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Sample records for absolute pointing accuracy

  1. Improving HST Pointing & Absolute Astrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lallo, Matthew; Nelan, E.; Kimmer, E.; Cox, C.; Casertano, S.

    2007-05-01

    Accurate absolute astrometry is becoming increasingly important in an era of multi-mission archives and virtual observatories. Hubble Space Telescope's (HST's) Guidestar Catalog II (GSC2) has reduced coordinate error to around 0.25 arcsecond, a factor 2 or more compared with GSC1. With this reduced catalog error, special attention must be given to calibrate and maintain the Fine Guidance Sensors (FGSs) and Science Instruments (SIs) alignments in HST to a level well below this in order to ensure that the accuracy of science product's astrometry keywords and target positioning are limited only by the catalog errors. After HST Servicing Mission 4, such calibrations' improvement in "blind" pointing accuracy will allow for more efficient COS acquisitions. Multiple SIs and FGSs each have their own footprints in the spatially shared HST focal plane. It is the small changes over time in primarily the whole-body positions & orientations of these instruments & guiders relative to one another that is addressed by this work. We describe the HST Cycle 15 program CAL/OTA 11021 which, along with future variants of it, determines and maintains positions and orientations of the SIs and FGSs to better than 50 milli- arcseconds and 0.04 to 0.004 degrees of roll, putting errors associated with the alignment sufficiently below GSC2 errors. We present recent alignment results and assess their errors, illustrate trends, and describe where and how the observer sees benefit from these calibrations when using HST.

  2. Achieving Climate Change Absolute Accuracy in Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wielicki, Bruce A.; Young, D. F.; Mlynczak, M. G.; Thome, K. J; Leroy, S.; Corliss, J.; Anderson, J. G.; Ao, C. O.; Bantges, R.; Best, F.; Bowman, K.; Brindley, H.; Butler, J. J.; Collins, W.; Dykema, J. A.; Doelling, D. R.; Feldman, D. R.; Fox, N.; Huang, X.; Holz, R.; Huang, Y.; Jennings, D.; Jin, Z.; Johnson, D. G.; Jucks, K.; Kato, S.; Kratz, D. P.; Liu, X.; Lukashin, C.; Mannucci, A. J.; Phojanamongkolkij, N.; Roithmayr, C. M.; Sandford, S.; Taylor, P. C.; Xiong, X.

    2013-01-01

    The Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO) mission will provide a calibration laboratory in orbit for the purpose of accurately measuring and attributing climate change. CLARREO measurements establish new climate change benchmarks with high absolute radiometric accuracy and high statistical confidence across a wide range of essential climate variables. CLARREO's inherently high absolute accuracy will be verified and traceable on orbit to Système Internationale (SI) units. The benchmarks established by CLARREO will be critical for assessing changes in the Earth system and climate model predictive capabilities for decades into the future as society works to meet the challenge of optimizing strategies for mitigating and adapting to climate change. The CLARREO benchmarks are derived from measurements of the Earth's thermal infrared spectrum (5-50 micron), the spectrum of solar radiation reflected by the Earth and its atmosphere (320-2300 nm), and radio occultation refractivity from which accurate temperature profiles are derived. The mission has the ability to provide new spectral fingerprints of climate change, as well as to provide the first orbiting radiometer with accuracy sufficient to serve as the reference transfer standard for other space sensors, in essence serving as a "NIST [National Institute of Standards and Technology] in orbit." CLARREO will greatly improve the accuracy and relevance of a wide range of space-borne instruments for decadal climate change. Finally, CLARREO has developed new metrics and methods for determining the accuracy requirements of climate observations for a wide range of climate variables and uncertainty sources. These methods should be useful for improving our understanding of observing requirements for most climate change observations.

  3. MSTAR: an absolute metrology system with submicrometer accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lay, Oliver P.; Dubovitsky, Serge; Peters, Robert D.; Burger, Johan; Steier, Willian H.; Ahn, Seh-Won; Fetterman, Harrold R.

    2004-10-01

    Laser metrology systems are a key component of stellar interferometers, used to monitor path lengths and dimensions internal to the instrument. Most interferometers use 'relative' metrology, in which the integer number of wavelengths along the path is unknown, and the measurement of length is ambiguous. Changes in the path length can be measured relative to an initial calibration point, but interruption of the metrology beam at any time requires a re-calibration of the system. The MSTAR sensor (Modulation Sideband Technology for Absolute Ranging) is a new system for measuring absolute distance, capable of resolving the integer cycle ambiguity of standard interferometers, and making it possible to measure distance with sub-nanometer accuracy. We describe the design of the system, show results for target distances up to 1 meter, and demonstrate how the system can be scaled to kilometer-scale distances. In recent experiments, we have used white light interferometry to augment the 'truth' measurements and validate the zero-point of the system. MSTAR is a general-purpose tool for conveniently measuring length with much greater accuracy than was previously possible, and has a wide range of possible applications.

  4. Absolute Points for Multiple Assignment Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adlakha, V.; Kowalski, K.

    2006-01-01

    An algorithm is presented to solve multiple assignment problems in which a cost is incurred only when an assignment is made at a given cell. The proposed method recursively searches for single/group absolute points to identify cells that must be loaded in any optimal solution. Unlike other methods, the first solution is the optimal solution. The…

  5. Individual Differences in Absolute and Relative Metacomprehension Accuracy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maki, Ruth H.; Shields, Micheal; Wheeler, Amanda Easton; Zacchilli, Tammy Lowery

    2005-01-01

    The authors investigated absolute and relative metacomprehension accuracy as a function of verbal ability in college students. Students read hard texts, revised texts, or a mixed set of texts. They then predicted their performance, took a multiple-choice test on the texts, and made posttest judgments about their performance. With hard texts,…

  6. An absolute interval scale of order for point patterns

    PubMed Central

    Protonotarios, Emmanouil D.; Baum, Buzz; Johnston, Alan; Hunter, Ginger L.; Griffin, Lewis D.

    2014-01-01

    Human observers readily make judgements about the degree of order in planar arrangements of points (point patterns). Here, based on pairwise ranking of 20 point patterns by degree of order, we have been able to show that judgements of order are highly consistent across individuals and the dimension of order has an interval scale structure spanning roughly 10 just-notable-differences (jnd) between disorder and order. We describe a geometric algorithm that estimates order to an accuracy of half a jnd by quantifying the variability of the size and shape of spaces between points. The algorithm is 70% more accurate than the best available measures. By anchoring the output of the algorithm so that Poisson point processes score on average 0, perfect lattices score 10 and unit steps correspond closely to jnds, we construct an absolute interval scale of order. We demonstrate its utility in biology by using this scale to quantify order during the development of the pattern of bristles on the dorsal thorax of the fruit fly. PMID:25079866

  7. Constraint on Absolute Accuracy of Metacomprehension Assessments: The Anchoring and Adjustment Model vs. the Standards Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kwon, Heekyung

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study is to provide a systematic account of three typical phenomena surrounding absolute accuracy of metacomprehension assessments: (1) the absolute accuracy of predictions is typically quite low; (2) there exist individual differences in absolute accuracy of predictions as a function of reading skill; and (3) postdictions…

  8. A Monte Carlo Comparison of Measures of Relative and Absolute Monitoring Accuracy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nietfeld, John L.; Enders, Craig K; Schraw, Gregory

    2006-01-01

    Researchers studying monitoring accuracy currently use two different indexes to estimate accuracy: relative accuracy and absolute accuracy. The authors compared the distributional properties of two measures of monitoring accuracy using Monte Carlo procedures that fit within these categories. They manipulated the accuracy of judgments (i.e., chance…

  9. Sun-pointing programs and their accuracy

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmerman, J.C.

    1981-05-01

    Several sun-pointing programs and their accuracy are described. FORTRAN program listings are given. Program descriptions are given for both Hewlett-Packard (HP-67) and Texas Instruments (TI-59) hand-held calculators.

  10. Accuracy of pointing a binaural listening array.

    PubMed

    Letowski, T R; Ricard, G L; Kalb, J T; Mermagen, T J; Amrein, K M

    1997-12-01

    We measured the accuracy with which sounds heard over a binaural, end-fire array could be located when the angular separation of the array's two arms was varied. Each individual arm contained nine cardioid electret microphones, the responses of which were combined to produce a unidirectional, band-limited pattern of sensitivity. We assessed the desirable angular separation of these arms by measuring the accuracy with which listeners could point to the source of a target sound presented against high-level background noise. We employed array separations of 30 degrees, 45 degrees, and 60 degrees, and signal-to-noise ratios of +5, -5, and -15 dB. Pointing accuracy was best for a separation of 60 degrees; this performance was indistinguishable from pointing during unaided listening conditions. In addition, the processing of the array was modeled to depict the information that was available for localization. The model indicates that highly directional binaural arrays can be expected to support accurate localization of sources of sound only near the axis of the array. Wider enhanced listening angles may be possible if the forward coverage of the sensor system is made less directional and more similar to that of human listeners. PMID:9473975

  11. HST Stellar Standards with 1% Accuracy in Absolute Flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohlin, R. C.

    2007-04-01

    Free of any atmospheric contamination, the {Hubble Space Telescope} provides the best available spectrophotometry from the far-UV to the near-IR for stars as faint as V˜16. The HST CALSPEC standard star network is based on three standard candles: the hot, pure hydrogen white dwarf (WD) stars G 191B2B, GD 153, and GD 71, which have Hubeny NLTE flux calculations that require the atomic physics for only one atom. These model flux distributions are normalized to the absolute flux for Vega of 3.46×10-9 erg cm-2 s-1 Å-1 at 5556 Å using precise Landolt V band photometry and the V bandpass function corrected for atmospheric transmission by M. Cohen. The three primary WD standards provide absolute flux calibrations for FOS, STIS and NICMOS spectrophotometry from these instruments on the HST. About 32 stellar spectral energy distributions (SEDs) have been constructed with a primary pedigree from the STIS data, which extends from 1150 Å for the hot stars to a long wavelength limit of 1 μm. NICMOS grism spectrophotometry provides an extension to 1.9 μm in the IR for 17 of the HST standards and longward to 2.5 μm for a few of the brighter stars. Included among these HST standards are Vega, the Sloan standard BD+17 4708, three bright solar analog candidates, three cool stars of type M or later, and five hot WDs. In addition, four K giants and four main sequence A-stars have NICMOS spectrophotometry from 0.8-2.5 μm. The WD fluxes are compared to their modeled SEDs and demonstrate an internal precision of 1-2%, while the A-stars agree with the Cohen IR fluxes to ˜2%. Three solar analog candidate stars differ from the solar spectrum by up to 10% in the region of heavy line blanketing from 3000-4000 Å and show differences in shape of ˜5% in the IR around 1.8 μm.

  12. MSTAR: an absolute metrology sensor with sub-micron accuracy for space-based applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, Robert D.; Lay, Oliver P.; Dubovitsky, Serge; Burger, Johan P.; Jeganathan, Muthu

    2004-01-01

    The MSTAR sensor is a new system for measuring absolute distance, capable of resolving the integer cycle ambiguity of standard interferometers, and making it possible to measure distance with subnanometer accuracy.

  13. Confidence-Accuracy Calibration in Absolute and Relative Face Recognition Judgments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weber, Nathan; Brewer, Neil

    2004-01-01

    Confidence-accuracy (CA) calibration was examined for absolute and relative face recognition judgments as well as for recognition judgments from groups of stimuli presented simultaneously or sequentially (i.e., simultaneous or sequential mini-lineups). When the effect of difficulty was controlled, absolute and relative judgments produced…

  14. Accuracy Study of a 2-Component Point Doppler Velocimeter (PDV)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhlman, John; Naylor, Steve; James, Kelly; Ramanath, Senthil

    1997-01-01

    A two-component Point Doppler Velocimeter (PDV) which has recently been developed is described, and a series of velocity measurements which have been obtained to quantify the accuracy of the PDV system are summarized. This PDV system uses molecular iodine vapor cells as frequency discriminating filters to determine the Doppler shift of laser light which is scattered off of seed particles in a flow. The majority of results which have been obtained to date are for the mean velocity of a rotating wheel, although preliminary data are described for fully-developed turbulent pipe flow. Accuracy of the present wheel velocity data is approximately +/- 1 % of full scale, while linearity of a single channel is on the order of +/- 0.5 % (i.e., +/- 0.6 m/sec and +/- 0.3 m/sec, out of 57 m/sec, respectively). The observed linearity of these results is on the order of the accuracy to which the speed of the rotating wheel has been set for individual data readings. The absolute accuracy of the rotating wheel data is shown to be consistent with the level of repeatability of the cell calibrations. The preliminary turbulent pipe flow data show consistent turbulence intensity values, and mean axial velocity profiles generally agree with pitot probe data. However, there is at present an offset error in the radial velocity which is on the order of 5-10 % of the mean axial velocity.

  15. Speed and Accuracy of Absolute Pitch Judgments: Some Latter-Day Results.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carroll, John B.

    Nine subjects, 5 of whom claimed absolute pitch (AP) ability were instructed to rapidly strike notes on the piano to match randomized tape-recorded piano notes. Stimulus set sizes were 64, 16, or 4 consecutive semitones, or 7 diatonic notes of a designated octave. A control task involved motor movements to notes announced in advance. Accuracy,…

  16. The Implications for Higher-Accuracy Absolute Measurements for NGS and its GRAV-D Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Childers, V. A.; Winester, D.; Roman, D. R.; Eckl, M. C.; Smith, D. A.

    2013-12-01

    absolute gravimetry, we expect that GRAV-D may be affected in a number of ways. 1) Areas requiring re-measurement as a result of poor quality data or temporal change could be measured with such a new meter. With a meter capable of field measurement with observation times that are very short, surveys previously conducted only with the relative meters could be performed with the absolute meter with no loss of time and a significant increase in accuracy. 2) Regions of rapid change due to hydrological change associated with aquifers could be measured and re-measured rather quickly. Such accuracy may provide more accurate snapshots of the aquifers over time. 3) NGS conducts absolute gravity comparisons at its Table Mountain facility for validating the performance of absolute meters through their co-located operation at gravity piers. An increase in accuracy of an order of magnitude may change the entire nature of absolute meter performance evaluation.

  17. Accuracy Assessment of Mobile Mapping Point Clouds Using the Existing Environment as Terrestrial Reference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, S.; Brenner, C.

    2016-06-01

    Mobile mapping data is widely used in various applications, what makes it especially important for data users to get a statistically verified quality statement on the geometric accuracy of the acquired point clouds or its processed products. The accuracy of point clouds can be divided into an absolute and a relative quality, where the absolute quality describes the position of the point cloud in a world coordinate system such as WGS84 or UTM, whereas the relative accuracy describes the accuracy within the point cloud itself. Furthermore, the quality of processed products such as segmented features depends on the global accuracy of the point cloud but mainly on the quality of the processing steps. Several data sources with different characteristics and quality can be thought of as potential reference data, such as cadastral maps, orthophoto, artificial control objects or terrestrial surveys using a total station. In this work a test field in a selected residential area was acquired as reference data in a terrestrial survey using a total station. In order to reach high accuracy the stationing of the total station was based on a newly made geodetic network with a local accuracy of less than 3 mm. The global position of the network was determined using a long time GNSS survey reaching an accuracy of 8 mm. Based on this geodetic network a 3D test field with facades and street profiles was measured with a total station, each point with a two-dimensional position and altitude. In addition, the surface of poles of street lights, traffic signs and trees was acquired using the scanning mode of the total station. Comparing this reference data to the acquired mobile mapping point clouds of several measurement campaigns a detailed quality statement on the accuracy of the point cloud data is made. Additionally, the advantages and disadvantages of the described reference data source concerning availability, cost, accuracy and applicability are discussed.

  18. Using AIRS and IASI Data to Evaluate Absolute Radiometric Accuracy and Stability for Climate Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aumann, Hartmut H.; Pagano, Thomas S.

    2008-01-01

    The creation of multi-decadal data sets for climate research requires better than 100 mK absolute calibration accuracy for the full range of spectral temperatures encountered under global conditions. Validation that this accuracy is achieved by the operational hyperspectral sounders from polar orbit is facilitated by comparing data from two instruments. Extreme radiometric calibration stability is critical to allow a long time series of noisy, but presumably long-term accurate truth measurements to be used for the validation of absolute accuracy at the 100 mK level. We use the RTGSST in the tropical oceans as ground truth. The difference between the AIRS derived sst2616 and the RTGSST based on six years of data shows a systematic cold bias of about 250 mK, but better than 4 mK/year stability. The double difference between AIRS and the RTGSST and IASI and the RTGSST with less than one year of data already allows statements at the 100 mK absolute level. It shows a 60 mK difference between the AIRS and the IASI calibration at 2616 cm-(sup 1) and 300 K, with a statistically insignificant 20 mK shift in six months.

  19. Accuracy of commercial dew-point hygrometers

    SciTech Connect

    Carotenuto, A.; Dell`Isola, M.; Crovini, L.; Actis, A.

    1995-12-31

    This paper presents an experimental evaluation of different types of commercial chilled-mirror dew-point hygrometers designed to verify their metrological behavior. Specifically, an analysis of their measurement uncertainties and long-term stability is carried out. A computing method is applied to estimate the measurement uncertainty of an indirect determination of the relative humidity using a chilled-mirror dew-point hygrometer and a dry-bulb temperature sensor.

  20. High Accuracy, Absolute, Cryogenic Refractive Index Measurements of Infrared Lens Materials for JWST NIRCam using CHARMS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leviton, Douglas; Frey, Bradley

    2005-01-01

    The current refractive optical design of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Near Infrared Camera (NIRCam) uses three infrared materials in its lenses: LiF, BaF2, and ZnSe. In order to provide the instrument s optical designers with accurate, heretofore unavailable data for absolute refractive index based on actual cryogenic measurements, two prismatic samples of each material were measured using the cryogenic, high accuracy, refraction measuring system (CHARMS) at NASA GSFC, densely covering the temperature range from 15 to 320 K and wavelength range from 0.4 to 5.6 microns. Measurement methods are discussed and graphical and tabulated data for absolute refractive index, dispersion, and thermo-optic coefficient for these three materials are presented along with estimates of uncertainty. Coefficients for second order polynomial fits of measured index to temperature are provided for many wavelengths to allow accurate interpolation of index to other wavelengths and temperatures.

  1. Absolute and Trend Accuracy of a New Regional Oximeter in Healthy Volunteers During Controlled Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Paidy, Samata; Kashif, Faisal

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Traditional patient monitoring may not detect cerebral tissue hypoxia, and typical interventions may not improve tissue oxygenation. Therefore, monitoring cerebral tissue oxygen status with regional oximetry is being increasingly used by anesthesiologists and perfusionists during surgery. In this study, we evaluated absolute and trend accuracy of a new regional oximetry technology in healthy volunteers. METHODS: A near-infrared spectroscopy sensor connected to a regional oximetry system (O3TM, Masimo, Irvine, CA) was placed on the subject’s forehead, to provide continuous measurement of regional oxygen saturation (rSo2). Reference blood samples were taken from the radial artery and internal jugular bulb vein, at baseline and after a series of increasingly hypoxic states induced by altering the inspired oxygen concentration while maintaining normocapnic arterial carbon dioxide pressure (Paco2). Absolute and trend accuracy of the regional oximetry system was determined by comparing rSo2 against reference cerebral oxygen saturation (Savo2), that is calculated by combining arterial and venous saturations of oxygen in the blood samples. RESULTS: Twenty-seven subjects were enrolled. Bias (test method mean error), standard deviation of error, standard error of the mean, and root mean square accuracy (ARMS) of rSo2 compared to Savo2 were 0.4%, 4.0%, 0.3%, and 4.0%, respectively. The limits of agreement were 8.4% (95% confidence interval, 7.6%–9.3%) to −7.6% (95% confidence interval, −8.4% to −6.7%). Trend accuracy analysis yielded a relative mean error of 0%, with a standard deviation of 2.1%, a standard error of 0.1%, and an ARMS of 2.1%. Multiple regression analysis showed that age and skin color did not affect the bias (all P > 0.1). CONCLUSIONS: Masimo O3 regional oximetry provided absolute root-mean-squared error of 4% and relative root-mean-squared error of 2.1% in healthy volunteers undergoing controlled hypoxia. PMID:25405692

  2. Absolute calibration accuracy of L4 TM and L5 TM sensor image pairs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chander, G.; Micijevic, E.

    2006-01-01

    The Landsat suite of satellites has collected the longest continuous archive of multispectral data of any land-observing space program. From the Landsat program's inception in 1972 to the present, the Earth science user community has benefited from a historical record of remotely sensed data. However, little attention has been paid to ensuring that the data are calibrated and comparable from mission to mission, Launched in 1982 and 1984 respectively, the Landsat 4 (L4) and Landsat 5 (L5) Thematic Mappers (TM) are the backbone of an extensive archive of moderate resolution Earth imagery. To evaluate the "current" absolute accuracy of these two sensors, image pairs from the L5 TM and L4 TM sensors were compared. The approach involves comparing image statistics derived from large common areas observed eight days apart by the two sensors. The average percent differences in reflectance estimates obtained from the L4 TM agree with those from the L5 TM to within 15 percent. Additional work to characterize the absolute differences between the two sensors over the entire mission is in progress.

  3. A system for measuring absolute frequencies of up to 4.25 THz using a Josephson point contact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mild, Yukinobu; Onae, Atsushi; Kurosawa, Tomizo; Sakuma, Eiichi

    1993-11-01

    A system for measuring the absolute frequency of a far-infrared (FIR) laser is described. Josephson point contacts have been utilized in the system as a frequency harmonic mixer connecting microwaves and optically pumped CH3OH laser lines. The Josephson point contacts are capable of generating beat signals of 90 GHz microwaves and FIR waves of up to 4.25 THz. To measure the frequency of the beat signals from the Josephson junction with a frequency counter, tracking oscillators have been developed, which tracks the beat signals by phase locking and regenerate clean signals for frequency counting. It is shown that the absolute frequency can be measured to an accuracy of about 100 Hz by using the tracking oscillators.

  4. Handheld Reflective Foil Emissometer with 0.007 Absolute Accuracy at 0.05

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Ham, E. W. M.; Ballico, M. J.

    2014-07-01

    The development and performance of a handheld emissometer for the measurement of the emissivity of highly reflective metallic foils used for the insulation of domestic and commercial buildings are described. Reflective roofing insulation based on a thin coating of metal on a more robust substrate is very widely used in hotter climates to reduce the radiant heat transfer between the ceiling and roof in commercial and residential buildings. The required normal emissivity of these foils is generally below 0.05, so stray reflected ambient infrared radiation (IR) makes traditional reflectance-based measurements of emissivity very difficult to achieve with the required accuracy. Many manufacturers apply additional coatings onto the metallic foil to reduce visible glare during installation on a roof, and to provide protection to the thin reflective layer; however, this layer can also substantially increase the IR emissivity. The system as developed at the National Measurement Institute, Australia (NMIA) is based on the principle of measurement of the modulation in thermal infrared radiation, as the sample is thermally modulated by hot and cold air streams. A commercial infrared to band radiation thermometer with a highly specialized stray and reflected radiation shroud attachment is used as the detector system, allowing for convenient handheld field measurements. The performance and accuracy of the system have been compared with NMIA's reference emissometer systems for a number of typical material samples, demonstrating its capability to measure the absolute thermal emissivity of these very highly reflective foils with an uncertainty of better than.

  5. Simultaneous relative and absolute orientation of point clouds with "TLS radomes"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glira, Philipp; Briese, Christian; Kamp, Nicole; Pfeifer, Norbert

    2013-04-01

    For the georeferencing of point clouds acquired by a terrestrial laser scanner (TLS) targets with known coordinates (control points) can be used. The determination of the target positions in a global coordinate frame with a total station and/or with GNSS can be very time-consuming. For multi-temporal comparison of TLS data these targets can be permanently installed on the measurement site. In permanent changing environments (e.g. high-moutain proglacial environments) this is not possible due to the movement of the targets. Furthermore, the integration of the TLS data with other data sources (e.g. airborne laser scanning data) has to be considered. For that aim the georeferencing of TLS measurements in a global coordinate frame has to be established. This work describes a new method for the simultaneous relative orientiation (registration) and absolute orientation (georeferencing) of point clouds by using spheres with a GNSS antenna inside. These spheres are thus used as GNSS antenna radomes. Consequently they are called within this work "TLS radomes". The simultaneous measurement with at least three GNSS antennas during the TLS data acquisition leads to long measurement times, i.e. high position accuracy and subsequently a very accurate realization of the datum. The presented TLS radomes consist of two hemispheres of polyethene enclosing the GNSS antenna. The GNSS antenna is mounted on an antenna rod, which can be enhanced by a prism and/or a reflective cylinder. For a modified optical reflectivity several coatings were tested. The one causing the smallest deformations, the smallest noise, and with the highest reflectivity was chosen. The whole construction can be mounted on a tripod. The TLS radomes are suitable for a wide range of different TLS sensors (i.e. independent of the ranging principle and the manufacturers). For the simultaneous relative and absolute orientation of the point clouds the centers of the radomes are used as identical points. With TLS these

  6. Accuracy limit of rigid 3-point water models.

    PubMed

    Izadi, Saeed; Onufriev, Alexey V

    2016-08-21

    Classical 3-point rigid water models are most widely used due to their computational efficiency. Recently, we introduced a new approach to constructing classical rigid water models [S. Izadi et al., J. Phys. Chem. Lett. 5, 3863 (2014)], which permits a virtually exhaustive search for globally optimal model parameters in the sub-space that is most relevant to the electrostatic properties of the water molecule in liquid phase. Here we apply the approach to develop a 3-point Optimal Point Charge (OPC3) water model. OPC3 is significantly more accurate than the commonly used water models of same class (TIP3P and SPCE) in reproducing a comprehensive set of liquid bulk properties, over a wide range of temperatures. Beyond bulk properties, we show that OPC3 predicts the intrinsic charge hydration asymmetry (CHA) of water - a characteristic dependence of hydration free energy on the sign of the solute charge - in very close agreement with experiment. Two other recent 3-point rigid water models, TIP3PFB and H2ODC, each developed by its own, completely different optimization method, approach the global accuracy optimum represented by OPC3 in both the parameter space and accuracy of bulk properties. Thus, we argue that an accuracy limit of practical 3-point rigid non-polarizable models has effectively been reached; remaining accuracy issues are discussed. PMID:27544113

  7. Observational constraints on atmospheric radiaitve feedbacks: absolute accuracy and next-generation observing systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dykema, J. A.; Hanssen, L. M.; Mekhontsev, S.; Anderson, J.

    2012-12-01

    The central role of atmospheric radiative feedbacks to understanding and projecting climate change calls for a robust observational system. Recent studies have shown the value of space-based measurements for putting quantitative constraints on a range of radiative feedback processes through a fingerprinting method applied to long-term observational records. More recent work has suggested the value of demonstrably accurate measurements to disentangle model error from observational uncertainties within reanalysis systems, potentially yielding improved representations of feedback processes within just a few years. Both of these methods rely on space-based measurements that can be objectively tested for accuracy on-orbit. A new class of mission has been proposed that incorporates the same type of empirical tests for accuracy as used in the laboratory into a space-based sensor. One example of such a mission is the Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO), a new mission suggested by the 2006 National Research Council Decadal Survey. CLARREO includes three sensor types: thermal infrared, microwave, and reflected shortwave. This paper presents a laboratory demonstration of prototype systems for testing the on-orbit accuracy of a thermal infrared sensor for CLARREO. These systems utilize infrared lasers to provide monochromatic light sources to quantitatively determine the optical properties of materials. These infrared optical properties are major determinants of the on-orbit radiometric performance of a thermal infrared sensor. For this reason, reliable quantitative information (including uncertainty) that tracks any changes in relevant infrared materials over the mission lifetime is essential to objective assessment of instrument accuracy. The practicality of mid-infrared lasers for these applications is due to the availability and continued evolution of compact, high-efficiency Quantum Cascade Lasers (QCLs). These lasers can provide over 100 m

  8. Insensitivity of the octahedral spherical hohlraum to power imbalance, pointing accuracy, and assemblage accuracy

    SciTech Connect

    Huo, Wen Yi; Zhao, Yiqing; Zheng, Wudi; Liu, Jie; Lan, Ke

    2014-11-15

    The random radiation asymmetry in the octahedral spherical hohlraum [K. Lan et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 0 10704 (2014)] arising from the power imbalance, pointing accuracy of laser quads, and the assemblage accuracy of capsule is investigated by using the 3-dimensional view factor model. From our study, for the spherical hohlraum, the random radiation asymmetry arising from the power imbalance of the laser quads is about half of that in the cylindrical hohlraum; the random asymmetry arising from the pointing error is about one order lower than that in the cylindrical hohlraum; and the random asymmetry arising from the assemblage error of capsule is about one third of that in the cylindrical hohlraum. Moreover, the random radiation asymmetry in the spherical hohlraum is also less than the amount in the elliptical hohlraum. The results indicate that the spherical hohlraum is more insensitive to the random variations than the cylindrical hohlraum and the elliptical hohlraum. Hence, the spherical hohlraum can relax the requirements to the power imbalance and pointing accuracy of laser facility and the assemblage accuracy of capsule.

  9. Absolute thickness metrology with submicrometer accuracy using a low-coherence distance measuring interferometer.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yang; Schmidt, Greg; Moore, Duncan T; Ellis, Jonathan D

    2015-09-01

    Absolute physical thickness across the sample aperture is critical in determining the index of a refraction profile from the optical path length profile for gradient index (GRIN) materials, which have a designed inhomogeneous refractive index. Motivated by this application, instrumentation was established to measure the absolute thickness of samples with nominally plane-parallel surfaces up to 50 mm thick. The current system is capable of measuring absolute thickness with 120 nm (1σ) repeatability and submicrometer expanded measurement uncertainty. Beside GRIN materials, this method is also capable of measuring other inhomogeneous and opaque materials. PMID:26368894

  10. The Accuracy of Point-of-Care Glucose Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Rebel, Annette; Rice, Mark A.; Fahy, Brenda G.

    2012-01-01

    Control of blood glucose (BG) in an acceptable range is a major therapy target for diabetes patients in both the hospital and outpatient environments. This review focuses on the state of point-of-care (POC) glucose monitoring and the accuracy of the measurement devices. The accuracy of the POC glucose monitor depends on device methodology and other factors, including sample source and collection and patient characteristics. Patient parameters capable of influencing measurements include variations in pH, blood oxygen, hematocrit, changes in microcirculation, and vasopressor therapy. These elements alone or when combined can significantly impact BG measurement accuracy with POC glucose monitoring devices (POCGMDs). In general, currently available POCGMDs exhibit the greatest accuracy within the range of physiological glucose levels but become less reliable at the lower and higher ranges of BG levels. This issue raises serious safety concerns and the importance of understanding the limitations of POCGMDs. This review will discuss potential interferences and shortcomings of the current POCGMDs and stress when these may impact the reliability of POCGMDs for clinical decision-making. PMID:22538154

  11. Accuracy and Efficiency in Fixed-Point Neural ODE Solvers.

    PubMed

    Hopkins, Michael; Furber, Steve

    2015-10-01

    Simulation of neural behavior on digital architectures often requires the solution of ordinary differential equations (ODEs) at each step of the simulation. For some neural models, this is a significant computational burden, so efficiency is important. Accuracy is also relevant because solutions can be sensitive to model parameterization and time step. These issues are emphasized on fixed-point processors like the ARM unit used in the SpiNNaker architecture. Using the Izhikevich neural model as an example, we explore some solution methods, showing how specific techniques can be used to find balanced solutions. We have investigated a number of important and related issues, such as introducing explicit solver reduction (ESR) for merging an explicit ODE solver and autonomous ODE into one algebraic formula, with benefits for both accuracy and speed; a simple, efficient mechanism for cancelling the cumulative lag in state variables caused by threshold crossing between time steps; an exact result for the membrane potential of the Izhikevich model with the other state variable held fixed. Parametric variations of the Izhikevich neuron show both similarities and differences in terms of algorithms and arithmetic types that perform well, making an overall best solution challenging to identify, but we show that particular cases can be improved significantly using the techniques described. Using a 1 ms simulation time step and 32-bit fixed-point arithmetic to promote real-time performance, one of the second-order Runge-Kutta methods looks to be the best compromise; Midpoint for speed or Trapezoid for accuracy. SpiNNaker offers an unusual combination of low energy use and real-time performance, so some compromises on accuracy might be expected. However, with a careful choice of approach, results comparable to those of general-purpose systems should be possible in many realistic cases. PMID:26313605

  12. Accuracy analysis of pointing control system of solar power station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, J. C.; Peebles, P. Z., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    The first-phase effort concentrated on defining the minimum basic functions that the retrodirective array must perform, identifying circuits that are capable of satisfying the basic functions, and looking at some of the error sources in the system and how they affect accuracy. The initial effort also examined three methods for generating torques for mechanical antenna control, performed a rough analysis of the flexible body characteristics of the solar collector, and defined a control system configuration for mechanical pointing control of the array.

  13. The Annular Suspension and Pointing (ASP) system for space experiments and predicted pointing accuracies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, W. W.; Joshi, S. M.

    1975-01-01

    An annular suspension and pointing system consisting of pointing assemblies for coarse and vernier pointing is described. The first assembly is attached to a carrier spacecraft (e.g., the space shuttle) and consists of an azimuth gimbal and an elevation gimbal which provide 'coarse' pointing. The second or vernier pointing assembly is made up of magnetic actuators of suspension and fine pointing, roll motor segments, and an instrument or experiment mounting plate around which is attached a continuous annular rim similar to that used in the annular momentum control device. The rim provides appropriate magnetic circuits for the actuators and the roll motor segments for any instrument roll position. The results of a study to determine the pointing accuracy of the system in the presence of crew motion disturbances are presented. Typical 3 sigma worst-case errors are found to be of the order of 0.001 arc-second.

  14. Assessing the Accuracy of the Precise Point Positioning Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisnath, S. B.; Collins, P.; Seepersad, G.

    2012-12-01

    The Precise Point Positioning (PPP) GPS data processing technique has developed over the past 15 years to become a standard method for growing categories of positioning and navigation applications. The technique relies on single receiver point positioning combined with the use of precise satellite orbit and clock information and high-fidelity error modelling. The research presented here uniquely addresses the current accuracy of the technique, explains the limits of performance, and defines paths to improvements. For geodetic purposes, performance refers to daily static position accuracy. PPP processing of over 80 IGS stations over one week results in few millimetre positioning rms error in the north and east components and few centimetres in the vertical (all one sigma values). Larger error statistics for real-time and kinematic processing are also given. GPS PPP with ambiguity resolution processing is also carried out, producing slight improvements over the float solution results. These results are categorised into quality classes in order to analyse the root error causes of the resultant accuracies: "best", "worst", multipath, site displacement effects, satellite availability and geometry, etc. Also of interest in PPP performance is solution convergence period. Static, conventional solutions are slow to converge, with approximately 35 minutes required for 95% of solutions to reach the 20 cm or better horizontal accuracy. Ambiguity resolution can significantly reduce this period without biasing solutions. The definition of a PPP error budget is a complex task even with the resulting numerical assessment, as unlike the epoch-by-epoch processing in the Standard Position Service, PPP processing involving filtering. An attempt is made here to 1) define the magnitude of each error source in terms of range, 2) transform ranging error to position error via Dilution Of Precision (DOP), and 3) scale the DOP through the filtering process. The result is a deeper

  15. Absolute Binding Free Energy Calculations: On the Accuracy of Computational Scoring of Protein-ligand Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Nidhi; Warshel, Arieh

    2010-01-01

    Calculating the absolute binding free energies is a challenging task. Reliable estimates of binding free energies should provide a guide for rational drug design. It should also provide us with deeper understanding of the correlation between protein structure and its function. Further applications may include identifying novel molecular scaffolds and optimizing lead compounds in computer-aided drug design. Available options to evaluate the absolute binding free energies range from the rigorous but expensive free energy perturbation to the microscopic Linear Response Approximation (LRA/β version) and its variants including the Linear Interaction Energy (LIE) to the more approximated and considerably faster scaled Protein Dipoles Langevin Dipoles (PDLD/S-LRA version), as well as the less rigorous Molecular Mechanics Poisson–Boltzmann/Surface Area (MM/PBSA) and Generalized Born/Surface Area (MM/GBSA) to the less accurate scoring functions. There is a need for an assessment of the performance of different approaches in terms of computer time and reliability. We present a comparative study of the LRA/β, the LIE, the PDLD/S-LRA/β and the more widely used MM/PBSA and assess their abilities to estimate the absolute binding energies. The LRA and LIE methods perform reasonably well but require specialized parameterization for the non-electrostatic term. On the average, the PDLD/S-LRA/β performs effectively. Our assessment of the MM/PBSA is less optimistic. This approach appears to provide erroneous estimates of the absolute binding energies due to its incorrect entropies and the problematic treatment of electrostatic energies. Overall, the PDLD/S-LRA/β appears to offer an appealing option for the final stages of massive screening approaches. PMID:20186976

  16. Mapping with Small UAS: A Point Cloud Accuracy Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toth, Charles; Jozkow, Grzegorz; Grejner-Brzezinska, Dorota

    2015-12-01

    Interest in using inexpensive Unmanned Aerial System (UAS) technology for topographic mapping has recently significantly increased. Small UAS platforms equipped with consumer grade cameras can easily acquire high-resolution aerial imagery allowing for dense point cloud generation, followed by surface model creation and orthophoto production. In contrast to conventional airborne mapping systems, UAS has limited ground coverage due to low flying height and limited flying time, yet it offers an attractive alternative to high performance airborne systems, as the cost of the sensors and platform, and the flight logistics, is relatively low. In addition, UAS is better suited for small area data acquisitions and to acquire data in difficult to access areas, such as urban canyons or densely built-up environments. The main question with respect to the use of UAS is whether the inexpensive consumer sensors installed in UAS platforms can provide the geospatial data quality comparable to that provided by conventional systems. This study aims at the performance evaluation of the current practice of UAS-based topographic mapping by reviewing the practical aspects of sensor configuration, georeferencing and point cloud generation, including comparisons between sensor types and processing tools. The main objective is to provide accuracy characterization and practical information for selecting and using UAS solutions in general mapping applications. The analysis is based on statistical evaluation as well as visual examination of experimental data acquired by a Bergen octocopter with three different image sensor configurations, including a GoPro HERO3+ Black Edition, a Nikon D800 DSLR and a Velodyne HDL-32. In addition, georeferencing data of varying quality were acquired and evaluated. The optical imagery was processed by using three commercial point cloud generation tools. Comparing point clouds created by active and passive sensors by using different quality sensors, and finally

  17. Accuracy, Precision, Sensitivity, and Specificity of Noninvasive ICP Absolute Value Measurements.

    PubMed

    Krakauskaite, Solventa; Petkus, Vytautas; Bartusis, Laimonas; Zakelis, Rolandas; Chomskis, Romanas; Preiksaitis, Aidanas; Ragauskas, Arminas; Matijosaitis, Vaidas; Petrikonis, Kestutis; Rastenyte, Daiva

    2016-01-01

    An innovative absolute intracranial pressure (ICP) value measurement method has been validated by multicenter comparative clinical studies. The method is based on two-depth transcranial Doppler (TCD) technology and uses intracranial and extracranial segments of the ophthalmic artery as pressure sensors. The ophthalmic artery is used as a natural pair of "scales" that compares ICP with controlled pressure Pe, which is externally applied to the orbit. To balance the scales, ICP = Pe a special two-depth TCD device was used as a pressure balance indicator. The proposed method is the only noninvasive ICP measurement method that does not need patient-specific calibration. PMID:27165929

  18. Evaluation of Generalized Born Model Accuracy for Absolute Binding Free Energy Calculations.

    PubMed

    Zeller, Fabian; Zacharias, Martin

    2014-06-27

    Generalized Born (GB) implicit solvent models are widely used in molecular dynamics simulations to evaluate the interactions of biomolecular complexes. The continuum treatment of the solvent results in significant computational savings in comparison to an explicit solvent representation. It is, however, not clear how accurately the GB approach reproduces the absolute free energies of biomolecular binding. On the basis of induced dissociation by means of umbrella sampling simulations, the absolute binding free energies of small proline-rich peptide ligands and a protein receptor were calculated. Comparative simulations according to the same protocol were performed by employing an explicit solvent model and various GB-type implicit solvent models in combination with a nonpolar surface tension term. The peptide ligands differed in a key residue at the peptide-protein interface, including either a nonpolar, a neutral polar, a positively charged, or a negatively charged group. For the peptides with a neutral polar or nonpolar interface residue, very good agreement between the explicit solvent and GB implicit solvent results was found. Deviations in the main separation free energy contributions are smaller than 1 kcal/mol. In contrast, for peptides with a charged interface residue, significant deviations of 2-4 kcal/mol were observed. The results indicate that recent GB models can compete with explicit solvent representations in total binding free energy calculations as long as no charged residues are present at the binding interface. PMID:24941018

  19. Approximating relational observables by absolute quantities: a quantum accuracy-size trade-off

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyadera, Takayuki; Loveridge, Leon; Busch, Paul

    2016-05-01

    The notion that any physical quantity is defined and measured relative to a reference frame is traditionally not explicitly reflected in the theoretical description of physical experiments where, instead, the relevant observables are typically represented as ‘absolute’ quantities. However, the emergence of the resource theory of quantum reference frames as a new branch of quantum information science in recent years has highlighted the need to identify the physical conditions under which a quantum system can serve as a good reference. Here we investigate the conditions under which, in quantum theory, an account in terms of absolute quantities can provide a good approximation of relative quantities. We find that this requires the reference system to be large in a suitable sense.

  20. Managing satellite pointing accuracy - A systems engineering approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marley, R.; Dungate, D. G.

    1992-02-01

    The accuracies with which the attitude of a satellite (notably the payload) must be controlled and measured influence the engineering of the Guidance, Navigation and Control (GNC) subsystem, payload and structure. They also drive requirements for ground-based calibration and attitude reconstruction software. By optimizing the allocation of margins to the various subsystems during the initial development phase, there is scope for improving the satellite design and reducing the cost, complexity, and development risk. This process, supported by dedicated software tools, can subsequently be iterated to update the design as the project matures. The performance at subsystem and system level, during later development phases, may be predicted in terms of component errors and compared with requirements. The scope of this paper is to describe how the system-level methods adopted in the ESA Handbook must be generalized to deal with diverse subsystems. Statistical methods for evaluating pointing and measurement performance are further developed, and the application of a software tool for design and validation is described.

  1. Correction to Method of Establishing the Absolute Radiometric Accuracy of Remote Sensing Systems While On-orbit Using Characterized Stellar Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowen, Howard S.; Cunningham, Douglas M.

    2007-01-01

    The contents include: 1) Brief history of related events; 2) Overview of original method used to establish absolute radiometric accuracy of remote sensing instruments using stellar sources; and 3) Considerations to improve the stellar calibration approach.

  2. Absolute accuracy of the Cyberware WB4 whole-body scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daanen, Hein A. M.; Taylor, Stacie E.; Brunsman, Matthew A.; Nurre, Joseph H.

    1997-03-01

    The Cyberware WB4 whole body scanner is one of the first scanning systems in the world that generates a high resolution data set of the outer surface of the human body. The Computerized Anthropometric Research and Design (CARD) Laboratory of Wright-Patterson AFB intends to use the scanner to enable quick and reliable acquisition of anthropometric data. For this purpose, a validation study was initiated to check the accuracy, reliability and errors of the system. A calibration object, consisting of two boxes and a cylinder, was scanned in several locations in the scanning space. The object dimensions in the resulting scans compared favorably to the actual dimensions of the calibration object.

  3. Using star tracks to determine the absolute pointing of the Fluorescence Detector telescopes of the Pierre Auger Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    De Donato, Cinzia; Sanchez, Federico; Santander, Marcos; Natl.Tech.U., San Rafael; Camin, Daniel; Garcia, Beatriz; Grassi, Valerio; /Milan U. /INFN, Milan

    2005-05-01

    To accurately reconstruct a shower axis from the Fluorescence Detector data it is essential to establish with high precision the absolute pointing of the telescopes. To d that they calculate the absolute pointing of a telescope using sky background data acquired during regular data taking periods. The method is based on the knowledge of bright star's coordinates that provide a reliable and stable coordinate system. it can be used to check the absolute telescope's pointing and its long-term stability during the whole life of the project, estimated in 20 years. They have analyzed background data taken from January to October 2004 to determine the absolute pointing of the 12 telescopes installed both in Los Leones and Coihueco. The method is based on the determination of the mean-time of the variance signal left by a star traversing a PMT's photocathode which is compared with the mean-time obtained by simulating the track of that star on the same pixel.

  4. Evaluating point cloud accuracy of static three-dimensional laser scanning based on point cloud error ellipsoid model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xijiang; Hua, Xianghong; Zhang, Guang; Wu, Hao; Xuan, Wei; Li, Moxiao

    2015-01-01

    Evaluation of static three-dimensional (3-D) laser scanning point cloud accuracy has become a topical research issue. Point cloud accuracy is typically estimated by comparing terrestrial laser scanning data related to a finite number of check point coordinates against those obtained by an independent source of higher accuracy. These methods can only estimate the point accuracy but not the point cloud accuracy, which is influenced by the positional error and sampling interval. It is proposed that the point cloud error ellipsoid is favorable for inspecting the point cloud accuracy, which is determined by the individual point error ellipsoid volume. The kernel of this method is the computation of the point cloud error ellipsoid volume and the determination of the functional relationship between the error ellipsoid and accuracy. The proposed point cloud accuracy evaluation method is particularly suited for small sampling intervals when there exists an intersection of two error ellipsoids, and is suited not only for planar but also for nonplanar target surfaces. The performance of the proposed method (PM) is verified using both planar and nonplanar board point clouds. The results demonstrate that the proposed evaluation method significantly outperforms the existing methods when the target surface is nonplanar or there exists an intersection of two error ellipsoids. The PM therefore has the potential for improving the reliability of point cloud digital elevation models and static 3-D laser scanning-based deformation monitoring.

  5. SU-E-T-189: First Experimental Verification of the Accuracy of Absolute Dose Reconstruction From PET-CT Imaging of Yttrium 90 Microspheres

    SciTech Connect

    Veltchev, I; Fourkal, E; Doss, M; Ma, C; Meyer, J; Yu, M; Horwitz, E

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: In the past few years there have been numerous proposals for 3D dose reconstruction from the PET-CT imaging of patients undergoing radioembolization treatment of the liver with yttrium-90 microspheres. One of the most promising techniques uses convolution of the measured PET activity distribution with a pre-calculated Monte Carlo dose deposition kernel. The goal of the present study is to experimentally verify the accuracy of this method and to analyze the significance of various error sources. Methods: Optically stimulated luminescence detectors (OSLD) were used (NanoDot, Landauer) in this experiment. Two detectors were mounted on the central axis of a cylinder filled with water solution of yttrium-90 chloride. The total initial activity was 90mCi. The cylinder was inserted in a larger water phantom and scanned on a Siemens Biograph 16 Truepoint PET-CT scanner. Scans were performed daily over a period of 20 days to build a calibration curve for the measured absolute activity spanning 7 yttrium-90 half-lives. The OSLDs were mounted in the phantom for a predetermined period of time in order to record 2Gy dose. The measured dose was then compared to the dose reconstructed from the activity density at the location of each dosimeter. Results: Thorough error analysis of the dose reconstruction algorithm takes into account the uncertainties in the absolute PET activity, branching ratios, and nonlinearity of the calibration curve. The measured dose for 105-minute exposure on day 10 of the experiment was 219(11)cGy, while the reconstructed dose at the location of the detector was 215(47)cGy. Conclusion: We present the first experimental verification of the accuracy of the convolution algorithm for absolute dose reconstruction of yttrium-90 microspheres. The excellent agreement between the measured and calculated point doses will encourage the broad clinical adoption of the convolution-based dose reconstruction algorithm, making future quantitative dose

  6. Absolute energy calibration for relativistic electron beams with pointing instability from a laser-plasma accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Cha, H. J.; Choi, I. W.; Kim, H. T.; Kim, I J.; Nam, K. H.; Jeong, T. M.; Lee, J.

    2012-06-15

    The pointing instability of energetic electron beams generated from a laser-driven accelerator can cause a serious error in measuring the electron spectrum with a magnetic spectrometer. In order to determine a correct electron spectrum, the pointing angle of an electron beam incident on the spectrometer should be exactly defined. Here, we present a method for absolutely calibrating the electron spectrum by monitoring the pointing angle using a scintillating screen installed in front of a permanent dipole magnet. The ambiguous electron energy due to the pointing instability is corrected by the numerical and analytical calculations based on the relativistic equation of electron motion. It is also possible to estimate the energy spread of the electron beam and determine the energy resolution of the spectrometer using the beam divergence angle that is simultaneously measured on the screen. The calibration method with direct measurement of the spatial profile of an incident electron beam has a simple experimental layout and presents the full range of spatial and spectral information of the electron beams with energies of multi-hundred MeV level, despite the limited energy resolution of the simple electron spectrometer.

  7. 75 FR 2549 - Clinical Accuracy Requirements for Point of Care Blood Glucose Meters; Public Meeting; Request...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-15

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Clinical Accuracy Requirements for Point of Care Blood... public meeting entitled: Clinical Accuracy Requirements for Point of Care Blood Glucose Meters. The purpose of the public meeting is to discuss the clinical accuracy requirements of blood glucose meters...

  8. High accuracy fine-pointing system - Breadboard performances and results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fazilleau, Y.; Moreau, B.; Betermier, J. M.; Boutemy, J. C.

    A fine pointing system designed according to the requirements of the Semiconductor Laser Intersatellite Link Experiment 1989 (SILEX 1989) is described, with particular attention given to the synthesis of the final breadboarding. The study includes all the pointing functions where the pointing, acquisition, and tracking (PAT) functions are associated with different FOVs. The laboratory model consists of a complete pointing system with two CCD sensors for detection, two general-scanning single-axis actuators, and the overall control electronics. Each major PAT function of the laboratory model was separately tested, giving all the major impacts for the future PAT applications concerning mechanical margins, optical aberrations, sensor linearity, and servoloop communications.

  9. On Essential Fixed Points of Compact Mappings on Arbitrary Absolute Neighborhood Retracts and Their Application to Multivalued Fractals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andres, Jan; Górniewicz, Lech

    The existence of essential fixed points is proved for compact self-maps of arbitrary absolute neighborhood retracts, provided the generalized Lefschetz number is nontrivial and the topological dimension of a fixed point set is equal to zero. Furthermore, continuous self-maps of some special compact absolute neighborhood retracts, whose Lefschetz number is nontrivial, are shown to possess pseudo-essential fixed points even without the zero dimensionality assumption. Both results are applied to the existence of essential and pseudo-essential multivalued fractals. An illustrative example of this application is supplied.

  10. Evaluation of the dimensional accuracy in single point incremental forming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araújo, R.; Silva, M. B.; Montanari, L.; Teixeira, P.; Reis, A.; Martins, P. A. F.

    2013-12-01

    Incremental Sheet Forming (ISF) is a forming process widely used to obtain small batches or prototypes. By improving forming strategies, the process can be used in a wide range of applications. However, this technology still presents some drawbacks. The dimensional accuracy between the 3D CAD model and the final product is one of the key challenges for this technique. The springback phenomenon during the incremental forming process is an important reason for the lack of accuracy. In order to study the mechanism of this phenomenon, the geometry of the sheet metal was measured in two different stages of the conventional production chain. First, the geometry of the sheet metal part was acquired after the forming stage, without be released from the blank holder. Then, the final geometry was achieved after the cutting process from the original sheet. A 3D scanning system was used to measure and inspect the springback phenomenon of each step. A reverse method is proposed to design the new tool path for compensation of the springback.

  11. Relationship among Environmental Pointing Accuracy, Mental Rotation, Sex, and Hormones

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Scott; Saucier, Deborah

    2004-01-01

    Humans rely on internal representations to solve a variety of spatial problems including navigation. Navigation employs specific information to compose a representation of space that is distinct from that obtained through static bird's-eye or horizontal perspectives. The ability to point to on-route locations, off-route locations, and the route…

  12. The use of low density high accuracy (LDHA) data for correction of high density low accuracy (HDLA) point cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rak, Michal Bartosz; Wozniak, Adam; Mayer, J. R. R.

    2016-06-01

    Coordinate measuring techniques rely on computer processing of coordinate values of points gathered from physical surfaces using contact or non-contact methods. Contact measurements are characterized by low density and high accuracy. On the other hand optical methods gather high density data of the whole object in a short time but with accuracy at least one order of magnitude lower than for contact measurements. Thus the drawback of contact methods is low density of data, while for non-contact methods it is low accuracy. In this paper a method for fusion of data from two measurements of fundamentally different nature: high density low accuracy (HDLA) and low density high accuracy (LDHA) is presented to overcome the limitations of both measuring methods. In the proposed method the concept of virtual markers is used to find a representation of pairs of corresponding characteristic points in both sets of data. In each pair the coordinates of the point from contact measurements is treated as a reference for the corresponding point from non-contact measurement. Transformation enabling displacement of characteristic points from optical measurement to their match from contact measurements is determined and applied to the whole point cloud. The efficiency of the proposed algorithm was evaluated by comparison with data from a coordinate measuring machine (CMM). Three surfaces were used for this evaluation: plane, turbine blade and engine cover. For the planar surface the achieved improvement was of around 200 μm. Similar results were obtained for the turbine blade but for the engine cover the improvement was smaller. For both freeform surfaces the improvement was higher for raw data than for data after creation of mesh of triangles.

  13. Estimation of measurement accuracy of track point coordinates in nuclear photoemulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamanov, V. V.

    1995-03-01

    A simple method for an estimation of the measurement accuracy of track point coordinates in nuclear photoemulsion is described. The method is based on analysis of residual deviations of measured track points from a straight line approximating the track. Reliability of the algorithm is illustrated by Monte Carlo simulation. Examples of using the method for an estimation of the accuracy of track point coordinates measured with the microscope KSM-1 (VEB Carl Zeiss Jena) are given.

  14. An approach to evaluate the absolute accuracy of WVR water vapor measurements inferred from multiple water vapor techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhizhao; Li, Min; Zhong, Weikun; Wong, Man Sing

    2013-12-01

    This paper uses three different types of water vapor observation instruments, radiosonde, AERONET sunphotometer and GPS, to infer the regression coefficients of one WVR (model: WVR-1100) in Hong Kong - a coastal city with high humidity. The regression using the three types of reference water vapor data is performed on a monthly basis for 6 months from January to June 2012. In order to evaluate the WVR regression accuracies, a water vapor-assisted (WV-assisted) GPS Precise Point Positioning (PPP) method is proposed. The inferred water vapor data are directly injected into PPP computation to correct the water vapor wet tropospheric delay in GPS signals. In principle, water vapor of better accuracy will produce GPS PPP solutions of higher accuracy. Our analysis results show that the radiosonde, AERONET and GPS data all can be used to regress WVR and produce accurate WVR water vapor if the regressed instruments have good data quality. We find that the WVR water vapor inferred from GPS water vapor regression has the most reliable regression results. The vertical component of PPP solutions is very stable, with consistent biases (bias varying by 0.38 cm) and standard deviations (bias variation by 0.59 cm) over a 6-month period in 2012. When sufficient AEROENT water vapor data are available for WVR regression, the WVR water vapor accuracy will become compatible with that inferred from GPS water vapor regression. However AERONET water vapor measurements are seriously affected by weather condition and can be obtained only in sunny and clear conditions. Compared with the bias variation of 0.38 cm using GPS water vapor to regress WVR, the WVR water vapor data regressed by radiosonde result in a bias variation of 3.95 cm in the PPP vertical component during the 6-month period. All of the regressed WVR contain a bias, which possibly results from the fact that the WVR, GPS, AERONET and radiosonde stations are all horizontally and vertically separated. Overall, the WVR water vapor

  15. Relationship between Modelling Accuracy and Inflection Point Attributes of Several Equations while Modelling Stand Diameter Distributions.

    PubMed

    Duan, Aiguo; Zhang, Jianguo; Zhang, Xiongqing; He, Caiyun

    2015-01-01

    In this study, seven popular equations, including 3-parameter Weibull, 2-parameter Weibull, Gompertz, Logistic, Mitscherlich, Korf and R distribution, were used to model stand diameter distributions for exploring the relationship between the equations' inflection point attributes and model accuracy. A database comprised of 146 diameter frequency distributions of Chinese fir (Cunninghamia lanceolata (Lamb.) Hook.) plantations was used to demonstrate model fitting and comparison. Results showed that the inflection points of the stand diameter cumulative percentage distribution ranged from 0.4 to 0.6, showing a 1/2 close rule. The equation's inflection point attribute was strongly related to its model accuracy. Equation with an inflection point showed much higher accuracy than that without an inflection point. The larger the effective inflection point interval of the fitting curve of the equation was, and the closer the inflection point was to 0.5 for the equations with fixed inflection points, the higher the equation's accuracy was. It could be found that the equation's inflection point had close relationship with skewness of diameter distribution and stand age, stand density, which provided a scientific basis for model selection of a stand diameter distribution for Chinese fir plantations and other tree species. PMID:26016995

  16. Relationship between Modelling Accuracy and Inflection Point Attributes of Several Equations while Modelling Stand Diameter Distributions

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Aiguo; Zhang, Jianguo; Zhang, Xiongqing; He, Caiyun

    2015-01-01

    In this study, seven popular equations, including 3-parameter Weibull, 2-parameter Weibull, Gompertz, Logistic, Mitscherlich, Korf and R distribution, were used to model stand diameter distributions for exploring the relationship between the equations’ inflection point attributes and model accuracy. A database comprised of 146 diameter frequency distributions of Chinese fir (Cunninghamia lanceolata (Lamb.) Hook.) plantations was used to demonstrate model fitting and comparison. Results showed that the inflection points of the stand diameter cumulative percentage distribution ranged from 0.4 to 0.6, showing a 1/2 close rule. The equation’s inflection point attribute was strongly related to its model accuracy. Equation with an inflection point showed much higher accuracy than that without an inflection point. The larger the effective inflection point interval of the fitting curve of the equation was, and the closer the inflection point was to 0.5 for the equations with fixed inflection points, the higher the equation’s accuracy was. It could be found that the equation’s inflection point had close relationship with skewness of diameter distribution and stand age, stand density, which provided a scientific basis for model selection of a stand diameter distribution for Chinese fir plantations and other tree species. PMID:26016995

  17. The relative and absolute timing accuracy of the EPIC-pn camera on XMM-Newton, from X-ray pulsations of the Crab and other pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin-Carrillo, A.; Kirsch, M. G. F.; Caballero, I.; Freyberg, M. J.; Ibarra, A.; Kendziorra, E.; Lammers, U.; Mukerjee, K.; Schönherr, G.; Stuhlinger, M.; Saxton, R. D.; Staubert, R.; Suchy, S.; Wellbrock, A.; Webb, N.; Guainazzi, M.

    2012-09-01

    Aims: Reliable timing calibration is essential for the accurate comparison of XMM-Newton light curves with those from other observatories, to ultimately use them to derive precise physical quantities. The XMM-Newton timing calibration is based on pulsar analysis. However, because pulsars show both timing noise and glitches, it is essential to monitor these calibration sources regularly. To this end, the XMM-Newton observatory performs observations twice a year of the Crab pulsar to monitor the absolute timing accuracy of the EPIC-pn camera in the fast timing and burst modes. We present the results of this monitoring campaign, comparing XMM-Newton data from the Crab pulsar (PSR B0531+21) with radio measurements. In addition, we use five pulsars (PSR J0537-69, PSR B0540-69, PSR B0833-45, PSR B1509-58, and PSR B1055-52) with periods ranging from 16 ms to 197 ms to verify the relative timing accuracy. Methods: We analysed 38 XMM-Newton observations (0.2-12.0 keV) of the Crab taken over the first ten years of the mission and 13 observations from the five complementary pulsars. All data were processed with SAS, the XMM-Newton Scientific Analysis Software, version 9.0. Epoch-folding techniques coupled with χ2 tests were used to derive relative timing accuracies. The absolute timing accuracy was determined using the Crab data and comparing the time shift between the main X-ray and radio peaks in the phase-folded light curves. Results: The relative timing accuracy of XMM-Newton is found to be better than 10-8. The strongest X-ray pulse peak precedes the corresponding radio peak by 306 ± 9 μs, which agrees with other high-energy observatories such as Chandra, INTEGRAL and RXTE. The derived absolute timing accuracy from our analysis is ± 48 μs.

  18. Geolocation and Pointing Accuracy Analysis for the WindSat Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meissner, Thomas; Wentz, Frank J.; Purdy, William E.; Gaiser, Peter W.; Poe, Gene; Uliana, Enzo A.

    2006-01-01

    Geolocation and pointing accuracy analyses of the WindSat flight data are presented. The two topics were intertwined in the flight data analysis and will be addressed together. WindSat has no unusual geolocation requirements relative to other sensors, but its beam pointing knowledge accuracy is especially critical to support accurate polarimetric radiometry. Pointing accuracy was improved and verified using geolocation analysis in conjunction with scan bias analysis. nvo methods were needed to properly identify and differentiate between data time tagging and pointing knowledge errors. Matchups comparing coastlines indicated in imagery data with their known geographic locations were used to identify geolocation errors. These coastline matchups showed possible pointing errors with ambiguities as to the true source of the errors. Scan bias analysis of U, the third Stokes parameter, and of vertical and horizontal polarizations provided measurement of pointing offsets resolving ambiguities in the coastline matchup analysis. Several geolocation and pointing bias sources were incfementally eliminated resulting in pointing knowledge and geolocation accuracy that met all design requirements.

  19. The measurement of pointing accuracy of two-dimensional scan mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Hui; An, Chao; Song, Junru; He, Xuhua

    2015-10-01

    The observation accuracy of space camera targeted on ground objects is directly affected by the pointing deviation of the two dimensional scan mirror. A plane model of the scan mirror's normal trajectory is established when scan mirror is rotating along the rolling axis while the pitching axis remains still. The pointing accuracy of scan mirror cross the track direction is measured with the plane model. A cone model of the scan mirror's normal trajectory is established when scan mirror is rotating along the pitching axis while the rolling axis remains still. The pointing accuracy of scan mirror along the track direction is measured with the plane model. The nonorthogonality of shafting of the rolling axis and the pitching axis is measured with the two models. Data processing results are feedback to pointing controller to correct the input signal of resolver, until the pointing accuracy of scan mirror meets the requirement. The experimental results indicate that the models of measuring the pointing accuracy of scan mirror are accurate and the data processing algorithm is feasible. The testing precision reached 10-3 second.

  20. An Automatic K-Point Grid Generation Scheme for Enhanced Efficiency and Accuracy in DFT Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohr, Jennifer A.-F.; Shepherd, James J.; Alavi, Ali

    2013-03-01

    We seek to create an automatic k-point grid generation scheme for density functional theory (DFT) calculations that improves the efficiency and accuracy of the calculations and is suitable for use in high-throughput computations. Current automated k-point generation schemes often result in calculations with insufficient k-points, which reduces the reliability of the results, or too many k-points, which can significantly increase computational cost. By controlling a wider range of k-point grid densities for the Brillouin zone based upon factors of conductivity and symmetry, a scalable k-point grid generation scheme can lower calculation runtimes and improve the accuracy of energy convergence. Johns Hopkins University

  1. The 'absolute existence' of phlogiston: the losing party's point of view.

    PubMed

    Boantza, Victor D; Gal, Ofer

    2011-09-01

    Long after its alleged demise, phlogiston was still presented, discussed and defended by leading chemists. Even some of the leading proponents of the new chemistry admitted its 'absolute existence'. We demonstrate that what was defended under the title 'phlogiston' was no longer a particular hypothesis about combustion and respiration. Rather, it was a set of ontological and epistemological assumptions and the empirical practices associated with them. Lavoisier's gravimetric reduction, in the eyes of the phlogistians, annihilated the autonomy of chemistry together with its peculiar concepts of chemical substance and quality, chemical process and chemical affinity. The defence of phlogiston was the defence of a distinctly chemical conception of matter and its appearances, a conception which reflected the chemist's acquaintance with details and particularities of substances, properties and processes and his skills of adducing causal relations from the interplay between their complexity and uniformity. PMID:22164642

  2. An automated method for the evaluation of the pointing accuracy of sun-tracking devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumgartner, Dietmar J.; Rieder, Harald E.; Pötzi, Werner; Freislich, Heinrich; Strutzmann, Heinz

    2016-04-01

    The accuracy of measurements of solar radiation (direct and diffuse radiation) depends significantly on the accuracy of the operational sun-tracking device. Thus rigid targets for instrument performance and operation are specified for international monitoring networks, such as e.g., the Baseline Surface Radiation Network (BSRN) operating under the auspices of the World Climate Research Program (WCRP). Sun-tracking devices fulfilling these accuracy targets are available from various instrument manufacturers, however none of the commercially available systems comprises a secondary accuracy control system, allowing platform operators to independently validate the pointing accuracy of sun-tracking sensors during operation. Here we present KSO-STREAMS (KSO-SunTRackEr Accuracy Monitoring System), a fully automated, system independent and cost-effective method for evaluating the pointing accuracy of sun-tracking devices. We detail the monitoring system setup, its design and specifications and results from its application to the sun-tracking system operated at the Austrian RADiation network (ARAD) site Kanzelhöhe Observatory (KSO). Results from KSO-STREAMS (for mid-March to mid-June 2015) show that the tracking accuracy of the device operated at KSO lies well within BSRN specifications (i.e. 0.1 degree accuracy). We contrast results during clear-sky and partly cloudy conditions documenting sun-tracking performance at manufacturer specified accuracies for active tracking (0.02 degrees) and highlight accuracies achieved during passive tracking i.e. periods with less than 300 W m‑2 direct radiation. Furthermore we detail limitations to tracking surveillance during overcast conditions and periods of partial solar limb coverage by clouds.

  3. Accuracy assessment of minimum control points for UAV photography and georeferencing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skarlatos, D.; Procopiou, E.; Stavrou, G.; Gregoriou, M.

    2013-08-01

    In recent years, Autonomous Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (AUAV) became popular among researchers across disciplines because they combine many advantages. One major application is monitoring and mapping. Their ability to fly beyond eye sight autonomously, collecting data over large areas whenever, wherever, makes them excellent platform for monitoring hazardous areas or disasters. In both cases rapid mapping is needed while human access isn't always a given. Indeed, current automatic processing of aerial photos using photogrammetry and computer vision algorithms allows for rapid orthophomap production and Digital Surface Model (DSM) generation, as tools for monitoring and damage assessment. In such cases, control point measurement using GPS is either impossible, or time consuming or costly. This work investigates accuracies that can be attained using few or none control points over areas of one square kilometer, in two test sites; a typical block and a corridor survey. On board GPS data logged during AUAV's flight are being used for direct georeferencing, while ground check points are being used for evaluation. In addition various control point layouts are being tested using bundle adjustment for accuracy evaluation. Results indicate that it is possible to use on board single frequency GPS for direct georeferencing in cases of disaster management or areas without easy access, or even over featureless areas. Due to large numbers of tie points in the bundle adjustment, horizontal accuracy can be fulfilled with a rather small number of control points, but vertical accuracy may not.

  4. An evaluation of the accuracy of geomagnetic data obtained from an unattended, automated, quasi-absolute station

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Herzog, D.C.

    1990-01-01

    A comparison is made of geomagnetic calibration data obtained from a high-sensitivity proton magnetometer enclosed within an orthogonal bias coil system, with data obtained from standard procedures at a mid-latitude U.S. Geological Survey magnetic observatory using a quartz horizontal magnetometer, a Ruska magnetometer, and a total field magnetometer. The orthogonal coil arrangement is used with the proton magnetometer to provide Deflected-Inclination-Deflected-Declination (DIDD) data from which quasi-absolute values of declination, horizontal intensity, and vertical intensity can be derived. Vector magnetometers provide the ordinate values to yield baseline calibrations for both the DIDD and standard observatory processes. Results obtained from a prototype system over a period of several months indicate that the DIDD unit can furnish adequate absolute field values for maintaining observatory calibration data, thus providing baseline control for unattended, remote stations. ?? 1990.

  5. High-accuracy interferometer with a prism pair for measurement of the absolute refractive index of glass

    SciTech Connect

    Hori, Yasuaki; Hirai, Akiko; Minoshima, Kaoru; Matsumoto, Hirokazu

    2009-04-10

    We propose a variable-path interferometric technique for the measurement of the absolute refractive index of optical glasses. We use two interferometers to decide the ratio between changes in the optical path in a prism-shaped sample glass and in air resulting from displacement of the sample. The method allows precise measurements to be made without prior knowledge of the properties of the sample. The combined standard uncertainty of the proposed method is 1.6x10{sup -6}.

  6. Absolute determination of the gelling point of gelatin under quasi-thermodynamic equilibrium.

    PubMed

    Bellini, Franco; Alberini, Ivana; Ferreyra, María G; Rintoul, Ignacio

    2015-05-01

    Thermodynamic studies on phase transformation of biopolymers in solution are useful to understand their nature and to evaluate their technological potentials. Thermodynamic studies should be conducted avoiding time-related phenomena. This condition is not easily achieved in hydrophilic biopolymers. In this contribution, the simultaneous effects of pH, salt concentration, and cooling rate (Cr) on the folding from random coil to triple helical collagen-like structures of gelatin were systematically studied. The phase transformation temperature at the absolute invariant condition of Cr = 0 °C/min (T(T)Cr=0) ) is introduced as a conceptual parameter to study phase transformations in biopolymers under quasi-thermodynamic equilibrium and avoiding interferences coming from time-related phenomena. Experimental phase diagrams obtained at different Cr are presented. The T(T)(Cr=0) compared with pH and TT(Cr=0) compared with [NaCl] diagram allowed to explore the transformation process at Cr = 0 °C/min. The results were explained by electrostatic interactions between the biopolymers and its solvation milieu. PMID:25832543

  7. Accuracy assessment of building point clouds automatically generated from iphone images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirmacek, B.; Lindenbergh, R.

    2014-06-01

    Low-cost sensor generated 3D models can be useful for quick 3D urban model updating, yet the quality of the models is questionable. In this article, we evaluate the reliability of an automatic point cloud generation method using multi-view iPhone images or an iPhone video file as an input. We register such automatically generated point cloud on a TLS point cloud of the same object to discuss accuracy, advantages and limitations of the iPhone generated point clouds. For the chosen example showcase, we have classified 1.23% of the iPhone point cloud points as outliers, and calculated the mean of the point to point distances to the TLS point cloud as 0.11 m. Since a TLS point cloud might also include measurement errors and noise, we computed local noise values for the point clouds from both sources. Mean (μ) and standard deviation (σ) of roughness histograms are calculated as (μ1 = 0.44 m., σ1 = 0.071 m.) and (μ2 = 0.025 m., σ2 = 0.037 m.) for the iPhone and TLS point clouds respectively. Our experimental results indicate possible usage of the proposed automatic 3D model generation framework for 3D urban map updating, fusion and detail enhancing, quick and real-time change detection purposes. However, further insights should be obtained first on the circumstances that are needed to guarantee a successful point cloud generation from smartphone images.

  8. Accuracy evaluation of segmentation for high resolution imagery and 3D laser point cloud data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Nina; Chen, Ninghua; Chen, Jianyu

    2014-09-01

    High resolution satellite imagery and 3D laser point cloud data provide precise geometry, rich spectral information and clear texture of feature. The segmentation of high resolution remote sensing images and 3D laser point cloud is the basis of object-oriented remote sensing image analysis, for the segmentation results will directly influence the accuracy of subsequent analysis and discrimination. Currently, there still lacks a common segmentation theory to support these algorithms. So when we face a specific problem, we should determine applicability of the segmentation method through segmentation accuracy assessment, and then determine an optimal segmentation. To today, the most common method for evaluating the effectiveness of a segmentation method is subjective evaluation and supervised evaluation. For providing a more objective evaluation result, we have carried out following work. Analysis and comparison previous proposed image segmentation accuracy evaluation methods, which are area-based metrics, location-based metrics and combinations metrics. 3D point cloud data, which was gathered by Reigl VZ1000, was used to make two-dimensional transformation of point cloud data. The object-oriented segmentation result of aquaculture farm, building and farmland polygons were used as test object and adopted to evaluate segmentation accuracy.

  9. Using Lunar Observations to Validate Pointing Accuracy and Geolocation, Detector Sensitivity Stability and Static Point Response of the CERES Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniels, Janet L.; Smith, G. Louis; Priestley, Kory J.; Thomas, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Validation of in-orbit instrument performance is a function of stability in both instrument and calibration source. This paper describes a method using lunar observations scanning near full moon by the Clouds and Earth Radiant Energy System (CERES) instruments. The Moon offers an external source whose signal variance is predictable and non-degrading. From 2006 to present, these in-orbit observations have become standardized and compiled for the Flight Models -1 and -2 aboard the Terra satellite, for Flight Models-3 and -4 aboard the Aqua satellite, and beginning 2012, for Flight Model-5 aboard Suomi-NPP. Instrument performance measurements studied are detector sensitivity stability, pointing accuracy and static detector point response function. This validation method also shows trends per CERES data channel of 0.8% per decade or less for Flight Models 1-4. Using instrument gimbal data and computed lunar position, the pointing error of each detector telescope, the accuracy and consistency of the alignment between the detectors can be determined. The maximum pointing error was 0.2 Deg. in azimuth and 0.17 Deg. in elevation which corresponds to an error in geolocation near nadir of 2.09 km. With the exception of one detector, all instruments were found to have consistent detector alignment from 2006 to present. All alignment error was within 0.1o with most detector telescopes showing a consistent alignment offset of less than 0.02 Deg.

  10. Using lunar observations to validate pointing accuracy and geolocation, detector sensitivity stability and static point response of the CERES instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniels, Janet; Smith, G. Louis; Priestley, Kory J.; Thomas, Susan

    2014-10-01

    Validation of in-orbit instrument performance is a function of stability in both instrument and calibration source. This paper describes a method using lunar observations scanning near full moon by the Clouds and Earth Radiant Energy System (CERES) instruments. The Moon offers an external source whose signal variance is predictable and non-degrading. From 2006 to present, these in-orbit observations have become standardized and compiled for the Flight Models -1 and -2 aboard the Terra satellite, for Flight Models-3 and -4 aboard the Aqua satellite, and beginning 2012, for Flight Model-5 aboard Suomi-NPP. Instrument performance measurements studied are detector sensitivity stability, pointing accuracy and static detector point response function. This validation method also shows trends per CERES data channel of 0.8% per decade or less for Flight Models 1-4. Using instrument gimbal data and computed lunar position, the pointing error of each detector telescope, the accuracy and consistency of the alignment between the detectors can be determined. The maximum pointing error was 0.2o in azimuth and 0.17o in elevation which corresponds to an error in geolocation near nadir of 2.09 km. With the exception of one detector, all instruments were found to have consistent detector alignment from 2006 to present. All alignment error was within 0.1o with most detector telescopes showing a consistent alignment offset of less than 0.02o.

  11. Accuracy and adaptation of reaching and pointing in pitched visual environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welch, R. B.; Post, R. B.

    1996-01-01

    Visually perceived eye level (VPEL) and the ability of subjects to reach with an unseen limb to targets placed at VPEL were measured in a statically pitched visual surround (pitchroom). VPEL was shifted upward and downward by upward and downward room pitch, respectively. Accuracy in reaching to VPEL represented a compromise between VPEL and actual eye level. This indicates that VPEL shifts reflect in part a change in perceived location of objects. When subjects were provided with terminal visual feedback about their reaching, accuracy improved rapidly. Subsequent reaching, with the room vertical, revealed a negative aftereffect (i.e., reaching errors that were opposite those made initially in the pitched room). In a second study, pointing accuracy was assessed for targets located both at VPEL and at other positions. Errors were similar for targets whether located at VPEL or elsewhere. Additionally, pointing responses were restricted to a narrower range than that of the actual target locations. The small size of reaching and pointing errors in both studies suggests that factors other than a change in perceived location are also involved in VPEL shifts.

  12. Absolute accuracy of water vapor measurements from six operational radiosonde types launched during AWEX-G and implications for AIRS validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miloshevich, Larry M.; VöMel, Holger; Whiteman, David N.; Lesht, Barry M.; Schmidlin, F. J.; Russo, Felicita

    2006-05-01

    A detailed assessment of radiosonde water vapor measurement accuracy throughout the tropospheric column is needed for assessing the impact of observational error on applications that use the radiosonde data as input, such as forecast modeling, radiative transfer calculations, remote sensor retrieval validation, climate trend studies, and development of climatologies and cloud and radiation parameterizations. Six operational radiosonde types were flown together in various combinations with a reference-quality hygrometer during the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) Water Vapor Experiment-Ground (AWEX-G), while simultaneous measurements were acquired from Raman lidar and microwave radiometers. This study determines the mean accuracy and variability of the radiosonde water vapor measurements relative to simultaneous measurements from the University of Colorado (CU) Cryogenic Frostpoint Hygrometer (CFH), a reference-quality standard of known absolute accuracy. The accuracy and performance characteristics of the following radiosonde types are evaluated: Vaisala RS80-H, RS90, and RS92; Sippican Mark IIa; Modem GL98; and the Meteolabor Snow White hygrometer. A validated correction for sensor time lag error is found to improve the accuracy and reduce the variability of upper tropospheric water vapor measurements from the Vaisala radiosondes. The AWEX data set is also used to derive and validate a new empirical correction that improves the mean calibration accuracy of Vaisala measurements by an amount that depends on the temperature, relative humidity, and sensor type. Fully corrected Vaisala radiosonde measurements are found to be suitably accurate for AIRS validation throughout the troposphere, whereas the other radiosonde types are suitably accurate under only a subset of tropospheric conditions. Although this study focuses on the accuracy of nighttime radiosonde measurements, comparison of Vaisala RS90 measurements to water vapor retrievals from a microwave radiometer

  13. A method for improved accuracy in three dimensions for determining wheel/rail contact points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xinwen; Gu, Shaojie; Zhou, Shunhua; Zhou, Yu; Lian, Songliang

    2015-11-01

    Searching for the contact points between wheels and rails is important because these points represent the points of exerted contact forces. In order to obtain an accurate contact point and an in-depth description of the wheel/rail contact behaviours on a curved track or in a turnout, a method with improved accuracy in three dimensions is proposed to determine the contact points and the contact patches between the wheel and the rail when considering the effect of the yaw angle and the roll angle on the motion of the wheel set. The proposed method, with no need of the curve fitting of the wheel and rail profiles, can accurately, directly, and comprehensively determine the contact interface distances between the wheel and the rail. The range iteration algorithm is used to improve the computation efficiency and reduce the calculation required. The present computation method is applied for the analysis of the contact of rails of CHINA (CHN) 75 kg/m and wheel sets of wearing type tread of China's freight cars. In addition, it can be proved that the results of the proposed method are consistent with that of Kalker's program CONTACT, and the maximum deviation from the wheel/rail contact patch area of this two methods is approximately 5%. The proposed method, can also be used to investigate static wheel/rail contact. Some wheel/rail contact points and contact patch distributions are discussed and assessed, wheel and rail non-worn and worn profiles included.

  14. Star Tracker Based ATP System Conceptual Design and Pointing Accuracy Estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orfiz, Gerardo G.; Lee, Shinhak

    2006-01-01

    A star tracker based beaconless (a.k.a. non-cooperative beacon) acquisition, tracking and pointing concept for precisely pointing an optical communication beam is presented as an innovative approach to extend the range of high bandwidth (> 100 Mbps) deep space optical communication links throughout the solar system and to remove the need for a ground based high power laser as a beacon source. The basic approach for executing the ATP functions involves the use of stars as the reference sources from which the attitude knowledge is obtained and combined with high bandwidth gyroscopes for propagating the pointing knowledge to the beam pointing mechanism. Details of the conceptual design are presented including selection of an orthogonal telescope configuration and the introduction of an optical metering scheme to reduce misalignment error. Also, estimates are presented that demonstrate that aiming of the communications beam to the Earth based receive terminal can be achieved with a total system pointing accuracy of better than 850 nanoradians (3 sigma) from anywhere in the solar system.

  15. An ultrahigh-accuracy Miniature Dew Point Sensor based on an Integrated Photonics Platform.

    PubMed

    Tao, Jifang; Luo, Yu; Wang, Li; Cai, Hong; Sun, Tao; Song, Junfeng; Liu, Hui; Gu, Yuandong

    2016-01-01

    The dew point is the temperature at which vapour begins to condense out of the gaseous phase. The deterministic relationship between the dew point and humidity is the basis for the industry-standard "chilled-mirror" dew point hygrometers used for highly accurate humidity measurements, which are essential for a broad range of industrial and metrological applications. However, these instruments have several limitations, such as high cost, large size and slow response. In this report, we demonstrate a compact, integrated photonic dew point sensor (DPS) that features high accuracy, a small footprint, and fast response. The fundamental component of this DPS is a partially exposed photonic micro-ring resonator, which serves two functions simultaneously: 1) sensing the condensed water droplets via evanescent fields and 2) functioning as a highly accurate, in situ temperature sensor based on the thermo-optic effect (TOE). This device virtually eliminates most of the temperature-related errors that affect conventional "chilled-mirror" hygrometers. Moreover, this DPS outperforms conventional "chilled-mirror" hygrometers with respect to size, cost and response time, paving the way for on-chip dew point detection and extension to applications for which the conventional technology is unsuitable because of size, cost, and other constraints. PMID:27417734

  16. Age-related differences in pointing accuracy in familiar and unfamiliar environments.

    PubMed

    Muffato, Veronica; Della Giustina, Martina; Meneghetti, Chiara; De Beni, Rossana

    2015-09-01

    This study aimed to investigate age-related differences in spatial mental representations of familiar and unfamiliar places. Nineteen young adults (aged 18-23) and 19 older adults (aged 60-74), all living in the same Italian town, completed a set of visuospatial measures and then pointed in the direction of familiar landmarks in their town and in the direction of landmarks in an unknown environment studied on a map. Results showed that older adults were less accurate in the visuospatial tasks and in pointing at landmarks in an unfamiliar environment, but performed as well as the young adults when pointing to familiar places. Pointing performance correlated with visuospatial tests accuracy in both familiar and unfamiliar environments, while only pointing in an unknown environment correlated with visuospatial working memory (VSWM). The spatial representation of well-known places seems to be well preserved in older adults (just as well as in young adults), while it declines for unfamiliar environments. Spatial abilities sustain the mental representations of both familiar and unfamiliar environments, while the support of VSWM resources is only needed for the latter. PMID:26224272

  17. An ultrahigh-accuracy Miniature Dew Point Sensor based on an Integrated Photonics Platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Jifang; Luo, Yu; Wang, Li; Cai, Hong; Sun, Tao; Song, Junfeng; Liu, Hui; Gu, Yuandong

    2016-07-01

    The dew point is the temperature at which vapour begins to condense out of the gaseous phase. The deterministic relationship between the dew point and humidity is the basis for the industry-standard “chilled-mirror” dew point hygrometers used for highly accurate humidity measurements, which are essential for a broad range of industrial and metrological applications. However, these instruments have several limitations, such as high cost, large size and slow response. In this report, we demonstrate a compact, integrated photonic dew point sensor (DPS) that features high accuracy, a small footprint, and fast response. The fundamental component of this DPS is a partially exposed photonic micro-ring resonator, which serves two functions simultaneously: 1) sensing the condensed water droplets via evanescent fields and 2) functioning as a highly accurate, in situ temperature sensor based on the thermo-optic effect (TOE). This device virtually eliminates most of the temperature-related errors that affect conventional “chilled-mirror” hygrometers. Moreover, this DPS outperforms conventional “chilled-mirror” hygrometers with respect to size, cost and response time, paving the way for on-chip dew point detection and extension to applications for which the conventional technology is unsuitable because of size, cost, and other constraints.

  18. An ultrahigh-accuracy Miniature Dew Point Sensor based on an Integrated Photonics Platform

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Jifang; Luo, Yu; Wang, Li; Cai, Hong; Sun, Tao; Song, Junfeng; Liu, Hui; Gu, Yuandong

    2016-01-01

    The dew point is the temperature at which vapour begins to condense out of the gaseous phase. The deterministic relationship between the dew point and humidity is the basis for the industry-standard “chilled-mirror” dew point hygrometers used for highly accurate humidity measurements, which are essential for a broad range of industrial and metrological applications. However, these instruments have several limitations, such as high cost, large size and slow response. In this report, we demonstrate a compact, integrated photonic dew point sensor (DPS) that features high accuracy, a small footprint, and fast response. The fundamental component of this DPS is a partially exposed photonic micro-ring resonator, which serves two functions simultaneously: 1) sensing the condensed water droplets via evanescent fields and 2) functioning as a highly accurate, in situ temperature sensor based on the thermo-optic effect (TOE). This device virtually eliminates most of the temperature-related errors that affect conventional “chilled-mirror” hygrometers. Moreover, this DPS outperforms conventional “chilled-mirror” hygrometers with respect to size, cost and response time, paving the way for on-chip dew point detection and extension to applications for which the conventional technology is unsuitable because of size, cost, and other constraints. PMID:27417734

  19. Effects of point-spread function on calibration and radiometric accuracy of CCD camera.

    PubMed

    Du, Hong; Voss, Kenneth J

    2004-01-20

    The point-spread function (PSF) of a camera can seriously affect the accuracy of radiometric calibration and measurement. We found that the PSF can produce a 3.7% difference between the apparent measured radiance of two plaques of different sizes with the same illumination. This difference can be removed by deconvolution with the measured PSF. To determine the PSF, many images of a collimated beam from a He-Ne laser are averaged. Since our optical system is focused at infinity, it should focus this source to a single pixel. Although the measured PSF is very sharp, dropping 4 and 6 orders of magnitude and 8 and 100 pixels away from the point source, respectively, we show that the effect of the PSF as far as 100 pixels away cannot be ignored without introducing an appreciable error to the calibration. We believe that the PSF should be taken into account in all optical systems to obtain accurate radiometric measurements. PMID:14765928

  20. Accuracy improvement techniques in Precise Point Positioning method using multiple GNSS constellations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasileios Psychas, Dimitrios; Delikaraoglou, Demitris

    2016-04-01

    The future Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS), including modernized GPS, GLONASS, Galileo and BeiDou, offer three or more signal carriers for civilian use and much more redundant observables. The additional frequencies can significantly improve the capabilities of the traditional geodetic techniques based on GPS signals at two frequencies, especially with regard to the availability, accuracy, interoperability and integrity of high-precision GNSS applications. Furthermore, highly redundant measurements can allow for robust simultaneous estimation of static or mobile user states including more parameters such as real-time tropospheric biases and more reliable ambiguity resolution estimates. This paper presents an investigation and analysis of accuracy improvement techniques in the Precise Point Positioning (PPP) method using signals from the fully operational (GPS and GLONASS), as well as the emerging (Galileo and BeiDou) GNSS systems. The main aim was to determine the improvement in both the positioning accuracy achieved and the time convergence it takes to achieve geodetic-level (10 cm or less) accuracy. To this end, freely available observation data from the recent Multi-GNSS Experiment (MGEX) of the International GNSS Service, as well as the open source program RTKLIB were used. Following a brief background of the PPP technique and the scope of MGEX, the paper outlines the various observational scenarios that were used in order to test various data processing aspects of PPP solutions with multi-frequency, multi-constellation GNSS systems. Results from the processing of multi-GNSS observation data from selected permanent MGEX stations are presented and useful conclusions and recommendations for further research are drawn. As shown, data fusion from GPS, GLONASS, Galileo and BeiDou systems is becoming increasingly significant nowadays resulting in a position accuracy increase (mostly in the less favorable East direction) and a large reduction of convergence

  1. Absolute Zero

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnelly, Russell J.; Sheibley, D.; Belloni, M.; Stamper-Kurn, D.; Vinen, W. F.

    2006-12-01

    Absolute Zero is a two hour PBS special attempting to bring to the general public some of the advances made in 400 years of thermodynamics. It is based on the book “Absolute Zero and the Conquest of Cold” by Tom Shachtman. Absolute Zero will call long-overdue attention to the remarkable strides that have been made in low-temperature physics, a field that has produced 27 Nobel Prizes. It will explore the ongoing interplay between science and technology through historical examples including refrigerators, ice machines, frozen foods, liquid oxygen and nitrogen as well as much colder fluids such as liquid hydrogen and liquid helium. A website has been established to promote the series: www.absolutezerocampaign.org. It contains information on the series, aimed primarily at students at the middle school level. There is a wealth of material here and we hope interested teachers will draw their student’s attention to this website and its substantial contents, which have been carefully vetted for accuracy.

  2. Estimated results analysis and application of the precise point positioning based high-accuracy ionosphere delay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shi-tai; Peng, Jun-huan

    2015-12-01

    The characterization of ionosphere delay estimated with precise point positioning is analyzed in this paper. The estimation, interpolation and application of the ionosphere delay are studied based on the processing of 24-h data from 5 observation stations. The results show that the estimated ionosphere delay is affected by the hardware delay bias from receiver so that there is a difference between the estimated and interpolated results. The results also show that the RMSs (root mean squares) are bigger, while the STDs (standard deviations) are better than 0.11 m. When the satellite difference is used, the hardware delay bias can be canceled. The interpolated satellite-differenced ionosphere delay is better than 0.11 m. Although there is a difference between the between the estimated and interpolated ionosphere delay results it cannot affect its application in single-frequency positioning and the positioning accuracy can reach cm level.

  3. Accuracy assessment of Kinect for Xbox One in point-based tracking applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goral, Adrian; Skalski, Andrzej

    2015-12-01

    We present the accuracy assessment of a point-based tracking system built on Kinect v2. In our approach, color, IR and depth data were used to determine the positions of spherical markers. To accomplish this task, we calibrated the depth/infrared and color cameras using a custom method. As a reference tool we used Polaris Spectra optical tracking system. The mean error obtained within the range from 0.9 to 2.9 m was 61.6 mm. Although the depth component of the error turned out to be the largest, the random error of depth estimation was only 1.24 mm on average. Our Kinect-based system also allowed for reliable angular measurements within the range of ±20° from the sensor's optical axis.

  4. Estimating the point accuracy of population registers using capture-recapture methods in Scotland.

    PubMed Central

    Garton, M J; Abdalla, M I; Reid, D M; Russell, I T

    1996-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVE: To estimate the point accuracy of adult registration on the community health index (CHI) by comparing it with the electoral register (ER) and the community charge register (CCR). DESIGN: Survey of overlapping samples from three registers to ascertain whether respondents were living at the addresses given on the registers, analysed by capture-recapture methods. SETTING: Aberdeen North and South parliamentary constituencies. PARTICIPANTS: Random samples of adult registrants aged at least 18 years from the CHI (n = 1000), ER (n = 998), and CCR (n = 956). MAIN RESULTS: Estimated sensitivities (the proportions of the target population registered at the address where they live) were: CHI--84.6% (95% confidence limits 82.4%, 86.7%); ER--90.0% (87.5%, 92.5%), and CCR--87.7% (85.3%, 90.3%). Positive predictive values (the proportions of registrants who were living at their stated addresses) were: CHI--84.6% (82.2%, 87.0%); ER--94.0% (90.9%, 97.1%), and CCR--93.7% (91.7%, 95.7%). CONCLUSIONS: The CHI assessed in this study was significantly less sensitive and predictive than the corresponding ER and CCR. Capture-recapture methods are effective in assessing the accuracy of population registers. PMID:8762363

  5. Instability analysis of pointing accuracy and power imbalance of spherical hohlraum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Hao; Wu, Changshu; Pei, Wenbing; Zou, Shiyang

    2016-05-01

    An analytic model to describe the statistic behavior of flux asymmetry on the capsule shell under the influence of random fluctuation of laser spots' position and laser energy is developed. Based on our previous work [Duan et al., Phys. Plasmas 22, 092704 (2015)] and a diagram technique, the expectation, variance, and probability density function of flux asymmetry raised by laser pointing accuracy and laser power imbalance of 4, 6, and 8 laser entrance holes (LEHs) spherical hohlraums are shown. For spherical hohlraums with different numbers of LEHs, it is found that the random part of flux asymmetry is proportional to the ratio between laser energy and square root of total spots' number ELaser/√{Nt } , and angle-of-incidence θ0, which indicates that a choice of small θ0 and a great number of Nt can reduce the random flux asymmetry. In order to achieve a cumulative probability in which each l-order flux asymmetry can meet corresponding requirements [Gu et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 012704 (2014)] beyond 90% in the condition of a 1000 μm capsule and 4000 μm hohlraum, the power imbalance, i.e., the ratio between standard derivation and expectation of laser spots power ΔF/Fspot for 4, 6, and 8 LEHs spherical hohlraums must not exceed 8.1%, 9.1%, and 8.5%, corresponding pointing accuracy rHΔθ must not exceed 79 μm , 102 μm , and 96 μm along the ê θ direction, and rH sin 2 θ0Δϕ must not exceed 77 μm , 99 μm , and 94 μm along the ê ϕ direction, respectively.

  6. The Investigation of Accuracy of 3 Dimensional Models Generated From Point Clouds with Terrestrial Laser Scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gumus, Kutalmis; Erkaya, Halil

    2013-04-01

    In Terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) applications, it is necessary to take into consideration the conditions that affect the scanning process, especially the general characteristics of the laser scanner, geometric properties of the scanned object (shape, size, etc.), and its spatial location in the environment. Three dimensional models obtained with TLS, allow determining the geometric features and relevant magnitudes of the scanned object in an indirect way. In order to compare the spatial location and geometric accuracy of the 3-dimensional model created by Terrestrial laser scanning, it is necessary to use measurement tools that give more precise results than TLS. Geometric comparisons are performed by analyzing the differences between the distances, the angles between surfaces and the measured values taken from cross-sections between the data from the 3-dimensional model created with TLS and the values measured by other measurement devices The performance of the scanners, the size and shape of the scanned objects are tested using reference objects the sizes of which are determined with high precision. In this study, the important points to consider when choosing reference objects were highlighted. The steps up to processing the point clouds collected by scanning, regularizing these points and modeling in 3 dimensions was presented visually. In order to test the geometric correctness of the models obtained by Terrestrial laser scanners, sample objects with simple geometric shapes such as cubes, rectangular prisms and cylinders that are made of concrete were used as reference models. Three dimensional models were generated by scanning these reference models with Trimble Mensi GS 100. The dimension of the 3D model that is created from point clouds was compared with the precisely measured dimensions of the reference objects. For this purpose, horizontal and vertical cross-sections were taken from the reference objects and generated 3D models and the proximity of

  7. Easy Absolute Values? Absolutely

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Sharon E.; Mittag, Kathleen Cage

    2015-01-01

    The authors teach a problem-solving course for preservice middle-grades education majors that includes concepts dealing with absolute-value computations, equations, and inequalities. Many of these students like mathematics and plan to teach it, so they are adept at symbolic manipulations. Getting them to think differently about a concept that they…

  8. On the accuracy of acid-base determinations from potentiometric titrations using only a few points from the titration curve.

    PubMed

    Olin, A; Wallén, B

    1977-05-01

    There are several procedures which use only a few points on the titration curve for the calculation of equivalence volumes in acid-base titrations. The accuracy of such determinations will depend on the positions of the points on the titration curve. The effects of errors in the stability constants and in the pH measurements on the accuracy of the analysis have been considered, and the results are used to establish the conditions under which these errors are minimized. PMID:18962087

  9. Accuracy of two osmometers on standard samples: electrical impedance technique and freezing point depression technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Resúa, Carlos; Pena-Verdeal, Hugo; Miñones, Mercedes; Gilino, Jorge; Giraldez, Maria J.; Yebra-Pimentel, Eva

    2013-11-01

    High tear fluid osmolarity is a feature common to all types of dry eye. This study was designed to establish the accuracy of two osmometers, a freezing point depression osmometer (Fiske 110) and an electrical impedance osmometer (TearLab™) by using standard samples. To assess the accuracy of the measurements provided by the two instruments we used 5 solutions of known osmolarity/osmolality; 50, 290 and 850 mOsm/kg and 292 and 338 mOsm/L. Fiske 110 is designed to be used in samples of 20 μl, so measurements were made on 1:9, 1:4, 1:1 and 1:0 dilutions of the standards. Tear Lab is addressed to be used in tear film and only a sample of 0.05 μl is required, so no dilutions were employed. Due to the smaller measurement range of the TearLab, the 50 and 850 mOsm/kg standards were not included. 20 measurements per standard sample were used and differences with the reference value was analysed by one sample t-test. Fiske 110 showed that osmolarity measurements differed statistically from standard values except those recorded for 290 mOsm/kg standard diluted 1:1 (p = 0.309), the 292 mOsm/L H2O sample (1:1) and 338 mOsm/L H2O standard (1:4). The more diluted the sample, the higher the error rate. For the TearLab measurements, one-sample t-test indicated that all determinations differed from the theoretical values (p = 0.001), though differences were always small. For undiluted solutions, Fiske 110 shows similar performance than TearLab. However, for the diluted standards, Fiske 110 worsens.

  10. ABSOLUTE POLARIMETRY AT RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    OKADA; BRAVAR, A.; BUNCE, G.; GILL, R.; HUANG, H.; MAKDISI, Y.; NASS, A.; WOOD, J.; ZELENSKI, Z.; ET AL.

    2007-09-10

    Precise and absolute beam polarization measurements are critical for the RHIC spin physics program. Because all experimental spin-dependent results are normalized by beam polarization, the normalization uncertainty contributes directly to final physics uncertainties. We aimed to perform the beam polarization measurement to an accuracy Of {Delta}P{sub beam}/P{sub beam} < 5%. The absolute polarimeter consists of Polarized Atomic Hydrogen Gas Jet Target and left-right pairs of silicon strip detectors and was installed in the RHIC-ring in 2004. This system features proton-proton elastic scattering in the Coulomb nuclear interference (CNI) region. Precise measurements of the analyzing power A{sub N} of this process has allowed us to achieve {Delta}P{sub beam}/P{sub beam} = 4.2% in 2005 for the first long spin-physics run. In this report, we describe the entire set up and performance of the system. The procedure of beam polarization measurement and analysis results from 2004-2005 are described. Physics topics of AN in the CNI region (four-momentum transfer squared 0.001 < -t < 0.032 (GeV/c){sup 2}) are also discussed. We point out the current issues and expected optimum accuracy in 2006 and the future.

  11. The Quantitative Relationship Between ISO 15197 Accuracy Criteria and Mean Absolute Relative Difference (MARD) in the Evaluation of Analytical Performance of Self-Monitoring of Blood Glucose (SMBG) Systems.

    PubMed

    Pardo, Scott; Simmons, David A

    2016-09-01

    The relationship between International Organization for Standardization (ISO) accuracy criteria and mean absolute relative difference (MARD), 2 methods for assessing the accuracy of blood glucose meters, is complex. While lower MARD values are generally better than higher MARD values, it is not possible to define a particular MARD value that ensures a blood glucose meter will satisfy the ISO accuracy criteria. The MARD value that ensures passing the ISO accuracy test can be described only as a probabilistic range. In this work, a Bayesian model is presented to represent the relationship between ISO accuracy criteria and MARD. Under the assumptions made in this work, there is nearly a 100% chance of satisfying ISO 15197:2013 accuracy requirements if the MARD value is between 3.25% and 5.25%. PMID:27118729

  12. Evaluation of Precise Point Positioning accuracy under large total electron content variations in equatorial latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Bilbao, I.; Moreno Monge, B.; Rodríguez-Caderot, G.; Herraiz, M.; Radicella, S. M.

    2015-01-01

    The ionosphere is one of the largest contributors to errors in GNSS positioning. Although in Precise Point Positioning (PPP) the ionospheric delay is corrected to a first order through the 'iono-free combination', significant errors may still be observed when large electron density gradients are present. To confirm this phenomenon, the temporal behavior of intense fluctuations of total electron content (TEC) and PPP altitude accuracy at equatorial latitudes are analyzed during four years of different solar activity. For this purpose, equatorial plasma irregularities are identified with periods of high rate of change of TEC (ROT). The largest ROT values are observed from 19:00 to 01:00 LT, especially around magnetic equinoxes, although some differences exist between the stations depending on their location. Highest ROT values are observed in the American and African regions. In general, large ROT events are accompanied by frequent satellite signal losses and an increase in the PPP altitude error during years 2001, 2004 and 2011. A significant increase in the PPP altitude error RMS is observed in epochs of high ROT with respect to epochs of low ROT in years 2001, 2004 and 2011, reaching up to 0.26 m in the 19:00-01:00 LT period.

  13. FIBER OPTIC POINT QUADRAT SYSTEM FOR IMPROVED ACCURACY IN VEGETATION SAMPLING

    EPA Science Inventory

    An automated, fiber optic point quadrat system for vegetation sampling is described. Because the effective point diameter of the system never exceeds 25um it minimizes the substantial errors which can arise with conventional point quadrats. Automatic contact detection eliminates ...

  14. Effects of LiDAR point density, sampling size and height threshold on estimation accuracy of crop biophysical parameters.

    PubMed

    Luo, Shezhou; Chen, Jing M; Wang, Cheng; Xi, Xiaohuan; Zeng, Hongcheng; Peng, Dailiang; Li, Dong

    2016-05-30

    Vegetation leaf area index (LAI), height, and aboveground biomass are key biophysical parameters. Corn is an important and globally distributed crop, and reliable estimations of these parameters are essential for corn yield forecasting, health monitoring and ecosystem modeling. Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) is considered an effective technology for estimating vegetation biophysical parameters. However, the estimation accuracies of these parameters are affected by multiple factors. In this study, we first estimated corn LAI, height and biomass (R2 = 0.80, 0.874 and 0.838, respectively) using the original LiDAR data (7.32 points/m2), and the results showed that LiDAR data could accurately estimate these biophysical parameters. Second, comprehensive research was conducted on the effects of LiDAR point density, sampling size and height threshold on the estimation accuracy of LAI, height and biomass. Our findings indicated that LiDAR point density had an important effect on the estimation accuracy for vegetation biophysical parameters, however, high point density did not always produce highly accurate estimates, and reduced point density could deliver reasonable estimation results. Furthermore, the results showed that sampling size and height threshold were additional key factors that affect the estimation accuracy of biophysical parameters. Therefore, the optimal sampling size and the height threshold should be determined to improve the estimation accuracy of biophysical parameters. Our results also implied that a higher LiDAR point density, larger sampling size and height threshold were required to obtain accurate corn LAI estimation when compared with height and biomass estimations. In general, our results provide valuable guidance for LiDAR data acquisition and estimation of vegetation biophysical parameters using LiDAR data. PMID:27410085

  15. Improved measurement accuracy in a Long Trace Profiler: Compensation for laser pointing instability

    SciTech Connect

    Irick, S.C.

    1993-08-02

    Laser pointing instability adds to the error of slope measurements taken with the Long Trace Profiler (LTP). As with carriage pitch error, this laser pointing error must be accounted for and subtracted from the surface under test (SUT) slope measurement. In the past, a separate reference beam (REF) allowed characterization of the component of slope error from carriage pitch. However, the component of slope error from laser pointing manifests itself differently in the SUT measured slope. An analysis of angle error propagation is given, and the effect of these errors on measured slope is determined. Then a method is proposed for identifying these errors and subtracting them from the measured SUT slope function. Separate measurements of carriage pitch and laser pointing instability isolate these effects, so that the effectiveness of the error identification algorithm may be demonstrated.

  16. Prism-pair interferometry by homodyne interferometers with a common light source for high-accuracy measurement of the absolute refractive index of glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Hori, Yasuaki; Hirai, Akiko; Minoshima, Kaoru

    2011-03-10

    A prism-pair interferometer comprising two homodyne interferometers with a common light source was developed for high-precision measurements of the refractive index of optical glasses with an uncertainty of the order of 10{sup -6}. The two interferometers measure changes in the optical path length in the glass sample and in air, respectively. Uncertainties in the absolute wavelength of the common light source are cancelled out by calculating a ratio between the results from the interferometers. Uncertainties in phase measurement are suppressed by a quadrature detection system. The combined standard uncertainty of the developed system is evaluated as 1.1x10{sup -6}.

  17. Improvement of the Accuracy of InSAR Image Co-Registration Based On Tie Points – A Review

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Weibao; Li, Yan; Li, Zhilin; Ding, Xiaoli

    2009-01-01

    Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) is a new measurement technology, making use of the phase information contained in the Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images. InSAR has been recognized as a potential tool for the generation of digital elevation models (DEMs) and the measurement of ground surface deformations. However, many critical factors affect the quality of InSAR data and limit its applications. One of the factors is InSAR data processing, which consists of image co-registration, interferogram generation, phase unwrapping and geocoding. The co-registration of InSAR images is the first step and dramatically influences the accuracy of InSAR products. In this paper, the principle and processing procedures of InSAR techniques are reviewed. One of important factors, tie points, to be considered in the improvement of the accuracy of InSAR image co-registration are emphatically reviewed, such as interval of tie points, extraction of feature points, window size for tie point matching and the measurement for the quality of an interferogram. PMID:22399966

  18. Evaluation of the FACSPresto, a New Point of Care Device for the Enumeration of CD4% and Absolute CD4+ T Cell Counts in HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Makadzange, Azure Tariro; Bogezi, Carola; Boyd, Kathryn; Gumbo, Anesu; Mukura, Dorinda; Matubu, Allen; Ndhlovu, Chiratidzo Ellen

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Enumeration of CD4+ T lymphocytes is important for pre-ART disease staging and screening for opportunistic infections, however access to CD4 testing in resource limited settings is poor. Point of care (POC) technologies can facilitate improved access to CD4 testing. We evaluated the analytical performance of a novel POC device the FACSPresto compared to the FACSCalibur as a reference standard and to the PIMA, a POC device in widespread use in sub-Saharan Africa. Method Specimens were obtained from 253 HIV infected adults. Venous blood samples were analyzed on the FACSPresto and the FACSCalibur, in a subset of 41 samples additional analysis was done on the PIMA. Results The absolute CD4 count results obtained on the FACSPresto were comparable to those on the FACSCalibur with low absolute (9.5cells/μl) and relative bias (3.2%). Bias in CD4% values was also low (1.06%) with a relative bias of 4.9%. The sensitivity was lower at a CD4 count threshold of ≤350cells/μl compared with ≤500cells/μl (84.9% vs. 92.8%) resulting in a high upward misclassification rate at low CD4 counts. Specificity at thresholds of ≤350cells/μl and ≤500cells/μl were 96.6% and 96.8% respectively. The PIMA had a high absolute (-68.6cells/μl) and relative bias (-10.5%) when compared with the FACSCalibur. At thresholds of ≤350cells/μl and ≤500cells/μl the sensitivity was 100% and 95.5% respectively; specificity was 85.7% and 84.2% respectively. The coefficients of repeatability were 4.13%, 5.29% and 9.8% respectively. Discussion The analytic performance of the FACSPresto against the reference standard was very good with better agreement and precision than the PIMA. The FACSPresto had comparable sensitivity at a threshold of 500 cells/μl and better specificity than the PIMA. However the FACSPresto showed reduced sensitivity at low CD4 count thresholds. Conclusion The FACSPresto can be reliably used as a POC device for enumerating absolute CD4 count and CD4% values

  19. An ultrahigh-accuracy body pointing system for the Large Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rybak, S. C.; Mayo, R. A.; Lieberman, S. I.; Hartter, L. L.

    1974-01-01

    The Large Space Telescope (LST) program is aimed at placing a three-meter diffraction-limited telescope in a 270-nm orbit to perform astronomical observations that are not possible with earth-based telescopes. A complex simulation model is described which was developed to determine whether the stringent pointing stability requirements could be met. The model (programmed on a hybrid computer) included detailed dynamic representation of control moment gyros (CMGs) and reaction wheels (RWs), including their noise characteristics; dynamic sensor representation (including noise); shockmounts for the CMG actuators; detailed representation of an image motion compensation system; and a detailed flexible body vehicle model. Stability and performance studies based on the simulation model showed that the body pointing system will meet LST requirements in the presence of CMG vibrational disturbances and sensor noise. The recommended system consists of three orthogonally mounted RWs for primary short-term control, and a cluster of CMG actuators for continuous RW desaturation and vehicle maneuvering.

  20. Ultrahigh-accuracy body-pointing system for the Large Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rybak, S. C.; Mayo, R. A.; Lieberman, S. I.; Hartter, L. L.

    1976-01-01

    The Large Space Telescope (LST) is a 3-m diffraction-limited telescope. Pointing stability requirements necessary to assure diffraction-limited images are plus or minus 0.005 arc-sec, over possible experiment observation times of several hours. In order to determine whether these stringent pointing requirements could be met, a complex simulation model was defined which consisted of detailed dynamic representations of control moment gyros (CMGs) and reaction wheels (RWs), including their noise characteristics, dynamic sensor representations with sensor noise, shock mounts for the CMG actuators, a detailed representation of an image motion compensation (IMC) system, and a detailed flexible body structural model with all significant vehicle and solar panel bending modes. On the basis of both stability and performance studies utilizing this model, it was determined that a body-pointing system will meet LST requirements in the presence of CMG vibrational disturbances and sensor noise. The recommended system consists of three orthogonally mounted RWs for primary short-term control, and a cluster of CMG actuators for continuous RW desaturation and vehicle maneuvering.

  1. Accuracy Assessment of the Precise Point Positioning for Different Troposphere Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oguz Selbesoglu, Mahmut; Gurturk, Mert; Soycan, Metin

    2016-04-01

    This study investigates the accuracy and repeatability of PPP technique at different latitudes by using different troposphere delay models. Nine IGS stations were selected between 00-800 latitudes at northern hemisphere and southern hemisphere. Coordinates were obtained for 7 days at 1 hour intervals in summer and winter. At first, the coordinates were estimated by using Niell troposphere delay model with and without including north and east gradients in order to investigate the contribution of troposphere delay gradients to the positioning . Secondly, Saastamoinen model was used to eliminate troposphere path delays by using standart atmosphere parameters were extrapolated for all station levels. Finally, coordinates were estimated by using RTCA-MOPS empirical troposphere delay model. Results demonstrate that Niell troposphere delay model with horizontal gradients has better mean values of rms errors 0.09 % and 65 % than the Niell troposphere model without horizontal gradients and RTCA-MOPS model, respectively. Saastamoinen model mean values of rms errors were obtained approximately 4 times bigger than the Niell troposphere delay model with horizontal gradients.

  2. Effect of terminal accuracy requirements on temporal gaze-hand coordination during fast discrete and reciprocal pointings

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Rapid discrete goal-directed movements are characterized by a well known coordination pattern between the gaze and the hand displacements. The gaze always starts prior to the hand movement and reaches the target before hand velocity peak. Surprisingly, the effect of the target size on the temporal gaze-hand coordination has not been directly investigated. Moreover, goal-directed movements are often produced in a reciprocal rather than in a discrete manner. The objectives of this work were to assess the effect of the target size on temporal gaze-hand coordination during fast 1) discrete and 2) reciprocal pointings. Methods Subjects performed fast discrete (experiment 1) and reciprocal (experiment 2) pointings with an amplitude of 50 cm and four target diameters (7.6, 3.8, 1.9 and 0.95 cm) leading to indexes of difficulty (ID = log2[2A/D]) of 3.7, 4.7, 5.7 and 6.7 bits. Gaze and hand displacements were synchronously recorded. Temporal gaze-hand coordination parameters were compared between experiments (discrete and reciprocal pointings) and IDs using analyses of variance (ANOVAs). Results Data showed that the magnitude of the gaze-hand lead pattern was much higher for discrete than for reciprocal pointings. Moreover, while it was constant for discrete pointings, it decreased systematically with an increasing ID for reciprocal pointings because of the longer duration of gaze anchoring on target. Conclusion Overall, the temporal gaze-hand coordination analysis revealed that even for high IDs, fast reciprocal pointings could not be considered as a concatenation of discrete units. Moreover, our data clearly illustrate the smooth adaptation of temporal gaze-hand coordination to terminal accuracy requirements during fast reciprocal pointings. It will be interesting for further researches to investigate if the methodology used in the experiment 2 allows assessing the effect of sensori-motor deficits on gaze-hand coordination. PMID:21320315

  3. A 3-D numerical study of pinhole diffraction to predict the accuracy of EUV point diffraction interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, K.A. |; Tejnil, E.; Bokor, J. |

    1995-12-01

    A 3-D electromagnetic field simulation is used to model the propagation of extreme ultraviolet (EUV), 13-nm, light through sub-1500 {Angstrom} dia pinholes in a highly absorptive medium. Deviations of the diffracted wavefront phase from an ideal sphere are studied within 0.1 numerical aperture, to predict the accuracy of EUV point diffraction interferometersused in at-wavelength testing of nearly diffraction-limited EUV optical systems. Aberration magnitudes are studied for various 3-D pinhole models, including cylindrical and conical pinhole bores.

  4. Accuracy level of pointing movements performed during slow passive whole-body rotations.

    PubMed

    Bourdin, C; Nougier, V; Bringoux, L; Gauthier, G M; Barraud, P A; Raphel, C

    2001-05-01

    Seated observers requested to detect low-velocity passive rotations show a high motion-detection threshold. However, when standing on a slowly rotating platform, their equilibrium is preserved, suggesting that cognitive sensing and sensorimotor reactions do not share the same central processes. The present experiments investigated the ability of observers seated on a slowly rotating chair in total darkness to indicate with their hand the position of briefly flashed targets (Experiment 1) and to indicate the subjective horizon with an outstretched arm (Experiment 2) or with a target driven by a joystick (Experiment 3). The overall hypothesis stated that egocentric coding of the position of a target should not be affected by sensing or not-sensing body rotation (Experiment 1), while geocentric positioning may (Experiments 2 and 3). Our data partially supported the hypothesis. Subjects pointed accurately to the memorized targets (Experiment 1), whereas misperception of body orientation was a source of inaccuracy for actions referred to a geocentric frame (Experiments 2 and 3). More interestingly, subjects' perceptions changed as a single, smooth, and monotonic function of tilt, independent of whether the perception of body orientation was present or not. PMID:11374084

  5. Influence of GPS/GLONASS differential code biases on the determination accuracy of the absolute total electron content in the ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasyukevich, Yu. V.; Mylnikova, A. A.; Kunitsyn, V. E.; Padokhin, A. M.

    2015-11-01

    Systematic error arises when the total electron content (TEC) is estimated with the simultaneous use of phase and code GPS/GLONASS measurements. This is related to the different signal propagation times at L1 and L2 frequencies in the radio frequency path of the transmitting and receiving equipment, the so-called differential code biases. A differential code bias of 1 ns results in an error of ~2.9 TECU when TEC is determined. Differential code bias variations on a long time interval, which were obtained at the CODE laboratory, were analyzed. It has been found that the systematic variation in these biases and considerable seasonal variations apparently caused by the environmental state (temperature and humidity), which sometimes reach 20 TECU (in TEC units), are observed for several stations. The algorithm for determining differential code biases at an individual station and the results of correction for absolute slant TEC are also presented. Presented results show algorithm effectiveness for various geographical regions and solar activity.

  6. Evaluation of Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) Scanner Pointing Accuracy using a Coastline Detection System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Currey, Chris; Smith, Lou; Neely, Bob

    1998-01-01

    Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) is a National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) investigation to examine the role of clouds in the radiative energy flow through the Earth-atmosphere system. The first CERES scanning radiometer was launched on November 27, 1997 into a 35 inclination, 350 km altitude orbit, on the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) spacecraft. The CERES instrument consists of a three channel scanning broadband radiometer. The spectral bands measure shortwave (0.3 - 5 microns), window (8 - 12 microns), and total (0.3 - 100 microns) radiation reflected or emitted from the Earth-atmosphere system. Each Earth viewing measurement is geolocated to the Earth fixed coordinate system using satellite ephemeris, Earth rotation and geoid, and instrument pointing data. The interactive CERES coastline detection system is used to assess the accuracy of the CERES geolocation process. By analyzing radiative flux gradients at the boundaries of ocean and land masses, the accuracy of the scanner measurement locations may be derived for the CERES/TRMM instrument/satellite system. The resulting CERES measurement location errors are within 10% of the nadir footprint size. Precise pointing knowledge of the Visible and Infrared Scanner (VIRS) is required for convolution of cloud properties onto the CERES footprint; initial VIRS coastline results are included.

  7. Acute response in vivo of a fiber-optic sensor for continuous glucose monitoring from canine studies on point accuracy.

    PubMed

    Liao, Kuo-Chih; Chang, Shih-Chieh; Chiu, Cheng-Yang; Chou, Yu-Hsiang

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the acute response of Sencil(™), a fiber-optic sensor, in point accuracy for glucose monitoring in vivo on healthy dogs under anesthesia. A total of four dogs with clinically normal glycemia were implanted with one sensor each in the chest region to measure the interstitial glucose concentration during the ovariohysterectomy procedure. The data was acquired every 10 seconds after initiation, and was compared to the concentration of venous plasma glucose sampled during the surgery procedures for accuracy of agreement analysis. In the four trials with a range of 71-297 mg/dL plasma glucose, the collected 21 pairs of ISF readings from the Sencil™ and the plasma reference showed superior dispersion of residue values than the conventional system, and a linear correlation (the Pearson correlation coefficient is 0.9288 and the y-intercept is 14.22 mg/dL). The MAD (17.6 mg/dL) and RMAD (16.16%) of Sencil™ measurements were in the comparable range of the conventional system. The Clarke error grid analysis indicated that 100% of the paired points were in the clinically acceptable zone A (61.9%) and B (38.1%). PMID:22163627

  8. Evaluation of the Effect of Fluctuation of Absolute Value for Diagnostic Accuracy of Fatigue Crack Monitoring Via Statistical Diagnostic Method Using Correlation between Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwasaki, Atsushi; Morimoto, Akihiro; Yatomi, Masataka; Kimura, Tadashi

    This research is about improvement of the diagnostic accuracy of the fatigue crack monitoring via the statistical diagnostic method. Our research group proposes an unsupervised damage diagnostic method named SI-F method which diagnoses the damage from detecting the change of correlation between sensors caused by the initiation or propagation of the damage via the statistical evaluation. By the method, correlation between sensors is identified by using the response surface and the change of them is statistically investigated with the F-test. To identify the crack length by the method, identification about the relation between the crack length and the F0 statistic is required. Then in this research, to evaluate effect of the regression error, the noise magnitude and the fluctuation of the external force to the relation, numerical simulation was conducted. For the simulation, two sets of data, one with constant load and one with variable load, are generated and compared. And the applicability of the result of the simulation is experimentally investigated. Finally, the results indicate that the F0 affected by the regression error and the noise magnitude but not affected by the external force.

  9. The coarse pointing assembly for SILEX program or how to achieve outstanding pointing accuracy with simple hardware associated with consistent control laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buvat, Daniel; Muller, Gerard; Peyrot, Patrick

    1991-06-01

    Attention is given to the coarse pointing assembly (CPA) for the SILEX program, designed on the basis of 10 years of MATRA experience in very accurate drive mechanisms successfully conducted by the SPOT 1 and 2 flights as well as EURECA IOC. The basic key design feature of the mechanism is a 1200-step stepper motor driven in microstepping with harmonic defects compensation. This allows very low torque noise associated with a high accuracy (0.01 deg). The direct drive principle avoids backlash and permits a linear control of the output shaft of each drive. The only parts susceptible to possible wear are the ball bearings, which have a design margin of greater than 1000 for 10 yr of service life. In order to meet the dynamic performances required by SILEX, a closed loop active damping system is added to each drive unit. Two accelerometers used in a differential way sense the hinge microvibrations and an active damping loop reduces their Q factor down to a few dB. All CPA electrical parts (including motor, optical encoder, and accelerometer) are redundant to avoid single point of failure.

  10. Using Mean Absolute Relative Phase, Deviation Phase and Point-Estimation Relative Phase to Measure Postural Coordination in a Serial Reaching Task

    PubMed Central

    Galgon, Anne K.; Shewokis, Patricia A.

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of this communication are to present the methods used to calculate mean absolute relative phase (MARP), deviation phase (DP) and point estimate relative phase (PRP) and compare their utility in measuring postural coordination during the performance of a serial reaching task. MARP and DP are derived from continuous relative phase time series representing the relationship between two body segments or joints during movements. MARP is a single measure used to quantify the coordination pattern and DP measures the stability of the coordination pattern. PRP also quantifies coordination patterns by measuring the relationship between the timing of maximal or minimal angular displacements of two segments within cycles of movement. Seven young adults practiced a bilateral serial reaching task 300 times over 3 days. Relative phase measures were used to evaluate inter-joint relationships for shoulder-hip (proximal) and hip-ankle (distal) postural coordination at early and late learning. MARP, PRP and DP distinguished between proximal and distal postural coordination. There was no effect of practice on any of the relative phase measures for the group, but individual differences were seen over practice. Combined, MARP and DP estimated stability of in-phase and anti-phase postural coordination patterns, however additional qualitative movement analyses may be needed to interpret findings in a serial task. We discuss the strengths and limitations of using MARP and DP and compare MARP and DP to PRP measures in assessing coordination patterns in the context of various types of skillful tasks. Key points MARP, DP and PRP measures coordination between segments or joint angles Advantages and disadvantages of each measure should be considered in relationship to the performance task MARP and DP may capture coordination patterns and stability of the patterns during discrete tasks or phases of movements within a task PRP and SD or PRP may capture coordination patterns and

  11. Points Clouds Generation Using Tls and Dense-Matching Techniques. a Test on Approachable Accuracies of Different Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiabrando, F.; Spanò, A.

    2013-07-01

    3D detailed models derived from digital survey techniques has increasingly developed and focused in many field of application, ranging from the land and urban areas survey, using remote sensed data, to landscape assets and finally to Cultural Heritage items. The high detailed content and accuracy of such models makes them so attractive and usable for large sets of purposes. The present paper is focused on a test aimed to point clouds generation fulfilled by archaeological data; active and passive sensors techniques and related image matching systems have been used in order to evaluate and compare the accuracy of results, achievable using proper TLS and low cost image-matching software and techniques. After a short review of approachable methods some attained results will be discussed; the test area consists of a set of mosaic floorings in a late roman domus located in Aquileia (UD-Italy) requesting a very high level of details and high scale and precision. The experimental section provides the descriptions of the applied tests in order to compare the different software and the employed methods.

  12. Control over structure-specific flexibility improves anatomical accuracy for point-based deformable registration in bladder cancer radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Wognum, S.; Chai, X.; Hulshof, M. C. C. M.; Bel, A.; Bondar, L.; Zolnay, A. G.; Hoogeman, M. S.

    2013-02-15

    Purpose: Future developments in image guided adaptive radiotherapy (IGART) for bladder cancer require accurate deformable image registration techniques for the precise assessment of tumor and bladder motion and deformation that occur as a result of large bladder volume changes during the course of radiotherapy treatment. The aim was to employ an extended version of a point-based deformable registration algorithm that allows control over tissue-specific flexibility in combination with the authors' unique patient dataset, in order to overcome two major challenges of bladder cancer registration, i.e., the difficulty in accounting for the difference in flexibility between the bladder wall and tumor and the lack of visible anatomical landmarks for validation. Methods: The registration algorithm used in the current study is an extension of the symmetric-thin plate splines-robust point matching (S-TPS-RPM) algorithm, a symmetric feature-based registration method. The S-TPS-RPM algorithm has been previously extended to allow control over the degree of flexibility of different structures via a weight parameter. The extended weighted S-TPS-RPM algorithm was tested and validated on CT data (planning- and four to five repeat-CTs) of five urinary bladder cancer patients who received lipiodol injections before radiotherapy. The performance of the weighted S-TPS-RPM method, applied to bladder and tumor structures simultaneously, was compared with a previous version of the S-TPS-RPM algorithm applied to bladder wall structure alone and with a simultaneous nonweighted S-TPS-RPM registration of the bladder and tumor structures. Performance was assessed in terms of anatomical and geometric accuracy. The anatomical accuracy was calculated as the residual distance error (RDE) of the lipiodol markers and the geometric accuracy was determined by the surface distance, surface coverage, and inverse consistency errors. Optimal parameter values for the flexibility and bladder weight

  13. Diagnostic Accuracy of Point-of-Care Tests for Hepatitis C Virus Infection: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Khuroo, Mehnaaz Sultan; Khuroo, Naira Sultan; Khuroo, Mohammad Sultan

    2015-01-01

    Background Point-of-care tests provide a plausible diagnostic strategy for hepatitis C infection in economically impoverished areas. However, their utility depends upon the overall performance of individual tests. Methods A literature search was conducted using the metasearch engine Mettā, a query interface for retrieving articles from five leading medical databases. Studies were included if they employed point-of-care tests to detect antibodies of hepatitis C virus and compared the results with reference tests. Two reviewers performed a quality assessment of the studies and extracted data for estimating test accuracy. Findings Thirty studies that had evaluated 30 tests fulfilled the inclusion criteria. The overall pooled sensitivity, specificity, positive likelihood-ratio, negative likelihood-ratio and diagnostic odds ratio for all tests were 97.4% (95% CI: 95.9–98.4), 99.5% (99.2–99.7), 80.17 (55.35–116.14), 0.03 (0.02–0.04), and 3032.85 (1595.86–5763.78), respectively. This suggested a high pooled accuracy for all studies. We found substantial heterogeneity between studies, but none of the subgroups investigated could account for the heterogeneity. Genotype diversity of HCV had no or minimal influence on test performance. Of the seven tests evaluated in the meta-regression model, OraQuick had the highest test sensitivity and specificity and showed better performance than a third generation enzyme immunoassay in seroconversion panels. The next highest test sensitivities and specificities were from TriDot and SDBioline, followed by Genedia and Chembio. The Spot and Multiplo tests produced poor test sensitivities but high test specificities. Nine of the remaining 23 tests produced poor test sensitivities and specificities and/or showed poor performances in seroconversion panels, while 14 tests had high test performances with diagnostic odds ratios ranging from 590.70 to 28822.20. Conclusions Performances varied widely among individual point-of-care tests

  14. Alaska national hydrography dataset positional accuracy assessment study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arundel, Samantha; Yamamoto, Kristina H.; Constance, Eric; Mantey, Kim; Vinyard-Houx, Jeremy

    2013-01-01

    Initial visual assessments Wide range in the quality of fit between features in NHD and these new image sources. No statistical analysis has been performed to actually quantify accuracy Determining absolute accuracy is cost prohibitive (must collect independent, well defined test points) Quantitative analysis of relative positional error is feasible.

  15. Geolocation Accuracy Evaluations of OrbView-3, EROS-A, and SPOT-5 Imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bresnahan, Paul

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation evaluates absolute geolocation accuracy of OrbView-3, EROS-A, and SPOT-5 by comparing test imagery-derived ground coordinates to Ground Control Points using SOCET set photogrammetric software.

  16. Absolute Summ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Alfred, Jr.

    Summ means the entirety of the multiverse. It seems clear, from the inflation theories of A. Guth and others, that the creation of many universes is plausible. We argue that Absolute cosmological ideas, not unlike those of I. Newton, may be consistent with dynamic multiverse creations. As suggested in W. Heisenberg's uncertainty principle, and with the Anthropic Principle defended by S. Hawking, et al., human consciousness, buttressed by findings of neuroscience, may have to be considered in our models. Predictability, as A. Einstein realized with Invariants and General Relativity, may be required for new ideas to be part of physics. We present here a two postulate model geared to an Absolute Summ. The seedbed of this work is part of Akhnaton's philosophy (see S. Freud, Moses and Monotheism). Most important, however, is that the structure of human consciousness, manifest in Kenya's Rift Valley 200,000 years ago as Homo sapiens, who were the culmination of the six million year co-creation process of Hominins and Nature in Africa, allows us to do the physics that we do. .

  17. Operator Influence on Blinded Diagnostic Accuracy of Point-of-Care Antigen Testing for Group A Streptococcal Pharyngitis.

    PubMed

    Penney, Carla; Porter, Robert; O'Brien, Mary; Daley, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Background. Acute pharyngitis caused by Group A Streptococcus (GAS) is a common presentation to pediatric emergency departments (ED). Diagnosis with conventional throat culture requires 18-24 hours, which prevents point-of-care treatment decisions. Rapid antigen detection tests (RADT) are faster, but previous reports demonstrate significant operator influence on performance. Objective. To measure operator influence on the diagnostic accuracy of a RADT when performed by pediatric ED nurses and clinical microbiology laboratory technologists, using conventional culture as the reference standard. Methods. Children presenting to a pediatric ED with suspected acute pharyngitis were recruited. Three pharyngeal swabs were collected at once. One swab was used to perform the RADT in the ED, and two were sent to the clinical microbiology laboratory for RADT and conventional culture testing. Results. The RADT when performed by technologists compared to nurses had a 5.1% increased sensitivity (81.4% versus 76.3%) (p = 0.791) (95% CI for difference between technologists and nurses = -11% to +21%) but similar specificity (97.7% versus 96.6%). Conclusion. The performance of the RADT was similar between technologists and ED nurses, although adequate power was not achieved. RADT may be employed in the ED without clinically significant loss of sensitivity. PMID:27579047

  18. Operator Influence on Blinded Diagnostic Accuracy of Point-of-Care Antigen Testing for Group A Streptococcal Pharyngitis

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, Mary

    2016-01-01

    Background. Acute pharyngitis caused by Group A Streptococcus (GAS) is a common presentation to pediatric emergency departments (ED). Diagnosis with conventional throat culture requires 18–24 hours, which prevents point-of-care treatment decisions. Rapid antigen detection tests (RADT) are faster, but previous reports demonstrate significant operator influence on performance. Objective. To measure operator influence on the diagnostic accuracy of a RADT when performed by pediatric ED nurses and clinical microbiology laboratory technologists, using conventional culture as the reference standard. Methods. Children presenting to a pediatric ED with suspected acute pharyngitis were recruited. Three pharyngeal swabs were collected at once. One swab was used to perform the RADT in the ED, and two were sent to the clinical microbiology laboratory for RADT and conventional culture testing. Results. The RADT when performed by technologists compared to nurses had a 5.1% increased sensitivity (81.4% versus 76.3%) (p = 0.791) (95% CI for difference between technologists and nurses = −11% to +21%) but similar specificity (97.7% versus 96.6%). Conclusion. The performance of the RADT was similar between technologists and ED nurses, although adequate power was not achieved. RADT may be employed in the ED without clinically significant loss of sensitivity. PMID:27579047

  19. Effects of Orbit and Pointing Geometry of a Spaceborne Formation for Monostatic-Bistatic Radargrammetry on Terrain Elevation Measurement Accuracy

    PubMed Central

    Renga, Alfredo; Moccia, Antonio

    2009-01-01

    During the last decade a methodology for the reconstruction of surface relief by Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) measurements – SAR interferometry – has become a standard. Different techniques developed before, such as stereo-radargrammetry, have been experienced from space only in very limiting geometries and time series, and, hence, branded as less accurate. However, novel formation flying configurations achievable by modern spacecraft allow fulfillment of SAR missions able to produce pairs of monostatic-bistatic images gathered simultaneously, with programmed looking angles. Hence it is possible to achieve large antenna separations, adequate for exploiting to the utmost the stereoscopic effect, and to make negligible time decorrelation, a strong liming factor for repeat-pass stereo-radargrammetric techniques. This paper reports on design of a monostatic-bistatic mission, in terms of orbit and pointing geometry, and taking into account present generation SAR and technology for accurate relative navigation. Performances of different methods for monostatic-bistatic stereo-radargrammetry are then evaluated, showing the possibility to determine the local surface relief with a metric accuracy over a wide range of Earth latitudes. PMID:22389594

  20. Improved localization accuracy in double-helix point spread function super-resolution fluorescence microscopy using selective-plane illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jie; Cao, Bo; Li, Heng; Yu, Bin; Chen, Danni; Niu, Hanben

    2014-09-01

    Recently, three-dimensional (3D) super resolution imaging of cellular structures in thick samples has been enabled with the wide-field super-resolution fluorescence microscopy based on double helix point spread function (DH-PSF). However, when the sample is Epi-illuminated, much background fluorescence from those excited molecules out-of-focus will reduce the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the image in-focus. In this paper, we resort to a selective-plane illumination strategy, which has been used for tissue-level imaging and single molecule tracking, to eliminate out-of-focus background and to improve SNR and the localization accuracy of the standard DH-PSF super-resolution imaging in thick samples. We present a novel super-resolution microscopy that combine selective-plane illumination and DH-PSF. The setup utilizes a well-defined laser light sheet which theoretical thickness is 1.7μm (FWHM) at 640nm excitation wavelength. The image SNR of DH-PSF microscopy between selective-plane illumination and Epi-illumination are compared. As we expect, the SNR of the DH-PSF microscopy based selective-plane illumination is increased remarkably. So, 3D localization precision of DH-PSF would be improved significantly. We demonstrate its capabilities by studying 3D localizing of single fluorescent particles. These features will provide high thick samples compatibility for future biomedical applications.

  1. Absolute Antenna Calibration at the US National Geodetic Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mader, G. L.; Bilich, A. L.

    2012-12-01

    Geodetic GNSS applications routinely demand millimeter precision and extremely high levels of accuracy. To achieve these accuracies, measurement and instrument biases at the centimeter to millimeter level must be understood. One of these biases is the antenna phase center, the apparent point of signal reception for a GNSS antenna. It has been well established that phase center patterns differ between antenna models and manufacturers; additional research suggests that the addition of a radome or the choice of antenna mount can significantly alter those a priori phase center patterns. For the more demanding GNSS positioning applications and especially in cases of mixed-antenna networks, it is all the more important to know antenna phase center variations as a function of both elevation and azimuth in the antenna reference frame and incorporate these models into analysis software. Determination of antenna phase center behavior is known as "antenna calibration". Since 1994, NGS has computed relative antenna calibrations for more than 350 antennas. In recent years, the geodetic community has moved to absolute calibrations - the IGS adopted absolute antenna phase center calibrations in 2006 for use in their orbit and clock products, and NGS's CORS group began using absolute antenna calibration upon the release of the new CORS coordinates in IGS08 epoch 2005.00 and NAD 83(2011,MA11,PA11) epoch 2010.00. Although NGS relative calibrations can be and have been converted to absolute, it is considered best practice to independently measure phase center characteristics in an absolute sense. Consequently, NGS has developed and operates an absolute calibration system. These absolute antenna calibrations accommodate the demand for greater accuracy and for 2-dimensional (elevation and azimuth) parameterization. NGS will continue to provide calibration values via the NGS web site www.ngs.noaa.gov/ANTCAL, and will publish calibrations in the ANTEX format as well as the legacy ANTINFO

  2. Wavelength Calibration Accuracy for the STIS CCD and MAMA Modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascucci, Ilaria; Hodge, Phil; Proffitt, Charles R.; Ayres, T.

    2011-03-01

    Two calibration programs were carried out to determine the accuracy of the wavelength solutions for the most used STIS CCD and MAMA modes after Servicing Mission 4. We report here on the analysis of this dataset and show that the STIS wavelength solution has not changed after SM4. We also show that a typical accuracy for the absolute wavelength zero-points is 0.1 pixels while the relative wavelength accuracy is 0.2 pixels.

  3. Influence of atmospheric correction and number of sampling points on the accuracy of water clarity assessment using remote sensing application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sriwongsitanon, Nutchanart; Surakit, Kritsanat; Thianpopirug, Sansarith

    2011-05-01

    SummaryThe main objectives of the research described in this paper are to assess the influence of atmospheric correction and the number of sampling points on the accuracy of lake water clarity using remote sensing. For this purpose field experiments were carried out at Bung Boraphet - the largest fresh water lake in Central Thailand. Two clarity parameters, secchi disk transparency (SDT), at 80 locations for three events on April 15th 2008 and March 24th and 31st 2009, and suspended sediment concentration (SSC) for the last two events were collected. These field data were collected nearly contemporaneous or contemporaneous to three Landsat 5 TM images, which were acquired on April 13th 2008 and March 24th and 31st 2009, respectively. Digital numbers of the Thematic Mapper (TM) image bands were transformed to at-sensor radiance by a radiometric correction process and then atmospheric correction was made using the Second Simulation of Satellite Signal in the Solar Spectrum (6S) code to acquire the surface reflectance. Linear regression equations between the log-transformed of clarity parameters and surface reflectance of each band and their band ratios at the same pixels were then determined. The band combinations TM1/TM3 and TM1 to estimate ln(SDT), and TM3/TM1 and TM1 to determine ln(SSC) for all satellite images were selected. These equations were later used to estimate the SDT and SSC values distributed across the whole lake. The results showed that lake wide average values of SDT for the three images are approximately 37, 97 and 81 cm, respectively, while the values of SSC for the second and third images are around 11 and 13 mg/l, respectively. The application of atmospheric correction to the TM data has proved to have the effect on the average values of SDT and SSC, and especially on their maximum and minimum values. Finally, it is possible to reduce the ground observation data of SDT and SSC substantially and still obtain reliable empirical relationships for

  4. The use of multiple versus single assessment time points to improve screening accuracy in identifying children at risk for later serious antisocial behavior.

    PubMed

    Petras, Hanno; Buckley, Jacquelyn A; Leoutsakos, Jeannie-Marie S; Stuart, Elizabeth A; Ialongo, Nicholas S

    2013-10-01

    Guided by Kraemer et al.'s (Psychological Methods, 3:257-271, 1999) framework for measuring the potency of risk factors, we sought to improve on the classification accuracy reported in Petras et al. (Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry 43:88-96, 2004a) and Petras et al. (Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry 44:790-797, 2005) by using multiple as opposed to single point in time assessments of early aggressive and disruptive behavior in the classification of youth who would likely benefit from targeted preventive interventions. Different from Petras et al. (2004a, 2005), the outcome used in this study included serious antisocial behavior in young adulthood as well as in adolescence. Among males, the use of multiple time points did not yield greater classification accuracy than the highest single time points, that is, third and fifth grades. For females, although fifth grade represented the best single time point in terms of classification accuracy, no significant association was found between earlier time points and the later outcome, rendering a test of the multiple time points hypothesis moot. The findings presented in this study have strong implications for the design of targeted intervention for violence prevention, indicating that the screening quality based on aggression ratings during the elementary years is rather modest, particularly for females. PMID:23408279

  5. Extreme-ultraviolet phase-shifting point-diffraction interferometer: a wave-front metrology tool with subangstrom reference-wave accuracy.

    PubMed

    Naulleau, P P; Goldberg, K A; Lee, S H; Chang, C; Attwood, D; Bokor, J

    1999-12-11

    The phase-shifting point-diffraction interferometer (PS/PDI) was recently developed and implemented at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory to characterize extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) projection optical systems for lithography. Here we quantitatively characterize the accuracy and precision of the PS/PDI. Experimental measurements are compared with theoretical results. Two major classes of errors affect the accuracy of the interferometer: systematic effects arising from measurement geometry and systematic and random errors due to an imperfect reference wave. To characterize these effects, and hence to calibrate the interferometer, a null test is used. This null test also serves as a measure of the accuracy of the interferometer. We show the EUV PS/PDI, as currently implemented, to have a systematic error-limited reference-wave accuracy of 0.0028 waves (lambda/357 or 0.038 nm at lambda = 13.5 nm) within a numerical aperture of 0.082. PMID:18324274

  6. Absolute transition probabilities of phosphorus.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, M. H.; Roig, R. A.; Bengtson, R. D.

    1971-01-01

    Use of a gas-driven shock tube to measure the absolute strengths of 21 P I lines and 126 P II lines (from 3300 to 6900 A). Accuracy for prominent, isolated neutral and ionic lines is estimated to be 28 to 40% and 18 to 30%, respectively. The data and the corresponding theoretical predictions are examined for conformity with the sum rules.-

  7. Millimeter-accuracy GPS landslide monitoring using Precise Point Positioning with Single Receiver Phase Ambiguity (PPP-SRPA) resolution: a case study in Puerto Rico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, G. Q.

    2013-03-01

    Continuous Global Positioning System (GPS) monitoring is essential for establishing the rate and pattern of superficial movements of landslides. This study demonstrates a technique which uses a stand-alone GPS station to conduct millimeter-accuracy landslide monitoring. The Precise Point Positioning with Single Receiver Phase Ambiguity (PPP-SRPA) resolution employed by the GIPSY/OASIS software package (V6.1.2) was applied in this study. Two-years of continuous GPS data collected at a creeping landslide were used to evaluate the accuracy of the PPP-SRPA solutions. The criterion for accuracy was the root-mean-square (RMS) of residuals of the PPP-SRPA solutions with respect to "true" landslide displacements over the two-year period. RMS is often regarded as repeatability or precision in GPS literature. However, when contrasted with a known "true" position or displacement it could be termed RMS accuracy or simply accuracy. This study indicated that the PPP-SRPA resolution can provide an accuracy of 2 to 3 mm horizontally and 8 mm vertically for 24-hour sessions with few outliers (< 1%) in the Puerto Rico region. Horizontal accuracy below 5 mm can be stably achieved with 4-hour or longer sessions if avoiding the collection of data during extreme weather conditions. Vertical accuracy below 10 mm can be achieved with 8-hour or longer sessions. This study indicates that the PPP-SRPA resolution is competitive with the conventional carrier-phase double-difference network resolution for static (longer than 4 hours) landslide monitoring while maintaining many advantages. It is evident that the PPP-SRPA method would become an attractive alternative to the conventional carrier-phase double-difference method for landslide monitoring, notably in remote areas or developing countries.

  8. Global accuracy estimates of point and mean undulation differences obtained from gravity disturbances, gravity anomalies and potential coefficients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jekeli, C.

    1979-01-01

    Through the method of truncation functions, the oceanic geoid undulation is divided into two constituents: an inner zone contribution expressed as an integral of surface gravity disturbances over a spherical cap; and an outer zone contribution derived from a finite set of potential harmonic coefficients. Global, average error estimates are formulated for undulation differences, thereby providing accuracies for a relative geoid. The error analysis focuses on the outer zone contribution for which the potential coefficient errors are modeled. The method of computing undulations based on gravity disturbance data for the inner zone is compared to the similar, conventional method which presupposes gravity anomaly data within this zone.

  9. Video-speed detection of the absolute position of a light point on a large-area photodetector based on luminescent waveguides.

    PubMed

    Koeppe, Robert; Neulinger, Anton; Bartu, Petr; Bauer, S

    2010-02-01

    A large-area photosensor is presented that uses the coupling of light into the planar waveguide mode of a polycarbonate foil by luminescent dyes to extend the active area of silicon photodiodes attached to the surface of the foil in a regular pattern. The photodiode signal is directly related to the distance between the point where light is coupled into the foil and the photodiode, thus enabling a precise recovery of the position of a localized light signal hitting the foil. We present a large-area device that can trace the movement of a light point generated by a laser pointer hitting its surface. PMID:20174049

  10. Absolute optical metrology : nanometers to kilometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dubovitsky, Serge; Lay, O. P.; Peters, R. D.; Liebe, C. C.

    2005-01-01

    We provide and overview of the developments in the field of high-accuracy absolute optical metrology with emphasis on space-based applications. Specific work on the Modulation Sideband Technology for Absolute Ranging (MSTAR) sensor is described along with novel applications of the sensor.

  11. High accuracy attitude reference stabilization and pointing using the Teledyne SDG-5 gyro and the DRIRU II inertial reference unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, K. N.; van Alstine, R. L.

    This paper presents the current performance levels of the SDG-5 gyro, a high performance two-axis dynamically tuned gyro, and the DRIRU II redundant inertial reference unit relating to stabilization and pointing applications. Also presented is a discussion of a product improvement program aimed at further noise reductions to meet the demanding requirements of future space defense applications.

  12. High-Capacity Communications from Martian Distances Part 4: Assessment of Spacecraft Pointing Accuracy Capabilities Required For Large Ka-Band Reflector Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodges, Richard E.; Sands, O. Scott; Huang, John; Bassily, Samir

    2006-01-01

    Improved surface accuracy for deployable reflectors has brought with it the possibility of Ka-band reflector antennas with extents on the order of 1000 wavelengths. Such antennas are being considered for high-rate data delivery from planetary distances. To maintain losses at reasonable levels requires a sufficiently capable Attitude Determination and Control System (ADCS) onboard the spacecraft. This paper provides an assessment of currently available ADCS strategies and performance levels. In addition to other issues, specific factors considered include: (1) use of "beaconless" or open loop tracking versus use of a beacon on the Earth side of the link, and (2) selection of fine pointing strategy (body-fixed/spacecraft pointing, reflector pointing or various forms of electronic beam steering). Capabilities of recent spacecraft are discussed.

  13. Teaching Absolute Value Meaningfully

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wade, Angela

    2012-01-01

    What is the meaning of absolute value? And why do teachers teach students how to solve absolute value equations? Absolute value is a concept introduced in first-year algebra and then reinforced in later courses. Various authors have suggested instructional methods for teaching absolute value to high school students (Wei 2005; Stallings-Roberts…

  14. Accuracy of reported flash point values on material safety data sheets and the impact on product classification.

    PubMed

    Radnoff, Diane

    2013-01-01

    Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDSs) are the foundation of worker right-to-know legislation for chemical hazards. Suppliers can use product test data to determine a product's classification. Alternatively, they may use evaluation and professional judgment based on test results for the product or a product, material, or substance with similar properties. While the criteria for classifying products under the new Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labeling of Chemicals (GHS) are different, a similar process is followed. Neither the current Workplace Hazardous Materials Information System (WHMIS) nor GHS require suppliers to test their products to classify them. In this project 83 samples of products classified as flammable or combustible, representing a variety of industry sectors and product types, were collected. Flash points were measured and compared to the reported values on the MSDSs. The classifications of the products were then compared using the WHMIS and GHS criteria. The results of the study indicated that there were significant variations between the disclosed and measured flash point values. Overall, more than one-third of the products had flash points lower than that disclosed on the MSDS. In some cases, the measured values were more than 20°C lower than the disclosed values. This could potentially result in an underestimation regarding the flammability of the product so it is important for employers to understand the limitations in the information provided on MSDSs when developing safe work procedures and training programs in the workplace. Nearly one-fifth of the products were misclassified under the WHMIS system as combustible when the measured flash point indicated that they should be classified as flammable when laboratory measurement error was taken into account. While a similar number of products were misclassified using GHS criteria, the tendency appeared to be to "over-classify" (provide a hazard class that was more conservative

  15. Analysis of Accuracy in Pointing with Redundant Hand-held Tools: A Geometric Approach to the Uncontrolled Manifold Method

    PubMed Central

    Campolo, Domenico; Widjaja, Ferdinan; Xu, Hong; Ang, Wei Tech; Burdet, Etienne

    2013-01-01

    This work introduces a coordinate-independent method to analyse movement variability of tasks performed with hand-held tools, such as a pen or a surgical scalpel. We extend the classical uncontrolled manifold (UCM) approach by exploiting the geometry of rigid body motions, used to describe tool configurations. In particular, we analyse variability during a static pointing task with a hand-held tool, where subjects are asked to keep the tool tip in steady contact with another object. In this case the tool is redundant with respect to the task, as subjects control position/orientation of the tool, i.e. 6 degrees-of-freedom (dof), to maintain the tool tip position (3dof) steady. To test the new method, subjects performed a pointing task with and without arm support. The additional dof introduced in the unsupported condition, injecting more variability into the system, represented a resource to minimise variability in the task space via coordinated motion. The results show that all of the seven subjects channeled more variability along directions not directly affecting the task (UCM), consistent with previous literature but now shown in a coordinate-independent way. Variability in the unsupported condition was only slightly larger at the endpoint but much larger in the UCM. PMID:23592956

  16. Accuracy of a Dual Path Platform (DPP) Assay for the Rapid Point-of-Care Diagnosis of Human Leptospirosis

    PubMed Central

    Nabity, Scott A.; Ribeiro, Guilherme S.; Lessa Aquino, Carolina; Takahashi, Daniele; Damião, Alcinéia Oliveira; Gonçalves, André H. O.; Miranda-Filho, Demócrito B.; Greenwald, Rena; Esfandiari, Javan; Lyashchenko, Konstantin P.; Reis, Mitermayer G.; Medeiros, Marco A.; Ko, Albert I.

    2012-01-01

    Background Diagnosis of leptospirosis by the gold standard serologic assay, the microscopic agglutination test (MAT), requires paired sera and is not widely available. We developed a rapid assay using immunodominant Leptospira immunoglobulin-like (Lig) proteins in a Dual Path Platform (DPP). This study aimed to evaluate the assay's diagnostic performance in the setting of urban transmission. Methodology We determined test sensitivity using 446 acute and convalescent sera from MAT-confirmed case-patients with severe or mild leptospirosis in Brazil. We assessed test specificity using 677 sera from the following groups: healthy residents of a Brazilian slum with endemic transmission, febrile outpatients from the same slum, healthy blood donors, and patients with dengue, hepatitis A, and syphilis. Three operators independently interpreted visual results without knowing specimen status. Results The overall sensitivity for paired sera was 100% and 73% for severe and mild disease, respectively. In the acute phase, the assay achieved a sensitivity of 85% and 64% for severe and mild leptospirosis, respectively. Within seven days of illness onset, the assay achieved a sensitivity of 77% for severe disease and 60% for mild leptospirosis. Sensitivity of the DPP assay was similar to that for IgM-ELISA and increased with both duration of symptoms (chi-square regression P = 0.002) and agglutinating titer (Spearman ρ = 0.24, P<0.001). Specificity was ≥93% for dengue, hepatitis A, syphilis, febrile outpatients, and blood donors, while it was 86% for healthy slum residents. Inter-operator agreement ranged from very good to excellent (kappa: 0.82–0.94) and test-to-test reproducibility was also high (kappa: 0.89). Conclusions The DPP assay performed acceptably well for diagnosis of severe acute clinical leptospirosis and can be easily implemented in hospitals and health posts where leptospirosis is a major public health problem. However, test accuracy may need improvement

  17. Accuracy analysis on C/A code and P(Y) code pseudo-range of GPS dual frequency receiver and application in point positioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Xiuying; Fan, Shijie; Guo, Jiming

    2008-10-01

    When the Anti-Spoofing (A-S) is active, the civilian users have some difficulties in using the P(Y) code for precise navigation and positioning. Z-tracking technique is one of the effective methods to acquire the P(Y) code. In this paper, the accuracy of pseudoranges from C/A code and P(Y) code for dual frequency GPS receiver is discussed. The principle of measuring the encrypted P(Y) code is described firstly, then a large data set from IGS tracking stations is utilized for analysis and verification with the help of a precise point positioning software developed by authors. Especially, P(Y) code pseudoranges of civilian GPS receivers allow eliminating/reducing the effect of ionospheric delay and improve the precision of positioning. The point positioning experiments for this are made in the end.

  18. Mathematical Model for Absolute Magnetic Measuring Systems in Industrial Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fügenschuh, Armin; Fügenschuh, Marzena; Ludszuweit, Marina; Mojsic, Aleksandar; Sokół, Joanna

    2015-09-01

    Scales for measuring systems are either based on incremental or absolute measuring methods. Incremental scales need to initialize a measurement cycle at a reference point. From there, the position is computed by counting increments of a periodic graduation. Absolute methods do not need reference points, since the position can be read directly from the scale. The positions on the complete scales are encoded using two incremental tracks with different graduation. We present a new method for absolute measuring using only one track for position encoding up to micrometre range. Instead of the common perpendicular magnetic areas, we use a pattern of trapezoidal magnetic areas, to store more complex information. For positioning, we use the magnetic field where every position is characterized by a set of values measured by a hall sensor array. We implement a method for reconstruction of absolute positions from the set of unique measured values. We compare two patterns with respect to uniqueness, accuracy, stability and robustness of positioning. We discuss how stability and robustness are influenced by different errors during the measurement in real applications and how those errors can be compensated.

  19. Evaluation of the Quantitative Accuracy of 3D Reconstruction of Edentulous Jaw Models with Jaw Relation Based on Reference Point System Alignment

    PubMed Central

    Li, Weiwei; Yuan, Fusong; Lv, Peijun; Wang, Yong; Sun, Yuchun

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To apply contact measurement and reference point system (RPS) alignment techniques to establish a method for 3D reconstruction of the edentulous jaw models with centric relation and to quantitatively evaluate its accuracy. Methods Upper and lower edentulous jaw models were clinically prepared, 10 pairs of resin cylinders with same size were adhered to axial surfaces of upper and lower models. The occlusal bases and the upper and lower jaw models were installed in the centric relation position. Faro Edge 1.8m was used to directly obtain center points of the base surface of the cylinders (contact method). Activity 880 dental scanner was used to obtain 3D data of the cylinders and the center points were fitted (fitting method). 3 pairs of center points were used to align the virtual model to centric relation. An observation coordinate system was interactively established. The straight-line distances in the X (horizontal left/right), Y (horizontal anterior/posterior), and Z (vertical) between the remaining 7 pairs of center points derived from contact method and fitting method were measured respectively and analyzed using a paired t-test. Results The differences of the straight-line distances of the remaining 7 pairs of center points between the two methods were X: 0.074 ± 0.107 mm, Y: 0.168 ± 0.176 mm, and Z: −0.003± 0.155 mm. The results of paired t-test were X and Z: p >0.05, Y: p <0.05. Conclusion By using contact measurement and the reference point system alignment technique, highly accurate reconstruction of the vertical distance and centric relation of a digital edentulous jaw model can be achieved, which meets the design and manufacturing requirements of the complete dentures. The error of horizontal anterior/posterior jaw relation was relatively large. PMID:25659133

  20. Toward subchemical accuracy in computational thermochemistry: focal point analysis of the heat of formation of NCO and [H,N,C,O] isomers.

    PubMed

    Schuurman, Michael S; Muir, Steven R; Allen, Wesley D; Schaefer, Henry F

    2004-06-22

    In continuing pursuit of thermochemical accuracy to the level of 0.1 kcal mol(-1), the heats of formation of NCO, HNCO, HOCN, HCNO, and HONC have been rigorously determined using state-of-the-art ab initio electronic structure theory, including conventional coupled cluster methods [coupled cluster singles and doubles (CCSD), CCSD with perturbative triples (CCSD(T)), and full coupled cluster through triple excitations (CCSDT)] with large basis sets, conjoined in cases with explicitly correlated MP2-R12/A computations. Limits of valence and all-electron correlation energies were extrapolated via focal point analysis using correlation consistent basis sets of the form cc-pVXZ (X=2-6) and cc-pCVXZ (X=2-5), respectively. In order to reach subchemical accuracy targets, core correlation, spin-orbit coupling, special relativity, the diagonal Born-Oppenheimer correction, and anharmonicity in zero-point vibrational energies were accounted for. Various coupled cluster schemes for partially including connected quadruple excitations were also explored, although none of these approaches gave reliable improvements over CCSDT theory. Based on numerous, independent thermochemical paths, each designed to balance residual ab initio errors, our final proposals are DeltaH(f,0) ( composite function )(NCO)=+30.5, DeltaH(f,0) ( composite function )(HNCO)=-27.6, DeltaH(f,0) ( composite function )(HOCN)=-3.1, DeltaH(f,0) ( composite function )(HCNO)=+40.9, and DeltaH(f,0) ( composite function )(HONC)=+56.3 kcal mol(-1). The internal consistency and convergence behavior of the data suggests accuracies of +/-0.2 kcal mol(-1) in these predictions, except perhaps in the HCNO case. However, the possibility of somewhat larger systematic errors cannot be excluded, and the need for CCSDTQ [full coupled cluster through quadruple excitations] computations to eliminate remaining uncertainties is apparent. PMID:15268193

  1. Improving the Accuracy of Quadrature Method Solutions of Fredholm Integral Equations That Arise from Nonlinear Two-Point Boundary Value Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sidi, Avram; Pennline, James A.

    1999-01-01

    In this paper we are concerned with high-accuracy quadrature method solutions of nonlinear Fredholm integral equations of the form y(x) = r(x) + definite integral of g(x, t)F(t,y(t))dt with limits between 0 and 1,0 less than or equal to x les than or equal to 1, where the kernel function g(x,t) is continuous, but its partial derivatives have finite jump discontinuities across x = t. Such integral equations arise, e.g., when one applied Green's function techniques to nonlinear two-point boundary value problems of the form y "(x) =f(x,y(x)), 0 less than or equal to x less than or equal to 1, with y(0) = y(sub 0) and y(l) = y(sub l), or other linear boundary conditions. A quadrature method that is especially suitable and that has been employed for such equations is one based on the trepezoidal rule that has a low accuracy. By analyzing the corresponding Euler-Maclaurin expansion, we derive suitable correction terms that we add to the trapezoidal rule, thus obtaining new numerical quadrature formulas of arbitrarily high accuracy that we also use in defining quadrature methods for the integral equations above. We prove an existence and uniqueness theorem for the quadrature method solutions, and show that their accuracy is the same as that of the underlying quadrature formula. The solution of the nonlinear systems resulting from the quadrature methods is achieved through successive approximations whose convergence is also proved. The results are demonstrated with numerical examples.

  2. Improving the Accuracy of Quadrature Method Solutions of Fredholm Integral Equations that Arise from Nonlinear Two-Point Boundary Value Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sidi, Avram; Pennline, James A.

    1999-01-01

    In this paper we are concerned with high-accuracy quadrature method solutions of nonlinear Fredholm integral equations of the form y(x) = r(x) + integral(0 to 1) g(x,t) F(t, y(t)) dt, 0 less than or equal to x less than or equal to 1, where the kernel function g(x,t) is continuous, but its partial derivatives have finite jump discontinuities across x = t. Such integrals equations arise, e.g., when one applies Green's function techniques to nonlinear two-point boundary value problems of the form U''(x) = f(x,y(x)), 0 less than or equal to x less than or equal to 1, with y(0) = y(sub 0) and g(l) = y(sub 1), or other linear boundary conditions. A quadrature method that is especially suitable and that has been employed for such equations is one based on the trapezoidal rule that has a low accuracy. By analyzing the corresponding Euler-Maclaurin expansion, we derive suitable correction terms that we add to the trapezoidal thus obtaining new numerical quadrature formulas of arbitrarily high accuracy that we also use in defining quadrature methods for the integral equations above. We prove an existence and uniqueness theorem for the quadrature method solutions, and show that their accuracy is the same as that of the underlying quadrature formula. The solution of the nonlinear systems resulting from the quadrature methods is achieved through successive approximations whose convergence is also proved. The results are demonstrated with numerical examples.

  3. Accuracy of Human and Veterinary Point-of-Care Glucometers for Use in Rhesus Macaques (Macaca mulatta), Sooty Mangabeys (Cercocebus atys), and Chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes).

    PubMed

    Clemmons, Elizabeth A; Stovall, Melissa I; Owens, Devon C; Scott, Jessica A; Jones-Wilkes, Amelia C; Kempf, Doty J; Ethun, Kelly F

    2016-01-01

    Handheld, point-of-care glucometers are commonly used in NHP for clinical and research purposes, but whether these devices are appropriate for use in NHP is unknown. Other animal studies indicate that glucometers should be species-specific, given differences in glucose distribution between RBC and plasma; in addition, Hct and sampling site (venous compared with capillary) influence glucometer readings. Therefore, we compared the accuracy of 2 human and 2 veterinary glucometers at various Hct ranges in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta), sooty mangabeys (Cercocebus atys), and chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) with that of standard laboratory glucose analysis. Subsequent analyses assessed the effect of hypoglycemia, hyperglycemia, and sampling site on glucometer accuracy. The veterinary glucometers overestimated blood glucose (BG) values in all species by 26 to 75 mg/dL. The mean difference between the human glucometers and the laboratory analyzer was 7 mg/dL or less in all species. The human glucometers overestimated BG in hypoglycemic mangabeys by 4 mg/dL and underestimated BG in hyperglycemic mangabeys by 11 mg/dL; similar patterns occurred in rhesus macaques. Hct did not affect glucometer accuracy, but all samples were within the range at which glucometers generally are accurate in humans. BG values were significantly lower in venous than capillary samples. The current findings show that veterinary glucometers intended for companion-animal species are inappropriate for use in the studied NHP species, whereas the human glucometers showed clinically acceptable accuracy in all 3 species. Finally, potential differences between venous and capillary BG values should be considered when comparing and evaluating results. PMID:27177571

  4. Annual bank and point bar morphodynamics of a meandering river determined by high-accuracy multitemporal laser scanning and flow data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotsari, E.; Vaaja, M.; Flener, C.; Kaartinen, H.; Kukko, A.; Kasvi, E.; Hyyppä, H.; Hyyppä, J.; Alho, P.

    2014-07-01

    The knowledge has been insufficient concerning the effects of peak flows, and local bend and flow characteristics on annual morphodynamics of consecutive bends in meandering rivers. Therefore, it was determined how flow peak magnitude and duration affect morphodynamics, how the short-term spatial evolution of a given meander bend associates with the neighboring bends, and how local bend and flow characteristics affect morphodynamics. The annual bank and point bar morphodynamics of eight consecutive bends of a subarctic meandering river were analyzed between 2009 and 2012 on the basis of high-accuracy multitemporal data, measured by mobile and terrestrial laser scanning and an Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler. According to the results, multiple years of highly accurate data are crucial for a broader picture of meandering channel evolution. The results showed for the first time in detail that none of the years were similar in terms of point bar and bank morphodynamics. The duration of point bar submergence and maximum water stage was more important for evolution of the meandering channel than the local effects of each bend. The detailed topographical data of the present study confirmed that the higher the flow and water stage peak the more deposition occurred on point bars. More importantly, the independence of the short-term spatial evolution of meander bends from the association with neighboring bends was confirmed. Erosion patterns did not relate particularly to the sinuosity or radius of curvature. A clear relation between velocity and bend curvature, on which some meander migration models rely, was not found.

  5. Computer-based classification accuracy due to the spatial resolution using per-point versus per-field classification techniques. [for photomapping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Latty, R. S.; Hoffer, R. M.

    1981-01-01

    Data sets simulating three different spatial resolutions (SR's) are computed from data with a 15-m nominal SR that were obtained with NASA's Thermatic Mapper Simulator from an altitude of about 6 km. The classification accuracies (CA's) achieved with the data of each of the four different SR's using a per-point Gaussian maximum likelihood classifier (GMLC) are intercompared. The CA's obtained using simulated 30-m SR data with the per-point GMLC are compared with the CA's achieved with a per-field classifier. It is found that: (1) the use of successively higher SR data resulted in lower overall CA's for classifications with the per-point GMLC, especially in cover classes associated with relatively higher spectral variability across adjacent pixels; (2) higher CA's were achieved using the per-field classifier with 30-m SR data than were achieved with the per-point GMLC; and (3) the largest increases in CA's were achieved with the per-field classifier in cover classes associated with relatively high levels of spectral variability across adjacent pixels.

  6. Eosinophil count - absolute

    MedlinePlus

    Eosinophils; Absolute eosinophil count ... the white blood cell count to give the absolute eosinophil count. ... than 500 cells per microliter (cells/mcL). Normal value ranges may vary slightly among different laboratories. Talk ...

  7. Absolute neutrino mass measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, Joachim

    2011-10-01

    The neutrino mass plays an important role in particle physics, astrophysics and cosmology. In recent years the detection of neutrino flavour oscillations proved that neutrinos carry mass. However, oscillation experiments are only sensitive to the mass-squared difference of the mass eigenvalues. In contrast to cosmological observations and neutrino-less double beta decay (0v2β) searches, single β-decay experiments provide a direct, model-independent way to determine the absolute neutrino mass by measuring the energy spectrum of decay electrons at the endpoint region with high accuracy. Currently the best kinematic upper limits on the neutrino mass of 2.2eV have been set by two experiments in Mainz and Troitsk, using tritium as beta emitter. The next generation tritium β-experiment KATRIN is currently under construction in Karlsruhe/Germany by an international collaboration. KATRIN intends to improve the sensitivity by one order of magnitude to 0.2eV. The investigation of a second isotope (137Rh) is being pursued by the international MARE collaboration using micro-calorimeters to measure the beta spectrum. The technology needed to reach 0.2eV sensitivity is still in the R&D phase. This paper reviews the present status of neutrino-mass measurements with cosmological data, 0v2β decay and single β-decay.

  8. Absolute neutrino mass measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, Joachim

    2011-10-06

    The neutrino mass plays an important role in particle physics, astrophysics and cosmology. In recent years the detection of neutrino flavour oscillations proved that neutrinos carry mass. However, oscillation experiments are only sensitive to the mass-squared difference of the mass eigenvalues. In contrast to cosmological observations and neutrino-less double beta decay (0v2{beta}) searches, single {beta}-decay experiments provide a direct, model-independent way to determine the absolute neutrino mass by measuring the energy spectrum of decay electrons at the endpoint region with high accuracy.Currently the best kinematic upper limits on the neutrino mass of 2.2eV have been set by two experiments in Mainz and Troitsk, using tritium as beta emitter. The next generation tritium {beta}-experiment KATRIN is currently under construction in Karlsruhe/Germany by an international collaboration. KATRIN intends to improve the sensitivity by one order of magnitude to 0.2eV. The investigation of a second isotope ({sup 137}Rh) is being pursued by the international MARE collaboration using micro-calorimeters to measure the beta spectrum. The technology needed to reach 0.2eV sensitivity is still in the R and D phase. This paper reviews the present status of neutrino-mass measurements with cosmological data, 0v2{beta} decay and single {beta}-decay.

  9. GNSS Absolute Antenna Calibration at the National Geodetic Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mader, G. L.; Bilich, A. L.; Geoghegan, C.

    2011-12-01

    Geodetic GNSS applications routinely demand millimeter precision and extremely high levels of accuracy. To achieve these accuracies, measurement and instrument biases at the centimeter to millimeter level must be understood. One of these biases is the antenna phase center, the apparent point of signal reception for a GNSS antenna. It has been well established that phase center patterns differ between antenna models and manufacturers; additional research suggests that the addition of a radome or the choice of antenna mount can significantly alter those a priori phase center patterns. For the more demanding GNSS positioning applications and especially in cases of mixed-antenna networks, it is all the more important to know antenna phase center variations as a function of both elevation and azimuth in the antenna reference frame and incorporate these models into analysis software. To help meet the needs of the high-precision GNSS community, the National Geodetic Survey (NGS) now operates an absolute antenna calibration facility. Located in Corbin, Virginia, this facility uses field measurements and actual GNSS satellite signals to quantitatively determine the carrier phase advance/delay introduced by the antenna element. The NGS facility was built to serve traditional NGS constituents such as the surveying and geodesy communities, however calibration services are open and available to all GNSS users as the calibration schedule permits. All phase center patterns computed by this facility will be publicly available and disseminated in both the ANTEX and NGS formats. We describe the NGS calibration facility, and discuss the observation models and strategy currently used to generate NGS absolute calibrations. We demonstrate that NGS absolute phase center variation (PCV) patterns are consistent with published values determined by other absolute antenna calibration facilities, and compare absolute calibrations to the traditional NGS relative calibrations.

  10. Direct Georeferencing on Small Unmanned Aerial Platforms for Improved Reliability and Accuracy of Mapping Without the Need for Ground Control Points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mian, O.; Lutes, J.; Lipa, G.; Hutton, J. J.; Gavelle, E.; Borghini, S.

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents results from a Direct Mapping Solution (DMS) comprised of an Applanix APX-15 UAV GNSS-Inertial system integrated with a Sony a7R camera to produce highly accurate ortho-rectified imagery without Ground Control Points on a Microdrones md4-1000 platform. A 55 millimeter Nikkor f/1.8 lens was mounted on the Sony a7R and the camera was then focused and calibrated terrestrially using the Applanix camera calibration facility, and then integrated with the APX-15 UAV GNSS-Inertial system using a custom mount specifically designed for UAV applications. In July 2015, Applanix and Avyon carried out a test flight of this system. The goal of the test flight was to assess the performance of DMS APX-15 UAV direct georeferencing system on the md4-1000. The area mapped during the test was a 250 x 300 meter block in a rural setting in Ontario, Canada. Several ground control points are distributed within the test area. The test included 8 North-South lines and 1 cross strip flown at 80 meters AGL, resulting in a ~1 centimeter Ground Sample Distance (GSD). Map products were generated from the test flight using Direct Georeferencing, and then compared for accuracy against the known positions of ground control points in the test area. The GNSS-Inertial data collected by the APX-15 UAV was post-processed in Single Base mode, using a base station located in the project area via POSPac UAV. The base-station's position was precisely determined by processing a 12-hour session using the CSRS-PPP Post Processing service. The ground control points were surveyed in using differential GNSS post-processing techniques with respect to the base-station.

  11. Measurement of Absolute Carbon Isotope Ratios: Mechanisms and Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, J. S.; Giacomo, J. A.; Dueker, S. R.

    2012-12-01

    An accelerator mass spectrometer (AMS) produced absolute isotope ratio measurements for 14C/13C as tested against >500 samples of NIST SRM-4990-C (OxII 14C standard) to an accuracy of 2.2±0.6‰ over a period of one year with measurements made to 1% counting statistics. The spectrometer is not maximized for 13C/12C, but measured ∂13C to 0.4±0.1‰ accuracy, with known methods for improvement. An AMS produces elemental anions from a sputter ion source and includes a charge-changing collision in a gas cell to isolate the rare 14C from the common isotopes and molecular isobars. Both these physical processes have been modeled to determine the parameters providing such absolute measures. Neutral resonant ionization in a cesium plasma produces mass-independent ionization, while velocity dependent charge-state distributions in gas collisions produce relative ion beam intensities that are linear in mass at specific collision energies. The mechanisms are not specific to carbon isotopes, but stand alone absolute IRMS (AIR-MS) instruments have not yet been made. Aside from the obvious applications in metrology, AIR-MS is particularly valuable in coupled separatory MS because no internal or external standards are required. Sample definition processes can be compared, even if no exact standard reference sample exists. Isotope dilution measurements do not require standards matching the dilution end-points and can be made over an extended, even extrapolated, range.

  12. A systematic review and meta-analysis of the diagnostic accuracy of point-of-care tests for the detection of hyperketonemia in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Tatone, Elise H; Gordon, Jessica L; Hubbs, Jessie; LeBlanc, Stephen J; DeVries, Trevor J; Duffield, Todd F

    2016-08-01

    Several rapid tests for use on farm have been validated for the detection of hyperketonemia (HK) in dairy cattle, however the reported sensitivity and specificity of each method varies and no single study has compared them all. Meta-analysis of diagnostic test accuracy is becoming more common in human medical literature but there are few veterinary examples. The objective of this work was to perform a systematic review and meta-analysis to determine the point-of-care testing method with the highest combined sensitivity and specificity, the optimal threshold for each method, and to identify gaps in the literature. A comprehensive literature search resulted in 5196 references. After removing duplicates and performing relevance screening, 23 studies were included for the qualitative synthesis and 18 for the meta-analysis. The three index tests evaluated in the meta-analysis were: the Precision Xtra(®) handheld device measuring beta-hydroxybutyrate (BHB) concentration in whole blood, and Ketostix(®) and KetoTest(®) semi-quantitative strips measuring the concentration of acetoacetate in urine and BHB in milk, respectively. The diagnostic accuracy of the 3 index tests relative to the reference standard measurement of BHB in serum or whole blood between 1.0-1.4mmol/L was compared using the hierarchical summary receiver operator characteristic (HSROC) method. Subgroup analysis was conducted for each index test to examine the accuracy at different thresholds. The impact of the reference standard threshold, the reference standard method, the prevalence of HK in the population, the primary study source and risk of bias of the primary study was explored using meta-regression. The Precision Xtra(®) device had the highest summary sensitivity in whole blood BHB at 1.2mmol/L, 94.8% (CI95%: 92.6-97.0), and specificity, 97.5% (CI95%: 96.9-98.1). The threshold employed (1.2-1.4mmol/L) did not impact the diagnostic accuracy of the test. The Ketostix(®) and KetoTest(®) strips had

  13. Absolute calibration of optical flats

    DOEpatents

    Sommargren, Gary E.

    2005-04-05

    The invention uses the phase shifting diffraction interferometer (PSDI) to provide a true point-by-point measurement of absolute flatness over the surface of optical flats. Beams exiting the fiber optics in a PSDI have perfect spherical wavefronts. The measurement beam is reflected from the optical flat and passed through an auxiliary optic to then be combined with the reference beam on a CCD. The combined beams include phase errors due to both the optic under test and the auxiliary optic. Standard phase extraction algorithms are used to calculate this combined phase error. The optical flat is then removed from the system and the measurement fiber is moved to recombine the two beams. The newly combined beams include only the phase errors due to the auxiliary optic. When the second phase measurement is subtracted from the first phase measurement, the absolute phase error of the optical flat is obtained.

  14. Absolute nuclear material assay

    DOEpatents

    Prasad, Manoj K.; Snyderman, Neal J.; Rowland, Mark S.

    2012-05-15

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  15. Absolute nuclear material assay

    DOEpatents

    Prasad, Manoj K.; Snyderman, Neal J.; Rowland, Mark S.

    2010-07-13

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  16. The AFGL absolute gravity program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammond, J. A.; Iliff, R. L.

    1978-01-01

    A brief discussion of the AFGL's (Air Force Geophysics Laboratory) program in absolute gravity is presented. Support of outside work and in-house studies relating to gravity instrumentation are discussed. A description of the current transportable system is included and the latest results are presented. These results show good agreement with measurements at the AFGL site by an Italian system. The accuracy obtained by the transportable apparatus is better than 0.1 microns sq sec 10 microgal and agreement with previous measurements is within the combined uncertainties of the measurements.

  17. Absolute GNSS Antenna Calibration at the National Geodetic Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mader, G.; Bilich, A.; Geoghegan, C.

    2012-04-01

    Geodetic GNSS applications routinely demand millimeter precision and extremely high levels of accuracy. To achieve these accuracies, measurement and instrument biases at the centimeter to millimeter level must be understood. One of these biases is the antenna phase center, the apparent point of signal reception for a GNSS antenna. It has been well established that phase center patterns differ between antenna models and manufacturers; additional research suggests that the addition of a radome or the choice of antenna mount can significantly alter those a priori phase center patterns. For the more demanding GNSS positioning applications and especially in cases of mixed-antenna networks, it is all the more important to know antenna phase center variations as a function of both elevation and azimuth in the antenna reference frame and incorporate these models into analysis software. To help meet the needs of the high-precision GNSS community, the National Geodetic Survey (NGS) now operates an absolute antenna calibration facility. Located in Corbin, Virginia, this facility uses field measurements and actual GNSS satellite signals to quantitatively determine the carrier phase advance/delay introduced by the antenna element. The NGS facility was built to serve traditional NGS constituents such as the surveying and geodesy communities, however calibration services are open and available to all GNSS users as the calibration schedule permits. All phase center patterns computed by this facility will be publicly available and disseminated in both the ANTEX and NGS formats. We describe the NGS calibration facility, and discuss the observation models and strategy currently used to generate NGS absolute calibrations. We demonstrate that NGS absolute phase center variation (PCV) patterns are consistent with published values determined by other absolute antenna calibration facilities, and outline future planned refinements to the system.

  18. More Than Just Accuracy: A Novel Method to Incorporate Multiple Test Attributes in Evaluating Diagnostic Tests Including Point of Care Tests

    PubMed Central

    Weigl, Bernhard; Fitzpatrick, Annette; Ide, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    Current frameworks for evaluating diagnostic tests are constrained by a focus on diagnostic accuracy, and assume that all aspects of the testing process and test attributes are discrete and equally important. Determining the balance between the benefits and harms associated with new or existing tests has been overlooked. Yet, this is critically important information for stakeholders involved in developing, testing, and implementing tests. This is particularly important for point of care tests (POCTs) where tradeoffs exist between numerous aspects of the testing process and test attributes. We developed a new model that multiple stakeholders (e.g., clinicians, patients, researchers, test developers, industry, regulators, and health care funders) can use to visualize the multiple attributes of tests, the interactions that occur between these attributes, and their impacts on health outcomes. We use multiple examples to illustrate interactions between test attributes (test availability, test experience, and test results) and outcomes, including several POCTs. The model could be used to prioritize research and development efforts, and inform regulatory submissions for new diagnostics. It could potentially provide a way to incorporate the relative weights that various subgroups or clinical settings might place on different test attributes. Our model provides a novel way that multiple stakeholders can use to visualize test attributes, their interactions, and impacts on individual and population outcomes. We anticipate that this will facilitate more informed decision making around diagnostic tests. PMID:27574576

  19. More Than Just Accuracy: A Novel Method to Incorporate Multiple Test Attributes in Evaluating Diagnostic Tests Including Point of Care Tests.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Matthew; Weigl, Bernhard; Fitzpatrick, Annette; Ide, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    Current frameworks for evaluating diagnostic tests are constrained by a focus on diagnostic accuracy, and assume that all aspects of the testing process and test attributes are discrete and equally important. Determining the balance between the benefits and harms associated with new or existing tests has been overlooked. Yet, this is critically important information for stakeholders involved in developing, testing, and implementing tests. This is particularly important for point of care tests (POCTs) where tradeoffs exist between numerous aspects of the testing process and test attributes. We developed a new model that multiple stakeholders (e.g., clinicians, patients, researchers, test developers, industry, regulators, and health care funders) can use to visualize the multiple attributes of tests, the interactions that occur between these attributes, and their impacts on health outcomes. We use multiple examples to illustrate interactions between test attributes (test availability, test experience, and test results) and outcomes, including several POCTs. The model could be used to prioritize research and development efforts, and inform regulatory submissions for new diagnostics. It could potentially provide a way to incorporate the relative weights that various subgroups or clinical settings might place on different test attributes. Our model provides a novel way that multiple stakeholders can use to visualize test attributes, their interactions, and impacts on individual and population outcomes. We anticipate that this will facilitate more informed decision making around diagnostic tests. PMID:27574576

  20. Stimulus probability effects in absolute identification.

    PubMed

    Kent, Christopher; Lamberts, Koen

    2016-05-01

    This study investigated the effect of stimulus presentation probability on accuracy and response times in an absolute identification task. Three schedules of presentation were used to investigate the interaction between presentation probability and stimulus position within the set. Data from individual participants indicated strong effects of presentation probability on both proportion correct and response times. The effects were moderated by the ubiquitous stimulus position effect. The accuracy and response time data were predicted by an exemplar-based model of perceptual cognition (Kent & Lamberts, 2005). The bow in discriminability was also attenuated when presentation probability for middle items was relatively high, an effect that will constrain future model development. The study provides evidence for item-specific learning in absolute identification. Implications for other theories of absolute identification are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26478959

  1. Absolute instability of the Gaussian wake profile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hultgren, Lennart S.; Aggarwal, Arun K.

    1987-01-01

    Linear parallel-flow stability theory has been used to investigate the effect of viscosity on the local absolute instability of a family of wake profiles with a Gaussian velocity distribution. The type of local instability, i.e., convective or absolute, is determined by the location of a branch-point singularity with zero group velocity of the complex dispersion relation for the instability waves. The effects of viscosity were found to be weak for values of the wake Reynolds number, based on the center-line velocity defect and the wake half-width, larger than about 400. Absolute instability occurs only for sufficiently large values of the center-line wake defect. The critical value of this parameter increases with decreasing wake Reynolds number, thereby indicating a shrinking region of absolute instability with decreasing wake Reynolds number. If backflow is not allowed, absolute instability does not occur for wake Reynolds numbers smaller than about 38.

  2. Stimulus Probability Effects in Absolute Identification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kent, Christopher; Lamberts, Koen

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of stimulus presentation probability on accuracy and response times in an absolute identification task. Three schedules of presentation were used to investigate the interaction between presentation probability and stimulus position within the set. Data from individual participants indicated strong effects of…

  3. Precision absolute positional measurement of laser beams.

    PubMed

    Fitzsimons, Ewan D; Bogenstahl, Johanna; Hough, James; Killow, Christian J; Perreur-Lloyd, Michael; Robertson, David I; Ward, Henry

    2013-04-20

    We describe an instrument which, coupled with a suitable coordinate measuring machine, facilitates the absolute measurement within the machine frame of the propagation direction of a millimeter-scale laser beam to an accuracy of around ±4 μm in position and ±20 μrad in angle. PMID:23669658

  4. Using, Seeing, Feeling, and Doing Absolute Value for Deeper Understanding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ponce, Gregorio A.

    2008-01-01

    Using sticky notes and number lines, a hands-on activity is shared that anchors initial student thinking about absolute value. The initial point of reference should help students successfully evaluate numeric problems involving absolute value. They should also be able to solve absolute value equations and inequalities that are typically found in…

  5. Absolute biological needs.

    PubMed

    McLeod, Stephen

    2014-07-01

    Absolute needs (as against instrumental needs) are independent of the ends, goals and purposes of personal agents. Against the view that the only needs are instrumental needs, David Wiggins and Garrett Thomson have defended absolute needs on the grounds that the verb 'need' has instrumental and absolute senses. While remaining neutral about it, this article does not adopt that approach. Instead, it suggests that there are absolute biological needs. The absolute nature of these needs is defended by appeal to: their objectivity (as against mind-dependence); the universality of the phenomenon of needing across the plant and animal kingdoms; the impossibility that biological needs depend wholly upon the exercise of the abilities characteristic of personal agency; the contention that the possession of biological needs is prior to the possession of the abilities characteristic of personal agency. Finally, three philosophical usages of 'normative' are distinguished. On two of these, to describe a phenomenon or claim as 'normative' is to describe it as value-dependent. A description of a phenomenon or claim as 'normative' in the third sense does not entail such value-dependency, though it leaves open the possibility that value depends upon the phenomenon or upon the truth of the claim. It is argued that while survival needs (or claims about them) may well be normative in this third sense, they are normative in neither of the first two. Thus, the idea of absolute need is not inherently normative in either of the first two senses. PMID:23586876

  6. Accuracy of point-of-care testing for circulatory cathodic antigen in the detection of schistosome infection: systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Minton, Jonathan; Boamah, Daniel; Otchere, Joseph; Asmah, Richard H; Rodgers, Mark; Bosompem, Kwabena M; Eusebi, Paolo; De Vlas, Sake J

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To assess the accuracy of point-of-care testing for circulatory cathodic antigen in the diagnosis of schistosome infection. Methods We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, LILACS and other bibliographic databases for studies published until 30 September 2015 that described circulatory cathodic antigen testing compared against one to three Kato–Katz tests per subject – for Schistosoma mansoni – or the filtration of one 10-ml urine sample per subject – for S. haematobium. We extracted the numbers of true positives, false positives, true negatives and false negatives for the antigen testing and performed meta-analyses using a bivariate hierarchical regression model. Findings Twenty-six studies published between 1994 and 2014 met the inclusion criteria. In the detection of S. mansoni, a single antigen test gave a pooled sensitivity of 0.90 (95% confidence interval, CI: 0.84–0.94) and a pooled specificity of 0.56 (95% CI: 0.39–0.71; n = 7) when compared against a single Kato–Katz test. The corresponding values from comparisons with two to three Kato–Katz tests per subject were 0.85 (95% CI: 0.80–0.88) and 0.66 (95% CI: 0.53–0.76; n = 14), respectively. There appeared to be no advantage in using three antigen tests per subject instead of one. When compared against the results of urine filtration, antigen testing for S. haematobium showed poor sensitivity and poor specificity. The performance of antigen testing was better in areas of high endemicity than in settings with low endemicity. Conclusion Antigen testing may represent an effective tool for monitoring programmes for the control of S. mansoni. PMID:27429491

  7. Fundamentals of absolute pyroheliometry and objective characterization. [using a narrow field of view radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crommelynck, D. A.

    1982-01-01

    The radiometric methodology in use with a narrow field of view radiometer for observation of the solar constant is described. The radiation output of the Sun is assumed to be constant, enabling the monitoring of the solar source by an accurately pointed radiometer, and the Sun's output is measured as a function of time. The instrument is described, its angular response considered, and principles for absolute radiometric measurement presented. Active modes of operation are analyzed, taking into consideration instrumental perturbations and sensor efficiency, heating wire effect, cavity sensor efficiency, thermal effects on the surface of the sensitive area, the effect of the field of view limiting system, and the frequency response of the heat flux detector and absolute radiometric system. Performance of absolute measurements with relatively high accuracy is demonstrated.

  8. Improved accuracies for satellite tracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kammeyer, P. C.; Fiala, A. D.; Seidelmann, P. K.

    1991-01-01

    A charge coupled device (CCD) camera on an optical telescope which follows the stars can be used to provide high accuracy comparisons between the line of sight to a satellite, over a large range of satellite altitudes, and lines of sight to nearby stars. The CCD camera can be rotated so the motion of the satellite is down columns of the CCD chip, and charge can be moved from row to row of the chip at a rate which matches the motion of the optical image of the satellite across the chip. Measurement of satellite and star images, together with accurate timing of charge motion, provides accurate comparisons of lines of sight. Given lines of sight to stars near the satellite, the satellite line of sight may be determined. Initial experiments with this technique, using an 18 cm telescope, have produced TDRS-4 observations which have an rms error of 0.5 arc second, 100 m at synchronous altitude. Use of a mosaic of CCD chips, each having its own rate of charge motion, in the focal place of a telescope would allow point images of a geosynchronous satellite and of stars to be formed simultaneously in the same telescope. The line of sight of such a satellite could be measured relative to nearby star lines of sight with an accuracy of approximately 0.03 arc second. Development of a star catalog with 0.04 arc second rms accuracy and perhaps ten stars per square degree would allow determination of satellite lines of sight with 0.05 arc second rms absolute accuracy, corresponding to 10 m at synchronous altitude. Multiple station time transfers through a communications satellite can provide accurate distances from the satellite to the ground stations. Such observations can, if calibrated for delays, determine satellite orbits to an accuracy approaching 10 m rms.

  9. Inertial Measures of Motion for Clinical Biomechanics: Comparative Assessment of Accuracy under Controlled Conditions – Changes in Accuracy over Time

    PubMed Central

    Lebel, Karina; Boissy, Patrick; Hamel, Mathieu; Duval, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Background Interest in 3D inertial motion tracking devices (AHRS) has been growing rapidly among the biomechanical community. Although the convenience of such tracking devices seems to open a whole new world of possibilities for evaluation in clinical biomechanics, its limitations haven’t been extensively documented. The objectives of this study are: 1) to assess the change in absolute and relative accuracy of multiple units of 3 commercially available AHRS over time; and 2) to identify different sources of errors affecting AHRS accuracy and to document how they may affect the measurements over time. Methods This study used an instrumented Gimbal table on which AHRS modules were carefully attached and put through a series of velocity-controlled sustained motions including 2 minutes motion trials (2MT) and 12 minutes multiple dynamic phases motion trials (12MDP). Absolute accuracy was assessed by comparison of the AHRS orientation measurements to those of an optical gold standard. Relative accuracy was evaluated using the variation in relative orientation between modules during the trials. Findings Both absolute and relative accuracy decreased over time during 2MT. 12MDP trials showed a significant decrease in accuracy over multiple phases, but accuracy could be enhanced significantly by resetting the reference point and/or compensating for initial Inertial frame estimation reference for each phase. Interpretation The variation in AHRS accuracy observed between the different systems and with time can be attributed in part to the dynamic estimation error, but also and foremost, to the ability of AHRS units to locate the same Inertial frame. Conclusions Mean accuracies obtained under the Gimbal table sustained conditions of motion suggest that AHRS are promising tools for clinical mobility assessment under constrained conditions of use. However, improvement in magnetic compensation and alignment between AHRS modules are desirable in order for AHRS to reach their

  10. GRATIS: Pointing and Tracking System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seiffert, M. D.; Lubin, P. M.; Craig, W. W.; McLean, R.; Harrison, F.

    1992-12-01

    The Gamma-Ray Arc Minute Telescope Imaging System (GRATIS; see companion paper by Harrison et al.) requires a balloon-borne stabilized platform capable of 20 arc second absolute pointing accuracy. We have developed a system which uses computer-based inertial-guidance control of an azimuth-elevation pointing mechanism for the telescope. An innovative computer-based star pattern recognition system automatically generates drift corrections from an image acquired by a Peltier cooled CCD camera. The inertial guidance system provides three axis pointing information with approximately 12 arc seconds precision. This is a true inertial guidance system with gyros, accelerometers, and an integral navigational processor. The gyros have high relative pointing precision, but a slow drift component degrades their absolute accuracy. Control of the elevation position is accomplished through a torque motor that is directly coupled to the telescope. Azimuth control is accomplished through an active zero-stiction bearing at the top of the gondola and a reaction wheel at the bottom. The pointing system has been fully constructed and tested and has been mated with the telescope. We present the results of an extensive series of tracking tests.

  11. Diagnostic Accuracy of a Prototype Point-of-Care Test for Ocular Chlamydia trachomatis under Field Conditions in The Gambia and Senegal

    PubMed Central

    Harding-Esch, Emma M.; Holland, Martin J.; Schémann, Jean-François; Molina, Sandra; Sarr, Isatou; Andreasen, Aura A.; Roberts, Chrissy h.; Sillah, Ansumana; Sarr, Boubacar; Harding, Edward F.; Edwards, Tansy; Bailey, Robin L.; Mabey, David C. W.

    2011-01-01

    Background The clinical signs of active trachoma are often present in the absence of ocular Chlamydia trachomatis infection in low prevalence and mass treated settings. Treatment decisions are currently based on the prevalence of clinical signs, and this may result in the unnecessary distribution of mass antibiotic treatment. We aimed to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of a prototype point-of-care (POC) test, developed for field diagnosis of ocular C. trachomatis, in low prevalence settings of The Gambia and Senegal. Methodology/Principal Findings Three studies were conducted, two in The Gambia and one in Senegal. Children under the age of 10 years were screened for the clinical signs of trachoma. Two ocular swabs were taken from the right eye. The first swab was tested by the POC test in the field and the result independently graded by two readers. The second swab was tested for the presence of C. trachomatis by Amplicor Polymerase Chain Reaction. In Senegal, measurements of humidity and temperature in the field were taken. A total of 3734 children were screened, 950 in the first and 1171 in the second Gambian study, and 1613 in Senegal. The sensitivity of the prototype POC test ranged between 33.3–67.9%, the specificity between 92.4–99.0%, the positive predictive value between 4.3–21.0%, and the negative predictive value between 98.0–99.8%. The rate of false-positives increased markedly at temperatures above 31.4°C and relative humidities below 11.4%. Conclusions/Significance In its present format, this prototype POC test is not suitable for field diagnosis of ocular C. trachomatis as its specificity decreases in hot and dry conditions: the environment in which trachoma is predominantly found. In the absence of a suitable test for infection, trachoma diagnosis remains dependent on clinical signs. Under current WHO recommendations, this is likely resulting in the continued mass treatment of non-infected communities. PMID:21829735

  12. The absolute path command

    2012-05-11

    The ap command traveres all symlinks in a given file, directory, or executable name to identify the final absolute path. It can print just the final path, each intermediate link along with the symlink chan, and the permissions and ownership of each directory component in the final path. It has functionality similar to "which", except that it shows the final path instead of the first path. It is also similar to "pwd", but it canmore » provide the absolute path to a relative directory from the current working directory.« less

  13. The absolute path command

    SciTech Connect

    Moody, A.

    2012-05-11

    The ap command traveres all symlinks in a given file, directory, or executable name to identify the final absolute path. It can print just the final path, each intermediate link along with the symlink chan, and the permissions and ownership of each directory component in the final path. It has functionality similar to "which", except that it shows the final path instead of the first path. It is also similar to "pwd", but it can provide the absolute path to a relative directory from the current working directory.

  14. Prospects for the Moon as an SI-Traceable Absolute Spectroradiometric Standard for Satellite Remote Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cramer, C. E.; Stone, T. C.; Lykke, K.; Woodward, J. T.

    2015-12-01

    The Earth's Moon has many physical properties that make it suitable for use as a reference light source for radiometric calibration of remote sensing satellite instruments. Lunar calibration has been successfully applied to many imagers in orbit, including both MODIS instruments and NPP-VIIRS, using the USGS ROLO model to predict the reference exoatmospheric lunar irradiance. Sensor response trending was developed for SeaWIFS with a relative accuracy better than 0.1 % per year with lunar calibration techniques. However, the Moon rarely is used as an absolute reference for on-orbit calibration, primarily due to uncertainties in the ROLO model absolute scale of 5%-10%. But this limitation lies only with the models - the Moon itself is radiometrically stable, and development of a high-accuracy absolute lunar reference is inherently feasible. A program has been undertaken by NIST to collect absolute measurements of the lunar spectral irradiance with absolute accuracy <1 % (k=2), traceable to SI radiometric units. Initial Moon observations were acquired from the Whipple Observatory on Mt. Hopkins, Arizona, elevation 2367 meters, with continuous spectral coverage from 380 nm to 1040 nm at ~3 nm resolution. The lunar spectrometer acquired calibration measurements several times each observing night by pointing to a calibrated integrating sphere source. The lunar spectral irradiance at the top of the atmosphere was derived from a time series of ground-based measurements by a Langley analysis that incorporated measured atmospheric conditions and ROLO model predictions for the change in irradiance resulting from the changing Sun-Moon-Observer geometry throughout each night. Two nights were selected for further study. An extensive error analysis, which includes instrument calibration and atmospheric correction terms, shows a combined standard uncertainty under 1 % over most of the spectral range. Comparison of these two nights' spectral irradiance measurements with predictions

  15. Combined Use of Absolute and Differential Seismic Arrival Time Data to Improve Absolute Event Location

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, S.; Johannesson, G.

    2012-12-01

    Arrival time measurements based on waveform cross correlation are becoming more common as advanced signal processing methods are applied to seismic data archives and real-time data streams. Waveform correlation can precisely measure the time difference between the arrival of two phases, and differential time data can be used to constrain relative location of events. Absolute locations are needed for many applications, which generally requires the use of absolute time data. Current methods for measuring absolute time data are approximately two orders of magnitude less precise than differential time measurements. To exploit the strengths of both absolute and differential time data, we extend our multiple-event location method Bayesloc, which previously used absolute time data only, to include the use of differential time measurements that are based on waveform cross correlation. Fundamentally, Bayesloc is a formulation of the joint probability over all parameters comprising the multiple event location system. The Markov-Chain Monte Carlo method is used to sample from the joint probability distribution given arrival data sets. The differential time component of Bayesloc includes scaling a stochastic estimate of differential time measurement precision based the waveform correlation coefficient for each datum. For a regional-distance synthetic data set with absolute and differential time measurement error of 0.25 seconds and 0.01 second, respectively, epicenter location accuracy is improved from and average of 1.05 km when solely absolute time data are used to 0.28 km when absolute and differential time data are used jointly (73% improvement). The improvement in absolute location accuracy is the result of conditionally limiting absolute location probability regions based on the precise relative position with respect to neighboring events. Bayesloc estimates of data precision are found to be accurate for the synthetic test, with absolute and differential time measurement

  16. Testing the quasi-absolute method in photon activation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Z. J.; Wells, D.; Starovoitova, V.; Segebade, C.

    2013-04-19

    In photon activation analysis (PAA), relative methods are widely used because of their accuracy and precision. Absolute methods, which are conducted without any assistance from calibration materials, are seldom applied for the difficulty in obtaining photon flux in measurements. This research is an attempt to perform a new absolute approach in PAA - quasi-absolute method - by retrieving photon flux in the sample through Monte Carlo simulation. With simulated photon flux and database of experimental cross sections, it is possible to calculate the concentration of target elements in the sample directly. The QA/QC procedures to solidify the research are discussed in detail. Our results show that the accuracy of the method for certain elements is close to a useful level in practice. Furthermore, the future results from the quasi-absolute method can also serve as a validation technique for experimental data on cross sections. The quasi-absolute method looks promising.

  17. Electronic Absolute Cartesian Autocollimator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leviton, Douglas B.

    2006-01-01

    An electronic absolute Cartesian autocollimator performs the same basic optical function as does a conventional all-optical or a conventional electronic autocollimator but differs in the nature of its optical target and the manner in which the position of the image of the target is measured. The term absolute in the name of this apparatus reflects the nature of the position measurement, which, unlike in a conventional electronic autocollimator, is based absolutely on the position of the image rather than on an assumed proportionality between the position and the levels of processed analog electronic signals. The term Cartesian in the name of this apparatus reflects the nature of its optical target. Figure 1 depicts the electronic functional blocks of an electronic absolute Cartesian autocollimator along with its basic optical layout, which is the same as that of a conventional autocollimator. Referring first to the optical layout and functions only, this or any autocollimator is used to measure the compound angular deviation of a flat datum mirror with respect to the optical axis of the autocollimator itself. The optical components include an illuminated target, a beam splitter, an objective or collimating lens, and a viewer or detector (described in more detail below) at a viewing plane. The target and the viewing planes are focal planes of the lens. Target light reflected by the datum mirror is imaged on the viewing plane at unit magnification by the collimating lens. If the normal to the datum mirror is parallel to the optical axis of the autocollimator, then the target image is centered on the viewing plane. Any angular deviation of the normal from the optical axis manifests itself as a lateral displacement of the target image from the center. The magnitude of the displacement is proportional to the focal length and to the magnitude (assumed to be small) of the angular deviation. The direction of the displacement is perpendicular to the axis about which the

  18. Impacts of visuomotor sequence learning methods on speed and accuracy: Starting over from the beginning or from the point of error.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Kanji; Watanabe, Katsumi

    2016-02-01

    The present study examined whether sequence learning led to more accurate and shorter performance time if people who are learning a sequence start over from the beginning when they make an error (i.e., practice the whole sequence) or only from the point of error (i.e., practice a part of the sequence). We used a visuomotor sequence learning paradigm with a trial-and-error procedure. In Experiment 1, we found fewer errors, and shorter performance time for those who restarted their performance from the beginning of the sequence as compared to those who restarted from the point at which an error occurred, indicating better learning of spatial and motor representations of the sequence. This might be because the learned elements were repeated when the next performance started over from the beginning. In subsequent experiments, we increased the occasions for the repetitions of learned elements by modulating the number of fresh start points in the sequence after errors. The results showed that fewer fresh start points were likely to lead to fewer errors and shorter performance time, indicating that the repetitions of learned elements enabled participants to develop stronger spatial and motor representations of the sequence. Thus, a single or two fresh start points in the sequence (i.e., starting over only from the beginning or from the beginning or midpoint of the sequence after errors) is likely to lead to more accurate and faster performance. PMID:26829021

  19. Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leckey, John P.

    2015-01-01

    The Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO) is a mission, led and developed by NASA, that will measure a variety of climate variables with an unprecedented accuracy to quantify and attribute climate change. CLARREO consists of three separate instruments: an infrared (IR) spectrometer, a reflected solar (RS) spectrometer, and a radio occultation (RO) instrument. The mission will contain orbiting radiometers with sufficient accuracy, including on orbit verification, to calibrate other space-based instrumentation, increasing their respective accuracy by as much as an order of magnitude. The IR spectrometer is a Fourier Transform spectrometer (FTS) working in the 5 to 50 microns wavelength region with a goal of 0.1 K (k = 3) accuracy. The FTS will achieve this accuracy using phase change cells to verify thermistor accuracy and heated halos to verify blackbody emissivity, both on orbit. The RS spectrometer will measure the reflectance of the atmosphere in the 0.32 to 2.3 microns wavelength region with an accuracy of 0.3% (k = 2). The status of the instrumentation packages and potential mission options will be presented.

  20. Instrument Pointing Capabilities: Past, Present, and Future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackmore, Lars; Murray, Emmanuell; Scharf, Daniel P.; Aung, Mimi; Bayard, David; Brugarolas, Paul; Hadaegh, Fred; Lee, Allan; Milman, Mark; Sirlin, Sam; Kang, Bryan

    2011-01-01

    This paper surveys the instrument pointing capabilities of past, present and future space telescopes and interferometers. As an important aspect of this survey, we present a taxonomy for "apples-to-apples" comparisons of pointing performances. First, pointing errors are defined relative to either an inertial frame or a celestial target. Pointing error can then be further sub-divided into DC, that is, steady state, and AC components. We refer to the magnitude of the DC error relative to the inertial frame as absolute pointing accuracy, and we refer to the magnitude of the DC error relative to a celestial target as relative pointing accuracy. The magnitude of the AC error is referred to as pointing stability. While an AC/DC partition is not new, we leverage previous work by some of the authors to quantitatively clarify and compare varying definitions of jitter and time window averages. With this taxonomy and for sixteen past, present, and future missions, pointing accuracies and stabilities, both required and achieved, are presented. In addition, we describe the attitude control technologies used to and, for future missions, planned to achieve these pointing performances.

  1. GNSS Absolute Antenna Calibration at the National Geodetic Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilich, A. L.; Mader, G. L.

    2009-12-01

    GNSS applications now routinely demand measurement and instrument biases at the centimeter to millimeter level in order to achieve the high precision and accuracy required for geodetic position solutions. One of these biases is the antenna phase center, the point of signal reception for a GNSS antenna. It has been well established that phase center patterns differ between antenna models and manufacturers; additional research suggests that the addition of a radome or the choice of antenna mount can significantly alter those a priori phase center patterns. As baseline lengths increase, or with antenna mixing, phase center effects on carrier phase data become more pronounced. To meet the needs of the high-precision GNSS community, the National Geodetic Survey (NGS) has constructed an absolute antenna calibration facility which uses field measurements and actual GNSS satellite signals to determine antenna phase center patterns. A pan/tilt motor changes the orientation of the antenna under test; signals are received at a wide range of angles, allowing computation of a robust phase center pattern. Ultimately, this facility will be used to measure antenna phase center variations of commonly-used geodetic GNSS antennas, as well as antennas submitted by users. The phase center patterns will be publicly available and disseminated in both the ANTEX and NGS formats. We provide information on the observation models and strategy currently used to generate NGS absolute calibrations, and propose some future refinements. We discuss the multipath mitigation strategy currently in use, and provide examples of antenna calibrations from the NGS facility. These examples are compared to the NGS relative calibrations as well as absolute calibrations generated by other organizations.

  2. Implants as absolute anchorage.

    PubMed

    Rungcharassaeng, Kitichai; Kan, Joseph Y K; Caruso, Joseph M

    2005-11-01

    Anchorage control is essential for successful orthodontic treatment. Each tooth has its own anchorage potential as well as propensity to move when force is applied. When teeth are used as anchorage, the untoward movements of the anchoring units may result in the prolonged treatment time, and unpredictable or less-than-ideal outcome. To maximize tooth-related anchorage, techniques such as differential torque, placing roots into the cortex of the bone, the use of various intraoral devices and/or extraoral appliances have been implemented. Implants, as they are in direct contact with bone, do not possess a periodontal ligament. As a result, they do not move when orthodontic/orthopedic force is applied, and therefore can be used as "absolute anchorage." This article describes different types of implants that have been used as orthodontic anchorage. Their clinical applications and limitations are also discussed. PMID:16463910

  3. Absolute Equilibrium Entropy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shebalin, John V.

    1997-01-01

    The entropy associated with absolute equilibrium ensemble theories of ideal, homogeneous, fluid and magneto-fluid turbulence is discussed and the three-dimensional fluid case is examined in detail. A sigma-function is defined, whose minimum value with respect to global parameters is the entropy. A comparison is made between the use of global functions sigma and phase functions H (associated with the development of various H-theorems of ideal turbulence). It is shown that the two approaches are complimentary though conceptually different: H-theorems show that an isolated system tends to equilibrium while sigma-functions allow the demonstration that entropy never decreases when two previously isolated systems are combined. This provides a more complete picture of entropy in the statistical mechanics of ideal fluids.

  4. Updated Absolute Flux Calibration of the COS FUV Modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massa, D.; Ely, J.; Osten, R.; Penton, S.; Aloisi, A.; Bostroem, A.; Roman-Duval, J.; Proffitt, C.

    2014-03-01

    We present newly derived point source absolute flux calibrations for the COS FUV modes at both the original and second lifetime positions. The analysis includes observa- tions through the Primary Science Aperture (PSA) of the standard stars WD0308-565, GD71, WD1057+729 and WD0947+857 obtained as part of two calibration programs. Data were were obtained for all of the gratings at all of the original CENWAVE settings at both the original and second lifetime positions and for the G130M CENWAVE = 1222 at the second lifetime position. Data were also obtained with the FUVB segment for the G130M CENWAVE = 1055 and 1096 setting at the second lifetime position. We also present the derivation of L-flats that were used in processing the data and show that the internal consistency of the primary standards is 1%. The accuracy of the absolute flux calibrations over the UV are estimated to be 1-2% for the medium resolution gratings, and 2-3% over most of the wavelength range of the G140L grating, although the uncertainty can be as large as 5% or more at some G140L wavelengths. We note that these errors are all relative to the optical flux near the V band and small additional errors may be present due to inaccuracies in the V band calibration. In addition, these error estimates are for the time at which the flux calibration data were obtained; the accuracy of the flux calibration at other times can be affected by errors in the time dependent sensitivity (TDS) correction.

  5. Diagnostic Accuracy of the HemoCue Hb 301, STAT-Site MHgb and URIT-12 Point-of-Care Hemoglobin Meters in a Central Laboratory and a Community Based Clinic in Durban, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Jaggernath, Manjeetha; Naicker, Rumallen; Madurai, Savathree; Brockman, Mark A.; Ndung’u, Thumbi; Gelderblom, Huub C.

    2016-01-01

    In South Africa, various point-of-care hemoglobin meters are used. However, the regulatory framework for approval, implementation and oversight of use of point-of-care hemoglobin meters is suboptimal. We assessed the diagnostic accuracy of the HemoCue Hb 301, STAT-Site MHgb and URIT-12 point-of-care hemoglobin meters, compared to a central laboratory based reference assay, in a central laboratory and a community based clinic in Durban, South Africa. Differences in performance of the point-of-care assays, compared to the reference assay, were more pronounced in the community based clinic. Results were reasonable for the HemoCue Hb 301, but poor for the STAT-Site MHgb and the URIT-12. Poor test performance of point-of-care hemoglobin meters, and inadequate evaluations and oversight in South Africa, leads to suboptimal clinical care and clinical research, and increased costs. There is a need for proper evaluation and quality assurance of point-of-care tests, the results of which should be made widely available to key stakeholders. PMID:27046200

  6. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Absolute Proper motions Outside the Plane (APOP) (Qi+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Z. X.; Yu, Y.; Bucciasrelli, B.; Lattanzi, M. G.; Smart, R. L.; Spagna, A.; McLean, B. J.; Tang, Z. H.; Jones, H. R. A.; Morbidelli, R.; Nicastro, L.; Vacchiato, A.

    2015-09-01

    The APOP is a absolute proper motion catalog achieved on the Digitized Sky Survey Schmidt plates data established by GSC-II project that outside the galactic plane (|b|>27°). The sky cover of this catalog is 22,525 square degree, the mean density is 4473 objects/sq.deg. and the magnitude limit is around R=20.8mag. The systematic errors of absolute proper motions related to the position, magnitude and color are practically all removed by using the extragalactic objects. The zero point error of absolute proper motions is less than 0.6mas/yr, and the accuracy is better than 4.0mas/yr for objects bright than R=18.5, and rises to 9.0mas/yr for objects with magnitude 18.5accuracy condition is good for objects with Declination>-30 degree and is not very well for others, the reason is that the epoch difference is large for Declination>-30° (45 years) but South than that is only around 12 years. It is fine for statistical studies for objects with Declination<-30° that people could find and remove obviously incorrect entries. (1 data file).

  7. Absolute and relative dosimetry for ELIMED

    SciTech Connect

    Cirrone, G. A. P.; Schillaci, F.; Scuderi, V.; Cuttone, G.; Candiano, G.; Musumarra, A.; Pisciotta, P.; Romano, F.; Carpinelli, M.; Presti, D. Lo; Raffaele, L.; Tramontana, A.; Cirio, R.; Sacchi, R.; Monaco, V.; Marchetto, F.; Giordanengo, S.

    2013-07-26

    The definition of detectors, methods and procedures for the absolute and relative dosimetry of laser-driven proton beams is a crucial step toward the clinical use of this new kind of beams. Hence, one of the ELIMED task, will be the definition of procedures aiming to obtain an absolute dose measure at the end of the transport beamline with an accuracy as close as possible to the one required for clinical applications (i.e. of the order of 5% or less). Relative dosimetry procedures must be established, as well: they are necessary in order to determine and verify the beam dose distributions and to monitor the beam fluence and the energetic spectra during irradiations. Radiochromic films, CR39, Faraday Cup, Secondary Emission Monitor (SEM) and transmission ionization chamber will be considered, designed and studied in order to perform a fully dosimetric characterization of the ELIMED proton beam.

  8. Fully distributed absolute blood flow velocity measurement for middle cerebral arteries using Doppler optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Qi, Li; Zhu, Jiang; Hancock, Aneeka M; Dai, Cuixia; Zhang, Xuping; Frostig, Ron D; Chen, Zhongping

    2016-02-01

    Doppler optical coherence tomography (DOCT) is considered one of the most promising functional imaging modalities for neuro biology research and has demonstrated the ability to quantify cerebral blood flow velocity at a high accuracy. However, the measurement of total absolute blood flow velocity (BFV) of major cerebral arteries is still a difficult problem since it is related to vessel geometry. In this paper, we present a volumetric vessel reconstruction approach that is capable of measuring the absolute BFV distributed along the entire middle cerebral artery (MCA) within a large field-of-view. The Doppler angle at each point of the MCA, representing the vessel geometry, is derived analytically by localizing the artery from pure DOCT images through vessel segmentation and skeletonization. Our approach could achieve automatic quantification of the fully distributed absolute BFV across different vessel branches. Experiments on rodents using swept-source optical coherence tomography showed that our approach was able to reveal the consequences of permanent MCA occlusion with absolute BFV measurement. PMID:26977365

  9. Fully distributed absolute blood flow velocity measurement for middle cerebral arteries using Doppler optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Li; Zhu, Jiang; Hancock, Aneeka M.; Dai, Cuixia; Zhang, Xuping; Frostig, Ron D.; Chen, Zhongping

    2016-01-01

    Doppler optical coherence tomography (DOCT) is considered one of the most promising functional imaging modalities for neuro biology research and has demonstrated the ability to quantify cerebral blood flow velocity at a high accuracy. However, the measurement of total absolute blood flow velocity (BFV) of major cerebral arteries is still a difficult problem since it is related to vessel geometry. In this paper, we present a volumetric vessel reconstruction approach that is capable of measuring the absolute BFV distributed along the entire middle cerebral artery (MCA) within a large field-of-view. The Doppler angle at each point of the MCA, representing the vessel geometry, is derived analytically by localizing the artery from pure DOCT images through vessel segmentation and skeletonization. Our approach could achieve automatic quantification of the fully distributed absolute BFV across different vessel branches. Experiments on rodents using swept-source optical coherence tomography showed that our approach was able to reveal the consequences of permanent MCA occlusion with absolute BFV measurement. PMID:26977365

  10. A vertically-stacked, polymer, microfluidic point mutation analyzer: Rapid, high accuracy detection of low-abundance K-ras mutations

    PubMed Central

    Han, Kyudong; Lee, Tae Yoon; Nikitopoulos, Dimitris E.; Soper, Steven A.; Murphy, Michael C.

    2011-01-01

    Recognition of point mutations in the K-ras gene can be used for the clinical management of several types of cancers. Unfortunately, several assay and hardware concerns must be addressed to allow users not well-trained in performing molecular analyses the opportunity to undertake these measurements. To provide for a larger user-base for these types of molecular assays, a vertically-stacked microfluidic analyzer with a modular architecture and process automation was developed. The analyzer employed a primary PCR coupled to an allele-specific ligase detection reaction (LDR). Each functional device, including continuous flow thermal reactors for the PCR and LDR, passive micromixers and ExoSAP-IT® purification, was designed and tested. Individual devices were fabricated in polycarbonate using hot embossing and assembled using adhesive bonding for system assembly. The system produced LDR products from a DNA sample in ~1 h, an 80% reduction in time compared to conventional bench-top instrumentation. Purifying the post-PCR products with the ExoSAP-IT® enzyme led to optimized LDR performance minimizing false positive signals and producing reliable results. Mutant alleles in genomic DNA were quantified to the level of 0.25 ng of mutant DNA in 50 ng of wild-type DNA for a 25 μL sample, equivalent to DNA from 42 mutant cells. PMID:21771577

  11. Improvement of registration accuracy in accelerated partial breast irradiation using the point-based rigid-body registration algorithm for patients with implanted fiducial markers

    SciTech Connect

    Inoue, Minoru; Yoshimura, Michio Sato, Sayaka; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Yamada, Masahiro; Hirata, Kimiko; Ogura, Masakazu; Hiraoka, Masahiro; Sasaki, Makoto; Fujimoto, Takahiro

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: To investigate image-registration errors when using fiducial markers with a manual method and the point-based rigid-body registration (PRBR) algorithm in accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) patients, with accompanying fiducial deviations. Methods: Twenty-two consecutive patients were enrolled in a prospective trial examining 10-fraction APBI. Titanium clips were implanted intraoperatively around the seroma in all patients. For image-registration, the positions of the clips in daily kV x-ray images were matched to those in the planning digitally reconstructed radiographs. Fiducial and gravity registration errors (FREs and GREs, respectively), representing resulting misalignments of the edge and center of the target, respectively, were compared between the manual and algorithm-based methods. Results: In total, 218 fractions were evaluated. Although the mean FRE/GRE values for the manual and algorithm-based methods were within 3 mm (2.3/1.7 and 1.3/0.4 mm, respectively), the percentages of fractions where FRE/GRE exceeded 3 mm using the manual and algorithm-based methods were 18.8%/7.3% and 0%/0%, respectively. Manual registration resulted in 18.6% of patients with fractions of FRE/GRE exceeding 5 mm. The patients with larger clip deviation had significantly more fractions showing large FRE/GRE using manual registration. Conclusions: For image-registration using fiducial markers in APBI, the manual registration results in more fractions with considerable registration error due to loss of fiducial objectivity resulting from their deviation. The authors recommend the PRBR algorithm as a safe and effective strategy for accurate, image-guided registration and PTV margin reduction.

  12. Absolute Identification by Relative Judgment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Neil; Brown, Gordon D. A.; Chater, Nick

    2005-01-01

    In unidimensional absolute identification tasks, participants identify stimuli that vary along a single dimension. Performance is surprisingly poor compared with discrimination of the same stimuli. Existing models assume that identification is achieved using long-term representations of absolute magnitudes. The authors propose an alternative…

  13. Be Resolute about Absolute Value

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kidd, Margaret L.

    2007-01-01

    This article explores how conceptualization of absolute value can start long before it is introduced. The manner in which absolute value is introduced to students in middle school has far-reaching consequences for their future mathematical understanding. It begins to lay the foundation for students' understanding of algebra, which can change…

  14. Accuracy evaluation of 3D lidar data from small UAV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tulldahl, H. M.; Bissmarck, Fredrik; Larsson, Hâkan; Grönwall, Christina; Tolt, Gustav

    2015-10-01

    A UAV (Unmanned Aerial Vehicle) with an integrated lidar can be an efficient system for collection of high-resolution and accurate three-dimensional (3D) data. In this paper we evaluate the accuracy of a system consisting of a lidar sensor on a small UAV. High geometric accuracy in the produced point cloud is a fundamental qualification for detection and recognition of objects in a single-flight dataset as well as for change detection using two or several data collections over the same scene. Our work presented here has two purposes: first to relate the point cloud accuracy to data processing parameters and second, to examine the influence on accuracy from the UAV platform parameters. In our work, the accuracy is numerically quantified as local surface smoothness on planar surfaces, and as distance and relative height accuracy using data from a terrestrial laser scanner as reference. The UAV lidar system used is the Velodyne HDL-32E lidar on a multirotor UAV with a total weight of 7 kg. For processing of data into a geographically referenced point cloud, positioning and orientation of the lidar sensor is based on inertial navigation system (INS) data combined with lidar data. The combination of INS and lidar data is achieved in a dynamic calibration process that minimizes the navigation errors in six degrees of freedom, namely the errors of the absolute position (x, y, z) and the orientation (pitch, roll, yaw) measured by GPS/INS. Our results show that low-cost and light-weight MEMS based (microelectromechanical systems) INS equipment with a dynamic calibration process can obtain significantly improved accuracy compared to processing based solely on INS data.

  15. An improved generalized Newton method for absolute value equations.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jingmei; Liu, Sanyang

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we suggest and analyze an improved generalized Newton method for solving the NP-hard absolute value equations [Formula: see text] when the singular values of A exceed 1. We show that the global and local quadratic convergence of the proposed method. Numerical experiments show the efficiency of the method and the high accuracy of calculation. PMID:27462490

  16. Improved cavity-type absolute total-radiation radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kendall, J. M., Sr.; Plamondon, J. A., Jr.

    1967-01-01

    Conical cavity-type absolute radiometer measures the intensity of radiant energy to an accuracy of one to two percent in a vacuum of ten to the minus fifth torr or lower. There is a uniform response over the ultraviolet, visible, and infrared range, and it requires no calibration or comparison with a radiation standard.

  17. Relative errors can cue absolute visuomotor mappings.

    PubMed

    van Dam, Loes C J; Ernst, Marc O

    2015-12-01

    When repeatedly switching between two visuomotor mappings, e.g. in a reaching or pointing task, adaptation tends to speed up over time. That is, when the error in the feedback corresponds to a mapping switch, fast adaptation occurs. Yet, what is learned, the relative error or the absolute mappings? When switching between mappings, errors with a size corresponding to the relative difference between the mappings will occur more often than other large errors. Thus, we could learn to correct more for errors with this familiar size (Error Learning). On the other hand, it has been shown that the human visuomotor system can store several absolute visuomotor mappings (Mapping Learning) and can use associated contextual cues to retrieve them. Thus, when contextual information is present, no error feedback is needed to switch between mappings. Using a rapid pointing task, we investigated how these two types of learning may each contribute when repeatedly switching between mappings in the absence of task-irrelevant contextual cues. After training, we examined how participants changed their behaviour when a single error probe indicated either the often-experienced error (Error Learning) or one of the previously experienced absolute mappings (Mapping Learning). Results were consistent with Mapping Learning despite the relative nature of the error information in the feedback. This shows that errors in the feedback can have a double role in visuomotor behaviour: they drive the general adaptation process by making corrections possible on subsequent movements, as well as serve as contextual cues that can signal a learned absolute mapping. PMID:26280315

  18. A method for establishing absolute full-energy peak efficiency and its confidence interval for HPGe detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizwan, U.; Chester, A.; Domingo, T.; Starosta, K.; Williams, J.; Voss, P.

    2015-12-01

    A method is proposed for establishing the absolute efficiency calibration of a HPGe detector including the confidence interval in the energy range of 79.6-3451.2 keV. The calibrations were accomplished with the 133Ba, 60Co, 56Co and 152Eu point-like radioactive sources with only the 60Co source being activity calibrated to an accuracy of 2% at the 90% confidence level. All data sets measured from activity calibrated and uncalibrated sources were fit simultaneously using the linearized least squares method. The proposed fit function accounts for scaling of the data taken with activity uncalibrated sources to the data taken with the high accuracy activity calibrated source. The confidence interval for the fit was found analytically using the covariance matrix. Accuracy of the fit was below 3.5% at the 90% confidence level in the 79.6-3451.2 keV energy range.

  19. Swarm Absolute Scalar Magnetometers first in-orbit results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fratter, Isabelle; Léger, Jean-Michel; Bertrand, François; Jager, Thomas; Hulot, Gauthier; Brocco, Laura; Vigneron, Pierre

    2016-04-01

    The ESA Swarm mission will provide the best ever survey of the Earth's magnetic field and its temporal evolution. This will be achieved by a constellation of three identical satellites, launched together on the 22nd of November 2013. In order to observe the magnetic field thoroughly, each satellite carries two magnetometers: a Vector Field Magnetometer (VFM) coupled with a star tracker camera, to measure the direction of the magnetic field in space, and an Absolute Scalar Magnetometer (ASM), to measure its intensity. The ASM is the French contribution to the Swarm mission. This new generation instrument was designed by CEA-Leti and developed in close partnership with CNES, with scientific support from IPGP. Its operating principle is based on the atomic spectroscopy of the helium 4 metastable state. It makes use of the Zeeman's effect to transduce the magnetic field into a frequency, the signal being amplified by optical pumping. The primary role of the ASM is to provide absolute measurements of the magnetic field's strength at 1 Hz, for the in-flight calibration of the VFM. As the Swarm magnetic reference, the ASM scalar performance is crucial for the mission's success. Thanks to its innovative design, the ASM offers the best precision, resolution and absolute accuracy ever attained in space, with similar performance all along the orbit. In addition, thanks to an original architecture, the ASM implements on an experimental basis a capacity for providing simultaneously vector measurements at 1 Hz. This new feature makes it the first instrument capable of delivering both scalar and vector measurements simultaneously at the same point. Swarm offers a unique opportunity to validate the ASM vector data in orbit by comparison with the VFM's. Furthermore, the ASM can provide scalar data at a much higher sampling rate, when run in "burst" mode at 250 Hz, with a 100 Hz measurement bandwidth. An analysis of the spectral content of the magnetic field above 1 Hz becomes thus

  20. An empirical reevaluation of absolute pitch: behavioral and electrophysiological measurements.

    PubMed

    Elmer, Stefan; Sollberger, Silja; Meyer, Martin; Jäncke, Lutz

    2013-10-01

    Here, we reevaluated the "two-component" model of absolute pitch (AP) by combining behavioral and electrophysiological measurements. This specific model postulates that AP is driven by a perceptual encoding ability (i.e., pitch memory) plus an associative memory component (i.e., pitch labeling). To test these predictions, during EEG measurements AP and non-AP (NAP) musicians were passively exposed to piano tones (first component of the model) and additionally instructed to judge whether combinations of tones and labels were conceptually associated or not (second component of the model). Auditory-evoked N1/P2 potentials did not reveal differences between the two groups, thus indicating that AP is not necessarily driven by a differential pitch encoding ability at the processing level of the auditory cortex. Otherwise, AP musicians performed the conceptual association task with an order of magnitude better accuracy and shorter RTs than NAP musicians did, this result clearly pointing to distinctive conceptual associations in AP possessors. Most notably, this behavioral superiority was reflected by an increased N400 effect and accompanied by a subsequent late positive component, the latter not being distinguishable in NAP musicians. PMID:23647515

  1. Multiple-integrating sphere spectrophotometer for measuring absolute spectral reflectance and transmittance.

    PubMed

    Zerlaut, G A; Anderson, T E

    1981-11-01

    A spectroreflectometer/transmissometer is described that permits determination of absolute optical characteristics in the 300-2600-nm wavelength region (which is essentially the complete solar spectrum). The uniqueness of the instrument derives from use of three rapidly interchangeable 20-cm (8-in.) integrating spheres to measure (1) absolute hemispherical spectral reflectance as a function of angles of incidence from -40 to +40 degrees employing an Edwards-type integrating sphere with a center-mounted sample [using small 2.5-cm (1-in.) diam specimens], (2) absolute hemispherical and absolute diffuse spectral reflectance at an angle of incidence of 20 degrees employing a sphere with a wall-mounted sample (for large specimens) and a screened detector, and (3) absolute hemispherical and absolute directional (near-normal exitance) transmittance employing a complete integrating sphere with the only ports being for the sample and reference beams. Data are presented that demonstrate the ability to measure the spectral reflectance of nonmirror surfaces to an absolute accuracy of 0.995 (an uncertainty of +/-0.005 reflectance units) in both reflectance spheres and of highly specular mirrors to an absolute accuracy of 0.993 (an uncertainty of +/-0.007 reflectance units). Spectral transmittance can be measured to an absolute accuracy of better than 0.995 (an uncertainty of +/-0.005 transmittance units). PMID:20372262

  2. MAGSAT: Vector magnetometer absolute sensor alignment determination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acuna, M. H.

    1981-01-01

    A procedure is described for accurately determining the absolute alignment of the magnetic axes of a triaxial magnetometer sensor with respect to an external, fixed, reference coordinate system. The method does not require that the magnetic field vector orientation, as generated by a triaxial calibration coil system, be known to better than a few degrees from its true position, and minimizes the number of positions through which a sensor assembly must be rotated to obtain a solution. Computer simulations show that accuracies of better than 0.4 seconds of arc can be achieved under typical test conditions associated with existing magnetic test facilities. The basic approach is similar in nature to that presented by McPherron and Snare (1978) except that only three sensor positions are required and the system of equations to be solved is considerably simplified. Applications of the method to the case of the MAGSAT Vector Magnetometer are presented and the problems encountered discussed.

  3. Swarm's Absolute Scalar Magnetometer metrological performances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leger, J.; Fratter, I.; Bertrand, F.; Jager, T.; Morales, S.

    2012-12-01

    The Absolute Scalar Magnetometer (ASM) has been developed for the ESA Earth Observation Swarm mission, planned for launch in November 2012. As its Overhauser magnetometers forerunners flown on Oersted and Champ satellites, it will deliver high resolution scalar measurements for the in-flight calibration of the Vector Field Magnetometer manufactured by the Danish Technical University. Latest results of the ground tests carried out to fully characterize all parameters that may affect its accuracy, both at instrument and satellite level, will be presented. In addition to its baseline function, the ASM can be operated either at a much higher sampling rate (burst mode at 250 Hz) or in a dual mode where it also delivers vector field measurements as a by-product. The calibration procedure and the relevant vector performances will be discussed.

  4. Global absolut gravity reference system as replacement of IGSN 71

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilmes, Herbert; Wziontek, Hartmut; Falk, Reinhard

    2015-04-01

    The determination of precise gravity field parameters is of great importance in a period in which earth sciences are achieving the necessary accuracy to monitor and document global change processes. This is the reason why experts from geodesy and metrology joined in a successful cooperation to make absolute gravity observations traceable to SI quantities, to improve the metrological kilogram definition and to monitor mass movements and smallest height changes for geodetic and geophysical applications. The international gravity datum is still defined by the International Gravity Standardization Net adopted in 1971 (IGSN 71). The network is based upon pendulum and spring gravimeter observations taken in the 1950s and 60s supported by the early free fall absolute gravimeters. Its gravity values agreed in every case to better than 0.1 mGal. Today, more than 100 absolute gravimeters are in use worldwide. The series of repeated international comparisons confirms the traceability of absolute gravity measurements to SI quantities and confirm the degree of equivalence of the gravimeters in the order of a few µGal. For applications in geosciences where e.g. gravity changes over time need to be analyzed, the temporal stability of an absolute gravimeter is most important. Therefore, the proposition is made to replace the IGSN 71 by an up-to-date gravity reference system which is based upon repeated absolute gravimeter comparisons and a global network of well controlled gravity reference stations.

  5. Sentinel-2/MSI absolute calibration: first results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lonjou, V.; Lachérade, S.; Fougnie, B.; Gamet, P.; Marcq, S.; Raynaud, J.-L.; Tremas, T.

    2015-10-01

    Sentinel-2 is an optical imaging mission devoted to the operational monitoring of land and coastal areas. It is developed in partnership between the European Commission and the European Space Agency. The Sentinel-2 mission is based on a satellites constellation deployed in polar sun-synchronous orbit. It will offer a unique combination of global coverage with a wide field of view (290km), a high revisit (5 days with two satellites), a high resolution (10m, 20m and 60m) and multi-spectral imagery (13 spectral bands in visible and shortwave infra-red domains). CNES is involved in the instrument commissioning in collaboration with ESA. This paper reviews all the techniques that will be used to insure an absolute calibration of the 13 spectral bands better than 5% (target 3%), and will present the first results if available. First, the nominal calibration technique, based on an on-board sun diffuser, is detailed. Then, we show how vicarious calibration methods based on acquisitions over natural targets (oceans, deserts, and Antarctica during winter) will be used to check and improve the accuracy of the absolute calibration coefficients. Finally, the verification scheme, exploiting photometer in-situ measurements over Lacrau plain, is described. A synthesis, including spectral coherence, inter-methods agreement and temporal evolution, will conclude the paper.

  6. Absolute Spectrophotometry of 237 Open Cluster Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clampitt, L.; Burstein, D.

    1994-12-01

    We present absolute spectrophotometry of 237 stars in 7 nearby open clusters: Hyades, Pleiades, Alpha Persei, Praesepe, Coma Berenices, IC 4665, and M 39. The observations were taken using the Wampler single-channel scanner (Wampler 1966) on the Crossley 0.9m telescope at Lick Observatory from July 1973 through December 1974. 21 bandpasses spanning the spectral range 3500 Angstroms to 7780 Angstroms were observed for each star, with bandwiths ranging from 32Angstroms to 64 Angstroms. Data are standardized to the Hayes--Latham (1975) system. Our measurements are compared to filter colors on the Johnson BV, Stromgren ubvy, and Geneva U V B_1 B_2 V_1 G systems, as well as to spectrophotometry of a few stars published by Gunn, Stryker & Tinsley and in the Spectrophotometric Standards Catalog (Adelman; as distributed by the NSSDC). Both internal and external comparisons to the filter systems indicate a formal statistical accuracy per bandpass of 0.01 to 0.02 mag, with apparent larger ( ~ 0.03 mag) differences in absolute calibration between this data set and existing spectrophotometry. These data will comprise part of the spectrophotometry that will be used to calibrate the Beijing-Arizona-Taipei-Connecticut Color Survey of the Sky (see separate paper by Burstein et al. at this meeting).

  7. Absolute calibration of ultraviolet filter photometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bless, R. C.; Fairchild, T.; Code, A. D.

    1972-01-01

    The essential features of the calibration procedure can be divided into three parts. First, the shape of the bandpass of each photometer was determined by measuring the transmissions of the individual optical components and also by measuring the response of the photometer as a whole. Secondly, each photometer was placed in the essentially-collimated synchrotron radiation bundle maintained at a constant intensity level, and the output signal was determined from about 100 points on the objective. Finally, two or three points on the objective were illuminated by synchrotron radiation at several different intensity levels covering the dynamic range of the photometers. The output signals were placed on an absolute basis by the electron counting technique described earlier.

  8. On-Orbit Absolute Temperature Calibration Using Multiple Phase Change Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Best, F. A.; Adler, D. P.; Pettersen, C.; Revercomb, H. E.; Perepezko, J. H.

    2009-12-01

    NASA’s anticipated plan for a mission dedicated to Climate (CLARREO) will hinge upon the ability to fly SI traceable standards that provide irrefutable absolute measurement accuracy. As an example, instrumentation designed to measure spectrally resolved infrared radiances will require high-emissivity calibration blackbodies that have absolute temperature uncertainties of better than 0.045K (3 sigma). A novel scheme to provide absolute calibration of temperature sensors, suitable for CLARREO on-orbit operation, has been demonstrated in the laboratory at the University of Wisconsin, and is now undergoing refinement under NASA Instrument Incubator Program funding. In this scheme, small quantities of reference materials (mercury, water, and gallium) are imbedded into the blackbody cavity wall, in a manner similar to the temperature sensors to be calibrated. As the blackbody cavity is slowly heated through the melt point of each reference material, the transient temperature signature from the imbedded thermistor sensors provides a very accurate indication of the melt temperature. Using small quantities of phase change material (less than half of a percent of the mass of the cavity), melt temperature accuracies of better than 10 mK have been demonstrated for mercury, water, and gallium (providing calibration from 233K to 303K). Refinements currently underway focus on ensuring that the melt materials in their sealed confinement housings perform as expected in the thermal and microgravity environment of a multi-year spaceflight mission. Thermal soak and cycling tests are underway to demonstrate that there is no dissolution from the housings into the melt materials that could alter melt temperature, and that there is no liquid metal embrittlement of the housings from the metal melt materials. In addition, NASA funding has been recently secured to conduct a demonstration of this scheme in the microgravity environment of the International Space Station.

  9. Evaluation of Relative Geometric Accuracy of Terrasar-X by Pixel Matching Methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nonaka, T.; Asaka, T.; Iwashita, K.

    2016-06-01

    Recently, high-resolution commercial SAR satellites with several meters of resolutions are widely utilized for various applications and disaster monitoring is one of the commonly applied areas. The information about the flooding situation and ground displacement was rapidly announced to the public after the Great East Japan Earthquake 2011. One of the studies reported the displacement in Tohoku region by the pixel matching methodology using both pre- and post- event TerraSAR-X data, and the validated accuracy was about 30 cm at the GEONET reference points. In order to discuss the spatial distribution of the displacement, we need to evaluate the relative accuracy of the displacement in addition to the absolute accuracy. In the previous studies, our study team evaluated the absolute 2D geo-location accuracy of the TerraSAR-X ortho-rectified EEC product for both flat and mountain areas. Therefore, the purpose of the current study was to evaluate the spatial and temporal relative geo-location accuracies of the product by considering the displacement of the fixed point as the relative geo-location accuracy. Firstly, by utilizing TerraSAR-X StripMap dataset, the pixel matching method for estimating the displacement with sub-pixel level was developed. Secondly, the validity of the method was confirmed by comparing with GEONET data. We confirmed that the accuracy of the displacement for X and Y direction was in agreement with the previous studies. Subsequently, the methodology was applied to 20 pairs of data set for areas of Tokyo Ota-ku and Kawasaki-shi, and the displacement of each pair was evaluated. It was revealed that the time series displacement rate had the seasonal trend and seemed to be related to atmospheric delay.

  10. Point-of-Care HbA1c Testing with the A1cNow Test Kit in General Practice Dental Clinics: A Pilot Study Involving Its Accuracy and Practical Issues in Its Use

    PubMed Central

    Strauss, Shiela M.; Rosedale, Mary; Pesce, Michael A.; Juterbock, Caroline; Kaur, Navjot; DePaola, Joe; Goetz, Deborah; Wolff, Mark S.; Malaspina, Dolores; Danoff, Ann

    2014-01-01

    With millions of at-risk people undiagnosed with pre-diabetes and diabetes, there is a need to identify alternate screening sites for out-of-range glucose values. We examined practical issues and accuracy (relative to High Performance Liquid Chromatography testing in a laboratory) in the use of the A1cNow point of care device for this screening in general practice dental clinics at a large University-based Dental College. Health care professionals obtained evaluable readings for only 70% of the subjects, even after two attempts, and its use according to manufacturer's instructions was often challenging in the busy environment of the dental clinic. At thresholds for pre-diabetes and diabetes established by the American Diabetes Association, sensitivities of the A1cNow kit relative to the HPLC method were 91.9% and 100%, respectively. However, specificities for pre-diabetes and diabetes were 66.7% and 82.4%, respectively, indicating many false positive results. A better strategy for diabetes screening may involve a laboratory-based analysis approach that is patient- and provider-friendly, with minimal burden to the dental team. PMID:25593546

  11. Absolute surface metrology by rotational averaging in oblique incidence interferometry.

    PubMed

    Lin, Weihao; He, Yumei; Song, Li; Luo, Hongxin; Wang, Jie

    2014-06-01

    A modified method for measuring the absolute figure of a large optical flat surface in synchrotron radiation by a small aperture interferometer is presented. The method consists of two procedures: the first step is oblique incidence measurement; the second is multiple rotating measurements. This simple method is described in terms of functions that are symmetric or antisymmetric with respect to reflections at the vertical axis. Absolute deviations of a large flat surface could be obtained when mirror antisymmetric errors are removed by N-position rotational averaging. Formulas are derived for measuring the absolute surface errors of a rectangle flat, and experiments on high-accuracy rectangle flats are performed to verify the method. Finally, uncertainty analysis is carried out in detail. PMID:24922410

  12. Evaluation of a Rapid Point of Care Test for Detecting Acute and Established HIV Infection, and Examining the Role of Study Quality on Diagnostic Accuracy: A Bayesian Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Smallwood, Megan; Vijh, Rohit; Nauche, Bénédicte; Lebouché, Bertrand; Joseph, Lawrence; Pant Pai, Nitika

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Fourth generation (Ag/Ab combination) point of care HIV tests like the FDA-approved Determine HIV1/2 Ag/Ab Combo test offer the promise of timely detection of acute HIV infection, relevant in the context of HIV control. However, a synthesis of their performance has not yet been done. In this meta-analysis we not only assessed device performance but also evaluated the role of study quality on diagnostic accuracy. Methods Two independent reviewers searched seven databases, including conferences and bibliographies, and independently extracted data from 17 studies. Study quality was assessed with QUADAS-2. Data on sensitivity and specificity (overall, antigen, and antibody) were pooled using a Bayesian hierarchical random effects meta-analysis model. Subgroups were analyzed by blood samples (serum/plasma vs. whole blood) and study designs (case-control vs. cross-sectional). Results The overall specificity of the Determine Combo test was 99.1%, 95% credible interval (CrI) [97.3–99.8]. The overall pooled sensitivity for the device was at 88.5%, 95% [80.1–93.4]. When the components of the test were analyzed separately, the pooled specificities were 99.7%, 95% CrI [96.8–100] and 99.6%, 95% CrI [99.0–99.8], for the antigen and antibody components, respectively. Pooled sensitivity of the antibody component was 97.3%, 95% CrI [60.7–99.9], and pooled sensitivity for the antigen component was found to be 12.3%, 95% (CrI) [1.1–44.2]. No significant differences were found between subgroups by blood sample or study design. However, it was noted that many studies restricted their study sample to p24 antigen or RNA positive specimens, which may have led to underestimation of overall test performance. Detection bias, selection (spectrum) bias, incorporation bias, and verification bias impaired study quality. Conclusions Although the specificity of all test components was high, antigenic sensitivity will merit from an improvement. Besides the accuracy of the

  13. Optomechanics for absolute rotation detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davuluri, Sankar

    2016-07-01

    In this article, we present an application of optomechanical cavity for the absolute rotation detection. The optomechanical cavity is arranged in a Michelson interferometer in such a way that the classical centrifugal force due to rotation changes the length of the optomechanical cavity. The change in the cavity length induces a shift in the frequency of the cavity mode. The phase shift corresponding to the frequency shift in the cavity mode is measured at the interferometer output to estimate the angular velocity of absolute rotation. We derived an analytic expression to estimate the minimum detectable rotation rate in our scheme for a given optomechanical cavity. Temperature dependence of the rotation detection sensitivity is studied.

  14. The Absolute Spectrum Polarimeter (ASP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kogut, A. J.

    2010-01-01

    The Absolute Spectrum Polarimeter (ASP) is an Explorer-class mission to map the absolute intensity and linear polarization of the cosmic microwave background and diffuse astrophysical foregrounds over the full sky from 30 GHz to 5 THz. The principal science goal is the detection and characterization of linear polarization from an inflationary epoch in the early universe, with tensor-to-scalar ratio r much greater than 1O(raised to the power of { -3}) and Compton distortion y < 10 (raised to the power of{-6}). We describe the ASP instrument and mission architecture needed to detect the signature of an inflationary epoch in the early universe using only 4 semiconductor bolometers.

  15. GeMS MCAO observations of the Galactic globular cluster NGC 2808: the absolute age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massari, D.; Fiorentino, G.; McConnachie, A.; Bono, G.; Dall'Ora, M.; Ferraro, I.; Iannicola, G.; Stetson, P. B.; Turri, P.; Tolstoy, E.

    2016-02-01

    Context. Globular clusters are the oldest stellar systems in the Milky Way, and they probe the early epoch of the Galaxy formation. However, the uncertainties on their absolute age are still too large to soundly constrain how the Galactic structures have assembled. Aims: The aim of this work is to obtain an accurate estimate of the absolute age of the globular cluster NGC 2808 using deep IR data obtained with the multi-conjugate adaptive optics system operating at the Gemini South telescope (GeMS). Methods: This exquisite photometry, combined with that obtained in V and I-bands with HST, allowed us to detect the faint Main Sequence Knee feature in NGC 2808 colour magnitude diagram. The difference between this point and the main sequence turn-off is a good age estimator that provides ages with unprecedented accuracy. Results: We find that NGC 2808 has an age of t = 10.9 ± 0.7 (intrinsic) ±0.45 (metallicity term) Gyr. A possible contamination by He-enhanced population could make the cluster up to 0.25 Gyr older. Although this age estimate agrees with the age coming from the classical turn-off method (t = 11.0 Gyr), its uncertainty is a factor ~3 better, since it avoids systematics in reddening, distance assumptions, and photometric zero point determination. The final absolute age indicates that NGC 2808 is slightly younger than other Galactic globular clusters with similar metallicity. Tables of the photometry are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/586/A51

  16. High angular resolution absolute intensity of the solar continuum from 1400 to 1790 A.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brueckner, G. E.; Moe, O. K.

    1972-01-01

    Absolute intensities of the solar UV continuum from 1400 to 1790 A have been measured from rocket spectra taken on August 13, 1970. The spectra had an angular resolution of 2 arc sec by 1 arc min, and the pointing accuracy of the instrument was plus or minus 2 arc sec. This permits us to study the center-to-limb variation of the intensity with a spatial resolution of 2 arc sec. Four positions on the solar disk have been studied corresponding to values of cos theta = 0.12, 0.22, 0.28 and 0.72, where theta is the heliocentric position angle. The measurements give higher values for the intensity than recent photoelectric measurement, but are in good agreement with the intensities of Widing et al.

  17. Absolute mass of neutrinos and the first unique forbidden {beta} decay of {sup 187}Re

    SciTech Connect

    Dvornicky, Rastislav; Simkovic, Fedor; Muto, Kazuo; Faessler, Amand

    2011-04-15

    The planned rhenium {beta}-decay experiment, called the ''Microcalorimeter Arrays for a Rhenium Experiment'' (MARE), might probe the absolute mass scale of neutrinos with the same sensitivity as the Karlsruhe tritium neutrino mass (KATRIN) experiment, which will take commissioning data in 2011 and will proceed for 5 years. We present the energy distribution of emitted electrons for the first unique forbidden {beta} decay of {sup 187}Re. It is found that the p-wave emission of electron dominates over the s wave. By assuming mixing of three neutrinos, the Kurie function for the rhenium {beta} decay is derived. It is shown that the Kurie plot near the end point is within a good accuracy linear in the limit of massless neutrinos like the Kurie plot of the superallowed {beta} decay of {sup 3}H.

  18. Superharp — A wire scanner with absolute position readout for beam energy measurement at CEBAF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, C.; Adderley, P.; Barker, D.; Beaufait, J.; Capek, K.; Carlini, R.; Dahlberg, J.; Feldl, E.; Jordan, K.; Kross, B.; Oren, W.; Wojcik, R.; VanDyke, J.

    1995-02-01

    The CEBAF superharp is an upgraded beam wire scanner which provides absolute beam position readout using a shaft encoder. Superharps allow for high precision measurements of the beam's profile and position ( Δx ˜ 10 μm). The Hall C endstation at CEBAF will use three pairs of superharps to perform beam energy measurements with 10 -3 accuracy. The three pairs are installed at the beginning, the mid-point and the end of the Hall C arc beamline. Using superharps in conjunction with a dual sensor system: the direct current pick-up and the bremsstrahlung detectors, beam profile measurements can be obtained over a wide beam current range of 1 ˜ 200 μA.

  19. Strategy for the absolute neutron emission measurement on ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Sasao, M.; Bertalot, L.; Ishikawa, M.; Popovichev, S.

    2010-10-15

    Accuracy of 10% is demanded to the absolute fusion measurement on ITER. To achieve this accuracy, a functional combination of several types of neutron measurement subsystem, cross calibration among them, and in situ calibration are needed. Neutron transport calculation shows the suitable calibration source is a DT/DD neutron generator of source strength higher than 10{sup 10} n/s (neutron/second) for DT and 10{sup 8} n/s for DD. It will take eight weeks at the minimum with this source to calibrate flux monitors, profile monitors, and the activation system.

  20. Testing and evaluation of thermal cameras for absolute temperature measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chrzanowski, Krzysztof; Fischer, Joachim; Matyszkiel, Robert

    2000-09-01

    The accuracy of temperature measurement is the most important criterion for the evaluation of thermal cameras used in applications requiring absolute temperature measurement. All the main international metrological organizations currently propose a parameter called uncertainty as a measure of measurement accuracy. We propose a set of parameters for the characterization of thermal measurement cameras. It is shown that if these parameters are known, then it is possible to determine the uncertainty of temperature measurement due to only the internal errors of these cameras. Values of this uncertainty can be used as an objective criterion for comparisons of different thermal measurement cameras.

  1. Series that Converge Absolutely but Don't Converge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kantrowitz, Robert; Schramm, Michael

    2012-01-01

    If a series of real numbers converges absolutely, then it converges. The usual proof requires completeness in the form of the Cauchy criterion. Failing completeness, the result is false. We provide examples of rational series that illustrate this point. The Cantor set appears in connection with one of the examples.

  2. Evaluation of the geometric stability and the accuracy potential of digital cameras — Comparing mechanical stabilisation versus parameterisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieke-Zapp, D.; Tecklenburg, W.; Peipe, J.; Hastedt, H.; Haig, Claudia

    Recent tests on the geometric stability of several digital cameras that were not designed for photogrammetric applications have shown that the accomplished accuracies in object space are either limited or that the accuracy potential is not exploited to the fullest extent. A total of 72 calibrations were calculated with four different software products for eleven digital camera models with different hardware setups, some with mechanical fixation of one or more parts. The calibration procedure was chosen in accord to a German guideline for evaluation of optical 3D measuring systems [VDI/VDE, VDI/VDE 2634 Part 1, 2002. Optical 3D Measuring Systems-Imaging Systems with Point-by-point Probing. Beuth Verlag, Berlin]. All images were taken with ringflashes which was considered a standard method for close-range photogrammetry. In cases where the flash was mounted to the lens, the force exerted on the lens tube and the camera mount greatly reduced the accomplished accuracy. Mounting the ringflash to the camera instead resulted in a large improvement of accuracy in object space. For standard calibration best accuracies in object space were accomplished with a Canon EOS 5D and a 35 mm Canon lens where the focusing tube was fixed with epoxy (47 μm maximum absolute length measurement error in object space). The fixation of the Canon lens was fairly easy and inexpensive resulting in a sevenfold increase in accuracy compared with the same lens type without modification. A similar accuracy was accomplished with a Nikon D3 when mounting the ringflash to the camera instead of the lens (52 μm maximum absolute length measurement error in object space). Parameterisation of geometric instabilities by introduction of an image variant interior orientation in the calibration process improved results for most cameras. In this case, a modified Alpa 12 WA yielded the best results (29 μm maximum absolute length measurement error in object space). Extending the parameter model with Fi

  3. Absolute validation of a diode laser hygrometer via intercomparison with the German national primary water vapor standard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchholz, B.; Böse, N.; Ebert, V.

    2014-09-01

    Direct tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (dTDLAS) is a powerful diagnostic technique for absolute and accurate gas analysis with highest chemical specificity. Due to its first principles approach, dTDLAS is often claimed to be "calibration-free", but this and the absolute accuracy has not been rigorously validated with respect to a high-accuracy reference. This work describes the first rigorous, side-by-side comparison of a dTDLAS hygrometer—called SEALDH—with a highly accurate, internationally validated, primary reference humidity generator (PHG), which also serves as the German national H2O-standard. This PHG provides a humidified air stream with dew points between -30 °C and +60 °C with an uncertainty of 0.035 K (2 σ) (equivalent relative H2O mixing ratio uncertainty: 0.4 %). Without any previous calibration, SEALDH was found to accurately reproduce the PHG reference values over the full range from 600 to 20,000 ppmv investigated in the 1-week lab study. Over this range, the SEALDH-PHG relative deviation was in average -1.45 %, the worst case being -2.5 % at 1,000 ppmv, the best -0.2 % at 600 ppmv. As SEALDH's relative uncertainty was metrologically determined to be 4.3 % ( k = 2), these deviations are for all concentration steps in full compliance with the PHG reference. Systematic contributions to the relative deviation could be correlated with line shape deviations between the measured line profile and the fitted Voigt line shape. Using this information, SEALDHs absolute accuracy can be improved further to down to an average relative deviation to the PHG of +0.21 %.

  4. Absolute Gravity Datum in the Age of Cold Atom Gravimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Childers, V. A.; Eckl, M. C.

    2014-12-01

    The international gravity datum is defined today by the International Gravity Standardization Net of 1971 (IGSN-71). The data supporting this network was measured in the 1950s and 60s using pendulum and spring-based gravimeter ties (plus some new ballistic absolute meters) to replace the prior protocol of referencing all gravity values to the earlier Potsdam value. Since this time, gravimeter technology has advanced significantly with the development and refinement of the FG-5 (the current standard of the industry) and again with the soon-to-be-available cold atom interferometric absolute gravimeters. This latest development is anticipated to provide improvement in the range of two orders of magnitude as compared to the measurement accuracy of technology utilized to develop ISGN-71. In this presentation, we will explore how the IGSN-71 might best be "modernized" given today's requirements and available instruments and resources. The National Geodetic Survey (NGS), along with other relevant US Government agencies, is concerned about establishing gravity control to establish and maintain high order geodetic networks as part of the nation's essential infrastructure. The need to modernize the nation's geodetic infrastructure was highlighted in "Precise Geodetic Infrastructure, National Requirements for a Shared Resource" National Academy of Science, 2010. The NGS mission, as dictated by Congress, is to establish and maintain the National Spatial Reference System, which includes gravity measurements. Absolute gravimeters measure the total gravity field directly and do not involve ties to other measurements. Periodic "intercomparisons" of multiple absolute gravimeters at reference gravity sites are used to constrain the behavior of the instruments to ensure that each would yield reasonably similar measurements of the same location (i.e. yield a sufficiently consistent datum when measured in disparate locales). New atomic interferometric gravimeters promise a significant

  5. Absolute homogeneity test of Kelantan catchment precipitation series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ros, Faizah Che; Tosaka, Hiroyuki; Sasaki, Kenji; Sidek, Lariyah Mohd; Basri, Hidayah

    2015-05-01

    Along the Kelantan River in north east of Malaysia Peninsular, there are several areas often damaged by flood during north-east monsoon season every year. It is vital to predict the expected behavior of precipitation and river runoff for reducing flood damages of the area under rapid urbanization and future planning. Nevertheless, the accuracy and reliability of any hydrological and climate studies vary based on the quality of the data used. The factors causing variations on these data are the method of gauging and data collection, stations environment, station relocation and the reliability of the measurement tool affect the homogenous precipitation records. Hence in this study, homogeneity of long precipitation data series is checked via the absolute homogeneity test consisting of four methods namely Pettitt test, standard normal homogeneity test (SNHT), Buishand range test and Von Neumann ratio test. For homogeneity test, the annual rainfall amount from the daily precipitation records at stations located in Kelantan operated by Department of Irrigation and Drainage Malaysia were considered in this study. The missing values were completed using the correlation and regression and inverse distance method. The data network consists of 103 precipitation gauging stations where 31 points are inactive, 6 gauging stations had missing precipitation values more than five years in a row and 16 stations have records less than twenty years. So total of 50 stations gauging stations were evaluated in this analysis. With the application of the mentioned methods and further graphical analysis, inhomogeneity was detected at 4 stations and 46 stations are found to be homogeneous.

  6. On-orbit absolute radiance standard for the next generation of IR remote sensing instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Best, Fred A.; Adler, Douglas P.; Pettersen, Claire; Revercomb, Henry E.; Gero, P. Jonathan; Taylor, Joseph K.; Knuteson, Robert O.; Perepezko, John H.

    2012-11-01

    The next generation of infrared remote sensing satellite instrumentation, including climate benchmark missions will require better absolute measurement accuracy than now available, and will most certainly rely on the emerging capability to fly SI traceable standards that provide irrefutable absolute measurement accuracy. As an example, instrumentation designed to measure spectrally resolved infrared radiances with an absolute brightness temperature error of better than 0.1 K will require high-emissivity (<0.999) calibration blackbodies with emissivity uncertainty of better than 0.06%, and absolute temperature uncertainties of better than 0.045K (k=3). Key elements of an On-Orbit Absolute Radiance Standard (OARS) meeting these stringent requirements have been demonstrated in the laboratory at the University of Wisconsin (UW) and refined under the NASA Instrument Incubator Program (IIP). This work recently culminated with an integrated subsystem that was used in the laboratory to demonstrate end-to-end radiometric accuracy verification for the UW Absolute Radiance Interferometer. Along with an overview of the design, we present details of a key underlying technology of the OARS that provides on-orbit absolute temperature calibration using the transient melt signatures of small quantities (<1g) of reference materials (gallium, water, and mercury) imbedded in the blackbody cavity. In addition we present performance data from the laboratory testing of the OARS.

  7. Dual-frequency-moiré based absolute position sensing for lens focusing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Didi; Wang, Yahui; Di, Chengliang

    2015-10-01

    Micro motor, a typical equipment to adjust the zoom lens, together with a position feedback sensor constitute the closed position loop, which is the key factor to perform successfully accurate lens focusing. Traditionally, the incremental grating ruler tends to be adopted as the position sensor, which continues counting the number of grating pitches on a dynamic one-dimensional moving platform. Instead of incremental counting, this paper proposes a dual-frequency-moiré based absolute position sensing method for reading immediate position at static environment. According to the relative positions of two kind of moiré, the absolute position of the measurement point can be retrieve at nano-meters level through look-up table. By the way, the measurement range can be expanded to millimeters level satisfying the demands of lens focusing, and furthermore the measurement efficiency is improved greatly without dynamic moving. In order to verify the performances of proposed method, a model of dual-frequency-moiré is built, and theological principles are deduced. Finally, the simulation results indicate that, with established configurations, dual-frequency-moiré could measure position within 0~5000μm. At the same time, the measurement accuracy achieves nano-meters level.

  8. System and method for calibrating a rotary absolute position sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Donald R. (Inventor); Permenter, Frank Noble (Inventor); Radford, Nicolaus A (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A system includes a rotary device, a rotary absolute position (RAP) sensor generating encoded pairs of voltage signals describing positional data of the rotary device, a host machine, and an algorithm. The algorithm calculates calibration parameters usable to determine an absolute position of the rotary device using the encoded pairs, and is adapted for linearly-mapping an ellipse defined by the encoded pairs to thereby calculate the calibration parameters. A method of calibrating the RAP sensor includes measuring the rotary position as encoded pairs of voltage signals, linearly-mapping an ellipse defined by the encoded pairs to thereby calculate the calibration parameters, and calculating an absolute position of the rotary device using the calibration parameters. The calibration parameters include a positive definite matrix (A) and a center point (q) of the ellipse. The voltage signals may include an encoded sine and cosine of a rotary angle of the rotary device.

  9. A comparison of absolute calibrations of a radiation thermometer based on a monochromator and a tunable source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keawprasert, T.; Anhalt, K.; Taubert, D. R.; Sperling, A.; Schuster, M.; Nevas, S.

    2013-09-01

    An LP3 radiation thermometer was absolutely calibrated at a newly developed monochromator-based set-up and the TUneable Lasers in Photometry (TULIP) facility of PTB in the wavelength range from 400 nm to 1100 nm. At both facilities, the spectral radiation of the respective sources irradiates an integrating sphere, thus generating uniform radiance across its precision aperture. The spectral irradiance of the integrating sphere is determined via an effective area of a precision aperture and a Si trap detector, traceable to the primary cryogenic radiometer of PTB. Due to the limited output power from the monochromator, the absolute calibration was performed with the measurement uncertainty of 0.17 % (k = 1), while the respective uncertainty at the TULIP facility is 0.14 %. Calibration results obtained by the two facilities were compared in terms of spectral radiance responsivity, effective wavelength and integral responsivity. It was found that the measurement results in integral responsivity at the both facilities are in agreement within the expanded uncertainty (k = 2). To verify the calibration accuracy, the absolutely calibrated radiation thermometer was used to measure the thermodynamic freezing temperatures of the PTB gold fixed-point blackbody.

  10. A comparison of absolute calibrations of a radiation thermometer based on a monochromator and a tunable source

    SciTech Connect

    Keawprasert, T.; Anhalt, K.; Taubert, D. R.; Sperling, A.; Schuster, M.; Nevas, S.

    2013-09-11

    An LP3 radiation thermometer was absolutely calibrated at a newly developed monochromator-based set-up and the TUneable Lasers in Photometry (TULIP) facility of PTB in the wavelength range from 400 nm to 1100 nm. At both facilities, the spectral radiation of the respective sources irradiates an integrating sphere, thus generating uniform radiance across its precision aperture. The spectral irradiance of the integrating sphere is determined via an effective area of a precision aperture and a Si trap detector, traceable to the primary cryogenic radiometer of PTB. Due to the limited output power from the monochromator, the absolute calibration was performed with the measurement uncertainty of 0.17 % (k= 1), while the respective uncertainty at the TULIP facility is 0.14 %. Calibration results obtained by the two facilities were compared in terms of spectral radiance responsivity, effective wavelength and integral responsivity. It was found that the measurement results in integral responsivity at the both facilities are in agreement within the expanded uncertainty (k= 2). To verify the calibration accuracy, the absolutely calibrated radiation thermometer was used to measure the thermodynamic freezing temperatures of the PTB gold fixed-point blackbody.

  11. Four Years of Absolute Gravity in the Taiwan Orogen (AGTO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouyen, Maxime; Masson, Frédéric; Hwang, Cheinway; Cheng, Ching-Chung; Le Moigne, Nicolas; Lee, Chiung-Wu; Kao, Ricky; Hsieh, Nicky

    2010-05-01

    AGTO is a scientific project between Taiwanese and French institutes, which aim is to improve tectonic knowledge of Taiwan primarily using absolute gravity measurements and permanent GPS stations. Both tools are indeed useful to study vertical movements and mass transfers involved in mountain building, a major process in Taiwan located at the convergent margin between Philippine Sea plate and Eurasian plate. This convergence results in two subductions north and south of Taiwan (Ryukyu and Manilla trenches, respectively), while the center is experiencing collision. These processes make Taiwan very active tectonically, as illustrated by numerous large earthquakes and rapid uplift of the Central Range. High slopes of Taiwan mountains and heavy rains brought by typhoons together lead to high landslides and mudflows risks. Practically, absolute gravity measurements have been yearly repeated since 2006 along a transect across south Taiwan, from Penghu to Lutao islands, using FG5 absolute gravimeters. This transect contains ten sites for absolute measurements and has been densified in 2008 by incorporating 45 sites for relative gravity measurements with CG5 gravimeters. The last relative and absolute measurements have been performed in November 2009. Most of the absolute sites have been measured with a good accuracy, about 1 or 2 ?Gal. Only the site located in Tainan University has higher standard deviation, due to the city noise. We note that absolute gravity changes seem to follow a trend in every site. However, straightforward tectonic interpretation of these trends is not valuable as many non-tectonic effects are supposed to change g with time, like groundwater or erosion. Estimating and removing these effects leads to a tectonic gravity signal, which has theoretically two origins : deep mass transfers around the site and vertical movements of the station. The latter can be well constrained by permanent GPS stations located close to the measurement pillar. Deep mass

  12. Four Years of Absolute Gravity in the Taiwan Orogen (AGTO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouyen, M.; Masson, F.; Hwang, C.; Cheng, C.; Le Moigne, N.; Lee, C.; Kao, R.; Hsieh, N.

    2009-12-01

    AGTO is a scientific project between Taiwanese and French institutes which aim is to improve tectonic knowledge of Taiwan primarily using absolute gravity measurements and permanent GPS stations. Both tools are indeed useful to study vertical movements and mass transfers involved in mountain building, a major process in Taiwan located at the convergent margin between Philippine Sea plate and Eurasian plate. This convergence results in two subductions north and south of Taiwan (Ryukyu and Manilla trenches, respectively), while the center is experiencing collision. These processes make Taiwan very active tectonically, as illustrated by numerous large earthquakes and rapid uplift of the Central Range. High slopes of Taiwan mountains and heavy rains brought by typhoons together lead to high landslides and mudflows risks. Practically, absolute gravity measurements have been yearly repeated since 2006 along a transect across south Taiwan, from Penghu to Lutao island, using FG5 absolute gravimeters. This transect contains ten sites for absolute measurements and has been densified in 2008 by incorporating 45 sites for relative gravity measurements with CG5 gravimeters. At the end of 2009, the relative gravity network will be densified again in its eastern part, i.e. in the Longitudinal Valley and the Central Range. A fourth set of absolute gravity measurements will also be performed at the same period. Most of the absolute sites have been measured with a good accuracy, about 1 or 2 μGal. Only the site located in Tainan University has higher standard deviation, due to the city noise. The stronger change in gravity reaches -7 μGal a -1 west of the Longitudinal Valley and might be explained by tectonic movement along a fault. A large decrease of -5 μGal a-1 is also measured in Tainan city and could be correlated with uplift of this region, also denoted by InSAR, leveling and GPS. Changes occurring in the Central Range are more difficult to interpret due to the small

  13. Cosmology with negative absolute temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieira, J. P. P.; Byrnes, Christian T.; Lewis, Antony

    2016-08-01

    Negative absolute temperatures (NAT) are an exotic thermodynamical consequence of quantum physics which has been known since the 1950's (having been achieved in the lab on a number of occasions). Recently, the work of Braun et al. [1] has rekindled interest in negative temperatures and hinted at a possibility of using NAT systems in the lab as dark energy analogues. This paper goes one step further, looking into the cosmological consequences of the existence of a NAT component in the Universe. NAT-dominated expanding Universes experience a borderline phantom expansion (w < ‑1) with no Big Rip, and their contracting counterparts are forced to bounce after the energy density becomes sufficiently large. Both scenarios might be used to solve horizon and flatness problems analogously to standard inflation and bouncing cosmologies. We discuss the difficulties in obtaining and ending a NAT-dominated epoch, and possible ways of obtaining density perturbations with an acceptable spectrum.

  14. Hitting the target: relatively easy, yet absolutely difficult.

    PubMed

    Mapp, Alistair P; Ono, Hiroshi; Khokhotva, Mykola

    2007-01-01

    It is generally agreed that absolute-direction judgments require information about eye position, whereas relative-direction judgments do not. The source of this eye-position information, particularly during monocular viewing, is a matter of debate. It may be either binocular eye position, or the position of the viewing-eye only, that is crucial. Using more ecologically valid stimulus situations than the traditional LED in the dark, we performed two experiments. In experiment 1, observers threw darts at targets that were fixated either monocularly or binocularly. In experiment 2, observers aimed a laser gun at targets while fixating either the rear or the front gunsight monocularly, or the target either monocularly or binocularly. We measured the accuracy and precision of the observers' absolute- and relative-direction judgments. We found that (a) relative-direction judgments were precise and independent of phoria, and (b) monocular absolute-direction judgments were inaccurate, and the magnitude of the inaccuracy was predictable from the magnitude of phoria. These results confirm that relative-direction judgments do not require information about eye position. Moreover, they show that binocular eye-position information is crucial when judging the absolute direction of both monocular and binocular targets. PMID:17972479

  15. GNSS Absolute Antenna Calibration in the Field at the National Geodetic Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mader, G.; Bilich, A.

    2008-12-01

    Geodetic GNSS applications now routinely demand millimeter precision and extremely high levels of accuracy. To achieve these accuracies, measurement and instrument biases at the centimeter to millimeter level must be understood. One of these biases is the antenna phase center, the point of signal reception for a GNSS antenna. It has been well established that phase center patterns differ between antenna models and manufacturers, and can be affected by the presence of a radome or other installation-specific factors. As GNSS geodesy increasingly moves toward real-time applications and high-rate or kinematic positioning, it is all the more important to have the most complete picture of antenna phase center variations possible, as a function of both elevation and azimuth. To meet the needs of the geodetic GNSS community, the National Geodetic Survey (NGS) has constructed an absolute antenna calibration facility. Located in Corbin, Virgina, adjacent to the NGS relative antenna calibration site, this facility uses field measurements and actual GNSS satellite signals to determine antenna phase center patterns. A pan/tilt motor changes the orientation of the antenna under test, so that signals are received and their phase center subsequently measured for a wide range of angles. The NGS phase center models are generated for all possible azimuths and over 90 to -30 degrees elevation angles; negative elevation angles are included to support studies where valid signals are received below the antenna's horizon. Ultimately, this facility will be used to measure antenna phase center variations of commonly-used geodetic GNSS antennas, as well as antennas submitted by users. The phase center patterns will be publicly available and disseminated in the ANTEX format. We present information on the current status of and future plans for the NGS antenna calibration facility. We outline the observation models and software used to generate absolute calibrations, and provide examples of

  16. Meditation Experience Predicts Introspective Accuracy

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Kieran C. R.; Zakarauskas, Pierre; Dixon, Matt; Ellamil, Melissa; Thompson, Evan; Christoff, Kalina

    2012-01-01

    The accuracy of subjective reports, especially those involving introspection of one's own internal processes, remains unclear, and research has demonstrated large individual differences in introspective accuracy. It has been hypothesized that introspective accuracy may be heightened in persons who engage in meditation practices, due to the highly introspective nature of such practices. We undertook a preliminary exploration of this hypothesis, examining introspective accuracy in a cross-section of meditation practitioners (1–15,000 hrs experience). Introspective accuracy was assessed by comparing subjective reports of tactile sensitivity for each of 20 body regions during a ‘body-scanning’ meditation with averaged, objective measures of tactile sensitivity (mean size of body representation area in primary somatosensory cortex; two-point discrimination threshold) as reported in prior research. Expert meditators showed significantly better introspective accuracy than novices; overall meditation experience also significantly predicted individual introspective accuracy. These results suggest that long-term meditators provide more accurate introspective reports than novices. PMID:23049790

  17. The absolute radiometric calibration of the advanced very high resolution radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, P. N.; Teillet, P. M.; Ding, Y.

    1988-01-01

    The need for independent, redundant absolute radiometric calibration methods is discussed with reference to the Thematic Mapper. Uncertainty requirements for absolute calibration of between 0.5 and 4 percent are defined based on the accuracy of reflectance retrievals at an agricultural site. It is shown that even very approximate atmospheric corrections can reduce the error in reflectance retrieval to 0.02 over the reflectance range 0 to 0.4.

  18. Determination of absolute internal conversion coefficients using the SAGE spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorri, J.; Greenlees, P. T.; Papadakis, P.; Konki, J.; Cox, D. M.; Auranen, K.; Partanen, J.; Sandzelius, M.; Pakarinen, J.; Rahkila, P.; Uusitalo, J.; Herzberg, R.-D.; Smallcombe, J.; Davies, P. J.; Barton, C. J.; Jenkins, D. G.

    2016-03-01

    A non-reference based method to determine internal conversion coefficients using the SAGE spectrometer is carried out for transitions in the nuclei of 154Sm, 152Sm and 166Yb. The Normalised-Peak-to-Gamma method is in general an efficient tool to extract internal conversion coefficients. However, in many cases the required well-known reference transitions are not available. The data analysis steps required to determine absolute internal conversion coefficients with the SAGE spectrometer are presented. In addition, several background suppression methods are introduced and an example of how ancillary detectors can be used to select specific reaction products is given. The results obtained for ground-state band E2 transitions show that the absolute internal conversion coefficients can be extracted using the methods described with a reasonable accuracy. In some cases of less intense transitions only an upper limit for the internal conversion coefficient could be given.

  19. Absolute magnitude calibration using trigonometric parallax - Incomplete, spectroscopic samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratnatunga, Kavan U.; Casertano, Stefano

    1991-01-01

    A new numerical algorithm is used to calibrate the absolute magnitude of spectroscopically selected stars from their observed trigonometric parallax. This procedure, based on maximum-likelihood estimation, can retrieve unbiased estimates of the intrinsic absolute magnitude and its dispersion even from incomplete samples suffering from selection biases in apparent magnitude and color. It can also make full use of low accuracy and negative parallaxes and incorporate censorship on reported parallax values. Accurate error estimates are derived for each of the fitted parameters. The algorithm allows an a posteriori check of whether the fitted model gives a good representation of the observations. The procedure is described in general and applied to both real and simulated data.

  20. New experimental methodology, setup and LabView program for accurate absolute thermoelectric power and electrical resistivity measurements between 25 and 1600 K: Application to pure copper, platinum, tungsten, and nickel at very high temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Abadlia, L.; Mayoufi, M.; Gasser, F.; Khalouk, K.; Gasser, J. G.

    2014-09-15

    In this paper we describe an experimental setup designed to measure simultaneously and very accurately the resistivity and the absolute thermoelectric power, also called absolute thermopower or absolute Seebeck coefficient, of solid and liquid conductors/semiconductors over a wide range of temperatures (room temperature to 1600 K in present work). A careful analysis of the existing experimental data allowed us to extend the absolute thermoelectric power scale of platinum to the range 0-1800 K with two new polynomial expressions. The experimental device is controlled by a LabView program. A detailed description of the accurate dynamic measurement methodology is given in this paper. We measure the absolute thermoelectric power and the electrical resistivity and deduce with a good accuracy the thermal conductivity using the relations between the three electronic transport coefficients, going beyond the classical Wiedemann-Franz law. We use this experimental setup and methodology to give new very accurate results for pure copper, platinum, and nickel especially at very high temperatures. But resistivity and absolute thermopower measurement can be more than an objective in itself. Resistivity characterizes the bulk of a material while absolute thermoelectric power characterizes the material at the point where the electrical contact is established with a couple of metallic elements (forming a thermocouple). In a forthcoming paper we will show that the measurement of resistivity and absolute thermoelectric power characterizes advantageously the (change of) phase, probably as well as DSC (if not better), since the change of phases can be easily followed during several hours/days at constant temperature.

  1. Evaluation of absolute form measurements using a tilted-wave interferometer.

    PubMed

    Fortmeier, Ines; Stavridis, Manuel; Wiegmann, Axel; Schulz, Michael; Osten, Wolfgang; Elster, Clemens

    2016-02-22

    Tilted-wave interferometry is a promising measurement technique for the highly accurate measurement of aspheres and freeform surfaces. However, the interferometric fringe evaluation of the sub-apertures causes unknown patch offsets, which currently prevent this measurement technique from providing absolute measurements. Simple strategies, such as constructing differences of optical path length differences (OPDs) or ignoring the piston parameter, can diminish the accuracy resulting from the absolute form measurement. Additional information is needed instead; in this paper, the required accuracy of such information is explored in virtual experiments. Our simulation study reveals that, when one absolute OPD is known within a range of 500 nm, the accuracy of the final measurement result is significantly enhanced. PMID:26906998

  2. Absolute oral bioavailability of ciprofloxacin.

    PubMed

    Drusano, G L; Standiford, H C; Plaisance, K; Forrest, A; Leslie, J; Caldwell, J

    1986-09-01

    We evaluated the absolute bioavailability of ciprofloxacin, a new quinoline carboxylic acid, in 12 healthy male volunteers. Doses of 200 mg were given to each of the volunteers in a randomized, crossover manner 1 week apart orally and as a 10-min intravenous infusion. Half-lives (mean +/- standard deviation) for the intravenous and oral administration arms were 4.2 +/- 0.77 and 4.11 +/- 0.74 h, respectively. The serum clearance rate averaged 28.5 +/- 4.7 liters/h per 1.73 m2 for the intravenous administration arm. The renal clearance rate accounted for approximately 60% of the corresponding serum clearance rate and was 16.9 +/- 3.0 liters/h per 1.73 m2 for the intravenous arm and 17.0 +/- 2.86 liters/h per 1.73 m2 for the oral administration arm. Absorption was rapid, with peak concentrations in serum occurring at 0.71 +/- 0.15 h. Bioavailability, defined as the ratio of the area under the curve from 0 h to infinity for the oral to the intravenous dose, was 69 +/- 7%. We conclude that ciprofloxacin is rapidly absorbed and reliably bioavailable in these healthy volunteers. Further studies with ciprofloxacin should be undertaken in target patient populations under actual clinical circumstances. PMID:3777908

  3. Absolute Instability in Coupled-Cavity TWTs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, D. M. H.; Rittersdorf, I. M.; Zhang, Peng; Lau, Y. Y.; Simon, D. H.; Gilgenbach, R. M.; Chernin, D.; Antonsen, T. M., Jr.

    2014-10-01

    This paper will present results of our analysis of absolute instability in a coupled-cavity traveling wave tube (TWT). The structure mode at the lower and upper band edges are respectively approximated by a hyperbola in the (omega, k) plane. When the Briggs-Bers criterion is applied, a threshold current for onset of absolute instability is observed at the upper band edge, but not the lower band edge. The nonexistence of absolute instability at the lower band edge is mathematically similar to the nonexistence of absolute instability that we recently demonstrated for a dielectric TWT. The existence of absolute instability at the upper band edge is mathematically similar to the existence of absolute instability in a gyroton traveling wave amplifier. These interesting observations will be discussed, and the practical implications will be explored. This work was supported by AFOSR, ONR, and L-3 Communications Electron Devices.

  4. Absolute negative mobility of interacting Brownian particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ou, Ya-li; Hu, Cai-tian; Wu, Jian-chun; Ai, Bao-quan

    2015-12-01

    Transport of interacting Brownian particles in a periodic potential is investigated in the presence of an ac force and a dc force. From Brownian dynamic simulations, we find that both the interaction between particles and the thermal fluctuations play key roles in the absolute negative mobility (the particle noisily moves backwards against a small constant bias). When no the interaction acts, there is only one region where the absolute negative mobility occurs. In the presence of the interaction, the absolute negative mobility may appear in multiple regions. The weak interaction can be helpful for the absolute negative mobility, while the strong interaction has a destructive impact on it.

  5. The Electromotive Series and Other Non-Absolute Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peckham, Gavin D.

    1998-01-01

    This article describes an analogy which may be used to illustrate the principles that underlie the establishment of non-absolute scales of measurements that are evaluated relative to a chosen reference point. The analogy is interwoven with the establishment of the electromotive series, but may be extended to other parameters such as the Celsius and Fahrenheit temperature scales, potential energies, formation and reaction enthalpies, etc.

  6. Automatic and robust extrinsic camera calibration for high-accuracy mobile mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goeman, Werner; Douterloigne, Koen; Bogaert, Peter; Pires, Rui; Gautama, Sidharta

    2012-10-01

    A mobile mapping system (MMS) is the answer of the geoinformation community to the exponentially growing demand for various geospatial data with increasingly higher accuracies and captured by multiple sensors. As the mobile mapping technology is pushed to explore its use for various applications on water, rail, or road, the need emerges to have an external sensor calibration procedure which is portable, fast and easy to perform. This way, sensors can be mounted and demounted depending on the application requirements without the need for time consuming calibration procedures. A new methodology is presented to provide a high quality external calibration of cameras which is automatic, robust and fool proof.The MMS uses an Applanix POSLV420, which is a tightly coupled GPS/INS positioning system. The cameras used are Point Grey color video cameras synchronized with the GPS/INS system. The method uses a portable, standard ranging pole which needs to be positioned on a known ground control point. For calibration a well studied absolute orientation problem needs to be solved. Here, a mutual information based image registration technique is studied for automatic alignment of the ranging pole. Finally, a few benchmarking tests are done under various lighting conditions which proves the methodology's robustness, by showing high absolute stereo measurement accuracies of a few centimeters.

  7. Verification of Absolute Calibration of Quantum Efficiency for LSST CCDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coles, Rebecca; Chiang, James; Cinabro, David; Gilbertson, Woodrow; Haupt, justine; Kotov, Ivan; Neal, Homer; Nomerotski, Andrei; O'Connor, Paul; Stubbs, Christopher; Takacs, Peter

    2016-01-01

    We describe a system to measure the Quantum Efficiency in the wavelength range of 300nm to 1100nm of 40x40 mm n-channel CCD sensors for the construction of the 3.2 gigapixel LSST focal plane. The technique uses a series of instruments to create a very uniform flux of photons of controllable intensity in the wavelength range of interest across the face of the sensor. This allows the absolute Quantum Efficiency to be measured with an accuracy in the 1% range. This system will be part of a production facility at Brookhaven National Lab for the basic components of the LSST camera.

  8. Gyrokinetic Statistical Absolute Equilibrium and Turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Jian-Zhou Zhu and Gregory W. Hammett

    2011-01-10

    A paradigm based on the absolute equilibrium of Galerkin-truncated inviscid systems to aid in understanding turbulence [T.-D. Lee, "On some statistical properties of hydrodynamical and magnetohydrodynamical fields," Q. Appl. Math. 10, 69 (1952)] is taken to study gyrokinetic plasma turbulence: A finite set of Fourier modes of the collisionless gyrokinetic equations are kept and the statistical equilibria are calculated; possible implications for plasma turbulence in various situations are discussed. For the case of two spatial and one velocity dimension, in the calculation with discretization also of velocity v with N grid points (where N + 1 quantities are conserved, corresponding to an energy invariant and N entropy-related invariants), the negative temperature states, corresponding to the condensation of the generalized energy into the lowest modes, are found. This indicates a generic feature of inverse energy cascade. Comparisons are made with some classical results, such as those of Charney-Hasegawa-Mima in the cold-ion limit. There is a universal shape for statistical equilibrium of gyrokinetics in three spatial and two velocity dimensions with just one conserved quantity. Possible physical relevance to turbulence, such as ITG zonal flows, and to a critical balance hypothesis are also discussed.

  9. Assessing and Ensuring GOES-R Magnetometer Accuracy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Delano R.; Todirita, Monica; Kronenwetter, Jeffrey; Chu, Donald

    2016-01-01

    The GOES-R magnetometer subsystem accuracy requirement is 1.7 nanoteslas (nT). During quiet times (100 nT), accuracy is defined as absolute mean plus 3 sigma. During storms (300 nT), accuracy is defined as absolute mean plus 2 sigma. Error comes both from outside the magnetometers, e.g. spacecraft fields and misalignments, as well as inside, e.g. zero offset and scale factor errors. Because zero offset and scale factor drift over time, it will be necessary to perform annual calibration maneuvers. To predict performance before launch, we have used Monte Carlo simulations and covariance analysis. Both behave as expected, and their accuracy predictions agree within 30%. With the proposed calibration regimen, both suggest that the GOES-R magnetometer subsystem will meet its accuracy requirements.

  10. Assessing and Ensuring GOES-R Magnetometer Accuracy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kronenwetter, Jeffrey; Carter, Delano R.; Todirita, Monica; Chu, Donald

    2016-01-01

    The GOES-R magnetometer accuracy requirement is 1.7 nanoteslas (nT). During quiet times (100 nT), accuracy is defined as absolute mean plus 3 sigma. During storms (300 nT), accuracy is defined as absolute mean plus 2 sigma. To achieve this, the sensor itself has better than 1 nT accuracy. Because zero offset and scale factor drift over time, it is also necessary to perform annual calibration maneuvers. To predict performance, we used covariance analysis and attempted to corroborate it with simulations. Although not perfect, the two generally agree and show the expected behaviors. With the annual calibration regimen, these predictions suggest that the magnetometers will meet their accuracy requirements.

  11. Direct comparisons between absolute and relative geomagnetic paleointensities: Absolute calibration of a relative paleointensity stack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mochizuki, N.; Yamamoto, Y.; Hatakeyama, T.; Shibuya, H.

    2013-12-01

    Absolute geomagnetic paleointensities (APIs) have been estimated from igneous rocks, while relative paleomagnetic intensities (RPIs) have been reported from sediment cores. These two datasets have been treated separately, as correlations between APIs and RPIs are difficult on account of age uncertainties. High-resolution RPI stacks have been constructed from globally distributed sediment cores with high sedimentation rates. Previous studies often assumed that the RPI stacks have a linear relationship with geomagnetic axial dipole moments, and calibrated the RPI values to API values. However, the assumption of a linear relationship between APIs and RPIs has not been evaluated. Also, a quantitative calibration method for the RPI is lacking. We present a procedure for directly comparing API and RPI stacks, thus allowing reliable calibrations of RPIs. Direct comparisons between APIs and RPIs were conducted with virtually no associated age errors using both tephrochronologic correlations and RPI minima. Using the stratigraphic positions of tephra layers in oxygen isotope stratigraphic records, we directly compared the RPIs and APIs reported from welded tuffs contemporaneously extruded with the tephra layers. In addition, RPI minima during geomagnetic reversals and excursions were compared with APIs corresponding to the reversals and excursions. The comparison of APIs and RPIs at these exact points allowed a reliable calibration of the RPI values. We applied this direct comparison procedure to the global RPI stack PISO-1500. For six independent calibration points, virtual axial dipole moments (VADMs) from the corresponding APIs and RPIs of the PISO-1500 stack showed a near-linear relationship. On the basis of the linear relationship, RPIs of the stack were successfully calibrated to the VADMs. The direct comparison procedure provides an absolute calibration method that will contribute to the recovery of temporal variations and distributions of geomagnetic axial dipole

  12. Inequalities, Absolute Value, and Logical Connectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parish, Charles R.

    1992-01-01

    Presents an approach to the concept of absolute value that alleviates students' problems with the traditional definition and the use of logical connectives in solving related problems. Uses a model that maps numbers from a horizontal number line to a vertical ray originating from the origin. Provides examples solving absolute value equations and…

  13. Monolithically integrated absolute frequency comb laser system

    DOEpatents

    Wanke, Michael C.

    2016-07-12

    Rather than down-convert optical frequencies, a QCL laser system directly generates a THz frequency comb in a compact monolithically integrated chip that can be locked to an absolute frequency without the need of a frequency-comb synthesizer. The monolithic, absolute frequency comb can provide a THz frequency reference and tool for high-resolution broad band spectroscopy.

  14. Introducing the Mean Absolute Deviation "Effect" Size

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorard, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    This paper revisits the use of effect sizes in the analysis of experimental and similar results, and reminds readers of the relative advantages of the mean absolute deviation as a measure of variation, as opposed to the more complex standard deviation. The mean absolute deviation is easier to use and understand, and more tolerant of extreme…

  15. Investigating Absolute Value: A Real World Application

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kidd, Margaret; Pagni, David

    2009-01-01

    Making connections between various representations is important in mathematics. In this article, the authors discuss the numeric, algebraic, and graphical representations of sums of absolute values of linear functions. The initial explanations are accessible to all students who have experience graphing and who understand that absolute value simply…

  16. Absolute Income, Relative Income, and Happiness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ball, Richard; Chernova, Kateryna

    2008-01-01

    This paper uses data from the World Values Survey to investigate how an individual's self-reported happiness is related to (i) the level of her income in absolute terms, and (ii) the level of her income relative to other people in her country. The main findings are that (i) both absolute and relative income are positively and significantly…

  17. Stability of array spectroradiometers and their suitability for absolute calibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nevas, Saulius; Teuber, Annette; Sperling, Armin; Lindemann, Matthias

    2012-04-01

    An investigation of the short- and long-term stability of various low-end and high-end array spectroradiometers is presented. Potentially weak points of array spectroradiometers with respect to their suitability for absolute calibrations are pointed out. The influence of ambient conditions on relevant instrumental characteristics and their temporal stability is discussed. It is shown that the temporal stability of some instruments can be significantly affected by high ambient humidity. Most important ambient temperature effects on instrument properties are also discussed.

  18. Absolute analytical prediction of photonic crystal guided mode resonance wavelengths

    SciTech Connect

    Hermannsson, Pétur Gordon; Vannahme, Christoph; Smith, Cameron L. C.; Kristensen, Anders

    2014-08-18

    A class of photonic crystal resonant reflectors known as guided mode resonant filters are optical structures that are widely used in the field of refractive index sensing, particularly in biosensing. For the purposes of understanding and design, their behavior has traditionally been modeled numerically with methods such as rigorous coupled wave analysis. Here it is demonstrated how the absolute resonance wavelengths of such structures can be predicted by analytically modeling them as slab waveguides in which the propagation constant is determined by a phase matching condition. The model is experimentally verified to be capable of predicting the absolute resonance wavelengths to an accuracy of within 0.75 nm, as well as resonance wavelength shifts due to changes in cladding index within an accuracy of 0.45 nm across the visible wavelength regime in the case where material dispersion is taken into account. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that the model is valid beyond the limit of low grating modulation, for periodically discontinuous waveguide layers, high refractive index contrasts, and highly dispersive media.

  19. Absolute Temperature Monitoring Using RF Radiometry in the MRI Scanner.

    PubMed

    El-Sharkawy, Abdel-Monem M; Sotiriadis, Paul P; Bottomley, Paul A; Atalar, Ergin

    2006-11-01

    Temperature detection using microwave radiometry has proven value for noninvasively measuring the absolute temperature of tissues inside the body. However, current clinical radiometers operate in the gigahertz range, which limits their depth of penetration. We have designed and built a noninvasive radiometer which operates at radio frequencies (64 MHz) with ∼100-kHz bandwidth, using an external RF loop coil as a thermal detector. The core of the radiometer is an accurate impedance measurement and automatic matching circuit of 0.05 Ω accuracy to compensate for any load variations. The radiometer permits temperature measurements with accuracy of ±0.1°K, over a tested physiological range of 28° C-40° C in saline phantoms whose electric properties match those of tissue. Because 1.5 T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanners also operate at 64 MHz, we demonstrate the feasibility of integrating our radiometer with an MRI scanner to monitor RF power deposition and temperature dosimetry, obtaining coarse, spatially resolved, absolute thermal maps in the physiological range. We conclude that RF radiometry offers promise as a direct, noninvasive method of monitoring tissue heating during MRI studies and thereby providing an independent means of verifying patient-safe operation. Other potential applications include titration of hyper- and hypo-therapies. PMID:18026562

  20. Absolute length measurement using manually decided stereo correspondence for endoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, M.; Koishi, T.; Nakaguchi, T.; Tsumura, N.; Miyake, Y.

    2009-02-01

    In recent years, various kinds of endoscope have been developed and widely used to endoscopic biopsy, endoscopic operation and endoscopy. The size of the inflammatory part is important to determine a method of medical treatment. However, it is not easy to measure absolute size of inflammatory part such as ulcer, cancer and polyp from the endoscopic image. Therefore, it is required measuring the size of those part in endoscopy. In this paper, we propose a new method to measure the absolute length in a straight line between arbitrary two points based on the photogrammetry using endoscope with magnetic tracking sensor which gives camera position and angle. In this method, the stereo-corresponding points between two endoscopic images are determined by the endoscopist without any apparatus of projection and calculation to find the stereo correspondences, then the absolute length can be calculated on the basis of the photogrammetry. The evaluation experiment using a checkerboard showed that the errors of the measurements are less than 2% of the target length when the baseline is sufficiently-long.

  1. Reticence, Accuracy and Efficacy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oreskes, N.; Lewandowsky, S.

    2015-12-01

    James Hansen has cautioned the scientific community against "reticence," by which he means a reluctance to speak in public about the threat of climate change. This may contribute to social inaction, with the result that society fails to respond appropriately to threats that are well understood scientifically. Against this, others have warned against the dangers of "crying wolf," suggesting that reticence protects scientific credibility. We argue that both these positions are missing an important point: that reticence is not only a matter of style but also of substance. In previous work, Bysse et al. (2013) showed that scientific projections of key indicators of climate change have been skewed towards the low end of actual events, suggesting a bias in scientific work. More recently, we have shown that scientific efforts to be responsive to contrarian challenges have led scientists to adopt the terminology of a "pause" or "hiatus" in climate warming, despite the lack of evidence to support such a conclusion (Lewandowsky et al., 2015a. 2015b). In the former case, scientific conservatism has led to under-estimation of climate related changes. In the latter case, the use of misleading terminology has perpetuated scientific misunderstanding and hindered effective communication. Scientific communication should embody two equally important goals: 1) accuracy in communicating scientific information and 2) efficacy in expressing what that information means. Scientists should strive to be neither conservative nor adventurous but to be accurate, and to communicate that accurate information effectively.

  2. Relative accuracy evaluation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Wang, Hongzhi; Yang, Zhongsheng; Li, Jianzhong

    2014-01-01

    The quality of data plays an important role in business analysis and decision making, and data accuracy is an important aspect in data quality. Thus one necessary task for data quality management is to evaluate the accuracy of the data. And in order to solve the problem that the accuracy of the whole data set is low while a useful part may be high, it is also necessary to evaluate the accuracy of the query results, called relative accuracy. However, as far as we know, neither measure nor effective methods for the accuracy evaluation methods are proposed. Motivated by this, for relative accuracy evaluation, we propose a systematic method. We design a relative accuracy evaluation framework for relational databases based on a new metric to measure the accuracy using statistics. We apply the methods to evaluate the precision and recall of basic queries, which show the result's relative accuracy. We also propose the method to handle data update and to improve accuracy evaluation using functional dependencies. Extensive experimental results show the effectiveness and efficiency of our proposed framework and algorithms. PMID:25133752

  3. Relative Accuracy Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yan; Wang, Hongzhi; Yang, Zhongsheng; Li, Jianzhong

    2014-01-01

    The quality of data plays an important role in business analysis and decision making, and data accuracy is an important aspect in data quality. Thus one necessary task for data quality management is to evaluate the accuracy of the data. And in order to solve the problem that the accuracy of the whole data set is low while a useful part may be high, it is also necessary to evaluate the accuracy of the query results, called relative accuracy. However, as far as we know, neither measure nor effective methods for the accuracy evaluation methods are proposed. Motivated by this, for relative accuracy evaluation, we propose a systematic method. We design a relative accuracy evaluation framework for relational databases based on a new metric to measure the accuracy using statistics. We apply the methods to evaluate the precision and recall of basic queries, which show the result's relative accuracy. We also propose the method to handle data update and to improve accuracy evaluation using functional dependencies. Extensive experimental results show the effectiveness and efficiency of our proposed framework and algorithms. PMID:25133752

  4. Objective Error Criterion for Evaluation of Mapping Accuracy Based on Sensor Time-of-Flight Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Barshan, Billur

    2008-01-01

    An objective error criterion is proposed for evaluating the accuracy of maps of unknown environments acquired by making range measurements with different sensing modalities and processing them with different techniques. The criterion can also be used for the assessment of goodness of fit of curves or shapes fitted to map points. A demonstrative example from ultrasonic mapping is given based on experimentally acquired time-of-flight measurements and compared with a very accurate laser map, considered as absolute reference. The results of the proposed criterion are compared with the Hausdorff metric and the median error criterion results. The error criterion is sufficiently general and flexible that it can be applied to discrete point maps acquired with other mapping techniques and sensing modalities as well.

  5. Absolute optical instruments without spherical symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyc, Tomáš; Dao, H. L.; Danner, Aaron J.

    2015-11-01

    Until now, the known set of absolute optical instruments has been limited to those containing high levels of symmetry. Here, we demonstrate a method of mathematically constructing refractive index profiles that result in asymmetric absolute optical instruments. The method is based on the analogy between geometrical optics and classical mechanics and employs Lagrangians that separate in Cartesian coordinates. In addition, our method can be used to construct the index profiles of most previously known absolute optical instruments, as well as infinitely many different ones.

  6. Absolute measurement of the extreme UV solar flux

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, R. W.; Ogawa, H. S.; Judge, D. L.; Phillips, E.

    1984-01-01

    A windowless rare-gas ionization chamber has been developed to measure the absolute value of the solar extreme UV flux in the 50-575-A region. Successful results were obtained on a solar-pointing sounding rocket. The ionization chamber, operated in total absorption, is an inherently stable absolute detector of ionizing UV radiation and was designed to be independent of effects from secondary ionization and gas effusion. The net error of the measurement is + or - 7.3 percent, which is primarily due to residual outgassing in the instrument, other errors such as multiple ionization, photoelectron collection, and extrapolation to the zero atmospheric optical depth being small in comparison. For the day of the flight, Aug. 10, 1982, the solar irradiance (50-575 A), normalized to unit solar distance, was found to be 5.71 + or - 0.42 x 10 to the 10th photons per sq cm sec.

  7. Approaching chemical accuracy with quantum Monte Carlo.

    PubMed

    Petruzielo, F R; Toulouse, Julien; Umrigar, C J

    2012-03-28

    A quantum Monte Carlo study of the atomization energies for the G2 set of molecules is presented. Basis size dependence of diffusion Monte Carlo atomization energies is studied with a single determinant Slater-Jastrow trial wavefunction formed from Hartree-Fock orbitals. With the largest basis set, the mean absolute deviation from experimental atomization energies for the G2 set is 3.0 kcal/mol. Optimizing the orbitals within variational Monte Carlo improves the agreement between diffusion Monte Carlo and experiment, reducing the mean absolute deviation to 2.1 kcal/mol. Moving beyond a single determinant Slater-Jastrow trial wavefunction, diffusion Monte Carlo with a small complete active space Slater-Jastrow trial wavefunction results in near chemical accuracy. In this case, the mean absolute deviation from experimental atomization energies is 1.2 kcal/mol. It is shown from calculations on systems containing phosphorus that the accuracy can be further improved by employing a larger active space. PMID:22462844

  8. Electrical Noise and the Measurement of Absolute Temperature, Boltzmann's Constant and Avogadro's Number.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ericson, T. J.

    1988-01-01

    Describes an apparatus capable of measuring absolute temperatures of a tungsten filament bulb up to normal running temperature and measuring Botzmann's constant to an accuracy of a few percent. Shows that electrical noise techniques are convenient to demonstrate how the concept of temperature is related to the micro- and macroscopic world. (CW)

  9. The Effect of Using Relative and Absolute Criteria to Decide Students' Passing or Failing a Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sayin, Ayfer

    2016-01-01

    In the formation education that is carried out within the scope of undergraduate and non-thesis graduate programs within the same university, different criteria are used to evaluate students' success. In this study, classification accuracy of letter grades that are generated to evaluate students' success using relative and absolute criteria and…

  10. Demonstrating the Error Budget for the Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory Through Solar Irradiance Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thome, Kurtis; McCorkel, Joel; McAndrew, Brendan

    2016-01-01

    The Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO) mission addresses the need to observe highaccuracy, long-term climate change trends and to use decadal change observations as a method to determine the accuracy of climate change. A CLARREO objective is to improve the accuracy of SI-traceable, absolute calibration at infrared and reflected solar wavelengths to reach on-orbit accuracies required to allow climate change observations to survive data gaps and observe climate change at the limit of natural variability. Such an effort will also demonstrate National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) approaches for use in future spaceborne instruments. The current work describes the results of laboratory and field measurements with the Solar, Lunar for Absolute Reflectance Imaging Spectroradiometer (SOLARIS) which is the calibration demonstration system (CDS) for the reflected solar portion of CLARREO. SOLARIS allows testing and evaluation of calibration approaches, alternate design and/or implementation approaches and components for the CLARREO mission. SOLARIS also provides a test-bed for detector technologies, non-linearity determination and uncertainties, and application of future technology developments and suggested spacecraft instrument design modifications. Results of laboratory calibration measurements are provided to demonstrate key assumptions about instrument behavior that are needed to achieve CLARREO's climate measurement requirements. Absolute radiometric response is determined using laser-based calibration sources and applied to direct solar views for comparison with accepted solar irradiance models to demonstrate accuracy values giving confidence in the error budget for the CLARREO reflectance retrieval.

  11. IMPROVEMENT OF SMVGEAR II ON VECTOR AND SCALAR MACHINES THROUGH ABSOLUTE ERROR TOLERANCE CONTROL (R823186)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The computer speed of SMVGEAR II was improved markedly on scalar and vector machines with relatively little loss in accuracy. The improvement was due to a method of frequently recalculating the absolute error tolerance instead of keeping it constant for a given set of chemistry. ...

  12. Absolute flatness testing of skip-flat interferometry by matrix analysis in polar coordinates.

    PubMed

    Han, Zhi-Gang; Yin, Lu; Chen, Lei; Zhu, Ri-Hong

    2016-03-20

    A new method utilizing matrix analysis in polar coordinates has been presented for absolute testing of skip-flat interferometry. The retrieval of the absolute profile mainly includes three steps: (1) transform the wavefront maps of the two cavity measurements into data in polar coordinates; (2) retrieve the profile of the reflective flat in polar coordinates by matrix analysis; and (3) transform the profile of the reflective flat back into data in Cartesian coordinates and retrieve the profile of the sample. Simulation of synthetic surface data has been provided, showing the capability of the approach to achieve an accuracy of the order of 0.01 nm RMS. The absolute profile can be retrieved by a set of closed mathematical formulas without polynomial fitting of wavefront maps or the iterative evaluation of an error function, making the new method more efficient for absolute testing. PMID:27140578

  13. Shuttle infrared telescope facility pointing and control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorell, K. R.; Barrows, W. F.; Matsumoto, Y. T.

    1981-01-01

    The Shuttle Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF) is being designed as a 0.85 m cryogenically cooled telescope capable of a three order of magnitude improvement over currently available infrared instruments. The SIRTF requires that the image at the focal plane be stabilized to better than 0.25 arcsec with an absolute accuracy of 1.0 arcsec. Current pointing-mount performance simulations indicate that neither of these requirements can be met without additional stabilization. The SIRTF pointing and control system will utilize gyro outputs, star field position measurements from a focal plane fine guidance sensor, and a steerable secondary mirror to provide the necessary stabilization and pointing control. The charge coupled device fine guidance sensor tracks multiple stars simultaneously and, through the use of multistar processing algorithms in a high performance microcomputer, generates three-axis attitude errors and gyro-drift estimates to correct the pointing-mount gyros. A high-bandwidth feedforward loop, driven directly from the pointing-mount gyro package, controls the steering mirror in order to correct disturbances not compensated for by the pointing-mount control system. A prototype design for the SIRTF pointing and control system is described in detail. Performance analyses made using a digital simulation of the pointing and control system as well as experimental data obtained in laboratory and field test measurements are presented.

  14. Absolute optical surface measurement with deflectometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wansong; Sandner, Marc; Gesierich, Achim; Burke, Jan

    Deflectometry utilises the deformation and displacement of a sample pattern after reflection from a test surface to infer the surface slopes. Differentiation of the measurement data leads to a curvature map, which is very useful for surface quality checks with sensitivity down to the nanometre range. Integration of the data allows reconstruction of the absolute surface shape, but the procedure is very error-prone because systematic errors may add up to large shape deviations. In addition, there are infinitely many combinations for slope and object distance that satisfy a given observation. One solution for this ambiguity is to include information on the object's distance. It must be known very accurately. Two laser pointers can be used for positioning the object, and we also show how a confocal chromatic distance sensor can be used to define a reference point on a smooth surface from which the integration can be started. The used integration algorithm works without symmetry constraints and is therefore suitable for free-form surfaces as well. Unlike null testing, deflectometry also determines radius of curvature (ROC) or focal lengths as a direct result of the 3D surface reconstruction. This is shown by the example of a 200 mm diameter telescope mirror, whose ROC measurements by coordinate measurement machine and deflectometry coincide to within 0.27 mm (or a sag error of 1.3μm). By the example of a diamond-turned off-axis parabolic mirror, we demonstrate that the figure measurement uncertainty comes close to a well-calibrated Fizeau interferometer.

  15. Absolute magnitudes of trans-neptunian objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duffard, R.; Alvarez-candal, A.; Pinilla-Alonso, N.; Ortiz, J. L.; Morales, N.; Santos-Sanz, P.; Thirouin, A.

    2015-10-01

    Accurate measurements of diameters of trans- Neptunian objects are extremely complicated to obtain. Radiomatric techniques applied to thermal measurements can provide good results, but precise absolute magnitudes are needed to constrain diameters and albedos. Our objective is to measure accurate absolute magnitudes for a sample of trans- Neptunian objects, many of which have been observed, and modelled, by the "TNOs are cool" team, one of Herschel Space Observatory key projects grantes with ~ 400 hours of observing time. We observed 56 objects in filters V and R, if possible. These data, along with data available in the literature, was used to obtain phase curves and to measure absolute magnitudes by assuming a linear trend of the phase curves and considering magnitude variability due to rotational light-curve. In total we obtained 234 new magnitudes for the 56 objects, 6 of them with no reported previous measurements. Including the data from the literature we report a total of 109 absolute magnitudes.

  16. A New Gimmick for Assigning Absolute Configuration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ayorinde, F. O.

    1983-01-01

    A five-step procedure is provided to help students in making the assignment absolute configuration less bothersome. Examples for both single (2-butanol) and multi-chiral carbon (3-chloro-2-butanol) molecules are included. (JN)

  17. On-Orbit Absolute Radiance Standard for Future IR Remote Sensing Instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Best, F. A.; Adler, D. P.; Pettersen, C.; Revercomb, H. E.; Gero, P. J.; Taylor, J. K.; Knuteson, R. O.; Perepezko, J. H.

    2010-12-01

    Future NASA infrared remote sensing missions, including the climate benchmark CLARREO mission will require better absolute measurement accuracy than now available, and will most certainly rely on the emerging capability to fly SI traceable standards that provide irrefutable absolute measurement accuracy. As an example, instrumentation designed to measure spectrally resolved infrared radiances with an absolute brightness temperature error of better than 0.1 K will require high-emissivity (>0.999) calibration blackbodies with emissivity uncertainty of better than 0.06%, and absolute temperature uncertainties of better than 0.045K (3 sigma). Key elements of an On-Orbit Absolute Radiance Standard (OARS) meeting these stringent requirements have been demonstrated in the laboratory at the University of Wisconsin and are undergoing Technology Readiness Level (TRL) advancement under the NASA Instrument Incubator Program (IIP). We present the new technologies that underlie the OARS and the results of laboratory testing that demonstrate the required accuracy is being met. The underlying technologies include on-orbit absolute temperature calibration using the transient melt signatures of small quantities (<1g) of reference materials (gallium, water, and mercury) imbedded in the blackbody cavity; and on-orbit cavity spectral emissivity measurement using a heated halo. For these emissivity measurements, a carefully baffled heated cylinder is placed in front of a blackbody in the infrared spectrometer system, and the combined radiance of the blackbody and Heated Halo reflection is observed. Knowledge of key temperatures and the viewing geometry allow the blackbody cavity spectral emissivity to be calculated. This work will culminate with an integrated subsystem that can provide on-orbit end-to-end radiometric accuracy validation for infrared remote sensing instruments.

  18. On-Orbit Absolute Radiance Standard for the Next Generation of IR Remote Sensing Instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Best, F. A.; Adler, D. P.; Pettersen, C.; Revercomb, H. E.; Gero, P.; Taylor, J. K.; Knuteson, R. O.; Perepezko, J. H.

    2011-12-01

    The next generation of infrared remote sensing satellite instrumentation, including climate benchmark missions will require better absolute measurement accuracy than now available, and will most certainly rely on the emerging capability to fly SI traceable standards that provide irrefutable absolute measurement accuracy. As an example, instrumentation designed to measure spectrally resolved infrared radiances with an absolute brightness temperature error of better than 0.1 K will require high-emissivity (>0.999) calibration blackbodies with emissivity uncertainty of better than 0.06%, and absolute temperature uncertainties of better than 0.045K (k=3). Key elements of an On-Orbit Absolute Radiance Standard (OARS) meeting these stringent requirements have been demonstrated in the laboratory at the University of Wisconsin and are undergoing further refinement under the NASA Instrument Incubator Program (IIP). This work will culminate with an integrated subsystem that can provide on-orbit end-to-end radiometric accuracy validation for infrared remote sensing instruments. We present the new technologies that underlie the OARS and updated results of laboratory testing that demonstrate the required accuracy. The underlying technologies include on-orbit absolute temperature calibration using the transient melt signatures of small quantities (<1g) of reference materials (gallium, water, and mercury) imbedded in the blackbody cavity; and on-orbit cavity spectral emissivity measurement using a heated halo. For these emissivity measurements, a carefully baffled heated cylinder is placed in front of a blackbody in the infrared spectrometer system, and the combined radiance of the blackbody and Heated Halo reflection is observed. Knowledge of key temperatures and the viewing geometry allow the blackbody cavity spectral emissivity to be calculated.

  19. On-Orbit Absolute Radiance Standard for the Next Generation of IR Remote Sensing Instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Best, F. A.; Adler, D. P.; Pettersen, C.; Revercomb, H. E.; Gero, P. J.; Taylor, J. K.; Knuteson, R. O.; Perepezko, J. H.

    2012-12-01

    The next generation of infrared remote sensing satellite instrumentation, including climate benchmark missions will require better absolute measurement accuracy than now available, and will most certainly rely on the emerging capability to fly SI traceable standards that provide irrefutable absolute measurement accuracy. As an example, instrumentation designed to measure spectrally resolved infrared radiances with an absolute brightness temperature error of better than 0.1 K will require high-emissivity (>0.999) calibration blackbodies with emissivity uncertainty of better than 0.06%, and absolute temperature uncertainties of better than 0.045K (k=3). Key elements of an On-Orbit Absolute Radiance Standard (OARS) meeting these stringent requirements have been demonstrated in the laboratory at the University of Wisconsin and are undergoing further refinement under the NASA Instrument Incubator Program (IIP). This work will culminate with an integrated subsystem that can provide on-orbit end-to-end radiometric accuracy validation for infrared remote sensing instruments. We present the new technologies that underlie the OARS and updated results of laboratory testing that demonstrate the required accuracy. The underlying technologies include on-orbit absolute temperature calibration using the transient melt signatures of small quantities (<1g) of reference materials (gallium, water, and mercury) imbedded in the blackbody cavity; and on-orbit cavity spectral emissivity measurement using a heated halo. For these emissivity measurements, a carefully baffled heated cylinder is placed in front of a blackbody in the infrared spectrometer system, and the combined radiance of the blackbody and Heated Halo reflection is observed. Knowledge of key temperatures and the viewing geometry allow the blackbody cavity spectral emissivity to be calculated.

  20. Assessing and ensuring GOES-R magnetometer accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, Delano; Todirita, Monica; Kronenwetter, Jeffrey; Dahya, Melissa; Chu, Donald

    2016-05-01

    The GOES-R magnetometer subsystem accuracy requirement is 1.7 nanoteslas (nT). During quiet times (100 nT), accuracy is defined as absolute mean plus 3 sigma error per axis. During storms (300 nT), accuracy is defined as absolute mean plus 2 sigma error per axis. Error comes both from outside the magnetometers, e.g. spacecraft fields and misalignments, as well as inside, e.g. zero offset and scale factor errors. Because zero offset and scale factor drift over time, it will be necessary to perform annual calibration maneuvers. To predict performance before launch, we have used Monte Carlo simulations and covariance analysis. With the proposed calibration regimen, both suggest that the magnetometer subsystem will meet its accuracy requirements.

  1. Accuracy analysis of automatic distortion correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolecki, Jakub; Rzonca, Antoni

    2015-06-01

    The paper addresses the problem of the automatic distortion removal from images acquired with non-metric SLR camera equipped with prime lenses. From the photogrammetric point of view the following question arises: is the accuracy of distortion control data provided by the manufacturer for a certain lens model (not item) sufficient in order to achieve demanded accuracy? In order to obtain the reliable answer to the aforementioned problem the two kinds of tests were carried out for three lens models. Firstly the multi-variant camera calibration was conducted using the software providing full accuracy analysis. Secondly the accuracy analysis using check points took place. The check points were measured in the images resampled based on estimated distortion model or in distortion-free images simply acquired in the automatic distortion removal mode. The extensive conclusions regarding application of each calibration approach in practice are given. Finally the rules of applying automatic distortion removal in photogrammetric measurements are suggested.

  2. Assessment of the Geodetic and Color Accuracy of Multi-Pass Airborne/Mobile Lidar Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pack, R. T.; Petersen, B.; Sunderland, D.; Blonquist, K.; Israelsen, P.; Crum, G.; Fowles, A.; Neale, C.

    2008-12-01

    The ability to merge lidar and color image data acquired by multiple passes of an aircraft or van is largely dependent on the accuracy of the navigation system that estimates the dynamic position and orientation of the sensor. We report an assessment of the performance of a Riegl Q560 lidar transceiver combined with a Litton LN-200 inertial measurement unit (IMU) based NovAtel SPAN GPS/IMU system and a Panasonic HD Video Camera system. Several techniques are reported that were used to maximize the performance of the GPS/IMU system in generating precisely merged point clouds. The airborne data used included eight flight lines all overflying the same building on the campus at Utah State University. These lines were flown at the FAA minimum altitude of 1000 feet for fixed-wing aircraft. The mobile data was then acquired with the same system mounted to look sideways out of a van several months later. The van was driven around the same building at variable speed in order to avoid pedestrians. An absolute accuracy of about 6 cm and a relative accuracy of less than 2.5 cm one-sigma are documented for the merged data. Several techniques are also reported for merging of the color video data stream with the lidar point cloud. A technique for back-projecting and burning lidar points within the video stream enables the verification of co-boresighting accuracy. The resulting pixel-level alignment is accurate with within the size of a lidar footprint. The techniques described in this paper enable the display of high-resolution colored points of high detail and color clarity.

  3. Inactivation of Cerebellar Cortical Crus II Disrupts Temporal Processing of Absolute Timing but not Relative Timing in Voluntary Movements

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Kenji; Sakurai, Yoshio

    2016-01-01

    Several recent studies have demonstrated that the cerebellum plays an important role in temporal processing at the scale of milliseconds. However, it is not clear whether intrinsic cerebellar function involves the temporal processing of discrete or continuous events. Temporal processing during discrete events functions by counting absolute time like a stopwatch, while during continuous events it measures events at intervals. During the temporal processing of continuous events, animals might respond to rhythmic timing of sequential responses rather than to the absolute durations of intervals. Here, we tested the contribution of the cerebellar cortex to temporal processing of absolute and relative timings in voluntary movements. We injected muscimol and baclofen to a part of the cerebellar cortex of rats. We then tested the accuracy of their absolute or relative timing prediction using two timing tasks requiring almost identical reaching movements. Inactivation of the cerebellar cortex disrupted accurate temporal prediction in the absolute timing task. The rats formed two groups based on the changes to their timing accuracy following one of two distinct patterns which can be described as longer or shorter declines in the accuracy of learned intervals. However, a part of the cerebellar cortical inactivation did not affect the rats’ performance of relative timing tasks. We concluded that a part of the cerebellar cortex, Crus II, contributes to the accurate temporal prediction of absolute timing and that the entire cerebellar cortex may be unnecessary in cases in which accurately knowing the absolute duration of an interval is not required for temporal prediction. PMID:26941621

  4. Tracking accuracy assessment for concentrator photovoltaic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norton, Matthew S. H.; Anstey, Ben; Bentley, Roger W.; Georghiou, George E.

    2010-10-01

    The accuracy to which a concentrator photovoltaic (CPV) system can track the sun is an important parameter that influences a number of measurements that indicate the performance efficiency of the system. This paper presents work carried out into determining the tracking accuracy of a CPV system, and illustrates the steps involved in gaining an understanding of the tracking accuracy. A Trac-Stat SL1 accuracy monitor has been used in the determination of pointing accuracy and has been integrated into the outdoor CPV module test facility at the Photovoltaic Technology Laboratories in Nicosia, Cyprus. Results from this work are provided to demonstrate how important performance indicators may be presented, and how the reliability of results is improved through the deployment of such accuracy monitors. Finally, recommendations on the use of such sensors are provided as a means to improve the interpretation of real outdoor performance.

  5. Accuracy of the Cloud Integrating Nephelometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerber, Hermann E.

    2004-01-01

    Potential error sources for measurements with the Cloud Integrating Nephelometer (CIN) are discussed and analyzed, including systematic errors of the measurement approach, flow and particle-trajectory deviations at flight velocity, ice-crystal breakup on probe surfaces, and errors in calibration and developing scaling constants. It is concluded that errors are minimal, and that the accuracy of the CIN should be close to the systematic behavior of the CIN derived in Gerber et al (2000). Absolute calibration of the CIN with a transmissometer operating co-located in a mountain-top cloud shows that the earlier scaling constant for the optical extinction coefficient obtained by other means is within 5% of the absolute calibration value, and that the CIN measurements on the Citation aircraft flights during the CRYSTAL-FACE study are accurate.

  6. Presenting a high accuracy Theta-Phi-style fiber-positioner prototype with a 15-mm pitch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haeuser, Marco; Lang-Bardl, Florian; Richter, Josef; Hess, Hans-Joachim; Degwert, Adrian; Karasz, Adolf; Kosyra, Ralf; Hopp, Ulrich; Bender, Ralf

    2014-07-01

    We present a Θ - Φ-style fiber-positioner prototype, which will be controlled via the EMI-robust CAN-Bus. Our positioner points without iterations or a metrology system. Due to the overlapping patrol disc of 17.3 mm diameter, we reach a filling factor of 100 %. The positioners diameter is 14.6 mm, containing the control electronics on a contemporary PCB of 13.5 mm width. While moving, the power consumption does not lead to a significant rise in temperature. Given a mechanical reference point measured by stall detection, the absolute accuracy is 27 μm (1σ = 14 µm) and pointings are repeatable with 7 μm (1σ = 4 μm). Better positioning may be reachable with upcoming calibration.

  7. Jasminum flexile flower absolute from India--a detailed comparison with three other jasmine absolutes.

    PubMed

    Braun, Norbert A; Kohlenberg, Birgit; Sim, Sherina; Meier, Manfred; Hammerschmidt, Franz-Josef

    2009-09-01

    Jasminum flexile flower absolute from the south of India and the corresponding vacuum headspace (VHS) sample of the absolute were analyzed using GC and GC-MS. Three other commercially available Indian jasmine absolutes from the species: J. sambac, J. officinale subsp. grandiflorum, and J. auriculatum and the respective VHS samples were used for comparison purposes. One hundred and twenty-one compounds were characterized in J. flexile flower absolute, with methyl linolate, benzyl salicylate, benzyl benzoate, (2E,6E)-farnesol, and benzyl acetate as the main constituents. A detailed olfactory evaluation was also performed. PMID:19831037

  8. Absolute Performance of AUSGeoid09 in Mountainous Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sussanna, Vittorio; Janssen, Volker; Gibbings, Peter

    2014-09-01

    The Australian Height Datum (AHD) is the current national vertical datum for Australia, and AUSGeoid09 is the latest quasigeoid model used to compute (normal-orthometric)AHDheights fromGlobalNavigation Satellite System (GNSS) derived ellipsoidal heights. While previous studies have evaluated the AUSGeoid09 model across Australia, such studies have not focused on mountainous regions in particular. This paper investigates the performance of AUSGeoid09 in an absolute sense in the Mid Hunter and Snowy Mountains regions of New South Wales. Absolute (i.e. single point) comparisons were undertaken between AUSGeoid09-derived heights and published AHD heights. The performance of AUSGeoid09 was evaluated relative to its predecessor AUSGeoid98. In both study areas, an overall improvement is evident when applying AUSGeoid09 to compute AHD heights in an absolute sense. In the MidHunter, AUSGeoid09 provided a substantial improvement over its predecessor, clearly demonstrating the benefits of its new geometric component on GNSS-derived AHD height determination. In the Snowy Mountains, moderate improvement over AUSGeoid98 was evident. However, a slope was detected for AUSGeoid09 residuals, and it appears that the geometric component may have overcompensated for sea surface topography in this area. While this appraisal of AUSGeoid09 performance in mountainous regions is encouraging, it has been shown that some discrepancies still remain between AUSGeoid09-derived heights and AHD. Eventually, a new vertical datum will be necessary to ensure homogeneity across Australia.

  9. Monitoring Groundwater Variations Using a Portable Absolute Gravimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuda, Yoichi; Nishijima, Jun; Hasegawa, Takashi; Sofyan, Yayan; Taniguchi, Makoto; Abidin, Hasanuddin Z.; Delinom, Robert M.

    2010-05-01

    In urbanized areas, one of the urgent problems is to monitor the groundwater variations especially connected with land subsidence. Although the groundwater variations are usually measured by water level meters, gravity measurements can provide us additional information about the water mass movements which should be beneficial for the analyses of groundwater flow and the managements of water resources as well. Therefore, in order to establish a new technique to monitor the groundwater variations by means of the gravity measurements, we investigated the applicability of a portable type absolute gravimeter (Micro-G LaCoste Inc. A10-017). We will report the results of some test measurements in Japan, and the outline of the surveys in Jakarta, Indonesia. As for the absolute gravity measurements, FG-5 of MGL would be more popular. FG-5 is a high precision absolute gravimeter with a 2ugal-accuracy for laboratory use, while the nominal accuracy of A-10 is 10ugal (measurement precision: ±5ugal). In spite of the disadvantage, A-10 is well suited for the field surveys because it is much smaller than FG-5 and can be operated with 12VDC power. The repeated measurements using A10-017 in Kyushu University show good correlations between the measured gravity values and the groundwater levels in nearby observation wells. In a geothermal plant of Takigami, we also observed the gravity changes associated with the cycle of the geothermal fluid. All these test measurements have proved that the gravimeter can achieve a 10ugal (10nm/s2) or better accuracy in the field surveys. In Jakarta, Indonesia, excess groundwater pumping is going on and it causes land subsidence. To reveal the associated gravity changes, we conducted the first gravity survey in August 2008 and the second survey in July 2009. Mainly due to the instrumental troubles during the 2008 surveys, we have not obtained enough reliable data yet. Nevertheless the result obtained so far suggested the gravity increases in the

  10. Absolute radiometric calibration of Als intensity data: effects on accuracy and target classification.

    PubMed

    Kaasalainen, Sanna; Pyysalo, Ulla; Krooks, Anssi; Vain, Ants; Kukko, Antero; Hyyppä, Juha; Kaasalainen, Mikko

    2011-01-01

    Radiometric calibration of airborne laser scanning (ALS) intensity data aims at retrieving a value related to the target scattering properties, which is independent on the instrument or flight parameters. The aim of a calibration procedure is also to be able to compare results from different flights and instruments, but practical applications are sparsely available, and the performance of calibration methods for this purpose needs to be further assessed. We have studied the radiometric calibration with data from three separate flights and two different instruments using external calibration targets. We find that the intensity data from different flights and instruments can be compared to each other only after a radiometric calibration process using separate calibration targets carefully selected for each flight. The calibration is also necessary for target classification purposes, such as separating vegetation from sand using intensity data from different flights. The classification results are meaningful only for calibrated intensity data. PMID:22346660

  11. Radiometric absolute noise-temperature measurement system features improved accuracy and calibration ease

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, W.; Ewen, H.; Haroules, G.

    1970-01-01

    Radiometric receiver system, which measures noise temperatures in degrees Kelvin, does not require cryogenic noise sources for routine operation. It eliminates radiometer calibration errors associated with RF attenuation measurements. Calibrated noise source is required only for laboratory adjustment and calibration.

  12. Absolute Radiometric Calibration of ALS Intensity Data: Effects on Accuracy and Target Classification

    PubMed Central

    Kaasalainen, Sanna; Pyysalo, Ulla; Krooks, Anssi; Vain, Ants; Kukko, Antero; Hyyppä, Juha; Kaasalainen, Mikko

    2011-01-01

    Radiometric calibration of airborne laser scanning (ALS) intensity data aims at retrieving a value related to the target scattering properties, which is independent on the instrument or flight parameters. The aim of a calibration procedure is also to be able to compare results from different flights and instruments, but practical applications are sparsely available, and the performance of calibration methods for this purpose needs to be further assessed. We have studied the radiometric calibration with data from three separate flights and two different instruments using external calibration targets. We find that the intensity data from different flights and instruments can be compared to each other only after a radiometric calibration process using separate calibration targets carefully selected for each flight. The calibration is also necessary for target classification purposes, such as separating vegetation from sand using intensity data from different flights. The classification results are meaningful only for calibrated intensity data. PMID:22346660

  13. Universal Cosmic Absolute and Modern Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostro, Ludwik

    The official Sciences, especially all natural sciences, respect in their researches the principle of methodic naturalism i.e. they consider all phenomena as entirely natural and therefore in their scientific explanations they do never adduce or cite supernatural entities and forces. The purpose of this paper is to show that Modern Science has its own self-existent, self-acting, and self-sufficient Natural All-in Being or Omni-Being i.e. the entire Nature as a Whole that justifies the scientific methodic naturalism. Since this Natural All-in Being is one and only It should be considered as the own scientifically justified Natural Absolute of Science and should be called, in my opinion, the Universal Cosmic Absolute of Modern Science. It will be also shown that the Universal Cosmic Absolute is ontologically enormously stratified and is in its ultimate i.e. in its most fundamental stratum trans-reistic and trans-personal. It means that in its basic stratum. It is neither a Thing or a Person although It contains in Itself all things and persons with all other sentient and conscious individuals as well, On the turn of the 20th century the Science has begun to look for a theory of everything, for a final theory, for a master theory. In my opinion the natural Universal Cosmic Absolute will constitute in such a theory the radical all penetrating Ultimate Basic Reality and will substitute step by step the traditional supernatural personal Absolute.

  14. In-Flight Measurement of the Absolute Energy Scale of the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Allafort, A.; Atwood, W.B.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Berenji, B.; Bloom, E.D.; Bonamente, E.; Borgland, A.W.; Bouvier, A.; Bregeon, J.; Brez, A.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Buson, S.; /more authors..

    2012-09-20

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT) on-board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope is a pair-conversion telescope designed to survey the gamma-ray sky from 20 MeV to several hundreds of GeV. In this energy band there are no astronomical sources with sufficiently well known and sharp spectral features to allow an absolute calibration of the LAT energy scale. However, the geomagnetic cutoff in the cosmic ray electron-plus-positron (CRE) spectrum in low Earth orbit does provide such a spectral feature. The energy and spectral shape of this cutoff can be calculated with the aid of a numerical code tracing charged particles in the Earth's magnetic field. By comparing the cutoff value with that measured by the LAT in different geomagnetic positions, we have obtained several calibration points between {approx}6 and {approx}13 GeV with an estimated uncertainty of {approx}2%. An energy calibration with such high accuracy reduces the systematic uncertainty in LAT measurements of, for example, the spectral cutoff in the emission from gamma ray pulsars.

  15. In-Flight Measurement of the Absolute Energy Scale of the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Allafort, A.; Atwood, W. B.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Barbielini, G; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Berenji, B,; Bloom, E. D.; Bonamente, E.; Borgland, A. W.; Bouvier, A.; Bregeon, J.; Brez, A.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Gehrels, N.; Hays, E.; McEnery, J. E.; Thompson, D. J.; Troja, E. J.

    2012-01-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT) on-board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope is a pair-conversion telescope designed to survey the gamma-ray sky from 20 MeV to several hundreds of GeV. In this energy band there are no astronomical sources with sufficiently well known and sharp spectral features to allow an absolute calibration of the LAT energy scale. However, the geomagnetic cutoff in the cosmic ray electron- plus-positron (CRE) spectrum in low Earth orbit does provide such a spectral feature. The energy and spectral shape of this cutoff can be calculated with the aid of a numerical code tracing charged particles in the Earth's magnetic field. By comparing the cutoff value with that measured by the LAT in different geomagnetic positions, we have obtained several calibration points between approx. 6 and approx. 13 GeV with an estimated uncertainty of approx. 2%. An energy calibration with such high accuracy reduces the systematic uncertainty in LAT measurements of, for example, the spectral cutoff in the emission from gamma ray pulsars.

  16. A Brief Overview of the Absolute Proper motions Outside the Plane catalog (APOP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Zhaoxiang; Yu, Yong; Smart, Richard L.; Lattanzi, Mario G.; Bucciarelli, Beatrice; Spagna, Alessandro; McLean, Brian J.; Tang, Zhenghong; Jones, Hugh R. A.; Morbidelli, Roberto; Nicastro, Luciano; Vecchiato, Alberto; Teixeira, Ramachrisna

    2015-10-01

    APOP is the first version of an absolute proper motion catalog achieved using the Digitized Sky Survey Schmidt plate material outside the galactic plane (|b|≥ 27(o) ). The resulting global zero point error is less than 0.6 mas/yr, and the precision better than 4.0 mas/yr for objects brighter than R_{F}=18.5, rising to 9.0 mas/yr for objects with magnitude in the range 18.5accuracy is about 150 mas (per coordinate) with a systematic deviation from the ICRS around 0.2 mas. The catalog covers 22,525 square degrees and lists 100,777,385 objects to the limiting magnitude of R_{F}˜ 20.8. Although the Gaia mission is poised to set the new standard in catalog astronomy, the methods and procedures used for APOP will be useful in other reductions to dispel astrometric magnitude- and color-dependent systematic errors from the next generation of ground-based surveys.

  17. Absolute temperature measurements using a two-color QWIP focal plane array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bundas, Jason; Dennis, Richard; Patnaude, Kelly; Burrows, Douglas; Faska, Ross; Sundaram, Mani; Reisinger, Axel; Manitakos, Dan

    2010-04-01

    The infrared photon flux emitted by an object depends not only on its temperature but also on a proportionality factor referred to as its emissivity. Since the latter parameter is usually not known quantitatively a priori, any temperature determination based on single-band radiometric measurements suffers from an inherent uncertainty. Recording photon fluxes in two separate spectral bands can in principle circumvent this limitation. The technique amounts to solving a system of two equations in two unknowns, namely, temperature and emissivity. The temperature derived in this manner can be considered absolute in the sense that it is independent of the emissivity, as long as that emissivity is the same in both bands. QmagiQ has previously developed a 320x256 midwave/longwave staring focal plane array which has been packaged into a dual-band laboratory camera. The camera in question constitutes a natural tool to generate simultaneous and independent emissivity maps and temperature maps of entire two-dimensional scenes, rather than at a single point on an object of interest. We describe a series of measurements we have performed on a variety of targets of different emissivities and temperatures. We examine various factors that affect the accuracy of the technique. They include the influence of the ambient radiation reflected off the target, which must be properly accounted for and subtracted from the collected signal in order to lead to the true target temperature. We also quantify the consequences of spectrally varying emissivities.

  18. Absolute pitch in Costa Rica: Distribution of pitch identification ability and implications for its genetic basis.

    PubMed

    Chavarria-Soley, Gabriela

    2016-08-01

    Absolute pitch is the unusual ability to recognize a pitch without an external reference. The current view is that both environmental and genetic factors are involved in the acquisition of the trait. In the present study, 127 adult musicians were subjected to a musical tone identification test. Subjects were university music students and volunteers who responded to a newspaper article. The test consisted of the identification of 40 piano and 40 pure tones. Subjects were classified in three categories according to their pitch naming ability: absolute pitch (AP), high accuracy of tone identification (HA), and non-absolute pitch (non-AP). Both the percentage of correct responses and the mean absolute deviation showed a statistically significant variation between categories. A very clear pattern of higher accuracy for white than for black key notes was observed for the HA and the non-AP groups. Meanwhile, the AP group had an almost perfect pitch naming accuracy for both kinds of tones. Each category presented a very different pattern of deviation around the correct response. The age at the beginning of musical training did not differ between categories. The distribution of pitch identification ability in this study suggests a complex inheritance of the trait. PMID:27586721

  19. Absolute flux density calibrations of radio sources: 2.3 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freiley, A. J.; Batelaan, P. D.; Bathker, D. A.

    1977-01-01

    A detailed description of a NASA/JPL Deep Space Network program to improve S-band gain calibrations of large aperture antennas is reported. The program is considered unique in at least three ways; first, absolute gain calibrations of high quality suppressed-sidelobe dual mode horns first provide a high accuracy foundation to the foundation to the program. Second, a very careful transfer calibration technique using an artificial far-field coherent-wave source was used to accurately obtain the gain of one large (26 m) aperture. Third, using the calibrated large aperture directly, the absolute flux density of five selected galactic and extragalactic natural radio sources was determined with an absolute accuracy better than 2 percent, now quoted at the familiar 1 sigma confidence level. The follow-on considerations to apply these results to an operational network of ground antennas are discussed. It is concluded that absolute gain accuracies within + or - 0.30 to 0.40 db are possible, depending primarily on the repeatability (scatter) in the field data from Deep Space Network user stations.

  20. Absolute isotopic abundances of TI in meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niederer, F. R.; Papanastassiou, D. A.; Wasserburg, G. J.

    1985-03-01

    The absolute isotope abundance of Ti has been determined in Ca-Al-rich inclusions from the Allende and Leoville meteorites and in samples of whole meteorites. The absolute Ti isotope abundances differ by a significant mass dependent isotope fractionation transformation from the previously reported abundances, which were normalized for fractionation using 46Ti/48Ti. Therefore, the absolute compositions define distinct nucleosynthetic components from those previously identified or reflect the existence of significant mass dependent isotope fractionation in nature. The authors provide a general formalism for determining the possible isotope compositions of the exotic Ti from the measured composition, for different values of isotope fractionation in nature and for different mixing ratios of the exotic and normal components.

  1. Molecular iodine absolute frequencies. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Sansonetti, C.J.

    1990-06-25

    Fifty specified lines of {sup 127}I{sub 2} were studied by Doppler-free frequency modulation spectroscopy. For each line the classification of the molecular transition was determined, hyperfine components were identified, and one well-resolved component was selected for precise determination of its absolute frequency. In 3 cases, a nearby alternate line was selected for measurement because no well-resolved component was found for the specified line. Absolute frequency determinations were made with an estimated uncertainty of 1.1 MHz by locking a dye laser to the selected hyperfine component and measuring its wave number with a high-precision Fabry-Perot wavemeter. For each line results of the absolute measurement, the line classification, and a Doppler-free spectrum are given.

  2. Absolute calibration in vivo measurement systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kruchten, D.A.; Hickman, D.P.

    1991-02-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is currently investigating a new method for obtaining absolute calibration factors for radiation measurement systems used to measure internally deposited radionuclides in vivo. Absolute calibration of in vivo measurement systems will eliminate the need to generate a series of human surrogate structures (i.e., phantoms) for calibrating in vivo measurement systems. The absolute calibration of in vivo measurement systems utilizes magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to define physiological structure, size, and composition. The MRI image provides a digitized representation of the physiological structure, which allows for any mathematical distribution of radionuclides within the body. Using Monte Carlo transport codes, the emission spectrum from the body is predicted. The in vivo measurement equipment is calibrated using the Monte Carlo code and adjusting for the intrinsic properties of the detection system. The calibration factors are verified using measurements of existing phantoms and previously obtained measurements of human volunteers. 8 refs.

  3. Accuracy analysis for DSM and orthoimages derived from SPOT HRS stereo data using direct georeferencing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinartz, Peter; Müller, Rupert; Lehner, Manfred; Schroeder, Manfred

    During the HRS (High Resolution Stereo) Scientific Assessment Program the French space agency CNES delivered data sets from the HRS camera system with high precision ancillary data. Two test data sets from this program were evaluated: one is located in Germany, the other in Spain. The first goal was to derive orthoimages and digital surface models (DSM) from the along track stereo data by applying the rigorous model with direct georeferencing and without ground control points (GCPs). For the derivation of DSM, the stereo processing software, developed at DLR for the MOMS-2P three line stereo camera was used. As a first step, the interior and exterior orientation of the camera, delivered as ancillary data from positioning and attitude systems were extracted. A dense image matching, using nearly all pixels as kernel centers provided the parallaxes. The quality of the stereo tie points was controlled by forward and backward matching of the two stereo partners using the local least squares matching method. Forward intersection lead to points in object space which are subsequently interpolated to a DSM in a regular grid. DEM filtering methods were also applied and evaluations carried out differentiating between accuracies in forest and other areas. Additionally, orthoimages were generated from the images of the two stereo looking directions. The orthoimage and DSM accuracy was determined by using GCPs and available reference DEMs of superior accuracy (DEM derived from laser data and/or classical airborne photogrammetry). As expected the results obtained without using GCPs showed a bias in the order of 5-20 m to the reference data for all three coordinates. By image matching it could be shown that the two independently derived orthoimages exhibit a very constant shift behavior. In a second step few GCPs (3-4) were used to calculate boresight alignment angles, introduced into the direct georeferencing process of each image independently. This method improved the absolute

  4. Absolute dose calculations for Monte Carlo simulations of radiotherapy beams.

    PubMed

    Popescu, I A; Shaw, C P; Zavgorodni, S F; Beckham, W A

    2005-07-21

    Monte Carlo (MC) simulations have traditionally been used for single field relative comparisons with experimental data or commercial treatment planning systems (TPS). However, clinical treatment plans commonly involve more than one field. Since the contribution of each field must be accurately quantified, multiple field MC simulations are only possible by employing absolute dosimetry. Therefore, we have developed a rigorous calibration method that allows the incorporation of monitor units (MU) in MC simulations. This absolute dosimetry formalism can be easily implemented by any BEAMnrc/DOSXYZnrc user, and applies to any configuration of open and blocked fields, including intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans. Our approach involves the relationship between the dose scored in the monitor ionization chamber of a radiotherapy linear accelerator (linac), the number of initial particles incident on the target, and the field size. We found that for a 10 x 10 cm2 field of a 6 MV photon beam, 1 MU corresponds, in our model, to 8.129 x 10(13) +/- 1.0% electrons incident on the target and a total dose of 20.87 cGy +/- 1.0% in the monitor chambers of the virtual linac. We present an extensive experimental verification of our MC results for open and intensity-modulated fields, including a dynamic 7-field IMRT plan simulated on the CT data sets of a cylindrical phantom and of a Rando anthropomorphic phantom, which were validated by measurements using ionization chambers and thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD). Our simulation results are in excellent agreement with experiment, with percentage differences of less than 2%, in general, demonstrating the accuracy of our Monte Carlo absolute dose calculations. PMID:16177516

  5. Absolute dose calculations for Monte Carlo simulations of radiotherapy beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popescu, I. A.; Shaw, C. P.; Zavgorodni, S. F.; Beckham, W. A.

    2005-07-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) simulations have traditionally been used for single field relative comparisons with experimental data or commercial treatment planning systems (TPS). However, clinical treatment plans commonly involve more than one field. Since the contribution of each field must be accurately quantified, multiple field MC simulations are only possible by employing absolute dosimetry. Therefore, we have developed a rigorous calibration method that allows the incorporation of monitor units (MU) in MC simulations. This absolute dosimetry formalism can be easily implemented by any BEAMnrc/DOSXYZnrc user, and applies to any configuration of open and blocked fields, including intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans. Our approach involves the relationship between the dose scored in the monitor ionization chamber of a radiotherapy linear accelerator (linac), the number of initial particles incident on the target, and the field size. We found that for a 10 × 10 cm2 field of a 6 MV photon beam, 1 MU corresponds, in our model, to 8.129 × 1013 ± 1.0% electrons incident on the target and a total dose of 20.87 cGy ± 1.0% in the monitor chambers of the virtual linac. We present an extensive experimental verification of our MC results for open and intensity-modulated fields, including a dynamic 7-field IMRT plan simulated on the CT data sets of a cylindrical phantom and of a Rando anthropomorphic phantom, which were validated by measurements using ionization chambers and thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD). Our simulation results are in excellent agreement with experiment, with percentage differences of less than 2%, in general, demonstrating the accuracy of our Monte Carlo absolute dose calculations.

  6. Precise Measurement of the Absolute Fluorescence Yield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ave, M.; Bohacova, M.; Daumiller, K.; Di Carlo, P.; di Giulio, C.; San Luis, P. Facal; Gonzales, D.; Hojvat, C.; Hörandel, J. R.; Hrabovsky, M.; Iarlori, M.; Keilhauer, B.; Klages, H.; Kleifges, M.; Kuehn, F.; Monasor, M.; Nozka, L.; Palatka, M.; Petrera, S.; Privitera, P.; Ridky, J.; Rizi, V.; D'Orfeuil, B. Rouille; Salamida, F.; Schovanek, P.; Smida, R.; Spinka, H.; Ulrich, A.; Verzi, V.; Williams, C.

    2011-09-01

    We present preliminary results of the absolute yield of fluorescence emission in atmospheric gases. Measurements were performed at the Fermilab Test Beam Facility with a variety of beam particles and gases. Absolute calibration of the fluorescence yield to 5% level was achieved by comparison with two known light sources--the Cherenkov light emitted by the beam particles, and a calibrated nitrogen laser. The uncertainty of the energy scale of current Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Rays experiments will be significantly improved by the AIRFLY measurement.

  7. Absolutely relative or relatively absolute: violations of value invariance in human decision making.

    PubMed

    Teodorescu, Andrei R; Moran, Rani; Usher, Marius

    2016-02-01

    Making decisions based on relative rather than absolute information processing is tied to choice optimality via the accumulation of evidence differences and to canonical neural processing via accumulation of evidence ratios. These theoretical frameworks predict invariance of decision latencies to absolute intensities that maintain differences and ratios, respectively. While information about the absolute values of the choice alternatives is not necessary for choosing the best alternative, it may nevertheless hold valuable information about the context of the decision. To test the sensitivity of human decision making to absolute values, we manipulated the intensities of brightness stimuli pairs while preserving either their differences or their ratios. Although asked to choose the brighter alternative relative to the other, participants responded faster to higher absolute values. Thus, our results provide empirical evidence for human sensitivity to task irrelevant absolute values indicating a hard-wired mechanism that precedes executive control. Computational investigations of several modelling architectures reveal two alternative accounts for this phenomenon, which combine absolute and relative processing. One account involves accumulation of differences with activation dependent processing noise and the other emerges from accumulation of absolute values subject to the temporal dynamics of lateral inhibition. The potential adaptive role of such choice mechanisms is discussed. PMID:26022836

  8. Metrological activity determination of 133Ba by sum-peak absolute method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva, R. L.; de Almeida, M. C. M.; Delgado, J. U.; Poledna, R.; Santos, A.; de Veras, E. V.; Rangel, J.; Trindade, O. L.

    2016-07-01

    The National Laboratory for Metrology of Ionizing Radiation provides gamma sources of radionuclide and standardized in activity with reduced uncertainties. Relative methods require standards to determine the sample activity while the absolute methods, as sum-peak, not. The activity is obtained directly with good accuracy and low uncertainties. 133Ba is used in research laboratories and on calibration of detectors for analysis in different work areas. Classical absolute methods don't calibrate 133Ba due to its complex decay scheme. The sum-peak method using gamma spectrometry with germanium detector standardizes 133Ba samples. Uncertainties lower than 1% to activity results were obtained.

  9. Absolute properties of the triple star HP Aurigae

    SciTech Connect

    Lacy, Claud H. Sandberg; Burks, Charles L.; Torres, Guillermo; Wolf, Marek E-mail: clburks@email.uark.edu E-mail: wolf@cesnet.cz

    2014-01-01

    New photometric, spectroscopic, and eclipse timing observations of the eclipsing binary star HP Aur allow for very accurate orbital determinations, even in the presence of a third body and transient starspot activity. The eclipsing binary masses are determined to an accuracy of ±0.4% and the radii to ±0.6%. The masses are 0.9543 ± 0.0041 and 0.8094 ± 0.0036 solar masses, and the radii are 1.0278 ± 0.0042 and 0.7758 ± 0.0034 solar radii, respectively. The orbital period in the outer orbit is accurately determined for the first time: 4.332 ± 0.011 yr. A comparison with current theories of stellar evolution shows that the components' absolute properties can be well-matched by the current models at an age of about 7 billion years.

  10. Landsat-5 TM reflective-band absolute radiometric calibration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chander, G.; Helder, D.L.; Markham, B.L.; Dewald, J.D.; Kaita, E.; Thome, K.J.; Micijevic, E.; Ruggles, T.A.

    2004-01-01

    The Landsat-5 Thematic Mapper (TM) sensor provides the longest running continuous dataset of moderate spatial resolution remote sensing imagery, dating back to its launch in March 1984. Historically, the radiometric calibration procedure for this imagery used the instrument's response to the Internal Calibrator (IC) on a scene-by-scene basis to determine the gain and offset of each detector. Due to observed degradations in the IC, a new procedure was implemented for U.S.-processed data in May 2003. This new calibration procedure is based on a lifetime radiometric calibration model for the instrument's reflective bands (1-5 and 7) and is derived, in part, from the IC response without the related degradation effects and is tied to the cross calibration with the Landsat-7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus. Reflective-band absolute radiometric accuracy of the instrument tends to be on the order of 7% to 10%, based on a variety of calibration methods.

  11. Sub-nanometer periodic nonlinearity error in absolute distance interferometers.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hongxing; Huang, Kaiqi; Hu, Pengcheng; Zhu, Pengfei; Tan, Jiubin; Fan, Zhigang

    2015-05-01

    Periodic nonlinearity which can result in error in nanometer scale has become a main problem limiting the absolute distance measurement accuracy. In order to eliminate this error, a new integrated interferometer with non-polarizing beam splitter is developed. This leads to disappearing of the frequency and/or polarization mixing. Furthermore, a strict requirement on the laser source polarization is highly reduced. By combining retro-reflector and angel prism, reference and measuring beams can be spatially separated, and therefore, their optical paths are not overlapped. So, the main cause of the periodic nonlinearity error, i.e., the frequency and/or polarization mixing and leakage of beam, is eliminated. Experimental results indicate that the periodic phase error is kept within 0.0018°. PMID:26026510

  12. Closed-loop step motor control using absolute encoders

    SciTech Connect

    Hicks, J.S.; Wright, M.C.

    1997-08-01

    A multi-axis, step motor control system was developed to accurately position and control the operation of a triple axis spectrometer at the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) located at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Triple axis spectrometers are used in neutron scattering and diffraction experiments and require highly accurate positioning. This motion control system can handle up to 16 axes of motion. Four of these axes are outfitted with 17-bit absolute encoders. These four axes are controlled with a software feedback loop that terminates the move based on real-time position information from the absolute encoders. Because the final position of the actuator is used to stop the motion of the step motors, the moves can be made accurately in spite of the large amount of mechanical backlash from a chain drive between the motors and the spectrometer arms. A modified trapezoidal profile, custom C software, and an industrial PC, were used to achieve a positioning accuracy of 0.00275 degrees of rotation. A form of active position maintenance ensures that the angles are maintained with zero error or drift.

  13. GEOSPATIAL DATA ACCURACY ASSESSMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The development of robust accuracy assessment methods for the validation of spatial data represent's a difficult scientific challenge for the geospatial science community. The importance and timeliness of this issue is related directly to the dramatic escalation in the developmen...

  14. Morphology and Absolute Magnitudes of the SDSS DR7 QSOs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coelho, B.; Andrei, A. H.; Antón, S.

    2014-10-01

    The ESA mission Gaia will furnish a complete census of the Milky Way, delivering astrometrics, dynamics, and astrophysics information for 1 billion stars. Operating in all-sky repeated survey mode, Gaia will also provide measurements of extra-galactic objects. Among the later there will be at least 500,000 QSOs that will be used to build the reference frame upon which the several independent observations will be combined and interpreted. Not all the QSOs are equally suited to fulfill this role of fundamental, fiducial grid-points. Brightness, morphology, and variability define the astrometric error budget for each object. We made use of 3 morphological parameters based on the PSF sharpness, circularity and gaussianity, which enable us to distinguish the "real point-like" QSOs. These parameters are being explored on the spectroscopically certified QSOs of the SDSS DR7, to compare the performance against other morphology classification schemes, as well as to derive properties of the host galaxy. We present a new method, based on the Gaia quasar database, to derive absolute magnitudes, on the SDSS filters domain. The method can be extrapolated all over the optical window, including the Gaia filters. We discuss colors derived from SDSS apparent magnitudes and colors based on absolute magnitudes that we obtained tanking into account corrections for dust extinction, either intergalactic or from the QSO host, and for the Lyman α forest. In the future we want to further discuss properties of the host galaxies, comparing for e.g. the obtained morphological classification with the color, the apparent and absolute magnitudes, and the redshift distributions.

  15. Accuracy control in Monte Carlo radiative calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Almazan, P. Planas

    1993-01-01

    The general accuracy law that rules the Monte Carlo, ray-tracing algorithms used commonly for the calculation of the radiative entities in the thermal analysis of spacecraft are presented. These entities involve transfer of radiative energy either from a single source to a target (e.g., the configuration factors). or from several sources to a target (e.g., the absorbed heat fluxes). In fact, the former is just a particular case of the latter. The accuracy model is later applied to the calculation of some specific radiative entities. Furthermore, some issues related to the implementation of such a model in a software tool are discussed. Although only the relative error is considered through the discussion, similar results can be derived for the absolute error.

  16. Development of a GPS-aided motion measurement, pointing, and stabilization system for a Synthetic Aperture Radar. [Global Positioning System (GPS)

    SciTech Connect

    Fellerhoff, J.R.; Kohler, S.M.

    1991-01-01

    An advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar Motion Compensation System has been developed by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). The system includes a miniaturized high accuracy ring laser gyro inertial measurement unit, a three axis gimbal pointing and stabilization assembly, a differential Global Positioning System (GPS) navigation aiding system, and a pilot guidance system. The system provides several improvements over previous SNL motion compensation systems and is capable of antenna stabilization to less than 0.01 degrees RMS and absolute position measurement to less than 5.0 meters RMS. These accuracies have been demonstrated in recent flight testing aboard a DHC-6-300 Twin Otter'' aircraft.

  17. Overlay accuracy fundamentals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandel, Daniel; Levinski, Vladimir; Sapiens, Noam; Cohen, Guy; Amit, Eran; Klein, Dana; Vakshtein, Irina

    2012-03-01

    Currently, the performance of overlay metrology is evaluated mainly based on random error contributions such as precision and TIS variability. With the expected shrinkage of the overlay metrology budget to < 0.5nm, it becomes crucial to include also systematic error contributions which affect the accuracy of the metrology. Here we discuss fundamental aspects of overlay accuracy and a methodology to improve accuracy significantly. We identify overlay mark imperfections and their interaction with the metrology technology, as the main source of overlay inaccuracy. The most important type of mark imperfection is mark asymmetry. Overlay mark asymmetry leads to a geometrical ambiguity in the definition of overlay, which can be ~1nm or less. It is shown theoretically and in simulations that the metrology may enhance the effect of overlay mark asymmetry significantly and lead to metrology inaccuracy ~10nm, much larger than the geometrical ambiguity. The analysis is carried out for two different overlay metrology technologies: Imaging overlay and DBO (1st order diffraction based overlay). It is demonstrated that the sensitivity of DBO to overlay mark asymmetry is larger than the sensitivity of imaging overlay. Finally, we show that a recently developed measurement quality metric serves as a valuable tool for improving overlay metrology accuracy. Simulation results demonstrate that the accuracy of imaging overlay can be improved significantly by recipe setup optimized using the quality metric. We conclude that imaging overlay metrology, complemented by appropriate use of measurement quality metric, results in optimal overlay accuracy.

  18. Accuracy analysis of the space shuttle solid rocket motor profile measuring device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estler, W. Tyler

    1989-01-01

    The Profile Measuring Device (PMD) was developed at the George C. Marshall Space Flight Center following the loss of the Space Shuttle Challenger. It is a rotating gauge used to measure the absolute diameters of mating features of redesigned Solid Rocket Motor field joints. Diameter tolerance of these features are typically + or - 0.005 inches and it is required that the PMD absolute measurement uncertainty be within this tolerance. In this analysis, the absolute accuracy of these measurements were found to be + or - 0.00375 inches, worst case, with a potential accuracy of + or - 0.0021 inches achievable by improved temperature control.

  19. Pitch and Plasticity: Insights from the Pitch Matching of Chords by Musicians with Absolute and Relative Pitch

    PubMed Central

    McLachlan, Neil M.; Marco, David J. T.; Wilson, Sarah J.

    2013-01-01

    Absolute pitch (AP) is a form of sound recognition in which musical note names are associated with discrete musical pitch categories. The accuracy of pitch matching by non-AP musicians for chords has recently been shown to depend on stimulus familiarity, pointing to a role of spectral recognition mechanisms in the early stages of pitch processing. Here we show that pitch matching accuracy by AP musicians was also dependent on their familiarity with the chord stimulus. This suggests that the pitch matching abilities of both AP and non-AP musicians for concurrently presented pitches are dependent on initial recognition of the chord. The dual mechanism model of pitch perception previously proposed by the authors suggests that spectral processing associated with sound recognition primes waveform processing to extract stimulus periodicity and refine pitch perception. The findings presented in this paper are consistent with the dual mechanism model of pitch, and in the case of AP musicians, the formation of nominal pitch categories based on both spectral and periodicity information. PMID:24961624

  20. Absolute partial photoionization cross sections of ozone.

    SciTech Connect

    Berkowitz, J.; Chemistry

    2008-04-01

    Despite the current concerns about ozone, absolute partial photoionization cross sections for this molecule in the vacuum ultraviolet (valence) region have been unavailable. By eclectic re-evaluation of old/new data and plausible assumptions, such cross sections have been assembled to fill this void.

  1. Solving Absolute Value Equations Algebraically and Geometrically

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shiyuan, Wei

    2005-01-01

    The way in which students can improve their comprehension by understanding the geometrical meaning of algebraic equations or solving algebraic equation geometrically is described. Students can experiment with the conditions of the absolute value equation presented, for an interesting way to form an overall understanding of the concept.

  2. Teaching Absolute Value Inequalities to Mature Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sierpinska, Anna; Bobos, Georgeana; Pruncut, Andreea

    2011-01-01

    This paper gives an account of a teaching experiment on absolute value inequalities, whose aim was to identify characteristics of an approach that would realize the potential of the topic to develop theoretical thinking in students enrolled in prerequisite mathematics courses at a large, urban North American university. The potential is…

  3. Increasing Capacity: Practice Effects in Absolute Identification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dodds, Pennie; Donkin, Christopher; Brown, Scott D.; Heathcote, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    In most of the long history of the study of absolute identification--since Miller's (1956) seminal article--a severe limit on performance has been observed, and this limit has resisted improvement even by extensive practice. In a startling result, Rouder, Morey, Cowan, and Pfaltz (2004) found substantially improved performance with practice in the…

  4. On Relative and Absolute Conviction in Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weber, Keith; Mejia-Ramos, Juan Pablo

    2015-01-01

    Conviction is a central construct in mathematics education research on justification and proof. In this paper, we claim that it is important to distinguish between absolute conviction and relative conviction. We argue that researchers in mathematics education frequently have not done so and this has lead to researchers making unwarranted claims…

  5. Nonequilibrium equalities in absolutely irreversible processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murashita, Yuto; Funo, Ken; Ueda, Masahito

    2015-03-01

    Nonequilibrium equalities have attracted considerable attention in the context of statistical mechanics and information thermodynamics. Integral nonequilibrium equalities reveal an ensemble property of the entropy production σ as = 1 . Although nonequilibrium equalities apply to rather general nonequilibrium situations, they break down in absolutely irreversible processes, where the forward-path probability vanishes and the entropy production diverges. We identify the mathematical origins of this inapplicability as the singularity of probability measure. As a result, we generalize conventional integral nonequilibrium equalities to absolutely irreversible processes as = 1 -λS , where λS is the probability of the singular part defined based on Lebesgue's decomposition theorem. The acquired equality contains two physical quantities related to irreversibility: σ characterizing ordinary irreversibility and λS describing absolute irreversibility. An inequality derived from the obtained equality demonstrates the absolute irreversibility leads to the fundamental lower bound on the entropy production. We demonstrate the validity of the obtained equality for a simple model.

  6. State estimation and absolute image registration for geosynchronous satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nankervis, R.; Koch, D. W.; Sielski, H.

    1980-01-01

    Spacecraft state estimation and the absolute registration of Earth images acquired by cameras onboard geosynchronous satellites are described. The basic data type of the procedure consists of line and element numbers of image points called landmarks whose geodetic coordinates, relative to United States Geodetic Survey topographic maps, are known. A conventional least squares process is used to estimate navigational parameters and camera pointing biases from observed minus computed landmark line and element numbers. These estimated parameters along with orbit and attitude dynamic models are used to register images, using an automated grey level correlation technique, inside the span represented by the landmark data. In addition, the dynamic models can be employed to register images outside of the data span in a near real time mode. An important application of this mode is in support of meteorological studies where rapid data reduction is required for the rapid tracking and predicting of dynamic phenomena.

  7. On the Standardization of Vertical Accuracy Figures in Dems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casella, V.; Padova, B.

    2013-01-01

    Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) play a key role in hydrological risk prevention and mitigation: hydraulic numeric simulations, slope and aspect maps all heavily rely on DEMs. Hydraulic numeric simulations require the used DEM to have a defined accuracy, in order to obtain reliable results. Are the DEM accuracy figures clearly and uniquely defined? The paper focuses on some issues concerning DEM accuracy definition and assessment. Two DEM accuracy definitions can be found in literature: accuracy at the interpolated point and accuracy at the nodes. The former can be estimated by means of randomly distributed check points, while the latter by means of check points coincident with the nodes. The two considered accuracy figures are often treated as equivalent, but they aren't. Given the same DEM, assessing it through one or the other approach gives different results. Our paper performs an in-depth characterization of the two figures and proposes standardization coefficients.

  8. Absolute Entropy and Energy of Carbon Dioxide Using the Two-Phase Thermodynamic Model.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shao-Nung; Pascal, Tod A; Goddard, William A; Maiti, Prabal K; Lin, Shiang-Tai

    2011-06-14

    The two-phase thermodynamic (2PT) model is used to determine the absolute entropy and energy of carbon dioxide over a wide range of conditions from molecular dynamics trajectories. The 2PT method determines the thermodynamic properties by applying the proper statistical mechanical partition function to the normal modes of a fluid. The vibrational density of state (DoS), obtained from the Fourier transform of the velocity autocorrelation function, converges quickly, allowing the free energy, entropy, and other thermodynamic properties to be determined from short 20-ps MD trajectories. The anharmonic effects in the vibrations are accounted for by the broadening of the normal modes into bands from sampling the velocities over the trajectory. The low frequency diffusive modes, which lead to finite DoS at zero frequency, are accounted for by considering the DoS as a superposition of gas-phase and solid-phase components (two phases). The analytical decomposition of the DoS allows for an evaluation of properties contributed by different types of molecular motions. We show that this 2PT analysis leads to accurate predictions of entropy and energy of CO2 over a wide range of conditions (from the triple point to the critical point of both the vapor and the liquid phases along the saturation line). This allows the equation of state of CO2 to be determined, which is limited only by the accuracy of the force field. We also validated that the 2PT entropy agrees with that determined from thermodynamic integration, but 2PT requires only a fraction of the time. A complication for CO2 is that its equilibrium configuration is linear, which would have only two rotational modes, but during the dynamics it is never exactly linear, so that there is a third mode from rotational about the axis. In this work, we show how to treat such linear molecules in the 2PT framework. PMID:26596450

  9. The Absolute Vector Magnetometers on Board Swarm, Lessons Learned From Two Years in Space.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hulot, G.; Leger, J. M.; Vigneron, P.; Brocco, L.; Olsen, N.; Jager, T.; Bertrand, F.; Fratter, I.; Sirol, O.; Lalanne, X.

    2015-12-01

    ESA's Swarm satellites carry 4He absolute magnetometers (ASM), designed by CEA-Léti and developed in partnership with CNES. These instruments are the first-ever space-born magnetometers to use a common sensor to simultaneously deliver 1Hz independent absolute scalar and vector readings of the magnetic field. They have provided the very high accuracy scalar field data nominally required by the mission (for both science and calibration purposes, since each satellite also carries a low noise high frequency fluxgate magnetometer designed by DTU), but also very useful experimental absolute vector data. In this presentation, we will report on the status of the instruments, as well as on the various tests and investigations carried out using these experimental data since launch in November 2013. In particular, we will illustrate the advantages of flying ASM instruments on space-born magnetic missions for nominal data quality checks, geomagnetic field modeling and science objectives.

  10. Measurement of absolute optical thickness of mask glass by wavelength-tuning Fourier analysis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yangjin; Hbino, Kenichi; Sugita, Naohiko; Mitsuishi, Mamoru

    2015-07-01

    Optical thickness is a fundamental characteristic of an optical component. A measurement method combining discrete Fourier-transform (DFT) analysis and a phase-shifting technique gives an appropriate value for the absolute optical thickness of a transparent plate. However, there is a systematic error caused by the nonlinearity of the phase-shifting technique. In this research the absolute optical-thickness distribution of mask blank glass was measured using DFT and wavelength-tuning Fizeau interferometry without using sensitive phase-shifting techniques. The error occurring during the DFT analysis was compensated for by using the unwrapping correlation. The experimental results indicated that the absolute optical thickness of mask glass was measured with an accuracy of 5 nm. PMID:26125394

  11. The correction of vibration in frequency scanning interferometry based absolute distance measurement system for dynamic measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Cheng; Liu, Guodong; Liu, Bingguo; Chen, Fengdong; Zhuang, Zhitao; Xu, Xinke; Gan, Yu

    2015-10-01

    Absolute distance measurement systems are of significant interest in the field of metrology, which could improve the manufacturing efficiency and accuracy of large assemblies in fields such as aircraft construction, automotive engineering, and the production of modern windmill blades. Frequency scanning interferometry demonstrates noticeable advantages as an absolute distance measurement system which has a high precision and doesn't depend on a cooperative target. In this paper , the influence of inevitable vibration in the frequency scanning interferometry based absolute distance measurement system is analyzed. The distance spectrum is broadened as the existence of Doppler effect caused by vibration, which will bring in a measurement error more than 103 times bigger than the changes of optical path difference. In order to decrease the influence of vibration, the changes of the optical path difference are monitored by a frequency stabilized laser, which runs parallel to the frequency scanning interferometry. The experiment has verified the effectiveness of this method.

  12. Interoceptive accuracy and panic.

    PubMed

    Zoellner, L A; Craske, M G

    1999-12-01

    Psychophysiological models of panic hypothesize that panickers focus attention on and become anxious about the physical sensations associated with panic. Attention on internal somatic cues has been labeled interoception. The present study examined the role of physiological arousal and subjective anxiety on interoceptive accuracy. Infrequent panickers and nonanxious participants participated in an initial baseline to examine overall interoceptive accuracy. Next, participants ingested caffeine, about which they received either safety or no safety information. Using a mental heartbeat tracking paradigm, participants' count of their heartbeats during specific time intervals were coded based on polygraph measures. Infrequent panickers were more accurate in the perception of their heartbeats than nonanxious participants. Changes in physiological arousal were not associated with increased accuracy on the heartbeat perception task. However, higher levels of self-reported anxiety were associated with superior performance. PMID:10596462

  13. Quantification and visualization of carotid segmentation accuracy and precision using a 2D standardized carotid map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Bernard; Ukwatta, Eranga; Shavakh, Shadi; Fenster, Aaron

    2013-06-01

    This paper describes a framework for vascular image segmentation evaluation. Since the size of vessel wall and plaque burden is defined by the lumen and wall boundaries in vascular segmentation, these two boundaries should be considered as a pair in statistical evaluation of a segmentation algorithm. This work proposed statistical metrics to evaluate the difference of local vessel wall thickness (VWT) produced by manual and algorithm-based semi-automatic segmentation methods (ΔT) with the local segmentation standard deviation of the wall and lumen boundaries considered. ΔT was further approximately decomposed into the local wall and lumen boundary differences (ΔW and ΔL respectively) in order to provide information regarding which of the wall and lumen segmentation errors contribute more to the VWT difference. In this study, the lumen and wall boundaries in 3D carotid ultrasound images acquired for 21 subjects were each segmented five times manually and by a level-set segmentation algorithm. The (absolute) difference measures (i.e., ΔT, ΔW, ΔL and their absolute values) and the pooled local standard deviation of manually and algorithmically segmented wall and lumen boundaries were computed for each subject and represented in a 2D standardized map. The local accuracy and variability of the segmentation algorithm at each point can be quantified by the average of these metrics for the whole group of subjects and visualized on the 2D standardized map. Based on the results shown on the 2D standardized map, a variety of strategies, such as adding anchor points and adjusting weights of different forces in the algorithm, can be introduced to improve the accuracy and variability of the algorithm.

  14. Dichotomy and perceptual distortions in absolute pitch ability

    PubMed Central

    Athos, E. Alexandra; Levinson, Barbara; Kistler, Amy; Zemansky, Jason; Bostrom, Alan; Freimer, Nelson; Gitschier, Jane

    2007-01-01

    Absolute pitch (AP) is the rare ability to identify the pitch of a tone without the aid of a reference tone. Understanding both the nature and genesis of AP can provide insights into neuroplasticity in the auditory system. We explored factors that may influence the accuracy of pitch perception in AP subjects both during the development of the trait and in later age. We used a Web-based survey and a pitch-labeling test to collect perceptual data from 2,213 individuals, 981 (44%) of whom proved to have extraordinary pitch-naming ability. The bimodal distribution in pitch-naming ability signifies AP as a distinct perceptual trait, with possible implications for its genetic basis. The wealth of these data has allowed us to uncover unsuspected note-naming irregularities suggestive of a “perceptual magnet” centered at the note “A.” In addition, we document a gradual decline in pitch-naming accuracy with age, characterized by a perceptual shift in the “sharp” direction. These findings speak both to the process of acquisition of AP and to its stability. PMID:17724340

  15. Accuracy evaluation of blood glucose monitoring systems in children on overnight closed-loop control.

    PubMed

    DeSalvo, Daniel J; Shanmugham, Satya; Ly, Trang T; Wilson, Darrell M; Buckingham, Bruce A

    2014-09-01

    This pilot study evaluated the difference in accuracy between the Bayer Contour® Next (CN) and HemoCue® (HC) glucose monitoring systems in children with type 1 diabetes participating in overnight closed-loop studies. Subjects aged 10-18 years old were admitted to a clinical research center and glucose values were obtained every 30 minutes overnight. Glucose values were measured using whole blood samples for CN and HC readings and results were compared to Yellow Springs Instrument (YSI) reference values obtained with plasma from the same sample. System accuracy was compared using mean absolute relative difference (MARD) and International Organization for Standardization (ISO) accuracy standards. A total of 28 subjects were enrolled in the study. Glucose measurements were evaluated at 457 time points. CN performed better than HC with an average MARD of 3.13% compared to 10.73% for HC (P < .001). With a limited sample size, CN met ISO criteria (2003 and 2013) at all glucose ranges while HC did not. CN performed very well, and would make an excellent meter for future closed-loop studies outside of a research center. PMID:24876427

  16. Total solar irradiance record accuracy and recent improvements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopp, Greg

    The total solar irradiance (TSI) data record includes uninterrupted measurements from over 10 spaceborne instruments spanning the last 31 years. Continuity of on-orbit measurements allows adjustments for instrument offsets to create a TSI composite needed for estimating solar influences on Earth's climate. Because climate sensitivities to solar forcings are determined not only from direct TSI measurements over recent 11-year solar cycles but also from reconstructions of historical solar variability based on the recent measurements, the accuracy of the TSI record is critical. This climate data record currently relies on both instrument stability and measurement continuity, although improvements in absolute accuracy via better instrument calibrations and new test facilities promise to reduce this current reliance on continuity. The Total Irradiance Monitor (TIM) is striving for improved levels of absolute accuracy, and a new TSI calibration facility is now able to validate the accuracy of modern instruments and diagnose causes of offsets between different TSI instruments. The instrument offsets are due to calibration errors. As of early 2010, none of the on-orbit instruments have been calibrated end-to-end to the needed accuracy levels. The new TSI Radiometer Facility (TRF) built for NASA's Glory mission provides these new calibration capabilities. Via direct optical power comparisons to a NIST-calibrated cryogenic radiometer, this ground-based facility provides calibrations of a TSI instrument much as the instrument is operated in space: under vacuum, at full solar irradiance power levels, and with uniform incoming light for irradiance measurements. Both the PICARD/PREMOS and the upcoming Glory/TIM instruments have been tested in this new facility, helping improve the absolute accuracy of the TSI data record and diagnose the causes of existing instrument offsets. In addition to being benchmarked to this new ground-based reference, the Glory/TIM and the future TSIS

  17. Probing absolute spin polarization at the nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Eltschka, Matthias; Jäck, Berthold; Assig, Maximilian; Kondrashov, Oleg V; Skvortsov, Mikhail A; Etzkorn, Markus; Ast, Christian R; Kern, Klaus

    2014-12-10

    Probing absolute values of spin polarization at the nanoscale offers insight into the fundamental mechanisms of spin-dependent transport. Employing the Zeeman splitting in superconducting tips (Meservey-Tedrow-Fulde effect), we introduce a novel spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy that combines the probing capability of the absolute values of spin polarization with precise control at the atomic scale. We utilize our novel approach to measure the locally resolved spin polarization of magnetic Co nanoislands on Cu(111). We find that the spin polarization is enhanced by 65% when increasing the width of the tunnel barrier by only 2.3 Å due to the different decay of the electron orbitals into vacuum. PMID:25423049

  18. Absolute-magnitude distributions of supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, Dean; Wright, John; Jenkins III, Robert L.; Maddox, Larry

    2014-05-01

    The absolute-magnitude distributions of seven supernova (SN) types are presented. The data used here were primarily taken from the Asiago Supernova Catalogue, but were supplemented with additional data. We accounted for both foreground and host-galaxy extinction. A bootstrap method is used to correct the samples for Malmquist bias. Separately, we generate volume-limited samples, restricted to events within 100 Mpc. We find that the superluminous events (M{sub B} < –21) make up only about 0.1% of all SNe in the bias-corrected sample. The subluminous events (M{sub B} > –15) make up about 3%. The normal Ia distribution was the brightest with a mean absolute blue magnitude of –19.25. The IIP distribution was the dimmest at –16.75.

  19. Absolute radiometry and the solar constant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willson, R. C.

    1974-01-01

    A series of active cavity radiometers (ACRs) are described which have been developed as standard detectors for the accurate measurement of irradiance in absolute units. It is noted that the ACR is an electrical substitution calorimeter, is designed for automatic remote operation in any environment, and can make irradiance measurements in the range from low-level IR fluxes up to 30 solar constants with small absolute uncertainty. The instrument operates in a differential mode by chopping the radiant flux to be measured at a slow rate, and irradiance is determined from two electrical power measurements together with the instrumental constant. Results are reported for measurements of the solar constant with two types of ACRs. The more accurate measurement yielded a value of 136.6 plus or minus 0.7 mW/sq cm (1.958 plus or minus 0.010 cal/sq cm per min).

  20. Asteroid absolute magnitudes and slope parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tedesco, Edward F.

    1991-01-01

    A new listing of absolute magnitudes (H) and slope parameters (G) has been created and published in the Minor Planet Circulars; this same listing will appear in the 1992 Ephemerides of Minor Planets. Unlike previous listings, the values of the current list were derived from fits of data at the V band. All observations were reduced in the same fashion using, where appropriate, a single basis default value of 0.15 for the slope parameter. Distances and phase angles were computed for each observation. The data for 113 asteroids was of sufficiently high quality to permit derivation of their H and G. These improved absolute magnitudes and slope parameters will be used to deduce the most reliable bias-corrected asteroid size-frequency distribution yet made.

  1. Absolute calibration of TFTR helium proportional counters

    SciTech Connect

    Strachan, J.D.; Diesso, M.; Jassby, D.; Johnson, L.; McCauley, S.; Munsat, T.; Roquemore, A.L.; Barnes, C.W. |; Loughlin, M. |

    1995-06-01

    The TFTR helium proportional counters are located in the central five (5) channels of the TFTR multichannel neutron collimator. These detectors were absolutely calibrated using a 14 MeV neutron generator positioned at the horizontal midplane of the TFTR vacuum vessel. The neutron generator position was scanned in centimeter steps to determine the collimator aperture width to 14 MeV neutrons and the absolute sensitivity of each channel. Neutron profiles were measured for TFTR plasmas with time resolution between 5 msec and 50 msec depending upon count rates. The He detectors were used to measure the burnup of 1 MeV tritons in deuterium plasmas, the transport of tritium in trace tritium experiments, and the residual tritium levels in plasmas following 50:50 DT experiments.

  2. Absolute enantioselective separation: optical activity ex machina.

    PubMed

    Bielski, Roman; Tencer, Michal

    2005-11-01

    The paper describes methodology of using three independent macroscopic factors affecting molecular orientation to accomplish separation of a racemic mixture without the presence of any other chiral compounds, i. e., absolute enantioselective separation (AES) which is an extension of a concept of applying these factors to absolute asymmetric synthesis. The three factors may be applied simultaneously or, if their effects can be retained, consecutively. The resulting three mutually orthogonal or near orthogonal directors constitute a true chiral influence and their scalar triple product is the measure of the chirality of the system. AES can be executed in a chromatography-like microfluidic process in the presence of an electric field. It may be carried out on a chemically modified flat surface, a monolithic polymer column made of a mesoporous material, each having imparted directional properties. Separation parameters were estimated for these media and possible implications for the natural homochirality are discussed. PMID:16342798

  3. An absolute measure for a key currency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oya, Shunsuke; Aihara, Kazuyuki; Hirata, Yoshito

    It is generally considered that the US dollar and the euro are the key currencies in the world and in Europe, respectively. However, there is no absolute general measure for a key currency. Here, we investigate the 24-hour periodicity of foreign exchange markets using a recurrence plot, and define an absolute measure for a key currency based on the strength of the periodicity. Moreover, we analyze the time evolution of this measure. The results show that the credibility of the US dollar has not decreased significantly since the Lehman shock, when the Lehman Brothers bankrupted and influenced the economic markets, and has increased even relatively better than that of the euro and that of the Japanese yen.

  4. From Hubble's NGSL to Absolute Fluxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heap, Sara R.; Lindler, Don

    2012-01-01

    Hubble's Next Generation Spectral Library (NGSL) consists of R-l000 spectra of 374 stars of assorted temperature, gravity, and metallicity. Each spectrum covers the wavelength range, 0.18-1.00 microns. The library can be viewed and/or downloaded from the website, http://archive.stsci.edu/prepds/stisngsll. Stars in the NGSL are now being used as absolute flux standards at ground-based observatories. However, the uncertainty in the absolute flux is about 2%, which does not meet the requirements of dark-energy surveys. We are therefore developing an observing procedure that should yield fluxes with uncertainties less than 1 % and will take part in an HST proposal to observe up to 15 stars using this new procedure.

  5. Simple and accurate empirical absolute volume calibration of a multi-sensor fringe projection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gdeisat, Munther; Qudeisat, Mohammad; AlSa`d, Mohammed; Burton, David; Lilley, Francis; Ammous, Marwan M. M.

    2016-05-01

    This paper suggests a novel absolute empirical calibration method for a multi-sensor fringe projection system. The optical setup of the projector-camera sensor can be arbitrary. The term absolute calibration here means that the centre of the three dimensional coordinates in the resultant calibrated volume coincides with a preset centre to the three-dimensional real-world coordinate system. The use of a zero-phase fringe marking spot is proposed to increase depth calibration accuracy, where the spot centre is determined with sub-pixel accuracy. Also, a new method is proposed for transversal calibration. Depth and transversal calibration methods have been tested using both single sensor and three-sensor fringe projection systems. The standard deviation of the error produced by this system is 0.25 mm. The calibrated volume produced by this method is 400 mm×400 mm×140 mm.

  6. Wavefront reconstruction in phase-shifting interferometry via sparse coding of amplitude and absolute phase.

    PubMed

    Katkovnik, V; Bioucas-Dias, J

    2014-08-01

    Phase-shifting interferometry is a coherent optical method that combines high accuracy with high measurement speeds. This technique is therefore desirable in many applications such as the efficient industrial quality inspection process. However, despite its advantageous properties, the inference of the object amplitude and the phase, herein termed wavefront reconstruction, is not a trivial task owing to the Poissonian noise associated with the measurement process and to the 2π phase periodicity of the observation mechanism. In this paper, we formulate the wavefront reconstruction as an inverse problem, where the amplitude and the absolute phase are assumed to admit sparse linear representations in suitable sparsifying transforms (dictionaries). Sparse modeling is a form of regularization of inverse problems which, in the case of the absolute phase, is not available to the conventional wavefront reconstruction techniques, as only interferometric phase modulo-2π is considered therein. The developed sparse modeling of the absolute phase solves two different problems: accuracy of the interferometric (wrapped) phase reconstruction and simultaneous phase unwrapping. Based on this rationale, we introduce the sparse phase and amplitude reconstruction (SPAR) algorithm. SPAR takes into full consideration the Poissonian (photon counting) measurements and uses the data-adaptive block-matching 3D (BM3D) frames as a sparse representation for the amplitude and for the absolute phase. SPAR effectiveness is documented by comparing its performance with that of competitors in a series of experiments. PMID:25121537

  7. Metallic Magnetic Calorimeters for Absolute Activity Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loidl, M.; Leblanc, E.; Rodrigues, M.; Bouchard, J.; Censier, B.; Branger, T.; Lacour, D.

    2008-05-01

    We present a prototype of metallic magnetic calorimeters that we are developing for absolute activity measurements of low energy emitting radionuclides. We give a detailed description of the realization of the prototype, containing an 55Fe source inside the detector absorber. We present the analysis of first data taken with this detector and compare the result of activity measurement with liquid scintillation counting. We also propose some ways for reducing the uncertainty on the activity determination with this new technique.

  8. Absolute photoionization cross sections of atomic oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samson, J. A. R.; Pareek, P. N.

    1985-01-01

    The absolute values of photoionization cross sections of atomic oxygen were measured from the ionization threshold to 120 A. An auto-ionizing resonance belonging to the 2S2P4(4P)3P(3Do, 3So) transition was observed at 479.43 A and another line at 389.97 A. The experimental data is in excellent agreement with rigorous close-coupling calculations that include electron correlations in both the initial and final states.

  9. Absolute photoionization cross sections of atomic oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samson, J. A. R.; Pareek, P. N.

    1982-01-01

    The absolute values of photoionization cross sections of atomic oxygen were measured from the ionization threshold to 120 A. An auto-ionizing resonance belonging to the 2S2P4(4P)3P(3Do, 3So) transition was observed at 479.43 A and another line at 389.97 A. The experimental data is in excellent agreement with rigorous close-coupling calculations that include electron correlations in both the initial and final states.

  10. Silicon Absolute X-Ray Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Seely, John F.; Korde, Raj; Sprunck, Jacob; Medjoubi, Kadda; Hustache, Stephanie

    2010-06-23

    The responsivity of silicon photodiodes having no loss in the entrance window, measured using synchrotron radiation in the 1.75 to 60 keV range, was compared to the responsivity calculated using the silicon thickness measured using near-infrared light. The measured and calculated responsivities agree with an average difference of 1.3%. This enables their use as absolute x-ray detectors.

  11. Blood pressure targets and absolute cardiovascular risk.

    PubMed

    Odutayo, Ayodele; Rahimi, Kazem; Hsiao, Allan J; Emdin, Connor A

    2015-08-01

    In the Eighth Joint National Committee guideline on hypertension, the threshold for the initiation of blood pressure-lowering treatment for elderly adults (≥60 years) without chronic kidney disease or diabetes mellitus was raised from 140/90 mm Hg to 150/90 mm Hg. However, the committee was not unanimous in this decision, particularly because a large proportion of adults ≥60 years may be at high cardiovascular risk. On the basis of Eighth Joint National Committee guideline, we sought to determine the absolute 10-year risk of cardiovascular disease among these adults through analyzing the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (2005-2012). The primary outcome measure was the proportion of adults who were at ≥20% predicted absolute cardiovascular risk and above goals for the Seventh Joint National Committee guideline but reclassified as at target under the Eighth Joint National Committee guideline (reclassified). The Framingham General Cardiovascular Disease Risk Score was used. From 2005 to 2012, the surveys included 12 963 adults aged 30 to 74 years with blood pressure measurements, of which 914 were reclassified based on the guideline. Among individuals reclassified as not in need of additional treatment, the proportion of adults 60 to 74 years without chronic kidney disease or diabetes mellitus at ≥20% absolute risk was 44.8%. This corresponds to 0.8 million adults. The proportion at high cardiovascular risk remained sizable among adults who were not receiving blood pressure-lowering treatment. Taken together, a sizable proportion of reclassified adults 60 to 74 years without chronic kidney disease or diabetes mellitus was at ≥20% absolute cardiovascular risk. PMID:26056340

  12. Absolute distance measurements by variable wavelength interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bien, F.; Camac, M.; Caulfield, H. J.; Ezekiel, S.

    1981-02-01

    This paper describes a laser interferometer which provides absolute distance measurements using tunable lasers. An active feedback loop system, in which the laser frequency is locked to the optical path length difference of the interferometer, is used to tune the laser wavelengths. If the two wavelengths are very close, electronic frequency counters can be used to measure the beat frequency between the two laser frequencies and thus to determine the optical path difference between the two legs of the interferometer.

  13. Absolute dosimetry for extreme-ultraviolet lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Kurt W.; Campiotti, Richard H.

    2000-06-01

    The accurate measurement of an exposure dose reaching the wafer on an extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithographic system has been a technical challenge directly applicable to the evaluation of candidate EUV resist materials and calculating lithography system throughputs. We have developed a dose monitoring sensor system that can directly measure EUV intensities at the wafer plane of a prototype EUV lithographic system. This sensor system, located on the wafer stage adjacent to the electrostatic chuck used to grip wafers, operates by translating the sensor into the aerial image, typically illuminating an 'open' (unpatterned) area on the reticle. The absolute signal strength can be related to energy density at the wafer, and thus used to determine resist sensitivity, and the signal as a function of position can be used to determine illumination uniformity at the wafer plane. Spectral filtering to enhance the detection of 13.4 nm radiation was incorporated into the sensor. Other critical design parameters include the packaging and amplification technologies required to place this device into the space and vacuum constraints of a EUV lithography environment. We describe two approaches used to determine the absolute calibration of this sensor. The first conventional approach requires separate characterization of each element of the sensor. A second novel approach uses x-ray emission from a mildly radioactive iron source to calibrate the absolute response of the entire sensor system (detector and electronics) in a single measurement.

  14. Accuracy of deception judgments.

    PubMed

    Bond, Charles F; DePaulo, Bella M

    2006-01-01

    We analyze the accuracy of deception judgments, synthesizing research results from 206 documents and 24,483 judges. In relevant studies, people attempt to discriminate lies from truths in real time with no special aids or training. In these circumstances, people achieve an average of 54% correct lie-truth judgments, correctly classifying 47% of lies as deceptive and 61% of truths as nondeceptive. Relative to cross-judge differences in accuracy, mean lie-truth discrimination abilities are nontrivial, with a mean accuracy d of roughly .40. This produces an effect that is at roughly the 60th percentile in size, relative to others that have been meta-analyzed by social psychologists. Alternative indexes of lie-truth discrimination accuracy correlate highly with percentage correct, and rates of lie detection vary little from study to study. Our meta-analyses reveal that people are more accurate in judging audible than visible lies, that people appear deceptive when motivated to be believed, and that individuals regard their interaction partners as honest. We propose that people judge others' deceptions more harshly than their own and that this double standard in evaluating deceit can explain much of the accumulated literature. PMID:16859438

  15. Absolute wavelength calibration of pulsed lasers by use of machine vision.

    PubMed

    Nayuki, T; Fujii, T; Nemoto, K

    2001-04-01

    We developed a new absolute wavelength calibration system that uses machine vision for measurement of low-repetition-rate, short-pulse-duration (10-Hz, 5-ns) tunable lasers. Weak fluorescence from an iodine cell was measured by use of machine vision as a spatially gated integrator, and a pulsed dye-laser wavelength was calibrated with an accuracy of +/-0.005 nm , which is precise enough for differential absorption lidar application. PMID:18040341

  16. Inertial Measures of Motion for Clinical Biomechanics: Comparative Assessment of Accuracy under Controlled Conditions - Effect of Velocity

    PubMed Central

    Lebel, Karina; Boissy, Patrick; Hamel, Mathieu; Duval, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Background Inertial measurement of motion with Attitude and Heading Reference Systems (AHRS) is emerging as an alternative to 3D motion capture systems in biomechanics. The objectives of this study are: 1) to describe the absolute and relative accuracy of multiple units of commercially available AHRS under various types of motion; and 2) to evaluate the effect of motion velocity on the accuracy of these measurements. Methods The criterion validity of accuracy was established under controlled conditions using an instrumented Gimbal table. AHRS modules were carefully attached to the center plate of the Gimbal table and put through experimental static and dynamic conditions. Static and absolute accuracy was assessed by comparing the AHRS orientation measurement to those obtained using an optical gold standard. Relative accuracy was assessed by measuring the variation in relative orientation between modules during trials. Findings Evaluated AHRS systems demonstrated good absolute static accuracy (mean error < 0.5o) and clinically acceptable absolute accuracy under condition of slow motions (mean error between 0.5o and 3.1o). In slow motions, relative accuracy varied from 2o to 7o depending on the type of AHRS and the type of rotation. Absolute and relative accuracy were significantly affected (p<0.05) by velocity during sustained motions. The extent of that effect varied across AHRS. Interpretation Absolute and relative accuracy of AHRS are affected by environmental magnetic perturbations and conditions of motions. Relative accuracy of AHRS is mostly affected by the ability of all modules to locate the same global reference coordinate system at all time. Conclusions Existing AHRS systems can be considered for use in clinical biomechanics under constrained conditions of use. While their individual capacity to track absolute motion is relatively consistent, the use of multiple AHRS modules to compute relative motion between rigid bodies needs to be optimized according to

  17. Accuracy Assessment of Altimeter Derived Geostrophic Velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leben, R. R.; Powell, B. S.; Born, G. H.; Guinasso, N. L.

    2002-12-01

    Along track sea surface height anomaly gradients are proportional to cross track geostrophic velocity anomalies allowing satellite altimetry to provide much needed satellite observations of changes in the geostrophic component of surface ocean currents. Often, surface height gradients are computed from altimeter data archives that have been corrected to give the most accurate absolute sea level, a practice that may unnecessarily increase the error in the cross track velocity anomalies and thereby require excessive smoothing to mitigate noise. Because differentiation along track acts as a high-pass filter, many of the path length corrections applied to altimeter data for absolute height accuracy are unnecessary for the corresponding gradient calculations. We report on a study to investigate appropriate altimetric corrections and processing techniques for improving geostrophic velocity accuracy. Accuracy is assessed by comparing cross track current measurements from two moorings placed along the descending TOPEX/POSEIDON ground track number 52 in the Gulf of Mexico to the corresponding altimeter velocity estimates. The buoys are deployed and maintained by the Texas Automated Buoy System (TABS) under Interagency Contracts with Texas A&M University. The buoys telemeter observations in near real-time via satellite to the TABS station located at the Geochemical and Environmental Research Group (GERG) at Texas A&M. Buoy M is located in shelf waters of 57 m depth with a second, Buoy N, 38 km away on the shelf break at 105 m depth. Buoy N has been operational since the beginning of 2002 and has a current meter at 2m depth providing in situ measurements of surface velocities coincident with Jason and TOPEX/POSEIDON altimeter over flights. This allows one of the first detailed comparisons of shallow water near surface current meter time series to coincident altimetry.

  18. Absolute testing of flats in sub-stitching interferometer by rotation-shift method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Xin; Xu, Fuchao; Xie, Weimin; Li, Yun; Xing, Tingwen

    2015-09-01

    Most of the commercial available sub-aperture stitching interferometers measure the surface with a standard lens that produces a reference wavefront, and the precision of the interferometer is generally limited by the standard lens. The test accuracy can be achieved by removing the error of reference surface by the absolute testing method. When the testing accuracy (repeatability and reproducibility) is close to 1nm, in addition to the reference surface, other factors will also affect the measuring accuracy such as environment, zoom magnification, stitching precision, tooling and fixture, the characteristics of optical materials and so on. We establish a stitching system in the thousand level cleanroom. The stitching system is including the Zygo interferometer, the motion system with Bilz active isolation system at level VC-F. We review the traditional absolute flat testing methods and emphasize the method of rotation-shift functions. According to the rotation-shift method we get the profile of the reference lens and the testing lens. The problem of the rotation-shift method is the tilt error. In the motion system, we control the tilt error no more than 4 second to reduce the error. In order to obtain higher testing accuracy, we analyze the influence surface shape measurement accuracy by recording the environment error with the fluke testing equipment.

  19. Star-pointing spectrometer for measurements of atmospheric ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oikarinen, Liisa; Saari, Heikki; Rainio, Kari; Graeffe, Jussi; Astola, Heikki

    1996-10-01

    Optical measurement of the density of ozone and other atmospheric species at night is possible by using stars as light sources. The Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT) has built a star-pointing spectrometer, which records stellar spectra by a 2D CCD-array. The spectrometer has a 'slitless' design, so it can measure the absolute intensity level of a stellar spectrum attenuated by the atmosphere. A spectral inversion method designed for the satellite-based instrument GOMOS is applied for constituent retrieval form stellar spectra measured on ground. Analysis of simulated measurements shows that when averaging over one night the total ozone column can be measured by the VTT spectrometer at an accuracy of 2-3 percent.

  20. Fixed-rate compressed floating-point arrays

    2014-03-30

    ZFP is a library for lossy compression of single- and double-precision floating-point data. One of the unique features of ZFP is its support for fixed-rate compression, which enables random read and write access at the granularity of small blocks of values. Using a C++ interface, this allows declaring compressed arrays (1D, 2D, and 3D arrays are supported) that through operator overloading can be treated just like conventional, uncompressed arrays, but which allow the user tomore » specify the exact number of bits to allocate to the array. ZFP also has variable-rate fixed-precision and fixed-accuracy modes, which allow the user to specify a tolerance on the relative or absolute error.« less

  1. Calibrating the absolute amplitude scale for air showers measured at LOFAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelles, A.; Hörandel, J. R.; Karskens, T.; Krause, M.; Buitink, S.; Corstanje, A.; Enriquez, J. E.; Erdmann, M.; Falcke, H.; Haungs, A.; Hiller, R.; Huege, T.; Krause, R.; Link, K.; Norden, M. J.; Rachen, J. P.; Rossetto, L.; Schellart, P.; Scholten, O.; Schröder, F. G.; ter Veen, S.; Thoudam, S.; Trinh, T. N. G.; Weidenhaupt, K.; Wijnholds, S. J.; Anderson, J.; Bähren, L.; Bell, M. E.; Bentum, M. J.; Best, P.; Bonafede, A.; Bregman, J.; Brouw, W. N.; Brüggen, M.; Butcher, H. R.; Carbone, D.; Ciardi, B.; de Gasperin, F.; Duscha, S.; Eislöffel, J.; Fallows, R. A.; Frieswijk, W.; Garrett, M. A.; van Haarlem, M. P.; Heald, G.; Hoeft, M.; Horneffer, A.; Iacobelli, M.; Juette, E.; Karastergiou, A.; Kohler, J.; Kondratiev, V. I.; Kuniyoshi, M.; Kuper, G.; van Leeuwen, J.; Maat, P.; McFadden, R.; McKay-Bukowski, D.; Orru, E.; Paas, H.; Pandey-Pommier, M.; Pandey, V. N.; Pizzo, R.; Polatidis, A. G.; Reich, W.; Röttgering, H.; Schwarz, D.; Serylak, M.; Sluman, J.; Smirnov, O.; Tasse, C.; Toribio, M. C.; Vermeulen, R.; van Weeren, R. J.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.; Wucknitz, O.; Zarka, P.

    2015-11-01

    Air showers induced by cosmic rays create nanosecond pulses detectable at radio frequencies. These pulses have been measured successfully in the past few years at the LOw-Frequency ARray (LOFAR) and are used to study the properties of cosmic rays. For a complete understanding of this phenomenon and the underlying physical processes, an absolute calibration of the detecting antenna system is needed. We present three approaches that were used to check and improve the antenna model of LOFAR and to provide an absolute calibration of the whole system for air shower measurements. Two methods are based on calibrated reference sources and one on a calibration approach using the diffuse radio emission of the Galaxy, optimized for short data-sets. An accuracy of 19% in amplitude is reached. The absolute calibration is also compared to predictions from air shower simulations. These results are used to set an absolute energy scale for air shower measurements and can be used as a basis for an absolute scale for the measurement of astronomical transients with LOFAR.

  2. Absolute uniqueness of phase retrieval with random illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fannjiang, Albert

    2012-07-01

    Random illumination is proposed to enforce absolute uniqueness and resolve all types of ambiguity, trivial or nontrivial, in phase retrieval. Almost sure irreducibility is proved for any complex-valued object whose support set has rank ⩾ 2. While the new irreducibility result can be viewed as a probabilistic version of the classical result by Bruck, Sodin and Hayes, it provides a novel perspective and an effective method for phase retrieval. In particular, almost sure uniqueness, up to a global phase, is proved for complex-valued objects under general two-point conditions. Under a tight sector constraint absolute uniqueness is proved to hold with probability exponentially close to unity as the object sparsity increases. Under a magnitude constraint with random amplitude illumination, uniqueness modulo global phase is proved to hold with probability exponentially close to unity as object sparsity increases. For general complex-valued objects without any constraint, almost sure uniqueness up to global phase is established with two sets of Fourier magnitude data under two independent illuminations. Numerical experiments suggest that random illumination essentially alleviates most, if not all, numerical problems commonly associated with the standard phasing algorithms.

  3. Relative and Absolute Error Control in a Finite-Difference Method Solution of Poisson's Equation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prentice, J. S. C.

    2012-01-01

    An algorithm for error control (absolute and relative) in the five-point finite-difference method applied to Poisson's equation is described. The algorithm is based on discretization of the domain of the problem by means of three rectilinear grids, each of different resolution. We discuss some hardware limitations associated with the algorithm,…

  4. Effects of tangential-type boundary condition discontinuities on the accuracy of the lattice Boltzmann method for heat and mass transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Like; AuYeung, Nick; Mei, Renwei; Klausner, James F.

    2016-08-01

    We present a systematic study on the effects of tangential-type boundary condition discontinuities on the accuracy of the lattice Boltzmann equation (LBE) method for Dirichlet and Neumann problems in heat and mass transfer modeling. The second-order accurate boundary condition treatments for continuous Dirichlet and Neumann problems are directly implemented for the corresponding discontinuous boundary conditions. Results from three numerical tests, including both straight and curved boundaries, are presented to show the accuracy and order of convergence of the LBE computations. Detailed error assessments are conducted for the interior temperature or concentration (denoted as a scalar ϕ) and the interior derivatives of ϕ for both types of boundary conditions, for the boundary flux in the Dirichlet problem and for the boundary ϕ values in the Neumann problem. When the discontinuity point on the straight boundary is placed at the center of the unit lattice in the Dirichlet problem, it yields only first-order accuracy for the interior distribution of ϕ, first-order accuracy for the boundary flux, and zeroth-order accuracy for the interior derivatives compared with the second-order accuracy of all quantities of interest for continuous boundary conditions. On the lattice scale, the LBE solution for the interior derivatives near the singularity is largely independent of the resolution and correspondingly the local distribution of the absolute errors is almost invariant with the changing resolution. For Neumann problems, when the discontinuity is placed at the lattice center, second-order accuracy is preserved for the interior distribution of ϕ; and a "superlinear" convergence order of 1.5 for the boundary ϕ values and first-order accuracy for the interior derivatives are obtained. For straight boundaries with the discontinuity point arbitrarily placed within the lattice and curved boundaries, the boundary flux becomes zeroth-order accurate for Dirichlet problems

  5. Absolute magnetic helicity and the cylindrical magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Low, B. C.

    2011-05-01

    The different magnetic helicities conserved under conditions of perfect electrical conductivity are expressions of the fundamental property that every evolving fluid surface conserves its net magnetic flux. This basic hydromagnetic point unifies the well known Eulerian helicities with the Lagrangian helicity defined by the conserved fluxes frozen into a prescribed set of disjoint toroidal tubes of fluid flowing as a permanent partition of the entire fluid [B. C. Low, Astrophys. J. 649, 1064 (2006)]. This unifying theory is constructed from first principles, beginning with an analysis of the Eulerian and Lagrangian descriptions of fluids, separating the ideas of fluid and magnetic-flux tubes and removing the complication of the magnetic vector potential's free gauge from the concept of helicity. The analysis prepares for the construction of a conserved Eulerian helicity, without that gauge complication, to describe a 3D anchored flux in an upright cylindrical domain, this helicity called absolute to distinguish it from the well known relative helicity. In a version of the Chandrasekhar-Kendall representation, the evolving field at any instant is a unique superposition of a writhed, untwisted axial flux with a circulating flux of field lines all closed and unlinked within the cylindrical domain. The absolute helicity is then a flux-weighted sum of the writhe of that axial flux and its mutual linkage with the circulating flux. The absolute helicity is also conserved if the frozen-in field and its domain are continuously deformed by changing the separation between the rigid cylinder-ends with no change of cylinder radius. This hitherto intractable cylindrical construction closes a crucial conceptual gap for the fundamentals to be complete at last. The concluding discussion shows the impact of this development on our understanding of helicity, covering (i) the helicities of wholly contained and anchored fields; (ii) the Eulerian and Lagrangian descriptions of field

  6. A special application of absolute value techniques in authentic problem solving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stupel, Moshe

    2013-06-01

    There are at least five different equivalent definitions of the absolute value concept. In instances where the task is an equation or inequality with only one or two absolute value expressions, it is a worthy educational experience for learners to solve the task using each one of the definitions. On the other hand, if more than two absolute value expressions are involved, the definition that is most helpful is the one involving solving by intervals and evaluating critical points. In point of fact, application of this technique is one reason that the topic of absolute value is important in mathematics in general and in mathematics teaching in particular. We present here an authentic practical problem that is solved using absolute values and the 'intervals' method, after which the solution is generalized with surprising results. This authentic problem also lends itself to investigation using educational technological tools such as GeoGebra dynamic geometry software: mathematics teachers can allow their students to initially cope with the problem by working in an inductive environment in which they conduct virtual experiments until a solid conjecture has been reached, after which they should prove the conjecture deductively, using classic theoretical mathematical tools.

  7. Absolute localization of ground robots by matching LiDAR and image data in dense forested environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussein, Marwan; Renner, Matthew; Iagnemma, Karl

    2014-06-01

    A method for the autonomous geolocation of ground vehicles in forest environments is discussed. The method provides an estimate of the global horizontal position of a vehicle strictly based on finding a geometric match between a map of observed tree stems, scanned in 3D by Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) sensors onboard the vehicle, to another stem map generated from the structure of tree crowns analyzed from high resolution aerial orthoimagery of the forest canopy. Extraction of stems from 3D data is achieved by using Support Vector Machine (SVM) classifiers and height above ground filters that separate ground points from vertical stem features. Identification of stems from overhead imagery is achieved by finding the centroids of tree crowns extracted using a watershed segmentation algorithm. Matching of the two maps is achieved by using a robust Iterative Closest Point (ICP) algorithm that determines the rotation and translation vectors to align the datasets. The alignment is used to calculate the absolute horizontal location of the vehicle. The method has been tested with real-world data and has been able to estimate vehicle geoposition with an average error of less than 2 m. It is noted that the algorithm's accuracy performance is currently limited by the accuracy and resolution of aerial orthoimagery used. The method can be used in real-time as a complement to the Global Positioning System (GPS) in areas where signal coverage is inadequate due to attenuation by the forest canopy, or due to intentional denied access. The method has two key properties that are significant: i) It does not require a priori knowledge of the area surrounding the robot. ii) Uses the geometry of detected tree stems as the only input to determine horizontal geoposition.

  8. A simple model explaining super-resolution in absolute optical instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonhardt, Ulf; Sahebdivan, Sahar; Kogan, Alex; Tyc, Tomáš

    2015-05-01

    We develop a simple, one-dimensional model for super-resolution in absolute optical instruments that is able to describe the interplay between sources and detectors. Our model explains the subwavelength sensitivity of a point detector to a point source reported in previous computer simulations and experiments (Miñano 2011 New J. Phys.13 125009; Miñano 2014 New J. Phys.16 033015).

  9. Absolute stellar photometry on moderate-resolution FPA images

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stone, T.C.

    2009-01-01

    An extensive database of star (and Moon) images has been collected by the ground-based RObotic Lunar Observatory (ROLO) as part of the US Geological Survey program for lunar calibration. The stellar data are used to derive nightly atmospheric corrections for the observations from extinction measurements, and absolute calibration of the ROLO sensors is based on observations of Vega and published reference flux and spectrum data. The ROLO telescopes were designed for imaging the Moon at moderate resolution, thus imposing some limitations for the stellar photometry. Attaining accurate stellar photometry with the ROLO image data has required development of specialized processing techniques. A key consideration is consistency in discriminating the star core signal from the off-axis point spread function. The analysis and processing methods applied to the ROLO stellar image database are described. ?? 2009 BIPM and IOP Publishing Ltd.

  10. Absolute and relative choreographies in rigid body dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisov, A. V.; Kilin, A. A.; Mamaev, I. S.

    2008-06-01

    For the classical problem of motion of a rigid body about a fixed point with zero area integral, we present a family of solutions that are periodic in the absolute space. Such solutions are known as choreographies. The family includes the well-known Delone solutions (for the Kovalevskaya case), some particular solutions for the Goryachev-Chaplygin case, and the Steklov solution. The “genealogy” of solutions of the family naturally appearing from the energy continuation and their connection with the Staude rotations are considered. It is shown that if the integral of areas is zero, the solutions are periodic with respect to a coordinate frame that rotates uniformly about the vertical (relative choreographies).

  11. Valproate reopens critical-period learning of absolute pitch

    PubMed Central

    Gervain, Judit; Vines, Bradley W.; Chen, Lawrence M.; Seo, Rubo J.; Hensch, Takao K.; Werker, Janet F.; Young, Allan H.

    2013-01-01

    Absolute pitch, the ability to identify or produce the pitch of a sound without a reference point, has a critical period, i.e., it can only be acquired early in life. However, research has shown that histone-deacetylase inhibitors (HDAC inhibitors) enable adult mice to establish perceptual preferences that are otherwise impossible to acquire after youth. In humans, we found that adult men who took valproate (VPA) (a HDAC inhibitor) learned to identify pitch significantly better than those taking placebo—evidence that VPA facilitated critical-period learning in the adult human brain. Importantly, this result was not due to a general change in cognitive function, but rather a specific effect on a sensory task associated with a critical-period. PMID:24348349

  12. Water Vapor Products from Differential-InSAR with Auxiliary Calibration Data: Accuracy and Statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, W.; Meyer, F. J.; Webley, P.

    2014-12-01

    Although water vapor disturbance has been long term recognized as the major error source in differential Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (d-InSAR) techniques for the ground deformation monitoring and topography reconstruction, it provides opportunities to extract the atmospheric water-vapor information from satellite SAR imageries that can be further used to support studies on earth energy budget, climate, the hydrological cycle, and meteorological forecasting, etc. The water vapor contribution in interferometric phases is normally referred as the atmospheric delay dominated by water vapor rather than condensed water (e.g. cloud). D-InSAR can produce maps of the column water vapor amounts (equivalent to integrated water vapor (IWV) or Precipitable Water Vapor (PWV) in other literatures) that are important parameters quantitatively describe the total amount of water vapor overlying a point on the earth surface. Similar products have been operationally produced in multi-spectrum remote sensing, e.g. Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) with a spatial resolution in 500 m to 1km; Whereas, the PWV products derived by d-InSAR have remarkably high spatial resolution that can capture fine scale of water vapor variations in space as small as tens of meters or even less. In recent years, some efforts have been made to derive the water vapor products from interferogram and analyze the corresponding products quality, such as studies comparing integrated water vapor derived from interferometric phases to other measurements (e.g. MERIS, MODIS, GNSS), studies on deriving absolute water vapor products from d-InSAR, and studies on integrating d-InSAR water vapor products in meteorological numerical forecast. In this study, considering these limitation factors and based on previous studies, we discuss the accuracy and statistics of the water vapor products from satellite SAR, including (1) Accuracy of the differential water vapor products; (2) Sources of

  13. Field Accuracy Test of Rpas Photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barry, P.; Coakley, R.

    2013-08-01

    Baseline Surveys Ltd is a company which specialises in the supply of accurate geospatial data, such as cadastral, topographic and engineering survey data to commercial and government bodies. Baseline Surveys Ltd invested in aerial drone photogrammetric technology and had a requirement to establish the spatial accuracy of the geographic data derived from our unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) photogrammetry before marketing our new aerial mapping service. Having supplied the construction industry with survey data for over 20 years, we felt that is was crucial for our clients to clearly understand the accuracy of our photogrammetry so they can safely make informed spatial decisions, within the known accuracy limitations of our data. This information would also inform us on how and where UAV photogrammetry can be utilised. What we wanted to find out was the actual accuracy that can be reliably achieved using a UAV to collect data under field conditions throughout a 2 Ha site. We flew a UAV over the test area in a "lawnmower track" pattern with an 80% front and 80% side overlap; we placed 45 ground markers as check points and surveyed them in using network Real Time Kinematic Global Positioning System (RTK GPS). We specifically designed the ground markers to meet our accuracy needs. We established 10 separate ground markers as control points and inputted these into our photo modelling software, Agisoft PhotoScan. The remaining GPS coordinated check point data were added later in ArcMap to the completed orthomosaic and digital elevation model so we could accurately compare the UAV photogrammetry XYZ data with the RTK GPS XYZ data at highly reliable common points. The accuracy we achieved throughout the 45 check points was 95% reliably within 41 mm horizontally and 68 mm vertically and with an 11.7 mm ground sample distance taken from a flight altitude above ground level of 90 m.The area covered by one image was 70.2 m × 46.4 m, which equals 0.325 Ha. This finding has shown

  14. Clock time is absolute and universal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Xinhang

    2015-09-01

    A critical error is found in the Special Theory of Relativity (STR): mixing up the concepts of the STR abstract time of a reference frame and the displayed time of a physical clock, which leads to use the properties of the abstract time to predict time dilation on physical clocks and all other physical processes. Actually, a clock can never directly measure the abstract time, but can only record the result of a physical process during a period of the abstract time such as the number of cycles of oscillation which is the multiplication of the abstract time and the frequency of oscillation. After Lorentz Transformation, the abstract time of a reference frame expands by a factor gamma, but the frequency of a clock decreases by the same factor gamma, and the resulting multiplication i.e. the displayed time of a moving clock remains unchanged. That is, the displayed time of any physical clock is an invariant of Lorentz Transformation. The Lorentz invariance of the displayed times of clocks can further prove within the framework of STR our earth based standard physical time is absolute, universal and independent of inertial reference frames as confirmed by both the physical fact of the universal synchronization of clocks on the GPS satellites and clocks on the earth, and the theoretical existence of the absolute and universal Galilean time in STR which has proved that time dilation and space contraction are pure illusions of STR. The existence of the absolute and universal time in STR has directly denied that the reference frame dependent abstract time of STR is the physical time, and therefore, STR is wrong and all its predictions can never happen in the physical world.

  15. A Method for Selecting between Fisher's Linear Classification Functions and Least Absolute Deviation in Predictive Discriminant Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meshbane, Alice; Morris, John D.

    A method for comparing the cross-validated classification accuracy of Fisher's linear classification functions (FLCFs) and the least absolute deviation is presented under varying data conditions for the two-group classification problem. With this method, separate-group as well as total-sample proportions of current classifications can be compared…

  16. The National Geodetic Survey absolute gravity program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peter, George; Moose, Robert E.; Wessells, Claude W.

    1989-03-01

    The National Geodetic Survey absolute gravity program will utilize the high precision afforded by the JILAG-4 instrument to support geodetic and geophysical research, which involves studies of vertical motions, identification and modeling of other temporal variations, and establishment of reference values. The scientific rationale of these objectives is given, the procedures used to collect gravity and environmental data in the field are defined, and the steps necessary to correct and remove unwanted environmental effects are stated. In addition, site selection criteria, methods of concomitant environmental data collection and relative gravity observations, and schedule and logistics are discussed.

  17. An absolute radius scale for Saturn's rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicholson, Philip D.; Cooke, Maren L.; Pelton, Emily

    1990-01-01

    Radio and stellar occultation observations of Saturn's rings made by the Voyager spacecraft are discussed. The data reveal systematic discrepancies of almost 10 km in some parts of the rings, limiting some of the investigations. A revised solution for Saturn's rotation pole has been proposed which removes the discrepancies between the stellar and radio occultation profiles. Corrections to previously published radii vary from -2 to -10 km for the radio occultation, and +5 to -6 km for the stellar occultation. An examination of spiral density waves in the outer A Ring supports that the revised absolute radii are in error by no more than 2 km.

  18. Characterization of the DARA solar absolute radiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finsterle, W.; Suter, M.; Fehlmann, A.; Kopp, G.

    2011-12-01

    The Davos Absolute Radiometer (DARA) prototype is an Electrical Substitution Radiometer (ESR) which has been developed as a successor of the PMO6 type on future space missions and ground based TSI measurements. The DARA implements an improved thermal design of the cavity detector and heat sink assembly to minimize air-vacuum differences and to maximize thermal symmetry of measuring and compensating cavity. The DARA also employs an inverted viewing geometry to reduce internal stray light. We will report on the characterization and calibration experiments which were carried out at PMOD/WRC and LASP (TRF).

  19. Absolute calibration of the Auger fluorescence detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Bauleo, P.; Brack, J.; Garrard, L.; Harton, J.; Knapik, R.; Meyhandan, R.; Rovero, A.C.; Tamashiro, A.; Warner, D.

    2005-07-01

    Absolute calibration of the Pierre Auger Observatory fluorescence detectors uses a light source at the telescope aperture. The technique accounts for the combined effects of all detector components in a single measurement. The calibrated 2.5 m diameter light source fills the aperture, providing uniform illumination to each pixel. The known flux from the light source and the response of the acquisition system give the required calibration for each pixel. In the lab, light source uniformity is studied using CCD images and the intensity is measured relative to NIST-calibrated photodiodes. Overall uncertainties are presently 12%, and are dominated by systematics.

  20. Absolute angular positioning in ultrahigh vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Schief, H.; Marsico, V.; Kern, K.

    1996-05-01

    Commercially available angular resolvers, which are routinely used in machine tools and robotics, are modified and adapted to be used under ultrahigh-vacuum (UHV) conditions. They provide straightforward and reliable measurements of angular positions for any kind of UHV sample manipulators. The corresponding absolute reproducibility is on the order of 0.005{degree}, whereas the relative resolution is better than 0.001{degree}, as demonstrated by high-resolution helium-reflectivity measurements. The mechanical setup and possible applications are discussed. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  1. Absolute method of measuring magnetic susceptibility

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorpe, A.; Senftle, F.E.

    1959-01-01

    An absolute method of standardization and measurement of the magnetic susceptibility of small samples is presented which can be applied to most techniques based on the Faraday method. The fact that the susceptibility is a function of the area under the curve of sample displacement versus distance of the magnet from the sample, offers a simple method of measuring the susceptibility without recourse to a standard sample. Typical results on a few substances are compared with reported values, and an error of less than 2% can be achieved. ?? 1959 The American Institute of Physics.

  2. Absolute Priority for a Vehicle in VANET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirani, Rostam; Hendessi, Faramarz; Montazeri, Mohammad Ali; Sheikh Zefreh, Mohammad

    In today's world, traffic jams waste hundreds of hours of our life. This causes many researchers try to resolve the problem with the idea of Intelligent Transportation System. For some applications like a travelling ambulance, it is important to reduce delay even for a second. In this paper, we propose a completely infrastructure-less approach for finding shortest path and controlling traffic light to provide absolute priority for an emergency vehicle. We use the idea of vehicular ad-hoc networking to reduce the imposed travelling time. Then, we simulate our proposed protocol and compare it with a centrally controlled traffic light system.

  3. Analysis of Point Cloud Generation from UAS Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostrowski, S.; Jóźków, G.; Toth, C.; Vander Jagt, B.

    2014-11-01

    Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) allow for the collection of low altitude aerial images, along with other geospatial information from a variety of companion sensors. The images can then be processed using sophisticated algorithms from the Computer Vision (CV) field, guided by the traditional and established procedures from photogrammetry. Based on highly overlapped images, new software packages which were specifically developed for UAS technology can easily create ground models, such as Point Clouds (PC), Digital Surface Model (DSM), orthoimages, etc. The goal of this study is to compare the performance of three different software packages, focusing on the accuracy of the 3D products they produce. Using a Nikon D800 camera installed on an ocotocopter UAS platform, images were collected during subsequent field tests conducted over the Olentangy River, north from the Ohio State University campus. Two areas around bike bridges on the Olentangy River Trail were selected because of the challenge the packages would have in creating accurate products; matching pixels over the river and dense canopy on the shore presents difficult scenarios to model. Ground Control Points (GCP) were gathered at each site to tie the models to a local coordinate system and help assess the absolute accuracy for each package. In addition, the models were also relatively compared to each other using their PCs.

  4. Monochromator-Based Absolute Calibration of a Standard Radiation Thermometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantilla, J. M.; Hernanz, M. L.; Campos, J.; Martín, M. J.; Pons, A.; del Campo, D.

    2014-04-01

    Centro Español de Metrología (CEM) is disseminating the International Temperature Scale (ITS-90), at high temperatures, by using the fixed points of Ag and Cu and a standard radiation thermometer. However, the future mise-en-pratique for the definition of the kelvin ( MeP-K) will include the dissemination of the kelvin by primary methods and by indirect approximations capable of exceptionally low uncertainties or increased reliability. Primary radiometry is, at present, able to achieve uncertainties competitive with the ITS-90 above the silver point with one of the possible techniques the calibration for radiance responsivity of an imaging radiometer (radiance method). In order to carry out this calibration, IO-CSIC (Spanish Designated Institute for luminous intensity and luminous flux) has collaborated with CEM, allowing traceability to its cryogenic radiometer. A monochromator integrating sphere-based spectral comparator facility has been used to calibrate one of the CEM standard radiation thermometers. The absolute calibrated standard radiation thermometer has been used to determine the temperatures of the fixed points of Cu, Co-C, Pt-C, and Re-C. The results obtained are 1357.80 K, 1597.10 K, 2011.66 K, and 2747.64 K, respectively, with uncertainties ranging from 0.4 K to 1.1 K.

  5. Determination of the absolute contours of optical flats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Primak, W.

    1969-01-01

    Emersons procedure is used to determine true absolute contours of optical flats. Absolute contours of standard flats are determined and a comparison is then made between standard and unknown flats. Contour differences are determined by deviation of Fizeau fringe.

  6. Superharp: A wire scanner with absolute position readout for beam energy measurement at CEBAF

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, C.

    1994-09-07

    Superharp is an upgrade CEBAF wire scanner with absolute position readout from shaft encoder. As high precision absolute beam position probe ({Delta}x {approximately} 10{mu}m), three pairs of superharps are installed at the entrance, the mid-point, and the exit of Hall C arc beamline in beam switch yard, which will be tuned in dispersive mode as energy spectrometer performing 10{sup {minus}3} beam energy measurement. With dual sensor system: the direct current pickup and the bremsstrahlung detection electronics, beam profile can be obtained by superharp at wide beam current range from 1 {mu}A to 100 {mu}A.

  7. Timing accuracy of the GEO 600 data acquisition system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kötter, K.; Hewitson, M.; Ward, H.

    2004-03-01

    This paper describes the tests done for validating the timing accuracy of the GEO 600 data acquisition system. Correct time stamping of the recorded data is required for a number of search algorithms for gravitational wave signals (coincidence analysis, targeted pulsar searches, etc). Tests on the current system determined the absolute timing offset to be 15.89 µs with a standard deviation of 63 ns. Both offset and jitter were measured against an external reference clock. Additional analysis of data recorded during the S1 data taking run was done to validate the timing accuracy during this period.

  8. Improving the accuracy of phase-shifting techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruz-Santos, William; López-García, Lourdes; Redondo-Galvan, Arturo

    2015-05-01

    The traditional phase-shifting profilometry technique is based on the projection of digital interference patterns and computation of the absolute phase map. Recently, a method was proposed that used phase interpolation to the corner detection, at subpixel accuracy in the projector image for improving the camera-projector calibration. We propose a general strategy to improve the accuracy in the search for correspondence that can be used to obtain high precision three-dimensional reconstruction. Experimental results show that our strategy can outperform the precision of the phase-shifting method.

  9. Standardization of the cumulative absolute velocity

    SciTech Connect

    O'Hara, T.F.; Jacobson, J.P. )

    1991-12-01

    EPRI NP-5930, A Criterion for Determining Exceedance of the Operating Basis Earthquake,'' was published in July 1988. As defined in that report, the Operating Basis Earthquake (OBE) is exceeded when both a response spectrum parameter and a second damage parameter, referred to as the Cumulative Absolute Velocity (CAV), are exceeded. In the review process of the above report, it was noted that the calculation of CAV could be confounded by time history records of long duration containing low (nondamaging) acceleration. Therefore, it is necessary to standardize the method of calculating CAV to account for record length. This standardized methodology allows consistent comparisons between future CAV calculations and the adjusted CAV threshold value based upon applying the standardized methodology to the data set presented in EPRI NP-5930. The recommended method to standardize the CAV calculation is to window its calculation on a second-by-second basis for a given time history. If the absolute acceleration exceeds 0.025g at any time during each one second interval, the earthquake records used in EPRI NP-5930 have been reanalyzed and the adjusted threshold of damage for CAV was found to be 0.16g-set.

  10. Absolute rates of hole transfer in DNA.

    PubMed

    Senthilkumar, Kittusamy; Grozema, Ferdinand C; Guerra, Célia Fonseca; Bickelhaupt, F Matthias; Lewis, Frederick D; Berlin, Yuri A; Ratner, Mark A; Siebbeles, Laurens D A

    2005-10-26

    Absolute rates of hole transfer between guanine nucleobases separated by one or two A:T base pairs in stilbenedicarboxamide-linked DNA hairpins were obtained by improved kinetic analysis of experimental data. The charge-transfer rates in four different DNA sequences were calculated using a density-functional-based tight-binding model and a semiclassical superexchange model. Site energies and charge-transfer integrals were calculated directly as the diagonal and off-diagonal matrix elements of the Kohn-Sham Hamiltonian, respectively, for all possible combinations of nucleobases. Taking into account the Coulomb interaction between the negative charge on the stilbenedicarboxamide linker and the hole on the DNA strand as well as effects of base pair twisting, the relative order of the experimental rates for hole transfer in different hairpins could be reproduced by tight-binding calculations. To reproduce quantitatively the absolute values of the measured rate constants, the effect of the reorganization energy was taken into account within the semiclassical superexchange model for charge transfer. The experimental rates could be reproduced with reorganization energies near 1 eV. The quantum chemical data obtained were used to discuss charge carrier mobility and hole-transport equilibria in DNA. PMID:16231945

  11. Transient absolute robustness in stochastic biochemical networks.

    PubMed

    Enciso, German A

    2016-08-01

    Absolute robustness allows biochemical networks to sustain a consistent steady-state output in the face of protein concentration variability from cell to cell. This property is structural and can be determined from the topology of the network alone regardless of rate parameters. An important question regarding these systems is the effect of discrete biochemical noise in the dynamical behaviour. In this paper, a variable freezing technique is developed to show that under mild hypotheses the corresponding stochastic system has a transiently robust behaviour. Specifically, after finite time the distribution of the output approximates a Poisson distribution, centred around the deterministic mean. The approximation becomes increasingly accurate, and it holds for increasingly long finite times, as the total protein concentrations grow to infinity. In particular, the stochastic system retains a transient, absolutely robust behaviour corresponding to the deterministic case. This result contrasts with the long-term dynamics of the stochastic system, which eventually must undergo an extinction event that eliminates robustness and is completely different from the deterministic dynamics. The transiently robust behaviour may be sufficient to carry out many forms of robust signal transduction and cellular decision-making in cellular organisms. PMID:27581485

  12. Absolute Electron Extraction Efficiency of Liquid Xenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamdin, Katayun; Mizrachi, Eli; Morad, James; Sorensen, Peter

    2016-03-01

    Dual phase liquid/gas xenon time projection chambers (TPCs) currently set the world's most sensitive limits on weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs), a favored dark matter candidate. These detectors rely on extracting electrons from liquid xenon into gaseous xenon, where they produce proportional scintillation. The proportional scintillation from the extracted electrons serves to internally amplify the WIMP signal; even a single extracted electron is detectable. Credible dark matter searches can proceed with electron extraction efficiency (EEE) lower than 100%. However, electrons systematically left at the liquid/gas boundary are a concern. Possible effects include spontaneous single or multi-electron proportional scintillation signals in the gas, or charging of the liquid/gas interface or detector materials. Understanding EEE is consequently a serious concern for this class of rare event search detectors. Previous EEE measurements have mostly been relative, not absolute, assuming efficiency plateaus at 100%. I will present an absolute EEE measurement with a small liquid/gas xenon TPC test bed located at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.

  13. Accuracy potential of large-format still-video cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maas, Hans-Gerd; Niederoest, Markus

    1997-07-01

    High resolution digital stillvideo cameras have found wide interest in digital close range photogrammetry in the last five years. They can be considered fully autonomous digital image acquisition systems without the requirement of permanent connection to an external power supply and a host computer for camera control and data storage, thus allowing for convenient data acquisition in many applications of digital photogrammetry. The accuracy potential of stillvideo cameras has been extensively discussed. While large format CCD sensors themselves can be considered very accurate measurement devices, lenses, camera bodies and sensor mounts of stillvideo cameras are not compression techniques in image storage, which may also affect the accuracy potential. This presentation shows recent experiences from accuracy tests with a number of large format stillvideo cameras, including a modified Kodak DCS200, a Kodak DCS460, a Nikon E2 and a Polaroid PDC-2000. The tests of the cameras include absolute and relative measurements and were performed using strong photogrammetric networks and good external reference. The results of the tests indicate that very high accuracies can be achieved with large blocks of stillvideo imagery especially in deformation measurements. In absolute measurements, however, the accuracy potential of the large format CCD sensors is partly ruined by a lack of stability of the cameras.

  14. SMOV Absolute Flux Calibration of the COS FUV Modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massa, Derck; Keyes, Charles; Penton, Steve; Bohlin, Ralph; Froning, Cynthia

    2010-01-01

    Point source sensitivity curves are determined for the COS FUV gratings: G140L, G130M and G160M. Observations through the Primary Science Aperture (PSA) were obtained of the standard star LDS749b for all central wavelength settings of all the gratings. In addition, PSA observations of the standard stars WD1057+729 and GD71 were obtained at selected settings. Further, observations of the standard star GD71 were also obtained at selected settings through the Bright Object Aperture (BOA), in order to characterize its transmission and, hence, the COS sensitivity using the BOA. The accuracy of the calibration is estimated to be 5%. Issues limiting the current accuracy and approaches to address them are discussed.

  15. A Conceptual Approach to Absolute Value Equations and Inequalities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Mark W.; Bryson, Janet L.

    2011-01-01

    The absolute value learning objective in high school mathematics requires students to solve far more complex absolute value equations and inequalities. When absolute value problems become more complex, students often do not have sufficient conceptual understanding to make any sense of what is happening mathematically. The authors suggest that the…

  16. 20 CFR 404.1205 - Absolute coverage groups.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Absolute coverage groups. 404.1205 Section... INSURANCE (1950- ) Coverage of Employees of State and Local Governments What Groups of Employees May Be Covered § 404.1205 Absolute coverage groups. (a) General. An absolute coverage group is a...

  17. High accuracy OMEGA timekeeping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imbier, E. A.

    1982-01-01

    The Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO) operates a worldwide satellite tracking network which uses a combination of OMEGA as a frequency reference, dual timing channels, and portable clock comparisons to maintain accurate epoch time. Propagational charts from the U.S. Coast Guard OMEGA monitor program minimize diurnal and seasonal effects. Daily phase value publications of the U.S. Naval Observatory provide corrections to the field collected timing data to produce an averaged time line comprised of straight line segments called a time history file (station clock minus UTC). Depending upon clock location, reduced time data accuracies of between two and eight microseconds are typical.

  18. A New Approach For Absolute Temperature Calibration: Application to the CLARREO Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Best, F. A.; Adler, D. P.; Ellington, S. D.; Thielman, D. J.; Revercomb, H. E.; Anderson, J. G.

    2007-12-01

    A novel scheme to provide on-orbit absolute calibration of blackbody temperature sensors (on-demand) has been demonstrated using a copy of the engineering model version of a space flight hardware blackbody design (GIFTS). The scheme uses the phase change signature of reference materials to assign an absolute temperatures scale to the blackbody sensors over a large temperature range. Uncertainties of better than 0.020 K have been demonstrated over the temperature range from 234 to 303 K. Thermal modeling has been conducted to optimize the design, and to show that accuracies comparable to those measured in the laboratory should be obtainable in the less-controlled on-orbit temperature environment. The implementation if this scheme is very attractive due to its simplicity and relatively low mass. In addition, all aspects of the electronics (control and temperature readout) needed to support this scheme have been developed and demonstrated in the as-delivered GIFTS Engineering Model blackbody calibration system developed by the University of Wisconsin. NASA's anticipated plan for a mission dedicated to Climate (CLARREO) will hinge upon the ability to fly absolute standards that can provide the basis to meet stringent requirements on measurement accuracy. For example, instrumentation designed to measure spectrally resolved infrared radiances will require high-emissivity calibration blackbodies having absolute temperature uncertainties of better than 0.020 K (3 sigma). The novel blackbody temperature calibration scheme described here is very well suited for the CLARREO mission because if its low mass, high accuracy, and ease of implementation into a demonstrated flight blackbody design.

  19. Combined absolute and relative gravity measurement for microgravity monitoring in Aso volcanic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sofyan, Yayan; Nishijima, Jun; Yoshikawa, Shin; Fujimitsu, Yasuhiro; Kagiyama, Tsuneomi; Fukuda, Yoichi

    2014-05-01

    Absolute measurement with a portable A10-017 absolute gravimeter at some benchmarks in the Aso volcanic field are valuable for reducing uncertainties of regional gravity variations and will be useful for delineating the long term trends of gravity changes. A10 absolute gravimeter is a new generation of portable absolute instrument and has accuracy 10 microGal. To further the development of a high precision gravity data, we also conducted measurement using two relative gravimeter (Scintrex CG-5 [549] and LaCoste type G-1016) to be combined with an A10 absolute gravimeter. The using absolute gravimeter along with relative gravimeter can reduce drift correction factor and improve the result of gravity change data in microgravity monitoring. Microgravity monitoring is a valued tool for mapping the redistribution of subsurface mass and for assessing changes in the fluid as a dynamic process in volcanic field. Gravity changes enable the characterization of subsurface processes: i.e., the mass of the intrusion or hydrothermal flow. A key assumption behind gravity monitoring is that changes in earth's gravity reflect mass-transport processes at depth [1]. The absolute gravity network was installed at seven benchmarks using on May 2010, which re-occupied in October 2010, and June 2011. The relative gravity measurements were performed at 28 benchmarks in one month before the eruption on May 2011 and then followed by series of gravity monitoring after the eruption in every three to five months. Gravity measurements covered the area more than 60 km2 in the west side of Aso caldera. Some gravity benchmarks were measured using both absolute and relative gravimeter and is used as the reference benchmarks. In longer time period, the combined gravity method will improve the result of gravity change data for monitoring in the Aso volcanic field. As a result, the gravity changes detected the hydrothermal flow in the subsurface which has a correlation to water level fluctuation in the

  20. Precision Pointing System Development

    SciTech Connect

    BUGOS, ROBERT M.

    2003-03-01

    The development of precision pointing systems has been underway in Sandia's Electronic Systems Center for over thirty years. Important areas of emphasis are synthetic aperture radars and optical reconnaissance systems. Most applications are in the aerospace arena, with host vehicles including rockets, satellites, and manned and unmanned aircraft. Systems have been used on defense-related missions throughout the world. Presently in development are pointing systems with accuracy goals in the nanoradian regime. Future activity will include efforts to dramatically reduce system size and weight through measures such as the incorporation of advanced materials and MEMS inertial sensors.

  1. Accuracy of open-source software segmentation and paper-based printed three-dimensional models.

    PubMed

    Szymor, Piotr; Kozakiewicz, Marcin; Olszewski, Raphael

    2016-02-01

    .43 ± 19.39; however, deviation in some of the generated points could not be calculated, and those points were excluded from further calculations. From 94% to 99% of the measured absolute deviations were <1 mm. The mean absolute deviation between the skull and virtual model was 0.15 ± 0.11 mm, between the virtual and printed models was 0.15 ± 0.12 mm, and between the skull and printed models was 0.24 ± 0.21 mm. Using the optical scanner and specialized inspection software for measurements of accuracy of the created parts is recommended, as it allows one not only to measure 2-dimensional distances between anatomical points but also to perform more clinically suitable comparisons of whole surfaces. However, it requires specialized software and a very accurate scanner in order to be useful. Threshold-based, manually corrected segmentation of orbital walls performed with 3D Slicer software is accurate enough to be used for creating a virtual model of the orbit. The accuracy of the paper-based Mcor Matrix 300 3D printer is comparable to those of other commonly used 3-dimensional printers and allows one to create precise anatomical models for clinical use. The method of dividing the model into smaller parts and sticking them together seems to be quite accurate, although we recommend it only for creating small, solid models with as few parts as possible to minimize shift associated with gluing. PMID:26748414

  2. Clinical accuracy of a continuous glucose monitoring system with an advanced algorithm.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Timothy S; Chang, Anna; Christiansen, Mark

    2015-03-01

    We assessed the performance of a modified Dexcom G4 Platinum system with an advanced algorithm, in comparison with frequent venous samples measured on a laboratory reference (YSI) during a clinic session and in comparison to self-monitored blood glucose (SMBG) during home use. Fifty-one subjects with diabetes were enrolled in a prospective multicenter study. Subjects wore 1 sensor for 7-day use and participated in one 12-hour in-clinic session on day 1, 4, or 7 to collect YSI reference venous glucose every 15 minutes and capillary SMBG test every 30 minutes. Carbohydrate consumption and insulin dosing and timing were manipulated to obtain data in low and high glucose ranges. In comparison with the laboratory reference method (n = 2,263) the system provided a mean and median absolute relative differences (ARD) of 9.0% and 7.0%, respectively. The mean absolute difference for CGM was 6.4 mg/dL when the YSIs were within hypoglycemia ranges (≤ 70 mg/dL). The percentage in the clinically accurate Clarke error grid A zone was 92.4% and in the benign error B zone was 7.1%. Majority of the sensors (73%) had an aggregated MARD in reference to YSI ≤ 10%. The MARD of CGM-SMBG for home use was 11.3%. The study showed that the point and rate accuracy, clinical accuracy, reliability, and consistency over the duration of wear and across glycemic ranges were superior to current commercial real-time CGM systems. The performance of this CGM is reaching that of a self-monitoring blood glucose meter in real use environment. PMID:25370149

  3. EOS mapping accuracy study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forrest, R. B.; Eppes, T. A.; Ouellette, R. J.

    1973-01-01

    Studies were performed to evaluate various image positioning methods for possible use in the earth observatory satellite (EOS) program and other earth resource imaging satellite programs. The primary goal is the generation of geometrically corrected and registered images, positioned with respect to the earth's surface. The EOS sensors which were considered were the thematic mapper, the return beam vidicon camera, and the high resolution pointable imager. The image positioning methods evaluated consisted of various combinations of satellite data and ground control points. It was concluded that EOS attitude control system design must be considered as a part of the image positioning problem for EOS, along with image sensor design and ground image processing system design. Study results show that, with suitable efficiency for ground control point selection and matching activities during data processing, extensive reliance should be placed on use of ground control points for positioning the images obtained from EOS and similar programs.

  4. Absolute Pitch: Effects of Timbre on Note-Naming Ability

    PubMed Central

    Vanzella, Patrícia; Schellenberg, E. Glenn

    2010-01-01

    Background Absolute pitch (AP) is the ability to identify or produce isolated musical tones. It is evident primarily among individuals who started music lessons in early childhood. Because AP requires memory for specific pitches as well as learned associations with verbal labels (i.e., note names), it represents a unique opportunity to study interactions in memory between linguistic and nonlinguistic information. One untested hypothesis is that the pitch of voices may be difficult for AP possessors to identify. A musician's first instrument may also affect performance and extend the sensitive period for acquiring accurate AP. Methods/Principal Findings A large sample of AP possessors was recruited on-line. Participants were required to identity test tones presented in four different timbres: piano, pure tone, natural (sung) voice, and synthesized voice. Note-naming accuracy was better for non-vocal (piano and pure tones) than for vocal (natural and synthesized voices) test tones. This difference could not be attributed solely to vibrato (pitch variation), which was more pronounced in the natural voice than in the synthesized voice. Although starting music lessons by age 7 was associated with enhanced note-naming accuracy, equivalent abilities were evident among listeners who started music lessons on piano at a later age. Conclusions/Significance Because the human voice is inextricably linked to language and meaning, it may be processed automatically by voice-specific mechanisms that interfere with note naming among AP possessors. Lessons on piano or other fixed-pitch instruments appear to enhance AP abilities and to extend the sensitive period for exposure to music in order to develop accurate AP. PMID:21085598

  5. Noninvasive absolute cerebral oximetry with frequency-domain near-infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallacoglu, Bertan

    Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) measurements of absolute concentrations of oxy-hemoglobin and deoxy-hemoglobin in the human brain can provide critical information about cerebral physiology in terms of cerebral blood volume, blood flow, oxygen delivery, and metabolic rate of oxygen. We developed several frequency domain NIRS data acquisition and analysis methods aimed at absolute measurements of hemoglobin concentration and saturation in cerebral tissue of adult human subjects. Extensive experimental investigations were carried out in various homogenous and two-layered tissue-mimicking phantoms, and biological tissues. The advantages and limitations of commonly used homogenous models and inversion strategies were thoroughly investigated. Prior to human subjects, extensive studies were carried out in in vivo animal models. In rabbits, absolute hemoglobin oxygen desaturation was shown to depend strongly on surgically induced testicular torsion. Methods developed in this study were then adapted for measurements in the rat brain. Absolute values were demonstrated to discern cerebrovascular impairment in a rat model of diet-induced vascular cognitive impairment. These results facilitated the development of clinically useful optical measures of cerebrovascular health. In a large group of human subjects, employing a homogeneous model for absolute measurements was shown to be reliable and robust. However, it was also shown to be limited due to the relatively thick extracerebral tissue. The procedure we develop in this work and the thesis thereof performs a nonlinear inversion procedure with six unknown parameters with no other prior knowledge for the retrieval of the optical coefficients and top layer thickness with high accuracy on two-layered media. Our absolute measurements of cerebral hemoglobin concentration and saturation are based on the discrimination of extracerebral and cerebral tissue layers, and they can enhance the impact of NIRS for cerebral hemodynamics and

  6. Ridge-spotting: A new test for Pacific absolute plate motion models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wessel, Paul; Müller, R. Dietmar

    2016-06-01

    Relative plate motions provide high-resolution descriptions of motions of plates relative to other plates. Yet geodynamically, motions of plates relative to the mantle are required since such motions can be attributed to forces (e.g., slab pull and ridge push) acting upon the plates. Various reference frames have been proposed, such as the hot spot reference frame, to link plate motions to a mantle framework. Unfortunately, both accuracy and precision of absolute plate motion models lag behind those of relative plate motion models. Consequently, it is paramount to use relative plate motions in improving our understanding of absolute plate motions. A new technique called "ridge-spotting" combines absolute and relative plate motions and examines the viability of proposed absolute plate motion models. We test the method on six published Pacific absolute plate motions models, including fixed and moving hot spot models as well as a geodynamically derived model. Ridge-spotting reconstructs the Pacific-Farallon and Pacific-Antarctica ridge systems over the last 80 Myr. All six absolute plate motion models predict large amounts of northward migration and monotonic clockwise rotation for the Pacific-Farallon ridge. A geodynamic implication of our ridge migration predictions is that the suggestion that the Pacific-Farallon ridge may have been pinned by a large mantle upwelling is not supported. Unexpected or erratic ridge behaviors may be tied to limitations in the models themselves or (for Indo-Atlantic models) discrepancies in the plate circuits used to project models into the Pacific realm. Ridge-spotting is promising and will be extended to include more plates and other ocean basins.

  7. D Modelling and Accuracy Assessment of Granite Quarry Using Unmmanned Aerial Vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Aguilera, D.; Fernández-Hernández, J.; Mancera-Taboada, J.; Rodríguez-Gonzálvez, P.; Hernández-López, D.; Felipe-García, B.; Gozalo-Sanz, I.; Arias-Perez, B.

    2012-07-01

    The unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) are automated systems whose main characteristic is that can be remotely piloted. This property is especially interesting in those civil engineering works in which the accuracy of the model is not reachable by common aerial or satellite systems, there is a difficult accessibility to the infrastructure due to location and geometry aspects, and the economic resources are limited. This paper aims to show the research, development and application of a UAV that will generate georeferenced spatial information at low cost, high quality, and high availability. In particular, a 3D modelling and accuracy assessment of granite quarry using UAV is applied. With regard to the image-based modelling pipeline, an automatic approach supported by open source tools is performed. The process encloses the well-known image-based modelling steps: calibration, extraction and matching of features; relative and absolute orientation of images and point cloud and surface generation. Beside this, an assessment of the final model accuracy is carried out by means of terrestrial laser scanner (TLS), imaging total station (ITS) and global navigation satellite system (GNSS) in order to ensure its validity. This step follows a twofold approach: (i) firstly, using singular check points to provide a dimensional control of the model and (ii) secondly, analyzing the level of agreement between the realitybased 3D model obtained from UAV and the generated with TLS. The main goal is to establish and validate an image-based modelling workflow using UAV technology which can be applied in the surveying and monitoring of different quarries.

  8. Accuracy in Judgments of Aggressiveness

    PubMed Central

    Kenny, David A.; West, Tessa V.; Cillessen, Antonius H. N.; Coie, John D.; Dodge, Kenneth A.; Hubbard, Julie A.; Schwartz, David

    2009-01-01

    Perceivers are both accurate and biased in their understanding of others. Past research has distinguished between three types of accuracy: generalized accuracy, a perceiver’s accuracy about how a target interacts with others in general; perceiver accuracy, a perceiver’s view of others corresponding with how the perceiver is treated by others in general; and dyadic accuracy, a perceiver’s accuracy about a target when interacting with that target. Researchers have proposed that there should be more dyadic than other forms of accuracy among well-acquainted individuals because of the pragmatic utility of forecasting the behavior of interaction partners. We examined behavioral aggression among well-acquainted peers. A total of 116 9-year-old boys rated how aggressive their classmates were toward other classmates. Subsequently, 11 groups of 6 boys each interacted in play groups, during which observations of aggression were made. Analyses indicated strong generalized accuracy yet little dyadic and perceiver accuracy. PMID:17575243

  9. Accuracy and coverage of the modernized Polish Maritime differential GPS system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Specht, Cezary

    2011-01-01

    The DGPS navigation service augments The NAVSTAR Global Positioning System by providing localized pseudorange correction factors and ancillary information which are broadcast over selected marine reference stations. The DGPS service position and integrity information satisfy requirements in coastal navigation and hydrographic surveys. Polish Maritime DGPS system has been established in 1994 and modernized (in 2009) to meet the requirements set out in IMO resolution for a future GNSS, but also to preserve backward signal compatibility of user equipment. Having finalized installation of the new technology L1, L2 reference equipment performance tests were performed.The paper presents results of the coverage modeling and accuracy measuring campaign based on long-term signal analyses of the DGPS reference station Rozewie, which was performed for 26 days in July 2009. Final results allowed to verify the coverage area of the differential signal from reference station and calculated repeatable and absolute accuracy of the system, after the technical modernization. Obtained field strength level area and position statistics (215,000 fixes) were compared to past measurements performed in 2002 (coverage) and 2005 (accuracy), when previous system infrastructure was in operation.So far, no campaigns were performed on differential Galileo. However, as signals, signal processing and receiver techniques are comparable to those know from DGPS. Because all satellite differential GNSS systems use the same transmission standard (RTCM), maritime DGPS Radiobeacons are standardized in all radio communication aspects (frequency, binary rate, modulation), then the accuracy results of differential Galileo can be expected as a similar to DGPS.Coverage of the reference station was calculated based on unique software, which calculate the signal strength level based on transmitter parameters or field signal strength measurement campaign, done in the representative points. The software works

  10. Use of Absolute and Comparative Performance Feedback in Absolute and Comparative Judgments and Decisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Don A.; Klein, William M. P.

    2008-01-01

    Which matters more--beliefs about absolute ability or ability relative to others? This study set out to compare the effects of such beliefs on satisfaction with performance, self-evaluations, and bets on future performance. In Experiment 1, undergraduate participants were told they had answered 20% correct, 80% correct, or were not given their…

  11. Gravitational acceleration as a cue for absolute size and distance?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hecht, H.; Kaiser, M. K.; Banks, M. S.

    1996-01-01

    When an object's motion is influenced by gravity, as in the rise and fall of a thrown ball, the vertical component of acceleration is roughly constant at 9.8 m/sec2. In principle, an observer could use this information to estimate the absolute size and distance of the object (Saxberg, 1987a; Watson, Banks, von Hofsten, & Royden, 1992). In five experiments, we examined people's ability to utilize the size and distance information provided by gravitational acceleration. Observers viewed computer simulations of an object rising and falling on a trajectory aligned with the gravitational vector. The simulated objects were balls of different diameters presented across a wide range of simulated distances. Observers were asked to identify the ball that was presented and to estimate its distance. The results showed that observers were much more sensitive to average velocity than to the gravitational acceleration pattern. Likewise, verticality of the motion and visibility of the trajectory's apex had negligible effects on the accuracy of size and distance judgments.

  12. Absolute Quantification of Individual Biomass Concentrations in a Methanogenic Coculture

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Identification of individual biomass concentrations is a crucial step towards an improved understanding of anaerobic digestion processes and mixed microbial conversions in general. The knowledge of individual biomass concentrations allows for the calculation of biomass specific conversion rates which form the basis of anaerobic digestion models. Only few attempts addressed the absolute quantification of individual biomass concentrations in methanogenic microbial ecosystems which has so far impaired the calculation of biomass specific conversion rates and thus model validation. This study proposes a quantitative PCR (qPCR) approach for the direct determination of individual biomass concentrations in methanogenic microbial associations by correlating the native qPCR signal (cycle threshold, Ct) to individual biomass concentrations (mg dry matter/L). Unlike existing methods, the proposed approach circumvents error-prone conversion factors that are typically used to convert gene copy numbers or cell concentrations into actual biomass concentrations. The newly developed method was assessed and deemed suitable for the determination of individual biomass concentrations in a defined coculture of Desulfovibrio sp. G11 and Methanospirillum hungatei JF1. The obtained calibration curves showed high accuracy, indicating that the new approach is well suited for any engineering applications where the knowledge of individual biomass concentrations is required. PMID:24949269

  13. Novel isotopic N, N-dimethyl leucine (iDiLeu) reagents enable absolute quantification of peptides and proteins using a standard curve approach

    PubMed Central

    Greer, Tyler; Lietz, Christopher B.; Xiang, Feng; Li, Lingjun

    2014-01-01

    Absolute quantification of protein targets using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) is a key component of candidate biomarker validation. One popular method combines multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) using a triple quadrupole instrument with stable isotope-labeled standards (SIS) for absolute quantification (AQUA). LC-MRM AQUA assays are sensitive and specific, but they are also expensive due to the cost of synthesizing stable isotope peptide standards. While the chemical modification approach using Mass Differential Tags for Relative and Absolute Quantification (mTRAQ) represents a more economical approach when quantifying large numbers of peptides, these reagents are costly and still suffer from lower throughput because only two concentration values per peptide can be obtained in a single LC-MS run. Here, we have developed and applied a set of five novel mass difference reagents, isotopic N,N-dimethyl leucine (iDiLeu). These labels contain an amine reactive group, triazine ester, are cost effective due to their synthetic simplicity, and have increased throughput compared to previous LC-MS quantification methods by allowing construction of a four-point standard curve in one run. iDiLeu-labeled peptides show remarkably similar retention time shifts, slightly lower energy thresholds for higher-energy collisional dissociation (HCD) fragmentation, and high quantification accuracy for trypsin-digested protein samples (median errors <15%). By spiking in an iDiLeu-labeled neuropeptide, allatostatin, into mouse urine matrix, two quantification methods are validated. The first uses one labeled peptide as an internal standard to normalize labeled peptide peak areas across runs (<19% error) while the second enables standard curve creation and analyte quantification in one run (<8% error). PMID:25377360

  14. Novel isotopic N, N-Dimethyl Leucine (iDiLeu) Reagents Enable Absolute Quantification of Peptides and Proteins Using a Standard Curve Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greer, Tyler; Lietz, Christopher B.; Xiang, Feng; Li, Lingjun

    2015-01-01

    Absolute quantification of protein targets using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) is a key component of candidate biomarker validation. One popular method combines multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) using a triple quadrupole instrument with stable isotope-labeled standards (SIS) for absolute quantification (AQUA). LC-MRM AQUA assays are sensitive and specific, but they are also expensive because of the cost of synthesizing stable isotope peptide standards. While the chemical modification approach using mass differential tags for relative and absolute quantification (mTRAQ) represents a more economical approach when quantifying large numbers of peptides, these reagents are costly and still suffer from lower throughput because only two concentration values per peptide can be obtained in a single LC-MS run. Here, we have developed and applied a set of five novel mass difference reagents, isotopic N, N-dimethyl leucine (iDiLeu). These labels contain an amine reactive group, triazine ester, are cost effective because of their synthetic simplicity, and have increased throughput compared with previous LC-MS quantification methods by allowing construction of a four-point standard curve in one run. iDiLeu-labeled peptides show remarkably similar retention time shifts, slightly lower energy thresholds for higher-energy collisional dissociation (HCD) fragmentation, and high quantification accuracy for trypsin-digested protein samples (median errors <15%). By spiking in an iDiLeu-labeled neuropeptide, allatostatin, into mouse urine matrix, two quantification methods are validated. The first uses one labeled peptide as an internal standard to normalize labeled peptide peak areas across runs (<19% error), whereas the second enables standard curve creation and analyte quantification in one run (<8% error).

  15. Test Plan for a Calibration Demonstration System for the Reflected Solar Instrument for the Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thome, Kurtis; McCorkel, Joel; Hair, Jason; McAndrew, Brendan; Daw, Adrian; Jennings, Donald; Rabin, Douglas

    2012-01-01

    The Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO) mission addresses the need to observe high-accuracy, long-term climate change trends and to use decadal change observations as the most critical method to determine the accuracy of climate change. One of the major objectives of CLARREO is to advance the accuracy of SI traceable absolute calibration at infrared and reflected solar wavelengths. This advance is required to reach the on-orbit absolute accuracy required to allow climate change observations to survive data gaps while remaining sufficiently accurate to observe climate change to within the uncertainty of the limit of natural variability. While these capabilities exist at NIST in the laboratory, there is a need to demonstrate that it can move successfully from NIST to NASA and/or instrument vendor capabilities for future spaceborne instruments. The current work describes the test plan for the Solar, Lunar for Absolute Reflectance Imaging Spectroradiometer (SOLARIS) which is the calibration demonstration system (CDS) for the reflected solar portion of CLARREO. The goal of the CDS is to allow the testing and evaluation of calibration approaches , alternate design and/or implementation approaches and components for the CLARREO mission. SOLARIS also provides a test-bed for detector technologies, non-linearity determination and uncertainties, and application of future technology developments and suggested spacecraft instrument design modifications. The end result of efforts with the SOLARIS CDS will be an SI-traceable error budget for reflectance retrieval using solar irradiance as a reference and methods for laboratory-based, absolute calibration suitable for climate-quality data collections. The CLARREO mission addresses the need to observe high-accuracy, long-term climate change trends and advance the accuracy of SI traceable absolute calibration. The current work describes the test plan for the SOLARIS which is the calibration demonstration

  16. Absolute geostrophic currents in global tropical oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Lina; Yuan, Dongliang

    2016-03-01

    A set of absolute geostrophic current (AGC) data for the period January 2004 to December 2012 are calculated using the P-vector method based on monthly gridded Argo profiles in the world tropical oceans. The AGCs agree well with altimeter geostrophic currents, Ocean Surface Current Analysis-Real time currents, and moored current-meter measurements at 10-m depth, based on which the classical Sverdrup circulation theory is evaluated. Calculations have shown that errors of wind stress calculation, AGC transport, and depth ranges of vertical integration cannot explain non-Sverdrup transport, which is mainly in the subtropical western ocean basins and equatorial currents near the Equator in each ocean basin (except the North Indian Ocean, where the circulation is dominated by monsoons). The identified non-Sverdrup transport is thereby robust and attributed to the joint effect of baroclinicity and relief of the bottom (JEBAR) and mesoscale eddy nonlinearity.

  17. Absolute Measurement of Electron Cloud Density

    SciTech Connect

    Covo, M K; Molvik, A W; Cohen, R H; Friedman, A; Seidl, P A; Logan, G; Bieniosek, F; Baca, D; Vay, J; Orlando, E; Vujic, J L

    2007-06-21

    Beam interaction with background gas and walls produces ubiquitous clouds of stray electrons that frequently limit the performance of particle accelerator and storage rings. Counterintuitively we obtained the electron cloud accumulation by measuring the expelled ions that are originated from the beam-background gas interaction, rather than by measuring electrons that reach the walls. The kinetic ion energy measured with a retarding field analyzer (RFA) maps the depressed beam space-charge potential and provides the dynamic electron cloud density. Clearing electrode current measurements give the static electron cloud background that complements and corroborates with the RFA measurements, providing an absolute measurement of electron cloud density during a 5 {micro}s duration beam pulse in a drift region of the magnetic transport section of the High-Current Experiment (HCX) at LBNL.

  18. Absolute instability of a viscous hollow jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gañán-Calvo, Alfonso M.

    2007-02-01

    An investigation of the spatiotemporal stability of hollow jets in unbounded coflowing liquids, using a general dispersion relation previously derived, shows them to be absolutely unstable for all physical values of the Reynolds and Weber numbers. The roots of the symmetry breakdown with respect to the liquid jet case, and the validity of asymptotic models are here studied in detail. Asymptotic analyses for low and high Reynolds numbers are provided, showing that old and well-established limiting dispersion relations [J. W. S. Rayleigh, The Theory of Sound (Dover, New York, 1945); S. Chandrasekhar, Hydrodynamic and Hydromagnetic Stability (Dover, New York, 1961)] should be used with caution. In the creeping flow limit, the analysis shows that, if the hollow jet is filled with any finite density and viscosity fluid, a steady jet could be made arbitrarily small (compatible with the continuum hypothesis) if the coflowing liquid moves faster than a critical velocity.

  19. Stitching interferometry: recent results and absolute calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bray, Michael

    2004-02-01

    Stitching Interferometry is a method of analysing large optical components using a standard "small" interferometer. This result is obtained by taking multiple overlapping images of the large component, and numerically "stitching" these sub-apertures together. We have already reported the industrial use our Stitching Interferometry systems (Previous SPIE symposia), but experimental results had been lacking because this technique is still new, and users needed to get accustomed to it before producing reliable measurements. We now have more results. We will report user comments and show new, unpublished results. We will discuss sources of error, and show how some of these can be reduced to arbitrarily small values. These will be discussed in some detail. We conclude with a few graphical examples of absolute measurements performed by us.

  20. Absolute nonlocality via distributed computing without communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czekaj, Ł.; Pawłowski, M.; Vértesi, T.; Grudka, A.; Horodecki, M.; Horodecki, R.

    2015-09-01

    Understanding the role that quantum entanglement plays as a resource in various information processing tasks is one of the crucial goals of quantum information theory. Here we propose an alternative perspective for studying quantum entanglement: distributed computation of functions without communication between nodes. To formalize this approach, we propose identity games. Surprisingly, despite no signaling, we obtain that nonlocal quantum strategies beat classical ones in terms of winning probability for identity games originating from certain bipartite and multipartite functions. Moreover we show that, for a majority of functions, access to general nonsignaling resources boosts success probability two times in comparison to classical ones for a number of large enough outputs. Because there are no constraints on the inputs and no processing of the outputs in the identity games, they detect very strong types of correlations: absolute nonlocality.

  1. Accuracy of tablet splitting.

    PubMed

    McDevitt, J T; Gurst, A H; Chen, Y

    1998-01-01

    We attempted to determine the accuracy of manually splitting hydrochlorothiazide tablets. Ninety-four healthy volunteers each split ten 25-mg hydrochlorothiazide tablets, which were then weighed using an analytical balance. Demographics, grip and pinch strength, digit circumference, and tablet-splitting experience were documented. Subjects were also surveyed regarding their willingness to pay a premium for commercially available, lower-dose tablets. Of 1752 manually split tablet portions, 41.3% deviated from ideal weight by more than 10% and 12.4% deviated by more than 20%. Gender, age, education, and tablet-splitting experience were not predictive of variability. Most subjects (96.8%) stated a preference for commercially produced, lower-dose tablets, and 77.2% were willing to pay more for them. For drugs with steep dose-response curves or narrow therapeutic windows, the differences we recorded could be clinically relevant. PMID:9469693

  2. On-orbit absolute temperature calibration using multiple phase change materials: overview of recent technology advancements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Best, Fred A.; Adler, Douglas P.; Pettersen, Claire; Revercomb, Henry E.; Perepezko, John H.

    2010-11-01

    NASA's anticipated plan for a mission dedicated to Climate (CLARREO) will hinge upon the ability to fly SI traceable standards that provide irrefutable absolute measurement accuracy. As an example, instrumentation designed to measure spectrally resolved infrared radiances will require high-emissivity calibration blackbodies that have absolute temperature uncertainties of better than 0.045K (3 sigma). A novel scheme to provide absolute calibration of temperature sensors onorbit, that uses the transient melt signatures from multiple phase change materials, has been demonstrated in the laboratory at the University of Wisconsin and is now undergoing technology advancement under NASA Instrument Incubator Program funding. Using small quantities of phase change material (less than half of a percent of the mass of the cavity), melt temperature accuracies of better than 10 mK have been demonstrated for mercury, water, and gallium (providing calibration from 233K to 303K). Refinements currently underway focus on ensuring that the melt materials in their sealed confinement housings perform as expected in the thermal and microgravity environment of a multi-year spaceflight mission. Thermal soak and cycling tests are underway to demonstrate that there is no dissolution from the housings into the melt materials that could alter melt temperature, and that there is no liquid metal embrittlement of the housings from the metal melt materials. In addition, NASA funding has been recently secured to conduct a demonstration of this scheme in the microgravity environment of the International Space Station.

  3. Integrated Navigation System Design for Micro Planetary Rovers: Comparison of Absolute Heading Estimation Algorithms and Nonlinear Filtering

    PubMed Central

    Ilyas, Muhammad; Hong, Beomjin; Cho, Kuk; Baeg, Seung-Ho; Park, Sangdeok

    2016-01-01

    This paper provides algorithms to fuse relative and absolute microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) navigation sensors, suitable for micro planetary rovers, to provide a more accurate estimation of navigation information, specifically, attitude and position. Planetary rovers have extremely slow speed (~1 cm/s) and lack conventional navigation sensors/systems, hence the general methods of terrestrial navigation may not be applicable to these applications. While relative attitude and position can be tracked in a way similar to those for ground robots, absolute navigation information is hard to achieve on a remote celestial body, like Moon or Mars, in contrast to terrestrial applications. In this study, two absolute attitude estimation algorithms were developed and compared for accuracy and robustness. The estimated absolute attitude was fused with the relative attitude sensors in a framework of nonlinear filters. The nonlinear Extended Kalman filter (EKF) and Unscented Kalman filter (UKF) were compared in pursuit of better accuracy and reliability in this nonlinear estimation problem, using only on-board low cost MEMS sensors. Experimental results confirmed the viability of the proposed algorithms and the sensor suite, for low cost and low weight micro planetary rovers. It is demonstrated that integrating the relative and absolute navigation MEMS sensors reduces the navigation errors to the desired level. PMID:27223293

  4. Integrated Navigation System Design for Micro Planetary Rovers: Comparison of Absolute Heading Estimation Algorithms and Nonlinear Filtering.

    PubMed

    Ilyas, Muhammad; Hong, Beomjin; Cho, Kuk; Baeg, Seung-Ho; Park, Sangdeok

    2016-01-01

    This paper provides algorithms to fuse relative and absolute microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) navigation sensors, suitable for micro planetary rovers, to provide a more accurate estimation of navigation information, specifically, attitude and position. Planetary rovers have extremely slow speed (~1 cm/s) and lack conventional navigation sensors/systems, hence the general methods of terrestrial navigation may not be applicable to these applications. While relative attitude and position can be tracked in a way similar to those for ground robots, absolute navigation information is hard to achieve on a remote celestial body, like Moon or Mars, in contrast to terrestrial applications. In this study, two absolute attitude estimation algorithms were developed and compared for accuracy and robustness. The estimated absolute attitude was fused with the relative attitude sensors in a framework of nonlinear filters. The nonlinear Extended Kalman filter (EKF) and Unscented Kalman filter (UKF) were compared in pursuit of better accuracy and reliability in this nonlinear estimation problem, using only on-board low cost MEMS sensors. Experimental results confirmed the viability of the proposed algorithms and the sensor suite, for low cost and low weight micro planetary rovers. It is demonstrated that integrating the relative and absolute navigation MEMS sensors reduces the navigation errors to the desired level. PMID:27223293

  5. On the calculation of the absolute grand potential of confined smectic-A phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chien-Cheng; Baus, Marc; Ryckaert, Jean-Paul

    2015-09-01

    We determine the absolute grand potential Λ along a confined smectic-A branch of a calamitic liquid crystal system enclosed in a slit pore of transverse area A and width L, using the rod-rod Gay-Berne potential and a rod-wall potential favouring perpendicular orientation at the walls. For a confined phase with an integer number of smectic layers sandwiched between the opposite walls, we obtain the excess properties (excess grand potential Λexc, solvation force fs and adsorption Γ) with respect to the bulk phase at the same μ (chemical potential) and T (temperature) state point. While usual thermodynamic integration methods are used along the confined smectic branch to estimate the grand potential difference as μ is varied at fixed L, T, the absolute grand potential at one reference state point is obtained via the evaluation of the absolute Helmholtz free energy in the (N, L, A, T) canonical ensemble. It proceeds via a sequence of free energy difference estimations involving successively the cost of localising rods on layers and the switching on of a one-dimensional harmonic field to keep layers integrity coupled to the elimination of inter-layers and wall interactions. The absolute free energy of the resulting set of fully independent layers of interacting rods is finally estimated via the existing procedures. This work opens the way to the computer simulation study of phase transitions implying confined layered phases.

  6. Absolute brightness temperature measurements at 3.5-mm wavelength. [of sun, Venus, Jupiter and Saturn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulich, B. L.; Rhodes, P. J.; Davis, J. H.; Hollis, J. M.

    1980-01-01

    Careful observations have been made at 86.1 GHz to derive the absolute brightness temperatures of the sun (7914 + or - 192 K), Venus (357.5 + or - 13.1 K), Jupiter (179.4 + or - 4.7 K), and Saturn (153.4 + or - 4.8 K) with a standard error of about three percent. This is a significant improvement in accuracy over previous results at millimeter wavelengths. A stable transmitter and novel superheterodyne receiver were constructed and used to determine the effective collecting area of the Millimeter Wave Observatory (MWO) 4.9-m antenna relative to a previously calibrated standard gain horn. The thermal scale was set by calibrating the radiometer with carefully constructed and tested hot and cold loads. The brightness temperatures may be used to establish an absolute calibration scale and to determine the antenna aperture and beam efficiencies of other radio telescopes at 3.5-mm wavelength.

  7. Calibration of the Reflected Solar Instrument for the Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thome, Kurtis; Barnes, Robert; Baize, Rosemary; O'Connell, Joseph; Hair, Jason

    2010-01-01

    The Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO) plans to observe climate change trends over decadal time scales to determine the accuracy of climate projections. The project relies on spaceborne earth observations of SI-traceable variables sensitive to key decadal change parameters. The mission includes a reflected solar instrument retrieving at-sensor reflectance over the 320 to 2300 nm spectral range with 500-m spatial resolution and 100-km swath. Reflectance is obtained from the ratio of measurements of the earth s surface to those while viewing the sun relying on a calibration approach that retrieves reflectance with uncertainties less than 0.3%. The calibration is predicated on heritage hardware, reduction of sensor complexity, adherence to detector-based calibration standards, and an ability to simulate in the laboratory on-orbit sources in both size and brightness to provide the basis of a transfer to orbit of the laboratory calibration including a link to absolute solar irradiance measurements.

  8. Absolute Absorption Cross Sections from Photon Recoil in a Matter-Wave Interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eibenberger, Sandra; Cheng, Xiaxi; Cotter, J. P.; Arndt, Markus

    2014-06-01

    We measure the absolute absorption cross section of molecules using a matter-wave interferometer. A nanostructured density distribution is imprinted onto a dilute molecular beam through quantum interference. As the beam crosses the light field of a probe laser some molecules will absorb a single photon. These absorption events impart a momentum recoil which shifts the position of the molecule relative to the unperturbed beam. Averaging over the shifted and unshifted components within the beam leads to a reduction of the fringe visibility, enabling the absolute absorption cross section to be extracted with high accuracy. This technique is independent of the molecular density, it is minimally invasive and successfully eliminates many problems related to photon cycling, state mixing, photobleaching, photoinduced heating, fragmentation, and ionization. It can therefore be extended to a wide variety of neutral molecules, clusters, and nanoparticles.

  9. The Swarm Absolute Scalar Magnetometers now operating in orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fratter, Isabelle; Leger, Jean-Michel; Bertrand, François; Jager, Thomas; Hulot, Gauthier

    2014-05-01

    Swarm is one of the Earth Explorer Missions run by the European Space Agency. Its principal goal is to make the best ever survey of the Earth's magnetic field and ionosphere and to study how they vary over space and time. This will be achieved by a constellation of three identical satellites, launched on the 22nd of November 2013. In order to observe the magnetic field thoroughly, each satellite carries two magnetometers: a Vector Field Magnetometer coupled with a star tracker camera, to measure the direction of the magnetic field in space, and an Absolute Scalar Magnetometer (ASM), to measure its intensity. The ASM is the French contribution to the Swarm mission. This new generation instrument, based on the atomic spectroscopy of the helium 4 metastable state, was developed by CEA-Leti (1) in Grenoble with technical assistance and financing from CNES (2) and scientific support from IPGP (3). As the Swarm magnetic reference, the ASM scalar performances are crucial for the mission's success. Thanks to a new dedicated design, the ASM offers the best precision and absolute accuracy ever attained in space, with similar performances all along the orbit. The ASM will thus deliver high resolution scalar measurements at 1 Hz for the in-flight calibration of the vector field data over the 4 year mission. It can also be operated at a much higher sampling rate ("burst" mode at 250 Hz). In addition, on an experimental basis, this instrument also takes vector field measurements, which are being validated jointly by CEA-Leti and IPGP, with support from CNES. This poster presents the capabilities and working principle of this instrument as well as the results of the in-flight verifications carried out during the 3 first months in orbit, including the performances, the last status and future prospects. 1 CEA-Leti : French Atomic Energy and Alternative Energies Commission - Electronics and Information Technology Laboratory 2 CNES : Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales - French Space

  10. Tipping Point

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... Tipping Point by CPSC Blogger September 22 appliance child Childproofing CPSC danger death electrical fall furniture head ... TV falls with about the same force as child falling from the third story of a building. ...

  11. Absolute Geodetic Rotation Measurement Using Atom Interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Stockton, J. K.; Takase, K.; Kasevich, M. A.

    2011-09-23

    We demonstrate a cold-atom interferometer gyroscope which overcomes accuracy and dynamic range limitations of previous atom interferometer gyroscopes. We show how the instrument can be used for precise determination of latitude, azimuth (true north), and Earth's rotation rate. Spurious noise terms related to multiple-path interferences are suppressed by employing a novel time-skewed pulse sequence. Extended versions of this instrument appear capable of meeting the stringent requirements for inertial navigation, geodetic applications of Earth's rotation rate determination, and tests of general relativity.

  12. Absolute geodetic rotation measurement using atom interferometry.

    PubMed

    Stockton, J K; Takase, K; Kasevich, M A

    2011-09-23

    We demonstrate a cold-atom interferometer gyroscope which overcomes accuracy and dynamic range limitations of previous atom interferometer gyroscopes. We show how the instrument can be used for precise determination of latitude, azimuth (true north), and Earth's rotation rate. Spurious noise terms related to multiple-path interferences are suppressed by employing a novel time-skewed pulse sequence. Extended versions of this instrument appear capable of meeting the stringent requirements for inertial navigation, geodetic applications of Earth's rotation rate determination, and tests of general relativity. PMID:22026848

  13. Absolute surface energy for zincblende semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, S. B.; Wei, Su-Huai

    2003-03-01

    Recent advance in nanosciences requires the determination of surface (or facet) energy of semiconductors, which is often difficult due to the polar nature of some of the most important surfaces such as the (111)A/(111)B surfaces. Several approaches have been developed in the past [1-3] to deal with the problem but an unambiguous division of the polar surface energies is yet to come [2]. Here we show that an accurate division is indeed possible for the zincblende semiconductors and will present the results for GaAs, ZnSe, and CuInSe2 [4], respectively. A general trend emerges, relating the absolute surface energy to the ionicity of the bulk materials. [1] N. Chetty and R. M. Martin, Phys. Rev. B 45, 6074 (1992). [2] N. Moll, et al., Phys. Rev. B 54, 8844 (1996). [3] S. Mankefors, Phys. Rev. B 59, 13151 (1999). [4] S. B. Zhang and S.-H. Wei, Phys. Rev. B 65, 081402 (2002).

  14. Absolute decay width measurements in 16O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheldon, C.; Ashwood, N. I.; Barr, M.; Curtis, N.; Freer, M.; Kokalova, Tz; Malcolm, J. D.; Spencer, S. J.; Ziman, V. A.; Faestermann, Th; Krücken, R.; Wirth, H.-F.; Hertenberger, R.; Lutter, R.; Bergmaier, A.

    2012-09-01

    The reaction 126C(63Li, d)168O* at a 6Li bombarding energy of 42 MeV has been used to populate excited states in 16O. The deuteron ejectiles were measured using the high-resolution Munich Q3D spectrograph. A large-acceptance silicon-strip detector array was used to register the recoil and break-up products. This complete kinematic set-up has enabled absolute α-decay widths to be measured with high-resolution in the 13.9 to 15.9 MeV excitation energy regime in 16O; many for the first time. This energy region spans the 14.4 MeV four-α breakup threshold. Monte-Carlo simulations of the detector geometry and break-up processes yield detection efficiencies for the two dominant decay modes of 40% and 37% for the α+12C(g.s.) and a+12C(2+1) break-up channels respectively.

  15. Absolute calibration of forces in optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutra, R. S.; Viana, N. B.; Maia Neto, P. A.; Nussenzveig, H. M.

    2014-07-01

    Optical tweezers are highly versatile laser traps for neutral microparticles, with fundamental applications in physics and in single molecule cell biology. Force measurements are performed by converting the stiffness response to displacement of trapped transparent microspheres, employed as force transducers. Usually, calibration is indirect, by comparison with fluid drag forces. This can lead to discrepancies by sizable factors. Progress achieved in a program aiming at absolute calibration, conducted over the past 15 years, is briefly reviewed. Here we overcome its last major obstacle, a theoretical overestimation of the peak stiffness, within the most employed range for applications, and we perform experimental validation. The discrepancy is traced to the effect of primary aberrations of the optical system, which are now included in the theory. All required experimental parameters are readily accessible. Astigmatism, the dominant effect, is measured by analyzing reflected images of the focused laser spot, adapting frequently employed video microscopy techniques. Combined with interface spherical aberration, it reveals a previously unknown window of instability for trapping. Comparison with experimental data leads to an overall agreement within error bars, with no fitting, for a broad range of microsphere radii, from the Rayleigh regime to the ray optics one, for different polarizations and trapping heights, including all commonly employed parameter domains. Besides signaling full first-principles theoretical understanding of optical tweezers operation, the results may lead to improved instrument design and control over experiments, as well as to an extended domain of applicability, allowing reliable force measurements, in principle, from femtonewtons to nanonewtons.

  16. Absolute spectrophotometry of northern compact planetary nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, S. A.; Corradi, R. L. M.; Perinotto, M.

    2005-06-01

    We present medium-dispersion spectra and narrowband images of six northern compact planetary nebulae (PNe): BoBn 1, DdDm 1, IC 5117, M 1-5, M 1-71, and NGC 6833. From broad-slit spectra, total absolute fluxes and equivalent widths were measured for all observable emission lines. High signal-to-noise emission line fluxes of Hα, Hβ, [Oiii], [Nii], and HeI may serve as emission line flux standards for northern hemisphere observers. From narrow-slit spectra, we derive systemic radial velocities. For four PNe, available emission line fluxes were measured with sufficient signal-to-noise to probe the physical properties of their electron densities, temperatures, and chemical abundances. BoBn 1 and DdDm 1, both type IV PNe, have an Hβ flux over three sigma away from previous measurements. We report the first abundance measurements of M 1-71. NGC 6833 measured radial velocity and galactic coordinates suggest that it is associated with the outer arm or possibly the galactic halo, and its low abundance ([O/H]=1.3× 10-4) may be indicative of low metallicity within that region.

  17. High Accuracy Wavelength Calibration For A Scanning Visible Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Filippo Scotti and Ronald Bell

    2010-07-29

    Spectroscopic applications for plasma velocity measurements often require wavelength accuracies ≤ 0.2Â. An automated calibration for a scanning spectrometer has been developed to achieve a high wavelength accuracy overr the visible spectrum, stable over time and environmental conditions, without the need to recalibrate after each grating movement. The method fits all relevant spectrometer paraameters using multiple calibration spectra. With a steping-motor controlled sine-drive, accuracies of ~0.025 Â have been demonstrated. With the addition of high resolution (0.075 aresec) optical encoder on the grading stage, greater precision (~0.005 Â) is possible, allowing absolute velocity measurements with ~0.3 km/s. This level of precision requires monitoring of atmospheric temperature and pressure and of grating bulk temperature to correct for changes in the refractive index of air and the groove density, respectively.

  18. High accuracy wavelength calibration for a scanning visible spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Scotti, Filippo; Bell, Ronald E

    2010-10-01

    Spectroscopic applications for plasma velocity measurements often require wavelength accuracies ≤0.2 Å. An automated calibration, which is stable over time and environmental conditions without the need to recalibrate after each grating movement, was developed for a scanning spectrometer to achieve high wavelength accuracy over the visible spectrum. This method fits all relevant spectrometer parameters using multiple calibration spectra. With a stepping-motor controlled sine drive, an accuracy of ∼0.25 Å has been demonstrated. With the addition of a high resolution (0.075 arc  sec) optical encoder on the grating stage, greater precision (∼0.005 Å) is possible, allowing absolute velocity measurements within ∼0.3 km/s. This level of precision requires monitoring of atmospheric temperature and pressure and of grating bulk temperature to correct for changes in the refractive index of air and the groove density, respectively. PMID:21033925

  19. Onboard Autonomous Corrections for Accurate IRF Pointing.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorgensen, J. L.; Betto, M.; Denver, T.

    2002-05-01

    Over the past decade, the Noise Equivalent Angle (NEA) of onboard attitude reference instruments, has decreased from tens-of-arcseconds to the sub-arcsecond level. This improved performance is partly due to improved sensor-technology with enhanced signal to noise ratios, partly due to improved processing electronics which allows for more sophisticated and faster signal processing. However, the main reason for the increased precision, is the application of onboard autonomy, which apart from simple outlier rejection also allows for removal of "false positive" answers, and other "unexpected" noise sources, that otherwise would degrade the quality of the measurements (e.g. discrimination between signals caused by starlight and ionizing radiation). The utilization of autonomous signal processing has also provided the means for another onboard processing step, namely the autonomous recovery from lost in space, where the attitude instrument without a priori knowledge derive the absolute attitude, i.e. in IRF coordinates, within fractions of a second. Combined with precise orbital state or position data, the absolute attitude information opens for multiple ways to improve the mission performance, either by reducing operations costs, by increasing pointing accuracy, by reducing mission expendables, or by providing backup decision information in case of anomalies. The Advanced Stellar Compass's (ASC) is a miniature, high accuracy, attitude instrument which features fully autonomous operations. The autonomy encompass all direct steps from automatic health checkout at power-on, over fully automatic SEU and SEL handling and proton induced sparkle removal, to recovery from "lost in space", and optical disturbance detection and handling. But apart from these more obvious autonomy functions, the ASC also features functions to handle and remove the aforementioned residuals. These functions encompass diverse operators such as a full orbital state vector model with automatic cloud

  20. A liquid-helium-cooled absolute reference cold load for long-wavelength radiometric calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bensadoun, Marc; Witebsky, Chris; Smoot, George; De Amici, Giovanni; Kogut, AL; Levin, Steve

    1992-01-01

    Design, radiometric and thermal performance, and operation of a large diameter (78 cm) liquid-helium-cooled blackbody absolute reference cold load (CL) for the calibration of microwave radiometers is described. CL provides an absolute calibration near the liquid-helium (LHe) boiling point, with total uncertainty in the radiometric temperature of less than 30 mK over the 2.5-23 cm wavelength operating range. CL was used at several wavelengths at the South Pole, Antarctica and the White Mountain Research Center, California. Results show that, for the instruments operated at 20-, 12-, 7.9-, and 4.0 cm wavelength at the South Pole, the total corrections to the LHe boiling-point temperature (about 3.8 K) were 48 +/-23, 18 +/-10, 10 +/-18, and 15 +/-mK.

  1. A Liquid-Helium-Cooled Absolute Reference Cold Load forLong-Wavelength Radiometric Calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Bensadoun, M.; Witebsky, C.; Smoot, George F.; De Amici,Giovanni; Kogut, A.; Levin, S.

    1990-05-01

    We describe a large (78-cm) diameter liquid-helium-cooled black-body absolute reference cold load for the calibration of microwave radiometers. The load provides an absolute calibration near the liquid helium (LHe) boiling point, accurate to better than 30 mK for wavelengths from 2.5 to 25 cm (12-1.2 GHz). The emission (from non-LHe temperature parts of the cold load) and reflection are small and well determined. Total corrections to the LHe boiling point temperature are {le} 50 mK over the operating range. This cold load has been used at several wavelengths at the South Pole and at the White Mountain Research Station. In operation, the average LHe loss rate was {le} 4.4 l/hr. Design considerations, radiometric and thermal performance and operational aspects are discussed. A comparison with other LHe-cooled reference loads including the predecessor of this cold load is given.

  2. Absolute nuclear material assay using count distribution (LAMBDA) space

    DOEpatents

    Prasad, Mano K.; Snyderman, Neal J.; Rowland, Mark S.

    2015-12-01

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  3. Absolute nuclear material assay using count distribution (LAMBDA) space

    DOEpatents

    Prasad, Manoj K.; Snyderman, Neal J.; Rowland, Mark S.

    2012-06-05

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  4. The Path to an Up-to-date Absolute Gravity Reference System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilmes, H.; Falk, R.; Wziontek, H.

    2014-12-01

    The determination of precise gravity field parameters is of great importance in a period in which earth sciences are achieving the necessary accuracy to monitor and document global change processes. This is the reason why experts from geodesy and metrology joined in a successful cooperation to make absolute gravity observations traceable to SI quantities, to improve the metrological kilogram definition and to monitor mass movements and smallest height changes for geodetic and geophysical applications. How can we determine such a gravity reference system and secure it over multiple decades? Precise knowledge of the gravity acceleration and definition of standards, models and corrections are an important prerequisite to the definition of the gravity system. Over more than three decades, the absolute gravity community cooperated successfully to obtain the gravity reference in comparisons at intervals of 4 years and to certify metrological equivalence between National Metrology Institutes. With increasing resolution of the absolute gravimeter sensors and new measurement principles it becomes obvious that such comparisons are not sufficient for all applications. Mainly for geodetic purposes it is necessary to sub-divide comparison intervals and maintain a connected network of gravity reference sites where compared absolute gravimeters operate together with superconducting gravimeters to derive a continuous gravity reference function. By means of this distributed monitoring of the gravity reference it will also be possible to relate observations of earlier absolute gravimeters to the present-day and to future instruments. It will be possible to include new sensors like atom interferometers and in future to relate the results of precise optical clocks. With co-located space geodetic sensors like GNSS, SLR and VLBI, these reference sites fulfill the conditions of a geodetic fundamental station as a component of IAG's Global Geodetic Observing System.

  5. Investigation of Practical and Theoretical Accuracy of Wireless Indoor Positioning System Ubisense

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woźniak, Marek; Odziemczyk, Waldemar; Nagórski, Kamil

    2013-12-01

    This paper presents the accuracy investigation results and functionality of Ubisense RTLS positioning system. Three kinds of studies were conducted: test of calibration accuracy, analysis of theoretical accuracy of the coordinates determination as well as accuracy measurements in field conditions. Test of calibration accuracy was made with several different geometric constellation of reference points (tag positions). We determined changes of orientation parameters of receivers and disturbance of positioning points coordinates against chosen reference points constellations. Analysis of theoretical accuracy was made for several receivers spatial positions and their orientations. It allowed to indicate favourable and unfavourable measurement area considering accuracy and reliability. Real positioning accuracy of the Ubisense system was determined by comparison with coordinates measured using precise tacheometer TCRP1201+. Results of conducted experiments and accuracy analysis of test measurement were presented in figures and diagrams.

  6. On the Error Sources in Absolute Individual Antenna Calibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aerts, Wim; Baire, Quentin; Bilich, Andria; Bruyninx, Carine; Legrand, Juliette

    2013-04-01

    field) multi path errors, both during calibration and later on at the station, absolute sub-millimeter positioning with GPS is not (yet) possible. References [1] G. Wübbena, M. Schmitz, G. Boettcher, C. Schumann, "Absolute GNSS Antenna Calibration with a Robot: Repeatability of Phase Variations, Calibration of GLONASS and Determination of Carrier-to-Noise Pattern", International GNSS Service: Analysis Center workshop, 8-12 May 2006, Darmstadt, Germany. [2] P. Zeimetz, H. Kuhlmann, "On the Accuracy of Absolute GNSS Antenna Calibration and the Conception of a New Anechoic Chamber", FIG Working Week 2008, 14-19 June 2008, Stockholm, Sweden. [3] P. Zeimetz, H. Kuhlmann, L. Wanninger, V. Frevert, S. Schön and K. Strauch, "Ringversuch 2009", 7th GNSS-Antennen-Workshop, 19-20 March 2009, Dresden, Germany.

  7. The absolute disparity anomaly and the mechanism of relative disparities.

    PubMed

    Chopin, Adrien; Levi, Dennis; Knill, David; Bavelier, Daphne

    2016-06-01

    There has been a long-standing debate about the mechanisms underlying the perception of stereoscopic depth and the computation of the relative disparities that it relies on. Relative disparities between visual objects could be computed in two ways: (a) using the difference in the object's absolute disparities (Hypothesis 1) or (b) using relative disparities based on the differences in the monocular separations between objects (Hypothesis 2). To differentiate between these hypotheses, we measured stereoscopic discrimination thresholds for lines with different absolute and relative disparities. Participants were asked to judge the depth of two lines presented at the same distance from the fixation plane (absolute disparity) or the depth between two lines presented at different distances (relative disparity). We used a single stimulus method involving a unique memory component for both conditions, and no extraneous references were available. We also measured vergence noise using Nonius lines. Stereo thresholds were substantially worse for absolute disparities than for relative disparities, and the difference could not be explained by vergence noise. We attribute this difference to an absence of conscious readout of absolute disparities, termed the absolute disparity anomaly. We further show that the pattern of correlations between vergence noise and absolute and relative disparity acuities can be explained jointly by the existence of the absolute disparity anomaly and by the assumption that relative disparity information is computed from absolute disparities (Hypothesis 1). PMID:27248566

  8. The absolute disparity anomaly and the mechanism of relative disparities

    PubMed Central

    Chopin, Adrien; Levi, Dennis; Knill, David; Bavelier, Daphne

    2016-01-01

    There has been a long-standing debate about the mechanisms underlying the perception of stereoscopic depth and the computation of the relative disparities that it relies on. Relative disparities between visual objects could be computed in two ways: (a) using the difference in the object's absolute disparities (Hypothesis 1) or (b) using relative disparities based on the differences in the monocular separations between objects (Hypothesis 2). To differentiate between these hypotheses, we measured stereoscopic discrimination thresholds for lines with different absolute and relative disparities. Participants were asked to judge the depth of two lines presented at the same distance from the fixation plane (absolute disparity) or the depth between two lines presented at different distances (relative disparity). We used a single stimulus method involving a unique memory component for both conditions, and no extraneous references were available. We also measured vergence noise using Nonius lines. Stereo thresholds were substantially worse for absolute disparities than for relative disparities, and the difference could not be explained by vergence noise. We attribute this difference to an absence of conscious readout of absolute disparities, termed the absolute disparity anomaly. We further show that the pattern of correlations between vergence noise and absolute and relative disparity acuities can be explained jointly by the existence of the absolute disparity anomaly and by the assumption that relative disparity information is computed from absolute disparities (Hypothesis 1). PMID:27248566

  9. A Helium-Cooled Absolute Cavity Radiometer For Solar And Laboratory Irradiance Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foukal, P.; Miller, P.

    1983-09-01

    We describe the design and testing of a helium-cooled absolute radiometer (HCAR) devel-oped for highly reproducible measurements of total solar irradiance and ultraviolet flux, and for laboratory standards uses. The receiver of this cryogenic radiometer is a blackened cone of pure copper whose temperature is sensed by a germanium resistance thermometer. During a duty cycle, radiant power input is compared to electrical heating in an accurate resistor wound on the receiver, as in conventional self-calibrating radiometers of the PACRAD and ACR type. But operation at helium temperatures enables us to achieve excellent radia-tive shielding between the receiver and the radiometer thermal background. This enables us to attain a sensitivity level of 10-7 watts at 30 seconds integration time, at least 10 times better than achieved by room temperature cavities. The dramatic drop of copper specific heat at helium temperatures reduces the time constant for a given mass of receiver, by a factor of 103. Together with other cryogenic materials properties such as electrical superconductivity and the high thermal conductivity of copper, this can be used to greatly reduce non-equivalence errors between electrical and radiant heating, that presently limit the absolute accuracy of radiometers to approximately 0,2%. Absolute accuracy of better than 0.01% has been achieved with a similar cryogenic radiometer in laboratory measurements of the Stefan-Boltzmann constant at NPL in the U.K. Electrical and radiometric tests con-ducted so far on our prototype indicate that comparable accuracy and long-term reproducibility can be achieved in a versatile instrument of manageable size for Shuttle flight and laboratory standards uses. This work is supported at AER under NOAA contract NA8ORAC00204 and NSF grant DMR-8260273.

  10. Probing the absolute density of the Earth's core using a vertical neutrino beam

    SciTech Connect

    Winter, Walter

    2005-08-01

    We demonstrate that one could measure the absolute matter density of the Earth's core with a vertical neutrino factory baseline at the per cent level for sin{sup 2}2{theta}{sub 13} > or approx. 0.01, where we include all correlations with the oscillation parameters in the analysis. We discuss the geographical feasibility of such an approach, and illustrate how the results change as a function of the detector location. We point out the complementarity to geophysics.

  11. Shuttle radar topography mission accuracy assessment and evaluation for hydrologic modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercuri, Pablo Alberto

    Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) are increasingly used even in low relief landscapes for multiple mapping applications and modeling approaches such as surface hydrology, flood risk mapping, agricultural suitability, and generation of topographic attributes. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has produced a nearly global database of highly accurate elevation data, the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) DEM. The main goals of this thesis were to investigate quality issues of SRTM, provide measures of vertical accuracy with emphasis on low relief areas, and to analyze the performance for the generation of physical boundaries and streams for watershed modeling and characterization. The absolute and relative accuracy of the two SRTM resolutions, at 1 and 3 arc-seconds, were investigated to generate information that can be used as a reference in areas with similar characteristics in other regions of the world. The absolute accuracy was obtained from accurate point estimates using the best available federal geodetic network in Indiana. The SRTM root mean square error for this area of the Midwest US surpassed data specifications. It was on the order of 2 meters for the 1 arc-second resolution in flat areas of the Midwest US. Estimates of error were smaller for the global coverage 3 arc-second data with very similar results obtained in the flat plains in Argentina. In addition to calculating the vertical accuracy, the impacts of physiography and terrain attributes, like slope, on the error magnitude were studied. The assessment also included analysis of the effects of land cover on vertical accuracy. Measures of local variability were described to identify the adjacency effects produced by surface features in the SRTM DEM, like forests and manmade features near the geodetic point. Spatial relationships among the bare-earth National Elevation Data and SRTM were also analyzed to assess the relative accuracy that was 2.33 meters in terms of the total

  12. Orion Absolute Navigation System Progress and Challenge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holt, Greg N.; D'Souza, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    The absolute navigation design of NASA's Orion vehicle is described. It has undergone several iterations and modifications since its inception, and continues as a work-in-progress. This paper seeks to benchmark the current state of the design and some of the rationale and analysis behind it. There are specific challenges to address when preparing a timely and effective design for the Exploration Flight Test (EFT-1), while still looking ahead and providing software extensibility for future exploration missions. The primary onboard measurements in a Near-Earth or Mid-Earth environment consist of GPS pseudo-range and delta-range, but for future explorations missions the use of star-tracker and optical navigation sources need to be considered. Discussions are presented for state size and composition, processing techniques, and consider states. A presentation is given for the processing technique using the computationally stable and robust UDU formulation with an Agee-Turner Rank-One update. This allows for computational savings when dealing with many parameters which are modeled as slowly varying Gauss-Markov processes. Preliminary analysis shows up to a 50% reduction in computation versus a more traditional formulation. Several state elements are discussed and evaluated, including position, velocity, attitude, clock bias/drift, and GPS measurement biases in addition to bias, scale factor, misalignment, and non-orthogonalities of the accelerometers and gyroscopes. Another consideration is the initialization of the EKF in various scenarios. Scenarios such as single-event upset, ground command, and cold start are discussed as are strategies for whole and partial state updates as well as covariance considerations. Strategies are given for dealing with latent measurements and high-rate propagation using multi-rate architecture. The details of the rate groups and the data ow between the elements is discussed and evaluated.

  13. Evaluation of the Absolute Regional Temperature Potential

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shindell, D. T.

    2012-01-01

    The Absolute Regional Temperature Potential (ARTP) is one of the few climate metrics that provides estimates of impacts at a sub-global scale. The ARTP presented here gives the time-dependent temperature response in four latitude bands (90-28degS, 28degS-28degN, 28-60degN and 60-90degN) as a function of emissions based on the forcing in those bands caused by the emissions. It is based on a large set of simulations performed with a single atmosphere-ocean climate model to derive regional forcing/response relationships. Here I evaluate the robustness of those relationships using the forcing/response portion of the ARTP to estimate regional temperature responses to the historic aerosol forcing in three independent climate models. These ARTP results are in good accord with the actual responses in those models. Nearly all ARTP estimates fall within +/-20%of the actual responses, though there are some exceptions for 90-28degS and the Arctic, and in the latter the ARTP may vary with forcing agent. However, for the tropics and the Northern Hemisphere mid-latitudes in particular, the +/-20% range appears to be roughly consistent with the 95% confidence interval. Land areas within these two bands respond 39-45% and 9-39% more than the latitude band as a whole. The ARTP, presented here in a slightly revised form, thus appears to provide a relatively robust estimate for the responses of large-scale latitude bands and land areas within those bands to inhomogeneous radiative forcing and thus potentially to emissions as well. Hence this metric could allow rapid evaluation of the effects of emissions policies at a finer scale than global metrics without requiring use of a full climate model.

  14. Absolute determination of local tropospheric OH concentrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armerding, Wolfgang; Comes, Franz-Josef

    1994-01-01

    Long path absorption (LPA) according to Lambert Beer's law is a method to determine absolute concentrations of trace gases such as tropospheric OH. We have developed a LPA instrument which is based on a rapid tuning of the light source which is a frequency doubled dye laser. The laser is tuned across two or three OH absorption features around 308 nm with a scanning speed of 0.07 cm(exp -1)/microsecond and a repetition rate of 1.3 kHz. This high scanning speed greatly reduces the fluctuation of the light intensity caused by the atmosphere. To obtain the required high sensitivity the laser output power is additionally made constant and stabilized by an electro-optical modulator. The present sensitivity is of the order of a few times 10(exp 5) OH per cm(exp 3) for an acquisition time of a minute and an absorption path length of only 1200 meters so that a folding of the optical path in a multireflection cell was possible leading to a lateral dimension of the cell of a few meters. This allows local measurements to be made. Tropospheric measurements have been carried out in 1991 resulting in the determination of OH diurnal variation at specific days in late summer. Comparison with model calculations have been made. Interferences are mainly due to SO2 absorption. The problem of OH self generation in the multireflection cell is of minor extent. This could be shown by using different experimental methods. The minimum-maximum signal to noise ratio is about 8 x 10(exp -4) for a single scan. Due to the small size of the absorption cell the realization of an open air laboratory is possible in which by use of an additional UV light source or by additional fluxes of trace gases the chemistry can be changed under controlled conditions allowing kinetic studies of tropospheric photochemistry to be made in open air.

  15. Absolute Radiometric Calibration of KOMPSAT-3A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, H. Y.; Shin, D. Y.; Kim, J. S.; Seo, D. C.; Choi, C. U.

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents a vicarious radiometric calibration of the Korea Multi-Purpose Satellite-3A (KOMPSAT-3A) performed by the Korea Aerospace Research Institute (KARI) and the Pukyong National University Remote Sensing Group (PKNU RSG) in 2015.The primary stages of this study are summarized as follows: (1) A field campaign to determine radiometric calibrated target fields was undertaken in Mongolia and South Korea. Surface reflectance data obtained in the campaign were input to a radiative transfer code that predicted at-sensor radiance. Through this process, equations and parameters were derived for the KOMPSAT-3A sensor to enable the conversion of calibrated DN to physical units, such as at-sensor radiance or TOA reflectance. (2) To validate the absolute calibration coefficients for the KOMPSAT-3A sensor, we performed a radiometric validation with a comparison of KOMPSAT-3A and Landsat-8 TOA reflectance using one of the six PICS (Libya 4). Correlations between top-of-atmosphere (TOA) radiances and the spectral band responses of the KOMPSAT-3A sensors at the Zuunmod, Mongolia and Goheung, South Korea sites were significant for multispectral bands. The average difference in TOA reflectance between KOMPSAT-3A and Landsat-8 image over the Libya 4, Libya site in the red-green-blue (RGB) region was under 3%, whereas in the NIR band, the TOA reflectance of KOMPSAT-3A was lower than the that of Landsat-8 due to the difference in the band passes of two sensors. The KOMPSAT-3Aensor includes a band pass near 940 nm that can be strongly absorbed by water vapor and therefore displayed low reflectance. Toovercome this, we need to undertake a detailed analysis using rescale methods, such as the spectral bandwidth adjustment factor.

  16. In-flight quality and accuracy of attitude measurements from the CHAMP advanced stellar compass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jørgensen, Peter S.; Jørgensen, John L.; Denver, Troelz; Betto, Maurizio

    2005-01-01

    The German geo-observations satellite CHAMP carries highly accurate vector instruments. The orientation of these relative to the inertial reference frame is obtained using star trackers. These advanced stellar compasses (ASC) are fully autonomous units, which provide, in real time, the absolute attitude with accuracy in the arc second range. In order to investigate the in-flight accuracy of the ASC, the terminology to characterize noise and biases is introduced. Relative instrument accuracy (RIA) and absolute instrument accuracy (AIA) can in principle be determined in-flight. However problems with modeling external noise sources often arise. The special CHAMP configuration with two star tracker cameras mounted fixed together provides an excellent opportunity to determine the AIA in-flight using the inter boresight angle.

  17. Improving absolute gravity estimates by the L p -norm approximation of the ballistic trajectory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagornyi, V. D.; Svitlov, S.; Araya, A.

    2016-04-01

    Iteratively re-weighted least squares (IRLS) were used to simulate the L p -norm approximation of the ballistic trajectory in absolute gravimeters. Two iterations of the IRLS delivered sufficient accuracy of the approximation without a significant bias. The simulations were performed on different samplings and perturbations of the trajectory. For the platykurtic distributions of the perturbations, the L p -approximation with 3  <  p  <  4 was found to yield several times more precise gravity estimates compared to the standard least-squares. The simulation results were confirmed by processing real gravity observations performed at the excessive noise conditions.

  18. System for absolute measurement of electrolytic conductivity in aqueous solutions based on van der Pauw's theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bing; Lin, Zhen; Zhang, Xiao; Yu, Xiang; Wei, Jiali; Wang, Xiaoping

    2014-05-01

    Based on an innovative application of van der Pauw's theory, a system was developed for the absolute measurement of electrolytic conductivity in aqueous solutions. An electrolytic conductivity meter was designed that uses a four-electrode system with an axial-radial two-dimensional adjustment structure coupled to an ac voltage excitation source and signal collecting circuit. The measurement accuracy, resolution and repeatability of the measurement system were examined through a series of experiments. Moreover, the measurement system and a high-precision electrolytic conductivity meter were compared using some actual water samples.

  19. The Geometric Accuracy Validation of the ZY-3 Mapping Satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, X.; Tang, X.; Zhang, G.; Zhu, X.

    2013-05-01

    ZiYuan-3 (ZY-3) mapping satellite is the first civilian high-resolution stereo mapping satellite of China. The satellite's objective is oriented towards plotting 1:50,000 and 1:25,000 topographic maps. This article proposes ZY-3 mapping satellite Rigorous Image Geometry Model and Rational Function Model (RFM). In addition, this paper utilizes the image of the ZY-3 satellite with the region of flatlands, hills and mountains for the block adjustment experiment. Different ground control points are selected and the accuracy is validated by check points, and the some Digital Surface Model (DSM), Digital Orthophoto Map (DOM) are generated and the accuracy is also validated by check points. The experiment reveals that the planar accuracy of DOM and vertical accuracy of DSM are better than 3m and 2 m, respectively. The experiment demonstrates the effectiveness of ZY-3 mapping satellite image geometry model.

  20. Characterizing flow in oil reservoir rock using SPH: absolute permeability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, David W.; Williams, John R.; Tilke, Peter; Leonardi, Christopher R.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, a three-dimensional smooth particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulator for modeling grain scale fluid flow in porous rock is presented. The versatility of the SPH method has driven its use in increasingly complex areas of flow analysis, including flows related to permeable rock for both groundwater and petroleum reservoir research. While previous approaches to such problems using SPH have involved the use of idealized pore geometries (cylinder/sphere packs etc), in this paper we detail the characterization of flow in models with geometries taken from 3D X-ray microtomographic imaging of actual porous rock; specifically 25.12 % porosity dolomite. This particular rock type has been well characterized experimentally and described in the literature, thus providing a practical `real world' means of verification of SPH that will be key to its acceptance by industry as a viable alternative to traditional reservoir modeling tools. The true advantages of SPH are realized when adding the complexity of multiple fluid phases, however, the accuracy of SPH for single phase flow is, as yet, under developed in the literature and will be the primary focus of this paper. Flow in reservoir rock will typically occur in the range of low Reynolds numbers, making the enforcement of no-slip boundary conditions an important factor in simulation. To this end, we detail the development of a new, robust, and numerically efficient method for implementing no-slip boundary conditions in SPH that can handle the degree of complexity of boundary surfaces, characteristic of an actual permeable rock sample. A study of the effect of particle density is carried out and simulation results for absolute permeability are presented and compared to those from experimentation showing good agreement and validating the method for such applications.

  1. a Portable Apparatus for Absolute Measurements of the Earth's Gravity.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zumberge, Mark Andrew

    We have developed a new, portable apparatus for making absolute measurements of the acceleration due to the earth's gravity. We use the method of interferometrically determining the acceleration of a freely falling corner -cube prism. The falling object is surrounded by a chamber which is driven vertically inside a fixed vacuum chamber. This falling chamber is servoed to track the falling corner -cube to shield it from drag due to background gas. In addition, the drag-free falling chamber removes the need for a magnetic release, shields the falling object from electrostatic forces, and provides a means of both gently arresting the falling object and quickly returning it to its start position, to allow rapid acquisition of data. A synthesized long period isolation device reduces the noise due to seismic oscillations. A new type of Zeeman laser is used as the light source in the interferometer, and is compared with the wavelength of an iodine stabilized laser. The times of occurrence of 45 interference fringes are measured to within 0.2 nsec over a 20 cm drop and are fit to a quadratic by an on-line minicomputer. 150 drops can be made in ten minutes resulting in a value of g having a precision of 3 to 6 parts in 10('9). Systematic errors have been determined to be less than 5 parts in 10('9) through extensive tests. Three months of gravity data have been obtained with a reproducibility ranging from 5 to 10 parts in 10('9). The apparatus has been designed to be easily portable. Field measurements are planned for the immediate future. An accuracy of 6 parts in 10('9) corresponds to a height sensitivity of 2 cm. Vertical motions in the earth's crust and tectonic density changes that may precede earthquakes are to be investigated using this apparatus.

  2. Mid-infrared absolute spectral responsivity scale based on an absolute cryogenic radiometer and an optical parametric oscillator laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Kun; Shi, Xueshun; Chen, Haidong; Liu, Yulong; Liu, Changming; Chen, Kunfeng; Li, Ligong; Gan, Haiyong; Ma, Chong

    2016-06-01

    We are reporting on a laser-based absolute spectral responsivity scale in the mid-infrared spectral range. By using a mid-infrared tunable optical parametric oscillator as the laser source, the absolute responsivity scale has been established by calibrating thin-film thermopile detectors against an absolute cryogenic radiometer. The thin-film thermopile detectors can be then used as transfer standard detectors. The extended uncertainty of the absolute spectral responsivity measurement has been analyzed to be 0.58%–0.68% (k  =  2).

  3. Voyager absolute far-ultraviolet spectrophotometry of hot stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holberg, J. B.; Forrester, W. T.; Shemansky, D. E.; Barry, D. C.

    1982-01-01

    Voyager observations in the 912-1200 A spectral region are used to indirectly intercompare absolute stellar spectrophotometry from previous experiments. Measurements of hot stars obtained by the Voyager 1 and 2 ultraviolet spectrometers show considerably higher 912-1200 A continuum fluxes than the recent observations of Brune et al. (1979) and Carruthers et al. (1981). The intercomparisons show all observations in basic agreement near 1200 A. The Carruthers et al. flux measurements are preferred down to 1050 A at which point the Voyager and Brune et al. values are respectively 60% higher and 60% lower. Below 1050 A the diasgreement among the observations becomes very large and the fluxes predicted by model atmospheres have been adopted. The pure hydrogen line-blanketed model atmosphere calculations of Wesemael et al. 1980) in comparison with Voyager observations of HZ 43 are used to adjust the Voyager calibration below 1050 A. This adjusted Voyager calibration, which is in good agreement with current model atmosphere fluxes for both early-type stars and DA white dwarfs, will be used for Voyager astronomical observations.

  4. Landsat classification accuracy assessment procedures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mead, R. R.; Szajgin, John

    1982-01-01

    A working conference was held in Sioux Falls, South Dakota, 12-14 November, 1980 dealing with Landsat classification Accuracy Assessment Procedures. Thirteen formal presentations were made on three general topics: (1) sampling procedures, (2) statistical analysis techniques, and (3) examples of projects which included accuracy assessment and the associated costs, logistical problems, and value of the accuracy data to the remote sensing specialist and the resource manager. Nearly twenty conference attendees participated in two discussion sessions addressing various issues associated with accuracy assessment. This paper presents an account of the accomplishments of the conference.

  5. SOFIA pointing history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kärcher, Hans J.; Kunz, Nans; Temi, Pasquale; Krabbe, Alfred; Wagner, Jörg; Süß, Martin

    2014-07-01

    The original pointing accuracy requirement of the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy SOFIA was defined at the beginning of the program in the late 1980s as very challenging 0.2 arcsec rms. The early science flights of the observatory started in December 2010 and the observatory has reached in the mean time nearly 0.7 arcsec rms, which is sufficient for most of the SOFIA science instruments. NASA and DLR, the owners of SOFIA, are planning now a future 4 year program to bring the pointing down to the ultimate 0.2 arcsec rms. This may be the right time to recall the history of the pointing requirement and its verification and the possibility of its achievement via early computer models and wind tunnel tests, later computer aided end-to-end simulations up to the first commissioning flights some years ago. The paper recollects the tools used in the different project phases for the verification of the pointing performance, explains the achievements and may give hints for the planning of the upcoming final pointing improvement phase.

  6. Analysis of the accuracy of Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) height models using International Global Navigation Satellite System Service (IGS) Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukul, Manas; Srivastava, Vinee; Mukul, Malay

    2015-08-01

    The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) carried out in February 2000 has provided near global topographic data that has been widely used in many fields of earth sciences. The mission goal of an absolute vertical accuracy within 16 m (with 90% confidence)/RMSE ˜10 m was achieved based on ground validation of SRTM data through various studies using global positioning system (GPS). We present a new and independent assessment of the vertical accuracy of both the X- and C-band SRTM datasets using data from the International GNSS Service (IGS) network of high-precision static GPS stations. These stations exist worldwide, have better spatial distribution than previous studies, have a vertical accuracy of 6 mm and constitute the most accurate ground control points (GCPs) possible on earth; these stations are used as fiducial stations to define the International Terrestrial Reference Frame (ITRF). Globally, for outlier-filtered data (135 X-band stations and 290 C-band stations), the error or difference between IGS and SRTM heights exhibits a non-normal distribution with a mean and standard error of 8.2 ± 0.7 and 6.9 ± 0.5 m for X- and C-band data, respectively. Continent-wise, Africa, Australia and North America comply with the SRTM mission absolute vertical accuracy of 16 m (with 90% confidence)/RMSE ˜10 m. However, Asia, Europe and South America have vertical errors higher than the SRTM mission goal. At stations where both the X- and C-band SRTM data were present, the root mean square error (RMSE) of both the X- and C-bands was identical at 11.5 m, indicating similar quality of both the X- and C-band SRTM data.

  7. Precision standoff guidance antenna accuracy evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irons, F. H.; Landesberg, M. M.

    1981-02-01

    This report presents a summary of work done to determine the inherent angular accuracy achievable with the guidance and control precision standoff guidance antenna. The antenna is a critical element in the anti-jam single station guidance program since its characteristics can limit the intrinsic location guidance accuracy. It was important to determine the extent to which high ratio beamsplitting results could be achieved repeatedly and what issues were involved with calibrating the antenna. The antenna accuracy has been found to be on the order of 0.006 deg. through the use of a straightforward lookup table concept. This corresponds to a cross range error of 21 m at a range of 200 km. This figure includes both pointing errors and off-axis estimation errors. It was found that the antenna off-boresight calibration is adequately represented by a straight line for each position plus a lookup table for pointing errors relative to broadside. In the event recalibration is required, it was found that only 1% of the model would need to be corrected.

  8. Supplementary and Enrichment Series: Absolute Value. Teachers' Commentary. SP-25.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bridgess, M. Philbrick, Ed.

    This is one in a series of manuals for teachers using SMSG high school supplementary materials. The pamphlet includes commentaries on the sections of the student's booklet, answers to the exercises, and sample test questions. Topics covered include addition and multiplication in terms of absolute value, graphs of absolute value in the Cartesian…

  9. Supplementary and Enrichment Series: Absolute Value. SP-24.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bridgess, M. Philbrick, Ed.

    This is one in a series of SMSG supplementary and enrichment pamphlets for high school students. This series is designed to make material for the study of topics of special interest to students readily accessible in classroom quantity. Topics covered include absolute value, addition and multiplication in terms of absolute value, graphs of absolute…

  10. Novalis' Poetic Uncertainty: A "Bildung" with the Absolute

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mika, Carl

    2016-01-01

    Novalis, the Early German Romantic poet and philosopher, had at the core of his work a mysterious depiction of the "absolute." The absolute is Novalis' name for a substance that defies precise knowledge yet calls for a tentative and sensitive speculation. How one asserts a truth, represents an object, and sets about encountering things…

  11. Absolute Humidity and the Seasonality of Influenza (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaman, J. L.; Pitzer, V.; Viboud, C.; Grenfell, B.; Goldstein, E.; Lipsitch, M.

    2010-12-01

    Much of the observed wintertime increase of mortality in temperate regions is attributed to seasonal influenza. A recent re-analysis of laboratory experiments indicates that absolute humidity strongly modulates the airborne survival and transmission of the influenza virus. Here we show that the onset of increased wintertime influenza-related mortality in the United States is associated with anomalously low absolute humidity levels during the prior weeks. We then use an epidemiological model, in which observed absolute humidity conditions temper influenza transmission rates, to successfully simulate the seasonal cycle of observed influenza-related mortality. The model results indicate that direct modulation of influenza transmissibility by absolute humidity alone is sufficient to produce this observed seasonality. These findings provide epidemiological support for the hypothesis that absolute humidity drives seasonal variations of influenza transmission in temperate regions. In addition, we show that variations of the basic and effective reproductive numbers for influenza, caused by seasonal changes in absolute humidity, are consistent with the general timing of pandemic influenza outbreaks observed for 2009 A/H1N1 in temperate regions. Indeed, absolute humidity conditions correctly identify the region of the United States vulnerable to a third, wintertime wave of pandemic influenza. These findings suggest that the timing of pandemic influenza outbreaks is controlled by a combination of absolute humidity conditions, levels of susceptibility and changes in population mixing and contact rates.

  12. Seasonal Effects on GPS PPP Accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saracoglu, Aziz; Ugur Sanli, D.

    2016-04-01

    GPS Precise Point Positioning (PPP) is now routinely used in many geophysical applications. Static positioning and 24 h data are requested for high precision results however real life situations do not always let us collect 24 h data. Thus repeated GPS surveys of 8-10 h observation sessions are still used by some research groups. Positioning solutions from shorter data spans are subject to various systematic influences, and the positioning quality as well as the estimated velocity is degraded. Researchers pay attention to the accuracy of GPS positions and of the estimated velocities derived from short observation sessions. Recently some research groups turned their attention to the study of seasonal effects (i.e. meteorological seasons) on GPS solutions. Up to now usually regional studies have been reported. In this study, we adopt a global approach and study the various seasonal effects (including the effect of the annual signal) on GPS solutions produced from short observation sessions. We use the PPP module of the NASA/JPL's GIPSY/OASIS II software and globally distributed GPS stations' data of the International GNSS Service. Accuracy studies previously performed with 10-30 consecutive days of continuous data. Here, data from each month of a year, incorporating two years in succession, is used in the analysis. Our major conclusion is that a reformulation for the GPS positioning accuracy is necessary when taking into account the seasonal effects, and typical one term accuracy formulation is expanded to a two-term one.

  13. Mapping shorelines to subpixel accuracy using Landsat imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abileah, Ron; Vignudelli, Stefano; Scozzari, Andrea

    2013-04-01

    A promising method to accurately map the shoreline of oceans, lakes, reservoirs, and rivers is proposed and verified in this work. The method is applied to multispectral satellite imagery in two stages. The first stage is a classification of each image pixel into land/water categories using the conventional 'dark pixel' method. The approach presented here, makes use of a single shortwave IR image band (SWIR), if available. It is well known that SWIR has the least water leaving radiance and relatively little sensitivity to water pollutants and suspended sediments. It is generally the darkest (over water) and most reliable single band for land-water discrimination. The boundary of the water cover map determined in stage 1 underestimates the water cover and often misses the true shoreline by a quantity up to one pixel. A more accurate shoreline would be obtained by connecting the center point of pixels with exactly 50-50 mix of water and land. Then, stage 2 finds the 50-50 mix points. According to the method proposed, image data is interpolated and up-sampled to ten times the original resolution. The local gradient in radiance is used to find the direction to the shore, thus searching along that path for the interpolated pixel closest to a 50-50 mix. Landsat images with 30m resolution, processed by this method, may thus provide the shoreline accurate to 3m. Compared to similar approaches available in the literature, the method proposed discriminates sub-pixels crossed by the shoreline by using a criteria based on the absolute value of radiance, rather than its gradient. Preliminary experimentation of the algorithm shows that 10m resolution accuracy is easily achieved and in some cases is often better than 5m. The proposed method can be used to study long term shoreline changes by exploiting the 30 years of archived world-wide coverage Landsat imagery. Landsat imagery is free and easily accessible for downloading. Some applications that exploit the Landsat dataset and

  14. Karst Water System Investigated by Absolute Gravimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinif, Y.; Meus, P.; van Camp, M.; Kaufmann, O.; van Ruymbeke, M.; Vandiepenbeeck, M.; Camelbeeck, T.

    2006-12-01

    The highly anisotropic and heterogeneous hydrogeological characteristics of karst aquifers are difficult to characterize and present challenges for modeling of storage capacities. Little is known about the surface and groundwater interconnection, about the connection between the porous formations and the draining cave and conduits, and about the variability of groundwater volume within the system. Usually, an aquifer is considered as a black box, where water fluxes are monitored as input and output. However, water inflow and outflow are highly variable and cannot be measured directly. A recent project, begun in 2006 sought to constrain the water budget in a Belgian karst aquifer and to assess the porosity and water dynamics, combining absolute gravity (AG) measurements and piezometric levels around the Rochefort cave. The advantage of gravity measurements is that they integrate all the subsystems in the karst system. This is not the case with traditional geophysical tools like boring or monitoring wells, which are soundings affected by their near environment and its heterogeneity. The investigated cave results from the meander cutoff system of the Lomme River. The main inputs are swallow holes of the river crossing the limestone massif. The river is canalized and the karst system is partly disconnected from the hydraulic system. In February and March 2006, when the river spilled over its dyke and sank into the most important swallow hole, this resulted in dramatic and nearly instantaneous increases in the piezometric levels in the cave, reaching up to 13 meters. Meanwhile, gravity increased by 50 and 90 nms-2 in February and March, respectively. A first conclusion is that during these sudden floods, the pores and fine fissures were poorly connected with the enlarged fractures, cave, and conduits. With a rise of 13 meters in the water level and a 5% porosity, a gravity change of 250 nms-2 should have been expected. This moderate gravity variation suggests either a

  15. New identification method for Hammerstein models based on approximate least absolute deviation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Bao-Chang; Zhang, Ying-Dan

    2016-07-01

    Disorder and peak noises or large disturbances can deteriorate the identification effects of Hammerstein non-linear models when using the least-square (LS) method. The least absolute deviation technique can be used to resolve this problem; however, its absolute value cannot meet the need of differentiability required by most algorithms. To improve robustness and resolve the non-differentiable problem, an approximate least absolute deviation (ALAD) objective function is established by introducing a deterministic function that exhibits the characteristics of absolute value under certain situations. A new identification method for Hammerstein models based on ALAD is thus developed in this paper. The basic idea of this method is to apply the stochastic approximation theory in the process of deriving the recursive equations. After identifying the parameter matrix of the Hammerstein model via the new algorithm, the product terms in the matrix are separated by calculating the average values. Finally, algorithm convergence is proven by applying the ordinary differential equation method. The proposed algorithm has a better robustness as compared to other LS methods, particularly when abnormal points exist in the measured data. Furthermore, the proposed algorithm is easier to apply and converges faster. The simulation results demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed algorithm.

  16. Analysis of the Accuracy of Ballistic Descent from a Circular Circumterrestrial Orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sikharulidze, Yu. G.; Korchagin, A. N.

    2002-01-01

    The problem of the transportation of the results of experiments and observations to Earth every so often appears in space research. Its simplest and low-cost solution is the employment of a small ballistic reentry spacecraft. Such a spacecraft has no system of control of the descent trajectory in the atmosphere. This can result in a large spread of landing points, which make it difficult to search for the spacecraft and very often a safe landing. In this work, a choice of a compromise scheme of the flight is considered, which includes the optimum braking maneuver, adequate conditions of the entry into the atmosphere with limited heating and overload, and also the possibility of landing within the limits of a circle with a radius of 12.5 km. The following disturbing factors were taken into account in the analysis of the accuracy of landing: the errors of the braking impulse execution, the variations of the atmosphere density and the wind, the error of the specification of the ballistic coefficient of the reentry spacecraft, and a displacement of its center of mass from the symmetry axis. It is demonstrated that the optimum maneuver assures the maximum absolute value of the reentry angle and the insensitivity of the trajectory of descent with respect to small errors of orientation of the braking engine in the plane of the orbit. It is also demonstrated that the possible error of the landing point due to the error of specification of the ballistic coefficient does not depend (in the linear approximation) upon its value and depends only upon the reentry angle and the accuracy of specification of this coefficient. A guided parachute with an aerodynamic efficiency of about two should be used at the last leg of the reentry trajectory. This will allow one to land in a prescribed range and to produce adequate conditions for the interception of the reentry spacecraft by a helicopter in order to prevent a rough landing.

  17. Tracking accuracy for Leosat-Geosat laser links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seshamani, Ramani; Rao, D. V. B.; Alex, T. K.; Jain, Y. K.

    1989-06-01

    A tracking accuracy of 1 microrad is required for the achievement of Leosat-Geosat laser communications links, entailing exceptionally accurate alignment between transmitter and receiver as well as point-ahead capability. The pointing and acquisition procedure would involve the two optical system/telescope units to be pointed toward each other with an attitude accuracy smaller than the position uncertainty; a spatial-scam operation by the Leosat's narrow beam, and subsequently by the Geosat's would have to be conducted before acquisition is completed, allowing switching from acquisition to tracking mode.

  18. Towards a stable and absolute atmospheric carbon dioxide instrument using spectroscopic null method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, B.; Nelson, D. D.; McManus, J. B.; Zahniser, M. S.; Wofsy, S. C.

    2013-07-01

    We present a novel spectral method to measure atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) with high precision and stability without resorting to calibration tanks during long-term operation. This spectral null method improves precision by reducing spectral proportional noise associated with laser emission instabilities. We employ sealed quartz cells with known CO2 column densities to serve as the permanent internal references in the null method, which improve the instrument's stability and accuracy. A prototype instrument - ABsolute Carbon dioxide (ABC) is developed using this new approach. The instrument has a one-second precision of 0.02 ppm, which averages down to 0.007 ppm within one minute. Long-term stability of within 0.1 ppm is achieved without any calibrations for over a one-month period. These results have the potential for eliminating the need for calibration cylinders for high accuracy field measurements of carbon dioxide.

  19. Towards a stable and absolute atmospheric carbon dioxide instrument using spectroscopic null method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, B.; Nelson, D. D.; McManus, J. B.; Zahniser, M. S.; Wofsy, S. C.

    2013-02-01

    We present a novel spectral method to measure atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) with high precision and stability without resorting to calibration tanks during long-term operation. This spectral null method improves precision by reducing spectral proportional noise associated with laser emission instabilities. We employ sealed quartz cells with known CO2 column densities to serve as the permanent internal references in the null method, which improve the instrument's stability and accuracy. A prototype instrument - ABsolute Carbon dioxide (ABC) is developed using this new approach. The instrument has one-second precision of 0.02 ppm, which averages down to 0.007 ppm within one minute. Long-term stability of within 0.1 ppm is achieved without any calibrations for over a one-month period. These results have the potential for eliminating the need for calibration cylinders for high accuracy field measurements of carbon dioxide.

  20. Absolute radiometric calibration of advanced remote sensing systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, P. N.

    1982-01-01

    The distinction between the uses of relative and absolute spectroradiometric calibration of remote sensing systems is discussed. The advantages of detector-based absolute calibration are described, and the categories of relative and absolute system calibrations are listed. The limitations and problems associated with three common methods used for the absolute calibration of remote sensing systems are addressed. Two methods are proposed for the in-flight absolute calibration of advanced multispectral linear array systems. One makes use of a sun-illuminated panel in front of the sensor, the radiance of which is monitored by a spectrally flat pyroelectric radiometer. The other uses a large, uniform, high-radiance reference ground surface. The ground and atmospheric measurements required as input to a radiative transfer program to predict the radiance level at the entrance pupil of the orbital sensor are discussed, and the ground instrumentation is described.

  1. Learning in the temporal bisection task: Relative or absolute?

    PubMed

    de Carvalho, Marilia Pinheiro; Machado, Armando; Tonneau, François

    2016-01-01

    We examined whether temporal learning in a bisection task is absolute or relational. Eight pigeons learned to choose a red key after a t-seconds sample and a green key after a 3t-seconds sample. To determine whether they had learned a relative mapping (short→Red, long→Green) or an absolute mapping (t-seconds→Red, 3t-seconds→Green), the pigeons then learned a series of new discriminations in which either the relative or the absolute mapping was maintained. Results showed that the generalization gradient obtained at the end of a discrimination predicted the pattern of choices made during the first session of a new discrimination. Moreover, most acquisition curves and generalization gradients were consistent with the predictions of the learning-to-time model, a Spencean model that instantiates absolute learning with temporal generalization. In the bisection task, the basis of temporal discrimination seems to be absolute, not relational. PMID:26752233

  2. Comparison of the accuracy of digitally fabricated polyurethane model and conventional gypsum model

    PubMed Central

    Kim, So-Yeun; Lee, So-Hyoun; Cho, Seong-Keun; Jeong, Chang-Mo; Jeon, Young-Chan; Yun, Mi-Jung

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE The accuracy of a gypsum model (GM), which was taken using a conventional silicone impression technique, was compared with that of a polyurethane model (PM), which was taken using an iTero™ digital impression system. MATERIALS AND METHODS The maxillary first molar artificial tooth was selected as the reference tooth. The GMs were fabricated through a silicone impression of a reference tooth, and PMs were fabricated by a digital impression (n=9, in each group). The reference tooth and experimental models were scanned using a 3 shape convince™ scan system. Each GM and PM image was superimposed on the registered reference model (RM) and 2D images were obtained. The discrepancies of the points registered on the superimposed images were measured and defined as GM-RM group and PM-RM group. Statistical analysis was performed using a Student's T-test (α=0.05). RESULTS A comparison of the absolute value of the discrepancy revealed a significant difference between the two groups only at the occlusal surface. The GM group showed a smaller mean discrepancy than the PM group. Significant differences in the GM-RM group and PM-RM group were observed in the margins (point a and f), mesial mid-axial wall (point b) and occlusal surfaces (point c and d). CONCLUSION Under the conditions examined, the digitally fabricated polyurethane model showed a tendency for a reduced size in the margin than the reference tooth. The conventional gypsum model showed a smaller discrepancy on the occlusal surface than the polyurethane model. PMID:24605199

  3. Assessing the Accuracy of Alaska National Hydrography Data for Mapping and Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arundel, S. T.; Yamamoto, K. H.; Mantey, K.; Vinyard-Houx, J.; Miller-Corbett, C. D.

    2012-12-01

    In July, 2011, the National Geospatial Program embarked on a large-scale Alaska Topographic Mapping Initiative. Maps will be published through the USGS US Topo program. Mapping of the state requires an understanding of the spatial quality of the National Hydrography Dataset (NHD), which is the hydrographic source for the US Topo. The NHD in Alaska was originally produced from topographic maps at 1:63,360 scale. It is critical to determine whether the NHD is accurate enough to be represented at the targeted map scale of the US Topo (1:25,000). Concerns are the spatial accuracy of data and the density of the stream network. Unsuitably low accuracy can be a result of the lower positional accuracy standards required for the original 1:63,360 scale mapping, temporal changes in water features, or any combination of these factors. Insufficient positional accuracy results in poor vertical integration with data layers of higher positional accuracy. Poor integration is readily apparent on the US Topo, particularly relative to current imagery and elevation data. In Alaska, current IFSAR-derived digital terrain models meet positional accuracy requirements for 1:24,000-scale mapping. Initial visual assessments indicate a wide range in the quality of fit between features in NHD and the IFSAR. However, no statistical analysis had been performed to quantify NHD feature accuracy. Determining the absolute accuracy is cost prohibitive, because of the need to collect independent, well-defined test points for such analysis; however, quantitative analysis of relative positional error is a feasible alternative. The purpose of this study is to determine the baseline accuracy of Alaska NHD pertinent to US Topo production, and to recommend reasonable guidelines and costs for NHD improvement and updates. A second goal is to detect error trends that might help identify areas or features where data improvements are most needed. There are four primary objectives of the study: 1. Choose study

  4. The Impact of Observation Duration on the Accuracy of Data Obtained from Direct Behavior Rating (DBR)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riley-Tillman, T. Chris; Christ, Theodore J.; Chafouleas, Sandra M.; Boice-Mallach, Christina H.; Briesch, Amy

    2011-01-01

    In this study, evaluation of direct behavior rating (DBR) occurred with regard to two primary areas: (a) accuracy of ratings with varied instrumentation (anchoring: proportional or absolute) and procedures (observation length: 5 min, 10 min, or 20 min) and (b) one-week test-retest reliability. Participants viewed video clips of a typical third…

  5. Swarm's absolute magnetometer experimental vector mode, an innovative capability for space magnetometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hulot, Gauthier; Vigneron, Pierre; Léger, Jean-Michel; Fratter, Isabelle; Olsen, Nils; Jager, Thomas; Bertrand, François; Brocco, Laura; Sirol, Olivier; Lalanne, Xavier; Boness, Axel; Cattin, Viviane

    2015-03-01

    European Space Agency's Swarm satellites carry a new generation of 4He absolute magnetometers (ASM), designed by CEA-Léti and developed in partnership with Centre National d'Études Spatiales. These instruments are the first ever spaceborne magnetometers to use a common sensor to simultaneously deliver 1 Hz independent absolute scalar and vector readings of the magnetic field. Since launch, these ASMs provided very high-accuracy scalar field data, as nominally required for the mission, together with experimental vector field data. Here we compare geomagnetic field models built from such ASM-only data with models built from the mission's nominal 1 Hz data, combining ASM scalar data with independent fluxgate magnetometer vector data. The high level of agreement between these models demonstrates the potential of the ASM's vector mode for data quality control and as a stand-alone magnetometer and illustrates the way the evolution of key field features can easily be monitored from space with such absolute vector magnetometers.

  6. A new absolute reference for atmospheric longwave irradiance measurements with traceability to SI units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gröbner, J.; Reda, I.; Wacker, S.; Nyeki, S.; Behrens, K.; Gorman, J.

    2014-06-01

    Two independently designed and calibrated absolute radiometers measuring downwelling longwave irradiance were compared during two field campaigns in February and October 2013 at Physikalisch Meteorologisches Observatorium Davos/World Radiation Center (PMOD/WRC). One absolute cavity pyrgeometer (ACP) developed by NREL and up to four Integrating Sphere Infrared Radiometers (IRIS) developed by PMOD/WRC took part in these intercomparisons. The internal consistency of the IRIS radiometers and the agreement with the ACP were within ±1 W m-2, providing traceability of atmospheric longwave irradiance to the international system of units with unprecedented accuracy. Measurements performed during the two field campaigns and over the past 4 years have shown that the World Infrared Standard Group (WISG) of pyrgeometers is underestimating clear-sky atmospheric longwave irradiance by 2 to 6 W m-2, depending on the amount of integrated water vapor (IWV). This behavior is an instrument-dependent feature and requires an individual sensitivity calibration of each pyrgeometer with respect to an absolute reference such as IRIS or ACP. For IWV larger than 10 mm, an average sensitivity correction of +6.5% should be applied to the WISG in order to be consistent with the longwave reference represented by the ACP and IRIS radiometers. A concerted effort at international level will need to be implemented in order to correct measurements of atmospheric downwelling longwave irradiance traceable to the WISG.

  7. Laser induced deflection (LID) method for absolute absorption measurements of optical materials and thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mühlig, Christian; Bublitz, Simon; Paa, Wolfgang

    2011-05-01

    We use optimized concepts to measure directly low absorption in optical materials and thin films at various laser wavelengths by the laser induced deflection (LID) technique. An independent absolute calibration, using electrical heaters, is applied to obtain absolute absorption data without the actual knowledge of the photo-thermal material properties. Verification of the absolute calibration is obtained by measuring different silicon samples at 633 nm where all laser light, apart from the measured reflection/scattering, is absorbed. Various experimental results for bulk materials and thin films are presented including measurements of fused silica and CaF2 at 193 nm, nonlinear crystals (LBO) for frequency conversion and AR coated fused silica for high power material processing at 1030 nm and Yb-doped silica raw materials for high power fiber lasers at 1550 nm. In particular for LBO the need of an independent calibration is demonstrated since thermal lens generation is dominated by stress-induced refractive index change which is in contrast to most of the common optical materials. The measured results are proven by numerical simulations and their influence on the measurement strategy and the obtained accuracy are shown.

  8. Method to calibrate the absolute energy scale of air showers with ultrahigh energy photons.

    PubMed

    Homola, Piotr; Risse, Markus

    2014-04-18

    Calibrating the absolute energy scale of air showers initiated by ultrahigh energy (UHE) cosmic rays is an important experimental issue. Currently, the corresponding systematic uncertainty amounts to 14%-21% using the fluorescence technique. Here, we describe a new, independent method which can be applied if ultrahigh energy photons are observed. While such photon-initiated showers have not yet been identified, the capabilities of present and future cosmic-ray detectors may allow their discovery. The method makes use of the geomagnetic conversion of UHE photons (preshower effect), which significantly affects the subsequent longitudinal shower development. The conversion probability depends on photon energy and can be calculated accurately by QED. The comparison of the observed fraction of converted photon events to the expected one allows the determination of the absolute energy scale of the observed photon air showers and, thus, an energy calibration of the air shower experiment. We provide details of the method and estimate the accuracy that can be reached as a function of the number of observed photon showers. Already a very small number of UHE photons may help to test and fix the absolute energy scale. PMID:24785024

  9. Radio frequency controlled synthetic wavelength sweep for absolute distance measurement by optical interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Le Floch, Sebastien; Salvade, Yves; Mitouassiwou, Rostand; Favre, Patrick

    2008-06-01

    We present a new technique applied to the variable optical synthetic wavelength generation in optical interferometry. It consists of a chain of optical injection locking among three lasers: first a distributed-feedback laser is used as a master to injection lock an intensity-modulated laser that is directly modulated around 15 GHz by a radio frequency generator on a sideband. A second distributed-feedback laser is injection locked on another sideband of the intensity-modulated laser. The variable synthetic wavelength for absolute distance measurement is simply generated by sweeping the radio frequency over a range of several hundred megahertz, which corresponds to the locking range of the two slave lasers. In this condition, the uncertainty of the variable synthetic wavelength is equivalent to the radio frequency uncertainty. This latter has a relative accuracy of 10{sup -7} or better, resulting in a resolution of {+-}25 {mu}m for distances exceeding tens of meters. The radio frequency generator produces a linear frequency sweep of 1 ms duration (i.e., exactly equal to one absolute distance measurement acquisition time), with frequency steps of about 1 MHz. Finally, results of absolute distance measurements for ranges up to 10 m are presented.

  10. Comparison of Using Relative and Absolute PCV Corrections in Short Baseline GNSS Observation Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawidowicz, Karol

    2011-01-01

    GNSS antenna phase center variations (PCV) are defined as shifts in positions depending on the observed elevation angle and azimuth to the satellite. When identical antennae are used in relative measurement the phase center variations will cancel out, particularly over short baselines. When different antennae are used, even on short baselines, ignoring these phase center variations can lead to serious (up to 10 cm) vertical errors. The only way to avoid these errors, when mixing different antenna types, is by applying antenna phase center variation models in processing. Till the 6th November 2006, the International GNSS Service used relative phase center models for GNSS antenna receivers. Then absolute calibration models, developed by the company "Geo++", started to be used. These models involved significant differences on the scale of GNSS networks compared to the VLBI and SLR measurements. The differences were due to the lack of the GNSS satellite antenna calibration models. When this problem was sufficiently resolved, the IGS decided to switch from relative to absolute models for both satellites and receivers. This decision caused significant variations to the results of the GNSS network solutions. The aim of this paper is to study the height differences in short baseline GNSS observations processing when different calibration models are used. The analysis was done using GNSS data collected at short baselines moved with different receiver antennas. The results of calculations show, that switching from relative to absolute receiver antenna PCV models has a significant effect on GNSS network solutions, particularly in high accuracy applications.

  11. Radio frequency controlled synthetic wavelength sweep for absolute distance measurement by optical interferometry.

    PubMed

    Le Floch, Sébastien; Salvadé, Yves; Mitouassiwou, Rostand; Favre, Patrick

    2008-06-01

    We present a new technique applied to the variable optical synthetic wavelength generation in optical interferometry. It consists of a chain of optical injection locking among three lasers: first a distributed-feedback laser is used as a master to injection lock an intensity-modulated laser that is directly modulated around 15 GHz by a radio frequency generator on a sideband. A second distributed-feedback laser is injection locked on another sideband of the intensity-modulated laser. The variable synthetic wavelength for absolute distance measurement is simply generated by sweeping the radio frequency over a range of several hundred megahertz, which corresponds to the locking range of the two slave lasers. In this condition, the uncertainty of the variable synthetic wavelength is equivalent to the radio frequency uncertainty. This latter has a relative accuracy of 10(-7) or better, resulting in a resolution of +/-25 microm for distances exceeding tens of meters. The radio frequency generator produces a linear frequency sweep of 1 ms duration (i.e., exactly equal to one absolute distance measurement acquisition time), with frequency steps of about 1 MHz. Finally, results of absolute distance measurements for ranges up to 10 m are presented. PMID:18516123

  12. Improved statistical determination of absolute neutrino masses via radiative emission of neutrino pairs from atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jue; Zhou, Shun

    2016-06-01

    The atomic transition from an excited state |e ⟩ to the ground state |g ⟩ by emitting a neutrino pair and a photon, i.e., |e ⟩→|g ⟩+|γ ⟩+|νi⟩+|ν¯j⟩ with i , j =1 , 2, 3, has been proposed by Yoshimura and his collaborators as an alternative way to determine the absolute scale m0 of neutrino masses. More recently, a statistical analysis of the fine structure of the photon spectrum from this atomic process has been performed [N. Song et al. Phys. Rev. D 93, 013020 (2016)] to quantitatively examine the experimental requirements for a realistic determination of absolute neutrino masses. In this paper, we show how to improve the statistical analysis and demonstrate that the previously required detection time can be reduced by one order of magnitude for the case of a 3 σ determination of m0˜0.01 eV with an accuracy better than 10%. Such an improvement is very encouraging for further investigations on measuring absolute neutrino masses through atomic processes.

  13. Temperature-dependent Absolute Refractive Index Measurements of Synthetic Fused Silica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leviton, Douglas B.; Frey, Bradley J.

    2006-01-01

    Using the Cryogenic, High-Accuracy Refraction Measuring System (CHARMS) at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, we have measured the absolute refractive index of five specimens taken from a very large boule of Corning 7980 fused silica from temperatures ranging from 30 to 310 K at wavelengths from 0.4 to 2.6 microns with an absolute uncertainty of plus or minus 1 x 10 (exp -5). Statistical variations in derived values of the thermo-optic coefficient (dn/dT) are at the plus or minus 2 x 10 (exp -8)/K level. Graphical and tabulated data for absolute refractive index, dispersion, and thermo-optic coefficient are presented for selected wavelengths and temperatures along with estimates of uncertainty in index. Coefficients for temperature-dependent Sellmeier fits of measured refractive index are also presented to allow accurate interpolation of index to other wavelengths and temperatures. We compare our results to those from an independent investigation (which used an interferometric technique for measuring index changes as a function of temperature) whose samples were prepared from the same slugs of material from which our prisms were prepared in support of the Kepler mission. We also compare our results with sparse cryogenic index data from measurements of this material from the literature.

  14. High Accuracy Fuel Flowmeter, Phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayer, C.; Rose, L.; Chan, A.; Chin, B.; Gregory, W.

    1983-01-01

    Technology related to aircraft fuel mass - flowmeters was reviewed to determine what flowmeter types could provide 0.25%-of-point accuracy over a 50 to one range in flowrates. Three types were selected and were further analyzed to determine what problem areas prevented them from meeting the high accuracy requirement, and what the further development needs were for each. A dual-turbine volumetric flowmeter with densi-viscometer and microprocessor compensation was selected for its relative simplicity and fast response time. An angular momentum type with a motor-driven, spring-restrained turbine and viscosity shroud was selected for its direct mass-flow output. This concept also employed a turbine for fast response and a microcomputer for accurate viscosity compensation. The third concept employed a vortex precession volumetric flowmeter and was selected for its unobtrusive design. Like the turbine flowmeter, it uses a densi-viscometer and microprocessor for density correction and accurate viscosity compensation.

  15. Helmet-mounted display accuracy in the aircraft cockpit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulholland, Fred F.

    2002-08-01

    When a Helmet-Mounted Display (HMD) system is used in an aircraft cockpit, the usual intent is to overlay symbols or images in the display on their real-world object counterparts. The HMD system determines a pointing angle (in aircraft coordinates) to the real-world object. This pointing angle is sent to the Mission Computer (MC) for use by other aircraft systems and is used by the HMD to position symbology in the HMD image. The accuracy of the HMD is defined as the error of the pointing angle sent to the MC versus the real-world angle to the object. This error is usually given in terms of milli-radians (mrad). Note that having the symbol in the HMD image overlay the corresponding object in the real world does not necessarily ensure an accurate pointing angle. One example of HMD use is to position an aiming cross in the display over an aircraft in the sky. The pointing angle to that aircraft is sent via the MC to another sensor (radar, missile, targeting pod) which then locks onto that aircraft or object. The accuracy requirement is to get the other sensor pointed at an angle to detect the same aircraft. There are aircraft integration issues to ensure target acquisition, but these will not be covered in this paper. One component of the HMD system is a tracker system, and the tracker system's accuracy is often looked at as the HMD accuracy. However, the accuracy of the tracker system is only one piece of the total HMD system accuracy, and as trackers get better, they may not even be the largest error component. This paper identifies the various error components of the HMD system installed in the aircraft cockpit and discusses the techniques used for minimizing errors and improving accuracy.

  16. High-precision laser-assisted absolute determination of x-ray diffraction angles

    SciTech Connect

    Kubicek, K.; Braun, J.; Bruhns, H.; Crespo Lopez-Urrutia, J. R.; Mokler, P. H.; Ullrich, J.

    2012-01-15

    A novel technique for absolute wavelength determination in high-precision crystal x-ray spectroscopy recently introduced has been upgraded reaching unprecedented accuracies. The method combines visible laser beams with the Bond method, where Bragg angles ({theta} and -{theta}) are determined without any x-ray reference lines. Using flat crystals this technique makes absolute x-ray wavelength measurements feasible even at low x-ray fluxes. The upgraded spectrometer has been used in combination with first experiments on the 1s2p {sup 1}P{sub 1}{yields} 1s{sup 2} {sup 1}S{sub 0} w-line in He-like argon. By resolving a minute curvature of the x-ray lines the accuracy reaches there the best ever reported value of 1.5 ppm. The result is sensitive to predicted second-order QED contributions at the level of two-electron screening and two-photon radiative diagrams and will allow for the first time to benchmark predicted binding energies for He-like ions at this level of precision.

  17. Absolute testing of surface based on sub-aperture stitching interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Xin; Xu, Fuchao; Xie, Weimin; Xing, Tingwen

    2015-02-01

    Large-aperture optical elements are widely employed in high-power laser system, astronomy, and outer-space technology. Sub-aperture stitching is an effective way to extend the lateral and vertical dynamic range of a conventional interferometer. Most of the commercial available sub-aperture stitching interferometers measure the surface with a standard lens that produces a reference wavefront, and the precision of the interferometer is generally limited by the standard lens. The test accuracy can be achieved by removing the error of reference surface by the absolute testing method. In our paper we use the different sub-apertures as the different flats to get the profile of the reference lens. Only two lens in the testing process which is fewer than the traditional 3-flat method. In the testing equipment, we add a reflective lens and a lens which can transparent and reflect to get the non rationally symmetric errors of the testing flat. The arithmetic is present in this paper which uses the absolute testing method to improve the testing accuracy of the sub-aperture stitching interferometers by removing the errors caused by reference surface.

  18. Testing the absolute-tempo hypothesis: context effects for familiar and unfamiliar songs.

    PubMed

    Rashotte, Matthew A; Wedell, Douglas H

    2014-11-01

    In two experiments, we investigated context effects on tempo judgments for familiar and unfamiliar songs performed by popular artists. In Experiment 1, participants made comparative tempo judgments to a remembered standard for song clips drawn from either a slow or a fast context, created by manipulating the tempos of the same songs. Although both familiar and unfamiliar songs showed significant shifts in their points of subjective equality toward the tempo context values, more-familiar songs showed significantly reduced contextual bias. In Experiment 2, tempo pleasantness ratings showed significant context effects in which the ordering of tempos on the pleasantness scale differed across contexts, with the most pleasant tempo shifting toward the contextual values, an assimilation of ideal points. Once again, these effects were significant but reduced for the more-familiar songs. The moderating effects of song familiarity support a weak version of the absolute-tempo hypothesis, in which long-term memory for tempo reduces but does not eliminate contextual effects. Thus, although both relative and absolute tempo information appear to be encoded in memory, the absolute representation may be subject to rapid revision by recently experienced tempo-altered versions of the same song. PMID:24972559

  19. Full-field absolute phase measurements in the heterodyne interferometer with an electro-optic modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y. L.; Hsieh, H. C.; Wu, W. T.; Su, D. C.

    2009-06-01

    A novel method for full-field absolute phase measurements in the heterodyne interferometer with an electro-optic modulator is proposed in this paper. Instead of the commonly-used half-wave voltage to drive the electro-optic modulator, a saw-tooth voltage signal with the amplitude being lower than its half-wave voltage is used. The interference signals become a group of periodical sinusoidal segments. The initial phase of each sinusoidal segment depends on the phase difference induced by the test sample. In real measurements, each segment is taken by a fast camera and becomes discrete digital points. After a series of operations, the starting point of the sampled sinusoidal segment can be determined accurately. Next, the period of the sampled sinusoidal segments is lengthened and they can be modified to a continuous sinusoidal wave by using a least-square sine fitting algorithm. The initial phase of the continuous sinusoidal wave can also be estimated. Subtracting the characteristic phase of the modulator from the initial phase, the absolute phase measured at the pixel can be obtained without the conventional reference signals. These operations are applied to other pixels, and the full-field absolute phase measurements can be achieved. The phase retardation of a quarter-wave plate is measured to show the validity of this method.

  20. On-Orbit Absolute Temperature Calibration for CLARREO Using Multiple Phase Change Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Best, F. A.; Adler, D. P.; Ellington, S. D.; Thielman, D. J.; Revercomb, H. E.; Perepezko, J. H.

    2008-12-01

    NASA's anticipated plan for a mission dedicated to Climate (CLARREO) will hinge upon the ability to fly SI traceable standards that provide irrefutable absolute measurement accuracy. As an example, instrumentation designed to measure spectrally resolved infrared radiances will require high-emissivity calibration blackbodies that have absolute temperature uncertainties of better than 0.045K (3 sigma). A novel scheme to provide absolute calibration of temperature sensors, suitable for CLARREO on-orbit operation, has been demonstrated in the laboratory at the University of Wisconsin, and is now undergoing refinement under NASA Instrument Incubator Program funding. In this scheme, small quantities of reference materials (mercury, water, and gallium - to date) are imbedded into the blackbody cavity wall, in a manner similar to the temperature sensors to be calibrated. As the blackbody cavity is slowly heated through a reference material melt temperature, the transient temperature signature of the imbedded thermistor sensors provides a very accurate indication of the melt temperature. Using small quantities of phase change material (less than half of a percent of the mass of the cavity), melt temperature accuracies of better than 10 mK have been demonstrated for mercury, water, and gallium (providing calibration from 233K to 303K). The flight implementation of this new scheme will involve special considerations for packaging the phase change materials to ensure long-term compatibility with the containment system, and design features that help ensure that the on-orbit melt behavior in a microgravity environment is unchanged from pre-flight full gravitational conditions under which the system is characterized.