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Sample records for absolute melting temperature

  1. Review of deformation behavior of tungsten at temperature less than 0.2 absolute melting temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, J. R.

    1972-01-01

    The deformation behavior of tungsten at temperatures 0.2 T sub m is reviewed, with primary emphasis on the temperature dependence of the yield stress and the ductile-brittle transition temperature. It appears that a model based on the high Peierls stress of tungsten best accounts for the observed mechanical behavior at low temperatures. Recent research is discussed which suggests an important role of electron concentration and bonding on the mechanical behavior of tungsten. It is concluded that future research on tungsten should include studies to define more clearly the correlation between electron concentration and mechanical behavior of tungsten alloys and other transition metal alloys.

  2. Melting temperature of graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Los, J. H.; Zakharchenko, K. V.; Katsnelson, M. I.; Fasolino, Annalisa

    2015-01-01

    We present an approach to the melting of graphene based on nucleation theory for a first order phase transition from the two-dimensional (2D) solid to the 3D liquid via an intermediate quasi-2D liquid. The applicability of nucleation theory, supported by the results of systematic atomistic Monte Carlo simulations, provides an intrinsic definition of the melting temperature of graphene, Tm, and allows us to determine it. We find Tm≃4510 K, about 250 K higher than that of graphite using the same interatomic interaction model. The found melting temperature is shown to be in good agreement with the asymptotic results of melting simulations for finite disks and ribbons of graphene. Our results strongly suggest that graphene is the most refractory of all known materials.

  3. Cosmology with negative absolute temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieira, J. P. P.; Byrnes, Christian T.; Lewis, Antony

    2016-08-01

    Negative absolute temperatures (NAT) are an exotic thermodynamical consequence of quantum physics which has been known since the 1950's (having been achieved in the lab on a number of occasions). Recently, the work of Braun et al. [1] has rekindled interest in negative temperatures and hinted at a possibility of using NAT systems in the lab as dark energy analogues. This paper goes one step further, looking into the cosmological consequences of the existence of a NAT component in the Universe. NAT-dominated expanding Universes experience a borderline phantom expansion (w < ‑1) with no Big Rip, and their contracting counterparts are forced to bounce after the energy density becomes sufficiently large. Both scenarios might be used to solve horizon and flatness problems analogously to standard inflation and bouncing cosmologies. We discuss the difficulties in obtaining and ending a NAT-dominated epoch, and possible ways of obtaining density perturbations with an acceptable spectrum.

  4. Cosmology with negative absolute temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieira, J. P. P.; Byrnes, Christian T.; Lewis, Antony

    2016-08-01

    Negative absolute temperatures (NAT) are an exotic thermodynamical consequence of quantum physics which has been known since the 1950's (having been achieved in the lab on a number of occasions). Recently, the work of Braun et al. [1] has rekindled interest in negative temperatures and hinted at a possibility of using NAT systems in the lab as dark energy analogues. This paper goes one step further, looking into the cosmological consequences of the existence of a NAT component in the Universe. NAT-dominated expanding Universes experience a borderline phantom expansion (w < -1) with no Big Rip, and their contracting counterparts are forced to bounce after the energy density becomes sufficiently large. Both scenarios might be used to solve horizon and flatness problems analogously to standard inflation and bouncing cosmologies. We discuss the difficulties in obtaining and ending a NAT-dominated epoch, and possible ways of obtaining density perturbations with an acceptable spectrum.

  5. Methods for Melting Temperature Calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Qi-Jun

    Melting temperature calculation has important applications in the theoretical study of phase diagrams and computational materials screenings. In this thesis, we present two new methods, i.e., the improved Widom's particle insertion method and the small-cell coexistence method, which we developed in order to capture melting temperatures both accurately and quickly. We propose a scheme that drastically improves the efficiency of Widom's particle insertion method by efficiently sampling cavities while calculating the integrals providing the chemical potentials of a physical system. This idea enables us to calculate chemical potentials of liquids directly from first-principles without the help of any reference system, which is necessary in the commonly used thermodynamic integration method. As an example, we apply our scheme, combined with the density functional formalism, to the calculation of the chemical potential of liquid copper. The calculated chemical potential is further used to locate the melting temperature. The calculated results closely agree with experiments. We propose the small-cell coexistence method based on the statistical analysis of small-size coexistence MD simulations. It eliminates the risk of a metastable superheated solid in the fast-heating method, while also significantly reducing the computer cost relative to the traditional large-scale coexistence method. Using empirical potentials, we validate the method and systematically study the finite-size effect on the calculated melting points. The method converges to the exact result in the limit of a large system size. An accuracy within 100 K in melting temperature is usually achieved when the simulation contains more than 100 atoms. DFT examples of Tantalum, high-pressure Sodium, and ionic material NaCl are shown to demonstrate the accuracy and flexibility of the method in its practical applications. The method serves as a promising approach for large-scale automated material screening in which

  6. Melting in temperature sensitive suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsayed, Ahmed M.

    We describe two experimental studies about melting in colloidal systems. In particular we studied melting of 1-dimensional lamellar phases and 3-dimensional colloidal crystals. In the first set of experiments we prepared suspensions composed of rodlike fd virus and the thermosensitive polymer, poly(N-isopropylacrylamide). The phase diagram of this systems is temperature and concentration dependent. Using video microscopy, we directly observed melting of lamellar phases and single lamellae into nematic phase. We found that lamellar phases swell with increasing temperature before melting into the nematic phase. The highly swollen lamellae can be superheated as a result of topological nucleation barriers that slow the formation of the nematic phase. In another set of experiments we prepared colloidal crystals from thermally responsive microgel spheres. The crystals are equilibrium close-packed three-dimensional structures. Upon increasing the temperature slightly above room temperature, particle volume fraction decreased from 0.74 to less than 0.5. Using video microscopy, we observed premelting at grain boundaries and dislocations within bulk colloidal crystals. Premelting is the localized loss of crystalline order at surfaces and defects at sample volume fractions above the bulk melting transition. Particle tracking revealed increased disorder in crystalline regions bordering defects, the amount of which depends on the type of defect, distance from the defect, and particle volume fraction. In total these observations suggest that interfacial free energy is the crucial parameter for premelting in colloidal and in atomic scale crystals.

  7. Evaluation of the Absolute Regional Temperature Potential

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shindell, D. T.

    2012-01-01

    The Absolute Regional Temperature Potential (ARTP) is one of the few climate metrics that provides estimates of impacts at a sub-global scale. The ARTP presented here gives the time-dependent temperature response in four latitude bands (90-28degS, 28degS-28degN, 28-60degN and 60-90degN) as a function of emissions based on the forcing in those bands caused by the emissions. It is based on a large set of simulations performed with a single atmosphere-ocean climate model to derive regional forcing/response relationships. Here I evaluate the robustness of those relationships using the forcing/response portion of the ARTP to estimate regional temperature responses to the historic aerosol forcing in three independent climate models. These ARTP results are in good accord with the actual responses in those models. Nearly all ARTP estimates fall within +/-20%of the actual responses, though there are some exceptions for 90-28degS and the Arctic, and in the latter the ARTP may vary with forcing agent. However, for the tropics and the Northern Hemisphere mid-latitudes in particular, the +/-20% range appears to be roughly consistent with the 95% confidence interval. Land areas within these two bands respond 39-45% and 9-39% more than the latitude band as a whole. The ARTP, presented here in a slightly revised form, thus appears to provide a relatively robust estimate for the responses of large-scale latitude bands and land areas within those bands to inhomogeneous radiative forcing and thus potentially to emissions as well. Hence this metric could allow rapid evaluation of the effects of emissions policies at a finer scale than global metrics without requiring use of a full climate model.

  8. An All Fiber White Light Interferometric Absolute Temperature Measurement System

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jeonggon Harrison

    2008-01-01

    Recently the author of this article proposed a new signal processing algorithm for an all fiber white light interferometer. In this article, an all fiber white light interferometric absolute temperature measurement system is presented using the previously proposed signal processing algorithm. Stability and absolute temperature measurement were demonstrated. These two tests demonstrated the feasibility of absolute temperature measurement with an accuracy of 0.015 fringe and 0.0005 fringe, respectively. A hysteresis test from 373K to 873K was also presented. Finally, robustness of the sensor system towards laser diode temperature drift, AFMZI temperature drift and PZT non-linearity was demonstrated.

  9. Passive absolute age and temperature history sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, Alex; Vianco, Paul T.

    2015-11-10

    A passive sensor for historic age and temperature sensing, including a first member formed of a first material, the first material being either a metal or a semiconductor material and a second member formed of a second material, the second material being either a metal or a semiconductor material. A surface of the second member is in contact with a surface of the first member such that, over time, the second material of the second member diffuses into the first material of the first member. The rate of diffusion for the second material to diffuse into the first material depends on a temperature of the passive sensor. One of the electrical conductance, the electrical capacitance, the electrical inductance, the optical transmission, the optical reflectance, or the crystalline structure of the passive sensor depends on the amount of the second material that has diffused into the first member.

  10. Absolute beam flux measurement at NDCX-I using gold-melting calorimetry technique

    SciTech Connect

    Ni, P.A.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Lidia, S.M.; Welch, J.

    2011-04-01

    We report on an alternative way to measure the absolute beam flux at the NDCX-I, LBNL linear accelerator. Up to date, the beam flux is determined from the analysis of the beam-induced optical emission from a ceramic scintilator (Al-Si). The new approach is based on calorimetric technique, where energy flux is deduced from the melting dynamics of a gold foil. We estimate an average 260 kW/cm2 beam flux over 5 {micro}s, which is consistent with values provided by the other methods. Described technique can be applied to various ion species and energies.

  11. Absolute Temperature Monitoring Using RF Radiometry in the MRI Scanner.

    PubMed

    El-Sharkawy, Abdel-Monem M; Sotiriadis, Paul P; Bottomley, Paul A; Atalar, Ergin

    2006-11-01

    Temperature detection using microwave radiometry has proven value for noninvasively measuring the absolute temperature of tissues inside the body. However, current clinical radiometers operate in the gigahertz range, which limits their depth of penetration. We have designed and built a noninvasive radiometer which operates at radio frequencies (64 MHz) with ∼100-kHz bandwidth, using an external RF loop coil as a thermal detector. The core of the radiometer is an accurate impedance measurement and automatic matching circuit of 0.05 Ω accuracy to compensate for any load variations. The radiometer permits temperature measurements with accuracy of ±0.1°K, over a tested physiological range of 28° C-40° C in saline phantoms whose electric properties match those of tissue. Because 1.5 T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanners also operate at 64 MHz, we demonstrate the feasibility of integrating our radiometer with an MRI scanner to monitor RF power deposition and temperature dosimetry, obtaining coarse, spatially resolved, absolute thermal maps in the physiological range. We conclude that RF radiometry offers promise as a direct, noninvasive method of monitoring tissue heating during MRI studies and thereby providing an independent means of verifying patient-safe operation. Other potential applications include titration of hyper- and hypo-therapies. PMID:18026562

  12. Internal stress-induced melting below melting temperature at high-rate laser heating

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Yong Seok; Levitas, Valery I.

    2014-06-30

    In this Letter, continuum thermodynamic and phase field approaches (PFAs) predicted internal stress-induced reduction in melting temperature for laser-irradiated heating of a nanolayer. Internal stresses appear due to thermal strain under constrained conditions and completely relax during melting, producing an additional thermodynamic driving force for melting. Thermodynamic melting temperature for Al reduces from 933.67 K for a stress-free condition down to 898.1 K for uniaxial strain and to 920.8 K for plane strain. Our PFA simulations demonstrated barrierless surface-induced melt nucleation below these temperatures and propagation of two solid-melt interfaces toward each other at the temperatures very close to the corresponding predicted thermodynamic equilibrium temperatures for the heating rate Q≤1.51×10{sup 10}K/s. At higher heating rates, kinetic superheating competes with a reduction in melting temperature and melting under uniaxial strain occurs at 902.1 K for Q = 1.51 × 10{sup 11 }K/s and 936.9 K for Q = 1.46 × 10{sup 12 }K/s.

  13. Melting the ice: on the relation between melting temperature and size for nanoscale ice crystals.

    PubMed

    Pan, Ding; Liu, Li-Min; Slater, Ben; Michaelides, Angelos; Wang, Enge

    2011-06-28

    Although the melting of ice is an everyday process, important issues remain unclear particularly on the nanoscale. Indeed despite extensive studies into ice melting and premelting, little is known about the relationship between (pre)melting and crystal size and morphology, with, for example, the melting temperature of ice nanocrystals being unclear. Here we report extensive long-time force-field-based molecular dynamics studies of the melting of hexagonal ice nanocrystals in the ca. 2 to 8 nm size range. We show that premelting is initiated at the corners of the crystals, then the edges between facets, and then the flat surfaces; that is, the melting temperature is related to the degree of coordination. A strong size dependence of the melting temperature is observed, with the combination of small particle size and premelting leading nanosized ice crystals to have liquid-like surfaces as low as about 130 K below the bulk ice melting temperature. These results will be of relevance in understanding the size dependence of ice crystal morphology and the surface reactivity of ice particles under atmospheric conditions.

  14. Investigations of the temperature regimes of the selective laser melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chivel, Yu.

    2012-06-01

    The principles of measuring the surface temperature of powder bed in the focal spot of the laser radiation while scanning the surface using galvoscanner with F-teta lens have been elaborated. Investigation of the melting of overhang layers has been conducted under full temperature monitoring. Temperature regimes of the selective laser melting process of the 3D object from steel 316L powder have been investigated.

  15. Method for Synthesizing Extremeley High Temperature Melting Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Saboungi, Marie-Louise and Glorieux, Benoit

    2005-11-22

    The invention relates to a method of synthesizing high-temperature melting materials. More specifically the invention relates to a containerless method of synthesizing very high temperature melting materials such as borides, carbides and transition-metal, lanthanide and actinide oxides, using an Aerodynamic Levitator and a laser. The object of the invention is to provide a method for synthesizing extremely high-temperature melting materials that are otherwise difficult to produce, without the use of containers, allowing the manipulation of the phase (amorphous/crystalline/metastable) and permitting changes of the environment such as different gaseous compositions.

  16. Method For Synthesizing Extremely High-Temperature Melting Materials

    DOEpatents

    Saboungi, Marie-Louise; Glorieux, Benoit

    2005-11-22

    The invention relates to a method of synthesizing high-temperature melting materials. More specifically the invention relates to a containerless method of synthesizing very high temperature melting materials such as borides, carbides and transition-metal, lanthanide and actinide oxides, using an Aerodynamic Levitator and a laser. The object of the invention is to provide a method for synthesizing extremely high-temperature melting materials that are otherwise difficult to produce, without the use of containers, allowing the manipulation of the phase (amorphous/crystalline/metastable) and permitting changes of the environment such as different gaseous compositions.

  17. Method for synthesizing extremely high-temperature melting materials

    DOEpatents

    Saboungi, Marie-Louise; Glorieux, Benoit

    2007-11-06

    The invention relates to a method of synthesizing high-temperature melting materials. More specifically the invention relates to a containerless method of synthesizing very high temperature melting materials such as carbides and transition-metal, lanthanide and actinide oxides, using an aerodynamic levitator and a laser. The object of the invention is to provide a method for synthesizing extremely high-temperature melting materials that are otherwise difficult to produce, without the use of containers, allowing the manipulation of the phase (amorphous/crystalline/metastable) and permitting changes of the environment such as different gaseous compositions.

  18. Estimation of the diversity between DNA calorimetric profiles, differential melting curves and corresponding melting temperatures.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chun-Ling; Fridman, Alexander S; Grigoryan, Inessa E; Galyuk, Elena N; Murashko, Oleg N; Hu, Chin-Kun; Lando, Dmitri Y

    2016-11-01

    The Poland-Fixman-Freire formalism was adapted for modeling of calorimetric DNA melting profiles, and applied to plasmid pBR 322 and long random sequences. We studied the influence of the difference (HGC -HAT ) between the helix-coil transition enthalpies of AT and GC base pairs on the calorimetric melting profile and on normalized calorimetric melting profile. A strong alteration of DNA calorimetrical profile with HGC -HAT was demonstrated. In contrast, there is a relatively slight change in the normalized profiles and in corresponding ordinary (optical) normalized differential melting curves (DMCs). For fixed HGC -HAT , the average relative deviation (S) between DMC and normalized calorimetric profile, and the difference between their melting temperatures (Tcal -Tm ) are weakly dependent on peculiarities of the multipeak fine structure of DMCs. At the same time, both the deviation S and difference (Tcal -Tm ) enlarge with the temperature melting range of the helix-coil transition. It is shown that the local deviation between DMC and normalized calorimetric profile increases in regions of narrow peaks distant from the melting temperature. PMID:27422497

  19. Modeling the melting temperature of nanoscaled bimetallic alloys.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming; Zhu, Tian-Shu

    2016-06-22

    The effect of size, composition and dimension on the melting temperature of nanoscaled bimetallic alloys was investigated by considering the interatomic interaction. The established thermodynamics model without any arbitrarily adjustable parameters can be used to predict the melting temperature of nanoscaled bimetallic alloys. It is found that, the melting temperature and interatomic interaction of nanoscaled bimetallic alloys decrease with the decrease in size and the increasing composition of the lower surface energy metal. Moreover, for the nanoscaled bimetallic alloys with the same size and composition, the dependence of the melting temperature on the dimension can be sequenced as follows: nanoparticles > nanowires > thin films. The accuracy of the developed model is verified by the recent experimental and computer simulation results.

  20. Modeling the Temperature Fields of Copper Powder Melting in the Process of Selective Laser Melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saprykin, A. A.; Ibragimov, E. A.; Babakova, E. V.

    2016-08-01

    Various process variables influence on the quality of the end product when SLM (Selective Laser Melting) synthesizing items of powder materials. The authors of the paper suggest using the model of distributing the temperature fields when forming single tracks and layers of copper powder PMS-1. Relying on the results of modeling it is proposed to reduce melting of powder particles out of the scanning area.

  1. Low melting temperature alloy deployment mechanism and recent experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madden, M. J.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes the concept of a low melting temperature alloy deployment mechanism, U.S. Patent 4,842,106. It begins with a brief history of conventional dimethyl-silicone fluid damped mechanisms. Design fundamentals of the new melting alloy mechanism are then introduced. Benefits of the new over the old are compared and contrasted. Recent experiments and lessons learned complete this paper.

  2. Substrate effect on the melting temperature of thin polyethylenefilms

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Y.; Rafailovich, M.; Sokolov, J.; Gersappe, D.; Araki, T.; Zou, Y.; Kilcoyne, A.D.L.; Ade, H.; Marom, G.; Lustiger, A.

    2006-01-17

    Strong dependence of the crystal orientation, morphology,and melting temperature (Tm) on the substrate is observed in thesemicrystalline polyethylene thin films. The Tm decreases with the filmthickness when the film is thinner that a certain critical thickness andthe magnitude of the depression increases with increasing surfaceinteraction. We attribute the large Tm depression to the decrease in theoverall free energy on melting, which is caused by the substrateattraction force to the chains that competes against the interchain forcewhich drives the chains to crystallization.

  3. Probing the microscopic flexibility of DNA from melting temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Gerald; Essex, Jonathan W.; Neylon, Cameron

    2009-10-01

    The microscopic flexibility of DNA is a key ingredient for understanding its interaction with proteins and drugs but is still poorly understood and technically challenging to measure. Several experimental methods probe very long DNA samples, but these miss local flexibility details. Others mechanically disturb or modify short molecules and therefore do not obtain flexibility properties of unperturbed and pristine DNA. Here, we show that it is possible to extract very detailed flexibility information about unmodified DNA from melting temperatures with statistical physics models. We were able to retrieve, from published melting temperatures, several established flexibility properties such as the presence of highly flexible TATA regions of genomic DNA and support recent findings that DNA is very flexible at short length scales. New information about the nanoscale Na+ concentration dependence of DNA flexibility was determined and we show the key role of ApT and TpA steps when it comes to ion-dependent flexibility and melting temperatures.

  4. Liquidus Temperature Depression in Cryolitic Melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solheim, Asbjørn

    2012-08-01

    The electrolyte in Hall-Héroult cells for the manufacture of primary aluminum nominally contains only cryolite (Na3AlF6) with additions of AlF3, CaF2, and Al2O3. However, impurities are present, entering the process with the feedstock. The effect on the liquidus temperature by the impurities cannot be calculated correctly by the well-known equation for freezing-point depression in binary systems simply because the electrolyte cannot be regarded as a binary system. By extending the equation for freezing-point depression to the ternary system NaF-AlF3-B, it appeared that the acidity of the impurity B plays a major role. Some calculations were made using an ideal Temkin model, and for most types of impurities, the effect on the liquidus temperature will be larger in an industrial electrolyte than what can be estimated from the equation for freezing-point depression in cryolite. Experimental data on the liquidus temperature in the system Na3AlF6-AlF3-Al2O3-CaF2-MgF2 show that the effect of MgF2 on the liquidus temperature increases strongly with decreasing NaF/AlF3 molar ratio, and it is suggested that MgF2 forms an anion complex, probably MgF{4/2-}.

  5. Articulated Multimedia Physics, Lesson 14, Gases, The Gas Laws, and Absolute Temperature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York Inst. of Tech., Old Westbury.

    As the fourteenth lesson of the Articulated Multimedia Physics Course, instructional materials are presented in this study guide with relation to gases, gas laws, and absolute temperature. The topics are concerned with the kinetic theory of gases, thermometric scales, Charles' law, ideal gases, Boyle's law, absolute zero, and gas pressures. The…

  6. Self-optimizing MPC of melt temperature in injection moulding.

    PubMed

    Dubay, R

    2002-01-01

    The parameters in plastic injection moulding are highly nonlinear and interacting. Good control of plastic melt temperature for injection moulding is very important in reducing operator setup time, assuring consistent product quality, and preventing thermal degradation of the melt. Step response testing was performed on the barrel heating zones on an industrial injection moulding machine (IMM). The open loop responses indicated a high degree of process coupling between the heating zones. From these experimental step responses, a multiple-input-multiple-output model predictive control strategy was developed and practically implemented. The requirement of negligible overshoot is important to the plastics industry for preventing material overheating and wastage, and reducing machine operator setup time. A generic learning and self-optimizing MPC methodology was developed and implemented on the IMM to control melt temperature for any polymer to be moulded on any machine having different electrical heater capacities. The control performance was tested for varying setpoint trajectories typical of normal machine operations. The results showed that the predictive controller provided good control of melt temperature for all zones with negligible oscillations, and, therefore, eliminated material degradation and extended machine setup time. PMID:12014805

  7. Fast, Computer Supported Experimental Determination of Absolute Zero Temperature at School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bogacz, Bogdan F.; Pedziwiatr, Antoni T.

    2014-01-01

    A simple and fast experimental method of determining absolute zero temperature is presented. Air gas thermometer coupled with pressure sensor and data acquisition system COACH is applied in a wide range of temperature. By constructing a pressure vs temperature plot for air under constant volume it is possible to obtain--by extrapolation to zero…

  8. Electrical Noise and the Measurement of Absolute Temperature, Boltzmann's Constant and Avogadro's Number.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ericson, T. J.

    1988-01-01

    Describes an apparatus capable of measuring absolute temperatures of a tungsten filament bulb up to normal running temperature and measuring Botzmann's constant to an accuracy of a few percent. Shows that electrical noise techniques are convenient to demonstrate how the concept of temperature is related to the micro- and macroscopic world. (CW)

  9. Syntheses of neptunium trichloride and measurements of its melting temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Hirokazu; Takano, Masahide; Kurata, Masaki; Minato, Kazuo

    2013-09-01

    Neptunium trichloride (NpCl3) of high purity was synthesized by the solid state reaction of neptunium nitride with cadmium chloride. Lattice parameters of hexagonal NpCl3 were determined from the powder X-ray diffraction pattern to be a = 0.7428 ± 0.0001 nm and c = 0.4262 ± 0.0003 nm, which fairly agree with the reported values. The melting temperature of NpCl3 was measured on a sample of about 1 mg, hermetically encapsulated in a gold crucible with a differential thermal analyzer. The value determined was 1070 ± 3 K which is close to the recommended value (1075 ± 30 K) derived from the mean value of the melting temperature of UCl3 and of PuCl3.

  10. A review of the deformation behavior of tungsten at temperatures less than 0.2 of the melting point /K/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, J. R.

    1974-01-01

    The deformation behavior of tungsten at temperatures below 0.2 times the absolute melting temperature is reviewed with primary emphasis on the temperature dependence of the yield stress and the ductile-brittle transition. It is concluded that a model based on the high Peierls stress of tungsten best accounts for the observed mechanical behavior at low temperatures. Recent research suggests an important role of electron concentration and bonding on the mechanical behavior of tungsten. Future research on tungsten should include studies to define more clearly the correlation between electron concentration and mechanical behavior of alloys of tungsten and other transition metal alloys.

  11. Making High-Temperature Superconductors By Melt Sintering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golben, John P.

    1992-01-01

    Melt-sintering technique applied to YBa2Cu3O7-x system and to Bi/Ca/Sr/Cu-oxide system to produce highly oriented bulk high-temperature-superconductor materials extending to macroscopically usable dimensions. Processing requires relatively inexpensive and simple equipment. Because critical current two orders of magnitude greater in crystal ab plane than in crystal c direction, high degree of orientation greatly enhances critical current in these bulk materials, making them more suitable for many proposed applications.

  12. Effects of confining pressure, pore pressure and temperature on absolute permeability. SUPRI TR-27

    SciTech Connect

    Gobran, B.D.; Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Brigham, W.E.

    1981-10-01

    This study investigates absolute permeability of consolidated sandstone and unconsolidated sand cores to distilled water as a function of the confining pressure on the core, the pore pressure of the flowing fluid and the temperature of the system. Since permeability measurements are usually made in the laboratory under conditions very different from those in the reservoir, it is important to know the effect of various parameters on the measured value of permeability. All studies on the effect of confining pressure on absolute permeability have found that when the confining pressure is increased, the permeability is reduced. The studies on the effect of temperature have shown much less consistency. This work contradicts the past Stanford studies by finding no effect of temperature on the absolute permeability of unconsolidated sand or sandstones to distilled water. The probable causes of the past errors are discussed. It has been found that inaccurate measurement of temperature at ambient conditions and non-equilibrium of temperature in the core can lead to a fictitious permeability reduction with temperature increase. The results of this study on the effect of confining pressure and pore pressure support the theory that as confining pressure is increased or pore pressure decreased, the permeability is reduced. The effects of confining pressure and pore pressure changes on absolute permeability are given explicitly so that measurements made under one set of confining pressure/pore pressure conditions in the laboratory can be extrapolated to conditions more representative of the reservoir.

  13. Performance Demonstration of Miniature Phase Transition Cells in Microgravity as a Validation for their use in the Absolute Calibration of Temperature Sensors On-Orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pettersen, C.; Best, F. A.; Adler, D. P.; Aguilar, D. M.; Perepezko, J. H.

    2012-12-01

    The next generation of infrared remote sensing missions, including the climate benchmark missions, will require better absolute measurement accuracy than now available, and will most certainly rely on the emerging capability to fly SI traceable standards that provide irrefutable absolute measurement accuracy. As an example, instrumentation designed to measure spectrally resolved infrared radiances with an absolute brightness temperature error of better than 0.1 K will require high-emissivity (>0.999) calibration blackbodies requiring absolute temperature uncertainties of better than 0.045K (k=3). Key elements of an On-Orbit Absolute Radiance Standard (OARS) meeting these stringent requirements have been demonstrated in the laboratory at the University of Wisconsin and were further refined under the NASA Instrument Incubator Program (IIP). In particular, the OARS has imbedded thermistors that can be periodically calibrated on-orbit using the melt signatures of small quantities (<0.5g) of three reference materials - mercury, water, and gallium, providing calibration from 233K to 303K. One of the many tests to determine the readiness of this technology for on-orbit application is a demonstration of performance in microgravity to be conducted on the International Space Station (ISS). This demonstration will make use of an Experiment Support Package developed by Utah State Space Dynamics Laboratory to continuously run melt cycles on miniature phase change cells containing gallium, a gallium-tin eutectic, and water. The phase change cells will be mounted in a small aluminum block along with a thermistor temperature sensor. A thermoelectric cooler will be used to change the temperature of the block. The demonstration will use the configuration of the phase transition cells developed under our NASA IIP that has been tested extensively in the laboratory under simulated mission life cycle scenarios - these included vibration, thermal soaks, and deep cycling. Melt signatures

  14. On the melting temperatures of low-temperature phases of polymorphic metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohsaka, K.; Trinh, E. H.

    1992-01-01

    An improved analytical formula for determining the melting temperatures of the low-temperature phases of polymorphic metals is proposed which uses the specific heat differences at the equilibrium transition temperatures. The formula is solved by an iterative method, with no more than one iteration necessary to converge. The results obtained using the formula proposed here are generally in good agreement with the analytical solution.

  15. Temperature-dependent Absolute Refractive Index Measurements of Synthetic Fused Silica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leviton, Douglas B.; Frey, Bradley J.

    2006-01-01

    Using the Cryogenic, High-Accuracy Refraction Measuring System (CHARMS) at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, we have measured the absolute refractive index of five specimens taken from a very large boule of Corning 7980 fused silica from temperatures ranging from 30 to 310 K at wavelengths from 0.4 to 2.6 microns with an absolute uncertainty of plus or minus 1 x 10 (exp -5). Statistical variations in derived values of the thermo-optic coefficient (dn/dT) are at the plus or minus 2 x 10 (exp -8)/K level. Graphical and tabulated data for absolute refractive index, dispersion, and thermo-optic coefficient are presented for selected wavelengths and temperatures along with estimates of uncertainty in index. Coefficients for temperature-dependent Sellmeier fits of measured refractive index are also presented to allow accurate interpolation of index to other wavelengths and temperatures. We compare our results to those from an independent investigation (which used an interferometric technique for measuring index changes as a function of temperature) whose samples were prepared from the same slugs of material from which our prisms were prepared in support of the Kepler mission. We also compare our results with sparse cryogenic index data from measurements of this material from the literature.

  16. Absolute brightness temperature measurements at 3.5-mm wavelength. [of sun, Venus, Jupiter and Saturn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulich, B. L.; Rhodes, P. J.; Davis, J. H.; Hollis, J. M.

    1980-01-01

    Careful observations have been made at 86.1 GHz to derive the absolute brightness temperatures of the sun (7914 + or - 192 K), Venus (357.5 + or - 13.1 K), Jupiter (179.4 + or - 4.7 K), and Saturn (153.4 + or - 4.8 K) with a standard error of about three percent. This is a significant improvement in accuracy over previous results at millimeter wavelengths. A stable transmitter and novel superheterodyne receiver were constructed and used to determine the effective collecting area of the Millimeter Wave Observatory (MWO) 4.9-m antenna relative to a previously calibrated standard gain horn. The thermal scale was set by calibrating the radiometer with carefully constructed and tested hot and cold loads. The brightness temperatures may be used to establish an absolute calibration scale and to determine the antenna aperture and beam efficiencies of other radio telescopes at 3.5-mm wavelength.

  17. Temperature effects on atomic pair distribution functions of melts

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, J. Ma, E.; Xu, M.; Guan, P. F.; Deng, S. W.; Cheng, Y. Q.

    2014-02-14

    Using molecular dynamics simulations, we investigate the temperature-dependent evolution of the first peak position/shape in pair distribution functions of liquids. For metallic liquids, the peak skews towards the left (shorter distance side) with increasing temperature, similar to the previously reported anomalous peak shift. Making use of constant-volume simulations in the absence of thermal expansion and change in inherent structure, we demonstrate that the apparent shift of the peak maximum can be a result of the asymmetric shape of the peak, as the asymmetry increases with temperature-induced spreading of neighboring atoms to shorter and longer distances due to the anharmonic nature of the interatomic interaction potential. These findings shed light on the first-shell expansion/contraction paradox for metallic liquids, aside from possible changes in local topological or chemical short-range ordering. The melts of covalent materials are found to exhibit an opposite trend of peak shift, which is attributed to an effect of the directionality of the interatomic bonds.

  18. Pressure dependence of the melting temperature of solids - Rare-gas solids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlosser, Herbert; Ferrante, John

    1991-01-01

    A method presented by Schlosser et al. (1989) for analyzing the pressure dependence of experimental melting-temperature data is applied to rare-gas solids. The plots of the logarithm of the reduced melting temperature vs that of the reduced pressure are straight lines in the absence of phase transitions. The plots of the reduced melting temperatures for Ar, Kr, and Xe are shown to be approximately straight lines.

  19. Study of absolute detection technique with the rotational Raman lidar for atmospheric temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shichun; Wei, Pengpeng; Gong, Xin; Hua, Dengxin

    2015-10-01

    The rotational Raman lidar is a valid tool to profile atmospheric temperature. But the fact that its proper operation generally needs a certain collocated device for calibration seriously restricts application in the meteorology and environment fields. We propose an absolute detection technique of atmospheric temperature with the rotational Raman lidar, which is based on the dependence of rotational Raman spectral envelope on temperature. To retrieve atmospheric temperature without calibration, six rotational Raman spectra of nitrogen molecule are chosen from the anti-Strokes branch. A temperature retrieval algorithm is presented and analyzed based on the least square principle. A two-cascade Raman spectroscopic filter is constructed by one first-order diffraction grating, one convex lens, one linear fiber array and 6 groups of fiber Bragg gratings. This lidar is configured with a 300-mJ pulse energy laser and a 250-mm clear aperture telescope. Simulation results show that it can extract the nitrogen molecules rotational Raman spectral lines, and that atmospheric temperature profile obtained through absolute retrieval algorithm can be up to 3.5 km with less than 0.5-K deviation within 17 minutes interval.

  20. Time-series modeling and prediction of global monthly absolute temperature for environmental decision making

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Liming; Yang, Guixia; Van Ranst, Eric; Tang, Huajun

    2013-03-01

    A generalized, structural, time series modeling framework was developed to analyze the monthly records of absolute surface temperature, one of the most important environmental parameters, using a deterministicstochastic combined (DSC) approach. Although the development of the framework was based on the characterization of the variation patterns of a global dataset, the methodology could be applied to any monthly absolute temperature record. Deterministic processes were used to characterize the variation patterns of the global trend and the cyclic oscillations of the temperature signal, involving polynomial functions and the Fourier method, respectively, while stochastic processes were employed to account for any remaining patterns in the temperature signal, involving seasonal autoregressive integrated moving average (SARIMA) models. A prediction of the monthly global surface temperature during the second decade of the 21st century using the DSC model shows that the global temperature will likely continue to rise at twice the average rate of the past 150 years. The evaluation of prediction accuracy shows that DSC models perform systematically well against selected models of other authors, suggesting that DSC models, when coupled with other ecoenvironmental models, can be used as a supplemental tool for short-term (˜10-year) environmental planning and decision making.

  1. High temperature ultrasonic sensor for the simultaneous measurement of viscosity and temperature of melts

    SciTech Connect

    Balasubramaniam, Krishnan; Shah, Vimal V.; Costley, R. Daniel; Boudreaux, Gary; Singh, Jagdish P.

    1999-12-01

    An ultrasonic sensor that simultaneously measures temperature and viscosity of molten materials at very high temperature is described. This sensor has applications as a process monitor in melters. The sensor is based on ultrasonic shear reflectance at the solid-melt interface. A delay line probe is constructed using refractory materials. A change in the time of flight within the delay line is used to measure the temperature. The results obtained from this sensor on various calibration glass samples demonstrate a measurement range of 100-20 000 P for the viscosity and 25-1500 degree sign C for the temperature. (c) 1999 American Institute of Physics.

  2. Phase change nanocomposites with tunable melting temperature and thermal energy storage density.

    PubMed

    Liu, Minglu; Wang, Robert Y

    2013-08-21

    Size-dependent melting decouples melting temperature from chemical composition and provides a new design variable for phase change material applications. To demonstrate this potential, we create nanocomposites that exhibit stable and tunable melting temperatures through numerous melt-freeze cycles. These composites consist of a monodisperse ensemble of Bi nanoparticles (NPs) embedded in a polyimide (PI) resin matrix. The Bi NPs operate as the phase change component whereas the PI resin matrix prevents nanoparticle coalescence during melt-freeze cycles. We tune melting temperature and enthalpy of fusion in these composites by varying the NP diameter. Adjusting the NP volume fraction also controls the composite's thermal energy storage density. Hence it is possible to leverage size effects to tune phase change temperature and energy density in phase change materials.

  3. Phase change nanocomposites with tunable melting temperature and thermal energy storage density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Minglu; Wang, Robert Y.

    2013-07-01

    Size-dependent melting decouples melting temperature from chemical composition and provides a new design variable for phase change material applications. To demonstrate this potential, we create nanocomposites that exhibit stable and tunable melting temperatures through numerous melt-freeze cycles. These composites consist of a monodisperse ensemble of Bi nanoparticles (NPs) embedded in a polyimide (PI) resin matrix. The Bi NPs operate as the phase change component whereas the PI resin matrix prevents nanoparticle coalescence during melt-freeze cycles. We tune melting temperature and enthalpy of fusion in these composites by varying the NP diameter. Adjusting the NP volume fraction also controls the composite's thermal energy storage density. Hence it is possible to leverage size effects to tune phase change temperature and energy density in phase change materials.Size-dependent melting decouples melting temperature from chemical composition and provides a new design variable for phase change material applications. To demonstrate this potential, we create nanocomposites that exhibit stable and tunable melting temperatures through numerous melt-freeze cycles. These composites consist of a monodisperse ensemble of Bi nanoparticles (NPs) embedded in a polyimide (PI) resin matrix. The Bi NPs operate as the phase change component whereas the PI resin matrix prevents nanoparticle coalescence during melt-freeze cycles. We tune melting temperature and enthalpy of fusion in these composites by varying the NP diameter. Adjusting the NP volume fraction also controls the composite's thermal energy storage density. Hence it is possible to leverage size effects to tune phase change temperature and energy density in phase change materials. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental details and additional DSC data on nanocomposites and pure PI resin. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr02842a

  4. Numerical modeling of inward and outward melting of high temperature PCM in a vertical cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riahi, S.; Saman, W. Y.; Bruno, F.; Tay, N. H. S.

    2016-05-01

    Numerical study of inward and outward melting of a high temperature PCM in cylindrical enclosures were performed, using FLUENT 15. For validation purposes, numerical modeling of inward melting of a low temperature PCM was initially conducted and the predicted results were compared with the experimental data from the literature. The validated model for the low temperature PCM was used for two high temperature cases; inward melting of a high temperature PCM in a cylindrical enclosure and outward melting in a cylindrical case with higher aspect ratio. The results of this study show that the numerical model developed is capable of capturing the details of melting process with buoyancy driven convection for Ra<108, i.e. laminar flow, for a high temperature PCM and can be used for the design and optimization of a latent heat thermal storage unit.

  5. Distinguishing snow and ice melt contributions using daily MODIS and a temperature index melt model in the Hunza River basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rittger, Karl; Brodzik, Mary J.; Racoviteanu, Adina; Barrett, Andrew; Jodha Kalsa, Siri; Armstrong, Richard

    2015-04-01

    In mountainous regions of High Asia, snow and ice both contribute to streamflow, but few in-situ observations exist that can help distinguish between the two components of melt. Our goal is to develop a melt model that can distinguish between seasonal snow and glacier ice melt at a continental scale. We use a combination of MODIS-derived data sets to distinguish three surface types at daily resolution: 1) exposed glacier ice, 2) snow over ice and 3) snow over land. We use MODICE to map glacier area and then distinguish areas of exposed ice from snow over ice using thresholds on MODIS-derived albedo or grain size products. We map snow over land using the daily MODSCAG fractional snow cover product, and use the time series of three surface types as input to a temperature index melt model. The model outputs melt volumes from exposed glacier ice, snow over ice and snow over land, respectively. To partition the glacier surface into exposed glacier ice versus snow over ice, we threshold MODIS albedo or grain size based on higher-resolution Landsat 8 imagery. During the ablation period, the high elevation mid-latitude snowpack receives intense incoming solar radiation resulting in surface albedo decreases and snow grain growth. We compare differences in modeled melt using two albedo products (Terra Daily Snow Cover algorithm (MOD10A1) and Surface Reflectance BRDF/Albedo (MCD43)) and two grain size products (MODIS Snow Covered Area and Grain Size Model (MODSCAG) and MODIS Dust Radiative Forcing in Snow (MODDRFS)). For the Hunza basin, a sub-basin of the Upper Indus basin, for the years 2001-2004, the modeled melt from exposed glacier ice accounts for: 26-44% (MOD10A1 albedo), 24-32% (MCD43 albedo), 17-28% (MODSCAG grain size) or 23-26% (MODDRFS grain size) of the combined melt from all three surface areas.

  6. Entropic changes in liquid gallium clusters: understanding the anomalous melting temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaston, Nicola; Steenbergen, Krista

    Melting in finite-sized materials differs in two ways from the solid-liquid phase transition in bulk systems. First, there is an inherent scaling of the melting temperature below that of the bulk, known as melting point depression. Secondly, at small sizes, changes in melting temperature become non-monotonic, and show a size-dependence that is sensitive to the structure of the particle. Melting temperatures that exceed those of the bulk material have been shown to occur in vacuum, but have still never been ascribed a convincing physical explanation. Here we find answers in the structure of the aggregate liquid phase in small gallium clusters, based on molecular dynamics simulations that reproduce the greater-than-bulk melting behavior observed in experiments, and demonstrate the critical role of a lowered entropy in destabilising the liquid state.

  7. Equilibration Rates and Negative Absolute Temperatures for Ultracold Atoms in Optical Lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rapp, Akos; Mandt, Stephan; Rosch, Achim

    2010-11-01

    As highly tunable interacting systems, cold atoms in optical lattices are ideal to realize and observe negative absolute temperatures, T<0. We show theoretically that, by reversing the confining potential, stable superfluid condensates at finite momentum and T<0 can be created with low entropy production for attractive bosons. They may serve as “smoking gun” signatures of equilibrated T<0. For fermions, we analyze the time scales needed to equilibrate to T<0. For moderate interactions, the equilibration time is proportional to the square of the radius of the cloud and grows with increasing interaction strengths as atoms and energy are transported by diffusive processes.

  8. Correlation between average melting temperature and glass transition temperature in metallic glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Zhibin; Li, Jiangong

    2009-02-01

    The correlation between average melting temperature (⟨Tm⟩) and glass transition temperature (Tg) in metallic glasses (MGs) is analyzed. A linear relationship, Tg=0.385⟨Tm⟩, is observed. This correlation agrees with Egami's suggestion [Rep. Prog. Phys. 47, 1601 (1984)]. The prediction of Tg from ⟨Tm⟩ through the relationship Tg=0.385⟨Tm⟩ has been tested using experimental data obtained on a large number of MGs. This relationship can be used to predict and design MGs with a desired Tg.

  9. Melting Temperature and Partial Melt Chemistry of H2O-Saturated Mantle Peridotite to 11 Gigapascals

    PubMed

    Kawamoto; Holloway

    1997-04-11

    The H2O-saturated solidus of a model mantle composition (Kilborne Hole peridotite nodule, KLB-1) was determined to be just above 1000°C from 5 to 11 gigapascals. Given reasonable H2O abundances in Earth's mantle, an H2O-rich fluid could exist only in a region defined by the wet solidus and thermal stability limits of hydrous minerals, at depths between 90 and 330 kilometers. The experimental partial melts monotonously became more mafic with increasing pressure from andesitic composition at 1 gigapascal to more mafic than the starting peridotite at 10 gigapascals. Because the chemistry of the experimental partial melts is similar to that of kimberlites, it is suggested that kimberlites may be derived by low-temperature melting of an H2O-rich mantle at depths of 150 to 300 kilometers. PMID:9092469

  10. Melting Temperature and Partial Melt Chemistry of H2O-Saturated Mantle Peridotite to 11 Gigapascals

    PubMed

    Kawamoto; Holloway

    1997-04-11

    The H2O-saturated solidus of a model mantle composition (Kilborne Hole peridotite nodule, KLB-1) was determined to be just above 1000°C from 5 to 11 gigapascals. Given reasonable H2O abundances in Earth's mantle, an H2O-rich fluid could exist only in a region defined by the wet solidus and thermal stability limits of hydrous minerals, at depths between 90 and 330 kilometers. The experimental partial melts monotonously became more mafic with increasing pressure from andesitic composition at 1 gigapascal to more mafic than the starting peridotite at 10 gigapascals. Because the chemistry of the experimental partial melts is similar to that of kimberlites, it is suggested that kimberlites may be derived by low-temperature melting of an H2O-rich mantle at depths of 150 to 300 kilometers.

  11. Measurements of absolute absorption cross sections of ozone in the 185- to 254-nm wavelength region and the temperature dependence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoshino, K.; Esmond, J. R.; Freeman, D. E.; Parkinson, W. H.

    1993-01-01

    Laboratory measurements of the relative absorption cross sections of ozone at temperatures 195, 228, and 295 K have been made throughout the 185 to 254 nm wavelength region. The absolute absorption cross sections at the same temperatures have been measured at several discrete wavelengths in the 185 to 250 nm region. The absolute cross sections of ozone have been used to put the relative cross sections on a firm absolute basis throughout the 185 to 255 nm region. These recalibrated cross sections are slightly lower than those of Molina and Molina (1986), but the differences are within a few percent and would not be significant in atmospheric applications.

  12. The impact of water temperature on the measurement of absolute dose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, Naveed Mehdi

    To standardize reference dosimetry in radiation therapy, Task Group 51 (TG 51) of American Association of Physicist's in Medicine (AAPM) recommends that dose calibration measurements be made in a water tank at a depth of 10 cm and at a reference geometry. Methodologies are provided for calculating various correction factors to be applied in calculating the absolute dose. However the protocol does not specify the water temperature to be used. In practice, the temperature of water during dosimetry may vary considerably between independent sessions and different centers. In this work the effect of water temperature on absolute dosimetry has been investigated. Density of water varies with temperature, which in turn may impact the beam attenuation and scatter properties. Furthermore, due to thermal expansion or contraction air volume inside the chamber may change. All of these effects can result in a change in the measurement. Dosimetric measurements were made using a Farmer type ion chamber on a Varian Linear Accelerator for 6 MV and 23 MV photon energies for temperatures ranging from 10 to 40 °C. A thermal insulation was designed for the water tank in order to maintain relatively stable temperature over the duration of the experiment. Dose measured at higher temperatures were found to be consistently higher by a very small magnitude. Although the differences in dose were less than the uncertainty in each measurement, a linear regression of the data suggests that the trend is statistically significant with p-values of 0.002 and 0.013 for 6 and 23 MV beams respectively. For a 10 degree difference in water phantom temperatures, which is a realistic deviation across clinics, the final calculated reference dose can differ by 0.24% or more. To address this effect, first a reference temperature (e.g.22 °C) can be set as the standard; subsequently a correction factor can be implemented for deviations from this reference. Such a correction factor is expected to be of similar

  13. Measurement of the Melting Point Temperature of Several Lithium-Sodium-Beryllium Fluoride Salt (Flinabe) Mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, J.M; Nygren, R.E.; Lutz, T.J.; Tanaka, T.J; Ulrickson, M.A.; Boyle, T.J.; Troncosa, K.P.

    2005-04-15

    The molten salt Flibe, a combination of lithium and beryllium fluorides studied for molten salt fission reactors, has been proposed as a breeder and coolant for fusion applications. The melting points of 2LiF-BeF{sub 2} and LiF-BeF{sub 2} are 460 deg. C and 363 deg. C, but LiF-BeF{sub 2} is rather viscous and has less lithium for breeding. In the Advanced Power Extraction (APEX) Program, concepts with a free flowing liquid for the first wall and blanket were investigated. Flinabe (a mixture of LiF, BeF{sub 2} and NaF) was selected for a molten salt design because a melting temperature below 350 deg. C appeared possible and this provided an attractive operating temperature window for a reactor. To confirm that a ternary salt with a low melting temperature existed, several combinations of the fluoride salts, LiF, NaF and BeF{sub 2}, were melted in a stainless steel crucible under vacuum. One had an apparent melting temperature of 305 deg. C. The test system, preparation of the mixtures, melting procedures and temperature curves for the melting and cooling are presented along with the apparent melting points. Thermal modeling of the salt pool and crucible is reported in an accompanying paper.

  14. High Strain-Rate Response of High Purity Aluminum at Temperatures Approaching Melt

    SciTech Connect

    Grunschel, S E; Clifton, R J; Jiao, T

    2010-01-28

    High-temperature, pressure-shear plate impact experiments were conducted to investigate the rate-controlling mechanisms of the plastic response of high-purity aluminum at high strain rates (10{sup 6} s{sup -1}) and at temperatures approaching melt. Since the melting temperature of aluminum is pressure dependent, and a typical pressure-shear plate impact experiment subjects the sample to large pressures (2 GPa-7 GPa), a pressure-release type experiment was used to reduce the pressure in order to measure the shearing resistance at temperatures up to 95% of the current melting temperature. The measured shearing resistance was remarkably large (50 MPa at a shear strain of 2.5) for temperatures this near melt. Numerical simulations conducted using a version of the Nemat-Nasser/Isaacs constitutive equation, modified to model the mechanism of geometric softening, appear to capture adequately the hardening/softening behavior observed experimentally.

  15. Comparative study on size dependence of melting temperatures of pure metal and alloy nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C. L.; Lee, J.-G.; Arakawa, K.; Mori, H.

    2011-07-04

    A comparative study on the size dependence of the melting temperatures of pure metal and alloy nanoparticles has been carried out. It was found that the melting temperatures of Bi-Sn, In-Sn, and Pb-Sn alloy nanoparticles decreased more rapidly with decreasing particle size than those of the constituent metal nanoparticles (Bi, In, Pb, Sn). Namely, the size dependence of the melting temperature was stronger for the alloy nanoparticles than that for the constituent metal nanoparticles. Results calculated with a thermodynamic model were in good agreement with the experimental observations.

  16. A Two-Dimensional Liquid Structure Explains the Elevated Melting Temperatures of Gallium Nanoclusters.

    PubMed

    Steenbergen, Krista G; Gaston, Nicola

    2016-01-13

    Melting in finite-sized materials differs in two ways from the solid-liquid phase transition in bulk systems. First, there is an inherent scaling of the melting temperature below that of the bulk, known as melting point depression. Second, at small sizes changes in melting temperature become nonmonotonic and show a size-dependence that is sensitive to the structure of the particle. Melting temperatures that exceed those of the bulk material have been shown to occur for a very limited range of nanoclusters, including gallium, but have still never been ascribed a convincing physical explanation. Here, we analyze the structure of the liquid phase in gallium clusters based on molecular dynamics simulations that reproduce the greater-than-bulk melting behavior observed in experiments. We observe persistent nonspherical shape distortion indicating a stabilization of the surface, which invalidates the paradigm of melting point depression. This shape distortion suggests that the surface acts as a constraint on the liquid state that lowers its entropy relative to that of the bulk liquid and thus raises the melting temperature.

  17. Effect of melt homogenization temperature on the cast structures of in 738 LC superalloy

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, L.; Zhen, B.L.; Banerji, A.; Reif, W. . Inst. fuer Metallforschung-Metallkunde); Sommer, F. . Inst. fuer Werkstoffwissenschaft)

    1994-03-01

    The structure of investment cast superalloys can be controlled by optimizing the process variables such as melt treatment, including melt superheating (T[sub s]) and the time of homogenization (t[sub h]), as well as casting parameters including mold preheating temperature (T[sub m]) and pouring temperature of the melt (T[sub p]). The effect of casting parameters has been extensively studied for several superalloys. A variation of the melt superheat, i.e. the temperature above the liquidus of the alloy, produces a significant effect on the cast microstructure. The melt must be superheated sufficiently above the liquidus temperature of the alloy to homogenize the melt by dissolving all the previously present phases in the charge. It is generally known that low superheating temperatures cause significant reductions in the grain size. There is no report on the details of the processing and mechanism of this effect. This paper presents the results of heterogeneous nucleation of the primary crystallites of [gamma]-phase and some modes of carbide precipitation in the nickel-base superalloy Inconel 738 LC cast with low melt superheating temperatures.

  18. Investigation of plasma-sprayed laminates for high-temperature melting operations

    SciTech Connect

    Bird, E.L.; Holcombe, C.E. Jr.

    1991-12-06

    Melting of reactive metals, such as zirconium (Zr), is normally accomplished either by vacuum-arc skull melting using consumable electrodes or by vaccum-induction melting, which is limited to small castings using water-cooled copper crucibles. An alternate process is being proposed to vacuum-induction melt large castings in a coated graphite crucible. The laminated coating would consist of plasma-sprayed layers of metal and ceramic that are designed to withstand temperatures approaching 2000{degrees}C while maintaining enough integrity to prevent contamination of the melt with carbon (C). This paper describes the selection process, experimental results, and feasibility of using laminated coatings that are plasma sprayed on graphite crucibles for melting Zr.

  19. Liquid structure and temperature invariance of sound velocity in supercooled Bi melt

    SciTech Connect

    Emuna, M.; Mayo, M.; Makov, G.; Greenberg, Y.; Caspi, E. N.; Yahel, E.; Beuneu, B.

    2014-03-07

    Structural rearrangement of liquid Bi in the vicinity of the melting point has been proposed due to the unique temperature invariant sound velocity observed above the melting temperature, the low symmetry of Bi in the solid phase and the necessity of overheating to achieve supercooling. The existence of this structural rearrangement is examined by measurements on supercooled Bi. The sound velocity of liquid Bi was measured into the supercooled region to high accuracy and it was found to be invariant over a temperature range of ∼60°, from 35° above the melting point to ∼25° into the supercooled region. The structural origin of this phenomenon was explored by neutron diffraction structural measurements in the supercooled temperature range. These measurements indicate a continuous modification of the short range order in the melt. The structure of the liquid is analyzed within a quasi-crystalline model and is found to evolve continuously, similar to other known liquid pnictide systems. The results are discussed in the context of two competing hypotheses proposed to explain properties of liquid Bi near the melting: (i) liquid bismuth undergoes a structural rearrangement slightly above melting and (ii) liquid Bi exhibits a broad maximum in the sound velocity located incidentally at the melting temperature.

  20. Thermal Diffusivity for III-VI Semiconductor Melts at Different Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ban, H.; Li, C.; Lin, B.; Emoto, K.; Scripa, R. N.; Su, C.-H.; Lehoczky, S. L.

    2004-01-01

    The change of the thermal properties of semiconductor melts reflects the structural changes inside the melts, and a fundamental understanding of this structural transformation is essential for high quality semiconductor crystal growth process. This paper focused on the technical development and the measurement of thermal properties of III-VI semiconductor melts at high temperatures. Our previous work has improved the laser flash method for the specialized quartz sample cell. In this paper, we reported the results of our recent progress in further improvements of the measurement system by minimizing the free convection of the melt, adding a front IR detector, and placing the sample cell in a vacuum environment. The results for tellurium and selenium based compounds, some of which have never been reported in the literature, were obtained at different temperatures as a function of time. The data were compared with other measured thermophysical properties to shed light on the structural transformations of the melt.

  1. Melting temperature of metal polycrystalline nanowires electrochemically deposited into the pores of anodic aluminum oxide.

    PubMed

    Shilyaeva, Yu I; Bardushkin, V V; Gavrilov, S A; Silibin, M V; Yakovlev, V B; Borgardt, N I; Volkov, R L; Smirnov, D I; Zheludkevich, M L

    2014-09-28

    The arrays of metallic nanowires are considered as promising precursors for 1D semiconductor nanostructures after appropriate treatment at temperatures close to the melting point. Therefore the melting behaviour of the metallic structures in oxide templates is a key parameter for the subsequent conversion process. The present paper focuses on understanding of the effect of mechanical stress generated during heating on the melting point of the metal nanowires deposited into the pores of anodic alumina. Extremely high local compressive stress appears due to the difference in the thermal coefficients of the oxide template and nanowires inside the pores. The effect of the composite structural parameter that may be related to the concentration of nanowires on the melting temperature has been investigated. A numerical model predicting the melting point has been developed for composites with indium, tin, and zinc nanowires. The simulation results obtained using the suggested model were compared with the experimental data.

  2. Thermophysical properties of liquid Ni around the melting temperature from molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozas, R. E.; Demiraǧ, A. D.; Toledo, P. G.; Horbach, J.

    2016-08-01

    Thermophysical properties of liquid nickel (Ni) around the melting temperature are investigated by means of classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulation, using three different embedded atom method potentials to model the interactions between the Ni atoms. Melting temperature, enthalpy, static structure factor, self-diffusion coefficient, shear viscosity, and thermal diffusivity are compared to recent experimental results. Using ab initio MD simulation, we also determine the static structure factor and the mean-squared displacement at the experimental melting point. For most of the properties, excellent agreement is found between experiment and simulation, provided the comparison relative to the corresponding melting temperature. We discuss the validity of the Hansen-Verlet criterion for the static structure factor as well as the Stokes-Einstein relation between self-diffusion coefficient and shear viscosity. The thermal diffusivity is extracted from the autocorrelation function of a wavenumber-dependent temperature fluctuation variable.

  3. Absolute absorption cross-section measurements of ozone in the wavelength region 238-335 nm and the temperature dependence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoshino, K.; Freeman, D. E.; Esmond, J. R.; Parkinson, W. H.

    1988-01-01

    The absolute absorption cross-section of ozone has been experimentally determined at the temperatures 195, 228, and 295 K at several discrete wavelengths in the 238-335-nm region. The present results for ozone at 295 K are found to be in agreement with those of Hearn (1961). Absolute cross-section measurements of ozone at 195 K have confirmed previous (Freeman et al., 1984) relative cross-section measurements throughout the 240-335-nm region.

  4. Measurement of the melting point temperature of several lithium-sodium-beryllium fluoride salt (FLINABE) mixtures.

    SciTech Connect

    Boyle, Timothy J.; Troncosa, Kenneth P.; Nygren, Richard Einar; Lutz, Thomas Joseph; McDonald, Jimmie M.; Tanaka, Tina Joan; Ulrickson, Michael Andrew

    2004-09-01

    The molten salt Flibe, a combination of lithium and beryllium flourides, was studied for molten salt fission reactors and has been proposed as a breeder and coolant for the fusion applications. 2LiF-BeF{sub 2} melts at 460 C. LiF-BeF{sub 2} melts at a lower temperature, 363 C, but is rather viscous and has less lithium breeder. In the Advanced Power Extraction (APEX) Program, concepts with a free flowing ternary molten salt for the first wall surface and blanket were investigated. The molten salt (FLiNaBe, a ternary mixture of LiF, BeF2 and NaF) salt was selected because a melting temperature below 350 C that would provide an attractive operating temperature window for a reactor application appeared possible. This information came from a Russian binary phase diagram and a US ternary phase diagram in the 1960's that were not wholly consistent. To confirm that a ternary salt with a low melting temperature existed, several combinations of the fluoride salts, LiF, NaF and, BeF{sub 2}, were melted in a small stainless steel crucible under vacuum. The proportions of the three salts were selected to yield conglomerate salts with as low a melting temperature as possible. The temperature of the salts and the crucible were recorded during the melting and subsequent re-solidification using a thermocouple directly in the salt pool and two thermocouples embedded in the crucible. One mixture had an apparent melting temperature of 305 C. Particular attention was paid to the cooling curve of the salt temperature to observe evidence of any mixed intermediate phases between the fully liquid and fully solid states. The clarity, texture, and thickness were observed and noted as well. The test system, preparation of the mixtures, and the melting procedure are described. The temperature curves for the melting and cooling of each of the mixtures are presented along with the apparent melting points. Thermal modeling of the salt pool and crucible was also done and is reported in a separate

  5. 46 CFR 153.908 - Cargo viscosity and melting point information; measuring cargo temperature during discharge...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... cargo temperature during discharge: Categories A, B, and C. 153.908 Section 153.908 Shipping COAST GUARD... Cargo viscosity and melting point information; measuring cargo temperature during discharge: Categories... in mPa.s and, if the cargo's viscosity exceeds 25 mPa.s at 20 °C, the temperature at which...

  6. 46 CFR 153.908 - Cargo viscosity and melting point information; measuring cargo temperature during discharge...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... cargo temperature during discharge: Categories A, B, and C. 153.908 Section 153.908 Shipping COAST GUARD... Cargo viscosity and melting point information; measuring cargo temperature during discharge: Categories... in mPa.s and, if the cargo's viscosity exceeds 25 mPa.s at 20 °C, the temperature at which...

  7. 46 CFR 153.908 - Cargo viscosity and melting point information; measuring cargo temperature during discharge...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... cargo temperature during discharge: Categories A, B, and C. 153.908 Section 153.908 Shipping COAST GUARD... Cargo viscosity and melting point information; measuring cargo temperature during discharge: Categories... in mPa.s and, if the cargo's viscosity exceeds 25 mPa.s at 20 °C, the temperature at which...

  8. The physical basis of enhanced temperature index ice melt parameterizations in the Nepal Himalaya.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litt, Maxime; Shea, Joseph; Koch, Inka; Wagnon, Patrick

    2016-04-01

    Glacier melt is an important component of seasonal water flows in the Himalayas. Due to scarce data availability and computational convenience, most glaciological projections in the Himalayan region derive ice melt from temperature index (TI) or enhanced temperature index (ETI) parameterizations, which require only temperature and solar radiation as inputs. Still, the processes linking these variables to melt remain poorly documented under high-altitude climates, where the air is cold, and the main input is shortwave radiation. In this study, we question the physical basis of enhanced temperature index (ETI) melt parameterizations in the Nepal Himalayas. Using atmospheric weather station (AWS) installed on Yala glacier at 5090 m a.s.l and Mera glaciers at 6350 m a.s.l., we study the surface energy balance (SEB) during one melt season, i.e, the monsoon and surrounding weeks, in 2014. The SEB estimates provide insights into the atmospheric controls on the glaciers. We study the variability of correlation coefficients linking daily means of temperature, SEB and SEB components. On Yala at 5090 m a.s.l, energy inputs are high during the pre-monsoon due to low surface albedo and strong incoming solar radiation near the solstice, and melt is strong. The temperature correlates moderately with the SEB (R = 0.58) mainly through sublimation and net longwave radiation. During the monsoon snow deposition reduces the magnitude of net shortwave radiation, thus dampening the melt rates. Strong longwave emission from clouds compensates for the surface emission, and the correlation of temperature with the SEB, mainly explained through net shortwave radiation, decreases (R = 0.49). During the post-monsoon, high albedo, heat losses through sublimation and clear-skies favoring longwave losses at the surface lead to a near zero SEB, and reduced melt. Temperature correlates well with the SEB (R = 0.88) through net longwave radiation. On Mera at 6300 m a.s.l, high surface albedo and

  9. Experimental investigations of melting at ultra-high pressures and temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavner, Abby

    The laser-heated diamond anvil cell is an important experimental tool used to access the high pressures and temperatures existing in the interior of the Earth and other planets. The ability to measure a temperature at high pressures is established, and the melting curves of elemental platinum and a complex aggregate, Allende meteorite, are determined. The melting curve of platinum was determined using a laser-heated diamond anvil cell in the pressure range of 12 to 70 GPa. The melting temperature at a given pressure is bracketed by a combination of visual observations and corresponding temperature measurements. The complete melting curve is built up from a series of melting experiments as a function of pressure, performed under different experimental conditions in the diamond cell; however, the placement of the phase boundary is inherently uncertain, due to an experimental "region of indifference" as the phase boundary is approached. To quantify the uncertainties, a statistical method using the logistic model is presented to provide best-fit phase boundaries to the platinum melting data, and can be generalized to fit phase boundary data of any sort. The high-pressure high-temperature phase diagram of Allende meteorite, a chondritic meteorite serving as a model of a primordial terrestrial planet, was investigated in the pressure and temperature ranges of 15 to 70 GPa and 1000 to 4000 K. The melting curve determined here overlaps and is in excellent agreement with previous piston-cylinder and multi-anvil measurements on the same material (Agee, et al., 1995). X-ray diffraction analysis of phases quenched from high pressure and temperature, and high pressure phases both before and after heating, are in good agreement with previous work. The phase diagram of Allende meteorite can be used to constrain events in the early geological evolution of the terrestrial planets.

  10. Melting Penetration Simulation of Fe-U System at High Temperature Using MPS_LER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mustari, A. P. A.; Yamaji, A.; Irwanto, Dwi

    2016-08-01

    Melting penetration information of Fe-U system is necessary for simulating the molten core behavior during severe accident in nuclear power plants. For Fe-U system, the information is mainly obtained from experiment, i.e. TREAT experiment. However, there is no reported data on SS304 at temperature above 1350°C. The MPS_LER has been developed and validated to simulate melting penetration on Fe-U system. The MPS_LER modelled the eutectic phenomenon by solving the diffusion process and by applying the binary phase diagram criteria. This study simulates the melting penetration of the system at higher temperature using MPS_LER. Simulations were conducted on SS304 at 1400, 1450 and 1500°C. The simulation results show rapid increase of melting penetration rate.

  11. Retinal origins of the temperature effect on absolute visual sensitivity in frogs.

    PubMed

    Aho, A C; Donner, K; Reuter, T

    1993-04-01

    1. The absolute sensitivity of vision was studied as a function of temperature in two species of frog (Rana temporaria, 9-21 degrees C, and Rana pipiens, 13-28 degrees C). 2. Log behavioural threshold (measured as the lowest light intensity by which frogs trying to escape from a dark box were able to direct their jumping) rose near-linearly with warming with a regression coefficient of 1.26 +/- 0.03 log units per 10 degrees C (Q10 = 18). Threshold retinal illumination corresponded to 0.011 photoisomerizations per rod per second (Rh* s-1) at 16.5 degrees C. 3. The effect of dim backgrounds on jumping thresholds suggested 'dark lights' of 0.011 Rh* s-1 at 16.5 degrees C and 0.080 Rh* s-1 at 23.5 degrees C, corresponding to Q10 = 17. 4. Response thresholds of retinal ganglion cells were extracellularly recorded in the isolated eyecup of R. temporaria. The thresholds of the most sensitive cells when stimulated with large-field steps of light were similar to the behavioural threshold and changed with temperature in a similar manner. 5. The decrease in ganglion cell 'step' sensitivity with warming consisted of a decrease in summation time (by a factor of 2-3 between 10 and 20 degrees C) and an increase in the threshold number of photoisomerizations (a decrease in 'flash' sensitivity, by a factor of 2-5 over the same interval). No effect of temperature changes on spatial summation was found. 6. Frequency-of-response functions of ganglion cells indicated an 11-fold increase in noise-equivalent dark light between 10 and 20 degrees C (mean values in four cells 0.009 vs. 0.10 Rh* s-1). 7. The temperature dependence of ganglion cell flash sensitivity could be strongly decreased with dim background illumination. 8. It is concluded that the desensitization of dark-adapted vision with rising temperature is a retinal effect composed of shortened summation time and lowered flash sensitivity (increased numbers of photons required for a threshold response) in ganglion cells. The

  12. Estimation of absolute water surface temperature based on atmospherically corrected thermal infrared multispectral scanner digital data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, James E.

    1986-01-01

    Airborne remote sensing systems, as well as those on board Earth orbiting satellites, sample electromagnetic energy in discrete wavelength regions and convert the total energy sampled into data suitable for processing by digital computers. In general, however, the total amount of energy reaching a sensor system located at some distance from the target is composed not only of target related energy, but, in addition, contains a contribution originating from the atmosphere itself. Thus, some method must be devised for removing or at least minimizing the effects of the atmosphere. The LOWTRAN-6 Program was designed to estimate atmospheric transmittance and radiance for a given atmospheric path at moderate spectral resolution over an operational wavelength region from 0.25 to 28.5 microns. In order to compute the Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner (TIMS) digital values which were recorded in the absence of the atmosphere, the parameters derived from LOWTRAN-6 are used in a correction equation. The TIMS data were collected at 1:00 a.m. local time on November 21, 1983, over a recirculating cooling pond for a power plant in southeastern Mississippi. The TIMS data were analyzed before and after atmospheric corrections were applied using a band ratioing model to compute the absolute surface temperature of various points on the power plant cooling pond. The summarized results clearly demonstrate the desirability of applying atmospheric corrections.

  13. Temperature and pressure dependences of kimberlite melts viscosity (experimental-theoretical study)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persikov, Eduard; Bykhtiyarov, Pavel; Cokol, Alexsander

    2016-04-01

    Experimental data on temperature and pressure dependences of viscosity of model kimberlite melts (silicate 82 + carbonate 18, wt. %, 100NBO/T = 313) have been obtained for the first time at 100 MPa of CO2 pressure and at the lithostatic pressures up to 7.5 GPa in the temperature range 1350 oC - 1950 oC using radiation high gas pressure apparatus and press free split-sphere multi - anvil apparatus (BARS). Experimental data obtained on temperature and pressure dependences of viscosity of model kimberlite melts at moderate and high pressures is compared with predicted data on these dependences of viscosity of basaltic melts (100NBO/T = 58) in the same T, P - range. Dependences of the viscosity of model kimberlite and basaltic melts on temperature are consistent to the exponential Arrenian equation in the T, P - range of experimental study. The correct values of activation energies of viscous flow of kimberlite melts have been obtained for the first time. The activation energies of viscous flow of model kimberlite melts exponentially increase with increasing pressure and are equal: E = 130 ± 1.3 kJ/mole at moderate pressure (P = 100 MPa) and E = 160 ± 1.6 kJ/mole at high pressure (P = 5.5 GPa). It has been established too that the viscosity of model kimberlite melts exponentially increases on about half order of magnitude with increasing pressures from 100 MPa to 7.5 GPa at the isothermal condition (1800 oC). It has been established that viscosity of model kimberlite melts at the moderate pressure (100 MPa) is lover on about one order of magnitude to compare with the viscosity of basaltic melts, but at high pressure range (5.5 - 7.5 GPa), on the contrary, is higher on about half order of magnitude at the same values of the temperatures. Here we use both a new experimental data on viscosity of kimberlite melts and our structural chemical model for calculation and prediction the viscosity of magmatic melts [1] to determine the fundamental features of viscosity of

  14. dnaMATE: a consensus melting temperature prediction server for short DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Panjkovich, Alejandro; Norambuena, Tomás; Melo, Francisco

    2005-07-01

    An accurate and robust large-scale melting temperature prediction server for short DNA sequences is dispatched. The server calculates a consensus melting temperature value using the nearest-neighbor model based on three independent thermodynamic data tables. The consensus method gives an accurate prediction of melting temperature, as it has been recently demonstrated in a benchmark performed using all available experimental data for DNA sequences within the length range of 16-30 nt. This constitutes the first web server that has been implemented to perform a large-scale calculation of melting temperatures in real time (up to 5000 DNA sequences can be submitted in a single run). The expected accuracy of calculations carried out by this server in the range of 50-600 mM monovalent salt concentration is that 89% of the melting temperature predictions will have an error or deviation of <5 degrees C from experimental data. The server can be freely accessed at http://dna.bio.puc.cl/tm.html. The standalone executable versions of this software for LINUX, Macintosh and Windows platforms are also freely available at the same web site. Detailed further information supporting this server is available at the same web site referenced above.

  15. Melting temperatures of the ZrO{sub 2}-MOX system

    SciTech Connect

    Uchida, T.; Hirooka, S.; Kato, M.; Morimoto, K.; Sugata, H.; Shibata, K.; Sato, D.

    2013-07-01

    Severe accidents occurred at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant Units 1-3 on March 11, 2011. MOX fuels were loaded in the Unit 3. For the thermal analysis of the severe accident, melting temperature and phase state of MOX corium were investigated. The simulated coriums were prepared from 4%Pu-containing MOX, 8%Pu-containing MOX and ZrO{sub 2}. Then X-ray diffraction, density and melting temperature measurements were carried out as a function of zirconium and plutonium contents. The cubic phase was observed in the 25%Zr-containing corium and the tetragonal phase was observed in the 50% and 75%Zr-containing coria. The lattice parameter and density monotonically changed with Pu content. Melting temperature increased with increasing Pu content; melting temperature were estimated to be 2932 K for 4%Pu MOX corium and 3012 K for 8%Pu MOX corium in the 25%ZrO{sub 2}-MOX system. The lowest melting temperature was observed for 50%Zr-containing corium. (authors)

  16. 46 CFR 153.908 - Cargo viscosity and melting point information; measuring cargo temperature during discharge...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... cargo temperature during discharge: Categories A, B, and C. 153.908 Section 153.908 Shipping COAST GUARD..., LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Operations Documents and Cargo Information § 153.908 Cargo viscosity and melting point information; measuring cargo temperature during discharge:...

  17. Shear melting and high temperature embrittlement: theory and application to machining titanium.

    PubMed

    Healy, Con; Koch, Sascha; Siemers, Carsten; Mukherji, Debashis; Ackland, Graeme J

    2015-04-24

    We describe a dynamical phase transition occurring within a shear band at high temperature and under extremely high shear rates. With increasing temperature, dislocation deformation and grain boundary sliding are supplanted by amorphization in a highly localized nanoscale band, which allows for massive strain and fracture. The mechanism is similar to shear melting and leads to liquid metal embrittlement at high temperature. From simulation, we find that the necessary conditions are lack of dislocation slip systems, low thermal conduction, and temperature near the melting point. The first two are exhibited by bcc titanium alloys, and we show that the final one can be achieved experimentally by adding low-melting-point elements: specifically, we use insoluble rare earth metals (REMs). Under high shear, the REM becomes mixed with the titanium, lowering the melting point within the shear band and triggering the shear-melting transition. This in turn generates heat which remains localized in the shear band due to poor heat conduction. The material fractures along the shear band. We show how to utilize this transition in the creation of new titanium-based alloys with improved machinability.

  18. Shear Melting and High Temperature Embrittlement: Theory and Application to Machining Titanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Healy, Con; Koch, Sascha; Siemers, Carsten; Mukherji, Debashis; Ackland, Graeme J.

    2015-04-01

    We describe a dynamical phase transition occurring within a shear band at high temperature and under extremely high shear rates. With increasing temperature, dislocation deformation and grain boundary sliding are supplanted by amorphization in a highly localized nanoscale band, which allows for massive strain and fracture. The mechanism is similar to shear melting and leads to liquid metal embrittlement at high temperature. From simulation, we find that the necessary conditions are lack of dislocation slip systems, low thermal conduction, and temperature near the melting point. The first two are exhibited by bcc titanium alloys, and we show that the final one can be achieved experimentally by adding low-melting-point elements: specifically, we use insoluble rare earth metals (REMs). Under high shear, the REM becomes mixed with the titanium, lowering the melting point within the shear band and triggering the shear-melting transition. This in turn generates heat which remains localized in the shear band due to poor heat conduction. The material fractures along the shear band. We show how to utilize this transition in the creation of new titanium-based alloys with improved machinability.

  19. Shear melting and high temperature embrittlement: theory and application to machining titanium.

    PubMed

    Healy, Con; Koch, Sascha; Siemers, Carsten; Mukherji, Debashis; Ackland, Graeme J

    2015-04-24

    We describe a dynamical phase transition occurring within a shear band at high temperature and under extremely high shear rates. With increasing temperature, dislocation deformation and grain boundary sliding are supplanted by amorphization in a highly localized nanoscale band, which allows for massive strain and fracture. The mechanism is similar to shear melting and leads to liquid metal embrittlement at high temperature. From simulation, we find that the necessary conditions are lack of dislocation slip systems, low thermal conduction, and temperature near the melting point. The first two are exhibited by bcc titanium alloys, and we show that the final one can be achieved experimentally by adding low-melting-point elements: specifically, we use insoluble rare earth metals (REMs). Under high shear, the REM becomes mixed with the titanium, lowering the melting point within the shear band and triggering the shear-melting transition. This in turn generates heat which remains localized in the shear band due to poor heat conduction. The material fractures along the shear band. We show how to utilize this transition in the creation of new titanium-based alloys with improved machinability. PMID:25955055

  20. Greenland ice sheet surface temperature, melt and mass loss: 2000-06

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hall, D.K.; Williams, R.S.; Luthcke, S.B.; DiGirolamo, N.E.

    2008-01-01

    A daily time series of 'clear-sky' surface temperature has been compiled of the Greenland ice sheet (GIS) using 1 km resolution moderate-resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) land-surface temperature (LST) maps from 2000 to 2006. We also used mass-concentration data from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) to study mass change in relationship to surface melt from 2003 to 2006. The mean LST of the GIS increased during the study period by ???0.27??Ca-1. The increase was especially notable in the northern half of the ice sheet during the winter months. Melt-season length and timing were also studied in each of the six major drainage basins. Rapid (<15 days) and sustained mass loss below 2000 m elevation was triggered in 2004 and 2005 as recorded by GRACE when surface melt begins. Initiation of large-scale surface melt was followed rapidly by mass loss. This indicates that surface meltwater is flowing rapidly to the base of the ice sheet, causing acceleration of outlet glaciers, thus highlighting the metastability of parts of the GIS and the vulnerability of the ice sheet to air-temperature increases. If air temperatures continue to rise over Greenland, increased surface melt will play a large role in ice-sheet mass loss.

  1. Kelvin Absolute Temperature Scale Identified as Length Scale and Related to de Broglie Thermal Wavelength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohrab, Siavash

    Thermodynamic equilibrium between matter and radiation leads to de Broglie wavelength λdβ = h /mβvrβ and frequency νdβ = k /mβvrβ of matter waves and stochastic definitions of Planck h =hk =mk <λrk > c and Boltzmann k =kk =mk <νrk > c constants, λrkνrk = c , that respectively relate to spatial (λ) and temporal (ν) aspects of vacuum fluctuations. Photon massmk =√{ hk /c3 } , amu =√{ hkc } = 1 /No , and universal gas constant Ro =No k =√{ k / hc } result in internal Uk = Nhνrk = Nmkc2 = 3 Nmkvmpk2 = 3 NkT and potential pV = uN\\vcirc / 3 = N\\ucirc / 3 = NkT energy of photon gas in Casimir vacuum such that H = TS = 4 NkT . Therefore, Kelvin absolute thermodynamic temperature scale [degree K] is identified as length scale [meter] and related to most probable wavelength and de Broglie thermal wavelength as Tβ =λmpβ =λdβ / 3 . Parallel to Wien displacement law obtained from Planck distribution, the displacement law λwS T =c2 /√{ 3} is obtained from Maxwell -Boltzmann distribution of speed of ``photon clusters''. The propagation speeds of sound waves in ideal gas versus light waves in photon gas are described in terms of vrβ in harmony with perceptions of Huygens. Newton formula for speed of long waves in canals √{ p / ρ } is modified to √{ gh } =√{ γp / ρ } in accordance with adiabatic theory of Laplace.

  2. Surface Temperature and Melt on the Greenland Ice Sheet, 2000 - 2011

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Dorothy K.; Comiso, Josefino C.; Shuman, Christopher A.; Koeing, Lora S.; Box, Jason E.; DiGirolamo, Nicolo E.

    2012-01-01

    Enhanced melting along with surface-temperature increases measured using infrared satellite data, have been documented for the Greenland Ice Sheet. Recently we developed a climate-quality data record of ice-surface temperature (IST) of the Greenland Ice Sheet using the Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) IST product -- http://modis-snow-ice.gsfc.nasa.gov.Using daily and mean-monthly MODIS IST maps from the data record we show maximum extent of melt for the ice sheet and its six major drainage basins for a 12-year period extending from March of 2000 through December of 2011. The duration of the melt season on the ice sheet varies in different drainage basins with some basins melting progressively earlier over the study period. Some (but not all) of the basins also show a progressively-longer duration of melt. The short time of the study period (approx 12 years) precludes an evaluation of statistically-significant trends. However the dataset provides valuable information on natural variability of IST, and on the ability of the MODIS instrument to capture changes in IST and melt conditions in different drainage basins of the ice sheet.

  3. Metal-sulfide melt non-interconnectivity in silicates, even at high pressure, high temperature, and high melt fractions

    SciTech Connect

    Minarik, W.G.; Ryerson, F.J.

    1996-01-01

    The authors have investigated the textural microstructure of iron-nickel-sulfur melts in contact with olivine, pyroxene, and the modified-spinel polymorph of olivine. The experiments were conducted at 1,500 C and pressures ranging from 1 to 17 GPa. For compositions more metal-rich than the monosulfide, including the eutectic composition, the metal sulfide melt has a dihedral angle greater than 60{degree} and does not form an interconnected grain-edge fluid. Increasing pressure does not measurably alter the dihedral angles. Textural evolution results in coarsening of the sulfide melt pockets, resulting in large pockets surrounded by many silicate grains and separated from one another by melt-free grain edges. Chemical communication between these large pockets is limited to lattice and grain-boundary diffusion. Due to the large interfacial energy between sulfide melt and silicates, sulfide melts are unable to separate from solid silicate via grain-boundary percolation and remain stranded in isolated melt pockets. Sulfide melt in excess of the critical melt fraction (5--25%) will develop a transient interconnectivity as sulfide collects into larger melt pockets and interconnectivity is pinched off. Efficient separation of core-forming sulfide melts from silicate requires either melting of the silicate matrix or a very large fraction of metal-sulfide melt (perhaps as large as 40%).

  4. The challenge of decomposition and melting of gallium nitride under high pressure and high temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porowski, S.; Sadovyi, B.; Gierlotka, S.; Rzoska, S. J.; Grzegory, I.; Petrusha, I.; Turkevich, V.; Stratiichuk, D.

    2015-10-01

    Gallium nitride (GaN) is considered to be one of the most important semiconductors nowadays. In this report a solution of the long standing puzzle regarding GaN decomposition and melting under high pressure and high temperature is presented. This includes the discussion of results obtained so far. The possibility of a consistent parameterisation of pressure (P) evolution of the melting temperature (Tm) in basic semiconductors (GaN, germanium, silicon…), independently from signs of dTm / dP is also presented.

  5. The impact of melt ponds on summertime microwave brightness temperatures and sea-ice concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kern, Stefan; Rösel, Anja; Toudal Pedersen, Leif; Ivanova, Natalia; Saldo, Roberto; Tage Tonboe, Rasmus

    2016-09-01

    Sea-ice concentrations derived from satellite microwave brightness temperatures are less accurate during summer. In the Arctic Ocean the lack of accuracy is primarily caused by melt ponds, but also by changes in the properties of snow and the sea-ice surface itself. We investigate the sensitivity of eight sea-ice concentration retrieval algorithms to melt ponds by comparing sea-ice concentration with the melt-pond fraction. We derive gridded daily sea-ice concentrations from microwave brightness temperatures of summer 2009. We derive the daily fraction of melt ponds, open water between ice floes, and the ice-surface fraction from contemporary Moderate Resolution Spectroradiometer (MODIS) reflectance data. We only use grid cells where the MODIS sea-ice concentration, which is the melt-pond fraction plus the ice-surface fraction, exceeds 90 %. For one group of algorithms, e.g., Bristol and Comiso bootstrap frequency mode (Bootstrap_f), sea-ice concentrations are linearly related to the MODIS melt-pond fraction quite clearly after June. For other algorithms, e.g., Near90GHz and Comiso bootstrap polarization mode (Bootstrap_p), this relationship is weaker and develops later in summer. We attribute the variation of the sensitivity to the melt-pond fraction across the algorithms to a different sensitivity of the brightness temperatures to snow-property variations. We find an underestimation of the sea-ice concentration by between 14 % (Bootstrap_f) and 26 % (Bootstrap_p) for 100 % sea ice with a melt-pond fraction of 40 %. The underestimation reduces to 0 % for a melt-pond fraction of 20 %. In presence of real open water between ice floes, the sea-ice concentration is overestimated by between 26 % (Bootstrap_f) and 14 % (Bootstrap_p) at 60 % sea-ice concentration and by 20 % across all algorithms at 80 % sea-ice concentration. None of the algorithms investigated performs best based on our investigation of data from summer 2009. We suggest that those algorithms which are

  6. Melting analysis on microbeads in rapid temperature-gradient inside microchannels for single nucleotide polymorphisms detection.

    PubMed

    Li, Kan-Chien; Ding, Shih-Torng; Lin, En-Chung; Wang, Lon Alex; Lu, Yen-Wen

    2014-11-01

    A continuous-flow microchip with a temperature gradient in microchannels was utilized to demonstrate spatial melting analysis on microbeads for clinical Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) genotyping on animal genomic DNA. The chip had embedded heaters and thermometers, which created a rapid and yet stable temperature gradient between 60 °C and 85 °C in a short distance as the detection region. The microbeads, which served as mobile supports carrying the target DNA and fluorescent dye, were transported across the temperature gradient. As the surrounding temperature increased, the fluorescence signals of the microbeads decayed with this relationship being acquired as the melting curve. Fast DNA denaturation, as a result of the improved heat transfer and thermal stability due to scaling, was also confirmed. Further, each individual microbead could potentially bear different sequences and pass through the detection region, one by one, for a series of melting analysis, with multiplex, high-throughput capability being possible. A prototype was tested with target DNA samples in different genotypes (i.e., wild and mutant types) with a SNP location from Landrace sows. The melting temperatures were obtained and compared to the ones using a traditional tube-based approach. The results showed similar levels of SNP discrimination, validating our proposed technique for scanning homozygotes and heterozygotes to distinguish single base changes for disease research, drug development, medical diagnostics, agriculture, and animal production.

  7. A coupled melt-freeze temperature index approach in a one-layer model to predict bulk volumetric liquid water content dynamics in snow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avanzi, Francesco; Yamaguchi, Satoru; Hirashima, Hiroyuki; De Michele, Carlo

    2016-04-01

    Liquid water in snow rules runoff dynamics and wet snow avalanches release. Moreover, it affects snow viscosity and snow albedo. As a result, measuring and modeling liquid water dynamics in snow have important implications for many scientific applications. However, measurements are usually challenging, while modeling is difficult due to an overlap of mechanical, thermal and hydraulic processes. Here, we evaluate the use of a simple one-layer one-dimensional model to predict hourly time-series of bulk volumetric liquid water content in seasonal snow. The model considers both a simple temperature-index approach (melt only) and a coupled melt-freeze temperature-index approach that is able to reconstruct melt-freeze dynamics. Performance of this approach is evaluated at three sites in Japan. These sites (Nagaoka, Shinjo and Sapporo) present multi-year time-series of snow and meteorological data, vertical profiles of snow physical properties and snow melt lysimeters data. These data-sets are an interesting opportunity to test this application in different climatic conditions, as sites span a wide latitudinal range and are subjected to different snow conditions during the season. When melt-freeze dynamics are included in the model, results show that median absolute differences between observations and predictions of bulk volumetric liquid water content are consistently lower than 1 vol%. Moreover, the model is able to predict an observed dry condition of the snowpack in 80% of observed cases at a non-calibration site, where parameters from calibration sites are transferred. Overall, the analysis show that a coupled melt-freeze temperature-index approach may be a valid solution to predict average wetness conditions of a snow cover at local scale.

  8. Temperature Dependence of Density, Viscosity and Electrical Conductivity for Hg-Based II-VI Semiconductor Melts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, C.; Ban, H.; Lin, B.; Scripa, R. N.; Su, C.-H.; Lehoczky, S. L.

    2004-01-01

    The relaxation phenomenon of semiconductor melts, or the change of melt structure with time, impacts the crystal growth process and the eventual quality of the crystal. The thermophysical properties of the melt are good indicators of such changes in melt structure. Also, thermophysical properties are essential to the accurate predication of the crystal growth process by computational modeling. Currently, the temperature dependent thermophysical property data for the Hg-based II-VI semiconductor melts are scarce. This paper reports the results on the temperature dependence of melt density, viscosity and electrical conductivity of Hg-based II-VI compounds. The melt density was measured using a pycnometric method, and the viscosity and electrical conductivity were measured by a transient torque method. Results were compared with available published data and showed good agreement. The implication of the structural changes at different temperature ranges was also studied and discussed.

  9. Evidence for low-temperature melting of mercury owing to relativity.

    PubMed

    Calvo, Florent; Pahl, Elke; Wormit, Michael; Schwerdtfeger, Peter

    2013-07-15

    An old problem solved: Monte Carlo simulations using the diatomic-in-molecule method derived from accurate ground- and excited-state relativistic calculations for Hg2 show that the melting temperature for bulk mercury is lowered by 105 K, which is due to relativistic effects.

  10. {sup 3}He melting pressure temperature scale below 25 mK

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, E.D.; Ni, W.; Xia, J.S.

    1995-04-01

    Using {sup 60}Co {gamma} ray anisotropy radiation as a primary thermometer, with a Pt NMR susceptibility secondary thermometer, the authors have made high precision measurements of the {sup 3}He melting pressure versus temperature from 500 {mu}K to 25 mK. Temperatures obtained for the fixed points on the melting curve are: the superfluid A transition T{sub A} = 2.505 mK, the A-B transition T{sub AB} = 1.948 mK, and the solid ordering temperature T{sub N} = 0.934 mK. The authors provide a functional form for P(T), which, with the fixed points, constitutes a convenient temperature scale, based on a primary thermometer, usable to well below 1 mK.

  11. Easy Absolute Values? Absolutely

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Sharon E.; Mittag, Kathleen Cage

    2015-01-01

    The authors teach a problem-solving course for preservice middle-grades education majors that includes concepts dealing with absolute-value computations, equations, and inequalities. Many of these students like mathematics and plan to teach it, so they are adept at symbolic manipulations. Getting them to think differently about a concept that they…

  12. High temperature exchange bias effect in melt-spun Mn55Bi45alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yiming; Xiang, Zhen; Wang, Taolei; Niu, Junchao; Xia, Kada; Lu, Wei; Zhang, Hong; Cao, Yongze; Yoshimura, Satoru; Saito, Hitoshi

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we report a high-temperature exchange bias (EB) effect in melt-spun Mn55Bi45 alloy ribbons. A remarkable spontaneous exchange bias (up to 1700 Oe) was achieved at temperature from 300 K to 550 K, which is far higher than what has so far been observed in other alloy systems. Such a phenomenon is attributed to the local antiferromagnetic cluster formed in the ferromagnetic matrix. The observation of high-temperature EB in the Mn55Bi45 alloy is of interest from the perspective of practical applications, and it is a good starting point for designing high-temperature spintronic devices.

  13. Developing Temperature Forcing for Snow and Ice Melt Runoff Models in High Mountain Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, A. P.; Armstrong, R. L.; Brodzik, M. J.; Khalsa, S. J. S.; Raup, B. H.; Rittger, K.

    2014-12-01

    Glaciers and snow cover are natural storage reservoirs that delay runoff on seasonal and longer time-scales. Glacier wastage and reduced snow packs will impact the volume and timing of runoff from mountain basins. Estimates of the contributions of glacier and snow melt to runoff in river systems draining mountain regions are critical for water resources planning. The USAID funded CHARIS project aims to estimate the contributions of glacier and snow melt to streamflow in the Ganges, Indus, Brahmaputra, Amu Darya and Syr Darya rivers. Most efforts to estimate glacier and snow melt contributions use temperature-index or degree-day approaches. Near-surface air temperature is a key forcing variable for such models. As with all mountain regions, meteorological stations are sparse and may have short records. Few stations exist at high elevations, with most stations located in valleys below the elevations of glaciers and seasonal snow cover. Reanalyses offer an alternative source of temperature data. However, reanalyses have coarse resolution and simplified topography, especially in the Himalaya. Surface fields are often biased. Any reanalysis product must be both bias-corrected and "downscaled" to the resolution of the melt-runoff model. We present a combined empirically-based bias-correction and downscaling procedure that uses near-surface air temperature from global atmospheric reanalyses to generate near-surface temperature forcing fields for the five river basins in the CHARIS study area. We focus on three 3rd Generation reanalyses; NASA MERRA, NCEP CFSR and ECMWF ERA-Interim. Evaluation of reanalysis temperature fields reveals differences between seasonal means of 500 hPa air temperatures for the three products are of the order of 1 °C, indicating choice of reanalysis can impact model results. The procedure accounts for these seasonal variations in biases of the reanalysis products and in lapse rates.

  14. Sulfide saturation of basalt and andesite melts at high pressures and temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wendlandt, R. F.

    1982-01-01

    When the sulfur content of an Fe-bearing magma exceeds the saturation limit for the bulk composition, an immiscible iron sulfide melt fraction separates. For an understanding of the geochemistry of sulfur-bearing magmatic systems, more information is needed regarding the solubility of metal sulfide in silicate melt at its source and the solubility changes as a function of changing intensive and extensive variables. In the present investigation, the sulfur saturation surface is determined for the pressure range from 12.5 to 30 kbar and the temperature range from 1300 to 1460 C for three silicate melt compositions representing a range of SiO2 and FeO compositions.

  15. High-temperature apparatus for chaotic mixing of natural silicate melts.

    PubMed

    Morgavi, D; Petrelli, M; Vetere, F P; González-García, D; Perugini, D

    2015-10-01

    A unique high-temperature apparatus was developed to trigger chaotic mixing at high-temperature (up to 1800 °C). This new apparatus, which we term Chaotic Magma Mixing Apparatus (COMMA), is designed to carry out experiments with high-temperature and high-viscosity (up to 10(6) Pa s) natural silicate melts. This instrument allows us to follow in time and space the evolution of the mixing process and the associated modulation of chemical composition. This is essential to understand the dynamics of magma mixing and related chemical exchanges. The COMMA device is tested by mixing natural melts from Aeolian Islands (Italy). The experiment was performed at 1180 °C using shoshonite and rhyolite melts, resulting in a viscosity ratio of more than three orders of magnitude. This viscosity ratio is close to the maximum possible ratio of viscosity between high-temperature natural silicate melts. Results indicate that the generated mixing structures are topologically identical to those observed in natural volcanic rocks highlighting the enormous potential of the COMMA to replicate, as a first approximation, the same mixing patterns observed in the natural environment. COMMA can be used to investigate in detail the space and time development of magma mixing providing information about this fundamental petrological and volcanological process that would be impossible to investigate by direct observations. Among the potentials of this new experimental device is the construction of empirical relationships relating the mixing time, obtained through experimental time series, and chemical exchanges between the melts to constrain the mixing-to-eruption time of volcanic systems, a fundamental topic in volcanic hazard assessment. PMID:26520985

  16. High-temperature apparatus for chaotic mixing of natural silicate melts.

    PubMed

    Morgavi, D; Petrelli, M; Vetere, F P; González-García, D; Perugini, D

    2015-10-01

    A unique high-temperature apparatus was developed to trigger chaotic mixing at high-temperature (up to 1800 °C). This new apparatus, which we term Chaotic Magma Mixing Apparatus (COMMA), is designed to carry out experiments with high-temperature and high-viscosity (up to 10(6) Pa s) natural silicate melts. This instrument allows us to follow in time and space the evolution of the mixing process and the associated modulation of chemical composition. This is essential to understand the dynamics of magma mixing and related chemical exchanges. The COMMA device is tested by mixing natural melts from Aeolian Islands (Italy). The experiment was performed at 1180 °C using shoshonite and rhyolite melts, resulting in a viscosity ratio of more than three orders of magnitude. This viscosity ratio is close to the maximum possible ratio of viscosity between high-temperature natural silicate melts. Results indicate that the generated mixing structures are topologically identical to those observed in natural volcanic rocks highlighting the enormous potential of the COMMA to replicate, as a first approximation, the same mixing patterns observed in the natural environment. COMMA can be used to investigate in detail the space and time development of magma mixing providing information about this fundamental petrological and volcanological process that would be impossible to investigate by direct observations. Among the potentials of this new experimental device is the construction of empirical relationships relating the mixing time, obtained through experimental time series, and chemical exchanges between the melts to constrain the mixing-to-eruption time of volcanic systems, a fundamental topic in volcanic hazard assessment.

  17. High-temperature apparatus for chaotic mixing of natural silicate melts

    SciTech Connect

    Morgavi, D.; Petrelli, M.; Vetere, F. P.; González-García, D.; Perugini, D.

    2015-10-15

    A unique high-temperature apparatus was developed to trigger chaotic mixing at high-temperature (up to 1800 °C). This new apparatus, which we term Chaotic Magma Mixing Apparatus (COMMA), is designed to carry out experiments with high-temperature and high-viscosity (up to 10{sup 6} Pa s) natural silicate melts. This instrument allows us to follow in time and space the evolution of the mixing process and the associated modulation of chemical composition. This is essential to understand the dynamics of magma mixing and related chemical exchanges. The COMMA device is tested by mixing natural melts from Aeolian Islands (Italy). The experiment was performed at 1180 °C using shoshonite and rhyolite melts, resulting in a viscosity ratio of more than three orders of magnitude. This viscosity ratio is close to the maximum possible ratio of viscosity between high-temperature natural silicate melts. Results indicate that the generated mixing structures are topologically identical to those observed in natural volcanic rocks highlighting the enormous potential of the COMMA to replicate, as a first approximation, the same mixing patterns observed in the natural environment. COMMA can be used to investigate in detail the space and time development of magma mixing providing information about this fundamental petrological and volcanological process that would be impossible to investigate by direct observations. Among the potentials of this new experimental device is the construction of empirical relationships relating the mixing time, obtained through experimental time series, and chemical exchanges between the melts to constrain the mixing-to-eruption time of volcanic systems, a fundamental topic in volcanic hazard assessment.

  18. High-temperature apparatus for chaotic mixing of natural silicate melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgavi, D.; Petrelli, M.; Vetere, F. P.; González-García, D.; Perugini, D.

    2015-10-01

    A unique high-temperature apparatus was developed to trigger chaotic mixing at high-temperature (up to 1800 °C). This new apparatus, which we term Chaotic Magma Mixing Apparatus (COMMA), is designed to carry out experiments with high-temperature and high-viscosity (up to 106 Pa s) natural silicate melts. This instrument allows us to follow in time and space the evolution of the mixing process and the associated modulation of chemical composition. This is essential to understand the dynamics of magma mixing and related chemical exchanges. The COMMA device is tested by mixing natural melts from Aeolian Islands (Italy). The experiment was performed at 1180 °C using shoshonite and rhyolite melts, resulting in a viscosity ratio of more than three orders of magnitude. This viscosity ratio is close to the maximum possible ratio of viscosity between high-temperature natural silicate melts. Results indicate that the generated mixing structures are topologically identical to those observed in natural volcanic rocks highlighting the enormous potential of the COMMA to replicate, as a first approximation, the same mixing patterns observed in the natural environment. COMMA can be used to investigate in detail the space and time development of magma mixing providing information about this fundamental petrological and volcanological process that would be impossible to investigate by direct observations. Among the potentials of this new experimental device is the construction of empirical relationships relating the mixing time, obtained through experimental time series, and chemical exchanges between the melts to constrain the mixing-to-eruption time of volcanic systems, a fundamental topic in volcanic hazard assessment.

  19. High-temperature apparatus for chaotic mixing of natural silicate melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgavi, D.; Petrelli, M.; Vetere, F. P.; Gonzalez, D.; Perugini, D.

    2015-12-01

    A unique high-temperature apparatus was developed to trigger chaotic mixing at high-temperature (up to 1800 °C). This new apparatus, which we term ChaOtic Magma Mixing Apparatus (COMMA), is designed to carry out experiments with high-temperature and high-viscosity (up to 106 Pas) natural silicate melts. The instrument represents an extraordinary advance because allows us to follow in time and space the evolution of the mixing process and the associated modulation of chemical composition. This is essential to understand the dynamics of magma mixing and related chemical exchanges in the volcanic environment. The COMMA device is tested at extreme conditions by mixing natural melts from Aeolian Islands (Italy). The experiment was performed at 1170°C, with melts of shoshonitic and rhyolitic composition, resulting in a viscosity ratio of more than three orders of magnitude. This viscosity ratio is close to the maximum possible ratio of viscosity between high-temperature natural silicate melts. Results indicate that the generated mixing structures are topologically identical to those observed in natural volcanic rocks highlighting the enormous potential of the COMMA to replicate, as a first approximation, the same mixing patterns observed in the natural environment. We anticipate the COMMA to become a state-of-the-art apparatus for detailed investigations of magma mixing processes providing unprecedented information about this fundamental petrological and volcanological process that would be impossible to investigate by direct observations. Among the potentials of this new experimental device is the construction of empirical relationships relating the mixing time, obtained through experimental time series, and chemical exchanges between the melts to constrain the mixing-to-eruption time of volcanic systems, a fundamental topic in volcanic hazard assessment.

  20. Influence of the melting temperature on the measurement of the mass concentration and size distribution of black carbon in snow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinase, Takeshi; Kita, Kazuyuki; Tsukagawa-Ogawa, Yoshimi; Goto-Azuma, Kumiko; Kawashima, Hiroto

    2016-04-01

    The influence of temperature and time of snow sample melting on the measurement of mass concentration and size distribution of black carbon (BC) in snow was evaluated experimentally. In the experiments, fresh (Shirouma) and aged (Hakusan) snow samples were melted at different temperatures or at different time lengths, and the BC mass concentration and size distribution in the melted snow samples were measured using a nebulizer and a single-particle soot photometer (SP2). In the experiment where melting temperature was varied, the BC mass concentration in the liquid decreased at a melting temperature of 70 °C. This decrease was 8.0 % for the Shirouma sample and 46.4 % for the Hakusan sample and depended on BC particle size, with a significant decrease found at BC diameters less than 350 nm. A similar decrease in BC mass concentration was found when the Hakusan snow sample that had been melted at 5 °C was heated to 70 °C. The experiment in which melting time was varied indicated that BC mass concentration in the liquid did not change for the Shirouma sample but decreased significantly with a longer melting time for the Hakusan sample (38.6 %). These results indicate that melting of snow samples at high temperatures or over long time periods can significantly affect the measurement of BC mass and its size distribution, especially for aged snow samples.

  1. The pressure and temperature dependence of carbon dioxide solubility in tholeiitic basalt melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Vivian; Holloway, John R.; Hervig, Richard L.

    1991-06-01

    The solubility of carbon dioxide in tholeiitic melt (1921 Kilauea basalt ) was determined under experimental conditions of 1 kbar, 1200°C; 10 and 15 kbar and 1300-1600°C. We examined the solubility at pressure and temperature conditions intermediate to those reported in previous studies, and, in particular, we addressed the effect of temperature on carbon dioxide solubility. Two different carbon sources were used in the experiments, silver oxalate and a mixture of carbonate minerals, to examine the effects of dissolved silver on carbon dioxide solubility. Three analytical methods were employed to measure accurately and precisely the dissolved carbon in the run products: ( 1 ) Fourier transform micro-infrared spectroscopy, ( 2 ) secondary ion mass spectrometry, and ( 3 ) bulk carbon analysis with a Perkin Elmer Elemental Analyzer. The first two methods are micro-beam techniques which allowed for assessment of sample homogeneity. Consistent with previous solubility studies, infrared analyses showed that carbon is dissolved in basaltic melt in the form of carbonate. However, our experimental results differ from the previous solubility study in that we demonstrate carbon dioxide solubility is temperature independent. At 1 kbar and 1200°C, carbon dioxide solubility is 543 ppm; at 10 kbar and 1300, 1400, and 1500°C, carbon dioxide solubility is approximately 0.77 ± .07 wt%; and at 15 kbar and 1400, 1450, 1500, 1550, and 1600°C, the solubility is approximately 1.21 ± .13 wt%. Dissolved silver does not appear to affect the solubility. These results invalidate previous models for carbon dioxide solubility. We have developed a new model which describes the pressure and temperature dependence of carbon dioxide solubility for tholeiitic basalts. Regression of the solubility data for the reaction CO2vapor + O2- melt = CO32- melt gives a heat of solution ( ΔH0 at 1 kbar and 1473 K) of 5.20 ± 4.30 kJ/mol and the change in partial molar volume ΔV0[ CO32- melt- O2- melt

  2. Uncertainties in Modelling Glacier Melt and Mass Balances: the Role of Air Temperature Extrapolation and Type of Melt Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellicciotti, F.; Ragettli, S.; Carenzo, M.; Ayala, A.; McPhee, J. P.; Stoffel, M.

    2014-12-01

    While glacier responses to climate are understood in general terms and in their main trends, model based projections are affected by the type of model used and uncertainties in the meteorological input data, among others. Recent works have attempted at improving glacio-hydrological models by including neglected processes and investigating uncertainties in their outputs. In this work, we select two knowledge gaps in current modelling practices and illustrate their importance through modelling with a fully distributed mass balance model that includes some of the state of the art approaches for calculations of glacier ablation, accumulation and glacier geometry changes. We use an advanced mass balance model applied to glaciers in the Andes of Chile, Swiss Alps and Nepalese Himalaya to investigate two issues that seem of importance for a sound assessment of glacier changes: 1) the use of physically-based models of glacier ablation (energy balance) versus more empirical models (enhanced temperature index approaches); 2) the importance of the correct extrapolation of air temperature forcing on glaciers and the large uncertainty in model outputs associated with it. The ablation models are calibrated with a large amount of data from in-situ campaigns, and distributed observations of air temperature used to calculate lapse rates and calibrate a thermodynamic model of temperature distribution. We show that no final assessment can be made of what type of melt model is more appropriate or accurate for simulation of glacier ablation at the glacier scale, not even for relatively well studied glaciers. Both models perform in a similar manner at low elevations, but important differences are evident at high elevations, where lack of data prevents a final statement on which model better represent the actual ablation amounts. Accurate characterization of air temperature is important for correct simulations of glacier mass balance and volume changes. Substantial differences are

  3. Influence of Crucible Materials on High-temperature Properties of Vacuum-melted Nickel-chromium-cobalt Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, R F; Rowe, John P; Freeman, J W

    1957-01-01

    A study of the effect of induction-vacuum-melting procedure on the high-temperature properties of a titanium-and-aluminum-hardened nickel-base alloy revealed that a major variable was the type of ceramic used as a crucible. Reactions between the melt and magnesia or zirconia crucibles apparently increased high-temperature properties by introducing small amounts of boron or zirconium into the melts. Heats melted in alumina crucibles had relatively low rupture life and ductility at 1,600 F and cracked during hot-working as a result of deriving no boron or zirconium from the crucible.

  4. Communication: The Effect of Dispersion Corrections on the Melting Temperature of Liquid Water

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, Soohaeng; Xantheas, Sotiris S.

    2011-03-28

    We report the results of the melting temperature (Tm) of liquid water for the Becke-Lee- Yang-Parr (BLYP) density functional including Dispersion corrections (BLYP-D) and the TTM3-F ab-initio based classical potential via constant pressure and constant enthalpy (NPH) ensemble molecular dynamics simulations of an ice Ih-liquid coexisting system. The inclusion of dispersion corrections to BLYP lowers the melting temperature of liquid water to Tm=360 K, which is a large improvement over the value of Tm > 400 K obtained with the original BLYP functional. The ab-initio based flexible, polarizable Thole-type model (TTM3-F) produces Tm=248 K from classical molecular dynamics simulations.

  5. Simulation of the temperature distribution in the selective beam melting process for polymer material

    SciTech Connect

    Riedlbauer, D. E-mail: julia.mergheim@ltm.uni-erlangen.de Mergheim, J. E-mail: julia.mergheim@ltm.uni-erlangen.de Steinmann, P. E-mail: julia.mergheim@ltm.uni-erlangen.de

    2014-05-15

    In the present contribution the temperature distribution in the selective beam melting process for polymer materials is simulated to better understand the influence of process parameters on the properties of the produced part. The basis for the developed simulation tool is the nonlinear heat equation including temperature dependent functions for the heat capacity and the heat conduction which were obtained by experimental measurements. The effect of latent heat occurring in the process is also taken into account. The heat equation is discretized in time and space where a Runge-Kutta method of Radau IIA type is used for time integration. An adaptive finite element method is applied for the discretization in space and the model is implemented into the finite element library deal.II. The heat and cooling rate as important process parameters are simulated for different beam velocities. The ability for computing these process parameters makes the simulation tool suited for optimizing the process management of selective beam melting plants.

  6. Synthesis of chalcogenide and pnictide crystals in salt melts using a steady-state temperature gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chareev, D. A.; Volkova, O. S.; Geringer, N. V.; Koshelev, A. V.; Nekrasov, A. N.; Osadchii, V. O.; Osadchii, E. G.; Filimonova, O. N.

    2016-07-01

    Some examples of growing crystals of metals, alloys, chalcogenides, and pnictides in melts of halides of alkali metals and aluminum at a steady-state temperature gradient are described. Transport media are chosen to be salt melts of eutectic composition with the participation of LiCl, NaCl, KCl, RbCl, CsCl, AlCl3, AlBr3, KBr, and KI in a temperature range of 850-150°C. Some crystals have been synthesized only using a conducting contour. This technique of crystal growth is similar to the electrochemical method. In some cases, to exclude mutual influence, some elements have been isolated and forced to migrate to the crystal growth region through independent channels. As a result, crystals of desired quality have been obtained using no special equipment and with sizes sufficient for study under laboratory conditions.

  7. Revisiting the melting temperature of NpO2 and the challenges associated with high temperature actinide compound measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böhler, R.; Welland, M. J.; Bruycker, F. De; Boboridis, K.; Janssen, A.; Eloirdi, R.; Konings, R. J. M.; Manara, D.

    2012-06-01

    This work revisits the melting behaviour of neptunium dioxide, an actinide compound which can be produced in the nuclear fuel during operation, and which has an important impact on the nuclear fuel and waste radioactivity especially on the very long term. The present experimental approach employs remote laser heating under controlled atmosphere and fast pyrometry. This technique circumvents problems encountered by more traditional heating techniques, in particular, the reaction between sample and containment at temperatures beyond 2500 K. In addition, only a small amount of sample material is required, which is an advantage with respect to the radioactivity and limited availability of neptunium. The NpO2 melting/freezing temperature has been measured to be 3070 K ± 62 K, much higher than previous values (around 2830 K) obtained by more traditional thermal analysis methods. The large amount of experimental data collected allowed a consistent statistical analysis. It seems likely, although not fully evident from the present results, that the high oxygen potential at temperatures around melting leads to a slightly hypo-stoichiometric congruent melting composition, as already observed in other actinide (ThO2, PuO2) and lanthanide oxides (e.g., CeO2). Finally, a recently developed phase-field model was used for the simulation of the observed thermograms, allowing a deeper insight in material properties that are difficult to directly measure. For example, a polaron contribution to the high-temperature thermal conductivity, well accepted for the commonly studied actinide oxide UO2, is shown here to likely be present in NpO2.

  8. DNA melting temperature assay for assessing the stability of DNA polyplexes intended for nonviral gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Schallon, Anja; Synatschke, Christopher V; Pergushov, Dmitry V; Jérôme, Valérie; Müller, Axel H E; Freitag, Ruth

    2011-10-01

    Many synthetic polycations have the ability to form complexes with the polyanion DNA, yet only a few, most notably poly(ethylene imine) (PEI), are efficient gene-delivery vehicles. Although a common explanation of this observation relies on the buffering capacity of the polycation, the intracellular stability of the complex may also play a role and should not be neglected. Assays typically used to follow complex formation, however, often do not provide the required information on stability. In this article, we propose the change in the DNA melting temperature observable after complex formation to be a significant indicator of complex stability. For a given DNA/polycation ratio, changes in the melting temperature are shown to depend on the polycation chemistry but not on the DNA topology or the polycation architecture. Effects of changes in the DNA/polycation ratio as well as the effect of polycation quaternization can be interpreted using the melting temperature assay. Finally, the assay was used to follow the displacement of DNA from the complexes by poly(methacrylic acid) or short single-stranded DNA sequences as competing polyanions.

  9. Reduction of melting temperature and enthalpy of drug crystals: theoretical aspects.

    PubMed

    Hasa, Dritan; Voinovich, Dario; Perissutti, Beatrice; Grassi, Gabriele; Fiorentino, Simona; Farra, Rossella; Abrami, Michela; Colombo, Italo; Grassi, Mario

    2013-09-27

    This review deals with the mathematical models describing the reduction of melting temperature and enthalpy of solids in the nano-size range. In particular, the attention focuses on the thermodynamic based models that are theoretically solid and can be suitably used in the case of organic drugs. Indeed, while much effort has been put in the past to study the melting of metal nano-crystals, little work has been done for organic drug nano-crystals. However, due to the high potential of drug nano-crystals (their solubility increases with size reduction), this theme has become more and more important in the pharmaceutical field. Accordingly, this review, after illustrating the physical frame of drug melting, focuses on the thermodynamic aspects required to describe the melting of spherical and not spherical nano-crystals. Finally, the reliability of some models is tested against the results coming from X-rays analysis in the case of two organic drugs (griseofulvin and nifedipine). This test proved models strength.

  10. Melting behavior of H[subscript 2]O at high pressures and temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Jung-Fu; Gregoryanz, Eugene; Struzhkin, Viktor V.; Somayazulu, Maddury; Mao, H.-K.; Hemley, R.J.

    2010-07-19

    Water plays an important role in the physics and chemistry of planetary interiors. In situ high pressure-temperature Raman spectroscopy and synchrotron x-ray diffraction have been used to examine the phase diagram of H{sub 2}O. A discontinuous change in the melting curve of H{sub 2}O is observed at approximately 35 GPa and 1040 K, indicating a triple point on the melting line. The melting curve of H{sub 2}O increases significantly above the triple point and may intersect the isentropes of Neptune and Uranus. Solid ice could therefore form in stratified layers at depth within these icy planets. The extrapolated melting curve may also intersect with the geotherm of Earth's lower mantle above 60 GPa. The presence of solid H{sub 2}O would result in a jump in the viscosity of the mid-lower mantle and provides an additional explanation for the observed higher viscosity of the mid-lower mantle.

  11. Quantum melting of a two-dimensional vortex lattice at zero temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Rozhkov, A.; Stroud, D.

    1996-11-01

    We consider the quantum melting of a two-dimensional flux lattice at temperature {ital T} = 0 in the {open_quote}{open_quote}superclean limit.{close_quote}{close_quote} In this regime, we find that vortex motion is dominated by the Magnus force. A Lindemann criterion predicts melting when {ital n}{sub {ital v}}/{ital n}{sub {ital p}}{ge}{beta}, where {ital n}{sub {ital v}} and {ital n}{sub {ital p}} are the areal number densities of vortex pancakes and Cooper pairs, and {beta}{approx_equal}0.1. A second criterion is derived by using Wigner-crystal and Laughlin wave functions for the solid and liquid phases respectively, and setting the two energies equal. This gives a melting value similar to the Lindemann result. We discuss the numerical value of the {ital T}=0 melting field for thin layers of a low-{ital T}{sub {ital c}} superconductor, such as {ital a}-MoGe, and single layers of high-{ital T}{sub {ital c}} materials. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  12. Cerium oxidation state in silicate melts: Combined fO2, temperature and compositional effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smythe, Duane J.; Brenan, James M.

    2015-12-01

    To quantify the relative proportions of Ce3+ and Ce4+ in natural magmas, we have synthesized a series of Ce doped glasses ranging in composition from basalt to rhyolite (±H2O) at 0.001 and 1 GPa, under fO2 conditions varying from FMQ -4.0 to FMQ +8.4, and temperatures from 1200 to 1500 °C. The Ce4+/Ce3+ ratio in the experimental run products was determined both potentiometrically and in situ, using Ce M4,5-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy. For a given melt composition, the change in Ce4+/Ce3+ ratio with fO2 follows the trend predicted from the reaction stoichiometry assuming simple oxides as melt species. In addition to fO2, melt composition and water content have been found to be secondary controls on Ce4+/Ce3+, with more depolymerized melts and hydrous compositions favoring the stabilization of Ce3+. The Ce4+/Ce3+ ratio can be expressed through the equation,

  13. Binding Energies and Melting Temperatures of Heavy Hadrons in Quark-Gluon Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Narodetskii, I. M.; Simonov, Yu. A.; Veselov, A. I.

    2011-05-23

    We discuss the consequences of the suggestion that the non-perturbative quark-antiquark potential at T{>=}T{sub c}, where T{sub c} is a temperature of a deconfinement phase transition in QCD can be studied through the modification of the correlation functions, which define the quadratic field correlators of the nonperturbative vaccuum fields. We use the non-perturbative quark-antiquark potential derived within the Field Correlator Method and the screened Coulomb potential with T-dependent Debye mass to calculate J/{psi}, {Upsilon} and {Omega}{sub bbb} binding energies and melting temperatures in the deconfined phase of QCD.

  14. Binding Energies and Melting Temperatures of Heavy Hadrons in Quark-Gluon Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narodetskii, I. M.; Simonov, Yu. A.; Veselov, A. I.

    2011-05-01

    We discuss the consequences of the suggestion that the non-perturbative quark-antiquark potential at T≥Tc, where Tc is a temperature of a deconfinement phase transition in QCD can be studied through the modification of the correlation functions, which define the quadratic field correlators of the nonperturbative vaccuum fields. We use the non-perturbative quark-antiquark potential derived within the Field Correlator Method and the screened Coulomb potential with T-dependent Debye mass to calculate J/ψ, Υ and Ωbbb binding energies and melting temperatures in the deconfined phase of QCD.

  15. High -Temperature melting in intra-continental settings - insight from numerical modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorczyk, Weronika; Hobbs, Bruce; Gonzalez, Christopher; Smithies, Hugh

    2015-04-01

    Most of intra-continental melting is associated with interaction of deep mantle plume with mantle lithosphere. Vast amount of mafic/felsic intra-plate intrusions are located along post-collisional lines, where for longer periods of time regional tectonic conditions are more likely to be (weakly) compressional to transpressional, and more rarely extensional. Arrival of the asthenosphere-derived plume would suggest initiation of extension along the weak/post-collision zone. Alternatively, in compressional regime a surprisingly large range of instabilities can develop that lead to melting of the lower crust and mantle lithosphere. Unexpected structural complexity arises which is quite sensitive to the geometry and rheological properties. This has dramatic effects on melting and devolatilisation within the lithosphere and hence in the localisation of and melt emplacement. Melts extracted in theses circumstances lead to emplacement of all variety of magmas: mafic, intermediate and felsic, from wide range of PT conditions. In order to investigate theses intra-plate sites of deformation, melt production and crustal growth in relation to pre-worked lithospheric crust we performed a series of 2D numerical experiments by using a coupled petrological - thermomechanical numerical model. The model includes, stable mineralogy, aqueous fluid transport, partial melting, melt extraction and melt emplacement in form of extrusive volcanics and intrusive plutons. As a case study we will present Musgrave Orogeny in Central Australia. The Musgrave Province developed at the nexus of the North, West and South Australian cratons and its Mesoproterozoic evolution incorporates a 100 Ma period of ultra-high temperature (UHT) metamorphism from ca. 1220 to ca. 1120 Ma. This was accompanied by high-temperature A-type granitic magmatism over an 80 Ma period, sourced in part from mantle-derived components and emplaced as a series of pulsed events that also coincide with peaks in UHT metamorphism

  16. Density and structure of jadeite melt at high pressure and high temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamaki, T.; Yu, T.; Jing, Z.; Park, C.; Shen, G.; Wang, Y.

    2011-12-01

    Knowledge of density of magma is important for understanding magma-related processes such as volcanic activity and differentiation in the Earth's early history. Since these processes take place in Earth's interior, we need to measure the density of magma in situ at high pressures. It is also necessary to relate the density with the structure of silicate melts at high pressure and temperature and further understand the densification mechanism of magma with pressure. Here we report the density and structural data for jadeite melt up to 7 GPa,. The density measurements were carried out using a DIA-type cubic press at the 13-BM-D beamline at APS using monochromatic radiation tuned to the desired energy (~20 keV) with a Si (111) double-crystal monochromator. Intensities of the incident and transmitted X-rays were measured by two ion chambers placed before and after the press for X-ray absorption measurements. Incident and transmitted X-ray intensities were obtained by moving the incident slits perpendicular to the X-ray beam direction at 0.010 mm steps crosses the sample. Lambert-Beer law was then applied to the normalized intensities as a function of the sample position across the assembly. Density of jadeite melt was determined up to 7 GPa and 2300 K. For structural determination, high-pressure and high-temperature energy-dispersive XRD experiments were carried out by using a Paris-Edinburgh press installed at the 16-BM-B of APS. Incident X-rays were collimated by a vertical slit (0.5 mm) and a horizontal slit (0.1 mm) to irradiate the sample. Diffracted X-rays were detected by a Ge solid state detector with a 4k multi-channel analyzer, through a collimator and 5.0mm (V) by and 0.1mm (H) receiving slits. Diffraction patterns were collected until the highest intensity reached 2000 counts, at 12 angles (2theta=3, 4, 5, 7, 9, 11, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35, 39.5 degrees). The structural measurements were carried out in the pressure range from 1 to 5 GPa and at 1600 to 2000 K

  17. Temperature dependence of vortex flux pinning in melt-textured superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Omari, I. A.; Hasan (Qaseer), M. K.; Rais, A.; Azez, K. A.

    2004-05-01

    Magnetic properties of melt-textured YBa2Cu3O7 superconductor are studied at different temperatures from 77 K up to the critical temperature, TC = 91 K, using vibrating sample magnetometer. Initial magnetization curve is measured from the demagnetized state in an applied magnetic field from 0 to 13.5 kOe, followed by measuring the full hysteresis loop. This procedure is repeated at different temperatures between 77 and 91 K. In all the measurements, the magnetic field was applied along the ab-plane of the sample which is perpendicular to the c-axis. Within the framework of the Bean critical state model, our results show that the maximum pinning forces which are represented by the magnetization remanence at which the internal field is zero are found to decrease with increasing temperature and they obey the empirical scale law M(emu/cm3) = 34 × (1 - T/TC )1/n, where n 2.9.

  18. Research on temperature measurement technology for graphite-cone-absorption-cavity absolute calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Ji Feng; Lu, Fei; Sun, Li Qun; Zhang, Kai; Hu, Xiao Yang; Zhou, Shan; Xu, De

    2015-02-01

    The nonlinear effect of materials and sensors in high-energy laser calorimeters is especially obvious—due to the steep temperature gradients of their absorbers. Significant measurement errors occur when traditional integral temperature sensors and methods are utilized. In an effort to remedy this, a method is proposed in this paper in which an absorption cavity is divided into many parts and multiple discrete thermocouple sensors are used to measure the temperature rise of the absorbers. The temperature distribution in the absorbers is theoretically analyzed, numerically simulated, and verified through experimentation. Energy measurement results are compared according to the temperature distribution for different layouts of thermocouples. A high-accuracy calorimeter is developed by setting and optimizing thermocouple layout, as well as correcting various elements such as the specific heat of graphite and responsivity of thermocouples. The calorimeter employing this measurement method is calibrated against a standard energy meter, resulting in correction coefficient of 1.027 and relative standard deviation of the correction coefficient of only 0.8%. Theoretical analysis, numerical simulation, and experimental verification all prove that the proposed method successfully improves measurement accuracy.

  19. Research on temperature measurement technology for graphite-cone-absorption-cavity absolute calorimeter.

    PubMed

    Wei, Ji Feng; Lu, Fei; Sun, Li Qun; Zhang, Kai; Hu, Xiao Yang; Zhou, Shan; Xu, De

    2015-02-01

    The nonlinear effect of materials and sensors in high-energy laser calorimeters is especially obvious-due to the steep temperature gradients of their absorbers. Significant measurement errors occur when traditional integral temperature sensors and methods are utilized. In an effort to remedy this, a method is proposed in this paper in which an absorption cavity is divided into many parts and multiple discrete thermocouple sensors are used to measure the temperature rise of the absorbers. The temperature distribution in the absorbers is theoretically analyzed, numerically simulated, and verified through experimentation. Energy measurement results are compared according to the temperature distribution for different layouts of thermocouples. A high-accuracy calorimeter is developed by setting and optimizing thermocouple layout, as well as correcting various elements such as the specific heat of graphite and responsivity of thermocouples. The calorimeter employing this measurement method is calibrated against a standard energy meter, resulting in correction coefficient of 1.027 and relative standard deviation of the correction coefficient of only 0.8%. Theoretical analysis, numerical simulation, and experimental verification all prove that the proposed method successfully improves measurement accuracy. PMID:25725875

  20. Temperature-dependent thermal expansivities of silicate melts: The system anorthite-diopside

    SciTech Connect

    Knoche, R.; Dingwell, D.B.; Webb, S.L. )

    1992-02-01

    The temperature-dependent thermal expansivities of melts along the join anorthite-diopside have been determined on glassy and liquid samples using a combination of calorimetry, dilatometry, and Pt double bob Archimedean densitometry. Supercooled liquid volumes and molar thermal expansivities were determined using scanning calorimetric and dilatometric measurements of properties in the glass region and their behavior at the glass transition. The extraction of low-temperature liquid molar expansivities from dilatometry/calorimetry is based on an assumed equivalence of the relaxation of volume and enthalpy at the glass transition using a method developed and tested by Webb et al. (1992). This method corrects for transient effects at the glass transition which can lead to serious overestimates of liquid thermal expansivity from peak' values. Superliquidus volumes were determined using double Pt bob Archimedean densitometry at temperatures up to 1,650C. The resulting data for liquid volumes near glass transition temperatures (810-920C) and at superliquidus temperatures (1,400-1,650C) are combined to yield thermal expansivities over the entire supercooled and stable liquid range. The molar expansivities are, in general, temperature dependent. The temperature-dependence of thermal expansivity increases from anorthite to diopside composition. The thermal expansivity of anorthite is essentially temperature independent, whereas that of diopside decreases by {congruent} 50% between 800 and 1,500C, with the consequence that the thermal expansivities of the liquids in the anorthite-diopside system converge at high temperature.

  1. Pressure and temperature effects on oxide melt structure: progress and prognoses (Bunsen Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stebbins, J. F.

    2009-04-01

    Thanks to decades of study by diffraction and spectroscopy, many aspects of the short-range structure of oxide glasses, and the effects of composition on them, are relatively well known. In most cases, these results represent (at best) the structure of the liquid at the glass transition, which is often far below the magmatic conditions of greatest interest for geological processes. At the same time, detailed thermodynamic and calorimetric studies at ambient pressure, and a few pioneering in-situ, high-pressure melt property measurements, have documented the fact that melt structure must change considerably as temperature and pressure are increased. Closing the gap between magma properties and our atomic-scale view thus requires much better information about temperature and pressure effects on melt structure. Recent progress on temperature effects has been made both by in-situ studies, and by work at ambient conditions on glass samples prepared with different cooling rates and thus capturing the melt structure at different fictive temperatures. The former type has the advantage of a greater accessible range of temperatures but can be limited by the inherent difficulties of high temperature experiments; for the latter, any structural tool may be applied but changes over the accessible range (typically Tg to Tg+200 K or less) can be subtle. We now know, for example, that in some systems local structural changes can be detected for network cations such as B, Al, and even Si, but that these can lead to either coordination decreases with T (e.g. B), correlated with thermal expansion, or to increases with T (e.g. Al in Ca aluminosilicates), correlated with entropic effects. In some systems, increases in the disorder of the network with T can be measured and correlated with heats of reaction among various bridging oxygen species. In a few cases, network modifier environments (e.g. Ni, Mg, Na) can be seen to change with T as well. But in general, extrapolating results from

  2. Temperature and pressure dependence of the absolute rate constant for the reactions of NH2 radicals with acetylene and ethylene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bosco, S. R.; Nava, D. F.; Brobst, W. D.; Stief, L. J.

    1984-01-01

    The absolute rate constants for the reaction between the NH2 free radical and acetylene and ethylene is measured experimentally using a flash photolysis technique. The constant is considered to be a function of temperature and pressure. At each temperature level of the experiment, the observed pseudo-first-order rate constants were assumed to be independent of flash intensity. The results of the experiment indicate that the bimolecular rate constant for the NH2 + C2H2 reaction increases with pressure at 373 K and 459 K but not at lower temperatures. Results near the pressure limit conform to an Arrhenius expression of 1.11 (+ or -) 0.36 x 10 to the -13th over the temperature range from 241 to 459 K. For the reaction NH2 + C2H4, a smaller rate of increase in the bimolecular rate constant was observed over the temperature range 250-465 K. The implications of these results for current theoretical models of NH2 + C2H2 (or H4) reactions in the atmospheres of Jupiter and Saturn are discussed.

  3. Can the thermodynamic melting temperature of sucrose, glucose, and fructose be measured using rapid-scanning differential scanning calorimetry (DSC)?

    PubMed

    Lee, Joo Won; Thomas, Leonard C; Schmidt, Shelly J

    2011-04-13

    The loss of crystalline structure in sucrose, glucose, and fructose has been shown to be due to the kinetic process of thermal decomposition (termed apparent melting), rather than thermodynamic melting. The purpose of this research was to investigate whether or not it is possible to scan quickly enough to suppress the kinetic process of thermal decomposition and reach the thermodynamic melting temperature of these sugars using a new rapid-scanning DSC. Indium, a thermodynamic melting material, and sucrose, glucose, and fructose were analyzed at three heating rates from 1 to 25 °C/min using standard DSC and at seven heating rates from 50 to 2000 °C/min using rapid-scanning DSC. Thermodynamic melting was achieved when the onset temperature (T(m onset)) of the endothermic peak leveled off to a constant value independent of heating rate. The T(m onset) for indium was constant (156.74 ± 0.42 °C) at all heating rates. In the case of fructose, the T(m onset) increased considerably until a heating rate of approximately 698 °C/min, after which the average T(m onset) for the remaining three heating rates was constant at 135.83 ± 1.14 °C. Thus, 135.83 °C is proposed to be the thermodynamic melting temperature of fructose. It is important to note that the heating rate at which this thermodynamic melting temperature is achieved is most likely influenced by the type and amount of trace components (e.g., water and salts) contained in the fructose, which are known to vary widely in sugars. In the case of sucrose and glucose, thermodynamic melting temperatures were not able to be obtained, because the upper limit heating rate used was not fast enough to suppress thermal decomposition and achieve thermodynamic melting, perhaps due to the higher apparent T(m onset) for sucrose and glucose compared to that for fructose.

  4. How melt stretching affect the brittle-ductile transition temperature of polymer glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Shiwang; Wang, Shi-Qing

    2013-03-01

    Upon increasing temperature a brittle polymer glass can turn ductile. PMMA is a good example. For a while this brittle-ductile transition (BDT) was thought to be determined by the emergence of a secondary relaxation....1-3 On the other hand, it has been known for a long time...4-6 that predeformation in the melt state (e.g., melt stretching) can also make brittle glasses behave in a ductile manner. This transformation has recently received a satisfactory explanation based on a picture of structural hybrid for polymer glasses....7 It appears that BDT is dictated by the relative mechanical characteristics of the primary structure (due to the van der Waals bonds) and the chain network. The present work, based on conventional Instron tensile extension tests and DMA tests, shows that melt stretching does not alter the secondary relaxation behavior of PMMA and PC yet can turn them the brittle PMMA ductile and the ductile PC brittle. Moreover, sufficient melt stretching makes the brittle PS ductile although it does not produce any secondary relaxation process..1. Monnerie, L.; Laupretre, F.; Halary, J. L. Adv. Polym. Sci2005, 187, 35-213. 2. Monnerie, L.; Halary, J. L.; Kausch, H. Adv. Polym. Sci2005, 187, 215-364. 3. Wu, S. J. Appl. Polym. Sci.1992, 46, (4), 619-624. 4. Vincent, P. I. Polymer1960, 1, (0), 425-444. 5. Harris, J. S.; Ward, I. M. J. Mater. Sci.1970, 5, (7), 573-579. 6. Ender, D. H.; Andrews, R. D. J. Appl. Phys.1965, 36, (10), 3057-3062. 7. Zartman, G. D.; Cheng, S.; Li, X.; Lin, F.; Becker, M. L.; Wang, S.-Q. Macromolecules2012, 45, (16), 6719-6732.

  5. Spectrum of temperature pulsations of the melt in gas-assisted cutting with fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubrov, Alexander V.; Zavalov, Yury N.; Dubrov, Vladimir D.; Grezev, Anatoly N.; Grezev, Nikolay V.; Makarova, Elena S.; Dubrovin, Nickolay G.

    2012-09-01

    Measurements of the temperature behavior in the zone of action of the laser-radiation on the molten metal have been performed using multichannel pyrometer. Measurements were carried out for test cutting of a 3-mm mild-steel plate with several values of cutting speed and pressure of assist gas (oxygen), using an 1800-watt Ytterbium fiber laser. It is shown that fluctuations of temperature are related to local melt's surface deformations due to unequal radiation absorption; thus the noise spectrum of temperature fluctuations reflects turbulent surface deformation caused by gas jet and capillary waves. The maximum density of turbulent energy dissipation ε depends on cutting conditions: its value rises with increasing cutting velocity and oxygen pressure in a described range of parameters. The maximum of ε is localized near depth of (1.2…1.5) mm along the cutting front. We can distinguish the specific radiation pulsation spectrum of laser cutting from other processes of radiation affection to the sample, including unwanted degrading of the quality of technological operations. The spectrum of capillary waves on the melt's surface is formed under the effect of assisted gas jet and has a function of ω-3, ω is cycle frequency. The results of this investigation can be useful for the development of monitoring and quality-control systems for the laser-cutting process.

  6. Structure and dynamical intra-molecular heterogeneity of star polymer melts above glass transition temperature.

    PubMed

    Chremos, Alexandros; Glynos, Emmanouil; Green, Peter F

    2015-01-28

    Structural and dynamical properties of star melts have been investigated with molecular dynamics simulations of a bead-spring model. Star polymers are known to be heterogeneous, but a systematic simulation study of their properties in melt conditions near the glass transition temperature was lacking. To probe their properties, we have expanded from linear to star polymers the applicability of Dobkowski's chain-length dependence correlation function [Z. Dobkowski, Eur. Polym. J. 18, 563 (1982)]. The density and the isokinetic temperature, based on the canonical definition of the laboratory glass-transition, can be described well by the correlation function and a subtle behavior manifests as the architecture becomes more complex. For linear polymer chains and low functionality star polymers, we find that an increase of the arm length would result in an increase of the density and the isokinetic temperature, but high functionality star polymers have the opposite behavior. The effect between low and high functionalities is more pronounced for short arm lengths. Complementary results such as the specific volume and number of neighbors in contact provide further insights on the subtle relation between structure and dynamics. The findings would be valuable to polymer, colloidal, and nanocomposites fields for the design of materials in absence of solution with the desired properties. PMID:25638003

  7. Configuration of grafted polystyrene chains in the melt: Temperature and concentration dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, X.; Zhao, W.; Zheng, X.; Rafailovich, M. H.; Sokolov, J.; Schwarz, S. A.; Pudensi, M. A. A.; Russell, T. P.; Kumar, S. K.; Fetters, L. J.

    1992-08-01

    The concentration profiles of carboxy-terminated polystyrene chains in the melt grafted onto oxide-covered silicon substrates were measured using secondary-ion mass spectroscopy. The grafting density increased with temperature and an enthalpy of +7.4 kcal/mole was deduced for the grafting reaction, SiOH+R(COOH)⇄R(COOSi)+H2O. Relatively high grafting densities (σ~6.6 mg/m2) were achieved with minimal chain distortion or displacement of long chains by shorter ones. Significant stretching of the grafted chains occurred for σ>10 mg/m2. An equilibrium constant for the grafting reaction incorporating entropy is discussed.

  8. [A study of phonon vibration like modes for aggregation structure in silicate melts by high temperature Raman spectrum].

    PubMed

    Xu, Pei-Cang; Li, Ru-Bi; Shang, Tong-Ming; Zhou, Jian; Sun, Jian-Hua; You, Jing-Lin

    2010-05-01

    Silicate melts are special fractal dimension system that is metastable state of near-way order and far-way disorder. In this paper, the size of nanometer aggregation structure and the frequences of phonon vibration like mode in the low dimension silicate series (CaO-Al2O3-SiO2 and Na2-Al2O3-SiO2 series) synthesized via high temperature melting and sol gel methods were measured by means of small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), low wavenumber Raman spectrum (LWRS) and high temperature Raman spectrum (HTRS in situ measuring). The nanometer self-similarity aggregation structure(it's size is about a few nm to a few tens nm) and phonic phonon vibration like modes of low temperature silicate gel, high temperature silicate melts and it's quenching glasses phases were obtained. So a quantitative method by HTRS for measuring the aggregation size in the high temperature melts was established. The results showed that the aggregation size of the silicate melts is smaller at high temperature than at room temperature and the number of bridge oxygen in one Si-O tetrahedron in network structure units is decreasing at high temperature. This study work provides important theory and information for deliberating geochemistry characteristic, crystallization & evolution of natural magma and enhancing performance of low dimension silicate matelials.

  9. Thermodynamic temperature assignment to the point of inflection of the melting curve of high-temperature fixed points.

    PubMed

    Woolliams, E R; Anhalt, K; Ballico, M; Bloembergen, P; Bourson, F; Briaudeau, S; Campos, J; Cox, M G; del Campo, D; Dong, W; Dury, M R; Gavrilov, V; Grigoryeva, I; Hernanz, M L; Jahan, F; Khlevnoy, B; Khromchenko, V; Lowe, D H; Lu, X; Machin, G; Mantilla, J M; Martin, M J; McEvoy, H C; Rougié, B; Sadli, M; Salim, S G R; Sasajima, N; Taubert, D R; Todd, A D W; Van den Bossche, R; van der Ham, E; Wang, T; Whittam, A; Wilthan, B; Woods, D J; Woodward, J T; Yamada, Y; Yamaguchi, Y; Yoon, H W; Yuan, Z

    2016-03-28

    The thermodynamic temperature of the point of inflection of the melting transition of Re-C, Pt-C and Co-C eutectics has been determined to be 2747.84 ± 0.35 K, 2011.43 ± 0.18 K and 1597.39 ± 0.13 K, respectively, and the thermodynamic temperature of the freezing transition of Cu has been determined to be 1357.80 ± 0.08 K, where the ± symbol represents 95% coverage. These results are the best consensus estimates obtained from measurements made using various spectroradiometric primary thermometry techniques by nine different national metrology institutes. The good agreement between the institutes suggests that spectroradiometric thermometry techniques are sufficiently mature (at least in those institutes) to allow the direct realization of thermodynamic temperature above 1234 K (rather than the use of a temperature scale) and that metal-carbon eutectics can be used as high-temperature fixed points for thermodynamic temperature dissemination. The results directly support the developing mise en pratique for the definition of the kelvin to include direct measurement of thermodynamic temperature.

  10. Thermodynamic temperature assignment to the point of inflection of the melting curve of high-temperature fixed points.

    PubMed

    Woolliams, E R; Anhalt, K; Ballico, M; Bloembergen, P; Bourson, F; Briaudeau, S; Campos, J; Cox, M G; del Campo, D; Dong, W; Dury, M R; Gavrilov, V; Grigoryeva, I; Hernanz, M L; Jahan, F; Khlevnoy, B; Khromchenko, V; Lowe, D H; Lu, X; Machin, G; Mantilla, J M; Martin, M J; McEvoy, H C; Rougié, B; Sadli, M; Salim, S G R; Sasajima, N; Taubert, D R; Todd, A D W; Van den Bossche, R; van der Ham, E; Wang, T; Whittam, A; Wilthan, B; Woods, D J; Woodward, J T; Yamada, Y; Yamaguchi, Y; Yoon, H W; Yuan, Z

    2016-03-28

    The thermodynamic temperature of the point of inflection of the melting transition of Re-C, Pt-C and Co-C eutectics has been determined to be 2747.84 ± 0.35 K, 2011.43 ± 0.18 K and 1597.39 ± 0.13 K, respectively, and the thermodynamic temperature of the freezing transition of Cu has been determined to be 1357.80 ± 0.08 K, where the ± symbol represents 95% coverage. These results are the best consensus estimates obtained from measurements made using various spectroradiometric primary thermometry techniques by nine different national metrology institutes. The good agreement between the institutes suggests that spectroradiometric thermometry techniques are sufficiently mature (at least in those institutes) to allow the direct realization of thermodynamic temperature above 1234 K (rather than the use of a temperature scale) and that metal-carbon eutectics can be used as high-temperature fixed points for thermodynamic temperature dissemination. The results directly support the developing mise en pratique for the definition of the kelvin to include direct measurement of thermodynamic temperature. PMID:26903099

  11. How deep, how hot: comparing pressure and temperature estimates from amphibole and rhyolite-MELTS thermobarometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pamukcu, A. S.; Gualda, G. A.

    2013-12-01

    Accurately constraining the pressure and temperature of magma residence is problematic, but it is key to understanding the structure and evolution of magmatic systems. Various thermometers exist (Fe-Ti oxides, Ti-in-zircon, Zr-in-sphene, etc.), but there are fewer barometers that can be applied to volcanic rocks. Most barometers capitalize on amphibole, a relatively common mineral whose composition is sensitive to pressure and temperature changes. Glass composition is a function of pressure for magmas saturated in quartz and feldspar, and a new thermobarometer based on rhyolite-MELTS simulations using glass (matrix glass and crystal-hosted glass inclusions) compositions has been recently proposed. We compare results from amphibole and matrix glass thermobarometry. We focus on outflow high-silica rhyolite pumice from the Peach Spring Tuff (CA-NV-AZ, USA), which are characterized by sanidine+plagioclase×quartz+amphibole+sphene in a high-silica rhyolite glass matrix. Compositional variations in amphibole are slight and described by edenite and Ti-Tschermak substitution, with little Al-Tschermak substitution, suggesting small changes in temperature but not in pressure. Plagioclase compositions are also nearly homogeneous. Thus, we expect thermobarometry results to cluster around a single pressure and temperature, making these samples excellent candidates for comparing thermobarometers. Amphibole×plagioclase thermobarometry reveals: - Amphibole-plagioclase: results vary widely depending on the calibration (e.g. 150-420 MPa, 520-730 °C); combined Anderson & Smith (1995) barometer with Holland & Blundy (1990) thermometer is most consistent, suggesting crystallization at 230 MPa, 680 °C. - Amphibole-only: calibrations give significantly different results (75-115 MPa, 770-960 °C [Ridolfi et al. 2010]; 400-950 MPa, 800-950°C [Ridolfi & Renzulli 2012]). Results suggest the recent re-calibration is particularly unreliable for these rocks, and the earlier calibration is

  12. Cooling vests with phase change materials: the effects of melting temperature on heat strain alleviation in an extremely hot environment.

    PubMed

    Gao, Chuansi; Kuklane, Kalev; Holmér, Ingvar

    2011-06-01

    A previous study by the authors using a heated thermal manikin showed that the cooling rates of phase change material (PCM) are dependent on temperature gradient, mass, and covering area. The objective of this study was to investigate if the cooling effects of the temperature gradient observed on a thermal manikin could be validated on human subjects in extreme heat. The subjects wore cooling vests with PCMs at two melting temperatures (24 and 28°C) and fire-fighting clothing and equipment, thus forming three test groups (vest24, vest28 and control group without the vest). They walked on a treadmill at a speed of 5 km/h in a climatic chamber (air temperature = 55°C, relative humidity = 30%, vapour pressure = 4,725 Pa, and air velocity = 0.4 m/s). The results showed that the PCM vest with a lower melting temperature (24°C) has a stronger cooling effect on the torso and mean skin temperatures than that with a higher melting temperature (28°C). Both PCM vests mitigate peak core temperature increase during the resting recovery period. The two PCM vests tested, however, had no significant effect on the alleviation of core temperature increase during exercise in the heat. To study the possibility of effective cooling of core temperature, cooling garments with PCMs at even lower melting temperatures (e.g. 15°C) and a larger covering area should be investigated.

  13. Continuous Measurements of Electrical Conductivity and Viscosity of Lherzorite Analogue Samples during Slow Increases and Decreases in Temperature: Melting and Pre-melting Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sueyoshi, K.; Hiraga, T.

    2014-12-01

    It has been considered that transport properties of the mantle (ex. electrical conductivity, viscosity, seismic attenuation) changes dramatically during ascend of the mantle especially at around the mantle solidus. To understand the mechanism of such changes, we measured the electrical conductivity and viscosity of the lherzorite analogues during slow increases and decreases in temperature reproducing the mantle crossing its solidus. Two types of samples, one was forsterite plus 20% diopside and the other was 50% forsterite, 40% enstatite and 10% diopside with addition of 0.5% spinel, were synthesized from Mg(OH)2, SiO2, CaCO3 and MgAl2O4 (spinel) powders with particle size of <50 nm. Samples were expected to exhibit different manners in initiation of partial melt and amount of melt during the temperature change. We continuously measured electrical conductivity of these samples at every temperature during gradual temperature change, which crosses the sample solidus (~1380℃ and 1230℃ for forsterite + diopside sample and spinel-added samples, respectively). Sample viscosity were also measured under constant loads of 0.5~50 MPa. The electrical conductivity and viscosity at well below (>150℃) the sample solidus exhibited linear distributions in their Arrhenius plots indicating that a single mechanism controls for each transport property within the experimental temperature ranges. Such linear relationship especially in the electrical conductivity was no longer observed at higher temperature regime exhibiting its exponential increase until the temperature reached the sample solidus. Such dramatic change with changing temperature has not been detected for the sample viscosity. Monotonic increase of electrical conductivity in accordance with increasing melt fraction was observed above the sample solidus.

  14. Behaviour of neutron irradiated beryllium during temperature excursions up to and beyond its melting temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pajuste, Elina; Kizane, Gunta; Avotiņa, Līga; Zariņš, Artūrs

    2015-10-01

    Beryllium pebble behaviour has been studied regarding the accidental operation conditions of tritium breeding blanket of fusion reactors. Structure evolution, oxidation and thermal properties have been compared for nonirradiated and neutron irradiated beryllium pebbles during thermal treatment in a temperature range from ambient temperature to 1600 K. For neutron irradiated pebbles tritium release process was studied. Methods of temperature programmed tritium desorption (TPD) in combination with thermogravimetry (TG) and temperature differential analysis (TDA), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) in combination with Energy Dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX) have been used. It was found that there are strong relation between tritium desorption spectra and structural evolution of neutron irradiated beryllium. The oxidation rate is also accelerated by the structure damages caused by neutrons.

  15. Surface Air Temperature - Long-Term Anomaly Series and Absolute Values (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, P. D.

    2013-12-01

    Of all the possible domains of the Earth's surface, surface air temperature has the longest records extending back at some European locations to the late-17th century. Since that time coverage has expanded to encompass most of the world since the 1950s onwards. It is this domain that provides our long-term record of change providing the yardstick against which we define both cooler and warmer and cooling and warming periods during the last 300 years. Assembling all the recorded data is beset with an array of problems: the reasons for collecting the data during this long period have been many and varied and instruments, exposures, observation times and methods of calculating averages have regularly changed. Even today, there is not a WMO-defined method of calculating the daily and monthly average with countries allowed to use whatever method they deem appropriate. The talk will discuss the history, the problems and the methods that have been used to overcome them. As we move to more automated measurements and dynamical approaches to interpolation (Reanalyses) the talk will conclude with a number of recommendations.

  16. Noncontact Laser Calorimetry of High Temperature Melts in a Static Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuyama, Hiroyuki; Kobatake, Hidekazu; Tsukada, Takao; Awaji, Satoshi

    Numerical simulations are widely used for high value-added materials processing such as semiconductor crystal growth, casting of super high-temperature alloys for a jet-engine turbine blade, and for welding in automobile manufacturing [1, 2]. Process modeling involving a liquid-to-solid transition requires precise thermophysical properties of materials in the solid and liquid state at temperatures near their melting points. However, high-temperature materials such as liquid silicon are chemically reactive and are easily contaminated by their containers and contact materials. Therefore, it remains extremely difficult to measure the thermophysical properties of high-temperature liquids. Especially, the thermal conductivity of a high-temperature liquid is a difficult property to measure because of the existence of the buoyancy and Marangoni convections in the liquid. Not only from process modeling but also from a scientific perspective, thermal conductivity data of high-temperature metallic or semiconductor liquids are important to investigate whether the Wiedemann—Franz law [3] is applicable to them.

  17. Role of absolute humidity in the inactivation of influenza viruses on stainless steel surfaces at elevated temperatures.

    PubMed

    McDevitt, James; Rudnick, Stephen; First, Melvin; Spengler, John

    2010-06-01

    Influenza virus has been found to persist in the environment for hours to days, allowing for secondary transmission of influenza via inanimate objects known as fomites. We evaluated the efficacy of heat and moisture for the decontamination of surfaces for the purpose of preventing of the spread of influenza. Aqueous suspensions of influenza A virus were deposited onto stainless steel coupons, allowed to dry under ambient conditions, and exposed to temperatures of 55 degrees C, 60 degrees C, or 65 degrees C and relative humidity (RH) of 25%, 50%, or 75% for up to 1 h. Quantitative virus assays were performed on the solution used to wash the viruses from these coupons, and results were compared with the solution used to wash coupons treated similarly but left under ambient conditions. Inactivation of influenza virus on surfaces increased with increasing temperature, RH, and exposure time. Reductions of greater than 5 logs of influenza virus on surfaces were achieved at temperatures of 60 and 65 degrees C, exposure times of 30 and 60 min, and RH of 50 and 75%. Our data also suggest that absolute humidity is a better predictor of surface inactivation than RH and allows the prediction of survival using two parameters rather than three. Modest amounts of heat and adequate moisture can provide effective disinfection of surfaces while not harming surfaces, electrical systems, or mechanical components, leaving no harmful residues behind after treatment and requiring a relatively short amount of time. PMID:20435770

  18. Temperature and pressure dependence of Ni partitioning between olivine and high-MgO silicate melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matzen, A. K.; Baker, M. B.; Beckett, J.; Stolper, E. M.

    2010-12-01

    Mantle melting that produces ocean island basalts (OIBs) takes place at temperatures (T) and pressures (P) significantly higher than the conditions at which they erupt or are intruded in the crust/shallow upper mantle [1]. To the degree that the olivine (ol)-liquid (liq) nickel partition coefficient depends on T and P, it is important that models used to describe ol-liq Ni partitioning during mantle melting include data from experiments at elevated T and P. The expressions can then be used in models which aim to reproduce the wide range of Ni contents measured in primitive phenocrysts from OIBs [2]. Available data on Ni partitioning is dominated by 1-atm experiments in which T and liquid composition are highly correlated, making it difficult to separate the effects of these variables on the observed variations in Ni partitioning between ol and liq based on 1-atm experiments alone [3].
    We conducted experiments on a mixture of MORB and olivine at 1 atm (1400°C) and 1-3 GPa (1450-1550°C). We moderated the loss of Ni from the silicate melt to the Pt-enclosed graphite capsule by surrounding the chip of MORB glass with powdered olivine and sintering the assembly at a T below the solidus of the MORB chip. The data presented in this work is from a series of reversed experiments where T and P were increased in such a way that the liquid composition remained approximately constant (MgO ~ 17 wt. %), effectively isolating the effects of T and P from those of liquid composition on the ol-liq partition coefficient. The resulting partition coefficient decreases from ~5 to 3.8 (by wt) as the temperature increases from 1400 to 1550°C. The rate of decrease of the Ni partition coefficient measured in these experiments (~0.5/100°C) is less than that of recent models, which predict a decrease of ~0.1/100°C [4]. Using the results of our experiments we fit a thermodynamic expression to describe the ol-liq Ni-Mg exchange equilibrium as a function of both T and liquid

  19. Thermal Diffusivity Measurements of Oxide and Metallic Melts at High Temperature by the Laser Flash Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, Hiroyuki; Ohta, Hiromichi; Waseda, Yoshio

    The importance of heat transfer properties such as thermal conductivity or thermal diffusivity of various materials at high temperature is strongly emphasized, in parallel with recent progress in surface technology for several electronic devices. Such importance has been well recognized in many pyrometallurgical processes related to plant design and accurate control of continuous casting in steelmaking. For example, heat transfer properties of molten salts are essential to design applications to heat transfer fluids for fusion reactors, breeder reactors, and thermal energy storage systems. Then, thermal property data of molten salts with sufficient reliability are strongly required to select an optimum composition of salt mixture for the desired condition [1]. We also need thermal property data of molten iron at elevated temperature and continuous casting powder melts consisting of various oxide components; SiO2, CaO, MgO, Al2O3, etc. for further improving the present continuous casting process for steel [2].

  20. The Melting Temperature of Liquid Water with the Effective Fragment Potential.

    PubMed

    Brorsen, Kurt R; Willow, Soohaeng Yoo; Xantheas, Sotiris S; Gordon, Mark S

    2015-09-17

    The direct simulation of the solid-liquid water interface with the effective fragment potential (EFP) via the constant enthalpy and pressure (NPH) ensemble was used to estimate the melting temperature (T(m)) of ice-I(h). Initial configurations and velocities, taken from equilibrated constant pressure and temperature (NPT) simulations at P = 1 atm and T = 305 K, 325 K and 399 K, respectively, yielded corresponding T(m) values of 378 ± 16 K, 382 ± 14 K and 384 ± 15 K. These estimates are consistently higher than experiment, albeit to the same degree as previously reported estimates using density functional theory (DFT)-based Born-Oppenheimer simulations with the Becke-Lee-Yang-Parr functional plus dispersion corrections (BLYP-D).

  1. Crystallization of diamond from a silicate melt of kimberlite composition in high-pressure and high-temperature experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Arima, Makoto; Nakayama, Kazuhiro ); Akaishi, Minoru; Yamaoka, Shinobu; Kanda, Hisao )

    1993-11-01

    In high-pressure and high-temperature experiments (1800-2200[degrees]C and 7.0-7.7 GPa), diamond crystallized and grew in a volatile-rich silicate melt of kimberlite composition. This diamond has well-developed [111] faces, and its morphologic characteristics resemble those of natural diamond but differ from those of synthetic diamond grown from metallic solvent-catalysts. The kimberlite melt has a strong solvent-catalytic effect on diamond formation, supporting the view that some natural diamonds crystallized from volatile-rich melts in the upper mantle. 19 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  2. The influence of shear on the ordering temperature of a triblock copolymer melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakatani, Alan I.; Morrison, Faith A.; Douglas, Jack F.; Mays, Jimmy W.; Jackson, Catheryn L.; Muthukumar, M.; Han, Charles C.

    1996-01-01

    The effect of shear on the ordering temperature of a triblock copolymer melt of polystyrene-polybutadiene-polystyrene (SBS) is examined by in situ small angle neutron scattering (SANS). Results obtained by SANS are compared to the rheologically determined order-disorder transition temperature, TRODT=115±5 °C. The SANS measurements from a Couette geometry shear cell are then used to construct a ``dynamical phase diagram'' based on characteristic changes in the scattering with temperature and shear rate, γ˙. A shear rate dependent ordering temperature, Tord(γ˙), is identified as the system is sheared isothermally from the disordered state. The scattering behavior is shown to be highly strain dependent. We compare our findings on the shear rate dependence of the ordering transition in triblock materials with previous observations on diblock copolymer materials and theoretical expectations for the shear rate dependence of the order-disorder transition temperature. A simple scaling argument leads to a good description of the shear rate dependence of Tord(γ˙) in both diblock and triblock copolymer measurements over the range of shear rates examined.

  3. Self-heating probe instrument and method for measuring high temperature melting volume change rate of material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Junwei; Wang, Zhiping; Lu, Yang; Cheng, Bo

    2013-03-01

    The castings defects are affected by the melting volume change rate of material. The change rate has an important effect on running safety of the high temperature thermal storage chamber, too. But the characteristics of existing measuring installations are complex structure, troublesome operation and low precision. In order to measure the melting volume change rate of material accurately and conveniently, a self-designed measuring instrument, self-heating probe instrument, and measuring method are described. Temperature in heating cavity is controlled by PID temperature controller; melting volume change rate υ and molten density are calculated based on the melt volume which is measured by the instrument. Positive and negative υ represent expansion and shrinkage of the sample volume after melting, respectively. Taking eutectic LiF+CaF2 for example, its melting volume change rate and melting density at 1 123 K are -20.6% and 2 651 kg·m-3 measured by this instrument, which is only 0.71% smaller than literature value. Density and melting volume change rate of industry pure aluminum at 973 K and analysis pure NaCl at 1 123 K are detected by the instrument too. The measure results are agreed with report values. Measuring error sources are analyzed and several improving measures are proposed. In theory, the measuring errors of the change rate and molten density which are measured by the self-designed instrument is nearly 1/20-1/50 of that measured by the refitted mandril thermal expansion instrument. The self-designed instrument and method have the advantages of simple structure, being easy to operate, extensive applicability for material, relatively high accuracy, and most importantly, temperature and sample vapor pressure have little effect on the measurement accuracy. The presented instrument and method solve the problems of complicated structure and procedures, and large measuring errors for the samples with high vapor pressure by existing installations.

  4. A molecular dynamics simulation of the melting points and glass transition temperatures of myo- and neo-inositol.

    PubMed

    Watt, Stephen W; Chisholm, James A; Jones, William; Motherwell, Sam

    2004-11-15

    The heat of sublimation, density, melting point, and glass transition temperature are calculated for myo- and neo-inositol, using the condensed-phase optimized molecular potentials for atomistic simulation studies (COMPASS) force field and molecular dynamics techniques. Our results show that the calculated heats of sublimation and density are very close to the experimental values for both compounds. Furthermore, our simulated melting temperatures for myo- and neo-inositol also compare very well to the experimentally obtained data. The glass transition temperatures for myo- and neo-inositol have been calculated to be ca. 494 K and ca. 518 K, respectively, and the shape of the volume versus temperature plots produced are typical for a glass transition. As a result, it is our view that the COMPASS force field suitably describes these two compounds in molecular simulations and that molecular dynamics techniques, combined with this force field, can be used to simulate the melt and glass transitions for such molecules.

  5. Effects of Temperature, Relative Humidity, Absolute Humidity, and Evaporation Potential on Survival of Airborne Gumboro Vaccine Virus

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yang; Dijkman, Remco; Fabri, Teun; de Jong, Mart C. M.; Groot Koerkamp, Peter W. G.

    2012-01-01

    Survival of airborne virus influences the extent of disease transmission via air. How environmental factors affect viral survival is not fully understood. We investigated the survival of a vaccine strain of Gumboro virus which was aerosolized at three temperatures (10°C, 20°C, and 30°C) and two relative humidities (RHs) (40% and 70%). The response of viral survival to four metrics (temperature, RH, absolute humidity [AH], and evaporation potential [EP]) was examined. The results show a biphasic viral survival at 10°C and 20°C, i.e., a rapid initial inactivation in a short period (2.3 min) during and after aerosolization, followed by a slow secondary inactivation during a 20-min period after aerosolization. The initial decays of aerosolized virus at 10°C (1.68 to 3.03 ln % min−1) and 20°C (3.05 to 3.62 ln % min−1) were significantly lower than those at 30°C (5.67 to 5.96 ln % min−1). The secondary decays at 10°C (0.03 to 0.09 ln % min−1) tended to be higher than those at 20°C (−0.01 to 0.01 ln % min−1). The initial viral survival responded to temperature and RH and potentially to EP; the secondary viral survival responded to temperature and potentially to RH. In both phases, survival of the virus was not significantly affected by AH. These findings suggest that long-distance transmission of airborne virus is more likely to occur at 20°C than at 10°C or 30°C and that current Gumboro vaccination by wet aerosolization in poultry industry is not very effective due to the fast initial decay. PMID:22156417

  6. Experimental evidence for thermal generation of interstitials in a metallic crystal near the melting temperature.

    PubMed

    Safonova, E V; Mitrofanov, Yu P; Konchakov, R A; Yu Vinogradov, A; Kobelev, N P; Khonik, V A

    2016-06-01

    The only intrinsic point defects of simple crystalline metals known from solid state physics are vacancies and interstitials. It is widely believed that while vacancies play a major role in crystal properties and their concentration reaches relatively big values near the melting temperature T m, interstitials essentially do not occur in thermodynamic equilibrium and their influence on properties is minor. Here, taking aluminum single crystals as an example, we present compelling experimental evidence for rapid thermoactivated growth of interstitial concentration upon approaching T m. Using high precision measurements of the shear modulus we found a diaelastic effect of up to [Formula: see text] near T m. It is argued that this effect is mostly due to the generation of dumbbell (split) interstitials. The interstitial concentration c i rapidly increases upon approaching T m and becomes only 2-3 times smaller than that of vacancies just below T m. The reason for this c i -increase is conditioned by a decrease of the Gibbs free energy with temperature, which in turn originates from the high formation entropy of dumbbell interstitials and a decrease of their formation enthalpy at high c i . Special molecular dynamic simulation confirmed all basic aspects of the proposed interpretation. The results obtained (i) demonstrate the significance of interstitial concentration near T m that could lead to the revaluation of vacancy concentration at high temperatures, (ii) suggest that dumbbell interstitials play a major role in the melting mechanism of monatomic metallic crystals and (iii) support a new avenue for in-depth understanding of glassy metals. PMID:27143564

  7. Experimental evidence for thermal generation of interstitials in a metallic crystal near the melting temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safonova, E. V.; Mitrofanov, Yu P.; Konchakov, R. A.; Vinogradov, A. Yu; Kobelev, N. P.; Khonik, V. A.

    2016-06-01

    The only intrinsic point defects of simple crystalline metals known from solid state physics are vacancies and interstitials. It is widely believed that while vacancies play a major role in crystal properties and their concentration reaches relatively big values near the melting temperature T m, interstitials essentially do not occur in thermodynamic equilibrium and their influence on properties is minor. Here, taking aluminum single crystals as an example, we present compelling experimental evidence for rapid thermoactivated growth of interstitial concentration upon approaching T m. Using high precision measurements of the shear modulus we found a diaelastic effect of up to -1.5% near T m. It is argued that this effect is mostly due to the generation of dumbbell (split) interstitials. The interstitial concentration c i rapidly increases upon approaching T m and becomes only 2-3 times smaller than that of vacancies just below T m. The reason for this c i -increase is conditioned by a decrease of the Gibbs free energy with temperature, which in turn originates from the high formation entropy of dumbbell interstitials and a decrease of their formation enthalpy at high c i . Special molecular dynamic simulation confirmed all basic aspects of the proposed interpretation. The results obtained (i) demonstrate the significance of interstitial concentration near T m that could lead to the revaluation of vacancy concentration at high temperatures, (ii) suggest that dumbbell interstitials play a major role in the melting mechanism of monatomic metallic crystals and (iii) support a new avenue for in-depth understanding of glassy metals.

  8. Experimental evidence for thermal generation of interstitials in a metallic crystal near the melting temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safonova, E. V.; Mitrofanov, Yu P.; Konchakov, R. A.; Vinogradov, A. Yu; Kobelev, N. P.; Khonik, V. A.

    2016-06-01

    The only intrinsic point defects of simple crystalline metals known from solid state physics are vacancies and interstitials. It is widely believed that while vacancies play a major role in crystal properties and their concentration reaches relatively big values near the melting temperature T m, interstitials essentially do not occur in thermodynamic equilibrium and their influence on properties is minor. Here, taking aluminum single crystals as an example, we present compelling experimental evidence for rapid thermoactivated growth of interstitial concentration upon approaching T m. Using high precision measurements of the shear modulus we found a diaelastic effect of up to -1.5% near T m. It is argued that this effect is mostly due to the generation of dumbbell (split) interstitials. The interstitial concentration c i rapidly increases upon approaching T m and becomes only 2–3 times smaller than that of vacancies just below T m. The reason for this c i -increase is conditioned by a decrease of the Gibbs free energy with temperature, which in turn originates from the high formation entropy of dumbbell interstitials and a decrease of their formation enthalpy at high c i . Special molecular dynamic simulation confirmed all basic aspects of the proposed interpretation. The results obtained (i) demonstrate the significance of interstitial concentration near T m that could lead to the revaluation of vacancy concentration at high temperatures, (ii) suggest that dumbbell interstitials play a major role in the melting mechanism of monatomic metallic crystals and (iii) support a new avenue for in-depth understanding of glassy metals.

  9. Experimental evidence for thermal generation of interstitials in a metallic crystal near the melting temperature.

    PubMed

    Safonova, E V; Mitrofanov, Yu P; Konchakov, R A; Yu Vinogradov, A; Kobelev, N P; Khonik, V A

    2016-06-01

    The only intrinsic point defects of simple crystalline metals known from solid state physics are vacancies and interstitials. It is widely believed that while vacancies play a major role in crystal properties and their concentration reaches relatively big values near the melting temperature T m, interstitials essentially do not occur in thermodynamic equilibrium and their influence on properties is minor. Here, taking aluminum single crystals as an example, we present compelling experimental evidence for rapid thermoactivated growth of interstitial concentration upon approaching T m. Using high precision measurements of the shear modulus we found a diaelastic effect of up to [Formula: see text] near T m. It is argued that this effect is mostly due to the generation of dumbbell (split) interstitials. The interstitial concentration c i rapidly increases upon approaching T m and becomes only 2-3 times smaller than that of vacancies just below T m. The reason for this c i -increase is conditioned by a decrease of the Gibbs free energy with temperature, which in turn originates from the high formation entropy of dumbbell interstitials and a decrease of their formation enthalpy at high c i . Special molecular dynamic simulation confirmed all basic aspects of the proposed interpretation. The results obtained (i) demonstrate the significance of interstitial concentration near T m that could lead to the revaluation of vacancy concentration at high temperatures, (ii) suggest that dumbbell interstitials play a major role in the melting mechanism of monatomic metallic crystals and (iii) support a new avenue for in-depth understanding of glassy metals.

  10. SS316 structure fabricated by selective laser melting and integrated with strain isolated optical fiber high temperature sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathew, Jinesh; Havermann, Dirk; Polyzos, Dimitrios; MacPherson, William N.; Hand, Duncan P.; Maier, Robert R. J.

    2015-09-01

    Smart metal having integrated high temperature sensing capability is reported. The SS316 structure is made by additive layer manufacturing via selective laser melting (SLM). Sensor component is embedded in to the structure during the SLM build process. The strain isolated in-fiber Fabry-Perot cavity sensor measures temperature up to 1100 °C inside the metal.

  11. Structure classification and melting temperature prediction in octet AB solids via machine learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilania, G.; Gubernatis, J. E.; Lookman, T.

    2015-06-01

    Machine learning methods are being increasingly used in condensed matter physics and materials science to classify crystals structures and predict material properties. However, the reliability of these methods for a given problem, especially when large data sets are unavailable, has not been well studied. By addressing the tasks of classifying crystal structure and predicting melting temperatures of the octet subset of AB solids, we performed such a study and found potential problems with using machine learning methods on relatively small data sets. At the same time, however, we can reaffirm the potential power of such methods for these tasks. In particular, we uncovered an important new material feature, the excess Born effective charge, that significantly increased the accuracy of the predictions for the classification problem we defined. This discovery leads us to propose a new scale for the degree of ionicity and covalency in these solids. More specifically, we partitioned the crystal structures of a set of 75 octet solids into those that are ionic and covalent bonded and thus performed a binary classification task. We found that using the standard indices (rσ,rπ) , suggested by St. John and Bloch several decades ago, enabled an average success in classification of 92 % . Using just rσ and the excess Born effective charge Δ ZA of the A atom enabled an average success of 97 % , but we also found relatively large variations about these averages that were dependent on how certain machine learning methods were used and for which a standard deviation was not a proper measure of the degree of confidence we can place in either average. Instead, we calculated and report with 95 % confidence that the traditional classification pair predicts an accuracy in the interval [89 %,95 %] and the accuracy of the new pair lies in the interval [96 %,99 %] . For melting temperature predictions, the size of our data set was 46. We estimate the root-mean-squared error of our

  12. Sequence dependent electrophoretic mobilities and melting temperatures for A-T containing oligodeoxyribonucleotides.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, W D; Zuo, E T; Jones, R L; Zon, G L; Baumstark, B R

    1987-01-01

    The electrophoretic mobilities and thermal melting properties of self complementary A-T containing dodecamer oligodeoxyribonucleotides have been investigated as a function of solution conditions. The oligomers contained tracts of nonalternating A-T base pairs of 2 (d(A2T2)3), 3 (d(A3T3)2), and 6 (d(A6T6] as well as the fully alternating (d(A-T)6) sequence. The melting temperature increased with the length of the nonalternating sequence and was approximately 12 degrees C higher in the d(A6T6) sequence than in the alternating oligomer. Under denaturing conditions all oligomers had the same electrophoretic mobility on acrylamide gels. Under conditions which favor duplex formation, the oligomers exhibited significant sequence dependent mobility differences. The mobilities of two oligomers, d(A-T)6 and d(A6-T6), were approximately equal and were less than those of the other oligonucleotides. The greatest mobility was observed for d(A2T2)3. These results are best explained by a model which requires bending at a junction of two or more continuous A or T bases with another sequence. Images PMID:3822802

  13. Correlation between the band gap expansion and melting temperature depression of nanostructured semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jianwei Zhao, Xinsheng; Liu, Xinjuan; Zheng, Xuejun; Yang, Xuexian; Zhu, Zhe

    2015-09-28

    The band gap and melting temperature of a semiconductor are tunable with the size and shape of the specimen at the nanometer scale, and related mechanisms remain as yet unclear. In order to understand the common origin of the size and shape effect on these two seemingly irrelevant properties, we clarify, correlate, formulate, and quantify these two properties of GaAs, GaN, InP, and InN nanocrystals from the perspectives of bond order-length-strength correlation using the core-shell configuration. The consistency in the theoretical predictions, experimental observations, and numerical calculations verify that the broken-bond-induced local bond contraction and strength gain dictates the band gap expansion, while the atomic cohesive energy loss due to bond number reduction depresses the melting point. The fraction of the under-coordinated atoms in the skin shell quantitatively determines the shape and size dependency. The atomic under-coordination in the skin down to a depth of two atomic layers inducing a change in the local chemical bond is the common physical origin.

  14. Deformation mechanisms in granodiorite at effective pressures to 100 MPa and temperatures to partial melting

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, M.; Handin, J.; Bauer, S.J.

    1981-01-01

    Deformation mechanisms in room-dry and water-saturated specimens of Charcoal Granodiorite, shortened at 10/sup -4/s/sup -1/, at effective pressures (Pe) to 100 MPa and temperatures to partial melting (less than or equal to 1050/sup 0/C) are documented with a view toward providing criteria to recognize and characterize the deformation for geological and engienering applications. Above 800/sup 0/C strength decreases dramatically at effective pressures greater than or equal to 50 MPa and water-weakening reduces strength an additional 30 to 40% at Pe = 100 MPa. Strains at failure are only 0.1 to 2.2% with macroscopic ductility (within this range) increasing as the effective pressures are increased and in wet versus dry tests. Shattering (multiple faulting) gives way to faulting along a single zone to failure without macroscopic faulting as ductility increases. Microscopically, cataclasis (extension microfracturing and thermal cracking with rigid-body motions) predominates at all conditions. Dislocation gliding contributes little to the strain. Precursive extension microfractures coalesce to produce the throughgoing faults with gouge zones exhibiting possible Riedel shears. Incipient melting, particularly in wet tests, produces a distinctive texture along feldspar grain boundaries that suggests a grain-boundary-softening effect contributes to the weakening. In addition, it is demonstrated that the presence of water does not lead to more microfractures, but to a reduction in the stresses required to initiate and propagate them.

  15. Extraction of temperature dependent electrical resistivity and thermal conductivity from silicon microwires self-heated to melting temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakan, Gokhan; Adnane, Lhacene; Gokirmak, Ali; Silva, Helena

    2012-09-01

    Temperature-dependent electrical resistivity, ρ(T), and thermal conductivity, k(T), of nanocrystalline silicon microwires self-heated to melt are extracted by matching simulated current-voltage (I-V) characteristics to experimental I-V characteristics. Electrical resistivity is extracted from highly doped p-type wires on silicon dioxide in which the heat losses are predominantly to the substrate and the self-heating depends mainly on ρ(T) of the wires. The extracted ρ(T) decreases from 11.8 mΩ cm at room-temperature to 5.2 mΩ cm at 1690 K, in reasonable agreement with the values measured up to ˜650 K. Electrical resistivity and thermal conductivity are extracted from suspended highly doped n-type silicon wires in which the heat losses are predominantly through the wires. In this case, measured ρ(T) (decreasing from 20.5 mΩ cm at room temperature to 12 mΩ cm at 620 K) is used to extract ρ(T) at higher temperatures (decreasing to 1 mΩ cm at 1690 K) and k(T) (decreasing from 30 W m-1 K-1 at room temperature to 20 W m-1 K-1 at 1690 K). The method is tested by using the extracted parameters to model wires with different dimensions. The experimental and simulated I-V curves for these wires show good agreement up to high voltage and temperature levels. This technique allows extraction of the electrical resistivity and thermal conductivity up to very high temperatures from self-heated microstructures.

  16. Igneous inclusions from ordinary chondrites: High temperature cumulates and a shock melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sack, Richard O.; Ghiorso, Mark S.; Wang, Ming-Sheng; Lipschutz, Michael E.

    1994-12-01

    We report microprobe, instrumental neutron activation analysis, and radiochemical neutron activation analysis data for three large igneous inclusions in the Yamato (Y-)75097, Y-793241, and Y-794046 ordinary chondrites. The inclusions in the first two chondrites are troctolitic cumulates that have undergone appreciable reactions with their hosts either during emplacement and/or cooling. Olivine-spinel Fe-Mg exchange pairs in these two inclusions record equilibration temperatures of about 710 C, and these temperatures are similar to those exhibited by mineral pairs in the Y-75097 and Y-793241 hosts. The inclusion in Y-794046 is texturally unique, consisting of fine-grained, randomly distributed olivines, coarse (approximately 2 mm) fascicular pyroxene laths, and angular pockets of maskelynite/plagioclase feldspar. The phase compositions are readily interpreted as having resulted from extremely rapid, essentially isochemical cooling to temperatures less than 1000 C of a melt with an initial temperature greater than 1670 C. We suggest that this igneous inclusion formed in-situ by shock.

  17. Entropy dependence of viscosity and the glass-transition temperature of melts in the system diopside-anorthite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taniguchi, H.

    1992-01-01

    Viscosities of diopside-anorthite melts were measured over the wide range of temperature (near the glass-transition temperature-1580°C/1bar) and pressure (5 20 kb/above the liquidus temperature). The measurements were carried out by the fibre-elongation method for low temperature and the counter-balanced sphere method for high temperature at 1 bar, and the sinking and floating spheres method for high temperature at high pressure. Some of the values obtained deviated slightly from those in the literature. The data on viscosity and the glasstransition temperature have been interpreted on the basis of the configurational entropy theory, by which temperature and compositional effects on viscosity were explained well. The configurational entropies at the glasstransition temperature of magmatic silicate melts are almost constant if we use an average molecular weight (amw) or “bead” as a unit; 8.0±1.2 J/K·amw, 1.1 ±0.2cal/K·bead. The latter value coincides well with the value from the literature for organic polymers. The negative deviation from linearity of the glass-transition temperature of intermediate melts may be interpreted as the effect of the mixing entropy. The calculated glasstransition temperature-composition curve using the mixing entropy agreed well with the experimental values.

  18. Effect of glass composition on activation energy of viscosity in glass-melting-temperature range

    SciTech Connect

    Hrma, Pavel R.; Han, Sang Soo

    2012-08-01

    In the high-temperature range, where the viscosity (Eta) of molten glass is <10{sup 3} Pa s, the activation energy (B) is virtually ln(Eta) = A + B/T, is nearly independent of melt composition. Hence, the viscosity-composition relationship for Eta < 10{sup 3} Pa s is defined by B as a function of composition. Using a database encompassing over 1300 compositions of high-level waste glasses with nearly 7000 viscosity data, we developed mathematical models for B(x), where x is the composition vector in terms of mass fractions of components. In this paper, we present 13 versions of B(x) as first- and second-order polynomials with coefficients for 15 to 39 components, including Others, a component that sums constituents having little effect on viscosity.

  19. Amphiphilic drug interactions with model cellular membranes are influenced by lipid chain-melting temperature

    PubMed Central

    Casey, Duncan; Charalambous, Kalypso; Gee, Antony; Law, Robert V.; Ces, Oscar

    2014-01-01

    Small-molecule amphiphilic species such as many drug molecules frequently exhibit low-to-negligible aqueous solubility, and generally have no identified transport proteins assisting their distribution, yet are able to rapidly penetrate significant distances into patient tissue and even cross the blood–brain barrier. Previous work has identified a mechanism of translocation driven by acid-catalysed lipid hydrolysis of biological membranes, a process which is catalysed by the presence of cationic amphiphilic drug molecules. In this study, the interactions of raclopride, a model amphiphilic drug, were investigated with mixtures of biologically relevant lipids across a range of compositions, revealing the influence of the chain-melting temperature of the lipids upon the rate of acyl hydrolysis. PMID:24621813

  20. Direct Selective Laser Sintering/Melting of High Density Alumina Powder Layers at Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deckers, J.; Meyers, S.; Kruth, J. P.; Vleugels, J.

    Direct selective laser sintering (SLS) or selective laser melting (SLM) are additive manufacturing techniques that can be used to produce three-dimensional ceramic parts directly, without the need for a sacrificial binder. In this paper, a low laser energy density is applied to SLS/SLM high density powder layers of sub-micrometer alumina at elevated temperatures (up to 800̊C). In order to achieve this, a furnace was designed and built into a commercial SLS machine. This furnace was able to produce a homogeneously heated cylindrical zone with a height of 60 mm and a diameter of 32 mm. After optimizing the layer deposition and laser scanning parameters, two ceramic parts with a density up to 85% and grain sizes as low as 5 μm were successfully produced.

  1. Crystal packing and melting temperatures of small oxalate esters: the role of C-H···O hydrogen bonding.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Sumy; Sathishkumar, Ranganathan; Mahapatra, Sudarshan; Desiraju, Gautam R

    2011-12-01

    The simple dialkyl oxalates are generally liquids at room temperature except for dimethyl and di-tert-butyl oxalate which melt at 327 and 343 K. The crystal structures of diethyl, di-iso-propyl, di-n-butyl, di-tert-butyl and methyl ethyl oxalates were determined. The liquid esters were crystallized using the cryocrystallization technique. A comparison of the intermolecular interactions and packing features in these crystal structures was carried out. The crystal structure of dimethyl oxalate was redetermined at various temperatures. The other compounds were also studied at several temperatures in order to assess the attractive nature of the hydrogen bonds therein. A number of moderate to well defined C-H···O interactions account for the higher melting points of the two solid esters. Additionally, a diminished entropic contribution ΔS(m) in di-tert-butyl oxalate possibly increases the melting point of this compound further.

  2. Evidence for hydrous melting along high-temperature veins within a gabbro from SWIR (ODP Leg 176)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feig, S. T.; Koepke, J.; Bremer, C.; Snow, J. E.

    2003-04-01

    The 1053 m long drilled gabbroic section of the Leg 176 from the Southwest Indian Ridge (SWIR) contains numerous high-temperature veins composed of orthopyroxene (opx), pargasite (par), clinopyroxene (cpx), and plagioclase (plag). According to Maeda et al. (2002) these veins were formed by a water-rich fluid at temperatures up to 1000°C. New partial melting experiments using oceanic gabbros from the Leg 176 as starting material revealed, that at such conditions gabbros should melt (Feig et al., this volume). By carefully checking high-temperature veins with backscattered electron imaging, we actually found in one gabbro (R6a) from the Leg microstructures which are evident for hydrous partial melting. Plag in contact with a vein shows a few tens of microns thick, irregular zone significantly enriched in An (An76), while cpx along veins react to idiomorphic opx (Mg# = 75) and par (Na+K on A = 0.73; Mg# = 74). An-rich plag, opx, and par are regarded as restitic crystals of a partial melting reaction, while micron-sized "pools" of hornblende between cpx and par are probably related to former melt pockets. Striking is the compositional agreement with corresponding phases of those hydrous partial melting experiments using as starting material a gabbro (61a) showing a composition (olivine - Fo71, plag - An55, cpx - Mg# = 78), which matches well that of R6a (olivine - Fo71, plag - An55, cpx - Mg# = 80). That run performed at 940°C (P = 200 MPa, NNO oxygen buffer, water-saturated) shows as crystal phases opx (Mg# = 75), par (Na+K on A = 0.68; Mg# = 74), and plag (~ An75; extrapolated from a run performed at 980°C with An79, since the plag of the 940°C-run was too tiny for microprobe analysis). Cpx was not stable in that run at 940°C. The coexisting melt of this run is dioritc with a SiO2 content of 60.9 wt%. Our experiments imply melting temperatures of ~940°C under water-saturated conditions for the formation of the high-temperature vein minerals. The melt, once

  3. Melting and chemical reactivity of hydrocarbons under high pressure and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobanov, S.; Chanyshev, A.; Chen, P.; Litasov, K.; Chen, X.; Goncharov, A.

    2013-12-01

    Hydrocarbons comprise roughly ⅓ of the icy mantles in interiors of icy giant planets and may determine the planetary physical properties. Here we present the results of laser heated diamond anvil cell experiments on hydrocarbon chemical reactivity at P up to 50 GPa and T up to 2000 K. Ethane (C2H6) and n-docosane (C22H46) were chosen as starting materials. Raman spectroscopy at high P was used to probe the C-H systems. Melting lines of the hydrocarbons were found by visual observations of fluid-solid interface. The melting lines lie below 1500 K at P<50 GPa and are indistinguishable (within experimental uncertainties) from each other and that of CH4. Hydrocarbons melt to metastable molecular liquids and decompose to CH4 at T>1000 K and P<20 GPa precipitating carbon (Fig.1). Gradual decomposition of hydrocarbons is evident with increasing T. No molecular hydrogen was observed. However, at P above ~20 GPa Raman spectra of quenched reaction products are different. Complex changes in C-C stretching and C-H bending spectral regions occured upon heating to 2000 K (Fig.2). C=C and C≡C bonds appeared at P>25-30 GPa. Remarkably, free H2 was found in experiments at P>30-35 GPa. The interpretation of Raman spectra of quenched reaction products is uncertain. In general, P and T affect the lifetimes of C-H and C-C bonds. Temperature provides energy to brake C-H and C-C bonds, while stabilization of the bonds with pressure may be more pronounced for C-C bonds. The composition of C-H fluid is determined by the competition between C-C and C-H bonds. This competition can result in hydrocarbons with long C-C network. The role of C=C and C≡C bonds at high P cannot be ruled out from this study. It is possible that unsaturated hydrocarbons appear upon quenching from highly dissociated C-H fluid rather than being present in C-H fluid. n-docosane at 12 GPa Ethane at 34 GPa

  4. Prospects and challenges of iron pyroelectrolysis in magnesium aluminosilicate melts near minimum liquidus temperature.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, N M; Kovalevsky, A V; Mikhalev, S M; Costa, F M; Frade, J R

    2015-04-14

    Although steel production by molten oxide electrolysis offers potential economic and environmental advantages over classic extractive metallurgy, its feasibility is far from being convincingly demonstrated, mainly due to inherent experimental difficulties exerted by harsh conditions and lack of knowledge regarding relevant mechanisms and physico-chemical processes in the melts. The present work was intended to demonstrate the concept of pyroelectrolysis at very high temperature near the minimum liquidus point of magnesium aluminosilicate, being conducted under electron-blocking conditions using yttria-stabilized zirconia cells, and to provide a new insight into electrochemistry behind this process. Significant current yields are possible for pyroelectrolysis performed in electron-blocking mode using a solid electrolyte membrane to separate the anode and the molten electrolyte. Parasitic electrochemical processes rise gradually as the concentration of iron oxide dissolved in the molten electrolytes is depleted, impairing faradaic efficiency. Reduction of silica to metallic silicon was identified as a significant contribution to those parasitic currents, among other plausible processes. Direct pyroelectrolysis without electron blocking was found much less plausible, due to major limitations on faradaic efficiency imposed by electronic leakage and insufficient ionic conductivity of the aluminosilicate melt. Ohmic losses may consume an excessive fraction of the applied voltage, thus failing to sustain the Nernst potential required for reduction to metallic iron. The results suggest the need for further optimization of the molten electrolyte composition to promote ionic conductivity and to suppress electronic transport contribution, possibly, by tuning the Al/Si ratio and altering the network-forming/modifying behaviour of the iron cations. PMID:25760633

  5. The melting temperature of liquid water with the effective fragment potential

    SciTech Connect

    Brorsen, Kurt R.; Willow, Soohaeng Y.; Xantheas, Sotiris S.; Gordon, Mark S.

    2015-09-17

    Direct simulation of the solid-liquid water interface with the effective fragment potential (EFP) via the constant enthalpy and pressure (NPH) ensemble was used to estimate the melting temperature (Tm) of ice-Ih. Initial configurations and velocities, taken from equilibrated constant pressure and temperature (NPT) simulations at T = 300 K, 350 K and 400 K, respectively, yielded corresponding Tm values of 378±16 K, 382±14 K and 384±15 K. These estimates are consistently higher than experiment, albeit to the same degree with previously reported estimates using density functional theory (DFT)-based Born-Oppenheimer simulations with the Becke-Lee-Yang-Parr functional plus dispersion corrections (BLYP-D). KRB was supported by a Computational Science Graduate Fellowship from the Department of Energy. MSG was supported by a U.S. National Science Foundation Software Infrastructure (SI2) grant (ACI – 1047772). SSX acknowledges support from the US Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences and Biosciences. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is a multiprogram national laboratory operated for DOE by Battelle.

  6. Elevated temperature strengthening of a melt spun austenitic steel by TiB2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michal, G. M.; Glasgow, T. K.; Moore, T. J.

    1986-01-01

    Mechanical properties of an iron-based alloy containing (by wt pct) 33Ni, 2Al, 6Ti, and 2B (resulting in an alloy containing 10 vol pct TiB2) were evaluated by hardness and tensile testing. The alloy was cast as a ribbon using a dual 'free-jet' variation of Jech et al. (1984) method of chill-block melt-spinning against a copper wheel; to simulate thermal cycles the alloy ribbon would experience during compaction into shapes, various segments of the ribbon were annealed under a vacuum at temperatures ranging from 500 to 1150 C. The results show that maximum strengths at 650 and 760 C were developed in ribbons annealed at 1100 C; in these ribbons an optimal combination of grain coarsening with minimum TiB2 particle growth was observed. However, the elevated-temperature strength of the TiB2-strengthened alloy under optimal annealing conditions was poorer than that of conventional iron-based superalloys strengthened by gamma-prime precipitates.

  7. Irreversibility temperatures in superconducting oxides: The flux-line-lattice melting, the glass-liquid transition, or the depinning temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Y.; Suenaga, M. )

    1991-03-01

    The magnetic-field dependence of the irreversibility temperatures follows an {ital H}={ital a}(1{minus}{ital T}{sub {ital r}}({ital H})/{ital T}{sub {ital c}}(0)){sup {ital n}} relationship with {ital n}{congruent}1.5, for pure and alloyed YBa{sub 2}(Cu{sub 1{minus}{ital x}}M{sub {ital x}}){sub 3}O{sub 7+{delta}} with {ital x}=0 and 0.02, where {ital M}=Al, Fe, Ni, and Zn, measured for an applied field parallel to the {ital c} axis. However, for {ital M}=Ni and {ital x}=0.04 and 0.06, {ital n}{congruent}2.0. This relationship is not applicable for either Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8} or (Bi,Pb){sub 2}Sr{sub 2}Ca{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 10} powders. It is also shown that the irreversibility temperature is a strong function of the magnetic hysteresis width {Delta}{ital M} for pure and alloyed YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7}. These results and the measurements of the flux creep {Delta}{ital M}({ital t}) for these specimens suggest that {ital T}{sub {ital r}}({ital H}) is a depinning line rather than a lattice melting or glass-to-liquid phase-transition temperature. However, the conventional flux-creep model cannot account for all of the observed temporal dependences of {Delta}{ital M}({ital t}).

  8. Melt detection of Fe-Ni at high-pressures using atomic dynamics measurements and a fast temperature readout spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, D.; Jackson, J. M.; Zhao, J.; Sturhahn, W.; Alp, E. E.; Hu, M.; Toellner, T. S.

    2013-12-01

    Cosmochemical studies suggest that the cores of terrestrial planetary bodies are primarily composed of Fe with ~5-10 wt% Ni (e.g., McDonough and Sun 1995). The P-T conditions of the cores of Mars, Mercury, Earth's moon, Io and Ganymede are thought to lie in the stability field of fcc-structured Fe alloyed with ~10 wt% Ni (e.g., Fei et al. 2005). Geomagnetic surveys suggest these terrestrial bodies either have or once had a magnetic dynamo (e.g., Margot et al. 2007), which likely requires the presence of a liquid metallic core surrounding a solid inner core. Therefore, an accurate determination of the melting temperature of fcc-structured Fe-Ni at high pressure will provide constraints on the thermal structure of these small terrestrial bodies, and in turn, may provide insight to their magnetic dynamo and interior evolution history. We have developed a new metric for detecting the solid-liquid phase boundary of Fe-bearing materials at high-pressures using synchrotron Mössbauer spectroscopy (SMS). Focused synchrotron radiation with 1 meV bandwidth passes through a laser-heated Fe-bearing sample inside a diamond-anvil cell. The characteristic SMS time signal vanishes when melting occurs. This process is described by the Lamb-Mössbauer factor, a quantity that is directly related to the mean-square displacement of the Fe atoms. Therefore, we measure the atomic dynamics in the material, in contrast to a static diffraction measurement. The SMS technique provides a new and independent means of melting point determination for materials under high-pressure, as well as access to vibrational properties of the solid near its melting point (Jackson et al. 2013). Accurate melting temperatures of the sample are also necessary factors in constructing reliable melting curves. However, most conventional temperature measurement methods in laser-heated diamond-anvil cell studies are often too slow (~0.3 Hz) to capture the sample's transient temperature fluctuations, which can be

  9. Temperature and pressure dependence of the mode Grüneisen parameters close to the melting point in hexagonal ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karacali, H.; Yurtseven, H.

    2007-02-01

    We reexamine the Pippard relations in this study by relating the specific heat CP to the Raman frequency shifts 1/ν∂ and the thermal expansivity αp to the 1/ν∂, when the mode Grüneisen parameter depends on the temperature and pressure close to the melting point in hexagonal ice. From linear relations between them, the values of the slope {dP}/{dT} are deduced in this crystal. Our slope values calculated here do not change significantly compared to those obtained when the mode Grüneisen parameter is taken as a constant close to the melting point in hexagonal ice.

  10. Crystal Composition and Afterglow in Mixed Silicates: The Role of Melting Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidletskiy, O.; Vedda, A.; Fasoli, M.; Neicheva, S.; Gektin, A.

    2015-08-01

    Modern applications of scintillator materials demand cutting-edge performances and require often a response speed in the nanosecond time scale. Slow light emission causing an "afterglow" is, therefore, of considerable concern in the development of fast scintillators. The mechanism of afterglow emission in mixed Ce-doped oxyorthosilicate scintillators is investigated by means of time-resolved scintillation, thermally stimulated luminescence (TSL), and radio-luminescence measurements. Various Ce-doped Lu2 xGd2 -2 xSiO5 oxyorthosilicate crystals (with x ranging from 0 to1) and Lu1.8Y0.2SiO5 grown by the Czochralski technique are considered. The detailed TSL analysis reveals that thermally assisted tunneling recombination of electrons trapped by oxygen vacancies with holes trapped by Ce luminescence centers occurs for all compositions. The reduction of the afterglow intensity by adding gadolinium or yttrium into the host is accompanied by a lowering of the traps concentration, as deduced by the TSL intensity. Such lowering of the oxygen vacancy concentrations is found to be correlated with the decrease of the melting temperature induced by gadolinium or yttrium content increase, which governs the oxygen vapor pressure. The occurrence of a similar mechanism also in other scintillators and its influence on carrier trapping is discussed.

  11. Some features of bulk melt-textured high-temperature superconductors subjected to alternating magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanderbemden, P.; Molenberg, I.; Simeonova, P.; Lovchinov, V.

    2014-12-01

    Monolithic, large grain, (RE)Ba2Cu3O7 high-temperature superconductors (where RE denotes a rare-earth ion) are known to be able to trap fields in excess of several teslas and represent thus an extremely promising competing technology for permanent magnet in several applications, e.g. in motors and generators. In any rotating machine, however, the superconducting permanent magnet is subjected to variable (transient, or alternating) parasitic magnetic fields. These magnetic fields interact with the superconductor, which yields a reduction of the remnant magnetization. In the present work we quantify these effects by analysing selected experimental data on bulk melt-textured superconductors subjected to AC fields. Our results indicate that the non-uniformity of superconducting properties in rather large samples might lead to unusual features and need to be taken into account to analyse the experimental data. We also investigate the evolution of the DC remnant magnetization of the bulk sample when it is subjected to a large number of AC magnetic field cycles, and investigate the experimental errors that result from a misorientation of the sample or a mispositioning of the Hall probe. The time-dependence of the remnant magnetization over 100000 cycles of the AC field is shown to display distinct regimes which all differ strongly from the usual decay due to magnetic relaxation.

  12. Investigating the Equilibrium Melting Temperature of Polyethylene Using the Non-Linear Hoffman-Weeks Analysis: Effect of Molecular Weight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadi, Hadi; Marand, Herve

    The limiting equilibrium melting temperature for infinite molar mass linear polyethylene, Tmo , has been a point of controversy for about five decades. On one hand, Broadhurst and Flory-Vrij extrapolated melting data for short alkanes to a value of ca. 145oC. On the other hand, Wunderlich proposed a value of 141oC from melting studies of extended-chain PE crystals formed under high pressure. While a difference in Tmo by 4oC might seem superfluous, it has significant implication for the analysis of the temperature and chain length dependences of crystal growth kinetic data. In this work we estimate the equilibrium melting temperatures, Tm for three linear narrow molecular weight distribution polyethylenes using the non-linear Hoffman-Weeks treatment. The resulting Tm values thus obtained are significantly lower than these predicted by the Flory-Vrij treatment and are within experimental uncertainty indistinguishable from those reported by Wunderlich and Hikosaka et al. Our results also suggest that the constant C2 in the expression for the undercooling dependence of the initial lamellar thickness (lg*= C1/ ΔT + C2) increases linearly with chain length.

  13. Aluminosilicate melts and glasses at 1 to 3 GPa: Temperature and pressure effects on recovered structural and density changes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bista, S; Stebbins, Jonathan; Hankins, William B.; Sisson, Thomas W.

    2015-01-01

    In the pressure range in the Earth’s mantle where many basaltic magmas are generated (1 to 3 GPa) (Stolper et al. 1981), increases in the coordination numbers of the network-forming cations in aluminosilicate melts have generally been considered to be minor, although effects on silicon and particularly on aluminum coordination in non-bridging oxygen-rich glasses from the higher, 5 to 12 GPa range, are now well known. Most high-precision measurements of network cation coordination in such samples have been made by spectroscopy (notably 27Al and 29Si NMR) on glasses quenched from high-temperature, high-pressure melts synthesized in solid-media apparatuses and decompressed to room temperature and 1 bar pressure. There are several effects that could lead to the underestimation of the extent of actual structural (and density) changes in high-pressure/temperature melts from such data. For non-bridging oxygen-rich sodium and calcium aluminosilicate compositions in the 1 to 3 GPa range, we show here that glasses annealed near to their glass transition temperatures systematically record higher recovered increases in aluminum coordination and in density than samples quenched from high-temperature melts. In the piston-cylinder apparatus used, rates of cooling through the glass transition are measured as very similar for both higher and lower initial temperatures, indicating that fictive temperature effects are not the likely explanation of these differences. Instead, transient decreases in melt pressure during thermal quenching, which may be especially large for high initial run temperatures, of as much as 0.5 to 1 GPa, may be responsible. As a result, the equilibrium proportion of high-coordinated Al in this pressure range may be 50 to 90% greater than previously estimated, reaching mean coordination numbers (e.g., 4.5) that are probably high enough to significantly affect melt properties. New data on jadeite (NaAlSi2O6) glass confirm that aluminum coordination increase

  14. Water in Basaltic Melts: an Experimental and Thermodynamic Study of the Effect of H2O on Liquidus Temperatures.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medard, E.; Grove, T. L.

    2006-12-01

    We present a thermodynamic model for the influence of H2O on liquidus temperatures of olivine-saturated primitive basaltic and andesitic melts. The thermodynamic model has been fitted to a suite of H2O-saturated liquidus experiments carried out on a primitive high-alumina basalt from Medicine Lake Volcano (82-72f) over a pressure range of 10 to 1000 MPa. The model of Silver and Stolper (S+S, 1985, J.Geol. 93:161) has been applied to the experimental data. This model uses the assumption of simple ideal mixing between water species and the anionic matrix in the melt. Water in the melt dissolves as molecular H2O, or dissociates to hydroxyl groups and an oxygen atomic network. For 82-72f, the liquidus olivine shows little compositional variability (Fo87.4 to Fo88.4) over the broad range of pressures and temperatures investigated that is not correlated with H2O content of the melt. This observation supports our assumption that major effect of H2O is on the anionic species in the melt and not on the cation equilibria (e.g. Mg and Si). The model reproduces the experimental data well. We find that there is a large influence of H2O addition on melting point for small amounts of H2O, resulting in a concave-down curvature when liquidus depression is plotted against the amount of H2O added. For addition of 0.8 and 5 wt% H2O to 82-72f, the liquidus is depressed by 35 K and 130 K, respectively. The best fits are obtained by assuming partial water dissociation to OH and H2O species, using the equilibrium constant measured by Stolper (1982). S+S applied their model to simple systems (diopside/H2O, albite/H2O, silica/H2O), and recovered the melting behavior extremely well. They also suggested that melt structure/composition influences the amount of liquidus depression caused by H2O addition. We have investigated the influence of bulk composition by performing complementary experiments on a high-magnesian andesite from Mount Shasta, and on a K, Na, and P rich alkali basalt from

  15. A novel method to determine the electron temperature and density from the absolute intensity of line and continuum emission: application to atmospheric microwave induced Ar plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iordanova, E.; Palomares, J. M.; Gamero, A.; Sola, A.; van der Mullen, J. J. A. M.

    2009-08-01

    An absolute intensity measurement (AIM) technique is presented that combines the absolute measurements of the line and the continuum emitted by strongly ionizing argon plasmas. AIM is an iterative combination of the absolute line intensity-collisional radiative model (ALI-CRM) and the absolute continuum intensity (ACI) method. The basis of ALI-CRM is that the excitation temperature T13 determined by the method of ALI is transformed into the electron temperature Te using a CRM. This gives Te as a weak function of electron density ne. The ACI method is based on the absolute value of the continuum radiation and determines the electron density in a way that depends on Te. The iterative combination gives ne and Te. As a case study the AIM method is applied to plasmas created by torche à injection axiale (TIA) at atmospheric pressure and fixed frequency at 2.45 GHz. The standard operating settings are a gas flow of 1 slm and a power of 800 W; the measurements have been performed at a position of 1 mm above the nozzle. With AIM we found an electron temperature of 1.2 eV and electron density values around 1021 m-3. There is not much dependence of these values on the plasma control parameters (power and gas flow). From the error analysis we can conclude that the determination of Te is within 7% and thus rather accurate but comparison with other studies shows strong deviations. The ne determination comes with an error of 40% but is in reasonable agreement with other experimental results.

  16. Relationships between processing temperature and microstructure in isothermal melt processed Bi-2212 thick films

    SciTech Connect

    Holesinger, T.G.; Phillips, D.S.; Willis, J.O.; Peterson, D.E.

    1995-05-01

    The microstructure and phase assemblage of isothermal melt processed (IMP) Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub y} (Bi-2212) thick films have been evaluated. Results from compositional analysis and phase identification indicate that the characteristics of the partial melt greatly influence the microstructural and chemical development of the thick films. The highest critical current densities were obtained in films processed below 800{degrees}C where the partial melt uniformly coats the substrate without excessive phase segregation.

  17. Effect of Feed Melting, Temperature History and Minor Component Addition on Spinel Crystallization in High-Level Waste Glass

    SciTech Connect

    Izak, Pavel; Hrma, Pavel R.; Arey, Bruce W.; Plaisted, Trevor J.

    2001-08-01

    This study was undertaken to help design mathematical models for high-level waste (HLW) glass melter that simulate spinel behavior in molten glass. Spinel, (Fe,Ni,Mn) (Fe,Cr)2O4, is the primary solid phase that precipitates from HLW glasses containing Fe and Ni in sufficient concentrations. Spinel crystallization affects the anticipated cost and risk of HLW vitrification. To study melting reactions, we used simulated HLW feed, prepared with co-precipitated Fe, Ni, Cr, and Mn hydroxides. Feed samples were heated up at a temperature-increase rate (4C/min) close to that which the feed experiences in the HLW glass melter. The decomposition, melting, and dissolution of feed components (such as nitrates, carbonates, and silica) and the formation of intermediate crystalline phases (spinel, sodalite [Na8(AlSiO4)6(NO2)2], and Zr-containing minerals) were characterized using evolved gas analysis, volume-expansion measurement, optical microscope, scanning electron microscope, thermogravimetric analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, and X-ray diffraction. Nitrates and quartz, the major feed components, converted to a glass-forming melt by 880C. A chromium-free spinel formed in the nitrate melt starting from 520C and Sodalite, a transient product of corundum dissolution, appeared above 600C and eventually dissolved in glass. To investigate the effects of temperature history and minor components (Ru,Ag, and Cu) on the dissolution and growth of spinel crystals, samples were heated up to temperatures above liquidus temperature (TL), then subjected to different temperature histories, and analyzed. The results show that spinel mass fraction, crystals composition, and crystal size depend on the chemical and physical makeup of the feed and temperature history.

  18. A preliminary view on adsorption of organics on ice at temperatures close to melting point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Xiangrui; Waldner, Astrid; Orlando, Fabrizio; Artiglia, Luca; Ammann, Markus; Bartels-Rausch, Thorsten

    2016-04-01

    -level spectroscopies to reveal the behaviour of adsorption and dissociation on ice. Additionally, pure ice and amine doped ice will be compared for their surface structure change at different temperatures, which will indicate the differences of surface disordering caused by different factors. For instance, we will have a chance to know better if impurities will cause local disordering, i.e. forming hydration shell, which challenges the traditional picture of a homogenous disordered doped ice surface. The findings of this study could not only improve our understanding of how acidic organics adsorb to ice, and of their chemical properties on ice, but also have potentials to know better the behaviour of pure ice at temperatures approaching to the melting point.

  19. Ni partitioning into olivine: separation of temperature and melt compositional effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matzen, A. K.; Baker, M. B.; Beckett, J. R.; Stolper, E. M.; Wood, B. J.

    2013-12-01

    The fractionation of elements between different phases during igneous processes is the principal way that the major components of the Earth chemically differentiate over time. Over roughly the last century, petrologists have devoted considerable effort to performing equilibrium experiments with the goal of using the experimental results to model natural processes, thereby giving insight into the mechanisms that produce the chemical variations observed in nature. Using Ni partitioning (DNi) between olivine (ol) and silicate melt (liq) as an example, we examine the different ways in which partitioning behavior can be parameterized and the consequences these parameterizations can have for the modeling of natural processes. For an ol-saturated liquid, any change in temperature (T) results in a change in liquid composition as ol either crystallizes from or dissolves into the liquid. The result is a strong covariation between liq composition and T, which makes it difficult to separate the effects of these two variables on the observed variations in DNi [e.g., 1]. We show how the correlation between the MgO contents of ol and liq and T can lead to an expression for DNi that appears to be independent of T. This is not an esoteric consideration; if T and liq composition vary independently in nature, a model that conflates their effects will give incorrect results. We model ol-liq DNi using the reaction of solid Mg2 SiO4 and liquid NiO to form solid Ni2 SiO4 and liq MgO (hereafter the exchange reaction)[e.g., 1]. We prefer an exchange reaction approach for the following reasons: (1) due to the small volume change of the reaction, it is not likely to be a strong function of pressure; and (2) the activity coefficient term is a ratio of the olivine coefficients and the liquid NiO and MgO coefficients, which is much more likely to be approximately constant over a wide range of compositions [e.g., 2]. Describing Ni partition coefficients using the exchange reaction leads to some

  20. Experimentally-determined carbon isotope fractionation in and between methane-bearing melt and fluid to upper mantle temperatures and pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mysen, Bjorn

    2016-07-01

    The behavior of melts and fluids is at the core of understanding formation and evolution of the Earth. To advance our understanding of their role, high-pressure/-temperature experiments were employed to determine melt and fluid structure together with carbon isotope partitioning within and between (CH4 +H2O +H2)-saturated aluminosilicate melts and (CH4 +H2O +H2)-fluids. The samples were characterized with vibrational spectroscopy while at temperatures and pressures from 475° to 850 °C and 92 to 1158 MPa, respectively. The solution equilibrium is 2CH4 +Qn = 2 CH3- +H2O +Q n + 1 where the superscript, n, in the Qn-notation describes silicate species where n denotes the number of bridging oxygen. The solution equilibrium affects the carbon isotope fractionation factor between melt and fluid, αmelt/fluid. Moreover, it is significantly temperature-dependent. The αmelt/fluid < 1 with temperatures less than about 1050 °C, and is greater than 1 at higher temperature. Methane-bearing melts can exist in the upper mantle at fO2 ≤fO2 (MW) (Mysen et al., 2011). Reduced (Csbnd H)-species in present-day upper mantle magma, therefore, are likely. During melting and crystallization in this environment, the δ13C of melts increases with temperature at a rate of ∼ 0.6 ‰ /°C. From the simple-system data presented here, at T ≤ 1050°C, melt in equilibrium with a peridotite-(CH4 +H2O +H2)-bearing mantle source will be isotopically lighter than fluid. At higher temperatures, melts will be isotopically heavier. Degassing at T ≤ 1050°C will shift δ13C of degassed magma to more positive values, whereas degassing at T ≥ 1050°C, will reduce the δ13C of the degassed magma.

  1. Mantle temperatures, and tests of experimentally calibrated olivine-melt equilibria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putirka, K. D.

    2005-12-01

    precise at both low and high MgO, and hydrous and non-hydrous systems compared to Beattie (1993) and Ford et al. (1983). Herzberg (pers. comm.) has modeled olivine-melt pairs for Hawaii and MOR's, which are in accord with Putirka (2005); these pairs are used to test for the effects of systematic model error on estimates of mantle temperatures. The Beattie (1993) and Ford (1983) models appear to predict too low a value for T (by 100-150 K), given comparisons of lnKd(Mg) v. 1/T(K) for experimental data, and the very low values for Kd(Mg) observed at Hawaii. The new calibrations indicate mantle equilibration temperatures of 1855 K at Hawaii and 1608 K at MOR's, in agreement with calculations by Putirka (2005). Excess temperatures at Hawaii thus likely exceed 200 K, as suggested by dynamic model predictions (Sleep, 1990; Schilling, 1991) for a thermal plume origin for the Hawaiian Islands and other hot spots.

  2. Shock temperatures in silica glass - Implications for modes of shock-induced deformation, phase transformation, and melting with pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitt, Douglas R.; Ahrens, Thomas J.

    1989-01-01

    Observations of shock-induced radiative thermal emissions are used to determine the gray body temperatures and emittances of silica glass under shock compression between 10 and 30 GPa. The results suggest that fused quartz deforms heterogeneously in this shock pressure range. It is shown that the 10-16 GPa range coincides with the permanent densification region, while the 16-30 GPa range coincides with the inferred mixed phase region along the silica glass Hugoniot. Low emittances in the mixed phase region are thought to represent the melting temperature of the high-pressure phase, stishovite. Also, consideration is given to the effects of pressure on melting relations for the system SiO2-Mg2SiO4.

  3. General principles of the synthesis of chalcogenides and pnictides in salt melts using a steady-state temperature gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chareev, D. A.

    2016-05-01

    The possibilities of growing crystals of metals, alloys, chalcogenides, and pnictides in halide melts using a steady-state temperature gradient are analyzed. Halides of alkali metals and aluminum can be used as transport media. The choice is determined by the melting temperature of salt mixtures. A conducting contour can also be applied to increase transport efficiency. This technique of crystal growth is similar to the electrochemical method. To eliminate interference during migration, some elements can be isolated and forced to migrate through independent channels to the crystal formation region. The technique considered here makes it possible to grow crystals of necessary quality without special equipment; the small crystal sizes are sufficient for laboratory study.

  4. Temperature Dependence of Electrical Resistance of Woven Melt-Infiltrated SiCf/SiC Ceramic Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Appleby, Matthew P.; Morscher, Gregory N.; Zhu, Dongming

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have successfully shown the use of electrical resistance (ER)measurements to monitor room temperature damage accumulation in SiC fiber reinforced SiC matrix composites (SiCf/SiC) Ceramic Matrix Composites (CMCs). In order to determine the feasibility of resistance monitoring at elevated temperatures, the present work investigates the temperature dependent electrical response of various MI (Melt Infiltrated)-CVI (Chemical Vapor Infiltrated) SiC/SiC composites containing Hi-Nicalon Type S, Tyranno ZMI and SA reinforcing fibers. Test were conducted using a commercially available isothermal testing apparatus as well as a novel, laser-based heating approach developed to more accurately simulate thermomechanical testing of CMCs. Secondly, a post-test inspection technique is demonstrated to show the effect of high-temperature exposure on electrical properties. Analysis was performed to determine the respective contribution of the fiber and matrix to the overall composite conductivity at elevated temperatures. It was concluded that because the silicon-rich matrix material dominates the electrical response at high temperature, ER monitoring would continue to be a feasible method for monitoring stress dependent matrix cracking of melt-infiltrated SiC/SiC composites under high temperature mechanical testing conditions. Finally, the effect of thermal gradients generated during localized heating of tensile coupons on overall electrical response of the composite is determined.

  5. Measurement of the Average Two-Dimensional Surface Temperature Distribution of Drops in a Melt Atomization Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirmse, Clemens; Chaves, Humberto

    2015-04-01

    During the production of metal and alloy powders by melt atomization, the knowledge of the surface temperature distribution of drops is essential. This paper shows the application of low-cost industrial CCD-cameras in connection with advanced image processing techniques to measure the average two-dimensional surface temperature distribution of drops in a melt atomization process. These measurements are necessary for comparison with the results of numerical investigations. The two-color pyrometer consists of two standard industrial CCD-cameras with appropriate optical filters. After calibration using a high-temperature furnace, the relative measurement error was smaller than 1.6% within the temperature range of 1273-1873 K. The pyrometer was applied to measure the average temperature distribution during the metal spraying process in a vacuum inert gas atomization facility. The measured temperature distribution averaged over 10 ms shows the development of a hollow cone spray of the atomized metal. The average axial distance between the atomization nozzle and the region of the liquidus temperature was found to be approximately 40 times the diameter of the atomization nozzle.

  6. Investigation of 10-Stage Axial-Flow X24C-2 Compressor. 1; Performance at Inlet Pressure of 21 Inches Mercury Absolute and Inlet Temperature of 538 R

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schum, Harold J.; Buckner, Howard A., Jr.

    1947-01-01

    The performance at inlet pressure of 21 inches mercury absolute and inlet temperature of 538 R for the 10-stage axial-flow X24C-2 compressor from the X24C-2 turbojet engine was investigated. the peak adiabatic temperature-rise efficiency for a given speed generally occurred at values of pressure coefficient fairly close to 0.35.For this compressor, the efficiency data at various speeds could be correlated on two converging curves by the use of a polytropic loss factor derived.

  7. Differential scanning calorimetric evaluation of human meibomian gland secretions and model lipid mixtures: transition temperatures and cooperativity of melting

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Hua; Wojtowicz, Jadwiga C.; Butovich, Igor A.

    2013-01-01

    Meibomian gland secretions (or meibum) are produced by holocrine meibomian glands and are secreted in melted form onto the ocular surface of humans and animals to form a protective tear film lipid layer (TFLL). Its protective effect strongly depends on the composition and, hence, thermotropic behavior of meibum. The goal of our study was to quantitatively evaluate the melting characteristics of human meibum and model lipid mixtures using differential scanning microcalorimetry. Standard calorimetric parameters, e.g. changes in calorimetric enthalpy, transition temperatures T(m), cooperativity of melting etc. were assessed. We found that thermotropic behavior of meibum resembled that of relatively simple mixtures of unsaturated wax esters, but showed a lower change in calorimetric enthalpy, which can be indicative of a looser packing of lipids in meibum compared with pure standards and their simple mixtures. The cooperativity of melting of meibomian lipids was comparable to that of an equimolar mixture of four oleic-acid based wax esters. We demonstrated that the phase transitions in meibum start at about 10 to 15 °C and end at 35-36 °C, with T(m) being about 30 °C. The highly asymmetrical shape of the thermotropic peak of meibum is important for the physiology and biophysics of TFLL. PMID:23578711

  8. Development of a simultaneous Hugoniot and temperature measurement for preheated-metal shock experiments: Melting temperatures of Ta at pressures of 100 GPa

    SciTech Connect

    Li Jun; Zhou Xianming; Li Jiabo; Wu Qiang; Cai Lingcang; Dai Chengda

    2012-05-15

    Equations of state of metals are important issues in earth science and planetary science. A major limitation of them is the lack of experimental data for determining pressure-volume and temperature of shocked metal simultaneously. By measuring them in a single experiment, a major source of systematic error is eliminated in determining from which shock pressure release pressure originates. Hence, a non-contact fast optical method was developed and demonstrated to simultaneously measure a Hugoniot pressure-volume (P{sub H}-V{sub H}) point and interfacial temperature T{sub R} on the release of Hugoniot pressure (P{sub R}) for preheated metals up to 1000 K. Experimental details in our investigation are (i) a Ni-Cr resistance coil field placed around the metal specimen to generate a controllable and stable heating source, (ii) a fiber-optic probe with an optical lens coupling system and optical pyrometer with ns time resolution to carry out non-contact fast optical measurements for determining P{sub H}-V{sub H} and T{sub R}. The shock response of preheated tantalum (Ta) at 773 K was investigated in our work. Measured data for shock velocity versus particle velocity at an initial state of room temperature was in agreement with previous shock compression results, while the measured shock data between 248 and 307 GPa initially heated to 773 K were below the Hugoniot evaluation from its off-Hugoniot states. Obtained interfacial temperatures on release of Hugoniot pressures (100-170 GPa) were in agreement with shock-melting points at initial ambient condition and ab initio calculations of melting curve. It indicates a good consistency for shock melting data of Ta at different initial temperatures. Our combined diagnostics for Hugoniot and temperature provides an important approach for studying EOS and the temperature effect of shocked metals. In particular, our measured melting temperatures of Ta address the current controversy about the difference by more than a factor of 2

  9. Development of a simultaneous Hugoniot and temperature measurement for preheated-metal shock experiments: melting temperatures of Ta at pressures of 100 GPa.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun; Zhou, Xianming; Li, Jiabo; Wu, Qiang; Cai, Lingcang; Dai, Chengda

    2012-05-01

    Equations of state of metals are important issues in earth science and planetary science. A major limitation of them is the lack of experimental data for determining pressure-volume and temperature of shocked metal simultaneously. By measuring them in a single experiment, a major source of systematic error is eliminated in determining from which shock pressure release pressure originates. Hence, a non-contact fast optical method was developed and demonstrated to simultaneously measure a Hugoniot pressure-volume (P(H)-V(H)) point and interfacial temperature T(R) on the release of Hugoniot pressure (P(R)) for preheated metals up to 1000 K. Experimental details in our investigation are (i) a Ni-Cr resistance coil field placed around the metal specimen to generate a controllable and stable heating source, (ii) a fiber-optic probe with an optical lens coupling system and optical pyrometer with ns time resolution to carry out non-contact fast optical measurements for determining P(H)-V(H) and T(R). The shock response of preheated tantalum (Ta) at 773 K was investigated in our work. Measured data for shock velocity versus particle velocity at an initial state of room temperature was in agreement with previous shock compression results, while the measured shock data between 248 and 307 GPa initially heated to 773 K were below the Hugoniot evaluation from its off-Hugoniot states. Obtained interfacial temperatures on release of Hugoniot pressures (100-170 GPa) were in agreement with shock-melting points at initial ambient condition and ab initio calculations of melting curve. It indicates a good consistency for shock melting data of Ta at different initial temperatures. Our combined diagnostics for Hugoniot and temperature provides an important approach for studying EOS and the temperature effect of shocked metals. In particular, our measured melting temperatures of Ta address the current controversy about the difference by more than a factor of 2 between the melting

  10. Development of a simultaneous Hugoniot and temperature measurement for preheated-metal shock experiments: melting temperatures of Ta at pressures of 100 GPa.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun; Zhou, Xianming; Li, Jiabo; Wu, Qiang; Cai, Lingcang; Dai, Chengda

    2012-05-01

    Equations of state of metals are important issues in earth science and planetary science. A major limitation of them is the lack of experimental data for determining pressure-volume and temperature of shocked metal simultaneously. By measuring them in a single experiment, a major source of systematic error is eliminated in determining from which shock pressure release pressure originates. Hence, a non-contact fast optical method was developed and demonstrated to simultaneously measure a Hugoniot pressure-volume (P(H)-V(H)) point and interfacial temperature T(R) on the release of Hugoniot pressure (P(R)) for preheated metals up to 1000 K. Experimental details in our investigation are (i) a Ni-Cr resistance coil field placed around the metal specimen to generate a controllable and stable heating source, (ii) a fiber-optic probe with an optical lens coupling system and optical pyrometer with ns time resolution to carry out non-contact fast optical measurements for determining P(H)-V(H) and T(R). The shock response of preheated tantalum (Ta) at 773 K was investigated in our work. Measured data for shock velocity versus particle velocity at an initial state of room temperature was in agreement with previous shock compression results, while the measured shock data between 248 and 307 GPa initially heated to 773 K were below the Hugoniot evaluation from its off-Hugoniot states. Obtained interfacial temperatures on release of Hugoniot pressures (100-170 GPa) were in agreement with shock-melting points at initial ambient condition and ab initio calculations of melting curve. It indicates a good consistency for shock melting data of Ta at different initial temperatures. Our combined diagnostics for Hugoniot and temperature provides an important approach for studying EOS and the temperature effect of shocked metals. In particular, our measured melting temperatures of Ta address the current controversy about the difference by more than a factor of 2 between the melting

  11. Shock compression behavior of bi-material powder composites with disparate melting temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, Kyle T.; Swift, Damian; Barham, Matthew; Stölken, James; Kuntz, Joshua; Kumar, Mukul

    2014-01-01

    Laser driven experiments were used to investigate the shock compression behavior of powder processed Bismuth/Tungsten (Bi/W) composite samples. The constituents provide different functionality to the composite behavior as Bi could be shock melted at the pressures attained in this work, while the W could not. Samples were prepared by uniaxial pressing, and the relative density was measured as a function of particle size, applied pressure, and composition for both hot and cold pressing conditions. This resulted in sample densities between 73% and 99% of the theoretical maximum density, and also noticeable differences in microstructure in the hot and cold pressed samples. The compression waves were generated with a 1.3 × 1.3 mm square spot directly onto the surface of the sample, using irradiances between 1012 and 1013 W/cm2, which resulted in calculated peak pressures between 50 and 150 GPa within a few micrometers. Sample recovery and post-mortem analysis revealed the formation of a crater on the laser drive surface, and the depth of this crater corresponded to the depth to which the Bi had been melted. The melt depth was found to be primarily a function of residual porosity and composition, and ranged from 167 to 528 μm. In general, a higher porosity led to a larger melt depth. Direct numerical simulations were performed, and indicated that the observed increase in melt depth for low-porosity samples could be largely attributed to increased heating associated with work done for pore collapse. However, the relative scaling was sensitive to composition, with low volume fraction Bi samples exhibiting a much stronger dependence on porosity than high Bi content samples. Select samples were repeated using an Al foil ablator, but there were no noticeable differences ensuring that the observed melting was indeed pressure-driven and was not a result of direct laser heating. The resultant microstructures and damage near the spall surface were also investigated

  12. High-melting lipid mixtures and the origin of detergent-resistant membranes studied with temperature-solubilization diagrams.

    PubMed

    Sot, Jesús; Manni, Marco M; Viguera, Ana R; Castañeda, Verónica; Cano, Ainara; Alonso, Cristina; Gil, David; Valle, Mikel; Alonso, Alicia; Goñi, Félix M

    2014-12-16

    The origin of resistance to detergent solubilization in certain membranes, or membrane components, is not clearly understood. We have studied the solubilization by Triton X-100 of binary mixtures composed of egg sphingomyelin (SM) and either ceramide, diacylglycerol, or cholesterol. Solubilization has been assayed in the 4-50°C range, and the results are summarized in a novel, to our knowledge, form of plots, that we have called temperature-solubilization diagrams. Despite using a large detergent excess (lipid/detergent 1:20 mol ratio) and extended solubilization times (24-48 h) certain mixtures were not amenable to Triton X-100 solubilization at one or more temperatures. DSC of all the lipid mixtures, and of all the lipid + detergent mixtures revealed that detergent resistance was associated with the presence of gel domains at the assay temperature. Once the system melted down, solubilization could occur. In general adding high-melting lipids limited the solubilization, whereas the addition of low-melting lipids promoted it. Lipidomic analysis of Madin-Darby canine kidney cell membranes and of the corresponding detergent-resistant fraction indicated a large enrichment of the nonsolubilized components in saturated diacylglycerol and ceramide. SM-cholesterol mixtures were special in that detergent solubilization was accompanied, for certain temperatures and compositions, by an independent phenomenon of reassembly of the partially solubilized lipid bilayers. The temperature at which lysis and reassembly prevailed was ∼25°C, thus for some SM-cholesterol mixtures solubilization occurred both above and below 25°C, but not at that temperature. These observations can be at the origin of the detergent resistance effects observed with cell membranes, and they also mean that cholesterol-containing detergent-resistant membrane remnants cannot correspond to structures existing in the native membrane before detergent addition.

  13. Thermal diffusivity of pyroxene, feldspar, and silica melts, glasses, and single-crystals at high temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pertermann, M.; Branlund, J.; Whittington, A.; Hofmeister, A.

    2007-12-01

    Thermal diffusivity (D) due to phonon transport (the lattice component) was measured using laser-flash analysis from oriented single-crystals and of glasses above the glass transition, which proxy as melts. Compositions include SiO2, CaMgSi2O6, LiAlSi2O6, NaAlSi3O8, and CaAl2Si2O8. KAlSi3O8 was studied previously. Viscosity measurements of the supercooled liquids, in the range 106.8 to 1012.3 Pas, confirm near-Arrhenian behavior. For all compositions and for crystal and glass, D decreases with T, approaching a constant generally near 1000 K: Dsat, which is larger in the crystal than in the glass. A rapid decrease in D as T is increased further (ca 1400 K for orthoclase) is consistent with crossing the glass transition, verified from our viscosity data on these systems. The amount of the decrease depends on the chemical composition and similar to the relative decrease observed in heat capacity. Orthoclase values for Dsat are 0.65± 0.3 mm2/s for bulk crystal and 0.53+/-0.03 mm2/s for the glass. Constant D = 0.475+/-.01 mm2/s represents melt. Thermal conductivity (klat) of orthoclase glass, calculated using previous results for heat capacity (CP) and our density data, increases with T due to CP strongly increasing with T, reaching a plateau near 1.45 W/m-K for melt, but is always below klat of the crystal. Similar results were obtained from the other systems studied. Melting of silica, pyroxene, and feldspars impedes heat transport, providing positive thermal feedback that may promote further melting in the continental crust. The consistency of the behavior for these different compositions and structures suggests that our results are universal, holding for oceanic lithosphere as well. Melts, due to being disordered, are poor transporters of heat via vibrations. However, d(ln klat)/dP depends inversely on bulk modulus, suggesting that at some high pressure, the thermal conductivity of the melt and corresponding crystal become equal so that retention of heat by melts

  14. Thermal behavior and temperature measurements of melting beryllium plasma-facing components exposed to high heat flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauthier, E.; Pocheau, C.; Kovari, M.; Barnard, J. M.; Crowley, B.; Godwin, J.; Lane, C.

    2015-08-01

    The emissivity of metallic materials is low and varies with temperature and wavelength inducing errors on surface temperature measurements. High heat flux experiments on beryllium were carried out to investigate the thermal behavior of bulk Be tiles. Thermal modeling aiming at determining the surface and bulk temperatures have been performed using ANSYS®. A Be tile was exposed to heat flux with power density ranging between 1 and 7 MW/m2. Surface temperatures were measured using an infrared camera in the 3-5 μm range and two-color pyrometers, one at short wavelengths (1.5-1.7 μm) and one at mid IR range wavelengths (2-4 μm) range. Both the IR camera and two-color pyrometers do not provide accurate temperature measurements on melted Be due to changes in the emissivities and emissivity ratio induced by surface modifications.

  15. Absolute Summ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Alfred, Jr.

    Summ means the entirety of the multiverse. It seems clear, from the inflation theories of A. Guth and others, that the creation of many universes is plausible. We argue that Absolute cosmological ideas, not unlike those of I. Newton, may be consistent with dynamic multiverse creations. As suggested in W. Heisenberg's uncertainty principle, and with the Anthropic Principle defended by S. Hawking, et al., human consciousness, buttressed by findings of neuroscience, may have to be considered in our models. Predictability, as A. Einstein realized with Invariants and General Relativity, may be required for new ideas to be part of physics. We present here a two postulate model geared to an Absolute Summ. The seedbed of this work is part of Akhnaton's philosophy (see S. Freud, Moses and Monotheism). Most important, however, is that the structure of human consciousness, manifest in Kenya's Rift Valley 200,000 years ago as Homo sapiens, who were the culmination of the six million year co-creation process of Hominins and Nature in Africa, allows us to do the physics that we do. .

  16. Investigation of the rate-controlling mechanism(s) for high temperature creep and the relationship between creep and melting by use of high pressure as a variable

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    Using high pressure as a variable, the rate-controlling mechanism for high temperature creep and the relationship between creep and melting is investigated for silicon and nickel. An apparatus is used in which the samples are heated to melting point and subjected to 1 to 3 GigaPascal pressure. The stress behavior of the materials are then studied.

  17. Volatile (F and Cl) concentrations in Iwate olivine-hosted melt inclusions indicating low-temperature subduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose-Koga, Estelle F.; Koga, Kenneth T.; Hamada, Morihisa; Hélouis, Thomas; Whitehouse, Martin J.; Shimizu, Nobumichi

    2014-12-01

    Investigation of olivine-hosted melt inclusions provides information about the abundance of volatile elements that are often lost during subaerial eruptions of lavas. We have measured the abundances of H2O, CO2, F, Cl, and S as well as Pb isotopes in 29 melt inclusions in the scoria of the 1686 eruption of the Iwate volcano, a frontal-arc volcano in the northeast Japan arc. Pb Isotope compositions identify that Iwate magma is derived from a mixture of depleted mantle, subducted basalt, and sediment. Systematics of F in comparison to MORB and other arc magma indicates that (1) the slab surface temperature must be among the lowest on Earth and (2) hydrous minerals, such as amphibole, humites, and/or mica, must be present as residual phases during the dehydration of the slab.

  18. Exploring the melting of a semirigid-chain polymer with temperature-resolved small-angle X-ray scattering.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, D A; Hocquet, S; Dosiére, M; Koch, M H J

    2004-04-01

    The thermal behavior of semirigid semicrystalline polymers differs significantly from that of flexible-chain polymers. The origin of the differences is believed to lie in the higher energy expenditure associated with the formation of adjacent re-entry folds at the crystalline surface in the case of semirigid chains. The effect of constraints imposed by the interlamellar amorphous regions on the neighboring crystals was studied with temperature-resolved synchrotron radiation small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). The analysis of SAXS patterns with a generalized paracrystalline lamellar stack model indicates that melting of a semirigid-chain polymer is not a random process but that the crystals grown in the smallest amorphous gaps melt first. This suggests that the hitherto largely neglected geometrical confinement effects may play an important role in determining the thermodynamic stability of semirigid-chain polymer crystals.

  19. Metal matrix-metal nanoparticle composites with tunable melting temperature and high thermal conductivity for phase-change thermal storage.

    PubMed

    Liu, Minglu; Ma, Yuanyu; Wu, Hsinwei; Wang, Robert Y

    2015-02-24

    Phase-change materials (PCMs) are of broad interest for thermal storage and management applications. For energy-dense storage with fast thermal charging/discharging rates, a PCM should have a suitable melting temperature, large enthalpy of fusion, and high thermal conductivity. To simultaneously accomplish these traits, we custom design nanocomposites consisting of phase-change Bi nanoparticles embedded in an Ag matrix. We precisely control nanoparticle size, shape, and volume fraction in the composite by separating the nanoparticle synthesis and nanocomposite formation steps. We demonstrate a 50-100% thermal energy density improvement relative to common organic PCMs with equivalent volume fraction. We also tune the melting temperature from 236-252 °C by varying nanoparticle diameter from 8.1-14.9 nm. Importantly, the silver matrix successfully prevents nanoparticle coalescence, and no melting changes are observed during 100 melt-freeze cycles. The nanocomposite's Ag matrix also leads to very high thermal conductivities. For example, the thermal conductivity of a composite with a 10% volume fraction of 13 nm Bi nanoparticles is 128 ± 23 W/m-K, which is several orders of magnitude higher than typical thermal storage materials. We complement these measurements with calculations using a modified effective medium approximation for nanoscale thermal transport. These calculations predict that the thermal conductivity of composites with 13 nm Bi nanoparticles varies from 142 to 47 W/m-K as the nanoparticle volume fraction changes from 10 to 35%. Larger nanoparticle diameters and/or smaller nanoparticle volume fractions lead to larger thermal conductivities.

  20. Metal matrix-metal nanoparticle composites with tunable melting temperature and high thermal conductivity for phase-change thermal storage.

    PubMed

    Liu, Minglu; Ma, Yuanyu; Wu, Hsinwei; Wang, Robert Y

    2015-02-24

    Phase-change materials (PCMs) are of broad interest for thermal storage and management applications. For energy-dense storage with fast thermal charging/discharging rates, a PCM should have a suitable melting temperature, large enthalpy of fusion, and high thermal conductivity. To simultaneously accomplish these traits, we custom design nanocomposites consisting of phase-change Bi nanoparticles embedded in an Ag matrix. We precisely control nanoparticle size, shape, and volume fraction in the composite by separating the nanoparticle synthesis and nanocomposite formation steps. We demonstrate a 50-100% thermal energy density improvement relative to common organic PCMs with equivalent volume fraction. We also tune the melting temperature from 236-252 °C by varying nanoparticle diameter from 8.1-14.9 nm. Importantly, the silver matrix successfully prevents nanoparticle coalescence, and no melting changes are observed during 100 melt-freeze cycles. The nanocomposite's Ag matrix also leads to very high thermal conductivities. For example, the thermal conductivity of a composite with a 10% volume fraction of 13 nm Bi nanoparticles is 128 ± 23 W/m-K, which is several orders of magnitude higher than typical thermal storage materials. We complement these measurements with calculations using a modified effective medium approximation for nanoscale thermal transport. These calculations predict that the thermal conductivity of composites with 13 nm Bi nanoparticles varies from 142 to 47 W/m-K as the nanoparticle volume fraction changes from 10 to 35%. Larger nanoparticle diameters and/or smaller nanoparticle volume fractions lead to larger thermal conductivities. PMID:25610944

  1. Shock compression behavior of bi-material powder composites with disparate melting temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, Kyle T.; Swift, Damian; Barham, Matthew; Stölken, James; Kuntz, Joshua; Kumar, Mukul

    2014-01-14

    Laser driven experiments were used to investigate the shock compression behavior of powder processed Bismuth/Tungsten (Bi/W) composite samples. The constituents provide different functionality to the composite behavior as Bi could be shock melted at the pressures attained in this work, while the W could not. Samples were prepared by uniaxial pressing, and the relative density was measured as a function of particle size, applied pressure, and composition for both hot and cold pressing conditions. This resulted in sample densities between 73% and 99% of the theoretical maximum density, and also noticeable differences in microstructure in the hot and cold pressed samples. The compression waves were generated with a 1.3 × 1.3 mm square spot directly onto the surface of the sample, using irradiances between 10{sup 12} and 10{sup 13} W/cm{sup 2}, which resulted in calculated peak pressures between 50 and 150 GPa within a few micrometers. Sample recovery and post-mortem analysis revealed the formation of a crater on the laser drive surface, and the depth of this crater corresponded to the depth to which the Bi had been melted. The melt depth was found to be primarily a function of residual porosity and composition, and ranged from 167 to 528 μm. In general, a higher porosity led to a larger melt depth. Direct numerical simulations were performed, and indicated that the observed increase in melt depth for low-porosity samples could be largely attributed to increased heating associated with work done for pore collapse. However, the relative scaling was sensitive to composition, with low volume fraction Bi samples exhibiting a much stronger dependence on porosity than high Bi content samples. Select samples were repeated using an Al foil ablator, but there were no noticeable differences ensuring that the observed melting was indeed pressure-driven and was not a result of direct laser heating. The resultant microstructures and damage near the spall surface were also

  2. Melting temperatures of H2O up to 72 GPa measured in a diamond anvil cell using CO2 laser heating technique.

    PubMed

    Kimura, T; Kuwayama, Y; Yagi, T

    2014-02-21

    The melting curve of H2O from 49 to 72 GPa was determined by using a laser-heated diamond anvil cell. Double-sided CO2 laser heating technique was employed in order to heat the sample directly. Discontinuous changes of the heating efficiency attributed to the H2O melting were observed between 49 and 72 GPa. The obtained melting temperatures at 49 and 72 GPa are 1200 and 1410 K, respectively. We found that the slope of the melting curve significantly decreases with increasing pressure, only 5 K/GPa at 72 GPa while 44 K/GPa at 49 GPa. Our results suggest that the melting curve does not intersect with the isentropes of Uranus and Neptune, and hence, H2O should remain in the liquid state even at the pressure and temperature conditions found deep within Uranus and Neptune. PMID:24559351

  3. Melting temperatures of H2O up to 72 GPa measured in a diamond anvil cell using CO2 laser heating technique.

    PubMed

    Kimura, T; Kuwayama, Y; Yagi, T

    2014-02-21

    The melting curve of H2O from 49 to 72 GPa was determined by using a laser-heated diamond anvil cell. Double-sided CO2 laser heating technique was employed in order to heat the sample directly. Discontinuous changes of the heating efficiency attributed to the H2O melting were observed between 49 and 72 GPa. The obtained melting temperatures at 49 and 72 GPa are 1200 and 1410 K, respectively. We found that the slope of the melting curve significantly decreases with increasing pressure, only 5 K/GPa at 72 GPa while 44 K/GPa at 49 GPa. Our results suggest that the melting curve does not intersect with the isentropes of Uranus and Neptune, and hence, H2O should remain in the liquid state even at the pressure and temperature conditions found deep within Uranus and Neptune.

  4. Non-linear effects of initial melt temperatures on microstructures and mechanical properties during quenching process of liquid Cu46Zr54 alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mo, Yun-Fei; Liu, Rang-Su; Tian, Ze-An; Liang, Yong-Chao; Zhang, Hai-Tao; Hou, Zhao-Yang; Liu, Hai-Rong; Zhang, Ai-long; Zhou, Li-Li; Peng, Ping; Xie, Zhong

    2015-05-01

    A MD simulation of liquid Cu46Zr54 alloys has been performed for understanding the effects of initial melt temperatures on the microstructural evolution and mechanical properties during quenching process. By using several microstructural analyzing methods, it is found that the icosahedral and defective icosahedral clusters play a key role in the microstructure transition. All the final solidification structures obtained at different initial melt temperatures are of amorphous structures, and their structural and mechanical properties are non-linearly related to the initial melt temperatures, and fluctuated in a certain range. Especially, there exists a best initial melt temperature, from which the glass configuration possesses the highest packing density, the optimal elastic constants, and the smaller extent of structural softening under deforming.

  5. Solubility and solution mechanisms of chlorine in aluminosilicate melts at high pressure and high temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalou, C.; Mysen, B. O.

    2012-12-01

    We address the effect of alkalies and aluminum on the solution behavior of Cl by combining solubility measurements of Cl and Raman data of Cl-bearing peralkaline aluminosilicate glasses (quenched melt). Six compositions along the join Na2Si3O7(NS3)-Na2(NaAl)3O7 and six compositions along the join K2Si3O7(KS3)-K2(KAl)3O7 were used. In order to isolate potential effects of Al/(Al+Si) from changes on melt polymerization, Al2O3 was exchanged with SiO2 in a charge-balanced form, NaAlO2 and KaAlO2 thus keeping approximately constant NBO/T (0.65 ± 0.02) for all melts (assuming Al3+ in 4-fold coordination in the melts). Starting materials were doped with 5wt% Cl in the form of PdCl2, which releases Cl2 as its gaseous phase during experiment. Samples were synthetized on piston-cylinder apparatus at 1600°C - 1.5 GPa. At the end of the experiments, Pd forms little spheres (1-2 μm) that for most part dissolves into the capsule. Chlorine oversaturation in the melts is ensured by the observation of bubbles in the quenched samples. The Cl solubility in Na-bearing systems is about twice that of the than in K-bearing system and may, therefore, be negatively correlated with ionic radius of the metal cation.. The solubility also decreases with Al/(Al+Si). In NS3 system, it decreases from 4.01 ± 0.13 wt% of Cl in Al-free systems to 1.87 ± 0.19 wt% of Cl for an Al/Al+Si ratio of 0.34. In KS3 system, this decrease is from 2.23 ± 0.08 wt% of Cl in Al-free systems to 0.62 ± 0.05 wt% of Cl for an Al/Al+Si ratio of 0.36. In Al-free systems, preliminary Raman data show the appearance of a peak around 465cm-1, that we assigned to alkali-Cl bonding. The intensity of this 465cm-1 peak increases with Al content confirming the role of Al in Cl solution mechanism.We also identify the molecular Cl peak at 1540cm-1. The peak can be detected only in Al-bearing melts. The Al substitution for Si results in increased abundance of three-dimensional cages on the melt structure into which molecular

  6. High-temperature corrosion of metals in the salt and metallic melts containing rare earths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpov, V. V.; Abramov, A. V.; Zhilyakov, A. Yu.; Belikov, S. V.; Volkovich, V. A.; Polovov, I. B.; Rebrin, O. I.

    2016-09-01

    A complex of independent methods was employed to study the corrosion resistance of molybdenum, zirconium, tantalum and tungsten in chloride, chloride-fluoride and fluoride-oxide melts based on LiCl, CaCl2, NaCl- KCl, LiF, and containing rare earths. Tests were conducted for 30 h at 750-1050 °C. The metals showed excellent corrosion resistance in fused chlorides (the corrosion rates were below 0.0005 g/(m2 h). Despite the presence of chemically active fluoride ions in the chloride-fluoride melts, the metals studied also showed very low corrosion rates, except molybdenum, for which the rate of corrosion was 0,8 g/(m2 h). The corrosion resistance of tantalum was considerably reduced in the fluoride-oxide melts; the corrosion rate was over 1 g/(m2 h) corresponding to the 8-th grade of stability and placing tantalum to the group of "low stability" materials.

  7. Relationships between membrane water molecules and Patman equilibration kinetics at temperatures far above the phosphatidylcholine melting point.

    PubMed

    Vaughn, Alexandra R; Bell, Thomas A; Gibbons, Elizabeth; Askew, Caitlin; Franchino, Hannabeth; Hirsche, Kelsey; Kemsley, Linea; Melchor, Stephanie; Moulton, Emma; Schwab, Morgan; Nelson, Jennifer; Bell, John D

    2015-04-01

    The naphthalene-based fluorescent probes Patman and Laurdan detect bilayer polarity at the level of the phospholipid glycerol backbone. This polarity increases with temperature in the liquid-crystalline phase of phosphatidylcholines and was observed even 90°C above the melting temperature. This study explores mechanisms associated with this phenomenon. Measurements of probe anisotropy and experiments conducted at 1M NaCl or KCl (to reduce water permittivity) revealed that this effect represents interactions of water molecules with the probes without proportional increases in probe mobility. Furthermore, comparison of emission spectra to Monte Carlo simulations indicated that the increased polarity represents elevation in probe access to water molecules rather than increased mobility of relevant bilayer waters. Equilibration of these probes with the membrane involves at least two steps which were distinguished by the membrane microenvironment reported by the probe. The difference in those microenvironments also changed with temperature in the liquid-crystalline phase in that the equilibrium state was less polar than the initial environment detected by Patman at temperatures near the melting point, more polar at higher temperatures, and again less polar as temperature was raised further. Laurdan also displayed this level of complexity during equilibration, although the relationship to temperature differed quantitatively from that experienced by Patman. This kinetic approach provides a novel way to study in molecular detail basic principles of what happens to the membrane environment around an individual amphipathic molecule as it penetrates the bilayer. Moreover, it provides evidence of unexpected and interesting membrane behaviors far from the phase transition.

  8. Evidence of liquid–liquid transition in glass-forming La50Al35Ni15 melt above liquidus temperature

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wei; Sandor, Magdalena T.; Yu, Yao; Ke, Hai-Bo; Zhang, Hua-Ping; Li, Mao-Zhi; Wang, Wei-Hua; Liu, Lin; Wu, Yue

    2015-01-01

    Liquid–liquid transition, a phase transition of one liquid phase to another with the same composition, provides a key opportunity for investigating the relationship between liquid structures and dynamics. Here we report experimental evidences of a liquid–liquid transition in glass-forming La50Al35Ni15 melt above its liquidus temperature by 27Al nuclear magnetic resonance including the temperature dependence of cage volume fluctuations and atomic diffusion. The observed dependence of the incubation time on the degree of undercooling is consistent with a first-order phase transition. Simulation results indicate that such transition is accompanied by the change of bond-orientational order without noticeable change in density. The temperature dependence of atomic diffusion revealed by simulations is also in agreement with experiments. These observations indicate the need of two-order parameters in describing phase transitions of liquids. PMID:26165855

  9. Metal-Silicate Partitioning of Bi, In, and Cd as a Function of Temperature and Melt Composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marin, Nicole; Righter, K.; Danielson, L.; Pando, K.; Lee, C.

    2013-01-01

    The origin of volatile elements in the Earth, Moon and Mars is not known; however, several theories have been proposed based on volatile elements such as In, As, Se, Te and Zn which are in lower concentration in the Earth, Moon, and Mars than in chondrites. Explanations for these low concentrations are based on two contrasting theories for the origin of Earth: equilibrium core formation versus late accretion. One idea is that the volatiles were added during growth of the planets and Moon, and some mobilized into the metallic core while others stayed in the mantle (e.g., [1]). The competing idea is that they were added to the mantles after core formation had completed (e.g., [2]). Testing these ideas involves quantitative modeling which can only be performed after data is obtained on the systematic metal-silicate partitioning behavior of volatile elements with temperature, pressure and melt composition. Until now, such data for Bi, In, and Cd has been lacking. After conducting a series of high pressure, high temperature experiments, the metal-silicate partition coefficients of Bi, In, and Cd as a function of temperature and melt composition can be used to evaluate potential conditions under which terrestrial planets differentiated into core and mantle, and how they acquired volatiles.

  10. Temperature of Earth's Deep Interior Constrained from Melting of Fe and Fe0.9Ni0.1 at High Pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, D.; Jackson, J. M.; Zhao, J.; Sturhahn, W.; Alp, E. E.; Hu, M. Y.; Toellner, T.; Murphy, C. A.; Prakapenka, V.

    2015-12-01

    The melting points of fcc- and hcp-structured Fe0.9Ni0.1 and Fe have been measured up to Mbar pressure. We use laser heated diamond anvil cells, time-resolved synchrotron Mössbauer spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction and a recently developed fast temperature readout spectrometer to carry out these measurements. X-ray photons at 57Fe's resonant energy with 1 meV bandwidth are focused on the sample in a laser heated diamond anvil cell, and when melting occurs, the characteristic Mössbauer signal abruptly decreases. Thus, time-resolved Mössbauer spectroscopy provides an excellent diagnostic for the first melt formed in the sample chamber. The thermal contributions of pressure of Fe0.9Ni0.1 and Fe have been constrained by combining nuclear resonant inelastic scattering and high temperature X-ray diffraction measurements. We find that the melting curve of Fe is systematically higher than the melting curve of Fe0.9Ni0.1, while the 1-σ temperature uncertainties of both melting curves overlap. The pressure dependencies of the melting temperature of fcc-structured Fe and Fe0.9Ni0.1 are measured, and the best-fit melting curves are located in the region bounded by previous studies. Our results may help reach a consensus on the high pressure melting curves of Fe and Fe-Ni alloys. We calculate the fcc-hcp-liquid triple points of Fe0.9Ni0.1and Fe, complemented by experiments with Mössbauer spectroscopy. The upper bound of Earth's inner core-outer core boundary temperature is estimated from our results, and the upper bound of the temperature at Earth's core-mantle boundary is computed with an adiabatic model. We discuss the implications of these temperatures on the phase relations of deep Earth materials. References:Murphy, C.A., J.M. Jackson, W. Sturhahn, and B. Chen (2011): Melting and thermal pressure of hcp-Fe from the phonon density of states, Phys. Earth Planet. Int., 188, 114-120 Jackson, J.M., W. Sturhahn, M. Lerche, J. Zhao, T.S. Toellner, E.E. Alp, S.V. Sinogeikin, J

  11. [New potentials for monitoring the temperature and the relative and absolute humidity of the air-oxygen mixture during the prolonged artificial ventilation of newborn infants].

    PubMed

    Milenin, O B; Efimov, M S

    1998-01-01

    A new HTM-902 monitor (UCCP, Germany/Serviceinstrument, Russia) was used for continuous measurements of the temperature and relative and absolute humidity of inspired gas during prolonged mechanical ventilation in 86 neonates with respiratory failure caused by the respiratory distress syndrome (n = 42), meconium aspiration syndrome (n = 28), and congenital pneumonia (n = 16). All measurements were performed with a special probe connected to the inspiratory contour through a standard adapter close to the patient's T-piece. The monitor helped maintain the optimal values of the inspired gas conditioning during assisted ventilation of the neonates. The optimal relationships between gas temperature and humidity can be attained only with humidifiers with a servocontrol of temperature and heated wire inside the inspiratory circle tube. For maintaining adequate humidity of inspired gas after any changes in the ventilator flow rate or in the temperature inside the incubator, the heating power of the humidifier had to be corrected. However, even with servocontrolled humidifiers and humidity regulation, an increase of temperature inside the incubator over 35 degrees C made impossible the maintenance of the inspired gas humidity at the level of 96-100% with its temperature at the level of the patient's T-piece no higher than 37 degrees C.

  12. Molybdenum Valence in Basaltic Silicate Melts: Effects of Temperature and Pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danielson, L. R.; Righter, K.; Newville, M.; Sutton, S.; Choi, Y.; Pando, K.

    2011-01-01

    The metal-silicate partitioning behavior of molybdenum has been used as a test for equilibrium core formation hypotheses [for example, 1-6]. However, current models that apply experimental data to equilibrium core-mantle differentiation infer the oxidation state of molybdenum from solubility data or from multivariable coefficients from metal-silicate partitioning data [1,3,7]. Molybdenum, a multi-valent element with a valence transition near the fO2 of interest for core formation (approx.IW-2) will be sensitive to changes in fO2 of the system and silicate melt structure. In a silicate melt, Mo can occur in either 4+ or 6+ valence state, and Mo(6+) can be either octahedrally or tetrahedrally coordinated. Here we present X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) measurements of Mo valence in basaltic run products at a range of P, T, and fO2 and further quantify the valence transition of Mo.

  13. Two-photon LIF on the HIT-SI3 experiment: Absolute density and temperature measurements of deuterium neutrals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, Drew; Sutherland, Derek; Siddiqui, Umair; Scime, Earl; Everson, Chris; Morgan, Kyle; Hossack, Aaron; Nelson, Brian; Jarboe, Tom

    2016-11-01

    Two-photon laser-induced fluorescence measurements were performed on the helicity injected torus (HIT-SI3) device to determine the density and temperature of the background neutral deuterium population. Measurements were taken in 2 ms long pulsed plasmas after the inductive helicity injectors were turned off. Attempts to measure neutrals during the main phase of the plasma were unsuccessful, likely due to the density of neutrals being below the detection threshold of the diagnostic. An unexpectedly low density of atomic deuterium was measured in the afterglow; roughly 100 times lower than the theoretical prediction of 1017 m-3. The neutral temperatures measured were on the order of 1 eV. Temporally and spatially resolved neutral density and temperature data are presented.

  14. Homogenization Temperature Measurements in Hydrothermal Diamond-Anvil Cell for Melt and Fluid Inclusions from the Jiajika Pegmatite Deposit, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J.; Chou, I.; Yuan, S.; Burruss, R. C.

    2009-12-01

    We measured the total homogenization temperatures (Th) of volatile-rich melt and fluid inclusions under elevated external pressures in a hydrothermal diamond-anvil cell (HDAC) to understand fluid evolution in the Jiajika pegmatite deposit in China, the largest spodumene deposit in Asia. Three types of inclusions were investigated: 1. CH4-H2O (~10 vol. %) bearing aluminosilicate melt inclusions hosted in quartz from granite; 2. CO2-NaCl-H2O (~80 vol. %) inclusions with daughter minerals mainly hosted in spodumene from pegmatite dikes; and 3. CO2-NaCl-H2O inclusions mainly hosted in quartz from pegmatite dikes. During normal microthermometric measurements at atmospheric pressure, most of these inclusions decrepitated at ~300°C. Therefore, we extended the method of Schmidt et al. (1998, Am. Mineral. 83, 995) and Darling and Bassett (2002, Am. Mineral., 87, 67) to melt inclusions in HDAC and conducted long-duration experiments with type 1 and 2 inclusions at one kbar Ar pressure in cold-seal pressure vessels (CSPV) as described by Thomas et al. (2006, Chapter 9 in Mineralogical Association of Canada Short Course, 36, 189). Results in both HDAC and CSPV experiments showed that Th's of type 1 and 2 inclusions were between 600 and 700 °C and between 500 and 700 °C, respectively. In HDAC experiments for type 1 inclusions, daughter minerals melted and coexisted with the fluid phase before total homogenization; however, in type 2 inclusions, daughter minerals dissolved completely in the CO2-NaCl-H2O solution at Th. Results obtained for type 3 inclusions showed that the CO2-rich and CO2-poor inclusions homogenized to liquid CO2 and aqueous phases at 260 - 570 and 240 - 350°C, respectively. Also, Th’s decrease linearly as the external pressure increases; the reduction of Th was ~1.5 °C/kbar, which is similar to ~1.2 °C/kbar reported by Darling and Bassett (ibid.) for the same type of natural fluid inclusions, but is much less than ~4.6 °C/kbar reported by Schmidt et

  15. Very high-temperature impact melt products as evidence for cosmic airbursts and impacts 12,900 years ago

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bunch, Ted E.; Hermes, Robert E.; Moore, Andrew M.T.; Kennett, Douglas J.; Weaver, James C.; Wittke, James H.; DeCarli, Paul S.; Bischoff, James L.; Hillman, Gordon C.; Howard, George A.; Kimbel, David R.; Kletetschka, Gunther; Lipo, Carl P.; Sakai, Sachiko; Revay, Zsolt; West, Allen; Firestone, Richard B.; Kennett, James P.

    2012-01-01

    It has been proposed that fragments of an asteroid or comet impacted Earth, deposited silica-and iron-rich microspherules and other proxies across several continents, and triggered the Younger Dryas cooling episode 12,900 years ago. Although many independent groups have confirmed the impact evidence, the hypothesis remains controversial because some groups have failed to do so. We examined sediment sequences from 18 dated Younger Dryas boundary (YDB) sites across three continents (North America, Europe, and Asia), spanning 12,000 km around nearly one-third of the planet. All sites display abundant microspherules in the YDB with none or few above and below. In addition, three sites (Abu Hureyra, Syria; Melrose, Pennsylvania; and Blackville, South Carolina) display vesicular, high-temperature, siliceous scoria-like objects, or SLOs, that match the spherules geochemically. We compared YDB objects with melt products from a known cosmic impact (Meteor Crater, Arizona) and from the 1945 Trinity nuclear airburst in Socorro, New Mexico, and found that all of these high-energy events produced material that is geochemically and morphologically comparable, including: (i) high-temperature, rapidly quenched microspherules and SLOs; (ii) corundum, mullite, and suessite (Fe3,/sup>Si), a rare meteoritic mineral that forms under high temperatures; (iii) melted SiO2 glass, or lechatelierite, with flow textures (or schlieren) that form at > 2,200 °C; and (iv) particles with features indicative of high-energy interparticle collisions. These results are inconsistent with anthropogenic, volcanic, authigenic, and cosmic materials, yet consistent with cosmic ejecta, supporting the hypothesis of extraterrestrial airbursts/impacts 12,900 years ago. The wide geographic distribution of SLOs is consistent with multiple impactors.

  16. Wear Properties of UHMWPE Orientedunder Uniaxial Compression during the Molten State and at Lower Temperatures than the Melting Point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohta, Makoto; Hyon, Suong-Hyu; Kang, Yu-Bong; Oka, Masanori; Tsutsumi, Sadami; Murakami, Syozo; Kohjiya, Shinzo

    Ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) has been used as a bearing material for artificial joints since the 1960's, and experience has shown that its wear is one of the limiting factors for long term use in such prosthetic implants. For improving wear resistance, we studied the influence of uniaxial compression on molecule orientation obtained by processing UHMWPE above (Sample A) and below (Sample B) its melting point, respectively. We then compared the wear properties of both UHMWPE samples. Using a slightly cross-linked UHMWPE, sample A was compressed during the molten state. Sample B UHMWPE was compressed at a temperature below the melting point. X-ray refraction tests revealed the (200) crystalline plane of Sample A and B to be oriented parallel to the compression surface. Further tests showed the heat of fusion and the density of Sample A to be higher than Sample B. The storage modulus of Sample A was always higher than in the original untreated UHMWPE (Sample C), while in Sample B it rapidly collapsed with increasing temperature. The αc-peak of Sample A was shifted to about 5°C higher, while the αc-peak of Sample B was shifted to the lower temperature side and the β-peak disappeared, compared with Sample C. Reciprocating wear tests carried out over 2×106 cycles, showed that the wear resistance of the sample A was enhanced by a factor of 10 when compared to Sample C. UHMWPE compressed during the molten state exhibits superior wear characteristics and has the potential to improve implant technology for artificial joints, potentially providing a longer lifetime.

  17. Mixing-to-eruption timescales: an integrated model combining numerical simulations and high-temperature experiments with natural melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montagna, Chiara; Perugini, Diego; De Campos, Christina; Longo, Antonella; Dingwell, Donald Bruce; Papale, Paolo

    2015-04-01

    Arrival of magma from depth into shallow reservoirs and associated mixing processes have been documented as possible triggers of explosive eruptions. Quantifying the timing from beginning of mixing to eruption is of fundamental importance in volcanology in order to put constraints about the possible onset of a new eruption. Here we integrate numerical simulations and high-temperature experiment performed with natural melts with the aim to attempt identifying the mixing-to-eruption timescales. We performed two-dimensional numerical simulations of the arrival of gas-rich magmas into shallow reservoirs. We solve the fluid dynamics for the two interacting magmas evaluating the space-time evolution of the physical properties of the mixture. Convection and mingling develop quickly into the chamber and feeding conduit/dyke. Over time scales of hours, the magmas in the reservoir appear to have mingled throughout, and convective patterns become harder to identify. High-temperature magma mixing experiments have been performed using a centrifuge and using basaltic and phonolitic melts from Campi Flegrei (Italy) as initial end-members. Concentration Variance Decay (CVD), an inevitable consequence of magma mixing, is exponential with time. The rate of CVD is a powerful new geochronometer for the time from mixing to eruption/quenching. The mingling-to-eruption time of three explosive volcanic eruptions from Campi Flegrei (Italy) yield durations on the order of tens of minutes. These results are in perfect agreement with the numerical simulations that suggest a maximum mixing time of a few hours to obtain a hybrid mixture. We show that integration of numerical simulation and high-temperature experiments can provide unprecedented results about mixing processes in volcanic systems. The combined application of numerical simulations and CVD geochronometer to the eruptive products of active volcanoes could be decisive for the preparation of hazard mitigation during volcanic unrest.

  18. Very high-temperature impact melt products as evidence for cosmic airbursts and impacts 12,900 years ago.

    PubMed

    Bunch, Ted E; Hermes, Robert E; Moore, Andrew M T; Kennett, Douglas J; Weaver, James C; Wittke, James H; DeCarli, Paul S; Bischoff, James L; Hillman, Gordon C; Howard, George A; Kimbel, David R; Kletetschka, Gunther; Lipo, Carl P; Sakai, Sachiko; Revay, Zsolt; West, Allen; Firestone, Richard B; Kennett, James P

    2012-07-10

    It has been proposed that fragments of an asteroid or comet impacted Earth, deposited silica- and iron-rich microspherules and other proxies across several continents, and triggered the Younger Dryas cooling episode 12,900 years ago. Although many independent groups have confirmed the impact evidence, the hypothesis remains controversial because some groups have failed to do so. We examined sediment sequences from 18 dated Younger Dryas boundary (YDB) sites across three continents (North America, Europe, and Asia), spanning 12,000 km around nearly one-third of the planet. All sites display abundant microspherules in the YDB with none or few above and below. In addition, three sites (Abu Hureyra, Syria; Melrose, Pennsylvania; and Blackville, South Carolina) display vesicular, high-temperature, siliceous scoria-like objects, or SLOs, that match the spherules geochemically. We compared YDB objects with melt products from a known cosmic impact (Meteor Crater, Arizona) and from the 1945 Trinity nuclear airburst in Socorro, New Mexico, and found that all of these high-energy events produced material that is geochemically and morphologically comparable, including: (i) high-temperature, rapidly quenched microspherules and SLOs; (ii) corundum, mullite, and suessite (Fe(3)Si), a rare meteoritic mineral that forms under high temperatures; (iii) melted SiO(2) glass, or lechatelierite, with flow textures (or schlieren) that form at > 2,200 °C; and (iv) particles with features indicative of high-energy interparticle collisions. These results are inconsistent with anthropogenic, volcanic, authigenic, and cosmic materials, yet consistent with cosmic ejecta, supporting the hypothesis of extraterrestrial airbursts/impacts 12,900 years ago. The wide geographic distribution of SLOs is consistent with multiple impactors.

  19. Induction heating pure vapor source of high temperature melting point materials on electron cyclotron resonance ion source.

    PubMed

    Kutsumi, Osamu; Kato, Yushi; Matsui, Yuuki; Kitagawa, Atsushi; Muramatsu, Masayuki; Uchida, Takashi; Yoshida, Yoshikazu; Sato, Fuminobu; Iida, Toshiyuki

    2010-02-01

    Multicharged ions that are needed are produced from solid pure material with high melting point in an electron cyclotron resonance ion source. We develop an evaporator by using induction heating (IH) with multilayer induction coil, which is made from bare molybdenum or tungsten wire without water cooling and surrounding the pure vaporized material. We optimize the shapes of induction coil and vaporized materials and operation of rf power supply. We conduct experiment to investigate the reproducibility and stability in the operation and heating efficiency. IH evaporator produces pure material vapor because materials directly heated by eddy currents have no contact with insulated materials, which are usually impurity gas sources. The power and the frequency of the induction currents range from 100 to 900 W and from 48 to 23 kHz, respectively. The working pressure is about 10(-4)-10(-3) Pa. We measure the temperature of the vaporized materials with different shapes, and compare them with the result of modeling. We estimate the efficiency of the IH vapor source. We are aiming at the evaporator's higher melting point material than that of iron. PMID:20192343

  20. Induction heating pure vapor source of high temperature melting point materials on electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Kutsumi, Osamu; Kato, Yushi; Matsui, Yuuki; Sato, Fuminobu; Iida, Toshiyuki; Kitagawa, Atsushi; Muramatsu, Masayuki; Uchida, Takashi; Yoshida, Yoshikazu

    2010-02-15

    Multicharged ions that are needed are produced from solid pure material with high melting point in an electron cyclotron resonance ion source. We develop an evaporator by using induction heating (IH) with multilayer induction coil, which is made from bare molybdenum or tungsten wire without water cooling and surrounding the pure vaporized material. We optimize the shapes of induction coil and vaporized materials and operation of rf power supply. We conduct experiment to investigate the reproducibility and stability in the operation and heating efficiency. IH evaporator produces pure material vapor because materials directly heated by eddy currents have no contact with insulated materials, which are usually impurity gas sources. The power and the frequency of the induction currents range from 100 to 900 W and from 48 to 23 kHz, respectively. The working pressure is about 10{sup -4}-10{sup -3} Pa. We measure the temperature of the vaporized materials with different shapes, and compare them with the result of modeling. We estimate the efficiency of the IH vapor source. We are aiming at the evaporator's higher melting point material than that of iron.

  1. A density-functional study of the phase diagram of cementite-type (Fe,Mn)3C at absolute zero temperature.

    PubMed

    Von Appen, Jörg; Eck, Bernhard; Dronskowski, Richard

    2010-11-15

    The phase diagram of (Fe(1-x) Mn(x))(3)C has been investigated by means of density-functional theory (DFT) calculations at absolute zero temperature. The atomic distributions of the metal atoms are not random-like as previously proposed but we find three different, ordered regions within the phase range. The key role is played by the 8d metal site which forms, as a function of the composition, differing magnetic layers, and these dominate the physical properties. We calculated the magnetic moments, the volumes, the enthalpies of mixing and formation of 13 different compositions and explain the changes of the macroscopic properties with changes in the electronic and magnetic structures by means of bonding analyses using the Crystal Orbital Hamilton Population (COHP) technique.

  2. Absolute rate of the reaction of O/3-P/ with hydrogen sulfide over the temperature range 263 to 495 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whytock, D. A.; Timmons, R. B.; Lee, J. H.; Michael, J. V.; Payne, W. A.; Stief, L. J.

    1976-01-01

    The technique of flash photolysis coupled with time resolved detection of O via resonance fluorescence has been used to obtain rate constants for the reaction of O(3-P) with H2S at temperatures from 263 to 495 K and at pressures in the range 10-400 torr. Under conditions where secondary reactions are avoided, the measured rate constants for the primary step obey the Arrhenius equation k = (7.24 plus or minus 1.07) x 10 to the -12th exp(-3300 plus or minus 100/1.987 T) cu cm/molecules/s. Experiments with D2S show that the reaction exhibits a primary isotope effect, in support of a hydrogen abstraction mechanism.

  3. Hot melt extrusion for amorphous solid dispersions: temperature and moisture activated drug-polymer interactions for enhanced stability.

    PubMed

    Sarode, Ashish L; Sandhu, Harpreet; Shah, Navnit; Malick, Waseem; Zia, Hossein

    2013-10-01

    Hot melt extrudates (HMEs) of indomethacin (IND) with Eudragit EPO and Kollidon VA 64 and those of itraconazole (ITZ) with HPMCAS-LF and Kollidon VA 64 were manufactured using a Leistritz twin screw extruder. The milled HMEs were stored at controlled temperature and humidity conditions. The samples were collected after specified time periods for 3 months. The stability of amorphous HMEs was assessed using moisture analysis, thermal evaluation, powder X-ray diffraction, FTIR, HPLC, and dissolution study. In general, the moisture content increased with time, temperature, and humidity levels. Amorphous ITZ was physically unstable at very high temperature and humidity levels, and its recrystallization was detected in the HMEs manufactured using Kollidon VA 64. Although physical stability of IND was better sustained by both Eudragit EPO and Kollidon VA 64, chemical degradation of the drug was identified in the stability samples of HMEs with Eudragit EPO stored at 50 °C. The dissolution rates and the supersaturation levels were significantly decreased for the stability samples in which crystallization was detected. Interestingly, the supersaturation was improved for the stability samples of IND:Eudragit EPO and ITZ:HPMCAS-LF, in which no physical or chemical instability was observed. This enhancement in supersaturation was attributed to the temperature and moisture activated electrostatic interactions between the drugs and their counterionic polymers. PMID:23961978

  4. Climatology of increased temperatures and melt at Swiss Camp, western slope of Greenland ice sheet, 1991-2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steffen, K.; McGrath, D.

    2013-12-01

    Climate observations (1991-2012) will be discussed from the Swiss Camp (69deg 33‧53″N, 49deg 19‧51″W, 1176 m), located at the western slope of the Greenland ice sheet, 60 km inland from Ilulissat. The mean annual temperature of -12 C increased 3.6 C between 1991 and 2012 (1.7 C per decade) with large interannual variability in all seasons. The mean spring temperature increased from -16.0 C to -13.8 C, and the fall temperature increased from -12.4 C to -11.3 C in the same time. The winter temperature showed the largest increase of 6.5 C, whereas summer temperatures increased 3.0 C during the 21 years (1991 - 2012). Radiation has been monitored continuously at Swiss Camp since 1993. Net radiation of 50 W/ m2 was recorded in 2012, the warmest summer month on record. The entire annual snow cover melted at Swiss Camp, reducing the monthly albedo value to 0.4 with bare ice exposed. Interannual variability of snow accumulation ranged between 0.07 and 0.70 m water equivalent, whereas annual snow and ice ablation varied between +0.35 (net gain) and -1.8 m (net loss) for the time period 1991-2012. The equilibrium line altitude (ELA) is no longer located at Swiss Camp (1176 m elevation) with a net surface lowering of 9.5 m since 1991. Increasing summer air temperatures have resulted in an upward migration of both the percolation facies and ablation area of the Greenland ice sheet. The 0°C isothermal migrated upward at a rate of 35 m/a over the 1995-2012 period in West Greenland. There is a 50% probability of the mean annual dry snow line migrating above Summit by 2025, at which time Summit will experience routine melt on an annual basis. The surface mass balance observations similarly indicate that the ELA has migrated upwards at a rate of 44 m/a over the 1997-2011 period in West Greenland, resulting in a more than doubling of the ablation zone width during this period. Inter-annual variability of monthly mean albedo at the Swiss Camp (1993 - 2012). Albedo at 0.5 is

  5. High temperature fluid-bed heat recovery for aluminum melting furnace

    SciTech Connect

    1982-12-01

    The objective of the study was to establish whether technical problems would be encountered in increasing the inlet temperature of the fluid bed heat exchanger unit at Alcoa above the 1100/sup 0/F target of the current contract. Specifically, the temperature range of up to, and potentially above, 1600/sup 0/F were investigated to establish the benefits of higher temperature, trade offs required, and plans to achieve that technology goal. The benefits are tabulated and are very significant, particularly at the temperature range of 1600 to 1800/sup 0/F. Relative to 1100/sup 0/F the heat recovery is increased by 24 to 29% at 1600 and 1800/sup 0/F respectively.

  6. Temporal variations in the mantle potential temperatures along the Northwest Hawaiian Ridge using olivine-liquid equilibria: Implications for Hawaiian plume melt flux variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tree, J. P.; Garcia, M. O.; Putirka, K. D.

    2013-12-01

    The Northwest Hawaiian Ridge extends 2800 km and comprises 47% of the total length of the Hawaiian-Emperor (H-E) Chain. The Ridge contains at least 52 volcanoes whose shape, volume, and distance from neighboring volcanoes vary markedly. The temporal melt flux variation of the H-E has been estimated with various geophysical methods involving fluid dynamics and lithospheric modeling. These models show a dramatic increase (up to 300%) in melt flux over the last 30 Myr. A potential explanation for the increase in melt flux is a temporal increase in the temperature of melting. Olivine thermometry offers the best method for evaluating mantle source temperature variations along the Ridge. An olivine-liquid equilibration temperature estimate can then be recast into a mantle potential temperature after accounting for the heat of fusion during mantle melting and decompression of the mantle as it follows an adiabat to the surface. New whole-rock XRF and olivine analyzes for 18 tholeiitic, three transitional tholeiites, and two picro-basalts from 11 volcanoes spanning the entire length of the Ridge from Middle Bank to Yuryaku (just south of the Bend) were made. These data were used to obtain a temperature estimate of the mantle during shield formation of each volcano. After screening samples for those in chemical equilibrium using a Rhodes diagram and assuming a Kdol-liq(Fe-Mg)=0.345 ×0.03, data from six volcanoes were input into the thermometers of Beattie (1993; Contrib. Mineral. Petr., 118, 103-111) and Putirka et al., (2007; Chemical Geology, 241, 177-206). The results were averaged to estimate mantle potential temperatures. These calculations yield mantle potential temperature estimates that vary positively with volcano volume (e.g., 1460oC at Yuryaku vs 1608-1630oC at Gardner Pinnacles, the largest volume seamount in the Ridge). These results suggest that temperature variations may be playing a significant role in modulating the melt flux of the Ridge. Seven more

  7. New experimental methodology, setup and LabView program for accurate absolute thermoelectric power and electrical resistivity measurements between 25 and 1600 K: Application to pure copper, platinum, tungsten, and nickel at very high temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Abadlia, L.; Mayoufi, M.; Gasser, F.; Khalouk, K.; Gasser, J. G.

    2014-09-15

    In this paper we describe an experimental setup designed to measure simultaneously and very accurately the resistivity and the absolute thermoelectric power, also called absolute thermopower or absolute Seebeck coefficient, of solid and liquid conductors/semiconductors over a wide range of temperatures (room temperature to 1600 K in present work). A careful analysis of the existing experimental data allowed us to extend the absolute thermoelectric power scale of platinum to the range 0-1800 K with two new polynomial expressions. The experimental device is controlled by a LabView program. A detailed description of the accurate dynamic measurement methodology is given in this paper. We measure the absolute thermoelectric power and the electrical resistivity and deduce with a good accuracy the thermal conductivity using the relations between the three electronic transport coefficients, going beyond the classical Wiedemann-Franz law. We use this experimental setup and methodology to give new very accurate results for pure copper, platinum, and nickel especially at very high temperatures. But resistivity and absolute thermopower measurement can be more than an objective in itself. Resistivity characterizes the bulk of a material while absolute thermoelectric power characterizes the material at the point where the electrical contact is established with a couple of metallic elements (forming a thermocouple). In a forthcoming paper we will show that the measurement of resistivity and absolute thermoelectric power characterizes advantageously the (change of) phase, probably as well as DSC (if not better), since the change of phases can be easily followed during several hours/days at constant temperature.

  8. New experimental methodology, setup and LabView program for accurate absolute thermoelectric power and electrical resistivity measurements between 25 and 1600 K: application to pure copper, platinum, tungsten, and nickel at very high temperatures.

    PubMed

    Abadlia, L; Gasser, F; Khalouk, K; Mayoufi, M; Gasser, J G

    2014-09-01

    In this paper we describe an experimental setup designed to measure simultaneously and very accurately the resistivity and the absolute thermoelectric power, also called absolute thermopower or absolute Seebeck coefficient, of solid and liquid conductors/semiconductors over a wide range of temperatures (room temperature to 1600 K in present work). A careful analysis of the existing experimental data allowed us to extend the absolute thermoelectric power scale of platinum to the range 0-1800 K with two new polynomial expressions. The experimental device is controlled by a LabView program. A detailed description of the accurate dynamic measurement methodology is given in this paper. We measure the absolute thermoelectric power and the electrical resistivity and deduce with a good accuracy the thermal conductivity using the relations between the three electronic transport coefficients, going beyond the classical Wiedemann-Franz law. We use this experimental setup and methodology to give new very accurate results for pure copper, platinum, and nickel especially at very high temperatures. But resistivity and absolute thermopower measurement can be more than an objective in itself. Resistivity characterizes the bulk of a material while absolute thermoelectric power characterizes the material at the point where the electrical contact is established with a couple of metallic elements (forming a thermocouple). In a forthcoming paper we will show that the measurement of resistivity and absolute thermoelectric power characterizes advantageously the (change of) phase, probably as well as DSC (if not better), since the change of phases can be easily followed during several hours/days at constant temperature.

  9. Investigation of Biodiesel Through Photopyroelectric and Dielectric-Constant Measurements as a Function of Temperature: Freezing/Melting Interval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanelato, E. B.; Machado, F. A. L.; Rangel, A. B.; Guimarães, A. O.; Vargas, H.; da Silva, E. C.; Mansanares, A. M.

    2015-06-01

    Biodiesel is a promising option for alternative fuels since it derives from natural and renewable materials; it is biodegradable and less polluting than fossil fuels. A gradual replacement of diesel by biodiesel has been adopted by many countries, making necessary the investigation of the physical properties of biodiesel and of its mixture in diesel. Photothermal techniques, specifically the photopyroelectric technique (PPE), have proved to be suitable in the characterization of biodiesel and of its precursor oils, as well as of the biodiesel/diesel mixtures. In this paper, we investigate thermal and electrical properties of animal fat-based biodiesel as a function of temperature, aiming to characterize the freezing/melting interval and the changes in the physical properties from the solid to the liquid phase. The samples were prepared using the transesterification method, by the ethylic route. Optical transmittance experiments were carried out in order to confirm the phase transition interval. Solid and liquid phases present distinct thermal diffusivities and conductivities, as well as dielectric constants. The PPE signal amplitude is governed by the changes in the thermal diffusivity/conductivity. As a consequence, the amplitude of the signal becomes like a step function, which is smoothed and sometimes delayed by the nucleation processes during cooling. A similar behavior is found in the dielectric constant data, which is higher in the liquid phase since the molecules have a higher degree of freedom. Both methods (PPE/dielectric constant) proved to be useful in the characterization of the freezing/melting interval, as well as to establish the distinction in the physical properties of solid and liquid phases. The methodology allowed a discussion of the cloud point and the pour point of the samples in the temperature variation interval.

  10. Temperature dependence of the crystal-liquid interfacial free energy and the endpoint of the melting line

    SciTech Connect

    Baidakov, Vladimir G. Protsenko, Sergey P.; Tipeev, Azat O.

    2013-12-14

    The crystal–liquid interfacial free energy γ has been calculated as a function of the crystal orientation in a molecular dynamics experiment in a system of Lennard-Jones (LJ) particles with a cutoff radius of the potential r{sub c}{sup *}=r{sub c}/σ=6.78 at a triple-point temperature T{sub t}{sup *}=k{sub B}T{sub t}/ε=0.692 and temperatures above (in the region of the stable coexistence of liquid and solid phases) and below (metastable continuation of the coexistence curve of liquid and solid phases) the temperature T{sub t}{sup *}. At T{sup *}=T{sub t}{sup *}, for determining γ use was made of the method of cleaving potential. The temperature dependence of γ on the crystal–liquid coexistence curve has been determined by the Gibbs-Cahn thermodynamic integration method. In the region of stable phase coexistence (T{sup *}>T{sub t}{sup *}) good agreement with the data of Davidchack and Laird [J. Chem. Phys. 118, 7651 (2003)] has been obtained with respect to the character of the temperature dependence of γ and the orientation anisotropy. In the region of metastable phase coexistence (T{sup *}melting line (T{sub K}{sup *}=0.529) (the existence of which was established first by Baidakov and Protsenko [Phys. Rev. Lett. 95, 015701 (2005)]) the interfacial free energy decreases, approaching at T{sup *}=T{sub K}{sup *} the orientation-averaged value γ{sub 0K}{sup *}=γ{sub 0K}σ{sup 2}/ε=0.365. The paper discusses the behavior of the excess interfacial energy, excess interfacial entropy and excess interfacial stress on the metastable extension of the melting line and close to T{sup *}=T{sub K}{sup *}.

  11. Electronic correlations determine the phase stability of iron up to the melting temperature

    PubMed Central

    Leonov, I.; Poteryaev, A. I.; Gornostyrev, Yu. N.; Lichtenstein, A. I.; Katsnelson, M. I.; Anisimov, V. I.; Vollhardt, D.

    2014-01-01

    We present theoretical results on the high-temperature phase stability and phonon spectra of paramagnetic bcc iron which explicitly take into account many-body effects. Several peculiarities, including a pronounced softening of the [110] transverse (T1) mode and a dynamical instability of the bcc lattice in harmonic approximation are identified. We relate these features to the α-to-γ and γ-to-δ phase transformations in iron. The high-temperature bcc phase is found to be highly anharmonic and appears to be stabilized by the lattice entropy. PMID:24998330

  12. Thermodynamics of Oligonucleotide Duplex Melting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schreiber-Gosche, Sherrie; Edwards, Robert A.

    2009-01-01

    Melting temperatures of oligonucleotides are useful for a number of molecular biology applications, such as the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Although melting temperatures are often calculated with simplistic empirical equations, application of thermodynamics provides more accurate melting temperatures and an opportunity for students to apply…

  13. Microstructure and elevated temperature wear behavior of induction melted Fe-based composite coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Ge; Meng, Huimin; Liu, Junyou

    2014-10-01

    Fe-based composite coating prepared onto the component of guide wheel using ultrasonic frequency inductive cladding (UFIC) technique has been investigated in terms of microstructure, phase constitutions, microhardness and elevated temperature wear behavior by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive spectrometer (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Vickers microhardness tester and ball-on-disc wear tester. The results indicated that the primary phase in the coating contained austenite γ-Fe, eutectic γ-Fe/(Cr,Fe)2B, boride (Cr,Fe)2B and precipitation enriched in Mo. The average microhardness of the coating was 760 ± 10 HV0.2, which was three times higher than that of the substrate. With increasing temperature, the friction coefficients of the coating and high-chromium cast iron decreased gradually while the wear rates increased during dry sliding wear condition. The relative wear resistance of the coating was 1.63 times higher than that of the high-chromium cast iron at 500 °C, which was ascribed to the hard borides with high thermal stability uniformly embedded in the coating and the formation of dense transfer layer formed onto the worn surface. The high temperature wear mechanism of the coating was dominated by mild abrasive wear. The study revealed that Fe-based composite coating had excellent high temperature wear resistance under dry sliding wear condition.

  14. Does Ice Dissolve or Does Halite Melt? A Low-Temperature Liquidus Experiment for Petrology Classes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brady, John B.

    1992-01-01

    Measurement of the compositions and temperatures of H2O-NaCl brines in equilibrium with ice can be used as an easy in-class experimental determination of a liquidus. This experiment emphasizes the symmetry of the behavior of brines with regard to the minerals ice and halite and helps to free students from the conceptual tethers of one-component…

  15. 46 CFR 153.908 - Cargo viscosity and melting point information; measuring cargo temperature during discharge...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... sensor or thermometer required by § 153.440(a)(3) or (c). If a portable thermometer is used, it must be located as prescribed for the temperature sensor in § 153.440(a)(3). (2) A total of 2 readings must...

  16. Satellite-derived, melt-season surface temperature of the Greenland Ice Sheet (2000-2005) and its relationship to mass balance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hall, D.K.; Williams, R.S.; Casey, K.A.; DiGirolamo, N.E.; Wan, Z.

    2006-01-01

    Mean, clear-sky surface temperature of the Greenland Ice Sheet was measured for each melt season from 2000 to 2005 using Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS)-derived land-surface temperature (LST) data-product maps. During the period of most-active melt, the mean, clear-sky surface temperature of the ice sheet was highest in 2002 (-8.29 ?? 5.29??C) and 2005 (-8.29 ?? 5.43??C), compared to a 6-year mean of -9.04 ?? 5.59??C, in agreement with recent work by other investigators showing unusually extensive melt in 2002 and 2005. Surface-temperature variability shows a correspondence with the dry-snow facies of the ice sheet; a reduction in area of the dry-snow facies would indicate a more-negative mass balance. Surface-temperature variability generally increased during the study period and is most pronounced in the 2005 melt season; this is consistent with surface instability caused by air-temperature fluctuations. Copyright 2006 by the American Geophysical Union.

  17. Predicting critical temperatures of ionic and non-ionic fluids from thermophysical data obtained near the melting point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Volker C.

    2015-10-01

    In the correlation and prediction of thermophysical data of fluids based on a corresponding-states approach, the critical temperature Tc plays a central role. For some fluids, in particular ionic ones, however, the critical region is difficult or even impossible to access experimentally. For molten salts, Tc is on the order of 3000 K, which makes accurate measurements a challenging task. Room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) decompose thermally between 400 K and 600 K due to their organic constituents; this range of temperatures is hundreds of degrees below recent estimates of their Tc. In both cases, reliable methods to deduce Tc based on extrapolations of experimental data recorded at much lower temperatures near the triple or melting points are needed and useful because the critical point influences the fluid's behavior in the entire liquid region. Here, we propose to employ the scaling approach leading to universal fluid behavior [Román et al., J. Chem. Phys. 123, 124512 (2005)] to derive a very simple expression that allows one to estimate Tc from the density of the liquid, the surface tension, or the enthalpy of vaporization measured in a very narrow range of low temperatures. We demonstrate the validity of the approach for simple and polar neutral fluids, for which Tc is known, and then use the methodology to obtain estimates of Tc for ionic fluids. When comparing these estimates to those reported in the literature, good agreement is found for RTILs, whereas the ones for the molten salts NaCl and KCl are lower than previous estimates by 10%. The coexistence curve for ionic fluids is found to be more adequately described by an effective exponent of βeff = 0.5 than by βeff = 0.33.

  18. Predicting critical temperatures of ionic and non-ionic fluids from thermophysical data obtained near the melting point.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Volker C

    2015-10-14

    In the correlation and prediction of thermophysical data of fluids based on a corresponding-states approach, the critical temperature Tc plays a central role. For some fluids, in particular ionic ones, however, the critical region is difficult or even impossible to access experimentally. For molten salts, Tc is on the order of 3000 K, which makes accurate measurements a challenging task. Room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) decompose thermally between 400 K and 600 K due to their organic constituents; this range of temperatures is hundreds of degrees below recent estimates of their Tc. In both cases, reliable methods to deduce Tc based on extrapolations of experimental data recorded at much lower temperatures near the triple or melting points are needed and useful because the critical point influences the fluid's behavior in the entire liquid region. Here, we propose to employ the scaling approach leading to universal fluid behavior [Román et al., J. Chem. Phys. 123, 124512 (2005)] to derive a very simple expression that allows one to estimate Tc from the density of the liquid, the surface tension, or the enthalpy of vaporization measured in a very narrow range of low temperatures. We demonstrate the validity of the approach for simple and polar neutral fluids, for which Tc is known, and then use the methodology to obtain estimates of Tc for ionic fluids. When comparing these estimates to those reported in the literature, good agreement is found for RTILs, whereas the ones for the molten salts NaCl and KCl are lower than previous estimates by 10%. The coexistence curve for ionic fluids is found to be more adequately described by an effective exponent of βeff = 0.5 than by βeff = 0.33.

  19. Platinum group metal particles aggregation in nuclear glass melts under the effect of temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanotin, Caroline; Puig, Jean; Neyret, Muriel; Marchal, Philippe

    2016-08-01

    The viscosity of simulated high level radioactive waste glasses containing platinum group metal particles is studied over a wide range of shear stress, as a function of the particles content and the temperature, thanks to a stress imposed rheometer, coupled to a high-temperature furnace. The system shows a very shear thinning behavior. At high shear rate, the system behaves as a suspension of small clusters and individual particles and is entirely controlled by the viscosity of the glass matrix as classical suspensions. At low shear rate, above a certain fraction in platinum group metal particles, the apparition of macroscopic aggregates made up of chains of RuO2 particles separated by thin layers of glass matrix strongly influences the viscosity of the nuclear glass and leads, in particular, to the apparition of yield stress and thixotropic effects. The maximum size of these clusters as well as their effective volume fraction have been estimated by a balance between Van der Waals attractive forces and hydrodynamic forces due to shear flow. We showed experimentally and theoretically that this aggregation phenomenon is favored by an increase of the temperature, owing to the viscosity decrease of the glass matrix, leading to an unusual increase of the suspension viscosity.

  20. Temperature measurements of partially-melted tin as a function of shock pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Seifter, Achim; Furlanetto, Michael R; Holtkamp, David B; Obst, Andrew W; Payton, J R; Stone, J B; Tabaka, L J; Grover, M; Macrum, G; Stevens, G D; Swift, D C; Turley, W D; Veeser, L R

    2009-01-01

    Equilibrium equation of state theory predicts that the free surface release temperature of shock loaded tin will show a plateau of 505 K in the pressure range from 19.5 to 33.0 GPa, corresponding to the solid-liquid mixed-phase region. In this paper we report free surface temperature measurements on shock-loaded tin from 15 to 31 GPa using multi-wavelength optical pyrometry. The shock waves were generated by direct contact of detonating high explosive with the sample. The pressure in the sample was determined by free surface velocity measurements using Photon Doppler Velocimetry. The emitted thermal radiance was measured at four wavelength bands in the near IR region from 1.5 to 5.0 {micro}m. The samples in most of the experiments had diamond-turned surface finishes, with a few samples being polished or ball rolled. At pressures higher than 25 GPa the measured free surface temperatures were higher than the predicted 505 K and increased with increasing pressure. This deviation could be explained by hot spots and/or variations in surface emissivity and requires a further investigation.

  1. Metal-Hydrogen Phase Diagrams in the Vicinity of Melting Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Shapovalov, V.I.

    1999-01-06

    Hydrogen-metal interaction phenomena belong to the most exciting challenges of today's physical metallurgy and physics of solids due to the uncommon behavior of hydrogen in condensed media and to the need for understanding hydrogen's strong negative impact on properties of some high-strength steels and.alloys. The paper cites and summarizes research data on fundamental thermodynamic characteristics of hydrogen in some metals that absorb it endothermally at elevated temperatures. For a number of metal-hydrogen systems, information on some phase diagrams previously not available to the English-speaking scientific community is presented.

  2. Evaluation of post-polymerase chain reaction melting temperature analysis for meat species identification in mixed DNA samples.

    PubMed

    López-Andreo, María; Garrido-Pertierra, Amando; Puyet, Antonio

    2006-10-18

    Real-time uniplex and duplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays with a SYBR Green I post-PCR melting curve analysis were evaluated for the identification and quantification of bovine, porcine, horse, and wallaroo DNA in food products. Quantitative values were derived from threshold-cycle (C(t)) data obtained from serial dilutions of purified DNA. The limits of detection in uniplex reactions were 0.04 pg for porcine and wallaroo DNA and 0.4 pg for cattle and horse DNA. Species specificity of the PCR products was tested by the identification of peaks in DNA melting curves, measured as the decrease of SYBR Green I fluorescence at the dissociation temperature. The peaks could be distinguished above the background even at the lowest amount of template DNA detected by the C(t) method. The system was also tested in duplex reactions, by use of either single-species DNA or DNA admixtures containing different shares of two species. The minimum proportions of each DNA species allowing the resolution of T(m) peaks in the duplex reactions were 5% (cattle or wallaroo) in cattle/wallaroo mixtures, 5% porcine and 1% horse in porcine/horse mixtures, 60% porcine and 1% wallaroo in porcine/wallaroo mixtures, and 1% cattle and 5% horse in cattle/horse mixtures. A loss in the sensitivity of the method was observed for some DNA combinations in the duplex assay. In contrast, the results obtained from SYBR Green I uniplex and duplex reactions with single-species DNA were largely comparable to those obtained previously with species-specific TaqMan probes, showing the suitability of that simpler experimental approach for large-scale analytical applications.

  3. Gallium melts under high-pressure and temperature conditions: Synchrotron x-ray tomography and diffraction studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, L. L.; Liu, H.

    2014-12-01

    Gallium has a rare water-ice type P-V-T phase diagram in which the density of Ga melt exceeds by about 3 % that of the stable solid Ga phase I at ambient pressure. Liquid gallium, which is easily supercooled, can remain in a metastable liquid state for several months at ambient pressure. A rich polymorphism and metastable modifications of Ga have been discovered in P-T domain. There are a number of studies of liquid gallium under high pressure conditions, but some fundamental properties, such as the equation of state (EoS) of liquid Ga under extreme conditions remain unclear. Very recently, the advanced pair distribution function (PDF) method in which synchrotron high-energy x-ray total scattering data, combined with reverse Monte Carlo simulation, was used to study the microstructure and EoS of liquid gallium under high pressure conditions. However, the application of PDF method for amorphous or liquid samples under pressure conditions normally required a priori knowledge of their EoS. The density estimation from the reverse Monte Carlo simulation with the best mathematical fit to the measured structure factor data could cause big errors if it is calculated without knowing the EoS. In the paper, the volume change of liquid and solid gallium have been studied as a function of pressure and temperature up to 3.63 GPa using synchrotron x-ray microtomography combined with energy dispersive x-ray diffraction (EDXRD) techniques. Two sets of directly measured P-V data at 300 K and 330 K were obtained from 3D tomography reconstruction data. The existence of a liquid-liquid phase transition region is proposed based on the abnormal compressibility of Ga melt at about 2.44 GPa and 330 K conditions.

  4. Selective laser melting additive manufactured Inconel 718 superalloy parts: High-temperature oxidation property and its mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Qingbo; Gu, Dongdong

    2014-10-01

    This work presented a comprehensive study of high-temperature oxidation behaviors and mechanisms of Selective laser melting (SLM) processed Inconel 718 superalloy parts using different methods including isothermal oxidation testing, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The experimental results revealed that the oxidation process of the tested parts processed at a lower volumetric laser energy density experienced the severe spallation. On reasonably increasing the applied volumetric laser energy density, the oxidation kinetics of the as-produced parts obeyed a parabolic law, exhibiting the significantly improved oxidation resistance performance. The constitutional phases within the oxidation film were identified and the corresponding formation mechanisms were elucidated in detail according to the thermodynamic principles. The cross-sectional morphologies of oxidized Inconel 718 parts indicated that the oxidation microstructure mainly consisted of an external oxidation layer and an internal oxidation zone. The oxidation process was controlled by the outward diffusion of oxide forming elements and inward penetration of oxygen, by which the interaction mechanisms between the microstructures and internal oxidation zones were clarified. On the basis of the experimental results and theoretical analyses, the physical oxidation mechanisms were accordingly established to illustrate the oxidation behaviors of SLM-processed Inconel 718 parts at elevated operative temperatures.

  5. Reduction in mechanical anisotropy through high temperature heat treatment of Hastelloy X processed by Selective Laser Melting (SLM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etter, T.; Kunze, K.; Geiger, F.; Meidani, H.

    2015-04-01

    Selective Laser Melting (SLM) is an additive manufacturing technology used to directly produce metallic parts from thin powder layers. To evaluate the anisotropic mechanical properties, tensile test specimens of the Ni-base alloy Hastelloy X were built with the loading direction oriented either parallel (z-specimens) or perpendicular to the build-up direction (xy- specimens). Specimens were investigated in the “as-built” condition and after high temperature heat treatment. Tensile tests at room temperature and at 850°C of “as-built” material have shown different mechanical properties for z- and xy-specimens. The anisotropy is reflected in the Young's modulus, with lower values measured parallel to the build-up direction. It is shown that the anisotropy is significantly reduced by a subsequent recrystallization heat treatment. The characterization of microstructural and textural anisotropy was done by Electron Back Scatter Diffraction (EBSD) analysis. Predictions of Young's modulus calculated from the measured textures compare well with the data from tensile tests.

  6. Contributed Review: Absolute spectral radiance calibration of fiber-optic shock-temperature pyrometers using a coiled-coil irradiance standard lamp.

    PubMed

    Fat'yanov, O V; Asimow, P D

    2015-10-01

    We describe an accurate and precise calibration procedure for multichannel optical pyrometers such as the 6-channel, 3-ns temporal resolution instrument used in the Caltech experimental geophysics laboratory. We begin with a review of calibration sources for shock temperatures in the 3000-30,000 K range. High-power, coiled tungsten halogen standards of spectral irradiance appear to be the only practical alternative to NIST-traceable tungsten ribbon lamps, which are no longer available with large enough calibrated area. However, non-uniform radiance complicates the use of such coiled lamps for reliable and reproducible calibration of pyrometers that employ imaging or relay optics. Careful analysis of documented methods of shock pyrometer calibration to coiled irradiance standard lamps shows that only one technique, not directly applicable in our case, is free of major radiometric errors. We provide a detailed description of the modified Caltech pyrometer instrument and a procedure for its absolute spectral radiance calibration, accurate to ±5%. We employ a designated central area of a 0.7× demagnified image of a coiled-coil tungsten halogen lamp filament, cross-calibrated against a NIST-traceable tungsten ribbon lamp. We give the results of the cross-calibration along with descriptions of the optical arrangement, data acquisition, and processing. We describe a procedure to characterize the difference between the static and dynamic response of amplified photodetectors, allowing time-dependent photodiode correction factors for spectral radiance histories from shock experiments. We validate correct operation of the modified Caltech pyrometer with actual shock temperature experiments on single-crystal NaCl and MgO and obtain very good agreement with the literature data for these substances. We conclude with a summary of the most essential requirements for error-free calibration of a fiber-optic shock-temperature pyrometer using a high-power coiled tungsten halogen

  7. Contributed Review: Absolute spectral radiance calibration of fiber-optic shock-temperature pyrometers using a coiled-coil irradiance standard lamp

    SciTech Connect

    Fat’yanov, O. V. Asimow, P. D.

    2015-10-15

    We describe an accurate and precise calibration procedure for multichannel optical pyrometers such as the 6-channel, 3-ns temporal resolution instrument used in the Caltech experimental geophysics laboratory. We begin with a review of calibration sources for shock temperatures in the 3000-30 000 K range. High-power, coiled tungsten halogen standards of spectral irradiance appear to be the only practical alternative to NIST-traceable tungsten ribbon lamps, which are no longer available with large enough calibrated area. However, non-uniform radiance complicates the use of such coiled lamps for reliable and reproducible calibration of pyrometers that employ imaging or relay optics. Careful analysis of documented methods of shock pyrometer calibration to coiled irradiance standard lamps shows that only one technique, not directly applicable in our case, is free of major radiometric errors. We provide a detailed description of the modified Caltech pyrometer instrument and a procedure for its absolute spectral radiance calibration, accurate to ±5%. We employ a designated central area of a 0.7× demagnified image of a coiled-coil tungsten halogen lamp filament, cross-calibrated against a NIST-traceable tungsten ribbon lamp. We give the results of the cross-calibration along with descriptions of the optical arrangement, data acquisition, and processing. We describe a procedure to characterize the difference between the static and dynamic response of amplified photodetectors, allowing time-dependent photodiode correction factors for spectral radiance histories from shock experiments. We validate correct operation of the modified Caltech pyrometer with actual shock temperature experiments on single-crystal NaCl and MgO and obtain very good agreement with the literature data for these substances. We conclude with a summary of the most essential requirements for error-free calibration of a fiber-optic shock-temperature pyrometer using a high-power coiled tungsten halogen

  8. Contributed Review: Absolute spectral radiance calibration of fiber-optic shock-temperature pyrometers using a coiled-coil irradiance standard lamp.

    PubMed

    Fat'yanov, O V; Asimow, P D

    2015-10-01

    We describe an accurate and precise calibration procedure for multichannel optical pyrometers such as the 6-channel, 3-ns temporal resolution instrument used in the Caltech experimental geophysics laboratory. We begin with a review of calibration sources for shock temperatures in the 3000-30,000 K range. High-power, coiled tungsten halogen standards of spectral irradiance appear to be the only practical alternative to NIST-traceable tungsten ribbon lamps, which are no longer available with large enough calibrated area. However, non-uniform radiance complicates the use of such coiled lamps for reliable and reproducible calibration of pyrometers that employ imaging or relay optics. Careful analysis of documented methods of shock pyrometer calibration to coiled irradiance standard lamps shows that only one technique, not directly applicable in our case, is free of major radiometric errors. We provide a detailed description of the modified Caltech pyrometer instrument and a procedure for its absolute spectral radiance calibration, accurate to ±5%. We employ a designated central area of a 0.7× demagnified image of a coiled-coil tungsten halogen lamp filament, cross-calibrated against a NIST-traceable tungsten ribbon lamp. We give the results of the cross-calibration along with descriptions of the optical arrangement, data acquisition, and processing. We describe a procedure to characterize the difference between the static and dynamic response of amplified photodetectors, allowing time-dependent photodiode correction factors for spectral radiance histories from shock experiments. We validate correct operation of the modified Caltech pyrometer with actual shock temperature experiments on single-crystal NaCl and MgO and obtain very good agreement with the literature data for these substances. We conclude with a summary of the most essential requirements for error-free calibration of a fiber-optic shock-temperature pyrometer using a high-power coiled tungsten halogen

  9. Contributed Review: Absolute spectral radiance calibration of fiber-optic shock-temperature pyrometers using a coiled-coil irradiance standard lamp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fat'yanov, O. V.; Asimow, P. D.

    2015-10-01

    We describe an accurate and precise calibration procedure for multichannel optical pyrometers such as the 6-channel, 3-ns temporal resolution instrument used in the Caltech experimental geophysics laboratory. We begin with a review of calibration sources for shock temperatures in the 3000-30 000 K range. High-power, coiled tungsten halogen standards of spectral irradiance appear to be the only practical alternative to NIST-traceable tungsten ribbon lamps, which are no longer available with large enough calibrated area. However, non-uniform radiance complicates the use of such coiled lamps for reliable and reproducible calibration of pyrometers that employ imaging or relay optics. Careful analysis of documented methods of shock pyrometer calibration to coiled irradiance standard lamps shows that only one technique, not directly applicable in our case, is free of major radiometric errors. We provide a detailed description of the modified Caltech pyrometer instrument and a procedure for its absolute spectral radiance calibration, accurate to ±5%. We employ a designated central area of a 0.7× demagnified image of a coiled-coil tungsten halogen lamp filament, cross-calibrated against a NIST-traceable tungsten ribbon lamp. We give the results of the cross-calibration along with descriptions of the optical arrangement, data acquisition, and processing. We describe a procedure to characterize the difference between the static and dynamic response of amplified photodetectors, allowing time-dependent photodiode correction factors for spectral radiance histories from shock experiments. We validate correct operation of the modified Caltech pyrometer with actual shock temperature experiments on single-crystal NaCl and MgO and obtain very good agreement with the literature data for these substances. We conclude with a summary of the most essential requirements for error-free calibration of a fiber-optic shock-temperature pyrometer using a high-power coiled tungsten halogen

  10. Absolute rate constant and O(3P) yield for the O(1D)+N2O reaction in the temperature range 227 K to 719 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vranckx, S.; Peeters, J.; Carl, S. A.

    2008-10-01

    The absolute rate constant for the reaction that is the major source of stratospheric NOx, O(1D)+N2O → products, has been determined in the temperature range 227 K to 719 K, and, in the temperature range 248 K to 600 K, the fraction of the reaction that yields O(3P). Both the rate constants and product yields were determined using a recently-developed chemiluminescence technique for monitoring O(1D) that allows for higher precision determinations for both rate constants, and, particularly, O(3P) yields, than do other methods. We found the rate constant, kR1, to be essentially independent of temperature between 400 K and 227 K, having a value of (1.37±0.11)×10-10 cm3 s-1, and for temperatures greater than 450 K a marked decrease in rate constant was observed, with a rate constant of only (0.94±0.11)×10-10 cm3 s-1 at 719 K. The rate constants determined over the 227 K 400 K range show very low scatter and are significantly greater, by 20% at room temperature and 15% at 227 K, than the current recommended values. The fraction of O(3P) produced in this reaction was determined to be 0.002±0.002 at 250 K rising steadily to 0.010±0.004 at 600 K, thus the channel producing O(3P) can be entirely neglected in atmospheric kinetic modeling calculations. A further result of this study is an expression of the relative quantum yields as a function of temperature for the chemiluminescence reactions (kCL1)C2H + O(1D) → CH(A) + CO and (kCL2)C2H + O(3P) → CH(A) + CO, both followed by CH(A) → CH(X) + hν, as kCL1(T)/kCL2(T)=(32.8T-3050)/(6.29T+398).

  11. Absolute rate constant and O(3P) yield for the O(1D)+N2O reaction in the temperature range 227 K to 719 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vranckx, S.; Peeters, J.; Carl, S. A.

    2008-05-01

    We have determined, in the temperature range 227 K to 719 K, the absolute rate constant for the reaction O(1D)+N2O → products and, in the temperature range 248 K to 600 K, the fraction of the reaction that yields O(3P). Both the rate constants and product yields were determined using a recently-developed chemiluminescence technique for monitoring O(1D) that allows for higher precision determinations for both rate constants, and, particularly, O(3P) yields, than do other methods. We found the rate constant, kR1, to be essentially independent of temperature between 400 K and 227 K, having a value of (1.37±0.09)×10-10 cm3 s-1. For temperatures greater than 450 K a marked decrease in value was observed, with a rate constant of only (0.94±0.11)×10-10 cm3 s-1 at 719 K. The rate constants determined over the 227 K-400 K range show very low scatter and are significantly greater, by 20% at room temperature and by 15% at 227 K, than the current recommended values. The fraction of O(3P) produced in this reaction was determined to be 0.002±0.002 at 250 K rising steadily to 0.010±0.004 at 600 K, thus the channel producing O(3P) can be entirely neglected in atmospheric kinetic modeling calculations. A further result of this study is an expression of the relative quantum yields as a function of temperature for the chemiluminescence reactions (kCL1) C2H+O(1D) → CH(A)+CO and (kCL2) C2H+O(3P) → CH(A)+CO, both followed by CH(A) → CH(X)+hν, as kCL1(T)/kCL2(T)=(32.8T-3050)/(6.29T+398).

  12. Teaching Absolute Value Meaningfully

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wade, Angela

    2012-01-01

    What is the meaning of absolute value? And why do teachers teach students how to solve absolute value equations? Absolute value is a concept introduced in first-year algebra and then reinforced in later courses. Various authors have suggested instructional methods for teaching absolute value to high school students (Wei 2005; Stallings-Roberts…

  13. Bubble nucleation in H2O-CO2 bearing basaltic melts: results of high temperature decompression experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Gall, N.; Pichavant, M.; Burgisser, A.

    2012-12-01

    Previous experiments have shown that mechanisms of basalt degassing are strongly contrasted when gas bubbles are present or when they are absent. Thus, experimental information on the kinetics of bubble nucleation in basaltic melts is needed, and high temperature decompression experiments have been investigated. All experiments used PST-9 basaltic pumice from Stromboli as starting material. The sample was fused in air at 1400°C for 3h and then cylinders (l up to 10mm, d 2.5 and 5mm) were cored. Synthesis experiments were performed to produce the volatile-bearing melts to be used in the decompression experiments. Glass cores, distilled H2O and Ag2C2O4 were loaded in AuPd capsules. Three different H2O/CO2 were introduced, corresponding to XH2Oin=1 (#1: only H2O dissolved in glass), 0.55 (#2: high dissolved H2O/CO2), 0 (#3: low dissolved H2O/CO2). The synthesis experiments were ran at 1200°C during about 40h in an internally heated vessel pressurized with Ar-H2. The synthesized crystal- and bubble-free glasses were cut in 2 parts: one for the decompression experiments and the other for the analysis. Decompression experiments were conducted at a fast rate of 39kPa/s, exceptionally of 77.8kPa/s, at 1200°C from an initial pressure (Pin) of 200MPa and to final pressures (Pf) of 200, 150, 100 and 50MPa. Experiments to 25MPa are in progress. Each run included 3 capsules, corresponding to the 3 XH2Oin conditions of glass synthesis, allowing results for the 3 H2O/CO2 to be directly compared. Charges were rapid-quenched immediately after attainment of Pf. Textures were analyzed by X-ray microtomography, and volatile concentrations and spatial distributions in pre- and post-decompression glasses were determined by FTIR. Pre-decompression glasses have homogeneous volatile contents and distributions. They divide into 3 compositional groups consistent with their XH2Oin conditions of synthesis: group #1 (average H2O content=4.82wt%, average CO2 content=0ppm), group #2 (2.15wt

  14. On the influence of debris in glacier melt modelling: a new temperature-index model accounting for the debris thickness feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carenzo, Marco; Mabillard, Johan; Pellicciotti, Francesca; Reid, Tim; Brock, Ben; Burlando, Paolo

    2013-04-01

    The increase of rockfalls from the surrounding slopes and of englacial melt-out material has led to an increase of the debris cover extent on Alpine glaciers. In recent years, distributed debris energy-balance models have been developed to account for the melt rate enhancing/reduction due to a thin/thick debris layer, respectively. However, such models require a large amount of input data that are not often available, especially in remote mountain areas such as the Himalaya. Some of the input data such as wind or temperature are also of difficult extrapolation from station measurements. Due to their lower data requirement, empirical models have been used in glacier melt modelling. However, they generally simplify the debris effect by using a single melt-reduction factor which does not account for the influence of debris thickness on melt. In this paper, we present a new temperature-index model accounting for the debris thickness feedback in the computation of melt rates at the debris-ice interface. The empirical parameters (temperature factor, shortwave radiation factor, and lag factor accounting for the energy transfer through the debris layer) are optimized at the point scale for several debris thicknesses against melt rates simulated by a physically-based debris energy balance model. The latter has been validated against ablation stake readings and surface temperature measurements. Each parameter is then related to a plausible set of debris thickness values to provide a general and transferable parameterization. The new model is developed on Miage Glacier, Italy, a debris cover glacier in which the ablation area is mantled in near-continuous layer of rock. Subsequently, its transferability is tested on Haut Glacier d'Arolla, Switzerland, where debris is thinner and its extension has been seen to expand in the last decades. The results show that the performance of the new debris temperature-index model (DETI) in simulating the glacier melt rate at the point scale

  15. Temperature of Earth's core constrained from melting of Fe and Fe0.9Ni0.1 at high pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Dongzhou; Jackson, Jennifer M.; Zhao, Jiyong; Sturhahn, Wolfgang; Alp, E. Ercan; Hu, Michael Y.; Toellner, Thomas S.; Murphy, Caitlin A.; Prakapenka, Vitali B.

    2016-08-01

    The melting points of fcc- and hcp-structured Fe0.9Ni0.1 and Fe are measured up to 125 GPa using laser heated diamond anvil cells, synchrotron Mössbauer spectroscopy, and a recently developed fast temperature readout spectrometer. The onset of melting is detected by a characteristic drop in the time-integrated synchrotron Mössbauer signal which is sensitive to atomic motion. The thermal pressure experienced by the samples is constrained by X-ray diffraction measurements under high pressures and temperatures. The obtained best-fit melting curves of fcc-structured Fe and Fe0.9Ni0.1 fall within the wide region bounded by previous studies. We are able to derive the γ-ɛ-l triple point of Fe and the quasi triple point of Fe0.9Ni0.1 to be 110 ± 5GPa, 3345 ± 120K and 116 ± 5GPa, 3260 ± 120K, respectively. The measured melting temperatures of Fe at similar pressure are slightly higher than those of Fe0.9Ni0.1 while their one sigma uncertainties overlap. Using previously measured phonon density of states of hcp-Fe, we calculate melting curves of hcp-structured Fe and Fe0.9Ni0.1 using our (quasi) triple points as anchors. The extrapolated Fe0.9Ni0.1 melting curve provides an estimate for the upper bound of Earth's inner core-outer core boundary temperature of 5500 ± 200K. The temperature within the liquid outer core is then approximated with an adiabatic model, which constrains the upper bound of the temperature at the core side of the core-mantle boundary to be 4000 ± 200K. We discuss a potential melting point depression caused by light elements and the implications of the presented core-mantle boundary temperature bounds on phase relations in the lowermost part of the mantle.

  16. A full-dimensional model of ozone forming reaction: the absolute value of the recombination rate coefficient, its pressure and temperature dependencies.

    PubMed

    Teplukhin, Alexander; Babikov, Dmitri

    2016-07-28

    Rigorous calculations of scattering resonances in ozone are carried out for a broad range of rotational excitations. The accurate potential energy surface of Dawes is adopted, and a new efficient method for calculations of ro-vibrational energies, wave functions and resonance lifetimes is employed (which uses hyper-spherical coordinates, the sequential diagonalization/truncation approach, grid optimization and complex absorbing potential). A detailed analysis is carried out to characterize distributions of resonance energies and lifetimes, their rotational/vibrational content and their positions with respect to the centrifugal barrier. Emphasis is on the contribution of these resonances to the recombination process that forms ozone. It is found that major contributions come from localized resonances at energies near the top of the barrier. Delocalized resonances at higher energies should also be taken into account, while very narrow resonances at low energies (trapped far behind the centrifugal barrier) should be treated as bound states. The absolute value of the recombination rate coefficient, its pressure and temperature dependencies are obtained using the energy-transfer model developed in the earlier work. Good agreement with experimental data is obtained if one follows the suggestion of Troe, who argued that the energy transfer mechanism of recombination is responsible only for 55% of the recombination rate (with the remaining 45% coming from the competing chaperon mechanism). PMID:27364351

  17. A full-dimensional model of ozone forming reaction: the absolute value of the recombination rate coefficient, its pressure and temperature dependencies.

    PubMed

    Teplukhin, Alexander; Babikov, Dmitri

    2016-07-28

    Rigorous calculations of scattering resonances in ozone are carried out for a broad range of rotational excitations. The accurate potential energy surface of Dawes is adopted, and a new efficient method for calculations of ro-vibrational energies, wave functions and resonance lifetimes is employed (which uses hyper-spherical coordinates, the sequential diagonalization/truncation approach, grid optimization and complex absorbing potential). A detailed analysis is carried out to characterize distributions of resonance energies and lifetimes, their rotational/vibrational content and their positions with respect to the centrifugal barrier. Emphasis is on the contribution of these resonances to the recombination process that forms ozone. It is found that major contributions come from localized resonances at energies near the top of the barrier. Delocalized resonances at higher energies should also be taken into account, while very narrow resonances at low energies (trapped far behind the centrifugal barrier) should be treated as bound states. The absolute value of the recombination rate coefficient, its pressure and temperature dependencies are obtained using the energy-transfer model developed in the earlier work. Good agreement with experimental data is obtained if one follows the suggestion of Troe, who argued that the energy transfer mechanism of recombination is responsible only for 55% of the recombination rate (with the remaining 45% coming from the competing chaperon mechanism).

  18. Calibrating IR cameras for in-situ temperature measurement during the electron beam melt processing of Inconel 718 and Ti-Al6-V4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinwiddie, R. B.; Kirka, M. M.; Lloyd, P. D.; Dehoff, R. R.; Lowe, L. E.; Marlow, G. S.

    2016-05-01

    High performance mid-wave infrared (IR) cameras are used for in-situ electron beam melt process monitoring and temperature measurements. Since standard factory calibrations are insufficient due to very low transmissions of the leaded glass window required for X-ray absorption, two techniques for temperature calibrations are compared. In-situ measurement of emittance will also be discussed. Ultimately, these imaging systems have the potential for routine use for online quality assurance and feedback control.

  19. The role of pyroxenite in basalt genesis: Melt-PX, a melting parameterization for mantle pyroxenites between 0.9 and 5 GPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambart, Sarah; Baker, Michael B.; Stolper, Edward M.

    2016-08-01

    Geochemical and isotopic data suggest that the source regions of oceanic basalts may contain pyroxenite in addition to peridotite. In order to incorporate the wide range of compositions and melting behaviors of pyroxenites into mantle melting models, we have developed a new parameterization, Melt-PX, which predicts near-solidus temperatures and extents of melting as a function of temperature and pressure for mantle pyroxenites. We used 183 high-pressure experiments (25 compositions; 0.9-5 GPa; 1150-1675°C) to constrain a model of melt fraction versus temperature from 5% melting up to the disappearance of clinopyroxene for pyroxenites as a function of pressure, temperature, and bulk composition. When applied to the global set of experimental data, our model reproduces the experimental F values with a standard error of estimate of 13% absolute; temperatures at which the pyroxenite is 5% molten are reproduced with a standard error of estimate of 30°C over a temperature range of ~500°C and a pressure range of ~4 GPa. In conjunction with parameterizations of peridotite melting, Melt-PX can be used to model the partial melting of multilithologic mantle sources—including the effects of varying the composition and the modal proportion of pyroxenite in such source regions. Examples of such applications include calculations of isentropic decompression melting of a mixed peridotite + pyroxenite mantle; these show that although the potential temperature of the upwelling mantle plays an important role in defining the extent of magma production, the composition and mass fraction of the pyroxenite also exert strong controls.

  20. Melting Temperature Mapping Method: A Novel Method for Rapid Identification of Unknown Pathogenic Microorganisms within Three Hours of Sample Collection.

    PubMed

    Niimi, Hideki; Ueno, Tomohiro; Hayashi, Shirou; Abe, Akihito; Tsurue, Takahiro; Mori, Masashi; Tabata, Homare; Minami, Hiroshi; Goto, Michihiko; Akiyama, Makoto; Yamamoto, Yoshihiro; Saito, Shigeru; Kitajima, Isao

    2015-07-28

    Acquiring the earliest possible identification of pathogenic microorganisms is critical for selecting the appropriate antimicrobial therapy in infected patients. We herein report the novel "melting temperature (Tm) mapping method" for rapidly identifying the dominant bacteria in a clinical sample from sterile sites. Employing only seven primer sets, more than 100 bacterial species can be identified. In particular, using the Difference Value, it is possible to identify samples suitable for Tm mapping identification. Moreover, this method can be used to rapidly diagnose the absence of bacteria in clinical samples. We tested the Tm mapping method using 200 whole blood samples obtained from patients with suspected sepsis, 85% (171/200) of which matched the culture results based on the detection level. A total of 130 samples were negative according to the Tm mapping method, 98% (128/130) of which were also negative based on the culture method. Meanwhile, 70 samples were positive according to the Tm mapping method, and of the 59 suitable for identification, 100% (59/59) exhibited a "match" or "broad match" with the culture or sequencing results. These findings were obtained within three hours of whole blood collection. The Tm mapping method is therefore useful for identifying infectious diseases requiring prompt treatment.

  1. Effects of batch to batch variations and test methodology on degree of crystallinity and melting temperature of UHMW-PE as measured by differential scanning calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Pascaud, R S; Evans, W T; McCullagh, P J; FitzPatrick, D

    1996-12-01

    The thermal and structural analysis of a total 22 batches from three medical grade ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene (UHMW-PE) resins was determined using the DSC method. Batch to batch variations of approximately 5% were obtained for the melting temperature and the degree of crystallinity. The variations correlated both to the changes caused by gamma-irradiation sterilization and subsequent aging, and to the differences in DSC results obtained from various laboratories on materials believed to exhibit essentially similar clinical performances. Varying the sample weight from 4.4 to 27.1 mg resulted in a significant relative increase of 5% in the degree of crystallinity. The study shows that the standard double melting/recrystallisation procedure for DSC evaluation produces variations in the melting behaviors of approximately the same magnitude as those indicated by batch lot or sterilization/aging. PMID:8953152

  2. Absolute rate coefficients over extended temperature ranges and mechanisms of the CF(X(2)Pi) reactions with F(2), Cl(2) and O(2).

    PubMed

    Vetters, B; Dils, B; Nguyen, T L; Vereecken, L; Carl, S A; Peeters, J

    2009-06-01

    The absolute rate coefficients of the reactions of the carbyne-radical CF(X(2)Pi, nu = 0) with O(2), F(2) and Cl(2) have been measured over extended temperature ranges, using pulsed-laser photodissociation-laser-induced fluorescence (PLP-LIF) techniques. The CF(X(2)Pi) radicals were generated by KrF excimer laser 2-photon photolysis of CF(2)Br(2) at 248 nm and the real-time exponential decays of CF(X(2)Pi, nu = 0) at varying coreactant concentrations, in large excess, were monitored by LIF (A(2)Sigma(+), nu' = 1 <-- X(2)Pi, nu'' = 0 transition). The experimental bimolecular rate coefficients of the CF(X(2)Pi) reactions with F(2) and Cl(2) can be described by simple Arrhenius expressions: k(F2)(295-408 K) = (1.5 +/- 0.2) x 10(-11) exp[-(370 +/- 40)K/T] cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1); and k(Cl2)(295-392 K) = (6.1 +/- 2.1) x 10(-12) exp[+(280 +/- 120)K/T]. The k(F2)(T) and k(Cl2)(T) results can be rationalized in terms of direct halogen-atom abstraction reactions in which the radical character of CF dominates; a quantum chemical CBS-Q//BHandHLYP/6-311G(d,p) study confirms that the ground state reactants CF(X(2)Pi) + F(2)(X(1)Sigma) connect directly with the ground-state products CF(2)(X(1)A(1)) + F((2)P) via a nearly barrierless F-atom abstraction route. The rate coefficient of CF(X(2)Pi) + O(2) can be represented by a two-term Arrhenius expression: k(O2)(258-780 K) = 1.1 x 10(-11) exp(-850 K/T) + 2.3 x 10(-13) exp(500 K/T), with a standard deviation of 5%. The first term dominates at higher temperatures T and the second at lower T where a negative temperature dependence is observed (<290 K). Quantum chemical computations at the CBS-QB3 and CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pVDZ levels of theory show that the k(O2)(T) behaviour is consistent with a change of the dominant rate-determining mechanism from a carbyne-type insertion into the O-O bond at high T to a radical-radical combination at low T.

  3. Effects of temperature, silicate melt composition, and oxygen fugacity on the partitioning of V, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Mo, Ag, Sn, Sb, W, Au, Pb, and Bi between sulfide phases and silicate melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yuan; Audétat, Andreas

    2015-08-01

    In order to assess the role of sulfide in controlling the ore metal budgets and fractionation during magmatic genesis and differentiation, the partition coefficients (D) of V, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Mo, Ag, Sn, Sb, W, Au, Pb, and Bi between sulfide liquid (SL), monosulfide solid solution (MSS), and basaltic to rhyolitic melts (SM) were determined at 900-1200 °C, 0.5-1.5 GPa, and oxygen fugacity (fO2) ranging from ∼FMQ-2 to FMQ+3, in a piston-cylinder apparatus. The DSL/SM values range from 0.4 to 2 for V, 0.5 to 3 for Mn, 80 to 580 for Co, 2300 to 18,000 for Ni, 800 to 4600 for Cu, 1 to 11 for Zn, 20 to 180 for As, 4 to 230 for Mo, 450 to 1600 for Ag, 5 to 24 for Sn, 10 to 80 for Sb, 0.03 to 0.16 for W, 2000 to 29,000 for Au, 24 to 170 for Pb, and 830 to 11,000 for Bi; whereas the DMSS/SM values range from 0.04 to 10 for V, 0.5 to 10 for Mn, 70 to 2500 for Co, 650 to 18,000 for Ni, 280 to 42,000 for Cu, 0.1 to 80 for Zn, 0.2 to 30 for As, 1 to 820 for Mo, 20 to 500 for Ag, 0.2 to 220 for Sn, 0.1 to 40 for Sb, 0.01 to 24 for W, 10 to 2000 for Au, 0.03 to 6 for Pb, and 1 to 350 for Bi. Both DMSS/SM and DSL/SM values generally increase with decreasing temperature or decreasing FeOtot content in silicate melt, except for Mo, DMSS/SM and DSL/SM of which show a clear decrease with decreasing temperature. At given temperature and FeOtot content, high oxygen fugacity appears to lead to a significant decrease in DMSS/SM of Au, Bi, Mo, and potentially As. The partitioning data obtained experimentally in this study and previous studies were fitted to an empirical equation that expresses the DMSS/SM and/or DSL/SM of a given element as a function of temperature, oxygen fugacity, and FeOtot content of the silicate melt: log (DSL/SMorDMSS/SM = d + a · 10, 000 / T + b · (ΔFMQ) + c · log (FeOmelt) in which T is temperature in K, FeOmelt denotes wt% FeOtot in silicate melt, and ΔFMQ denotes log fO2 relative to the fayalite-magnetite-quartz (FMQ) oxygen buffer. The

  4. Eosinophil count - absolute

    MedlinePlus

    Eosinophils; Absolute eosinophil count ... the white blood cell count to give the absolute eosinophil count. ... than 500 cells per microliter (cells/mcL). Normal value ranges may vary slightly among different laboratories. Talk ...

  5. Melt containment member

    SciTech Connect

    Rieken, Joel R.; Heidloff, Andrew J.

    2014-09-09

    A tubular melt containment member for transient containment of molten metals and alloys, especially reactive metals and alloys, includes a melt-contacting layer or region that comprises an oxygen-deficient rare earth oxide material that is less reactive as compared to the counterpart stoichiometric rare earth oxide. The oxygen-deficient (sub-stoichiometric) rare earth oxide can comprise oxygen-deficient yttria represented by Y.sub.2O.sub.3-x wherein x is from 0.01 to 0.1. Use of the oxygen-deficient rare earth oxide as the melt-contacting layer or region material reduces reaction with the melt for a given melt temperature and melt contact time.

  6. Effect of composition and temperature on the properties of High-Level Waste (HLW) glasses melting above 1200{degrees}C (Draft)

    SciTech Connect

    Vienna, J.D.; Hrma, P.R.; Schweiger, M.J.

    1996-02-01

    Increasing the melting temperature of HLW glass allows an increase of waste loading (thus reducing product volume) and the production of more durable glasses at a faster melting rate. However, HLW glasses that melt at high temperatures differ in composition from glasses formulated for low temperature ({approximately}1150{degree}C). Consequently, the composition of high-temperature glasses falls in a region previously not well tested or understood. This report represents a preliminary study of property/composition relationships of high-temperature Hanford HLW glasses using a one-component-at-a-time change approach. A test matrix has been designed to explore a composition region expected for high-temperature high-waste loading HLW glasses to be produced at Hanford. This matrix was designed by varying several key components (SiO{sub 2}, B{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Na{sub 2}O, Li{sub 2}O, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, ZrO{sub 2}, Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3}, P{sub 2}O{sub 5}, UO{sub 2}, TiO{sub 2}, Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and others) starting from a glass based on a Hanford HLW all-blend waste. Glasses were fabricated and tested for viscosity, glass transition temperature, electrical conductivity, crystallinity, liquidus temperature, and PCT release. The effect of individual components on glass properties was assessed using first- and second- order empirical models. The first-order component effects were compared with those from low-temperature HLW glasses.

  7. P-V-T-X evolution of olivine-hosted melt inclusions during high-temperature homogenization treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiavi, Federica; Provost, Ariel; Schiano, Pierre; Cluzel, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    During low-high temperature (T) cycles imposed on olivine-hosted melt inclusions (MIs) we observe a systematic increase in homogenization temperature (Th) with time, regardless of their initial major-element and H2O contents. Bubble persistence at high T suggests that inclusion internal pressure (Pint) is lower than its original, trapping pressure. We explore how reversible and irreversible processes modify the composition (X), volume (V) and Pint of heated MIs, and compare the results of theoretical modeling with experimental observations of MIs from FAMOUS Zone (FZ, Mid-Atlantic Ridge) and La Sommata (SOM, Vulcano, Aeolian Islands) basaltic samples. Due to olivine dissolution at inclusion walls and thermoelastic deformation, Pint-V-X conditions change significantly upon heating. Olivine dissolution induces changes in major-element composition (i.e., enrichment in Fe and Mg), morphology and volume (up to +25% at 1500 °C). We provide equations for the thermoelastic deformation of olivine bearing a two-phase, liquid-gas inclusion for the end-member cases of chemical equilibrium and no exchange between gas and liquid. These equations allow Pint-V evolution to be related to variations in bubble volume fraction. Upon heating, both Pint and V variations are smaller in the presence of a gas bubble than for a homogeneous liquid inclusion, at the same T. Dissolution-reprecipitation and thermoelastic deformation of the olivine host are reversible processes, so initial Pint-V-X conditions are restored upon cooling. On the contrary, water loss from MIs and plastic deformation of the olivine host are processes that irreversibly lower Pint, and account for the systematic increase of Th with time. Our theoretical and experimental investigations suggest that the increase of Th in volatile-rich SOM MIs is mainly related to progressive release of water. Compared to larger MIs located at a similar distance from the olivine rim, smaller MIs show a faster increase in Th with time

  8. The Influence of the Melt-Pouring Temperature and Inoculant Content on the Macro and Microstructure of the IN713C Ni-Based Superalloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matysiak, Hubert; Zagorska, Malgorzata; Balkowiec, Alicja; Adamczyk-Cieslak, Boguslawa; Dobkowski, Krzysztof; Koralnik, Mateusz; Cygan, Rafal; Nawrocki, Jacek; Cwajna, Jan; Kurzydlowski, Krzysztof J.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this work was to determine the effect of melt-pouring temperature T m and inoculant (cobalt aluminate—CoAl2O4) concentration in the prime coat of the shell mold on the macro- and microstructure of the IN713C superalloy. The results show that cobalt aluminate is an effective modifier of the IN713C superalloy, which causes refinement of the equiaxed grains (EX) and a reduction of the fraction and size of the columnar grains on the casting surface. Also, the melt-pouring temperature in the range of 1450-1520°C was found to influence the mean EX grain size. Based on the results of differential thermal analysis of the alloy and detailed microstructure characterization, a sequence of precipitations has been proposed that advances current understanding of processes that take place during alloy solidification and casting cooling.

  9. Influence of Temperature During Spark Plasma Sintering Compaction of Melt-Spun p-Bi0.5Sb1.5Te3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melnikov, A. A.; Tabachkova, N. Yu.; Kichik, S. A.; Marakushev, I. S.; Koryakin, A. N.; Ponomarev, V. F.

    2015-06-01

    The melt spinning technique is a process for obtaining materials based on ultrafast cooling and solidification of a melt in contact with a liquid-cooled rotating wheel. In this work, p-Bi0.5Sb1.5Te3 powders were obtained and compacted by spark plasma sintering at various temperature conditions, and the changes in their structural and dimensional characteristics were investigated. It is shown that the sintering temperature conditions significantly affect the structure of the material, causing active recrystallization processes even at short sintering times (5 min to 10 min). Material obtained in this work has slight preferential orientation of (0 0 1) planes perpendicular to the pressure axis, which disappears with increasing sintering time. Power factor values for all samples were greater for current direction perpendicular to the pressure axis, which corresponds to compacted nonspun material. It is shown that annealing in vacuum negatively affects the material, reducing the power factor for all current directions.

  10. Improvements in the realization of the ITS-90 over the temperature range from the melting point of gallium to the freezing point of silver at NIM

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, J.; Zhang, J. T.; Ping, Q.

    2013-09-11

    The temperature primary standard over the range from the melting point of gallium to the freezing point of silver in National institute of Metrology (NIM), China, was established in the early 1990s. The performance of all of fixed-point furnaces degraded and needs to be updated due to many years of use. Nowadays, the satisfactory fixed point materials can be available with the development of the modern purification techniques. NIM plans to use a group of three cells for each defining fixed point temperature. In this way the eventual drift of individual cells can be evidenced by periodic intercomparison and this will increase the reliability in disseminating the ITS-90 in China. This article describes the recent improvements in realization of ITS-90 over temperature range from the melting point of gallium to the freezing point of silver at NIM. Taking advantages of the technological advances in the design and manufacture of furnaces, the new three-zone furnaces and the open-type fixed points were developed from the freezing point of indium to the freezing point of silver, and a furnace with the three-zone semiconductor cooling was designed to automatically realize the melting point of gallium. The reproducibility of the new melting point of gallium and the new open-type freezing points of In, Sn, Zn. Al and Ag is improved, especially the freezing points of Al and Ag with the reproducibility of 0.2mK and 0.5mK respectively. The expanded uncertainty in the realization of these defining fixed point temperatures is 0.34mK, 0.44mK, 0.54mK, 0.60mK, 1.30mK and 1.88mK respectively.

  11. Temperature Dependence of Behavior of Interface Between Molten Sn and LiCl-KCl Eutectic Melt Due to Rising Gas Bubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natsui, Shungo; Nashimoto, Ryota; Takai, Hifumi; Kumagai, Takehiko; Kikuchi, Tatsuya; Suzuki, Ryosuke O.

    2016-06-01

    The behavior of the interface between molten Sn and the LiCl-KCl eutectic melt system was observed directly. We found that the transient behavior of the interface exhibits considerable temperature dependence through a change in its physical properties. The "metal film" generated in the upper molten salt phase significantly influences the shape of the interface. Although the lifetime of the metal film depends on the gas flow rate, it is not affected by the buoyancy if the interfacial tension is dominant.

  12. Secular changes in the style of mantle melting and mantle differentiation as constrained by the depths and temperatures of magma genesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, C.; Luffi, P.; Plank, T.; Dalton, H.; Leeman, W.; Hoink, T.; Li, J.; Masters, G.

    2008-12-01

    The Earth's mantle differentiates mainly by decompression partial melting induced by solid-state convection. Owing to their low densities, these magmas rise to the surface and drive the formation of oceanic and continental crusts. Because many trace elements, including the heat-producing elements, are partitioned into liquids, the extraction of melts to the surface concentrates these elements to the surface of the Earth and depletes the mantle. However, at high pressures, e.g. greater than 9 GPa, magmas become dense enough to be negatively buoyant. High pressure melting occurs only if the Earth was sufficiently hot to allow for deep intersection of the solidus with the adiabat. To assess how the depth and temperature of melting has changed through time, we compiled an updated experimental dataset to calibrate new SiO2-based and Mg- based thermobarometers for mafic to ultramafic magmas multiply saturated in olivine and orthopyroxene at depth. Mid-ocean ridge basalts yield equilibration Ps and Ts of 0.37-1.2 GPa and 1300-1400 C. Island arc basalts yield similar Ps and Ts but anomalously wet arcs yield slightly lower temperatures and pressures. The deepest basaltic magmatism at present occurs in hotspot regions; for example, post-shield magmas in Hawaii yield Ps and Ts as high as 5 GPa (150 km) and 1600 C. Thus, in the modern Earth, melting is limited to the uppermost 200 km of the mantle. However, in the Earth's first Gy, it may have been hotter than 1700 C as constrained by thermobarometry on 3.5 Gy Barberton komatiites. Initial melting depths of these magmas may have been as high as 8 GPa. We show that melt compositions formed at 9 GPa or greater are negatively buoyant, suggesting that prior to 3.5 Gy ago, melting occurred deep enough to generate sinking magmas, which percolated downwards to impregnate the underlying mantle. After a critical fraction of melt impregnation is met, the aggregate would convectively sink into the lower mantle. Because high P and T melts

  13. Viscosity Measurement for Tellurium Melt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Bochuan; Li, Chao; Ban, Heng; Scripa, Rosalia N.; Su, Ching-Hua; Lehoczky, Sandor L.

    2006-01-01

    The viscosity of high temperature Te melt was measured using a new technique in which a rotating magnetic field was applied to the melt sealed in a suspended ampoule, and the torque exerted by rotating melt flow on the ampoule wall was measured. Governing equations for the coupled melt flow and ampoule torsional oscillation were solved, and the viscosity was extracted from the experimental data by numerical fitting. The computational result showed good agreement with experimental data. The melt velocity transient initiated by the rotating magnetic field reached a stable condition quickly, allowing the viscosity and electrical conductivity of the melt to be determined in a short period.

  14. Evaluating Snow Melt Onset Date in the United States using Satellite Observation of Passive Microwave Temperature Brightness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osborne, D.; Hunsaker, A. G.; Jacobs, J. M.; Vuyovich, C.

    2015-12-01

    The timing and magnitude of Spring snowmelt events impact riverine flooding and inform reservoir operations. While the melt water volume is a primary concern, the timing of the snowmelt is also important. Melt timing determination is challenging because snowpack ripening observations are seldom available. Diurnal Amplitude Variation (DAV) is a method that uses remotely sensed passive microwave observations to determine snowpack ripening and snowmelt onset. Previous studies have successfully used the DAV method in northern latitudes. This study evaluates the ability of the DAV approach to be used to determine melt onset dates in mid-latitudes. The analysis is conducted for 675 Soil Climate Analysis Network (SCAN) and Snow Telemetry (SNOTEL) stations in the United States. The Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I) and Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer - EOS (AMSR-E) products are used to calculate the DAV signal at each location. Methods for determining the melt onset date at each station are presented and applied to all pixels in the United States. Preliminary results will also be presented which characterize the DAV derived melt onset timing for the United States using the long-term SSM/I record.

  15. Investigation of the rate-controlling mechanism(s) for high temperature creep and the relationship between creep and melting by use of high pressure as a variable. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-12-31

    Using high pressure as a variable, the rate-controlling mechanism for high temperature creep and the relationship between creep and melting is investigated for silicon and nickel. An apparatus is used in which the samples are heated to melting point and subjected to 1 to 3 GigaPascal pressure. The stress behavior of the materials are then studied.

  16. Absolute nuclear material assay

    DOEpatents

    Prasad, Manoj K.; Snyderman, Neal J.; Rowland, Mark S.

    2012-05-15

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  17. Absolute nuclear material assay

    DOEpatents

    Prasad, Manoj K.; Snyderman, Neal J.; Rowland, Mark S.

    2010-07-13

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  18. Pressure-temperature-time-deformation path of kyanite-bearing migmatitic paragneiss in the Kali Gandaki valley (Central Nepal): Investigation of Late Eocene-Early Oligocene melting processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iaccarino, Salvatore; Montomoli, Chiara; Carosi, Rodolfo; Massonne, Hans-Joachim; Langone, Antonio; Visonà, Dario

    2015-08-01

    Kyanite-bearing migmatitic paragneiss of the lower Greater Himalayan Sequence (GHS) in the Kali Gandaki transect (Central Himalaya) was investigated. In spite of the intense shearing, it was still possible to obtain many fundamental information for understanding the processes active during orogenesis. Using a multidisciplinary approach, including careful meso- and microstructural observations, pseudosection modelling (with PERPLE_X), trace element thermobarometry and in situ monazite U-Th-Pb geochronology, we constrained the pressure-temperature-time-deformation path of the studied rock, located in a structural key position. The migmatitic gneiss has experienced protracted prograde metamorphism after the India-Asia collision (50-55 Ma) from ~ 43 Ma to 28 Ma. During the late phase (36-28 Ma) of this metamorphism, the gneiss underwent high-pressure melting at "near peak" conditions (710-720 °C/1.0-1.1 GPa) leading to kyanite-bearing leucosome formation. In the time span of 25-18 Ma, the rock experienced decompression and cooling associated with pervasive shearing reaching P-T conditions of 650-670 °C and 0.7-0.8 GPa, near the sillimanite-kyanite transition. This time span is somewhat older than previously reported for this event in the study area. During this stage, additional, but very little melt was produced. Taking the migmatitic gneiss as representative of the GHS, these data demonstrate that this unit underwent crustal melting at about 1 GPa in the Eocene-Early Oligocene, well before the widely accepted Miocene decompressional melting related to its extrusion. In general, kyanite-bearing migmatite, as reported here, could be linked to the production of the high-Ca granitic melts found along the Himalayan belt.

  19. Temperature field around a spherical, cylindrical, and needle-shaped crystal, growing in a pre-cooled melt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivantsov, G. P.

    1985-01-01

    The growth of a single crystal in a precooled melt was examined. The conditions under which this occurs are described. It is found that the movement of the crystallization front is proportional to the root of time. The problem is solved based on the presented considerations.

  20. Monitoring snow melt characteristics on the Greenland ice sheet using a new MODIS land surface temperature and emissivity product (MOD21)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hulley, G. C.; Hall, D. K.; Hook, S. J.

    2013-12-01

    Land Surface Temperature (LST) and emissivity are sensitive energy-balance parameters that control melt and energy exchange between the surface and the atmosphere. MODIS LST is currently used to monitor melt zones on glaciers and can be used for glacier or ice sheet mass balance calculations. Much attention has been paid recently to the warming of the Arctic in the context of global warming, with a focus on the Greenland ice sheet because of its importance with sea-level rise. Various researchers have shown a steady decline in the extent of the Northern Hemisphere sea ice, both the total extent and the extent of the perennial or multiyear ice. Surface melt characteristics over the Greenland ice sheet have been traditionally monitored using the MODIS LST and albedo products (e.g. MOD11 and MOD10A1). Far fewer studies have used thermal emissivity data to monitor surface melt characteristics due to the lack of suitable data. In theory, longwave emissivity combined with LST information should give a more direct measure of snow melt characteristics since the emissivity is an intrinsic property of the surface, whereas the albedo is dependent on other factors such as solar zenith angle, and shadowing effects. Currently no standard emissivity product exists that can dynamically retrieve changes in longwave emissivity consistently over long time periods. This problem has been addressed with the new MOD21 product, which uses the ASTER TES algorithm to dynamically retrieve LST and spectral emissivity (bands 29, 31, 32) at 1-km resolution. In this study we show that using a new proposed index termed the snow emissivity difference index (SEDI) derived from the MOD21 longwave emissivity product, combined with the LST, will improve our understanding of snow melt and freezeup dynamics on ice sheets such as Greenland. The results also suggest that synergistic use of both thermal-based and albedo data will help to improve our understanding of snow melt dynamics on glaciers and ice

  1. Absolute photoacoustic thermometry in deep tissue.

    PubMed

    Yao, Junjie; Ke, Haixin; Tai, Stephen; Zhou, Yong; Wang, Lihong V

    2013-12-15

    Photoacoustic thermography is a promising tool for temperature measurement in deep tissue. Here we propose an absolute temperature measurement method based on the dual temperature dependences of the Grüneisen parameter and the speed of sound in tissue. By taking ratiometric measurements at two adjacent temperatures, we can eliminate the factors that are temperature irrelevant but difficult to correct for in deep tissue. To validate our method, absolute temperatures of blood-filled tubes embedded ~9 mm deep in chicken tissue were measured in a biologically relevant range from 28°C to 46°C. The temperature measurement accuracy was ~0.6°C. The results suggest that our method can be potentially used for absolute temperature monitoring in deep tissue during thermotherapy.

  2. Melt electrospinning.

    PubMed

    Hutmacher, Dietmar W; Dalton, Paul D

    2011-01-01

    Melt electrospinning is relatively under-investigated compared to solution electrospinning but provides opportunities in numerous areas, in which solvent accumulation or toxicity are a concern. These applications are diverse, and provide a broad set of challenges to researchers involved in electrospinning. In this context, melt electrospinning provides an alternative approach that bypasses some challenges to solution electrospinning, while bringing new issues to the forefront, such as the thermal stability of polymers. This Focus Review describes the literature on melt electrospinning, as well as highlighting areas where both melt and solution are combined, and potentially merge together in the future.

  3. Size dependence of the melting temperature of metallic nanoclusters from the viewpoint of the thermodynamic theory of similarity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samsonov, V. M.; Vasilyev, S. A.; Bembel, A. G.

    2016-08-01

    The generalized Thomson formula T m = T m (∞) (1-δ) R for the melting point of small objects T m has been analyzed from the viewpoint of the thermodynamic theory of similarity, where R is the radius of the particle and T m (∞) is the melting point of the corresponding large crystal. According to this formula, the parameter δ corresponds to the value of the radius of the T m ( R -1) particle obtained by the linear extrapolation of the dependence to the melting point of the particle equal to 0 K. It has been shown that δ = αδ0, where α is the factor of the asphericity of the particle (shape factor). In turn, the redefined characteristic length δ0 is expressed through the interphase tension σ sl at the boundary of the crystal with its own melt, the specific volume of the solid phase v s and the macroscopic value of the heat of fusion λ∞:δ0 = 2σ sl v s /λ∞. If we go from the reduced radius of the particle R/δ to the redefined reduced radius R/ r 1 or R/ d, where r 1 is the radius of the first coordination shell and d ≈ r 1 is the effective atomic diameter, then the simplex δ/ r 1 or δ/ d will play the role of the characteristic criterion of thermodynamic similarity. At a given value of α, this role will be played by the simplex Estimates of the parameters δ0 and δ0/ d have been carried out for ten metals with different lattice types. It has been shown that the values of the characteristic length δ0 are close to 1 nm and that the simplex δ0/ d is close to unity. In turn, the calculated values of the parameter δ agree on the order of magnitude with existing experimental data.

  4. An effective utilization of the slag from acid leaching of coal-waste: preparation of water glass with a low-temperature co-melting reaction.

    PubMed

    Fang, Li; Duan, Xiaofang; Chen, Rongming; Cheng, Fangqin

    2014-08-01

    This paper presents an effective utilization of slag from acid leaching of coal-waste with a novel approach, namely low-temperature co-melting method, for preparation of sodium silicate (Na2O x nSiO2) using slag from acid leaching of coal-waste as feedstock. It is very interesting that the co-melting reaction temperature of the mixture of Na2CO3 and the feedstock (50-100 microm) was as low as 850 degrees C, which was significantly lower than the temperature used in traditional sodium silicate production (1400 degrees C). The optimum SiO2/Na2O ratio was identified as 7:3 according to the results of thermogravimetry-differential scanning calorimetry (TGA-DSC), ICP-AES, and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses. In this condition, the main product was sodium disilicate (Na2O x 2SiO2), with water solubility of 85.0%. More importantly, the impurities such as aluminum in the feedstock, which had adverse effect on subsequent treatment, were concentrated almost completely in the filter residue as insoluble sodium alumunosilicates, i.e., Na(Si2Al)O6 x H2O. The lower co-melting temperature of this process demonstrates a significant energy-saving opportunity and thus a promising approach for highly effective utilization of coal-waste. Implications: Recently, alumina extraction from coal-waste has been extensively investigated and industrial applied in China. However, the slag-containing silica generated from the acid leaching process of coal-waste led to a secondary pollution, which hindered large-scale production. The proposed low-temperature co-melting method for preparation of sodium silicate (Na2O x nSiO2) using slag from acid leaching of coal-waste as feedstock indicated that it is an efficient approach for the recovery of silica from the acid-leached slag of coal-waste with minimal environmental impact.

  5. Electron cyclotron emission spectra in X- and O-mode polarisation at JET: Martin-Puplett interferometer, absolute calibration, revised uncertainties, inboard/outboard temperature profile, and wall properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmuck, S.; Fessey, J.; Boom, J. E.; Meneses, L.; Abreu, P.; Belonohy, E.; Lupelli, I.

    2016-09-01

    At the tokamak Joint European Torus (JET), the electron cyclotron emission spectra in O-mode and X-mode polarisations are diagnosed simultaneous in absolute terms for several harmonics with two Martin-Puplett interferometers. From the second harmonic range in X-mode polarisation, the electron temperature profile can be deduced for the outboard side (low magnetic field strength) of JET but only for some parts of the inboard side (high magnetic field strength). This spatial restriction can be bypassed, if a cutoff is not present inside the plasma for O-mode waves in the first harmonic range. Then, from this spectral domain, the profile on the entire inboard side is accessible. The profile determination relies on the new absolute and independent calibration for both interferometers. During the calibration procedure, the antenna pattern was investigated as well, and, potentially, an increase in the diagnostic responsivity of about 5% was found for the domain 100-300 GHz. This increase and other uncertainty sources are taken into account in the thorough revision of the uncertainty for the diagnostic absolute calibration. The uncertainty deduced and the convolution inherent for Fourier spectroscopy diagnostics have implications for the temperature profile inferred. Having probed the electron cyclotron emission spectra in orthogonal polarisation directions for the first harmonic range, a condition is derived for the reflection and polarisation-scrambling coefficients of the first wall on the outboard side of JET.

  6. On-Orbit Absolute Radiance Standard for Future IR Remote Sensing Instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Best, F. A.; Adler, D. P.; Pettersen, C.; Revercomb, H. E.; Gero, P. J.; Taylor, J. K.; Knuteson, R. O.; Perepezko, J. H.

    2010-12-01

    Future NASA infrared remote sensing missions, including the climate benchmark CLARREO mission will require better absolute measurement accuracy than now available, and will most certainly rely on the emerging capability to fly SI traceable standards that provide irrefutable absolute measurement accuracy. As an example, instrumentation designed to measure spectrally resolved infrared radiances with an absolute brightness temperature error of better than 0.1 K will require high-emissivity (>0.999) calibration blackbodies with emissivity uncertainty of better than 0.06%, and absolute temperature uncertainties of better than 0.045K (3 sigma). Key elements of an On-Orbit Absolute Radiance Standard (OARS) meeting these stringent requirements have been demonstrated in the laboratory at the University of Wisconsin and are undergoing Technology Readiness Level (TRL) advancement under the NASA Instrument Incubator Program (IIP). We present the new technologies that underlie the OARS and the results of laboratory testing that demonstrate the required accuracy is being met. The underlying technologies include on-orbit absolute temperature calibration using the transient melt signatures of small quantities (<1g) of reference materials (gallium, water, and mercury) imbedded in the blackbody cavity; and on-orbit cavity spectral emissivity measurement using a heated halo. For these emissivity measurements, a carefully baffled heated cylinder is placed in front of a blackbody in the infrared spectrometer system, and the combined radiance of the blackbody and Heated Halo reflection is observed. Knowledge of key temperatures and the viewing geometry allow the blackbody cavity spectral emissivity to be calculated. This work will culminate with an integrated subsystem that can provide on-orbit end-to-end radiometric accuracy validation for infrared remote sensing instruments.

  7. The formation of nuggets of highly siderophile elements in quenched silicate melts at high temperatures: Before or during the silicate quench?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malavergne, V.; Charon, E.; Jones, J.; Cordier, P.; Righter, K.; Deldicque, D.; Hennet, L.

    2016-01-01

    The Highly Siderophile Elements (HSE) are powerful tracers of planetary differentiation. Despite the importance of their partitioning between silicate and metal for the understanding of planetary core formation, especially for the Earth and Mars, there is still a huge discrepancy between conclusions based on different high temperature (HT) experimental studies. These disagreements may be due to the presence of HSE micro and nanonuggets in HT experiments. The formation of these nuggets is still interpreted in different ways. One hypothesis is that these HSE nuggets formed during the quench of the silicate melt, while another hypothesis supposes that these nuggets formed before the quench and represented artefacts of HT experiments. The goal of this work is to clarify whether the presence of HSE nuggets in silicate melts is linked to a quench effect or not. Understanding the formation of these HSE nuggets represents thus a necessary step towards the resolution of the Earth's core formation scenarios. We performed new HT experiments (1275-2000 °C) at different oxygen fugacities (fO2), between ambient air up to ∼5 log units below the Iron-Wüstite buffer [IW-5], for two different silicate compositions (synthetic martian and terrestrial basalts) mixed with a metallic mixture of Pt-Au-Pd-Ru. Our 1275-1600 °C experiments were contained in either olivine, diopside or graphite crucible; experiments at 2000 °C were performed using a levitation method, so no capsule was necessary. Our samples contained quenched silicate melts, minerals (olivine, pyroxene, spinel depending on the run), a two-phase metallic bead and nano and micro-nuggets of HSE. Our samples underwent fine textural, structural and analytical characterizations. The distribution of the nuggets was not homogeneous throughout the quenched silicate melt. HSE nuggets were present within crystals. Dendritic textures from the quenched silicate melt formed around HSE nuggets, which could be crystallized, showing

  8. Atomic scale modelling of chromium diffusion and melting in α-iron and iron-chromium alloys using high-temperature molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terentiev, Dmitri A.; Malerba, Lorenzo; Olsson, Par; Hou, Marc

    2004-04-01

    EAM interatomic potential to be used for radiation effect simulations in the Fe-Cr system has been recently proposed. In the present work, this potential is used to calculate by means of classical molecular dynamics (MD) the diffusivity of solute Cr atoms in Fe-12%Cr random alloy. Fe self-diffusivity is calculated as well, both in the alloy and in the pure metal, for comparison. In addition, the melting point for both the pure metal and the alloy, as predicted by the potential, has been determined and a comparison between the efficiency of vacancy and interstitial mechanisms for diffusion has been performed. This study allows the validity of the potential to be checked against experimental data outside its fitting range, while providing some insight into the description that this potential gives of irradiation effects. A correct prediction of the diffusivity of solute atoms at high temperature and the melting point are indeed an important pre-requisite for a correct prediction of ion mixing and point defect clustering within a displacement cascade during the thermal spike phase. The conclusion of the study is that the present potential is capable of reproducing with excellent accuracy both the diffusion coefficient and the melting point in Fe and in the Fe-Cr alloy. Atomic diffusion through interstitials is also seen to be a more efficient mechanism than through vacancies in the materials considered.

  9. Temperature-programed time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry study of 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium trifluoromethanesulfonate during glass-liquid transition, crystallization, melting, and solvation

    SciTech Connect

    Souda, Ryutaro; Guenster, Jens

    2008-09-07

    For this study, time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry was used to analyze the molecular orientation of 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium trifluoromethanesulfonate ([bmim][OTf]) and its interaction with the adsorbed Na and LiI species at temperatures of 150-300 K. A glassy [bmim][OTf] film crystallizes at around 230 K, as observed from the increase in the [bmim]{sup +} yield. LiI and Na adsorbed on the glassy film are solvated, whereas they tend to form islands on a crystalline film. The crystalline surface inertness is ascribable to the termination with the CF{sub 3} and C{sub 4}H{sub 9} groups, whereas the exposure of polar SO{sub 3} and imidazole groups at the glassy film results in the solvation. Surface layering occurs during solvation of LiI on the glassy film in such a way that the [bmim]{sup +} ([OTf]{sup -}) moiety is exposed to the vacuum (oriented to the bulk). The LiI adsorbed on the glassy film is incorporated into the bulk at temperatures higher than 200 K because of the glass-liquid transition. No further uptake of LiI is observed during crystallization, providing a contrast to the results of normal molecular solids such as water and ethanol. The surface layers of the crystal melt at temperatures below the bulk melting point, as confirmed from the dissolution of adsorbed LiI, but the melting layer retains a short-range order similar to the crystal. The [bmim][OTf] can be regarded as a strongly correlated liquid with the combined liquid property and crystal-type local structure. The origin of this behavior is discussed.

  10. Effects of water-saturation on strength and ductility of three igneous rocks at effective pressures to 50 MPA and temperatures to partial melting

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, S.J.; Friedman, M.; Handin, J.

    1981-01-01

    The short-term failure strengths and strains at failure of room-dry and water-saturated, cylindrical specimens (2 by 4 cm) of Charcoal Granodiorite (CG), Mt. Hood Andesite (MHA), and Cuerbio Basalt (CB) at a strain rate of 10/sup -4/s/sup -1/, at effective confining pressures of 0, 50, and 100 MPa and at temperatures to partial melting were investigated. Data from water-saturated specimens of the granodiorite and andesite, compared to room-dry counterparts, indicate (1) the pore pressures are essentially communicated throughout each test specimen so that they are fully effective; (2) at P/sub e/ = 0 and 50 MPa the granodiorite does not water-weaken; (3) at these same effective pressures the more porous and finer-grained andesite begins to exhibit water-weakening at about 600/sup 0/C; (4) at P/sub e/ = 0 and 870 to 900/sup 0/C the andesite's strength averages 20 MPa while the strength of dry specimens at the same P and T exhibit a strength of 100 MPa; (5) at P/sub e/ = 50 MPa compared to 160 MPa dry; (6) the basalt at P/sub e/ = 0, appears to be water-weakened at 800/sup 0/C; (7) water saturated specimens deformed at temperatures less than that of melting exhibit ultimate strengths at less than 2% shortening and then work-soften along faults; (8) again as do the dry counterparts, the wet specimens deform primarily by microscopic fracturing that coalesces into one or more macroscopic faults; and (9) the temperature for incipient melting of the andesite is decreased >150/sup 0/C in the water-saturated tests.

  11. Effects of water-saturation on strength and ductility of three igneous rocks at effective pressures to 50 MPa and temperatures to partial melting

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, S.J.; Friedman, M.; Handin, J.

    1981-01-01

    Instantaneous-failure strengths and ductilities of water-saturated cylindrical specimens of Charcoal Granodiorite, Mount Hood Andesite, and Cuerbio Basalt are determined at a strain rate of 10{sup -4}s{sup -1} and at effective confining pressures (Pe) of 0 and 50 MPa and at temperatures to partial melting. The data indicate: (1) at Pe = 0 and 50 MPa (Pc and Pp of 50 MPa and of 100 and 50 MPa, respectively) the granodiorite does not water-weaken; (2) at these same Pe the more porous and finer-grained andesite begins to exhibit water-weakening at about 600/sup 0/C; (3) at Pe = 0 and 870-900{sup 0}C the andesite's wet strength averages 20 MPa compared to 100 MPa, dry; (4) at Pe = 50 MPa and 920{sup 0}C its wet strength is 45 MPa compared to 160 MPa dry; (5) at Pe = 0, the basalt appears to be water-weakened above 800{sup 0}C; (6) water-saturated specimens deformed at temperatures less than T{sub m} exhibit ultimate strengths at less than 2 percent shortening and then work-soften along faults; and (7) both dry and wet specimens deform primarily by brittle fracture. Extrapolations indicate: (1) crystalline rocks should be drillable because they remain brittle until partial melting occurs, and penetration rates should increase with temperature because there is a corresponding decrease in brittle fracture strength; (2) boreholes in ''water-filled'' holes will be stable to >10 km at temperatures temperatures are kept to less than or equal to 700{sup 0}C, even open boreholes in granodiorite are apt to be stable to >10 km; and (4) open boreholes in the andesite are apt to be much less stable, and at similar temperatures would fail at 2 to 5-km depth.

  12. Optical emission, shock-induced opacity, temperatures, and melting of Gd3Ga5O12 single crystals shock-compressed from 41 to 290 GPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xianming; Nellis, William J.; Li, Jiabo; Li, Jun; Zhao, Wanguang; Liu, Xun; Cao, Xiuxia; Liu, Qiancheng; Xue, Tao; Wu, Qiang; Mashimo, T.

    2015-08-01

    Strong oxides at high shock pressures have broad crossovers from elastic solids at ambient to failure by plastic deformation, to heterogeneous deformation to weak solids, to fluid-like solids that equilibrate thermally in a few ns, to melting and, at sufficiently high shock pressures and temperatures, to metallic fluid oxides. This sequence of crossovers in single-crystal cubic Gd3Ga5O12 (Gd-Ga Garnet-GGG) has been diagnosed by fast emission spectroscopy using a 16-channel optical pyrometer in the spectral range 400-800 nm with bandwidths per channel of 10 nm, a writing time of ˜1000 ns and time resolution of 3 ns. Spectra were measured at shock pressures from 40 to 290 GPa (100 GPa = 1 Mbar) with corresponding gray-body temperatures from 3000 to 8000 K. Experimental lifetimes were a few 100 ns. Below 130 GPa, emission is heterogeneous and measured temperatures are indicative of melting temperatures in grain boundary regions rather than bulk temperatures. At 130 GPa and 2200 K, GGG equilibrates thermally and homogeneously in a thin opaque shock front. This crossover has a characteristic spectral signature in going from partially transmitting shock-heated material behind the shock front to an opaque shock front. Opacity is caused by optical scattering and absorption of light generated by fast compression. GGG melts at ˜5000 K in a two-phase region at shock pressures in the range 200 GPa to 217 GPa. Hugoniot equation-of-state data were measured by a Doppler Pin SystemDPS with ps time resolution and are generally consistent with previous data. Extrapolation of previous electrical conductivity measurements indicates that GGG becomes a poor metal at a shock pressure above ˜400 GPa. Because the shock impedance of GGG is higher than that of Al2O3 used previously to make metallic fluid H (MFH), the use of GGG to make MFH will achieve higher pressures and lower temperatures than use of Al2O3. However, maximum dynamic pressures at which emission temperatures of fluid

  13. Melting of Ice under Pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Schwegler, E; Sharma, M; Gygi, F; Galli, G

    2008-07-31

    The melting of ice under pressure is investigated with a series of first principles molecular dynamics simulations. In particular, a two-phase approach is used to determine the melting temperature of the ice-VII phase in the range of 10 to 50 GPa. Our computed melting temperatures are consistent with existing diamond anvil cell experiments. We find that for pressures between 10 to 40 GPa, ice melts as a molecular solid. For pressures above {approx}45 GPa there is a sharp increase in the slope of the melting curve due to the presence of molecular dissociation and proton diffusion in the solid, prior to melting. The onset of significant proton diffusion in ice-VII as a function of increasing temperature is found to be gradual and bears many similarities to that of a type-II superionic solid.

  14. Derivation of heating rate dependent exposure strategies for the selective laser melting of thermoplastic polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drummer, Dietmar; Drexler, Maximilian; Wudy, Katrin

    2015-05-01

    The selective laser melting of polymer powder is for rapid prototyping applications an established technology, although a lack in basic process knowledge appears. Considering demands of series production the selective laser melting technique is faced with varies challenges concerning processable material systems, process strategies and part properties. Consequently basic research is necessary to shift from rapid prototyping to rapid manufacturing of small lot sized series. Based on basic research the high potential of selective laser melting for the production of complex parts without any tools can be opened up. For the derivation of part quality increasing process strategies knowledge about interactions between sub-processes of selective laser melting and resulting part properties is necessary. The selective laser melting consists of three major sub-processes: Geometry exposure, tempering and powder feeding. According to the interaction of sub-processes resulting temperature fields during the selective laser melting process determine the part properties by changing micro structural pore number and distribution. Beneath absolute temperatures also the time-dependency of the thermal fields influences the porosity of molten parts. Present process strategies tend to decrease building time by increasing scanning speed and laser power. Although the absolute energy input into the material is constant for increasing scanning speed and laser power in the same ratio, time dependent material effects are neglected. The heating rate is a combined parameter derived from absolute temperature and time. Within the paper the authors analyze the basic interactions between different heating rates and part properties (e.g. porosity, mechanical strengths). Therefore with different heating rates produced specimens are analyzed with imaging technologies as well as mechanical tests. Based on the done basic investigations new heating rate dependent process strategies can be established

  15. Effect of pool rotation on three-dimensional flow in a shallow annular pool of silicon melt with bidirectional temperature gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Quan-Zhuang; Peng, Lan; Wang, Fei; Liu, Jia

    2016-08-01

    In order to understand the effect of pool rotation on silicon melt flow with the bidirectional temperature gradients, we conducted a series of unsteady three-dimensional (3D) numerical simulations in a shallow annular pool. The bidirectional temperature gradients are produced by the temperature difference between outer and inner walls as well as a constant heat flux at the bottom. Results show that when Marangoni number is small, a 3D steady flow is common without pool rotation. But it bifurcates to a 3D oscillatory flow at a low rotation Reynolds number. Subsequently, the flow becomes steady and axisymmetric at a high rotation Reynolds number. When the Marangoni number is large, pool rotation can effectively suppress the temperature fluctuation on the free surface, meanwhile, it improves the flow stability. The critical heat flux density diagrams are mapped, and the effects of radial and vertical temperature gradients on the flow are discussed. Additionally, the transition process from the flow dominated by the radial temperature gradient to the one dominated by the vertical temperature gradient is presented.

  16. Absolute biological needs.

    PubMed

    McLeod, Stephen

    2014-07-01

    Absolute needs (as against instrumental needs) are independent of the ends, goals and purposes of personal agents. Against the view that the only needs are instrumental needs, David Wiggins and Garrett Thomson have defended absolute needs on the grounds that the verb 'need' has instrumental and absolute senses. While remaining neutral about it, this article does not adopt that approach. Instead, it suggests that there are absolute biological needs. The absolute nature of these needs is defended by appeal to: their objectivity (as against mind-dependence); the universality of the phenomenon of needing across the plant and animal kingdoms; the impossibility that biological needs depend wholly upon the exercise of the abilities characteristic of personal agency; the contention that the possession of biological needs is prior to the possession of the abilities characteristic of personal agency. Finally, three philosophical usages of 'normative' are distinguished. On two of these, to describe a phenomenon or claim as 'normative' is to describe it as value-dependent. A description of a phenomenon or claim as 'normative' in the third sense does not entail such value-dependency, though it leaves open the possibility that value depends upon the phenomenon or upon the truth of the claim. It is argued that while survival needs (or claims about them) may well be normative in this third sense, they are normative in neither of the first two. Thus, the idea of absolute need is not inherently normative in either of the first two senses. PMID:23586876

  17. Absolute biological needs.

    PubMed

    McLeod, Stephen

    2014-07-01

    Absolute needs (as against instrumental needs) are independent of the ends, goals and purposes of personal agents. Against the view that the only needs are instrumental needs, David Wiggins and Garrett Thomson have defended absolute needs on the grounds that the verb 'need' has instrumental and absolute senses. While remaining neutral about it, this article does not adopt that approach. Instead, it suggests that there are absolute biological needs. The absolute nature of these needs is defended by appeal to: their objectivity (as against mind-dependence); the universality of the phenomenon of needing across the plant and animal kingdoms; the impossibility that biological needs depend wholly upon the exercise of the abilities characteristic of personal agency; the contention that the possession of biological needs is prior to the possession of the abilities characteristic of personal agency. Finally, three philosophical usages of 'normative' are distinguished. On two of these, to describe a phenomenon or claim as 'normative' is to describe it as value-dependent. A description of a phenomenon or claim as 'normative' in the third sense does not entail such value-dependency, though it leaves open the possibility that value depends upon the phenomenon or upon the truth of the claim. It is argued that while survival needs (or claims about them) may well be normative in this third sense, they are normative in neither of the first two. Thus, the idea of absolute need is not inherently normative in either of the first two senses.

  18. Optomechanics for absolute rotation detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davuluri, Sankar

    2016-07-01

    In this article, we present an application of optomechanical cavity for the absolute rotation detection. The optomechanical cavity is arranged in a Michelson interferometer in such a way that the classical centrifugal force due to rotation changes the length of the optomechanical cavity. The change in the cavity length induces a shift in the frequency of the cavity mode. The phase shift corresponding to the frequency shift in the cavity mode is measured at the interferometer output to estimate the angular velocity of absolute rotation. We derived an analytic expression to estimate the minimum detectable rotation rate in our scheme for a given optomechanical cavity. Temperature dependence of the rotation detection sensitivity is studied.

  19. Estimation of melting points of organic compounds-II.

    PubMed

    Jain, Akash; Yalkowsky, Samuel H

    2006-12-01

    A model for calculation of melting points of organic compounds from structure is described. The model utilizes additive, constitutive and nonadditive, constitutive molecular properties to calculate the enthalpy of melting and the entropy of melting, respectively. Application of the model to over 2200 compounds, including a number of drugs with complex structures, gives an average absolute error of 30.1 degrees.

  20. Evaluation of the Gibbs Free Energy Changes and Melting Temperatures of DNA/DNA Duplexes Using Hybridization Enthalpy Calculated by Molecular Dynamics Simulation.

    PubMed

    Lomzov, Alexander A; Vorobjev, Yury N; Pyshnyi, Dmitrii V

    2015-12-10

    A molecular dynamics simulation approach was applied for the prediction of the thermal stability of oligonucleotide duplexes. It was shown that the enthalpy of the DNA/DNA complex formation could be calculated using this approach. We have studied the influence of various simulation parameters on the secondary structure and the hybridization enthalpy value of Dickerson-Drew dodecamer. The optimal simulation parameters for the most reliable prediction of the enthalpy values were determined. The thermodynamic parameters (enthalpy and entropy changes) of a duplex formation were obtained experimentally for 305 oligonucleotides of various lengths and GC-content. The resulting database was studied with molecular dynamics (MD) simulation using the optimized simulation parameters. Gibbs free energy changes and the melting temperatures were evaluated using the experimental correlation between enthalpy and entropy changes of the duplex formation and the enthalpy values calculated by the MD simulation. The average errors in the predictions of enthalpy, the Gibbs free energy change, and the melting temperature of oligonucleotide complexes were 11%, 10%, and 4.4 °C, respectively. We have shown that the molecular dynamics simulation gives a possibility to calculate the thermal stability of native DNA/DNA complexes a priori with an unexpectedly high accuracy.

  1. Resource recycling through artificial lightweight aggregates from sewage sludge and derived ash using boric acid flux to lower co-melting temperature.

    PubMed

    Hu, Shao-Hua; Hu, Shen-Chih; Fu, Yen-Pei

    2012-02-01

    This study focuses on artificial lightweight aggregates (ALWAs) formed from sewage sludge and ash at lowered co-melting temperatures using boric acid as the fluxing agent. The weight percentages of boric acid in the conditioned mixtures of sludge and ash were 13% and 22%, respectively. The ALWA derived from sewage sludge was synthesized under the following conditions: preheating at 400 degrees C 0.5 hr and a sintering temperature of 850 degrees C 1 hr. The analytical results of water adsorption, bulk density, apparent porosity, and compressive strength were 3.88%, 1.05 g/cm3, 3.93%, and 29.7 MPa, respectively. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) images of the ALWA show that the trends in water adsorption and apparent porosity were opposite to those of bulk density. This was due to the inner pores being sealed off by lower-melting-point material at the aggregates'surface. In the case of ash-derived aggregates, water adsorption, bulk density, apparent porosity, and compressive strength were 0.82%, 0.91 g/cm3, 0.82%, and 28.0 MPa, respectively. Both the sludge- and ash-derived aggregates meet the legal standards for ignition loss and soundness in Taiwan for construction or heat insulation materials.

  2. Influence of processing parameters and formulation factors on the bioadhesive, temperature stability and drug release properties of hot-melt extruded films containing miconazole.

    PubMed

    Chen, Meiwan; Lu, Jiannan; Deng, Weibin; Singh, Abhilasha; Mohammed, Noorullah Naqvi; Repka, Michael A; Wu, Chuanbin

    2014-06-01

    This study investigated the processing parameters and formulation factors on the bioadhesive properties, temperature stability properties, and drug release properties of miconazole in PolyOx® and Klucel® matrix systems produced by Hot-melt Extrusion (HME) technology. Miconazole incorporated into these matrix systems were found to be stable for 8 months by X-ray diffraction (XRD). The addition of miconazole increased area under the curve (AUC) at contact time intervals of 30 and 60 sec, while the bioadhesion decreased with an increase in processing temperatures. The release profiles suggest that a sustained release of miconazole was observed from all of the tested HME film formulations for approximately 10 h. The release from the optimal HME film extruded at 205°C was found to be significantly different than that extruded at 190°C. Therefore, this matrix system may address the present shortcomings of currently available therapy for oral and pharyngeal candidiasis.

  3. In situ study of the fractionation of hydrogen isotopes between aluminosilicate melts and coexisting aqueous fluids at high pressure and high temperature - Implications for the δD in magmatic processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalou, Célia; Le Losq, Charles; Mysen, Bjorn O.

    2015-09-01

    The hydrogen isotopic composition of melt inclusions trapped in phenocrysts during their crystallization and growth in a magma may contribute to a better understanding of the water cycle between the atmosphere, the hydrosphere and the lithosphere. Such understanding relies on the knowledge of the hydrogen isotopic fractionation factors between aqueous fluids, silicate melts, and minerals at temperature and pressure conditions relevant to the Earth's interior. Significant D/H fractionation between silicate melts and aqueous fluids was reported at hundreds of MPa and °C by using in situ measurements in hydrothermal diamond anvil cell (HDAC) experiments (Mysen, 2013a, 2013b, Am. Mineral. 98, 376-386 and 1754-1764). However, the available dataset is focused on fluids and melts with D/H ratios close to unity. The relevance of such data for natural processes that involve per mil variations of δD-values may not always be clear. To address such concerns, the effect of the bulk D/H ratio on hydrogen isotope partitioning between water-saturated silicate melts and coexisting silicate-saturated aqueous fluids has been determined in the Na2O-Al2O3-SiO2-H2O-D2O system. To this end, in situ Raman spectroscopic measurements were performed on fluids and melts with bulk D/H ratios from 0.05 to 2.67 by using an externally-heated diamond anvil cell in the 300-800 °C and 200-1500 MPa temperature and pressure range, respectively. In these pressure/temperature ranges, the D/H ratios of fluids in equilibrium with melt barely change with temperature (in average ΔHfluid = 0.47 ± 1.15 kJ /mol). In contrast, the D/H ratios of coexisting melts display strong dependence on temperature (average ΔHmelt = 7.18 ± 1.27 kJ /mol). The temperature-dependence of the D/H fractionation factor between melt and fluid (αfluid-melt = D /Hfluid / D /Hmelt) is comparable in all the experiments and can be written: 1000 ṡ ln ⁡ (αfluid-melt) = 263 (± 26) ṡT-2- 126 (± 48). Therefore, the αfluid-melt

  4. Determination of gas temperature and C2 absolute density in Ar/H2/CH4 microwave discharges used for nanocrystalline diamond deposition from the C2 Mulliken system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lombardi, G.; Bénédic, F.; Mohasseb, F.; Hassouni, K.; Gicquel, A.

    2004-08-01

    The spectroscopic characterization of Ar/H2/CH4 discharges suitable for the synthesis of nanocrystalline diamond using the microwave plasma assisted chemical vapour deposition process is reported. The experiments are realized in a moderate-pressure bell jar reactor, where discharges are ignited using a microwave cavity coupling system. The concentration of CH4 is maintained at 1% and the coupled set of hydrogen concentration/microwave power (MWP) ranges from 2%/500 W to 7%/800 W at a pressure of 200 mbar. Emission spectroscopy and broadband absorption spectroscopy studies are carried out on the \\C_{2}(D\\,^{1\\!}\\Sigma_u^{+}\\mbox{--}X\\,^{1\\!}\\Sigma_g^{+}) Mulliken system and the C2(d 3Pgrg-a 3Pgru) Swan system in order to determine the gas temperature and the C2 absolute density within the plasma. For this purpose, and since the Swan system is quite well-known, much importance is devoted to the achievement of a detailed simulation of the Mulliken system, which allows the determination of both the rotational temperature and the density of the \\smash{X\\,^{1\\!}\\Sigma_g^{+}} ground state, as well as the rotational temperature of the \\smash{D\\,^{1\\!}\\Sigma_u^{+}} state, from experimental data. All the experimental values are compared to those predicted by a thermochemical model developed to describe Ar/H2/CH4 microwave discharges under quasi-homogeneous plasma assumption. This comparison shows a reasonable agreement between the values measured from the C2 Mulliken system, those measured from the C2 Swan system and that calculated from plasma modelling, especially at low hydrogen concentration/MWP. These consistent results show that the use of the Mulliken system leads to fairly good estimates of the gas temperature and of the C2 absolute density. The relatively high gas temperatures found for the conditions investigated, typically between 3000 K and 4000 K, are attributed to the low thermal conductivity of argon that may limit thermal losses to the

  5. The impact of a phase-change cooling vest on heat strain and the effect of different cooling pack melting temperatures.

    PubMed

    House, James R; Lunt, Heather C; Taylor, Rowan; Milligan, Gemma; Lyons, Jason A; House, Carol M

    2013-05-01

    Cooling vests (CV) are often used to reduce heat strain. CVs have traditionally used ice as the coolant, although other phase-change materials (PCM) that melt at warmer temperatures have been used in an attempt to enhance cooling by avoiding vasoconstriction, which supposedly occurs when ice CVs are used. This study assessed the effectiveness of four CVs that melted at 0, 10, 20 and 30 °C (CV₀, CV₁₀, CV₂₀, and CV₃₀) when worn by 10 male volunteers exercising and then recovering in 40 °C air whilst wearing fire-fighting clothing. When compared with a non-cooling control condition (CON), only the CV₀ and CV₁₀ vests provided cooling during exercise (40 and 29 W, respectively), whereas all CVs provided cooling during resting recovery (CV₀ 69 W, CV₁₀ 66 W, CV₂₀ 55 W and CV₃₀ 29 W) (P < 0.05). In all conditions, skin blood flow increased when exercising and reduced during recovery, but was lower in the CV₀ and CV₁₀ conditions compared with control during exercise (observed power 0.709) (P < 0.05), but not during resting recovery (observed power only 0.55). The participants preferred the CV₁₀ to the CV₀, which caused temporary erythema to underlying skin, although this resolved overnight after each occurrence. Consequently, a cooling vest melting at 10 °C would seem to be the most appropriate choice for cooling during combined work and rest periods, although possibly an ice-vest (CV₀) may also be appropriate if more insulation was worn between the cooling packs and the skin than used in this study.

  6. The impact of a phase-change cooling vest on heat strain and the effect of different cooling pack melting temperatures.

    PubMed

    House, James R; Lunt, Heather C; Taylor, Rowan; Milligan, Gemma; Lyons, Jason A; House, Carol M

    2013-05-01

    Cooling vests (CV) are often used to reduce heat strain. CVs have traditionally used ice as the coolant, although other phase-change materials (PCM) that melt at warmer temperatures have been used in an attempt to enhance cooling by avoiding vasoconstriction, which supposedly occurs when ice CVs are used. This study assessed the effectiveness of four CVs that melted at 0, 10, 20 and 30 °C (CV₀, CV₁₀, CV₂₀, and CV₃₀) when worn by 10 male volunteers exercising and then recovering in 40 °C air whilst wearing fire-fighting clothing. When compared with a non-cooling control condition (CON), only the CV₀ and CV₁₀ vests provided cooling during exercise (40 and 29 W, respectively), whereas all CVs provided cooling during resting recovery (CV₀ 69 W, CV₁₀ 66 W, CV₂₀ 55 W and CV₃₀ 29 W) (P < 0.05). In all conditions, skin blood flow increased when exercising and reduced during recovery, but was lower in the CV₀ and CV₁₀ conditions compared with control during exercise (observed power 0.709) (P < 0.05), but not during resting recovery (observed power only 0.55). The participants preferred the CV₁₀ to the CV₀, which caused temporary erythema to underlying skin, although this resolved overnight after each occurrence. Consequently, a cooling vest melting at 10 °C would seem to be the most appropriate choice for cooling during combined work and rest periods, although possibly an ice-vest (CV₀) may also be appropriate if more insulation was worn between the cooling packs and the skin than used in this study. PMID:23160652

  7. Bulk heat transfer coefficient in the ice-upper ocean system in the ice melt season derived from concentration-temperature relationship

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nihashi, Sohey; Ohshima, Kay I.

    2008-06-01

    The bulk heat transfer coefficient in the ice-upper ocean system (Kb) in the ice melt season is estimated by a new method at 18 areas that cover much of the Antarctic seasonal ice zone. The method is based on a model in which ice melting is caused only by heat input through open water and is treated in a bulk fashion in the ice-upper ocean system. Kb is estimated by fitting a convergent curve derived from the model to an observed ice concentration-temperature plot (CT-plot). Estimated Kb is 1.15 ± 0.72 × 10-4 m s-1 on average. If Kb can be expressed by the product of the heat transfer coefficient (ch) and the friction velocity (uτ), ch is 0.0113 ± 0.0055. This value is about two times larger than that estimated at the ice bottom. The relationship between Kb and the geostrophic wind speed (Uw), which is roughly proportional to uτ, shows a significant positive correlation, as expected. Further, Kb seems more likely to be proportional to the square or cube of Uw rather than a linear relationship. Since Kb estimated from our method is associated with ice melting in a bulk fashion in the ice-upper ocean system, this relationship likely indicates both the mixing process of heat in the upper ocean (proportional to uτ3) and the local heat transfer process at the ice-ocean interface (proportional to uτ).

  8. The absolute path command

    2012-05-11

    The ap command traveres all symlinks in a given file, directory, or executable name to identify the final absolute path. It can print just the final path, each intermediate link along with the symlink chan, and the permissions and ownership of each directory component in the final path. It has functionality similar to "which", except that it shows the final path instead of the first path. It is also similar to "pwd", but it canmore » provide the absolute path to a relative directory from the current working directory.« less

  9. The absolute path command

    SciTech Connect

    Moody, A.

    2012-05-11

    The ap command traveres all symlinks in a given file, directory, or executable name to identify the final absolute path. It can print just the final path, each intermediate link along with the symlink chan, and the permissions and ownership of each directory component in the final path. It has functionality similar to "which", except that it shows the final path instead of the first path. It is also similar to "pwd", but it can provide the absolute path to a relative directory from the current working directory.

  10. Absolute CF{sub 2} density and gas temperature measurements by absorption spectroscopy in dual-frequency capacitively coupled CF{sub 4}/Ar plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Wen-Yao; Xu, Yong Peng, Fei; Gong, Fa-Ping; Li, Xiao-Song; Zhu, Ai-Min; Liu, Yong-Xin; Wang, You-Nian

    2014-10-15

    Broadband ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy has been used to determine the CF{sub 2} radical density in dual-frequency capacitively coupled CF{sub 4}/Ar plasmas, using the CF{sub 2} A{sup ~1}B{sub 1}←X{sup ~1}A{sub 1} system of absorption spectrum. The rotational temperature of ground state CF{sub 2} and excited state CF was also estimated by using A{sup ~1}B{sub 1}←X{sup ~1}A{sub 1} system and B{sup 2}Δ−X{sup 2}Π system, respectively. The translational gas temperature was deduced from the Doppler width of the Ar{sup *}({sup 3}P{sub 2}) and Ar{sup *}({sup 3}P{sub 0}) metastable atoms absorption line by using the tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy. The rotational temperatures of the excited state CF are about 100 K higher than those of ground state CF{sub 2}, and about 200 K higher than the translational gas temperatures. The dependences of the radical CF{sub 2} density, electron density, electron temperature, rotational temperature, and gas temperature on the high frequency power and pressure have been analyzed. Furthermore, the production and loss mechanisms of CF{sub 2} radical and the gas heating mechanisms have also been discussed.

  11. PNAS Plus: Very high-temperature impact melt products as evidence for cosmic airbursts and impacts 12,900 years ago

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunch, Ted E.; Hermes, Robert E.; Moore, Andrew M. T.; Kennett, Douglas J.; Weaver, James C.; Wittke, James H.; DeCarli, Paul S.; Bischoff, James L.; Hillman, Gordon C.; Howard, George A.; Kimbel, David R.; Kletetschka, Gunther; Lipo, Carl P.; Sakai, Sachiko; Revay, Zsolt; West, Allen; Firestone, Richard B.; Kennett, James P.

    2012-07-01

    It has been proposed that fragments of an asteroid or comet impacted Earth, deposited silica-and iron-rich microspherules and other proxies across several continents, and triggered the Younger Dryas cooling episode 12,900 years ago. Although many independent groups have confirmed the impact evidence, the hypothesis remains controversial because some groups have failed to do so. We examined sediment sequences from 18 dated Younger Dryas boundary (YDB) sites across three continents (North America, Europe, and Asia), spanning 12,000 km around nearly one-third of the planet. All sites display abundant microspherules in the YDB with none or few above and below. In addition, three sites (Abu Hureyra, Syria; Melrose, Pennsylvania; and Blackville, South Carolina) display vesicular, high-temperature, siliceous scoria-like objects, or SLOs, that match the spherules geochemically. We compared YDB objects with melt products from a known cosmic impact (Meteor Crater, Arizona) and from the 1945 Trinity nuclear airburst in Socorro, New Mexico, and found that all of these high-energy events produced material that is geochemically and morphologically comparable, including: (i) high-temperature, rapidly quenched microspherules and SLOs; (ii) corundum, mullite, and suessite (Fe3Si), a rare meteoritic mineral that forms under high temperatures; (iii) melted SiO2 glass, or lechatelierite, with flow textures (or schlieren) that form at > 2,200 °C; and (iv) particles with features indicative of high-energy interparticle collisions. These results are inconsistent with anthropogenic, volcanic, authigenic, and cosmic materials, yet consistent with cosmic ejecta, supporting the hypothesis of extraterrestrial airbursts/impacts 12,900 years ago. The wide geographic distribution of SLOs is consistent with multiple impactors.

  12. Surface Tension and Viscosity of SCN and SCN-acetone Alloys at Melting Points and Higher Temperatures Using Surface Light Scattering Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tin, Padetha; deGroh, Henry C., III.

    2003-01-01

    Succinonitrile has been and is being used extensively in NASA's Microgravity Materials Science and Fluid Physics programs and as well as in several ground-based and microgravity studies including the Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (IDGE). Succinonitrile (SCN) is useful as a model for the study of metal solidification, although it is an organic material, it has a BCC crystal structure and solidifies dendriticly like a metal. It is also transparent and has a low melting point (58.08 C). Previous measurements of succinonitrile (SCN) and alloys of succinonitrile and acetone surface tensions are extremely limited. Using the Surface Light Scattering technique we have determined non invasively, the surface tension and viscosity of SCN and SCN-Acetone Alloys at different temperatures. This relatively new and unique technique has several advantages over the classical methods such as, it is non invasive, has good accuracy and measures the surface tension and viscosity simultaneously. The accuracy of interfacial energy values obtained from this technique is better than 2% and viscosity about 10 %. Succinonitrile and succinonitrile-acetone alloys are well-established model materials with several essential physical properties accurately known - except the liquid/vapor surface tension at different elevated temperatures. We will be presenting the experimentally determined liquid/vapor surface energy and liquid viscosity of succinonitrile and succinonitrile-acetone alloys in the temperature range from their melting point to around 100 C using this non-invasive technique. We will also discuss about the measurement technique and new developments of the Surface Light Scattering Spectrometer.

  13. xMELTS: A thermodynamic model for the estimation of magmatic phase relations over the pressure range 0-30 GPa and at temperatures up to 2500 C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghiorso, M. S.; Hirschmann, M. M.; Grove, T. L.

    2007-12-01

    A thermodynamic model for multicomponent silicate liquids in the system SiO2-TiO2-Al2O3- Fe2O3-Cr2O3-FeO-MgO-CaO-Na2O-K2O-P2O5-H2O is calibrated over the pressure range 0-27.5 GPa and temperature range 700-2500°C from previously published experimental data (LEPR, http://lepr.ofm-research.org) on liquid-solid phase equilibria. The liquid model is combined with thermodynamic models for relevant igneous solid solutions - including a new model for majoritic garnets - to facilitate the calculation of phase relations by minimization of thermodynamic potentials. Extension to high pressures is achieved by adopting the liquid EOS of Ghiorso (2004, AJS 304, 637-838) and the Universal EOS for solid phases. The Gibbs free energy of the liquid is described as a regular associated solution, which permits a more physical description of the configurational entropy. The model includes both the speciation of water as molecular and hydroxyl units and multiple species of oxidized iron. The latter makes possible an internally consistent description of melt redox equilibria over the oxygen fugacity range from the iron- wüstite buffer to air. The model is calibrated from approximately 20000 statements of phase equilibria, including 6100 between endmember components of clinopyroxene and liquid, 3550 between olivine and liquid, 2800 orthopyroxene-liquid, 2750 feldspar-liquid, 2200 spinel-liquid, 950 garnet-liquid, 350 liquid-rhombohedral oxide (largely ilmenitess), 650 statements of water saturation, and a host of miscellaneous phases coexisting with liquid, importantly quartz, leucite, nepheline, (Mg,Fe2+)-perovskite, and (Mg,Fe2+)- wüstite. Calibrant liquids span naturally occurring compositions, but do not include data on simple systems (e.g., CMAS). xMELTS supersedes MELTS (Ghiorso and Sack, 1995, CMP 119, 197-212) and pMELTS (Ghiorso et al., 2002, G3 10.1029/2001GC000217) for the calculation of magmatic phase equilibria from crustal conditions down to the base of the transition

  14. Development of melting temperature-based SYBR Green I polymerase chain reaction methods for multiplex genetically modified organism detection.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Marta; Rodríguez-Lázaro, David; Esteve, Teresa; Prat, Salomé; Pla, Maria

    2003-12-15

    Commercialization of several genetically modified crops has been approved worldwide to date. Uniplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based methods to identify these different insertion events have been developed, but their use in the analysis of all commercially available genetically modified organisms (GMOs) is becoming progressively insufficient. These methods require a large number of assays to detect all possible GMOs present in the sample and thereby the development of multiplex PCR systems using combined probes and primers targeted to sequences specific to various GMOs is needed for detection of this increasing number of GMOs. Here we report on the development of a multiplex real-time PCR suitable for multiple GMO identification, based on the intercalating dye SYBR Green I and the analysis of the melting curves of the amplified products. Using this method, different amplification products specific for Maximizer 176, Bt11, MON810, and GA21 maize and for GTS 40-3-2 soybean were obtained and identified by their specific Tm. We have combined amplification of these products in a number of multiplex reactions and show the suitability of the methods for identification of GMOs with a sensitivity of 0.1% in duplex reactions. The described methods offer an economic and simple alternative to real-time PCR systems based on sequence-specific probes (i.e., TaqMan chemistry). These methods can be used as selection tests and further optimized for uniplex GMO quantification.

  15. An electron backscatter diffraction investigation of crystallographic orientations of embedded nanoparticles within melt-textured YBCO high temperature superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koblischka-Veneva, A.; Koblischka, M. R.; Babu, N. Hari; Cardwell, D. A.; Shlyk, L.; Krabbes, G.

    2006-07-01

    Microstructures of melt-textured YBCO samples with embedded nanosized particles of Y2BaCuO5 (Y-211) and Y2Ba4CuMOx (M-2411 with M = U,Zr) are analysed by means of electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). With the recent developments of the EBSD technique, we can directly measure the crystallographic orientation of the embedded nanoparticles, employing a spatial resolution of about 40 nm. The high image quality of the Kikuchi patterns allows true three-phase (YBCO, Y-211 and M-2411) scans to be performed. The Y-211 particles do not exhibit any preferred orientation, even if their size is considerably reduced, to the 100 nm range. The size reduction reduces the negative influence of the Y-211 particles on the YBCO matrix, however. U-2411 particles, which are formed during the processing stage, do not show any orientation, and with increasing concentration, some texture develops. In contrast to this, embedded Zr-2411 particles are fully oriented in the (001) orientation according to the surrounding superconducting matrix.

  16. Correlation between band gap, dielectric constant, Young’s modulus and melting temperature of GaN nanocrystals and their size and shape dependences

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Haiming; Meng, Xiangkang

    2015-01-01

    With structural miniaturization down to the nanoscale, the detectable parameters of materials no longer remain constant but become tunable. For GaN nanocrystals example, the band gap increases while the dielectric constant, Young’s modulus and melting temperature decrease with decreasing the solid size. Herein, we developed the models to describe the size and shape dependences of these seemingly uncorrelated parameters for GaN nanocrystals, based on our established thermodynamic model for cohesive energy of metallic nanocrystals. Consistency between our theoretical predictions and the corresponding experimental or simulated results confirms the accuracy of the developed models and indicates the essentiality of cohesive energy in describing the effects of size and shape on the physicochemical properties of different low-dimensional systems. PMID:26582533

  17. Experimental Partitioning of Chalcophile Elements between Mantle Silicate Minerals and Basaltic Melt at High Pressures and Temperatures - Implications for Sulfur Geochemistry of Mantle and Crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasgupta, R.; Jego, S.; Ding, S.; Li, Y.; Lee, C. T.

    2015-12-01

    The behavior of chalcophile elements during mantle melting, melt extraction, and basalt differentiation is critical for formation of ore deposits and geochemical model and evolution of crust-mantle system. While chalcophile elements are strongly partitioned into sulfides, their behavior with different extent of melting, in particular, in the absence of sulfides, can only be modeled with complete knowledge of the partitioning behavior of these elements between dominant mantle minerals and basaltic melt with or without dissolved sulfide (S2-). However, experimental data on mineral-melt partitioning are lacking for many chalcophile elements. Crystallization experiments were conducted at 3 GPa and 1450-1600 °C using a piston cylinder and synthetic silicate melt compositions similar to low-degree partial melt of peridotite. Starting silicate mixes doped with 100-300 ppm of each of various chalcophile elements were loaded into Pt/graphite double capsules. To test the effect of dissolved sulfur in silicate melt on mineral-melt partitioning of chalcophile elements, experiments were conducted on both sulfur-free and sulfur-bearing (1100-1400 ppm S in melt) systems. Experimental phases were analyzed by EPMA (for major elements and S) and LA-ICP-MS (for trace elements). All experiments produced an assemblage of cpx + melt ± garnet ± olivine ± spinel and yielded new partition coefficients (D) for Sn, Zn, Mo, Sb, Bi, Pb, and Se for cpx/melt, olivine/melt, and garnet/melt pairs. Derived Ds (mineral/basalt) reveal little effect of S2- in the melt on mineral-melt partition coefficients of the measured chalcophile elements, with Ds for Zn, Mo, Bi, Pb decreasing by less than a factor of 2 from S-free to S-bearing melt systems or remaining similar, within error, between S-free and S-bearing melt systems. By combining our data with existing partitioning data between sulfide phases and silicate melt we model the fractionation of these elements during mantle melting and basalt

  18. Room temperature magneto-structural transition in Al for Sn substituted Ni-Mn-Sn melt spun ribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maziarz, W.; Czaja, P.; Szczerba, M. J.; Przewoźnik, J.; Kapusta, C.; Żywczak, A.; Stobiecki, T.; Cesari, E.; Dutkiewicz, J.

    2013-12-01

    Martensitic and magnetic transformations in Ni48Mn39.5Sn12.5-xAlx (x=0, 1, 2, 3) Heusler alloy ribbons were investigated. It is demonstrated that both magnetic and structural transformations occur in all of the studied samples. It is also shown that substitution of Sn with Al causes the martensitic transformation (MT) and the reverse martensitic transformation (RMT) temperatures to increase to room temperature (ΔTMT=49 K; ΔTRMT=43 K), whereas the Curie temperature of martensite TCM decreases (ΔT=36 K) and the Curie temperature of austenite TCA remains practically insensitive to Al introduction. This then allows to tune TCA and the MT temperature leading to their coincidence at ambient temperature. The austenite phase with the L21 type structure has been identified to exist in all the samples regardless of composition. On the other hand the structure of martensite has been shown to be sensitive to composition. It has been determined as the 10 M martensite with (32¯) stacking sequence in Al free samples and the 4O martensite with the stacking periodicity (31¯) in Al containing samples. In addition, the splitting of the field cooling (FC) and the field heating (FH) thermo-magnetic curves at low (50 Oe) magnetic field and below the TCM has been attributed to intermartensitic transition. The application of large magnetic field (50 kOe) has shown the existence of two distinct ferromagnetic states with a considerable hysteresis loop. The properties of these materials make them promising for magnetocaloric applications.

  19. Thermodynamics of Oligonucleotide Duplex Melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreiber-Gosche, Sherrie; Edwards, Robert A.

    2009-05-01

    Melting temperatures of oligonucleotides are useful for a number of molecular biology applications, such as the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Although melting temperatures are often calculated with simplistic empirical equations, application of thermodynamics provides more accurate melting temperatures and an opportunity for students to apply rigorous thermodynamic analysis to an important biochemical problem. Because the stacking of base pairs on top of one another is a significant factor in the energetics of oligonucleotide melting, several investigators have applied van't Hoff analysis to melting temperature data using a nearest-neighbor model and have obtained entropies and enthalpies for the stacking of bases. The present article explains how the equilibrium constant for the dissociation of strands from double-stranded oligonucleotides can be expressed in terms of the total strand concentration and thus how the total strand concentration influences the melting temperature. It also presents a simplified analysis based on the entropies and enthalpies of stacking that is manually tractable so that students can work examples to help them understand the thermodynamics of oligonucleotide melting.

  20. In-Situ Observation of Crystallization and Growth in High-Temperature Melts Using the Confocal Laser Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohn, Il; Dippenaar, Rian

    2016-08-01

    This review discusses the innovative efforts initiated by Emi and co-workers for in-situ observation of phase transformations at high temperatures for materials. By using the high-temperature confocal laser-scanning microscope (CLSM), a robust database of the phase transformation behavior during heating and cooling of slags, fluxes, and steel can be developed. The rate of solidification and the progression of solid-state phase transformations can be readily investigated under a variety of atmospheric conditions and be correlated with theoretical predictions. The various research efforts following the work of Emi and co-workers have allowed a deeper fundamental understanding of the elusive solidification and phase transformation mechanisms in materials beyond the ambit of steels. This technique continues to evolve in terms of its methodology, application to other materials, and its contribution to technology.

  1. High temperature breakdown of the Stokes-Einstein relation in a computer simulated Cu-Zr melt.

    PubMed

    Han, X J; Li, J G; Schober, H R

    2016-03-28

    Transport properties and the Stokes-Einstein (SE) relation in liquid Cu8Zr3 are studied by molecular dynamics simulation with a modified embedded atom potential. The critical temperature Tc of mode coupling theory (MCT) is derived as 930 K from the self-diffusion coefficient D and viscosity η. The SE relation breaks down around TSE = 1900 K, which is far above Tc. At temperatures below TSE, the product of D and η fluctuates around a constant value, similar to the prediction of MCT near Tc. The influence of the microscopic atomic motion on macroscopic properties is investigated by analyzing the time dependent liquid structure and the self-hole filling process. The self-holes for the two components are preferentially filled by atoms of the same component. The self-hole filling dynamics explains the different breakdown behaviors of the SE relation in Zr-rich liquid CuZr2 compared to Cu-rich Cu8Zr3. At TSE, a kink is found in the temperature dependence of both partial and total coordination numbers for the three atomic pair combinations and of the typical time of self-hole filling. This indicates a strong correlation between liquid structure, atomic dynamics, and the breakdown of SE relation. The previously suggested usefulness of the parameter d(D1/D2)/dT to predict TSE is confirmed. Additionally we propose a viscosity criterion to predict TSE in the absence of diffusion data.

  2. High temperature breakdown of the Stokes-Einstein relation in a computer simulated Cu-Zr melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, X. J.; Li, J. G.; Schober, H. R.

    2016-03-01

    Transport properties and the Stokes-Einstein (SE) relation in liquid Cu8Zr3 are studied by molecular dynamics simulation with a modified embedded atom potential. The critical temperature Tc of mode coupling theory (MCT) is derived as 930 K from the self-diffusion coefficient D and viscosity η. The SE relation breaks down around TSE = 1900 K, which is far above Tc. At temperatures below TSE, the product of D and η fluctuates around a constant value, similar to the prediction of MCT near Tc. The influence of the microscopic atomic motion on macroscopic properties is investigated by analyzing the time dependent liquid structure and the self-hole filling process. The self-holes for the two components are preferentially filled by atoms of the same component. The self-hole filling dynamics explains the different breakdown behaviors of the SE relation in Zr-rich liquid CuZr2 compared to Cu-rich Cu8Zr3. At TSE, a kink is found in the temperature dependence of both partial and total coordination numbers for the three atomic pair combinations and of the typical time of self-hole filling. This indicates a strong correlation between liquid structure, atomic dynamics, and the breakdown of SE relation. The previously suggested usefulness of the parameter d(D1/D2)/dT to predict TSE is confirmed. Additionally we propose a viscosity criterion to predict TSE in the absence of diffusion data.

  3. High temperature breakdown of the Stokes-Einstein relation in a computer simulated Cu-Zr melt.

    PubMed

    Han, X J; Li, J G; Schober, H R

    2016-03-28

    Transport properties and the Stokes-Einstein (SE) relation in liquid Cu8Zr3 are studied by molecular dynamics simulation with a modified embedded atom potential. The critical temperature Tc of mode coupling theory (MCT) is derived as 930 K from the self-diffusion coefficient D and viscosity η. The SE relation breaks down around TSE = 1900 K, which is far above Tc. At temperatures below TSE, the product of D and η fluctuates around a constant value, similar to the prediction of MCT near Tc. The influence of the microscopic atomic motion on macroscopic properties is investigated by analyzing the time dependent liquid structure and the self-hole filling process. The self-holes for the two components are preferentially filled by atoms of the same component. The self-hole filling dynamics explains the different breakdown behaviors of the SE relation in Zr-rich liquid CuZr2 compared to Cu-rich Cu8Zr3. At TSE, a kink is found in the temperature dependence of both partial and total coordination numbers for the three atomic pair combinations and of the typical time of self-hole filling. This indicates a strong correlation between liquid structure, atomic dynamics, and the breakdown of SE relation. The previously suggested usefulness of the parameter d(D1/D2)/dT to predict TSE is confirmed. Additionally we propose a viscosity criterion to predict TSE in the absence of diffusion data. PMID:27036459

  4. Liquidus temperatures of komatiites and the effect of cooling rate on element partitioning between olivine and komatiitic melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sossi, Paolo A.; O'Neill, Hugh St. C.

    2016-05-01

    Archean komatiites are the hottest magmas preserved on Earth and are thus unique probes of its thermal evolution. Estimating their eruption temperatures remains problematic, however, because the uppermost (A1, A2) zones of komatiite flows contain randomly oriented spinifex-textured olivines, indicative of rapid cooling and growth. Fe-Mg partitioning between olivine and assumed komatiitic liquid typically shows departures from equilibrium, extending towards higher K_{{D}}^{{{{Fe}}^{2 + } - {{Mg}}}}. If these higher values are a disequilibrium effect, using them to calculate parental magma composition would lead to errors in estimated liquidus temperatures. In order to investigate this possibility, we have performed experiments on two komatiite compositions, the classic Barberton Aluminium Undepleted Komatiite (AUK) sample 49J (32.2 % MgO) and Munro AUK sample 422/95 (23 % MgO). Isothermal experiments to constrain phase equilibria on 49J at atmospheric pressure, between 1360 and 1600 °C at 1.7 log units below and 1.1 above the fayalite-magnetite-quartz (FMQ) buffer reveal a liquidus temperature ( T liq) of 1616 °C, 40 °C lower than a previous estimate. The K_{{D}}^{{Σ {{Fe}}{-}{{Mg}}}} ranges between 0.320 and 0.295 at FMQ - 1.7, with a slight negative dependence on temperature. To replicate the conditions that prevailed during the quenching of komatiites in their upper chill zones, experiments with a constant cooling rate at FMQ - 1.7 were performed on 422/95 ( T liq = 1450 °C) at 0.5, 1.5, 2.5, 6.5 and 16 °C/min. Olivine morphology changes from euhedral to tabular at low cooling rates, hopper at intermediate, and skeletal and chain structures at high rates. Concurrently, the K_{{D}}^{{Σ {{Fe}}{-}{{Mg}}}} increases monotonically from an equilibrium value of 0.305 to 0.376 at 16 °C/min, reflecting the inability of unwanted cations to diffuse away from the growing olivine. The high K_{{D}}^{{Σ {{Fe}}{-}{{Mg}}}} between olivine and komatiitic liquid caused by

  5. Study of iron nanoparticle melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedorov, A. V.; Shulgin, A. V.; Lavruk, S. A.

    2016-10-01

    In paper melting process of iron nanoparticles was investigated with molecular dynamics method. Melting temperatures was found for particles with radius from 1.5 to 4 nm. Results match with data of other authors. Heat capacity was calculated based on investigation of caloric curves. Dependence between heat capacity and temperature for different size of nanoparticles was approximated. Heat conductivity of iron nanoparticles was calculated.

  6. The viscosity of planetary tholeiitic melts: A configurational entropy model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sehlke, Alexander; Whittington, Alan G.

    2016-10-01

    The viscosity (η) of silicate melts is a fundamental physical property controlling mass transfer in magmatic systems. Viscosity can span many orders of magnitude, strongly depending on temperature and composition. Several models are available that describe this dependency for terrestrial melts quite well. Planetary basaltic lavas however are distinctly different in composition, being dominantly alkali-poor, iron-rich and/or highly magnesian. We measured the viscosity of 20 anhydrous tholeiitic melts, of which 15 represent known or estimated surface compositions of Mars, Mercury, the Moon, Io and Vesta, by concentric cylinder and parallel plate viscometry. The planetary basalts span a viscosity range of 2 orders of magnitude at liquidus temperatures and 4 orders of magnitude near the glass transition, and can be more or less viscous than terrestrial lavas. We find that current models under- and overestimate superliquidus viscosities by up to 2 orders of magnitude for these compositions, and deviate even more strongly from measured viscosities toward the glass transition. We used the Adam-Gibbs theory (A-G) to relate viscosity (η) to absolute temperature (T) and the configurational entropy of the system at that temperature (Sconf), which is in the form of log η =Ae +Be /TSconf . Heat capacities (CP) for glasses and liquids of our investigated compositions were calculated via available literature models. We show that the A-G theory is applicable to model the viscosity of individual complex tholeiitic melts containing 10 or more major oxides as well or better than the commonly used empirical equations. We successfully modeled the global viscosity data set using a constant Ae of -3.34 ± 0.22 log units and 12 adjustable sub-parameters, which capture the compositional and temperature dependence on melt viscosity. Seven sub-parameters account for the compositional dependence of Be and 5 for Sconf. Our model reproduces the 496 measured viscosity data points with a 1

  7. Absolute rate constant for the reaction of atomic chlorine with hydrogen peroxide vapor over the temperature range 265-400 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michael, J. V.; Whytock, D. A.; Lee, J. H.; Payne, W. A.; Stief, L. J.

    1977-01-01

    Rate constants for the reaction of atomic chlorine with hydrogen peroxide were measured from 265-400 K using the flash photolysis-resonance fluorescence technique. Analytical techniques were developed to measure H2O2 under reaction conditions. Due to ambiguity in the interpretation of the analytical results, the data combine to give two equally acceptable representations of the temperature dependence. The results are compared to previous work at 298 K and are theoretically discussed in terms of the mechanism of the reaction. Additional experiments on the H + H2O2 reaction at 298 and 359 K are compared with earlier results from this laboratory and give a slightly revised bimolecular rate constant.

  8. Estimating the physicochemical properties of polyhalogenated aromatic and aliphatic compounds using UPPER: part 1. Boiling point and melting point.

    PubMed

    Admire, Brittany; Lian, Bo; Yalkowsky, Samuel H

    2015-01-01

    The UPPER (Unified Physicochemical Property Estimation Relationships) model uses enthalpic and entropic parameters to estimate 20 biologically relevant properties of organic compounds. The model has been validated by Lian and Yalkowsky on a data set of 700 hydrocarbons. The aim of this work is to expand the UPPER model to estimate the boiling and melting points of polyhalogenated compounds. In this work, 19 new group descriptors are defined and used to predict the transition temperatures of an additional 1288 compounds. The boiling points of 808 and the melting points of 742 polyhalogenated compounds are predicted with average absolute errors of 13.56 K and 25.85 K, respectively.

  9. Estimating the physicochemical properties of polyhalogenated aromatic and aliphatic compounds using UPPER: part 1. Boiling point and melting point.

    PubMed

    Admire, Brittany; Lian, Bo; Yalkowsky, Samuel H

    2015-01-01

    The UPPER (Unified Physicochemical Property Estimation Relationships) model uses enthalpic and entropic parameters to estimate 20 biologically relevant properties of organic compounds. The model has been validated by Lian and Yalkowsky on a data set of 700 hydrocarbons. The aim of this work is to expand the UPPER model to estimate the boiling and melting points of polyhalogenated compounds. In this work, 19 new group descriptors are defined and used to predict the transition temperatures of an additional 1288 compounds. The boiling points of 808 and the melting points of 742 polyhalogenated compounds are predicted with average absolute errors of 13.56 K and 25.85 K, respectively. PMID:25022475

  10. Mathematical model for predicting topographical properties of poly (ε-caprolactone) melt electrospun scaffolds including the effects of temperature and linear transitional speed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Junghyuk; Khadem Mohtaram, Nima; Lee, Patrick C.; Willerth, Stephanie M.; Jun, Martin B. G.

    2015-04-01

    Melt electrospinning can be used to fabricate various fibrous biomaterial scaffolds with a range of mechanical properties and varying topographical properties for different applications such as tissue scaffold and filtration and etc, making it a powerful technique. Engineering the topography of such electrospun microfibers can be easily done by tuning the operational parameters of this process. Recent experimental studies have shown promising results for fabricating various topographies, but there is no body of work that focuses on using mathematical models of this technique to further understand the effect of operational parameters on these properties of microfiber scaffolds. In this study, we developed a novel mathematical model using numerical simulations to demonstrate the effect of temperature, feed rate and flow rate on controlling topographical properties such as fiber diameter of these spun fibrous scaffolds. These promising modelling results are also compared to our previous and current experimental results. Overall, we show that our novel mathematical model can predict the topographical properties affected by key operational parameters such as change in temperature, flow rate and feed rate, and this model could serve as a promising strategy for the controlling of topographical properties of such structures for different applications.

  11. Calibrating IR Cameras for In-Situ Temperature Measurement During the Electron Beam Melting Process using Inconel 718 and Ti-Al6-V4

    SciTech Connect

    Dinwiddie, Ralph Barton; Lloyd, Peter D; Dehoff, Ryan R; Lowe, Larry E

    2016-01-01

    The Department of Energy s (DOE) Manufacturing Demonstration Facility (MDF) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) provides world-leading capabilities in advanced manufacturing (AM) facilities which leverage previous, on-going government investments in materials science research and characterization. MDF contains systems for fabricating components with complex geometries using AM techniques (i.e. 3D-Printing). Various metal alloy printers, for example, use electron beam melting (EBM) systems for creating these components which are otherwise extremely difficult- if not impossible- to machine. ORNL has partnered with manufacturers on improving the final part quality of components and developing new materials for further advancing these devices. One method being used to study (AM) processes in more depth relies on the advanced imaging capabilities at ORNL. High performance mid-wave infrared (IR) cameras are used for in-situ process monitoring and temperature measurements. However, standard factory calibrations are insufficient due to very low transmissions of the leaded glass window required for X-ray absorption. Two techniques for temperature calibrations will be presented and compared. In-situ measurement of emittance will also be discussed. Ample information can be learned from in-situ IR process monitoring of the EBM process. Ultimately, these imaging systems have the potential for routine use for online quality assurance and feedback control.

  12. Absolute rate constants of Mo 2 (X 1Σg+) and Mo (a 7S 3) with O 2 at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakabayashi, Tomohiro; Ishikawa, Yo-ichi; Arai, Shigeyoshi

    1996-07-01

    The gas phase reactivities of ground-state molybdenum dimers and atoms for oxygen molecule have been investigated in a mass-flow controlled cell. Transient concentration of Mo 2 (X 1Σg+, ν = 0) or Mo (a 7S 3) produced by 355 nm multiphoton dissociation (MPD) of Mo(CO) 6 was monitored by a laser-induced fluorescence (LIF). The predictable disturbance caused by free electrons inevitably produced in the MPD of metal carbonyls was examined by an appropriate addition of SF 6 as an electron scavenger. The pseudo-first order decay rates of these molybdenum species were found to depend linearly on O 2 pressure both in the absence and in the presence of SF 6, giving the bimolecular rate constants of (1.1 ± 0.1) × 10 -11 for Mo 2 (X 1Σg+, ν = 0) + O 2 and (1.2 ± 0.1) × 10 -10 cm 3 molecule -1 s -1 for Mo (a 7S 3) + O 2 under the 6.5 Torr total pressure with balance Ar at room temperature.

  13. Dynamics of surface melting

    SciTech Connect

    Elsayed-Ali, H.E.

    1990-08-01

    The objectives of this program is to study the phenomenon of surface melting of single crystals of metals, to test for its existence, and to investigate its dynamics. Both conventional static electron diffraction and dynamic ultrafast electron diffraction are used in our study. This year, the ultrahigh vacuum facility containing the picosecond electron reflection high-energy electron diffraction system was equipped with a cylindrical mirror analyzer and a static electron gum for Auger spectroscopy. An image analysis system capable of acquiring the pulsed diffraction patterns was assembled and used in analysis of picosecond laser heated surfaces. A large set of time-resolved experiments were conducted to study the thermal response of Pb(110) to picosecond laser heating. The surface Debye-Waller effect was used to time-resolve the evolution of surface temperature. This provided us with a picosecond time-resolved surface lattice temperature probe. Results for laser fluences below surface melting show agreement with a heat-diffusion model. The temperature dependence of the Pb(100) along the (110) and the (001) azimuths using x-ray photoelectron forward scattering of the 4f{sub 7/2} core-level photoelectrons confirmed, for the first time, surface melting of Pb(100) at temperatures as low as 560 K.

  14. Melt pool dynamics during selective electron beam melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scharowsky, T.; Osmanlic, F.; Singer, R. F.; Körner, C.

    2014-03-01

    Electron beam melting is a promising additive manufacturing technique for metal parts. Nevertheless, the process is still poorly understood making further investigations indispensable to allow a prediction of the part's quality. To improve the understanding of the process especially the beam powder interaction, process observation at the relevant time scale is necessary. Due to the difficult accessibility of the building area, the high temperatures, radiation and the very high scanning speeds during the melting process the observation requires an augmented effort in the observation equipment. A high speed camera in combination with an illumination laser, band pass filter and mirror system is suitable for the observation of the electron beam melting process. The equipment allows to observe the melting process with a high spatial and temporal resolution. In this paper the adjustment of the equipment and results of the lifetime and the oscillation frequencies of the melt pool for a simple geometry are presented.

  15. Analysis of the continuous melting of glass

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, A R

    1984-01-01

    Some historical aspects of continuous glass melting are recalled. Then, an overall heat balance of the process is used to illustrate that future improvements will be achieved by different means than those which have been successful in the past. The heat balance also permits comparison of ohmic melting with combustion melting when the primary energy source in both cases is coal. A simplified analysis of batch melting begins by defining a melted batch according to its effective viscosity and proceeds to calculate the temperature distribution in a cold tap batch blanket. Then, the fraction liquid as a function of temperature is determined. 15 references, 7 figures.

  16. Stabilizing Crystal Oscillators With Melting Metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, J. B.; Miller, C. G.

    1984-01-01

    Heat of fusion provides extended period of constant temperature and frequency. Crystal surrounded by metal in spherical container. As outside temperature rises to melting point of metal, metal starts to liquefy; but temperature stays at melting point until no solid metal remains. Potential terrestrial applications include low-power environmental telemetering transmitters and instrumentation transmitters for industrial processes.

  17. ABSOLUTE POLARIMETRY AT RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    OKADA; BRAVAR, A.; BUNCE, G.; GILL, R.; HUANG, H.; MAKDISI, Y.; NASS, A.; WOOD, J.; ZELENSKI, Z.; ET AL.

    2007-09-10

    Precise and absolute beam polarization measurements are critical for the RHIC spin physics program. Because all experimental spin-dependent results are normalized by beam polarization, the normalization uncertainty contributes directly to final physics uncertainties. We aimed to perform the beam polarization measurement to an accuracy Of {Delta}P{sub beam}/P{sub beam} < 5%. The absolute polarimeter consists of Polarized Atomic Hydrogen Gas Jet Target and left-right pairs of silicon strip detectors and was installed in the RHIC-ring in 2004. This system features proton-proton elastic scattering in the Coulomb nuclear interference (CNI) region. Precise measurements of the analyzing power A{sub N} of this process has allowed us to achieve {Delta}P{sub beam}/P{sub beam} = 4.2% in 2005 for the first long spin-physics run. In this report, we describe the entire set up and performance of the system. The procedure of beam polarization measurement and analysis results from 2004-2005 are described. Physics topics of AN in the CNI region (four-momentum transfer squared 0.001 < -t < 0.032 (GeV/c){sup 2}) are also discussed. We point out the current issues and expected optimum accuracy in 2006 and the future.

  18. Rapid universal identification of bacterial pathogens from clinical cultures by using a novel sloppy molecular beacon melting temperature signature technique.

    PubMed

    Chakravorty, Soumitesh; Aladegbami, Bola; Burday, Michele; Levi, Michael; Marras, Salvatore A E; Shah, Darshini; El-Hajj, Hiyam H; Kramer, Fred Russell; Alland, David

    2010-01-01

    A real-time PCR assay with the ability to rapidly identify all pathogenic bacteria would have widespread medical utility. Current real-time PCR technologies cannot accomplish this task due to severe limitations in multiplexing ability. To this end, we developed a new assay system which supports very high degrees of multiplexing. We developed a new class of mismatch-tolerant "sloppy" molecular beacons, modified them to provide an extended hybridization range, and developed a multiprobe, multimelting temperature (T(m)) signature approach to bacterial species identification. Sloppy molecular beacons were exceptionally versatile, and they were able to generate specific T(m) values for DNA sequences that differed by as little as one nucleotide to as many as 23 polymorphisms. Combining the T(m) values generated by several probe-target hybrids resulted in T(m) signatures that served as highly accurate sequence identifiers. Using this method, PCR assays with as few as six sloppy molecular beacons targeting bacterial 16S rRNA gene segments could reproducibly classify 119 different sequence types of pathogenic and commensal bacteria, representing 64 genera, into 111 T(m) signature types. Blinded studies using the assay to identify the bacteria present in 270 patient-derived clinical cultures including 106 patient blood cultures showed a 95 to 97% concordance with conventional methods. Importantly, no bacteria were misidentified; rather, the few species that could not be identified were classified as "indeterminate," resulting in an assay specificity of 100%. This approach enables highly multiplexed target detection using a simple PCR format that can transform infectious disease diagnostics and improve patient outcomes.

  19. Effect of Mantle Wedge Hybridization by Sediment Melt on Geochemistry of Arc Magma and Arc Mantle Source - Insights from Laboratory Experiments at High Pressures and Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallik, A.; Dasgupta, R.; Tsuno, K.; Nelson, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    Generation of arc magmas involves metasomatism of the mantle wedge by slab-derived H2O-rich fluids and/or melts and subsequent melting of the modified source. The chemistry of arc magmas and the residual mantle wedge are not only regulated by the chemistry of the slab input, but also by the phase relations of metasomatism or hybridization process in the wedge. The sediment-derived silica-rich fluids and hydrous partial melts create orthopyroxene-rich zones in the mantle wedge, due to reaction of mantle olivine with silica in the fluid/melt [1,2]. Geochemical evidence for such a reaction comes from pyroxenitic lithologies coexisting with peridotite in supra-subduction zones. In this study, we have simulated the partial melting of a parcel of mantle wedge modified by bulk addition of sediment-derived melt with variable H2O contents to investigate the major and trace element chemistry of the magmas and the residues formed by this process. Experiments at 2-3 GPa and 1150-1300 °C were conducted on mixtures of 25% sediment-derived melt and 75% lherzolite, with bulk H2O contents varying from 2 to 6 wt.%. Partial reactive crystallization of the rhyolitic slab-derived melt and partial melting of the mixed source produced a range of melt compositions from ultra-K basanites to basaltic andesites, in equilibrium with an orthopyroxene ± phlogopite ± clinopyroxene ± garnet bearing residue, depending on P and bulk H2O content. Model calculations using partition coefficients (from literature) of trace elements between experimental minerals and silicate melt suggest that the geochemical signatures of the slab-derived melt, such as low Ce/Pb and depletion in Nb and Ta (characteristic slab signatures) are not erased from the resulting melt owing to reactive crystallization. The residual mineral assemblage is also found to be similar to the supra-subduction zone lithologies, such as those found in Dabie Shan (China) and Sanbagawa Belt (Japan). In this presentation, we will also

  20. Absolute Equilibrium Entropy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shebalin, John V.

    1997-01-01

    The entropy associated with absolute equilibrium ensemble theories of ideal, homogeneous, fluid and magneto-fluid turbulence is discussed and the three-dimensional fluid case is examined in detail. A sigma-function is defined, whose minimum value with respect to global parameters is the entropy. A comparison is made between the use of global functions sigma and phase functions H (associated with the development of various H-theorems of ideal turbulence). It is shown that the two approaches are complimentary though conceptually different: H-theorems show that an isolated system tends to equilibrium while sigma-functions allow the demonstration that entropy never decreases when two previously isolated systems are combined. This provides a more complete picture of entropy in the statistical mechanics of ideal fluids.

  1. Melting phenomena in polymer blending

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hongbing

    This study is focused on understanding of the melting process of polymer blends during blending. Four topics are addressed in this thesis: melting behavior of polymer blends in an extruder, heat transfer between a solid polymer pellet and polymer melt; rheological properties of polymer melt suspensions; and morphology development of polymer blends during melting. A barrel sliding mechanism and a perturbation method was used to investigate the melting behavior of polypropylene (PP) and polystyrene (PS) blends in the extruder. It was found that the melting process in the extruder could be divided into three distinct regions. Most of melting occurred in the transition region mainly due to mechanical energy input. Friction between solid polymer pellets played a critical role in converting mechanical energy into heat. The location of the transition region for each process could be determined from the on-line visualization results, temperature and pressure profiles, and the perturbation signals. A representative heat transfer coefficient between a solid polymer pellet and another polymer melt under shear flow was obtained as 250W/m2 · K through numerical simulations. The dynamics of thermocouple used in the experiment was captured using a first order process approximation. A good match was achieved between the simulation and experiment after taking the thermocouple dynamics into account. Suspensions of ethylene acrylate copolymer (EAC) melt with PS beads were used to study rheological properties of polymer flow during extrusion. It was found that deformation of PS beads under high local shear stress could result in the decrease of the relative viscosity with increasing volume fraction. On-line visualization in a TSE showed an "erosion" mechanism for polycarbonate (PC) drop deformation and breakup in polyethylene (PE) melt. This "erosion" mechanism was also found from corresponding numerical simulations. Stress peaks at the interface from simulation result could explain

  2. Temperature-induced melting of double-stranded DNA in the absence and presence of covalently bonded antitumour drugs: insight from molecular dynamics simulations

    PubMed Central

    Bueren-Calabuig, Juan A.; Giraudon, Christophe; Galmarini, Carlos M.; Egly, Jean Marc; Gago, Federico

    2011-01-01

    The difference in melting temperature of a double-stranded (ds) DNA molecule in the absence and presence of bound ligands can provide experimental information about the stabilization brought about by ligand binding. By simulating the dynamic behaviour of a duplex of sequence 5′-d(TAATAACGGATTATT)·5′-d(AATAATCCGTTATTA) in 0.1 M NaCl aqueous solution at 400 K, we have characterized in atomic detail its complete thermal denaturation profile in <200 ns. A striking asymmetry was observed on both sides of the central CGG triplet and the strand separation process was shown to be strongly affected by bonding in the minor groove of the prototypical interstrand crosslinker mitomycin C or the monofunctional tetrahydroisoquinolines trabectedin (Yondelis®), Zalypsis® and PM01183®. Progressive helix unzipping was clearly interspersed with some reannealing events, which were most noticeable in the oligonucleotides containing the monoadducts, which maintained an average of 6 bp in the central region at the end of the simulations. These significant differences attest to the demonstrated ability of these drugs to stabilize dsDNA, stall replication and transcription forks, and recruit DNA repair proteins. This stabilization, quantified here in terms of undisrupted base pairs, supports the view that these monoadducts can functionally mimic a DNA interstrand crosslink. PMID:21727089

  3. Coercivity of the Nd-Fe-B hot-deformed magnets diffusion-processed with low melting temperature glass forming alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seelam, U. M. R.; Liu, Lihua; Akiya, T.; Sepehri-Amin, H.; Ohkubo, T.; Sakuma, N.; Yano, M.; Kato, A.; Hono, K.

    2016-08-01

    Nd- and Pr-based alloys with bulk glass forming ability and low melting temperatures, Nd60Al10Ni10Cu20 and Pr60Al10Ni10Cu20, were used for grain boundary diffusion process to enhance the coercivity of hot-deformed magnets. The coercivity increment was proportional to the weight gain after the diffusion process. For the sample with 64% weight gain, the coercivity increased up to 2.8 T, which is the highest value for bulk Nd-Fe-B magnets that do not contain heavy rare-earth elements, Dy or Tb. Approximately half of the intergranular regions were amorphous and the remaining regions were crystalline. Magnetic isolation of the Nd2Fe14B grains by the Nd-rich amorphous/crystalline intergranular phases is attributed to the large coercivity enhancement. The coercivity does not change after the crystallization of the intergranular phase, indicating that the coercivity is not influenced by the strain at the interface with the crystalline intergranular phase.

  4. Melting in super-earths.

    PubMed

    Stixrude, Lars

    2014-04-28

    We examine the possible extent of melting in rock-iron super-earths, focusing on those in the habitable zone. We consider the energetics of accretion and core formation, the timescale of cooling and its dependence on viscosity and partial melting, thermal regulation via the temperature dependence of viscosity, and the melting curves of rock and iron components at the ultra-high pressures characteristic of super-earths. We find that the efficiency of kinetic energy deposition during accretion increases with planetary mass; considering the likely role of giant impacts and core formation, we find that super-earths probably complete their accretionary phase in an entirely molten state. Considerations of thermal regulation lead us to propose model temperature profiles of super-earths that are controlled by silicate melting. We estimate melting curves of iron and rock components up to the extreme pressures characteristic of super-earth interiors based on existing experimental and ab initio results and scaling laws. We construct super-earth thermal models by solving the equations of mass conservation and hydrostatic equilibrium, together with equations of state of rock and iron components. We set the potential temperature at the core-mantle boundary and at the surface to the local silicate melting temperature. We find that ancient (∼4 Gyr) super-earths may be partially molten at the top and bottom of their mantles, and that mantle convection is sufficiently vigorous to sustain dynamo action over the whole range of super-earth masses.

  5. Multidiffusion mechanisms for noble gases (He, Ne, Ar) in silicate glasses and melts in the transition temperature domain: Implications for glass polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amalberti, Julien; Burnard, Pete; Laporte, Didier; Tissandier, Laurent; Neuville, Daniel R.

    2016-01-01

    Noble gases are ideal probes to study the structure of silicate glasses and melts as the modifications of the silicate network induced by the incorporation of noble gases are negligible. In addition, there are systematic variations in noble gas atomic radii and several noble gas isotopes with which the influence of the network itself on diffusion may be investigated. Noble gases are therefore ideally suited to constrain the time scales of magma degassing and cooling. In order to document noble gas diffusion behavior in silicate glass, we measured the diffusivities of three noble gases (4He, 20Ne and 40Ar) and the isotopic diffusivities of two Ar isotopes (36Ar and 40Ar) in two synthetic basaltic glasses (G1 and G2; 20Ne and 36Ar were only measured in sample G1). These new diffusion results are used to re-interpret time scales of the acquisition of fractionated atmospheric noble gas signatures in pumices. The noble gas bearing glasses were synthesized by exposing the liquids to high noble gas partial pressures at high temperature and pressure (1750-1770 K and 1.2 GPa) in a piston-cylinder apparatus. Diffusivities were measured by step heating the glasses between 423 and 1198 K and measuring the fraction of gas released at each temperature step by noble gas mass spectrometry. In addition we measured the viscosity of G1 between 996 and 1072 K in order to determine the precise glass transition temperature and to estimate network relaxation time scales. The results indicate that, to a first order, that the smaller the size of the diffusing atom, the greater its diffusivity at a given temperature: D(He) > D(Ne) > D(Ar) at constant T. Significantly, the diffusivities of the noble gases in the glasses investigated do not display simple Arrhenian behavior: there are well-defined departures from Arrhenian behavior which occur at lower temperatures for He than for Ne or Ar. We propose that the non-Arrhenian behavior of noble gases can be explained by structural modifications

  6. Evidence for Extremely-High-Temperature Melting in the Solar Nebula from a CaAl4O7-bearing Spherule from Murchison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, S. B.; Grossman, L.; Davis, A. M.; Beckett, J. R.; Chamberlin, L.

    1993-07-01

    We have recovered a unique refractory spherule (B6) from the Murchison C2 chondrite. Approximately 140 micrometers in diameter, it is concentrically zoned, with an outer rim sequence, from outermost to innermost, of aluminous diopside (10 micrometers thick), anorthite (3 micrometers) and melilite (3 micrometers). Inside the melilite layer is a 7-micrometer-thick, nearly pure (except for a single, diverging-inward spray of hibonite crystals) layer of spinel. Inward from this layer is a 22-micrometer-wide zone of hibonite (~5.5 wt% TiO2) + spinel, in which hibonite laths, 1-4 micrometers across and up to 10 micrometers wide, are predominantly radially oriented and enclosed in spinel. Inward from this zone, presumably at the core of the inclusion, are CaAl4O7, occurring as anhedral grains ~10 micrometers across, and minor perovskite. Some of the hibonite laths protrude into the CaAl4O7. The sequence of mineral assemblages from the spinel shell inward parallels that expected for fractional crystallization of a melt of the composition of B6. Based on this, the inclusion's spherical shape, and its texture (radially oriented hibonite laths, including a diverging-inward spray; laths enclosed in spinel and protruding into CaAl4O7), we conclude that the oxide phases in B6 crystallized from a liquid. The spinel layer indicates that at least some of the spinel was molten; from the bulk composition, calculated liquidus phase relations in the system Al2O3-MgO-CaO [1], and the amount of spinel contained in the layer, we infer a melting temperature >2000 degrees C. This is >500 degrees higher than the maximum temperature at which any condensed major phase is stable at 10-3 atm in a gas of solar composition, but we see no evidence of evaporation. First, the inclusion has a Group II REE pattern, rather than a Group III or an ultrarefractory pattern, which could reflect devolatilization. Second, although evaporation of molten (but not solid) Mg2SiO4 leads to Mg isotopic mass

  7. Speciation in granitic melts

    SciTech Connect

    Burnham, C.W.; Nekvasil, H.

    1985-01-01

    Refinement of the cryoscopic equations for the major granitic melt components, NaAlSi/sub 3/O/sub 8/(ab), CaAl/sub 2/O/sub 8/(an), KAlSi/sub 3/O/sub 8/(or), and Si/sub 4/O/sub 8/(qz), has led to the recognition of several major speciation reactions in anhydrous and hydrous melts of the system Ab-An-Or-Qz-H/sub 2/O. These reactions involve either dissociation of the feldspar-like components, as in incongruent melting, or interaction between them and qz. In all cases of interaction, one of the speciation products has the stoichiometry of dpy or py (pyrophyllite) (Al/sub 1.455/Si/sub 2.91/O/sub 8/ +/- 0.73H/sub 2/O), in which Al is presumed to be in either fivefold (dpy) or sixfold (py) coordination. The py component also is a major product of speciation by interaction between sil (Al/sub 3.2/Si/sub 1.6/O/sub 8/) and qz in peraluminous melts of the system Ab-Or-Qz-Sil-H/sub 2/O; as a consequence, the quartz liquidus field boundary is shifted to lower temperatures and toward qz. There is no evidence in peraluminous haplogranite melts for the existence of a muscovite-like species. Application of the refined thermodynamic model to the system Ab-Qz-Eu - H/sub 2/O at 2.0 kbar predicts the occurrence of a eu and qz-consuming reaction that produces a petalite-like species and a consequent dramatic shift in liquidus field boundaries. Higher pressures favor conversion of pe to qz + sp. In the spodumene-like species, sp, Al presumably is six-coordinated.

  8. Absolute neutrino mass measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, Joachim

    2011-10-06

    The neutrino mass plays an important role in particle physics, astrophysics and cosmology. In recent years the detection of neutrino flavour oscillations proved that neutrinos carry mass. However, oscillation experiments are only sensitive to the mass-squared difference of the mass eigenvalues. In contrast to cosmological observations and neutrino-less double beta decay (0v2{beta}) searches, single {beta}-decay experiments provide a direct, model-independent way to determine the absolute neutrino mass by measuring the energy spectrum of decay electrons at the endpoint region with high accuracy.Currently the best kinematic upper limits on the neutrino mass of 2.2eV have been set by two experiments in Mainz and Troitsk, using tritium as beta emitter. The next generation tritium {beta}-experiment KATRIN is currently under construction in Karlsruhe/Germany by an international collaboration. KATRIN intends to improve the sensitivity by one order of magnitude to 0.2eV. The investigation of a second isotope ({sup 137}Rh) is being pursued by the international MARE collaboration using micro-calorimeters to measure the beta spectrum. The technology needed to reach 0.2eV sensitivity is still in the R and D phase. This paper reviews the present status of neutrino-mass measurements with cosmological data, 0v2{beta} decay and single {beta}-decay.

  9. The Effect of Temperature and Carbon to Hematite Ratio on the Formation of Cementite During the Couple of STMA and Partial Melting Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soleymani, Amir Peyman; Panjepour, Masoud; Meratian, Mahmood

    2016-04-01

    In this research, the role of the couple of simultaneous thermal-mechanical activation (STMA) and partial melting (PM) processes in the carbothermic reduction of hematite and cementite formation was studied. For this purpose, the STMA process was performed for 6 hours at 1073 K (800 °C) on the mixture of hematite and graphite with stoichiometry ratio (22 wt pct C) in argon atmosphere in the first stage, and then this process was coupled to the PM process at 1453 K (1180 °C) for 25 minutes. The results obtained showed that the percentage of cementite phase in the product of the STMA process was only about 24 wt pct and after carrying out the PM process, this value reached 77 wt pct in the final product. In the second stage, the effect of the ratio of the parameters of carbon to hematite on the initial mixture (1:1, 1:25, and 1:5 times the stoichiometry ratio) and STMA process temperature [1073 K, 1123 K, and 1173 K (800 °C, 850 °C, and 900 °C)] was studied. The results were indicative of the fact that by an increase in the ratio of carbon to hematite and at STMA temperature, the percentage of cementite in the final product obtained from the PM process significantly increased. In fact, the specimens obtained from the couple of the STMA and PM processes with a carbon to hematite ratio of 1.5:1 at 1073 K (800 °C) and that of 1.25:1 at 1173 K (900 °C) showed the greatest percentage of cementite. The mechanism regarding the processes showed that by controlling the amount and manner of free carbon distribution in the STMA product based on the parameters of the ratio of carbon to hematite and temperature, it was possible to obtain pure cementite. Therefore, the couple of STMA and PM processes can also be brought up as a new method in the production of pure cementite.

  10. Ash melting treatment by rotating type surface melting furnace

    SciTech Connect

    Abe, Seiichi; Kambayashi, Fumiaki; Okada, Masaharu

    1996-12-31

    Results of melting treatment of fly ash from municipal solid waste incinerators are described, and safety and an effective use of slag discharged from the melting treatment are studied. The fly ash has an average particle size of 22 {micro}m and a melting fluidity point of 1280--1330 C and was able to be melted by using a Kubota melting furnace without any additives. Eighty-eight percent of the fly ash was turned to slag and 12% to dust, which contained a lot of heavy metals such as Pb and Zn. Dioxins in the supplied fly ash were 10 ng TEQ/g, originally, and 99.98% was decomposed by the melting treatment. Dioxin concentrations of slag, fly ash and flue gas from the melting treatment were 0.00, 0.00 and 0.25 ng TEQ/m{sup 3} N, respectively. A leaching test was conducted to confirm the safety of slag. Leaching level of heavy metals from slag was significantly lower than compared to those of bottom and fly ashes from municipal solid waste (MSW) incinerators. It was found that leaching is influenced by pH and the specific surface area of the materials. Furthermore, using slag as a ceramic material, slag was ground and burned at a relatively low temperature (900--1100 C) into a ceramic with strength equal to or more than that of general ceramic tiles.

  11. Determination of Absolute Zero Using a Computer-Based Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amrani, D.

    2007-01-01

    We present a simple computer-based laboratory experiment for evaluating absolute zero in degrees Celsius, which can be performed in college and undergraduate physical sciences laboratory courses. With a computer, absolute zero apparatus can help demonstrators or students to observe the relationship between temperature and pressure and use…

  12. Comparative Evaluation of Sloppy Molecular Beacon and Dual-Labeled Probe Melting Temperature Assays to Identify Mutations in Mycobacterium tuberculosis Resulting in Rifampin, Fluoroquinolone and Aminoglycoside Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jong Seok; Via, Laura E.; Barry, Clifton E.; Alland, David; Chakravorty, Soumitesh

    2015-01-01

    Several molecular assays to detect resistance to Rifampin, the Fluoroquinolones, and Aminoglycosides in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) have been recently described. A systematic approach for comparing these assays in the laboratory is needed in order to determine the relative advantage of each assay and to decide which ones should be advanced to evaluation. We performed an analytic comparison of a Sloppy Molecular Beacon (SMB) melting temperature (Tm) assay and a Dual labeled probe (DLP) Tm assay. Both assays targeted the M. tuberculosis rpoB, gyrA, rrs genes and the eis promoter region. The sensitivity and specificity to detect mutations, analytic limit of detection (LOD) and the detection of heteroresistance were tested using a panel of 56 clinical DNA samples from drug resistant M. tuberculosis strains. Both SMB and DLP assays detected 29/29 (100%) samples with rpoB RRDR mutations and 3/3 (100%) samples with eis promoter mutations correctly. The SMB assay detected all 17/17 gyrA mutants and 22/22 rrs mutants, while the DLP assay detected 16/17 (94%) gyrA mutants and 12/22 (55%) rrs mutants. Both assays showed comparable LODs for detecting rpoB and eis mutations; however, the SMB assay LODs were at least two logs better for detecting wild type and mutants in gyrA and rrs targets. The SMB assay was also moderately better at detecting heteroresistance. In summary, both assays appeared to be promising methods to detect drug resistance associated mutations in M. tuberculosis; however, the relative advantage of each assay varied under each test condition. PMID:25938476

  13. Comparative Evaluation of Sloppy Molecular Beacon and Dual-Labeled Probe Melting Temperature Assays to Identify Mutations in Mycobacterium tuberculosis Resulting in Rifampin, Fluoroquinolone and Aminoglycoside Resistance.

    PubMed

    Roh, Sandy S; Smith, Laura E; Lee, Jong Seok; Via, Laura E; Barry, Clifton E; Alland, David; Chakravorty, Soumitesh

    2015-01-01

    Several molecular assays to detect resistance to Rifampin, the Fluoroquinolones, and Aminoglycosides in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) have been recently described. A systematic approach for comparing these assays in the laboratory is needed in order to determine the relative advantage of each assay and to decide which ones should be advanced to evaluation. We performed an analytic comparison of a Sloppy Molecular Beacon (SMB) melting temperature (Tm) assay and a Dual labeled probe (DLP) Tm assay. Both assays targeted the M. tuberculosis rpoB, gyrA, rrs genes and the eis promoter region. The sensitivity and specificity to detect mutations, analytic limit of detection (LOD) and the detection of heteroresistance were tested using a panel of 56 clinical DNA samples from drug resistant M. tuberculosis strains. Both SMB and DLP assays detected 29/29 (100%) samples with rpoB RRDR mutations and 3/3 (100%) samples with eis promoter mutations correctly. The SMB assay detected all 17/17 gyrA mutants and 22/22 rrs mutants, while the DLP assay detected 16/17 (94%) gyrA mutants and 12/22 (55%) rrs mutants. Both assays showed comparable LODs for detecting rpoB and eis mutations; however, the SMB assay LODs were at least two logs better for detecting wild type and mutants in gyrA and rrs targets. The SMB assay was also moderately better at detecting heteroresistance. In summary, both assays appeared to be promising methods to detect drug resistance associated mutations in M. tuberculosis; however, the relative advantage of each assay varied under each test condition.

  14. Rapid, high-throughput detection of rifampin resistance and heteroresistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis by use of sloppy molecular beacon melting temperature coding.

    PubMed

    Chakravorty, Soumitesh; Kothari, Harsheel; Aladegbami, Bola; Cho, Eun Jin; Lee, Jong Seok; Roh, Sandy S; Kim, Hyunchul; Kwak, Hyungkyung; Lee, Eun Gae; Hwang, Soo Hee; Banada, Padmapriya P; Safi, Hassan; Via, Laura E; Cho, Sang-Nae; Barry, Clifton E; Alland, David

    2012-07-01

    Rifampin resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis is largely determined by mutations in an 80-bp rifampin resistance determining region (RRDR) of the rpoB gene. We developed a rapid single-well PCR assay to identify RRDR mutations. The assay uses sloppy molecular beacons to probe an asymmetric PCR of the M. tuberculosis RRDR by melting temperature (T(m)) analysis. A three-point T(m) code is generated which distinguishes wild-type from mutant RRDR DNA sequences in approximately 2 h. The assay was validated on synthetic oligonucleotide targets containing the 44 most common RRDR mutations. It was then tested on a panel of DNA extracted from 589 geographically diverse clinical M. tuberculosis cultures, including isolates with wild-type RRDR sequences and 25 different RRDR mutations. The assay detected 236/236 RRDR mutant sequences as mutant (sensitivity, 100%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 98 to 100%) and 353/353 RRDR wild-type sequences as wild type (specificity, 100%; 95% CI, 98.7 to 100%). The assay identified 222/225 rifampin-resistant isolates as rifampin resistant (sensitivity, 98.7%; 95% CI, 95.8 to 99.6%) and 335/336 rifampin-susceptible isolates as rifampin susceptible (specificity, 99.7%; 95% CI, 95.8 to 99.6%). All mutations were either individually identified or clustered into small mutation groups using the triple T(m) code. The assay accurately identified mixed (heteroresistant) samples and was shown analytically to detect RRDR mutations when present in at least 40% of the total M. tuberculosis DNA. This was at least as accurate as Sanger DNA sequencing. The assay was easy to use and well suited for high-throughput applications. This new sloppy molecular beacon assay should greatly simplify rifampin resistance testing in clinical laboratories.

  15. Prevalence of human papillomavirus infection and genotype distribution determined by the cyclic-catcher melting temperature analysis in Korean medical checkup population.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yun-Jee; Kwon, Min-Jung; Woo, Hee-Yeon; Paik, Soon-Young

    2013-10-01

    Although cytology screening has reduced the incidence and mortality rate of cervical cancer significantly, its usefulness is limited to samples from the site of the lesion, resulting in its low sensitivity and unsuitability for use in medical checkups. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the prevalence of HPV infection using genotype distribution and to analyze the correlation of the HPV DNA test results with cytological results. We also evaluated the benefits of quantitative information obtained from cyclic-catcher melting temperature analysis (CMTA) in screening for cervical cancer. We performed cyclic-CMTA using Anyplex™ II HPV28 Detection in combination with cervical cytology for 2,181 subjects. The following HPV positivity types were detected using cyclic-CMTA and HPV positivity was found to increase together with the severity of the cytology results: (1) For 419 HPV positive specimens, HPV DNA was detected in 18.1% of normal specimens, 78.3% of ASCUS, and all of LSIL and HSIL; (2) high-risk HPV DNAs were detected in 63.3% of normal (N=547), 65.9% of ASCUS (N=41), 76.9% of LSIL (N=13), and 88.9% of HSIL (N=9) among total detected HPV DNA regardless multiple detection; (3) multiple HPV genotypes were detected in 4.8% of normal specimens (N=2,146), 52.2% of ASCUS (N=23), 57.1% of LSIL (N=7), and 40.0% of HSIL (N=5). In addition, a high level of viral DNA was observed using cyclic-CMTA in all specimens beyond the LSIL stage according to cytology, while only 6% of specimens with normal cytology showed a correlation with viral quantitation by cyclic-CMTA. The combination of HPV genotyping with a quantitative assay and cytology will allow for a more accurate diagnosis of cervical cancer.

  16. Results from recent vacuum testing of an on-orbit absolute radiance standard (OARS) intended for the next generation of infrared remote sensing instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Best, Fred A.; Adler, Douglas P.; Pettersen, Claire; Revercomb, Henry E.; Gero, P. Jonathan; Taylor, Joseph K.; Knuteson, Robert O.

    2014-11-01

    Future NASA infrared remote sensing missions will require better absolute measurement accuracies than now available, and will most certainly rely on the emerging capability to fly SI traceable standards that provide irrefutable absolute measurement accuracy. To establish a CLARRREO-type climate benchmark, instrumentation will need to measure spectrally resolved infrared radiances with an absolute brightness temperature error of better than 0.1 K, verified onorbit. This will require an independent high-emissivity (<0.999) verification blackbody with an emissivity uncertainty of better than 0.06%, an absolute temperature uncertainty of better than 0.045K (3 sigma), and the capability of operation over a wide range of (Earth scene) temperatures. Key elements of an On-Orbit Absolute Radiance Standard (OARS) meeting these stringent requirements have been demonstrated in the laboratory at the University of Wisconsin and have undergone further refinement under funding from NASA's Earth Science and Technology Office, culminating in an end-to-end demonstration under vacuum with a prototype climate benchmark instrument. We present the new technologies that underlie the OARS, and the results of testing that demonstrate the required accuracy is being met in a vacuum environment. The underlying technologies include: on-orbit absolute temperature calibration using the transient melt signatures of small quantities (<1g) of reference materials (gallium, water, and mercury) imbedded in the blackbody cavity; and on-orbit cavity spectral emissivity measurement using a carefully baffled heated halo placed in front of the OARS blackbody viewed by the infrared spectrometer system. Emissivity is calculated from the radiance measured from the blackbody combined with the knowledge of key temperatures and radiometric view factors.

  17. Melting in Martian Snowbanks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zent, A. P.; Sutter, B.

    2005-01-01

    Precipitation as snow is an emerging paradigm for understanding water flow on Mars, which gracefully resolves many outstanding uncertainties in climatic and geomorphic interpretation. Snowfall does not require a powerful global greenhouse to effect global precipitation. It has long been assumed that global average temperatures greater than 273K are required to sustain liquid water at the surface via rainfall and runoff. Unfortunately, the best greenhouse models to date predict global mean surface temperatures early in Mars' history that differ little from today's, unless exceptional conditions are invoked. Snowfall however, can occur at temperatures less than 273K; all that is required is saturation of the atmosphere. At global temperatures lower than 273K, H2O would have been injected into the atmosphere by impacts and volcanic eruptions during the Noachian, and by obliquity-driven climate oscillations more recently. Snow cover can accumulate for a considerable period, and be available for melting during local spring and summer, unless sublimation rates are sufficient to remove the entire snowpack. We decided to explore the physics that controls the melting of snow in the high-latitude regions of Mars to understand the frequency and drainage of snowmelt in the high martian latitudes.

  18. Absolute cavity pyrgeometer

    DOEpatents

    Reda, Ibrahim

    2013-10-29

    Implementations of the present disclosure involve an apparatus and method to measure the long-wave irradiance of the atmosphere or long-wave source. The apparatus may involve a thermopile, a concentrator and temperature controller. The incoming long-wave irradiance may be reflected from the concentrator to a thermopile receiver located at the bottom of the concentrator to receive the reflected long-wave irradiance. In addition, the thermopile may be thermally connected to a temperature controller to control the device temperature. Through use of the apparatus, the long-wave irradiance of the atmosphere may be calculated from several measurements provided by the apparatus. In addition, the apparatus may provide an international standard of pyrgeometers' calibration that is traceable back to the International System of Units (SI) rather than to a blackbody atmospheric simulator.

  19. Selective Laser Melting of Polymer Powder - Part Mechanics as Function of Exposure Speed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drexler, Maximilian; Lexow, Matthias; Drummer, Dietmar

    The selective laser melting of polymer powders is a well-established technology for additive manufacturing applications, although there is still a deficit in basic process knowledge. Considering the demands of series production, the technique of selective laser melting of polymers is faced with various challenges concerning suitable material systems, process strategies and part properties. Consequently, basic research is necessary to understand and optimize processes in order to enable a shift from prototyping applications to serial production of small-lot sized series. A better understanding of the interaction between the sub-processes of selective laser melting and the resulting part properties is necessary for the derivation of new process strategies for increased part quality. Selective laser melting of polymers is mainly divided in the three phases of powder feeding, tempering and geometry exposure. By the interaction of these sub-processes, the resulting temperature fields determine the part properties through microstructural changes in the pore number and distribution. In addition to absolute temperature values, the time dependency of the thermal fields has an influence on the porosity of the molten parts. Current process strategies aim for a decrease in building time by increasing scan speed and laser power, although the absolute energy input into the material does not change when scan speed and laser power are increased at a constant ratio. In prior investigations, the authors showed a correlation between the heating rate and the shape of the resulting melt pool. Based on this correlation, the interaction between heating rates (on a fixed level of exposure energy) and mechanical part properties (tensile test) is analyzed within the paper. The study also implies additional results for other levels of energy input during geometry exposure, which allow for a cross-check of the results. Furthermore, part positioning in the build chamber as well as part density

  20. First-Order Vortex-Lattice Melting Transition in YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7{ital {minus}{delta}}} near the Critical Temperature Detected by Magnetic Torque

    SciTech Connect

    Willemin, M.; Schilling, A.; Keller, H.; Hofer, J.; Rossel, C.; Welp, U.; Kwok, W.K.; Olsson, R.J.; Crabtree, G.W.

    1998-11-01

    High-resolution magnetic-torque studies on an untwinned YBa{sub 2}Cu {sub 3}O{sub 7{minus}{delta}} single crystal near its critical temperature T{sub c} reveal that the first-order vortex-lattice melting transition (VLMT) persists at least up to 0.5thinspthinspK below T{sub c} . The associated sharp discontinuity in magnetization is detectable even at temperatures where the torque signal deviates from mean-field behavior due to fluctuations. The magnetic irreversibility at the VLMT can be suppressed by applying a weak transverse ac magnetic field. This offers the possibility of separating the irreversibility line from the melting line near T{sub c} . {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society }

  1. Laser melting of uranium carbides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utton, C. A.; De Bruycker, F.; Boboridis, K.; Jardin, R.; Noel, H.; Guéneau, C.; Manara, D.

    2009-03-01

    In the context of the material research aimed at supporting the development of nuclear plants of the fourth Generation, renewed interest has recently arisen in carbide fuels. A profound understanding of the behaviour of nuclear materials in extreme conditions is of prime importance for the analysis of the operation limits of nuclear fuels, and prediction of possible nuclear reactor accidents. In this context, the main goal of the present paper is to demonstrate the feasibility of laser induced melting experiments on stoichiometric uranium carbides; UC, UC1.5 and UC2. Measurements were performed, at temperatures around 3000 K, under a few bars of inert gas in order to minimise vaporisation and oxidation effects, which may occur at these temperatures. Moreover, a recently developed investigation method has been employed, based on in situ analysis of the sample surface reflectivity evolution during melting. Current results, 2781 K for the melting point of UC, 2665 K for the solidus and 2681 K for the liquidus of U2C3, 2754 K for the solidus and 2770 K for the liquidus of UC2, are in fair agreement with early publications where the melting behaviour of uranium carbides was investigated by traditional furnace melting methods. Further information has been obtained in the current research about the non-congruent (solidus-liquidus) melting of certain carbides, which suggest that a solidus-liquidus scheme is followed by higher ratio carbides, possibly even for UC2.

  2. Absolute Identification by Relative Judgment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Neil; Brown, Gordon D. A.; Chater, Nick

    2005-01-01

    In unidimensional absolute identification tasks, participants identify stimuli that vary along a single dimension. Performance is surprisingly poor compared with discrimination of the same stimuli. Existing models assume that identification is achieved using long-term representations of absolute magnitudes. The authors propose an alternative…

  3. Be Resolute about Absolute Value

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kidd, Margaret L.

    2007-01-01

    This article explores how conceptualization of absolute value can start long before it is introduced. The manner in which absolute value is introduced to students in middle school has far-reaching consequences for their future mathematical understanding. It begins to lay the foundation for students' understanding of algebra, which can change…

  4. Melting of major Glaciers in the western Himalayas: evidence of climatic changes from long term MSU derived tropospheric temperature trend (1979-2008)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, A. K.; Yang, K.-H. S.; El-Askary, H. M.; Kafatos, M.

    2009-12-01

    Global warming or the increase of the surface and atmospheric temperatures of the Earth, is increasingly discernible in the polar, sub-polar and major land glacial areas. The Himalayan and Tibetan Plateau Glaciers, which are the largest glaciers outside of the Polar Regions, are showing a large-scale decrease of snow cover and an extensive glacial retreat. These glaciers such as Siachen and Gangotri are a major water resource for Asia as they feed major rivers such as the Indus, Ganga and Brahmaputra. Due to scarcity of ground measuring stations, the long-term observations of atmospheric temperatures acquired from the Microwave Sounding Unit (MSU) since 1979-2008 is highly useful. The lower and middle tropospheric temperature trend based on 30 years of MSU data shows warming of the Northern Hemisphere's mid-latitude regions. The mean month-to-month warming (up to 0.048±0.026°K/year or 1.44°K over 30 years) of the mid troposphere (near surface over the high altitude Himalayas and Tibetan Plateau) is prominent and statistically significant at a 95% confidence interval. Though the mean annual warming trend over the Himalayas (0.016±0.005°K/year), and Tibetan Plateau (0.008±0.006°K/year) is positive, the month to month warming trend is higher (by 2-3 times, positive and significant) only over a period of six months (December to May). The factors responsible for the reversal of this trend from June to November are discussed here. The inequality in the magnitude of the warming trends of the troposphere between the western and eastern Himalayas and the IG (Indo-Gangetic) plains is attributed to the differences in increased aerosol loading (due to dust storms) over these regions. The monthly mean lower-tropospheric MSU-derived temperature trend over the IG plains (dust sink region; up to 0.032±0.027°K/year) and dust source regions (Sahara desert, Middle East, Arabian region, Afghanistan-Iran-Pakistan and Thar Desert regions; up to 0.068±0.033°K/year) also shows

  5. Effect of solvent on melting gel behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degnah, Ahmed Abdulaziz

    Melting gel and hybrid glass are organic-inorganic materials derived from sol gel processing. The behavior of the melting gel is that it is a solid at room temperature, but when the melting gel is reheated to 110°C (T1) it becomes fluid. The melting gel has reversible behavior due to incomplete crosslinking between polysiloxane chains. When the melting gel is heated to its consolidation temperature of 150°C (T2) the gel no longer softens (T2>T1), because crosslinking is completed. The melting gel at the consolidation temperature becomes hybrid glass. Melting gel coatings were applied to titanium alloy substrates. Melting gels were prepared containing phenyl substitutions with 1.0 mole Phenyltrimethoxysilane (PhTMS) in ratio to 0.25 moles of Diphenyldimethoxysilane (DPhDMS). The methanol to DPhDMS ratio was varied to change the thickness of the coatings. The coatings were inspected visually to see that there is good adhesion between the coating and the substrate. Nanoindenter tests were performed to determine hardness. The coated samples were placed in an oven and heated to 150ºC for 24, 48 or 96 hours before cooling back to room temperature, which took about 4 hours. The measurements of the hardness on samples containing 3 levels of solvent and heat treatment were collected by indentation technique. The best combination of solvent and temperature was 1:8 PhTMS:MeOH for all temperatures.

  6. Communication: Theory of melt-memory in polymer crystallization.

    PubMed

    Muthukumar, M

    2016-07-21

    Details of crystallization processes of a polymer at the crystallization temperature Tc from its melt kept initially at the melt temperature Tm depend profoundly on the nature of the initial melt state and often are accompanied by memory effects. This phenomenon is in contrast to small molecular systems where the supercooling (Tm (0)-Tc), with Tm (0) being the equilibrium melting temperature, and not (Tm - Tc), determines the nature of crystallization. In addressing this five-decade old puzzle of melt-memory in polymer crystallization, we present a theory to describe melt-memory effects, by invoking an intermediate inhomogeneous melt state in the pathway between the melt and crystalline states. Using newly introduced dissolution temperature T1 (0) for the inhomogeneous melt state and the transition temperature Tt (0) for the transition between the inhomogeneous melt and crystalline states, analytical formulas are derived for the nucleation rate as a function of the melt temperature. The theory is general to address different kinds of melt-memory effects depending on whether Tm is higher or lower than Tm (0). The derived results are in qualitative agreement with known experimental data, while making predictions for further experiments on melt-memory.

  7. Communication: Theory of melt-memory in polymer crystallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muthukumar, M.

    2016-07-01

    Details of crystallization processes of a polymer at the crystallization temperature Tc from its melt kept initially at the melt temperature Tm depend profoundly on the nature of the initial melt state and often are accompanied by memory effects. This phenomenon is in contrast to small molecular systems where the supercooling (Tm0-Tc), with Tm0 being the equilibrium melting temperature, and not (Tm - Tc), determines the nature of crystallization. In addressing this five-decade old puzzle of melt-memory in polymer crystallization, we present a theory to describe melt-memory effects, by invoking an intermediate inhomogeneous melt state in the pathway between the melt and crystalline states. Using newly introduced dissolution temperature T10 for the inhomogeneous melt state and the transition temperature Tt0 for the transition between the inhomogeneous melt and crystalline states, analytical formulas are derived for the nucleation rate as a function of the melt temperature. The theory is general to address different kinds of melt-memory effects depending on whether Tm is higher or lower than Tm0. The derived results are in qualitative agreement with known experimental data, while making predictions for further experiments on melt-memory.

  8. Communication: Theory of melt-memory in polymer crystallization.

    PubMed

    Muthukumar, M

    2016-07-21

    Details of crystallization processes of a polymer at the crystallization temperature Tc from its melt kept initially at the melt temperature Tm depend profoundly on the nature of the initial melt state and often are accompanied by memory effects. This phenomenon is in contrast to small molecular systems where the supercooling (Tm (0)-Tc), with Tm (0) being the equilibrium melting temperature, and not (Tm - Tc), determines the nature of crystallization. In addressing this five-decade old puzzle of melt-memory in polymer crystallization, we present a theory to describe melt-memory effects, by invoking an intermediate inhomogeneous melt state in the pathway between the melt and crystalline states. Using newly introduced dissolution temperature T1 (0) for the inhomogeneous melt state and the transition temperature Tt (0) for the transition between the inhomogeneous melt and crystalline states, analytical formulas are derived for the nucleation rate as a function of the melt temperature. The theory is general to address different kinds of melt-memory effects depending on whether Tm is higher or lower than Tm (0). The derived results are in qualitative agreement with known experimental data, while making predictions for further experiments on melt-memory. PMID:27448866

  9. Thermodynamics of freezing and melting.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Ulf R; Costigliola, Lorenzo; Bailey, Nicholas P; Schrøder, Thomas B; Dyre, Jeppe C

    2016-01-01

    Although the freezing of liquids and melting of crystals are fundamental for many areas of the sciences, even simple properties like the temperature-pressure relation along the melting line cannot be predicted today. Here we present a theory in which properties of the coexisting crystal and liquid phases at a single thermodynamic state point provide the basis for calculating the pressure, density and entropy of fusion as functions of temperature along the melting line, as well as the variation along this line of the reduced crystalline vibrational mean-square displacement (the Lindemann ratio), and the liquid's diffusion constant and viscosity. The framework developed, which applies for the sizable class of systems characterized by hidden scale invariance, is validated by computer simulations of the standard 12-6 Lennard-Jones system. PMID:27530064

  10. Thermodynamics of freezing and melting.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Ulf R; Costigliola, Lorenzo; Bailey, Nicholas P; Schrøder, Thomas B; Dyre, Jeppe C

    2016-08-17

    Although the freezing of liquids and melting of crystals are fundamental for many areas of the sciences, even simple properties like the temperature-pressure relation along the melting line cannot be predicted today. Here we present a theory in which properties of the coexisting crystal and liquid phases at a single thermodynamic state point provide the basis for calculating the pressure, density and entropy of fusion as functions of temperature along the melting line, as well as the variation along this line of the reduced crystalline vibrational mean-square displacement (the Lindemann ratio), and the liquid's diffusion constant and viscosity. The framework developed, which applies for the sizable class of systems characterized by hidden scale invariance, is validated by computer simulations of the standard 12-6 Lennard-Jones system.

  11. Thermodynamics of freezing and melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedersen, Ulf R.; Costigliola, Lorenzo; Bailey, Nicholas P.; Schrøder, Thomas B.; Dyre, Jeppe C.

    2016-08-01

    Although the freezing of liquids and melting of crystals are fundamental for many areas of the sciences, even simple properties like the temperature-pressure relation along the melting line cannot be predicted today. Here we present a theory in which properties of the coexisting crystal and liquid phases at a single thermodynamic state point provide the basis for calculating the pressure, density and entropy of fusion as functions of temperature along the melting line, as well as the variation along this line of the reduced crystalline vibrational mean-square displacement (the Lindemann ratio), and the liquid's diffusion constant and viscosity. The framework developed, which applies for the sizable class of systems characterized by hidden scale invariance, is validated by computer simulations of the standard 12-6 Lennard-Jones system.

  12. A benchmark initiative on mantle convection with melting and melt segregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmeling, Harro; Dannberg, Juliane; Dohmen, Janik; Kalousova, Klara; Maurice, Maxim; Noack, Lena; Plesa, Ana; Soucek, Ondrej; Spiegelman, Marc; Thieulot, Cedric; Tosi, Nicola; Wallner, Herbert

    2016-04-01

    In recent years a number of mantle convection models have been developed which include partial melting within the asthenosphere, estimation of melt volumes, as well as melt extraction with and without redistribution at the surface or within the lithosphere. All these approaches use various simplifying modelling assumptions whose effects on the dynamics of convection including the feedback on melting have not been explored in sufficient detail. To better assess the significance of such assumptions and to provide test cases for the modelling community we carry out a benchmark comparison. The reference model is taken from the mantle convection benchmark, cases 1a to 1c (Blankenbach et al., 1989), assuming a square box with free slip boundary conditions, the Boussinesq approximation, constant viscosity and Rayleigh numbers of 104 to 10^6. Melting is modelled using a simplified binary solid solution with linearly depth dependent solidus and liquidus temperatures, as well as a solidus temperature depending linearly on depletion. Starting from a plume free initial temperature condition (to avoid melting at the onset time) five cases are investigated: Case 1 includes melting, but without thermal or dynamic feedback on the convection flow. This case provides a total melt generation rate (qm) in a steady state. Case 2 is identical to case 1 except that latent heat is switched on. Case 3 includes batch melting, melt buoyancy (melt Rayleigh number Rm) and depletion buoyancy, but no melt percolation. Output quantities are the Nusselt number (Nu), root mean square velocity (vrms), the maximum and the total melt volume and qm approaching a statistical steady state. Case 4 includes two-phase flow, i.e. melt percolation, assuming a constant shear and bulk viscosity of the matrix and various melt retention numbers (Rt). These cases are carried out using the Compaction Boussinseq Approximation (Schmeling, 2000) or the full compaction formulation. For cases 1 - 3 very good agreement

  13. Singular perturbation of absolute stability.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siljak, D. D.

    1972-01-01

    It was previously shown (author, 1969) that the regions of absolute stability in the parameter space can be determined when the parameters appear on the right-hand side of the system equations, i.e., the regular case. Here, the effect on absolute stability of a small parameter attached to higher derivatives in the equations (the singular case) is studied. The Lur'e-Postnikov class of nonlinear systems is considered.

  14. Size-dependent melting of Bi nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, E. A.; Efremov, M. Yu.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, Z.; Allen, L. H.

    2005-02-01

    Nanocalorimetry was used to investigate the melting of Bi nanoparticles. The particles were formed by evaporating Bi onto a silicon nitride substrate, which was then heated. The particles self-assemble into truncated spherical particles. Below 5-nm average film thickness, mean particle sizes increased linearly with deposition thickness but increased rapidly for 10-nm-thick films. As expected, small particles were found to exhibit size-dependent melting temperatures less than the bulk melting temperature (e.g., ΔT =67K for a 3-nm radius particle). The measured melting temperatures for particles below ˜7nm in radius, however, were ˜50K above the value predicted by the homogeneous melting model. We discuss this discrepancy in terms of a possible size-dependent crystal structure change and the superheating of the solid phase.

  15. Solubility and Partitioning of Carbon and Sulfur in Fe-rich Alloy and Silicate Melt Systems at High Pressures and Temperatures: Implications for Earth's Heterogeneous Accretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.; Dasgupta, R.; Tsuno, K.; Monteleone, B.; Shimizu, N.

    2015-12-01

    The partitioning of C and S between Fe-rich alloy and silicate melt are critical to understand the origin and distribution of these two volatile elements in terrestrial planets. Thirty-five experiments in graphite capsule have been performed at 2-8 GPa and 1600-2200 °C to investigate the effects of P, T, fO2, H2O, and melt composition on C and S partitioning in Fe-Ni±S±Si alloy and silicate melt systems. The results show that C-solubility in Si-free alloy melt is ~5.5 wt% and is little affected by P, T, or the presence of 0-5 wt.% S [1]. However, C-solubility in Si-bearing alloy decreases from ~5.5 to ~1.8 wt% with increasing Si content to 10 wt.%. C-solubility in silicate melt is mainly controlled by fO2 and the bulk H2O content. At fO2 from IW-0.6 to IW-1.5, C-solubility drops from ~90 to ~10 ppm. However, at fO2 below IW-1.5, C-solubility increases up to 240 ppm with decreasing fO2 if the melt H2O content is 0.3-0.8 wt.%; whereas C-solubility decreases or only slightly increases if melt H2O is <0.2 wt.%. Raman and FTIR spectra show that the silicate glass with fO2 around IW-0.6 contained ~10-30 ppm carbon as CO32-; however, at fO2melt H2O content, as in the case for C-solubility in silicate melt but in an opposite way. varied from 0.4 to 38, mainly controlled by fO2, P, and T. Our new results along with previous data suggest that in a magma ocean, in particular at dry conditions, much more C than S would have segregated in the core. To satisfy the C/S ratios currently estimated for Earth's core and silicate mantle [2], a C-rich but S-poor material needs to be delivered to the silicate Earth after complete core formation. Alternatively, a C- and S-rich material was delivered to the Earth during the late stage of core formation, but with S preferentially segregated in the

  16. From Hubble's NGSL to Absolute Fluxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heap, Sara R.; Lindler, Don

    2012-01-01

    Hubble's Next Generation Spectral Library (NGSL) consists of R-l000 spectra of 374 stars of assorted temperature, gravity, and metallicity. Each spectrum covers the wavelength range, 0.18-1.00 microns. The library can be viewed and/or downloaded from the website, http://archive.stsci.edu/prepds/stisngsll. Stars in the NGSL are now being used as absolute flux standards at ground-based observatories. However, the uncertainty in the absolute flux is about 2%, which does not meet the requirements of dark-energy surveys. We are therefore developing an observing procedure that should yield fluxes with uncertainties less than 1 % and will take part in an HST proposal to observe up to 15 stars using this new procedure.

  17. Melt dumping in string stabilized ribbon growth

    DOEpatents

    Sachs, Emanuel M.

    1986-12-09

    A method and apparatus for stabilizing the edge positions of a ribbon drawn from a melt includes the use of wettable strings drawn in parallel up through the melt surface, the ribbon being grown between the strings. A furnace and various features of the crucible used therein permit continuous automatic growth of flat ribbons without close temperature control or the need for visual inspection.

  18. Oxidation and melting of aluminum nanopowders.

    PubMed

    Trunov, Mikhaylo A; Umbrajkar, Swati M; Schoenitz, Mirko; Mang, Joseph T; Dreizin, Edward L

    2006-07-01

    Recently, nanometer-sized aluminum powders became available commercially, and their use as potential additives to propellants, explosives, and pyrotechnics has attracted significant interest. It has been suggested that very low melting temperatures are expected for nanosized aluminum powders and that such low melting temperatures could accelerate oxidation and trigger ignition much earlier than for regular, micron-sized aluminum powders. The objective of this work was to investigate experimentally the melting and oxidation behavior of nanosized aluminum powders. Powder samples with three different nominal sizes of 44, 80, and 121 nm were provided by Nanotechnologies Inc. The particle size distributions were measured using small-angle X-ray scattering. Melting was studied by differential scanning calorimetry where the powders were heated from room temperature to 750 degrees C in an argon environment. Thermogravimetric analysis was used to measure the mass increase indicative of oxidation while the powders were heated in an oxygen-argon gas mixture. The measured melting curves were compared to those computed using the experimental particle size distributions and thermodynamic models describing the melting temperature and enthalpy as functions of the particle size. The melting behavior predicted by different models correlated with the experimental observations only qualitatively. Characteristic stepwise oxidation was observed for all studied nanopowders. The observed oxidation behavior was well interpreted considering the recently established kinetics of oxidation of micron-sized aluminum powders. No correlation was found between the melting and oxidation of aluminum nanopowders.

  19. Prediction of ethylene content in melt-state random and block polypropylene by near-infrared spectroscopy and chemometrics: influence of a change in sample temperature and its compensation method.

    PubMed

    Watari, Masahiro; Ozaki, Yukihiro

    2005-05-01

    This paper reports on the influence of a change in sample temperature, and a method for its compensation, for the prediction of ethylene (C2) content in melt-state random polypropylene (RPP) and block polypropylene (BPP) by near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy and chemometrics. Near-infrared (NIR) spectra of RPP in the melt and solid states were measured by a Fourier transform near-infrared (FT-NIR) on-line monitoring system and an FT-NIR laboratory system. There are some significant differences between the solid and melt-state RPP spectra. Moreover, we investigated the predicted values of the C2 content from the RPP or BPP spectra measured at 190 degrees C and 250 degrees C using the calibration model for the C2 content developed using the RPP or BPP spectra measured at 230 degrees C. The errors in the predicted values of the C2 content depend on the pretreatment methods for each calibration model. It was found that multiplicative signal correction (MSC) is very effective in compensating for the influence of the change of temperature for the RPP or BPP samples on the predicted C2 content. From the suggestion of principal component analysis (PCA) and difference spectrum analysis, we propose a new compensation method for the temperature change that uses the difference spectra between two spectra sets measured at different temperatures. We achieved good results using the difference spectra between the RPP/BPP spectra sets measured at 190 degrees C and 250 degrees C after correction and the calibration model developed with the spectra measured at 230 degrees C. The comparison between the method using MSC and the proposed method showed that the predicted error in the latter is slightly better than those in the former.

  20. Transient melting of an ESR electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharicha, A.; Karimi-Sibaki, E.; Bohacek, J.; Wu, M.; Ludwig, A.

    2016-07-01

    Melting parameters of ESR process such as melt rate and immersion depth of electrode are of great importance. In this paper, a dynamic mesh based simulation framework is proposed to model melt rate and shape of electrode during the ESR process. Coupling interactions between turbulent flow, temperature, and electromagnetic fields are fully considered. The model is computationally efficient, and enables us to directly calculate melting parameters. Furthermore, dynamic change of electrode shape by melting can be captured. It is necessary to control the feeding velocity of electrode due to melting instabilities in the ESR process. As such, a numerical control is implemented based on the immersion depth of electrode to achieve the steady state in the simulation. Furthermore, the modeling result is evaluated against an experiment.

  1. Quantifying melting and mobilistaion of interstitial melts in crystal mushes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veksler, Ilya; Dobson, Katherine; Hess, Kai-Uwe; Ertel-Ingrisch, Werner; Humphreys, Madeleine

    2015-04-01

    The deformation of crystals mushes and separation of melts and crystals in is critical to understanding the development of physical and chemical heterogeneity in magma chambers and has been invoked as an eruption trigger mechanism. Here we investigate the behaviour of the melt in the well characterised, classic crystal mush system of the Skaergaard intrusion by combining experimental petrology and the non-destructive 3D imaging methods. Starting materials for partial melting experiments were four samples from the upper Middle Zone of the Layered Series. Cylinders, 15 mm in diameter and 20 mm in length, were drilled out of the rock samples, placed in alumina crucibles and held for 5 days in electric furnaces at atmospheric pressure and 1050-1100 °C. Redox conditions set by the CO-CO2 gas mixture were kept close to those of the FMQ buffer. We then use spatially registered 3D x-ray computed tomography images, collected before and after the experiment, to determine the volume and distribution of the crystal framework and interstitial phases, and the volume, distribution and connectivity the interstitial phases that undergo melting and extraction while at elevated temperature. Image analysis has allowed us to quantify these physical changes with high spatial resolution. Our work is a first step towards quantitative understanding of the melt mobilisation and migration processes operating in notionally locked crystal rich magmatic systems.

  2. Syn-orogenic high-temperature crustal melting: Geochronological and Nd-Sr-Pb isotope constraints from basement-derived granites (Central Damara Orogen, Namibia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostendorf, Jörg; Jung, Stefan; Berndt-Gerdes, Jasper; Hauff, Folkmar

    2014-04-01

    Major and trace element and Nd, Sr and Pb isotope data from c. 550 Ma-old gray granites and c. 510 Ma-old red leucogranites of the high-grade central part of the Damara orogen (Namibia) indicate a dominantly deep crustal origin. Moderately peraluminous gray granites are isotopically evolved (initial ɛNd: c. - 17) and were likely derived from meta-igneous sources with late Archean to Paleoproterozoic crustal residence ages. Based on a comparison with experimental results, the granites were derived by partial melting of a granodioritic biotite gneiss at c. 900-950 °C and less than 10 kbar. Slightly peraluminous red leucogranites are also isotopically evolved (initial ɛNd: - 15 to - 18) but have undergone extensive crystal fractionation coupled with minor contamination of mid crustal meta-pelitic material. Major and trace element data do not support closed-system fractional crystallization processes for all samples, however, some chemical features underline the importance of crystal fractionation processes especially for the leucogranites. Isotope data do not support mixing of different crust-derived melts or assimilation of crustal rocks by a mafic magma on a large scale. For the gray granites, unradiogenic Pb isotope compositions with substantial variation in 207Pb/204Pb at almost constant 206Pb/204Pb, strongly negative ɛNd values and moderately radiogenic Sr isotope compositions argue for an undepleted nature of the source. High Rb/Sr ratios of the red leucogranites permit a comparison with the gray granites but similar initial ɛNd values indicate that the source of these granites is not fundamentally different to the source of the gray granites. The most acceptable model for both granite types involves partial melting of meta-igneous basement rocks of Archean to Proterozoic age. The consistency of the chemical data with a crustal anatectic origin and the observation that the gray granites intruded before the first peak of high-grade regional metamorphism

  3. Disequilibrium melt distributions during static recrystallisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walte, N. P.; Bons, P. D.; Passchier, C. W.; Koehn, D.; Arnold, J.

    2003-04-01

    DISEQUILIBRIUM MELT DISTRIBUTIONS DURING STATIC RECRYSTALLISATION N.P. Walte (1), P.D. Bons (2), C.W. Passchier (1), D. Koehn (1), J. Arnold (1) (1) Institute for Earth Sciences, Johannes Gutenberg-University, Mainz, Germany, (2) Institute for Earth Sciences, Eberhard Karls University, Tübingen, Germany (walte@mail.uni-mainz.de) The geometry of melt-filled pores in a partially molten rock strongly controls the permeability, rheology and initial segregation of melt. Current theory for monomineralic aggregates, using only the wetting angle and melt fraction as parameters, predicts a perfectly regular melt framework or equally shaped melt inclusions on grain boundary junctions. However, published melt-present high-temperature experiments with rock forming minerals such as quartz or olivine show considerable deviations from this predicted regular equilibrium melt geometry. Disequilibrium features, such as fully wetted grain boundaries, melt lenses, and large melt patches have been described, and were attributed to surface energy anisotropy of the minerals. This study used static analogue experiments with norcamphor plus ethanol liquid, that allow continuous in-situ observation of the evolving distribution of melt during static recrystallisation. The liquid-crystal surface energy of norcamphor is effectively isotropic. For the experiments an approximately 0.1 mm thin sample of norcamphor plus ethanole was placed between two glass plates and observed with a miroscope. Ethanol was used as a melt analogue because it allows to run experiments at room temperature, avoiding any temperature gradients. The wetting angle is approximately 15°, which is well below 60° and within the range reported for quartz and olivine plus melt experiments. The experiments show that all described disequilibrium features can form during fluid-enhanced static recrystallisation, especially where surrounding grains consume small, few-sided grains. These features are unstable and transient: a

  4. Absolute flux scale for radioastronomy

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, V.P.; Stankevich, K.S.

    1986-07-01

    The authors propose and provide support for a new absolute flux scale for radio astronomy, which is not encumbered with the inadequacies of the previous scales. In constructing it the method of relative spectra was used (a powerful tool for choosing reference spectra). A review is given of previous flux scales. The authors compare the AIS scale with the scale they propose. Both scales are based on absolute measurements by the ''artificial moon'' method, and they are practically coincident in the range from 0.96 to 6 GHz. At frequencies above 6 GHz, 0.96 GHz, the AIS scale is overestimated because of incorrect extrapolation of the spectra of the primary and secondary standards. The major results which have emerged from this review of absolute scales in radio astronomy are summarized.

  5. Thermodynamics of freezing and melting

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, Ulf R.; Costigliola, Lorenzo; Bailey, Nicholas P.; Schrøder, Thomas B.; Dyre, Jeppe C.

    2016-01-01

    Although the freezing of liquids and melting of crystals are fundamental for many areas of the sciences, even simple properties like the temperature–pressure relation along the melting line cannot be predicted today. Here we present a theory in which properties of the coexisting crystal and liquid phases at a single thermodynamic state point provide the basis for calculating the pressure, density and entropy of fusion as functions of temperature along the melting line, as well as the variation along this line of the reduced crystalline vibrational mean-square displacement (the Lindemann ratio), and the liquid's diffusion constant and viscosity. The framework developed, which applies for the sizable class of systems characterized by hidden scale invariance, is validated by computer simulations of the standard 12-6 Lennard-Jones system. PMID:27530064

  6. Heat capacity and absolute entropy of iron phosphides

    SciTech Connect

    Dobrokhotova, Z.V.; Zaitsev, A.I.; Litvina, A.D.

    1994-09-01

    There is little or no data on the thermodynamic properties of iron phosphides despite their importance for several areas of science and technology. The information available is of a qualitative character and is based on assessments of the heat capacity and absolute entropy. In the present work, we measured the heat capacity over the temperature range of 113-873 K using a differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) and calculated the absolute entropy.

  7. Melting of Transition Metals

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, M; Japel, S; Boehler, R

    2005-04-11

    We review the transition melting studies carried out at Mainz, and describe a recently developed model used to explain that the relatively low melting slopes are due to the partially filled d-bands, and the persistence of the pressure induced s-d transition. The basic tenets of the model have now been reconfirmed by new measurements for Cu and Ni. The measurements show that Cu which has a filled 3d-band, has a melt slope that is about 2.5 greater than its neighbor Ni. In the case of Mo, the apparent discrepancy of DAC melting measurements with shock melting can be explained by accounting for the change in melt slope due to the bcc-cp transition observed in the shock studies. The Fe melt curve is revisited. The possible relevance of the Jahn-Teller effect and recently observed transition metal melts with Icosahedral Short-Range Order (ISRO) is discussed.

  8. Three-dimensional electrical conductivity structure beneath Australia from inversion of geomagnetic observatory data: evidence for lateral variations in transition-zone temperature, water content and melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koyama, Takao; Khan, Amir; Kuvshinov, Alexey

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, we report the 3-D electrical conductivity distribution beneath the Australian continent in the depth range 410-1600 km, which we have imaged by inverting C-response estimates from a regional network of geomagnetic observatories. The inversion scheme is based on a quasi-Newton optimization method while the forward algorithm relies on an integral-equation approach. To properly account for the ocean effect in responses at coastal observatories we included a high-resolution (1° × 1°) fixed thin laterally varying surface conductance layer. As starting model in the inversion we considered a laboratory-based 3-D conductivity model of the region obtained from seismic surface wave data and thermodynamic modelling. This model provides a good fit to observed C-response estimates supporting its choice as initial model. The most striking feature of the obtained 3-D model is a high-conductivity anomaly in the lower part of the mantle transition zone (MTZ; 520-660 km depth) beneath southeastern Australia implying considerable lateral as radial heterogeneity in the conductivity structure. The high-conductivity region appears to be 0.5-1 log units more conductive than previous global and other regionalized 1-D models. Further analysis using laboratory-based conductivity models combined with thermochemical phase equilibrium computations shows that the strong conductivity anomaly implies water contents of around 0.1 wt per cent in the upper part and >0.4 wt per cent in the lower part of the MTZ. This implies a large MTZ water reservoir that likely totals one to three times that which currently resides in the oceans. The amount of water in the lower MTZ appears to exceed the experimentally determined water storage capacity of the main lower MTZ mineral ringwoodite, which, as a result, undergoes dehydration-induced partial melting. Including contributions to conductivity from a thin melt layer (20 km thick) located in the mid-MTZ increases conductivity locally in the

  9. Electrical conductivity measurements on silicate melts using the loop technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waff, H. S.

    1976-01-01

    A new method is described for measurement of the electrical conductivity of silicate melts under controlled oxygen partial pressure at temperatures to 1550 C. The melt samples are suspended as droplets on platinum-rhodium loops, minimizing iron loss from the melt due to alloying with platinum, and providing maximum surface exposure of the melt to the oxygen-buffering gas atmosphere. The latter provides extremely rapid equilibration of the melt with the imposed oxygen partial pressure. The loop technique involves a minimum of setup time and cost, provides reproducible results to within + or - 5% and is well suited to electrical conductivity studies on silicate melts containing redox cations.

  10. Relativistic Absolutism in Moral Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vogt, W. Paul

    1982-01-01

    Discusses Emile Durkheim's "Moral Education: A Study in the Theory and Application of the Sociology of Education," which holds that morally healthy societies may vary in culture and organization but must possess absolute rules of moral behavior. Compares this moral theory with current theory and practice of American educators. (MJL)

  11. Absolute transition probabilities of phosphorus.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, M. H.; Roig, R. A.; Bengtson, R. D.

    1971-01-01

    Use of a gas-driven shock tube to measure the absolute strengths of 21 P I lines and 126 P II lines (from 3300 to 6900 A). Accuracy for prominent, isolated neutral and ionic lines is estimated to be 28 to 40% and 18 to 30%, respectively. The data and the corresponding theoretical predictions are examined for conformity with the sum rules.-

  12. Size effect on the melting temperature depression of Al12Mg17 complex metallic alloy nanoparticles prepared by planetary ball milling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zolriasatein, Ashkan; Shokuhfar, Ali

    2015-11-01

    This research investigates the synthesis and size-dependent melting point depression of complex metallic alloy (CMA) nanoparticles. Al12Mg17 which belongs to this new category of intermetallic materials was initially produced as pre-alloyed ingot, then homogenized to achieve single phase compound and crushed into small size powder and finally, mechanically milled in a planetary ball mill to synthesize nanoparticles. Phase and microstructural characterizations of the as-crushed and milled powders were performed using X-ray diffractometry (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Effects of the mechanical milling on thermal behavior of the Al12Mg17 nanoparticles in comparison with as-cast Al12Mg17 ingot has been investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) measurement. It was found that an average particle size of 24 nm with crystallite size of 16 nm was achieved after 20 h of ball milling process. The size- dependent melting point depression of the Al12Mg17 nanoparticles has been experimentally observed and also comparison of the obtained results with theoretical models was carried out.

  13. First-principles melting of gallium clusters down to nine atoms: structural and electronic contributions to melting.

    PubMed

    Steenbergen, Krista G; Gaston, Nicola

    2013-10-01

    First-principles Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics simulations of small gallium clusters, including parallel tempering, probe the distinction between cluster and molecule in the size range of 7-12 atoms. In contrast to the larger sizes, dynamic measures of structural change at finite temperature demonstrate that Ga7 and Ga8 do not melt, suggesting a size limit to melting in gallium exists at 9 atoms. Analysis of electronic structure further supports this size limit, additionally demonstrating that a covalent nature cannot be identified for clusters larger than the gallium dimer. Ga9, Ga10 and Ga11 melt at greater-than-bulk temperatures, with no evident covalent character. As Ga12 represents the first small gallium cluster to melt at a lower-than-bulk temperature, we examine the structural properties of each cluster at finite temperature in order to probe both the origins of greater-than-bulk melting, as well as the significant differences in melting temperatures induced by a single atom addition. Size-sensitive melting temperatures can be explained by both energetic and entropic differences between the solid and liquid phases for each cluster. We show that the lower-than-bulk melting temperature of the 12-atom cluster can be attributed to persistent pair bonding, reminiscent of the pairing observed in α-gallium. This result supports the attribution of greater-than-bulk melting in gallium clusters to the anomalously low melting temperature of the bulk, due to its dimeric structure.

  14. Partitioning of rare earth elements between hibonite and melt and implications for nebular condensation of the rare earth elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drake, Michael J.; Boynton, William V.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of oxygen fugacity on the partitioning of REEs between hibonite and silicate melt is investigated in hibonite-growth experiments at 1470 C. The experimental procedures and apparatus are described, and the results are presented in extensive tables and graphs and characterized in detail. The absolute activity coefficients in hibonite are estimated as 330 for La, 1200 for Eu(3+), and 24,000 for Yb. It is inferred that ideal solution behavior cannot be assumed when calculating REE condensation temperatures for (Ca, Al)-rich inclusions in carbonaceous chondrites.

  15. Water loss from olivine hosted melt inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y.; Provost, A.; Schiano, P.; Cluzel, N.

    2009-12-01

    Water content in melt inclusions has long been used as an important index for the water content of the hosting magma. However, many studies have shown that post-entrapment diffusive re-equilibration can affect the water content of melt inclusions. This process must be considered when using melt inclusions to infer water content of the hosting magma. Theoretical model on the diffusive re-equilibration between melt inclusions and external melts showed that the re-equilibration rate depends on the diffusivity of the re-equilibrating species in the host mineral, the partition coefficient of this species between the host mineral and melt, and the geometry of the melt inclusion and host mineral. The water diffusivity in olivine and water partition coefficient between melt and olivine have been measured by recent studies, therefore the diffusive re-equilibration model can be tested by experiments. In this study, we carried out in-situ Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) measurements on the water content of olivine hosted melt inclusions at high temperatures. Initial water content of the melt inclusions is about 4 wt%. A heating stage system is combined with a microscope FTIR and the absorption spectrum through the olivine and melt inclusion is repeatedly measured. Although the absorption band at around 3540 cm-1 has not be calibrated at high temperatures, it is assumed that the absorbance is linearly related to the total water concentration in the melt inclusion, and the relative water content can be inferred. Cautions have been exercised to maintain a consistent measurement spot such that the thickness of the melt inclusion within the beam path did not change significantly during each experiment. Oxygen fugacity in the heating stage is controlled by Zr purified Ar gas to be about 7 logarithm units below the QFM buffer and about 1 logarithm unit above the QIF buffer at 1473 K. Preliminary results showed that at 1430 and 1581 K, the total water content of the

  16. Local and bulk melting of Cu at grain boundaries

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Shengnian; Han, Li - Bo; An, Qi; Zheng, Lianqing

    2008-01-01

    We investigate gain boundary (GB) melting using molecular dynamics simulations on face-centered-cubic Cu bicrystals with symmetric {l_angle}110{r_angle} tilt grain boundaries. Two representative types of GBs are explored: {Sigma} = 11/(113)/50.48{sup o} (low GB energy) and {Sigma} = 27/(552)/148.41{sup o} (high GB energy). The temperature and temporal evolutions of the Cu bicrystals under stepped heating are characterized in terms of order parameters and diffusion coefficients, as ell as the nucleation and growth of melt. Within the GB region, continuous local melting precedes discontinuous bulk melting, while continuous solid state disordering may precede local melting. Premelting may occur for local melting but not for bulk melting. For {Sigma} = 11/(113)/50.48{sup o}, premelting of the GB region is negligible, and local melting occurs near the thermodynamic melting temperature. The GB region as a whole is superheated by about 13% before its bulk melting. In the case of {Sigma} = 27/(552)/148.41, considerable premelting is observed for local melting, while the bulk melting occurs with negligible superheating. The exact melting behavior of a general GB depends on the GB energy, but is likely bracketed within these two cases.

  17. Melt onset over Arctic sea ice controlled by atmospheric moisture transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mortin, Jonas; Svensson, Gunilla; Graversen, Rune G.; Kapsch, Marie-Luise; Stroeve, Julienne C.; Boisvert, Linette N.

    2016-06-01

    The timing of melt onset affects the surface energy uptake throughout the melt season. Yet the processes triggering melt and causing its large interannual variability are not well understood. Here we show that melt onset over Arctic sea ice is initiated by positive anomalies of water vapor, clouds, and air temperatures that increase the downwelling longwave radiation (LWD) to the surface. The earlier melt onset occurs; the stronger are these anomalies. Downwelling shortwave radiation (SWD) is smaller than usual at melt onset, indicating that melt is not triggered by SWD. When melt occurs early, an anomalously opaque atmosphere with positive LWD anomalies preconditions the surface for weeks preceding melt. In contrast, when melt begins late, clearer than usual conditions are evident prior to melt. Hence, atmospheric processes are imperative for melt onset. It is also found that spring LWD increased during recent decades, consistent with trends toward an earlier melt onset.

  18. Melting of icosahedral nickel clusters under hydrostatic pressure.

    PubMed

    Fu, Bing; Chen, Li; Wang, Feifei; Xie, Yiqun; Ye, Xiang

    2014-12-01

    The thermal stabilities and melting behavior of icosahedral nickel clusters under hydrostatic pressure have been studied by constant-pressure molecular dynamics simulation. The potential energy and Lindemann index are calculated. The overall melting temperature exhibits a strong dependence on pressure. The Lindemann index of solid structure before melting varies slowly and is almost independent of pressure. However, after the clusters melt completely, the Lindemann index at the overall melting point strongly depends on pressure. The overall melting temperature is found to be increasing nonlinearly with increasing pressure, while the volume change during melting decreases linearly with increasing pressure. Under a high pressure and temperature environment, similar angular distributions were found between liquid and solid structures, indicating the existence of a converging local structure.

  19. A benchmark initiative on mantle convection with melting and melt segregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmeling, Harro; Dohmen, Janik; Wallner, Herbert; Noack, Lena; Tosi, Nicola; Plesa, Ana-Catalina; Maurice, Maxime

    2015-04-01

    In recent years a number of mantle convection models have been developed which include partial melting within the asthenosphere, estimation of melt volumes, as well as melt extraction with and without redistribution at the surface or within the lithosphere. All these approaches use various simplifying modelling assumptions whose effects on the dynamics of convection including the feedback on melting have not been explored in sufficient detail. To better assess the significance of such assumptions and to provide test cases for the modelling community we initiate a benchmark comparison. In the initial phase of this endeavor we focus on the usefulness of the definitions of the test cases keeping the physics as sound as possible. The reference model is taken from the mantle convection benchmark, case 1b (Blanckenbach et al., 1989), assuming a square box with free slip boundary conditions, the Boussinesq approximation, constant viscosity and a Rayleigh number of 1e5. Melting is modelled assuming a simplified binary solid solution with linearly depth dependent solidus and liquidus temperatures, as well as a solidus temperature depending linearly on depletion. Starting from a plume free initial temperature condition (to avoid melting at the onset time) three cases are investigated: Case 1 includes melting, but without thermal or dynamic feedback on the convection flow. This case provides a total melt generation rate (qm) in a steady state. Case 2 includes batch melting, melt buoyancy (melt Rayleigh number Rm), depletion buoyancy and latent heat, but no melt percolation. Output quantities are the Nusselt number (Nu), root mean square velocity (vrms) and qm approaching a statistical steady state. Case 3 includes two-phase flow, i.e. melt percolation, assuming a constant shear and bulk viscosity of the matrix and various melt retention numbers (Rt). These cases should be carried out using the Compaction Boussinseq Approximation (Schmeling, 2000) or the full compaction

  20. Water freezing and ice melting

    SciTech Connect

    Malolepsza, Edyta; Keyes, Tom

    2015-10-12

    The generalized replica exchange method (gREM) is designed to sample states with coexisting phases and thereby to describe strong first order phase transitions. The isobaric MD version of the gREM is presented and applied to freezing of liquid water, and melting of hexagonal and cubic ice. It is confirmed that coexisting states are well sampled. The statistical temperature as a function of enthalpy, TS(H), is obtained. Hysteresis between freezing and melting is observed and discussed. The entropic analysis of phase transitions is applied and equilibrium transition temperatures, latent heats, and surface tensions are obtained for hexagonal ice↔liquid and cubic ice↔liquid, with excellent agreement with published values. A new method is given to assign water molecules among various symmetry types. As a result, pathways for water freezing, ultimately leading to hexagonal ice, are found to contain intermediate layered structures built from hexagonal and cubic ice.

  1. Water freezing and ice melting

    DOE PAGES

    Malolepsza, Edyta; Keyes, Tom

    2015-10-12

    The generalized replica exchange method (gREM) is designed to sample states with coexisting phases and thereby to describe strong first order phase transitions. The isobaric MD version of the gREM is presented and applied to freezing of liquid water, and melting of hexagonal and cubic ice. It is confirmed that coexisting states are well sampled. The statistical temperature as a function of enthalpy, TS(H), is obtained. Hysteresis between freezing and melting is observed and discussed. The entropic analysis of phase transitions is applied and equilibrium transition temperatures, latent heats, and surface tensions are obtained for hexagonal ice↔liquid and cubic ice↔liquid,more » with excellent agreement with published values. A new method is given to assign water molecules among various symmetry types. As a result, pathways for water freezing, ultimately leading to hexagonal ice, are found to contain intermediate layered structures built from hexagonal and cubic ice.« less

  2. Water Freezing and Ice Melting.

    PubMed

    Małolepsza, Edyta; Keyes, Tom

    2015-12-01

    The generalized replica exchange method (gREM) is designed to sample states with coexisting phases and thereby to describe strong first order phase transitions. The isobaric MD version of the gREM is presented and applied to the freezing of liquid water and the melting of hexagonal and cubic ice. It is confirmed that coexisting states are well-sampled. The statistical temperature as a function of enthalpy, TS(H), is obtained. Hysteresis between freezing and melting is observed and discussed. The entropic analysis of phase transitions is applied and equilibrium transition temperatures, latent heats, and surface tensions are obtained for hexagonal ice ↔ liquid and cubic ice ↔ liquid with excellent agreement with published values. A new method is given to assign water molecules among various symmetry types. Pathways for water freezing, ultimately leading to hexagonal ice, are found to contain intermediate layered structures built from hexagonal and cubic ice.

  3. Water Freezing and Ice Melting.

    PubMed

    Małolepsza, Edyta; Keyes, Tom

    2015-12-01

    The generalized replica exchange method (gREM) is designed to sample states with coexisting phases and thereby to describe strong first order phase transitions. The isobaric MD version of the gREM is presented and applied to the freezing of liquid water and the melting of hexagonal and cubic ice. It is confirmed that coexisting states are well-sampled. The statistical temperature as a function of enthalpy, TS(H), is obtained. Hysteresis between freezing and melting is observed and discussed. The entropic analysis of phase transitions is applied and equilibrium transition temperatures, latent heats, and surface tensions are obtained for hexagonal ice ↔ liquid and cubic ice ↔ liquid with excellent agreement with published values. A new method is given to assign water molecules among various symmetry types. Pathways for water freezing, ultimately leading to hexagonal ice, are found to contain intermediate layered structures built from hexagonal and cubic ice. PMID:26642983

  4. Dynamic crystallization of silicate melts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, W. J.

    1984-01-01

    Two types of furnaces with differing temperature range capabilities were used to provide variations in melt temperatures and cooling rates in a study of the effects of heterogeneous nucleation on crystallization. Materials of chondrule composition were used to further understanding of how the disequilibrium features displayed by minerals in rocks are formed. Results show that the textures of natural chondrules were duplicated. It is concluded that the melt history is dominant over cooling rate and composition in controlling texture. The importance of nuclei, which are most readily derived from preexisting crystalline material, support an origin for natural chondrules based on remelting of crystalline material. This would be compatible with a simple, uniform chondrule forming process having only slight variations in thermal histories resulting in the wide range of textures.

  5. Moral absolutism and ectopic pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Kaczor, C

    2001-02-01

    If one accepts a version of absolutism that excludes the intentional killing of any innocent human person from conception to natural death, ectopic pregnancy poses vexing difficulties. Given that the embryonic life almost certainly will die anyway, how can one retain one's moral principle and yet adequately respond to a situation that gravely threatens the life of the mother and her future fertility? The four options of treatment most often discussed in the literature are non-intervention, salpingectomy (removal of tube with embryo), salpingostomy (removal of embryo alone), and use of methotrexate (MXT). In this essay, I review these four options and introduce a fifth (the milking technique). In order to assess these options in terms of the absolutism mentioned, it will also be necessary to discuss various accounts of the intention/foresight distinction. I conclude that salpingectomy, salpingostomy, and the milking technique are compatible with absolutist presuppositions, but not the use of methotrexate.

  6. Moral absolutism and ectopic pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Kaczor, C

    2001-02-01

    If one accepts a version of absolutism that excludes the intentional killing of any innocent human person from conception to natural death, ectopic pregnancy poses vexing difficulties. Given that the embryonic life almost certainly will die anyway, how can one retain one's moral principle and yet adequately respond to a situation that gravely threatens the life of the mother and her future fertility? The four options of treatment most often discussed in the literature are non-intervention, salpingectomy (removal of tube with embryo), salpingostomy (removal of embryo alone), and use of methotrexate (MXT). In this essay, I review these four options and introduce a fifth (the milking technique). In order to assess these options in terms of the absolutism mentioned, it will also be necessary to discuss various accounts of the intention/foresight distinction. I conclude that salpingectomy, salpingostomy, and the milking technique are compatible with absolutist presuppositions, but not the use of methotrexate. PMID:11262641

  7. The Absolute Spectrum Polarimeter (ASP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kogut, A. J.

    2010-01-01

    The Absolute Spectrum Polarimeter (ASP) is an Explorer-class mission to map the absolute intensity and linear polarization of the cosmic microwave background and diffuse astrophysical foregrounds over the full sky from 30 GHz to 5 THz. The principal science goal is the detection and characterization of linear polarization from an inflationary epoch in the early universe, with tensor-to-scalar ratio r much greater than 1O(raised to the power of { -3}) and Compton distortion y < 10 (raised to the power of{-6}). We describe the ASP instrument and mission architecture needed to detect the signature of an inflationary epoch in the early universe using only 4 semiconductor bolometers.

  8. Classification images predict absolute efficiency.

    PubMed

    Murray, Richard F; Bennett, Patrick J; Sekuler, Allison B

    2005-02-24

    How well do classification images characterize human observers' strategies in perceptual tasks? We show mathematically that from the classification image of a noisy linear observer, it is possible to recover the observer's absolute efficiency. If we could similarly predict human observers' performance from their classification images, this would suggest that the linear model that underlies use of the classification image method is adequate over the small range of stimuli typically encountered in a classification image experiment, and that a classification image captures most important aspects of human observers' performance over this range. In a contrast discrimination task and in a shape discrimination task, we found that observers' absolute efficiencies were generally well predicted by their classification images, although consistently slightly (approximately 13%) higher than predicted. We consider whether a number of plausible nonlinearities can account for the slight under prediction, and of these we find that only a form of phase uncertainty can account for the discrepancy.

  9. Absolute calibration of optical flats

    DOEpatents

    Sommargren, Gary E.

    2005-04-05

    The invention uses the phase shifting diffraction interferometer (PSDI) to provide a true point-by-point measurement of absolute flatness over the surface of optical flats. Beams exiting the fiber optics in a PSDI have perfect spherical wavefronts. The measurement beam is reflected from the optical flat and passed through an auxiliary optic to then be combined with the reference beam on a CCD. The combined beams include phase errors due to both the optic under test and the auxiliary optic. Standard phase extraction algorithms are used to calculate this combined phase error. The optical flat is then removed from the system and the measurement fiber is moved to recombine the two beams. The newly combined beams include only the phase errors due to the auxiliary optic. When the second phase measurement is subtracted from the first phase measurement, the absolute phase error of the optical flat is obtained.

  10. On the absolute thermodynamics of water from computer simulations: A comparison of first-principles molecular dynamics, reactive and empirical force fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascal, Tod A.; Schärf, Daniel; Jung, Yousung; Kühne, Thomas D.

    2012-12-01

    We present the absolute enthalpy, entropy, heat capacity, and free energy of liquid water at ambient conditions calculated by the two-phase thermodynamic method applied to ab initio, reactive and classical molecular dynamics simulations. We find that the absolute entropy and heat capacity of liquid water from ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) is underestimated, but falls within the range of the flexible empirical as well as the reactive force fields. The origin of the low absolute entropy of liquid water from AIMD simulations is due to an underestimation of the translational entropy by 20% and the rotational entropy by 40% compared to the TIP3P classical water model, consistent with previous studies that reports low diffusivity and increased ordering of liquid water from AIMD simulations. Classical MD simulations with rigid water models tend to be in better agreement with experiment (in particular TIP3P yielding the best agreement), although the TIP4P-ice water model, the only empirical force field that reproduces the experimental melting temperature, has the lowest entropy, perhaps expectedly. This reiterates the limitations of existing empirical water models in simultaneously capturing the thermodynamics of solid and liquid phases. We find that the quantum corrections to heat capacity of water can be as large as 60%. Although certain water models are computed to yield good absolute free energies of water compared to experiments, they are often due to the fortuitous enthalpy-entropy cancellation, but not necessarily due to the correct descriptions of enthalpy and entropy separately.

  11. Nanotexturing of surfaces to reduce melting point.

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, Ernest J.; Zubia, David; Mireles, Jose; Marquez, Noel; Quinones, Stella

    2011-11-01

    This investigation examined the use of nano-patterned structures on Silicon-on-Insulator (SOI) material to reduce the bulk material melting point (1414 C). It has been found that sharp-tipped and other similar structures have a propensity to move to the lower energy states of spherical structures and as a result exhibit lower melting points than the bulk material. Such a reduction of the melting point would offer a number of interesting opportunities for bonding in microsystems packaging applications. Nano patterning process capabilities were developed to create the required structures for the investigation. One of the technical challenges of the project was understanding and creating the specialized conditions required to observe the melting and reshaping phenomena. Through systematic experimentation and review of the literature these conditions were determined and used to conduct phase change experiments. Melting temperatures as low as 1030 C were observed.

  12. Crystal growing from the melt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, S. H.

    1987-01-01

    The mechanical and electrical properties of crystals produced by a unidirectional process depend strongly on the temperature and flow fields since these control the concentration of solute at the melt-crystal interface. The solute gradient there drives morphological instabilities that lead to cellular or dendritic interfaces. In the presentation several features of flow-solidification interactions will be discussed. These will include the effects of convection driven by density changes and buoyancy and the imposition of forced flow.

  13. Heterozygote PCR product melting curve prediction.

    PubMed

    Dwight, Zachary L; Palais, Robert; Kent, Jana; Wittwer, Carl T

    2014-03-01

    Melting curve prediction of PCR products is limited to perfectly complementary strands. Multiple domains are calculated by recursive nearest neighbor thermodynamics. However, the melting curve of an amplicon containing a heterozygous single-nucleotide variant (SNV) after PCR is the composite of four duplexes: two matched homoduplexes and two mismatched heteroduplexes. To better predict the shape of composite heterozygote melting curves, 52 experimental curves were compared with brute force in silico predictions varying two parameters simultaneously: the relative contribution of heteroduplex products and an ionic scaling factor for mismatched tetrads. Heteroduplex products contributed 25.7 ± 6.7% to the composite melting curve, varying from 23%-28% for different SNV classes. The effect of ions on mismatch tetrads scaled to 76%-96% of normal (depending on SNV class) and averaged 88 ± 16.4%. Based on uMelt (www.dna.utah.edu/umelt/umelt.html) with an expanded nearest neighbor thermodynamic set that includes mismatched base pairs, uMelt HETS calculates helicity as a function of temperature for homoduplex and heteroduplex products, as well as the composite curve expected from heterozygotes. It is an interactive Web tool for efficient genotyping design, heterozygote melting curve prediction, and quality control of melting curve experiments. The application was developed in Actionscript and can be found online at http://www.dna.utah.edu/hets/.

  14. Purification of Niobium by Electron Beam Melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankar, M.; Mirji, K. V.; Prasad, V. V. Satya; Baligidad, R. G.; Gokhale, A. A.

    2016-06-01

    Pure niobium metal, produced by alumino-thermic reduction of niobium oxide, contains various impurities which need to be reduced to acceptable levels to obtain aerospace grade purity. In the present work, an attempt has been made to refine niobium metals by electron beam drip melting technique to achieve purity confirming to the ASTM standard. Input power to the electron gun and melt rate were varied to observe their combined effect on extend of refining and loss of niobium. Electron beam (EB) melting is shown to reduce alkali metals, trace elements and interstitial impurities well below the specified limits. The reduction in the impurities during EB melting is attributed to evaporation and degassing due to the combined effect of high vacuum and high melt surface temperature. The % removal of interstitial impurities is essentially a function of melt rate and input power. As the melt rate decreases or input power increases, the impurity levels in the solidified niobium ingot decrease. The EB refining process is also accompanied by considerable amount of niobium loss, which is attributed to evaporation of pure niobium and niobium sub-oxide. Like other impurities, Nb loss increases with decreasing melt rate or increase in input power.

  15. Natural melting within a spherical shell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bahrami, Parviz A.

    1990-01-01

    Fundamental heat transfer experiments were performed on the melting of a phase change medium in a spherical shell. Free expansion of the medium into a void space within the sphere was permitted. A step function temperature jump on the outer shell wall was imposed and the timewise evolution of the melting process and the position of the solid-liquid interface was photographically recorded. Numerical integration of the interface position data yielded information about the melted mass and the energy of melting. It was found that the rate of melting and the heat transfer were significantly affected by the movement of the solid medium to the base of the sphere due to gravity. The energy transfer associated with melting was substantially higher than that predicted by the conduction model. Furthermore, the radio of the measured values of sensible energy in the liquid melt to the energy of melting were nearly proportional to the Stefan number. The experimental results are in agreement with a theory set forth in an earlier paper.

  16. Oceanic slab melting and mantle metasomatism.

    PubMed

    Scaillet, B; Prouteau, G

    2001-01-01

    Modern plate tectonic brings down oceanic crust along subduction zones where it either dehydrates or melts. Those hydrous fluids or melts migrate into the overlying mantle wedge trigerring its melting which produces arc magmas and thus additional continental crust. Nowadays, melting seems to be restricted to cases of young (< 50 Ma) subducted plates. Slab melts are silicic and strongly sodic (trondhjemitic). They are produced at low temperatures (< 1000 degrees C) and under water excess conditions. Their interaction with mantle peridotite produces hydrous metasomatic phases such as amphibole and phlogopite that can be more or less sodium rich. Upon interaction the slab melt becomes less silicic (dacitic to andesitic), and Mg, Ni and Cr richer. Virtually all exposed slab melts display geochemical evidence of ingestion of mantle material. Modern slab melts are thus unlike Archean Trondhjemite-Tonalite-Granodiorite rocks (TTG), which suggests that both types of magmas were generated via different petrogenetic pathways which may imply an Archean tectonic model of crust production different from that of the present-day, subduction-related, one. PMID:11838241

  17. Recent Changes in the Arctic Melt Season

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stroeve, Julienne; Markus, Thorsten; Meier, Walter N.; Miller, Jeff

    2007-01-01

    Melt-season duration, melt-onset and freeze-up dates are derived from satellite passive microwave data and analyzed from 1979 to 2005 over Arctic sea ice. Results indicate a shift towards a longer melt season, particularly north of Alaska and Siberia, corresponding to large retreats of sea ice observed in these regions. Although there is large interannual and regional variability in the length of the melt season, the Arctic is experiencing an overall lengthening of the melt season at a rate of about 2 weeks decade(sup -1). In fact, all regions in the Arctic (except for the central Arctic) have statistically significant (at the 99% level or higher) longer melt seasons by greater than 1 week decade(sup -1). The central Arctic shows a statistically significant trend (at the 98% level) of 5.4 days decade(sup -1). In 2005 the Arctic experienced its longest melt season, corresponding with the least amount of sea ice since 1979 and the warmest temperatures since the 1880s. Overall, the length of the melt season is inversely correlated with the lack of sea ice seen in September north of Alaska and Siberia, with a mean correlation of -0.8.

  18. Oceanic slab melting and mantle metasomatism.

    PubMed

    Scaillet, B; Prouteau, G

    2001-01-01

    Modern plate tectonic brings down oceanic crust along subduction zones where it either dehydrates or melts. Those hydrous fluids or melts migrate into the overlying mantle wedge trigerring its melting which produces arc magmas and thus additional continental crust. Nowadays, melting seems to be restricted to cases of young (< 50 Ma) subducted plates. Slab melts are silicic and strongly sodic (trondhjemitic). They are produced at low temperatures (< 1000 degrees C) and under water excess conditions. Their interaction with mantle peridotite produces hydrous metasomatic phases such as amphibole and phlogopite that can be more or less sodium rich. Upon interaction the slab melt becomes less silicic (dacitic to andesitic), and Mg, Ni and Cr richer. Virtually all exposed slab melts display geochemical evidence of ingestion of mantle material. Modern slab melts are thus unlike Archean Trondhjemite-Tonalite-Granodiorite rocks (TTG), which suggests that both types of magmas were generated via different petrogenetic pathways which may imply an Archean tectonic model of crust production different from that of the present-day, subduction-related, one.

  19. Achieving Climate Change Absolute Accuracy in Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wielicki, Bruce A.; Young, D. F.; Mlynczak, M. G.; Thome, K. J; Leroy, S.; Corliss, J.; Anderson, J. G.; Ao, C. O.; Bantges, R.; Best, F.; Bowman, K.; Brindley, H.; Butler, J. J.; Collins, W.; Dykema, J. A.; Doelling, D. R.; Feldman, D. R.; Fox, N.; Huang, X.; Holz, R.; Huang, Y.; Jennings, D.; Jin, Z.; Johnson, D. G.; Jucks, K.; Kato, S.; Kratz, D. P.; Liu, X.; Lukashin, C.; Mannucci, A. J.; Phojanamongkolkij, N.; Roithmayr, C. M.; Sandford, S.; Taylor, P. C.; Xiong, X.

    2013-01-01

    The Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO) mission will provide a calibration laboratory in orbit for the purpose of accurately measuring and attributing climate change. CLARREO measurements establish new climate change benchmarks with high absolute radiometric accuracy and high statistical confidence across a wide range of essential climate variables. CLARREO's inherently high absolute accuracy will be verified and traceable on orbit to Système Internationale (SI) units. The benchmarks established by CLARREO will be critical for assessing changes in the Earth system and climate model predictive capabilities for decades into the future as society works to meet the challenge of optimizing strategies for mitigating and adapting to climate change. The CLARREO benchmarks are derived from measurements of the Earth's thermal infrared spectrum (5-50 micron), the spectrum of solar radiation reflected by the Earth and its atmosphere (320-2300 nm), and radio occultation refractivity from which accurate temperature profiles are derived. The mission has the ability to provide new spectral fingerprints of climate change, as well as to provide the first orbiting radiometer with accuracy sufficient to serve as the reference transfer standard for other space sensors, in essence serving as a "NIST [National Institute of Standards and Technology] in orbit." CLARREO will greatly improve the accuracy and relevance of a wide range of space-borne instruments for decadal climate change. Finally, CLARREO has developed new metrics and methods for determining the accuracy requirements of climate observations for a wide range of climate variables and uncertainty sources. These methods should be useful for improving our understanding of observing requirements for most climate change observations.

  20. Greenland Ice Sheet Melt from MODIS and Associated Atmospheric Variability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hakkinen, Sirpa; Hall, Dorothy K.; Shuman, Christopher A.; Worthen, Denise L.; DiGirolamo, Nicolo E.

    2014-01-01

    Daily June-July melt fraction variations over the Greenland Ice Sheet (GIS) derived from the MODerate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) (2000-2013) are associated with atmospheric blocking forming an omega-shape ridge over the GIS at 500hPa height (from NCEPNCAR). Blocking activity with a range of time scales, from synoptic waves breaking poleward ( 5 days) to full-fledged blocks (5 days), brings warm subtropical air masses over the GIS controlling daily surface temperatures and melt. The temperature anomaly of these subtropical air mass intrusions is also important for melting. Based on the largest MODIS melt years (2002 and 2012), the area-average temperature anomaly of 2 standard deviations above the 14-year June-July mean, results in a melt fraction of 40 or more. Summer 2007 had the most blocking days, however atmospheric temperature anomalies were too small to instigate extreme melting.

  1. Scaling Laws for Melting Ice Avalanches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turnbull, B.

    2011-12-01

    This Letter describes an investigation of interfacial melting in ice-bearing granular flows. It is proposed that energy associated with granular collisions causes melting at an ice particle’s surface, which can thus occur at temperatures well below freezing. A laboratory experiment has been designed that allows quantification of this process and its effect on the dynamics of a granular shear flow of ice spheres. This experiment employs a rotating drum, half filled with ice particles, situated in a temperature controlled laboratory. Capillary forces between the wetted melted particle surfaces lead to the clumping of particles and enhanced flow speeds, in turn leading to further melting. Dimensional analysis defines a parameter space for further experimentation.

  2. Experimental calibration of a new oxybarometer for silicic magmas based on the partitioning of vanadium between magnetite and silicate melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arató, Róbert; Audétat, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    Oxygen fugacity is an important parameter in magmatic systems that affects the stability of mineral phases and fluid species. However, there is no well-established method to reconstruct the oxygen fugacity of slowly cooled magmas such as granite, for example, because existing oxybarometers (e.g., magnetite-ilmenite method) are susceptible to re-equilibration processes during slow cooling and thus lead to erroneous results when applied for granitic rocks. In this study, we aim at developing an oxybarometer that is based on the partitioning of vanadium (a redox-sensitive element) between magnetite inclusions and silicate melt inclusions preserved in quartz phenocrysts, where they were protected from subsolidus alteration and can be measured as entities by LA-ICP-MS. In the first - experimental - part of this study we investigated the effects of temperature (800-950 ° C), pressure (1-2 kbar), oxygen fugacity (from ΔFMQ+0.7 to ΔFMQ+4.0), magnetite composition, and melt composition on the partition coefficient of vanadium between magnetite and melt (DVmgt-melt). The experiments were carried out in cold-seal pressure vessels and the starting material was a mixture of V-doped haplogranite glasses or natural obsidian powder with variable aluminum saturation index (ASI), and synthetic, V-free magnetite of 10-20 μm grain size. The vanadium partition coefficient was found to depend strongly on oxygen fugacity, and to lesser (but still considerable) degrees on melt composition and temperature. A more than 1.5 log unit decrease in DVmgt-melt values with increasing oxygen fugacity can be explained by a change of the dominant valence state of V in the silicate melt. For a given oxygen fugacity buffer DVmgt-melt decreases with increasing temperature, but this reflects mostly the change in absolute fO2 values while the net temperature effect is in fact positive. DVmgt-melt depends significantly on melt composition, resulting in higher D-values with increasing aluminum

  3. Automatic twin vessel recrystallizer. Effective purification of acetaminophen by successive automatic recrystallization and absolute determination of purity by DSC.

    PubMed

    Nara, Osamu

    2011-01-24

    I describe an interchangeable twin vessel (J, N) automatic glass recrystallizer that eliminates the time-consuming recovery and recycling of crystals for repeated recrystallization. The sample goes in the dissolution vessel J containing a magnetic stir-bar K; J is clamped to the upper joint H of recrystallizer body D. Empty crystallization vessel N is clamped to the lower joint M. Pure solvent is delivered to the dissolution vessel and the crystallization vessel via the head of the condenser A. Crystallization vessel is heated (P). The dissolution reservoir is stirred and heated by the solvent vapor (F). Continuous outflow of filtrate E out of J keeps N at a stable boiling temperature. This results in efficient dissolution, evaporation and separation of pure crystals Q. Pure solvent in the dissolution reservoir is recovered by suction. Empty dissolution and crystallization vessels are detached. Stirrer magnet is transferred to the crystallization vessel and the role of the vessels are then reversed. Evacuating mother liquor out of the upper twin vessel, the apparatus unit is ready for the next automatic recrystallization by refilling twin vessels with pure solvent. We show successive automatic recrystallization of acetaminophen from diethyl ether obtaining acetaminophen of higher melting temperatures than USP and JP reference standards by 8× automatic recrystallization, 96% yield at each stage. Also, I demonstrate a novel approach to the determination of absolute purity by combining the successive automatic recrystallization with differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) measurement requiring no reference standards. This involves the measurement of the criterial melting temperature T(0) corresponding to the 100% pure material and quantitative ΔT in DSC based on the van't Hoff law of melting point depression. The purity of six commercial acetaminophen samples and reference standards and an eight times recrystallized product evaluated were 98.8 mol%, 97.9 mol%, 99

  4. Congruent Melting Kinetics: Constraints on Chondrule Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenwood, James P.; Hess, Paul C.

    1995-01-01

    The processes and mechanisms of melting and their applications to chondrule formation are discussed A model for the kinetics of congruent melting is developed and used to place constraints on the duration and maximum temperature experienced by the interiors of relict-bearing chondrules. Specifically, chondrules containing relict forsteritic olivine or enstatitic pyroxene cannot have been heated in excess of 1901 C or 1577 C, respectively, for more than a few seconds.

  5. The AFGL absolute gravity program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammond, J. A.; Iliff, R. L.

    1978-01-01

    A brief discussion of the AFGL's (Air Force Geophysics Laboratory) program in absolute gravity is presented. Support of outside work and in-house studies relating to gravity instrumentation are discussed. A description of the current transportable system is included and the latest results are presented. These results show good agreement with measurements at the AFGL site by an Italian system. The accuracy obtained by the transportable apparatus is better than 0.1 microns sq sec 10 microgal and agreement with previous measurements is within the combined uncertainties of the measurements.

  6. Familial Aggregation of Absolute Pitch

    PubMed Central

    Baharloo, Siamak; Service, Susan K.; Risch, Neil; Gitschier, Jane; Freimer, Nelson B.

    2000-01-01

    Absolute pitch (AP) is a behavioral trait that is defined as the ability to identify the pitch of tones in the absence of a reference pitch. AP is an ideal phenotype for investigation of gene and environment interactions in the development of complex human behaviors. Individuals who score exceptionally well on formalized auditory tests of pitch perception are designated as “AP-1.” As described in this report, auditory testing of siblings of AP-1 probands and of a control sample indicates that AP-1 aggregates in families. The implications of this finding for the mapping of loci for AP-1 predisposition are discussed. PMID:10924408

  7. Physics of deep plume melting: komatiitic melt accumulation and segregation in the transition zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmeling, Harro; Arndt, Nick; Kohl, Svenja

    2014-05-01

    develops and a large melt fraction accumulates immediately above the phase boundary. In a third set of models, a hot 1D plume head is assumed to move through the transition zone. The top of the plume head remains below the solidus temperature and the melt density is always less than that of the ambient mantle. In this case melt percolates upwards and accumulates near the top of the plume head within a very thin layer, reaching up to 100% melt fraction. These models show 1) that not only melt density, but also porosity dependent matrix viscosity controls the melt ascent or accumulation, 2) that there are parameter ranges and physical conditions which may lead to the accumulation of very large melt fractions (> degree of melting), 3) that in spite of melt being denser than olivine at some depths, in general these melts escape these regions and continue to percolate upward faster than the rising mantle.

  8. Frictional melt and seismic slip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, S.; di Toro, G.; Hirose, T.; Shimamoto, T.

    2008-01-01

    Frictional melt is implied in a variety of processes such as seismic slip, ice skating, and meteorite combustion. A steady state can be reached when melt is continuously produced and extruded from the sliding interface, as shown recently in a number of laboratory rock friction experiments. A thin, low-viscosity, high-temperature melt layer is formed resulting in low shear resistance. A theoretical solution describing the coupling of shear heating, thermal diffusion, and extrusion is obtained, without imposing a priori the melt thickness. The steady state shear traction can be approximated at high slip rates by the theoretical form τss = σn1/4 (A/?) ? under a normal stress σn, slip rate V, radius of contact area R (A is a dimensional normalizing factor and W is a characteristic rate). Although the model offers a rather simplified view of a complex process, the predictions are compatible with experimental observations. In particular, we consider laboratory simulations of seismic slip on earthquake faults. A series of high-velocity rotary shear experiments on rocks, performed for σn in the range 1-20 MPa and slip rates in the range 0.5-2 m s-1, is confronted to the theoretical model. The behavior is reasonably well reproduced, though the effect of radiation loss taking place in the experiment somewhat alters the data. The scaling of friction with σn, R, and V in the presence of melt suggests that extrapolation of laboratory measures to real Earth is a highly nonlinear, nontrivial exercise.

  9. On the phase diagram of water with density functional theory potentials: the melting temperature of Ice I-h with the Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof and Becke-Lee-Yang-Parr functionals

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, Soohaeng; Zeng, Xiao Cheng; Xantheas, Sotiris S.

    2009-06-11

    The melting temperature (Tm) of ice Ih was determined from constant enthalphy (NPH) Born-Oppenheimer Molecular Dynamics (BOMD) simulations to be 417±3 K for the Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof (PBE) and 411±4 K for the Becke-Lee-Yang-Parr (BLYP) density functionals using a coexisting ice (Ih)-liquid phase at constant pressures of P = 2,500 and 10,000 bar and a density ρ = 1 g/cm3, respectively. This suggests that ambient condition simulations at ρ = 1 g/cm3 will rather describe a supercooled state that is overstructured when compared to liquid water. This work was supported by the US Department of Energy Office of Basic Energy Sciences' Chemical Sciences program. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy.

  10. Rock melting tool with annealer section

    DOEpatents

    Bussod, Gilles Y.; Dick, Aaron J.; Cort, George E.

    1998-01-01

    A rock melting penetrator is provided with an afterbody that rapidly cools a molten geological structure formed around the melting tip of the penetrator to the glass transition temperature for the surrounding molten glass-like material. An annealing afterbody then cools the glass slowly from the glass transition temperature through the annealing temperature range to form a solid self-supporting glass casing. This allows thermally induced strains to relax by viscous deformations as the molten glass cools and prevents fracturing of the resulting glass liner. The quality of the glass lining is improved, along with its ability to provide a rigid impermeable casing in unstable rock formations.

  11. High Temperature Superconductivity in Praseodymium Doped (0%, 2%, 4%) in Melt-Textured Y(1-x)Pr(x)Ba2Cu3O(7-delta) Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, Claudell

    1995-01-01

    A study of the magnetic and structural properties of the alloy Y(1-x)Pr(x)Ba2Cu3O(7-delta) of 0%, 2%, and 4% doping of praseodymium is presented. The resulting oxides of the alloy series are a high-temperature superconductor Y-Ba-Cu-O, which has an orthorhombic superconducting crystal-lattice. Magnetic relaxation studies have been performed on the Y-Pr-Ba-CuO bulk samples for field orientation parallel to the c-axis, using a vibrating sample magnetometer. Relaxation was measured at several temperatures to obtain the irreversible magnetization curves used for the Bean model. Magnetization current densities were derived from the relaxation data. Field and temperature dependence of the logarithmic flux-creep relaxation was measured in critical state. The data indicates that the effective activation energy U(eff) increases with increasing T between 77 K and 86 K. Also, the data shows that U(eff)(T) and superconducting transition temperature, Tc, decreased as the lattice parameters increased with increasing Pr ion concentration, x, for the corresponding Y(1-x)Pr(x)Ba(x)Cu3O(7-delta) oxides. One contribution to Tc decrease in this sampling is suspected to be due to the larger ionic radius of the Pr(3+) ion. The upper critical field (H(sub c2)) was measured in the presence of magnetic field parallel to the c axis. A linear temperature dependence with H(sub c2) was obtained.

  12. Energy-Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology (E-SMARRT): Development of Elevated Temperature Aluminum Metal Matrix Composite (MMC) Alloy and Its Processing Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, David C.; Gegal, Gerald A.

    2014-04-15

    The objective of this project was to provide a production capable cast aluminum metal matrix composite (MMC) alloy with an operating temperature capability of 250-300°C. Important industrial sectors as well as the military now seek lightweight aluminum alloy castings that can operate in temperature ranges of 250-300°C. Current needs in this temperature range are being satisfied by the use of titanium alloy castings. These have the desired strength properties but the end components are heavier and significantly more costly. Also, the energy requirements for production of titanium alloy castings are significantly higher than those required for production of aluminum alloys and aluminum alloy castings.

  13. Melting Metal on a Playing Card

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenslade, Thomas B., Jr.

    2016-01-01

    Many of us are familiar with the demonstration of boiling water in a paper cup held over a candle or a Bunsen burner; the ignition temperature of paper is above the temperature of 100°C at which water boils under standard conditions. A more dramatic demonstration is melting tin held in a playing card. This illustration is from Tissandier's book on…

  14. Determination of melt influence on divalent element partitioning between anorthite and CMAS melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Sarah A.; Asimow, P. D.; Burnett, D. S.

    2006-08-01

    We propose a theory for crystal-melt trace element partitioning that considers the energetic consequences of crystal-lattice strain, of multi-component major-element silicate liquid mixing, and of trace-element activity coefficients in melts. We demonstrate application of the theory using newly determined partition coefficients for Ca, Mg, Sr, and Ba between pure anorthite and seven CMAS liquid compositions at 1330 °C and 1 atm. By selecting a range of melt compositions in equilibrium with a common crystal composition at equal liquidus temperature and pressure, we have isolated the contribution of melt composition to divalent trace element partitioning in this simple system. The partitioning data are fit to Onuma curves with parameterizations that can be thermodynamically rationalized in terms of the melt major element activity product (aO)(a)2 and lattice strain theory modeling. Residuals between observed partition coefficients and the lattice strain plus major oxide melt activity model are then attributed to non-ideality of trace constituents in the liquids. The activity coefficients of the trace species in the melt are found to vary systematically with composition. Accounting for the major and trace element thermodynamics in the melt allows a good fit in which the parameters of the crystal-lattice strain model are independent of melt composition.

  15. Metallic Recovery and Ferrous Melting Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Luis Trueba

    2004-05-30

    recovery. The use of an argon atmosphere was also found to increase recoveries, but to a lesser extent than with carbon additions to the briquettes. Task 3--Finally, thermodynamic studies were carried out to evaluate the potential for removing manganese and sulfur from iron melts for the production of ferritic ductile iron. Thermodynamic calculations indicated that manganese and sulfur might be removed from iron melts by careful control of the temperature and slag. In laboratory tests however, it was shown that the removal of sulfur was much less successful than that indicated by the thermodynamic analyses.

  16. Experimental study of the electrolysis of silicate melts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, R.; Larimer, K. T.

    1991-01-01

    To produce oxygen from lunar resources, it may be feasible to melt and electrolyze local silicate ores. This possibility was explored experimentally with synthesized melts of appropriate compositions. Platinum electrodes were employed at a melt temperature of 1425 C. When silicon components of the melt were reduced, the platinum cathode degraded rapidly, which prompted the substitution of a graphite cathode substrate. Discrete particles containing iron or titanium were found in the solidified electrolyte after three hours of electrolysis. Electrolyte conductivities did not decrease substantially, but the escape of gas bubbles, in some cases, appeared to be hindered by high viscosity of the melt.

  17. Models for silicate melt viscosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giordano, D.; Russell, K.; Moretti, R.; Mangiacapra, A.; Potuzak, M.; Romano, C.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2004-12-01

    The prediction of viscosity in silicate liquids, over the range of temperatures and compositions encountered in nature, remains one of the most challenging and elusive goals in Earth Sciences. Recent work has demonstrated that there are now sufficient experimental measurements of melt viscosity to create new viscosity models to replace previous Arrhenian models [1],[2] and extend the compositional range of more recent non-Arrhenian models [3]. Most recently, [4] have developed an empirical strategy for accurately predicting viscosities over a very wide range of anhydrous silicate melt compositions (e.g., rhyolite to basanite). Future models that improve upon this work, will probably extend the composition range of the model to consider, at least, H2O and other volatile components and may utilize a compositional basis that reflects melt structure. In preparation for the next generation model, we explore the attributes of the three most common equations that could be used to model the non-Arrhenian viscosity of multicomponent silicate melts. The equations for the non-Arrhenian temperature dependence of viscosity (η ) include: a) Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann (VFT): log η = A + B/(T - C) b) Adam and Gibbs (AG): log η = A + B/[T log (T/C)], and c) Avramov (Av): log η = A + [B/T]α We use an experimental database of approximately 900 high-quality viscosity measurements on silicate melts to test the ability of each equation to capture the experimental data. These equations have different merits [5]. VFT is purely empirical in nature. The AG model has a quasi-theoretical basis that links macroscopic transport properties directly to thermodynamic properties via the configurational entropy. Lastly, the model proposed by Avramov adopts a form designed to relate the fit parameter (α ) to the fragility of the melt. [1] Shaw, H.R., 1972. Am J Science, 272, 438-475. [2] Bottinga Y. and Weill, D., 1972. Am J Science, 272, 438-475. [3] Hess, K.U. and Dingwell, D.B, 1996, Am Min, 81

  18. Comparative Study on Two Melting Simulation Methods: Melting Curve of Gold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhong-Li; Sun, Jun-Sheng; Li, Rui; Zhang, Xiu-Lu; Cai, Ling-Cang

    2016-05-01

    Melting simulation methods are of crucial importance to determining melting temperature of materials efficiently. A high-efficiency melting simulation method saves much simulation time and computational resources. To compare the efficiency of our newly developed shock melting (SM) method with that of the well-established two-phase (TP) method, we calculate the high-pressure melting curve of Au using the two methods based on the optimally selected interatomic potentials. Although we only use 640 atoms to determine the melting temperature of Au in the SM method, the resulting melting curve accords very well with the results from the TP method using much more atoms. Thus, this shows that a much smaller system size in SM method can still achieve a fully converged melting curve compared with the TP method, implying the robustness and efficiency of the SM method. Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant No. 41574076 and the NSAF of China under Grant No. U1230201/A06, and the Young Core Teacher Scheme of Henan Province under Grant No. 2014GGJS-108

  19. Melt inclusions: Chapter 6

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,; Lowenstern, J. B.

    2014-01-01

    Melt inclusions are small droplets of silicate melt that are trapped in minerals during their growth in a magma. Once formed, they commonly retain much of their initial composition (with some exceptions) unless they are re-opened at some later stage. Melt inclusions thus offer several key advantages over whole rock samples: (i) they record pristine concentrations of volatiles and metals that are usually lost during magma solidification and degassing, (ii) they are snapshots in time whereas whole rocks are the time-integrated end products, thus allowing a more detailed, time-resolved view into magmatic processes (iii) they are largely unaffected by subsolidus alteration. Due to these characteristics, melt inclusions are an ideal tool to study the evolution of mineralized magma systems. This chapter first discusses general aspects of melt inclusions formation and methods for their investigation, before reviewing studies performed on mineralized magma systems.

  20. Arctic Warming, Greenland Melt and Moulins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steffen, K.; Huff, R.; Behar, A.

    2007-12-01

    Air temperatures on the Greenland ice sheet have increased by 4 deg. C since 1991. The ice sheet melt area increased by 30% for the western part between 1979-2006, with record melt years in 1987, 1991, 1998, 2002, 2005, and possibly the most extreme melt year in 2007. The increasing trend in the total area of melting bare ice is unmistakable at 13% per year, significant at a probability of 0.99. Hence, the bare ice region, the wet snow region, and the equilibrium line altitude have moved further inland and resulting in increased melt water flux towards the coast. Warm and extended air temperatures are to blame for 1.5 m water equivalent surface reduction at the long-term equilibrium line altitude, 1100 m elevation at 70 deg. N during summer 2007. Increase in ice velocity in the ablation region and the concurrent increase in melt water suggests that water penetrates to great depth through moulins and cracks, lubricating the bottom of the ice sheet. New insight was gained of subsurface hydrologic channels and cavities using new instrumentation and a video system during the melt peak in August 2007. Volume and geometry of a 100 m deep moulin were mapped with a rotating laser, and photographs with digital cameras. Sub-glacial hydrologic channels were investigated and filmed using a tethered, autonomous system, several hundred meters into the ice. These new results will be discussed in view of the rapid increase in melt area and mass loss of the Greenland ice sheet due to increasing air temperatures.

  1. PURIFICATION OF IRIDIUM BY ELECTRON BEAM MELTING

    SciTech Connect

    Ohriner, Evan Keith

    2008-01-01

    The purification of iridium metal by electron beam melting has been characterized for 48 impurity elements. Chemical analysis was performed by glow discharge mass spectrographic (GDMS) analysis for all elements except carbon, which was analyzed by combustion. The average levels of individual elemental impurities in the starting powder varied from 37 g/g to 0.02 g/g. The impurity elements Li, Na, Mg, P, S, Cl, K, Ca, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Pd, Ag, Cd, Sn, Sb, Te, Ba, Ce, Tl, Pb, and Bi were not detectable following the purification. No significant change in concentration of the elements Ti, V, Zr, Nb, Mo, and Re was found. The elements B, C, Al, Si, Cr, Fe, Ru, Rh, and Pt were partially removed by vaporization during electron beam melting. Langmuir's equation for ideal vaporization into a vacuum was used to calculate for each impurity element the expected ratio of impurity content after melting to that before melting. Equilibrium vapor pressures were calculated using Henry's law, with activity coefficients obtained from published data for the elements Fe, Ti, and Pt. Activity coefficients were estimated from enthalpy data for Al, Si, V, Cr, Mn, Co, Ni, Zr, Nb, Mo, and Hf and an ideal solution model was used for the remaining elements. The melt temperature was determined from measured iridium weight loss. Excellent agreement was found between measured and calculated impurity ratios for all impurity elements. The results are consistent with some localized heating of the melt pool due to rastering of the electron beam, with an average vaporization temperature of 3100 K as compared to a temperature of 2965 K calculated for uniform heating of the melt pool. The results are also consistent with ideal mixing in the melt pool.

  2. Quasi-Ab initio molecular dynamic study of Fe melting

    PubMed

    Belonoshko; Ahuja; Johansson

    2000-04-17

    We have investigated the melting of hcp Fe at high pressure by employing molecular dynamics simulations in conjunction with the full potential linear muffin tin orbital method. Apart from being of fundamental value, the melting of iron at high pressure is also important for our understanding of the Earth. The subject of iron melting at high pressures is controversial. The experimental data for the iron melting temperature can be separated into two regions, "low" and "high." Here we present an ab initio simulated iron melting curve which is in agreement with the low temperatures at lower pressures, but is in excellent agreement with the high-mostly shockwave-temperatures at high pressures. A comparison with available data lends support to the presented iron melting curve.

  3. Strength and ductility of room-dry and water-saturated igneous rocks at low pressures and temperatures to partial melting. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, M.; Handin, J.; Higgs, N.G.; Lantz, J.R.; Bauer, S.J.

    1980-11-01

    Rock types that are likely candidates for drilling were tested. Reported herein are the short-time ultimate strengths and ductilities determined at temperatures of 25/sup 0/ to 1050/sup 0/C and a strain rate of 10/sup -4/s/sup -1/ of (a) room-dry Mt. Hood Andesite, Cuerbio Basalt, and Charcoal (St. Cloud Gray) Granodiorite at confining pressures of 0, 50, and 100 MPa, (b) water-saturated specimens of the same three rocks at zero effective pressure (both pore and confining pressures of 50 MPa), and (c) room-dry Newberry Rhyolite Obsidian at 0 and 50 MPa. These strengths are then compared with the stresses developed at the wall of a borehole in an elastic medium at the appropriate temperatures and mean pressures to assess the problem of borehole stability. (MHR)

  4. Estimated phase transition and melting temperature of APTES self-assembled monolayer using surface-enhanced anti-stokes and stokes Raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yingying; Yanagisawa, Masahiro; Kunimoto, Masahiro; Nakamura, Masatoshi; Homma, Takayuki

    2016-02-01

    A structure's temperature can be determined from the Raman spectrum using the frequency and the ratio of the intensities of the anti-Stokes and Stokes signals (the Ias/Is ratio). In this study, we apply this approach and an equation relating the temperature, Raman frequency, and Ias/Is ratio to in-situ estimation of the phase change point of a (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane self-assembled monolayer (APTES SAM). Ag nanoparticles were deposited on APTES to enhance the Raman signals. A time-resolved measurement mode was used to monitor the variation in the Raman spectra in situ. Moreover, the structural change in APTES SAM (from ordered to disordered structure) under heating was discussed in detail, and the phase change point (around 118 °C) was calculated.

  5. Greenland ice sheet melt from MODIS and associated atmospheric variability

    PubMed Central

    Häkkinen, Sirpa; Hall, Dorothy K; Shuman, Christopher A; Worthen, Denise L; DiGirolamo, Nicolo E

    2014-01-01

    Daily June-July melt fraction variations over the Greenland ice sheet (GIS) derived from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) (2000–2013) are associated with atmospheric blocking forming an omega-shape ridge over the GIS at 500 hPa height. Blocking activity with a range of time scales, from synoptic waves breaking poleward (<5 days) to full-fledged blocks (≥5 days), brings warm subtropical air masses over the GIS controlling daily surface temperatures and melt. The temperature anomaly of these subtropical air mass intrusions is also important for melting. Based on the years with the greatest melt (2002 and 2012) during the MODIS era, the area-average temperature anomaly of 2 standard deviations above the 14 year June-July mean results in a melt fraction of 40% or more. Though the summer of 2007 had the most blocking days, atmospheric temperature anomalies were too small to instigate extreme melting. Key Points Short-term atmospheric blocking over Greenland contributes to melt episodes Associated temperature anomalies are equally important for the melt Duration and strength of blocking events contribute to surface melt intensity PMID:25821277

  6. Geophysical constraints on partial melt in the upper mantle

    SciTech Connect

    Shankland, T.J.; O'Connell, R.J.; Waff, H.S.

    1981-08-01

    This paper adresses the conditions under which partial melt can exist in the mantle in order to be observed as a geophysical 'anomaly'. Typical observed anomalies are high electrical conductivity of the order of 0.1 S/m or greater, velocity decreases of 7--10%, seismic Q values less than 100, and a frequency band for seismic effects in the region mear 1 Hz. Existing theories of electrical conduction in partial melts and of frequency-dependent seismic properties together with recent measurements of melt electrical conductivity, viscosity, and partial melt texture can be used to establish requirements for melt to be observed by geophysical methods. From electrical anomalies, mainly sensitive to melt volume and its interconnection, one can require a minimum melt fraction of several percent at temperatures close to the solidus (1150/sup 0/--1300/sup 0/C). However, seismic models demand only a small volume in very flattened shapes (aspect ratio approx. =0.001, melt fraction approx.0.1%). Further, if melt configuration permits seismic dissipation in bulk, that is, there exist flattened voids intersecting more or less equant voids, then it is possible to infer melt fractions for elastic anomalies that are consistent with the several percent required for electrical anomalies. Observed equilibrium textures of partly melted peridotite together with inferred melt-solid surface energies suggest that melt on a grain size scale in a gravitational field segregates into a strongly anisotropic pattern. Thus if partial melt causes mantle geophysical anomalies, it should exist in a variety of void shapes and probably of sizes. While the association of electrical and elastic anomalies with indications of reduced density, volcanism, and high heat flow makes the hypothesis of partial melting an attractive explanation, the minimum physical requirement is for existence of relatively high temperature.

  7. Apparatus for absolute pressure measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hecht, R. (Inventor)

    1969-01-01

    An absolute pressure sensor (e.g., the diaphragm of a capacitance manometer) was subjected to a superimposed potential to effectively reduce the mechanical stiffness of the sensor. This substantially increases the sensitivity of the sensor and is particularly useful in vacuum gauges. An oscillating component of the superimposed potential induced vibrations of the sensor. The phase of these vibrations with respect to that of the oscillating component was monitored, and served to initiate an automatic adjustment of the static component of the superimposed potential, so as to bring the sensor into resonance at the frequency of the oscillating component. This establishes a selected sensitivity for the sensor, since a definite relationship exists between resonant frequency and sensitivity.

  8. Melting icebergs to produce fresh water and mechanical energy

    SciTech Connect

    Camirand, W.M.; Hautala, E.; Randall, J.M.

    1981-10-20

    Fresh water and mechanical energy are obtained from melting of icebergs. Warm surface seawater is contacted with a fluid, which is vaporized. The resulting vapor is used to generate mechanical energy and then is condensed by contacting it with cold melt water from the iceberg. The fluid is regenerated with a concomitant elevation in the temperature of the melt water. The warmer melt water is cycled to the body of the iceberg to facilitate its melting and produce additional cold melt water, which is apportioned as fresh water and water cycled to condense the aforesaid vapor. In an alternate embodiment of the invention warm seawater is evaporated at reduced pressure. Mechanical energy is generated from the vapor, which is then condensed by direct and intimate contact with cold melt water from the iceberg. The resultant fresh water is a mixture of condensed vapor and melt water from the iceberg and has a temperature greater than the cold melt water. This fresh water mixture is contacted with the body of the iceberg to further melt it; part of the cold melt water is separated as fresh water and the remainder is cycled for use in condensing the vapor from the warm surface seawater.

  9. From Hubble's Next Generation Spectral Library (NGSL) to Absolute Fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heap, S. R.; Lindler, D.

    2016-05-01

    Hubble's Next Generation Spectral Library (NGSL) consists of R˜1000 spectra of 374 stars of assorted temperature, gravity, and metallicity. Each spectrum covers the wavelength range, 0.18-1.03 μ. The library can be viewed and/or downloaded from the website, http://archive.stsci.edu/prepds/stisngsl/. Stars in the NGSL are now being used as absolute flux standards at ground-based observatories. However, the uncertainty in the absolute flux is about 2%, which does not meet the requirements of dark-energy surveys. We have therefore developed an observing procedure, data-reduction procedure, and correction algorithms that should yield fluxes with uncertainties less than 1%.

  10. The role of subgrain boundaries in partial melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levine, Jamie S. F.; Mosher, Sharon; Rahl, Jeffrey M.

    2016-08-01

    Evidence for partial melting along subgrain boundaries in quartz and plagioclase is documented for rocks from the Lost Creek Gneiss of the Llano Uplift, central Texas, the Wet Mountains of central Colorado, and the Albany-Fraser Orogen, southwestern Australia. Domains of quartz or plagioclase crystals along subgrain boundaries are preferentially involved in partial melting over unstrained domains of these minerals. Material along subgrain boundaries in quartz and plagioclase has the same morphology as melt pseudomorphs present along grain boundaries and is commonly laterally continuous with this former grain boundary melt, indicating the material along subgrain boundaries can also be categorized as a melt pseudomorph. Subgrain boundaries consist of arrays of dislocations within a crystal lattice, and unlike fractures would not act as conduits for melt migration. Instead, the presence of former melt along subgrain boundaries requires that partial melting occurred in these locations because it is kinetically more favorable for melting reactions to occur there. Preferential melting in high strain locations may be attributed to strain energy, which provides a minor energetic contribution to the reaction and leads to preferential melting in locations with weakened bonds, and/or the presence of small quantities of water associated with dislocations, which may enhance diffusion rates or locally lower the temperature needed for partial melting.

  11. Friction and roughness of a melting rock surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, S.; di Toro, G.; Griffith, W. A.

    2010-07-01

    Under extreme conditions like those encountered during earthquake slip, frictional melt is likely to occur. It has been observed on ancient faults that the melt is mostly extruded toward local extensional jogs or lateral tension cracks. In the case of laboratory experiments with a rotary shear apparatus, melt is extruded from the sample borders. When this happens, a thin and irregular melt layer is formed whereby the normal load is still in part supported by contact asperities under an incipient yield condition (as in dry friction models), but also, in the interstices between asperities, by the pressure of the viscous fluid wetting the interface. In addition, roughness of the surface is dynamically reshaped by the melting process of an inhomogeneous material (polymineralic rock). In particular, we argue that the roughness of the melting surface decreases with melting rate and temperature gradient perpendicular to the fault. Taking into account the above conditions, we obtain an expression for the average melt layer thickness and viscous pressure that may be used in estimates of friction in the presence of melt. We argue that the ratio of melt thickness to roughness depends on sliding velocity; such a ratio may be used as a gauge of slip-rate during fossil earthquakes on faults bearing pseudotachylite (solidified melt). Finally, we derive an improved analytical solution for friction in the presence of melt including the effect of roughness evolution.

  12. Melting entropy of nanocrystals: an approach from statistical physics.

    PubMed

    Safaei, A; Attarian Shandiz, M

    2010-12-21

    Considering size effect on the equations obtained from statistical mechanical theories for the entropy of crystal and liquid phases, a new model has been developed for the melting entropy of nanocrystals, including the effects of the quasi-harmonic, anharmonic and electronic components of the overall melting entropy. Then with the use of our suggested new proportionality between the melting point and the entropy temperature (θ(0)), the melting entropy of nanocrystals has been obtained in terms of their melting point. Moreover, for the first time, the size-dependency of the electronic component of the overall melting entropy, arising from the change in the electronic ground-state of the nanocrystal upon melting, has been taken into account to calculate the melting entropy of nanocrystals. Through neglecting the effect of the electronic component, the present model can corroborate the previous model for size-dependent melting entropy of crystals represented by Jiang and Shi. The present model has been validated by the available computer simulation results for Ag and V nanoparticles. Moreover, a fairly constant function has been introduced which couples the melting temperature, the entropy temperature and the atomic density of elements to each other.

  13. Melting relations of the aliende meteorite.

    PubMed

    Seitz, M G; Kushiro, I

    1974-03-01

    The proportions of major oxides in the Allende carbonaceous chondrite after partial reduction are remarkably similar to those in possible mantle material of the earth. When heated, the Allende meteorite generates a sulfide melt (47 percent iron, 25 percent nickel, and 24 percent sulfur by weight), a ferrobasaltic melt, and olivine with or without pyroxene, over a wide pressure range (5 to 25 kilobars). The silicate melt contains more sodium and less titanium than lunar ferrobasalts. An aggregate of the Allende chondrite rich in calcium and aluminum produces silica-undersaturated, calcium-rich melt and spinel over a wide pressure and temperature range. From these studies, it is suggested that the earth's core contains significant amounts of both nickel and sulfur and that a 3 : 2 mixture of Allende bulk sample and calcium- and aluminum-rich aggregates is closer in major element abundances than either of these components to the average composition of the moon.

  14. Production of Synthetic Nuclear Melt Glass.

    PubMed

    Molgaard, Joshua J; Auxier, John D; Giminaro, Andrew V; Oldham, Colton J; Gill, Jonathan; Hall, Howard L

    2016-01-01

    Realistic surrogate nuclear debris is needed within the nuclear forensics community to test and validate post-detonation analysis techniques. Here we outline a novel process for producing bulk surface debris using a high temperature furnace. The material developed in this study is physically and chemically similar to trinitite (the melt glass produced by the first nuclear test). This synthetic nuclear melt glass is assumed to be similar to the vitrified material produced near the epicenter (ground zero) of any surface nuclear detonation in a desert environment. The process outlined here can be applied to produce other types of nuclear melt glass including that likely to be formed in an urban environment. This can be accomplished by simply modifying the precursor matrix to which this production process is applied. The melt glass produced in this study has been analyzed and compared to trinitite, revealing a comparable crystalline morphology, physical structure, void fraction, and chemical composition. PMID:26779720

  15. High pressure melting curves of silver, gold and copper

    SciTech Connect

    Hieu, Ho Khac

    2013-11-15

    In this work, based on the Lindemann's formula of melting and the pressure-dependent Grüneisen parameter, we have investigated the pressure effect on melting temperature of silver, gold and copper metals. The analytical expression of melting temperature as a function of volume compression has been derived. Our results are compared with available experimental data as well as with previous theoretical studies and the good and reasonable agreements are found. We also proposed the potential of this approach on predicting melting of copper at very high pressure.

  16. A theoretical model to study melting of metals under pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kholiya, Kuldeep; Chandra, Jeewan

    2015-10-01

    On the basis of the thermal equation-of-state a simple theoretical model is developed to study the pressure dependence of melting temperature. The model is then applied to compute the high pressure melting curve of 10 metals (Cu, Mg, Pb, Al, In, Cd, Zn, Au, Ag and Mn). It is found that the melting temperature is not linear with pressure and the slope dTm/dP of the melting curve decreases continuously with the increase in pressure. The results obtained with the present model are also compared with the previous theoretical and experimental data. A good agreement between theoretical and experimental result supports the validity of the present model.

  17. Signatures of nonthermal melting.

    PubMed

    Zier, Tobias; Zijlstra, Eeuwe S; Kalitsov, Alan; Theodonis, Ioannis; Garcia, Martin E

    2015-09-01

    Intense ultrashort laser pulses can melt crystals in less than a picosecond but, in spite of over thirty years of active research, for many materials it is not known to what extent thermal and nonthermal microscopic processes cause this ultrafast phenomenon. Here, we perform ab-initio molecular-dynamics simulations of silicon on a laser-excited potential-energy surface, exclusively revealing nonthermal signatures of laser-induced melting. From our simulated atomic trajectories, we compute the decay of five structure factors and the time-dependent structure function. We demonstrate how these quantities provide criteria to distinguish predominantly nonthermal from thermal melting. PMID:26798822

  18. Signatures of nonthermal melting

    PubMed Central

    Zier, Tobias; Zijlstra, Eeuwe S.; Kalitsov, Alan; Theodonis, Ioannis; Garcia, Martin E.

    2015-01-01

    Intense ultrashort laser pulses can melt crystals in less than a picosecond but, in spite of over thirty years of active research, for many materials it is not known to what extent thermal and nonthermal microscopic processes cause this ultrafast phenomenon. Here, we perform ab-initio molecular-dynamics simulations of silicon on a laser-excited potential-energy surface, exclusively revealing nonthermal signatures of laser-induced melting. From our simulated atomic trajectories, we compute the decay of five structure factors and the time-dependent structure function. We demonstrate how these quantities provide criteria to distinguish predominantly nonthermal from thermal melting. PMID:26798822

  19. Melting and superheating of nanowires--a nanotube approach.

    PubMed

    Sar, Dillip Kumar; Nanda, Karuna Kar

    2010-05-21

    We have investigated the size-dependent melting of nanotubes based on a thermodynamic approach and shown that the melting temperature of nanotubes depends on the outer radius and on the inner radius through the thickness of the nanotubes. Size-dependent melting of nanowires and thin films has been derived from that of nanotubes. We validate the size-dependent melting of nanotubes, nanowires and thin films by comparing the results with available molecular dynamic simulations and experimental results. It has also been inferred that superheating occurs when the melting starts from the inner surface and proceeds towards the outer surface, while melting point depression occurs when the melting starts from the outer surface and proceeds towards the inner surface. PMID:20413835

  20. Growth of Si Bulk Crystals with Large Diameter Ratio Using Small Crucibles by Creating a Large Low-Temperature Region Inside a Si Melt Contained in an NOC Furnace Developed Using Two Zone Heaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, Kazuo; Ono, Satoshi; Murai, Ryota; Kaneko, Yuzuru

    2016-06-01

    Three zone heaters were generally used for a noncontact crucible (NOC) furnace. For practical reasons a simpler NOC furnace was developed with two zone heaters, which had a carbon heat holder to cover the three roles of each heater. Large low-temperature regions were obtained, and silicon ingots were grown in small crucibles with a large diameter and diameter ratio. Here, the diameter ratio is the ratio of the ingot diameter to the crucible diameter and can be as large as 0.90. The diameter ratio was controlled mainly by the temperature reduction of the first heater. Power changes of the second heater did not have a significant impact on the ingot diameter. Using this NOC furnace, maximum ingot diameters of 28.0, 33.5, and 45.0 cm were obtained using crucibles of 33, 40, and 50 cm in diameter, respectively. The oxygen concentration of the ingots did not strongly depend on the diameter ratio and were always low because convection in the Si melt was markedly suppressed by the carbon heat holder. Moreover, the oxygen concentration of the ingots has a tendency to become lower as the crucible diameter becomes larger.

  1. Transition metals in superheat melts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jakes, Petr; Wolfbauer, Michael-Patrick

    1993-01-01

    A series of experiments with silicate melts doped with transition element oxides was carried out at atmospheric pressures of inert gas at temperatures exceeding liquidus. As predicted from the shape of fO2 buffer curves in T-fO2 diagrams the reducing conditions for a particular oxide-metal pair can be achieved through the T increase if the released oxygen is continuously removed. Experimental studies suggest that transition metals such as Cr or V behave as siderophile elements at temperatures exceeding liquidus temperatures if the system is not buffered by the presence of other oxide of more siderophile element. For example the presence of FeO prevents the reduction of Cr2O3. The sequence of decreasing siderophility of transition elements at superheat conditions (Mo, Ni, Fe, Cr) matches the decreasing degree of depletion of siderophile elements in mantle rocks as compared to chondrites.

  2. Surface melting of electronic order.

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkins, S. B.; Liu, X.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Kim, J.-W.; Ryan, P. J.; Mitchell, J. F.; Hill, J. P.

    2011-01-01

    We report temperature-dependent surface x-ray scattering studies of the orbital ordered surface in La{sub 0.5}Sr{sub 1.5}MnO{sub 4}. We find that as the bulk ordering temperature is approached from below the thickness of the interface between the electronically ordered and electronically disordered regions at the surface grows, though the bulk correlation length remains unchanged. Close to the transition, the surface is so rough that there is no well-defined electronic surface, despite the presence of bulk electronic order. That is, the electronic ordering at the surface has melted. Above the bulk transition, long-range ordering in the bulk is destroyed but finite-sized isotropic fluctuations persist, with a correlation length roughly equal to that of the low-temperature in-plane surface correlation length.

  3. Melt fracture revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Greenberg, J. M.

    2003-07-16

    In a previous paper the author and Demay advanced a model to explain the melt fracture instability observed when molten linear polymer melts are extruded in a capillary rheometer operating under the controlled condition that the inlet flow rate was held constant. The model postulated that the melts were a slightly compressible viscous fluid and allowed for slipping of the melt at the wall. The novel feature of that model was the use of an empirical switch law which governed the amount of wall slip. The model successfully accounted for the oscillatory behavior of the exit flow rate, typically referred to as the melt fracture instability, but did not simultaneously yield the fine scale spatial oscillations in the melt typically referred to as shark skin. In this note a new model is advanced which simultaneously explains the melt fracture instability and shark skin phenomena. The model postulates that the polymer is a slightly compressible linearly viscous fluid but assumes no slip boundary conditions at the capillary wall. In simple shear the shear stress {tau}and strain rate d are assumed to be related by d = F{tau} where F ranges between F{sub 2} and F{sub 1} > F{sub 2}. A strain rate dependent yield function is introduced and this function governs whether F evolves towards F{sub 2} or F{sub 1}. This model accounts for the empirical observation that at high shears polymers align and slide more easily than at low shears and explains both the melt fracture and shark skin phenomena.

  4. Applications of nonequilibrium melting concept to damage-accumulation processes

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, N.Q.; Okamoto, P.R.

    1998-01-01

    The authors recent study of crystalline-to-amorphous transformation led to the successful development of a unified thermodynamic description of disorder-induced amorphization and heat-induced melting, based on a generalized version of the Lindemann melting criterion. The generalized criterion requires that the melting temperature of a defective crystal decreases with increasing static atomic disorder. Hence, any crystal can melt at temperatures below the melting point of its perfect crystalline state when driven far from equilibrium by introducing critical amounts of misfitting solute atoms and lattice imperfections, radiation damage, and/or tensile stresses. This conceptual approach to nonequilibrium melting provides new insight into long-standing materials problems such as brittle fracture, embrittlement, and environmentally-induced cracking, for example irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking.

  5. Melting of MORB at core-mantle boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, Gopal K.; Fiquet, Guillaume; Siebert, Julien; Auzende, Anne-Line; Morard, Guillaume; Antonangeli, Daniele; Garbarino, Gaston

    2015-12-01

    We investigated the melting properties of natural mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB) up to core-mantle boundary (CMB) pressures using laser-heated diamond anvil cell. Textural and chemical characterizations of quenched samples were performed by analytical transmission electron microscopy. We used in situ X-ray diffraction primarily for phase identification whereas our melting criterion based on laser power versus temperature plateau combined with textural analysis of recovered solidus and subsolidus samples is accurate and unambiguous. At CMB pressure (135 GPa), the MORB solidus temperature is 3970 (± 150) K. Quenched melt textures observed in recovered samples indicate that CaSiO3 perovskite (CaPv) is the liquidus phase in the entire pressure range up to CMB. The partial melt composition derived from the central melt pool is enriched in FeO, which suggests that such melt pockets may be gravitationally stable at the core mantle boundary.

  6. Melting in the Fe-Ni system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lord, O. T.; Walter, M. J.; Vocadlo, L.; Wood, I. G.; Dobson, D. P.

    2012-12-01

    The melting temperature of the Fe-rich core alloy at the inner core boundary (ICB) condition of 330 GPa is a key geophysical parameter because it represents an anchor point on the geotherm. An accurate knowledge of the melting curves of candidate alloys is therefore highly desirable. In spite of this, there is still considerable uncertainty in the melting point even of pure Fe at these conditions; estimates range from as low as 4850K based on one laser heated diamond anvil cell (LHDAC) study [1] to as high as 6900K based on recent quantum Monte Carlo calculations [2]. In reality we expect that the bulk core alloy may contain 5-10 wt% Ni (based on cosmochemical and meteoritic arguments) and up to 10 wt% of an as yet undetermined mix of light elements (with Si, S, C and O being the most likely candidates). While some recent studies have looked at the effects of light elements on the melting curve of Fe [e.g.: 3,4] with some of these studies including a small amount of Ni in their starting material, to date there has been no systematic study of melting temperatures in the Fe-Ni system. To address this issue, we have embarked upon just such a study. Using the LHDAC we have determined the melting curve of the pure Ni end-member to 180 GPa, and that of pure Fe to 50 GPa, using perturbations in the power vs. temperature function as the melting criterion [5]. Ar or NaCl were employed as pressure media while temperature was measured using standard spectroradiometric techniques [6]. In the case of Ni, perturbations were observed for both the sample and the Ar medium, allowing us to determine the melting curve of Ar and Ni simultaneously. Our results thus far for Ni and Ar agree closely with all of the available data, while extending the melting curves by a factor of two in pressure. In the case of Fe, our current dataset is also in good agreement with previous studies [2,7]. The agreement of all three melting curves with the literature data as well as other materials

  7. Absolute configuration of isovouacapenol C

    PubMed Central

    Fun, Hoong-Kun; Yodsaoue, Orapun; Karalai, Chatchanok; Chantrapromma, Suchada

    2010-01-01

    The title compound, C27H34O5 {systematic name: (4aR,5R,6R,6aS,7R,11aS,11bR)-4a,6-dihy­droxy-4,4,7,11b-tetra­methyl-1,2,3,4,4a,5,6,6a,7,11,11a,11b-dodeca­hydro­phenanthro[3,2-b]furan-5-yl benzoate}, is a cassane furan­oditerpene, which was isolated from the roots of Caesalpinia pulcherrima. The three cyclo­hexane rings are trans fused: two of these are in chair conformations with the third in a twisted half-chair conformation, whereas the furan ring is almost planar (r.m.s. deviation = 0.003 Å). An intra­molecular C—H⋯O inter­action generates an S(6) ring. The absolute configurations of the stereogenic centres at positions 4a, 5, 6, 6a, 7, 11a and 11b are R, R, R, S, R, S and R, respectively. In the crystal, mol­ecules are linked into infinite chains along [010] by O—H⋯O hydrogen bonds. C⋯O [3.306 (2)–3.347 (2) Å] short contacts and C—H⋯π inter­actions also occur. PMID:21588364

  8. Frequency-domain analysis of absolute gravimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svitlov, S.

    2012-12-01

    An absolute gravimeter is analysed as a linear time-invariant system in the frequency domain. Frequency responses of absolute gravimeters are derived analytically based on the propagation of the complex exponential signal through their linear measurement functions. Depending on the model of motion and the number of time-distance coordinates, an absolute gravimeter is considered as a second-order (three-level scheme) or third-order (multiple-level scheme) low-pass filter. It is shown that the behaviour of an atom absolute gravimeter in the frequency domain corresponds to that of the three-level corner-cube absolute gravimeter. Theoretical results are applied for evaluation of random and systematic measurement errors and optimization of an experiment. The developed theory agrees with known results of an absolute gravimeter analysis in the time and frequency domains and can be used for measurement uncertainty analyses, building of vibration-isolation systems and synthesis of digital filtering algorithms.

  9. Melt Segregation and Tidal Heating at Io

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajendar, A.; Dufek, J.; Roberts, J. H.; Paty, C. S.

    2011-12-01

    Recent evidence of melt beneath Io's surface (Khurana et al., 2010) and repeated observation of volcanic activity and features consistent with volcanic activity at the surface (e.g. Veeder et al, 1994; Rathbun et al., 2004; Lopes-Gautier et al., 1999; Smith et al., 1979) has raised further questions about the structure of the Galilean moon and the processes that shape it. In this study we examine the thermal state, melt fraction, and multiphase dynamics of melt segregation within Io's interior. Using a coupled multiphase dynamics and tidal heating model we explore the location, spatial extent, and temporal residence times of melt in Io's subsurface, as well as response to orbital parameters. In a thermally evolving body subject to tidal forcing, in which melt production and migration takes place, feedback can occur with respect to the physical and thermal properties. We explore this feedback to produce a thermal model of Io, taking into account the rate of tidal heating and fluid motion within the interior. First, a layered model of the internal structure is assumed. The equations of motion for forced oscillations in a layered spherical body are then solved using the propagator matrix method (Sabadini and Vermeesen, 2004) to obtain the displacements and strains due to tidal motion (Roberts and Nimmo, 2008). From this, the radial distribution of tidal heat generation within Io is calculated. This radial heating profile is then used as input for a multi-phase fluid model in order to obtain an estimate of the radial temperature distribution and thus the material properties and melt fractions. In the multiphase model individual phases (melt and solid residue) separately conserve mass, momentum and enthalpy (Dufek and Bachmann, 2010) allowing us to explore melt segregation phenomena. Enthalpy closure is provided by the MELTS (Ghiorso and Sack, 1995) thermodynamics algorithm, which is called at each point in space. This accounts for the partitioning between latent and

  10. Crystallization, recrystallization, and melting lines in syndiotactic polypropylene crystallized from quiescent melt and semicrystalline state due to stress-induced localized melting and recrystallization.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ying; Wang, Yaotao; Fu, Lianlian; Jiang, Zhiyong; Men, Yongfeng

    2014-11-13

    Crystalline lamellar thickness in syndiotactic polypropylene (sPP) during crystallization from either isothermal molten or stretching induced localized melt states and during subsequent heating was investigated by means of temperature dependent small-angle X-ray scattering techniques. Well-defined crystallization lines where the reciprocal lamellar thickness is linearly dependent on crystallization temperature were observed. Unlike in the case of polybutene-1 where stretching crystallization line was shifted to direction of much smaller lamellar thickness (Macromolecules 2013, 46, 7874), the stretching induced crystallization line for sPP deviates from its corresponding isothermal crystallization line only slightly. Such phenomenon could be attributed to the fact that both crystallization processes from quiescent melt and stress induced localized melt are mediated in a mesomorphic phase in sPP. Subsequent heating of sPP after crystallization revealed the same melting behavior in both systems for the two kinds of crystallites obtained from either quiescent melt or stretching induced localized melt. Both of them underwent melting and recrystallization when the lamellar thickness was smaller than a critical value and melting directly without changing in thickness when the lamellar thickness was larger than the critical value. The melting behavior in sPP systems can be understood by considering the chain relaxation ability within crystalline phase and also can be used as evidence that the crystallization from molten state and stress-induced crystallization passed through the intermediate phase before forming crystallites.

  11. Melting of the Abrikosov flux lattice in anisotropic superconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beck, R. G.; Farrell, D. E.; Rice, J. P.; Ginsberg, D. M.; Kogan, V. G.

    1992-01-01

    It has been proposed that the Abrikosov flux lattice in high-Tc superconductors is melted over a significant fraction of the phase diagram. A thermodynamic argument is provided which establishes that the angular dependence of the melting temperature is controlled by the superconducting mass anisotropy. Using a low-frequency torsional-oscillator technique, this relationship has been tested in untwinned single-crystal YBa2Cu3O(7-delta). The results offer decisive support for the melting proposal.

  12. Retrograde Melting and Internal Liquid Gettering in Silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Hudelson, Steve; Newman, Bonna K.; Bernardis, Sarah; Fenning, David P.; Bertoni, Mariana I.; Marcus, Matthew A.; Fakra, Sirine C.; Lai, Barry; Buonassisi, Tonio

    2011-07-01

    Retrograde melting (melting upon cooling) is observed in silicon doped with 3d transition metals, via synchrotron-based temperature-dependent X-ray microprobe measurements. Liquid metal-silicon droplets formed via retrograde melting act as efficient sinks for metal impurities dissolved within the silicon matrix. Cooling results in decomposition of the homogeneous liquid phase into solid multiple-metal alloy precipitates. These phenomena represent a novel pathway for engineering impurities in semiconductor-based systems.

  13. Rotation of melting ice disks due to melt fluid flow.

    PubMed

    Dorbolo, S; Adami, N; Dubois, C; Caps, H; Vandewalle, N; Darbois-Texier, B

    2016-03-01

    We report experiments concerning the melting of ice disks (85 mm in diameter and 14 mm in height) at the surface of a thermalized water bath. During the melting, the ice disks undergo translational and rotational motions. In particular, the disks rotate. The rotation speed has been found to increase with the bath temperature. We investigated the flow under the bottom face of the ice disks by a particle image velocimetry technique. We find that the flow goes downwards and also rotates horizontally, so that a vertical vortex is generated under the ice disk. The proposed mechanism is the following. In the vicinity of the bottom face of the disk, the water eventually reaches the temperature of 4 °C for which the water density is maximum. The 4 °C water sinks and generates a downwards plume. The observed vertical vorticity results from the flow in the plume. Finally, by viscous entrainment, the horizontal rotation of the flow induces the solid rotation of the ice block. This mechanism seems generic: any vertical flow that generates a vortex will induce the rotation of a floating object.

  14. Partial melting on the acapulcoite-lodranite meteorite parent body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCoy, Timothy James

    1994-01-01

    temperatures, rapid cooling at intermediate temperatures, and slow cooling at low temperatures, indicating that the body may have broken up and gravitationally reassembled. One to three impact events liberated the acapulcoites and lodranites from their parent body. These meteorites represent our best opportunity to understand partial melting and incomplete differentiation of asteroids.

  15. Automated realization of the gallium melting and triple points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, X.; Duan, Y.; Zhang, J. T.; Wang, W.

    2013-09-01

    In order to improve the automation and convenience of the process involved in realizing the gallium fixed points, an automated apparatus, based on thermoelectric and heat pipe technologies, was designed and developed. This paper describes the apparatus design and procedures for freezing gallium mantles and realizing gallium melting and triple points. Also, investigations on the melting behavior of a gallium melting point cell and of gallium triple point cells were carried out while controlling the temperature outside the gallium point cells at 30 °C, 30.5 °C, 31 °C, and 31.5 °C. The obtained melting plateau curves show dentate temperature oscillations on the melting plateaus for the gallium point cells when thermal couplings occurred between the outer and inner liquid-solid interfaces. The maximum amplitude of the temperature fluctuations was about 1.5 mK. Therefore, the temperature oscillations can be used to indicate the ending of the equilibrium phase transitions. The duration and amplitude of such temperature oscillations depend on the temperature difference between the setting temperature and the gallium point temperature; the smaller the temperature difference, the longer the duration of both the melting plateaus and the temperature fluctuations.

  16. SCALE ANALYSIS OF CONVECTIVE MELTING WITH INTERNAL HEAT GENERATION

    SciTech Connect

    John Crepeau

    2011-03-01

    Using a scale analysis approach, we model phase change (melting) for pure materials which generate internal heat for small Stefan numbers (approximately one). The analysis considers conduction in the solid phase and natural convection, driven by internal heat generation, in the liquid regime. The model is applied for a constant surface temperature boundary condition where the melting temperature is greater than the surface temperature in a cylindrical geometry. We show the time scales in which conduction and convection heat transfer dominate.

  17. Melting a Sample within TEMPUS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    One of the final runs of the TEMPUS experiment shows heating of a sample on STS-94, July 15, 1997, MET:14/11:01 (approximate) and the flows on the surface. At the point this image was taken, the sample was in the process of melting. The surface of the sample is begirning to flow, looking like the motion of plate tectonics on the surface of a planet. During this mission, TEMPUS was able to run than 120 melting cycles with zirconium, with a maximum temperature of 2,000 degrees C, and was able to undercool by 340 degrees -- the highest temperature and largest undercooling ever achieved in space. The TEMPUS investigators also have provided the first measurements of viscosity of palladium-silicon alloys in the undercooled liquid alloy which are not possible on Earth. TEMPUS (stands for Tiegelfreies Elektromagnetisches Prozessiere unter Schwerelosigkeit (containerless electromagnetic processing under weightlessness). It was developed by the German Space Agency (DARA) for flight aboard Spacelab. The DARA project scientist was Igon Egry. The experiment was part of the space research investigations conducted during the Microgravity Science Laboratory-1R mission (STS-94, July 1-17 1997). DARA and NASA are exploring the possibility of flying an advanced version of TEMPUS on the International Space Station.(176KB JPEG, 1350 x 1516 pixels; downlinked video, higher quality not available) The MPG from which this composite was made is available at http://mix.msfc.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/MSFC-0300193.html.

  18. Melt-Quenched Glasses of Metal-Organic Frameworks.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Thomas D; Yue, Yuanzheng; Li, Peng; Qiao, Ang; Tao, Haizheng; Greaves, Neville G; Richards, Tom; Lampronti, Giulio I; Redfern, Simon A T; Blanc, Frédéric; Farha, Omar K; Hupp, Joseph T; Cheetham, Anthony K; Keen, David A

    2016-03-16

    Crystalline solids dominate the field of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), with access to the liquid and glass states of matter usually prohibited by relatively low temperatures of thermal decomposition. In this work, we give due consideration to framework chemistry and topology to expand the phenomenon of the melting of 3D MOFs, linking crystal chemistry to framework melting temperature and kinetic fragility of the glass-forming liquids. Here we show that melting temperatures can be lowered by altering the chemistry of the crystalline MOF state, which provides a route to facilitate the melting of other MOFs. The glasses formed upon vitrification are chemically and structurally distinct from the three other existing categories of melt-quenched glasses (inorganic nonmetallic, organic, and metallic), and retain the basic metal-ligand connectivity of crystalline MOFs, which connects their mechanical properties to their starting chemical composition. The transfer of functionality from crystal to glass points toward new routes to tunable, functional hybrid glasses.

  19. Rapid detection of HCV genotyping 1a, 1b, 2a, 3a, 3b and 6a in a single reaction using two-melting temperature codes by a real-time PCR-based assay.

    PubMed

    Athar, Muhammad Ammar; Xu, Ye; Xie, Xiaoting; Xu, Zhenxing; Ahmad, Vakil; Hayder, Zulfiqar; Hussain, Syed Sajid; Liao, Yiqun; Li, Qingge

    2015-09-15

    The genotype of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) is an important indicator for antiviral therapeutic response. We hereby described development of a rapid HCV genotyping approach that enabled the identification of the six most common HCV subtypes of Asia, i.e., 1a, 1b, 2a, 3a, 3b, and 6a, in a single reaction. Using two dual-labeled, self-quenched probes that target the core region of the HCV genome, the exact subtype could be accurately identified by two-melting temperature codes determined from the two respective probes in a real-time PCR assay. Analytical sensitivity studies using armored RNA samples representing each of the six HCV subtypes showed that 5 copies/reaction of HCV RNA could be detected. The assay was evaluated using 244 HCV-positive serum samples and the results were compared with sequencing analysis. Of the 224 samples, subtype 3a (127, 52.3%) was the dominant, followed by 1b (51, 20.9%), 3b (47, 19.3%), 2a (8, 3.3%), 6a (4, 1.6%) and the least was subtype 1a (1, 0.4%). Moreover, 6 (2.5%) mixed infection samples were also detected. These results were fully concordant with sequencing analysis. We concluded that this real-time PCR-based assay could provide a rapid and reliable tool for routine HCV genotyping in most Asian countries.

  20. Synchrotron x-ray spectroscopy of EuHN O3 aqueous solutions at high temperatures and pressures and Nb-bearing silicate melt phases coexisting with hydrothermal fluids using a modified hydrothermal diamond anvil cell and rail assembly

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mayanovic, Robert A.; Anderson, Alan J.; Bassett, William A.; Chou, I.-Ming

    2007-01-01

    A modified hydrothermal diamond anvil cell (HDAC) rail assembly has been constructed for making synchrotron x-ray absorption spectroscopy, x-ray fluorescence, and x-ray mapping measurements on fluids or solid phases in contact with hydrothermal fluids up to ???900??C and 700 MPa. The diamond anvils of the HDAC are modified by laser milling grooves or holes, for the reduction of attenuation of incident and fluorescent x rays and sample cavities. The modified HDAC rail assembly has flexibility in design for measurement of light elements at low concentrations or heavy elements at trace levels in the sample and the capability to probe minute individual phases of a multiphase fluid-based system using focused x-ray microbeam. The supporting rail allows for uniform translation of the HDAC, rotation and tilt stages, and a focusing mirror, which is used to illuminate the sample for visual observation using a microscope, relative to the direction of the incident x-ray beam. A structure study of Eu(III) aqua ion behavior in high-temperature aqueous solutions and a study of Nb partitioning and coordination in a silicate melt in contact with a hydrothermal fluid are described as applications utilizing the modified HDAC rail assembly. ?? 2007 American Institute of Physics.

  1. Absolute Income, Relative Income, and Happiness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ball, Richard; Chernova, Kateryna

    2008-01-01

    This paper uses data from the World Values Survey to investigate how an individual's self-reported happiness is related to (i) the level of her income in absolute terms, and (ii) the level of her income relative to other people in her country. The main findings are that (i) both absolute and relative income are positively and significantly…

  2. Investigating Absolute Value: A Real World Application

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kidd, Margaret; Pagni, David

    2009-01-01

    Making connections between various representations is important in mathematics. In this article, the authors discuss the numeric, algebraic, and graphical representations of sums of absolute values of linear functions. The initial explanations are accessible to all students who have experience graphing and who understand that absolute value simply…

  3. Preschoolers' Success at Coding Absolute Size Values.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, James

    1980-01-01

    Forty-five 2-year-old and forty-five 3-year-old children coded relative and absolute sizes using 1.5-inch, 6-inch, and 18-inch cardboard squares. Results indicate that absolute coding is possible for children of this age. (Author/RH)

  4. Introducing the Mean Absolute Deviation "Effect" Size

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorard, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    This paper revisits the use of effect sizes in the analysis of experimental and similar results, and reminds readers of the relative advantages of the mean absolute deviation as a measure of variation, as opposed to the more complex standard deviation. The mean absolute deviation is easier to use and understand, and more tolerant of extreme…

  5. Monolithically integrated absolute frequency comb laser system

    DOEpatents

    Wanke, Michael C.

    2016-07-12

    Rather than down-convert optical frequencies, a QCL laser system directly generates a THz frequency comb in a compact monolithically integrated chip that can be locked to an absolute frequency without the need of a frequency-comb synthesizer. The monolithic, absolute frequency comb can provide a THz frequency reference and tool for high-resolution broad band spectroscopy.

  6. Estimating the absolute wealth of households

    PubMed Central

    Gerkey, Drew; Hadley, Craig

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To estimate the absolute wealth of households using data from demographic and health surveys. Methods We developed a new metric, the absolute wealth estimate, based on the rank of each surveyed household according to its material assets and the assumed shape of the distribution of wealth among surveyed households. Using data from 156 demographic and health surveys in 66 countries, we calculated absolute wealth estimates for households. We validated the method by comparing the proportion of households defined as poor using our estimates with published World Bank poverty headcounts. We also compared the accuracy of absolute versus relative wealth estimates for the prediction of anthropometric measures. Findings The median absolute wealth estimates of 1 403 186 households were 2056 international dollars per capita (interquartile range: 723–6103). The proportion of poor households based on absolute wealth estimates were strongly correlated with World Bank estimates of populations living on less than 2.00 United States dollars per capita per day (R2 = 0.84). Absolute wealth estimates were better predictors of anthropometric measures than relative wealth indexes. Conclusion Absolute wealth estimates provide new opportunities for comparative research to assess the effects of economic resources on health and human capital, as well as the long-term health consequences of economic change and inequality. PMID:26170506

  7. Absolute optical metrology : nanometers to kilometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dubovitsky, Serge; Lay, O. P.; Peters, R. D.; Liebe, C. C.

    2005-01-01

    We provide and overview of the developments in the field of high-accuracy absolute optical metrology with emphasis on space-based applications. Specific work on the Modulation Sideband Technology for Absolute Ranging (MSTAR) sensor is described along with novel applications of the sensor.

  8. Interaction of tungsten with tungsten carbide in a copper melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodrova, L. E.; Goida, E. Yu.; Pastukhov, E. A.; Marshuk, L. A.; Popova, E. A.

    2013-07-01

    The chemical interaction between tungsten and tungsten carbide in a copper melt with the formation of W2C at 1300°C is studied. It is shown that the mechanical activation of a composition consisting of copper melt + W and WC powders by low-temperature vibrations initiates not only the chemical interaction of its solid components but also their refinement.

  9. Absolute instability of the Gaussian wake profile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hultgren, Lennart S.; Aggarwal, Arun K.

    1987-01-01

    Linear parallel-flow stability theory has been used to investigate the effect of viscosity on the local absolute instability of a family of wake profiles with a Gaussian velocity distribution. The type of local instability, i.e., convective or absolute, is determined by the location of a branch-point singularity with zero group velocity of the complex dispersion relation for the instability waves. The effects of viscosity were found to be weak for values of the wake Reynolds number, based on the center-line velocity defect and the wake half-width, larger than about 400. Absolute instability occurs only for sufficiently large values of the center-line wake defect. The critical value of this parameter increases with decreasing wake Reynolds number, thereby indicating a shrinking region of absolute instability with decreasing wake Reynolds number. If backflow is not allowed, absolute instability does not occur for wake Reynolds numbers smaller than about 38.

  10. Ab-initio calculations on melting of thorium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, D.; Sahoo, B. D.; Joshi, K. D.; Kaushik, T. C.; Gupta, Satish C.

    2016-05-01

    Ab-initio molecular dynamics study has been performed on face centered cubic structured thorium to determine its melting temperature at room pressure. The ion-electron interaction potential energy calculated as a function of temperature for three volumes (a0)3 and (1.02a0)3 and (1.04a0)3 increases gradually with temperature and undergoes a sharp jump at ~2200 K, ~2100 K and ~1800 K, respectively. Here, a0 = 5.043 Å is the equilibrium lattice parameter at 0 K obtained from ab-initio calculations. These jumps in interaction energy are treated as due to the onset of melting and corresponding temperatures as melting point. The melting point of 2100 K is close to the experimental value of 2023K. Further, the same has been verified by plotting the atomic arrangement evolved at various temperatures and corresponding pair correlation functions.

  11. Organic contaminant release from melting snow. 2. Influence of snow pack and melt characteristics.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Torsten; Lei, Ying Duan; Muradi, Ibrahim; Wania, Frank

    2009-02-01

    Large reservoirs of organic contaminants in seasonal snowpack can be released in short pulses during spring snowmelt, potentially impacting the receiving ecosystems. Laboratory experiments using artificial snow spiked with organic target substances were conducted to investigate the behavior of six organic contaminants with widely variable distribution properties in melting snow. Whereas the influence of a chemical's equilibrium phase partitioning on the elution behavior is explored in a companion paper, we discuss here the impact of snow properties and melt features, including the snowpack depth, the temperature at the interface between soil and snow, the meltwater content the internal ice surface area, and the existence of distinct snow layers. Water-soluble organic substances are released in high concentrations at the beginning of a melt period when a deep and aged snowpack undergoes intense melting. Warm ground can cause notable melting at the snow bottom leading to a delayed and dampened concentration peak. Hydraulic barriers in layered snow packs cause preferential meltwater flow which also mitigates the early contaminant flush. Hydrophobic organic pollutants that are associated with particles accumulate near the snow surface and are released at the end of melting. Dirt cones at the surface of a dense snowpack enhance this enrichment. The findings of this laboratory study will aid in the understanding of the behavior of organic pollutants during the melting of more complex, natural snow covers.

  12. The microwave properties of simulated melting precipitation particles: sensitivity to initial melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, B. T.; Olson, W. S.; Skofronick-Jackson, G.

    2015-06-01

    A simplified approach is presented for assessing the microwave response to the initial melting of realistically-shaped ice particles. This paper is divided into two parts: (1) a description of the Single Particle Melting Model (SPMM): a heuristic melting simulation for ice-phase precipitation particles of any shape or size. SPMM is applied to two simulated aggregate snow particles, simulating melting up to 0.15 melt fraction by mass; and (2) the computation of the single-particle microwave scattering and extinction properties these hydrometeors, using the discrete dipole approximation (via DDSCAT), at the following selected frequencies: 13.4, 35.6, 94.0 GHz for radar applications; and 89, 165.0 and 183.31 GHz for radiometer applications. These selected frequencies are consistent with current microwave remote sensing platforms, such as CloudSat and the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission. Comparisons with calculations using variable-density spheres indicate significant deviations in scattering and extinction properties throughout the initial range of melting (liquid volume fractions less than 0.15). Integration of the single-particle properties over an exponential particle-size distribution provides additional insight into idealized radar reflectivity and passive microwave brightness temperature sensitivity to variations in size/mass, shape, melt fraction, and particle orientation.

  13. The microwave properties of simulated melting precipitation particles: sensitivity to initial melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, B. T.; Olson, W. S.; Skofronick-Jackson, G.

    2016-01-01

    A simplified approach is presented for assessing the microwave response to the initial melting of realistically shaped ice particles. This paper is divided into two parts: (1) a description of the Single Particle Melting Model (SPMM), a heuristic melting simulation for ice-phase precipitation particles of any shape or size (SPMM is applied to two simulated aggregate snow particles, simulating melting up to 0.15 melt fraction by mass), and (2) the computation of the single-particle microwave scattering and extinction properties of these hydrometeors, using the discrete dipole approximation (via DDSCAT), at the following selected frequencies: 13.4, 35.6, and 94.0 GHz for radar applications and 89, 165.0, and 183.31 GHz for radiometer applications. These selected frequencies are consistent with current microwave remote-sensing platforms, such as CloudSat and the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission. Comparisons with calculations using variable-density spheres indicate significant deviations in scattering and extinction properties throughout the initial range of melting (liquid volume fractions less than 0.15). Integration of the single-particle properties over an exponential particle size distribution provides additional insight into idealized radar reflectivity and passive microwave brightness temperature sensitivity to variations in size/mass, shape, melt fraction, and particle orientation.

  14. Organic contaminant release from melting snow. 2. Influence of snow pack and melt characteristics.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Torsten; Lei, Ying Duan; Muradi, Ibrahim; Wania, Frank

    2009-02-01

    Large reservoirs of organic contaminants in seasonal snowpack can be released in short pulses during spring snowmelt, potentially impacting the receiving ecosystems. Laboratory experiments using artificial snow spiked with organic target substances were conducted to investigate the behavior of six organic contaminants with widely variable distribution properties in melting snow. Whereas the influence of a chemical's equilibrium phase partitioning on the elution behavior is explored in a companion paper, we discuss here the impact of snow properties and melt features, including the snowpack depth, the temperature at the interface between soil and snow, the meltwater content the internal ice surface area, and the existence of distinct snow layers. Water-soluble organic substances are released in high concentrations at the beginning of a melt period when a deep and aged snowpack undergoes intense melting. Warm ground can cause notable melting at the snow bottom leading to a delayed and dampened concentration peak. Hydraulic barriers in layered snow packs cause preferential meltwater flow which also mitigates the early contaminant flush. Hydrophobic organic pollutants that are associated with particles accumulate near the snow surface and are released at the end of melting. Dirt cones at the surface of a dense snowpack enhance this enrichment. The findings of this laboratory study will aid in the understanding of the behavior of organic pollutants during the melting of more complex, natural snow covers. PMID:19244999

  15. {sup 3}He melting pressure thermometry

    SciTech Connect

    Ni, W.; Xia, J.S.; Adams, E.D.

    1995-10-01

    High-precision measurements of the {sup 3}He melting pressure versus temperature have been made from 500 {mu}K to 25 mK using a {sup 60}Co nuclear orientation primary thermometer and a Pt NMR susceptibility secondary thermometer. Temperatures for the fixed points on the melting curve are: the superfluid A transition T{sub A}=2.505 mK, the A-B transition T{sub AB}=1.948 mK, and the solid ordering temperature T{sub N}=0.934 mK. These fixed points and a functional form for P(T) constitute a convenient temperature scale, based on a primary thermometer, usable to well below 1 mK.

  16. Binary Colloidal Alloy Test-5: Three-Dimensional Melt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yodh, Arjun G.

    2008-01-01

    Binary Colloidal Alloy Test - 5: Three-Dimensional Melt (BCAT-5-3DMelt) photographs initially randomized colloidal samples in microgravity to determine their resulting structure over time. BCAT-5-3D-Melt will allow the scientists to capture the kinetics (evolution) of their samples, as well as the final equilibrium state of each sample. BCAT-5-3D-Melt will look at the mechanisms of melting using three-dimensional temperature sensitive colloidal crystals. Results will help scientists develop fundamental physics concepts previously shadowed by the effects of gravity.

  17. Low melting mesophase pitches

    SciTech Connect

    Diefendorf, R.J.; Chen, S.H.

    1984-04-17

    A low melting point, low molecular weight, heptane insoluble, 1,2,4-trichlorobenzene soluble mesophase pitch useful in carbon fiber spinning as such or as a plasticizer in a carbon fiber spinning composition is obtained by heating chrysene, triphenylene or paraterphenyl as well as mixtures thereof and hydrocarbon fractions containing the same, dissolving the resulting heat treated material with 1,2,4-trichlorobenzene, and separating the insolubles, and then contacting the 1,2,4-trichlorobenzene soluble fraction with a sufficient amount of heptane to precipitate the low melting point, low molecular weight mesophase pitch.

  18. Gyrokinetic Statistical Absolute Equilibrium and Turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Jian-Zhou Zhu and Gregory W. Hammett

    2011-01-10

    A paradigm based on the absolute equilibrium of Galerkin-truncated inviscid systems to aid in understanding turbulence [T.-D. Lee, "On some statistical properties of hydrodynamical and magnetohydrodynamical fields," Q. Appl. Math. 10, 69 (1952)] is taken to study gyrokinetic plasma turbulence: A finite set of Fourier modes of the collisionless gyrokinetic equations are kept and the statistical equilibria are calculated; possible implications for plasma turbulence in various situations are discussed. For the case of two spatial and one velocity dimension, in the calculation with discretization also of velocity v with N grid points (where N + 1 quantities are conserved, corresponding to an energy invariant and N entropy-related invariants), the negative temperature states, corresponding to the condensation of the generalized energy into the lowest modes, are found. This indicates a generic feature of inverse energy cascade. Comparisons are made with some classical results, such as those of Charney-Hasegawa-Mima in the cold-ion limit. There is a universal shape for statistical equilibrium of gyrokinetics in three spatial and two velocity dimensions with just one conserved quantity. Possible physical relevance to turbulence, such as ITG zonal flows, and to a critical balance hypothesis are also discussed.

  19. Engine performance and the determination of absolute ceiling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diehl, Walter S

    1924-01-01

    This report contains a brief study of the variation of engine power with temperature and pressure. The variation of propeller efficiency in standard atmosphere is obtained from the general efficiency curve which is developed in NACA report no. 168. The variation of both power available and power required are then determined and curves plotted, so that the absolute ceiling may be read directly from any known sea-level value of the ratio of power available to power required.

  20. Laser surface melting of aluminium alloy 6013 for improving stress corrosion and corrosion fatigue resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Wen-Long

    Laser surface treatment of aluminium alloy 6013, a relatively new high strength aluminium alloy, was conducted with the aim of improving the alloy's resistance to stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue. In the first phase of this research, laser surface melting (LSM) of the alloy was conducted using an excimer laser. The microstructural changes induced by the laser treatment were studied in detail and characterised. The results showed that excimer LSM produced a relatively thin, non-dentritic planar re-melted layer which is largely free of coarse constituent particles and precipitates. The planar growth phenomenon was explained using the high velocity and high temperature gradient absolute stability criteria. The structure of the oxide and/or the nitride bearing film at the outmost surface of the re-melted layer was also characterised. The results of the electrochemical tests showed that the pitting corrosion resistance of the alloy could be greatly increased by excimer laser melting, especially when the alloy was treated in nitrogen gas: the corrosion current density of the N2-treated specimen was some two orders of magnitude lower than that of the air-treated specimen which was one order of magnitude lower than that of the untreated specimen. The effect of the outer surface oxide and/or nitride bearing film per se on pitting corrosion resistance was determined. The results of a Mott - Schottky analysis strongly suggest that the outer surface film, which exhibited the nature of an n-type semiconductor was responsible for the significant improvement of the corrosion resistance of the laser-treated material. Furthermore, the corrosion response of the surface film was modelled using equivalent circuits. Based on the results of the slow strain rate tensile (SSRT) and corrosion fatigue tests, the stress corrosion cracking and pitting corrosion fatigue behaviour of the excimer laser treated material was evaluated. The results of the SSRT test showed that, in