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Sample records for absolute melting point

  1. Nanotexturing of surfaces to reduce melting point.

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, Ernest J.; Zubia, David; Mireles, Jose; Marquez, Noel; Quinones, Stella

    2011-11-01

    This investigation examined the use of nano-patterned structures on Silicon-on-Insulator (SOI) material to reduce the bulk material melting point (1414 C). It has been found that sharp-tipped and other similar structures have a propensity to move to the lower energy states of spherical structures and as a result exhibit lower melting points than the bulk material. Such a reduction of the melting point would offer a number of interesting opportunities for bonding in microsystems packaging applications. Nano patterning process capabilities were developed to create the required structures for the investigation. One of the technical challenges of the project was understanding and creating the specialized conditions required to observe the melting and reshaping phenomena. Through systematic experimentation and review of the literature these conditions were determined and used to conduct phase change experiments. Melting temperatures as low as 1030 C were observed.

  2. Positioning, alignment and absolute pointing of the ANTARES neutrino telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fehr, F.; Distefano, C.; Antares Collaboration

    2010-01-01

    A precise detector alignment and absolute pointing is crucial for point-source searches. The ANTARES neutrino telescope utilises an array of hydrophones, tiltmeters and compasses for the relative positioning of the optical sensors. The absolute calibration is accomplished by long-baseline low-frequency triangulation of the acoustic reference devices in the deep-sea with a differential GPS system at the sea surface. The absolute pointing can be independently verified by detecting the shadow of the Moon in cosmic rays.

  3. Low-melting point heat transfer fluid

    DOEpatents

    Cordaro, Joseph Gabriel; Bradshaw, Robert W.

    2010-11-09

    A low-melting point, heat transfer fluid made of a mixture of five inorganic salts including about 29.1-33.5 mol % LiNO.sub.3, 0-3.9 mol % NaNO.sub.3, 2.4-8.2 mol % KNO.sub.3, 18.6-19.9 mol % NaNO.sub.2, and 40-45.6 mol % KNO.sub.2. These compositions can have liquidus temperatures below 80.degree. C. for some compositions.

  4. Low-melting point heat transfer fluid

    DOEpatents

    Cordaro, Joseph G.; Bradshaw, Robert W.

    2011-04-12

    A low-melting point, heat transfer fluid comprising a mixture of LiNO.sub.3, NaNO.sub.3, KNO.sub.3, NaNO.sub.2 and KNO.sub.2 salts where the Li, Na and K cations are present in amounts of about 20-33.5 mol % Li, about 18.6-40 mol % Na, and about 40-50.3 mol % K and where the nitrate and nitrite anions are present in amounts of about 36-50 mol % NO.sub.3, and about 50-62.5 mol % NO.sub.2. These compositions can have liquidus temperatures between 70.degree. C. and 80.degree. C. for some compositions.

  5. Estimating the physicochemical properties of polyhalogenated aromatic and aliphatic compounds using UPPER: part 1. Boiling point and melting point.

    PubMed

    Admire, Brittany; Lian, Bo; Yalkowsky, Samuel H

    2015-01-01

    The UPPER (Unified Physicochemical Property Estimation Relationships) model uses enthalpic and entropic parameters to estimate 20 biologically relevant properties of organic compounds. The model has been validated by Lian and Yalkowsky on a data set of 700 hydrocarbons. The aim of this work is to expand the UPPER model to estimate the boiling and melting points of polyhalogenated compounds. In this work, 19 new group descriptors are defined and used to predict the transition temperatures of an additional 1288 compounds. The boiling points of 808 and the melting points of 742 polyhalogenated compounds are predicted with average absolute errors of 13.56 K and 25.85 K, respectively.

  6. An interesting relationship between drug absorption and melting point.

    PubMed

    Chu, Katherine A; Yalkowsky, Samuel H

    2009-05-21

    The ability to predict the extent of passive intestinal drug absorption is very important for efficient lead candidate selection and development. Physicochemical-based absorption predictive models previously developed use solubility, partition coefficient and pK(a) as drug input parameters for intestinal absorption. Alternatively, this study looks at the relationship between melting point and passive transport for poorly soluble drugs. It is based entirely on the expression derived from the General Solubility Equation (GSE) that relates melting point to the product of intrinsic solubility and partition coefficient. Given that the melting point of a compound is one of the first and more reliable physical properties measured, it can be advantageously used as a guide in early drug discovery and development. This paper elucidates the interesting relationship between the melting point and dose to the fraction absorbed of poorly soluble drugs, i.e., class II and IV compounds in the Biopharmaceutics Classification System. The newly defined melting point based absorption potential (MPbAP) parameter is successful at distinguishing 90% of the 91 drugs considered being well absorbed (FA>0.5) or poorly absorbed. In general, lower melting compounds are more likely to be well absorbed than higher melting compounds for any given dose. The fraction absorbed for drugs with high melting temperatures is limited by the dose to a greater degree than it is for low melting compounds.

  7. Stagnation-Point Shielding by Melting and Vaporization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Leonard

    1959-01-01

    An approximate theoretical analysis was made of the shielding mechanism whereby the rate of heat transfer to the forward stagnation point of blunt bodies is reduced by melting and evaporation. General qualitative results are given and a numerical example, the melting and evaporation of ice, is presented and discussed in detail.

  8. Toward Fully in Silico Melting Point Prediction Using Molecular Simulations.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong; Maginn, Edward J

    2013-03-12

    Melting point is one of the most fundamental and practically important properties of a compound. Molecular simulation methods have been developed for the accurate computation of melting points. However, all of these methods need an experimental crystal structure as input, which means that such calculations are not really predictive since the melting point can be measured easily in experiments once a crystal structure is known. On the other hand, crystal structure prediction (CSP) has become an active field and significant progress has been made, although challenges still exist. One of the main challenges is the existence of many crystal structures (polymorphs) that are very close in energy. Thermal effects and kinetic factors make the situation even more complicated, such that it is still not trivial to predict experimental crystal structures. In this work, we exploit the fact that free energy differences are often small between crystal structures. We show that accurate melting point predictions can be made by using a reasonable crystal structure from CSP as a starting point for a free energy-based melting point calculation. The key is that most crystal structures predicted by CSP have free energies that are close to that of the experimental structure. The proposed method was tested on two rigid molecules and the results suggest that a fully in silico melting point prediction method is possible.

  9. Toward Fully in Silico Melting Point Prediction Using Molecular Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y; Maginn, EJ

    2013-03-01

    Melting point is one of the most fundamental and practically important properties of a compound. Molecular computation of melting points. However, all of these methods simulation methods have been developed for the accurate need an experimental crystal structure as input, which means that such calculations are not really predictive since the melting point can be measured easily in experiments once a crystal structure is known. On the other hand, crystal structure prediction (CSP) has become an active field and significant progress has been made, although challenges still exist. One of the main challenges is the existence of many crystal structures (polymorphs) that are very close in energy. Thermal effects and kinetic factors make the situation even more complicated, such that it is still not trivial to predict experimental crystal structures. In this work, we exploit the fact that free energy differences are often small between crystal structures. We show that accurate melting point predictions can be made by using a reasonable crystal structure from CSP as a starting point for a free energy-based melting point calculation. The key is that most crystal structures predicted by CSP have free energies that are close to that of the experimental structure. The proposed method was tested on two rigid molecules and the results suggest that a fully in silico melting point prediction method is possible.

  10. Estimating the melting point, entropy of fusion, and enthalpy of ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The entropies of fusion, enthalies of fusion, and melting points of organic compounds can be estimated through three models developed using the SPARC (SPARC Performs Automated Reasoning in Chemistry) platform. The entropy of fusion is modeled through a combination of interaction terms and physical descriptors. The enthalpy of fusion is modeled as a function of the entropy of fusion, boiling point, and fexibility of the molecule. The melting point model is the enthlapy of fusion divided by the entropy of fusion. These models were developed in part to improve SPARC's vapor pressure and solubility models. These models have been tested on 904 unique compounds. The entropy model has a RMS of 12.5 J mol-1K-1. The enthalpy model has a RMS of 4.87 kJ mol-1. The melting point model has a RMS of 54.4°C. Published in the journal, SAR and QSAR in Environmental Research

  11. Quantitative structure-property relationships for prediction of boiling point, vapor pressure, and melting point.

    PubMed

    Dearden, John C

    2003-08-01

    Boiling point, vapor pressure, and melting point are important physicochemical properties in the modeling of the distribution and fate of chemicals in the environment. However, such data often are not available, and therefore must be estimated. Over the years, many attempts have been made to calculate boiling points, vapor pressures, and melting points by using quantitative structure-property relationships, and this review examines and discusses the work published in this area, and concentrates particularly on recent studies. A number of software programs are commercially available for the calculation of boiling point, vapor pressure, and melting point, and these have been tested for their predictive ability with a test set of 100 organic chemicals.

  12. A density functional theory based approach for predicting melting points of ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lihua; Bryantsev, Vyacheslav S

    2017-02-01

    Accurate prediction of melting points of ILs is important both from the fundamental point of view and from the practical perspective for screening ILs with low melting points and broadening their utilization in a wider temperature range. In this work, we present an ab initio approach to calculate melting points of ILs with known crystal structures and illustrate its application for a series of 11 ILs containing imidazolium/pyrrolidinium cations and halide/polyatomic fluoro-containing anions. The melting point is determined as a temperature at which the Gibbs free energy of fusion is zero. The Gibbs free energy of fusion can be expressed through the use of the Born-Fajans-Haber cycle via the lattice free energy of forming a solid IL from gaseous phase ions and the sum of the solvation free energies of ions comprising IL. Dispersion-corrected density functional theory (DFT) involving (semi)local (PBE-D3) and hybrid exchange-correlation (HSE06-D3) functionals is applied to estimate the lattice enthalpy, entropy, and free energy. The ions solvation free energies are calculated with the SMD-generic-IL solvation model at the M06-2X/6-31+G(d) level of theory under standard conditions. The melting points of ILs computed with the HSE06-D3 functional are in good agreement with the experimental data, with a mean absolute error of 30.5 K and a mean relative error of 8.5%. The model is capable of accurately reproducing the trends in melting points upon variation of alkyl substituents in organic cations and replacement one anion by another. The results verify that the lattice energies of ILs containing polyatomic fluoro-containing anions can be approximated reasonably well using the volume-based thermodynamic approach. However, there is no correlation of the computed lattice energies with molecular volume for ILs containing halide anions. Moreover, entropies of solid ILs follow two different linear relationships with molecular volume for halides and polyatomic fluoro

  13. Low-melting point inorganic nitrate salt heat transfer fluid

    DOEpatents

    Bradshaw, Robert W.; Brosseau, Douglas A.

    2009-09-15

    A low-melting point, heat transfer fluid made of a mixture of four inorganic nitrate salts: 9-18 wt % NaNO.sub.3, 40-52 wt % KNO.sub.3, 13-21 wt % LiNO.sub.3, and 20-27 wt % Ca(NO.sub.3).sub.2. These compositions can have liquidus temperatures less than 100 C; thermal stability limits greater than 500 C; and viscosity in the range of 5-6 cP at 300 C; and 2-3 cP at 400 C.

  14. A new low-melting-point aluminum braze

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobson, D.M.; Humpston, G.; Sangha, S.P.S.

    1996-08-01

    Most high-strength aluminum engineering alloys cannot be joined by brazing because they either degrade or melt at the temperature at which commercially available aluminum brazes are used. Previous efforts to develop aluminum brazing filler metal alloys with a significantly reduced melting point have tended to be frustrated by poor mechanical properties of the alloys, corrosion of the joints or the high cost, toxicity or volatility of the constituent materials. This paper describes the development and assessment of a new brazing alloy with a composition of 73Al-20Cu-2Ni-55I (wt-%), which has been designed to overcome these limitations. A joining process has been devised for fluxless brazing of aluminum engineering alloys using the new filler metal for use in both inert gas and vacuum furnaces. The production of ductile foil preforms and roll-clad base metals is described together with preliminary results of mechanical property assessments and corrosion resistance trials. These results are highly encouraging and point to promising new applications for aluminum brazing technology.

  15. Effect of enzymatic interesterification on melting point of palm olein.

    PubMed

    Yassin, Atif A A; Mohamed, Ibrahim O; Ibrahim, Mohd N; Yusoff, Mohd S A

    2003-07-01

    Immobilized PS-C 'Amano' II lipase was used to catalyze the interesterification of palm olein (POo) with 30, 50, and 70% stearic acid in n-hexane at 60 degrees C. The catalytic performance of the immobilized lipase was evaluated by determining the composition change of fatty acyl groups and triacylglycerol (TAG) by gas liquid chromatography and high-performance liquid chromatography, respectively. The interesterification process resulted in the formation of new TAGs, mainly tripalmitin and dipalmitostearin, both of which were absent in the original oil. These changes in TAG composition resulted in an increase in slip melting point, from the original 25.5 degrees C to 36.3, 37.0, and 40.0 degrees C in the modified POo with 30, 50, and 70% stearic acid, respectively. All the reactions attained steady state in about 6 h. This type of work will find great applications in food industries, such as confectionery.

  16. Large melting point hysteresis of Ge nanocrystals embedded inSiO2

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Q.; Sharp, I.D.; Yuan, C.W.; Yi, D.O.; Liao, C.Y.; Glaeser,A.M.; Minor, A.M.; Beeman, J.W.; Ridgway, M.C.; Kluth, P.; Ager III,J.W.; Chrzan, D.C.; Haller, E.E.

    2006-05-04

    The melting behavior of Ge nanocrystals embedded within SiO{sub 2} is evaluated using in situ transmission electron microscopy. The observed melting point hysteresis is large ({+-} 17%) and nearly symmetric about the bulk melting point. This hysteresis is modeled successfully using classical nucleation theory without the need to invoke epitaxy.

  17. The Melting Point of Palladium Using Miniature Fixed Points of Different Ceramic Materials: Part II—Analysis of Melting Curves and Long-Term Investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edler, F.; Huang, K.

    2016-12-01

    Fifteen miniature fixed-point cells made of three different ceramic crucible materials (Al2O3, ZrO2, and Al2O3(86 %)+ZrO2(14 %)) were filled with pure palladium and used to calibrate type B thermocouples (Pt30 %Rh/Pt6 %Rh). A critical point by using miniature fixed points with small amounts of fixed-point material is the analysis of the melting curves, which are characterized by significant slopes during the melting process compared to flat melting plateaus obtainable using conventional fixed-point cells. The method of the extrapolated starting point temperature using straight line approximation of the melting plateau was applied to analyze the melting curves. This method allowed an unambiguous determination of an electromotive force (emf) assignable as melting temperature. The strict consideration of two constraints resulted in a unique, repeatable and objective method to determine the emf at the melting temperature within an uncertainty of about 0.1 μ V. The lifetime and long-term stability of the miniature fixed points was investigated by performing more than 100 melt/freeze cycles for each crucible of the different ceramic materials. No failure of the crucibles occurred indicating an excellent mechanical stability of the investigated miniature cells. The consequent limitation of heating rates to values below {± }3.5 K min^{-1} above 1100° C and the carefully and completely filled crucibles (the liquid palladium occupies the whole volume of the crucible) are the reasons for successfully preventing the crucibles from breaking. The thermal stability of the melting temperature of palladium was excellent when using the crucibles made of Al2O3(86 %)+ZrO2(14 %) and ZrO2. Emf drifts over the total duration of the long-term investigation were below a temperature equivalent of about 0.1 K-0.2 K.

  18. Spatial inhomogeneity in crystalline materials and saddle-type congruent melting points in ternary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedorov, P. P.; Buchinskaya, Irina I.

    2012-01-01

    Solidification of multicomponent melts to solid solutions is considered in terms of thermodynamic topological analysis. The use of phase portraits of systems for finding congruent melting points (invariant points) is discussed. Methods for predicting the existence of invariant points in ternary systems are considered. An example analysis is presented for two series of fluoride systems (CaF2-SrF2-RF3 and SrF2-BaF2-RF3, where R are rare-earth elements). The stability of melt crystallization in the vicinity of congruent melting singular points of solid solutions is discussed. The bibliography includes 104 references.

  19. Ion Coulomb crystals: from quantum technology to chemistry close to the absolute zero point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dulieu, O.; Willitsch, S.

    2017-03-01

    Ion Coulomb crystals are ordered structures of atomic or molecular ions stored in ion traps at temperatures close to the absolute zero point. These unusual "crystals" form the basis of extremely accurate clocks, provide an environment for precise studies of chemical reactions and enable advanced implementations of the technology for a quantum computer. In this article, we discuss the techniques for generating atomic and molecular Coulomb crystals and highlight some of their applications.

  20. The dynamic control ratio at the equilibrium point (DCRe): introducing relative and absolute reliability scores.

    PubMed

    Alt, Tobias; Knicker, Axel J; Strüder, Heiko K

    2017-04-01

    Analytical methods to assess thigh muscle balance need to provide reliable data to allow meaningful interpretation. However, reproducibility of the dynamic control ratio at the equilibrium point has not been evaluated yet. Therefore, the aim of this study was to compare relative and absolute reliability indices of its angle and moment values with conventional and functional hamstring-quadriceps ratios. Furthermore, effects of familiarisation and angular velocity on reproducibility were analysed. A number of 33 male volunteers participated in 3 identical test sessions. Peak moments (PMs) were determined unilaterally during maximum concentric and eccentric knee flexion (prone) and extension (supine position) at 0.53, 1.57 and 2.62 rad · s(-1). A repeated measure, ANOVA, confirmed systematic bias. Intra-class correlation coefficients and standard errors of measurement indicated relative and absolute reliability. Correlation coefficients were averaged over respective factors and tested for significant differences. All balance scores showed comparable low-to-moderate relative (<0.8-0.9) and good absolute reliability (<10%). Relative reproducibility of dynamic control equilibrium parameters augmented with increasing angular velocity, but not with familiarisation. At 2.62 rad · s(-1), high (moment: 0.906) to moderate (angle: 0.833) relative reliability scores with accordingly high absolute indices (4.9% and 6.4%) became apparent. Thus, the dynamic control equilibrium is an equivalent method for the reliable assessment of thigh muscle balance.

  1. Massively parallel digital high resolution melt for rapid and absolutely quantitative sequence profiling

    PubMed Central

    Velez, Daniel Ortiz; Mack, Hannah; Jupe, Julietta; Hawker, Sinead; Kulkarni, Ninad; Hedayatnia, Behnam; Zhang, Yang; Lawrence, Shelley; Fraley, Stephanie I.

    2017-01-01

    In clinical diagnostics and pathogen detection, profiling of complex samples for low-level genotypes represents a significant challenge. Advances in speed, sensitivity, and extent of multiplexing of molecular pathogen detection assays are needed to improve patient care. We report the development of an integrated platform enabling the identification of bacterial pathogen DNA sequences in complex samples in less than four hours. The system incorporates a microfluidic chip and instrumentation to accomplish universal PCR amplification, High Resolution Melting (HRM), and machine learning within 20,000 picoliter scale reactions, simultaneously. Clinically relevant concentrations of bacterial DNA molecules are separated by digitization across 20,000 reactions and amplified with universal primers targeting the bacterial 16S gene. Amplification is followed by HRM sequence fingerprinting in all reactions, simultaneously. The resulting bacteria-specific melt curves are identified by Support Vector Machine learning, and individual pathogen loads are quantified. The platform reduces reaction volumes by 99.995% and achieves a greater than 200-fold increase in dynamic range of detection compared to traditional PCR HRM approaches. Type I and II error rates are reduced by 99% and 100% respectively, compared to intercalating dye-based digital PCR (dPCR) methods. This technology could impact a number of quantitative profiling applications, especially infectious disease diagnostics. PMID:28176860

  2. Massively parallel digital high resolution melt for rapid and absolutely quantitative sequence profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velez, Daniel Ortiz; Mack, Hannah; Jupe, Julietta; Hawker, Sinead; Kulkarni, Ninad; Hedayatnia, Behnam; Zhang, Yang; Lawrence, Shelley; Fraley, Stephanie I.

    2017-02-01

    In clinical diagnostics and pathogen detection, profiling of complex samples for low-level genotypes represents a significant challenge. Advances in speed, sensitivity, and extent of multiplexing of molecular pathogen detection assays are needed to improve patient care. We report the development of an integrated platform enabling the identification of bacterial pathogen DNA sequences in complex samples in less than four hours. The system incorporates a microfluidic chip and instrumentation to accomplish universal PCR amplification, High Resolution Melting (HRM), and machine learning within 20,000 picoliter scale reactions, simultaneously. Clinically relevant concentrations of bacterial DNA molecules are separated by digitization across 20,000 reactions and amplified with universal primers targeting the bacterial 16S gene. Amplification is followed by HRM sequence fingerprinting in all reactions, simultaneously. The resulting bacteria-specific melt curves are identified by Support Vector Machine learning, and individual pathogen loads are quantified. The platform reduces reaction volumes by 99.995% and achieves a greater than 200-fold increase in dynamic range of detection compared to traditional PCR HRM approaches. Type I and II error rates are reduced by 99% and 100% respectively, compared to intercalating dye-based digital PCR (dPCR) methods. This technology could impact a number of quantitative profiling applications, especially infectious disease diagnostics.

  3. Massively parallel digital high resolution melt for rapid and absolutely quantitative sequence profiling.

    PubMed

    Velez, Daniel Ortiz; Mack, Hannah; Jupe, Julietta; Hawker, Sinead; Kulkarni, Ninad; Hedayatnia, Behnam; Zhang, Yang; Lawrence, Shelley; Fraley, Stephanie I

    2017-02-08

    In clinical diagnostics and pathogen detection, profiling of complex samples for low-level genotypes represents a significant challenge. Advances in speed, sensitivity, and extent of multiplexing of molecular pathogen detection assays are needed to improve patient care. We report the development of an integrated platform enabling the identification of bacterial pathogen DNA sequences in complex samples in less than four hours. The system incorporates a microfluidic chip and instrumentation to accomplish universal PCR amplification, High Resolution Melting (HRM), and machine learning within 20,000 picoliter scale reactions, simultaneously. Clinically relevant concentrations of bacterial DNA molecules are separated by digitization across 20,000 reactions and amplified with universal primers targeting the bacterial 16S gene. Amplification is followed by HRM sequence fingerprinting in all reactions, simultaneously. The resulting bacteria-specific melt curves are identified by Support Vector Machine learning, and individual pathogen loads are quantified. The platform reduces reaction volumes by 99.995% and achieves a greater than 200-fold increase in dynamic range of detection compared to traditional PCR HRM approaches. Type I and II error rates are reduced by 99% and 100% respectively, compared to intercalating dye-based digital PCR (dPCR) methods. This technology could impact a number of quantitative profiling applications, especially infectious disease diagnostics.

  4. A thermal expansion investigation of the melting point anomaly in trihalomesitylenes.

    PubMed

    Saraswatula, Viswanadha G; Saha, Binoy K

    2015-06-18

    Generally the order of melting point of halogenated compounds is found to be I > Br > Cl whereas, in the series of trihalomesitylenes the order follows as Br > I ≈ Cl. This melting point anomaly has been explained in terms of their thermal expansion behaviours. The order of thermal expansion in this series is found to be Br < I ≈ Cl.

  5. Using a Disposable Pipet for Preparing Air-Sensitive Compounds for Melting Point Determinations or Storage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanz, Martial

    2004-01-01

    A thin-wall disposable Pasteur pipet is used as a vacuum-tight receptacle for air-sensitive compounds to ascertain their melting points. This technique is easy, economical, and successfully used for many years to develop air-sensitive samples for melting point determinations.

  6. 46 CFR 153.908 - Cargo viscosity and melting point information; measuring cargo temperature during discharge...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Cargo viscosity and melting point information; measuring... Cargo viscosity and melting point information; measuring cargo temperature during discharge: Categories... lading, a written statement of the following: (1) For Category A or B NLS, the cargo's viscosity at 20...

  7. 46 CFR 153.908 - Cargo viscosity and melting point information; measuring cargo temperature during discharge...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Cargo viscosity and melting point information; measuring... Cargo viscosity and melting point information; measuring cargo temperature during discharge: Categories... lading, a written statement of the following: (1) For Category A or B NLS, the cargo's viscosity at 20...

  8. 46 CFR 153.908 - Cargo viscosity and melting point information; measuring cargo temperature during discharge...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Cargo viscosity and melting point information; measuring... Cargo viscosity and melting point information; measuring cargo temperature during discharge: Categories... lading, a written statement of the following: (1) For Category A or B NLS, the cargo's viscosity at 20...

  9. 46 CFR 153.908 - Cargo viscosity and melting point information; measuring cargo temperature during discharge...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Cargo viscosity and melting point information; measuring... Cargo viscosity and melting point information; measuring cargo temperature during discharge: Categories... lading, a written statement of the following: (1) For Category A or B NLS, the cargo's viscosity at 20...

  10. Free-energy calculations using classical molecular simulation: application to the determination of the melting point and chemical potential of a flexible RDX model.

    PubMed

    Sellers, Michael S; Lísal, Martin; Brennan, John K

    2016-03-21

    We present an extension of various free-energy methodologies to determine the chemical potential of the solid and liquid phases of a fully-flexible molecule using classical simulation. The methods are applied to the Smith-Bharadwaj atomistic potential representation of cyclotrimethylene trinitramine (RDX), a well-studied energetic material, to accurately determine the solid and liquid phase Gibbs free energies, and the melting point (Tm). We outline an efficient technique to find the absolute chemical potential and melting point of a fully-flexible molecule using one set of simulations to compute the solid absolute chemical potential and one set of simulations to compute the solid-liquid free energy difference. With this combination, only a handful of simulations are needed, whereby the absolute quantities of the chemical potentials are obtained, for use in other property calculations, such as the characterization of crystal polymorphs or the determination of the entropy. Using the LAMMPS molecular simulator, the Frenkel and Ladd and pseudo-supercritical path techniques are adapted to generate 3rd order fits of the solid and liquid chemical potentials. Results yield the thermodynamic melting point Tm = 488.75 K at 1.0 atm. We also validate these calculations and compare this melting point to one obtained from a typical superheated simulation technique.

  11. Negative pressures and melting point depression in oxide-coated liquid metal droplets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spaepen, F.; Turnbull, D.

    1979-01-01

    Negative pressures and melting point depression in oxide-coated liquid metal droplets are studied. The calculation presented show the existence of large negative pressures when the oxide coating is thick enough. The change in the melting point caused by these negative pressures should be considered in studies of homogeneous crystal nucleation. Furthermore, since the negative pressure raises the entropy of the melt, it increases the entropy loss at the crystal-melt interface; the resulting increase of the surface tension could have a large effect on the homogeneous nucleation frequency.

  12. Our Educational Melting Pot: Have We Reached the Boiling Point?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lauderdale, Katherine Lynn, Ed.; Bonilla, Carlos A., Ed.

    The articles and excerpts in this collection illustrate the complexity of the melting pot concept. Multiculturalism has become a watchword in American life and education, but it may be that in trying to atone for past transgressions educators and others are simply going too far. These essays illustrate some of the problems of a multicultural…

  13. An approach for chemical stability during melt extrusion of a drug substance with a high melting point.

    PubMed

    Haser, Abbe; Huang, Siyuan; Listro, Tony; White, David; Zhang, Feng

    2017-03-27

    Poorly water-soluble drug substances that exhibit high melting points are difficult to process by melt extrusion due to chemical instability at high temperatures required for processing. The purpose of this study was to extrude meloxicam (melting point 255°C) by optimizing processing parameters and formulation composition. Five extrusion studies were performed: 1) design space, 2) impact of moisture, 3) impact of melt residence time, 4) specific energy optimization, and 5) altered microenvironment pH. Powder X-ray diffraction and polarized light microscopy were used to confirm amorphous conversion. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry was used to characterize the extrusion degradation pathway. The formulation consisted of 10% meloxicam and 90% copovidone. When processed above 140°C, significant chemical degradation was observed. The minimum energy input to convert meloxicam was 1.8kWh/kg. Degradation of meloxicam during extrusion was identified as hydrolysis. Barrel configuration and screw design were designed to drive-off moisture and reduce melt residence time. With optimized parameters, the purity of the extrudate was 96.7%. To further enhance chemical stability, meglumine was added to provide a stabilizing basic microenvironment resulting in 100% purity. By process parameter optimization and formulation modification, we successfully extruded a meloxicam amorphous solid dispersion.

  14. Prediction of melting point for drug-like compounds via QSPR methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deeb, Omar; Goodarzi, Mohammad; Alfalah, Sherin

    2011-02-01

    Melting point is a basic physical property that specifies the transition temperature between solid and liquid phases. Melting point has numerous applications in biochemical and environmental sciences due to its relationship with solubility. Sufficient aqueous solubility is essential for a compound to be transferred to the site of action within an organism. In spite of the huge number of available melting point data, few useful guidelines exist for understanding the relationship between the compound melting point and its chemical structure. Therefore, methods for estimating the melting point of organic compounds would considerably help medicinal chemists in designing new drugs within a specified range of melting point and solubility. A highly effective tool depending on quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR) can be utilized to predict melting point for drug-like compounds with no literature values. QSPR models were developed using genetic algorithms, multiple linear regression and neural networks analyses. Predictive non-linear QSPR models were developed for the relevant descriptors. The results obtained offers excellent regression models that possesses good prediction ability.

  15. Effect of grain size on the melting point of confined thin aluminum films

    SciTech Connect

    Wejrzanowski, Tomasz; Lewandowska, Malgorzata; Sikorski, Krzysztof; Kurzydlowski, Krzysztof J.

    2014-10-28

    The melting of aluminum thin film was studied by a molecular dynamics (MD) simulation technique. The effect of the grain size and type of confinement was investigated for aluminum film with a constant thickness of 4 nm. The results show that coherent intercrystalline interface suppress the transition of solid aluminum into liquid, while free-surface gives melting point depression. The mechanism of melting of polycrystalline aluminum thin film was investigated. It was found that melting starts at grain boundaries and propagates to grain interiors. The melting point was calculated from the Lindemann index criterion, taking into account only atoms near to grain boundaries. This made it possible to extend melting point calculations to bigger grains, which require a long time (in the MD scale) to be fully molten. The results show that 4 nm thick film of aluminum melts at a temperature lower than the melting point of bulk aluminum (933 K) only when the grain size is reduced to 6 nm.

  16. Using star tracks to determine the absolute pointing of the Fluorescence Detector telescopes of the Pierre Auger Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    De Donato, Cinzia; Sanchez, Federico; Santander, Marcos; Natl.Tech.U., San Rafael; Camin, Daniel; Garcia, Beatriz; Grassi, Valerio; /Milan U. /INFN, Milan

    2005-05-01

    To accurately reconstruct a shower axis from the Fluorescence Detector data it is essential to establish with high precision the absolute pointing of the telescopes. To d that they calculate the absolute pointing of a telescope using sky background data acquired during regular data taking periods. The method is based on the knowledge of bright star's coordinates that provide a reliable and stable coordinate system. it can be used to check the absolute telescope's pointing and its long-term stability during the whole life of the project, estimated in 20 years. They have analyzed background data taken from January to October 2004 to determine the absolute pointing of the 12 telescopes installed both in Los Leones and Coihueco. The method is based on the determination of the mean-time of the variance signal left by a star traversing a PMT's photocathode which is compared with the mean-time obtained by simulating the track of that star on the same pixel.

  17. A comparison of methods for melting point calculation using molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong; Maginn, Edward J

    2012-04-14

    Accurate and efficient prediction of melting points for complex molecules is still a challenging task for molecular simulation, although many methods have been developed. Four melting point computational methods, including one free energy-based method (the pseudo-supercritical path (PSCP) method) and three direct methods (two interface-based methods and the voids method) were applied to argon and a widely studied ionic liquid 1-n-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ([BMIM][Cl]). The performance of each method was compared systematically. All the methods under study reproduce the argon experimental melting point with reasonable accuracy. For [BMIM][Cl], the melting point was computed to be 320 K using a revised PSCP procedure, which agrees with the experimental value 337-339 K very well. However, large errors were observed in the computed results using the direct methods, suggesting that these methods are inappropriate for large molecules with sluggish dynamics. The strengths and weaknesses of each method are discussed.

  18. Reliability and Validity of Instrument to Assess Chemistry Manipulative Techniques--Capillary Melting Point Determination.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Cheng-Hsia; Horng, Jhy-Ming

    1991-01-01

    A study that revised and validated the criterion-referenced mastery measurement (CRMM) constructed specifically for the capillary melting point determination technique (CMPDT) is described. The methods, results, and conclusion are included. (KR)

  19. THE RATIO OF THE GLASS TEMPERATURE TO THE MELTING POINT IN POLYMERS.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    PLASTICS , MELTING POINT, TRANSITION TEMPERATURE, POLYETHYLENE PLASTICS , VINYL PLASTICS , BUTADIENES, FLUORINE COMPOUNDS, STYRENE PLASTICS , POLYMERS...NYLON, PHYSICAL PROPERTIES, MOLECULAR STRUCTURE, CARBONATES, ESTERS, ACRYLIC RESINS, PHENOLIC PLASTICS , ANHYDRIDES, CARBOXYLIC ACIDS, PHTHALATES, UNITED KINGDOM.

  20. Estimating the melting point, entropy of fusion, and enthalpy of fusion of organic compounds via SPARC.

    PubMed

    Whiteside, T S; Hilal, S H; Brenner, A; Carreira, L A

    2016-08-01

    The entropy of fusion, enthalpy of fusion, and melting point of organic compounds can be estimated through three models developed using the SPARC (SPARC Performs Automated Reasoning in Chemistry) platform. The entropy of fusion is modelled through a combination of interaction terms and physical descriptors. The enthalpy of fusion is modelled as a function of the entropy of fusion, boiling point, and flexibility of the molecule. The melting point model is the enthalpy of fusion divided by the entropy of fusion. These models were developed in part to improve SPARC's vapour pressure and solubility models. These models have been tested on 904 unique compounds. The entropy model has a RMS of 12.5 J mol(-1) K(-1). The enthalpy model has a RMS of 4.87 kJ mol(-1). The melting point model has a RMS of 54.4°C.

  1. Origin of melting point depression for rare gas solids confined in carbon pores.

    PubMed

    Morishige, Kunimitsu; Kataoka, Takaaki

    2015-07-21

    To obtain insights into the mechanism of the melting-point depression of rare gas solids confined in crystalline carbon pores, we examined the freezing and melting behavior of Xe and Ar confined to the crystalline pores of ordered mesoporous carbons as well as compressed exfoliated graphite compared to the amorphous pores of ordered mesoporous silicas, by means of X-ray diffraction. For the Xe and Ar confined to the crystalline carbon pores, there was no appreciable thermal hysteresis between freezing and melting. Furthermore, the position of the main diffraction peak did not change appreciably on freezing and melting. This strongly suggests that the liquids confined in the carbon pores form a multilayered structure parallel to the smooth walls. For the Xe and Ar confined to the amorphous silica pores, on the other hand, the position of the main diffraction peak shifted into higher scattering angle on freezing suggested that the density of the confined solid is distinctly larger than for the confined liquid. Using compressed exfoliated graphite with carbon walls of higher crystallinity, we observed that three-dimensional (3D) microcrystals of Xe confined in the slit-shaped pores melted to leave the unmelted bilayers on the pore walls below the bulk triple point. The lattice spacing of the 3D microcrystals confined is larger by ∼0.7% than that of the bilayer next to the pore walls in the vicinity of the melting point.

  2. Origin of melting point depression for rare gas solids confined in carbon pores

    SciTech Connect

    Morishige, Kunimitsu Kataoka, Takaaki

    2015-07-21

    To obtain insights into the mechanism of the melting-point depression of rare gas solids confined in crystalline carbon pores, we examined the freezing and melting behavior of Xe and Ar confined to the crystalline pores of ordered mesoporous carbons as well as compressed exfoliated graphite compared to the amorphous pores of ordered mesoporous silicas, by means of X-ray diffraction. For the Xe and Ar confined to the crystalline carbon pores, there was no appreciable thermal hysteresis between freezing and melting. Furthermore, the position of the main diffraction peak did not change appreciably on freezing and melting. This strongly suggests that the liquids confined in the carbon pores form a multilayered structure parallel to the smooth walls. For the Xe and Ar confined to the amorphous silica pores, on the other hand, the position of the main diffraction peak shifted into higher scattering angle on freezing suggested that the density of the confined solid is distinctly larger than for the confined liquid. Using compressed exfoliated graphite with carbon walls of higher crystallinity, we observed that three-dimensional (3D) microcrystals of Xe confined in the slit-shaped pores melted to leave the unmelted bilayers on the pore walls below the bulk triple point. The lattice spacing of the 3D microcrystals confined is larger by ∼0.7% than that of the bilayer next to the pore walls in the vicinity of the melting point.

  3. Origin of melting point depression for rare gas solids confined in carbon pores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morishige, Kunimitsu; Kataoka, Takaaki

    2015-07-01

    To obtain insights into the mechanism of the melting-point depression of rare gas solids confined in crystalline carbon pores, we examined the freezing and melting behavior of Xe and Ar confined to the crystalline pores of ordered mesoporous carbons as well as compressed exfoliated graphite compared to the amorphous pores of ordered mesoporous silicas, by means of X-ray diffraction. For the Xe and Ar confined to the crystalline carbon pores, there was no appreciable thermal hysteresis between freezing and melting. Furthermore, the position of the main diffraction peak did not change appreciably on freezing and melting. This strongly suggests that the liquids confined in the carbon pores form a multilayered structure parallel to the smooth walls. For the Xe and Ar confined to the amorphous silica pores, on the other hand, the position of the main diffraction peak shifted into higher scattering angle on freezing suggested that the density of the confined solid is distinctly larger than for the confined liquid. Using compressed exfoliated graphite with carbon walls of higher crystallinity, we observed that three-dimensional (3D) microcrystals of Xe confined in the slit-shaped pores melted to leave the unmelted bilayers on the pore walls below the bulk triple point. The lattice spacing of the 3D microcrystals confined is larger by ˜0.7% than that of the bilayer next to the pore walls in the vicinity of the melting point.

  4. Estimation of melting points of large set of persistent organic pollutants utilizing QSPR approach.

    PubMed

    Watkins, Marquita; Sizochenko, Natalia; Rasulev, Bakhtiyor; Leszczynski, Jerzy

    2016-03-01

    The presence of polyhalogenated persistent organic pollutants (POPs), such as Cl/Br-substituted benzenes, biphenyls, diphenyl ethers, and naphthalenes has been identified in all environmental compartments. The exposure to these compounds can pose potential risk not only for ecological systems, but also for human health. Therefore, efficient tools for comprehensive environmental risk assessment for POPs are required. Among the factors vital for environmental transport and fate processes is melting point of a compound. In this study, we estimated the melting points of a large group (1419 compounds) of chloro- and bromo- derivatives of dibenzo-p-dioxins, dibenzofurans, biphenyls, naphthalenes, diphenylethers, and benzenes by utilizing quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR) techniques. The compounds were classified by applying structure-based clustering methods followed by GA-PLS modeling. In addition, random forest method has been applied to develop more general models. Factors responsible for melting point behavior and predictive ability of each method were discussed.

  5. Effect of Finishing System on Subcutaneous Fat Melting Point and Fatty Acid Composition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Angus-cross steers (n = 69) were used to determine the effect of finishing system on subcutaneous fat melting point and fatty acid composition. Three finishing systems were evaluated: 1) mixed pasture for 134 d [MP], 2) mixed pasture for 93 d and alfalfa for 41 d [AL], or 3) concentrate finishing f...

  6. A comparison of methods for melting point calculation using molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y; Maginn, EJ

    2012-04-14

    Accurate and efficient prediction of melting points for complex molecules is still a challenging task for molecular simulation, although many methods have been developed. Four melting point computational methods, including one free energy-based method (the pseudo-supercritical path (PSCP) method) and three direct methods (two interface-based methods and the voids method) were applied to argon and a widely studied ionic liquid 1-n-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ([BMIM][Cl]). The performance of each method was compared systematically. All the methods under study reproduce the argon experimental melting point with reasonable accuracy. For [BMIM][Cl], the melting point was computed to be 320 K using a revised PSCP procedure, which agrees with the experimental value 337-339 K very well. However, large errors were observed in the computed results using the direct methods, suggesting that these methods are inappropriate for large molecules with sluggish dynamics. The strengths and weaknesses of each method are discussed. (C) 2012 American Institute of Physics. [http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.3702587

  7. The Relationship between Lattice Enthalpy and Melting Point in Magnesium and Aluminium Oxides. Science Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talbot, Christopher; Yap, Lydia

    2013-01-01

    This "Science Note" presents a study by Christopher Talbot and Lydia Yap, who teach IB Chemistry at Anglo-Chinese School (Independent), Republic of Singapore, to pre-university students. Pre-university students may postulate the correlation between the magnitude of the lattice enthalpy compound and its melting point, since both…

  8. Explaining Melting and Evaporation below Boiling Point. Can Software Help with Particle Ideas?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Papageorgiou, George; Johnson, Philip; Fotiades, Fotis

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports the findings of a study exploring the use of a software package to help pupils understand particulate explanations for melting and evaporation below boiling point. Two matched classes in a primary school in Greece (ages 11-12, n = 16 and 19) were involved in a short intervention of six one hour lessons. Covering the same…

  9. Palm-based standard reference materials for iodine value and slip melting point.

    PubMed

    Tarmizi, Azmil Haizam Ahmad; Lin, Siew Wai; Kuntom, Ainie

    2008-09-22

    This work described study protocols on the production of Palm-Based Standard Reference Materials for iodine value and slip melting point. Thirty-three laboratories collaborated in the inter-laboratory proficiency tests for characterization of iodine value, while thirty-two laboratories for characterization of slip melting point. The iodine value and slip melting point of palm oil, palm olein and palm stearin were determined in accordance to MPOB Test Methods p3.2:2004 and p4.2:2004, respectively. The consensus values and their uncertainties were based on the acceptability of statistical agreement of results obtained from collaborating laboratories. The consensus values and uncertainties for iodine values were 52.63 +/- 0.14 Wijs in palm oil, 56.77 +/- 0.12 Wijs in palm olein and 33.76 +/- 0.18 Wijs in palm stearin. For the slip melting points, the consensus values and uncertainties were 35.6 +/- 0.3 degrees C in palm oil, 22.7 +/- 0.4 degrees C in palm olein and 53.4 +/- 0.2 degrees C in palm stearin. Repeatability and reproducibility relative standard deviations were found to be good and acceptable, with values much lower than that of 10%. Stability of Palm-Based Standard Reference Materials remained stable at temperatures of -20 degrees C, 0 degrees C, 6 degrees C and 24 degrees C upon storage for one year.

  10. Estimating the melting point, entropy of fusion, and enthalpy of fusion of organic compounds via SPARC

    EPA Science Inventory

    The entropies of fusion, enthalies of fusion, and melting points of organic compounds can be estimated through three models developed using the SPARC (SPARC Performs Automated Reasoning in Chemistry) platform. The entropy of fusion is modeled through a combination of interaction ...

  11. Calculation of the melting point of alkali halides by means of computer simulations.

    PubMed

    Aragones, J L; Sanz, E; Valeriani, C; Vega, C

    2012-09-14

    In this paper, we study the liquid-solid coexistence of NaCl-type alkali halides, described by interaction potentials such as Tosi-Fumi (TF), Smith-Dang (SD), and Joung-Cheatham (JC), and compute their melting temperature (T(m)) at 1 bar via three independent routes: (1) liquid/solid direct coexistence, (2) free-energy calculations, and (3) Hamiltonian Gibbs-Duhem integration. The melting points obtained by the three routes are consistent with each other. The calculated T(m) of the Tosi-Fumi model of NaCl is in good agreement with the experimental value as well as with other numerical calculations. However, the other two models considered for NaCl, SD and JC, overestimate the melting temperature of NaCl by more than 200 K. We have also computed the melting temperature of other alkali halides using the Tosi-Fumi interaction potential and observed that the predictions are not always as close to the experimental values as they are for NaCl. It seems that there is still room for improvement in the area of force-fields for alkaline halides, given that so far most models are still unable to describe a simple yet important property such as the melting point.

  12. Micro- and nano-spheres of low melting point metals and alloys, formed by ultrasonic cavitation.

    PubMed

    Friedman, H; Reich, S; Popovitz-Biro, R; von Huth, P; Halevy, I; Koltypin, Y; Gedanken, A; Porat, Z

    2013-01-01

    Metals and alloys of low melting points (<430 °C) can be melted in hot silicone oil to form two immiscible liquids. Irradiation of the system with ultrasonic energy induces acoustic cavitation in the oil, which disperses the molten metals into microspheres that solidify rapidly upon cooling. This method has been applied to seven pure metals (Ga, In, Sn, Bi, Pb, Zn, Hg) and two eutectic alloys of gold (Au-Ge and Au-Si). The morphology and composition of the resulting microspheres were examined by SEM and EDS. Eutectic Au-Si formed also crystalline Au nanoparticles, which were separated and studied by HRTEM.

  13. Melting heat transfer in an axisymmetric stagnation-point flow of the Jeffrey fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nawaz, M.; Hayat, T.; Zeeshan, A.

    2016-03-01

    This investigation explores the characteristics of melting heat transfer in a boundary layer flow of the Jeffrey fluid near the stagnation point on a stretching sheet subject to an applied magnetic field. The governing boundary layer equations are transformed to ordinary differential equations by similarity transformations. Resulting nonlinear problems are solved analytically by the homotopy analysis method. It is noticed that an increase in the melting parameter decreases the dimensionless velocity and temperature, while an increase in the Deborah number increases the velocity and momentum boundary layer thickness.

  14. Radiation effects on stagnation point flow with melting heat transfer and second order slip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mabood, F.; Shafiq, A.; Hayat, T.; Abelman, S.

    This article examines the effects of melting heat transfer and thermal radiation in stagnation point flow towards a stretching/shrinking surface. Mathematical formulation is made in the presence of mass transfer and second order slip condition. Numerical solutions to the resulting nonlinear problems are obtained by Runge-Kutta fourth fifth order method. Physical quantities like velocity, temperature, concentration, skin friction, Nusselt and Sherwood number are analyzed via sundry parameters for stretching/shrinking, first order slip, second order slip, radiation, melting, Prandtl and Schmidt. A comparative study with the previously published results in limiting sense is made.

  15. Models for mean bonding length, melting point and lattice thermal expansion of nanoparticle materials

    SciTech Connect

    Omar, M.S.

    2012-11-15

    Graphical abstract: Three models are derived to explain the nanoparticles size dependence of mean bonding length, melting temperature and lattice thermal expansion applied on Sn, Si and Au. The following figures are shown as an example for Sn nanoparticles indicates hilly applicable models for nanoparticles radius larger than 3 nm. Highlights: ► A model for a size dependent mean bonding length is derived. ► The size dependent melting point of nanoparticles is modified. ► The bulk model for lattice thermal expansion is successfully used on nanoparticles. -- Abstract: A model, based on the ratio number of surface atoms to that of its internal, is derived to calculate the size dependence of lattice volume of nanoscaled materials. The model is applied to Si, Sn and Au nanoparticles. For Si, that the lattice volume is increases from 20 Å{sup 3} for bulk to 57 Å{sup 3} for a 2 nm size nanocrystals. A model, for calculating melting point of nanoscaled materials, is modified by considering the effect of lattice volume. A good approach of calculating size-dependent melting point begins from the bulk state down to about 2 nm diameter nanoparticle. Both values of lattice volume and melting point obtained for nanosized materials are used to calculate lattice thermal expansion by using a formula applicable for tetrahedral semiconductors. Results for Si, change from 3.7 × 10{sup −6} K{sup −1} for a bulk crystal down to a minimum value of 0.1 × 10{sup −6} K{sup −1} for a 6 nm diameter nanoparticle.

  16. Synthesis of low-melting-point metallic nanoparticles with an ultrasonic nanoemulsion method.

    PubMed

    Han, Z H; Yang, B; Qi, Y; Cumings, J

    2011-05-01

    A one-step, economical nanoemulsion method has been introduced to synthesize low-melting-point metallic nanoparticles. This nanoemulsion technique exploits the extremely high shear rates generated by the ultrasonic agitation and the relatively large viscosity of the continuous phase - polyalphaolefin (PAO), to rupture the molten metal down to diameter below 100 nm. Field's metal nanoparticles and Indium nanoparticles of respective average diameters of 15 nm and 30 nm have been obtained. The nanoparticles size and shape are determined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Their phase transition behavior is examined using a differential scanning calorimeter (DSC). It is found that these nanoparticles dispersed in PAO can undergo reversible, melting-freezing phase transition, and exhibit a relatively large hysteresis. The experimental results suggest that the nanoemulsion method is a viable route for mass production of low-melting nanoparticles.

  17. New Approach in Filling of Fixed-Point Cells: Case Study of the Melting Point of Gallium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bojkovski, J.; Hiti, M.; Batagelj, V.; Drnovšek, J.

    2008-02-01

    The typical way of constructing fixed-point cells is very well described in the literature. The crucible is loaded with shot, or any other shape of pure metal, inside an argon-filled glove box. Then, the crucible is carefully slid into a fused-silica tube that is closed at the top with an appropriate cap. After that, the cell is removed from the argon glove box and melted inside a furnace while under vacuum or filled with an inert gas like argon. Since the metal comes as shot, or in some other shape such as rods of various sizes, and takes more volume than the melted material, it is necessary to repeat the procedure until a sufficient amount of material is introduced into the crucible. With such a procedure, there is the possibility of introducing additional impurities into the pure metal with each cycle of melting the material and putting it back into the glove box to fill the cell. Our new approach includes the use of a special, so-called dry-box system, which is well known in chemistry. The atmosphere inside the dry box contains less than 20 ppm of water and less than 3 ppm of oxygen. Also, the size of the dry box allows it to contain a furnace for melting materials, not only for gallium but for higher-temperature materials as well. With such an approach, the cell and all its parts (pure metal, graphite, fused-silica tube, and cap) are constantly inside the controlled atmosphere, even while melting the material and filling the crucible. With such a method, the possibility of contaminating the cell during the filling process is minimized.

  18. 'Magic numbers' in the melting of a cluster of point charges on a sphere

    SciTech Connect

    Livshits, A. M. Lozovik, Yu. E.

    2010-11-15

    The thermodynamic properties of a cluster of point Coulomb charges on a sphere have been analyzed using the Monte Carlo method for the number of charges 20 {<=} N {<=} 90. The ground state of the system of charges is described in the model of a closed quasi-two-dimensional triangular lattice with topological defects. We have determined the dependence of the Lindeman parameter {delta}{sub L} of this system on N and on the dimensionless parameter, which is proportional to the temperature T and to the radius R of the cluster, where element is the dielectric constant of the medium and the charge of a particle. The 'magic numbers,' i.e., the N values, for which the melting point of the closed triangular lattice of charges is much higher than those for neighboring N values, have been found. The evolution of the lattice-melting mechanisms with an increase in the number of charges N in a mesoscopic cluster has been analyzed. For N {<=} 32, the melting of the lattice does not involve dislocations (nontopological melting); this behavior of the mesoscopic system of charges on the sphere differs from the behavior of the extended planar two-dimensional system. At N {>=} 50, melting is accompanied by the formation of dislocations. The mechanism of dislocation-free non-topological melting of a closed lattice, which occurs at small N values and is associated with the cooperative rotational motion of 'rings' of particles, has been analyzed. The model has various implementations in the mesoscopic region; in particular, it describes the system of electrons over the liquid-helium cluster, the liquid-helium cluster with incorporated charged particles, a multielectron bubble in liquid helium, a charged quantum dot, etc.

  19. Development of quantitative structure property relationships for predicting the melting point of energetic materials.

    PubMed

    Morrill, Jason A; Byrd, Edward F C

    2015-11-01

    The accurate prediction of the melting temperature of organic compounds is a significant problem that has eluded researchers for many years. The most common approach used to develop predictive models entails the derivation of quantitative structure-property relationships (QSPRs), which are multivariate linear relationships between calculated quantities that are descriptors of molecular or electronic features and a property of interest. In this report the derivation of QSPRs to predict melting temperatures of energetic materials based on descriptors calculated using the AM1 semiempirical quantum mechanical method are described. In total, the melting points and experimental crystal structures of 148 energetic materials were analyzed. Principal components analysis was performed in order to assess the relative importance and roles of the descriptors in our QSPR models. Also described are the results of k means cluster analysis, performed in order to identify natural groupings within our study set of structures. The QSPR models resulting from these analyses gave training set R(2) values of 0.6085 (RMSE = ± 15.7 °C) and 0.7468 (RMSE = ± 13.2 °C). The test sets for these clusters had R(2) values of 0.9428 (RMSE = ± 7.0 °C) and 0.8974 (RMSE = ± 8.8 °C), respectively. These models are among the best melting point QSPRs yet published for energetic materials.

  20. Physics of solid and liquid alkali halide surfaces near the melting point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zykova-Timan, Tatyana; Ceresoli, Davide; Tartaglino, Ugo; Tosatti, Erio

    2006-03-01

    NaCl (and other alkali halide) crystal surfaces have the peculiar property of repelling their own melt. As a result they let themselves be wetted only partially by their own liquid at the melting point TM. We recently investigated the physical reasons for this unusual behavior. We found them through theory and molecular dynamics simulation to stem from the conspiracy of three factors. First, the solid NaCl(100) surface is exceptionally anharmonic,but also exceptionally stable. It can in fact survive even well above the melting point, for unlike most other surfaces it does not spontaneously melt. Second, the solid-liquid interface is very costly, due to a 27% density difference between solid and liquid. Third, the surface tension of liquid NaCl is relatively high. This last feature is due to an unexpected entropy deficit, that can in turn be traced to incipient molecular charge order in the outermost regions of the molten salt surface[1,2].[1] T. Zykova-Timan, D. Ceresoli, U. Tartaglino, E. Tosatti, Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 176105 (2005) [2] T. Zykova-Timan, D. Ceresoli, U. Tartaglino, E. Tosatti, J. Chem. Phys. 123, 164701 (2005)

  1. 46 CFR 153.488 - Design and equipment for tanks carrying high melting point NLSs: Category B.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... equipment for tanks carrying high melting point NLSs: Category B. Unless waived under § 153.491, for a ship... a Category B NLS with a melting point of 15 °C or more, the cargo tank must have— (a) An arrangement... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Design and equipment for tanks carrying high...

  2. 46 CFR 153.488 - Design and equipment for tanks carrying high melting point NLSs: Category B.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... equipment for tanks carrying high melting point NLSs: Category B. Unless waived under § 153.491, for a ship... a Category B NLS with a melting point of 15 °C or more, the cargo tank must have— (a) An arrangement... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Design and equipment for tanks carrying high...

  3. 46 CFR 153.488 - Design and equipment for tanks carrying high melting point NLSs: Category B.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... equipment for tanks carrying high melting point NLSs: Category B. Unless waived under § 153.491, for a ship... a Category B NLS with a melting point of 15 °C or more, the cargo tank must have— (a) An arrangement... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Design and equipment for tanks carrying high...

  4. 46 CFR 153.488 - Design and equipment for tanks carrying high melting point NLSs: Category B.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... equipment for tanks carrying high melting point NLSs: Category B. Unless waived under § 153.491, for a ship... a Category B NLS with a melting point of 15 °C or more, the cargo tank must have— (a) An arrangement... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Design and equipment for tanks carrying high...

  5. 46 CFR 153.488 - Design and equipment for tanks carrying high melting point NLSs: Category B.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... equipment for tanks carrying high melting point NLSs: Category B. Unless waived under § 153.491, for a ship... a Category B NLS with a melting point of 15 °C or more, the cargo tank must have— (a) An arrangement... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Design and equipment for tanks carrying high...

  6. A Comprehensive Evaluation of the Melting Points of Fatty Acids and Esters Determined by Differential Scanning Calorimetry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The melting point is one of the most important physical properties of a chemical compound and plays a significant role in determining possible applications. For fatty acid esters the melting point is essential for a variety of food and non-food applications, the latter including biodiesel and its c...

  7. Unravelling the Role of the Compressed Gas on Melting Point of Liquid Confined in Nanospace.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shimou; Liu, Yusheng; Fu, Haiying; He, Yaxing; Li, Cheng; Huang, Wei; Jiang, Zheng; Wu, Guozhong

    2012-04-19

    Phase behaviors of the liquids in nanospaces are of particular interest to understand the thermodynamics of the liquid on the nanoscale and for their applications that involve the confined systems. However, in many cases, the inconsistent observations of melting point variation for confined liquids are often revealed by different groups. Ionic liquids are a special kind of liquid. Here, by using the merits of the nonvolatile nature of ionic liquids, we realized the encapsulation of ionic liquids inside of mesopores silica oxide nanoparticles with a complete removal of compressed gas under high-vacuum condition; the completely confined ionic liquid formed a crystalline-like phase. It was found that compressed gas plays an important role in changing the melting point of the confined ionic liquid.

  8. The Melting Point of Palladium Using Miniature Fixed Points of Different Ceramic Materials: Part I—Principles and Performances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edler, F.; Huang, K.

    2016-12-01

    Fifteen miniature fixed-point cells made of three different ceramic crucible materials (Al2O3, ZrO2, and Al2O3 (86 %)+ZrO2 (14 %)) were filled with pure palladium and used for the calibration of type B thermocouples (Pt30%Rh/Pt6%Rh). The melting behavior of the palladium was investigated by using different high-temperature furnaces usable in horizontal and vertical positions. It was found that the electromotive forces measured at the melting temperature of palladium are consistent with a temperature equivalent of ±0.25 K when using a furnace with an adequate temperature homogeneity (±1 K over a length of 12 cm), independent of the ceramic crucible materials. The emfs measured in the one-zone furnaces with larger temperature gradients along the crucibles are sensitive related to the position of the crucibles in the temperature gradient of these furnaces. This is caused by higher parasitic heat flux effects which can cause measurement errors up to about {-}(1 {-}2) K, depending on the thermal conductivity of the ceramic material. It was found that the emfs measured by using crucibles with lower thermal conductivity (ZrO2) were less dependent on parasitic heat flux effects than crucibles made of material of higher thermal conductivity (Al2O3). The investigated miniature fixed points are suitable for the repeatable realization of the melting point of palladium to calibrate noble metal thermocouples without the disadvantages of the wire-bridge method or the wire-coil method.

  9. Draft report on melt point as a function of composition for urania-based systems

    SciTech Connect

    Valdez, James A; Byler, Darrin D

    2012-06-08

    This report documents the testing of a urania (UO{sub 2.00}) sample as a baseline and the attempt to determine the melt point associated with 4 compositions of urania-ceria and urania-neodymia pseudo binaries provided by ORNL, with compositions of 95/5, and 80/20 and of (U/Ce)O{sub 2.00} and (U/Nd)O{sub 2.00} in the newly developed ceramic melt point determination system. A redesign of the system using parts fabricated from tungsten was undertaken in order to help prevent contamination and tungsten carbide formation in the crucibles. The previously developed system employed mostly graphite parts that were shown to react with the sample containment black-body crucible leading to unstable temperature readings and crucible failure, thus the redesign. Measured melt point values of UO{sub 2.00} and U{sub 0.95}Ce{sub 0.05}O{sub 2.00}, U{sub 0.80}Ce{sub 0.20}O{sub 2.00}, U{sub 0.95}Nd{sub 0.05}O{sub 2.00} and U{sub 0.80}Nd{sub 0.20}O{sub 2.00} were measured using a 2-color pyrometer. The value measured for UO{sub 2.00} was consistent with the published accepted value 2845 C {+-} 25 C, although a wide range of values has been published by researchers and will be discussed later in the text. For comparison, values obtained from a published binary phase diagram of UO{sub 2}-Nd{sub 2}O{sub 3} were used for comparison with our measure values. No literature melt point values for comparison with the measurements performed in this study were found for (U/Ce)O{sub 2.00} in our stoichiometry range.

  10. Melting point equations for the ternary system water/sodium chloride/ethylene glycol revisited.

    PubMed

    Benson, James D; Bagchi, Aniruddha; Han, Xu; Critser, John K; Woods, Erik J

    2010-12-01

    Partial phase diagrams are of considerable utility in the development of optimized cryobiological procedures. Recent theoretical predictions of the melting points of ternary solutions of interest to cryobiology have caused us to re-examine measurements that our group made for the ethylene-glycol-sodium chloride-water phase diagram. Here we revisit our previous experiments by measuring melting points at five ethylene-glycol to sodium chloride ratios (R values; R=5, 10, 15, 30, and 45) and five levels of concentration for each ratio. Melting points were averaged from three measurements and plotted as a function of total solute concentration for each R value studied. The new measurements differed from our original experimental values and agreed with predicted values from both theoretical models. Additionally, the data were fit to the polynomial described in our previous report and the resulting equation was obtained: T(m) = (38.3-2.145 x 10⁻¹ R)w + (81.19 - 2.909×10⁻¹ R)w², where w is the total solute mass fraction. This new equation provided good fits to the experimental data as well as published values and relates the determined polynomial constants to the R value of the corresponding isopleths of the three dimensional phase diagram, allowing the liquids curve for any R value to be obtained.

  11. Growth of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes by High Melting Point Metal Oxide Catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Yang; Xiang, Rong; An, Hua; Inoue, Taiki; Chiashi, Shohei; Maruyama, Shigeo

    We report on the growth of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) from Co oxide catalysts. The concept is using the relatively lower mobility of metal oxide (than metal) to suppress catalyst aggregation at high temperatures. Compared to the SWNTs grown by pre-reduced catalysts, SWNTs grown from oxidized Co catalysts have shown narrower diameter distribution and smaller average diameter. Different growth parameters are discussed regarding the resulting morphology of SWNTs. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) investigations reveal the information that Co catalysts are transformed to Co3O4 after reduction-calcination process. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) investigations indicate that Co3O4 has decomposed to CoO before growth at a typical growth temperature (800 ºC) in Ar atmosphere. We propose that CoO has higher melting point than Co and thus is more stable during the growth. Our results indicate that besides the bimetallic catalysts, monometallic catalytic system could also be useful in stabilizing the catalysts to grow chirality-specific SWNTs by transforming the relatively low melting point metal catalysts to high melting point metal oxide catalysts. Yang Qian was supported through ``Global Leader Program for Social Design and Management''.

  12. Liposome fluidization and melting point depression by pressurized CO2 determined by fluorescence anisotropy.

    PubMed

    Bothun, Geoffrey D; Knutson, Barbara L; Strobel, Herbert J; Nokes, Sue E

    2005-01-18

    The influence of CO2 on the bilayer fluidity of liposomes, which are representative of model cellular membranes, was examined for the first time at the elevated pressures (up to 13.9 MPa) associated with CO2-based processing of liposomes and microbial sterilization. Fluidization and melting point depression of aqueous dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) liposomes by pressurized CO2 (present as an excess phase) were studied by steady-state fluorescence anisotropy using the membrane probe 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene (DPH). Isothermal experiments revealed reversible, pressure-dependent fluidization of DPPC bilayers at temperatures corresponding to near-gel (295 K) and fluid (333 K) phases at atmospheric pressure, where the gel-to-fluid phase transition (Tm) occurs at approximately 315 K. Isobaric measurements (PCO2 =1.8, 7.0, and 13.9 MPa) of DPH anisotropy demonstrate substantial melting point depression (DeltaTm = -4.8 to -18.5 K) and a large broadening of the gel-fluid phase transition region, which were interpreted using conventional theories of melting point depression. Liposome fluidity is influenced by CO2 accumulation in the hydrocarbon core and polar headgroup region, as well as the formation of carbonic acid and/or the presence of buffering species under elevated CO2 pressure.

  13. Evaluation of sustained release suppositories prepared with fatty base including solid fats with high melting points.

    PubMed

    Takatori, Toshihito; Shimono, Norihito; Higaki, Kazutaka; Kimura, Toshikiro

    2004-07-08

    To prepare the sustained release suppositories, solid fats such as polyglycerol ester of fatty acids (PGEFs) or beeswax were utilized with a fatty suppository base, Witepsol H15. PGEFs such as decaglycerol heptabehenate (HB750) and hexaglycerol pentastearate (PS500), and beeswax have relatively high melting points. The addition of PGEFs or beeswax to Witepsol H15 increased the apparent viscosity of suppository bases at 37 degrees C without any large change in the melting point of Witepsol H15. Moreover, the apparent viscosity of a mixed base with HB750, PS500 or beeswax at 37 degrees C was significantly correlated with the amount of each solid fat in a mixed base. The release of acetaminophen (AAP), a model drug, from suppositories was delayed by HB750, PS500 or beeswax, and an excellent correlation was observed between the apparent viscosity of these mixed bases and Higuchi's rate constants in each mixed base suppository, suggesting that these solid fats could regulate the drug release from the mixed base suppositories by changing their viscosity. In the in vivo absorption study in rats, several suppositories made from Witepsol H15-HB750 or Witepsol H15-beeswax mixed bases prolonged the rectal absorption of AAP without reducing AUC. In conclusion, by using solid fats such as HB750 and beeswax with relatively high melting points, it is possible to control the rate of drug release from fatty base suppositories for maintaining the plasma concentration of drugs for longer time periods.

  14. Molecular dynamics study of the effect of alkyl chain length on melting points of [CnMIM][PF6] ionic liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y; Maginn, EJ

    2014-01-01

    Based on molecular dynamics simulations, the melting points T-m of a series of 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate ionic liquids [CnMIM][PF6] with n = 2, 4, 10, 12, and 14 were studied using the free energy-based pseudosupercritical path (PSCP) method. The experimental trend that the Tm decreases with increasing alkyl chain length for ILs with short alkyl chains and increases for the ones with long alkyl chains was correctly captured. Further analysis revealed that the different trends are the results of the balance between fusion enthalpy and fusion entropy. For the ILs with short alkyl chains (ethyl and butyl groups), fusion entropy plays the dominant role so that [C4MIM][PF6], which has a larger fusion entropy due to its higher liquid phase entropy has the lower melting temperature. As for the ILs with long alkyl chains, due to the enhanced van der Waals interactions brought about by the long non-polar alkyl chains, enthalpy becomes the deciding factor and the melting points increase when the alkyl chain goes from C10 to C14. While the melting points for [C2MIM][PF6] and [C4MIM][PF6] were quantitatively predicted and the trends for the long chain ILs were captured correctly, the absolute melting points for [C10MIM][PF6], [C12MIM][PF6] and [C14MIM][PF6] were systematically overestimated in the simulations. Three possible reasons for the overestimation were studied but all ruled out. Further simulation or experimental studies are needed to explain the difference.

  15. Melting Point Depression and Fast Diffusion in Nanostructured Brazing Fillers Confined Between Barrier Nanolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaptay, G.; Janczak-Rusch, J.; Jeurgens, L. P. H.

    2016-08-01

    Successful brazing using Cu-based nanostructured brazing fillers at temperatures much below the bulk melting temperature of Cu was recently demonstrated (Lehmert et al. in, Mater Trans 56:1015-1018, 2015). The Cu-based nano-fillers are composed of alternating nanolayers of Cu and a permeable, non-wetted AlN barrier. In this study, a thermodynamic model is derived to estimate the melting point depression (MPD) in such Cu/AlN nano-multilayers (NMLs) as function of the Cu nanolayer thickness. Depending on the melting route, the model predicts a MPD range of 238-609 K for Cu10nm/AlN10nm NMLs, which suggests a heterogeneous pre-melting temperature range of 750-1147 K (476-874 °C), which is consistent with experimental observations. As suggested by basic kinetic considerations, the observed Cu outflow to the NML surface at the temperatures of 723-1023 K (450-750 °C) can also be partially rationalized by fast solid-state diffusion of Cu along internal interfaces, especially for the higher temperatures.

  16. Melting point and phase diagram of methanol as obtained from computer simulations of the OPLS model.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez Salgado, D; Vega, C

    2010-03-07

    In this work, the melting point and the phase diagram of methanol is determined via computer simulations using the OPLS model. The three different solid structures that are found experimentally were considered. By computing the free energies of both the fluid phase and the three different solid structures (alpha, beta, gamma), the initial solid-solid and fluid-solid coexistence points were determined. By performing Gibbs-Duhem integration, the complete coexistence lines were evaluated. In this way, it was possible to compute, for the first time, the complete phase diagram for a potential model of methanol. It is found that the optimized potential model for liquid simulations (OPLS) provides reasonable predictions for the densities of the three solid polymorphs, although they tend to be somewhat low when compared with the experiment. Overall the model provides a qualitatively correct description of the phase diagram of methanol. The beta solid, which is thermodynamically stable in the experimental phase diagram of methanol, is found to be metastable in the phase diagram of the model. The alpha phase is stable at low pressures and the gamma phase is stable at high pressures, in agreement with experiment. Thus, the model is able to predict the existence of the gamma solid at high pressure. From free energy calculations we found that the melting point of the model at room pressure is 215 K. That was further confirmed by direct coexistence simulations. Thus, the model presents a melting point about 40 K above the experimental value of 175 K. Thus the OPLS model provides a reasonable description of the phase diagram of methanol, but it could probably be modified to improve the phase diagram predictions.

  17. Melting point and phase diagram of methanol as obtained from computer simulations of the OPLS model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez Salgado, D.; Vega, C.

    2010-03-01

    In this work, the melting point and the phase diagram of methanol is determined via computer simulations using the OPLS model. The three different solid structures that are found experimentally were considered. By computing the free energies of both the fluid phase and the three different solid structures (α,β,γ), the initial solid-solid and fluid-solid coexistence points were determined. By performing Gibbs-Duhem integration, the complete coexistence lines were evaluated. In this way, it was possible to compute, for the first time, the complete phase diagram for a potential model of methanol. It is found that the optimized potential model for liquid simulations (OPLS) provides reasonable predictions for the densities of the three solid polymorphs, although they tend to be somewhat low when compared with the experiment. Overall the model provides a qualitatively correct description of the phase diagram of methanol. The β solid, which is thermodynamically stable in the experimental phase diagram of methanol, is found to be metastable in the phase diagram of the model. The α phase is stable at low pressures and the γ phase is stable at high pressures, in agreement with experiment. Thus, the model is able to predict the existence of the γ solid at high pressure. From free energy calculations we found that the melting point of the model at room pressure is 215 K. That was further confirmed by direct coexistence simulations. Thus, the model presents a melting point about 40 K above the experimental value of 175 K. Thus the OPLS model provides a reasonable description of the phase diagram of methanol, but it could probably be modified to improve the phase diagram predictions.

  18. Absolute determination of the gelling point of gelatin under quasi-thermodynamic equilibrium.

    PubMed

    Bellini, Franco; Alberini, Ivana; Ferreyra, María G; Rintoul, Ignacio

    2015-05-01

    Thermodynamic studies on phase transformation of biopolymers in solution are useful to understand their nature and to evaluate their technological potentials. Thermodynamic studies should be conducted avoiding time-related phenomena. This condition is not easily achieved in hydrophilic biopolymers. In this contribution, the simultaneous effects of pH, salt concentration, and cooling rate (Cr) on the folding from random coil to triple helical collagen-like structures of gelatin were systematically studied. The phase transformation temperature at the absolute invariant condition of Cr = 0 °C/min (T(T)Cr=0) ) is introduced as a conceptual parameter to study phase transformations in biopolymers under quasi-thermodynamic equilibrium and avoiding interferences coming from time-related phenomena. Experimental phase diagrams obtained at different Cr are presented. The T(T)(Cr=0) compared with pH and TT(Cr=0) compared with [NaCl] diagram allowed to explore the transformation process at Cr = 0 °C/min. The results were explained by electrostatic interactions between the biopolymers and its solvation milieu.

  19. Fluid-fluid-solid triple point on melting curves at high temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norman, G. E.; Saitov, I. M.

    2016-11-01

    An analysis is presented of experimental data where fluid-fluid phase transitions are observed for different substances at high temperatures with triple points on melting curves. Viscosity drops point to the structural character of the transition, whereas conductivity jumps remind of both semiconductor-to-metal and plasma nature. The slope of the phase equilibrium dependencies of pressure on temperature and the consequent change of the specific volume, which follows from the Clapeyron-Clausius equation, are discussed. P(V, T) surfaces are presented and discussed for the phase transitions considered in the vicinity of the triple points. The cases of abnormal P(T) dependencies on curves of phase equilibrium are in the focus of discussion. In particular, a P(V, T) surface is presented when both fluid-fluid and melting P(T) curves are abnormal. Particular attention is paid to warm dense hydrogen and deuterium, where remarkable contradictions exist between data of different authors. The possible connection of the P(V, T) surface peculiarities with the experimental data uncertainties is outlined.

  20. Microneedle pretreatment enhances the percutaneous permeation of hydrophilic compounds with high melting points

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Two commercially available microneedle rollers with a needle length of 200 μm and 300 μm were selected to examine the influence of microneedle pretreatment on the percutaneous permeation of four non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (diclofenac, ibuprofen, ketoprofen, paracetamol) with different physicochemical drug characteristics in Franz-type diffusion cells. Samples of the receptor fluids were taken at predefined times over 6 hours and were analysed by UV–VIS high-performance liquid-chromatography. Histological examinations after methylene blue application were additionally performed to gather information about barrier disruption. Results Despite no visible pores in the stratum corneum, the microneedle pretreatment resulted in a twofold (200 μm) and threefold higher (300 μm) flux through the pretreated skin samples compared to untreated skin samples for ibuprofen and ketoprofen (LogKow > 3, melting point < 100°C). The flux of the hydrophilic compounds diclofenac and paracetamol (logKow < 1, melting point > 100°C) increased their amount by four (200 μm) to eight (300 μm), respectively. Conclusion Commercially available microneedle rollers with 200–300 μm long needles enhance the drug delivery of topically applied non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and represent a valuable tool for percutaneous permeation enhancement particularly for substances with poor permeability due to a hydrophilic nature and high melting points. PMID:22947102

  1. Below melting point photothermal reshaping of single gold nanorods driven by surface diffusion.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Adam B; Siddiquee, Arif M; Chon, James W M

    2014-12-23

    Plasmonic gold nanorod instability and reshaping behavior below melting points are important for many future applications but are yet to be fully understood, with existing nanoparticle melting theories unable to explain the observations. Here, we have systematically studied the photothermal reshaping behavior of gold nanorods irradiated with femtosecond laser pulses to report that the instability is driven by curvature-induced surface diffusion rather than a threshold melting process, and that the stability dramatically decreases with increasing aspect ratio. We successfully utilized the surface diffusion model to explain the observations and found that the activation energy for surface diffusion was dependent on the aspect ratio of the rods, from 0.6 eV for aspect ratio of 5 to 1.5 eV for aspect ratio less than 3. This result indicates that the surface atoms are much easier to diffuse around in larger aspect ratio rods than in shorter rods and can induce reshaping at any given temperature. Current plasmonics and nanorod applications with the sharp geometric features used for greater field enhancement will therefore need to consider surface diffusion driven shape change even at low temperatures.

  2. Condensation on (002) graphite of liquid bismuth far below its bulk melting point

    SciTech Connect

    Zayed, M.K.; Elsayed-Ali, H.E.

    2005-11-15

    Condensation of thermally evaporated Bi on (002) graphite, at temperatures of 300-523 K, was studied using in situ reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) and room temperature ex situ atomic force microscopy (AFM). For deposition at temperatures below 415{+-}5 K, transmission RHEED patterns of Bi appeared at an average thickness of {approx}0.5 monolayer (ML). AFM images showed that the film consisted of crystallites in the shape of triangular step pyramids with step heights corresponding to single and double Bi layers in the [111] direction. This morphology indicates crystallization from the vapor. For deposition at higher temperatures, diffuse RHEED patterns appeared independent of the deposited thickness. When these films were cooled, clear transmission patterns of crystalline Bi appeared. After cooling to near room temperature, the melting and solidification behaviors of these films were investigated with RHEED. Upon subsequent heating, the topmost layers of the probed Bi crystallites started to lose long-range order at {approx}10-15 K below the Bi bulk melting point, T{sub 0}=544.52 K. When crystallized from the melt, supercooling by {approx}125 K below T{sub 0} was observed. These results indicate that Bi condensed on graphite in the form of supercooled liquid droplets when the graphite temperature was above 419 K (T{sub 0}-125). Below that temperature, Bi condensed in the solid phase. Bi films crystallized by cooling the liquid had crystal morphologies that depended on the degree of liquid supercooling.

  3. Optical Measurement for Solid- and Liquid-Phase Sb2Te3 around Its Melting Point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuwahara, Masashi; Endo, Rie; Tsutsumi, Kouichi; Morikasa, Fukuyoshi; Tsuruoka, Tohru; Fukaya, Toshio; Suzuki, Michio; Susa, Masahiro; Endo, Tomoyoshi; Tadokoro, Toshiyasu

    2013-11-01

    We have developed a system for measuring the complex refractive index of liquid- and solid-phase chalcogenide around their melting points. The system consists of a spectroscopic ellipsometer, an infrared heating system, and prism optics. As a container for the chalcogenide, we use a customized quartz cell, evacuated to several pascal level to avoid sample degradation. We adopted a measurement configuration that uses access from the bottom side, because a mirror-like surface which is necessary for optical measurement was naturally and easily created at the container bottom by gravity. We succeeded in observing the remarkable difference on the indices between liquid- and solid-phase Sb2Te3.

  4. Relationship Between Ice Nucleation Temperature Depression and Equilibrium Melting Points Depression of Medaka (Oryzias latipes) Embryos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimizuka, Norihito; Suzuki, Toru

    We measured the ice nucleation temperature depression , ΔTf , and equilibrium melting points depression, ΔTm, of Medaka (Oryzias latipes) embryos with different cryoprotectant (ethylene glycol, 1.3-propanediol, 1.4-butanediol, glycerol aqueous solutions) treatments. Our obtained results showed the good relationship between the ΔTf ,and ΔTm all samples. In addition the value of λ , which can be obtained from the linear relationship, ΔTf =λ ΔTm, were confirmed to show correlation with the value of λ , as obtained by the W/O emulsion method.

  5. Ag-nanoparticle fractionation by low melting point agarose gel electrophoresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guarrotxena, Nekane; Braun, Gary

    2012-10-01

    The separation of surface-enhanced raman scattering (SERS)-active Ag-multi-nanoparticle (NP) assemblies by low melting point agarose gel electrophoresis was accomplished here by controlling surface charge using NP capping agents, and the pore size of agarose gel matrix. Detailed transmission electron microscopy analysis of excised gel fractions showed dimers and small clusters to have the greatest SERS activity and a mobility in between the monomers and large aggregates. This strategy enables one to: (1) stabilize small multispherical Ag clusters against further aggregation during purification; (2) fractionate and recover spherical assemblies by nuclearity; and (3) analyze SERS-enhancements for each fraction to optimize purification conditions.

  6. Physics of solid and liquid alkali halide surfaces near the melting point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zykova-Timan, T.; Ceresoli, D.; Tartaglino, U.; Tosatti, E.

    2005-10-01

    This paper presents a broad theoretical and simulation study of the high-temperature behavior of crystalline alkali halide surfaces typified by NaCl(100), of the liquid NaCl surface near freezing, and of the very unusual partial wetting of the solid surface by the melt. Simulations are conducted using two-body rigid-ion Born-Mayer-Huggins-Fumi-Tosi (BMHFT) potentials, with full treatment of long-range Coulomb forces. After a preliminary check of the description of bulk NaCl provided by these potentials, which seems generally good even at the melting point, we carry out a new investigation of solid and liquid surfaces. Solid NaCl(100) is found in this model to be very anharmonic and yet exceptionally stable when hot. It is predicted by a thermodynamic integration calculation of the surface free energy that NaCl(100) should be a well-ordered, nonmelting surface, metastable even well above the melting point. By contrast, the simulated liquid NaCl surface is found to exhibit large thermal fluctuations and no layering order. In spite of that, it is shown to possess a relatively large surface free energy. The latter is traced to a surface entropy deficit, reflecting some kind of surface short-range order. We show that the surface short-range order is most likely caused by the continuous transition of the bulk ionic melt into the vapor, made of NaCl molecules and dimers rather than of single ions. Finally, the solid-liquid interface free energy is derived through Young's equation from direct simulation of partial wetting of NaCl(100) by a liquid droplet. The resulting interface free energy is large, in line with the conspicuous solid-liquid 27% density difference. A partial wetting angle near 50° close to the experimental value of 48° is obtained in the process. It is concluded that three elements, namely, the exceptional anharmonic stability of the solid (100) surface, the molecular short-range order at the liquid surface, and the costly solid-liquid interface, all

  7. Enantiomeric 3-chloromandelic acid system: binary melting point phase diagram, ternary solubility phase diagrams and polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Le Minh, Tam; von Langermann, Jan; Lorenz, Heike; Seidel-Morgenstern, Andreas

    2010-09-01

    A systematic study of binary melting point and ternary solubility phase diagrams of the enantiomeric 3-chloromandelic acid (3-ClMA) system was performed under consideration of polymorphism. The melting point phase diagram was measured by means of thermal analysis, that is, using heat-flux differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The results reveal that 3-ClMA belongs to the racemic compound-forming systems. Polymorphism was found for both the enantiomer and the racemate as confirmed by X-ray powder diffraction analysis. The ternary solubility phase diagram of 3-ClMA in water was determined between 5 and 50 degrees C by the classical isothermal technique. The solubilities of the pure enantiomers are extremely temperature-dependent. The solid-liquid equilibria of racemic 3-ClMA are not trivial due to the existence of polymorphism. The eutectic composition in the chiral system changes as a function of temperature. Further, solubility data in the alternative solvent toluene are also presented.

  8. A novel method of measuring the melting point of animal fats.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, S S; Dawkins, S T; Dawkins, R L

    2014-10-01

    The melting point (TM) of fat is relevant to health, but available methods of determining TM are cumbersome. One of the standard methods of measuring TM for animal and vegetable fats is the slip point, also known as the open capillary method. This method is imprecise and not amenable to automation or mass testing. We have developed a technique for measuring TM of animal fat using the Rotor-Gene Q (Qiagen, Hilden, Germany). The assay has an intra-assay SD of 0.08°C. A single operator can extract and assay up to 250 samples of animal fat in 24 h, including the time to extract the fat from the adipose tissue. This technique will improve the quality of research into genetic and environmental contributions to fat composition of meat.

  9. Thermodynamic temperature assignment to the point of inflection of the melting curve of high-temperature fixed points.

    PubMed

    Woolliams, E R; Anhalt, K; Ballico, M; Bloembergen, P; Bourson, F; Briaudeau, S; Campos, J; Cox, M G; del Campo, D; Dong, W; Dury, M R; Gavrilov, V; Grigoryeva, I; Hernanz, M L; Jahan, F; Khlevnoy, B; Khromchenko, V; Lowe, D H; Lu, X; Machin, G; Mantilla, J M; Martin, M J; McEvoy, H C; Rougié, B; Sadli, M; Salim, S G R; Sasajima, N; Taubert, D R; Todd, A D W; Van den Bossche, R; van der Ham, E; Wang, T; Whittam, A; Wilthan, B; Woods, D J; Woodward, J T; Yamada, Y; Yamaguchi, Y; Yoon, H W; Yuan, Z

    2016-03-28

    The thermodynamic temperature of the point of inflection of the melting transition of Re-C, Pt-C and Co-C eutectics has been determined to be 2747.84 ± 0.35 K, 2011.43 ± 0.18 K and 1597.39 ± 0.13 K, respectively, and the thermodynamic temperature of the freezing transition of Cu has been determined to be 1357.80 ± 0.08 K, where the ± symbol represents 95% coverage. These results are the best consensus estimates obtained from measurements made using various spectroradiometric primary thermometry techniques by nine different national metrology institutes. The good agreement between the institutes suggests that spectroradiometric thermometry techniques are sufficiently mature (at least in those institutes) to allow the direct realization of thermodynamic temperature above 1234 K (rather than the use of a temperature scale) and that metal-carbon eutectics can be used as high-temperature fixed points for thermodynamic temperature dissemination. The results directly support the developing mise en pratique for the definition of the kelvin to include direct measurement of thermodynamic temperature.

  10. Improvements in the realization of the ITS-90 over the temperature range from the melting point of gallium to the freezing point of silver at NIM

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, J.; Zhang, J. T.; Ping, Q.

    2013-09-11

    The temperature primary standard over the range from the melting point of gallium to the freezing point of silver in National institute of Metrology (NIM), China, was established in the early 1990s. The performance of all of fixed-point furnaces degraded and needs to be updated due to many years of use. Nowadays, the satisfactory fixed point materials can be available with the development of the modern purification techniques. NIM plans to use a group of three cells for each defining fixed point temperature. In this way the eventual drift of individual cells can be evidenced by periodic intercomparison and this will increase the reliability in disseminating the ITS-90 in China. This article describes the recent improvements in realization of ITS-90 over temperature range from the melting point of gallium to the freezing point of silver at NIM. Taking advantages of the technological advances in the design and manufacture of furnaces, the new three-zone furnaces and the open-type fixed points were developed from the freezing point of indium to the freezing point of silver, and a furnace with the three-zone semiconductor cooling was designed to automatically realize the melting point of gallium. The reproducibility of the new melting point of gallium and the new open-type freezing points of In, Sn, Zn. Al and Ag is improved, especially the freezing points of Al and Ag with the reproducibility of 0.2mK and 0.5mK respectively. The expanded uncertainty in the realization of these defining fixed point temperatures is 0.34mK, 0.44mK, 0.54mK, 0.60mK, 1.30mK and 1.88mK respectively.

  11. Infrared radiative properties of alumina up to the melting point: A first-principles study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, J. Y.; Xu, M.; Liu, L. H.

    2016-11-01

    The high thermal emission of alumina dominates the radiative heat transfer of rocket exhaust plume. Yet numerous experimental measurements on radiative properties of alumina at high temperatures vary considerably from each other and cannot provide physical insight into the underlying mechanism. In this work, the ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) method and ab initio parameterized Drude model are combined to predict the radiative properties of alumina for temperatures up to 2327 K (the melting point) in the spectral range 1-12 μm. Contributed by different microscopic processes, the optical absorption of alumina in the spectral range 1-4 and 4-12 μm is described by two distinct methods. In the spectral range 4-12 μm, the multi-phonon process mainly contributes to optical absorption and can be simulated by the AIMD method based on the linear response theory. While in the spectral range 1-4 μm, the optical absorption is mainly caused by intrinsic carriers and can be effectively described by the ab initio parameterized Drude model. The first-principles calculations can successfully predict the infrared radiative properties of alumina at high temperatures and well reproduce the literature experiments. Moreover, the theoretical simulations verify that alumina can retain its semiconducting character even in the liquid phase and there emerges sharp increase in the near-infrared optical absorption of alumina upon melting.

  12. Melting heat transfer in stagnation point flow of carbon nanotubes towards variable thickness surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayat, T.; Muhammad, Khursheed; Farooq, M.; Alsaedi, A.

    2016-01-01

    This work concentrates on the mathematical modeling for stagnation point flow of nanofluids over an impermeable stretching sheet with variable thickness. Carbon nanotubes [single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs)] as the nanoparticles are utilized. Water and kerosene oil are taken as the base fluids. Heat transfer through melting effect is discussed. Transformation procedure is adapted to obtain the non-linear ordinary differential equations from the fundamental laws of mass, linear momentum and energy. The optimal values of convergence control parameters and corresponding individual and total residual errors for SWCNTs and MWCNTs are computed by means of homotopy analysis method (HAM) based BVPh 2.0. Characteristics of different involved parameters on the velocity, temperature, skin friction coefficient and Nusselt number are discussed. Higher velocity profile is observed for wall thickness parameter in case of water carbon nanotubes when compared with the kerosene oil carbon nanotubes.

  13. Graphene confinement effects on melting/freezing point and structure and dynamics behavior of water.

    PubMed

    Foroutan, Masumeh; Fatemi, S Mahmood; Shokouh, F

    2016-05-01

    In this work, the melting/freezing point of confined water between two graphene sheets was calculated from the direct coexistence of the solid-liquid interface. Also, molecular dynamics simulation of confined liquid water-ice between two graphene sheets was applied. The phase transition temperature of the confined ice-water mixture was calculated as 240K that was 29K less than the non-confined ice-water system. In order to study the behavior of water molecules at different distances from the graphene sheets, 5 regions were provided using some imaginary planes, located between two graphene sheets. The obtained simulation results showed that water molecules located in the region near each graphene sheet with the thickness of 2nm had a different behavior from other water molecules located in other regions. The results demonstrated that water molecules in the vicinity of graphene sheets had more mean square displacements than those in the middle regions.

  14. Determination of work functions near melting points of refractory metals by using a direct-current arc

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, W. A.; Chapman, G. B., II

    1972-01-01

    Effective work functions of refractory metals at temperatures near their melting points were determined by using a direct-current arc. A metal wire connected as the cathode was melted by striking an arc discharge in an argon atmosphere. A melted sphere was formed with a definite emitting area which was calculated from the sphere diameter measured after terminating the arc. Effective work functions were calculated from the Richardson-Dushman equation by using this emission area. The procedure is experimentally advantageous because surface cleanliness of the specimen is not critical, high vacuum is not required, and the anode-cathode spacing is not critical.

  15. [Rapid quantification of total nitrogen and end-point determination of hide melting in manufacturing of donkey-hide gelatin].

    PubMed

    Han, Hai-Fan; Zhang, Lu; Zhang, Yan; Li, Wen-Long; Qu, Hai-Bin

    2014-03-01

    Hide melting presents itself as one of the most critical processes in the production of donkey-hide gelatin. Here a NIR-based method was established for the rapid analysis of in-process hide melting solutions as well as for end-point determination of this process. Near infrared (NIR) spectra of hide melting solutions were collected in transflective mode. With the contents of total nitrogen determined by the Kjeldahl method as reference values, partial least squares regression (PLSR) was employed to build calibration models between NIR spectra and total nitrogen. Model parameters including wavelength range and PLS factors were optimized to achieve best model performance. Based on the contents of total nitrogen predicted by calibration model, end point of hide melting was determined. The constructed PLS model gave a high correlation coefficient (R2) of 0.991 3 and a root mean square error of prediction (RMSEP) of 0.807 g x L(-1). With the predicted total nitrogen and predefined limit, decisions concerning the proper times of melting were made. This research demonstrated that NIR transflectance spectroscopy could be used to expeditiously determine the contents of total nitrogen which was subsequently chosen as the indictor for determining the end-point of hide melting. The proposed procedure may help avoid unnecessary raw material or energy consumption.

  16. Increase of Unsaturated Fatty Acids (Low Melting Point) of Broiler Fatty Waste Obtained Through Staphylococcus xylosus Fermentation.

    PubMed

    Marques, Roger V; Duval, Eduarda H; Corrêa, Luciara B; Corrêa, Érico K

    2015-11-01

    The increasing rise in the production of meat around the world causes a significant generation of agro-industrial waste--most of it with a low value added. Fatty wastes have the potential of being converted into biodiesel, given the overcome of technological and economical barriers, as well as its presentation in solid form. Therefore, the aim of this work was to investigate the capacity of Staphylococcus xylosus strains to modify the chemical structure of chicken fatty wastes intending to reduce the melting points of the wastes to mild temperatures, thereby breaking new ground in the production of biodiesel from these sources in an economically attractive and sustainable manner. The effects in time of fermentation and concentration of the fat in the medium were investigated, assessing the melting point and profile of fatty acids. The melting temperature showed a decrease of approximately 22 °C in the best operational conditions, due to reduction in the content of saturated fatty acids (high melting point) and increase of unsaturated fatty acids (low melting point).

  17. Melting point trends and solid phase behaviors of model salts with ion size asymmetry and distributed cation charge.

    PubMed

    Lindenberg, E K; Patey, G N

    2015-07-14

    The melting point trends of model salts composed of coarse grain ions are examined using NPT molecular dynamics simulations. The model salts incorporate ion size asymmetry and distributed cation charge, which are two common features in ionic liquids. A series of single-phase and two-phase simulations are done at set temperatures with 50 K intervals for each salt, and the normal melting point is estimated within 50 K. The melting point trends are then established relative to a charge-centered, size symmetric salt with a normal melting point between 1250 K and 1300 K. We consider two sets of size asymmetric salts with size ratios up to 3:1; the melting point trends are different in each set. The lowest melting point we find is between 450 K and 500 K, which is a reduction of over 60% from the charge-centered, size symmetric case. In both sets, we find diversity in the solid phase structures. For all size ratios with small cation charge displacements, the salts crystallize with orientationally disordered cations. When the partial cation charge is far enough off-center in salts with ion size ratios near 1:1, the salts can become trapped in glassy states and have underlying crystal structures that are orientationally ordered. At ion size ratios near 3:1, the salts with large cation charge displacements show premelting transitions at temperatures as low as 300 K. After the premelting transition, these salts exist either as fast ion conductors, where the smaller anions move through a face centered cubic (fcc) cation lattice, or as plastic crystals, where ion pairs rotate on a fcc lattice.

  18. Genome-wide mapping for fatty acid composition and melting point of fat in a purebred Duroc pig population.

    PubMed

    Uemoto, Y; Soma, Y; Sato, S; Ishida, M; Shibata, T; Kadowaki, H; Kobayashi, E; Suzuki, K

    2012-02-01

    The fatty acid composition and melting point of fatty tissue are among the most important economic traits in pig breeding because of their influence on the eating quality of meat. Identifying the quantitative trait locus (QTL) of these traits may help reveal the genetic structure of fatty acid composition and the melting point of fatty tissue and improve meat-quality traits by marker-assisted selection. We conducted whole-genome QTL analysis for fatty acid composition and melting point of inner and outer subcutaneous fat and inter- and intramuscular fat in a purebred Duroc population. A total of 129 markers were genotyped and used for QTL analysis. For fatty acid compositions of inner and outer subcutaneous fat, three significant QTL and 17 suggestive QTL were detected on SSC2, 4, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 14 and 18. For the melting point of inner and outer subcutaneous fat, two significant QTL were detected on the same region of SSC14. For fatty acid compositions of inter- and intramuscular fat, five significant QTL and 13 suggestive QTL were detected on SSC2, 4, 6, 8, 9, 10, 14 and 15. On SSC14, significant QTL for C18:0 and C18:1 of outer subcutaneous fat and intramuscular fat, and melting point of subcutaneous fat, which had high likelihood of odds (LOD) scores (2.67-5.78), were detected in the same region. This study determined QTL affecting fatty acid composition and melting point of different fat tissues in purebred Duroc pigs.

  19. CADASTER QSPR Models for Predictions of Melting and Boiling Points of Perfluorinated Chemicals.

    PubMed

    Bhhatarai, Barun; Teetz, Wolfram; Liu, Tao; Öberg, Tomas; Jeliazkova, Nina; Kochev, Nikolay; Pukalov, Ognyan; Tetko, Igor V; Kovarich, Simona; Papa, Ester; Gramatica, Paola

    2011-03-14

    Quantitative structure property relationship (QSPR) studies on per- and polyfluorinated chemicals (PFCs) on melting point (MP) and boiling point (BP) are presented. The training and prediction chemicals used for developing and validating the models were selected from Syracuse PhysProp database and literatures. The available experimental data sets were split in two different ways: a) random selection on response value, and b) structural similarity verified by self-organizing-map (SOM), in order to propose reliable predictive models, developed only on the training sets and externally verified on the prediction sets. Individual linear and non-linear approaches based models developed by different CADASTER partners on 0D-2D Dragon descriptors, E-state descriptors and fragment based descriptors as well as consensus model and their predictions are presented. In addition, the predictive performance of the developed models was verified on a blind external validation set (EV-set) prepared using PERFORCE database on 15 MP and 25 BP data respectively. This database contains only long chain perfluoro-alkylated chemicals, particularly monitored by regulatory agencies like US-EPA and EU-REACH. QSPR models with internal and external validation on two different external prediction/validation sets and study of applicability-domain highlighting the robustness and high accuracy of the models are discussed. Finally, MPs for additional 303 PFCs and BPs for 271 PFCs were predicted for which experimental measurements are unknown.

  20. A review of the deformation behavior of tungsten at temperatures less than 0.2 of the melting point /K/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, J. R.

    1974-01-01

    The deformation behavior of tungsten at temperatures below 0.2 times the absolute melting temperature is reviewed with primary emphasis on the temperature dependence of the yield stress and the ductile-brittle transition. It is concluded that a model based on the high Peierls stress of tungsten best accounts for the observed mechanical behavior at low temperatures. Recent research suggests an important role of electron concentration and bonding on the mechanical behavior of tungsten. Future research on tungsten should include studies to define more clearly the correlation between electron concentration and mechanical behavior of alloys of tungsten and other transition metal alloys.

  1. Absolute Standards for Climate Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leckey, J.

    2016-10-01

    In a world of changing climate, political uncertainty, and ever-changing budgets, the benefit of measurements traceable to SI standards increases by the day. To truly resolve climate change trends on a decadal time scale, on-orbit measurements need to be referenced to something that is both absolute and unchanging. One such mission is the Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO) that will measure a variety of climate variables with an unprecedented accuracy to definitively quantify climate change. In the CLARREO mission, we will utilize phase change cells in which a material is melted to calibrate the temperature of a blackbody that can then be observed by a spectrometer. A material's melting point is an unchanging physical constant that, through a series of transfers, can ultimately calibrate a spectrometer on an absolute scale. CLARREO consists of two primary instruments: an infrared (IR) spectrometer and a reflected solar (RS) spectrometer. The mission will contain orbiting radiometers with sufficient accuracy to calibrate other space-based instrumentation and thus transferring the absolute traceability. The status of various mission options will be presented.

  2. Properties of new low melting point quaternary ammonium salts with bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide anion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kärnä, Minna; Lahtinen, Manu; Kujala, Anna; Hakkarainen, Pirkko-Leena; Valkonen, Jussi

    2010-11-01

    Eight new monocationic quaternary ammonium (QA) salts with the bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide (TFSI) anion were prepared by metathesis using our previously reported QA halides as precursors. New salts were characterized both in liquid and solid state using 1H and 13C NMR techniques, mass spectroscopy and elemental analysis together with X-ray diffraction and thermoanalytical methods. In addition, residual water content, viscosity and conductivity measurements were made for three of the room-temperature ionic liquids (RTILs). The crystal structures of three compounds were determined by X-ray single crystal diffraction. Powder diffraction was used to study the crystallinity of the solid salts and to compare structural similarities between the single crystals and the microcrystalline bulk powders. Three of the salts are liquid below room temperature, having broad liquid ranges (˜300 °C), and in total five out of eight salts melt below 100 °C. Moreover, powder diffraction data of the two RTILs were able to be measured at sub-ambient temperatures using in situ low-temperature powder X-ray diffraction revealing high crystallinity on both RTILs below their freezing point. The RTILs presented relatively high conductivities (˜0.1-0.2 S m -1) and moderate to relatively low viscosities. The determined physicochemical properties of the reported ILs suggest their applicability on various applications such as heat transfer fluids, high temperature synthesis and lubricants.

  3. Investigation of the Melting Point Depression of 12-Hydroxystearic Acid Organogels Using the Flory Diluent Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavicchi, Kevin; Lipowski, Brian

    2013-03-01

    This talk will focus on the gelation behavior of 12-hydroxystearic acid (12-HSA) in organic solvents. Thermo-reversible gelation occurs by crystallization of 12-HSA in organic solvent to form 3-D fibrillar networks. The melting point vs. composition for 12-HSA in a range of solvents has been measured. The liquidus lines could be fit with the Flory-diluent model that takes into account the non-ideal free energy of mixing and the disparity in the size of the solvent and 12-HSA molecules. The fits indicated that the effective molar volume of 12-HSA increased as the hydrogen bonding Hansen solubility parameter δh of the solvent decreased. This is attributed to the hydrogen-bonding driven aggregation of the 12-HSA in the liquid state based on previous observations that 12-HSA forms aggregated structures in non-polar solvents (e.g. dimers and tetrameters). These results indicate that the stabilization of the solid phase in 12-HSA solutions has contributions from both variations in the entropy of mixing as well the enthalpy of mixing. The importance of both these factors for designing small molecule gelators will be discussed.

  4. Development of a High-Resolution Melting Approach for Scanning Beta Globin Gene Point Mutations in the Greek and Other Mediterranean Populations.

    PubMed

    Chassanidis, Christos; Boutou, Effrossyni; Voskaridou, Ersi; Balassopoulou, Angeliki

    2016-01-01

    Beta-thalassaemia is one of the most common autosomal recessive disorders worldwide. The disease's high incidence, which is observed in the broader Mediterranean area has led to the establishment of molecular diagnostics' assays to prevent affected births. Therefore, the development of a reliable, cost-effective and rapid scanning method for β globin gene point mutations, easily adapted to a routine laboratory, is absolutely essential. Here, we describe, for the first time, the development of a High-Resolution Melting Analysis (HRMA) approach, suitable for scanning the particularly heterogeneous beta globin gene mutations present in the Greek population, and thus adaptable to the Mediterranean and other areas where these mutations have been identified. Within this context, β globin gene regions containing mutations frequently identified in the Greek population were divided in ten overlapping amplicons. Our reactions' setup allowed for the simultaneous amplification of multiple primer sets and partial multiplexing, thereby resulting in significant reduction of the experimental time. DNA samples from β-thalassaemia patients/carriers with defined genotypes were tested. Distinct genotypes displayed distinguishable melting curves, enabling accurate detection of mutations. The described HRMA can be adapted to a high-throughput level. It represents a rapid, simple, cost-effective, reliable, highly feasible and sensitive method for β-thalassaemia gene scanning.

  5. A quantum mechanical quantitative structure-property relationship study of the melting point of a variety of organosilicons.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yi; Holder, Andrew J

    2011-11-01

    We have developed quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR) models that correlate the melting points of chain and cyclic silanes and siloxanes with their molecular structures. A comprehensive correlation was derived for a variety of molecules, but the quality of the comprehensive model was modest at best. This provided the impetus for the development of two additional models focused on silanes and siloxanes, respectively. Statistical analyses confirm the robustness of the refined models, and the chemical interpretation of the descriptors was consistent with effects expected for melting.

  6. Removal of oxides from alkali metal melts by reductive titration to electrical resistance-change end points

    DOEpatents

    Tsang, Floris Y.

    1980-01-01

    Alkali metal oxides dissolved in alkali metal melts are reduced with soluble metals which are converted to insoluble oxides. The end points of the reduction is detected as an increase in electrical resistance across an alkali metal ion-conductive membrane interposed between the oxide-containing melt and a material capable of accepting the alkali metal ions from the membrane when a difference in electrical potential, of the appropriate polarity, is established across it. The resistance increase results from blocking of the membrane face by ions of the excess reductant metal, to which the membrane is essentially non-conductive.

  7. Steady distribution structure of point defects near crystal-melt interface under pulling stop of CZ Si crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, T.; Takahashi, T.; Shirai, K.

    2017-02-01

    In order to reveal a steady distribution structure of point defects of no growing Si on the solid-liquid interface, the crystals were grown at a high pulling rate, which Vs becomes predominant, and the pulling was suddenly stopped. After restoring the variations of the crystal by the pulling-stop, the crystals were then left in prolonged contact with the melt. Finally, the crystals were detached and rapidly cooled to freeze point defects and then a distribution of the point defects of the as-grown crystals was observed. As a result, a dislocation loop (DL) region, which is formed by the aggregation of interstitials (Is), was formed over the solid-liquid interface and was surrounded with a Vs-and-Is-free recombination region (Rc-region), although the entire crystals had been Vs rich in the beginning. It was also revealed that the crystal on the solid-liquid interface after the prolonged contact with the melt can partially have a Rc-region to be directly in contact with the melt, unlike a defect distribution of a solid-liquid interface that has been growing. This experimental result contradicts a hypothesis of Voronkov's diffusion model, which always assumes the equilibrium concentrations of Vs and Is as the boundary condition for distribution of point defects on the growth interface. The results were disscussed from a qualitative point of view of temperature distribution and thermal stress by the pulling-stop.

  8. Characteristics of magnetic field and melting heat transfer in stagnation point flow of Tangent-hyperbolic liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayat, T.; Shafiq, Anum; Alsaedi, A.

    2016-05-01

    This paper examines the influence of melting heat transfer in the stagnation point flow of an incompressible magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) Tangent hyperbolic fluid. Stretched flow by a vertical surface is considered. Inclined nature of magnetic field is taken for an electrically conducting liquid. The resulting non-linear differential systems are computed for the convergent series solutions. Influences of various pertinent parameters like Weissenberg, magnetic, melting, ratio, angle of inclination, mixed convection, Eckert and Prandtl on the velocity and temperature are analyzed. Numerical data for various parameters on skin friction coefficient and local Nusselt number is also examined. It is found that the melting parameter reduces the temperature and thermal boundary layer while it shows opposite behavior for the velocity. Mixed convection has different role in the assisting and opposing flows.

  9. Easy Absolute Values? Absolutely

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Sharon E.; Mittag, Kathleen Cage

    2015-01-01

    The authors teach a problem-solving course for preservice middle-grades education majors that includes concepts dealing with absolute-value computations, equations, and inequalities. Many of these students like mathematics and plan to teach it, so they are adept at symbolic manipulations. Getting them to think differently about a concept that they…

  10. (abstract) The Design of a Benign Fail-safe Mechanism Using a Low-melting-point Metal Alloy Coupler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blomquist, Richard S.

    1995-01-01

    Because the alpha proton X ray spectrometer (APXS) sensor head on the Mars Pathfinder rover, Sojourner, is placed on Martian soil by the deployment mechanism (ADM), the rover would be crippled if the actuator fails when the mechanism is in its deployed position, as rover ground clearance is then reduced to zero. This paper describes the unique fail-safe mounted on the ADM, especially the use of a low-temperature-melting alloy as a coupler device. The final form of the design is a low-melting-point metal pellet coupler, made from Cerrobend, in parallel with a Negator spring pack. In its solid state, the metal rigidly connects the driver (the actuator) and the driven part (the mechanism). When commanded, a strip heater wrapped around the coupler melts the metal pellet (at 60(deg)C), allowing the driven part to turn independent of the driver. The Negator spring retracts the mechanism to its fully stowed position. This concept meets all the design criteria, and provides an added benefit. When the metal hardens the coupler once again rigidly connects the actuator and the mechanism. The concept presented here can easily be applied to other applications. Anywhere release devices are needed, low-melting-point couplers can be considered. The issues to be concerned with are thermal isolation, proper setting of the parts before actuation, and possible outgassing concerns. However, when these issues are overcome, the resulting release mechanism can promise to be the most light, simple, power conserving alternative available.

  11. Genome-wide association study in arabidopsis thaliana of natural variation in seed oil melting point, a widespread adaptive trait in plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Seed oil melting point is an adaptive, quantitative trait determined by the relative proportions of the fatty acids that compose the oil. Micro- and macro-evolutionary evidence suggests selection has changed the melting point of seed oils to co-vary with germination temperatures because of a trade-o...

  12. A preliminary view on adsorption of organics on ice at temperatures close to melting point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Xiangrui; Waldner, Astrid; Orlando, Fabrizio; Artiglia, Luca; Ammann, Markus; Bartels-Rausch, Thorsten

    2016-04-01

    -level spectroscopies to reveal the behaviour of adsorption and dissociation on ice. Additionally, pure ice and amine doped ice will be compared for their surface structure change at different temperatures, which will indicate the differences of surface disordering caused by different factors. For instance, we will have a chance to know better if impurities will cause local disordering, i.e. forming hydration shell, which challenges the traditional picture of a homogenous disordered doped ice surface. The findings of this study could not only improve our understanding of how acidic organics adsorb to ice, and of their chemical properties on ice, but also have potentials to know better the behaviour of pure ice at temperatures approaching to the melting point.

  13. Elevated Levels of High-Melting-Point Phosphatidylglycerols Do Not Induce Chilling Sensitivity in an Arabidopsis Mutant.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, J.; Browse, J.

    1995-01-01

    Molecular species of phosphatidylglycerol that contain only 16:0, 18:0, and 16:1-trans fatty acids undergo the transition from liquid crystalline phase to gel phase at temperatures well above 20[deg]C. Several lines of evidence have been used to implicate elevated proportions of these high-melting-point molecular species as a major cause of plant chilling sensitivity. In the fatty acid biosynthesis 1 (fab1) mutant of Arabidopsis, leaf phosphatidylglycerol contained 43% high-melting-point molecular species[mdash]a higher percentage than is found in many chilling-sensitive plants. Nevertheless, the mutant was completely unaffected (when compared with wild-type controls) by a range of low-temperature treatments that quickly led to the death of cucumber and other chilling-sensitive plants. Our results clearly demonstrate that high-melting-point phosphatidylglycerols do not mediate classic chilling damage. However, growth of fab1 plants was compromised by long-term (>2 weeks) exposure to 2[deg]C. This finding and other observations are consistent with a proposition that plants native to tropical and subtropical regions have evolved many traits that are incompatible with long-term growth or development in cooler climates but that may confer selective advantages at high temperatures. PMID:12242349

  14. Effect of inorganic salts and glucose additives on dose-response, melting point and mass density of genipin gel dosimeters.

    PubMed

    Al-jarrah, A M; Abdul Rahman, Azhar; Shahrim, Iskandar; Razak, Nik Noor Ashikin Nik Ab; Ababneh, Baker; Tousi, Ehsan Taghizadeh

    2016-01-01

    Genipin gel dosimeters are hydrogels infused with a radiation-sensitive material which yield dosimetric information in three dimensions (3D). The effect of inorganic salts and glucose on the visible absorption dose-response, melting points and mass density of genipin gel dosimeters has been experimentally evaluated using 6-MV LINAC photons. As a result, the addition of glucose with optimum concentration of 10% (w/w) was found to improve the thermal stability of the genipin gel and increase its melting point (Tm) by 6 °C accompanied by a slight decrease of dose-response. Furthermore, glucose helps to adjust the gel mass density to obtain the desired tissue-equivalent properties. A drop of Tm was observed when salts were used as additives. As the salt concentration increased, gel Tm decreased. The mass density and melting point of the genipin gel could be adjusted using different amounts of glucose that improved the genipin gel suitability for 3D dose measurements without introducing additional toxicity to the final gel.

  15. Characterization of Low-Melting-Point Sn-Bi-In Lead-Free Solders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qin; Ma, Ninshu; Lei, YongPing; Lin, Jian; Fu, HanGuang; Gu, Jian

    2016-11-01

    Development of lead-free solders with low melting temperature is important for substitution of Pb-based solders to reduce direct risks to human health and the environment. In the present work, Sn-Bi-In solders were studied for different ratios of Bi and Sn to obtain solders with low melting temperature. The microstructure, thermal properties, wettability, mechanical properties, and reliability of joints with Cu have been investigated. The results show that the microstructures of the Sn-Bi-In solders were composed of β-Sn, Bi, and InBi phases. The intermetallic compound (IMC) layer was mainly composed of Cu6Sn5, and its thickness increased slightly as the Bi content was increased. The melting temperature of the solders was around 100°C to 104°C. However, when the Sn content exceeded 50 wt.%, the melting range became larger and the wettability became worse. The tensile strength of the solder alloys and solder joints declined with increasing Bi content. Two fracture modes (IMC layer fracture and solder/IMC mixed fracture) were found in solder joints. The fracture mechanism of solder joints was brittle fracture. In addition, cleavage steps on the fracture surface and coarse grains in the fracture structure were comparatively apparent for higher Bi content, resulting in decreased elongation for both solder alloys and solder joints.

  16. Genome-Wide Association Study in Arabidopsis thaliana of Natural Variation in Seed Oil Melting Point: A Widespread Adaptive Trait in Plants.

    PubMed

    Branham, Sandra E; Wright, Sara J; Reba, Aaron; Morrison, Ginnie D; Linder, C Randal

    2016-05-01

    Seed oil melting point is an adaptive, quantitative trait determined by the relative proportions of the fatty acids that compose the oil. Micro- and macro-evolutionary evidence suggests selection has changed the melting point of seed oils to covary with germination temperatures because of a trade-off between total energy stores and the rate of energy acquisition during germination under competition. The seed oil compositions of 391 natural accessions of Arabidopsis thaliana, grown under common-garden conditions, were used to assess whether seed oil melting point within a species varied with germination temperature. In support of the adaptive explanation, long-term monthly spring and fall field temperatures of the accession collection sites significantly predicted their seed oil melting points. In addition, a genome-wide association study (GWAS) was performed to determine which genes were most likely responsible for the natural variation in seed oil melting point. The GWAS found a single highly significant association within the coding region of FAD2, which encodes a fatty acid desaturase central to the oil biosynthesis pathway. In a separate analysis of 15 a priori oil synthesis candidate genes, 2 (FAD2 and FATB) were located near significant SNPs associated with seed oil melting point. These results comport with others' molecular work showing that lines with alterations in these genes affect seed oil melting point as expected. Our results suggest natural selection has acted on a small number of loci to alter a quantitative trait in response to local environmental conditions.

  17. Transverse dynamics of water across the melting point: A parallel neutron and x-ray inelastic scattering study

    SciTech Connect

    Cunsolo A.; Kodituwakku C.; Bencivenga, F.; Frontzek, M.; Leu, b.M.; Said, A.H.

    2012-05-29

    Joint inelastic neutron and x-ray scattering measurements have been performed on heavy water across the melting point. The spectra bear clear evidence of low- and high-frequency inelastic shoulders related to transverse and longitudinal modes, respectively. Upon increasing the momentum transfer, the spectral shape evolves from a viscoelastic regime, where the low-frequency mode is clearly over-damped, toward an elastic one where its propagation becomes instead allowed. The crossover between the two regimes occurs whenever both the characteristic frequency and the linewidth of the low-frequency mode match the inverse of the structural relaxation time. Furthermore, we observe that the frequency of the transverse mode undergoes a discontinuity across the melting, whose extent reduces upon increasing the exchanged momentum.

  18. Determination of work functions near melting points of refractory metals by using a direct-current arc.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, W. A.; Chapman, G. B., II

    1973-01-01

    A direct-current arc in argon at atmospheric pressure was used to determine effective work functions of refractory metals, including tantalum, tungsten, molybdenum, and niobium. The procedure is experimentally advantageous, because surface cleanliness of the specimen is not critical, high vacuum is not required, and the anode-cathode spacing is not critical. The experimental procedure involves striking an arc to a metal wire cathode to form a melted ball having an emitting area defined by its diameter. The literature melting point of the metal is taken as the emitting temperature. By using these parameters and the known arc current, effective work functions were calculated from the Richardson-Dushman equation. The calculated work functions agree with recommended handbook values to within about 0.1 V and have typical repeatabilities of 0.02 V.

  19. Multiple Solutions of an Unsteady Stagnation-Point Flow with Melting Heat Transfer in a Darcy-Brinkman Porous Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalid Aurangzaib, M.; Bhattacharyya, Krishnendu; Shafie, Sharidan

    2016-06-01

    The characteristics of the unsteady boundary layer flow with melting heat transfer near a stagnation-point towards a flat plate embedded in a DarcyBrinkman porous medium with thermal radiation are investigated. The governing partial differential equations are transformed into self-similar ordinary differential equations by similarity transformations. The transformed self-similar equations are solved numerically using bvp4c from Matlab for several values of the flow parameters. The study reveals that the multiple solutions exist for the decelerating (A < 0) flow, whereas for the accelerating (A ≥ 0) flow, the solution is unique. The results also indicate that the melting phenomenon increases the rate of heat transfer and delays the boundary layer separation. To validate the current numerical results, comparison with available results is made and found to be in a good agreement.

  20. Microstructural Evolution of the Interface Between Pure Titanium and Low Melting Point Zr-Ti-Ni(Cu) Filler Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dongmyoung; Sun, Juhyun; Kang, Donghan; Shin, Seungyoung; Hong, Juhwa

    2014-12-01

    Low melting point Zr-based filler metals with melting point depressants (MPDs) such as Cu and Ni elements are used for titanium brazing. However, the phase transition of the filler metals in the titanium joint needs to be explained, since the main element of Zr in the filler metals differs from that of the parent titanium alloys. In addition, since the MPDs easily form brittle intermetallics, that deteriorate joint properties, the phase evolution they cause needs to be studied. Zr-based filler metals having Cu content from 0 to 12 at. pct and Ni content from 12 to 24 at. pct with a melting temperature range of 1062 K to 1082 K (789 °C to 809 °C) were wetting-tested on a titanium plate to investigate the phase transformation and evolution at the interface between the titanium plate and the filler metals. In the interface, the alloys system with Zr, Zr2Ni, and (Ti,Zr)2Ni phases was easily changed to a Ti-based alloy system with Ti, Ti2Ni, and (Ti,Zr)2Ni phases, by the local melting of parent titanium. The dissolution depths of the parent metal were increased with increasing Ni content in the filler metals because Ni has a faster diffusion rate than Cu. Instead, slow diffusion of Cu into titanium substrate leads to the accumulation of Cu at the molten zone of the interface, which could form undesirable Ti x Cu y intermetallics. This study confirmed that Zr-based filler metals are compatible with the parent titanium metal with the minimum content of MPDs.

  1. High-frequency acoustic modes in liquid gallium at the melting point.

    PubMed

    Scopigno, T; Filipponi, A; Krisch, M; Monaco, G; Ruocco, G; Sette, F

    2002-12-16

    The microscopic dynamics in liquid gallium at melting has been studied by inelastic x-ray scattering. We demonstrate the existence of acousticlike modes up to wave vectors above one-half of the first maximum of the static structure factor, at variance with earlier results from inelastic neutron scattering [F. J. Bermejo et al., Phys. Rev. E 49, 3133 (1994)]. Despite structural (extremely rich polymorphism) and electronic (mixed valence) peculiarities, the collective dynamics is strikingly similar to the one of van der Waals and metallic fluids. This result speaks in favor of the universality of the short time dynamics in monatomic liquids rather than of system-specific dynamics.

  2. Mixing cations with different alkyl chain lengths markedly depresses the melting point in deep eutectic solvents formed from alkylammonium bromide salts and urea.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhengfei; Greaves, Tamar L; Warr, Gregory G; Atkin, Rob

    2017-02-16

    The melting point of a deep eutectic solvent formed from a ternary mixture of ethylammonium bromide (EABr), butylammonium bromide (BABr) and urea is 10 °C, which is almost 40 °C lower than the melting points of binary DESs formed from either EABr:urea or BABr:urea mixtures. This reveals a new route to prepare room temperature DESs via mixing different cations.

  3. High-Frequency Acoustic Modes in Liquid Gallium at the Melting Point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scopigno, T.; Filipponi, A.; Krisch, M.; Monaco, G.; Ruocco, G.; Sette, F.

    2002-12-01

    The microscopic dynamics in liquid gallium at melting has been studied by inelastic x-ray scattering. We demonstrate the existence of acousticlike modes up to wave vectors above one-half of the first maximum of the static structure factor, at variance with earlier results from inelastic neutron scattering [F. J. Bermejo et al.,

    Phys. Rev. EPLEEE81063-651X 49, 3133 (1994)
    ]. Despite structural (extremely rich polymorphism) and electronic (mixed valence) peculiarities, the collective dynamics is strikingly similar to the one of van der Waals and metallic fluids. This result speaks in favor of the universality of the short time dynamics in monatomic liquids rather than of system-specific dynamics.

  4. Printing low-melting-point alloy ink to directly make a solidified circuit or functional device with a heating pen

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lei; Liu, Jing

    2014-01-01

    A new method to directly print out a solidified electronic circuit through low-melting-point metal ink is proposed. A functional pen with heating capability was fabricated. Several typical thermal properties of the alloy ink Bi35In48.6Sn16Zn0.4 were measured and evaluated. Owing to the specifically selected melting point of the ink, which is slightly higher than room temperature, various electronic devices, graphics or circuits can be manufactured in a short period of time and then rapidly solidified by cooling in the surrounding air. The liquid–solid phase change mechanism of the written lines was experimentally characterized using a scanning electron microscope. In order to determine the matching substrate, wettability between the metal ink Bi35In48.6Sn16Zn0.4 and several materials, including mica plate and silicone rubber, was investigated. The resistance–temperature curve of a printed resistor indicated its potential as a temperature control switch. Furthermore, the measured reflection coefficient of a printed double-diamond antenna accords well with the simulated result. With unique merits such as no pollution, no requirement for encapsulation and easy recycling, the present printing approach is an important supplement to current printed electronics and has enormous practical value in the future. PMID:25484611

  5. Printing low-melting-point alloy ink to directly make a solidified circuit or functional device with a heating pen.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Liu, Jing

    2014-12-08

    A new method to directly print out a solidified electronic circuit through low-melting-point metal ink is proposed. A functional pen with heating capability was fabricated. Several typical thermal properties of the alloy ink Bi35In48.6Sn16Zn0.4 were measured and evaluated. Owing to the specifically selected melting point of the ink, which is slightly higher than room temperature, various electronic devices, graphics or circuits can be manufactured in a short period of time and then rapidly solidified by cooling in the surrounding air. The liquid-solid phase change mechanism of the written lines was experimentally characterized using a scanning electron microscope. In order to determine the matching substrate, wettability between the metal ink Bi35In48.6Sn16Zn0.4 and several materials, including mica plate and silicone rubber, was investigated. The resistance-temperature curve of a printed resistor indicated its potential as a temperature control switch. Furthermore, the measured reflection coefficient of a printed double-diamond antenna accords well with the simulated result. With unique merits such as no pollution, no requirement for encapsulation and easy recycling, the present printing approach is an important supplement to current printed electronics and has enormous practical value in the future.

  6. Induction heating pure vapor source of high temperature melting point materials on electron cyclotron resonance ion source.

    PubMed

    Kutsumi, Osamu; Kato, Yushi; Matsui, Yuuki; Kitagawa, Atsushi; Muramatsu, Masayuki; Uchida, Takashi; Yoshida, Yoshikazu; Sato, Fuminobu; Iida, Toshiyuki

    2010-02-01

    Multicharged ions that are needed are produced from solid pure material with high melting point in an electron cyclotron resonance ion source. We develop an evaporator by using induction heating (IH) with multilayer induction coil, which is made from bare molybdenum or tungsten wire without water cooling and surrounding the pure vaporized material. We optimize the shapes of induction coil and vaporized materials and operation of rf power supply. We conduct experiment to investigate the reproducibility and stability in the operation and heating efficiency. IH evaporator produces pure material vapor because materials directly heated by eddy currents have no contact with insulated materials, which are usually impurity gas sources. The power and the frequency of the induction currents range from 100 to 900 W and from 48 to 23 kHz, respectively. The working pressure is about 10(-4)-10(-3) Pa. We measure the temperature of the vaporized materials with different shapes, and compare them with the result of modeling. We estimate the efficiency of the IH vapor source. We are aiming at the evaporator's higher melting point material than that of iron.

  7. Anomalous ultrasonic absorption in alkoxyethanols aqueous solutions near their critical and melting points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Arrigo, G.; Paparelli, A.

    1989-08-01

    Ultrasonic absorption and velocity measurements have been performed in aqueous solutions of ethoxyethanol and n-butoxyethanol in the frequency range of 5-250 MHz and from about 50 °C to the respective melting temperatures (TM). The latter system exhibits a closed loop of miscibility with a LCST at TC=49 °C. The overall behavior of the absorption looks, in general, similar to previously investigated alcohol-water systems and critical binary mixtures. However, it shows two main characteristic features: (a) a noticeable increase of amplitude and dispersion of the peak values as the temperature decreases toward TM; (b) a weak critical anomaly which is seen only at the lowest frequencies and in a narrow temperature interval around TC. A comparison with the frequency and temperature predictions by the Romanov-Solov'ev fluctuation model and by the Ferrell-Bhattacharjee dynamic scaling theory for critical mixtures shows that the observed spectra near TM cannot be explained by critical-like phenomena. The occurrence of pseudocritical fluctuations, which extends their influence from TM to higher temperatures up TC, is suggested.

  8. Liquidus projection of the Ag-Ba-Ge system and melting points of clathrate type-I compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Zeiringer, I.; Grytsiv, A.; Broz, P.

    2012-12-15

    The liquidus and solidus projection has been constructed for the Ag-Ba-Ge system up to 33.3 at% Ba, using electron micro probe analysis (EPMA), X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) and differential thermal analysis (DSC/DTA). Eight different primary crystallization regions were found: (Ge), Ba{sub 8}Ag{sub x}Ge{sub 46-x-y}{open_square}{sub y} ({kappa}{sub I}) ({open_square} is a vacancy), Ba{sub 6}Ag{sub x}Ge{sub 25-x} ({kappa}{sub Ix}), BaGe{sub 2}, Ba(Ag{sub 1-x}Ge{sub x}){sub 2} ({tau}{sub 1}), BaAg{sub 2-x}Ge{sub 2+x} ({tau}{sub 2}) BaAg{sub 5} and (Ag). The ternary invariant reactions have been determined for the region investigated and are the basis for a Schulz-Scheil diagram. The second part of this work provides a comprehensive compilation of melting points of ternary A{sub 8}T{sub x}M{sub 46-x} and quaternary (A=Sr, Ba, Eu; T=Ni, Pd, Pt, Cu, Ag, Au, Zn, Cd, B, Al, Ga; M=Si, Ge, Sn) clathrate type-I compounds and decomposition temperatures of inverse clathrate type-I Ge{sub 38}{l_brace}P,As,Sb{r_brace}{sub 8}{l_brace}Cl,Br,I{r_brace}{sub 8}, Si{sub 46-x}P{sub x}Te{sub y} and tin based compounds. - Graphical Abstract: Partial liquidus projection of the Ag-Ba-Ge system. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The liquidus and solidus projection has been constructed for the Ag-Ba-Ge system up to 33.33 at% Ba. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Eight different primary crystallization fields have been found. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer All the ternary compounds form congruently from the melt. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The ternary invariant reactions have been determined and are the basis for a Schulz-Scheil diagram.

  9. Melting Point Depression of Small Molecules in Cross-linked and Uncross-linked Polyisoprene: Deviations from Flory-Huggins Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Qian; McKenna, Gregory

    2006-03-01

    Thermoporosimetry (TPY) is becoming increasingly used to study nano-scale heterogeneity in polymers. The starting point for TPY is the Gibbs-Thomson (GT) relation between melting point and inverse crystal size. In the case of polymers, the Flory-Huggins (FH) model predicts that there is a depression of melting point due to the mixing of the polymer and the solvent molecules, and this needs to be taken into account. The first step in analysis of heterogeneity size using TPY and the GT equation requires that there be quantitative agreement between FH and the melting points in the uncross-linked rubber. We find that both benzene and hexadecane exhibit excessive melting point depressions in uncross-linked polyisoprene. This may imply that the uncross-linked polymer is divided into `nanoheterogeneities.' We further find that the heat of fusion decreases as polymer concentration increases for the benzene, but not for the hexadecane. To our knowledge this is the first systematic investigation of the validity of melting of small organics in un-cross-linked polymers using the FH expressions.

  10. The effect of C2 substitution on melting point and liquid phase dynamics of imidazolium based-ionic liquids: insights from molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y; Maginn, EJ

    2012-01-01

    Using molecular dynamics simulations, the melting points and liquid phase dynamic properties were studied for four alkyl-imidazolium-based ionic liquids, 1-n-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate ([BMIM][PF6]), 1-n-butyl-2,3-dimethylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate ([BMMIM][PF6]), 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate ([EMIM][PF6]), and 1-ethyl-2,3-dimethylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate ([EMMIM][PF6]), respectively. Experimentally it has been observed that the substitution of a methyl group for a hydrogen at the C2 position of the cation ring leads to an increase in both the melting point and liquid phase viscosity, contrary to arguments that had been made regarding associations between the ions. The melting points of the four ionic liquids were accurately predicted using simulations, as were the trends in viscosity. The simulation results show that the origin of the effect is mainly entropic, although enthalpy also plays an important role.

  11. Radiance Temperatures (in the Wavelength Range 530 to 1500 nm) of Nickel at Its Melting Point by a Pulse-Heating Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaschnitz, E.; McClure, J. L.; Cezairliyan, A.

    1998-11-01

    The radiance temperatures (at seven wavelengths in the range 530 to 1500 nm) of nickel at its melting point were measured by a pulse-heating technique. The method is based on rapid resistive self-heating of the specimen from room temperature to its melting point in less than 1 s and on simultaneously measuring specimen radiance temperatures every 0.5 ms. Melting of the specimen was manifested by a plateau in the radiance temperature-versus-time function for each wavelength. The melting-point radiance temperatures for a given specimen were determined by averaging the measured temperatures along the plateau at each wavelength. The melting-point radiance temperatures for nickel, as determined by averaging the results at each wavelength for 25 specimens, are: 1641 K at 530 nm, 1615 K at 627 nm, 1606 K at 657 nm, 1589 K at 722 nm, 1564 K at 812 nm, 1538 K at 908 nm, and 1381 K at 1500 nm. Based on uncertainties arising from pyrometry and specimen conditions, the combined uncertainty (two standard-deviation level) is about ± 6 K for the reported values in the range 530 to 900 nm and is about ± 8 K for the reported value at 1500 nm.

  12. Intrinsic point defect behavior in silicon crystals during growth from the melt: A model derived from experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, Takao; Takahashi, Toru

    2011-11-01

    During the growth of float-zoning (FZ) and Czochralski (CZ) Si crystals, the temperature distributions from the growth interface were measured using a two-color infrared thermometer for the FZ crystal surfaces and three thermocouples within the CZ bulk crystals. The results showed that the thermal gradient is a decreasing function of the growth rate, which forms the basis of this work. In a comparison of the shape variations in the growth interfaces observed in both FZ and CZ crystals of three different diameters, all of the results were in agreement with the above premise. In consideration of Stefan's condition the premise above is discussed. One of the most important observations is that the region of increasing thermal gradient extends not only to the region grown before but also to the region afterward by stopping the pulling in FZ crystals or lowering the growth rate in CZ crystals. This phenomenon is termed the “BA (before and after) effect”. The growing CZ crystals are detached from the melt and rapidly cooled so that the point defects are frozen. Using the anomalous oxygen precipitation (AOP) phenomenon obtained by the above detaching, which demonstrates the existence of vacancies in the crystal, we found that the growth interface is always filled with vacancies. By increasing the thermal gradient, which can be controlled by lowering the growth rate, the vacancy (AOP) region is reduced, due to the generation of a silicon interstitial-rich region. The ratio of vacancies from the growth interface and silicon interstitials generated by the thermal gradient ultimately determines the nature of the bulk silicon crystal grown from the melt, i.e., with voids, defect-free or with dislocation loops.

  13. Relationships between membrane water molecules and Patman equilibration kinetics at temperatures far above the phosphatidylcholine melting point.

    PubMed

    Vaughn, Alexandra R; Bell, Thomas A; Gibbons, Elizabeth; Askew, Caitlin; Franchino, Hannabeth; Hirsche, Kelsey; Kemsley, Linea; Melchor, Stephanie; Moulton, Emma; Schwab, Morgan; Nelson, Jennifer; Bell, John D

    2015-04-01

    The naphthalene-based fluorescent probes Patman and Laurdan detect bilayer polarity at the level of the phospholipid glycerol backbone. This polarity increases with temperature in the liquid-crystalline phase of phosphatidylcholines and was observed even 90°C above the melting temperature. This study explores mechanisms associated with this phenomenon. Measurements of probe anisotropy and experiments conducted at 1M NaCl or KCl (to reduce water permittivity) revealed that this effect represents interactions of water molecules with the probes without proportional increases in probe mobility. Furthermore, comparison of emission spectra to Monte Carlo simulations indicated that the increased polarity represents elevation in probe access to water molecules rather than increased mobility of relevant bilayer waters. Equilibration of these probes with the membrane involves at least two steps which were distinguished by the membrane microenvironment reported by the probe. The difference in those microenvironments also changed with temperature in the liquid-crystalline phase in that the equilibrium state was less polar than the initial environment detected by Patman at temperatures near the melting point, more polar at higher temperatures, and again less polar as temperature was raised further. Laurdan also displayed this level of complexity during equilibration, although the relationship to temperature differed quantitatively from that experienced by Patman. This kinetic approach provides a novel way to study in molecular detail basic principles of what happens to the membrane environment around an individual amphipathic molecule as it penetrates the bilayer. Moreover, it provides evidence of unexpected and interesting membrane behaviors far from the phase transition.

  14. Freeze substitution followed by low melting point wax embedding preserves histomorphology and allows protein and mRNA localization techniques.

    PubMed

    Durán, Iván; Marí-Beffa, Manuel; Santamaría, Jesús A; Becerra, José; Santos-Ruiz, Leonor

    2011-05-01

    Fixation and embedding are major steps in tissue preservation for histological analysis. However, conventional fixatives like aldehyde-based solutions usually mask tissular epitopes preventing their immunolocalization. Alternative fixation methods used to avoid this drawback, such as cryopreservation, alcohol- or zinc salts-based fixatives do not efficiently preserve tissue and cell morphology. Likewise, paraffin and resin embedding, commonly used for thin sectioning, frequently damage epitopes due to the clearing agents and high temperatures needed along the embedding procedure. Alternatives like cryosectioning avoid the embedding steps but yield sections of poorer quality and are not suitable for all kinds of samples. To overcome these handicaps, we have developed a method that preserves histoarchitecture as well as tissue antigenic properties. This method, which we have named CryoWax, involves freeze substitution of the samples in isopentane and methanol, followed by embedding in low melting point polyester wax. CryoWax has proven efficient in obtaining thin sections of embryos and adult tissues from different species, including amphioxus, zebrafish, and mouse. CryoWax sections displayed optimal preservation of tissue morphology and were successfully immunostained for fixation- and temperature-sensitive antigens. Furthermore, CryoWax has been tested for in situ hybridization application, obtaining positive results.

  15. Liquidus projection of the Ag-Ba-Ge system and melting points of clathrate type-I compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeiringer, I.; Grytsiv, A.; Brož, P.; Rogl, P.

    2012-12-01

    The liquidus and solidus projection has been constructed for the Ag-Ba-Ge system up to 33.3 at% Ba, using electron micro probe analysis (EPMA), X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) and differential thermal analysis (DSC/DTA). Eight different primary crystallization regions were found: (Ge), Ba8AgxGe46-x-y□y (κI) (□ is a vacancy), Ba6AgxGe25-x (κIx), BaGe2, Ba(Ag1-xGex)2 (τ1), BaAg2-xGe2+x (τ2) BaAg5 and (Ag). The ternary invariant reactions have been determined for the region investigated and are the basis for a Schulz-Scheil diagram. The second part of this work provides a comprehensive compilation of melting points of ternary A8TxM46-x and quaternary (A=Sr, Ba, Eu; T=Ni, Pd, Pt, Cu, Ag, Au, Zn, Cd, B, Al, Ga; M=Si, Ge, Sn) clathrate type-I compounds and decomposition temperatures of inverse clathrate type-I Ge38{P,As,Sb}8{Cl,Br,I}8, Si46-xPxTey and tin based compounds.

  16. On-demand multi-batch self-assembly of hybrid MEMS by patterning solders of different melting points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Mei; Lau, W. M.; Yang, Jun

    2007-11-01

    Self-assembly has been widely accepted as the next generation technology for integrating highly dense microelectromechanical systems (MEMS), in particular for complex and hybrid systems composed of sensing, actuating, optical, electronic, mechanical and fluidic components. In addition, some micro components may have the same material, size, shape and binding affinity, but different functions. Ideally, each micro component should bind and can only bind to a designated binding site with no recognition error even for similar sites. Due to the spontaneous nature of 'self'-assembly, challenges remain in controlling this process. In this work, a relatively simple controllable, fluid-based self-assembly method has been demonstrated, which is able to integrate hybrid MEMS in a multi-batch-wise manner. The essence of this method is to pattern solders with different melting points to designated binding sites, and to activate them separately and sequentially, even individually if needed, with appropriate processing steps at adequate temperatures. Thus, self-assembly of MEMS micro components becomes programmable.

  17. Predicting critical temperatures of ionic and non-ionic fluids from thermophysical data obtained near the melting point.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Volker C

    2015-10-14

    In the correlation and prediction of thermophysical data of fluids based on a corresponding-states approach, the critical temperature Tc plays a central role. For some fluids, in particular ionic ones, however, the critical region is difficult or even impossible to access experimentally. For molten salts, Tc is on the order of 3000 K, which makes accurate measurements a challenging task. Room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) decompose thermally between 400 K and 600 K due to their organic constituents; this range of temperatures is hundreds of degrees below recent estimates of their Tc. In both cases, reliable methods to deduce Tc based on extrapolations of experimental data recorded at much lower temperatures near the triple or melting points are needed and useful because the critical point influences the fluid's behavior in the entire liquid region. Here, we propose to employ the scaling approach leading to universal fluid behavior [Román et al., J. Chem. Phys. 123, 124512 (2005)] to derive a very simple expression that allows one to estimate Tc from the density of the liquid, the surface tension, or the enthalpy of vaporization measured in a very narrow range of low temperatures. We demonstrate the validity of the approach for simple and polar neutral fluids, for which Tc is known, and then use the methodology to obtain estimates of Tc for ionic fluids. When comparing these estimates to those reported in the literature, good agreement is found for RTILs, whereas the ones for the molten salts NaCl and KCl are lower than previous estimates by 10%. The coexistence curve for ionic fluids is found to be more adequately described by an effective exponent of βeff = 0.5 than by βeff = 0.33.

  18. Low-melting-point titanium-base brazing alloys. Part 1: Characteristics of two-, three-, and four-component filler metals

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, E.; Chen, C.H.

    1997-12-01

    The melting point, microstructure, phase, and electrochemical behavior of Ti-21Ni-15Cu alloy, together with two-, three-, and four-component low-melting-point titanium-base brazing alloys, are presented in this paper. Five filler metals were selected for the study, in which melting points were measured by differential thermal analysis, phases identified by x-ray diffractometry, and corrosion behaviors tested by potentiodynamic polarization. The experimental results show that the three-component Ti-15Cu-15Ni and the newly developed Ti-21Ni-14Cu alloys exhibit the combination of lower melting point and superior corrosion resistance compared to the two- and four-component titanium alloys, 316L stainless steel, and a Co-Cr-Mo alloy in Hank`s solution at 37 C. On a short time basis, the presence of Ti{sub 2}Ni and Ti{sub 2}Cu intermetallics in the Ti-15Cu-15Ni and Ti-21Ni-14Cu alloys should not be preferentially dissolved in galvanic corrosion with respect to the dissimilar Ti-6Al-4V alloy.

  19. CATALYST-FREE REACTIONS UNDER SOLVENT-FEE CONDITIONS: MICROWAVE-ASSISTED SYNTHESIS OF HETEROCYCLIC HYDRAZONES BELOW THE MELTING POINT OF NEAT REACTANTS: JOURNAL ARTICLE

    EPA Science Inventory

    NRMRL-CIN-1437 Jeselnik, M., Varma*, R.S., Polanc, S., and Kocevar, M. Catalyst-free Reactions under Solvent-fee Conditions: Microwave-assisted Synthesis of Heterocyclic Hydrazones below the Melting Point of Neat Reactants. Published in: Chemical Communications 18:1716-1717 (200...

  20. Fine mapping of porcine SSC14 QTL and SCD gene effects on fatty acid composition and melting point of fat in a Duroc purebred population.

    PubMed

    Uemoto, Y; Nakano, H; Kikuchi, T; Sato, S; Ishida, M; Shibata, T; Kadowaki, H; Kobayashi, E; Suzuki, K

    2012-04-01

    The stearoyl-CoA desaturase (delta-9-desaturase; SCD) gene is a candidate gene for fatty acid composition. It is located on pig SSC14 in a region where quantitative trait loci (QTL) for fatty acid composition were previously detected in a Duroc purebred population. The objective of the present study was to fine map the QTL, to identify polymorphisms of the pig SCD gene and to examine the effects of SCD polymorphisms on fatty acid composition and melting point of fat in the population. The pigs were examined for fatty acid composition and melting point of inner and outer subcutaneous fat and inter- and intramuscular fat; the number of pigs examined was 479-521. Two SNPs (g.-353C>T and g.-233T>C) were identified in the promoter region of the SCD gene and were completely linked in the pigs from the base generation. In all pigs, 19 microsatellite markers and SCD haplotypes were then genotyped. Different statistical models were applied to evaluate the effects of QTL and the possible causality of the SCD gene variants with respect to the QTL. The results show that all significant QTL for C14:0, C18:0, C18:1 and melting point of fat were detected in the same region, located near the SCD gene. The results also show a significant association between SCD haplotypes and fatty acid composition and fat melting point in this population. These results indicate that the haplotype of the SCD gene has a strong effect on fatty acid composition and melting point of fat.

  1. Absolute Zero

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnelly, Russell J.; Sheibley, D.; Belloni, M.; Stamper-Kurn, D.; Vinen, W. F.

    2006-12-01

    Absolute Zero is a two hour PBS special attempting to bring to the general public some of the advances made in 400 years of thermodynamics. It is based on the book “Absolute Zero and the Conquest of Cold” by Tom Shachtman. Absolute Zero will call long-overdue attention to the remarkable strides that have been made in low-temperature physics, a field that has produced 27 Nobel Prizes. It will explore the ongoing interplay between science and technology through historical examples including refrigerators, ice machines, frozen foods, liquid oxygen and nitrogen as well as much colder fluids such as liquid hydrogen and liquid helium. A website has been established to promote the series: www.absolutezerocampaign.org. It contains information on the series, aimed primarily at students at the middle school level. There is a wealth of material here and we hope interested teachers will draw their student’s attention to this website and its substantial contents, which have been carefully vetted for accuracy.

  2. Influence of partial melting on magnetic fabrics of migmatites: evidence from Paleoproterozoic terrains of Pointe Géologie, Terre Adélie (East Antarctica)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bascou, Jérôme; Henry, Bernard; Ménot, René-Pierre; Funaki, Minoru; Barruol, Guilhem

    2014-05-01

    A magnetic structural mapping using Anisotropy of Magnetic Susceptibility (AMS) technique was carried out in Pointe Géologie archipelago (Terre Adélie, East Antarctica) that represents a deep crustal section affected by intensive anatectic processes during Paleoproterozoic times, 1.69 Ga ago. This generated different High Temperature rock types such as: migmatites including leucosomes and melanosomes, coarse-grained pink granites dyke and anatexites. Magnetic mineralogy study shows that oxide minerals are mainly large and solid state deformed grains of magnetite. In the leucosomes, oxides appear more scattered than in the melanosomes and their rounded isometric shape suggests rotations of the former elongated grain during melt segregation. This contrasted magnetite grains distribution will generate specific AMS signatures for melanocratic layers on the one hand and felsic leucosomes, dykes and anatexites on the other hand. The mean magnetic susceptibility (Km) and the anisotropy degree (P') are higher in the gneisses and much lower in granitic samples. Orientation of principal susceptibility axes also differs. In migmatitic gneisses, magnetic foliations are coherent with the local and regional structural pattern. Nevertheless AMS technique provides complementary information on the orientation of lineations when they are difficult to observe in the field. The magnetic lineations are dominantly sub-horizontal in the shear zone while they tend to be vertical in granitic dykes, anatexites and well-defined leucosomes. Such a changing of orientation is related to a rheological contrast between the solid-state deformation suffered by the oxide grains and their reorientation in a viscous flow during the aggregation of felsic melt. Increasing amounts of partial melting lead to a loss of the rock cohesion related to the migration of the melt trough a solid-state made of previously deformed minerals. Thus the former tectonic structures will be progressively erased. Melt

  3. Solubility of NaCl in water and its melting point by molecular dynamics in the slab geometry and a new BK3-compatible force field.

    PubMed

    Kolafa, Jiří

    2016-11-28

    Saturated concentration of rock salt in water is determined by a simulation of brine in contact with a crystal in the slab geometry. The NaCl crystals are rotated to expose facets with higher Miller indices than [001] to brine. The rock salt melting point is obtained by both the standard and adiabatic simulations in the slab geometry with attention paid to finite size effects as well as to a possible influence of facets with higher Miller indices and applied stress. Two force fields are used, the Lennard-Jones-based model by Young and Cheatham with SPC/E water and the Kiss and Baranyai polarizable model with BK3 water. The latter model is refitted to thermomechanical properties of crystal NaCl leading to better values of solubility and the melting point.

  4. Solubility of NaCl in water and its melting point by molecular dynamics in the slab geometry and a new BK3-compatible force field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolafa, Jiří

    2016-11-01

    Saturated concentration of rock salt in water is determined by a simulation of brine in contact with a crystal in the slab geometry. The NaCl crystals are rotated to expose facets with higher Miller indices than [001] to brine. The rock salt melting point is obtained by both the standard and adiabatic simulations in the slab geometry with attention paid to finite size effects as well as to a possible influence of facets with higher Miller indices and applied stress. Two force fields are used, the Lennard-Jones-based model by Young and Cheatham with SPC/E water and the Kiss and Baranyai polarizable model with BK3 water. The latter model is refitted to thermomechanical properties of crystal NaCl leading to better values of solubility and the melting point.

  5. A study of the influence of isotopic substitution on the melting point and temperature of maximum density of water by means of path integral simulations of rigid models.

    PubMed

    McBride, Carl; Aragones, Juan L; Noya, Eva G; Vega, Carlos

    2012-11-21

    The melting point of ice I(h), as well as the temperature of maximum density (TMD) in the liquid phase, has been computed using the path integral Monte Carlo method. Two new models are introduced, TIP4PQ_D2O and TIP4PQ_T2O, which are specifically designed to study D(2)O and T(2)O respectively. We have also used these models to study the "competing quantum effects" proposal of Habershon, Markland and Manolopoulos; the TIP4PQ/2005, TIP4PQ/2005 (D(2)O) and TIP4PQ/2005 (T(2)O) models are able to study the isotopic substitution of hydrogen for deuterium or tritium whilst constraining the geometry, while the TIP4PQ_D2O and TIP4PQ_T2O models, where the O-H bond lengths are progressively shortened, permit the study of the influence of geometry (and thus dipole moment) on the isotopic effects. For TIP4PQ_D2O-TIP4PQ/2005 we found a melting point shift of 4.9 K (experimentally the value is 3.68 K) and a TMD shift of 6 K (experimentally 7.2 K). For TIP4PQ_T2O-TIP4PQ/2005 we found a melting point shift of 5.2 K (experimentally the value is 4.49 K) and a TMD shift of 7 K (experimentally 9.4 K).

  6. Absolute Summ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Alfred, Jr.

    Summ means the entirety of the multiverse. It seems clear, from the inflation theories of A. Guth and others, that the creation of many universes is plausible. We argue that Absolute cosmological ideas, not unlike those of I. Newton, may be consistent with dynamic multiverse creations. As suggested in W. Heisenberg's uncertainty principle, and with the Anthropic Principle defended by S. Hawking, et al., human consciousness, buttressed by findings of neuroscience, may have to be considered in our models. Predictability, as A. Einstein realized with Invariants and General Relativity, may be required for new ideas to be part of physics. We present here a two postulate model geared to an Absolute Summ. The seedbed of this work is part of Akhnaton's philosophy (see S. Freud, Moses and Monotheism). Most important, however, is that the structure of human consciousness, manifest in Kenya's Rift Valley 200,000 years ago as Homo sapiens, who were the culmination of the six million year co-creation process of Hominins and Nature in Africa, allows us to do the physics that we do. .

  7. Absolute Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartig, George

    1990-12-01

    The absolute sensitivity of the FOS will be determined in SV by observing 2 stars at 3 epochs, first in 3 apertures (1.0", 0.5", and 0.3" circular) and then in 1 aperture (1.0" circular). In cycle 1, one star, BD+28D4211 will be observed in the 1.0" aperture to establish the stability of the sensitivity and flat field characteristics and improve the accuracy obtained in SV. This star will also be observed through the paired apertures since these are not calibrated in SV. The stars will be observed in most detector/grating combinations. The data will be averaged to form the inverse sensitivity functions required by RSDP.

  8. Point-like and line-like melting of the vortex lattice in the universal phase diagram of layered superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Koshelev, A.E.

    1997-11-01

    The phase diagram of layered superconductors in the vortex state is studied by Monte Carlo simulations of the three-dimensional uniformly frustrated XY model with different anisotropy parameters. In the London regime the phase diagram of layered superconductors is shown to be universal if plotted in scaled temperature and field with the field scale being the two-dimensional (2D)-three-dimensional (3D) crossover field B{sub cr}. We find a very broad crossover region between quasi-two-dimensional and line-like melting regimes ranging from {approximately}B{sub cr} to {approximately}10B{sub cr}. The region is characterized by several distinct features: (i) the melting of the lattice occurs when the Josephson energy is suppressed to 64{percent} of its bare value; (ii) the latent heat at the transition does not change much with the anisotropy parameter; (iii) the jump of the Josephson energy at the transition is equal to the jump of the in-plane energy. The entropy jump reaches a maximum value of 0.45k{sub B}/vortex/layer at a field {approximately}10B{sub cr} and decreases with decreasing field due to an increase in the transition temperature. This behavior is found to be in a good agreement with experimental observations after the renormalization due to the temperature dependence of superconducting parameters is taken into account. The pancake alignment above the transition increases with increasing of the Josephson coupling. At high fields the melting is accompanied by a significant drop in the coupling energy and the destruction of vortex lines, while at small fields the vortex lines preserve at the transition. In the studied region of parameters we find that the line liquid does not have superconductivity along the direction of magnetic field in the thermodynamic limit. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  9. Using Paraffin with -10 deg C to 10 deg C Melting Point for Payload Thermal Energy Storage in SpaceX Dragon Trunk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Michael K.

    2013-01-01

    A concept of using paraffin wax phase change material (PCM) with a melting point between -10 deg C and 10 deg C for payload thermal energy storage in a Space Exploration Technologies (SpaceX) Dragon trunk is presented. It overcomes the problem of limited heater power available to a payload with significant radiators when the Dragon is berthed to the International Space Station (ISS). It stores adequate thermal energy to keep a payload warm without power for 6 hours during the transfer from the Dragon to an ExPRESS logistics carrier (ELC) on the ISS.

  10. Rheology of Melt-bearing Crustal Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenberg, C. L.; Medvedev, S.; Handy, M. R.

    2006-12-01

    A review and reinterpretation of previous experimental data on the deformation of melt-bearing crustal rocks (Rosenberg and Handy, 2005) revealed that the relationship of aggregate strength to melt fraction is non-linear, even if plotted on a linear ordinate and abscissa. At melt fractions, Φ 0.07, the dependence of aggregate strength on Φ is significantly greater than at Φ > 0.07. This melt fraction (Φ= 0.07) marks the transition from a significant increase in the proportion of melt-bearing grain boundaries up to this point to a minor increase thereafter. Therefore, we suggest that the increase of melt-interconnectivity causes the dramatic strength drop between the solidus and a melt fraction of 0.07. A second strength drop occurs at higher melt fractions and corresponds to the breakdown of the solid (crystal) framework, corresponding to the well-known "rheologically critical melt percentage" (RCMP; Arzi, 1978). Although the strength drop at the RCMP is about 4 orders of magnitude, the absolute value of this drop is small compared to the absolute strength of the unmelted aggregate, rendering the RCMP invisible in a linear aggregate strength vs. melt fraction diagram. Predicting the rheological properties and thresholds of melt-bearing crust on the basis of the results and interpretations above is very difficult, because the rheological data base was obtained from experiments performed at undrained conditions in the brittle field. These conditions are unlikely to represent the flow of partially melted crust. The measured strength of most of the experimentally deformed, partially-melted samples corresponds to their maximum differential stress, before the onset of brittle failure, not to their viscous strength during "ductile" (viscous) flow. To overcome these problems, we extrapolated a theoretically-derived flow law for partially melted granite deforming by diffusion-accommodated grain-boundary sliding (Paterson, 2001) and an experimentally-derived flow law for

  11. Nanoencapsulation of a water soluble drug in biocompatible polyesters. Effect of polyesters melting point and glass transition temperature on drug release behavior.

    PubMed

    Karavelidis, Vassilios; Giliopoulos, Dimitrios; Karavas, Evangelos; Bikiaris, Dimitrios

    2010-12-23

    Five polyesters based on 1,3-propanediol or ethylene glycol and an aliphatic dicarboxylic acid were used for the preparation of Ropinirole HCl-loaded nanoparticles. The advantage of the present study is that the used polyesters - as well as poly(lactic acid) (PLA) - have similar degree of crystallinity but different melting points, varying from 46.7 to 166.4°C. Based on polymer toxicity on HUVEC, the biocompatibility of these aliphatic polyesters was found comparable to that of PLA and thus the studied polyesters could be used as drug carriers. Drug encapsulation in polyesters was performed via emulsification/solvent evaporation method. Particle size of drug-loaded nanoparticles was between 140 and 190 nm, as measured by light scattering. Drug loading content for all the polyesters varies between 10 and 16% and their entrapment efficiency is relatively high (32-48%). WAXD patterns of nanoparticles show that Ropinirole HCl lies in amorphous state within polymer matrices. Drug release diagrams reveal that the higher percentage of Ropinirole HCl is released during the first 6h after its insertion in the dissolution medium. Fast release rates of the drug are attributed to high hydrophilicity of Ropinirole HCl. Melting point (T(m)) and glass transition temperature (T(g)) of the host polymer matrices seem to be important parameters, since higher drug release rates are observed in polyesters with low T(m) and T(g).

  12. Measurement of the size of intracellular ice crystals in mouse oocytes using a melting point depression method and the influence of intracellular solute concentrations.

    PubMed

    Han, Xu; Critser, John K

    2009-12-01

    Characterization of intracellular ice formed during the cooling procedures of cells significantly benefits the development and optimization design of cryopreservation or cryosurgery techniques. In this study, we investigated the influence of the concentration of extracellular non-permeable and permeable solutes on the melting points of the intracellular ice in mouse oocytes using cryomicroscopy. The results showed that the melting points of the intracellular ice are always lower than the extracellular ice. Based on this observation and the Gibbs-Thomson relation, we established a physical model to calculate the size of intracellular ice crystals and described its relationship with the concentrations of intracellular permeating solutes and macromolecules. This model predicts that the increased concentration of macromolecules in cells, by increasing the extracellular non-permeating solute concentration, can significantly lower the required concentration of permeable solutes for intracellular vitrification. The prediction was tested through the cryomicroscopic observation of the co-existence of intracellular vitrification and extracellular crystallization during cooling at 100 degrees C/min when the extracellular solutions contain 5 molal (m) ethylene glycol and 0.3 to 0.6m NaCl.

  13. Final report of APMP.T-S7: APMP regional comparison of Co-C eutectic melting point using Pt/Pd thermocouples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Y.-G.; Wei, Z.; Ogura, H.; Jahan, F.; Singh, Y. P.

    2016-01-01

    A regional supplementary comparison on the Co-C eutectic point (1324 °C in ITS-90) was carried out in APMP involving five NMIs: KRISS (Korea), NIM (China), NMIJ (Japan), NMIA (Australia) and NPLI (India). The comparison was done through a round robin style with two Pt/Pd thermocouples having greatly different thermoelectric inhomogeneity (± 0.0196 % and ± 0.132 % at 1324 °C), which were made by the pilot laboratory (KRISS). Both were calibrated twice, before and after the circulation by the pilot laboratory. As a reference value, the weighted mean was adopted since the Birge ration criterion was safely satisfied. The participants were asked to supply the temperature profile of the furnace used to realize the Co-C point in order to estimate the uncertainty due to thermoelectric inhomogeneity. Results from all laboratories were consistent with the reference value within the calculated uncertainties. Birge number of 0.2 to 0.3 and En number less than 0.5 were obtained, meaning that the comparison successfully demonstrated the use of Pt/Pd thermocouple to compare the calibration capabilities of participating laboratories at the melting temperature of Co-C eutectic point regardless of the amount of thermoelectric inhomogeneity. It was verified that the calibration uncertainty level of {(0.2 °C ~ 0.3 °C) + ucell} (k = 2) can be obtained at the Co-C eutectic melting point by means of Pt/Pd thermocouple having a small inhomogeneity of about 0.02 %. Main text To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCT, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  14. Correlation between the band gap, elastic modulus, Raman shift and melting point of CdS, ZnS, and CdSe semiconductors and their size dependency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, C.; Zhou, Z. F.; Li, J. W.; Yang, X. X.; Qin, W.; Jiang, R.; Guo, N. G.; Wang, Y.; Sun, C. Q.

    2012-02-01

    With structural miniaturization down to the nanoscale, the detectable quantities of solid materials no longer remain constant but become tunable. For the II-VI semiconductors example, the band gap expands, the elastic modulus increases, the melting point drops, and the Raman optical phonons experience red shift associated with creation of low frequency Raman acoustic modes that undergo blue shift with decreasing the dimensional scale. In order to understand the common origin of the size dependency of these seemingly irrelevant properties, we formulated these quantities for CdS, ZnS, and CdSe semiconductors from the perspectives of bond order-length-strength correlation and the local bond averaging approach. Consistency between the theory predictions and the measured size dependence of these quantities clarified that the undercoordination-induced local strain and quantum entrapment and the varied fraction of undercoordinated atoms of the entire solid correlate these quantities and dominate their size effect.

  15. ESCIMO.spread - a spreadsheet-based point snow surface energy balance model to calculate hourly snow water equivalent and melt rates for historical and changing climate conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strasser, U.; Marke, T.

    2010-05-01

    This paper describes the spreadsheet-based point energy balance model ESCIMO.spread which simulates the energy and mass balance as well as melt rates of a snow surface. The model makes use of hourly recordings of temperature, precipitation, wind speed, relative humidity, global and longwave radiation. The effect of potential climate change on the seasonal evolution of the snow cover can be estimated by modifying the time series of observed temperature and precipitation by means of adjustable parameters. Model output is graphically visualized in hourly and daily diagrams. The results compare well with weekly measured snow water equivalent (SWE). The model is easily portable and adjustable, and runs particularly fast: hourly calculation of a one winter season is instantaneous on a standard computer. ESICMO.spread can be obtained from the authors on request (contact: ulrich.strasser@uni-graz.at).

  16. Surface Tension and Viscosity of SCN and SCN-acetone Alloys at Melting Points and Higher Temperatures Using Surface Light Scattering Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tin, Padetha; deGroh, Henry C., III.

    2003-01-01

    Succinonitrile has been and is being used extensively in NASA's Microgravity Materials Science and Fluid Physics programs and as well as in several ground-based and microgravity studies including the Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (IDGE). Succinonitrile (SCN) is useful as a model for the study of metal solidification, although it is an organic material, it has a BCC crystal structure and solidifies dendriticly like a metal. It is also transparent and has a low melting point (58.08 C). Previous measurements of succinonitrile (SCN) and alloys of succinonitrile and acetone surface tensions are extremely limited. Using the Surface Light Scattering technique we have determined non invasively, the surface tension and viscosity of SCN and SCN-Acetone Alloys at different temperatures. This relatively new and unique technique has several advantages over the classical methods such as, it is non invasive, has good accuracy and measures the surface tension and viscosity simultaneously. The accuracy of interfacial energy values obtained from this technique is better than 2% and viscosity about 10 %. Succinonitrile and succinonitrile-acetone alloys are well-established model materials with several essential physical properties accurately known - except the liquid/vapor surface tension at different elevated temperatures. We will be presenting the experimentally determined liquid/vapor surface energy and liquid viscosity of succinonitrile and succinonitrile-acetone alloys in the temperature range from their melting point to around 100 C using this non-invasive technique. We will also discuss about the measurement technique and new developments of the Surface Light Scattering Spectrometer.

  17. Teaching Absolute Value Meaningfully

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wade, Angela

    2012-01-01

    What is the meaning of absolute value? And why do teachers teach students how to solve absolute value equations? Absolute value is a concept introduced in first-year algebra and then reinforced in later courses. Various authors have suggested instructional methods for teaching absolute value to high school students (Wei 2005; Stallings-Roberts…

  18. Short communication: Diet-induced variations in milk fatty acid composition have minor effects on the estimated melting point of milk fat in cows, goats, and ewes: Insights from a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Toral, P G; Bernard, L; Chilliard, Y; Glasser, F

    2013-02-01

    In ruminants, the ability to maintain milk fat melting point within physiological values could play a role in the regulation of milk fat secretion when milk fatty acid (FA) composition varies, such as in response to feeding factors. However, the relationship between milk fat fluidity and changes in milk FA composition is difficult to study experimentally. A meta-analysis was therefore conducted to compare the magnitude of diet-induced variations in milk FA composition and the calculated melting point of milk FA (used as a proxy to estimate the variations in the melting point of milk fat) in 3 dairy ruminant species (cow, goat, and sheep). The coefficient of variation (CV), a scale-free measure of statistical dispersion, was used to compare the variability of criteria differing in their order of magnitude. The analysis of a database of milk FA profiles from cows, goats, and sheep fed different dietary treatments (unsupplemented diets and diets supplemented with lipids rich in oleic acid, linoleic acid, linolenic acid, or C20-22 polyunsaturated FA) revealed that the variability of the calculated melting point of milk FA was narrow (CV of 5%) compared with the variability of milk FA percentages (CV of 18 to 72%). The regulation of the melting point of milk fat is thus probably involved in the control of diet-induced variations in milk fat secretion. The calculated melting point of ewe milk FA was approximately 3°C lower than that of goats or cows across all types of diets, which might be linked to differences in milk fat content (higher in sheep) or the structure of milk triacylglycerides among these species. Lipid supplementation increased the calculated melting point of C18 FA in milk, whereas that of total FA was significantly reduced by supplements rich in oleic, linoleic, and linolenic acids but not C20-22 polyunsaturated FA. However, the slight effects of dietary treatments on the calculated melting point of milk FA did not differ between cows, goats, and ewes.

  19. Fat accumulation, fatty acids and melting point changes in broiler chick abdominal fat as affected by time of dietary fat feeding and slaughter age.

    PubMed

    Carmona, J M; Lopez-Bote, C J; Daza, A; Rey, A I

    2017-03-23

    1. This work aims to quantify changes in fatty acid profile, melting point, abdominal fat accumulation and 2-thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances production depending on dietary fat source and age at slaughter, and to estimate the optimal date for the change from an unsaturated fat to a saturated fat diet or vice versa. 2. Treatments established were (1) birds fed 8% tallow from 21 to 49 d (TTT); (2) birds fed 8% tallow from 21 to 37 d and 8% sunflower oil from d 38 to 49 (TSS); (3) birds fed 8% sunflower oil from 21 to 37 d and 8% tallow from d 38 to 49 (STT); (4) birds fed 8% sunflower oil from 21 to 41 d and 8% tallow from d 42 to 49 (SST); (5) birds fed 8% sunflower oil from 21 to 49 d (SSS). Birds from each group were slaughtered on d 21, 29, 38, 40, 42, 44, 46 and 49. 3. The polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) proportion in the SSS group reached maximum values at d 40 and fitted a quadratic response. This group also showed a decrease in saturated fatty acids (SATs) and monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs) of lower intensity than the PUFA increase. The highest synthesis of SAT + MUFA was found in the SSS and TSS groups, whereas these had the lowest body-to-dietary PUFA ratio. 4. A high and quadratic increase in the MUFA proportion was observed during the first 10 d of feeding with the tallow-enriched diet at the expenses of the proportion of PUFA that quadratically decreased (minimum values at d 38). 5. Lipogenic and desaturation capacity decreased with age. 6. The TSS group increased tissue PUFA content faster that the SST group decreased PUFA content after the change in diet which indicates that the earlier feeding has to be taken into consideration for obtaining higher or lower changes in quality parameters. 7. The melting point of the SSS group showed a lower response to the dietary treatment in the initial period when compared to the TTT treatment. 8. The TTT, STT, SST and TSS groups showed similar fat accumulation, and changes in lipid

  20. Absolute quantification of the alleles in somatic point mutations by bioluminometric methods based on competitive polymerase chain reaction in the presence of a locked nucleic acid blocker or an allele-specific primer.

    PubMed

    Iliadi, Alexandra; Petropoulou, Margarita; Ioannou, Penelope C; Christopoulos, Theodore K; Anagnostopoulos, Nikolaos I; Kanavakis, Emmanuel; Traeger-Synodinos, Jan

    2011-09-01

    In somatic (acquired) point mutations, the challenge is to quantify minute amounts of the mutant allele in the presence of a large excess of the normal allele that differs only in a single base pair. We report two bioluminometric methods that enable absolute quantification of the alleles. The first method exploits the ability of a locked nucleic acid (LNA) oligonucleotide to bind to and inhibit effectively the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of the normal allele while the amplification of the mutant allele remains unaffected. The second method employs allele-specific PCR primers, thereby allowing the amplification of the corresponding allele only. DNA internal standards (competitors) are added to the PCR mixture to compensate for any sample-to-sample variation in the amplification efficiency. The amplification products from the two alleles and the internal standards are quantified by a microtiter well-based bioluminometric hybridization assay using the photoprotein aequorin as a reporter. The methods allow absolute quantification of less than 300 copies of the mutant allele even in samples containing less than 1% of the mutant allele.

  1. Low-melting-point titanium-base brazing alloys. Part 2: Characteristics of brazing Ti-21Ni-14Cu on Ti-6Al-4V substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, E.; Chen, C.H.

    1997-12-01

    Filler metal of a low-melting-point (917 C) Ti-21Ni-14Cu was brazed onto the substrate of Ti-6Al-4V alloy at 960 C for 2, 4, and 8 h to investigate the microstructural evolution and electrochemical characteristics of the brazed metal as a function of the period of brazing time. Optical microscopy, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, and x-ray diffractometry were used to characterize the microstructure and phase of the brazed metal; also, the potentiostat was used for corrosion study. Experimental results indicate that diffusion of copper and nickel from the filler metal into the equiaxed {alpha} plus intergranular {beta} structure of Ti-6Al-4V substrate causes the lamellar Widmanstaetten structure to form. The intermetallic Ti{sub 2}Ni phase existing in the prior filler metal diminishes, while the Ti{sub 2}Cu phase can be identified for the metal brazed at 960 C for 2 h, but the latter phase decreases with time. Advantage might be taken from the evidence of faster diffusion of nickel than copper along the {beta} phase to the substrate. In deaerated Hank`s solution, corrosion potential, corrosion current density, and critical potential for active-to-passive transition decrease while the passivation range broadens with the period of brazing time. However, all the brazed metals, immersed for different periods in oxygen-saturated Hank`s solution, show similar corrosion behavior, irrespective of the brazing time.

  2. Melting Point Distribution Analysis of Globally Approved and Discontinued Drugs: A Research for Improving the Chance of Success of Drug Design and Discovery.

    PubMed

    Mao, Fei; Kong, Qingya; Ni, Wei; Xu, Xiang; Ling, Dazheng; Lu, Zhengyu; Li, Jian

    2016-08-01

    The melting point (MP), an easily accessible physical parameter, has considerable potential for the judgment of drug-like properties. However, to the best of our knowledge, there are no useful guidelines for understanding the relationship between the MP and drug-like properties. To this end, we have constructed the largest MP database (experimental value) of globally approved drugs (3164 organic small-molecule drugs) and discontinued drugs (417 organic small-molecule drugs) and subsequently extracted six subdatabases from the whole approved database and two subdatabases from the discontinued database. The MP distribution statistics and analysis of approved drugs reveal five noteworthy observations; moreover, the MP distribution statistics and analysis of discontinued drugs further supplement these criteria. In addition, the comparison of molecular weight (MW) versus MP and Clog P versus MP distributions of different classes of approved drugs indicated that the MWs and Clog P values of most drugs in the optimal MP range were not more than 500 and 5, respectively, implying the MP distribution criterion was in accordance with Lipinski's rule of five.

  3. Fast Xe-129 relaxation in solid xenon near its melting point: Cross-over from Raman scattering of phonons to vacancy diffusion.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzma, N. N.; Patton, B.; Raman, K.; Happer, W.

    2002-03-01

    NMR measurements of longitudinal relaxation times T1 in pure solid xenon were carried out using both natural-abundance and isotopically-enriched samples of hyperpolarized ^129Xe. At temperatures below 120 K and fields above 500 Gauss, the relaxation rate 1/T1 is field- and abundance-independent, consistent with the model of ^129Xe spin-flip Raman scattering of phonons(R. J. Fitzgerald et al.), Phys. Rev. B 59, 8795 (1999).. Above 120 K, vacancies invade the xenon lattice(P. R. Granfors et al.) Phys. Rev. B 24, 4753 (1981)., and a dramatic cross-over to the nuclear dipole-dipole relaxation due to the diffusion of vacancies is observed. As a result, the measured relaxation times of xenon near its melting point strongly depend on field and somewhat on ^129Xe abundance, and can be as short as several seconds, leading to potential difficulties in cryogenic applications of hyperpolarized ^129Xe. The data are analyzed using the theory of nuclear relaxation due to spin diffusion in cubic crystals(C. A. Sholl, J. Phys. C 21), 319 (1988)., and some estimates of the vacancy density and jump rates are discussed.

  4. Low-melting-point titanium-base brazing alloys—part 2: Characteristics of brazing Ti-21Ni-14Cu on Ti-6Al-4v substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, E.; Chen, C.-H.

    1997-12-01

    Filler metal of a low-melting-point (917 °C) Ti-21Ni-14Cu was brazed onto the substrate of Ti-6Al-4V alloy at 960 °C for 2,4, and 8 h to investigate the microstructural evolution and electrochemical characteristics of the brazed metal as a function of the period of brazing time. Optical microscopy, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, and x-ray diffractometry were used to characterize the microstructure and phase of the brazed metal; also, the potentiostat was used for corrosion study. Experimental results indicate that diffusion of copper and nickel from the filler metal into the equiaxed a plus intergranular β structure of Ti-6Al-4V substrate causes the lamellar Widmanstätten structure to form. The intermetallic Ti2Ni phase existing in the prior filler metal diminishes, while the Ti2Cu phase can be identified for the metal brazed at 960 °C for 2 h, but the latter phase decreases with time. Advantage might be taken from the evidence of faster diffusion of nickel than copper along the β phase to the substrate. In deaerated Hank’s solution, corrosion potential, corrosion current density, and critical potential for active-to-passive transition decrease while the passivation range broadens with the period of brazing time. However, all the brazed metals, immersed for different periods in oxygen-saturated Hank’s solution, show similar corrosion behavior, irrespective of the brazing time.

  5. On the rational formulation of alternative fuels: melting point and net heat of combustion predictions for fuel compounds using machine learning methods.

    PubMed

    Saldana, D A; Starck, L; Mougin, P; Rousseau, B; Creton, B

    2013-01-01

    We report the development of predictive models for two fuel specifications: melting points (T(m)) and net heat of combustion (Δ(c)H). Compounds inside the scope of these models are those likely to be found in alternative fuels, i.e. hydrocarbons, alcohols and esters. Experimental T(m) and Δ(c)H values for these types of molecules have been gathered to generate a unique database. Various quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR) approaches have been used to build models, ranging from methods leading to multi-linear models such as genetic function approximation (GFA), or partial least squares (PLS) to those leading to non-linear models such as feed-forward artificial neural networks (FFANN), general regression neural networks (GRNN), support vector machines (SVM), or graph machines. Except for the case of the graph machines method for which the only inputs are SMILES formulae, previously listed approaches working on molecular descriptors and functional group count descriptors were used to develop specific models for T(m) and Δ(c)H. For each property, the predictive models return slightly different responses for each molecular structure. Therefore, models labelled as 'consensus models' were built by averaging values computed with selected individual models. Predicted results were then compared with experimental data and with predictions of models in the literature.

  6. Melting Point Distribution Analysis of Globally Approved and Discontinued Drugs: A Research for Improving the Chance of Success of Drug Design and Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Fei; Kong, Qingya; Ni, Wei; Xu, Xiang; Ling, Dazheng; Lu, Zhengyu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The melting point (MP), an easily accessible physical parameter, has considerable potential for the judgment of drug‐like properties. However, to the best of our knowledge, there are no useful guidelines for understanding the relationship between the MP and drug‐like properties. To this end, we have constructed the largest MP database (experimental value) of globally approved drugs (3164 organic small‐molecule drugs) and discontinued drugs (417 organic small‐molecule drugs) and subsequently extracted six subdatabases from the whole approved database and two subdatabases from the discontinued database. The MP distribution statistics and analysis of approved drugs reveal five noteworthy observations; moreover, the MP distribution statistics and analysis of discontinued drugs further supplement these criteria. In addition, the comparison of molecular weight (MW) versus MP and Clog P versus MP distributions of different classes of approved drugs indicated that the MWs and Clog P values of most drugs in the optimal MP range were not more than 500 and 5, respectively, implying the MP distribution criterion was in accordance with Lipinski's rule of five. PMID:27547646

  7. Absolutely classical spin states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohnet-Waldraff, F.; Giraud, O.; Braun, D.

    2017-01-01

    We introduce the concept of "absolutely classical" spin states, in analogy to absolutely separable states of bipartite quantum systems. Absolutely classical states are states that remain classical (i.e., a convex sum of projectors on coherent states of a spin j ) under any unitary transformation applied to them. We investigate the maximal size of the ball of absolutely classical states centered on the maximally mixed state and derive a lower bound for its radius as a function of the total spin quantum number. We also obtain a numerical estimate of this maximal radius and compare it to the case of absolutely separable states.

  8. Absolute nuclear material assay

    DOEpatents

    Prasad, Manoj K [Pleasanton, CA; Snyderman, Neal J [Berkeley, CA; Rowland, Mark S [Alamo, CA

    2012-05-15

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  9. Absolute nuclear material assay

    DOEpatents

    Prasad, Manoj K.; Snyderman, Neal J.; Rowland, Mark S.

    2010-07-13

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  10. Absolute calibration of optical flats

    DOEpatents

    Sommargren, Gary E.

    2005-04-05

    The invention uses the phase shifting diffraction interferometer (PSDI) to provide a true point-by-point measurement of absolute flatness over the surface of optical flats. Beams exiting the fiber optics in a PSDI have perfect spherical wavefronts. The measurement beam is reflected from the optical flat and passed through an auxiliary optic to then be combined with the reference beam on a CCD. The combined beams include phase errors due to both the optic under test and the auxiliary optic. Standard phase extraction algorithms are used to calculate this combined phase error. The optical flat is then removed from the system and the measurement fiber is moved to recombine the two beams. The newly combined beams include only the phase errors due to the auxiliary optic. When the second phase measurement is subtracted from the first phase measurement, the absolute phase error of the optical flat is obtained.

  11. Low melting mesophase pitches

    SciTech Connect

    Diefendorf, R.J.; Chen, S.H.

    1984-04-17

    A low melting point, low molecular weight, heptane insoluble, 1,2,4-trichlorobenzene soluble mesophase pitch useful in carbon fiber spinning as such or as a plasticizer in a carbon fiber spinning composition is obtained by heating chrysene, triphenylene or paraterphenyl as well as mixtures thereof and hydrocarbon fractions containing the same, dissolving the resulting heat treated material with 1,2,4-trichlorobenzene, and separating the insolubles, and then contacting the 1,2,4-trichlorobenzene soluble fraction with a sufficient amount of heptane to precipitate the low melting point, low molecular weight mesophase pitch.

  12. Absolute instability of the Gaussian wake profile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hultgren, Lennart S.; Aggarwal, Arun K.

    1987-01-01

    Linear parallel-flow stability theory has been used to investigate the effect of viscosity on the local absolute instability of a family of wake profiles with a Gaussian velocity distribution. The type of local instability, i.e., convective or absolute, is determined by the location of a branch-point singularity with zero group velocity of the complex dispersion relation for the instability waves. The effects of viscosity were found to be weak for values of the wake Reynolds number, based on the center-line velocity defect and the wake half-width, larger than about 400. Absolute instability occurs only for sufficiently large values of the center-line wake defect. The critical value of this parameter increases with decreasing wake Reynolds number, thereby indicating a shrinking region of absolute instability with decreasing wake Reynolds number. If backflow is not allowed, absolute instability does not occur for wake Reynolds numbers smaller than about 38.

  13. Effect of Indium Content on the Melting Point, Dross, and Oxidation Characteristics of Sn-2Ag-3Bi-xIn Solders.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Ae-Jeong; Kim, Seong-Jun; Lee, Sang-Hoon; Kang, Chung-Yun

    2013-06-01

    This paper presents the effect of indium (In) content on the melting temperature, wettabililty, dross formation, and oxidation characteristics of the Sn-2Ag-3Bi-xIn alloy. The melting temperature of the Sn-2Ag-3Bi-xIn alloy (2 ≤ x ≤ 6) was lower than 473 K. The melting range between the solidus and liquidus temperatures was approximately 20 K, irrespective of the indium content. As the indium content increased, the wetting time increased slightly and the maximum wetting force remained to be mostly constant. The dross formation decreased to approximately 50% when adding 1In to Sn-2Ag-3Bi, and no dross formation was observed in the case of Sn-2Ag-3Bi-xIn alloy (x ≥ 1.5) at 523 K for 180 min. Upon approaching the inside of the oxidized solder of the Sn-2Ag-3Bi-1.5In alloy from the surface, the O and In contents decreased and the Sn content increased based on depth profiling analysis using Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). The mechanism for restraining dross (Sn oxidation) of Sn-2Ag-3Bi alloy with addition of indium may be due to surface segregation of indium. This is due to the lower formation energy of indium oxide than those of Sn oxidation.

  14. Small particle melting of pure metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, G. L.; Bayles, R. A.; Gile, W. W.; Jesser, W. A.

    1986-01-01

    Submicron-sized crystallites of lead, tin, indium and bismuth were melted in situ in the modified specimen chamber of a Siemens transmission e lectron microscope. Melting point and size determinations were made directly from the dark field images of the crystallites. Particles exhibited melting points that decreased with decreasing particle size. A near-linear relationship was observed for the melting point as a function of the reciprocal of the radius. Thermodynamnic expressions based on the significant contributions of the surface energy to the free energy of the system also suggest a linear relation. Other factors, such as shape and surface contamination, were also observed to affect the size-dependent melting of particles. Crystallites of extended platelet shape did not exhibit a significant depression in melting point. Elevated residual gas pressures were found to lessen the melting point depression of spherical particles.

  15. Absolute and relative blindsight.

    PubMed

    Balsdon, Tarryn; Azzopardi, Paul

    2015-03-01

    The concept of relative blindsight, referring to a difference in conscious awareness between conditions otherwise matched for performance, was introduced by Lau and Passingham (2006) as a way of identifying the neural correlates of consciousness (NCC) in fMRI experiments. By analogy, absolute blindsight refers to a difference between performance and awareness regardless of whether it is possible to match performance across conditions. Here, we address the question of whether relative and absolute blindsight in normal observers can be accounted for by response bias. In our replication of Lau and Passingham's experiment, the relative blindsight effect was abolished when performance was assessed by means of a bias-free 2AFC task or when the criterion for awareness was varied. Furthermore, there was no evidence of either relative or absolute blindsight when both performance and awareness were assessed with bias-free measures derived from confidence ratings using signal detection theory. This suggests that both relative and absolute blindsight in normal observers amount to no more than variations in response bias in the assessment of performance and awareness. Consideration of the properties of psychometric functions reveals a number of ways in which relative and absolute blindsight could arise trivially and elucidates a basis for the distinction between Type 1 and Type 2 blindsight.

  16. Melting line of polymeric nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakub, L. N.

    2013-05-01

    We made an attempt to predict location of the melting line of polymeric nitrogen using two equations for Helmholtz free energy: proposed earlier for cubic gauche-structure and developed recently for liquid polymerized nitrogen. The P-T relation, orthobaric densities and latent heat of melting were determined using a standard double tangent construction. The estimated melting temperature decreases with increasing pressure, alike the temperature of molecular-nonmolecular transition in solid. We discuss the possibility of a triple point (solid-molecular fluid-polymeric fluid) at ˜80 GPa and observed maximum of melting temperature of nitrogen.

  17. Absolute neutrino mass scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capelli, Silvia; Di Bari, Pasquale

    2013-04-01

    Neutrino oscillation experiments firmly established non-vanishing neutrino masses, a result that can be regarded as a strong motivation to extend the Standard Model. In spite of being the lightest massive particles, neutrinos likely represent an important bridge to new physics at very high energies and offer new opportunities to address some of the current cosmological puzzles, such as the matter-antimatter asymmetry of the Universe and Dark Matter. In this context, the determination of the absolute neutrino mass scale is a key issue within modern High Energy Physics. The talks in this parallel session well describe the current exciting experimental activity aiming to determining the absolute neutrino mass scale and offer an overview of a few models beyond the Standard Model that have been proposed in order to explain the neutrino masses giving a prediction for the absolute neutrino mass scale and solving the cosmological puzzles.

  18. The absolute path command

    SciTech Connect

    Moody, A.

    2012-05-11

    The ap command traveres all symlinks in a given file, directory, or executable name to identify the final absolute path. It can print just the final path, each intermediate link along with the symlink chan, and the permissions and ownership of each directory component in the final path. It has functionality similar to "which", except that it shows the final path instead of the first path. It is also similar to "pwd", but it can provide the absolute path to a relative directory from the current working directory.

  19. Design of Low-Melting Point Compositions Suitable for Transient Liquid Phase Sintering of PM Steels Based on a Thermodynamic and Kinetic Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernardo, Elena; de Oro, Raquel; Campos, Mónica; Torralba, José Manuel

    2014-04-01

    The possibility of tailoring the characteristics of a liquid metal is an important asset in a wide number of processing techniques. For most of these processes, the nature and degree of the interaction between liquid and solid phases are usually a focus of interest since they determine liquid properties such as wettability and infiltration capacity. Particularly, within the powder metallurgy (PM) technology, it is considered one of the key aspects to obtain high performance steels through liquid phase sintering. In this work, it is proved how thermodynamic and kinetics software is a powerful tool to study the liquid/solid interactions. The assessment of different liquid phase promoters for transient liquid phase sintering is addressed through the use of ThermoCalc and DICTRA calculations. Besides melting temperatures, particular attention is given to the solubility phenomena between the phases and the kinetics of these processes. Experimental validation of thermodynamic results is carried out by wetting and infiltration experiments at high temperatures. Compositions presenting different liquid/solid solubility are evaluated and directly correlated to the behavior of the liquid during a real sintering process. Therefore, this work opens the possibility to optimize liquid phase compositions and predict the liquid behavior from the design step, which is considered of high technological value for the PM industry.

  20. Absolute Positioning Using the Global Positioning System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-04-01

    Global Positioning System ( GPS ) has becom a useful tool In providing relativ survey...Includes the development of a low cost navigator for wheeled vehicles. ABSTRACT The Global Positioning System ( GPS ) has become a useful tool In providing...technique of absolute or point positioning involves the use of a single Global Positioning System ( GPS ) receiver to determine the three-dimenslonal

  1. Electronic Absolute Cartesian Autocollimator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leviton, Douglas B.

    2006-01-01

    An electronic absolute Cartesian autocollimator performs the same basic optical function as does a conventional all-optical or a conventional electronic autocollimator but differs in the nature of its optical target and the manner in which the position of the image of the target is measured. The term absolute in the name of this apparatus reflects the nature of the position measurement, which, unlike in a conventional electronic autocollimator, is based absolutely on the position of the image rather than on an assumed proportionality between the position and the levels of processed analog electronic signals. The term Cartesian in the name of this apparatus reflects the nature of its optical target. Figure 1 depicts the electronic functional blocks of an electronic absolute Cartesian autocollimator along with its basic optical layout, which is the same as that of a conventional autocollimator. Referring first to the optical layout and functions only, this or any autocollimator is used to measure the compound angular deviation of a flat datum mirror with respect to the optical axis of the autocollimator itself. The optical components include an illuminated target, a beam splitter, an objective or collimating lens, and a viewer or detector (described in more detail below) at a viewing plane. The target and the viewing planes are focal planes of the lens. Target light reflected by the datum mirror is imaged on the viewing plane at unit magnification by the collimating lens. If the normal to the datum mirror is parallel to the optical axis of the autocollimator, then the target image is centered on the viewing plane. Any angular deviation of the normal from the optical axis manifests itself as a lateral displacement of the target image from the center. The magnitude of the displacement is proportional to the focal length and to the magnitude (assumed to be small) of the angular deviation. The direction of the displacement is perpendicular to the axis about which the

  2. Absolute airborne gravimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumann, Henri

    This work consists of a feasibility study of a first stage prototype airborne absolute gravimeter system. In contrast to relative systems, which are using spring gravimeters, the measurements acquired by absolute systems are uncorrelated and the instrument is not suffering from problems like instrumental drift, frequency response of the spring and possible variation of the calibration factor. The major problem we had to resolve were to reduce the influence of the non-gravitational accelerations included in the measurements. We studied two different approaches to resolve it: direct mechanical filtering, and post-processing digital compensation. The first part of the work describes in detail the different mechanical passive filters of vibrations, which were studied and tested in the laboratory and later in a small truck in movement. For these tests as well as for the airborne measurements an absolute gravimeter FG5-L from Micro-G Ltd was used together with an Inertial navigation system Litton-200, a vertical accelerometer EpiSensor, and GPS receivers for positioning. These tests showed that only the use of an optical table gives acceptable results. However, it is unable to compensate for the effects of the accelerations of the drag free chamber. The second part describes the strategy of the data processing. It is based on modeling the perturbing accelerations by means of GPS, EpiSensor and INS data. In the third part the airborne experiment is described in detail, from the mounting in the aircraft and data processing to the different problems encountered during the evaluation of the quality and accuracy of the results. In the part of data processing the different steps conducted from the raw apparent gravity data and the trajectories to the estimation of the true gravity are explained. A comparison between the estimated airborne data and those obtained by ground upward continuation at flight altitude allows to state that airborne absolute gravimetry is feasible and

  3. Fatigue behavior of porous biomaterials manufactured using selective laser melting.

    PubMed

    Yavari, S Amin; Wauthle, R; van der Stok, J; Riemslag, A C; Janssen, M; Mulier, M; Kruth, J P; Schrooten, J; Weinans, H; Zadpoor, A A

    2013-12-01

    Porous titanium alloys are considered promising bone-mimicking biomaterials. Additive manufacturing techniques such as selective laser melting allow for manufacturing of porous titanium structures with a precise design of micro-architecture. The mechanical properties of selective laser melted porous titanium alloys with different designs of micro-architecture have been already studied and are shown to be in the range of mechanical properties of bone. However, the fatigue behavior of this biomaterial is not yet well understood. We studied the fatigue behavior of porous structures made of Ti6Al4V ELI powder using selective laser melting. Four different porous structures were manufactured with porosities between 68 and 84% and the fatigue S-N curves of these four porous structures were determined. The three-stage mechanism of fatigue failure of these porous structures is described and studied in detail. It was found that the absolute S-N curves of these four porous structures are very different. In general, given the same absolute stress level, the fatigue life is much shorter for more porous structures. However, the normalized fatigue S-N curves of these four structures were found to be very similar. A power law was fitted to all data points of the normalized S-N curves. It is shown that the measured data points conform to the fitted power law very well, R(2)=0.94. This power law may therefore help in estimating the fatigue life of porous structures for which no fatigue test data is available. It is also observed that the normalized endurance limit of all tested porous structures (<0.2) is lower than that of corresponding solid material (c.a. 0.4).

  4. Melt Production in Oblique Impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierazzo, E.; Melosh, H. J.

    2000-05-01

    Hydrocode modeling is a fundamental tool for the study of melt production in planetary impact events. Until recently, however, numerical modeling of impacts for melt production studies has been limited to vertical impacts. We present the first results of the investigation of melt production in oblique impacts. Simulations were carried out using Sandia's three-dimensional hydrocode CTH, coupled to the SESAME equation of state. While keeping other impact parameters constant, the calculations span impact angles (measured from the surface) from 90° (vertical impact) to 15°. The results show that impact angle affects the strength and distribution of the shock wave generated in the impact. As a result, both the isobaric core and the regions of melting in the target appear asymmetric and concentrated in the downrange, shallower portion of the target. The use of a pressure-decay power law (which describes pressure as function of linear distance from the impact point) to reconstruct the region of melting and vaporization is therefore complicated by the asymmetry of the shock wave. As an analog to the pressure decay versus distance from the impact point, we used a "volumetric pressure decay," where the pressure decay is modeled as a function of volume of target material shocked at or above the given shock pressure. We find that the volumetric pressure decay exponent is almost constant for impact angles from 90° to 30°, dropping by about a factor of two for a 15° impact. In the range of shock pressures at which most materials of geologic interest melt or begin to vaporize, we find that the volume of impact melt decreases by at most 20% for impacts from 90° down to 45°. Below 45°, however, the amount of melt in the target decreases rapidly with impact angle. Compared to the vertical case, the reduction in volume of melt is about 50% for impacts at 30° and more than 90% for a 15° impact. These estimates do not include possible melting due to shear heating, which can

  5. Absolute-structure reports.

    PubMed

    Flack, Howard D

    2013-08-01

    All the 139 noncentrosymmetric crystal structures published in Acta Crystallographica Section C between January 2011 and November 2012 inclusive have been used as the basis of a detailed study of the reporting of absolute structure. These structure determinations cover a wide range of space groups, chemical composition and resonant-scattering contribution. Defining A and D as the average and difference of the intensities of Friedel opposites, their level of fit has been examined using 2AD and selected-D plots. It was found, regardless of the expected resonant-scattering contribution to Friedel opposites, that the Friedel-difference intensities are often dominated by random uncertainty and systematic error. An analysis of data collection strategy is provided. It is found that crystal-structure determinations resulting in a Flack parameter close to 0.5 may not necessarily be from crystals twinned by inversion. Friedifstat is shown to be a robust estimator of the resonant-scattering contribution to Friedel opposites, very little affected by the particular space group of a structure nor by the occupation of special positions. There is considerable confusion in the text of papers presenting achiral noncentrosymmetric crystal structures. Recommendations are provided for the optimal way of treating noncentrosymmetric crystal structures for which the experimenter has no interest in determining the absolute structure.

  6. Two alternative multiplex PCRs for the identification of the seven species of anglerfish (Lophius spp.) using an end-point or a melting curve analysis real-time protocol.

    PubMed

    Castigliego, Lorenzo; Armani, Andrea; Tinacci, Lara; Gianfaldoni, Daniela; Guidi, Alessandra

    2015-01-01

    Anglerfish (Lophius spp.) is consumed worldwide and is an important economic resource though its seven species are often fraudulently interchanged due to their different commercial value, especially when sold in the form of fillets or pieces. Molecular analysis is the only possible mean to verify traceability and counteract fraud. We developed two multiplex PCRs, one end-point and one real-time with melting curve post-amplification analysis, which can even be run with the simplest two-channel thermocyclers. The two methods were tested on seventy-five reference samples. Their specificity was checked in twenty more species of those most commonly available on the market and in other species of the Lophiidae family. Both methods, the choice of which depends on the equipment and budget of the lab, provide a rapid and easy-to-read response, improving both the simplicity and cost-effectiveness of existing methods for identifying Lophius species.

  7. Stabilizing Crystal Oscillators With Melting Metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, J. B.; Miller, C. G.

    1984-01-01

    Heat of fusion provides extended period of constant temperature and frequency. Crystal surrounded by metal in spherical container. As outside temperature rises to melting point of metal, metal starts to liquefy; but temperature stays at melting point until no solid metal remains. Potential terrestrial applications include low-power environmental telemetering transmitters and instrumentation transmitters for industrial processes.

  8. Absolute Equilibrium Entropy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shebalin, John V.

    1997-01-01

    The entropy associated with absolute equilibrium ensemble theories of ideal, homogeneous, fluid and magneto-fluid turbulence is discussed and the three-dimensional fluid case is examined in detail. A sigma-function is defined, whose minimum value with respect to global parameters is the entropy. A comparison is made between the use of global functions sigma and phase functions H (associated with the development of various H-theorems of ideal turbulence). It is shown that the two approaches are complimentary though conceptually different: H-theorems show that an isolated system tends to equilibrium while sigma-functions allow the demonstration that entropy never decreases when two previously isolated systems are combined. This provides a more complete picture of entropy in the statistical mechanics of ideal fluids.

  9. Absolute multilateration between spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muelaner, Jody; Wadsworth, William; Azini, Maria; Mullineux, Glen; Hughes, Ben; Reichold, Armin

    2017-04-01

    Environmental effects typically limit the accuracy of large scale coordinate measurements in applications such as aircraft production and particle accelerator alignment. This paper presents an initial design for a novel measurement technique with analysis and simulation showing that that it could overcome the environmental limitations to provide a step change in large scale coordinate measurement accuracy. Referred to as absolute multilateration between spheres (AMS), it involves using absolute distance interferometry to directly measure the distances between pairs of plain steel spheres. A large portion of each sphere remains accessible as a reference datum, while the laser path can be shielded from environmental disturbances. As a single scale bar this can provide accurate scale information to be used for instrument verification or network measurement scaling. Since spheres can be simultaneously measured from multiple directions, it also allows highly accurate multilateration-based coordinate measurements to act as a large scale datum structure for localized measurements, or to be integrated within assembly tooling, coordinate measurement machines or robotic machinery. Analysis and simulation show that AMS can be self-aligned to achieve a theoretical combined standard uncertainty for the independent uncertainties of an individual 1 m scale bar of approximately 0.49 µm. It is also shown that combined with a 1 µm m‑1 standard uncertainty in the central reference system this could result in coordinate standard uncertainty magnitudes of 42 µm over a slender 1 m by 20 m network. This would be a sufficient step change in accuracy to enable next generation aerospace structures with natural laminar flow and part-to-part interchangeability.

  10. Absolute measurement of length with nanometric resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apostol, D.; Garoi, F.; Timcu, A.; Damian, V.; Logofatu, P. C.; Nascov, V.

    2005-08-01

    Laser interferometer displacement measuring transducers have a well-defined traceability route to the definition of the meter. The laser interferometer is de-facto length scale for applications in micro and nano technologies. However their physical unit -half lambda is too large for nanometric resolution. Fringe interpolation-usual technique to improve the resolution-lack of reproducibility could be avoided using the principles of absolute distance measurement. Absolute distance refers to the use of interferometric techniques for determining the position of an object without the necessity of measuring continuous displacements between points. The interference pattern as produced by the interference of two point-like coherent sources is fitted to a geometric model so as to determine the longitudinal location of the target by minimizing least square errors. The longitudinal coordinate of the target was measured with accuracy better than 1 nm, for a target position range of 0.4μm.

  11. Estimating Absolute Site Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Malagnini, L; Mayeda, K M; Akinci, A; Bragato, P L

    2004-07-15

    The authors use previously determined direct-wave attenuation functions as well as stable, coda-derived source excitation spectra to isolate the absolute S-wave site effect for the horizontal and vertical components of weak ground motion. They used selected stations in the seismic network of the eastern Alps, and find the following: (1) all ''hard rock'' sites exhibited deamplification phenomena due to absorption at frequencies ranging between 0.5 and 12 Hz (the available bandwidth), on both the horizontal and vertical components; (2) ''hard rock'' site transfer functions showed large variability at high-frequency; (3) vertical-motion site transfer functions show strong frequency-dependence, and (4) H/V spectral ratios do not reproduce the characteristics of the true horizontal site transfer functions; (5) traditional, relative site terms obtained by using reference ''rock sites'' can be misleading in inferring the behaviors of true site transfer functions, since most rock sites have non-flat responses due to shallow heterogeneities resulting from varying degrees of weathering. They also use their stable source spectra to estimate total radiated seismic energy and compare against previous results. they find that the earthquakes in this region exhibit non-constant dynamic stress drop scaling which gives further support for a fundamental difference in rupture dynamics between small and large earthquakes. To correct the vertical and horizontal S-wave spectra for attenuation, they used detailed regional attenuation functions derived by Malagnini et al. (2002) who determined frequency-dependent geometrical spreading and Q for the region. These corrections account for the gross path effects (i.e., all distance-dependent effects), although the source and site effects are still present in the distance-corrected spectra. The main goal of this study is to isolate the absolute site effect (as a function of frequency) by removing the source spectrum (moment-rate spectrum) from

  12. Absolute Radiation Thermometry in the NIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bünger, L.; Taubert, R. D.; Gutschwager, B.; Anhalt, K.; Briaudeau, S.; Sadli, M.

    2017-04-01

    A near infrared (NIR) radiation thermometer (RT) for temperature measurements in the range from 773 K up to 1235 K was characterized and calibrated in terms of the "Mise en Pratique for the definition of the Kelvin" (MeP-K) by measuring its absolute spectral radiance responsivity. Using Planck's law of thermal radiation allows the direct measurement of the thermodynamic temperature independently of any ITS-90 fixed-point. To determine the absolute spectral radiance responsivity of the radiation thermometer in the NIR spectral region, an existing PTB monochromator-based calibration setup was upgraded with a supercontinuum laser system (0.45 μm to 2.4 μm) resulting in a significantly improved signal-to-noise ratio. The RT was characterized with respect to its nonlinearity, size-of-source effect, distance effect, and the consistency of its individual temperature measuring ranges. To further improve the calibration setup, a new tool for the aperture alignment and distance measurement was developed. Furthermore, the diffraction correction as well as the impedance correction of the current-to-voltage converter is considered. The calibration scheme and the corresponding uncertainty budget of the absolute spectral responsivity are presented. A relative standard uncertainty of 0.1 % (k=1) for the absolute spectral radiance responsivity was achieved. The absolute radiometric calibration was validated at four temperature values with respect to the ITS-90 via a variable temperature heatpipe blackbody (773 K ...1235 K) and at a gold fixed-point blackbody radiator (1337.33 K).

  13. Methods for Melting Temperature Calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Qi-Jun

    Melting temperature calculation has important applications in the theoretical study of phase diagrams and computational materials screenings. In this thesis, we present two new methods, i.e., the improved Widom's particle insertion method and the small-cell coexistence method, which we developed in order to capture melting temperatures both accurately and quickly. We propose a scheme that drastically improves the efficiency of Widom's particle insertion method by efficiently sampling cavities while calculating the integrals providing the chemical potentials of a physical system. This idea enables us to calculate chemical potentials of liquids directly from first-principles without the help of any reference system, which is necessary in the commonly used thermodynamic integration method. As an example, we apply our scheme, combined with the density functional formalism, to the calculation of the chemical potential of liquid copper. The calculated chemical potential is further used to locate the melting temperature. The calculated results closely agree with experiments. We propose the small-cell coexistence method based on the statistical analysis of small-size coexistence MD simulations. It eliminates the risk of a metastable superheated solid in the fast-heating method, while also significantly reducing the computer cost relative to the traditional large-scale coexistence method. Using empirical potentials, we validate the method and systematically study the finite-size effect on the calculated melting points. The method converges to the exact result in the limit of a large system size. An accuracy within 100 K in melting temperature is usually achieved when the simulation contains more than 100 atoms. DFT examples of Tantalum, high-pressure Sodium, and ionic material NaCl are shown to demonstrate the accuracy and flexibility of the method in its practical applications. The method serves as a promising approach for large-scale automated material screening in which

  14. The viscosity of planetary tholeiitic melts: A configurational entropy model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sehlke, Alexander; Whittington, Alan G.

    2016-10-01

    The viscosity (η) of silicate melts is a fundamental physical property controlling mass transfer in magmatic systems. Viscosity can span many orders of magnitude, strongly depending on temperature and composition. Several models are available that describe this dependency for terrestrial melts quite well. Planetary basaltic lavas however are distinctly different in composition, being dominantly alkali-poor, iron-rich and/or highly magnesian. We measured the viscosity of 20 anhydrous tholeiitic melts, of which 15 represent known or estimated surface compositions of Mars, Mercury, the Moon, Io and Vesta, by concentric cylinder and parallel plate viscometry. The planetary basalts span a viscosity range of 2 orders of magnitude at liquidus temperatures and 4 orders of magnitude near the glass transition, and can be more or less viscous than terrestrial lavas. We find that current models under- and overestimate superliquidus viscosities by up to 2 orders of magnitude for these compositions, and deviate even more strongly from measured viscosities toward the glass transition. We used the Adam-Gibbs theory (A-G) to relate viscosity (η) to absolute temperature (T) and the configurational entropy of the system at that temperature (Sconf), which is in the form of log η =Ae +Be /TSconf . Heat capacities (CP) for glasses and liquids of our investigated compositions were calculated via available literature models. We show that the A-G theory is applicable to model the viscosity of individual complex tholeiitic melts containing 10 or more major oxides as well or better than the commonly used empirical equations. We successfully modeled the global viscosity data set using a constant Ae of -3.34 ± 0.22 log units and 12 adjustable sub-parameters, which capture the compositional and temperature dependence on melt viscosity. Seven sub-parameters account for the compositional dependence of Be and 5 for Sconf. Our model reproduces the 496 measured viscosity data points with a 1

  15. Laser melting of uranium carbides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utton, C. A.; De Bruycker, F.; Boboridis, K.; Jardin, R.; Noel, H.; Guéneau, C.; Manara, D.

    2009-03-01

    In the context of the material research aimed at supporting the development of nuclear plants of the fourth Generation, renewed interest has recently arisen in carbide fuels. A profound understanding of the behaviour of nuclear materials in extreme conditions is of prime importance for the analysis of the operation limits of nuclear fuels, and prediction of possible nuclear reactor accidents. In this context, the main goal of the present paper is to demonstrate the feasibility of laser induced melting experiments on stoichiometric uranium carbides; UC, UC1.5 and UC2. Measurements were performed, at temperatures around 3000 K, under a few bars of inert gas in order to minimise vaporisation and oxidation effects, which may occur at these temperatures. Moreover, a recently developed investigation method has been employed, based on in situ analysis of the sample surface reflectivity evolution during melting. Current results, 2781 K for the melting point of UC, 2665 K for the solidus and 2681 K for the liquidus of U2C3, 2754 K for the solidus and 2770 K for the liquidus of UC2, are in fair agreement with early publications where the melting behaviour of uranium carbides was investigated by traditional furnace melting methods. Further information has been obtained in the current research about the non-congruent (solidus-liquidus) melting of certain carbides, which suggest that a solidus-liquidus scheme is followed by higher ratio carbides, possibly even for UC2.

  16. Cryogenic, Absolute, High Pressure Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, John J. (Inventor); Shams. Qamar A. (Inventor); Powers, William T. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A pressure sensor is provided for cryogenic, high pressure applications. A highly doped silicon piezoresistive pressure sensor is bonded to a silicon substrate in an absolute pressure sensing configuration. The absolute pressure sensor is bonded to an aluminum nitride substrate. Aluminum nitride has appropriate coefficient of thermal expansion for use with highly doped silicon at cryogenic temperatures. A group of sensors, either two sensors on two substrates or four sensors on a single substrate are packaged in a pressure vessel.

  17. Monochromator-Based Absolute Calibration of Radiation Thermometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keawprasert, T.; Anhalt, K.; Taubert, D. R.; Hartmann, J.

    2011-08-01

    A monochromator integrating-sphere-based spectral comparator facility has been developed to calibrate standard radiation thermometers in terms of the absolute spectral radiance responsivity, traceable to the PTB cryogenic radiometer. The absolute responsivity calibration has been improved using a 75 W xenon lamp with a reflective mirror and imaging optics to a relative standard uncertainty at the peak wavelength of approximately 0.17 % ( k = 1). Via a relative measurement of the out-of-band responsivity, the spectral responsivity of radiation thermometers can be fully characterized. To verify the calibration accuracy, the absolutely calibrated radiation thermometer is used to measure Au and Cu freezing-point temperatures and then to compare the obtained results with the values obtained by absolute methods, resulting in T - T 90 values of +52 mK and -50 mK for the gold and copper fixed points, respectively.

  18. Thermodynamics of freezing and melting.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Ulf R; Costigliola, Lorenzo; Bailey, Nicholas P; Schrøder, Thomas B; Dyre, Jeppe C

    2016-08-17

    Although the freezing of liquids and melting of crystals are fundamental for many areas of the sciences, even simple properties like the temperature-pressure relation along the melting line cannot be predicted today. Here we present a theory in which properties of the coexisting crystal and liquid phases at a single thermodynamic state point provide the basis for calculating the pressure, density and entropy of fusion as functions of temperature along the melting line, as well as the variation along this line of the reduced crystalline vibrational mean-square displacement (the Lindemann ratio), and the liquid's diffusion constant and viscosity. The framework developed, which applies for the sizable class of systems characterized by hidden scale invariance, is validated by computer simulations of the standard 12-6 Lennard-Jones system.

  19. Thermodynamics of freezing and melting

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, Ulf R.; Costigliola, Lorenzo; Bailey, Nicholas P.; Schrøder, Thomas B.; Dyre, Jeppe C.

    2016-01-01

    Although the freezing of liquids and melting of crystals are fundamental for many areas of the sciences, even simple properties like the temperature–pressure relation along the melting line cannot be predicted today. Here we present a theory in which properties of the coexisting crystal and liquid phases at a single thermodynamic state point provide the basis for calculating the pressure, density and entropy of fusion as functions of temperature along the melting line, as well as the variation along this line of the reduced crystalline vibrational mean-square displacement (the Lindemann ratio), and the liquid's diffusion constant and viscosity. The framework developed, which applies for the sizable class of systems characterized by hidden scale invariance, is validated by computer simulations of the standard 12-6 Lennard-Jones system. PMID:27530064

  20. Database applicaton for absolute spectrophotometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bochkov, Valery V.; Shumko, Sergiy

    2002-12-01

    32-bit database application with multidocument interface for Windows has been developed to calculate absolute energy distributions of observed spectra. The original database contains wavelength calibrated observed spectra which had been already passed through apparatus reductions such as flatfielding, background and apparatus noise subtracting. Absolute energy distributions of observed spectra are defined in unique scale by means of registering them simultaneously with artificial intensity standard. Observations of sequence of spectrophotometric standards are used to define absolute energy of the artificial standard. Observations of spectrophotometric standards are used to define optical extinction in selected moments. FFT algorithm implemented in the application allows performing convolution (deconvolution) spectra with user-defined PSF. The object-oriented interface has been created using facilities of C++ libraries. Client/server model with Windows Socket functionality based on TCP/IP protocol is used to develop the application. It supports Dynamic Data Exchange conversation in server mode and uses Microsoft Exchange communication facilities.

  1. Empirical models relating viscosity and tracer diffusion in magmatic silicate melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mungall, James E.

    2002-01-01

    The Adam-Gibbs equations describing relaxation in silicate melts are applied to diffusion of trace components of multicomponent liquids. The Adam-Gibbs theory is used as a starting point to derive an explicit relation between viscosity and diffusion including non-Arrhenian temperature dependence. The general form of the equation is Diη = Aiexp{Δ( scEi)/ TSc}, where D is diffusivity, η is melt viscosity, T is absolute temperature, Δ( scEi) is the difference between the products of activation energies and local configurational entropies for viscous and diffusive relaxation, Ai is a constant that depends on the characteristics of the diffusing solute particles, and Sc is configurational entropy of the melt. The general equation will be impractical for most predictive purposes due to the paucity of configurational entropy data for silicate melts. Under most magmatic conditions the proposed non-Arrhenian behaviour can be neglected, allowing the general equation to be simplified to a generalized form of the Eyring equation to describe diffusion of solutes that interact weakly with the melt structure: Diη/ T = Qiexp{Δ Ei/ RT}, where Qi and Δ Ei depend on the characteristics of the solute and the melt structure. If the diffusing solute interacts strongly with the melt structure or is a network-forming cation itself, then Δ Ei = 0, and the relation between viscosity and diffusion has the functional form of the classic Eyring and Stokes-Einstein equations; Diη/ T = Qi. If the diffusing solute can make diffusive jumps without requiring cooperative rearrangement of the melt structure, the diffusivity is entirely decoupled from melt viscosity and should be Arrhenian, i.e., Di = Qiexp{ Bi/ T}. A dataset of 594 published diffusivities in melts ranging from the system CAS through diopside, basalt, andesite, anhydrous rhyolite, hydrous rhyolite, and peralkaline rhyolite to albite, orthoclase, and jadeite is compared with the model equations. Alkali diffusion is completely

  2. Absolute classification with unsupervised clustering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeon, Byeungwoo; Landgrebe, D. A.

    1992-01-01

    An absolute classification algorithm is proposed in which the class definition through training samples or otherwise is required only for a particular class of interest. The absolute classification is considered as a problem of unsupervised clustering when one cluster is known initially. The definitions and statistics of the other classes are automatically developed through the weighted unsupervised clustering procedure, which is developed to keep the cluster corresponding to the class of interest from losing its identity as the class of interest. Once all the classes are developed, a conventional relative classifier such as the maximum-likelihood classifier is used in the classification.

  3. Absolute transition probabilities of phosphorus.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, M. H.; Roig, R. A.; Bengtson, R. D.

    1971-01-01

    Use of a gas-driven shock tube to measure the absolute strengths of 21 P I lines and 126 P II lines (from 3300 to 6900 A). Accuracy for prominent, isolated neutral and ionic lines is estimated to be 28 to 40% and 18 to 30%, respectively. The data and the corresponding theoretical predictions are examined for conformity with the sum rules.-

  4. Relativistic Absolutism in Moral Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vogt, W. Paul

    1982-01-01

    Discusses Emile Durkheim's "Moral Education: A Study in the Theory and Application of the Sociology of Education," which holds that morally healthy societies may vary in culture and organization but must possess absolute rules of moral behavior. Compares this moral theory with current theory and practice of American educators. (MJL)

  5. Microscopy of Si films during laser melting

    SciTech Connect

    Lemons, R.A.; Boesch, M.A.

    1982-04-15

    By using an optical microscope to directly observe thin Si films as they are melted with a cw argon laser beam, the crystallization process can be better understood. In an environment containing oxygen, stable filaments of solid silicon precipitate from the molten pool at low laser power. The surrounding melt may contain dissolved oxygen which reduces the melting point, allowing the liquid and solid to coexist. As laser power is increased a uniform molten pool is achieved. In emitted light the pool is dark compared to the surrounding solid due to the melt's low emissivity. The spectrum of this emitted thermal radiation accurately fits the Planck law at 1740 /sup 0/K, confirming the temperature of the melt.

  6. Magnetic Biocomposites for Remote Melting.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Mengbo; Liebert, Tim; Müller, Robert; Dellith, Andrea; Gräfe, Christine; Clement, Joachim H; Heinze, Thomas

    2015-08-10

    A new approach toward the fabrication of biocompatible composites suitable for remote melting is presented. It is shown that magnetite nanoparticles (MNP) can be embedded into a matrix of biocompatible thermoplastic dextran esters. For that purpose, fatty acid esters of dextran with adjustable melting points in the range of 30-140 °C were synthesized. Esterification of the polysaccharide by activation of the acid as iminium chlorides guaranteed mild reaction conditions leading to high quality products as confirmed by FTIR- and NMR spectroscopy as well as by gel permeation chromatography (GPC). A method for the preparation of magnetically responsive bionanocomposites was developed consisting of combined dissolution/suspension of the dextran ester and hydrophobized MNPs in an organic solvent followed by homogenization with ultrasonication, casting of the solution, drying and melting of the composite for a defined shaping. This process leads to a uniform distribution of MNPs in nanocomposite as revealed by scanning electron microscope. Samples of different geometries were exposed to high frequency alternating magnetic field. It could be shown that defined remote melting of such biocompatible nanocomposites is possible for the first time. This may lead to a new class of magnetic remote control systems, which are suitable for controlled release applications or self-healing materials.

  7. Development of a melting model for meteors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dias, Bruno; Bariselli, Federico; Turchi, Alessandro; Frezzotti, Aldo; Chatelain, Philippe; Magin, Thierry

    2016-11-01

    Meteor phenomenon is a frequent event happening on planet Earth. Due to the high entry velocities of these objects, the surface of the material undergoes extreme heat loads. Since the material is mainly composed by several oxides, eventually, the surface temperature will overcome the melting point. In this study we propose a melting model, in order to understand the material behavior, coupled with a flow solver. A detailed study of the flow around the stagnation streamline is also presented.

  8. The Absolute Spectrum Polarimeter (ASP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kogut, A. J.

    2010-01-01

    The Absolute Spectrum Polarimeter (ASP) is an Explorer-class mission to map the absolute intensity and linear polarization of the cosmic microwave background and diffuse astrophysical foregrounds over the full sky from 30 GHz to 5 THz. The principal science goal is the detection and characterization of linear polarization from an inflationary epoch in the early universe, with tensor-to-scalar ratio r much greater than 1O(raised to the power of { -3}) and Compton distortion y < 10 (raised to the power of{-6}). We describe the ASP instrument and mission architecture needed to detect the signature of an inflationary epoch in the early universe using only 4 semiconductor bolometers.

  9. Physics of negative absolute temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, Eitan; Penrose, Oliver

    2017-01-01

    Negative absolute temperatures were introduced into experimental physics by Purcell and Pound, who successfully applied this concept to nuclear spins; nevertheless, the concept has proved controversial: a recent article aroused considerable interest by its claim, based on a classical entropy formula (the "volume entropy") due to Gibbs, that negative temperatures violated basic principles of statistical thermodynamics. Here we give a thermodynamic analysis that confirms the negative-temperature interpretation of the Purcell-Pound experiments. We also examine the principal arguments that have been advanced against the negative temperature concept; we find that these arguments are not logically compelling, and moreover that the underlying "volume" entropy formula leads to predictions inconsistent with existing experimental results on nuclear spins. We conclude that, despite the counterarguments, negative absolute temperatures make good theoretical sense and did occur in the experiments designed to produce them.

  10. Optomechanics for absolute rotation detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davuluri, Sankar

    2016-07-01

    In this article, we present an application of optomechanical cavity for the absolute rotation detection. The optomechanical cavity is arranged in a Michelson interferometer in such a way that the classical centrifugal force due to rotation changes the length of the optomechanical cavity. The change in the cavity length induces a shift in the frequency of the cavity mode. The phase shift corresponding to the frequency shift in the cavity mode is measured at the interferometer output to estimate the angular velocity of absolute rotation. We derived an analytic expression to estimate the minimum detectable rotation rate in our scheme for a given optomechanical cavity. Temperature dependence of the rotation detection sensitivity is studied.

  11. Absolute Antenna Calibration at the US National Geodetic Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mader, G. L.; Bilich, A. L.

    2012-12-01

    Geodetic GNSS applications routinely demand millimeter precision and extremely high levels of accuracy. To achieve these accuracies, measurement and instrument biases at the centimeter to millimeter level must be understood. One of these biases is the antenna phase center, the apparent point of signal reception for a GNSS antenna. It has been well established that phase center patterns differ between antenna models and manufacturers; additional research suggests that the addition of a radome or the choice of antenna mount can significantly alter those a priori phase center patterns. For the more demanding GNSS positioning applications and especially in cases of mixed-antenna networks, it is all the more important to know antenna phase center variations as a function of both elevation and azimuth in the antenna reference frame and incorporate these models into analysis software. Determination of antenna phase center behavior is known as "antenna calibration". Since 1994, NGS has computed relative antenna calibrations for more than 350 antennas. In recent years, the geodetic community has moved to absolute calibrations - the IGS adopted absolute antenna phase center calibrations in 2006 for use in their orbit and clock products, and NGS's CORS group began using absolute antenna calibration upon the release of the new CORS coordinates in IGS08 epoch 2005.00 and NAD 83(2011,MA11,PA11) epoch 2010.00. Although NGS relative calibrations can be and have been converted to absolute, it is considered best practice to independently measure phase center characteristics in an absolute sense. Consequently, NGS has developed and operates an absolute calibration system. These absolute antenna calibrations accommodate the demand for greater accuracy and for 2-dimensional (elevation and azimuth) parameterization. NGS will continue to provide calibration values via the NGS web site www.ngs.noaa.gov/ANTCAL, and will publish calibrations in the ANTEX format as well as the legacy ANTINFO

  12. Melt containment member

    SciTech Connect

    Rieken, Joel R.; Heidloff, Andrew J.

    2014-09-09

    A tubular melt containment member for transient containment of molten metals and alloys, especially reactive metals and alloys, includes a melt-contacting layer or region that comprises an oxygen-deficient rare earth oxide material that is less reactive as compared to the counterpart stoichiometric rare earth oxide. The oxygen-deficient (sub-stoichiometric) rare earth oxide can comprise oxygen-deficient yttria represented by Y.sub.2O.sub.3-x wherein x is from 0.01 to 0.1. Use of the oxygen-deficient rare earth oxide as the melt-contacting layer or region material reduces reaction with the melt for a given melt temperature and melt contact time.

  13. Melting Behaviour of Ferronickel Slags

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagadin, Christoph; Luidold, Stefan; Wagner, Christoph; Wenzl, Christine

    2016-12-01

    The industrial manufacturing of ferronickel in electric furnaces produces large amounts of slag with strong acidic character and high melting points, which seriously stresses the furnace refractory lining. In this study, the melting behavior of synthetically produced ferronickel slags on magnesia as refractory material was determined by means of a hot stage microscope. Therefore, slags comprising the main oxides SiO2 (35-70 wt.%), MgO (15-45 wt.%) and Fe2O3 (5-35 wt.%) were melted in a graphite crucible and afterwards analyzed by a hot stage microscope. The design of experiments, which was created by the statistic software MODDE®, included 20 experiments with varying slag compositions as well as atmospheres. The evaluation of the test results occurred at three different characteristic states of the samples like the softening point according to DIN 51730 and the temperatures at which the area of residual cross-section of the samples amounted to 30% and 40%, respectively, of the original value depending of their SiO2/MgO ratio and iron oxide content. Additionally, the thickness of the zone influenced by the slag was measured and evaluated.

  14. Studies of thermal dissolution of RDX in TNT melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suvorova, N. A.; Hamilton, V. T.; Oschwald, D. M.; Balakirev, F. F.; Smilowitz, L. B.; Henson, B. F.

    2017-01-01

    The thermal response of energetic materials is studied due to its importance in issues of material safety and surety. Secondary high explosives which melt before they thermally decompose present challenging systems to model due to the addition of material flow. Composition B is a particularly challenging system due to its multiphase nature with a low melt component (TNT) and a high melt component (RDX). The dissolution of RDX crystals in molten TNT at the temperature below RDX melting point has been investigated using hot stage microscopy. In this paper, we present data on the dissolution rate of RDX crystals in molten TNT as a function of temperature above the TNT melt.

  15. Series that Converge Absolutely but Don't Converge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kantrowitz, Robert; Schramm, Michael

    2012-01-01

    If a series of real numbers converges absolutely, then it converges. The usual proof requires completeness in the form of the Cauchy criterion. Failing completeness, the result is false. We provide examples of rational series that illustrate this point. The Cantor set appears in connection with one of the examples.

  16. Absolute Instability in Swept Leading-Edge Boundary Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, R.-S.; Li, F.; Malik, M. R.

    1997-11-01

    Absolute instabilities in the swept Hiemenz flow and flows over Poll's swept cylinder are studied. It is assumed that the span is infinite and the laminar flow field is subjected to a line impulsive excitation so that the spanwise wavenumber (β) is taken to be real, which is akin to the rotating disk study made by Lingwood.footnote Lingwood, R. J., J. Fluid Mech., 299, 17, 1995. We found that these flows can be absolutely unstable in the chordwise (x) direction. The pinch-point singularities formed by the coalescence of two distinct spatial branches can lie either below or above the real α-axis. The pinch points with a positive αi imply the existence of an unstable disturbance propagating against the mainstream, which has never been observed before. It is found that singularities of pinch type occur in a region very close to the leading edge, therefore the attachment-line Reynolds number is used to correlate the onset of absolute instability. The critical Reynolds number for absolute instability is found to be about R=540 compared to 583 for the attachment-line instability. Provided the non-linear behavior of this absolute instability is sufficient to trigger the laminar to turbulent transition, then it would cause a complete loss of laminar flow on a swept wing as does the attachment-line instability.

  17. The initiation of segmented buoyancy-driven melting during continental breakup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallacher, Ryan J.; Keir, Derek; Harmon, Nicholas; Stuart, Graham; Leroy, Sylvie; Hammond, James O. S.; Kendall, J.-Michael; Ayele, Atalay; Goitom, Berhe; Ogubazghi, Ghebrebrhan; Ahmed, Abdulhakim

    2016-10-01

    Melting of the mantle during continental breakup leads to magmatic intrusion and volcanism, yet our understanding of the location and dominant mechanisms of melt generation in rifting environments is impeded by a paucity of direct observations of mantle melting. It is unclear when during the rifting process the segmented nature of magma supply typical of seafloor spreading initiates. Here, we use Rayleigh-wave tomography to construct a high-resolution absolute three-dimensional shear-wave velocity model of the upper 250 km beneath the Afar triple junction, imaging the mantle response during progressive continental breakup. Our model suggests melt production is highest and melting depths deepest early during continental breakup. Elevated melt production during continental rifting is likely due to localized thinning and melt focusing when the rift is narrow. In addition, we interpret segmented zones of melt supply beneath the rift, suggesting that buoyancy-driven active upwelling of the mantle initiates early during continental rifting.

  18. The initiation of segmented buoyancy-driven melting during continental breakup.

    PubMed

    Gallacher, Ryan J; Keir, Derek; Harmon, Nicholas; Stuart, Graham; Leroy, Sylvie; Hammond, James O S; Kendall, J-Michael; Ayele, Atalay; Goitom, Berhe; Ogubazghi, Ghebrebrhan; Ahmed, Abdulhakim

    2016-10-18

    Melting of the mantle during continental breakup leads to magmatic intrusion and volcanism, yet our understanding of the location and dominant mechanisms of melt generation in rifting environments is impeded by a paucity of direct observations of mantle melting. It is unclear when during the rifting process the segmented nature of magma supply typical of seafloor spreading initiates. Here, we use Rayleigh-wave tomography to construct a high-resolution absolute three-dimensional shear-wave velocity model of the upper 250 km beneath the Afar triple junction, imaging the mantle response during progressive continental breakup. Our model suggests melt production is highest and melting depths deepest early during continental breakup. Elevated melt production during continental rifting is likely due to localized thinning and melt focusing when the rift is narrow. In addition, we interpret segmented zones of melt supply beneath the rift, suggesting that buoyancy-driven active upwelling of the mantle initiates early during continental rifting.

  19. Absolute calibration of optical tweezers

    SciTech Connect

    Viana, N.B.; Mazolli, A.; Maia Neto, P.A.; Nussenzveig, H.M.; Rocha, M.S.; Mesquita, O.N.

    2006-03-27

    As a step toward absolute calibration of optical tweezers, a first-principles theory of trapping forces with no adjustable parameters, corrected for spherical aberration, is experimentally tested. Employing two very different setups, we find generally very good agreement for the transverse trap stiffness as a function of microsphere radius for a broad range of radii, including the values employed in practice, and at different sample chamber depths. The domain of validity of the WKB ('geometrical optics') approximation to the theory is verified. Theoretical predictions for the trapping threshold, peak position, depth variation, multiple equilibria, and 'jump' effects are also confirmed.

  20. Melt inclusions: Chapter 6

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,; Lowenstern, J. B.

    2014-01-01

    Melt inclusions are small droplets of silicate melt that are trapped in minerals during their growth in a magma. Once formed, they commonly retain much of their initial composition (with some exceptions) unless they are re-opened at some later stage. Melt inclusions thus offer several key advantages over whole rock samples: (i) they record pristine concentrations of volatiles and metals that are usually lost during magma solidification and degassing, (ii) they are snapshots in time whereas whole rocks are the time-integrated end products, thus allowing a more detailed, time-resolved view into magmatic processes (iii) they are largely unaffected by subsolidus alteration. Due to these characteristics, melt inclusions are an ideal tool to study the evolution of mineralized magma systems. This chapter first discusses general aspects of melt inclusions formation and methods for their investigation, before reviewing studies performed on mineralized magma systems.

  1. Absolute, Extreme-Ultraviolet, Solar Spectral Irradiance Monitor (AESSIM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huber, Martin C. E.; Smith, Peter L.; Parkinson, W. H.; Kuehne, M.; Kock, M.

    1988-01-01

    AESSIM, the Absolute, Extreme-Ultraviolet, Solar Spectral Irradiance Monitor, is designed to measure the absolute solar spectral irradiance at extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) wavelengths. The data are required for studies of the processes that occur in the earth's upper atmosphere and for predictions of atmospheric drag on space vehicles. AESSIM is comprised of sun-pointed spectrometers and newly-developed, secondary standards of spectral irradiance for the EUV. Use of the in-orbit standard sources will eliminate the uncertainties caused by changes in spectrometer efficiency that have plagued all previous measurements of the solar spectral EUV flux.

  2. Melting and superheating of nanowires--a nanotube approach.

    PubMed

    Sar, Dillip Kumar; Nanda, Karuna Kar

    2010-05-21

    We have investigated the size-dependent melting of nanotubes based on a thermodynamic approach and shown that the melting temperature of nanotubes depends on the outer radius and on the inner radius through the thickness of the nanotubes. Size-dependent melting of nanowires and thin films has been derived from that of nanotubes. We validate the size-dependent melting of nanotubes, nanowires and thin films by comparing the results with available molecular dynamic simulations and experimental results. It has also been inferred that superheating occurs when the melting starts from the inner surface and proceeds towards the outer surface, while melting point depression occurs when the melting starts from the outer surface and proceeds towards the inner surface.

  3. Quantum melting of spin ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onoda, Shigeki; Tanaka, Yoichi

    2010-03-01

    A quantum melting of the spin ice is proposed for pyrochlore-lattice magnets Pr2TM2O7 (TM =Ir, Zr, and Sn). The quantum pseudospin-1/2 model is derived from the strong-coupling perturbation of the f-p electron transfer in the basis of atomic non-Kramers magnetic doublets. The ground states are characterized by a cooperative ferroquadrupole and pseudospin chirality in the cubic unit cell, forming a magnetic analog of smectic liquid crystals. Then, pinch points observed in spin correlations for dipolar spin-ice systems are replaced with the minima. The relevance to experiments is discussed.

  4. System and method for calibrating a rotary absolute position sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Donald R. (Inventor); Permenter, Frank Noble (Inventor); Radford, Nicolaus A (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A system includes a rotary device, a rotary absolute position (RAP) sensor generating encoded pairs of voltage signals describing positional data of the rotary device, a host machine, and an algorithm. The algorithm calculates calibration parameters usable to determine an absolute position of the rotary device using the encoded pairs, and is adapted for linearly-mapping an ellipse defined by the encoded pairs to thereby calculate the calibration parameters. A method of calibrating the RAP sensor includes measuring the rotary position as encoded pairs of voltage signals, linearly-mapping an ellipse defined by the encoded pairs to thereby calculate the calibration parameters, and calculating an absolute position of the rotary device using the calibration parameters. The calibration parameters include a positive definite matrix (A) and a center point (q) of the ellipse. The voltage signals may include an encoded sine and cosine of a rotary angle of the rotary device.

  5. Cosmology with negative absolute temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieira, J. P. P.; Byrnes, Christian T.; Lewis, Antony

    2016-08-01

    Negative absolute temperatures (NAT) are an exotic thermodynamical consequence of quantum physics which has been known since the 1950's (having been achieved in the lab on a number of occasions). Recently, the work of Braun et al. [1] has rekindled interest in negative temperatures and hinted at a possibility of using NAT systems in the lab as dark energy analogues. This paper goes one step further, looking into the cosmological consequences of the existence of a NAT component in the Universe. NAT-dominated expanding Universes experience a borderline phantom expansion (w < -1) with no Big Rip, and their contracting counterparts are forced to bounce after the energy density becomes sufficiently large. Both scenarios might be used to solve horizon and flatness problems analogously to standard inflation and bouncing cosmologies. We discuss the difficulties in obtaining and ending a NAT-dominated epoch, and possible ways of obtaining density perturbations with an acceptable spectrum.

  6. Signatures of nonthermal melting

    PubMed Central

    Zier, Tobias; Zijlstra, Eeuwe S.; Kalitsov, Alan; Theodonis, Ioannis; Garcia, Martin E.

    2015-01-01

    Intense ultrashort laser pulses can melt crystals in less than a picosecond but, in spite of over thirty years of active research, for many materials it is not known to what extent thermal and nonthermal microscopic processes cause this ultrafast phenomenon. Here, we perform ab-initio molecular-dynamics simulations of silicon on a laser-excited potential-energy surface, exclusively revealing nonthermal signatures of laser-induced melting. From our simulated atomic trajectories, we compute the decay of five structure factors and the time-dependent structure function. We demonstrate how these quantities provide criteria to distinguish predominantly nonthermal from thermal melting. PMID:26798822

  7. Constraints on Melt Geometry and Distribution from Seismic Anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammond, J. O. S.

    2014-12-01

    Geophysically imaging melt beneath volcanic systems has been a long-standing goal in Earth Science. It presents the only way of taking a snapshot of the magmatic system, and thus offers clues to the eruptive potential of potentially hazardous volcanoes. Techniques such as magnetotellurics or seismic tomography have provided invocative images of the magmatic system, furthering our understanding that a volcano is not simply underlain by a small shallow magma chamber occasionally connected to the surface, but likely lies above a much larger interconnected crystal-melt-mush (CMM) zone, where most of the melt is stored before being transported to shallow depths. However, despite these breakthroughs it has remained difficult to estimate the details of melt storage; in particular the shape and amount of melt stored in the magmatic system. In most settings melt is likely to retain a preferential orientation, whether through being stored as dikes or sills in the crust, or through the formation of melt bands or preferentially oriented inclusions or channels in the mantle. This will cause significant seismic anisotropy, with the amount and symmetry of the anisotropy dictated by the nature of melt segregation. Thus, measurements of seismic anisotropy offer a richer dataset than simply measuring absolute velocities alone. Here I will show the typical characteristics of melt induced anisotropy that may be observed in a variety of teleseismic techniques (shear-wave splitting, receiver functions, surface waves, Pn). I apply these observations to datasets from the East-African rift and other magmatic regions showing the nature of partial melt storage in the mantle and deep crust. These datasets offer the potential to better understand the storage characteristics of melt, especially when combined with other geophysical, geodetic and geological datasets such as magnetotellurics, GPS, InSAR and petrology.

  8. Melt fracture revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Greenberg, J. M.

    2003-07-16

    In a previous paper the author and Demay advanced a model to explain the melt fracture instability observed when molten linear polymer melts are extruded in a capillary rheometer operating under the controlled condition that the inlet flow rate was held constant. The model postulated that the melts were a slightly compressible viscous fluid and allowed for slipping of the melt at the wall. The novel feature of that model was the use of an empirical switch law which governed the amount of wall slip. The model successfully accounted for the oscillatory behavior of the exit flow rate, typically referred to as the melt fracture instability, but did not simultaneously yield the fine scale spatial oscillations in the melt typically referred to as shark skin. In this note a new model is advanced which simultaneously explains the melt fracture instability and shark skin phenomena. The model postulates that the polymer is a slightly compressible linearly viscous fluid but assumes no slip boundary conditions at the capillary wall. In simple shear the shear stress {tau}and strain rate d are assumed to be related by d = F{tau} where F ranges between F{sub 2} and F{sub 1} > F{sub 2}. A strain rate dependent yield function is introduced and this function governs whether F evolves towards F{sub 2} or F{sub 1}. This model accounts for the empirical observation that at high shears polymers align and slide more easily than at low shears and explains both the melt fracture and shark skin phenomena.

  9. Mathematical Model for Absolute Magnetic Measuring Systems in Industrial Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fügenschuh, Armin; Fügenschuh, Marzena; Ludszuweit, Marina; Mojsic, Aleksandar; Sokół, Joanna

    2015-09-01

    Scales for measuring systems are either based on incremental or absolute measuring methods. Incremental scales need to initialize a measurement cycle at a reference point. From there, the position is computed by counting increments of a periodic graduation. Absolute methods do not need reference points, since the position can be read directly from the scale. The positions on the complete scales are encoded using two incremental tracks with different graduation. We present a new method for absolute measuring using only one track for position encoding up to micrometre range. Instead of the common perpendicular magnetic areas, we use a pattern of trapezoidal magnetic areas, to store more complex information. For positioning, we use the magnetic field where every position is characterized by a set of values measured by a hall sensor array. We implement a method for reconstruction of absolute positions from the set of unique measured values. We compare two patterns with respect to uniqueness, accuracy, stability and robustness of positioning. We discuss how stability and robustness are influenced by different errors during the measurement in real applications and how those errors can be compensated.

  10. Automatic twin vessel recrystallizer. Effective purification of acetaminophen by successive automatic recrystallization and absolute determination of purity by DSC.

    PubMed

    Nara, Osamu

    2011-01-24

    I describe an interchangeable twin vessel (J, N) automatic glass recrystallizer that eliminates the time-consuming recovery and recycling of crystals for repeated recrystallization. The sample goes in the dissolution vessel J containing a magnetic stir-bar K; J is clamped to the upper joint H of recrystallizer body D. Empty crystallization vessel N is clamped to the lower joint M. Pure solvent is delivered to the dissolution vessel and the crystallization vessel via the head of the condenser A. Crystallization vessel is heated (P). The dissolution reservoir is stirred and heated by the solvent vapor (F). Continuous outflow of filtrate E out of J keeps N at a stable boiling temperature. This results in efficient dissolution, evaporation and separation of pure crystals Q. Pure solvent in the dissolution reservoir is recovered by suction. Empty dissolution and crystallization vessels are detached. Stirrer magnet is transferred to the crystallization vessel and the role of the vessels are then reversed. Evacuating mother liquor out of the upper twin vessel, the apparatus unit is ready for the next automatic recrystallization by refilling twin vessels with pure solvent. We show successive automatic recrystallization of acetaminophen from diethyl ether obtaining acetaminophen of higher melting temperatures than USP and JP reference standards by 8× automatic recrystallization, 96% yield at each stage. Also, I demonstrate a novel approach to the determination of absolute purity by combining the successive automatic recrystallization with differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) measurement requiring no reference standards. This involves the measurement of the criterial melting temperature T(0) corresponding to the 100% pure material and quantitative ΔT in DSC based on the van't Hoff law of melting point depression. The purity of six commercial acetaminophen samples and reference standards and an eight times recrystallized product evaluated were 98.8 mol%, 97.9 mol%, 99

  11. Zipper model for the melting of thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullah, Mikrajuddin; Khairunnisa, Shafira; Akbar, Fathan

    2016-01-01

    We propose an alternative model to Lindemann’s criterion for melting that explains the melting of thin films on the basis of a molecular zipper-like mechanism. Using this model, a unique criterion for melting is obtained. We compared the results of the proposed model with experimental data of melting points and heat of fusion for many materials and obtained interesting results. The interesting thing reported here is how complex physics problems can sometimes be modeled with simple objects around us that seemed to have no correlation. This kind of approach is sometimes very important in physics education and should always be taught to undergraduate or graduate students.

  12. Dislocation theory of melting for iron, revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Poirier, J.P.; Shankland, T.J.

    1993-11-01

    Melting point T{sub m} of iron at conditions of the Earth`s inner core boundary (ICB) has been calculated from dislocation theory of melting in metals. Monte Carlo calculations were used to estimate uncertainties introduced by uncertainty in the geophysical parameters that are used in the calculations. These calculations take into account the effects of pressure at ICB conditions and of possible freezing point depression resulting from dilution of pure iron in the outer core. With this approach T{sub m} of pure {var_epsilon}-Fe at a pressure of 330 GPa and without freezing point depression is 6160 {plus_minus} 250 K; for a 1000 K freezing point depression it is 6110 K. T{sub m} of pure {gamma}-Fe is 6060 K, a value that is not significantly different. A possible {alpha}{prime} phase would melt at 5600 K. These values agree with calculated shock wave determinations of T{sub m}. Although calculated T{sub m} of the pure phase is little affected by assumptions about the extent of freezing point depression, the estimated temperature of the inner core boundary is lower by the breezing point depression, perhaps 500--1000 K less than T{sub m} of a pure phase.

  13. Dislocation theory of melting for iron, revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Poirier, J. ); Shankland, T.J. )

    1994-07-10

    The melting point T[sub m] of iron at conditions of the Earth's inner core boundary (ICB) has been calculated from the dislocation theory of melting in metals. Monte Carlo calculations were used to estimate uncertainties introduced by uncertainty in the geophysical parameters that are used in the calculations. These calculations take into account the effects of pressure at ICB conditions and of possible freezing point depression resulting from dilution of pure iron in the outer core. With this approach T[sub m] of pure [epsilon]-Fe at a pressure of 330 GPa and without freezing point depression is 6160[plus minus]250 K; for a 1000 K freezing point depression it is 6110 K. T[sub m] of pure [gamma]-Fe is 6060 K, a value that is not significantly different. A possible [alpha][prime] phase would melt at 5600 K. These values agree with calculated shock wave determinations of T[sub m]. Although calculated T[sub m] of the pure phase is little affected by assumptions about the extent of freezing point depression, the estimated temperature of the inner core boundary is lower by the freezing point depression, perhaps 500--1000 K less than T[sub m] of a pure phase. [copyright] 1994 American Institute of Physics

  14. The Electromotive Series and Other Non-Absolute Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peckham, Gavin D.

    1998-01-01

    This article describes an analogy which may be used to illustrate the principles that underlie the establishment of non-absolute scales of measurements that are evaluated relative to a chosen reference point. The analogy is interwoven with the establishment of the electromotive series, but may be extended to other parameters such as the Celsius and Fahrenheit temperature scales, potential energies, formation and reaction enthalpies, etc.

  15. A Two-Porosity Double-Lithology Model for Partial Melting, Melt Transport and Melt-Rock Reaction in the Mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Y.; Parmentier, M. E.

    2005-12-01

    general, the smaller these relative rates or ratios, the slower the rate at which the melt in the channel re-equilibrates with the matrix. For a given element of interest three important length scales are identified: matrix melting length (L_m); melt-rock reaction length (LMR); and a critical length for channel-matrix partitioning (L_c). The geochemical signature of the melt developed in the deep part of the melting region can be preserved via channelized flow when LMR > L_m, a condition that can be easily met for incompatible trace elements in the mantle when Xc > 10 m. For narrow channels (Xc < 1 m) significant reduction in matrix melt fraction (< 0.2%) and/or percolation of melt from the channel into the matrix continuum are needed to preserve the identity of the channelized melt. Given the chemical exchanges between the matrix and the channel continuum, the rate of matrix melting may be balanced by (or locked into) the rates of melt-rock reaction at some point in a 1-D mantle column. This dynamical rather than chemical equilibrium between the melt in the channel and that in the matrix is established when L_c > 5L_m for an incompatible element. In the limit of slow melt-rock reaction, incompatible trace elements are preferentially partitioned into the channel melt in a dynamically equilibrated double-lithology mantle. Implications of channel-matrix partitioning for partial melting, melt migration, and melt-rock reaction in a heterogeneous mantle will be discussed.

  16. Applications of nonequilibrium melting concept to damage-accumulation processes

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, N.Q.; Okamoto, P.R.

    1998-01-01

    The authors recent study of crystalline-to-amorphous transformation led to the successful development of a unified thermodynamic description of disorder-induced amorphization and heat-induced melting, based on a generalized version of the Lindemann melting criterion. The generalized criterion requires that the melting temperature of a defective crystal decreases with increasing static atomic disorder. Hence, any crystal can melt at temperatures below the melting point of its perfect crystalline state when driven far from equilibrium by introducing critical amounts of misfitting solute atoms and lattice imperfections, radiation damage, and/or tensile stresses. This conceptual approach to nonequilibrium melting provides new insight into long-standing materials problems such as brittle fracture, embrittlement, and environmentally-induced cracking, for example irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking.

  17. Petrogenesis of melt rocks, Manicouagan impact structure, Quebec

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simonds, C. H.; Floran, R. J.; Mcgee, P. E.; Phinney, W. C.; Warner, J. L.

    1978-01-01

    It is suggested, on the basis of previous theoretical studies of shock waves, that the Manicouagan melt formed in 1 or 2 s in a 5-km-radius hemisphere near the point of impact. The melt and the less shocked debris surrounding it flowed downward and outward for a few minutes until the melt formed a lining of a 5- to 8-km deep, 15- to 22-km-radius cavity. Extremely turbulent flow thoroughly homogenized the melt and promoted the incorporation and progressive digestion of debris that had been finely fragmented (but not melted) to grain sizes of less than one mm by the passage of the shock waves. The equilibration of clasts and melt, plagioclase nucleation, and readjustment of the crater floor are discussed.

  18. Vitrification of waste with conitnuous filling and sequential melting

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, James R.; Reich, Morris

    2001-09-04

    A method of filling a canister with vitrified waste starting with a waste, such as high-level radioactive waste, that is cooler than its melting point. Waste is added incrementally to a canister forming a column of waste capable of being separated into an upper zone and a lower zone. The minimum height of the column is defined such that the waste in the lower zone can be dried and melted while maintaining the waste in the upper zone below its melting point. The maximum height of the column is such that the upper zone remains porous enough to permit evolved gases from the lower zone to flow through the upper zone and out of the canister. Heat is applied to the waste in the lower zone to first dry then to raise and maintain its temperature to a target temperature above the melting point of the waste. Then the heat is applied to a new lower zone above the melted waste and the process of adding, drying and melting the waste continues upward in the canister until the entire canister is filled and the entire contents are melted and maintained at the target temperature for the desired period. Cooling of the melted waste takes place incrementally from the bottom of the canister to the top, or across the entire canister surface area, forming a vitrified product.

  19. What is Needed for Absolute Paleointensity?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valet, J. P.

    2015-12-01

    Many alternative approaches to the Thellier and Thellier technique for absolute paleointensity have been proposed during the past twenty years. One reason is the time consuming aspect of the experiments. Another reason is to avoid uncertainties in determinations of the paleofield which are mostly linked to the presence of multidomain grains. Despite great care taken by these new techniques, there is no indication that they always provide the right answer and in fact sometimes fail. We are convinced that the most valid approach remains the original double heating Thellier protocol provided that natural remanence is controlled by pure magnetite with a narrow distribution of small grain sizes, mostly single domains. The presence of titanium, even in small amount generates biases which yield incorrect field values. Single domain grains frequently dominate the magnetization of glass samples, which explains the success of this selective approach. They are also present in volcanic lava flows but much less frequently, and therefore contribute to the low success rate of most experiments. However the loss of at least 70% of the magnetization at very high temperatures prior to the Curie point appears to be an essential prerequisite that increases the success rate to almost 100% and has been validated from historical flows and from recent studies. This requirement can easily be tested by thermal demagnetization while low temperature experiments can document the detection of single domain magnetite using the δFC/δZFC parameter as suggested (Moskowitz et al, 1993) for biogenic magnetite.

  20. Gyrokinetic Statistical Absolute Equilibrium and Turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Jian-Zhou Zhu and Gregory W. Hammett

    2011-01-10

    A paradigm based on the absolute equilibrium of Galerkin-truncated inviscid systems to aid in understanding turbulence [T.-D. Lee, "On some statistical properties of hydrodynamical and magnetohydrodynamical fields," Q. Appl. Math. 10, 69 (1952)] is taken to study gyrokinetic plasma turbulence: A finite set of Fourier modes of the collisionless gyrokinetic equations are kept and the statistical equilibria are calculated; possible implications for plasma turbulence in various situations are discussed. For the case of two spatial and one velocity dimension, in the calculation with discretization also of velocity v with N grid points (where N + 1 quantities are conserved, corresponding to an energy invariant and N entropy-related invariants), the negative temperature states, corresponding to the condensation of the generalized energy into the lowest modes, are found. This indicates a generic feature of inverse energy cascade. Comparisons are made with some classical results, such as those of Charney-Hasegawa-Mima in the cold-ion limit. There is a universal shape for statistical equilibrium of gyrokinetics in three spatial and two velocity dimensions with just one conserved quantity. Possible physical relevance to turbulence, such as ITG zonal flows, and to a critical balance hypothesis are also discussed.

  1. Melt-melt immiscibility as result of synchronous melting of metapelites and impure marbles at crustal depth in the Moldanubian Zone, Bohemian Massif.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrero, Silvio; O´Brien, Patrick J.; Ziemann, Martin A.; Wunder, Bernd; Hecht, Lutz; Wälle, Markus

    2016-04-01

    Investigation of melt and fluid inclusions in migmatites grants access to the unadultered products of crustal melting, shedding light on the processes driving crustal differentiation. Stromatic migmatites from the Oberpfalz (Moldanubian Zone, Bohemain Massif) present a unique occurrence of calcite-rich inclusions (CRI), crystallized inclusions of anatectic melt (nanogranites) and CO2-rich inclusions, all hosted in peritectic garnet. Their distribution as clusters in the host suggests a primary nature, i.e. that they formed during garnet growth, thus testifying for the coexistence of different melts and fluid during partial melting in the middle-lower crust. CRI are generally small (≤10 μm in diameter) and, from a microstructural point of view, strikingly resemble the coexistent nanogranites, i.e. they show a well-developed negative crystal shape and have a cryptocrystalline nature. Their phase assemblage, identified via Raman spectroscopy and EDS mapping, consists of calcite, white mica and chlorite, with quartz as accessory mineral. Moreover, calcite crystals locally develop euhedral faces, further supporting the hypothesis that this phase crystallized from an originally homogeneous calcite-rich melt. Piston-cylinder re-homogenization experiments achieved nanogranites re-melting at pressure-temperature conditions consistent with geothermobarometric estimates, 800-850°C and 0.7-0.9 GPa. After having been re-heated at these conditions, the coexistent calcite-rich inclusions appear modified, with formation of internal porosity and re-crystallization of calcite in microcrystalline aggregates, suggesting that during the experimental run calcite melting was achieved. LA-ICPMS analyses show that CRIs are generally highly enriched in LILE (particularly Sr, Ba) and LREE (up to LaN ≈500, with moderate to low fractionation among LREE, La/Sm=1-9) with respect both to the host garnet and the coexistent nanogranites. The higher abundance of LREE in CRIs is consistent with

  2. Absolute optical metrology : nanometers to kilometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dubovitsky, Serge; Lay, O. P.; Peters, R. D.; Liebe, C. C.

    2005-01-01

    We provide and overview of the developments in the field of high-accuracy absolute optical metrology with emphasis on space-based applications. Specific work on the Modulation Sideband Technology for Absolute Ranging (MSTAR) sensor is described along with novel applications of the sensor.

  3. ON A SUFFICIENT CONDITION FOR ABSOLUTE CONTINUITY.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The formulation of a condition which yields absolute continuity when combined with continuity and bounded variation is the problem considered in the...Briefly, the formulation is achieved through a discussion which develops a proof by contradiction of a sufficiently theorem for absolute continuity which uses in its hypothesis the condition of continuity and bounded variation .

  4. Introducing the Mean Absolute Deviation "Effect" Size

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorard, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    This paper revisits the use of effect sizes in the analysis of experimental and similar results, and reminds readers of the relative advantages of the mean absolute deviation as a measure of variation, as opposed to the more complex standard deviation. The mean absolute deviation is easier to use and understand, and more tolerant of extreme…

  5. Monolithically integrated absolute frequency comb laser system

    SciTech Connect

    Wanke, Michael C.

    2016-07-12

    Rather than down-convert optical frequencies, a QCL laser system directly generates a THz frequency comb in a compact monolithically integrated chip that can be locked to an absolute frequency without the need of a frequency-comb synthesizer. The monolithic, absolute frequency comb can provide a THz frequency reference and tool for high-resolution broad band spectroscopy.

  6. Segregation effects during solidification in weightless melts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, C.

    1973-01-01

    Two types of melt segregation effects were studied: (1) evaporative segregation, or segregation due to surface evaporation; and (2) freezing segregation, or segregation due to liquid-solid phase transformation. These segregation effects are closely related. In fact, evaporative segregation always precedes freezing segregation to some degree and must often be studied prior to performing meaningful solidification experiments. This is particularly true since evaporation may cause the melt composition, at least at the critical surface regions or layers to be affected manyfold within seconds so that the surface region or layer melting point and other thermophysical properties, nucleation characteristics, base for undercooling, and critical velocity to avoid constitutional supercooling, may be completely unexpected. An important objective was, therefore, to develop the necessary normal evaporation equations for predicting the compositional changes within specified times at temperature and to correlate these equations with actual experimental data collected from the literature.

  7. Melting a Sample within TEMPUS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    One of the final runs of the TEMPUS experiment shows heating of a sample on STS-94, July 15, 1997, MET:14/11:01 (approximate) and the flows on the surface. At the point this image was taken, the sample was in the process of melting. The surface of the sample is begirning to flow, looking like the motion of plate tectonics on the surface of a planet. During this mission, TEMPUS was able to run than 120 melting cycles with zirconium, with a maximum temperature of 2,000 degrees C, and was able to undercool by 340 degrees -- the highest temperature and largest undercooling ever achieved in space. The TEMPUS investigators also have provided the first measurements of viscosity of palladium-silicon alloys in the undercooled liquid alloy which are not possible on Earth. TEMPUS (stands for Tiegelfreies Elektromagnetisches Prozessiere unter Schwerelosigkeit (containerless electromagnetic processing under weightlessness). It was developed by the German Space Agency (DARA) for flight aboard Spacelab. The DARA project scientist was Igon Egry. The experiment was part of the space research investigations conducted during the Microgravity Science Laboratory-1R mission (STS-94, July 1-17 1997). DARA and NASA are exploring the possibility of flying an advanced version of TEMPUS on the International Space Station.(176KB JPEG, 1350 x 1516 pixels; downlinked video, higher quality not available) The MPG from which this composite was made is available at http://mix.msfc.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/MSFC-0300193.html.

  8. Melt electrospinning of biodegradable polyurethane scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Karchin, Ari; Simonovsky, Felix I.; Ratner, Buddy D.; Sanders, Joan E.

    2014-01-01

    Electrospinning from the melt, in contrast to from solution, is an attractive tissue engineering scaffold manufacturing process as it allows for the formation of small diameter fibers while eliminating potentially cytotoxic solvents. Despite this, there is a dearth of literature on scaffold formation via melt electrospinning. This is likely due to the technical challenges related to the need for a well-controlled high temperature setup and the difficulty in developing an appropriate polymer. In this paper, a biodegradable and thermally stable polyurethane (PU) is described specifically for use in melt electrospinning. Polymer formulations of aliphatic PUs based on (CH2)4-content diisocyanates, polycaprolactone (PCL), 1,4-butanediamine and 1,4-butanediol (BD) were evaluated for utility in the melt electrospinning process. The final polymer formulation, a catalyst-purified PU based on 1,4-butane diisocyanate, PCL and BD in a 4/1/3 molar ratio with a weight-average molecular weight of about 40 kDa, yielded a nontoxic polymer that could be readily electrospun from the melt. Scaffolds electrospun from this polymer contained point bonds between fibers and mechanical properties analogous to many in vivo soft tissues. PMID:21640853

  9. Seismogenic frictional melting in the magmatic column

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendrick, J. E.; Lavallée, Y.; Hess, K.-U.; De Angelis, S.; Ferk, A.; Gaunt, H. E.; Meredith, P. G.; Dingwell, D. B.; Leonhardt, R.

    2014-04-01

    Lava dome eruptions subjected to high extrusion rates commonly evolve from endogenous to exogenous growth and limits to their structural stability hold catastrophic potential as explosive eruption triggers. In the conduit, strain localisation in magma, accompanied by seismogenic failure, marks the onset of brittle magma ascent dynamics. The rock record of exogenous dome structures preserves vestiges of cataclastic processes and thermal anomalies, key to unravelling subsurface processes. Here, a combined structural, thermal and magnetic investigation of a shear band crosscutting a large block erupted in 2010 at Soufrière Hills volcano (SHV) reveals evidence of faulting and frictional melting within the magmatic column. The mineralogy of this pseudotachylyte vein offers confirmation of complete recrystallisation, altering the structure, porosity and permeability of the material, and the magnetic signature typifies local electric currents in faults. Such melting events may be linked to the step-wise extrusion of magma accompanied by repetitive long-period (LP) drumbeat seismicity at SHV. Frictional melting of Soufrière Hills andesite in a high velocity rotary shear apparatus highlights the small slip distances (< 15 cm) thought to be required to bring 800 °C magma to melting point at upper conduit stress conditions (10 MPa). We conclude that frictional melting is a common consequence of seismogenic magma fracture during dome building eruptions and that it may govern the ascent of magma in the upper conduit.

  10. Seismogenic frictional melting in the magmatic column

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendrick, J. E.; Lavallée, Y.; Hess, K.-U.; De Angelis, S.; Ferk, A.; Gaunt, H. E.; Dingwell, D. B.; Leonhardt, R.

    2013-10-01

    Lava dome eruptions subjected to high extrusion rates commonly evolve from endogenous to exogenous growth and limits to their structural stability hold catastrophic potential as explosive eruption triggers. In the conduit, strain localisation in magma, accompanied by seismogenic failure, marks the onset of brittle magma ascent dynamics. The rock record of exogenous dome structures preserves vestiges of cataclastic processes (Cashman et al., 2008; Kennedy and Russell, 2011) and of thermal anomalies (Kendrick et al., 2012), key to unravelling subsurface processes. Here, a combined structural, thermal and magnetic investigation of a shear band crosscutting a large block erupted in 2010 at Soufrière Hills volcano (SHV) reveals evidence of faulting and frictional melting within the magmatic column. The mineralogy of this pseudotachylyte vein offers confirmation of complete recrystallisation with an isothermal remanent magnetisation signature that typifies local electric currents in faults. The pseudotachylyte presents an impermeable barrier, which is thought to have influenced the degassing pathway. Such melting events may be linked to the step-wise extrusion of magma accompanied by repetitive long-period (LP) drumbeat seismicity at SHV (Neuberg et al., 2006). Frictional melting of SHV andesite in a high velocity rotary shear apparatus highlights the small slip distances (< 15 cm) required to bring 800 °C magma to melting point at upper conduit stress conditions (10 MPa). We conclude that frictional melting is an inevitable consequence of seismogenic, conduit-dwelling magma fracture during dome building eruptions and that it may have an important influence on magma ascent dynamics.

  11. Abyssal Peridotites and Mantle Melting Beneath Ocean Ridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dick, H. J.; Snow, J. E.; Hellebrand, E.; Shimizu, N.

    2005-12-01

    Studies of abyssal peridotite from ultraslow and slow spreading ridges show significant regional variability; with a strong correlation between the compositions of peridotite averaged by locality and spatially associated MORB reflecting higher degrees of mantle melting near mantle hot spots. Local variability of peridotite compositions, however, is often large, and may equal the regional variability along ocean ridges. The latter is attributed to local melting and melt transport processes such as melt channelization or late-stage melt impregnation in the lithosphere. The observed regional correlation appears only when many samples are averaged to eliminate local and outcrop scale variability. Almost all the peridotites used in these correlations are from transforms, and therefore represent similar thermal and mantle melting histories. Thus, regional differences in mantle composition are preserved. Until recently, little data were available for peridotites away from transforms representing the central mantle environment beneath magmatic segments. This is key, as geophysical and geologic evidence suggest focused melt flow beneath slow spreading ridges. If so, beneath individual magmatic segments there should be a corresponding mantle melting cell in which melt is focused from a broad melting region to a melt transport zone at its mid-point that feeds an overlying crustal magmatic center. High melt fluxes in the transport zone would produce very depleted peridotites stripped of pyroxene by melt-rock reaction during magma ascent. Studies of peridotites far from transforms at ultraslow Gakkel and SW Indian Ridges indicate this is the case: with near-Cpx free intergranular harzburgite and dunite locally abundant in contrast to transform peridotites. Recent mapping of the plutonic foundation of an ancient 35-km long slow spreading ridge segment at the Kane Core Complex also found a narrow 10-km wide zone of focused melt flow through the mantle marked by abundant dunite

  12. Viscosity Measurement for Tellurium Melt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Bochuan; Li, Chao; Ban, Heng; Scripa, Rosalia N.; Su, Ching-Hua; Lehoczky, Sandor L.

    2006-01-01

    The viscosity of high temperature Te melt was measured using a new technique in which a rotating magnetic field was applied to the melt sealed in a suspended ampoule, and the torque exerted by rotating melt flow on the ampoule wall was measured. Governing equations for the coupled melt flow and ampoule torsional oscillation were solved, and the viscosity was extracted from the experimental data by numerical fitting. The computational result showed good agreement with experimental data. The melt velocity transient initiated by the rotating magnetic field reached a stable condition quickly, allowing the viscosity and electrical conductivity of the melt to be determined in a short period.

  13. Absolute quantitation of protein posttranslational modification isoform.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhu; Li, Ning

    2015-01-01

    Mass spectrometry has been widely applied in characterization and quantification of proteins from complex biological samples. Because the numbers of absolute amounts of proteins are needed in construction of mathematical models for molecular systems of various biological phenotypes and phenomena, a number of quantitative proteomic methods have been adopted to measure absolute quantities of proteins using mass spectrometry. The liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) coupled with internal peptide standards, i.e., the stable isotope-coded peptide dilution series, which was originated from the field of analytical chemistry, becomes a widely applied method in absolute quantitative proteomics research. This approach provides more and more absolute protein quantitation results of high confidence. As quantitative study of posttranslational modification (PTM) that modulates the biological activity of proteins is crucial for biological science and each isoform may contribute a unique biological function, degradation, and/or subcellular location, the absolute quantitation of protein PTM isoforms has become more relevant to its biological significance. In order to obtain the absolute cellular amount of a PTM isoform of a protein accurately, impacts of protein fractionation, protein enrichment, and proteolytic digestion yield should be taken into consideration and those effects before differentially stable isotope-coded PTM peptide standards are spiked into sample peptides have to be corrected. Assisted with stable isotope-labeled peptide standards, the absolute quantitation of isoforms of posttranslationally modified protein (AQUIP) method takes all these factors into account and determines the absolute amount of a protein PTM isoform from the absolute amount of the protein of interest and the PTM occupancy at the site of the protein. The absolute amount of the protein of interest is inferred by quantifying both the absolute amounts of a few PTM

  14. Thermoacoustic Streaming and Ultrasonic Processing of Low Melting Melts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, E. H.

    1997-01-01

    Ultrasonic levitation allows the processing of low melting materials both in 1 G as well as in microgravity. The free suspension of the melts also facilitates undercooling, permitting the measurements of the physical properties of the metastable liquids.

  15. Axial vibration control of melt structure of sodium nitrate in crystal growth process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadovskiy, Andrey; Sukhanova, Ekaterina; Belov, Stanislav; Kostikov, Vladimir; Zykova, Marina; Artyushenko, Maxim; Zharikov, Evgeny; Avetissov, Igor

    2015-05-01

    The melt structure evolution under the action of the low-frequency axial vibration control (AVC) technique was studied in situ by Raman spectroscopy for several complex chemical compound melts: sodium nitrate, margarine acid, paraffin mixture (C17-C20). The measurements were conducted in the temperature range from the melting point up to 60 °C above. Comparison of crystallization heats for AVC activated and steady melts with melting heats of AVC-CZ and conventional CZ produced powders allowed to propose the energy diagram of NaNO3 states for activated and non-activated melts and crystals based on DTA, XRD, DSC and Raman experimental data.

  16. Absolute realization of low BRDF value

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zilong; Liao, Ningfang; Li, Ping; Wang, Yu

    2010-10-01

    Low BRDF value is widespread used in many critical domains such as space and military fairs. These values below 0.1 Sr-1 . So the Absolute realization of these value is the most critical issue in the absolute measurement of BRDF. To develop the Absolute value realization theory of BRDF , defining an arithmetic operators of BRDF , achieving an absolute measurement Eq. of BRDF based on radiance. This is a new theory method to solve the realization problem of low BRDF value. This theory method is realized on a self-designed common double orientation structure in space. By designing an adding structure to extend the range of the measurement system and a control and processing software, Absolute realization of low BRDF value is achieved. A material of low BRDF value is measured in this measurement system and the spectral BRDF value are showed within different angles allover the space. All these values are below 0.4 Sr-1 . This process is a representative procedure about the measurement of low BRDF value. A corresponding uncertainty analysis of this measurement data is given depend on the new theory of absolute realization and the performance of the measurement system. The relative expand uncertainty of the measurement data is 0.078. This uncertainty analysis is suitable for all measurements using the new theory of absolute realization and the corresponding measurement system.

  17. Absolute length measurement using manually decided stereo correspondence for endoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, M.; Koishi, T.; Nakaguchi, T.; Tsumura, N.; Miyake, Y.

    2009-02-01

    In recent years, various kinds of endoscope have been developed and widely used to endoscopic biopsy, endoscopic operation and endoscopy. The size of the inflammatory part is important to determine a method of medical treatment. However, it is not easy to measure absolute size of inflammatory part such as ulcer, cancer and polyp from the endoscopic image. Therefore, it is required measuring the size of those part in endoscopy. In this paper, we propose a new method to measure the absolute length in a straight line between arbitrary two points based on the photogrammetry using endoscope with magnetic tracking sensor which gives camera position and angle. In this method, the stereo-corresponding points between two endoscopic images are determined by the endoscopist without any apparatus of projection and calculation to find the stereo correspondences, then the absolute length can be calculated on the basis of the photogrammetry. The evaluation experiment using a checkerboard showed that the errors of the measurements are less than 2% of the target length when the baseline is sufficiently-long.

  18. Superfast 3D absolute shape measurement using five binary patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyun, Jae-Sang; Zhang, Song

    2017-03-01

    This paper presents a method that recovers high-quality 3D absolute coordinates point by point with only five binary patterns. Specifically, three dense binary dithered patterns are used to compute the wrapped phase; and the average intensity is combined with two additional binary patterns to determine fringe order pixel by pixel in phase domain. The wrapped phase is temporarily unwrapped point by point by referring to the fringe order. We further developed a computational framework to reduce random noise impact due to dithering, defocusing and random noise. Since only five binary fringe patterns are required to recover one 3D frame, extremely high speed 3D shape measurement can be achieved. For example, we developed a system that captures 2D images at 3333 Hz, and thus performs 3D shape measurement at 667 Hz.

  19. Comparisons of absolute gravimeters (COOMET.M.G-S1)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinnichenko, Mr Alexander; Germak, Alessandro, Dr

    2017-01-01

    This report describes the results of the RMO supplementary comparison COOMET.M.G-S1 (also known as bilateral comparison COOMET 634/UA/14). The comparison measurements between the two participants NSC 'IM' (pilot laboratory) and INRIM were started in December 2015 and finished in January 2016. Participants of comparisons were conducted at their national standards the measurements of the free fall acceleration in gravimetric point laboratory of absolute gravimetry of INRIM named INRiM.2. Absolute measurements of gravimetric acceleration were conducted by ballistic gravimeters. The agreement between the two participants is good. Main text To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCM, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  20. Absolute measurement of the extreme UV solar flux

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, R. W.; Ogawa, H. S.; Judge, D. L.; Phillips, E.

    1984-01-01

    A windowless rare-gas ionization chamber has been developed to measure the absolute value of the solar extreme UV flux in the 50-575-A region. Successful results were obtained on a solar-pointing sounding rocket. The ionization chamber, operated in total absorption, is an inherently stable absolute detector of ionizing UV radiation and was designed to be independent of effects from secondary ionization and gas effusion. The net error of the measurement is + or - 7.3 percent, which is primarily due to residual outgassing in the instrument, other errors such as multiple ionization, photoelectron collection, and extrapolation to the zero atmospheric optical depth being small in comparison. For the day of the flight, Aug. 10, 1982, the solar irradiance (50-575 A), normalized to unit solar distance, was found to be 5.71 + or - 0.42 x 10 to the 10th photons per sq cm sec.

  1. Tidal Heating and Melt Segregation and Migration within Io

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajendar, A.; Paty, C. S.; Dufek, J.; Roberts, J. H.

    2014-12-01

    Io's volcanic activity is driven by the dissipation of energy in its interior due to tidal forces exerted by Jupiter, maintained by its orbital resonances with Europa and Ganymede. The 2011 discovery of a global partial melt layer beneath Io's surface has raised further questions about the structure of the Galilean moon and the processes that shape it. In this study we use two coupled simulations, the MFIX multiphase dynamics and the TiRADE tidal heating models, to investigate the location and extent, thermal state, melt fraction, stability, and migration of melt Io's viscous asthenosphere. We explore the feedback between melt migration and production, taking into account the rate of tidal heating and melt migration through the magma ocean layer. We begin with an assumed 1D layered internal structure based on previous investigations. This structure is input into TiRADE, which solves the equations of motion for forced oscillations in a layered spherical body using the propagator matrix method to obtain the displacements and strains due to tidal forcing. From this, we obtain the radial distribution of tidal heat generation within Io. This heating profile is then used as input for the MFIX multiphase fluid model in order to obtain the vertical flow of partially molten material, as well as the radial temperature distribution and thus the material properties and melt fractions. In the multiphase model, individual phases (melt and solid residue) separately conserve mass, momentum and enthalpy allowing us to explore melt segregation phenomena. Enthalpy closure is provided by the MELTS thermodynamics algorithm, which is called at each point in space, accounting for the partitioning between latent and sensible heat, and updating the physical properties of the melt and solid phases. This approach allows us to explore the sensitivity of melt generation to internal structure, as well as the time scales that govern melt production and eruption (i.e.: the residence and migration

  2. Absolute pitch and pupillary response: effects of timbre and key color.

    PubMed

    Schlemmer, Kathrin B; Kulke, Franziska; Kuchinke, Lars; Van Der Meer, Elke

    2005-07-01

    The pitch identification performance of absolute pitch possessors has previously been shown to depend on pitch range, key color, and timbre of presented tones. In the present study, the dependence of pitch identification performance on key color and timbre of musical tones was examined by analyzing hit rates, reaction times, and pupillary responses of absolute pitch possessors (n = 9) and nonpossessors (n = 12) during a pitch identification task. Results revealed a significant dependence of pitch identification hit rate but not reaction time on timbre and key color in both groups. Among absolute pitch possessors, peak dilation of the pupil was significantly dependent on key color whereas the effect of timbre was marginally significant. Peak dilation of the pupil differed significantly between absolute pitch possessors and nonpossessors. The observed effects point to the importance of learning factors in the acquisition of absolute pitch.

  3. Thermodynamics of Oligonucleotide Duplex Melting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schreiber-Gosche, Sherrie; Edwards, Robert A.

    2009-01-01

    Melting temperatures of oligonucleotides are useful for a number of molecular biology applications, such as the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Although melting temperatures are often calculated with simplistic empirical equations, application of thermodynamics provides more accurate melting temperatures and an opportunity for students to apply…

  4. A New Gimmick for Assigning Absolute Configuration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ayorinde, F. O.

    1983-01-01

    A five-step procedure is provided to help students in making the assignment absolute configuration less bothersome. Examples for both single (2-butanol) and multi-chiral carbon (3-chloro-2-butanol) molecules are included. (JN)

  5. Magnifying absolute instruments for optically homogeneous regions

    SciTech Connect

    Tyc, Tomas

    2011-09-15

    We propose a class of magnifying absolute optical instruments with a positive isotropic refractive index. They create magnified stigmatic images, either virtual or real, of optically homogeneous three-dimensional spatial regions within geometrical optics.

  6. The Simplicity Argument and Absolute Morality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mijuskovic, Ben

    1975-01-01

    In this paper the author has maintained that there is a similarity of thought to be found in the writings of Cudworth, Emerson, and Husserl in his investigation of an absolute system of morality. (Author/RK)

  7. {sup 3}He melting pressure thermometry

    SciTech Connect

    Ni, W.; Xia, J.S.; Adams, E.D.

    1995-10-01

    High-precision measurements of the {sup 3}He melting pressure versus temperature have been made from 500 {mu}K to 25 mK using a {sup 60}Co nuclear orientation primary thermometer and a Pt NMR susceptibility secondary thermometer. Temperatures for the fixed points on the melting curve are: the superfluid A transition T{sub A}=2.505 mK, the A-B transition T{sub AB}=1.948 mK, and the solid ordering temperature T{sub N}=0.934 mK. These fixed points and a functional form for P(T) constitute a convenient temperature scale, based on a primary thermometer, usable to well below 1 mK.

  8. Molecular dynamics simulations of the melting curve of NiAl alloy under pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Wenjin; Peng, Yufeng; Liu, Zhongli

    2014-05-15

    The melting curve of B2-NiAl alloy under pressure has been investigated using molecular dynamics technique and the embedded atom method (EAM) potential. The melting temperatures were determined with two approaches, the one-phase and the two-phase methods. The first one simulates a homogeneous melting, while the second one involves a heterogeneous melting of materials. Both approaches reduce the superheating effectively and their results are close to each other at the applied pressures. By fitting the well-known Simon equation to our melting data, we yielded the melting curves for NiAl: 1783(1 + P/9.801){sup 0.298} (one-phase approach), 1850(1 + P/12.806){sup 0.357} (two-phase approach). The good agreement of the resulting equation of states and the zero-pressure melting point (calc., 1850 ± 25 K, exp., 1911 K) with experiment proved the correctness of these results. These melting data complemented the absence of experimental high-pressure melting of NiAl. To check the transferability of this EAM potential, we have also predicted the melting curves of pure nickel and pure aluminum. Results show the calculated melting point of Nickel agrees well with experiment at zero pressure, while the melting point of aluminum is slightly higher than experiment.

  9. Absolute cross sections of compound nucleus reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capurro, O. A.

    1993-11-01

    The program SEEF is a Fortran IV computer code for the extraction of absolute cross sections of compound nucleus reactions. When the evaporation residue is fed by its parents, only cumulative cross sections will be obtained from off-line gamma ray measurements. But, if one has the parent excitation function (experimental or calculated), this code will make it possible to determine absolute cross sections of any exit channel.

  10. Kelvin and the absolute temperature scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erlichson, Herman

    2001-07-01

    This paper describes the absolute temperature scale of Kelvin (William Thomson). Kelvin found that Carnot's axiom about heat being a conserved quantity had to be abandoned. Nevertheless, he found that Carnot's fundamental work on heat engines was correct. Using the concept of a Carnot engine Kelvin found that Q1/Q2 = T1/T2. Thermometers are not used to obtain absolute temperatures since they are calculated temperatures.

  11. Review of deformation behavior of tungsten at temperature less than 0.2 absolute melting temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, J. R.

    1972-01-01

    The deformation behavior of tungsten at temperatures 0.2 T sub m is reviewed, with primary emphasis on the temperature dependence of the yield stress and the ductile-brittle transition temperature. It appears that a model based on the high Peierls stress of tungsten best accounts for the observed mechanical behavior at low temperatures. Recent research is discussed which suggests an important role of electron concentration and bonding on the mechanical behavior of tungsten. It is concluded that future research on tungsten should include studies to define more clearly the correlation between electron concentration and mechanical behavior of tungsten alloys and other transition metal alloys.

  12. Isotope thermometry in melt-affected ice cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moran, T.; Marshall, S. J.; Sharp, M. J.

    2011-06-01

    A statistically significant relationship is observed between stable water isotopes (δ18O) and melt amounts in a melt-affected firn core (SSummit) taken from the Prince of Wales Icefield, Ellesmere Island, Canada. By contrast, a low-melt firn core taken from a higher-elevation, higher-latitude location on the same icefield shows no relationship between these variables. We interpret this as evidence for meltwater-induced isotopic enrichment at SSummit. A percent melt-based correction slope is applied to isotopic values from SSummit. Uncorrected and corrected temperature records derived from the raw and corrected δ18O values are compared to bias-corrected temperature data from the NCEP Reanalysis. Improvements are observed in the isotopic reconstruction of SSummit annual precipitation-weighted temperatures when we correct for meltwater enrichment, with a reduction from +0.6°C to 0.0°C in the mean annual error and a decrease in root-mean-square error from 1.8°C to 1.6°C. The correction factor appears to overcorrect isotopic modification during high melt years such as 1999, during which SSummit experienced nearly 70% more melt than the average from 1975 to 2000. Excluding 1999 data from the correction analysis results in a slight reduction in mean absolute error from 1.4°C to 1.3°C. These results suggest that melt-induced isotopic modification cannot be corrected in very high melt years.

  13. Controlled Growth of Rubrene Nanowires by Eutectic Melt Crystallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Jeyon; Hyon, Jinho; Park, Kyung-Sun; Cho, Boram; Baek, Jangmi; Kim, Jueun; Lee, Sang Uck; Sung, Myung Mo; Kang, Youngjong

    2016-03-01

    Organic semiconductors including rubrene, Alq3, copper phthalocyanine and pentacene are crystallized by the eutectic melt crystallization. Those organic semiconductors form good eutectic systems with the various volatile crystallizable additives such as benzoic acid, salicylic acid, naphthalene and 1,3,5-trichlorobenzene. Due to the formation of the eutectic system, organic semiconductors having originally high melting point (Tm > 300 °C) are melted and crystallized at low temperature (Te = 40.8–133 °C). The volatile crystallizable additives are easily removed by sublimation. For a model system using rubrene, single crystalline rubrene nanowires are prepared by the eutectic melt crystallization and the eutectic-melt-assisted nanoimpinting (EMAN) technique. It is demonstrated that crystal structure and the growth direction of rubrene can be controlled by using different volatile crystallizable additives. The field effect mobility of rubrene nanowires prepared using several different crystallizable additives are measured and compared.

  14. Controlled Growth of Rubrene Nanowires by Eutectic Melt Crystallization

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Jeyon; Hyon, Jinho; Park, Kyung-Sun; Cho, Boram; Baek, Jangmi; Kim, Jueun; Lee, Sang Uck; Sung, Myung Mo; Kang, Youngjong

    2016-01-01

    Organic semiconductors including rubrene, Alq3, copper phthalocyanine and pentacene are crystallized by the eutectic melt crystallization. Those organic semiconductors form good eutectic systems with the various volatile crystallizable additives such as benzoic acid, salicylic acid, naphthalene and 1,3,5-trichlorobenzene. Due to the formation of the eutectic system, organic semiconductors having originally high melting point (Tm > 300 °C) are melted and crystallized at low temperature (Te = 40.8–133 °C). The volatile crystallizable additives are easily removed by sublimation. For a model system using rubrene, single crystalline rubrene nanowires are prepared by the eutectic melt crystallization and the eutectic-melt-assisted nanoimpinting (EMAN) technique. It is demonstrated that crystal structure and the growth direction of rubrene can be controlled by using different volatile crystallizable additives. The field effect mobility of rubrene nanowires prepared using several different crystallizable additives are measured and compared. PMID:26976527

  15. Melting of Boltzmann particles in different 2D trapping potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Dyuti; Filinov, Alexei; Ghosal, Amit; Bonitz, Michael

    2015-03-01

    We analyze the quantum melting of two dimensional Wigner solid in several confined geometries and compare them with corresponding thermal melting in a purely classical system. Our results show that the geometry play little role in deciding the crossover quantum parameter nX, as the effects from boundary is well screened by the quantum zero point motion. The unique phase diagram in the plane of thermal and quantum fluctuations determined from independent melting criteria separates out the Wigner molecule ``phase'' from the classical and quantum ``liquids''. An intriguing signature of weakening liquidity with increasing temperature T have been found in the extreme quantum regime (n). This crossover is associated with production of defects, just like in case of thermal melting, though the role of them in determining the mechanism of the crossover appears different. Our study will help comprehending melting in a variety of experimental realization of confined system - from quantum dots to complex plasma.

  16. The melting of pulmonary surfactant monolayers.

    PubMed

    Yan, Wenfei; Biswas, Samares C; Laderas, Ted G; Hall, Stephen B

    2007-05-01

    Monomolecular films of phospholipids in the liquid-expanded (LE) phase after supercompression to high surface pressures (pi), well above the equilibrium surface pressure (pi(e)) at which fluid films collapse from the interface to form a three-dimensional bulk phase, and in the tilted-condensed (TC) phase both replicate the resistance to collapse that is characteristic of alveolar films in the lungs. To provide the basis for determining which film is present in the alveolus, we measured the melting characteristics of monolayers containing TC dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPPC), as well as supercompressed 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl phosphatidylcholine and calf lung surfactant extract (CLSE). Films generated by appropriate manipulations on a captive bubble were heated from < or =27 degrees C to > or =60 degrees C at different constant pi above pi(e). DPPC showed the abrupt expansion expected for the TC-LE phase transition, followed by the contraction produced by collapse. Supercompressed CLSE showed no evidence of the TC-LE expansion, arguing that supercompression did not simply convert the mixed lipid film to TC DPPC. For both DPPC and CLSE, the melting point, taken as the temperature at which collapse began, increased at higher pi, in contrast to 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl phosphatidylcholine, for which higher pi produced collapse at lower temperatures. For pi between 50 and 65 mN/m, DPPC melted at 48-55 degrees C, well above the main transition for bilayers at 41 degrees C. At each pi, CLSE melted at temperatures >10 degrees C lower. The distinct melting points for TC DPPC and supercompressed CLSE provide the basis by which the nature of the alveolar film might be determined from the temperature-dependence of pulmonary mechanics.

  17. The melting of pulmonary surfactant monolayers

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Wenfei; Biswas, Samares C.; Laderas, Ted G.; Hall, Stephen B.

    2012-01-01

    Monomolecular films of phospholipids in the liquid-expanded (LE) phase after supercompression to high surface pressures (π), well above the equilibrium surface pressure (πe) at which fluid films collapse from the interface to form a three-dimensional bulk phase, and in the tilted-condensed (TC) phase both replicate the resistance to collapse that is characteristic of alveolar films in the lungs. To provide the basis for determining which film is present in the alveolus, we measured the melting characteristics of monolayers containing TC dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPPC), as well as supercompressed 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl phosphatidylcholine and calf lung surfactant extract (CLSE). Films generated by appropriate manipulations on a captive bubble were heated from ≤27°C to ≥60°C at different constant π above πe. DPPC showed the abrupt expansion expected for the TC-LE phase transition, followed by the contraction produced by collapse. Supercompressed CLSE showed no evidence of the TC-LE expansion, arguing that supercompression did not simply convert the mixed lipid film to TC DPPC. For both DPPC and CLSE, the melting point, taken as the temperature at which collapse began, increased at higher π, in contrast to 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl phosphatidylcholine, for which higher π produced collapse at lower temperatures. For π between 50 and 65 mN/m, DPPC melted at 48–55°C, well above the main transition for bilayers at 41°C. At each π, CLSE melted at temperatures >10°C lower. The distinct melting points for TC DPPC and supercompressed CLSE provide the basis by which the nature of the alveolar film might be determined from the temperature-dependence of pulmonary mechanics. PMID:17194731

  18. Jasminum flexile flower absolute from India--a detailed comparison with three other jasmine absolutes.

    PubMed

    Braun, Norbert A; Kohlenberg, Birgit; Sim, Sherina; Meier, Manfred; Hammerschmidt, Franz-Josef

    2009-09-01

    Jasminum flexile flower absolute from the south of India and the corresponding vacuum headspace (VHS) sample of the absolute were analyzed using GC and GC-MS. Three other commercially available Indian jasmine absolutes from the species: J. sambac, J. officinale subsp. grandiflorum, and J. auriculatum and the respective VHS samples were used for comparison purposes. One hundred and twenty-one compounds were characterized in J. flexile flower absolute, with methyl linolate, benzyl salicylate, benzyl benzoate, (2E,6E)-farnesol, and benzyl acetate as the main constituents. A detailed olfactory evaluation was also performed.

  19. Enantioselective preparative HPLC separation of the HBCD-Stereoisomers from the technical product and their absolute structure elucidation using X-ray crystallography.

    PubMed

    Koeppen, Robert; Becker, Roland; Emmerling, Franziska; Jung, Christian; Nehls, Irene

    2007-03-01

    1,2,5,6,9,10-Hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) is a widely used flame retardant, which tends to persist in the environment and accumulates in biota. The six stereoisomers (three racemates named alpha-, beta-, and gamma-HBCD) of the technical mixture were isolated with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Direct separations were performed on a chiral stationary phase containing permethylated beta-cyclodextrin (NUCLEODEX beta-PM column) and the pure enantiomers of alpha-, beta-, and gamma-HBCD were physically characterized for the first time. The absolute configurations of all six isomers were determined by anomalous dispersion using single crystal X-ray crystallography. Optical rotations alphaD in tetrahydrofuran were +4.2/-4.0 (alpha-HBCD), +26.1/-27.5 (beta-HBCD), and +68.0/-66.3 (gamma-HBCD). The sense of rotation could be correlated with the absolute configurations of alpha-, beta-, and gamma-HBCD enantiomers and their order of elution on a chiral permethylated beta-cyclodextrin-bonded stationary phase. The diastereomersalpha-, beta-, and gamma-HBCD displayed distinctly different melting points as well as (1)H-, (13)C NMR, and IR spectra.

  20. An absolute photometric system at 10 and 20 microns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rieke, G. H.; Lebofsky, M. J.; Low, F. J.

    1985-01-01

    Two new direct calibrations at 10 and 20 microns are presented in which terrestrial flux standards are referred to infrared standard stars. These measurements give both good agreement and higher accuracy when compared with previous direct calibrations. As a result, the absolute calibrations at 10 and 20 microns have now been determined with accuracies of 3 and 8 percent, respectively. A variety of absolute calibrations based on extrapolation of stellar spectra from the visible to 10 microns are reviewed. Current atmospheric models of A-type stars underestimate their fluxes by about 10 percent at 10 microns, whereas models of solar-type stars agree well with the direct calibrations. The calibration at 20 microns can probably be determined to about 5 percent by extrapolation from the more accurate result at 10 microns. The photometric system at 10 and 20 microns is updated to reflect the new absolute calibration, to base its zero point directly on the colors of A0 stars, and to improve the accuracy in the comparison of the standard stars.

  1. Free surfaces overcome superheating in simulated melting of isotactic polypropylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Qin; Sirota, Eric B.; Zhang, Min; Chung, T. C. Mike; Milner, Scott T.

    The equilibrium melting point (Tm) is a challenging experimental benchmark for molecular dynamics simulation of polymer melting and crystallization. Tm obtained from melting simulation of α phase isotactic polypropylene (iPP) can exhibit superheating of over 100°C. Superheating has been attributed to the use of periodic boundary conditions and ultrafast simulated heating rates, both of which inhibit melting. We have developed a simple method to overcome superheating; we replace the periodic crystal structure with a periodic array of finite thickness slabs, separated by vacuum gaps. Thermal disorder at the slab surface promotes nucleation of the melt phase. Above Tm, we observe that the melting front advances into the crystal with a velocity proportional to T -Tm . This correspond to a quadratic rise in the system energy versus temperature, at constant heating rate. We obtain Tm as the onset of this quadratic rise in energy, which give values consistent with experimental melting points for iPP oligomers. The same simulations allow reasonable estimates of the crystal-vacuum interfacial free energy, from the energy difference between crystalline slabs and periodic crystals. The authors acknowledge support from National Science Foundation DMR-1507980.

  2. Melting the Divide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, S. M.

    2014-12-01

    Presenting Quaternary Environmental Change to students who fall into Widening Participation criteria at the University of Cambridge, gives a unique opportunity to present academic debate in an approachable and entertaining way. Literally by discussing the melting of our ice caps, melts the divide Cambridge has between its reputation and the reality for the brightest, underprivileged, students. There is a balance between presenting cutting edge research with the need to come across as accessible (and importantly valuable to "learning"). Climate change over the Quaternary lends itself well to this aim. By lecturing groups of potential students through the entire Quaternary in an hour, stopping to discuss how our ancestors interacted with past Interglacials and what are the mechanisms driving change (in generalized terms), you are able to introduce cutting edge research (such as the latest NEEM ice core) to the students. This shows the evolution and importance of higher education and academic research. The lecture leads well onto group discussions (termed "supervisions" in Cambridge), to explore their opinions on the concern for present Anthropogenic Climate Change in relation to Past Climate Change after being presented with images that our ancestors "made it". Here discussion thrives off students saying obvious things (or sarcastic comments!) which quickly can lead into a deep technical discussion on their terms. Such discussions give the students a zest for higher education, simply throwing Ruddiman's (2003) "The Anthroprocene Started Several Thousand Years Ago" at them, questions in a second their concept of Anthropogenic Climate Change. Supervisions lend themselves well to bright, articulate, students and by offering these experiences to students of Widening Participation criteria we quickly melt the divide between the reputation of Cambridge ( and higher education as a whole) and the day to day practice. Higher education is not for the privileged, but a free and

  3. Development of a new radiometer for the thermodynamic measurement of high temperature fixed points

    SciTech Connect

    Dury, M. R.; Goodman, T. M.; Lowe, D. H.; Machin, G.; Woolliams, E. R.

    2013-09-11

    The National Physical Laboratory (NPL) has developed a new radiometer to measure the thermodynamic melting point temperatures of high temperature fixed points with ultra-low uncertainties. In comparison with the NPL's Absolute Radiation Thermometer (ART), the 'THermodynamic Optical Radiometer' (THOR) is more portable and compact, with a much lower size-of-source effect and improved performance in other parameters such as temperature sensitivity. It has been designed for calibration as a whole instrument via the radiance method, removing the need to calibrate the individual subcomponents, as required by ART, and thereby reducing uncertainties. In addition, the calibration approach has been improved through a new integrating sphere that has been designed to have greater uniformity.

  4. Universal Cosmic Absolute and Modern Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostro, Ludwik

    The official Sciences, especially all natural sciences, respect in their researches the principle of methodic naturalism i.e. they consider all phenomena as entirely natural and therefore in their scientific explanations they do never adduce or cite supernatural entities and forces. The purpose of this paper is to show that Modern Science has its own self-existent, self-acting, and self-sufficient Natural All-in Being or Omni-Being i.e. the entire Nature as a Whole that justifies the scientific methodic naturalism. Since this Natural All-in Being is one and only It should be considered as the own scientifically justified Natural Absolute of Science and should be called, in my opinion, the Universal Cosmic Absolute of Modern Science. It will be also shown that the Universal Cosmic Absolute is ontologically enormously stratified and is in its ultimate i.e. in its most fundamental stratum trans-reistic and trans-personal. It means that in its basic stratum. It is neither a Thing or a Person although It contains in Itself all things and persons with all other sentient and conscious individuals as well, On the turn of the 20th century the Science has begun to look for a theory of everything, for a final theory, for a master theory. In my opinion the natural Universal Cosmic Absolute will constitute in such a theory the radical all penetrating Ultimate Basic Reality and will substitute step by step the traditional supernatural personal Absolute.

  5. Thermodynamic and melting properties of RDX at elevated pressures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, D. W.; Nauflett, G. W.; Brasch, J. W., Sr.; Austin, T. D.

    1980-01-01

    The laboratory set up for determination of melting and thermodynamic properties of RDX using a diamond anvil cell apparatus capable of pressures exceeding 10 kbar and 250 C is described. The slope of the melting temperature versus applied pressure curve for RDX, as determined in the diamond cell, was found to equal 4.09 + or - 0.6 C (kbar). The density of liquid RDX at its melting point was calculated from this slope to be approximately 1.63 gm/cu cm. Practical and theoretical considerations in using the diamond anvil cell to generate thermodynamic data on RDX are discussed.

  6. Melt Heterogeneity and Degassing at MT Etna from Melt Inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salem, L. C.; Edmonds, M.; Maclennan, J.; Corsaro, R. A.

    2014-12-01

    The melts feeding Mt Etna, Italy, are rich in volatiles and drive long-lasting powerful eruptions of basaltic magma in both effusive and explosive styles of activity. The volatile systematics of the volcanic system are well understood through melt inclusion and volcanic gas studies. Etna's melts are generated from a complex mantle setting, with subduction-related chemical modifications as well as OIB-type features, and then the melts must travel through thick carbonate-rich crust. The continual influx of mantle-derived volatile-rich magma controls the major compositional and eruptive features of Mount Etna and magma mixing has been recognized as an important process driving large eruptions [Kamenetsky, 2007]. Our study focusses on the 1669 eruption, the largest in historical times. Olivine-hosted melt inclusions were analyzed for volatile, trace and major elements using electron microprobe and ion probe (SIMS). We use volatile systematics and geochemical data to deconvolve mantle-derived heterogeneity from melt mixing and crystal fractionation. Our data are well described by a mixing trend between two distinct melts: a CO2-rich (CO2~1000ppm), incompatible trace element depleted melt (La/Yb~16), and a CO2-poor, enriched melt. The mixing also generates a strong correlation between Sr and CO2 in the melt inclusions dataset, reflecting the presence of a strong Sr anomaly in one of the end-member melts. We investigate the origin of this Sr anomaly by considering plagioclase dissolution and crustal assimilation. We also investigate degassing processes in the crust and plumbing system of the volcano. We compare our results with similar studies of OIB and arc-related basalts elsewhere and assess the implications for linking eruption size and style with the nature of the mantle-derived melts. Kamenetsky et al. (2007) Geology 35, 255-258.

  7. Quantitative standards for absolute linguistic universals.

    PubMed

    Piantadosi, Steven T; Gibson, Edward

    2014-01-01

    Absolute linguistic universals are often justified by cross-linguistic analysis: If all observed languages exhibit a property, the property is taken to be a likely universal, perhaps specified in the cognitive or linguistic systems of language learners and users. In many cases, these patterns are then taken to motivate linguistic theory. Here, we show that cross-linguistic analysis will very rarely be able to statistically justify absolute, inviolable patterns in language. We formalize two statistical methods--frequentist and Bayesian--and show that in both it is possible to find strict linguistic universals, but that the numbers of independent languages necessary to do so is generally unachievable. This suggests that methods other than typological statistics are necessary to establish absolute properties of human language, and thus that many of the purported universals in linguistics have not received sufficient empirical justification.

  8. Melting in Martian Snowbanks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zent, A. P.; Sutter, B.

    2005-01-01

    Precipitation as snow is an emerging paradigm for understanding water flow on Mars, which gracefully resolves many outstanding uncertainties in climatic and geomorphic interpretation. Snowfall does not require a powerful global greenhouse to effect global precipitation. It has long been assumed that global average temperatures greater than 273K are required to sustain liquid water at the surface via rainfall and runoff. Unfortunately, the best greenhouse models to date predict global mean surface temperatures early in Mars' history that differ little from today's, unless exceptional conditions are invoked. Snowfall however, can occur at temperatures less than 273K; all that is required is saturation of the atmosphere. At global temperatures lower than 273K, H2O would have been injected into the atmosphere by impacts and volcanic eruptions during the Noachian, and by obliquity-driven climate oscillations more recently. Snow cover can accumulate for a considerable period, and be available for melting during local spring and summer, unless sublimation rates are sufficient to remove the entire snowpack. We decided to explore the physics that controls the melting of snow in the high-latitude regions of Mars to understand the frequency and drainage of snowmelt in the high martian latitudes.

  9. Absolute Distance Measurement with the MSTAR Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lay, Oliver P.; Dubovitsky, Serge; Peters, Robert; Burger, Johan; Ahn, Seh-Won; Steier, William H.; Fetterman, Harrold R.; Chang, Yian

    2003-01-01

    The MSTAR sensor (Modulation Sideband Technology for Absolute Ranging) is a new system for measuring absolute distance, capable of resolving the integer cycle ambiguity of standard interferometers, and making it possible to measure distance with sub-nanometer accuracy. The sensor uses a single laser in conjunction with fast phase modulators and low frequency detectors. We describe the design of the system - the principle of operation, the metrology source, beamlaunching optics, and signal processing - and show results for target distances up to 1 meter. We then demonstrate how the system can be scaled to kilometer-scale distances.

  10. Melting of Ice under Pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Schwegler, E; Sharma, M; Gygi, F; Galli, G

    2008-07-31

    The melting of ice under pressure is investigated with a series of first principles molecular dynamics simulations. In particular, a two-phase approach is used to determine the melting temperature of the ice-VII phase in the range of 10 to 50 GPa. Our computed melting temperatures are consistent with existing diamond anvil cell experiments. We find that for pressures between 10 to 40 GPa, ice melts as a molecular solid. For pressures above {approx}45 GPa there is a sharp increase in the slope of the melting curve due to the presence of molecular dissociation and proton diffusion in the solid, prior to melting. The onset of significant proton diffusion in ice-VII as a function of increasing temperature is found to be gradual and bears many similarities to that of a type-II superionic solid.

  11. Melting of ice under pressure.

    PubMed

    Schwegler, Eric; Sharma, Manu; Gygi, François; Galli, Giulia

    2008-09-30

    The melting of ice under pressure is investigated with a series of first-principles molecular dynamics simulations. In particular, a two-phase approach is used to determine the melting temperature of the ice-VII phase in the range of 10-50 GPa. Our computed melting temperatures are consistent with existing diamond anvil cell experiments. We find that for pressures between 10 and 40 GPa, ice melts as a molecular solid. For pressures above approximately 45 Gpa, there is a sharp increase in the slope of the melting curve because of the presence of molecular dissociation and proton diffusion in the solid before melting. The onset of significant proton diffusion in ice-VII as a function of increasing temperature is found to be gradual and bears many similarities to that of a type-II superionic solid.

  12. Absolutely relative or relatively absolute: violations of value invariance in human decision making.

    PubMed

    Teodorescu, Andrei R; Moran, Rani; Usher, Marius

    2016-02-01

    Making decisions based on relative rather than absolute information processing is tied to choice optimality via the accumulation of evidence differences and to canonical neural processing via accumulation of evidence ratios. These theoretical frameworks predict invariance of decision latencies to absolute intensities that maintain differences and ratios, respectively. While information about the absolute values of the choice alternatives is not necessary for choosing the best alternative, it may nevertheless hold valuable information about the context of the decision. To test the sensitivity of human decision making to absolute values, we manipulated the intensities of brightness stimuli pairs while preserving either their differences or their ratios. Although asked to choose the brighter alternative relative to the other, participants responded faster to higher absolute values. Thus, our results provide empirical evidence for human sensitivity to task irrelevant absolute values indicating a hard-wired mechanism that precedes executive control. Computational investigations of several modelling architectures reveal two alternative accounts for this phenomenon, which combine absolute and relative processing. One account involves accumulation of differences with activation dependent processing noise and the other emerges from accumulation of absolute values subject to the temporal dynamics of lateral inhibition. The potential adaptive role of such choice mechanisms is discussed.

  13. Free dendritic growth in viscous melts - Cyclohexanol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, N. B.; Glicksman, M. E.

    1989-01-01

    Experiments were carried out to measure the growth speed, V, and dendritic tip radius, R, of highly purified cyclohexanol. The data show that VR-squared = constant over the entire experimentally observed supercooling range, Delta T is between 0.1 and 1 K. The stability parameter estimated from this result indicates that sigma(asterisk) = 0.027, a value in good agreement with the values of sigma(asterisk) found for the cubic plastic crystals succinonitrile pivalic acid. Cyclohexanol differs from other carefully measured plastic crystals in that the viscosity of its melt at the melting point is about 20 times higher, so gravity-induced convection remains weak even at small supercoolings.

  14. Dynamics in Polymer Melts and Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Gerald

    Intense research has led to substantial progress in the field of polymer melts and nanocomposites, both regarding the fundamental understanding and the relationship to applications. From a fundamental point of view, knowing the microscopic single chain dynamics is important. It may even lead to optimized materials ranging from the classical car tire to battery or fuel cell applications. In polymer melts, different processes, such as diffusion, reptation, contour length fluctuations, etc. occur and determine the macroscopic results, e.g. obtained by rheology. In nanocomposites confinement effects and interactions of chains with surfaces play an important role. High resolution techniques, such as small-angle neutron scattering or neutron spin echo spectroscopy are suited to explore the structure and dynamics of chains. The presentation illuminates the fundamental relationship between the microscopic dynamics and the mesoscopic properties, exploiting different experimental techniques, such as dielectric spectroscopy, rheology, neutron scattering and neutron spin echo spectroscopy.

  15. Comparative vs. Absolute Judgments of Trait Desirability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hofstee, Willem K. B.

    1970-01-01

    Reversals of trait desirability are studied. Terms indicating conservativw behavior appeared to be judged relatively desirable in comparative judgement, while traits indicating dynamic and expansive behavior benefited from absolute judgement. The reversal effect was shown to be a general one, i.e. reversals were not dependent upon the specific…

  16. New Techniques for Absolute Gravity Measurements.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-01-07

    Hammond, J.A. (1978) Bollettino Di Geofisica Teorica ed Applicata Vol. XX. 8. Hammond, J. A., and Iliff, R. L. (1979) The AFGL absolute gravity system...International Gravimetric Bureau, No. L:I-43. 7. Hammond. J.A. (1978) Bollettino Di Geofisica Teorica ed Applicata Vol. XX. 8. Hammond, J.A., and

  17. An Absolute Electrometer for the Physics Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Straulino, S.; Cartacci, A.

    2009-01-01

    A low-cost, easy-to-use absolute electrometer is presented: two thin metallic plates and an electronic balance, usually available in a laboratory, are used. We report on the very good performance of the device that allows precise measurements of the force acting between two charged plates. (Contains 5 footnotes, 2 tables, and 6 figures.)

  18. Stimulus Probability Effects in Absolute Identification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kent, Christopher; Lamberts, Koen

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of stimulus presentation probability on accuracy and response times in an absolute identification task. Three schedules of presentation were used to investigate the interaction between presentation probability and stimulus position within the set. Data from individual participants indicated strong effects of…

  19. In Brief: Melting glaciers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy; Tretkoff, Ernie

    2010-12-01

    Glaciers in Patagonia and Alaska have been losing their mass, and for longer than glaciers elsewhere in the world, according to a 7 December report compiled by the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP). “Climate change is causing significant mass loss of glaciers in high mountains worldwide,” notes the report, which calls for accelerated research, monitoring, and modeling of glaciers and snow and their role in water supplies. The report “also highlights the vulnerability and exposure of people dependent upon [glacier-fed] rivers to floods, droughts and eventually shortages as a result of changes in the melting and freezing cycles linked with climate change and other pollution impacts,” according to UNEP executive director Achim Steiner. For more information, visit http://www.grida.no/publications/high­mountain-glaciers/.

  20. Waste glass melting stages

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, L.D.; Dennis, T.; Elliott, M.L.; Hrma, P.

    1993-04-01

    Three different simulated nuclear waste glass feeds, consisting of dried waste and glass frit, were heat treated for 1 hour in a gradient furnace at temperatures ranging from approximately 600[degrees]C--1000[degrees]C. Simulated melter feeds from the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP), the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), and Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe (KfK) in Germany were used. The samples were thin-sectioned and examined by optical microscopy to investigate the stages of the conversion from feed to glass. Various phenomena were seen, such as frit softening, bubble formation, foaming, bubble motion and removal, convective mixing, and homogenization. Behavior of different feeds was similar, although the degree of gas generation and melt homogenization varied.

  1. Waste glass melting stages

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, L.D.; Dennis, T.; Elliott, M.L.; Hrma, P.

    1993-04-01

    Three different simulated nuclear waste glass feeds, consisting of dried waste and glass frit, were heat treated for 1 hour in a gradient furnace at temperatures ranging from approximately 600{degrees}C--1000{degrees}C. Simulated melter feeds from the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP), the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), and Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe (KfK) in Germany were used. The samples were thin-sectioned and examined by optical microscopy to investigate the stages of the conversion from feed to glass. Various phenomena were seen, such as frit softening, bubble formation, foaming, bubble motion and removal, convective mixing, and homogenization. Behavior of different feeds was similar, although the degree of gas generation and melt homogenization varied.

  2. Tin in silicate melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paparoni, Guido

    An experimental technique that uses Re metal capsules as containers for tin-bearing systems has been developed and successfully used in the study of the compositional dependence of SnO2 solubility in silicate melts. These experiments have been performed in the absence of an aqueous fluid phase and oxygen fugacity (fO2) has been established by the addition of tin-metal to SnO2. This approach solves three long-standing problems in the study of SnO 2 solubility in silicate melts: (1) Alloying of noble-metal crucibles and corrosion of ceramic crucibles is avoided; (2) fO 2 is established by direct contact of a metal-oxide oxygen buffer; (3) Gaseous SnO is not lost to the furnace atmosphere. The Re-capsule technique, combined with evacuated silica-tube experiments, has been applied to the study of the system SnO-SiO2 at pressures of 1 atm and 10 kbar. SnO2 solubilities of up to 95 wt% SnO are reported. The system SnO-SiO2 is found to be a pseudo-binary of the ternary system Sn°-SnO2-SiO2. A revised phase diagram for the system SnO-SiO2 at a pressure ≈1 atm is provided, and a new phase diagram for the system SnOSiO2 at a pressure = 10 kbar has been constructed. These results are used to suggest the topology of the ternary system Sn°-SnO2SiO2. The Re-capsule technique has also been applied to the study of the subaluminous haplogranite system (SiO2NaAlSi3O8-KAlSi 3O8) at T = 1100°C, P = 10 kbar and fO 2 at Sn°-SnO2. Solubilities span the range of 41 to 80 wt% SnO. In the haplogranite system, the solubility of SnO2 increases with the proportion of normative SiO2, and SnO is found to expand the stability field of SiO2. In the feldspar join, Na-based melts dissolve a larger proportion of SnO than K-based melts. This effect is lost as SiO2 is progressively added to the feldspar join. Small amounts of F (1 wt%) are found to increase the solubility of SnO 2 by an equivalent 15 wt% normative quartz as shown with the Spor Mountain rhyolite. A comparison of SnO2 solubilities

  3. Sealing ceramic material in low melting point glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moritoki, M.; Fujikawa, T.; Miyanaga, J.

    1984-01-01

    A structured device placed in an aerated crucible to pack ceramics molding substance that is to be processed was designed. The structure is wrapped by sealing material made of pyrex glass and graphite foil or sheet with a weight attached on top of it. The crucible is made of carbon; the ceramics material to be treated through heat intervenient press process is molding substance consisting mainly of silicon nitride.

  4. Molecular dynamics of liquid lead near its melting point

    SciTech Connect

    Khusnutdinov, R. M.; Mokshin, A. V. Yul'met'ev, R. M.

    2009-03-15

    The molecular dynamics of liquid lead is simulated at T = 613 K using the following three models of an interparticle interaction potential: the Dzugutov pair potential and two multiparticle potentials (the 'glue' potential and the Gupta potential). One of the purposes of this work is to determine the optimal model potential of the interatomic interaction in liquid lead. The calculated structural static and dynamic characteristics are compared with the experimental data on X-ray and neutron scattering. On the whole, all three model potentials adequately reproduce the experimental data. The calculations using the Dzugutov pair potential are found to reproduce the structural properties and dynamics of liquid lead on the nanoscale best of all. The role of a multiparticle contribution to the glue and Gupta potentials is studied, and its effect on the dynamic properties of liquid lead in nanoregions is revealed. In particular, the neglect of this contribution is shown to noticeably decrease the acoustic-mode frequency.

  5. A melting point for the birefringent component of muscle.

    PubMed

    Aronson, J F

    1966-09-01

    The A filament of the striated muscle sarcomere is an ordered aggregate of one or a few species of proteins. Ordering of these filaments into a parallel array is the basis of birefringence in the A region, and loss of birefringence is therefore a measure of decreased order. Heating caused a large decrease in the birefringence of glycerinated rabbit psoas muscle fibers over a narrow temperature range ( approximately 3 degrees C) and a large decrease in both the birefringence and optical density of the A region of Drosophila melanogaster fibrils. These changes were interpreted as a loss of A filament structure and were used to define a transition temperature (T(tr)) as a measure of the stability of the A region. Since the transition temperature was sensitive to pH, ionic strength, and urea, solvent conditions which often affect protein structure, it is an experimentally useful indicator for factors affecting the structure of the A filament. Fibers from glycerinated frog muscle were less stable over a wide pH range than fibers from glycerinated rabbit muscle, a fact which demonstrates a species difference in structure. Glycerinated rabbit fibrils heated to 70 degrees C shortened to about 40% of their initial length. The extent of shortening was not correlated with the loss of birefringence, and phase-contrast microscopy showed that this shortening occurred in the I region as well as in the A region. This response may be useful for studying the I filament and actin in much the same way that the decrease in birefringence was used for studying the A filament and myosin. The observations presented show that some properties of muscle proteins can be studied essentially in situ without the necessity of first dispersing the structure in solutions of high or low ionic strength.

  6. Melting and melt-movement in the Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Robert S.

    Researchers came together to discuss melting and melt-movement in the Earth at a 2-day Royal Society Discussion Meeting held in March 1992 at the Royal Society, London.In recent years, many new tools have become available to geologists studying igneous and metamorphic rocks. They can be examined at ever-higher magnifications: the composition within individual crystals can be measured; their isotopic, trace, and rare-earth element concentrations can be determined; and measurements of partition coefficients and melting behavior can be made in the laboratory at pressures and temperatures appropriate to in-situ rocks. Along with these improvements in instrumentation and experimental techniques, advances have been made in understanding the physics of melt generation and separation, and computers have been developed that are sufficiently powerful to model theoretical formulations of the behavior of melt in the Earth.

  7. Multi-stage melt-rock interaction in the Mt. Maggiore (Corsica, France) ophiolitic peridotites: microstructural and geochemical evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rampone, Elisabetta; Piccardo, Giovanni B.; Hofmann, Albrecht W.

    2008-10-01

    Spinel and plagioclase peridotites from the Mt.Maggiore (Corsica, France) ophiolitic massif record a composite asthenosphere-lithosphere history of partial melting and subsequent multi-stage melt-rock interaction. Cpx-poor spinel lherzolites are consistent with mantle residues after low-degree fractional melting ( F = 5-10%). Opx + spinel symplectites at the rims of orthopyroxene porphyroclasts indicate post-melting lithospheric cooling ( T = 970-1,100°C); this was followed by formation of olivine embayments within pyroxene porphyroclasts by melt-rock interaction. Enrichment in modal olivine (up to 85 wt%) at constant bulk Mg values, and variable absolute REE contents (at constant LREE/HREE) indicate olivine precipitation and pyroxene dissolution during reactive porous melt flow. This stage occurred at spinel-facies depths, after incorporation of the peridotites in the thermal lithosphere. Plagioclase-enriched peridotites show melt impregnation microtextures, like opx + plag intergrowths replacing exsolved cpx porphyroclasts and interstitial gabbronoritic veinlets. This second melt-rock interaction stage caused systematic chemical changes in clinopyroxene (e.g. Ti, REE, Zr, Y increase), related to the concomitant effects of local melt-rock interaction at decreasing melt mass, and crystallization of small (<3%) trapped melt fractions. LREE depletion in minerals of the gabbronoritic veinlets indicates that the impregnating melts were more depleted than normal MORB. Preserved microtextural evidence of previous melt-rock interaction in the impregnated peridotites suggests that they were progressively uplifted in response to lithosphere extension and thinning. Migrating melts were likely produced by mantle upwelling and melting related to extension; they were modified from olivine-saturated to opx-saturated compositions, and caused different styles of melt-rock interaction (reactive spinel harzburgites, vs. impregnated plagioclase peridotites) depending on the

  8. Absolute exponential stability of recurrent neural networks with Lipschitz-continuous activation functions and time delays.

    PubMed

    Cao, Jinde; Wang, Jun

    2004-04-01

    This paper investigates the absolute exponential stability of a general class of delayed neural networks, which require the activation functions to be partially Lipschitz continuous and monotone nondecreasing only, but not necessarily differentiable or bounded. Three new sufficient conditions are derived to ascertain whether or not the equilibrium points of the delayed neural networks with additively diagonally stable interconnection matrices are absolutely exponentially stable by using delay Halanay-type inequality and Lyapunov function. The stability criteria are also suitable for delayed optimization neural networks and delayed cellular neural networks whose activation functions are often nondifferentiable or unbounded. The results herein answer a question: if a neural network without any delay is absolutely exponentially stable, then under what additional conditions, the neural networks with delay is also absolutely exponentially stable.

  9. [A applicability of sugar esters in hot-melt technology].

    PubMed

    Szuts, Angéla; Laczkovich, Orsolya; Nassab, Parya Reisi; Aigner, Zoltán; Szabone Révész, Piroska

    2007-01-01

    One of the most important tasks in pharmaceutical technology is the optimization of drug release. The hot-melt technology is an important method with which to modify the bioavailability. Sugar esters (SEs) have a wide range of HLB values (1-16). Due to their low melting points, they are promising carriers for the melting method. The aims of the present work were to study the thermal properties (DSC) and the structures (XRPD) of SEs with low, medium or high HLB values, and to evaluate their applicability in the hot-melt technology. Relationships were found between the HLB value, the structure and the thermal behaviour. After melting and solidification, the SEs have partially amorphous layered structures which slowly crystallize in time; the original structure does not return for SEs with high, moderate, or low HLB values. These results demonstrate that changes in morphology must be considered during research and development. During the examination of meloxicam-SE melted products the SEs influenced the drug release, depending on their HLB values. In the cases of ibuprofen-SE melted products, the SEs did not influence the drug release. Here, a change in the drug distribution was the predominant effect, which was accompanied by movement in the SE structure.

  10. Hot-melt extrusion--basic principles and pharmaceutical applications.

    PubMed

    Lang, Bo; McGinity, James W; Williams, Robert O

    2014-09-01

    Originally adapted from the plastics industry, the use of hot-melt extrusion has gained favor in drug delivery applications both in academia and the pharmaceutical industry. Several commercial products made by hot-melt extrusion have been approved by the FDA, demonstrating its commercial feasibility for pharmaceutical processing. A significant number of research articles have reported on advances made regarding the pharmaceutical applications of the hot-melt extrusion processing; however, only limited articles have been focused on general principles regarding formulation and process development. This review provides an in-depth analysis and discussion of the formulation and processing aspects of hot-melt extrusion. The impact of physicochemical properties of drug substances and excipients on formulation development using a hot-melt extrusion process is discussed from a material science point of view. Hot-melt extrusion process development, scale-up, and the interplay of formulation and process attributes are also discussed. Finally, recent applications of hot-melt extrusion to a variety of dosage forms and drug substances have also been addressed.

  11. A metastable liquid melted from a crystalline solid under decompression

    DOE PAGES

    Lin, Chuanlong; Smith, Jesse S.; Sinogeikin, Stanislav V.; ...

    2017-01-23

    A metastable liquid may exist under supercooling, sustaining the liquid below the melting point such as supercooled water and silicon. It may also exist as a transient state in solid–solid transitions, as demonstrated in recent studies of colloidal particles and glass-forming metallic systems. One important question is whether a crystalline solid may directly melt into a sustainable metastable liquid. By thermal heating, a crystalline solid will always melt into a liquid above the melting point. Here we report that a high-pressure crystalline phase of bismuth can melt into a metastable liquid below the melting line through a decompression process. Themore » decompression-induced metastable liquid can be maintained for hours in static conditions, and transform to crystalline phases when external perturbations, such as heating and cooling, are applied. It occurs in the pressure–temperature region similar to where the supercooled liquid Bi is observed. Finally, akin to supercooled liquid, the pressure-induced metastable liquid may be more ubiquitous than we thought.« less

  12. A metastable liquid melted from a crystalline solid under decompression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chuanlong; Smith, Jesse S.; Sinogeikin, Stanislav V.; Kono, Yoshio; Park, Changyong; Kenney-Benson, Curtis; Shen, Guoyin

    2017-01-01

    A metastable liquid may exist under supercooling, sustaining the liquid below the melting point such as supercooled water and silicon. It may also exist as a transient state in solid-solid transitions, as demonstrated in recent studies of colloidal particles and glass-forming metallic systems. One important question is whether a crystalline solid may directly melt into a sustainable metastable liquid. By thermal heating, a crystalline solid will always melt into a liquid above the melting point. Here we report that a high-pressure crystalline phase of bismuth can melt into a metastable liquid below the melting line through a decompression process. The decompression-induced metastable liquid can be maintained for hours in static conditions, and transform to crystalline phases when external perturbations, such as heating and cooling, are applied. It occurs in the pressure-temperature region similar to where the supercooled liquid Bi is observed. Akin to supercooled liquid, the pressure-induced metastable liquid may be more ubiquitous than we thought.

  13. A metastable liquid melted from a crystalline solid under decompression

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chuanlong; Smith, Jesse S.; Sinogeikin, Stanislav V.; Kono, Yoshio; Park, Changyong; Kenney-Benson, Curtis; Shen, Guoyin

    2017-01-01

    A metastable liquid may exist under supercooling, sustaining the liquid below the melting point such as supercooled water and silicon. It may also exist as a transient state in solid–solid transitions, as demonstrated in recent studies of colloidal particles and glass-forming metallic systems. One important question is whether a crystalline solid may directly melt into a sustainable metastable liquid. By thermal heating, a crystalline solid will always melt into a liquid above the melting point. Here we report that a high-pressure crystalline phase of bismuth can melt into a metastable liquid below the melting line through a decompression process. The decompression-induced metastable liquid can be maintained for hours in static conditions, and transform to crystalline phases when external perturbations, such as heating and cooling, are applied. It occurs in the pressure–temperature region similar to where the supercooled liquid Bi is observed. Akin to supercooled liquid, the pressure-induced metastable liquid may be more ubiquitous than we thought. PMID:28112152

  14. ELM induced tungsten melting and its impact on tokamak operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coenen, J. W.; Arnoux, G.; Bazylev, B.; Matthews, G. F.; Jachmich, S.; Balboa, I.; Clever, M.; Dejarnac, R.; Coffey, I.; Corre, Y.; Devaux, S.; Frassinetti, L.; Gauthier, E.; Horacek, J.; Knaup, M.; Komm, M.; Krieger, K.; Marsen, S.; Meigs, A.; Mertens, Ph.; Pitts, R. A.; Puetterich, T.; Rack, M.; Stamp, M.; Sergienko, G.; Tamain, P.; Thompson, V.

    2015-08-01

    In JET-ILW dedicated melt exposures were performed using a sequence of 3MA/2.9T H-Mode JET pulses with an input power of PIN = 23 MW, a stored energy of ∼6 MJ and regular type I ELMs at ΔWELM = 0.3 MJ and fELM ∼ 30 Hz. In order to assess the risk of starting ITER operations with a full W divertor, one of the task was to measure the consequences of W transients melting due to ELMs. JET is the only tokamak able to produce transients/ ELMs large enough (>300 kJ per ELM) to facilitate melting of tungsten. Such ELMs are comparable to mitigated ELMs expected in ITER. By moving the outer strike point (OSP) onto a dedicated leading edge the base temperature was raised within ∼1 s to allow transient ELM-driven melting during the subsequent 0.5 s. Almost 1 mm (∼6 mm3) of W was moved by ∼ 150 ELMs within 5 subsequent discharges. Significant material losses in terms of ejections into the plasma were not observed. There is indirect evidence that some small droplets (∼ 80 μm) were ejected. The impact on the main plasma parameters is minor and no disruptions occurred. The W-melt gradually moved along the lamella edge towards the high field side, driven by j × B forces. The evaporation rate determined is 100 times less than expected from steady state melting and thus only consistent with transient melting during individual ELMs. IR data, spectroscopy, as well as melt modeling point to transient melting. Although the type of damage studied in these JET experiments is unlikely to be experienced in ITER, the results do strongly support the design strategy to avoid exposed edges in the ITER divertor. The JET experiments required a surface at normal incidence and considerable pre-heating to produce tungsten melting. They provide unique experimental evidence for the absence of significant melt splashing at events resembling mitigated ELMs on ITER and establish a unique experimental benchmark for the simulations being used to study transient shallow melting on ITER W

  15. Fault rheology beyond frictional melting

    PubMed Central

    Lavallée, Yan; Hirose, Takehiro; Kendrick, Jackie E.; Hess, Kai-Uwe; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2015-01-01

    During earthquakes, comminution and frictional heating both contribute to the dissipation of stored energy. With sufficient dissipative heating, melting processes can ensue, yielding the production of frictional melts or “pseudotachylytes.” It is commonly assumed that the Newtonian viscosities of such melts control subsequent fault slip resistance. Rock melts, however, are viscoelastic bodies, and, at high strain rates, they exhibit evidence of a glass transition. Here, we present the results of high-velocity friction experiments on a well-characterized melt that demonstrate how slip in melt-bearing faults can be governed by brittle fragmentation phenomena encountered at the glass transition. Slip analysis using models that incorporate viscoelastic responses indicates that even in the presence of melt, slip persists in the solid state until sufficient heat is generated to reduce the viscosity and allow remobilization in the liquid state. Where a rock is present next to the melt, we note that wear of the crystalline wall rock by liquid fragmentation and agglutination also contributes to the brittle component of these experimentally generated pseudotachylytes. We conclude that in the case of pseudotachylyte generation during an earthquake, slip even beyond the onset of frictional melting is not controlled merely by viscosity but rather by an interplay of viscoelastic forces around the glass transition, which involves a response in the brittle/solid regime of these rock melts. We warn of the inadequacy of simple Newtonian viscous analyses and call for the application of more realistic rheological interpretation of pseudotachylyte-bearing fault systems in the evaluation and prediction of their slip dynamics. PMID:26124123

  16. Fault rheology beyond frictional melting.

    PubMed

    Lavallée, Yan; Hirose, Takehiro; Kendrick, Jackie E; Hess, Kai-Uwe; Dingwell, Donald B

    2015-07-28

    During earthquakes, comminution and frictional heating both contribute to the dissipation of stored energy. With sufficient dissipative heating, melting processes can ensue, yielding the production of frictional melts or "pseudotachylytes." It is commonly assumed that the Newtonian viscosities of such melts control subsequent fault slip resistance. Rock melts, however, are viscoelastic bodies, and, at high strain rates, they exhibit evidence of a glass transition. Here, we present the results of high-velocity friction experiments on a well-characterized melt that demonstrate how slip in melt-bearing faults can be governed by brittle fragmentation phenomena encountered at the glass transition. Slip analysis using models that incorporate viscoelastic responses indicates that even in the presence of melt, slip persists in the solid state until sufficient heat is generated to reduce the viscosity and allow remobilization in the liquid state. Where a rock is present next to the melt, we note that wear of the crystalline wall rock by liquid fragmentation and agglutination also contributes to the brittle component of these experimentally generated pseudotachylytes. We conclude that in the case of pseudotachylyte generation during an earthquake, slip even beyond the onset of frictional melting is not controlled merely by viscosity but rather by an interplay of viscoelastic forces around the glass transition, which involves a response in the brittle/solid regime of these rock melts. We warn of the inadequacy of simple Newtonian viscous analyses and call for the application of more realistic rheological interpretation of pseudotachylyte-bearing fault systems in the evaluation and prediction of their slip dynamics.

  17. Absolute Helmholtz free energy of highly anharmonic crystals: theory vs Monte Carlo.

    PubMed

    Yakub, Lydia; Yakub, Eugene

    2012-04-14

    We discuss the problem of the quantitative theoretical prediction of the absolute free energy for classical highly anharmonic solids. Helmholtz free energy of the Lennard-Jones (LJ) crystal is calculated accurately while accounting for both the anharmonicity of atomic vibrations and the pair and triple correlations in displacements of the atoms from their lattice sites. The comparison with most precise computer simulation data on sublimation and melting lines revealed that theoretical predictions are in excellent agreement with Monte Carlo simulation data in the whole range of temperatures and densities studied.

  18. From Hubble's NGSL to Absolute Fluxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heap, Sara R.; Lindler, Don

    2012-01-01

    Hubble's Next Generation Spectral Library (NGSL) consists of R-l000 spectra of 374 stars of assorted temperature, gravity, and metallicity. Each spectrum covers the wavelength range, 0.18-1.00 microns. The library can be viewed and/or downloaded from the website, http://archive.stsci.edu/prepds/stisngsll. Stars in the NGSL are now being used as absolute flux standards at ground-based observatories. However, the uncertainty in the absolute flux is about 2%, which does not meet the requirements of dark-energy surveys. We are therefore developing an observing procedure that should yield fluxes with uncertainties less than 1 % and will take part in an HST proposal to observe up to 15 stars using this new procedure.

  19. Consistent thermostatistics forbids negative absolute temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunkel, Jörn; Hilbert, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Over the past 60 years, a considerable number of theories and experiments have claimed the existence of negative absolute temperature in spin systems and ultracold quantum gases. This has led to speculation that ultracold gases may be dark-energy analogues and also suggests the feasibility of heat engines with efficiencies larger than one. Here, we prove that all previous negative temperature claims and their implications are invalid as they arise from the use of an entropy definition that is inconsistent both mathematically and thermodynamically. We show that the underlying conceptual deficiencies can be overcome if one adopts a microcanonical entropy functional originally derived by Gibbs. The resulting thermodynamic framework is self-consistent and implies that absolute temperature remains positive even for systems with a bounded spectrum. In addition, we propose a minimal quantum thermometer that can be implemented with available experimental techniques.

  20. Asteroid absolute magnitudes and slope parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tedesco, Edward F.

    1991-01-01

    A new listing of absolute magnitudes (H) and slope parameters (G) has been created and published in the Minor Planet Circulars; this same listing will appear in the 1992 Ephemerides of Minor Planets. Unlike previous listings, the values of the current list were derived from fits of data at the V band. All observations were reduced in the same fashion using, where appropriate, a single basis default value of 0.15 for the slope parameter. Distances and phase angles were computed for each observation. The data for 113 asteroids was of sufficiently high quality to permit derivation of their H and G. These improved absolute magnitudes and slope parameters will be used to deduce the most reliable bias-corrected asteroid size-frequency distribution yet made.

  1. Computer processing of spectrograms for absolute intensities.

    PubMed

    Guttman, A; Golden, J; Galbraith, H J

    1967-09-01

    A computer program was developed to process photographically recorded spectra for absolute intensity. Test and calibration films are subjected to densitometric scans that provide digitally recorded densities on magnetic tapes. The nonlinear calibration data are fitted by least-squares cubic polynomials to yield a good approximation to the monochromatic H&D curves for commonly used emulsions (2475 recording film, Royal-X, Tri-X, 4-X). Several test cases were made. Results of these cases show that the machine processed absolute intensities are accurate to within 15%o. Arbitrarily raising the sensitivity threshold by 0.1 density units above gross fog yields cubic polynomial fits to the H&D curves that are radiometrically accurate within 10%. In addition, curves of gamma vs wavelength for 2475, Tri-X, and 4-X emulsions were made. These data show slight evidence of the photographic Purkinje effect in the 2475 emulsion.

  2. An absolute measure for a key currency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oya, Shunsuke; Aihara, Kazuyuki; Hirata, Yoshito

    It is generally considered that the US dollar and the euro are the key currencies in the world and in Europe, respectively. However, there is no absolute general measure for a key currency. Here, we investigate the 24-hour periodicity of foreign exchange markets using a recurrence plot, and define an absolute measure for a key currency based on the strength of the periodicity. Moreover, we analyze the time evolution of this measure. The results show that the credibility of the US dollar has not decreased significantly since the Lehman shock, when the Lehman Brothers bankrupted and influenced the economic markets, and has increased even relatively better than that of the euro and that of the Japanese yen.

  3. Probing absolute spin polarization at the nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Eltschka, Matthias; Jäck, Berthold; Assig, Maximilian; Kondrashov, Oleg V; Skvortsov, Mikhail A; Etzkorn, Markus; Ast, Christian R; Kern, Klaus

    2014-12-10

    Probing absolute values of spin polarization at the nanoscale offers insight into the fundamental mechanisms of spin-dependent transport. Employing the Zeeman splitting in superconducting tips (Meservey-Tedrow-Fulde effect), we introduce a novel spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy that combines the probing capability of the absolute values of spin polarization with precise control at the atomic scale. We utilize our novel approach to measure the locally resolved spin polarization of magnetic Co nanoislands on Cu(111). We find that the spin polarization is enhanced by 65% when increasing the width of the tunnel barrier by only 2.3 Å due to the different decay of the electron orbitals into vacuum.

  4. Absolute and relative dosimetry for ELIMED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cirrone, G. A. P.; Cuttone, G.; Candiano, G.; Carpinelli, M.; Leonora, E.; Lo Presti, D.; Musumarra, A.; Pisciotta, P.; Raffaele, L.; Randazzo, N.; Romano, F.; Schillaci, F.; Scuderi, V.; Tramontana, A.; Cirio, R.; Marchetto, F.; Sacchi, R.; Giordanengo, S.; Monaco, V.

    2013-07-01

    The definition of detectors, methods and procedures for the absolute and relative dosimetry of laser-driven proton beams is a crucial step toward the clinical use of this new kind of beams. Hence, one of the ELIMED task, will be the definition of procedures aiming to obtain an absolute dose measure at the end of the transport beamline with an accuracy as close as possible to the one required for clinical applications (i.e. of the order of 5% or less). Relative dosimetry procedures must be established, as well: they are necessary in order to determine and verify the beam dose distributions and to monitor the beam fluence and the energetic spectra during irradiations. Radiochromic films, CR39, Faraday Cup, Secondary Emission Monitor (SEM) and transmission ionization chamber will be considered, designed and studied in order to perform a fully dosimetric characterization of the ELIMED proton beam.

  5. Silicon Absolute X-Ray Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Seely, John F.; Korde, Raj; Sprunck, Jacob; Medjoubi, Kadda; Hustache, Stephanie

    2010-06-23

    The responsivity of silicon photodiodes having no loss in the entrance window, measured using synchrotron radiation in the 1.75 to 60 keV range, was compared to the responsivity calculated using the silicon thickness measured using near-infrared light. The measured and calculated responsivities agree with an average difference of 1.3%. This enables their use as absolute x-ray detectors.

  6. Experimental study of the structural characteristics of Al melts on the basis of Fourier analysis of acoustic emission signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorontsov, Vadim; Zhuravlev, Danil; Cherepanov, Alexander

    2014-09-01

    This scientific work is devoted to the study of the genetic connection structures of solid and liquid phases. Fourier analysis of signals of acoustic emission (AE) accompanying the melting of high purity aluminum from the melting point up to t=860°C was performed. The experimental data allowed for following the dynamics of the range order of the disorder zones in the melt with increasing melt temperature until their complete destruction.

  7. The role of pyroxenite in basalt genesis: Melt-PX, a melting parameterization for mantle pyroxenites between 0.9 and 5 GPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambart, Sarah; Baker, Michael B.; Stolper, Edward M.

    2016-08-01

    Geochemical and isotopic data suggest that the source regions of oceanic basalts may contain pyroxenite in addition to peridotite. In order to incorporate the wide range of compositions and melting behaviors of pyroxenites into mantle melting models, we have developed a new parameterization, Melt-PX, which predicts near-solidus temperatures and extents of melting as a function of temperature and pressure for mantle pyroxenites. We used 183 high-pressure experiments (25 compositions; 0.9-5 GPa; 1150-1675°C) to constrain a model of melt fraction versus temperature from 5% melting up to the disappearance of clinopyroxene for pyroxenites as a function of pressure, temperature, and bulk composition. When applied to the global set of experimental data, our model reproduces the experimental F values with a standard error of estimate of 13% absolute; temperatures at which the pyroxenite is 5% molten are reproduced with a standard error of estimate of 30°C over a temperature range of ~500°C and a pressure range of ~4 GPa. In conjunction with parameterizations of peridotite melting, Melt-PX can be used to model the partial melting of multilithologic mantle sources—including the effects of varying the composition and the modal proportion of pyroxenite in such source regions. Examples of such applications include calculations of isentropic decompression melting of a mixed peridotite + pyroxenite mantle; these show that although the potential temperature of the upwelling mantle plays an important role in defining the extent of magma production, the composition and mass fraction of the pyroxenite also exert strong controls.

  8. Melt flow effect on interface stability during directional solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedorov, O. P.; Mashkovskiy, A. G.

    2015-03-01

    In the framework of the phenomenological macroscopic continuum theory using the approximation of a flat frontier layer the stability of solid-liquid interface at the directional solidification under melt motion along the interface is studied. The stability conditions are reduced to determination of eigenvalues of boundary value problem for infinitesimal disturbances of stationary process. In case of stagnant melt it is shown that in the plane "wave number-pulling rate" there are two areas of instability for low and large pulling rates divided by the area of steady-steady growth. Neutral stability curve calculated for rather large pulling rates for succinonitrile-acetone (SCN-Ac) system is close to the relevant values received by Mullins and Sekerka, while the absolute values of critical growth rates are of the same order of magnitude as the experimental ones. Melt flow along the interface leads to emergence of the third area of instability which is characterized by small values of wave numbers. When increasing the melt flow rate the area of instability extends towards great values of wave numbers.

  9. Negative absolute temperature for mobile particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, Simon; Ronzheimer, Philipp; Schreiber, Michael; Hodgman, Sean; Bloch, Immanuel; Schneider, Ulrich

    2013-05-01

    Absolute temperature is usually bound to be strictly positive. However, negative absolute temperature states, where the occupation probability of states increases with their energy, are possible in systems with an upper energy bound. So far, such states have only been demonstrated in localized spin systems with finite, discrete spectra. We realized a negative absolute temperature state for motional degrees of freedom with ultracold bosonic 39K atoms in an optical lattice, by implementing the attractive Bose-Hubbard Hamiltonian. This new state strikingly revealed itself by a quasimomentum distribution that is peaked at maximum kinetic energy. The measured kinetic energy distribution and the extracted negative temperature indicate that the ensemble is close to degeneracy, with coherence over several lattice sites. The state is as stable as a corresponding positive temperature state: The negative temperature stabilizes the system against mean-field collapse driven by negative pressure. Negative temperatures open up new parameter regimes for cold atoms, enabling fundamentally new many-body states. Additionally, they give rise to several counterintuitive effects such as heat engines with above unity efficiency.

  10. Measurement of absolute gravity acceleration in Firenze

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Angelis, M.; Greco, F.; Pistorio, A.; Poli, N.; Prevedelli, M.; Saccorotti, G.; Sorrentino, F.; Tino, G. M.

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports the results from the accurate measurement of the acceleration of gravity g taken at two separate premises in the Polo Scientifico of the University of Firenze (Italy). In these laboratories, two separate experiments aiming at measuring the Newtonian constant and testing the Newtonian law at short distances are in progress. Both experiments require an independent knowledge on the local value of g. The only available datum, pertaining to the italian zero-order gravity network, was taken more than 20 years ago at a distance of more than 60 km from the study site. Gravity measurements were conducted using an FG5 absolute gravimeter, and accompanied by seismic recordings for evaluating the noise condition at the site. The absolute accelerations of gravity at the two laboratories are (980 492 160.6 ± 4.0) μGal and (980 492 048.3 ± 3.0) μGal for the European Laboratory for Non-Linear Spectroscopy (LENS) and Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, respectively. Other than for the two referenced experiments, the data here presented will serve as a benchmark for any future study requiring an accurate knowledge of the absolute value of the acceleration of gravity in the study region.

  11. System for absolute measurements by interferometric sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norton, Douglas A.

    1993-03-01

    The most common problem of interferometric sensors is their inability to measure absolute path imbalance. Presented in this paper is a signal processing system that gives absolute, unambiguous reading of optical path difference for almost any style of interferometric sensor. Key components are a wide band (incoherent) optical source, a polychromator, and FFT electronics. Advantages include no moving parts in the signal processor, no active components at the sensor location, and the use of standard single mode fiber for sensor illumination and signal transmission. Actual absolute path imbalance of the interferometer is determined without using fringe counting or other inferential techniques. The polychromator extracts the interference information that occurs at each discrete wavelength within the spectral band of the optical source. The signal processing consists of analog and digital filtering, Fast Fourier analysis, and a peak detection and interpolation algorithm. This system was originally designed for use in a remote pressure sensing application that employed a totally passive fiber optic interferometer. A performance qualification was made using a Fabry-Perot interferometer and a commercially available laser interferometer to measure the reference displacement.

  12. Chemical composition of French mimosa absolute oil.

    PubMed

    Perriot, Rodolphe; Breme, Katharina; Meierhenrich, Uwe J; Carenini, Elise; Ferrando, Georges; Baldovini, Nicolas

    2010-02-10

    Since decades mimosa (Acacia dealbata) absolute oil has been used in the flavor and perfume industry. Today, it finds an application in over 80 perfumes, and its worldwide industrial production is estimated five tons per year. Here we report on the chemical composition of French mimosa absolute oil. Straight-chain analogues from C6 to C26 with different functional groups (hydrocarbons, esters, aldehydes, diethyl acetals, alcohols, and ketones) were identified in the volatile fraction. Most of them are long-chain molecules: (Z)-heptadec-8-ene, heptadecane, nonadecane, and palmitic acid are the most abundant, and constituents such as 2-phenethyl alcohol, methyl anisate, and ethyl palmitate are present in smaller amounts. The heavier constituents were mainly triterpenoids such as lupenone and lupeol, which were identified as two of the main components. (Z)-Heptadec-8-ene, lupenone, and lupeol were quantified by GC-MS in SIM mode using external standards and represents 6%, 20%, and 7.8% (w/w) of the absolute oil. Moreover, odorant compounds were extracted by SPME and analyzed by GC-sniffing leading to the perception of 57 odorant zones, of which 37 compounds were identified by their odorant description, mass spectrum, retention index, and injection of the reference compound.

  13. Constrained Least Absolute Deviation Neural Networks

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhishun; Peterson, Bradley S.

    2008-01-01

    It is well known that least absolute deviation (LAD) criterion or L1-norm used for estimation of parameters is characterized by robustness, i.e., the estimated parameters are totally resistant (insensitive) to large changes in the sampled data. This is an extremely useful feature, especially, when the sampled data are known to be contaminated by occasionally occurring outliers or by spiky noise. In our previous works, we have proposed the least absolute deviation neural network (LADNN) to solve unconstrained LAD problems. The theoretical proofs and numerical simulations have shown that the LADNN is Lyapunov-stable and it can globally converge to the exact solution to a given unconstrained LAD problem. We have also demonstrated its excellent application value in time-delay estimation. More generally, a practical LAD application problem may contain some linear constraints, such as a set of equalities and/or inequalities, which is called constrained LAD problem, whereas the unconstrained LAD can be considered as a special form of the constrained LAD. In this paper, we present a new neural network called constrained least absolute deviation neural network (CLADNN) to solve general constrained LAD problems. Theoretical proofs and numerical simulations demonstrate that the proposed CLADNN is Lyapunov stable and globally converges to the exact solution to a given constrained LAD problem, independent of initial values. The numerical simulations have also illustrated that the proposed CLADNN can be used to robustly estimate parameters for nonlinear curve fitting, which is extensively used in signal and image processing. PMID:18269958

  14. Studies on the dynamics of DNA melting

    SciTech Connect

    Zhuang, W.

    1992-01-01

    In this study the self-consistent phonon theory is applied to the understanding of DNA melting from a microscopic point of view. Studies of the dynamics of hydrogen bond motion for a model of replicating fork at room temperature are given. The anharmonic effect increases the hydrogen bond fluctuation by more than a factor of 2 over the harmonic result in some frequency regions. The frequency dependence of the h-bond motion suggests spectral features that could be regarded as a signature for the existence of forks in DNA samples. The effect of an open loop of various sizes on the thermal stability of the adjoining intact base pairs in a duplex DNA chain is studied. For a Y-shaped fork configuration the thermal fluctuation at the fork is so enhanced that the life time of the adjoining base pair is much smaller than the 1 millisecond time scale associated with helicase separation of a base pair. The analysis indicates the significance of thermal fluctuational base pair opening in facilitating the enzyme unwinding process during chain elongation of a replicating DNA. It is likely that the thermal fluctuational opening of the base pair at the junction of a replicating fork is fast enough so that a DNA unwinding enzyme can encounter an unstacked base pair with reasonable probability. The algorithm of calculating base pair opening probability is applied to a localized structure, the replicating fork. The addition of two hot phonons to some local modes can lead to the separation of the last closed base pair. The contribution of various vibrational modes to the melting of poly(dG)[center dot]poly(dC) is studied. The principal contribution comes from the H-bond breathing modes that have been observed in Raman scattering and that have been associated with helix melting. The softening of these modes on approach to melting is in agreement with the observed behavior. The contribution to melting from base rotation modes that are important in melting is also discussed.

  15. The initiation of segmented buoyancy-driven melting during continental breakup

    PubMed Central

    Gallacher, Ryan J.; Keir, Derek; Harmon, Nicholas; Stuart, Graham; Leroy, Sylvie; Hammond, James O. S.; Kendall, J-Michael; Ayele, Atalay; Goitom, Berhe; Ogubazghi, Ghebrebrhan; Ahmed, Abdulhakim

    2016-01-01

    Melting of the mantle during continental breakup leads to magmatic intrusion and volcanism, yet our understanding of the location and dominant mechanisms of melt generation in rifting environments is impeded by a paucity of direct observations of mantle melting. It is unclear when during the rifting process the segmented nature of magma supply typical of seafloor spreading initiates. Here, we use Rayleigh-wave tomography to construct a high-resolution absolute three-dimensional shear-wave velocity model of the upper 250 km beneath the Afar triple junction, imaging the mantle response during progressive continental breakup. Our model suggests melt production is highest and melting depths deepest early during continental breakup. Elevated melt production during continental rifting is likely due to localized thinning and melt focusing when the rift is narrow. In addition, we interpret segmented zones of melt supply beneath the rift, suggesting that buoyancy-driven active upwelling of the mantle initiates early during continental rifting. PMID:27752044

  16. Thermodynamics of Oligonucleotide Duplex Melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreiber-Gosche, Sherrie; Edwards, Robert A.

    2009-05-01

    Melting temperatures of oligonucleotides are useful for a number of molecular biology applications, such as the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Although melting temperatures are often calculated with simplistic empirical equations, application of thermodynamics provides more accurate melting temperatures and an opportunity for students to apply rigorous thermodynamic analysis to an important biochemical problem. Because the stacking of base pairs on top of one another is a significant factor in the energetics of oligonucleotide melting, several investigators have applied van't Hoff analysis to melting temperature data using a nearest-neighbor model and have obtained entropies and enthalpies for the stacking of bases. The present article explains how the equilibrium constant for the dissociation of strands from double-stranded oligonucleotides can be expressed in terms of the total strand concentration and thus how the total strand concentration influences the melting temperature. It also presents a simplified analysis based on the entropies and enthalpies of stacking that is manually tractable so that students can work examples to help them understand the thermodynamics of oligonucleotide melting.

  17. Construction of Gallium Point at NMIJ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widiatmo, J. V.; Saito, I.; Yamazawa, K.

    2017-03-01

    Two open-type gallium point cells were fabricated using ingots whose nominal purities are 7N. Measurement systems for the realization of the melting point of gallium using these cells were built. The melting point of gallium is repeatedly realized by means of the measurement systems for evaluating the repeatability. Measurements for evaluating the effect of hydrostatic pressure coming from the molten gallium existing during the melting process and the effect of gas pressure that fills the cell were also performed. Direct cell comparisons between those cells were conducted. This comparison was aimed to evaluate the consistency of each cell, especially related to the nominal purity. Direct cell comparison between the open-type and the sealed-type gallium point cell was also conducted. Chemical analysis was conducted using samples extracted from ingots used in both the newly built open-type gallium point cells, from which the effect of impurities in the ingot was evaluated.

  18. Hot melt adhesive attachment pad

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, R. L.; Frizzill, A. W.; Little, B. D.; Progar, D. J.; Coultrip, R. H.; Couch, R. H.; Gleason, J. R.; Stein, B. A.; Buckley, J. D.; St.clair, T. L. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A hot melt adhesive attachment pad for releasably securing distinct elements together is described which is particularly useful in the construction industry or a spatial vacuum environment. The attachment pad consists primarily of a cloth selectively impregnated with a charge of hot melt adhesive, a thermo-foil heater, and a thermo-cooler. These components are securely mounted in a mounting assembly. In operation, the operator activates the heating cycle transforming the hot melt adhesive to a substantially liquid state, positions the pad against the attachment surface, and activates the cooling cycle solidifying the adhesive and forming a strong, releasable bond.

  19. Plasma arc melting of zirconium

    SciTech Connect

    Tubesing, P.K.; Korzekwa, D.R.; Dunn, P.S.

    1997-12-31

    Zirconium, like some other refractory metals, has an undesirable sensitivity to interstitials such as oxygen. Traditionally, zirconium is processed by electron beam melting to maintain minimum interstitial contamination. Electron beam melted zirconium, however, does not respond positively to mechanical processing due to its large grain size. The authors undertook a study to determine if plasma arc melting (PAM) technology could be utilized to maintain low interstitial concentrations and improve the response of zirconium to subsequent mechanical processing. The PAM process enabled them to control and maintain low interstitial levels of oxygen and carbon, produce a more favorable grain structure, and with supplementary off-gassing, improve the response to mechanical forming.

  20. Melting Kinetics of Confined Systems at the Nanoscale: Superheating and Supercooling

    SciTech Connect

    Sharp, I. D.; Xu, Q.; Yuan, C. W.; Liao, C. Y.; Glaeser, A. M.; Chrzan, D. C.; Haller, E. E.; Yi, D. O.; Minor, A. M.; Beeman, J. W.; Ager, J. W. III; Ridgway, M. C.; Kluth, P.

    2007-04-10

    In situ electron diffraction measurements of silica-embedded Ge nanocrystals reveal a melting/solidification hysteresis of 470 K which is approximately symmetric about the bulk melting point. This surprising behavior, which is thought to be impossible in bulk systems, is well described by a simple, classical thermodynamic model. Surface pre-melting, which occurs for materials with free surfaces, is suppressed by the presence of the host matrix, thereby allowing both kinetic supercooling and kinetic superheating of the embedded nanocrystals.

  1. Melt Focusing Along Permeability Barriers in Various Tectonic Settings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montesi, L. G.; Hebert, L. B.

    2012-12-01

    The lithosphere, cold and rigid, acts as a barrier to the migration of melt from sources in the convecting mantle to the surface. In mid-ocean ridge settings in particular, the contrast between the width of the melt production zone at depths, reaching tens to hundreds of kilometer from the ridge axis, and the zone of crustal accretion, only one or two kilometers wide, points to the presence of an efficient focusing mechanism. The development of a zone impermeable to melt, or permeability barrier, at the base of the thermal boundary layer, and transport of melt in a high porosity channel at the base of this barrier provides a reasonable explanation for this focusing. Applied to various segmented and non-segmented mid-ocean ridges like the ultraslow Southwest Indian Ridge and the ultrafast East Pacific Rise at the Siqueiros transform, this process predicts along-strike variations in crustal thickness that compare favorably with observations. Although the concept of permeability barriers has been discussed mainly in the context of mid-ocean ridges, it may apply to other locations where melting in the upper mantle occurs. Permeability barriers form when ascending melt cools and crystallizes as it enters the thermal boundary layer at the base of the lithosphere. Such a setup is present at subduction zones as melts ascending from the mantle wedge interact with the overriding plate. Convection in the wedge introduces thermal gradients that may focus melt roughly to a point above the transition from a coupled to decoupled slab interface. This location is close to where volcanic arcs are observed. Above mantle plumes, a permeability barrier may develop coincident with the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary, allowing low-degree melts to stall and form a low-velocity layer that has been observed seismically. To date, the hypothesis of a permeability barrier has been thoroughly tested only in the context of mid-ocean ridges. Whether crystallization would be rapid enough in

  2. Error analysis in newborn screening: can quotients support the absolute values?

    PubMed

    Arneth, Borros; Hintz, Martin

    2017-03-01

    Newborn screening is performed using modern tandem mass spectrometry, which can simultaneously detect a variety of analytes, including several amino acids and fatty acids. Tandem mass spectrometry measures the diagnostic parameters as absolute concentrations and produces fragments which are used as markers of specific substances. Several prominent quotients can also be derived, which are quotients of two absolute measured concentrations. In this study, we determined the precision of both the absolute concentrations and the derived quotients. First, the measurement error of the absolute concentrations and the measurement error of the ratios were practically determined. Then, the Gaussian theory of error calculation was used. Finally, these errors were compared with one another. The practical analytical accuracies of the quotients were significantly higher (e.g., coefficient of variation (CV) = 5.1% for the phenylalanine to tyrosine (Phe/Tyr) quotient and CV = 5.6% for the Fisher quotient) than the accuracies of the absolute measured concentrations (mean CVs = 12%). According to our results, the ratios are analytically correct and, from an analytical point of view, can support the absolute values in finding the correct diagnosis.

  3. Relative and Absolute Error Control in a Finite-Difference Method Solution of Poisson's Equation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prentice, J. S. C.

    2012-01-01

    An algorithm for error control (absolute and relative) in the five-point finite-difference method applied to Poisson's equation is described. The algorithm is based on discretization of the domain of the problem by means of three rectilinear grids, each of different resolution. We discuss some hardware limitations associated with the algorithm,…

  4. An estimate of the impact of trapped melt ponds on sea ice thinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flocco, Daniela; Feltham, Daniel; Schroeder, David

    2013-04-01

    Melt ponds form on Arctic sea ice during the melting season and their presence affects the heat and mass balance of the ice cover. Towards the end of the melt season melt ponds cover up to 50% of the sea ice area decreasing the value of the surface albedo by up to 20%. The dramatic impact of melt ponds on the albedo feedback mechanism for sea ice melt has been demonstrated in previous studies. Here, we focus on the refreezing of melt ponds. As the ponds freeze from above, they gradually release latent heat that inhibits basal ice growth. The refreezing process can take up to three months. Freezing of the melt pond comes to an halt if the pond's freezing point reaches the air temperature since the Stefan condition for sea ice growth is not met anymore. Since the ice in presence of melt pond will stay thinner and flatter for longer, the areas where ponds are present are likely location for pond formation in the subsequent years. The presence of a pond trapped in the ice delays significantly the sea ice growth at locations where melt ponds form. The potential volume loss of sea ice per year in the Arctic considering a melt pond cover of 20% is up to 1000 km3 without considering the presence of snow. Within the ASBO (Arctic Synoptic Basin-wide Observations) project we have developed a model of refreezing melt ponds that uses mushy layer theory to describe the sea ice and takes account of the presence of salt in the refreezing melt pond. We use this model to investigate the rate at which melt ponds refreeze, releasing latent heat, and their impact on sea ice growth. In this work we would like to present model result with climatology input. We will give an estimate of the impact of the melt pond presence on sea ice growth in the Arctic basin.

  5. Absolute magnetic helicity and the cylindrical magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Low, B. C.

    2011-05-15

    The different magnetic helicities conserved under conditions of perfect electrical conductivity are expressions of the fundamental property that every evolving fluid surface conserves its net magnetic flux. This basic hydromagnetic point unifies the well known Eulerian helicities with the Lagrangian helicity defined by the conserved fluxes frozen into a prescribed set of disjoint toroidal tubes of fluid flowing as a permanent partition of the entire fluid [B. C. Low, Astrophys. J. 649, 1064 (2006)]. This unifying theory is constructed from first principles, beginning with an analysis of the Eulerian and Lagrangian descriptions of fluids, separating the ideas of fluid and magnetic-flux tubes and removing the complication of the magnetic vector potential's free gauge from the concept of helicity. The analysis prepares for the construction of a conserved Eulerian helicity, without that gauge complication, to describe a 3D anchored flux in an upright cylindrical domain, this helicity called absolute to distinguish it from the well known relative helicity. In a version of the Chandrasekhar-Kendall representation, the evolving field at any instant is a unique superposition of a writhed, untwisted axial flux with a circulating flux of field lines all closed and unlinked within the cylindrical domain. The absolute helicity is then a flux-weighted sum of the writhe of that axial flux and its mutual linkage with the circulating flux. The absolute helicity is also conserved if the frozen-in field and its domain are continuously deformed by changing the separation between the rigid cylinder-ends with no change of cylinder radius. This hitherto intractable cylindrical construction closes a crucial conceptual gap for the fundamentals to be complete at last. The concluding discussion shows the impact of this development on our understanding of helicity, covering (i) the helicities of wholly contained and anchored fields; (ii) the Eulerian and Lagrangian descriptions of field

  6. The initial stages of melting of graphene between 4000 K and 6000 K.

    PubMed

    Ganz, Eric; Ganz, Ariel B; Yang, Li-Ming; Dornfeld, Matthew

    2017-02-01

    Graphene and its analogues have some of the highest predicted melting points of any materials. Previous work estimated the melting temperature for freestanding graphene to be a remarkable 4510 K. However, this work relied on theoretical methods that do not accurately account for the role of bond breaking or complex bonding configurations in the melting process. Furthermore, experiments to verify these high melting points have been challenging. Practical applications of graphene and carbon nanotubes at high temperatures will require a detailed understanding of the behavior of these materials under these conditions. Therefore, we have used reliable ab initio molecular dynamics calculations to study the initial stages of melting of freestanding graphene monolayers between 4000 and 6000 K. To accommodate large defects, and for improved accuracy, we used a large 10 × 10 periodic unit cell. We find that the system can be heated up to 4500 K for 18 ps without melting, and 3-rings and short lived broken bonds (10-rings) are observed. At 4500 K, the system appears to be in a quasi-2D liquid state. At 5000 K, the system is starting to melt. During the 20 ps simulation, diffusion events are observed, leading to the creation of a 5775 defect. We calculate accurate excitation energies for these configurations, and the pair correlation function is presented. The modified Lindemann criterion was calculated. Graphene and nanotubes together with other proposed high melting point materials would be interesting candidates for experimental tests of melting in the weightless environment of space.

  7. Modeling of Melt Growth During Carbothermal Processing of Lunar Regolith

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balasubramaniam, R.; Gokoglu S.; Hegde, U.

    2012-01-01

    The carbothermal processing of lunar regolith has been proposed as a means to produce carbon monoxide and ultimately oxygen to support human exploration of the moon. In this process, gaseous methane is pyrolyzed as it flows over the hot surface of a molten zone of lunar regolith and is converted to carbon and hydrogen. Carbon gets deposited on the surface of the melt, and mixes and reacts with the metal oxides in it to produce carbon monoxide that bubbles out of the melt. Carbon monoxide is further processed in other reactors downstream to ultimately produce oxygen. The amount of oxygen produced crucially depends on the amount of regolith that is molten. In this paper we develop a model of the heat transfer in carbothermal processing. Regolith in a suitable container is heated by a heat flux at its surface such as by continuously shining a beam of solar energy or a laser on it. The regolith on the surface absorbs the energy and its temperature rises until it attains the melting point. The energy from the heat flux is then used for the latent heat necessary to change phase from solid to liquid, after which the temperature continues to rise. Thus a small melt pool appears under the heated zone shortly after the heat flux is turned on. As time progresses, the pool absorbs more heat and supplies the energy required to melt more of the regolith, and the size of the molten zone increases. Ultimately, a steady-state is achieved when the heat flux absorbed by the melt is balanced by radiative losses from the surface. In this paper, we model the melting and the growth of the melt zone with time in a bed of regolith when a portion of its surface is subjected to a constant heat flux. The heat flux is assumed to impinge on a circular area. Our model is based on an axisymmetric three-dimensional variation of the temperature field in the domain. Heat transfer occurs only by conduction, and effects of convective heat transport are assumed negligible. Radiative heat loss from the

  8. A special application of absolute value techniques in authentic problem solving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stupel, Moshe

    2013-06-01

    There are at least five different equivalent definitions of the absolute value concept. In instances where the task is an equation or inequality with only one or two absolute value expressions, it is a worthy educational experience for learners to solve the task using each one of the definitions. On the other hand, if more than two absolute value expressions are involved, the definition that is most helpful is the one involving solving by intervals and evaluating critical points. In point of fact, application of this technique is one reason that the topic of absolute value is important in mathematics in general and in mathematics teaching in particular. We present here an authentic practical problem that is solved using absolute values and the 'intervals' method, after which the solution is generalized with surprising results. This authentic problem also lends itself to investigation using educational technological tools such as GeoGebra dynamic geometry software: mathematics teachers can allow their students to initially cope with the problem by working in an inductive environment in which they conduct virtual experiments until a solid conjecture has been reached, after which they should prove the conjecture deductively, using classic theoretical mathematical tools.

  9. Study of iron nanoparticle melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedorov, A. V.; Shulgin, A. V.; Lavruk, S. A.

    2016-10-01

    In paper melting process of iron nanoparticles was investigated with molecular dynamics method. Melting temperatures was found for particles with radius from 1.5 to 4 nm. Results match with data of other authors. Heat capacity was calculated based on investigation of caloric curves. Dependence between heat capacity and temperature for different size of nanoparticles was approximated. Heat conductivity of iron nanoparticles was calculated.

  10. Absolute stellar photometry on moderate-resolution FPA images

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stone, T.C.

    2009-01-01

    An extensive database of star (and Moon) images has been collected by the ground-based RObotic Lunar Observatory (ROLO) as part of the US Geological Survey program for lunar calibration. The stellar data are used to derive nightly atmospheric corrections for the observations from extinction measurements, and absolute calibration of the ROLO sensors is based on observations of Vega and published reference flux and spectrum data. The ROLO telescopes were designed for imaging the Moon at moderate resolution, thus imposing some limitations for the stellar photometry. Attaining accurate stellar photometry with the ROLO image data has required development of specialized processing techniques. A key consideration is consistency in discriminating the star core signal from the off-axis point spread function. The analysis and processing methods applied to the ROLO stellar image database are described. ?? 2009 BIPM and IOP Publishing Ltd.

  11. Clock time is absolute and universal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Xinhang

    2015-09-01

    A critical error is found in the Special Theory of Relativity (STR): mixing up the concepts of the STR abstract time of a reference frame and the displayed time of a physical clock, which leads to use the properties of the abstract time to predict time dilation on physical clocks and all other physical processes. Actually, a clock can never directly measure the abstract time, but can only record the result of a physical process during a period of the abstract time such as the number of cycles of oscillation which is the multiplication of the abstract time and the frequency of oscillation. After Lorentz Transformation, the abstract time of a reference frame expands by a factor gamma, but the frequency of a clock decreases by the same factor gamma, and the resulting multiplication i.e. the displayed time of a moving clock remains unchanged. That is, the displayed time of any physical clock is an invariant of Lorentz Transformation. The Lorentz invariance of the displayed times of clocks can further prove within the framework of STR our earth based standard physical time is absolute, universal and independent of inertial reference frames as confirmed by both the physical fact of the universal synchronization of clocks on the GPS satellites and clocks on the earth, and the theoretical existence of the absolute and universal Galilean time in STR which has proved that time dilation and space contraction are pure illusions of STR. The existence of the absolute and universal time in STR has directly denied that the reference frame dependent abstract time of STR is the physical time, and therefore, STR is wrong and all its predictions can never happen in the physical world.

  12. Absolute Radiometric Calibration of EUNIS-06

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, R. J.; Rabin, D. M.; Kent, B. J.; Paustian, W.

    2007-01-01

    The Extreme-Ultraviolet Normal-Incidence Spectrometer (EUNIS) is a soundingrocket payload that obtains imaged high-resolution spectra of individual solar features, providing information about the Sun's corona and upper transition region. Shortly after its successful initial flight last year, a complete end-to-end calibration was carried out to determine the instrument's absolute radiometric response over its Longwave bandpass of 300 - 370A. The measurements were done at the Rutherford-Appleton Laboratory (RAL) in England, using the same vacuum facility and EUV radiation source used in the pre-flight calibrations of both SOHO/CDS and Hinode/EIS, as well as in three post-flight calibrations of our SERTS sounding rocket payload, the precursor to EUNIS. The unique radiation source provided by the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) had been calibrated to an absolute accuracy of 7% (l-sigma) at 12 wavelengths covering our bandpass directly against the Berlin electron storage ring BESSY, which is itself a primary radiometric source standard. Scans of the EUNIS aperture were made to determine the instrument's absolute spectral sensitivity to +- 25%, considering all sources of error, and demonstrate that EUNIS-06 was the most sensitive solar E W spectrometer yet flown. The results will be matched against prior calibrations which relied on combining measurements of individual optical components, and on comparisons with theoretically predicted 'insensitive' line ratios. Coordinated observations were made during the EUNIS-06 flight by SOHO/CDS and EIT that will allow re-calibrations of those instruments as well. In addition, future EUNIS flights will provide similar calibration updates for TRACE, Hinode/EIS, and STEREO/SECCHI/EUVI.

  13. Achieving Climate Change Absolute Accuracy in Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wielicki, Bruce A.; Young, D. F.; Mlynczak, M. G.; Thome, K. J; Leroy, S.; Corliss, J.; Anderson, J. G.; Ao, C. O.; Bantges, R.; Best, F.; Bowman, K.; Brindley, H.; Butler, J. J.; Collins, W.; Dykema, J. A.; Doelling, D. R.; Feldman, D. R.; Fox, N.; Huang, X.; Holz, R.; Huang, Y.; Jennings, D.; Jin, Z.; Johnson, D. G.; Jucks, K.; Kato, S.; Kratz, D. P.; Liu, X.; Lukashin, C.; Mannucci, A. J.; Phojanamongkolkij, N.; Roithmayr, C. M.; Sandford, S.; Taylor, P. C.; Xiong, X.

    2013-01-01

    The Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO) mission will provide a calibration laboratory in orbit for the purpose of accurately measuring and attributing climate change. CLARREO measurements establish new climate change benchmarks with high absolute radiometric accuracy and high statistical confidence across a wide range of essential climate variables. CLARREO's inherently high absolute accuracy will be verified and traceable on orbit to Système Internationale (SI) units. The benchmarks established by CLARREO will be critical for assessing changes in the Earth system and climate model predictive capabilities for decades into the future as society works to meet the challenge of optimizing strategies for mitigating and adapting to climate change. The CLARREO benchmarks are derived from measurements of the Earth's thermal infrared spectrum (5-50 micron), the spectrum of solar radiation reflected by the Earth and its atmosphere (320-2300 nm), and radio occultation refractivity from which accurate temperature profiles are derived. The mission has the ability to provide new spectral fingerprints of climate change, as well as to provide the first orbiting radiometer with accuracy sufficient to serve as the reference transfer standard for other space sensors, in essence serving as a "NIST [National Institute of Standards and Technology] in orbit." CLARREO will greatly improve the accuracy and relevance of a wide range of space-borne instruments for decadal climate change. Finally, CLARREO has developed new metrics and methods for determining the accuracy requirements of climate observations for a wide range of climate variables and uncertainty sources. These methods should be useful for improving our understanding of observing requirements for most climate change observations.

  14. Ab-initio Study of the Si(100) Melting Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wensell, M. G.; Briggs, E. L.; Roland, C.; Bernholc, J.

    1997-03-01

    We have investigated the melting of the Si (100) surface, the most important semiconductor surface for device applications, with quantum molecular dynamics simulations. Melting is a fundamental aspect of semiconductor processing, especially important during growth, laser irradiation, and the rapid thermal annealing of surfaces. However, despite its widespread use, little is known about the microscopic dynamics of the melting process. From a theoretical point of view, the modeling of the Si crystal/melt interface represents a particular challenge: liquid Si is a low-coordinated metallic liquid, whereas bulk Si is a semiconductor. A description of the melting process therefore requires a detailed knowledge of the electronic properties of the system. Finite temperature simulations of at least 6 picosecond duration were carried out with a real-space multigrid code which solves the Kohn-Sham equations at each timestep. We find that the inclusion of spin has a substantial effect on the speed and dynamics of the transition onset. The melting leads to the formation of a well-defined liquid-solid interface whose structural, electronic and thermodynamics properties were characterized.

  15. Brownian motion: Absolute negative particle mobility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ros, Alexandra; Eichhorn, Ralf; Regtmeier, Jan; Duong, Thanh Tu; Reimann, Peter; Anselmetti, Dario

    2005-08-01

    Noise effects in technological applications, far from being a nuisance, can be exploited with advantage - for example, unavoidable thermal fluctuations have found application in the transport and sorting of colloidal particles and biomolecules. Here we use a microfluidic system to demonstrate a paradoxical migration mechanism in which particles always move in a direction opposite to the net acting force (`absolute negative mobility') as a result of an interplay between thermal noise, a periodic and symmetric microstructure, and a biased alternating-current electric field. This counterintuitive phenomenon could be used for bioanalytical purposes, for example in the separation and fractionation of colloids, biological molecules and cells.

  16. Arbitrary segments of absolute negative mobility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ruyin; Nie, Linru; Chen, Chongyang; Wang, Chaojie

    2017-01-01

    In previous research work, investigators have reported only one or two segments of absolute negative mobility (ANM) in a periodic potential. In fact, many segments of ANM also occur in the system considered here. We investigate transport of an inertial particle in a gating ratchet periodic potential subjected to a constant bias force. Our numerical results show that its mean velocity can decrease with the bias force increasing, i.e. ANM phenomenon. Furthermore, the ANM can take place arbitrary segments, even up to more than thirty. Intrinsic physical mechanism and conditions for arbitrary segments of ANM to occur are discussed in detail.

  17. Absolute quantification of myocardial blood flow.

    PubMed

    Yoshinaga, Keiichiro; Manabe, Osamu; Tamaki, Nagara

    2016-07-21

    With the increasing availability of positron emission tomography (PET) myocardial perfusion imaging, the absolute quantification of myocardial blood flow (MBF) has become popular in clinical settings. Quantitative MBF provides an important additional diagnostic or prognostic information over conventional visual assessment. The success of MBF quantification using PET/computed tomography (CT) has increased the demand for this quantitative diagnostic approach to be more accessible. In this regard, MBF quantification approaches have been developed using several other diagnostic imaging modalities including single-photon emission computed tomography, CT, and cardiac magnetic resonance. This review will address the clinical aspects of PET MBF quantification and the new approaches to MBF quantification.

  18. An absolute radius scale for Saturn's rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicholson, Philip D.; Cooke, Maren L.; Pelton, Emily

    1990-01-01

    Radio and stellar occultation observations of Saturn's rings made by the Voyager spacecraft are discussed. The data reveal systematic discrepancies of almost 10 km in some parts of the rings, limiting some of the investigations. A revised solution for Saturn's rotation pole has been proposed which removes the discrepancies between the stellar and radio occultation profiles. Corrections to previously published radii vary from -2 to -10 km for the radio occultation, and +5 to -6 km for the stellar occultation. An examination of spiral density waves in the outer A Ring supports that the revised absolute radii are in error by no more than 2 km.

  19. Absolute Rate Theories of Epigenetic Stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walczak, Aleksandra M.; Onuchic, Jose N.; Wolynes, Peter G.

    2006-03-01

    Spontaneous switching events in most characterized genetic switches are rare, resulting in extremely stable epigenetic properties. We show how simple arguments lead to theories of the rate of such events much like the absolute rate theory of chemical reactions corrected by a transmission factor. Both the probability of the rare cellular states that allow epigenetic escape, and the transmission factor, depend on the rates of DNA binding and unbinding events and on the rates of protein synthesis and degradation. Different mechanisms of escape from the stable attractors occur in the nonadiabatic, weakly adiabatic and strictly adiabatic regimes, characterized by the relative values of those input rates.

  20. Absolute rate theories of epigenetic stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walczak, Aleksandra M.; Onuchic, José N.; Wolynes, Peter G.

    2005-12-01

    Spontaneous switching events in most characterized genetic switches are rare, resulting in extremely stable epigenetic properties. We show how simple arguments lead to theories of the rate of such events much like the absolute rate theory of chemical reactions corrected by a transmission factor. Both the probability of the rare cellular states that allow epigenetic escape and the transmission factor depend on the rates of DNA binding and unbinding events and on the rates of protein synthesis and degradation. Different mechanisms of escape from the stable attractors occur in the nonadiabatic, weakly adiabatic, and strictly adiabatic regimes, characterized by the relative values of those input rates. rate theory | stochastic gene expression | gene switches

  1. Absolute method of measuring magnetic susceptibility

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorpe, A.; Senftle, F.E.

    1959-01-01

    An absolute method of standardization and measurement of the magnetic susceptibility of small samples is presented which can be applied to most techniques based on the Faraday method. The fact that the susceptibility is a function of the area under the curve of sample displacement versus distance of the magnet from the sample, offers a simple method of measuring the susceptibility without recourse to a standard sample. Typical results on a few substances are compared with reported values, and an error of less than 2% can be achieved. ?? 1959 The American Institute of Physics.

  2. Absolute Priority for a Vehicle in VANET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirani, Rostam; Hendessi, Faramarz; Montazeri, Mohammad Ali; Sheikh Zefreh, Mohammad

    In today's world, traffic jams waste hundreds of hours of our life. This causes many researchers try to resolve the problem with the idea of Intelligent Transportation System. For some applications like a travelling ambulance, it is important to reduce delay even for a second. In this paper, we propose a completely infrastructure-less approach for finding shortest path and controlling traffic light to provide absolute priority for an emergency vehicle. We use the idea of vehicular ad-hoc networking to reduce the imposed travelling time. Then, we simulate our proposed protocol and compare it with a centrally controlled traffic light system.

  3. Using a Spreadsheet To Explore Melting, Dissolving and Phase Diagrams.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodwin, Alan

    2002-01-01

    Compares phase diagrams relating to the solubilities and melting points of various substances in textbooks with those generated by a spreadsheet using data from the literature. Argues that differences between the diagrams give rise to new chemical insights. (Author/MM)

  4. Absolute Calibration of the AXAF Telescope Effective Area

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kellogg, E.; Cohen, L.; Edgar, R.; Evans, I.; Freeman, M.; Gaetz, T.; Jerius, D.; McDermott, W. C.; McKinnon, P.; Murray, S.; Podgorski, W.; Schwartz, D.; VanSpeybroeck, L.; Wargelin, B.; Zombeck, M.; Weisskopf, M.; Elsner, R.; ODell, S.; Tennant, A.; Kolodziejczak, J.

    1997-01-01

    The prelaunch calibration of AXAF encompasses many aspects of the telescope. In principle, all that is needed is the complete point response function. This is, however, a function of energy, off-axis angle of the source, and operating mode of the facility. No single measurement would yield the entire result. Also, any calibration made prior to launch will be affected by changes in conditions after launch, such as the change from one g to zero g. The reflectivity of the mirror and perhaps even the detectors can change as well, for example by addition or removal of small amounts of material deposited on their surfaces. In this paper, we give a broad view of the issues in performing such a calibration, and discuss how they are being addressed in prelaunch preparation of AXAF. As our title indicates, we concentrate here on the total throughput of the observatory. This can be thought of as the integral of the point response function, i.e. the encircled energy, out ot the largest practical solid angle for an observation. Since there is no standard x-ray source in the sky whose flux is known to the -1% accuracy we are trying to achieve, we must do this calibration on the ground. we also must provide a means for monitoring any possible changes in this calibration from pre-launch until on-orbit operation can transfer the calibration to a celestial x-ray source whose emission is stable. In this paper, we analyze the elements of the absolute throughput calibration, which we call Effective Area. We review the requirements for calibrations of components or subsystems of the AXAF facility, including mirror, detectors, and gratings. We show how it is necessary to calibrate this ground-based detection system at standard man-made x-ray sources, such as electron storage rings. We present the status of all these calibrations, with indications of the measurements remaining to be done, even though the measurements on the AXAF flight optics and detectors will have been completed by the

  5. Monochromator-Based Absolute Calibration of a Standard Radiation Thermometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantilla, J. M.; Hernanz, M. L.; Campos, J.; Martín, M. J.; Pons, A.; del Campo, D.

    2014-04-01

    Centro Español de Metrología (CEM) is disseminating the International Temperature Scale (ITS-90), at high temperatures, by using the fixed points of Ag and Cu and a standard radiation thermometer. However, the future mise-en-pratique for the definition of the kelvin ( MeP-K) will include the dissemination of the kelvin by primary methods and by indirect approximations capable of exceptionally low uncertainties or increased reliability. Primary radiometry is, at present, able to achieve uncertainties competitive with the ITS-90 above the silver point with one of the possible techniques the calibration for radiance responsivity of an imaging radiometer (radiance method). In order to carry out this calibration, IO-CSIC (Spanish Designated Institute for luminous intensity and luminous flux) has collaborated with CEM, allowing traceability to its cryogenic radiometer. A monochromator integrating sphere-based spectral comparator facility has been used to calibrate one of the CEM standard radiation thermometers. The absolute calibrated standard radiation thermometer has been used to determine the temperatures of the fixed points of Cu, Co-C, Pt-C, and Re-C. The results obtained are 1357.80 K, 1597.10 K, 2011.66 K, and 2747.64 K, respectively, with uncertainties ranging from 0.4 K to 1.1 K.

  6. Melting and crystallization of ice in partially filled nanopores.

    PubMed

    Solveyra, Estefanía González; de la Llave, Ezequiel; Scherlis, Damián A; Molinero, Valeria

    2011-12-08

    We investigate the melting and formation of ice in partially filled hydrophilic and hydrophobic nanopores of 3 nm diameter using molecular dynamics simulations with the mW water model. Above the melting temperature, the partially filled nanopores contain two water phases in coexistence: a condensed liquid plug and a surface-adsorbed phase. It has been long debated in the literature whether the surface-adsorbed phase is involved in the crystallization. We find that only the liquid plug crystallizes on cooling, producing ice I with stacks of hexagonal and cubic layers. The confined ice is wetted by a premelted liquid layer that persists in equilibrium with ice down to temperatures well below its melting point. The liquid-ice transition is first-order-like but rounded. We determine the temperature and enthalpy of melting as a function of the filling fraction of the pore. In agreement with experiments, we find that the melting temperature of the nanoconfined ice is strongly depressed with respect to the bulk T(m), it depends weakly on the filling fraction and is insensitive to the hydrophobicity of the pore wall. The state of water in the crystallized hydrophilic and hydrophobic pores, however, is not the same: the hydrophobic pore has a negligible density of the surface-adsorbed phase and higher fraction of water in the ice phase than the hydrophilic pore. The widths of the ice cores are nevertheless comparable for the hydrophobic and hydrophilic pores, and this may explain their almost identical melting temperatures. The enthalpy of melting ΔH(m), when normalized by the actual amount of ice in the pore, is indistinguishable for the hydrophobic and hydrophilic pores, insensitive to the filling fraction, and within the error bars, the same as the difference in enthalpy between bulk liquid and bulk ice evaluated at the temperature of melting of ice in the nanopores.

  7. Quantifying melting and mobilistaion of interstitial melts in crystal mushes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veksler, Ilya; Dobson, Katherine; Hess, Kai-Uwe; Ertel-Ingrisch, Werner; Humphreys, Madeleine

    2015-04-01

    The deformation of crystals mushes and separation of melts and crystals in is critical to understanding the development of physical and chemical heterogeneity in magma chambers and has been invoked as an eruption trigger mechanism. Here we investigate the behaviour of the melt in the well characterised, classic crystal mush system of the Skaergaard intrusion by combining experimental petrology and the non-destructive 3D imaging methods. Starting materials for partial melting experiments were four samples from the upper Middle Zone of the Layered Series. Cylinders, 15 mm in diameter and 20 mm in length, were drilled out of the rock samples, placed in alumina crucibles and held for 5 days in electric furnaces at atmospheric pressure and 1050-1100 °C. Redox conditions set by the CO-CO2 gas mixture were kept close to those of the FMQ buffer. We then use spatially registered 3D x-ray computed tomography images, collected before and after the experiment, to determine the volume and distribution of the crystal framework and interstitial phases, and the volume, distribution and connectivity the interstitial phases that undergo melting and extraction while at elevated temperature. Image analysis has allowed us to quantify these physical changes with high spatial resolution. Our work is a first step towards quantitative understanding of the melt mobilisation and migration processes operating in notionally locked crystal rich magmatic systems.

  8. Absolute Spectrophotometry of 237 Open Cluster Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clampitt, L.; Burstein, D.

    1994-12-01

    We present absolute spectrophotometry of 237 stars in 7 nearby open clusters: Hyades, Pleiades, Alpha Persei, Praesepe, Coma Berenices, IC 4665, and M 39. The observations were taken using the Wampler single-channel scanner (Wampler 1966) on the Crossley 0.9m telescope at Lick Observatory from July 1973 through December 1974. 21 bandpasses spanning the spectral range 3500 Angstroms to 7780 Angstroms were observed for each star, with bandwiths ranging from 32Angstroms to 64 Angstroms. Data are standardized to the Hayes--Latham (1975) system. Our measurements are compared to filter colors on the Johnson BV, Stromgren ubvy, and Geneva U V B_1 B_2 V_1 G systems, as well as to spectrophotometry of a few stars published by Gunn, Stryker & Tinsley and in the Spectrophotometric Standards Catalog (Adelman; as distributed by the NSSDC). Both internal and external comparisons to the filter systems indicate a formal statistical accuracy per bandpass of 0.01 to 0.02 mag, with apparent larger ( ~ 0.03 mag) differences in absolute calibration between this data set and existing spectrophotometry. These data will comprise part of the spectrophotometry that will be used to calibrate the Beijing-Arizona-Taipei-Connecticut Color Survey of the Sky (see separate paper by Burstein et al. at this meeting).

  9. Linear ultrasonic motor for absolute gravimeter.

    PubMed

    Jian, Yue; Yao, Zhiyuan; Silberschmidt, Vadim V

    2017-02-01

    Thanks to their compactness and suitability for vacuum applications, linear ultrasonic motors are considered as substitutes for classical electromagnetic motors as driving elements in absolute gravimeters. Still, their application is prevented by relatively low power output. To overcome this limitation and provide better stability, a V-type linear ultrasonic motor with a new clamping method is proposed for a gravimeter. In this paper, a mechanical model of stators with flexible clamping components is suggested, according to a design criterion for clamps of linear ultrasonic motors. After that, an effect of tangential and normal rigidity of the clamping components on mechanical output is studied. It is followed by discussion of a new clamping method with sufficient tangential rigidity and a capability to facilitate pre-load. Additionally, a prototype of the motor with the proposed clamping method was fabricated and the performance tests in vertical direction were implemented. Experimental results show that the suggested motor has structural stability and high dynamic performance, such as no-load speed of 1.4m/s and maximal thrust of 43N, meeting the requirements for absolute gravimeters.

  10. Why to compare absolute numbers of mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Sabine; Schulz, Sabine; Schropp, Eva-Maria; Eberhagen, Carola; Simmons, Alisha; Beisker, Wolfgang; Aichler, Michaela; Zischka, Hans

    2014-11-01

    Prompted by pronounced structural differences between rat liver and rat hepatocellular carcinoma mitochondria, we suspected these mitochondrial populations to differ massively in their molecular composition. Aiming to reveal these mitochondrial differences, we came across the issue on how to normalize such comparisons and decided to focus on the absolute number of mitochondria. To this end, fluorescently stained mitochondria were quantified by flow cytometry. For rat liver mitochondria, this approach resulted in mitochondrial protein contents comparable to earlier reports using alternative methods. We determined similar protein contents for rat liver, heart and kidney mitochondria. In contrast, however, lower protein contents were determined for rat brain mitochondria and for mitochondria from the rat hepatocellular carcinoma cell line McA 7777. This result challenges mitochondrial comparisons that rely on equal protein amounts as a typical normalization method. Exemplarily, we therefore compared the activity and susceptibility toward inhibition of complex II of rat liver and hepatocellular carcinoma mitochondria and obtained significant discrepancies by either normalizing to protein amount or to absolute mitochondrial number. Importantly, the latter normalization, in contrast to the former, demonstrated a lower complex II activity and higher susceptibility toward inhibition in hepatocellular carcinoma mitochondria compared to liver mitochondria. These findings demonstrate that solely normalizing to protein amount may obscure essential molecular differences between mitochondrial populations.

  11. The absolute threshold of cone vision

    PubMed Central

    Koeing, Darran; Hofer, Heidi

    2013-01-01

    We report measurements of the absolute threshold of cone vision, which has been previously underestimated due to sub-optimal conditions or overly strict subjective response criteria. We avoided these limitations by using optimized stimuli and experimental conditions while having subjects respond within a rating scale framework. Small (1′ fwhm), brief (34 msec), monochromatic (550 nm) stimuli were foveally presented at multiple intensities in dark-adapted retina for 5 subjects. For comparison, 4 subjects underwent similar testing with rod-optimized stimuli. Cone absolute threshold, that is, the minimum light energy for which subjects were just able to detect a visual stimulus with any response criterion, was 203 ± 38 photons at the cornea, ∼0.47 log units lower than previously reported. Two-alternative forced-choice measurements in a subset of subjects yielded consistent results. Cone thresholds were less responsive to criterion changes than rod thresholds, suggesting a limit to the stimulus information recoverable from the cone mosaic in addition to the limit imposed by Poisson noise. Results were consistent with expectations for detection in the face of stimulus uncertainty. We discuss implications of these findings for modeling the first stages of human cone vision and interpreting psychophysical data acquired with adaptive optics at the spatial scale of the receptor mosaic. PMID:21270115

  12. [Estimation of absolute risk for fracture].

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Saeko

    2009-03-01

    Osteoporosis treatment aims to prevent fractures and maintain the QOL of the elderly. However, persons at high risk of future fracture cannot be effectively identified on the basis of bone density (BMD) alone, although BMD is used as an diagnostic criterion. Therefore, the WHO recommended that absolute risk for fracture (10-year probability of fracture) for each individual be evaluated and used as an index for intervention threshold. The 10-year probability of fracture is calculated based on age, sex, BMD at the femoral neck (body mass index if BMD is not available), history of previous fractures, parental hip fracture history, smoking, steroid use, rheumatoid arthritis, secondary osteoporosis and alcohol consumption. The WHO has just announced the development of a calculation tool (FRAX: WHO Fracture Risk Assessment Tool) in February this year. Fractures could be prevented more effectively if, based on each country's medical circumstances, an absolute risk value for fracture to determine when to start medical treatment is established and persons at high risk of fracture are identified and treated accordingly.

  13. Absolute stereochemistry of altersolanol A and alterporriols.

    PubMed

    Kanamaru, Saki; Honma, Miho; Murakami, Takanori; Tsushima, Taro; Kudo, Shinji; Tanaka, Kazuaki; Nihei, Ken-Ichi; Nehira, Tatsuo; Hashimoto, Masaru

    2012-02-01

    The absolute stereochemistry of altersolanol A (1) was established by observing a positive exciton couplet in the circular dichroism (CD) spectrum of the C3,C4-O-bis(2-naphthoyl) derivative 10 and by chemical correlations with known compound 8. Before the discussion, the relative stereochemistry of 1 was confirmed by X-ray crystallographic analysis. The shielding effect at C7'-OMe group by C1-O-benzoylation established the relative stereochemical relationship between the C8-C8' axial bonding and the C1-C4/C1'-C4' polyol moieties of alterporriols E (3), an atropisomer of the C8-C8' dimer of 1. As 3 could be obtained by dimerization of 1 in vitro, the absolute configuration of its central chirality elements (C1-C4) must be identical to those of 1. Spectral comparison between the experimental and theoretical CD spectra supported the above conclusion. Axial stereochemistry of novel C4-O-deoxy dimeric derivatives, alterporriols F (4) and G (5), were also revealed by comparison of their CD spectra to those of 2 and 3.

  14. Absolute Electron Extraction Efficiency of Liquid Xenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamdin, Katayun; Mizrachi, Eli; Morad, James; Sorensen, Peter

    2016-03-01

    Dual phase liquid/gas xenon time projection chambers (TPCs) currently set the world's most sensitive limits on weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs), a favored dark matter candidate. These detectors rely on extracting electrons from liquid xenon into gaseous xenon, where they produce proportional scintillation. The proportional scintillation from the extracted electrons serves to internally amplify the WIMP signal; even a single extracted electron is detectable. Credible dark matter searches can proceed with electron extraction efficiency (EEE) lower than 100%. However, electrons systematically left at the liquid/gas boundary are a concern. Possible effects include spontaneous single or multi-electron proportional scintillation signals in the gas, or charging of the liquid/gas interface or detector materials. Understanding EEE is consequently a serious concern for this class of rare event search detectors. Previous EEE measurements have mostly been relative, not absolute, assuming efficiency plateaus at 100%. I will present an absolute EEE measurement with a small liquid/gas xenon TPC test bed located at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.

  15. Standardization of the cumulative absolute velocity

    SciTech Connect

    O'Hara, T.F.; Jacobson, J.P. )

    1991-12-01

    EPRI NP-5930, A Criterion for Determining Exceedance of the Operating Basis Earthquake,'' was published in July 1988. As defined in that report, the Operating Basis Earthquake (OBE) is exceeded when both a response spectrum parameter and a second damage parameter, referred to as the Cumulative Absolute Velocity (CAV), are exceeded. In the review process of the above report, it was noted that the calculation of CAV could be confounded by time history records of long duration containing low (nondamaging) acceleration. Therefore, it is necessary to standardize the method of calculating CAV to account for record length. This standardized methodology allows consistent comparisons between future CAV calculations and the adjusted CAV threshold value based upon applying the standardized methodology to the data set presented in EPRI NP-5930. The recommended method to standardize the CAV calculation is to window its calculation on a second-by-second basis for a given time history. If the absolute acceleration exceeds 0.025g at any time during each one second interval, the earthquake records used in EPRI NP-5930 have been reanalyzed and the adjusted threshold of damage for CAV was found to be 0.16g-set.

  16. Swarm's Absolute Scalar Magnetometers Burst Mode Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coisson, P.; Vigneron, P.; Hulot, G.; Crespo Grau, R.; Brocco, L.; Lalanne, X.; Sirol, O.; Leger, J. M.; Jager, T.; Bertrand, F.; Boness, A.; Fratter, I.

    2014-12-01

    Each of the three Swarm satellites embarks an Absolute Scalar Magnetometer (ASM) to provide absolute scalar measurements of the magnetic field with high accuracy and stability. Nominal data acquisition of these ASMs is 1 Hz. But they can also run in a so-called "burst mode" and provide data at 250 Hz. During the commissioning phase of the mission, seven burst mode acquisition campaigns have been run simultaneously for all satellites, obtaining a total of ten days of burs-mode data. These campaigns allowed the identification of issues related to the operations of the piezo-electric motor and the heaters connected to the ASM, that do not impact the nominal 1 Hz scalar data. We analyze the burst mode data to identify high frequency geomagnetic signals, focusing the analysis in two regions: the low latitudes, where we seek signatures of ionospheric irregularities, and the high latitudes, to identify high frequency signals related to polar region currents. Since these campaigns have been conducted during the initial months of the mission, the three satellites where still close to each other, allowing to analyze the spatial coherency of the signals. Wavelet analysis have revealed 31 Hz signals appearing in the night-side in the equatorial region.

  17. Superharp: A wire scanner with absolute position readout for beam energy measurement at CEBAF

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, C.

    1994-09-07

    Superharp is an upgrade CEBAF wire scanner with absolute position readout from shaft encoder. As high precision absolute beam position probe ({Delta}x {approximately} 10{mu}m), three pairs of superharps are installed at the entrance, the mid-point, and the exit of Hall C arc beamline in beam switch yard, which will be tuned in dispersive mode as energy spectrometer performing 10{sup {minus}3} beam energy measurement. With dual sensor system: the direct current pickup and the bremsstrahlung detection electronics, beam profile can be obtained by superharp at wide beam current range from 1 {mu}A to 100 {mu}A.

  18. Extracting infrared absolute reflectance from relative reflectance measurements.

    PubMed

    Berets, Susan L; Milosevic, Milan

    2012-06-01

    Absolute reflectance measurements are valuable to the optics industry for development of new materials and optical coatings. Yet, absolute reflectance measurements are notoriously difficult to make. In this paper, we investigate the feasibility of extracting the absolute reflectance from a relative reflectance measurement using a reference material with known refractive index.

  19. A Conceptual Approach to Absolute Value Equations and Inequalities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Mark W.; Bryson, Janet L.

    2011-01-01

    The absolute value learning objective in high school mathematics requires students to solve far more complex absolute value equations and inequalities. When absolute value problems become more complex, students often do not have sufficient conceptual understanding to make any sense of what is happening mathematically. The authors suggest that the…

  20. Vortex melting and the liquid state in YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x}.

    SciTech Connect

    Crabtree, G. W.

    1998-11-18

    The experimental vortex phase diagram of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} is reviewed, with emphasis on first order vortex melting, the upper and lower critical points on the melting line, and the effect of disorder arising from twin boundary and point defect pinning.

  1. Insignificant influence of the matrix on the melting of incoherently embedded tin and zinc nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, L. M.; Hou, H. F.; Yao, C. Y.; Wang, L. W.

    2017-01-01

    For studying the melting point depression of metals, isolated metallic nanoparticles embedded in a matrix are usually prepared by mechanical milling. Al is the main available matrix material. In this work, to explore possible alternative matrices for further investigation of melting, mechanically milled metal-nonmetal systems are developed, namely Sn-LiF, Zn-LiF and Zn-Al2O3. The outcome indicates that different matrices do not have a significantly different influence on the melting of Sn and Zn. Theoretical analyses of both the thermodynamics and kinetics of surface-induced melting may support this experimental finding.

  2. The role of the "Casimir force analogue" at the microscopic processes of crystallization and melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuvildeev, V. N.; Semenycheva, A. V.

    2016-10-01

    Melting (crystallization), a phase transition from a crystalline solid to a liquid state, is a common phenomenon in nature. We suggest a new factor, "the Casimir force analogue", to describe mechanisms of melting and crystallization. The Casimir force analogue is a force occurring between the surfaces of solid and liquid phases of metals caused by different energy density of phonons of these phases. It explains abrupt changes in geometry and thermodynamic parameters at a melting point. "The Casimir force analogue" helps to estimate latent melting heat and to gain an insight into a solid-liquid transition problem.

  3. The melting curve of Ni to 1 Mbar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lord, Oliver T.; Wood, Ian G.; Dobson, David P.; Vočadlo, Lidunka; Wang, Weiwei; Thomson, Andrew R.; Wann, Elizabeth T. H.; Morard, Guillaume; Mezouar, Mohamed; Walter, Michael J.

    2014-12-01

    The melting curve of Ni has been determined to 125 GPa using laser-heated diamond anvil cell (LH-DAC) experiments in which two melting criteria were used: firstly, the appearance of liquid diffuse scattering (LDS) during in situ X-ray diffraction (XRD) and secondly, plateaux in temperature vs. laser power functions in both in situ and off-line experiments. Our new melting curve, defined by a Simon-Glatzel fit to the data where TM (K) =[ (PM/18.78±10.20 + 1) ] 1 / 2.42 ± 0.66 × 1726, is in good agreement with the majority of the theoretical studies on Ni melting and matches closely the available shock wave melting data. It is however dramatically steeper than the previous off-line LH-DAC studies in which determination of melting was based on the visual observation of motion aided by the laser speckle method. We estimate the melting point (TM) of Ni at the inner-core boundary (ICB) pressure of 330 GPa to be TM = 5800 ± 700 K (2 σ), within error of the value for Fe of TM = 6230 ± 500 K determined in a recent in situ LH-DAC study by similar methods to those employed here. This similarity suggests that the alloying of 5-10 wt.% Ni with the Fe-rich core alloy is unlikely to have any significant effect on the temperature of the ICB, though this is dependent on the details of the topology of the Fe-Ni binary phase diagram at core pressures. Our melting temperature for Ni at 330 GPa is ∼2500 K higher than that found in previous experimental studies employing the laser speckle method. We find that those earlier melting curves coincide with the onset of rapid sub-solidus recrystallization, suggesting that visual observations of motion may have misinterpreted dynamic recrystallization as convective motion of a melt. This finding has significant implications for our understanding of the high-pressure melting behaviour of a number of other transition metals.

  4. What Do Nectaris Basin Impact Melt Rocks Look like and Where Can We Find Them?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, B. A.; Petro, N. E.; Lawrence, S. J.

    2015-01-01

    The formation of the Nectaris basin is a key event defining the stratigraphy of the Moon. Its absolute age, therefore, is a linchpin for lunar bombardment history. Fernandes et al. gave a thorough account of the history of different samples thought to originate in Nectaris, with the upshot being there is little agreement on what samples represent Nectaris, if any. We are revisiting the effort to identify Nectaris basin impact-melt rocks at the Apollo 16 site, to model their emplacement, and to use these parameters to examine other sites where Nectaris impact melt is more abundant and/or more recognizable for potential further study.

  5. Improved capacitive melting curve measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebedash, Alexander; Tuoriniemi, Juha; Pentti, Elias; Salmela, Anssi

    2009-02-01

    Sensitivity of the capacitive method for determining the melting pressure of helium can be enhanced by loading the empty side of the capacitor with helium at a pressure nearly equal to that desired to be measured and by using a relatively thin and flexible membrane in between. This way one can achieve a nanobar resolution at the level of 30 bar, which is two orders of magnitude better than that of the best gauges with vacuum reference. This extends the applicability of melting curve thermometry to lower temperatures and would allow detecting tiny anomalies in the melting pressure, which must be associated with any phenomena contributing to the entropy of the liquid or solid phases. We demonstrated this principle in measurements of the crystallization pressure of isotopic helium mixtures at millikelvin temperatures by using partly solid pure 4He as the reference substance providing the best possible universal reference pressure. The achieved sensitivity was good enough for melting curve thermometry on mixtures down to 100 μK. Similar system can be used on pure isotopes by virtue of a blocked capillary giving a stable reference condition with liquid slightly below the melting pressure in the reference volume. This was tested with pure 4He at temperatures 0.08-0.3 K. To avoid spurious heating effects, one must carefully choose and arrange any dielectric materials close to the active capacitor. We observed some 100 pW loading at moderate excitation voltages.

  6. Molecular dynamical simulations of melting behaviors of metal clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Hamid, Ilyar; Fang, Meng; Duan, Haiming

    2015-04-15

    The melting behaviors of metal clusters are studied in a wide range by molecular dynamics simulations. The calculated results show that there are fluctuations in the heat capacity curves of some metal clusters due to the strong structural competition; For the 13-, 55- and 147-atom clusters, variations of the melting points with atomic number are almost the same; It is found that for different metal clusters the dynamical stabilities of the octahedral structures can be inferred in general by a criterion proposed earlier by F. Baletto et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 116 3856 (2002)] for the statically stable structures.

  7. Application of the Cold Crucible for Melting of UO{sub 2}/ZrO{sub 2} Mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, S.W.; Min, B.T.; Shin, Y.S.; Park, I.K.; Kim, J.H.; Song, J.H.; Kim, H.D.

    2002-07-01

    The melting and discharge technique of UO{sub 2}/ZrO{sub 2} mixtures using the cold crucible melting method that does not need a separate crucible such as tungsten one with high melting point is developed and applied to the KAERI FCI test called TROI. To discharge the melt from a cold crucible into a fuel-coolant interaction chamber after melting, a plug is specially designed using the concept for electro-magnetic field characteristics so as to as thin as possible the crust that is formed between the melt and plug. Its function keeps the melt in the crucible during melting period and provides the melt discharge path. About 8.5 kg melt is discharged from the cold crucible to the melt-water interaction chamber through the punched hole with 8 cm in diameter. The melt temperature is also measured and analyzed from observation of the melt surface. The power balance using the operating parameters such as current, voltage and coupling factor of R.F generator is analyzed. (authors)

  8. Use of Absolute and Comparative Performance Feedback in Absolute and Comparative Judgments and Decisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Don A.; Klein, William M. P.

    2008-01-01

    Which matters more--beliefs about absolute ability or ability relative to others? This study set out to compare the effects of such beliefs on satisfaction with performance, self-evaluations, and bets on future performance. In Experiment 1, undergraduate participants were told they had answered 20% correct, 80% correct, or were not given their…

  9. Entropic changes in liquid gallium clusters: understanding the anomalous melting temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaston, Nicola; Steenbergen, Krista

    Melting in finite-sized materials differs in two ways from the solid-liquid phase transition in bulk systems. First, there is an inherent scaling of the melting temperature below that of the bulk, known as melting point depression. Secondly, at small sizes, changes in melting temperature become non-monotonic, and show a size-dependence that is sensitive to the structure of the particle. Melting temperatures that exceed those of the bulk material have been shown to occur in vacuum, but have still never been ascribed a convincing physical explanation. Here we find answers in the structure of the aggregate liquid phase in small gallium clusters, based on molecular dynamics simulations that reproduce the greater-than-bulk melting behavior observed in experiments, and demonstrate the critical role of a lowered entropy in destabilising the liquid state.

  10. Additive manufacturing of polymer melts for implantable medical devices and scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Youssef, Almoatazbellah; Hollister, Scott J; Dalton, Paul D

    2017-02-28

    Melt processing is routinely used to fabricate medical polymeric devices/implants for clinical reconstruction and can be incorporated into quality systems procedures for medical device manufacture. As additive manufacturing (AM) becomes increasingly used for biomaterials and biofabrication, the translation of new, customizable, medical devices to the clinic becomes paramount. Melt processing is therefore a distinguishable group within AM that provides an avenue to manufacture scaffolds/implants with a clinical end-point. Three key melt processing AM technologies are highlighted in this review: melt micro-extrusion, selective laser sintering and melt electrospinning writing. The in vivo (including clinical) outcomes of medical devices and scaffolds made with these processes are reviewed. Together, they encompass the melt AM of scaffold architectures with feature sizes and resolutions ranging from 800 nm up to 700 μm.

  11. Experimental research of phase transition's kinetics in a liquid melt of high-purity aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorontsov, V. B.; Zhuravlev, D. V.; Cherepanov, A. S.

    2015-08-01

    This scientific work is devoted to the studying of the genetic connection structures of solid and liquid phases. Fourier analysis of signals of acoustic emission (AE) accompanying melting high purity aluminum from the melting point up to t = 860°C was performed. Based on the results of previous studies cluster formations in the melt - the micro-regions, those retain crystallinity (areas with short-range order of symmetry) were considered as the source of AE. The experimental data allowed to follow the dynamics of disorder zones range order in the melt with increasing melt temperature up to their complete destruction. The presented results of spectral analysis of the signals were analyzed from the standpoint of the theory of cluster melting metals.

  12. Thermophysical and Optical Properties of Semiconducting Ga2Te3 Melt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Chao; Su, Ching-Hua; Lehoczky, Sandor L.; Scripa, Rosalie N.; Ban, Heng

    2005-01-01

    The majority of bulk semiconductor single crystals are presently grown from their melts. The thermophysical and optical properties of the melts provide a fundamental understanding of the melt structure and can be used to optimize the growth conditions to obtain higher quality crystals. In this paper, we report several thermophysical and optical properties for Ga2Te3 melts, such as electrical conductivity, viscosity, and optical transmission for temperatures ranging from the melting point up to approximately 990 C. The conductivity and viscosity of the melts are determined using the transient torque technique. The optical transmission of the melts is measured between the wavelengths of 300 and 2000 nm by an dual beam reversed-optics spectrophotometer. The measured properties are in good agreement with the published data. The conductivities indicate that the Ga2Te3 melt is semiconductor-like. The anomalous behavior in the measured properties are used as an indication of a structural transformation in the Ga2Te3 melt and discussed in terms of Eyring's and Bachinskii's predicted behaviors for homogeneous melts.

  13. Absolute nonlocality via distributed computing without communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czekaj, Ł.; Pawłowski, M.; Vértesi, T.; Grudka, A.; Horodecki, M.; Horodecki, R.

    2015-09-01

    Understanding the role that quantum entanglement plays as a resource in various information processing tasks is one of the crucial goals of quantum information theory. Here we propose an alternative perspective for studying quantum entanglement: distributed computation of functions without communication between nodes. To formalize this approach, we propose identity games. Surprisingly, despite no signaling, we obtain that nonlocal quantum strategies beat classical ones in terms of winning probability for identity games originating from certain bipartite and multipartite functions. Moreover we show that, for a majority of functions, access to general nonsignaling resources boosts success probability two times in comparison to classical ones for a number of large enough outputs. Because there are no constraints on the inputs and no processing of the outputs in the identity games, they detect very strong types of correlations: absolute nonlocality.

  14. In vivo absorption spectroscopy for absolute measurement.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Hiromitsu; Fukuda, Takashi

    2012-10-01

    In in vivo spectroscopy, there are differences between individual subjects in parameters such as tissue scattering and sample concentration. We propose a method that can provide the absolute value of a particular substance concentration, independent of these individual differences. Thus, it is not necessary to use the typical statistical calibration curve, which assumes an average level of scattering and an averaged concentration over individual subjects. This method is expected to greatly reduce the difficulties encountered during in vivo measurements. As an example, for in vivo absorption spectroscopy, the method was applied to the reflectance measurement in retinal vessels to monitor their oxygen saturation levels. This method was then validated by applying it to the tissue phantom under a variety of absorbance values and scattering efficiencies.

  15. Determining Absolute Zero Using a Tuning Fork

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldader, Jeffrey D.

    2008-04-01

    The Celsius and Kelvin temperature scales, we tell our students, are related. We explain that a change in temperature of 1°C corresponds to a change of 1 Kelvin and that atoms and molecules have zero kinetic energy at zero Kelvin, -273°C. In this paper, we will show how students can derive the relationship between the Celsius and Kelvin temperature scales using a simple, well-known physics experiment. By making multiple measurements of the speed of sound at different temperatures, using the classic physics experiment of determining the speed of sound with a tuning fork and variable-length tube, they can determine the temperature at which the speed of sound is zero—absolute zero.

  16. MAGSAT: Vector magnetometer absolute sensor alignment determination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acuna, M. H.

    1981-01-01

    A procedure is described for accurately determining the absolute alignment of the magnetic axes of a triaxial magnetometer sensor with respect to an external, fixed, reference coordinate system. The method does not require that the magnetic field vector orientation, as generated by a triaxial calibration coil system, be known to better than a few degrees from its true position, and minimizes the number of positions through which a sensor assembly must be rotated to obtain a solution. Computer simulations show that accuracies of better than 0.4 seconds of arc can be achieved under typical test conditions associated with existing magnetic test facilities. The basic approach is similar in nature to that presented by McPherron and Snare (1978) except that only three sensor positions are required and the system of equations to be solved is considerably simplified. Applications of the method to the case of the MAGSAT Vector Magnetometer are presented and the problems encountered discussed.

  17. An estimate of global absolute dynamic topography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tai, C.-K.; Wunsch, C.

    1984-01-01

    The absolute dynamic topography of the world ocean is estimated from the largest scales to a short-wavelength cutoff of about 6700 km for the period July through September, 1978. The data base consisted of the time-averaged sea-surface topography determined by Seasat and geoid estimates made at the Goddard Space Flight Center. The issues are those of accuracy and resolution. Use of the altimetric surface as a geoid estimate beyond the short-wavelength cutoff reduces the spectral leakage in the estimated dynamic topography from erroneous small-scale geoid estimates without contaminating the low wavenumbers. Comparison of the result with a similarly filtered version of Levitus' (1982) historical average dynamic topography shows good qualitative agreement. There is quantitative disagreement, but it is within the estimated errors of both methods of calculation.

  18. Micron Accurate Absolute Ranging System: Range Extension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalley, Larry L.; Smith, Kely L.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to investigate Fresnel diffraction as a means of obtaining absolute distance measurements with micron or greater accuracy. It is believed that such a system would prove useful to the Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST) as a non-intrusive, non-contact measuring system for use with secondary concentrator station-keeping systems. The present research attempts to validate past experiments and develop ways to apply the phenomena of Fresnel diffraction to micron accurate measurement. This report discusses past research on the phenomena, and the basis of the use Fresnel diffraction distance metrology. The apparatus used in the recent investigations, experimental procedures used, preliminary results are discussed in detail. Continued research and equipment requirements on the extension of the effective range of the Fresnel diffraction systems is also described.

  19. Absolute measurements of fast neutrons using yttrium.

    PubMed

    Roshan, M V; Springham, S V; Rawat, R S; Lee, P; Krishnan, M

    2010-08-01

    Yttrium is presented as an absolute neutron detector for pulsed neutron sources. It has high sensitivity for detecting fast neutrons. Yttrium has the property of generating a monoenergetic secondary radiation in the form of a 909 keV gamma-ray caused by inelastic neutron interaction. It was calibrated numerically using MCNPX and does not need periodic recalibration. The total yttrium efficiency for detecting 2.45 MeV neutrons was determined to be f(n) approximately 4.1x10(-4) with an uncertainty of about 0.27%. The yttrium detector was employed in the NX2 plasma focus experiments and showed the neutron yield of the order of 10(8) neutrons per discharge.

  20. Melting processes of oligomeric α and β isotactic polypropylene crystals at ultrafast heating rates.

    PubMed

    Ji, Xiaojing; He, Xuehao; Jiang, Shichun

    2014-02-07

    The melting behaviors of α (stable) and β (metastable) isotactic polypropylene (iPP) crystals at ultrafast heating rates are simulated with atomistic molecular dynamics method. Quantitative information about the melting processes of α- and β-iPP crystals at atomistic level is achieved. The result shows that the melting process starts from the interfaces of lamellar crystal through random dislocation of iPP chains along the perpendicular direction of lamellar crystal structure. In the melting process, the lamellar crystal gradually expands but the corresponding thickness decreases. The analysis shows that the system expansion lags behind the crystallinity decreasing and the lagging extents for α- and β-iPP are significantly different. The apparent melting points of α- and β-iPP crystals rise with the increase of the heating rate and lamellar crystal thickness. The apparent melting point of α-iPP crystal is always higher than that of β-iPP at differently heating rates. Applying the Gibbs-Thomson rule and the scaling property of the melting kinetics, the equilibrium melting points of perfect α- and β-iPP crystals are finally predicted and it shows a good agreement with experimental result.

  1. Melting processes of oligomeric α and β isotactic polypropylene crystals at ultrafast heating rates

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, Xiaojing; He, Xuehao E-mail: scjiang@tju.edu.cn; Jiang, Shichun E-mail: scjiang@tju.edu.cn

    2014-02-07

    The melting behaviors of α (stable) and β (metastable) isotactic polypropylene (iPP) crystals at ultrafast heating rates are simulated with atomistic molecular dynamics method. Quantitative information about the melting processes of α- and β-iPP crystals at atomistic level is achieved. The result shows that the melting process starts from the interfaces of lamellar crystal through random dislocation of iPP chains along the perpendicular direction of lamellar crystal structure. In the melting process, the lamellar crystal gradually expands but the corresponding thickness decreases. The analysis shows that the system expansion lags behind the crystallinity decreasing and the lagging extents for α- and β-iPP are significantly different. The apparent melting points of α- and β-iPP crystals rise with the increase of the heating rate and lamellar crystal thickness. The apparent melting point of α-iPP crystal is always higher than that of β-iPP at differently heating rates. Applying the Gibbs-Thomson rule and the scaling property of the melting kinetics, the equilibrium melting points of perfect α- and β-iPP crystals are finally predicted and it shows a good agreement with experimental result.

  2. Partial Melting of the Indarch (EH4) Meteorite : A Textural, Chemical and Phase Relations View of Melting and Melt Migration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCoy, Timothy J.; Dickinson, Tamara L.; Lofgren, Gary E.

    2000-01-01

    To Test whether Aubrites can be formed by melting of enstatite Chondrites and to understand igneous processes at very low oxygen fugacities, we have conducted partial melting experiments on the Indarch (EH4) chondrite at 1000-1500 C. Silicate melting begins at 1000 C. Substantial melt migration occurs at 1300-1400 C and metal migrates out of the silicate change at 1450 C and approx. 50% silicate partial melting. As a group, our experiments contain three immiscible metallic melts 9Si-, and C-rich), two immiscible sulfide melts(Fe-and FeMgMnCa-rich) and Silicate melt. Our partial melting experiments on the Indarch (EH4) enstatite Chondrite suggest that igneous processes at low fO2 exhibit serveral unique features. The complete melting of sulfides at 1000 C suggest that aubritic sulfides are not relicts. Aubritic oldhamite may have crystallized from Ca and S complexed in the silicate melt. Significant metal-sulfide melt migration might occur at relatively low degrees of silicate partial melting. Substantial elemental exchange occurred between different melts (e.g., between sulfide and silicate, Si between silicate and metal), a feature not observed during experiments at higher fO2. This exchange may help explain the formation of aubrites from known enstatite chondrites.

  3. Measured and modelled absolute gravity in Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, E.; Forsberg, R.; Strykowski, G.

    2012-12-01

    Present day changes in the ice volume in glaciated areas like Greenland will change the load on the Earth and to this change the lithosphere will respond elastically. The Earth also responds to changes in the ice volume over a millennial time scale. This response is due to the viscous properties of the mantle and is known as Glaical Isostatic Adjustment (GIA). Both signals are present in GPS and absolute gravity (AG) measurements and they will give an uncertainty in mass balance estimates calculated from these data types. It is possible to separate the two signals if both gravity and Global Positioning System (GPS) time series are available. DTU Space acquired an A10 absolute gravimeter in 2008. One purpose of this instrument is to establish AG time series in Greenland and the first measurements were conducted in 2009. Since then are 18 different Greenland GPS Network (GNET) stations visited and six of these are visited more then once. The gravity signal consists of three signals; the elastic signal, the viscous signal and the direct attraction from the ice masses. All of these signals can be modelled using various techniques. The viscous signal is modelled by solving the Sea Level Equation with an appropriate ice history and Earth model. The free code SELEN is used for this. The elastic signal is modelled as a convolution of the elastic Greens function for gravity and a model of present day ice mass changes. The direct attraction is the same as the Newtonian attraction and is calculated as this. Here we will present the preliminary results of the AG measurements in Greenland. We will also present modelled estimates of the direct attraction, the elastic and the viscous signals.

  4. Absolute bioavailability of quinine formulations in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Babalola, C P; Bolaji, O O; Ogunbona, F A; Ezeomah, E

    2004-09-01

    This study compared the absolute bioavailability of quinine sulphate as capsule and as tablet against the intravenous (i.v.) infusion of the drug in twelve male volunteers. Six of the volunteers received intravenous infusion over 4 h as well as the capsule formulation of the drug in a cross-over manner, while the other six received the tablet formulation. Blood samples were taken at predetermined time intervals and plasma analysed for quinine (QN) using reversed-phase HPLC method. QN was rapidly absorbed after the two oral formulations with average t(max) of 2.67 h for both capsule and tablet. The mean elimination half-life of QN from the i.v. and oral dosage forms varied between 10 and 13.5 hr and were not statistically different (P > 0.05). On the contrary, the maximum plasma concentration (C(max)) and area under the curve (AUC) from capsule were comparable to those from i.v. (P > 0.05), while these values were markedly higher than values from tablet formulation (P < 0.05). The therapeutic QN plasma levels were not achieved with the tablet formulation. The absolute bioavailability (F) were 73% (C.l., 53.3 - 92.4%) and 39 % (C.I., 21.7 - 56.6%) for the capsule and tablet respectively and the difference was significant (P < 0.05). The subtherapeutic levels obtained from the tablet form used in this study may cause treatment failure during malaria and caution should be taken when predictions are made from results obtained from different formulations of QN.

  5. Absolute GPS Positioning Using Genetic Algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramillien, G.

    A new inverse approach for restoring the absolute coordinates of a ground -based station from three or four observed GPS pseudo-ranges is proposed. This stochastic method is based on simulations of natural evolution named genetic algorithms (GA). These iterative procedures provide fairly good and robust estimates of the absolute positions in the Earth's geocentric reference system. For comparison/validation, GA results are compared to the ones obtained using the classical linearized least-square scheme for the determination of the XYZ location proposed by Bancroft (1985) which is strongly limited by the number of available observations (i.e. here, the number of input pseudo-ranges must be four). The r.m.s. accuracy of the non -linear cost function reached by this latter method is typically ~10-4 m2 corresponding to ~300-500-m accuracies for each geocentric coordinate. However, GA can provide more acceptable solutions (r.m.s. errors < 10-5 m2), even when only three instantaneous pseudo-ranges are used, such as a lost of lock during a GPS survey. Tuned GA parameters used in different simulations are N=1000 starting individuals, as well as Pc=60-70% and Pm=30-40% for the crossover probability and mutation rate, respectively. Statistical tests on the ability of GA to recover acceptable coordinates in presence of important levels of noise are made simulating nearly 3000 random samples of erroneous pseudo-ranges. Here, two main sources of measurement errors are considered in the inversion: (1) typical satellite-clock errors and/or 300-metre variance atmospheric delays, and (2) Geometrical Dilution of Precision (GDOP) due to the particular GPS satellite configuration at the time of acquisition. Extracting valuable information and even from low-quality starting range observations, GA offer an interesting alternative for high -precision GPS positioning.

  6. Swarm Absolute Scalar Magnetometers first in-orbit results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fratter, Isabelle; Léger, Jean-Michel; Bertrand, François; Jager, Thomas; Hulot, Gauthier; Brocco, Laura; Vigneron, Pierre

    2016-04-01

    The ESA Swarm mission will provide the best ever survey of the Earth's magnetic field and its temporal evolution. This will be achieved by a constellation of three identical satellites, launched together on the 22nd of November 2013. In order to observe the magnetic field thoroughly, each satellite carries two magnetometers: a Vector Field Magnetometer (VFM) coupled with a star tracker camera, to measure the direction of the magnetic field in space, and an Absolute Scalar Magnetometer (ASM), to measure its intensity. The ASM is the French contribution to the Swarm mission. This new generation instrument was designed by CEA-Leti and developed in close partnership with CNES, with scientific support from IPGP. Its operating principle is based on the atomic spectroscopy of the helium 4 metastable state. It makes use of the Zeeman's effect to transduce the magnetic field into a frequency, the signal being amplified by optical pumping. The primary role of the ASM is to provide absolute measurements of the magnetic field's strength at 1 Hz, for the in-flight calibration of the VFM. As the Swarm magnetic reference, the ASM scalar performance is crucial for the mission's success. Thanks to its innovative design, the ASM offers the best precision, resolution and absolute accuracy ever attained in space, with similar performance all along the orbit. In addition, thanks to an original architecture, the ASM implements on an experimental basis a capacity for providing simultaneously vector measurements at 1 Hz. This new feature makes it the first instrument capable of delivering both scalar and vector measurements simultaneously at the same point. Swarm offers a unique opportunity to validate the ASM vector data in orbit by comparison with the VFM's. Furthermore, the ASM can provide scalar data at a much higher sampling rate, when run in "burst" mode at 250 Hz, with a 100 Hz measurement bandwidth. An analysis of the spectral content of the magnetic field above 1 Hz becomes thus

  7. Properties of sugar-based low-melting mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Veronika; Kunz, Werner

    2014-05-01

    Physico-chemical properties of ternary sugar-based low-melting mixtures were determined. Choline chloride, urea and glucose or sorbitol, serving as sugars, were blended in various compositions. The refractive index, density, viscosity, decomposition temperatures and glass transition temperatures were measured. Further, the influence of temperature and water content was investigated. The results show that the mixtures are liquid below room temperature and the viscosity and density are dependent on the temperature and composition. Moreover, the viscosity decreases with increasing water content. These mixtures are biodegradable, low toxic, non-volatile, non-reactive with water and can be accomplished with low-cost materials. In consideration of these advantages and a melting point below room temperature, these low-melting mixtures can be a good alternative to ionic liquids as well as environmentally unfriendly and toxic solvents.

  8. Ice cream structural elements that affect melting rate and hardness.

    PubMed

    Muse, M R; Hartel, R W

    2004-01-01

    Statistical models were developed to reveal which structural elements of ice cream affect melting rate and hardness. Ice creams were frozen in a batch freezer with three types of sweetener, three levels of the emulsifier polysorbate 80, and two different draw temperatures to produce ice creams with a range of microstructures. Ice cream mixes were analyzed for viscosity, and finished ice creams were analyzed for air cell and ice crystal size, overrun, and fat destabilization. The ice phase volume of each ice cream were calculated based on the freezing point of the mix. Melting rate and hardness of each hardened ice cream was measured and correlated with the structural attributes by using analysis of variance and multiple linear regression. Fat destabilization, ice crystal size, and the consistency coefficient of the mix were found to affect the melting rate of ice cream, whereas hardness was influenced by ice phase volume, ice crystal size, overrun, fat destabilization, and the rheological properties of the mix.

  9. Stepwise melting of a model glass former under confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvo, F.; Wales, D. J.

    2009-10-01

    The equilibrium thermodynamics of a binary Lennard-Jones model glass former are investigated using exchange Monte Carlo simulations, covering the crystalline and amorphous regions of configuration space in appropriate temperature ranges. We investigate both bulk and film mixtures, the latter being confined between noninteracting flat walls. Both the bulk and film systems exhibit a principal heat capacity peak at the melting point, but confinement leads to a significant depression in the melting temperature by about 25%. Microcanonical caloric curves, as well as analysis of the probability distributions of a bond-orientational order parameter, show that this transition has first-order character. However, the film system shows additional features at lower temperatures, which are interpreted in terms of localized partial melting, perpendicular to the confining walls and near the walls, with some increase in layering. This premelting is associated with local minima on the underlying potential energy surface that are not supported by the bulk system.

  10. Arctic temperature amplification and sea-ice melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graversen, R. G.; Kapsch, M.; Mauritzen, T.; Tjernström, M.

    2012-04-01

    In recent decades, Arctic temperatures increase more than the global average - this has become known as Arctic temperature amplification. At the same time, Arctic sea-ice extent is shrinking with a pace being largest in summer. Reanalysis data show Arctic temperature amplification in the free troposphere above the boundary layer. In summer this warming aloft cannot be attributed to surface processes. This is because the surface-air temperature trends are modest in the Arctic during summer, since the ice-melt keeps the temperatures close to the melting point. Rather the warming in the free troposphere could be due to changes of the heat advection into the Arctic and changes of the cloudiness. The warming aloft induces an increase of the energy flux towards the surface in terms of longwave radiation and turbulent fluxes, which contributes to the sea-ice melt during summer. When the ice melts, surface-based processes start acting, among them the surface-albedo feedback where the sea-ice reduction leads to an increase of absorption of solar radiation. During summer, the excess of energy at the surface is stored in the ocean, both internally as heat, and latently due to the ice melt. This energy is released during the following autumn and winter causing positive surface-air temperature in these seasons. The extreme ice melt in 2007 is an example of this chain of processes. During the summer of 2007 the Arctic sea ice shrank to the lowest extent ever observed. Using the state-of-the-art ERA-Interim reanalysis data, the role of the atmospheric energy transport in this extreme melt event is explored.

  11. Novel Low-Melt Viscosity Polyimides for Resin Transfer Molding (RTM)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-08-29

    are amenable to RTM , and potentially adaptable to vacuum assisted resin transfer molding ( VARTM ) processes. Figure 2 shows that the absolute...2008 Research/Final 01/02/2006 -28/05/08 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER NOVEL LOW-MELT VISCOSITY POLYIMIDES FOR RESIN TRANSFER MOLDING ( RTM ...the range of 10-30 poise and high glass transition temperatures (T,s) of 330-370 ’C were developed for resin transfer molding ( RTM ) applications

  12. On the calculation of the absolute grand potential of confined smectic-A phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chien-Cheng; Baus, Marc; Ryckaert, Jean-Paul

    2015-09-01

    We determine the absolute grand potential Λ along a confined smectic-A branch of a calamitic liquid crystal system enclosed in a slit pore of transverse area A and width L, using the rod-rod Gay-Berne potential and a rod-wall potential favouring perpendicular orientation at the walls. For a confined phase with an integer number of smectic layers sandwiched between the opposite walls, we obtain the excess properties (excess grand potential Λexc, solvation force fs and adsorption Γ) with respect to the bulk phase at the same μ (chemical potential) and T (temperature) state point. While usual thermodynamic integration methods are used along the confined smectic branch to estimate the grand potential difference as μ is varied at fixed L, T, the absolute grand potential at one reference state point is obtained via the evaluation of the absolute Helmholtz free energy in the (N, L, A, T) canonical ensemble. It proceeds via a sequence of free energy difference estimations involving successively the cost of localising rods on layers and the switching on of a one-dimensional harmonic field to keep layers integrity coupled to the elimination of inter-layers and wall interactions. The absolute free energy of the resulting set of fully independent layers of interacting rods is finally estimated via the existing procedures. This work opens the way to the computer simulation study of phase transitions implying confined layered phases.

  13. Continuous manufacturing of solid lipid nanoparticles by hot melt extrusion.

    PubMed

    Patil, Hemlata; Kulkarni, Vijay; Majumdar, Soumyajit; Repka, Michael A

    2014-08-25

    Solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN) can either be produced by hot homogenization of melted lipids at higher temperatures or by a cold homogenization process. This paper proposes and demonstrates the formulation of SLN for pharmaceutical applications by combining two processes: hot melt extrusion (HME) technology for melt-emulsification and high-pressure homogenization (HPH) for size reduction. This work aimed at developing continuous and scalable processes for SLN by mixing a lipid and aqueous phase containing an emulsifier in the extruder barrel at temperatures above the melting point of the lipid and further reducing the particle size of emulsion by HPH linked to HME in a sequence. The developed novel platform demonstrated better process control and size reduction compared to the conventional process of hot homogenization (batch process). Varying the process parameters enabled the production of SLN below 200 nm (for 60 mg/ml lipid solution at a flow rate of 100ml/min). Among the several process parameters investigated, the lipid concentration, residence time and screw design played major roles in influencing the size of the SLN. This new process demonstrates the potential use of hot melt extrusion technology for continuous and large-scale production of SLN.

  14. An enthalpy landscape view of homogeneous melting in crystals.

    PubMed

    Nieves, Alex M; Sinno, Talid

    2011-08-21

    A detailed analysis of homogeneous melting in crystalline materials modeled by empirical interatomic potentials is presented using the theory of inherent structures. We show that the homogeneous melting of a perfect, infinite crystalline material can be inferred directly from the growth exponent of the inherent structure density-of-states distribution expressed as a function of formation enthalpy. Interestingly, this growth is already established by the presence of very few homogeneously nucleated point defects in the form of Frenkel pairs. This finding supports the notion that homogeneous melting is appropriately defined in terms of a one-phase theory and does not require detailed consideration of the liquid phase. We then apply this framework to the study of applied hydrostatic compression on homogeneous melting and show that the inherent structure analysis used here is able to capture the correct pressure-dependence for two crystalline materials, namely silicon and aluminum. The coupling between the melting temperature and applied pressure arises through the distribution of formation volumes for the various inherent structures.

  15. Transcrystalline melt migration in clinopyroxene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonzogni, Yann; Provost, Ariel; Schiano, Pierre

    2011-03-01

    Glass inclusions in clinopyroxene phenocrysts from La Sommata (Vulcano Island, Aeolian Arc) were reheated and submitted to a sustained thermal gradient. Each remelted inclusion undergoes a transient textural and chemical reequilibration and concomitantly begins to migrate along a crystallographic direction, at a small angle with the thermal gradient. The completion of morphological evolution requires a characteristic time that is governed by chemical diffusion. Chemical reequilibration results in the formation of a colored halo that delineates the former location and shape of the inclusion after it has migrated away. Transcrystalline migration proceeds by dissolution of the host clinopyroxene ahead and precipitation astern. Its rate is not limited by Fick's law, but by the crystal-melt interface kinetics. Clinopyroxene dissolution and growth are slower than for olivine in similar conditions but obey the same analytical law, which can be transposed to equally or more sluggish melting or crystallization events in nature. When a gas bubble is initially present, it responds to elastic forces by quickly shifting toward the cold end of the inclusion, where it soon becomes engulfed as an isolated fluid inclusion in the reprecipitated crystal. This study confirms that transcrystalline melt migration, beside its possible implications for small-scale melt segregation and fluid-inclusion generation in the Earth's mantle, provides an experimental access to interfacial kinetic laws in near-equilibrium conditions.

  16. Absolute calibration of forces in optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutra, R. S.; Viana, N. B.; Maia Neto, P. A.; Nussenzveig, H. M.

    2014-07-01

    Optical tweezers are highly versatile laser traps for neutral microparticles, with fundamental applications in physics and in single molecule cell biology. Force measurements are performed by converting the stiffness response to displacement of trapped transparent microspheres, employed as force transducers. Usually, calibration is indirect, by comparison with fluid drag forces. This can lead to discrepancies by sizable factors. Progress achieved in a program aiming at absolute calibration, conducted over the past 15 years, is briefly reviewed. Here we overcome its last major obstacle, a theoretical overestimation of the peak stiffness, within the most employed range for applications, and we perform experimental validation. The discrepancy is traced to the effect of primary aberrations of the optical system, which are now included in the theory. All required experimental parameters are readily accessible. Astigmatism, the dominant effect, is measured by analyzing reflected images of the focused laser spot, adapting frequently employed video microscopy techniques. Combined with interface spherical aberration, it reveals a previously unknown window of instability for trapping. Comparison with experimental data leads to an overall agreement within error bars, with no fitting, for a broad range of microsphere radii, from the Rayleigh regime to the ray optics one, for different polarizations and trapping heights, including all commonly employed parameter domains. Besides signaling full first-principles theoretical understanding of optical tweezers operation, the results may lead to improved instrument design and control over experiments, as well as to an extended domain of applicability, allowing reliable force measurements, in principle, from femtonewtons to nanonewtons.

  17. Elevation correction factor for absolute pressure measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panek, Joseph W.; Sorrells, Mark R.

    1996-01-01

    With the arrival of highly accurate multi-port pressure measurement systems, conditions that previously did not affect overall system accuracy must now be scrutinized closely. Errors caused by elevation differences between pressure sensing elements and model pressure taps can be quantified and corrected. With multi-port pressure measurement systems, the sensing elements are connected to pressure taps that may be many feet away. The measurement system may be at a different elevation than the pressure taps due to laboratory space or test article constraints. This difference produces a pressure gradient that is inversely proportional to height within the interface tube. The pressure at the bottom of the tube will be higher than the pressure at the top due to the weight of the tube's column of air. Tubes with higher pressures will exhibit larger absolute errors due to the higher air density. The above effect is well documented but has generally been taken into account with large elevations only. With error analysis techniques, the loss in accuracy from elevation can be easily quantified. Correction factors can be applied to maintain the high accuracies of new pressure measurement systems.

  18. Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leckey, John P.

    2015-01-01

    The Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO) is a mission, led and developed by NASA, that will measure a variety of climate variables with an unprecedented accuracy to quantify and attribute climate change. CLARREO consists of three separate instruments: an infrared (IR) spectrometer, a reflected solar (RS) spectrometer, and a radio occultation (RO) instrument. The mission will contain orbiting radiometers with sufficient accuracy, including on orbit verification, to calibrate other space-based instrumentation, increasing their respective accuracy by as much as an order of magnitude. The IR spectrometer is a Fourier Transform spectrometer (FTS) working in the 5 to 50 microns wavelength region with a goal of 0.1 K (k = 3) accuracy. The FTS will achieve this accuracy using phase change cells to verify thermistor accuracy and heated halos to verify blackbody emissivity, both on orbit. The RS spectrometer will measure the reflectance of the atmosphere in the 0.32 to 2.3 microns wavelength region with an accuracy of 0.3% (k = 2). The status of the instrumentation packages and potential mission options will be presented.

  19. Absolute flux measurements for swift atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fink, M.; Kohl, D. A.; Keto, J. W.; Antoniewicz, P.

    1987-01-01

    While a torsion balance in vacuum can easily measure the momentum transfer from a gas beam impinging on a surface attached to the balance, this measurement depends on the accommodation coefficients of the atoms with the surface and the distribution of the recoil. A torsion balance is described for making absolute flux measurements independent of recoil effects. The torsion balance is a conventional taut suspension wire design and the Young modulus of the wire determines the relationship between the displacement and the applied torque. A compensating magnetic field is applied to maintain zero displacement and provide critical damping. The unique feature is to couple the impinging gas beam to the torsion balance via a Wood's horn, i.e., a thin wall tube with a gradual 90 deg bend. Just as light is trapped in a Wood's horn by specular reflection from the curved surfaces, the gas beam diffuses through the tube. Instead of trapping the beam, the end of the tube is open so that the atoms exit the tube at 90 deg to their original direction. Therefore, all of the forward momentum of the gas beam is transferred to the torsion balance independent of the angle of reflection from the surfaces inside the tube.

  20. Satellite derived albedoes during spring melt for selected locations in the Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busse, J.; Anderson, M.

    2005-12-01

    Snow and ice surfaces have a high level of reflectance, therefore, a high albedo, compared to open water and soil which have lower albedo values and absorb more sunlight. As the high albedo snow and ice begins to melt, the albedo values drop. This contributes to a positive feedback mechanism. The dropping albedo values indicate that more radiation is being absorbed by the surface. As more radiation is absorbed by the surface, more melt occurs, which then leads to lower albedoes and more absorption. This positive feedback continues until the fall when new snow covers the surface and the albedo begins to increase, disrupting the cycle. In the Arctic, the amount of sea ice surviving the summer melt season continues to decrease, indicating a change in the surface conditions during this important melt season. However, very little is known about the albedoes during the melt period. This study documents the albedo changes that occur during the melt season and compares these changes to melt onset dates derived from passive microwave data in order to obtain a multi-frequency response to the energy conditions. Time series of albedo data from the AVHRR Polar Pathfinder Twice-Daily 25-km EASE-Grid Composites are obtained to show the transition from winter to summer conditions from 13 different points within the Arctic. Areas experiencing melt are explored and melt onset dates are determined. Snow and ice melt can also be detected using SMMR and SSM/I passive microwave data. Microwave data are useful to pinpoint when melt occurs, because microwaves can also detect changes in surface conditions. The albedo data are compared with melt onset dates obtained from microwave sensors to determine relationships between microwave-derived melt and albedo responses. Data from areas experiencing early melt onset and late melt onset are explored. Studying the time series from the 13 different points in the Arctic show the relationship between surface melt and albedo variations during the

  1. Freezing, melting and structure of ice in a hydrophilic nanopore.

    PubMed

    Moore, Emily B; de la Llave, Ezequiel; Welke, Kai; Scherlis, Damian A; Molinero, Valeria

    2010-04-28

    The nucleation, growth, structure and melting of ice in 3 nm diameter hydrophilic nanopores are studied through molecular dynamics simulations with the mW water model. The melting temperature of water in the pore was T(m)(pore) = 223 K, 51 K lower than the melting point of bulk water in the model and in excellent agreement with experimental determinations for 3 nm silica pores. Liquid and ice coexist in equilibrium at the melting point and down to temperatures as low as 180 K. Liquid water is located at the interface of the pore wall, increasing from one monolayer at the freezing temperature, T(f)(pore) = 195 K, to two monolayers a few degrees below T(m)(pore). Crystallization of ice in the pore occurs through homogeneous nucleation. At the freezing temperature, the critical nucleus contains approximately 75 to 100 molecules, with a radius of gyration similar to the radius of the pore. The critical nuclei contain features of both cubic and hexagonal ice, although stacking of hexagonal and cubic layers is not defined until the nuclei reach approximately 150 molecules. The structure of the confined ice is rich in stacking faults, in agreement with the interpretation of X-ray and neutron diffraction experiments. Though the presence of cubic layers is twice as prevalent as hexagonal ones, the crystals should not be considered defective Ic as sequences with more than three adjacent cubic (or hexagonal) layers are extremely rare in the confined ice.

  2. A molecular dynamics study of melting and dissociation of tungsten nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Min; Wang, Jun; Fu, Baoqin; Hou, Qing

    2015-12-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations were conducted to study the melting and dissociation of free tungsten nanoparticles. For the various interatomic potentials applied, the melting points of the tungsten nanoparticles increased with increasing nanoparticle diameter. Combining these results with the melting point of bulk tungsten in the experiment, the melting point of nanoparticles with diameters ranging from 4 to 12 nm could be determined. As the temperature increases, free nanoparticles are subject to dissociation phenomena. The dissociation rate was observed to follow Arrhenius behavior, and the Meyer-Neldel rule was obeyed. These results are useful in understanding the behavior of tungsten dust generated in nuclear fusion devices as well as for the preparation, formation, and application of tungsten powders.

  3. A molecular dynamics study of melting and dissociation of tungsten nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Min; Wang, Jun; Fu, Baoqin; Hou, Qing

    2015-12-15

    Molecular dynamics simulations were conducted to study the melting and dissociation of free tungsten nanoparticles. For the various interatomic potentials applied, the melting points of the tungsten nanoparticles increased with increasing nanoparticle diameter. Combining these results with the melting point of bulk tungsten in the experiment, the melting point of nanoparticles with diameters ranging from 4 to 12 nm could be determined. As the temperature increases, free nanoparticles are subject to dissociation phenomena. The dissociation rate was observed to follow Arrhenius behavior, and the Meyer–Neldel rule was obeyed. These results are useful in understanding the behavior of tungsten dust generated in nuclear fusion devices as well as for the preparation, formation, and application of tungsten powders.

  4. A Two-Dimensional Liquid Structure Explains the Elevated Melting Temperatures of Gallium Nanoclusters.

    PubMed

    Steenbergen, Krista G; Gaston, Nicola

    2016-01-13

    Melting in finite-sized materials differs in two ways from the solid-liquid phase transition in bulk systems. First, there is an inherent scaling of the melting temperature below that of the bulk, known as melting point depression. Second, at small sizes changes in melting temperature become nonmonotonic and show a size-dependence that is sensitive to the structure of the particle. Melting temperatures that exceed those of the bulk material have been shown to occur for a very limited range of nanoclusters, including gallium, but have still never been ascribed a convincing physical explanation. Here, we analyze the structure of the liquid phase in gallium clusters based on molecular dynamics simulations that reproduce the greater-than-bulk melting behavior observed in experiments. We observe persistent nonspherical shape distortion indicating a stabilization of the surface, which invalidates the paradigm of melting point depression. This shape distortion suggests that the surface acts as a constraint on the liquid state that lowers its entropy relative to that of the bulk liquid and thus raises the melting temperature.

  5. Absolute nuclear material assay using count distribution (LAMBDA) space

    DOEpatents

    Prasad, Mano K.; Snyderman, Neal J.; Rowland, Mark S.

    2015-12-01

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  6. Absolute nuclear material assay using count distribution (LAMBDA) space

    DOEpatents

    Prasad, Manoj K [Pleasanton, CA; Snyderman, Neal J [Berkeley, CA; Rowland, Mark S [Alamo, CA

    2012-06-05

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  7. Insight in Ridge Axial Melt Lens in the Oman Ophiolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudier, F.; Nicolas, A.; Daignieres, M.

    2008-12-01

    As in fast spreading ridges, the Oman ophiolite had a melt lens perched on top of the magma chamber where the gabbro unit was crystallizing. This melt lens is now reduced to an horizon where its roof and floor are coinciding and this horizon is now identified in the field. It is generally marked by a sharp discordance between the isotropic gabbros from the root zone of sheeted dike complex (RZSDC) and steeply dipping foliated gabbros. These gabbros are issued from the mush settled on the floor of the melt lens, after subsidence inside the magma chamber. After stretching, compaction and rotation in the chamber, the mush has drifted through the wall of the chamber with, as a result, the observed steep foliated gabbros. Depending on its vertical distance beneath the lens horizon, a given gabbro derives from increasing distances inside the melt lens. Insights in the active melt lens are possible in three ways. 1) Looking at gabbros from the lens horizon, which virtually have not subsided. 2) Considering uncommon areas which display flat-lying foliated gabbros, below the contact with RZSDC and which grade down section into the steep foliated gabbros. Such situations are ascribed to a retreat of the melt lens, exposing gabbros which crystallized on its floor. Their good foliation points to a dynamic deposition on the floor, presumably by convection currents. 3) Considering the ubiquitous occurrence of anorthosites which are interlayered with the foliated gabbros. The anorthosites carry several important messages such as: - compaction of the mush at early stage of subsidence; - chemical nature of the rising melt which drops plagioclase first, followed by either olivine or clinopyroxene; - frequency and volume of melt intrusions, each one coming as short and massive melt surge; - spacing of areas of melt delivery on the lens floor. These results are essentially derived from anorthosites description and distribution in the field. It is concluded that melt lens activity is

  8. A Liquid-Helium-Cooled Absolute Reference Cold Load forLong-Wavelength Radiometric Calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Bensadoun, M.; Witebsky, C.; Smoot, George F.; De Amici,Giovanni; Kogut, A.; Levin, S.

    1990-05-01

    We describe a large (78-cm) diameter liquid-helium-cooled black-body absolute reference cold load for the calibration of microwave radiometers. The load provides an absolute calibration near the liquid helium (LHe) boiling point, accurate to better than 30 mK for wavelengths from 2.5 to 25 cm (12-1.2 GHz). The emission (from non-LHe temperature parts of the cold load) and reflection are small and well determined. Total corrections to the LHe boiling point temperature are {le} 50 mK over the operating range. This cold load has been used at several wavelengths at the South Pole and at the White Mountain Research Station. In operation, the average LHe loss rate was {le} 4.4 l/hr. Design considerations, radiometric and thermal performance and operational aspects are discussed. A comparison with other LHe-cooled reference loads including the predecessor of this cold load is given.

  9. A liquid-helium-cooled absolute reference cold load for long-wavelength radiometric calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bensadoun, Marc; Witebsky, Chris; Smoot, George; De Amici, Giovanni; Kogut, AL; Levin, Steve

    1992-01-01

    Design, radiometric and thermal performance, and operation of a large diameter (78 cm) liquid-helium-cooled blackbody absolute reference cold load (CL) for the calibration of microwave radiometers is described. CL provides an absolute calibration near the liquid-helium (LHe) boiling point, with total uncertainty in the radiometric temperature of less than 30 mK over the 2.5-23 cm wavelength operating range. CL was used at several wavelengths at the South Pole, Antarctica and the White Mountain Research Center, California. Results show that, for the instruments operated at 20-, 12-, 7.9-, and 4.0 cm wavelength at the South Pole, the total corrections to the LHe boiling-point temperature (about 3.8 K) were 48 +/-23, 18 +/-10, 10 +/-18, and 15 +/-mK.

  10. Absolute and Convective Instability of a Liquid Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, S. P.; Hudman, M.; Chen, J. N.

    1999-01-01

    The existence of absolute instability in a liquid jet has been predicted for some time. The disturbance grows in time and propagates both upstream and downstream in an absolutely unstable liquid jet. The image of absolute instability is captured in the NASA 2.2 sec drop tower and reported here. The transition from convective to absolute instability is observed experimentally. The experimental results are compared with the theoretical predictions on the transition Weber number as functions of the Reynolds number. The role of interfacial shear relative to all other relevant forces which cause the onset of jet breakup is explained.

  11. Pulling Marbles from a Bag: Deducing the Regional Impact History of the SPA Basin from Impact Melt Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Barbara A.; Coker, R. F.

    2009-01-01

    The South Pole-Aitken (SPA) basin is an important target for absolute age-dating. Vertical and lateral impact mixing ensures that regolith within SPA will contain rock fragments from SPA itself, local impact craters, and faraway giant basins. About 20% of the regolith at any given site is foreign [1, 2], but much of this material will be cold ejecta, not impact melt. We calculated the fraction of contributed impact melt using scaling laws to estimate the amount and provenance of impact melt, demonstrating that SPA melt is the dominant impact melt rock (>70%) likely to be present. We also constructed a statistical model to illustrate how many randomly-selected impact-melt fragments would need to be dated, and with what accuracy, to confidently reproduce the impact history of a site. A detailed impact history becomes recognizable after a few hundred to a thousand randomly-selected marbles, however, it will be useful to have more information (e.g. compositional, mineralogical, remote sensing) to group fragments. These exercises show that SPA melt has a high probability of being present in a scoop sample and that dating of a few hundred to a thousand impact-melt fragments will yield the impact history of the SPA basin.

  12. Absolute Plate Velocities from Seismic Anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreemer, Corné; Zheng, Lin; Gordon, Richard

    2015-04-01

    The orientation of seismic anisotropy inferred beneath plate interiors may provide a means to estimate the motions of the plate relative to the sub-asthenospheric mantle. Here we analyze two global sets of shear-wave splitting data, that of Kreemer [2009] and an updated and expanded data set, to estimate plate motions and to better understand the dispersion of the data, correlations in the errors, and their relation to plate speed. We also explore the effect of using geologically current plate velocities (i.e., the MORVEL set of angular velocities [DeMets et al. 2010]) compared with geodetically current plate velocities (i.e., the GSRM v1.2 angular velocities [Kreemer et al. 2014]). We demonstrate that the errors in plate motion azimuths inferred from shear-wave splitting beneath any one tectonic plate are correlated with the errors of other azimuths from the same plate. To account for these correlations, we adopt a two-tier analysis: First, find the pole of rotation and confidence limits for each plate individually. Second, solve for the best fit to these poles while constraining relative plate angular velocities to consistency with the MORVEL relative plate angular velocities. The SKS-MORVEL absolute plate angular velocities (based on the Kreemer [2009] data set) are determined from the poles from eight plates weighted proportionally to the root-mean-square velocity of each plate. SKS-MORVEL indicates that eight plates (Amur, Antarctica, Caribbean, Eurasia, Lwandle, Somalia, Sundaland, and Yangtze) have angular velocities that differ insignificantly from zero. The net rotation of the lithosphere is 0.25±0.11° Ma-1 (95% confidence limits) right-handed about 57.1°S, 68.6°E. The within-plate dispersion of seismic anisotropy for oceanic lithosphere (σ=19.2° ) differs insignificantly from that for continental lithosphere (σ=21.6° ). The between-plate dispersion, however, is significantly smaller for oceanic lithosphere (σ=7.4° ) than for continental

  13. Orion Absolute Navigation System Progress and Challenge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holt, Greg N.; D'Souza, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    The absolute navigation design of NASA's Orion vehicle is described. It has undergone several iterations and modifications since its inception, and continues as a work-in-progress. This paper seeks to benchmark the current state of the design and some of the rationale and analysis behind it. There are specific challenges to address when preparing a timely and effective design for the Exploration Flight Test (EFT-1), while still looking ahead and providing software extensibility for future exploration missions. The primary onboard measurements in a Near-Earth or Mid-Earth environment consist of GPS pseudo-range and delta-range, but for future explorations missions the use of star-tracker and optical navigation sources need to be considered. Discussions are presented for state size and composition, processing techniques, and consider states. A presentation is given for the processing technique using the computationally stable and robust UDU formulation with an Agee-Turner Rank-One update. This allows for computational savings when dealing with many parameters which are modeled as slowly varying Gauss-Markov processes. Preliminary analysis shows up to a 50% reduction in computation versus a more traditional formulation. Several state elements are discussed and evaluated, including position, velocity, attitude, clock bias/drift, and GPS measurement biases in addition to bias, scale factor, misalignment, and non-orthogonalities of the accelerometers and gyroscopes. Another consideration is the initialization of the EKF in various scenarios. Scenarios such as single-event upset, ground command, and cold start are discussed as are strategies for whole and partial state updates as well as covariance considerations. Strategies are given for dealing with latent measurements and high-rate propagation using multi-rate architecture. The details of the rate groups and the data ow between the elements is discussed and evaluated.

  14. Evaluation of the Absolute Regional Temperature Potential

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shindell, D. T.

    2012-01-01

    The Absolute Regional Temperature Potential (ARTP) is one of the few climate metrics that provides estimates of impacts at a sub-global scale. The ARTP presented here gives the time-dependent temperature response in four latitude bands (90-28degS, 28degS-28degN, 28-60degN and 60-90degN) as a function of emissions based on the forcing in those bands caused by the emissions. It is based on a large set of simulations performed with a single atmosphere-ocean climate model to derive regional forcing/response relationships. Here I evaluate the robustness of those relationships using the forcing/response portion of the ARTP to estimate regional temperature responses to the historic aerosol forcing in three independent climate models. These ARTP results are in good accord with the actual responses in those models. Nearly all ARTP estimates fall within +/-20%of the actual responses, though there are some exceptions for 90-28degS and the Arctic, and in the latter the ARTP may vary with forcing agent. However, for the tropics and the Northern Hemisphere mid-latitudes in particular, the +/-20% range appears to be roughly consistent with the 95% confidence interval. Land areas within these two bands respond 39-45% and 9-39% more than the latitude band as a whole. The ARTP, presented here in a slightly revised form, thus appears to provide a relatively robust estimate for the responses of large-scale latitude bands and land areas within those bands to inhomogeneous radiative forcing and thus potentially to emissions as well. Hence this metric could allow rapid evaluation of the effects of emissions policies at a finer scale than global metrics without requiring use of a full climate model.

  15. Absolute determination of local tropospheric OH concentrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armerding, Wolfgang; Comes, Franz-Josef

    1994-01-01

    Long path absorption (LPA) according to Lambert Beer's law is a method to determine absolute concentrations of trace gases such as tropospheric OH. We have developed a LPA instrument which is based on a rapid tuning of the light source which is a frequency doubled dye laser. The laser is tuned across two or three OH absorption features around 308 nm with a scanning speed of 0.07 cm(exp -1)/microsecond and a repetition rate of 1.3 kHz. This high scanning speed greatly reduces the fluctuation of the light intensity caused by the atmosphere. To obtain the required high sensitivity the laser output power is additionally made constant and stabilized by an electro-optical modulator. The present sensitivity is of the order of a few times 10(exp 5) OH per cm(exp 3) for an acquisition time of a minute and an absorption path length of only 1200 meters so that a folding of the optical path in a multireflection cell was possible leading to a lateral dimension of the cell of a few meters. This allows local measurements to be made. Tropospheric measurements have been carried out in 1991 resulting in the determination of OH diurnal variation at specific days in late summer. Comparison with model calculations have been made. Interferences are mainly due to SO2 absorption. The problem of OH self generation in the multireflection cell is of minor extent. This could be shown by using different experimental methods. The minimum-maximum signal to noise ratio is about 8 x 10(exp -4) for a single scan. Due to the small size of the absorption cell the realization of an open air laboratory is possible in which by use of an additional UV light source or by additional fluxes of trace gases the chemistry can be changed under controlled conditions allowing kinetic studies of tropospheric photochemistry to be made in open air.

  16. Absolute Radiometric Calibration of KOMPSAT-3A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, H. Y.; Shin, D. Y.; Kim, J. S.; Seo, D. C.; Choi, C. U.

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents a vicarious radiometric calibration of the Korea Multi-Purpose Satellite-3A (KOMPSAT-3A) performed by the Korea Aerospace Research Institute (KARI) and the Pukyong National University Remote Sensing Group (PKNU RSG) in 2015.The primary stages of this study are summarized as follows: (1) A field campaign to determine radiometric calibrated target fields was undertaken in Mongolia and South Korea. Surface reflectance data obtained in the campaign were input to a radiative transfer code that predicted at-sensor radiance. Through this process, equations and parameters were derived for the KOMPSAT-3A sensor to enable the conversion of calibrated DN to physical units, such as at-sensor radiance or TOA reflectance. (2) To validate the absolute calibration coefficients for the KOMPSAT-3A sensor, we performed a radiometric validation with a comparison of KOMPSAT-3A and Landsat-8 TOA reflectance using one of the six PICS (Libya 4). Correlations between top-of-atmosphere (TOA) radiances and the spectral band responses of the KOMPSAT-3A sensors at the Zuunmod, Mongolia and Goheung, South Korea sites were significant for multispectral bands. The average difference in TOA reflectance between KOMPSAT-3A and Landsat-8 image over the Libya 4, Libya site in the red-green-blue (RGB) region was under 3%, whereas in the NIR band, the TOA reflectance of KOMPSAT-3A was lower than the that of Landsat-8 due to the difference in the band passes of two sensors. The KOMPSAT-3Aensor includes a band pass near 940 nm that can be strongly absorbed by water vapor and therefore displayed low reflectance. Toovercome this, we need to undertake a detailed analysis using rescale methods, such as the spectral bandwidth adjustment factor.

  17. Direct writing by way of melt electrospinning.

    PubMed

    Brown, Toby D; Dalton, Paul D; Hutmacher, Dietmar W

    2011-12-15

    Melt electrospun fibers of poly(ϵ-caprolactone) are accurately deposited using an automated stage as the collector. Matching the translation speed of the collector to the speed of the melt electrospinning jet establishes control over the location of fiber deposition. In this sense, melt electrospinning writing can be seen to bridge the gap between solution electrospinning and direct writing additive manufacturing processes.

  18. Thermodynamics of glass forming polymeric melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandya, Prapti B.; Patel, Ashmi T.; Pratap, Arun

    2013-06-01

    The temperature dependence of the Gibbs free energy difference (ΔG) between the under cooled melt and the corresponding equilibrium solid has been analyzed for two samples of glass forming polymeric melts; polyamid-6 (PA-6), polypropylene oxide (PPO) in the entire temperature range: i.e. Tm (melting temperature) to Tg (glass transition temperature).

  19. Water freezing and ice melting

    DOE PAGES

    Malolepsza, Edyta; Keyes, Tom

    2015-10-12

    The generalized replica exchange method (gREM) is designed to sample states with coexisting phases and thereby to describe strong first order phase transitions. The isobaric MD version of the gREM is presented and applied to freezing of liquid water, and melting of hexagonal and cubic ice. It is confirmed that coexisting states are well sampled. The statistical temperature as a function of enthalpy, TS(H), is obtained. Hysteresis between freezing and melting is observed and discussed. The entropic analysis of phase transitions is applied and equilibrium transition temperatures, latent heats, and surface tensions are obtained for hexagonal ice↔liquid and cubic ice↔liquid,more » with excellent agreement with published values. A new method is given to assign water molecules among various symmetry types. As a result, pathways for water freezing, ultimately leading to hexagonal ice, are found to contain intermediate layered structures built from hexagonal and cubic ice.« less

  20. Water freezing and ice melting

    SciTech Connect

    Malolepsza, Edyta; Keyes, Tom

    2015-10-12

    The generalized replica exchange method (gREM) is designed to sample states with coexisting phases and thereby to describe strong first order phase transitions. The isobaric MD version of the gREM is presented and applied to freezing of liquid water, and melting of hexagonal and cubic ice. It is confirmed that coexisting states are well sampled. The statistical temperature as a function of enthalpy, TS(H), is obtained. Hysteresis between freezing and melting is observed and discussed. The entropic analysis of phase transitions is applied and equilibrium transition temperatures, latent heats, and surface tensions are obtained for hexagonal ice↔liquid and cubic ice↔liquid, with excellent agreement with published values. A new method is given to assign water molecules among various symmetry types. As a result, pathways for water freezing, ultimately leading to hexagonal ice, are found to contain intermediate layered structures built from hexagonal and cubic ice.

  1. Viscoelastic properties of Ionomer Melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goswami, Monojoy; Kumar, Sanat

    2007-03-01

    Viscoelastic prperties of a model telechelic ionomer, i.e., a melt of non-polar polymers with a charge at each chain end along with neutralizing counterions, have been examined using molecular dynamics simulation. Equlibrium calculation of the loss modulus G^''(φ) and storage modulus G^'(φ) shows plateau at lower temperatures when the systems are not relaxed. In this situation the specific heat (Cv) peak corresponds to the self-assembly of the system, at lower temperatures the specific heat begins to plateau. Similarities of the dynamic features found for telechelic melts with those observed in glass-forming liquids and entangled polymers have been shown. Furthremore, using an athermal 'probe', the properties of these materials is being distinctly classified as 'strong' glass or physical gels.

  2. Water Freezing and Ice Melting.

    PubMed

    Małolepsza, Edyta; Keyes, Tom

    2015-12-08

    The generalized replica exchange method (gREM) is designed to sample states with coexisting phases and thereby to describe strong first order phase transitions. The isobaric MD version of the gREM is presented and applied to the freezing of liquid water and the melting of hexagonal and cubic ice. It is confirmed that coexisting states are well-sampled. The statistical temperature as a function of enthalpy, TS(H), is obtained. Hysteresis between freezing and melting is observed and discussed. The entropic analysis of phase transitions is applied and equilibrium transition temperatures, latent heats, and surface tensions are obtained for hexagonal ice ↔ liquid and cubic ice ↔ liquid with excellent agreement with published values. A new method is given to assign water molecules among various symmetry types. Pathways for water freezing, ultimately leading to hexagonal ice, are found to contain intermediate layered structures built from hexagonal and cubic ice.

  3. Low melting high lithia glass compositions and methods

    DOEpatents

    Jantzen, Carol M.; Pickett, John B.; Cicero-Herman, Connie A.; Marra, James C.

    2003-09-23

    The invention relates to methods of vitrifying waste and for lowering the melting point of glass forming systems by including lithia formers in the glass forming composition in significant amounts, typically from about 0.16 wt % to about 11 wt %, based on the total glass forming oxides. The lithia is typically included as a replacement for alkali oxide glass formers that would normally be present in a particular glass forming system. Replacement can occur on a mole percent or weight percent basis, and typically results in a composition wherein lithia forms about 10 wt % to about 100 wt % of the alkali oxide glass formers present in the composition. The present invention also relates to the high lithia glass compositions formed by these methods. The invention is useful for stabilization of numerous types of waste materials, including aqueous waste uranium oxides The decrease in melting point achieved by the present invention desirably prevents volatilization of hazardous or radioactive species during vitrification.

  4. Melting And Purification Of Niobium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moura, Hernane R. Salles; de Moura, Lourenço

    2007-08-01

    The aspects involved in the purification of niobium in Electron Beam Furnaces will be outlined and correlated with practical experience accumulated over 17 years of continuously producing high purity niobium metal and niobium-zirconium ingots at CBMM, meeting the needs for a wide range of uses. This paper also reports some comments regarding raw material requirements, the experience on cold hearth operation melting niobium and the production of large grains niobium ingots by CBMM with some comments of their main characteristics.

  5. Melting And Purification Of Niobium

    SciTech Connect

    Salles Moura, Hernane R.; Moura, Lourenco de

    2007-08-09

    The aspects involved in the purification of niobium in Electron Beam Furnaces will be outlined and correlated with practical experience accumulated over 17 years of continuously producing high purity niobium metal and niobium-zirconium ingots at CBMM, meeting the needs for a wide range of uses. This paper also reports some comments regarding raw material requirements, the experience on cold hearth operation melting niobium and the production of large grains niobium ingots by CBMM with some comments of their main characteristics.

  6. Crystal growing from the melt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, S. H.

    1987-01-01

    The mechanical and electrical properties of crystals produced by a unidirectional process depend strongly on the temperature and flow fields since these control the concentration of solute at the melt-crystal interface. The solute gradient there drives morphological instabilities that lead to cellular or dendritic interfaces. In the presentation several features of flow-solidification interactions will be discussed. These will include the effects of convection driven by density changes and buoyancy and the imposition of forced flow.

  7. Melt Spinning of Crystalline Alloys.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-01-01

    manufactoring iron-based amorphous alloys for magnetic appli- cations (2). Liebermann and Graham (3) and Kavesh (-)’have discussed the effect of melt spinning...and Mn. The main objectige was to determine whether the conclusions of Liebermann and Graham and Kavesh can be applied over a wide range of materials...length, width and thickness, p is density (2.71.103 Kgm-3 ), and W is the measured weight. Liebermann and Graham (3) applied Bernoulli’s equation

  8. The surface quasiliquid melt acceleration and the role of thermodynamic phase in the thermal decomposition of crystalline organic explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Henson, Bryan F

    2010-01-01

    We show that melt acceleration in the thermal decomposition of crystalline organic solids is a manifestation of the surface quasiliquid phase. We derive a single universal rate law for melt acceleration that is a simple function of the metastable liquid activity below the melting point, and has a zero order term proportional to the quasiliquid thickness. We argue that the underlying mechanisms of this model will provide a molecular definition for the stability of the class of secondary explosives.

  9. The influence of melting and melt drainage on crustal rheology during orogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diener, Johann F. A.; Fagereng, Åke

    2014-08-01

    Partial melting significantly weakens crustal rocks by introducing a low-viscosity liquid phase. However, near-concomitant melt drainage can remove this weak phase, potentially reversing the rheological effects such that the strength of a specific lithology depends on when the prograde pressure-temperature path intersects a melting reaction, how much melt is produced, and how long this melt is retained before it is lost. Phase equilibria and mixed rheology modeling of typical metapelite and metagreywacke compositions indicate that these rocks undergo continuous but pulsed melt production during prograde metamorphism. Depending on whether melt removal is continuous or episodic, and assuming geological strain rates, the lithologies can retain a very low strength less than 1 MPa or transiently strengthen to ˜5 MPa following melt loss. Lithologies undergoing episodic melt loss can therefore cycle between being relatively weak and relatively strong components within a composite crustal section. Melt production, retention, and weakening in the middle to lower crust as a whole is more sustained during heating and melt production, consistent with geodynamic inferences of weak, melt-bearing lower crust. However, the long-term consequence of melting and melt loss is a 50-400% increase in the strength of residual lithologies. The strengthening is more pronounced in metapelite than metagreywacke and is achieved through a combination of dehydration and the removal of the weak mica framework coupled to increased proportions of strong feldspars and garnet. Despite prolonged weakness, melting and melt loss therefore ultimately result in a dry and elastic lower crust.

  10. A universal criterion of melting.

    PubMed

    Lubchenko, Vassiliy

    2006-09-28

    Melting is analyzed dynamically as a problem of localization at a liquid-solid interface. A Lindemann-like criterion of melting is derived in terms of particular vibrational amplitudes, which turn out to equal a universal quotient (about one-tenth) of the molecular spacing, at the interface. The near universality of the Lindemann ratio apparently arises owing to strongly overdamped dynamics near melting, and despite the anharmonic interactions being system-specific. A similar criterion is derived for structural displacements in the bulk of the solid, in particular the premelted layer; the criterion is no longer strictly universal, but still depends only on the harmonic properties of the solid. We further compute the dependence of the magnitude of the elemental molecular translations, in deeply supercooled fluids, on the temperature and the high frequency elastic constants. We show explicitly that the surface tension between distinct liquid states, near the glass transition of a supercooled liquid, is nearly evenly split between entropic and energetic contributions.

  11. Compositional convection in viscous melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tait, Stephen; Jaupart, Claude

    1989-04-01

    DURING solidification of multi-component melts, gradients in temperature and composition develop on different scales because of the large difference between their respective molecular diffusivities. Two consequences are the development of double-diffusive convection1 and the creation of mushy zones in which solid and liquid intimately coexist with a complex small-scale geometry2,3. Theoretical analysis requires simplifying assumptions that must be verified by laboratory experiments. Hitherto, experiments have been carried out with aqueous solutions which do not accurately represent the dynamics of melts with high Prandtl numbers, such as magmas. Here we describe the characteristics of compositional convection using a new experimental technique which allows the viscosity of the solution to be varied independently of chemical composition and liquidus temperature. A supereutectic melt was cooled from below, causing the growth of a horizontal layer of crystals. Convective instability occurred when the local solutal Rayleigh number of the compositional boundary layer ahead of the advancing crystallization front attained a value of ~3 on average. We observed a novel regime of convection in which the thermal boundary layer above the crystallization front was essentially unmodified by the motion of the plumes. The plumes carried a small heat flux and did not mix the fluid to a uniform temperature.

  12. Supercontinent Succession and the Calculation of Absolute Paleolongitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, R. N.; Kilian, T.; Evans, D. A.

    2010-12-01

    Where will the next supercontinent form? Traditional ‘introversion’ and ‘extraversion’ models of supercontinent succession predict that Super Asia will respectively form whence Pangea was or on the opposite side of the world. We develop the ‘orthoversion’ model whereby a succeeding supercontinent forms 90° away: somewhere along the great circle of subduction encircling its relict predecessor—a mantle topology that arises when supercontinents develop return flow beneath their mature centroids. This centroid defines the minimum moment of inertia (I_min) about which rapid and oscillatory true polar wander occurs owing to the prolate shape of nonhydrostatic Earth. Fitting great circles to each supercontinent’s true polar wander legacy, we determine that the distances between successive supercontinent centers (I_min axes) are 88° and 87° for Nuna→Rodinia and Rodinia→Pangea, respectively—both as predicted by the orthoversion model. Not only can supercontinent centers be pinned back into Precambrian time, they provide fixed points for the calculation of absolute paleolongitude.

  13. ATLAS ALFA—measuring absolute luminosity with scintillating fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franz, S.; Barrillon, P.

    2009-10-01

    ALFA is a high-precision scintillating fibre tracking detector under construction for the absolute determination of the LHC luminosity at the ATLAS interaction point. This detector, mounted in so-called Roman Pots, will track protons elastically scattered under μrad angles at IP1.In total there are four pairs of vertically arranged detector modules which approach the LHC beam axis to mm distance. Each detector module consists of ten layers of two times 64 scintillating fibres each (U and V planes). The fibres are coupled to 64 channels Multi-Anodes PhotoMultipliers Tubes read out by compact front-end electronics. Each detector module is complemented by so-called overlap detectors: Three layers of two times 30 scintillating fibres which will be used to measure the relative positioning of two vertically arranged main detectors. The total number of channels is about 15000. Conventional plastic scintillator tiles are mounted in front of the fibre detectors and will serve as trigger counter. The extremely restricted space inside the pots makes the coupling to the read out devices very challenging. Several technologies have been tested in a beam at DESY and a cosmic-ray setup at CERN. A possible upgrade of the photo detection could consist in the replacement of the PMT by Geiger-mode avalanche photodiodes. Preliminary tests are being performed comparing the performance of these devices with the ones of the PMTs.

  14. Calibration method of absolute orientation of camera optical axis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yong; Guo, Pengyu; Zhang, Xiaohu; Ding, Shaowen; Su, Ang; Li, Lichun

    2013-08-01

    Camera calibration is one of the most basic and important processes in optical measuring field. Generally, the objective of camera calibration is to estimate the internal and external parameters of object cameras, while the orientation error of optical axis is not included yet. Orientation error of optical axis is a important factor, which seriously affects measuring precision in high-precision measurement field, especially for those distant aerospace measurement in which object distance is much longer than focal length, that lead to magnifying the orientation errors to thousands times. In order to eliminate the influence of orientation error of camera optical axis, the imaging model of camera is analysed and established in this paper, and the calibration method is also introduced: Firstly, we analyse the reasons that cause optical axis error and its influence. Then, we find the model of optical axis orientation error and imaging model of camera basing on it's practical physical meaning. Furthermore, we derive the bundle adjustment algorithm which could compute the internal and external camera parameters and absolute orientation of camera optical axis simultaneously at high precision. In numeric simulation, we solve the camera parameters by using bundle adjustment optimization algorithm, then we correct the image points by calibration results according to the model of optical axis error, and the simulation result shows that our calibration model is reliable, effective and precise.

  15. Droplet digital PCR for absolute quantification of pathogens.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Aguirre, Ion; Rački, Nejc; Dreo, Tanja; Ravnikar, Maja

    2015-01-01

    The recent advent of different digital PCR (dPCR) platforms is enabling the expansion of this technology for research and diagnostic applications worldwide. The main principle of dPCR, as in other PCR-based methods including quantitative PCR (qPCR), is the specific amplification of a nucleic acid target. The distinctive feature of dPCR is the separation of the reaction mixture into thousands to millions of partitions which is followed by a real time or end point detection of the amplification. The distribution of target sequences into partitions is described by the Poisson distribution, thus allowing accurate and absolute quantification of the target from the ratio of positive against all partitions at the end of the reaction. This omits the need to use reference materials with known target concentrations and increases the accuracy of quantification at low target concentrations compared to qPCR. dPCR has also shown higher resilience to inhibitors in a number of different types of samples. In this chapter we describe the droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) workflow for the detection and quantification of pathogens using the droplet digital Bio-Rad platform QX100. We present as an example the quantification of the quarantine plant pathogenic bacterium, Erwinia amylovora.

  16. Melting and freezing of water in cylindrical silica nanopores.

    PubMed

    Jähnert, S; Vaca Chávez, F; Schaumann, G E; Schreiber, A; Schönhoff, M; Findenegg, G H

    2008-10-21

    Freezing and melting of H(2)O and D(2)O in the cylindrical pores of well-characterized MCM-41 silica materials (pore diameters from 2.5 to 4.4 nm) was studied by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and (1)H NMR cryoporometry. Well-resolved DSC melting and freezing peaks were obtained for pore diameters down to 3.0 nm, but not in 2.5 nm pores. The pore size dependence of the melting point depression DeltaT(m) can be represented by the Gibbs-Thomson equation when the existence of a layer of nonfreezing water at the pore walls is taken into account. The DSC measurements also show that the hysteresis connected with the phase transition, and the melting enthalpy of water in the pores, both vanish near a pore diameter D* approximately equal to 2.8 nm. It is concluded that D* represents a lower limit for first-order melting/freezing in the pores. The NMR spin echo measurements show that a transition from low to high mobility of water molecules takes place in all MCM-41 materials, including the one with 2.5 nm pores, but the transition revealed by NMR occurs at a higher temperature than indicated by the DSC melting peaks. The disagreement between the NMR and DSC transition temperatures becomes more pronounced as the pore size decreases. This is attributed to the fact that with decreasing pore size an increasing fraction of the water molecules is situated in the first and second molecular layers next to the pore wall, and these molecules have slower dynamics than the molecules in the core of the pore.

  17. Modeling of formation of intraplate partial melting zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perepechko, Y. V.; Sorokin, K. E.

    2010-12-01

    This study suggests the mathematical model of dynamics of partial melting in lithosphere causing formation of magmatic systems. The intraplate magmatic systems can be formed at achievement of required thermodynamic conditions, which can be developed due to the following mechanisms: contact heating; decompression melting at mantle matter penetration into lithosphere; and heating by filtering mantle melts and fluids in the weakened lithosphere zones above the asthenospheric structure related to a hotspot. The most efficient mechanism from the point of time and heating degree is the latter one. It is heating of lithosphere matter by mantle melts and fluids, which is especially important for development of melting sites in these systems. At formation of intraplate magmatic systems the fluid is filtered in a porous medium, porous matrix melts partially, and finally a granulated medium is formed there. To decrease the processes of heat and mass transfer in this system, the equations of dynamics of multiphase multivelocity media are derived in this study. In contrast to the Darcy-type models used in previous studies, the suggested two-velocity hydrodynamics theory describing fluid motions in a porous medium with complex reology is the thermodynamically consistent one and allows the description of nonstationary nonlinear processes. The governing equations of the model describe both the process of filtration through the deformed porous matrix and hydrodynamics of heterophase granulated medium without pressure equilibrium in phases. The work was supported by the grants 08-05-00467, 09-05-00602, 09-05-01084 from the Russian Foundation for Basic Research.

  18. String-like cooperative motion in homogeneous melting.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hao; Khalkhali, Mohammad; Liu, Qingxia; Douglas, Jack F

    2013-03-28

    Despite the fundamental nature and practical importance of melting, there is still no generally accepted theory of this ubiquitous phenomenon. Even the earliest simulations of melting of hard discs by Alder and Wainwright indicated the active role of collective atomic motion in melting and here we utilize molecular dynamics simulation to determine whether these correlated motions are similar to those found in recent studies of glass-forming (GF) liquids and other condensed, strongly interacting, particle systems. We indeed find string-like collective atomic motion in our simulations of "superheated" Ni crystals, but other observations indicate significant differences from GF liquids. For example, we observe neither stretched exponential structural relaxation, nor any decoupling phenomenon, while we do find a boson peak, findings that have strong implications for understanding the physical origin of these universal properties of GF liquids. Our simulations also provide a novel view of "homogeneous" melting in which a small concentration of interstitial defects exerts a powerful effect on the crystal stability through their initiation and propagation of collective atomic motion. These relatively rare point defects are found to propagate down the strings like solitons, driving the collective motion. Crystal integrity remains preserved when the permutational atomic motions take the form of ring-like atomic exchanges, but a topological transition occurs at higher temperatures where the rings open to form linear chains similar in geometrical form and length distribution to the strings of GF liquids. The local symmetry breaking effect of the open strings apparently destabilizes the local lattice structure and precipitates crystal melting. The crystal defects are thus not static entities under dynamic conditions, such as elevated temperatures or material loading, but rather are active agents exhibiting a rich nonlinear dynamics that is not addressed in conventional "static

  19. Determination of Absolute Zero Using a Computer-Based Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amrani, D.

    2007-01-01

    We present a simple computer-based laboratory experiment for evaluating absolute zero in degrees Celsius, which can be performed in college and undergraduate physical sciences laboratory courses. With a computer, absolute zero apparatus can help demonstrators or students to observe the relationship between temperature and pressure and use…

  20. A Global Forecast of Absolute Poverty and Employment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopkins, M. J. D.

    1980-01-01

    Estimates are made of absolute poverty and employment under the hypothesis that existing trends continue. Concludes that while the number of people in absolute poverty is not likely to decline by 2000, the proportion will fall. Jobs will have to grow 3.9% per year in developing countries to achieve full employment. (JOW)

  1. Absolute Humidity and the Seasonality of Influenza (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaman, J. L.; Pitzer, V.; Viboud, C.; Grenfell, B.; Goldstein, E.; Lipsitch, M.

    2010-12-01

    Much of the observed wintertime increase of mortality in temperate regions is attributed to seasonal influenza. A recent re-analysis of laboratory experiments indicates that absolute humidity strongly modulates the airborne survival and transmission of the influenza virus. Here we show that the onset of increased wintertime influenza-related mortality in the United States is associated with anomalously low absolute humidity levels during the prior weeks. We then use an epidemiological model, in which observed absolute humidity conditions temper influenza transmission rates, to successfully simulate the seasonal cycle of observed influenza-related mortality. The model results indicate that direct modulation of influenza transmissibility by absolute humidity alone is sufficient to produce this observed seasonality. These findings provide epidemiological support for the hypothesis that absolute humidity drives seasonal variations of influenza transmission in temperate regions. In addition, we show that variations of the basic and effective reproductive numbers for influenza, caused by seasonal changes in absolute humidity, are consistent with the general timing of pandemic influenza outbreaks observed for 2009 A/H1N1 in temperate regions. Indeed, absolute humidity conditions correctly identify the region of the United States vulnerable to a third, wintertime wave of pandemic influenza. These findings suggest that the timing of pandemic influenza outbreaks is controlled by a combination of absolute humidity conditions, levels of susceptibility and changes in population mixing and contact rates.

  2. Novalis' Poetic Uncertainty: A "Bildung" with the Absolute

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mika, Carl

    2016-01-01

    Novalis, the Early German Romantic poet and philosopher, had at the core of his work a mysterious depiction of the "absolute." The absolute is Novalis' name for a substance that defies precise knowledge yet calls for a tentative and sensitive speculation. How one asserts a truth, represents an object, and sets about encountering things…

  3. Simulation and measurement of melting effects on metal sheets caused by direct lightning strikes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kern, Alexander

    1991-01-01

    Direct lightning strikes melt metal parts of various systems, like fuel and propellant tanks of rockets and airplanes, at the point of strike. Responsible for this melting are the impulse current and, if occurring, the long duration current, both carrying a remarkable charge Q. For studying these meltings the simulation in the laboratory has to be based on the parameters of natural lightnings. International standards exist defining certain threat levels of natural lightnings and giving possible generator circuits for the simulation. The melting caused by both types of lightning currents show different appearance. Their characteristics, their differences in melting and heating of metal sheets are investigated. Nevertheless the simulation of lightning in the laboratory is imperfect. While natural lightning is a discharge without a counter electrode, the simulation always demands a close counter electrode. The influence of this counter electrode is studied.

  4. Martian mantle primary melts - An experimental study of iron-rich garnet lherzolite minimum melt composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bertka, Constance M.; Holloway, John R.

    1988-01-01

    The minimum melt composition in equilibrium with an iron-rich garnet lherzolite assemblage is ascertained from a study of the liquidus relations of iron-rich basaltic compositions at 23 kb. The experimentally determined primary melt composition and its calculated sodium content reveal that Martian garnet lherzolite minimum melts are picritic alkali olivine basalts. Martian primary melts are found to be more picritic than terrestrial garnet lherzolite primary melts.

  5. Probing the atomic structure of basaltic melts generated by partial melting of upper mantle peridotite (KLB-1): Insights from high-resolution solid-state NMR study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, S. Y.; Lee, S. K.

    2015-12-01

    Probing the structural disorder in multi-component silicate glasses and melts with varying composition is essential to reveal the change of macroscopic properties in natural silicate melts. While a number of NMR studies for the structure of multi-component silicate glasses and melts including basaltic and andesitic glasses have been reported (e.g., Park and Lee, Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta, 2012, 80, 125; Park and Lee, Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta, 2014, 26, 42), many challenges still remain. The composition of multi-component basaltic melts vary with temperature, pressure, and melt fraction (Kushiro, Annu. Rev. Earth Planet. Sci., 2001, 71, 107). Especially, the eutectic point (the composition of first melt) of nepheline-forsterite-quartz (the simplest model of basaltic melts) moves with pressure from silica-saturated to highly undersaturated and alkaline melts. The composition of basaltic melts generated by partial melting of upper mantle peridotite (KLB-1, the xenolith from Kilbourne Hole) also vary with pressure. In this study we report experimental results for the effects of composition on the atomic structure of Na2O-MgO-Al2O3-SiO2 (NMAS) glasses in nepheline (NaAlSiO4)-forsterite (Mg2SiO4)-quartz (SiO2) eutectic composition and basaltic glasses generated by partial melting of upper mantle peridotite (KLB-1) using high-resolution multi-nuclear solid-state NMR. The Al-27 3QMAS (triple quantum magic angle spinning) NMR spectra of NMAS glasses in nepheline-forsterite-quartz eutectic composition show only [4]Al. The Al-27 3QMAS NMR spectra of KLB-1 basaltic glasses show mostly [4]Al and a non-negligible fraction of [5]Al. The fraction of [5]Al, the degree of configurational disorder, increases from 0 at XMgO [MgO/(MgO+Al2O3)]=0.55 to ~3% at XMgO=0.79 in KLB-1 basaltic glasses while only [4]Al are observed in nepheline-forsterite-quartz eutectic composition. The current experimental results provide that the fraction of [5]Al abruptly increases by the effect of

  6. Connection between dynamics and thermodynamics of liquids on the melting line.

    PubMed

    Fragiadakis, D; Roland, C M

    2011-03-01

    The dynamics of a large number of liquids and polymers exhibit scaling properties characteristic of a simple repulsive inverse power-law potential, most notably the superpositioning of relaxation data as a function of the variable TV^{γ}, where T is temperature, V the specific volume, and γ a material constant. A related scaling law T{m}V{m}{Γ}, with the same exponent Γ = γ, links the melting temperature T{m} and volume V{m} of the model IPL liquid; liquid dynamics is then invariant at the melting point. Motivated by a similar invariance of dynamics experimentally observed at transitions of liquid crystals, we determine dynamic and melting-point scaling exponents γ and Γ for a large number of nonassociating liquids. Rigid, spherical molecules containing no polar bonds have Γ = γ; consequently, the reduced relaxation time, viscosity, and diffusion coefficient are each constant along the melting line. For other liquids γ > Γ always; that is, the dynamics is more sensitive to volume than is the melting point, and for these liquids the dynamics at the melting point slows down with increasing T{m} (that is, increasing pressure).

  7. Absolute surface metrology with a phase-shifting interferometer for incommensurate transverse spatial shifts.

    PubMed

    Bloemhof, E E

    2014-02-10

    We consider the detailed implementation and practical utility of a novel absolute optical metrology scheme recently proposed for use with a phase-shifting interferometer (PSI). This scheme extracts absolute phase differences between points on the surface of the optic under test by differencing phase maps made with slightly different transverse spatial shifts of that optic. These absolute phase (or height) differences, which for single-pixel shifts are automatically obtained in the well-known Hudgin geometry, yield the underlying absolute surface map by standard wavefront reconstruction techniques. The PSI by itself maps surface height only relative to that of a separate reference optic known or assumed to be flat. In practice, even relatively high-quality (and expensive) transmission flats or spheres used to reference a PSI are flat or spherical only to a few dozen nanometers peak to valley (P-V) over typical 4 in. apertures. The new technique for removing the effects of the reference surface is in principle accurate as well as simple, and may represent a significant advance in optical metrology. Here it is shown that transverse shifts need not match the pixel size; somewhat counterintuitively, the single-pixel spatial resolution of the PSI is retained even when transverse shifts are much coarser. Practical considerations for shifts not necessarily commensurate with pixel size, and broader applications, are discussed.

  8. Fully distributed absolute blood flow velocity measurement for middle cerebral arteries using Doppler optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Li; Zhu, Jiang; Hancock, Aneeka M.; Dai, Cuixia; Zhang, Xuping; Frostig, Ron D.; Chen, Zhongping

    2016-01-01

    Doppler optical coherence tomography (DOCT) is considered one of the most promising functional imaging modalities for neuro biology research and has demonstrated the ability to quantify cerebral blood flow velocity at a high accuracy. However, the measurement of total absolute blood flow velocity (BFV) of major cerebral arteries is still a difficult problem since it is related to vessel geometry. In this paper, we present a volumetric vessel reconstruction approach that is capable of measuring the absolute BFV distributed along the entire middle cerebral artery (MCA) within a large field-of-view. The Doppler angle at each point of the MCA, representing the vessel geometry, is derived analytically by localizing the artery from pure DOCT images through vessel segmentation and skeletonization. Our approach could achieve automatic quantification of the fully distributed absolute BFV across different vessel branches. Experiments on rodents using swept-source optical coherence tomography showed that our approach was able to reveal the consequences of permanent MCA occlusion with absolute BFV measurement. PMID:26977365

  9. On the Absolute Instability of the Attachment-Line and Swept-Hiemenz Boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Türkylmazoglu, M.; Gajjar, J. S. B.

    Recently it has been shown that flow over a rotating-disk is absolutely unstable. In this paper we investigate the absolute instability of the related swept-Hiemenz and attachment-line boundary-layer flows. The linearized stability equations are obtained and the eigenvalues of the dispersion relation are found by solving the full stability equations in Fourier-transform space using a spectral method. Unlike previous work on this problem, no quasi-parallel approximation has been made and all the terms appearing in the stability equations have been retained. We were unable to locate branch points satisfying the Briggs-Bers criterion for the attachment-line boundary layer suggesting that this flow is only convectively unstable. However, for the swept-Hiemenz boundary layer our results show that this flow becomes absolutely unstable (in the chordwise direction), starting from the leading-edge extending up to a chordwise position of approximately 310 for some particular spanwise Reynolds numbers. It is found that the retention of all the terms in the full system of equations leads to results which are more unstable, in terms of absolute instability, than the Orr-Sommerfeld system studied by others. The techniques used here apply equally to other non-parallel two- and three-dimensional boundary-layer flows.

  10. Melting by temperature-modulated calorimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Wunderlich, B.; Okazaki, Iwao; Ishikiriyama, Kazuhiko; Boller, A. |

    1997-09-01

    Well-crystallized macromolecules melt irreversibly due to the need of molecular nucleation, while small molecules melt reversibly as long as crystal nuclei are present to assist crystallization. Furthermore, imperfect crystals of low-molar-mass polymers may have a sufficiently small region of metastability between crystallization and melting to show a reversing heat-flow component due to melting of poor crystals followed by crystallization of imperfect crystals which have insufficient time to perfect before the modulation switches to heating and melts the imperfect crystals. Many metals, in turn. melt sharply and reversibly as long as nuclei remain after melting for subsequent crystallization during the cooling cycle. Their analysis is complicated, however, due to thermal conductivity limitations of the calorimeters. Polymers of sufficiently high molar mass, finally, show a small amount of reversible. local melting that may be linked to partial melting of individual molecules. Experiments by temperature-modulated calorimetry and model calculations are presented. The samples measured included poly(ethylene terephthalate)s, poly(ethylene oxide)s, and indium. Two unsolved problems that arose from this research involve the origin of a high, seemingly stable, reversible heat capacity of polymers in the melting region, and a smoothing of melting and crystallization into a close-to-elliptical Lissajous figure in a heat-flow versus sample-temperature plot.

  11. Absolute radiometric calibration of advanced remote sensing systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, P. N.

    1982-01-01

    The distinction between the uses of relative and absolute spectroradiometric calibration of remote sensing systems is discussed. The advantages of detector-based absolute calibration are described, and the categories of relative and absolute system calibrations are listed. The limitations and problems associated with three common methods used for the absolute calibration of remote sensing systems are addressed. Two methods are proposed for the in-flight absolute calibration of advanced multispectral linear array systems. One makes use of a sun-illuminated panel in front of the sensor, the radiance of which is monitored by a spectrally flat pyroelectric radiometer. The other uses a large, uniform, high-radiance reference ground surface. The ground and atmospheric measurements required as input to a radiative transfer program to predict the radiance level at the entrance pupil of the orbital sensor are discussed, and the ground instrumentation is described.

  12. A developmental study of latent absolute pitch memory.

    PubMed

    Jakubowski, Kelly; Müllensiefen, Daniel; Stewart, Lauren

    2017-03-01

    The ability to recall the absolute pitch level of familiar music (latent absolute pitch memory) is widespread in adults, in contrast to the rare ability to label single pitches without a reference tone (overt absolute pitch memory). The present research investigated the developmental profile of latent absolute pitch (AP) memory and explored individual differences related to this ability. In two experiments, 288 children from 4 to12 years of age performed significantly above chance at recognizing the absolute pitch level of familiar melodies. No age-related improvement or decline, nor effects of musical training, gender, or familiarity with the stimuli were found in regard to latent AP task performance. These findings suggest that latent AP memory is a stable ability that is developed from as early as age 4 and persists into adulthood.

  13. Melting line of the Lennard-Jones system, infinite size, and full potential.

    PubMed

    Mastny, Ethan A; de Pablo, Juan J

    2007-09-14

    Literature estimates of the melting curve of the Lennard-Jones system vary by as much as 10%. The origin of such discrepancies remains unclear. We present precise values for the Lennard-Jones melting temperature, and we examine possible sources of systematic errors in the prediction of melting points, including finite-size and interaction-cutoff effects. A hypothetical thermodynamic integration path is used to find the relative free energies of the solid and liquid phases, for various system sizes, at constant cutoff radius. The solid-liquid relative free energy and melting temperature scale linearly as the inverse of the number of particles, and it is shown that finite-size effects can account for deviations in the melting temperature (from the infinite-size limit) of up to 5%. An extended-ensemble density-of-states method is used to determine free energy changes for each phase as a continuous function of the cutoff radius. The resulting melting temperature predictions exhibit an oscillatory behavior as the cutoff radius is increased. Deviations in the melting temperature (from the full potential limit) arising from a finite cutoff radius are shown to be of comparable magnitude as those resulting from finite-size effects. This method is used to identify melting temperatures at five different pressures, for the infinite-size and full potential Lennard-Jones system. We use our simulation results as references to connect the Lennard-Jones solid equation of state of van der Hoef with the Lennard-Jones fluid equation of state of Johnson. Once the references are applied the two equations of state are used to identify a melting curve. An empirical equation that fits this melting curve is provided. We also report a reduced triple point temperature T(tr)=0.694.

  14. ELM-induced transient tungsten melting in the JET divertor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coenen, J. W.; Arnoux, G.; Bazylev, B.; Matthews, G. F.; Autricque, A.; Balboa, I.; Clever, M.; Dejarnac, R.; Coffey, I.; Corre, Y.; Devaux, S.; Frassinetti, L.; Gauthier, E.; Horacek, J.; Jachmich, S.; Komm, M.; Knaup, M.; Krieger, K.; Marsen, S.; Meigs, A.; Mertens, Ph.; Pitts, R. A.; Puetterich, T.; Rack, M.; Stamp, M.; Sergienko, G.; Tamain, P.; Thompson, V.; Contributors, JET-EFDA

    2015-02-01

    The original goals of the JET ITER-like wall included the study of the impact of an all W divertor on plasma operation (Coenen et al 2013 Nucl. Fusion 53 073043) and fuel retention (Brezinsek et al 2013 Nucl. Fusion 53 083023). ITER has recently decided to install a full-tungsten (W) divertor from the start of operations. One of the key inputs required in support of this decision was the study of the possibility of W melting and melt splashing during transients. Damage of this type can lead to modifications of surface topology which could lead to higher disruption frequency or compromise subsequent plasma operation. Although every effort will be made to avoid leading edges, ITER plasma stored energies are sufficient that transients can drive shallow melting on the top surfaces of components. JET is able to produce ELMs large enough to allow access to transient melting in a regime of relevance to ITER. Transient W melt experiments were performed in JET using a dedicated divertor module and a sequence of IP = 3.0 MA/BT = 2.9 T H-mode pulses with an input power of PIN = 23 MW, a stored energy of ˜6 MJ and regular type I ELMs at ΔWELM = 0.3 MJ and fELM ˜ 30 Hz. By moving the outer strike point onto a dedicated leading edge in the W divertor the base temperature was raised within ˜1 s to a level allowing transient, ELM-driven melting during the subsequent 0.5 s. Such ELMs (δW ˜ 300 kJ per ELM) are comparable to mitigated ELMs expected in ITER (Pitts et al 2011 J. Nucl. Mater. 415 (Suppl.) S957-64). Although significant material losses in terms of ejections into the plasma were not observed, there is indirect evidence that some small droplets (˜80 µm) were released. Almost 1 mm (˜6 mm3) of W was moved by ˜150 ELMs within 7 subsequent discharges. The impact on the main plasma parameters was minor and no disruptions occurred. The W-melt gradually moved along the leading edge towards the high-field side, driven by j × B forces. The evaporation rate determined

  15. Counterintuitive DNA Sequence Dependence in Supercoiling-Induced DNA Melting

    PubMed Central

    Vlijm, Rifka; v.d. Torre, Jaco; Dekker, Cees

    2015-01-01

    The metabolism of DNA in cells relies on the balance between hybridized double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) and local de-hybridized regions of ssDNA that provide access to binding proteins. Traditional melting experiments, in which short pieces of dsDNA are heated up until the point of melting into ssDNA, have determined that AT-rich sequences have a lower binding energy than GC-rich sequences. In cells, however, the double-stranded backbone of DNA is destabilized by negative supercoiling, and not by temperature. To investigate what the effect of GC content is on DNA melting induced by negative supercoiling, we studied DNA molecules with a GC content ranging from 38% to 77%, using single-molecule magnetic tweezer measurements in which the length of a single DNA molecule is measured as a function of applied stretching force and supercoiling density. At low force (<0.5pN), supercoiling results into twisting of the dsDNA backbone and loop formation (plectonemes), without inducing any DNA melting. This process was not influenced by the DNA sequence. When negative supercoiling is introduced at increasing force, local melting of DNA is introduced. We measured for the different DNA molecules a characteristic force Fchar, at which negative supercoiling induces local melting of the dsDNA. Surprisingly, GC-rich sequences melt at lower forces than AT-rich sequences: Fchar = 0.56pN for 77% GC but 0.73pN for 38% GC. An explanation for this counterintuitive effect is provided by the realization that supercoiling densities of a few percent only induce melting of a few percent of the base pairs. As a consequence, denaturation bubbles occur in local AT-rich regions and the sequence-dependent effect arises from an increased DNA bending/torsional energy associated with the plectonemes. This new insight indicates that an increased GC-content adjacent to AT-rich DNA regions will enhance local opening of the double-stranded DNA helix. PMID:26513573

  16. A mathematical model describing the solid conveying and melting behavior of planetary roller extruders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudloff, J.; Lang, M.; Kretschmer, K.; Heidemeyer, P.; Bastian, M.; Koch, M.

    2014-05-01

    Due to increased quality requirements and the trend to cost reduction by process optimization, the modeling of plastic processing by means of simulation software becomes more and more important to predict process behavior. Most tools are based on a physical analysis of the process conditions and a reflection of those in a mathematical model, either based on FE methods or an approach to approximation or complete analytical models. First models were published for planetary roller extruders. However, these models deal primarily with the melt conveying behavior and have not yet been developed for the melting process which in many cases is critical to address homogenization features of such machines in the melt phase. This paper presents an approach to calculate the melting degree along the barrel of a planetary roller extruder. Therefore, models that are used to describe the melting process of single and twin screw extruders are adjusted to the conditions in the planetary roller extruder. At first the relevant process was divided in the three steps solid conveying, melting initiation and melting propagation. The solid conveying is described by the Archimedes solid conveying model. In order to estimate the melting initiation the solid particles temperature increase was used for partial filled sections. Further, it was assumed that the melting cannot start later than at the point where the extruder flow channels are fully filled for the first time. The melting propagation was described by a modified disperse melting model. The developed models were implemented into a simulation tool. The models were verified by experimental investigations. A comparison between simulated results and experimental data shows a good agreement.

  17. Melting of linear alkanes between swollen elastomers and solid substrates.

    PubMed

    Nanjundiah, Kumar; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2013-10-01

    We have measured the melting and freezing behavior of linear alkanes confined between cross-linked poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) elastomers and solid sapphire substrates. Small molecules are often used as lubricants to reduce friction or as plasticizers, but very little is directly known about the migration or changes in physical properties of these small molecules at interfaces, particularly the changes in transition temperatures upon confinement. Our previous studies highlighted striking differences between the crystal structure of confined and unconfined pentadecane crystals in contact with sapphire substrates. Here, we have used surface-sensitive infrared-visible sum-frequency-generation spectroscopy (SFG) to study the melting temperatures (Tm) of alkanes in nanometer thick interfacial regions between swollen PDMS elastomers in contact with sapphire substrate. We find that confined alkanes show depression in Tm compared to the melting temperature of unconfined bulk alkanes. The depression in Tm is a function of chain length, and these differences were smallest for shorter alkanes and largest for 19 unit long alkanes. In comparison, the DSC results for swollen PDMS elastomer show a broad distribution of melting points corresponding to different sizes of crystals formed within the network. The Tm for confined alkanes has been modeled using the combination of Flory-Rehner and Gibbs-Thomson models, and the depression in Tm is related to the thickness of the confined alkanes. These findings have important implications in understanding friction and adhesion of soft elastomeric materials and also the effects of confinement between two solid materials.

  18. Optimization of Melting Conditions of POLY(3-HYDROXYBUTYRATE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Lorenzo, Maria Laura; Sajkiewicz, Pawel; Gradys, Arkadiusz; La Pietra, Paola

    2008-08-01

    Studies of kinetics of polymer crystallization are generally performed by heating the material above the melting point, in order to erase previous thermal and mechanical history, followed by rapid cooling to the desired crystallization temperature or by cooling at a constant rate. For poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) this procedure implies some degradation of the polymer chain, which starts below the onset of melting. In this contribution the effects of melting conditions on the subsequent crystallization kinetics are discussed. It is shown that in order to sufficiently cancel memories of previous crystalline order of the analyzed PHB, it is necessary to bring the material at a temperature higher than 192 °C. Thermal treatments conducted at lower temperatures are not sufficient to destroy all solid aggregates, and crystallization of PHB has an anticipated onset of crystallization due to nucleation occurring via self-seeding. The chain degradation attained upon exposure at high temperatures has a much minor influence on crystallization kinetics than incomplete melting.

  19. Rotation of melting ice disks due to melt fluid flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorbolo, S.; Adami, N.; Dubois, C.; Caps, H.; Vandewalle, N.; Darbois-Texier, B.

    2016-03-01

    We report experiments concerning the melting of ice disks (85 mm in diameter and 14 mm in height) at the surface of a thermalized water bath. During the melting, the ice disks undergo translational and rotational motions. In particular, the disks rotate. The rotation speed has been found to increase with the bath temperature. We investigated the flow under the bottom face of the ice disks by a particle image velocimetry technique. We find that the flow goes downwards and also rotates horizontally, so that a vertical vortex is generated under the ice disk. The proposed mechanism is the following. In the vicinity of the bottom face of the disk, the water eventually reaches the temperature of 4°C for which the water density is maximum. The 4°C water sinks and generates a downwards plume. The observed vertical vorticity results from the flow in the plume. Finally, by viscous entrainment, the horizontal rotation of the flow induces the solid rotation of the ice block. This mechanism seems generic: any vertical flow that generates a vortex will induce the rotation of a floating object.

  20. Rotation of melting ice disks due to melt fluid flow.

    PubMed

    Dorbolo, S; Adami, N; Dubois, C; Caps, H; Vandewalle, N; Darbois-Texier, B

    2016-03-01

    We report experiments concerning the melting of ice disks (85 mm in diameter and 14 mm in height) at the surface of a thermalized water bath. During the melting, the ice disks undergo translational and rotational motions. In particular, the disks rotate. The rotation speed has been found to increase with the bath temperature. We investigated the flow under the bottom face of the ice disks by a particle image velocimetry technique. We find that the flow goes downwards and also rotates horizontally, so that a vertical vortex is generated under the ice disk. The proposed mechanism is the following. In the vicinity of the bottom face of the disk, the water eventually reaches the temperature of 4 °C for which the water density is maximum. The 4 °C water sinks and generates a downwards plume. The observed vertical vorticity results from the flow in the plume. Finally, by viscous entrainment, the horizontal rotation of the flow induces the solid rotation of the ice block. This mechanism seems generic: any vertical flow that generates a vortex will induce the rotation of a floating object.

  1. The triple point of sulfur hexafluoride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rourke, P. M. C.

    2016-04-01

    A cryogenic fixed point cell has been filled with high purity (99.999%) sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) and measured in an adiabatic closed-cycle cryostat system. Temperature measurements of the SF6 melting curve were performed using a capsule-type standard platinum resistance thermometer (CSPRT) calibrated over the International Temperature Scale of 1990 (ITS-90) subrange from the triple point of equilibrium hydrogen to the triple point of water. The measured temperatures were corrected by 0.37 mK for the effects of thermometer self-heating, and the liquidus-point temperature estimated by extrapolation to melted fraction F  =  1 of a simple linear regression versus melted fraction F in the range F  =  0.53 to 0.84. Based on this measurement, the temperature of the triple point of sulfur hexafluoride is shown to be 223.555 23(49) K (k  =  1) on the ITS-90. This value is in excellent agreement with the best prior measurements reported in the literature, but with considerably smaller uncertainty. An analysis of the detailed uncertainty budget of this measurement suggests that if the triple point of sulfur hexafluoride were to be included as a defining fixed point of the next revision of the International Temperature Scale, it could do so with a total realization uncertainty of approximately 0.43 mK, slightly larger than the realization uncertainties of the defining fixed points of the ITS-90. Since the combined standard uncertainty of this SF6 triple point temperature determination is dominated by chemical impurity effects, further research exploring gas purification techniques and the influence of specific impurity species on the SF6 triple point temperature may bring the realization uncertainty of SF6 as a fixed point material into the range of the defining fixed points of the ITS-90.

  2. Liquid structure and temperature invariance of sound velocity in supercooled Bi melt.

    PubMed

    Emuna, M; Mayo, M; Greenberg, Y; Caspi, E N; Beuneu, B; Yahel, E; Makov, G

    2014-03-07

    Structural rearrangement of liquid Bi in the vicinity of the melting point has been proposed due to the unique temperature invariant sound velocity observed above the melting temperature, the low symmetry of Bi in the solid phase and the necessity of overheating to achieve supercooling. The existence of this structural rearrangement is examined by measurements on supercooled Bi. The sound velocity of liquid Bi was measured into the supercooled region to high accuracy and it was found to be invariant over a temperature range of ∼60°, from 35° above the melting point to ∼25° into the supercooled region. The structural origin of this phenomenon was explored by neutron diffraction structural measurements in the supercooled temperature range. These measurements indicate a continuous modification of the short range order in the melt. The structure of the liquid is analyzed within a quasi-crystalline model and is found to evolve continuously, similar to other known liquid pnictide systems. The results are discussed in the context of two competing hypotheses proposed to explain properties of liquid Bi near the melting: (i) liquid bismuth undergoes a structural rearrangement slightly above melting and (ii) liquid Bi exhibits a broad maximum in the sound velocity located incidentally at the melting temperature.

  3. Liquid structure and temperature invariance of sound velocity in supercooled Bi melt

    SciTech Connect

    Emuna, M.; Mayo, M.; Makov, G.; Greenberg, Y.; Caspi, E. N.; Yahel, E.; Beuneu, B.

    2014-03-07

    Structural rearrangement of liquid Bi in the vicinity of the melting point has been proposed due to the unique temperature invariant sound velocity observed above the melting temperature, the low symmetry of Bi in the solid phase and the necessity of overheating to achieve supercooling. The existence of this structural rearrangement is examined by measurements on supercooled Bi. The sound velocity of liquid Bi was measured into the supercooled region to high accuracy and it was found to be invariant over a temperature range of ∼60°, from 35° above the melting point to ∼25° into the supercooled region. The structural origin of this phenomenon was explored by neutron diffraction structural measurements in the supercooled temperature range. These measurements indicate a continuous modification of the short range order in the melt. The structure of the liquid is analyzed within a quasi-crystalline model and is found to evolve continuously, similar to other known liquid pnictide systems. The results are discussed in the context of two competing hypotheses proposed to explain properties of liquid Bi near the melting: (i) liquid bismuth undergoes a structural rearrangement slightly above melting and (ii) liquid Bi exhibits a broad maximum in the sound velocity located incidentally at the melting temperature.

  4. Size-dependent Melting Behavior of Iron Nanoparticles by Replica Exchange Molecular Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, Qiang; Yang, Yang; Zhai, Yingteng; Sun, Deyan; Xiang, Hongjun; Gong, Xingao

    2013-03-01

    Due to the finite size effect, nanoparticles own unique physical, chemical, and magnetic properties. Comparing with the bulk materials, the large surface/volume ratio of nanoparticles could lead to more complicate atomic and electronic behavior, thus the thermodynamical properties can be also very rich. In the last a few decades, as one of the fundamental problems in the nano science, the melting behavior of nanoparticles had been widely investigated by numerous experimental and theoretical studies. Using replica-exchange molecular dynamics method (REMD), we have investigated the size dependence of the melting behavior of iron nanoparticles. Comparing to the conventional molecular dynamics (MD), the REMD method is found to be very efficient to determine the melting point, by avoiding the superheating and undercooling phenomena. With accurate determination of the melting point, we find that the melting temperature does not follow linearly with the inverse of size. By incorporating the size dependent thickness of surface liquid layer which is observed in our simulation, we propose a revised liquid skin melting model to describe the size dependent melting temperature. Special Funds for Major State Basic Research, NSFC, MOE, Shanghai Municipality

  5. Eruption style at Kīlauea Volcano in Hawai‘i linked to primary melt composition

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sides. I.R.,; Edmonds, M.; Maclennan, J.; Swanson, Don; Houghton, B.F.

    2014-01-01

    Explosive eruptions at basaltic volcanoes have been linked to gas segregation from magmas at shallow depths in the crust. The composition of primary melts formed at greater depths was thought to have little influence on eruptive style. Ocean island basaltic volcanoes are the product of melting of a geochemically heterogeneous mantle plume and are expected to give rise to heterogeneous primary melts. This range in primary melt composition, particularly with respect to the volatile components, will profoundly influence magma buoyancy, storage and eruption style. Here we analyse the geochemistry of a suite of melt inclusions from 25 historical eruptions at the ocean island volcano of Kīlauea, Hawai‘i, over the past 600 years. We find that more explosive styles of eruption at Kīlauea Volcano are associated statistically with more geochemically enriched primary melts that have higher volatile concentrations. These enriched melts ascend faster and retain their primary nature, undergoing little interaction with the magma reservoir at the volcano’s summit. We conclude that the eruption style and magma-supply rate at Kīlauea are fundamentally linked to the geochemistry of the primary melts formed deep below the volcano. Magmas might therefore be predisposed towards explosivity right at the point of formation in their mantle source region.

  6. Modeling of submarine melting in Petermann Fjord, Northwestern Greenland using an ocean general circulation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, C.; Rignot, E. J.; Xu, Y.; An, L.

    2013-12-01

    Basal melting of the floating tongue of Petermann Glacier, in northwestern Greenland is by far the largest process of mass ablation. Melting of the floating tongue is controlled by the buoyancy of the melt water plume, the pressure-dependence of the melting point of sea ice, and the mixing of warm subsurface water with fresh buoyant subglacial discharge. In prior simulations of this melting process, the role of subglacial discharge has been neglected because in similar configurations (floating ice shelves) in the Antarctic, surface runoff is negligible; this is however not true in Greenland. Here, we use the Mass Institute of Technology general circulation model (MITgcm) at a high spatial resolution (10 m x 10 m) to simulate the melting process of the ice shelf in 2-D. the model is constrained by ice shelf bathymetry and ice thickness from NASA Operation IceBridge, ocean temperature/salinity data from Johnson et al. (2011), and subglacial discharge estimated from output products of the Regional Atmospheric Climate Model (RACMO). We compare the results obtained in winter (no runoff) with summer, and the sensitivity of the results to thermal forcing from the ocean, and to the magnitude of subglacial runoff. We conclude on the impact of the ocean and surface melting on the melting regime of the floating ice tongue of Petermann. This work is performed under a contract with NASA Cryosphere Program.

  7. Explicit analytic equations for multimolecular thermal melting curves.

    PubMed

    Böttcher, Albrecht; Kowerko, Danny; Sigel, Roland K O

    2015-07-01

    The analysis of thermal melting curves requires the knowledge of equations for the temperature dependence of the relative fraction of folded and unfolded components. To implement these equations as standard tools for curve fitting, they should be as explicit as possible. From the van't Hoff formalism it is known that the equilibrium constant and hence the folded fraction is a function of the absolute temperature, the van't Hoff transition enthalpy, and the melting temperature. The work presented here is devoted to the mathematically self-contained derivation and the listing of explicit equations for the folded fraction as a function of the thermodynamic parameters in the case of arbitrary molecularities. Part of the results are known, others are new. It is in particular shown for the first time that the folded fraction is the composition of a universal function which depends solely on the molecularity and a dimensionless function which is governed by the concrete thermodynamic regime but is independent of the molecularity. The results will prove useful for extracting the thermodynamic parameters from experimental data on the basis of regression analysis. As supporting information, open-source Matlab scripts for the computer implementation of the equations are provided.

  8. Predicting major element mineral/melt equilibria - A statistical approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hostetler, C. J.; Drake, M. J.

    1980-01-01

    Empirical equations have been developed for calculating the mole fractions of NaO0.5, MgO, AlO1.5, SiO2, KO0.5, CaO, TiO2, and FeO in a solid phase of initially unknown identity given only the composition of the coexisting silicate melt. The approach involves a linear multivariate regression analysis in which solid composition is expressed as a Taylor series expansion of the liquid compositions. An internally consistent precision of approximately 0.94 is obtained, that is, the nature of the liquidus phase in the input data set can be correctly predicted for approximately 94% of the entries. The composition of the liquidus phase may be calculated to better than 5 mol % absolute. An important feature of this 'generalized solid' model is its reversibility; that is, the dependent and independent variables in the linear multivariate regression may be inverted to permit prediction of the composition of a silicate liquid produced by equilibrium partial melting of a polymineralic source assemblage.

  9. Exact statistical mechanical lattice model and classical Lindemann theory of melting of inert gas solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunne, Lawrence J.; Murrell, John N.; Manos, George

    2008-05-01

    A modified form of Lindemann's model shows that the melting points of the heavy inert gases and other effectively spherical molecular species are proportional to the depths of their diatomic potential wells. The success of the model when compared with experiment seems to rely on the almost constant value of the ratio of the fractional volume and entropy changes during fusion. The Lindemann proposal can be incorporated into an exactly treated statistical mechanical lattice model utilising expandable clusters which reproduces the solid-liquid melting phenomenon for argon with a realistic volume change and melting line.

  10. The Influence of Water on Mantle Melting and Crystallization in Back-arc Basin Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lytle, M. L.; Kelley, K. A.; Hauri, E. H.

    2009-12-01

    Water is the central component that distinguishes back-arc spreading ridges from normal mid-ocean ridges. Specifically, the addition of water from the subducted plate to back-arc basin magma sources strongly influences mantle melting and magmatic crystallization processes. Here, we present new SIMS measurements of magmatic volatiles (H2O, CO2, S, Cl, F) and new LA-ICP-MS trace element data in back-arc basin basalt (BABB) glasses, coupled with previously published major, volatile, and trace element data, from the Mariana trough, Manus, Woodlark, Lau, and North Fiji back-arc basins in the western Pacific, and use these data to relate melt composition to crystallization and melting processes. Glasses record magmatic liquid lines of descent (LLD), which reflect fractional crystallization of olivine, plagioclase and clinopyroxene and are consistent with the modal phenocryst abundances of the rocks. LLD’s also vary with magmatic H2O concentration, and using a multi-element approach (e.g., MgO vs. Al2O3, CaO, CaO/Al2O3, and Eu anomaly), the data show clear delays in the onset of plagioclase fractionation related to higher magmatic H2O content, although not enough to cause clinopyroxene to saturate before plagioclase. The MgO concentration at the onset of plagioclase fractionation shows a linear decrease of ~1.0 wt.% MgO at the point of plag-in with each wt.% increase in melt H2O content. These well-constrained LLD’s permit more accurate corrections of basalt compositions to primary melts, achieved by tracing melt compositions along empirically-determined fractionation slopes to the point of plag-in appropriate for their H2O contents before adding equilibrium olivine until melts are in equilibrium with Fo90. We use the calculated primary melts to constrain pressures and temperatures of melt equilibration using new models of melt thermobarometry (Lee et al., 2009), and apply both an inverse melting model using TiO2 contents of the primary melts to determine melt

  11. Study of the Melting Behavior of YAG Single Crystal by Optical Differential Thermal Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-11-01

    melting point of AI2O3 as determined by the DOSMTOP agreed well with the 2055 ± 1. VIECHNICKI, D. J., and SCHMID, F. Crystal Growth Using the Heat...Exchanger Method (HEM). L Crystal Growth , v. 26, 1974, p. 162-164. 2. VIECHNICKI, D. J., and CASLAVSKY, J. L. Solid State Formation O/AW.-FJ^/JO...temperature was near the 1937 C thermoarrest temperature observed during the melting of large boules of sintered YAG material in the crystal growth

  12. Experimental evidence for flux-lattice melting. [in high-Tc superconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farrell, D. E.; Rice, J. P.; Ginsberg, D. M.

    1991-01-01

    A low-frequency torsional oscillator has been used to search for flux-lattice melting in an untwinned single crystal of YBa2Cu3O(7-delta). The damping of the oscillator was measured as a function of temperature, for applied magnetic fields in the range H = 0.1-2.3 T. A remarkably sharp damping peak has been located. It is suggested that the temperature of the peak corresponds to the melting point of the Abrikosov flux lattice.

  13. Impact melt in small lunar highland craters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plescia, J. B.; Cintala, M. J.

    2012-03-01

    Impact melt deposits have been identified in small, simple impact craters within the lunar highlands. Such deposits are rare, but have been observed in craters as small as 170 m diameter. The melt occurs as well-defined pools on the crater floor, as well as veneers on the inner crater wall and stringers of material extending over the rim and away from the crater. Model calculations indicate that the amount of melt formed in craters 100-2000 m diameter would amount to a few to ˜106 m3, representing <1% of the crater volume. Thus, significant, visible impact melt deposits would not be expected in such small craters as most of the melt material that was formed would be ejected. Variations in the properties of the projectile or the target cannot account for the amount of observed melt; the amount of melt produced is largely insensitive to such variations. Rather, we suggest that these small melt-containing craters represent near-vertical impacts in which the axes of melting and melt motion are essentially straight down, toward the base of the transient cavity. For a given event energy under vertical impact conditions, the volume of melt produced would be greater than in an oblique impact and the momentum of the material would be directed vertically downward with minimal lateral momentum such that most of the melt is retained within the crater interior. Since vertical impacts are relatively rare, such small craters with visible, interior melt deposits are rare. While we focus here on the highlands, such craters also occur on the maria.

  14. Testing the absolute-tempo hypothesis: context effects for familiar and unfamiliar songs.

    PubMed

    Rashotte, Matthew A; Wedell, Douglas H

    2014-11-01

    In two experiments, we investigated context effects on tempo judgments for familiar and unfamiliar songs performed by popular artists. In Experiment 1, participants made comparative tempo judgments to a remembered standard for song clips drawn from either a slow or a fast context, created by manipulating the tempos of the same songs. Although both familiar and unfamiliar songs showed significant shifts in their points of subjective equality toward the tempo context values, more-familiar songs showed significantly reduced contextual bias. In Experiment 2, tempo pleasantness ratings showed significant context effects in which the ordering of tempos on the pleasantness scale differed across contexts, with the most pleasant tempo shifting toward the contextual values, an assimilation of ideal points. Once again, these effects were significant but reduced for the more-familiar songs. The moderating effects of song familiarity support a weak version of the absolute-tempo hypothesis, in which long-term memory for tempo reduces but does not eliminate contextual effects. Thus, although both relative and absolute tempo information appear to be encoded in memory, the absolute representation may be subject to rapid revision by recently experienced tempo-altered versions of the same song.

  15. Mini-implants and miniplates generate sub-absolute and absolute anchorage.

    PubMed

    Consolaro, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    The functional demand imposed on bone promotes changes in the spatial properties of osteocytes as well as in their extensions uniformly distributed throughout the mineralized surface. Once spatial deformation is established, osteocytes create the need for structural adaptations that result in bone formation and resorption that happen to meet the functional demands. The endosteum and the periosteum are the effectors responsible for stimulating adaptive osteocytes in the inner and outer surfaces. Changes in shape, volume and position of the jaws as a result of skeletal correction of the maxilla and mandible require anchorage to allow bone remodeling to redefine morphology, esthetics and function as a result of spatial deformation conducted by orthodontic appliances. Examining the degree of changes in shape, volume and structural relationship of areas where mini-implants and miniplates are placed allows us to classify mini-implants as devices of subabsolute anchorage and miniplates as devices of absolute anchorage.

  16. Investigating the highest melting temperature materials: A laser melting study of the TaC-HfC system

    PubMed Central

    Cedillos-Barraza, Omar; Manara, Dario; Boboridis, K.; Watkins, Tyson; Grasso, Salvatore; Jayaseelan, Daniel D.; Konings, Rudy J. M.; Reece, Michael J.; Lee, William E.

    2016-01-01

    TaC, HfC and their solid solutions are promising candidate materials for thermal protection structures in hypersonic vehicles because of their very high melting temperatures (>4000 K) among other properties. The melting temperatures of slightly hypostoichiometric TaC, HfC and three solid solution compositions (Ta1−xHfxC, with x = 0.8, 0.5 and 0.2) have long been identified as the highest known. In the current research, they were reassessed, for the first time in the last fifty years, using a laser heating technique. They were found to melt in the range of 4041–4232 K, with HfC having the highest and TaC the lowest. Spectral radiance of the hot samples was measured in situ, showing that the optical emissivity of these compounds plays a fundamental role in their heat balance. Independently, the results show that the melting point for HfC0.98, (4232 ± 84) K, is the highest recorded for any compound studied until now. PMID:27905481

  17. Investigating the highest melting temperature materials: A laser melting study of the TaC-HfC system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cedillos-Barraza, Omar; Manara, Dario; Boboridis, K.; Watkins, Tyson; Grasso, Salvatore; Jayaseelan, Daniel D.; Konings, Rudy J. M.; Reece, Michael J.; Lee, William E.

    2016-12-01

    TaC, HfC and their solid solutions are promising candidate materials for thermal protection structures in hypersonic vehicles because of their very high melting temperatures (>4000 K) among other properties. The melting temperatures of slightly hypostoichiometric TaC, HfC and three solid solution compositions (Ta1‑xHfxC, with x = 0.8, 0.5 and 0.2) have long been identified as the highest known. In the current research, they were reassessed, for the first time in the last fifty years, using a laser heating technique. They were found to melt in the range of 4041–4232 K, with HfC having the highest and TaC the lowest. Spectral radiance of the hot samples was measured in situ, showing that the optical emissivity of these compounds plays a fundamental role in their heat balance. Independently, the results show that the melting point for HfC0.98, (4232 ± 84) K, is the highest recorded for any compound studied until now.

  18. Investigating the highest melting temperature materials: A laser melting study of the TaC-HfC system.

    PubMed

    Cedillos-Barraza, Omar; Manara, Dario; Boboridis, K; Watkins, Tyson; Grasso, Salvatore; Jayaseelan, Daniel D; Konings, Rudy J M; Reece, Michael J; Lee, William E

    2016-12-01

    TaC, HfC and their solid solutions are promising candidate materials for thermal protection structures in hypersonic vehicles because of their very high melting temperatures (>4000 K) among other properties. The melting temperatures of slightly hypostoichiometric TaC, HfC and three solid solution compositions (Ta1-xHfxC, with x = 0.8, 0.5 and 0.2) have long been identified as the highest known. In the current research, they were reassessed, for the first time in the last fifty years, using a laser heating technique. They were found to melt in the range of 4041-4232 K, with HfC having the highest and TaC the lowest. Spectral radiance of the hot samples was measured in situ, showing that the optical emissivity of these compounds plays a fundamental role in their heat balance. Independently, the results show that the melting point for HfC0.98, (4232 ± 84) K, is the highest recorded for any compound studied until now.

  19. Effects of Melt Processing on Evolution of Structure in PEEK

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Georgiev, Georgi; Dai, Patrick Shuanghua; Oyebode, Elizabeth; Cebe, Peggy; Capel, Malcolm

    1999-01-01

    We report on the effects of melt processing temperature on structure formation in Poly(ether-ether-ketone), PEEK. Real time Small Angle X-ray Scattering, SAXS, and thermal analysis are used to follow the melting behavior after various stages of processing. Assignment of peaks to structural entities within the material, the relative perfection of the crystals, and the possibility of their reorganization, are all influenced by the melt processing history. With the advent of high intensity synchrotron sources of X-radiation, polymer scientists gain a research tool which, when used along with thermal analysis, provides additional structural information about the crystals during growth and subsequent melting. PEEK is an engineering thermoplastic polymer with a very high glass transition temperature (145 C) and crystal melting point (337 C). PEEK has been the subject of recent studies by X-ray scattering in which melt and cold crystallization were followed in real-time. X-ray scattering and thermal studies have been used to address the formation of dual endothermic response which has been variously ascribed to lamellar insertion, dual crystal populations, or melting followed by re-crystallization. Another important issue is whether all of the amorphous phase is located in interlamellar regions, or alternatively whether some is located in "pockets" away from the crystalline lamellar stacks. The interpretation of scattering from lamellar stacks varies depending upon whether such amorphous pockets are formed. Some groups believe all of the amorphous phase is interlamellar. This leads to selection of a smaller thickness for the crystals. Other groups suggest that most amorphous phase is not interlamellar, and this leads to the suggestion that the crystal thickness is larger than the amorphous layer within the stacks. To investigate these ideas, we used SAXS and Differential Scanning Calorimetry to compare results of single and dual stage melt crystallization of PEEK using a

  20. Prospects for the Moon as an SI-Traceable Absolute Spectroradiometric Standard for Satellite Remote Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cramer, C. E.; Stone, T. C.; Lykke, K.; Woodward, J. T.

    2015-12-01

    The Earth's Moon has many physical properties that make it suitable for use as a reference light source for radiometric calibration of remote sensing satellite instruments. Lunar calibration has been successfully applied to many imagers in orbit, including both MODIS instruments and NPP-VIIRS, using the USGS ROLO model to predict the reference exoatmospheric lunar irradiance. Sensor response trending was developed for SeaWIFS with a relative accuracy better than 0.1 % per year with lunar calibration techniques. However, the Moon rarely is used as an absolute reference for on-orbit calibration, primarily due to uncertainties in the ROLO model absolute scale of 5%-10%. But this limitation lies only with the models - the Moon itself is radiometrically stable, and development of a high-accuracy absolute lunar reference is inherently feasible. A program has been undertaken by NIST to collect absolute measurements of the lunar spectral irradiance with absolute accuracy <1 % (k=2), traceable to SI radiometric units. Initial Moon observations were acquired from the Whipple Observatory on Mt. Hopkins, Arizona, elevation 2367 meters, with continuous spectral coverage from 380 nm to 1040 nm at ~3 nm resolution. The lunar spectrometer acquired calibration measurements several times each observing night by pointing to a calibrated integrating sphere source. The lunar spectral irradiance at the top of the atmosphere was derived from a time series of ground-based measurements by a Langley analysis that incorporated measured atmospheric conditions and ROLO model predictions for the change in irradiance resulting from the changing Sun-Moon-Observer geometry throughout each night. Two nights were selected for further study. An extensive error analysis, which includes instrument calibration and atmospheric correction terms, shows a combined standard uncertainty under 1 % over most of the spectral range. Comparison of these two nights' spectral irradiance measurements with predictions