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Sample records for absolute light intensity

  1. Absolute phase recovery in structured light illumination systems: Sinusoidal vs. intensity discrete patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porras-Aguilar, Rosario; Falaggis, Konstantinos

    2016-09-01

    Structured light illumination is a well-established technology for noncontact 3D surface measurements. A common challenge in those systems is to obtain the absolute surface information using few measurement frames. This work discusses techniques based on the projection of multiple sinusoidal fringe patterns with different fringe period, as well as the projection of intensity discrete Gray Code and grey-level coded patterns. The use of sinusoidal multi-frequency techniques has been since years an on-going area of research, where various algorithms have been developed based on beats, look-up tables, or number-theoretical approaches. This work shows that a related technique, the so-called algebraic reconstruction technique that is borrowed from the area of multi-wavelength interferometry can be used for this purpose. This approach provides a robust analytical solution to the phase-unwrapping problem. However, this work argues that despite these advances, the acquisition of additional phase maps obtained with different fringe periods requires too many measurement frames, and hence is inefficient. Motivated by that, this work proposes a new grey level coding scheme that uses only few measurement frames, overcomes typical defocus errors, and has an error detecting feature. The latter feature makes the need of separate error detecting algorithms obsolete. This so-called closed-loop space filling curve can be implemented with an arbitrary number of N grey-levels enabling to code up to (2N) code-words. The performance of this so-called closed-loop space filling curve is demonstrated using experimental data.

  2. A calibration-independent laser-induced incandescence technique for soot measurement by detecting absolute light intensity.

    PubMed

    Snelling, David R; Smallwood, Gregory J; Liu, Fengshan; Gülder, Omer L; Bachalo, William D

    2005-11-01

    Laser-induced incandescence (LII) has proved to be a useful diagnostic tool for spatially and temporally resolved measurement of particulate (soot) volume fraction and primary particle size in a wide range of applications, such as steady flames, flickering flames, and Diesel engine exhausts. We present a novel LII technique for the determination of soot volume fraction by measuring the absolute incandescence intensity, avoiding the need for ex situ calibration that typically uses a source of particles with known soot volume fraction. The technique developed in this study further extends the capabilities of existing LII for making practical quantitative measurements of soot. The spectral sensitivity of the detection system is determined by calibrating with an extended source of known radiance, and this sensitivity is then used to interpret the measured LII signals. Although it requires knowledge of the soot temperature, either from a numerical model of soot particle heating or experimentally determined by detecting LII signals at two different wavelengths, this technique offers a calibration-independent procedure for measuring soot volume fraction. Application of this technique to soot concentration measurements is demonstrated in a laminar diffusion flame. PMID:16270566

  3. Light intensity compressor

    DOEpatents

    Rushford, Michael C.

    1990-01-01

    In a system for recording images having vastly differing light intensities over the face of the image, a light intensity compressor is provided that utilizes the properties of twisted nematic liquid crystals to compress the image intensity. A photoconductor or photodiode material that is responsive to the wavelength of radiation being recorded is placed adjacent a layer of twisted nematic liquid crystal material. An electric potential applied to a pair of electrodes that are disposed outside of the liquid crystal/photoconductor arrangement to provide an electric field in the vicinity of the liquid crystal material. The electrodes are substantially transparent to the form of radiation being recorded. A pair of crossed polarizers are provided on opposite sides of the liquid crystal. The front polarizer linearly polarizes the light, while the back polarizer cooperates with the front polarizer and the liquid crystal material to compress the intensity of a viewed scene. Light incident upon the intensity compressor activates the photoconductor in proportion to the intensity of the light, thereby varying the field applied to the liquid crystal. The increased field causes the liquid crystal to have less of a twisting effect on the incident linearly polarized light, which will cause an increased percentage of the light to be absorbed by the back polarizer. The intensity of an image may be compressed by forming an image on the light intensity compressor.

  4. Light intensity compressor

    DOEpatents

    Rushford, Michael C.

    1990-02-06

    In a system for recording images having vastly differing light intensities over the face of the image, a light intensity compressor is provided that utilizes the properties of twisted nematic liquid crystals to compress the image intensity. A photoconductor or photodiode material that is responsive to the wavelength of radiation being recorded is placed adjacent a layer of twisted nematic liquid crystal material. An electric potential applied to a pair of electrodes that are disposed outside of the liquid crystal/photoconductor arrangement to provide an electric field in the vicinity of the liquid crystal material. The electrodes are substantially transparent to the form of radiation being recorded. A pair of crossed polarizers are provided on opposite sides of the liquid crystal. The front polarizer linearly polarizes the light, while the back polarizer cooperates with the front polarizer and the liquid crystal material to compress the intensity of a viewed scene. Light incident upon the intensity compressor activates the photoconductor in proportion to the intensity of the light, thereby varying the field applied to the liquid crystal. The increased field causes the liquid crystal to have less of a twisting effect on the incident linearly polarized light, which will cause an increased percentage of the light to be absorbed by the back polarizer. The intensity of an image may be compressed by forming an image on the light intensity compressor.

  5. Ion chambers simplify absolute intensity measurements in the vacuum ultraviolet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sampson, J. A. R.

    1966-01-01

    Single or double ion chamber technique measures absolute radiation intensities in the extreme vacuum ultraviolet region of the spectrum. The ion chambers use rare gases as the ion carrier. Photon absorbed by the gas creates one ion pair so a measure of these is a measure of the number of incident photons.

  6. Absolute intensity of radiation emitted by uranium plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jalufka, N. W.; Lee, J. H.; Mcfarland, D. R.

    1975-01-01

    The absolute intensity of radiation emitted by fissioning and nonfissioning uranium plasmas in the spectral range from 350 nm to 1000 nm was measured. The plasma was produced in a plasma-focus apparatus and the plasma properties are simular to those anticipated for plasma-core nuclear reactors. The results are expected to contribute to the establishment of design criteria for the development of plasma-core reactors.

  7. High Intensity Lights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Xenon arc lamps developed during the Apollo program by Streamlight, Inc. are the basis for commercial flashlights and emergency handlights. These are some of the brightest portable lights made. They throw a light some 50 times brighter than automobile high beams and are primarily used by police and military. The light penetrates fog and smoke and returns less back-scatter light. They are operated on portable power packs as boat and auto batteries. An infrared model produces totally invisible light for covert surveillance.

  8. Use of intensity quotients and differences in absolute structure refinement

    PubMed Central

    Parsons, Simon; Flack, Howard D.; Wagner, Trixie

    2013-01-01

    Several methods for absolute structure refinement were tested using single-crystal X-ray diffraction data collected using Cu Kα radiation for 23 crystals with no element heavier than oxygen: conventional refinement using an inversion twin model, estimation using intensity quotients in SHELXL2012, estimation using Bayesian methods in PLATON, estimation using restraints consisting of numerical intensity differences in CRYSTALS and estimation using differences and quotients in TOPAS-Academic where both quantities were coded in terms of other structural parameters and implemented as restraints. The conventional refinement approach yielded accurate values of the Flack parameter, but with standard uncertainties ranging from 0.15 to 0.77. The other methods also yielded accurate values of the Flack parameter, but with much higher precision. Absolute structure was established in all cases, even for a hydrocarbon. The procedures in which restraints are coded explicitly in terms of other structural parameters enable the Flack parameter to correlate with these other parameters, so that it is determined along with those parameters during refinement. PMID:23719469

  9. Use of intensity quotients and differences in absolute structure refinement.

    PubMed

    Parsons, Simon; Flack, Howard D; Wagner, Trixie

    2013-06-01

    Several methods for absolute structure refinement were tested using single-crystal X-ray diffraction data collected using Cu Kα radiation for 23 crystals with no element heavier than oxygen: conventional refinement using an inversion twin model, estimation using intensity quotients in SHELXL2012, estimation using Bayesian methods in PLATON, estimation using restraints consisting of numerical intensity differences in CRYSTALS and estimation using differences and quotients in TOPAS-Academic where both quantities were coded in terms of other structural parameters and implemented as restraints. The conventional refinement approach yielded accurate values of the Flack parameter, but with standard uncertainties ranging from 0.15 to 0.77. The other methods also yielded accurate values of the Flack parameter, but with much higher precision. Absolute structure was established in all cases, even for a hydrocarbon. The procedures in which restraints are coded explicitly in terms of other structural parameters enable the Flack parameter to correlate with these other parameters, so that it is determined along with those parameters during refinement. PMID:23719469

  10. High Intensity Lighting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Nightime illumination is an important part of round-the-clock pre-launch preparations because NASA uses TV and film cameras to monitor each step of the preliminaries and at times to identify the cause of malfunction during countdown. Generating a one billion candlepower beam visible 50 miles away, the lamps developed by Duro-Test Corporation provide daylight quality light that eliminates color distortion in film and TV coverage. The lighting system was first used at Kennedy Space Center in 1968 for the launch of Apollo 8. Modified versions are available in wide range of applications, such as the battery of spotlights with colored filters that light up Niagara Falls, as well as the lamps used in the projectors for the Smithsonian's IMAX Theatre, indoor theatres with supersized screens and outdoor projection systems.

  11. Glassy Carbon as an Absolute Intensity Calibration Standard for Small-Angle Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Fan; Ilavsky, Jan; Long, Gabrielle G.; Quintana, John P. G.; Allen, Andrew J.; Jemian, Pete R.

    2010-05-01

    Absolute calibration of small-angle scattering (SAS) intensity data (measured in terms of the differential scattering cross section per unit sample volume per unit solid angle) is essential for many important aspects of quantitative SAS analysis, such as obtaining the number density, volume fraction, and specific surface area of the scatterers. It also enables scattering data from different instruments (light, X-ray, or neutron scattering) to be combined, and it can even be useful to detect the existence of artifacts in the experimental data. Different primary or secondary calibration methods are available. In the latter case, absolute intensity calibration requires a stable artifact with the necessary scattering profile. Glassy carbon has sometimes been selected as this intensity calibration standard. Here we review the spatial homogeneity and temporal stability of one type of commercially available glassy carbon that is being used as an intensity calibration standard at a number of SAS facilities. We demonstrate that glassy carbon is sufficiently homogeneous and stable during routine use to be relied upon as a suitable standard for absolute intensity calibration of SAS data.

  12. Glassy carbon as an absolute intensity calibration standard for small-angle scattering.

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, F.; Ilavsky, J.; Long, G.; Allen, A.; Quintana, J.; Jemian, P.; NIST

    2010-05-01

    Absolute calibration of small-angle scattering (SAS) intensity data (measured in terms of the differential scattering cross section per unit sample volume per unit solid angle) is essential for many important aspects of quantitative SAS analysis, such as obtaining the number density, volume fraction, and specific surface area of the scatterers. It also enables scattering data from different instruments (light, X-ray, or neutron scattering) to be combined, and it can even be useful to detect the existence of artifacts in the experimental data. Different primary or secondary calibration methods are available. In the latter case, absolute intensity calibration requires a stable artifact with the necessary scattering profile. Glassy carbon has sometimes been selected as this intensity calibration standard. Here we review the spatial homogeneity and temporal stability of one type of commercially available glassy carbon that is being used as an intensity calibration standard at a number of SAS facilities. We demonstrate that glassy carbon is sufficiently homogeneous and stable during routine use to be relied upon as a suitable standard for absolute intensity calibration of SAS data.

  13. Perceiving the Intensity of Light

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Purves, Dale; Williams, S. Mark; Nundy, Surajit; Lotto, R. Beau

    2004-01-01

    The relationship between luminance (i.e., the photometric intensity of light) and its perception (i.e., sensations of lightness or brightness) has long been a puzzle. In addition to the mystery of why these perceptual qualities do not scale with luminance in any simple way, "illusions" such as simultaneous brightness contrast, Mach bands,…

  14. Absolute intensity and polarization of rotational Raman scattering from N2, O2, and CO2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penney, C. M.; St.peters, R. L.; Lapp, M.

    1973-01-01

    An experimental examination of the absolute intensity, polarization, and relative line intensities of rotational Raman scattering (RRS) from N2, O2, and CO2 is reported. The absolute scattering intensity for N2 is characterized by its differential cross section for backscattering of incident light at 647.1 nm, which is calculated from basic measured values. The ratio of the corresponding cross section for O2 to that for N2 is 2.50 plus or minus 5 percent. The intensity recent for N2, O2, and CO2 are shown to compare favorably to values calculated from recent measurements of the depolarization of Rayleigh scattering plus RRS. Measured depolarizations of various RRS lines agree to within a few percent with the theoretical value of 3/4. Detailed error analyses are presented for intensity and depolarization measurements. Finally, extensive RRS spectra at nominal gas temperatures of 23 C, 75 C, and 125 C are presented and shown to compare favorably to theoretical predictions.

  15. Light intensity modulation in phototherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukyanovich, P. A.; Zon, B. A.; Kunin, A. A.; Pankova, S. N.

    2015-04-01

    A hypothesis that blocking ATP synthesis is one of the main causes of the stimulating effect is considered based on analysis of the primary photostimulation mechanisms. The light radiation intensity modulation is substantiated and the estimates of such modulation parameters are made. An explanation is offered to the stimulation efficiency decrease phenomenon at the increase of the radiation dose during the therapy. The results of clinical research of the medical treatment in preventive dentistry are presented depending on the spectrum and parameters of the light flux modulation.

  16. High intensity portable fluorescent light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kendall, F. B.

    1972-01-01

    Eight high intensity portable fluorescent lights were produced. Three prototype lights were also produced, two of which were subsequently updated to the physical and operational configuration of the qualification and flight units. Positioning of lamp apertures and reflectors in these lights is such that the light is concentrated and intensified in a specific pattern rather than widely diffused. Indium amalgam control of mercury vapor pressure in the lamp gives high output at lamp ambient temperatures up to 105 C. A small amount of amalgam applied to each electrode stem helps to obtain fast warm-up. Shrinking a Teflon sleeve on the tube and potting metal caps on each end of the lamp minimizes dispersion of mercury vapor and glass particles in the event of accidental lamp breakage. Operation at 20 kHz allows the lamps to consume more power than at low frequency, thus increasing their light output and raising their efficiency. When used to expose color photographic film, light from the lamps produces results approximately equal to sunlight.

  17. Uncertainty Estimation in Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Absolute Dosimetry Verification

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez-Doblado, Francisco . E-mail: paco@us.es; Hartmann, Guenther H.; Pena, Javier; Capote, Roberto; Paiusco, Marta; Rhein, Bernhard; Leal, Antonio; Lagares, Juan Ignacio

    2007-05-01

    Purpose: Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) represents an important method for improving RT. The IMRT relative dosimetry checks are well established; however, open questions remain in reference dosimetry with ionization chambers (ICs). The main problem is the departure of the measurement conditions from the reference ones; thus, additional uncertainty is introduced into the dose determination. The goal of this study was to assess this effect systematically. Methods and Materials: Monte Carlo calculations and dosimetric measurements with five different detectors were performed for a number of representative IMRT cases, covering both step-and-shoot and dynamic delivery. Results: Using ICs with volumes of about 0.125 cm{sup 3} or less, good agreement was observed among the detectors in most of the situations studied. These results also agreed well with the Monte Carlo-calculated nonreference correction factors (c factors). Additionally, we found a general correlation between the IC position relative to a segment and the derived correction factor c, which can be used to estimate the expected overall uncertainty of the treatment. Conclusion: The increase of the reference dose relative standard uncertainty measured with ICs introduced by nonreference conditions when verifying an entire IMRT plan is about 1-1.5%, provided that appropriate small-volume chambers are used. The overall standard uncertainty of the measured IMRT dose amounts to about 2.3%, including the 0.5% of reproducibility and 1.5% of uncertainty associated with the beam calibration factor. Solid state detectors and large-volume chambers are not well suited to IMRT verification dosimetry because of the greater uncertainties. An action level of 5% is appropriate for IMRT verification. Greater discrepancies should lead to a review of the dosimetric procedure, including visual inspection of treatment segments and energy fluence.

  18. Absolute Intensities of the Vacuum Ultraviolet Spectra in a Metal-Etch Plasma Processing Discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Aragon, B.P.; Blain, M.G.; Hamilton, T.W.; Jarecki, R.L.; Woodworth, J.R.

    1998-12-09

    In this paper we report absolute intensities of vacuum ultraviolet and near ultraviolet emission lines (4.8 eV to 18 eV ) for aluminum etching discharges in an inductively coupled plasma reactor. We report line intensities as a function of wafer type, pressure, gas mixture and rf excitation level. IrI a standard aluminum etching mixture containing C12 and BC13 almost all the light emitted at energies exceeding 8.8 eV was due to neutral atomic chlorine. Optical trapping of the WV radiation in the discharge complicates calculations of VUV fluxes to the wafer. However, we see total photon fluxes to the wailer at energies above 8.8 eV on the order of 4 x 1014 photons/cm2sec with anon- reactive wafer and 0.7 x 10 `4 photons/cm2sec with a reactive wtier. The maj ority of the radiation observed was between 8.9 and 9.3 eV. At these energies, the photons have enough energy to create electron-hole pairs in Si02, but may penetrate up to a micron into the Si02 before being absorbed. Relevance of these measurements to vacuum-W photon-induced darnage of Si02 during etching is discussed.

  19. Absolute intensities of the vacuum ultraviolet spectra in a metal-etch plasma processing discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Woodworth, J.R.; Blain, M.G.; Jarecki, R.L.; Hamilton, T.W.; Aragon, B.P.

    1999-11-01

    In this article we report absolute intensities of vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) and near ultraviolet emission lines (4.8{endash}18 eV) for discharges used to etch aluminum in a commercial inductively coupled plasma reactor. We report line intensities as functions of wafer type, pressure, gas mixture, and radio frequency excitation level. In a standard aluminum etching mixture containing Cl{sub 2} and BCl{sub 3} almost all the light emitted at energies exceeding 8.8 eV was due to neutral atomic chlorine. Optical trapping of the VUV radiation in the discharge complicates calculations of VUV fluxes to the wafer. However, we measured total photon fluxes to the wafer at energies above 8.8 eV on the order of 4{times}10{sup 14}&hthinsp;photons/cm{sup 2}&hthinsp;s with a nonreactive wafer and 0.7{times}10{sup 14}&hthinsp;photons/cm{sup 2}&hthinsp;s with a reactive wafer. The majority of the radiation was between 8.9 and 9.3 eV. At these energies, the photons have enough energy to create electron-hole pairs in SiO{sub 2} and may penetrate up to a micron into the SiO{sub 2} before being absorbed. Relevance of these measurements to VUV photon-induced damage of SiO{sub 2} during etching is discussed. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Vacuum Society.}

  20. Prediction of absolute infrared intensities for the fundamental vibrations of H2O2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, J. D.; Hillman, J. J.

    1981-01-01

    Absolute infrared intensities are predicted for the vibrational bands of gas-phase H2O2 by the use of a hydrogen atomic polar tensor transferred from the hydroxyl hydrogen atom of CH3OH. These predicted intensities are compared with intensities predicted by the use of a hydrogen atomic polar tensor transferred from H2O. The predicted relative intensities agree well with published spectra of gas-phase H2O2, and the predicted absolute intensities are expected to be accurate to within at least a factor of two. Among the vibrational degrees of freedom, the antisymmetric O-H bending mode nu(6) is found to be the strongest with a calculated intensity of 60.5 km/mole. The torsional band, a consequence of hindered rotation, is found to be the most intense fundamental with a predicted intensity of 120 km/mole. These results are compared with the recent absolute intensity determinations for the nu(6) band.

  1. Spray characterization with a nonintrusive technique using absolute scattered light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hess, C. F.; Espinosa, V. E.

    1984-01-01

    A technique to measure the size and velocity of particles is discussed, and results are presented. In this technique two small laser beams of one color identify the center of a laser beam of a different color. This defines a region of almost uniform intensity where the light scattered by the individual particles can be related to their sizes. A variation of this technique that uses two polarizations of the same color of laser beam is also presented. Results are presented for monodisperse, bimodal, trimodal, and polydisperse sprays produced by the Berglund-Liu droplet generator and a pressure nozzle. Size distributions obtained at three different ranges for the same spray show excellent self-consistency in the overlapping regions. Measurements of a spray of known characteristics exhibit errors in the order of 10 percent.

  2. Brooding light intensity effects on broiler performance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Light intensity is an environmental factor which is used with a high degree of variation throughout the US Broiler Industry. Light intensity influences bird activity, immune response, growth rate and has been used to alleviate mortality issues related to metabolic disease (spiking mortality). The ...

  3. Absolute pulse energy measurements of soft x-rays at the Linac Coherent Light Source.

    PubMed

    Tiedtke, K; Sorokin, A A; Jastrow, U; Juranić, P; Kreis, S; Gerken, N; Richter, M; Arp, U; Feng, Y; Nordlund, D; Soufli, R; Fernández-Perea, M; Juha, L; Heimann, P; Nagler, B; Lee, H J; Mack, S; Cammarata, M; Krupin, O; Messerschmidt, M; Holmes, M; Rowen, M; Schlotter, W; Moeller, S; Turner, J J

    2014-09-01

    This paper reports novel measurements of x-ray optical radiation on an absolute scale from the intense and ultra-short radiation generated in the soft x-ray regime of a free electron laser. We give a brief description of the detection principle for radiation measurements which was specifically adapted for this photon energy range. We present data characterizing the soft x-ray instrument at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) with respect to the radiant power output and transmission by using an absolute detector temporarily placed at the downstream end of the instrument. This provides an estimation of the reflectivity of all x-ray optical elements in the beamline and provides the absolute photon number per bandwidth per pulse. This parameter is important for many experiments that need to understand the trade-offs between high energy resolution and high flux, such as experiments focused on studying materials via resonant processes. Furthermore, the results are compared with the LCLS diagnostic gas detectors to test the limits of linearity, and observations are reported on radiation contamination from spontaneous undulator radiation and higher harmonic content. PMID:25321502

  4. Intense Pulsed Light Therapy for Skin Rejuvenation.

    PubMed

    DiBernardo, Barry E; Pozner, Jason N

    2016-07-01

    Intense pulsed light (IPL), also known as pulsed light and broad band light, is a nonlaser light source used to treat a variety of vascular and pigmented lesions, photo damage, active acne, and unwanted hair. Current IPL systems are much improved from older-generation devices with better calibration, integrated cooling, and improved tuning. These devices are extremely popular because of their versatility and are often the first devices recommended and purchased in many offices. PMID:27363767

  5. Absolute intensities of the vacuum ultraviolet spectra in oxide etch plasma processing discharges

    SciTech Connect

    WOODWORTH,JOSEPH R.; RILEY,MERLE E.; AMATUCCI,VINCENT A.; HAMILTON,THOMAS W.; ARAGON,BEN P.

    2000-05-01

    In this paper, the authors report the absolute intensities of ultraviolet light between 4.9 eV and 24 eV ( 250 nm to 50 mn ) striking a silicon wafer in a number of oxide-etch processing discharges. The emphasis is on photons with energies greater than 8.8 eV, which have enough energy to damage SiO{sub 2}. These discharges were in an inductively-driven Gaseous Electronics Conference reference cell which had been modified to more closely resemble commercial etching tools. Comparisons of measurements made through a side port in the cell and through a hole in the wafer indicate that the VUV light in these discharges is strongly trapped. For the pure halocarbon gases examined in these experiments (C{sub 2}F{sub 6}, CHF{sub 3}, C{sub 4}F{sub 8}), the fluxes of VUV photons to the wafer varied from 1 x 10{sup 15} to 3 x 10{sup 15} photons/cm{sup 2} sec or equivalently from 1.5 to 5 mW/cm{sup 2}. These measurements imply that 0.1% to 0.3% of the rf source power to these discharges ends up hitting the wafer as VUV photons for the typical 20 mT, 200 W rf discharges. For typical ashing discharges containing pure oxygen, the VUV intensities are slightly higher--about 8 mW/cm{sup 2} . As argon or hydrogen diluents are added to the fluorocarbon gases, the VUV intensities increase dramatically, with a 10/10/10 mixture of Ar/C{sub 2}F{sub 6}/H{sub 2} yielding VUV fluxes on the wafer 26 mW/cm{sup 2} and pure argon discharges yielding 52 mW/cm{sup 2} . Adding an rf bias to the wafer had only a small effect on the VUV observed through a side-port of the GEC cell.

  6. Revised Pioneer 10 absolute electron intensities in the inner Jovian magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, D. N.; Van Allen, J. A.

    1977-01-01

    Improved techniques for the analysis of Pioneer 10 Jupiter encounter data are used to obtain significantly more reliable values for energetic electron (Ee less than 21 MeV) intensities within the inner magnetosphere. The revised absolute intensities of electrons in the energy range 0.06-21 MeV are less than previous estimates by factors as great as 10 for L not exceeding 6. Previously published intensities at greater radial distances for Ee less than 21 MeV and at all radial distances for Ee greater than 21 MeV are not affected by the revisions.

  7. Techniques for optically compressing light intensity ranges

    DOEpatents

    Rushford, M.C.

    1989-03-28

    A pin hole camera assembly for use in viewing an object having a relatively large light intensity range, for example a crucible containing molten uranium in an atomic vapor laser isotope separator (AVLIS) system is disclosed herein. The assembly includes means for optically compressing the light intensity range appearing at its input sufficient to make it receivable and decipherable by a standard video camera. A number of different means for compressing the intensity range are disclosed. These include the use of photogray glass, the use of a pair of interference filters, and the utilization of a new liquid crystal notch filter in combination with an interference filter. 18 figs.

  8. Techniques for optically compressing light intensity ranges

    DOEpatents

    Rushford, Michael C.

    1989-01-01

    A pin hole camera assembly for use in viewing an object having a relatively large light intensity range, for example a crucible containing molten uranium in an atomic vapor laser isotope separator (AVLIS) system is disclosed herein. The assembly includes means for optically compressing the light intensity range appearing at its input sufficient to make it receivable and decipherable by a standard video camera. A number of different means for compressing the intensity range are disclosed. These include the use of photogray glass, the use of a pair of interference filters, and the utilization of a new liquid crystal notch filter in combination with an interference filter.

  9. Absolute intensity measurement of the 4-0 vibration-rotation band of carbon monoxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chackerian, C., Jr.; Valero, F. P. J.

    1976-01-01

    The absolute intensity of the 4-0 vibration band of CO is measured in spectra obtained using a 25-m base-path multiple-traversal absorption cell and a 5-m scanning spectrometer. The intensities of individual vibration-rotation lines in this band are determined from measurements of their equivalent widths, and absolute values for the rotationless transition moment and the vibration-rotation interaction factor are derived from the measured line strengths. The experimentally obtained vibration-rotation function is compared with a theoretical curve; agreement between theory and experiment is found to be good for the P-branch but poor for the R-branch. It is noted that numerical solutions to the radial Schroedinger equation lead to vibration-rotation function values that are in good agreement with the experiment.

  10. Absolute intensity calibration of the 32-channel heterodyne radiometer on experimental advanced superconducting tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, X.; Zhao, H. L.; Liu, Y. Li, E. Z.; Han, X.; Ti, A.; Hu, L. Q.; Zhang, X. D.; Domier, C. W.; Luhmann, N. C.

    2014-09-15

    This paper presents the results of the in situ absolute intensity calibration for the 32-channel heterodyne radiometer on the experimental advanced superconducting tokamak. The hot/cold load method is adopted, and the coherent averaging technique is employed to improve the signal to noise ratio. Measured spectra and electron temperature profiles are compared with those from an independent calibrated Michelson interferometer, and there is a relatively good agreement between the results from the two different systems.

  11. Absolute intensity calibration of the 32-channel heterodyne radiometer on experimental advanced superconducting tokamak.

    PubMed

    Liu, X; Zhao, H L; Liu, Y; Li, E Z; Han, X; Domier, C W; Luhmann, N C; Ti, A; Hu, L Q; Zhang, X D

    2014-09-01

    This paper presents the results of the in situ absolute intensity calibration for the 32-channel heterodyne radiometer on the experimental advanced superconducting tokamak. The hot/cold load method is adopted, and the coherent averaging technique is employed to improve the signal to noise ratio. Measured spectra and electron temperature profiles are compared with those from an independent calibrated Michelson interferometer, and there is a relatively good agreement between the results from the two different systems. PMID:25273727

  12. Absolute calibration method for nanosecond-resolved, time-streaked, fiber optic light collection, spectroscopy systems

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, Mark D.; Oliver, Bryan V.; Droemer, Darryl W.; Frogget, Brent; Crain, Marlon D.; Maron, Yitzhak

    2012-08-15

    This paper describes a convenient and accurate method to calibrate fast (<1 ns resolution) streaked, fiber optic light collection, spectroscopy systems. Such systems are inherently difficult to calibrate due to the lack of sufficiently intense, calibrated light sources. Such a system is used to collect spectral data on plasmas generated in electron beam diodes fielded on the RITS-6 accelerator (8-12MV, 140-200kA) at Sandia National Laboratories. On RITS, plasma light is collected through a small diameter (200 {mu}m) optical fiber and recorded on a fast streak camera at the output of a 1 meter Czerny-Turner monochromator. For this paper, a 300 W xenon short arc lamp (Oriel Model 6258) was used as the calibration source. Since the radiance of the xenon arc varies from cathode to anode, just the area around the tip of the cathode ('hotspot') was imaged onto the fiber, to produce the highest intensity output. To compensate for chromatic aberrations, the signal was optimized at each wavelength measured. Output power was measured using 10 nm bandpass interference filters and a calibrated photodetector. These measurements give power at discrete wavelengths across the spectrum, and when linearly interpolated, provide a calibration curve for the lamp. The shape of the spectrum is determined by the collective response of the optics, monochromator, and streak tube across the spectral region of interest. The ratio of the spectral curve to the measured bandpass filter curve at each wavelength produces a correction factor (Q) curve. This curve is then applied to the experimental data and the resultant spectra are given in absolute intensity units (photons/sec/cm{sup 2}/steradian/nm). Error analysis shows this method to be accurate to within +/- 20%, which represents a high level of accuracy for this type of measurement.

  13. Absolute calibration method for nanosecond-resolved, time-streaked, fiber optic light collection, spectroscopy systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, Mark D.; Oliver, Bryan V.; Droemer, Darryl W.; Frogget, Brent; Crain, Marlon D.; Maron, Yitzhak

    2012-08-01

    This paper describes a convenient and accurate method to calibrate fast (<1 ns resolution) streaked, fiber optic light collection, spectroscopy systems. Such systems are inherently difficult to calibrate due to the lack of sufficiently intense, calibrated light sources. Such a system is used to collect spectral data on plasmas generated in electron beam diodes fielded on the RITS-6 accelerator (8-12MV, 140-200kA) at Sandia National Laboratories. On RITS, plasma light is collected through a small diameter (200 μm) optical fiber and recorded on a fast streak camera at the output of a 1 meter Czerny-Turner monochromator. For this paper, a 300 W xenon short arc lamp (Oriel Model 6258) was used as the calibration source. Since the radiance of the xenon arc varies from cathode to anode, just the area around the tip of the cathode ("hotspot") was imaged onto the fiber, to produce the highest intensity output. To compensate for chromatic aberrations, the signal was optimized at each wavelength measured. Output power was measured using 10 nm bandpass interference filters and a calibrated photodetector. These measurements give power at discrete wavelengths across the spectrum, and when linearly interpolated, provide a calibration curve for the lamp. The shape of the spectrum is determined by the collective response of the optics, monochromator, and streak tube across the spectral region of interest. The ratio of the spectral curve to the measured bandpass filter curve at each wavelength produces a correction factor (Q) curve. This curve is then applied to the experimental data and the resultant spectra are given in absolute intensity units (photons/sec/cm2/steradian/nm). Error analysis shows this method to be accurate to within +/- 20%, which represents a high level of accuracy for this type of measurement.

  14. OCT angiography by absolute intensity difference applied to normal and diseased human retinas

    PubMed Central

    Ruminski, Daniel; Sikorski, Bartosz L.; Bukowska, Danuta; Szkulmowski, Maciej; Krawiec, Krzysztof; Malukiewicz, Grazyna; Bieganowski, Lech; Wojtkowski, Maciej

    2015-01-01

    We compare four optical coherence tomography techniques for noninvasive visualization of microcapillary network in the human retina and murine cortex. We perform phantom studies to investigate contrast-to-noise ratio for angiographic images obtained with each of the algorithm. We show that the computationally simplest absolute intensity difference angiographic OCT algorithm that bases only on two cross-sectional intensity images may be successfully used in clinical study of healthy eyes and eyes with diabetic maculopathy and branch retinal vein occlusion. PMID:26309740

  15. Intensity evaluation using a femtosecond pulse laser for absolute distance measurement.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hanzhong; Zhang, Fumin; Li, Jianshuang; Cao, Shiying; Meng, Xiangsong; Qu, Xinghua

    2015-06-10

    In this paper, we propose a method of intensity evaluation based on different pulse models using a femtosecond pulse laser, which enables long-range absolute distance measurement with nanometer precision and large non-ambiguity range. The pulse cross-correlation is analyzed based on different pulse models, including Gaussian, Sech(2), and Lorenz. The DC intensity and the amplitude of the cross-correlation patterns are also demonstrated theoretically. In the experiments, we develop a new combined system and perform the distance measurements on an underground granite rail system. The DC intensity and amplitude of the interference fringes are measured and show a good agreement with the theory, and the distance to be determined can be up to 25 m using intensity evaluation, within 64 nm deviation compared with a He-Ne incremental interferometer, and corresponds to a relative precision of 2.7×10(-9). PMID:26192864

  16. High angular resolution absolute intensity of the solar continuum from 1400 to 1790 A.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brueckner, G. E.; Moe, O. K.

    1972-01-01

    Absolute intensities of the solar UV continuum from 1400 to 1790 A have been measured from rocket spectra taken on August 13, 1970. The spectra had an angular resolution of 2 arc sec by 1 arc min, and the pointing accuracy of the instrument was plus or minus 2 arc sec. This permits us to study the center-to-limb variation of the intensity with a spatial resolution of 2 arc sec. Four positions on the solar disk have been studied corresponding to values of cos theta = 0.12, 0.22, 0.28 and 0.72, where theta is the heliocentric position angle. The measurements give higher values for the intensity than recent photoelectric measurement, but are in good agreement with the intensities of Widing et al.

  17. Measurements of absolute line intensities in carbon dioxide bands near 5.2 microns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinsland, C. P.; Benner, D. C.; Devi, V. M.

    1985-01-01

    A nonlinear least-squares spectral fitting procedure has been used to derive experimental absolute intensities for over 300 unblended lines belonging to twelve CO2 bands in the 5.2-micron region. The spectral data were recorded at 0.01/cm resolution and room temperature with the Fourier transform spectrometer in the McMath solar telescope complex at the National Solar Observatory on Kitt Peak and have a signal-to-rms noise ratio of 2000-4000. A natural sample of carbon dioxide was used as the sample gas. For each band, the measured line intensities have been analyzed to derive the vibrational band intensity and coefficients of the F factor. The results are compared to the values used to calculate the intensities in the 1982 Air Force Geophysics Laboratory line parameters compilation.

  18. Trapping of intense light in hollow shell

    SciTech Connect

    Luan, Shixia; Yu, Wei; Yu, M. Y.; Weng, Suming; Wang, Jingwei; Xu, Han; Zhuo, Hongbin; Wong, A. Y.

    2015-09-15

    A small hollow shell for trapping laser light is proposed. Two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation shows that under appropriate laser and plasma conditions a part of the radiation fields of an intense short laser pulse can enter the cavity of a small shell through an over-critical density plasma in an adjacent guide channel and become trapped. The trapped light evolves into a circulating radial wave pattern until its energy is dissipated.

  19. Correction of sunspot intensities for scattered light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullan, D. J.

    1973-01-01

    Correction of sunspot intensities for scattered light usually involves fitting theoretical curves to observed aureoles (Zwaan, 1965; Staveland, 1970, 1972). In this paper we examine the inaccuracies in the determination of scattered light by this method. Earlier analyses are extended to examine uncertainties due to the choice of the expression for limb darkening. For the spread function, we consider Lorentzians and Gaussians for which analytic expressions for the aureole can be written down. Lorentzians lead to divergence and normalization difficulties, and should not be used in scattered light determinations. Gaussian functions are more suitable.

  20. Current Trends in Intense Pulsed Light

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Intense pulsed light technologies have evolved significantly since their introduction to the medical community 20 years ago. Now such devices can be used safely and effectively for the cosmetic treatment of many vascular lesions, unwanted hair, and pigmented lesions. Newer technologies often give results equal to those of laser treatments. PMID:22768357

  1. Skin rejuvenation with intense pulsed light.

    PubMed

    Kohl, Elisabeth A; Babilas, Philipp; Landthaler, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Skin rejuvenation has developed into one of the most popular indications for laser and intense pulsed light (IPL) treatment in dermatology. During the past few years, nonablative skin rejuvenation with infrared lasers has become ever more popular. The results for hyperpigmentation, telangiectasias and erythema are very good, whereas the results in treating wrinkles are not as good as with ablative therapy. PMID:20887700

  2. Rapidly pulsed, high intensity, incoherent light source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, J. C., Jr.; Brandhorst, H. W., Jr. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A rapid pulsing, high intensity, incoherent light is produced by selectively energizing a plurality of discharge lamps with a triggering circuit. Each lamp is connected to a capacitor, and a power supply is electrically connected to all but one of the capacitors. This last named capacitor is electrically connected to a discharge lamp which is connected to the triggering circuit.

  3. Cathodoluminescent Source of Intense White Light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, John E.

    2007-01-01

    The device described exploits cathodoluminescence to generate intense light in the visible and near-infrared regions of the spectrum. In this device, the material to be excited to luminescence is a layer of quartz or alumina powder on an electrically conductive plate exposed to a low-pressure plasma discharge. The plate is electrically biased positively to collect electron current.

  4. Absolute intensity measurements of CO2 bands in the 2395-2680/cm region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malathy Devi, V.; Benner, D. C.; Rinsland, C. P.

    1984-01-01

    Absolute intensities for over 800 transitions belonging to twelve bands of (C-12)(O-16)2, (O-16)(C-12)(O-18), (O-16)(C-12)(O-17), and (O-16)(C-13)(O-18) molecules in the 2395-2680/cm spectral region have been derived using a nonlinear least-squares spectral fitting procedure. The data used in the analysis were recorded at room temperature and low pressure with the 0.01/cm resolution Fourier transform spectrometer in the McMath solar telescope complex at the National Solar Observatory. The measured intensities obtained for each band have been analyzed to derive the vibrational band intensity and F-factor coefficients. The results are compared with other published values.

  5. Infrared mapping of ultrasound fields generated by medical transducers: Feasibility of determining absolute intensity levels

    PubMed Central

    Khokhlova, Vera A.; Shmeleva, Svetlana M.; Gavrilov, Leonid R.; Martin, Eleanor; Sadhoo, Neelaksh; Shaw, Adam

    2013-01-01

    Considerable progress has been achieved in the use of infrared (IR) techniques for qualitative mapping of acoustic fields of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) transducers. The authors have previously developed and demonstrated a method based on IR camera measurement of the temperature rise induced in an absorber less than 2 mm thick by ultrasonic bursts of less than 1 s duration. The goal of this paper was to make the method more quantitative and estimate the absolute intensity distributions by determining an overall calibration factor for the absorber and camera system. The implemented approach involved correlating the temperature rise measured in an absorber using an IR camera with the pressure distribution measured in water using a hydrophone. The measurements were conducted for two HIFU transducers and a flat physiotherapy transducer of 1 MHz frequency. Corresponding correction factors between the free field intensity and temperature were obtained and allowed the conversion of temperature images to intensity distributions. The system described here was able to map in good detail focused and unfocused ultrasound fields with sub-millimeter structure and with local time average intensity from below 0.1 W/cm2 to at least 50 W/cm2. Significantly higher intensities could be measured simply by reducing the duty cycle. PMID:23927199

  6. Infrared mapping of ultrasound fields generated by medical transducers: feasibility of determining absolute intensity levels.

    PubMed

    Khokhlova, Vera A; Shmeleva, Svetlana M; Gavrilov, Leonid R; Martin, Eleanor; Sadhoo, Neelaksh; Shaw, Adam

    2013-08-01

    Considerable progress has been achieved in the use of infrared (IR) techniques for qualitative mapping of acoustic fields of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) transducers. The authors have previously developed and demonstrated a method based on IR camera measurement of the temperature rise induced in an absorber less than 2 mm thick by ultrasonic bursts of less than 1 s duration. The goal of this paper was to make the method more quantitative and estimate the absolute intensity distributions by determining an overall calibration factor for the absorber and camera system. The implemented approach involved correlating the temperature rise measured in an absorber using an IR camera with the pressure distribution measured in water using a hydrophone. The measurements were conducted for two HIFU transducers and a flat physiotherapy transducer of 1 MHz frequency. Corresponding correction factors between the free field intensity and temperature were obtained and allowed the conversion of temperature images to intensity distributions. The system described here was able to map in good detail focused and unfocused ultrasound fields with sub-millimeter structure and with local time average intensity from below 0.1 W/cm(2) to at least 50 W/cm(2). Significantly higher intensities could be measured simply by reducing the duty cycle. PMID:23927199

  7. Comparison of absolute intensity between EAS with gamma-families and general EAS at Mount Norikura

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakatsuka, T.; Nishikawa, K.; Saito, T.; Sakata, M.; Dake, S.; Kawamoto, M.; Mitsumune, T.; Shima, M.; Yamamoto, Y.; Kusumose, M.

    1985-01-01

    Gamma-families with total energy greater than 10 TeV, found in the EX chamber which was cooperated with the EAS array were combined with EAS triggered by big bursts. The absolute intensity of the size spectrum of these combined EAS was compared with that of general EAS obtained by AS trigger. The EAS with sizes greater than 2x1 million were always accompanied by gamma-families with sigma E sub gamma H 10 TeV, n sub gamma, H 2 and Emin=3 TeV, although the rate of EAS accompaning such gamma-families decreases rapidly as their sizes decrease.

  8. Correction due to the finite speed of light in absolute gravimeters Correction due to the finite speed of light in absolute gravimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagornyi, V. D.; Zanimonskiy, Y. M.; Zanimonskiy, Y. Y.

    2011-06-01

    Equations (45) and (47) in our paper [1] in this issue have incorrect sign and should read \\tilde T_i=T_i+{b\\mp S_i\\over c},\\cr\\tilde T_i=T_i\\mp {S_i\\over c}. The error traces back to our formula (3), inherited from the paper [2]. According to the technical documentation [3, 4], the formula (3) is implemented by several commercially available instruments. An incorrect sign would cause a bias of about 20 µGal not known for these instruments, which probably indicates that the documentation incorrectly reflects the implemented measurement equation. Our attention to the error was drawn by the paper [5], also in this issue, where the sign is mentioned correctly. References [1] Nagornyi V D, Zanimonskiy Y M and Zanimonskiy Y Y 2011 Correction due to the finite speed of light in absolute gravimeters Metrologia 48 101-13 [2] Niebauer T M, Sasagawa G S, Faller J E, Hilt R and Klopping F 1995 A new generation of absolute gravimeters Metrologia 32 159-80 [3] Micro-g LaCoste, Inc. 2006 FG5 Absolute Gravimeter Users Manual [4] Micro-g LaCoste, Inc. 2007 g7 Users Manual [5] Niebauer T M, Billson R, Ellis B, Mason B, van Westrum D and Klopping F 2011 Simultaneous gravity and gradient measurements from a recoil-compensated absolute gravimeter Metrologia 48 154-63

  9. Absolute line intensities in CO2 bands near 4.8 microns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinsland, C. P.; Benner, D. C.; Devi, V. M.

    1986-01-01

    Absolute intensities for 726 unblended lines in 20 bands of C-12(O-16)2, C-13(O-16)2, O-16C-12O-18, and O-16C-12O-17 in the 4.8-micron spectral region have been determined using a natural sample of ultrahigh-purity CO2. Spectral data were recorded at low pressure (less than 10 torr) and room temperature with the Fourier transform spectrometer in the McMath solar telescope complex on Kitt Peak. Derived vibrational band intensities and coefficients of the F factor for each band were compared to values of the 1982 Air Force Geophysics Laboratory line parameters compilation. The present work fills out the CO2 lines in the 5-micron band systems. Lines in the strongest of these measured bands are being used to infer atmospheric pressure from high-resolution stratospheric spectra recorded during the Spacelab 3 Atmospheric Trace Molecule Spectroscopy experiment.

  10. Zeeman effect induced by intense laser light.

    PubMed

    Stambulchik, E; Maron, Y

    2014-08-22

    We analyze spectral line shapes of hydrogenlike species subjected to fields of electromagnetic waves. It is shown that the magnetic component of an electromagnetic wave may significantly influence the spectra. In particular, the Zeeman effect induced by a visible or infrared light can be experimentally observed using present-day powerful lasers. In addition, the effect may be used for diagnostics of focused beam intensities achieved at existing and newly built laser facilities. PMID:25192094

  11. Fast GPU-based absolute intensity determination for energy-dispersive X-ray Laue diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alghabi, F.; Send, S.; Schipper, U.; Abboud, A.; Pietsch, U.; Kolb, A.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a novel method for fast determination of absolute intensities in the sites of Laue spots generated by a tetragonal hen egg-white lysozyme crystal after exposure to white synchrotron radiation during an energy-dispersive X-ray Laue diffraction experiment. The Laue spots are taken by means of an energy-dispersive X-ray 2D pnCCD detector. Current pnCCD detectors have a spatial resolution of 384 × 384 pixels of size 75 × 75 μm2 each and operate at a maximum of 400 Hz. Future devices are going to have higher spatial resolution and frame rates. The proposed method runs on a computer equipped with multiple Graphics Processing Units (GPUs) which provide fast and parallel processing capabilities. Accordingly, our GPU-based algorithm exploits these capabilities to further analyse the Laue spots of the sample. The main contribution of the paper is therefore an alternative algorithm for determining absolute intensities of Laue spots which are themselves computed from a sequence of pnCCD frames. Moreover, a new method for integrating spectral peak intensities and improved background correction, a different way of calculating mean count rate of the background signal and also a new method for n-dimensional Poisson fitting are presented.We present a comparison of the quality of results from the GPU-based algorithm with the quality of results from a prior (base) algorithm running on CPU. This comparison shows that our algorithm is able to produce results with at least the same quality as the base algorithm. Furthermore, the GPU-based algorithm is able to speed up one of the most time-consuming parts of the base algorithm, which is n-dimensional Poisson fitting, by a factor of more than 3. Also, the entire procedure of extracting Laue spots' positions, energies and absolute intensities from a raw dataset of pnCCD frames is accelerated by a factor of more than 3.

  12. Absolute intensities of CO2 lines in the 3140-3410/cm spectral region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benner, D. Chris; Devi, V. Malathy; Ferry-Leeper, Penelope S.; Rinsland, Curtis P.

    1988-01-01

    Absolute intensities for 430 transitions belonging to eleven rotation-vibration bands of (C-12)(O-16)2, (C-13)(O-16)2, and (O-16)(C-18)(O-18) in the 3140-3410/cm spectral region have been determined by analyzing spectra recorded at 0.01/cm resolution with the Fourier transform spectrometer in the McMath solar telescope complex at the National Solar Observatory on Kitt Peak. The data were recorded at room temperature and low pressures (less than 10 torr) using a natural sample of carbon dioxide. Intensities were derived using a nonlinear least-squares spectral fitting procedure, and the values obtained for each band have been analyzed to determine the vibrational band intensity and nonrigid rotor coefficients. An alternative mathematical formulation is shown in the case of bands for which the Coriolis effect is large and the Q-branch line intensities were not determinable either because they were severely blended or absent from the spectra. Comparison are made between the results obtained in this study and other published values.

  13. 33 CFR 84.15 - Intensity of lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Intensity of lights. 84.15... NAVIGATION RULES ANNEX I: POSITIONING AND TECHNICAL DETAILS OF LIGHTS AND SHAPES § 84.15 Intensity of lights. (a) The minimum luminous intensity of lights shall be calculated by using the formula:...

  14. 33 CFR 84.15 - Intensity of lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Intensity of lights. 84.15... NAVIGATION RULES ANNEX I: POSITIONING AND TECHNICAL DETAILS OF LIGHTS AND SHAPES § 84.15 Intensity of lights. (a) The minimum luminous intensity of lights will be calculated by using the formula: I = 3.43 ×...

  15. 33 CFR 84.15 - Intensity of lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Intensity of lights. 84.15... NAVIGATION RULES ANNEX I: POSITIONING AND TECHNICAL DETAILS OF LIGHTS AND SHAPES § 84.15 Intensity of lights. (a) The minimum luminous intensity of lights will be calculated by using the formula: I=3.43×106...

  16. 33 CFR 84.15 - Intensity of lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Intensity of lights. 84.15... NAVIGATION RULES ANNEX I: POSITIONING AND TECHNICAL DETAILS OF LIGHTS AND SHAPES § 84.15 Intensity of lights. (a) The minimum luminous intensity of lights will be calculated by using the formula: I=3.43×106...

  17. 33 CFR 84.15 - Intensity of lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Intensity of lights. 84.15... NAVIGATION RULES ANNEX I: POSITIONING AND TECHNICAL DETAILS OF LIGHTS AND SHAPES § 84.15 Intensity of lights. (a) The minimum luminous intensity of lights shall be calculated by using the formula:...

  18. Muscle Activation During Exercise in Severe Acute Hypoxia: Role of Absolute and Relative Intensity

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Peralta, Rafael; Losa-Reyna, José; González-Izal, Miriam; Perez-Suarez, Ismael; Calle-Herrero, Jaime; Izquierdo, Mikel

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Torres-Peralta, Rafael, José Losa-Reyna, Miriam González-Izal, Ismael Perez-Suarez, Jaime Calle-Herrero, Mikel Izquierdo, and José A.L. Calbet. Muscle activation during exercise in severe acute hypoxia: Role of absolute and relative intensity. High Alt Med Biol 15:472–482, 2014.—The aim of this study was to determine the influence of severe acute hypoxia on muscle activation during whole body dynamic exercise. Eleven young men performed four incremental cycle ergometer tests to exhaustion breathing normoxic (FIo2=0.21, two tests) or hypoxic gas (FIo2=0.108, two tests). Surface electromyography (EMG) activities of rectus femoris (RF), vastus medialis (VL), vastus lateralis (VL), and biceps femoris (BF) were recorded. The two normoxic and the two hypoxic tests were averaged to reduce EMG variability. Peak Vo2 was 34% lower in hypoxia than in normoxia (p<0.05). The EMG root mean square (RMS) increased with exercise intensity in all muscles (p<0.05), with greater effect in hypoxia than in normoxia in the RF and VM (p<0.05), and a similar trend in VL (p=0.10). At the same relative intensity, the RMS was greater in normoxia than in hypoxia in RF, VL, and BF (p<0.05), with a similar trend in VM (p=0.08). Median frequency increased with exercise intensity (p<0.05), and was higher in hypoxia than in normoxia in VL (p<0.05). Muscle contraction burst duration increased with exercise intensity in VM and VL (p<0.05), without clear effects of FIo2. No significant FIo2 effects on frequency domain indices were observed when compared at the same relative intensity. In conclusion, muscle activation during whole body exercise increases almost linearly with exercise intensity, following a muscle-specific pattern, which is adjusted depending on the FIo2 and the relative intensity of exercise. Both VL and VM are increasingly involved in power output generation with the increase of intensity and the reduction in FIo2. PMID:25225839

  19. Dark Light, Rod Saturation, and the Absolute and Incremental Sensitivity of Mouse Cone Vision

    PubMed Central

    Naarendorp, Frank; Esdaille, Tricia M.; Banden, Serenity M.; Andrews-Labenski, John; Gross, Owen P.; Pugh, Edward N.

    2012-01-01

    Visual thresholds of mice for the detection of small, brief targets were measured with a novel behavioral methodology in the dark and in the presence of adapting lights spanning ∼8 log10 units of intensity. To help dissect the contributions of rod and cone pathways, both wild-type mice and mice lacking rod (Gnat1−/−) or cone (Gnat2cpfl3) function were studied. Overall, the visual sensitivity of mice was found to be remarkably similar to that of the human peripheral retina. Rod absolute threshold corresponded to 12-15 isomerized pigment molecules (R*) in image fields of 800 to 3000 rods. Rod “dark light” (intrinsic retinal noise in darkness) corresponded to that estimated previously from single-cell recordings, 0.012R*s−1rod−1, indicating that spontaneous thermalisomerizations are responsible. Psychophysical rod saturation was measured for the first time in a nonhman species and found to be very similar to that of the human rod monochromat. Cone threshold corresponded to ∼5 R* cone−1 in an image field of 280 cones. Cone dark light was equivalent to ∼5000 R*s−1 cone−1, consistent with primate single-cell data but 100-fold higher than predicted by recent measurements of the rate of thermal isomerization of mouse cone opsins, indicating that nonopsin sources of noise determine cone threshold. The new, fully automated behavioral method is based on the ability of mice to learn to interrupt spontaneous wheel running on the presentation of a visual cue and provides an efficient and highly reliable means of examining visual function in naturally behaving normal and mutant mice. PMID:20844144

  20. Lasers and Intense Pulsed Light Hidradenitis Suppurativa.

    PubMed

    Saunte, Ditte M; Lapins, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Lasers and intense pulsed light (IPL) treatment are useful for the treatment of hidradenitis suppurativa (HS). Carbon dioxide lasers are used for cutting or vaporization of the affected area. It is a effective therapy for the management of severe and recalcitrant HS with persistent sinus tract and scarring, and can be performed under local anesthesia. HS has a follicular pathogenesis. Lasers and IPL targeting the hair have been found useful in treating HS by reducing the numbers of hairs in areas with HS. The methods have few side effects, but the studies are preliminary and need to be repeated. PMID:26617364

  1. Nonlinear Optics of Intense Attosecond Light Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazarkin, Alexander

    2006-10-01

    The interaction of an intense light pulse of "subatomic" duration with a system of multiple discrete quantum states is analyzed. The nonperturbative character of the response to the pulse field leading to an efficient conversion into high order harmonics is predicted. The spatial-temporal evolution of the field is shown to obey a generalized nonlinear wave equation of the double-sine-Gordon type. In addition to the solitary wave structures, it predicts a nontrivial regime of pulse amplification accompanied by extreme temporal self-contraction of the amplified field.

  2. Variation in light intensity with height and time from subsequent lightning return strokes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, D. M.; Uman, M. A.

    1983-01-01

    Photographic measurements of relative light intensity as a function of height and time have been conducted for seven return strokes in two lightning flashes at 7.8 and 8.7 km ranges, using film which possesses an approximately constant spectral response in the 300-670 nm range. The amplitude of the initial light peak is noted to decrease exponentially with height, with a decay constant of 0.6-0.8 km. The logarithm of the peak light intensity near the ground is found to be approximately proportional to the initial peak electric field intensity, implying that the current decrease with height may be much slower than the light decrease. Absolute light intensity is presently estimated through the integration of the photographic signals from individual channel segments, in order to simulate the calibrated, all-sky photoelectric data of Guo and Krider (1982).

  3. Absolute Configuration from Different Multifragmentation Pathways in Light-Induced Coulomb Explosion Imaging.

    PubMed

    Pitzer, Martin; Kastirke, Gregor; Kunitski, Maksim; Jahnke, Till; Bauer, Tobias; Goihl, Christoph; Trinter, Florian; Schober, Carl; Henrichs, Kevin; Becht, Jasper; Zeller, Stefan; Gassert, Helena; Waitz, Markus; Kuhlins, Andreas; Sann, Hendrik; Sturm, Felix; Wiegandt, Florian; Wallauer, Robert; Schmidt, Lothar Ph H; Johnson, Allan S; Mazenauer, Manuel; Spenger, Benjamin; Marquardt, Sabrina; Marquardt, Sebastian; Schmidt-Böcking, Horst; Stohner, Jürgen; Dörner, Reinhard; Schöffler, Markus; Berger, Robert

    2016-08-18

    The absolute configuration of individual small molecules in the gas phase can be determined directly by light-induced Coulomb explosion imaging (CEI). Herein, this approach is demonstrated for ionization with a single X-ray photon from a synchrotron light source, leading to enhanced efficiency and faster fragmentation as compared to previous experiments with a femtosecond laser. In addition, it is shown that even incomplete fragmentation pathways of individual molecules from a racemic CHBrClF sample can give access to the absolute configuration in CEI. This leads to a significant increase of the applicability of the method as compared to the previously reported complete break-up into atomic ions and can pave the way for routine stereochemical analysis of larger chiral molecules by light-induced CEI. PMID:27298209

  4. Rhodamine intense pulsed light versus conventional intense pulsed light for facial telangiectasias.

    PubMed

    Piccolo, Domenico; Crisman, Giuliana; Kostaki, Dimitra; Cannarozzo, Giovanni; Sannino, Mario; Chimenti, Sergio

    2016-04-01

    Facial telangiectasias represent the major aesthetic alterations of several chronic inflammatory disorders arising on facial skin. We herein report on relevant clinical results of a new subtype of intense pulsed light treatments, the so-called rhodamine intense pulsed light (r-IPL), in comparison with conventional IPL (c-IPL) treatments on forty-five patients affected by facial telangiectasias. The aim of this study is to determinate whether r-IPL represents an effective and safe treatment for the most common superficial vascular alterations and could be advised as a first choice therapy for facial telangiectasias. PMID:26736070

  5. 14 CFR 25.1389 - Position light distribution and intensities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... light distribution and intensities. (a) General. The intensities prescribed in this section must be provided by new equipment with light covers and color filters in place. Intensities must be determined with... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Position light distribution and...

  6. 14 CFR 29.1389 - Position light distribution and intensities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Position light distribution and intensities. (a) General. The intensities prescribed in this section must be provided by new equipment with light covers and color filters in place. Intensities must be... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Position light distribution and...

  7. 14 CFR 27.1389 - Position light distribution and intensities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... light distribution and intensities. (a) General. the intensities prescribed in this section must be provided by new equipment with light covers and color filters in place. Intensities must be determined with... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Position light distribution and...

  8. 14 CFR 25.1389 - Position light distribution and intensities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... light distribution and intensities. (a) General. The intensities prescribed in this section must be provided by new equipment with light covers and color filters in place. Intensities must be determined with... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Position light distribution and...

  9. 14 CFR 27.1389 - Position light distribution and intensities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... light distribution and intensities. (a) General. the intensities prescribed in this section must be provided by new equipment with light covers and color filters in place. Intensities must be determined with... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Position light distribution and...

  10. Absolute intensity calibration of the Wendelstein 7-X high efficiency extreme ultraviolet overview spectrometer system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greiche, Albert; Biel, Wolfgang; Marchuk, Oleksandr; Burhenn, Rainer

    2008-09-01

    The new high effiency extreme ultraviolet overview spectrometer (HEXOS) system for the stellarator Wendelstein 7-X is now mounted for testing and adjustment at the tokamak experiment for technology oriented research (TEXTOR). One part of the testing phase was the intensity calibration of the two double spectrometers which in total cover a spectral range from 2.5 to 160.0 nm with overlap. This work presents the current intensity calibration curves for HEXOS and describes the method of calibration. The calibration was implemented with calibrated lines of a hollow cathode light source and the branching ratio technique. The hollow cathode light source provides calibrated lines from 16 up to 147 nm. We could extend the calibrated region in the spectrometers down to 2.8 nm by using the branching line pairs emitted by an uncalibrated pinch extreme ultraviolet light source as well as emission lines from boron and carbon in TEXTOR plasmas. In total HEXOS is calibrated from 2.8 up to 147 nm, which covers most of the observable wavelength region. The approximate density of carbon in the range of the minor radius from 18 to 35 cm in a TEXTOR plasma determined by simulating calibrated vacuum ultraviolet emission lines with a transport code was 5.5×1017 m-3 which corresponds to a local carbon concentration of 2%.

  11. 14 CFR 23.1389 - Position light distribution and intensities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Equipment Lights § 23.1389 Position light distribution and intensities. (a) General. The intensities prescribed in this section must be provided by new equipment with each light cover and color filter in place... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Position light distribution and...

  12. 14 CFR 23.1389 - Position light distribution and intensities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Equipment Lights § 23.1389 Position light distribution and intensities. (a) General. The intensities prescribed in this section must be provided by new equipment with each light cover and color filter in place... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Position light distribution and...

  13. Experimental assessment of the speed of light perturbation in free-fall absolute gravimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumann, H.; Pythoud, F.; Blas, D.; Sibiryakov, S.; Eichenberger, A.; Klingelé, E. E.

    2015-10-01

    Precision absolute gravity measurements are growing in importance, especially in the context of the new definition of the kilogram. For the case of free fall absolute gravimeters with a Michelson-type interferometer tracking the position of a free falling body, one of the effects that needs to be taken into account is the ‘speed of light perturbation’ due to the finite speed of propagation of light. This effect has been extensively discussed in the past, and there is at present a disagreement between different studies. In this work, we present the analysis of new data and confirm the result expected from the theoretical analysis applied nowadays in free-fall gravimeters. We also review the standard derivations of this effect (by using phase shift or Doppler effect arguments) and show their equivalence.

  14. Ultrahigh enhancement in absolute and relative rotation sensing using fast and slow light

    SciTech Connect

    Shahriar, M. S.; Pati, G. S.; Tripathi, R.; Gopal, V.; Messall, M.; Salit, K.

    2007-05-15

    We describe a resonator-based optical gyroscope whose sensitivity for measuring absolute rotation is enhanced via use of the anomalous dispersion characteristic of superluminal light propagation. The enhancement is given by the inverse of the group index, saturating to a bound determined by the group velocity dispersion. We also show how the offsetting effect of the concomitant broadening of the resonator linewidth may be circumvented by using an active cavity. For realistic conditions, the enhancement factor is as high as 10{sup 6}. We also show how normal dispersion used for slow light can enhance relative rotation sensing in a specially designed Sagnac interferometer, with the enhancement given by the slowing factor.

  15. Effective light absorption and absolute electron transport rates in the coral Pocillopora damicornis.

    PubMed

    Szabó, Milán; Wangpraseurt, Daniel; Tamburic, Bojan; Larkum, Anthony W D; Schreiber, Ulrich; Suggett, David J; Kühl, Michael; Ralph, Peter J

    2014-10-01

    Pulse Amplitude Modulation (PAM) fluorometry has been widely used to estimate the relative photosynthetic efficiency of corals. However, both the optical properties of intact corals as well as past technical constrains to PAM fluorometers have prevented calculations of the electron turnover rate of PSII. We used a new Multi-colour PAM (MC-PAM) in parallel with light microsensors to determine for the first time the wavelength-specific effective absorption cross-section of PSII photochemistry, σII(λ), and thus PAM-based absolute electron transport rates of the coral photosymbiont Symbiodinium both in culture and in hospite in the coral Pocillopora damicornis. In both cases, σII of Symbiodinium was highest in the blue spectral region and showed a progressive decrease towards red wavelengths. Absolute values for σII at 440 nm were up to 1.5-times higher in culture than in hospite. Scalar irradiance within the living coral tissue was reduced by 20% in the blue when compared to the incident downwelling irradiance. Absolute electron transport rates of P. damicornis at 440 nm revealed a maximum PSII turnover rate of ca. 250 electrons PSII(-1) s(-1), consistent with one PSII turnover for every 4 photons absorbed by PSII; this likely reflects the limiting steps in electron transfer between PSII and PSI. Our results show that optical properties of the coral host strongly affect light use efficiency of Symbiodinium. Therefore, relative electron transport rates do not reflect the productivity rates (or indeed how the photosynthesis-light response is parameterised). Here we provide a non-invasive approach to estimate absolute electron transport rates in corals. PMID:25146689

  16. Absolute intensity measurements of the CO2 bands 401-III /backward arrow/ 000 and 411-III /backward arrow/ 010

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valero, F. P. J.

    1977-01-01

    The absolute intensities of the studied transitions of CO2 have been measured from spectra obtained under high resolution. Vibration-rotation line intensities and integrated band intensities are reported. The studied bands are characterized by origins at 7593.5 and 7584 cm to the minus 1. Spectra were obtained by an Ames' 25-m base path White-type absorption cell equipped with silver-coated mirrors together with a 5-m focal length Czerny-Turner scanning spectrometer. The procedures for calculating the widths and intensities are explained, and uncertainty limits of the reported values are considered.

  17. An optical microsensor to measure fluorescent light intensity in biofilms.

    PubMed

    Beyenal, Haluk; Yakymyshyn, Chris; Hyungnak, Jeon; Davis, Catherine C; Lewandowski, Zbigniew

    2004-09-01

    We have developed an optical microsensor to quantify fluorescent light intensity distribution in biofilms. The optical system consisted of a beam splitter, light couplers, filters and a spectrophotometer able to accept the fiberoptic cable to measure fluorescent light intensity. The emitted light, fluorescence from the biofilm, was collected at the tip of the optical microsensor and was transferred to a spectrophotometer via a fiberoptic cable. The total fluorescent light intensity was evaluated from the emission spectrum by numerical integration. The newly developed fiberoptic microsensor was tested using a Staphylococcus aureus strain producing yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) grown as biofilm. We used a 405-nm violet laser diode for excitation, and measured the emission intensity between 480 nm and 540 nm. The optical microsensor that quantifies fluorescent light intensity is a promising tool in biofilm research which often requires detection and quantification of fluorescent light intensity distribution generated by various fluorescent proteins. PMID:15279941

  18. Unconventional use of intense pulsed light.

    PubMed

    Piccolo, D; Di Marcantonio, D; Crisman, G; Cannarozzo, G; Sannino, M; Chiricozzi, A; Chimenti, S

    2014-01-01

    According to the literature, intense pulsed light (IPL) represents a versatile tool in the treatment of some dermatological conditions (i.e., pigmentation disorders, hair removal, and acne), due to its wide range of wavelengths. The authors herein report on 58 unconventional but effective uses of IPL in several cutaneous diseases, such as rosacea (10 cases), port-wine stain (PWS) (10 cases), disseminated porokeratosis (10 cases), pilonidal cyst (3 cases), seborrheic keratosis (10 cases), hypertrophic scar (5 cases) and keloid scar (5 cases), Becker's nevus (2 cases), hidradenitis suppurativa (2 cases), and sarcoidosis (1 case). Our results should suggest that IPL could represent a valid therapeutic support and option by providing excellent outcomes and low side effects, even though it should be underlined that the use and the effectiveness of IPL are strongly related to the operator's experience (acquired by attempting at least one specific course on the use of IPL and one-year experience in a specialized centre). Moreover, the daily use of these devices will surely increase clinical experience and provide new information, thus enhancing long-term results and improving IPL effectiveness. PMID:25276803

  19. Unconventional Use of Intense Pulsed Light

    PubMed Central

    Piccolo, D.; Di Marcantonio, D.; Crisman, G.; Cannarozzo, G.; Sannino, M.; Chiricozzi, A.; Chimenti, S.

    2014-01-01

    According to the literature, intense pulsed light (IPL) represents a versatile tool in the treatment of some dermatological conditions (i.e., pigmentation disorders, hair removal, and acne), due to its wide range of wavelengths. The authors herein report on 58 unconventional but effective uses of IPL in several cutaneous diseases, such as rosacea (10 cases), port-wine stain (PWS) (10 cases), disseminated porokeratosis (10 cases), pilonidal cyst (3 cases), seborrheic keratosis (10 cases), hypertrophic scar (5 cases) and keloid scar (5 cases), Becker's nevus (2 cases), hidradenitis suppurativa (2 cases), and sarcoidosis (1 case). Our results should suggest that IPL could represent a valid therapeutic support and option by providing excellent outcomes and low side effects, even though it should be underlined that the use and the effectiveness of IPL are strongly related to the operator's experience (acquired by attempting at least one specific course on the use of IPL and one-year experience in a specialized centre). Moreover, the daily use of these devices will surely increase clinical experience and provide new information, thus enhancing long-term results and improving IPL effectiveness. PMID:25276803

  20. On the Intensity Profile of Electric Lamps and Light Bulbs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bacalla, Xavier; Salumbides, Edcel John

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate that the time profile of the light intensity from domestic lighting sources exhibits simple yet interesting properties that foster lively student discussions. We monitor the light intensity of an industrial fluorescent lamp (also known as TL) and an incandescent bulb using a photodetector connected to an oscilloscope. The light…

  1. Intense Pulsed Light (IPL) in Aesthetic Dermatology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pytras, B.; Drozdowski, P.; Zub, K.

    2011-08-01

    Introduction. Newer and newer technologies have been widely developed in recent years due to increasing need for aesthetic medicine procedures. Less invasive methods of skin imperfection and time-related lesions removal, IPL (Intense Pulse Light) being one of them, are gaining more and more interest. The shorter the "downtime" for the patient is and the more efficient the procedure results, the more popular the method becomes. Materials and methods_Authors analyse the results of treatment of a 571 patients-group (501 women and 70 men) aged 5-72 years in the period: October 2006-August 2010. IPL™ Quantum (Lumenis Ltd.) device with 560 nm. cut-off filter was used. Results. The results were regarded as: very good, good or satisfying (%):Skin photoaging symptomes 37/40/23, Isolated facial dyschromia 30/55/25, Isolated facial erythema 62/34/4, Lower limbs teleangiectasia 12/36/52, Keratosis solaris on hands 100/-/-. Approximately half of the patients developed transitory erythema and 25%- transitory, mild, circumscribed oedema. Following undesirable effects were noted: skin thermal irritation (6,1% of the patients) and skin hypopigmentation (2% of the patients). Discussion. Results and post-treatment management proposed by authors are similar to those reported by other authors. Conclusions. Treatment results of the 571-patients group prove IPL to be a very efficient method of non-ablative skin rejuvenation. It turned out effective also in lower limbs teleangiectasia treatment. It presents low risk of transitory and mild side effects. Futhermore, with short or no downtime, it is well-tolerated by the patients.

  2. Adaptation of the Cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa to Light Intensity 1

    PubMed Central

    Raps, Shirley; Wyman, Kevin; Siegelman, Harold W.; Falkowski, Paul G.

    1983-01-01

    Light intensity adaptation (20 to 565 microeinsteins per square meter per second) of Microcystis aeruginosa (UV-027) was examined in turbidostat culture. Chlorophyll a and phycocyanin concentrations decreased with increasing light intensity while carotenoid, cellular carbon, and nitrogen contents did not vary. Variation in the number but not the size of photosynthetic units per cell, based on chlorophyll a/P700 ratios, occurred on light intensity adaptation. Changes in the numbers of photosynthetic units partially dampened the effects of changes in light intensity on growth rates. PMID:16663094

  3. Light shield and cooling apparatus. [high intensity ultraviolet lamp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, T. G., Jr. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A light shield and cooling apparatus was developed for a high intensity ultraviolet lamp including water and high pressure air for cooling and additional apparatus for shielding the light and suppressing the high pressure air noise.

  4. On the Intensity Profile of Electric Lamps and Light Bulbs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacalla, Xavier; Salumbides, Edcel John

    2013-11-01

    We demonstrate that the time profile of the light intensity from domestic lighting sources exhibits simple yet interesting properties that foster lively student discussions. We monitor the light intensity of an industrial fluorescent lamp (also known as TL) and an incandescent bulb using a photodetector connected to an oscilloscope. The light intensity of these sources displays modulation at twice the ac power supply frequency. The familiarity of ac line power supply, commonplace light sources, and simplicity of the setup encourage student confidence, allowing them to think deeper and continually reassess their notions, and if managed can lead to a satisfactory explanation of the observations.

  5. An imaging technique for detection and absolute calibration of scintillation light

    SciTech Connect

    Pappalardo, Alfio; Cosentino, Luigi; Finocchiaro, Paolo

    2010-03-15

    Triggered by the need of a detection system to be used in experiments of nuclear fusion in laser-generated plasmas, we developed an imaging technique for the measurement and calibration of the scintillation light yield of scintillating materials. As in such experiments, all the reaction products are generated in an ultrashort time frame, the event-by-event data acquisition scheme is not feasible. As an alternative to the emulsion technique (or the equivalent CR39 sheets) we propose a scintillating screen readout by means of a high performance charge coupled device camera. Even though it is not strictly required in the particular application, this technique allows the absolute calibration of the scintillation light yield.

  6. Absolute integrated intensity and individual line parameters for the 6.2-micron band of NO2. [in solar spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldman, A.; Bonomo, F. S.; Williams, W. J.; Murcray, D. G.; Snider, D. E.

    1975-01-01

    The absolute integrated intensity of the 6.2-micron band of NO2 at 40 C was determined from quantitative spectra at about 10 per cm resolution by the spectral band model technique. A value of 1430 plus or minus 300 per sq cm per atm was obtained. Individual line parameters, positions, intensities, and ground-state energies were derived, and line-by-line calculations were compared with the band model results and with the quantitative spectra obtained at about 0.5 per cm resolution.

  7. Phototoxicity of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons at varying light intensities

    SciTech Connect

    Ankley, G.T.; Phipps, G.L.; Mattson, V.R.; Erickson, R.J.; Kosian, P.A.; Cox, J.S.; Sheedy, B.R.; Mount, D.R.

    1994-12-31

    Conceptual models suggest that the toxicity of photoactivated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) should be a function both of chemical (PAH) dose, and intensity of the ultraviolet (UV) light to which the organism is exposed (photon dose). However, there have been no systematic studies with aquatic organisms to quantify the relationship between PAH dose and UV intensity in producing phototoxicity. In these studies, oligochaetes (Lumbriculus variegatus) were exposed, via the water, to multiple concentrations of individual PAHs known to be photoactivated (fluoranthene, pyrene, anthracene), and then placed under UV light of three different intensities. The resultant phototoxicity clearly was a function both of PAH dose and light intensity. A joint toxicity model relating toxicity to PAH concentrations and light intensity will be presented.

  8. Coherent light in intense spatiospectral twin beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peřina, Jan

    2016-06-01

    Intense spatio-spectral twin beams generated in the regime with pump depletion are analyzed applying a suggested quantum model that treats the signal, idler, and pump fields in the same way. The model assumes the signal and idler fields in the form of the generalized superposition of signal and noise and reveals nonzero signal coherent components in both fields, contrary to the models developed earlier. The influence of coherent components on the properties of intense twin beams is elucidated. The interference pattern formed in the process of sum-frequency generation and that of the Hong-Ou-Mandel interferometer are shown to be able to experimentally confirm the presence of coherent components.

  9. Intense pulsed light: what works, what's new, what's next.

    PubMed

    Ciocon, David H; Boker, Andreas; Goldberg, David J

    2009-12-01

    Intense pulsed light technology has revolutionized the noninvasive treatment of a whole variety of cutaneous cosmetic problems. Today's machines are safer, more diverse, less painful, and readily available. Intense pulsed lights can be used to treat vascular and pigmented lesions and are used for facial rejuvenation and the removal of unwanted hair. Newer, less powerful home-device intense pulsed light sources will not replace those used in a physician's office but will augment the use of today's more powerful medical office systems. PMID:20024870

  10. Consecutive polarizers arrangement producing maximum polarized light intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wirjawan, Johannes V. D.

    2016-03-01

    Polarizer mainly functions as a specific filter that blocks or transmits lights of certain polarization. Malus' law predicts the average intensity of polarized light passing a polarizer that transmits certain polarization direction will be proportional to the squared cosine of angle between the two polarization directions. Arranging several polarizers consecutively with various transmission directions will produce various final intensity as well as final polarized direction. Specific arrangement of an arbitrary number (N > 3) of polarizers producing maximum intensity of polarized light will be discussed in this paper. In addition, interesting pattern of maximum values of some trigonometric functions that are difficult to be solved analytically can be obtained from this discussion.

  11. Absolute radiometric calibration of Als intensity data: effects on accuracy and target classification.

    PubMed

    Kaasalainen, Sanna; Pyysalo, Ulla; Krooks, Anssi; Vain, Ants; Kukko, Antero; Hyyppä, Juha; Kaasalainen, Mikko

    2011-01-01

    Radiometric calibration of airborne laser scanning (ALS) intensity data aims at retrieving a value related to the target scattering properties, which is independent on the instrument or flight parameters. The aim of a calibration procedure is also to be able to compare results from different flights and instruments, but practical applications are sparsely available, and the performance of calibration methods for this purpose needs to be further assessed. We have studied the radiometric calibration with data from three separate flights and two different instruments using external calibration targets. We find that the intensity data from different flights and instruments can be compared to each other only after a radiometric calibration process using separate calibration targets carefully selected for each flight. The calibration is also necessary for target classification purposes, such as separating vegetation from sand using intensity data from different flights. The classification results are meaningful only for calibrated intensity data. PMID:22346660

  12. Absolute Radiometric Calibration of ALS Intensity Data: Effects on Accuracy and Target Classification

    PubMed Central

    Kaasalainen, Sanna; Pyysalo, Ulla; Krooks, Anssi; Vain, Ants; Kukko, Antero; Hyyppä, Juha; Kaasalainen, Mikko

    2011-01-01

    Radiometric calibration of airborne laser scanning (ALS) intensity data aims at retrieving a value related to the target scattering properties, which is independent on the instrument or flight parameters. The aim of a calibration procedure is also to be able to compare results from different flights and instruments, but practical applications are sparsely available, and the performance of calibration methods for this purpose needs to be further assessed. We have studied the radiometric calibration with data from three separate flights and two different instruments using external calibration targets. We find that the intensity data from different flights and instruments can be compared to each other only after a radiometric calibration process using separate calibration targets carefully selected for each flight. The calibration is also necessary for target classification purposes, such as separating vegetation from sand using intensity data from different flights. The classification results are meaningful only for calibrated intensity data. PMID:22346660

  13. Muscle activation during exercise in severe acute hypoxia: role of absolute and relative intensity.

    PubMed

    Torres-Peralta, Rafael; Losa-Reyna, José; González-Izal, Miriam; Perez-Suarez, Ismael; Calle-Herrero, Jaime; Izquierdo, Mikel; Calbet, José A L

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the influence of severe acute hypoxia on muscle activation during whole body dynamic exercise. Eleven young men performed four incremental cycle ergometer tests to exhaustion breathing normoxic (FIO2=0.21, two tests) or hypoxic gas (FIO2=0.108, two tests). Surface electromyography (EMG) activities of rectus femoris (RF), vastus medialis (VL), vastus lateralis (VL), and biceps femoris (BF) were recorded. The two normoxic and the two hypoxic tests were averaged to reduce EMG variability. Peak VO2 was 34% lower in hypoxia than in normoxia (p<0.05). The EMG root mean square (RMS) increased with exercise intensity in all muscles (p<0.05), with greater effect in hypoxia than in normoxia in the RF and VM (p<0.05), and a similar trend in VL (p=0.10). At the same relative intensity, the RMS was greater in normoxia than in hypoxia in RF, VL, and BF (p<0.05), with a similar trend in VM (p=0.08). Median frequency increased with exercise intensity (p<0.05), and was higher in hypoxia than in normoxia in VL (p<0.05). Muscle contraction burst duration increased with exercise intensity in VM and VL (p<0.05), without clear effects of FIO2. No significant FIO2 effects on frequency domain indices were observed when compared at the same relative intensity. In conclusion, muscle activation during whole body exercise increases almost linearly with exercise intensity, following a muscle-specific pattern, which is adjusted depending on the FIO2 and the relative intensity of exercise. Both VL and VM are increasingly involved in power output generation with the increase of intensity and the reduction in FIO2. PMID:25225839

  14. Quantitative vapor-phase IR intensities and DFT computations to predict absolute IR spectra based on molecular structure: I. Alkanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Stephen D.; Johnson, Timothy J.; Sharpe, Steven W.; Yavelak, Veronica; Oates, R. P.; Brauer, Carolyn S.

    2013-11-01

    Recently recorded quantitative IR spectra of a variety of gas-phase alkanes are shown to have integrated intensities in both the C3H stretching and C3H bending regions that depend linearly on the molecular size, i.e. the number of C3H bonds. This result is well predicted from CH4 to C15H32 by density functional theory (DFT) computations of IR spectra using Becke's three parameter functional (B3LYP/6-31+G(d,p)). Using the experimental data, a simple model predicting the absolute IR band intensities of alkanes based only on structural formula is proposed: For the C3H stretching band envelope centered near 2930 cm-1 this is given by (km/mol) CH_str=(34±1)×CH-(41±23) where CH is number of C3H bonds in the alkane. The linearity is explained in terms of coordinated motion of methylene groups rather than the summed intensities of autonomous -CH2-units. The effect of alkyl chain length on the intensity of a C3H bending mode is explored and interpreted in terms of conformer distribution. The relative intensity contribution of a methyl mode compared to the total C3H stretch intensity is shown to be linear in the number of methyl groups in the alkane, and can be used to predict quantitative spectra a priori based on structure alone.

  15. Absolute Line Intensities in the ν 3Band of 12CH 3F by Diode-Laser Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lepère, Muriel; Blanquet, Ghislain; Walrand, Jacques

    1996-06-01

    Infrared absolute line intensities of the ν 3band of 12CH 3F have been measured around 9.5 μm using a diode-laser spectrometer. These line strengths were obtained from the equivalent width method and, for a few lines, by fitting a Rautian profile to the measured shape of the lines. From these results, we have deduced the vibrational bandstrength ( Sv0= 379.2 ± 5.9 cm -2·atm -1at 296 K) and the first Herman-Wallis factor (α = 0.35 × 10 -3± 0.10 × 10 -3).

  16. Absolute Line Intensities in the 2ν 02 Band of Cyanogen Chloride at 12.8 μm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lepère, Muriel; Blanquet, Ghislain; Walrand, Jacques

    2000-05-01

    Absolute line intensities were measured at high resolution with a tunable diode laser. This work concerns the 2ν02 band of cyanogen chloride ClCN in the region 780 cm-1. Thirty-two absorption lines were recorded for the isotopomer 35ClCN and 26 lines for 37ClCN. From the analysis of these lines, we determined the bandstrengths: S0v = 19.14 cm-2 atm-1 for 35ClCN and S0v = 17.84 cm-2 atm-1 for 37ClCN.

  17. Light-intensity modulator withstands high heat fluxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maples, H. G.; Strass, H. K.

    1966-01-01

    Mechanism modulates and controls the intensity of luminous radiation in light beams associated with high-intensity heat flux. This modulator incorporates two fluid-cooled, externally grooved, contracting metal cylinders which when rotated about their longitudinal axes present a circular aperture of varying size depending on the degree of rotation.

  18. Assessment of absolute added correlative coding in optical intensity modulation and direct detection channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong-Nhat, Nguyen; Elsherif, Mohamed A.; Malekmohammadi, Amin

    2016-06-01

    The performance of absolute added correlative coding (AACC) modulation format with direct detection has been numerically and analytically reported, targeting metro data center interconnects. Hereby, the focus lies on the performance of the bit error rate, noise contributions, spectral efficiency, and chromatic dispersion tolerance. The signal space model of AACC, where the average electrical and optical power expressions are derived for the first time, is also delineated. The proposed modulation format was also compared to other well-known signaling, such as on-off-keying (OOK) and four-level pulse-amplitude modulation, at the same bit rate in a directly modulated vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser-based transmission system. The comparison results show a clear advantage of AACC in achieving longer fiber delivery distance due to the higher dispersion tolerance.

  19. ELLIPSOIDAL VARIABLE V1197 ORIONIS: ABSOLUTE LIGHT-VELOCITY ANALYSIS FOR KNOWN DISTANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, R. E.; Chochol, D.; KomzIk, R.; Van Hamme, W.; Pribulla, T.; Volkov, I.

    2009-09-01

    V1197 Orionis light curves from a long-term observing program for red giant binaries show ellipsoidal variation of small amplitude in the V and R{sub C} bands, although not clearly in U and B. Eclipses are not detected. All four bands show large irregular intrinsic variations, including fleeting quasi-periodicities identified by power spectra, that degrade analysis and may be caused by dynamical tides generated by orbital eccentricity. To deal with the absence of eclipses and consequent lack of astrophysical and geometrical information, direct use is made of the Hipparcos parallax distance while the V and R{sub C} light curves and (older) radial velocity curves are analyzed simultaneously in terms of absolute flux. The red giant's temperature is estimated from new spectra. This type of analysis, called Inverse Distance Estimation for brevity, is new and can also be applied to other ellipsoidal variables. Advantages gained by utilization of definite distance and temperature are discussed in regard to how radius, fractional lobe filling, and mass ratio information are expressed in the observations. The advantages were tested in solutions of noisy synthetic data. Also discussed and tested by simulations are ideas on the optimal number of light curves to be solved simultaneously under various conditions. The dim companion has not been observed or discussed in the literature but most solutions find its mass to be well below that of the red giant. Solutions show red giant masses that are too low for evolution to the red giant stage within the age of the Galaxy, although that result is probably an artifact of the intrinsic brightness fluctuations.

  20. LED intense headband light source for fingerprint analysis

    DOEpatents

    Villa-Aleman, Eliel

    2005-03-08

    A portable, lightweight and high-intensity light source for detecting and analyzing fingerprints during field investigation. On-site field analysis requires long hours of mobile analysis. In one embodiment, the present invention comprises a plurality of light emitting diodes; a power source; and a personal attachment means; wherein the light emitting diodes are powered by the power source, and wherein the power source and the light emitting diodes are attached to the personal attachment means to produce a personal light source for on-site analysis of latent fingerprints. The present invention is available for other applications as well.

  1. Dissimilarity of yellow-blue surfaces under neutral light sources differing in intensity: separate contributions of light intensity and chroma.

    PubMed

    Tokunaga, Rumi; Logvinenko, Alexander D; Maloney, Laurence T

    2008-01-01

    Observers viewed two side-by-side arrays each of which contained three yellow Munsell papers, three blue, and one neutral Munsell. Each array was illuminated uniformly and independently of the other. The neutral light source intensities were 1380, 125, or 20 lux. All six possible combinations of light intensities were set as illumination conditions. On each trial, observers were asked to rate the dissimilarity between each chip in one array and each chip in the other by using a 30-point scale. Each pair of surfaces in each illumination condition was judged five times. We analyzed this data using non-metric multi-dimensional scaling to determine how light intensity and surface chroma contributed to dissimilarity and how they interacted. Dissimilarities were captured by a three-dimensional configuration in which one dimension corresponded to differences in light intensity. PMID:18598408

  2. Neonatal intensive care unit lighting: update and recommendations.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Roberto G; Pattini, Andrea E

    2016-08-01

    Achieving adequate lighting in neonatal intensive care units is a major challenge: in addition to the usual considerations of visual performance, cost, energy and aesthetics, there appear different biological needs of patients, health care providers and family members. Communicational aspects of light, its role as a facilitator of the visual function of doctors and nurses, and its effects on the newborn infant physiology and development were addressed in order to review the effects of light (natural and artificial) within neonatal care with a focus on development. The role of light in regulating the newborn infant circadian cycle in particular and the therapeutic use of light in general were also reviewed. For each aspect, practical recommendations were specified for a proper well-lit environment in neonatal intensive care units. PMID:27399015

  3. Absolute Rovibrational Intensities of C-12O2-16 Absorption Bands in the 3090-3850/ CM Spectral Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devi, V. Malathy; Benner, D. Chris; Rinsland, Curtis P.; Smith, Mary Ann H.

    1998-01-01

    A multispectrum nonlinear least-squares fitting technique has been used to determine the absolute intensities for approximately 1500 spectral lines in 36 vibration - rotation bands Of C-12O2-16 between 3090 and 3850/ cm. A total of six absorption spectra of a high- purity (99.995% minimum) natural sample of carbon dioxide were used in the analysis. The spectral data (0.01/cm resolution) were recorded at room temperature and low pressure (1 to 10 Torr) using the McMath-Pierce Fourier transform spectrometer of the National Solar Observatory (NSO) on Kitt Peak. The absorption path lengths for these spectra varied between 24.86 and 385.76 m. The first experimental determination of the intensity of the theoretically predicted 2(nu)(sub 2, sup 2) + nu(sub 3) "forbidden" band has been made. The measured line intensities obtained for each band have been analyzed to determine the vibrational band intensity, S(sub nu), in /cm/( molecule/sq cm) at 296 K, square of the rotationless transition dipole moment |R|(exp 2) in Debye, as well as the nonrigid rotor coefficients. The results are compared to the values listed in the 1996 HITRAN database which are obtained using the direct numerical diagonalization (DND) technique as well as to other published values where available.

  4. Absolute intensities and optical constants of crystalline C 2N 2 in the infrared region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ospina, Mario; Zhao, Guizhi; Khanna, R. K.

    Infrared absorption spectra of several thin films of crystalline C 2N 2 were investigated in the 4000-200 cm -1 region at 70 K and under ˜0.6 cm -1 resolution. The integrated band intensities were obtained by least square fit of the integrated absorbance vs sample thickness data. The optical constants ( n and k, the real and imaginary parts of the complex refractive index) in the regions of absorption bands were evaluated by the Kramers—Kronig analysis of the absorbance data. These constants reproduce the laboratory spectra to within 12%.

  5. Beta decay of the fission product 125Sb and a new complete evaluation of absolute gamma ray transition intensities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajput, M. U.; Ali, N.; Hussain, S.; Mujahid, S. A.; MacMahon, D.

    2012-04-01

    The radionuclide 125Sb is a long-lived fission product, which decays to 125Te by negative beta emission with a half-life of 1008 day. The beta decay is followed by the emission of several gamma radiations, ranging from low to medium energy, that can suitably be used for high-resolution detector calibrations, decay heat calculations and in many other applications. In this work, the beta decay of 125Sb has been studied in detail. The complete published experimental data of relative gamma ray intensities in the beta decay of the radionuclide 125Sb has been compiled. The consistency analysis was performed and discrepancies found at several gamma ray energies. Evaluation of the discrepant data was carried out using Normalized Residual and RAJEVAL methods. The decay scheme balance was carried out using beta branching ratios, internal conversion coefficients, populating and depopulating gamma transitions to 125Te levels. The work has resulted in the consistent conversion factor equal to 29.59(13) %, and determined a new evaluated set of the absolute gamma ray emission probabilities. The work has also shown 22.99% of the delayed intensity fraction as outgoing from the 58 d isomeric 144 keV energy level and 77.01% of the prompt intensity fraction reaching to the ground state from the other excited states. The results are discussed and compared with previous evaluations. The present work includes additional experimental data sets which were not included in the previous evaluations. A new set of recommended relative and absolute gamma ray emission probabilities is presented.

  6. Video meteor light curve analysis of Orionids and Geminids and developing a method for obtaining the absolute light curves of shower meteors from the single station data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grašić, L.; Milanović, N.; Pavlović, D.

    2016-01-01

    We developed a method for obtaining the absolute light curves of the shower meteors from single station video data. We found that even though the height of a meteor atmospheric trajectory obtained by using this method may have a large error, the absolute light curve shape is preserved. We used our method to calculate the F parameters of the Orionid and Geminid light curves. The light curves were obtained from the single station video data by the instrument with a limiting sensitivity of 3.5m. We found that for our sample of the light curves the zenith distance of meteor radiant does not affect the F parameter for either of the two showers. The value of F parameter of the Orionids obtained in this paper matches the values obtained by other authors, whilst for the Geminids it is significantly different.

  7. New Precision CCD Light Curves, Analyses, and Absolute Parameters for the Overcontact Binaries V842 Her and DZ Psc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradstreet, D. H.; Hargis, J. R.; Sanders, S. J.

    2004-12-01

    New V & Rc light curves and the derived absolute parameters are presented for the overcontact systems DZ Psc and V842 Her. These systems were selected for photometric study because the existing radial velocity solutions (Rucinski et al. 1999, 2003) necessitate precision light curves to complete the description of the absolute geometric and orbital parameters. Data were obtained using the 41-cm telescope at the Eastern University Observatory equipped with an SBIG ST-10XME CCD. DZ Psc (NSV 223; P=0.36613 d) is a low mass ratio, high fillout W-type contact binary with two previously published light curves. We confirm the total nature of the secondary eclipse and find clear evidence of spot activity. The light curve is asymmetric between primary and secondary eclipse, with the level of secondary eclipse exhibiting a definite negative slope. We also find the light curve has changed between the 2003 and 2004 observing seasons; the depth of secondary eclipse has increased by nearly 0.04 mag in R. We will present a new light and radial velocity curve solution using Binary Maker 3 (Bradstreet & Steelman 2002) and Wilson-Devinney and compare this to the solution by Niarchos & Gazeas (2004). A period study, using newly derived and previously existing times of minimum light, will also be presented. V842 Her (P=0.41903 d) is a W-type contact binary with two previously published light curves. The light curve exhibits a total primary eclipse and slight asymmetries in the maxima due to the presence of spots. A light curve solution has been previously published but no solutions exist that incorporate the mass ratio information from the recent radial velocity data. We present a new light and radial velocity solution using our higher precision V & Rc light curves as well as a period study.

  8. Self-organization of intense light within erosive gas discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torchigin, V. P.; Torchigin, A. V.

    2007-01-01

    Process of appearance of fire balls at gas discharges is considered. It is shown that the intense white light radiated by atoms excited at gas discharge is subject to self-organization in such a way that miniature ball lightnings appear.

  9. Effect of light sources and light intensity on growth performance and behaviour of female turkeys.

    PubMed

    Denbow, D M; Leighton, A T; Hulet, R M

    1990-09-01

    1. The effect of different light sources (incandescent, sodium vapour, daylight fluorescent and warm fluorescent) and light intensities (10.8 and 86.1 lux) on growth performance and behaviour of female turkeys was investigated in two experiments conducted at different times of the year. 2. Although light source influenced body weight and efficiency of food utilisation, there was no consistent effect between experiments in favour of any particular source. 3. Light intensity had no effect on body weight, efficiency of food utilisation or behaviour. PMID:2245342

  10. High Pressure CPT Signals using Intensity Modulated Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Post, Amber; Jau, Yuan-Yu; Miron, Eli; Romalis, Michael; Kuzma, Nicholas; Happer, William

    2004-05-01

    Coherent Population Trapping (CPT) is a promising technique for use in miniature atomic clocks, since it uses modulated light to detect clock resonances rather than microwaves. This method typically uses frequency-modulated light to probe cells with low buffer gas pressure, in which the ground-state hyperfine structure is clearly resolved. However, conventional frequency-modulated CPT fails at the higher pressures needed to inhibit wall collisions in miniature cells. We present theory and supporting experimental results of high-pressure CPT signals using intensity-modulated light. Circularly polarized light tuned to the Rb D1 line traps most of the atoms in the F=2, m_F=2, where the microwave ``end resonance"^2 is excited. We will show experimental data and briefly discuss linewidth broadening mechanisms. 2 Y.-Y. Jau, A. B. Post, N. N. Kuzma, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. (in press, 2004).

  11. SiPM response to long and intense light pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinogradov, S.; Arodzero, A.; Lanza, R. C.; Welsch, C. P.

    2015-07-01

    Recently Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPMs) have become well recognized as the detector of choice for various applications which demand good photon number resolution and time resolution of short weak light pulses in the nanosecond time scale. In the case of longer and more intensive light pulses, SiPM performance gradually degrades due to dark noise, afterpulsing, and non-instant cell recovering. Nevertheless, SiPM benefits are expected to overbalance their drawbacks in applications such as X-ray cargo inspection using Scintillation-Cherenkov detectors and accelerator beam loss monitoring with Cherenkov fibres, where light pulses of a microsecond time scale have to be detected with good amplitude and timing resolution in a wide dynamic range of 105-106. This report is focused on transient characteristics of a SiPM response on a long rectangular light pulse with special attention to moderate and high light intensities above the linear dynamic range. An analytical model of the transient response and an initial consideration of experimental results in comparison with the model are presented.

  12. Near field light intensity distribution analysis in bimodal polymer waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herzog, T.; Gut, K.

    2015-12-01

    The paper presents analysis of light intensity distribution and sensitivity in differential interferometer based on bimodal polymer waveguide. Key part is analysis of optimal waveguide layer thickness in structure SiO2/SU-8/H2O for maximum bulk refractive index sensitivity. The paper presents new approach to detecting phase difference between modes through registrations only part of energy propagating in the waveguide. Additionally in this paper the analysis of changes in light distribution when energy in modes is not equal were performed.

  13. Light induced modulation instability of surfaces under intense illumination

    SciTech Connect

    Burlakov, V. M. Goriely, A.; Foulds, I.

    2013-12-16

    We show that a flat surface of a polymer in rubber state illuminated with intense electromagnetic radiation is unstable with respect to periodic modulation. Initial periodic perturbation is amplified due to periodic thermal expansion of the material heated by radiation. Periodic heating is due to focusing-defocusing effects caused by the initial surface modulation. The surface modulation has a period longer than the excitation wavelength and does not require coherent light source. Therefore, it is not related to the well-known laser induced periodic structures on polymer surfaces but may contribute to their formation and to other phenomena of light-matter interaction.

  14. Constant Light Output Ballasting For High Intensity Discharge Lamps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donkin, Adrian

    1988-02-01

    Since the commercial introduction some twenty years ago of HMI* (Hydragyrum-mercury, Medium, Iodide) type lamps, as a source intended primarily for floodlighting applications, their attraction as a cinematographic light source has been apparent due to their largely desirable characteristics. Use in this field has been restricted due to the absolute requirement for an alternating current supply - with a sine wave supply frame rates are limited to a sub-multiple of the supply frequency with the supply frequency phase locked to the camera frame rate. This has effectively barred metal halide HID lighting from use in high speed photography. The general characteristics of metal halide HID lamps are presented alongside a sample of other light sources. An electronic ballast which has been proven to 12000 Watts in the motion picture industry is then described which overcomes the limitations of the conventional magnetic ballast - the square wave output of the electronic ballast theoretically allows the use of any camera frame rate/shutter angle combination. Finally the suitability of luminaires for high speed photography is discussed.

  15. Effect of light sources and light intensity on growth performance and behavior of male turkeys.

    PubMed

    Leighton, A T; Hulet, R M; Denbow, D M

    1989-09-01

    This study consisted of two experiments: the first was conducted with Large White turkey males during the spring and summer (experiment 1) and the second during the autumn and winter (experiment 2). When 56 d of age, the birds were assigned to light-controlled pens and exposed to continuous illumination. Light sources used were incandescent, daylight fluorescent, warm fluorescent or high pressure sodium vapour lamps at light intensities of 10.8 or 86.1 lux. Results obtained showed that the light sources used had no significant effects on growth performance, efficiency of food utilization, feather scores or live bird quality of Large White turkeys. Social encounters were higher in birds reared under fluorescent and sodium vapour lights and mortality was higher in birds under fluorescent lights in experiment 1. Behaviour, feather scores, live bird grade and mortality were unaffected by light source treatments in experiment 2. Light intensity had no significant effect on growth, efficiency of food utilization, feather scores or bird market quality. Social encounters and mortality were higher in males exposed to 86.1 lux of light intensity. PMID:2819500

  16. Absolute geomagnetic intensity determinations on Formative potsherds (1400-700 BC) from the Oaxaca Valley, Southwestern Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pétronille, Marie; Goguitchaichvili, Avto; Morales, Juan; Carvallo, Claire; Hueda-Tanabe, Yuki

    2012-11-01

    New Thellier-Coe archeointensity determinations have been measured on 15 potsherds from the Oaxaca Valley belonging to three of the four Formative Periods (Pre-Classical) of Mesoamerica, spanning 1400-700 BC. Seven of these are considered to be reliable and indicate a geomagnetic field strength of about 30 μT. This value is some 75% of the present geomagnetic field strength but is in agreement with the absolute intensities predicted from global models for this time and location, and consistent with coeval published determinations. These data thus provide significant evidence for the geomagnetic field strength in an area and for a time that was previously poorly constrained, thus providing an important contribution towards establishing a local master curve for the last 3500 yr. When established, such a curve would be a useful dating tool and also enable establishing for field strength correlations with climatic events and civilization evolutions in a region that is particularly strong in archeological and geological features. Such potential is examined for aridity events, although such observations can only be considered tentative at this stage.

  17. Light intensity matching between different intravascular optical coherence tomography systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shengnan; Eggermont, Jeroen; Nakatani, Shimpei; Lelieveldt, Boudewijn P. F.; Dijkstra, Jouke

    2016-02-01

    Currently two commercial intravascular optical coherence tomography (IVOCT) systems are available: Illumien Optis from St. Jude Medical (SJM) and Lunawave from Terumo. Both systems store the light intensity data in a raw vendor specific polar format. However, whereas SJM uses 16-bits per pixel Terumo uses 8-bits meaning the intensity values are in different ranges. This complicates quantitative light intensity based analysis when comparing results based on data from both systems. Therefore, this work aims to find an intensity transformation function from Terumo's 8-bit OFDI data to SJM's 16-bit range. The data consists of 8 pullbacks, 4 acquired with each system in the same arteries of 2 different patents pre- and post-stenting implantation. A total of 133 matching sections without stent struts from the two sets of pullbacks were identified based on landmarks such as side-branches and calcified regions. Since the main region of interest in the image is the tissue region only the pixels within 2mm behind the lumen border are used. In order to match the SJM data range, the Terumo data was rescaled and cumulative distribution functions (CDF) were calculated based on the histogram distributions. Comparing these CDFs, the transformation function can be determined. Application of this transformation function not only improves the visual similarity of matching slices it can also be used for further quantitative analysis.

  18. Intensity estimation method of LED array for visible light communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Takanori; Yendo, Tomohiro; Arai, Shintaro; Yamazato, Takaya; Okada, Hiraku; Fujii, Toshiaki

    2013-03-01

    This paper focuses on a road-to-vehicle visible light communication (VLC) system using LED traffic light as the transmitter and camera as the receiver. The traffic light is composed of a hundred of LEDs on two dimensional plain. In this system, data is sent as two dimensional brightness patterns by controlling each LED of the traffic light individually, and they are received as images by the camera. Here, there are problems that neighboring LEDs on the received image are merged due to less number of pixels in case that the receiver is distant from the transmitter, and/or due to blurring by defocus of the camera. Because of that, bit error rate (BER) increases due to recognition error of intensity of LEDs To solve the problem, we propose a method that estimates the intensity of LEDs by solving the inverse problem of communication channel characteristic from the transmitter to the receiver. The proposed method is evaluated by BER characteristics which are obtained by computer simulation and experiments. In the result, the proposed method can estimate with better accuracy than the conventional methods, especially in case that the received image is blurred a lot, and the number of pixels is small.

  19. Hybrid proton acceleration scheme using relativistic intense laser light

    SciTech Connect

    Andreev, A. A.; Platonov, K. Yu.; Schnuerer, M.; Prasad, R.; Ter-Avetisyan, S.

    2013-03-15

    Ion acceleration phenomena at relativistic intense laser interaction with thin foil targets are studied to find an efficient laser-target interaction concept at the conditions, where neither the ponderomotive pressure of the laser light nor the hot electron pressure is negligible. Particle in cell simulations and the analytical model are allowing to predict optimum laser-target parameters and suggesting a significant increase of proton energy if a hybrid proton acceleration scheme is used. In the proposed scenario, the laser polarisation is changed during the acceleration process: First with circularly polarised laser light the target is accelerated as a whole by the ponderamotive pressure, and then with linearly polarised laser light the electrons are heated which additionally increases the accelerating field. The calculations are in good agreement with experimental findings.

  20. Current indications and new applications of intense pulsed light.

    PubMed

    González-Rodríguez, A J; Lorente-Gual, R

    2015-06-01

    Intense pulsed light (IPL) systems have evolved since they were introduced into medical practice 20 years ago. Pulsed light is noncoherent, noncollimated, polychromatic light energy emitted at different wavelengths that target specific chromophores. This selective targeting capability makes IPL a versatile therapy with many applications, from the treatment of pigmented or vascular lesions to hair removal and skin rejuvenation. Its large spot size ensures a high skin coverage rate. The nonablative nature of IPL makes it an increasingly attractive alternative for patients unwilling to accept the adverse effects associated with other procedures, which additionally require prolonged absence from work and social activities. In many cases, IPL is similar to laser therapy in effectiveness, and its versatility, convenience, and safety will lead to an expanded range of applications and possibilities in coming years. PMID:25638325

  1. Effects of laryngoscope handle light source on the light intensity from disposable laryngoscope blades.

    PubMed

    Milne, A D; Brousseau, P A; Brousseau, C A

    2014-12-01

    A bench-top study was performed to assess the effects of different laryngoscope handles on the light intensity delivered from disposable metal or plastic laryngoscope blades. The light intensity from both the handle light sources themselves and the combined handle and laryngoscope blade sets was measured using a custom-designed testing system and light meter. Five samples of each disposable blade type were tested and compared with a standard re-usable stainless steel blade using three different handle/light sources (Vital Signs LED, Heine 2.5 V Xenon and 3.5 V Xenon). The light intensity delivered by the disposable blades ranged from 790 to 3846 lux for the different handle types. Overall, the 3.5 V Heine handle delivered the highest light output (p < 0.007) in comparison with the other handles. For the disposable blades, the overall light output was significantly higher from the plastic than the metal blades (p < 0.001). PMID:25040627

  2. Proposal for observing intensity-intensity-correlation speckle patterns with thermal light via phase conjugation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Li-Gang; Al-Amri, M.; Zubairy, M. Suhail

    2015-10-01

    In traditional Hanbury Brown-Twiss (HBT) schemes, thermal intensity-intensity correlations (IICs) are phase insensitive. Here we propose a modified HBT scheme with phase conjugation to demonstrate phase-sensitive and nonfactorizable features of thermal IIC speckles. It shows that the novel phase-sensitive features originate from the correlation between the original and phase-conjugated thermal light. Our numerical simulation confirms the possibility of experimental realization, even for the cases of the imperfect phase conjugation. Unlike two-photon speckles, our scheme uses thermal light sources, not the entangled two-photon sources. Our result provides deeper insight into thermal correlations and may lead to significant applications in imaging and speckle technologies.

  3. Light intensity adaptation and phycobilisome composition of Microcystis aeruginosa

    SciTech Connect

    Raps, S.; Kycia, J.H.; Ledbetter, M.C.; Siegelman, H.W.

    1985-12-01

    Phycobilisomes isolated from Microcystis aeruginosa grown to midlog at high light (270 microeinsteins per square meter per second) or at low light intensities (40 microeinsteins per square meter per second) were found to be identical. Electron micrographs established that they have a triangular central core apparently consisting of three allophycocyanin trimers surrounded by six rods, each composed of two hexameric phycocyanin molecules. The apparent mass of a phycobilisome obtained by gel filtration is 2.96 x 10/sup 6/ daltons. The molar ratio of the phycobiliproteins per phycobilisome is 12 phycocyanin hexamers:9 allophycocyanin trimers. The electron microscopic observations combined with the phycobilisome apparent mass and the phycobiliprotein stoichiometry data indicate that M. aeruginosa phycobilisomes are composed of a triangular central core of three stacks of three allophycocyanin trimers and six rods each containing two phycocyanin hexamers. Adaptation of M. aeruginosa to high light intensity results in a decrease in the number of phycobilisomes per cell with no alteration in phycobilisome composition or structure.

  4. The instantaneous light-intensity function of a fluorescent lamp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gluskin, Emanuel; Topalis, Frangiskos V.; Kateri, Ifigenia; Bisketzis, Nikolas

    2006-05-01

    Using some simple physics and “system” considerations, the instantaneous light intensity function ψ(t) of a fluorescent lamp fed via a regular ballast from the 50 60 Hz line is argued to be ψ(t)=ψ+bp(t), where p(t) is the instantaneous power function of the lamp, and b is a constant, and experiment confirms this formula well. The main frequency of ψ(t), the very significant singularity of its waveform, and the relative intensity of the ripple, i.e., the depth of the modulation, are the focus. The results are important for research into the vision problem that some humans (autistic, but others, too) experience regarding fluorescent light. The inertia of the processes in the lamp which are responsible for the light emission, provides some nonzero emission at the instants when p(t) has zeros. The smaller the volume of the tube and the mass of the gas are, the more weakly the inertia of the processes is expressed, and the relatively smaller is ψ. However, it should be very difficult to theoretically obtain ψ(t), in particular ψ, from the very complicated physics of the low-pressure discharge in the tube. We conclude that ψ has to be connected with the (also easily measured) lamp's inductance. The work should attract more attention of the physicists to the properties of the common fluorescent lamps.

  5. Phytoplankton productivity in relation to light intensity: A simple equation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peterson, D.H.; Perry, M.J.; Bencala, K.E.; Talbot, M.C.

    1987-01-01

    A simple exponential equation is used to describe photosynthetic rate as a function of light intensity for a variety of unicellular algae and higher plants where photosynthesis is proportional to (1-e-??1). The parameter ?? (=Ik-1) is derived by a simultaneous curve-fitting method, where I is incident quantum-flux density. The exponential equation is tested against a wide range of data and is found to adequately describe P vs. I curves. The errors associated with photosynthetic parameters are calculated. A simplified statistical model (Poisson) of photon capture provides a biophysical basis for the equation and for its ability to fit a range of light intensities. The exponential equation provides a non-subjective simultaneous curve fitting estimate for photosynthetic efficiency (a) which is less ambiguous than subjective methods: subjective methods assume that a linear region of the P vs. I curve is readily identifiable. Photosynthetic parameters ?? and a are used widely in aquatic studies to define photosynthesis at low quantum flux. These parameters are particularly important in estuarine environments where high suspended-material concentrations and high diffuse-light extinction coefficients are commonly encountered. ?? 1987.

  6. Central serous chorioretinopathy: from glucocorticoids to light intensity

    PubMed Central

    Norouzpour, Amir; Abrishami, Majid

    2016-01-01

    Central serous chorioretinopathy (CSC) is characterized by a localized accumulation of subretinal fluid and an idiopathic focal leakage from choroidal vessels. The exact pathogenesis of CSC, however, still remains obscure. In this paper, we hypothesized that CSC may result from a response of choroidal vessels to an acute increase in the environmental light intensity leading to a focal leakage from the choroidal vessels. High levels of glucocorticoids, in our proposed model, may cause persistence rather than initiation of the focal leakage, probably by suppressing the synthesis of collagen and extracellular matrix components and inhibiting fibroblastic activity. PMID:26949657

  7. Laser versus intense pulsed light: Competing technologies in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Ross, E Victor

    2006-04-01

    Lasers have been competing with non-laser intense pulsed light (IPL) sources in the cosmetic arena over the past 10 years. Initially IPLs were somewhat cumbersome and accepted by a minority of "serious" practitioners. Recently, however, the popularity of full-face visible light skin rejuvenation, enhanced engineering of IPLs, and favorable cost versus many lasers, have lead to a proliferation of IPL devices. No longer a stepchild in the rejuvenation market, IPLs may overtake lasers as the devices of choice among most physicians. We review the pros and cons of lasers and IPLs within the context of design, cost, and other practical concerns for a typical office-based practice. PMID:16596659

  8. Historical document image segmentation using background light intensity normalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Zhixin; Govindaraju, Venu

    2004-12-01

    This paper presents a new document binarization algorithm for camera images of historical documents, which are especially found in The Library of Congress of the United States. The algorithm uses a background light intensity normalization algorithm to enhance an image before a local adaptive binarization algorithm is applied. The image normalization algorithm uses an adaptive linear or non-linear function to approximate the uneven background of the image due to the uneven surface of the document paper, aged color or uneven light source of the cameras for image lifting. Our algorithm adaptively captures the background of a document image with a "best fit" approximation. The document image is then normalized with respect to the approximation before a thresholding algorithm is applied. The technique works for both gray scale and color historical handwritten document images with significant improvement in readability for both human and OCR.

  9. Historical document image segmentation using background light intensity normalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Zhixin; Govindaraju, Venu

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a new document binarization algorithm for camera images of historical documents, which are especially found in The Library of Congress of the United States. The algorithm uses a background light intensity normalization algorithm to enhance an image before a local adaptive binarization algorithm is applied. The image normalization algorithm uses an adaptive linear or non-linear function to approximate the uneven background of the image due to the uneven surface of the document paper, aged color or uneven light source of the cameras for image lifting. Our algorithm adaptively captures the background of a document image with a "best fit" approximation. The document image is then normalized with respect to the approximation before a thresholding algorithm is applied. The technique works for both gray scale and color historical handwritten document images with significant improvement in readability for both human and OCR.

  10. The effect of sterilisation on the light intensity of the reusable Trachlight™.

    PubMed

    Milne, A D; Cave, A L; Brousseau, P A; Hung, O R

    2012-01-01

    We examined the light intensity delivered by the Trachlight™ reusable lightwand and the effect of repeated sterilisation on this light intensity. Using a light meter and test chamber, the light intensity of 12 new Trachlights and 31 Trachlights available in operating theatres was measured. In addition, five new devices underwent 30 repeated sterilisations with light intensity measurement after each cleaning. There was no difference between the light intensity of new Trachlights (median (IQR [range]) 2282 (2202-2780 [1970-4400])) lux and the devices currently in service (2295 (2018-2796 [1649-3280]) lux (p = 0.27)). The median (range) number of uses for devices currently in service was only 3 (0-9). There was, however, significant light intensity loss after 10, 20 and 30 cleanings (p = 0.001). After 10 cleanings, the mean light intensity was 75% of initial output, and after 30 cycles, light intensity was 59% of initial output. PMID:21991929

  11. LIGHT INTENSITY AFFECTS DISTRIBUTION OF ATTACKING PSEUDACTEON CURVATUS (DIPTERA: PHORIDAE) IN A LABORATORY REARING SYSTEM

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Distribution of attacking phorid flies (Pseudacteon curvatus Borgmeier) in a laboratory rearing system was tested for dependence on light intensity under 2 different light regimes. Light intensity (range, approx. 220-340 Lux) influenced fly distribution in light regime 1; in the second light regime...

  12. Light-intensity and high-intensity interval training improve cardiometabolic health in rats.

    PubMed

    Batacan, Romeo B; Duncan, Mitch J; Dalbo, Vincent J; Connolly, Kylie J; Fenning, Andrew S

    2016-09-01

    Physical activity has the potential to reduce cardiometabolic risk factors but evaluation of different intensities of physical activity and the mechanisms behind their health effects still need to be fully established. This study examined the effects of sedentary behaviour, light-intensity training, and high-intensity interval training on biometric indices, glucose and lipid metabolism, inflammatory and oxidative stress markers, and vascular and cardiac function in adult rats. Rats (12 weeks old) were randomly assigned to 1 of 4 groups: control (CTL; no exercise), sedentary (SED; no exercise and housed in small cages to reduce activity), light-intensity trained (LIT; four 30-min exercise bouts/day at 8 m/min separated by 2-h rest period, 5 days/week), and high-intensity interval trained (HIIT, four 2.5-min work bouts/day at 50 m/min separated by 3-min rest periods, 5 days/week). After 12 weeks of intervention, SED had greater visceral fat accumulation (p < 0.01) and slower cardiac conduction (p = 0.04) compared with the CTL group. LIT and HIIT demonstrated beneficial changes in body weight, visceral and epididymal fat weight, glucose regulation, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, total cholesterol, and mesenteric vessel contractile response compared with the CTL group (p < 0.05). LIT had significant improvements in insulin sensitivity and cardiac conduction compared with the CTL and SED groups whilst HIIT had significant improvements in systolic blood pressure and endothelium-independent vasodilation to aorta and mesenteric artery compared with the CTL group (p < 0.05). LIT and HIIT induce health benefits by improving traditional cardiometabolic risk factors. LIT improves cardiac health while HIIT promotes improvements in vascular health. PMID:27523646

  13. Numerical model for light propagation and light intensity distribution inside coated fused silica capillaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piasecki, Tomasz; Macka, Mirek; Paull, Brett; Brabazon, Dermot

    2011-07-01

    Numerical simulations of light propagation through capillaries have been reported to a limited extent in the literature for uses such as flow-cell design. These have been restricted to prediction of light path for very specific cases to date. In this paper, a new numerical model of light propagation through multi-walled cylindrical systems, to represent coated and uncoated capillaries is presented. This model allows for light ray paths and light intensity distribution within the capillary to be predicted. Macro-scale (using PMMA and PC cylinders) and micro-scale (using PTFE coated fused silica capillaries) experiments were conducted to validate the model's accuracy. These experimental validations have shown encouragingly good agreement between theoretical predictions and measured results, which could allow for optimisation of associated regions for monolith synthesis and use in fluidic chromatography, optical detection systems and flow cells for capillary electrophoresis and flow injection analysis.

  14. Absolute calibration method for fast-streaked, fiber optic light collection, spectroscopy systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, Mark D.; Frogget, Brent; Oliver, Bryan Velten; Maron, Yitzhak; Droemer, Darryl W.; Crain, Marlon D.

    2010-04-01

    This report outlines a convenient method to calibrate fast (<1ns resolution) streaked, fiber optic light collection, spectroscopy systems. Such a system is used to collect spectral data on plasmas generated in the A-K gap of electron beam diodes fielded on the RITS-6 accelerator (8-12MV, 140-200kA). On RITS, light is collected through a small diameter (200 micron) optical fiber and recorded on a fast streak camera at the output of 1 meter Czerny-Turner monochromator (F/7 optics). To calibrate such a system, it is necessary to efficiently couple light from a spectral lamp into a 200 micron diameter fiber, split it into its spectral components, with 10 Angstroms or less resolution, and record it on a streak camera with 1ns or less temporal resolution.

  15. ELVES light intensity studies at the Pierre Auger Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mussa, Roberto; Maiorana, Carolina

    2016-04-01

    The Pierre Auger Observatory, located in Malargüe (Argentina), is the largest facility (3000 km2) for the study of Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays (E>1018 eV). The four sites of the Fluorescence Detector (FD) are continuously observing the night sky with moon fraction below 50% (13% duty cycle) with 100 ns time resolution and a space resolution below one degree. The fluorescence light (λ = 300 nm to 420 nm) produced by shower in the atmosphere is proportional to the energy of the primary cosmic ray. The atmospheric optical properties are continuously monitored by the Observatory with a set of dedicated instruments (lidars, cloud cameras, weather stations). The energy of each cosmic ray can therefore be measured with a systematic energy resolution about 14%. After the serendipitous discovery of an ELVES candidate event in 2005, a special trigger has been implemented to detect these phenomena with high efficiency, fully operational since March 2013. Since January 2014 the ELVES candidates are read out with a modified DAQ scheme, to observe the light emission from above the vertical of the causative lightning. This paper will report about the analysis of the correlation between light emission and lightning intensity as recorded by lightning detection networks, on data taken in the last three years of operation.

  16. Influence of the Light Intensity on the layers electrophotographic intensity based on As and Sb chalkogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andriesh, A. M.; Buzdugan, A. I.; Shutov, S. D.

    1988-10-01

    Based on dependence of the electrographic sensitivity from the intensity of illumination by an integral and monochromatic light one show that the law of intercompatibility in thin layers based on glasses As_2S_3, alloys of As_2S_3 and Sb_2S_3 and heterostructures Sb_2S_3 and As_2S_3 is not more valid. Underlinear dependences of the lux-ampere characteristics are interpreted based on the Rose model which supposes a great density of localized states of the quasicontinuous and an exponential distribution by energy in a forbidden zone of a semiconductor. Tables 1, Bibliography 5, Illustr. 2

  17. Light curves and absolute magnitudes of four recent fast LMC novae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hearnshaw, J. B.; Livingston, C. M.; Gilmore, A. C.; Kilmartin, P. M.

    2004-05-01

    The light curves of four recent fast LMC novae (Nova LMC 1988a, 1992, 1995, 2000) have been analysed to obtain the parameter t2, the time for a two magnitude decline below maximum light. Using the calibration of Della Valle & Livio (1995), values of MV at maximum are obtained. The weighted mean distance modulus to the LMC based on these novae is 18.89 ± 0.16. This differs significantly drom the distance modulus adpoted by Della Valle & Livio of 18.50, but only differs at the 1σ-level from Feast's (1999) value of 18.70 ± 0.10. The evidence based on these novae suggests that either: (i) DMLMC = 18.50 is too close for the LMC; or (ii) some novae in the LMC, including these four, are significantly underluminous at maximum light compared with those in M31, by about 0.4 mag. This could be a metallicity effect, given that more metal-rich M31 novae were predominantly used by Della Valle & Livio to obtain their calibration.

  18. Low-cost, robust, filtered spectrometer for absolute intensity measurements in the soft x-ray region

    SciTech Connect

    Lanier, N.E.; Gerhardt, S.P.; Den Hartog, D.J.

    2000-06-22

    We have developed a low-cost, robust, multifoil-filtered spectrometer to provide absolute measurements of low-z impurity concentrations in the Madison Symmetric Torus reversed-field pinch. The spectrometer utilizes an array of six thin-film coated soft x-ray diodes. Each multilayered coating is specifically tailored to isolate the K-shell emission lines of H- and He-like oxygen, carbon and aluminum. With calibrations obtained via a synchrotron source absolute measurements of photon flux have been made. We address the technical aspects of this diagnostic and present impurity data from both standard and high-confinement plasma discharges.

  19. Intense pulsed light sintering of copper nanoink for printed electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hak-Sung; Dhage, Sanjay R.; Shim, Dong-Eun; Hahn, H. Thomas

    2009-12-01

    An intense pulsed light (IPL) from a xenon flash lamp was used to sinter copper nanoink printed on low-temperature polymer substrates at room temperature in ambient condition. The IPL can sinter the copper nanoink without damaging the polymer substrates in extremely short time (2 ms). The microstructure of the sintered copper film was investigated using X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray micro tomography, and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The sintered copper film has a grainy structure with neck-like junctions. The resulting resistivity was 5 μΩ cm of electrical resistivity which is only 3 times as high as that of bulk copper. The IPL sintering technique allows copper nanoparticles to be used in inkjet printing on low-temperature substrates such as polymers in ambient conditions.

  20. Granulomatous tattoo reaction induced by intense pulse light treatment.

    PubMed

    Tourlaki, Athanasia; Boneschi, Vinicio; Tosi, Diego; Pigatto, Paolo; Brambilla, Lucia

    2010-10-01

    Cosmetic tattooing involves implantation of pigments into the dermis in order to create a permanent makeup. Here, we report a case of sarcoidal granulomatous reaction to old cosmetic tattoos after an intense pulsed light (IPL) treatment for facial skin rejuvenation. We consider this case as a peculiar example of photo-induced reaction to tattoo. In addition, we hypothesize that an underlying immune dysfunction was present, and acted as a predisposing factor for this unusual response, as the patient had suffered from an episode of acute pulmonary sarcoidosis 15 years before. Overall, our observation suggests that IPL treatment should be used cautiously in patients with tattoos, especially when a history of autoimmune disease is present. PMID:21175859

  1. Easy Absolute Values? Absolutely

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Sharon E.; Mittag, Kathleen Cage

    2015-01-01

    The authors teach a problem-solving course for preservice middle-grades education majors that includes concepts dealing with absolute-value computations, equations, and inequalities. Many of these students like mathematics and plan to teach it, so they are adept at symbolic manipulations. Getting them to think differently about a concept that they…

  2. Einstein A coefficients and absolute line intensities for the E2Π-X2Σ+ transition of CaH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Gang; Harrison, Jeremy J.; Ram, Ram S.; Western, Colin M.; Bernath, Peter F.

    2012-01-01

    Einstein A coefficients and absolute line intensities have been calculated for the E2Π-X2Σ+ transition of CaH. Using wavefunctions derived from the Rydberg-Klein-Rees (RKR) method and electronic transition dipole moment functions obtained from high-level ab initio calculations, rotationless transition dipole moment matrix elements have been calculated for all 10 bands involving v‧=0,1 of the E2Π state and v″=0,1,2,3,4 of the X2Σ state. The rotational line strength factors (Hönl-London factors) are derived for the intermediate coupling case between Hund's case (a) and (b) for the E2Π-X2Σ+ transition. The computed transition dipole moments and the spectroscopic constants from a recent study [Ram et al., Journal of Molecular Spectroscopy 2011;266:86-91] have been combined to generate line lists containing Einstein A coefficients and absolute line intensities for 10 bands of the E2Π-X2Σ+ transition of CaH for J-values up to 50.5. The absolute line intensities have been used to determine a rotational temperature of 778±3 °C for the CaH sample in the recent study.

  3. Light field creating and imaging with different order intensity derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yu; Jiang, Huan

    2014-10-01

    Microscopic image restoration and reconstruction is a challenging topic in the image processing and computer vision, which can be widely applied to life science, biology and medicine etc. A microscopic light field creating and three dimensional (3D) reconstruction method is proposed for transparent or partially transparent microscopic samples, which is based on the Taylor expansion theorem and polynomial fitting. Firstly the image stack of the specimen is divided into several groups in an overlapping or non-overlapping way along the optical axis, and the first image of every group is regarded as reference image. Then different order intensity derivatives are calculated using all the images of every group and polynomial fitting method based on the assumption that the structure of the specimen contained by the image stack in a small range along the optical axis are possessed of smooth and linear property. Subsequently, new images located any position from which to reference image the distance is Δz along the optical axis can be generated by means of Taylor expansion theorem and the calculated different order intensity derivatives. Finally, the microscopic specimen can be reconstructed in 3D form using deconvolution technology and all the images including both the observed images and the generated images. The experimental results show the effectiveness and feasibility of our method.

  4. Metabolic acclimation to excess light intensity in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Davis, Maria C; Fiehn, Oliver; Durnford, Dion G

    2013-07-01

    There are several well-described acclimation responses to excess light in green algae but the effect on metabolism has not been thoroughly investigated. This study examines the metabolic changes during photoacclimation to high-light (HL) stress in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii using nuclear magnetic resonance and mass spectrometry. Using principal component analysis, a clear metabolic response to HL intensity was observed on global metabolite pools, with major changes in the levels of amino acids and related nitrogen metabolites. Amino acid pools increased during short-term photoacclimation, but were especially prominent in HL-acclimated cultures. Unexpectedly, we observed an increase in mitochondrial metabolism through downstream photorespiratory pathways. The expression of two genes encoding key enzymes in the photorespiratory pathway, glycolate dehydrogenase and malate synthase, were highly responsive to the HL stress. We propose that this pathway contributes to metabolite pools involved in nitrogen assimilation and may play a direct role in photoacclimation. Our results suggest that primary and secondary metabolism is highly pliable and plays a critical role in coping with the energetic imbalance during HL exposure and a necessary adjustment to support an increased growth rate that is an effective energy sink for the excess reducing power generated during HL stress. PMID:23346954

  5. Rhodopsin gene expression regulated by the light dark cycle, light spectrum and light intensity in the dinoflagellate Prorocentrum

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xinguo; Li, Ling; Guo, Chentao; Lin, Xin; Li, Meizhen; Lin, Senjie

    2015-01-01

    The proton pump rhodopsin is widely found in marine bacteria and archaea, where it functions to capture light energy and convert it to ATP. While found in several lineages of dinoflagellates, this gene has not been studied in Prorocentrales species and whether it functionally tunes to light spectra and intensities as in bacteria remains unclear. Here we identified and characterized this gene in the bloom-forming Prorocentrum donghaiense. It is a 7-helix transmembrane polypeptide containing conserved domains and critical amino acid residues of PPR. This gene is phylogenetically affiliated to the xanthorhodopsin clade, but seems to have a distinct evolutionary origin. Quantitative reverse transcription PCR showed that in regular cultures, the transcript abundance of the gene exhibited a clear diel pattern, high abundance in the light period and low in the dark. The same diel pattern was observed for protein abundance with a Western blot using specific antiserum. The rhythm was dampened when the cultures were shifted to continuous dark or light condition, suggesting that this gene is not under circadian clock control. Rhodopsin transcript and protein abundances varied with light intensity, both being highest at a moderate illumination level. Furthermore, the expression of this gene responded to different light spectra, with slightly higher transcript abundance under green than blue light, and lowest abundance under red light. Transformed Escherichia coli over-expressing this rhodopsin gene also exhibited an absorption maximum in the blue–green region with slightly higher absorption in the green. These rhodopsin-promoting light conditions are similar to the relatively turbid marine habitat where the species forms blooms, suggesting that this gene may function to compensate for the light-limited photosynthesis in the dim environment. PMID:26082770

  6. Determinations of its Absolute Dimensions and Distance by the Analyses of Light and Radial-Velocity Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jae-Woo; Lee, Chung-Uk; Kim, Chun-Hwey; Kang, Young-Beom; Koo, Jae-Rim

    2004-12-01

    We completed the light curves of the contact binary CK Boo for 13 nights from June to July in 2004 using the 1-m reflector and BVR filters at Mt. Lemmon Optical Astronomy Observatory, and determined four new times of minimum light (three timings for primary eclipse, one for secondary). With contact mode of the 1998-version Wilson-Devinney binary model, we analyzed our BVR light curves and Rucinski & Lu (1999)'s radial-velocity ones. As a result, we found CK boo to be A-type overcontact binary (f=84%) with the low mass ratio (q=0.11) and orbital inclination (i=65°). Absolute dimensions of the system are determined from our new solution; M1=1.42M⊙, M2=0.15M⊙, R1=1.47R⊙, R2=0.59M⊙, and the distance to it is derived as about 129pc. Our distance is well consistent with that (157±33pc) from the Hipparcos trigonometric parallax within the limit of the error yielded by the latter.

  7. 14 CFR 23.1389 - Position light distribution and intensities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... intensities in the horizontal plane, minimum intensities in any vertical plane, and maximum intensities in...) Intensities in the horizontal plane. Each intensity in the horizontal plane (the plane containing the longitudinal axis of the airplane and perpendicular to the plane of symmetry of the airplane) must equal...

  8. 14 CFR 23.1389 - Position light distribution and intensities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... intensities in the horizontal plane, minimum intensities in any vertical plane, and maximum intensities in...) Intensities in the horizontal plane. Each intensity in the horizontal plane (the plane containing the longitudinal axis of the airplane and perpendicular to the plane of symmetry of the airplane) must equal...

  9. Absolute ν 2 Line Intensities of HOCl by Simultaneous Measurements in the Infrared with a Tunable Diode Laser and Far-Infrared Region Using a Fourier Transform Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vander Auwera, J.; Kleffmann, J.; Flaud, J.-M.; Pawelke, G.; Bürger, H.; Hurtmans, D.; Pétrisse, R.

    2000-11-01

    We have measured absolute line intensities in the ν2 fundamental band at 1238 cm-1 of both isotopomers of hypochlorous acid, HOCl. To obtain the partial pressure of the species in the sample mixture, unavailable through direct measurement since HOCl exists only in equilibrium with H2O and Cl2O and may decay by secondary reactions, we relied on known absolute line intensities in the pure rotational far-infrared (FIR) spectrum determined from Stark effect measurements. We have thus recorded simultaneously the FIR pure rotation spectrum of HOCl using a Bruker IFS120HR interferometer and the spectrum of a few vibration-rotation lines in the infrared (IR) ν2 band using a tunable diode laser spectrometer. The absolute intensities of these IR lines thus determined allowed us to 'calibrate' the intensities of vibration-rotation lines in the whole ν2 band, measured previously using Fourier transform spectroscopy. The treatment of the data took into account the blackbody emission contribution in the FIR and the evolution of the HOCl amount during the recording of the spectra. The latter was found to be almost constant over hours after conditioning of the cell. The square of the ν2 band vibrational transition dipole moment was determined to be 0.013947(23) D2 and 0.013870(51) D2 for HO35Cl and HO37Cl, respectively, that is, 29 to 73% lower than previous measurements. A linear Herman-Wallis factor was also determined for both isotopomers. Finally, the line intensities were least-squares fitted using a model that takes into account a weak resonance between the (010) and (002) levels.

  10. Lighting intensity of the soilsurface and restocking of oak groves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slepykh, Victor; Zubko, Anna; Povolotckaia, Nina

    2016-04-01

    Oak groves of Caucasian Mineral Vody region (CMVR) possess a high ecological and balneological potential which defines the significance of their preservation and reproduction [1]. The role assessment of lighting intensity on renewal of oak groves was carried out on four trial squares (ts) in natural sixty-seven years old forest stand with prevalence of English oak (Quercus robur L.) with unimodal sity (type of the habitat - C1). The illumination was measured at the grass level by the universal measuring instrument of meteoparameters ATT-9508 with an illumination sensor of ATA-1591. The assessment of reforestation was carried out according to the established standards [2]. In the winter of 2005 there was conducted a selecting cutting cabin of the forest stand according to a local method on ts2 with intensity 30%, on ts4 - 50% after which the illumination on the soil surface in relation to illumination of an open place in the summer of 2005 increased from 4.9% to 33.9% on ts2, and from 5.9% to 24.4% on ts4. But by 2014 the illumination decreased till 3.0% on ts2, till 5.4% on ts4 because of an intensive soil grassing down. The control was carried out by ts1 and ts3 on which from 2005 to 2014 the illumination of the soil surface decreased from 4 to 2% as a result of the development of all storeys. As a result due to an intensive soil grassing-down, the total quantity of young oak trees decreased from 2005 to 2014 from 25.6 thousand pcs/ha to 5.9 thousand pcs/ha on ts2; on from 17.3 thousand pcs/ha to 4.0 thousand pcs/ha on ts4. At the same time the total quantity of young oak trees on control squares increased respectively for 1.4% (from 18.8 thousand pcs/ha to 19.1 thousand pcs/ha) on ts1, for 38.7% (from 25.2 thousand pcs/ha to 41.1 thousand pcs/ha). The experiment showed that small young oak trees perishes in the first years of their life from a lack of light and competition from grasland vegetation without providing successful reforestation. Conclusion. So it is

  11. 14 CFR 27.1389 - Position light distribution and intensities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... minimum intensities in the horizontal plane, minimum intensities in any vertical plane, and maximum...: (1) Intensities in the horizontal plane. Each intensity in the horizontal plane (the plane containing the longitudinal axis of the rotorcraft and perpendicular to the plane of symmetry of the...

  12. 14 CFR 25.1389 - Position light distribution and intensities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... minimum intensities in the horizontal plane, minimum intensities in any vertical plane, and maximum...: (1) Intensities in the horizontal plane. Each intensity in the horizontal plane (the plane containing the longitudinal axis of the airplane and perpendicular to the plane of symmetry of the airplane)...

  13. 14 CFR 25.1389 - Position light distribution and intensities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... intensities in overlapping beams, within dihedral angles L, R, and A, and must meet the following requirements... in overlaps may be used with main beam intensities substantially greater than the minima specified in §§ 25.1391 and 25.1393 if the overlap intensities in relation to the main beam intensities do...

  14. 14 CFR 27.1389 - Position light distribution and intensities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... intensities in overlapping beams, within dihedral angles L, R, and A, and must meet the following requirements... overlaps may be used with main beam intensities substantially greater than the minima specified in §§ 27.1391 and 27.1393, if the overlap intensities in relation to the main beam intensities do not...

  15. 14 CFR 29.1389 - Position light distribution and intensities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... maximum intensities in overlapping beams, within dihedral angles, L, R, and A, and must meet the following... overlaps may be used with the use of main beam intensities substantially greater than the minima specified in §§ 29.1391 and 29.1393 if the overlap intensities in relation to the main beam intensities do...

  16. 14 CFR 29.1389 - Position light distribution and intensities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... maximum intensities in overlapping beams, within dihedral angles, L, R, and A, and must meet the following... overlaps may be used with the use of main beam intensities substantially greater than the minima specified in §§ 29.1391 and 29.1393 if the overlap intensities in relation to the main beam intensities do...

  17. 14 CFR 29.1389 - Position light distribution and intensities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... maximum intensities in overlapping beams, within dihedral angles, L, R, and A, and must meet the following... overlaps may be used with the use of main beam intensities substantially greater than the minima specified in §§ 29.1391 and 29.1393 if the overlap intensities in relation to the main beam intensities do...

  18. 14 CFR 29.1389 - Position light distribution and intensities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... maximum intensities in overlapping beams, within dihedral angles, L, R, and A, and must meet the following... overlaps may be used with the use of main beam intensities substantially greater than the minima specified in §§ 29.1391 and 29.1393 if the overlap intensities in relation to the main beam intensities do...

  19. 14 CFR 27.1389 - Position light distribution and intensities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... intensities in overlapping beams, within dihedral angles L, R, and A, and must meet the following requirements... overlaps may be used with main beam intensities substantially greater than the minima specified in §§ 27.1391 and 27.1393, if the overlap intensities in relation to the main beam intensities do not...

  20. 14 CFR 25.1389 - Position light distribution and intensities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... intensities in overlapping beams, within dihedral angles L, R, and A, and must meet the following requirements... in overlaps may be used with main beam intensities substantially greater than the minima specified in §§ 25.1391 and 25.1393 if the overlap intensities in relation to the main beam intensities do...

  1. Effect of light intensity on broiler production, processing characteristics, and welfare.

    PubMed

    Deep, A; Schwean-Lardner, K; Crowe, T G; Fancher, B I; Classen, H L

    2010-11-01

    Manipulation of light intensity is an important management tool affecting broiler production and well being. Despite considerable research on light intensity, there is still a debate on the optimum level to be used for intensively housed broilers. Two trials were conducted with the objective of investigating the effect of light intensity, within the practical levels at confinement barns (1, 10, 20, and 40 lx), on production, processing characteristics, and welfare of broilers raised to 35 d of age. Each light intensity treatment was replicated in 2 environmentally controlled rooms in each trial with 950 Ross × Ross 308 chicks per room. Data were analyzed as a randomized complete block design with trial serving as a block. All chicks were exposed to 40 lx of light intensity and 23 h of light for the first 7 d followed by treatment light intensity and 17 h of day length thereafter. Body weight and feed consumption were determined at 7, 14, and 35 d of age. At the end of each trial, 60 birds per treatment were processed to determine the detailed meat yield. Skeletal and footpad and ocular health were monitored at 31 and 32 d of age, respectively. Body weight, feed consumption, feed:gain ratio, and mortality were unaffected by light intensity. Carcass, thigh, and drum yield as a percentage of live weight decreased linearly with increasing light intensity. The 1 lx treatment resulted in heavier wings as a percentage of live weight. Light intensity had no effect on skeletal health, but ulcerative footpad lesions decreased linearly with increasing light intensity. Birds exposed to the 1 lx treatment had heavier and larger eyes. In conclusion, light intensity did not affect broiler production and mortality but did affect carcass characteristics. The 1 lx light intensity treatment had a negative effect on broiler welfare as demonstrated by increased ulcerative footpad lesions and eye size. PMID:20952694

  2. Fast Acting Optical Forces From Far Detuned, High Intensity Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corder, Christopher; Arnold, Brian; Hua, Xiang; Metcalf, Harold

    2015-05-01

    We are exploring fast acting, strong optical forces from standing wave light fields with high intensity and large detuning δ >> γ , where γ is the transition linewidth. We observe these fast acting forces on a time scale of a few times the excited state lifetime τ ≡ 1 / γ thus an atom may experience at most one or two spontaneous emission events. The dipole force is typically considered when the Rabi frequency Ω << δ , but we use Ω ~ δ so the usual approximations break down because a significant excited state population can occur, even for our short interaction times that limit spontaneous emission. Our experiment measures the transverse velocity distribution of a beam of 23S He after a chosen interaction time with a perpendicular standing wave detuned from the 23S -->33P transition near 389 nm. The distribution shows velocity resonance effects that persist over a large range of Ω. We also simulate the experiment numerically using the Optical Bloch Equations and the results are consistent with our measurements. Supported by ONR and Dept. of Education GAANN

  3. Optoelectrofluidic field separation based on light-intensity gradients

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sanghyun; Park, Hyun Jin; Yoon, Jin Sung; Kang, Kwan Hyoung

    2010-01-01

    Optoelectrofluidic field separation (OEFS) of particles under light -intensity gradient (LIG) is reported, where the LIG illumination on the photoconductive layer converts the short-ranged dielectrophoresis (DEP) force to the long-ranged one. The long-ranged DEP force can compete with the hydrodynamic force by alternating current electro-osmosis (ACEO) over the entire illumination area for realizing effective field separation of particles. In the OEFS system, the codirectional illumination and observation induce the levitation effect, compensating the attenuation of the DEP force under LIG illumination by slightly floating particles from the surface. Results of the field separation and concentration of diverse particle pairs (0.82–16 μm) are well demonstrated, and conditions determining the critical radius and effective particle manipulation are discussed. The OEFS with codirectional LIG strategy could be a promising particle manipulation method in many applications where a rapid manipulation of biological cells and particles over the entire working area are of interest. PMID:20697461

  4. 14 CFR 23.1391 - Minimum intensities in the horizontal plane of position lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... lights. Each position light intensity must equal or exceed the applicable values in the following table: Dihedral angle (light included) Angle from right or left of longitudinal axis, measured from dead ahead Intensity (candles) L and R (red and green) 0° to 10°10° to 20° 20° to 110° 4030 5 A (rear white) 110°...

  5. 14 CFR 23.1391 - Minimum intensities in the horizontal plane of position lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... lights. Each position light intensity must equal or exceed the applicable values in the following table: Dihedral angle (light included) Angle from right or left of longitudinal axis, measured from dead ahead Intensity (candles) L and R (red and green) 0° to 10°10° to 20° 20° to 110° 4030 5 A (rear white) 110°...

  6. 14 CFR 27.1395 - Maximum intensities in overlapping beams of forward and rear position lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Maximum intensities in overlapping beams of forward and rear position lights. 27.1395 Section 27.1395 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION... Equipment Lights § 27.1395 Maximum intensities in overlapping beams of forward and rear position lights....

  7. 14 CFR 27.1395 - Maximum intensities in overlapping beams of forward and rear position lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Maximum intensities in overlapping beams of forward and rear position lights. 27.1395 Section 27.1395 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION... Equipment Lights § 27.1395 Maximum intensities in overlapping beams of forward and rear position lights....

  8. 14 CFR 25.1395 - Maximum intensities in overlapping beams of forward and rear position lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Maximum intensities in overlapping beams of forward and rear position lights. 25.1395 Section 25.1395 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION... Equipment Lights § 25.1395 Maximum intensities in overlapping beams of forward and rear position lights....

  9. 14 CFR 25.1395 - Maximum intensities in overlapping beams of forward and rear position lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Maximum intensities in overlapping beams of forward and rear position lights. 25.1395 Section 25.1395 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION... Equipment Lights § 25.1395 Maximum intensities in overlapping beams of forward and rear position lights....

  10. 14 CFR 25.1395 - Maximum intensities in overlapping beams of forward and rear position lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Maximum intensities in overlapping beams of forward and rear position lights. 25.1395 Section 25.1395 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION... Equipment Lights § 25.1395 Maximum intensities in overlapping beams of forward and rear position lights....

  11. 14 CFR 29.1395 - Maximum intensities in overlapping beams of forward and rear position lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Maximum intensities in overlapping beams of forward and rear position lights. 29.1395 Section 29.1395 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION... Equipment Lights § 29.1395 Maximum intensities in overlapping beams of forward and rear position lights....

  12. 14 CFR 23.1395 - Maximum intensities in overlapping beams of position lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Maximum intensities in overlapping beams of position lights. 23.1395 Section 23.1395 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT... AIRPLANES Equipment Lights § 23.1395 Maximum intensities in overlapping beams of position lights....

  13. 14 CFR 23.1395 - Maximum intensities in overlapping beams of position lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Maximum intensities in overlapping beams of position lights. 23.1395 Section 23.1395 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT... AIRPLANES Equipment Lights § 23.1395 Maximum intensities in overlapping beams of position lights....

  14. 14 CFR 27.1395 - Maximum intensities in overlapping beams of forward and rear position lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Maximum intensities in overlapping beams of forward and rear position lights. 27.1395 Section 27.1395 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION... Equipment Lights § 27.1395 Maximum intensities in overlapping beams of forward and rear position lights....

  15. 14 CFR 27.1395 - Maximum intensities in overlapping beams of forward and rear position lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Maximum intensities in overlapping beams of forward and rear position lights. 27.1395 Section 27.1395 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION... Equipment Lights § 27.1395 Maximum intensities in overlapping beams of forward and rear position lights....

  16. 14 CFR 23.1395 - Maximum intensities in overlapping beams of position lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Maximum intensities in overlapping beams of position lights. 23.1395 Section 23.1395 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT... AIRPLANES Equipment Lights § 23.1395 Maximum intensities in overlapping beams of position lights....

  17. 14 CFR 23.1395 - Maximum intensities in overlapping beams of position lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Maximum intensities in overlapping beams of position lights. 23.1395 Section 23.1395 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT... AIRPLANES Equipment Lights § 23.1395 Maximum intensities in overlapping beams of position lights....

  18. 14 CFR 29.1395 - Maximum intensities in overlapping beams of forward and rear position lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Maximum intensities in overlapping beams of forward and rear position lights. 29.1395 Section 29.1395 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION... Equipment Lights § 29.1395 Maximum intensities in overlapping beams of forward and rear position lights....

  19. 14 CFR 29.1395 - Maximum intensities in overlapping beams of forward and rear position lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Maximum intensities in overlapping beams of forward and rear position lights. 29.1395 Section 29.1395 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION... Equipment Lights § 29.1395 Maximum intensities in overlapping beams of forward and rear position lights....

  20. 14 CFR 29.1395 - Maximum intensities in overlapping beams of forward and rear position lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Maximum intensities in overlapping beams of forward and rear position lights. 29.1395 Section 29.1395 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION... Equipment Lights § 29.1395 Maximum intensities in overlapping beams of forward and rear position lights....

  1. 14 CFR 25.1395 - Maximum intensities in overlapping beams of forward and rear position lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Maximum intensities in overlapping beams of forward and rear position lights. 25.1395 Section 25.1395 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION... Equipment Lights § 25.1395 Maximum intensities in overlapping beams of forward and rear position lights....

  2. Combining relative and absolute paleointensity methods to obtain high-resolution geomagnetic field intensity records: a case study of the Big Island, Hawaii (USA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Groot, L. V.; Dekkers, M. J.; Herrero-Bervera, E.; Biggin, A. J.

    2012-12-01

    Reliable records of absolute paleointensity as function of time for a given region are notoriously difficult to obtain. Yet such records are indispensible for model descriptions of the behavior of the geomagnetic field. Here, we take a new approach to compile a regional paleointensity curve for the Big Island of Hawaii (USA), completing the full vector description of the Earth's magnetic field for this region since its directional behavior is well known. Our approach consists of applying both absolute and relative paleointensity techniques on a sample set that comprises 57 independent sites on Hawaii; we provide a paleointensity curve for the past 1500 years. Firstly, we obtained a relative paleointensity record using the 'pseudo-Thellier' technique. The record was calibrated using 29 flows from the IGRF age range. To calibrate our relative record for older ages, we applied absolute paleointensity techniques: both Thellier-Thellier and multispecimen experiments. The large number of sites allows us to use stringent criteria to select only the most reliable absolute paleointensities. With this approach regional intensity curves with high resolution and precision can be successfully acquired. The obtained paleointensity curve for the Big Island of Hawaii reveals a step-wise decay of the intensity of the Earth's magnetic field since 1000 AD. We find an intensity of ~58 microTesla around 1000 AD, decaying to ~40 microTesla around 1400 AD, at a rate of about 0.5 microTesla per decade. Between 1400 and 1800 AD a relatively constant field intensity is suggested (a decay of just 0.05 microTesla per decade). The historically observed decay from 1800 AD onwards has a rate of approximately 0.3 microTesla per decade to the current field intensity of ~35 microTesla and is consistent with our data. Our results, although regional in character, support the trend proposed by Gubbins et al. (2006) rather than the trend of the GUFM1 model by Jackson et al. (2000). Gubbins, D., Jones

  3. Crystalline sulfur dioxide: Crystal field splittings, absolute band intensities, and complex refractive indices derived from infra-red spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khanna, R. K.; Zhao, Guizhi; Ospina, M. J.; Pearl, J. C.

    The infra-red absorption spectra of thin crystalline films of sulfur dioxide at 90 K are reported in the 2700-450 cm -1 region. The observed multiplicity of the bands in the regions of fundamental modes is attributed to crystal field effects, including factor group and LO—TO splittings, and naturally present minor 34S, 36S and 18O substituted isotopic species. Complex refractive indices determined by an iterative Kramers—Kronig analysis of the extinction data, and absolute band strengths derived from them, are also reported in this region.

  4. 14 CFR 23.1389 - Position light distribution and intensities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... overlapping beams, within dihedral angles L, R, and A, and must meet the following requirements: (1... with main beam intensities substantially greater than the minima specified in §§ 23.1391 and 23.1393, if the overlap intensities in relation to the main beam intensities do not adversely affect...

  5. Absolute intensities for the Q-branch of the 3 nu(sub 2) (-) nu(sub 1) (465.161/cm) band of nitrous oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirota, J. Marcos; Reuter, Dennis C.

    1993-12-01

    The absolute intensities of four lines, Q 15-Q 18 in the 03(sup 1)0-10(sup 0)0 band, of N2O have been measured using a tunable diode laser spectrometer at temperatures between 380 and 420 K and pressures between 4 and 15 torr. Even though these transitions are weak and produced only about 2% of absorption at the line center for a pathlength of 52 m, they were measured with a signal to noise ratio of about 20 due to the high sensitivity of the instrument. The band strength derived is 1.03 x 10(exp -24) cm/molec at 296 K.

  6. Absolute intensities for the Q-branch of the 3 nu(sub 2) (-) nu(sub 1) (465.161/cm) band of nitrous oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sirota, J. Marcos; Reuter, Dennis C.

    1993-01-01

    The absolute intensities of four lines, Q 15-Q 18 in the 03(sup 1)0-10(sup 0)0 band, of N2O have been measured using a tunable diode laser spectrometer at temperatures between 380 and 420 K and pressures between 4 and 15 torr. Even though these transitions are weak and produced only about 2% of absorption at the line center for a pathlength of 52 m, they were measured with a signal to noise ratio of about 20 due to the high sensitivity of the instrument. The band strength derived is 1.03 x 10(exp -24) cm/molec at 296 K.

  7. A new method for the absolute radiance calibration for UV/vis measurements of scattered sun light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, T.; Beirle, S.; Dörner, S.; Penning de Vries, M.; Remmers, J.; Rozanov, A.; Shaiganfar, R.

    2015-05-01

    Absolute radiometric calibrations are important for measurements of the atmospheric spectral radiance. Such measurements can be used to determine actinic fluxes, the properties of aerosols and clouds and the short wave energy budget. Conventional calibration methods in the laboratory are based on calibrated light sources and reflectors and are expensive, time consuming and subject to relatively large uncertainties. Also, the calibrated instruments might change during transport from the laboratory to the measurement sites. Here we present a new calibration method for UV/vis instruments that measure the spectrally resolved sky radiance, like for example zenith sky Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS-) instruments or Multi-AXis (MAX-) DOAS instruments. Our method is based on the comparison of the solar zenith angle dependence of the measured zenith sky radiance with radiative transfer simulations. For the application of our method clear sky measurements during periods with almost constant aerosol optical depth are needed. The radiative transfer simulations have to take polarisation into account. We show that the calibration results are almost independent from the knowledge of the aerosol optical properties and surface albedo, which causes a rather small uncertainty of about <7%. For wavelengths below about 330 nm it is essential that the ozone column density during the measurements is constant and known.

  8. Light-Induced Changes of the Circadian Clock of Humans: Increasing Duration is More Effective than Increasing Light Intensity

    PubMed Central

    Dewan, Karuna; Benloucif, Susan; Reid, Kathryn; Wolfe, Lisa F.; Zee, Phyllis C.

    2011-01-01

    Study Objectives: To evaluate the effect of increasing the intensity and/or duration of exposure on light-induced changes in the timing of the circadian clock of humans. Design: Multifactorial randomized controlled trial, between and within subject design Setting: General Clinical Research Center (GCRC) of an academic medical center Participants: 56 healthy young subjects (20-40 years of age) Interventions: Research subjects were admitted for 2 independent stays of 4 nights/3 days for treatment with bright or dim-light (randomized order) at a time known to induce phase delays in circadian timing. The intensity and duration of the bright light were determined by random assignment to one of 9 treatment conditions (duration of 1, 2, or 3 hours at 2000, 4000, or 8000 lux). Measurements and Results: Treatment-induced changes in the dim light melatonin onset (DLMO) and dim light melatonin offset (DLMOff) were measured from blood samples collected every 20-30 min throughout baseline and post-treatment nights. Comparison by multi-factor analysis of variance (ANOVA) of light-induced changes in the time of the circadian melatonin rhythm for the 9 conditions revealed that changing the duration of the light exposure from 1 to 3 h increased the magnitude of light-induced delays. In contrast, increasing from moderate (2,000 lux) to high (8,000 lux) intensity light did not alter the magnitude of phase delays of the circadian melatonin rhythm. Conclusions: Results from the present study suggest that for phototherapy of circadian rhythm sleep disorders in humans, a longer period of moderate intensity light may be more effective than a shorter exposure period of high intensity light. Citation: Dewan K; Benloucif S; Reid K; Wolfe LF; Zee PC. Light-induced changes of the circadian clock of humans: increasing duration is more effective than increasing light intensity. SLEEP 2011;34(5):593-599. PMID:21532952

  9. A Chloroplast Light-Regulated Oxidative Sensor for Moderate Light Intensity in Arabidopsis[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Dangoor, Inbal; Peled-Zehavi, Hadas; Wittenberg, Gal; Danon, Avihai

    2012-01-01

    The transition from dark to light involves marked changes in the redox reactions of photosynthetic electron transport and in chloroplast stromal enzyme activity even under mild light and growth conditions. Thus, it is not surprising that redox regulation is used to dynamically adjust and coordinate the stromal and thylakoid compartments. While oxidation of regulatory proteins is necessary for the regulation, the identity and the mechanism of action of the oxidizing pathway are still unresolved. Here, we studied the oxidation of a thylakoid-associated atypical thioredoxin-type protein, ACHT1, in the Arabidopsis thaliana chloroplast. We found that after a brief period of net reduction in plants illuminated with moderate light intensity, a significant oxidation reaction of ACHT1 arises and counterbalances its reduction. Interestingly, ACHT1 oxidation is driven by 2-Cys peroxiredoxin (Prx), which in turn eliminates peroxides. The ACHT1 and 2-Cys Prx reaction characteristics in plants further indicated that ACHT1 oxidation is linked with changes in the photosynthetic production of peroxides. Our findings that plants with altered redox poise of the ACHT1 and 2-Cys Prx pathway show higher nonphotochemical quenching and lower photosynthetic electron transport infer a feedback regulatory role for this pathway. PMID:22570442

  10. Effects of light intensity light quality and air velocity on temperature in plant reproductive organs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitaya, Y.; Hirai, H.

    Excess temperature increase in plant reproductive organs such as anthers and stigmata could cause fertility impediments and thus produce sterile seeds under artificial lighting conditions in closed plant growth facilities There is a possibility that the aberration was caused by an excess increase in temperatures of reproductive organs in Bioregenerative Life Support Systems under microgravity conditions in space The fundamental study was conducted to know the thermal situation of the plant reproductive organs as affected by light intensity light quality and air velocity on the earth and to estimate the excess temperature increase in the reproductive organs in closed plant growth facilities in space Thermal images of reproductive organs of rice and strawberry were captured using infrared thermography at an air temperature of 10 r C The temperatures in flowers at 300 mu mol m -2 s -1 PPFD under the lights from red LEDs white LEDs blue LEDs fluorescent lamps and incandescent lamps increased by 1 4 1 7 1 9 6 0 and 25 3 r C respectively for rice and by 2 8 3 4 4 1 7 8 and 43 4 r C respectively for strawberry The flower temperatures increased with increasing PPFD levels The temperatures in petals anthers and stigmas of strawberry at 300 mu mol m -2 s -1 PPFD under incandescent lamps increased by 32 7 29 0 and 26 6 r C respectively at 0 1 m s -1 air velocity and by 20 6 18 5 and 15 9 r C respectively at 0 8 m s -1 air velocity The temperatures of reproductive organs decreased with increasing

  11. 14 CFR 23.1391 - Minimum intensities in the horizontal plane of position lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Minimum intensities in the horizontal plane of position lights. 23.1391 Section 23.1391 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... CATEGORY AIRPLANES Equipment Lights § 23.1391 Minimum intensities in the horizontal plane of...

  12. 14 CFR 23.1391 - Minimum intensities in the horizontal plane of position lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Minimum intensities in the horizontal plane of position lights. 23.1391 Section 23.1391 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... CATEGORY AIRPLANES Equipment Lights § 23.1391 Minimum intensities in the horizontal plane of...

  13. Alterations of the lipid content and fatty acid profile of Chlorella protothecoides under different light intensities.

    PubMed

    Krzemińska, Izabela; Piasecka, Agata; Nosalewicz, Artur; Simionato, Diana; Wawrzykowski, Jacek

    2015-11-01

    Chlorella protothecoides is a valuable source of lipids that may be used for biodiesel production. The present work shows analysis of the potential of photoheterotrophic cultivation of C. protothecoides under various light intensities aiming to identify the conditions with maximal biomass and lipid content. An increase in light intensity was associated with an increased specific growth rate and a shortened doubling time. Also, the relative total lipid content increased from 24.8% to 37.5% with increase of light intensity. The composition of fatty acid methyl esters was affected by light intensity with the C16-18 fatty acids increased from 76.97% to 90.24% of total fatty acids. However, the content of linolenic acids decreased with the increase of the culture irradiance. These studies indicate that cultures irradiated with high light intensities achieve the minimal specifications for biodiesel quality on linolenic acids and thus are suitable for biodiesel production. PMID:26231126

  14. An unexpected negative influence of light intensity on hydrogen production by dark fermentative bacteria Clostridium beijerinckii.

    PubMed

    Zagrodnik, R; Laniecki, M

    2016-01-01

    The role of light intensity on biohydrogen production from glucose by Clostridium beijerinckii, Clostridium acetobutylicum, and Rhodobacter sphaeroides was studied to evaluate the performance and possible application in co-culture fermentation system. The applied source of light had spectrum similar to the solar radiation. The influence of light intensity on hydrogen production in dark process by C. acetobutylicum was negligible. In contrast, dark fermentation by C. beijerinckii bacteria showed a significant decrease (83%) in produced hydrogen at light intensity of 540W/m(2). Here, the redirection of metabolism from acetic and butyric acid formation towards lactic acid was observed. This not yet reported effect was probably caused by irradiation of these bacteria by light within UVA range, which is an important component of the solar radiation. The excessive illumination with light of intensity higher than 200W/m(2) resulted in decrease in hydrogen production with photofermentative bacteria as well. PMID:26602144

  15. 14 CFR 23.1393 - Minimum intensities in any vertical plane of position lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Minimum intensities in any vertical plane... CATEGORY AIRPLANES Equipment Lights § 23.1393 Minimum intensities in any vertical plane of position lights... above or below the horizontal plane Intensity, l 0° 1.00 0° to 5° 0.90 5° to 10° 0.80 10° to 15° 0.70...

  16. 14 CFR 23.1393 - Minimum intensities in any vertical plane of position lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Minimum intensities in any vertical plane... CATEGORY AIRPLANES Equipment Lights § 23.1393 Minimum intensities in any vertical plane of position lights... above or below the horizontal plane Intensity, l 0° 1.00 0° to 5° 0.90 5° to 10° 0.80 10° to 15° 0.70...

  17. Effects of light intensity, oxygen concentration, and carbon dioxide concentration on photosynthesis in algae.

    PubMed

    Pope, D H

    1975-03-01

    The effects of various combinations of light intensity, oxygen concentration, and CO2 concentration on photosynthesis and growth in several algal types were studied. The results suggest the following. (1) Different algae show different responses to high oxygen concentrations and high light intensities. (2) Inhibition of photosynthesis (CO2 fixation and growth), if seen, increases with increasing oxygen concentration and with increasing light intensity (at light intensities greater than saturation). (3) The inhibition of net photosynthesis observed cannot be attributed to high light intensity alone. (4) The inhibition cannot be attributed to increased rates of excretion of organic materials under conditions of high oxygen concentration and high light intensity. (5) Increased concentrations of CO2 can decrease the effect of high oxygen and light in some algae. (6) The decrease in net photosynthesis observed is probably the result of photorespiration. (7) The effect of light intensity, oxygen concentration, or CO2 concentration on algal photosynthesis should not be studied without considering the effect of the other factors. Some implications of these results, as related to primary productivity measurements, are also discussed. PMID:24241158

  18. Modeling spatiotemporal patterns of understory light intensity using airborne laser scanner (LiDAR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Shouzhang; Zhao, Chuanyan; Xu, Zhonglin

    2014-11-01

    This study described a spatiotemporally explicit 3D raytrace model to provide spatiotemporal patterns of understory light (light intensity in the forest floor and along the vertical gradient). The model was built based on voxels derived from LiDAR and field investigation data, geographical information (elevation and location), and solar position (azimuth and altitude angles). We calculated the distance (L, in meters) traveled by solar ray in the crowns based on the model, and then calibrated and verified the light attenuation function using L based on Beer's law. L and the ratio of below canopy light intensity to above canopy light intensity showed obviously exponential relationship, with R2 = 0.94 and P < 0.05. Estimated and observed understory light intensities were obviously positively correlated, with R2 = 0.92 and P < 0.01, and the estimated values were slightly lower than the observed values. The spatiotemporal patterns of the light intensity in the forest floor were mapped with the respect to the solar position, and these patterns represented the variations in the forest-shaded area. The spatial patterns of the light intensity along vertical gradient were also mapped, and they showed strong variations. We concluded that L could account for the complex patterns of understory light environment with respect to the geographical and solar position variations. The 3D raytrace model can be integrated with ecological or hydrological models to resolve several issues, such as plant succession and competition, soil evaporation, plant transpiration, and snowmelt in the forest.

  19. Variable light source with a million-to-one intensity ratio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snow, W. B.

    1964-01-01

    A wide range, variable intensity light source of constant color characteristics has been developed for testing and calibrating photomultiplier tubes. A light attenuator first diffuses light from a constant source, then permits variable attenuation through a series of chambers and adjustable apertures.

  20. Absolute calibration of the Auger fluorescence detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Bauleo, P.; Brack, J.; Garrard, L.; Harton, J.; Knapik, R.; Meyhandan, R.; Rovero, A.C.; Tamashiro, A.; Warner, D.

    2005-07-01

    Absolute calibration of the Pierre Auger Observatory fluorescence detectors uses a light source at the telescope aperture. The technique accounts for the combined effects of all detector components in a single measurement. The calibrated 2.5 m diameter light source fills the aperture, providing uniform illumination to each pixel. The known flux from the light source and the response of the acquisition system give the required calibration for each pixel. In the lab, light source uniformity is studied using CCD images and the intensity is measured relative to NIST-calibrated photodiodes. Overall uncertainties are presently 12%, and are dominated by systematics.

  1. Research on the jamming mechanism for intense light bomb by antagonizing low-light level night-vision device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Che, Jinxi; Li, Zhongmin; Zhang, Jinchun

    2013-08-01

    The low-light level night-vision device was widely applied in military and common field. The working principle of the low-light level night-vision device and radiation shine mechanism of highlight interference bomb were analysed. The tactical use way of the highlight interference bomb was briefly analysed. In addition, the computing method of flash radiation was provided. The jamming mechanism for intense light bomb by antagonizing low-light level night-vision device was analysed from the relation between surroundings illuminate and luminance of fluorescent screen, the relation between target illuminate and damage threshold of fluorescent screen and the influence on lifetime of instrument by intense light, which provided reference to study the jamming technology on the low-light level night-vision device.

  2. High-intensity xenon pulse light source for fluorescence excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyamoto, Makoto; Ueno, Kazuo

    1997-05-01

    A newly developed 60W xenon flash lamp, L6604 and L6605, achieves the goals of longer operating life, higher output, and improved light stability. It operates at 2 Joules per flash input energy with approximately a 4 microsecond flash duration. The stability achieved is 2-3 percent peak-to-peak during a lifetime of 5 X 10e7 flashes, which is almost double that of conventional xenon flash lamps. This newly developed xenon flashlamp should serve as an excellent light source for analytical cytology and other fluorescence instruments. It can function as a high output, stable excitation light source for conventional fluorescence or delayed luminescence with a CCD. Besides providing powerful and stable illumination for absorption analysis of cells on slides, this lamp eliminates the optical artifacts associated with vibration of the stage which often limit throughput. This paper will describe in detail performance improvements obtained from this newly developed xenon flash lamp.

  3. Rod photoreceptors drive circadian photoentrainment across a wide range of light intensities

    PubMed Central

    Altimus, C.M.; Güler, A.D.; Alam, N.M.; Arman, A.C.; Prusky, G.T.; Sampath, A.P.; Hattar, S

    2010-01-01

    In mammals, synchronization of the circadian pacemaker in the hypothalamus is achieved through direct input from the eyes conveyed by intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs). Circadian photoentrainment can be maintained by rod and cone photoreceptors, but their functional contributions and their retinal circuits that impinge on ipRGCs are not well understood. We demonstrate in genetic mouse models lacking functional rods, or where rods are the only functional photoreceptors, that rods are solely responsible for photoentrainment at scotopic light intensities. Surprisingly, rods were also capable of driving circadian photoentrainment at photopic intensities where they were incapable of supporting a visually–guided behavior. Using animals in which cone photoreceptors were ablated, we demonstrate that rods signal through cones at high light intensities, but not low light intensities. Thus two distinct retinal circuits drive ipRGC function to support circadian photoentrainment across a wide range of light intensities. PMID:20711184

  4. Studies on light intensity distribution inside an open pond photo-bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Ramakant; Sahu, Akhilesh; K K, Vasumathi; M, Premalatha

    2015-08-01

    Light intensity profiles inside an open tank were studied using ANSYS Fluent. Experiments were performed by taking Scenedesmus arcuatus, green microalgae at three different concentrations under actual sunlight conditions. Absorption of light intensity at different depths was measured experimentally. The results generated from CFD simulations were compared with the experimental results and the cornet model. It has been found that there is a good agreement between the light intensity profile obtained from the CFD simulation and that calculated using the Cornet's model. Light intensity profiles at different depths were calculated using CFD simulation by varying the dimensions of the tank. The effect of wall reflectivity, diffuse fraction and scattering phase function on light profile in side open tank are also studied using CFD simulation. PMID:25868715

  5. An attempt to determine the absolute geomagnetic field intensity in Southwestern Iceland during the Gauss-Matuyama reversal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goguitchaichvili, Avto; Prévot, Michel; Thompson, John; Roberts, Neil

    1999-08-01

    We have measured the variation in the intensity of the geomagnetic field during the Gauss-Matuyama (N4-R3) polarity reversal by application of the Thelliers' method to specimens of lava flows from Hvalfjördur district in Western Iceland (Reynivallahals Mts.). Eleven lava flows all show very similar directions corresponding to an equatorial VGP (Plat=2.9°N, Plong=81.9°E, A95=4.2, K=119). Twenty-nine specimens from nine of the flows were pre-selected for palaeointensity determination on the basis that specimens from the same drill cores showed a single component of magnetisation upon thermal or AF demagnetisation, and possessed low magnetic viscosity and reversible susceptibility curves upon heating at 600-650°C. Observation that the directional data obtained in the course of the palaeointensity experiments occasionally showed substantial non-linearity indicates that a significant chemical remanent magnetization (CRM) can be acquired in the direction of the laboratory field during heating at T. For each double heating step we calculated the ratio of CRM( T) to the magnitude of the natural remanent magnetization (NRM( T)) in the direction of characteristic remanence (obtained independently from another specimen from the same core). When this ratio exceeded 15%, the paleointensity data was rejected. In addition, specimens for which the quality factor was less than 5 were rejected. Twelve reliable palaeointensity values were obtained from specimens representing five lava flows. The results confirm that the palaeointensity was substantially reduced during the N4-R3 reversal. The range of mean palaeointensity values obtained for the five flows is 8.8 to 20.5 and the overall mean is 14.8±4.6 μT. This corresponds to an equivalent VDM of 3.81±1.19 (10 22 A m 2). A comparison of all Thellier palaeointensity data from the R3 magnetozone in the Rayinivallahals Mts. area reveals a progressive although irregular increase in the palaeointensity between the Gauss

  6. Extreme light. An intense pursuit of fundamental high energy physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mourou, Gérard; Wheeler, Jonathan A.; Tajima, Toshiki

    2015-09-01

    By the compression of petawatt pulses to multi-exawatt, a new route for the generation of Schwinger intensities capable of producing highenergy radiation and particle beams with extremely short time structure down to the attosecond-zeptosecond regime is being presented. Far from the traditional laser investigation in the eV regime, this laser-based approach offers a new paradigm to investigate the structure of vacuum and applications to subatomic physics.

  7. The influence of reduced light intensity on the response of benthic diatoms to herbicide exposure.

    PubMed

    Wood, Rebecca J; Mitrovic, Simon M; Lim, Richard P; Kefford, Ben J

    2016-09-01

    Herbicide pollution events in aquatic ecosystems often coincide with increased turbidity and reduced light intensity. It is therefore important to determine whether reduced light intensity can influence herbicide toxicity, especially to primary producers such as benthic diatoms. Benthic diatoms collected from 4 rivers were exposed to herbicides in 48 h rapid toxicity tests under high light (100 µmol m(-2)  s(-1) ) and low light (20 µmol m(-2)  s(-1) ) intensities. The effects of 2 herbicides (atrazine and glyphosate) were assessed on 26 freshwater benthic diatom taxa. There was no significant interaction of light and herbicide effects at the community level or on the majority (22 of 26) of benthic diatom taxa. This indicates that low light levels will likely have only a minor influence on the response of benthic diatoms to herbicides. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:2252-2260. © 2016 SETAC. PMID:26801964

  8. Photosensitivity control of an isotropic medium through polarization of light pulses with tilted intensity front.

    PubMed

    Kazansky, Peter G; Shimotsuma, Yasuhiko; Sakakura, Masaaki; Beresna, Martynas; Gecevičius, Mindaugas; Svirko, Yuri; Akturk, Selcuk; Qiu, Jianrong; Miura, Kiyotaka; Hirao, Kazuyuki

    2011-10-10

    We present the first experimental evidence of anisotropic photosensitivity of an isotropic homogeneous medium under uniform illumination. Our experiments reveal fundamentally new type of light induced anisotropy originated from the hidden asymmetry of pulsed light beam with a finite tilt of intensity front. We anticipate that the observed phenomenon, which enables employing mutual orientation of a light polarization plane and pulse front tilt to control interaction of matter with ultrashort light pulses, will open new opportunities in material processing. PMID:21997076

  9. Light-front time evolution in intense fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Guangyao; Zhao, Xingbo; Li, Yang; Maris, Pieter; Tuchin, Kirill; Vary, James

    2016-03-01

    We report on the influence of strong electromagnetic fields generated by an ultra-relativistic heavy ion on the quantized field of a charged fermion particle using the time-dependent basis light-front quantization (tBLFQ) approach. We calculate transitions of the charged fermion and find agreement with light-front perturbation theory at small coupling. We then present non-perturbative effects, such as the real-time evolution of the momentum distribution and the helicity configuration of the fermion in strong fields. We will discuss prospects for applying the tBLFQ formalism to time-dependent QED and QCD fields in heavy ion collisions and electron-ion collisions. This work is supported by DOE Grants DE-FG02-87ER40371 & DESC0008485.

  10. Effect of the light spectrum of various substrates for inkjet printed conductive structures sintered with intense pulsed light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weise, Dana; Mitra, Kalyan Yoti; Ueberfuhr, Peter; Baumann, Reinhard R.

    2015-02-01

    In this work, the novel method of intense pulsed light (IPL) sintering of a nanoparticle silver ink is presented. Various patterns are printed with the Inkjet technology on two flexible foils with different light spectra. One is a clear Polyethylenterephthalat [PET] foil and the second is a light brownish Polyimide [PI] foil. The samples are flashed with different parameters regarding to pulse intensity and pulse length. Microscopic images are indicating the impact of the flashing parameters and the different light spectra of the substrates on the sintered structures. Sheet and line resistance are measured and the conductivity is calculated. A high influence of the property of the substrate with respect to light absorption and thermal conductivity on the functionality of printed conductive structures could be presented. With this new method of IPL sintering, highly conductive inkjet printed silver patterns could be manufactured within milliseconds on flexible polymeric foils without damaging the substrate.

  11. Effect of the light spectrum of various substrates for inkjet printed conductive structures sintered with intense pulsed light

    SciTech Connect

    Weise, Dana Mitra, Kalyan Yoti Ueberfuhr, Peter; Baumann, Reinhard R.

    2015-02-17

    In this work, the novel method of intense pulsed light (IPL) sintering of a nanoparticle silver ink is presented. Various patterns are printed with the Inkjet technology on two flexible foils with different light spectra. One is a clear Polyethylenterephthalat [PET] foil and the second is a light brownish Polyimide [PI] foil. The samples are flashed with different parameters regarding to pulse intensity and pulse length. Microscopic images are indicating the impact of the flashing parameters and the different light spectra of the substrates on the sintered structures. Sheet and line resistance are measured and the conductivity is calculated. A high influence of the property of the substrate with respect to light absorption and thermal conductivity on the functionality of printed conductive structures could be presented. With this new method of IPL sintering, highly conductive inkjet printed silver patterns could be manufactured within milliseconds on flexible polymeric foils without damaging the substrate.

  12. Absolute phase-assisted three-dimensional data registration for a dual-camera structured light system

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Song; Yau Shingtung

    2008-06-10

    For a three-dimensional shape measurement system with a single projector and multiple cameras, registering patches from different cameras is crucial. Registration usually involves a complicated and time-consuming procedure. We propose a new method that can robustly match different patches via absolute phase without significantly increasing its cost. For y and z coordinates, the transformations from one camera to the other are approximated as third-order polynomial functions of the absolute phase. The x coordinates involve only translations and scalings. These functions are calibrated and only need to be determined once. Experiments demonstrated that the alignment error is within RMS 0.7 mm.

  13. Prism-pair interferometry by homodyne interferometers with a common light source for high-accuracy measurement of the absolute refractive index of glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Hori, Yasuaki; Hirai, Akiko; Minoshima, Kaoru

    2011-03-10

    A prism-pair interferometer comprising two homodyne interferometers with a common light source was developed for high-precision measurements of the refractive index of optical glasses with an uncertainty of the order of 10{sup -6}. The two interferometers measure changes in the optical path length in the glass sample and in air, respectively. Uncertainties in the absolute wavelength of the common light source are cancelled out by calculating a ratio between the results from the interferometers. Uncertainties in phase measurement are suppressed by a quadrature detection system. The combined standard uncertainty of the developed system is evaluated as 1.1x10{sup -6}.

  14. Photocathode fatigue of L-24 PM head due to high intensity light pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, K.F.

    1980-01-08

    The sensitivity of radiation detectors which utilizes photomultipliers was determined after exposing the multiplier phototubes to high intensity light pulses. Test results found that generally less than a 5% change was found. (FS)

  15. Is the zodiacal light intensity steady. [cloud surface brightness and polarization from OSO-5 data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burnett, G. B.; Sparrow, J. G.; Ney, E. P.

    1974-01-01

    It is pointed out that conclusions reported by Sparrow and Ney (1972, 1973) could be confirmed in an investigation involving the refinement of OSO-5 data on zodiacal light. It had been found by Sparrow and Ney that the absolute value of both the surface brightness and polarization of the zodiacal cloud varied by less than 10% over the 4-yr period from January 1969 to January 1973.

  16. Rapid Adiabatic Passage in a Rb gas with intense Frequency Chirped Laser Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufman, Brian; Grogan, Tanner; Paltoo, Tracy; Wright, Matthew

    We will discuss our progress toward using intense frequency chirped laser light to control the excitation of atoms in a room-temperature gas cell. We illuminate 87Rb atoms with a 1 GHz in 8 ns frequency chirped pulse of laser light covering the 5S1/2 F =1 --> 5P3/2 and explore the saturation behavior as intensity increases. We estimate that we are exciting over 90% of the atoms over 1 mm2.

  17. Particle acceleration studies with intense lasers and advanced light sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, C. D.; Gray, R. J.; MacLellan, D. A.; Rusby, D.; McKenna, P.; Ridgers, C. P.; Booth, N.; Robinson, A. P. L.; Wilson, L.; Green, J. S.

    2013-10-01

    The interaction of lasers with matter is a subject which has progressed rapidly over the last two decades as higher intensity lasers are found to have possible applications in inertial fusion, laboratory astrophysics and ion acceleration for oncology or ultrafast proton probing. All of these applications require a good understanding of laser-electron coupling and fast electron transport in solid targets which has proven difficult to diagnose. Here we present data from an experiment carried out on the Astra Gemini laser system at STFC-Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, where novel targets and diagnostics illuminate the complex processes at play. An outline of how x-ray free electron lasers may further expand our understanding of such processes will also be described.

  18. Technique for compressing light intensity ranges utilizing a specifically designed liquid crystal notch filter

    DOEpatents

    Rushford, Michael C.

    1988-01-01

    A pin hole camera assembly for use in viewing an object having a relatively large light intensity range, for example a crucible containing molten metal in an atomic vapor laser isotope separation (AVLIS) system is disclosed herein. The assembly includes means for optically compressing the light intensity range appearing at its input sufficient to make it receivable and decipherable by a standard video camera. To accomplish this, the assembly utilizes the combination of interference filter and a liquid crystal notch filter. The latter which preferably includes a cholesteric liquid crystal arrangement is configured to pass light at all wavelengths, except a relatively narrow wavelength band which defines the filter's notch, and includes means for causing the notch to vary to at least a limited extent with the intensity of light at its light incidence surface.

  19. Multiphoton Microscopy and Interaction of Intense Light Pulses with Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guay, Jean-Michel

    2011-07-01

    The nanoscale manipulation of soft-matter, such as biological tissues, in its native environment has promising applications in medicine to correct for defects (eg. eye cataracts) or to destroy malignant regions (eg. cancerous tumours). To achieve this we need the ability to first image and then do precise ablation with sub-micron resolution with the same setup. For this purpose, we designed and built a multiphoton microscope and tested it on goldfish gills and bovine cells. We then studied light-matter interaction on a hard polymer (PMMA) because the nature of ablation of soft-matter in its native environment is complex and not well understood. Ablation and modification thresholds for successive laser shots were obtained. The ablation craters revealed 3D nanostructures and polarization dependent orientation. The interaction also induced localized porosity in PMMA that can be controlled.

  20. 14 CFR 23.1393 - Minimum intensities in any vertical plane of position lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    .... Each position light intensity must equal or exceed the applicable values in the following table: Angle above or below the horizontal plane Intensity, l 0° 1.00 0° to 5° 0.90 5° to 10° 0.80 10° to 15° 0.70...

  1. 14 CFR 23.1393 - Minimum intensities in any vertical plane of position lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    .... Each position light intensity must equal or exceed the applicable values in the following table: Angle above or below the horizontal plane Intensity, l 0° 1.00 0° to 5° 0.90 5° to 10° 0.80 10° to 15° 0.70...

  2. 14 CFR 23.1393 - Minimum intensities in any vertical plane of position lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    .... Each position light intensity must equal or exceed the applicable values in the following table: Angle above or below the horizontal plane Intensity, l 0° 1.00 0° to 5° 0.90 5° to 10° 0.80 10° to 15° 0.70...

  3. The Velocity of Light Intensity Increase Modulates the Photoprotective Response in Coastal Diatoms

    PubMed Central

    Giovagnetti, Vasco; Flori, Serena; Tramontano, Ferdinando; Lavaud, Johann; Brunet, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    In aquatic ecosystems, the superimposition of mixing events to the light diel cycle exposes phytoplankton to changes in the velocity of light intensity increase, from diurnal variations to faster mixing-related ones. This is particularly true in coastal waters, where diatoms are dominant. This study aims to investigate if coastal diatoms differently activate the photoprotective responses, xanthophyll cycle (XC) and non-photochemical fluorescence quenching (NPQ), to cope with predictable light diel cycle and unpredictable mixing-related light variations. We compared the effect of two fast light intensity increases (simulating mixing events) with that of a slower increase (corresponding to the light diel cycle) on the modulation of XC and NPQ in the planktonic coastal diatom Pseudo-nitzschia multistriata. During each light treatment, the photon flux density (PFD) progressively increased from darkness to five peaks, ranging from 100 to 650 µmol photons m−2 s−1. Our results show that the diel cycle-related PFD increase strongly activates XC through the enhancement of the carotenoid biosynthesis and induces a moderate and gradual NPQ formation over the light gradient. In contrast, during mixing-related PFD increases, XC is less activated, while higher NPQ rapidly develops at moderate PFD. We observe that together with the light intensity and its increase velocity, the saturation light for photosynthesis (Ek) is a key parameter in modulating photoprotection. We propose that the capacity to adequately regulate and actuate alternative photoprotective ‘safety valves’ in response to changing velocity of light intensity increase further enhances the photophysiological flexibility of diatoms. This might be an evolutionary outcome of diatom adaptation to turbulent marine ecosystems characterized by unpredictable mixing-related light changes over the light diel cycle. PMID:25083713

  4. Temporal intensity correlation of light scattered by a hot atomic vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dussaux, A.; Passerat de Silans, T.; Guerin, W.; Alibart, O.; Tanzilli, S.; Vakili, F.; Kaiser, R.

    2016-04-01

    We present temporal intensity correlation measurements of light scattered by a hot atomic vapor. Clear evidence of photon bunching is shown at very short time scales (nanoseconds) imposed by the Doppler broadening of the hot vapor. Moreover, we demonstrate that relevant information about the scattering process, such as the ratio of single to multiple scattering, can be deduced from the measured intensity correlation function. These measurements justify the interest in temporal intensity correlation to access nontrivial spectral features, with potential applications in astrophysics.

  5. The relationship between light intensity and nutrient uptake kinetics in six freshwater diatoms.

    PubMed

    Shi, Pengling; Shen, Hong; Wang, Wenjing; Chen, Wenjie; Xie, Ping

    2015-08-01

    In order to find effective measures to control diatom blooms, a better understanding of the physiological characteristics of nutrient uptake in diatoms is needed. A study of P and Si-uptake kinetics for diatom species from two light regimes was conducted at low (LL), moderate (ML) and high light intensities (HL) (2, 25 and 80 μmol photons/(m(2)·sec)), respectively. The results showed that P uptake of diatoms was heavily influenced by historic light regimes. P affinity changed with growth and photosynthetic activity. The lowest half saturation constant for P uptake (Km(P)) was under HL for high-light adapted diatoms while the lowest half-saturation constant for low-light adapted diatoms was observed under LL. The Si half-saturation constant (Km(Si)) increased with increasing light intensities for pennate diatoms but decreased for centric diatoms. Diatom volumes were correlated with the maximum Si uptake rates (Vm(Si)) at HL and Km(Si) at ML and HL for six diatom species. Our results imply that when we assess the development of diatom blooms we should consider light intensity and cell volume in addition to ambient Si or P concentration. The relationship between light intensity and P-uptake suggests that we can find suitable methods to control diatom blooms on the basis of reducing phytoplankton activity of P-uptake and photosynthesis simultaneously. PMID:26257343

  6. 33 CFR 84.21 - Intensity of non-electric lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Intensity of non-electric lights. 84.21 Section 84.21 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INLAND NAVIGATION RULES ANNEX I: POSITIONING AND TECHNICAL DETAILS OF LIGHTS AND SHAPES § 84.21...

  7. 33 CFR 84.21 - Intensity of non-electric lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Intensity of non-electric lights. 84.21 Section 84.21 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INLAND NAVIGATION RULES ANNEX I: POSITIONING AND TECHNICAL DETAILS OF LIGHTS AND SHAPES § 84.21...

  8. 14 CFR 25.1395 - Maximum intensities in overlapping beams of forward and rear position lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... position light intensity may exceed the applicable values in the following table, except as provided in... white in dihedral angle L 5 1 Rear white in dihedral angle R 5 1 Where— (a) Area A includes all directions in the adjacent dihedral angle that pass through the light source and intersect the...

  9. 14 CFR 29.1395 - Maximum intensities in overlapping beams of forward and rear position lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... position light intensity may exceed the applicable values in the following table, except as provided in... white in dihedral angle L 5 1 Rear white in dihedral angle R 5 1 Where— (a) Area A includes all directions in the adjacent dihedral angle that pass through the light source and intersect the...

  10. 14 CFR 23.1391 - Minimum intensities in the horizontal plane of position lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Minimum intensities in the horizontal plane of position lights. 23.1391 Section 23.1391 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Equipment Lights §...

  11. 14 CFR 27.1395 - Maximum intensities in overlapping beams of forward and rear position lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... position light intensity may exceed the applicable values in the following table, except as provided in... white in dihedral angle L 5 1 Rear white in dihedral angle R 5 1 Where— (a) Area A includes all directions in the adjacent dihedral angle that pass through the light source and intersect the...

  12. 14 CFR 23.1395 - Maximum intensities in overlapping beams of position lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... position light intensity may exceed the applicable values in the following equal or exceed the applicable... white in dihedral angle L 5 1 Rear white in dihedral angle R 5 1 Where— (a) Area A includes all directions in the adjacent dihedral angle that pass through the light source and intersect the...

  13. 33 CFR 84.21 - Intensity of non-electric lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Intensity of non-electric lights. 84.21 Section 84.21 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INLAND NAVIGATION RULES ANNEX I: POSITIONING AND TECHNICAL DETAILS OF LIGHTS AND SHAPES § 84.21...

  14. 33 CFR 84.21 - Intensity of non-electric lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Intensity of non-electric lights. 84.21 Section 84.21 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INLAND NAVIGATION RULES ANNEX I: POSITIONING AND TECHNICAL DETAILS OF LIGHTS AND SHAPES § 84.21...

  15. 33 CFR 84.21 - Intensity of non-electric lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Intensity of non-electric lights. 84.21 Section 84.21 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INLAND NAVIGATION RULES ANNEX I: POSITIONING AND TECHNICAL DETAILS OF LIGHTS AND SHAPES § 84.21...

  16. Coherent BOTDA sensor with intensity modulated local light and IQ demodulation.

    PubMed

    Li, Zonglei; Yan, Lianshan; Shao, Liyang; Pan, Wei; Luo, Bin

    2015-06-15

    Coherent Brillouin optical time domain analysis (BOTDA) sensing system with intensity modulated local (IML) light and fast IQ demodulation is proposed and demonstrated. IML light instead of phase modulated local (PML) light is utilized to reduce the coherent and multiple sidebands induced noises. A spatial resolution of 3-m and ± 1.8°C temperature accuracy at the far end of the fiber are obtained over 40-km sensing distance. PMID:26193612

  17. Plants Actively Avoid State Transitions upon Changes in Light Intensity: Role of Light-Harvesting Complex II Protein Dephosphorylation in High Light1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Suorsa, Marjaana; Rantala, Marjaana; Aro, Eva-Mari

    2015-01-01

    Photosystem II (PSII) core and light-harvesting complex II (LHCII) proteins in plant chloroplasts undergo reversible phosphorylation upon changes in light intensity (being under control of redox-regulated STN7 and STN8 kinases and TAP38/PPH1 and PSII core phosphatases). Shift of plants from growth light to high light results in an increase of PSII core phosphorylation, whereas LHCII phosphorylation concomitantly decreases. Exactly the opposite takes place when plants are shifted to lower light intensity. Despite distinct changes occurring in thylakoid protein phosphorylation upon light intensity changes, the excitation balance between PSII and photosystem I remains unchanged. This differs drastically from the canonical-state transition model induced by artificial states 1 and 2 lights that concomitantly either dephosphorylate or phosphorylate, respectively, both the PSII core and LHCII phosphoproteins. Analysis of the kinase and phosphatase mutants revealed that TAP38/PPH1 phosphatase is crucial in preventing state transition upon increase in light intensity. Indeed, tap38/pph1 mutant revealed strong concomitant phosphorylation of both the PSII core and LHCII proteins upon transfer to high light, thus resembling the wild type under state 2 light. Coordinated function of thylakoid protein kinases and phosphatases is shown to secure balanced excitation energy for both photosystems by preventing state transitions upon changes in light intensity. Moreover, PROTON GRADIENT REGULATION5 (PGR5) is required for proper regulation of thylakoid protein kinases and phosphatases, and the pgr5 mutant mimics phenotypes of tap38/pph1. This shows that there is a close cooperation between the redox- and proton gradient-dependent regulatory mechanisms for proper function of the photosynthetic machinery. PMID:25902812

  18. The role of lasers and intense pulsed light technology in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Husain, Zain; Alster, Tina S

    2016-01-01

    The role of light-based technologies in dermatology has expanded dramatically in recent years. Lasers and intense pulsed light have been used to safely and effectively treat a diverse array of cutaneous conditions, including vascular and pigmented lesions, tattoos, scars, and undesired hair, while also providing extensive therapeutic options for cosmetic rejuvenation and other dermatologic conditions. Dermatologic laser procedures are becoming increasingly popular worldwide, and demand for them has fueled new innovations and clinical applications. These systems continue to evolve and provide enhanced therapeutic outcomes with improved safety profiles. This review highlights the important roles and varied clinical applications that lasers and intense pulsed light play in the dermatologic practice. PMID:26893574

  19. The role of lasers and intense pulsed light technology in dermatology

    PubMed Central

    Husain, Zain; Alster, Tina S

    2016-01-01

    The role of light-based technologies in dermatology has expanded dramatically in recent years. Lasers and intense pulsed light have been used to safely and effectively treat a diverse array of cutaneous conditions, including vascular and pigmented lesions, tattoos, scars, and undesired hair, while also providing extensive therapeutic options for cosmetic rejuvenation and other dermatologic conditions. Dermatologic laser procedures are becoming increasingly popular worldwide, and demand for them has fueled new innovations and clinical applications. These systems continue to evolve and provide enhanced therapeutic outcomes with improved safety profiles. This review highlights the important roles and varied clinical applications that lasers and intense pulsed light play in the dermatologic practice. PMID:26893574

  20. Light intensity affects the uptake and metabolism of glycine by pakchoi (Brassica chinensis L.)

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Qingxu; Cao, Xiaochuang; Wu, Lianghuan; Mi, Wenhai; Feng, Ying

    2016-01-01

    The uptake of glycine by pakchoi (Brassica chinensis L.), when supplied as single N-source or in a mixture of glycine and inorganic N, was studied at different light intensities under sterile conditions. At the optimal intensity (414 μmol m−2 s−1) for plant growth, glycine, nitrate, and ammonium contributed 29.4%, 39.5%, and 31.1% shoot N, respectively, and light intensity altered the preferential absorption of N sources. The lower 15N-nitrate in root but higher in shoot and the higher 15N-glycine in root but lower in shoot suggested that most 15N-nitrate uptake by root transported to shoot rapidly, with the shoot being important for nitrate assimilation, and the N contribution of glycine was limited by post-uptake metabolism. The amount of glycine that was taken up by the plant was likely limited by root uptake at low light intensities and by the metabolism of ammonium produced by glycine at high light intensities. These results indicate that pakchoi has the ability to uptake a large quantity of glycine, but that uptake is strongly regulated by light intensity, with metabolism in the root inhibiting its N contribution. PMID:26882864

  1. Light intensity affects the uptake and metabolism of glycine by pakchoi (Brassica chinensis L.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Qingxu; Cao, Xiaochuang; Wu, Lianghuan; Mi, Wenhai; Feng, Ying

    2016-02-01

    The uptake of glycine by pakchoi (Brassica chinensis L.), when supplied as single N-source or in a mixture of glycine and inorganic N, was studied at different light intensities under sterile conditions. At the optimal intensity (414 μmol m-2 s-1) for plant growth, glycine, nitrate, and ammonium contributed 29.4%, 39.5%, and 31.1% shoot N, respectively, and light intensity altered the preferential absorption of N sources. The lower 15N-nitrate in root but higher in shoot and the higher 15N-glycine in root but lower in shoot suggested that most 15N-nitrate uptake by root transported to shoot rapidly, with the shoot being important for nitrate assimilation, and the N contribution of glycine was limited by post-uptake metabolism. The amount of glycine that was taken up by the plant was likely limited by root uptake at low light intensities and by the metabolism of ammonium produced by glycine at high light intensities. These results indicate that pakchoi has the ability to uptake a large quantity of glycine, but that uptake is strongly regulated by light intensity, with metabolism in the root inhibiting its N contribution.

  2. Light intensity affects the uptake and metabolism of glycine by pakchoi (Brassica chinensis L.).

    PubMed

    Ma, Qingxu; Cao, Xiaochuang; Wu, Lianghuan; Mi, Wenhai; Feng, Ying

    2016-01-01

    The uptake of glycine by pakchoi (Brassica chinensis L.), when supplied as single N-source or in a mixture of glycine and inorganic N, was studied at different light intensities under sterile conditions. At the optimal intensity (414 μmol m(-2) s(-1)) for plant growth, glycine, nitrate, and ammonium contributed 29.4%, 39.5%, and 31.1% shoot N, respectively, and light intensity altered the preferential absorption of N sources. The lower (15)N-nitrate in root but higher in shoot and the higher (15)N-glycine in root but lower in shoot suggested that most (15)N-nitrate uptake by root transported to shoot rapidly, with the shoot being important for nitrate assimilation, and the N contribution of glycine was limited by post-uptake metabolism. The amount of glycine that was taken up by the plant was likely limited by root uptake at low light intensities and by the metabolism of ammonium produced by glycine at high light intensities. These results indicate that pakchoi has the ability to uptake a large quantity of glycine, but that uptake is strongly regulated by light intensity, with metabolism in the root inhibiting its N contribution. PMID:26882864

  3. H2 production in Rhodopseudomonas palustris as a way to cope with high light intensities.

    PubMed

    Muzziotti, Dayana; Adessi, Alessandra; Faraloni, Cecilia; Torzillo, Giuseppe; De Philippis, Roberto

    2016-06-01

    The ability of coping with the damaging effects of high light intensity represents an essential issue when purple non-sulfur bacteria (PNSB) are grown under direct sunlight for photobiological hydrogen production. This study was aimed at investigating whether H2 photo-evolution could represent, for Rhodopseudomonas palustris 42OL, a safety valve to dissipate an excess of reducing power generated under high light intensities. The physiological status of this strain was assessed under anaerobic (AnG) and aerobic (AG) growing conditions and under H2-producing (HP) conditions at low and high light intensities. The results obtained clearly showed that Fv/Fm ratio was significantly affected by the light intensity under which R. palustris 42OL cells were grown, under either AnG or AG conditions, while, under HP, it constantly remained at its highest value. The increase in light intensity significantly increased the H2 production rate, which showed a positive correlation with the maximum electron transfer rate (rETRmax). These findings are important for optimization of hydrogen production by PNSB under solar light. PMID:26916624

  4. Fractional CO2 Laser Versus Intense Pulsed Light in Treating Striae Distensae

    PubMed Central

    El Taieb, Moustafa Adam; Ibrahim, Ahmed Khair

    2016-01-01

    Context: Striae distensae are linear atrophic dermal scars covered with flat atrophic epidermis. They may cause disfigurement, especially in females. Many factors may cause striae distensae such as steroids, obesity, and pregnancy. Although there is no standard treatment for striae; many topical applications, peeling, and light and laser systems have been tried. Aims: To evaluate and compare the efficacy of fractional CO2 laser with intense pulse light in treating striae distensae. Subjects and Methods: Forty patients with striae distensae were recruited. Twenty of them were treated by fractional CO2 laser and 20 were treated with intense pulse light. Length and width of the largest striae were measured pre- and post-treatment. Patient satisfaction was also evaluated and graded. Patients were photographed after each treatment session and photos were examined by a blinded physician who had no knowledge about the cases. Results: Both groups showed significant improvement after treatments (P < 0.05). Patients treated with fractional CO2 laser showed significant improvement after the fifth session compared with those treated with ten sessions of intense pulsed light (P < 0.05) in all parameters except in the length of striae (P > 0.05). Conclusions: The current study has provided supportive evidence to the effectiveness of both fractional CO2 laser and intense pulse light as treatments for striae distensae. Fractional CO2 laser was found to be more effective in the treatment of striae distensae compared with intense pulse light. PMID:27057017

  5. Biomass and carotenoid production in photosynthetic bacteria wastewater treatment: effects of light intensity.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qin; Zhang, Panyue; Zhang, Guangming

    2014-11-01

    This study investigated the feasibility of using photosynthetic bacteria (PSB) to produce biomass and carotenoid while treating wastewater. The effects of light intensity on the biomass, carotenoid and bacteriochlorophyll accumulation in together with pollutant removal were studied. Results showed that it was feasible to use PSB to treat wastewater as well as to produce biomass or carotenoid. 2000 lux was an optimal intensity for biomass production and COD removal, and the corresponding values were 2645 mg/L and 94.7%. 8000 lux was an optimal light intensity for carotenoid production (1.455 mg/L). Mechanism analysis displayed that the greater the bacteriochlorophyll and carotenoid were secreted, the lower the light conversion efficiency turned out to be. The highest light conversion efficiency was achieved at 500 lux; the ATP production, biomass production, and COD removal were the highest at 2000 lux, but the bacteriochlorophyll and carotenoid content were the lowest at 2000 lux. PMID:25218205

  6. Growth and biopigment accumulation of cyanobacterium Spirulina platensis at different light intensities and temperature

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Manoj; Kulshreshtha, Jyoti; Singh, Gajendra Pal

    2011-01-01

    In order to find out optimum culture condition for algal growth, the effect of light irradiance and temperature on growth rate, biomass composition and pigment production of Spirulina platensis were studied in axenic batch cultures. Growth kinetics of cultures showed a wide range of temperature tolerance from 20 °C to 40 °C. Maximum growth rate, cell production with maximum accumulation of chlorophyll and phycobilliproteins were found at temperature 35 °C and 2,000 lux light intensity. But with further increase in temperature and light intensity, reduction in growth rate was observed. Carotenoid content was found maximum at 3,500 lux. Improvement in the carotenoid content with increase in light intensity is an adaptive mechanism of cyanobacterium S.platensis for photoprotection, could be a good basis for the exploitation of microalgae as a source of biopigments. PMID:24031731

  7. Lighting, sleep and circadian rhythm: An intervention study in the intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Engwall, Marie; Fridh, Isabell; Johansson, Lotta; Bergbom, Ingegerd; Lindahl, Berit

    2015-12-01

    Patients in an intensive care unit (ICU) may risk disruption of their circadian rhythm. In an intervention research project a cycled lighting system was set up in an ICU room to support patients' circadian rhythm. Part I aimed to compare experiences of the lighting environment in two rooms with different lighting environments by lighting experiences questionnaire. The results indicated differences in advantage for the patients in the intervention room (n=48), in perception of daytime brightness (p=0.004). In nighttime, greater lighting variation (p=0.005) was found in the ordinary room (n=52). Part II aimed to describe experiences of lighting in the room equipped with the cycled lighting environment. Patients (n=19) were interviewed and the results were presented in categories: "A dynamic lighting environment", "Impact of lighting on patients' sleep", "The impact of lighting/lights on circadian rhythm" and "The lighting calms". Most had experiences from sleep disorders and half had nightmares/sights and circadian rhythm disruption. Nearly all were pleased with the cycled lighting environment, which together with daylight supported their circadian rhythm. In night's actual lighting levels helped patients and staff to connect which engendered feelings of calm. PMID:26215384

  8. Effect of light intensity on linear shrinkage of photo-activated composite resins during setting.

    PubMed

    Inoue, K; Howashi, G; Kanetou, T; Masumi, S; Ueno, O; Fujii, K

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to examine the effects of light intensity on linear shrinkage of photo-activated composite resins during setting. The materials used were four commercially available photo-activated composite resins. Three light-irradiation instruments were selected and prepared so as to obtain four light intensities (200, 480, 800 and 1600 mW cm(-2)). The linear shrinkage during setting was examined 10 min after light irradiation using a trial balance plastometer, and the specimen thickness was 2.0 mm for all materials. The depth of cure was examined according to the test method described in the International Organization for Standardization (ISO/FDIS 4049: 2000(E)). In measuring the linear shrinkage 60 s from the start of light irradiation for 10 s, there was a significant correlation (r = 0.89-0.94) between the amount of linear shrinkage and the light intensity: an increase in light intensity produced a greater linear shrinkage. Furthermore, there was a significant correlation (r = 0.92-1.0) between the linear shrinkage and the irradiation time: an increase in irradiation time resulted in a greater linear shrinkage. Values of the depth of cure ranged from 1.69 to 3.75 mm. PMID:15634297

  9. Simultaneous Effects of Light Intensity and Phosphorus Supply on the Sterol Content of Phytoplankton

    PubMed Central

    Piepho, Maike; Martin-Creuzburg, Dominik; Wacker, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    Sterol profiles of microalgae and their change with environmental conditions are of great interest in ecological food web research and taxonomic studies alike. Here, we investigated effects of light intensity and phosphorus supply on the sterol content of phytoplankton and assessed potential interactive effects of these important environmental factors on the sterol composition of algae. We identified sterol contents of four common phytoplankton genera, Scenedesmus, Chlamydomonas, Cryptomonas and Cyclotella, and analysed the change in sterol content with varying light intensities in both a high-phosphorus and a low-phosphorus approach. Sterol contents increased significantly with increasing light in three out of four species. Phosphorus-limitation reversed the change of sterol content with light intensity, i.e., sterol content decreased with increasing light at low phosphorus supply. Generally sterol contents were lower in low-phosphorus cultures. In conclusion, both light and phosphorus conditions strongly affect the sterol composition of algae and hence should be considered in ecological and taxonomic studies investigating the biochemical composition of algae. Data suggest a possible sterol limitation of growth and reproduction of herbivorous crustacean zooplankton during summer when high light intensities and low phosphorus supply decrease sterol contents of algae. PMID:21209879

  10. Small angle neutron scattering on an absolute intensity scale and the internal surface of diatom frustules from three species of differing morphologies.

    PubMed

    Garvey, C J; Strobl, M; Percot, A; Saroun, J; Haug, J; Vyverman, W; Chepurnov, V A; Ferris, J M

    2013-05-01

    The internal nanostructure of the diatoms Cyclotella meneghiniana, Seminavis robusta and Achnanthes subsessilis was investigated using small angle neutron scattering (SANS) to examine thin biosilica samples, consisting of isotropic (powder) from their isolated cell walls. The interpretation of SANS data was assisted by several other measurements. The N2 adsorption, interpreted within the Branuer-Emmet-Teller isotherm, yielded the specific surface area of the material. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and Raman spectroscopy indicates that the isolated material is amorphous silica with small amounts of organic cell wall materials acting as a filling material between the silica particles. A two-phase (air and amorphous silica) model was used to interpret small angle neutron scattering data. After correction for instrumental resolution, the measurements on two SANS instruments covered an extended range of scattering vectors 0.0011 nm(-1) < q < 5.6 nm(-1), giving an almost continuous SANS curve over a range of scattering vectors, q, on an absolute scale of intensity for each sample. Each of the samples gave a characteristic scattering curve where log (intensity) versus log (q) has a -4 dependence, with other features superimposed. In the high-q regime, departure from this behaviour was observed at a length-scales equivalent to the proposed unitary silica particle. The limiting Porod scattering law was used to determine the specific area per unit of volume of each sample illuminated by the neutron beam. The Porod behaviour, and divergence from this behaviour, is discussed in terms of various structural features and the proposed mechanisms for the bio-assembly of unitary silica particles in frustules. PMID:23377745

  11. Dynamic reorganization of photosystem II supercomplexes in response to variations in light intensities.

    PubMed

    Albanese, Pascal; Manfredi, Marcello; Meneghesso, Andrea; Marengo, Emilio; Saracco, Guido; Barber, James; Morosinotto, Tomas; Pagliano, Cristina

    2016-10-01

    Plants are sessile organisms and need to acclimate to ever-changing light conditions in order to survive. These changes trigger a dynamic reorganization of the membrane protein complexes in the thylakoid membranes. Photosystem II (PSII) and its light harvesting system (LHCII) are the major target of this acclimation response, and accumulating evidences indicate that the amount and composition of PSII-LHCII supercomplexes in thylakoids are dynamically adjusted in response to changes in light intensity and quality. In this study, we characterized the PSII-LHCII supercomplexes in thylakoid membranes of pea plants in response to long-term acclimation to different light intensities. We provide evidence of a reorganization of the PSII-LHCII supercomplexes showing distinct changes in their antenna moiety. Mass spectrometry analysis revealed a specific reduction of Lhcb3, Lhcb6 and M-LHCII trimers bound to the PSII cores, while the Lhcb4.3 isoform increased in response to high light intensities. The modulation of Lhcb protein content correlates with the reduction of the functional PSII antenna size. These results suggest that the Lhcb3, Lhcb4.3 and Lhcb6 antenna subunits are major players in modulation of the PSII antenna size upon long-term acclimation to increased light levels. PsbS was not detected in the isolated PSII-LHCII supercomplexes at any light condition, despite an increased accumulation in thylakoids of high light acclimated plants, suggesting that PsbS is not a constitutive component of PSII-LHCII supercomplexes. PMID:27378191

  12. Theory of light quenching: effects of fluorescence polarization, intensity, and anisotropy decays.

    PubMed Central

    Kuśba, J; Bogdanov, V; Gryczynski, I; Lakowicz, J R

    1994-01-01

    Experimental studies have recently demonstrated that fluorescence emission can be quenched by laser light pulses from modern high repetition rate lasers, a phenomenon we call "light quenching." We now describe the theory of light quenching and some of its effects on the steady-state and time-resolved intensity and anisotropy decays of fluorophores. Light quenching can decrease or increase the steady-state or time-zero anisotropy. Remarkably, the light quenching can break the usual z axis symmetry of the excited-state population, and the emission polarization can range from -1 to +1 under selected conditions. The measured anisotropy (or polarization) depends upon whether the observation axis is parallel or perpendicular to the propagation direction of the light quenching beam. The effects of light quenching are different for a single pulse, which results in both excitation and quenching, as compared with a time-delayed quenching pulse. Time-delayed light quenching pulses can result in step-like changes in the time-dependent intensity or anisotropy and are predicted to cause oscillations in the frequency-domain intensity and anisotropy decays. The increasing availability of pulsed laser sources offers the opportunity for a new class of two-pulse or multiple-pulse experiments where the sample is prepared by an excitation pulse, the excited state population is modified by the quenching pulse(s), followed by time- or frequency-domain measurements of the resulting emission. PMID:7858140

  13. The effect of low light intensity on the maintenance of circadian synchrony in human subjects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winget, C. M.; Lyman, J.; Beljan, J. R.

    1977-01-01

    The light-intensity threshold for humans is not known. In past space flights owing to power restrictions, light intensities have been minimal and reported to be as low as 15 ft. c. This study was conducted to determine whether the light (L)/dark (D) environment of 16L : 8D at the relatively low light intensity of 15 ft. c. was adequate for the maintenance of circadian synchrony in human subjects. Six healthy male subjects aged 20-23 years were exposed for 21 days to a 16L : 8D photoperiod. During the first 7 days the light intensity was 100 ft. c.; it was reduced to 15 ft. c. during the next 7 days and increased again to 100 ft. c. during the last 7 days of the study. Rectal temperature (RT) and heart rate (HR) were recorded continuously throughout the 21 days of the study. In the 100 ft. c. 16L : 8D the RT and HR rhythms remained stable and circadian throughout. When the light intensity was decreased to 15 ft. c. the periodicity of the HR rhythm was significantly decreased and this rhythm showed marked instability. In contrast the period of the RT rhythm did not change but a consistent phase delay occurred due to a delay in the lights-on associated rise in RT. These divergent effects on these two rhythms in internal desynchronization and performance decrement during the 15 ft. c. exposure. The data emphasize the need for establishing accurately the minimal lighting requirements for the maintenance of circadian rhythms of humans in confined environments.

  14. Technical brief: Constant intense light exposure to lesion and initiate regeneration in normally pigmented zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Rajaram, Kamya; Summerbell, Emily R; Patton, James G

    2014-01-01

    Zebrafish are capable of robust and spontaneous regeneration of injured retina. Constant intense light exposure to adult albino zebrafish specifically causes apoptosis of rod and cone photoreceptor cells and is an excellent model to study the molecular mechanisms underlying photoreceptor regeneration. However, this paradigm has only been applied to lesion zebrafish of the nonpigmented albino genetic background, which precludes the use of numerous transgenic reporter lines that are widely used to study regeneration. Here, we explored the effectiveness of constant intense light exposure in causing photoreceptor apoptosis and stimulating regeneration in normally pigmented zebrafish retinas. We show that constant intense light exposure causes widespread photoreceptor damage in the dorsal-central retinas of pigmented zebrafish. Photoreceptor loss triggers dedifferentiation and proliferation of Müller glia as well as progenitor cell proliferation. We also demonstrate that the timeline of regeneration response is comparable between the albino and the pigmented retinas. PMID:25324680

  15. The effect of background galaxy contamination on the absolute magnitude and light curve speed class of type Ia supernovae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boisseau, John R.; Wheeler, J. Craig

    1991-01-01

    Observational data are presented in support of the hypothesis that background galaxy contamination is present in the photometric data of Ia supernovae and that this effect can account for the observed dispersion in the light curve speeds of most of Ia supernovae. The implication is that the observed dispersion in beta is artificial and that most of Ia supernovae have nearly homogeneous light curves. The result supports the notion that Ia supernovae are good standard candles.

  16. A light intensity function suitable for multimode fiber-optic sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    He, Gang; Cuomo, Frank W.

    1991-01-01

    Intensity distribution functions on the image plane are derived under the assumption that a multimode optic fiber is illuminated by a light source which can be approximated by infinite uniangular beams carrying equal power. The application of the theory to a Lambertian source is discussed. Experimental results, based on the observation of the light intensity distribution imaged on an opaque screen and collected by a digital camera, are presented. The theoretical and experimental data are compared to verify that the intensity function is an accurate model for describing the realistic approach to sensor design. The limitations of the uniangular and uniform intensity distribution models are discussed on the basis of theoretical and experimental results.

  17. Effect of ambient temperature and light intensity on physiological reactions of heavy broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Olanrewaju, H A; Purswell, J L; Collier, S D; Branton, S L

    2010-12-01

    The effects of ambient temperature, light intensity, and their interaction on blood acid-base balance, metabolites, and electrolytes in broiler chickens under environmentally controlled conditions were examined in 2 trials. The experiment consisted of a factorial arrangement of treatments in a randomized complete block design. The 9 treatments consisted of 3 levels of temperatures (low = 15.6°C; moderate = 21.1°C; high = 26.7°C) from 21 to 56 d of age and 3 levels of light intensities (0.5, 3.0, 20 lx) from 8 to 56 d of age at 50% RH. A total of 540 Ross 708 chicks were randomly distributed into 9 environmentally controlled chambers (30 male and 30 female chicks/chamber) at 1 d of age. Feed and water were provided ad libitum. Venous blood samples were collected on d 21 (baseline), 28, 42, and 56. High ambient temperature significantly (P ≤ 0.05) reduced BW, partial pressure of CO(2), bicarbonate, hematocrit, hemoglobin, K(+), and Na(+) along with significantly (P ≤ 0.05) elevated pH level, Cl(-), glucose, osmolality, and anion gap concentrations. Partial pressure of O(2) was slightly increased in response to increased ambient temperature. There was no effect of light intensity on most of the blood variables examined. Acid-base regulation during high ambient temperature and light intensity exposure did not deteriorate despite a lower partial pressure of CO(2), which consequently increased blood pH because of a compensatory decrease in HCO(3)(-) concentration. Plasma corticosterone was not affected by temperature, light intensity, or their interaction. These results indicate that continuous exposure of broiler chickens to varying light intensities had a minor effect on physiological blood variables, whereas high ambient temperature markedly affected various blood variables without inducing stress in broilers. PMID:21076106

  18. Spectral intensity of the N2 emission in argon low-pressure arc discharges for lighting purposes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedl, R.; Fantz, U.

    2012-04-01

    Nitrogen is discussed as an alternative to hazardous mercury in lamps for general lighting. Molecular nitrogen bands emit in both the near-UV (the second positive system C3Πu → B3Πg) and the visible spectral range (the first positive system B3Πg → A3Σ+u), which reduces conversion losses. To analyse the potential of nitrogen, low-pressure arc discharges in an argon background were characterized by means of optical emission spectroscopy. The spectral intensity of the molecular nitrogen emission rises with increasing nitrogen content in the discharge and shows a maximum around 4 mbar of absolute pressure. With regard to the application as a light source, radiation efficiencies were determined, which are around 5% at maximum. In order to identify the main population processes a collisional radiative model for the nitrogen-argon system was established which reveals the high relevance of heavy-particle collisions due to a pressure of a few mbar. The decisive excitation reactions for the state N2 C3Πu are the well-known processes of energy pooling between metastable nitrogen molecules and energy transfer from metastable argon atoms. For the state N2 B3Πg the main population channels are collision-induced crossings within the nitrogen states, where the collision partner can be either a nitrogen molecule or an argon atom, and the quenching collisions with argon.

  19. Determinations of its Absolute Dimensions and Distance by the Analyses of Light and Radial-Velocity Curves of the Contact Binary -I. V417 Aquilae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jae-Woo; Kim, Chun-Hwey; Lee, Chung-Uk; Oh, Kyu-Dong

    2004-06-01

    New photometric and spectroscopic solutions of W-type overcontact binary V417 Aql were obtained by solving the UBV light curves of Samec et al. (1997) and radial-velocity ones of Lu & Rucinski (1999) with the 2003 version of the Wilson-Devinney binary code. In the light curve synthesis the light of a third-body, which Qian (2003) proposed, was considered and obtained about 2.7%, 2.2%, and 0.4% for U, B, and V bandpasses, respectively. The model with third-light is better fitted to eclipse parts than that with no third-light. Absolute dimensions of V417 Aql are determined from our solution as M1=0.53 M⊙, M2=1.45 M⊙, R1=0.84 R⊙ and R2=1.31 M⊙, and the distance to it is deduced as about 216pc. Our distance is well consistent with that (204pc) derived from Rucinski & Duerbeck's (1997) relation, MV=MV(log P, B-V), but is more distant than that (131±40pc) determined by the Hipparcos trigonometric parallax. The difference may result from the relatively large error of Hipparcos parallax for V417 Aql.

  20. High resolution light intensity spectrum analyzer (LISA) based on Brillouin optical filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heras, C.; Subías, J.; Pelayo, J.; Villuendas, F.

    2007-04-01

    A high-resolution light intensity spectrum analyzer technique to derive the RF modulation spectrum of optical signals is presented and experimentally confirmed. It uses the XPM nonlinear effect in a dispersion shifted fiber to obtain the light intensity spectrum, and a Brillouin optical filtering method to implement the high resolution spectrometric analysis. Measured RF spectra of PRBS modulated optical signals at 2.5 Gb/s and 10 Gb/s are presented and compared with their corresponding ones obtained in the electrical detection domain to confirm the capabilities of the method.Influence of fiber electrostriction effect is measured and analyzed.

  1. Using a Hexagonal Mirror for Varying Light Intensity in the Measurement of Small-Angle Variation.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Meng-Chang; Lin, Jiun-You; Chang, Chia-Ou

    2016-01-01

    Precision positioning and control are critical to industrial-use processing machines. In order to have components fabricated with excellent precision, the measurement of small-angle variations must be as accurate as possible. To achieve this goal, this study provides a new and simple optical mechanism by varying light intensity. A He-Ne laser beam was passed through an attenuator and into a beam splitter. The reflected light was used as an intensity reference for calibrating the measurement. The transmitted light as a test light entered the optical mechanism hexagonal mirror, the optical mechanism of which was created by us, and then it entered the power detector after four consecutive reflections inside the mirror. When the hexagonal mirror was rotated by a small angle, the laser beam was parallel shifted. Once the laser beam was shifted, the hitting area on the detector was changed; it might be partially outside the sensing zone and would cause the variation of detection intensity. This variation of light intensity can be employed to measure small-angle variations. The experimental results demonstrate the feasibility of this method. The resolution and sensitivity are 3 × 10(-40) and 4 mW/° in the angular range of 0.6°, respectively, and 9.3 × 10(-50) and 13 mW/° in the angular range of 0.25°. PMID:27537893

  2. The effect of mechanical cleaning and thermal disinfection on light intensity provided by fibrelight Macintosh laryngoscopes.

    PubMed

    Bucx, M J L; De Gast, H M; Veldhuis, J; Hassing, L H; Meulemans, A; Kammeyer, A

    2003-05-01

    The increased use of thermal decontamination procedures for fibrelight laryngoscope blades, to comply with international guidelines, will have considerable economical effects. We evaluated the effect of mechanical cleaning plus thermal disinfection at 90 degrees C, with or without subsequent steam sterilisation at 134 degrees C, on light intensity provided by fibrelight laryngoscopes. After mounting the blades in a special frame with a built-in light source, light intensity was measured using radiometer/photometer. In total, 14 blades provided by 11 companies were tested. The majority of fibrelight laryngoscope blades were fairly resistant to the damaging effects of machine washing plus disinfection at 90 degrees C (mean [range] reduction in light intensity 34.6%[2.1-78.3%]). However, when exposed to an additional sterilisation procedure at 134 degrees C, the majority of blades were unable to withstand the combined treatment for 300 cycles (mean [range] reduction in light intensity 86.5%[32.0-98.7%]). This study stresses the need for fibrelight laryngoscope blades which are more resistant to thermal decontamination procedures than those available at present. PMID:12694003

  3. Light intensity alters the extent of arsenic toxicity in Helianthus annuus L. seedlings.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Geeta; Srivastava, Prabhat Kumar; Singh, Vijay Pratap; Prasad, Sheo Mohan

    2014-06-01

    The present study is aimed at assessing the extent of arsenic (As) toxicity under three different light intensities-optimum (400 μmole photon m(-2) s(-1)), sub-optimum (225 μmole photon m(-2) s(-1)), and low (75 μmole photon m(-2) s(-1))-exposed to Helianthus annuus L. var. DRSF-113 seedlings by examining various physiological and biochemical parameters. Irrespective of the light intensities under which H. annuus L. seedlings were grown, there was an As dose (low, i.e., 6 mg kg(-1) soil, As1; and high, i.e., 12 mg kg(-1) soil, As2)-dependent decrease in all the growth parameters, viz., fresh mass, shoot length, and root length. Optimum light-grown seedlings exhibited better growth performance than the sub-optimum and low light-grown seedlings; however, low light-grown plants had maximum root and shoot lengths. Accumulation of As in the plant tissues depended upon its concentration used, proximity of the plant tissue, and intensity of the light. Greater intensity of light allowed greater assimilation of photosynthates accompanied by more uptake of nutrients along with As from the medium. The levels of chlorophyll a, b, and carotenoids declined with increasing concentrations of As. Seedlings acquired maximum Chl a and b under optimum light which were more compatible to face As1 and As2 doses of As, also evident from the overall status of enzymatic (SOD, POD, CAT, and GST) and non-enzymatic antioxidant (Pro). PMID:24699829

  4. Effect of light intensity on flight control and temporal properties of photoreceptors in bumblebees.

    PubMed

    Reber, Therese; Vähäkainu, Antti; Baird, Emily; Weckström, Matti; Warrant, Eric; Dacke, Marie

    2015-05-01

    To control flight, insects rely on the pattern of visual motion generated on the retina as they move through the environment. When light levels fall, vision becomes less reliable and flight control thus becomes more challenging. Here, we investigated the effect of light intensity on flight control by filming the trajectories of free-flying bumblebees (Bombus terrestris, Linnaeus 1758) in an experimental tunnel at different light levels. As light levels fell, flight speed decreased and the flight trajectories became more tortuous but the bees were still remarkably good at centring their flight about the tunnel's midline. To investigate whether this robust flight performance can be explained by visual adaptations in the bumblebee retina, we also examined the response speed of the green-sensitive photoreceptors at the same light intensities. We found that the response speed of the photoreceptors significantly decreased as light levels fell. This indicates that bumblebees have both behavioural (reduction in flight speed) and retinal (reduction in response speed of the photoreceptors) adaptations to allow them to fly in dim light. However, the more tortuous flight paths recorded in dim light suggest that these adaptations do not support flight with the same precision during the twilight hours of the day. PMID:25750416

  5. Effects of Plant Size, Temperature, and Light Intensity on Flowering of Phalaenopsis Hybrids in Mediterranean Greenhouses

    PubMed Central

    Paradiso, Roberta; De Pascale, Stefania

    2014-01-01

    Mediterranean greenhouses for cultivation of Phalaenopsis orchids reproduce the warm, humid, and shaded environment of tropical underbrush. Heating represents the highest production cost, due to the high thermal requirements and the long unproductive phase of juvenility, in which plants attain the critical size for flowering. Our researches aimed to investigate the effect of plant size, temperature, and light intensity, during the phase of flower induction, on flowering of modern genotypes selected for Mediterranean greenhouses. Three experiments were carried out to compare (i) plant size: reduced size versus size considered optimal for flowering (hybrids “Sogo Yukidian,” “Chain Xen Diamond,” and “Pinlong”); (ii) temperature: moderate reduction of temperature versus standard thermal regime (hybrid “Premium”); (iii) light intensity: supplemental lighting versus reference light intensity (hybrid “Premium”). The premature exposure of plants to the inductive treatment delayed the beginning of flowering and reduced the flower stem quality, in all the tested hybrids. In “Premium,” the lower temperature did not affect flowering earliness and commercial quality of flower stems compared to the standard regime, whereas it promoted stem branching. In the same hybrid, supplemental lighting anticipated flowering and promoted the emission of the second stem and the stem branching, compared to the reference light regime. PMID:25506068

  6. Delayed detonation models for normal and subluminous type Ia sueprnovae: Absolute brightness, light curves, and molecule formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoflich, P.; Khokhlov, A. M.; Wheeler, J. C.

    1995-01-01

    We compute optical and infrared light curves of the pulsating class of delayed detonation models for Type Ia supernovae (SN Ia's) using an elaborate treatment of the Local Thermodynamic Equilbrium (LTE) radiation transport, equation of state and ionization balance, expansion opacity including the cooling by CO, Co(+), and SiO, and a Monte Carlo gamma-ray deposition scheme. The models have an amount of Ni-56 in the range from approximately or equal to 0.1 solar mass up to 0.7 solar mass depending on the density at which the transition from a deflagration to a detonation occurs. Models with a large nickel production give light curves comparable to those of typical Type Ia supernovae. Subluminous supernovae can be explained by models with a low nickel production. Multiband light curves are presented in comparison with the normally bright event SN 1992bc and the subluminous events Sn 1991bg and SN 1992bo to establish the principle that the delayed detonation paradigm in Chandrasekhar mass models may give a common explosion mechanism accounting for both normal and subluminous SN Ia's. Secondary IR-maxima are formed in the models of normal SN Ia's as a photospheric effect if the photospheric radius continues to increase well after maximum light. Secondary maxima appear later and stronger in models with moderate expansion velocities and with radioactive material closer to the surface. Model light curves for subluminous SN Ia's tend to show only one 'late' IR-maximum. In some delayed detonation models shell-like envelopes form, which consist of unburned carbon and oxygen. The formation of molecules in these envelopes is addressed. If the model retains a C/O-envelope and is subluminous, strong vibration bands of CO may appear, typically several weeks past maximum light. CO should be very weak or absent in normal Sn Ia's.

  7. Distribution of Atomic Hydrogen in the Upper Atmosphere: Assessment of Absolute Densities and Variations in the light of Recent Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishop, J.

    2002-12-01

    Knowledge of atomic hydrogen densities ([H](z)) in the upper atmosphere is important both for understanding mesospheric-lower thermospheric (MLT) chemistry and for realistic modeling of geocoronal interactions with ionized populations (e.g., plasmasphere, ring current). Work culminating in the 1970's failed to achieve consistent determinations of the distribution of atomic hydrogen; because of this, the relevance of [H](z) determinations in other areas of aeronomic research has remained unacknowledged. Extensive independent sets of optical data, coupled with improved solar Lyman line series irradiances and corrections of assumptions used in the earlier data analyses, however, now enable us to resolve the older inconsistencies and pursue determination of quantities of genuine interest: thermospheric atomic hydrogen vertical fluxes, characteristics of the satellite atom component in the geocorona, etc. These data sets include: Wisconsin Hα\\ Mapper (WHAM) Fabry-Perot data from Kitt Peak Observatory, providing ~ \\ 40,000\\ spectra of geocoronal and galactic Balmer~α intensities beginning in 1997; very high resolution Fabry-Perot data from Pine Bluff Observatory (Wisconsin) of both Balmer~α\\ and Balmer~β\\ intensities and line profiles from 2000-2001; FUSE EUV measurements of Lyman line series intensities from 1999 and 2000 (excluding Lyman~α); MiniSat1/EURD EUV spectrometer measurements of Lyman line series intensities (excluding Lyman~α) from 1997 to 2001; and IMAGE/GEO Lyman~α\\ intensity data from geocoronal positions (satellite apogees ~ 7~R E). In this presentation, modeling analyses of representative data subsets will be discussed, focusing on results relevant to broader aeronomy topics.

  8. Red Color Light at Different Intensities Affects the Performance, Behavioral Activities and Welfare of Broilers.

    PubMed

    Senaratna, D; Samarakone, T S; Gunawardena, W W D A

    2016-07-01

    Red light (RL) marked higher weight gain (WG) and preference of broilers compared to other light colors. This study aimed to investigate how different intensities of RL affect the performance, behavior and welfare of broilers. RL treatments were T1 = high intensity (320 lux), T2 = medium intensity (20 lux); T3 = dim intensity (5 lux), T4 = control/white light at (20 lux) provided on 20L:4D schedule and T5 = negative control; 12 hours dark: 12 hours day light. Cobb strain broilers were used in a Complete Randomize Design with 6 replicates. WG, water/feed intake, feed conversion ratio (FCR), mortality, behavior and welfare were assessed. At 35 d, significantly (p<0.05) highest body weight (2,147.06 g±99) was recorded by T3. Lowest body weight (1,640.55 g±56) and FCR (1.34) were recorded by T5. Skin weight was the only carcass parameter showed a significant (p<0.05) influence giving the highest (56.2 g) and the lowest (12.6 g) values for T5 and T1 respectively. Reduced welfare status indicated by significantly (p<0.05) higher foot pad lesions, hock burns and breast blisters was found under T3, due to reduced expression of behavior. Highest walking (2.08%±1%) was performed under T1 in the evening during 29 to 35 days. Highest dust bathing (3.01%±2%) was performed in the morning during 22 to 28 days and highest bird interaction (BI) (4.87%±4%) was observed in the evening by T5 during 14 to 21 days. Light intensity×day session×age interaction was significantly (p<0.05) affected walking, dust bathing and BI. Light intensity significantly (p<0.05) affected certain behaviors such as lying, eating, drinking, standing, walking, preening while lying, wing/leg stretching, sleeping, dozing, BI, vocalization, idling. In conclusion, birds essentially required provision of light in the night for better performance. Exposed to 5 lux contributed to higher WG, potentially indicating compromised welfare status. Further researches are suggested to investigate RL intensity based

  9. Red Color Light at Different Intensities Affects the Performance, Behavioral Activities and Welfare of Broilers

    PubMed Central

    Senaratna, D.; Samarakone, T. S.; Gunawardena, W. W. D. A.

    2016-01-01

    Red light (RL) marked higher weight gain (WG) and preference of broilers compared to other light colors. This study aimed to investigate how different intensities of RL affect the performance, behavior and welfare of broilers. RL treatments were T1 = high intensity (320 lux), T2 = medium intensity (20 lux); T3 = dim intensity (5 lux), T4 = control/white light at (20 lux) provided on 20L:4D schedule and T5 = negative control; 12 hours dark: 12 hours day light. Cobb strain broilers were used in a Complete Randomize Design with 6 replicates. WG, water/feed intake, feed conversion ratio (FCR), mortality, behavior and welfare were assessed. At 35 d, significantly (p<0.05) highest body weight (2,147.06 g±99) was recorded by T3. Lowest body weight (1,640.55 g±56) and FCR (1.34) were recorded by T5. Skin weight was the only carcass parameter showed a significant (p<0.05) influence giving the highest (56.2 g) and the lowest (12.6 g) values for T5 and T1 respectively. Reduced welfare status indicated by significantly (p<0.05) higher foot pad lesions, hock burns and breast blisters was found under T3, due to reduced expression of behavior. Highest walking (2.08%±1%) was performed under T1 in the evening during 29 to 35 days. Highest dust bathing (3.01%±2%) was performed in the morning during 22 to 28 days and highest bird interaction (BI) (4.87%±4%) was observed in the evening by T5 during 14 to 21 days. Light intensity×day session×age interaction was significantly (p<0.05) affected walking, dust bathing and BI. Light intensity significantly (p<0.05) affected certain behaviors such as lying, eating, drinking, standing, walking, preening while lying, wing/leg stretching, sleeping, dozing, BI, vocalization, idling. In conclusion, birds essentially required provision of light in the night for better performance. Exposed to 5 lux contributed to higher WG, potentially indicating compromised welfare status. Further researches are suggested to investigate RL intensity based

  10. Molecular bases and photobiological consequences of light intensity adaptation in photosynthetic organisms

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y-B.; Durnford, D.; Koblizek, M.; Falkowski, P. G.

    2003-02-10

    By applying a combination of light transitions, uncouplers, and inhibitors of photosynthetic electron transport inhibitors we modulate the redox poise of many components in the plastid and examine the pattern of expression of cab1 gene. This gene encodes the major light harvesting protein that services photosystem II. While our results have confirmed our own previous finding that light intensity regulation of cab1 gene expression is signaled by the redox state of the PQ pool, we have also identified additional sensor(s) located in the PET chain.

  11. Absolute band intensities in the nu19/nu23 (530 cm(-1)) and nu7 (777 cm(-1)) bands of acetone ((CH3)2CO) from 232 to 295 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, W. F.; Stevenson, A.; Reuter, D. C.; Sirota, J. M.

    2000-01-01

    Absolute band intensities of acetone ((CH3)2CO) in the nu19/nu23 and nu7 band systems near 530 and 777 cm(-1), respectively, were measured at temperatures of 232, 262 and 295 K, using a Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometer. No evident temperature dependence for the band intensities was observed. The dipole moments and the fundamental band intensities were derived in the harmonic oscillator approximation. The results are useful for the spectroscopic retrieval of acetone concentrations in the upper atmosphere.

  12. Photoprotective capacity of non-photochemical quenching in plants acclimated to different light intensities.

    PubMed

    Ware, Maxwell A; Belgio, Erica; Ruban, Alexander V

    2015-12-01

    Arabidopsis plants grown at low light were exposed to a gradually increasing actinic light routine. This method allows for the discerning of the photoprotective component of NPQ, pNPQ and photoinhibition. They exhibited lower values of Photosystem II (PSII) yield in comparison to high-light grown plants, and higher calculated dark fluorescence level (F'o calc.) than the measured one (F'o act.). As a result, in low-light grown plants, the values of qP measured in the dark appeared higher than 1. Normally, F'o act. and F'o calc. match well at moderate light intensities but F'o act. becomes higher at increasing intensities due to reaction centre (RCII) damage; this indicates the onset of photoinhibition. To explain the unusual increase of qP in the dark in low-light grown plants, we have undertaken an analysis of PSII antenna size using biochemical and spectroscopic approaches. Sucrose gradient separation of thylakoid membrane complexes and fast fluorescence induction experiments illustrated that the relative PSII cross section does not increase appreciably with the rise in PSII antenna size in the low-light grown plants. This suggests that part of the increased LHCII antenna is less efficiently coupled to the RCII. A model based upon the existence of an uncoupled population LHCII is proposed to explain the discrepancies in calculated and measured values of F'o. PMID:25702085

  13. The influence of light intensity and photoperiod on duckweed biomass and starch accumulation for bioethanol production.

    PubMed

    Yin, Yehu; Yu, Changjiang; Yu, Li; Zhao, Jinshan; Sun, Changjiang; Ma, Yubin; Zhou, Gongke

    2015-01-01

    Duckweed has been considered as a valuable feedstock for bioethanol production due to its high biomass and starch production. To investigate the effects of light conditions on duckweed biomass and starch production, Lemna aequinoctialis 6000 was cultivated at different photoperiods (12:12, 16:8 and 24:0h) and light intensities (20, 50, 80, 110, 200 and 400μmolm(-2)s(-1)). The results showed that the duckweed biomass and starch production was increased with increasing light intensity and photoperiod except at 200 and 400μmolm(-2)s(-1). Considering the light cost, 110μmolm(-2)s(-1) was optimum light condition for starch accumulation with the highest maximum growth rate, biomass and starch production of 8.90gm(-2)day(-1), 233.25gm(-2) and 98.70gm(-2), respectively. Moreover, the results suggested that high light induction was a promising method for duckweed starch accumulation. This study provides optimized light conditions for future industrial large-scale duckweed cultivation. PMID:25841186

  14. The Fast Declining Type Ia Supernova 2003gs, and Evidence for a Significant Dispersion in Near-Infrared Absolute Magnitudes of Fast Decliners at Maximum Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krisciunas, Kevin; Marion, G. H.; Suntzeff, Nicholas B.; Blanc, Guillaume; Bufano, Filomena; Candia, Pablo; Cartier, Regis; Elias-Rosa, Nancy; Espinoza, Juan; Gonzalez, David; Gonzalez, Luis; Gonzalez, Sergio; Gooding, Samuel D.; Hamuy, Mario; Knox, Ethan A.; Milne, Peter A.; Morrell, Nidia; Phillips, Mark M.; Stritzinger, Maximilian; Thomas-Osip, Joanna

    2009-12-01

    We obtained optical photometry of SN 2003gs on 49 nights, from 2 to 494 days after T(B max). We also obtained near-IR photometry on 21 nights. SN 2003gs was the first fast declining Type Ia SN that has been well observed since SN 1999by. While it was subluminous in optical bands compared to more slowly declining Type Ia SNe, it was not subluminous at maximum light in the near-IR bands. There appears to be a bimodal distribution in the near-IR absolute magnitudes of Type Ia SNe at maximum light. Those that peak in the near-IR after T(B max) are subluminous in the all bands. Those that peak in the near-IR prior to T(B max), such as SN 2003gs, have effectively the same near-IR absolute magnitudes at maximum light regardless of the decline rate Δm 15(B). Near-IR spectral evidence suggests that opacities in the outer layers of SN 2003gs are reduced much earlier than for normal Type Ia SNe. That may allow γ rays that power the luminosity to escape more rapidly and accelerate the decline rate. This conclusion is consistent with the photometric behavior of SN 2003gs in the IR, which indicates a faster than normal decline from approximately normal peak brightness. Based in part on observations taken at the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory, National Optical Astronomy Observatories, which are operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc. (AURA) under cooperative agreement with the National Science Foundation. The near-IR photometry from La Silla and Paranal was obtained by the European Supernova Collaboration (ESC).

  15. Effect of varying light intensity on welfare indices of broiler chickens grown to heavy weights

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects of varying light-intensity on ocular, immue, fear, and leg health of broiler chickens grown to heavy weights under environmentally controlled conditions were evaluated. Four identical trials were conducted with two replications per trial. In each trial, 600 Ross 308 chicks were randomly ...

  16. The Effect of Light Intensity and Noise on the Classroom Behaviour of Pupils with Asperger Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Menzinger, Bernhard; Jackson, Robin

    2009-01-01

    The focus of the study reported in this article is the behavioural response of pupils with Asperger syndrome to light and sound intensity and the development of ways to help them to cope with such sensory stimuli. A number of practical ways of minimising the negative effects of various sensory stimuli are noted: (1) the establishment of "a place…

  17. Device to color modulate a stationary light beam gives high intensity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gantz, W. A.

    1966-01-01

    Signal controlled system color modulates a beam of light while also providing high intensity and a stationary beam, either collimated or focused. The color modulation acquired by the presented system can be compatible with any color film by employing color filters formed to provide a color wedge having a color distribution compatible with the films color sensitivity.

  18. Effect of varying light intensity on blood physiological reactions of broiler chickens grown to heavy weights

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study investigated effects of varying levels of light intensities (25, 10, 5, 2.5, and 0.2 lx) from 22 to 56 d of age at 50% RH on blood acid-base balance, metabolites, and electrolytes of heavy broilers reared under environmentally controlled conditions. Four identical trials were conducted wi...

  19. Light Intensity and Carbon Dioxide Availability Impact Antioxidant Activity in Green Onions (Allium fistulosumm L)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levine, Lanfang; Bisbee, Patricia; Pare, Paul

    The prospect of long-duration manned space missions poses many challenges, including the development of a sustainable life support system and effective methods of space-radiation protection. To mitigate the risk of increased space-radiation, functional foods rich in antioxidant properties such as green onions are of particular interest. However it has yet to be established whether antioxidant properties can be preserved or enhanced in space environment where carbon dioxide, lighting intensity, gravity and pressure differ from which plants have acclimated to on earth. In this study, green onions (Allium fistulosumm L. cultivar Kinka) rich in antioxidant flavonoids are used as a model system to investigate variations in antioxidant capacity with plants grown under varying light intensities and CO2 concentrations. The antioxidant potential is determined using both radical cation scavenging and oxygen radical absorbance assays. For all light intensities assayed, antioxidant potential in water extract of green onions per gram biomass declined with CO2 increases up to 1200 ppm, and then leveled off with further CO2 increase to 4000 ppm. This inverse carbon dioxide versus antioxidant activity correlation suggests lower accumulation rates for water soluble antioxidant compounds compared to total biomass under increasing CO2 concentrations. The effect of increasing atmospheric CO2 concentration on antioxidant activity of ethanol extracts were light intensity dependent. The implications of these findings are discussed in the context of traditional plant antioxidants including vitamin C and the major onion flavonoid quercetin.

  20. INTERACTIVE EFFECTS OF AMMONIA AND LIGHT INTENSITY ON OCULAR, FEAR AND LEG HEALTH IN BROILER CHICKENS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Purpose. High gaseous ammonia is detrimental to poultry health under confined environments; ocular disease is common in chickens during the first two week of placement. Furthermore, welfare consultants have expressed concerns that low light-intensity may cause damage to the lens, leading to blindnes...

  1. Decoy-state protocol for quantum cryptography with four different intensities of coherent light

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Xiangbin

    2005-07-15

    We propose an efficient decoy-state protocol for practical quantum key distribution using coherent states. The protocol uses four intensities of different coherent light. A good final key rate is achieved by our protocol with typical parameters of existing practical setups, even with a very low channel transmittance.

  2. Effect of ambient temperature and light intensity on physiological reactions of heavy broiler chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects of ambient temperature, light intensity, and their interaction on blood acid-base balance, metabolites, and electrolytes in broiler chickens under environmentally controlled conditions were examined in 2 trials. The experiment was consisted of a factorial arrangement of treatments in a r...

  3. Interactive effects of ammonia and light intensity on hematochemical variables in broiler chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study examined the influence of atmospheric ammonia exposure, light intensity, and their interaction on blood gases, electrolytes, and acid-base balance in broiler chickens under environmentally controlled conditions. The experiment consisted of a 3 × 3 factorial arranged in a randomized comple...

  4. Light intensity-associated eye lesions of Fischer 344 rats in long-term studies.

    PubMed

    Rao, G N

    1991-01-01

    Albino rats and mice are sensitive to light and the recommended illumination of animal rooms (75-125 ft-candles) is known to cause retinal damage. When a room is illuminated by ceiling lights, animals in the cages of the top row and, to some extent, in the side columns of cage racks will be exposed to higher light intensity than those in the other cages of the rack. In 2-yr chemical carcinogenicity studies of the National Toxicology Program (previously the Carcinogenicity Bioassay Program of the National Cancer Institute), Fischer 344 rats were group-housed in hanging drawer-type clear polycarbonate cages. During the course of the chronic studies, a number of rats developed opacity of the eye. Ocular examination indicated chronic uveitis, deep interstitial keratitis, cataract formation leading to panophthalmitis, and in severe cases, phthisis bulbi. Histologic examination showed cataract and retinal degeneration. Incidences of these lesions were highest (greater than 55%) in the rats of the top rows and lowest in those of the bottom rows (less than 10%) of cages with no relation to chemical treatment, indicating an association with light intensity. The incidence of these eye lesions was markedly decreased (less than 15%) by decreasing the light intensity of the animal room to less than 50 ft-candles at 5 ft from the floor and rotating the cages in each column of a rack from top to bottom when cages or racks were changed. PMID:1663269

  5. Simulation of reflected light intensity changes during navigation and radio-frequency lesioning in the brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansson, Johannes D.; Fredriksson, Ingemar; Wa˚Rdell, Karin; Eriksson, Ola

    2009-07-01

    An electrode with adjacent optical fibers for measurements during navigation and radio frequency lesioning in the brain is modeled for Monte Carlo simulations of light transport in brain tissue. Relative reflected light intensity at 780 nm, I780, from this electrode and probes with identical fiber configuration are simulated using the intensity from native white matter as reference. Models are made of homogeneous native and coagulated gray, thalamus, and white matter as well as blood. Dual layer models, including models with a layer of cerebrospinal fluid between the fibers and the brain tissue, are also made. Simulated I780 was 0.16 for gray matter, 0.67 for coagulate gray matter, 0.36 for thalamus, 0.39 for coagulated thalamus, unity for white matter, 0.70 for coagulated white matter, and 0.24 for blood. Thalamic matter is also found to reflect more light than gray matter and less than white matter in clinical studies. In conclusion, the reflected light intensity can be used to differentiate between gray and white matter during navigation. Furthermore, coagulation of light gray tissue, such as the thalamus, might be difficult to detect using I780, but coagulation in darker gray tissue should result in a rapid increase of I780.

  6. The effect of low light intensity on the maintenance of circadian synchrony in human subjects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winget, C. M.; Lyman, J.; Beljan, J. R.

    1976-01-01

    Experiments were conducted on six healthy male subjects aged 20-23 yr and exposed for 21 days in a confined regulated environment to 16L:8D light:dark cycle with a view toward determining whether the light environment of 16L:8D at the relatively low light intensity of 15 ft.c. is adequate for the maintenance of circadian synchrony in man. The light intensity was 100 ft.c. during the first seven days, reduced to 15 ft.c. during the next seven days, and increased again to 100 ft.c. during the last seven days. Rectal temperature (RT) and heart rate (HR) were recorded throughout the three phases. In the 100 ft.c. regime, the RT and HR rhythms remained stable and circadian throughout. It is shown that 15 ft.c. light intensity is at or below threshold for maintaining circadian synchrony of human physiologic rhythms marked by instability and internal desynchronization with degradation of performance and well-being.

  7. Backscattering enhancement of light by nanoparticles positioned in localized optical intensity peaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhigang; Li, Xu; Taflove, Allen; Backman, Vadim

    2006-02-01

    We report what we believe to be a novel backscattering phenomenon associated with localized optical intensity peaks (spanning as little as 43 nm) arising at the shadow-side surfaces of plane-wave-illuminated dielectric microcylinders of noncircular cross sections. Namely, for nanometer-scale dielectric particles positioned within the localized intensity peaks, their backscattering of visible light is enhanced by several orders of magnitude relative to the case of isolated nanoparticles (i.e., Rayleigh scattering). The positions of the localized intensity peaks can be quickly scanned along the microcylinder surface by changing either the incident wavelength or angle. This combination of giant backscattering enhancement of nanoparticles and ease and rapidity of scanning may present advantages relative to the use of fragile, mechanically scanned, near-field probes. Potential applications include visible-light detection, characterization, and manipulation of nanoparticles.

  8. Detection of light and vibration modulates bioluminescence intensity in the glowworm, Arachnocampa flava.

    PubMed

    Mills, Rebecca; Popple, Julie-Anne; Veidt, Martin; Merritt, David John

    2016-04-01

    Glowworms are larval fungus gnats that emit light from a specialised abdominal light organ. The light attracts small arthropod prey to their web-like silk snares. Larvae glow throughout the night and can modulate their bioluminescence in response to sensory input. To better understand light output regulation and its ecological significance, we examined the larvae's reaction to light exposure, vibration and sound. Exposure to a 5-min light pulse in the laboratory causes larvae to exponentially decrease their light output over 5-10 min until they completely switch off. They gradually return to pre-exposure levels but do not show a rebound. Larvae are most sensitive to ultraviolet light, then blue, green and red. Vibration of the larval snares results in a several-fold increase in bioluminescence over 20-30 s, followed by an exponential return to pre-exposure levels over 15-30 min. Under some conditions, larvae can respond to vibration by initiating bioluminescence when they are not glowing; however, the response is reduced compared to when they are glowing. We propose that inhibitory and excitatory mechanisms combine to modulate bioluminescence intensity by regulating biochemical reactions or gating the access of air to the light organ. PMID:26897608

  9. Absolute Zero

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnelly, Russell J.; Sheibley, D.; Belloni, M.; Stamper-Kurn, D.; Vinen, W. F.

    2006-12-01

    Absolute Zero is a two hour PBS special attempting to bring to the general public some of the advances made in 400 years of thermodynamics. It is based on the book “Absolute Zero and the Conquest of Cold” by Tom Shachtman. Absolute Zero will call long-overdue attention to the remarkable strides that have been made in low-temperature physics, a field that has produced 27 Nobel Prizes. It will explore the ongoing interplay between science and technology through historical examples including refrigerators, ice machines, frozen foods, liquid oxygen and nitrogen as well as much colder fluids such as liquid hydrogen and liquid helium. A website has been established to promote the series: www.absolutezerocampaign.org. It contains information on the series, aimed primarily at students at the middle school level. There is a wealth of material here and we hope interested teachers will draw their student’s attention to this website and its substantial contents, which have been carefully vetted for accuracy.

  10. Violation of Bloch's Law that specifies reciprocity of intensity and duration with brief light flashes

    PubMed Central

    Greene, Ernest

    2013-01-01

    For more than a century researchers have been reporting that the visual impact of a very brief flash is determined by the quantity of photons that the flash delivers. This has been variously described as the Bunsen-Roscoe Law or Bloch's Law, often specified as reciprocity of intensity × duration. Prior research found no evidence for such reciprocity when microsecond-duration flashes from a light-emitting diode array were used to display the major contours of nameable shapes. The present work tested with flash durations ranging up to 100 ms and also found no reciprocity. This departure from classic principles might be due to the specific range of wavelengths of the light-emitting diodes and to a mesopic level of ambient light, which together would preclude activation of rods. The reciprocity of intensity and duration may only be valid with full dark adaptation and very dim flashes that activate rods. PMID:25165512

  11. Net effect of many gravitational fields on the intensity of celestial light sources. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Cipperly, G.E.

    1982-12-01

    This thesis investigates the lens-like action of the gravitational fields of celestial bodies, which can alter the apparent intensity of more distant sources. Previous work in this area has shown that the chance of an individual body being sufficiently well aligned with a source to cause a very large gravitational intensity change is small. The issue addressed in this study is the possibility of there being a significant total change in the intensity of a source due to the combined effects of the gravitational fields of all celestial bodies, and in particular, the potential impact on intensity distance measurements, that is, determination of the distances of celestial light sources by means of intensity comparisons. It is first shown that the problem can be treated in flat space by associating an appropriate index of refraction with gravitational fields. A wave approach is taken in deriving the total deflection of a ray by the field of a single point mass. A statistical analysis is then performed to determine the expression for the mean total change in the intensity of celestial light sources due to the combined fields of all intervening bodies.

  12. Economic Analysis of Greenhouse Lighting: Light Emitting Diodes vs. High Intensity Discharge Fixtures

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Jacob A.; Bugbee, Bruce

    2014-01-01

    Lighting technologies for plant growth are improving rapidly, providing numerous options for supplemental lighting in greenhouses. Here we report the photosynthetic (400–700 nm) photon efficiency and photon distribution pattern of two double-ended HPS fixtures, five mogul-base HPS fixtures, ten LED fixtures, three ceramic metal halide fixtures, and two fluorescent fixtures. The two most efficient LED and the two most efficient double-ended HPS fixtures had nearly identical efficiencies at 1.66 to 1.70 micromoles per joule. These four fixtures represent a dramatic improvement over the 1.02 micromoles per joule efficiency of the mogul-base HPS fixtures that are in common use. The best ceramic metal halide and fluorescent fixtures had efficiencies of 1.46 and 0.95 micromoles per joule, respectively. We also calculated the initial capital cost of fixtures per photon delivered and determined that LED fixtures cost five to ten times more than HPS fixtures. The five-year electric plus fixture cost per mole of photons is thus 2.3 times higher for LED fixtures, due to high capital costs. Compared to electric costs, our analysis indicates that the long-term maintenance costs are small for both technologies. If widely spaced benches are a necessary part of a production system, the unique ability of LED fixtures to efficiently focus photons on specific areas can be used to improve the photon capture by plant canopies. Our analysis demonstrates, however, that the cost per photon delivered is higher in these systems, regardless of fixture category. The lowest lighting system costs are realized when an efficient fixture is coupled with effective canopy photon capture. PMID:24905835

  13. Combined effects of light intensity and NH{4/+}-enrichment on growth, pigmentation, and photosynthetic performance of Ulva prolifera (Chlorophyta)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhiguang; Wu, Haiyi; Zhan, Dongmei; Sun, Fuxin; Sun, Jianzhang; Wang, Guangce

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of light intensity and enhanced nitrogen supply on the growth and photosynthesis of the green-tide macroalga, Ulva prolifera. Thalli of U. prolifera were grown in natural or NH{4/+}-enriched seawater under two different light intensities for 7 days, and then the growth rate, pigmentation, and photosynthetic performance of the thalli were evaluated. The results show that the relative growth rate (RGR) was markedly higher under the high light level than under the low light level. Enrichment with NH{4/+} enhanced the RGR under high light intensity, but did not affect RGR under low light intensity. In low light conditions, NH{4/+} -enrichment resulted in a marked decrease in the maximal photosynthetic rate ( P m) and the maximum carbon fixation rate ( V max), but it did not affect the half saturation constant for carbon ( K 0.5) or the ratio of V max to K 0.5, which reflects the carbon acquisition efficiency. In high light conditions, P m, K 0.5, and the dark respiration rate ( R d) increased under NH{4/+} enrichment, but V max and the V max / K 0.5 ratio decreased. Regardless of the light intensity, NH{4/+}-enrichment did not affect the apparent photosynthetic efficiency ( α), which reflects the ability of the alga to use light energy at low light levels. Under both low and high light intensities, the chlorophyll a (Chl a), chlorophyll b (Chl b), and carotenoids (Car) contents in thalli were higher in NH{4/+}-enriched than in natural seawater, except that there was a decrease in the Chl b content of thalli in NH{4/+}-enriched seawater under low light intensity. Therefore, NH{4/+} enrichment improved the growth and photosynthetic performance of U. prolifera under high light intensity, but not under low light intensity. We discuss the possible mechanisms underlying these physiological responses.

  14. Effects of light intensity and temperature on Cryptomonas ovata (Cryptophyceae) growth and nutrient uptake rates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cloern, James E.

    1977-01-01

    Specific growth rate of Cryptomonas ovata var. palustris Pringsheim was measured in batch culture at 14 light-temperature combinations. Both the maximum growth rate (μm) and optimum light intensity (Iopt) fit an empirical function that increases exponentially with temperature up to an optimum (Topt), then declines rapidly as temperature exceeds Topt. Incorporation of these functions into Steele's growth equation gives a good estimate of specific growth rate over a wide range of temperature and light intensity. Rates of phosphate, ammonium and nitrate uptake were measured separately at 16 combinations of irradiance and temperature and following a spike addition of all starved cells initially took up nutrient at a rapid rate. This transitory surge was followed by a period of steady, substrate-saturated uptake that persisted until external nutrient concentration fell. Substrate-saturated NO3−-uptake proceeded at very slow rates in the dark and was stimulated by both increased temperature and irradiance; NH4+-uptake apparently proceeded at a basal rate at 8 and l4 C and was also stimulated by increased temperature and irradiance. Rates of NH4−-uptake were much higher than NO3−-uptake at all light-temperature combinations. Below 20 C, PO4−3-uptake was more rapid in dark than in light, but was light enhanced at 26 C.

  15. An intense, high-repetition nanosecond light source using a commercially available Xe-arc lamp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araki, Tsutomu; Yamada, Akihisa; Uchida, Teruo

    1993-07-01

    We describe the construction and emission characteristics of a Xe light source that produces broadband emission spectrum (250-650 nm) and high-repetition pulsed light of nanosecond duration. The standard dc-operated Xe-arc lamp, which is commercially available, is employed as the primary light source, with modified circuitry to realize pulsed operation. A dc voltage higher than 5 kV is applied to the electrode gap through a high-value resistor in order to generate a periodical discharge of current between the electrode gap. In order to further increase the intensity of the light pulses, the electrical polarity of the electrode must be in inverse connection relative to the normal connection under the dc operation. Intense light pulses as large as 20 W (peak value) of 3 ns width were generated repetitively from the Xe lamp. Fluorescence lifetimes of a quinine-sulfate solution and a fluorescent cell nucleus were measured to demonstrate the usefulness of the light source.

  16. [Effects of light intensity on Quercus liaotungensis seed germination and seedling growth].

    PubMed

    Yan, Xing-fu; Wang, Jian-li; Zhou, Li-biao

    2011-07-01

    This paper studied the effects of different shading (55.4%, 18.9%, 5.5%, 2.2%, 0.5% , and 0.3% natural sunlight) on the seed germination and seedling growth of Quercus liaotungensis. The seed germination rate and germination index were the highest (72.5% and 0.22, respectively) at 55.4% natural sunlight, declined with decreasing light intensity, and were the lowest (42.5% and 0.11, respectively) at 0.3% natural sunlight. Strong light had definite delaying effect on the germination. The index of germination vigor increased with decreasing light intensity, being the maximum at 0.5% natural sunlight. The delay of seed germination under strong light could be the selective tradeoff on varied seed fates. Strong light benefited the basal stem diameter and root system growth and dry mass accumulation of Q. liaotunensis seedling, but resulted in the minimum seedlings height (6.06 cm). Greater morphological plasticity was observed for the seedlings under different shading, which lent support to the higher adaptability of the seedlings to light environment. For example, the specific leaf area, specific shoot length, specific root length, and chlorophyll b and total chlorophyll contents were the maximum at 0.5% natural sunlight, being 142.57 cm2 x g(-1), 156.86 cm x g(-1), 271.87 cm x g(-1), 0.07 g x cm(-2), and 0.24 g x cm(-2), respectively, and the minimum at 55.4% natural sunlight, being 44.89 cm2 x g(-1), 52.84 cm x g(-1), 101.98 cm x g(-1), 0.04 g x cm(-2), and 0.15 g x cm(-2), respectively. The variation of the root/shoot ratio of Q. liaotungensis seedlings under different shading could be the effects of the combination of light intensity and water availability. PMID:22007441

  17. Absolute Rovibrational Intensities for the Chi(sup 1)Sigma(sup +) v=3 <-- 0 Band of (12)C(16)O Obtained with Kitt Peak and BOMEM FTS Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chackerian, Charles, Jr.; Kshirsagar, R. J.; Giver, L. P.; Brown, L. R.; Condon, Estelle P. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    This work was initiated to compare absolute line intensities retrieved with the Kitt Peak FTS (Fourier Transform Spectrometer) and Ames BOMEM FTS. Since thermal contaminations can be a problem using the BOMEM instrument if proper precautions are not taken it was thought that measurements done at 6300 per cm would more easily result in satisfactory intercomparisons. Very recent measurements of the CO 3 <-- 0 band fine intensities confirms results reported here that the intensities listed in HITRAN (High Resolution Molecular Absorption Database) for this band are on the order of six to seven percent too low. All of the infrared intensities in the current HITRAN tabulation are based on the electric dipole moment function reported fifteen years ago. The latter in turn was partly based on intensities for the 3 <-- 0 band reported thirty years ago. We have, therefore, redetermined the electric dipole moment function of ground electronic state CO.

  18. Light intensity modulation by coccoliths of Emiliania huxleyi as a micro-photo-regulator

    PubMed Central

    Mizukawa, Yuri; Miyashita, Yuito; Satoh, Manami; Shiraiwa, Yoshihiro; Iwasaka, Masakazu

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we present experimental evidence showing that coccoliths have light-scattering anisotropy that contributes to a possible control of solar light exposure in the ocean. Changing the angle between the incident light and an applied magnetic field causes differences in the light-scattering intensities of a suspension of coccoliths isolated from Emiliania huxleyi. The magnetic field effect is induced by the diamagnetic torque force directing the coccolith radial plane perpendicular to the applied magnetic fields at 400 to 500 mT. The developed technique reveals the light-scattering anisotropies in the 3-μm-diameter floating coccoliths by orienting themselves in response to the magnetic fields. The detached coccolith scatters radially the light incident to its radial plane. The experimental results on magnetically oriented coccoliths show that an individual coccolith has a specific direction of light scattering, although the possible physiological effect of the coccolith remains for further study, focusing on the light-scattering anisotropies of coccoliths on living cells. PMID:26323524

  19. Influence of distance and incident angle on light intensities in intravascular optical coherence tomography pullback runs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shengnan; Eggermont, Jeroen; Wolterbeek, Ron; Lelieveldy, Boudewijn P. F.; Dijkstra, Jouke

    2016-02-01

    Intravascular optical coherence tomography (IVOCT) is an intravascular imaging modality which enables the visualization arterial structures at the micro-structural level. The interpretations of these structures is mainly on the basis of relative image intensities. However, even for homogeneous tissue light intensities can differ. In this study the incident light intensity is modeled to be related to the catheter position. Two factors, the distance between catheter and inner lumen wall as well as the incident angle of the light upon the lumen wall, are considered. A three-level hierarchical model is constructed to statistically validate this model to include the potential effect of different pullbacks and/or frame numbers. The model is solved using 169 images out of 9 pull-backs recorded with a St.Jude Medical IVOCT system. F-tests results indicate that both the distance and the incident angle contribute to the model statistically significantly with p < 0.001. Based on the results from the statistical analysis, a potential compensation method is introduced to normalize the IVOCT intensities for the catheter position effects and small shadows.

  20. Correlated peak relative light intensity and peak current in triggered lightning subsequent return strokes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Idone, V. P.; Orville, R. E.

    1985-01-01

    The correlation between peak relative light intensity L(R) and stroke peak current I(R) is examined for 39 subsequent return strokes in two triggered lightning flashes. One flash contained 19 strokes and the other 20 strokes for which direct measurements were available of the return stroke peak current at ground. Peak currents ranged from 1.6 to 21 kA. The measurements of peak relative light intensity were obtained from photographic streak recordings using calibrated film and microsecond resolution. Correlations, significant at better than the 0.1 percent level, were found for several functional relationships. Although a relation between L(R) and I(R) is evident in these data, none of the analytical relations considered is clearly favored. The correlation between L(R) and the maximum rate of current rise is also examined, but less correlation than between L(R) and I(R) is found. In addition, the peak relative intensity near ground is evaluated for 22 dart leaders, and a mean ratio of peak dart leader to peak return stroke relative light intensity was found to be 0.1 with a range of 0.02-0.23. Using two different methods, the peak current near ground in these dart leaders is estimated to range from 0.1 to 6 kA.

  1. Influence of green, red and blue light emitting diodes on multiprotein complex proteins and photosynthetic activity under different light intensities in lettuce leaves (Lactuca sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Muneer, Sowbiya; Kim, Eun Jeong; Park, Jeong Suk; Lee, Jeong Hyun

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the response of light emitting diodes (LEDs) at different light intensities (70 and 80 for green LEDs, 88 and 238 for red LEDs and 80 and 238 μmol m-2 s-1 for blue LEDs) at three wavelengths in lettuce leaves. Lettuce leaves were exposed to (522 nm), red (639 nm) and blue (470 nm) LEDs of different light intensities. Thylakoid multiprotein complex proteins and photosynthetic metabolism were then investigated. Biomass and photosynthetic parameters increased with an increasing light intensity under blue LED illumination and decreased when illuminated with red and green LEDs with decreased light intensity. The expression of multiprotein complex proteins including PSII-core dimer and PSII-core monomer using blue LEDs illumination was higher at higher light intensity (238 μmol m-2 s-1) and was lowered with decreased light intensity (70-80 μmol m-2 s-1). The responses of chloroplast sub-compartment proteins, including those active in stomatal opening and closing, and leaf physiological responses at different light intensities, indicated induced growth enhancement upon illumination with blue LEDs. High intensity blue LEDs promote plant growth by controlling the integrity of chloroplast proteins that optimize photosynthetic performance in the natural environment. PMID:24642884

  2. New approach for absolute fluence distribution calculations in Monte Carlo simulations of light propagation in turbid media

    SciTech Connect

    Böcklin, Christoph Baumann, Dirk; Fröhlich, Jürg

    2014-02-14

    A novel way to attain three dimensional fluence rate maps from Monte-Carlo simulations of photon propagation is presented in this work. The propagation of light in a turbid medium is described by the radiative transfer equation and formulated in terms of radiance. For many applications, particularly in biomedical optics, the fluence rate is a more useful quantity and directly derived from the radiance by integrating over all directions. Contrary to the usual way which calculates the fluence rate from absorbed photon power, the fluence rate in this work is directly calculated from the photon packet trajectory. The voxel based algorithm works in arbitrary geometries and material distributions. It is shown that the new algorithm is more efficient and also works in materials with a low or even zero absorption coefficient. The capabilities of the new algorithm are demonstrated on a curved layered structure, where a non-scattering, non-absorbing layer is sandwiched between two highly scattering layers.

  3. Towards determination of absolute molar mass of cellulose polymer by size exclusion chromatography with mulitple angle laser light scattering detection.

    PubMed

    Pawcenis, Dominika; Thomas, Jacob L; Łojewski, Tomasz; Milczarek, Jakub M; Łojewska, Joanna

    2015-08-28

    The study focuses on determination of a set of crucial parameters for molar mass calculation of cellulose from the results of size exclusion chromatography coupled with multiple angle laser light scattering (MALLS) and differential refractive index (DRI) detectors. In the present work, cellulose has been derivatised to obtain cellulose tricarbanilate (CTC) soluble in tetrahydrofuran (THF). The parameters of Rayleigh scattering in the MALLS detector: refractive index increment (dn/dc) and second virial coefficient (A2) of CTC in THF were determined for laser wavelength 658nm. In order to avoid errors resulting from cellulose derivatisation by-products present in the CTC solution, the so called "on-line" method of measuring dn/dc and A2 was applied. Based on the A2 determination, its influence on cellulose molar mass calculations and cellulose molecular dimensions were critically assessed. The latter includes evaluation of artificially aged cellulose towards conceivable branching by conformation plot analysis. PMID:26210115

  4. Shockley-Read-Hall recombination in P3HT:PCBM solar cells as observed under ultralow light intensities

    SciTech Connect

    Tzabari, Lior; Tessler, Nir

    2011-03-15

    We present light intensity dependent measurements of the quantum efficiency of P3HT:PCBM photovoltaic devices. Unlike previous studies we focus on ultralow light intensities down to 10{sup -3} mW/cm{sup 2}. We find that although when the devices are excited at intensities close to 1 Sun they exhibit very little bias or light intensity dependence, this is clearly not the case for light intensities below 1 mW/cm{sup 2}, where the cell's efficiency becomes highly dependent on the bias and light intensity. Using a simple model for the device efficiency we can fit the experimental data across a wide range of parameters and thus separate the effects of generation efficiency (geminate recombination) and charge recombination. Our finding suggests that recombination through trap (charge transfer) states is an important loss mechanism and we are able to quantify the density and depth of these states.

  5. Dual gradients of light intensity and nutrient concentration for full-factorial mapping of photosynthetic productivity.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Brian; Graham, Percival J; Sinton, David

    2016-08-01

    Optimizing bioproduct generation from microalgae is complicated by the myriad of coupled parameters affecting photosynthetic productivity. Quantifying the effect of multiple coupled parameters in full-factorial fashion requires a prohibitively high number of experiments. We present a simple hydrogel-based platform for the rapid, full-factorial mapping of light and nutrient availability on the growth and lipid accumulation of microalgae. We accomplish this without microfabrication using thin sheets of cell-laden hydrogels. By immobilizing the algae in a hydrogel matrix we are able to take full advantage of the continuous spatial chemical gradient produced by a diffusion-based gradient generator while eliminating the need for chambers. We map the effect of light intensities between 0 μmol m(-2) s(-1) and 130 μmol m(-2) s(-1) (∼28 W m(-2)) coupled with ammonium concentrations between 0 mM and 7 mM on Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Our data set, verified with bulk experiments, clarifies the role of ammonium availability on the photosynthetic productivity Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, demonstrating the dependence of ammonium inhibition on light intensity. Specifically, a sharp optimal growth peak emerges at approximately 2 mM only for light intensities between 80 and 100 μmol m(-2) s(-1)- suggesting that ammonium inhibition is insignificant at lower light intensities. We speculate that this phenomenon is due to the regulation of the high affinity ammonium transport system in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii as well as free ammonia toxicity. The complexity of this photosynthetic biological response highlights the importance of full-factorial data sets as enabled here. PMID:27364571

  6. Antioxidant capacity reduced in scallions grown under elevated CO 2 independent of assayed light intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levine, Lanfang H.; Paré, Paul W.

    2009-10-01

    Long-duration manned space missions mandate the development of a sustainable life support system and effective countermeasures against damaging space radiation. To mitigate the risk of inevitable exposure to space radiation, cultivation of fresh fruits and vegetables rich in antioxidants is an attractive alternative to pharmacological agents. However it has yet to be established whether antioxidant properties of crops can be preserved or enhanced in a space environment where environmental conditions differ from that which plants have acclimated to on earth. Scallion ( Allium fistulosum) rich in antioxidant vitamins C and A, and flavonoids was used as a model plant to study the impact of a range of CO 2 concentrations and light intensities that are likely encountered in a space habitat on food quality traits. Scallions were hydroponically grown in controlled environmental chambers under a combination of 3 CO 2 concentrations of 400, 1200 and 4000 μmol mol -1 and 3 light intensity levels of 150, 300, 450 μmol m -2 s -1. Total antioxidant activity (TAA) of scallion extracts was determined using a radical cation scavenging assay. Both elevated CO 2 and increasing light intensity enhanced biomass accumulation, but effects on TAA (based on dry weight) differed. TAA was reduced for plants grown under elevated CO 2, but remained unchanged with increases in light intensity. Elevated CO 2 stimulated greater biomass production than antioxidants, while an increase in photosynthetic photo flux promoted the synthesis of antioxidant compounds at a rate similar to that of biomass. Consequently light is a more effective stimulus than CO 2 for antioxidant production.

  7. Absolute Summ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Alfred, Jr.

    Summ means the entirety of the multiverse. It seems clear, from the inflation theories of A. Guth and others, that the creation of many universes is plausible. We argue that Absolute cosmological ideas, not unlike those of I. Newton, may be consistent with dynamic multiverse creations. As suggested in W. Heisenberg's uncertainty principle, and with the Anthropic Principle defended by S. Hawking, et al., human consciousness, buttressed by findings of neuroscience, may have to be considered in our models. Predictability, as A. Einstein realized with Invariants and General Relativity, may be required for new ideas to be part of physics. We present here a two postulate model geared to an Absolute Summ. The seedbed of this work is part of Akhnaton's philosophy (see S. Freud, Moses and Monotheism). Most important, however, is that the structure of human consciousness, manifest in Kenya's Rift Valley 200,000 years ago as Homo sapiens, who were the culmination of the six million year co-creation process of Hominins and Nature in Africa, allows us to do the physics that we do. .

  8. Magnetic orientation in birds: non-compass responses under monochromatic light of increased intensity.

    PubMed

    Wiltschko, Wolfgang; Munro, Ursula; Ford, Hugh; Wiltschko, Roswitha

    2003-10-22

    Migratory Australian silvereyes (Zosterops lateralis) were tested under monochromatic light at wavelengths of 424 nm blue and 565 nm green. At a low light level of 7 x 10(15) quanta m(-2) s(-1) in the local geomagnetic field, the birds preferred their seasonally appropriate southern migratory direction under both wavelengths. Their reversal of headings when the vertical component of the magnetic field was inverted indicated normal use of the avian inclination compass. A higher light intensity of 43 x 10(15) quanta m(-2) s(-1), however, caused a fundamental change in behaviour: under bright blue, the silvereyes showed an axial tendency along the east-west axis; under bright green, they showed a unimodal preference of a west-northwesterly direction that followed a shift in magnetic north, but was not reversed by inverting the vertical component of the magnetic field. Hence it is not based on the inclination compass. The change in behaviour at higher light intensities suggests a complex interaction between at least two receptors. The polar nature of the response under bright green cannot be explained by the current models of light-dependent magnetoreception and will lead to new considerations on these receptive processes. PMID:14561276

  9. Shaping of spherical light intensity based on the interference of tightly focused beams with different polarizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khonina, Svetlana N.; Ustinov, Andrey V.; Volotovsky, Sergey G.

    2014-08-01

    We consider the shaping of spherical intensity distributions based on the interference of counter-propagating tightly focused vortex beams with different polarizations. The formation of 3D distributions is performed using a simple method of optimization of the width and position of the single annular aperture. The optimum parameters for the narrow aperture are calculated analytically. In addition the wide aperture parameters are numerically adjusted. It is shown that depending on the polarization, the additional vortex phase and/or phase shift in the beams allow to form either solid light balls or light spheres of subwavelength radius. They consist of the various electric field components.

  10. Signatures of attosecond electron tunneling dynamics in the evolution of intense few-cycle light pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serebryannikov, E. E.; Verhoef, A. J.; Mitrofanov, A.; Baltuška, A.; Zheltikov, A. M.

    2009-11-01

    The sensitivity of electron tunneling to the phase of an ionizing light field is shown to manifest itself in detectable features in the spectral and temporal evolution of intense few-cycle light pulses in an ionizing medium. An ultrafast buildup of electron density in the regime of tunneling ionization gives rise to a modulation of a few-cycle field wave form and enhances the short-wavelength part of its spectrum. In a low-pressure gas, the signatures of electron tunneling in the evolution of few-cycle pulses can be isolated from the effects related to atomic nonlinear susceptibilities, giving an access to attosecond electron tunneling dynamics.

  11. Absolute intensities and self-, N2-, and air-broadened Lorentz halfwidths for selected lines in the nu3 band of (C-12)H3D from measurements with a tunable diode laser spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malathy Devi, V.; Benner, D. C.; Rinsland, C. P.; Smith, M. A. H.; Thakur, K. B.

    1986-01-01

    Absolute intensities and self-, air- and N2-broadened half-widths have been determined for the first time for individual lines in the nu3(A1) band of (C-12)H3D near 7.6 microns from measurements of individual vibration-rotation lines using a tunable diode laser spectrometer. The intensity measurements are believed to be accurate to within three percent. Within experimental uncertainties, equal broadening efficiencies are found for both air and nitrogen. Self-broadened half-widths determined for three transitions yield an average half-width value of 0.803 + or -0.0010/cm/atm at 296 K.

  12. A coordinate transformation method for calculating the 3D light intensity distribution in ICF hohlraum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Zhili; Li, Xiaoyan; Zhao, Kuixia; Chen, Xudong; Chen, Mingyu; Pu, Jixiong

    2016-06-01

    For an inertial confinement fusion (ICF) system, the light intensity distribution in the hohlraum is key to the initial plasma excitation and later laser-plasma interaction process. Based on the concept of coordinate transformation of spatial points and vector, we present a robust method with a detailed procedure that makes the calculation of the three dimensional (3D) light intensity distribution in hohlraum easily. The method is intuitive but powerful enough to solve the complex cases of random number of laser beams with arbitrary polarization states and incidence angles. Its application is exemplified in the Shenguang III Facility (SG-III) that verifies its effectiveness and it is useful for guiding the design of hohlraum structure parameter.

  13. Chronic neuropathic facial pain after intense pulsed light hair removal. Clinical features and pharmacological management

    PubMed Central

    Párraga-Manzol, Gabriela; Sánchez-Torres, Alba; Moreno-Arias, Gerardo

    2015-01-01

    Intense Pulsed Light (IPL) photodepilation is usually performed as a hair removal method. The treatment is recommended to be indicated by a physician, depending on each patient and on its characteristics. However, the use of laser devices by medical laypersons is frequent and it can suppose a risk of damage for the patients. Most side effects associated to IPL photodepilation are transient, minimal and disappear without sequelae. However, permanent side effects can occur. Some of the complications are laser related but many of them are caused by an operator error or mismanagement. In this work, we report a clinical case of a patient that developed a chronic neuropathic facial pain following IPL hair removal for unwanted hair in the upper lip. The specific diagnosis was painful post-traumatic trigeminal neuropathy, reference 13.1.2.3 according to the International Headache Society (IHS). Key words:Neuropathic facial pain, photodepilation, intense pulse light. PMID:26535105

  14. Measuring acoustic energy density in microchannel acoustophoresis using a simple and rapid light-intensity method.

    PubMed

    Barnkob, Rune; Iranmanesh, Ida; Wiklund, Martin; Bruus, Henrik

    2012-07-01

    We present a simple and rapid method for measuring the acoustic energy density in microchannel acoustophoresis based on light-intensity measurements of a suspension of particles. The method relies on the assumption that each particle in the suspension undergoes single-particle acoustophoresis. It is validated by the single-particle tracking method, and we show by proper re-scaling that the re-scaled light intensity plotted versus re-scaled time falls on a universal curve. The method allows for analysis of moderate-resolution images in the concentration range encountered in typical experiments, and it is an attractive alternative to particle tracking and particle image velocimetry for quantifying acoustophoretic performance in microchannels. PMID:22522812

  15. Correlation of Red Blood Cell Aggregate Size with Transmitted Light Intensity Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hitt, Darren L.

    1998-11-01

    Under sufficiently low shear rates, such as those encountered in the microcirculation, human red blood cells are known to form aggregate structures (`rouleaux'). These aggregates may range in size from a simple chain containing only a few cells to complex three-dimensional structures containing tens of cells. Previous studies have attempted to characterize the aggregate size by examining the spatial distribution of transmitted light intensity resulting from transillumination of the blood flow. For experiments performed in vitro and in vivo, spectral analysis of the transmitted light intensities has shown that the presence of aggregates in the flow can linked with an increase in the spectral power at small wavenumbers. The magnitudes of the affected wavenumbers correspond to structures considerably larger than individual cells. A precise numerical correlation, however, is difficult to establish. In this work, computer simulations of aggregating blood flow are used along with statistical considerations in an attempt to better correlate the observed spectral trends with actual aggregate size.

  16. 14 CFR 29.1391 - Minimum intensities in the horizontal plane of forward and rear position lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    .... Each position light intensity must equal or exceed the applicable values in the following table: Dihedral angle (light included) Angle from right or left of longitudinal axis, measured from dead ahead Intensity (candles) L and R (forward red and green) 0° to 10°10° to 20° 20° to 110° 4030 5 A (rear...

  17. 14 CFR 27.1391 - Minimum intensities in the horizontal plane of forward and rear position lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    .... Each position light intensity must equal or exceed the applicable values in the following table: Dihedral angle (light included) Angle from right or left of longitudinal axis, measured from dead ahead Intensity (candles) L and R (forward red and green) 10° to 10°10° to 20° 20° to 110° 4030 5 A (rear...

  18. 14 CFR 25.1391 - Minimum intensities in the horizontal plane of forward and rear position lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    .... Each position light intensity must equal or exceed the applicable values in the following table: Dihedral angle (light included) Angle from right or left of longitudinal axis, measured from dead ahead Intensity (candles) L and R (forward red and green) 0° to 10°10° to 20° 20° to 110° 4030 5 A (rear...

  19. 14 CFR 27.1391 - Minimum intensities in the horizontal plane of forward and rear position lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    .... Each position light intensity must equal or exceed the applicable values in the following table: Dihedral angle (light included) Angle from right or left of longitudinal axis, measured from dead ahead Intensity (candles) L and R (forward red and green) 10° to 10°10° to 20° 20° to 110° 4030 5 A (rear...

  20. 14 CFR 25.1391 - Minimum intensities in the horizontal plane of forward and rear position lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    .... Each position light intensity must equal or exceed the applicable values in the following table: Dihedral angle (light included) Angle from right or left of longitudinal axis, measured from dead ahead Intensity (candles) L and R (forward red and green) 0° to 10°10° to 20° 20° to 110° 4030 5 A (rear...

  1. 14 CFR 29.1391 - Minimum intensities in the horizontal plane of forward and rear position lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    .... Each position light intensity must equal or exceed the applicable values in the following table: Dihedral angle (light included) Angle from right or left of longitudinal axis, measured from dead ahead Intensity (candles) L and R (forward red and green) 0° to 10°10° to 20° 20° to 110° 4030 5 A (rear...

  2. 14 CFR 27.1391 - Minimum intensities in the horizontal plane of forward and rear position lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Minimum intensities in the horizontal plane of forward and rear position lights. 27.1391 Section 27.1391 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION... Equipment Lights § 27.1391 Minimum intensities in the horizontal plane of forward and rear position...

  3. 14 CFR 29.1391 - Minimum intensities in the horizontal plane of forward and rear position lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Minimum intensities in the horizontal plane of forward and rear position lights. 29.1391 Section 29.1391 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION... Equipment Lights § 29.1391 Minimum intensities in the horizontal plane of forward and rear position...

  4. 14 CFR 27.1391 - Minimum intensities in the horizontal plane of forward and rear position lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Minimum intensities in the horizontal plane of forward and rear position lights. 27.1391 Section 27.1391 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION... Equipment Lights § 27.1391 Minimum intensities in the horizontal plane of forward and rear position...

  5. 14 CFR 25.1391 - Minimum intensities in the horizontal plane of forward and rear position lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Minimum intensities in the horizontal plane of forward and rear position lights. 25.1391 Section 25.1391 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION... Equipment Lights § 25.1391 Minimum intensities in the horizontal plane of forward and rear position...

  6. 14 CFR 29.1391 - Minimum intensities in the horizontal plane of forward and rear position lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Minimum intensities in the horizontal plane of forward and rear position lights. 29.1391 Section 29.1391 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION... Equipment Lights § 29.1391 Minimum intensities in the horizontal plane of forward and rear position...

  7. 14 CFR 25.1391 - Minimum intensities in the horizontal plane of forward and rear position lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Minimum intensities in the horizontal plane of forward and rear position lights. 25.1391 Section 25.1391 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION... Equipment Lights § 25.1391 Minimum intensities in the horizontal plane of forward and rear position...

  8. Comparison of laser and intense pulsed light sintering (IPL) for inkjet-printed copper nanoparticle layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niittynen, Juha; Sowade, Enrico; Kang, Hyunkyoo; Baumann, Reinhard R.; Mäntysalo, Matti

    2015-03-01

    In this contribution we discuss the sintering of an inkjet-printed copper nanoparticle ink based on electrical performance and microstructure analysis. Laser and intense pulsed light (IPL) sintering are employed in order to compare the different techniques and their feasibility for electronics manufacturing. A conductivity of more than 20% of that of bulk copper material has been obtained with both sintering methods. Laser and IPL sintering techniques are considered to be complementary techniques and are highly suitable in different application fields.

  9. GLIDE: a grid-based light-weight infrastructure for data-intensive environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mattmann, Chris A.; Malek, Sam; Beckman, Nels; Mikic-Rakic, Marija; Medvidovic, Nenad; Chrichton, Daniel J.

    2005-01-01

    The promise of the grid is that it will enable public access and sharing of immense amounts of computational and data resources among dynamic coalitions of individuals and institutions. However, the current grid solutions make several limiting assumptions that curtail their widespread adoption. To address these limitations, we present GLIDE, a prototype light-weight, data-intensive middleware infrastructure that enables access to the robust data and computational power of the grid on DREAM platforms.

  10. Effects of light intensity and titanium dioxide concentration on photocatalytic sterilization rates of microbial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Horie, Yasuhiko; David, D.A.1; Taya, Masahito; Tone, Setsuji

    1996-11-01

    Photocatalytic sterilization of Escherichia coli (bacterium) or Saccharomyces serevisiae (yeast) was conducted with a rectangular bubble-column photoreactor (40 mm in width, 40 mm in breadth, and 250 mm in height) containing slurried TiO{sub 2} semiconductor particles. The profiles of cell deactivation with sterilization time could be expressed in fair agreement with experimental data, based on a series-event model and a second-order kinetics with respect to the concentrations of microbial cells and oxidative radicals generated by photoexcitation of TiO{sub 2} particles. Sterilization rate constants for the microbes were determined under various conditions of TiO{sub 2} concentrations (0--5 {times} 0{sup {minus}1} kg/m{sup 3}) and average light intensities (0--223 W/m{sup 2}) in the photoreactor. Linear relationships were obtained between the rate constants and average light intensity at TiO{sub 2} concentration of 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}2} kg/m{sup 3}. When incident light intensity was kept constant (27 W/m{sup 2} for E. coli or 238 W/m{sup 2} for S. cerevisiae), the correlations between the rate constants and TiO{sub 2} concentration were interpreted considering a fraction of TiO{sub 2} particles adhered to the cells in slurry.

  11. Natural variation in tocochromanols content in Arabidopsis thaliana accessions - the effect of temperature and light intensity.

    PubMed

    Gabruk, Michał; Habina, Iwona; Kruk, Jerzy; Dłużewska, Jolanta; Szymańska, Renata

    2016-06-01

    In this study, 25 accessions of Arabidopsis thaliana originating from a variety of climate conditions were grown under controlled circumstances of different light intensity and temperature. The accessions were analyzed for prenyllipids content and composition, as well as expression of the genes involved in tocochromanol biosynthesis (vte1-5). It was found that the applied conditions did not strongly affect total tocochromanols content and there was no apparent correlation of the tocochromanol content with the origin of the accessions. However, the presented results indicate that the temperature, more than the light intensity, affects the expression of the vte1-5 genes and the content of some prenyllipids. An interesting observation was that under low growth temperature, the hydroxy-plastochromanol (PC-OH) to plastochromanol (PC) ratio was considerably increased regardless of the light intensity in most of the accessions. PC-OH is known to be formed as a result of singlet oxygen stress, therefore this observation indicates that the singlet oxygen production is enhanced under low temperature. Unexpectedly, the highest increase in the PC-OH/PC ratio was found for accessions originating from cold climate (Shigu, Krazo-1 and Lov-5), even though such plants could be expected to be more resistant to low temperature stress. PMID:27174597

  12. The effects of oxygen concentration and light intensity on the photostability of zwitterionic chromophores

    SciTech Connect

    Raymond, S. G.; Williams, G. V. M.; Lochocki, B.; Bhuiyan, M. D. H.; Kay, A. J.; Quilty, J. W.

    2009-06-01

    Photostability measurements at different oxygen partial pressures and light intensities have been made on host-guest films containing amorphous polycarbonate and an organic chromophore with a high second order nonlinear optical figure of merit. We find that the photodegradation quantum efficiency dramatically increases with increasing oxygen partial pressure. At very low oxygen partial pressures (8x10{sup -6} bar) the average number of photons required to photodegrade a chromophore is as high as 2x10{sup 8} at 655 nm. The photodegradation quantum efficiency in air is observed to decrease with increasing optical intensity. We show that this is due to a reduced oxygen content in the film caused by chromophore photodegradation rather than ground state bleaching. There is an anomalous increase and then decrease in the photoluminescence intensity that cannot easily be explained.

  13. Effect of Light Intensity and Photoperiod on Growth and Biochemical Composition of a Local Isolate of Nostoc calcicola.

    PubMed

    Khajepour, Fateme; Hosseini, Seyed Abbas; Ghorbani Nasrabadi, Rasoul; Markou, Giorgos

    2015-08-01

    A study was conducted to investigate the effect of light intensity (21, 42, and 63 μmol photons m(-2) s(-1)) and photoperiod (8:16, 12:12, and 16:8 h light/dark) on the biomass production and its biochemical composition (total carotenoids, chlorophyll a, phycoerythrin (PE), phycocyanin (PC) and allophycocyanin (APC), total protein, and carbohydrates) of a local isolate of Nostoc calcicola. The results revealed that N. calcicola prefers dim light; however, the most of the levels of light intensity and photoperiod investigated did not have a significant impact on biomass production. Increasing light intensity biomass content of chlorophyll a, PE, PC, APC, and total protein decreased, while total carotenoids and carbohydrate increased. The same behavior was observed also when light duration (photoperiod) increased. The interaction effect of increasing light intensity and photoperiod resulted in an increase of carbohydrate and total carotenoids, and to the decrease of chlorophyll a, PE, PC, APC, and total protein content. The results indicate that varying the light regime, it is capable to manipulate the biochemical composition of the local isolate of N. calcicola, producing either valuable phycobiliproteins or proteins under low light intensity and shorter photoperiods, or producing carbohydrates and carotenoids under higher light intensities and longer photoperiods. PMID:26100389

  14. Fractal dynamics of light scattering intensity fluctuation in disordered dusty plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Safaai, S. S.; Muniandy, S. V.; Chew, W. X.; Asgari, H.; Yap, S. L.; Wong, C. S.

    2013-10-15

    Dynamic light scattering (DLS) technique is a simple and yet powerful technique for characterizing particle properties and dynamics in complex liquids and gases, including dusty plasmas. Intensity fluctuation in DLS experiments often studied using correlation analysis with assumption that the fluctuation is statistically stationary. In this study, the temporal variation of the nonstationary intensity fluctuation is analyzed directly to show the existence of fractal characteristics by employing wavelet scalogram approach. Wavelet based scale decomposition approach is used to separate non-scaling background noise (without dust) from scaling intensity fluctuation from dusty plasma. The Hurst exponents for light intensity fluctuation in dusty plasma at different neutral gas pressures are determined. At low pressures, weaker damping of dust motions via collisions with neutral gases results in stronger persistent behavior in the fluctuation of DLS time series. The fractal scaling Hurst exponent is demonstrated to be useful for characterizing structural phases in complex disordered dusty plasma, especially when particle configuration or sizes are highly inhomogeneous which makes the standard pair-correlation function difficult to interpret. The results from fractal analysis are compared with alternative interpretation of disorder based on approximate entropy and particle transport using mean square displacement.

  15. Intensity of an oxygen saturation image improved using scanning NIR-LED light irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Hsin-Yi; Yang, Ching-Ching; Hung, Min-Wei; Huang, Kuo-Cheng

    2014-09-01

    A near-infrared (940 nm) image of skin tissue can be substantially enhanced using optical scanning technology (OST) that can reduce the scattering effect and remove the wrinkles or fine hair in the image. Using OST to create the skin tissue image ensured that the contour of blood vessels became more clear than that obtained from the divergent light source. In addition, the oxygen saturation of the blood vessels and tissues obtained using OST were approximately 98.65 and 93.17%, respectively, exhibiting an increase of more than 20% compared with that obtained using divergent light, and approached the value when measured using commercial pulse oximetry. Because the proposed method has a deep light penetration depth and high image intensity and resolution for oxygen saturation analysis, it is highly appropriate to be applied to future studies on diabetes and cardiovascular diseases.

  16. Measurement of the intensity of the beam in the abort gap at the Tevatron utilizing synchrotron light

    SciTech Connect

    Thurman-Keup, R.; Lorman, E.; Meyer, T.; Pordes, S.; De Santis, S.; /LBL, Berkeley

    2005-05-01

    This paper discusses the implementation of abort gap beam intensity monitoring at the Tevatron collider at Fermilab. There are two somewhat independent monitors which measure the intensity of the synchrotron light emitted by particles in the abort gaps. One system uses a gated Photomultiplier Tube (PMT) to measure the light intensity, and the other system uses a single lens telescope, gated image intensifier, and Charge Injection Device (CID) camera to image the beam.

  17. 14 CFR 27.1393 - Minimum intensities in any vertical plane of forward and rear position lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Minimum intensities in any vertical plane... Equipment Lights § 27.1393 Minimum intensities in any vertical plane of forward and rear position lights... above or below the horizontal plane Intensity, l 0° 1.00 0° to 5° 0.90 5° to 10° 0.80 10° to 15° 0.70...

  18. 14 CFR 29.1393 - Minimum intensities in any vertical plane of forward and rear position lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Minimum intensities in any vertical plane... Equipment Lights § 29.1393 Minimum intensities in any vertical plane of forward and rear position lights... above or below the horizontal plane Intensity, I 0° 1.00 0° to 5° .90 5° to 10° .80 10° to 15° .70...

  19. 14 CFR 29.1393 - Minimum intensities in any vertical plane of forward and rear position lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Minimum intensities in any vertical plane... Equipment Lights § 29.1393 Minimum intensities in any vertical plane of forward and rear position lights... above or below the horizontal plane Intensity, I 0° 1.00 0° to 5° .90 5° to 10° .80 10° to 15° .70...

  20. 14 CFR 27.1393 - Minimum intensities in any vertical plane of forward and rear position lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Minimum intensities in any vertical plane... Equipment Lights § 27.1393 Minimum intensities in any vertical plane of forward and rear position lights... above or below the horizontal plane Intensity, l 0° 1.00 0° to 5° 0.90 5° to 10° 0.80 10° to 15° 0.70...

  1. 14 CFR 25.1393 - Minimum intensities in any vertical plane of forward and rear position lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Minimum intensities in any vertical plane... Equipment Lights § 25.1393 Minimum intensities in any vertical plane of forward and rear position lights... above or below the horizontal plane Intensity, l 0° 1.00 0° to 5° 0.90 5° to 10° 0.80 10° to 15° 0.70...

  2. 14 CFR 25.1393 - Minimum intensities in any vertical plane of forward and rear position lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Minimum intensities in any vertical plane... Equipment Lights § 25.1393 Minimum intensities in any vertical plane of forward and rear position lights... above or below the horizontal plane Intensity, l 0° 1.00 0° to 5° 0.90 5° to 10° 0.80 10° to 15° 0.70...

  3. Oxygen vacancies and intense luminescence in manganese loaded Zno microflowers for visible light water splitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sambandam, Balaji; Michael, Robin Jude Vimal; Manoharan, Periakaruppan T.

    2015-08-01

    ZnO nanorods and Mn/ZnO microflowers with nano-sized petals exhibit singly ionized oxygen vacancies, V+O. This is strongly supported by a green photoluminescence emission at 2.22 eV and an EPR g value of 1.953, both of which are suppressed greatly after annealing in an oxygen atmosphere. A strong red emission observed during exposure to X-rays reveals the presence of F+ centres as a consequence of the V+O. Mn/ZnO displayed enhanced H2 generation with visible light exposure, when compared to pure ZnO and annealed Mn/ZnO in the visible region, which directly correlated with the oxygen vacancy concentration. There is an interesting correlation between the intensities of the EPR lines at the g-value of 1.953 due to the oxygen vacancies, the intensity of light emitted from the exposure to X-rays, the intensity of the photoluminescence due to oxygen vacancies and the quantity of H2 produced by the photocatalytic effect when comparing the three different nanomaterials, viz. pure ZnO, Mn/ZnO before and after annealing, all having been made exactly by the same methodologies.ZnO nanorods and Mn/ZnO microflowers with nano-sized petals exhibit singly ionized oxygen vacancies, V+O. This is strongly supported by a green photoluminescence emission at 2.22 eV and an EPR g value of 1.953, both of which are suppressed greatly after annealing in an oxygen atmosphere. A strong red emission observed during exposure to X-rays reveals the presence of F+ centres as a consequence of the V+O. Mn/ZnO displayed enhanced H2 generation with visible light exposure, when compared to pure ZnO and annealed Mn/ZnO in the visible region, which directly correlated with the oxygen vacancy concentration. There is an interesting correlation between the intensities of the EPR lines at the g-value of 1.953 due to the oxygen vacancies, the intensity of light emitted from the exposure to X-rays, the intensity of the photoluminescence due to oxygen vacancies and the quantity of H2 produced by the

  4. Influence of environmental temperature and light intensity on growth performance and blood physiological parameters of broilers grown to heavy weight

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In a study of temperature and light intensity, 9 treatments consisted of 3 levels (Low=15.6, Moderate=21.1, High=26.7 °C) of temperatures and 3 levels (0.5, 3.0, 20 lx) of light intensities from d 8 to 56 d of age. Across all light levels at d 56, broilers subjected to high temperature significantly...

  5. Inhibition of enteric pathogens and surrogates using integrated, high intensity 405nm led light on the surface of almonds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The disinfecting properties of 405 nm light were investigated against Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella, and their non-pathogenic surrogate bacteria on the surface of almonds. High intensity monochromatic blue light (MBL) was generated from an array of narrow-band 405 nm light-emitting diodes (LE...

  6. Long lifetime, low intensity light source for use in nighttime viewing of equipment maps and other writings

    DOEpatents

    Frank, Alan M.; Edwards, William R.

    1983-01-01

    A long-lifetime light source with sufficiently low intensity to be used for reading a map or other writing at nighttime, while not obscuring the user's normal night vision. This light source includes a diode electrically connected in series with a small power source and a lens properly positioned to focus at least a portion of the light produced by the diode.

  7. The Influence of Low Intensities of Light Pollution on Bat Communities in a Semi-Natural Context

    PubMed Central

    Lacoeuilhe, Aurelie; Machon, Nathalie; Julien, Jean-François; Le Bocq, Agathe; Kerbiriou, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Anthropogenic light pollution is an increasingly significant issue worldwide. Over the past century, the use of artificial lighting has increased in association with human activity. Artificial lights are suspected to have substantial effects on the ecology of many species, e.g., by producing discontinuities in the territories of nocturnal animals. We analyzed the potential influence of the intensity and type of artificial light on bat activity in a semi-natural landscape in France. We used a species approach, followed by a trait-based approach, to light sensitivity. We also investigated whether the effect of light could be related to foraging traits. We performed acoustic surveys at sites located along a gradient of light intensities to assess the activity of 15 species of bats. We identified 2 functional response groups of species: one group that was light-tolerant and one group that was light-intolerant. Among the species in the latter group that appear to be disadvantaged by lighting conditions, many are rare and threatened in Europe, whereas the species from the former group are better able to thrive in disturbed habitats such as lighted areas and may actually benefit from artificial lighting. Finally, several methods of controlling light pollution are suggested for the conservation of bat communities. Recommendations for light management and the creation of dim-light corridors are proposed; these strategies may play an important role in protecting against the impact of light pollution on nocturnal animals. PMID:25360638

  8. The influence of low intensities of light pollution on bat communities in a semi-natural context.

    PubMed

    Lacoeuilhe, Aurelie; Machon, Nathalie; Julien, Jean-François; Le Bocq, Agathe; Kerbiriou, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Anthropogenic light pollution is an increasingly significant issue worldwide. Over the past century, the use of artificial lighting has increased in association with human activity. Artificial lights are suspected to have substantial effects on the ecology of many species, e.g., by producing discontinuities in the territories of nocturnal animals. We analyzed the potential influence of the intensity and type of artificial light on bat activity in a semi-natural landscape in France. We used a species approach, followed by a trait-based approach, to light sensitivity. We also investigated whether the effect of light could be related to foraging traits. We performed acoustic surveys at sites located along a gradient of light intensities to assess the activity of 15 species of bats. We identified 2 functional response groups of species: one group that was light-tolerant and one group that was light-intolerant. Among the species in the latter group that appear to be disadvantaged by lighting conditions, many are rare and threatened in Europe, whereas the species from the former group are better able to thrive in disturbed habitats such as lighted areas and may actually benefit from artificial lighting. Finally, several methods of controlling light pollution are suggested for the conservation of bat communities. Recommendations for light management and the creation of dim-light corridors are proposed; these strategies may play an important role in protecting against the impact of light pollution on nocturnal animals. PMID:25360638

  9. Method and apparatus for measuring the intensity and phase of an ultrashort light pulse

    DOEpatents

    Kane, Daniel J.; Trebino, Rick P.

    1998-01-01

    The pulse shape I(t) and phase evolution x(t) of ultrashort light pulses are obtained using an instantaneously responding nonlinear optical medium to form a signal pulse. A light pulse, such a laser pulse, is split into a gate pulse and a probe pulse, where the gate pulse is delayed relative to the probe pulse. The gate pulse and the probe pulse are combined within an instantaneously responding optical medium to form a signal pulse functionally related to a temporal slice of the gate pulse corresponding to the time delay of the probe pulse. The signal pulse is then input to a wavelength-selective device to output pulse field information comprising intensity vs. frequency for a first value of the time delay. The time delay is varied over a range of values effective to yield an intensity plot of signal intensity vs. wavelength and delay. In one embodiment, the beams are overlapped at an angle so that a selected range of delay times is within the intersection to produce a simultaneous output over the time delays of interest.

  10. Pigment-targeted light wavelength and intensity promotes efficient photoautotrophic growth of Cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Bland, Erik; Angenent, Largus T

    2016-09-01

    A consensus is lacking whether monochromatic rather than broad-spectrum illumination is more efficient for photosynthetic microbe production platforms. Light wavelength and intensity were tuned to pigment composition for growth of the Cyanobacterium Synechocystis PCC 6803. Phycocyanin (PC)-targeting LEDs (620nm) provided more than 6times the peak efficiency of white LEDs, with peak efficiency growth rates of 0.063h(-1) at 81μEm(-2)s(-1) and 0.039h(-1) at 126μEm(-2)s(-1) for red and white LEDs, respectively. Chlorophyll a (Chl a)-targeting LEDs (680- and 440-nm) performed poorly. Indeed, 10 times greater mass abundance was observed for PC than Chl a. PC levels did not change while Chl a levels decreased when Synechocystis transitioned from white light at 50μEm(-2)s(-1) to 250μEm(-2)s(-1) with 620nm, 680nm, or white LEDs. This work demonstrates that light wavelengths and intensity need to be optimized for each strain. PMID:27285573

  11. Intensity and polarization of light scattered by size distributions of randomly oriented nonspherical particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mishchenko, M. I.; Travis, L. D.

    1993-01-01

    Calculations of light scattering by small particles are important in many diverse fields of science and engineering. In many cases of practical interest, scattering particles are nonspherical and are distributed over sizes and orientations. However, accurate light scattering computations for ensembles of nonspherical particles are difficult and time-consuming, and the literature in which such calculations are reported is rather scarce. In this paper, the T-matrix approach, as extended recently to randomly oriented particles, is used to calculate rigorously light scattering by size distributions of randomly oriented axially symmetric particles. To model the variation of particle sizes in real ensembles, we use a power law distribution typical of some terrestrial aerosols. Contour plots of intensity and degree of linear polarization for polydisperse prolate and oblate spheroids of different aspect ratios and effective equivalent-sphere size parameters from 0 to 10 are calculated and compared with calculations for equivalent spheres. The angular scattering behavior of nonspherical polydispersions is found to be greatly different from that of spheres, while the scattering properties of oblate and prolate spheroids of the same aspect ratio are similar. With increasing particle size, both intensity and polarization become more shape-dependent. In general, nonspherical particles are stronger side scatterers and weaker backscatterers than equivalent spheres. With increasing aspect ratio of nonspherical particles polarization tends to be predominantly positive. Possible effects of particle nonsphericity on optical remote sensing of atmospheric aerosols are discussed.

  12. Root growth reacts rapidly and more pronounced than shoot growth towards increasing light intensity in tobacco seedlings.

    PubMed

    Walter, Achim; Nagel, Kerstin A

    2006-09-01

    Light intensity is crucial for plant growth and often fluctuates on a small time scale due to altering climate conditions or sunflecks. Recently, we performed a study that looked into the growth effect of a sudden elevation of light intensity on Nicotiana tabacum seedlings.1 It was shown that an increase in light intensity leads to a pronounced increase of root-shoot-ratio as root growth reacts strongly and rapidly to an increase of light intensity. In transition experiments from low (60 micromol m(-2) s(-1)) to high (300 micromol m(-2) s(-1)) light intensity, root growth increased by a factor of four within four days, reaching the steady-state level measured in plants that were cultivated in high-light conditions. During the first three hours after light increase, strong fluctuations of the velocity of the root tip were observed that were putatively caused by a superposition of hydraulic and photosynthetic acclimation to the altered conditions. Experiments with externally applied sucrose and with transgenic plants having reduced capacity for sucrose synthesis indicated clearly that increasing light intensity rapidly enhanced root growth by elevating sucrose export from shoot to root. PMID:19704663

  13. A simple method for correcting spatially resolved solar intensity oscillation observations for variations in scattered light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jefferies, S. M.; Duvall, T. L., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    A measurement of the intensity distribution in an image of the solar disk will be corrupted by a spatial redistribution of the light that is caused by the earth's atmosphere and the observing instrument. A simple correction method is introduced here that is applicable for solar p-mode intensity observations obtained over a period of time in which there is a significant change in the scattering component of the point spread function. The method circumvents the problems incurred with an accurate determination of the spatial point spread function and its subsequent deconvolution from the observations. The method only corrects the spherical harmonic coefficients that represent the spatial frequencies present in the image and does not correct the image itself.

  14. Sedentary behaviors and light-intensity activities in relation to colorectal cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Keum, NaNa; Cao, Yin; Oh, Hannah; Smith-Warner, Stephanie A; Orav, John; Wu, Kana; Fuchs, Charles S; Cho, Eunyoung; Giovannucci, Edward L

    2016-05-01

    A recent meta-analysis found that sedentary behaviors are associated with an increased colorectal cancer (CRC) risk. Yet, the finding on TV viewing time, the most widely used surrogate of sedentary behaviors, was based on only two studies. Furthermore, light-intensity activities (e.g., standing and slow walking), non-sedentary by posture but close to sedentary behaviors by Metabolic Equivalent Task values, have not been investigated in relation to CRC risk. Thus, we prospectively analyzed the relationships based on 69,715 women from Nurses' Health Study (1992-2010) and 36,806 men from Health Professionals Follow-Up Study (1988 - 2010). Throughout follow-up, time spent on sedentary behaviors including sitting watching TV and on light-intensity activities were assessed repeatedly; incidence of CRC was ascertained. Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using Cox proportional hazards models from each cohort. A total of 1,119 and 913 incident cases were documented from women and men, respectively. The multivariable HR comparing ≥ 21 versus < 7 hr/week of sitting watching TV was 1.21 (95% CI = 1.02 to 1.43, ptrend =.01) in women and 1.06 (95% CI = 0.84 to 1.34, ptrend =.93) in men. In women, those highly sedentary and physically less active had an approximately 41% elevated risk of CRC (95% CI = 1.03 to 1.92) compared with those less sedentary and physically more active. The other sedentary behaviors and light-intensity activities were not related to CRC risk in women or men. In conclusion, we found that prolonged sitting time watching TV was associated with an increased CRC risk in women but not in men. PMID:26649988

  15. Observation of vasculature alternation by intense pulsed light combined with physicochemical methods.

    PubMed

    Son, Taeyoon; Kang, Heesung; Jung, Byungjo

    2016-05-01

    Intense pulsed light (IPL) with low energy insufficient to completely destroy a vasculature was applied to rabbit ears to investigate vasculature alteration. Glycerol was combined with IPL to enhance the transfer efficacy of IPL energy. Both trans-illumination and laser speckle contrast images were obtained and analyzed after treatment. The application of IPL and glycerol combination induced vasodilation and improvement in blood flow. Moreover, such phenomenon was maintained over time. IPL may be applied to treat blood circulatory diseases by inducing vasodilation and to improve blood flow. PMID:26776941

  16. Comparison of laser and intense pulsed light sintering (IPL) for inkjet-printed copper nanoparticle layers

    PubMed Central

    Niittynen, Juha; Sowade, Enrico; Kang, Hyunkyoo; Baumann, Reinhard R.; Mäntysalo, Matti

    2015-01-01

    In this contribution we discuss the sintering of an inkjet-printed copper nanoparticle ink based on electrical performance and microstructure analysis. Laser and intense pulsed light (IPL) sintering are employed in order to compare the different techniques and their feasibility for electronics manufacturing. A conductivity of more than 20% of that of bulk copper material has been obtained with both sintering methods. Laser and IPL sintering techniques are considered to be complementary techniques and are highly suitable in different application fields. PMID:25743631

  17. Reactive Sintering of Copper Nanoparticles Using Intense Pulsed Light for Printed Electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Jongeun; Kim, Hak-Sung; Hahn, H. Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Most commercial copper nanoparticles are covered with an oxide shell and cannot be sintered into conducting lines/films by conventional thermal sintering. To address this issue, past efforts have utilized complex reduction schemes and sophisticated chambers to prevent oxidation, thereby rendering the process cost ineffective. To alleviate these problems, we demonstrate a reactive sintering process using intense pulsed light (IPL) in the present study. The IPL process successfully removed the oxide shells of copper nanoparticles, leaving a conductive, pure copper film in a short period of time (2 ms) under ambient conditions. The in situ copper oxide reduction mechanism was studied using several different experiments and analyses. We observed instant copper oxide reduction and sintering through poly( N-vinylpyrrolidone) functionalization of copper nanoparticles, followed by IPL irradiation. This phenomenon may be explained by oxide reduction either via an intermediate acid created by ultraviolet (UV) light irradiation or by hydroxyl (-OH) end groups, which act like long-chain alcohol reductants.

  18. Asymptotic model for shape resonance control of diatomics by intense non-resonant light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crubellier, Anne; González-Férez, Rosario; Koch, Christiane P.; Luc-Koenig, Eliane

    2015-04-01

    We derive a universal model for atom pairs interacting with non-resonant light via the polarizability anisotropy, based on the long range properties of the scattering. The corresponding dynamics can be obtained using a nodal line technique to solve the asymptotic Schrödinger equation. It consists of imposing physical boundary conditions at long range and vanishing the wavefunction at a position separating the inner zone and the asymptotic region. We show that nodal lines which depend on the intensity of the non-resonant light can satisfactorily account for the effect of the polarizability at short range. The approach allows to determine the resonance structure, energy, width, channel mixing and hybridization even for narrow resonances.

  19. Intense Pulsed Light Sintering of CH3NH3PbI3 Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Lavery, Brandon W; Kumari, Sudesh; Konermann, Hannah; Draper, Gabriel L; Spurgeon, Joshua; Druffel, Thad

    2016-04-01

    Perovskite solar cells utilizing a two-step deposited CH3NH3PbI3 thin film were rapidly sintered using an intense pulsed light source. For the first time, a heat treatment has shown the capability of sintering methylammonium lead iodide perovskite and creating large crystal sizes approaching 1 μm without sacrificing surface coverage. Solar cells with an average efficiency of 11.5% and a champion device of 12.3% are reported. The methylammonium lead iodide perovskite was subjected to 2000 J of energy in a 2 ms pulse of light generated by a xenon lamp, resulting in temperatures significantly exceeding the degradation temperature of 150 °C. The process opens up new opportunities in the manufacturability of perovskite solar cells by eliminating the rate-limiting annealing step, and makes it possible to envision a continuous roll-to-roll process similar to the printing press used in the newspaper industry. PMID:26943510

  20. Automatic Suppression of Intense Monochromatic Light in Electro-Optical Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Ritt, Gunnar; Eberle, Bernd

    2012-01-01

    Electro-optical imaging sensors are widely distributed and used for many different tasks. Due to technical improvements, their pixel size has been steadily decreasing, resulting in a reduced saturation capacity. As a consequence, this progress makes them susceptible to intense point light sources. Developments in laser technology have led to very compact and powerful laser sources of any wavelength in the visible and near infrared spectral region, offered as laser pointers. The manifold of wavelengths makes it difficult to encounter sensor saturation over the complete operating waveband by conventional measures like absorption or interference filters. We present a concept for electro-optical sensors to suppress overexposure in the visible spectral region. The key element of the concept is a spatial light modulator in combination with wavelength multiplexing. This approach allows spectral filtering within a localized area in the field of view of the sensor. The system offers the possibility of automatic reduction of overexposure by monochromatic laser radiation. PMID:23202039

  1. Signal intensity transfer function determination on thermal systems with stray light or scattering present

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burks, Stephen D.; Haefner, David P.; Burks, Thomas J.

    2015-05-01

    Accurate Signal Intensity Transfer Functions (SITF) measurements are necessary to determine the calibration factor in the 3D noise calculation of an electro-optical imaging system. The typical means for measuring a sensor's SITF is to place the sensor in a flooded field environment at a distance that is relatively close to the aperture of the emitter. Unfortunately, this arrangement has the potential to allow for additional contributions to the SITF in the form of scattering or stray light if the optics are not designed properly in the system under test. Engineers at the US Army Night Vision and Electronic Sensors Directorate are working to determine a means of evaluating the contribution due to scatting or stray light.

  2. Low intensity noise and narrow line-width diode laser light at 540 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lirong; Tamaki, Ryo; Kasai, Katsuyuki; Okada-Shudo, Yoshiko; Watanabe, Masayoshi; Zhang, Yun

    2015-05-01

    We present a convenient method to generate high quality single-frequency green light at a wavelength of 540 nm. It consists of a noise suppressed external cavity diode laser at a wavelength of 1080 nm by optical filtering and resonant optical feedback, and a frequency doubling of the fundamental light with an a-cut KTP crystal. Highly efficient conversion is realized by type II non-critical phase matching. A stable single-frequency operation with a maximum power of about 20 mW is performed for more than 3 h. Both the intensity noise and line-width reach the level of a monolithic nonplanar ring laser, which is well known for its extraordinarily narrow line-width and extremely low noise among available single-frequency operating lasers.

  3. Photoreceptor damage induced by low-intensity light: model of retinal degeneration in mammals

    PubMed Central

    Contín, Maria Ana; Arietti, Milagros M.; Benedetto, María M.; Bussi, Claudio; Guido, Mario E.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Retinal degeneration caused by a defect in the phototransduction cascade leads to the apoptosis of photoreceptor cells, although the precise molecular mechanism is still unknown. In addition, constant low light exposure produces photoreceptor cell death through the activation of downstream phototransduction. The authors investigated the time course and molecular mechanisms of death and the rhodopsin phosphorylation occurring during retinal degeneration after exposure to continuous low-intensity light. Methods Wistar rats were exposed to constant cool white 200 lx intensity LED light (LL) for one to ten days and compared with animals kept in the dark (DD) or controls exposed to a regular 12:12 h (LD) cycle. One eye from each rat was used for histological and quantitative outer nuclear layer (ONL) analysis and the other for biochemical assays. Results The histological analysis showed a significant reduction in the ONL of LL-exposed rats after seven days compared with LD- or DD-exposed rats. Retinal analysis by flow cytometer and the TUNEL assay revealed an increase in cell death in the ONL, the in vitro enzymatic activity assay and western blot analysis showing no caspase-3 activation. The rhodopsin analysis demonstrated more phosphorylation in serine 334 residues (Ser334) in LL-exposed than in LD- or DD-exposed rats. However, for all times studied, rhodopsin was completely dephosphorylated after four days of DD treatment. Conclusions Constant light exposure for seven days produces ONL reduction by photoreceptor cell death through a capase-3-independent mechanism. Increases in rhodopsin-phospho-Ser334 levels were observed, supporting the notion that changes in the regulation of the phototransduction cascade occur during retinal degeneration. PMID:23901245

  4. Detection of internal structure by scattered light intensity: Application to kidney cell sorting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goolsby, C. L.; Kunze, M. E.

    1985-01-01

    Scattered light measurements in flow cytometry were sucessfully used to distinguish cells on the basis of differing morphology and internal structure. Differences in scattered light patterns due to changes in internal structure would be expected to occur at large scattering angles. Practically, the results of these calculations suggest that in experimental situations an array of detectors would be useful. Although in general the detection of the scattered light intensity at several intervals within the 10 to 60 region would be sufficient, there are many examples where increased sensitivity could be acheived at other angles. The ability to measure at many different angular intervals would allow the experimenter to empirically select the optimum intervals for the varying conditions of cell size, N/C ratio, granule size and internal structure from sample to sample. The feasibility of making scattered light measurements at many different intervals in flow cytometry was demonstrated. The implementation of simplified versions of these techniques in conjunction with independant measurements of cell size could potentially improve the usefulness of flow cytometry in the study of the internal structure of cells.

  5. Phenotypic plasticity of Neonotonia wightii and Pueraria phaseoloides grown under different light intensities.

    PubMed

    Santos, Leonardo D T; Da Cruz, Leandro R; Dos Santos, Samuel A; Sant'anna-Santos, Bruno F; Dos Santos, Izabela T; De Oliveira, Ariane M; Barros, Rodrigo E; Santos, Márcia V; Faria, Rodrigo M

    2015-03-01

    Plants have the ability to undergo morphophysiological changes based on availability of light. The present study evaluated biomass accumulation, leaf morphoanatomy and physiology of Neonotonia wightii and Pueraria phaseoloides grown in full sunlight, as well as in 30% and 50% shade. Two assays were performed, one for each species, using a randomized block design with 10 replicates. A higher accumulation of fresh mass in the shoot of the plants was observed for both species under cultivation in 50% shade, while no differences were detected between the full sunlight and 30% shade. N. wightii and P. phaseoloides showed increase in area and reduction in thickness leaf when cultivated in 50% shade. There were no changes in photosynthetic rate, stomatal conductance, water use efficiency and evapotranspiration of P. phaseoloides plants because growth environment. However, the shade treatments caused alterations in physiological parameters of N. wightii. In both species, structural changes in the mesophyll occurred depending on the availability of light; however, the amount of leaf blade tissue remained unaltered. Despite the influence of light intensity variation on the morphophysiological plasticity of N. wightii and P. phaseoloides, no effects on biomass accumulation were observed in response to light. PMID:25714076

  6. Fast bistable intensive light scattering in helix-free ferroelectric liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Andreev, Alexander; Andreeva, Tatiana; Kompanets, Igor; Zalyapin, Nikolay; Xu, Huan; Pivnenko, Mike; Chu, Daping

    2016-05-01

    A new type of ferroelectric liquid crystal (FLC) is considered, where the reorientation of the director (main optical axes) at the interaction of an electric field with the FLC's spontaneous polarization is due to the movement of spatially localized waves with a stationary profile: solitons arise at the transition due to the Maxwellian mechanism of energy dissipation. Under certain conditions, the appearance of such waves leads to the formation of a structure of transient domains, and as a consequence, to the scattering of light. The Maxwellian mechanism of energy dissipation allows one to reduce the electric field strength at which the maximum efficiency of light scattering is achieved down to 2-3 V/μm and to increase the frequency of light modulation up to 3-5 kHz. Intensive bistable light scattering in an electro-optical cell filled with a specially designed helix-free FLC was studied, and a stable scattering state can be switched on and off for a few tens of microseconds and memorized for a few tens of seconds. PMID:27140360

  7. Effect of blue LED light intensity on carotenoid accumulation in citrus juice sacs.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lancui; Ma, Gang; Yamawaki, Kazuki; Ikoma, Yoshinori; Matsumoto, Hikaru; Yoshioka, Terutaka; Ohta, Satoshi; Kato, Masaya

    2015-09-01

    In the present study, the effects of blue LED light intensity on carotenoid accumulation and expression of genes related to carotenoid biosynthesis were investigated in the juice sacs of Satsuma mandarin (Citrus unshiu Marc.) and Valencia orange (Citrus sinensis Osbeck) in vitro. The results showed that 100 μmol m(-2)s(-1) blue LED light (100B) was effective for increasing carotenoid content, especially β-cryptoxanthin, in Satsuma mandarin after cultured in vitro for four weeks. In Valencia orange, in contrast, 50 μmol m(-2)s(-1) blue LED light (50B) treatment was effective for inducing carotenoid accumulation through increasing the contents of two major carotenoids, all-trans-violaxanthin and 9-cis-violaxanthin. In addition, gene expression results showed that the simultaneous increases in the expression of genes (CitPSY, CitPDS, CitZDS, CitLCYb2, and CitHYb) involved in producing β,β-xanthophylls were well consistent with the accumulation of β-cryptoxanthin in Satsuma mandarin under 100B, and violaxanthin in Valencia orange under 50B. The results presented herein contribute to further elucidating the regulatory mechanism of carotenoid accumulation by blue LED light. PMID:26432407

  8. Effects of moderate-intensity light on vitamin A-deficient rat retinas

    SciTech Connect

    Carter-Dawson, L.; Kuwabara, T.; Bieri, J.G.

    1981-05-01

    The effects of moderate-intensity light (150 to 200 ft-cd) on retinal structure were compared between retinol-adequate and retinol-deficient rats after 1 to 6 days of light exposure during the 12 hr light phase of the cycle. Both damage to the outer segments and loss of photoreceptor cells were accelerated in retinol-adequate rats. Outer segments in retinas of retinol-adequate rats showed an abnormal staining pattern and disruption of disc structure in the distal portion about 2 days before those of retinol-deficient rats. After 4 days of exposure 24% of the photoreceptor cells had degenerated in the retinol-adequate retinas, but only 6% in the retinol-deficient retinas. By 6 days 65% and 41% of the photoreceptors had degenerated in the retinol-adequate and retinol-deficient retinas, respectively. Thus light exposure induced more rapid degeneration of photoreceptor cells in rats receiving adequate retinol than in those deficient in this vitamin.

  9. Ultrasound modulated light blood flow measurement using intensity autocorrelation function: a Monte-Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsalach, A.; Metzger, Y.; Breskin, I.; Zeitak, R.; Shechter, R.

    2014-03-01

    Development of techniques for continuous measurement of regional blood flow, and in particular cerebral blood flow (CBF), is essential for monitoring critical care patients. Recently, a novel technique, based on ultrasound modulation of light was developed for non-invasive, continuous CBF monitoring (termed ultrasound-tagged light (UTL or UT-NIRS)), and shown to correlate with readings of 133 Xe SPECT1 and laser Doppler2. Coherent light is introduced into the tissue concurrently with an Ultrasound (US) field. Displacement of scattering centers within the sampled volume induced by Brownian motion, blood flow and the US field affects the photons' temporal correlation. Hence, the temporal fluctuations of the obtained speckle pattern provide dynamic information about the blood flow. We developed a comprehensive simulation, combining the effects of Brownian motion, US and flow on the obtained speckle pattern. Photons trajectories within the tissue are generated using a Monte-Carlo based model. Then, the temporal changes in the optical path due to displacement of scattering centers are determined, and the corresponding interference pattern over time is derived. Finally, the light intensity autocorrelation function of a single speckle is calculated, from which the tissue decorrelation time is determined. The simulation's results are compared with in-vitro experiments, using a digital correlator, demonstrating decorrelation time prediction within the 95% confidence interval. This model may assist in the development of optical based methods for blood flow measurements and particularly, in methods using the acousto-optic effect.

  10. A bimodal temperature response and effect of light intensity in the photocontrol of germination of seeds in Jussiaea suffruticosa.

    PubMed

    Wulff, R; Arias, I; Ponce, M; Muñoz, V

    1972-12-01

    A bimodal temperature response is observed in the germination of seeds in Jussiaea suffruticosa, both under continuous and cyclic light treatments. Germination exhibits two maxima at around 25° C and at 40°, and a minimum in the region of 30-35°. The response depends on light intensity both under continuous and intermittent light treatments. This dependence is much more noticeable in the region of minimum germination (30°). Both preincubation in darkness at 35° and high light intensities (15 500 lux) tend to eliminate the bimodal temperature response. PMID:24477485

  11. Absolute Rovibrational Intensities, Self-Broadening and Self-Shift Coefficients for the X(sup 1) Sigma(+) V=3 (left arrow) V=0 Band (C-12)(O-16)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chackerian, Charles, Jr.; Freedman, R.; Giver, L. P.; Brown, L. R.

    2001-01-01

    The rotationless transition moment squared for the x(sup 1) sigma (sup +) v=3 (left arrow) v=0 band of CO is measured to be the absolute value of R (sub 3-0) squared = 1.7127(25)x 10(exp -7) Debye squared. This value is about 8.6 percent smaller than the value assumed for HITRAN 2000. The Herman-Wallis intensity factor of this band is F=1+0.01168(11)m+0.0001065(79)m squared. The determination of self-broadening coefficients is improved with the inclusion of line narrowing; self-shifts are also reported.

  12. Absolute number density calibration of the absorption by ground-state lead atoms of the 283. 3-nm resonance line from a high-intensity lead hollow cathode lamp and the calculated effect of argon pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Simons, J.W.; McClean, R.E. ); Oldenborg, R.C. )

    1991-03-21

    The absolute number density calibration for the absorption by ground-state lead atoms of the 283.3-nm resonance line from a high-intensity lead hollow cathode lamp (Photron superlamp) is determined and found to be the same as that of a standard hollow cathode lamp. Comparisons of the calibrations to theoretical calculations are found to be quite satisfactory. The effects of argon pressures in the absorption cell on the calibration are examined theoretically by using a simple Lorentzian broadening and shifting model. These calculations show the expected reduction in sensitivity and increasing linearity of Beer-Lambert plots with increasing argon pressure.

  13. Quantifying the effects of light intensity on bioproduction and maintenance energy during photosynthetic growth of Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    PubMed

    Imam, Saheed; Fitzgerald, Colin M; Cook, Emily M; Donohue, Timothy J; Noguera, Daniel R

    2015-02-01

    Obtaining a better understanding of the physiology and bioenergetics of photosynthetic microbes is an important step toward optimizing these systems for light energy capture or production of valuable commodities. In this work, we analyzed the effect of light intensity on bioproduction, biomass formation, and maintenance energy during photoheterotrophic growth of Rhodobacter sphaeroides. Using data obtained from steady-state bioreactors operated at varying dilution rates and light intensities, we found that irradiance had a significant impact on biomass yield and composition, with significant changes in photopigment, phospholipid, and biopolymer storage contents. We also observed a linear relationship between incident light intensity and H2 production rate between 3 and 10 W m(-2), with saturation observed at 100 W m(-2). The light conversion efficiency to H2 was also higher at lower light intensities. Photosynthetic maintenance energy requirements were also significantly affected by light intensity, with links to differences in biomass composition and the need to maintain redox homeostasis. Inclusion of the measured condition-dependent biomass and maintenance energy parameters and the measured photon uptake rate into a genome-scale metabolic model for R. sphaeroides (iRsp1140) significantly improved its predictive performance. We discuss how our analyses provide new insights into the light-dependent changes in bioenergetic requirements and physiology during photosynthetic growth of R. sphaeroides and potentially other photosynthetic organisms. PMID:25428581

  14. A validated model to predict microalgae growth in outdoor pond cultures subjected to fluctuating light intensities and water temperatures

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Huesemann, Michael H.; Crowe, Braden J.; Waller, Peter; Chavis, Aaron R.; Hobbs, Samuel J.; Edmundson, Scott J.; Wigmosta, Mark S.

    2015-12-11

    Here, a microalgae biomass growth model was developed for screening novel strains for their potential to exhibit high biomass productivities under nutrient-replete conditions in outdoor ponds subjected to fluctuating light intensities and water temperatures. Growth is modeled by first estimating the light attenuation by biomass according to a scatter-corrected Beer-Lambert Law, and then calculating the specific growth rate in discretized culture volume slices that receive declining light intensities due to attenuation. The model requires the following experimentally determined strain-specific input parameters: specific growth rate as a function of light intensity and temperature, biomass loss rate in the dark as amore » function of temperature and average light intensity during the preceding light period, and the scatter-corrected biomass light absorption coefficient. The model was successful in predicting the growth performance and biomass productivity of three different microalgae species (Chlorella sorokiniana, Nannochloropsis salina, and Picochlorum sp.) in raceway pond cultures (batch and semi-continuous) subjected to diurnal sunlight intensity and water temperature variations. Model predictions were moderately sensitive to minor deviations in input parameters. To increase the predictive power of this and other microalgae biomass growth models, a better understanding of the effects of mixing-induced rapid light dark cycles on photo-inhibition and short-term biomass losses due to dark respiration in the aphotic zone of the pond is needed.« less

  15. A validated model to predict microalgae growth in outdoor pond cultures subjected to fluctuating light intensities and water temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Huesemann, Michael H.; Crowe, Braden J.; Waller, Peter; Chavis, Aaron R.; Hobbs, Samuel J.; Edmundson, Scott J.; Wigmosta, Mark S.

    2015-12-11

    Here, a microalgae biomass growth model was developed for screening novel strains for their potential to exhibit high biomass productivities under nutrient-replete conditions in outdoor ponds subjected to fluctuating light intensities and water temperatures. Growth is modeled by first estimating the light attenuation by biomass according to a scatter-corrected Beer-Lambert Law, and then calculating the specific growth rate in discretized culture volume slices that receive declining light intensities due to attenuation. The model requires the following experimentally determined strain-specific input parameters: specific growth rate as a function of light intensity and temperature, biomass loss rate in the dark as a function of temperature and average light intensity during the preceding light period, and the scatter-corrected biomass light absorption coefficient. The model was successful in predicting the growth performance and biomass productivity of three different microalgae species (Chlorella sorokiniana, Nannochloropsis salina, and Picochlorum sp.) in raceway pond cultures (batch and semi-continuous) subjected to diurnal sunlight intensity and water temperature variations. Model predictions were moderately sensitive to minor deviations in input parameters. To increase the predictive power of this and other microalgae biomass growth models, a better understanding of the effects of mixing-induced rapid light dark cycles on photo-inhibition and short-term biomass losses due to dark respiration in the aphotic zone of the pond is needed.

  16. Light-Intensity Physical Activities and Mortality in the United States General Population and CKD Subpopulation

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Guo; Marcus, Robin L.; Chonchol, Michel; Greene, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Background and objectives Sedentary behavior is associated with increased mortality in the general population. Whether replacing sedentary behavior with low- or light-intensity activities confers a survival benefit in the general or CKD populations is unknown. Design, setting, participants, & measurements This observational analysis of the 2003–2004 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey examined the associations of low- and light-intensity activities with mortality. On the basis of the number of counts/min recorded by an accelerometer, durations of sedentary (<100/min), low (100–499/min), light (500–2019/min), and moderate/vigorous (≥2020/min) activity were defined and normalized to 60 minutes. The mortality associations of 2 min/hr less sedentary duration in conjunction with 2 min/hr more (tradeoff) spent in one of the low, light, or moderate/vigorous activity durations while controlling for the other two activity durations were examined in multivariable Cox regression models in the entire cohort and in the CKD subgroup. Results Of the 3626 participants included, 383 had CKD. The mean sedentary duration was 34.4±7.9 min/hr in the entire cohort and 40.8±6.8 in the CKD subgroup. Tradeoff of sedentary duration with low activity duration was not associated with mortality in the entire cohort or the CKD subgroup. Tradeoff of sedentary duration with light activity duration was associated with a lower hazard of death in the entire cohort (hazard ratio, 0.67; 95% confidence interval, 0.48 to 0.93) and CKD subgroup (hazard ratio, 0.59; 95% confidence interval, 0.35 to 0.98). Tradeoff of sedentary duration with moderate/vigorous activity duration had a nonsignificant lower hazard in the entire cohort and CKD subgroup. Conclusions Patients with CKD are sedentary nearly two thirds of the time. Interventions that replace sedentary duration with an increase in light activity duration might confer a survival benefit. PMID:25931456

  17. Effect of intense pulsed light on immature burn scars: A clinical study

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Arindam; Dewangan, Yatindra Kumar; Bain, Jayanta; Rakshit, Pritha; Dhruw, Krishnanand; Basu, Sandip Kanti; Saha, Jayanta Kumar; Majumdar, Bijay Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: As intense pulsed light (IPL) is widely used to treat cutaneous vascular malformations and also used as non-ablative skin rejunuvation to remodel the skin collagen. A study has been undertaken to gauze the effect of IPL on immature burn scars with regard to vascularity, pliability and height. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted between June 2013 and May 2014, among patients with immature burn scars that healed conservatively within 2 months. Photographic evidence of appearance of scars and grading and rating was done with Vancouver Scar Scale parameters. Ratings were done for both case and control scar after the completion of four IPL treatment sessions and were compared. Results: Out of the 19 cases, vascularity, pliability and height improved significantly (P < 0.05) in 13, 14 and 11 scars respectively following IPL treatment. Conclusions: Intense pulsed light was well-tolerated by patients, caused good improvement in terms of vascularity, pliability, and height of immature burn scar. PMID:25593424

  18. Characterization of material ablation driven by laser generated intense extreme ultraviolet light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Nozomi; Masuda, Masaya; Deguchi, Ryo; Murakami, Masakatsu; Sunahara, Atsushi; Fujioka, Shinsuke; Yogo, Akifumi; Nishimura, Hiroaki

    2015-09-01

    We present a comparative study on the hydrodynamic behaviour of plasmas generated by material ablation by the irradiation of nanosecond extreme ultraviolet (EUV or XUV) or infrared laser pulses on solid samples. It was clarified that the difference in the photon energy deposition and following material heating mechanism between these two lights result in the difference in the plasma parameters and plasma expansion characteristics. Silicon plate was ablated by either focused intense EUV pulse (λ = 9-25 nm, 10 ns) or laser pulse (λ = 1064 nm, 10 ns), both with an intensity of ˜109 W/cm2. Both the angular distributions and energy spectra of the expanding ions revealed that the photoionized plasma generated by the EUV light differs significantly from that produced by the laser. The laser-generated plasma undergoes spherical expansion, whereas the EUV-generated plasma undergoes planar expansion in a comparatively narrow angular range. It is presumed that the EUV radiation is transmitted through the expanding plasma and directly photoionizes the samples in the solid phase, consequently forming a high-density and high-pressure plasma. Due to a steep pressure gradient along the direction of the target normal, the EUV plasma expands straightforward resulting in the narrower angular distribution observed.

  19. Nutritional quality of ten leafy vegetables harvested at two light intensities.

    PubMed

    Colonna, Emma; Rouphael, Youssef; Barbieri, Giancarlo; De Pascale, Stefania

    2016-05-15

    The nutritional composition of ten leafy vegetables (chicory, green lettuce, lamb's lettuce, mizuna, red chard, red lettuce, rocket, spinach, Swiss chard, and tatsoi) and quality traits of the selected leafy vegetables in relation to the light intensity (low and high Photosynthetically Active Radiation; PAR) at time of harvest were determined. Irrespective of the light intensity at time of harvest, the highest leaf dry matter (DM), proteins, nitrate, P, K and Ca contents were observed in rocket followed by mizuna. The highest lipophilic antioxidant activity (LAA) was recorded in red lettuce and rocket, whereas ascorbic acid (AA) and total phenolic (TP) contents of red lettuce were higher compared to the other leafy vegetables. When leafy vegetables were harvested at low as opposed to high PAR, the leaf content was higher in DM, protein, K, Ca and Mg, hydrophilic antioxidant activity (HAA), and LAA by 12.5%, 10.0%, 12.6%, 23.7%, 14.1%, 11.9%, and 18.5%, respectively. The highest values in TP for chicory, green lettuce, lamb's lettuce, mizuna, red chard, and red lettuce, were observed under high PAR. PMID:26776027

  20. Ergodic to non-ergodic transition monitored by scattered light intensity statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manno, M.; Bulone, D.; Martorana, V.; San Biagio, P. L.

    2004-10-01

    Many soft materials, such as gels or glasses, exhibit both a fast and a very slow relaxation behavior, often related to thermally activated processes restoring ergodicity. Pusey and Van Megen (Physica A 157 (1989) 705), have elaborated a theory that allows the usage of standard light scattering techniques to treat systems that are dynamically arrested, or non-ergodic, over the experimental time-scale. This theory concerning the distribution of intensity scattered by non-ergodic media is here extended, by taking into account second order temporal coherence of scattered radiation. The time-integrated intensity distribution function so obtained allows to distinguish between fast and slow contributions when the two time scales are not (or not yet) completely separated. Thus, by simple and quick static light scattering measurements one can follow an ergodic-to-non-ergodic transition. We present an experiment on gelation kinetics of sucrose-pectin systems, which illustrates the quality of the method, and show how the gel network is formed out of a homogeneous solution.

  1. Characterization of material ablation driven by laser generated intense extreme ultraviolet light

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Nozomi Masuda, Masaya; Deguchi, Ryo; Murakami, Masakatsu; Fujioka, Shinsuke; Yogo, Akifumi; Nishimura, Hiroaki; Sunahara, Atsushi

    2015-09-14

    We present a comparative study on the hydrodynamic behaviour of plasmas generated by material ablation by the irradiation of nanosecond extreme ultraviolet (EUV or XUV) or infrared laser pulses on solid samples. It was clarified that the difference in the photon energy deposition and following material heating mechanism between these two lights result in the difference in the plasma parameters and plasma expansion characteristics. Silicon plate was ablated by either focused intense EUV pulse (λ = 9–25 nm, 10 ns) or laser pulse (λ = 1064 nm, 10 ns), both with an intensity of ∼10{sup 9 }W/cm{sup 2}. Both the angular distributions and energy spectra of the expanding ions revealed that the photoionized plasma generated by the EUV light differs significantly from that produced by the laser. The laser-generated plasma undergoes spherical expansion, whereas the EUV-generated plasma undergoes planar expansion in a comparatively narrow angular range. It is presumed that the EUV radiation is transmitted through the expanding plasma and directly photoionizes the samples in the solid phase, consequently forming a high-density and high-pressure plasma. Due to a steep pressure gradient along the direction of the target normal, the EUV plasma expands straightforward resulting in the narrower angular distribution observed.

  2. Intensity of blue LED light: a potential stimulus for biomass and lipid content in fresh water microalgae Chlorella vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Atta, Madiha; Idris, Ani; Bukhari, Ataullah; Wahidin, Suzana

    2013-11-01

    Light quality and the intensity are key factors which render microalgae as a potential source of biodiesel. In this study the effects of various intensities of blue light and its photoperiods on the growth and lipid content of Chlorella vulgaris were investigated by using LED (Light Emitting Diode) in batch culture. C. vulgaris was grown for 13 days at three different light intensities (100, 200 and 300 μmol m(-2)s(-1)). Effect of three different light and dark regimes (12:12, 16:08 and 24:00 h Light:Dark) were investigated for each light intensity at 25°C culture temperature. Maximum lipid content (23.5%) was obtained due to high efficiency and deep penetration of 200 μmol m(-2)s(-1) of blue light (12:12 L:D) with improved specific growth (1.26 d(-1)) within reduced cultivation time of 8 days. White light could produce 20.9% lipid content in 10 days at 16:08 h L:D. PMID:24063820

  3. Energy transfer properties of Rhodobacter sphaeroides chromatophores during adaptation to low light intensity.

    PubMed

    Driscoll, B; Lunceford, C; Lin, S; Woronowicz, K; Niederman, R A; Woodbury, N W

    2014-08-28

    Time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy was used to explore the pathway and kinetics of energy transfer in photosynthetic membrane vesicles (chromatophores) isolated from Rhodobacter (Rba.) sphaeroides cells harvested 2, 4, 6 or 24 hours after a transition from growth in high to low level illumination. As previously observed, this light intensity transition initiates the remodeling of the photosynthetic apparatus and an increase in the number of light harvesting 2 (LH2) complexes relative to light harvesting 1 (LH1) and reaction center (RC) complexes. It has generally been thought that the increase in LH2 complexes served the purpose of increasing the overall energy transmission to the RC. However, fluorescence lifetime measurements and analysis in terms of energy transfer within LH2 and between LH2 and LH1 indicate that, during the remodeling time period measured, only a portion of the additional LH2 generated are well connected to LH1 and the reaction center. The majority of the additional LH2 fluorescence decays with a lifetime comparable to that of free, unconnected LH2 complexes. The presence of large LH2-only domains has been observed by atomic force microscopy in Rba. sphaeroides chromatophores (Bahatyrova et al., Nature, 2004, 430, 1058), providing structural support for the existence of pools of partially connected LH2 complexes. These LH2-only domains represent the light-responsive antenna complement formed after a switch in growth conditions from high to low illumination, while the remaining LH2 complexes occupy membrane regions containing mixtures of LH2 and LH1-RC core complexes. The current study utilized a multi-parameter approach to explore the fluorescence spectroscopic properties related to the remodeling process, shedding light on the structure-function relationship of the photosynthetic assembles. Possible reasons for the accumulation of these largely disconnected LH2-only pools are discussed. PMID:25008288

  4. Light intensity regulation of cab gene transcription is signaled by the redox state of the plastoquinone pool.

    PubMed Central

    Escoubas, J M; Lomas, M; LaRoche, J; Falkowski, P G

    1995-01-01

    The eukaryotic green alga Dunaliella tertiolecta acclimates to decreased growth irradiance by increasing cellular levels of light-harvesting chlorophyll protein complex apoproteins associated with photosystem II (LHCIIs), whereas increased growth irradiance elicits the opposite response. Nuclear run-on transcription assays and measurements of cab mRNA stability established that light intensity-dependent changes in LHCII are controlled at the level of transcription. cab gene transcription in high-intensity light was partially enhanced by reducing plastoquinone with 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethyl urea (DCMU), whereas it was repressed in low-intensity light by partially inhibiting the oxidation of plastoquinol with 2,5-dibromo-3-methyl-6-isopropyl-p-benzoquinone (DBMIB). Uncouplers of photosynthetic electron transport and inhibition of water splitting had no effect on LHCII levels. These results strongly implicate the redox state of the plastoquinone pool in the chloroplast as a photon-sensing system that is coupled to the light-intensity regulation of nuclear-encoded cab gene transcription. The accumulation of cellular chlorophyll at low-intensity light can be blocked with cytoplasmically directed phosphatase inhibitors, such as okadaic acid, microcystin L-R, and tautomycin. Gel mobility-shift assays revealed that cells grown in high-intensity light contained proteins that bind to the promoter region of a cab gene carrying sequences homologous to higher plant light-responsive elements. On the basis of these experimental results, we propose a model for a light intensity signaling system where cab gene expression is reversibly repressed by a phosphorylated factor coupled to the redox status of plastoquinone through a chloroplast protein kinase. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7479759

  5. Absolute infrared intensities for F-113 and F-114 and an assessment of their greenhouse warming potential relative to other chlorofluorocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Jerry D.; Stephens, Robert D.

    1988-03-01

    The literature concerning the "greenhouse" warming potentials of Chlorofluorocarbons F-11, F-12, F-22, F-113, F-114, F-134a, and F-142b is reviewed. Additionally, infrared intensities are reported for each of the fundamental absorption bands of F-113 (CF2ClCFCl2) and F-114 (CF2ClCF2Cl) in the region between 8 and 20 μm. The measurements were made with a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer operated at 0.04 cm-1 apodized resolution. The total intensities measured for this region were 4905 cm-2 atm-1 for F-113 and 6064 cm-2 atm-1 for F-114, compared to a total intensity of 3404 cm-2 atm-1 for F-12 (CF2Cl2) in the same region. On the basis of these infrared intensities and the atmospheric lifetimes of F-113 and of F-114 relative to F-12, and on a per unit mass basis, F-113 and F-114 are about 0.8 and 1.9 times as effective, respectively, as F-12 in the "greenhouse" warming of the Earth.

  6. 14 CFR 25.1393 - Minimum intensities in any vertical plane of forward and rear position lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    .... Each position light intensity must equal or exceed the applicable values in the following table: Angle above or below the horizontal plane Intensity, l 0° 1.00 0° to 5° 0.90 5° to 10° 0.80 10° to 15° 0.70...

  7. 14 CFR 29.1393 - Minimum intensities in any vertical plane of forward and rear position lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    .... Each position light intensity must equal or exceed the applicable values in the following table: Angle above or below the horizontal plane Intensity, I 0° 1.00 0° to 5° .90 5° to 10° .80 10° to 15° .70...

  8. 14 CFR 29.1393 - Minimum intensities in any vertical plane of forward and rear position lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    .... Each position light intensity must equal or exceed the applicable values in the following table: Angle above or below the horizontal plane Intensity, I 0° 1.00 0° to 5° .90 5° to 10° .80 10° to 15° .70...

  9. 14 CFR 29.1393 - Minimum intensities in any vertical plane of forward and rear position lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    .... Each position light intensity must equal or exceed the applicable values in the following table: Angle above or below the horizontal plane Intensity, I 0° 1.00 0° to 5° .90 5° to 10° .80 10° to 15° .70...

  10. 14 CFR 25.1393 - Minimum intensities in any vertical plane of forward and rear position lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    .... Each position light intensity must equal or exceed the applicable values in the following table: Angle above or below the horizontal plane Intensity, l 0° 1.00 0° to 5° 0.90 5° to 10° 0.80 10° to 15° 0.70...

  11. 14 CFR 27.1393 - Minimum intensities in any vertical plane of forward and rear position lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    .... Each position light intensity must equal or exceed the applicable values in the following table: Angle above or below the horizontal plane Intensity, l 0° 1.00 0° to 5° 0.90 5° to 10° 0.80 10° to 15° 0.70...

  12. 14 CFR 25.1393 - Minimum intensities in any vertical plane of forward and rear position lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    .... Each position light intensity must equal or exceed the applicable values in the following table: Angle above or below the horizontal plane Intensity, l 0° 1.00 0° to 5° 0.90 5° to 10° 0.80 10° to 15° 0.70...

  13. 14 CFR 27.1393 - Minimum intensities in any vertical plane of forward and rear position lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    .... Each position light intensity must equal or exceed the applicable values in the following table: Angle above or below the horizontal plane Intensity, l 0° 1.00 0° to 5° 0.90 5° to 10° 0.80 10° to 15° 0.70...

  14. 14 CFR 27.1393 - Minimum intensities in any vertical plane of forward and rear position lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    .... Each position light intensity must equal or exceed the applicable values in the following table: Angle above or below the horizontal plane Intensity, l 0° 1.00 0° to 5° 0.90 5° to 10° 0.80 10° to 15° 0.70...

  15. 14 CFR 29.1391 - Minimum intensities in the horizontal plane of forward and rear position lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Minimum intensities in the horizontal plane of forward and rear position lights. 29.1391 Section 29.1391 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Equipment Lights § 29.1391...

  16. 14 CFR 27.1391 - Minimum intensities in the horizontal plane of forward and rear position lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Minimum intensities in the horizontal plane of forward and rear position lights. 27.1391 Section 27.1391 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Equipment Lights § 27.1391...

  17. 14 CFR 25.1391 - Minimum intensities in the horizontal plane of forward and rear position lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Minimum intensities in the horizontal plane of forward and rear position lights. 25.1391 Section 25.1391 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Equipment Lights § 25.1391...

  18. Sound Velocity and Diffraction Intensity Measurements Based on Raman-Nath Theory of the Interaction of Light and Ultrasound

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neeson, John F.; Austin, Stephen

    1975-01-01

    Describes a method for the measurement of the velocity of sound in various liquids based on the Raman-Nath theory of light-sound interaction. Utilizes an analog computer program to calculate the intensity of light scattered into various diffraction orders. (CP)

  19. Effect of plasma reflection on open-circuit voltage of a solar cell at ultrahigh light intensities

    SciTech Connect

    Tewary, V.K.; Kothari, L.S.; Jain, S.C.

    1980-07-01

    It is shown that the observed decrease of open-circuit voltage of a silicon solar cell for ruby laser light at intensities beyond 10/sup 5/ W/cm/sup 2/ can be explained by incorporating the effect of plasma reflection of light from the surface of the solar cell.

  20. Long lifetime, low intensity light source for use in nighttime viewing of equipment maps and other writings

    DOEpatents

    Frank, A.M.; Edwards, W.R.

    1982-03-23

    A long-lifetime light source is discussed with sufficiently low intensity to be used for reading a map or other writing at nightime, while not obscuring the user's normal night vision. This light source includes a diode electrically connected in series with a small power source and a lens properly positioned to focus at least a portion of the light produced by the diode.

  1. Long lifetime, low intensity light source for use in nighttime viewing of equipment maps and other writings

    DOEpatents

    Frank, A.M.; Edwards, W.R.

    1983-10-11

    A long-lifetime light source with sufficiently low intensity to be used for reading a map or other writing at nighttime, while not obscuring the user's normal night vision is disclosed. This light source includes a diode electrically connected in series with a small power source and a lens properly positioned to focus at least a portion of the light produced by the diode. 1 fig.

  2. Effects of light intensity from photostimulation in four strains of commercial egg layers: 1. Ovarian morphology and carcass parameters.

    PubMed

    Renema, R A; Robinson, F E

    2001-08-01

    We examined the effects of light intensity (LI) from photostimulation to 45 wk of age on egg production parameters and egg size characteristics and on ovarian and carcass morphology at sexual maturity and 45 wk of age in four layer strains. Floor housed pullets were raised in a light-tight facility from 1 d of age until housing in individually illuminated cages at 17 wk of age. Two white egg strains, ISA-White (ISA-W) and Shaver 2000 (S2000), and two brown egg strains, ISA-Brown (ISA-B) and Shaver 579 (S579), were used. Pullets were randomly assigned to a processing group that was killed at sexual maturity (first oviposition) (Group 1) or kept to 45 wk (Group 2). Birds were photostimulated at 18 wk of age using a LI of 1, 5, 50, or 500 lx (4 x 4 factorial design). One bird from Group 1 and one from Group 2 were caged together in individually lit cages (one brown and one white egg layer). Carcass and ovarian morphology data were examined as related to Strain, LI, or the interaction of Strain and LI. The time from photostimulation to sexual maturity did not differ due to LI, but was shorter for brown egg strains (ISA-B = 19.9 d, S579 = 20.2 d) than for white egg strains (ISA-W = 26.6 d, S2000 = 28.1 d). Body weight at sexual maturity differed among all strains, with the white egg strains having the lowest BW. Ovary weight was the greatest in ISA-W birds, in which 8.0 large yellow follicles (LYF) were present compared to 6.8 in S2000 birds. The LI affected ovary development, as birds with the 1 lx exposure had lower ovary weights and fewer LYF than did 50 lx birds, suggesting that the 1 lx LI did not result in an adequate photostimulatory cueing of sexual maturation. The threshold LI for a complete morphological response to photostimulation in this study was 5 lx. Strain differences in BW observed at sexual maturity continued to 45 wk of age. Light intensity affected 45 wk BW, with 5 lx LI birds weighing 7.2 and 8.7% more than the 50 and 500 lx birds, respectively. On

  3. New findings regarding light intensity and its effects as a zeitgeber in the Sprague-Dawley rat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tischler, A. C.; Winget, C. M.; Holley, D. C.; Deroshia, C. W.; Gott, J.; Mele, G.; Callahan, P. X.

    1993-01-01

    In most mammals, the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the anterior hypothalamus has been implicated as the central driving mechanism of circadian rhythmicity. The photic input from the retina, via the retino-hypothalamic tract, and modulation from the pineal gland help regulate the clock. In this study, we investigated the effects of low light intensity on the circadian system of the Sprague-Dawley rat. A series of light intensity experiments were conducted to determine if a light level of 0.1 Lux will maintain entrained circadian rhythms of feeding, drinking, and locomotor activity.

  4. Interactions between light intensity and phosphorus nutrition affect the phosphate-mining capacity of white lupin (Lupinus albus L.)

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Lingyun; Tang, Xiaoyan; Vance, Carroll P.; White, Philip J.; Zhang, Fusuo; Shen, Jianbo

    2014-01-01

    Light intensity affects photosynthetic carbon (C) fixation and the supply of carbon to roots. To evaluate interactions between carbon supply and phosphorus (P) supply, effects of light intensity on sucrose accumulation, root growth, cluster root formation, carboxylate exudation, and P uptake capacity were studied in white lupin (Lupinus albus L.) grown hydroponically with either 200 µmol m–2 s–1 or 600 µmol m–2 s–1 light and a sufficient (50 µM P) or deficient (1 µM P) P supply. Plant biomass and root:shoot ratio increased with increasing light intensity, particularly when plants were supplied with sufficient P. Both low P supply and increasing light intensity increased the production of cluster roots and citrate exudation. Transcripts of a phosphoenol pyruvate carboxylase gene (LaPEPC3) in cluster roots (which is related to the exudation of citrate), transcripts of a phosphate transporter gene (LaPT1), and P uptake all increased with increasing light intensity, under both P-sufficient and P-deficient conditions. Across all four experimental treatments, increased cluster root formation and carboxylate exudation were associated with lower P concentration in the shoot and greater sucrose concentration in the roots. It is suggested that C in excess of shoot growth capabilities is translocated to the roots as sucrose, which serves as both a nutritional signal and a C-substrate for carboxylate exudation and cluster root formation. PMID:24723402

  5. Interactions between light intensity and phosphorus nutrition affect the phosphate-mining capacity of white lupin (Lupinus albus L.).

    PubMed

    Cheng, Lingyun; Tang, Xiaoyan; Vance, Carroll P; White, Philip J; Zhang, Fusuo; Shen, Jianbo

    2014-07-01

    Light intensity affects photosynthetic carbon (C) fixation and the supply of carbon to roots. To evaluate interactions between carbon supply and phosphorus (P) supply, effects of light intensity on sucrose accumulation, root growth, cluster root formation, carboxylate exudation, and P uptake capacity were studied in white lupin (Lupinus albus L.) grown hydroponically with either 200 µmol m(-2) s(-1) or 600 µmol m(-2) s(-1) light and a sufficient (50 µM P) or deficient (1 µM P) P supply. Plant biomass and root:shoot ratio increased with increasing light intensity, particularly when plants were supplied with sufficient P. Both low P supply and increasing light intensity increased the production of cluster roots and citrate exudation. Transcripts of a phosphoenol pyruvate carboxylase gene (LaPEPC3) in cluster roots (which is related to the exudation of citrate), transcripts of a phosphate transporter gene (LaPT1), and P uptake all increased with increasing light intensity, under both P-sufficient and P-deficient conditions. Across all four experimental treatments, increased cluster root formation and carboxylate exudation were associated with lower P concentration in the shoot and greater sucrose concentration in the roots. It is suggested that C in excess of shoot growth capabilities is translocated to the roots as sucrose, which serves as both a nutritional signal and a C-substrate for carboxylate exudation and cluster root formation. PMID:24723402

  6. Experimental demonstration of tomographic slit technique for measurement of arbitrary intensity profiles of light beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soto, José; Rendón, Manuel; Martín, Manuel

    1997-10-01

    We demonstrate experimentally an optical imaging method that makes use of a slit to collect tomographic projection data of arbitrarily shaped light beams; a tomographic backprojection algorithm is then used to reconstruct the intensity profiles of these beams. Two different implementations of the method are presented. In one, a single slit is scanned and rotated in front of the laser beam. In the other, the sides of a polygonal slit, which is linearly displaced in a x-y plane perpendicular to the beam, are used to collect the data. This latter version is more suitable than the other for adaptation at micrometer-size scale. A mathematical justification is given here for the superior performance against laser-power fluctuations of the tomographic slit technique compared with the better-known tomographic knife-edge technique.

  7. Radiation emission from ultra-relativistic plasma electrons in short-intense laser light interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ondarza-Rovira, R.; Boyd, TJM

    2016-05-01

    Intense femtosecond laser light incident on overcritical density plasmas has shown to emit a prolific number of high-order harmonics of the driver frequency, with spectra characterised by power-law decays. When the laser pulse is p-polarised, plasma effects do modify the harmonic spectrum, weakening the so-called universal decay index p = 8/3 to 5/3. In this work appeal is made to a single particle radiation model in support of the predictions from particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. Using these, we further show that the emission radiated by electrons -those that are relativistically accelerated inside the plasma, after being expelled into vacuum, the so-called Brunel electrons- is characterised not only by the plasma line but also by ultraviolet harmonic orders characterised by the 5/3 decay index.

  8. Ultraviolet light attenuates vasospasm development: low-intensity 325-nm illumination in animal model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morimoto, Yuji; Nakai, Kanji; Arai, Tsunenori; Shima, Katsuji; Kikuchi, Makoto

    1999-06-01

    We studied whether prophylactic low-intensity ultraviolet light (UV) irradiation reduces development of delayed cerebral vasospasm in rabbit model. Eleven rabbits had carotid angiography and placement of silicon sheaths around the right common carotid artery (CCA). Just before the placement, CCAs of 6 in the 11 animals were adventitiously exposed to UV (10 mJ/mm2) emitted from a helium-cadmium laser (wavelength equals 325 nm). Sheaths were filled with autologous blood in all of 11 animals. Vasospasm developed 24 to 48 hours (Day 2) later. The CCA luminal diameter without UV irradiation was 77% of the Day 0 state. The prophylactic laser treatment reduced the development of vasospasm, 90% of the Day 0 state. Histological examination of the treated CCA revealed extended smooth muscle cells. There was no endothelial damage. These results suggest that UV is effective for prophylaxis of cerebral vasospasm.

  9. Pigment Deposition of Cosmetic Contact Lenses on the Cornea after Intense Pulsed-Light Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Sojin; Lee, Jong Rak

    2010-01-01

    We report a case of corneal deposition of pigments from cosmetic contact lenses after intense pulsed-light (IPL) therapy. A 30-year-old female visited our outpatient clinic with ocular pain and epiphora in both eyes; these symptoms developed soon after she had undergone facial IPL treatment. She was wearing cosmetic contact lenses throughout the IPL procedure. At presentation, her uncorrected visual acuity was 2/20 in both eyes, and the slit-lamp examination revealed deposition of the color pigment of the cosmetic contact lens onto the corneal epithelium. We scraped the corneal epithelium along with the deposited pigments using a no. 15 blade; seven days after the procedure, the corneal epithelium had healed without any complications. This case highlights the importance of considering the possibility of ocular complications during IPL treatment, particularly in individuals using contact lenses. To prevent ocular damage, IPL procedures should be performed only after removing the lenses and applying eyeshields. PMID:21165237

  10. High-resolution and wide-bandwidth light intensity fiber optic displacement sensor for MEMS metrology.

    PubMed

    Orłowska, Karolina; Świątkowski, Michał; Kunicki, Piotr; Kopiec, Daniel; Gotszalk, Teodor

    2016-08-01

    We report on the design, properties, and applications of a high-resolution and wide-bandwidth light intensity fiber optic displacement sensor for microelectromechanical system (MEMS) metrology. There are two types of structures that the system is dedicated to: vibrating with both high and low frequencies. In order to ensure high-frequency and high-resolution measurements, frequency down mixing and selective signal processing were applied. The obtained effective measuring bandwidth ranges from single hertz to 1 megahertz. The achieved resolution presented here is 116  pm/Hz1/2 and 138  pm/Hz1/2 for low-frequency and high-frequency operation modes, respectively, whereas the measurement of static displacement is 100 μm. PMID:27505377

  11. Clinical therapeutic effect of intense pulse light PhotoDerm for vascular dermatosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Li-Jun; Xu, Li-Wei; Li, Ying-Yi; Yang, Ji-Qing; Qi, Jia-Xue

    2008-12-01

    Objective: To observe the clinical therapeutic effect of intense pulsed light PhotoDerm (IPL PhotoDerm) for vascular dermatosis and analysis the possible factors affecting the therapeutic effect. Methods: Treat all blank kinds of vascular dermatosis 85 cases with IPL PhotoDerm, observe the therapeutic effect and no obvious side-effects of vascular dermatosis. Results: The cure rate of telangiectasis, arterial spider nevus, strawberry nevus, avermrus uemongioma and nevus flammeus with IPL PhotoDerm is respective 76.5%, 91.7%, 88.9%, 27.8%, 15%, and the cure rate in three times is respective 35.3%, 91.7%, 66.7%, 5.6% and 5%. 6 eases appear pigmentation, pigment subsidence or atrophic scar. Conclusion: The therapeutic effect of vascular dermatosis with IPL PhotoDerm is satisfying, and the no obvious side-effects is less.

  12. Optoelectrofluidic field separation based on light-intensity gradients and its applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Jinsung; Lee, Sanghyun; Kang, Kwan Hyoung

    2010-11-01

    Optoelectrofluidic field separation (OEFS) of particles under light-intensity gradient (LIG) is reported, where the LIG illumination on the photoconductive layer converts the short-ranged dielectrophoresis (DEP) force to the long-ranged one. The long-ranged DEP force can compete with the hydrodynamic force by alternating current electro-osmosis (ACEO) over the entire illumination area for realizing effective field separation of particles. Results of the field separation and concentration of diverse particle pairs (0.82--16 μm) are well demonstrated, and conditions determining the critical radius and effective particle manipulation are discussed. In addition, expanding the OEFS to biological applications such as rapid cell manipulation and separation will be discussed. The OEFS with LIG strategy could be a promising manipulation method of particles including biological cells in many applications where a rapid manipulation of particles over the entire working area is of interest.

  13. Different roles of cyclic electron flow around photosystem I under sub-saturating and saturating light intensities in tobacco leaves

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wei; Yang, Ying-Jie; Hu, Hong; Zhang, Shi-Bao

    2015-01-01

    In higher plants, the generation of proton gradient across the thylakoid membrane (ΔpH) through cyclic electron flow (CEF) has mainly two functions: (1) to generate ATP and balance the ATP/NADPH energy budget, and (2) to protect photosystems I and II against photoinhibition. The intensity of light under which plants are grown alters both CEF activity and the ATP/NADPH demand for primary metabolic processes. However, it is unclear how the role of CEF is affected by the level of irradiance that is applied during the growth and measurement periods. We studied the role of CEF at different light intensities in leaves from sun- and shade-grown plants. At 849 μmol photons m-2 s-1, both types of leaves had nearly the same degree of CEF activation. Modeling of the ATP/NADPH demand revealed that, at this light intensity, the contribution of CEF toward supplying ATP was much higher in the sun leaves. Meanwhile, the shade leaves showed higher levels of non-photochemical quenching and the P700 oxidation ratio. Therefore, at 849 μmol photons m-2 s-1, CEF mainly helped in the synthesis of ATP in the sun leaves, but functioned in photoprotection for the shade leaves. When the light intensity increased to 1976 μmol photons m-2 s-1, CEF activation was greatly enhanced in the sun leaves, but its contribution to supplying ATP changed slightly. These results indicate that the main role of CEF is altered flexibly in response to light intensity. In particular, CEF mainly contributes to balancing the ATP/NADPH energy budget under sub-saturating light intensities. When exposed to saturating light intensities, CEF mainly protects photosynthetic apparatus against photoinhibition. PMID:26579169

  14. Emotion differentiation and intensity during acute tobacco abstinence: A comparison of heavy and light smokers.

    PubMed

    Sheets, Erin S; Bujarski, Spencer; Leventhal, Adam M; Ray, Lara A

    2015-08-01

    The ability to recognize and label discrete emotions, termed emotion differentiation, is particularly pertinent to overall emotion regulation abilities. Patterns of deficient emotion differentiation have been associated with mood and anxiety disorders but have yet to be examined in relation to nicotine dependence. This study employed ecological momentary assessment to examine smokers' subjective experience of discrete emotions during 24-h of forced tobacco abstinence. Thirty daily smokers rated their emotions up to 23 times over the 24-hour period, and smoking abstinence was biologically verified. From these data, we computed individual difference measures of emotion differentiation, overall emotion intensity, and emotional variability. As hypothesized, heavy smokers reported poorer negative emotion differentiation than light smokers (d=0.55), along with more intense negative emotion (d=0.97) and greater negative emotion variability (d=0.97). No differences were observed in positive emotion differentiation. Across the sample, poorer negative emotion differentiation was associated with greater endorsement of psychological motives to smoke, including negative and positive reinforcement motives, while positive emotion differentiation was not. PMID:25885662

  15. The influence of photoperiod and light intensity on the growth and photosynthesis of Dunaliella salina (chlorophyta) CCAP 19/30.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yanan; Ibrahim, Iskander M; Harvey, Patricia J

    2016-09-01

    The green microalga Dunaliella salina survives in a wide range of salinities via mechanisms involving glycerol synthesis and degradation and is exploited for large amounts of nutraceutical carotenoids produced under stressed conditions. In this study, D. salina CCAP 19/30 was cultured in varying photoperiods and light intensities to study the relationship of light with different growth measurement parameters, with cellular contents of glycerol, starch and carotenoids, and with photosynthesis and respiration. Results show CCAP 19/30 regulated cell volume when growing under light/dark cycles: cell volume increased in the light and decreased in the dark, and these changes corresponded to changes in cellular glycerol content. The decrease in cell volume in the dark was independent of cell division and biological clock and was regulated by the photoperiod of the light/dark cycle. When the light intensity was increased to above 1000 μmol photons m(-2) s(-1), cells displayed evidence of photodamage. However, these cells also maintained the maximum level of photosynthesis efficiency and respiration possible, and the growth rate increased as light intensity increased. Significantly, the intracellular glycerol content also increased, >2-fold compared to the content in light intensity of 500 μmol photons m(-2) s(-1), but there was no commensurate increase in the pool size of carotenoids. These data suggest that in CCAP 19/30 glycerol stabilized the photosynthetic apparatus for maximum performance in high light intensities, a role normally attributed to carotenoids. PMID:27231875

  16. Intense Pulsed Light Pulse Configuration Manipulation Can Resolve the Classic Conflict Between Safety and Efficacy.

    PubMed

    Belenky, Inna; Tagger, Cruzy; Bingham, Andrea

    2015-11-01

    The widely used intense pulse light (IPL) technology was first commercially launched to the medical market in 1994 and similar to lasers, is based on the basic principle of selective photothermolysis. The main conflict during treatments with light-based technologies is between safety and efficacy of the treatment. The aim of this study was to evaluate new IPL technology, which integrates three different pulse configurations, with specific attention on the safety and efficacy of the treatment. 101 volunteers (with Fitzpatrick skin types I-VI) were treated as follows: 9 patients underwent 8 bi-weekly acne clearance treatments, 51 patients underwent 6-12 hair removal treatments, 11 patients were treated for general skin rejuvenation, 15 patients were treated for pigmentation lesions, and 15 patients were treated for vascular lesions. No serious adverse events were recorded. All patients that were treated for hair removal achieved significant hair clearance. The patients with facial rosacea responded the fastest to the treatment. Eight of nine patients that were treated for acne clearance achieved significant reduction in acne appearance. The results represented in this study support the approach that when taking into consideration both efficacy of the treatment and safety of the patients, the system should be "flexible" enough to allow exact treatment settings profile for each patient, according to their skin type and the symptom's biophysical characteristics. < PMID:26580874

  17. Using Multivariate Regression Model with Least Absolute Shrinkage and Selection Operator (LASSO) to Predict the Incidence of Xerostomia after Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Head and Neck Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ting, Hui-Min; Chang, Liyun; Huang, Yu-Jie; Wu, Jia-Ming; Wang, Hung-Yu; Horng, Mong-Fong; Chang, Chun-Ming; Lan, Jen-Hong; Huang, Ya-Yu; Fang, Fu-Min; Leung, Stephen Wan

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to develop a multivariate logistic regression model with least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (LASSO) to make valid predictions about the incidence of moderate-to-severe patient-rated xerostomia among head and neck cancer (HNC) patients treated with IMRT. Methods and Materials Quality of life questionnaire datasets from 206 patients with HNC were analyzed. The European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer QLQ-H&N35 and QLQ-C30 questionnaires were used as the endpoint evaluation. The primary endpoint (grade 3+ xerostomia) was defined as moderate-to-severe xerostomia at 3 (XER3m) and 12 months (XER12m) after the completion of IMRT. Normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) models were developed. The optimal and suboptimal numbers of prognostic factors for a multivariate logistic regression model were determined using the LASSO with bootstrapping technique. Statistical analysis was performed using the scaled Brier score, Nagelkerke R2, chi-squared test, Omnibus, Hosmer-Lemeshow test, and the AUC. Results Eight prognostic factors were selected by LASSO for the 3-month time point: Dmean-c, Dmean-i, age, financial status, T stage, AJCC stage, smoking, and education. Nine prognostic factors were selected for the 12-month time point: Dmean-i, education, Dmean-c, smoking, T stage, baseline xerostomia, alcohol abuse, family history, and node classification. In the selection of the suboptimal number of prognostic factors by LASSO, three suboptimal prognostic factors were fine-tuned by Hosmer-Lemeshow test and AUC, i.e., Dmean-c, Dmean-i, and age for the 3-month time point. Five suboptimal prognostic factors were also selected for the 12-month time point, i.e., Dmean-i, education, Dmean-c, smoking, and T stage. The overall performance for both time points of the NTCP model in terms of scaled Brier score, Omnibus, and Nagelkerke R2 was satisfactory and corresponded well with the expected values. Conclusions

  18. Influence of Light Intensity on Growth and Pigment Production by Monascus ruber in Submerged Fermentation.

    PubMed

    Bühler, Rose Marie Meinicke; Müller, Bruna Luíse; Moritz, Denise Esteves; Vendruscolo, Francielo; de Oliveira, Debora; Ninow, Jorge Luiz

    2015-07-01

    To reduce environmental problems caused by glycerine accumulation and to make the production of biodiesel more profitable, crude glycerin without treatment was used as substrate for obtaining higher value-added bioproducts. Monascus ruber is a filamentous fungus that produces pigments, particularly red ones, which are used for coloring foods (rice wine and meat products). The interest in developing pigments from natural sources is increasing due to the restriction of using synthetic dyes. The effects of temperature, pH, microorganism morphology, aeration, nitrogen source, and substrates have been studied in the cultivation of M. ruber. In this work, it was observed that light intensity is also an important factor that should be considered for understanding the metabolism of the fungus. In M. ruber cultivation, inhibition of growth and pigment production was observed in Petri dishes and blaffed flasks exposed to direct illumination. Growth and pigment production were higher in Petri dishes and flasks exposed to red light and in the absence of light. Radial growth rate of M. ruber in plates in darkness was 1.50 mm day(-1) and in plates exposed to direct illumination was 0.59 mm day(-1). Maximum production of red pigments (8.32 UA) and biomass (8.82 g L(-1)) were obtained in baffled flasks covered with red film and 7.17 UA of red pigments, and 7.40 g L(-1) of biomass was obtained in flasks incubated in darkness. Under conditions of 1248 lux of luminance, the maximum pigment production was 4.48 UA, with production of 6.94 g L(-1) of biomass, indicating that the fungus has photoreceptors which influence the physiological responses. PMID:25957271

  19. Carcinogenesis related to intense pulsed light and UV exposure: an experimental animal study.

    PubMed

    Hedelund, L; Lerche, C; Wulf, H C; Haedersdal, M

    2006-12-01

    This study examines whether intense pulsed light (IPL) treatment has a carcinogenic potential itself or may influence ultraviolet (UV)-induced carcinogenesis. Secondly, it evaluates whether UV exposure may influence IPL-induced side effects. Hairless, lightly pigmented mice (n=144) received three IPL treatments at 2-week intervals. Simulated solar radiation was administered preoperatively [six standard erythema doses (SED) four times weekly for 11 weeks] as well as pre- and postoperatively (six SED four times weekly up to 26 weeks). Skin tumors were assessed weekly during a 12-month observation period. Side effects were evaluated clinically. No tumors appeared in untreated control mice or in just IPL-treated mice. Skin tumors developed in UV-exposed mice independently of IPL treatments. The time it took for 50% of the mice to first develop skin tumor ranged from 47 to 49 weeks in preoperative UV-exposed mice (p=0.94) and from 22 to 23 weeks in pre- and postoperative UV-exposed mice (p=0.11). IPL rejuvenation of lightly pigmented skin did not induce pigmentary changes (p=1.00). IPL rejuvenation of UV-pigmented skin resulted in an immediate increased skin pigmentation and a subsequent short-term reduced skin pigmentation (p<0.002). Postoperative UV radiation resulted in re-pigmentation of IPL-induced pigment reduction (p=0.12). No texture changes were observed. Postoperative edema and erythema were increased by preoperative UV exposure (p<0.002). IPL rejuvenation has no carcinogenic potential itself and does not influence UV-induced carcinogenesis. UV exposure influences the occurrence of side effects after IPL rejuvenation in an animal model. PMID:16964439

  20. Purifying synthetic high-strength wastewater by microalgae chlorella vulgaris under various light emitting diode wavelengths and intensities

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The high-strength wastewater is now well known as a threat to the natural water since it is highly possible to arouse water eutrophication or algal blooms. The effects of various light emitting diode wavelengths and intensities on the microalgae biological wastewater treatment system was studied in this research. The various nutrient removals and economic efficiencies represented similar variation trends, and these variations under both high C and N loading treatments were similar too. The order for microalgae C. vulgaris reproduction in terms of dry weight and nutrient removal efficiency both were red > white > yellow > blue, under high carbon and nitrogen loading treatments, indicating that the red light was the optimum light wavelength. Furthermore, considering the optimal light intensity in terms of nutrient removal efficiency was 2500 and 2000 μmol/m2•s, while in terms of economic efficiency was 1000, 1500 and 2000 μmol/m2•s. Therefore, the optimum light intensity was found to be 2000 μmol/m2•s. In addition, the optimal experimental illumination time was determined as 120 h. The Chlorella vulgaris microalgae biological wastewater treatment system utilized in this research was able to purify the high-strength carbon and nitrogen wastewater effectively under optimum light wavelength and intensity. PMID:24499586

  1. Effect of light intensity on food detection in captive great fruit-eating bats, Artibeus lituratus (Chiroptera: Phyllostomidae).

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, Eduardo de A; Pessoa, Valdir F; Aguiar, Ludmilla M S; Pessoa, Daniel M A

    2014-11-01

    Bats are known for their well-developed echolocation. However, several experiments focused on the bat visual system have shown evidence of the importance of visual cues under specific luminosity for different aspects of bat biology, including foraging behavior. This study examined the foraging abilities of five female great fruit-eating bats, Artibeus lituratus, under different light intensities. Animals were given a series of tasks to test for discrimination between a food target against an inedible background, under light levels similar to the twilight illumination (18lx), the full moon (2lx) and complete darkness (0lx). We found that the bats required a longer time frame to detect targets under a light intensity similar to twilight, possibly due to inhibitory effects present under a more intense light level. Additionally, bats were more efficient at detecting and capturing targets under light conditions similar to the luminosity of a full moon, suggesting that visual cues were important for target discrimination. These results demonstrate that light intensity affects foraging behavior and enables the use of visual cues for food detection in frugivorous bats. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Neotropical Behaviour. PMID:25153795

  2. Acne phototherapy using UV-free high-intensity narrow-band blue light: a three-center clinical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shalita, Alan R.; Harth, Yoram; Elman, Monica; Slatkine, Michael; Talpalariu, Gerry; Rosenberg, Yitzhak; Korman, Avner; Klein, Arieh

    2001-05-01

    Propionibacterium. acnes is a Gram positive, microaerophilic bacterium which takes a part in the pathogenesis of inflammatory acne. P. acnes is capable to produce high amounts endogenic porphyrins with no need of any trigger molecules. Light in the violet-blue range (407-420 nm) has been shown to exhibit a phototoxic effect on Propionibacterium acnes when irradiated in vitro. The purpose of our study was to test the clinical effects of a high intensity narrowband blue light source on papulo pustular acne. A total of 35 patients in 3 centers were treated twice a week with a high intensity metal halide lamp illuminating the entire face (20x20 cm2) or the back with visible light in the 407-420 nm range at an intensity of 90 mW/cm2 (CureLight Ltd.) for a total of 4 weeks. UV is totally cut off. In each treatment the patient was exposed to light for 8-15 minutes. After 8 treatments, 80% of the patients with mild to moderate papulo-pustular acne showed significant improvement at reducing the numbers of non- inflammatory, inflammatory and total facial lesions. Inflammatory lesion count decrease by a mean of 68%. No side effects to the treatment were noticed. In conclusion, full face or back illumination with the high intensity pure blue light we used exhibits a rapid significant decrease in acne lesions counts in 8 biweekly treatments.

  3. Purifying synthetic high-strength wastewater by microalgae chlorella vulgaris under various light emitting diode wavelengths and intensities.

    PubMed

    Ge, Zhigang; Zhang, Hui; Zhang, Yuejin; Yan, Cheng; Zhao, Yongjun

    2013-01-01

    The high-strength wastewater is now well known as a threat to the natural water since it is highly possible to arouse water eutrophication or algal blooms. The effects of various light emitting diode wavelengths and intensities on the microalgae biological wastewater treatment system was studied in this research. The various nutrient removals and economic efficiencies represented similar variation trends, and these variations under both high C and N loading treatments were similar too. The order for microalgae C. vulgaris reproduction in terms of dry weight and nutrient removal efficiency both were red > white > yellow > blue, under high carbon and nitrogen loading treatments, indicating that the red light was the optimum light wavelength. Furthermore, considering the optimal light intensity in terms of nutrient removal efficiency was 2500 and 2000 μmol/m2•s, while in terms of economic efficiency was 1000, 1500 and 2000 μmol/m2•s. Therefore, the optimum light intensity was found to be 2000 μmol/m2•s. In addition, the optimal experimental illumination time was determined as 120 h. The Chlorella vulgaris microalgae biological wastewater treatment system utilized in this research was able to purify the high-strength carbon and nitrogen wastewater effectively under optimum light wavelength and intensity. PMID:24499586

  4. Effect of light intensity on the degree of ammonia toxicity on PSII activity of Arthrospira platensis and Chlorella vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Markou, Giorgos; Muylaert, Koenraad

    2016-09-01

    Herein the effect of increasing light intensity on the degree of ammonia toxicity and its impact on the photosynthetic performance of Arthrospira and Chlorella was investigated using Chl fluorescence as a technique to characterize their photosystem II (PSII) activity. The results revealed that the increase of light intensity amplifies the ammonia toxicity on PSII. Chl fluorescence transients shown that at a given free ammonia (FA) concentration (100mg-N/L), the photochemistry potential decreased by increasing light intensity. The inhibition of the PSII was not reversible either by re-incubating the cells under dark or under decreased FA concentration. Moreover, the decrease of photochemical and non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) of fluorescence suggest that ammonia toxicity decreases the open available PSII centers, as well the inability of PSII to transfer the generated electrons beyond QA. The collapse of NPQ suggests that ammonia toxicity inhibits the photoprotection mechanism(s) and hence renders PSII more sensitive to photoinhibition. PMID:27262720

  5. Teaching Absolute Value Meaningfully

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wade, Angela

    2012-01-01

    What is the meaning of absolute value? And why do teachers teach students how to solve absolute value equations? Absolute value is a concept introduced in first-year algebra and then reinforced in later courses. Various authors have suggested instructional methods for teaching absolute value to high school students (Wei 2005; Stallings-Roberts…

  6. The aesthetic applications of intense pulsed light using the Lumenis M-22 device

    PubMed Central

    Ullmann, Yehuda; Elkhatib, Rania; Fodor, Lucian

    2011-01-01

    Background: Fifteen years have passed since the first Intense Pulsed Light (IPL) devices were introduced into the market. A variety of devices that use light energy for aesthetic puposes are currently manufactured by several companies, and newer devices offering improved performance and features are periodically being introduced. Herein we present our experience with the MP-22 device (Lumenis Ltd., Yokneam, Israel) for cosmetic treatment of benign skin lesions. Patients and Methods: We collected patient data from all patients who received IPL and Nd:Yag laser treatments with the MP-22 over a one year period (Jan 2009–Jan 2010). The study group included 92 patients who were treated on the face, neck, trunk and hands. The main indications for treatment were lentigo and superficial vascular lesions. Patient age ranged from 16 to 72 years old, and 89 patients were female. Exclusion criteria for treatment were suspicion of skin cancer, isotretinoin treatment during the previous 6 months, and pregnancy. Satisfaction after treatment was evaluated by the patients on a scale ranging from 0 to 5, with 5 = excellent, 4 = very good, 3= good, 2= moderate improvement, 1= mild improvement and 0= no improvement. Results: Ninety-three percent of the patients were satisfied (rating 3, 4 or 5 on the above scale). Ninety-five percent of the patients had one or two treatment sessions. Of the treatments, 82 were on the face, two on the neck, four on the trunk and 13 on the dorsal aspect of the hands. Minor side effects such as erythema for longer than 24 hours and facial edema for more than one day were reported by 9 patients. Major complications such as scars, hyperpigmentation or hypopigmentation were not recorded. The fluence delivered varied from 14–18 J/cm2. Conclusion: IPL is an effective and safe method for skin treatments, namely removal of vascular and pigmented lesions. PMID:24155509

  7. Impact of intense pulsed light irradiation on cultured primary fibroblasts and a vascular endothelial cell line

    PubMed Central

    WU, DI; ZHOU, BINGRONG; XU, YANG; YIN, ZHIQIANG; LUO, DAN

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects of intense pulsed light (IPL) on cell proliferation and the secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) in human fibroblasts and vascular endothelial cell lines, and to investigate the effects of IPL on the mRNA expression levels of type I and III procollagens in cultured human fibroblasts. Foreskin fibroblasts and a vascular endothelial cell line (ECV034) were cultured and treated with various wavelengths and doses of IPL irradiation. After culture for 1, 12, 24 and 48 h following IPL irradiation, fibroblasts and the vascular endothelial cell line were harvested for investigation of morphological changes by light microscopy, cell proliferation viability by MTT assay, and VEGF and MMP secretions by ELISA. The mRNA expression levels of type I and III procollagens in the fibroblasts were detected by RT-PCR. No marked morphological changes were observed in the cultured fibroblasts compared with the control. Cell growth and cellular viability were increased in fibroblasts 24 and 48 h after IPL irradiation. The levels of type I and III procollagen mRNA expression in fibroblasts increased in a time-dependent manner. However, the IPL management had no impact on VEGF and MMP secretion levels in fibroblasts and the ECV034 cell line at any time-point after irradiation as well as cell morphology and cellular proliferation. IPL irradiation may induce cellular proliferation and promote the expression of procollagen mRNAs directly in cultured primary fibroblasts, which may primarily contribute to photorejuvenation. PMID:23170124

  8. Intense pulsed light induces synthesis of dermal extracellular proteins in vitro.

    PubMed

    Cuerda-Galindo, E; Díaz-Gil, G; Palomar-Gallego, M A; Linares-GarcíaValdecasas, R

    2015-09-01

    Intense pulsed light (IPL) devices have been shown to be highly effective for the skin rejuvenation. In our study, we try to elucidate effects of IPL in fibroblast proliferation, in gene expression, and in extracellular matrix protein production. 1BR3G human skin fibroblasts were used to test the effects of an IPL device (MiniSilk FT, Deka®). Fibroblasts were divided into three groups: group 1 was irradiated with filter 800-1200 nm (frequency 10 Hz, 15 s, fluence 60.1 J/cm) twice; group 2 was irradiated with filter 550-1200 nm (double pulse 5 ms + 5 ms, delay 10 ms, fluence 13 J/cm2) twice; and group 3 was irradiated with filter 550-1200 nm (frequency 10 Hz, 15 s, fluence 60.1 J/cm2) twice. To determine changes in gene expression, messenger RNA (mRNA) levels for collagen types I and III and metalloproteinase 1 (MMP-1) were performed 48 h after irradiation. To determine changes in hyaluronic acid, versican, and decorin, mRNA and ELISA tests were performed after 48 h of treatment. In addition to this, a Picro-Sirius red staining for collagen was made. The study showed an increase of mRNA and hyaluronic acid, decorin, and versican production. With RT-PCR assays, an increase mRNA for collagen type I, type III, and MMP-1 was observed. Collagen and hyaluronic synthesis was increased in all groups with no differences among them, while decorin and versican synthesis was higher in those groups irradiated with 550-1200-nm filters with no dependence of type pulse or total energy dose. IPL applied in vitro cultured cells increases fibroblasts activity. Synthesis of extracellular proteins seems to be produced more specifically in determined wavelengths, which could demonstrate a biochemical mechanism light depending. PMID:26188855

  9. Modulation of defect modes intensity by controlled light scattering in photonic crystal with liquid crystal domain structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunyakov, V. A.; Krakhalev, M. N.; Zyryanov, V. Ya.; Shabanov, V. F.; Loiko, V. A.

    2016-07-01

    A method to modulate the defect modes intensity in a multilayer photonic crystal with a nematic liquid crystal layer arranged midmost has been proposed. The various electrohydrodynamic domain structures (Williams domains, oblique rolls and grid pattern) were formed in the nematic layer under the action of ac electric field. The domains cause a polarization-sensitive light scattering which leads to an anisotropic reduction of the defect modes intensity. Thus by varying the applied voltage, we can tune gradually the transmittance spectrum of photonic crystal. In addition, the spectrum strongly depends on the light polarization direction above threshold voltage.

  10. The influence of light intensity and photoperiod on the growth and lipid content of microalgae Nannochloropsis sp.

    PubMed

    Wahidin, Suzana; Idris, Ani; Shaleh, Sitti Raehanah Muhamad

    2013-02-01

    Illumination factors such as length of photoperiod and intensity can affect growth of microalgae and lipid content. In order to optimize microalgal growth in mass culture system and lipid content, the effects of light intensity and photoperiod cycle on the growth of the marine microalgae, Nannochloropsis sp. were studied in batch culture. Nannochloropsis sp. was grown aseptically for 9 days at three different light intensities (50, 100 and 200 μmol m(-2) s(-1)) and three different photoperiod cycles (24:0, 18:06 and 12:12 h light:dark) at 23 °C cultivation temperature. Under the light intensity of 100 μmol m(-2) s(-1) and photoperiod of 18 h light: 6 h dark cycle, Nannochloropsis sp. was found to grow favorably with a maximum cell concentration of 6.5×10(7) cells mL(-1), which corresponds to the growth rate of 0.339 d(-1) after 8 day cultivation and the lipid content was found to be 31.3%. PMID:23232218

  11. Numerical evaluation of droplet sizing based on the ratio of fluorescent and scattered light intensities (LIF/Mie technique)

    SciTech Connect

    Charalampous, Georgios; Hardalupas, Yannis

    2011-03-20

    The dependence of fluorescent and scattered light intensities from spherical droplets on droplet diameter was evaluated using Mie theory. The emphasis is on the evaluation of droplet sizing, based on the ratio of laser-induced fluorescence and scattered light intensities (LIF/Mie technique). A parametric study is presented, which includes the effects of scattering angle, the real part of the refractive index and the dye concentration in the liquid (determining the imaginary part of the refractive index). The assumption that the fluorescent and scattered light intensities are proportional to the volume and surface area of the droplets for accurate sizing measurements is not generally valid. More accurate sizing measurements can be performed with minimal dye concentration in the liquid and by collecting light at a scattering angle of 60 deg. rather than the commonly used angle of 90 deg. Unfavorable to the sizing accuracy are oscillations of the scattered light intensity with droplet diameter that are profound at the sidescatter direction (90 deg.) and for droplets with refractive indices around 1.4.

  12. Performance of photoperiod and light intensity on biogas upgrade and biogas effluent nutrient reduction by the microalgae Chlorella sp.

    PubMed

    Yan, Cheng; Zheng, Zheng

    2013-07-01

    Biogas is an environment-friendly fuel but that must be upgraded before being utilized. The method about removing CO2 from biogas by microalgal culturing using biogas effluent as nutrient medium in this study could effectively upgrade biogas and simultaneously reduce the biogas effluent nutrient. Results showed that the optimum parameters for microalgal growth and biogas effluent nutrient reduction was moderate light intensity with middle photoperiod. While low light intensity with long photoperiod and moderate light intensity with middle photoperiod obtained the best biogas CO2 removal and biogas upgrade effects. Therefore, the optimal parameters were moderate light intensity 350 μmol m(-2)s(-1) with middle photoperiod 14 h light:10h dark. Under this condition, the microalgal dry weight, CH4 concentration, reduction efficiency of chemical oxygen demand, total nitrogen, and total phosphorus was 615.84 ± 33.07 mg L(-1), 92.16 ± 2.83% (v/v), 88.74 ± 3.45%, 83.94 ± 3.51%, and 80.43 ± 4.17%, respectively. PMID:23665690

  13. Convexity of the Photosynthetic Light-Response Curve in Relation to Intensity and Direction of Light during Growth.

    PubMed Central

    Ogren, E.

    1993-01-01

    Photosynthesis in the intermediate light range is most efficient when the convexity of the photosynthetic light-response curve is high. Factors determining the convexity were examined for intact leaves using Salix sp. and for a plant cell culture using the green microalga Coccomyxa sp. It was found that the leaf had lower convexity than diluted plant cells because the light gradient through the leaf was not fully matched by a corresponding gradient in photosynthetic capacity. The degree to which the leaf gradients were matched was quantified by measuring photosynthesis at both leaf surfaces using modulated fluorescence. Two principal growth conditions were identified as those causing mismatch of leaf gradients and lowering of the convexity relative to cells. The first was growth under low light, where leaves did not develop any noteworthy gradient in photosynthetic capacity. This led to decreased convexity, particularly in old leaves with high chlorophyll content and, hence, steep light gradients. Second and less conspicuous was growth under high light conditions when light was given bilaterally rather than unilaterally, which yielded leaves of high photosynthetic capacity at both surfaces. Two situations were also identified that caused the convexity to decrease at the chloroplast level: (a) increased light during growth, for both leaves and cells, and (b) increased CO2 concentration during measurement of high-light-grown leaves. These changes of the intrinsic convexity were interpreted to indicate that the convexity declines with increased capacity of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase relative to the capacity of electron transport. PMID:12231754

  14. Flight control and landing precision in the nocturnal bee Megalopta is robust to large changes in light intensity.

    PubMed

    Baird, Emily; Fernandez, Diana C; Wcislo, William T; Warrant, Eric J

    2015-01-01

    Like their diurnal relatives, Megalopta genalis use visual information to control flight. Unlike their diurnal relatives, however, they do this at extremely low light intensities. Although Megalopta has developed optical specializations to increase visual sensitivity, theoretical studies suggest that this enhanced sensitivity does not enable them to capture enough light to use visual information to reliably control flight in the rainforest at night. It has been proposed that Megalopta gain extra sensitivity by summing visual information over time. While enhancing the reliability of vision, this strategy would decrease the accuracy with which they can detect image motion-a crucial cue for flight control. Here, we test this temporal summation hypothesis by investigating how Megalopta's flight control and landing precision is affected by light intensity and compare our findings with the results of similar experiments performed on the diurnal bumblebee Bombus terrestris, to explore the extent to which Megalopta's adaptations to dim light affect their precision. We find that, unlike Bombus, light intensity does not affect flight and landing precision in Megalopta. Overall, we find little evidence that Megalopta uses a temporal summation strategy in dim light, while we find strong support for the use of this strategy in Bombus. PMID:26578977

  15. Flight control and landing precision in the nocturnal bee Megalopta is robust to large changes in light intensity

    PubMed Central

    Baird, Emily; Fernandez, Diana C.; Wcislo, William T.; Warrant, Eric J.

    2015-01-01

    Like their diurnal relatives, Megalopta genalis use visual information to control flight. Unlike their diurnal relatives, however, they do this at extremely low light intensities. Although Megalopta has developed optical specializations to increase visual sensitivity, theoretical studies suggest that this enhanced sensitivity does not enable them to capture enough light to use visual information to reliably control flight in the rainforest at night. It has been proposed that Megalopta gain extra sensitivity by summing visual information over time. While enhancing the reliability of vision, this strategy would decrease the accuracy with which they can detect image motion—a crucial cue for flight control. Here, we test this temporal summation hypothesis by investigating how Megalopta's flight control and landing precision is affected by light intensity and compare our findings with the results of similar experiments performed on the diurnal bumblebee Bombus terrestris, to explore the extent to which Megalopta's adaptations to dim light affect their precision. We find that, unlike Bombus, light intensity does not affect flight and landing precision in Megalopta. Overall, we find little evidence that Megalopta uses a temporal summation strategy in dim light, while we find strong support for the use of this strategy in Bombus. PMID:26578977

  16. Effects of Light Intensity Activity on CVD Risk Factors: A Systematic Review of Intervention Studies

    PubMed Central

    Batacan, Romeo B.; Duncan, Mitch J.; Dalbo, Vincent J.; Tucker, Patrick S.; Fenning, Andrew S.

    2015-01-01

    The effects of light intensity physical activity (LIPA) on cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors remain to be established. This review summarizes the effects of LIPA on CVD risk factors and CVD-related markers in adults. A systematic search of four electronic databases (PubMed, Academic Search Complete, SPORTDiscus, and CINAHL) examining LIPA and CVD risk factors (body composition, blood pressure, glucose, insulin, glycosylated hemoglobin, and lipid profile) and CVD-related markers (maximal oxygen uptake, heart rate, C-reactive protein, interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and tumor necrosis factor receptors 1 and 2) published between 1970 and 2015 was performed on 15 March 2015. A total of 33 intervention studies examining the effect of LIPA on CVD risk factors and markers were included in this review. Results indicated that LIPA did not improve CVD risk factors and CVD-related markers in healthy individuals. LIPA was found to improve systolic and diastolic blood pressure in physically inactive populations with a medical condition. Reviewed studies show little support for the role of LIPA to reduce CVD risk factors. Many of the included studies were of low to fair study quality and used low doses of LIPA. Further studies are needed to establish the value of LIPA in reducing CVD risk. PMID:26543862

  17. Effects of Light Intensity Activity on CVD Risk Factors: A Systematic Review of Intervention Studies.

    PubMed

    Batacan, Romeo B; Duncan, Mitch J; Dalbo, Vincent J; Tucker, Patrick S; Fenning, Andrew S

    2015-01-01

    The effects of light intensity physical activity (LIPA) on cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors remain to be established. This review summarizes the effects of LIPA on CVD risk factors and CVD-related markers in adults. A systematic search of four electronic databases (PubMed, Academic Search Complete, SPORTDiscus, and CINAHL) examining LIPA and CVD risk factors (body composition, blood pressure, glucose, insulin, glycosylated hemoglobin, and lipid profile) and CVD-related markers (maximal oxygen uptake, heart rate, C-reactive protein, interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and tumor necrosis factor receptors 1 and 2) published between 1970 and 2015 was performed on 15 March 2015. A total of 33 intervention studies examining the effect of LIPA on CVD risk factors and markers were included in this review. Results indicated that LIPA did not improve CVD risk factors and CVD-related markers in healthy individuals. LIPA was found to improve systolic and diastolic blood pressure in physically inactive populations with a medical condition. Reviewed studies show little support for the role of LIPA to reduce CVD risk factors. Many of the included studies were of low to fair study quality and used low doses of LIPA. Further studies are needed to establish the value of LIPA in reducing CVD risk. PMID:26543862

  18. Sintering of Inkjet-Printed Silver Nanoparticles at Room Temperature Using Intense Pulsed Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, J. S.; Ryu, J.; Kim, H. S.; Hahn, H. T.

    2011-11-01

    Intense pulsed light (IPL) was used to sinter printed silver nanoink patterns consisting of 20-nm to 40-nm silver nanoparticles dispersed in diethylene glycol (DEG). Three consecutive pulses at 50 J/cm2 in less than 30 ms was sufficient to adequately sinter silver nanoink patterns for printed electronics without degradation of the substrates. This is an exceptionally short time compared with that of the conventional thermal sintering process. On the sintered conductive silver patterns, neck-like junctions between nanoparticles were observed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The melting temperature, 194.1°C, of silver nanoparticles was found using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Also, x-ray diffraction (XRD) was used to find the grain size of the printed silver nanoink patterns. The IPL-sintered silver pattern had a grain size of 86.3 ± 7.2 nm. From this work, it was found that the IPL-sintered silver pattern had a low resistivity of 49 ± 3 nΩ m, which is low enough to be used for printed electronics.

  19. Photorejuvenation with intense pulsed light: results of a multi-center study.

    PubMed

    Sadick, Neil S; Weiss, Robert; Kilmer, Suzanne; Bitter, Patrick

    2004-01-01

    This multi-center study evaluating the role of Intense Pulsed Light (IPL) in the non-ablative rejuvenation of Type I and Type II photoaged skin study was conducted in order to evaluate the clinical efficacy and safety of using IPL in treating clinical indications associated with photoaged skin. Ninety-three patients of Fitzpatrick skin phenotypes I-III, Fitzpatrick Wrinkle Classes I-II, and Elastosis Scores 1-6 were enrolled in the study. Up to five treatments were performed at 4-week intervals with follow-up visits at 4 and 6 months after the last treatment. Patients received full-face treatments using the recommended parameters of the Quantum SR/HR (Lumenis Ltd.) with the 560 or 640 nm cutoff filter. Parameters of elastometry, physicians' evaluation of the Elastosis Score ('W/ES'), and global improvement as well as patient satisfaction were analyzed. Results showed that the average Fitzpatrick W/ES improved significantly (p<0.001) by 1.39 and 1.32 units at the 4 and 6 months follow-ups, respectively; an improved W/ES evaluation was recorded for 82% and 75% of the patients at each of these time points. In conclusion, IPL treatment is an effective non-invasive, non-ablative method for rejuvenating photoaged skin with minimal adverse events, no downtime, excellent long-term results, and a very high measure of patient satisfaction. PMID:14964745

  20. Regulation of Photosynthetic Carbon Metabolism in Cucumber by Light Intensity and Photosynthetic Period 1

    PubMed Central

    Robbins, N. Suzanne; Pharr, David M.

    1987-01-01

    The effects of photosynthetic periods and light intensity on cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) carbon exchange rates and photoassimilate partitioning were determined in relation to the activities of galactinol synthase and sucrose-phosphate synthase. Carbon assimilation and partitioning appeared to be controlled by different mechanisms. Carbon exchange rates were influenced by total photon flux density, but were nearly constant over the entire photoperiod for given photoperiod lengths. Length of the photosynthetic periods did influence photoassimilate partitioning. Assimilate export rate was decreased by more than 60% during the latter part of the short photoperiod treatment. This decrease in export rate was associated with a sharp increase in leaf starch acccumulation rate. Results were consistent with the hypothesis that starch accumulation occurs at the expense of export under short photoperiods. Galactinol synthase activities did not appear to influence the partitioning of photoassimilates between starch and transport carbohydrates. Sucrose phosphate synthase activities correlated highly with sugar formation rates (sucrose, raffinose, stachyose + assimilate export rate, r = 0.93, α = 0.007). Cucumber leaf sucrose phosphate synthase fluctuated diurnally in a similar pattern to that observed in vegetative soybean plants. PMID:16665742

  1. Fabrication of Elemental Copper by Intense Pulsed Light Processing of a Copper Nitrate Hydroxide Ink.

    PubMed

    Draper, Gabriel L; Dharmadasa, Ruvini; Staats, Meghan E; Lavery, Brandon W; Druffel, Thad

    2015-08-01

    Printed electronics and renewable energy technologies have shown a growing demand for scalable copper and copper precursor inks. An alternative copper precursor ink of copper nitrate hydroxide, Cu2(OH)3NO3, was aqueously synthesized under ambient conditions with copper nitrate and potassium hydroxide reagents. Films were deposited by screen-printing and subsequently processed with intense pulsed light. The Cu2(OH)3NO3 quickly transformed in less than 100 s using 40 (2 ms, 12.8 J cm(-2)) pulses into CuO. At higher energy densities, the sintering improved the bulk film quality. The direct formation of Cu from the Cu2(OH)3NO3 requires a reducing agent; therefore, fructose and glucose were added to the inks. Rather than oxidizing, the thermal decomposition of the sugars led to a reducing environment and direct conversion of the films into elemental copper. The chemical and physical transformations were studied with XRD, SEM, FTIR and UV-vis. PMID:26154246

  2. Electronic Absolute Cartesian Autocollimator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leviton, Douglas B.

    2006-01-01

    An electronic absolute Cartesian autocollimator performs the same basic optical function as does a conventional all-optical or a conventional electronic autocollimator but differs in the nature of its optical target and the manner in which the position of the image of the target is measured. The term absolute in the name of this apparatus reflects the nature of the position measurement, which, unlike in a conventional electronic autocollimator, is based absolutely on the position of the image rather than on an assumed proportionality between the position and the levels of processed analog electronic signals. The term Cartesian in the name of this apparatus reflects the nature of its optical target. Figure 1 depicts the electronic functional blocks of an electronic absolute Cartesian autocollimator along with its basic optical layout, which is the same as that of a conventional autocollimator. Referring first to the optical layout and functions only, this or any autocollimator is used to measure the compound angular deviation of a flat datum mirror with respect to the optical axis of the autocollimator itself. The optical components include an illuminated target, a beam splitter, an objective or collimating lens, and a viewer or detector (described in more detail below) at a viewing plane. The target and the viewing planes are focal planes of the lens. Target light reflected by the datum mirror is imaged on the viewing plane at unit magnification by the collimating lens. If the normal to the datum mirror is parallel to the optical axis of the autocollimator, then the target image is centered on the viewing plane. Any angular deviation of the normal from the optical axis manifests itself as a lateral displacement of the target image from the center. The magnitude of the displacement is proportional to the focal length and to the magnitude (assumed to be small) of the angular deviation. The direction of the displacement is perpendicular to the axis about which the

  3. Effect of varying light intensity on growth performance and carcass characteristics of broiler chickens grown to heavy weights

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study investigated effects of varying levels of light intensities (25, 10, 5, 2.5, and 0.2 lx) on growth performance and carcass characteristics of broiler chickens grown to heavy weights. Four identical trials were conducted with two replications per trial. In each trial, 600 1-d-old Ross 308 ...

  4. Influence of photoperiod, light intensity, and their interaction on growth performance and carcass characteristics of broilers grown to heavy weights

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We investigated the effects of photoperiod, light intensity and their interaction on growth performance and carcass characteristics of broilers in 2 trials. In each trial, 540 1-d-old Ross × Ross 708 chicks were randomly distributed into 9 environmentally controlled rooms (30 males/30 females chicks...

  5. [Effects of light intensity on associated enzyme activity and gene expression during callus formation of Vitis vinifera].

    PubMed

    Liu, Rong; Yang, Guowei; Wu, Yueyan; Rao, Huiyun; Li, Xuefu; Li, Meiqin; Qian, Pingxian

    2015-08-01

    We analyzed the best light intensity for callus induction and maintenance in Vitis vinifera and explored the mechanism of grape callus browning. Tender stem segments of grape cultivar "gold finger" were used to study the effects of different light intensities (0, 500, 1 000, 1 500, 2 000, 2 500, 3 000 and 4 000 Lx) on the induction rate, browning rate and associated enzyme activity and gene expression during Vitis vinifera callus formation. The callus induction rate under 0, 500, 1 000 and 1 500 Lx was more than 92%, significantly higher than in other treatments (P < 0.05). A lower browning rate and better callus growth were also observed during subculture under 1 000 and 1 500 Lx treatments. We found that chlorogenic acid, caffeic acid, p-hydroxybenzoic acid and coumaric acid contents were correlated with the browning rate of callus, among which chlorogenic acid content was positively correlated with the browning rate (P < 0.05). Peroxidase (POD) and polyphenol oxidase (PPO) activities were negatively correlated with the browning rate of callus (P < 0.01). The POD, PPO and phenylalanine ammonialyase (PAL) expression levels were positively correlated with the browning rate at P < 0.05 or P < 0.01. An appropriate light intensity for the tissue culture of Vitis vinifera was 1 000-1 500 Lx, higher or lower light intensities significantly impaired normal callus growth. PMID:26762043

  6. Microhardness of composite resin cured through different primary tooth thicknesses with different light intensities and curing times: In vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Mazhari, Fatemeh; Ajami, Behjatolmolok; Moazzami, Saied Mostafa; Baghaee, Bahareh; Hafez, Bahareh

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of increased exposure time and light intensity on microhardness of cured composite through different thicknesses of tooth structure in primary teeth. Materials and Methods: One hundred and seventy cylindrical resin composite specimens were prepared. All specimens were divided into 17 experimental and control groups. “Light-emitting diode” light curing unit (LCU) applied directly or through 1, 2, and 3 mm thicknesses tooth slices for experimental groups. The irradiation protocols were 25 and 50 s at 650 mW/cm2 and 15 and 30 s at 1100 mW/cm2. The “quartz-tungsten-halogen” LCU (400 mW/cm2) for 40 s was used in control group. Microhardness was measured by the Vickers hardness test. Results: Indirectly cured specimens and those cured through a 1 mm thick tooth structure, an increase in intensity caused hardness drop. In the specimens cured through 2 and 3 mm thick tooth structures, increased intensity and/or exposure time did not show any appropriate changes on microhardness. Conclusion: Irradiation through a 1.0 mm thick tooth slice resulted in reduced microhardness although it was still within the clinically acceptable level. The hardness values of the specimens cured through 2 or 3 mm thick tooth slices fell below the clinically acceptable level even after doubling the exposure time and/or light intensity. PMID:27095897

  7. Proteomic study related to vascular connections in watermelon scions grafted onto bottle-gourd rootstock under different light intensities.

    PubMed

    Muneer, Sowbiya; Ko, Chung Ho; Soundararajan, Prabhakaran; Manivnnan, Abinaya; Park, Yoo Gyeong; Jeong, Byoung Ryong

    2015-01-01

    Although grafting is broadly used in the production of crops, no information is available about the proteins involved in vascular connections between rootstock and scion. Similarly, proteome changes under the light intensities widely used for grafted seedlings are of practical use. The objective of this study was to determine the proteome of vascular connections using watermelon (Citrullus vulgaris Schrad.) 'Sambok Honey' and 'Speed' as the scion and bottle gourd (Lagenaria siceraria Stanld.) 'RS Dongjanggun' as the rootstock grown under different light intensities (25, 50, 75 and 100 μmol m-2 s-1). Our proteomic analysis revealed 24 and 27 differentially expressed proteins in 'Sambok Honey' and 'Speed', respectively, under different light intensities. The identified proteins were largely involved in ion binding, amino acid metabolism, transcriptional regulation and defense response. The enhancement of ion-binding, transcriptional regulation, amino acid metabolism, and defense response proteins suggests a strengthening of the connection between the rootstock and scion under high light intensity. Indeed, the accumulation of key enzymes in the biological processes described above appears to play an important role in the vascular connections of grafted seedlings. Moreover, it appears that 100 μmol m-2 s-1 results in better protein expression responses in grafted seedlings. PMID:25789769

  8. Effects of strain and light intensity on growth performance and carcass characteristics of broilers grown to heavy weights

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects of genetic strain and light intensity on growth performance and carcass characteristics of broilers grown to heavy weights were investigated. The experimental design was a randomized complete block design. Treatment structure was a 2 × 5 factorial arrangement with the main factors being ...

  9. Effects of genetic strain and light intensity on blood physiological variables of broilers grown to heavy weights

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects of genetic strain, light intensity and their interaction were examined on blood physiological variables of broilers maintained in environmentally-controlled rooms in each of 5 trials. The study consisted of a 2 × 5 factorial arranged in a randomized complete block design with 10 treatmen...

  10. Interactive effects of photoperiod and light intensity on blood physiological and biochemical reactions of broilers grown to heavy weights

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects of photoperiod, light intensity, and their interaction on blood acid-base balance, metabolites, and electrolytes in broiler chickens under environmentally controlled conditions were examined in 2 trials. The experiment was consisted of a factorial arrangement of treatments in a randomize...

  11. Proteomic Study Related to Vascular Connections in Watermelon Scions Grafted onto Bottle-Gourd Rootstock under Different Light Intensities

    PubMed Central

    Muneer, Sowbiya; Ko, Chung Ho; Soundararajan, Prabhakaran; Manivnnan, Abinaya; Park, Yoo Gyeong; Jeong, Byoung Ryong

    2015-01-01

    Although grafting is broadly used in the production of crops, no information is available about the proteins involved in vascular connections between rootstock and scion. Similarly, proteome changes under the light intensities widely used for grafted seedlings are of practical use. The objective of this study was to determine the proteome of vascular connections using watermelon (Citrullus vulgaris Schrad.) ‘Sambok Honey’ and ‘Speed’ as the scion and bottle gourd (Lagenaria siceraria Stanld.) ‘RS Dongjanggun’ as the rootstock grown under different light intensities (25, 50, 75 and 100 μmol m−2 s−1). Our proteomic analysis revealed 24 and 27 differentially expressed proteins in ‘Sambok Honey’ and ‘Speed’, respectively, under different light intensities. The identified proteins were largely involved in ion binding, amino acid metabolism, transcriptional regulation and defense response. The enhancement of ion-binding, transcriptional regulation, amino acid metabolism, and defense response proteins suggests a strengthening of the connection between the rootstock and scion under high light intensity. Indeed, the accumulation of key enzymes in the biological processes described above appears to play an important role in the vascular connections of grafted seedlings. Moreover, it appears that 100 μmol m−2 s−1 results in better protein expression responses in grafted seedlings. PMID:25789769

  12. Effects of various LED light wavelengths and intensities on microalgae-based simultaneous biogas upgrading and digestate nutrient reduction process.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yongjun; Wang, Juan; Zhang, Hui; Yan, Cheng; Zhang, Yuejin

    2013-05-01

    Biogas is a well-known, primary renewable energy source, but its utilizations are possible only after upgrading. The microalgae-based bag photo-bioreactor utilized in this research could effectively upgrade biogas and simultaneously reduce the nutrient content in digestate. Red light was determined as the optimal light wavelength for microalgae growth, biogas upgrading, and digestate nutrient reduction. In the range of moderate light intensities (i.e., 800, 1200, 1600, and 2000 μmol m(-2) s(-1)), higher light intensities achieved higher biogas upgrade and larger digestate nutrient reduction. Methane content attained the highest value of 92.74±3.56% (v/v). The highest chemical oxygen demand, total nitrogen, and total phosphorus reduction efficiency of digestate were 85.35±1.04%, 77.98±1.84%, and 73.03±2.14%, respectively. Considering the reduction and economic efficiencies of the carbon dioxide content of biogas and digestate nutrient as well as the biogas upgrading standard, the optimal light intensity range was determined to be from 1200 to 1600 μmol m(-2) s(-1). PMID:23567717

  13. Variation in pupil diameter in North American Gartersnakes (Thamnophis) is regulated by immersion in water, not by light intensity.

    PubMed

    Fontenot, Clifford L

    2008-07-01

    A variable pupil generally regulates the amount of incoming light available for image formation on the retina. However, some of the semi-aquatic snakes (North American Gartersnakes, Thamnophis) that forage in relatively low light conditions reduce the pupil aperture in response to submergence underwater at the expense incoming light. Given that these snakes have all-cone retinas, reduction of incoming light because of pupillary constriction upon immersion seems counterintuitive. To test the effect of light and water on pupil aperture, three species of North American Gartersnakes (T. atratus, T. hammondii, and T. sirtalis) were exposed to nine light intensities in air and water. There was no effect of light on relative pupil aperture for any species. However, all three species showed a significant reduction in pupil aperture upon submergence underwater. The lack of a light response is surprising, and may be related to the method of accommodation in snakes. Snakes lack a ciliary muscle, and move the lens by constricting the pupil, which increases pressure in the posterior chamber and pushes the lens forward. Upon submergence, the snakes may be attempting to overcome the change in refractive index and defocus imposed by the water, by constricting the pupil. Thus, having the iris muscle involved in accommodation may preclude it from much of a light regulating function. PMID:18514250

  14. The light intensity under which cells are grown controls the type of peripheral light-harvesting complexes that are assembled in a purple photosynthetic bacterium

    SciTech Connect

    Brotosudarmo, Tatas H. P.; Collins, Aaron M.; Gall, Andrew; Roszak, Aleksander W.; Gardiner, Alastair T.; Blankenship, Robert E.; Cogdell, Richard J.

    2011-11-15

    The differing composition of LH2 (peripheral light-harvesting) complexes present in Rhodopseudomonas palustris 2.1.6 have been investigated when cells are grown under progressively decreasing light intensity. Analysis of the absorption spectra reveals there must be more than two types of LH2 complexes present. Purified HL (high-light) and LL (low-light) LH2 complexes have mixed apoprotein compositions. The HL complexes contain PucABa and PucABb apoproteins. The LL complexes contain PucABa, PucABd and PucBb-only apoproteins. This mixed apoprotein composition can explain their resonance Raman spectra.

  15. The Spatial Intensity Distribution of the UV Light in HH Objects. Revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moro-Martin, A.; Noriego-Crespo, A.; Boehm, K.-H.; Raga, A. C.

    1996-01-01

    Simple kinematical bow shock models have successfylly explained many of the observed features in Herbig-Haro objects. It is shown that similar models can be applied to the spatial intensity distribution of the UV lines observed by IUE. Archival IUE spectra have been used for the HH 1, HH 2(H+A'), HH 2(G+B), HH 24A, HH 32A, HH 43(A+B+C), and HH 47A objects where the brightest UV lines (C IV (lambda)1549,Si III(lambda)1891, C III] (lambda)1909, C II] (lambda)2326, MgII (lambda)2799) were studied, as well as the UV continuum (modeled by the hydrogen two-photon contiuum). The quality of the IUE data is rather limited due to the broad point spread function and the low signal-to-noise, and therefore the models were degraded to make them comparable to the observations. The physical parameters used in the models were obtained from previous optical studies and varied accordingly to match the observations, but within the known uncertainties. The objects were modeled by a single bow shock model (i.e., HH 1, HH 24A, HH 32A, and HH 47A) or the superposition of two (i.e., HH 2(H+A') and HH 2(G+B) or more (i.e., HH 43(A+B+C)) of them. The idea was to take into account the complexity of the morphology of these objects, and the contribution to the UV light from diffrent condensations within the IUE aperature.

  16. Assessment of incident intensity on laser speckle contrast imaging using a nematic liquid crystal spatial light modulator (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirby, Mitchell A.; Khaksari, Kosar; Kirkpatrick, Sean J.

    2016-03-01

    In this work the effects of incident intensity and effective camera dynamic range on image acquisition of both frozen and time-averaged dynamic speckle patterns, and their effects on laser speckle contrast imaging are addressed. A nematic liquid crystal, phase-only, spatial light modulator (SLM) was employed to generate laser speckle in a controlled and repeatable fashion. By addressing the calculated spatial contrast of frozen and time-averaged dynamic speckle patterns imaged across a wide range of intensities, we present a description of optimum intensity characteristics that should be observed when using LSCI. The results indicate the importance of assessing the intensity of the signal quantized by the camera in LSCI. By analyzing intensity PDF's during image acquisition of speckle patterns used in LSCI, an optimum incident intensity can be detected when a single, polarized speckle frame displays the first order statistics characteristic of fully developed speckle. Our results indicate that there is a range of laser power densities where the ensuing imaged speckle exhibit optimum sensitivity to flow as well as relatively constant calculated contrast values. It is clear that at high intensities, high frequency information is lost due to camera saturation, resulting in a decrease in contrast. When imaging speckle at low intensity, there is a risk for loss of data during the digital quantization process. The results are presented in a generalized fashion, so they should be applicable to any LSCI system, regardless of incident laser power or camera depth.

  17. Eosinophil count - absolute

    MedlinePlus

    Eosinophils; Absolute eosinophil count ... the white blood cell count to give the absolute eosinophil count. ... than 500 cells per microliter (cells/mcL). Normal value ranges may vary slightly among different laboratories. Talk ...

  18. Video-speed detection of the absolute position of a light point on a large-area photodetector based on luminescent waveguides.

    PubMed

    Koeppe, Robert; Neulinger, Anton; Bartu, Petr; Bauer, S

    2010-02-01

    A large-area photosensor is presented that uses the coupling of light into the planar waveguide mode of a polycarbonate foil by luminescent dyes to extend the active area of silicon photodiodes attached to the surface of the foil in a regular pattern. The photodiode signal is directly related to the distance between the point where light is coupled into the foil and the photodiode, thus enabling a precise recovery of the position of a localized light signal hitting the foil. We present a large-area device that can trace the movement of a light point generated by a laser pointer hitting its surface. PMID:20174049

  19. Research on reduction of long-term distortions and suppression of light intensity fluctuations in a TDLAS system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Guo-jie; Wang, Yu; Dong, Feng-zhong; Xia, Hua; Pang, Tao; Zhang, Zhi-rong; Wu, Bian

    2011-11-01

    For any tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) system, its performance is often degraded by long-term distortion and fluctuations of light intensity. The source of long-term distortion and the corresponding proposal are discussed at first in this paper. It is proved that the long-term distortion of the system is mainly induced by the change of wavelength dependent transfer function. A balanced optical path can be used to reduce it effectively. In order to decrease the disturbance of intensity fluctuation, a novel method for online correction is presented. It is developed according to the linear relation between the peaks of harmonic power spectra and the incident light intensity. It is demonstrated by the experiments and explained as residual sum frequency and difference frequency power of signal and reference after the lock-in amplifier. This method could achieve real-time light intensity correction with only little calculation. By using a 17.5m multi-pass cell, the experiments show that the system can achieve about 20ppmv stability for long-term continual monitoring. Allan variance indicates that the detection limit for short-term measurement is between 0.3ppmv and 1.5ppmv depending on the response time allowed by the instrument.

  20. The effect of visible-light intensity on shape evolution and antibacterial properties of triangular silver nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashkarran, Ali Akbar

    2016-08-01

    Triangular silver nanostructures represent a novel class of nanomaterials with tunable surface plasmon resonance (SPR). By controlling the size and geometry of these structures, their SPR peaks could be tuned from the visible to the near-infrared region with numerous applications in optoelectronic, sensors, nanomedicine and specially cancer diagnosis and treatment. In this study, triangular silver nanostructures were prepared by photoinducing of spherical silver nanoparticles (NPs) with an average diameter of 10 nm. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and ultra violet visible (UV-Vis) spectroscopy were used to characterize silver triangles. We have found that uniform triangular silver nanostructures can be obtained using an appropriate visible-light illumination to the primary spherical silver NPs. TEM images indicated that formation of triangular structures depends on the intensity of light source. The effect of intensity of visible-light source on the geometry and size distribution of silver triangles was investigated. It was found that formation of triangular structures in addition to their size and shape evolution strongly depends on the intensity of the light illumination. Furthermore, a comparative study on the antibacterial activities of silver triangles of different sizes reveals that silver triangles experience a size-dependent interaction with the gram-negative Escherichia coli bacteria.

  1. Video tracking for high-similarity drug tablets based on reflective lightness intensity and fuzzy recognition system.

    PubMed

    Liang, Zhongwei; Liu, Xiaochu; Tan, Shisong; Wen, Yiheng

    2016-03-01

    Video tracking of drug tablet exerts important influences on the efficiency and reliability of its mass production; this topic also becomes a difficult and targeted focus for pharmaceutical production monitory in the past several years due to the high similarity and random distribution of those objectives to be searched for. By measuring the reflective lightness intensity of illumination lightness on tablet surface, reflective lightness intensity matrix was established and demonstrated in the form of grey image, presenting its shape topology and topography details in return. On this basis, a series of mathematical properties for describing reflective lightness intensity images were proposed, thereafter a set of fuzzy recognition system and its identification rules can be employed to classify those moving tablets with inputted image properties, which facilitates the determination of their instantaneous coordinate positions on given image frame accordingly. By repeating identical operations on the next frame, the real-time motions of tablet objectives were traced successfully. Orthogonal tracking experiment and performance comparisons verified the accuracy and reliability of this new method in pharmaceutical industry. With original suggestions concerning imaging arrangements, tablet descriptions and video tracking, this article provides reliable references and new research ideas for tablet tracking performance in high-yielding production domain. PMID:26893227

  2. Life History Changes in Coral Fluorescence and the Effects of Light Intensity on Larval Physiology and Settlement in Seriatopora hystrix

    PubMed Central

    Roth, Melissa S.; Fan, Tung-Yung; Deheyn, Dimitri D.

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescence is common in both coral adult and larval stages, and is produced by fluorescent proteins that absorb higher energy light and emit lower energy light. This study investigated the changes of coral fluorescence in different life history stages and the effects of parental light environment on larval fluorescence, larval endosymbiotic dinoflagellate abundance, larval size and settlement in the brooding coral Seriatopora hystrix. Data showed that coral fluorescence changed during development from green in larvae to cyan in adult colonies. In larvae, two green fluorescent proteins (GFPs) co-occur where the peak emission of one GFP overlaps with the peak excitation of the second GFP allowing the potential for energy transfer. Coral larvae showed great variation in GFP fluorescence, dinoflagellate abundance, and size. There was no obvious relationship between green fluorescence intensity and dinoflagellate abundance, green fluorescence intensity and larval size, or dinoflagellate abundance and larval size. Larvae of parents from high and low light treatments showed similar green fluorescence intensity, yet small but significant differences in size, dinoflagellate abundance, and settlement. The large variation in larval physiology combined with subtle effects of parental environment on larval characteristics seem to indicate that even though adult corals produce larvae with a wide range of physiological capacities, these larvae can still show small preferences for settling in similar habitats as their parents. These data highlight the importance of environmental conditions at the onset of life history and parent colony effects on coral larvae. PMID:23544072

  3. Effect of molecular anisotropy on the intensity and degree of polarization of light scattered from model atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bahethi, O. P.; Fraser, R. S.

    1980-01-01

    Computations of the properties of sunlight scattered from models of the earth-atmosphere system are presented to show the effect of molecular anisotropy on the intensity, flux, and degree of polarization of the scattered light. The values of these parameters change significantly when the anisotropy factor is neglected in the molecular optical thickness and scattering phase matrix. However, if the Rayleigh scattering optical thickness is kept constant and the molecular anisotropy factor is included only in the Rayleigh phase matrix, the flux does not change, the intensity changes by a small amount, but the changes in the degree of polarization are still significant.

  4. Estimation of optimum specific light intensity per cell on a high-cell-density continuous culture of Chlorella zofingiensis not limited by nutrients or CO₂.

    PubMed

    Imaizumi, Yuki; Nagao, Norio; Yusoff, Fatimah Md; Taguchi, Satoru; Toda, Tatsuki

    2014-06-01

    To determine the optimum light intensity per cell required for rapid growth regardless of cell density, continuous cultures of the microalga Chlorella zofingiensis were grown with a sufficient supply of nutrients and CO2 and were subjected to different light intensities in the range of 75-1000 μE m(-2) s(-1). The cell density of culture increased over time for all light conditions except for the early stage of the high light condition of 1000 μE m(-2) s(-1). The light intensity per cell required for the high specific growth rate of 0.5 day(-1) was determined to be 28-45 μE g-ds(-1) s(-1). The specific growth rate was significantly correlated to light intensity (y=0.721×x/(66.98+x), r(2)=0.85, p<0.05). A high specific growth rate was maintained over a range of light intensities (250-1000 μE m(-2) s(-1)). This range of light intensities suggested that effective production of C. zofingiensis can be maintained outdoors under strong light by using the optimum specific light intensity. PMID:24747382

  5. [Interactive effects of light intensity and nitrogen supply on fraxinus mandshurica seedlings growth, biomass, and nitrogen allocation].

    PubMed

    Huo, Chang-fu; Wang, Zheng-quan; Sun, Hai-long; Fan, Zhi-qiang; Zhao, Xiao-min

    2008-08-01

    With sand culture in greenhouse, the responses of Fraxinus mandshurica seedlings growth, biomass, and N allocation to 2 levels of light intensity and 4 levels of N supply were studied. The results showed that under low light intensity, the seedlings shoot/root ratio (S/R) and net N uptake rate (NNUR) increased significantly (P < 0.01), but their relative growth rate (RGR) and net assimilation rate (NAR) had a significant decrease (P < 0.01). The biomass of root, stem, leaf, and total plant under low light was decreased by 36.8% (P < 0.01), 1.7%, 12.7% (P < 0.05) , and 24.3% (P < 0.01), respectively, and the N allocation to leaf increased but that to root was in adverse. At the two light levels, N supply had an obvious promotion effect on the seedlings growth, and the S/R and the N allocation to leaf were increased obviously with increasing N supply. Significant interactive effects of light and N supply were observed on the seedlings diameter, S/R, RGR, and biomass allocation. PMID:18975738

  6. Effect of light intensity on pigments and main acyl lipids during 'natural' chloroplast development in wheat seedlings.

    PubMed

    Lechowicz, W; Maternicka, K; Faltynowicz, M; Poskuta, J

    1986-01-01

    The content and composition of pigments and acyl lipids (monogalactosyl diacylglycerol, digalactosyl diacylglycerol and phosphatidyl glycerol) have been investigated in developing chloroplasts isolated from successive 2-cm sections along the leaves of wheat seedlings grown either under 100, 30 or 3 W·m(-2). In all examined stages of plastid development chlorophyll a/b and chlorophyll/carotenoid ratios were higher with increasing irradiance, whereas chlorophyll content expressed on fresh weight basis gradually decreased.Concentrations of monogalactosyl diacylglycerol, digalactosyl diacylglycerol and phosphatidyl glycerol decreased per chlorophyll unit with increasing plastid maturity. The higher was the light intensity applied during plant growth, the higher were galactolipid and phosphatidyl glycerol contents in developing chloroplasts. During plastid development the percentage of α-linolenic acid markedly increased in total and individual acyl lipids. Under high light conditions, the accumulation of this fatty acid proceeded more rapidly. Significantly higher proportion of α-linolenic acid was found in acyl lipid fraction of chloroplasts differentiating in high light grown plants, than in those from plants exposed to lower light intensities. The differences in the double bond index may indicate higher fluidity of thylakoid membranes in sun-type chloroplasts.Trans-3Δ-hexadecenoic acid, virtually absent in the youngest plastids, was found in much higher concentration (per chlorophyll unit and as mol % of phosphatidyl glycerol fatty acids) in chloroplasts developing at high light conditions. PMID:24443210

  7. Correlation of spatial intensity distribution of light reaching the retina and restoration of vision by optogenetic stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shivalingaiah, Shivaranjani; Gu, Ling; Mohanty, Samarendra K.

    2011-03-01

    Stimulation of retinal neuronal cells using optogenetics via use of chanelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) and blue light has opened up a new direction for restoration of vision with respect to treatment of Retinitis pigmentosa (RP). In addition to delivery of ChR2 to specific retinal layer using genetic engineering, threshold level of blue light needs to be delivered onto the retina for generating action potential and successful behavioral outcome. We report measurement of intensity distribution of light reaching the retina of Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) mouse models and compared those results with theoretical simulations of light propagation in eye. The parameters for the stimulating source positioning in front of eye was determined for optimal light delivery to the retina. In contrast to earlier viral method based delivery of ChR2 onto retinal ganglion cells, in-vivo electroporation method was employed for retina-transfection of RP mice. The behavioral improvement in mice with Thy1-ChR2-YFP transfected retina, expressing ChR2 in retinal ganglion cells, was found to correlate with stimulation intensity.

  8. Red light as a 12-oxo-leukotriene B₄ antagonist: an explanation for the efficacy of intensive red light in the therapy of peripheral inflammatory diseases.

    PubMed

    Paschke, Fritz; Rabong, Constantin; Schuster, Christoph

    2014-12-01

    To explain the successful treatment of various inflammatory diseases by using intensive red light, a non-linear theory is presented for the interaction of electric dipoles with light involving frequency doubling. It is applied to analyze the influence of light on organic molecules with permanent electric dipoles. The molecule 5-hydroxy-12-oxo-(5S,6Z,8E,10E,14Z)-6,8,10,14-eicosatetraenoic acid, 12-oxo-leukotriene B4 (12-Oxo-LTB4, an intermediate in the lipoxygenase-catalyzed path of arachidonic acid metabolism), is suspected to play a major role in the healing process, as, first, it plays a key role in the metabolism of leukotriene B4 (LTB4), which in many diseases acts as a source of inflammatory reactions; second, its dipole resonance is located at a wavelength of 316 nm, which can be excited by a 632 nm source through frequency doubling. From the structure of 12-Oxo-LTB4 and the knowledge of the partial charges of its 54 atoms, the equivalent values for dipole charges and dipole moment are derived. The power balance demonstrates that intensive red light with a power density of 0.4 W/cm2 transfers sufficient energy to 12-Oxo-LTB4 to render it biologically inactive. Hence, by generating a reactive high-energy leukotriene pathway intermediate, the law of mass action steers the chemical equilibrium to interrupt the inflammatory cascade. PMID:25029080

  9. Resonance running hologram velocity nonlinearity dependence upon light intensity in photorefractive crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Oliveira, Ivan; Carvalho, Jesiel F.; Frejlich, Jaime

    2013-06-01

    We report on the nonlinear relation between the resonance hologram velocity and the recording light irradiance in fringe-locked running hologram experiments carried out on a nominally undoped photorefractive Bi12TiO20 crystal using 532 nm wavelength laser light. Such nonlinearity is due to the dependence of the material diffusion length on the light irradiance. Experimental data show a good agreement with the theoretical equations thus supporting the mathematical model here reported and allowing to compute the quantum efficiency for photoelectron generation, the dependence of the diffusion length upon the recorded light irradiance, and the far from saturation diffusion length.

  10. Scattering Intensity and Directionality Probed Along Individual Zinc Oxide Nanorods with Precisely Controlled Light Polarization and Nanorod Orientation

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Daniel S.; Singh, Manpreet; Song, Sheng; Chang, Jae Young; Kang, Yongkoo; Hahm, Jong-in

    2015-01-01

    We elucidated the light-matter interaction of individual ZnO NRs with a monochromatic beam of linearly polarized light that scatters elastically from the ZnO NRs by performing forward scattering and back-aperture imaging in a dark-field setting. We precisely controlled the electric field vector of the incident light and the NR orientation within the plane of light interaction during both modes of measurement, and spatially resolved the scattering response from different interaction points along the NR long axis. We then discerned, for the first time, the effects of light polarization, analyzer angle, and NR orientation on the intensity and directionality of the optical responses both qualitatively and quantitatively along the length of the single ZnO NRs. We identified distinctive scattering profiles from individual ZnO NRs subject to incident light polarization with controlled NR orientation from the forward dark-field scattering and back-aperture imaging modes. The fundamental light interaction behavior of ZnO NRs is likely to govern their functional outcomes in photonics, optoelectronics, and sensor devices. Hence, our efforts provided much needed insight into unique optical responses from individual 1D ZnO nanomaterials, which could be highly beneficial in developing next-generation optoelectronic systems and optical biodetectors with improved device efficiency and sensitivity. PMID:26568952

  11. Visible Light-Driven Photocatalytic Activity of Oleic Acid-Coated TiO2 Nanoparticles Synthesized from Absolute Ethanol Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Huihui; Liu, Bin; Yin, Shu; Sato, Tsugio; Wang, Yuhua

    2015-10-01

    The one-step synthesis of oleic acid-coated TiO2 nanoparticles with visible light-driven photocatalytic activity was reported by this manuscript, using oleic acid-ethanol as crucial starting materials. The photocatalytic degradation of nitrogen monoxide (deNOx) in the gas phase was investigated in a continuous reactor using a series of TiO2 semiconductors, prepared from oleic acid- or acetic acid-ethanol solution. The surface modification on TiO2 by organic fatty acid, oleic acid, could reinvest TiO2 photocatalyst with the excellent visible light response. The deNOx ability is almost as high as 30 % destruction in the visible light region ( λ > 510 nm) which is similar to the nitrogen-doped TiO2. Meanwhile, acetic acid, a monobasic acid, has a weaker ability on visible light modification of TiO2.

  12. Absolute (γ,p0) and (γ,p1) cross sections and angular distributions for the light, deformed nucleus 19F

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerkhove, E.; Ferdinande, H.; van de Vyver, R.; Berkvens, P.; van Otten, P.; van Camp, E.; Ryckbosch, D.

    1984-06-01

    Absolute (γ,p0) and (γ,p1) differential cross sections for 19F have been measured at seven angles in the energy interval between 13.4 and 25.8 MeV. A sum of Legendre polynomials was fitted to the angular distributions to deduce the angular distribution coefficients. The (γ,p0) and (γ,p1) cross sections have a similar magnitude and represent a minor fraction of the total photoproton channel. The global difference between the two cross sections is attributed to configurational splitting effects. From the (γ,p0) angular distribution coefficients, an E2 cross section was estimated, contributing about 37% to the total E2 energy-weighted sum rule.

  13. Magnesium Deficiency and High Light Intensity Enhance Activities of Superoxide Dismutase, Ascorbate Peroxidase, and Glutathione Reductase in Bean Leaves 1

    PubMed Central

    Cakmak, Ismail; Marschner, Horst

    1992-01-01

    The influence of varied Mg supply (10-1000 micromolar) and light intensity (100-580 microeinsteins per square meter per second) on the concentrations of ascorbate (AsA) and nonprotein SH-compounds and the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD; EC 1.15.11) and the H2O2 scavenging enzymes, AsA peroxidase (EC 1.11.1.7), dehydroascorbate reductase (EC 1.8.5.1), and glutathione reductase (EC 1.6.4.2) were studied in bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) leaves over a 13-day period. The concentrations of AsA and SH-compounds and the activities of SOD and H2O2 scavenging enzymes increased with light intensity, in particular in Mg-deficient leaves. Over the 12-day period of growth for a given light intensity, the concentrations of AsA and SH-compounds and the activities of these enzymes remained more or less constant in Mg-sufficient leaves. In contrast, in Mg-deficient leaves, a progressive increase was recorded, particularly in concentrations of AsA and activities of AsA peroxidase and glutathione reductase, whereas the activities of guaiacol peroxidase and catalase were only slightly enhanced. Partial shading of Mg-deficient leaf blades for 4 days prevented chlorosis, and the activities of the O2.− and H2O2 scavenging enzymes remained at a low level. The results demonstrate the role of both light intensity and Mg nutritional status on the regulation of O2.− and H2O2 scavenging enzymes in chloroplasts. PMID:16668779

  14. The relationship between maximum tolerated light intensity and photoprotective energy dissipation in the photosynthetic antenna: chloroplast gains and losses

    PubMed Central

    Ruban, Alexander V.; Belgio, Erica

    2014-01-01

    The principle of quantifying the efficiency of protection of photosystem II (PSII) reaction centres against photoinhibition by non-photochemical energy dissipation (NPQ) has been recently introduced by Ruban & Murchie (2012 Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1817, 977–982 (doi:10.1016/j.bbabio.2012.03.026)). This is based upon the assessment of two key parameters: (i) the relationship between the PSII yield and NPQ, and (ii) the fraction of intact PSII reaction centres in the dark after illumination. In this paper, we have quantified the relationship between the amplitude of NPQ and the light intensity at which all PSII reaction centres remain intact for plants with different levels of PsbS protein, known to play a key role in the process. It was found that the same, nearly linear, relationship exists between the levels of the protective NPQ component (pNPQ) and the tolerated light intensity in all types of studied plants. This approach allowed for the quantification of the maximum tolerated light intensity, the light intensity at which all plant leaves become photoinhibited, the fraction of (most likely) unnecessary or ‘wasteful’ NPQ, and the fraction of photoinhibited PSII reaction centres under conditions of prolonged illumination by full sunlight. It was concluded that the governing factors in the photoprotection of PSII are the level and rate of protective pNPQ formation, which are often in discord with the amplitude of the conventional measure of photoprotection, the quickly reversible NPQ component, qE. Hence, we recommend pNPQ as a more informative and less ambiguous parameter than qE, as it reflects the effectiveness and limitations of the major photoprotective process of the photosynthetic membrane. PMID:24591709

  15. The relationship between maximum tolerated light intensity and photoprotective energy dissipation in the photosynthetic antenna: chloroplast gains and losses.

    PubMed

    Ruban, Alexander V; Belgio, Erica

    2014-04-19

    The principle of quantifying the efficiency of protection of photosystem II (PSII) reaction centres against photoinhibition by non-photochemical energy dissipation (NPQ) has been recently introduced by Ruban & Murchie (2012 Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1817, 977-982 (doi:10.1016/j.bbabio.2012.03.026)). This is based upon the assessment of two key parameters: (i) the relationship between the PSII yield and NPQ, and (ii) the fraction of intact PSII reaction centres in the dark after illumination. In this paper, we have quantified the relationship between the amplitude of NPQ and the light intensity at which all PSII reaction centres remain intact for plants with different levels of PsbS protein, known to play a key role in the process. It was found that the same, nearly linear, relationship exists between the levels of the protective NPQ component (pNPQ) and the tolerated light intensity in all types of studied plants. This approach allowed for the quantification of the maximum tolerated light intensity, the light intensity at which all plant leaves become photoinhibited, the fraction of (most likely) unnecessary or 'wasteful' NPQ, and the fraction of photoinhibited PSII reaction centres under conditions of prolonged illumination by full sunlight. It was concluded that the governing factors in the photoprotection of PSII are the level and rate of protective pNPQ formation, which are often in discord with the amplitude of the conventional measure of photoprotection, the quickly reversible NPQ component, qE. Hence, we recommend pNPQ as a more informative and less ambiguous parameter than qE, as it reflects the effectiveness and limitations of the major photoprotective process of the photosynthetic membrane. PMID:24591709

  16. Photo-enhanced toxicity of fluoranthene to Gulf of Mexico marine organisms at different larval ages and ultraviolet light intensities.

    PubMed

    Finch, Bryson E; Stubblefield, William A

    2016-05-01

    Significant increases in toxicity have been observed as a result of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) absorption of ultraviolet (UV) radiation in aquatic organisms. Early life stage aquatic organisms are predicted to be more susceptible to PAH photo-enhanced toxicity as a result of their translucence and tendency to inhabit shallow littoral or surface waters. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the sensitivity of varying ages of larval mysid shrimp (Americamysis bahia), inland silverside (Menidia beryllina), sheepshead minnow (Cyprinodon variegatus), and Gulf killifish (Fundulus grandis) to photo-enhanced toxicity and to examine the correlation between photo-enhanced toxicity and organism pigmentation. Organisms were exposed to fluoranthene and artificial UV light at different larval ages and results were compared using median lethal concentrations (LC50s) and the lethal time-to-death (LT50s). In addition, a high UV light intensity, short-duration (4-h) experiment was conducted at approximately 24 W/m(2) of ultraviolet radiation A (UV-A) and compared with a low-intensity, long-duration (12-h) experiment at approximately 8 W/m(2) of UV-A. The results indicated decreased toxicity with increasing age for all larval organisms. The amount of organism pigmentation was correlated with observed LC50 and LT50 values. High-intensity short-duration exposure resulted in greater toxicity than low-intensity long-duration UV treatments for mysid shrimp, inland silverside, and sheepshead minnow. Data from these experiments suggest that toxicity is dependent on age, pigmentation, UV light intensity, and fluoranthene concentration. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:1113-1122. © 2015 SETAC. PMID:26590351

  17. High light intensity plays a major role in emergence of population level variation in Arabidopsis thaliana along an altitudinal gradient.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, Antariksh; Yadav, Amrita; Tripathi, Abhinandan Mani; Roy, Sribash

    2016-01-01

    Environmental conditions play an important role in the emergence of genetic variations in natural populations. We identified genome-wide patterns of nucleotide variations in the coding regions of natural Arabidopsis thaliana populations. These populations originated from 700 m to 3400 m a.m.s.l. in the Western Himalaya. Using a pooled RNA-Seq approach, we identified the local and global level population-specific SNPs. The biological functions of the SNP-containing genes were primarily related to the high light intensity prevalent at high-altitude regions. The novel SNPs identified in these genes might have arisen de novo in these populations. In another approach, the FSTs of SNP-containing genes were correlated with the corresponding climatic factors. 'Radiation in the growing season' was the only environmental factor found to be strongly correlated with the gene-level FSTs. In both the approaches, the high light intensity was identified as the primary abiotic stress associated with the variations in these populations. The differential gene expression analysis between field and controlled condition grown plants also showed high light intensity as the primary abiotic stress, particularly for the high altitude populations. Our results provide a genome-wide perspective of nucleotide variations in populations along altitudinal gradient and their putative role in emergence of these variations. PMID:27211014

  18. High light intensity plays a major role in emergence of population level variation in Arabidopsis thaliana along an altitudinal gradient

    PubMed Central

    Tyagi, Antariksh; Yadav, Amrita; Tripathi, Abhinandan Mani; Roy, Sribash

    2016-01-01

    Environmental conditions play an important role in the emergence of genetic variations in natural populations. We identified genome-wide patterns of nucleotide variations in the coding regions of natural Arabidopsis thaliana populations. These populations originated from 700 m to 3400 m a.m.s.l. in the Western Himalaya. Using a pooled RNA-Seq approach, we identified the local and global level population-specific SNPs. The biological functions of the SNP-containing genes were primarily related to the high light intensity prevalent at high-altitude regions. The novel SNPs identified in these genes might have arisen de novo in these populations. In another approach, the FSTs of SNP-containing genes were correlated with the corresponding climatic factors. ‘Radiation in the growing season’ was the only environmental factor found to be strongly correlated with the gene-level FSTs. In both the approaches, the high light intensity was identified as the primary abiotic stress associated with the variations in these populations. The differential gene expression analysis between field and controlled condition grown plants also showed high light intensity as the primary abiotic stress, particularly for the high altitude populations. Our results provide a genome-wide perspective of nucleotide variations in populations along altitudinal gradient and their putative role in emergence of these variations. PMID:27211014

  19. Water column depth and light intensity modulate the zebrafish preference response in the black/white test.

    PubMed

    Córdova, Sandro Daniel; Dos Santos, Thainá Garbino; de Oliveira, Diogo Losch

    2016-04-21

    Currently, the black/white preference test has been used to evaluate anxiety-like behaviors in zebrafish. However, several inconsistent results have been reported across literature. Since animal behavior can be influenced by several environmental factors, the main goal of the present study was to investigate the influence of different water column depths and light intensities on zebrafish behavioral responses in the black/white test. On a 4cm water column depth, animals spent more time in the black than in the white compartment. However, when animals were tested in an 8cm water column, no significant difference was found. Using an inclined acrylic floor inside the aquarium, animals spent more time in the deep compartment when this was black. However, there is no difference in time spent in each compartment when the deeper compartment was white. For light intensity test, animals showed preference for the white compartment only when both compartments were illuminated with 100lx. For the others illumination settings, there was no difference in the compartment preference. In conclusion, our results suggest that variations in water column depth and light intensity can modulate zebrafish preference in the black/white test. These variations may be implicated in the discrepancies observed in literature. PMID:26960010

  20. Intensity and angle-of-arrival spectra of laser light propagating through axially homogeneous buoyancy-driven turbulence.

    PubMed

    Pawar, Shashikant S; Arakeri, Jaywant H

    2016-08-01

    Frequency spectra obtained from the measurements of light intensity and angle of arrival (AOA) of parallel laser light propagating through the axially homogeneous, axisymmetric buoyancy-driven turbulent flow at high Rayleigh numbers in a long (length-to-diameter ratio of about 10) vertical tube are reported. The flow is driven by an unstable density difference created across the tube ends using brine and fresh water. The highest Rayleigh number is about 8×109. The aim of the present work is to find whether the conventional Obukhov-Corrsin scaling or Bolgiano-Obukhov (BO) scaling is obtained for the intensity and AOA spectra in the case of light propagation in a buoyancy-driven turbulent medium. Theoretical relations for the frequency spectra of log amplitude and AOA fluctuations developed for homogeneous isotropic turbulent media are modified for the buoyancy-driven flow in the present case to obtain the asymptotic scalings for the high and low frequency ranges. For low frequencies, the spectra of intensity and vertical AOA fluctuations obtained from measurements follow BO scaling, while scaling for the spectra of horizontal AOA fluctuations shows a small departure from BO scaling. PMID:27505375

  1. Association between absolute volumes of lung spared from low-dose irradiation and radiation-induced lung injury after intensity-modulated radiotherapy in lung cancer: a retrospective analysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jinmei; Hong, Jinsheng; Zou, Xi; Lv, Wenlong; Guo, Feibao; Hong, Hualan; Zhang, Weijian

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the association between absolute volumes of lung spared from low-dose irradiation and radiation-induced lung injury (RILI) after intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for lung cancer. The normal lung relative volumes receiving greater than 5, 10, 20 and 30 Gy (V5-30) mean lung dose (MLD), and absolute volumes spared from greater than 5, 10, 20 and 30 Gy (AVS5-30) for the bilateral and ipsilateral lungs of 83 patients were recorded. Any association of clinical factors and dose-volume parameters with Grade ≥2 RILI was analyzed. The median follow-up was 12.3 months; 18 (21.7%) cases of Grade 2 RILI, seven (8.4%) of Grade 3 and two (2.4%) of Grade 4 were observed. Univariate analysis revealed the located lobe of the primary tumor. V5, V10, V20, MLD of the ipsilateral lung, V5, V10, V20, V30 and MLD of the bilateral lung, and AVS5 and AVS10 of the ipsilateral lung were associated with Grade ≥2 RILI (P < 0.05). Multivariate analysis indicated AVS5 of the ipsilateral lung was prognostic for Grade ≥2 RILI (P = 0.010, OR = 0.272, 95% CI: 0.102-0.729). Receiver operating characteristic curves indicated Grade ≥2 RILI could be predicted using AVS5 of the ipsilateral lung (area under curve, 0.668; cutoff value, 564.9 cm(3); sensitivity, 60.7%; specificity, 70.4%). The incidence of Grade ≥2 RILI was significantly lower with AVS5 of the ipsilateral lung ≥564.9 cm(3) than with AVS5 < 564.9 cm(3) (P = 0.008). Low-dose irradiation relative volumes and MLD of the bilateral or ipsilateral lung were associated with Grade ≥2 RILI, and AVS5 of the ipsilateral lung was prognostic for Grade ≥2 RILI for lung cancer after IMRT. PMID:26454068

  2. System for obtaining smooth laser beams where intensity variations are reduced by spectral dispersion of the laser light (SSD)

    DOEpatents

    Skupsky, Stanley; Kessler, Terrance J.; Short, Robert W.; Craxton, Stephen; Letzring, Samuel A.; Soures, John

    1991-01-01

    In an SSD (smoothing by spectral dispersion) system which reduces the time-averaged spatial variations in intensity of the laser light to provide uniform illumination of a laser fusion target, an electro-optic phase modulator through which a laser beam passes produces a broadband output beam by imposing a frequency modulated bandwidth on the laser beam. A grating provides spatial and angular spectral dispersion of the beam. Due to the phase modulation, the frequencies ("colors") cycle across the beam. The dispersed beam may be amplified and frequency converted (e.g., tripled) in a plurality of beam lines. A distributed phase plate (DPP) in each line is irradiated by the spectrally dispersed beam and the beam is focused on the target where a smooth (uniform intensity) pattern is produced. The color cycling enhances smoothing and the use of a frequency modulated laser pulse prevents the formation of high intensity spikes which could damage the laser medium in the power amplifiers.

  3. Effect of molecular anisotropy on the intensity and degree of polarization of light scattered from model atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bahethi, O. P.; Fraser, R. S.

    1975-01-01

    Computations of the intensity, flux, degree of polarization, and the positions of neutral points are presented for models of the terrestrial gaseous and hazy atmospheres by incorporating the molecular anisotropy due to air in the Rayleigh scattering optical thickness and phase matrix. Molecular anisotropy causes significant changes in the intensity, flux and the degree of polarization of the scattered light. The positions of neutral points do not change significantly. When the Rayleigh scattering optical thickness is kept constant and the molecular anisotropy factor is included only in the Rayleigh phase matrix, the flux does not change and the intensity and positions of neutron points change by a small amount. The changes in the degree of polarization are still significant.

  4. Influence of light intensity on surface-free energy and dentin bond strength of single-step self-etch adhesives.

    PubMed

    Nojiri, Kie; Tsujimoto, Akimasa; Suzuki, Takayuki; Shibasaki, Syo; Matsuyoshi, Saki; Takamizawa, Toshiki; Miyazaki, Masashi

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the influence of light intensity on the surface-free energy and dentin bond strength of single-step selfetch adhesives. The adhesives were applied to the dentin surfaces of bovine mandibular incisors and cured with light intensities of 0 (no irradiation), 200, 400, and 600 mW/cm(2). Surface-free energies were determined by measuring the contact angles of three test liquids placed on the cured adhesives. Dentin bond strengths of the specimens were also measured. Polymerization with a higher light intensity resulted in a lower surface-free energy of the cured adhesives. The greatest bond strength was achieved when a light intensity of 400 mW/cm(2) or greater was used. Our data suggest that the surface-free energy and dentin bond strength of single-step self-etch adhesives are affected by light intensity of the curing unit. PMID:26438984

  5. Dose-response relationship for light intensity and ocular and electroencephalographic correlates of human alertness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cajochen, C.; Zeitzer, J. M.; Czeisler, C. A.; Dijk, D. J.

    2000-01-01

    Light can elicit both circadian and acute physiological responses in humans. In a dose response protocol men and women were exposed to illuminances ranging from 3 to 9100 lux for 6.5 h during the early biological night after they had been exposed to <3 lux for several hours. Light exerted an acute alerting response as assessed by a reduction in the incidence of slow-eye movements, a reduction of EEG activity in the theta-alpha frequencies (power density in the 5-9 Hz range) as well as a reduction in self-reported sleepiness. This alerting response was positively correlated with the degree of melatonin suppression by light. In accordance with the dose response function for circadian resetting and melatonin suppression, the responses of all three indices of alertness to variations in illuminance were consistent with a logistic dose response curve. Half of the maximum alerting response to bright light of 9100 lux was obtained with room light of approximately 100 lux. This sensitivity to light indicates that variations in illuminance within the range of typical, ambient, room light (90-180 lux) can have a significant impact on subjective alertness and its electrophysiologic concomitants in humans during the early biological night.

  6. Curing light intensity effects on wear resistance of two resin composites.

    PubMed

    St-Georges, Annie J; Swift, Edward J; Thompson, Jeffrey Y; Heymann, Harald O

    2002-01-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the wear resistance of resin composite polymerized using four different light-curing systems. For this, a well-defined cylindrical cavity preparation (4.0 mm in diameter x 3.0 mm in depth) was made in a ceramic block (n=4 per material/light condition). Uncured material, either a universal hybrid composite (Herculite XRV) or a flowable hybrid composite (Revolution Formula 2), was packed and light-cured from the top surface only with one of the four light-curing units: 1) a conventional quartz-tungsten-halogen light, 2) a soft-start light, 3) an argon-ion laser or 4) a plasma-arc curing light. After storing the specimens in deionized water at 37 degrees C for 24 hours, the excess cured material was ground through successive grits up to a final 1200-grit SiC abrasive. The specimens were placed in deionized water at 37 degrees C for an additional 24 hours. Wear simulation was performed using a four-station Leinfelder-type three-body wear device. A slurry of water and unplasticized polymethylmethacrylate beads, simulating an artificial food bolus, was placed on the surface of each resin-composite-restored ceramic block. The entire cycling procedure was carried out 400,000 times. Impressions of each resin composite surface were taken with polyvinylsiloxane and epoxy replicas were made. Wear analyses were conducted by generating tracings across the worn surface of epoxy replicas using profilometer scans. For the universal hybrid composite and the flowable hybrid composite, the lowest wear occurred in specimens that were cured using the conventional quartz-tungsten-halogen light, and the highest wear was detected on those specimens made using the argon-ion laser. For both resin composites, the mean wear for specimens cured using the argon-ion laser was significantly higher than that of the specimens cured with the three other lights, which were statistically similar. PMID:12120780

  7. Intensive Plasmonic Flash Light Sintering of Copper Nanoinks Using a Band-Pass Light Filter for Highly Electrically Conductive Electrodes in Printed Electronics.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Yeon-Taek; Chung, Wan-Ho; Jang, Yong-Rae; Kim, Hak-Sung

    2016-04-01

    In this work, an intensive plasmonic flash light sintering technique was developed by using a band-pass light filter matching the plasmonic wavelength of the copper nanoparticles. The sintering characteristics, such as resistivity and microstructure, of the copper nanoink films were studied as a function of the range of the wavelength employed in the flash white light sintering. The flash white light irradiation conditions (e.g., wavelength range, irradiation energy, pulse number, on-time, and off-time) were optimized to obtain a high conductivity of the copper nanoink films without causing damage to the polyimide substrate. The wavelength range corresponding to the plasmonic wavelength of the copper nanoparticles could efficiently sinter the copper nanoink and enhance its conductivity. Ultimately, the sintered copper nanoink films under optimal light sintering conditions showed the lowest resistivity (6.97 μΩ·cm), which was only 4.1 times higher than that of bulk copper films (1.68 μΩ·cm). PMID:26975337

  8. Absolute nuclear material assay

    DOEpatents

    Prasad, Manoj K.; Snyderman, Neal J.; Rowland, Mark S.

    2012-05-15

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  9. Absolute nuclear material assay

    DOEpatents

    Prasad, Manoj K.; Snyderman, Neal J.; Rowland, Mark S.

    2010-07-13

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  10. Arrangement for multiplexing and intensity splitting light beams for interface into fiber optic cables

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, Steve A.

    1990-01-01

    An arrangement especially suitable for use in a laser apparatus for converting a plurality of different input light beams, for example copper vapor laser beams, into a plurality of substantially identical light beams is disclosed herein. This arrangement utilizes an optical mixing bar which is preferably integrally formed as a single unit and which includes a main body for mixing light therein, a flat input surface on one end of the main body, and a multi-faceted output face on the opposite end of the main body. This arrangement also includes means for directing the plurality of different input light beams onto the input face of the mixing base, whereby to cause the different beams to mix within the main body of the mixing bar and exit the latter from its multi-faceted output face as the desired plurality of substantially identical output beams.

  11. Dynamic compartment specific changes in glutathione and ascorbate levels in Arabidopsis plants exposed to different light intensities

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Excess light conditions induce the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) directly in the chloroplasts but also cause an accumulation and production of ROS in peroxisomes, cytosol and vacuoles. Antioxidants such as ascorbate and glutathione occur in all cell compartments where they detoxify ROS. In this study compartment specific changes in antioxidant levels and related enzymes were monitored among Arabidopsis wildtype plants and ascorbate and glutathione deficient mutants (vtc2-1 and pad2-1, respectively) exposed to different light intensities (50, 150 which was considered as control condition, 300, 700 and 1,500 μmol m-2 s-1) for 4 h and 14 d. Results The results revealed that wildtype plants reacted to short term exposure to excess light conditions with the accumulation of ascorbate and glutathione in chloroplasts, peroxisomes and the cytosol and an increased activity of catalase in the leaves. Long term exposure led to an accumulation of ascorbate and glutathione mainly in chloroplasts. In wildtype plants an accumulation of ascorbate and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) could be observed in vacuoles when exposed to high light conditions. The pad2-1 mutant reacted to long term excess light exposure with an accumulation of ascorbate in peroxisomes whereas the vtc2-1 mutant reacted with an accumulation of glutathione in the chloroplasts (relative to the wildtype) and nuclei during long term high light conditions indicating an important role of these antioxidants in these cell compartments for the protection of the mutants against high light stress. Conclusion The results obtained in this study demonstrate that the accumulation of ascorbate and glutathione in chloroplasts, peroxisomes and the cytosol is an important reaction of plants to short term high light stress. The accumulation of ascorbate and H2O2 along the tonoplast and in vacuoles during these conditions indicates an important route for H2O2 detoxification under these conditions. PMID

  12. Individual-based measurements of light intensity provide new insights into the effects of artificial light at night on daily rhythms of urban-dwelling songbirds.

    PubMed

    Dominoni, Davide M; Carmona-Wagner, Esther O; Hofmann, Michaela; Kranstauber, Bart; Partecke, Jesko

    2014-05-01

    The growing interest in the effects of light pollution on daily and seasonal cycles of animals has led to a boost of research in recent years. In birds, it has been hypothesized that artificial light at night can affect daily aspects of behaviour, but one caveat is the lack of knowledge about the light intensity that wild animals, such as birds, are exposed to during the night. Organisms have naturally evolved daily rhythms to adapt to the 24-h cycle of day and night, thus, it is important to investigate the potential shifts in daily cycles due to global anthropogenic processes such as urbanization. We captured adult male European blackbirds (Turdus merula) in one rural forest and two urban sites differing in the degree of anthropogenic disturbance. We tagged these birds with light loggers and simultaneously recorded changes in activity status (active/non-active) through an automated telemetry system. We first analysed the relationship between light at night, weather conditions and date with daily activity onset and end. We then compared activity, light at night exposure and noise levels between weekdays and weekends. Onset of daily activity was significantly advanced in both urban sites compared to the rural population, while end of daily activity did not vary either among sites. Birds exposed to higher amounts of light in the late night showed earlier onset of activity in the morning, but light at night did not influence end of daily activity. Light exposure at night and onset/end of daily activity timing was not different between weekdays and weekends, but all noise variables were. A strong seasonal effect was detected in both urban and rural populations, such as birds tended to be active earlier in the morning and later in the evening (relative to civil twilight) in the early breeding season than at later stages. Our results point at artificial light at night as a major driver of change in timing of daily activity. Future research should focus on the costs and

  13. Effects of the El Chichon volcanic cloud in the stratosphere on the intensity of light from the sky.

    PubMed

    Coulson, K L

    1983-08-01

    This is the second of two papers dealing with the effects of volcanic debris from the eruption of El Chichon on light from the sunlit sky. The polarization of skylight was considered in the first of the two, whereas this one is devoted to skylight intensity. It is shown here that the magnitude of the skylight intensity is modified very significantly from its clear sky value by the volcanic cloud, as is its change with solar depression angle during twilight and its distribution over the sky during the day. Emphasis is on measurements at a wavelength of 0.07 microm. Generally the volcanic cloud produces a diminution of zenith intensity during twilight with a considerable enhancement of intensity over the sky throughout the main part of the day. The solar aureole is not as sharp as it is in normally clear conditions, but the volcanic cloud causes a very diffuse type of aureole which covers a large portion of the sky. The preferential scattering of the longer wavelengths of sunlight, which is made evident by brilliant red and yellow colors in the sunrise period, causes a pronounced change of longwave/shortwave color ratios during twilight from their values in clear atmospheric conditions. The combination of intensity data shown here with polarization data in the previous paper should give a relatively complete picture of the effects of volcanic debris on solar radiation in the atmosphere and be useful in the verification of radiative transfer models of atmospheric turbidity. PMID:18196123

  14. A Bloch equation approach to intensity dependent optical spectra of light harvesting complex II: excitation dependence of light harvesting complex II pump-probe spectra.

    PubMed

    Richter, Marten; Renger, Thomas; Knorr, Andreas

    2008-01-01

    On the basis of the recent progress in the resolution of the structure of the antenna light harvesting complex II (LHC II) of the photosystem II, we propose a microscopically motivated theory to predict excitation intensity-dependent spectra. We show that optical Bloch equations provide the means to include all 2( N ) excited states of an oligomer complex of N coupled two-level systems and analyze the effects of Pauli Blocking and exciton-exciton annihilation on pump-probe spectra. We use LHC Bloch equations for 14 Coulomb coupled two-level systems, which describe the S (0) and S (1) level of every chlorophyll molecule. All parameter introduced into the Hamiltonian are based on microscopic structure and a quantum chemical model. The derived Bloch equations describe not only linear absorption but also the intensity dependence of optical spectra in a regime where the interplay of Pauli Blocking effects as well as exciton-exciton annihilation effects are important. As an example, pump-probe spectra are discussed. The observed saturation of the spectra for high intensities can be viewed as a relaxation channel blockade on short time scales due to Pauli blocking. The theoretical investigation is useful for the interpretation of the experimental data, if the experimental conditions exceed the low intensity pump limit and effects like strong Pauli Blocking and exciton-exciton annihilation need to be considered. These effects become important when multiple excitations are generated by the pump pulse in the complex. PMID:17924202

  15. The Absolute Spectrum Polarimeter (ASP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kogut, A. J.

    2010-01-01

    The Absolute Spectrum Polarimeter (ASP) is an Explorer-class mission to map the absolute intensity and linear polarization of the cosmic microwave background and diffuse astrophysical foregrounds over the full sky from 30 GHz to 5 THz. The principal science goal is the detection and characterization of linear polarization from an inflationary epoch in the early universe, with tensor-to-scalar ratio r much greater than 1O(raised to the power of { -3}) and Compton distortion y < 10 (raised to the power of{-6}). We describe the ASP instrument and mission architecture needed to detect the signature of an inflationary epoch in the early universe using only 4 semiconductor bolometers.

  16. Light intensity and production parameters of phytocenoses cultivated on soil-like substrate under controled environment conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tikhomirov, A.; Ushakova, S.; Gribovskaya, I.; Tirranen, L.; Manukovsky, N.; Zolotukhin, I.

    To investigate feasibility of enhancing closedness in a new generation of biological life support systems (LSS) to involve the inedible phytomass into intrasystem mass exchange the vermicomposting method we have chosen made possible to produce soil-like substrate (SLS) suitable for growing plants. However, to use the SLS in life support systems call for investigation of its physical, chemical and other parameters. Of special importance among them is the capacity of SLS to provide the LSS photosynthesizing component with required mineral elements in selected cultivation conditions. In this connection the aim of this work was to study opportunities of enhancing pr4oduction activity of wheat and radish cenoses by varying the intensity of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) without decreasing the harvest index. Increase of light intensity to 250 W/m 2 PAR decreased the intensity of visible photosynthesis of wheat cenosi and slightly increased visible photosynthesis of radish cenosis as compared to 200 W/m 2 PAR. The maximum productivity of wheat cenosis both total and seeds corresponded to the irradiance of 200 W/m 2 PAR. The light intensity of 250 W/m2 PAR decreased productivity of wheat plants and had no significant effect of the productivity of radish cenosis as compared to 200 W/m 2 PAR. Qualitative and quantitative composition of microflora of the watering solution and SLS was determined by the condition of plants, development phase and PAR intensity. By the end of wheat vegetation under 250 W/m 2 there were an order more bacteria of the colon rod group and phytopathogenic bacteria in the watering solution and SLS than under other illumination conditions. Investigation of the mineral composition of SLS and the watering solution demonstrated that one of the reasons of inadequate response of the cenosis under study to elevated PAR intensity may be deficiency of accessible forms of some mineral elements, e.g. nitrogen. The above said materials evidence that

  17. Low-intensity light induces vasorelaxation: a study for possible mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morimoto, Yuji; Matsuo, Hirotaka; Arai, Tsunenori; Kikuchi, Makoto

    1996-05-01

    To investigate the mechanism of light induced vasorelaxation, vascular tension change in normal buffer solution was compared with that in the buffer containing either the following drug: (1) guanylate cyclase inhibitor; (2) nitric oxide synthetase inhibitors and the optical isomers; and (3) vasodilating agent. The vasorelaxation caused by ultraviolet light irradiation was independent of the presence of an intact endothelium. It was inhibited by methyleneblue, but not influenced by either L-NMMA or D-NMMA. On the other hand, this vasorelaxation was enhanced by the agents containing nitro group (L-NAME, D-NAME) or sodium nitrite. These results show that the light activates guanylate cyclase, which results in the vasorelaxation. This activation was reinforced by the agents containing nitro group. We conclude that primary photochemical product, which is probably nitric oxide originated from photodissociation of nitro groups, may produce the vasorelaxation. The preliminary investigation suggests that ultraviolet irradiation may be benefit in the treatment for vasospasm.

  18. Intensity spectra after first-order dispersion of composite models of scalar cyclostationary light.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Pousa, Carlos R

    2009-04-01

    The spectrum of the intensity of dispersed waves obeying cyclostationary statistics is studied. The formalism is based on an exact formula by Marshall and Yariv [IEEE Photon. Technol. Lett.12, 302 (2000)] relating the intensity spectrum after first-order dispersion to the Fourier transform of a certain restriction of the time-averaged fourth-order correlation of the optical wave e(t) before dispersion. The formalism permits a simple computation of the spectrum of composite models defined by the independent addition or multiplication of a stationary and a cyclostationary field. The computations are simplified by introducing the auxiliary field z(tau)(t)=e(t)*e(t+tau), whose power spectral density represents the basic building block for solving the spectrum of composite models. The results are illustrated by a number of examples, including the intensity spectrum after dispersion of analog-modulated, partially coherent carriers, or the complete spectrum of intensity fluctuations of multiwavelength dispersion-based microwave photonic filters. PMID:19340275

  19. Timing and Intensity of Light Correlate with Body Weight in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Baron, Kelly G.; Wilson, John; Kang, Joseph; Zee, Phyllis C.

    2014-01-01

    Light exposure can influence sleep and circadian timing, both of which have been shown to influence weight regulation. The goal of this study was to evaluate the relationship between ambient light, sleep and body mass index. Participants included 54 individuals (26 males, mean age 30.6, SD = 11.7 years). Light levels, sleep midpoint and duration were measured with wrist actigraphy (Actiwatch-L) for 7 days. BMI was derived from self-reported height and weight. Caloric intake was determined from 7 days of food logs. For each participant, light and activity data were output in 2 minute epochs, smoothed using a 5 point (10 minute) moving average and then aggregated over 24 hours. The mean light timing above 500 lux (MLiT500) was defined as the average clock time of all aggregated data points above 500 lux. MLiT500 was positively correlated with BMI (r = 0.51, p<0.001), and midpoint of sleep (r = 0.47, p<0.01). In a multivariable linear regression model including MLiT500 and midpoint of sleep, MLiT500 was a significant predictor of BMI (B = 1.26 SE = 0.34, β = 0.53 p = 0.001, r2Δ = 0.22). Adjusting for covariates, MLiT500 remained an independent predictor of BMI (B = 1.28 SE = 0.36, β = 0.54, p = 0.002, r2Δ = 0.20). The full model accounted for 34.7% of the variance in BMI (p = 0.01). Exposure to moderate levels of light at biologically appropriate times can influence weight, independent of sleep timing and duration. PMID:24694994

  20. Timing and intensity of light correlate with body weight in adults.

    PubMed

    Reid, Kathryn J; Santostasi, Giovanni; Baron, Kelly G; Wilson, John; Kang, Joseph; Zee, Phyllis C

    2014-01-01

    Light exposure can influence sleep and circadian timing, both of which have been shown to influence weight regulation. The goal of this study was to evaluate the relationship between ambient light, sleep and body mass index. Participants included 54 individuals (26 males, mean age 30.6, SD = 11.7 years). Light levels, sleep midpoint and duration were measured with wrist actigraphy (Actiwatch-L) for 7 days. BMI was derived from self-reported height and weight. Caloric intake was determined from 7 days of food logs. For each participant, light and activity data were output in 2 minute epochs, smoothed using a 5 point (10 minute) moving average and then aggregated over 24 hours. The mean light timing above 500 lux (MLiT500) was defined as the average clock time of all aggregated data points above 500 lux. MLiT500 was positively correlated with BMI (r = 0.51, p<0.001), and midpoint of sleep (r = 0.47, p<0.01). In a multivariable linear regression model including MLiT500 and midpoint of sleep, MLiT500 was a significant predictor of BMI (B = 1.26 SE = 0.34, β = 0.53 p = 0.001, r2Δ = 0.22). Adjusting for covariates, MLiT500 remained an independent predictor of BMI (B = 1.28 SE = 0.36, β = 0.54, p = 0.002, r2Δ = 0.20). The full model accounted for 34.7% of the variance in BMI (p = 0.01). Exposure to moderate levels of light at biologically appropriate times can influence weight, independent of sleep timing and duration. PMID:24694994