Science.gov

Sample records for absolute melting temperature

  1. Review of deformation behavior of tungsten at temperature less than 0.2 absolute melting temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, J. R.

    1972-01-01

    The deformation behavior of tungsten at temperatures 0.2 T sub m is reviewed, with primary emphasis on the temperature dependence of the yield stress and the ductile-brittle transition temperature. It appears that a model based on the high Peierls stress of tungsten best accounts for the observed mechanical behavior at low temperatures. Recent research is discussed which suggests an important role of electron concentration and bonding on the mechanical behavior of tungsten. It is concluded that future research on tungsten should include studies to define more clearly the correlation between electron concentration and mechanical behavior of tungsten alloys and other transition metal alloys.

  2. Cosmology with negative absolute temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieira, J. P. P.; Byrnes, Christian T.; Lewis, Antony

    2016-08-01

    Negative absolute temperatures (NAT) are an exotic thermodynamical consequence of quantum physics which has been known since the 1950's (having been achieved in the lab on a number of occasions). Recently, the work of Braun et al. [1] has rekindled interest in negative temperatures and hinted at a possibility of using NAT systems in the lab as dark energy analogues. This paper goes one step further, looking into the cosmological consequences of the existence of a NAT component in the Universe. NAT-dominated expanding Universes experience a borderline phantom expansion (w < ‑1) with no Big Rip, and their contracting counterparts are forced to bounce after the energy density becomes sufficiently large. Both scenarios might be used to solve horizon and flatness problems analogously to standard inflation and bouncing cosmologies. We discuss the difficulties in obtaining and ending a NAT-dominated epoch, and possible ways of obtaining density perturbations with an acceptable spectrum.

  3. Methods for Melting Temperature Calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Qi-Jun

    Melting temperature calculation has important applications in the theoretical study of phase diagrams and computational materials screenings. In this thesis, we present two new methods, i.e., the improved Widom's particle insertion method and the small-cell coexistence method, which we developed in order to capture melting temperatures both accurately and quickly. We propose a scheme that drastically improves the efficiency of Widom's particle insertion method by efficiently sampling cavities while calculating the integrals providing the chemical potentials of a physical system. This idea enables us to calculate chemical potentials of liquids directly from first-principles without the help of any reference system, which is necessary in the commonly used thermodynamic integration method. As an example, we apply our scheme, combined with the density functional formalism, to the calculation of the chemical potential of liquid copper. The calculated chemical potential is further used to locate the melting temperature. The calculated results closely agree with experiments. We propose the small-cell coexistence method based on the statistical analysis of small-size coexistence MD simulations. It eliminates the risk of a metastable superheated solid in the fast-heating method, while also significantly reducing the computer cost relative to the traditional large-scale coexistence method. Using empirical potentials, we validate the method and systematically study the finite-size effect on the calculated melting points. The method converges to the exact result in the limit of a large system size. An accuracy within 100 K in melting temperature is usually achieved when the simulation contains more than 100 atoms. DFT examples of Tantalum, high-pressure Sodium, and ionic material NaCl are shown to demonstrate the accuracy and flexibility of the method in its practical applications. The method serves as a promising approach for large-scale automated material screening in which

  4. Melting in temperature sensitive suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsayed, Ahmed M.

    We describe two experimental studies about melting in colloidal systems. In particular we studied melting of 1-dimensional lamellar phases and 3-dimensional colloidal crystals. In the first set of experiments we prepared suspensions composed of rodlike fd virus and the thermosensitive polymer, poly(N-isopropylacrylamide). The phase diagram of this systems is temperature and concentration dependent. Using video microscopy, we directly observed melting of lamellar phases and single lamellae into nematic phase. We found that lamellar phases swell with increasing temperature before melting into the nematic phase. The highly swollen lamellae can be superheated as a result of topological nucleation barriers that slow the formation of the nematic phase. In another set of experiments we prepared colloidal crystals from thermally responsive microgel spheres. The crystals are equilibrium close-packed three-dimensional structures. Upon increasing the temperature slightly above room temperature, particle volume fraction decreased from 0.74 to less than 0.5. Using video microscopy, we observed premelting at grain boundaries and dislocations within bulk colloidal crystals. Premelting is the localized loss of crystalline order at surfaces and defects at sample volume fractions above the bulk melting transition. Particle tracking revealed increased disorder in crystalline regions bordering defects, the amount of which depends on the type of defect, distance from the defect, and particle volume fraction. In total these observations suggest that interfacial free energy is the crucial parameter for premelting in colloidal and in atomic scale crystals.

  5. Evaluation of the Absolute Regional Temperature Potential

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shindell, D. T.

    2012-01-01

    The Absolute Regional Temperature Potential (ARTP) is one of the few climate metrics that provides estimates of impacts at a sub-global scale. The ARTP presented here gives the time-dependent temperature response in four latitude bands (90-28degS, 28degS-28degN, 28-60degN and 60-90degN) as a function of emissions based on the forcing in those bands caused by the emissions. It is based on a large set of simulations performed with a single atmosphere-ocean climate model to derive regional forcing/response relationships. Here I evaluate the robustness of those relationships using the forcing/response portion of the ARTP to estimate regional temperature responses to the historic aerosol forcing in three independent climate models. These ARTP results are in good accord with the actual responses in those models. Nearly all ARTP estimates fall within +/-20%of the actual responses, though there are some exceptions for 90-28degS and the Arctic, and in the latter the ARTP may vary with forcing agent. However, for the tropics and the Northern Hemisphere mid-latitudes in particular, the +/-20% range appears to be roughly consistent with the 95% confidence interval. Land areas within these two bands respond 39-45% and 9-39% more than the latitude band as a whole. The ARTP, presented here in a slightly revised form, thus appears to provide a relatively robust estimate for the responses of large-scale latitude bands and land areas within those bands to inhomogeneous radiative forcing and thus potentially to emissions as well. Hence this metric could allow rapid evaluation of the effects of emissions policies at a finer scale than global metrics without requiring use of a full climate model.

  6. On-orbit absolute temperature calibration using multiple phase change materials: overview of recent technology advancements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Best, Fred A.; Adler, Douglas P.; Pettersen, Claire; Revercomb, Henry E.; Perepezko, John H.

    2010-11-01

    NASA's anticipated plan for a mission dedicated to Climate (CLARREO) will hinge upon the ability to fly SI traceable standards that provide irrefutable absolute measurement accuracy. As an example, instrumentation designed to measure spectrally resolved infrared radiances will require high-emissivity calibration blackbodies that have absolute temperature uncertainties of better than 0.045K (3 sigma). A novel scheme to provide absolute calibration of temperature sensors onorbit, that uses the transient melt signatures from multiple phase change materials, has been demonstrated in the laboratory at the University of Wisconsin and is now undergoing technology advancement under NASA Instrument Incubator Program funding. Using small quantities of phase change material (less than half of a percent of the mass of the cavity), melt temperature accuracies of better than 10 mK have been demonstrated for mercury, water, and gallium (providing calibration from 233K to 303K). Refinements currently underway focus on ensuring that the melt materials in their sealed confinement housings perform as expected in the thermal and microgravity environment of a multi-year spaceflight mission. Thermal soak and cycling tests are underway to demonstrate that there is no dissolution from the housings into the melt materials that could alter melt temperature, and that there is no liquid metal embrittlement of the housings from the metal melt materials. In addition, NASA funding has been recently secured to conduct a demonstration of this scheme in the microgravity environment of the International Space Station.

  7. Melting by temperature-modulated calorimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Wunderlich, B.; Okazaki, Iwao; Ishikiriyama, Kazuhiko; Boller, A. |

    1997-09-01

    Well-crystallized macromolecules melt irreversibly due to the need of molecular nucleation, while small molecules melt reversibly as long as crystal nuclei are present to assist crystallization. Furthermore, imperfect crystals of low-molar-mass polymers may have a sufficiently small region of metastability between crystallization and melting to show a reversing heat-flow component due to melting of poor crystals followed by crystallization of imperfect crystals which have insufficient time to perfect before the modulation switches to heating and melts the imperfect crystals. Many metals, in turn. melt sharply and reversibly as long as nuclei remain after melting for subsequent crystallization during the cooling cycle. Their analysis is complicated, however, due to thermal conductivity limitations of the calorimeters. Polymers of sufficiently high molar mass, finally, show a small amount of reversible. local melting that may be linked to partial melting of individual molecules. Experiments by temperature-modulated calorimetry and model calculations are presented. The samples measured included poly(ethylene terephthalate)s, poly(ethylene oxide)s, and indium. Two unsolved problems that arose from this research involve the origin of a high, seemingly stable, reversible heat capacity of polymers in the melting region, and a smoothing of melting and crystallization into a close-to-elliptical Lissajous figure in a heat-flow versus sample-temperature plot.

  8. On-Orbit Absolute Temperature Calibration Using Multiple Phase Change Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Best, F. A.; Adler, D. P.; Pettersen, C.; Revercomb, H. E.; Perepezko, J. H.

    2009-12-01

    NASA’s anticipated plan for a mission dedicated to Climate (CLARREO) will hinge upon the ability to fly SI traceable standards that provide irrefutable absolute measurement accuracy. As an example, instrumentation designed to measure spectrally resolved infrared radiances will require high-emissivity calibration blackbodies that have absolute temperature uncertainties of better than 0.045K (3 sigma). A novel scheme to provide absolute calibration of temperature sensors, suitable for CLARREO on-orbit operation, has been demonstrated in the laboratory at the University of Wisconsin, and is now undergoing refinement under NASA Instrument Incubator Program funding. In this scheme, small quantities of reference materials (mercury, water, and gallium) are imbedded into the blackbody cavity wall, in a manner similar to the temperature sensors to be calibrated. As the blackbody cavity is slowly heated through the melt point of each reference material, the transient temperature signature from the imbedded thermistor sensors provides a very accurate indication of the melt temperature. Using small quantities of phase change material (less than half of a percent of the mass of the cavity), melt temperature accuracies of better than 10 mK have been demonstrated for mercury, water, and gallium (providing calibration from 233K to 303K). Refinements currently underway focus on ensuring that the melt materials in their sealed confinement housings perform as expected in the thermal and microgravity environment of a multi-year spaceflight mission. Thermal soak and cycling tests are underway to demonstrate that there is no dissolution from the housings into the melt materials that could alter melt temperature, and that there is no liquid metal embrittlement of the housings from the metal melt materials. In addition, NASA funding has been recently secured to conduct a demonstration of this scheme in the microgravity environment of the International Space Station.

  9. Passive absolute age and temperature history sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, Alex; Vianco, Paul T.

    2015-11-10

    A passive sensor for historic age and temperature sensing, including a first member formed of a first material, the first material being either a metal or a semiconductor material and a second member formed of a second material, the second material being either a metal or a semiconductor material. A surface of the second member is in contact with a surface of the first member such that, over time, the second material of the second member diffuses into the first material of the first member. The rate of diffusion for the second material to diffuse into the first material depends on a temperature of the passive sensor. One of the electrical conductance, the electrical capacitance, the electrical inductance, the optical transmission, the optical reflectance, or the crystalline structure of the passive sensor depends on the amount of the second material that has diffused into the first member.

  10. On-Orbit Absolute Temperature Calibration for CLARREO Using Multiple Phase Change Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Best, F. A.; Adler, D. P.; Ellington, S. D.; Thielman, D. J.; Revercomb, H. E.; Perepezko, J. H.

    2008-12-01

    NASA's anticipated plan for a mission dedicated to Climate (CLARREO) will hinge upon the ability to fly SI traceable standards that provide irrefutable absolute measurement accuracy. As an example, instrumentation designed to measure spectrally resolved infrared radiances will require high-emissivity calibration blackbodies that have absolute temperature uncertainties of better than 0.045K (3 sigma). A novel scheme to provide absolute calibration of temperature sensors, suitable for CLARREO on-orbit operation, has been demonstrated in the laboratory at the University of Wisconsin, and is now undergoing refinement under NASA Instrument Incubator Program funding. In this scheme, small quantities of reference materials (mercury, water, and gallium - to date) are imbedded into the blackbody cavity wall, in a manner similar to the temperature sensors to be calibrated. As the blackbody cavity is slowly heated through a reference material melt temperature, the transient temperature signature of the imbedded thermistor sensors provides a very accurate indication of the melt temperature. Using small quantities of phase change material (less than half of a percent of the mass of the cavity), melt temperature accuracies of better than 10 mK have been demonstrated for mercury, water, and gallium (providing calibration from 233K to 303K). The flight implementation of this new scheme will involve special considerations for packaging the phase change materials to ensure long-term compatibility with the containment system, and design features that help ensure that the on-orbit melt behavior in a microgravity environment is unchanged from pre-flight full gravitational conditions under which the system is characterized.

  11. Absolute brightness temperature measurements at 2.1-mm wavelength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulich, B. L.

    1974-01-01

    Absolute measurements of the brightness temperatures of the Sun, new Moon, Venus, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, and Uranus, and of the flux density of DR21 at 2.1-mm wavelength are reported. Relative measurements at 3.5-mm wavelength are also preented which resolve the absolute calibration discrepancy between The University of Texas 16-ft radio telescope and the Aerospace Corporation 15-ft antenna. The use of the bright planets and DR21 as absolute calibration sources at millimeter wavelengths is discussed in the light of recent observations.

  12. Absolute beam flux measurement at NDCX-I using gold-melting calorimetry technique

    SciTech Connect

    Ni, P.A.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Lidia, S.M.; Welch, J.

    2011-04-01

    We report on an alternative way to measure the absolute beam flux at the NDCX-I, LBNL linear accelerator. Up to date, the beam flux is determined from the analysis of the beam-induced optical emission from a ceramic scintilator (Al-Si). The new approach is based on calorimetric technique, where energy flux is deduced from the melting dynamics of a gold foil. We estimate an average 260 kW/cm2 beam flux over 5 {micro}s, which is consistent with values provided by the other methods. Described technique can be applied to various ion species and energies.

  13. Testing and evaluation of thermal cameras for absolute temperature measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chrzanowski, Krzysztof; Fischer, Joachim; Matyszkiel, Robert

    2000-09-01

    The accuracy of temperature measurement is the most important criterion for the evaluation of thermal cameras used in applications requiring absolute temperature measurement. All the main international metrological organizations currently propose a parameter called uncertainty as a measure of measurement accuracy. We propose a set of parameters for the characterization of thermal measurement cameras. It is shown that if these parameters are known, then it is possible to determine the uncertainty of temperature measurement due to only the internal errors of these cameras. Values of this uncertainty can be used as an objective criterion for comparisons of different thermal measurement cameras.

  14. Absolute Temperature Monitoring Using RF Radiometry in the MRI Scanner.

    PubMed

    El-Sharkawy, Abdel-Monem M; Sotiriadis, Paul P; Bottomley, Paul A; Atalar, Ergin

    2006-11-01

    Temperature detection using microwave radiometry has proven value for noninvasively measuring the absolute temperature of tissues inside the body. However, current clinical radiometers operate in the gigahertz range, which limits their depth of penetration. We have designed and built a noninvasive radiometer which operates at radio frequencies (64 MHz) with ∼100-kHz bandwidth, using an external RF loop coil as a thermal detector. The core of the radiometer is an accurate impedance measurement and automatic matching circuit of 0.05 Ω accuracy to compensate for any load variations. The radiometer permits temperature measurements with accuracy of ±0.1°K, over a tested physiological range of 28° C-40° C in saline phantoms whose electric properties match those of tissue. Because 1.5 T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanners also operate at 64 MHz, we demonstrate the feasibility of integrating our radiometer with an MRI scanner to monitor RF power deposition and temperature dosimetry, obtaining coarse, spatially resolved, absolute thermal maps in the physiological range. We conclude that RF radiometry offers promise as a direct, noninvasive method of monitoring tissue heating during MRI studies and thereby providing an independent means of verifying patient-safe operation. Other potential applications include titration of hyper- and hypo-therapies. PMID:18026562

  15. Internal stress-induced melting below melting temperature at high-rate laser heating

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Yong Seok; Levitas, Valery I.

    2014-06-30

    In this Letter, continuum thermodynamic and phase field approaches (PFAs) predicted internal stress-induced reduction in melting temperature for laser-irradiated heating of a nanolayer. Internal stresses appear due to thermal strain under constrained conditions and completely relax during melting, producing an additional thermodynamic driving force for melting. Thermodynamic melting temperature for Al reduces from 933.67 K for a stress-free condition down to 898.1 K for uniaxial strain and to 920.8 K for plane strain. Our PFA simulations demonstrated barrierless surface-induced melt nucleation below these temperatures and propagation of two solid-melt interfaces toward each other at the temperatures very close to the corresponding predicted thermodynamic equilibrium temperatures for the heating rate Q≤1.51×10{sup 10}K/s. At higher heating rates, kinetic superheating competes with a reduction in melting temperature and melting under uniaxial strain occurs at 902.1 K for Q = 1.51 × 10{sup 11 }K/s and 936.9 K for Q = 1.46 × 10{sup 12 }K/s.

  16. Investigations of the temperature regimes of the selective laser melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chivel, Yu.

    2012-06-01

    The principles of measuring the surface temperature of powder bed in the focal spot of the laser radiation while scanning the surface using galvoscanner with F-teta lens have been elaborated. Investigation of the melting of overhang layers has been conducted under full temperature monitoring. Temperature regimes of the selective laser melting process of the 3D object from steel 316L powder have been investigated.

  17. Method for Synthesizing Extremeley High Temperature Melting Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Saboungi, Marie-Louise and Glorieux, Benoit

    2005-11-22

    The invention relates to a method of synthesizing high-temperature melting materials. More specifically the invention relates to a containerless method of synthesizing very high temperature melting materials such as borides, carbides and transition-metal, lanthanide and actinide oxides, using an Aerodynamic Levitator and a laser. The object of the invention is to provide a method for synthesizing extremely high-temperature melting materials that are otherwise difficult to produce, without the use of containers, allowing the manipulation of the phase (amorphous/crystalline/metastable) and permitting changes of the environment such as different gaseous compositions.

  18. Method for synthesizing extremely high-temperature melting materials

    SciTech Connect

    Saboungi, Marie-Louise; Glorieux, Benoit

    2007-11-06

    The invention relates to a method of synthesizing high-temperature melting materials. More specifically the invention relates to a containerless method of synthesizing very high temperature melting materials such as carbides and transition-metal, lanthanide and actinide oxides, using an aerodynamic levitator and a laser. The object of the invention is to provide a method for synthesizing extremely high-temperature melting materials that are otherwise difficult to produce, without the use of containers, allowing the manipulation of the phase (amorphous/crystalline/metastable) and permitting changes of the environment such as different gaseous compositions.

  19. Method For Synthesizing Extremely High-Temperature Melting Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Saboungi, Marie-Louise; Glorieux, Benoit

    2005-11-22

    The invention relates to a method of synthesizing high-temperature melting materials. More specifically the invention relates to a containerless method of synthesizing very high temperature melting materials such as borides, carbides and transition-metal, lanthanide and actinide oxides, using an Aerodynamic Levitator and a laser. The object of the invention is to provide a method for synthesizing extremely high-temperature melting materials that are otherwise difficult to produce, without the use of containers, allowing the manipulation of the phase (amorphous/crystalline/metastable) and permitting changes of the environment such as different gaseous compositions.

  20. Estimation of the diversity between DNA calorimetric profiles, differential melting curves and corresponding melting temperatures.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chun-Ling; Fridman, Alexander S; Grigoryan, Inessa E; Galyuk, Elena N; Murashko, Oleg N; Hu, Chin-Kun; Lando, Dmitri Y

    2016-11-01

    The Poland-Fixman-Freire formalism was adapted for modeling of calorimetric DNA melting profiles, and applied to plasmid pBR 322 and long random sequences. We studied the influence of the difference (HGC -HAT ) between the helix-coil transition enthalpies of AT and GC base pairs on the calorimetric melting profile and on normalized calorimetric melting profile. A strong alteration of DNA calorimetrical profile with HGC -HAT was demonstrated. In contrast, there is a relatively slight change in the normalized profiles and in corresponding ordinary (optical) normalized differential melting curves (DMCs). For fixed HGC -HAT , the average relative deviation (S) between DMC and normalized calorimetric profile, and the difference between their melting temperatures (Tcal -Tm ) are weakly dependent on peculiarities of the multipeak fine structure of DMCs. At the same time, both the deviation S and difference (Tcal -Tm ) enlarge with the temperature melting range of the helix-coil transition. It is shown that the local deviation between DMC and normalized calorimetric profile increases in regions of narrow peaks distant from the melting temperature. PMID:27422497

  1. Modeling the melting temperature of nanoscaled bimetallic alloys.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming; Zhu, Tian-Shu

    2016-06-22

    The effect of size, composition and dimension on the melting temperature of nanoscaled bimetallic alloys was investigated by considering the interatomic interaction. The established thermodynamics model without any arbitrarily adjustable parameters can be used to predict the melting temperature of nanoscaled bimetallic alloys. It is found that, the melting temperature and interatomic interaction of nanoscaled bimetallic alloys decrease with the decrease in size and the increasing composition of the lower surface energy metal. Moreover, for the nanoscaled bimetallic alloys with the same size and composition, the dependence of the melting temperature on the dimension can be sequenced as follows: nanoparticles > nanowires > thin films. The accuracy of the developed model is verified by the recent experimental and computer simulation results. PMID:27292044

  2. The relationship between indoor and outdoor temperature, apparent temperature, relative humidity, and absolute humidity.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, J L; Schwartz, J; Dockery, D W

    2014-02-01

    Many studies report an association between outdoor ambient weather and health. Outdoor conditions may be a poor indicator of personal exposure because people spend most of their time indoors. Few studies have examined how indoor conditions relate to outdoor ambient weather. The average indoor temperature, apparent temperature, relative humidity (RH), and absolute humidity (AH) measured in 16 homes in Greater Boston, Massachusetts, from May 2011 to April 2012 was compared to measurements taken at Boston Logan airport. The relationship between indoor and outdoor temperatures is nonlinear. At warmer outdoor temperatures, there is a strong correlation between indoor and outdoor temperature (Pearson correlation coefficient, r = 0.91, slope, β = 0.41), but at cooler temperatures, the association is weak (r = 0.40, β = 0.04). Results were similar for outdoor apparent temperature. The relationships were linear for RH and AH. The correlation for RH was modest (r = 0.55, β = 0.39). Absolute humidity exhibited the strongest indoor-to-outdoor correlation (r = 0.96, β = 0.69). Indoor and outdoor temperatures correlate well only at warmer outdoor temperatures. Outdoor RH is a poor indicator of indoor RH, while indoor AH has a strong correlation with outdoor AH year-round. PMID:23710826

  3. Substrate effect on the melting temperature of thin polyethylenefilms

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Y.; Rafailovich, M.; Sokolov, J.; Gersappe, D.; Araki, T.; Zou, Y.; Kilcoyne, A.D.L.; Ade, H.; Marom, G.; Lustiger, A.

    2006-01-17

    Strong dependence of the crystal orientation, morphology,and melting temperature (Tm) on the substrate is observed in thesemicrystalline polyethylene thin films. The Tm decreases with the filmthickness when the film is thinner that a certain critical thickness andthe magnitude of the depression increases with increasing surfaceinteraction. We attribute the large Tm depression to the decrease in theoverall free energy on melting, which is caused by the substrateattraction force to the chains that competes against the interchain forcewhich drives the chains to crystallization.

  4. Low melting temperature alloy deployment mechanism and recent experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madden, M. J.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes the concept of a low melting temperature alloy deployment mechanism, U.S. Patent 4,842,106. It begins with a brief history of conventional dimethyl-silicone fluid damped mechanisms. Design fundamentals of the new melting alloy mechanism are then introduced. Benefits of the new over the old are compared and contrasted. Recent experiments and lessons learned complete this paper.

  5. Fuel Rod Melt Progression Simulation Using Low-Temperature Melting Metal Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Seung Dong Lee; Suh, Kune Y.; GoonCherl Park; Un Chul Lee

    2002-07-01

    The TMI-2 accident and various severe fuel damage experiments have shown that core damage is likely to proceed through various states before the core slumps into the lower head. Numerous experiments were conducted to address when and how the core can lose its original geometry, what geometries are formed, and in what processes the core materials are transported to the lower plenum of the reactor pressure vessel. Core degradation progresses along the line of clad ballooning, clad oxidation, material interaction, metallic blockage, molten pool formation, melt progression, and relocation to the lower head. Relocation into the lower plenum may occur from the lateral periphery or from the bottom of the core depending upon the thermal and physical states of the pool. Determining the quantities and rate of molten material transfer to the lower head is important since significant amounts of molten material relocated to the lower head can threaten the vessel integrity by steam explosion and thermal and mechanical attack of the melt. In this paper the focus is placed on the melt flow regime on a cylindrical fuel rod utilizing the LAMDA (Lumped Analysis of Melting in Degrading Assemblies) facility at the Seoul National University. The downward relocation of the molten material is a combination of the external film flow and the internal pipe flow. The heater rods are 0.8 m long and are coated by a low-temperature melting metal alloy. The electrical internal heating method is employed during the test. External heating is adopted to simulate the exothermic Zircaloy-steam reaction. Tests are conducted in several quasi-steady-state conditions. Given the variable boundary conditions including the heat flux and the water level, observation is made for the melting location, progression, and the mass of molten material. Finally, the core melt progression model is developed from the visual inspection and quantitative analysis of the experimental data. As the core material relocates

  6. Pressure dependence of the melting temperature of metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlosser, Herbert; Vinet, Pascal; Ferrante, John

    1989-01-01

    A new method for the analysis of the experimental data for the pressure dependence of the melting temperature of metals is presented. The method combines Lindemann's law, the Debye model, and a first-order equation of state with the experimental observation that the Grueneisen parameter divided by the volume is constant. It is observed that, based on these assumptions, in the absence of phase transitions, plots of the logarithm of the normalized melting temperature versus the logarithm of the normalized pressure are straight lines. It is found that the normalized-melting--temperature versus normalized-pressure curves accurately satisfy the linear relationship for Al, Ag, Au, Cs, Cu, K, Na, Pt, and Rb. In addition, this technique provides a sensitive tool for detecting phase transitions.

  7. Probing the microscopic flexibility of DNA from melting temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Gerald; Essex, Jonathan W.; Neylon, Cameron

    2009-10-01

    The microscopic flexibility of DNA is a key ingredient for understanding its interaction with proteins and drugs but is still poorly understood and technically challenging to measure. Several experimental methods probe very long DNA samples, but these miss local flexibility details. Others mechanically disturb or modify short molecules and therefore do not obtain flexibility properties of unperturbed and pristine DNA. Here, we show that it is possible to extract very detailed flexibility information about unmodified DNA from melting temperatures with statistical physics models. We were able to retrieve, from published melting temperatures, several established flexibility properties such as the presence of highly flexible TATA regions of genomic DNA and support recent findings that DNA is very flexible at short length scales. New information about the nanoscale Na+ concentration dependence of DNA flexibility was determined and we show the key role of ApT and TpA steps when it comes to ion-dependent flexibility and melting temperatures.

  8. Liquidus Temperature Depression in Cryolitic Melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solheim, Asbjørn

    2012-08-01

    The electrolyte in Hall-Héroult cells for the manufacture of primary aluminum nominally contains only cryolite (Na3AlF6) with additions of AlF3, CaF2, and Al2O3. However, impurities are present, entering the process with the feedstock. The effect on the liquidus temperature by the impurities cannot be calculated correctly by the well-known equation for freezing-point depression in binary systems simply because the electrolyte cannot be regarded as a binary system. By extending the equation for freezing-point depression to the ternary system NaF-AlF3-B, it appeared that the acidity of the impurity B plays a major role. Some calculations were made using an ideal Temkin model, and for most types of impurities, the effect on the liquidus temperature will be larger in an industrial electrolyte than what can be estimated from the equation for freezing-point depression in cryolite. Experimental data on the liquidus temperature in the system Na3AlF6-AlF3-Al2O3-CaF2-MgF2 show that the effect of MgF2 on the liquidus temperature increases strongly with decreasing NaF/AlF3 molar ratio, and it is suggested that MgF2 forms an anion complex, probably MgF{4/2-}.

  9. Articulated Multimedia Physics, Lesson 14, Gases, The Gas Laws, and Absolute Temperature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York Inst. of Tech., Old Westbury.

    As the fourteenth lesson of the Articulated Multimedia Physics Course, instructional materials are presented in this study guide with relation to gases, gas laws, and absolute temperature. The topics are concerned with the kinetic theory of gases, thermometric scales, Charles' law, ideal gases, Boyle's law, absolute zero, and gas pressures. The…

  10. The relationship between indoor and outdoor temperature, apparent temperature, relative humidity, and absolute humidity

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Jennifer L.; Schwartz, Joel; Dockery, Douglas W.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Many studies report an association between outdoor ambient weather and health. Outdoor conditions may be a poor indicator of personal exposure because people spend most of their time indoors. Few studies have examined how indoor conditions relate to outdoor ambient weather. Methods and Results The average indoor temperature, apparent temperature, relative humidity (RH), and absolute humidity (AH) measured in 16 homes in Greater Boston, Massachusetts, from May 2011 - April 2012 was compared to measurements taken at Boston Logan airport. The relationship between indoor and outdoor temperatures is non-linear. At warmer outdoor temperatures, there is a strong correlation between indoor and outdoor temperature (Pearson correlation coefficient, r = 0.91, slope, β = 0.41), but at cooler temperatures, the association is weak (r = 0.40, β = 0.04). Results were similar for outdoor apparent temperature. The relationships were linear for RH and AH. The correlation for RH was modest (r = 0.55, β = 0.39). AH exhibited the strongest indoor-to-outdoor correlation (r = 0.96, β = 0.69). Conclusions Indoor and outdoor temperatures correlate well only at warmer outdoor temperatures. Outdoor RH is a poor indicator of indoor RH, while indoor AH has a strong correlation with outdoor AH year-round. PMID:23710826

  11. Constraints on melting, temperature and chemical composition from full waveform tomographic images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cobden, L. J.; Trampert, J.; Fichtner, A.

    2014-12-01

    The recent development of full waveform tomography on continental scales has provided new insights into the seismic structure of the lithosphere and asthenosphere. In particular, we can map shorter wavelength, high-amplitude velocity anomalies which would traditionally be damped and spatially smeared using classical methods. Quantitative interpretation of these anomalies - expressed as absolute rather than relative velocities - may open up the possibility of identifying important dynamic processes such as melting, that would otherwise go undetected or unconstrained. In this study we focus on the S-wave speed structure beneath Europe, as obtained from full waveform inversion. On average, the European continent is slow compared to 1-D reference models such as AK135, but of particular interest are regions beneath the Atlantic and Iberian Peninsula which are 6-8% slower. Traditional interpretation of a regional tomography model would assume a fixed chemical composition, and from this estimate lateral temperature variations. In our case we allow both the temperature and composition to vary at random within very broad ranges, and generate thousands of different thermochemical structures in a Monte Carlo procedure. We then convert these thermochemical structures into S-wave speeds using thermodynamic modelling, and including a correction for temperature-dependent intrinsic attenuation. Although we cannot uniquely define the chemical composition in a given location, due to trade-offs between different chemical components and the temperature, this does not affect our interpretation of the very slow regions. We find that in order to generate such low velocities without melting, either prohibitively high temperatures (above the melting temperature) or extremely low Q values (in contradiction with seismic constraints) are required. Our study demonstrates: 1. The importance of using absolute rather than relative seismic wave speeds in constraining the thermochemical structure

  12. High-temperature oxygen sensors for glass-forming melts.

    PubMed

    Baucke, F G

    1996-09-01

    Electrochemical sensors are reported for the on-line measurement of oxygen partial pressures of oxidic glass-forming melts on a laboratory and technical scale. Based on the principle of solid electrolyte cells without transference, they are principally simple units. The extreme chemical and temperature conditions of their applications, however, demanded extensive fundamental investigations and resulted in specific forms of reference and measuring electrodes, a thermo-dynamic procedure of verifying the correct functioning of such cells, and a method of measuring thermoelectric voltages of non-isothermal glass melts. PMID:15048355

  13. Self-optimizing MPC of melt temperature in injection moulding.

    PubMed

    Dubay, R

    2002-01-01

    The parameters in plastic injection moulding are highly nonlinear and interacting. Good control of plastic melt temperature for injection moulding is very important in reducing operator setup time, assuring consistent product quality, and preventing thermal degradation of the melt. Step response testing was performed on the barrel heating zones on an industrial injection moulding machine (IMM). The open loop responses indicated a high degree of process coupling between the heating zones. From these experimental step responses, a multiple-input-multiple-output model predictive control strategy was developed and practically implemented. The requirement of negligible overshoot is important to the plastics industry for preventing material overheating and wastage, and reducing machine operator setup time. A generic learning and self-optimizing MPC methodology was developed and implemented on the IMM to control melt temperature for any polymer to be moulded on any machine having different electrical heater capacities. The control performance was tested for varying setpoint trajectories typical of normal machine operations. The results showed that the predictive controller provided good control of melt temperature for all zones with negligible oscillations, and, therefore, eliminated material degradation and extended machine setup time. PMID:12014805

  14. Cold spots in quantum systems far from equilibrium: Local entropies and temperatures near absolute zero

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shastry, Abhay; Stafford, Charles A.

    2015-12-01

    We consider a question motivated by the third law of thermodynamics: Can there be a local temperature arbitrarily close to absolute zero in a nonequilibrium quantum system? We consider nanoscale quantum conductors with the source reservoir held at finite temperature and the drain held at or near absolute zero, a problem outside the scope of linear response theory. We obtain local temperatures close to absolute zero when electrons originating from the finite temperature reservoir undergo destructive quantum interference. The local temperature is computed by numerically solving a nonlinear system of equations describing equilibration of a scanning thermoelectric probe with the system, and we obtain excellent agreement with analytic results derived using the Sommerfeld expansion. A local entropy for a nonequilibrium quantum system is introduced and used as a metric quantifying the departure from local equilibrium. It is shown that the local entropy of the system tends to zero when the probe temperature tends to zero, consistent with the third law of thermodynamics.

  15. Modeling the dependence of alumina solubility on temperature and melt composition in cryolite-based melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yunshu; Rapp, Robert A.

    2004-06-01

    The solubility of alumina in NaF-AlF3 melts was calculated and modeled thermodynamically for the temperature range of 1240 to 1300 K (967 °C to 1027 °C). The solute complexes of alumina in the cryolite melts were identified to be Na2Al2OF6 (acidic solute), Na2Al2O2F4 (neutral solute), and Na4Al2O2F6 (basic solute). The assumption that the oxygen-free solute species in solution were Na3AlF6 and NaAlF4 was supported by the modeling results. The equilibrium constants for the formation reactions of the solutes were calculated and the corresponding Δ G {/f 0} values were evaluated as a function of temperature. The interaction derivatives (∂ ln a NaF/∂ x add, ∂ ln a NaF/∂ x add, and ∂ ln a AlF3/∂ x add) for small additions of LiF, CaF2, and MgF2 to the NaF-AlF3-Al2O3 ternary system were also estimated as a function of temperature and melt composition.

  16. Electrical Noise and the Measurement of Absolute Temperature, Boltzmann's Constant and Avogadro's Number.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ericson, T. J.

    1988-01-01

    Describes an apparatus capable of measuring absolute temperatures of a tungsten filament bulb up to normal running temperature and measuring Botzmann's constant to an accuracy of a few percent. Shows that electrical noise techniques are convenient to demonstrate how the concept of temperature is related to the micro- and macroscopic world. (CW)

  17. Fast, Computer Supported Experimental Determination of Absolute Zero Temperature at School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bogacz, Bogdan F.; Pedziwiatr, Antoni T.

    2014-01-01

    A simple and fast experimental method of determining absolute zero temperature is presented. Air gas thermometer coupled with pressure sensor and data acquisition system COACH is applied in a wide range of temperature. By constructing a pressure vs temperature plot for air under constant volume it is possible to obtain--by extrapolation to zero…

  18. Melting of Temperature-Sensitive 3D Colloidal Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsayed, Ahmed; Han, Yilong; Yodh, Arjun

    2006-03-01

    We employ thermally responsive monodisperse microgel colloidal spheres to study the melting mechanisms of colloidal crystals [1]. The particle diameter decreases with increasing temperature and leads to volume fraction changes that drive phase-transitions. We will describe observations of a variety of phenomena. Premelting, the localized loss of crystalline order near defects (e.g. grain boundaries) at volume fractions above the bulk melting transition, is directly observed by video microscopy, and is characterized by monitoring the first peak position of the particle pair correlation function. We find the position of the first peak shifts toward smaller particle separations at the onset of premelting. After Delaunay triangulation, mean square rotational and translational fluctuations of bonds were measured close to and away from defects. The behavior of all such quantities exhibits increased disorder near the defects. By locally heating the material within a crystal domain, we also studied the superheating and melting of a perfect 3D crystal. Finally, the introduction of weak attractions between spheres reveals free-floating 3D crystal `blobs' which can be made to melt and recrystallize by tuning the temperature. [1] A. M. Alsayed, M. F. Islam, J. Zhang, P. J. Collings, A. G. Yodh, Science 309, 1207 (2005). This work was supported by grants from NSF (DMR-0505048 and MRSEC DMR05-20020) and NASA (NAG8-2172).

  19. Viscosity and Density Measurements of High Temperature Melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Yuzuru

    Since the viscosity and density are most fundamental properties for any fluids, many efforts to obtain reliable values have been made. However, the measurements are not so easy, especially at high temperature in molten state. The high temperature melts are typically classified into molten metals, molten salts, and molten oxides. They appear in many industrial processes, for example, steelmaking, nonferrous metallurgy, aluminum smelting, foundry, glass making, etc. The adaptable methods for the measurements should be chosen carefully by considering some physical and chemical properties of the melt. Iida published the review on the properties including viscosity and density of molten metals [1], and the comparison among the viscosities of molten iron reported by many researchers showed considerable difference of several dozen percent. The viscosity value is in considerably wide range depending on the groups of the melts, for example, in general low for molten metals and high for molten silicates, including slag and glass, and the difference reaches more than ten orders by reflecting the difference in the melt structure. On the other hand, density is mainly depending on atomic mass and not so different to each other because of not so big difference in molar volumes of the components. Various methods for viscosity and density measurement were also introduced [2] and also the viscometries were summarized [3].

  20. Temperature and composition dependencies of trace element partitioning - Olivine/melt and low-Ca pyroxene/melt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colson, R. O.; Mckay, G. A.; Taylor, L. A.

    1988-01-01

    This paper presents a systematic thermodynamic analysis of the effects of temperature and composition on olivine/melt and low-Ca pyroxene/melt partitioning. Experiments were conducted in several synthetic basalts with a wide range of Fe/Mg, determining partition coefficients for Eu, Ca, Mn, Fe, Ni, Sm, Cd, Y, Yb, Sc, Al, Zr, and Ti and modeling accurately the changes in free energy for trace element exchange between crystal and melt as functions of the trace element size and charge. On the basis of this model, partition coefficients for olivine/melt and low-Ca pyroxene/melt can be predicted for a wide range of elements over a variety of basaltic bulk compositions and temperatures. Moreover, variations in partition coeffeicients during crystallization or melting can be modeled on the basis of changes in temperature and major element chemistry.

  1. Syntheses of neptunium trichloride and measurements of its melting temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Hirokazu; Takano, Masahide; Kurata, Masaki; Minato, Kazuo

    2013-09-01

    Neptunium trichloride (NpCl3) of high purity was synthesized by the solid state reaction of neptunium nitride with cadmium chloride. Lattice parameters of hexagonal NpCl3 were determined from the powder X-ray diffraction pattern to be a = 0.7428 ± 0.0001 nm and c = 0.4262 ± 0.0003 nm, which fairly agree with the reported values. The melting temperature of NpCl3 was measured on a sample of about 1 mg, hermetically encapsulated in a gold crucible with a differential thermal analyzer. The value determined was 1070 ± 3 K which is close to the recommended value (1075 ± 30 K) derived from the mean value of the melting temperature of UCl3 and of PuCl3.

  2. A review of the deformation behavior of tungsten at temperatures less than 0.2 of the melting point /K/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, J. R.

    1974-01-01

    The deformation behavior of tungsten at temperatures below 0.2 times the absolute melting temperature is reviewed with primary emphasis on the temperature dependence of the yield stress and the ductile-brittle transition. It is concluded that a model based on the high Peierls stress of tungsten best accounts for the observed mechanical behavior at low temperatures. Recent research suggests an important role of electron concentration and bonding on the mechanical behavior of tungsten. Future research on tungsten should include studies to define more clearly the correlation between electron concentration and mechanical behavior of alloys of tungsten and other transition metal alloys.

  3. Melting and Frustration in Temperature-Sensitive Colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yodh, Arjun

    2009-03-01

    I will review experiments from my laboratory that employ temperature-sensitive microgel particles to induce novel phase behavior in suspension. This phenomenon offers a fantastic new variable for control of lyotropic suspensions. Recent experiments, for example, have enabled us to learn how three-dimensional crystals first begin to melt [1], to directly observe melting in 2-D wherein intermediate hexatic phases form [2], and to create geometrically frustrated colloidal ``anti-ferromagnets'' [3]. [4pt] References: [0pt] [1] Alsayed, A.M., Islam, M.F., Zhang, J., Collings, P.J., Yodh, A.G., Science 309, 1207-1210, (2005). [0pt] [2] Han Y, Ha NY, Alsayed AM and Yodh AG, Phys. Rev. E, Vol. 77 (2008). [0pt] [3] Y. Han, Y. Shokef, A. M. Alsayed, P. Yunker, T. C. Lubensky, and A. G. Yodh, ``Geometric frustration in buckled colloidal monolayers,'' to be published in Nature (2008).

  4. Effects of confining pressure, pore pressure and temperature on absolute permeability. SUPRI TR-27

    SciTech Connect

    Gobran, B.D.; Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Brigham, W.E.

    1981-10-01

    This study investigates absolute permeability of consolidated sandstone and unconsolidated sand cores to distilled water as a function of the confining pressure on the core, the pore pressure of the flowing fluid and the temperature of the system. Since permeability measurements are usually made in the laboratory under conditions very different from those in the reservoir, it is important to know the effect of various parameters on the measured value of permeability. All studies on the effect of confining pressure on absolute permeability have found that when the confining pressure is increased, the permeability is reduced. The studies on the effect of temperature have shown much less consistency. This work contradicts the past Stanford studies by finding no effect of temperature on the absolute permeability of unconsolidated sand or sandstones to distilled water. The probable causes of the past errors are discussed. It has been found that inaccurate measurement of temperature at ambient conditions and non-equilibrium of temperature in the core can lead to a fictitious permeability reduction with temperature increase. The results of this study on the effect of confining pressure and pore pressure support the theory that as confining pressure is increased or pore pressure decreased, the permeability is reduced. The effects of confining pressure and pore pressure changes on absolute permeability are given explicitly so that measurements made under one set of confining pressure/pore pressure conditions in the laboratory can be extrapolated to conditions more representative of the reservoir.

  5. Liquidus Temperatures of Cryolite Melts With Low Cryolite Ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apisarov, Alexei; Dedyukhin, Alexander; Nikolaeva, Elena; Tinghaev, Pavel; Tkacheva, Olga; Redkin, Alexander; Zaikov, Yurii

    2011-02-01

    The effect of calcium fluoride on liquidus temperatures of the cryolite melts with a low cryolite ratio (CR) was studied. The systems KF-NaF-AlF3 and KF-LiF-AlF3 with CRs of 1.3, 1.5, and 1.7 have been investigated. The liquidus curves of systems containing CaF2 are different and depend on the K/(K + Na) and K/(K + Li) ratios. In potassium cryolite with CRs of 1.3 and 1.5, the calcium fluoride solubility is low and increases with NaF (LiF) concentration.

  6. In situ thermal imaging and absolute temperature monitoring by luminescent diphenylalanine nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Gan, Zhixing; Wu, Xinglong; Zhang, Jinlei; Zhu, Xiaobin; Chu, Paul K

    2013-06-10

    The temperature sensing capability of diphenylalanine nanotubes is investigated. The materials can detect local rapid temperature changes and measure the absolute temperature in situ with a precision of 1 °C by monitoring the temperature-dependent photoluminescence (PL) intensity and lifetime, respectively. The PL lifetime is independent of ion concentrations in the medium as well as pH in the physiological range. This biocompatible thermal sensing platform has immense potential in the in situ mapping of microenvironmental temperature fluctuations in biological systems for disease diagnosis and therapeutics. PMID:23679829

  7. A New Approach For Absolute Temperature Calibration: Application to the CLARREO Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Best, F. A.; Adler, D. P.; Ellington, S. D.; Thielman, D. J.; Revercomb, H. E.; Anderson, J. G.

    2007-12-01

    A novel scheme to provide on-orbit absolute calibration of blackbody temperature sensors (on-demand) has been demonstrated using a copy of the engineering model version of a space flight hardware blackbody design (GIFTS). The scheme uses the phase change signature of reference materials to assign an absolute temperatures scale to the blackbody sensors over a large temperature range. Uncertainties of better than 0.020 K have been demonstrated over the temperature range from 234 to 303 K. Thermal modeling has been conducted to optimize the design, and to show that accuracies comparable to those measured in the laboratory should be obtainable in the less-controlled on-orbit temperature environment. The implementation if this scheme is very attractive due to its simplicity and relatively low mass. In addition, all aspects of the electronics (control and temperature readout) needed to support this scheme have been developed and demonstrated in the as-delivered GIFTS Engineering Model blackbody calibration system developed by the University of Wisconsin. NASA's anticipated plan for a mission dedicated to Climate (CLARREO) will hinge upon the ability to fly absolute standards that can provide the basis to meet stringent requirements on measurement accuracy. For example, instrumentation designed to measure spectrally resolved infrared radiances will require high-emissivity calibration blackbodies having absolute temperature uncertainties of better than 0.020 K (3 sigma). The novel blackbody temperature calibration scheme described here is very well suited for the CLARREO mission because if its low mass, high accuracy, and ease of implementation into a demonstrated flight blackbody design.

  8. Performance Demonstration of Miniature Phase Transition Cells in Microgravity as a Validation for their use in the Absolute Calibration of Temperature Sensors On-Orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pettersen, C.; Best, F. A.; Adler, D. P.; Aguilar, D. M.; Perepezko, J. H.

    2012-12-01

    The next generation of infrared remote sensing missions, including the climate benchmark missions, will require better absolute measurement accuracy than now available, and will most certainly rely on the emerging capability to fly SI traceable standards that provide irrefutable absolute measurement accuracy. As an example, instrumentation designed to measure spectrally resolved infrared radiances with an absolute brightness temperature error of better than 0.1 K will require high-emissivity (>0.999) calibration blackbodies requiring absolute temperature uncertainties of better than 0.045K (k=3). Key elements of an On-Orbit Absolute Radiance Standard (OARS) meeting these stringent requirements have been demonstrated in the laboratory at the University of Wisconsin and were further refined under the NASA Instrument Incubator Program (IIP). In particular, the OARS has imbedded thermistors that can be periodically calibrated on-orbit using the melt signatures of small quantities (<0.5g) of three reference materials - mercury, water, and gallium, providing calibration from 233K to 303K. One of the many tests to determine the readiness of this technology for on-orbit application is a demonstration of performance in microgravity to be conducted on the International Space Station (ISS). This demonstration will make use of an Experiment Support Package developed by Utah State Space Dynamics Laboratory to continuously run melt cycles on miniature phase change cells containing gallium, a gallium-tin eutectic, and water. The phase change cells will be mounted in a small aluminum block along with a thermistor temperature sensor. A thermoelectric cooler will be used to change the temperature of the block. The demonstration will use the configuration of the phase transition cells developed under our NASA IIP that has been tested extensively in the laboratory under simulated mission life cycle scenarios - these included vibration, thermal soaks, and deep cycling. Melt signatures

  9. Temperature-dependent Absolute Refractive Index Measurements of Synthetic Fused Silica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leviton, Douglas B.; Frey, Bradley J.

    2006-01-01

    Using the Cryogenic, High-Accuracy Refraction Measuring System (CHARMS) at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, we have measured the absolute refractive index of five specimens taken from a very large boule of Corning 7980 fused silica from temperatures ranging from 30 to 310 K at wavelengths from 0.4 to 2.6 microns with an absolute uncertainty of plus or minus 1 x 10 (exp -5). Statistical variations in derived values of the thermo-optic coefficient (dn/dT) are at the plus or minus 2 x 10 (exp -8)/K level. Graphical and tabulated data for absolute refractive index, dispersion, and thermo-optic coefficient are presented for selected wavelengths and temperatures along with estimates of uncertainty in index. Coefficients for temperature-dependent Sellmeier fits of measured refractive index are also presented to allow accurate interpolation of index to other wavelengths and temperatures. We compare our results to those from an independent investigation (which used an interferometric technique for measuring index changes as a function of temperature) whose samples were prepared from the same slugs of material from which our prisms were prepared in support of the Kepler mission. We also compare our results with sparse cryogenic index data from measurements of this material from the literature.

  10. On the melting temperatures of low-temperature phases of polymorphic metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohsaka, K.; Trinh, E. H.

    1992-01-01

    An improved analytical formula for determining the melting temperatures of the low-temperature phases of polymorphic metals is proposed which uses the specific heat differences at the equilibrium transition temperatures. The formula is solved by an iterative method, with no more than one iteration necessary to converge. The results obtained using the formula proposed here are generally in good agreement with the analytical solution.

  11. Performance Demonstration of Miniature Phase Transition Cells in Microgravity as a Validation for their use in the Absolute Calibration of Temperature Sensors On-Orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pettersen, C.; Adler, D. P.; Best, F. A.; Aguilar, D. M.; Perepezko, J. H.

    2011-12-01

    The next generation of infrared remote sensing missions, including the climate benchmark missions, will require better absolute measurement accuracy than now available, and will most certainly rely on the emerging capability to fly SI traceable standards that provide irrefutable absolute measurement accuracy. As an example, instrumentation designed to measure spectrally resolved infrared radiances with an absolute brightness temperature error of better than 0.1 K will require high-emissivity (>0.999) calibration blackbodies requiring absolute temperature uncertainties of better than 0.045K (k=3). Key elements of an On-Orbit Absolute Radiance Standard (OARS) meeting these stringent requirements have been demonstrated in the laboratory at the University of Wisconsin and are undergoing further refinement under the NASA Instrument Incubator Program (IIP). In particular, the OARS has embedded thermistors that can be periodically calibrated on-orbit using the melt signatures of small quantities (<0.5g) of three reference materials - mercury, water, and gallium (providing calibration from 233K to 303K). One of the many tests to determine the readiness of this technology for on-orbit application is a demonstration of performance in microgravity. We present the details of a demonstration experiment to be conducted on the International Space Station later this year. The demonstration will use the configuration of the phase transition cells developed under our NASA IIP that has been tested extensively in the laboratory under simulated mission life cycle scenarios - these included vibration, thermal soaks, and deep cycling. The planned microgravity demonstration will compare melt signatures obtained pre-flight on the ground with those obtained on the ISS for three phase change materials (water, gallium-tin, and gallium). With a successful demonstration experiment the phase transition cells in a microgravity environment will have cleared the last hurdle before being ready for

  12. Absolute brightness temperature measurements at 3.5-mm wavelength. [of sun, Venus, Jupiter and Saturn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulich, B. L.; Rhodes, P. J.; Davis, J. H.; Hollis, J. M.

    1980-01-01

    Careful observations have been made at 86.1 GHz to derive the absolute brightness temperatures of the sun (7914 + or - 192 K), Venus (357.5 + or - 13.1 K), Jupiter (179.4 + or - 4.7 K), and Saturn (153.4 + or - 4.8 K) with a standard error of about three percent. This is a significant improvement in accuracy over previous results at millimeter wavelengths. A stable transmitter and novel superheterodyne receiver were constructed and used to determine the effective collecting area of the Millimeter Wave Observatory (MWO) 4.9-m antenna relative to a previously calibrated standard gain horn. The thermal scale was set by calibrating the radiometer with carefully constructed and tested hot and cold loads. The brightness temperatures may be used to establish an absolute calibration scale and to determine the antenna aperture and beam efficiencies of other radio telescopes at 3.5-mm wavelength.

  13. Absolutely Exponential Stability and Temperature Control for Gas Chromatograph System Under Dwell Time Switching Techniques.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xi-Ming; Wang, Xue-Fang; Tan, Ying; Wang, Xiao-Liang; Wang, Wei

    2016-06-01

    This paper provides a design strategy for temperature control of the gas chromatograph. Usually gas chromatograph is modeled by a simple first order system with a time-delay, and a proportion integration (PI) controller is widely used to regulate the output of the gas chromatograph to the desired temperature. As the characteristics of the gas chromatograph varies at the different temperature range, the single-model based PI controller cannot work well when output temperature varies from one range to another. Moreover, the presence of various disturbance will further deteriorate the performance. In order to improve the accuracy of the temperature control, multiple models are used at the different temperature ranges. With a PI controller designed for each model accordingly, a delay-dependent switching control scheme using the dwell time technique is proposed to ensure the absolute exponential stability of the closed loop. Experiment results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed switching technique. PMID:26316283

  14. Temperature effects on atomic pair distribution functions of melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, J.; Xu, M.; Guan, P. F.; Deng, S. W.; Cheng, Y. Q.; Ma, E.

    2014-02-01

    Using molecular dynamics simulations, we investigate the temperature-dependent evolution of the first peak position/shape in pair distribution functions of liquids. For metallic liquids, the peak skews towards the left (shorter distance side) with increasing temperature, similar to the previously reported anomalous peak shift. Making use of constant-volume simulations in the absence of thermal expansion and change in inherent structure, we demonstrate that the apparent shift of the peak maximum can be a result of the asymmetric shape of the peak, as the asymmetry increases with temperature-induced spreading of neighboring atoms to shorter and longer distances due to the anharmonic nature of the interatomic interaction potential. These findings shed light on the first-shell expansion/contraction paradox for metallic liquids, aside from possible changes in local topological or chemical short-range ordering. The melts of covalent materials are found to exhibit an opposite trend of peak shift, which is attributed to an effect of the directionality of the interatomic bonds.

  15. Temperature effects on atomic pair distribution functions of melts

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, J. Ma, E.; Xu, M.; Guan, P. F.; Deng, S. W.; Cheng, Y. Q.

    2014-02-14

    Using molecular dynamics simulations, we investigate the temperature-dependent evolution of the first peak position/shape in pair distribution functions of liquids. For metallic liquids, the peak skews towards the left (shorter distance side) with increasing temperature, similar to the previously reported anomalous peak shift. Making use of constant-volume simulations in the absence of thermal expansion and change in inherent structure, we demonstrate that the apparent shift of the peak maximum can be a result of the asymmetric shape of the peak, as the asymmetry increases with temperature-induced spreading of neighboring atoms to shorter and longer distances due to the anharmonic nature of the interatomic interaction potential. These findings shed light on the first-shell expansion/contraction paradox for metallic liquids, aside from possible changes in local topological or chemical short-range ordering. The melts of covalent materials are found to exhibit an opposite trend of peak shift, which is attributed to an effect of the directionality of the interatomic bonds.

  16. Electron cyclotron emission measurements on JET: Michelson interferometer, new absolute calibration, and determination of electron temperature.

    PubMed

    Schmuck, S; Fessey, J; Gerbaud, T; Alper, B; Beurskens, M N A; de la Luna, E; Sirinelli, A; Zerbini, M

    2012-12-01

    At the fusion experiment JET, a Michelson interferometer is used to measure the spectrum of the electron cyclotron emission in the spectral range 70-500 GHz. The interferometer is absolutely calibrated using the hot/cold technique and, in consequence, the spatial profile of the plasma electron temperature is determined from the measurements. The current state of the interferometer hardware, the calibration setup, and the analysis technique for calibration and plasma operation are described. A new, full-system, absolute calibration employing continuous data acquisition has been performed recently and the calibration method and results are presented. The noise level in the measurement is very low and as a result the electron cyclotron emission spectrum and thus the spatial profile of the electron temperature are determined to within ±5% and in the most relevant region to within ±2%. The new calibration shows that the absolute response of the system has decreased by about 15% compared to that measured previously and possible reasons for this change are presented. Temperature profiles measured with the Michelson interferometer are compared with profiles measured independently using Thomson scattering diagnostics, which have also been recently refurbished and recalibrated, and agreement within experimental uncertainties is obtained. PMID:23282107

  17. Pressure dependence of the melting temperature of solids - Rare-gas solids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlosser, Herbert; Ferrante, John

    1991-01-01

    A method presented by Schlosser et al. (1989) for analyzing the pressure dependence of experimental melting-temperature data is applied to rare-gas solids. The plots of the logarithm of the reduced melting temperature vs that of the reduced pressure are straight lines in the absence of phase transitions. The plots of the reduced melting temperatures for Ar, Kr, and Xe are shown to be approximately straight lines.

  18. Study of absolute detection technique with the rotational Raman lidar for atmospheric temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shichun; Wei, Pengpeng; Gong, Xin; Hua, Dengxin

    2015-10-01

    The rotational Raman lidar is a valid tool to profile atmospheric temperature. But the fact that its proper operation generally needs a certain collocated device for calibration seriously restricts application in the meteorology and environment fields. We propose an absolute detection technique of atmospheric temperature with the rotational Raman lidar, which is based on the dependence of rotational Raman spectral envelope on temperature. To retrieve atmospheric temperature without calibration, six rotational Raman spectra of nitrogen molecule are chosen from the anti-Strokes branch. A temperature retrieval algorithm is presented and analyzed based on the least square principle. A two-cascade Raman spectroscopic filter is constructed by one first-order diffraction grating, one convex lens, one linear fiber array and 6 groups of fiber Bragg gratings. This lidar is configured with a 300-mJ pulse energy laser and a 250-mm clear aperture telescope. Simulation results show that it can extract the nitrogen molecules rotational Raman spectral lines, and that atmospheric temperature profile obtained through absolute retrieval algorithm can be up to 3.5 km with less than 0.5-K deviation within 17 minutes interval.

  19. Time-series modeling and prediction of global monthly absolute temperature for environmental decision making

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Liming; Yang, Guixia; Van Ranst, Eric; Tang, Huajun

    2013-03-01

    A generalized, structural, time series modeling framework was developed to analyze the monthly records of absolute surface temperature, one of the most important environmental parameters, using a deterministicstochastic combined (DSC) approach. Although the development of the framework was based on the characterization of the variation patterns of a global dataset, the methodology could be applied to any monthly absolute temperature record. Deterministic processes were used to characterize the variation patterns of the global trend and the cyclic oscillations of the temperature signal, involving polynomial functions and the Fourier method, respectively, while stochastic processes were employed to account for any remaining patterns in the temperature signal, involving seasonal autoregressive integrated moving average (SARIMA) models. A prediction of the monthly global surface temperature during the second decade of the 21st century using the DSC model shows that the global temperature will likely continue to rise at twice the average rate of the past 150 years. The evaluation of prediction accuracy shows that DSC models perform systematically well against selected models of other authors, suggesting that DSC models, when coupled with other ecoenvironmental models, can be used as a supplemental tool for short-term (˜10-year) environmental planning and decision making.

  20. Numerical modeling of inward and outward melting of high temperature PCM in a vertical cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riahi, S.; Saman, W. Y.; Bruno, F.; Tay, N. H. S.

    2016-05-01

    Numerical study of inward and outward melting of a high temperature PCM in cylindrical enclosures were performed, using FLUENT 15. For validation purposes, numerical modeling of inward melting of a low temperature PCM was initially conducted and the predicted results were compared with the experimental data from the literature. The validated model for the low temperature PCM was used for two high temperature cases; inward melting of a high temperature PCM in a cylindrical enclosure and outward melting in a cylindrical case with higher aspect ratio. The results of this study show that the numerical model developed is capable of capturing the details of melting process with buoyancy driven convection for Ra<108, i.e. laminar flow, for a high temperature PCM and can be used for the design and optimization of a latent heat thermal storage unit.

  1. Entropic changes in liquid gallium clusters: understanding the anomalous melting temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaston, Nicola; Steenbergen, Krista

    Melting in finite-sized materials differs in two ways from the solid-liquid phase transition in bulk systems. First, there is an inherent scaling of the melting temperature below that of the bulk, known as melting point depression. Secondly, at small sizes, changes in melting temperature become non-monotonic, and show a size-dependence that is sensitive to the structure of the particle. Melting temperatures that exceed those of the bulk material have been shown to occur in vacuum, but have still never been ascribed a convincing physical explanation. Here we find answers in the structure of the aggregate liquid phase in small gallium clusters, based on molecular dynamics simulations that reproduce the greater-than-bulk melting behavior observed in experiments, and demonstrate the critical role of a lowered entropy in destabilising the liquid state.

  2. Melting and casting processes for high-temperature intermetallics

    SciTech Connect

    Sen, Subhayu; Stefanescu, D.M. )

    1991-05-01

    Most of the metallic systems thus far identified as promising from the commercial viewpoint are composed of elements which are either susceptible to oxidation, such as Al, or highly reactive, such as Ti; these characteristics entail the use of such melting and casting techniques as vacuum-induction melting, vacuum-arc remelting, electroslag refining, plasma-arc melting, spray casting, and directional solidification. Spray casting is noteworthy both in its ability to produce near-net-shape components and its inherent reduction of the oxygen and hydrogen pickup which has been associated with the embrittlement of aluminides. 24 refs.

  3. Absolute temperature measurements using a two-color QWIP focal plane array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bundas, Jason; Dennis, Richard; Patnaude, Kelly; Burrows, Douglas; Faska, Ross; Sundaram, Mani; Reisinger, Axel; Manitakos, Dan

    2010-04-01

    The infrared photon flux emitted by an object depends not only on its temperature but also on a proportionality factor referred to as its emissivity. Since the latter parameter is usually not known quantitatively a priori, any temperature determination based on single-band radiometric measurements suffers from an inherent uncertainty. Recording photon fluxes in two separate spectral bands can in principle circumvent this limitation. The technique amounts to solving a system of two equations in two unknowns, namely, temperature and emissivity. The temperature derived in this manner can be considered absolute in the sense that it is independent of the emissivity, as long as that emissivity is the same in both bands. QmagiQ has previously developed a 320x256 midwave/longwave staring focal plane array which has been packaged into a dual-band laboratory camera. The camera in question constitutes a natural tool to generate simultaneous and independent emissivity maps and temperature maps of entire two-dimensional scenes, rather than at a single point on an object of interest. We describe a series of measurements we have performed on a variety of targets of different emissivities and temperatures. We examine various factors that affect the accuracy of the technique. They include the influence of the ambient radiation reflected off the target, which must be properly accounted for and subtracted from the collected signal in order to lead to the true target temperature. We also quantify the consequences of spectrally varying emissivities.

  4. Melting Temperature and Partial Melt Chemistry of H2O-Saturated Mantle Peridotite to 11 Gigapascals

    PubMed

    Kawamoto; Holloway

    1997-04-11

    The H2O-saturated solidus of a model mantle composition (Kilborne Hole peridotite nodule, KLB-1) was determined to be just above 1000°C from 5 to 11 gigapascals. Given reasonable H2O abundances in Earth's mantle, an H2O-rich fluid could exist only in a region defined by the wet solidus and thermal stability limits of hydrous minerals, at depths between 90 and 330 kilometers. The experimental partial melts monotonously became more mafic with increasing pressure from andesitic composition at 1 gigapascal to more mafic than the starting peridotite at 10 gigapascals. Because the chemistry of the experimental partial melts is similar to that of kimberlites, it is suggested that kimberlites may be derived by low-temperature melting of an H2O-rich mantle at depths of 150 to 300 kilometers. PMID:9092469

  5. Measurements of absolute absorption cross sections of ozone in the 185- to 254-nm wavelength region and the temperature dependence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoshino, K.; Esmond, J. R.; Freeman, D. E.; Parkinson, W. H.

    1993-01-01

    Laboratory measurements of the relative absorption cross sections of ozone at temperatures 195, 228, and 295 K have been made throughout the 185 to 254 nm wavelength region. The absolute absorption cross sections at the same temperatures have been measured at several discrete wavelengths in the 185 to 250 nm region. The absolute cross sections of ozone have been used to put the relative cross sections on a firm absolute basis throughout the 185 to 255 nm region. These recalibrated cross sections are slightly lower than those of Molina and Molina (1986), but the differences are within a few percent and would not be significant in atmospheric applications.

  6. The impact of water temperature on the measurement of absolute dose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, Naveed Mehdi

    To standardize reference dosimetry in radiation therapy, Task Group 51 (TG 51) of American Association of Physicist's in Medicine (AAPM) recommends that dose calibration measurements be made in a water tank at a depth of 10 cm and at a reference geometry. Methodologies are provided for calculating various correction factors to be applied in calculating the absolute dose. However the protocol does not specify the water temperature to be used. In practice, the temperature of water during dosimetry may vary considerably between independent sessions and different centers. In this work the effect of water temperature on absolute dosimetry has been investigated. Density of water varies with temperature, which in turn may impact the beam attenuation and scatter properties. Furthermore, due to thermal expansion or contraction air volume inside the chamber may change. All of these effects can result in a change in the measurement. Dosimetric measurements were made using a Farmer type ion chamber on a Varian Linear Accelerator for 6 MV and 23 MV photon energies for temperatures ranging from 10 to 40 °C. A thermal insulation was designed for the water tank in order to maintain relatively stable temperature over the duration of the experiment. Dose measured at higher temperatures were found to be consistently higher by a very small magnitude. Although the differences in dose were less than the uncertainty in each measurement, a linear regression of the data suggests that the trend is statistically significant with p-values of 0.002 and 0.013 for 6 and 23 MV beams respectively. For a 10 degree difference in water phantom temperatures, which is a realistic deviation across clinics, the final calculated reference dose can differ by 0.24% or more. To address this effect, first a reference temperature (e.g.22 °C) can be set as the standard; subsequently a correction factor can be implemented for deviations from this reference. Such a correction factor is expected to be of similar

  7. High Strain-Rate Response of High Purity Aluminum at Temperatures Approaching Melt

    SciTech Connect

    Grunschel, S E; Clifton, R J; Jiao, T

    2010-01-28

    High-temperature, pressure-shear plate impact experiments were conducted to investigate the rate-controlling mechanisms of the plastic response of high-purity aluminum at high strain rates (10{sup 6} s{sup -1}) and at temperatures approaching melt. Since the melting temperature of aluminum is pressure dependent, and a typical pressure-shear plate impact experiment subjects the sample to large pressures (2 GPa-7 GPa), a pressure-release type experiment was used to reduce the pressure in order to measure the shearing resistance at temperatures up to 95% of the current melting temperature. The measured shearing resistance was remarkably large (50 MPa at a shear strain of 2.5) for temperatures this near melt. Numerical simulations conducted using a version of the Nemat-Nasser/Isaacs constitutive equation, modified to model the mechanism of geometric softening, appear to capture adequately the hardening/softening behavior observed experimentally.

  8. 46 CFR 153.908 - Cargo viscosity and melting point information; measuring cargo temperature during discharge...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Cargo viscosity and melting point information; measuring... Cargo viscosity and melting point information; measuring cargo temperature during discharge: Categories... lading, a written statement of the following: (1) For Category A or B NLS, the cargo's viscosity at 20...

  9. 46 CFR 153.908 - Cargo viscosity and melting point information; measuring cargo temperature during discharge...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Cargo viscosity and melting point information; measuring... Cargo viscosity and melting point information; measuring cargo temperature during discharge: Categories... lading, a written statement of the following: (1) For Category A or B NLS, the cargo's viscosity at 20...

  10. 46 CFR 153.908 - Cargo viscosity and melting point information; measuring cargo temperature during discharge...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Cargo viscosity and melting point information; measuring... Cargo viscosity and melting point information; measuring cargo temperature during discharge: Categories... lading, a written statement of the following: (1) For Category A or B NLS, the cargo's viscosity at 20...

  11. 46 CFR 153.908 - Cargo viscosity and melting point information; measuring cargo temperature during discharge...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Cargo viscosity and melting point information; measuring... Cargo viscosity and melting point information; measuring cargo temperature during discharge: Categories... lading, a written statement of the following: (1) For Category A or B NLS, the cargo's viscosity at 20...

  12. Liquid structure and temperature invariance of sound velocity in supercooled Bi melt

    SciTech Connect

    Emuna, M.; Mayo, M.; Makov, G.; Greenberg, Y.; Caspi, E. N.; Yahel, E.; Beuneu, B.

    2014-03-07

    Structural rearrangement of liquid Bi in the vicinity of the melting point has been proposed due to the unique temperature invariant sound velocity observed above the melting temperature, the low symmetry of Bi in the solid phase and the necessity of overheating to achieve supercooling. The existence of this structural rearrangement is examined by measurements on supercooled Bi. The sound velocity of liquid Bi was measured into the supercooled region to high accuracy and it was found to be invariant over a temperature range of ∼60°, from 35° above the melting point to ∼25° into the supercooled region. The structural origin of this phenomenon was explored by neutron diffraction structural measurements in the supercooled temperature range. These measurements indicate a continuous modification of the short range order in the melt. The structure of the liquid is analyzed within a quasi-crystalline model and is found to evolve continuously, similar to other known liquid pnictide systems. The results are discussed in the context of two competing hypotheses proposed to explain properties of liquid Bi near the melting: (i) liquid bismuth undergoes a structural rearrangement slightly above melting and (ii) liquid Bi exhibits a broad maximum in the sound velocity located incidentally at the melting temperature.

  13. Absolute absorption cross-section measurements of ozone in the wavelength region 238-335 nm and the temperature dependence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoshino, K.; Freeman, D. E.; Esmond, J. R.; Parkinson, W. H.

    1988-01-01

    The absolute absorption cross-section of ozone has been experimentally determined at the temperatures 195, 228, and 295 K at several discrete wavelengths in the 238-335-nm region. The present results for ozone at 295 K are found to be in agreement with those of Hearn (1961). Absolute cross-section measurements of ozone at 195 K have confirmed previous (Freeman et al., 1984) relative cross-section measurements throughout the 240-335-nm region.

  14. Thermal Diffusivity for III-VI Semiconductor Melts at Different Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ban, H.; Li, C.; Lin, B.; Emoto, K.; Scripa, R. N.; Su, C.-H.; Lehoczky, S. L.

    2004-01-01

    The change of the thermal properties of semiconductor melts reflects the structural changes inside the melts, and a fundamental understanding of this structural transformation is essential for high quality semiconductor crystal growth process. This paper focused on the technical development and the measurement of thermal properties of III-VI semiconductor melts at high temperatures. Our previous work has improved the laser flash method for the specialized quartz sample cell. In this paper, we reported the results of our recent progress in further improvements of the measurement system by minimizing the free convection of the melt, adding a front IR detector, and placing the sample cell in a vacuum environment. The results for tellurium and selenium based compounds, some of which have never been reported in the literature, were obtained at different temperatures as a function of time. The data were compared with other measured thermophysical properties to shed light on the structural transformations of the melt.

  15. Size and shape dependent melting temperature and thermal expansivity of metallic and semiconductor nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Ghanshyam R.; Thakar, Nilesh A.; Pandya, Tushar C.

    2016-05-01

    Liquid drop model is used to predict the size dependent melting temperature of low dimensional systems. In the present work we have modified liquid drop model for predicting shape and size dependent melting temperature of nanoparticles of Pb and Si. The new modified liquid drop model gives good agreement between calculated and experimental data which demonstrate the validity of the present work. It is found that the particle shape can affect the melting temperature of nanoparticles and this effect on the melting temperature becomes larger with decreasing of particle size. In the present study relationship for size and shape dependent of thermal expansivity is deduced for metallic and semiconductor nanoparticles. The present relationship for thermal expansivity may be used to predict the coefficient of thermal expansion for nanoparticles.

  16. Thermophysical properties of liquid Ni around the melting temperature from molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozas, R. E.; Demiraǧ, A. D.; Toledo, P. G.; Horbach, J.

    2016-08-01

    Thermophysical properties of liquid nickel (Ni) around the melting temperature are investigated by means of classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulation, using three different embedded atom method potentials to model the interactions between the Ni atoms. Melting temperature, enthalpy, static structure factor, self-diffusion coefficient, shear viscosity, and thermal diffusivity are compared to recent experimental results. Using ab initio MD simulation, we also determine the static structure factor and the mean-squared displacement at the experimental melting point. For most of the properties, excellent agreement is found between experiment and simulation, provided the comparison relative to the corresponding melting temperature. We discuss the validity of the Hansen-Verlet criterion for the static structure factor as well as the Stokes-Einstein relation between self-diffusion coefficient and shear viscosity. The thermal diffusivity is extracted from the autocorrelation function of a wavenumber-dependent temperature fluctuation variable.

  17. Physical Basis for the Temperature-Based Melt-Index Method.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohmura, Atsumu

    2001-04-01

    The close relationship between air temperature measured at standard screen level and the rate of melt on snow and ice has been widely used to estimate the rate of melt. The parameterization of the melt rate using air temperature usually takes a simple form as a function of either the mean temperature for the relevant period or positive degree-day statistics. The computation provides the melt rate with sufficient accuracy for most practical purposes. Because of its simplicity, it is often called a crude method and is rated as inferior to other more sophisticated methods such as the energy balance method. The method is often used with the justification that temperature data are easily available or that obtaining energy balance fluxes is difficult. The physical process responsible for the temperature effect on the melt rate is often attributed to the sensible heat conduction from the atmosphere. The simulation capacity of the temperature-based melt-index method, however, is too good to be called crude and inferior. The author investigated physical processes that make the air temperature so effective a parameter for melt rate. Air temperature has a more profound influence on melt than previously has been acknowledged. The influence of air temperature through the turbulent sensible heat flux is limited, however. The air temperature information is transferred to the surface mainly through longwave atmospheric radiation, which is by far the most important heat source for melt. Under cloudless-sky conditions, as much as 60% of the atmospheric emission is derived from within the first 100 m and 90% from the first 1 km of the atmosphere. When the sky is overcast with the cloud bottom within the first 1 km, more than 90% originates within this layer between the surface and the bottom of the cloud. When the sky is overcast with the cloud bottom higher than 1 km, the first 1 km of the atmosphere still makes up about 70% of the longwave irradiance at the surface, for which the

  18. Absolute Measurements of Starspot Area and Temperature: II Pegasi in 1989 October

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neff, James E.; O'Neal, Douglas; Saar, Steven H.

    1995-10-01

    We are developing an empirical spectrum synthesis technique that yields independent measurements of starspot filling factor, f5, and starspot temperature, TS, by fitting TiO bands of differing temperature sensitivity. The absolute depth of the TiO bands constrains fS, while the ratio of their depths is a function only of TS. One strength of this technique is its ability to determine the spot parameters in traditionally difficult cases: slowly rotating stars, uniformly spotted stars, and stars that always have spots. For this initial study, we have used a simpler procedure of measuring the band depths in the most spotted star in our survey (the single-lined RS CVn binary system II Pegasi) and for a full grid of comparison stars (inactive G, K, and M dwarfs and giants). This yields TS and fS for a given assumed temperature of the nonspotted photosphere, TQ. The latter was further constrained by the use of simultaneous photometry. We have analyzed a series of spectra of II Peg obtained throughout a single 6.7 day rotational cycle in 1989 October. We find that starspots on II Peg are better modeled by comparison spectra of giants than by dwarfs. Combining TiO analysis with contemporaneous photometry, we find that cool starspots (TS ≍ 3500 K) are always visible, with a fractional projected coverage of the visible hemisphere varying from 54% to 64% as the star rotates. The nonspotted photosphere has a temperature TQ ≍ 4800 K. Our results imply that even at the historical light maximum of V = 7.2, at least 34% of II Peg was covered by starspots.

  19. Determination of the melting temperature of palladium nanoparticles by X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlasenko, V. G.; Podsukhina, S. S.; Kozinkin, A. V.; Zubavichus, Ya. V.

    2016-02-01

    The anharmonicity parameters of the interatomic potential in ~4-nm palladium nanoparticles deposited on poly(tetra)fluoroethylene microgranules 0.2-0.5 μm in average size were studied by X-ray absorption spectroscopy from an analysis of temperature-dependent EXAFS Pd K edges. The parameters of the interatomic potential obtained were used to calculate melting temperature T melt = 1591 K and Debye temperature ΘD = 257 K of palladium nanoparticles; these temperatures are significantly lower than those in metallic palladium: 277 K and 1825 K, respectively.

  20. Measurement of absolute minority species concentration and temperature in a flame by the photothermal deflection spectroscopy technique.

    PubMed

    Li, Yunjing; Gupta, Rajendra

    2003-04-20

    It is experimentally demonstrated that absolute concentrations of minority species in flames can be measured by the photothermal deflection spectroscopy (PTDS) technique. In addition, the PTDS signal simultaneously yields the flame temperature the measurement point. Absolute concentration profiles of OH have been measured in a flat-flame burner with methane as fuel. The PTDS measurements agree well with those obtained independently by the absorption technique. The flame temperature measurements by PTDS are also in good agreement with those obtained by the Boltzmann distribution among the rotational levels of OH. PMID:12716166

  1. The melting curve of iron to 250 gigapascals - A constraint on the temperature at earth's center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Quentin; Jeanloz, Raymond; Bass, Jay; Svendsen, Bob; Ahrens, Thomas J.

    1987-01-01

    The melting curve of iron, the primary constituent of earth's core, has been measured to pressures of 250 gigapascals with a combination of static and dynamic techniques. The melting temperature of iron at the pressure of the core-mantle boundary (136 GPa) is 4800 + or - 200 K, whereas at the inner core-outer core boundary (330 GPa), it is 7600 + or - 500 K. A melting temperature for iron-rich alloy of 6600 K at the inner core-outer core boundary and a maximum temperature of 6900 K at earth's center are inferred. This latter value is the first experimental upper bound on the temperature at earth's center, and these results imply that the temperature of the lower mantle is significantly less than that of the outer core.

  2. The physical basis of enhanced temperature index ice melt parameterizations in the Nepal Himalaya.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litt, Maxime; Shea, Joseph; Koch, Inka; Wagnon, Patrick

    2016-04-01

    Glacier melt is an important component of seasonal water flows in the Himalayas. Due to scarce data availability and computational convenience, most glaciological projections in the Himalayan region derive ice melt from temperature index (TI) or enhanced temperature index (ETI) parameterizations, which require only temperature and solar radiation as inputs. Still, the processes linking these variables to melt remain poorly documented under high-altitude climates, where the air is cold, and the main input is shortwave radiation. In this study, we question the physical basis of enhanced temperature index (ETI) melt parameterizations in the Nepal Himalayas. Using atmospheric weather station (AWS) installed on Yala glacier at 5090 m a.s.l and Mera glaciers at 6350 m a.s.l., we study the surface energy balance (SEB) during one melt season, i.e, the monsoon and surrounding weeks, in 2014. The SEB estimates provide insights into the atmospheric controls on the glaciers. We study the variability of correlation coefficients linking daily means of temperature, SEB and SEB components. On Yala at 5090 m a.s.l, energy inputs are high during the pre-monsoon due to low surface albedo and strong incoming solar radiation near the solstice, and melt is strong. The temperature correlates moderately with the SEB (R = 0.58) mainly through sublimation and net longwave radiation. During the monsoon snow deposition reduces the magnitude of net shortwave radiation, thus dampening the melt rates. Strong longwave emission from clouds compensates for the surface emission, and the correlation of temperature with the SEB, mainly explained through net shortwave radiation, decreases (R = 0.49). During the post-monsoon, high albedo, heat losses through sublimation and clear-skies favoring longwave losses at the surface lead to a near zero SEB, and reduced melt. Temperature correlates well with the SEB (R = 0.88) through net longwave radiation. On Mera at 6300 m a.s.l, high surface albedo and

  3. Experimental investigations of melting at ultra-high pressures and temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavner, Abby

    The laser-heated diamond anvil cell is an important experimental tool used to access the high pressures and temperatures existing in the interior of the Earth and other planets. The ability to measure a temperature at high pressures is established, and the melting curves of elemental platinum and a complex aggregate, Allende meteorite, are determined. The melting curve of platinum was determined using a laser-heated diamond anvil cell in the pressure range of 12 to 70 GPa. The melting temperature at a given pressure is bracketed by a combination of visual observations and corresponding temperature measurements. The complete melting curve is built up from a series of melting experiments as a function of pressure, performed under different experimental conditions in the diamond cell; however, the placement of the phase boundary is inherently uncertain, due to an experimental "region of indifference" as the phase boundary is approached. To quantify the uncertainties, a statistical method using the logistic model is presented to provide best-fit phase boundaries to the platinum melting data, and can be generalized to fit phase boundary data of any sort. The high-pressure high-temperature phase diagram of Allende meteorite, a chondritic meteorite serving as a model of a primordial terrestrial planet, was investigated in the pressure and temperature ranges of 15 to 70 GPa and 1000 to 4000 K. The melting curve determined here overlaps and is in excellent agreement with previous piston-cylinder and multi-anvil measurements on the same material (Agee, et al., 1995). X-ray diffraction analysis of phases quenched from high pressure and temperature, and high pressure phases both before and after heating, are in good agreement with previous work. The phase diagram of Allende meteorite can be used to constrain events in the early geological evolution of the terrestrial planets.

  4. Estimation of absolute water surface temperature based on atmospherically corrected thermal infrared multispectral scanner digital data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, James E.

    1986-01-01

    Airborne remote sensing systems, as well as those on board Earth orbiting satellites, sample electromagnetic energy in discrete wavelength regions and convert the total energy sampled into data suitable for processing by digital computers. In general, however, the total amount of energy reaching a sensor system located at some distance from the target is composed not only of target related energy, but, in addition, contains a contribution originating from the atmosphere itself. Thus, some method must be devised for removing or at least minimizing the effects of the atmosphere. The LOWTRAN-6 Program was designed to estimate atmospheric transmittance and radiance for a given atmospheric path at moderate spectral resolution over an operational wavelength region from 0.25 to 28.5 microns. In order to compute the Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner (TIMS) digital values which were recorded in the absence of the atmosphere, the parameters derived from LOWTRAN-6 are used in a correction equation. The TIMS data were collected at 1:00 a.m. local time on November 21, 1983, over a recirculating cooling pond for a power plant in southeastern Mississippi. The TIMS data were analyzed before and after atmospheric corrections were applied using a band ratioing model to compute the absolute surface temperature of various points on the power plant cooling pond. The summarized results clearly demonstrate the desirability of applying atmospheric corrections.

  5. Effect of Hydrogen and Carbon on the Melting Temperature of the Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, Y.; Sakamaki, K.; Takahashi, E.; Fukai, Y.; Suzuki, T.; Funakoshi, K.

    2007-12-01

    The temperature of the Earth's outer core has been discussed based on the melting temperature of Fe- O-S alloys (e.g., Boehler, 1996). Although hydrogen and carbon are the possible candidates of the core component, their effects on the melting temperature of iron at high-pressures are unclear. Using a Kawai-type multi-anvil apparatus at SPring-8 synchrotron, we carried out a series of melting experiments on FeH and Fe3C up to 20 and 28 GPa, respectively. In the experiments on FeH, Fe sponge mixed with MgO was packed into a NaCl container with a hydrogen source, LiAlH4 (e.g., Fukai et al., 1989). During heating under high-pressures, hydrogenation of iron was observed by volume change. The phase boundary between ɛ'-phase (low-temperature phase) and γ-phase (high-temperature phase) of iron-hydride was determined using both cooling and heating experiments. Hydrogen concentrations in the γ-FeHx and ɛ'-FeHx were calculated based on the excess volume data from that of pure iron. It is found that γ-FeHx and ɛ'-FeHx synthesized in our experiments at pressures between 10 and 20 GPa are nearly stoichiometric FeH. Melting temperature of the γ-FeH was determined by the abrupt change in the X-ray diffraction patterns (crystalline to amorphous). The melting temperatures were determined to be 1473, 1473, 1493, 1573 and 1593 K at 10, 11.5, 15, 18 and 20 GPa, respectively. In the experiments using Fe3C, the synthesized Fe3C powder was encapsulated in a MgO container. In the diffraction sequences during heating, the peaks of Fe3C disappeared, and the new peaks identified as those of Fe7C3 were observed with halo caused by liquid. Finally, the Fe7C3 peaks disappeared, and only the halo pattern was observed. Based on these observations, the incongruent melting of Fe3C to Fe7C3 and liquid is estimated to occur at 1823 and 1923 K at 19.7 and 27.0 GPa, respectively. The liquidus temperatures of the Fe3C composition are found to be at 2098 and 2198 K at 19.5 and 26.8 GPa

  6. Temperature and pressure dependences of kimberlite melts viscosity (experimental-theoretical study)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persikov, Eduard; Bykhtiyarov, Pavel; Cokol, Alexsander

    2016-04-01

    Experimental data on temperature and pressure dependences of viscosity of model kimberlite melts (silicate 82 + carbonate 18, wt. %, 100NBO/T = 313) have been obtained for the first time at 100 MPa of CO2 pressure and at the lithostatic pressures up to 7.5 GPa in the temperature range 1350 oC - 1950 oC using radiation high gas pressure apparatus and press free split-sphere multi - anvil apparatus (BARS). Experimental data obtained on temperature and pressure dependences of viscosity of model kimberlite melts at moderate and high pressures is compared with predicted data on these dependences of viscosity of basaltic melts (100NBO/T = 58) in the same T, P - range. Dependences of the viscosity of model kimberlite and basaltic melts on temperature are consistent to the exponential Arrenian equation in the T, P - range of experimental study. The correct values of activation energies of viscous flow of kimberlite melts have been obtained for the first time. The activation energies of viscous flow of model kimberlite melts exponentially increase with increasing pressure and are equal: E = 130 ± 1.3 kJ/mole at moderate pressure (P = 100 MPa) and E = 160 ± 1.6 kJ/mole at high pressure (P = 5.5 GPa). It has been established too that the viscosity of model kimberlite melts exponentially increases on about half order of magnitude with increasing pressures from 100 MPa to 7.5 GPa at the isothermal condition (1800 oC). It has been established that viscosity of model kimberlite melts at the moderate pressure (100 MPa) is lover on about one order of magnitude to compare with the viscosity of basaltic melts, but at high pressure range (5.5 - 7.5 GPa), on the contrary, is higher on about half order of magnitude at the same values of the temperatures. Here we use both a new experimental data on viscosity of kimberlite melts and our structural chemical model for calculation and prediction the viscosity of magmatic melts [1] to determine the fundamental features of viscosity of

  7. Predicting the co-melting temperatures of municipal solid waste incinerator fly ash and sewage sludge ash using grey model and neural network.

    PubMed

    Pai, Tzu-Yi; Lin, Kae-Long; Shie, Je-Lung; Chang, Tien-Chin; Chen, Bor-Yann

    2011-03-01

    A grey model (GM) and an artificial neural network (ANN) were employed to predict co-melting temperature of municipal solid waste incinerator (MSWI) fly ash and sewage sludge ash (SSA) during formation of modified slag. The results indicated that in the aspect of model prediction, the mean absolute percentage error (MAPEs) were between 1.69 and 13.20% when adopting seven different GM (1, N) models. The MAPE were 1.59 and 1.31% when GM (1, 1) and rolling grey model (RGM (1, 1)) were adopted. The MAPEs fell within the range of 0.04 and 0.50% using different types of ANN. In GMs, the MAPE of 1.31% was found to be the lowest when using RGM (1, 1) to predict co-melting temperature. This value was higher than those of ANN2-1 to ANN8-1 by 1.27, 1.25, 1.24, 1.18, 1.16, 1.14 and 0.81%, respectively. GM only required a small amount of data (at least four data). Therefore, GM could be applied successfully in predicting the co-melting temperature of MSWI fly ash and SSA when no sufficient information is available. It also indicates that both the composition of MSWI fly ash and SSA could be applied on the prediction of co-melting temperature. PMID:20406756

  8. Linear relation between TH (homogeneous ice nucleation temperature) and Tm (melting temperature) for aqueous solutions of sucrose, trehalose, and maltose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanno, Hitoshi; Soga, Makoto; Kajiwara, Kazuhito

    2007-08-01

    Homogeneous ice nucleation temperatures ( THs) of aqueous sucrose, trehalose, and maltose solutions were measured together with melting temperatures ( Tms). It is shown that there is a linear relation between TH and Tm for these solutions. Almost identical supercooling behavior is observed for these aqueous disaccharide solutions.

  9. Melting temperatures of the ZrO{sub 2}-MOX system

    SciTech Connect

    Uchida, T.; Hirooka, S.; Kato, M.; Morimoto, K.; Sugata, H.; Shibata, K.; Sato, D.

    2013-07-01

    Severe accidents occurred at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant Units 1-3 on March 11, 2011. MOX fuels were loaded in the Unit 3. For the thermal analysis of the severe accident, melting temperature and phase state of MOX corium were investigated. The simulated coriums were prepared from 4%Pu-containing MOX, 8%Pu-containing MOX and ZrO{sub 2}. Then X-ray diffraction, density and melting temperature measurements were carried out as a function of zirconium and plutonium contents. The cubic phase was observed in the 25%Zr-containing corium and the tetragonal phase was observed in the 50% and 75%Zr-containing coria. The lattice parameter and density monotonically changed with Pu content. Melting temperature increased with increasing Pu content; melting temperature were estimated to be 2932 K for 4%Pu MOX corium and 3012 K for 8%Pu MOX corium in the 25%ZrO{sub 2}-MOX system. The lowest melting temperature was observed for 50%Zr-containing corium. (authors)

  10. Kelvin Absolute Temperature Scale Identified as Length Scale and Related to de Broglie Thermal Wavelength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohrab, Siavash

    Thermodynamic equilibrium between matter and radiation leads to de Broglie wavelength λdβ = h /mβvrβ and frequency νdβ = k /mβvrβ of matter waves and stochastic definitions of Planck h =hk =mk <λrk > c and Boltzmann k =kk =mk <νrk > c constants, λrkνrk = c , that respectively relate to spatial (λ) and temporal (ν) aspects of vacuum fluctuations. Photon massmk =√{ hk /c3 } , amu =√{ hkc } = 1 /No , and universal gas constant Ro =No k =√{ k / hc } result in internal Uk = Nhνrk = Nmkc2 = 3 Nmkvmpk2 = 3 NkT and potential pV = uN\\vcirc / 3 = N\\ucirc / 3 = NkT energy of photon gas in Casimir vacuum such that H = TS = 4 NkT . Therefore, Kelvin absolute thermodynamic temperature scale [degree K] is identified as length scale [meter] and related to most probable wavelength and de Broglie thermal wavelength as Tβ =λmpβ =λdβ / 3 . Parallel to Wien displacement law obtained from Planck distribution, the displacement law λwS T =c2 /√{ 3} is obtained from Maxwell -Boltzmann distribution of speed of ``photon clusters''. The propagation speeds of sound waves in ideal gas versus light waves in photon gas are described in terms of vrβ in harmony with perceptions of Huygens. Newton formula for speed of long waves in canals √{ p / ρ } is modified to √{ gh } =√{ γp / ρ } in accordance with adiabatic theory of Laplace.

  11. Relationship between Crystal Thickness and Isothermal Crystallization Temperature for Determination of Equilibrium Melting Temperature for Syndiotatic Polypropylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhi-Gang; Hsiao Hsiao, Benjamin; Srinivas, Srivatsan; Crist, Buckley

    2000-03-01

    Syndiotatic polypropylene (sPP) was used to investigate the relationship between isothermal crystallization temperature (Tc = 70-115^oC), crystal thickness and subsequent melting using simultaneous synchrotron small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and wide-angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD) in conjunction with DSC. The thickest lamellar crystals melt at the end of the DSC endotherm. At this temperature, the SAXS intensity (corrected formelt scattering) showed a diffuse profile, and the crystalline feature in the WAXD pattern was completely absent. This crystal thickness was estimated using an approach based on the single lamella structure factor, which will also be compared to the value determined by the interface distribution function. The equilibrium melting temperature obtained this way will be contrasted by other methods such as the Hoffman-Weeks approach. Acknowledgement: This work was supported by by a NSF grant (DMR 9732653).

  12. Shear melting and high temperature embrittlement: theory and application to machining titanium.

    PubMed

    Healy, Con; Koch, Sascha; Siemers, Carsten; Mukherji, Debashis; Ackland, Graeme J

    2015-04-24

    We describe a dynamical phase transition occurring within a shear band at high temperature and under extremely high shear rates. With increasing temperature, dislocation deformation and grain boundary sliding are supplanted by amorphization in a highly localized nanoscale band, which allows for massive strain and fracture. The mechanism is similar to shear melting and leads to liquid metal embrittlement at high temperature. From simulation, we find that the necessary conditions are lack of dislocation slip systems, low thermal conduction, and temperature near the melting point. The first two are exhibited by bcc titanium alloys, and we show that the final one can be achieved experimentally by adding low-melting-point elements: specifically, we use insoluble rare earth metals (REMs). Under high shear, the REM becomes mixed with the titanium, lowering the melting point within the shear band and triggering the shear-melting transition. This in turn generates heat which remains localized in the shear band due to poor heat conduction. The material fractures along the shear band. We show how to utilize this transition in the creation of new titanium-based alloys with improved machinability. PMID:25955055

  13. Greenland ice sheet surface temperature, melt and mass loss: 2000-06

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hall, D.K.; Williams, R.S., Jr.; Luthcke, S.B.; DiGirolamo, N.E.

    2008-01-01

    A daily time series of 'clear-sky' surface temperature has been compiled of the Greenland ice sheet (GIS) using 1 km resolution moderate-resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) land-surface temperature (LST) maps from 2000 to 2006. We also used mass-concentration data from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) to study mass change in relationship to surface melt from 2003 to 2006. The mean LST of the GIS increased during the study period by ???0.27??Ca-1. The increase was especially notable in the northern half of the ice sheet during the winter months. Melt-season length and timing were also studied in each of the six major drainage basins. Rapid (<15 days) and sustained mass loss below 2000 m elevation was triggered in 2004 and 2005 as recorded by GRACE when surface melt begins. Initiation of large-scale surface melt was followed rapidly by mass loss. This indicates that surface meltwater is flowing rapidly to the base of the ice sheet, causing acceleration of outlet glaciers, thus highlighting the metastability of parts of the GIS and the vulnerability of the ice sheet to air-temperature increases. If air temperatures continue to rise over Greenland, increased surface melt will play a large role in ice-sheet mass loss.

  14. Water-melt interaction in hydrous magmatic systems at high temperature and pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mysen, Bjorn

    2014-12-01

    Experimental data on the structure and properties of melts and fluids relevant to water-melt interaction in hydrous magmatic systems in the Earth's interior have been reviewed. Complex relationships between water solubility in melts and their bulk composition [Al/Si-ratio, metal oxide/(Al + Si) and electron properties of metal cations] explain why water solubility in felsic magmas such as those of rhyolite and andesite composition is significantly greater than the water solubility in basalt melts. The silicate solubility in aqueous fluid is also significantly dependent on composition with metal oxide/(Al + Si) and electron properties of the metal cations, the dominant variables. Hydrogen bonding is not important in hydrous fluids and melts at temperatures above 500°C to 550°C and does not, therefore, play a role in hydrous magmatic systems. The properties of hydrous melts and aqueous solutions are governed by how the silicate speciation ( Q n species, where n is the number of bridging oxygen in an individual species) varies with bulk composition, silicate composition, temperature, and pressure. The reactions that describe the interactions are similar in melts, fluids, and supercritical fluids. The degree of melt polymerization caused by dissolved water varies with melt composition and total water content. Silicate- and alkali-rich felsic magmatic melts are more sensitive to water content than more mafic magmas. Transport and configurational properties of hydrous magmatic melts can be modeled with the aid of the Q n speciation variations. Liquidus and melting phase relations of hydrous systems also can be described in such terms, as can minor and trace element partition coefficients. Stable isotope fractionation (e.g., D/H) can also be rationalized in this manner. Critical to these latter observations is the high silicate concentration in aqueous fluids. These components can enhance solubility of minor and trace elements by orders of magnitude and change the

  15. Temperature and melt solid interface control during crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batur, Celal

    1990-01-01

    Findings on the adaptive control of a transparent Bridgman crystal growth furnace are summarized. The task of the process controller is to establish a user specified axial temperature profile by controlling the temperatures in eight heating zones. The furnace controller is built around a computer. Adaptive PID (Proportional Integral Derivative) and Pole Placement control algorithms are applied. The need for adaptive controller stems from the fact that the zone dynamics changes with respect to time. The controller was tested extensively on the Lead Bromide crystal growth. Several different temperature profiles and ampoule's translational rates are tried. The feasibility of solid liquid interface quantification by image processing was determined. The interface is observed by a color video camera and the image data file is processed to determine if the interface is flat, convex or concave.

  16. Thermal performance of a heat storage module using PCM's with different melting temperature; Experimental

    SciTech Connect

    Farid, M.M. ); Kim, Y.; Kansawa, A. )

    1990-05-01

    A latent heat storage module was constructed, consisting of 45 cylindrical capsules fixed vertically in 15 rows. The capsules, made of 0.335-m long copper tubes having external diameters of 31.8 mm, were fixed in an insulated rectangular duct. Three commercial waxes having melting temperatures of 44{degrees}C, 53{degrees}C, and 64{degrees}C were selected. Each of the three sets of 15 tubes was filled with different wax. For comparison purposes, experiments were also done with a single commercial wax, having a melting temperature of 53{degrees}C, in all the tubes. During heat charge, hot air flowed across the capsules such that the melting temperature of the waxes decreased in the flow direction. Air flow direction was reversed during heat discharge. This paper reports that experimental measurements showed some improvement in the heat transfer rates during both heat charge and discharge when three types of PCM's were used.

  17. A theoretical approach to study the melting temperature of metallic nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arora, Neha; Joshi, Deepika P.

    2016-05-01

    The physical properties of any material change with the change of its size from bulk range to nano range. A theoretical study to account for the size and shape effect on melting temperature of metallic nanowires has been done. We have studied zinc(Zn), indium (In),lead (Pb) and tin (Sn) nanowires with three different cross sectional shapes like regular triangular, square and regular hexagonal. Variation of melting temperature with the size and shape is graphically represented with the available experimental data. It was found that melting temperature of the nanowires decreases with decrement in the size of nanowire, due to surface effect and at very small size the most probable shape also varies with material

  18. Variability of Surface Temperature and Melt on the Greenland Ice Sheet, 2000-2011

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Dorothy K.; Comiso, Josefino, C.; Shuman, Christopher A.; Koenig, Lora S.; DiGirolamo, Nicolo E.

    2012-01-01

    Enhanced melting along with surface-temperature increases measured using infrared satellite data, have been documented for the Greenland Ice Sheet. Recently we developed a climate-quality data record of ice-surface temperature (IST) of the Greenland Ice Sheet using the Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) 1ST product -- http://modis-snow-ice.gsfc.nasa.gov. Using daily and mean monthly MODIS 1ST maps from the data record we show maximum extent of melt for the ice sheet and its six major drainage basins for a 12-year period extending from March of 2000 through December of 2011. The duration of the melt season on the ice sheet varies in different drainage basins with some basins melting progressively earlier over the study period. Some (but not all) of the basins also show a progressively-longer duration of melt. The short time of the study period (approximately 12 years) precludes an evaluation of statistically-significant trends. However the dataset provides valuable information on natural variability of IST, and on the ability of the MODIS instrument to capture changes in IST and melt conditions indifferent drainage basins of the ice sheet.

  19. Surface Temperature and Melt on the Greenland Ice Sheet, 2000 - 2011

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Dorothy K.; Comiso, Josefino C.; Shuman, Christopher A.; Koeing, Lora S.; Box, Jason E.; DiGirolamo, Nicolo E.

    2012-01-01

    Enhanced melting along with surface-temperature increases measured using infrared satellite data, have been documented for the Greenland Ice Sheet. Recently we developed a climate-quality data record of ice-surface temperature (IST) of the Greenland Ice Sheet using the Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) IST product -- http://modis-snow-ice.gsfc.nasa.gov.Using daily and mean-monthly MODIS IST maps from the data record we show maximum extent of melt for the ice sheet and its six major drainage basins for a 12-year period extending from March of 2000 through December of 2011. The duration of the melt season on the ice sheet varies in different drainage basins with some basins melting progressively earlier over the study period. Some (but not all) of the basins also show a progressively-longer duration of melt. The short time of the study period (approx 12 years) precludes an evaluation of statistically-significant trends. However the dataset provides valuable information on natural variability of IST, and on the ability of the MODIS instrument to capture changes in IST and melt conditions in different drainage basins of the ice sheet.

  20. The challenge of decomposition and melting of gallium nitride under high pressure and high temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porowski, S.; Sadovyi, B.; Gierlotka, S.; Rzoska, S. J.; Grzegory, I.; Petrusha, I.; Turkevich, V.; Stratiichuk, D.

    2015-10-01

    Gallium nitride (GaN) is considered to be one of the most important semiconductors nowadays. In this report a solution of the long standing puzzle regarding GaN decomposition and melting under high pressure and high temperature is presented. This includes the discussion of results obtained so far. The possibility of a consistent parameterisation of pressure (P) evolution of the melting temperature (Tm) in basic semiconductors (GaN, germanium, silicon…), independently from signs of dTm / dP is also presented.

  1. Generation of Primary Kilauea Magmas: Constraints on Pressure, Temperature and Composition of Melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gudfinnsson, G. H.; Presnall, D. C.

    2004-12-01

    Picrite glasses from the submarine extension of Kilauea, Puna Ridge, which contain up to 15.0 wt% MgO, are the most magnesian glass samples reported from Hawaii. Their compositions form a distinct olivine fractionation trend. A comparison of this trend with phase relations of garnet lherzolite in the CaO-MgO-Al2O3-SiO2 (CMAS) and CaO-MgO-Al2O3-SiO2-Na2O-FeO (CMASNF) system indicates that melts parental to the Hawaiian picrites are produced by melting of a garnet lherzolite source at a pressure of 5 ± 1 GPa. The primary melt composition for Kilauea proposed by Clague et al. (1995), which has 18.4 wt% MgO, is close to the expected 5 GPa melt composition. By using the pressure-independent CMASNF geothermometer (Gudfinnsson and Presnall, 2001), we obtain a temperature of formation of 1450° C for the most magnesian Puna Ridge glass after correction for the presence of 0.4 wt% H2O and 0.7 wt% CO2. This assumes that the glass is not much modified after separation from the lherzolite source. However, comparison with phase relations in the CMAS system strongly suggests that the most magnesian Puna Ridge glasses are the product of some olivine fractionation, and therefore give temperature considerably lower than that of the source. When applied to the proposed Kilauea primary melt composition of Clague et al. (1995), the CMASNF geothermometer gives a melting temperature of 1596° C or about 1565° C after correction for the presence of volatiles. This compares well with the anhydrous solidus temperature of 1600 ± 15° C at 5 GPa for the fertile KR4003 lherzolite (Lesher et al., 2003), which has the complete garnet lherzolite phase assemblage present at the solidus at this pressure. This consistency supports use of phase relations from the CMAS system and the CMASNF geothermometer to the Puna Ridge picrite compositions. With the pressure and temperature of melting known, one can calculate the potential temperature of the Hawaiian mantle, provided certain conditions are met

  2. Reversible melting and crystallization of short and long flexible chain molecules by temperature-modulated calorimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pak, Jeongihm

    2001-12-01

    Melting and crystallization of linear, flexible molecules of different lengths was studied by temperature-modulated differential scanning calorimetry, TMDSC. Various techniques for TMDSC with single and multifrequency modulations have been analyzed to optimize the conditions for the present study. The finally chosen method involved a quasi-isothermal mode with a temperature amplitude of 0.5 K and a period of 60 s (frequency = 0.167 Hz). The interpretation of the reversible and irreversible melting was developed by comparison of a variety of different modes of analysis (sinusoidal, sawtooth, and complex sawtooth). The analyzed molecules ranged from n-paraffins, oligomeric fractions of polyethylene and poly(oxyethylene) to macromolecules of polyethylene. The most important discovery was that there is a critical chain length for reversible melting and crystallization of small, flexible molecules at 10 nm or about 75 backbone chain atoms. Below this chain length, melting and crystallization is reversible under the given conditions of analysis and in the presence of primary crystal nuclei. Above this chain length, the crystallization requires a degree of supercooling which becomes constant for 200 chain atoms or more at a value of 6.0--10 K. This critical chain length sets a lower limit for the need of supercooling, a characteristic property of flexible polymers. This result was then applied to resolving the problem of the existence of a small amount of reversible melting in polymers, discovered about five years ago. The following was shown: chain segments with melting temperatures equal to oligomers of less than the critical chain length can crystallize and melt reversibly, even when contained within the metastable structure of semicrystalline polymers. Above this chain length, longer segments can only show reversible melting when a molecular nucleus remains on the crystal surface after partial melting. The short-chain segments have been seen in linear

  3. Prediction of melting temperatures in fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) procedures using thermodynamic models.

    PubMed

    Fontenete, Sílvia; Guimarães, Nuno; Wengel, Jesper; Azevedo, Nuno Filipe

    2016-06-01

    The thermodynamics and kinetics of DNA hybridization, i.e. the process of self-assembly of one, two or more complementary nucleic acid strands, has been studied for many years. The appearance of the nearest-neighbor model led to several theoretical and experimental papers on DNA thermodynamics that provide reasonably accurate thermodynamic information on nucleic acid duplexes and allow estimation of the melting temperature. Because there are no thermodynamic models specifically developed to predict the hybridization temperature of a probe used in a fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) procedure, the melting temperature is used as a reference, together with corrections for certain compounds that are used during FISH. However, the quantitative relation between melting and experimental FISH temperatures is poorly described. In this review, various models used to predict the melting temperature for rRNA targets, for DNA oligonucleotides and for nucleic acid mimics (chemically modified oligonucleotides), will be addressed in detail, together with a critical assessment of how this information should be used in FISH. PMID:25586037

  4. Melting analysis on microbeads in rapid temperature-gradient inside microchannels for single nucleotide polymorphisms detectiona)

    PubMed Central

    Li, Kan-Chien; Ding, Shih-Torng; Lin, En-Chung; Wang, Lon (Alex); Lu, Yen-Wen

    2014-01-01

    A continuous-flow microchip with a temperature gradient in microchannels was utilized to demonstrate spatial melting analysis on microbeads for clinical Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) genotyping on animal genomic DNA. The chip had embedded heaters and thermometers, which created a rapid and yet stable temperature gradient between 60 °C and 85 °C in a short distance as the detection region. The microbeads, which served as mobile supports carrying the target DNA and fluorescent dye, were transported across the temperature gradient. As the surrounding temperature increased, the fluorescence signals of the microbeads decayed with this relationship being acquired as the melting curve. Fast DNA denaturation, as a result of the improved heat transfer and thermal stability due to scaling, was also confirmed. Further, each individual microbead could potentially bear different sequences and pass through the detection region, one by one, for a series of melting analysis, with multiplex, high-throughput capability being possible. A prototype was tested with target DNA samples in different genotypes (i.e., wild and mutant types) with a SNP location from Landrace sows. The melting temperatures were obtained and compared to the ones using a traditional tube-based approach. The results showed similar levels of SNP discrimination, validating our proposed technique for scanning homozygotes and heterozygotes to distinguish single base changes for disease research, drug development, medical diagnostics, agriculture, and animal production. PMID:25553186

  5. Temperature Dependence of Density, Viscosity and Electrical Conductivity for Hg-Based II-VI Semiconductor Melts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, C.; Ban, H.; Lin, B.; Scripa, R. N.; Su, C.-H.; Lehoczky, S. L.

    2004-01-01

    The relaxation phenomenon of semiconductor melts, or the change of melt structure with time, impacts the crystal growth process and the eventual quality of the crystal. The thermophysical properties of the melt are good indicators of such changes in melt structure. Also, thermophysical properties are essential to the accurate predication of the crystal growth process by computational modeling. Currently, the temperature dependent thermophysical property data for the Hg-based II-VI semiconductor melts are scarce. This paper reports the results on the temperature dependence of melt density, viscosity and electrical conductivity of Hg-based II-VI compounds. The melt density was measured using a pycnometric method, and the viscosity and electrical conductivity were measured by a transient torque method. Results were compared with available published data and showed good agreement. The implication of the structural changes at different temperature ranges was also studied and discussed.

  6. Absolute absorption spectra of batho- and photorhodopsins at room temperature. Picosecond laser photolysis of rhodopsin in polyacrylamide.

    PubMed Central

    Kandori, H; Shichida, Y; Yoshizawa, T

    1989-01-01

    Picosecond laser photolysis of rhodopsin in 15% polyacrylamide gel was performed for estimating absolute absorption spectra of the primary intermediates of cattle rhodopsin (bathorhodopsin and photorhodopsin). Using a rhodopsin digitonin extract embedded in 15% polyacrylamide gel, a precise percentage of bleaching of rhodopsin after excitation of a picosecond laser pulse was measured. Using this value, the absolute absorption spectrum of bathorhodopsin was calculated from the spectral change before and 1 ns after the picosecond laser excitation (corresponding to the difference spectrum between rhodopsin and bathorhodopsin). The absorption spectrum of bathorhodopsin thus obtained displayed a lambda max at 535 nm, which was shorter than that at low temperature (543 nm) and a half band-width broader than that measured at low temperature. The oscillator strength of bathorhodopsin at room temperature was smaller than that at low temperature. The absolute absorption spectrum of photorhodopsin was also estimated from the difference spectrum measured at 15 ps after the excitation of rhodopsin (Shichida, Y., S. Matuoka, and T. Yoshizawa. 1984. Photobiochem. Photobiophys. 7:221-228), assuming a sequential conversion of photorhodopsin to bathorhodopsin. Its lambda max was located at approximately 570 nm, and the oscillator strength was smaller than those of rhodopsin and bathorhodopsin. PMID:2790133

  7. Easy Absolute Values? Absolutely

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Sharon E.; Mittag, Kathleen Cage

    2015-01-01

    The authors teach a problem-solving course for preservice middle-grades education majors that includes concepts dealing with absolute-value computations, equations, and inequalities. Many of these students like mathematics and plan to teach it, so they are adept at symbolic manipulations. Getting them to think differently about a concept that they…

  8. Physical Mechanism of Stick-Slip Behavior in Polymer Melt Extrusion: Temperature Dependence of Flow Curve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Katsuhiko; Toda, Akihiko

    2001-11-01

    The flow instability in a polymer liquid extruded from a die has been discussed on its temperature dependence, based on a modeling of the behavior by a statistical stick-slip model of a group of springs. The present experimental results of polyethylene melt showed the shift of an N-shaped flow curve to lower shear rate with decreasing temperature, which approaches the melting point of polyethylene crystals. This result is consistent with the microscopic modeling of the flow instability with the disentanglement of the chain in the bulk under high shear rate. The shift of flow curve with temperature explains the existence of the temperature window with minimum applied pressure under constant speed found by Keller et al..

  9. Liquidus Temperatures in the Iron - Sulfur System and Melting of Fe3S at High Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seagle, C. T.; Heinz, D. L.; Campbell, A. J.; Miller, N.; Prakapenka, V. B.

    2007-12-01

    The details of binary iron-light element systems at pressures relevant to the core can be used to constrain core composition and temperature. We have conducted several experiments in the iron-sulfur system using the diamond anvil cell. Compositions of 10 and 16 weight percent sulfur were used with angle dispersive x-ray diffraction and double-sided laser heating at Sector 13 of the Advanced Photon Source. Melting was determined by the disappearance of diffraction lines associated with the liquidus phase upon raising the temperature above the liquidus, and the reappearance of those reflections upon lowering the temperature below the liquidus. Fe3S melts incongruently at 21 GPa and continues this behavior up to higher pressures. Liquidus temperatures at 10 wt. % sulfur have been determined up to 155 GPa.

  10. {sup 3}He melting pressure temperature scale below 25 mK

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, E.D.; Ni, W.; Xia, J.S.

    1995-04-01

    Using {sup 60}Co {gamma} ray anisotropy radiation as a primary thermometer, with a Pt NMR susceptibility secondary thermometer, the authors have made high precision measurements of the {sup 3}He melting pressure versus temperature from 500 {mu}K to 25 mK. Temperatures obtained for the fixed points on the melting curve are: the superfluid A transition T{sub A} = 2.505 mK, the A-B transition T{sub AB} = 1.948 mK, and the solid ordering temperature T{sub N} = 0.934 mK. The authors provide a functional form for P(T), which, with the fixed points, constitutes a convenient temperature scale, based on a primary thermometer, usable to well below 1 mK.

  11. Properties of Silicate Melts at High Pressure and Temperature from Ab Initio Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seclaman, A. C.; Caracas, R.

    2014-12-01

    The evolution of planetary interiors is intrinsically connected to the behavior and properties of silicate melts at high pressures and temperatures. Our work comes as a complement to existing data expanding the pressure, temperature, and compositional ranges. We used the V.A.S.P. code to perform NVT Molecular Dynamics simulations on two basic compositions: Mg2SiO4 and MgSiO3. All calculations are done within augmented planar wave formalism of the Density Functional Theory. Supercells of 160 atoms clino-enstatite and 112 atoms forsterite were melted at 5000K and then cooled and thermalized, using the Nose-Hoover thermostat, at temperatures more representative of Earth's interior (3000 and 4000K). The pressure range of our investigations spans from 0 to approximately 160GPa. Since important properties, density and magnetism, are dependent on the presence of iron we also created (Fex-1,Mgx)SiO3 and (Fex-1,Mgx)2SiO4melts from the thermalized pure compositions by replacing the desired amount of magnesium atoms with iron. Because other transitional elements present similar behavior as iron, and nickel is an important element in the core, compositions containing different amounts of nickel were also created by adding extra Ni atoms in the system. We analyze in detail the behavior with pressure of the density, clustering and coordination, total magnetization, and thermodynamical parameters of the melts. Our results indicate that changes in the structure and magnetic moment of the Forsterite melt begin at relatively low pressure. As an application of our data to the Earth's present deep interior we analyzed in great detail various possible mixtures of Fe bearing melt and solid mantle in an attempt to fit the density estimated for the Ultra Low Velocity Zones.

  12. Resolving Histories of Magmatic Volatiles in Fluids and Silicate Melts as a Function of Pressure, Temperature, and Melt Composition through Apatite Geochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, J. D.; Piccoli, P. M.; Goldoff, B. A.

    2012-12-01

    Fluids including aqueous or aqueous-carbonic vapor, aqueous liquid, and hydrosaline liquid, if present in magma, influence magmatic and volcanic processes, and the exsolution of fluids from magma sequesters and buffers volatile components from melt thus impacting the textural and chemical evolution of melts and phenocrysts. Establishing the timing of initial magmatic fluid saturation and monitoring changes in fluid chemistry through textural interpretations are often challenging because primary magmatic fluid inclusions are uncommon to most plutonic systems and are extremely rare in phenocrysts of eruptive magmas. Moreover, miarolitic cavities, often interpreted to be a priori evidence of fluid exsolution, are rarely observed in igneous systems. Geochemical tools used to resolve magmatic volatile histories include the analysis and interpretation of melt inclusion compositions and those of hydrous minerals including micas, amphiboles, and apatite. We have conducted more than 50 new hydrothermal experiments involving apatite+rhyodacite melt±fluids at 28, 50, 100, 200, and 400 MPa, and have combined these new data with published results for apatite-saturated melts at 200 MPa. This integrated body of data supports determination of a broadly applicable geochemical relationship that correlates the mole fractions of H2O and Cl in apatite with mole fractions of H2O and Cl in coexisting silicate melt as a function of pressure, temperature, and melt composition (for felsic to basaltic melts). The mathematical expression of this relationship is useful for a wide variety of applications: constraining H2O, Cl, and F concentrations in silicate melts and hence verifying concentrations of magmatic volatiles determined from silicate melt inclusions; establishing pressures or temperatures of apatite crystallization or last equilibration with melt ± fluids (if temperature and pressure, respectively, are constrained from other geothermobarometers); determining concentrations of

  13. Melting temperature of heavy quarkonium with a holographic potential up to sub-leading order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zi-qiang, Zhang; Yan, Wu; De-fu, Hou

    2016-06-01

    A calculation of the melting temperatures of heavy quarkonium states with the holographic potential was introduced in a previous work. In this paper, we consider the holographic potential at sub-leading order, which permits finite coupling corrections to be taken into account. It is found that this correction lowers the dissociation temperatures of heavy quarkonium. Supported by QLPL(QLPL201408) and NSFC (11547204, 11375070, 11135011, 11221504)

  14. Calorimetric observation of the melting of free water nanoparticles at cryogenic temperatures.

    PubMed

    Hock, C; Schmidt, M; Kuhnen, R; Bartels, C; Ma, L; Haberland, H; van Issendorff, B

    2009-08-14

    We present an experimental study of the thermodynamics of free, size-selected water cluster anions consisting of 48 and 118 molecules. The measured caloric curves of the clusters are bulklike at low temperatures but show a well-defined, particle-size specific transition at 93+/-3 K for (H2O)48- and 118+/-3 K for (H2O)118-. At the transition temperature the heat capacity strongly increases, which marks the onset of melting. PMID:19792643

  15. Path integral calculation of free energies: quantum effects on the melting temperature of neon.

    PubMed

    Ramírez, R; Herrero, C P; Antonelli, A; Hernández, E R

    2008-08-14

    The path integral formulation has been combined with several methods to determine free energies of quantum many-body systems, such as adiabatic switching and reversible scaling. These techniques are alternatives to the standard thermodynamic integration method. A quantum Einstein crystal is used as a model to demonstrate the accuracy and reliability of these free energy methods in quantum simulations. Our main interest focuses on the calculation of the melting temperature of Ne at ambient pressure, taking into account quantum effects in the atomic dynamics. The free energy of the solid was calculated by considering a quantum Einstein crystal as reference state, while for the liquid, the reference state was defined by the classical limit of the fluid. Our findings indicate that, while quantum effects in the melting temperature of this system are small, they still amount to about 6% of the melting temperature, and are therefore not negligible. The particle density as well as the melting enthalpy and entropy of the solid and liquid phases at coexistence is compared to results obtained in the classical limit and also to available experimental data. PMID:18715054

  16. Direct melt processing of pentacene at temperatures above 1000 °C by pulsed laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goose, Joseph E.; Wong, Keith; Clancy, Paulette; Thompson, Michael O.

    2008-11-01

    Pentacene remains as a leading candidate for organic thin film transistors in applications such as sensor and flexible displays. Its processing, however, has been limited to relatively low temperatures and only in the solid phase. Liquid pentacene has never been experimentally observed, although the melting temperature is predicted to lie between 200 and 400 °C. We report a method of heating pentacene thin films to temperatures above 1000 °C using pulsed laser irradiation. This rapid heating induces morphological changes consistent with formation of a transient liquid phase. X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy show that the pentacene remains intact after processing at these extreme temperatures.

  17. Experimental investigation of the amorphous silicon melting temperature by fast heating processes

    SciTech Connect

    Baeri, P.; Campisano, S.U.; Grimaldi, M.G.; Rimini, E.

    1982-12-01

    The recrystallization of amorphous Si layers on Si crystal substrates after laser irradiation was investigated to test previous experimental evidence that both the melting point and the melting enthalpy of the amorphous are lower than the corresponding crystalline values. The irradiation was performed in some cases from the back side of 100-..mu..m-thick Si wafers to obtain a temperature distribution in the amorphous layer with a small spatial gradient. In the case of front irradiation the threshold energy density was measured as a function of the amorphous layer thickness, for the polycrystalline formation, crystallization with residual disorder, and good annealing, respectively. The experimental data agree quite well with heat flow calculations assuming a reduction of about 30% in the melting point and enthalpy of amorphous silicon with respect to crystalline silicon.

  18. Sulfide saturation of basalt and andesite melts at high pressures and temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wendlandt, R. F.

    1982-01-01

    When the sulfur content of an Fe-bearing magma exceeds the saturation limit for the bulk composition, an immiscible iron sulfide melt fraction separates. For an understanding of the geochemistry of sulfur-bearing magmatic systems, more information is needed regarding the solubility of metal sulfide in silicate melt at its source and the solubility changes as a function of changing intensive and extensive variables. In the present investigation, the sulfur saturation surface is determined for the pressure range from 12.5 to 30 kbar and the temperature range from 1300 to 1460 C for three silicate melt compositions representing a range of SiO2 and FeO compositions.

  19. Developing Temperature Forcing for Snow and Ice Melt Runoff Models in High Mountain Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, A. P.; Armstrong, R. L.; Brodzik, M. J.; Khalsa, S. J. S.; Raup, B. H.; Rittger, K.

    2014-12-01

    Glaciers and snow cover are natural storage reservoirs that delay runoff on seasonal and longer time-scales. Glacier wastage and reduced snow packs will impact the volume and timing of runoff from mountain basins. Estimates of the contributions of glacier and snow melt to runoff in river systems draining mountain regions are critical for water resources planning. The USAID funded CHARIS project aims to estimate the contributions of glacier and snow melt to streamflow in the Ganges, Indus, Brahmaputra, Amu Darya and Syr Darya rivers. Most efforts to estimate glacier and snow melt contributions use temperature-index or degree-day approaches. Near-surface air temperature is a key forcing variable for such models. As with all mountain regions, meteorological stations are sparse and may have short records. Few stations exist at high elevations, with most stations located in valleys below the elevations of glaciers and seasonal snow cover. Reanalyses offer an alternative source of temperature data. However, reanalyses have coarse resolution and simplified topography, especially in the Himalaya. Surface fields are often biased. Any reanalysis product must be both bias-corrected and "downscaled" to the resolution of the melt-runoff model. We present a combined empirically-based bias-correction and downscaling procedure that uses near-surface air temperature from global atmospheric reanalyses to generate near-surface temperature forcing fields for the five river basins in the CHARIS study area. We focus on three 3rd Generation reanalyses; NASA MERRA, NCEP CFSR and ECMWF ERA-Interim. Evaluation of reanalysis temperature fields reveals differences between seasonal means of 500 hPa air temperatures for the three products are of the order of 1 °C, indicating choice of reanalysis can impact model results. The procedure accounts for these seasonal variations in biases of the reanalysis products and in lapse rates.

  20. High-temperature apparatus for chaotic mixing of natural silicate melts.

    PubMed

    Morgavi, D; Petrelli, M; Vetere, F P; González-García, D; Perugini, D

    2015-10-01

    A unique high-temperature apparatus was developed to trigger chaotic mixing at high-temperature (up to 1800 °C). This new apparatus, which we term Chaotic Magma Mixing Apparatus (COMMA), is designed to carry out experiments with high-temperature and high-viscosity (up to 10(6) Pa s) natural silicate melts. This instrument allows us to follow in time and space the evolution of the mixing process and the associated modulation of chemical composition. This is essential to understand the dynamics of magma mixing and related chemical exchanges. The COMMA device is tested by mixing natural melts from Aeolian Islands (Italy). The experiment was performed at 1180 °C using shoshonite and rhyolite melts, resulting in a viscosity ratio of more than three orders of magnitude. This viscosity ratio is close to the maximum possible ratio of viscosity between high-temperature natural silicate melts. Results indicate that the generated mixing structures are topologically identical to those observed in natural volcanic rocks highlighting the enormous potential of the COMMA to replicate, as a first approximation, the same mixing patterns observed in the natural environment. COMMA can be used to investigate in detail the space and time development of magma mixing providing information about this fundamental petrological and volcanological process that would be impossible to investigate by direct observations. Among the potentials of this new experimental device is the construction of empirical relationships relating the mixing time, obtained through experimental time series, and chemical exchanges between the melts to constrain the mixing-to-eruption time of volcanic systems, a fundamental topic in volcanic hazard assessment. PMID:26520985

  1. High-temperature apparatus for chaotic mixing of natural silicate melts

    SciTech Connect

    Morgavi, D.; Petrelli, M.; Vetere, F. P.; González-García, D.; Perugini, D.

    2015-10-15

    A unique high-temperature apparatus was developed to trigger chaotic mixing at high-temperature (up to 1800 °C). This new apparatus, which we term Chaotic Magma Mixing Apparatus (COMMA), is designed to carry out experiments with high-temperature and high-viscosity (up to 10{sup 6} Pa s) natural silicate melts. This instrument allows us to follow in time and space the evolution of the mixing process and the associated modulation of chemical composition. This is essential to understand the dynamics of magma mixing and related chemical exchanges. The COMMA device is tested by mixing natural melts from Aeolian Islands (Italy). The experiment was performed at 1180 °C using shoshonite and rhyolite melts, resulting in a viscosity ratio of more than three orders of magnitude. This viscosity ratio is close to the maximum possible ratio of viscosity between high-temperature natural silicate melts. Results indicate that the generated mixing structures are topologically identical to those observed in natural volcanic rocks highlighting the enormous potential of the COMMA to replicate, as a first approximation, the same mixing patterns observed in the natural environment. COMMA can be used to investigate in detail the space and time development of magma mixing providing information about this fundamental petrological and volcanological process that would be impossible to investigate by direct observations. Among the potentials of this new experimental device is the construction of empirical relationships relating the mixing time, obtained through experimental time series, and chemical exchanges between the melts to constrain the mixing-to-eruption time of volcanic systems, a fundamental topic in volcanic hazard assessment.

  2. High-temperature apparatus for chaotic mixing of natural silicate melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgavi, D.; Petrelli, M.; Vetere, F. P.; Gonzalez, D.; Perugini, D.

    2015-12-01

    A unique high-temperature apparatus was developed to trigger chaotic mixing at high-temperature (up to 1800 °C). This new apparatus, which we term ChaOtic Magma Mixing Apparatus (COMMA), is designed to carry out experiments with high-temperature and high-viscosity (up to 106 Pas) natural silicate melts. The instrument represents an extraordinary advance because allows us to follow in time and space the evolution of the mixing process and the associated modulation of chemical composition. This is essential to understand the dynamics of magma mixing and related chemical exchanges in the volcanic environment. The COMMA device is tested at extreme conditions by mixing natural melts from Aeolian Islands (Italy). The experiment was performed at 1170°C, with melts of shoshonitic and rhyolitic composition, resulting in a viscosity ratio of more than three orders of magnitude. This viscosity ratio is close to the maximum possible ratio of viscosity between high-temperature natural silicate melts. Results indicate that the generated mixing structures are topologically identical to those observed in natural volcanic rocks highlighting the enormous potential of the COMMA to replicate, as a first approximation, the same mixing patterns observed in the natural environment. We anticipate the COMMA to become a state-of-the-art apparatus for detailed investigations of magma mixing processes providing unprecedented information about this fundamental petrological and volcanological process that would be impossible to investigate by direct observations. Among the potentials of this new experimental device is the construction of empirical relationships relating the mixing time, obtained through experimental time series, and chemical exchanges between the melts to constrain the mixing-to-eruption time of volcanic systems, a fundamental topic in volcanic hazard assessment.

  3. High-temperature apparatus for chaotic mixing of natural silicate melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgavi, D.; Petrelli, M.; Vetere, F. P.; González-García, D.; Perugini, D.

    2015-10-01

    A unique high-temperature apparatus was developed to trigger chaotic mixing at high-temperature (up to 1800 °C). This new apparatus, which we term Chaotic Magma Mixing Apparatus (COMMA), is designed to carry out experiments with high-temperature and high-viscosity (up to 106 Pa s) natural silicate melts. This instrument allows us to follow in time and space the evolution of the mixing process and the associated modulation of chemical composition. This is essential to understand the dynamics of magma mixing and related chemical exchanges. The COMMA device is tested by mixing natural melts from Aeolian Islands (Italy). The experiment was performed at 1180 °C using shoshonite and rhyolite melts, resulting in a viscosity ratio of more than three orders of magnitude. This viscosity ratio is close to the maximum possible ratio of viscosity between high-temperature natural silicate melts. Results indicate that the generated mixing structures are topologically identical to those observed in natural volcanic rocks highlighting the enormous potential of the COMMA to replicate, as a first approximation, the same mixing patterns observed in the natural environment. COMMA can be used to investigate in detail the space and time development of magma mixing providing information about this fundamental petrological and volcanological process that would be impossible to investigate by direct observations. Among the potentials of this new experimental device is the construction of empirical relationships relating the mixing time, obtained through experimental time series, and chemical exchanges between the melts to constrain the mixing-to-eruption time of volcanic systems, a fundamental topic in volcanic hazard assessment.

  4. Thermal diffusivity of rhyolitic glasses and melts: effects of temperature, crystals and dissolved water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romine, William L.; Whittington, Alan G.; Nabelek, Peter I.; Hofmeister, Anne M.

    2012-12-01

    Thermal diffusivity ( D) was measured using laser-flash analysis on pristine and remelted obsidian samples from Mono Craters, California. These high-silica rhyolites contain between 0.013 and 1.10 wt% H2O and 0 to 2 vol% crystallites. At room temperature, D glass varies from 0.63 to 0.68 mm2 s-1, with more crystalline samples having higher D. As T increases, D glass decreases, approaching a constant value of ˜0.55 mm2 s-1 near 700 K. The glass data are fit with a simple model as an exponential function of temperature and a linear function of crystallinity. Dissolved water contents up to 1.1 wt% have no statistically significant effect on the thermal diffusivity of the glass. Upon crossing the glass transition, D decreases rapidly near ˜1,000 K for the hydrous melts and ˜1,200 K for anhydrous melts. Rhyolitic melts have a D melt of ˜0.51 mm2 s-1. Thermal conductivity ( k = D· ρ· C P) of rhyolitic glass and melt increases slightly with T because heat capacity ( C P) increases with T more strongly than density ( ρ) and D decrease. The thermal conductivity of rhyolitic melts is ˜1.5 W m-1 K-1, and should vary little over the likely range of magmatic temperatures and water contents. These values of D and k are similar to those of major crustal rock types and granitic protoliths at magmatic temperatures, suggesting that changes in thermal properties accompanying partial melting of the crust should be relatively minor. Numerical models of shallow rhyolite intrusions indicate that the key difference in thermal history between bodies that quench to obsidian, and those that crystallize, results from the release of latent heat of crystallization. Latent heat release enables bodies that crystallize to remain at high temperatures for much longer times and cool more slowly than glassy bodies. The time to solidification is similar in both cases, however, because solidification requires cooling through the glass transition in the first case, and cooling only to the

  5. Origin of Invariant Gel Melting Temperatures in the c-T Phase Diagram of an Organogel.

    PubMed

    Christ, Elliot; Blanc, Christophe; Al Ouahabi, Abdelaziz; Maurin, David; Le Parc, Rozenn; Bantignies, Jean-Louis; Guenet, Jean-Michel; Collin, Dominique; Mésini, Philippe J

    2016-05-17

    Binary c-T phase diagrams of organogelators in solvent are frequently simplified to two domains, gel and sol, even when the melting temperatures display two distinct regimes, an increase with T and a plateau. Herein, the c-T phase diagram of an organogelator in solvent is elucidated by rheology, DSC, optical microscopy, and transmitted light intensity measurements. We evidence a miscibility gap between the organogelator and the solvent above a threshold concentration, cL. In this domain the melting or the formation of the gel becomes a monotectic transformation, which explains why the corresponding temperatures are nonvariant above cL. As shown by further studies by variable temperature FTIR and NMR, different types of H-bonds drive both the liquid-liquid phase separation and the gelation. PMID:27088451

  6. Mesoscopic model parametrization of hydrogen bonds and stacking interactions of RNA from melting temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Gerald

    2013-01-01

    Information about molecular interactions in DNA can be obtained from experimental melting temperature data by using mesoscopic statistical physics models. Here, we extend the technique to RNA and show that the new parameters correctly reproduce known properties such as the stronger hydrogen bonds of AU base pairs. We also were able to calculate a complete set of elastic constants for all 10 irreducible combinations of nearest neighbours (NNs). We believe that this is particularly useful as experimentally derived information about RNA elasticity is relatively scarce. The melting temperature prediction using the present model improves over those from traditional NN model, providing thus an alternative way to calculate these temperatures for RNA. Additionally, we calculated the site-dependent base pair oscillation to explain why RNA shows larger oscillation amplitudes despite having stronger AU hydrogen bonds. PMID:23087379

  7. Influence of the melting temperature on the measurement of the mass concentration and size distribution of black carbon in snow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinase, Takeshi; Kita, Kazuyuki; Tsukagawa-Ogawa, Yoshimi; Goto-Azuma, Kumiko; Kawashima, Hiroto

    2016-04-01

    The influence of temperature and time of snow sample melting on the measurement of mass concentration and size distribution of black carbon (BC) in snow was evaluated experimentally. In the experiments, fresh (Shirouma) and aged (Hakusan) snow samples were melted at different temperatures or at different time lengths, and the BC mass concentration and size distribution in the melted snow samples were measured using a nebulizer and a single-particle soot photometer (SP2). In the experiment where melting temperature was varied, the BC mass concentration in the liquid decreased at a melting temperature of 70 °C. This decrease was 8.0 % for the Shirouma sample and 46.4 % for the Hakusan sample and depended on BC particle size, with a significant decrease found at BC diameters less than 350 nm. A similar decrease in BC mass concentration was found when the Hakusan snow sample that had been melted at 5 °C was heated to 70 °C. The experiment in which melting time was varied indicated that BC mass concentration in the liquid did not change for the Shirouma sample but decreased significantly with a longer melting time for the Hakusan sample (38.6 %). These results indicate that melting of snow samples at high temperatures or over long time periods can significantly affect the measurement of BC mass and its size distribution, especially for aged snow samples.

  8. The pressure and temperature dependence of carbon dioxide solubility in tholeiitic basalt melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Vivian; Holloway, John R.; Hervig, Richard L.

    1991-06-01

    The solubility of carbon dioxide in tholeiitic melt (1921 Kilauea basalt ) was determined under experimental conditions of 1 kbar, 1200°C; 10 and 15 kbar and 1300-1600°C. We examined the solubility at pressure and temperature conditions intermediate to those reported in previous studies, and, in particular, we addressed the effect of temperature on carbon dioxide solubility. Two different carbon sources were used in the experiments, silver oxalate and a mixture of carbonate minerals, to examine the effects of dissolved silver on carbon dioxide solubility. Three analytical methods were employed to measure accurately and precisely the dissolved carbon in the run products: ( 1 ) Fourier transform micro-infrared spectroscopy, ( 2 ) secondary ion mass spectrometry, and ( 3 ) bulk carbon analysis with a Perkin Elmer Elemental Analyzer. The first two methods are micro-beam techniques which allowed for assessment of sample homogeneity. Consistent with previous solubility studies, infrared analyses showed that carbon is dissolved in basaltic melt in the form of carbonate. However, our experimental results differ from the previous solubility study in that we demonstrate carbon dioxide solubility is temperature independent. At 1 kbar and 1200°C, carbon dioxide solubility is 543 ppm; at 10 kbar and 1300, 1400, and 1500°C, carbon dioxide solubility is approximately 0.77 ± .07 wt%; and at 15 kbar and 1400, 1450, 1500, 1550, and 1600°C, the solubility is approximately 1.21 ± .13 wt%. Dissolved silver does not appear to affect the solubility. These results invalidate previous models for carbon dioxide solubility. We have developed a new model which describes the pressure and temperature dependence of carbon dioxide solubility for tholeiitic basalts. Regression of the solubility data for the reaction CO2vapor + O2- melt = CO32- melt gives a heat of solution ( ΔH0 at 1 kbar and 1473 K) of 5.20 ± 4.30 kJ/mol and the change in partial molar volume ΔV0[ CO32- melt- O2- melt

  9. Influence of Crucible Materials on High-temperature Properties of Vacuum-melted Nickel-chromium-cobalt Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, R F; Rowe, John P; Freeman, J W

    1957-01-01

    A study of the effect of induction-vacuum-melting procedure on the high-temperature properties of a titanium-and-aluminum-hardened nickel-base alloy revealed that a major variable was the type of ceramic used as a crucible. Reactions between the melt and magnesia or zirconia crucibles apparently increased high-temperature properties by introducing small amounts of boron or zirconium into the melts. Heats melted in alumina crucibles had relatively low rupture life and ductility at 1,600 F and cracked during hot-working as a result of deriving no boron or zirconium from the crucible.

  10. Absolute Zero

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnelly, Russell J.; Sheibley, D.; Belloni, M.; Stamper-Kurn, D.; Vinen, W. F.

    2006-12-01

    Absolute Zero is a two hour PBS special attempting to bring to the general public some of the advances made in 400 years of thermodynamics. It is based on the book “Absolute Zero and the Conquest of Cold” by Tom Shachtman. Absolute Zero will call long-overdue attention to the remarkable strides that have been made in low-temperature physics, a field that has produced 27 Nobel Prizes. It will explore the ongoing interplay between science and technology through historical examples including refrigerators, ice machines, frozen foods, liquid oxygen and nitrogen as well as much colder fluids such as liquid hydrogen and liquid helium. A website has been established to promote the series: www.absolutezerocampaign.org. It contains information on the series, aimed primarily at students at the middle school level. There is a wealth of material here and we hope interested teachers will draw their student’s attention to this website and its substantial contents, which have been carefully vetted for accuracy.

  11. Simulation of the temperature distribution in the selective beam melting process for polymer material

    SciTech Connect

    Riedlbauer, D. E-mail: julia.mergheim@ltm.uni-erlangen.de Mergheim, J. E-mail: julia.mergheim@ltm.uni-erlangen.de Steinmann, P. E-mail: julia.mergheim@ltm.uni-erlangen.de

    2014-05-15

    In the present contribution the temperature distribution in the selective beam melting process for polymer materials is simulated to better understand the influence of process parameters on the properties of the produced part. The basis for the developed simulation tool is the nonlinear heat equation including temperature dependent functions for the heat capacity and the heat conduction which were obtained by experimental measurements. The effect of latent heat occurring in the process is also taken into account. The heat equation is discretized in time and space where a Runge-Kutta method of Radau IIA type is used for time integration. An adaptive finite element method is applied for the discretization in space and the model is implemented into the finite element library deal.II. The heat and cooling rate as important process parameters are simulated for different beam velocities. The ability for computing these process parameters makes the simulation tool suited for optimizing the process management of selective beam melting plants.

  12. Synthesis of chalcogenide and pnictide crystals in salt melts using a steady-state temperature gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chareev, D. A.; Volkova, O. S.; Geringer, N. V.; Koshelev, A. V.; Nekrasov, A. N.; Osadchii, V. O.; Osadchii, E. G.; Filimonova, O. N.

    2016-07-01

    Some examples of growing crystals of metals, alloys, chalcogenides, and pnictides in melts of halides of alkali metals and aluminum at a steady-state temperature gradient are described. Transport media are chosen to be salt melts of eutectic composition with the participation of LiCl, NaCl, KCl, RbCl, CsCl, AlCl3, AlBr3, KBr, and KI in a temperature range of 850-150°C. Some crystals have been synthesized only using a conducting contour. This technique of crystal growth is similar to the electrochemical method. In some cases, to exclude mutual influence, some elements have been isolated and forced to migrate to the crystal growth region through independent channels. As a result, crystals of desired quality have been obtained using no special equipment and with sizes sufficient for study under laboratory conditions.

  13. Communication: The Effect of Dispersion Corrections on the Melting Temperature of Liquid Water

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, Soohaeng; Xantheas, Sotiris S.

    2011-03-28

    We report the results of the melting temperature (Tm) of liquid water for the Becke-Lee- Yang-Parr (BLYP) density functional including Dispersion corrections (BLYP-D) and the TTM3-F ab-initio based classical potential via constant pressure and constant enthalpy (NPH) ensemble molecular dynamics simulations of an ice Ih-liquid coexisting system. The inclusion of dispersion corrections to BLYP lowers the melting temperature of liquid water to Tm=360 K, which is a large improvement over the value of Tm > 400 K obtained with the original BLYP functional. The ab-initio based flexible, polarizable Thole-type model (TTM3-F) produces Tm=248 K from classical molecular dynamics simulations.

  14. Revisiting the melting temperature of NpO2 and the challenges associated with high temperature actinide compound measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böhler, R.; Welland, M. J.; Bruycker, F. De; Boboridis, K.; Janssen, A.; Eloirdi, R.; Konings, R. J. M.; Manara, D.

    2012-06-01

    This work revisits the melting behaviour of neptunium dioxide, an actinide compound which can be produced in the nuclear fuel during operation, and which has an important impact on the nuclear fuel and waste radioactivity especially on the very long term. The present experimental approach employs remote laser heating under controlled atmosphere and fast pyrometry. This technique circumvents problems encountered by more traditional heating techniques, in particular, the reaction between sample and containment at temperatures beyond 2500 K. In addition, only a small amount of sample material is required, which is an advantage with respect to the radioactivity and limited availability of neptunium. The NpO2 melting/freezing temperature has been measured to be 3070 K ± 62 K, much higher than previous values (around 2830 K) obtained by more traditional thermal analysis methods. The large amount of experimental data collected allowed a consistent statistical analysis. It seems likely, although not fully evident from the present results, that the high oxygen potential at temperatures around melting leads to a slightly hypo-stoichiometric congruent melting composition, as already observed in other actinide (ThO2, PuO2) and lanthanide oxides (e.g., CeO2). Finally, a recently developed phase-field model was used for the simulation of the observed thermograms, allowing a deeper insight in material properties that are difficult to directly measure. For example, a polaron contribution to the high-temperature thermal conductivity, well accepted for the commonly studied actinide oxide UO2, is shown here to likely be present in NpO2.

  15. Cerium oxidation state in silicate melts: Combined fO2, temperature and compositional effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smythe, Duane J.; Brenan, James M.

    2015-12-01

    To quantify the relative proportions of Ce3+ and Ce4+ in natural magmas, we have synthesized a series of Ce doped glasses ranging in composition from basalt to rhyolite (±H2O) at 0.001 and 1 GPa, under fO2 conditions varying from FMQ -4.0 to FMQ +8.4, and temperatures from 1200 to 1500 °C. The Ce4+/Ce3+ ratio in the experimental run products was determined both potentiometrically and in situ, using Ce M4,5-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy. For a given melt composition, the change in Ce4+/Ce3+ ratio with fO2 follows the trend predicted from the reaction stoichiometry assuming simple oxides as melt species. In addition to fO2, melt composition and water content have been found to be secondary controls on Ce4+/Ce3+, with more depolymerized melts and hydrous compositions favoring the stabilization of Ce3+. The Ce4+/Ce3+ ratio can be expressed through the equation,

  16. Quantum melting of a two-dimensional vortex lattice at zero temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Rozhkov, A.; Stroud, D.

    1996-11-01

    We consider the quantum melting of a two-dimensional flux lattice at temperature {ital T} = 0 in the {open_quote}{open_quote}superclean limit.{close_quote}{close_quote} In this regime, we find that vortex motion is dominated by the Magnus force. A Lindemann criterion predicts melting when {ital n}{sub {ital v}}/{ital n}{sub {ital p}}{ge}{beta}, where {ital n}{sub {ital v}} and {ital n}{sub {ital p}} are the areal number densities of vortex pancakes and Cooper pairs, and {beta}{approx_equal}0.1. A second criterion is derived by using Wigner-crystal and Laughlin wave functions for the solid and liquid phases respectively, and setting the two energies equal. This gives a melting value similar to the Lindemann result. We discuss the numerical value of the {ital T}=0 melting field for thin layers of a low-{ital T}{sub {ital c}} superconductor, such as {ital a}-MoGe, and single layers of high-{ital T}{sub {ital c}} materials. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  17. Melting behavior of H[subscript 2]O at high pressures and temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Jung-Fu; Gregoryanz, Eugene; Struzhkin, Viktor V.; Somayazulu, Maddury; Mao, H.-K.; Hemley, R.J.

    2010-07-19

    Water plays an important role in the physics and chemistry of planetary interiors. In situ high pressure-temperature Raman spectroscopy and synchrotron x-ray diffraction have been used to examine the phase diagram of H{sub 2}O. A discontinuous change in the melting curve of H{sub 2}O is observed at approximately 35 GPa and 1040 K, indicating a triple point on the melting line. The melting curve of H{sub 2}O increases significantly above the triple point and may intersect the isentropes of Neptune and Uranus. Solid ice could therefore form in stratified layers at depth within these icy planets. The extrapolated melting curve may also intersect with the geotherm of Earth's lower mantle above 60 GPa. The presence of solid H{sub 2}O would result in a jump in the viscosity of the mid-lower mantle and provides an additional explanation for the observed higher viscosity of the mid-lower mantle.

  18. The temperature of primary melts and mantle sources of komatiites, OIBs, MORBs and LIPs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobolev, Alexander

    2015-04-01

    There is general agreement that the convecting mantle, although mostly peridotitic in composition, is compositionally and thermally heterogeneous on different spatial scales. The amount, sizes, temperatures and compositions of these heterogeneities significantly affect mantle dynamics because they may diverge greatly from dominant peridotites in their density and fusibility. Differences in potential temperature and composition of mantle domains affect magma production and cannot be easily distinguished from each other. This has led to radically different interpretations of the melting anomalies that produce ocean-island basalts, large igneous provinces and komatiites: most scientists believe that they originate as hot, deep-sourced mantle plumes; but a small though influential group (e.g. Anderson 2005, Foulger, 2010) propose that they derive from high proportions of easily fusible recycled or delaminated crust, or in the case of komatiites contain large amount of H2O (e.g. Grove & Parman, 2004). The way to resolve this ambiguity is an independent estimation of temperature and composition of mantle sources of various types of magma. In this paper I report application of newly developed olivine-spinel-melt geothermometers based on partition of Al, Cr, Sc and Y for different primitive lavas from mid-ocean ridges, ocean-island basalts, large igneous provinces and komatiites. The results suggest significant variations of crystallization temperature for the same Fo of high magnesium olivines of different types of mantle-derived magmas: from the lowest (down to 1220 degree C) for MORB to the highest (up to over 1500 degree C) for komatiites and Siberian meimechites. These results match predictions from Fe-Mg olivine-melt equilibrium and confirm the relatively low temperature of the mantle source of MORB and higher temperatures in the mantle plumes that produce the OIB of Iceland, Hawaii, Gorgona, Archean komatiites and several LIPs (e.g Siberian and NAMP). The

  19. High -Temperature melting in intra-continental settings - insight from numerical modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorczyk, Weronika; Hobbs, Bruce; Gonzalez, Christopher; Smithies, Hugh

    2015-04-01

    Most of intra-continental melting is associated with interaction of deep mantle plume with mantle lithosphere. Vast amount of mafic/felsic intra-plate intrusions are located along post-collisional lines, where for longer periods of time regional tectonic conditions are more likely to be (weakly) compressional to transpressional, and more rarely extensional. Arrival of the asthenosphere-derived plume would suggest initiation of extension along the weak/post-collision zone. Alternatively, in compressional regime a surprisingly large range of instabilities can develop that lead to melting of the lower crust and mantle lithosphere. Unexpected structural complexity arises which is quite sensitive to the geometry and rheological properties. This has dramatic effects on melting and devolatilisation within the lithosphere and hence in the localisation of and melt emplacement. Melts extracted in theses circumstances lead to emplacement of all variety of magmas: mafic, intermediate and felsic, from wide range of PT conditions. In order to investigate theses intra-plate sites of deformation, melt production and crustal growth in relation to pre-worked lithospheric crust we performed a series of 2D numerical experiments by using a coupled petrological - thermomechanical numerical model. The model includes, stable mineralogy, aqueous fluid transport, partial melting, melt extraction and melt emplacement in form of extrusive volcanics and intrusive plutons. As a case study we will present Musgrave Orogeny in Central Australia. The Musgrave Province developed at the nexus of the North, West and South Australian cratons and its Mesoproterozoic evolution incorporates a 100 Ma period of ultra-high temperature (UHT) metamorphism from ca. 1220 to ca. 1120 Ma. This was accompanied by high-temperature A-type granitic magmatism over an 80 Ma period, sourced in part from mantle-derived components and emplaced as a series of pulsed events that also coincide with peaks in UHT metamorphism

  20. Depths and Temperatures of Mantle Melt Extraction in the Southern Cascadia Subduction Zone (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Till, C.; Grove, T. L.; Donnelly-Nolan, J. M.; Carlson, R. W.

    2013-12-01

    Plagioclase and spinel lherzolite thermometry and barometry applied to an extensive suite of <10.5 Ma primitive basaltic lavas (most Mg#>0.70) containing variable H2O contents (<<1 to ~4 wt%) suggests these melts were extracted from the mantle at 40-58 km below Oregon's High Lava Plains, 41-51 km below California's Modoc Plateau, and 37-60 km below the central-southern Cascades volcanic arc. Of the 155 basalt samples investigated, 33 are calc-alkaline basalts (CAB) and the remainder are high alumina olivine tholeiites (HAOT) or mildly alkaline basalts (MAB). All 33 of the CAB are from the subduction-influenced volcanic centers of Lassen, Mt. Shasta, Three Sisters, Medicine Lake, and Newberry in the present-day Cascades arc or rear arc. All of these volcanic centers also erupted HAOT or MAB. Olivine-plagioclase hygrometry for a representative subset of the 20 CAB from Newberry indicates they contained ~4 wt% H2O prior to eruption. Water contents for the remaining CAB were approximated using the H2O-melt composition scaling relationship developed by Ruscitto et al. [2010, EPSL 298(1-2), 153-161] yielding ≤1-3 wt% H2O. The calculated pressures and temperatures of last equilibration with mantle lherzolite for all 33 CAB were adjusted for the effects of H2O following Till et al. [2012, JGR 117(B06206)] and are on average 50×15°C (1s) cooler and 1.65×0.27 km deeper than their calculated temperatures and depths for anhydrous conditions. The minimum depths of melt extraction calculated for all basalts considered (including the CAB) are close to the Moho, as determined by regional geophysical studies. Thus, our results suggest that the geophysical Moho and lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary are located in close proximity to one another (within 5-10 km). The basalts originated at 1185-1383°C and the presence of both wet and dry basalts that were generated at such different temperatures at similar times, depths, and geographic locations in the Cascades arc and rear arc

  1. Radiometric absolute noise-temperature measurement system features improved accuracy and calibration ease

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, W.; Ewen, H.; Haroules, G.

    1970-01-01

    Radiometric receiver system, which measures noise temperatures in degrees Kelvin, does not require cryogenic noise sources for routine operation. It eliminates radiometer calibration errors associated with RF attenuation measurements. Calibrated noise source is required only for laboratory adjustment and calibration.

  2. Density and structure of jadeite melt at high pressure and high temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamaki, T.; Yu, T.; Jing, Z.; Park, C.; Shen, G.; Wang, Y.

    2011-12-01

    Knowledge of density of magma is important for understanding magma-related processes such as volcanic activity and differentiation in the Earth's early history. Since these processes take place in Earth's interior, we need to measure the density of magma in situ at high pressures. It is also necessary to relate the density with the structure of silicate melts at high pressure and temperature and further understand the densification mechanism of magma with pressure. Here we report the density and structural data for jadeite melt up to 7 GPa,. The density measurements were carried out using a DIA-type cubic press at the 13-BM-D beamline at APS using monochromatic radiation tuned to the desired energy (~20 keV) with a Si (111) double-crystal monochromator. Intensities of the incident and transmitted X-rays were measured by two ion chambers placed before and after the press for X-ray absorption measurements. Incident and transmitted X-ray intensities were obtained by moving the incident slits perpendicular to the X-ray beam direction at 0.010 mm steps crosses the sample. Lambert-Beer law was then applied to the normalized intensities as a function of the sample position across the assembly. Density of jadeite melt was determined up to 7 GPa and 2300 K. For structural determination, high-pressure and high-temperature energy-dispersive XRD experiments were carried out by using a Paris-Edinburgh press installed at the 16-BM-B of APS. Incident X-rays were collimated by a vertical slit (0.5 mm) and a horizontal slit (0.1 mm) to irradiate the sample. Diffracted X-rays were detected by a Ge solid state detector with a 4k multi-channel analyzer, through a collimator and 5.0mm (V) by and 0.1mm (H) receiving slits. Diffraction patterns were collected until the highest intensity reached 2000 counts, at 12 angles (2theta=3, 4, 5, 7, 9, 11, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35, 39.5 degrees). The structural measurements were carried out in the pressure range from 1 to 5 GPa and at 1600 to 2000 K

  3. Extraction of the global absolute temperature for Northern Hemisphere using a set of 6190 meteorological stations from 1800 to 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christopoulos, Demetris T.

    2015-06-01

    Starting from a set of 6190 meteorological stations we are choosing 6130 of them and only for Northern Hemisphere we are computing average values for absolute annual Mean, Minimum, Q1, Median, Q3, Maximum temperature plus their standard deviations for years 1800-2013, while we use 4887 stations and 389 467 rows of complete yearly data. The data quality and the seasonal bias indices are defined and used in order to evaluate our dataset. After the year 1969 the data quality is monotonically decreasing while the seasonal bias is positive in most of the cases. An Extreme Value Distribution estimation is performed for minimum and maximum values, giving some upper bounds for both of them and indicating a big magnitude for temperature changes. Finally suggestions for improving the quality of meteorological data are presented.

  4. Temperature measurement of mineral melt by means of a high-speed camera.

    PubMed

    Bizjan, Benjamin; Širok, Brane; Drnovšek, Janko; Pušnik, Igor

    2015-09-10

    This paper presents a temperature evaluation method by means of high-speed, visible light digital camera visualization and its application to the mineral wool production process. The proposed method adequately resolves the temperature-related requirements in mineral wool production and significantly improves the spatial and temporal resolution of measured temperature fields. Additionally, it is very cost effective in comparison with other non-contact temperature field measurement methods, such as infrared thermometry. Using the proposed method for temperatures between 800°C and 1500°C, the available temperature measurement range is approximately 300 K with a single temperature calibration point and without the need for camera setting adjustments. In the case of a stationary blackbody, the proposed method is able to produce deviations of less than 5 K from the reference (thermocouple-measured) temperature in a measurement range within 100 K from the calibration temperature. The method was also tested by visualization of rotating melt film in the rock wool production process. The resulting temperature fields are characterized by a very good temporal and spatial resolution (18,700 frames per second at 128  pixels×328  pixels and 8000 frames per second at 416  pixels×298  pixels). PMID:26368973

  5. Research on temperature measurement technology for graphite-cone-absorption-cavity absolute calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Ji Feng; Lu, Fei; Sun, Li Qun; Zhang, Kai; Hu, Xiao Yang; Zhou, Shan; Xu, De

    2015-02-01

    The nonlinear effect of materials and sensors in high-energy laser calorimeters is especially obvious—due to the steep temperature gradients of their absorbers. Significant measurement errors occur when traditional integral temperature sensors and methods are utilized. In an effort to remedy this, a method is proposed in this paper in which an absorption cavity is divided into many parts and multiple discrete thermocouple sensors are used to measure the temperature rise of the absorbers. The temperature distribution in the absorbers is theoretically analyzed, numerically simulated, and verified through experimentation. Energy measurement results are compared according to the temperature distribution for different layouts of thermocouples. A high-accuracy calorimeter is developed by setting and optimizing thermocouple layout, as well as correcting various elements such as the specific heat of graphite and responsivity of thermocouples. The calorimeter employing this measurement method is calibrated against a standard energy meter, resulting in correction coefficient of 1.027 and relative standard deviation of the correction coefficient of only 0.8%. Theoretical analysis, numerical simulation, and experimental verification all prove that the proposed method successfully improves measurement accuracy.

  6. Research on temperature measurement technology for graphite-cone-absorption-cavity absolute calorimeter.

    PubMed

    Wei, Ji Feng; Lu, Fei; Sun, Li Qun; Zhang, Kai; Hu, Xiao Yang; Zhou, Shan; Xu, De

    2015-02-01

    The nonlinear effect of materials and sensors in high-energy laser calorimeters is especially obvious-due to the steep temperature gradients of their absorbers. Significant measurement errors occur when traditional integral temperature sensors and methods are utilized. In an effort to remedy this, a method is proposed in this paper in which an absorption cavity is divided into many parts and multiple discrete thermocouple sensors are used to measure the temperature rise of the absorbers. The temperature distribution in the absorbers is theoretically analyzed, numerically simulated, and verified through experimentation. Energy measurement results are compared according to the temperature distribution for different layouts of thermocouples. A high-accuracy calorimeter is developed by setting and optimizing thermocouple layout, as well as correcting various elements such as the specific heat of graphite and responsivity of thermocouples. The calorimeter employing this measurement method is calibrated against a standard energy meter, resulting in correction coefficient of 1.027 and relative standard deviation of the correction coefficient of only 0.8%. Theoretical analysis, numerical simulation, and experimental verification all prove that the proposed method successfully improves measurement accuracy. PMID:25725875

  7. Thermal performance of a heat storage module using PCM's with different melting temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Farid, M.M.; Kanzawa, A.

    1989-05-01

    The performance of a heat storage unit consisting of number of vertical cylindrical capsules filled with phase change materials, with air flowing across them for heat exchange has been analyzed. Earlier theoretical models did not consider temperature distribution in the radial direction within the capsules, an assumption that limits their applications for small diameter capsules. The mathematical model developed in this work is based on solving the heat conduction equation in both melt and solid phases in cylindrical coordinates, taking into account the radial temperature distribution in both phases. Heat flux was then evaluated at the surface of the first row of the capsules to determine the temperature of the air leaving that row by a simple heat balance. It was found that such computation may be carried out for every few rows rather than for a single row to minimize computer time. The simulation study showed a significant improvement in the rate of heat transfer during heat charge and discharge when phase change materials with different melting temperatures were used.

  8. Seismic Attenuation, Temperature, H20, Mantle Melting and Rock Uplift, Central North Island New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salmon, M.; Savage, M.; Stern, T.

    2005-12-01

    Back-arc basins of the western Pacific are elevated some 1-2 km above the adjacent oceanic floor. Where oceanic back-arc basins propagate into continental lithosphere we also see an uplift signal, which can be mapped and evaluated with geological methods. Trying to understand the driving force for this uplift requires seismological methods to quantify temperatures, and therefore buoyancy, in the upper mantle. New Zealand's North Island is one such place where the back-arc basin has propagated into continental lithosphere. Geological records show that the North Island has undergone up to 2.5 km of broad wavelength rock uplift since 5 Ma. We use earthquake data to map variations in seismic attenuation (Qp-1) beneath the North Island. Results are used to determine some constraints on the effects of temperature, water and melt on buoyancy in the mantle wedge above the subduction zone. A region of high attenuation extending to depths of ~140 km correlates, spatially, with the region of back-arc extension, volcanism and high heat flow (Central Volcanic Region or CVR). In this region the path-averaged Qp-1 for frequencies from 1-15Hz is 4.0×10-3±0.3×10-3 and shows little variation with depth. West of the CVR, the north-western North Island shows a decrease in attenuation but Qp-1 remains slightly elevated (path-averaged Qp-1 1.4×10-3±0.2×10-3). Here attenuation increases with depth until it reaches similar values as the CVR mantle at approximately 80 km. We use Qp values to calculate temperatures at 30 km and 80 km depth below these two regions. Temperatures at 30 km below the CVR are elevated to just above the melting temperature (1.02 Tm) while to the west temperatures are just below the solidus (~0.95 Tm). At 80 km depth attenuation indicates temperatures for both regions are just above the solidus. To reconcile temperatures calculated from heat flow measurements in the north-western North Island with those calculated from attenuation, melting temperatures must

  9. Influence of Air Temperature Difference on the Snow Melting Simulation of SWAT Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    YAN, Y.; Onishi, T.

    2013-12-01

    The temperature-index models are commonly used to simulate the snowmelt process in mountain areas because of its good performance, low data requirements, and computational simplicity. Widely used distributed hydrological model: Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model is also using a temperature-index module. However, the lack of monitoring air temperature data still involves uncertainties and errors in its simulation performance especially in data sparse area. Thus, to evaluate the different air temperature data influence on the snow melt of the SWAT model, five different air temperature data are applied in two different Russia basins (Birobidjan basin and Malinovka basin). The data include the monitoring air temperature data (TM), NCEP reanalysis data (TNCEP), the dataset created by inverse distance weighted interpolation (IDW) method (TIDW), the dataset created by improved IDW method considering the elevation influence (TIDWEle), and the dataset created by using linear regression and MODIS Land Surface Temperature (LST) data (TLST). Among these data, the TLST , the TIDW and TIDWEle data have the higher spatial density, while the TNCEP and TM DATA have the most valid monitoring value for daily scale. The daily simulation results during the snow melting seasons (March, April and May) showed reasonable results in both test basins for all air temperature data. While R2 and NSE in Birobidjan basin are around 0.6, these values in Malinovka basin are over 0.75. Two methods: Generalized Likelihood Uncertainty Estimation (GLUE) and Sequential Uncertainty Fitting, version. 2 (SUFI-2) were used for model calibration and uncertainty analysis. The evolution index is p-factor which means the percentage of measured data bracketed by the 95% Prediction Uncertainty (95PPU). The TLST dataset always obtained the best results in both basins compared with other datasets. On the other hand, the two IDW based method get the worst results among all the scenarios. Totally, the

  10. Temperature and pressure dependence of the absolute rate constant for the reactions of NH2 radicals with acetylene and ethylene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bosco, S. R.; Nava, D. F.; Brobst, W. D.; Stief, L. J.

    1984-01-01

    The absolute rate constants for the reaction between the NH2 free radical and acetylene and ethylene is measured experimentally using a flash photolysis technique. The constant is considered to be a function of temperature and pressure. At each temperature level of the experiment, the observed pseudo-first-order rate constants were assumed to be independent of flash intensity. The results of the experiment indicate that the bimolecular rate constant for the NH2 + C2H2 reaction increases with pressure at 373 K and 459 K but not at lower temperatures. Results near the pressure limit conform to an Arrhenius expression of 1.11 (+ or -) 0.36 x 10 to the -13th over the temperature range from 241 to 459 K. For the reaction NH2 + C2H4, a smaller rate of increase in the bimolecular rate constant was observed over the temperature range 250-465 K. The implications of these results for current theoretical models of NH2 + C2H2 (or H4) reactions in the atmospheres of Jupiter and Saturn are discussed.

  11. Temperature-dependent thermal expansivities of silicate melts: The system anorthite-diopside

    SciTech Connect

    Knoche, R.; Dingwell, D.B.; Webb, S.L. )

    1992-02-01

    The temperature-dependent thermal expansivities of melts along the join anorthite-diopside have been determined on glassy and liquid samples using a combination of calorimetry, dilatometry, and Pt double bob Archimedean densitometry. Supercooled liquid volumes and molar thermal expansivities were determined using scanning calorimetric and dilatometric measurements of properties in the glass region and their behavior at the glass transition. The extraction of low-temperature liquid molar expansivities from dilatometry/calorimetry is based on an assumed equivalence of the relaxation of volume and enthalpy at the glass transition using a method developed and tested by Webb et al. (1992). This method corrects for transient effects at the glass transition which can lead to serious overestimates of liquid thermal expansivity from peak' values. Superliquidus volumes were determined using double Pt bob Archimedean densitometry at temperatures up to 1,650C. The resulting data for liquid volumes near glass transition temperatures (810-920C) and at superliquidus temperatures (1,400-1,650C) are combined to yield thermal expansivities over the entire supercooled and stable liquid range. The molar expansivities are, in general, temperature dependent. The temperature-dependence of thermal expansivity increases from anorthite to diopside composition. The thermal expansivity of anorthite is essentially temperature independent, whereas that of diopside decreases by {congruent} 50% between 800 and 1,500C, with the consequence that the thermal expansivities of the liquids in the anorthite-diopside system converge at high temperature.

  12. TSDC study of XLPE recrystallization effects in the melting range of temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diego, J. A.; Belana, J.; Òrrit, J.; Sellarès, J.; Mudarra, M.; Cañadas, J. C.

    2006-05-01

    The electrical properties of crosslinked polyethylene (XLPE), employed in mid-voltage cable insulation are studied using thermally stimulated depolarization currents (TSDC), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and x-ray diffraction. A complex heteropolar peak appears by TSDC between 50 and 110 °C, with a maximum at 105 °C. These measurements reveal that there is an optimal polarization temperature (Tpo) around 90 °C. For this polarization temperature, the measured discharge peak area is maximum. Although the presence of a Tpo is common in the study of relaxations by TSDC, in this case one would expect a monotonic decrease in the TSDC response with increasing polarization temperatures due to the decrease in the total crystalline fraction. In this paper, TSDC curves obtained under several conditions are interpreted in terms of recrystallization processes in XLPE during the polarization stage, if the sample is polarized in the melting temperature range. In this case, the recrystallization of a fraction of the material molten at this temperature promotes the formation of more stable and defect-free crystals. The presence of recrystallization processes is detected by DSC and confirmed by x-ray diffractometry. TSDC measurements have been performed with samples polarized at several temperatures (Tp) cooling from the melt or heating from room temperature. Also, TSDC results are obtained with previous annealing or with several cooling rates. These results allow us to infer that crystalline material grown from recrystallization processes that take place in the polarization stage attains a particularly stable polarization. Possible microscopical causes of this effect are discussed.

  13. Room-temperature instability of TRM and the problem of estimating absolute paleointensity from non single domain materials.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaar, R.; Tauxe, L.

    2015-12-01

    Absolute paleointensity data are essential for understanding Earth's deep interior, climatic modeling, and geochronology applications, among others. Paleointensity data are derived from experiments in which the ancient TRM is replaced by a laboratory controlled TRM. This procedure is built on the assumption that the process of ancient TRM acquisition is entirely reproducible in the lab. Here we show experimental results violating this assumption in a manner not expected from standard theory. We prepared 118 pairs of nearly identical specimens. One specimen from each pair was given laboratory TRM and allowed to "age" in a controlled fixed field, identical and parallel to the laboratory TRM field, for two years. After two years the second specimen was given a "fresh" TRM. Thus, the two specimens in each pair differ in only one significant respect: the time elapsed from the TRM acquisition. We carried out IZZI-type absolute paleointensity experiments on the two groups. Under the assumption of TRM stability we expect that the behavior of the twin specimens in the experiment would be exactly the same. Yet, we found a small but systematic difference between the "aged" and the "fresh" TRM. The "aged" TRM yield more curved and zigzaggy Arai plots, and exhibit a shift in the blocking/unblocking spectra. This effect leads to a systematic bias in paleointensity estimates caused only by room-temperature instability of TRM. The change in TRM properties is likely caused by irreversible changes in micromagnetic structures of non single domains.

  14. Semiclassical theory of melting of shell effects in nuclei with temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Harjeet; Jain, Sudhir R.

    2015-11-01

    The level density parameter is calculated on the basis of exact semiclassical ‘trace formulae’ for magic and semi-magic nuclei. This powerful formula entails the level density of a quantum system in terms of the detailed properties of periodic orbits of the underlying classical system. Keeping the description within the mean-field approximation of a many-body Fermionic system, we present the well-known dependence of the level density parameter a on the mass number A which summarizes the shell effects in nuclei. To understand the melting of shell effects with temperature, we present calculations leading us to the behaviour of a vs A at non-zero temperatures for nearly one hundred nuclei. We see all the points huddling together along to the A/1-line as the temperature increases. With no adjustable parameters, we also find that our results for a are within ten to fifteen percent of the values deduced from the experiments.

  15. Melting and dissociation of ammonia at high pressure and high temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Ojwang, J.G.O.; McWilliams, R. Stewart; Ke, Xuezhi; Goncharov, Alexander F.

    2012-12-10

    Raman spectroscopy and synchrotron x-ray diffraction measurements of ammonia (NH{sub 3}) in laser-heated diamond anvil cells, at pressures up to 60 GPa and temperatures up to 2500 K, reveal that the melting line exhibits a maximum near 37 GPa and intermolecular proton fluctuations substantially increase in the fluid with pressure. We find that NH{sub 3} is chemically unstable at high pressures, partially dissociating into N{sub 2} and H{sub 2}. Ab initio calculations performed in this work show that this process is thermodynamically driven. The chemical reactivity dramatically increases at high temperature (in the fluid phase at T > 1700 K) almost independent of pressure. Quenched from these high temperature conditions, NH{sub 3} exhibits structural differences from known solid phases. We argue that chemical reactivity of NH{sub 3} competes with the theoretically predicted dynamic dissociation and ionization.

  16. How melt stretching affect the brittle-ductile transition temperature of polymer glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Shiwang; Wang, Shi-Qing

    2013-03-01

    Upon increasing temperature a brittle polymer glass can turn ductile. PMMA is a good example. For a while this brittle-ductile transition (BDT) was thought to be determined by the emergence of a secondary relaxation....1-3 On the other hand, it has been known for a long time...4-6 that predeformation in the melt state (e.g., melt stretching) can also make brittle glasses behave in a ductile manner. This transformation has recently received a satisfactory explanation based on a picture of structural hybrid for polymer glasses....7 It appears that BDT is dictated by the relative mechanical characteristics of the primary structure (due to the van der Waals bonds) and the chain network. The present work, based on conventional Instron tensile extension tests and DMA tests, shows that melt stretching does not alter the secondary relaxation behavior of PMMA and PC yet can turn them the brittle PMMA ductile and the ductile PC brittle. Moreover, sufficient melt stretching makes the brittle PS ductile although it does not produce any secondary relaxation process..1. Monnerie, L.; Laupretre, F.; Halary, J. L. Adv. Polym. Sci2005, 187, 35-213. 2. Monnerie, L.; Halary, J. L.; Kausch, H. Adv. Polym. Sci2005, 187, 215-364. 3. Wu, S. J. Appl. Polym. Sci.1992, 46, (4), 619-624. 4. Vincent, P. I. Polymer1960, 1, (0), 425-444. 5. Harris, J. S.; Ward, I. M. J. Mater. Sci.1970, 5, (7), 573-579. 6. Ender, D. H.; Andrews, R. D. J. Appl. Phys.1965, 36, (10), 3057-3062. 7. Zartman, G. D.; Cheng, S.; Li, X.; Lin, F.; Becker, M. L.; Wang, S.-Q. Macromolecules2012, 45, (16), 6719-6732.

  17. MELT WIRE SENSORS AVAILABLE TO DETERMINE PEAK TEMPERATURES IN ATR IRRADIATION TESTING

    SciTech Connect

    K. L. Davis; D. Knudson; J. Daw; J. Palmer; J. L. Rempe

    2012-07-01

    In April 2007, the Department of Energy (DOE) designated the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) to advance US leadership in nuclear science and technology. By attracting new users from universities, laboratories, and industry, the ATR will support basic and applied nuclear research and development and help address the nation's energy security needs. In support of this new program, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has developed in-house capabilities to fabricate, test, and qualify new and enhanced temperature sensors for irradiation testing. Although most efforts emphasize sensors capable of providing real-time data, selected tasks have been completed to enhance sensors provided in irradiation locations where instrumentation leads cannot be included, such as drop-in capsule and Hydraulic Shuttle Irradiation System (HSIS) or 'rabbit' locations. To meet the need for these locations, the INL has developed melt wire temperature sensors for use in ATR irradiation testing. Differential scanning calorimetry and environmental testing of prototypical sensors was used to develop a library of 28 melt wire materials, capable of detecting peak irradiation temperatures ranging from 85 to 1500°C. This paper will discuss the development work and present test results.

  18. Structure and dynamical intra-molecular heterogeneity of star polymer melts above glass transition temperature.

    PubMed

    Chremos, Alexandros; Glynos, Emmanouil; Green, Peter F

    2015-01-28

    Structural and dynamical properties of star melts have been investigated with molecular dynamics simulations of a bead-spring model. Star polymers are known to be heterogeneous, but a systematic simulation study of their properties in melt conditions near the glass transition temperature was lacking. To probe their properties, we have expanded from linear to star polymers the applicability of Dobkowski's chain-length dependence correlation function [Z. Dobkowski, Eur. Polym. J. 18, 563 (1982)]. The density and the isokinetic temperature, based on the canonical definition of the laboratory glass-transition, can be described well by the correlation function and a subtle behavior manifests as the architecture becomes more complex. For linear polymer chains and low functionality star polymers, we find that an increase of the arm length would result in an increase of the density and the isokinetic temperature, but high functionality star polymers have the opposite behavior. The effect between low and high functionalities is more pronounced for short arm lengths. Complementary results such as the specific volume and number of neighbors in contact provide further insights on the subtle relation between structure and dynamics. The findings would be valuable to polymer, colloidal, and nanocomposites fields for the design of materials in absence of solution with the desired properties. PMID:25638003

  19. Attenuation and Velocity Structure in Spain and Morocco: Distinguishing Between Water, Temperature, and Partial Melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezada, M. J.; Humphreys, E.

    2014-12-01

    Temperature, melt fraction, and water content affect seismic velocity and attenuation differently. Both are sensitive to temperature, but velocity is more sensitive to melt fraction and attenuation is thought to be more sensitive to water content. For these reasons, combining attenuation measurements with tomographic imaging of velocity structure can help untangle these fields and better resolve lithospheric structure and physical state. We map variations in attenuation beneath Spain and northern Morocco using teleseismic data generated by more than a dozen teleseismic deep-focus earthquakes recorded on a dense array of stations. For each event, we first estimate the source from the best quality recordings. We then apply an attenuation operator to the source estimate, using a range of t* values, to match the record at each station. We invert for a smooth map of t* from the ensemble of measurements. The spatial patterns in t* correlate very well with the tectonic domains in Spain and Morocco. In particular, areas in Spain that resisted deformation during the Variscan and Alpine orogenies produce very little attenuation. Comparing the attenuation map with seismic velocity structure we find that, in Morocco, some areas with strong low-velocity anomalies and recent volcanism do not cause high attenuation. These observations suggest that water content is a more likely cause for seismic attenuation in the study area than temperature, and that the non-attenuative low-velocity anomalies in Morocco are produced by partial mel.

  20. Al-Fe-Zr alloys for high temperature applications produced by rapid quenching from the melt

    SciTech Connect

    Okazaki, K.; Skinner, D.J.

    1984-09-01

    The melt-spinning technique to produce microstructure for high temperature-high strength Al-Fe-Zr alloys, meeting aerospace structural requirements, is presented, including the investigations for the improvement of the thermal stability of iron aluminide dispersoids by addition of Zr. The alloys containing about 27 to 30 percent volume fraction of dispersoids would be the optimum to meet the requirements from the strength and ductility viewpoint. The thermal stability of the alloys was determined by measuring the microvickers hardness on the isochronally annealed ribbons. 9 references.

  1. Relationship Between Ice Nucleation Temperature Depression and Equilibrium Melting Points Depression of Medaka (Oryzias latipes) Embryos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimizuka, Norihito; Suzuki, Toru

    We measured the ice nucleation temperature depression , ΔTf , and equilibrium melting points depression, ΔTm, of Medaka (Oryzias latipes) embryos with different cryoprotectant (ethylene glycol, 1.3-propanediol, 1.4-butanediol, glycerol aqueous solutions) treatments. Our obtained results showed the good relationship between the ΔTf ,and ΔTm all samples. In addition the value of λ , which can be obtained from the linear relationship, ΔTf =λ ΔTm, were confirmed to show correlation with the value of λ , as obtained by the W/O emulsion method.

  2. How deep, how hot: comparing pressure and temperature estimates from amphibole and rhyolite-MELTS thermobarometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pamukcu, A. S.; Gualda, G. A.

    2013-12-01

    Accurately constraining the pressure and temperature of magma residence is problematic, but it is key to understanding the structure and evolution of magmatic systems. Various thermometers exist (Fe-Ti oxides, Ti-in-zircon, Zr-in-sphene, etc.), but there are fewer barometers that can be applied to volcanic rocks. Most barometers capitalize on amphibole, a relatively common mineral whose composition is sensitive to pressure and temperature changes. Glass composition is a function of pressure for magmas saturated in quartz and feldspar, and a new thermobarometer based on rhyolite-MELTS simulations using glass (matrix glass and crystal-hosted glass inclusions) compositions has been recently proposed. We compare results from amphibole and matrix glass thermobarometry. We focus on outflow high-silica rhyolite pumice from the Peach Spring Tuff (CA-NV-AZ, USA), which are characterized by sanidine+plagioclase×quartz+amphibole+sphene in a high-silica rhyolite glass matrix. Compositional variations in amphibole are slight and described by edenite and Ti-Tschermak substitution, with little Al-Tschermak substitution, suggesting small changes in temperature but not in pressure. Plagioclase compositions are also nearly homogeneous. Thus, we expect thermobarometry results to cluster around a single pressure and temperature, making these samples excellent candidates for comparing thermobarometers. Amphibole×plagioclase thermobarometry reveals: - Amphibole-plagioclase: results vary widely depending on the calibration (e.g. 150-420 MPa, 520-730 °C); combined Anderson & Smith (1995) barometer with Holland & Blundy (1990) thermometer is most consistent, suggesting crystallization at 230 MPa, 680 °C. - Amphibole-only: calibrations give significantly different results (75-115 MPa, 770-960 °C [Ridolfi et al. 2010]; 400-950 MPa, 800-950°C [Ridolfi & Renzulli 2012]). Results suggest the recent re-calibration is particularly unreliable for these rocks, and the earlier calibration is

  3. Thermodynamic temperature assignment to the point of inflection of the melting curve of high-temperature fixed points.

    PubMed

    Woolliams, E R; Anhalt, K; Ballico, M; Bloembergen, P; Bourson, F; Briaudeau, S; Campos, J; Cox, M G; del Campo, D; Dong, W; Dury, M R; Gavrilov, V; Grigoryeva, I; Hernanz, M L; Jahan, F; Khlevnoy, B; Khromchenko, V; Lowe, D H; Lu, X; Machin, G; Mantilla, J M; Martin, M J; McEvoy, H C; Rougié, B; Sadli, M; Salim, S G R; Sasajima, N; Taubert, D R; Todd, A D W; Van den Bossche, R; van der Ham, E; Wang, T; Whittam, A; Wilthan, B; Woods, D J; Woodward, J T; Yamada, Y; Yamaguchi, Y; Yoon, H W; Yuan, Z

    2016-03-28

    The thermodynamic temperature of the point of inflection of the melting transition of Re-C, Pt-C and Co-C eutectics has been determined to be 2747.84 ± 0.35 K, 2011.43 ± 0.18 K and 1597.39 ± 0.13 K, respectively, and the thermodynamic temperature of the freezing transition of Cu has been determined to be 1357.80 ± 0.08 K, where the ± symbol represents 95% coverage. These results are the best consensus estimates obtained from measurements made using various spectroradiometric primary thermometry techniques by nine different national metrology institutes. The good agreement between the institutes suggests that spectroradiometric thermometry techniques are sufficiently mature (at least in those institutes) to allow the direct realization of thermodynamic temperature above 1234 K (rather than the use of a temperature scale) and that metal-carbon eutectics can be used as high-temperature fixed points for thermodynamic temperature dissemination. The results directly support the developing mise en pratique for the definition of the kelvin to include direct measurement of thermodynamic temperature. PMID:26903099

  4. The brightness temperature of Venus and the absolute flux-density scale at 608 MHz.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muhleman, D. O.; Berge, G. L.; Orton, G. S.

    1973-01-01

    The disk temperature of Venus was measured at 608 MHz near the inferior conjunction of 1972, and a value of 498 plus or minus 33 K was obtained using a nominal CKL flux-density scale. The result is consistent with earlier measurements, but has a much smaller uncertainty. Our theoretical model prediction is larger by a factor of 1.21 plus or minus 0.09. This discrepancy has been noticed previously for frequencies below 1400 MHz, but was generally disregarded because of the large observational uncertainties. No way could be found to change the model to produce agreement without causing a conflict with well-established properties of Venus. Thus it is suggested that the flux-density scale may require an upward revision, at least near this frequency, in excess of what has previously been considered likely.

  5. Development of Sn-based, low melting temperature Pb-free solder alloys.

    SciTech Connect

    Grant, Richard L.; Vianco, Paul Thomas; Rejent, Jerome Andrew

    2003-09-01

    Low temperature, Sn-based Pb-free solders were developed by making alloy additions to the starting material, 96.5Sn-3.5Ag (mass%). The melting behavior was determined using Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC). The solder microstructure was evaluated by optical microscopy and electron probe microanalysis (EPMA). Shear strength measurements, hardness tests, intermetallic compound (IMC) layer growth measurements, and solderability tests were performed on selected alloys. Three promising ternary alloy compositions and respective solidus temperatures were: 91.84Sn-3.33Ag-4.83Bi, 212 C; 87.5Sn-7.5Au-5.0Bi, 200 C; and 86.4Sn-5.1 Ag-8.5Au, 205 C. A quaternary alloy had the composition 86.8Sn-3.2Ag-5.0Bi-5.0Au and solidus temperature of 194 C The shear strength of this quaternary alloy was nearly twice that of the eutectic Sn-Pb solder. The 66Sn-5.0Ag-10Bi-5.0Au-101n-4.0Cu alloy had a solidus temperature of 178 C and good solderability on Cu. The lowest solidus temperature of 159 C was realized with the alloy 62Sn-5.0Ag-10Bi-4.0Au-101n-4.0Cu-5.0Ga. The contributing factor towards the melting point depression was the composition of the solid solution, Sn-based matrix phase of each solder.

  6. Continuous Measurements of Electrical Conductivity and Viscosity of Lherzorite Analogue Samples during Slow Increases and Decreases in Temperature: Melting and Pre-melting Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sueyoshi, K.; Hiraga, T.

    2014-12-01

    It has been considered that transport properties of the mantle (ex. electrical conductivity, viscosity, seismic attenuation) changes dramatically during ascend of the mantle especially at around the mantle solidus. To understand the mechanism of such changes, we measured the electrical conductivity and viscosity of the lherzorite analogues during slow increases and decreases in temperature reproducing the mantle crossing its solidus. Two types of samples, one was forsterite plus 20% diopside and the other was 50% forsterite, 40% enstatite and 10% diopside with addition of 0.5% spinel, were synthesized from Mg(OH)2, SiO2, CaCO3 and MgAl2O4 (spinel) powders with particle size of <50 nm. Samples were expected to exhibit different manners in initiation of partial melt and amount of melt during the temperature change. We continuously measured electrical conductivity of these samples at every temperature during gradual temperature change, which crosses the sample solidus (~1380℃ and 1230℃ for forsterite + diopside sample and spinel-added samples, respectively). Sample viscosity were also measured under constant loads of 0.5~50 MPa. The electrical conductivity and viscosity at well below (>150℃) the sample solidus exhibited linear distributions in their Arrhenius plots indicating that a single mechanism controls for each transport property within the experimental temperature ranges. Such linear relationship especially in the electrical conductivity was no longer observed at higher temperature regime exhibiting its exponential increase until the temperature reached the sample solidus. Such dramatic change with changing temperature has not been detected for the sample viscosity. Monotonic increase of electrical conductivity in accordance with increasing melt fraction was observed above the sample solidus.

  7. Behaviour of neutron irradiated beryllium during temperature excursions up to and beyond its melting temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pajuste, Elina; Kizane, Gunta; Avotiņa, Līga; Zariņš, Artūrs

    2015-10-01

    Beryllium pebble behaviour has been studied regarding the accidental operation conditions of tritium breeding blanket of fusion reactors. Structure evolution, oxidation and thermal properties have been compared for nonirradiated and neutron irradiated beryllium pebbles during thermal treatment in a temperature range from ambient temperature to 1600 K. For neutron irradiated pebbles tritium release process was studied. Methods of temperature programmed tritium desorption (TPD) in combination with thermogravimetry (TG) and temperature differential analysis (TDA), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) in combination with Energy Dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX) have been used. It was found that there are strong relation between tritium desorption spectra and structural evolution of neutron irradiated beryllium. The oxidation rate is also accelerated by the structure damages caused by neutrons.

  8. Role of Absolute Humidity in the Inactivation of Influenza Viruses on Stainless Steel Surfaces at Elevated Temperatures

    PubMed Central

    McDevitt, James; Rudnick, Stephen; First, Melvin; Spengler, John

    2010-01-01

    Influenza virus has been found to persist in the environment for hours to days, allowing for secondary transmission of influenza via inanimate objects known as fomites. We evaluated the efficacy of heat and moisture for the decontamination of surfaces for the purpose of preventing of the spread of influenza. Aqueous suspensions of influenza A virus were deposited onto stainless steel coupons, allowed to dry under ambient conditions, and exposed to temperatures of 55°C, 60°C, or 65°C and relative humidity (RH) of 25%, 50%, or 75% for up to 1 h. Quantitative virus assays were performed on the solution used to wash the viruses from these coupons, and results were compared with the solution used to wash coupons treated similarly but left under ambient conditions. Inactivation of influenza virus on surfaces increased with increasing temperature, RH, and exposure time. Reductions of greater than 5 logs of influenza virus on surfaces were achieved at temperatures of 60 and 65°C, exposure times of 30 and 60 min, and RH of 50 and 75%. Our data also suggest that absolute humidity is a better predictor of surface inactivation than RH and allows the prediction of survival using two parameters rather than three. Modest amounts of heat and adequate moisture can provide effective disinfection of surfaces while not harming surfaces, electrical systems, or mechanical components, leaving no harmful residues behind after treatment and requiring a relatively short amount of time. PMID:20435770

  9. Melting and nucleation temperatures of three salt hydrate phase change materials under static pressures up to 800 MPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Günther, Eva; Mehling, Harald; Werner, Matthias

    2007-08-01

    Phase change materials (PCMs) are used for efficient thermal energy storage. When a PCM melts and solidifies, it absorbs and releases a large amount of heat within a small temperature interval. Salt hydrates are interesting PCMs with high storage density, but their solidification is often problematic due to large subcooling. From thermodynamic theory, it should be possible to cause nucleation by applying high pressure to the subcooled melt, and thereby reduce subcooling. However, for the design of a pressure based triggering system there are still many unknown factors. In this context, we investigated the pressure dependence of the melting and nucleation temperatures. We present experimental data of three inorganic PCMs under static pressures up to 800 MPa. For NaOAc · 3H2O we observed a shifting of the nucleation temperature from -20°C at ambient pressure to +40°C at 800 MPa. This confirms that within this pressure range, the nucleation temperature of NaOAc · 3H2O is shifted above room temperature. For CaCl2 · 6H2O, a good agreement with reported melting temperature data was observed, and the range of experimental data was extended. For KF · 4H2O, the shift of the melting temperature was found to differ considerably from theoretic predictions.

  10. Temperature and pressure dependence of Ni partitioning between olivine and high-MgO silicate melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matzen, A. K.; Baker, M. B.; Beckett, J.; Stolper, E. M.

    2010-12-01

    Mantle melting that produces ocean island basalts (OIBs) takes place at temperatures (T) and pressures (P) significantly higher than the conditions at which they erupt or are intruded in the crust/shallow upper mantle [1]. To the degree that the olivine (ol)-liquid (liq) nickel partition coefficient depends on T and P, it is important that models used to describe ol-liq Ni partitioning during mantle melting include data from experiments at elevated T and P. The expressions can then be used in models which aim to reproduce the wide range of Ni contents measured in primitive phenocrysts from OIBs [2]. Available data on Ni partitioning is dominated by 1-atm experiments in which T and liquid composition are highly correlated, making it difficult to separate the effects of these variables on the observed variations in Ni partitioning between ol and liq based on 1-atm experiments alone [3].
    We conducted experiments on a mixture of MORB and olivine at 1 atm (1400°C) and 1-3 GPa (1450-1550°C). We moderated the loss of Ni from the silicate melt to the Pt-enclosed graphite capsule by surrounding the chip of MORB glass with powdered olivine and sintering the assembly at a T below the solidus of the MORB chip. The data presented in this work is from a series of reversed experiments where T and P were increased in such a way that the liquid composition remained approximately constant (MgO ~ 17 wt. %), effectively isolating the effects of T and P from those of liquid composition on the ol-liq partition coefficient. The resulting partition coefficient decreases from ~5 to 3.8 (by wt) as the temperature increases from 1400 to 1550°C. The rate of decrease of the Ni partition coefficient measured in these experiments (~0.5/100°C) is less than that of recent models, which predict a decrease of ~0.1/100°C [4]. Using the results of our experiments we fit a thermodynamic expression to describe the ol-liq Ni-Mg exchange equilibrium as a function of both T and liquid

  11. Influence of melt-temperature fluctuations on striation formation in large-scale Czochralski Si growth systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanda, Tadashi; Hourai, Masataka; Miki, Shinichiro; Shigematsu, Tatsuhiko; Tomokage, Hajime; Miyano, Takaya; Morita, Hiroshi; Shintani, Akira

    1996-09-01

    The effects of melt-temperature fluctuations on growth striations in crystals grown in a commercial-scale growth system were studied by an analysis of the fast-Fourier-transform (FFT) method applied to the melt-temperature fluctuations and to the growth striations as evaluated by X-ray topography and spreading-resistance (SR) methods. The period of the growth striations observed in crystals corresponded exactly to that of temperature fluctuations in the melt; however, the amplitude of these growth striations decreased when temperature fluctuations with a constant amplitude occurred rapidly. This phenomenon results from a delay in the response of the microscopic growth rate to rapid temperature fluctuations. The amplitude of melt-temperature fluctuations and the peak height of the FFT power spectra were observed to decrease in the radial direction toward the crystal center, and this trend was also observed for growth striations. It was concluded that temporal thermal fluctuations caused by melt convection are preserved in growth striations for crystals grown in large growth systems.

  12. Crystallization of diamond from a silicate melt of kimberlite composition in high-pressure and high-temperature experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Arima, Makoto; Nakayama, Kazuhiro ); Akaishi, Minoru; Yamaoka, Shinobu; Kanda, Hisao )

    1993-11-01

    In high-pressure and high-temperature experiments (1800-2200[degrees]C and 7.0-7.7 GPa), diamond crystallized and grew in a volatile-rich silicate melt of kimberlite composition. This diamond has well-developed [111] faces, and its morphologic characteristics resemble those of natural diamond but differ from those of synthetic diamond grown from metallic solvent-catalysts. The kimberlite melt has a strong solvent-catalytic effect on diamond formation, supporting the view that some natural diamonds crystallized from volatile-rich melts in the upper mantle. 19 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Estimating peak and solidification temperatures for anatectic pelitic migmatites using phase diagrams: sampling heterogeneous migmatites and confronting melt loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, Brett M.; Pattison, David R. M.

    2016-04-01

    Calculating a pressure-temperature phase diagram relevant to an anatectic pelitic migmatite sampled in outcrop is challenging because it is unclear what constitutes a meaningful bulk composition. Melt loss during metamorphism may have changed the bulk composition. The heterogeneous nature of migmatites, with light and dark coloured domains (leucosome and melanosome), means a choice must be made regarding how a migmatitic outcrop should be sampled. To address these issues, migmatites were simulated using thermodynamic modelling techniques for different melting and crystallization scenarios and bulk compositions. Using phase diagrams calculated for varying proportions of simulated melanosome and leucosome, temperatures of interest were estimated and compared with known values. Our modelling suggests: (1) It is generally possible to constrain the peak temperature using phase diagrams calculated with the composition of the melanosome; the more leucosome that is incorporated, the more innaccurate the estimate. For phase diagrams calculated using a combination of leucosome and melanosome material, peak temperature estimates differ from actual peak conditions by ‑25 to +50°C. In certain of these cases, such as those involving high proportions of leucosome to melanosome, or in which solid K-feldspar was absent at peak conditions, but is now present in the rock due to later crystallization from melt, it is not possible to estimate peak temperature. (2) The solidification temperature, whether due to crystallization of the last melt or physical loss of the melt during crystallization, will fall between the peak temperature and the water-saturated solidus (~660°C) if the melt and solids chemically interacted during cooling. This temperature can be accurately constrained from the phase diagram. If the melt crystallized in chemical isolation from the melanosome, the solidification temperature is the water-saturated solidus (625-645°C); however, physical melt loss during

  14. Self-heating probe instrument and method for measuring high temperature melting volume change rate of material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Junwei; Wang, Zhiping; Lu, Yang; Cheng, Bo

    2013-03-01

    The castings defects are affected by the melting volume change rate of material. The change rate has an important effect on running safety of the high temperature thermal storage chamber, too. But the characteristics of existing measuring installations are complex structure, troublesome operation and low precision. In order to measure the melting volume change rate of material accurately and conveniently, a self-designed measuring instrument, self-heating probe instrument, and measuring method are described. Temperature in heating cavity is controlled by PID temperature controller; melting volume change rate υ and molten density are calculated based on the melt volume which is measured by the instrument. Positive and negative υ represent expansion and shrinkage of the sample volume after melting, respectively. Taking eutectic LiF+CaF2 for example, its melting volume change rate and melting density at 1 123 K are -20.6% and 2 651 kg·m-3 measured by this instrument, which is only 0.71% smaller than literature value. Density and melting volume change rate of industry pure aluminum at 973 K and analysis pure NaCl at 1 123 K are detected by the instrument too. The measure results are agreed with report values. Measuring error sources are analyzed and several improving measures are proposed. In theory, the measuring errors of the change rate and molten density which are measured by the self-designed instrument is nearly 1/20-1/50 of that measured by the refitted mandril thermal expansion instrument. The self-designed instrument and method have the advantages of simple structure, being easy to operate, extensive applicability for material, relatively high accuracy, and most importantly, temperature and sample vapor pressure have little effect on the measurement accuracy. The presented instrument and method solve the problems of complicated structure and procedures, and large measuring errors for the samples with high vapor pressure by existing installations.

  15. Winter Mesopause Region Scale Height derived from VHF Meteor Radar Temperatures and LF absolute Reflection Heights measured at Collm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobi, Ch.; Kürschner, D.

    The change of ionospheric absolute reflection heights h of low-frequency LF radio waves at oblique incidence in the course of the day is measured at Collm Observatory 51 3 r N 13 0 r E using 1 8 kHz sideband phase comparisons on sporadic oscillation bursts between the sky wave and the ground wave of a commercial 177 kHz transmitter Zehlendorf reflection point 52 1 r N 13 2 r E Plasma scale height H estimates are calculated from the decrease increase of h in the morning evening during winter months The day-to-day variations of H are compared with those of daily mean temperatures at 90 km measured with a VHF meteor radar 36 2 MHz at Collm utilising the amplitude decay of meteor reflections A good qualitative correspondence is found between the two data sets Since mesospheric long-period temperature variations are generally accepted to be the signature of atmospheric planetary waves this shows that LF reflection height measurements can be used for monitoring the dynamics of the upper middle atmosphere

  16. Experimental evidence for thermal generation of interstitials in a metallic crystal near the melting temperature.

    PubMed

    Safonova, E V; Mitrofanov, Yu P; Konchakov, R A; Yu Vinogradov, A; Kobelev, N P; Khonik, V A

    2016-06-01

    The only intrinsic point defects of simple crystalline metals known from solid state physics are vacancies and interstitials. It is widely believed that while vacancies play a major role in crystal properties and their concentration reaches relatively big values near the melting temperature T m, interstitials essentially do not occur in thermodynamic equilibrium and their influence on properties is minor. Here, taking aluminum single crystals as an example, we present compelling experimental evidence for rapid thermoactivated growth of interstitial concentration upon approaching T m. Using high precision measurements of the shear modulus we found a diaelastic effect of up to [Formula: see text] near T m. It is argued that this effect is mostly due to the generation of dumbbell (split) interstitials. The interstitial concentration c i rapidly increases upon approaching T m and becomes only 2-3 times smaller than that of vacancies just below T m. The reason for this c i -increase is conditioned by a decrease of the Gibbs free energy with temperature, which in turn originates from the high formation entropy of dumbbell interstitials and a decrease of their formation enthalpy at high c i . Special molecular dynamic simulation confirmed all basic aspects of the proposed interpretation. The results obtained (i) demonstrate the significance of interstitial concentration near T m that could lead to the revaluation of vacancy concentration at high temperatures, (ii) suggest that dumbbell interstitials play a major role in the melting mechanism of monatomic metallic crystals and (iii) support a new avenue for in-depth understanding of glassy metals. PMID:27143564

  17. Experimental evidence for thermal generation of interstitials in a metallic crystal near the melting temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safonova, E. V.; Mitrofanov, Yu P.; Konchakov, R. A.; Vinogradov, A. Yu; Kobelev, N. P.; Khonik, V. A.

    2016-06-01

    The only intrinsic point defects of simple crystalline metals known from solid state physics are vacancies and interstitials. It is widely believed that while vacancies play a major role in crystal properties and their concentration reaches relatively big values near the melting temperature T m, interstitials essentially do not occur in thermodynamic equilibrium and their influence on properties is minor. Here, taking aluminum single crystals as an example, we present compelling experimental evidence for rapid thermoactivated growth of interstitial concentration upon approaching T m. Using high precision measurements of the shear modulus we found a diaelastic effect of up to -1.5% near T m. It is argued that this effect is mostly due to the generation of dumbbell (split) interstitials. The interstitial concentration c i rapidly increases upon approaching T m and becomes only 2–3 times smaller than that of vacancies just below T m. The reason for this c i -increase is conditioned by a decrease of the Gibbs free energy with temperature, which in turn originates from the high formation entropy of dumbbell interstitials and a decrease of their formation enthalpy at high c i . Special molecular dynamic simulation confirmed all basic aspects of the proposed interpretation. The results obtained (i) demonstrate the significance of interstitial concentration near T m that could lead to the revaluation of vacancy concentration at high temperatures, (ii) suggest that dumbbell interstitials play a major role in the melting mechanism of monatomic metallic crystals and (iii) support a new avenue for in-depth understanding of glassy metals.

  18. Comparison of melt-solid interface position by radiography and temperature measurement in a vertical Bridgman furnace

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hubert, James A.; Fripp, Archibald L.; Welch, Christopher S.

    1993-01-01

    The melt-solid interface position was measured during the Bridgman growth of germanium by both temperature profiling and by X-ray imaging. The temperature field of the ampoule, growth material and measurement thermocouples was analyzed by means of numerical analysis. It is shown that both the temperature shift and the discontinuity in temperature gradient is a function of the imposed thermal field and the thermal properties of the thermocouples.

  19. Electrical detection of the temperature induced melting transition of a DNA hairpin covalently attached to gold interdigitated microelectrodes

    PubMed Central

    Brewood, Greg P.; Rangineni, Yaswanth; Fish, Daniel J.; Bhandiwad, Ashwini S.; Evans, David R.; Solanki, Raj; Benight, Albert S.

    2008-01-01

    The temperature induced melting transition of a self-complementary DNA strand covalently attached at the 5′ end to the surface of a gold interdigitated microelectrode (GIME) was monitored in a novel, label-free, manner. The structural state of the hairpin was assessed by measuring four different electronic properties of the GIME (capacitance, impedance, dissipation factor and phase angle) as a function of temperature from 25°C to 80°C. Consistent changes in all four electronic properties of the GIME were observed over this temperature range, and attributed to the transition of the attached single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) from an intramolecular, folded hairpin structure to a melted ssDNA. The melting curve of the self-complementary single strand was also measured in solution using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and UV absorbance spectroscopy. Temperature dependent electronic measurements on the surface and absorbance versus temperature values measured in solution experiments were analyzed assuming a two-state process. The model analysis provided estimates of the thermodynamic transition parameters of the hairpin on the surface. Two-state analyses of optical melting data and DSC measurements provided evaluations of the thermodynamic transition parameters of the hairpin in solution. Comparison of surface and solution measurements provided quantitative evaluation of the effect of the surface on the thermodynamics of the melting transition of the DNA hairpin. PMID:18628294

  20. SS316 structure fabricated by selective laser melting and integrated with strain isolated optical fiber high temperature sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathew, Jinesh; Havermann, Dirk; Polyzos, Dimitrios; MacPherson, William N.; Hand, Duncan P.; Maier, Robert R. J.

    2015-09-01

    Smart metal having integrated high temperature sensing capability is reported. The SS316 structure is made by additive layer manufacturing via selective laser melting (SLM). Sensor component is embedded in to the structure during the SLM build process. The strain isolated in-fiber Fabry-Perot cavity sensor measures temperature up to 1100 °C inside the metal.

  1. Structure classification and melting temperature prediction in octet AB solids via machine learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilania, G.; Gubernatis, J. E.; Lookman, T.

    2015-06-01

    Machine learning methods are being increasingly used in condensed matter physics and materials science to classify crystals structures and predict material properties. However, the reliability of these methods for a given problem, especially when large data sets are unavailable, has not been well studied. By addressing the tasks of classifying crystal structure and predicting melting temperatures of the octet subset of AB solids, we performed such a study and found potential problems with using machine learning methods on relatively small data sets. At the same time, however, we can reaffirm the potential power of such methods for these tasks. In particular, we uncovered an important new material feature, the excess Born effective charge, that significantly increased the accuracy of the predictions for the classification problem we defined. This discovery leads us to propose a new scale for the degree of ionicity and covalency in these solids. More specifically, we partitioned the crystal structures of a set of 75 octet solids into those that are ionic and covalent bonded and thus performed a binary classification task. We found that using the standard indices (rσ,rπ) , suggested by St. John and Bloch several decades ago, enabled an average success in classification of 92 % . Using just rσ and the excess Born effective charge Δ ZA of the A atom enabled an average success of 97 % , but we also found relatively large variations about these averages that were dependent on how certain machine learning methods were used and for which a standard deviation was not a proper measure of the degree of confidence we can place in either average. Instead, we calculated and report with 95 % confidence that the traditional classification pair predicts an accuracy in the interval [89 %,95 %] and the accuracy of the new pair lies in the interval [96 %,99 %] . For melting temperature predictions, the size of our data set was 46. We estimate the root-mean-squared error of our

  2. Tribo-induced melting and temperature gradients at sliding asperity contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krim, J.; Pan, L.; Lichtenwalner, D. J.; Kingon, A. I.

    2012-02-01

    Tribo-induced nanoscale surface melting mechanisms have been investigated by means of a combined QCM-STM technique [1] for a range of Au and Au-Ni alloys with varying compositional percentages and phases. The QCM-STM setup allows studies to be performed at sliding speeds of up to m/s, and also reveals valuable information concerning tip-substrate temperature gradients.[3] A transition from solid-solid to solid-``liquid like'' contact was observed for each sample at sufficiently high asperity sliding speeds. Pure gold, solid-solution and two-phase Au-Ni (20 at.% Ni) alloys were compared, which are materials of great relevance to MEMS RF switch technology.[2] The transition points agree favorably with theoretical predictions for their surface melting characteristics. We acknowledge NSF and AFOSR support for this research. [4pt] [1] B. D. Dawson, S. M. Lee, and J. Krim, Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 205502 (2009) [0pt] [2] Zhenyin Yang; Lichtenwalner, D.J.; Morris, A.S.; Krim, J.; Kingon, A.I, Journal of Microelectromechanical Systems, April 2009, Volume: 18 Issue:2, 287-295 [0pt] [3] C.G. Dunkle, I.B. Altfeder, A.A. Voevodin, J. Jones, J. Krim and P.Taborek, J. Appl. Phys., 107, art#114903, (2010)

  3. Deformation mechanisms in granodiorite at effective pressures to 100 MPa and temperatures to partial melting

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, M.; Handin, J.; Bauer, S.J.

    1981-01-01

    Deformation mechanisms in room-dry and water-saturated specimens of Charcoal Granodiorite, shortened at 10/sup -4/s/sup -1/, at effective pressures (Pe) to 100 MPa and temperatures to partial melting (less than or equal to 1050/sup 0/C) are documented with a view toward providing criteria to recognize and characterize the deformation for geological and engienering applications. Above 800/sup 0/C strength decreases dramatically at effective pressures greater than or equal to 50 MPa and water-weakening reduces strength an additional 30 to 40% at Pe = 100 MPa. Strains at failure are only 0.1 to 2.2% with macroscopic ductility (within this range) increasing as the effective pressures are increased and in wet versus dry tests. Shattering (multiple faulting) gives way to faulting along a single zone to failure without macroscopic faulting as ductility increases. Microscopically, cataclasis (extension microfracturing and thermal cracking with rigid-body motions) predominates at all conditions. Dislocation gliding contributes little to the strain. Precursive extension microfractures coalesce to produce the throughgoing faults with gouge zones exhibiting possible Riedel shears. Incipient melting, particularly in wet tests, produces a distinctive texture along feldspar grain boundaries that suggests a grain-boundary-softening effect contributes to the weakening. In addition, it is demonstrated that the presence of water does not lead to more microfractures, but to a reduction in the stresses required to initiate and propagate them.

  4. Correlation between the band gap expansion and melting temperature depression of nanostructured semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jianwei Zhao, Xinsheng; Liu, Xinjuan; Zheng, Xuejun; Yang, Xuexian; Zhu, Zhe

    2015-09-28

    The band gap and melting temperature of a semiconductor are tunable with the size and shape of the specimen at the nanometer scale, and related mechanisms remain as yet unclear. In order to understand the common origin of the size and shape effect on these two seemingly irrelevant properties, we clarify, correlate, formulate, and quantify these two properties of GaAs, GaN, InP, and InN nanocrystals from the perspectives of bond order-length-strength correlation using the core-shell configuration. The consistency in the theoretical predictions, experimental observations, and numerical calculations verify that the broken-bond-induced local bond contraction and strength gain dictates the band gap expansion, while the atomic cohesive energy loss due to bond number reduction depresses the melting point. The fraction of the under-coordinated atoms in the skin shell quantitatively determines the shape and size dependency. The atomic under-coordination in the skin down to a depth of two atomic layers inducing a change in the local chemical bond is the common physical origin.

  5. Correlation between the band gap expansion and melting temperature depression of nanostructured semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jianwei; Zhao, Xinsheng; Liu, Xinjuan; Zheng, Xuejun; Yang, Xuexian; Zhu, Zhe

    2015-09-01

    The band gap and melting temperature of a semiconductor are tunable with the size and shape of the specimen at the nanometer scale, and related mechanisms remain as yet unclear. In order to understand the common origin of the size and shape effect on these two seemingly irrelevant properties, we clarify, correlate, formulate, and quantify these two properties of GaAs, GaN, InP, and InN nanocrystals from the perspectives of bond order-length-strength correlation using the core-shell configuration. The consistency in the theoretical predictions, experimental observations, and numerical calculations verify that the broken-bond-induced local bond contraction and strength gain dictates the band gap expansion, while the atomic cohesive energy loss due to bond number reduction depresses the melting point. The fraction of the under-coordinated atoms in the skin shell quantitatively determines the shape and size dependency. The atomic under-coordination in the skin down to a depth of two atomic layers inducing a change in the local chemical bond is the common physical origin.

  6. Melting temperature, adiabats, and Grueneisen parameter of lithium, sodium, and potassium versus pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Boehler, R.

    1983-05-01

    The pressure dependence of the melting temperatures of Li, Na, and K were measured to 32 kbar with accuracies in pressure and temperature of +- 0.4 percent and +- 0.25/sup 0/C, respectively. The measurements were made in a piston cylinder apparatus with a fluid pressure medium. The adiabatic pressure derivatives of temperature, (par. delta T/par. delta P)/sub s/, were measured to 32 kbar and 400/sup 0/C by a pressure pulse method. The logarithm of (par. delta T/par. delta P)/sub s/ decreases linearly with volume. The changes of (par. delta T/par. delta P)/sub s/ at the liquid-solid transitions fall within the data scatter. The Grueneisen parameter was calculated from ..gamma.. = B/sub s//T (par. delta T/par. delta P)/sub s/, where B/sub s/ is the adiabatic bulk modulus. For all three alkali metals, ..gamma.. decreases with compression in both the solid and the liquid states, and at constant volume, ..gamma.. decreases with temperature.

  7. Effects of melt temperature and casting speed on the structure and defect formation during direct-chill casting of an Al-Cu alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eskin, D. G.; Savran, V. I.; Katgerman, L.

    2005-07-01

    A thorough experimental investigation of the effects of melt temperature and casting speed on the structure and defect formation during the steady and nonsteady stages of direct-chill (DC) casting of an Al-2.8 pct Cu alloy is performed. In addition, the temperature and melt-flow distributions in the sump of billets cast at different melt temperatures are numerically simulated and used in the discussion on the experimental results. Apart from already known phenomena such as the coarsening of the structure, deepening of the sump, and increased probability of bleed-outs during DC casting with increased casting temperature, a few new observations are made. The increased melt temperature is shown to increase the severity of subsurface segregation, whereas the macrosegregation in the rest of the billet remains virtually unaffected. Hot-tearing susceptibility is strongly diminished by an increased melt superheat. The amount and distribution of “floating” grains is demonstrated to depend on both the melt temperature and the casting speed. The porosity was found to only slightly depend on the melt temperature. The amount of nonequilibrium eutectic in the center of the billet increases with increasing melt temperature. The effects of melt temperature on the dimensions of the sump, transition region, and mushy zone and on the melt-flow pattern in the sump are discussed and used in the interpretation of experimentally observed phenomena.

  8. Effect of glass composition on activation energy of viscosity in glass-melting-temperature range

    SciTech Connect

    Hrma, Pavel R.; Han, Sang Soo

    2012-08-01

    In the high-temperature range, where the viscosity (Eta) of molten glass is <10{sup 3} Pa s, the activation energy (B) is virtually ln(Eta) = A + B/T, is nearly independent of melt composition. Hence, the viscosity-composition relationship for Eta < 10{sup 3} Pa s is defined by B as a function of composition. Using a database encompassing over 1300 compositions of high-level waste glasses with nearly 7000 viscosity data, we developed mathematical models for B(x), where x is the composition vector in terms of mass fractions of components. In this paper, we present 13 versions of B(x) as first- and second-order polynomials with coefficients for 15 to 39 components, including Others, a component that sums constituents having little effect on viscosity.

  9. Direct Selective Laser Sintering/Melting of High Density Alumina Powder Layers at Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deckers, J.; Meyers, S.; Kruth, J. P.; Vleugels, J.

    Direct selective laser sintering (SLS) or selective laser melting (SLM) are additive manufacturing techniques that can be used to produce three-dimensional ceramic parts directly, without the need for a sacrificial binder. In this paper, a low laser energy density is applied to SLS/SLM high density powder layers of sub-micrometer alumina at elevated temperatures (up to 800̊C). In order to achieve this, a furnace was designed and built into a commercial SLS machine. This furnace was able to produce a homogeneously heated cylindrical zone with a height of 60 mm and a diameter of 32 mm. After optimizing the layer deposition and laser scanning parameters, two ceramic parts with a density up to 85% and grain sizes as low as 5 μm were successfully produced.

  10. High-temperature and melting behaviour of nanocrystalline refractory compounds: an experimental approach applied to thorium dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cappia, F.; Hudry, D.; Courtois, E.; Janßen, A.; Luzzi, L.; Konings, R. J. M.; Manara, D.

    2014-04-01

    The behaviour from 1500 K up to melting of nanocrystalline (nc) thorium dioxide, the refractory binary oxide with the highest melting point (3651 K), was explored here for the first time using fast laser heating, multi-wavelength pyrometry and Raman spectroscopy for the analysis of samples quenched to room temperature. Nc-ThO2 was melted at temperatures hundreds of K below the melting temperature assessed for bulk thorium dioxide. A particular behaviour has been observed in the formed liquid and its co-existence with a partially restructured solid, possibly due to the metastable nature of the liquid itself. Raman spectroscopy was used to characterize the thermal-induced structural evolution of nc-ThO2. Assessment of a semi-empirical relation between the Raman active T2g mode peak characteristics (peak width and frequency) and crystallites size provided a powerful, fast and non-destructive tool to determine local crystallites growth within the nc-ThO2 samples before and after melting. This semi-quantitative analysis, partly based on a phonon-confinement model, constitutes an advantageous, more flexible, complementary approach to electron microscopy and powder x-ray diffraction (PXRD) for the crystallite size determination. The adopted experimental approach (laser heating coupled with Raman spectroscopy) is therefore proven to be a promising methodology for the high temperature investigation of nanostructured refractory oxides.

  11. Kinetics of iron redox reaction in silicate melts: A high temperature Xanes study on an alkali basalt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cochain, B.; Neuville, D. R.; de Ligny, D.; Roux, J.; Baudelet, F.; Strukelj, E.; Richet, P.

    2009-11-01

    In Earth and Materials sciences, iron is the most important transition element. Glass and melt properties are strongly affected by iron content and redox state with the consequence that some properties (i.e. viscosity, heat capacity, crystallization...) depend not only on the amounts of Fe2+ and Fe3+, but also on the coordination state of these ions. In this work we investigate iron redox reactions through XANES experiments at the K-edge of iron. Using a high-temperature heating device, pre-edge of XANES spectra exhibits definite advantages to make in-situ measurements and to determine the evolution of redox state with time, temperature and composition of synthetic silicate melts. In this study, new kinetics measurements are presented for a basalt melt from the 31,000-BC eruption of the Puy de Lemptegy Volcano in France. These measurements have been made between 773 K and at superliquidus temperatures up to 1923 K.

  12. Melting and chemical reactivity of hydrocarbons under high pressure and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobanov, S.; Chanyshev, A.; Chen, P.; Litasov, K.; Chen, X.; Goncharov, A.

    2013-12-01

    Hydrocarbons comprise roughly ⅓ of the icy mantles in interiors of icy giant planets and may determine the planetary physical properties. Here we present the results of laser heated diamond anvil cell experiments on hydrocarbon chemical reactivity at P up to 50 GPa and T up to 2000 K. Ethane (C2H6) and n-docosane (C22H46) were chosen as starting materials. Raman spectroscopy at high P was used to probe the C-H systems. Melting lines of the hydrocarbons were found by visual observations of fluid-solid interface. The melting lines lie below 1500 K at P<50 GPa and are indistinguishable (within experimental uncertainties) from each other and that of CH4. Hydrocarbons melt to metastable molecular liquids and decompose to CH4 at T>1000 K and P<20 GPa precipitating carbon (Fig.1). Gradual decomposition of hydrocarbons is evident with increasing T. No molecular hydrogen was observed. However, at P above ~20 GPa Raman spectra of quenched reaction products are different. Complex changes in C-C stretching and C-H bending spectral regions occured upon heating to 2000 K (Fig.2). C=C and C≡C bonds appeared at P>25-30 GPa. Remarkably, free H2 was found in experiments at P>30-35 GPa. The interpretation of Raman spectra of quenched reaction products is uncertain. In general, P and T affect the lifetimes of C-H and C-C bonds. Temperature provides energy to brake C-H and C-C bonds, while stabilization of the bonds with pressure may be more pronounced for C-C bonds. The composition of C-H fluid is determined by the competition between C-C and C-H bonds. This competition can result in hydrocarbons with long C-C network. The role of C=C and C≡C bonds at high P cannot be ruled out from this study. It is possible that unsaturated hydrocarbons appear upon quenching from highly dissociated C-H fluid rather than being present in C-H fluid. n-docosane at 12 GPa Ethane at 34 GPa

  13. Prospects and challenges of iron pyroelectrolysis in magnesium aluminosilicate melts near minimum liquidus temperature.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, N M; Kovalevsky, A V; Mikhalev, S M; Costa, F M; Frade, J R

    2015-04-14

    Although steel production by molten oxide electrolysis offers potential economic and environmental advantages over classic extractive metallurgy, its feasibility is far from being convincingly demonstrated, mainly due to inherent experimental difficulties exerted by harsh conditions and lack of knowledge regarding relevant mechanisms and physico-chemical processes in the melts. The present work was intended to demonstrate the concept of pyroelectrolysis at very high temperature near the minimum liquidus point of magnesium aluminosilicate, being conducted under electron-blocking conditions using yttria-stabilized zirconia cells, and to provide a new insight into electrochemistry behind this process. Significant current yields are possible for pyroelectrolysis performed in electron-blocking mode using a solid electrolyte membrane to separate the anode and the molten electrolyte. Parasitic electrochemical processes rise gradually as the concentration of iron oxide dissolved in the molten electrolytes is depleted, impairing faradaic efficiency. Reduction of silica to metallic silicon was identified as a significant contribution to those parasitic currents, among other plausible processes. Direct pyroelectrolysis without electron blocking was found much less plausible, due to major limitations on faradaic efficiency imposed by electronic leakage and insufficient ionic conductivity of the aluminosilicate melt. Ohmic losses may consume an excessive fraction of the applied voltage, thus failing to sustain the Nernst potential required for reduction to metallic iron. The results suggest the need for further optimization of the molten electrolyte composition to promote ionic conductivity and to suppress electronic transport contribution, possibly, by tuning the Al/Si ratio and altering the network-forming/modifying behaviour of the iron cations. PMID:25760633

  14. Catalytic liquefaction by zinc chloride melts at pre-pyrolysis temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Vermeulen, T.; Onu, C.; Joyce, P.J.; Hershkowitz, F.; Grens, E.A.

    1980-02-01

    Liquid-phase catalysts have proved effective for opening chemical linkages in subbituminous coal and capping the reactive segments with hydrogen atoms or other low-molecular-weight groups. The preferred temperature range is 275 to 325/sup 0/C (530 to 620/sup 0/F), so that the linkages are opened by controlled catalytic action rather than by thermal pyrolysis which requires appreciably higher temperatures. The best catalyst melt compositions used to date are zinc chloride with 10% water together with tetralin, and zinc chloride with 15% methanol and 3% of zinc metal. Useful residence times range from 30 minutes, or less, to as high as 90 minutes. The products of the treatment have predominately low (300) to medium (3000) molecular weights, analogous to syncrudes and solvent-refined coal. Conversions to pyridine-soluble products of 95% or better are achieved with Wyodak Roland Seam coal, and to date as much as 70% of that coal has been recovered as toluene-solubles (oils and asphaltenes). A major benefit of these conversion conditions is the almost complete absence of by-product char or gas. At these lower temperatures the hydrogen pressures used can be less than in conventional liquefaction; for example, 40 atm rather than 100 atm or more. Hydrogen consumption is significantly lower than in conventional liquefaction; the product yield is higher; and simpler procedures are foreseen for product recovery. The research performed so far clearly shows the industrial potential of homogeneous (liquid-phase) catalysts in penetrating and interacting with the mild temperature and pressure of these studies.

  15. The melting temperature of liquid water with the effective fragment potential

    SciTech Connect

    Brorsen, Kurt R.; Willow, Soohaeng Y.; Xantheas, Sotiris S.; Gordon, Mark S.

    2015-09-17

    Direct simulation of the solid-liquid water interface with the effective fragment potential (EFP) via the constant enthalpy and pressure (NPH) ensemble was used to estimate the melting temperature (Tm) of ice-Ih. Initial configurations and velocities, taken from equilibrated constant pressure and temperature (NPT) simulations at T = 300 K, 350 K and 400 K, respectively, yielded corresponding Tm values of 378±16 K, 382±14 K and 384±15 K. These estimates are consistently higher than experiment, albeit to the same degree with previously reported estimates using density functional theory (DFT)-based Born-Oppenheimer simulations with the Becke-Lee-Yang-Parr functional plus dispersion corrections (BLYP-D). KRB was supported by a Computational Science Graduate Fellowship from the Department of Energy. MSG was supported by a U.S. National Science Foundation Software Infrastructure (SI2) grant (ACI – 1047772). SSX acknowledges support from the US Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences and Biosciences. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is a multiprogram national laboratory operated for DOE by Battelle.

  16. Thermodynamic Analysis of Isotope Effects on Triple Points and/or Melting Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Hook, W. Alexander

    1995-05-01

    Available literature information on triple point or melting point isotope effects (and related physical properties) is subjected to thermodynamic analysis and consistency checks. New values for the melting point isotope effects for C6H6/CgD6 and c-C6H12/c-C6D12 are reported. 6Li/7Li melting point isotope effects reported recently by Hidaka and Lunden (Z. Naturforsch. 49 a, 475 (1994)) for various inorganic salts are questioned

  17. Melt detection of Fe-Ni at high-pressures using atomic dynamics measurements and a fast temperature readout spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, D.; Jackson, J. M.; Zhao, J.; Sturhahn, W.; Alp, E. E.; Hu, M.; Toellner, T. S.

    2013-12-01

    Cosmochemical studies suggest that the cores of terrestrial planetary bodies are primarily composed of Fe with ~5-10 wt% Ni (e.g., McDonough and Sun 1995). The P-T conditions of the cores of Mars, Mercury, Earth's moon, Io and Ganymede are thought to lie in the stability field of fcc-structured Fe alloyed with ~10 wt% Ni (e.g., Fei et al. 2005). Geomagnetic surveys suggest these terrestrial bodies either have or once had a magnetic dynamo (e.g., Margot et al. 2007), which likely requires the presence of a liquid metallic core surrounding a solid inner core. Therefore, an accurate determination of the melting temperature of fcc-structured Fe-Ni at high pressure will provide constraints on the thermal structure of these small terrestrial bodies, and in turn, may provide insight to their magnetic dynamo and interior evolution history. We have developed a new metric for detecting the solid-liquid phase boundary of Fe-bearing materials at high-pressures using synchrotron Mössbauer spectroscopy (SMS). Focused synchrotron radiation with 1 meV bandwidth passes through a laser-heated Fe-bearing sample inside a diamond-anvil cell. The characteristic SMS time signal vanishes when melting occurs. This process is described by the Lamb-Mössbauer factor, a quantity that is directly related to the mean-square displacement of the Fe atoms. Therefore, we measure the atomic dynamics in the material, in contrast to a static diffraction measurement. The SMS technique provides a new and independent means of melting point determination for materials under high-pressure, as well as access to vibrational properties of the solid near its melting point (Jackson et al. 2013). Accurate melting temperatures of the sample are also necessary factors in constructing reliable melting curves. However, most conventional temperature measurement methods in laser-heated diamond-anvil cell studies are often too slow (~0.3 Hz) to capture the sample's transient temperature fluctuations, which can be

  18. Melting Temperatures of 2D Electron Solids in the Lowest Landau Level from Microwave Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y. P.; Ganapathy, S.; Lewis, R. M.; Engel, L. W.; Tsui, D. C.; Wang, Z. H.; Ye, P. D.; Pfeiffer, L. N.; West, K. W.

    2005-03-01

    We studied the temperature(T) dependence of the microwave conductivity spectra of two dimensional electron systems in the high magnetic field (B) insulating phase (HBIP) for Landau filling factor ν<˜1/5. Such an insulating phase, believed to be a pinned electron solid, supports a characteristic pinning resonance in the conductivity spectrum. Two samples were studied. Sample 1 is a heterojunction with density n˜7x10^10 cm^ -2 and mobility μ˜5x10^6cm^2/Vs and has a single resonance in the HBIP. Sample 2 is a 65nm-wide QW with n˜6x10 ^10cm-2 and μ˜10x10^6cm^2/V and was recently found to have two resonances in the HBIP, interpreted as corresponding to two different solid phases, with one crossing over to the other as ν is reduced [1]. We studied the higher-T behavior of the resonances at many different combinations of n (through backgating) and B, and measured the characteristic temperatures Tc at which the resonances disappear. We foundTc is a non-increasing function of ν for either sample, although the function differs significantly for both samples. We interpret Tc as the melting temperature of the electron solid(s) to a quantum liquid, for which ν captures the importance of inter-electron quantum correlation. [1] Y.P. Chen et al., Phys.Rev.Lett. 93, 206805 (2004)

  19. Temperature and pressure dependence of the mode Grüneisen parameters close to the melting point in hexagonal ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karacali, H.; Yurtseven, H.

    2007-02-01

    We reexamine the Pippard relations in this study by relating the specific heat CP to the Raman frequency shifts 1/ν∂ and the thermal expansivity αp to the 1/ν∂, when the mode Grüneisen parameter depends on the temperature and pressure close to the melting point in hexagonal ice. From linear relations between them, the values of the slope {dP}/{dT} are deduced in this crystal. Our slope values calculated here do not change significantly compared to those obtained when the mode Grüneisen parameter is taken as a constant close to the melting point in hexagonal ice.

  20. Some features of bulk melt-textured high-temperature superconductors subjected to alternating magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanderbemden, P.; Molenberg, I.; Simeonova, P.; Lovchinov, V.

    2014-12-01

    Monolithic, large grain, (RE)Ba2Cu3O7 high-temperature superconductors (where RE denotes a rare-earth ion) are known to be able to trap fields in excess of several teslas and represent thus an extremely promising competing technology for permanent magnet in several applications, e.g. in motors and generators. In any rotating machine, however, the superconducting permanent magnet is subjected to variable (transient, or alternating) parasitic magnetic fields. These magnetic fields interact with the superconductor, which yields a reduction of the remnant magnetization. In the present work we quantify these effects by analysing selected experimental data on bulk melt-textured superconductors subjected to AC fields. Our results indicate that the non-uniformity of superconducting properties in rather large samples might lead to unusual features and need to be taken into account to analyse the experimental data. We also investigate the evolution of the DC remnant magnetization of the bulk sample when it is subjected to a large number of AC magnetic field cycles, and investigate the experimental errors that result from a misorientation of the sample or a mispositioning of the Hall probe. The time-dependence of the remnant magnetization over 100000 cycles of the AC field is shown to display distinct regimes which all differ strongly from the usual decay due to magnetic relaxation.

  1. Investigating the Equilibrium Melting Temperature of Polyethylene Using the Non-Linear Hoffman-Weeks Analysis: Effect of Molecular Weight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadi, Hadi; Marand, Herve

    The limiting equilibrium melting temperature for infinite molar mass linear polyethylene, Tmo , has been a point of controversy for about five decades. On one hand, Broadhurst and Flory-Vrij extrapolated melting data for short alkanes to a value of ca. 145oC. On the other hand, Wunderlich proposed a value of 141oC from melting studies of extended-chain PE crystals formed under high pressure. While a difference in Tmo by 4oC might seem superfluous, it has significant implication for the analysis of the temperature and chain length dependences of crystal growth kinetic data. In this work we estimate the equilibrium melting temperatures, Tm for three linear narrow molecular weight distribution polyethylenes using the non-linear Hoffman-Weeks treatment. The resulting Tm values thus obtained are significantly lower than these predicted by the Flory-Vrij treatment and are within experimental uncertainty indistinguishable from those reported by Wunderlich and Hikosaka et al. Our results also suggest that the constant C2 in the expression for the undercooling dependence of the initial lamellar thickness (lg*= C1/ ΔT + C2) increases linearly with chain length.

  2. Aluminosilicate melts and glasses at 1 to 3 GPa: Temperature and pressure effects on recovered structural and density changes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bista, S; Stebbins, Jonathan; Hankins, William B.; Sisson, Thomas W.

    2015-01-01

    In the pressure range in the Earth’s mantle where many basaltic magmas are generated (1 to 3 GPa) (Stolper et al. 1981), increases in the coordination numbers of the network-forming cations in aluminosilicate melts have generally been considered to be minor, although effects on silicon and particularly on aluminum coordination in non-bridging oxygen-rich glasses from the higher, 5 to 12 GPa range, are now well known. Most high-precision measurements of network cation coordination in such samples have been made by spectroscopy (notably 27Al and 29Si NMR) on glasses quenched from high-temperature, high-pressure melts synthesized in solid-media apparatuses and decompressed to room temperature and 1 bar pressure. There are several effects that could lead to the underestimation of the extent of actual structural (and density) changes in high-pressure/temperature melts from such data. For non-bridging oxygen-rich sodium and calcium aluminosilicate compositions in the 1 to 3 GPa range, we show here that glasses annealed near to their glass transition temperatures systematically record higher recovered increases in aluminum coordination and in density than samples quenched from high-temperature melts. In the piston-cylinder apparatus used, rates of cooling through the glass transition are measured as very similar for both higher and lower initial temperatures, indicating that fictive temperature effects are not the likely explanation of these differences. Instead, transient decreases in melt pressure during thermal quenching, which may be especially large for high initial run temperatures, of as much as 0.5 to 1 GPa, may be responsible. As a result, the equilibrium proportion of high-coordinated Al in this pressure range may be 50 to 90% greater than previously estimated, reaching mean coordination numbers (e.g., 4.5) that are probably high enough to significantly affect melt properties. New data on jadeite (NaAlSi2O6) glass confirm that aluminum coordination increase

  3. MgO melting curve constraints from shock temperature and rarefaction overtake measurements in samples preheated to 2300 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fat'yanov, O. V.; Asimow, P. D.

    2014-05-01

    Continuing our effort to obtain experimental constraints on the melting curve of MgO at 100-200 GPa, we extended our target preheating capability to 2300 K. Our new Mo capsule design holds a long MgO crystal in a controlled thermal gradient until impact by a Ta flyer launched at up to 7.5 km/s on the Caltech two-stage light-gas gun. Radiative shock temperatures and rarefaction overtake times were measured simultaneously by a 6-channel VIS/NIR pyrometer with 3 ns time resolution. The majority of our experiments showed smooth monotonic increases in MgO sound speed and shock temperature with pressure from 197 to 243 GPa. The measured temperatures as well as the slopes of the pressure dependences for both temperature and sound speed were in good agreement with those calculated numerically for the solid phase at our peak shock compression conditions. Most observed sound speeds, however, were ~800 m/s higher than those predicted by the model. A single unconfirmed data point at 239 GPa showed anomalously low temperature and sound speed, which could both be explained by partial melting in this experiment and could suggest that the Hugoniot of MgO preheated to 2300 K crosses its melting line just slightly above 240 GPa.

  4. Relationships between processing temperature and microstructure in isothermal melt processed Bi-2212 thick films

    SciTech Connect

    Holesinger, T.G.; Phillips, D.S.; Willis, J.O.; Peterson, D.E.

    1995-05-01

    The microstructure and phase assemblage of isothermal melt processed (IMP) Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub y} (Bi-2212) thick films have been evaluated. Results from compositional analysis and phase identification indicate that the characteristics of the partial melt greatly influence the microstructural and chemical development of the thick films. The highest critical current densities were obtained in films processed below 800{degrees}C where the partial melt uniformly coats the substrate without excessive phase segregation.

  5. Effect of Feed Melting, Temperature History and Minor Component Addition on Spinel Crystallization in High-Level Waste Glass

    SciTech Connect

    Izak, Pavel; Hrma, Pavel R.; Arey, Bruce W.; Plaisted, Trevor J.

    2001-08-01

    This study was undertaken to help design mathematical models for high-level waste (HLW) glass melter that simulate spinel behavior in molten glass. Spinel, (Fe,Ni,Mn) (Fe,Cr)2O4, is the primary solid phase that precipitates from HLW glasses containing Fe and Ni in sufficient concentrations. Spinel crystallization affects the anticipated cost and risk of HLW vitrification. To study melting reactions, we used simulated HLW feed, prepared with co-precipitated Fe, Ni, Cr, and Mn hydroxides. Feed samples were heated up at a temperature-increase rate (4C/min) close to that which the feed experiences in the HLW glass melter. The decomposition, melting, and dissolution of feed components (such as nitrates, carbonates, and silica) and the formation of intermediate crystalline phases (spinel, sodalite [Na8(AlSiO4)6(NO2)2], and Zr-containing minerals) were characterized using evolved gas analysis, volume-expansion measurement, optical microscope, scanning electron microscope, thermogravimetric analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, and X-ray diffraction. Nitrates and quartz, the major feed components, converted to a glass-forming melt by 880C. A chromium-free spinel formed in the nitrate melt starting from 520C and Sodalite, a transient product of corundum dissolution, appeared above 600C and eventually dissolved in glass. To investigate the effects of temperature history and minor components (Ru,Ag, and Cu) on the dissolution and growth of spinel crystals, samples were heated up to temperatures above liquidus temperature (TL), then subjected to different temperature histories, and analyzed. The results show that spinel mass fraction, crystals composition, and crystal size depend on the chemical and physical makeup of the feed and temperature history.

  6. Experimental investigation of low temperature garnet-melt partitioning in CMASH, with application to subduction zone processes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morizet, Y.; Blundy, J.; McDade, P.

    2003-04-01

    During subduction, the slab undergoes several processes such as dehydration and partial melting at pressures of 2-3 GPa and temperatures of 600-900^oC. Under these conditions, there is little or no distinction between melt and fluid phases (Bureau &Keppler, 1999, EPSL 165, 187-196). To investigate the behaviour of trace elements under these conditions we have carried out partitioning experiments in the system CMASH at 2.2 GPa, 700-920^oC. CMAS starting compositions were doped with trace elements, and loaded together with quartz and water into a Pt capsule, which was in turn contained within a Ni-lined Ti capsule. Run durations were 3-7 days. A run at 810^oC produced euhedral calcic garnet, zoisite, quartz, hydrous melt and tiny clinopyroxene interpreted as quench crystals. LA-ICPMS and SIMS were used to quantify trace element concentrations of the phases. Garnet-melt D's for the HREE decrease from ˜300 for Lu to less than 0.2 for La. DSc and D_V are less than 5, consistent with the large X-site dimension in the garnet. DLi DSr and DBa are considerably less than the adjacent REE. There is a very slight negative partitioning anomaly for Zr and Hf relative to Nd and Sm; DHf is slightly greater than DZr. D_U < DTh, due largely to the oxidizing conditions of the experiment (NNO). The most striking result is very high D's for Nb and Ta: 18±10 and 5.4±1.9 (LA-ICPMS), 25.8±11.9 and 6.6±1.3 (SIMS) for Nb and Ta respectively. These are considerably larger than any previously measured (at much higher temperatures). The observed partitioning behaviour is consistent with the large temperature dependence for DREE proposed by Van Westrenen et al. (2001, Contrib Min Pet, 142, 219-234), and an even larger temperature dependence for DNb and DTa. These preliminary results suggest that garnet (rather than rutile) may play the key role in controlling the Nb and Ta budget of arc magmas and the Nb/Ta ratio of residual eclogites. For example, modelling of eclogite melting, using a N

  7. A preliminary view on adsorption of organics on ice at temperatures close to melting point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Xiangrui; Waldner, Astrid; Orlando, Fabrizio; Artiglia, Luca; Ammann, Markus; Bartels-Rausch, Thorsten

    2016-04-01

    -level spectroscopies to reveal the behaviour of adsorption and dissociation on ice. Additionally, pure ice and amine doped ice will be compared for their surface structure change at different temperatures, which will indicate the differences of surface disordering caused by different factors. For instance, we will have a chance to know better if impurities will cause local disordering, i.e. forming hydration shell, which challenges the traditional picture of a homogenous disordered doped ice surface. The findings of this study could not only improve our understanding of how acidic organics adsorb to ice, and of their chemical properties on ice, but also have potentials to know better the behaviour of pure ice at temperatures approaching to the melting point.

  8. Experimentally-determined carbon isotope fractionation in and between methane-bearing melt and fluid to upper mantle temperatures and pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mysen, Bjorn

    2016-07-01

    The behavior of melts and fluids is at the core of understanding formation and evolution of the Earth. To advance our understanding of their role, high-pressure/-temperature experiments were employed to determine melt and fluid structure together with carbon isotope partitioning within and between (CH4 +H2O +H2)-saturated aluminosilicate melts and (CH4 +H2O +H2)-fluids. The samples were characterized with vibrational spectroscopy while at temperatures and pressures from 475° to 850 °C and 92 to 1158 MPa, respectively. The solution equilibrium is 2CH4 +Qn = 2 CH3- +H2O +Q n + 1 where the superscript, n, in the Qn-notation describes silicate species where n denotes the number of bridging oxygen. The solution equilibrium affects the carbon isotope fractionation factor between melt and fluid, αmelt/fluid. Moreover, it is significantly temperature-dependent. The αmelt/fluid < 1 with temperatures less than about 1050 °C, and is greater than 1 at higher temperature. Methane-bearing melts can exist in the upper mantle at fO2 ≤fO2 (MW) (Mysen et al., 2011). Reduced (Csbnd H)-species in present-day upper mantle magma, therefore, are likely. During melting and crystallization in this environment, the δ13C of melts increases with temperature at a rate of ∼ 0.6 ‰ /°C. From the simple-system data presented here, at T ≤ 1050°C, melt in equilibrium with a peridotite-(CH4 +H2O +H2)-bearing mantle source will be isotopically lighter than fluid. At higher temperatures, melts will be isotopically heavier. Degassing at T ≤ 1050°C will shift δ13C of degassed magma to more positive values, whereas degassing at T ≥ 1050°C, will reduce the δ13C of the degassed magma.

  9. In Situ Determination of Viscosity and Structure of Carbonatitic to Carbonate-Silicate Melts as Function of Pressure and Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stagno, V.; Kono, Y.; Lustrino, M.; Irifune, T.

    2015-12-01

    Carbonatitic and carbonate-silicate magmas are representative of mantle-derived liquids that form by partial melting of carbonated peridotite and eclogite rocks at depths greater than 60 km in the Earth's interior. Carbonatitic melts are expected to contain 1-5 wt% SiO2, but at shallower conditions (about 100 km in depth), as a result of large melt fraction during decompression, SiO2 content increases up to 10-20 wt%. This variation in composition is expected to cause significant changes in the physical properties (e.g. viscosity and melt structure) of these magmas. The aim of this study was to determine the viscosity and structure of CO2-rich melts with variable SiO2 content representative of carbonatitic to carbonate-silicate natural melts. A mixture of CaCO3, MgCO3, SiO2, FeO, and NaCl was used as starting material. Synthetic glasses with 5 wt% and 18wt% SiO2 were quenched at high pressure using multi anvil presses. Viscosity measurements on CO2-bearing liquids were conducted with the falling-sphere method using the Paris-Edinburg type large volume apparatus at pressures between 1.5-6 GPa and temperatures of 1100-1500 °C. Determinations of viscosity of these liquids were determined from radiographic images recorded with a high-speed camera installed at Sector 16-BM-B (APS, Argonne). Falling velocity of the platinum probing spheres was measured by ultrafast X-ray radiography using a high-speed camera with a 500 fps recording rate (exposure time of 2 ms). The viscosity was, then, calculated from the Stokes equation including the correction factors for the effect of the wall and the end effect (Kono et al. 2014). Structural measurements of the liquid at high temperature were also performed using multi-angle energy dispersive X-ray diffraction technique. Preliminary results from this study will contribute to understand the variation of viscosity as function of pressure, temperature and degree of polymerization of CO2- melts during up welling within the

  10. Polarized optical properties of forsterite from room temperature up to the melting point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckes, M.; Gibert, B.; De Sousa Meneses, D.; Malki, M.; Echegut, P.

    2012-12-01

    Olivines are the most abundant phases of the Earth's upper mantle. Determining their optical properties under extreme conditions is essential to investigate their lattice dynamics and related structural evolution and to quantify their thermophysical properties. Optical properties of forsterite were determined by acquiring infrared emittance spectra from room temperature up to the melting point along the [100], [010] and [001] polarization directions and over a wide spectral range, from 50 to 15000 cm-1. The fitting of the experimental data by using a semi-quantum dielectric function model provides new results on lattice vibrations and phonon-phonon interactions in forsterite. In particular, a sudden enhancement of anharmonicity at high temperature is observed and is concomitant with the disappearance or brutal change of some modes around 1000K. The normal modes involving Mg1 cation motions are the more impacted and some of them vanish around 1200K. The polarization along [001] direction is more specifically impacted and this change can be linked to the magnesium mobility within M1 sites. This result is consistent with ab initio calculations1 and experimental data on tracer diffusion2 in forsterite that show the presence of an enhanced diffusion of magnesium via M1 sites along [001] direction. These data contribute to explain literature results that show evidences of a change of vibrational behaviour around 1000K, and in particular a strenghtening of lattice anharmonicity 3,4. This vibrational change may impact some important geophysical properties that depends on ionic diffusion, such as creep or electrical conductivity, were magnesium diffusion plays a key role. Finally, absorption coefficient has been calculated over the whole IR range from optical indices, allowing for the evaluation of the contribution of heat transport by radiation in forsterite. 1. J. Brodholt, Am. Mineral. 82, 1049-1053 (1997). 2. S. Chakraborty, J. R. Farver, R. A. Yund, D. C. Rubie, Phys

  11. Shock temperatures in silica glass - Implications for modes of shock-induced deformation, phase transformation, and melting with pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitt, Douglas R.; Ahrens, Thomas J.

    1989-01-01

    Observations of shock-induced radiative thermal emissions are used to determine the gray body temperatures and emittances of silica glass under shock compression between 10 and 30 GPa. The results suggest that fused quartz deforms heterogeneously in this shock pressure range. It is shown that the 10-16 GPa range coincides with the permanent densification region, while the 16-30 GPa range coincides with the inferred mixed phase region along the silica glass Hugoniot. Low emittances in the mixed phase region are thought to represent the melting temperature of the high-pressure phase, stishovite. Also, consideration is given to the effects of pressure on melting relations for the system SiO2-Mg2SiO4.

  12. Study of Melt Thermal-Rate Treatment and Low-Temperature Pouring on Al-15%Si Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qinglei; Zhang, Shuo; Zhang, Zhenwei; Yan, Xingchen; Geng, Haoran

    2013-08-01

    Under the condition of melt thermal-rate treatment (MTRT) and low-temperature pouring (LTP), the tensile properties of Al-15%Si alloy are improved, the average size of primary Si is refined to about 20 μm from about 50 μm, and eutectic silicon can be well modified. The ultimate tensile strength and elongation are 201 MPa and 3.5%, and these values increase by 12% and 25%, respectively, compared with that obtained by conventional casting technique. The Al-15%Si alloy modified with Sr and RE additions was also studied for comparison purposes. The tensile properties of the Al-15%Si alloy treated with MTRT + LTP are superior to those modified with Sr or RE addition individually. The eutectic growth temperature difference between modified and unmodified melts was used to indicate the modification level. The modification effect of MTRT + LTP on Al-15%Si alloy is better than that modified with Sr or RE addition.

  13. General principles of the synthesis of chalcogenides and pnictides in salt melts using a steady-state temperature gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chareev, D. A.

    2016-05-01

    The possibilities of growing crystals of metals, alloys, chalcogenides, and pnictides in halide melts using a steady-state temperature gradient are analyzed. Halides of alkali metals and aluminum can be used as transport media. The choice is determined by the melting temperature of salt mixtures. A conducting contour can also be applied to increase transport efficiency. This technique of crystal growth is similar to the electrochemical method. To eliminate interference during migration, some elements can be isolated and forced to migrate through independent channels to the crystal formation region. The technique considered here makes it possible to grow crystals of necessary quality without special equipment; the small crystal sizes are sufficient for laboratory study.

  14. Temperature Dependence of Electrical Resistance of Woven Melt-Infiltrated SiCf/SiC Ceramic Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Appleby, Matthew P.; Morscher, Gregory N.; Zhu, Dongming

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have successfully shown the use of electrical resistance (ER)measurements to monitor room temperature damage accumulation in SiC fiber reinforced SiC matrix composites (SiCf/SiC) Ceramic Matrix Composites (CMCs). In order to determine the feasibility of resistance monitoring at elevated temperatures, the present work investigates the temperature dependent electrical response of various MI (Melt Infiltrated)-CVI (Chemical Vapor Infiltrated) SiC/SiC composites containing Hi-Nicalon Type S, Tyranno ZMI and SA reinforcing fibers. Test were conducted using a commercially available isothermal testing apparatus as well as a novel, laser-based heating approach developed to more accurately simulate thermomechanical testing of CMCs. Secondly, a post-test inspection technique is demonstrated to show the effect of high-temperature exposure on electrical properties. Analysis was performed to determine the respective contribution of the fiber and matrix to the overall composite conductivity at elevated temperatures. It was concluded that because the silicon-rich matrix material dominates the electrical response at high temperature, ER monitoring would continue to be a feasible method for monitoring stress dependent matrix cracking of melt-infiltrated SiC/SiC composites under high temperature mechanical testing conditions. Finally, the effect of thermal gradients generated during localized heating of tensile coupons on overall electrical response of the composite is determined.

  15. Measurement of the Average Two-Dimensional Surface Temperature Distribution of Drops in a Melt Atomization Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirmse, Clemens; Chaves, Humberto

    2015-04-01

    During the production of metal and alloy powders by melt atomization, the knowledge of the surface temperature distribution of drops is essential. This paper shows the application of low-cost industrial CCD-cameras in connection with advanced image processing techniques to measure the average two-dimensional surface temperature distribution of drops in a melt atomization process. These measurements are necessary for comparison with the results of numerical investigations. The two-color pyrometer consists of two standard industrial CCD-cameras with appropriate optical filters. After calibration using a high-temperature furnace, the relative measurement error was smaller than 1.6% within the temperature range of 1273-1873 K. The pyrometer was applied to measure the average temperature distribution during the metal spraying process in a vacuum inert gas atomization facility. The measured temperature distribution averaged over 10 ms shows the development of a hollow cone spray of the atomized metal. The average axial distance between the atomization nozzle and the region of the liquidus temperature was found to be approximately 40 times the diameter of the atomization nozzle.

  16. An Experimental Investigation of Melting Relations in the Fe-C System at High Pressure and Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Fei, Y.

    2006-12-01

    Because of its high cosmochemical abundance and its high solubility in Fe-Ni metal, carbon has been suggested to be one of the light elements in the Earth's core and iron carbide has been proposed to be the major component in the inner core instead of pure iron. If carbon indeed is an important component in the core chemistry, the effect of the carbon content on the melting temperature places an important constraint on the temperature of the core. In order to determine the carbon solubility in metallic iron and the effect of pressure on the eutectic temperature and composition, we have conducted a series of high pressure and temperature experiments up to 25GPa using both piston-cylinder apparatus and multi-anvil device at the Geophysical Laboratory. Starting materials with different carbon contents (2, 3.2, 4, 5, and 6 wt% C) were prepared from mixtures of fine power of pure iron and graphite. The starting materials were loaded into MgO capsules and then compressed to the desired pressures, using various well-calibrated high-pressure cell assemblies that are capable of reaching different maximum pressures. High temperatures were generated using either graphite heater (<6 GPa) or rhenium heater at higher pressures. Temperatures were measured with a W5%Re- W26%Re thermocouple. Thermocouple wires were inserted axially into the center of the assembly through a 4-bore alumina rod. Melting relations were determined with a JEOL JXA-8900 electron microprobe, based on quench textures and chemical compositions of the quenched phases. Powder X-ray diffraction technique was also used to identify phases and determine unit cell parameters. We have carried out extensive experiments at 5 and 10 GPa to define the melting relations at high pressure. The eutectic temperature at 5 GPa is about 1250 °C, which is lower than the calculated value in previous study. The solubility of carbon in metallic iron and the eutectic temperature increase with increasing pressure, whereas the

  17. Investigation of 10-Stage Axial-Flow X24C-2 Compressor. 1; Performance at Inlet Pressure of 21 Inches Mercury Absolute and Inlet Temperature of 538 R

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schum, Harold J.; Buckner, Howard A., Jr.

    1947-01-01

    The performance at inlet pressure of 21 inches mercury absolute and inlet temperature of 538 R for the 10-stage axial-flow X24C-2 compressor from the X24C-2 turbojet engine was investigated. the peak adiabatic temperature-rise efficiency for a given speed generally occurred at values of pressure coefficient fairly close to 0.35.For this compressor, the efficiency data at various speeds could be correlated on two converging curves by the use of a polytropic loss factor derived.

  18. Localised sequence regions possessing high melting temperatures prevent the amplification of a DNA mimic in competitive PCR.

    PubMed

    McDowell, D G; Burns, N A; Parkes, H C

    1998-07-15

    The polymerase chain reaction is an immensely powerful technique for identification and detection purposes. Increasingly, competitive PCR is being used as the basis for quantification. However, sequence length, melting temperature and primary sequence have all been shown to influence the efficiency of amplification in PCR systems and may therefore compromise the required equivalent co-amplification of target and mimic in competitive PCR. The work discussed here not only illustrates the need to balance length and melting temperature when designing a competitive PCR assay, but also emphasises the importance of careful examination of sequences for GC-rich domains and other sequences giving rise to stable secondary structures which could reduce the efficiency of amplification by serving as pause or termination sites. We present data confirming that under particular circumstances such localised sequence, high melting temperature regions can act as permanent termination sites, and offer an explanation for the severity of this effect which results in prevention of amplification of a DNA mimic in competitive PCR. It is also demonstrated that when Taq DNA polymerase is used in the presence of betaine or a proof reading enzyme, the effect may be reduced or eliminated. PMID:9649616

  19. Machine learning with systematic density-functional theory calculations: Application to melting temperatures of single- and binary-component solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seko, Atsuto; Maekawa, Tomoya; Tsuda, Koji; Tanaka, Isao

    2014-02-01

    A combination of systematic density-functional theory (DFT) calculations and machine learning techniques has a wide range of potential applications. This study presents an application of the combination of systematic DFT calculations and regression techniques to the prediction of the melting temperature for single and binary compounds. Here we adopt the ordinary least-squares regression, partial least-squares regression, support vector regression, and Gaussian process regression. Among the four kinds of regression techniques, SVR provides the best prediction. The inclusion of physical properties computed by the DFT calculation to a set of predictor variables makes the prediction better. In addition, limitation of the predictive power is shown when extrapolation from the training dataset is required. Finally, a simulation to find the highest melting temperature toward the efficient materials design using kriging is demonstrated. The kriging design finds the compound with the highest melting temperature much faster than random designs. This result may stimulate the application of kriging to efficient materials design for a broad range of applications.

  20. Melting and phase relations in the Fe-C-S-O system at high pressure and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fei, Yingwei

    2010-05-01

    The physical state of the core (liquid outer core and solid inner core) could provide tight constraint on the core temperature if melting temperature of core materials is precisely determined at high pressure. On the other hand, the density of the Earth's core is significantly lower than that of pure iron measured experimentally at high pressure and temperature. The density deficit in the core (both liquid outer core and solid inner core) provides inside into the chemistry of the core, suggesting that the core must contain several weight percent of one or more light elements (lighter than iron) in addition to Fe-Ni alloy. Sulfur (S), carbon (C), and oxygen (O) are the prominent candidates among the proposed light elements, because of their high solar abundance and strong chemical affinity for Fe. Determining the effect of pressure on melting relations in the Fe-S, Fe-C, and Fe-O binary systems and multi-component system is crucial for understanding the chemistry, temperature, and evolution of planetary cores. There has been significant progress in determining the melting relations in the system Fe-FeS at high pressure, using multi-anvil apparatus and laser-heating diamond-anvil cell. These studies have revealed new iron-sulfur compounds (Fe3S2, Fe2S, and Fe3S) stable at high pressures, change of melting relations, and pressure effect on eutectic temperature and composition. The behaviors of the Fe-C and Fe-O systems have also been experimentally investigated recently. Experimental data in the Fe-C-S-O system at high pressure have just emerged. In parallel, there are high-quality data on density measurements of solid and liquid phases at high pressure and temperature. In this study, I present recent advances in experimental techniques and melting relations in the Fe-C-S-O system. The emphasis will be on the need to develop thermodynamic models by synthesis of thermochemical, thermophysical, and phase equilibrium data. The systematic approach provides a better

  1. Differential scanning calorimetric evaluation of human meibomian gland secretions and model lipid mixtures: transition temperatures and cooperativity of melting

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Hua; Wojtowicz, Jadwiga C.; Butovich, Igor A.

    2013-01-01

    Meibomian gland secretions (or meibum) are produced by holocrine meibomian glands and are secreted in melted form onto the ocular surface of humans and animals to form a protective tear film lipid layer (TFLL). Its protective effect strongly depends on the composition and, hence, thermotropic behavior of meibum. The goal of our study was to quantitatively evaluate the melting characteristics of human meibum and model lipid mixtures using differential scanning microcalorimetry. Standard calorimetric parameters, e.g. changes in calorimetric enthalpy, transition temperatures T(m), cooperativity of melting etc. were assessed. We found that thermotropic behavior of meibum resembled that of relatively simple mixtures of unsaturated wax esters, but showed a lower change in calorimetric enthalpy, which can be indicative of a looser packing of lipids in meibum compared with pure standards and their simple mixtures. The cooperativity of melting of meibomian lipids was comparable to that of an equimolar mixture of four oleic-acid based wax esters. We demonstrated that the phase transitions in meibum start at about 10 to 15 °C and end at 35-36 °C, with T(m) being about 30 °C. The highly asymmetrical shape of the thermotropic peak of meibum is important for the physiology and biophysics of TFLL. PMID:23578711

  2. Development of a simultaneous Hugoniot and temperature measurement for preheated-metal shock experiments: Melting temperatures of Ta at pressures of 100 GPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jun; Zhou, Xianming; Li, Jiabo; Wu, Qiang; Cai, Lingcang; Dai, Chengda

    2012-05-01

    Equations of state of metals are important issues in earth science and planetary science. A major limitation of them is the lack of experimental data for determining pressure-volume and temperature of shocked metal simultaneously. By measuring them in a single experiment, a major source of systematic error is eliminated in determining from which shock pressure release pressure originates. Hence, a non-contact fast optical method was developed and demonstrated to simultaneously measure a Hugoniot pressure-volume (PH-VH) point and interfacial temperature TR on the release of Hugoniot pressure (PR) for preheated metals up to 1000 K. Experimental details in our investigation are (i) a Ni-Cr resistance coil field placed around the metal specimen to generate a controllable and stable heating source, (ii) a fiber-optic probe with an optical lens coupling system and optical pyrometer with ns time resolution to carry out non-contact fast optical measurements for determining PH-VH and TR. The shock response of preheated tantalum (Ta) at 773 K was investigated in our work. Measured data for shock velocity versus particle velocity at an initial state of room temperature was in agreement with previous shock compression results, while the measured shock data between 248 and 307 GPa initially heated to 773 K were below the Hugoniot evaluation from its off-Hugoniot states. Obtained interfacial temperatures on release of Hugoniot pressures (100-170 GPa) were in agreement with shock-melting points at initial ambient condition and ab initio calculations of melting curve. It indicates a good consistency for shock melting data of Ta at different initial temperatures. Our combined diagnostics for Hugoniot and temperature provides an important approach for studying EOS and the temperature effect of shocked metals. In particular, our measured melting temperatures of Ta address the current controversy about the difference by more than a factor of 2 between the melting temperatures measured

  3. Development of a simultaneous Hugoniot and temperature measurement for preheated-metal shock experiments: melting temperatures of Ta at pressures of 100 GPa.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun; Zhou, Xianming; Li, Jiabo; Wu, Qiang; Cai, Lingcang; Dai, Chengda

    2012-05-01

    Equations of state of metals are important issues in earth science and planetary science. A major limitation of them is the lack of experimental data for determining pressure-volume and temperature of shocked metal simultaneously. By measuring them in a single experiment, a major source of systematic error is eliminated in determining from which shock pressure release pressure originates. Hence, a non-contact fast optical method was developed and demonstrated to simultaneously measure a Hugoniot pressure-volume (P(H)-V(H)) point and interfacial temperature T(R) on the release of Hugoniot pressure (P(R)) for preheated metals up to 1000 K. Experimental details in our investigation are (i) a Ni-Cr resistance coil field placed around the metal specimen to generate a controllable and stable heating source, (ii) a fiber-optic probe with an optical lens coupling system and optical pyrometer with ns time resolution to carry out non-contact fast optical measurements for determining P(H)-V(H) and T(R). The shock response of preheated tantalum (Ta) at 773 K was investigated in our work. Measured data for shock velocity versus particle velocity at an initial state of room temperature was in agreement with previous shock compression results, while the measured shock data between 248 and 307 GPa initially heated to 773 K were below the Hugoniot evaluation from its off-Hugoniot states. Obtained interfacial temperatures on release of Hugoniot pressures (100-170 GPa) were in agreement with shock-melting points at initial ambient condition and ab initio calculations of melting curve. It indicates a good consistency for shock melting data of Ta at different initial temperatures. Our combined diagnostics for Hugoniot and temperature provides an important approach for studying EOS and the temperature effect of shocked metals. In particular, our measured melting temperatures of Ta address the current controversy about the difference by more than a factor of 2 between the melting

  4. Development of a simultaneous Hugoniot and temperature measurement for preheated-metal shock experiments: Melting temperatures of Ta at pressures of 100 GPa

    SciTech Connect

    Li Jun; Zhou Xianming; Li Jiabo; Wu Qiang; Cai Lingcang; Dai Chengda

    2012-05-15

    Equations of state of metals are important issues in earth science and planetary science. A major limitation of them is the lack of experimental data for determining pressure-volume and temperature of shocked metal simultaneously. By measuring them in a single experiment, a major source of systematic error is eliminated in determining from which shock pressure release pressure originates. Hence, a non-contact fast optical method was developed and demonstrated to simultaneously measure a Hugoniot pressure-volume (P{sub H}-V{sub H}) point and interfacial temperature T{sub R} on the release of Hugoniot pressure (P{sub R}) for preheated metals up to 1000 K. Experimental details in our investigation are (i) a Ni-Cr resistance coil field placed around the metal specimen to generate a controllable and stable heating source, (ii) a fiber-optic probe with an optical lens coupling system and optical pyrometer with ns time resolution to carry out non-contact fast optical measurements for determining P{sub H}-V{sub H} and T{sub R}. The shock response of preheated tantalum (Ta) at 773 K was investigated in our work. Measured data for shock velocity versus particle velocity at an initial state of room temperature was in agreement with previous shock compression results, while the measured shock data between 248 and 307 GPa initially heated to 773 K were below the Hugoniot evaluation from its off-Hugoniot states. Obtained interfacial temperatures on release of Hugoniot pressures (100-170 GPa) were in agreement with shock-melting points at initial ambient condition and ab initio calculations of melting curve. It indicates a good consistency for shock melting data of Ta at different initial temperatures. Our combined diagnostics for Hugoniot and temperature provides an important approach for studying EOS and the temperature effect of shocked metals. In particular, our measured melting temperatures of Ta address the current controversy about the difference by more than a factor of 2

  5. [Effects of mold preheating temperatures and the time of melt casting on the structure of cast denture frameworks].

    PubMed

    Biffar, R; Balz, U

    1989-11-01

    At casting temperatures of 1330 degrees to 1530 degrees C and preheating temperatures of 900 degrees to 1100 degrees C, 28 cast denture frameworks were manufactured using the cobalt chromium alloy Biosil f (Degussa). The inner defects were detected by X-ray defectoscopy and the grain numbers of clasp, connector and basis elements determined by metallography. The best results for compact castings were observed at a temperature range of 1410 degrees to 1480 degrees C. Casting previous to the melting of the last alloy cube results in a structure of clasps and connectors with 100-200 grains/mm2 and a high amount of defects; exceeding the liquidus temperature of 1380 degrees C produces grain numbers of 20-30/mm2, while a casting temperature of 1530 degrees C results in 3-5/mm2. Overheating of the melt, also in connection with low preheating temperatures, is probably a cause for the premature loss of clasp retention and fracture of many denture frameworks. PMID:2700705

  6. Shock compression behavior of bi-material powder composites with disparate melting temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, Kyle T.; Swift, Damian; Barham, Matthew; Stölken, James; Kuntz, Joshua; Kumar, Mukul

    2014-01-01

    Laser driven experiments were used to investigate the shock compression behavior of powder processed Bismuth/Tungsten (Bi/W) composite samples. The constituents provide different functionality to the composite behavior as Bi could be shock melted at the pressures attained in this work, while the W could not. Samples were prepared by uniaxial pressing, and the relative density was measured as a function of particle size, applied pressure, and composition for both hot and cold pressing conditions. This resulted in sample densities between 73% and 99% of the theoretical maximum density, and also noticeable differences in microstructure in the hot and cold pressed samples. The compression waves were generated with a 1.3 × 1.3 mm square spot directly onto the surface of the sample, using irradiances between 1012 and 1013 W/cm2, which resulted in calculated peak pressures between 50 and 150 GPa within a few micrometers. Sample recovery and post-mortem analysis revealed the formation of a crater on the laser drive surface, and the depth of this crater corresponded to the depth to which the Bi had been melted. The melt depth was found to be primarily a function of residual porosity and composition, and ranged from 167 to 528 μm. In general, a higher porosity led to a larger melt depth. Direct numerical simulations were performed, and indicated that the observed increase in melt depth for low-porosity samples could be largely attributed to increased heating associated with work done for pore collapse. However, the relative scaling was sensitive to composition, with low volume fraction Bi samples exhibiting a much stronger dependence on porosity than high Bi content samples. Select samples were repeated using an Al foil ablator, but there were no noticeable differences ensuring that the observed melting was indeed pressure-driven and was not a result of direct laser heating. The resultant microstructures and damage near the spall surface were also investigated

  7. Thermal diffusivity of pyroxene, feldspar, and silica melts, glasses, and single-crystals at high temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pertermann, M.; Branlund, J.; Whittington, A.; Hofmeister, A.

    2007-12-01

    Thermal diffusivity (D) due to phonon transport (the lattice component) was measured using laser-flash analysis from oriented single-crystals and of glasses above the glass transition, which proxy as melts. Compositions include SiO2, CaMgSi2O6, LiAlSi2O6, NaAlSi3O8, and CaAl2Si2O8. KAlSi3O8 was studied previously. Viscosity measurements of the supercooled liquids, in the range 106.8 to 1012.3 Pas, confirm near-Arrhenian behavior. For all compositions and for crystal and glass, D decreases with T, approaching a constant generally near 1000 K: Dsat, which is larger in the crystal than in the glass. A rapid decrease in D as T is increased further (ca 1400 K for orthoclase) is consistent with crossing the glass transition, verified from our viscosity data on these systems. The amount of the decrease depends on the chemical composition and similar to the relative decrease observed in heat capacity. Orthoclase values for Dsat are 0.65± 0.3 mm2/s for bulk crystal and 0.53+/-0.03 mm2/s for the glass. Constant D = 0.475+/-.01 mm2/s represents melt. Thermal conductivity (klat) of orthoclase glass, calculated using previous results for heat capacity (CP) and our density data, increases with T due to CP strongly increasing with T, reaching a plateau near 1.45 W/m-K for melt, but is always below klat of the crystal. Similar results were obtained from the other systems studied. Melting of silica, pyroxene, and feldspars impedes heat transport, providing positive thermal feedback that may promote further melting in the continental crust. The consistency of the behavior for these different compositions and structures suggests that our results are universal, holding for oceanic lithosphere as well. Melts, due to being disordered, are poor transporters of heat via vibrations. However, d(ln klat)/dP depends inversely on bulk modulus, suggesting that at some high pressure, the thermal conductivity of the melt and corresponding crystal become equal so that retention of heat by melts

  8. High-Melting Lipid Mixtures and the Origin of Detergent-Resistant Membranes Studied with Temperature-Solubilization Diagrams

    PubMed Central

    Sot, Jesús; Manni, Marco M.; Viguera, Ana R.; Castañeda, Verónica; Cano, Ainara; Alonso, Cristina; Gil, David; Valle, Mikel; Alonso, Alicia; Goñi, Félix M.

    2014-01-01

    The origin of resistance to detergent solubilization in certain membranes, or membrane components, is not clearly understood. We have studied the solubilization by Triton X-100 of binary mixtures composed of egg sphingomyelin (SM) and either ceramide, diacylglycerol, or cholesterol. Solubilization has been assayed in the 4–50°C range, and the results are summarized in a novel, to our knowledge, form of plots, that we have called temperature-solubilization diagrams. Despite using a large detergent excess (lipid/detergent 1:20 mol ratio) and extended solubilization times (24–48 h) certain mixtures were not amenable to Triton X-100 solubilization at one or more temperatures. DSC of all the lipid mixtures, and of all the lipid + detergent mixtures revealed that detergent resistance was associated with the presence of gel domains at the assay temperature. Once the system melted down, solubilization could occur. In general adding high-melting lipids limited the solubilization, whereas the addition of low-melting lipids promoted it. Lipidomic analysis of Madin-Darby canine kidney cell membranes and of the corresponding detergent-resistant fraction indicated a large enrichment of the nonsolubilized components in saturated diacylglycerol and ceramide. SM-cholesterol mixtures were special in that detergent solubilization was accompanied, for certain temperatures and compositions, by an independent phenomenon of reassembly of the partially solubilized lipid bilayers. The temperature at which lysis and reassembly prevailed was ∼25°C, thus for some SM-cholesterol mixtures solubilization occurred both above and below 25°C, but not at that temperature. These observations can be at the origin of the detergent resistance effects observed with cell membranes, and they also mean that cholesterol-containing detergent-resistant membrane remnants cannot correspond to structures existing in the native membrane before detergent addition. PMID:25517149

  9. Absolute Summ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Alfred, Jr.

    Summ means the entirety of the multiverse. It seems clear, from the inflation theories of A. Guth and others, that the creation of many universes is plausible. We argue that Absolute cosmological ideas, not unlike those of I. Newton, may be consistent with dynamic multiverse creations. As suggested in W. Heisenberg's uncertainty principle, and with the Anthropic Principle defended by S. Hawking, et al., human consciousness, buttressed by findings of neuroscience, may have to be considered in our models. Predictability, as A. Einstein realized with Invariants and General Relativity, may be required for new ideas to be part of physics. We present here a two postulate model geared to an Absolute Summ. The seedbed of this work is part of Akhnaton's philosophy (see S. Freud, Moses and Monotheism). Most important, however, is that the structure of human consciousness, manifest in Kenya's Rift Valley 200,000 years ago as Homo sapiens, who were the culmination of the six million year co-creation process of Hominins and Nature in Africa, allows us to do the physics that we do. .

  10. A self-contained 3He melting curve thermometer for dissemination of the PLTS-2000 temperature scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shvarts, Dm; Adams, A.; Lusher, C. P.; Körber, R.; Cowan, B. P.; Noonan, P.; Saunders, J.; Mikheev, V. A.

    2004-01-01

    We describe a self-contained 3He melting curve thermometer (MCT), which is compact and easy to operate and makes a reliable tool for the direct dissemination of the new provisional low-temperature scale, PLTS-2000. It is based on a cylindrical pressure gauge and uses a tunnel diode oscillator circuit for capacitive read-out. The gas-handling system uses a set of relief valves and an electronic pressure sensor, enabling the thermometer to be fully automated, including the calibration procedure. The performance of the MCT was evaluated by comparison with a current-sensing noise thermometer in the temperature range from 20 to 700 mK.

  11. Investigation of the rate-controlling mechanism(s) for high temperature creep and the relationship between creep and melting by use of high pressure as a variable

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    Using high pressure as a variable, the rate-controlling mechanism for high temperature creep and the relationship between creep and melting is investigated for silicon and nickel. An apparatus is used in which the samples are heated to melting point and subjected to 1 to 3 GigaPascal pressure. The stress behavior of the materials are then studied.

  12. Effects of temperature and dissolved lithium perchlorate on the viscoelastic and dynamic properties of poly(ethylene oxide), (PEO) melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogoslovov, Radoslav B.

    Poly(ethylene oxide)/lithium perchlorate (PEO/LiClO4) complexes are widely studied as a prototype solid polymer electrolyte in rechargeable lithium-polymer batteries. Characterizing the structure and dynamics of the system in its molten state is important for understanding the role of the polymer environment in lithium ion transport and conductivity. A fiber-optic coupled Fabry-Perot interferometer is employed in the investigation of the electrolyte viscoelastic and dynamic properties, which are both related to the intrachain local mobility and therefore to ion diffusion. The properties of the system are studied as a function of composition, temperature, and frequency. Structural relaxation processes are observed both in the neat polymer melt and in the salt containing electrolytes. For the neat PEO-1K melt the relaxation is identified as Maxwell-Debye single-exponential relaxation (beta = 1). The relaxation time follows Arrhenius temperature dependence with activation energy of the order of 10-11 kJ/mol. Upon addition of salt, the character of the relaxation persists with beta = 1, while the characteristic relaxation time slows down and the activation energy increases slightly. The slowdown of the dynamics is more pronounced at lower temperatures. In addition, with increasing salt concentration the elastic modulus increases significantly making the system stiffer at all temperatures, while the maximum of the storage modulus is shifted to higher temperatures. These effects result in a decrease in polymer segmental mobility and consequently in reduction of lithium ion diffusivity, with increased salt concentration. A unique q-dependent measurement is performed, allowing the investigation of the Brillouin frequency and linewidth as a function of frequency. It revealed a double-step relaxation in the electrolyte. The two relaxations are identified as secondary relaxations with Maxwell-Debye character (beta=1). The lower-frequency relaxation is stronger and has

  13. Aluminosilicate melts and glasses at 1 to 3 GPa: temperature and pressure effects on recovered structural and density changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bista, S.; Stebbins, J. F.; Hankins, B.; Sisson, T. W.

    2013-12-01

    The effects of pressure on aluminosilicate melt and glass structure have been studied by both in-situ methods and by quenching and recovering glasses from high pressure and temperature. Significant increases in the coordination number of Al are now well known from the pressure range of 6-10 GPa. New results show that even at shallower mantle pressures of 1-3 GPa, typical aluminosilicate melts have significant concentrations of aluminum cations with coordination numbers greater than 4, with up to 10's of percents of AlO5 and AlO6. Here, we compare the densities and Al coordinations of glass samples recovered from piston-cylinder experiments carried out at 1 to 3 GPa and different temperatures. Samples of two different compositions (Ca3Al2Si6O18 and Na2Si3O7 with 0.5% Al2O3) were compressed and held at temperatures ranging from near to their ambient glass transitions (Tg) up to temperatures above the liquidus. Our 2 GPa sodium aluminosilicate and calcium aluminosilicate glasses quenched from near to Tg show about 5 and 6 percent recovered densification, respectively. In both compositions, samples that were quenched from above the melting point showed substantially lower recovered density and lower Al coordination number compared to the samples that were held near to Tg. For example, sodium aluminosilicate glass quenched from 510°C (near to Tg) had 70% more AlO5 than samples from 1200°C. Based on the measurement of actual cooling rates, fictive temperature differences for the glasses from these two extreme temperatures are not large enough to account for this apparent loss in density and Al-coordination during quench. The most likely cause for these differences is therefore probably the pressure drop during cooling from temperatures above liquidus, as the pressure medium does not respond quickly enough to the thermal contraction of the liquid and furnace parts to remain isobaric. Results from previous high T and P quenching studies thus give only minimum estimates

  14. Coordinated Hard Sphere Mixture (CHaSM): A simplified model for oxide and silicate melts at mantle pressures and temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, Aaron S.; Asimow, Paul D.; Stevenson, David J.

    2015-08-01

    We develop a new model to understand and predict the behavior of oxide and silicate melts at extreme temperatures and pressures, including deep mantle conditions like those in the early Earth magma ocean. The Coordinated Hard Sphere Mixture (CHaSM) is based on an extension of the hard sphere mixture model, accounting for the range of coordination states available to each cation in the liquid. By utilizing approximate analytic expressions for the hard sphere model, this method is capable of predicting complex liquid structure and thermodynamics while remaining computationally efficient, requiring only minutes of calculation time on standard desktop computers. This modeling framework is applied to the MgO system, where model parameters are trained on a collection of crystal polymorphs, producing realistic predictions of coordination evolution and the equation of state of MgO melt over a wide range of pressures and temperatures. We find that the typical coordination number of the Mg cation evolves continuously upward from 5.25 at 0 GPa to 8.5 at 250 GPa. The results produced by CHaSM are evaluated by comparison with predictions from published first-principles molecular dynamics calculations, indicating that CHaSM is accurately capturing the dominant physics controlling the behavior of oxide melts at high pressure. Finally, we present a simple quantitative model to explain the universality of the increasing Grüneisen parameter trend for liquids, which directly reflects their progressive evolution toward more compact solid-like structures upon compression. This general behavior is opposite that of solid materials, and produces steep adiabatic thermal profiles for silicate melts, thus playing a crucial role in magma ocean evolution.

  15. Metal matrix-metal nanoparticle composites with tunable melting temperature and high thermal conductivity for phase-change thermal storage.

    PubMed

    Liu, Minglu; Ma, Yuanyu; Wu, Hsinwei; Wang, Robert Y

    2015-02-24

    Phase-change materials (PCMs) are of broad interest for thermal storage and management applications. For energy-dense storage with fast thermal charging/discharging rates, a PCM should have a suitable melting temperature, large enthalpy of fusion, and high thermal conductivity. To simultaneously accomplish these traits, we custom design nanocomposites consisting of phase-change Bi nanoparticles embedded in an Ag matrix. We precisely control nanoparticle size, shape, and volume fraction in the composite by separating the nanoparticle synthesis and nanocomposite formation steps. We demonstrate a 50-100% thermal energy density improvement relative to common organic PCMs with equivalent volume fraction. We also tune the melting temperature from 236-252 °C by varying nanoparticle diameter from 8.1-14.9 nm. Importantly, the silver matrix successfully prevents nanoparticle coalescence, and no melting changes are observed during 100 melt-freeze cycles. The nanocomposite's Ag matrix also leads to very high thermal conductivities. For example, the thermal conductivity of a composite with a 10% volume fraction of 13 nm Bi nanoparticles is 128 ± 23 W/m-K, which is several orders of magnitude higher than typical thermal storage materials. We complement these measurements with calculations using a modified effective medium approximation for nanoscale thermal transport. These calculations predict that the thermal conductivity of composites with 13 nm Bi nanoparticles varies from 142 to 47 W/m-K as the nanoparticle volume fraction changes from 10 to 35%. Larger nanoparticle diameters and/or smaller nanoparticle volume fractions lead to larger thermal conductivities. PMID:25610944

  16. Shock compression behavior of bi-material powder composites with disparate melting temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, Kyle T.; Swift, Damian; Barham, Matthew; Stölken, James; Kuntz, Joshua; Kumar, Mukul

    2014-01-14

    Laser driven experiments were used to investigate the shock compression behavior of powder processed Bismuth/Tungsten (Bi/W) composite samples. The constituents provide different functionality to the composite behavior as Bi could be shock melted at the pressures attained in this work, while the W could not. Samples were prepared by uniaxial pressing, and the relative density was measured as a function of particle size, applied pressure, and composition for both hot and cold pressing conditions. This resulted in sample densities between 73% and 99% of the theoretical maximum density, and also noticeable differences in microstructure in the hot and cold pressed samples. The compression waves were generated with a 1.3 × 1.3 mm square spot directly onto the surface of the sample, using irradiances between 10{sup 12} and 10{sup 13} W/cm{sup 2}, which resulted in calculated peak pressures between 50 and 150 GPa within a few micrometers. Sample recovery and post-mortem analysis revealed the formation of a crater on the laser drive surface, and the depth of this crater corresponded to the depth to which the Bi had been melted. The melt depth was found to be primarily a function of residual porosity and composition, and ranged from 167 to 528 μm. In general, a higher porosity led to a larger melt depth. Direct numerical simulations were performed, and indicated that the observed increase in melt depth for low-porosity samples could be largely attributed to increased heating associated with work done for pore collapse. However, the relative scaling was sensitive to composition, with low volume fraction Bi samples exhibiting a much stronger dependence on porosity than high Bi content samples. Select samples were repeated using an Al foil ablator, but there were no noticeable differences ensuring that the observed melting was indeed pressure-driven and was not a result of direct laser heating. The resultant microstructures and damage near the spall surface were also

  17. Melting temperatures of H2O up to 72 GPa measured in a diamond anvil cell using CO2 laser heating technique.

    PubMed

    Kimura, T; Kuwayama, Y; Yagi, T

    2014-02-21

    The melting curve of H2O from 49 to 72 GPa was determined by using a laser-heated diamond anvil cell. Double-sided CO2 laser heating technique was employed in order to heat the sample directly. Discontinuous changes of the heating efficiency attributed to the H2O melting were observed between 49 and 72 GPa. The obtained melting temperatures at 49 and 72 GPa are 1200 and 1410 K, respectively. We found that the slope of the melting curve significantly decreases with increasing pressure, only 5 K/GPa at 72 GPa while 44 K/GPa at 49 GPa. Our results suggest that the melting curve does not intersect with the isentropes of Uranus and Neptune, and hence, H2O should remain in the liquid state even at the pressure and temperature conditions found deep within Uranus and Neptune. PMID:24559351

  18. Solubility and solution mechanisms of chlorine in aluminosilicate melts at high pressure and high temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalou, C.; Mysen, B. O.

    2012-12-01

    We address the effect of alkalies and aluminum on the solution behavior of Cl by combining solubility measurements of Cl and Raman data of Cl-bearing peralkaline aluminosilicate glasses (quenched melt). Six compositions along the join Na2Si3O7(NS3)-Na2(NaAl)3O7 and six compositions along the join K2Si3O7(KS3)-K2(KAl)3O7 were used. In order to isolate potential effects of Al/(Al+Si) from changes on melt polymerization, Al2O3 was exchanged with SiO2 in a charge-balanced form, NaAlO2 and KaAlO2 thus keeping approximately constant NBO/T (0.65 ± 0.02) for all melts (assuming Al3+ in 4-fold coordination in the melts). Starting materials were doped with 5wt% Cl in the form of PdCl2, which releases Cl2 as its gaseous phase during experiment. Samples were synthetized on piston-cylinder apparatus at 1600°C - 1.5 GPa. At the end of the experiments, Pd forms little spheres (1-2 μm) that for most part dissolves into the capsule. Chlorine oversaturation in the melts is ensured by the observation of bubbles in the quenched samples. The Cl solubility in Na-bearing systems is about twice that of the than in K-bearing system and may, therefore, be negatively correlated with ionic radius of the metal cation.. The solubility also decreases with Al/(Al+Si). In NS3 system, it decreases from 4.01 ± 0.13 wt% of Cl in Al-free systems to 1.87 ± 0.19 wt% of Cl for an Al/Al+Si ratio of 0.34. In KS3 system, this decrease is from 2.23 ± 0.08 wt% of Cl in Al-free systems to 0.62 ± 0.05 wt% of Cl for an Al/Al+Si ratio of 0.36. In Al-free systems, preliminary Raman data show the appearance of a peak around 465cm-1, that we assigned to alkali-Cl bonding. The intensity of this 465cm-1 peak increases with Al content confirming the role of Al in Cl solution mechanism.We also identify the molecular Cl peak at 1540cm-1. The peak can be detected only in Al-bearing melts. The Al substitution for Si results in increased abundance of three-dimensional cages on the melt structure into which molecular

  19. Relationships between membrane water molecules and Patman equilibration kinetics at temperatures far above the phosphatidylcholine melting point.

    PubMed

    Vaughn, Alexandra R; Bell, Thomas A; Gibbons, Elizabeth; Askew, Caitlin; Franchino, Hannabeth; Hirsche, Kelsey; Kemsley, Linea; Melchor, Stephanie; Moulton, Emma; Schwab, Morgan; Nelson, Jennifer; Bell, John D

    2015-04-01

    The naphthalene-based fluorescent probes Patman and Laurdan detect bilayer polarity at the level of the phospholipid glycerol backbone. This polarity increases with temperature in the liquid-crystalline phase of phosphatidylcholines and was observed even 90°C above the melting temperature. This study explores mechanisms associated with this phenomenon. Measurements of probe anisotropy and experiments conducted at 1M NaCl or KCl (to reduce water permittivity) revealed that this effect represents interactions of water molecules with the probes without proportional increases in probe mobility. Furthermore, comparison of emission spectra to Monte Carlo simulations indicated that the increased polarity represents elevation in probe access to water molecules rather than increased mobility of relevant bilayer waters. Equilibration of these probes with the membrane involves at least two steps which were distinguished by the membrane microenvironment reported by the probe. The difference in those microenvironments also changed with temperature in the liquid-crystalline phase in that the equilibrium state was less polar than the initial environment detected by Patman at temperatures near the melting point, more polar at higher temperatures, and again less polar as temperature was raised further. Laurdan also displayed this level of complexity during equilibration, although the relationship to temperature differed quantitatively from that experienced by Patman. This kinetic approach provides a novel way to study in molecular detail basic principles of what happens to the membrane environment around an individual amphipathic molecule as it penetrates the bilayer. Moreover, it provides evidence of unexpected and interesting membrane behaviors far from the phase transition. PMID:25559316

  20. Evidence of liquid–liquid transition in glass-forming La50Al35Ni15 melt above liquidus temperature

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wei; Sandor, Magdalena T.; Yu, Yao; Ke, Hai-Bo; Zhang, Hua-Ping; Li, Mao-Zhi; Wang, Wei-Hua; Liu, Lin; Wu, Yue

    2015-01-01

    Liquid–liquid transition, a phase transition of one liquid phase to another with the same composition, provides a key opportunity for investigating the relationship between liquid structures and dynamics. Here we report experimental evidences of a liquid–liquid transition in glass-forming La50Al35Ni15 melt above its liquidus temperature by 27Al nuclear magnetic resonance including the temperature dependence of cage volume fluctuations and atomic diffusion. The observed dependence of the incubation time on the degree of undercooling is consistent with a first-order phase transition. Simulation results indicate that such transition is accompanied by the change of bond-orientational order without noticeable change in density. The temperature dependence of atomic diffusion revealed by simulations is also in agreement with experiments. These observations indicate the need of two-order parameters in describing phase transitions of liquids. PMID:26165855

  1. Evidence of liquid-liquid transition in glass-forming La50Al35Ni15 melt above liquidus temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Wei; Sandor, Magdalena T.; Yu, Yao; Ke, Hai-Bo; Zhang, Hua-Ping; Li, Mao-Zhi; Wang, Wei-Hua; Liu, Lin; Wu, Yue

    2015-07-01

    Liquid-liquid transition, a phase transition of one liquid phase to another with the same composition, provides a key opportunity for investigating the relationship between liquid structures and dynamics. Here we report experimental evidences of a liquid-liquid transition in glass-forming La50Al35Ni15 melt above its liquidus temperature by 27Al nuclear magnetic resonance including the temperature dependence of cage volume fluctuations and atomic diffusion. The observed dependence of the incubation time on the degree of undercooling is consistent with a first-order phase transition. Simulation results indicate that such transition is accompanied by the change of bond-orientational order without noticeable change in density. The temperature dependence of atomic diffusion revealed by simulations is also in agreement with experiments. These observations indicate the need of two-order parameters in describing phase transitions of liquids.

  2. Metal-Silicate Partitioning of Bi, In, and Cd as a Function of Temperature and Melt Composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marin, Nicole; Righter, K.; Danielson, L.; Pando, K.; Lee, C.

    2013-01-01

    The origin of volatile elements in the Earth, Moon and Mars is not known; however, several theories have been proposed based on volatile elements such as In, As, Se, Te and Zn which are in lower concentration in the Earth, Moon, and Mars than in chondrites. Explanations for these low concentrations are based on two contrasting theories for the origin of Earth: equilibrium core formation versus late accretion. One idea is that the volatiles were added during growth of the planets and Moon, and some mobilized into the metallic core while others stayed in the mantle (e.g., [1]). The competing idea is that they were added to the mantles after core formation had completed (e.g., [2]). Testing these ideas involves quantitative modeling which can only be performed after data is obtained on the systematic metal-silicate partitioning behavior of volatile elements with temperature, pressure and melt composition. Until now, such data for Bi, In, and Cd has been lacking. After conducting a series of high pressure, high temperature experiments, the metal-silicate partition coefficients of Bi, In, and Cd as a function of temperature and melt composition can be used to evaluate potential conditions under which terrestrial planets differentiated into core and mantle, and how they acquired volatiles.

  3. The spall strength and Hugoniot elastic limit of mono-crystalline and polycrystalline copper near melting temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razorenov, S. V.; Zaretsky, E. B.; Savinykh, A. S.

    2014-05-01

    In present work, the Hugoniot elastic limit (HEL) and spall strength of polycrystalline commercial grade copper and single crystal copper of <100> and <111> orientations were determined for sample temperatures varying from 20 to 1081°C. The differently preheated samples whose thickness varied between 0.5 and 2 mm were shock-loaded by copper plates of 1-mm thickness accelerated up to 300-400 m/s velocity in the 58mm smooth bore gas gun, or by aluminium plates of 0.4 mm in thickness (~660 m/s), accelerated with explosive facilities. The velocity histories of the free rear surface of the loaded samples were recorded with VISAR laser velocimeter. The velocity histories of the samples of polycrystalline copper demonstrate 9-fold growth of the stress at HEL between room and melting temperatures. Unlike other metals commercial grade copper maintains very high spall strength near the melting point Tm; it is only twice as low as that of the copper at 0.85 Tm. The copper single crystals of both orientations also demonstrate substantial spall strength at 0.94 Tm (1000°C). At the same time, the increase of the stress at HEL with temperature in these samples is much weaker than that found for polycrystalline samples of copper.

  4. Temperature of Earth's Deep Interior Constrained from Melting of Fe and Fe0.9Ni0.1 at High Pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, D.; Jackson, J. M.; Zhao, J.; Sturhahn, W.; Alp, E. E.; Hu, M. Y.; Toellner, T.; Murphy, C. A.; Prakapenka, V.

    2015-12-01

    The melting points of fcc- and hcp-structured Fe0.9Ni0.1 and Fe have been measured up to Mbar pressure. We use laser heated diamond anvil cells, time-resolved synchrotron Mössbauer spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction and a recently developed fast temperature readout spectrometer to carry out these measurements. X-ray photons at 57Fe's resonant energy with 1 meV bandwidth are focused on the sample in a laser heated diamond anvil cell, and when melting occurs, the characteristic Mössbauer signal abruptly decreases. Thus, time-resolved Mössbauer spectroscopy provides an excellent diagnostic for the first melt formed in the sample chamber. The thermal contributions of pressure of Fe0.9Ni0.1 and Fe have been constrained by combining nuclear resonant inelastic scattering and high temperature X-ray diffraction measurements. We find that the melting curve of Fe is systematically higher than the melting curve of Fe0.9Ni0.1, while the 1-σ temperature uncertainties of both melting curves overlap. The pressure dependencies of the melting temperature of fcc-structured Fe and Fe0.9Ni0.1 are measured, and the best-fit melting curves are located in the region bounded by previous studies. Our results may help reach a consensus on the high pressure melting curves of Fe and Fe-Ni alloys. We calculate the fcc-hcp-liquid triple points of Fe0.9Ni0.1and Fe, complemented by experiments with Mössbauer spectroscopy. The upper bound of Earth's inner core-outer core boundary temperature is estimated from our results, and the upper bound of the temperature at Earth's core-mantle boundary is computed with an adiabatic model. We discuss the implications of these temperatures on the phase relations of deep Earth materials. References:Murphy, C.A., J.M. Jackson, W. Sturhahn, and B. Chen (2011): Melting and thermal pressure of hcp-Fe from the phonon density of states, Phys. Earth Planet. Int., 188, 114-120 Jackson, J.M., W. Sturhahn, M. Lerche, J. Zhao, T.S. Toellner, E.E. Alp, S.V. Sinogeikin, J

  5. Thermodynamic temperature measurements of the melting temperatures of Co-C, Pt-C and Re-C fixed points at NRC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todd, A. D. W.; Woods, D. J.

    2013-02-01

    This paper outlines measurements made at the National Research Council Canada (NRC) of the thermodynamic melting temperatures of Co-C, Pt-C and Re-C fixed points that have been part of the high-temperature fixed-point research plan of Working Group 5 of the Consultative Committee for Thermometry (CCT-WG5) to assign melting temperatures to those fixed points. This document will outline the equipment used, describe the scheme used to calibrate a pyrometer with traceability to a cryogenic electrical substitution radiometer, and detail the method of measuring the fixed points. It will then report the uncertainties in the measurements and the results. A brief description of the improvements that we plan to implement to the scheme to reduce the uncertainties for future measurements will be given. The thermodynamic temperatures determined for the three fixed points are: 1597.776 K with an expanded uncertainty of 0.36 K, 2011.390 K with an expanded uncertainty of 0.55 K, and 2748.056 K with an expanded uncertainty of 0.95 K, for the Co-C, Pt-C and Re-C fixed points, respectively (all expanded uncertainties assume a 95% confidence interval and a Gaussian distribution).

  6. Molybdenum Valence in Basaltic Silicate Melts: Effects of Temperature and Pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danielson, L. R.; Righter, K.; Newville, M.; Sutton, S.; Choi, Y.; Pando, K.

    2011-01-01

    The metal-silicate partitioning behavior of molybdenum has been used as a test for equilibrium core formation hypotheses [for example, 1-6]. However, current models that apply experimental data to equilibrium core-mantle differentiation infer the oxidation state of molybdenum from solubility data or from multivariable coefficients from metal-silicate partitioning data [1,3,7]. Molybdenum, a multi-valent element with a valence transition near the fO2 of interest for core formation (approx.IW-2) will be sensitive to changes in fO2 of the system and silicate melt structure. In a silicate melt, Mo can occur in either 4+ or 6+ valence state, and Mo(6+) can be either octahedrally or tetrahedrally coordinated. Here we present X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) measurements of Mo valence in basaltic run products at a range of P, T, and fO2 and further quantify the valence transition of Mo.

  7. Effect of Melting Iron-Based Alloy Temperature on Carbon Content Observed in Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Xiaomei; Chang, Penghui; Chen, Gehua; Lin, Jingjun; Liu, Ruixiang; Yang, Hao

    2015-11-01

    Our recent work has determined the carbon content in a melting ferroalloy by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). The emission spectrum of carbon that we obtained in the laboratory is suitable for carbon content determination in a melting ferroalloy but we cannot get the expected results when this method is applied in industrial conditions: there is always an unacceptable error of around 4% between the actual value and the measured value. By comparing the measurement condition in the industrial condition with that in the laboratory, the results show that the temperature of the molten ferroalloy samples to be measured is constant under laboratory conditions while it decreases gradually under industrial conditions. However, temperature has a considerable impact on the measurement of carbon content, and this is the reason why there is always an error between the actual value and the measured value. In this paper we compare the errors of carbon content determination at different temperatures to find the optimum reference temperature range which can fit the requirements better in industrial conditions and, hence, make the measurement more accurate. The results of the comparative analyses show that the measured value of the carbon content in molten state (1620 K) is consistent with the nominal value of the solid standard sample (error within 0.7%). In fact, it is the most accurate measurement in the solid state. Based on this, we can effectively improve the accuracy of measurements in laboratory and can provide a reference standard of temperature for the measurement in industrial conditions. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 51374040), and supported by Laser-Induced Plasma Spectroscopy Equipment Development and Application, China (No. 2014YQ120351)

  8. Radiance Temperatures (in the Wavelength Range 530 to 1500 nm) of Nickel at Its Melting Point by a Pulse-Heating Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaschnitz, E.; McClure, J. L.; Cezairliyan, A.

    1998-11-01

    The radiance temperatures (at seven wavelengths in the range 530 to 1500 nm) of nickel at its melting point were measured by a pulse-heating technique. The method is based on rapid resistive self-heating of the specimen from room temperature to its melting point in less than 1 s and on simultaneously measuring specimen radiance temperatures every 0.5 ms. Melting of the specimen was manifested by a plateau in the radiance temperature-versus-time function for each wavelength. The melting-point radiance temperatures for a given specimen were determined by averaging the measured temperatures along the plateau at each wavelength. The melting-point radiance temperatures for nickel, as determined by averaging the results at each wavelength for 25 specimens, are: 1641 K at 530 nm, 1615 K at 627 nm, 1606 K at 657 nm, 1589 K at 722 nm, 1564 K at 812 nm, 1538 K at 908 nm, and 1381 K at 1500 nm. Based on uncertainties arising from pyrometry and specimen conditions, the combined uncertainty (two standard-deviation level) is about ± 6 K for the reported values in the range 530 to 900 nm and is about ± 8 K for the reported value at 1500 nm.

  9. Absolute absorption coefficient of C6H2 in the mid-UV range at low temperature; implications for the interpretation of Titan atmospheric spectra.

    PubMed

    Bénilan, Y; Bruston, P; Raulin, F; Courtin, R; Guillemin, J C

    1995-01-01

    The interpretation of mid-UV albedo spectra of planetary atmospheres, especially that of Titan, is the main goal of the SIPAT (Spectroscopie uv d'Interet Prebiologique dans l'Atmosphere de Titan) research program. This laboratory experiment has been developed in order to systematically determine the absorption coefficients of molecular compounds which are potential absorbers of scattered sunlight in planetary atmospheres, with high spectral resolution, and at various temperatures below room temperature. From photochemical modelling and experimental simulations, we may expect triacetylene (C6H2) to be present in the atmosphere of Titan, even though it has not yet been detected. We present here the first determination of the absolute absorption coefficient of that compound in the 200-300 nm range and at two temperatures (296 K and 233 K). The temperature dependence of the C6H2 absorption coefficient in that wavelength range is compared to that previously observed in the case of cyanoacetylene (HC3N). We then discuss the implications of the present results for the interpretation of Titan UV spectra, where it appears that large uncertainities can be introduced either by the presence of trace impurities in laboratory samples or by the variations of absorption coefficients with temperature. PMID:11538441

  10. Air temperature thresholds to evaluate snow melting at the surface of Alpine glaciers by T-index models: the case study of Forni Glacier (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senese, A.; Maugeri, M.; Vuillermoz, E.; Smiraglia, C.; Diolaiuti, G.

    2014-03-01

    The glacier melt conditions (i.e.: null surface temperature and positive energy budget) can be assessed by analyzing meteorological and energy data acquired by a supraglacial Automatic Weather Station (AWS). In the case this latter is not present the assessment of actual melting conditions and the evaluation of the melt amount is difficult and simple methods based on T-index (or degree days) models are generally applied. These models require the choice of a correct temperature threshold. In fact, melt does not necessarily occur at daily air temperatures higher than 273.15 K. In this paper, to detect the most indicative threshold witnessing melt conditions in the April-June period, we have analyzed air temperature data recorded from 2006 to 2012 by a supraglacial AWS set up at 2631 m a.s.l. on the ablation tongue of the Forni Glacier (Italian Alps), and by a weather station located outside the studied glacier (at Bormio, a village at 1225 m a.s.l.). Moreover we have evaluated the glacier energy budget and the Snow Water Equivalent (SWE) values during this time-frame. Then the snow ablation amount was estimated both from the surface energy balance (from supraglacial AWS data) and from T-index method (from Bormio data, applying the mean tropospheric lapse rate and varying the air temperature threshold) and the results were compared. We found that the mean tropospheric lapse rate permits a good and reliable reconstruction of glacier air temperatures and the major uncertainty in the computation of snow melt is driven by the choice of an appropriate temperature threshold. From our study using a 5.0 K lower threshold value (with respect to the largely applied 273.15 K) permits the most reliable reconstruction of glacier melt.

  11. Partitioning of Mo, P and other siderophile elements (Cu, Ga, Sn, Ni, Co, Cr, Mn, V, and W) between metal and silicate melt as a function of temperature and silicate melt composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Righter, K.; Pando, K. M.; Danielson, L.; Lee, Cin-Ty

    2010-03-01

    Metal-silicate partition coefficients can provide information about the earliest differentiation histories of terrestrial planets and asteroids. Systematic studies of the effects of key parameters such as temperature and melt composition are lacking for many elements. In particular, data for Mo is scarce, but given its refractory nature, is of great value in interpreting metal-silicate equilibrium. Two series of experiments have been carried out to study Mo and P partitioning between Fe metallic liquid and basaltic to peridotitic silicate melt, at 1 GPa and temperatures between 1500 and 1900 °C. Because the silicate melt utilized was natural basalt, there are also measurable quantities of 9 other siderophile elements (Ni, Co, W, Sn, Cu, Mn, V, Cr, Ga and Zn). The Ni and Co data can be used to assess consistency with previous studies. In addition, the new data also allow a first systematic look at the temperature dependence of Cu, Ga, Sn, Cr, Mn V and W for basaltic to peridotitic melts. Many elements exhibit an increase in siderophile behavior at higher temperature, contrary to popular belief, but consistent with predictions from thermodynamics. Using these new data we examine DMomet/sil and DPmet/sil in detail and show that increasing temperature causes a decrease in the former and an increase in the latter, whereas both increase with MgO content of the silicate melt. The depletions of Mo and P in the mantle of the Earth can be explained by metal-silicate equilibrium at magma ocean conditions — both elements are satisfied at PT conditions of an intermediate depth magma ocean for the Earth 22.5 GPa and 2400 °C.

  12. A Plagioclase-Augite Inclusion in Caddo County: Low-Temperature Melt of Primitive Achondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, H.; Baba, T.; Saiki, K.; Otsuki, M.; Ebihara, M.

    1993-07-01

    the silicate phases in Caddo County: Na (5.79X CI), Al (6.17X CI) in contrast with Bild and Wasson's [3] results on Lodran, which showed depletion of Ca relative to Mg or Si. Mg-normalized abundance ratios of Ca in the silicates of Caddo County (11.8X CI) are one order of magnitude larger than Acapulco (0.9X CI). Ni content of metal phase of Caddo County is about 7%, and Ir is 2.5 ppm. The Ru content in the FeNi metal is 2 to 5 ppm. Abundances of Ni, Ir, and Ru are in the range of IAB iron meteorite in agreement with those by Palme et at. [1]. According to the formation model of lodranites [4], Ca-Al-rich melt and Fe-Ni- S eutectic melt are removed from source materials. Kracher and Wasson [5] suggested that the type IAB iron meteorites have been formed out of the Fe-Ni- S melt. It is interesting to note that Ca-Al-rich melts removed during formation of lodranitelike materials crystallize plagioclase and Aug. The Ca- Al-rich silicates like plagioclase and Aug are major minerals in the silicate inclusion of Caddo County. From bulk chemistry by INAA, Ca, Al, REE, typically absent in lodranites, were enriched in Caddo County. These facts indicate that this type of meteorite was formed from the Fe-Ni-S-rich and Ca-Al-rich melts. However, we have to admit that silicate inclusions in the IAB group have different oxygen isotopic abundances from those of lodranites. Lodranitelike meteorites in mineralogy and bulk chemistry are missing in the winonaite-IAB group and those of Caddo County have not been found in the Acapulcoite- lodranite group. References: [1] Palme H. et al. (1991) LPSC XXII, 1015-1016. [2] Kimura M. et al. (1992) Proc. NIPR Symp. Antarct. Meteorites, 5, 165-190. [3] Bild R. W. and Wasson J. T. (1976) Mineral. Mag., 40, 721-735. [4] Takeda H. et al. (1992) Proc. Japan Academy, 68, B, 115-120. [5] Kracher A. and Wasson J. T. (1982) GCA, 46, 2419.

  13. The impact of coniferous forest temperature on incoming longwave radiation to melting snow

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Experiments were conducted in Rocky Mountain evergreen forests of differing density, insolation and latitude to test whether air temperatures are suitable surrogates for canopy temperature in estimating sub-canopy longwave irradiance to snow. Under conditions of low to no insolation then air temper...

  14. Mixing-to-eruption timescales: an integrated model combining numerical simulations and high-temperature experiments with natural melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montagna, Chiara; Perugini, Diego; De Campos, Christina; Longo, Antonella; Dingwell, Donald Bruce; Papale, Paolo

    2015-04-01

    Arrival of magma from depth into shallow reservoirs and associated mixing processes have been documented as possible triggers of explosive eruptions. Quantifying the timing from beginning of mixing to eruption is of fundamental importance in volcanology in order to put constraints about the possible onset of a new eruption. Here we integrate numerical simulations and high-temperature experiment performed with natural melts with the aim to attempt identifying the mixing-to-eruption timescales. We performed two-dimensional numerical simulations of the arrival of gas-rich magmas into shallow reservoirs. We solve the fluid dynamics for the two interacting magmas evaluating the space-time evolution of the physical properties of the mixture. Convection and mingling develop quickly into the chamber and feeding conduit/dyke. Over time scales of hours, the magmas in the reservoir appear to have mingled throughout, and convective patterns become harder to identify. High-temperature magma mixing experiments have been performed using a centrifuge and using basaltic and phonolitic melts from Campi Flegrei (Italy) as initial end-members. Concentration Variance Decay (CVD), an inevitable consequence of magma mixing, is exponential with time. The rate of CVD is a powerful new geochronometer for the time from mixing to eruption/quenching. The mingling-to-eruption time of three explosive volcanic eruptions from Campi Flegrei (Italy) yield durations on the order of tens of minutes. These results are in perfect agreement with the numerical simulations that suggest a maximum mixing time of a few hours to obtain a hybrid mixture. We show that integration of numerical simulation and high-temperature experiments can provide unprecedented results about mixing processes in volcanic systems. The combined application of numerical simulations and CVD geochronometer to the eruptive products of active volcanoes could be decisive for the preparation of hazard mitigation during volcanic unrest.

  15. Very high-temperature impact melt products as evidence for cosmic airbursts and impacts 12,900 years ago

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bunch, Ted E.; Hermes, Robert E.; Moore, Andrew M.T.; Kennett, Douglas J.; Weaver, James C.; Wittke, James H.; DeCarli, Paul S.; Bischoff, James L.; Hillman, Gordon C.; Howard, George A.; Kimbel, David R.; Kletetschka, Gunther; Lipo, Carl P.; Sakai, Sachiko; Revay, Zsolt; West, Allen; Firestone, Richard B.; Kennett, James P.

    2012-01-01

    It has been proposed that fragments of an asteroid or comet impacted Earth, deposited silica-and iron-rich microspherules and other proxies across several continents, and triggered the Younger Dryas cooling episode 12,900 years ago. Although many independent groups have confirmed the impact evidence, the hypothesis remains controversial because some groups have failed to do so. We examined sediment sequences from 18 dated Younger Dryas boundary (YDB) sites across three continents (North America, Europe, and Asia), spanning 12,000 km around nearly one-third of the planet. All sites display abundant microspherules in the YDB with none or few above and below. In addition, three sites (Abu Hureyra, Syria; Melrose, Pennsylvania; and Blackville, South Carolina) display vesicular, high-temperature, siliceous scoria-like objects, or SLOs, that match the spherules geochemically. We compared YDB objects with melt products from a known cosmic impact (Meteor Crater, Arizona) and from the 1945 Trinity nuclear airburst in Socorro, New Mexico, and found that all of these high-energy events produced material that is geochemically and morphologically comparable, including: (i) high-temperature, rapidly quenched microspherules and SLOs; (ii) corundum, mullite, and suessite (Fe3,/sup>Si), a rare meteoritic mineral that forms under high temperatures; (iii) melted SiO2 glass, or lechatelierite, with flow textures (or schlieren) that form at > 2,200 °C; and (iv) particles with features indicative of high-energy interparticle collisions. These results are inconsistent with anthropogenic, volcanic, authigenic, and cosmic materials, yet consistent with cosmic ejecta, supporting the hypothesis of extraterrestrial airbursts/impacts 12,900 years ago. The wide geographic distribution of SLOs is consistent with multiple impactors.

  16. On-orbit absolute radiance standard for the next generation of IR remote sensing instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Best, Fred A.; Adler, Douglas P.; Pettersen, Claire; Revercomb, Henry E.; Gero, P. Jonathan; Taylor, Joseph K.; Knuteson, Robert O.; Perepezko, John H.

    2012-11-01

    The next generation of infrared remote sensing satellite instrumentation, including climate benchmark missions will require better absolute measurement accuracy than now available, and will most certainly rely on the emerging capability to fly SI traceable standards that provide irrefutable absolute measurement accuracy. As an example, instrumentation designed to measure spectrally resolved infrared radiances with an absolute brightness temperature error of better than 0.1 K will require high-emissivity (<0.999) calibration blackbodies with emissivity uncertainty of better than 0.06%, and absolute temperature uncertainties of better than 0.045K (k=3). Key elements of an On-Orbit Absolute Radiance Standard (OARS) meeting these stringent requirements have been demonstrated in the laboratory at the University of Wisconsin (UW) and refined under the NASA Instrument Incubator Program (IIP). This work recently culminated with an integrated subsystem that was used in the laboratory to demonstrate end-to-end radiometric accuracy verification for the UW Absolute Radiance Interferometer. Along with an overview of the design, we present details of a key underlying technology of the OARS that provides on-orbit absolute temperature calibration using the transient melt signatures of small quantities (<1g) of reference materials (gallium, water, and mercury) imbedded in the blackbody cavity. In addition we present performance data from the laboratory testing of the OARS.

  17. Liquid madelung energy and schottky defect energy related to liquid structure and melting temperature for alkali halides

    SciTech Connect

    March, N.H.; Tosi, M.P.

    1985-01-01

    Motivated by the work of Reiss et al. in which the melting temperature T /SUB m/ of alkali halides is correlated with Coulomb energy, we consider the cohesive energy W of ionic melts and Schottky defect energy E /SUB s/ in the hot crystal, relative to the thermal energy k /SUB B/ T /SUB m/ . It is shown here that is accurately approximated by the liquid Madelung energy and hence that W/k /SUB B/ T /SUB m/ relates to the charge-charg direct correlation function c /SUB QQ/ (r) at r = 0. The existence of a ''Madelung constant'' for the liquid at T /SUB m/ is thereby demonstrated through the alkali halide series. An estimate of the ratio E /SUB s/ /k /SUB B/ T /SUB m/ i then considered; the basic additional ingredient being argued to be the static dielectric constant of the solid. Th BarrDawson-Lidiard empirical correlation between E /SUB s/ and k /SUB B/ T /SUB m/ can be understood in this way.

  18. Induction heating pure vapor source of high temperature melting point materials on electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Kutsumi, Osamu; Kato, Yushi; Matsui, Yuuki; Sato, Fuminobu; Iida, Toshiyuki; Kitagawa, Atsushi; Muramatsu, Masayuki; Uchida, Takashi; Yoshida, Yoshikazu

    2010-02-15

    Multicharged ions that are needed are produced from solid pure material with high melting point in an electron cyclotron resonance ion source. We develop an evaporator by using induction heating (IH) with multilayer induction coil, which is made from bare molybdenum or tungsten wire without water cooling and surrounding the pure vaporized material. We optimize the shapes of induction coil and vaporized materials and operation of rf power supply. We conduct experiment to investigate the reproducibility and stability in the operation and heating efficiency. IH evaporator produces pure material vapor because materials directly heated by eddy currents have no contact with insulated materials, which are usually impurity gas sources. The power and the frequency of the induction currents range from 100 to 900 W and from 48 to 23 kHz, respectively. The working pressure is about 10{sup -4}-10{sup -3} Pa. We measure the temperature of the vaporized materials with different shapes, and compare them with the result of modeling. We estimate the efficiency of the IH vapor source. We are aiming at the evaporator's higher melting point material than that of iron.

  19. High temperature fluid-bed heat recovery for aluminum melting furnace

    SciTech Connect

    1982-12-01

    The objective of the study was to establish whether technical problems would be encountered in increasing the inlet temperature of the fluid bed heat exchanger unit at Alcoa above the 1100/sup 0/F target of the current contract. Specifically, the temperature range of up to, and potentially above, 1600/sup 0/F were investigated to establish the benefits of higher temperature, trade offs required, and plans to achieve that technology goal. The benefits are tabulated and are very significant, particularly at the temperature range of 1600 to 1800/sup 0/F. Relative to 1100/sup 0/F the heat recovery is increased by 24 to 29% at 1600 and 1800/sup 0/F respectively.

  20. Hot melt extrusion for amorphous solid dispersions: temperature and moisture activated drug-polymer interactions for enhanced stability.

    PubMed

    Sarode, Ashish L; Sandhu, Harpreet; Shah, Navnit; Malick, Waseem; Zia, Hossein

    2013-10-01

    Hot melt extrudates (HMEs) of indomethacin (IND) with Eudragit EPO and Kollidon VA 64 and those of itraconazole (ITZ) with HPMCAS-LF and Kollidon VA 64 were manufactured using a Leistritz twin screw extruder. The milled HMEs were stored at controlled temperature and humidity conditions. The samples were collected after specified time periods for 3 months. The stability of amorphous HMEs was assessed using moisture analysis, thermal evaluation, powder X-ray diffraction, FTIR, HPLC, and dissolution study. In general, the moisture content increased with time, temperature, and humidity levels. Amorphous ITZ was physically unstable at very high temperature and humidity levels, and its recrystallization was detected in the HMEs manufactured using Kollidon VA 64. Although physical stability of IND was better sustained by both Eudragit EPO and Kollidon VA 64, chemical degradation of the drug was identified in the stability samples of HMEs with Eudragit EPO stored at 50 °C. The dissolution rates and the supersaturation levels were significantly decreased for the stability samples in which crystallization was detected. Interestingly, the supersaturation was improved for the stability samples of IND:Eudragit EPO and ITZ:HPMCAS-LF, in which no physical or chemical instability was observed. This enhancement in supersaturation was attributed to the temperature and moisture activated electrostatic interactions between the drugs and their counterionic polymers. PMID:23961978

  1. Climatology of increased temperatures and melt at Swiss Camp, western slope of Greenland ice sheet, 1991-2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steffen, K.; McGrath, D.

    2013-12-01

    Climate observations (1991-2012) will be discussed from the Swiss Camp (69deg 33‧53″N, 49deg 19‧51″W, 1176 m), located at the western slope of the Greenland ice sheet, 60 km inland from Ilulissat. The mean annual temperature of -12 C increased 3.6 C between 1991 and 2012 (1.7 C per decade) with large interannual variability in all seasons. The mean spring temperature increased from -16.0 C to -13.8 C, and the fall temperature increased from -12.4 C to -11.3 C in the same time. The winter temperature showed the largest increase of 6.5 C, whereas summer temperatures increased 3.0 C during the 21 years (1991 - 2012). Radiation has been monitored continuously at Swiss Camp since 1993. Net radiation of 50 W/ m2 was recorded in 2012, the warmest summer month on record. The entire annual snow cover melted at Swiss Camp, reducing the monthly albedo value to 0.4 with bare ice exposed. Interannual variability of snow accumulation ranged between 0.07 and 0.70 m water equivalent, whereas annual snow and ice ablation varied between +0.35 (net gain) and -1.8 m (net loss) for the time period 1991-2012. The equilibrium line altitude (ELA) is no longer located at Swiss Camp (1176 m elevation) with a net surface lowering of 9.5 m since 1991. Increasing summer air temperatures have resulted in an upward migration of both the percolation facies and ablation area of the Greenland ice sheet. The 0°C isothermal migrated upward at a rate of 35 m/a over the 1995-2012 period in West Greenland. There is a 50% probability of the mean annual dry snow line migrating above Summit by 2025, at which time Summit will experience routine melt on an annual basis. The surface mass balance observations similarly indicate that the ELA has migrated upwards at a rate of 44 m/a over the 1997-2011 period in West Greenland, resulting in a more than doubling of the ablation zone width during this period. Inter-annual variability of monthly mean albedo at the Swiss Camp (1993 - 2012). Albedo at 0.5 is

  2. New experimental methodology, setup and LabView program for accurate absolute thermoelectric power and electrical resistivity measurements between 25 and 1600 K: Application to pure copper, platinum, tungsten, and nickel at very high temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Abadlia, L.; Mayoufi, M.; Gasser, F.; Khalouk, K.; Gasser, J. G.

    2014-09-15

    In this paper we describe an experimental setup designed to measure simultaneously and very accurately the resistivity and the absolute thermoelectric power, also called absolute thermopower or absolute Seebeck coefficient, of solid and liquid conductors/semiconductors over a wide range of temperatures (room temperature to 1600 K in present work). A careful analysis of the existing experimental data allowed us to extend the absolute thermoelectric power scale of platinum to the range 0-1800 K with two new polynomial expressions. The experimental device is controlled by a LabView program. A detailed description of the accurate dynamic measurement methodology is given in this paper. We measure the absolute thermoelectric power and the electrical resistivity and deduce with a good accuracy the thermal conductivity using the relations between the three electronic transport coefficients, going beyond the classical Wiedemann-Franz law. We use this experimental setup and methodology to give new very accurate results for pure copper, platinum, and nickel especially at very high temperatures. But resistivity and absolute thermopower measurement can be more than an objective in itself. Resistivity characterizes the bulk of a material while absolute thermoelectric power characterizes the material at the point where the electrical contact is established with a couple of metallic elements (forming a thermocouple). In a forthcoming paper we will show that the measurement of resistivity and absolute thermoelectric power characterizes advantageously the (change of) phase, probably as well as DSC (if not better), since the change of phases can be easily followed during several hours/days at constant temperature.

  3. Temporal variations in the mantle potential temperatures along the Northwest Hawaiian Ridge using olivine-liquid equilibria: Implications for Hawaiian plume melt flux variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tree, J. P.; Garcia, M. O.; Putirka, K. D.

    2013-12-01

    The Northwest Hawaiian Ridge extends 2800 km and comprises 47% of the total length of the Hawaiian-Emperor (H-E) Chain. The Ridge contains at least 52 volcanoes whose shape, volume, and distance from neighboring volcanoes vary markedly. The temporal melt flux variation of the H-E has been estimated with various geophysical methods involving fluid dynamics and lithospheric modeling. These models show a dramatic increase (up to 300%) in melt flux over the last 30 Myr. A potential explanation for the increase in melt flux is a temporal increase in the temperature of melting. Olivine thermometry offers the best method for evaluating mantle source temperature variations along the Ridge. An olivine-liquid equilibration temperature estimate can then be recast into a mantle potential temperature after accounting for the heat of fusion during mantle melting and decompression of the mantle as it follows an adiabat to the surface. New whole-rock XRF and olivine analyzes for 18 tholeiitic, three transitional tholeiites, and two picro-basalts from 11 volcanoes spanning the entire length of the Ridge from Middle Bank to Yuryaku (just south of the Bend) were made. These data were used to obtain a temperature estimate of the mantle during shield formation of each volcano. After screening samples for those in chemical equilibrium using a Rhodes diagram and assuming a Kdol-liq(Fe-Mg)=0.345 ×0.03, data from six volcanoes were input into the thermometers of Beattie (1993; Contrib. Mineral. Petr., 118, 103-111) and Putirka et al., (2007; Chemical Geology, 241, 177-206). The results were averaged to estimate mantle potential temperatures. These calculations yield mantle potential temperature estimates that vary positively with volcano volume (e.g., 1460oC at Yuryaku vs 1608-1630oC at Gardner Pinnacles, the largest volume seamount in the Ridge). These results suggest that temperature variations may be playing a significant role in modulating the melt flux of the Ridge. Seven more

  4. Mantle flow, volatiles, slab-surface temperatures and melting dynamics in the north Tonga Arc - Lau Backarc Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, S.; Caulfield, J.; Arculus, R. J.; Dale, C. W.; Jenner, F. E.; Pearce, J. A.; Macpherson, C.; Handley, H. K.

    2013-12-01

    The Fonualei Spreading Centre affords an excellent opportunity to evaluate geochemical changes with increasing depth to the slab in the Lau Backarc Basin. We present H2O and CO2 concentrations and Sr, Nd, Pb, Hf and U-Th-Ra isotope data for selected glasses as well as Hf isotope data from boninites and seamounts to the north of the Tonga Arc. The Pb and Hf isotope data are used to show that mantle flow is oriented to the southwest and that the tear in the northern end of the slab may not extend east as far as the boninite locality. Along the Fonualei Spreading Centre, key geochemical parameters change smoothly with increasing distance from the arc front and increasing slab surface temperatures. The latter may range from 720 to 865 C, based on decreasing H2O/Ce ratios. Consistent with experimental data, the geochemical trends are interpreted to reflect changes in the amount and composition of wet pelite melts or super-critical fluids and aqueous fluids derived from the slab. With one exception, all of the lavas preserve both 238U excesses and 226Ra excesses. We suggest that lavas from the Fonualei Spreading Centre and Valu Fa Ridge are dominated by fluid-fluxed melting whereas those from the East and Central Lau Spreading Centres, where slab surface temperatures exceed ~ 850-900 C, are largely derived through decompression. A similar observation is found for the Manus and East Scotia backarc basins and may reflect the expiry of a key phase such as lawsonite in the subducted basaltic crust.

  5. Investigation of Biodiesel Through Photopyroelectric and Dielectric-Constant Measurements as a Function of Temperature: Freezing/Melting Interval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanelato, E. B.; Machado, F. A. L.; Rangel, A. B.; Guimarães, A. O.; Vargas, H.; da Silva, E. C.; Mansanares, A. M.

    2015-06-01

    Biodiesel is a promising option for alternative fuels since it derives from natural and renewable materials; it is biodegradable and less polluting than fossil fuels. A gradual replacement of diesel by biodiesel has been adopted by many countries, making necessary the investigation of the physical properties of biodiesel and of its mixture in diesel. Photothermal techniques, specifically the photopyroelectric technique (PPE), have proved to be suitable in the characterization of biodiesel and of its precursor oils, as well as of the biodiesel/diesel mixtures. In this paper, we investigate thermal and electrical properties of animal fat-based biodiesel as a function of temperature, aiming to characterize the freezing/melting interval and the changes in the physical properties from the solid to the liquid phase. The samples were prepared using the transesterification method, by the ethylic route. Optical transmittance experiments were carried out in order to confirm the phase transition interval. Solid and liquid phases present distinct thermal diffusivities and conductivities, as well as dielectric constants. The PPE signal amplitude is governed by the changes in the thermal diffusivity/conductivity. As a consequence, the amplitude of the signal becomes like a step function, which is smoothed and sometimes delayed by the nucleation processes during cooling. A similar behavior is found in the dielectric constant data, which is higher in the liquid phase since the molecules have a higher degree of freedom. Both methods (PPE/dielectric constant) proved to be useful in the characterization of the freezing/melting interval, as well as to establish the distinction in the physical properties of solid and liquid phases. The methodology allowed a discussion of the cloud point and the pour point of the samples in the temperature variation interval.

  6. Temperature dependence of the crystal-liquid interfacial free energy and the endpoint of the melting line

    SciTech Connect

    Baidakov, Vladimir G. Protsenko, Sergey P.; Tipeev, Azat O.

    2013-12-14

    The crystal–liquid interfacial free energy γ has been calculated as a function of the crystal orientation in a molecular dynamics experiment in a system of Lennard-Jones (LJ) particles with a cutoff radius of the potential r{sub c}{sup *}=r{sub c}/σ=6.78 at a triple-point temperature T{sub t}{sup *}=k{sub B}T{sub t}/ε=0.692 and temperatures above (in the region of the stable coexistence of liquid and solid phases) and below (metastable continuation of the coexistence curve of liquid and solid phases) the temperature T{sub t}{sup *}. At T{sup *}=T{sub t}{sup *}, for determining γ use was made of the method of cleaving potential. The temperature dependence of γ on the crystal–liquid coexistence curve has been determined by the Gibbs-Cahn thermodynamic integration method. In the region of stable phase coexistence (T{sup *}>T{sub t}{sup *}) good agreement with the data of Davidchack and Laird [J. Chem. Phys. 118, 7651 (2003)] has been obtained with respect to the character of the temperature dependence of γ and the orientation anisotropy. In the region of metastable phase coexistence (T{sup *}melting line (T{sub K}{sup *}=0.529) (the existence of which was established first by Baidakov and Protsenko [Phys. Rev. Lett. 95, 015701 (2005)]) the interfacial free energy decreases, approaching at T{sup *}=T{sub K}{sup *} the orientation-averaged value γ{sub 0K}{sup *}=γ{sub 0K}σ{sup 2}/ε=0.365. The paper discusses the behavior of the excess interfacial energy, excess interfacial entropy and excess interfacial stress on the metastable extension of the melting line and close to T{sup *}=T{sub K}{sup *}.

  7. Electronic correlations determine the phase stability of iron up to the melting temperature

    PubMed Central

    Leonov, I.; Poteryaev, A. I.; Gornostyrev, Yu. N.; Lichtenstein, A. I.; Katsnelson, M. I.; Anisimov, V. I.; Vollhardt, D.

    2014-01-01

    We present theoretical results on the high-temperature phase stability and phonon spectra of paramagnetic bcc iron which explicitly take into account many-body effects. Several peculiarities, including a pronounced softening of the [110] transverse (T1) mode and a dynamical instability of the bcc lattice in harmonic approximation are identified. We relate these features to the α-to-γ and γ-to-δ phase transformations in iron. The high-temperature bcc phase is found to be highly anharmonic and appears to be stabilized by the lattice entropy. PMID:24998330

  8. 46 CFR 153.908 - Cargo viscosity and melting point information; measuring cargo temperature during discharge...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... sensor or thermometer required by § 153.440(a)(3) or (c). If a portable thermometer is used, it must be located as prescribed for the temperature sensor in § 153.440(a)(3). (2) A total of 2 readings must...

  9. Microstructure and elevated temperature wear behavior of induction melted Fe-based composite coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Ge; Meng, Huimin; Liu, Junyou

    2014-10-01

    Fe-based composite coating prepared onto the component of guide wheel using ultrasonic frequency inductive cladding (UFIC) technique has been investigated in terms of microstructure, phase constitutions, microhardness and elevated temperature wear behavior by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive spectrometer (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Vickers microhardness tester and ball-on-disc wear tester. The results indicated that the primary phase in the coating contained austenite γ-Fe, eutectic γ-Fe/(Cr,Fe)2B, boride (Cr,Fe)2B and precipitation enriched in Mo. The average microhardness of the coating was 760 ± 10 HV0.2, which was three times higher than that of the substrate. With increasing temperature, the friction coefficients of the coating and high-chromium cast iron decreased gradually while the wear rates increased during dry sliding wear condition. The relative wear resistance of the coating was 1.63 times higher than that of the high-chromium cast iron at 500 °C, which was ascribed to the hard borides with high thermal stability uniformly embedded in the coating and the formation of dense transfer layer formed onto the worn surface. The high temperature wear mechanism of the coating was dominated by mild abrasive wear. The study revealed that Fe-based composite coating had excellent high temperature wear resistance under dry sliding wear condition.

  10. Does Ice Dissolve or Does Halite Melt? A Low-Temperature Liquidus Experiment for Petrology Classes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brady, John B.

    1992-01-01

    Measurement of the compositions and temperatures of H2O-NaCl brines in equilibrium with ice can be used as an easy in-class experimental determination of a liquidus. This experiment emphasizes the symmetry of the behavior of brines with regard to the minerals ice and halite and helps to free students from the conceptual tethers of one-component…

  11. High Temperature Tensile Properties and Fatigue Behavior of a Melt-Infiltrated SiC/SiC Composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalluri, Sreeramesh; Calomino, Anthony M.; Brewer, David N.; Kiraly, Louis J. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    High temperature fatigue behavior of a woven, SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composite (CMC) was investigated in air at two temperatures. The reinforcement for the CMC consisted of 5HS Sylramic(Trademark) fabric with a [0deg/90deg]4s lay-up. The SiC matrix material was infiltrated into the fiber-preform with a slurry-cast, melt-infiltration process. Tensile and fatigue test specimens were machined from the CMC plates. Initially tensile tests were conducted to obtain the average values of tensile properties at 1038 and 1204 C. Subsequently, low-cycle fatigue (LCF) tests with zero and two-hour hold-times at the maximum stress were conducted at the same two temperatures. Fatigue life data generated in the LCF tests were used to determine the geometric mean fatigue lives. In this paper, the tensile behavior and the fatigue durability of the CMC determined under different loading conditions are documented. In addition, reductions observed in the cyclic lives of the composite due to the two hour hold-time at maximum tensile stress are discussed.

  12. Thermodynamics of Oligonucleotide Duplex Melting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schreiber-Gosche, Sherrie; Edwards, Robert A.

    2009-01-01

    Melting temperatures of oligonucleotides are useful for a number of molecular biology applications, such as the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Although melting temperatures are often calculated with simplistic empirical equations, application of thermodynamics provides more accurate melting temperatures and an opportunity for students to apply…

  13. Satellite-derived, melt-season surface temperature of the Greenland Ice Sheet (2000-2005) and its relationship to mass balance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hall, D.K.; Williams, R.S., Jr.; Casey, K.A.; DiGirolamo, N.E.; Wan, Z.

    2006-01-01

    Mean, clear-sky surface temperature of the Greenland Ice Sheet was measured for each melt season from 2000 to 2005 using Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS)-derived land-surface temperature (LST) data-product maps. During the period of most-active melt, the mean, clear-sky surface temperature of the ice sheet was highest in 2002 (-8.29 ?? 5.29??C) and 2005 (-8.29 ?? 5.43??C), compared to a 6-year mean of -9.04 ?? 5.59??C, in agreement with recent work by other investigators showing unusually extensive melt in 2002 and 2005. Surface-temperature variability shows a correspondence with the dry-snow facies of the ice sheet; a reduction in area of the dry-snow facies would indicate a more-negative mass balance. Surface-temperature variability generally increased during the study period and is most pronounced in the 2005 melt season; this is consistent with surface instability caused by air-temperature fluctuations. Copyright 2006 by the American Geophysical Union.

  14. Medium decoupling of dynamics at temperatures ˜100 K above glass-transition temperature: A case study with (acetamide + lithium bromide/nitrate) melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guchhait, Biswajit; Daschakraborty, Snehasis; Biswas, Ranjit

    2012-05-01

    Time-resolved fluorescence Stokes shift and anisotropy measurements using a solvation probe in [0.78CH3CONH2 + 0.22{f LiBr + (1-f) LiNO3}] melts reveal a strong decoupling of medium dynamics from viscosity. Interestingly, this decoupling has been found to occur at temperatures ˜50-100 K above the glass transition temperatures of the above melt at various anion concentrations (fLiBr). The decoupling is reflected via the following fractional viscosity dependence (η) of the measured average solvation and rotation times (⟨τs⟩ and ⟨τr⟩, respectively): ⟨τx⟩ ∝ (η/T)p (x being solvation or rotation), with p covering the range, 0.20 < p < 0.70. Although this is very similar to what is known for deeply supercooled liquids, it is very surprising because of the temperature range at which the above decoupling occurs for these molten mixtures. The kinship to the supercooled liquids is further exhibited via p which is always larger for ⟨τr⟩ than for ⟨τs⟩, indicating a sort of translation-rotation decoupling. Multiple probes have been used in steady state fluorescence measurements to explore the extent of static heterogeneity. Estimated experimental dynamic Stokes shift for coumarin 153 in these mixtures lies in the range, 1000 < Δνt/cm-1 < 1700, and is in semi-quantitative agreement with predictions from our semi-molecular theory. The participation of the fluctuating density modes at various length-scales to the observed solvation times has also been investigated.

  15. Using Raman scattering to detect nanoscale liquid structure in high temperature melts and track solidification during the subcritical size stages of nucleation using bismuth germanate and n-alkanes melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosquera Vargas, Edgar Eduardo

    Freezing is the most relevant phase transition for materials scientists. Identification of structures in melts and tracking of their evolution from the early stages of pre-nucleation to the formation of the first phase is an experimental challenge. Knowledge about this evolution is essential to predict the relation between the properties of materials obtained by solidification process from the melt and the conditions used to synthesize them. For example, when cooling from the melt, some materials might crystallize into metastable forms. These are transient phases that convert to a stable form at some posterior stage of the solidification. Identification of transient states is key to understanding the nucleation and crystallization phenomena. Experimental studies of liquid structure of freezing melts are traditionally conducted by X-ray and neutron scattering techniques, using intense synchrotron and reactor sources. The main limitation of these techniques is that nucleation is a stochastic event. Therefore, any single crystalline phase in the liquid will only be observed in a diffraction pattern if oriented at the correct angle between the source and the detector. Therefore, researches must conduct many times the same experiment to have a chance to detect the phases. Moreover, a quantitative interpretation is impossible for realistic experimental time; therefore, the intensity of the diffracting peaks cannot be related to the fraction of crystallized fraction in the melt. We propose to use Raman spectroscopy to study the evolution of liquid structure during the freezing process. To our best knowledge, Raman spectroscopy has not been used to study the evolution of the liquid structure in freezing melts, although it has been extensively used to study the dynamics of many solutions at controlled temperature and pressures conditions, demonstrating to be very useful to even determine interactions between phases at molecular levels. We use Raman spectroscopy to study the

  16. Predicting critical temperatures of ionic and non-ionic fluids from thermophysical data obtained near the melting point.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Volker C

    2015-10-14

    In the correlation and prediction of thermophysical data of fluids based on a corresponding-states approach, the critical temperature Tc plays a central role. For some fluids, in particular ionic ones, however, the critical region is difficult or even impossible to access experimentally. For molten salts, Tc is on the order of 3000 K, which makes accurate measurements a challenging task. Room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) decompose thermally between 400 K and 600 K due to their organic constituents; this range of temperatures is hundreds of degrees below recent estimates of their Tc. In both cases, reliable methods to deduce Tc based on extrapolations of experimental data recorded at much lower temperatures near the triple or melting points are needed and useful because the critical point influences the fluid's behavior in the entire liquid region. Here, we propose to employ the scaling approach leading to universal fluid behavior [Román et al., J. Chem. Phys. 123, 124512 (2005)] to derive a very simple expression that allows one to estimate Tc from the density of the liquid, the surface tension, or the enthalpy of vaporization measured in a very narrow range of low temperatures. We demonstrate the validity of the approach for simple and polar neutral fluids, for which Tc is known, and then use the methodology to obtain estimates of Tc for ionic fluids. When comparing these estimates to those reported in the literature, good agreement is found for RTILs, whereas the ones for the molten salts NaCl and KCl are lower than previous estimates by 10%. The coexistence curve for ionic fluids is found to be more adequately described by an effective exponent of βeff = 0.5 than by βeff = 0.33. PMID:26472385

  17. Platinum group metal particles aggregation in nuclear glass melts under the effect of temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanotin, Caroline; Puig, Jean; Neyret, Muriel; Marchal, Philippe

    2016-08-01

    The viscosity of simulated high level radioactive waste glasses containing platinum group metal particles is studied over a wide range of shear stress, as a function of the particles content and the temperature, thanks to a stress imposed rheometer, coupled to a high-temperature furnace. The system shows a very shear thinning behavior. At high shear rate, the system behaves as a suspension of small clusters and individual particles and is entirely controlled by the viscosity of the glass matrix as classical suspensions. At low shear rate, above a certain fraction in platinum group metal particles, the apparition of macroscopic aggregates made up of chains of RuO2 particles separated by thin layers of glass matrix strongly influences the viscosity of the nuclear glass and leads, in particular, to the apparition of yield stress and thixotropic effects. The maximum size of these clusters as well as their effective volume fraction have been estimated by a balance between Van der Waals attractive forces and hydrodynamic forces due to shear flow. We showed experimentally and theoretically that this aggregation phenomenon is favored by an increase of the temperature, owing to the viscosity decrease of the glass matrix, leading to an unusual increase of the suspension viscosity.

  18. Temperature measurements of partially-melted tin as a function of shock pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Seifter, Achim; Furlanetto, Michael R; Holtkamp, David B; Obst, Andrew W; Payton, J R; Stone, J B; Tabaka, L J; Grover, M; Macrum, G; Stevens, G D; Swift, D C; Turley, W D; Veeser, L R

    2009-01-01

    Equilibrium equation of state theory predicts that the free surface release temperature of shock loaded tin will show a plateau of 505 K in the pressure range from 19.5 to 33.0 GPa, corresponding to the solid-liquid mixed-phase region. In this paper we report free surface temperature measurements on shock-loaded tin from 15 to 31 GPa using multi-wavelength optical pyrometry. The shock waves were generated by direct contact of detonating high explosive with the sample. The pressure in the sample was determined by free surface velocity measurements using Photon Doppler Velocimetry. The emitted thermal radiance was measured at four wavelength bands in the near IR region from 1.5 to 5.0 {micro}m. The samples in most of the experiments had diamond-turned surface finishes, with a few samples being polished or ball rolled. At pressures higher than 25 GPa the measured free surface temperatures were higher than the predicted 505 K and increased with increasing pressure. This deviation could be explained by hot spots and/or variations in surface emissivity and requires a further investigation.

  19. Long-period upper mesosphere temperature and plasma scale height variations derived from VHF meteor radar and LF absolute reflection height measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobi, C.; Kürschner, D.

    2006-09-01

    The change of ionospheric absolute reflection heights h of low-frequency (LF) radio waves at oblique incidence in the course of the day is measured at Collm Observatory (51.3° N, 13.0° E) using 1.8 kHz sideband phase comparisons between the sky-wave and the ground wave of a commercial 177 kHz transmitter (Zehlendorf, reflection point at 52.1° N, 13.2° E). Plasma scale height estimates H are calculated from the decrease/increase of h in the morning/evening. The day-to-day variations of H are compared with those of daily mean temperatures at 90 km, measured with a VHF meteor radar (36.2 MHz) at Collm and using the amplitude decay of meteor reflections. A good qualitative correspondence is found between the two data sets. Since mesospheric long-period temperature variations are generally accepted to be the signature of atmospheric planetary waves, this shows that LF reflection height measurements can be used for monitoring the dynamics of the upper middle atmosphere.

  20. Metal-Hydrogen Phase Diagrams in the Vicinity of Melting Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Shapovalov, V.I.

    1999-01-06

    Hydrogen-metal interaction phenomena belong to the most exciting challenges of today's physical metallurgy and physics of solids due to the uncommon behavior of hydrogen in condensed media and to the need for understanding hydrogen's strong negative impact on properties of some high-strength steels and.alloys. The paper cites and summarizes research data on fundamental thermodynamic characteristics of hydrogen in some metals that absorb it endothermally at elevated temperatures. For a number of metal-hydrogen systems, information on some phase diagrams previously not available to the English-speaking scientific community is presented.

  1. Gallium melts under high-pressure and temperature conditions: Synchrotron x-ray tomography and diffraction studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, L. L.; Liu, H.

    2014-12-01

    Gallium has a rare water-ice type P-V-T phase diagram in which the density of Ga melt exceeds by about 3 % that of the stable solid Ga phase I at ambient pressure. Liquid gallium, which is easily supercooled, can remain in a metastable liquid state for several months at ambient pressure. A rich polymorphism and metastable modifications of Ga have been discovered in P-T domain. There are a number of studies of liquid gallium under high pressure conditions, but some fundamental properties, such as the equation of state (EoS) of liquid Ga under extreme conditions remain unclear. Very recently, the advanced pair distribution function (PDF) method in which synchrotron high-energy x-ray total scattering data, combined with reverse Monte Carlo simulation, was used to study the microstructure and EoS of liquid gallium under high pressure conditions. However, the application of PDF method for amorphous or liquid samples under pressure conditions normally required a priori knowledge of their EoS. The density estimation from the reverse Monte Carlo simulation with the best mathematical fit to the measured structure factor data could cause big errors if it is calculated without knowing the EoS. In the paper, the volume change of liquid and solid gallium have been studied as a function of pressure and temperature up to 3.63 GPa using synchrotron x-ray microtomography combined with energy dispersive x-ray diffraction (EDXRD) techniques. Two sets of directly measured P-V data at 300 K and 330 K were obtained from 3D tomography reconstruction data. The existence of a liquid-liquid phase transition region is proposed based on the abnormal compressibility of Ga melt at about 2.44 GPa and 330 K conditions.

  2. Reduction in mechanical anisotropy through high temperature heat treatment of Hastelloy X processed by Selective Laser Melting (SLM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etter, T.; Kunze, K.; Geiger, F.; Meidani, H.

    2015-04-01

    Selective Laser Melting (SLM) is an additive manufacturing technology used to directly produce metallic parts from thin powder layers. To evaluate the anisotropic mechanical properties, tensile test specimens of the Ni-base alloy Hastelloy X were built with the loading direction oriented either parallel (z-specimens) or perpendicular to the build-up direction (xy- specimens). Specimens were investigated in the “as-built” condition and after high temperature heat treatment. Tensile tests at room temperature and at 850°C of “as-built” material have shown different mechanical properties for z- and xy-specimens. The anisotropy is reflected in the Young's modulus, with lower values measured parallel to the build-up direction. It is shown that the anisotropy is significantly reduced by a subsequent recrystallization heat treatment. The characterization of microstructural and textural anisotropy was done by Electron Back Scatter Diffraction (EBSD) analysis. Predictions of Young's modulus calculated from the measured textures compare well with the data from tensile tests.

  3. Selective laser melting additive manufactured Inconel 718 superalloy parts: High-temperature oxidation property and its mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Qingbo; Gu, Dongdong

    2014-10-01

    This work presented a comprehensive study of high-temperature oxidation behaviors and mechanisms of Selective laser melting (SLM) processed Inconel 718 superalloy parts using different methods including isothermal oxidation testing, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The experimental results revealed that the oxidation process of the tested parts processed at a lower volumetric laser energy density experienced the severe spallation. On reasonably increasing the applied volumetric laser energy density, the oxidation kinetics of the as-produced parts obeyed a parabolic law, exhibiting the significantly improved oxidation resistance performance. The constitutional phases within the oxidation film were identified and the corresponding formation mechanisms were elucidated in detail according to the thermodynamic principles. The cross-sectional morphologies of oxidized Inconel 718 parts indicated that the oxidation microstructure mainly consisted of an external oxidation layer and an internal oxidation zone. The oxidation process was controlled by the outward diffusion of oxide forming elements and inward penetration of oxygen, by which the interaction mechanisms between the microstructures and internal oxidation zones were clarified. On the basis of the experimental results and theoretical analyses, the physical oxidation mechanisms were accordingly established to illustrate the oxidation behaviors of SLM-processed Inconel 718 parts at elevated operative temperatures.

  4. Teaching Absolute Value Meaningfully

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wade, Angela

    2012-01-01

    What is the meaning of absolute value? And why do teachers teach students how to solve absolute value equations? Absolute value is a concept introduced in first-year algebra and then reinforced in later courses. Various authors have suggested instructional methods for teaching absolute value to high school students (Wei 2005; Stallings-Roberts…

  5. Contributed Review: Absolute spectral radiance calibration of fiber-optic shock-temperature pyrometers using a coiled-coil irradiance standard lamp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fat'yanov, O. V.; Asimow, P. D.

    2015-10-01

    We describe an accurate and precise calibration procedure for multichannel optical pyrometers such as the 6-channel, 3-ns temporal resolution instrument used in the Caltech experimental geophysics laboratory. We begin with a review of calibration sources for shock temperatures in the 3000-30 000 K range. High-power, coiled tungsten halogen standards of spectral irradiance appear to be the only practical alternative to NIST-traceable tungsten ribbon lamps, which are no longer available with large enough calibrated area. However, non-uniform radiance complicates the use of such coiled lamps for reliable and reproducible calibration of pyrometers that employ imaging or relay optics. Careful analysis of documented methods of shock pyrometer calibration to coiled irradiance standard lamps shows that only one technique, not directly applicable in our case, is free of major radiometric errors. We provide a detailed description of the modified Caltech pyrometer instrument and a procedure for its absolute spectral radiance calibration, accurate to ±5%. We employ a designated central area of a 0.7× demagnified image of a coiled-coil tungsten halogen lamp filament, cross-calibrated against a NIST-traceable tungsten ribbon lamp. We give the results of the cross-calibration along with descriptions of the optical arrangement, data acquisition, and processing. We describe a procedure to characterize the difference between the static and dynamic response of amplified photodetectors, allowing time-dependent photodiode correction factors for spectral radiance histories from shock experiments. We validate correct operation of the modified Caltech pyrometer with actual shock temperature experiments on single-crystal NaCl and MgO and obtain very good agreement with the literature data for these substances. We conclude with a summary of the most essential requirements for error-free calibration of a fiber-optic shock-temperature pyrometer using a high-power coiled tungsten halogen

  6. Contributed Review: Absolute spectral radiance calibration of fiber-optic shock-temperature pyrometers using a coiled-coil irradiance standard lamp.

    PubMed

    Fat'yanov, O V; Asimow, P D

    2015-10-01

    We describe an accurate and precise calibration procedure for multichannel optical pyrometers such as the 6-channel, 3-ns temporal resolution instrument used in the Caltech experimental geophysics laboratory. We begin with a review of calibration sources for shock temperatures in the 3000-30,000 K range. High-power, coiled tungsten halogen standards of spectral irradiance appear to be the only practical alternative to NIST-traceable tungsten ribbon lamps, which are no longer available with large enough calibrated area. However, non-uniform radiance complicates the use of such coiled lamps for reliable and reproducible calibration of pyrometers that employ imaging or relay optics. Careful analysis of documented methods of shock pyrometer calibration to coiled irradiance standard lamps shows that only one technique, not directly applicable in our case, is free of major radiometric errors. We provide a detailed description of the modified Caltech pyrometer instrument and a procedure for its absolute spectral radiance calibration, accurate to ±5%. We employ a designated central area of a 0.7× demagnified image of a coiled-coil tungsten halogen lamp filament, cross-calibrated against a NIST-traceable tungsten ribbon lamp. We give the results of the cross-calibration along with descriptions of the optical arrangement, data acquisition, and processing. We describe a procedure to characterize the difference between the static and dynamic response of amplified photodetectors, allowing time-dependent photodiode correction factors for spectral radiance histories from shock experiments. We validate correct operation of the modified Caltech pyrometer with actual shock temperature experiments on single-crystal NaCl and MgO and obtain very good agreement with the literature data for these substances. We conclude with a summary of the most essential requirements for error-free calibration of a fiber-optic shock-temperature pyrometer using a high-power coiled tungsten halogen

  7. Contributed Review: Absolute spectral radiance calibration of fiber-optic shock-temperature pyrometers using a coiled-coil irradiance standard lamp

    SciTech Connect

    Fat’yanov, O. V. Asimow, P. D.

    2015-10-15

    We describe an accurate and precise calibration procedure for multichannel optical pyrometers such as the 6-channel, 3-ns temporal resolution instrument used in the Caltech experimental geophysics laboratory. We begin with a review of calibration sources for shock temperatures in the 3000-30 000 K range. High-power, coiled tungsten halogen standards of spectral irradiance appear to be the only practical alternative to NIST-traceable tungsten ribbon lamps, which are no longer available with large enough calibrated area. However, non-uniform radiance complicates the use of such coiled lamps for reliable and reproducible calibration of pyrometers that employ imaging or relay optics. Careful analysis of documented methods of shock pyrometer calibration to coiled irradiance standard lamps shows that only one technique, not directly applicable in our case, is free of major radiometric errors. We provide a detailed description of the modified Caltech pyrometer instrument and a procedure for its absolute spectral radiance calibration, accurate to ±5%. We employ a designated central area of a 0.7× demagnified image of a coiled-coil tungsten halogen lamp filament, cross-calibrated against a NIST-traceable tungsten ribbon lamp. We give the results of the cross-calibration along with descriptions of the optical arrangement, data acquisition, and processing. We describe a procedure to characterize the difference between the static and dynamic response of amplified photodetectors, allowing time-dependent photodiode correction factors for spectral radiance histories from shock experiments. We validate correct operation of the modified Caltech pyrometer with actual shock temperature experiments on single-crystal NaCl and MgO and obtain very good agreement with the literature data for these substances. We conclude with a summary of the most essential requirements for error-free calibration of a fiber-optic shock-temperature pyrometer using a high-power coiled tungsten halogen

  8. Evidence for a Phase Transition in Silicate Melt at Extreme Pressure and Temperature Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spaulding, D. K.; McWilliams, R. S.; Jeanloz, R.; Eggert, J. H.; Celliers, P. M.; Hicks, D. G.; Collins, G. W.; Smith, R. F.

    2012-02-01

    Laser-driven shock compression experiments reveal the presence of a phase transition in MgSiO3 over the pressure-temperature range 300-400 GPa and 10 000-16 000 K, with a positive Clapeyron slope and a volume change of ˜6.3 (±2.0) percent. The observations are most readily interpreted as an abrupt liquid-liquid transition in a silicate composition representative of terrestrial planetary mantles, implying potentially significant consequences for the thermal-chemical evolution of extrasolar planetary interiors. In addition, the present results extend the Hugoniot equation of state of MgSiO3 single crystal and glass to 950 GPa.

  9. Greater absolute rates of N2O production and consumption with soil warming dwarf variations in denitrification enzyme temperature sensitivities across seasons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiemann, L. K.; Billings, S. A.

    2010-12-01

    denitrification (i.e. consumption of gross N2O production into N2) to a greater degree, and permit release of a relatively smaller proportion of the nitrate they consumed as N2O; b) the suite of enzymes responsible for N2O production and the one enzyme responsible for its consumption exhibit differential temperature sensitivities in their production and expression during winter months, but the sensitivity of these processes converges during warmer seasons; c) in spite of the smaller proportion of NO3- released as N2O with warming, warming’s positive influence on the amount of NO3- transformed by denitrifying organisms resulted in far greater absolute quantities of N2O released with incubation and seasonal warming. Continuing work explores the influence that temperature may exert on the relative abundances of denitrifying populations and their gene expression, and links these microbial characteristics to denitrification processes with warming. These data signify the importance of understanding enzyme kinetics in concert with microbial adaptation and acclimation as a factor governing the net fluxes of N2O from soil vs. its transformation into N2 with warming.

  10. Bubble nucleation in H2O-CO2 bearing basaltic melts: results of high temperature decompression experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Gall, N.; Pichavant, M.; Burgisser, A.

    2012-12-01

    Previous experiments have shown that mechanisms of basalt degassing are strongly contrasted when gas bubbles are present or when they are absent. Thus, experimental information on the kinetics of bubble nucleation in basaltic melts is needed, and high temperature decompression experiments have been investigated. All experiments used PST-9 basaltic pumice from Stromboli as starting material. The sample was fused in air at 1400°C for 3h and then cylinders (l up to 10mm, d 2.5 and 5mm) were cored. Synthesis experiments were performed to produce the volatile-bearing melts to be used in the decompression experiments. Glass cores, distilled H2O and Ag2C2O4 were loaded in AuPd capsules. Three different H2O/CO2 were introduced, corresponding to XH2Oin=1 (#1: only H2O dissolved in glass), 0.55 (#2: high dissolved H2O/CO2), 0 (#3: low dissolved H2O/CO2). The synthesis experiments were ran at 1200°C during about 40h in an internally heated vessel pressurized with Ar-H2. The synthesized crystal- and bubble-free glasses were cut in 2 parts: one for the decompression experiments and the other for the analysis. Decompression experiments were conducted at a fast rate of 39kPa/s, exceptionally of 77.8kPa/s, at 1200°C from an initial pressure (Pin) of 200MPa and to final pressures (Pf) of 200, 150, 100 and 50MPa. Experiments to 25MPa are in progress. Each run included 3 capsules, corresponding to the 3 XH2Oin conditions of glass synthesis, allowing results for the 3 H2O/CO2 to be directly compared. Charges were rapid-quenched immediately after attainment of Pf. Textures were analyzed by X-ray microtomography, and volatile concentrations and spatial distributions in pre- and post-decompression glasses were determined by FTIR. Pre-decompression glasses have homogeneous volatile contents and distributions. They divide into 3 compositional groups consistent with their XH2Oin conditions of synthesis: group #1 (average H2O content=4.82wt%, average CO2 content=0ppm), group #2 (2.15wt

  11. Ligand induced stabilization of the melting temperature of the HSV-1 single-strand DNA binding protein using the thermal shift assay.

    PubMed

    Rupesh, Kanchi Ravi; Smith, Aaron; Boehmer, Paul E

    2014-11-01

    We have adapted the thermal shift assay to measure the ligand binding properties of the herpes simplex virus-1 single-strand DNA binding protein, ICP8. By measuring SYPRO Orange fluorescence in microtiter plates using a fluorescence-enabled thermal cycler, we have quantified the effects of oligonucleotide ligands on the melting temperature of ICP8. We found that single-stranded oligomers raise the melting temperature of ICP8 in a length- and concentration-dependent manner, ranging from 1°C for (dT)5 to a maximum of 9°C with oligomers ⩾10 nucleotides, with an apparent Kd of <1μM for (dT)20. Specifically, the results indicate that ICP8 is capable of interacting with oligomers as short as 5 nucleotides. Moreover, the observed increases in melting temperature of up to 9°C, indicates that single-strand DNA binding significantly stabilizes the structure of ICP8. This assay may be applied to investigate the ligand binding proteins of other single-strand DNA binding proteins and used as a high-throughput screen to identify compounds with therapeutic potential that inhibit single-strand DNA binding. As proof of concept, the single-strand DNA binding agent ciprofloxacin reduces the ligand induced stabilization of the melting temperature of ICP8 in a dose-dependent manner. PMID:25449284

  12. Ligand induced stabilization of the melting temperature of the HSV-1 single-strand DNA binding protein using the thermal shift assay

    PubMed Central

    Rupesh, Kanchi Ravi; Smith, Aaron; Boehmer, Paul E.

    2014-01-01

    We have adapted the thermal shift assay to measure the ligand binding properties of the herpes simplex virus-1 single-strand DNA binding protein, ICP8. By measuring SYPRO Orange fluorescence in microtiter plates using a fluorescence-enabled thermal cycler, we have quantified the effects of oligonucleotide ligands on the melting temperature of ICP8. We found that single-stranded oligomers raise the melting temperature of ICP8 in a length- and concentration-dependent manner, ranging from 1 °C for (dT)5 to a maximum of 9 °C with oligomers ≥10 nucleotides, with an apparent Kd of <1 µM for (dT)20. Specifically, the results indicate that ICP8 is capable of interacting with oligomers as short as 5 nucleotides. Moreover, the observed increases in melting temperature of up to 9 °C, indicates that single-strand DNA binding significantly stabilizes the structure of ICP8. This assay may be applied to investigate the ligand binding proteins of other single-strand DNA binding proteins and used as a high-throughput screen to identify compounds with therapeutic potential that inhibit single-strand DNA binding. As proof of concept, the single-strand DNA binding agent ciprofloxacin reduces the ligand induced stabilization of the melting temperature of ICP8 in a dose-dependent manner. PMID:25449284

  13. On the influence of debris in glacier melt modelling: a new temperature-index model accounting for the debris thickness feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carenzo, Marco; Mabillard, Johan; Pellicciotti, Francesca; Reid, Tim; Brock, Ben; Burlando, Paolo

    2013-04-01

    The increase of rockfalls from the surrounding slopes and of englacial melt-out material has led to an increase of the debris cover extent on Alpine glaciers. In recent years, distributed debris energy-balance models have been developed to account for the melt rate enhancing/reduction due to a thin/thick debris layer, respectively. However, such models require a large amount of input data that are not often available, especially in remote mountain areas such as the Himalaya. Some of the input data such as wind or temperature are also of difficult extrapolation from station measurements. Due to their lower data requirement, empirical models have been used in glacier melt modelling. However, they generally simplify the debris effect by using a single melt-reduction factor which does not account for the influence of debris thickness on melt. In this paper, we present a new temperature-index model accounting for the debris thickness feedback in the computation of melt rates at the debris-ice interface. The empirical parameters (temperature factor, shortwave radiation factor, and lag factor accounting for the energy transfer through the debris layer) are optimized at the point scale for several debris thicknesses against melt rates simulated by a physically-based debris energy balance model. The latter has been validated against ablation stake readings and surface temperature measurements. Each parameter is then related to a plausible set of debris thickness values to provide a general and transferable parameterization. The new model is developed on Miage Glacier, Italy, a debris cover glacier in which the ablation area is mantled in near-continuous layer of rock. Subsequently, its transferability is tested on Haut Glacier d'Arolla, Switzerland, where debris is thinner and its extension has been seen to expand in the last decades. The results show that the performance of the new debris temperature-index model (DETI) in simulating the glacier melt rate at the point scale

  14. A full-dimensional model of ozone forming reaction: the absolute value of the recombination rate coefficient, its pressure and temperature dependencies.

    PubMed

    Teplukhin, Alexander; Babikov, Dmitri

    2016-07-28

    Rigorous calculations of scattering resonances in ozone are carried out for a broad range of rotational excitations. The accurate potential energy surface of Dawes is adopted, and a new efficient method for calculations of ro-vibrational energies, wave functions and resonance lifetimes is employed (which uses hyper-spherical coordinates, the sequential diagonalization/truncation approach, grid optimization and complex absorbing potential). A detailed analysis is carried out to characterize distributions of resonance energies and lifetimes, their rotational/vibrational content and their positions with respect to the centrifugal barrier. Emphasis is on the contribution of these resonances to the recombination process that forms ozone. It is found that major contributions come from localized resonances at energies near the top of the barrier. Delocalized resonances at higher energies should also be taken into account, while very narrow resonances at low energies (trapped far behind the centrifugal barrier) should be treated as bound states. The absolute value of the recombination rate coefficient, its pressure and temperature dependencies are obtained using the energy-transfer model developed in the earlier work. Good agreement with experimental data is obtained if one follows the suggestion of Troe, who argued that the energy transfer mechanism of recombination is responsible only for 55% of the recombination rate (with the remaining 45% coming from the competing chaperon mechanism). PMID:27364351

  15. Temperature of Earth's core constrained from melting of Fe and Fe0.9Ni0.1 at high pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Dongzhou; Jackson, Jennifer M.; Zhao, Jiyong; Sturhahn, Wolfgang; Alp, E. Ercan; Hu, Michael Y.; Toellner, Thomas S.; Murphy, Caitlin A.; Prakapenka, Vitali B.

    2016-08-01

    The melting points of fcc- and hcp-structured Fe0.9Ni0.1 and Fe are measured up to 125 GPa using laser heated diamond anvil cells, synchrotron Mössbauer spectroscopy, and a recently developed fast temperature readout spectrometer. The onset of melting is detected by a characteristic drop in the time-integrated synchrotron Mössbauer signal which is sensitive to atomic motion. The thermal pressure experienced by the samples is constrained by X-ray diffraction measurements under high pressures and temperatures. The obtained best-fit melting curves of fcc-structured Fe and Fe0.9Ni0.1 fall within the wide region bounded by previous studies. We are able to derive the γ-ɛ-l triple point of Fe and the quasi triple point of Fe0.9Ni0.1 to be 110 ± 5GPa, 3345 ± 120K and 116 ± 5GPa, 3260 ± 120K, respectively. The measured melting temperatures of Fe at similar pressure are slightly higher than those of Fe0.9Ni0.1 while their one sigma uncertainties overlap. Using previously measured phonon density of states of hcp-Fe, we calculate melting curves of hcp-structured Fe and Fe0.9Ni0.1 using our (quasi) triple points as anchors. The extrapolated Fe0.9Ni0.1 melting curve provides an estimate for the upper bound of Earth's inner core-outer core boundary temperature of 5500 ± 200K. The temperature within the liquid outer core is then approximated with an adiabatic model, which constrains the upper bound of the temperature at the core side of the core-mantle boundary to be 4000 ± 200K. We discuss a potential melting point depression caused by light elements and the implications of the presented core-mantle boundary temperature bounds on phase relations in the lowermost part of the mantle.

  16. Structural behavior of Al 3+ in silicate melts: In situ, high-temperature measurements as a function of bulk chemical composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mysen, Bjorn

    1995-02-01

    The anionic structure of aluminosilicate melts has been determined along the join Li 2Si 2O 5Li 2(LiAl) 2O 5 (LS2-LA2) with microRaman spectroscopy in the temperature range 25°-1460°C. Those data are compared with the structural behavior of melts along the join Na 2Si 2O 5Na 2(NaAl) 2O 5 (NS2-NA2) in the same temperature interval. In these systems, Li' and Na + serve both to charge-balance Al 3+ in tetrahedral coordination and as network-modifiers. The NBO/ T ( T = Si + Al) equals unity in the Al/(Al + Si) range examined (0-0.3). In the Al-free endmember glass and melt systems, the three species, Q4, Q3, and Q2 coexist and the expression, (1) 2 Q3 ⇔ Q2 + Q4, describes the equilibrium. Substitution of Na- or Li-charge-balanced Al 3+ for Si 4+ results in stabilization of an additional, more depolymerized structural unit, Q1. An additional equilibrium, (2) 2 Q2 ⇔ Q1 + Q3, is needed, therefore, for a complete description of the equilibria. In the LS2-LA2 system, the ΔH for this latter reaction ( ΔH2) ranges between ˜0 and -87 kJ/mol and is negatively correlated with Al/(Al + Si). In the NS2-NA2 system, the ΔH2 is positive with values between 16 and 37 kJ/mol and is positively correlated with Al/(Al + Si). Equilibrium (1) is affected by equilibrium (2) in the Al-bearing melts, so that in the NS2-NA2 melt system, equilibrium (1) shifts to the left with temperature ( ΔH1 = -10--15 kJ/mol), whereas in the LS2-LA2 system, equilibrium (1) shifts more strongly to the right with temperature than in the absence of Al ( ΔH1 is positively correlated with Al/(Al + Si) with values in the range 6-48 kJ/mol). Activity coefficients for Q2 units in the melts calculated from liquidus phase relations in combination with the determined mol fractions of structural units in the melts show simple relations between activity coefficient of the unit and its molar abundance in the melts.

  17. Melting Temperature Mapping Method: A Novel Method for Rapid Identification of Unknown Pathogenic Microorganisms within Three Hours of Sample Collection

    PubMed Central

    Niimi, Hideki; Ueno, Tomohiro; Hayashi, Shirou; Abe, Akihito; Tsurue, Takahiro; Mori, Masashi; Tabata, Homare; Minami, Hiroshi; Goto, Michihiko; Akiyama, Makoto; Yamamoto, Yoshihiro; Saito, Shigeru; Kitajima, Isao

    2015-01-01

    Acquiring the earliest possible identification of pathogenic microorganisms is critical for selecting the appropriate antimicrobial therapy in infected patients. We herein report the novel “melting temperature (Tm) mapping method” for rapidly identifying the dominant bacteria in a clinical sample from sterile sites. Employing only seven primer sets, more than 100 bacterial species can be identified. In particular, using the Difference Value, it is possible to identify samples suitable for Tm mapping identification. Moreover, this method can be used to rapidly diagnose the absence of bacteria in clinical samples. We tested the Tm mapping method using 200 whole blood samples obtained from patients with suspected sepsis, 85% (171/200) of which matched the culture results based on the detection level. A total of 130 samples were negative according to the Tm mapping method, 98% (128/130) of which were also negative based on the culture method. Meanwhile, 70 samples were positive according to the Tm mapping method, and of the 59 suitable for identification, 100% (59/59) exhibited a “match” or “broad match” with the culture or sequencing results. These findings were obtained within three hours of whole blood collection. The Tm mapping method is therefore useful for identifying infectious diseases requiring prompt treatment. PMID:26218169

  18. Power-law dependence of the melting temperature of ubiquitin on the volume fraction of macromolecular crowders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waegele, Matthias M.; Gai, Feng

    2011-03-01

    The dependence of the melting temperature increase (ΔTm) of the protein ubiquitin on the volume fraction (φ) of several commonly used macromolecular crowding agents (dextran 6, 40, and 70 and ficoll 70) was quantitatively examined and compared to a recently developed theoretical crowding model, i.e., ΔTm ˜ (Rg/Rc)αφα/3. We found that in the current case this model correctly predicts the power-law dependence of ΔTm on φ but significantly overestimates the role of the size (i.e., Rc) of the crowding agent. In addition, we found that for ubiquitin the exponent α is in the range of 4.1-6.5, suggesting that the relation of α = 3/(3ν - 1) is a better choice for estimating α based on the Flory coefficient (ν) of the polypeptide chain. Taken together these findings highlight the importance of improving our knowledge and theoretical treatment of the microcompartmentalization of the commonly used model crowding agents.

  19. Eosinophil count - absolute

    MedlinePlus

    Eosinophils; Absolute eosinophil count ... the white blood cell count to give the absolute eosinophil count. ... than 500 cells per microliter (cells/mcL). Normal value ranges may vary slightly among different laboratories. Talk ...

  20. Effects of temperature, silicate melt composition, and oxygen fugacity on the partitioning of V, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Mo, Ag, Sn, Sb, W, Au, Pb, and Bi between sulfide phases and silicate melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yuan; Audétat, Andreas

    2015-08-01

    In order to assess the role of sulfide in controlling the ore metal budgets and fractionation during magmatic genesis and differentiation, the partition coefficients (D) of V, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Mo, Ag, Sn, Sb, W, Au, Pb, and Bi between sulfide liquid (SL), monosulfide solid solution (MSS), and basaltic to rhyolitic melts (SM) were determined at 900-1200 °C, 0.5-1.5 GPa, and oxygen fugacity (fO2) ranging from ∼FMQ-2 to FMQ+3, in a piston-cylinder apparatus. The DSL/SM values range from 0.4 to 2 for V, 0.5 to 3 for Mn, 80 to 580 for Co, 2300 to 18,000 for Ni, 800 to 4600 for Cu, 1 to 11 for Zn, 20 to 180 for As, 4 to 230 for Mo, 450 to 1600 for Ag, 5 to 24 for Sn, 10 to 80 for Sb, 0.03 to 0.16 for W, 2000 to 29,000 for Au, 24 to 170 for Pb, and 830 to 11,000 for Bi; whereas the DMSS/SM values range from 0.04 to 10 for V, 0.5 to 10 for Mn, 70 to 2500 for Co, 650 to 18,000 for Ni, 280 to 42,000 for Cu, 0.1 to 80 for Zn, 0.2 to 30 for As, 1 to 820 for Mo, 20 to 500 for Ag, 0.2 to 220 for Sn, 0.1 to 40 for Sb, 0.01 to 24 for W, 10 to 2000 for Au, 0.03 to 6 for Pb, and 1 to 350 for Bi. Both DMSS/SM and DSL/SM values generally increase with decreasing temperature or decreasing FeOtot content in silicate melt, except for Mo, DMSS/SM and DSL/SM of which show a clear decrease with decreasing temperature. At given temperature and FeOtot content, high oxygen fugacity appears to lead to a significant decrease in DMSS/SM of Au, Bi, Mo, and potentially As. The partitioning data obtained experimentally in this study and previous studies were fitted to an empirical equation that expresses the DMSS/SM and/or DSL/SM of a given element as a function of temperature, oxygen fugacity, and FeOtot content of the silicate melt: log (DSL/SMorDMSS/SM = d + a · 10, 000 / T + b · (ΔFMQ) + c · log (FeOmelt) in which T is temperature in K, FeOmelt denotes wt% FeOtot in silicate melt, and ΔFMQ denotes log fO2 relative to the fayalite-magnetite-quartz (FMQ) oxygen buffer. The

  1. Temperature induced changes on the structure and the dynamics of the ``tetrahedral'' glasses and melts of ZnCl2 and ZnBr2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yannopoulos, S. N.; Kalampounias, A. G.; Chrissanthopoulos, A.; Papatheodorou, G. N.

    2003-02-01

    Glassy, supercooled, and molten ZnCl2 and ZnBr2 have been studied by Raman spectroscopy over the broad temperature range -196 to 800 °C in an effort to follow in detail the structural changes caused by temperature variation. A systematic study has also been undertaken for the corresponding crystalline polymorphs showing that each material exists in only one crystalline phase if water traces are not present. The reduced isotropic and anisotropic Raman spectra of the ZnCl2 and ZnBr2 glasses and melts are isomorphous. Unusually drastic changes of the relative intensities of particular bands occur with temperature in the reduced isotropic spectra. A comparison between the spectral features of crystals, glasses, and melts has revealed that the network structure of the glasses and melts consists of ZnX4/2 (X=Br,Cl) tetrahedra bound to each other by apex- and edge-bridged halides. The substructure of the glass/melt is formed by mixing a variety of tetrahedra participating in "open," "cluster," and "chain" networks which are bound to each other by bridged halides. The boundaries of the substructure involve neutral or charged terminal halide bonds with zinc of an average threefold coordination. Temperature rise breaks up the substructure to smaller fragments, increases the number of terminal bonds, and rearranges the apex- and edge-bridging networks. The good glass-forming ability of the ZnX2 melts is attributed to the existence and mixing of the three topologically different networks within the substructure. Our data of ZnCl2 are in qualitative agreement with molecular dynamics simulations as regards the frequency distribution of vibrational modes. However, simulations are not able to correctly predict polarization properties in the glass and the melt. The low-frequency Raman spectra reveal the presence of the Boson peak in both glasses, which interestingly persists, well resolved, also into the normal liquid state above the melting point. The spectra in the region of the

  2. Melt containment member

    SciTech Connect

    Rieken, Joel R.; Heidloff, Andrew J.

    2014-09-09

    A tubular melt containment member for transient containment of molten metals and alloys, especially reactive metals and alloys, includes a melt-contacting layer or region that comprises an oxygen-deficient rare earth oxide material that is less reactive as compared to the counterpart stoichiometric rare earth oxide. The oxygen-deficient (sub-stoichiometric) rare earth oxide can comprise oxygen-deficient yttria represented by Y.sub.2O.sub.3-x wherein x is from 0.01 to 0.1. Use of the oxygen-deficient rare earth oxide as the melt-contacting layer or region material reduces reaction with the melt for a given melt temperature and melt contact time.

  3. Effect of composition and temperature on the properties of High-Level Waste (HLW) glasses melting above 1200{degrees}C (Draft)

    SciTech Connect

    Vienna, J.D.; Hrma, P.R.; Schweiger, M.J.

    1996-02-01

    Increasing the melting temperature of HLW glass allows an increase of waste loading (thus reducing product volume) and the production of more durable glasses at a faster melting rate. However, HLW glasses that melt at high temperatures differ in composition from glasses formulated for low temperature ({approximately}1150{degree}C). Consequently, the composition of high-temperature glasses falls in a region previously not well tested or understood. This report represents a preliminary study of property/composition relationships of high-temperature Hanford HLW glasses using a one-component-at-a-time change approach. A test matrix has been designed to explore a composition region expected for high-temperature high-waste loading HLW glasses to be produced at Hanford. This matrix was designed by varying several key components (SiO{sub 2}, B{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Na{sub 2}O, Li{sub 2}O, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, ZrO{sub 2}, Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3}, P{sub 2}O{sub 5}, UO{sub 2}, TiO{sub 2}, Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and others) starting from a glass based on a Hanford HLW all-blend waste. Glasses were fabricated and tested for viscosity, glass transition temperature, electrical conductivity, crystallinity, liquidus temperature, and PCT release. The effect of individual components on glass properties was assessed using first- and second- order empirical models. The first-order component effects were compared with those from low-temperature HLW glasses.

  4. P-V-T-X evolution of olivine-hosted melt inclusions during high-temperature homogenization treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiavi, Federica; Provost, Ariel; Schiano, Pierre; Cluzel, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    During low-high temperature (T) cycles imposed on olivine-hosted melt inclusions (MIs) we observe a systematic increase in homogenization temperature (Th) with time, regardless of their initial major-element and H2O contents. Bubble persistence at high T suggests that inclusion internal pressure (Pint) is lower than its original, trapping pressure. We explore how reversible and irreversible processes modify the composition (X), volume (V) and Pint of heated MIs, and compare the results of theoretical modeling with experimental observations of MIs from FAMOUS Zone (FZ, Mid-Atlantic Ridge) and La Sommata (SOM, Vulcano, Aeolian Islands) basaltic samples. Due to olivine dissolution at inclusion walls and thermoelastic deformation, Pint-V-X conditions change significantly upon heating. Olivine dissolution induces changes in major-element composition (i.e., enrichment in Fe and Mg), morphology and volume (up to +25% at 1500 °C). We provide equations for the thermoelastic deformation of olivine bearing a two-phase, liquid-gas inclusion for the end-member cases of chemical equilibrium and no exchange between gas and liquid. These equations allow Pint-V evolution to be related to variations in bubble volume fraction. Upon heating, both Pint and V variations are smaller in the presence of a gas bubble than for a homogeneous liquid inclusion, at the same T. Dissolution-reprecipitation and thermoelastic deformation of the olivine host are reversible processes, so initial Pint-V-X conditions are restored upon cooling. On the contrary, water loss from MIs and plastic deformation of the olivine host are processes that irreversibly lower Pint, and account for the systematic increase of Th with time. Our theoretical and experimental investigations suggest that the increase of Th in volatile-rich SOM MIs is mainly related to progressive release of water. Compared to larger MIs located at a similar distance from the olivine rim, smaller MIs show a faster increase in Th with time

  5. The Influence of the Melt-Pouring Temperature and Inoculant Content on the Macro and Microstructure of the IN713C Ni-Based Superalloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matysiak, Hubert; Zagorska, Malgorzata; Balkowiec, Alicja; Adamczyk-Cieslak, Boguslawa; Dobkowski, Krzysztof; Koralnik, Mateusz; Cygan, Rafal; Nawrocki, Jacek; Cwajna, Jan; Kurzydlowski, Krzysztof J.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this work was to determine the effect of melt-pouring temperature T m and inoculant (cobalt aluminate—CoAl2O4) concentration in the prime coat of the shell mold on the macro- and microstructure of the IN713C superalloy. The results show that cobalt aluminate is an effective modifier of the IN713C superalloy, which causes refinement of the equiaxed grains (EX) and a reduction of the fraction and size of the columnar grains on the casting surface. Also, the melt-pouring temperature in the range of 1450-1520°C was found to influence the mean EX grain size. Based on the results of differential thermal analysis of the alloy and detailed microstructure characterization, a sequence of precipitations has been proposed that advances current understanding of processes that take place during alloy solidification and casting cooling.

  6. Temperature Dependence of Behavior of Interface Between Molten Sn and LiCl-KCl Eutectic Melt Due to Rising Gas Bubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natsui, Shungo; Nashimoto, Ryota; Takai, Hifumi; Kumagai, Takehiko; Kikuchi, Tatsuya; Suzuki, Ryosuke O.

    2016-06-01

    The behavior of the interface between molten Sn and the LiCl-KCl eutectic melt system was observed directly. We found that the transient behavior of the interface exhibits considerable temperature dependence through a change in its physical properties. The "metal film" generated in the upper molten salt phase significantly influences the shape of the interface. Although the lifetime of the metal film depends on the gas flow rate, it is not affected by the buoyancy if the interfacial tension is dominant.

  7. Improvements in the realization of the ITS-90 over the temperature range from the melting point of gallium to the freezing point of silver at NIM

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, J.; Zhang, J. T.; Ping, Q.

    2013-09-11

    The temperature primary standard over the range from the melting point of gallium to the freezing point of silver in National institute of Metrology (NIM), China, was established in the early 1990s. The performance of all of fixed-point furnaces degraded and needs to be updated due to many years of use. Nowadays, the satisfactory fixed point materials can be available with the development of the modern purification techniques. NIM plans to use a group of three cells for each defining fixed point temperature. In this way the eventual drift of individual cells can be evidenced by periodic intercomparison and this will increase the reliability in disseminating the ITS-90 in China. This article describes the recent improvements in realization of ITS-90 over temperature range from the melting point of gallium to the freezing point of silver at NIM. Taking advantages of the technological advances in the design and manufacture of furnaces, the new three-zone furnaces and the open-type fixed points were developed from the freezing point of indium to the freezing point of silver, and a furnace with the three-zone semiconductor cooling was designed to automatically realize the melting point of gallium. The reproducibility of the new melting point of gallium and the new open-type freezing points of In, Sn, Zn. Al and Ag is improved, especially the freezing points of Al and Ag with the reproducibility of 0.2mK and 0.5mK respectively. The expanded uncertainty in the realization of these defining fixed point temperatures is 0.34mK, 0.44mK, 0.54mK, 0.60mK, 1.30mK and 1.88mK respectively.

  8. Viscosity Measurement for Tellurium Melt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Bochuan; Li, Chao; Ban, Heng; Scripa, Rosalia N.; Su, Ching-Hua; Lehoczky, Sandor L.

    2006-01-01

    The viscosity of high temperature Te melt was measured using a new technique in which a rotating magnetic field was applied to the melt sealed in a suspended ampoule, and the torque exerted by rotating melt flow on the ampoule wall was measured. Governing equations for the coupled melt flow and ampoule torsional oscillation were solved, and the viscosity was extracted from the experimental data by numerical fitting. The computational result showed good agreement with experimental data. The melt velocity transient initiated by the rotating magnetic field reached a stable condition quickly, allowing the viscosity and electrical conductivity of the melt to be determined in a short period.

  9. Absolute nuclear material assay

    DOEpatents

    Prasad, Manoj K.; Snyderman, Neal J.; Rowland, Mark S.

    2012-05-15

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  10. Absolute nuclear material assay

    DOEpatents

    Prasad, Manoj K.; Snyderman, Neal J.; Rowland, Mark S.

    2010-07-13

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  11. Use of DNA melting simulation software for in silico diagnostic assay design: targeting regions with complex melting curves and confirmation by real-time PCR using intercalating dyes

    PubMed Central

    Rasmussen, John P; Saint, Christopher P; Monis, Paul T

    2007-01-01

    Background DNA melting curve analysis using double-stranded DNA-specific dyes such as SYTO9 produce complex and reproducible melting profiles, resulting in the detection of multiple melting peaks from a single amplicon and allowing the discrimination of different species. We compare the melting curves of several Naegleria and Cryptosporidium amplicons generated in vitro with in silico DNA melting simulations using the programs POLAND and MELTSIM., then test the utility of these programs for assay design using a genetic marker for toxin production in cyanobacteria. Results The SYTO9 melting curve profiles of three species of Naegleria and two species of Cryptosporidium were similar to POLAND and MELTSIM melting simulations, excepting some differences in the relative peak heights and the absolute melting temperatures of these peaks. MELTSIM and POLAND were used to screen sequences from a putative toxin gene in two different species of cyanobacteria and identify regions exhibiting diagnostic melting profiles. For one of these diagnostic regions the POLAND and MELTSIM melting simulations were observed to be different, with POLAND more accurately predicting the melting curve generated in vitro. Upon further investigation of this region with MELTSIM, inconsistencies between the melting simulation for forward and reverse complement sequences were observed. The assay was used to accurately type twenty seven cyanobacterial DNA extracts in vitro. Conclusion Whilst neither POLAND nor MELTSIM simulation programs were capable of exactly predicting DNA dissociation in the presence of an intercalating dye, the programs were successfully used as tools to identify regions where melting curve differences could be exploited for diagnostic melting curve assay design. Refinements in the simulation parameters would be required to account for the effect of the intercalating dye and salt concentrations used in real-time PCR. The agreement between the melting curve simulations for

  12. Investigation of the rate-controlling mechanism(s) for high temperature creep and the relationship between creep and melting by use of high pressure as a variable. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-12-31

    Using high pressure as a variable, the rate-controlling mechanism for high temperature creep and the relationship between creep and melting is investigated for silicon and nickel. An apparatus is used in which the samples are heated to melting point and subjected to 1 to 3 GigaPascal pressure. The stress behavior of the materials are then studied.

  13. In situ X-ray observations of the melting relations in the Fe-S-H system under high pressure and high temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibazaki, Y.; Stagno, V.; Higo, Y.; Fei, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Sulfur and hydrogen are two of the most plausible light elements in the planetary cores. Particularly the cores of icy satellites, such as Ganymede, are considered to contain a significant amount of those elements based on studies of meteorites. Therefore, it is essential to investigate the properties of iron alloyed with those light elements at high pressure and high temperature, in order to shed light on the composition and structure of the cores. To date, the Fe-FeS system has been extensively investigated at high pressure and temperature. Hydrogen is known to dissolve in interstitial sites of Fe and FeS lattices and strongly depresses the melting temperatures. However, it is still not clear how hydrogen affects the eutectic point (temperature and composition) of the Fe-FeS system. In order to understand the melting relations in the Fe-S-H system, we have performed in situ X-ray diffraction experiments at high pressure and high temperature. The experiments were carried out using the multi-anvil apparatus at the BL04B1 beamline of SPring-8, Japan, up to 10 GPa and 1700 K. Fe-FeS powder mixtures (15.5 wt% S and 30 wt %S) were packed into a NaCl capsule along with LiAlH4. Hydrogen was supplied to the Fe-FeS sample by a thermal decomposition of LiAlH4. The Fe-FeS sample was separated from LiAlH4 using a thin MgO disk to avoid the direct chemical reaction between the sample and LiAlH4. The NaCl capsule is able to seal hydrogen effectively at high pressure and high temperature. The diffraction patterns were collected for a period of 300 s at a temperature interval of 50-100 K. The collected diffraction data show that FeHx and FeSHx were synthesized at high temperature and then the sample was totally molten via a partial melting with increasing temperature. Since the atomic volumes of Fe and FeS expand due to the hydrogen dissolution (hydrogenation), the hydrogen concentrations in FeHx and FeSHx were estimated by comparing the volumes of between Fe and FeHx or between

  14. Pressure-temperature-time-deformation path of kyanite-bearing migmatitic paragneiss in the Kali Gandaki valley (Central Nepal): Investigation of Late Eocene-Early Oligocene melting processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iaccarino, Salvatore; Montomoli, Chiara; Carosi, Rodolfo; Massonne, Hans-Joachim; Langone, Antonio; Visonà, Dario

    2015-08-01

    Kyanite-bearing migmatitic paragneiss of the lower Greater Himalayan Sequence (GHS) in the Kali Gandaki transect (Central Himalaya) was investigated. In spite of the intense shearing, it was still possible to obtain many fundamental information for understanding the processes active during orogenesis. Using a multidisciplinary approach, including careful meso- and microstructural observations, pseudosection modelling (with PERPLE_X), trace element thermobarometry and in situ monazite U-Th-Pb geochronology, we constrained the pressure-temperature-time-deformation path of the studied rock, located in a structural key position. The migmatitic gneiss has experienced protracted prograde metamorphism after the India-Asia collision (50-55 Ma) from ~ 43 Ma to 28 Ma. During the late phase (36-28 Ma) of this metamorphism, the gneiss underwent high-pressure melting at "near peak" conditions (710-720 °C/1.0-1.1 GPa) leading to kyanite-bearing leucosome formation. In the time span of 25-18 Ma, the rock experienced decompression and cooling associated with pervasive shearing reaching P-T conditions of 650-670 °C and 0.7-0.8 GPa, near the sillimanite-kyanite transition. This time span is somewhat older than previously reported for this event in the study area. During this stage, additional, but very little melt was produced. Taking the migmatitic gneiss as representative of the GHS, these data demonstrate that this unit underwent crustal melting at about 1 GPa in the Eocene-Early Oligocene, well before the widely accepted Miocene decompressional melting related to its extrusion. In general, kyanite-bearing migmatite, as reported here, could be linked to the production of the high-Ca granitic melts found along the Himalayan belt.

  15. Monitoring snow melt characteristics on the Greenland ice sheet using a new MODIS land surface temperature and emissivity product (MOD21)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hulley, G. C.; Hall, D. K.; Hook, S. J.

    2013-12-01

    Land Surface Temperature (LST) and emissivity are sensitive energy-balance parameters that control melt and energy exchange between the surface and the atmosphere. MODIS LST is currently used to monitor melt zones on glaciers and can be used for glacier or ice sheet mass balance calculations. Much attention has been paid recently to the warming of the Arctic in the context of global warming, with a focus on the Greenland ice sheet because of its importance with sea-level rise. Various researchers have shown a steady decline in the extent of the Northern Hemisphere sea ice, both the total extent and the extent of the perennial or multiyear ice. Surface melt characteristics over the Greenland ice sheet have been traditionally monitored using the MODIS LST and albedo products (e.g. MOD11 and MOD10A1). Far fewer studies have used thermal emissivity data to monitor surface melt characteristics due to the lack of suitable data. In theory, longwave emissivity combined with LST information should give a more direct measure of snow melt characteristics since the emissivity is an intrinsic property of the surface, whereas the albedo is dependent on other factors such as solar zenith angle, and shadowing effects. Currently no standard emissivity product exists that can dynamically retrieve changes in longwave emissivity consistently over long time periods. This problem has been addressed with the new MOD21 product, which uses the ASTER TES algorithm to dynamically retrieve LST and spectral emissivity (bands 29, 31, 32) at 1-km resolution. In this study we show that using a new proposed index termed the snow emissivity difference index (SEDI) derived from the MOD21 longwave emissivity product, combined with the LST, will improve our understanding of snow melt and freezeup dynamics on ice sheets such as Greenland. The results also suggest that synergistic use of both thermal-based and albedo data will help to improve our understanding of snow melt dynamics on glaciers and ice

  16. Thermodynamics of Glass Melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conradt, Reinhard

    First, a model based on linear algebra is described by which the thermodynamic properties of industrial multi-component glasses and glass melts can be accurately predicted from their chemical composition. The model is applied to calculate the heat content of glass melts at high temperatures, the standard heat of formation of glasses from the elements, and the vapor pressures of individual oxides above the melt. An E-fiber glass composition is depicted as an example. Second, the role of individual raw materials in the melting process of E-glass is addressed, with a special focus on the decomposition kinetics and energetic situation of alkaline earth carriers. Finally, the heat of the batch-to-melt conversion is calculated. A simplified reaction path model comprising heat turnover, content of residual solid matter, and an approach to batch viscosity is outlined.

  17. Evolution of the microstructure and hardness of a rapidly solidified/melt-spun AZ91 alloy upon aging at different temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Baishu; Liu Yongbing; An Jian; Li Rongguang; Su Zhenguo; Su Guihua; Lu You; Cao Zhanyi

    2009-04-15

    The effect of aging at different temperatures on a rapidly solidified/melt-spun AZ91 alloy has been investigated in depth. The microstructures of as-spun and aged ribbons with a thickness of approximately 60 {mu}m were characterized using X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and laser optical microscopy; microhardness measurements were also conducted. It was found that the commercial AZ91 alloy undergoes a cellular/dendritic transition during melt-spinning at a speed of 34 m/s. A strengthening effect due to aging was observed: a maximum hardness of 110 HV/0.05 and an age-hardenability of 50% were obtained when the ribbon was aged at 200 deg. C for 20 min. The {beta}-Mg{sub 17}Al{sub 12} phase exhibits net and dispersion types of distribution during precipitation. The dispersion of precipitates in dendritic grains or cells is the main source of strengthening.

  18. In-situ temperature field measurements and direct observation of crystal/melt at vertical Bridgman growth of lead chloride under stationary and dynamic arrangement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Král, Robert; Nitsch, Karel

    2015-10-01

    Influence of growth conditions, i.e. temperature gradient in the furnace and the pulling rate, on the position and the shape of the crystal/melt interface during vertical Bridgman growth was studied. The position and the shape of the crystal/melt interface are a key factor for describing the final quality of growing crystal. Following two methods for characterization of its position and shape were used: (i) direct observation and (ii) direct temperature field measurement during simulated vertical Bridgman growth. As a model compound a lead chloride is used. Three different ampoule positions in two different temperature gradients in the furnace and two experimental arrangements - stationary (0 mm/h pulling rate) and dynamic (3 mm/h pulling rate) were analyzed. Obtained temperature data were projected as 2D planar cut under radial symmetry and denoted as isolevels. Their further conversion by linear approximation into isotherms allowed detail analysis of heat conditions in the system during simulated growth by comparison of isotherms 500 °C (m.p. of lead chloride) at different growth conditions.

  19. Melting line of polymeric nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakub, L. N.

    2013-05-01

    We made an attempt to predict location of the melting line of polymeric nitrogen using two equations for Helmholtz free energy: proposed earlier for cubic gauche-structure and developed recently for liquid polymerized nitrogen. The P-T relation, orthobaric densities and latent heat of melting were determined using a standard double tangent construction. The estimated melting temperature decreases with increasing pressure, alike the temperature of molecular-nonmolecular transition in solid. We discuss the possibility of a triple point (solid-molecular fluid-polymeric fluid) at ˜80 GPa and observed maximum of melting temperature of nitrogen.

  20. On-Orbit Absolute Radiance Standard for Future IR Remote Sensing Instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Best, F. A.; Adler, D. P.; Pettersen, C.; Revercomb, H. E.; Gero, P. J.; Taylor, J. K.; Knuteson, R. O.; Perepezko, J. H.

    2010-12-01

    Future NASA infrared remote sensing missions, including the climate benchmark CLARREO mission will require better absolute measurement accuracy than now available, and will most certainly rely on the emerging capability to fly SI traceable standards that provide irrefutable absolute measurement accuracy. As an example, instrumentation designed to measure spectrally resolved infrared radiances with an absolute brightness temperature error of better than 0.1 K will require high-emissivity (>0.999) calibration blackbodies with emissivity uncertainty of better than 0.06%, and absolute temperature uncertainties of better than 0.045K (3 sigma). Key elements of an On-Orbit Absolute Radiance Standard (OARS) meeting these stringent requirements have been demonstrated in the laboratory at the University of Wisconsin and are undergoing Technology Readiness Level (TRL) advancement under the NASA Instrument Incubator Program (IIP). We present the new technologies that underlie the OARS and the results of laboratory testing that demonstrate the required accuracy is being met. The underlying technologies include on-orbit absolute temperature calibration using the transient melt signatures of small quantities (<1g) of reference materials (gallium, water, and mercury) imbedded in the blackbody cavity; and on-orbit cavity spectral emissivity measurement using a heated halo. For these emissivity measurements, a carefully baffled heated cylinder is placed in front of a blackbody in the infrared spectrometer system, and the combined radiance of the blackbody and Heated Halo reflection is observed. Knowledge of key temperatures and the viewing geometry allow the blackbody cavity spectral emissivity to be calculated. This work will culminate with an integrated subsystem that can provide on-orbit end-to-end radiometric accuracy validation for infrared remote sensing instruments.

  1. On-Orbit Absolute Radiance Standard for the Next Generation of IR Remote Sensing Instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Best, F. A.; Adler, D. P.; Pettersen, C.; Revercomb, H. E.; Gero, P.; Taylor, J. K.; Knuteson, R. O.; Perepezko, J. H.

    2011-12-01

    The next generation of infrared remote sensing satellite instrumentation, including climate benchmark missions will require better absolute measurement accuracy than now available, and will most certainly rely on the emerging capability to fly SI traceable standards that provide irrefutable absolute measurement accuracy. As an example, instrumentation designed to measure spectrally resolved infrared radiances with an absolute brightness temperature error of better than 0.1 K will require high-emissivity (>0.999) calibration blackbodies with emissivity uncertainty of better than 0.06%, and absolute temperature uncertainties of better than 0.045K (k=3). Key elements of an On-Orbit Absolute Radiance Standard (OARS) meeting these stringent requirements have been demonstrated in the laboratory at the University of Wisconsin and are undergoing further refinement under the NASA Instrument Incubator Program (IIP). This work will culminate with an integrated subsystem that can provide on-orbit end-to-end radiometric accuracy validation for infrared remote sensing instruments. We present the new technologies that underlie the OARS and updated results of laboratory testing that demonstrate the required accuracy. The underlying technologies include on-orbit absolute temperature calibration using the transient melt signatures of small quantities (<1g) of reference materials (gallium, water, and mercury) imbedded in the blackbody cavity; and on-orbit cavity spectral emissivity measurement using a heated halo. For these emissivity measurements, a carefully baffled heated cylinder is placed in front of a blackbody in the infrared spectrometer system, and the combined radiance of the blackbody and Heated Halo reflection is observed. Knowledge of key temperatures and the viewing geometry allow the blackbody cavity spectral emissivity to be calculated.

  2. On-Orbit Absolute Radiance Standard for the Next Generation of IR Remote Sensing Instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Best, F. A.; Adler, D. P.; Pettersen, C.; Revercomb, H. E.; Gero, P. J.; Taylor, J. K.; Knuteson, R. O.; Perepezko, J. H.

    2012-12-01

    The next generation of infrared remote sensing satellite instrumentation, including climate benchmark missions will require better absolute measurement accuracy than now available, and will most certainly rely on the emerging capability to fly SI traceable standards that provide irrefutable absolute measurement accuracy. As an example, instrumentation designed to measure spectrally resolved infrared radiances with an absolute brightness temperature error of better than 0.1 K will require high-emissivity (>0.999) calibration blackbodies with emissivity uncertainty of better than 0.06%, and absolute temperature uncertainties of better than 0.045K (k=3). Key elements of an On-Orbit Absolute Radiance Standard (OARS) meeting these stringent requirements have been demonstrated in the laboratory at the University of Wisconsin and are undergoing further refinement under the NASA Instrument Incubator Program (IIP). This work will culminate with an integrated subsystem that can provide on-orbit end-to-end radiometric accuracy validation for infrared remote sensing instruments. We present the new technologies that underlie the OARS and updated results of laboratory testing that demonstrate the required accuracy. The underlying technologies include on-orbit absolute temperature calibration using the transient melt signatures of small quantities (<1g) of reference materials (gallium, water, and mercury) imbedded in the blackbody cavity; and on-orbit cavity spectral emissivity measurement using a heated halo. For these emissivity measurements, a carefully baffled heated cylinder is placed in front of a blackbody in the infrared spectrometer system, and the combined radiance of the blackbody and Heated Halo reflection is observed. Knowledge of key temperatures and the viewing geometry allow the blackbody cavity spectral emissivity to be calculated.

  3. An effective utilization of the slag from acid leaching of coal-waste: preparation of water glass with a low-temperature co-melting reaction.

    PubMed

    Fang, Li; Duan, Xiaofang; Chen, Rongming; Cheng, Fangqin

    2014-08-01

    This paper presents an effective utilization of slag from acid leaching of coal-waste with a novel approach, namely low-temperature co-melting method, for preparation of sodium silicate (Na2O x nSiO2) using slag from acid leaching of coal-waste as feedstock. It is very interesting that the co-melting reaction temperature of the mixture of Na2CO3 and the feedstock (50-100 microm) was as low as 850 degrees C, which was significantly lower than the temperature used in traditional sodium silicate production (1400 degrees C). The optimum SiO2/Na2O ratio was identified as 7:3 according to the results of thermogravimetry-differential scanning calorimetry (TGA-DSC), ICP-AES, and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses. In this condition, the main product was sodium disilicate (Na2O x 2SiO2), with water solubility of 85.0%. More importantly, the impurities such as aluminum in the feedstock, which had adverse effect on subsequent treatment, were concentrated almost completely in the filter residue as insoluble sodium alumunosilicates, i.e., Na(Si2Al)O6 x H2O. The lower co-melting temperature of this process demonstrates a significant energy-saving opportunity and thus a promising approach for highly effective utilization of coal-waste. Implications: Recently, alumina extraction from coal-waste has been extensively investigated and industrial applied in China. However, the slag-containing silica generated from the acid leaching process of coal-waste led to a secondary pollution, which hindered large-scale production. The proposed low-temperature co-melting method for preparation of sodium silicate (Na2O x nSiO2) using slag from acid leaching of coal-waste as feedstock indicated that it is an efficient approach for the recovery of silica from the acid-leached slag of coal-waste with minimal environmental impact. PMID:25185391

  4. The formation of nuggets of highly siderophile elements in quenched silicate melts at high temperatures: Before or during the silicate quench?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malavergne, V.; Charon, E.; Jones, J.; Cordier, P.; Righter, K.; Deldicque, D.; Hennet, L.

    2016-01-01

    The Highly Siderophile Elements (HSE) are powerful tracers of planetary differentiation. Despite the importance of their partitioning between silicate and metal for the understanding of planetary core formation, especially for the Earth and Mars, there is still a huge discrepancy between conclusions based on different high temperature (HT) experimental studies. These disagreements may be due to the presence of HSE micro and nanonuggets in HT experiments. The formation of these nuggets is still interpreted in different ways. One hypothesis is that these HSE nuggets formed during the quench of the silicate melt, while another hypothesis supposes that these nuggets formed before the quench and represented artefacts of HT experiments. The goal of this work is to clarify whether the presence of HSE nuggets in silicate melts is linked to a quench effect or not. Understanding the formation of these HSE nuggets represents thus a necessary step towards the resolution of the Earth's core formation scenarios. We performed new HT experiments (1275-2000 °C) at different oxygen fugacities (fO2), between ambient air up to ∼5 log units below the Iron-Wüstite buffer [IW-5], for two different silicate compositions (synthetic martian and terrestrial basalts) mixed with a metallic mixture of Pt-Au-Pd-Ru. Our 1275-1600 °C experiments were contained in either olivine, diopside or graphite crucible; experiments at 2000 °C were performed using a levitation method, so no capsule was necessary. Our samples contained quenched silicate melts, minerals (olivine, pyroxene, spinel depending on the run), a two-phase metallic bead and nano and micro-nuggets of HSE. Our samples underwent fine textural, structural and analytical characterizations. The distribution of the nuggets was not homogeneous throughout the quenched silicate melt. HSE nuggets were present within crystals. Dendritic textures from the quenched silicate melt formed around HSE nuggets, which could be crystallized, showing

  5. Atomic scale modelling of chromium diffusion and melting in α-iron and iron-chromium alloys using high-temperature molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terentiev, Dmitri A.; Malerba, Lorenzo; Olsson, Par; Hou, Marc

    2004-04-01

    EAM interatomic potential to be used for radiation effect simulations in the Fe-Cr system has been recently proposed. In the present work, this potential is used to calculate by means of classical molecular dynamics (MD) the diffusivity of solute Cr atoms in Fe-12%Cr random alloy. Fe self-diffusivity is calculated as well, both in the alloy and in the pure metal, for comparison. In addition, the melting point for both the pure metal and the alloy, as predicted by the potential, has been determined and a comparison between the efficiency of vacancy and interstitial mechanisms for diffusion has been performed. This study allows the validity of the potential to be checked against experimental data outside its fitting range, while providing some insight into the description that this potential gives of irradiation effects. A correct prediction of the diffusivity of solute atoms at high temperature and the melting point are indeed an important pre-requisite for a correct prediction of ion mixing and point defect clustering within a displacement cascade during the thermal spike phase. The conclusion of the study is that the present potential is capable of reproducing with excellent accuracy both the diffusion coefficient and the melting point in Fe and in the Fe-Cr alloy. Atomic diffusion through interstitials is also seen to be a more efficient mechanism than through vacancies in the materials considered.

  6. Effects of water-saturation on strength and ductility of three igneous rocks at effective pressures to 50 MPA and temperatures to partial melting

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, S.J.; Friedman, M.; Handin, J.

    1981-01-01

    The short-term failure strengths and strains at failure of room-dry and water-saturated, cylindrical specimens (2 by 4 cm) of Charcoal Granodiorite (CG), Mt. Hood Andesite (MHA), and Cuerbio Basalt (CB) at a strain rate of 10/sup -4/s/sup -1/, at effective confining pressures of 0, 50, and 100 MPa and at temperatures to partial melting were investigated. Data from water-saturated specimens of the granodiorite and andesite, compared to room-dry counterparts, indicate (1) the pore pressures are essentially communicated throughout each test specimen so that they are fully effective; (2) at P/sub e/ = 0 and 50 MPa the granodiorite does not water-weaken; (3) at these same effective pressures the more porous and finer-grained andesite begins to exhibit water-weakening at about 600/sup 0/C; (4) at P/sub e/ = 0 and 870 to 900/sup 0/C the andesite's strength averages 20 MPa while the strength of dry specimens at the same P and T exhibit a strength of 100 MPa; (5) at P/sub e/ = 50 MPa compared to 160 MPa dry; (6) the basalt at P/sub e/ = 0, appears to be water-weakened at 800/sup 0/C; (7) water saturated specimens deformed at temperatures less than that of melting exhibit ultimate strengths at less than 2% shortening and then work-soften along faults; (8) again as do the dry counterparts, the wet specimens deform primarily by microscopic fracturing that coalesces into one or more macroscopic faults; and (9) the temperature for incipient melting of the andesite is decreased >150/sup 0/C in the water-saturated tests.

  7. Temperature-programed time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry study of 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium trifluoromethanesulfonate during glass-liquid transition, crystallization, melting, and solvation

    SciTech Connect

    Souda, Ryutaro; Guenster, Jens

    2008-09-07

    For this study, time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry was used to analyze the molecular orientation of 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium trifluoromethanesulfonate ([bmim][OTf]) and its interaction with the adsorbed Na and LiI species at temperatures of 150-300 K. A glassy [bmim][OTf] film crystallizes at around 230 K, as observed from the increase in the [bmim]{sup +} yield. LiI and Na adsorbed on the glassy film are solvated, whereas they tend to form islands on a crystalline film. The crystalline surface inertness is ascribable to the termination with the CF{sub 3} and C{sub 4}H{sub 9} groups, whereas the exposure of polar SO{sub 3} and imidazole groups at the glassy film results in the solvation. Surface layering occurs during solvation of LiI on the glassy film in such a way that the [bmim]{sup +} ([OTf]{sup -}) moiety is exposed to the vacuum (oriented to the bulk). The LiI adsorbed on the glassy film is incorporated into the bulk at temperatures higher than 200 K because of the glass-liquid transition. No further uptake of LiI is observed during crystallization, providing a contrast to the results of normal molecular solids such as water and ethanol. The surface layers of the crystal melt at temperatures below the bulk melting point, as confirmed from the dissolution of adsorbed LiI, but the melting layer retains a short-range order similar to the crystal. The [bmim][OTf] can be regarded as a strongly correlated liquid with the combined liquid property and crystal-type local structure. The origin of this behavior is discussed.

  8. Effects of water-saturation on strength and ductility of three igneous rocks at effective pressures to 50 MPa and temperatures to partial melting

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, S.J.; Friedman, M.; Handin, J.

    1981-01-01

    Instantaneous-failure strengths and ductilities of water-saturated cylindrical specimens of Charcoal Granodiorite, Mount Hood Andesite, and Cuerbio Basalt are determined at a strain rate of 10{sup -4}s{sup -1} and at effective confining pressures (Pe) of 0 and 50 MPa and at temperatures to partial melting. The data indicate: (1) at Pe = 0 and 50 MPa (Pc and Pp of 50 MPa and of 100 and 50 MPa, respectively) the granodiorite does not water-weaken; (2) at these same Pe the more porous and finer-grained andesite begins to exhibit water-weakening at about 600/sup 0/C; (3) at Pe = 0 and 870-900{sup 0}C the andesite's wet strength averages 20 MPa compared to 100 MPa, dry; (4) at Pe = 50 MPa and 920{sup 0}C its wet strength is 45 MPa compared to 160 MPa dry; (5) at Pe = 0, the basalt appears to be water-weakened above 800{sup 0}C; (6) water-saturated specimens deformed at temperatures less than T{sub m} exhibit ultimate strengths at less than 2 percent shortening and then work-soften along faults; and (7) both dry and wet specimens deform primarily by brittle fracture. Extrapolations indicate: (1) crystalline rocks should be drillable because they remain brittle until partial melting occurs, and penetration rates should increase with temperature because there is a corresponding decrease in brittle fracture strength; (2) boreholes in ''water-filled'' holes will be stable to >10 km at temperatures temperatures are kept to less than or equal to 700{sup 0}C, even open boreholes in granodiorite are apt to be stable to >10 km; and (4) open boreholes in the andesite are apt to be much less stable, and at similar temperatures would fail at 2 to 5-km depth.

  9. Optical emission, shock-induced opacity, temperatures, and melting of Gd3Ga5O12 single crystals shock-compressed from 41 to 290 GPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xianming; Nellis, William J.; Li, Jiabo; Li, Jun; Zhao, Wanguang; Liu, Xun; Cao, Xiuxia; Liu, Qiancheng; Xue, Tao; Wu, Qiang; Mashimo, T.

    2015-08-01

    Strong oxides at high shock pressures have broad crossovers from elastic solids at ambient to failure by plastic deformation, to heterogeneous deformation to weak solids, to fluid-like solids that equilibrate thermally in a few ns, to melting and, at sufficiently high shock pressures and temperatures, to metallic fluid oxides. This sequence of crossovers in single-crystal cubic Gd3Ga5O12 (Gd-Ga Garnet-GGG) has been diagnosed by fast emission spectroscopy using a 16-channel optical pyrometer in the spectral range 400-800 nm with bandwidths per channel of 10 nm, a writing time of ˜1000 ns and time resolution of 3 ns. Spectra were measured at shock pressures from 40 to 290 GPa (100 GPa = 1 Mbar) with corresponding gray-body temperatures from 3000 to 8000 K. Experimental lifetimes were a few 100 ns. Below 130 GPa, emission is heterogeneous and measured temperatures are indicative of melting temperatures in grain boundary regions rather than bulk temperatures. At 130 GPa and 2200 K, GGG equilibrates thermally and homogeneously in a thin opaque shock front. This crossover has a characteristic spectral signature in going from partially transmitting shock-heated material behind the shock front to an opaque shock front. Opacity is caused by optical scattering and absorption of light generated by fast compression. GGG melts at ˜5000 K in a two-phase region at shock pressures in the range 200 GPa to 217 GPa. Hugoniot equation-of-state data were measured by a Doppler Pin SystemDPS with ps time resolution and are generally consistent with previous data. Extrapolation of previous electrical conductivity measurements indicates that GGG becomes a poor metal at a shock pressure above ˜400 GPa. Because the shock impedance of GGG is higher than that of Al2O3 used previously to make metallic fluid H (MFH), the use of GGG to make MFH will achieve higher pressures and lower temperatures than use of Al2O3. However, maximum dynamic pressures at which emission temperatures of fluid

  10. Derivation of heating rate dependent exposure strategies for the selective laser melting of thermoplastic polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drummer, Dietmar; Drexler, Maximilian; Wudy, Katrin

    2015-05-01

    The selective laser melting of polymer powder is for rapid prototyping applications an established technology, although a lack in basic process knowledge appears. Considering demands of series production the selective laser melting technique is faced with varies challenges concerning processable material systems, process strategies and part properties. Consequently basic research is necessary to shift from rapid prototyping to rapid manufacturing of small lot sized series. Based on basic research the high potential of selective laser melting for the production of complex parts without any tools can be opened up. For the derivation of part quality increasing process strategies knowledge about interactions between sub-processes of selective laser melting and resulting part properties is necessary. The selective laser melting consists of three major sub-processes: Geometry exposure, tempering and powder feeding. According to the interaction of sub-processes resulting temperature fields during the selective laser melting process determine the part properties by changing micro structural pore number and distribution. Beneath absolute temperatures also the time-dependency of the thermal fields influences the porosity of molten parts. Present process strategies tend to decrease building time by increasing scanning speed and laser power. Although the absolute energy input into the material is constant for increasing scanning speed and laser power in the same ratio, time dependent material effects are neglected. The heating rate is a combined parameter derived from absolute temperature and time. Within the paper the authors analyze the basic interactions between different heating rates and part properties (e.g. porosity, mechanical strengths). Therefore with different heating rates produced specimens are analyzed with imaging technologies as well as mechanical tests. Based on the done basic investigations new heating rate dependent process strategies can be established

  11. Melting of ice under pressure

    PubMed Central

    Schwegler, Eric; Sharma, Manu; Gygi, François; Galli, Giulia

    2008-01-01

    The melting of ice under pressure is investigated with a series of first-principles molecular dynamics simulations. In particular, a two-phase approach is used to determine the melting temperature of the ice-VII phase in the range of 10–50 GPa. Our computed melting temperatures are consistent with existing diamond anvil cell experiments. We find that for pressures between 10 and 40 GPa, ice melts as a molecular solid. For pressures above ≈45 Gpa, there is a sharp increase in the slope of the melting curve because of the presence of molecular dissociation and proton diffusion in the solid before melting. The onset of significant proton diffusion in ice-VII as a function of increasing temperature is found to be gradual and bears many similarities to that of a type-II superionic solid. PMID:18809909

  12. Melting of Ice under Pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Schwegler, E; Sharma, M; Gygi, F; Galli, G

    2008-07-31

    The melting of ice under pressure is investigated with a series of first principles molecular dynamics simulations. In particular, a two-phase approach is used to determine the melting temperature of the ice-VII phase in the range of 10 to 50 GPa. Our computed melting temperatures are consistent with existing diamond anvil cell experiments. We find that for pressures between 10 to 40 GPa, ice melts as a molecular solid. For pressures above {approx}45 GPa there is a sharp increase in the slope of the melting curve due to the presence of molecular dissociation and proton diffusion in the solid, prior to melting. The onset of significant proton diffusion in ice-VII as a function of increasing temperature is found to be gradual and bears many similarities to that of a type-II superionic solid.

  13. Absolute biological needs.

    PubMed

    McLeod, Stephen

    2014-07-01

    Absolute needs (as against instrumental needs) are independent of the ends, goals and purposes of personal agents. Against the view that the only needs are instrumental needs, David Wiggins and Garrett Thomson have defended absolute needs on the grounds that the verb 'need' has instrumental and absolute senses. While remaining neutral about it, this article does not adopt that approach. Instead, it suggests that there are absolute biological needs. The absolute nature of these needs is defended by appeal to: their objectivity (as against mind-dependence); the universality of the phenomenon of needing across the plant and animal kingdoms; the impossibility that biological needs depend wholly upon the exercise of the abilities characteristic of personal agency; the contention that the possession of biological needs is prior to the possession of the abilities characteristic of personal agency. Finally, three philosophical usages of 'normative' are distinguished. On two of these, to describe a phenomenon or claim as 'normative' is to describe it as value-dependent. A description of a phenomenon or claim as 'normative' in the third sense does not entail such value-dependency, though it leaves open the possibility that value depends upon the phenomenon or upon the truth of the claim. It is argued that while survival needs (or claims about them) may well be normative in this third sense, they are normative in neither of the first two. Thus, the idea of absolute need is not inherently normative in either of the first two senses. PMID:23586876

  14. Effect of pool rotation on three-dimensional flow in a shallow annular pool of silicon melt with bidirectional temperature gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Quan-Zhuang; Peng, Lan; Wang, Fei; Liu, Jia

    2016-08-01

    In order to understand the effect of pool rotation on silicon melt flow with the bidirectional temperature gradients, we conducted a series of unsteady three-dimensional (3D) numerical simulations in a shallow annular pool. The bidirectional temperature gradients are produced by the temperature difference between outer and inner walls as well as a constant heat flux at the bottom. Results show that when Marangoni number is small, a 3D steady flow is common without pool rotation. But it bifurcates to a 3D oscillatory flow at a low rotation Reynolds number. Subsequently, the flow becomes steady and axisymmetric at a high rotation Reynolds number. When the Marangoni number is large, pool rotation can effectively suppress the temperature fluctuation on the free surface, meanwhile, it improves the flow stability. The critical heat flux density diagrams are mapped, and the effects of radial and vertical temperature gradients on the flow are discussed. Additionally, the transition process from the flow dominated by the radial temperature gradient to the one dominated by the vertical temperature gradient is presented.

  15. Optomechanics for absolute rotation detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davuluri, Sankar

    2016-07-01

    In this article, we present an application of optomechanical cavity for the absolute rotation detection. The optomechanical cavity is arranged in a Michelson interferometer in such a way that the classical centrifugal force due to rotation changes the length of the optomechanical cavity. The change in the cavity length induces a shift in the frequency of the cavity mode. The phase shift corresponding to the frequency shift in the cavity mode is measured at the interferometer output to estimate the angular velocity of absolute rotation. We derived an analytic expression to estimate the minimum detectable rotation rate in our scheme for a given optomechanical cavity. Temperature dependence of the rotation detection sensitivity is studied.

  16. Across- and along-arc geochemical variations of lava chemistry in the Sangihe arc: Various fluid and melt slab fluxes in response to slab temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanyu, Takeshi; Gill, James; Tatsumi, Yoshiyuki; Kimura, Jun-Ichi; Sato, Keiko; Chang, Qing; Senda, Ryoko; Miyazaki, Takashi; Hirahara, Yuka; Takahashi, Toshiro; Zulkarnain, Iskandar

    2012-10-01

    The Sangihe arc, northern Indonesia, is an oceanic arc that is the western half of the only active arc-arc collision on Earth. To elucidate magma genesis and slab thermal structure in such a setting, we have obtained new geochemical data for lavas from the entire Sangihe arc. In the southern arc, the volcanic front lavas are enriched in fluid-mobile elements, while the rear arc lavas are more enriched in melt-mobile elements. The proportion of sediment versus altered oceanic crust in the slab component is only ˜20% but still larger in Sangihe than other arcs in the western Pacific such as Izu, suggesting more subduction of the thick sediments in the narrowing Molucca Sea. The slab component changes in character across the arc from low-temperature fluid, through high-temperature fluid, to partial melt during progressive subduction. The geochemical systematics, the estimated mass fraction of the slab component, and the inferred stability of accessory rutile, zircon, and phengite in the slab are all similar between the southern Sangihe and Izu arcs, indicating that the thermal structure of the slab is not affected by impending collision. In contrast, lavas from the dormant northern Sangihe arc show geochemical characteristics similar to the Quaternary rear arc rather than the Quaternary volcanic front lavas in the southern arc. This may be related to advanced collision in the northern arc that could have slowed the subduction rate and heated the slab in the Pliocene followed by cessation of volcanic activity in the Quaternary.

  17. Temperature and melt fraction distributions in a mantle wedge determined from the electrical conductivity structure: Application to one nonvolcanic and two volcanic regions in the Kyushu subduction zone, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hata, Maki; Uyeshima, Makoto

    2015-04-01

    We propose a new method for estimating the temperatures and melt fractions of the upper mantle. Our method is based on connecting the electrical conductivity structure from geophysical observations with laboratory-determined relationships between the electrical conductivity and temperature of four nominally anhydrous minerals (olivine, orthopyroxene, clinopyroxene, and garnet) and basaltic melt. The temperatures are expressed as the upper limit temperatures using the Hashin-Shtrikman lower bound in solid phases and using the Hashin-Shtrikman upper bound in solid-liquid mixed phases. We apply the method to a nonvolcanic and two volcanic regions in the Kyushu subduction zone, southwest Japan. Our results suggest that the temperatures of the upper mantle are 1100-1450°C for dry mantle and 900-1350°C for wet mantle and that the melt fractions of the upper mantle are <20% beneath the two volcanic regions and <5% beneath the nonvolcanic region for both dry and wet mantle.

  18. In situ study of the fractionation of hydrogen isotopes between aluminosilicate melts and coexisting aqueous fluids at high pressure and high temperature - Implications for the δD in magmatic processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalou, Célia; Le Losq, Charles; Mysen, Bjorn O.

    2015-09-01

    The hydrogen isotopic composition of melt inclusions trapped in phenocrysts during their crystallization and growth in a magma may contribute to a better understanding of the water cycle between the atmosphere, the hydrosphere and the lithosphere. Such understanding relies on the knowledge of the hydrogen isotopic fractionation factors between aqueous fluids, silicate melts, and minerals at temperature and pressure conditions relevant to the Earth's interior. Significant D/H fractionation between silicate melts and aqueous fluids was reported at hundreds of MPa and °C by using in situ measurements in hydrothermal diamond anvil cell (HDAC) experiments (Mysen, 2013a, 2013b, Am. Mineral. 98, 376-386 and 1754-1764). However, the available dataset is focused on fluids and melts with D/H ratios close to unity. The relevance of such data for natural processes that involve per mil variations of δD-values may not always be clear. To address such concerns, the effect of the bulk D/H ratio on hydrogen isotope partitioning between water-saturated silicate melts and coexisting silicate-saturated aqueous fluids has been determined in the Na2O-Al2O3-SiO2-H2O-D2O system. To this end, in situ Raman spectroscopic measurements were performed on fluids and melts with bulk D/H ratios from 0.05 to 2.67 by using an externally-heated diamond anvil cell in the 300-800 °C and 200-1500 MPa temperature and pressure range, respectively. In these pressure/temperature ranges, the D/H ratios of fluids in equilibrium with melt barely change with temperature (in average ΔHfluid = 0.47 ± 1.15 kJ /mol). In contrast, the D/H ratios of coexisting melts display strong dependence on temperature (average ΔHmelt = 7.18 ± 1.27 kJ /mol). The temperature-dependence of the D/H fractionation factor between melt and fluid (αfluid-melt = D /Hfluid / D /Hmelt) is comparable in all the experiments and can be written: 1000 ṡ ln ⁡ (αfluid-melt) = 263 (± 26) ṡT-2- 126 (± 48). Therefore, the αfluid-melt

  19. Rapid, dynamic segregation of core forming melts: Results from in-situ High Pressure- High Temperature X-ray Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, H. C.; Yu, T.; Wang, Y.

    2011-12-01

    The timing and mechanisms of core formation in the Earth, as well as in Earth-forming planetesimals is a problem of significant importance in our understanding of the early evolution of terrestrial planets . W-Hf isotopic signatures in meteorites indicate that core formation in small pre-differentiated planetesimals was relatively rapid, and occurred over the span of a few million years. This time scale is difficult to achieve by percolative flow of the metallic phase through a silicate matrix in textural equilibrium. It has been suggested that during this active time in the early solar system, dynamic processes such as impacts may have caused significant deformation in the differentiating planetesimals, which could lead to much higher permeability of the core forming melts. Here, we have measured the change in permeability of core forming melts in a silicate matrix due to deformation. Mixtures of San Carlos olivine and FeS close to the equilibrium percolation threshold (~5 vol%FeS) were pre-synthesized to achieve an equilibrium microstructure, and then loaded into the rotational Drickamer apparatus at GSE-CARS, sector 13-BMD, at the Advanced Photon Source (Argonne National Laboratory). The samples were subsequently pressed to ~2GPa, and heated to 1100°C. Alternating cycles of rotation to collect X-ray tomography images, and twisting to deform the sample were conducted until the sample had been twisted by 1080°. Qualitative and quantitative analyses were performed on the resulting 3-dimensional x-ray tomographic images to evaluate the effect of shear deformation on permeability and migration velocity. Lattice-Boltzmann simulations were conducted, and show a marked increase in the permeability with increasing deformation, which would allow for much more rapid core formation in planetesimals.

  20. The absolute path command

    2012-05-11

    The ap command traveres all symlinks in a given file, directory, or executable name to identify the final absolute path. It can print just the final path, each intermediate link along with the symlink chan, and the permissions and ownership of each directory component in the final path. It has functionality similar to "which", except that it shows the final path instead of the first path. It is also similar to "pwd", but it canmore » provide the absolute path to a relative directory from the current working directory.« less

  1. The absolute path command

    SciTech Connect

    Moody, A.

    2012-05-11

    The ap command traveres all symlinks in a given file, directory, or executable name to identify the final absolute path. It can print just the final path, each intermediate link along with the symlink chan, and the permissions and ownership of each directory component in the final path. It has functionality similar to "which", except that it shows the final path instead of the first path. It is also similar to "pwd", but it can provide the absolute path to a relative directory from the current working directory.

  2. The impact of a phase-change cooling vest on heat strain and the effect of different cooling pack melting temperatures.

    PubMed

    House, James R; Lunt, Heather C; Taylor, Rowan; Milligan, Gemma; Lyons, Jason A; House, Carol M

    2013-05-01

    Cooling vests (CV) are often used to reduce heat strain. CVs have traditionally used ice as the coolant, although other phase-change materials (PCM) that melt at warmer temperatures have been used in an attempt to enhance cooling by avoiding vasoconstriction, which supposedly occurs when ice CVs are used. This study assessed the effectiveness of four CVs that melted at 0, 10, 20 and 30 °C (CV₀, CV₁₀, CV₂₀, and CV₃₀) when worn by 10 male volunteers exercising and then recovering in 40 °C air whilst wearing fire-fighting clothing. When compared with a non-cooling control condition (CON), only the CV₀ and CV₁₀ vests provided cooling during exercise (40 and 29 W, respectively), whereas all CVs provided cooling during resting recovery (CV₀ 69 W, CV₁₀ 66 W, CV₂₀ 55 W and CV₃₀ 29 W) (P < 0.05). In all conditions, skin blood flow increased when exercising and reduced during recovery, but was lower in the CV₀ and CV₁₀ conditions compared with control during exercise (observed power 0.709) (P < 0.05), but not during resting recovery (observed power only 0.55). The participants preferred the CV₁₀ to the CV₀, which caused temporary erythema to underlying skin, although this resolved overnight after each occurrence. Consequently, a cooling vest melting at 10 °C would seem to be the most appropriate choice for cooling during combined work and rest periods, although possibly an ice-vest (CV₀) may also be appropriate if more insulation was worn between the cooling packs and the skin than used in this study. PMID:23160652

  3. Absolute CF{sub 2} density and gas temperature measurements by absorption spectroscopy in dual-frequency capacitively coupled CF{sub 4}/Ar plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Wen-Yao; Xu, Yong Peng, Fei; Gong, Fa-Ping; Li, Xiao-Song; Zhu, Ai-Min; Liu, Yong-Xin; Wang, You-Nian

    2014-10-15

    Broadband ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy has been used to determine the CF{sub 2} radical density in dual-frequency capacitively coupled CF{sub 4}/Ar plasmas, using the CF{sub 2} A{sup ~1}B{sub 1}←X{sup ~1}A{sub 1} system of absorption spectrum. The rotational temperature of ground state CF{sub 2} and excited state CF was also estimated by using A{sup ~1}B{sub 1}←X{sup ~1}A{sub 1} system and B{sup 2}Δ−X{sup 2}Π system, respectively. The translational gas temperature was deduced from the Doppler width of the Ar{sup *}({sup 3}P{sub 2}) and Ar{sup *}({sup 3}P{sub 0}) metastable atoms absorption line by using the tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy. The rotational temperatures of the excited state CF are about 100 K higher than those of ground state CF{sub 2}, and about 200 K higher than the translational gas temperatures. The dependences of the radical CF{sub 2} density, electron density, electron temperature, rotational temperature, and gas temperature on the high frequency power and pressure have been analyzed. Furthermore, the production and loss mechanisms of CF{sub 2} radical and the gas heating mechanisms have also been discussed.

  4. PNAS Plus: Very high-temperature impact melt products as evidence for cosmic airbursts and impacts 12,900 years ago

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunch, Ted E.; Hermes, Robert E.; Moore, Andrew M. T.; Kennett, Douglas J.; Weaver, James C.; Wittke, James H.; DeCarli, Paul S.; Bischoff, James L.; Hillman, Gordon C.; Howard, George A.; Kimbel, David R.; Kletetschka, Gunther; Lipo, Carl P.; Sakai, Sachiko; Revay, Zsolt; West, Allen; Firestone, Richard B.; Kennett, James P.

    2012-07-01

    It has been proposed that fragments of an asteroid or comet impacted Earth, deposited silica-and iron-rich microspherules and other proxies across several continents, and triggered the Younger Dryas cooling episode 12,900 years ago. Although many independent groups have confirmed the impact evidence, the hypothesis remains controversial because some groups have failed to do so. We examined sediment sequences from 18 dated Younger Dryas boundary (YDB) sites across three continents (North America, Europe, and Asia), spanning 12,000 km around nearly one-third of the planet. All sites display abundant microspherules in the YDB with none or few above and below. In addition, three sites (Abu Hureyra, Syria; Melrose, Pennsylvania; and Blackville, South Carolina) display vesicular, high-temperature, siliceous scoria-like objects, or SLOs, that match the spherules geochemically. We compared YDB objects with melt products from a known cosmic impact (Meteor Crater, Arizona) and from the 1945 Trinity nuclear airburst in Socorro, New Mexico, and found that all of these high-energy events produced material that is geochemically and morphologically comparable, including: (i) high-temperature, rapidly quenched microspherules and SLOs; (ii) corundum, mullite, and suessite (Fe3Si), a rare meteoritic mineral that forms under high temperatures; (iii) melted SiO2 glass, or lechatelierite, with flow textures (or schlieren) that form at > 2,200 °C; and (iv) particles with features indicative of high-energy interparticle collisions. These results are inconsistent with anthropogenic, volcanic, authigenic, and cosmic materials, yet consistent with cosmic ejecta, supporting the hypothesis of extraterrestrial airbursts/impacts 12,900 years ago. The wide geographic distribution of SLOs is consistent with multiple impactors.

  5. Surface Tension and Viscosity of SCN and SCN-acetone Alloys at Melting Points and Higher Temperatures Using Surface Light Scattering Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tin, Padetha; deGroh, Henry C., III.

    2003-01-01

    Succinonitrile has been and is being used extensively in NASA's Microgravity Materials Science and Fluid Physics programs and as well as in several ground-based and microgravity studies including the Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (IDGE). Succinonitrile (SCN) is useful as a model for the study of metal solidification, although it is an organic material, it has a BCC crystal structure and solidifies dendriticly like a metal. It is also transparent and has a low melting point (58.08 C). Previous measurements of succinonitrile (SCN) and alloys of succinonitrile and acetone surface tensions are extremely limited. Using the Surface Light Scattering technique we have determined non invasively, the surface tension and viscosity of SCN and SCN-Acetone Alloys at different temperatures. This relatively new and unique technique has several advantages over the classical methods such as, it is non invasive, has good accuracy and measures the surface tension and viscosity simultaneously. The accuracy of interfacial energy values obtained from this technique is better than 2% and viscosity about 10 %. Succinonitrile and succinonitrile-acetone alloys are well-established model materials with several essential physical properties accurately known - except the liquid/vapor surface tension at different elevated temperatures. We will be presenting the experimentally determined liquid/vapor surface energy and liquid viscosity of succinonitrile and succinonitrile-acetone alloys in the temperature range from their melting point to around 100 C using this non-invasive technique. We will also discuss about the measurement technique and new developments of the Surface Light Scattering Spectrometer.

  6. Dissolution of Quartz, Albite and K-feldspar Into H2O-Saturated Haplogranitic Melt at 800oC and 200 MPa: Diffusive Transport Properties of Granitic Melts at Crustal Anatectic Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acosta, A.; London, D.; Dewers, T.; Morgan, G.

    2002-12-01

    With the aim of investigating the diffusive transport properties of granitic melts at crustal anatectic conditions and obtaining some constraints on speciation and coordination in the melt, we conducted albite, K-feldspar and quartz dissolution experiments in H2O-saturated metaluminous haplogranitic glass (nominal composition of the 200 MPa H2O-saturated haplogranite eutectic of Tuttle and Bowen, 1958) at 800oC and 200 MPa. Mineral and glass cylinders were juxtaposed against flat polished surfaces inside platinum or gold capsules, then run for durations in the range 120-960 h. Based on the time dependence of interface retreat dissolution is interface reaction-controlled up to 700 h, and becomes diffusion-controlled afterwards. Upon dissolution of albite, Al and Na entering the melt decouple and Na diffuses away from the interface to maintain a constant Al/Na molar ratio throughout the entire melt column. Potassium from the bulk melt diffuses uphill towards the albite-melt interface to maintain a constant Aluminum Saturation Index (ASI=molar Al2O3/Na2O+K2O) of 1.00 throughout the entire melt column. Dissolution of K-feldspar results in migration of K away from the interface and uphill diffusion of Na from the bulk melt towards the interface, again maintaining constant Al/Na and ASI ratios in the bulk melt. Dissolution of quartz produces enrichment in SiO2 versus dilution of the rest of components in the interface melt. These results indicate that in the five-component H2O-saturated metaluminous haplogranite system, uncoupled diffusion takes place along the following four directions in composition space: SiO2; Na2O; K2O; and a combination of Al2O3 and alkalis such that the Al/Na molar ratio is equal to that in the bulk melt, and the Al2O3/Na2O+K2O molar ratio is equal to the equilibrium ASI of the melt. These observations are in accord with results obtained from corundum and andalusite dissolution experiments in the same system and P-T-X conditions (Acosta-Vigil et

  7. Nanoencapsulation of a water soluble drug in biocompatible polyesters. Effect of polyesters melting point and glass transition temperature on drug release behavior.

    PubMed

    Karavelidis, Vassilios; Giliopoulos, Dimitrios; Karavas, Evangelos; Bikiaris, Dimitrios

    2010-12-23

    Five polyesters based on 1,3-propanediol or ethylene glycol and an aliphatic dicarboxylic acid were used for the preparation of Ropinirole HCl-loaded nanoparticles. The advantage of the present study is that the used polyesters - as well as poly(lactic acid) (PLA) - have similar degree of crystallinity but different melting points, varying from 46.7 to 166.4°C. Based on polymer toxicity on HUVEC, the biocompatibility of these aliphatic polyesters was found comparable to that of PLA and thus the studied polyesters could be used as drug carriers. Drug encapsulation in polyesters was performed via emulsification/solvent evaporation method. Particle size of drug-loaded nanoparticles was between 140 and 190 nm, as measured by light scattering. Drug loading content for all the polyesters varies between 10 and 16% and their entrapment efficiency is relatively high (32-48%). WAXD patterns of nanoparticles show that Ropinirole HCl lies in amorphous state within polymer matrices. Drug release diagrams reveal that the higher percentage of Ropinirole HCl is released during the first 6h after its insertion in the dissolution medium. Fast release rates of the drug are attributed to high hydrophilicity of Ropinirole HCl. Melting point (T(m)) and glass transition temperature (T(g)) of the host polymer matrices seem to be important parameters, since higher drug release rates are observed in polyesters with low T(m) and T(g). PMID:20863892

  8. Correlation between band gap, dielectric constant, Young’s modulus and melting temperature of GaN nanocrystals and their size and shape dependences

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Haiming; Meng, Xiangkang

    2015-01-01

    With structural miniaturization down to the nanoscale, the detectable parameters of materials no longer remain constant but become tunable. For GaN nanocrystals example, the band gap increases while the dielectric constant, Young’s modulus and melting temperature decrease with decreasing the solid size. Herein, we developed the models to describe the size and shape dependences of these seemingly uncorrelated parameters for GaN nanocrystals, based on our established thermodynamic model for cohesive energy of metallic nanocrystals. Consistency between our theoretical predictions and the corresponding experimental or simulated results confirms the accuracy of the developed models and indicates the essentiality of cohesive energy in describing the effects of size and shape on the physicochemical properties of different low-dimensional systems. PMID:26582533

  9. Mantle flow, volatiles, slab-surface temperatures and melting dynamics in the north Tonga arc-Lau back-arc basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caulfield, John; Turner, Simon; Arculus, Richard; Dale, Chris; Jenner, Frances; Pearce, Julian; MacPherson, Colin; Handley, Heather

    2012-11-01

    The Fonualei Spreading Center affords an excellent opportunity to evaluate geochemical changes with increasing depth to the slab in the Lau back-arc basin. We present H2O and CO2concentrations and Sr, Nd, Pb, Hf and U-Th-Ra isotope data for selected glasses as well as new Hf isotope data from boninites and seamounts to the north of the Tonga arc. The Pb and Hf isotope data are used to show that mantle flow is oriented to the southwest and that the tear in the northern end of the slab may not extend east as far as the boninite locality. Along the Fonualei Spreading Center, key geochemical parameters change smoothly with increasing distance from the arc front and increasing slab surface temperatures. The latter may range from 720 to 866°C, based on decreasing H2O/Ce ratios. Consistent with experimental data, the geochemical trends are interpreted to reflect changes in the amount and composition of wet pelite melts or super-critical fluids and aqueous fluids derived from the slab. With one exception, all of the lavas preserve both238U excesses and 226Ra excesses. We suggest that lavas from the Fonualei Spreading Center and Valu Fa Ridge are dominated by fluid-fluxed melting whereas those from the East and Central Lau Spreading Centers, where slab surface temperatures exceed ˜850-900°C, are largely derived through decompression. A similar observation is found for the Manus and East Scotia back-arc basins and may reflect the expiry of a key phase such as lawsonite in the subducted basaltic crust.

  10. Experimental Partitioning of Chalcophile Elements between Mantle Silicate Minerals and Basaltic Melt at High Pressures and Temperatures - Implications for Sulfur Geochemistry of Mantle and Crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasgupta, R.; Jego, S.; Ding, S.; Li, Y.; Lee, C. T.

    2015-12-01

    The behavior of chalcophile elements during mantle melting, melt extraction, and basalt differentiation is critical for formation of ore deposits and geochemical model and evolution of crust-mantle system. While chalcophile elements are strongly partitioned into sulfides, their behavior with different extent of melting, in particular, in the absence of sulfides, can only be modeled with complete knowledge of the partitioning behavior of these elements between dominant mantle minerals and basaltic melt with or without dissolved sulfide (S2-). However, experimental data on mineral-melt partitioning are lacking for many chalcophile elements. Crystallization experiments were conducted at 3 GPa and 1450-1600 °C using a piston cylinder and synthetic silicate melt compositions similar to low-degree partial melt of peridotite. Starting silicate mixes doped with 100-300 ppm of each of various chalcophile elements were loaded into Pt/graphite double capsules. To test the effect of dissolved sulfur in silicate melt on mineral-melt partitioning of chalcophile elements, experiments were conducted on both sulfur-free and sulfur-bearing (1100-1400 ppm S in melt) systems. Experimental phases were analyzed by EPMA (for major elements and S) and LA-ICP-MS (for trace elements). All experiments produced an assemblage of cpx + melt ± garnet ± olivine ± spinel and yielded new partition coefficients (D) for Sn, Zn, Mo, Sb, Bi, Pb, and Se for cpx/melt, olivine/melt, and garnet/melt pairs. Derived Ds (mineral/basalt) reveal little effect of S2- in the melt on mineral-melt partition coefficients of the measured chalcophile elements, with Ds for Zn, Mo, Bi, Pb decreasing by less than a factor of 2 from S-free to S-bearing melt systems or remaining similar, within error, between S-free and S-bearing melt systems. By combining our data with existing partitioning data between sulfide phases and silicate melt we model the fractionation of these elements during mantle melting and basalt

  11. Investigation of Aluminate and Al2O3 Crystals and Melts at High Temperature Using XANES Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Neuville, Daniel R.; Roux, Jacques; Cormier, Laurent; Henderson, Grant S.; Ligny, Dominique de; Flank, Anne-Marie; Lagarde, Pierre

    2007-02-02

    Using X-ray absorption at the Al K-edge at high temperature, structural information was determined on Al2O3, CaAl2O4 (CA), Ca3Al2O6 (C3A) and CaAl2Si2O8 (anorthite) in the crystalline and liquid states (2380 K). Important changes are observed for Al2O3 where all oscillation in the XANES spectra disappear above the liquidus temperature. For the three other compositions some modifications of the XANES spectra can be attributed to changes in the Al coordination.

  12. Lipase-catalyzed resolution of (2R*,3S*)- and (2R*,3R*)-3-methyl-3-phenyl-2-aziridinemethanol at low temperatures and determination of the absolute configurations of the four stereoisomers.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Takashi; Liu, Yu; Ohta, Hiroshi; Korenaga, Toshinobu; Ema, Tadashi

    2005-02-18

    [reaction: see text] Lipase-catalyzed resolution of (2R*,3S*)-3-methyl-3-phenyl-2-aziridinemethanol, (+/-)-2, at low temperatures gave synthetically useful (2R,3S)-2 and its acetate (2S,3R)-2a with (2S)-selectivity (E = 55 at -40 degrees C), while a similar reaction of (2R*,3R*)-3-methyl-3-phenyl-2-aziridinemethanol, (+/-)-3, gave (2S,3S)-3 and its acetate (2R,3R)-3a with (2R)-selectivity (E = 73 at -20 degrees C). Compound (+/-)-2 was prepared conveniently via diastereoselective addition of MeMgBr to tert-butyl 3-phenyl-2H-azirine-2-carboxylate, (+/-)-1a, which was successfully prepared by the Neber reaction of oxime tosylate of tert-butyl benzoyl acetate 7a. The tert-butyl ester was requisite to promote this reaction. For determination of the absolute configuration of (2S,3R)-2a, enantiopure (2S,3R)-2 was independently prepared in three steps involving diastereoselective methylation of 3-phenyl-2H-azirine-2-methanol, (S)-10, with MeMgBr. The absolute configuration of (2S,3S)-3 was determined by X-ray analysis of the corresponding N-(S)-2-(6-methoxy-2-naphthyl)propanoyl derivative (S,S,S)-13. PMID:15704972

  13. In-Situ Observation of Crystallization and Growth in High-Temperature Melts Using the Confocal Laser Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohn, Il; Dippenaar, Rian

    2016-08-01

    This review discusses the innovative efforts initiated by Emi and co-workers for in-situ observation of phase transformations at high temperatures for materials. By using the high-temperature confocal laser-scanning microscope (CLSM), a robust database of the phase transformation behavior during heating and cooling of slags, fluxes, and steel can be developed. The rate of solidification and the progression of solid-state phase transformations can be readily investigated under a variety of atmospheric conditions and be correlated with theoretical predictions. The various research efforts following the work of Emi and co-workers have allowed a deeper fundamental understanding of the elusive solidification and phase transformation mechanisms in materials beyond the ambit of steels. This technique continues to evolve in terms of its methodology, application to other materials, and its contribution to technology.

  14. In-Situ Observation of Crystallization and Growth in High-Temperature Melts Using the Confocal Laser Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohn, Il; Dippenaar, Rian

    2016-04-01

    This review discusses the innovative efforts initiated by Emi and co-workers for in-situ observation of phase transformations at high temperatures for materials. By using the high-temperature confocal laser-scanning microscope (CLSM), a robust database of the phase transformation behavior during heating and cooling of slags, fluxes, and steel can be developed. The rate of solidification and the progression of solid-state phase transformations can be readily investigated under a variety of atmospheric conditions and be correlated with theoretical predictions. The various research efforts following the work of Emi and co-workers have allowed a deeper fundamental understanding of the elusive solidification and phase transformation mechanisms in materials beyond the ambit of steels. This technique continues to evolve in terms of its methodology, application to other materials, and its contribution to technology.

  15. Pulverized coal firing of aluminum melting furnaces. Final report. [Sulfide capacity of various slags in given temperature range

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, D.L. Jr.; Dastolfo, L.E. Jr.; DeYoung, D.H.

    1984-04-01

    Significant progress has been achieved in the development of a desulfurizing coal combustion process by the Aluminum Company of America (Alcoa) in a research program funded by the United States Department of Energy. Conceptually, high sulfur coal is burned with additives in a staged cyclone combustor, such that sufficient sulfur to obviate products of combustion (POC) scrubbing is retained in the slag by-product. Bench scale studies conducted during the program have shown that 70% of the sulfur (2.65% sulfur coal) reports to the slag at equilibrium through a 25% addition of iron ore to the coal. Results obtained correlate with published data for similar slag at higher temperatures. In pilot scale combustion tests, equilibrium levels of coal sulfur were retained by the slag (11 to 14%). Equilibrium sulfur capture was limited by low particulate retention and operating temperature higher than optimal. Cost estimates for implementation of the process are included in this report. 28 references, 39 figures, 58 tables.

  16. High temperature breakdown of the Stokes-Einstein relation in a computer simulated Cu-Zr melt.

    PubMed

    Han, X J; Li, J G; Schober, H R

    2016-03-28

    Transport properties and the Stokes-Einstein (SE) relation in liquid Cu8Zr3 are studied by molecular dynamics simulation with a modified embedded atom potential. The critical temperature Tc of mode coupling theory (MCT) is derived as 930 K from the self-diffusion coefficient D and viscosity η. The SE relation breaks down around TSE = 1900 K, which is far above Tc. At temperatures below TSE, the product of D and η fluctuates around a constant value, similar to the prediction of MCT near Tc. The influence of the microscopic atomic motion on macroscopic properties is investigated by analyzing the time dependent liquid structure and the self-hole filling process. The self-holes for the two components are preferentially filled by atoms of the same component. The self-hole filling dynamics explains the different breakdown behaviors of the SE relation in Zr-rich liquid CuZr2 compared to Cu-rich Cu8Zr3. At TSE, a kink is found in the temperature dependence of both partial and total coordination numbers for the three atomic pair combinations and of the typical time of self-hole filling. This indicates a strong correlation between liquid structure, atomic dynamics, and the breakdown of SE relation. The previously suggested usefulness of the parameter d(D1/D2)/dT to predict TSE is confirmed. Additionally we propose a viscosity criterion to predict TSE in the absence of diffusion data. PMID:27036459

  17. Viscosity of Hydrous Rhyolitic Melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Xu, Z.; Liu, Y.

    2002-12-01

    It is critical to understand and to be able to predict viscosity of hydrous silicate melts for understanding magma transport, bubble growth, volcanic eruptions, and magma fragmentation. We report new viscosity data for hydrous rhyolitic melt in the viscosity range of 109 to 1015 Pa s based on the kinetics of hydrous species reaction in the melt upon cooling (i.e., based on the equivalence between the glass transition temperature and the apparent equilibrium temperature). We also report viscosity data obtained from bubble growth experiments. Our data show that the viscosity model of Hess and Dingwell (1996) systematically overestimates the viscosity of hydrous rhyolitic melt at the high viscosity range by a factor of 2 to 4 (still within their stated 2σ uncertainty). Another problem with the model of Hess and Dingwell is that the functional dependence of viscosity on total H2O content cannot be extended to dry melt: as total H2O content decreases to zero, the viscosity would first increase, and then decrease to zero. A zero viscosity for a dry melt makes no sense. Hence we need a mixing law for hydrous melt viscosity that is extendible to dry melts. By examining the viscosity of rhyolitic melts containing 6 ppm to about 8.0 wt% total H2O (both our own data and literature data), we propose the following relation for the dependence of viscosity on total H2O content: 1/η = 1/η 1+(1/η 2-1/η 1)xn ≈ 1/η 1+xn/η 2 where η is viscosity and 1/η is fluidity, η 1 is the viscosity of the dry melt, x is the mole fraction of total dissolved H2O, n and η 2 are two fitting parameters, and η 2 can be identified to be the viscosity of the hypothetical melt consisting of pure H2O (η 2 cannot be directly measured since such a melt does not exist). The above equation appears to work well for the viscosity of hydrous rhyolitic melts. By fitting hydrous rhyolitic melt viscosity with the above equation, we find that rhyolitic melt viscosity vary by 1.2 orders of magnitude

  18. Liquidus temperatures of komatiites and the effect of cooling rate on element partitioning between olivine and komatiitic melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sossi, Paolo A.; O'Neill, Hugh St. C.

    2016-05-01

    Archean komatiites are the hottest magmas preserved on Earth and are thus unique probes of its thermal evolution. Estimating their eruption temperatures remains problematic, however, because the uppermost (A1, A2) zones of komatiite flows contain randomly oriented spinifex-textured olivines, indicative of rapid cooling and growth. Fe-Mg partitioning between olivine and assumed komatiitic liquid typically shows departures from equilibrium, extending towards higher K_{{D}}^{{{{Fe}}^{2 + } - {{Mg}}}}. If these higher values are a disequilibrium effect, using them to calculate parental magma composition would lead to errors in estimated liquidus temperatures. In order to investigate this possibility, we have performed experiments on two komatiite compositions, the classic Barberton Aluminium Undepleted Komatiite (AUK) sample 49J (32.2 % MgO) and Munro AUK sample 422/95 (23 % MgO). Isothermal experiments to constrain phase equilibria on 49J at atmospheric pressure, between 1360 and 1600 °C at 1.7 log units below and 1.1 above the fayalite-magnetite-quartz (FMQ) buffer reveal a liquidus temperature ( T liq) of 1616 °C, 40 °C lower than a previous estimate. The K_{{D}}^{{Σ {{Fe}}{-}{{Mg}}}} ranges between 0.320 and 0.295 at FMQ - 1.7, with a slight negative dependence on temperature. To replicate the conditions that prevailed during the quenching of komatiites in their upper chill zones, experiments with a constant cooling rate at FMQ - 1.7 were performed on 422/95 ( T liq = 1450 °C) at 0.5, 1.5, 2.5, 6.5 and 16 °C/min. Olivine morphology changes from euhedral to tabular at low cooling rates, hopper at intermediate, and skeletal and chain structures at high rates. Concurrently, the K_{{D}}^{{Σ {{Fe}}{-}{{Mg}}}} increases monotonically from an equilibrium value of 0.305 to 0.376 at 16 °C/min, reflecting the inability of unwanted cations to diffuse away from the growing olivine. The high K_{{D}}^{{Σ {{Fe}}{-}{{Mg}}}} between olivine and komatiitic liquid caused by

  19. Absolute rate constant for the reaction of atomic chlorine with hydrogen peroxide vapor over the temperature range 265-400 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michael, J. V.; Whytock, D. A.; Lee, J. H.; Payne, W. A.; Stief, L. J.

    1977-01-01

    Rate constants for the reaction of atomic chlorine with hydrogen peroxide were measured from 265-400 K using the flash photolysis-resonance fluorescence technique. Analytical techniques were developed to measure H2O2 under reaction conditions. Due to ambiguity in the interpretation of the analytical results, the data combine to give two equally acceptable representations of the temperature dependence. The results are compared to previous work at 298 K and are theoretically discussed in terms of the mechanism of the reaction. Additional experiments on the H + H2O2 reaction at 298 and 359 K are compared with earlier results from this laboratory and give a slightly revised bimolecular rate constant.

  20. Electronic Absolute Cartesian Autocollimator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leviton, Douglas B.

    2006-01-01

    An electronic absolute Cartesian autocollimator performs the same basic optical function as does a conventional all-optical or a conventional electronic autocollimator but differs in the nature of its optical target and the manner in which the position of the image of the target is measured. The term absolute in the name of this apparatus reflects the nature of the position measurement, which, unlike in a conventional electronic autocollimator, is based absolutely on the position of the image rather than on an assumed proportionality between the position and the levels of processed analog electronic signals. The term Cartesian in the name of this apparatus reflects the nature of its optical target. Figure 1 depicts the electronic functional blocks of an electronic absolute Cartesian autocollimator along with its basic optical layout, which is the same as that of a conventional autocollimator. Referring first to the optical layout and functions only, this or any autocollimator is used to measure the compound angular deviation of a flat datum mirror with respect to the optical axis of the autocollimator itself. The optical components include an illuminated target, a beam splitter, an objective or collimating lens, and a viewer or detector (described in more detail below) at a viewing plane. The target and the viewing planes are focal planes of the lens. Target light reflected by the datum mirror is imaged on the viewing plane at unit magnification by the collimating lens. If the normal to the datum mirror is parallel to the optical axis of the autocollimator, then the target image is centered on the viewing plane. Any angular deviation of the normal from the optical axis manifests itself as a lateral displacement of the target image from the center. The magnitude of the displacement is proportional to the focal length and to the magnitude (assumed to be small) of the angular deviation. The direction of the displacement is perpendicular to the axis about which the

  1. Calibrating IR Cameras for In-Situ Temperature Measurement During the Electron Beam Melting Process using Inconel 718 and Ti-Al6-V4

    SciTech Connect

    Dinwiddie, Ralph Barton; Lloyd, Peter D; Dehoff, Ryan R; Lowe, Larry E

    2016-01-01

    The Department of Energy s (DOE) Manufacturing Demonstration Facility (MDF) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) provides world-leading capabilities in advanced manufacturing (AM) facilities which leverage previous, on-going government investments in materials science research and characterization. MDF contains systems for fabricating components with complex geometries using AM techniques (i.e. 3D-Printing). Various metal alloy printers, for example, use electron beam melting (EBM) systems for creating these components which are otherwise extremely difficult- if not impossible- to machine. ORNL has partnered with manufacturers on improving the final part quality of components and developing new materials for further advancing these devices. One method being used to study (AM) processes in more depth relies on the advanced imaging capabilities at ORNL. High performance mid-wave infrared (IR) cameras are used for in-situ process monitoring and temperature measurements. However, standard factory calibrations are insufficient due to very low transmissions of the leaded glass window required for X-ray absorption. Two techniques for temperature calibrations will be presented and compared. In-situ measurement of emittance will also be discussed. Ample information can be learned from in-situ IR process monitoring of the EBM process. Ultimately, these imaging systems have the potential for routine use for online quality assurance and feedback control.

  2. ABSOLUTE POLARIMETRY AT RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    OKADA; BRAVAR, A.; BUNCE, G.; GILL, R.; HUANG, H.; MAKDISI, Y.; NASS, A.; WOOD, J.; ZELENSKI, Z.; ET AL.

    2007-09-10

    Precise and absolute beam polarization measurements are critical for the RHIC spin physics program. Because all experimental spin-dependent results are normalized by beam polarization, the normalization uncertainty contributes directly to final physics uncertainties. We aimed to perform the beam polarization measurement to an accuracy Of {Delta}P{sub beam}/P{sub beam} < 5%. The absolute polarimeter consists of Polarized Atomic Hydrogen Gas Jet Target and left-right pairs of silicon strip detectors and was installed in the RHIC-ring in 2004. This system features proton-proton elastic scattering in the Coulomb nuclear interference (CNI) region. Precise measurements of the analyzing power A{sub N} of this process has allowed us to achieve {Delta}P{sub beam}/P{sub beam} = 4.2% in 2005 for the first long spin-physics run. In this report, we describe the entire set up and performance of the system. The procedure of beam polarization measurement and analysis results from 2004-2005 are described. Physics topics of AN in the CNI region (four-momentum transfer squared 0.001 < -t < 0.032 (GeV/c){sup 2}) are also discussed. We point out the current issues and expected optimum accuracy in 2006 and the future.

  3. The Efforts to Utilize High-Temperature Melting Technologies for ILLW and the Development of Guidelines for their Technical Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, K. S.; Choi, Y. C.; Seo, Y. C.; Jeong, C. W.; Park, W. J.

    2003-02-25

    A couple of domestic institutions have been investigating the application of vitrification technology to treat low- and intermediate-level radioactive wastes in Korea. In the case that such investigations prove to be successful, it is expected that commercial vitrification plants will be constructed. The safety insuring on vitrification plants could not be compatible with criterion on radioactive waste management because the facilities are at high temperature and contain a variety of accommodations for the exhaust gases and residual products. Therefore, it is necessary to suggest a new strategy or modifications of criterion of radioactive waste management on considerations related with the vitrification technology. In order to ensure the safety of vitrification plants, a technical guideline or standard for design and operation of vitrification plants must be established too. A study on the safety assessment of vitrification plants in consideration with general items as an industrial facility, safety and technical requirements as a nuclear facility is needed to be ready before using and permitting them. Also, the stability of vitrified waste forms produced by vitrification plants must be analyzed to ensure their acceptance in final repositories, which includes chemical durability as one of the main considerable items. This paper introduces the status on the utilization of vitrification technology for treating LILW and efforts to develop technical guides with basic study results on chemical durability of forms.

  4. Melt pool dynamics during selective electron beam melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scharowsky, T.; Osmanlic, F.; Singer, R. F.; Körner, C.

    2014-03-01

    Electron beam melting is a promising additive manufacturing technique for metal parts. Nevertheless, the process is still poorly understood making further investigations indispensable to allow a prediction of the part's quality. To improve the understanding of the process especially the beam powder interaction, process observation at the relevant time scale is necessary. Due to the difficult accessibility of the building area, the high temperatures, radiation and the very high scanning speeds during the melting process the observation requires an augmented effort in the observation equipment. A high speed camera in combination with an illumination laser, band pass filter and mirror system is suitable for the observation of the electron beam melting process. The equipment allows to observe the melting process with a high spatial and temporal resolution. In this paper the adjustment of the equipment and results of the lifetime and the oscillation frequencies of the melt pool for a simple geometry are presented.

  5. Stabilizing Crystal Oscillators With Melting Metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, J. B.; Miller, C. G.

    1984-01-01

    Heat of fusion provides extended period of constant temperature and frequency. Crystal surrounded by metal in spherical container. As outside temperature rises to melting point of metal, metal starts to liquefy; but temperature stays at melting point until no solid metal remains. Potential terrestrial applications include low-power environmental telemetering transmitters and instrumentation transmitters for industrial processes.

  6. Effects of spacer length and terminal group on the crystallization and morphology of biscarbamates: a longer spacer does not reduce the melting temperature.

    PubMed

    Khan, Mostofa Kamal; Sundararajan, Pudupadi R

    2013-05-01

    The effects of alkyl side chain and spacer lengths and the type of terminal group on the morphology and crystallization of a homologous series of biscarbamates (model compounds for polyurethanes) were investigated. Biscarbamates were synthesized with alkyl side chains of various lengths ranging from C4 to C18 and an alkyl spacer group with 12 CH2 units (C12 spacer) between the two hydrogen bonding motifs. The crystallization and morphological features are compared with the previously studied biscarbamates with a C6 spacer. As a token example, we also studied a biscarbamate molecule in which the terminal methyl group was replaced by a phenyl group. We stress four important conclusions of the study: (1) A number of studies in the literature found that the longer alkyl spacers reduced the thermal transition temperatures of the molecules, and such behavior was attributed to an increase in the flexibility of the alkyl spacer. However, the results of the present study are to the contrary. With the biscarbamates studied here, the hydrogen-bonding groups on both sides of the C12 spacer act as "anchors", and the longer spacer does not reduce the melting temperatures compared with those with the C6 spacer. (2) The melt viscosity measurements show shear-thinning behavior, which has been mostly observed with polysaccharides and hydrogen-bonded polymers. (3) Avrami analysis shows a two-stage crystallization, which is not commonly observed in organic small molecule systems. (4) The phenyl end group does not add another self-assembly code in terms of π-stacking but acts as a defect. While formation of crystals was observed for biscarbamates with short alkyl side chains with a C6 spacer, an increase in spacer length to C12 induces spherulitic morphology. Although the overall sizes of the spherulites are the same for both spacers, the rate of spherulite growth was higher and the crystallization rate was lower with the C12 spacer compared with the C6 spacer. In contrast with the

  7. Redox dynamics in multicomponent, iron-bearing silicate melts and glasses: Application to the float-glass processing of high-temperature silicate glassmelts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Glen Bennett

    Processing high-strain-point glasses by the float process is challenged by the relative thermochemical properties of glassmelts and the liquid-metal float medium. As the chemical reaction between the glassmelt and the float metal involves dynamic reduction of the glassmelt, this research has examined the constraints on high-temperature float processing of glassmelts by combining metal-alloy/oxide reaction thermodynamics and Wagnerian kinetic models for redox reactions in silicate melts. The dynamic response of Fe-bearing, p-type (polaronic) semiconducting amorphous silicates to a chemical potential gradient of oxygen has been shown to be rate-limited by the chemical diffusion of network-modifying cations. The persistence of this mechanism to very low Fe concentrations in Fe-doped magnesium aluminosilicate glasses was proven with Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy. Three glasses, with 0.1, 0.5, and 1.25 mol. % FeO were reacted with air at temperatures from 710-845sp°C. For all compositions and temperatures, oxidation was dominated by network modifier diffusion; an activation energy of 475 kJ*molsp{-1} characterized the process. Chemical dynamics in a high-temperature float environment were characterized on liquid-liquid reaction couples between two low-Fe sodium-aluminoborosilicate (NABS) glassmelts (0.01 and 0.08 mol. % FeO) and Au-30Sn and Au-28Ge (atomic basis) alloys. Experiments were performed in the temperature range 1250-1450sp°C for 30 min; wavelength-dispersive and Rutherford backscattering spectroscopies were employed. These exothermic liquid-metal alloys display large negative deviations from ideal solution behavior, with significantly depressed chemical activities. Diffusion of Sn or Ge in the NABS glassmelts (depth and concentration) was limited at all temperatures to levels comparable to conventional soda-lime (NCS) float glass (˜2 min on pure Sn at 1100sp°C). Incorporation of Sn or Ge was reduced significantly in the higher-Fe-content NABS

  8. Morphology and Melting Behavior of Polypropylenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alamo, R. G.; Mandelkern, L.

    1997-03-01

    The double melting of isothermally crystallized polypropylenes (metallocenes or Ziegler fractions) of a low defect content, is found to be associated with the presence of dominant (usually thicker) and daughter lamellae. A double population of lamellae thicknesses that adheres to the formulated epitaxial crystallization is seen by TEM even in samples crystallized at temperatures above 160 degC. Mixed and positive spherulites are also observed to grow linearly at these temperatures. During the melting process, positive or mixed spherulites show a well defined change to a negative character at a temperature corresponding to the low temperature endotherm in agreement with the melting of the daughter lamellae at this temperature. It is also found that the melting and stability of the dominant lamellae are influenced by the presence of epitaxial transversal lamellae. The kinetics of the melting process are investigated in relation to the initial morphology. Higher defected polypropylenes with a high concentration of gamma crystals do not show associated melting kinetics.

  9. Lattice stability and high-pressure melting mechanism of dense hydrogen up to 1.5 TPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Hua Y.; Hoffmann, R.; Wu, Q.

    2015-09-01

    Lattice stability and metastability, as well as melting, are important features of the physics and chemistry of dense hydrogen. Using ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD), the classical superheating limit and melting line of metallic hydrogen are investigated up to 1.5 TPa. The computations show that the classical superheating degree is about 100 K, and the classical melting curve becomes flat at a level of 350 K when beyond 500 GPa. This information allows us to estimate the well depth and the potential barriers that must be overcome when the crystal melts. Inclusion of nuclear quantum effects (NQE) using path integral molecular dynamics (PIMD) predicts that both superheating limit and melting temperature are lowered to below room temperature, but the latter never reaches absolute zero. Detailed analysis indicates that the melting is thermally activated, rather than driven by pure zero-point motion (ZPM). This argument was further supported by extensive PIMD simulations, demonstrating the stability of Fddd structure against liquefaction at low temperatures.

  10. Implants as absolute anchorage.

    PubMed

    Rungcharassaeng, Kitichai; Kan, Joseph Y K; Caruso, Joseph M

    2005-11-01

    Anchorage control is essential for successful orthodontic treatment. Each tooth has its own anchorage potential as well as propensity to move when force is applied. When teeth are used as anchorage, the untoward movements of the anchoring units may result in the prolonged treatment time, and unpredictable or less-than-ideal outcome. To maximize tooth-related anchorage, techniques such as differential torque, placing roots into the cortex of the bone, the use of various intraoral devices and/or extraoral appliances have been implemented. Implants, as they are in direct contact with bone, do not possess a periodontal ligament. As a result, they do not move when orthodontic/orthopedic force is applied, and therefore can be used as "absolute anchorage." This article describes different types of implants that have been used as orthodontic anchorage. Their clinical applications and limitations are also discussed. PMID:16463910

  11. Absolute Equilibrium Entropy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shebalin, John V.

    1997-01-01

    The entropy associated with absolute equilibrium ensemble theories of ideal, homogeneous, fluid and magneto-fluid turbulence is discussed and the three-dimensional fluid case is examined in detail. A sigma-function is defined, whose minimum value with respect to global parameters is the entropy. A comparison is made between the use of global functions sigma and phase functions H (associated with the development of various H-theorems of ideal turbulence). It is shown that the two approaches are complimentary though conceptually different: H-theorems show that an isolated system tends to equilibrium while sigma-functions allow the demonstration that entropy never decreases when two previously isolated systems are combined. This provides a more complete picture of entropy in the statistical mechanics of ideal fluids.

  12. Effect of Mantle Wedge Hybridization by Sediment Melt on Geochemistry of Arc Magma and Arc Mantle Source - Insights from Laboratory Experiments at High Pressures and Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallik, A.; Dasgupta, R.; Tsuno, K.; Nelson, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    Generation of arc magmas involves metasomatism of the mantle wedge by slab-derived H2O-rich fluids and/or melts and subsequent melting of the modified source. The chemistry of arc magmas and the residual mantle wedge are not only regulated by the chemistry of the slab input, but also by the phase relations of metasomatism or hybridization process in the wedge. The sediment-derived silica-rich fluids and hydrous partial melts create orthopyroxene-rich zones in the mantle wedge, due to reaction of mantle olivine with silica in the fluid/melt [1,2]. Geochemical evidence for such a reaction comes from pyroxenitic lithologies coexisting with peridotite in supra-subduction zones. In this study, we have simulated the partial melting of a parcel of mantle wedge modified by bulk addition of sediment-derived melt with variable H2O contents to investigate the major and trace element chemistry of the magmas and the residues formed by this process. Experiments at 2-3 GPa and 1150-1300 °C were conducted on mixtures of 25% sediment-derived melt and 75% lherzolite, with bulk H2O contents varying from 2 to 6 wt.%. Partial reactive crystallization of the rhyolitic slab-derived melt and partial melting of the mixed source produced a range of melt compositions from ultra-K basanites to basaltic andesites, in equilibrium with an orthopyroxene ± phlogopite ± clinopyroxene ± garnet bearing residue, depending on P and bulk H2O content. Model calculations using partition coefficients (from literature) of trace elements between experimental minerals and silicate melt suggest that the geochemical signatures of the slab-derived melt, such as low Ce/Pb and depletion in Nb and Ta (characteristic slab signatures) are not erased from the resulting melt owing to reactive crystallization. The residual mineral assemblage is also found to be similar to the supra-subduction zone lithologies, such as those found in Dabie Shan (China) and Sanbagawa Belt (Japan). In this presentation, we will also

  13. Coercivity of the Nd-Fe-B hot-deformed magnets diffusion-processed with low melting temperature glass forming alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seelam, U. M. R.; Liu, Lihua; Akiya, T.; Sepehri-Amin, H.; Ohkubo, T.; Sakuma, N.; Yano, M.; Kato, A.; Hono, K.

    2016-08-01

    Nd- and Pr-based alloys with bulk glass forming ability and low melting temperatures, Nd60Al10Ni10Cu20 and Pr60Al10Ni10Cu20, were used for grain boundary diffusion process to enhance the coercivity of hot-deformed magnets. The coercivity increment was proportional to the weight gain after the diffusion process. For the sample with 64% weight gain, the coercivity increased up to 2.8 T, which is the highest value for bulk Nd-Fe-B magnets that do not contain heavy rare-earth elements, Dy or Tb. Approximately half of the intergranular regions were amorphous and the remaining regions were crystalline. Magnetic isolation of the Nd2Fe14B grains by the Nd-rich amorphous/crystalline intergranular phases is attributed to the large coercivity enhancement. The coercivity does not change after the crystallization of the intergranular phase, indicating that the coercivity is not influenced by the strain at the interface with the crystalline intergranular phase.

  14. Multidiffusion mechanisms for noble gases (He, Ne, Ar) in silicate glasses and melts in the transition temperature domain: Implications for glass polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amalberti, Julien; Burnard, Pete; Laporte, Didier; Tissandier, Laurent; Neuville, Daniel R.

    2016-01-01

    Noble gases are ideal probes to study the structure of silicate glasses and melts as the modifications of the silicate network induced by the incorporation of noble gases are negligible. In addition, there are systematic variations in noble gas atomic radii and several noble gas isotopes with which the influence of the network itself on diffusion may be investigated. Noble gases are therefore ideally suited to constrain the time scales of magma degassing and cooling. In order to document noble gas diffusion behavior in silicate glass, we measured the diffusivities of three noble gases (4He, 20Ne and 40Ar) and the isotopic diffusivities of two Ar isotopes (36Ar and 40Ar) in two synthetic basaltic glasses (G1 and G2; 20Ne and 36Ar were only measured in sample G1). These new diffusion results are used to re-interpret time scales of the acquisition of fractionated atmospheric noble gas signatures in pumices. The noble gas bearing glasses were synthesized by exposing the liquids to high noble gas partial pressures at high temperature and pressure (1750-1770 K and 1.2 GPa) in a piston-cylinder apparatus. Diffusivities were measured by step heating the glasses between 423 and 1198 K and measuring the fraction of gas released at each temperature step by noble gas mass spectrometry. In addition we measured the viscosity of G1 between 996 and 1072 K in order to determine the precise glass transition temperature and to estimate network relaxation time scales. The results indicate that, to a first order, that the smaller the size of the diffusing atom, the greater its diffusivity at a given temperature: D(He) > D(Ne) > D(Ar) at constant T. Significantly, the diffusivities of the noble gases in the glasses investigated do not display simple Arrhenian behavior: there are well-defined departures from Arrhenian behavior which occur at lower temperatures for He than for Ne or Ar. We propose that the non-Arrhenian behavior of noble gases can be explained by structural modifications

  15. Evidence for Extremely-High-Temperature Melting in the Solar Nebula from a CaAl4O7-bearing Spherule from Murchison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, S. B.; Grossman, L.; Davis, A. M.; Beckett, J. R.; Chamberlin, L.

    1993-07-01

    We have recovered a unique refractory spherule (B6) from the Murchison C2 chondrite. Approximately 140 micrometers in diameter, it is concentrically zoned, with an outer rim sequence, from outermost to innermost, of aluminous diopside (10 micrometers thick), anorthite (3 micrometers) and melilite (3 micrometers). Inside the melilite layer is a 7-micrometer-thick, nearly pure (except for a single, diverging-inward spray of hibonite crystals) layer of spinel. Inward from this layer is a 22-micrometer-wide zone of hibonite (~5.5 wt% TiO2) + spinel, in which hibonite laths, 1-4 micrometers across and up to 10 micrometers wide, are predominantly radially oriented and enclosed in spinel. Inward from this zone, presumably at the core of the inclusion, are CaAl4O7, occurring as anhedral grains ~10 micrometers across, and minor perovskite. Some of the hibonite laths protrude into the CaAl4O7. The sequence of mineral assemblages from the spinel shell inward parallels that expected for fractional crystallization of a melt of the composition of B6. Based on this, the inclusion's spherical shape, and its texture (radially oriented hibonite laths, including a diverging-inward spray; laths enclosed in spinel and protruding into CaAl4O7), we conclude that the oxide phases in B6 crystallized from a liquid. The spinel layer indicates that at least some of the spinel was molten; from the bulk composition, calculated liquidus phase relations in the system Al2O3-MgO-CaO [1], and the amount of spinel contained in the layer, we infer a melting temperature >2000 degrees C. This is >500 degrees higher than the maximum temperature at which any condensed major phase is stable at 10-3 atm in a gas of solar composition, but we see no evidence of evaporation. First, the inclusion has a Group II REE pattern, rather than a Group III or an ultrarefractory pattern, which could reflect devolatilization. Second, although evaporation of molten (but not solid) Mg2SiO4 leads to Mg isotopic mass

  16. Absolute neutrino mass measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, Joachim

    2011-10-01

    The neutrino mass plays an important role in particle physics, astrophysics and cosmology. In recent years the detection of neutrino flavour oscillations proved that neutrinos carry mass. However, oscillation experiments are only sensitive to the mass-squared difference of the mass eigenvalues. In contrast to cosmological observations and neutrino-less double beta decay (0v2β) searches, single β-decay experiments provide a direct, model-independent way to determine the absolute neutrino mass by measuring the energy spectrum of decay electrons at the endpoint region with high accuracy. Currently the best kinematic upper limits on the neutrino mass of 2.2eV have been set by two experiments in Mainz and Troitsk, using tritium as beta emitter. The next generation tritium β-experiment KATRIN is currently under construction in Karlsruhe/Germany by an international collaboration. KATRIN intends to improve the sensitivity by one order of magnitude to 0.2eV. The investigation of a second isotope (137Rh) is being pursued by the international MARE collaboration using micro-calorimeters to measure the beta spectrum. The technology needed to reach 0.2eV sensitivity is still in the R&D phase. This paper reviews the present status of neutrino-mass measurements with cosmological data, 0v2β decay and single β-decay.

  17. Absolute neutrino mass measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, Joachim

    2011-10-06

    The neutrino mass plays an important role in particle physics, astrophysics and cosmology. In recent years the detection of neutrino flavour oscillations proved that neutrinos carry mass. However, oscillation experiments are only sensitive to the mass-squared difference of the mass eigenvalues. In contrast to cosmological observations and neutrino-less double beta decay (0v2{beta}) searches, single {beta}-decay experiments provide a direct, model-independent way to determine the absolute neutrino mass by measuring the energy spectrum of decay electrons at the endpoint region with high accuracy.Currently the best kinematic upper limits on the neutrino mass of 2.2eV have been set by two experiments in Mainz and Troitsk, using tritium as beta emitter. The next generation tritium {beta}-experiment KATRIN is currently under construction in Karlsruhe/Germany by an international collaboration. KATRIN intends to improve the sensitivity by one order of magnitude to 0.2eV. The investigation of a second isotope ({sup 137}Rh) is being pursued by the international MARE collaboration using micro-calorimeters to measure the beta spectrum. The technology needed to reach 0.2eV sensitivity is still in the R and D phase. This paper reviews the present status of neutrino-mass measurements with cosmological data, 0v2{beta} decay and single {beta}-decay.

  18. The Effect of Temperature and Carbon to Hematite Ratio on the Formation of Cementite During the Couple of STMA and Partial Melting Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soleymani, Amir Peyman; Panjepour, Masoud; Meratian, Mahmood

    2016-04-01

    In this research, the role of the couple of simultaneous thermal-mechanical activation (STMA) and partial melting (PM) processes in the carbothermic reduction of hematite and cementite formation was studied. For this purpose, the STMA process was performed for 6 hours at 1073 K (800 °C) on the mixture of hematite and graphite with stoichiometry ratio (22 wt pct C) in argon atmosphere in the first stage, and then this process was coupled to the PM process at 1453 K (1180 °C) for 25 minutes. The results obtained showed that the percentage of cementite phase in the product of the STMA process was only about 24 wt pct and after carrying out the PM process, this value reached 77 wt pct in the final product. In the second stage, the effect of the ratio of the parameters of carbon to hematite on the initial mixture (1:1, 1:25, and 1:5 times the stoichiometry ratio) and STMA process temperature [1073 K, 1123 K, and 1173 K (800 °C, 850 °C, and 900 °C)] was studied. The results were indicative of the fact that by an increase in the ratio of carbon to hematite and at STMA temperature, the percentage of cementite in the final product obtained from the PM process significantly increased. In fact, the specimens obtained from the couple of the STMA and PM processes with a carbon to hematite ratio of 1.5:1 at 1073 K (800 °C) and that of 1.25:1 at 1173 K (900 °C) showed the greatest percentage of cementite. The mechanism regarding the processes showed that by controlling the amount and manner of free carbon distribution in the STMA product based on the parameters of the ratio of carbon to hematite and temperature, it was possible to obtain pure cementite. Therefore, the couple of STMA and PM processes can also be brought up as a new method in the production of pure cementite.

  19. Thermal properties of defect melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ami, S.; Hofsäss, T.; Horsley, R.

    1984-03-01

    Using mean field theory and high temperature expansions the transition temperature, entropy jump and heat capacity are calculated in the recent microscopic model of defect melting proposed by Kleinert. The results are compared with the experimental data for almost isotropic substances.

  20. Comparative Evaluation of Sloppy Molecular Beacon and Dual-Labeled Probe Melting Temperature Assays to Identify Mutations in Mycobacterium tuberculosis Resulting in Rifampin, Fluoroquinolone and Aminoglycoside Resistance.

    PubMed

    Roh, Sandy S; Smith, Laura E; Lee, Jong Seok; Via, Laura E; Barry, Clifton E; Alland, David; Chakravorty, Soumitesh

    2015-01-01

    Several molecular assays to detect resistance to Rifampin, the Fluoroquinolones, and Aminoglycosides in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) have been recently described. A systematic approach for comparing these assays in the laboratory is needed in order to determine the relative advantage of each assay and to decide which ones should be advanced to evaluation. We performed an analytic comparison of a Sloppy Molecular Beacon (SMB) melting temperature (Tm) assay and a Dual labeled probe (DLP) Tm assay. Both assays targeted the M. tuberculosis rpoB, gyrA, rrs genes and the eis promoter region. The sensitivity and specificity to detect mutations, analytic limit of detection (LOD) and the detection of heteroresistance were tested using a panel of 56 clinical DNA samples from drug resistant M. tuberculosis strains. Both SMB and DLP assays detected 29/29 (100%) samples with rpoB RRDR mutations and 3/3 (100%) samples with eis promoter mutations correctly. The SMB assay detected all 17/17 gyrA mutants and 22/22 rrs mutants, while the DLP assay detected 16/17 (94%) gyrA mutants and 12/22 (55%) rrs mutants. Both assays showed comparable LODs for detecting rpoB and eis mutations; however, the SMB assay LODs were at least two logs better for detecting wild type and mutants in gyrA and rrs targets. The SMB assay was also moderately better at detecting heteroresistance. In summary, both assays appeared to be promising methods to detect drug resistance associated mutations in M. tuberculosis; however, the relative advantage of each assay varied under each test condition. PMID:25938476

  1. Results from recent vacuum testing of an on-orbit absolute radiance standard (OARS) intended for the next generation of infrared remote sensing instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Best, Fred A.; Adler, Douglas P.; Pettersen, Claire; Revercomb, Henry E.; Gero, P. Jonathan; Taylor, Joseph K.; Knuteson, Robert O.

    2014-11-01

    Future NASA infrared remote sensing missions will require better absolute measurement accuracies than now available, and will most certainly rely on the emerging capability to fly SI traceable standards that provide irrefutable absolute measurement accuracy. To establish a CLARRREO-type climate benchmark, instrumentation will need to measure spectrally resolved infrared radiances with an absolute brightness temperature error of better than 0.1 K, verified onorbit. This will require an independent high-emissivity (<0.999) verification blackbody with an emissivity uncertainty of better than 0.06%, an absolute temperature uncertainty of better than 0.045K (3 sigma), and the capability of operation over a wide range of (Earth scene) temperatures. Key elements of an On-Orbit Absolute Radiance Standard (OARS) meeting these stringent requirements have been demonstrated in the laboratory at the University of Wisconsin and have undergone further refinement under funding from NASA's Earth Science and Technology Office, culminating in an end-to-end demonstration under vacuum with a prototype climate benchmark instrument. We present the new technologies that underlie the OARS, and the results of testing that demonstrate the required accuracy is being met in a vacuum environment. The underlying technologies include: on-orbit absolute temperature calibration using the transient melt signatures of small quantities (<1g) of reference materials (gallium, water, and mercury) imbedded in the blackbody cavity; and on-orbit cavity spectral emissivity measurement using a carefully baffled heated halo placed in front of the OARS blackbody viewed by the infrared spectrometer system. Emissivity is calculated from the radiance measured from the blackbody combined with the knowledge of key temperatures and radiometric view factors.

  2. Absolute cavity pyrgeometer

    DOEpatents

    Reda, Ibrahim

    2013-10-29

    Implementations of the present disclosure involve an apparatus and method to measure the long-wave irradiance of the atmosphere or long-wave source. The apparatus may involve a thermopile, a concentrator and temperature controller. The incoming long-wave irradiance may be reflected from the concentrator to a thermopile receiver located at the bottom of the concentrator to receive the reflected long-wave irradiance. In addition, the thermopile may be thermally connected to a temperature controller to control the device temperature. Through use of the apparatus, the long-wave irradiance of the atmosphere may be calculated from several measurements provided by the apparatus. In addition, the apparatus may provide an international standard of pyrgeometers' calibration that is traceable back to the International System of Units (SI) rather than to a blackbody atmospheric simulator.

  3. Selective Laser Melting of Polymer Powder - Part Mechanics as Function of Exposure Speed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drexler, Maximilian; Lexow, Matthias; Drummer, Dietmar

    The selective laser melting of polymer powders is a well-established technology for additive manufacturing applications, although there is still a deficit in basic process knowledge. Considering the demands of series production, the technique of selective laser melting of polymers is faced with various challenges concerning suitable material systems, process strategies and part properties. Consequently, basic research is necessary to understand and optimize processes in order to enable a shift from prototyping applications to serial production of small-lot sized series. A better understanding of the interaction between the sub-processes of selective laser melting and the resulting part properties is necessary for the derivation of new process strategies for increased part quality. Selective laser melting of polymers is mainly divided in the three phases of powder feeding, tempering and geometry exposure. By the interaction of these sub-processes, the resulting temperature fields determine the part properties through microstructural changes in the pore number and distribution. In addition to absolute temperature values, the time dependency of the thermal fields has an influence on the porosity of the molten parts. Current process strategies aim for a decrease in building time by increasing scan speed and laser power, although the absolute energy input into the material does not change when scan speed and laser power are increased at a constant ratio. In prior investigations, the authors showed a correlation between the heating rate and the shape of the resulting melt pool. Based on this correlation, the interaction between heating rates (on a fixed level of exposure energy) and mechanical part properties (tensile test) is analyzed within the paper. The study also implies additional results for other levels of energy input during geometry exposure, which allow for a cross-check of the results. Furthermore, part positioning in the build chamber as well as part density

  4. Melting in Martian Snowbanks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zent, A. P.; Sutter, B.

    2005-01-01

    Precipitation as snow is an emerging paradigm for understanding water flow on Mars, which gracefully resolves many outstanding uncertainties in climatic and geomorphic interpretation. Snowfall does not require a powerful global greenhouse to effect global precipitation. It has long been assumed that global average temperatures greater than 273K are required to sustain liquid water at the surface via rainfall and runoff. Unfortunately, the best greenhouse models to date predict global mean surface temperatures early in Mars' history that differ little from today's, unless exceptional conditions are invoked. Snowfall however, can occur at temperatures less than 273K; all that is required is saturation of the atmosphere. At global temperatures lower than 273K, H2O would have been injected into the atmosphere by impacts and volcanic eruptions during the Noachian, and by obliquity-driven climate oscillations more recently. Snow cover can accumulate for a considerable period, and be available for melting during local spring and summer, unless sublimation rates are sufficient to remove the entire snowpack. We decided to explore the physics that controls the melting of snow in the high-latitude regions of Mars to understand the frequency and drainage of snowmelt in the high martian latitudes.

  5. Absolute Identification by Relative Judgment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Neil; Brown, Gordon D. A.; Chater, Nick

    2005-01-01

    In unidimensional absolute identification tasks, participants identify stimuli that vary along a single dimension. Performance is surprisingly poor compared with discrimination of the same stimuli. Existing models assume that identification is achieved using long-term representations of absolute magnitudes. The authors propose an alternative…

  6. Be Resolute about Absolute Value

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kidd, Margaret L.

    2007-01-01

    This article explores how conceptualization of absolute value can start long before it is introduced. The manner in which absolute value is introduced to students in middle school has far-reaching consequences for their future mathematical understanding. It begins to lay the foundation for students' understanding of algebra, which can change…

  7. Low temperature synthesis of potassium doped barium lead perovskites K{sub x}Ba{sub 1{minus}x}PbO{sub 3{minus}y} from hydroxide melts

    SciTech Connect

    Bezzenberger, R.; Schoellhorn, R.

    1995-12-01

    Perovskite type barium oxoplumbates can be grown at low temperatures via chemical synthesis from alkali hydroxide melts. Strongly oxidizing conditions and low K/Ba ratio lead to the formation of the ternary phase BaPbO{sub 3} whereas less oxidizing conditions and high K/Ba ratio favor the formation of the quaternary solid solution K{sub x}Ba{sub 1{minus}x}PbO{sub 3{minus}y} with tetragonal symmetry. Mixed valence PbII/PbIV quaternary phases can similarly be prepared by anodic deposition from hydroxide melts in closed systems; partial substitution by rare earth ions is possible. Ternary and quaternary oxoplumbates can be reduced electrochemically in aqueous electrolytes at ambient temperature under formation of lead metal.

  8. Challenges in Melt Furnace Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belt, Cynthia

    2014-09-01

    Measurement is a critical part of running a cast house. Key performance indicators such as energy intensity, production (or melt rate), downtime (or OEE), and melt loss must all be understood and monitored on a weekly or monthly basis. Continuous process variables such as bath temperature, flue temperature, and furnace pressure should be used to control the furnace systems along with storing the values in databases for later analysis. While using measurement to track furnace performance over time is important, there is also a time and place for short-term tests.

  9. Thermocapillary flow and natural convection in a melt column with an unknown melt/solid interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lan, C. W.; Kou, Sindo

    1991-01-01

    A vertical melt column set up between an upper heating rod and a lower sample rod, i.e., the so-called half-zone system, is a convenient experimental tool for studying convection in the melt in floating-zone crystal growth. In order to help understand the convection observed in the melt column, a computer model has been developed to describe steady state, axisymmetrical thermocapillary flow and natural convection in the melt. The governing equations and boundary conditions are expressed in general non-orthogonal curvilinear coordinates in order to accurately treat the unknown melt/solid interface as well as all other physical boundaries in the system. The effects of key dimensionless variables on the following items are discussed: (1) convection and temperature distribution in the melt; (2) the shape of the melt/solid interface; (3) the height of the melt column. These dimensionless variables are the Grashof, Marangoni and Prandtl numbers.

  10. Communication: Theory of melt-memory in polymer crystallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muthukumar, M.

    2016-07-01

    Details of crystallization processes of a polymer at the crystallization temperature Tc from its melt kept initially at the melt temperature Tm depend profoundly on the nature of the initial melt state and often are accompanied by memory effects. This phenomenon is in contrast to small molecular systems where the supercooling (Tm0-Tc), with Tm0 being the equilibrium melting temperature, and not (Tm - Tc), determines the nature of crystallization. In addressing this five-decade old puzzle of melt-memory in polymer crystallization, we present a theory to describe melt-memory effects, by invoking an intermediate inhomogeneous melt state in the pathway between the melt and crystalline states. Using newly introduced dissolution temperature T10 for the inhomogeneous melt state and the transition temperature Tt0 for the transition between the inhomogeneous melt and crystalline states, analytical formulas are derived for the nucleation rate as a function of the melt temperature. The theory is general to address different kinds of melt-memory effects depending on whether Tm is higher or lower than Tm0. The derived results are in qualitative agreement with known experimental data, while making predictions for further experiments on melt-memory.

  11. Communication: Theory of melt-memory in polymer crystallization.

    PubMed

    Muthukumar, M

    2016-07-21

    Details of crystallization processes of a polymer at the crystallization temperature Tc from its melt kept initially at the melt temperature Tm depend profoundly on the nature of the initial melt state and often are accompanied by memory effects. This phenomenon is in contrast to small molecular systems where the supercooling (Tm (0)-Tc), with Tm (0) being the equilibrium melting temperature, and not (Tm - Tc), determines the nature of crystallization. In addressing this five-decade old puzzle of melt-memory in polymer crystallization, we present a theory to describe melt-memory effects, by invoking an intermediate inhomogeneous melt state in the pathway between the melt and crystalline states. Using newly introduced dissolution temperature T1 (0) for the inhomogeneous melt state and the transition temperature Tt (0) for the transition between the inhomogeneous melt and crystalline states, analytical formulas are derived for the nucleation rate as a function of the melt temperature. The theory is general to address different kinds of melt-memory effects depending on whether Tm is higher or lower than Tm (0). The derived results are in qualitative agreement with known experimental data, while making predictions for further experiments on melt-memory. PMID:27448866

  12. Thermodynamics of freezing and melting.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Ulf R; Costigliola, Lorenzo; Bailey, Nicholas P; Schrøder, Thomas B; Dyre, Jeppe C

    2016-01-01

    Although the freezing of liquids and melting of crystals are fundamental for many areas of the sciences, even simple properties like the temperature-pressure relation along the melting line cannot be predicted today. Here we present a theory in which properties of the coexisting crystal and liquid phases at a single thermodynamic state point provide the basis for calculating the pressure, density and entropy of fusion as functions of temperature along the melting line, as well as the variation along this line of the reduced crystalline vibrational mean-square displacement (the Lindemann ratio), and the liquid's diffusion constant and viscosity. The framework developed, which applies for the sizable class of systems characterized by hidden scale invariance, is validated by computer simulations of the standard 12-6 Lennard-Jones system. PMID:27530064

  13. High-resolution melting-curve analysis of obg gene to differentiate the temperature-sensitive Mycoplasma synoviae vaccine strain MS-H from non-temperature-sensitive strains.

    PubMed

    Shahid, Muhammad A; Markham, Philip F; Marenda, Marc S; Agnew-Crumpton, Rebecca; Noormohammadi, Amir H

    2014-01-01

    Temperature-sensitive (ts+) vaccine strain MS-H is the only live attenuated M. synoviae vaccine commercially available for use in poultry. With increasing use of this vaccine to control M. synoviae infections, differentiation of MS-H from field M. synoviae strains and from rarely occurring non-temperature-sensitive (ts-) MS-H revertants has become important, especially in countries where local strains are indistinguishable from MS-H by sequence analysis of variable lipoprotein haemagglutinin (vlhA) gene. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the obg of MS-H have been found to associate with ts phenotype. In this study, four PCRs followed by high-resolution melting (HRM)-curve analysis of the regions encompassing these SNPs were developed and evaluated for their potential to differentiate MS-H from 36 M. synoviae strains/isolates. The nested-obg PCR-HRM differentiated ts+ MS-H vaccine not only from field M. synoviae strains/isolates but also from ts- MS-H revertants. The mean genotype confidence percentages, 96.9±3.4 and 8.8±11.2 for ts+ and ts- strains, respectively, demonstrated high differentiating power of the nested-obg PCR-HRM. Using a combination of nested-obg and obg-F3R3 PCR-HRM, 97% of the isolates/strains were typed according to their ts phenotype with all MS-H isolates typed as MS-H. A set of respiratory swabs from MS-H vaccinated specific pathogen free chickens and M. synoviae infected commercial chicken flocks were tested using obg PCR-HRM system and results were consistent with those of vlhA genotyping. The PCR-HRM system developed in this study, proved to be a rapid and reliable tool using pure M. synoviae cultures as well as direct clinical specimens. PMID:24643035

  14. Melting granites to make granites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, Bruna B.; Sawyer, Edward W.; Janasi, Valdecir de A.

    2014-05-01

    Large-scale partial melting in the continental crust is widely attributed to fluid-absent incongruent breakdown of hydrous minerals in the case of pelites, greywackes and meta-mafic rocks. Granite is a far more common rock in the continental crust, but fluid-absent hydrate-breakdown melting is unlikely to result in significant melting in granites because of their low modal abundance of mica or amphibole. Experiments show that fluid-present melting can produce ~30% melt at low temperatures (690°C). Thus, granites and leucogranites can be very fertile if H2O-present melting occurs via reactions such as plagioclase + quartz + K-feldspar + H2O = melt, because of their high modal proportions of the reactant phases. Our study investigates the Kinawa Migmatite in the São Francisco Craton, southeastern Brazil. This migmatite is derived from an Archaean TTG sequence and can be divided into; 1) pink diatexites, 2) leucosomes, 3) grey gneisses and 4) amphibolites. The migmatite records upper-amphibolite to beginning of granulite facies metamorphism in a P-T range from 5.1-6.6 kbar and ~650-780°C. Pink diatexites are the most abundant rocks, and their appearance varies depending on the amount of melt they contained. Three types are recognised: residual diatexites (low melt fraction (Mf)), schlieren diatexites (moderate Mf) and homogeneous diatexites (high Mf). They are very closely related spatially in the field, with mostly transitional contacts. There is a sequence with progressive loss of ferromagnesian minerals, schollen and schlieren through the sequence to the most melt-rich parts of the diatexites as magmatic flow became more intense. There are fewer ferromagnesian minerals, thus the melt becomes cleaner (more leucocratic) and, because the schlieren have disaggregated the aspect is more homogeneous. These parts are texturally similar to leucogranites in which the biotite is randomly distributed and pre-melting structures are completely destroyed. The likely protolith

  15. X-ray studies of the melting of Pb nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Kevin Francis

    Numerous theoretical and experimental studies in the literature have shown that the melting temperature of a small crystallite is reduced from the bulk melting temperature in inverse proportion to the crystallite size. The three models of melting differ mainly in whether a liquid skin envelops the interior crystallite before or during the melting (namely, the Liquid Skin or the Liquid Nucleation and Growth Model) or never (the Homogeneous Melting Model). Despite four decades of experimental investigation, all three melting models remain viable. To identify the melting mechanism unambiguously, we measured the liquid skin growth as well as the size-dependent melting temperature of an ensemble of Pb nanocrystals (5 to 50 nm diameter). Sphere-like nanocrystalline islands were formed in situ by condensing, melting, and re-solidifying Pb (roughly 2 nanometers average thickness) on an oxidized silicon substrate surface. Auger electron spectroscopy showed that the sample remains atomically clean for tens of hours. X-ray powder diffraction signals were obtained by using a weakly scattering Si (532)-oriented substrate, a position-sensitive x-ray detector, and a rotating anode x-ray source. Whereas most prior studies have measured the size-dependent melting temperature via the diffraction intensity, it is shown here that crystallite re-orientation also occurs below the melting temperature, making the diffraction intensity an unreliable indicator of melting. Instead of the diffraction intensity, Fourier analysis of the diffraction peak shape reveals the size-dependent melting via changes in the crystallite size distribution. The melting temperature varies inversely with the crystallite size. Surface melting is demonstrated via the reversible growth of a 0.5 nm liquid skin on the crystallites just below the size-dependent melting temperature. Both results support the Liquid Skin Melting Model over other models in the literature; quantitative comparisons to the models are made.

  16. A benchmark initiative on mantle convection with melting and melt segregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmeling, Harro; Dannberg, Juliane; Dohmen, Janik; Kalousova, Klara; Maurice, Maxim; Noack, Lena; Plesa, Ana; Soucek, Ondrej; Spiegelman, Marc; Thieulot, Cedric; Tosi, Nicola; Wallner, Herbert

    2016-04-01

    In recent years a number of mantle convection models have been developed which include partial melting within the asthenosphere, estimation of melt volumes, as well as melt extraction with and without redistribution at the surface or within the lithosphere. All these approaches use various simplifying modelling assumptions whose effects on the dynamics of convection including the feedback on melting have not been explored in sufficient detail. To better assess the significance of such assumptions and to provide test cases for the modelling community we carry out a benchmark comparison. The reference model is taken from the mantle convection benchmark, cases 1a to 1c (Blankenbach et al., 1989), assuming a square box with free slip boundary conditions, the Boussinesq approximation, constant viscosity and Rayleigh numbers of 104 to 10^6. Melting is modelled using a simplified binary solid solution with linearly depth dependent solidus and liquidus temperatures, as well as a solidus temperature depending linearly on depletion. Starting from a plume free initial temperature condition (to avoid melting at the onset time) five cases are investigated: Case 1 includes melting, but without thermal or dynamic feedback on the convection flow. This case provides a total melt generation rate (qm) in a steady state. Case 2 is identical to case 1 except that latent heat is switched on. Case 3 includes batch melting, melt buoyancy (melt Rayleigh number Rm) and depletion buoyancy, but no melt percolation. Output quantities are the Nusselt number (Nu), root mean square velocity (vrms), the maximum and the total melt volume and qm approaching a statistical steady state. Case 4 includes two-phase flow, i.e. melt percolation, assuming a constant shear and bulk viscosity of the matrix and various melt retention numbers (Rt). These cases are carried out using the Compaction Boussinseq Approximation (Schmeling, 2000) or the full compaction formulation. For cases 1 - 3 very good agreement

  17. From Hubble's NGSL to Absolute Fluxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heap, Sara R.; Lindler, Don

    2012-01-01

    Hubble's Next Generation Spectral Library (NGSL) consists of R-l000 spectra of 374 stars of assorted temperature, gravity, and metallicity. Each spectrum covers the wavelength range, 0.18-1.00 microns. The library can be viewed and/or downloaded from the website, http://archive.stsci.edu/prepds/stisngsll. Stars in the NGSL are now being used as absolute flux standards at ground-based observatories. However, the uncertainty in the absolute flux is about 2%, which does not meet the requirements of dark-energy surveys. We are therefore developing an observing procedure that should yield fluxes with uncertainties less than 1 % and will take part in an HST proposal to observe up to 15 stars using this new procedure.

  18. Rheology of Melt-bearing Crustal Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenberg, C. L.; Medvedev, S.; Handy, M. R.

    2006-12-01

    A review and reinterpretation of previous experimental data on the deformation of melt-bearing crustal rocks (Rosenberg and Handy, 2005) revealed that the relationship of aggregate strength to melt fraction is non-linear, even if plotted on a linear ordinate and abscissa. At melt fractions, Φ 0.07, the dependence of aggregate strength on Φ is significantly greater than at Φ > 0.07. This melt fraction (Φ= 0.07) marks the transition from a significant increase in the proportion of melt-bearing grain boundaries up to this point to a minor increase thereafter. Therefore, we suggest that the increase of melt-interconnectivity causes the dramatic strength drop between the solidus and a melt fraction of 0.07. A second strength drop occurs at higher melt fractions and corresponds to the breakdown of the solid (crystal) framework, corresponding to the well-known "rheologically critical melt percentage" (RCMP; Arzi, 1978). Although the strength drop at the RCMP is about 4 orders of magnitude, the absolute value of this drop is small compared to the absolute strength of the unmelted aggregate, rendering the RCMP invisible in a linear aggregate strength vs. melt fraction diagram. Predicting the rheological properties and thresholds of melt-bearing crust on the basis of the results and interpretations above is very difficult, because the rheological data base was obtained from experiments performed at undrained conditions in the brittle field. These conditions are unlikely to represent the flow of partially melted crust. The measured strength of most of the experimentally deformed, partially-melted samples corresponds to their maximum differential stress, before the onset of brittle failure, not to their viscous strength during "ductile" (viscous) flow. To overcome these problems, we extrapolated a theoretically-derived flow law for partially melted granite deforming by diffusion-accommodated grain-boundary sliding (Paterson, 2001) and an experimentally-derived flow law for

  19. Melt dumping in string stabilized ribbon growth

    DOEpatents

    Sachs, Emanuel M.

    1986-12-09

    A method and apparatus for stabilizing the edge positions of a ribbon drawn from a melt includes the use of wettable strings drawn in parallel up through the melt surface, the ribbon being grown between the strings. A furnace and various features of the crucible used therein permit continuous automatic growth of flat ribbons without close temperature control or the need for visual inspection.

  20. Oxidation and melting of aluminum nanopowders.

    PubMed

    Trunov, Mikhaylo A; Umbrajkar, Swati M; Schoenitz, Mirko; Mang, Joseph T; Dreizin, Edward L

    2006-07-01

    Recently, nanometer-sized aluminum powders became available commercially, and their use as potential additives to propellants, explosives, and pyrotechnics has attracted significant interest. It has been suggested that very low melting temperatures are expected for nanosized aluminum powders and that such low melting temperatures could accelerate oxidation and trigger ignition much earlier than for regular, micron-sized aluminum powders. The objective of this work was to investigate experimentally the melting and oxidation behavior of nanosized aluminum powders. Powder samples with three different nominal sizes of 44, 80, and 121 nm were provided by Nanotechnologies Inc. The particle size distributions were measured using small-angle X-ray scattering. Melting was studied by differential scanning calorimetry where the powders were heated from room temperature to 750 degrees C in an argon environment. Thermogravimetric analysis was used to measure the mass increase indicative of oxidation while the powders were heated in an oxygen-argon gas mixture. The measured melting curves were compared to those computed using the experimental particle size distributions and thermodynamic models describing the melting temperature and enthalpy as functions of the particle size. The melting behavior predicted by different models correlated with the experimental observations only qualitatively. Characteristic stepwise oxidation was observed for all studied nanopowders. The observed oxidation behavior was well interpreted considering the recently established kinetics of oxidation of micron-sized aluminum powders. No correlation was found between the melting and oxidation of aluminum nanopowders. PMID:16805619

  1. Transient melting of an ESR electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharicha, A.; Karimi-Sibaki, E.; Bohacek, J.; Wu, M.; Ludwig, A.

    2016-07-01

    Melting parameters of ESR process such as melt rate and immersion depth of electrode are of great importance. In this paper, a dynamic mesh based simulation framework is proposed to model melt rate and shape of electrode during the ESR process. Coupling interactions between turbulent flow, temperature, and electromagnetic fields are fully considered. The model is computationally efficient, and enables us to directly calculate melting parameters. Furthermore, dynamic change of electrode shape by melting can be captured. It is necessary to control the feeding velocity of electrode due to melting instabilities in the ESR process. As such, a numerical control is implemented based on the immersion depth of electrode to achieve the steady state in the simulation. Furthermore, the modeling result is evaluated against an experiment.

  2. Quantifying melting and mobilistaion of interstitial melts in crystal mushes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veksler, Ilya; Dobson, Katherine; Hess, Kai-Uwe; Ertel-Ingrisch, Werner; Humphreys, Madeleine

    2015-04-01

    The deformation of crystals mushes and separation of melts and crystals in is critical to understanding the development of physical and chemical heterogeneity in magma chambers and has been invoked as an eruption trigger mechanism. Here we investigate the behaviour of the melt in the well characterised, classic crystal mush system of the Skaergaard intrusion by combining experimental petrology and the non-destructive 3D imaging methods. Starting materials for partial melting experiments were four samples from the upper Middle Zone of the Layered Series. Cylinders, 15 mm in diameter and 20 mm in length, were drilled out of the rock samples, placed in alumina crucibles and held for 5 days in electric furnaces at atmospheric pressure and 1050-1100 °C. Redox conditions set by the CO-CO2 gas mixture were kept close to those of the FMQ buffer. We then use spatially registered 3D x-ray computed tomography images, collected before and after the experiment, to determine the volume and distribution of the crystal framework and interstitial phases, and the volume, distribution and connectivity the interstitial phases that undergo melting and extraction while at elevated temperature. Image analysis has allowed us to quantify these physical changes with high spatial resolution. Our work is a first step towards quantitative understanding of the melt mobilisation and migration processes operating in notionally locked crystal rich magmatic systems.

  3. Microstructures and mechanical properties of dispersion-strengthened high-temperature Al-8.5Fe-1.2V-1.7Si alloys produced by atomized melt deposition process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hariprasad, S.; Sastry, S. M. L.; Jerina, K. L.; Lederich, R. J.

    1993-04-01

    Dispersion-strengthened high-temperature Al-8.5 pct Fe-pct Si-pct V alloys were produced by atomized melt deposition (AMD) process. The effects of process parameters on the evolution of microstructures were determined using optical metallography and scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The extent of undercooling and the rate of droplet solidification were correlated with process parameters, such as melt superheat, metal/gas flow rates, and melt stream diameter. The size distribution and morphology of silicide dispersoids were used to estimate the degree of undercooling and the cooling rate as functions of process parameters. The tensile properties at 25 °C to 425 °C and fracture toughness at 25 °C of these alloys produced with wide variations in dispersoids size and grain size were determined. Under optimum conditions, the alloy has ultimate tensile strength of 281 MPa and 9.5 pct ductility in the as-deposited condition. Upon hot-isostatic pressing and extrusion, the ultimate tensile strength increased to 313 MPa and ductility increased to 18 pct.

  4. Heat capacity and absolute entropy of iron phosphides

    SciTech Connect

    Dobrokhotova, Z.V.; Zaitsev, A.I.; Litvina, A.D.

    1994-09-01

    There is little or no data on the thermodynamic properties of iron phosphides despite their importance for several areas of science and technology. The information available is of a qualitative character and is based on assessments of the heat capacity and absolute entropy. In the present work, we measured the heat capacity over the temperature range of 113-873 K using a differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) and calculated the absolute entropy.

  5. Thermodynamics of freezing and melting

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, Ulf R.; Costigliola, Lorenzo; Bailey, Nicholas P.; Schrøder, Thomas B.; Dyre, Jeppe C.

    2016-01-01

    Although the freezing of liquids and melting of crystals are fundamental for many areas of the sciences, even simple properties like the temperature–pressure relation along the melting line cannot be predicted today. Here we present a theory in which properties of the coexisting crystal and liquid phases at a single thermodynamic state point provide the basis for calculating the pressure, density and entropy of fusion as functions of temperature along the melting line, as well as the variation along this line of the reduced crystalline vibrational mean-square displacement (the Lindemann ratio), and the liquid's diffusion constant and viscosity. The framework developed, which applies for the sizable class of systems characterized by hidden scale invariance, is validated by computer simulations of the standard 12-6 Lennard-Jones system. PMID:27530064

  6. Probing depth dependencies of melt emplacement on time dependent quantities in a continental rift scenario with melting and melt extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallner, Herbert; Schmeling, Harro

    2014-05-01

    Since some years seismological observations provide increasing evidence of a discontinuity near the mid of older mantle lithosphere. Explanation may be a melt infiltration front (MIF) as upper margin of an evolving network of veins. These are formed by crystallized melt supplied by episodic melting events in the asthenosphere. To test this concept geodynamically we performed numerical modelling applying melting, extraction of melt and emplacement in a viscous matrix. Thereupon, we were faced to the problem defining an intrusion level for the melt. Findings of prior studies led to the need of movable, process dependent boundaries of the emplacement zone additionally making the process probably more self-consistent. Here we present a preliminary study exploring several empirical attempts to relate time dependent states to an upward moving boundary for intrusion. Modeled physics is based on thermo-mechanics of visco-plastic flow. The equations of conservation of mass, momentum and energy are solved for a multi component (crust-mantle) and two phase (melt-matrix) system. Rheology is temperature-, pressure-, and stress-dependent. In consideration of depletion and enrichment melting and solidification are controlled by a simplified linear binary solid solution model. The Compaction Boussinesq Approximation and the high Prandtl number approximation are used, elasticity is neglected and geometry is restricted to 2D. Approximation is done with the Finite Difference Method with markers in an Eulerian formulation (FDCON). Model guiding scenario is a extending thick lithosphere associated to by updoming asthenosphere probably additionally heated by a plume nearby. As the P-T conditions in the asthenosphere are near the solidus caused changes may increase melting and generate partial melt. Against conventional expectations on permeability at lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB) depth a fast melt transport into and sometimes through the lithosphere often is observed. The

  7. Absolute transition probabilities of phosphorus.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, M. H.; Roig, R. A.; Bengtson, R. D.

    1971-01-01

    Use of a gas-driven shock tube to measure the absolute strengths of 21 P I lines and 126 P II lines (from 3300 to 6900 A). Accuracy for prominent, isolated neutral and ionic lines is estimated to be 28 to 40% and 18 to 30%, respectively. The data and the corresponding theoretical predictions are examined for conformity with the sum rules.-

  8. Magnetic properties of Mn-Bi melt-spun ribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Tetsuji; Nishimura, Ryuji; Nishio-Hamane, Daisuke

    2014-01-01

    Mn-Bi melt-spun ribbons with the low temperature phase (LTP) of MnBi were produced by melt-spinning and subsequent annealing. The as-rapidly quenched Mn-Bi melt-spun ribbons contained some LTP MnBi phase and exhibited a high coercivity exceeding 8 kOe. Annealing of the melt-spun ribbons resulted in an increase in the amount of the LTP MnBi phase. A maximum remanence value of 42 emu/g was achieved in Mn50Bi50 melt-spun ribbon annealed at 673 K for 1 h. High-temperature measurements revealed that the coercivity of the annealed Mn50Bi50 melt-spun ribbon increased with increasing ambient temperature. Although the Mn50Bi50 melt-spun ribbons showed a much smaller coercivity than Nd15Fe77B8 melt-spun ribbon at room temperature, it exhibited a higher coercivity at temperatures of 473 K and higher. Therefore, the magnetic properties of Mn50Bi50 melt-spun ribbon are comparable to those of Nd-Fe-B melt-spun ribbon at an ambient temperature of 473 K and become superior to those of Nd-Fe-B melt-spun ribbon at 573 K.

  9. Electrical conductivity measurements on silicate melts using the loop technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waff, H. S.

    1976-01-01

    A new method is described for measurement of the electrical conductivity of silicate melts under controlled oxygen partial pressure at temperatures to 1550 C. The melt samples are suspended as droplets on platinum-rhodium loops, minimizing iron loss from the melt due to alloying with platinum, and providing maximum surface exposure of the melt to the oxygen-buffering gas atmosphere. The latter provides extremely rapid equilibration of the melt with the imposed oxygen partial pressure. The loop technique involves a minimum of setup time and cost, provides reproducible results to within + or - 5% and is well suited to electrical conductivity studies on silicate melts containing redox cations.

  10. Size effect on the melting temperature depression of Al12Mg17 complex metallic alloy nanoparticles prepared by planetary ball milling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zolriasatein, Ashkan; Shokuhfar, Ali

    2015-11-01

    This research investigates the synthesis and size-dependent melting point depression of complex metallic alloy (CMA) nanoparticles. Al12Mg17 which belongs to this new category of intermetallic materials was initially produced as pre-alloyed ingot, then homogenized to achieve single phase compound and crushed into small size powder and finally, mechanically milled in a planetary ball mill to synthesize nanoparticles. Phase and microstructural characterizations of the as-crushed and milled powders were performed using X-ray diffractometry (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Effects of the mechanical milling on thermal behavior of the Al12Mg17 nanoparticles in comparison with as-cast Al12Mg17 ingot has been investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) measurement. It was found that an average particle size of 24 nm with crystallite size of 16 nm was achieved after 20 h of ball milling process. The size- dependent melting point depression of the Al12Mg17 nanoparticles has been experimentally observed and also comparison of the obtained results with theoretical models was carried out.

  11. How to detect melting in laser heating diamond anvil cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liuxiang, Yang

    2016-07-01

    Research on the melting phenomenon is the most challenging work in the high pressure/temperature field. Until now, large discrepancies still exist in the melting curve of iron, the most interesting and extensively studied element in geoscience research. Here we present a summary about techniques detecting melting in the laser heating diamond anvil cell.

  12. Decoupling of component diffusion in a glass-forming Zr(46.75)Ti(8.25)Cu(7.5)Ni(10)Be(27.5) melt far above the liquidus temperature.

    PubMed

    Basuki, Sri Wahyuni; Bartsch, Alexander; Yang, Fan; Rätzke, Klaus; Meyer, Andreas; Faupel, Franz

    2014-10-17

    We report (95)Zr and (57)Co radiotracer diffusivities and viscosity data in the equilibrium liquid state of a bulk metallic glass forming Zr(46.75)Ti(8.25)Cu(7.5)Ni(10)Be(27.5) melt (Vitreloy 4) far above the liquidus temperature T(l) that are not affected by convection, as evidenced via quasielastic neutron scattering. Zr diffusion is strongly decoupled from diffusion of the smaller components by more than a factor of 4 at T(l), although it obeys the Stokes-Einstein equation. The results suggest that, in the present Zr-based metallic glass forming systems, diffusion and viscous flow start to develop solidlike, i.e., energy-landscape-controlled, features already in the stable liquid state more than 300 K above the mode coupling temperature T(c). PMID:25361269

  13. Decoupling of Component Diffusion in a Glass-Forming Zr46.75Ti8.25Cu7.5Ni10Be27.5 Melt Far above the Liquidus Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basuki, Sri Wahyuni; Bartsch, Alexander; Yang, Fan; Rätzke, Klaus; Meyer, Andreas; Faupel, Franz

    2014-10-01

    We report Zr95 and Co57 radiotracer diffusivities and viscosity data in the equilibrium liquid state of a bulk metallic glass forming Zr46.75Ti8.25Cu7.5Ni10Be27.5 melt (Vitreloy 4) far above the liquidus temperature Tl that are not affected by convection, as evidenced via quasielastic neutron scattering. Zr diffusion is strongly decoupled from diffusion of the smaller components by more than a factor of 4 at Tl, although it obeys the Stokes-Einstein equation. The results suggest that, in the present Zr-based metallic glass forming systems, diffusion and viscous flow start to develop solidlike, i.e., energy-landscape-controlled, features already in the stable liquid state more than 300 K above the mode coupling temperature Tc.

  14. Mixed burden softening and melting phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaushik, Pallav

    The blast furnace (BF) will remain the major iron producing unit for the foreseeable future. The cohesive zone, where ferrous materials soften and melt, affects the productivity of the BF. This research was focused on expanding the current understanding of the mechanism of softening and melting of the ferrous materials. The other objective of this project was to examine the potential use of direct reduced iron (DRI) and hot briquetted iron (HBI) as the BF burden. The materials used in this study were DRI, HBI, lump iron ore and pellets. A wide variety of experimental procedures were employed to completely understand the process phenomena. The softening and melting (SM) experiments were conducted under load and X-Ray fluoroscopy was used to visualize the process. The results of these experiments were conducive in determining a suitable mechanism of softening and melting of the burden. For single burdens of DRI and HBI, softening occurred when metal began to melt. For mixed burdens of DRI and pellets/lump ore, the initial deformation was not affected by DRI; however DRI dominated as the temperature increased and melting occurred only when DRI melted. Melt dripping was observed at temperatures close to meltdown. A FactSage slag model was used to obtain the evolution of liquid with temperature. It was compared with the bed shrinkage which indicated that the most likely reason of the softening of the burden is the deformation of solid, phases, especially iron. The bulk SM experiments were interrupted at temperatures of interest and samples were examined for the morphological changes. These experiments were instrumental in studying the burden interaction at different stages during softening and melting of the burden. In addition, in separate experiments (without load), the melting structure of DRI/HBI samples was studied. The results of these experiments were expanded to include viscosity, surface energy and deformation rate calculations which were helpful in

  15. Elongational rheology of polyethylene melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seyfzadeh, Bijan

    Elongational melt flow behavior is an important and fundamental concept underlying many industrial plastics operations which involve a rapid change of shape as for example fiber spinning and stretching, bottle blow molding, and film blowing and stretching. Under high process loads polymeric materials experience enormous stresses causing the molecular structure to gain considerable orientation. This event has significant effects on the melt flow behavior and can be measured in terms of elongational viscosity and changes in enthalpy and entropy. Different polymeric materials with unique molecular characteristics are expected to respond uniquely to the elongational deformation; hence, molecular parameters such as molecular weight and degree of branching were related to the measurable elongational flow variables. Elongational viscosities were measured for high and low density polyethylenes using an advanced capillary extrusion rheometer fitted with semi-hyperbolic dies. Said dies establish a purely elongational. flow field at constant elongational strain rate. The elongational viscosities were evaluated under influence of process strain rate, Hencky strain (natural logarithm of area reduction of the extrusion die), and temperature. Enthalpy and entropy changes associated with the orientation development of semi-hyperbolic processed melts were also determined. Results showed that elongational viscosities were primarily affected by differences in weight average molecular weight rather than degree of branching. This effect was process strain rate as well as temperature dependent. An investigation of melt relaxation and the associated first decay time constants revealed that with increasing strain rate the molecular field of the melt asymptotically gained orientation in approaching a limit. As a result of this behavior molecular uniqueness vanished at high process strain rates, yielding to orientation development and the associated restructuring of the melt's molecular

  16. Partial melting of TTG gneisses: crustal contamination and the production of granitic melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meade, F. C.; Masotta, M.; Troll, V. R.; Freda, C.; Johnson, T. E.; Dahren, B.

    2011-12-01

    Understanding partial melting of ancient TTG gneiss terranes is crucial when considering crustal contamination in volcanic systems, as these rocks are unlikely to melt completely at magmatic temperatures (1000-1200 °C) and crustal pressures (<500 MPa). Variations in the bulk composition of the gneiss, magma temperature, pressure (depth) and the composition and abundance of any fluids present will produce a variety of melt compositions, from partial melts enriched in incompatible elements to more complete melts, nearing the bulk chemistry of the parent gneiss. We have used piston cylinder experiments to simulate partial melting in a suite of 12 gneisses from NW Scotland (Lewisian) and Eastern Greenland (Ammassalik, Liverpool Land) under magma chamber temperature and pressure conditions (P=200 MPa, T=975 °C). These gneisses form the basement to much of the North Atlantic Igneous Province, where crustal contamination of magmas was commonplace but the composition of the crustal partial melts are poorly constrained [1]. The experiments produced partial melts in all samples (e.g. Fig 1). Electron microprobe analyses of glasses indicate they are compositionally heterogeneous and are significantly different from the whole rock chemistry of the parent gneisses. The melts have variably evolved compositions but are typically trachy-dacitic to rhyolitic (granitic). This integrated petrological, experimental and in-situ geochemical approach allows quantification of the processes of partial melting of TTG gneiss in a volcanic context, providing accurate major/trace element and isotopic (Sr, Pb) end-members for modeling crustal contamination. The experimental melts and restites will be compared geochemically with a suite of natural TTG gneisses, providing constraints on the extent to which the gneisses have produced and subsequently lost melt. [1] Geldmacher et al. (2002) Scottish Journal of Geology, v.38, p.55-61.

  17. The Absolute Spectrum Polarimeter (ASP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kogut, A. J.

    2010-01-01

    The Absolute Spectrum Polarimeter (ASP) is an Explorer-class mission to map the absolute intensity and linear polarization of the cosmic microwave background and diffuse astrophysical foregrounds over the full sky from 30 GHz to 5 THz. The principal science goal is the detection and characterization of linear polarization from an inflationary epoch in the early universe, with tensor-to-scalar ratio r much greater than 1O(raised to the power of { -3}) and Compton distortion y < 10 (raised to the power of{-6}). We describe the ASP instrument and mission architecture needed to detect the signature of an inflationary epoch in the early universe using only 4 semiconductor bolometers.

  18. Absolute calibration of optical flats

    DOEpatents

    Sommargren, Gary E.

    2005-04-05

    The invention uses the phase shifting diffraction interferometer (PSDI) to provide a true point-by-point measurement of absolute flatness over the surface of optical flats. Beams exiting the fiber optics in a PSDI have perfect spherical wavefronts. The measurement beam is reflected from the optical flat and passed through an auxiliary optic to then be combined with the reference beam on a CCD. The combined beams include phase errors due to both the optic under test and the auxiliary optic. Standard phase extraction algorithms are used to calculate this combined phase error. The optical flat is then removed from the system and the measurement fiber is moved to recombine the two beams. The newly combined beams include only the phase errors due to the auxiliary optic. When the second phase measurement is subtracted from the first phase measurement, the absolute phase error of the optical flat is obtained.

  19. Water loss from olivine hosted melt inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y.; Provost, A.; Schiano, P.; Cluzel, N.

    2009-12-01

    Water content in melt inclusions has long been used as an important index for the water content of the hosting magma. However, many studies have shown that post-entrapment diffusive re-equilibration can affect the water content of melt inclusions. This process must be considered when using melt inclusions to infer water content of the hosting magma. Theoretical model on the diffusive re-equilibration between melt inclusions and external melts showed that the re-equilibration rate depends on the diffusivity of the re-equilibrating species in the host mineral, the partition coefficient of this species between the host mineral and melt, and the geometry of the melt inclusion and host mineral. The water diffusivity in olivine and water partition coefficient between melt and olivine have been measured by recent studies, therefore the diffusive re-equilibration model can be tested by experiments. In this study, we carried out in-situ Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) measurements on the water content of olivine hosted melt inclusions at high temperatures. Initial water content of the melt inclusions is about 4 wt%. A heating stage system is combined with a microscope FTIR and the absorption spectrum through the olivine and melt inclusion is repeatedly measured. Although the absorption band at around 3540 cm-1 has not be calibrated at high temperatures, it is assumed that the absorbance is linearly related to the total water concentration in the melt inclusion, and the relative water content can be inferred. Cautions have been exercised to maintain a consistent measurement spot such that the thickness of the melt inclusion within the beam path did not change significantly during each experiment. Oxygen fugacity in the heating stage is controlled by Zr purified Ar gas to be about 7 logarithm units below the QFM buffer and about 1 logarithm unit above the QIF buffer at 1473 K. Preliminary results showed that at 1430 and 1581 K, the total water content of the

  20. Local and bulk melting of Cu at grain boundaries

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Shengnian; Han, Li - Bo; An, Qi; Zheng, Lianqing

    2008-01-01

    We investigate gain boundary (GB) melting using molecular dynamics simulations on face-centered-cubic Cu bicrystals with symmetric {l_angle}110{r_angle} tilt grain boundaries. Two representative types of GBs are explored: {Sigma} = 11/(113)/50.48{sup o} (low GB energy) and {Sigma} = 27/(552)/148.41{sup o} (high GB energy). The temperature and temporal evolutions of the Cu bicrystals under stepped heating are characterized in terms of order parameters and diffusion coefficients, as ell as the nucleation and growth of melt. Within the GB region, continuous local melting precedes discontinuous bulk melting, while continuous solid state disordering may precede local melting. Premelting may occur for local melting but not for bulk melting. For {Sigma} = 11/(113)/50.48{sup o}, premelting of the GB region is negligible, and local melting occurs near the thermodynamic melting temperature. The GB region as a whole is superheated by about 13% before its bulk melting. In the case of {Sigma} = 27/(552)/148.41, considerable premelting is observed for local melting, while the bulk melting occurs with negligible superheating. The exact melting behavior of a general GB depends on the GB energy, but is likely bracketed within these two cases.

  1. Cloud screening and melt water detection over melting sea ice using AATSR/SLSTR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Istomina, Larysa; Heygster, Georg

    2014-05-01

    With the onset of melt in the Arctic Ocean, the fraction of melt water on sea ice, the melt pond fraction, increases. The consequences are: the reduced albedo of sea ice, increased transmittance of sea ice and affected heat balance of the system with more heat passing through the ice into the ocean, which facilitates further melting. The onset of melt, duration of melt season and melt pond fraction are good indicators of the climate state of the Arctic and its change. In the absence of reliable sea ice thickness retrievals in summer, melt pond fraction retrieval from satellite is in demand as input for GCM as an indicator of melt state of the sea ice. The retrieval of melt pond fraction with a moderate resolution radiometer as AATSR is, however, a non-trivial task due to a variety of subpixel surface types with very different optical properties, which give non-unique combinations if mixed. In this work this has been solved by employing additional information on the surface and air temperature of the pixel. In the current work, a concept of melt pond detection on sea ice is presented. The basis of the retrieval is the sensitivity of AATSR reflectance channels 550nm and 860nm to the amount of melt water on sea ice. The retrieval features extensive usage of a database of in situ surface albedo spectra. A tree of decisions is employed to select the feasible family of in situ spectra for the retrieval, depending on the melt stage of the surface. Reanalysis air temperature at the surface and brightness temperature measured by the satellite sensor are analyzed in order to evaluate the melting status of the surface. Case studies for FYI and MYI show plausible retrieved melt pond fractions, characteristic for both of the ice types. The developed retrieval can be used to process the historical AATSR (2002-2012) dataset, as well as for the SLSTR sensor onboard the future Sentinel-3 mission (scheduled for launch in 2015), to keep the continuity and obtain longer time sequence

  2. A benchmark initiative on mantle convection with melting and melt segregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmeling, Harro; Dohmen, Janik; Wallner, Herbert; Noack, Lena; Tosi, Nicola; Plesa, Ana-Catalina; Maurice, Maxime

    2015-04-01

    In recent years a number of mantle convection models have been developed which include partial melting within the asthenosphere, estimation of melt volumes, as well as melt extraction with and without redistribution at the surface or within the lithosphere. All these approaches use various simplifying modelling assumptions whose effects on the dynamics of convection including the feedback on melting have not been explored in sufficient detail. To better assess the significance of such assumptions and to provide test cases for the modelling community we initiate a benchmark comparison. In the initial phase of this endeavor we focus on the usefulness of the definitions of the test cases keeping the physics as sound as possible. The reference model is taken from the mantle convection benchmark, case 1b (Blanckenbach et al., 1989), assuming a square box with free slip boundary conditions, the Boussinesq approximation, constant viscosity and a Rayleigh number of 1e5. Melting is modelled assuming a simplified binary solid solution with linearly depth dependent solidus and liquidus temperatures, as well as a solidus temperature depending linearly on depletion. Starting from a plume free initial temperature condition (to avoid melting at the onset time) three cases are investigated: Case 1 includes melting, but without thermal or dynamic feedback on the convection flow. This case provides a total melt generation rate (qm) in a steady state. Case 2 includes batch melting, melt buoyancy (melt Rayleigh number Rm), depletion buoyancy and latent heat, but no melt percolation. Output quantities are the Nusselt number (Nu), root mean square velocity (vrms) and qm approaching a statistical steady state. Case 3 includes two-phase flow, i.e. melt percolation, assuming a constant shear and bulk viscosity of the matrix and various melt retention numbers (Rt). These cases should be carried out using the Compaction Boussinseq Approximation (Schmeling, 2000) or the full compaction

  3. Melt onset over Arctic sea ice controlled by atmospheric moisture transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mortin, Jonas; Svensson, Gunilla; Graversen, Rune G.; Kapsch, Marie-Luise; Stroeve, Julienne C.; Boisvert, Linette N.

    2016-06-01

    The timing of melt onset affects the surface energy uptake throughout the melt season. Yet the processes triggering melt and causing its large interannual variability are not well understood. Here we show that melt onset over Arctic sea ice is initiated by positive anomalies of water vapor, clouds, and air temperatures that increase the downwelling longwave radiation (LWD) to the surface. The earlier melt onset occurs; the stronger are these anomalies. Downwelling shortwave radiation (SWD) is smaller than usual at melt onset, indicating that melt is not triggered by SWD. When melt occurs early, an anomalously opaque atmosphere with positive LWD anomalies preconditions the surface for weeks preceding melt. In contrast, when melt begins late, clearer than usual conditions are evident prior to melt. Hence, atmospheric processes are imperative for melt onset. It is also found that spring LWD increased during recent decades, consistent with trends toward an earlier melt onset.

  4. Water freezing and ice melting

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Malolepsza, Edyta; Keyes, Tom

    2015-10-12

    The generalized replica exchange method (gREM) is designed to sample states with coexisting phases and thereby to describe strong first order phase transitions. The isobaric MD version of the gREM is presented and applied to freezing of liquid water, and melting of hexagonal and cubic ice. It is confirmed that coexisting states are well sampled. The statistical temperature as a function of enthalpy, TS(H), is obtained. Hysteresis between freezing and melting is observed and discussed. The entropic analysis of phase transitions is applied and equilibrium transition temperatures, latent heats, and surface tensions are obtained for hexagonal ice↔liquid and cubic ice↔liquid,more » with excellent agreement with published values. A new method is given to assign water molecules among various symmetry types. As a result, pathways for water freezing, ultimately leading to hexagonal ice, are found to contain intermediate layered structures built from hexagonal and cubic ice.« less

  5. Water freezing and ice melting

    SciTech Connect

    Malolepsza, Edyta; Keyes, Tom

    2015-10-12

    The generalized replica exchange method (gREM) is designed to sample states with coexisting phases and thereby to describe strong first order phase transitions. The isobaric MD version of the gREM is presented and applied to freezing of liquid water, and melting of hexagonal and cubic ice. It is confirmed that coexisting states are well sampled. The statistical temperature as a function of enthalpy, TS(H), is obtained. Hysteresis between freezing and melting is observed and discussed. The entropic analysis of phase transitions is applied and equilibrium transition temperatures, latent heats, and surface tensions are obtained for hexagonal ice↔liquid and cubic ice↔liquid, with excellent agreement with published values. A new method is given to assign water molecules among various symmetry types. As a result, pathways for water freezing, ultimately leading to hexagonal ice, are found to contain intermediate layered structures built from hexagonal and cubic ice.

  6. Dynamic crystallization of silicate melts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, W. J.

    1984-01-01

    Two types of furnaces with differing temperature range capabilities were used to provide variations in melt temperatures and cooling rates in a study of the effects of heterogeneous nucleation on crystallization. Materials of chondrule composition were used to further understanding of how the disequilibrium features displayed by minerals in rocks are formed. Results show that the textures of natural chondrules were duplicated. It is concluded that the melt history is dominant over cooling rate and composition in controlling texture. The importance of nuclei, which are most readily derived from preexisting crystalline material, support an origin for natural chondrules based on remelting of crystalline material. This would be compatible with a simple, uniform chondrule forming process having only slight variations in thermal histories resulting in the wide range of textures.

  7. Water Freezing and Ice Melting.

    PubMed

    Małolepsza, Edyta; Keyes, Tom

    2015-12-01

    The generalized replica exchange method (gREM) is designed to sample states with coexisting phases and thereby to describe strong first order phase transitions. The isobaric MD version of the gREM is presented and applied to the freezing of liquid water and the melting of hexagonal and cubic ice. It is confirmed that coexisting states are well-sampled. The statistical temperature as a function of enthalpy, TS(H), is obtained. Hysteresis between freezing and melting is observed and discussed. The entropic analysis of phase transitions is applied and equilibrium transition temperatures, latent heats, and surface tensions are obtained for hexagonal ice ↔ liquid and cubic ice ↔ liquid with excellent agreement with published values. A new method is given to assign water molecules among various symmetry types. Pathways for water freezing, ultimately leading to hexagonal ice, are found to contain intermediate layered structures built from hexagonal and cubic ice. PMID:26642983

  8. Viscoelastic properties of Ionomer Melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goswami, Monojoy; Kumar, Sanat

    2007-03-01

    Viscoelastic prperties of a model telechelic ionomer, i.e., a melt of non-polar polymers with a charge at each chain end along with neutralizing counterions, have been examined using molecular dynamics simulation. Equlibrium calculation of the loss modulus G^''(φ) and storage modulus G^'(φ) shows plateau at lower temperatures when the systems are not relaxed. In this situation the specific heat (Cv) peak corresponds to the self-assembly of the system, at lower temperatures the specific heat begins to plateau. Similarities of the dynamic features found for telechelic melts with those observed in glass-forming liquids and entangled polymers have been shown. Furthremore, using an athermal 'probe', the properties of these materials is being distinctly classified as 'strong' glass or physical gels.

  9. Nanotexturing of surfaces to reduce melting point.

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, Ernest J.; Zubia, David; Mireles, Jose; Marquez, Noel; Quinones, Stella

    2011-11-01

    This investigation examined the use of nano-patterned structures on Silicon-on-Insulator (SOI) material to reduce the bulk material melting point (1414 C). It has been found that sharp-tipped and other similar structures have a propensity to move to the lower energy states of spherical structures and as a result exhibit lower melting points than the bulk material. Such a reduction of the melting point would offer a number of interesting opportunities for bonding in microsystems packaging applications. Nano patterning process capabilities were developed to create the required structures for the investigation. One of the technical challenges of the project was understanding and creating the specialized conditions required to observe the melting and reshaping phenomena. Through systematic experimentation and review of the literature these conditions were determined and used to conduct phase change experiments. Melting temperatures as low as 1030 C were observed.

  10. Hydrogen concentration in plagioclase as a hygrometer of arc basaltic melts: Approaches from melt inclusion analyses and hydrous melting experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamada, Morihisa; Ushioda, Masashi; Fujii, Toshitsugu; Takahashi, Eiichi

    2013-03-01

    The partition coefficients of hydrogen between plagioclase and basaltic melt were determined by two approaches. For the first part of this study, plagioclase-hosted melt inclusions in mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB) from the Rodriguez Triple Junction in the Indian Ocean were analyzed. The hydrogen concentration in plagioclase is less than 60 wt ppm water, and the average H2O concentration in melt inclusions is 0.3 wt%. Therefore, the apparent partition coefficient of hydrogen between plagioclase and melt is ≈0.01 on a molar basis. For the second part of this study, hydrous melting experiments of arc basaltic magma were performed at 0.35 GPa using an internally-heated pressure vessel at f≈NNO+3. The starting material was hydrous basaltic glass with H2O ranging from 0.8 to 5.5 wt%. A grain of Ca-rich plagioclase (≈1 mg) and 10 mg of powdered basaltic glass were sealed in a Au80Pd20 alloy capsule, and then kept at near the crystallization temperature of plagioclase as a liquidus phase to attain an equilibrium of hydrogen between plagioclase and melt. Combining the results of these two parts of this study, we formulated two linear equations to correlate the hydrogen concentration in plagioclase and the H2O concentration in melt. When H2O in melt is ≤1 wt%, hydrogen in plagioclase (wt ppm water)≈80×H2O in melt (wt%). When H2O in melt is≥4 wt%, hydrogen in plagioclase (wt ppm water)≈40×H2O in melt (wt%). Hydrogen concentration in plagioclase lies between two equations when H2O in melt ranges from 1 to 4 wt%. In accordance with these formulations, the partition coefficients of hydrogen between plagioclase and basaltic melt switches from 0.01±0.005 under H2O-poor conditions (≤100 wt ppm water in plagioclase, ≤1 wt% H2O in melt) to 0.005±0.001 under H2O-rich conditions (≥150 wt ppm water in plagioclase, ≥4 wt% H2O in melt). Such switches of hydrogen partitioning with an increase in H2O can be related to change of the atomic site for hydrogen in the

  11. Achieving Climate Change Absolute Accuracy in Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wielicki, Bruce A.; Young, D. F.; Mlynczak, M. G.; Thome, K. J; Leroy, S.; Corliss, J.; Anderson, J. G.; Ao, C. O.; Bantges, R.; Best, F.; Bowman, K.; Brindley, H.; Butler, J. J.; Collins, W.; Dykema, J. A.; Doelling, D. R.; Feldman, D. R.; Fox, N.; Huang, X.; Holz, R.; Huang, Y.; Jennings, D.; Jin, Z.; Johnson, D. G.; Jucks, K.; Kato, S.; Kratz, D. P.; Liu, X.; Lukashin, C.; Mannucci, A. J.; Phojanamongkolkij, N.; Roithmayr, C. M.; Sandford, S.; Taylor, P. C.; Xiong, X.

    2013-01-01

    The Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO) mission will provide a calibration laboratory in orbit for the purpose of accurately measuring and attributing climate change. CLARREO measurements establish new climate change benchmarks with high absolute radiometric accuracy and high statistical confidence across a wide range of essential climate variables. CLARREO's inherently high absolute accuracy will be verified and traceable on orbit to Système Internationale (SI) units. The benchmarks established by CLARREO will be critical for assessing changes in the Earth system and climate model predictive capabilities for decades into the future as society works to meet the challenge of optimizing strategies for mitigating and adapting to climate change. The CLARREO benchmarks are derived from measurements of the Earth's thermal infrared spectrum (5-50 micron), the spectrum of solar radiation reflected by the Earth and its atmosphere (320-2300 nm), and radio occultation refractivity from which accurate temperature profiles are derived. The mission has the ability to provide new spectral fingerprints of climate change, as well as to provide the first orbiting radiometer with accuracy sufficient to serve as the reference transfer standard for other space sensors, in essence serving as a "NIST [National Institute of Standards and Technology] in orbit." CLARREO will greatly improve the accuracy and relevance of a wide range of space-borne instruments for decadal climate change. Finally, CLARREO has developed new metrics and methods for determining the accuracy requirements of climate observations for a wide range of climate variables and uncertainty sources. These methods should be useful for improving our understanding of observing requirements for most climate change observations.

  12. Commercial Zone Melting Ingots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yun; Xie, Hongyao; Shu, Shengcheng; Yan, Yonggao; Li, Han; Tang, Xinfeng

    2014-06-01

    Bismuth telluride-based compounds have been extensively utilized for commercial application. However, thermoelectric materials must suffer numerous mechanical vibrations and thermal stresses while in service, making it equally important to discuss the mechanical properties, especially at high temperature. In this study, the compressive and bending strengths of Bi0.5Sb1.5Te3 commercial zone melting (ZM) ingots were investigated at 25, 100, and 200 °C, respectively. Due to the obvious anisotropy of materials prepared by ZM method, the effect of anisotropy on the strengths was also explored. Two-parameter Weibull distribution was employed to fit a series of values acquired by a universal testing machine. And digital speckle photography was applied to record the strain field evolution, providing visual observation of surface strain. The compressive and bending strengths along ZM direction were approximately three times as large as those perpendicular to the ZM direction independent of the temperature, indicating a weak van der Waals bond along the c axis.

  13. Natural melting within a spherical shell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bahrami, Parviz A.

    1990-01-01

    Fundamental heat transfer experiments were performed on the melting of a phase change medium in a spherical shell. Free expansion of the medium into a void space within the sphere was permitted. A step function temperature jump on the outer shell wall was imposed and the timewise evolution of the melting process and the position of the solid-liquid interface was photographically recorded. Numerical integration of the interface position data yielded information about the melted mass and the energy of melting. It was found that the rate of melting and the heat transfer were significantly affected by the movement of the solid medium to the base of the sphere due to gravity. The energy transfer associated with melting was substantially higher than that predicted by the conduction model. Furthermore, the radio of the measured values of sensible energy in the liquid melt to the energy of melting were nearly proportional to the Stefan number. The experimental results are in agreement with a theory set forth in an earlier paper.

  14. Recent Changes in the Arctic Melt Season

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stroeve, Julienne; Markus, Thorsten; Meier, Walter N.; Miller, Jeff

    2007-01-01

    Melt-season duration, melt-onset and freeze-up dates are derived from satellite passive microwave data and analyzed from 1979 to 2005 over Arctic sea ice. Results indicate a shift towards a longer melt season, particularly north of Alaska and Siberia, corresponding to large retreats of sea ice observed in these regions. Although there is large interannual and regional variability in the length of the melt season, the Arctic is experiencing an overall lengthening of the melt season at a rate of about 2 weeks decade(sup -1). In fact, all regions in the Arctic (except for the central Arctic) have statistically significant (at the 99% level or higher) longer melt seasons by greater than 1 week decade(sup -1). The central Arctic shows a statistically significant trend (at the 98% level) of 5.4 days decade(sup -1). In 2005 the Arctic experienced its longest melt season, corresponding with the least amount of sea ice since 1979 and the warmest temperatures since the 1880s. Overall, the length of the melt season is inversely correlated with the lack of sea ice seen in September north of Alaska and Siberia, with a mean correlation of -0.8.

  15. Purification of Niobium by Electron Beam Melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankar, M.; Mirji, K. V.; Prasad, V. V. Satya; Baligidad, R. G.; Gokhale, A. A.

    2016-06-01

    Pure niobium metal, produced by alumino-thermic reduction of niobium oxide, contains various impurities which need to be reduced to acceptable levels to obtain aerospace grade purity. In the present work, an attempt has been made to refine niobium metals by electron beam drip melting technique to achieve purity confirming to the ASTM standard. Input power to the electron gun and melt rate were varied to observe their combined effect on extend of refining and loss of niobium. Electron beam (EB) melting is shown to reduce alkali metals, trace elements and interstitial impurities well below the specified limits. The reduction in the impurities during EB melting is attributed to evaporation and degassing due to the combined effect of high vacuum and high melt surface temperature. The % removal of interstitial impurities is essentially a function of melt rate and input power. As the melt rate decreases or input power increases, the impurity levels in the solidified niobium ingot decrease. The EB refining process is also accompanied by considerable amount of niobium loss, which is attributed to evaporation of pure niobium and niobium sub-oxide. Like other impurities, Nb loss increases with decreasing melt rate or increase in input power.

  16. Oceanic slab melting and mantle metasomatism.

    PubMed

    Scaillet, B; Prouteau, G

    2001-01-01

    Modern plate tectonic brings down oceanic crust along subduction zones where it either dehydrates or melts. Those hydrous fluids or melts migrate into the overlying mantle wedge trigerring its melting which produces arc magmas and thus additional continental crust. Nowadays, melting seems to be restricted to cases of young (< 50 Ma) subducted plates. Slab melts are silicic and strongly sodic (trondhjemitic). They are produced at low temperatures (< 1000 degrees C) and under water excess conditions. Their interaction with mantle peridotite produces hydrous metasomatic phases such as amphibole and phlogopite that can be more or less sodium rich. Upon interaction the slab melt becomes less silicic (dacitic to andesitic), and Mg, Ni and Cr richer. Virtually all exposed slab melts display geochemical evidence of ingestion of mantle material. Modern slab melts are thus unlike Archean Trondhjemite-Tonalite-Granodiorite rocks (TTG), which suggests that both types of magmas were generated via different petrogenetic pathways which may imply an Archean tectonic model of crust production different from that of the present-day, subduction-related, one. PMID:11838241

  17. Temperature dependence of the f←f hypersensitive transitions of Ho 3+ and Nd 3+ in molten salt solvents and the structure of the LaCl 3-KCl melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chrissanthopoulos, A.; Papatheodorou, G. N.

    2006-01-01

    The electronic absorption spectra of the hypersensitive transitions 5G 6← 5I 8 of Ho 3+ and 4G 5/2← 4I 9/2 of Nd 3+ have been measured in molten LiCl-KCl eutectic and in LaCl 3-KCl molten mixtures. The ligand field components of the above transitions in octahedral symmetry have been identified and the molar absorptivity changes with temperature and composition have been measured. The spectra are discussed in terms of the coordination geometries of the probe cations Ho 3+ and Nd 3+ in these molten salt solvents. The Boltzmann thermal factor appears to be responsible in part for the variation of the 'hot' band intensities. The data suggest that the predominant factors affecting the oscillator strength of the Ho 3+ and Nd 3+ hypersensitive transitions is the degree of octahedral distortions in conjunction with the overall charge asymmetry around the LnCl63- (Ln=Ho, Nd). It appears that no drastic changes occur in the coordination of the probe cations as we go from dilute in LaCl 3 to pure LaCl 3 melts; this suggests that in the host melt the coordination of La 3+ is more likely to be six-fold. A further evidence for the six-fold coordination is given by the measured Judd-Ofelt parameters of Nd 3+ in both molten NdCl 3 and La(Nd)Cl 3.

  18. Experimental melting of arc crustal pyroxenites and the origin of ultracalcic ne-normative melts in arc settings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Médard, E.; Schiano, P.; Schmidt, M. W.

    2003-04-01

    Primitive ultracalcic melts have been documented at mid-ocean-ridges, back-arc basins, oceanic islands and volcanic arcs. Ultracalcic nepheline-normative melts in island arcs occurs both as glass inclusions and lavas (Schiano et al., G3, 2000). The high CaO contents (up to 18 wt%), low SiO_2 contents (down to 43 wt%) and high CaO/Al_2O_3 ratios (up to 1.2) of these melts cannot be simply explained by lherzolite melting under anhydrous or hydrous conditions. Lherzolite melting involving CO_2-rich fluids produces high-CaO/Al_2O_3 liquids, however, low amounts of CO_2 (500 ppm, Sisson and Bronto, Nature, 1998) have been mesured in arc-related ultracalcic glass inclusions. Ne-normative ultracalcic melts could be generated by melting of carbonate-bearing lherzolites or by lherzolite melting in the garnet stability field (as suggested for nephelinites and melilitites). However, the ultracalcic ne-normative melts observed in arcs do not bear the caracteristic trace-element signatures of these processes. Is it possible to generate ultracalcic ne-normative liquids without CO_2? In order to add new constraints on this problem, multiple saturation experiments and direct melting experiments were performed on ne-normative compositions. Model ultracalcic melts are in equilibrium with olivine and clinopyroxene at crustal pressures (0.2 -- 0.7 GPa) and temperatures near 1250^oC. These results suggest that in arc settings, such melts can be derived at crustal levels from partial melting of ol-cpx rich rocks. Therefore, melting experiments were conducted on amphibole-bearing cpx-ol compositions at 0.50--1.0 GPa. Partial melts are ultracalcic above 1220--1250^oC, and in equilibrium with ol and cpx. Compared to lherzolite melting, cpx is more Ca-rich and a residual phase to higher melt fractions, so the maximum CaO content, reached at the cpx out, is higher. Mg# of melts increase with melt fraction, as do equilibrium Mg# of residual olivine (Fo82 to Fo89 at very high melt fraction

  19. Greenland Ice Sheet Melt from MODIS and Associated Atmospheric Variability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hakkinen, Sirpa; Hall, Dorothy K.; Shuman, Christopher A.; Worthen, Denise L.; DiGirolamo, Nicolo E.

    2014-01-01

    Daily June-July melt fraction variations over the Greenland Ice Sheet (GIS) derived from the MODerate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) (2000-2013) are associated with atmospheric blocking forming an omega-shape ridge over the GIS at 500hPa height (from NCEPNCAR). Blocking activity with a range of time scales, from synoptic waves breaking poleward ( 5 days) to full-fledged blocks (5 days), brings warm subtropical air masses over the GIS controlling daily surface temperatures and melt. The temperature anomaly of these subtropical air mass intrusions is also important for melting. Based on the largest MODIS melt years (2002 and 2012), the area-average temperature anomaly of 2 standard deviations above the 14-year June-July mean, results in a melt fraction of 40 or more. Summer 2007 had the most blocking days, however atmospheric temperature anomalies were too small to instigate extreme melting.

  20. Retention of sodium during chondrule melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hewins, R. H.

    1991-04-01

    Using published data, the differences in Na concentrations in different groups of porphyritic olivine chondrules are analyzed. The results show that Na was incorporated into type II chondrule precursors as albite and was not significantly lost during melting. Type I chondrules, which contain very low concentrations of Na, were also not depleted in Na during melting, as indicated by the lack of correlation between the Na/Al ratios and the liquidus temperatures in type I chondrules. It is concluded that the difference in Na concentration is caused by the abundance of precursor albite in type II chondrules, rather than the loss of Na from the melt.

  1. The AFGL absolute gravity program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammond, J. A.; Iliff, R. L.

    1978-01-01

    A brief discussion of the AFGL's (Air Force Geophysics Laboratory) program in absolute gravity is presented. Support of outside work and in-house studies relating to gravity instrumentation are discussed. A description of the current transportable system is included and the latest results are presented. These results show good agreement with measurements at the AFGL site by an Italian system. The accuracy obtained by the transportable apparatus is better than 0.1 microns sq sec 10 microgal and agreement with previous measurements is within the combined uncertainties of the measurements.

  2. Experimental calibration of a new oxybarometer for silicic magmas based on the partitioning of vanadium between magnetite and silicate melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arató, Róbert; Audétat, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    Oxygen fugacity is an important parameter in magmatic systems that affects the stability of mineral phases and fluid species. However, there is no well-established method to reconstruct the oxygen fugacity of slowly cooled magmas such as granite, for example, because existing oxybarometers (e.g., magnetite-ilmenite method) are susceptible to re-equilibration processes during slow cooling and thus lead to erroneous results when applied for granitic rocks. In this study, we aim at developing an oxybarometer that is based on the partitioning of vanadium (a redox-sensitive element) between magnetite inclusions and silicate melt inclusions preserved in quartz phenocrysts, where they were protected from subsolidus alteration and can be measured as entities by LA-ICP-MS. In the first - experimental - part of this study we investigated the effects of temperature (800-950 ° C), pressure (1-2 kbar), oxygen fugacity (from ΔFMQ+0.7 to ΔFMQ+4.0), magnetite composition, and melt composition on the partition coefficient of vanadium between magnetite and melt (DVmgt-melt). The experiments were carried out in cold-seal pressure vessels and the starting material was a mixture of V-doped haplogranite glasses or natural obsidian powder with variable aluminum saturation index (ASI), and synthetic, V-free magnetite of 10-20 μm grain size. The vanadium partition coefficient was found to depend strongly on oxygen fugacity, and to lesser (but still considerable) degrees on melt composition and temperature. A more than 1.5 log unit decrease in DVmgt-melt values with increasing oxygen fugacity can be explained by a change of the dominant valence state of V in the silicate melt. For a given oxygen fugacity buffer DVmgt-melt decreases with increasing temperature, but this reflects mostly the change in absolute fO2 values while the net temperature effect is in fact positive. DVmgt-melt depends significantly on melt composition, resulting in higher D-values with increasing aluminum

  3. Congruent Melting Kinetics: Constraints on Chondrule Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenwood, James P.; Hess, Paul C.

    1995-01-01

    The processes and mechanisms of melting and their applications to chondrule formation are discussed A model for the kinetics of congruent melting is developed and used to place constraints on the duration and maximum temperature experienced by the interiors of relict-bearing chondrules. Specifically, chondrules containing relict forsteritic olivine or enstatitic pyroxene cannot have been heated in excess of 1901 C or 1577 C, respectively, for more than a few seconds.

  4. Frictional melt and seismic slip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, S.; di Toro, G.; Hirose, T.; Shimamoto, T.

    2008-01-01

    Frictional melt is implied in a variety of processes such as seismic slip, ice skating, and meteorite combustion. A steady state can be reached when melt is continuously produced and extruded from the sliding interface, as shown recently in a number of laboratory rock friction experiments. A thin, low-viscosity, high-temperature melt layer is formed resulting in low shear resistance. A theoretical solution describing the coupling of shear heating, thermal diffusion, and extrusion is obtained, without imposing a priori the melt thickness. The steady state shear traction can be approximated at high slip rates by the theoretical form τss = σn1/4 (A/?) ? under a normal stress σn, slip rate V, radius of contact area R (A is a dimensional normalizing factor and W is a characteristic rate). Although the model offers a rather simplified view of a complex process, the predictions are compatible with experimental observations. In particular, we consider laboratory simulations of seismic slip on earthquake faults. A series of high-velocity rotary shear experiments on rocks, performed for σn in the range 1-20 MPa and slip rates in the range 0.5-2 m s-1, is confronted to the theoretical model. The behavior is reasonably well reproduced, though the effect of radiation loss taking place in the experiment somewhat alters the data. The scaling of friction with σn, R, and V in the presence of melt suggests that extrapolation of laboratory measures to real Earth is a highly nonlinear, nontrivial exercise.

  5. On the phase diagram of water with density functional theory potentials: the melting temperature of Ice I-h with the Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof and Becke-Lee-Yang-Parr functionals

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, Soohaeng; Zeng, Xiao Cheng; Xantheas, Sotiris S.

    2009-06-11

    The melting temperature (Tm) of ice Ih was determined from constant enthalphy (NPH) Born-Oppenheimer Molecular Dynamics (BOMD) simulations to be 417±3 K for the Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof (PBE) and 411±4 K for the Becke-Lee-Yang-Parr (BLYP) density functionals using a coexisting ice (Ih)-liquid phase at constant pressures of P = 2,500 and 10,000 bar and a density ρ = 1 g/cm3, respectively. This suggests that ambient condition simulations at ρ = 1 g/cm3 will rather describe a supercooled state that is overstructured when compared to liquid water. This work was supported by the US Department of Energy Office of Basic Energy Sciences' Chemical Sciences program. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy.

  6. High Temperature Superconductivity in Praseodymium Doped (0%, 2%, 4%) in Melt-Textured Y(1-x)Pr(x)Ba2Cu3O(7-delta) Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, Claudell

    1995-01-01

    A study of the magnetic and structural properties of the alloy Y(1-x)Pr(x)Ba2Cu3O(7-delta) of 0%, 2%, and 4% doping of praseodymium is presented. The resulting oxides of the alloy series are a high-temperature superconductor Y-Ba-Cu-O, which has an orthorhombic superconducting crystal-lattice. Magnetic relaxation studies have been performed on the Y-Pr-Ba-CuO bulk samples for field orientation parallel to the c-axis, using a vibrating sample magnetometer. Relaxation was measured at several temperatures to obtain the irreversible magnetization curves used for the Bean model. Magnetization current densities were derived from the relaxation data. Field and temperature dependence of the logarithmic flux-creep relaxation was measured in critical state. The data indicates that the effective activation energy U(eff) increases with increasing T between 77 K and 86 K. Also, the data shows that U(eff)(T) and superconducting transition temperature, Tc, decreased as the lattice parameters increased with increasing Pr ion concentration, x, for the corresponding Y(1-x)Pr(x)Ba(x)Cu3O(7-delta) oxides. One contribution to Tc decrease in this sampling is suspected to be due to the larger ionic radius of the Pr(3+) ion. The upper critical field (H(sub c2)) was measured in the presence of magnetic field parallel to the c axis. A linear temperature dependence with H(sub c2) was obtained.

  7. Rock melting tool with annealer section

    DOEpatents

    Bussod, Gilles Y.; Dick, Aaron J.; Cort, George E.

    1998-01-01

    A rock melting penetrator is provided with an afterbody that rapidly cools a molten geological structure formed around the melting tip of the penetrator to the glass transition temperature for the surrounding molten glass-like material. An annealing afterbody then cools the glass slowly from the glass transition temperature through the annealing temperature range to form a solid self-supporting glass casing. This allows thermally induced strains to relax by viscous deformations as the molten glass cools and prevents fracturing of the resulting glass liner. The quality of the glass lining is improved, along with its ability to provide a rigid impermeable casing in unstable rock formations.

  8. Dynamical meson melting in holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishii, Takaaki; Kinoshita, Shunichiro; Murata, Keiju; Tanahashi, Norihiro

    2014-04-01

    We discuss mesons in thermalizing gluon backgrounds in the = 2 super-symmetric QCD using the gravity dual. We numerically compute the dynamics of a probe D7-brane in the Vaidya-AdS geometry that corresponds to a D3-brane background thermalizing from zero to finite temperatures by energy injection. In static backgrounds, it has been known that there are two kinds of brane embeddings where the brane intersects the black hole or not. They correspond to the phases with melted or stable mesons. In our dynamical setup, we obtain three cases depending on final temperatures and injection time scales. The brane stays outside of the black hole horizon when the final temperature is low, while it intersects the horizon and settles down to the static equilibrium state when the final temperature is high. Between these two cases, we find the overeager case where the brane dynamically intersects the horizon although the final temperature is not high enough for a static brane to intersect the horizon. The interpretation of this phenomenon in the dual field theory is meson melting due to non-thermal effects caused by rapid energy injection. In addition, we comment on the late time evolution of the brane and a possibility of its reconnection.

  9. Energy-Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology (E-SMARRT): Development of Elevated Temperature Aluminum Metal Matrix Composite (MMC) Alloy and Its Processing Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, David C.; Gegal, Gerald A.

    2014-04-15

    The objective of this project was to provide a production capable cast aluminum metal matrix composite (MMC) alloy with an operating temperature capability of 250-300°C. Important industrial sectors as well as the military now seek lightweight aluminum alloy castings that can operate in temperature ranges of 250-300°C. Current needs in this temperature range are being satisfied by the use of titanium alloy castings. These have the desired strength properties but the end components are heavier and significantly more costly. Also, the energy requirements for production of titanium alloy castings are significantly higher than those required for production of aluminum alloys and aluminum alloy castings.

  10. A CaAl4O7-bearing refractory spherule from Murchison - Evidence for very high-temperature melting in the solar nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, S. B.; Yoneda, S.; Grossman, L.; Davis, A. M.

    1994-04-01

    Results are presented of analyses (by a SEM equipped with an EDXS system, INAA, and an electron microprobe) of a unique refractory spherule, B6, recovered from the Murchison C2 chondrite. The spinel-, hibonite-, CaAl4O7-, perovskite-bearing spherule appears to have been almost completely molten, requiring exposure to the highest temperature yet inferred for any refractory inclusion. Strong evidence is presented that the spherule crystallized from a liquid. The presence of measurable excess Al2O3 in B6 spinel despite the normal a(Al2O3)/a(MgO) ratio of the inclusion is further evidence of its unusually high temperature history. Despite the high peak temperature, no volatility-derived fractionation of REEs or isotopic fractionation of Mg occurred, probably because cooling was rapid enough for a very rapid formation of a spinel shell which sealed off the molten interior of the inclusion from the nebular gas.

  11. Partial melting of subducting oceanic crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peacock, Simon M.; Rushmer, Tracy; Thompson, Alan Bruce

    1994-01-01

    The conditions under which partial melting of subducting oceanic crust occurs can be determined by combining a partial melting model for basaltic compositions with two-dimensional thermal models of subduction zones. For porosities of approximately 1% containing H2O the amount of partial melt generated at the wet basaltic solidus is limited to less than 5 vol%. At higher temperatures (approximately 1000 C at 1.5 GPa) large amounts of partial melt, up to 50 vol%, form by the breakdown of amphibole and the release of structurally bound H2O. In most subduction zones, substantial partial melting of subducting oceanic crust will only occur if high shear stresses (greater than approximately 100 MPa) can be maintained by rocks close to, or above, their melting temperatures. In the absence of high shear stresses, substantial melting of the oceanic crust will only occur during subduction of very young (less than 5 Ma) oceanic lithosphere. Partial melting of hydrated basalt (amphibolites) derived from the mid-ocean ridge has been proposed as being responsible for the generation of certain recent high-Al andesitic to dacitic volcanic rocks (adakites). Three of these volcanic suites (Mount St. Helens, southern Chile, and Panama) occur in volcanic arcs where oceanic crust less than 25 Ma is being subducted at rates of 1 - 3 cm/yr and the calculated thermal regime is several hundreds of degrees hotter than more typical subduction zone environments. However, oceanic lithosphere is not currently being subducted beneath Baja and New Guinea, where recent adakites are also present, suggesting that some adakite magmas may form by water-undersaturated partial melting of underplated mafic lower crust or previously subducted oceanic crust. Further experimental work on compositions representative of oceanic crust is required to define the depth of possible adakite source regions more accurately.

  12. Kinetics of Melting and Applications to Chondrules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenwood, James Paul

    1997-12-01

    The congruent melting kinetics of Amelia albite were experimentally determined at 1125o C,/ 1150o C,/ 1175o C, and 1200o C. It was determined that congruent melting is a heterogeneous process. Melting is initiated at external surfaces and cleavage planes. Melting kinetics of albite are best described using a normal growth model. Congruent melting of albite was found to be interface controlled, and rates of melting are directly proportional to the amount of superheat, and inversely proportional to viscosity. Comparison of the results obtained here with previous studies of melting kinetics on other materials (oxides and silicates) finds that the normal growth model can be used to predict melting rates within an order of magnitude. The normal growth model was used to predict congruent melting rates of forsterite and enstatite as well as other minerals which may have been present in the chondrule forming region of the solar nebula. Constraints on the peak temperatures of chondrule formation are thus obtained. Specifically, chondrules containing relict grains of forsteritic olivine and enstatitic pyroxene could not have been heated above 1901o C and 1577o C, respectively, for more than a few seconds. Reanalyses of Na-Al-rich chondrule glasses by EPMA have found that previous EPMA work resulted in loss of Na from the activated volume due to migration in an electrical potential gradient. The Na-Al-rich chondrules have Na/Al ratios of unity, suggesting that they did not lose alkalis during flash heating. Experiments reproduced the chondrule glasses and determined the formational constraints of these chondrules. Specifically, the chondrules needed to have been cooled at low rates (<6o C/hr) at the lower temperature end of chondrule formation.

  13. Melting Metal on a Playing Card

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenslade, Thomas B., Jr.

    2016-01-01

    Many of us are familiar with the demonstration of boiling water in a paper cup held over a candle or a Bunsen burner; the ignition temperature of paper is above the temperature of 100°C at which water boils under standard conditions. A more dramatic demonstration is melting tin held in a playing card. This illustration is from Tissandier's book on…

  14. Metallic Recovery and Ferrous Melting Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Luis Trueba

    2004-05-30

    recovery. The use of an argon atmosphere was also found to increase recoveries, but to a lesser extent than with carbon additions to the briquettes. Task 3--Finally, thermodynamic studies were carried out to evaluate the potential for removing manganese and sulfur from iron melts for the production of ferritic ductile iron. Thermodynamic calculations indicated that manganese and sulfur might be removed from iron melts by careful control of the temperature and slag. In laboratory tests however, it was shown that the removal of sulfur was much less successful than that indicated by the thermodynamic analyses.

  15. Experimental study of the electrolysis of silicate melts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, R.; Larimer, K. T.

    1991-01-01

    To produce oxygen from lunar resources, it may be feasible to melt and electrolyze local silicate ores. This possibility was explored experimentally with synthesized melts of appropriate compositions. Platinum electrodes were employed at a melt temperature of 1425 C. When silicon components of the melt were reduced, the platinum cathode degraded rapidly, which prompted the substitution of a graphite cathode substrate. Discrete particles containing iron or titanium were found in the solidified electrolyte after three hours of electrolysis. Electrolyte conductivities did not decrease substantially, but the escape of gas bubbles, in some cases, appeared to be hindered by high viscosity of the melt.

  16. Comparative Study on Two Melting Simulation Methods: Melting Curve of Gold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhong-Li; Sun, Jun-Sheng; Li, Rui; Zhang, Xiu-Lu; Cai, Ling-Cang

    2016-05-01

    Melting simulation methods are of crucial importance to determining melting temperature of materials efficiently. A high-efficiency melting simulation method saves much simulation time and computational resources. To compare the efficiency of our newly developed shock melting (SM) method with that of the well-established two-phase (TP) method, we calculate the high-pressure melting curve of Au using the two methods based on the optimally selected interatomic potentials. Although we only use 640 atoms to determine the melting temperature of Au in the SM method, the resulting melting curve accords very well with the results from the TP method using much more atoms. Thus, this shows that a much smaller system size in SM method can still achieve a fully converged melting curve compared with the TP method, implying the robustness and efficiency of the SM method. Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant No. 41574076 and the NSAF of China under Grant No. U1230201/A06, and the Young Core Teacher Scheme of Henan Province under Grant No. 2014GGJS-108

  17. Experimental and numerical investigation of temperature distribution and melt pool geometry during pulsed laser welding of Ti6Al4V alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbari, Mohammad; Saedodin, Seyfolah; Toghraie, Davood; Shoja-Razavi, Reza; Kowsari, Farshad

    2014-07-01

    This paper reports on a numerical and experimental investigation of laser welding of titanium alloy (Ti6Al4V) for modeling the temperature distribution to predict the heat affected zone (HAZ), depth and width of the molten pool. This is a transient three-dimensional problem in which, because of simplicity, the weld pool surface is considered flat. The complex physical phenomenon causing the formation of keyhole has not been considered. The temperature histories of welding process were studied. It was observed that the finite volume thermal model was in good agreement with the experimental data. Also, we predicted the temperature as a function of distance at different laser welding speeds and saw that at each welding speed, the temperature profile was decreased sharply in points close to the laser beam center, and then decreased slightly in the far region from the laser beam center. The model prediction error was found to be in the 2-17% range with most numerical values falling within 7% of the experimental values.

  18. Melt inclusions: Chapter 6

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Audétat A.; Lowenstern, J. B.

    2014-01-01

    Melt inclusions are small droplets of silicate melt that are trapped in minerals during their growth in a magma. Once formed, they commonly retain much of their initial composition (with some exceptions) unless they are re-opened at some later stage. Melt inclusions thus offer several key advantages over whole rock samples: (i) they record pristine concentrations of volatiles and metals that are usually lost during magma solidification and degassing, (ii) they are snapshots in time whereas whole rocks are the time-integrated end products, thus allowing a more detailed, time-resolved view into magmatic processes (iii) they are largely unaffected by subsolidus alteration. Due to these characteristics, melt inclusions are an ideal tool to study the evolution of mineralized magma systems. This chapter first discusses general aspects of melt inclusions formation and methods for their investigation, before reviewing studies performed on mineralized magma systems.

  19. Glass Melt Stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaeffer, Helmut A.; Müller-Simon, Hayo

    The employment of sensors during glass melting represents a major prerequisite for an improved process control leading to higher production yields. In situ sensoring techniques can be divided into two groups: on the one hand, techniques which extract information of glass melt properties, e.g., oxidation state and concentrations of relevant polyvalent species (such as iron, sulfur, chromium) and on the other hand, techniques which monitor the furnace atmosphere with respect to toxic emissions (e.g., SO2, NO x ) and combustion species (e.g., CO, CO2, H2O). Nowadays it is feasible not only to install early warning systems indicating deviations from target glass properties, but also to implement process control systems which enforce a stable and reproducible glass melting. Examples are given for the redox control of green glass melting utilizing high portions of recycled cullet and the redox control of amber glass melting.

  20. Arctic Warming, Greenland Melt and Moulins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steffen, K.; Huff, R.; Behar, A.

    2007-12-01

    Air temperatures on the Greenland ice sheet have increased by 4 deg. C since 1991. The ice sheet melt area increased by 30% for the western part between 1979-2006, with record melt years in 1987, 1991, 1998, 2002, 2005, and possibly the most extreme melt year in 2007. The increasing trend in the total area of melting bare ice is unmistakable at 13% per year, significant at a probability of 0.99. Hence, the bare ice region, the wet snow region, and the equilibrium line altitude have moved further inland and resulting in increased melt water flux towards the coast. Warm and extended air temperatures are to blame for 1.5 m water equivalent surface reduction at the long-term equilibrium line altitude, 1100 m elevation at 70 deg. N during summer 2007. Increase in ice velocity in the ablation region and the concurrent increase in melt water suggests that water penetrates to great depth through moulins and cracks, lubricating the bottom of the ice sheet. New insight was gained of subsurface hydrologic channels and cavities using new instrumentation and a video system during the melt peak in August 2007. Volume and geometry of a 100 m deep moulin were mapped with a rotating laser, and photographs with digital cameras. Sub-glacial hydrologic channels were investigated and filmed using a tethered, autonomous system, several hundred meters into the ice. These new results will be discussed in view of the rapid increase in melt area and mass loss of the Greenland ice sheet due to increasing air temperatures.

  1. PURIFICATION OF IRIDIUM BY ELECTRON BEAM MELTING

    SciTech Connect

    Ohriner, Evan Keith

    2008-01-01

    The purification of iridium metal by electron beam melting has been characterized for 48 impurity elements. Chemical analysis was performed by glow discharge mass spectrographic (GDMS) analysis for all elements except carbon, which was analyzed by combustion. The average levels of individual elemental impurities in the starting powder varied from 37 g/g to 0.02 g/g. The impurity elements Li, Na, Mg, P, S, Cl, K, Ca, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Pd, Ag, Cd, Sn, Sb, Te, Ba, Ce, Tl, Pb, and Bi were not detectable following the purification. No significant change in concentration of the elements Ti, V, Zr, Nb, Mo, and Re was found. The elements B, C, Al, Si, Cr, Fe, Ru, Rh, and Pt were partially removed by vaporization during electron beam melting. Langmuir's equation for ideal vaporization into a vacuum was used to calculate for each impurity element the expected ratio of impurity content after melting to that before melting. Equilibrium vapor pressures were calculated using Henry's law, with activity coefficients obtained from published data for the elements Fe, Ti, and Pt. Activity coefficients were estimated from enthalpy data for Al, Si, V, Cr, Mn, Co, Ni, Zr, Nb, Mo, and Hf and an ideal solution model was used for the remaining elements. The melt temperature was determined from measured iridium weight loss. Excellent agreement was found between measured and calculated impurity ratios for all impurity elements. The results are consistent with some localized heating of the melt pool due to rastering of the electron beam, with an average vaporization temperature of 3100 K as compared to a temperature of 2965 K calculated for uniform heating of the melt pool. The results are also consistent with ideal mixing in the melt pool.

  2. Si isotope fractionation between Si-poor metal and silicate melt at pressure-temperature conditions relevant to metal segregation in small planetary bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kempl, J.; Vroon, P. Z.; Zinngrebe, E.; van Westrenen, W.

    2013-04-01

    Experimental investigations of Si isotope fractionation between Si-bearing metal alloy and silicate phases have to date been limited to high pressure (1-7 GPa) and high temperature (1800-2200 °C) conditions at highly reducing conditions, to optimize applicability of results to early core formation processes in the Earth. Here, we assess the extent and mechanism of Si isotopic fractionation at conditions relevant to metal segregation in small (km-scale) planetary bodies, using samples obtained from an industrial-scale blast furnace of Tata Steel (IJmuiden, the Netherlands). During the low-pressure, high-temperature process of steelmaking inhomogeneous blast furnace burden consisting of pre- and untreated iron ore, iron silicates and coke is reduced to oxygen fugacities near the C-CO buffer, resulting in the segregation of a metal phase containing only ∼0.3 wt% Si. Seven sample sets, each comprising a metal alloy and a silicate slag, were taken during tapping of the blast furnace at tapping temperatures between 1400 °C and 1600 °C. We find large isotopic mass fractionation between metal and silicate, with Δ30Sisilicate-metal varying between 0.7‰ and 1.6‰, values that are as high as previously obtained in high-pressure, highly reduced experiments. A model for metal-silicate Si isotope fractionation in blast furnaces can explain both the sense and magnitude of fractionation, if the presence of SiO-bearing vapour is explicitly taken into account. Our data indicate that significant Si isotope fractionation can occur between metal and silicate at low-pressure, high-temperature and only mildly reducing conditions for which Si solubility in molten Fe-rich metal is low. This suggests an important role for SiO at low confining pressures. Our data can be applied to models of aubrite meteorite formation through high-temperature differentiation of an enstatite chondrite parent body. Our calculations suggest a far larger degree of rehomogenisation during differentiation

  3. Strength and ductility of room-dry and water-saturated igneous rocks at low pressures and temperatures to partial melting. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, M.; Handin, J.; Higgs, N.G.; Lantz, J.R.; Bauer, S.J.

    1980-11-01

    Rock types that are likely candidates for drilling were tested. Reported herein are the short-time ultimate strengths and ductilities determined at temperatures of 25/sup 0/ to 1050/sup 0/C and a strain rate of 10/sup -4/s/sup -1/ of (a) room-dry Mt. Hood Andesite, Cuerbio Basalt, and Charcoal (St. Cloud Gray) Granodiorite at confining pressures of 0, 50, and 100 MPa, (b) water-saturated specimens of the same three rocks at zero effective pressure (both pore and confining pressures of 50 MPa), and (c) room-dry Newberry Rhyolite Obsidian at 0 and 50 MPa. These strengths are then compared with the stresses developed at the wall of a borehole in an elastic medium at the appropriate temperatures and mean pressures to assess the problem of borehole stability. (MHR)

  4. Estimated phase transition and melting temperature of APTES self-assembled monolayer using surface-enhanced anti-stokes and stokes Raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yingying; Yanagisawa, Masahiro; Kunimoto, Masahiro; Nakamura, Masatoshi; Homma, Takayuki

    2016-02-01

    A structure's temperature can be determined from the Raman spectrum using the frequency and the ratio of the intensities of the anti-Stokes and Stokes signals (the Ias/Is ratio). In this study, we apply this approach and an equation relating the temperature, Raman frequency, and Ias/Is ratio to in-situ estimation of the phase change point of a (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane self-assembled monolayer (APTES SAM). Ag nanoparticles were deposited on APTES to enhance the Raman signals. A time-resolved measurement mode was used to monitor the variation in the Raman spectra in situ. Moreover, the structural change in APTES SAM (from ordered to disordered structure) under heating was discussed in detail, and the phase change point (around 118 °C) was calculated.

  5. Geophysical constraints on partial melt in the upper mantle

    SciTech Connect

    Shankland, T.J.; O'Connell, R.J.; Waff, H.S.

    1981-08-01

    This paper adresses the conditions under which partial melt can exist in the mantle in order to be observed as a geophysical 'anomaly'. Typical observed anomalies are high electrical conductivity of the order of 0.1 S/m or greater, velocity decreases of 7--10%, seismic Q values less than 100, and a frequency band for seismic effects in the region mear 1 Hz. Existing theories of electrical conduction in partial melts and of frequency-dependent seismic properties together with recent measurements of melt electrical conductivity, viscosity, and partial melt texture can be used to establish requirements for melt to be observed by geophysical methods. From electrical anomalies, mainly sensitive to melt volume and its interconnection, one can require a minimum melt fraction of several percent at temperatures close to the solidus (1150/sup 0/--1300/sup 0/C). However, seismic models demand only a small volume in very flattened shapes (aspect ratio approx. =0.001, melt fraction approx.0.1%). Further, if melt configuration permits seismic dissipation in bulk, that is, there exist flattened voids intersecting more or less equant voids, then it is possible to infer melt fractions for elastic anomalies that are consistent with the several percent required for electrical anomalies. Observed equilibrium textures of partly melted peridotite together with inferred melt-solid surface energies suggest that melt on a grain size scale in a gravitational field segregates into a strongly anisotropic pattern. Thus if partial melt causes mantle geophysical anomalies, it should exist in a variety of void shapes and probably of sizes. While the association of electrical and elastic anomalies with indications of reduced density, volcanism, and high heat flow makes the hypothesis of partial melting an attractive explanation, the minimum physical requirement is for existence of relatively high temperature.

  6. Greenland ice sheet melt from MODIS and associated atmospheric variability

    PubMed Central

    Häkkinen, Sirpa; Hall, Dorothy K; Shuman, Christopher A; Worthen, Denise L; DiGirolamo, Nicolo E

    2014-01-01

    Daily June-July melt fraction variations over the Greenland ice sheet (GIS) derived from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) (2000–2013) are associated with atmospheric blocking forming an omega-shape ridge over the GIS at 500 hPa height. Blocking activity with a range of time scales, from synoptic waves breaking poleward (<5 days) to full-fledged blocks (≥5 days), brings warm subtropical air masses over the GIS controlling daily surface temperatures and melt. The temperature anomaly of these subtropical air mass intrusions is also important for melting. Based on the years with the greatest melt (2002 and 2012) during the MODIS era, the area-average temperature anomaly of 2 standard deviations above the 14 year June-July mean results in a melt fraction of 40% or more. Though the summer of 2007 had the most blocking days, atmospheric temperature anomalies were too small to instigate extreme melting. Key Points Short-term atmospheric blocking over Greenland contributes to melt episodes Associated temperature anomalies are equally important for the melt Duration and strength of blocking events contribute to surface melt intensity PMID:25821277

  7. Melting icebergs to produce fresh water and mechanical energy

    SciTech Connect

    Camirand, W.M.; Hautala, E.; Randall, J.M.

    1981-10-20

    Fresh water and mechanical energy are obtained from melting of icebergs. Warm surface seawater is contacted with a fluid, which is vaporized. The resulting vapor is used to generate mechanical energy and then is condensed by contacting it with cold melt water from the iceberg. The fluid is regenerated with a concomitant elevation in the temperature of the melt water. The warmer melt water is cycled to the body of the iceberg to facilitate its melting and produce additional cold melt water, which is apportioned as fresh water and water cycled to condense the aforesaid vapor. In an alternate embodiment of the invention warm seawater is evaporated at reduced pressure. Mechanical energy is generated from the vapor, which is then condensed by direct and intimate contact with cold melt water from the iceberg. The resultant fresh water is a mixture of condensed vapor and melt water from the iceberg and has a temperature greater than the cold melt water. This fresh water mixture is contacted with the body of the iceberg to further melt it; part of the cold melt water is separated as fresh water and the remainder is cycled for use in condensing the vapor from the warm surface seawater.

  8. The role of subgrain boundaries in partial melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levine, Jamie S. F.; Mosher, Sharon; Rahl, Jeffrey M.

    2016-08-01

    Evidence for partial melting along subgrain boundaries in quartz and plagioclase is documented for rocks from the Lost Creek Gneiss of the Llano Uplift, central Texas, the Wet Mountains of central Colorado, and the Albany-Fraser Orogen, southwestern Australia. Domains of quartz or plagioclase crystals along subgrain boundaries are preferentially involved in partial melting over unstrained domains of these minerals. Material along subgrain boundaries in quartz and plagioclase has the same morphology as melt pseudomorphs present along grain boundaries and is commonly laterally continuous with this former grain boundary melt, indicating the material along subgrain boundaries can also be categorized as a melt pseudomorph. Subgrain boundaries consist of arrays of dislocations within a crystal lattice, and unlike fractures would not act as conduits for melt migration. Instead, the presence of former melt along subgrain boundaries requires that partial melting occurred in these locations because it is kinetically more favorable for melting reactions to occur there. Preferential melting in high strain locations may be attributed to strain energy, which provides a minor energetic contribution to the reaction and leads to preferential melting in locations with weakened bonds, and/or the presence of small quantities of water associated with dislocations, which may enhance diffusion rates or locally lower the temperature needed for partial melting.

  9. Friction and roughness of a melting rock surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, S.; di Toro, G.; Griffith, W. A.

    2010-07-01

    Under extreme conditions like those encountered during earthquake slip, frictional melt is likely to occur. It has been observed on ancient faults that the melt is mostly extruded toward local extensional jogs or lateral tension cracks. In the case of laboratory experiments with a rotary shear apparatus, melt is extruded from the sample borders. When this happens, a thin and irregular melt layer is formed whereby the normal load is still in part supported by contact asperities under an incipient yield condition (as in dry friction models), but also, in the interstices between asperities, by the pressure of the viscous fluid wetting the interface. In addition, roughness of the surface is dynamically reshaped by the melting process of an inhomogeneous material (polymineralic rock). In particular, we argue that the roughness of the melting surface decreases with melting rate and temperature gradient perpendicular to the fault. Taking into account the above conditions, we obtain an expression for the average melt layer thickness and viscous pressure that may be used in estimates of friction in the presence of melt. We argue that the ratio of melt thickness to roughness depends on sliding velocity; such a ratio may be used as a gauge of slip-rate during fossil earthquakes on faults bearing pseudotachylite (solidified melt). Finally, we derive an improved analytical solution for friction in the presence of melt including the effect of roughness evolution.

  10. Signatures of nonthermal melting.

    PubMed

    Zier, Tobias; Zijlstra, Eeuwe S; Kalitsov, Alan; Theodonis, Ioannis; Garcia, Martin E

    2015-09-01

    Intense ultrashort laser pulses can melt crystals in less than a picosecond but, in spite of over thirty years of active research, for many materials it is not known to what extent thermal and nonthermal microscopic processes cause this ultrafast phenomenon. Here, we perform ab-initio molecular-dynamics simulations of silicon on a laser-excited potential-energy surface, exclusively revealing nonthermal signatures of laser-induced melting. From our simulated atomic trajectories, we compute the decay of five structure factors and the time-dependent structure function. We demonstrate how these quantities provide criteria to distinguish predominantly nonthermal from thermal melting. PMID:26798822

  11. Signatures of nonthermal melting

    PubMed Central

    Zier, Tobias; Zijlstra, Eeuwe S.; Kalitsov, Alan; Theodonis, Ioannis; Garcia, Martin E.

    2015-01-01

    Intense ultrashort laser pulses can melt crystals in less than a picosecond but, in spite of over thirty years of active research, for many materials it is not known to what extent thermal and nonthermal microscopic processes cause this ultrafast phenomenon. Here, we perform ab-initio molecular-dynamics simulations of silicon on a laser-excited potential-energy surface, exclusively revealing nonthermal signatures of laser-induced melting. From our simulated atomic trajectories, we compute the decay of five structure factors and the time-dependent structure function. We demonstrate how these quantities provide criteria to distinguish predominantly nonthermal from thermal melting. PMID:26798822

  12. Production of Synthetic Nuclear Melt Glass.

    PubMed

    Molgaard, Joshua J; Auxier, John D; Giminaro, Andrew V; Oldham, Colton J; Gill, Jonathan; Hall, Howard L

    2016-01-01

    Realistic surrogate nuclear debris is needed within the nuclear forensics community to test and validate post-detonation analysis techniques. Here we outline a novel process for producing bulk surface debris using a high temperature furnace. The material developed in this study is physically and chemically similar to trinitite (the melt glass produced by the first nuclear test). This synthetic nuclear melt glass is assumed to be similar to the vitrified material produced near the epicenter (ground zero) of any surface nuclear detonation in a desert environment. The process outlined here can be applied to produce other types of nuclear melt glass including that likely to be formed in an urban environment. This can be accomplished by simply modifying the precursor matrix to which this production process is applied. The melt glass produced in this study has been analyzed and compared to trinitite, revealing a comparable crystalline morphology, physical structure, void fraction, and chemical composition. PMID:26779720

  13. Melting relations of the Allende meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seitz, M. G.; Kushiro, I.

    1974-01-01

    The proportions of major oxides in the Allende carbonaceous chondrite after partial reduction are remarkably similar to those in possible mantle material of the earth. When heated, the Allende meteorite generates a sulfide melt, a ferrobasaltic melt, and olivine with or without pyroxene, over a wide pressure range (5 to 25 kilobar). The silicate melt contains more sodium and less titanium than lunar ferrobasalts. An aggregate of the Allende chondrite rich in calcium and aluminum produces silica-undersaturated, calcium-rich melt and spinel over a wide pressure and temperature range. It is suggested that the earth's core contains significant amounts of both nickel and sulfur and that a 3:2 mixture of Allende bulk sample and calcium- and aluminum-rich agregates is closer in major element abundances than either of these components to the average composition of the moon.

  14. High pressure melting curves of silver, gold and copper

    SciTech Connect

    Hieu, Ho Khac

    2013-11-15

    In this work, based on the Lindemann's formula of melting and the pressure-dependent Grüneisen parameter, we have investigated the pressure effect on melting temperature of silver, gold and copper metals. The analytical expression of melting temperature as a function of volume compression has been derived. Our results are compared with available experimental data as well as with previous theoretical studies and the good and reasonable agreements are found. We also proposed the potential of this approach on predicting melting of copper at very high pressure.

  15. Surface-tension-driven flow in a glass melt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcneil, Thomas J.; Cole, Robert; Shankar Subramanian, R.

    1985-01-01

    Motion driven by surface tension gradients was observed in a vertical capillary liquid bridge geometry in a sodium borate melt. The surface tension gradients were introduced by maintaining a temperature gradient on the free melt surface. The flow velocities at the free surface of the melt, which were measured using a tracer technique, were found to be proportional to the applied temperature difference and inversely proportional to the melt viscosity. The experimentally observed velocities were in reasonable accord with predictions from a theoretical model of the system.

  16. A theoretical model to study melting of metals under pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kholiya, Kuldeep; Chandra, Jeewan

    2015-10-01

    On the basis of the thermal equation-of-state a simple theoretical model is developed to study the pressure dependence of melting temperature. The model is then applied to compute the high pressure melting curve of 10 metals (Cu, Mg, Pb, Al, In, Cd, Zn, Au, Ag and Mn). It is found that the melting temperature is not linear with pressure and the slope dTm/dP of the melting curve decreases continuously with the increase in pressure. The results obtained with the present model are also compared with the previous theoretical and experimental data. A good agreement between theoretical and experimental result supports the validity of the present model.

  17. Melt migration through Io's convecting mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elder, C. M.; Showman, A. P.

    2013-12-01

    The extensive volcanism occurring on the surface of Io suggests that its interior must contain at least some partial melt. Unlike Earth, Io cannot lose its internal heat through convection alone [1]. Instead, melt moving through the solid mantle helps remove heat from Io's interior by carrying its latent heat towards the surface as it buoyantly ascends through the mantle. We investigate this process by considering melt migration in a column of rock rising through the mantle between downwelling plumes. Convective scaling laws provide the upwelling velocity and the temperature of the rising mantle. Properties of melt migration in this rising mantle are calculated using porous flow equations and an equation for the conservation of energy which includes latent heat consumption, heat advection and heat conduction [2]. This combination of convective scaling laws and porous flow laws allows us to self-consistently determine the radial melt fraction profile in Io's interior, the average melt fraction in Io's interior and the heat flux due to advection of melt. The average melt fraction can be compared to the melt fraction constraints calculated by [3] from Galileo magnetometer measurements. The surface heat flux calculations can be compared to the value of Io's observed surface heat flux which ranges with observation from 1.5-4 W m-2 [4]. [1] Moore W. B. (2003) J. Geophys. Res., 108, E8, 15-1. [2] Hewitt I. J. and Fowler A. C. (2008) Proc. R. Soc. A., 464, 2467-2491. [3] Khurana K. K. et al. (2011) Science, 332, 1186-1189. [4] Moore, W. B. et al. (2007) In: Io After Galileo, Springer-Praxis, 89-108.

  18. Growth of Si Bulk Crystals with Large Diameter Ratio Using Small Crucibles by Creating a Large Low-Temperature Region Inside a Si Melt Contained in an NOC Furnace Developed Using Two Zone Heaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, Kazuo; Ono, Satoshi; Murai, Ryota; Kaneko, Yuzuru

    2016-06-01

    Three zone heaters were generally used for a noncontact crucible (NOC) furnace. For practical reasons a simpler NOC furnace was developed with two zone heaters, which had a carbon heat holder to cover the three roles of each heater. Large low-temperature regions were obtained, and silicon ingots were grown in small crucibles with a large diameter and diameter ratio. Here, the diameter ratio is the ratio of the ingot diameter to the crucible diameter and can be as large as 0.90. The diameter ratio was controlled mainly by the temperature reduction of the first heater. Power changes of the second heater did not have a significant impact on the ingot diameter. Using this NOC furnace, maximum ingot diameters of 28.0, 33.5, and 45.0 cm were obtained using crucibles of 33, 40, and 50 cm in diameter, respectively. The oxygen concentration of the ingots did not strongly depend on the diameter ratio and were always low because convection in the Si melt was markedly suppressed by the carbon heat holder. Moreover, the oxygen concentration of the ingots has a tendency to become lower as the crucible diameter becomes larger.

  19. Molecular dynamics simulations on the melting of gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Zhiwei; Feng, Haijun; Zhou, Jian

    2014-01-01

    Molecular dynamics is employed to study the melting of bulk gold and gold nanoparticles. PCFF, Sutton-Chen and COMPASS force fields are adopted to study the melting point of bulk gold and we find out that the Sutton-Chen force field is the most accurate model in predicting the melting point of bulk gold. Consequently, the Sutton-Chen force field is applied to study the melting points of spherical gold nanoparticles with different diameters. Variations of diffusion coefficient, potential energy and translational order parameter with temperature are analyzed. The simulated melting points of gold nanoparticles are between 615∼1115 K, which are much lower than that of bulk gold (1336 K). As the diameter of gold nanoparticle drops, the melting point also descends. The melting mechanism is also analyzed for gold nanoparticles.

  20. Stress-induced melting of crystals in natural rubber: a new way to tailor the transition temperature of shape memory polymers.

    PubMed

    Heuwers, Benjamin; Quitmann, Dominik; Katzenberg, Frank; Tiller, Joerg C

    2012-09-26

    Lightly cross-linked natural rubber (NR, cis-1,4-polyisoprene) was found to be an exceptional cold programmable shape memory polymer (SMP) with strain storage of up to 1000%. These networks are stabilized by strain-induced crystals. Here, we explore the influence of mechanical stress applied perpendicular to the elongation direction of the network on the stability of these crystals. We found that the material recovers its original shape at a critical transverse stress. It could be shown that this is due to a disruption of the strain-stabilizing crystals, which represents a completely new trigger for SMPs. The variation of transverse stress allows tuning of the trigger temperature T(trig) (σ) in a range of 45 to 0 °C, which is the first example of manipulating the transition of a crystal-stabilized SMP after programming. PMID:22760997

  1. Reversible scaling simulations of the melting transition in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaczmarski, M.; Rurali, R.; Hernández, E.

    2004-06-01

    In this work we report simulations of the melting temperature of silicon at zero pressure employing a series of models, which include an empirical potential and three tight binding models. We have determined the melting temperature for each model by evaluating the free energies of the solid and liquid phases as a function of temperature, finding the temperature at which they match. We have employed the reversible scaling technique due to

    de Koning, Antonelli, and Yip [Phys. Rev. Lett. 83, 3973 (1999)
    ] to obtain the free energies in a range of temperatures bracketing the melting temperature. Good agreement is found between our results and the experimental melting temperature for all models.

  2. Surface melting of electronic order.

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkins, S. B.; Liu, X.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Kim, J.-W.; Ryan, P. J.; Mitchell, J. F.; Hill, J. P.

    2011-01-01

    We report temperature-dependent surface x-ray scattering studies of the orbital ordered surface in La{sub 0.5}Sr{sub 1.5}MnO{sub 4}. We find that as the bulk ordering temperature is approached from below the thickness of the interface between the electronically ordered and electronically disordered regions at the surface grows, though the bulk correlation length remains unchanged. Close to the transition, the surface is so rough that there is no well-defined electronic surface, despite the presence of bulk electronic order. That is, the electronic ordering at the surface has melted. Above the bulk transition, long-range ordering in the bulk is destroyed but finite-sized isotropic fluctuations persist, with a correlation length roughly equal to that of the low-temperature in-plane surface correlation length.

  3. Transition metals in superheat melts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jakes, Petr; Wolfbauer, Michael-Patrick

    1993-01-01

    A series of experiments with silicate melts doped with transition element oxides was carried out at atmospheric pressures of inert gas at temperatures exceeding liquidus. As predicted from the shape of fO2 buffer curves in T-fO2 diagrams the reducing conditions for a particular oxide-metal pair can be achieved through the T increase if the released oxygen is continuously removed. Experimental studies suggest that transition metals such as Cr or V behave as siderophile elements at temperatures exceeding liquidus temperatures if the system is not buffered by the presence of other oxide of more siderophile element. For example the presence of FeO prevents the reduction of Cr2O3. The sequence of decreasing siderophility of transition elements at superheat conditions (Mo, Ni, Fe, Cr) matches the decreasing degree of depletion of siderophile elements in mantle rocks as compared to chondrites.

  4. Melt fracture revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Greenberg, J. M.

    2003-07-16

    In a previous paper the author and Demay advanced a model to explain the melt fracture instability observed when molten linear polymer melts are extruded in a capillary rheometer operating under the controlled condition that the inlet flow rate was held constant. The model postulated that the melts were a slightly compressible viscous fluid and allowed for slipping of the melt at the wall. The novel feature of that model was the use of an empirical switch law which governed the amount of wall slip. The model successfully accounted for the oscillatory behavior of the exit flow rate, typically referred to as the melt fracture instability, but did not simultaneously yield the fine scale spatial oscillations in the melt typically referred to as shark skin. In this note a new model is advanced which simultaneously explains the melt fracture instability and shark skin phenomena. The model postulates that the polymer is a slightly compressible linearly viscous fluid but assumes no slip boundary conditions at the capillary wall. In simple shear the shear stress {tau}and strain rate d are assumed to be related by d = F{tau} where F ranges between F{sub 2} and F{sub 1} > F{sub 2}. A strain rate dependent yield function is introduced and this function governs whether F evolves towards F{sub 2} or F{sub 1}. This model accounts for the empirical observation that at high shears polymers align and slide more easily than at low shears and explains both the melt fracture and shark skin phenomena.

  5. Improving HST Pointing & Absolute Astrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lallo, Matthew; Nelan, E.; Kimmer, E.; Cox, C.; Casertano, S.

    2007-05-01

    Accurate absolute astrometry is becoming increasingly important in an era of multi-mission archives and virtual observatories. Hubble Space Telescope's (HST's) Guidestar Catalog II (GSC2) has reduced coordinate error to around 0.25 arcsecond, a factor 2 or more compared with GSC1. With this reduced catalog error, special attention must be given to calibrate and maintain the Fine Guidance Sensors (FGSs) and Science Instruments (SIs) alignments in HST to a level well below this in order to ensure that the accuracy of science product's astrometry keywords and target positioning are limited only by the catalog errors. After HST Servicing Mission 4, such calibrations' improvement in "blind" pointing accuracy will allow for more efficient COS acquisitions. Multiple SIs and FGSs each have their own footprints in the spatially shared HST focal plane. It is the small changes over time in primarily the whole-body positions & orientations of these instruments & guiders relative to one another that is addressed by this work. We describe the HST Cycle 15 program CAL/OTA 11021 which, along with future variants of it, determines and maintains positions and orientations of the SIs and FGSs to better than 50 milli- arcseconds and 0.04 to 0.004 degrees of roll, putting errors associated with the alignment sufficiently below GSC2 errors. We present recent alignment results and assess their errors, illustrate trends, and describe where and how the observer sees benefit from these calibrations when using HST.

  6. Absolute oral bioavailability of ciprofloxacin.

    PubMed

    Drusano, G L; Standiford, H C; Plaisance, K; Forrest, A; Leslie, J; Caldwell, J

    1986-09-01

    We evaluated the