operates in two modes, leak detection and leak localization, and will trigger an alarm within seconds of exposure contact. The fast and accurate response of the sensor provides reliable fluid leak detection for pipelines, tanks, airports, pumps, and valves to detect and minimize any potential catastrophic damage.

  4. Fighting the Epidemic of Nuclear Plant Leaks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Udell, Richard A.

    1983-01-01

    The current epidemic of steam generator tube leaks alone should put to rest the rosy future once envisioned for nuclear power. It is impossible to regulate quality into a nuclear plant; it must be built and designed that way. The economic impact of the leaks is discussed. (RM)

  5. 40 CFR 65.105 - Leak repair.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... leak. (3) Maximum instrument reading measured by Method 21 of appendix A of 40 CFR part 60 at the time... 40 Protection of Environment 15 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Leak repair. 65.105 Section 65.105 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED)...

  6. Leak checker data logging system

    DOEpatents

    Gannon, J.C.; Payne, J.J.

    1996-09-03

    A portable, high speed, computer-based data logging system for field testing systems or components located some distance apart employs a plurality of spaced mass spectrometers and is particularly adapted for monitoring the vacuum integrity of a long string of a superconducting magnets such as used in high energy particle accelerators. The system provides precise tracking of a gas such as helium through the magnet string when the helium is released into the vacuum by monitoring the spaced mass spectrometers allowing for control, display and storage of various parameters involved with leak detection and localization. A system user can observe the flow of helium through the magnet string on a real-time basis hour the exact moment of opening of the helium input valve. Graph reading can be normalized to compensate for magnet sections that deplete vacuum faster than other sections between testing to permit repetitive testing of vacuum integrity in reduced time. 18 figs.

  7. Leak checker data logging system

    DOEpatents

    Gannon, Jeffrey C.; Payne, John J.

    1996-01-01

    A portable, high speed, computer-based data logging system for field testing systems or components located some distance apart employs a plurality of spaced mass spectrometers and is particularly adapted for monitoring the vacuum integrity of a long string of a superconducting magnets such as used in high energy particle accelerators. The system provides precise tracking of a gas such as helium through the magnet string when the helium is released into the vacuum by monitoring the spaced mass spectrometers allowing for control, display and storage of various parameters involved with leak detection and localization. A system user can observe the flow of helium through the magnet string on a real-time basis hour the exact moment of opening of the helium input valve. Graph reading can be normalized to compensate for magnet sections that deplete vacuum faster than other sections between testing to permit repetitive testing of vacuum integrity in reduced time.

  8. Leak checker data logging system

    SciTech Connect

    Payne, J.J.; Gannon, J.C.

    1994-12-31

    A portable, high speed, computer-based data logging system for field testing systems or components located some distance apart employs a plurality of spaced mass spectrometers and is particularly adapted for monitoring the vacuum integrity of a long string of a superconducting magnets such as used in high energy particle accelerators. The system provides precise tracking of a gas such as helium through the magnet string when the helium is released into the vacuum by monitoring the spaced mass spectrometers allowing for control, display and storage of various parameters involved with leak detection and localization. A system user can observe the flow of helium through the magnet string on a real-time basis hour the exact moment of opening of the helium input valve. Graph reading can be normalized to compensate for magnet sections that deplete vacuum faster than other sections between testing to permit repetitive testing of vacuum integrity in reduced time.

  9. Absolute oral bioavailability of ciprofloxacin.

    PubMed

    Drusano, G L; Standiford, H C; Plaisance, K; Forrest, A; Leslie, J; Caldwell, J

    1986-09-01

    We evaluated the absolute bioavailability of ciprofloxacin, a new quinoline carboxylic acid, in 12 healthy male volunteers. Doses of 200 mg were given to each of the volunteers in a randomized, crossover manner 1 week apart orally and as a 10-min intravenous infusion. Half-lives (mean +/- standard deviation) for the intravenous and oral administration arms were 4.2 +/- 0.77 and 4.11 +/- 0.74 h, respectively. The serum clearance rate averaged 28.5 +/- 4.7 liters/h per 1.73 m2 for the intravenous administration arm. The renal clearance rate accounted for approximately 60% of the corresponding serum clearance rate and was 16.9 +/- 3.0 liters/h per 1.73 m2 for the intravenous arm and 17.0 +/- 2.86 liters/h per 1.73 m2 for the oral administration arm. Absorption was rapid, with peak concentrations in serum occurring at 0.71 +/- 0.15 h. Bioavailability, defined as the ratio of the area under the curve from 0 h to infinity for the oral to the intravenous dose, was 69 +/- 7%. We conclude that ciprofloxacin is rapidly absorbed and reliably bioavailable in these healthy volunteers. Further studies with ciprofloxacin should be undertaken in target patient populations under actual clinical circumstances. PMID:3777908

  10. Leak detection for underground storage tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Durgin, P.B. ); Young, T.M.

    1993-01-01

    This symposium was held in New Orleans, Louisiana on January 29, 1992. The purpose of this conference was to provide a forum for exchange of state-of-the-art information on leak detection for underground storage tanks that leaked fuel. A widespread concern was protection of groundwater supplies from these leaking tanks. In some cases, the papers report on research that was conducted two or three years ago but has never been adequately directed to the underground storage tank leak-detection audience. In other cases, the papers report on the latest leak-detection research. The symposium was divided into four sessions that were entitled: Internal Monitoring; External Monitoring; Regulations and Standards; and Site and Risk Evaluation. Individual papers have been cataloged separately for inclusion in the appropriate data bases.

  11. Microwave Radar Detection of Gas Pipeline Leaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopalsami, N.; Kanareykin, D. B.; Asanov, V.; Bakhtiari, S.; Raptis, A. C.

    2003-03-01

    We are developing a microwave radar sensing and imaging system to detect and locate gas leaks in natural gas pipelines. The underlying detection principle is radar backscattering from the index-of-refraction inhomogeneities introduced by the dispersion of methane in air. An essential first step in the development effort is modeling to estimate the radar cross section. This paper describes the modeling results and the experimental efforts underway to validate the model. For the case of leaks from small holes in a pressurized gas pipeline, we modeled the gas dynamics of the leak jet to determine the plume geometry and the variation of methane concentration in air as a function of distance from the leak source. From the static and dynamic changes in the index of refraction in the turbulent plume, the radar backscatter cross sections were calculated. The results show that the radar cross sections of the leak plumes should be detectable by special-purpose radars.

  12. The International Space Station 2B Photovoltaic Thermal Control System (PVTCS) Leak: An Operational History

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vareha, Anthony N.

    2014-01-01

    As early as 2004, the Photovoltaic Thermal Control System (PVTCS) for the International Space Station's 2B electrical power channel began slowly leaking ammonia overboard. Initially, the operations strategy was "feed the leak," a strategy successfully put into action via Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) during the STS-134 Space Shuttle mission. This recharge was to have allowed for continued power channel operation into 2014 or 2015, at which point another EVA would have been required. In mid-2012, the leak rate increased from 1.5lbm/year to approximately 5lbm/year. As a result, an EVA was planned and executed within a 5 week timeframe to drastically alter the architecture of the PVTCS via connection to an adjacent dormant thermal control system. This EVA, US EVA 20, was successfully executed on November 1, 2012 and left the 2B PVTCS in a configuration where the system was now being adequately cooled via a different radiator than what the system was designed to utilize. Data monitoring over the next several months showed that the isolated radiator had not been leaking, and the system itself continued to leak steadily until May 9th, 2013. It was on this day that the ISS crew noticed the visible presence of ammonia crystals escaping from the 2B channel's truss segment, signifying a rapid acceleration of the leak from 5lbm/year to 5lbm/day. Within 48 hours of the crew noticing the leak, US EVA 21 was in progress to replace the coolant pump - the only remaining replaceable leak source. This was successful, and telemetry monitoring has shown that indeed the coolant pump was the leak source and was thus isolated from the running 2B PVTCS. This paper will explore the management of the 2B PVTCS leak from the operations perspective.

  13. Absolute neutrino mass measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, Joachim

    2011-10-01

    The neutrino mass plays an important role in particle physics, astrophysics and cosmology. In recent years the detection of neutrino flavour oscillations proved that neutrinos carry mass. However, oscillation experiments are only sensitive to the mass-squared difference of the mass eigenvalues. In contrast to cosmological observations and neutrino-less double beta decay (0v2β) searches, single β-decay experiments provide a direct, model-independent way to determine the absolute neutrino mass by measuring the energy spectrum of decay electrons at the endpoint region with high accuracy. Currently the best kinematic upper limits on the neutrino mass of 2.2eV have been set by two experiments in Mainz and Troitsk, using tritium as beta emitter. The next generation tritium β-experiment KATRIN is currently under construction in Karlsruhe/Germany by an international collaboration. KATRIN intends to improve the sensitivity by one order of magnitude to 0.2eV. The investigation of a second isotope (137Rh) is being pursued by the international MARE collaboration using micro-calorimeters to measure the beta spectrum. The technology needed to reach 0.2eV sensitivity is still in the R&D phase. This paper reviews the present status of neutrino-mass measurements with cosmological data, 0v2β decay and single β-decay.

  14. Absolute neutrino mass measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, Joachim

    2011-10-06

    The neutrino mass plays an important role in particle physics, astrophysics and cosmology. In recent years the detection of neutrino flavour oscillations proved that neutrinos carry mass. However, oscillation experiments are only sensitive to the mass-squared difference of the mass eigenvalues. In contrast to cosmological observations and neutrino-less double beta decay (0v2{beta}) searches, single {beta}-decay experiments provide a direct, model-independent way to determine the absolute neutrino mass by measuring the energy spectrum of decay electrons at the endpoint region with high accuracy.Currently the best kinematic upper limits on the neutrino mass of 2.2eV have been set by two experiments in Mainz and Troitsk, using tritium as beta emitter. The next generation tritium {beta}-experiment KATRIN is currently under construction in Karlsruhe/Germany by an international collaboration. KATRIN intends to improve the sensitivity by one order of magnitude to 0.2eV. The investigation of a second isotope ({sup 137}Rh) is being pursued by the international MARE collaboration using micro-calorimeters to measure the beta spectrum. The technology needed to reach 0.2eV sensitivity is still in the R and D phase. This paper reviews the present status of neutrino-mass measurements with cosmological data, 0v2{beta} decay and single {beta}-decay.

  15. Ultrasonic Detectors Safely Identify Dangerous, Costly Leaks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2013-01-01

    In 1990, NASA grounded its space shuttle fleet. The reason: leaks detected in the hydrogen fuel systems of the Space Shuttles Atlantis and Columbia. Unless the sources of the leaks could be identified and fixed, the shuttles would not be safe to fly. To help locate the existing leaks and check for others, Kennedy Space Center engineers used portable ultrasonic detectors to scan the fuel systems. As a gas or liquid escapes from a leak, the resulting turbulence creates ultrasonic noise, explains Gary Mohr, president of Elmsford, New York-based UE Systems Inc., a long-time leader in ultrasonic detector technologies. "In lay terms, the leak is like a dog whistle, and the detector is like the dog ear." Because the ultrasound emissions from a leak are highly localized, they can be used not only to identify the presence of a leak but also to help pinpoint a leak s location. The NASA engineers employed UE s detectors to examine the shuttle fuel tanks and solid rocket boosters, but encountered difficulty with the devices limited range-certain areas of the shuttle proved difficult or unsafe to scan up close. To remedy the problem, the engineers created a long-range attachment for the detectors, similar to "a zoom lens on a camera," Mohr says. "If you are on the ground, and the leak is 50 feet away, the detector would now give you the same impression as if you were only 25 feet away." The enhancement also had the effect of reducing background noise, allowing for a clearer, more precise detection of a leak s location.

  16. Demonstration of rapid and sensitive module leak certification for Space Station Freedom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dietz, R. N.; Goodrich, R. W.

    1991-01-01

    A leak detection and quantification demonstration using perflurocarbon tracer (PFT) technology was successfully performed at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center on January 25, 1991. The real-time Dual Trap Analyzer (DTA) at one-half hour after the start of the first run gave an estimated leak rate of 0.7 mL/min. This has since been refined to be 1.15 (+ or -) 0.09 mL/min. The leak rates in the next three runs were determined to be 9.8 (+ or -) 0.7, -0.4 (+ or -) 0.3, and 76 (+ or -) 6 mL/min, respectively. The theory on leak quantification in the steady-state and time-dependent modes for a single zone test facility was developed and applied to the above determinations. The laboratory PFT analysis system gave a limit-of-detection (LOD) of 0.05 fL for ocPDCH. This is the tracer of choice and is about 100-fold better than that for the DTA. Applied to leak certification, the LOD is about 0.00002 mL/s (0.000075 L/h), a 5 order-of-magnitude improvement over the original leak certification specification. Furthermore, this limit can be attained in a measurement period of 3 to 4 hours instead of days, weeks, or months. A new Leak Certification Facility is also proposed to provide for zonal (three zones) determination of leak rates. The appropriate multizone equations, their solutions, and error analysis have already been derived. A new concept of seal-integrity certification has been demonstrated for a variety of controlled leaks in the range of module leak testing. High structural integrity leaks were shown to have a linear dependence of flow on (Delta)p. The rapid determination of leak rates at different pressures is proposed and is to be determined while subjecting the module to other external force-generating parameters such as vibration, torque, solar intensity, etc.

  17. Optimal diagnosis of anastomotic colorectal leak by combination of conventional colonic enema and CT.

    PubMed

    Danse, E; Goncette, L; Kartheuser, A

    2007-01-01

    Post-operative complications of colorectal surgery occur not uncommonly. They have to be detected as early as possible, in order to reduce their morbidity and mortality rates. The most frequent early complications are abscesses, mechanical obstruction, and anastomotic leak. Imaging studies are required in order to assess such complications. We present a case for which radiological procedures were contributive for an optimal diagnosis of anastomotic leak following colo-rectal anastomosis. We emphasize the role of conventional radiology (contrast enema) combined with CT in the post-operative detection of an anastomotic intestinal leak. PMID:18376770

  18. Demonstration of rapid and sensitive module leak certification for space station freedom

    SciTech Connect

    Dietz, R.N.; Goodrich, R.W. )

    1991-03-01

    A leak detection and quantification demonstration using perflurocarbon tracer (PFT) technology was successfully performed at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center on January 25, 1991. The real-time Dual Trap Analyzer (DTA) at one-half hour after the start of the first run gave an estimated leak rate of 0.7 mL/min. This has since been refined to be 1.15 {plus minus} 0.09 mL/min. The leak rates in the next three runs were determined to be 9.8 {plus minus} 0.7, {minus}0.4 {plus minus} 0.3, and 76 {plus minus} 6 mL/min, respectively. The theory on leak quantification in the steady-state and time-dependent modes for a single zone test facility was developed and applied to the above determinations. The laboratory PFT analysis system gave a limit-of-detection (LOD) of 0.05 fL for ocPDCH. This is the tracer of choice and is about 100-fold better than that for the DTA. Applied to leak certification, the LOD is about 0.00002 mL/s (0.000075 L/h), a 5 order-of-magnitude improvement over the original leak certification specification. Furthermore, this limit can be attained in a measurement period of 3 to 4 hours instead of days, weeks, or months. A new Leak Certification Facility is also proposed to provide for zonal (three zones) determination of leak rates. The appropriate multizone equations, their solutions, and error analysis have already been derived. A new concept of seal-integrity certification has been demonstrated for a variety of controlled leaks in the range of module leak testing. High structural integrity leaks were shown to have a linear dependence of flow on {Delta}p. The rapid determination of leak rates at different pressures is proposed and is to be determined while subjecting the module to other external force-generating parameters such as vibration, torque, solar intensity, etc. 13 refs.

  19. Demonstration of rapid and sensitive module leak certification for space station freedom. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Dietz, R.N.; Goodrich, R.W.

    1991-03-01

    A leak detection and quantification demonstration using perflurocarbon tracer (PFT) technology was successfully performed at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center on January 25, 1991. The real-time Dual Trap Analyzer (DTA) at one-half hour after the start of the first run gave an estimated leak rate of 0.7 mL/min. This has since been refined to be 1.15 {plus_minus} 0.09 mL/min. The leak rates in the next three runs were determined to be 9.8 {plus_minus} 0.7, {minus}0.4 {plus_minus} 0.3, and 76 {plus_minus} 6 mL/min, respectively. The theory on leak quantification in the steady-state and time-dependent modes for a single zone test facility was developed and applied to the above determinations. The laboratory PFT analysis system gave a limit-of-detection (LOD) of 0.05 fL for ocPDCH. This is the tracer of choice and is about 100-fold better than that for the DTA. Applied to leak certification, the LOD is about 0.00002 mL/s (0.000075 L/h), a 5 order-of-magnitude improvement over the original leak certification specification. Furthermore, this limit can be attained in a measurement period of 3 to 4 hours instead of days, weeks, or months. A new Leak Certification Facility is also proposed to provide for zonal (three zones) determination of leak rates. The appropriate multizone equations, their solutions, and error analysis have already been derived. A new concept of seal-integrity certification has been demonstrated for a variety of controlled leaks in the range of module leak testing. High structural integrity leaks were shown to have a linear dependence of flow on {Delta}p. The rapid determination of leak rates at different pressures is proposed and is to be determined while subjecting the module to other external force-generating parameters such as vibration, torque, solar intensity, etc. 13 refs.

  20. An improved PCA method with application to boiler leak detection.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xi; Marquez, Horacio J; Chen, Tongwen; Riaz, Muhammad

    2005-07-01

    Principal component analysis (PCA) is a popular fault detection technique. It has been widely used in process industries, especially in the chemical industry. In industrial applications, achieving a sensitive system capable of detecting incipient faults, which maintains the false alarm rate to a minimum, is a crucial issue. Although a lot of research has been focused on these issues for PCA-based fault detection and diagnosis methods, sensitivity of the fault detection scheme versus false alarm rate continues to be an important issue. In this paper, an improved PCA method is proposed to address this problem. In this method, a new data preprocessing scheme and a new fault detection scheme designed for Hotelling's T2 as well as the squared prediction error are developed. A dynamic PCA model is also developed for boiler leak detection. This new method is applied to boiler water/steam leak detection with real data from Syncrude Canada's utility plant in Fort McMurray, Canada. Our results demonstrate that the proposed method can effectively reduce false alarm rate, provide effective and correct leak alarms, and give early warning to operators. PMID:16082787

  1. Absolute Identification by Relative Judgment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Neil; Brown, Gordon D. A.; Chater, Nick

    2005-01-01

    In unidimensional absolute identification tasks, participants identify stimuli that vary along a single dimension. Performance is surprisingly poor compared with discrimination of the same stimuli. Existing models assume that identification is achieved using long-term representations of absolute magnitudes. The authors propose an alternative…

  2. Be Resolute about Absolute Value

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kidd, Margaret L.

    2007-01-01

    This article explores how conceptualization of absolute value can start long before it is introduced. The manner in which absolute value is introduced to students in middle school has far-reaching consequences for their future mathematical understanding. It begins to lay the foundation for students' understanding of algebra, which can change…

  3. Tank leak detection using electrical resistance methods

    SciTech Connect

    Ramirez, A.; Daily, W.; Binley, A.; LaBrecque, D.

    1996-01-01

    Large volumes of hazardous liquids and high-level radioactive wastes are stored worldwide in surface and underground tanks. Frequently these tanks are found to leak, thereby resulting in not only a loss of stored inventory, but in contamination to soils and groundwater. It is important to develop a reliable method of detecting leaks before large quantities are emitted into the environment surround the tanks. Two field experiments were performed to evaluate the performance of electrical resistance tomography (ERT) as a leak detection method under metal underground storage tanks (UST). This paper provides a summary of the field experiments performed under a 15 m diameter steel tank mockup located at the Hanford Reservation.

  4. Analytical and experimental studies of leak location and environment characterization for the international space station

    SciTech Connect

    Woronowicz, Michael; Blackmon, Rebecca; Brown, Martin; Abel, Joshua; Hawk, Doug; Autrey, David; Glenn, Jodie; Bond, Tim; Buffington, Jesse; Cheng, Edward; Ma, Jonathan; Rossetti, Dino; DeLatte, Danielle; Garcia, Kelvin; Mohammed, Jelila; Montt de Garcia, Kristina; Perry, Radford; Tull, Kimathi; Warren, Eric

    2014-12-09

    The International Space Station program is developing a robotically-operated leak locator tool to be used externally. The tool would consist of a Residual Gas Analyzer for partial pressure measurements and a full range pressure gauge for total pressure measurements. The primary application is to demonstrate the ability to detect NH{sub 3} coolant leaks in the ISS thermal control system. An analytical model of leak plume physics is presented that can account for effusive flow as well as plumes produced by sonic orifices and thruster operations. This model is used along with knowledge of typical RGA and full range gauge performance to analyze the expected instrument sensitivity to ISS leaks of various sizes and relative locations (“directionality”). The paper also presents experimental results of leak simulation testing in a large thermal vacuum chamber at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. This test characterized instrument sensitivity as a function of leak rates ranging from 1 lb{sub m/}/yr. to about 1 lb{sub m}/day. This data may represent the first measurements collected by an RGA or ion gauge system monitoring off-axis point sources as a function of location and orientation. Test results are compared to the analytical model and used to propose strategies for on-orbit leak location and environment characterization using the proposed instrument while taking into account local ISS conditions and the effects of ram/wake flows and structural shadowing within low Earth orbit.

  5. Analytical and Experimental Studies of Leak Location and Environment Characterization for the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woronowicz, Michael; Abel, Joshua; Autrey, David; Blackmon, Rebecca; Bond, Tim; Brown, Martin; Buffington, Jesse; Cheng, Edward; DeLatte, Danielle; Garcia, Kelvin; Glenn, Jodie; Hawk, Doug; Ma, Jonathan; Mohammed, Jelila; Montt de Garcia, Kristina; Perry, Radford; Rossetti, Dino; Tull, Kimathi; Warren, Eric

    2014-01-01

    The International Space Station program is developing a robotically-operated leak locator tool to be used externally. The tool would consist of a Residual Gas Analyzer for partial pressure measurements and a full range pressure gauge for total pressure measurements. The primary application is to detect NH3 coolant leaks in the ISS thermal control system. An analytical model of leak plume physics is presented that can account for effusive flow as well as plumes produced by sonic orifices and thruster operations. This model is used along with knowledge of typical RGA and full range gauge performance to analyze the expected instrument sensitivity to ISS leaks of various sizes and relative locations ("directionality"). The paper also presents experimental results of leak simulation testing in a large thermal vacuum chamber at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. This test characterized instrument sensitivity as a function of leak rates ranging from 1 lb-mass/yr. to about 1 lb-mass/day. This data may represent the first measurements collected by an RGA or ion gauge system monitoring off-axis point sources as a function of location and orientation. Test results are compared to the analytical model and used to propose strategies for on-orbit leak location and environment characterization using the proposed instrument while taking into account local ISS conditions and the effects of ram/wake flows and structural shadowing within low Earth orbit.

  6. Analytical and Experimental Studies of Leak Location and Environment Characterization for the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woronowicz, Michael S.; Abel, Joshua C.; Autrey, David; Blackmon, Rebecca; Bond, Tim; Brown, Martin; Buffington, Jesse; Cheng, Edward; DeLatte, Danielle; Garcia, Kelvin; Glenn, Jodie; Hawk, Doug; Ma, Jonathan; Mohammed, Jelila; de Garcia, Kristina Montt; Perry, Radford; Rossetti, Dino; Tull, Kimathi; Warren, Eric

    2014-01-01

    The International Space Station program is developing a robotically-operated leak locator tool to be used externally. The tool would consist of a Residual Gas Analyzer for partial pressure measurements and a full range pressure gauge for total pressure measurements. The primary application is to detect NH3 coolant leaks in the ISS thermal control system.An analytical model of leak plume physics is presented that can account for effusive flow as well as plumes produced by sonic orifices and thruster operations. This model is used along with knowledge of typical RGA and full range gauge performance to analyze the expected instrument sensitivity to ISS leaks of various sizes and relative locations (directionality).The paper also presents experimental results of leak simulation testing in a large thermal vacuum chamber at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. This test characterized instrument sensitivity as a function of leak rates ranging from 1 lbmyr. to about 1 lbmday. This data may represent the first measurements collected by an RGA or ion gauge system monitoring off-axis point sources as a function of location and orientation. Test results are compared to the analytical model and used to propose strategies for on-orbit leak location and environment characterization using the proposed instrument while taking into account local ISS conditions and the effects of ramwake flows and structural shadowing within low Earth orbit.

  7. Analytical and experimental studies of leak location and environment characterization for the international space station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woronowicz, Michael; Abel, Joshua; Autrey, David; Blackmon, Rebecca; Bond, Tim; Brown, Martin; Buffington, Jesse; Cheng, Edward; DeLatte, Danielle; Garcia, Kelvin; Glenn, Jodie; Hawk, Doug; Ma, Jonathan; Mohammed, Jelila; de Garcia, Kristina Montt; Perry, Radford; Rossetti, Dino; Tull, Kimathi; Warren, Eric

    2014-12-01

    The International Space Station program is developing a robotically-operated leak locator tool to be used externally. The tool would consist of a Residual Gas Analyzer for partial pressure measurements and a full range pressure gauge for total pressure measurements. The primary application is to demonstrate the ability to detect NH3 coolant leaks in the ISS thermal control system. An analytical model of leak plume physics is presented that can account for effusive flow as well as plumes produced by sonic orifices and thruster operations. This model is used along with knowledge of typical RGA and full range gauge performance to analyze the expected instrument sensitivity to ISS leaks of various sizes and relative locations ("directionality"). The paper also presents experimental results of leak simulation testing in a large thermal vacuum chamber at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. This test characterized instrument sensitivity as a function of leak rates ranging from 1 lbm//yr. to about 1 lbm/day. This data may represent the first measurements collected by an RGA or ion gauge system monitoring off-axis point sources as a function of location and orientation. Test results are compared to the analytical model and used to propose strategies for on-orbit leak location and environment characterization using the proposed instrument while taking into account local ISS conditions and the effects of ram/wake flows and structural shadowing within low Earth orbit.

  8. Environmental policy -- A leaking drum?

    SciTech Connect

    Bishop, J.

    1995-07-01

    Twenty years ago, the US had virtually no overall environmental policy. Since then, one has evolved as a result of accumulated legislation, much of which was crafted in reaction to specific events, typically real or potential disasters. The familiar names of Love Canal, Times Beach, Bhopal and others are the symbolic anchor points of that evolution, which yielded Superfund, the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act, and other environmental statutes. The laws in each case were developed in response to particular environmental and health issues--clean water for drinking and recreation, unpolluted air, safe production of chemicals and chemical-based products. The result was a growing body of environmental legislation that eventually became an accumulate of requirements lacking internal consistency or coherence. Because policymaking followed, rather than guided, legislative actions, the policy itself became inconsistent and sometimes illogical. Like a drum that gradually and indiscriminately is filled with a mixture of mutually reactive chemicals, environmental policy increasingly became a volatile source of concern for those industries in whose midst it had been placed. Lately, there is growing consensus that the drum not only has been overfilled, it also is leaking.

  9. CONTAINMENT AND BARRIER LEAK DETECTION STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report summarizes regulatory requirements for construction of containment unit and leak detection monitoring, identifies and describes monitoring and measurement devices currently being used or researched, and provides case studies on the use of these techniques. Informati...

  10. Gasleak: A leak stopper; New computer program tracks gas leak repairs

    SciTech Connect

    Macdissi, T.J.; Reisner, R.K. )

    1988-11-01

    Keeping track of gas leaks in a large distribution system can be difficult and time-consuming job. This article presents GASLEAK, a personal computer program that tracks and assists in the scheduling of gas leak repairs. GASLEAK is a compiled menu-driven database program designed to operate on an IBM of IBM-compatible personal computer. The GASLEAK program allows the operator to enter, update, erase and report on gas leak information.

  11. Postoperative Low-Flow Cerebrospinal Fluid Leak of Endoscopic Endonasal Transsphenoidal Surgery for Pituitary Adenoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhan, Rucai; Chen, Songyu; Xu, Shujun; Liu, James K.; Li, Xingang

    2015-01-01

    Abstract To assess the effectiveness of continuous lumbar drainage (LD) for management of postoperative cerebrospinal fluid leaks after endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal approach for resection of pituitary adenoma. Three hundred eighty-four medical records of patients who were admitted to our institute during a 2.5-year period were retrospectively reviewed, 33 of them experienced low-flow cerebrospinal fluid leak postoperatively. If LD was used, all patients with low-flow cerebrospinal fluid leak were classified into 2 groups, lumbar drained group and conservatively treated group. The age, sex, management of cerebrospinal fluid leaks, and related complications were reviewed. Statistical comparisons between the 2 groups were made using SPSS 19.0 (IBM Corp, Armonk, NY). The differences were considered statistically significant if the P value was less than 0.05. Thirty-three of 384 (8.6%) experienced low-flow postoperative cerebrospinal fluid leaks. Cured rate of cerebrospinal fluid leak was 94.4% (17/18) in continuous lumbar drained group, and 93.3% (14/15) in control group. There were 2 (11.2%) patients who developed meningitis in the LD group and 1 (5.6%) patient in the control group. One patient required endoscopic repair of skull base because of persistent cerebrospinal fluid leak in both groups, with the rates of 5.6% and 6.7%, respectively. There was no significant difference noted in each rate in both groups. Placement of LD may not be necessary for the management of low-flow postoperative cerebrospinal fluid leak after using endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal approach to pituitary adenoma. PMID:26080170

  12. mpileaks - an MPI opject leak debugging library

    2011-11-14

    The mpileaks tool is to be used by MPI application developers to track and report leaked MPI objects, such as requests, groups, and datatypes. This debugging tool is useful as a quality assurance check for MPI applications, or it can be used to identify leaks fatal to long-running MPI applications. It provides an efficient method to report bugs that are otherwise fifficult to identify.

  13. Hydraulic-Leak Detector for Hidden Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, G. E.; Loo, S.

    1986-01-01

    Slow leakage of fluid made obvious. Indicator consists of wick wrapped at one end around joint to be monitored. Wick absorbs hydraulic fluid leaking from joint and transmits to opposite end, located outside cover plate and visible to inspector. Leakage manifested as discoloration of outside end of wick. Indicator reveals leaks in hidden fittings on hydraulic lines. Fast inspection of joints without disassembly. Used in aerospace, petroleum, chemical, nuclear, and other industries where removing covers for inspection impossible, difficult, or time-consuming.

  14. Leak Path Development in CO2 Wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torsater, M.; Todorovic, J.; Opedal, N.; Lavrov, A.

    2014-12-01

    Wells have in numerous scientific works been denoted the "weak link" of safe and cost-efficient CO2 Capture and Storage (CCS). Whether they are active or abandoned, all wells are man-made intrusions into the storage reservoir with sealing abilities depending on degradable materials like steel and cement. If dense CO2 is allowed to expand (e.g. due to leakage) it will cool down its surroundings and cause strong thermal and mechanical loading on the wellbore. In addition, CO2 reacts chemically with rock, cement and steel. To ensure long-term underground containment, it is therefore necessary to study how, why, where and when leakage occurs along CO2wells. If cement bonding to rock or casing is poor, leak paths can form already during drilling and completion of the well. In the present work, we have mapped the bonding quality of cement-rock and cement-steel interfaces - and measured their resistance towards CO2 flow. This involved a large experimental matrix including different rocks, steels, cement types and well fluids. The bonding qualities were measured on composite cores using micro computed tomography (µ-CT), and CO2 was flooded through the samples to determine leakage rates. These were further compared to numerical simulations of leakage through the digitalized µ-CT core data, and CO2chemical interactions with the materials were mapped using electron microscopy. We also present a new laboratory set-up for measuring how well integrity is affected by downhole temperature variations - and we showcase some initial results. Our work concludes that leak path development in CO2 wells depends critically on the drilling fluids and presflushes/spacers chosen already during drilling and completion of a well. Fluid films residing on rock and casing surfaces strongly degrade the quality of cement bonding. The operation of the well is also important, as even slight thermal cycling (between 10°C and 95°C on casing) leads to significant de-bonding of the annular cement.

  15. Modeling Leaking Gas Plume Migration

    SciTech Connect

    Silin, Dmitriy; Patzek, Tad; Benson, Sally M.

    2007-08-20

    In this study, we obtain simple estimates of 1-D plume propagation velocity taking into account the density and viscosity contrast between CO{sub 2} and brine. Application of the Buckley-Leverett model to describe buoyancy-driven countercurrent flow of two immiscible phases leads to a transparent theory predicting the evolution of the plume. We obtain that the plume does not migrate upward like a gas bubble in bulk water. Rather, it stretches upward until it reaches a seal or until the fluids become immobile. A simple formula requiring no complex numerical calculations describes the velocity of plume propagation. This solution is a simplification of a more comprehensive theory of countercurrent plume migration that does not lend itself to a simple analytical solution (Silin et al., 2006). The range of applicability of the simplified solution is assessed and provided. This work is motivated by the growing interest in injecting carbon dioxide into deep geological formations as a means of avoiding its atmospheric emissions and consequent global warming. One of the potential problems associated with the geologic method of sequestration is leakage of CO{sub 2} from the underground storage reservoir into sources of drinking water. Ideally, the injected green-house gases will stay in the injection zone for a geologically long time and eventually will dissolve in the formation brine and remain trapped by mineralization. However, naturally present or inadvertently created conduits in the cap rock may result in a gas leak from primary storage. Even in supercritical state, the carbon dioxide viscosity and density are lower than those of the indigenous formation brine. Therefore, buoyancy will tend to drive the CO{sub 2} upward unless it is trapped beneath a low permeability seal. Theoretical and experimental studies of buoyancy-driven supercritical CO{sub 2} flow, including estimation of time scales associated with plume evolution, are critical for developing technology

  16. Automated Hydrogen Gas Leak Detection System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The Gencorp Aerojet Automated Hydrogen Gas Leak Detection System was developed through the cooperation of industry, academia, and the Government. Although the original purpose of the system was to detect leaks in the main engine of the space shuttle while on the launch pad, it also has significant commercial potential in applications for which there are no existing commercial systems. With high sensitivity, the system can detect hydrogen leaks at low concentrations in inert environments. The sensors are integrated with hardware and software to form a complete system. Several of these systems have already been purchased for use on the Ford Motor Company assembly line for natural gas vehicles. This system to detect trace hydrogen gas leaks from pressurized systems consists of a microprocessor-based control unit that operates a network of sensors. The sensors can be deployed around pipes, connectors, flanges, and tanks of pressurized systems where leaks may occur. The control unit monitors the sensors and provides the operator with a visual representation of the magnitude and locations of the leak as a function of time. The system can be customized to fit the user's needs; for example, it can monitor and display the condition of the flanges and fittings associated with the tank of a natural gas vehicle.

  17. 49 CFR 230.64 - Leaks under lagging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Leaks under lagging. 230.64 Section 230.64... Steam Leaks § 230.64 Leaks under lagging. The steam locomotive owner and/or operator shall take out of service at once any boiler that has developed a leak under the lagging due to a crack in the shell, or...

  18. 40 CFR 1065.345 - Vacuum-side leak verification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Vacuum-side leak verification. 1065....345 Vacuum-side leak verification. (a) Scope and frequency. Verify that there are no significant vacuum-side leaks using one of the leak tests described in this section. For laboratory testing,...

  19. 40 CFR 1065.345 - Vacuum-side leak verification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Vacuum-side leak verification. 1065....345 Vacuum-side leak verification. (a) Scope and frequency. Verify that there are no significant vacuum-side leaks using one of the leak tests described in this section. For laboratory testing,...

  20. Percutaneous transcatheter closure of mitral paravalvular leak via transarterial retrograde approach

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Ho-Ping; Huang, Chi-Hung; Hou, Shaw-Min; Hsiung, Ming-Chon; Tsai, Shen-Kou; Yin, Wei-Hsian

    2015-01-01

    Repeat surgery has usually been considered the first choice to solve paravalvular leaks of prosthetic valves, but it carries a high operative risk, a high mortality rate and an increased risk for re-leaks. Percutaneous closure of such defects is possible, and different approaches and devices are used for this purpose. For mitral paravalvular leaks, constructing an arterio-venous wire loop for delivering the closure device through an antegrade approach is the most commonly used technique. Transcatheter closure can also be performed through a transapical approach or retrograde transfemoral arterial approach. We present a case of 68-year-old man with a mitral paravalvular leak that was successfully closed using an Amplatzer® Duct Occluder II, via retrograde transfemoral arterial approach under three-dimensional transesophageal echocardiographic guidance, without the use of a wire loop. The initial attempt to cross the paravalvular defect was unsuccessful, but the obstacle was finally overcome by introducing complex interventional techniques. PMID:26788047

  1. Method for oil pipeline leak detection based on distributed fiber optic technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Huabo; Tu, Yaqing; Luo, Ting

    1998-08-01

    Pipeline leak detection is a difficult problem to solve up to now. Some traditional leak detection methods have such problems as high rate of false alarm or missing detection, low location estimate capability. For the problems given above, a method for oil pipeline leak detection based on distributed optical fiber sensor with special coating is presented. The fiber's coating interacts with hydrocarbon molecules in oil, which alters the refractive indexed of the coating. Therefore the light-guiding properties of the fiber are modified. Thus pipeline leak location can be determined by OTDR. Oil pipeline lead detection system is designed based on the principle. The system has some features like real time, multi-point detection at the same time and high location accuracy. In the end, some factors that probably influence detection are analyzed and primary improving actions are given.

  2. Successful Treatment of Persistent Postcholecystectomy Bile Leak Using Percutaneous Cystic Duct Coiling

    PubMed Central

    Rai, Vinay; Beckley, Akin; Fabre, Anna; Bellows, Charles F.

    2015-01-01

    Laparoscopic cholecystectomy is one of the most commonly performed operations worldwide. Cystic duct is the most common site of bile leak after cholecystectomy. The treatment of choice is usually conservative. Using sufficient percutaneous drainage of the biloma cavity and endoscopic retrograde cholangiography (ERCP) with sphincterotomy and/or stenting, the cure rate of bile leaks is greater than 90%. In very rare cases, all of these measures remain unsuccessful. We report a technique for the successful treatment of persistent cystic duct leak. After failed ERCP and stenting, bile leak was treated by coiling the cystic duct through a drain tract. This technique is safe and effective and helps avoid the morbidity of reoperation. PMID:26798539

  3. AIRBORNE, OPTICAL REMOTE SENSNG OF METHANE AND ETHANE FOR NATURAL GAS PIPELINE LEAK DETECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Jerry Myers

    2005-04-15

    Ophir Corporation was awarded a contract by the U. S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory under the Project Title ''Airborne, Optical Remote Sensing of Methane and Ethane for Natural Gas Pipeline Leak Detection'' on October 14, 2002. The scope of the work involved designing and developing an airborne, optical remote sensor capable of sensing methane and, if possible, ethane for the detection of natural gas pipeline leaks. Flight testing using a custom dual wavelength, high power fiber amplifier was initiated in February 2005. Ophir successfully demonstrated the airborne system, showing that it was capable of discerning small amounts of methane from a simulated pipeline leak. Leak rates as low as 150 standard cubic feet per hour (scf/h) were detected by the airborne sensor.

  4. Endoscopic management of gastrointestinal perforations, leaks and fistulas

    PubMed Central

    Rogalski, Pawel; Daniluk, Jaroslaw; Baniukiewicz, Andrzej; Wroblewski, Eugeniusz; Dabrowski, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal perforations, leaks and fistulas may be serious and life-threatening. The increasing number of endoscopic procedures with a high risk of perforation and the increasing incidence of leakage associated with bariatric operations call for a minimally invasive treatment for these complications. The therapeutic approach can vary greatly depending on the size, location, and timing of gastrointestinal wall defect recognition. Some asymptomatic patients can be treated conservatively, while patients with septic symptoms or cardio-pulmonary insufficiency may require intensive care and urgent surgical treatment. However, most gastrointestinal wall defects can be satisfactorily treated by endoscopy. Although the initial endoscopic closure rates of chronic fistulas is very high, the long-term results of these treatments remain a clinical problem. The efficacy of endoscopic therapy depends on several factors and the best mode of treatment will depend on a precise localization of the site, the extent of the leak and the endoscopic appearance of the lesion. Many endoscopic tools for effective closure of gastrointestinal wall defects are currently available. In this review, we summarized the basic principles of the management of acute iatrogenic perforations, as well as of postoperative leaks and chronic fistulas of the gastrointestinal tract. We also described the effectiveness of various endoscopic methods based on current research and our experience. PMID:26457014

  5. Absolute Humidity and the Seasonality of Influenza (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaman, J. L.; Pitzer, V.; Viboud, C.; Grenfell, B.; Goldstein, E.; Lipsitch, M.

    2010-12-01

    Much of the observed wintertime increase of mortality in temperate regions is attributed to seasonal influenza. A recent re-analysis of laboratory experiments indicates that absolute humidity strongly modulates the airborne survival and transmission of the influenza virus. Here we show that the onset of increased wintertime influenza-related mortality in the United States is associated with anomalously low absolute humidity levels during the prior weeks. We then use an epidemiological model, in which observed absolute humidity conditions temper influenza transmission rates, to successfully simulate the seasonal cycle of observed influenza-related mortality. The model results indicate that direct modulation of influenza transmissibility by absolute humidity alone is sufficient to produce this observed seasonality. These findings provide epidemiological support for the hypothesis that absolute humidity drives seasonal variations of influenza transmission in temperate regions. In addition, we show that variations of the basic and effective reproductive numbers for influenza, caused by seasonal changes in absolute humidity, are consistent with the general timing of pandemic influenza outbreaks observed for 2009 A/H1N1 in temperate regions. Indeed, absolute humidity conditions correctly identify the region of the United States vulnerable to a third, wintertime wave of pandemic influenza. These findings suggest that the timing of pandemic influenza outbreaks is controlled by a combination of absolute humidity conditions, levels of susceptibility and changes in population mixing and contact rates.

  6. Laser-Pulse/Fiber-Optic Liquid-Leak Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padgett, M. E.

    1986-01-01

    Several potential leak sites monitored using single sensing fiber. Fluid systems monitored quickly for leaks in remote, hazardous, or inaccessible locations by system of compact, lightweight fiber-optic leak sensors presently undergoing development. Sensors installed at potential leak sites as joints, couplings, and fittings. Sensor read by sending laser pulse along fiber, then noting presence or relative amplitude of return pulse. Leak-monitoring technique applicable to wide range of fluid systems and minimizes human exposure to toxic or dangerous fluids.

  7. Detecting Conductive Liquid Leaking from Nonconductive Pipe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Youngquist, Robert C.

    2003-01-01

    A method that can be implemented with relatively simple electronic circuitry provides a capability for detecting leakage of an electrically conductive liquid from an electrically nonconductive underground pipe. Alternatively or in addition, the method can be applied to locate the pipe, whether or not there is a leak. Although the method is subject to limitations (some of which are described below), it is still attractive as an additional option for detecting leaks and locating pipes without need for extensive digging. The method is based on capacitive coupling of an alternating electrical signal from the liquid to a portable electronic unit that resembles a metal detector. A signal voltage is applied to the liquid at some convenient point along the pipe: for example, the signal could be coupled into the liquid via an aboveground metal pipe fitting, the interior surface of which is in contact with the liquid. The signal is conducted through the liquid in the pipe; in the case of diffusive leak of liquid into the surrounding ground, the signal is conducted through the leak, into the portion of the adjacent ground that has become soaked with the liquid. (A drip leak cannot be detected by this method because there is no conductive path between the liquid inside and the liquid outside the pipe.) The portable unit includes an electrically conductive plate connected to the input terminal of an amplifier. When the plate is brought near the pipe or the leaked liquid, a small portion of the signal power is coupled capacitively from the liquid to the plate. The user scans the plate near the ground surface to find the locus of maximum signal strength. The leak can be identified as a relatively wide area, contiguous with the location of the pipe, over which the signal is detectable.

  8. [Geriatrics: an absolute necessity].

    PubMed

    Oostvogel, F J

    1982-02-01

    The medical care for elderly people could be greatly improved. If no specific attention is paid immediately, namely through the various training courses and by way of further and part-time schooling, then this medical care will remain unsatisfactory. This situation worsens continually due to the growing number of elderly people and, within this group, a much higher rate of very aged people. Increasing the care in institutions is altogether unsatisfactory. The problem should be dealt with structurally and the emphasis placed upon prevention and early-diagnosis. There is an urgent need for an integrated method, keeping in mind the limits of the elderly person, from the physical, psychological and social aspects. This demands teamwork in a multidisciplinary system inside as well as outside the institutions. It demands a thorough knowledge of geriatrics based upon gerontology. Geriatricians are urgently needed in this development together with doctors in nursing homes, general practitioners and specialists, so that the necessary care may be established as quickly as possible. PMID:7101393

  9. Transcatheter ablation of an iatrogenic renal artery pseudoaneurysm with absolute alcohol: A rare case report

    PubMed Central

    Beig, Jahangir; Hafeez, Imran; Tramboo, Nisar Ahmed; Rather, Hilal; Yaqoob, Irfan

    2014-01-01

    A 25 year old male was admitted with features of life threatening renal haemorrhage after undergoing open nephrolithotomy for a staghorn calculus of the right kidney. CECT abdomen and selective renal angiography revealed a 2.5 × 3.0 cm pseudoaneurysm arising from the lower segmental branch of right renal artery, leaking into retroperitoneal space. After an initial failed attempt of transcatheter embolization with N-butyl cyanoacrylate (NBCA) and 10% lipiodol mixture, the pseudoaneurysm was successfully ablated with absolute alcohol. Our case demonstrates that absolute alcohol ablation is a safe and effective modality for controlling haemorrhage from an iatrogenic renal artery pseudoaneurysm. PMID:25634415

  10. Operational Philosophy Concerning Manned Spacecraft Cabin Leaks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeSimpelaere, Edward

    2011-01-01

    The last thirty years have seen the Space Shuttle as the prime United States spacecraft for manned spaceflight missions. Many lessons have been learned about spacecraft design and operation throughout these years. Over the next few decades, a large increase of manned spaceflight in the commercial sector is expected. This will result in the exposure of commercial crews and passengers to many of the same risks crews of the Space Shuttle have encountered. One of the more dire situations that can be encountered is the loss of pressure in the habitable volume of the spacecraft during on orbit operations. This is referred to as a cabin leak. This paper seeks to establish a general cabin leak response philosophy with the intent of educating future spacecraft designers and operators. After establishing a relative definition for a cabin leak, the paper covers general descriptions of detection equipment, detection methods, and general operational methods for management of a cabin leak. Subsequently, all these items are addressed from the perspective of the Space Shuttle Program, as this will be of the most value to future spacecraft due to similar operating profiles. Emphasis here is placed upon why and how these methods and philosophies have evolved to meet the Space Shuttle s needs. This includes the core ideas of: considerations of maintaining higher cabin pressures vs. lower cabin pressures, the pros and cons of a system designed to feed the leak with gas from pressurized tanks vs. using pressure suits to protect against lower cabin pressures, timeline and consumables constraints, re-entry considerations with leaks of unknown origin, and the impact the International Space Station (ISS) has had to the standard Space Shuttle cabin leak response philosophy. This last item in itself includes: procedural management differences, hardware considerations, additional capabilities due to the presence of the ISS and its resource, and ISS docking/undocking considerations with a

  11. Absolute radiometry and the solar constant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willson, R. C.

    1974-01-01

    A series of active cavity radiometers (ACRs) are described which have been developed as standard detectors for the accurate measurement of irradiance in absolute units. It is noted that the ACR is an electrical substitution calorimeter, is designed for automatic remote operation in any environment, and can make irradiance measurements in the range from low-level IR fluxes up to 30 solar constants with small absolute uncertainty. The instrument operates in a differential mode by chopping the radiant flux to be measured at a slow rate, and irradiance is determined from two electrical power measurements together with the instrumental constant. Results are reported for measurements of the solar constant with two types of ACRs. The more accurate measurement yielded a value of 136.6 plus or minus 0.7 mW/sq cm (1.958 plus or minus 0.010 cal/sq cm per min).

  12. Absolute calibration of TFTR helium proportional counters

    SciTech Connect

    Strachan, J.D.; Diesso, M.; Jassby, D.; Johnson, L.; McCauley, S.; Munsat, T.; Roquemore, A.L.; Barnes, C.W. |; Loughlin, M. |

    1995-06-01

    The TFTR helium proportional counters are located in the central five (5) channels of the TFTR multichannel neutron collimator. These detectors were absolutely calibrated using a 14 MeV neutron generator positioned at the horizontal midplane of the TFTR vacuum vessel. The neutron generator position was scanned in centimeter steps to determine the collimator aperture width to 14 MeV neutrons and the absolute sensitivity of each channel. Neutron profiles were measured for TFTR plasmas with time resolution between 5 msec and 50 msec depending upon count rates. The He detectors were used to measure the burnup of 1 MeV tritons in deuterium plasmas, the transport of tritium in trace tritium experiments, and the residual tritium levels in plasmas following 50:50 DT experiments.

  13. Use of an Autologous Liver Round Ligament Flap Zeros Postoperative Bile Leak after Curative Resection of Hilar Cholangiocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Da-Xin; Tan, Xiao-Dong; Gao, Feng; Xu, Jin; Cui, Dong-Xu; Dai, Xian-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Background Postoperative bile leak is a major surgical morbidity after curative resection with hepaticojejunostomy for hilar cholangiocarcinoma, especially in Bismuth-Corlette types III and IV. This retrospective study assessed the effectiveness and safety of an autologous hepatic round ligament flap (AHRLF) for reducing bile leak after hilar hepaticojejunostomy. Methods Nine type III and IV hilar cholangiocarcinoma patients were consecutively hospitalized for elective perihilar partial hepatectomy with hilar hepaticojejunostomy using an AHRLF between October 2009 and September 2013. The AHRLF was harvested to reinforce the perihilar hepaticojejunostomy. Main outcome measures included operative time, blood loss, postoperative recovery times, morbidity, bile leak, R0 resection rate, and overall survival. Results All patients underwent uneventful R0 resection with hilar hepaticojejunostomy. No patient experienced postoperative bile leak. Conclusions The AHRLF was associated with lack of bile leak after curative perihilar hepatectomy with hepaticojejunostomy for hilar cholangiocarcinoma, without compromising oncologic safety, and is recommended in selected patients. PMID:25938440

  14. Standoff gas leak detectors based on tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frish, M. B.; Wainner, R. T.; Green, B. D.; Laderer, M. C.; Allen, M. G.

    2005-11-01

    Trace gas sensing and analysis by Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy (TDLAS) has become a robust and reliable technology accepted for industrial process monitoring and control, quality assurance, environmental sensing, plant safety, and infrastructure security. Sensors incorporating well-packaged wavelength-stabilized near-infrared (1.2 to 2.0 μm) laser sources sense over a dozen toxic or industrially-important gases. A large emerging application for TDLAS is standoff sensing of gas leaks, e.g. from natural gas pipelines. The Remote Methane Leak Detector (RMLD), a handheld standoff TDLAS leak survey tool that we developed, is replacing traditional leak detection tools that must be physically immersed within a leak to detect it. Employing a 10 mW 1.6 micron DFB laser, the RMLD illuminates a non-cooperative topographic surface, up to 30 m distant, and analyzes returned scattered light to deduce the presence of excess methane. The eye-safe, battery-powered, 6-pound handheld RMLD enhances walking pipeline survey rates by more than 30%. When combined with a spinning or rastering mirror, the RMLD serves as a platform for mobile leak mapping systems. Also, to enable high-altitude surveying and provide aerial disaster response, we are extending the standoff range to 3000 m by adding an EDFA to the laser transmitter.

  15. ICPP water inventory study leak test report

    SciTech Connect

    Richards, B.T.

    1993-12-01

    Data from the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) indicate that there are three areas where perched water bodies (groundwater) are suspect to exist beneath the ICPP. Questions have been raised concerning the recharge sources for the northwest (NW) perched water body which is located below the northwest area of the ICPP. In response to these questions, a Water Inventory Study was initiated to determine the extent and the potential impacts of the ICPP water systems as a recharge source. A key part of the Water Inventory Study was the leak test investigation, performed to leak test the ICPP water piping distribution system, or portions thereof, which could potentially contribute to the recharge of the NW perched water body. This report provides an overview and the results of the leak test investigation and will be incorporated into the overall Water Inventory Study Report.

  16. Remote Leak Detection: Indirect Thermal Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clements, Sandra

    2002-01-01

    Remote sensing technologies are being considered for efficient, low cost gas leak detection. Eleven specific techniques have been identified for further study and evaluation of several of these is underway. The Indirect Thermal Technique is one of the techniques that is being explored. For this technique, an infrared camera is used to detect the temperature change of a pipe or fitting at the site of a gas leak. This temperature change is caused by the change in temperature of the gas expanding from the leak site. During the 10-week NFFP program, the theory behind the technique was further developed, experiments were performed to determine the conditions for which the technique might be viable, and a proof-of-concept system was developed and tested in the laboratory.

  17. Spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid leak at the clivus

    PubMed Central

    Składzien, Jacek; Betlej, Marek; Chrzan, Robert; Mika, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    We present a case report of a 60-year-old woman with a spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid leak at the clivus, obesity and no history of trauma. Follow-up imaging scans confirmed enlargement of the defect within the posterior clival framework to the size of 16 × 9 × 4 mm with a suspected meningocerebral hernia. The surgeons used the “two nostrils – four hands” endoscopic operating technique. The patient reported a history of cerebrospinal fluid leaks lasting for 3 years, with increasingly shorter leak-free periods and an increasing incidence of inflammatory complications. The patient recovered without complications, and she was discharged 14 days after the surgery. Good local outcome and improved patient condition were achieved postoperatively. PMID:26865899

  18. Real-time electronic monitoring of a pitted and leaking gas gathering pipeline

    SciTech Connect

    Asperger, R.G.; Hewitt, P.G.

    1986-08-01

    Hydrogen patch, flush electrical resistance, and flush linear polarization proves wre used with flush coupons to monitor corrosion rates in a pitted and leaking sour gas gathering line. Four inhibitors were evaluated in stopping the leaks. Inhibitor residuals and the amount and ratio of water and condensate in the lines were measured at five locations along the line. The best inhibitor reduced reduced the pit-leak frequency by over a factor of 10. Inhibitor usage rate was optimized using the hydrogen patch current as a measure of the instantaneous corrosion rate. Improper pigging was identified as a cause of corrosion transients. This problem is discussed in relation to the pigging of pipelines in stratified flow where moving fluids are the carriers for continuously injected corrosion inhibitors.

  19. Laser Schlieren System Detects Sounds Of Leaks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shakkottai, Parthasarathy P.; Alwar, A. Vijayaragavan

    1990-01-01

    Hostile environments monitored safely and noninvasively. Modified laser schlieren system acts as microphone to detect sounds of leaks remotely. Sensitive to acoustical frequencies above audible range and especially suited for monitoring leaks of high-pressure steam from boilers or chemical vapors from processing equipment. Does not require placement of delicate equipment in harsh environment monitored, and no contact needed with boiler or other unit being monitored. Detects sound waves via variation of index of refraction of air at acoustical frequencies. Used to monitor sound frequencies beyond range of human hearing.

  20. Apparatus for Leak Testing Pressurized Hoses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Underwood, Steve D. (Inventor); Garrison, Steve G. (Inventor); Gant, Bobby D. (Inventor); Palmer, John R. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A hose-attaching apparatus for leak-testing a pressurized hose may include a hose-attaching member. A bore may extend through the hose-attaching member. An internal annular cavity may extend coaxially around the bore. At least one of a detector probe hole and a detector probe may be connected to the internal annular cavity. At least a portion of the bore may have a diameter which is at least one of substantially equal to and less than a diameter of a hose to be leak-tested.

  1. Technique for detecting liquid metal leaks

    DOEpatents

    Bauerle, James E.

    1979-01-01

    In a system employing flowing liquid metal as a heat transfer medium in contact with tubular members containing a working fluid, i.e., steam, liquid metal leaks through the wall of the tubular member are detected by dislodging the liquid metal compounds forming in the tubular member at the leak locations and subsequently transporting the dislodged compound in the form of an aerosol to a detector responsive to the liquid metal compound. In the application to a sodium cooled tubular member, the detector would consist of a sodium responsive device, such as a sodium ion detector.

  2. Locating of leaks in water-cooled generator stator bars using perfluorocarbon tracers

    SciTech Connect

    Loss, W.M.; Dietz, R.N.

    1991-09-01

    Water cooled stator bars in power plant generators often fail during the maintenance cycle due to water leakage. After the hydrogen pressure in the generator shell has been released water can leak through cracks in the copper and through the insulation. Leaking bars, but not the leaks themselves, are detected with so-called ``hi-pot`` (high potential) tests where direct electrical current is applied to the stator bar windings. A study initiated by ConEd and Brookhaven`s Tracer Technology Center to explore the cause of these leakage problems to determine if the failures originate in the manufacturing process or are created in service by phase related torque stresses. To this purpose bars that had failed the hi-pot test were investigated first with the insulation in place and then stripped to the bare copper. The bars were pressurized with gases containing perfluorocarbon tracers and the magnitude and location of the leaks was detected by using tracers technology principles and instruments such as the ``double source`` method and the Dual Trap Analyzer. In the second part of the project the windings within a generator were tested in-situ for leaks during an outage using tracer principles. Recommendations are given suggesting the shut down of stator bar cooling water before hydrogen bleeding during outages and a revision of the current vent flow rate. The new standard should establish a reasonable leak rate for the stator bar windings proper and exclude leakage of pump seals and connections. Testing during the maintenance cycle in generators should include routine tracer leak detection following the hi-pot test.

  3. Locating of leaks in water-cooled generator stator bars using perfluorocarbon tracers

    SciTech Connect

    Loss, W.M.; Dietz, R.N.

    1991-09-01

    Water cooled stator bars in power plant generators often fail during the maintenance cycle due to water leakage. After the hydrogen pressure in the generator shell has been released water can leak through cracks in the copper and through the insulation. Leaking bars, but not the leaks themselves, are detected with so-called hi-pot'' (high potential) tests where direct electrical current is applied to the stator bar windings. A study initiated by ConEd and Brookhaven's Tracer Technology Center to explore the cause of these leakage problems to determine if the failures originate in the manufacturing process or are created in service by phase related torque stresses. To this purpose bars that had failed the hi-pot test were investigated first with the insulation in place and then stripped to the bare copper. The bars were pressurized with gases containing perfluorocarbon tracers and the magnitude and location of the leaks was detected by using tracers technology principles and instruments such as the double source'' method and the Dual Trap Analyzer. In the second part of the project the windings within a generator were tested in-situ for leaks during an outage using tracer principles. Recommendations are given suggesting the shut down of stator bar cooling water before hydrogen bleeding during outages and a revision of the current vent flow rate. The new standard should establish a reasonable leak rate for the stator bar windings proper and exclude leakage of pump seals and connections. Testing during the maintenance cycle in generators should include routine tracer leak detection following the hi-pot test.

  4. Absolute transition probabilities of phosphorus.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, M. H.; Roig, R. A.; Bengtson, R. D.

    1971-01-01

    Use of a gas-driven shock tube to measure the absolute strengths of 21 P I lines and 126 P II lines (from 3300 to 6900 A). Accuracy for prominent, isolated neutral and ionic lines is estimated to be 28 to 40% and 18 to 30%, respectively. The data and the corresponding theoretical predictions are examined for conformity with the sum rules.-

  5. Locating Small Leaks in Large Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawler, W. F.

    1983-01-01

    Test tool for detecting minute leads in bimetal joints, welds, or other locations employs fine-control valve and hypodermic needle. Test item is connected in conventional manner to helium mass spectrometer tuned to read extremely small amounts of helium gas. Uniqueness of method is ability to detect tiny leaks, through surfaces, not discoverable by gross coverage of test structures by helium gas.

  6. COPPER PITTING AND PINHOLE LEAK RESEARCH STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Localized copper corrosion or pitting is a significant problem at many water utilities across the United States. Copper pinhole leak problems resulting from extensive pitting are widely under reported. Given the sensitive nature of the problem, extent of damage possible, costs o...

  7. Subcapsular bile leak following percutaneous drainage

    SciTech Connect

    LaManna, M.M.; Korsvik, H.E.; Parker, J.A.

    1984-10-01

    The authors describe the scintigraphic appearance of a case of subcapsular biliary leak. Hepatobiliary scintigraphy using Tc-99m labeled radiopharmaceuticals is employed primarily for the diagnosis of acute cholecystitis and for the demonstration of biliary tract patentcy. This procedure can also provide functional and morphologic information for evaluation of biliary tract trauma.

  8. Weld leaks rapidly and safely detected

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Test method detects leaks that occur during hydrostatic pressure testing of welded joints in metal tanks. A strip of aluminum foil and a strip of water-soluble paper are placed over the weld. A voltage applied between the tank wall and the foil strip is monitored to detect a decrease in ohmic resistance caused by water leakage into the paper layer.

  9. 40 CFR 65.105 - Leak repair.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... leak. (3) Maximum instrument reading measured by Method 21 of appendix A of 40 CFR part 60 at the time... Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONSOLIDATED... allowed for a valve if valve assembly replacement is necessary during the process unit shutdown, and...

  10. 40 CFR 65.105 - Leak repair.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... leak. (3) Maximum instrument reading measured by Method 21 of appendix A of 40 CFR part 60 at the time.... First attempt at repair for pumps includes, but is not limited to, tightening the packing gland nuts and... bonnet bolts, and/or tightening the packing gland nuts, and/or injecting lubricant into the...

  11. 40 CFR 63.1024 - Leak repair.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... reading measured by Method 21 of 40 CFR part 60, appendix A at the time the leak is successfully repaired... detected. First attempt at repair for pumps includes, but is not limited to, tightening the packing gland... the bonnet bolts, and/or tightening the packing gland nuts, and/or injecting lubricant into...

  12. 40 CFR 63.1005 - Leak repair.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... successful repair of the leak. (3) Maximum instrument reading measured by Method 21 of 40 CFR part 60..., tightening the packing gland nuts and/or ensuring that the seal flush is operating at design pressure and..., and/or replacing the bonnet bolts, and/or tightening the packing gland nuts, and/or...

  13. 40 CFR 65.105 - Leak repair.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... leak. (3) Maximum instrument reading measured by Method 21 of appendix A of 40 CFR part 60 at the time.... First attempt at repair for pumps includes, but is not limited to, tightening the packing gland nuts and... bonnet bolts, and/or tightening the packing gland nuts, and/or injecting lubricant into the...

  14. 40 CFR 63.1024 - Leak repair.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... reading measured by Method 21 of 40 CFR part 60, appendix A at the time the leak is successfully repaired... detected. First attempt at repair for pumps includes, but is not limited to, tightening the packing gland... the bonnet bolts, and/or tightening the packing gland nuts, and/or injecting lubricant into...

  15. 40 CFR 63.1005 - Leak repair.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... successful repair of the leak. (3) Maximum instrument reading measured by Method 21 of 40 CFR part 60..., tightening the packing gland nuts and/or ensuring that the seal flush is operating at design pressure and..., and/or replacing the bonnet bolts, and/or tightening the packing gland nuts, and/or...

  16. 40 CFR 63.1005 - Leak repair.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... successful repair of the leak. (3) Maximum instrument reading measured by Method 21 of 40 CFR part 60..., tightening the packing gland nuts and/or ensuring that the seal flush is operating at design pressure and..., and/or replacing the bonnet bolts, and/or tightening the packing gland nuts, and/or...

  17. 40 CFR 65.105 - Leak repair.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... leak. (3) Maximum instrument reading measured by Method 21 of appendix A of 40 CFR part 60 at the time.... First attempt at repair for pumps includes, but is not limited to, tightening the packing gland nuts and... bonnet bolts, and/or tightening the packing gland nuts, and/or injecting lubricant into the...

  18. 40 CFR 63.1024 - Leak repair.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... reading measured by Method 21 of 40 CFR part 60, appendix A at the time the leak is successfully repaired... detected. First attempt at repair for pumps includes, but is not limited to, tightening the packing gland... the bonnet bolts, and/or tightening the packing gland nuts, and/or injecting lubricant into...

  19. Microphone Detects Boiler-Tube Leaks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parthasarathy, S. P.

    1985-01-01

    Unit simple, sensitive, rugged, and reliable. Diaphragmless microphone detects leaks from small boiler tubes. Porous plug retains carbon granules in tube while allowing pressure changes to penetrate to granules. Has greater life expectancy than previous controllers and used in variety of hot corrosive atmospheres.

  20. GASFLOW analysis of a tritium leak accident

    SciTech Connect

    Farman, R.F.; Fujita, R.K.; Travis, J.R.

    1994-09-01

    The consequences of an earthquake-induced fire involving a tritium leak were analyzed using the GASFLOW computer code. Modeling features required by the analysis include ventilation boundary conditions, flow of a gas mixture in an enclosure containing obstacles, thermally induced buoyancy, and combustion phenomena.

  1. 40 CFR 63.1024 - Leak repair.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... reading measured by Method 21 of 40 CFR part 60, appendix A at the time the leak is successfully repaired... at repair for valves includes, but is not limited to, tightening the bonnet bolts, and/or replacing the bonnet bolts, and/or tightening the packing gland nuts, and/or injecting lubricant into...

  2. 40 CFR 63.1005 - Leak repair.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... successful repair of the leak. (3) Maximum instrument reading measured by Method 21 of 40 CFR part 60... temperature. First attempt at repair for valves includes, but is not limited to, tightening the bonnet bolts, and/or replacing the bonnet bolts, and/or tightening the packing gland nuts, and/or...

  3. Rock deformation models and fluid leak-off in hydraulic fracturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yarushina, Viktoriya M.; Bercovici, David; Oristaglio, Michael L.

    2013-09-01

    Fluid loss into reservoir rocks during hydraulic fracturing is modelled via a poro-elastoplastic pressure diffusion equation in which the total compressibility is a sum of fluid, rock and pore space compressibilities. Inclusion of pore compressibility and porosity-dependent permeability in the model leads to a strong pressure dependence of leak-off (i.e. drainage rate). Dilation of the matrix due to fluid invasion causes higher rates of fluid leak-off. The present model is appropriate for naturally fractured and tight gas reservoirs as well as for soft and poorly consolidated formations whose mechanical behaviour departs from simple elastic laws. Enhancement of the leak-off coefficient by dilation, predicted by the new model, may help explain the low percentage recovery of fracturing fluid (usually between 5 and 50 per cent) in shale gas stimulation by hydraulic fracturing.

  4. Particulate activity accumulated on a moving filter and RCS leak detection.

    PubMed

    Peng, Wu-Hung

    2012-08-01

    Analytical equations for calculating the particulate activity accumulated on a moving filter of a containment air particulate radiation monitor due to a reactor coolant system leak in the containment, including the noble gas decay products, were presented. The particulate airborne concentration in the containment was treated by assumptions of a constant reactor coolant leak rate at a constant concentration, a given aerosolizing fraction, a constant removal coefficient to account for the loss due to diffusion, settling, diffusiophoresis, and containment air recirculation operation. The ratio of moving-to-fixed filter activity was presented for radionuclide of various half-lives and for different filter moving speeds. The monitor response at one hour after the initiation of a 1-gallon per minute leak at measured reactor coolant concentrations was compared to the standard deviation of the background count rate for an operating pressurized water reactor. The detectability of a 1-gallon per minute leak in an hour can be demonstrated if the aerosolization percentage of the radionuclide in the leaked coolant is at least a few percent. PMID:22739972

  5. Ultrasensitive leak detection during ultrahigh vacuum evacuation by quadrupole mass spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Xu; Huang Tianbin; Wang Ligong; Jin Qiji; Cha Liangzhen

    2006-01-15

    One must do ultrasensitive leak detection during ultrahigh-vacuum (UHV) evacuation, especially just before the device is sealed off from the vacuum system, to guarantee the longevity of the sealed high-vacuum or even UHV devices with small volume. A quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) with an UHV evacuation system can be used under accumulation mode to do the testing. Possible accumulate modes, as well as their advantages and shortcomings, are studied experimentally and discussed in this paper. We found that the opening action of the metal valve during accumulation mode always severely affects the height of the peak indicated by QMS and causes considerable errors. If we determine the leak rate by the peak area instead of the peak height, the situation is much improved. This method has proven quite useful in ensuring the tightness quality for complex sealed UHV devices with small volumes. Ultrasensitive leak detection has been carried out for such real evacuating devices, and a leak rate of 2x10{sup -14} Pa{center_dot}m{sup 3}/s was detected, which is far lower than its dynamic mode and the detection limit of the current advanced commercial leak detectors.

  6. REFLEAK: NIST Leak/Recharge Simulation Program for Refrigerant Mixtures

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 73 NIST REFLEAK: NIST Leak/Recharge Simulation Program for Refrigerant Mixtures (PC database for purchase)   REFLEAK estimates composition changes of zeotropic mixtures in leak and recharge processes.

  7. 49 CFR 230.64 - Leaks under lagging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Boilers and Appurtenances Steam Leaks § 230.64 Leaks under lagging. The steam locomotive owner and/or operator shall take out...

  8. 49 CFR 230.64 - Leaks under lagging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Boilers and Appurtenances Steam Leaks § 230.64 Leaks under lagging. The steam locomotive owner and/or operator shall take out...

  9. 49 CFR 230.64 - Leaks under lagging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Boilers and Appurtenances Steam Leaks § 230.64 Leaks under lagging. The steam locomotive owner and/or operator shall take out...

  10. 49 CFR 230.64 - Leaks under lagging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Boilers and Appurtenances Steam Leaks § 230.64 Leaks under lagging. The steam locomotive owner and/or operator shall take out...

  11. Modeling leaks from liquid hydrogen storage systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Winters, William Stanley, Jr.

    2009-01-01

    This report documents a series of models for describing intended and unintended discharges from liquid hydrogen storage systems. Typically these systems store hydrogen in the saturated state at approximately five to ten atmospheres. Some of models discussed here are equilibrium-based models that make use of the NIST thermodynamic models to specify the states of multiphase hydrogen and air-hydrogen mixtures. Two types of discharges are considered: slow leaks where hydrogen enters the ambient at atmospheric pressure and fast leaks where the hydrogen flow is usually choked and expands into the ambient through an underexpanded jet. In order to avoid the complexities of supersonic flow, a single Mach disk model is proposed for fast leaks that are choked. The velocity and state of hydrogen downstream of the Mach disk leads to a more tractable subsonic boundary condition. However, the hydrogen temperature exiting all leaks (fast or slow, from saturated liquid or saturated vapor) is approximately 20.4 K. At these temperatures, any entrained air would likely condense or even freeze leading to an air-hydrogen mixture that cannot be characterized by the REFPROP subroutines. For this reason a plug flow entrainment model is proposed to treat a short zone of initial entrainment and heating. The model predicts the quantity of entrained air required to bring the air-hydrogen mixture to a temperature of approximately 65 K at one atmosphere. At this temperature the mixture can be treated as a mixture of ideal gases and is much more amenable to modeling with Gaussian entrainment models and CFD codes. A Gaussian entrainment model is formulated to predict the trajectory and properties of a cold hydrogen jet leaking into ambient air. The model shows that similarity between two jets depends on the densimetric Froude number, density ratio and initial hydrogen concentration.

  12. Blowdown transients and implication for leak protection shutdown strategy

    SciTech Connect

    Magee, P M

    1980-04-01

    The creep-fatigue damage due to a blowdown transient is independent of the rate of water-side blowdown following isolation. The damage depends primarily upon plant system characteristics which set the rate of IHTS sodium cooldown after reactor scram and main pump trip. The time delay between a small leak alarm and reactor scram should be considered as a tradeoff between (1) providing time to confirm the existence of the leak to a reasonable level of assurance and (2) the potential for secondary tube wastage damage. In general, there appears to be no incentive to delay water-side blowdown following scram because the additional stress damage due to blowdown is insignificant and the potential for wastage damage should be eliminated as quickly as possible. One exception is the case of multiple evaporators feeding a superheater (as for CRBRP) where isolation and blowdown of one evaporator shortly after scram can cause significant additional stress damage to the superheater upper tubesheet. When initiated, the water-side blowdown process should be rapid. About 30 seconds blowdown time appears practical and adequate, based on the CRBRP design.

  13. Double Shell Tank AY-102 Radioactive Waste Leak Investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Washenfelder, Dennis J.

    2014-04-10

    PowerPoint. The objectives of this presentation are to: Describe Effort to Determine Whether Tank AY-102 Leaked; Review Probable Causes of the Tank AY-102 Leak; and, Discuss Influence of Leak on Hanford’s Double-Shell Tank Integrity Program.

  14. Leak Detection and Location Technology Assessment for Aerospace Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, William C.; Coffey, Neil C.; Madaras, Eric I.

    2008-01-01

    Micro Meteoroid and Orbital Debris (MMOD) and other impacts can cause leaks in the International Space Station and other aerospace vehicles. The early detection and location of leaks is paramount to astronaut safety. Therefore this document surveys the state of the art in leak detection and location technology for aerospace vehicles.

  15. 49 CFR 195.134 - CPM leak detection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false CPM leak detection. 195.134 Section 195.134... PIPELINE Design Requirements § 195.134 CPM leak detection. This section applies to each hazardous liquid... computational pipeline monitoring (CPM) leak detection system and each replaced component of an existing...

  16. 49 CFR 195.444 - CPM leak detection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false CPM leak detection. 195.444 Section 195.444... PIPELINE Operation and Maintenance § 195.444 CPM leak detection. Each computational pipeline monitoring (CPM) leak detection system installed on a hazardous liquid pipeline transporting liquid in...

  17. 49 CFR 195.134 - CPM leak detection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false CPM leak detection. 195.134 Section 195.134... PIPELINE Design Requirements § 195.134 CPM leak detection. This section applies to each hazardous liquid... computational pipeline monitoring (CPM) leak detection system and each replaced component of an existing...

  18. 49 CFR 195.444 - CPM leak detection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false CPM leak detection. 195.444 Section 195.444... PIPELINE Operation and Maintenance § 195.444 CPM leak detection. Each computational pipeline monitoring (CPM) leak detection system installed on a hazardous liquid pipeline transporting liquid in...

  19. 49 CFR 195.444 - CPM leak detection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false CPM leak detection. 195.444 Section 195.444... PIPELINE Operation and Maintenance § 195.444 CPM leak detection. Each computational pipeline monitoring (CPM) leak detection system installed on a hazardous liquid pipeline transporting liquid in...

  20. 49 CFR 195.134 - CPM leak detection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false CPM leak detection. 195.134 Section 195.134... PIPELINE Design Requirements § 195.134 CPM leak detection. This section applies to each hazardous liquid... computational pipeline monitoring (CPM) leak detection system and each replaced component of an existing...

  1. 49 CFR 195.134 - CPM leak detection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false CPM leak detection. 195.134 Section 195.134... PIPELINE Design Requirements § 195.134 CPM leak detection. This section applies to each hazardous liquid... computational pipeline monitoring (CPM) leak detection system and each replaced component of an existing...

  2. 49 CFR 195.444 - CPM leak detection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false CPM leak detection. 195.444 Section 195.444... PIPELINE Operation and Maintenance § 195.444 CPM leak detection. Each computational pipeline monitoring (CPM) leak detection system installed on a hazardous liquid pipeline transporting liquid in...

  3. 49 CFR 195.134 - CPM leak detection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false CPM leak detection. 195.134 Section 195.134... PIPELINE Design Requirements § 195.134 CPM leak detection. This section applies to each hazardous liquid... computational pipeline monitoring (CPM) leak detection system and each replaced component of an existing...

  4. 49 CFR 195.444 - CPM leak detection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false CPM leak detection. 195.444 Section 195.444... PIPELINE Operation and Maintenance § 195.444 CPM leak detection. Each computational pipeline monitoring (CPM) leak detection system installed on a hazardous liquid pipeline transporting liquid in...

  5. 40 CFR 1065.345 - Vacuum-side leak verification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... test. You may use any gas analyzer for this test. If you use a FID for this test, correct for any HC... used for this test. Perform a vacuum-side leak test as follows: (1) Prepare a gas analyzer as you would... a leak. (e) Vacuum-decay leak test. To perform this test you must apply a vacuum to the...

  6. The Absolute Spectrum Polarimeter (ASP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kogut, A. J.

    2010-01-01

    The Absolute Spectrum Polarimeter (ASP) is an Explorer-class mission to map the absolute intensity and linear polarization of the cosmic microwave background and diffuse astrophysical foregrounds over the full sky from 30 GHz to 5 THz. The principal science goal is the detection and characterization of linear polarization from an inflationary epoch in the early universe, with tensor-to-scalar ratio r much greater than 1O(raised to the power of { -3}) and Compton distortion y < 10 (raised to the power of{-6}). We describe the ASP instrument and mission architecture needed to detect the signature of an inflationary epoch in the early universe using only 4 semiconductor bolometers.

  7. Absolute calibration of optical flats

    DOEpatents

    Sommargren, Gary E.

    2005-04-05

    The invention uses the phase shifting diffraction interferometer (PSDI) to provide a true point-by-point measurement of absolute flatness over the surface of optical flats. Beams exiting the fiber optics in a PSDI have perfect spherical wavefronts. The measurement beam is reflected from the optical flat and passed through an auxiliary optic to then be combined with the reference beam on a CCD. The combined beams include phase errors due to both the optic under test and the auxiliary optic. Standard phase extraction algorithms are used to calculate this combined phase error. The optical flat is then removed from the system and the measurement fiber is moved to recombine the two beams. The newly combined beams include only the phase errors due to the auxiliary optic. When the second phase measurement is subtracted from the first phase measurement, the absolute phase error of the optical flat is obtained.

  8. Modeling and measurement of the performance of a branched conduit sampling system in a mass spectrometer leak detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, John M.

    1994-01-01

    In the leak testing of a large engineering system, one may distinguish three stages, namely leakage measurement by an overall enclosure, leak location, and leakage measurement by a local enclosure. Sniffer probes attached to helium mass spectrometer leak detectors are normally designed for leak location, a qualitative inspection technique intended to pinpoint where a leak is but not to quantify its rate of discharge. The main conclusion of the present effort is that local leakage measurement by a leak detector with a sniffer probe is feasible provided one has: (1) quantitative data on the performance of the mass separator cell (a device interior to the unit where the stream of fluid in the sample line branches); and (2) a means of stabilizing the mass transfer boundary layer that is created near a local leak site when a sniffer probe is placed in its immediate vicinity. Theoretical models of the mass separator cell are provided and measurements of the machine-specific parameters in the formulas are presented. A theoretical model of a porous probe end for stabilizing the mass transfer boundary is also presented.

  9. Medium- and high-pressure sonic leak pinpointing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huebler, J. E.; Ziolkowski, C. J.; Craig, J. M.; Saha, N. C.

    1983-05-01

    A detector to pinpoint natural gas leaks in medium and high pressure distribution systems ( 15psi) has been developed through the prototype stage. The device can detect acoustic emissions from leaking gas in the 2-5 KHz range. The actual leak pinpointing sensor, which is moved from one position to another above the pipe until the leak site is pinpointed, and a background noise monitor, offset from the pipe area, that is used to substract background noise from the signal developed by the leak pinpointing sensor. The prototype device is handportable, rugged, and low in cost, yet sensitive and easy to use in the field, as demonstrated with preliminary field tests.

  10. Leak Location and Classification in the Space Shuttle Main Engine Nozzle by Infrared Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Samuel S.; Walker, James L.; Lansing, Mathew

    2003-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) is composed of cooling tubes brazed to the inside of a conical structural jacket. Because of the geometry there are regions that can't be inspected for leaks using the bubble solution and low-pressure method. The temperature change due escaping gas is detectable on the surface of the nozzle under the correct conditions. The methods and results presented in this summary address the thermographic identification of leaks in the Space Shuttle Main Engine nozzles. A highly sensitive digital infrared camera is used to record the minute temperature change associated with a leak source, such as a crack or pinhole, hidden within the nozzle wall by observing the inner "hot wall" surface as the nozzle is pressurized. These images are enhanced by digitally subtracting a thermal reference image taken before pressurization, greatly diminishing background noise. The method provides a nonintrusive way of localizing the tube that is leaking and the exact leak source position to within a very small axial distance. Many of the factors that influence the inspectability of the nozzle are addressed; including pressure rate, peak pressure, gas type, ambient temperature and surface preparation.

  11. Leak before break evaluation for main steam piping system made of SA106 Gr.C

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Kyoung Mo; Jee, Kye Kwang; Pyo, Chang Ryul; Ra, In Sik

    1997-04-01

    The basis of the leak before break (LBB) concept is to demonstrate that piping will leak significantly before a double ended guillotine break (DEGB) occurs. This is demonstrated by quantifying and evaluating the leak process and prescribing safe shutdown of the plant on the basis of the monitored leak rate. The application of LBB for power plant design has reduced plant cost while improving plant integrity. Several evaluations employing LBB analysis on system piping based on DEGB design have been completed. However, the application of LBB on main steam (MS) piping, which is LBB applicable piping, has not been performed due to several uncertainties associated with occurrence of steam hammer and dynamic strain aging (DSA). The objective of this paper is to demonstrate the applicability of the LBB design concept to main steam lines manufactured with SA106 Gr.C carbon steel. Based on the material properties, including fracture toughness and tensile properties obtained from the comprehensive material tests for base and weld metals, a parametric study was performed as described in this paper. The PICEP code was used to determine leak size crack (LSC) and the FLET code was used to perform the stability assessment of MS piping. The effects of material properties obtained from tests were evaluated to determine the LBB applicability for the MS piping. It can be shown from this parametric study that the MS piping has a high possibility of design using LBB analysis.

  12. Propellant Feed System Leak Detection: Lessons Learned From the Linear Aerospike SR-71 Experiment (LASRE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hass, Neal; Mizukami, Masashi; Neal, Bradford A.; St. John, Clinton; Beil, Robert J.; Griffin, Timothy P.

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents pertinent results and assessment of propellant feed system leak detection as applied to the Linear Aerospike SR-71 Experiment (LASRE) program flown at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. The LASRE was a flight test of an aerospike rocket engine using liquid oxygen and high-pressure gaseous hydrogen as propellants. The flight safety of the crew and the experiment demanded proven technologies and techniques that could detect leaks and assess the integrity of hazardous propellant feed systems. Point source detection and systematic detection were used. Point source detection was adequate for catching gross leakage from components of the propellant feed systems, but insufficient for clearing LASRE to levels of acceptability. Systematic detection, which used high-resolution instrumentation to evaluate the health of the system within a closed volume, provided a better means for assessing leak hazards. Oxygen sensors detected a leak rate of approximately 0.04 cubic inches per second of liquid oxygen. Pressure sensor data revealed speculated cryogenic boiloff through the fittings of the oxygen system, but location of the source(s) was indeterminable. Ultimately, LASRE was cancelled because leak detection techniques were unable to verify that oxygen levels could be maintained below flammability limits.

  13. Method for mapping a natural gas leak

    DOEpatents

    Reichardt, Thomas A.; Luong, Amy Khai; Kulp, Thomas J.; Devdas, Sanjay

    2009-02-03

    A system is described that is suitable for use in determining the location of leaks of gases having a background concentration. The system is a point-wise backscatter absorption gas measurement system that measures absorption and distance to each point of an image. The absorption measurement provides an indication of the total amount of a gas of interest, and the distance provides an estimate of the background concentration of gas. The distance is measured from the time-of-flight of laser pulse that is generated along with the absorption measurement light. The measurements are formatted into an image of the presence of gas in excess of the background. Alternatively, an image of the scene is superimposed on the image of the gas to aid in locating leaks. By further modeling excess gas as a plume having a known concentration profile, the present system provides an estimate of the maximum concentration of the gas of interest.

  14. The Leaking Pipeline: Women Postgraduate and Early Career Researchers in Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Kate

    2004-01-01

    This paper explores the "leaking pipeline" in women's participation rates from Bachelor to postgraduate research programmes. In examining projects at two Australian universities to identify and implement strategies to improve women's participation in research higher degrees, it focuses on three points of "leakage" between Bachelor and Bachelor…

  15. Natural gas pipeline leaks across Washington, DC.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Robert B; Down, Adrian; Phillips, Nathan G; Ackley, Robert C; Cook, Charles W; Plata, Desiree L; Zhao, Kaiguang

    2014-01-01

    Pipeline safety in the United States has increased in recent decades, but incidents involving natural gas pipelines still cause an average of 17 fatalities and $133 M in property damage annually. Natural gas leaks are also the largest anthropogenic source of the greenhouse gas methane (CH4) in the U.S. To reduce pipeline leakage and increase consumer safety, we deployed a Picarro G2301 Cavity Ring-Down Spectrometer in a car, mapping 5893 natural gas leaks (2.5 to 88.6 ppm CH4) across 1500 road miles of Washington, DC. The δ(13)C-isotopic signatures of the methane (-38.2‰ ± 3.9‰ s.d.) and ethane (-36.5 ± 1.1 s.d.) and the CH4:C2H6 ratios (25.5 ± 8.9 s.d.) closely matched the pipeline gas (-39.0‰ and -36.2‰ for methane and ethane; 19.0 for CH4/C2H6). Emissions from four street leaks ranged from 9200 to 38,200 L CH4 day(-1) each, comparable to natural gas used by 1.7 to 7.0 homes, respectively. At 19 tested locations, 12 potentially explosive (Grade 1) methane concentrations of 50,000 to 500,000 ppm were detected in manholes. Financial incentives and targeted programs among companies, public utility commissions, and scientists to reduce leaks and replace old cast-iron pipes will improve consumer safety and air quality, save money, and lower greenhouse gas emissions. PMID:24432903

  16. Use of sulfur hexafluoride and perfluorocarbon tracers in plutonium storage containers for leak detection

    SciTech Connect

    Kung, J.K.

    1998-05-01

    This study involves an investigation of the feasibility of a tracer-based leak detection system for long-term interim plutonium storage. In particular, a protocol has been developed based on the use of inert tracers with varying concentrations in order to {open_quotes}fingerprint{close_quotes} or {open_quotes}tag{close_quotes} specific containers. A particular combination of tracers at specific ratios could be injected into the free volume of each container, allowing for the detection of leaks as well as determination of the location of leaking containers. Based on plutonium storage considerations, sulfur hexafluoride and four perfluorocarbon tracers were selected and should allow a wide range of viable fingerprinting combinations. A {open_quotes}high-low{close_quotes} protocol which uses two distinct chromatographic peak areas or concentration levels, is recommended. Combinations of air exchange rates, detection durations, and detectability limits are examined in order to predict minimum tracer concentrations required for injection in storage containers.

  17. Airborne pipeline leak detection: UV or IR?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babin, François; Gravel, Jean-François; Allard, Martin

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents a study of different approaches to the measurement of the above ground vapor plume created by the spill caused by a small 0.1 l/min (or less) leak in an underground liquid petroleum pipeline. The scenarios are those for the measurement from an airborne platform. The usual approach is that of IR absorption, but in the case of liquid petroleum products, there are drawbacks that will be discussed, especially when using alkanes to detect a leak. The optical measurements studied include UV enhanced Raman lidar, UV fluorescence lidar and IR absorption path integrated lidars. The breadboards used for testing the different approaches will be described along with the set-ups for leak simulation. Although IR absorption would intuitively be the most sensitive, it is shown that UV-Raman could be an alternative. When using the very broad alkane signature in the IR, the varying ground spectral reflectance are a problem. It is also determined that integrated path measurements are preferred, the UV enhanced Raman measurements showing that the vapor plume stays very close to the ground.

  18. Waste Transfer Leaks Control Decision Record

    SciTech Connect

    RYAN, G.W.

    2000-06-27

    Control decision meetings for Waste Transfer Leaks were held on April 24,25,26, and 27, 2000. The agenda for the control decision meetings is included in Appendix A, and attendee lists are included in Appendix B. The purpose of the control decision meetings was to review and revise previously selected controls for the prevention or mitigation of waste transfer leak accidents. Re-evaluation of the controls is warranted due to revisions in the hazard and accident analysis for these Tank Farm events. In particular, calculated radiological consequences are significantly reduced from those currently reported in the Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR). Revised hazard and accident analysis and a revised control recommendation will be reflected in an Authorization Basis Amendment to be submitted at the Department of Energy, Office of River Protection's (ORP's) request by June 30, 2000 to satisfy ORP Performance Incentive (PI) 2.1.1, Revision 1, ''Authorization Basis Management Process Efficiency Improvement''. The scope of the control decision meetings was to address all waste transfer leak-related hazardous conditions identified in the Tank Farm hazard analysis database, excluding those associated with the use of the Replacement Cross-Site Transfer System (RCSTS) slurry line and sluicing of Tank 241-C-106, which is addressed in FSAR Addendum 1. The scope of this control decision process does include future waste feed delivery waste transfer operations.

  19. Imaging spectrometer for fugitive gas leak detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinnrichs, Michele

    1999-12-01

    Under contract to the U.S. Air Force and Navy, Pacific Advanced Technology has developed a very sensitive infrared imaging spectrometer that can perform remote imaging and spectro-radiometry. One of the most exciting applications for this technology is in the remote monitoring of smoke stack emissions and fugitive leaks. To date remote continuous emission monitoring (CEM) systems have not been approved by the EPA, however, they are under consideration. If the remote sensing technology is available with the sensitivity to monitor emission at the required levels and man portable it can reduce the cost and improve the reliability of performing such measurements. Pacific Advanced Technology (PAT) believes that it currently has this technology available to industry. This paper will present results from a field test where gas vapors during a refueling process were imaged and identified. In addition images of propane from a leaking stove will be presented. We at PAT have developed a real time image processing board that enhances the signal to noise ratio of low contrast gases and makes them easily viewable using the Image Multispectral Sensing (IMSS) imaging spectrometer. The IMSS imaging spectrometer is the size of a camcorder. Currently the data is stored in a Notebook computer thus allowing the system to be easily carried into power plants to look for fugitive leaks. In the future the IMSS will have an embedded processor and DSP and will be able to transfer data over an Ethernet link.

  20. Correlation of leak rates of various fluids with the leak rate of an inert gas in the same configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schleier, Howard

    1990-01-01

    NASA is interested in field testing for possible leakage in their fueling systems; however, many fuels are hazardous to the extent that personnel cannot be on hand when the system is being monitored. It is proposed that an inert material such as helium be used on the field test, and that those results be calibrated to simulate the actual process. A technique such as this would allow personnel to be on site during the testing and use techniques to determine the behavior of the system that could not be used otherwise. This endeavor attempts to develop such a correlation. The results show promise, but more refinement and data are needed.

  1. Measles-induced respiratory distress, air-leak and ARDS.

    PubMed

    Piastra, M; Onesimo, R; De Luca, D; Lancella, L; Marzano, L; De Rosa, G; Pietrini, D; Valentini, P; Conti, G

    2010-02-01

    Young infants with measles requiring respiratory support have a significant risk for death and long-term complications. Even in developed countries, the occurrence of spontaneous air-leaks and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) still represent the most severe clinical presentation in early childhood, with a high fatality rate. A clinical series review from a tertiary university paediatric intensive care unit (PICU) was undertaken. During the 2006-2007 outbreak in Rome, Italy, a young infant presented with ARDS/spontaneous air-leak and needed aggressive ventilatory management and haemodynamic support. Both nebulised iloprost and intravenous pentoxifylline were administered during the acute hypoxaemic phase; the role of this pharmacologic approach in critically ill patients is still under debate. We observed four further cases of respiratory impairment requiring a non-invasive approach. Clinical-radiological findings ranged from interstitial pneumonia to bronchiolitis-like pictures. All patients were imported cases, representing an important epidemiological factor and future medical issue, though they were not malnourished nor affected by chronic diseases. We conclude that early respiratory assessment and timely PICU referral is of mainstem importance in the youngest infants with measles-induced respiratory failure. The protean nature of clinical presentation and the possibility of rapid respiratory deterioration should be highlighted, and infants from immigrant families may represent a susceptible high-risk group. PMID:20012881

  2. The AFGL absolute gravity program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammond, J. A.; Iliff, R. L.

    1978-01-01

    A brief discussion of the AFGL's (Air Force Geophysics Laboratory) program in absolute gravity is presented. Support of outside work and in-house studies relating to gravity instrumentation are discussed. A description of the current transportable system is included and the latest results are presented. These results show good agreement with measurements at the AFGL site by an Italian system. The accuracy obtained by the transportable apparatus is better than 0.1 microns sq sec 10 microgal and agreement with previous measurements is within the combined uncertainties of the measurements.

  3. Hierarchical Leak Detection and Localization Method in Natural Gas Pipeline Monitoring Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Jiangwen; Yu, Yang; Wu, Yinfeng; Feng, Renjian; Yu, Ning

    2012-01-01

    In light of the problems of low recognition efficiency, high false rates and poor localization accuracy in traditional pipeline security detection technology, this paper proposes a type of hierarchical leak detection and localization method for use in natural gas pipeline monitoring sensor networks. In the signal preprocessing phase, original monitoring signals are dealt with by wavelet transform technology to extract the single mode signals as well as characteristic parameters. In the initial recognition phase, a multi-classifier model based on SVM is constructed and characteristic parameters are sent as input vectors to the multi-classifier for initial recognition. In the final decision phase, an improved evidence combination rule is designed to integrate initial recognition results for final decisions. Furthermore, a weighted average localization algorithm based on time difference of arrival is introduced for determining the leak point’s position. Experimental results illustrate that this hierarchical pipeline leak detection and localization method could effectively improve the accuracy of the leak point localization and reduce the undetected rate as well as false alarm rate. PMID:22368464

  4. Hierarchical leak detection and localization method in natural gas pipeline monitoring sensor networks.

    PubMed

    Wan, Jiangwen; Yu, Yang; Wu, Yinfeng; Feng, Renjian; Yu, Ning

    2012-01-01

    In light of the problems of low recognition efficiency, high false rates and poor localization accuracy in traditional pipeline security detection technology, this paper proposes a type of hierarchical leak detection and localization method for use in natural gas pipeline monitoring sensor networks. In the signal preprocessing phase, original monitoring signals are dealt with by wavelet transform technology to extract the single mode signals as well as characteristic parameters. In the initial recognition phase, a multi-classifier model based on SVM is constructed and characteristic parameters are sent as input vectors to the multi-classifier for initial recognition. In the final decision phase, an improved evidence combination rule is designed to integrate initial recognition results for final decisions. Furthermore, a weighted average localization algorithm based on time difference of arrival is introduced for determining the leak point's position. Experimental results illustrate that this hierarchical pipeline leak detection and localization method could effectively improve the accuracy of the leak point localization and reduce the undetected rate as well as false alarm rate. PMID:22368464

  5. Transient absolute robustness in stochastic biochemical networks.

    PubMed

    Enciso, German A

    2016-08-01

    Absolute robustness allows biochemical networks to sustain a consistent steady-state output in the face of protein concentration variability from cell to cell. This property is structural and can be determined from the topology of the network alone regardless of rate parameters. An important question regarding these systems is the effect of discrete biochemical noise in the dynamical behaviour. In this paper, a variable freezing technique is developed to show that under mild hypotheses the corresponding stochastic system has a transiently robust behaviour. Specifically, after finite time the distribution of the output approximates a Poisson distribution, centred around the deterministic mean. The approximation becomes increasingly accurate, and it holds for increasingly long finite times, as the total protein concentrations grow to infinity. In particular, the stochastic system retains a transient, absolutely robust behaviour corresponding to the deterministic case. This result contrasts with the long-term dynamics of the stochastic system, which eventually must undergo an extinction event that eliminates robustness and is completely different from the deterministic dynamics. The transiently robust behaviour may be sufficient to carry out many forms of robust signal transduction and cellular decision-making in cellular organisms. PMID:27581485

  6. Absolute/convective instability of planar viscoelastic jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Prasun K.; Zaki, Tamer A.

    2015-01-01

    Spatiotemporal linear stability analysis is used to investigate the onset of local absolute instability in planar viscoelastic jets. The influence of viscoelasticity in dilute polymer solutions is modeled with the FENE-P constitutive equation which requires the specification of a non-dimensional polymer relaxation time (the Weissenberg number, We), the maximum polymer extensibility, L, and the ratio of solvent and solution viscosities, β. A two-parameter family of velocity profiles is used as the base state with the parameter, S, controlling the amount of co- or counter-flow while N-1 sets the thickness of the jet shear layer. We examine how the variation of these fluid and flow parameters affects the minimum value of S at which the flow becomes locally absolutely unstable. Initially setting the Reynolds number to Re = 500, we find that the first varicose jet-column mode dictates the presence of absolute instability, and increasing the Weissenberg number produces important changes in the nature of the instability. The region of absolute instability shifts towards thin shear layers, and the amount of back-flow needed for absolute instability decreases (i.e., the influence of viscoelasticity is destabilizing). Additionally, when We is sufficiently large and N-1 is sufficiently small, single-stream jets become absolutely unstable. Numerical experiments with approximate equations show that both the polymer and solvent contributions to the stress become destabilizing when the scaled shear rate, η = /W e dU¯1/dx 2L ( /d U ¯ 1 d x 2 is the base-state velocity gradient), is sufficiently large. These qualitative trends are largely unchanged when the Reynolds number is reduced; however, the relative importance of the destabilizing stresses increases tangibly. Consequently, absolute instability is substantially enhanced, and single-stream jets become absolutely unstable over a sizable portion of the parameter space.

  7. The reaction NH2 + PH3 yields NH3 + PH2: Absolute rate constant measurement and implication for NH3 and PH3 photochemistry in the atmosphere of Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bosco, S. R.; Brobst, W. D.; Nava, D. F.; Stief, L. J.

    1983-01-01

    The rate constant is measured over the temperature interval 218-456 K using the technique of flash photolysis-laser-induced fluorescence. NH2 radicals are produced by the flash photolysis of ammonia highly diluted in argon, and the decay of fluorescent NH2 photons is measured by multiscaling techniques. For each of the five temperatures employed in the study, the results are shown to be independent of variations in PH3 concentration, total pressure (argon), and flash intensity. It is found that the rate constant results are best represented for T between 218 and 456 K by the expression k = (1.52 + or - 0.16) x 10 to the -12th exp(-928 + or - 56/T) cu cm per molecule per sec; the error quoted is 1 standard deviation. This is the first determination of the rate constant for the reaction NH2 + PH3. The data are compared with an estimate made in order to explain results of the radiolysis of NH3-PH3 mixtures. The Arrhenius parameters determined here for NH2 + PH3 are then constrasted with those for the corresponding reactions of H and OH with PH3.

  8. Cosmology with negative absolute temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieira, J. P. P.; Byrnes, Christian T.; Lewis, Antony

    2016-08-01

    Negative absolute temperatures (NAT) are an exotic thermodynamical consequence of quantum physics which has been known since the 1950's (having been achieved in the lab on a number of occasions). Recently, the work of Braun et al. [1] has rekindled interest in negative temperatures and hinted at a possibility of using NAT systems in the lab as dark energy analogues. This paper goes one step further, looking into the cosmological consequences of the existence of a NAT component in the Universe. NAT-dominated expanding Universes experience a borderline phantom expansion (w < ‑1) with no Big Rip, and their contracting counterparts are forced to bounce after the energy density becomes sufficiently large. Both scenarios might be used to solve horizon and flatness problems analogously to standard inflation and bouncing cosmologies. We discuss the difficulties in obtaining and ending a NAT-dominated epoch, and possible ways of obtaining density perturbations with an acceptable spectrum.

  9. Swarm's Absolute Scalar Magnetometer metrological performances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leger, J.; Fratter, I.; Bertrand, F.; Jager, T.; Morales, S.

    2012-12-01

    The Absolute Scalar Magnetometer (ASM) has been developed for the ESA Earth Observation Swarm mission, planned for launch in November 2012. As its Overhauser magnetometers forerunners flown on Oersted and Champ satellites, it will deliver high resolution scalar measurements for the in-flight calibration of the Vector Field Magnetometer manufactured by the Danish Technical University. Latest results of the ground tests carried out to fully characterize all parameters that may affect its accuracy, both at instrument and satellite level, will be presented. In addition to its baseline function, the ASM can be operated either at a much higher sampling rate (burst mode at 250 Hz) or in a dual mode where it also delivers vector field measurements as a by-product. The calibration procedure and the relevant vector performances will be discussed.

  10. 340 Facility secondary containment and leak detection

    SciTech Connect

    Bendixsen, R.B.

    1995-01-31

    This document presents a preliminary safety evaluation for the 340 Facility Secondary Containment and Leak Containment system, Project W-302. Project W-302 will construct Building 340-C which has been designed to replace the current 340 Building and vault tank system for collection of liquid wastes from the Pacific Northwest Laboratory buildings in the 300 Area. This new nuclear facility is Hazard Category 3. The vault tank and related monitoring and control equipment are Safety Class 2 with the remainder of the structure, systems and components as Safety Class 3 or 4.

  11. Low heat-leak cryogenic envelope

    DOEpatents

    DeHaan, James R.

    1976-10-19

    A plurality of cryogenic envelope sections are joined together to form a power transmission line. Each of the sections is comprised of inner and outer tubes having multilayer metalized plastic spirally wrapped within a vacuum chamber formed between the inner and outer tubes. A refrigeration tube traverses the vacuum chamber, but exits one section and enters another through thermal standoffs for reducing heat-leak from the outer tube to the refrigeration tube. The refrigeration tube passes through a spirally wrapped shield within each section's vacuum chamber in a manner so that the refrigeration tube is in close thermal contact with the shield, but is nevertheless slideable with respect thereto.

  12. One-Piece Leak-Proof Battery

    DOEpatents

    Verhoog, Roelof

    1999-03-23

    The casing of a leak-proof one-piece battery is made of a material comprising a mixture of at least a matrix based on polypropylene and an alloy of a polyamide and a polypropylene. The ratio of the matrix to the alloy is in the range 0.5 to 6 by weight. The alloy forms elongate arborescent inclusions in the matrix such that, on average, the largest dimension of a segment of the arborescence is at least twenty times the smallest dimension of the segment.

  13. Legal briefs: leaking underground storage tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Morse, H.N.

    1987-04-01

    This is an appeal from the final determination of the New Jersey Spill Compensation Fund denying the Township of South Orange Village's claims for damages arising from the contamination of its water supply as a result of the discharge of gasoline caused by leaking underground storage tanks. The Fund decided that the Township's claims were facially ineligible because they were not timely filed under N.J.S.A. 58:10-23.11k and because the damages were caused by discharges which occurred prior to April 1, 1977, the effective date of the Spill Compensation and Control Act, (N.J.S.A. 58:10-23.11 et seq.).

  14. Carbon granule probe microphone for leak detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parthasarathy, S. P.

    1985-02-01

    A microphone which is not subject to corrosion is provided by employing carbon granules to sense sound waves. The granules are packed into a ceramic tube and no diaphragm is used. A pair of electrodes is located in the tube adjacent the carbon granules and are coupled to a sensing circuit. Sound waves cause pressure changes on the carbon granules which results in a change in resistance in the electrical path between the electrodes. This change in resistance is detected by the sensing circuit. The microphone is suitable for use as a leak detection probe in recovery boilers, where it provides reliable operation without corrosion problems associated with conventional microphones.

  15. Optical leak detection of oxygen using IR-laser diodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Disimile, P. J.; Fox, C.; Toy, N.

    1991-01-01

    The ability to accurately measure the concentration of gaseous oxygen and its corresponding flow rate is becoming of greater importance. The technique being presented is based on the principal of light attenuation due to the absorption of radiation by the A-band of oxygen which is located in the 759-770 nm wavelength range. With an ability to measure the change in the light transmission to 0.05 percent, a sensitive optical leak detection system which has a rapid time response is possible. In this research program, the application of laser diode technology and its ability to be temperature tuned to a selected oxygen absorption spectral peak has allowed oxygen concentrations as low as 16,000 ppm to be detected.

  16. Narrative Review: Clarkson Disease-Systemic Capillary Leak Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Druey, Kirk M.; Greipp, Philip R.

    2010-01-01

    In 1960, Dr. Bayard Clarkson described a patient experiencing sporadic episodes of hypovolemia, hypotension, and edema. Plasma during the acute attack induced a “shock”-like syndrome when given systemically in rats. The unusual and enigmatic “Systemic Capillary Leak Syndrome” (SCLS) named for Dr. Clarkson is of unknown etiology and is characterized by transient, severe, reversible hemoconcentration and hypoalbuminemia due to leakage of fluids and macromolecules (up to 900 kDa) into tissues (1). Fewer than 150 cases of SCLS have been reported since 1960, but the nonspecific presenting symptoms and signs and high mortality rate may have resulted in under-recognition of this disorder. Given the substantial overlap of SCLS with other “shock” syndromes, including sepsis, anaphylaxis, and angioedema, clinicians should consider this diagnosis in patients with unexplained edema, increased hematocrit, and hypotension. PMID:20643990

  17. A Hydrogen Leak Detection System for Aerospace and Commercial Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Gary W.; Makel, D. B.; Jansa, E. D.; Patterson, G.; Cova, P. J.; Liu, C. C.; Wu, Q. H.; Powers, W. T.

    1995-01-01

    Leaks on the space shuttle while on the launch pad have generated interest in hydrogen leak monitoring technology. Microfabricated hydrogen sensors are being fabricated at Case Western Reserve University (CWRU) and tested at NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC). These sensors have been integrated into hardware and software designed by Aerojet. This complete system allows for multipoint leak monitoring designed to provide leak source and magnitude information in real time. The monitoring system processes data from the hydrogen sensors and presents the operator with a visual indication of the leak location and magnitude. Although the leak monitoring system was designed for hydrogen propulsion systems, the possible applications of this monitoring system are wide ranged. This system is in operation in an automotive application which requires high sensitivity to hydrogen.

  18. SIXTH INTERIM STATUS REPORT: MODEL 9975 PCV O-RING FIXTURE LONG-TERM LEAK PERFORMANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Daugherty, W.

    2011-08-31

    (CSR) data. These two predictive models show reasonable agreement at higher temperatures (350-400 F). However, at 300 F, the room temperature leak test failures to date experienced longer aging times than predicted by the CSR-based model. This suggests that extrapolations of the CSR model predictions to temperatures below 300 F will provide a conservative prediction of service life relative to the leak rate criterion. Leak test failure data at lower temperatures are needed to verify this apparent trend. Insufficient failure data exist currently to perform a similar comparison for GLT-S O-rings. Aging and periodic leak testing will continue for the remaining fixtures.

  19. Leak locating microphone, method and system for locating fluid leaks in pipes

    DOEpatents

    Kupperman, David S.; Spevak, Lev

    1994-01-01

    A leak detecting microphone inserted directly into fluid within a pipe includes a housing having a first end being inserted within the pipe and a second opposed end extending outside the pipe. A diaphragm is mounted within the first housing end and an acoustic transducer is coupled to the diaphragm for converting acoustical signals to electrical signals. A plurality of apertures are provided in the housing first end, the apertures located both above and below the diaphragm, whereby to equalize fluid pressure on either side of the diaphragm. A leak locating system and method are provided for locating fluid leaks within a pipe. A first microphone is installed within fluid in the pipe at a first selected location and sound is detected at the first location. A second microphone is installed within fluid in the pipe at a second selected location and sound is detected at the second location. A cross-correlation is identified between the detected sound at the first and second locations for identifying a leak location.

  20. Offsite radiological consequence analysis for the waste transfer leak

    SciTech Connect

    ZIMMERMAN, B.D.

    2003-03-21

    This document quantifies the offsite radiological/consequence of the bounding waste transfer leak accident for comparison with the 25 rem Evaluation Guideline established in DOE-STD-3009, Appendix A. The bounding waste transfer leak accident is a fine spray leak into the air. The calculation applies reasonably conservative input parameters in accordance with DOE-STD-3009, Appendix A, guidance. The calculated offsite dose of 0.7 rem does not challenge the Evaluation Guideline.

  1. Design Review Report for S and SX Farm Leak Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    LAMPHERE, J.E.

    2000-01-28

    The design for S and SX Farm Leak Detector ECN (649594) provides leak detection for valve pits S-A and S-B the Over Ground Transfer (OGT) conduit installation for the leak detection in COB No.10 between No.10 and PICS at 241-5-106 The Design Review was held 11/20/98 All comments received on RCR forms during the meeting are recorded on the meeting minutes were resolved and incorporated to the satisfaction reviewers.

  2. CALM: cascading system with leaking detection mechanism for medical image segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jiang; Lim, Joo Hwee; Li, Huiqi

    2008-03-01

    Medical image segmentation is a challenging process due to possible image over-segmentation and under-segmentation (leaking). The CALM medical image segmentation system is constructed with an innovative scheme that cascades threshold level-set and region-growing segmentation algorithms using Union and Intersection set operators. These set operators help to balance the over-segmentation rate and under-segmentation rate of the system respectively. While adjusting the curvature scalar parameter in the threshold level-set algorithm, we observe that the abrupt change in the size of the segmented areas coincides with the occurrences of possible leaking. Instead of randomly choose a value or use the system default curvature scalar values, this observation prompts us to use the following formula in CALM to automatically decide the optimal curvature values γ to prevent the occurrence of leaking : δ2S/δγ2 >= M, where S is the size of the segmented area and M is a large positive number. Motivated for potential applications in organ transplant and analysis, the CALM system is tested on the segmentation of the kidney regions from the Magnetic Resonance images taken from the National University Hospital of Singapore. Due to the nature of MR imaging, low-contrast, weak edges and overlapping regions of adjacent organs at kidney boundaries are frequently seen in the datasets and hence kidney segmentation is prone to leaking. The kidney segmentation accuracy rate achieved by CALM is 22% better compared with those achieved by the component algorithms or the system without leaking detection mechanism. CALM is easy-to-implement and can be applied to many applications besides kidney segmentation.

  3. Drain amylase aids detection of anastomotic leak after esophagectomy

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Erin H.; Hill, Joshua S.; Reames, Mark K.; Symanowski, James; Hurley, Susie C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Anastomotic leak following esophagectomy is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. As hospital length of stay decreases, the timely diagnosis of leak becomes more important. We evaluated CT esophagram, white blood count (WBC), and drain amylase levels in the early detection of anastomotic leak. Methods The diagnostic performance of CT esophagram, drain amylase >800 IU/L, and WBC >12,000/µL within the first 10 days after surgery in predicting leak at any time after esophagectomy was calculated. Results Anastomotic leak occurred in 13 patients (13%). CT esophagram performed within 10 days of surgery diagnosed six of these leaks with a sensitivity of 0.54. Elevation in drain amylase level within 10 days of surgery diagnosed anastomotic leak with a sensitivity of 0.38. When the CT esophagram and drain amylase were combined, the sensitivity rose to 0.69 with a specificity of 0.98. WBC elevation had a sensitivity of 0.92, with a specificity of 0.34. Among 30 patients with normal drain amylase and a normal WBC, one developed an anastomotic leak. Conclusions Drain amylase adds to the sensitivity of CT esophagram in the early detection of anastomotic leak. Selected patients with normal drain amylase levels and normal WBC may be able to safely forgo CT esophagram. PMID:27034784

  4. Lymphangiography in the Diagnosis and Localization of Various Chyle Leaks

    SciTech Connect

    Deso, Steve; Ludwig, Benjamin; Kabutey, Nii-Kabu; Kim, Ducksoo; Guermazi, Ali

    2012-02-15

    Purpose: Chyle leaks are rare entities infrequently encountered by most physicians. However, large centers providing advanced surgical care are inevitably confronted with chyle leaks as a complication of surgery, an extension of disease, or as a primary disorder. Regardless of the etiology, proper diagnosis and localization are paramount in the management of any chyle leak. Materials and Methods: Here we present 16 patients with 17 chyle leaks (5 chyluria, 8 chylothorax, and 4 chylous ascites) who underwent bipedal lymphangiography (LAG) and postprocedure computed tomography (CT) imaging. Results: In each case, the source of the chyle leak was identified and properly localized to guide further treatment. Of the 16 patients who underwent LAG and postprocedure CT imaging, the initial LAG alone provided the diagnosis and localized the chyle leak in 4 patients (25%); the postprocedure CT imaging provided the diagnosis and localized the chyle leak in 6 patients (37.5%); and the two modalities were equal in the diagnosing and localizing the chyle leak in the remaining 6 patients (37.5%)ConclusionThese cases highlight the unparalleled abilities of LAG and the added benefit of post-LAG CT imaging in the diagnosis and fine anatomic localization of chyle leaks. In addition, these cases demonstrate the retained utility of LAG in these investigations despite the development of alternative tests involving CT, magnetic resonance imaging, and nuclear medicine imaging.

  5. Applicability of leak-before-break criteria

    SciTech Connect

    Shuman, S.; Beckjord, E.; Sekerak, P.; Ewart, E.; Jacobs, S.

    1986-01-01

    On February 1, 1984, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission issued Generic Letter 84-04 on the subject of postulated pipe breaks in pressurized water reactor (PWR) primary coolant loops, opening the way for pipe-whip restraint exemptions. The letter substitutes the leak-before-break (LBB) criteria for the double-ended guillotine break regarding PWR primary reactor coolant system (RCS) piping and asymmetric blowdown loads. The LBB criterion refers to the fact that a piping flaw will leak before it breaks. The current requirement to provide pipe-whip restraints is applied within the plant to all high-energy piping with a potential for damaging structures, systems, and components essential to safe reactor shutdown. This includes primary RCS piping 30 in. and larger as well as smaller piping systems. A study was performed to evaluate the applicability of the LBB criteria proposed in NUREG-1061 to the latter set. The costs and benefits of this kind of application were assessed through a demonstration using steam generator cubicle B at Millstone Nuclear Power Station Unit 3.

  6. Leak-tight vertical membrane microvalves.

    PubMed

    Hansson, Jonas; Hillmering, Mikael; Haraldsson, Tommy; van der Wijngaart, Wouter

    2016-04-12

    Pneumatic microvalves are fundamental control components in a large range of microfluidic applications. Their key performance parameters are small size, i.e. occupying a minimum of microfluidic real estate, low flow resistance in the open state, and leak-tight closing at limited control pressures. In this work we present the successful design, realization and evaluation of the first leak-tight, vertical membrane, pneumatic microvalves. The realization of the vertical membrane microvalves is enabled by a novel dual-sided molding method for microstructuring monolithic 3D microfluidic networks in PDMS in a single step, eliminating the need for layer-to-layer alignment during bonding. We demonstrate minimum lateral device features down to 20-30 μm in size, and vertical via density of ∼30 000 per cm(2), which provides significant gains in chip real estate compared to previously reported PDMS manufacturing methods. In contrast to horizontal membrane microvalves, there are no manufacturing restrictions on the cross-sectional geometry of the flow channel of the vertical membrane microvalves. This allows tuning the design towards lower closing pressure or lower open state flow resistance compared to those of horizontal membrane microvalves. PMID:26983557

  7. Acoustic leak detection and ultrasonic crack detection

    SciTech Connect

    Kupperman, D.S.; Claytor, T.N.; Groenwald, R.

    1983-10-01

    A program is under way to assess the effectiveness of current and proposed techniques for acoustic leak detection (ALD) in reactor coolant systems. An ALD facility has been constructed and tests have begun on five laboratory-grown cracks (three fatigue and two thermal-fatigue and two field-induced IGSCC specimens. After ultrasonic testing revealed cracks in the Georgia Power Co. HATCH-1 BWR recirculation header, the utility installed an ALD system. Data from HATCH-1 have given an indication of the background noise level at a BWR recirculation header sweepolet weld. The HATCH leak detection system was tested to determine the sensitivity and dynamic range. Other background data have been acquired at the Watts Bar Nuclear Reactor in Tennessee. An ANL waveguide system, including transducer and electronics, was installed and tested on an accumulator safety injection pipe. The possibility of using ultrasonic wave scattering patterns to discriminate between IGSCCs and geometric reflectors has been explored. Thirteen reflectors (field IGSCCs, graphite wool IGSCCs, weld roots, and slits) were examined. Work with cast stainless steel (SS) included sound velocity and attenuation in isotropic and anisotropic cast SS. Reducing anisotropy does not help reduce attenuation in large-grained material. Large artificial flaws (e.g., a 1-cm-deep notch with a 4-cm path) could not be detected in isotropic centrifugally cast SS (1 to 2-mm grains) by longitudinal or shear waves at frequencies of 1 MHz or greater, but could be detected with 0.5-MHz shear waves. 13 figures.

  8. Steel Casing Resistivity Technology (SCRT): Innovative Applications of Electrical Methods for Buried Tank Leak Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fink, J. B.; Levitt, M. T.; Gee, G. W.

    2002-12-01

    The need for non-invasive leak detection methods is extremely important for monitoring cleanup efforts of nuclear waste contained in underground storage tanks at the Hanford Nuclear Facility in Washington. Drilling is both very expensive and undesirable in the tank farms. Various geophysical imaging methods were evaluated over the past two years at two "cold" sites but within geologic conditions similar to the tank farms. The "cold" sites consisted of 1. a dense array of 32 steel casings, and 2. a "mock tank" in which various controlled leaks (injections) of a saturated aqueous solution of Na2S2O35H20 were metered. Nearly all methods required invasive drilling for subsurface placement of sensors. An innovative direct-current electrical method using existing infrastructure as grounding electrodes, such as steel casings and steel tanks, has shown very promising results and is undergoing further testing. The most useful results have been obtained by using multiple grounding points for spatial determinations and continuous time-series monitoring for temporal variations. Although the large size of tanks and lengths of casings make discrete volume estimations difficult, data acquired for test leaks to date have shown a surprising correlation between leak rates and the rate-of-change of specific electrical measurements. First order volume approximations can be made based on existing knowledge of the geologic environment and hydraulic parameters. Spatial data provide general leak location and gross flow characteristics, whereas temporal data indicate test leak commencement, cessation, and approximate leak rates. On-going testing is providing quantitative calibration information that is expected to transfer to the tank farm environments. Procedures are being developed that will simplify the installation and operation of the system in the tank-farm environments. Implementation of the technology necessitated remote operation and monitoring of the electrical system

  9. Quantifying Urban Natural Gas Leaks from Street-level Methane Mapping: Measurements and Uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Fischer, J. C.; Ham, J. M.; Griebenow, C.; Schumacher, R. S.; Salo, J.

    2013-12-01

    Leaks from the natural gas pipeline system are a significant source of anthropogenic methane in urban settings. Detecting and repairing these leaks will reduce the energy and carbon footprints of our cities. Gas leaks can be detected from spikes in street-level methane concentrations measured by analyzers deployed on vehicles. While a spike in methane concentration indicates a leak, an algorithm (e.g., inverse model) must be used to estimate the size of the leak (i.e., flux) from concentration data and supporting meteorological information. Unfortunately, this drive-by approach to leak quantification is confounded by the complexity of urban roughness, changing weather conditions, and other incidental factors (e.g., traffic, vehicle speed, etc.). Furthermore, the vehicle might only pass through the plume one to three times during routine mapping. The objective of this study was to conduct controlled release experiments to better quantify the relationship between mobile methane concentration measurements and the size and location of the emission source (e.g., pipeline leakage) in an urban environment. A portable system was developed that could release methane at known rates between 10 and 40 LPM while maintaining concentrations below the lower explosive limit. A mapping vehicle was configured with fast response methane analyzers, GPS, and meteorological instruments. Portable air-sampling tripods were fabricated that could be deployed at defined distances downwind from the release point and automatically-triggered to collect grab samples. The experimental protocol was as follows: (1) identify an appropriate release point within a city, (2) release methane at a known rate, (3) measure downwind street-level concentrations with the vehicle by making multiple passes through the plume, and (4) collect supporting concentration and meteorological data with the static tripod samplers deployed in the plume. Controlled release studies were performed at multiple locations and

  10. Absolute photon-flux measurements in the vacuum ultraviolet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samson, J. A. R.; Haddad, G. N.

    1974-01-01

    Absolute photon-flux measurements in the vacuum ultraviolet have extended to short wavelengths by use of rare-gas ionization chambers. The technique involves the measurement of the ion current as a function of the gas pressure in the ion chamber. The true value of the ion current, and hence the absolute photon flux, is obtained by extrapolating the ion current to zero gas pressure. Examples are given at 162 and 266 A. The short-wavelength limit is determined only by the sensitivity of the current-measuring apparatus and by present knowledge of the photoionization processes that occur in the rate gases.

  11. Improving HST Pointing & Absolute Astrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lallo, Matthew; Nelan, E.; Kimmer, E.; Cox, C.; Casertano, S.

    2007-05-01

    Accurate absolute astrometry is becoming increasingly important in an era of multi-mission archives and virtual observatories. Hubble Space Telescope's (HST's) Guidestar Catalog II (GSC2) has reduced coordinate error to around 0.25 arcsecond, a factor 2 or more compared with GSC1. With this reduced catalog error, special attention must be given to calibrate and maintain the Fine Guidance Sensors (FGSs) and Science Instruments (SIs) alignments in HST to a level well below this in order to ensure that the accuracy of science product's astrometry keywords and target positioning are limited only by the catalog errors. After HST Servicing Mission 4, such calibrations' improvement in "blind" pointing accuracy will allow for more efficient COS acquisitions. Multiple SIs and FGSs each have their own footprints in the spatially shared HST focal plane. It is the small changes over time in primarily the whole-body positions & orientations of these instruments & guiders relative to one another that is addressed by this work. We describe the HST Cycle 15 program CAL/OTA 11021 which, along with future variants of it, determines and maintains positions and orientations of the SIs and FGSs to better than 50 milli- arcseconds and 0.04 to 0.004 degrees of roll, putting errors associated with the alignment sufficiently below GSC2 errors. We present recent alignment results and assess their errors, illustrate trends, and describe where and how the observer sees benefit from these calibrations when using HST.

  12. Absolute Instability in Coupled-Cavity TWTs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, D. M. H.; Rittersdorf, I. M.; Zhang, Peng; Lau, Y. Y.; Simon, D. H.; Gilgenbach, R. M.; Chernin, D.; Antonsen, T. M., Jr.

    2014-10-01

    This paper will present results of our analysis of absolute instability in a coupled-cavity traveling wave tube (TWT). The structure mode at the lower and upper band edges are respectively approximated by a hyperbola in the (omega, k) plane. When the Briggs-Bers criterion is applied, a threshold current for onset of absolute instability is observed at the upper band edge, but not the lower band edge. The nonexistence of absolute instability at the lower band edge is mathematically similar to the nonexistence of absolute instability that we recently demonstrated for a dielectric TWT. The existence of absolute instability at the upper band edge is mathematically similar to the existence of absolute instability in a gyroton traveling wave amplifier. These interesting observations will be discussed, and the practical implications will be explored. This work was supported by AFOSR, ONR, and L-3 Communications Electron Devices.

  13. Comprehensive leak detection survey and benefit/cost analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Scholze, R.J. Jr.; Maloney, S.W.

    1995-06-01

    Fort Carson, Colorado was the site of a comprehensive leak detection investigation of the potable water system with the express purpose of quantifying the benefits to be derived by a military installation from use of leak detection and repair technology. Military bases are often the size of a small city and one Directorate or Department has responsibility for all real estate (buildings, roads, grounds, etc.) unlike a municipal public works department. The investigation used state of the art noise correlation and computer correlation technology to survey the distribution system mains. This was complemented by a building to building survey covering office and commercial buildings along with family and barracks housing where investigators entered buildings and quantified visible leaks in faucets and water closets, etc. Following repairs and a year`s time, a follow-on survey is performed to again examine all aspects of the system. The result was a complete economic evaluation and benefit/cost analysis of the installation. Representative findings include: the majority of distribution system leaks were at hydrants or similar appurtenances; and family housing was found to be the other major concentration of leaks. However, where the first survey found 80 percent of housing units had leaks, findings from the second round on the order of 20 percent. Office buildings were found from the first survey to not merit follow-on attention due to limited numbers of leaks. Water-consciousness was raised for both the responsible directorate and individuals in family housing and leak repair was given a higher priority for repairs. This paper will outline the leak detection methodology used, characterize the types and patterns of leaks found, introduce an economic analysis for the entire leak detection process, and finally, provide lessons learned with practical results and implications.

  14. Geomechanical analysis to predict the oil leak at the wellbores in Big Hill Strategic Petroleum Reserve

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Byoung Yoon

    2014-02-01

    Oil leaks were found in wellbores of Caverns 105 and 109 at the Big Hill Strategic Petroleum Reserve site. According to the field observations, two instances of casing damage occurred at the depth of the interbed between the caprock bottom and salt top. A three dimensional finite element model, which contains wellbore element blocks and allows each cavern to be configured individually, is constructed to investigate the wellbore damage mechanism. The model also contains element blocks to represent interface between each lithology and a shear zone to examine the interbed behavior in a realistic manner. The causes of the damaged casing segments are a result of vertical and horizontal movements of the interbed between the caprock and salt dome. The salt top subsides because the volume of caverns below the salt top decrease with time due to salt creep closure, while the caprock subsides at a slower rate because the caprock is thick and stiffer. This discrepancy yields a deformation of the well. The deformed wellbore may fail at some time. An oil leak occurs when the wellbore fails. A possible oil leak date of each well is determined using the equivalent plastic strain failure criterion. A well grading system for a remediation plan is developed based on the predicted leak dates of each wellbore.

  15. Method for sealing remote leaks in an enclosure using an aerosol

    DOEpatents

    Modera, Mark P.; Carrie, Francois R.

    1999-01-01

    The invention is a method and device for sealing leaks remotely by means of injecting a previously prepared aerosol into the enclosure being sealed according to a particular sealing efficiency defined by the product of a penetration efficiency and a particle deposition efficiency. By using different limits in the relationship between penetration efficiency and flowrate, the same method according the invention can be used for coating the inside of an enclosure. Specifically the invention is a method and device for preparing, transporting, and depositing a solid phase aerosol to the interior surface of the enclosure relating particle size, particle carrier flow rate, and pressure differential, so that particles deposited there can bridge and substantially seal each leak, with out providing a substantial coating at inside surfaces of the enclosure other than the leak. The particle size and flow parameters can be adjusted to coat the interior of the enclosure (duct) without substantial plugging of the leaks depending on how the particle size and flowrate relationships are chosen.

  16. Analysis of a water-coolant leak into a very high-temperature vitrification chamber.

    SciTech Connect

    Felicione, F. S.

    1998-06-11

    A coolant-leakage incident occurred during non-radioactive operation of the Plasma Hearth Process waste-vitrification development system at Argonne National Laboratory when a stray electric arc ruptured az water-cooling jacket. Rapid evaporation of the coolant that entered the very high-temperature chamber pressurized the normally sub-atmospheric system above ambient pressure for over 13 minutes. Any positive pressurization, and particularly a lengthy one, is a safety concern since this can cause leakage of contaminants from the system. A model of the thermal phenomena that describe coolant/hot-material interactions was developed to better understand the characteristics of this type of incident. The model is described and results for a variety of hypothetical coolant-leak incidents are presented. It is shown that coolant leak rates above a certain threshold will cause coolant to accumulate in the chamber, and evaporation from this pool can maintain positive pressure in the system long after the leak has been stopped. Application of the model resulted in reasonably good agreement with the duration of the pressure measured during the incident. A closed-form analytic solution is shown to be applicable to the initial leak period in which the peak pressures are generated, and is presented and discussed.

  17. Impacts of Sewer Leaks on Surrounding Groundwater and Surface Water Quality in Singapore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ly, D.; Chui, T. M.

    2011-12-01

    Underground sewers deteriorate over time resulting in cracks and joint defects. Sewage thus leaks out of the sewers and contaminates the surrounding groundwater. Singapore does not directly use groundwater as a water supply. However, contaminated groundwater flows into the drains nearby through weep holes, and subsequently enters water supply reservoirs. This study examines the impacts of sewage leaks on surrounding groundwater and surface water quality by modeling the interactions between leaky sewers, groundwater and drains. It first explores the representations of important yet challenging boundary conditions, namely weep holes and leaky sewers, so that their fluxes vary realistically with water pressure throughout a simulation. It then simulates groundwater flow and contaminant transport from leaky sewers to nearby drains over a period of ten years. It further rehabilitates the sewers and models the attenuation of contamination plume for another ten years. The results of this project contribute to the modeling and understanding of the potential impacts of sewer leaks on surrounding groundwater and surface water quality. For example, groundwater quality changes with hydrologic conditions, and it is highest during heavy rainfall and times of high water table because of the low leakage and high dilution rates. Water quality fluctuates daily or even hourly in the vicinity of the sewers, but is more stable in the flow through the weep holes into the drains. Overall, this study benefits the sewer leak monitoring and sewer rehabilitation in many urban areas worldwide.

  18. Emissions of Methane and Other Hydrocarbons Due to Wellbore Leaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyman, S. N.; Mansfield, M. L.

    2013-12-01

    The explosive growth of oil and gas production in the United States has focused public and regulatory attention on environmental impacts of hydrocarbon extraction, including air quality and climate impacts. However, EPA and others have acknowledged that current air emissions factors and inventories for many oil and gas-related source categories are inadequate or lacking entirely. One potentially important emissions source is leakage of natural gas from wellbores. This phenomenon has long been recognized to occur, but no attempt has been made to quantify emission rates of gas leaked from wellbores to the atmosphere. Soil gas measurements carried out by USGS over the last several years in Utah's oil and gas fields have shown that, while concentrations of methane in soils near many wells are low, soil gas near some wells can contain more than 10% methane, indicating that underground leakage is occurring. In summer 2013 we carried out a campaign to measure the emission rate of methane and other hydrocarbons from soils near wells in two oil and gas fields in Utah. We measured emissions from several locations on some well pads to determine the change in emission rate with distance from well heads, and we measured at non-well sites in the same fields to determine background emission rates. Methane emission rates at some wells exceeded 3 g m-2 h-1, while emission rates at other wells were similar to background levels, and a correlation was observed between soil gas methane concentrations and methane emission rates from the soil. We used these data to estimate total methane and hydrocarbon emission rates from these two fields.

  19. FIFTH INTERIM STATUS REPORT: MODEL 9975 PCV O-RING FIXTURE LONG-TERM LEAK PERFORMANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Daugherty, W.; Hoffman, E.

    2011-04-11

    A series of experiments to monitor the aging performance of Viton{reg_sign} GLT O-rings used in the Model 9975 package has been ongoing for six years at the Savannah River National Laboratory. Sixty-seven mock-ups of 9975 Primary Containment Vessels (PCVs) were assembled and heated to temperatures ranging from 200 to 450 F. They were leak-tested initially and have been tested at nominal six month intervals to determine if they meet the criterion of leaktightness defined in ANSI standard N14.5-97. Fourteen additional tests were initiated in 2008 with GLT-S O-rings heated to temperatures ranging from 200 to 400 F. High temperature aging continues for 36 GLT O-ring fixtures at 200-350 F. Room temperature leak test failures have been experienced in 6 of the GLT O-ring fixtures aging at 300 and 350 F, and in all 3 of the GLT O-ring fixtures aging at higher temperatures. No failures have yet been observed in GLT O-ring fixtures aging at 200 F for 30-48 months, which is still bounding to O-ring temperatures during storage in KAMS. High temperature aging continues for 6 GLT-S O-ring fixtures at 200-300 F. Room temperature leak test failures have been experienced in all 8 of the GLT-S O-ring fixtures aging at 350 and 400 F. No failures have yet been observed in GLT-S O-ring fixtures aging at 200 or 300 F for 19 months. For O-ring fixtures that have failed the room temperature leak test and been disassembled, the Orings displayed a compression set ranging from 51-95%. This is significantly greater than seen to date for packages inspected during KAMS field surveillance (23% average). For GLT O-rings, service life based on the room temperature leak rate criterion is comparable to that predicted by compression stress relaxation (CSR) data at higher temperatures (350-400 F). While there are no comparable failure data yet at aging temperatures below 300 F, extrapolations of the data for GLT O-rings suggests the CSR model predictions provide a conservative prediction of service

  20. FIFTH INTERIM STATUS REPORT: MODEL 9975 PCV O-RING FIXTURE LONG-TERM LEAK PERFORMANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Daugherty, W.; Hoffman, E.

    2010-11-01

    A series of experiments to monitor the aging performance of Viton{sup reg.} GLT O-rings used in the Model 9975 package has been ongoing for six years at the Savannah River National Laboratory. Sixty-seven mock-ups of 9975 Primary Containment Vessels (PCVs) were assembled and heated to temperatures ranging from 200 to 450 F. They were leak-tested initially and have been tested at nominal six month intervals to determine if they meet the criterion of leaktightness defined in ANSI standard N14.5-97. Fourteen additional tests were initiated in 2008 with GLT-S O-rings heated to temperatures ranging from 200 to 400 F. High temperature aging continues for 36 GLT O-ring fixtures at 200--350 F. Room temperature leak test failures have been experienced in 5 of the GLT O-ring fixtures aging at 300 and 350 F, and in all 3 of the GLT O-ring fixtures aging at higher temperatures. No failures have yet been observed in GLT O-ring fixtures aging at 200 F for 30--48 months, which is still bounding to O-ring temperatures during storage in KAMS. High temperature aging continues for 6 GLT-S O-ring fixtures at 200--300 F. Room temperature leak test failures have been experienced in all 8 of the GLT-S O-ring fixtures aging at 350 and 400 F. No failures have yet been observed in GLT-S O-ring fixtures aging at 200 or 300 F for 19 months. For O-ring fixtures that have failed the room temperature leak test and been disassembled, the O-rings displayed a compression set ranging from 51--95%. This is significantly greater than seen to date for packages inspected during KAMS field surveillance (23% average). For GLT O-rings, service life based on the room temperature leak rate criterion is comparable to that predicted by compression stress relaxation (CSR) data at higher temperatures (350--400 F). While there are no comparable failure data yet at aging temperatures below 300 F, extrapolations of the data for GLT O-rings suggests that CSR model predictions provide a conservative prediction of

  1. Absolute negative mobility of interacting Brownian particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ou, Ya-li; Hu, Cai-tian; Wu, Jian-chun; Ai, Bao-quan

    2015-12-01

    Transport of interacting Brownian particles in a periodic potential is investigated in the presence of an ac force and a dc force. From Brownian dynamic simulations, we find that both the interaction between particles and the thermal fluctuations play key roles in the absolute negative mobility (the particle noisily moves backwards against a small constant bias). When no the interaction acts, there is only one region where the absolute negative mobility occurs. In the presence of the interaction, the absolute negative mobility may appear in multiple regions. The weak interaction can be helpful for the absolute negative mobility, while the strong interaction has a destructive impact on it.

  2. SEVENTH INTERIM STATUS REPORT: MODEL 9975 PCV O-RING FIXTURE LONG-TERM LEAK PERFORMANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Daugherty, W.

    2012-08-30

    surveillance (24% average). For GLT O-rings, separate service life estimates have been made based on the O-ring fixture leak test data and based on compression stress relaxation (CSR) data. These two predictive models show reasonable agreement at higher temperatures (350 – 400 ºF). However, at 300 ºF, the room temperature leak test failures to date experienced longer aging times than predicted by the CSRbased model. This suggests that extrapolations of the CSR model predictions to temperatures below 300 ºF will provide a conservative prediction of service life relative to the leak rate criterion. Leak test failure data at lower temperatures are needed to verify this apparent trend. Insufficient failure data exist currently to perform a similar comparison for GLT-S O-rings. Aging and periodic leak testing will continue for the remaining PCV O-ring fixtures.

  3. 10 CFR 39.35 - Leak testing of sealed sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leak testing of sealed sources. 39.35 Section 39.35 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION LICENSES AND RADIATION SAFETY REQUIREMENTS FOR WELL LOGGING Equipment § 39.35 Leak testing of sealed sources. (a) Testing and recordkeeping requirements. Each licensee who uses a sealed source shall have the...

  4. LOW COST IMAGER FOR POLLUTANT GAS LEAK DETECTION - PHASE II

    EPA Science Inventory

    An inexpensive imaging Instrument to quickly locate leaks of methane and other greenhouse and VOC gases would reduce the cost and effort expended by industry to comply with EPA regulations. In Phase I, of this WBIR program, a new gas leak visualization camera was demonstrated...

  5. Heat exchanger with leak detecting double wall tubes

    DOEpatents

    Bieberbach, George; Bongaards, Donald J.; Lohmeier, Alfred; Duke, James M.

    1981-01-01

    A straight shell and tube heat exchanger utilizing double wall tubes and three tubesheets to ensure separation of the primary and secondary fluid and reliable leak detection of a leak in either the primary or the secondary fluids to further ensure that there is no mixing of the two fluids.

  6. A voice-actuated wind tunnel model leak checking system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, W. E.

    1985-01-01

    A voice-actuated wind tunnel model leak checking system was developed. The system uses a voice recognition and response unit to interact with the technician along with a graphics terminal to provide the technician with visual feedback while checking a model for leaks.

  7. Air leak after lung resection: pathophysiology and patients' implications.

    PubMed

    Pompili, Cecilia; Miserocchi, Giuseppe

    2016-02-01

    Protocols for the management of air leaks are critical aspects in the postoperative course of patients following lung resections. Many investigations in the last decade are focusing on the chest tube modalities or preventative measures, however, little is known about the pathophysiology of air leak and the patient perception of this common complication. This review concentrates on understanding the reasons why a pulmonary parenchyma may start to leak or an air leak may be longer than others. Experimental works support the notion that lung overdistension may favor air leak. These studies may represent the basis of future investigations. Furthermore, the standardization of nomenclature in the field of pleural space management and the creation of novel air leak scoring systems have contributed to improve the knowledge among thoracic surgeons and facilitate the organization of trials on this matter. We tried to summarize available evidences about the patient perception of a prolonged air leak and about what would be useful for them in order to prevent worsening of their quality of life. Future investigations are warranted to better understand the pathophysiologic mechanisms responsible of prolonged air leak in order to define tailored treatments and protocols. Improving the care at home with web-based telemonitoring or real time connected chest drainage may in a future improve the quality of life of the patients experience this complication and also enhance hospital finances. PMID:26941970

  8. 10 CFR 36.59 - Detection of leaking sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Detection of leaking sources. 36.59 Section 36.59 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION LICENSES AND RADIATION SAFETY REQUIREMENTS FOR IRRADIATORS Operation of Irradiators § 36.59 Detection of leaking sources. (a) Each dry-source-storage sealed source must be tested for leakage at intervals not to exceed...

  9. 10 CFR 36.59 - Detection of leaking sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Detection of leaking sources. 36.59 Section 36.59 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION LICENSES AND RADIATION SAFETY REQUIREMENTS FOR IRRADIATORS Operation of Irradiators § 36.59 Detection of leaking sources. (a) Each dry-source-storage sealed source must be tested for leakage at intervals not to exceed...

  10. Commercial Grade Item (CGI) Dedication for Leak Detection Relays

    SciTech Connect

    KOCH, M.R.; JOHNS, B.R.

    1999-12-21

    This Test Plan provides a test method to dedicate the leak detection relays used on the new Pumping and Instrumentation Control (PIC) skids. The new skids are fabricated on-site. The leak detection system is a safety class system per the Authorization Basis.

  11. Commercial Grade Item (CGI) Dedication for Leak Detection Relays

    SciTech Connect

    JOHNS, B.R.

    1999-05-05

    This Test Plan provides a test method to dedicate the leak detection relays used on the new Pumping and Instrumentation Control (PIC) skids. The new skids are fabricated on-site. The leak detection system is a safety class system per the Authorization Basis.

  12. Commercial Grade Item (CGI) Dedication for Leak Detection Relays

    SciTech Connect

    KOCH, M.R.

    2000-02-28

    This Test Plan provides a test method to dedicate the leak detection relays used on the new Pumping Instrumentation and Control (PIC) skids. The new skids are fabricated on-site. The leak detection system is a safety class system per the Authorization Basis.

  13. 40 CFR 63.1255 - Standards: Equipment leaks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... comply only with the provisions of this subpart: (i) 40 CFR part 60. (ii) 40 CFR part 61. (3) (4) The... successful repair of the leak. (iv) The maximum instrument reading measured by Method 21 of 40 CFR part 60... pump and agitator subject to this section shall be monitored quarterly to detect leaks by the...

  14. 40 CFR 63.1255 - Standards: Equipment leaks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... comply only with the provisions of this subpart: (i) 40 CFR part 60. (ii) 40 CFR part 61. (3) (4) The... successful repair of the leak. (iv) The maximum instrument reading measured by Method 21 of 40 CFR part 60... pump and agitator subject to this section shall be monitored quarterly to detect leaks by the...

  15. 40 CFR 63.1255 - Standards: Equipment leaks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... comply only with the provisions of this subpart: (i) 40 CFR part 60. (ii) 40 CFR part 61. (3) (4) The... successful repair of the leak. (iv) The maximum instrument reading measured by Method 21 of 40 CFR part 60... pump and agitator subject to this section shall be monitored quarterly to detect leaks by the...

  16. Commercial Grade Item (CGI) Dedication for Leak Detection Relays

    SciTech Connect

    JOHNS, B.R.; KOCH, M.R.

    2000-01-28

    This Test Plan provides a test method to dedicate the leak detection relays used on the new Pumping Instrumentation and Control (PIC) skids. The new skids are fabricated on-site. The leak detection system is a safety class system per the Authorization Basis.

  17. Commercial Grade Item (CGI) Dedication for Leak Detection Relays

    SciTech Connect

    KOCH, M.R.

    1999-10-26

    This Test Plan provides a test method to dedicate the leak detection relays used on the new Pumping and Instrumentation Control (PIC) skids. The new skids are fabricated on-site. The leak detection system is a safety class system per the Authorization Basis.

  18. Silver plating technique seals leaks in thin wall tubing joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blenderman, W. H.

    1966-01-01

    Leaks in thin wall tubing joints are sealed by cleaning and silver plating the hot gas side of the joint in the leakage area. The pressure differential across the silver during hydrostatic test and subsequent use forces the ductile silver into the leak area and seals it.

  19. HIGH RESOLUTION RESISTIVITY LEAK DETECTION DATA PROCESSING & EVALUATION MEHTODS & REQUIREMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    SCHOFIELD JS

    2007-10-04

    This document has two purposes: {sm_bullet} Describe how data generated by High Resolution REsistivity (HRR) leak detection (LD) systems deployed during single-shell tank (SST) waste retrieval operations are processed and evaluated. {sm_bullet} Provide the basic review requirements for HRR data when Hrr is deployed as a leak detection method during SST waste retrievals.

  20. ELECTRICAL RESPONSE OF A LEAK IN A GEOMEMBRANE LINER

    EPA Science Inventory

    A leak in a geomembrane lined impoundment or landfill has a characteristic electrical response. imulate the waste material, the liner, and the soil under the liner by infinite horizontal layers and express the secondary potential for a leak in the geomembrane liner in terms of a ...

  1. Air leak after lung resection: pathophysiology and patients’ implications

    PubMed Central

    Miserocchi, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Protocols for the management of air leaks are critical aspects in the postoperative course of patients following lung resections. Many investigations in the last decade are focusing on the chest tube modalities or preventative measures, however, little is known about the pathophysiology of air leak and the patient perception of this common complication. This review concentrates on understanding the reasons why a pulmonary parenchyma may start to leak or an air leak may be longer than others. Experimental works support the notion that lung overdistension may favor air leak. These studies may represent the basis of future investigations. Furthermore, the standardization of nomenclature in the field of pleural space management and the creation of novel air leak scoring systems have contributed to improve the knowledge among thoracic surgeons and facilitate the organization of trials on this matter. We tried to summarize available evidences about the patient perception of a prolonged air leak and about what would be useful for them in order to prevent worsening of their quality of life. Future investigations are warranted to better understand the pathophysiologic mechanisms responsible of prolonged air leak in order to define tailored treatments and protocols. Improving the care at home with web-based telemonitoring or real time connected chest drainage may in a future improve the quality of life of the patients experience this complication and also enhance hospital finances. PMID:26941970

  2. 241-AY-102 Leak Detection Pit Drain Line Inspection Report

    SciTech Connect

    Boomer, Kayle D.; Engeman, Jason K.; Gunter, Jason R.; Joslyn, Cameron C.; Vazquez, Brandon J.; Venetz, Theodore J.; Garfield, John S.

    2014-01-20

    This document provides a description of the design components, operational approach, and results from the Tank AY-102 leak detection pit drain piping visual inspection. To perform this inspection a custom robotic crawler with a deployment device was designed, built, and operated by IHI Southwest Technologies, Inc. for WRPS to inspect the 6-inch leak detection pit drain line.

  3. The detection of carbon dioxide leaks using quasi-tomographic laser absorption spectroscopy measurements in variable wind

    PubMed Central

    Levine, Zachary H.; Pintar, Adam L.; Dobler, Jeremy T.; Blume, Nathan; Braun, Michael; Scott Zaccheo, T.; Pernini, Timothy G.

    2016-01-01

    Laser absorption spectroscopy (LAS) has been used over the last several decades for the measurement of trace gasses in the atmosphere. For over a decade, LAS measurements from multiple sources and tens of retroreflectors have been combined with sparse-sample tomography methods to estimate the 2-D distribution of trace gas concentrations and underlying fluxes from point-like sources. In this work, we consider the ability of such a system to detect and estimate the position and rate of a single point leak which may arise as a failure mode for carbon dioxide storage. The leak is assumed to be at a constant rate giving rise to a plume with a concentration and distribution that depend on the wind velocity. We demonstrate the ability of our approach to detect a leak using numerical simulation and also present a preliminary measurement. PMID:27453761

  4. Effect of leak location on measured respirator fit.

    PubMed

    Crutchfield, C D; Park, D L

    1997-06-01

    A significant difference in leak detection as a function of leak location was observed during a study assessing how well current models of quantitative fit-test systems detect leakage. Known sources of leakage (matched hypodermic needles) were introduced at three fixed locations into factory-probed half-mask and full-face respirators mounted on a headform-breathing machine system. The leak locations were the bridge of the nose, the cheek, and the chin. Baseline leakage into each respirator was determined by conducting a fit-test with all fixed leak sources capped. Fit tests were repeated with each individual source uncapped. Study objectives included determining (1) how well each system measured the leakage, and (2) whether leak location had any effect on leak measurement. An ambient aerosol fit-test system (Portacount Plus) and a controlled negative pressure (CNP) fit-test system (FitTester 3000) were used. The ambient aerosol system detected an overall average of 37.2% of the known leakage, with a coefficient of variation of 44.7%. An analysis of variance showed significant differences in aerosol system measurements of leakage as a function of leak location and mask type (p < 0.001). A different pattern of aerosol leak detection as a function of leak location was observed between half-mask and full-face respirators, which appears to be related to differences in in-mask airflow dynamics. The CNP system detected an overall average of 97.9% of the known leakage through the same hypodermic needles, with a coefficient of variation of 4.3%. CNP system results were not affected by leak location (p > 0.43) or mask type (p > 0.32). PMID:9183835

  5. Overspecification of color, pattern, and size: salience, absoluteness, and consistency

    PubMed Central

    Tarenskeen, Sammie; Broersma, Mirjam; Geurts, Bart

    2015-01-01

    The rates of overspecification of color, pattern, and size are compared, to investigate how salience and absoluteness contribute to the production of overspecification. Color and pattern are absolute and salient attributes, whereas size is relative and less salient. Additionally, a tendency toward consistent responses is assessed. Using a within-participants design, we find similar rates of color and pattern overspecification, which are both higher than the rate of size overspecification. Using a between-participants design, however, we find similar rates of pattern and size overspecification, which are both lower than the rate of color overspecification. This indicates that although many speakers are more likely to include color than pattern (probably because color is more salient), they may also treat pattern like color due to a tendency toward consistency. We find no increase in size overspecification when the salience of size is increased, suggesting that speakers are more likely to include absolute than relative attributes. However, we do find an increase in size overspecification when mentioning the attributes is triggered, which again shows that speakers tend to refer in a consistent manner, and that there are circumstances in which even size overspecification is frequently produced. PMID:26594190

  6. Pharmaceutical container/closure integrity. IV: Development of an indirect correlation between vacuum decay leak measurement and microbial ingress.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, L T; Muangsiri, W; Schiere, R; Guazzo, D K; Kirsch, L E

    1999-01-01

    The rational development of a physical test method to evaluate the microbial barrier properties of sterile containers necessitates its correlation to microbiological exclusion. This can be accomplished by direct or indirect correlation. In the former, the proposed physical test is directly compared to microbial challenges using appropriate test units that stimulate container leaks at both high and low probabilities of microbial ingress. Previous work has demonstrated the development of a direct correlation using helium leak rate methods and microbial immersion challenges. An indirect correlation can be established by comparing the proposed physical method to well-defined leakage standards that represent various known levels of microbial ingress. Thus the quality assurance properties of a physical test method can be established by comparison to another physical test method that has been previously characterized. This approach has the distinct advantages of being faster, quantitatively rigorous, and less subject to the vicissitudes, of microbial testing. This approach was demonstrated by comparing the helium leak rate method to vacuum decay testing. Additionally it was demonstrated that vacuum decay testing was a fast and reproducible method for detecting leaks of about 1 to 2 mm. Leaks were simulated by affixing micropipettes into glass vials. PMID:10754714

  7. Inequalities, Absolute Value, and Logical Connectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parish, Charles R.

    1992-01-01

    Presents an approach to the concept of absolute value that alleviates students' problems with the traditional definition and the use of logical connectives in solving related problems. Uses a model that maps numbers from a horizontal number line to a vertical ray originating from the origin. Provides examples solving absolute value equations and…

  8. Absolute optical metrology : nanometers to kilometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dubovitsky, Serge; Lay, O. P.; Peters, R. D.; Liebe, C. C.

    2005-01-01

    We provide and overview of the developments in the field of high-accuracy absolute optical metrology with emphasis on space-based applications. Specific work on the Modulation Sideband Technology for Absolute Ranging (MSTAR) sensor is described along with novel applications of the sensor.

  9. Monolithically integrated absolute frequency comb laser system

    DOEpatents

    Wanke, Michael C.

    2016-07-12

    Rather than down-convert optical frequencies, a QCL laser system directly generates a THz frequency comb in a compact monolithically integrated chip that can be locked to an absolute frequency without the need of a frequency-comb synthesizer. The monolithic, absolute frequency comb can provide a THz frequency reference and tool for high-resolution broad band spectroscopy.

  10. Introducing the Mean Absolute Deviation "Effect" Size

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorard, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    This paper revisits the use of effect sizes in the analysis of experimental and similar results, and reminds readers of the relative advantages of the mean absolute deviation as a measure of variation, as opposed to the more complex standard deviation. The mean absolute deviation is easier to use and understand, and more tolerant of extreme…

  11. Investigating Absolute Value: A Real World Application

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kidd, Margaret; Pagni, David

    2009-01-01

    Making connections between various representations is important in mathematics. In this article, the authors discuss the numeric, algebraic, and graphical representations of sums of absolute values of linear functions. The initial explanations are accessible to all students who have experience graphing and who understand that absolute value simply…

  12. Absolute Income, Relative Income, and Happiness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ball, Richard; Chernova, Kateryna

    2008-01-01

    This paper uses data from the World Values Survey to investigate how an individual's self-reported happiness is related to (i) the level of her income in absolute terms, and (ii) the level of her income relative to other people in her country. The main findings are that (i) both absolute and relative income are positively and significantly…

  13. Absolute instability of the Gaussian wake profile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hultgren, Lennart S.; Aggarwal, Arun K.

    1987-01-01

    Linear parallel-flow stability theory has been used to investigate the effect of viscosity on the local absolute instability of a family of wake profiles with a Gaussian velocity distribution. The type of local instability, i.e., convective or absolute, is determined by the location of a branch-point singularity with zero group velocity of the complex dispersion relation for the instability waves. The effects of viscosity were found to be weak for values of the wake Reynolds number, based on the center-line velocity defect and the wake half-width, larger than about 400. Absolute instability occurs only for sufficiently large values of the center-line wake defect. The critical value of this parameter increases with decreasing wake Reynolds number, thereby indicating a shrinking region of absolute instability with decreasing wake Reynolds number. If backflow is not allowed, absolute instability does not occur for wake Reynolds numbers smaller than about 38.

  14. Leak testing of cryogenic components — problems and solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, S. P.; Pandarkar, S. P.; Unni, T. G.; Sinha, A. K.; Mahajan, K.; Suthar, R. L.

    2008-05-01

    A prototype of Cold Neutron Source (CNS) for Dhruva Reactor is being manufactured at Centre for Design and Manufacture (CDM), BARC, Mumbai for validating the mechanical and thermal engineering design aspects, besides checking the integrity of all joints and components at low temperature, 77K. Task of a Cold Neutron Source is to generate cold neutrons by cooling down the thermal neutrons, which are originally produced in a nuclear research reactor. The complete Cold Neutron Source system comprises a complex arrangement of moderator pot, transfer line (piping), pumps, refrigerators, storage tanks, a heat exchanger and associated controls and instrumentation. The heart of the system is moderator pot in which water (moderator) is cooled down by Liquid Nitrogen (LN2) being circulated through an annular cavity machined on the walls of the pot. Transfer lines for LN2 basically consist of two concentric Stainless Steel flexible pipes, which are joined to the inlet and outlet Aluminium tubes of the moderator pot through transition joints. Leak in any component may result in loss of liquid Nitrogen, degradation of vacuum, which in turn may affect the heat removal efficiency of the source. Hence, leak testing was considered a very important quality control tool and all joints and components were subjected to helium leak test using mass spectrometer leak detector (MSLD) at cryogenic temperature. During one of the earlier experiments, flow of LN2 through inner flexible pipe of the transfer line resulted in rise of pressure in the vacuum annulus and sweating on the outer flexible pipe. After investigations it was found that large thermal stress compounded with mechanical stress resulted in cracks in the inner pipe. Accordingly design was modified to get leak proof transfer line assembly. Further, during leak testing of thin wall moderator pot, gross leak was observed on the outer jacket welded joint. Leak was so large that even a small amount of Helium gas in the vicinity of the

  15. Orion Absolute Navigation System Progress and Challenge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holt, Greg N.; D'Souza, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    The absolute navigation design of NASA's Orion vehicle is described. It has undergone several iterations and modifications since its inception, and continues as a work-in-progress. This paper seeks to benchmark the current state of the design and some of the rationale and analysis behind it. There are specific challenges to address when preparing a timely and effective design for the Exploration Flight Test (EFT-1), while still looking ahead and providing software extensibility for future exploration missions. The primary onboard measurements in a Near-Earth or Mid-Earth environment consist of GPS pseudo-range and delta-range, but for future explorations missions the use of star-tracker and optical navigation sources need to be considered. Discussions are presented for state size and composition, processing techniques, and consider states. A presentation is given for the processing technique using the computationally stable and robust UDU formulation with an Agee-Turner Rank-One update. This allows for computational savings when dealing with many parameters which are modeled as slowly varying Gauss-Markov processes. Preliminary analysis shows up to a 50% reduction in computation versus a more traditional formulation. Several state elements are discussed and evaluated, including position, velocity, attitude, clock bias/drift, and GPS measurement biases in addition to bias, scale factor, misalignment, and non-orthogonalities of the accelerometers and gyroscopes. Another consideration is the initialization of the EKF in various scenarios. Scenarios such as single-event upset, ground command, and cold start are discussed as are strategies for whole and partial state updates as well as covariance considerations. Strategies are given for dealing with latent measurements and high-rate propagation using multi-rate architecture. The details of the rate groups and the data ow between the elements is discussed and evaluated.

  16. Resilience to Leaking — Dynamic Systems Modeling of Information Security

    PubMed Central

    Hamacher, Kay

    2012-01-01

    Leaking of confidential material is a major threat to information security within organizations and to society as a whole. This insight has gained traction in the political realm since the activities of Wikileaks, which hopes to attack ‘unjust’ systems or ‘conspiracies’. Eventually, such threats to information security rely on a biologistic argument on the benefits and drawbacks that uncontrolled leaking might pose for ‘just’ and ‘unjust’ entities. Such biological metaphors are almost exclusively based on the economic advantage of participants. Here, I introduce a mathematical model of the complex dynamics implied by leaking. The complex interactions of adversaries are modeled by coupled logistic equations including network effects of econo-communication networks. The modeling shows, that there might arise situations where the leaking envisioned and encouraged by Wikileaks and the like can strengthen the defending entity (the ‘conspiracy’). In particular, the only severe impact leaking can have on an organization seems to originate in the exploitation of leaks by another entity the organization competes with. Therefore, the model suggests that leaks can be used as a `tactical mean’ in direct adversary relations, but do not necessarily increase public benefit and societal immunization to ‘conspiracies’. Furthermore, within the model the exploitation of the (open) competition between entities seems to be a more promising approach to control malicious organizations : divide-et-impera policies triumph here. PMID:23227151

  17. Fuzzy clustering of infrared images applied in air leak localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Nan; Peng, Guang-zheng; Jiang, Mu-zhou

    2009-07-01

    Most current research into the localization of leaks is focused on leaks of petroleum and natural gas pipelines, while there is very little new work being done on the leakage of vessels. A novel air-leak diagnosis and localization method based on infrared thermography is described in this paper, which is developed in an attempt to overcome the disadvantages of low efficiency and poor anti-jamming ability associated with the traditional approaches to localization of leaks from a vessel. The method achieves leak positioning through a factor θ based kernelized fuzzy clustering segmentation done to weighted differential thermal images of the test objects. The temperature difference factor θ is inventively built as a parameter changed with temperature range of the target region, in order to enhance the robustness and the interference proof ability of the algorithm. Heat transfer simulation with air-leak flow is addressed by the finite element analysis. The experimental results indicate that the method proposed is effective and sensitive. The purpose of air-leak localization has been reached.

  18. Distributed fiber optic acoustic sensor for leak detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurmer, John P.; Kingsley, Stuart A.; Laudo, John S.; Krak, Stephen J.

    1992-01-01

    Leaks in dielectric fluid-filled, high-voltage distribution lines can cause significant problems for the electric power industry. Often, these lines run over long distance and are difficult to access. Operators may know that a leak exists because additional fluid is required to maintain pipe pressure; however, locating the leak is often a significant challenge. A system that could monitor and locate leaks within the electrical distribution pipe lines would be highly desirable. We present a distributed fiber optic acoustic sensor technology that could be used to measure and locate leaks within fluid-filled, high-voltage distribution lines. In this application, the optical fiber sensor is placed inside the fluid-filled pipe and can potentially locate leaks to within several meters. The fiber optic acoustic sensor is designed such that it can listen to the sound produced by the fluid as it escapes from the pipe into the surrounding soil. The fluid inside the pipe is typically maintained at a pressure of 200 psi and escapes at high velocity when a leak occurs. The distributed fiber optic sensing system being developed is based upon the Sagnac interferometer and is unusual in that range information is not obtained by the more common method of optical time domain reflectometry or optical frequency domain reflectometry, but by essentially a CW technique which works in the frequency domain. It is also unusual in that the signal processing technique actually looks for the absence of a signal.

  19. Resilience to leaking--dynamic systems modeling of information security.

    PubMed

    Hamacher, Kay

    2012-01-01

    Leaking of confidential material is a major threat to information security within organizations and to society as a whole. This insight has gained traction in the political realm since the activities of Wikileaks, which hopes to attack 'unjust' systems or 'conspiracies'. Eventually, such threats to information security rely on a biologistic argument on the benefits and drawbacks that uncontrolled leaking might pose for 'just' and 'unjust' entities. Such biological metaphors are almost exclusively based on the economic advantage of participants. Here, I introduce a mathematical model of the complex dynamics implied by leaking. The complex interactions of adversaries are modeled by coupled logistic equations including network effects of econo-communication networks. The modeling shows, that there might arise situations where the leaking envisioned and encouraged by Wikileaks and the like can strengthen the defending entity (the 'conspiracy'). In particular, the only severe impact leaking can have on an organization seems to originate in the exploitation of leaks by another entity the organization competes with. Therefore, the model suggests that leaks can be used as a `tactical mean' in direct adversary relations, but do not necessarily increase public benefit and societal immunization to 'conspiracies'. Furthermore, within the model the exploitation of the (open) competition between entities seems to be a more promising approach to control malicious organizations : divide-et-impera policies triumph here. PMID:23227151

  20. Autogenous Metallic Pipe Leak Repair in Potable Water Systems.

    PubMed

    Tang, Min; Triantafyllidou, Simoni; Edwards, Marc A

    2015-07-21

    Copper and iron pipes have a remarkable capability for autogenous repair (self-repair) of leaks in potable water systems. Field studies revealed exemplars that metallic pipe leaks caused by nails, rocks, and erosion corrosion autogenously repaired, as confirmed in the laboratory experiments. This work demonstrated that 100% (N = 26) of 150 μm leaks contacting representative bulk potable water in copper pipes sealed autogenously via formation of corrosion precipitates at 20-40 psi, pH 3.0-11.0, and with upward and downward leak orientations. Similar leaks in carbon steel pipes at 20 psi self-repaired at pH 5.5 and 8.5, but two leaks did not self-repair permanently at pH 11.0 suggesting that water chemistry may control the durability of materials that seal the leaks and therefore the permanence of repair. Larger 400 μm holes in copper pipes had much lower (0-33%) success of self-repair at pH 3.0-11.0, whereas all 400 μm holes in carbon steel pipes at 20 psi self-repaired at pH 4.0-11.0. Pressure tests indicated that some of the repairs created at 20-40 psi ambient pressure could withstand more than 100 psi without failure. Autogenous repair has implications for understanding patterns of pipe failures, extending the lifetime of decaying infrastructure, and developing new plumbing materials. PMID:26057741

  1. Development of perfluorocarbon tracer technology for underground leak location.

    PubMed

    Hassoun, S; McBride, T; Russell, D A

    2000-10-01

    A method has been developed for the atmospheric sampling and analysis of four perfluorocarbon tracer (PFT) compounds simultaneously at the parts per trillion (ppt) level. PFTs were pre-concentrated using adsorbent tube air sampling. Analysis was achieved by thermal desorption (TD) and gas chromatography (GC) with electron capture detection (ECD). Efficient separation of the PFTs from the other sample constituents was achieved by use of a capillary porous layer open tubular (PLOT) GC column without the need to cool the GC oven to sub-ambient temperatures using liquid coolants (M. de Bortoli and E. Pecchio, J. High Resolut. Chromatogr., 1985, 8, 422) or for a catalytic destruction step to remove interferents (T. W. D'Ottavio, R. W. Goodrich and R. N. Dietz, Environ. Sci. Technol., 1986, 20, 100). Results from test field trials with two volatile PFTs that were buried to simulate an underground leaking cable were successful. The PFTs were detected above ground level to pinpoint the leak position. The highest tracer concentrations were detected within 1 m of the simulated leak positions 2 days after tracer burial. The developed technology was applied to an oil leaking high voltage electricity cable. One PFT was added to the cable oil which enabled detection of the oil leak to within 3 m. The reported method has many advantages over currently used leak detection methods and could, in the future, be applied to the detection of underground leaks in a variety of cables and pipes. PMID:11254045

  2. Management of Frontal Sinus Cerebrospinal Fluid Leaks and Encephaloceles.

    PubMed

    Illing, Elisa A; Woodworth, Bradford A

    2016-08-01

    Encephaloceles and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leaks of the frontal sinus may result from congenital, traumatic, spontaneous, or neoplastic causes. Paramount to success is adequate preoperative planning with accurate history, physical exam, endoscopy, imaging, and testing to confirm location of the leak and origin of the disease. Generally, frontal sinus CSF leaks may be addressed endoscopically with favorable anatomy, proper surgical technique, and appropriate equipment. Open surgical approaches (eg, osteoplastic flap) are often required for superior/lateral defects or if the surgeon is not experienced with endoscopic frontal sinus techniques. PMID:27450619

  3. The Present State of Standards of Method for Leak Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamura, Yoshikazu

    Domestic standard of the leak testing is enacted as Japan Industrial Standards. The conformity is advanced between these domestic standards and ISO (International Organization for Standardization) standard. ISO 9712 (Non-destructive testing.—Qualification and certification of personnel) was revised to include the leak testing of qualification and certification in 2005. It will be executed in the near future though it is thought that it takes time to an international conformity with JIS Z 2305 of a domestic standard. On the other hand, the calibrated leak will be offered by domestic organization.

  4. Outcomes of the Use of Fully Covered Esophageal Self-Expandable Stent in the Management of Colorectal Anastomotic Strictures and Leaks

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Chad J.; Morales, Angel; Othman, Mohamed O.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Colorectal anastomotic leak or stricture is a dreaded complication leading to significant morbidity and mortality. The novel use of self-expandable metal stents (SEMS) in the management of postoperative colorectal anastomotic leaks or strictures can avoid surgical reintervention. Methods. Retrospective study with particular attention to the indications, operative or postoperative complications, and clinical outcomes of SEMS placement for patients with either a colorectal anastomotic stricture or leak. Results. Eight patients had SEMS (WallFlex stent) for the management of postoperative colorectal anastomotic leak or stricture. Five had a colorectal anastomotic stricture and 3 had a colorectal anastomotic leak. Complete resolution of the anastomotic stricture or leak was achieved in all patients. Three had recurrence of the anastomotic stricture on 3-month flexible sigmoidoscopy follow-up after the initial stent was removed. Two of these patients had a stricture that was technically too difficult to place another stent. Stent migration was noted in 2 patients, one at day 3 and the other at day 14 after stent placement that required a larger 23 mm stent to be placed. Conclusions. The use of SEMS in the management of colorectal anastomotic leaks or strictures is feasible and is associated with high technical and clinical success rate. PMID:25587210

  5. Absolute optical instruments without spherical symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyc, Tomáš; Dao, H. L.; Danner, Aaron J.

    2015-11-01

    Until now, the known set of absolute optical instruments has been limited to those containing high levels of symmetry. Here, we demonstrate a method of mathematically constructing refractive index profiles that result in asymmetric absolute optical instruments. The method is based on the analogy between geometrical optics and classical mechanics and employs Lagrangians that separate in Cartesian coordinates. In addition, our method can be used to construct the index profiles of most previously known absolute optical instruments, as well as infinitely many different ones.

  6. Low heat leak connector for cryogenic system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stelts, P. D. (Inventor)

    1965-01-01

    Heat leak from the surrounding atmosphere during fluid transfer from a spaced shell-insulated vessel for storing liquified gas having an upper gaseous phase, in minimized by forming a relatively wide, shallow blister on the wall of the vessel at the point of transfer line connection. The shell and the opposed walls of the blister have aligned openings whose common axis passes centrally through the blister and is normal to the surfaces of the vessel and shell. A fluid transfer line conduit passing through the shell opening is in fluid-tight connection with the shell and blister wall. The fluid transfer line confines the fluid in a continuous stream. The blister is filled with a heat insulating material which provides a thermal break between the central wall portions of the blister. A connector at the bottom of the vessel comprises a tube extending between the openings in the blister which projects a short distance within the body of liquefied gas and terminates in a reverse bend to prevent backflow of liquid through the pipe.

  7. Effects of a documented hydrogen fluoride leak

    SciTech Connect

    Feder, W.A.

    1985-01-01

    At about 6 a.m. on June 19, 1984, 1037 liters of pressurized HF liquid escaped from a storage tank through a 2 mm diameter hole. 48 hours after the leak was discovered and sealed, visible injury to vegetation was observed 2 miles downwind of the source in a tear drop pattern. Injury symptoms ranged from a slight browning of leaves and needles to death of twigs and leaves and needles. Poplar, white pine, spruce, oak, red maple and several herbaceous plant species were injured. Ragweed was not injured but sensitive fern was severely injured. Goldenrod was also injured but recovered within 3 weeks after exposure. White pine trees within 1/4 of a mile from the source were killed. Fluoride analysis of tissues from upwind and downwind trees and herbaceous plants revealed fluoride tissue levels ranging from 5 to 34,000 ppm. Examples of distance/concentration are given. Soils revealed fluoride levels of about 1 ppm at all locations.

  8. On the Absolute Continuity of the Blackwell Measure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bárány, Balázs; Kolossváry, István

    2015-04-01

    In 1957, Blackwell expressed the entropy of hidden Markov chains using a measure which can be characterised as an invariant measure for an iterated function system with place-dependent weights. This measure, called the Blackwell measure, plays a central role in understanding the entropy rate and other important characteristics of fundamental models in information theory. We show that for a suitable set of parameter values the Blackwell measure is absolutely continuous for almost every parameter in the case of binary symmetric channels.

  9. Control of respiration in non-phosphorylating mitochondria is shared between the proton leak and the respiratory chain.

    PubMed Central

    Brand, M D; Hafner, R P; Brown, G C

    1988-01-01

    We measured the relationship between rate of respiration and membrane potential in isolated mitochondria titrated with malonate (to inhibit the electron transport chain) or with uncoupler (to increase the proton conductance of the inner membrane). We used the flux control summation and connectivity theorems of metabolic control theory to calculate the control over non-phosphorylating respiration exerted by the respiratory chain (and associated reactions) and by the leak of protons across the inner membrane. At 37 degrees C the flux control coefficient of the leak over respiration was 0.66; the flux control coefficient of the chain over respiration was 0.34. At 25 degrees C the values were 0.75 and 0.25 respectively. We argue that the basis for previous conclusions that all the control is exerted by the proton leak under similar conditions is invalid. PMID:2849419

  10. The detection of carbon dioxide leaks using quasi-tomographic laser absorption spectroscopy measurements in variable wind

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Levine, Zachary H.; Pintar, Adam L.; Dobler, Jeremy T.; Blume, Nathan; Braun, Michael; Zaccheo, T. Scott; Pernini, Timothy G.

    2016-04-13

    Laser absorption spectroscopy (LAS) has been used over the last several decades for the measurement of trace gasses in the atmosphere. For over a decade, LAS measurements from multiple sources and tens of retroreflectors have been combined with sparse-sample tomography methods to estimate the 2-D distribution of trace gas concentrations and underlying fluxes from point-like sources. In this work, we consider the ability of such a system to detect and estimate the position and rate of a single point leak which may arise as a failure mode for carbon dioxide storage. The leak is assumed to be at a constant ratemore » giving rise to a plume with a concentration and distribution that depend on the wind velocity. Lastly, we demonstrate the ability of our approach to detect a leak using numerical simulation and also present a preliminary measurement.« less

  11. The detection of carbon dioxide leaks using quasi-tomographic laser absorption spectroscopy measurements in variable wind

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Levine, Zachary H.; Pintar, Adam L.; Dobler, Jeremy T.; Blume, Nathan; Braun, Michael; Zaccheo, T. Scott; Pernini, Timothy G.

    2016-04-13

    Laser absorption spectroscopy (LAS) has been used over the last several decades for the measurement of trace gasses in the atmosphere. For over a decade, LAS measurements from multiple sources and tens of retroreflectors have been combined with sparse-sample tomography methods to estimate the 2-D distribution of trace gas concentrations and underlying fluxes from point-like sources. In this work, we consider the ability of such a system to detect and estimate the position and rate of a single point leak which may arise as a failure mode for carbon dioxide storage. The leak is assumed to be at a constant ratemore » giving rise to a plume with a concentration and distribution that depend on the wind velocity. We demonstrate the ability of our approach to detect a leak using numerical simulation and also present a preliminary measurement.« less

  12. Probabilistic design of a near-surface CO2 leak detection system.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ya-Mei; Small, Mitchell J; Ogretim, Egemen O; Gray, Donald D; Bromhal, Grant S; Strazisar, Brian R; Wells, Arthur W

    2011-08-01

    A methodology is developed for predicting the performance of near-surface CO(2) leak detection systems at geologic sequestration sites. The methodology integrates site characterization and modeling to predict the statistical properties of natural CO(2) fluxes, the transport of CO(2) from potential subsurface leakage points, and the detection of CO(2) surface fluxes by the monitoring network. The probability of leak detection is computed as the probability that the leakage signal is sufficient to increase the total flux beyond a statistically determined threshold. The methodology is illustrated for a highly idealized site monitored with CO(2) accumulation chamber measurements taken on a uniform grid. The TOUGH2 code is used to predict the spatial profile of surface CO(2) fluxes resulting from different leakage rates and different soil permeabilities. A response surface is fit to the TOUGH2 results to allow interpolation across a continuous range of values of permeability and leakage rate. The spatial distribution of leakage probability is assumed uniform in this application. Nonlinear, nonmonotonic relationships of network performance to soil permeability and network density are evident. In general, dense networks (with ∼10-20 m between monitors) are required to ensure a moderate to high probability of leak detection. PMID:21732603

  13. Application of the leak-before-break concept in nuclear power plant safety analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kiselev, V.A.; Rivkin, E.Yu.

    1994-06-01

    The objective of this report was to attempt to justify the leak-before-break concept in reactor safety analyses, thus eliminating the need to show protection against the double-ended guillotine break in these analyses. The two assumptions of the concept: (1) A complete break would not occur, and (2) A leak via a through crack would be discovered before the crack size approached the critical value were discussed and conditions to insure validity of each assumption were outlined. Methods of analyses in various countries were also discussed. It was noted that the determination of the area of elastoplastic opening of a crack for a prescribed flow rate is a difficult problem, and it was recommended that testing be performed on full size pipes under postulated conditions.

  14. Operator-related risk factors of anastomotic leaks after colorectal surgery: an up-to-date

    PubMed Central

    CAZIUC, ALEXANDRA; DINDELEGAN, GEORGE CALIN; MIRONIUC, AUREL

    2015-01-01

    Digestive fistulas are a major complication after digestive surgery. Anastomotic leakage increases the hospitalization time, the prognosis and survival rate after colorectal surgical interventions. The factors involved are either systemic (determined by the patients’ co-morbidities), or local (vicious surgical technique or the injuries produced by the disease that requires the anastomosis). Although there are many studies regarding the risk factors of anastomotic leaks, there is no consensus for the role played by each one of them in the healing process of digestive sutures. Most authors sustain that the importance of systemic factors is secondary, the main role being played by the surgeon and the local conditions of the anastomosis. Knowledge of the risk factors can lead to new methods of reducing the incidence of anastomotic leaks by improving vascularization, limiting the tension and the duration of surgery, and by new surgical techniques used for digestive sutures. PMID:26528059

  15. Absolute magnitudes of trans-neptunian objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duffard, R.; Alvarez-candal, A.; Pinilla-Alonso, N.; Ortiz, J. L.; Morales, N.; Santos-Sanz, P.; Thirouin, A.

    2015-10-01

    Accurate measurements of diameters of trans- Neptunian objects are extremely complicated to obtain. Radiomatric techniques applied to thermal measurements can provide good results, but precise absolute magnitudes are needed to constrain diameters and albedos. Our objective is to measure accurate absolute magnitudes for a sample of trans- Neptunian objects, many of which have been observed, and modelled, by the "TNOs are cool" team, one of Herschel Space Observatory key projects grantes with ~ 400 hours of observing time. We observed 56 objects in filters V and R, if possible. These data, along with data available in the literature, was used to obtain phase curves and to measure absolute magnitudes by assuming a linear trend of the phase curves and considering magnitude variability due to rotational light-curve. In total we obtained 234 new magnitudes for the 56 objects, 6 of them with no reported previous measurements. Including the data from the literature we report a total of 109 absolute magnitudes.

  16. A New Gimmick for Assigning Absolute Configuration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ayorinde, F. O.

    1983-01-01

    A five-step procedure is provided to help students in making the assignment absolute configuration less bothersome. Examples for both single (2-butanol) and multi-chiral carbon (3-chloro-2-butanol) molecules are included. (JN)

  17. Role of leak potassium channels in pain signaling.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiang-Yao; Toyoda, Hiroki

    2015-10-01

    Potassium (K(+)) channels are membrane proteins that allow rapid and selective flow of K(+) ions across the cell membrane, generating electrical signals in neurons. Thus, K(+) channels play a critical role in determining the neuronal excitability. Two-pore domain (K2P) "leak" K(+) channels give rise to leak K(+) currents that are responsible for the resting membrane potential and input resistance. The wide expression of leak K(+) channels in the central and peripheral nervous system suggests that these channels are critically involved in pain signaling and behavior. Indeed, it has become apparent in the past decade that the leak K(+) channels play essential roles in the development of pain. In this review, we describe evidence for the roles of TASK1, TASK3, TREK1, TREK2, TRAAK and TRESK channels in pain signaling and behavior. Furthermore, we describe the possible involvement of TASK2 and TWIK1 channels in pain. PMID:26321392

  18. Current leak detection technologies for aboveground storage tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, P.E.

    1995-12-31

    Before the discovery of groundwater contamination at a number of sites that received national attention, tank owners and operators made reasonable but mostly ineffective attempts to prevent leaks in both new and existing tanks. However, the double bottom tank began to be used on new and retrofitted tanks to solve this problem. Extensive experience and use of this design led to variants that include leak detection liners placed over the old tank bottom which function to prevent galvanic corrosion and to ensure the containment of leaks and the use of concrete as the spacer material which has various construction benefits. In addition, liners have been used under new tanks. Any system using a liner of any kind is generically referred to as a tank with a release prevention barrier (RPB). Five different basic technologies for leak detection are covered including use of RPBs, Volumetric, Acoustic Emission, Soil Vapor Monitoring and Enhanced Inventory.

  19. 40 CFR 61.135 - Standard: Equipment leaks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Emissions from Coke By-Product Recovery Plants § 61.135 Standard: Equipment leaks. (a) Each owner or operator of equipment in benzene service shall comply with the requirements of 40 CFR part 61, subpart...

  20. 40 CFR 61.135 - Standard: Equipment leaks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Emissions from Coke By-Product Recovery Plants § 61.135 Standard: Equipment leaks. (a) Each owner or operator of equipment in benzene service shall comply with the requirements of 40 CFR part 61, subpart...

  1. 40 CFR 61.135 - Standard: Equipment leaks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Emissions from Coke By-Product Recovery Plants § 61.135 Standard: Equipment leaks. (a) Each owner or operator of equipment in benzene service shall comply with the requirements of 40 CFR part 61, subpart...

  2. 40 CFR 61.135 - Standard: Equipment leaks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Emissions from Coke By-Product Recovery Plants § 61.135 Standard: Equipment leaks. (a) Each owner or operator of equipment in benzene service shall comply with the requirements of 40 CFR part 61, subpart...

  3. 40 CFR 61.135 - Standard: Equipment leaks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Emissions from Coke By-Product Recovery Plants § 61.135 Standard: Equipment leaks. (a) Each owner or operator of equipment in benzene service shall comply with the requirements of 40 CFR part 61, subpart...

  4. Helium Leak Measurements Using CO2 as a Carrier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, B. C.; Camarillo, R. G.

    1972-01-01

    Detection delay defects are omitted by using helium mass spectrometer leak detector combined with several known procedures. Technique combines carbon dioxide purging, cryogenic separating helium accumulation, and use of carbon dioxide as carrier gas.

  5. Clinical challenges of persistent pulmonary air-leaks--case report.

    PubMed

    van Zeller, M; Bastos, P; Fernandes, G; Magalhães, A

    2014-01-01

    Air leaks are a common problem after pulmonary resection and can be a source of significant morbidity and mortality. The authors describe the case of a 68-year-old male patient who presented with a persistent air-leak after pulmonary resection. Watchful waiting, surgical procedures, as well as medical therapy like pleurodesis and implantation of endobronchial one-way valves on the bronchial segments identified using systematic occlusion of the bronchial segments, were all tried unsuccessfully. During that time the patient remained hospitalized with a chest tube. The instillation of methylene blue through the chest tube was used to identify the segments leading to the persistent air-leak; this enabled successful endobronchial valve placement which sufficiently reduced the size of the air-leak so that the chest tube could be removed. Nonsurgical approaches seem promising and, for some patients may be the only treatment option after all conventional treatments have failed or are considered too high risk. PMID:24268518

  6. Thermographic Leak Detection of the Space Shuttle Main Engine Nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, James L.; Russell, Samuel S.

    1999-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Main Engines Nozzles consist of over one thousand tapered Inconel coolant tubes brazed to a stainless steel structural jacket. Liquid Hydrogen flows through the tubing, from the aft to forward end of the nozzle, under high pressure to maintain a thermal balance between the rocket exhaust and the nozzle wall. Three potential problems occur within the SSME nozzle coolant tubes as a result of manufacturing anomalies and the highly volatile service environment including poor or incomplete bonding of the tubes to the structural jacket, cold wall leaks and hot wall leaks. Of these conditions the identification of cold wall leaks has been the most problematic. The methods and results presented in this summary addresses the thermographic identification of cold wall "interstitial" leaks between the structural jacket and coolant tubes of the Space Shuttle Main Engines Nozzles.

  7. Detection of gas leaks in the subsurface environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghandehari, Masoud; Khalil, Gamal; Kimura, Fletcher

    2005-05-01

    Leaking valves, connections and distribution pipelines are significant sources of fugitive gas and volatile chemical emissions in chemical manufacturing, gas production, transmission, and oil refineries. A gas leak detection method has been developed based on continuous monitoring of the oxygen concentration surrounding a natural gas pipeline. The method utilizes optical fibers coated with an oxygen permeable polymeric film containing a luminescent sensor molecule. When the specialty fiber is illuminated by a light source that excites the luminophor, the functional cladding compound has the ability to detect and quantify leaks by measuring small changes in oxygen concentrations in the surrounding environment. Key features of the technology include long-term performance based on well understood platinum porphyrin chemistry, in addition to the capability of distributed sensing using fiber optic evanescent field spectroscopy. Results of leak detection in various environments namely atmospheric conditions, dry sand as well as saturated sand is reported, along with test results on long term system performance.

  8. Electrical detection of leaks in lined waste ponds

    SciTech Connect

    Frangos, W.

    1994-12-31

    Leaks in lined waste disposal ponds may be detected by observing the flow of electrical current between electrodes placed inside and outside the pond. Regions of relatively high current density indicate holes in the liner. In order to detect leaks after a pond has received toxic or solid material, sensing electrodes may be placed outside, below the liner on a wide-space grid. Voltage data can then by analyzed to reveal the locations of leaks situated far from the nearest sensing electrode with good accuracy. In a prototype installation in Slovakia, sensing electrodes were positioned on a roughly 8- by 10-meter grid. Six leaks were predicted and subsequently visually verified to be within 30 centimeters of their predicted locations. This location accuracy is comparable to that with which the positions of the sensing electrodes was known. Later measurements confirmed the completeness of repairs.

  9. Minimally Invasive, Nonsurgical Approach to Repairing Mitral Valve Leaks

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    Minimally Invasive, Nonsurgical Approach to Repairing Mitral Valve Leaks - David X. Zhao, MD Click Here to view the BroadcastMed, Inc. Privacy Policy and Legal Notice © 2016 BroadcastMed, Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Isolation of persistent air leaks and placement of intrabronchial valves

    PubMed Central

    Mahajan, Amit K.; Doeing, Diana C.; Hogarth, Douglas K.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Alveolar-pleural fistulas causing persistent air leaks are conditions associated with prolonged hospital courses, high morbidity, and possibly increased mortality. Intrabronchial valves serve as a noninvasive therapeutic option for the closure of alveolar-pleural fistulas. Methods The present review describes a brief history of, and indications for, the placement of intrabronchial valves in patients with persistent air leaks. The essential steps necessary for placement are air leak isolation, airway sizing, and valve deployment. Additionally, the indications and methods for intrabronchial valve removal, along with the potential complications from intrabronchial valve placement, are described. Conclusions The increased use of intrabronchial valves in the treatment of persistent air leaks requires bronchoscopists and clinicians to understand the procedural steps and techniques necessary for intrabronchial valve placement. PMID:23312104

  11. OVERVIEW OF EPA RESEARCH ON UNDERGROUND STORAGE TANK LEAK DETECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Research for leak detection at underground storage tank systems (USTs) is being carried out at two Offices of Research and Development (ORD) laboratories within EPA's organization. he Edison, New Jersey lab -- the Risk Reduction Engineering Laboratory -- focuses its attention on ...

  12. Postoperative Low-Flow Cerebrospinal Fluid Leak of Endoscopic Endonasal Transsphenoidal Surgery for Pituitary Adenoma--Wait and See, or Lumbar Drain?

    PubMed

    Zhan, Rucai; Chen, Songyu; Xu, Shujun; Liu, James K; Li, Xingang

    2015-06-01

    To assess the effectiveness of continuous lumbar drainage (LD) for management of postoperative cerebrospinal fluid leaks after endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal approach for resection of pituitary adenoma. Three hundred eighty-four medical records of patients who were admitted to our institute during a 2.5-year period were retrospectively reviewed, 33 of them experienced low-flow cerebrospinal fluid leak postoperatively. If LD was used, all patients with low-flow cerebrospinal fluid leak were classified into 2 groups, lumbar drained group and conservatively treated group. The age, sex, management of cerebrospinal fluid leaks, and related complications were reviewed. Statistical comparisons between the 2 groups were made using SPSS 19.0 (IBM Corp, Armonk, NY). The differences were considered statistically significant if the P value was less than 0.05.Thirty-three of 384 (8.6%) experienced low-flow postoperative cerebrospinal fluid leaks. Cured rate of cerebrospinal fluid leak was 94.4% (17/18) in continuous lumbar drained group, and 93.3% (14/15) in control group. There were 2 (11.2%) patients who developed meningitis in the LD group and 1 (5.6%) patient in the control group. One patient required endoscopic repair of skull base because of persistent cerebrospinal fluid leak in both groups, with the rates of 5.6% and 6.7%, respectively. There was no significant difference noted in each rate in both groups.Placement of LD may not be necessary for the management of low-flow postoperative cerebrospinal fluid leak after using endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal approach to pituitary adenoma. PMID:26080170

  13. Space Shuttle RCS Oxidizer Leak Repair for STS-26

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delventhal, R. A.; Faget, N. M.

    1989-01-01

    Following propellant loading of the Space Shuttle's reaction control system (RCS) for mission STS 26, an oxidizer leak was detected in the left orbital maneuvering system (OMS) pod, where the RCS is located. Subsequent investigation determined that the leak was isolated at a mechanical Dynatube fitting near the RCS nitrogen tetroxide tank. An intense effort was initiated to design, fabricate, and qualify a sealing device to stop the oxidizer leak externally so that the Space Shuttle launch could proceed. It was discovered that sealing devices called clamshells were widely used throughout the petrochemical and power generation industries to stop leaks developed in large diameter pipes which carry steam or other hazardous fluids. These clamshells are available in different diameters and strengths and are placed around the pipe at the location of the leak. A sealing compound is then injected under high pressure into the clamshell to stop the leak. This technology was scaled down and applied to the problem of stopping the leak on the Orbiter, which was on a half-inch diameter line in a nearly inaccessible location. Many obstacles had to be overcome such as determining that the sealing material would be compatible with the nitrogen tetroxide and ensuring that the clamshell would actually fit around the Dynatube fitting without interfering with other lines which were in close proximity. The effort at the NASA Johnson Space Center included materials compatibility testing of several sealants, design of a clamshell to fit in the confined compartment, and manufacture and qualification of the flight hardware. A clamshell was successfully placed around the Dynatube fitting on the Orbiter and the oxidizer leak was terminated. Then it was decided to apply this technology further and design clamshells for other mechanical fittings onboard the Orbiter and develop sealing compounds which will be compatible with fuels such as monomethyl hydrazine (MMH). The potential exists for

  14. Identification of sewage leaks by active remote-sensing methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldshleger, Naftaly; Basson, Uri

    2016-04-01

    The increasing length of sewage pipelines, and concomitant risk of leaks due to urban and industrial growth and development is exposing the surrounding land to contamination risk and environmental harm. It is therefore important to locate such leaks in a timely manner, to minimize the damage. Advances in active remote sensing Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) and Frequency Domain Electromagnetic (FDEM) technologies was used to identify leaking potentially responsible for pollution and to identify minor spills before they cause widespread damage. This study focused on the development of these electromagnetic methods to replace conventional acoustic methods for the identification of leaks along sewage pipes. Electromagnetic methods provide an additional advantage in that they allow mapping of the fluid-transport system in the subsurface. Leak-detection systems using GPR and FDEM are not limited to large amounts of water, but enable detecting leaks of tens of liters per hour, because they can locate increases in environmental moisture content of only a few percentage along the pipes. The importance and uniqueness of this research lies in the development of practical tools to provide a snapshot and monitoring of the spatial changes in soil moisture content up to depths of about 3-4 m, in open and paved areas, at relatively low cost, in real time or close to real time. Spatial measurements performed using GPR and FDEM systems allow monitoring many tens of thousands of measurement points per hectare, thus providing a picture of the spatial situation along pipelines and the surrounding. The main purpose of this study was to develop a method for detecting sewage leaks using the above-proposed geophysical methods, since their contaminants can severely affect public health. We focused on identifying, locating and characterizing such leaks in sewage pipes in residential and industrial areas.

  15. Inservice leak testing of primary pressure isolation valves

    SciTech Connect

    Livingston, R.A.

    1983-02-01

    This report discusses the inservice leak testing of primary pressure isolation valves in commercial power reactors which was investigated to identify problems with current test procedures and requirements. Nine utilities were surveyed to gather information which is presented in this report. An analysis of the survey information was performed, resulting in recommended changes to improve valve leak testing requirements currently invoked by Section XI of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, Plant Technical Specifications, and Regulatory Guides addressing this subject.

  16. SSME propellant path leak detection real-time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawford, R. A.; Smith, L. M.

    1994-01-01

    Included are four documents that outline the technical aspects of the research performed on NASA Grant NAG8-140: 'A System for Sequential Step Detection with Application to Video Image Processing'; 'Leak Detection from the SSME Using Sequential Image Processing'; 'Digital Image Processor Specifications for Real-Time SSME Leak Detection'; and 'A Color Change Detection System for Video Signals with Applications to Spectral Analysis of Rocket Engine Plumes'.

  17. Leak location in fluid filled cables using the PFT method

    SciTech Connect

    Ghafurian, R.; Dominguez, J.; Tai, N.; Dietz, R.N.; Rodenbaugh, T.

    1999-01-01

    A new method of pinpointing dielectric fluid leaks on pipe-type and self-contained cables using perfluorocarbon tracer (PFT) is presented. The method has successfully been used on the Con Edison transmission system to locate leaks of dielectric fluid on both types of cables. Application of the PFT technique does not require feeder deenergization and provides major advantages over the conventional method of freeze and pressure testing. Description of the method and results of field application are presented in the paper.

  18. Identification of leaking TRIGA fuel elements

    SciTech Connect

    Bennion, John S.; Crawford, Kevan C.; Gansauge, Todd C.; Sandquist, Gary M.

    1990-07-01

    -steel-clad fuel elements were eventually swapped. After exchanging nearly one-half of the incore fuel elements without any noticeable decrease in leaked fission-product activity, it was apparent that multiple defective elements were probably responsible for the leakage. A more aggressive identification program was implemented whereby water samples were taken directly above each fuel element in the core during operation at 90 kW. A small weighted polyethylene funnel was connected to 1/8-inch Tygon tubing extending from the reactor pool to an adjacent laboratory containing gamma spectroscopy equipment. The tubing was wrapped around a high-purity germanium detector and coupled to a small peristaltic pump adjusted to provide a flow velocity of approximately one foot-per-second and drained into a large bucket. The detector signal was fed into a multichannel scaler calibrated to measure the 151 keV photon emitted by Kr-85m. The funnel was manually suspended above each core fuel position for one minute sampling water convected along each fuel element. A careful record of the time during which each position was sampled was maintained so that elements with high krypton activity could be precisely located. After three such operations, a total of seven stainless-steel elements were identified as candidates contributing to the leakage and were replaced. Subsequent operations have shown no fission-product release and confirmed that the fuel responsible for the leakage had been removed from the core. Evaluation of the candidate leaking elements is planned to identify actual 'leakers' in the future. (author)

  19. New Gulf Oil Leak Estimates Dwarf Original Figures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2010-06-01

    New estimates of the amount of oil flowing from BP's leaking oil well in the Gulf of Mexico are dramatically higher than initial numbers, according to figures released by U.S. Secretary of Energy Steven Chu, Secretary of the Interior Ken Salazar, and U.S. Geological Survey Director Marcia McNutt on 15 June. “The most likely flow rate of oil today is between 35,000 and 60,000 barrels per day,” based on estimates by U.S. government and independent scientists, they indicated. “This estimate brings together several scientific methodologies and the latest information from the seafloor and represents a significant step forward in our effort to put a number on the oil that is escaping from BP's well,” Chu indicated. He noted the numbers could change with the collection of additional data, and he added that the administration has been focusing on responding to the upper end of the flow estimate.

  20. Fixing the Leak: Empirical Corrections for the Small Light Leak in Hinode XRT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saar, Steven H.; DeLuca, E. E.; McCauley, P.; Kobelski, A.

    2013-07-01

    On May 9, 2012, the the straylight level of XRT on Hinode suddenly increased, consistent with the appearance of a pinhole in the entrance filter (possibly a micrometeorite breach). The effect of this event is most noticeable in the optical G band data, which shows an average light excess of ~30%. However, data in several of the X-ray filters is also affected, due to low sensitivity "tails" of their filter responses into the visible. Observations taken with the G band filter but with the visible light shutter (VLS) closed show a weak, slightly shifted, out-of-focus image, revealing the leaked light. The intensity of the leak depends on telescope pointing, dropping strongly for images taken off-disk. By monitoring light levels in the corners of full-Sun Ti-poly filter images, we determine the approximate time of the event: ~13:30 UT. We use pairs of images taken just-before and after the filter breach to directly measure the leakage in two affected X-ray filters. We then develop a model using a scaled, shifted, and smoothed versions of the VLS closed images to remove the contamination. We estimate the uncertainties involved in our proposed correction procedure. This research was supported under NASA contract NNM07AB07C for Hinode XRT.