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Sample records for absolute pressure scale

  1. Absolute neutrino mass scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capelli, Silvia; Di Bari, Pasquale

    2013-04-01

    Neutrino oscillation experiments firmly established non-vanishing neutrino masses, a result that can be regarded as a strong motivation to extend the Standard Model. In spite of being the lightest massive particles, neutrinos likely represent an important bridge to new physics at very high energies and offer new opportunities to address some of the current cosmological puzzles, such as the matter-antimatter asymmetry of the Universe and Dark Matter. In this context, the determination of the absolute neutrino mass scale is a key issue within modern High Energy Physics. The talks in this parallel session well describe the current exciting experimental activity aiming to determining the absolute neutrino mass scale and offer an overview of a few models beyond the Standard Model that have been proposed in order to explain the neutrino masses giving a prediction for the absolute neutrino mass scale and solving the cosmological puzzles.

  2. Cryogenic, Absolute, High Pressure Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, John J. (Inventor); Shams. Qamar A. (Inventor); Powers, William T. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A pressure sensor is provided for cryogenic, high pressure applications. A highly doped silicon piezoresistive pressure sensor is bonded to a silicon substrate in an absolute pressure sensing configuration. The absolute pressure sensor is bonded to an aluminum nitride substrate. Aluminum nitride has appropriate coefficient of thermal expansion for use with highly doped silicon at cryogenic temperatures. A group of sensors, either two sensors on two substrates or four sensors on a single substrate are packaged in a pressure vessel.

  3. Elevation correction factor for absolute pressure measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panek, Joseph W.; Sorrells, Mark R.

    1996-01-01

    With the arrival of highly accurate multi-port pressure measurement systems, conditions that previously did not affect overall system accuracy must now be scrutinized closely. Errors caused by elevation differences between pressure sensing elements and model pressure taps can be quantified and corrected. With multi-port pressure measurement systems, the sensing elements are connected to pressure taps that may be many feet away. The measurement system may be at a different elevation than the pressure taps due to laboratory space or test article constraints. This difference produces a pressure gradient that is inversely proportional to height within the interface tube. The pressure at the bottom of the tube will be higher than the pressure at the top due to the weight of the tube's column of air. Tubes with higher pressures will exhibit larger absolute errors due to the higher air density. The above effect is well documented but has generally been taken into account with large elevations only. With error analysis techniques, the loss in accuracy from elevation can be easily quantified. Correction factors can be applied to maintain the high accuracies of new pressure measurement systems.

  4. Kelvin and the absolute temperature scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erlichson, Herman

    2001-07-01

    This paper describes the absolute temperature scale of Kelvin (William Thomson). Kelvin found that Carnot's axiom about heat being a conserved quantity had to be abandoned. Nevertheless, he found that Carnot's fundamental work on heat engines was correct. Using the concept of a Carnot engine Kelvin found that Q1/Q2 = T1/T2. Thermometers are not used to obtain absolute temperatures since they are calculated temperatures.

  5. Design of piezoresistive MEMS absolute pressure sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, S.; Pant, B. D.

    2012-10-01

    MEMS pressure sensors are one of the most widely commercialized microsensors in the MEMS industry. They have a plethora of applications in various fields including the automobile, space, biomedical, aviation and military sectors. One of the simplest and most efficient methods in MEMS pressure sensors for measuring pressure is to use the phenomenon of piezoresistance. The piezoresistive effect causes change in the resistance of certain doped materials when they are subjected to stress, as a result of energy band deformation. Piezoresistive pressure sensors consist of piezoresistors placed over a thin diaphragm which deflects under the action of the pressure to be measured. The result of this deflection causes the piezoresistors to change their resistance due to the stress experienced by them. The change is converted into electrical signals and measured in order to find the value of applied pressure. In this work, a high range (30 Bar) pressure sensor is designed based on the principle of piezoresistivity. The inaccuracies in the analytical models that are generally used to model the pressure sensor diaphragm have also been analysed. Thus, the Finite Element Method (FEM) is adopted to optimize the pressure sensor for parameters like sensitivity and linearity. This is achieved by choosing the proper shape of piezoresistor, thickness of diaphragm and the position of the piezoresistor on the pressure sensor diaphragm. For the square diaphragm, sensitivity of 5.18 mV/V/Bar and a linearity error of 0.02% are obtained. For the circular diaphragm, sensitivity of 3.69 mV/V/Bar and a linearity error of 0.011% are obtained.

  6. Absolute OH and O radical densities in effluent of a He/H2O micro-scaled atmospheric pressure plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedikt, J.; Schröder, D.; Schneider, S.; Willems, G.; Pajdarová, A.; Vlček, J.; Schulz-von der Gathen, V.

    2016-08-01

    The effluent of a micro-scaled atmospheric pressure plasma jet (μ-APPJ) operated in helium with admixtures of water vapor (≲ {{10}4} ppm) has been analyzed by means of cavity ring-down laser absorption spectroscopy and molecular beam mass spectrometry to measure hydroxyl (OH) radical densities, and by two-photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy to measure atomic oxygen (O) densities. Additionally, the performance of the bubbler as a source of water vapor in the helium feed gas has been carefully characterized and calibrated. The largest OH and O densities in the effluent of 2× {{10}14}~\\text{c}{{\\text{m}}-3} and 3.2× {{10}13}~\\text{c}{{\\text{m}}-3} , respectively, have been measured at around 6000 ppm. The highest selectivity is reached around 1500 ppm, where the OH density is at  ∼63% of its maximum value and is 14 times larger than the O density. The measured density profiles and distance variations are compared to the results of a 2D axially symmetric fluid model of species transport and reaction kinetics in the plasma effluent. It is shown that the main loss of OH radicals in the effluent is their mutual reaction. In the case of O, reactions with other species than OH also have to be considered to explain the density decay in the effluent. The results presented here provide additional information for understanding the plasma-chemical processes in non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasmas. They also open the way to applying μ-APPJ with He/H2O as a selective source of OH radicals.

  7. Non-Invasive Method of Determining Absolute Intracranial Pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yost, William T. (Inventor); Cantrell, John H., Jr. (Inventor); Hargens, Alan E. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A method is presented for determining absolute intracranial pressure (ICP) in a patient. Skull expansion is monitored while changes in ICP are induced. The patient's blood pressure is measured when skull expansion is approximately zero. The measured blood pressure is indicative of a reference ICP value. Subsequently, the method causes a known change in ICP and measured the change in skull expansion associated therewith. The absolute ICP is a function of the reference ICP value, the known change in ICP and its associated change in skull expansion; and a measured change in skull expansion.

  8. An absolute radius scale for Saturn's rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicholson, Philip D.; Cooke, Maren L.; Pelton, Emily

    1990-01-01

    Radio and stellar occultation observations of Saturn's rings made by the Voyager spacecraft are discussed. The data reveal systematic discrepancies of almost 10 km in some parts of the rings, limiting some of the investigations. A revised solution for Saturn's rotation pole has been proposed which removes the discrepancies between the stellar and radio occultation profiles. Corrections to previously published radii vary from -2 to -10 km for the radio occultation, and +5 to -6 km for the stellar occultation. An examination of spiral density waves in the outer A Ring supports that the revised absolute radii are in error by no more than 2 km.

  9. Two methods for absolute calibration of dynamic pressure transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swift, G. W.; Migliori, A.; Garrett, S. L.; Wheatley, J. C.

    1982-12-01

    Two techniques are described for absolute calibration of a dynamic pressure transducer from 0 to 400 Hz in 1-MPa helium gas. One technique is based on a comparison to a mercury manometer; the other is based on the principle of reciprocity. The two techniques agree within the instrumental uncertainties of 1%.

  10. Bio-Inspired Stretchable Absolute Pressure Sensor Network

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yue; Li, Yu-Hung; Guo, Zhiqiang; Kim, Kyunglok; Chang, Fu-Kuo; Wang, Shan X.

    2016-01-01

    A bio-inspired absolute pressure sensor network has been developed. Absolute pressure sensors, distributed on multiple silicon islands, are connected as a network by stretchable polyimide wires. This sensor network, made on a 4’’ wafer, has 77 nodes and can be mounted on various curved surfaces to cover an area up to 0.64 m × 0.64 m, which is 100 times larger than its original size. Due to Micro Electro-Mechanical system (MEMS) surface micromachining technology, ultrathin sensing nodes can be realized with thicknesses of less than 100 µm. Additionally, good linearity and high sensitivity (~14 mV/V/bar) have been achieved. Since the MEMS sensor process has also been well integrated with a flexible polymer substrate process, the entire sensor network can be fabricated in a time-efficient and cost-effective manner. Moreover, an accurate pressure contour can be obtained from the sensor network. Therefore, this absolute pressure sensor network holds significant promise for smart vehicle applications, especially for unmanned aerial vehicles. PMID:26729134

  11. Bio-Inspired Stretchable Absolute Pressure Sensor Network.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yue; Li, Yu-Hung; Guo, Zhiqiang; Kim, Kyunglok; Chang, Fu-Kuo; Wang, Shan X

    2016-01-02

    A bio-inspired absolute pressure sensor network has been developed. Absolute pressure sensors, distributed on multiple silicon islands, are connected as a network by stretchable polyimide wires. This sensor network, made on a 4'' wafer, has 77 nodes and can be mounted on various curved surfaces to cover an area up to 0.64 m × 0.64 m, which is 100 times larger than its original size. Due to Micro Electro-Mechanical system (MEMS) surface micromachining technology, ultrathin sensing nodes can be realized with thicknesses of less than 100 µm. Additionally, good linearity and high sensitivity (~14 mV/V/bar) have been achieved. Since the MEMS sensor process has also been well integrated with a flexible polymer substrate process, the entire sensor network can be fabricated in a time-efficient and cost-effective manner. Moreover, an accurate pressure contour can be obtained from the sensor network. Therefore, this absolute pressure sensor network holds significant promise for smart vehicle applications, especially for unmanned aerial vehicles.

  12. Effects of confining pressure, pore pressure and temperature on absolute permeability. SUPRI TR-27

    SciTech Connect

    Gobran, B.D.; Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Brigham, W.E.

    1981-10-01

    This study investigates absolute permeability of consolidated sandstone and unconsolidated sand cores to distilled water as a function of the confining pressure on the core, the pore pressure of the flowing fluid and the temperature of the system. Since permeability measurements are usually made in the laboratory under conditions very different from those in the reservoir, it is important to know the effect of various parameters on the measured value of permeability. All studies on the effect of confining pressure on absolute permeability have found that when the confining pressure is increased, the permeability is reduced. The studies on the effect of temperature have shown much less consistency. This work contradicts the past Stanford studies by finding no effect of temperature on the absolute permeability of unconsolidated sand or sandstones to distilled water. The probable causes of the past errors are discussed. It has been found that inaccurate measurement of temperature at ambient conditions and non-equilibrium of temperature in the core can lead to a fictitious permeability reduction with temperature increase. The results of this study on the effect of confining pressure and pore pressure support the theory that as confining pressure is increased or pore pressure decreased, the permeability is reduced. The effects of confining pressure and pore pressure changes on absolute permeability are given explicitly so that measurements made under one set of confining pressure/pore pressure conditions in the laboratory can be extrapolated to conditions more representative of the reservoir.

  13. The Electromotive Series and Other Non-Absolute Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peckham, Gavin D.

    1998-01-01

    This article describes an analogy which may be used to illustrate the principles that underlie the establishment of non-absolute scales of measurements that are evaluated relative to a chosen reference point. The analogy is interwoven with the establishment of the electromotive series, but may be extended to other parameters such as the Celsius and Fahrenheit temperature scales, potential energies, formation and reaction enthalpies, etc.

  14. Large-Scale Measurement of Absolute Protein Glycosylation Stoichiometry.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shisheng; Zhang, Hui

    2015-07-07

    Protein glycosylation is one of the most important protein modifications. Glycosylation site occupancy alteration has been implicated in human diseases and cancers. However, current glycoproteomic methods focus on the identification and quantification of glycosylated peptides and glycosylation sites but not glycosylation occupancy or glycoform stoichiometry. Here we describe a method for large-scale determination of the absolute glycosylation stoichiometry using three independent relative ratios. Using this method, we determined 117 absolute N-glycosylation occupancies in OVCAR-3 cells. Finally, we investigated the possible functions and the determinants for partial glycosylation.

  15. Communication: The absolute shielding scales of oxygen and sulfur revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komorovsky, Stanislav; Repisky, Michal; Malkin, Elena; Ruud, Kenneth; Gauss, Jürgen

    2015-03-01

    We present an updated semi-experimental absolute shielding scale for the 17O and 33S nuclei. These new shielding scales are based on accurate rotational microwave data for the spin-rotation constants of H217O [Puzzarini et al., J. Chem. Phys. 131, 234304 (2009)], C17O [Cazzoli et al., Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 4, 3575 (2002)], and H233S [Helgaker et al., J. Chem. Phys. 139, 244308 (2013)] corrected both for vibrational and temperature effects estimated at the CCSD(T) level of theory as well as for the relativistic corrections to the relation between the spin-rotation constant and the absolute shielding constant. Our best estimate for the oxygen shielding constants of H217O is 328.4(3) ppm and for C17O -59.05(59) ppm. The relativistic correction for the sulfur shielding of H233S amounts to 3.3%, and the new sulfur shielding constant for this molecule is 742.9(4.6) ppm.

  16. Communication: The absolute shielding scales of oxygen and sulfur revisited.

    PubMed

    Komorovsky, Stanislav; Repisky, Michal; Malkin, Elena; Ruud, Kenneth; Gauss, Jürgen

    2015-03-07

    We present an updated semi-experimental absolute shielding scale for the (17)O and (33)S nuclei. These new shielding scales are based on accurate rotational microwave data for the spin-rotation constants of H2(17)O [Puzzarini et al., J. Chem. Phys. 131, 234304 (2009)], C(17)O [Cazzoli et al., Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 4, 3575 (2002)], and H2(33)S [Helgaker et al., J. Chem. Phys. 139, 244308 (2013)] corrected both for vibrational and temperature effects estimated at the CCSD(T) level of theory as well as for the relativistic corrections to the relation between the spin-rotation constant and the absolute shielding constant. Our best estimate for the oxygen shielding constants of H2(17)O is 328.4(3) ppm and for C(17)O -59.05(59) ppm. The relativistic correction for the sulfur shielding of H2(33)S amounts to 3.3%, and the new sulfur shielding constant for this molecule is 742.9(4.6) ppm.

  17. Communication: The absolute shielding scales of oxygen and sulfur revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Komorovsky, Stanislav; Repisky, Michal; Malkin, Elena; Ruud, Kenneth; Gauss, Jürgen

    2015-03-07

    We present an updated semi-experimental absolute shielding scale for the {sup 17}O and {sup 33}S nuclei. These new shielding scales are based on accurate rotational microwave data for the spin–rotation constants of H{sub 2}{sup 17}O [Puzzarini et al., J. Chem. Phys. 131, 234304 (2009)], C{sup 17}O [Cazzoli et al., Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 4, 3575 (2002)], and H{sub 2}{sup 33}S [Helgaker et al., J. Chem. Phys. 139, 244308 (2013)] corrected both for vibrational and temperature effects estimated at the CCSD(T) level of theory as well as for the relativistic corrections to the relation between the spin–rotation constant and the absolute shielding constant. Our best estimate for the oxygen shielding constants of H{sub 2}{sup 17}O is 328.4(3) ppm and for C{sup 17}O −59.05(59) ppm. The relativistic correction for the sulfur shielding of H{sub 2}{sup 33}S amounts to 3.3%, and the new sulfur shielding constant for this molecule is 742.9(4.6) ppm.

  18. New apparatus for calibrations in the range of 2 kPa absolute pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, S. Y.; Choi, I. M.

    2005-12-01

    Capacitance diaphragm gauges (CDGs) are precise electromechanical pressure sensors in which the displacement of a stretched thin metal diaphragm is detected by the measurement of a capacitance. These are very accurate gauges, and are frequently used as transfer gauges. To calibrate such accurate low-pressure gauges, precise mercury manometers have been used. However, complexity, concern about mercury vapour, and cost of mercury manometers have made it difficult to use these manometers in many industrial calibration laboratories. As a substitute, gas-operated piston gauges can be used for the calibration of such low-pressure gauges. However, the minimum pressure that is necessary to balance the tare weight, which generally corresponds to a pressure of several kilopascals, is a major obstacle. To reduce this minimum operating pressure, we adopted a variable bell-jar pressure method. To realize this method effectively, we developed a new mass-handling device that makes it possible to add or remove weights up to 200 g easily, with a resolution of 10 g, without breaking the vacuum during the calibration. This calibration system can be used to measure pressures from 100 Pa to 2 kPa in the absolute mode. In this paper, we also present the calibration results for two types of CDGs with full-scale ranges of 1330 Pa and 1000 Pa, respectively.

  19. An absolute scale for measuring the utility of money

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, P. J.

    2010-07-01

    Measurement of the utility of money is essential in the insurance industry, for prioritising public spending schemes and for the evaluation of decisions on protection systems in high-hazard industries. Up to this time, however, there has been no universally agreed measure for the utility of money, with many utility functions being in common use. In this paper, we shall derive a single family of utility functions, which have risk-aversion as the only free parameter. The fact that they return a utility of zero at their low, reference datum, either the utility of no money or of one unit of money, irrespective of the value of risk-aversion used, qualifies them to be regarded as absolute scales for the utility of money. Evidence of validation for the concept will be offered based on inferential measurements of risk-aversion, using diverse measurement data.

  20. On measuring the absolute scale of baryon acoustic oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutherland, Will

    2012-10-01

    The baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) feature in the distribution of galaxies provides a fundamental standard ruler which is widely used to constrain cosmological parameters. In most analyses, the comoving length of the ruler is inferred from a combination of cosmic microwave background (CMB) observations and theory. However, this inferred length may be biased by various non-standard effects in early universe physics; this can lead to biased inferences of cosmological parameters such as H0, Ωm and w, so it would be valuable to measure the absolute BAO length by combining a galaxy redshift survey and a suitable direct low-z distance measurement. One obstacle is that low-redshift BAO surveys mainly constrain the ratio rS/DV(z), where DV is a dilation scale which is not directly observable by standard candles. Here, we find a new approximation DV(z)≃34DL(43z)(1+43z)-1(1-0.02455 z3+0.0105 z4) which connects DV to the standard luminosity distance DL at a somewhat higher redshift; this is shown to be very accurate (relative error <0.2 per cent) for all Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe compatible Friedmann models at z < 0.4, with very weak dependence on cosmological parameters H0, Ωm, Ωk, w. This provides a route to measure the absolute BAO length using only observations at z ≲ 0.3, including Type Ia supernovae, and potentially future H0-free physical distance indicators such as gravitational lenses or gravitational wave standard sirens. This would provide a zero-parameter check of the standard cosmology at 103 ≲ z ≲ 105, and can constrain the number of relativistic species Neff with fewer degeneracies than the CMB.

  1. Leak rate estimation of a resistive plate chamber gap by monitoring absolute pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, S.; Datar, V. M.; Kalmani, S. D.; Majumder, G.; Mondal, N. K.; Satyanarayana, B.

    2016-11-01

    The differential pressure of a conventional manometer is highly dependent on the atmospheric pressure. The measurements with a manometer for an extended time period show a large variation due to solar atmospheric tides. However, the measurements of absolute pressure, both outside and inside of a resistive plate chamber (RPC), are independent of each other. By monitoring the absolute pressures, both outside and inside of a RPC, along with the temperature, its leakage rate can be estimated. During the test period, the supporting button spacers inside a RPC may get detached due to some manufacturing defect. This effect can be detected clearly by observing the sudden fall of pressure inside the chamber.

  2. Strong thermal leptogenesis and the absolute neutrino mass scale

    SciTech Connect

    Bari, Pasquale Di; King, Sophie E.; Fiorentin, Michele Re E-mail: sk1806@soton.ac.uk

    2014-03-01

    We show that successful strong thermal leptogenesis, where the final asymmetry is independent of the initial conditions and in particular a large pre-existing asymmetry is efficiently washed-out, favours values of the lightest neutrino mass m{sub 1}∼>10 meV for normal ordering (NO) and m{sub 1}∼>3 meV for inverted ordering (IO) for models with orthogonal matrix entries respecting |Ω{sub ij}{sup 2}|∼<2. We show analytically why lower values of m{sub 1} require a higher level of fine tuning in the seesaw formula and/or in the flavoured decay parameters (in the electronic for NO, in the muonic for IO). We also show how this constraint exists thanks to the measured values of the neutrino mixing angles and could be tightened by a future determination of the Dirac phase. Our analysis also allows us to place a more stringent constraint for a specific model or class of models, such as SO(10)-inspired models, and shows that some models cannot realise strong thermal leptogenesis for any value of m{sub 1}. A scatter plot analysis fully supports the analytical results. We also briefly discuss the interplay with absolute neutrino mass scale experiments concluding that they will be able in the coming years to either corner strong thermal leptogenesis or find positive signals pointing to a non-vanishing m{sub 1}. Since the constraint is much stronger for NO than for IO, it is very important that new data from planned neutrino oscillation experiments will be able to solve the ambiguity.

  3. Scaling of pressurized fluidized beds

    SciTech Connect

    Guralnik, S.; Glicksman, L.R.

    1994-10-01

    The project has two primary objectives. The first is to verify a set of hydrodynamic scaling relationships for commercial pressurized fluidized bed combustors (PFBC). The second objective is to investigate solids mixing in pressurized bubbling fluidized beds. American Electric Power`s (AEP) Tidd combined-cycle demonstration plant will provide time-varying pressure drop data to serve as the basis for the scaling verification. The verification will involve demonstrating that a properly scaled cold model and the Tidd PFBC exhibit hydrodynamically similar behavior. An important issue in PFBC design is the spacing of fuel feed ports. The feed spacing is dictated by the fuel distribution and the mixing characteristics within the bed. After completing the scaling verification, the cold model will be used to study the characteristics of PFBCs. A thermal tracer technique will be utilized to study mixing both near the fuel feed region and in the far field. The results allow the coal feed and distributor to be designed for optimal heating.

  4. Fabrication of capacitive absolute pressure sensors by thin film vacuum encapsulation on SOI substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belsito, Luca; Mancarella, Fulvio; Roncaglia, Alberto

    2016-09-01

    The paper reports on the fabrication and characterization of absolute capacitive pressure sensors fabricated by polysilicon low-pressure chemical vapour deposition vacuum packaging on silicon-on-insulator substrates. The fabrication process proposed is carried out at wafer level and allows obtaining a large number of miniaturized sensors per substrate on 1  ×  2 mm2 chips with high yield. The sensors present average pressure sensitivity of 8.3 pF/bar and average pressure resolution limit of 0.24 mbar within the measurement range 200-1200 mbar. The temperature drift of the sensor prototypes was also measured in the temperature range 25-45 °C, yielding an average temperature sensitivity of 67 fF K-1 at ambient pressure.

  5. Absolute pressure dependence of the second ionization level of EL2 in GaAs

    SciTech Connect

    Bliss, D.E.; Nolte, D.D.; Walukiewicz, W.; Haller, E.E. Department of Materials Science and Mineral Engineering, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94720 ); Lagowski, J. )

    1990-03-19

    We report the results of deep level transient spectroscopy experiments with the second ionization level of the double donor defect (EL2) under uniaxial stress in {ital p}-type GaAs. We measure the shift in the hole emission rate as a function of stress applied in the (100) and (110) directions. By modeling the valence band with two independently displacing bands and appropriately derived effective masses, we determine the absolute hydrostatic pressure derivative of the defect to be 39{plus minus}15 meV GPa{sup {minus}1}. The shear contribution is negligible. These results are very different from those obtained for the first ionization level, which has a much higher absolute pressure derivative of 90 meV GPa{sup {minus}1}.

  6. Absolute pressure derivatives of deep level defects in III-V semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Nolte, D.D.; Walukiewicz, W.; Haller, E.E.

    1987-11-01

    Based on transition metal reference levels, we present absolute pressure derivatives for band-edges in GaAs and InP and defects in GaAs. The defect deformation potentials are directly related to the electron-lattice coupling which drives lattice relaxation around the defects. We find an exceedingly large inward lattice relaxation of the EL2 defect in GaAs upon electron emission. 12 refs., 1 fig.

  7. Absolute pressure dependence of the second ionization level of EL2 in GaAs

    SciTech Connect

    Bliss, D.E.; Walukiewicz, W.; Nolte, D.D.; Haller, E.E.

    1989-11-01

    We report the results of DLTS experiments under uniaxial stress on the second ionization level of EL2(++/+) in p-type GaAs. We measured the shift in the hole emission rate as a function of stress applied in the (100) and (110) directions. By modeling the valence band with two independently displacing bands and appropriately derived effective masses, we obtain a small absolute hydrostatic pressure derivative for the defect, 39 {plus minus} 15 MeV GPa{sup {minus}1}. The shear contribution is negligible. This result is very different than for the first ionization level, EL2(+/o) with a emission energy pressure derivative of 90 {plus minus} 15 MeV GPa{sup {minus}1}. The difference can be accounted for by the pressure dependence of the electron capture barrier of EL2(+/o), 49 {plus minus} 15 MeV GPa{sup {minus}1}. The absolute pressure derivatives of the two levels are then comparable and in good agreement with simple theory for Ga site point defects. 20 refs., 2 figs.

  8. The assessment of protective behavioral strategies: comparing the absolute frequency and contingent frequency response scales.

    PubMed

    Kite, Benjamin A; Pearson, Matthew R; Henson, James M

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of the present studies was to examine the effects of response scale on the observed relationships between protective behavioral strategies (PBS) measures and alcohol-related outcomes. We reasoned that an "absolute frequency" scale (stem: "how many times …"; response scale: 0 times to 11+ times) conflates the frequency of using PBS with the frequency of consuming alcohol; thus, we hypothesized that the use of an absolute frequency response scale would result in positive relationships between types of PBS and alcohol-related outcomes. Alternatively, a "contingent frequency" scale (stem: "When drinking … how often …"; response scale: never to always) does not conflate frequency of alcohol use with use of PBS; therefore, we hypothesized that use of a contingent frequency scale would result in negative relationships between use of PBS and alcohol-related outcomes. Two published measures of PBS were used across studies: the Protective Behavioral Strategies Survey (PBSS) and the Strategy Questionnaire (SQ). Across three studies, we demonstrate that when measured using a contingent frequency response scale, PBS measures relate negatively to alcohol-related outcomes in a theoretically consistent manner; however, when PBS measures were measured on an absolute frequency response scale, they were nonsignificantly or positively related to alcohol-related outcomes. We discuss the implications of these findings for the assessment of PBS.

  9. Three-dimensional convective and absolute instabilities in pressure-driven two-layer channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahu, Kirti; Matar, Omar

    2011-11-01

    A generalized linear stability analysis of three-dimensional disturbance in a pressure-driven two-layer channel flow, focusing on the range of parameters for which Squire's theorem does not exist is considered. Three-dimensional linear stability equations, in which both the spatial wavenumber and temporal frequency are complex, are derived and solved using an efficient spectral collocation method. A Briggs-type analysis is then carried out to delineate the boundaries between convective and absolute instabilities in m-Re space. We find that although three-dimensional disturbances are temporally more unstable than the two-dimensional disturbances, absolute modes of instability are most unstable for two-dimensional disturbances. An energy ``budget'' analysis also shows that the most dangerous modes are ``interfacial'' ones.

  10. A technique for measuring absolute toe pressures: evaluation of pressure-sensitive film techniques.

    PubMed

    Tuckman, A S; Werner, F W; Fortino, M D; Spadaro, J A

    1992-05-01

    Although a number of pathologies of the forefoot in ballet dancers on pointe have been described, pressures and deforming forces have not been adequately measured. To evaluate the possible use of pressure-sensitive film (PSF) in measuring the pressures on the external soft tissues in such a confined space as the dancer's toe shoe, it was tested and calibrated with 20 cadaver toes. Each cadaver toe was internally stabilized and loaded longitudinally against PSF on a flat surface. The resultant films were analyzed with a video imaging system and the pressures and total forces were determined. Results showed that the linearity of the PSF to pressure had a regression value of 0.98. By using two sensitivity ranges of films, the total force measured by the PSF was found to be within 10% of the known applied force on each toe. The PSF, therefore, may very well be a useful and accurate method of measuring external soft tissue pressures on the forefoot.

  11. Kelvin Absolute Temperature Scale Identified as Length Scale and Related to de Broglie Thermal Wavelength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohrab, Siavash

    Thermodynamic equilibrium between matter and radiation leads to de Broglie wavelength λdβ = h /mβvrβ and frequency νdβ = k /mβvrβ of matter waves and stochastic definitions of Planck h =hk =mk <λrk > c and Boltzmann k =kk =mk <νrk > c constants, λrkνrk = c , that respectively relate to spatial (λ) and temporal (ν) aspects of vacuum fluctuations. Photon massmk =√{ hk /c3 } , amu =√{ hkc } = 1 /No , and universal gas constant Ro =No k =√{ k / hc } result in internal Uk = Nhνrk = Nmkc2 = 3 Nmkvmpk2 = 3 NkT and potential pV = uN\\vcirc / 3 = N\\ucirc / 3 = NkT energy of photon gas in Casimir vacuum such that H = TS = 4 NkT . Therefore, Kelvin absolute thermodynamic temperature scale [degree K] is identified as length scale [meter] and related to most probable wavelength and de Broglie thermal wavelength as Tβ =λmpβ =λdβ / 3 . Parallel to Wien displacement law obtained from Planck distribution, the displacement law λwS T =c2 /√{ 3} is obtained from Maxwell -Boltzmann distribution of speed of ``photon clusters''. The propagation speeds of sound waves in ideal gas versus light waves in photon gas are described in terms of vrβ in harmony with perceptions of Huygens. Newton formula for speed of long waves in canals √{ p / ρ } is modified to √{ gh } =√{ γp / ρ } in accordance with adiabatic theory of Laplace.

  12. Absolute and Relative Reliability of Percentage of Syllables Stuttered and Severity Rating Scales

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karimi, Hamid; O'Brian, Sue; Onslow, Mark; Jones, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Percentage of syllables stuttered (%SS) and severity rating (SR) scales are measures in common use to quantify stuttering severity and its changes during basic and clinical research conditions. However, their reliability has not been assessed with indices measuring both relative and absolute reliability. This study was designed to provide…

  13. Global-Scale Location and Distance Estimates: Common Representations and Strategies in Absolute and Relative Judgments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedman, Alinda; Montello, Daniel R.

    2006-01-01

    The authors examined whether absolute and relative judgments about global-scale locations and distances were generated from common representations. At the end of a 10-week class on the regional geography of the United States, participants estimated the latitudes of 16 North American cities and all possible pairwise distances between them. Although…

  14. Energy dispersive X-ray analysis on an absolute scale in scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Z; D'Alfonso, A J; Weyland, M; Taplin, D J; Allen, L J; Findlay, S D

    2015-10-01

    We demonstrate absolute scale agreement between the number of X-ray counts in energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy using an atomic-scale coherent electron probe and first-principles simulations. Scan-averaged spectra were collected across a range of thicknesses with precisely determined and controlled microscope parameters. Ionization cross-sections were calculated using the quantum excitation of phonons model, incorporating dynamical (multiple) electron scattering, which is seen to be important even for very thin specimens.

  15. The possibility of constructing the hydrogen scale of the absolute atomic masses of the elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuz'min, I. I.

    2009-12-01

    The paper presents a scheme for the experimental-empirical construction of the existing chemical, physical, and carbon scales of the relative nonintegral atomic masses of the elements. The quantitative interrelation between the nonintegral relative atomic masses, their minimized fractional positive and negative natural deviations from integral numbers, and their integral parts are reproduced mathematically. Nonisotopic fractional deviations are shown to be a consequence of methodological side effects of the scheme for theoretical processing of the data of thorough physical and chemical measurements performed by Stas and Aston in constructing scales of relative atomic masses. In conformity with the Prout hypothesis, the absolute atomic mass unit and the corresponding Avogadro’s number value are suggested for the construction of the hydrogen scale of absolute atomic masses of nonisotopic elements, individual isotopes, and isotope-containing elements.

  16. The relative and absolute reliability of center of pressure trajectory during gait initiation in older adults.

    PubMed

    Khanmohammadi, Roya; Talebian, Saeed; Hadian, Mohammad Reza; Olyaei, Gholamreza; Bagheri, Hossein

    2017-02-01

    It has been thought that for scientific acceptance of a parameter, its psychometric properties such as reliability, validity and responsiveness have critical roles. Therefore, this study was conducted to estimate how many trials are required to obtain a reliable center of pressure (COP) parameter during gait initiation (GI) and to investigate the effect of number of trials on the relative and absolute reliability. Twenty older adults participated in the study. Subjects began stepping over the force platform in response to an auditory stimulus. Ten trials were collected in one session. The displacement, velocity, mean and median frequency of the COP in the mediolateral (ML) and anteroposterior (AP) directions were evaluated. Relative reliability was determined using the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), and absolute reliability was evaluated using the standard error of measurement (SEM) and minimal detectable change (MDC95). The results revealed with respect to parameter, one to five trials should be averaged to ensure excellent reliability. Moreover, ICC, SEM% and MDC95% values were between 0.39-0.89, 4.84-41.5% and 13.4-115% for single trial and 0.86-0.99, 1.74-19.7% and 4.83-54.7% for ten trials averaged, respectively. Moreover, the ML and AP COP displacement in locomotor phase had the most relative reliability as well as the ML and AP median frequency in locomotor phase had the most absolute reliability. In general, the results showed that the COP-related parameters in time and frequency domains, based on average of five trials, provide reliable outcome measures for evaluation of dynamic postural control in older adults.

  17. Measurements of absolute radical densities in atmospheric pressure plasmas with complex gas mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connell, Deborah

    2015-05-01

    Low temperature plasmas are emerging as an exciting development for therapeutics. Non-equilibrium plasmas, operated at ambient atmospheric pressure and temperature, are very efficient sources for highly reactive neutral particles, including reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS), which are known to play a crucial role in biological systems and existing therapeutics. Transport of these plasma components to the target is complex. In order to understand the chemical kinetics and plasma-liquid-biological interaction mechanisms measurements of the relevant RONS are key. Under atmospheric pressure these are challenging, primarily due to the multi-phase and highly collisional environment, requiring extremely high temporal (picosecond to nanosecond) and spatial (microns) resolution. Absolute measurements of radical densities (including O and OH) using picosecond two-photon absorption laser induced fluorescence (ps-TALIF), UV and high-resolution synchrotron VUV absorption spectroscopy will be presented. Fluorescence lifetime measurements of the laser-excited radicals are possible with picosecond resolution and this provides us with information about collisional quenching partners and thus collision kinetics with the surrounding environment. The authors acknowledge support by the UK EPSRC EP/H003797 and EP/K018388.

  18. The 2ν{sub 3} Raman overtone of sulfur hexafluoride: Absolute spectra, pressure effects, and polarizability properties

    SciTech Connect

    Chrysos, M. Rachet, F.; Kremer, D.

    2014-03-28

    Of the six normal vibrations of SF{sub 6}, ν{sub 3} has a key role in the mechanisms of radiative forcing. This vibration, though inactive in Raman, shows up through the transition 2ν{sub 3} allowing for a complementary view on the asymmetric stretch of the molecule. Here, we look back into this topic, which has already caught some interest in the past but with some points been left out. We make a systematic incoherent-light-scattering analysis of the overtone with the use of different gas pressures and polarization orientations for the incident beam. Absolute-scale isotropic and anisotropic spectra are reported along with natural and pressure-induced widths and shifts, and other spectral features such as the peaks corresponding to the (experimentally indistinguishable) interfering channels E{sub g} and F{sub 2g} hitherto seen solely as two-photon IR-absorption features. We make the first-ever prediction of the SF{sub 6} polarizability second derivative with respect to the ν{sub 3}-mode coordinate and we develop a heuristic argument to explain why the superposition of the three degenerate stretching motions that are related to the ν{sub 3} mode cannot but generate a polarized Raman band.

  19. Absolute Calibration of the Radio Astronomy Flux Density Scale at 22 to 43 GHz Using Planck

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Partridge, B.; López-Caniego, M.; Perley, R. A.; Stevens, J.; Butler, B. J.; Rocha, G.; Walter, B.; Zacchei, A.

    2016-04-01

    The Planck mission detected thousands of extragalactic radio sources at frequencies from 28 to 857 GHz. Planck's calibration is absolute (in the sense that it is based on the satellite’s annual motion around the Sun and the temperature of the cosmic microwave background), and its beams are well characterized at sub-percent levels. Thus, Planck's flux density measurements of compact sources are absolute in the same sense. We have made coordinated Very Large Array (VLA) and Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) observations of 65 strong, unresolved Planck sources in order to transfer Planck's calibration to ground-based instruments at 22, 28, and 43 GHz. The results are compared to microwave flux density scales currently based on planetary observations. Despite the scatter introduced by the variability of many of the sources, the flux density scales are determined to 1%-2% accuracy. At 28 GHz, the flux density scale used by the VLA runs 2%-3% ± 1.0% below Planck values with an uncertainty of +/- 1.0%; at 43 GHz, the discrepancy increases to 5%-6% ± 1.4% for both ATCA and the VLA.

  20. New low-cost dimensionally stable composite linear absolute position encoder scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassler, William L., Jr.; Nakayama, Robert K.

    1990-11-01

    A major problem in the use of standard linear position encoders is that the etched glass scales they use have a coefficient of thermal expansion (C. T. E. ) of about 1 1 . Oppm/ C. This means that their position measurements drift with changes in environmental temperature proportional to their C. T. E. . A new low cost dimensionally stable composite scale was made for use in a new absolute linear position encoder. The unidirectional Polyphenylene Sulfide/AS4 carbon fiber composite material that this scale is made of was tested for dimensional stability with respect to changes in temperature humidity and creep. The C. T. E. of the scale material was measured to be nominally 0. 29 ppm/ C with a standard deviation of 0. 12 over the operating temperature range of -2 to 62 C. The overall displacement strain due to 98 moisture absorption relative to 0 moisture absorption was measured to be 9 ppm. The strain due to stress-relief creep was found to be a maximum of 3 ppm over a period of 173 days. These results show that a linear position encoder scale made of this material is superior to those made of the standard glass currently being used and more cost effective than fused silica for most applications. 1.

  1. COMPARISON OF VENTED AND ABSOLUTE PRESSURE TRANSDUCERS FOR WATER-LEVEL MONITORING IN HANFORD SITE CENTRAL PLATEAU WELLS

    SciTech Connect

    MCDONALD JP

    2011-09-08

    Automated water-level data collected using vented pressure transducers deployed in Hanford Site Central Plateau wells commonly display more variability than manual tape measurements in response to barometric pressure fluctuations. To explain this difference, it was hypothesized that vented pressure transducers installed in some wells are subject to barometric pressure effects that reduce water-level measurement accuracy. Vented pressure transducers use a vent tube, which is open to the atmosphere at land surface, to supply air pressure to the transducer housing for barometric compensation so the transducer measurements will represent only the water pressure. When using vented transducers, the assumption is made that the air pressure between land surface and the well bore is in equilibrium. By comparison, absolute pressure transducers directly measure the air pressure within the wellbore. Barometric compensation is achieved by subtracting the well bore air pressure measurement from the total pressure measured by a second transducer submerged in the water. Thus, no assumption of air pressure equilibrium is needed. In this study, water-level measurements were collected from the same Central Plateau wells using both vented and absolute pressure transducers to evaluate the different methods of barometric compensation. Manual tape measurements were also collected to evaluate the transducers. Measurements collected during this study demonstrated that the vented pressure transducers over-responded to barometric pressure fluctuations due to a pressure disequilibrium between the air within the wellbores and the atmosphere at land surface. The disequilibrium is thought to be caused by the relatively long time required for barometric pressure changes to equilibrate between land surface and the deep vadose zone and may be exacerbated by the restriction of air flow between the well bore and the atmosphere due to the presence of sample pump landing plates and well caps. The

  2. A self-consistent, absolute isochronal age scale for young moving groups in the solar neighbourhood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Cameron P. M.; Mamajek, Eric E.; Naylor, Tim

    2015-11-01

    We present a self-consistent, absolute isochronal age scale for young ( ≲ 200 Myr), nearby ( ≲ 100 pc) moving groups in the solar neighbourhood based on homogeneous fitting of semi-empirical pre-main-sequence model isochrones using the τ2 maximum-likelihood fitting statistic of Naylor & Jeffries in the MV, V - J colour-magnitude diagram. The final adopted ages for the groups are as follows: 149^{+51}_{-19} {Myr} for the AB Dor moving group, 24 ± 3 Myr for the β Pic moving group (BPMG), 45^{+11}_{-7} {Myr} for the Carina association, 42^{+6}_{-4} {Myr} for the Columba association, 11 ± 3 Myr for the η Cha cluster, 45 ± 4 Myr for the Tucana-Horologium moving group (Tuc-Hor), 10 ± 3 Myr for the TW Hya association and 22^{+4}_{-3} {Myr} for the 32 Ori group. At this stage we are uncomfortable assigning a final, unambiguous age to the Argus association as our membership list for the association appears to suffer from a high level of contamination, and therefore it remains unclear whether these stars represent a single population of coeval stars. Our isochronal ages for both the BPMG and Tuc-Hor are consistent with recent lithium depletion boundary (LDB) ages, which unlike isochronal ages, are relatively insensitive to the choice of low-mass evolutionary models. This consistency between the isochronal and LDB ages instils confidence that our self-consistent, absolute age scale for young, nearby moving groups is robust, and hence we suggest that these ages be adopted for future studies of these groups. Software implementing the methods described in this study is available from http://www.astro.ex.ac.uk/people/timn/tau-squared/.

  3. Pressure Drops Due to Silica Scaling

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, K.L.; Freeston, D.H.; Dimas, Z.O.; Slatter, A.

    1995-01-01

    Experience with reinjection returns in many geothermal fields has prompted a move towards injecting waste fluids at some distance from the production field. This means that often, reinjection pipelines cover very long distances. If the waste water in the pipelines is supersaturated with respect to amorphous silica, then the deposition of silica in these pipelines is almost certain. Although the deposit may be of negligible thickness, the inner surface characteristics of the pipe will be different to those of clean mild steel. During a silica scaling experiment. geothermal brine was passed through a series of pipes of different sizes and over a period of three weeks, silica scale formed on the inner surface. The pressure drop along a distance of approximately 5m was measured by a water manometer in all test pipe sections. Significant pressure drop was observed during this time and can be correlated with the increase in the friction factor of the pipe walls due to silica scaling.

  4. Pressure dependence of the absolute rate constant for the reaction OH + C2H2 from 228 to 413 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michael, J. V.; Nava, D. F.; Payne, W. A.; Stief, L. J.; Borkowski, R. P.

    1980-01-01

    The pressure dependence of the absolute rate constant for the reaction of the hydroxyl radical with acetylene, important in both atmospheric and combustion chemistry, is determined for temperatures between 228 and 413 K. The flash photolysis-resonance fluorescence technique was employed at five temperatures over wide ranges of pressure and acetylene concentrations, with the OH produced by water photolysis and hydroxyl resonance fluorescent photons measured by multiscaling techniques. Results indicate that, except at the lowest temperature, the bimolecular rate constant for the reaction depends strongly on total pressure, with the pressure effect becoming more pronounced with increasing temperature. At limiting high pressures, the rate constant is found to be equal to 6.83 + or - 1.19 x 10 to the -12th exp (-646 + or - 47/T) cu cm/molecule per sec, where T is the temperature. Results thus demonstrate the importance of environmental conditions in theoretical studies of atmospheric and combustion product compositions

  5. A Concurrent Mixed Methods Approach to Examining the Quantitative and Qualitative Meaningfulness of Absolute Magnitude Estimation Scales in Survey Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koskey, Kristin L. K.; Stewart, Victoria C.

    2014-01-01

    This small "n" observational study used a concurrent mixed methods approach to address a void in the literature with regard to the qualitative meaningfulness of the data yielded by absolute magnitude estimation scaling (MES) used to rate subjective stimuli. We investigated whether respondents' scales progressed from less to more and…

  6. Length measurement in absolute scale via low-dispersion optical cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pravdova, Lenka; Lesundak, Adam; Smid, Radek; Hrabina, Jan; Rerucha, Simon; Cip, Ondrej

    2016-12-01

    We report on the length measuring instrument with the absolute scale that was based on the combination of an optical frequency comb and a passive optical cavity. The time spacing of short femtosecond pulses, generated by the optical frequency comb, is optically phase locked onto the cavity free spectral range with a derivative spectroscopy technique so that the value of the repetition frequency of the femtosecond laser is tied to and determines the measured displacement. The instantaneous value of the femtosecond pulse train frequency is counted by a frequency counter. This counted value corresponds to the length given by the spacing between the two mirrors of the passive cavity. The phase lock between the femtosecond pulsed beam and the passive cavity is possible due to the low-dispersion of the cavity mirrors, where the silver coating on the mirrors was used to provide the low dispersion for the broadband radiation of the comb. Every reflection on the output mirror feeds a portion of the beam back to the cavity so that the output beam is a result of multiple interfering components. The parameters of the output beam are given not only by the parameters of the mirrors but mainly by the absolute distance between the mirror surfaces. Thus, one cavity mirror can be considered as the reference starting point of the distance to be measured and the other mirror is the measuring probe surveying the unknown distance. The measuring mirror of the experimental setup of the low-dispersion cavity is mounted on a piezoelectric actuator which provides small changes in the cavity length we used to test the length measurement method. For the verification of the measurement accuracy a reference incremental interferometer was integrated into our system so that the displacement of the piezoelectric actuator could be obtained with both measuring methods simultaneously.

  7. The protoelectric potential map (PPM): an absolute two-dimensional chemical potential scale for a global understanding of chemistry.

    PubMed

    Radtke, Valentin; Himmel, Daniel; Pütz, Katharina; Goll, Sascha K; Krossing, Ingo

    2014-04-07

    We introduce the protoelectric potential map (PPM) as a novel, two-dimensional plot of the absolute reduction potential (peabs scale) combined with the absolute protochemical potential (Brønsted acidity: pHabs scale). The validity of this thermodynamically derived PPM is solvent-independent due to the scale zero points, which were chosen as the ideal electron gas and the ideal proton gas at standard conditions. To tie a chemical environment to these reference states, the standard Gibbs energies for the transfer of the gaseous electrons/protons to the medium are needed as anchor points. Thereby, the thermodynamics of any redox, acid-base or combined system in any medium can be related to any other, resulting in a predictability of reactions even over different media or phase boundaries. Instruction is given on how to construct the PPM from the anchor points derived and tabulated with this work. Since efforts to establish "absolute" reduction potential scales and also "absolute" pH scales already exist, a short review in this field is given and brought into relation to the PPM. Some comments on the electrochemical validation and realization conclude this concept article.

  8. In-Flight Measurement of the Absolute Energy Scale of the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Allafort, A.; Atwood, W.B.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Berenji, B.; Bloom, E.D.; Bonamente, E.; Borgland, A.W.; Bouvier, A.; Bregeon, J.; Brez, A.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Buson, S.; /more authors..

    2012-09-20

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT) on-board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope is a pair-conversion telescope designed to survey the gamma-ray sky from 20 MeV to several hundreds of GeV. In this energy band there are no astronomical sources with sufficiently well known and sharp spectral features to allow an absolute calibration of the LAT energy scale. However, the geomagnetic cutoff in the cosmic ray electron-plus-positron (CRE) spectrum in low Earth orbit does provide such a spectral feature. The energy and spectral shape of this cutoff can be calculated with the aid of a numerical code tracing charged particles in the Earth's magnetic field. By comparing the cutoff value with that measured by the LAT in different geomagnetic positions, we have obtained several calibration points between {approx}6 and {approx}13 GeV with an estimated uncertainty of {approx}2%. An energy calibration with such high accuracy reduces the systematic uncertainty in LAT measurements of, for example, the spectral cutoff in the emission from gamma ray pulsars.

  9. In-Flight Measurement of the Absolute Energy Scale of the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Allafort, A.; Atwood, W. B.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Barbielini, G; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Berenji, B,; Bloom, E. D.; Bonamente, E.; Borgland, A. W.; Bouvier, A.; Bregeon, J.; Brez, A.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Gehrels, N.; Hays, E.; McEnery, J. E.; Thompson, D. J.; Troja, E. J.

    2012-01-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT) on-board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope is a pair-conversion telescope designed to survey the gamma-ray sky from 20 MeV to several hundreds of GeV. In this energy band there are no astronomical sources with sufficiently well known and sharp spectral features to allow an absolute calibration of the LAT energy scale. However, the geomagnetic cutoff in the cosmic ray electron- plus-positron (CRE) spectrum in low Earth orbit does provide such a spectral feature. The energy and spectral shape of this cutoff can be calculated with the aid of a numerical code tracing charged particles in the Earth's magnetic field. By comparing the cutoff value with that measured by the LAT in different geomagnetic positions, we have obtained several calibration points between approx. 6 and approx. 13 GeV with an estimated uncertainty of approx. 2%. An energy calibration with such high accuracy reduces the systematic uncertainty in LAT measurements of, for example, the spectral cutoff in the emission from gamma ray pulsars.

  10. NMR absolute shielding scale and nuclear magnetic dipole moment of (207)Pb.

    PubMed

    Adrjan, Bożena; Makulski, Włodzimierz; Jackowski, Karol; Demissie, Taye B; Ruud, Kenneth; Antušek, Andrej; Jaszuński, Michał

    2016-06-28

    An absolute shielding scale is proposed for (207)Pb nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. It is based on ab initio calculations performed on an isolated tetramethyllead Pb(CH3)4 molecule and the assignment of the experimental resonance frequency from the gas-phase NMR spectra of Pb(CH3)4, extrapolated to zero density of the buffer gas to obtain the result for an isolated molecule. The computed (207)Pb shielding constant is 10 790 ppm for the isolated molecule, leading to a shielding of 10799.7 ppm for liquid Pb(CH3)4 which is the accepted reference standard for (207)Pb NMR spectra. The new experimental and theoretical data are used to determine μ((207)Pb), the nuclear magnetic dipole moment of (207)Pb, by applying the standard relationship between NMR frequencies, shielding constants and nuclear moments of two nuclei in the same external magnetic field. Using the gas-phase (207)Pb and (reference) proton results and the theoretical value of the Pb shielding in Pb(CH3)4, we find μ((207)Pb) = 0.59064 μN. The analysis of new experimental and theoretical data obtained for the Pb(2+) ion in water solutions provides similar values of μ((207)Pb), in the range of 0.59000-0.59131 μN.

  11. Effect of static pressure on absolute paleointensity recording with implications for meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volk, Michael W. R.; Gilder, Stuart A.

    2016-08-01

    We investigated the influence of hydrostatic and nonhydrostatic stress on the recording process of magnetic field intensity with particular relevance for meteorites that experienced pressures lower than 5 GPa corresponding to the lowest shock stage classification (S1) in meteorites. Thermal remanent magnetizations were imparted on natural obsidian samples containing pseudo-single domain titanomagnetite, analogous to some achondritic meteorites. Thellier-type paleointensity experiments were carried out at ambient conditions after pressure cycling to 0.6, 1.2, and 1.8 GPa. Each experiment used 10 samples to assess reproducibility, which is better than ±5%. The recorded paleointensity decreased 10%/GPa under hydrostatic stress and 20%/GPa under nonhydrostatic stress, leading to the fundamental conclusion that paleointensity results from meteorites may be appreciably underestimated. Pressure cycling shifts the blocking and unblocking spectra, thereby producing more linear slopes on an Arai diagram with increasing strain. We explain why, for samples with a single magnetization component that does not alter, a two-step paleointensity protocol sufficiently resolves the true paleointensity. Moreover, we propose that pressure cycling of pseudo-single domain bearing samples will remove the inherent curvature of the Arai slope, thereby allowing one to obtain a more accurate estimate of the true paleointensity. This likely also holds true for samples possessing multidomain grains. Conversely, linear trends on Arai plots in meteorites might have their origin in a pressure effect that does not necessarily reflect the ubiquitous presence of single domain particles.

  12. Pressure dependence of the absolute rate constant for the reaction OH + C2H2 from 228 to 413K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michael, J. V.; Nava, D. F.; Borokowski, R. P.; Payne, W. A.; Stief, L. J.

    1980-01-01

    The pressure dependence of absolute rate constants for the reaction of OH + C2H2 yields products has been examined at five temperatures ranging from 228 to 413 K. The experimental techniques which was used is flash photolysis-resonance fluoresence. OH was produced by water photolysis and hydroxyl resonance fluorescent photons were measured by multiscaling techniques. The results indicate that the low pressure bimolecular rate constant is 4 x 10 the the minus 13th power cu cm molecule (-1) s(-1) over the temperature range studied. A substantial increase in the bimolecular rate constant with an increase in pressure was observed at all temperatures except 228 K. This indicates the importance of initial adduct formation and subsequent stablization. The high pressure results are well represented by the Arrhenius expression (k sub bi) sub infinity = (6.83 + or - 1.19) x 10 to the minus 12th power exp(-646 + or - 47/T)cu cm molecule (-1) s(-1). The results are compared to previous investigated and are theoretically discussed. The implications of these results on modeling of terrestrial and planetary atmospheres and also in combustion chemistry are discussed.

  13. Temperature and pressure dependence of the absolute rate constant for the reactions of NH2 radicals with acetylene and ethylene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bosco, S. R.; Nava, D. F.; Brobst, W. D.; Stief, L. J.

    1984-01-01

    The absolute rate constants for the reaction between the NH2 free radical and acetylene and ethylene is measured experimentally using a flash photolysis technique. The constant is considered to be a function of temperature and pressure. At each temperature level of the experiment, the observed pseudo-first-order rate constants were assumed to be independent of flash intensity. The results of the experiment indicate that the bimolecular rate constant for the NH2 + C2H2 reaction increases with pressure at 373 K and 459 K but not at lower temperatures. Results near the pressure limit conform to an Arrhenius expression of 1.11 (+ or -) 0.36 x 10 to the -13th over the temperature range from 241 to 459 K. For the reaction NH2 + C2H4, a smaller rate of increase in the bimolecular rate constant was observed over the temperature range 250-465 K. The implications of these results for current theoretical models of NH2 + C2H2 (or H4) reactions in the atmospheres of Jupiter and Saturn are discussed.

  14. Investigation of Absolute and Relative Scaling Conceptions of Students in Introductory College Chemistry Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerlach, Karrie; Trate, Jaclyn; Blecking, Anja; Geissinger, Peter; Murphy, Kristen

    2014-01-01

    Scale as a theme in science instruction is not a new idea. As early as the mid-1980s, scale was identified as an important component of a student's overall science literacy. However, the study of scale and the scale literacy of students in varying levels of education have received less attention than other science-literacy components. Foremost…

  15. A Technique to Measure Energy Partitioning and Absolute Gas Pressures of Strombolian Explosions Using Doppler Radar at Erebus Volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerst, A.; Hort, M.; Kyle, P. R.; Voege, M.

    2008-12-01

    In 2005/06 we deployed three 24GHz (K-Band) continuous wave Doppler radar instruments at the crater rim of Erebus volcano in Antarctica. At the time there was a ~40 m wide, ~1000°C hot convecting phonolite lava lake, which was the source of ~0-6 Strombolian gas bubble explosions per day. We measured the velocities of ~50 explosions using a sample rate of 1-15 Hz. Data were downloaded in real-time through a wireless network. The measurements provide new insights into the still largely unknown mechanism of Strombolian eruptions, and help improve existing eruption models. We present a technique for a quasi in-situ measurement of the absolute pressure inside an eruption gas bubble. Pressures were derived using a simple eruption model and measured high resolution bubble surface velocities during explosions. Additionally, this technique allows us to present a comprehensive energy budget of a volcanic explosion as a time series of all important energy terms (i.e. potential, kinetic, dissipative, infrasonic, surface, seismic and thermal energy output). The absolute gas pressure inside rising expanding gas bubbles rapidly drops from ~3-10 atm (at the time when the lake starts to bulge) to ~1 atm before the bubble bursts, which usually occurs at radii of ~15-20m. These pressures are significantly lower than previously assumed for such explosions. The according internal energy of the gas agrees well with the observed total energy output. The results show that large explosions released about 109 to 1010 J each (equivalent to about 200-2000 kg of TNT), at a peak discharge rate frequently exceeding 109 W (the power output of a typical nuclear power plant). This dynamic output is mainly controlled by the kinetic and potential energy of the exploding magma shell, while other energy types were found to be much smaller (with the exception of thermal energy). Remarkably, most explosions at Erebus show two distinct surface acceleration peaks separated by ~0.3 seconds. This suggests

  16. Easy Absolute Values? Absolutely

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Sharon E.; Mittag, Kathleen Cage

    2015-01-01

    The authors teach a problem-solving course for preservice middle-grades education majors that includes concepts dealing with absolute-value computations, equations, and inequalities. Many of these students like mathematics and plan to teach it, so they are adept at symbolic manipulations. Getting them to think differently about a concept that they…

  17. Music Proficiency and Quantification of Absolute Pitch: A Large-Scale Study among Brazilian Musicians.

    PubMed

    Leite, Raphael B C; Mota-Rolim, Sergio A; Queiroz, Claudio M T

    2016-01-01

    Absolute pitch (AP) is the ability to identify and name the pitch of a sound without external reference. Often, accuracy and speed at naming isolated musical pitches are correlated with demographic, biological, and acoustical parameters to gain insight into the genesis and evolution of this ability in specific cohorts. However, the majority of those studies were conducted in North America, Europe, or Asia. To fill this gap, here we investigated the pitch-naming performance in a large population of Brazilian conservatory musicians (N = 200). As previously shown, we found that the population performance was rather a continuum than an "all-or-none" ability. By comparing the observed distribution of correct responses to a theoretical binomial distribution, we estimated the prevalence of AP as being 18% amongst regular music students. High accuracy thresholds (e.g., 85% of correct responses) yielded a prevalence of 4%, suggesting that AP might have been underestimated in previous reports. Irrespective of the threshold used, AP prevalence was higher in musicians who started their musical practice and formal musical education early in life. Finally, we compared the performance of those music students (average proficiency group) with another group of students selected to take part in the conservatory orchestra (high proficiency group, N = 30). Interestingly, the prevalence of AP was higher in the latter in comparison to the former group. In addition, even when the response was incorrect, the mean absolute deviation from the correct response was smaller in the high proficiency group compared to the average proficiency group (Glass's Δ: 0.5). Taken together, our results show that the prevalence of AP in Brazilian students is similar to other non-tonal language populations, although this measure is highly dependent on the scoring threshold used. Despite corroborating that early involvement with musical practice and formal education can foster AP ability, the present data

  18. Music Proficiency and Quantification of Absolute Pitch: A Large-Scale Study among Brazilian Musicians

    PubMed Central

    Leite, Raphael B. C.; Mota-Rolim, Sergio A.; Queiroz, Claudio M. T.

    2016-01-01

    Absolute pitch (AP) is the ability to identify and name the pitch of a sound without external reference. Often, accuracy and speed at naming isolated musical pitches are correlated with demographic, biological, and acoustical parameters to gain insight into the genesis and evolution of this ability in specific cohorts. However, the majority of those studies were conducted in North America, Europe, or Asia. To fill this gap, here we investigated the pitch-naming performance in a large population of Brazilian conservatory musicians (N = 200). As previously shown, we found that the population performance was rather a continuum than an “all-or-none” ability. By comparing the observed distribution of correct responses to a theoretical binomial distribution, we estimated the prevalence of AP as being 18% amongst regular music students. High accuracy thresholds (e.g., 85% of correct responses) yielded a prevalence of 4%, suggesting that AP might have been underestimated in previous reports. Irrespective of the threshold used, AP prevalence was higher in musicians who started their musical practice and formal musical education early in life. Finally, we compared the performance of those music students (average proficiency group) with another group of students selected to take part in the conservatory orchestra (high proficiency group, N = 30). Interestingly, the prevalence of AP was higher in the latter in comparison to the former group. In addition, even when the response was incorrect, the mean absolute deviation from the correct response was smaller in the high proficiency group compared to the average proficiency group (Glass's Δ: 0.5). Taken together, our results show that the prevalence of AP in Brazilian students is similar to other non-tonal language populations, although this measure is highly dependent on the scoring threshold used. Despite corroborating that early involvement with musical practice and formal education can foster AP ability, the present data

  19. The brightness temperature of Venus and the absolute flux-density scale at 608 MHz.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muhleman, D. O.; Berge, G. L.; Orton, G. S.

    1973-01-01

    The disk temperature of Venus was measured at 608 MHz near the inferior conjunction of 1972, and a value of 498 plus or minus 33 K was obtained using a nominal CKL flux-density scale. The result is consistent with earlier measurements, but has a much smaller uncertainty. Our theoretical model prediction is larger by a factor of 1.21 plus or minus 0.09. This discrepancy has been noticed previously for frequencies below 1400 MHz, but was generally disregarded because of the large observational uncertainties. No way could be found to change the model to produce agreement without causing a conflict with well-established properties of Venus. Thus it is suggested that the flux-density scale may require an upward revision, at least near this frequency, in excess of what has previously been considered likely.

  20. Absolute and relative emission spectroscopy study of 3 cm wide planar radio frequency atmospheric pressure bio-plasma source

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Xiaolong; Nikiforov, Anton Yu Leys, Christophe; Ionita, Eusebiu-Rosini; Dinescu, Gheorghe

    2015-08-03

    The dynamics of low power atmospheric pressure radio frequency discharge generated in Ar gas in long gap of 3 cm is investigated. This plasma source is characterized and analyzed for possible large scale biomedical applications where low gas temperature and potential-less effluent are required. The discharge forms a homogenous glow-like afterglow in ambient air at input power of 30 W with low gas temperature of 330 K, which is desirable in biomedical applications. With absolute calibrated spectroscopy of the discharge, electron density of 0.4 × 10{sup 18} m{sup −3} and electron temperature of 1.5 eV are obtained from continuum Bremsstrahlung radiation of the source. Time and spatial resolved emission spectroscopy is used to analyze discharge generation mechanism and active species formation. It is found that discharge dynamics strongly correlates with the discharge current waveform. Strong Ar(2p) excited states emission is observed nearby the electrodes surface on a distance up to 200 μm in the plasma sheath region at 10 ns after the current peak, whereas OH(A) emission is uniform along of the interelectrode gap.

  1. Absolute calibration of the Greenland time scale: implications for Antarctic time scales and for Δ 14C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shackleton, N. J.; Fairbanks, R. G.; Chiu, Tzu-chien; Parrenin, F.

    2004-07-01

    We propose a new age scale for the two ice cores (GRIP and GISP2) that were drilled at Greenland summit, based on accelerator mass spectrometry 14C dating of foraminifera in core MD95-2042 (Paleoceanography 15 (2000) 565), calibrated by means of recently obtained paired 14C and 230Th measurements on pristine corals (Marine radiocarbon calibration curve spanning 10,500 to 50,000 years BP (thousand years before present) Based on paired 230Th/ 234U/ 238U and 14C dates on Pristine Corals Geological Society of America Bulletin, 2003, submitted for publication). The record of core MD95-2042 can be correlated very precisely to the Greenland ice cores. Between 30 and 40 ka BP our scale is 1.4 ka older than the GRIP SS09sea time scale (Journal of Quaternary Science 16 (2001) 299). At the older end of Marine Isotope Stage 3 we use published 230Th dates from speleothems to calibrate the record. Using this scale we show a Δ 14C record that is broadly consistent with the modelled record (Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 200 (2002) 177) and with the data of Hughen et al. (Science 303 (2004) 202), but not consistent with the high values obtained by Beck et al. (Science 292 (2001) 2453) or by Voelker et al. (Radiocarbon 40 (1998) 517). We show how a set of age scales for the Antarctic ice cores can be derived that are both fully consistent with the Greenland scale, and glaciologically reasonable.

  2. Gypsum scaling in pressure retarded osmosis: experiments, mechanisms and implications.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Minmin; Hou, Dianxun; She, Qianhong; Tang, Chuyang Y

    2014-01-01

    Pressure retarded osmosis (PRO) is an osmotically-driven membrane process that can be used to harvest salinity-gradient power. The PRO performance (both water flux and power density) can be severely limited by membrane fouling. The current study, for the first time, investigates PRO scaling in a bench-scale pressurized system using calcium sulfate dihydrate (gypsum) as a model scalant. In addition to the bulk feed solution (FS) saturation index (SI bulk), gypsum scaling was found to be strongly affected by the draw solution (DS) type and concentration, the applied hydraulic pressure, and the membrane orientation. The commonly recommended active layer facing draw solution (AL-DS) orientation was highly prone to internal scaling. In this orientation, severe internal concentration polarization (ICP) of scaling precursors induced gypsum clogging in membrane support layer even when the FS was undersaturated (e.g., SI bulk = 0.8). At higher SI bulk values, external gypsum crystal deposition occurred in addition to internal scaling. More severe scaling was observed when the DS contained scaling precursors such as Ca(2+) or SO4(2-), suggesting that the reverse diffusion of these precursors into the FS can significantly enhanced gypsum scaling. Increasing applied hydraulic pressure could enhance reverse solute diffusion and thus result in more severe gypsum scaling when the DS contained scaling precursors. A conceptual model, capturing the two important PRO scaling mechanisms (ICP of scaling precursors from FS and reverse diffusion of scaling precursors from the DS), is presented to rationalize the experimental results. Our results provide significant implications for PRO scaling control.

  3. Bottom pressure scaling of vibro-fluidized granular matter

    PubMed Central

    Katsuragi, Hiroaki

    2015-01-01

    Vibrated granular beds show various interesting phenomena such as convection, segregation, and so on. However, its fundamental physical properties (e.g., internal pressure structure) have not yet been understood well. Thus, in this study, the bottom wall pressure in a vertically vibrated granular column is experimentally measured and used to reveal the nature of granular fluidization. The scaling method allows us to elucidate the fluidization (softening) degree of a vibrated granular column. The peak value of the bottom pressure pm is scaled as Γ, where pJ, d, g, ω, H, and Γ are the Janssen pressure, grain diameter, gravitational acceleration, angular frequency, height of the column, and dimensionless vibrational acceleration, respectively. This scaling implies that the pressure of vibrated granular matter is quite different from the classical pressure forms: static and dynamic pressures. This scaling represents the importance of geometric factors for discussing the behavior of vibro-fluidized granular matter. The scaling is also useful to evaluate the dissipation degree in vibro-fluidized granular matter. PMID:26602973

  4. Length scales in alloy dissolution and measurement of absolute interfacial free energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rugolo, J.; Erlebacher, J.; Sieradzki, K.

    2006-12-01

    De-alloying is the selective dissolution of one or more of the elemental components of an alloy. In binary alloys that exhibit complete solid solubility, de-alloying of the less noble component results in the formation of nanoporous metals, a materials class that has attracted attention for applications such as catalysis, sensing and actuation. In addition, the occurrence of de-alloying in metallic alloy systems under stress is known to result in stress-corrosion cracking, a key failure mechanism in fossil fuel and nuclear plants, ageing aircraft, and also an important concern in the design of nuclear-waste storage containers. Central to the design of corrosion-resistant alloys is the identification of a composition-dependent electrochemical critical potential, Vcrit, above which the current rises dramatically with potential, signalling the onset of bulk de-alloying. Below Vcrit, the surface is passivated by the accumulation of up to several monolayers of the more noble component. The current understanding of the processes that control Vcrit is incomplete. Here, we report on de-alloying results of Ag/Au superlattices that clarify the role of pre-existing length scales in alloy dissolution. Our data motivated us to re-analyse existing data on critical potentials of Ag-Au alloys and develop a simple unifying picture that accounts for the compositional dependence of solid-solution alloy critical potentials.

  5. Length scales in alloy dissolution and measurement of absolute interfacial free energy.

    PubMed

    Rugolo, J; Erlebacher, J; Sieradzki, K

    2006-12-01

    De-alloying is the selective dissolution of one or more of the elemental components of an alloy. In binary alloys that exhibit complete solid solubility, de-alloying of the less noble component results in the formation of nanoporous metals, a materials class that has attracted attention for applications such as catalysis, sensing and actuation. In addition, the occurrence of de-alloying in metallic alloy systems under stress is known to result in stress-corrosion cracking, a key failure mechanism in fossil fuel and nuclear plants, ageing aircraft, and also an important concern in the design of nuclear-waste storage containers. Central to the design of corrosion-resistant alloys is the identification of a composition-dependent electrochemical critical potential, Vcrit, above which the current rises dramatically with potential, signalling the onset of bulk de-alloying. Below Vcrit, the surface is passivated by the accumulation of up to several monolayers of the more noble component. The current understanding of the processes that control Vcrit is incomplete. Here, we report on de-alloying results of Ag/Au superlattices that clarify the role of pre-existing length scales in alloy dissolution. Our data motivated us to re-analyse existing data on critical potentials of Ag-Au alloys and develop a simple unifying picture that accounts for the compositional dependence of solid-solution alloy critical potentials.

  6. First experimental determination of the absolute gas-phase rate coefficient for the reaction of OH with 4-hydroxy-2-butanone (4H2B) at 294 K by vapor pressure measurements of 4H2B.

    PubMed

    El Dib, Gisèle; Sleiman, Chantal; Canosa, André; Travers, Daniel; Courbe, Jonathan; Sawaya, Terufat; Mokbel, Ilham; Chakir, Abdelkhaleq

    2013-01-10

    The reaction of the OH radicals with 4-hydroxy-2-butanone was investigated in the gas phase using an absolute rate method at room temperature and over the pressure range 10-330 Torr in He and air as diluent gases. The rate coefficients were measured using pulsed laser photolysis (PLP) of H(2)O(2) to produce OH and laser induced fluorescence (LIF) to measure the OH temporal profile. An average value of (4.8 ± 1.2) × 10(-12) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) was obtained. The OH quantum yield following the 266 nm pulsed laser photolysis of 4-hydroxy-2-butanone was measured for the first time and found to be about 0.3%. The investigated kinetic study required accurate measurements of the vapor pressure of 4-hydroxy-2-butanone, which was measured using a static apparatus. The vapor pressure was found to range from 0.056 to 7.11 Torr between 254 and 323 K. This work provides the first absolute rate coefficients for the reaction of 4-hydroxy-2-butanone with OH and the first experimental saturated vapor pressures of the studied compound below 311 K. The obtained results are compared to those of the literature and the effects of the experimental conditions on the reactivity are examined. The calculated tropospheric lifetime obtained in this work suggests that once emitted into the atmosphere, 4H2B may contribute to the photochemical pollution in a local or regional scale.

  7. MicroScale - Atmospheric Pressure Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Sankaran, Mohan

    2012-01-25

    Low-temperature plasmas play an essential role in the manufacturing of integrated circuits which are ubiquitous in modern society. In recent years, these top-down approaches to materials processing have reached a physical limit. As a result, alternative approaches to materials processing are being developed that will allow the fabrication of nanoscale materials from the bottom up. The aim of our research is to develop a new class of plasmas, termed “microplasmas” for nanomaterials synthesis. Microplasmas are a special class of plasmas formed in geometries where at least one dimension is less than 1 mm. Plasma confinement leads to several unique properties including high-pressure stability and non-equilibrium that make microplasams suitable for nanomaterials synthesis. Vapor-phase precursors can be dissociated to homogeneously nucleate nanometer-sized metal and alloyed nanoparticles. Alternatively, metal salts dispersed in liquids or polymer films can be electrochemically reduced to form metal nanoparticles. In this talk, I will discuss these topics in detail, highlighting the advantages of microplasma-based systems for the synthesis of well-defined nanomaterials.

  8. Does temperature affect the accuracy of vented pressure transducer in fine-scale water level measurement?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Z.; Higgins, C. W.

    2015-03-01

    Submersible pressure transducers have been utilized for collecting water level data since the early 1960s. Together with a digital data logger, it is a convenient way to record water level fluctuations for long-term monitoring. Despite the wide use of pressure transducers for water level monitoring, little has been reported regarding their accuracy and performance under field conditions. The effects of temperature fluctuations on the output of vented pressure transducers were considered in this study. The pressure transducers were tested under both laboratory and field conditions. The results of this study indicate that temperature fluctuation has a strong effect on the transducer output. Rapid changes in temperature introduce noise and fluctuations in the water level readings under a constant hydraulic head while the absolute temperature is also related to sensor errors. The former is attributed to venting and the latter is attributed to temperature compensation effects in the strain gauges. Individual pressure transducers responded differently to the thermal fluctuations in the same testing environment. In the field of surface hydrology, especially when monitoring fine-scale water level fluctuations, ignoring or failing to compensate for the temperature effect can introduce considerable error into pressure transducer readings. It is recommended that a performance test for the pressure transducer is conducted before field deployment.

  9. Characterizing the Pressure Smoothing Scale of the Intergalactic Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, Girish; Hennawi, Joseph F.; Oñorbe, Jose; Rorai, Alberto; Springel, Volker

    2015-10-01

    The thermal state of the intergalactic medium (IGM) at z < 6 constrains the nature and timing of cosmic reionization events, but its inference from the Lyα forest is degenerate with the 3D structure of the IGM on ˜100 kpc scales, where, analogous to the classical Jeans argument, the pressure of the T ≃ 104 K gas supports it against gravity. We simulate the IGM using smoothed particle hydrodynamics, and find that, at z < 6, the gas density power spectrum does not exhibit the expected filtering scale cutoff, because dense gas in collapsed halos dominates the small-scale power masking pressure smoothing effects. We introduce a new statistic, the real-space Lyα flux, Freal, which naturally suppresses dense gas, and is thus robust against the poorly understood physics of galaxy formation, revealing pressure smoothing in the diffuse IGM. The Freal power spectrum is accurately described by a simple fitting function with cutoff at λF, allowing us to rigorously quantify the pressure smoothing scale for the first time: we find λF = 79 kpc (comoving) at z = 3 for our fiducial thermal model. This statistic has the added advantage that it directly relates to observations of correlated Lyα forest absorption in close quasar pairs, recently proposed as a method to measure the pressure smoothing scale. Our results enable one to quantify the pressure smoothing scale in simulations, and ask meaningful questions about its dependence on reionization and thermal history. Accordingly, the standard description of the IGM in terms of the amplitude T0 and slope γ of the temperature-density relation T={T}0{(ρ /\\bar{ρ })}γ -1 should be augmented with a third pressure smoothing scale parameter λF.

  10. Linear ruby scale and one megabar. [high pressure fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruoff, A. L.

    1979-01-01

    The accuracy and validity of certain techniques used in studying high-pressure transitions have been investigated. Experiments which place upper limits of about 20 GPa and about 50 GPa on pressures practically attainable using uniaxial supported opposed anvil devices with tungsten carbide pistons and uniaxial opposed flat anvil diamond devices, respectively, are reported. Direct static determinations of the transition pressures of GaP by two different methods are described. The values obtained indicate that the linear ruby scale increasingly overestimates the transition pressure as the pressure rises above 10 GPa. It is further shown that the use of shock-based marker materials, such as silver, as the basis of pressure measurement in X-ray diffraction studies leads to bulk moduli of cubic carbides which are in extreme disagreement with expected values.

  11. High-accuracy absolute rotation rate measurements with a large ring laser gyro: establishing the scale factor.

    PubMed

    Hurst, Robert B; Mayerbacher, Marinus; Gebauer, Andre; Schreiber, K Ulrich; Wells, Jon-Paul R

    2017-02-01

    Large ring lasers have exceeded the performance of navigational gyroscopes by several orders of magnitude and have become useful tools for geodesy. In order to apply them to tests in fundamental physics, remaining systematic errors have to be significantly reduced. We derive a modified expression for the Sagnac frequency of a square ring laser gyro under Earth rotation. The modifications include corrections for dispersion (of both the gain medium and the mirrors), for the Goos-Hänchen effect in the mirrors, and for refractive index of the gas filling the cavity. The corrections were measured and calculated for the 16  m2 Grossring laser located at the Geodetic Observatory Wettzell. The optical frequency and the free spectral range of this laser were measured, allowing unique determination of the longitudinal mode number, and measurement of the dispersion. Ultimately we find that the absolute scale factor of the gyroscope can be estimated to an accuracy of approximately 1 part in 108.

  12. Absolute pitch among students at the Shanghai Conservatory of Music: a large-scale direct-test study.

    PubMed

    Deutsch, Diana; Li, Xiaonuo; Shen, Jing

    2013-11-01

    This paper reports a large-scale direct-test study of absolute pitch (AP) in students at the Shanghai Conservatory of Music. Overall note-naming scores were very high, with high scores correlating positively with early onset of musical training. Students who had begun training at age ≤5 yr scored 83% correct not allowing for semitone errors and 90% correct allowing for semitone errors. Performance levels were higher for white key pitches than for black key pitches. This effect was greater for orchestral performers than for pianists, indicating that it cannot be attributed to early training on the piano. Rather, accuracy in identifying notes of different names (C, C#, D, etc.) correlated with their frequency of occurrence in a large sample of music taken from the Western tonal repertoire. There was also an effect of pitch range, so that performance on tones in the two-octave range beginning on Middle C was higher than on tones in the octave below Middle C. In addition, semitone errors tended to be on the sharp side. The evidence also ran counter to the hypothesis, previously advanced by others, that the note A plays a special role in pitch identification judgments.

  13. DAQ Software Contributions, Absolute Scale Energy Calibration and Background Evaluation for the NOvA Experiment at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Flumerfelt, Eric Lewis

    2015-08-01

    The NOvA (NuMI Off-axis ve [nu_e] Appearance) Experiment is a long-baseline accelerator neutrino experiment currently in its second year of operations. NOvA uses the Neutrinos from the Main Injector (NuMI) beam at Fermilab, and there are two main off-axis detectors: a Near Detector at Fermilab and a Far Detector 810 km away at Ash River, MN. The work reported herein is in support of the NOvA Experiment, through contributions to the development of data acquisition software, providing an accurate, absolute-scale energy calibration for electromagnetic showers in NOvA detector elements, crucial to the primary electron neutrino search, and through an initial evaluation of the cosmic background rate in the NOvA Far Detector, which is situated on the surface without significant overburden. Additional support work for the NOvA Experiment is also detailed, including DAQ Server Administration duties and a study of NOvA’s sensitivity to neutrino oscillations into a “sterile” state.

  14. Catchment-scale variability of absolute versus temporal anomaly soil moisture: Time-invariant part not always plays the leading role

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xiaodong; Zhao, Xining; Si, Bing Cheng; Brocca, Luca; Hu, Wei; Wu, Pute

    2015-10-01

    Recently, the characterization of soil moisture spatiotemporal variability is recommended to consider temporal soil moisture anomalies because of their distinctive behaviors with absolute soil moisture and their importance in hydrological applications. Here we characterized soil moisture spatiotemporal variability in the Yuanzegou catchment (0.58 km2) on the Loess Plateau of China, considering both absolute soil moisture and temporal anomalies. The dataset contained soil moisture observations in the 0-80 cm between 2009 and 2011 at 78 sampling locations. The spatial variance of time-invariant temporal means was shown to be the primary contributor (61.7-76.2%) to the total variance but the magnitude of this contribution was much lower than observed in large-scale studies. The seasonal variation in contribution can be attributed into differences in soil wetness conditions; lower contribution was found at intermediate wetness for spatial variances of temporal mean and temporal anomalies. Furthermore, the upward-convex relationship between spatial variance and spatial means of absolute soil moisture was mainly characterized by the covariance of temporal mean and temporal anomalies. Time stability of absolute soil moisture and its components were analyzed by using both the "accuracy" metric mean relative difference (MRD) and the "precision" metric variance of relative difference (VRD). As MRD was considered, time stability of absolute soil moisture primarily characterized time-invariant patterns. However, as VRD was used, the time stability of absolute soil moisture characterized only a small part of time-invariant or -variant pattern.

  15. Measuring Fluid Pressure on the Pore-scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giordano, N.; Petrovitch, C.; Pyrak-Nolte, L. J.

    2008-12-01

    The capillary pressure plays an important role in theoretical descriptions of immiscible two-phase flow in porous media. Most measurements of capillary pressure on the pore-scale are either based on external measurements of the fluid pressure of two immiscible fluids in a porous media or extracted from the analysis of interfacial curvature from digital-photomicroscopy. Experimentally, it is very difficult to measure local pressure at the interface of a two-phase flow system at the pore scale. In this study, we developed micro- capacitors for measuring local pressures in two-dimensional micro-models. Micro-models are transparent microfluidic flow cells that enable direct imaging of fluid distributions in known pore geometries. They are made using photo-projection lithography to make percolative structures that have areal dimensions of 600 µm x 600 µm with an aperture of 2.0 μ m. The size of the micro-model enables full-frame optical imaging during drainage and imbibition experiments. We have modified the micro-model fabrication process to include micro-capacitors to measure local pressure. We added two thin metal films to the opposing glass substrates prior to our normal micromodel assembly. The metal films act as a parallel plate capacitor. The capacitance depends on the dielectric material inside the plates which in our study is decane and nitrogen. As the pressure in the fluids changes, there is a corresponding change in the density of the fluid, and hence a change in the dielectric constant. The changes in dieletric constant are measured via precision measurements of the capacitance. Capacitance changes as small of 1/107 are measured which corresponds to pressure changes of 102 Pa. This pressure resolution is approximately 1% of the full range in our typical drainage/imbibition cycles. This capacitance method enables us to make measurements of small pressure changes with high spatial resolution. The spatial resolution is set by the size of the capacitor

  16. Final report on EURAMET.M.P-K4.2010: Key and supplementary comparison of national pressure standards in the range 1 Pa to 15 kPa of absolute and gauge pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krajíček, Zdeněk; Bergoglio, Mercede; Jousten, Karl; Otal, Pierre; Sabuga, Wladimir; Saxholm, Sari; Pražák, Dominik; Vičar, Martin

    2014-01-01

    This report describes a EURAMET comparison of five European National Metrology Institutes in low gauge and absolute pressure in gas (nitrogen), denoted as EURAMET.M.P-K4.2010. Its main intention is to state equivalence of the pressure standards, in particular those based on the technology of force-balanced piston gauges such as e.g. FRS by Furness Controls, UK and FPG8601 by DHI-Fluke, USA. It covers the range from 1 Pa to 15 kPa, both gauge and absolute. The comparison in absolute mode serves as a EURAMET Key Comparison which can be linked to CCM.P-K4 and CCM.P-K2 via PTB. The comparison in gauge mode is a supplementary comparison. The comparison was carried out from September 2008 till October 2012. The participating laboratories were the following: CMI, INRIM, LNE, MIKES, PTB-Berlin (absolute pressure 1 kPa and below) and PTB-Braunschweig (absolute pressure 1 kPa and above and gauge pressure). CMI was the pilot laboratory and provided a transfer standard for the comparison. This transfer standard was also the laboratory standard of CMI at the same time, which resulted in a unique and logistically difficult star comparison. Both in gauge and absolute pressures all the participating institutes successfully proved their equivalence with respect to the reference value and all also proved mutual bilateral equivalences in all the points. All the participating laboratories are also equivalent with the reference values of CCM.P-K4 and CCM.P-K2 in the relevant points. The comparison also proved the ability of FPG8601 to serve as a transfer standard. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCM, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  17. Diffusion Time-Scale of Porous Pressure-Sensitive Paint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Tianshu; Teduka, Norikazu; Kameda, Masaharu; Asai, Keisuke

    2001-01-01

    Pressure-sensitive paint (PSP) is an optical pressure sensor that utilizes the oxygen quenching of luminescence. PSP measurements in unsteady aerodynamic flows require fast time response of the paint. There are two characteristic time-scales that are related to the time response of PSP. One is the luminescent lifetime representing an intrinsic physical limit for the achievable temporal resolution of PSP. Another is the time-scale of oxygen diffusion across the PSP layer. When the time-scale of oxygen diffusion is much larger than the luminescent lifetime, the time response of PSP is controlled by oxygen diffusion. In a thin homogenous polymer layer where diffusion is Fickian, the oxygen concentration 1021 can be described by the diffusion equation in one-dimension.

  18. Student Award Finalist: Reactive species generated in atmospheric-pressure plasmas with water admixtures for biomedical applications: Absolute measurements and numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröter, Sandra; Bredin, J.; West, A.; Niemi, K.; Dedrick, J.; de Oliveira, N.; Joyeux, D.; Nahon, L.; Foucher, M.; Booth, J.-P.; Wagenaars, E.; Gans, T.; O'Connell, D.

    2015-09-01

    We investigate the production of atomic oxygen (O), hydroxyl (OH) and atomic hydrogen (H) in an rf atmospheric-pressure plasma operated in helium with water admixtures. These species, and their longer-lived products, are known to influence biological systems. Absolute measurements of species densities are required to develop these plasmas for therapeutics. Accurate determination of radical densities is challenging at elevated pressures in complex gas mixtures due to collisional quenching. We measure radical densities using VUV high-resolution Fourier-transform absorption spectroscopy with synchrotron radiation, UV broadband absorption spectroscopy, and picosecond two-photon absorption laser induced fluorescence (ps-TALIF). These diagnostics are the most suitable techniques allowing direct, absolute and 2-dimensional spatial resolution measurements at atmospheric pressure. Ps-TALIF also enables measurements of the lifetimes of laser-excited states of O and H, providing insight into the chemical kinetics and ambient air diffusion into the plasma jet region. Good agreement has been found between the measurements and a numerical chemical-kinetic simulation. Funding from the UK EPSRC (EP/K018388/1 & EP/H003797/1), the York-Paris Low Temperature Plasma Collaborative Research Centre and financial state aid managed by the laboratory of excellence Plas@Par (ANR-11-IDEX-0004-02).

  19. Concordance of Shape Risk Scale, a new pressure ulcer risk tool, with Braden Scale.

    PubMed

    Soppi, Esa T; Iivanainen, Ansa K; Korhonen, Pasi A

    2014-12-01

    The occurrence of pressure ulcers was examined in a cross-sectional study in 23 health care facilities and in home care involving 548 patients. The screening of pressure ulcer risk was assessed simultaneously using the Braden Scale and the new Shape Risk Scale (SRS), and the results were compared. The overall prevalence of pressure ulcers in the study population was 15·5% (85/548). The Braden Scale was performed as described in the literature. The direct concordance of the Braden and SRS scales was 46%. In more than 90% of cases, the SRS classified patients as well as or better than the Braden Scale. The SRS allocates patients significantly different from the Braden Scale into the risk categories, especially the difference is significant between the low and medium-risk categories. The greatest advantage of SRS to Braden Scale is that it correctly identifies patients with low risk of pressure ulcers. It is interesting that the two risk scores, taking into consideration the basically different pathophysiological factors, can still give rather similar results. The users considered that both scales are easy to use.

  20. Generalizing Microdischarge Breakdown Scaling Laws for Pressure and Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loveless, Amanda; Garner, Allen

    2016-10-01

    Shrinking device dimensions for micro- and nanoelectromechanical systems necessitates accurate breakdown voltage predictions for reliable operation. Additionally, one must accurately predict breakdown voltage to optimize system geometry for applications in microplasmas and micropropulsion. Traditional approaches use Paschen's law (PL) to predict breakdown, but PL fails at small gap distances ( 15 μm) where field emission dominates. Subsequent work derived scaling laws and analytic expressions for breakdown voltage in argon at atmospheric pressure. Applications at high (e.g. combustion) and low (e.g. vacuum nanoelectronics) pressures for various gases motivate the generalization of these models for pressure and gas. This work addresses these concerns by deriving scaling laws generalized for gap distance, pressure, and gas, while also specifically incorporating and exploring the impact of field enhancement and work function. We compare these analytic scaling laws to experimental data and particle-in-cell simulations. Funded by a U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Nuclear Education Program Faculty Development Grant Program at Purdue University.

  1. Absolute-energy-scale calibration of ARGO-YBJ for light primaries in multi-TeV region with the Moon shadow observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartoli, B.; Bernardini, P.; Bi, X. J.; Cao, Z.; Catalanotti, S.; Chen, S. Z.; Chen, T. L.; Cui, S. W.; Dai, B. Z.; D'Amone, A.; Danzengluobu; De Mitri, I.; D'Ettorre Piazzoli, B.; Di Girolamo, T.; Di Sciascio, G.; Feng, C. F.; Feng, Zhaoyang; Feng, Zhenyong; Gou, Q. B.; Guo, Y. Q.; He, H. H.; Hu, Haibing; Hu, Hongbo; Iacovacci, M.; Iuppa, R.; Jia, H. Y.; Labaciren; Li, H. J.; Liu, C.; Liu, J.; Liu, M. Y.; Lu, H.; Ma, L. L.; Ma, X. H.; Mancarella, G.; Mari, S. M.; Marsella, G.; Mastroianni, S.; Montini, P.; Ning, C. C.; Perrone, L.; Pistilli, P.; Salvini, P.; Santonico, R.; Shen, P. R.; Sheng, X. D.; Shi, F.; Surdo, A.; Tan, Y. H.; Vallania, P.; Vernetto, S.; Vigorito, C.; Wang, H.; Wu, C. Y.; Wu, H. R.; Xue, L.; Yang, Q. Y.; Yang, X. C.; Yao, Z. G.; Yuan, A. F.; Zha, M.; Zhang, H. M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, X. Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, J.; Zhaxiciren; Zhaxisangzhu; Zhou, X. X.; Zhu, F. R.; Zhu, Q. Q.; collaboration), (The ARGO-YBJ

    2017-04-01

    In 2011 ARGO-YBJ experiment has reported a work to study the absolute rigidity scale of the primary cosmic ray particles based on the Moon's shadow observation. Given the progress in high energy hadronic interaction models with LHC data, in cosmic ray chemical composition measurement and in experimental data accumulation, more updates can be researched. This paper aims to further disentangle the composition dependence in absolute-energy-scale calibration by using specific moon-shadow data which mainly is comprised of light component cosmic rays. Results show that, 17% energy scale error is estimated from 3 TeV to 50 TeV. To validate the performance of this technique, the light component cosmic ray spectrum in the same energy region is shown.

  2. Absolute rate of the reaction of atomic hydrogen with ethylene from 198 to 320 K at high pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, J. H.; Michael, J. V.; Payne, W. A.; Stief, L. J.

    1978-01-01

    The rate constant for the H+C2H4 reaction has been measured as a function of temperature. Experiments were performed with high pressures of Ar heat bath gas at seven temperatures from 198 to 320 K with the flash photolysis-resonance fluorescence (FP-RF) technique. Pressures were chosen so as to isolate the addition rate constant k1. The results are well represented by an Arrhenius expression. The results are compared with other studies and are theoretically discussed.

  3. Absolute atomic oxygen and nitrogen densities in radio-frequency driven atmospheric pressure cold plasmas: Synchrotron vacuum ultra-violet high-resolution Fourier-transform absorption measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Niemi, K.; O'Connell, D.; Gans, T.; Oliveira, N. de; Joyeux, D.; Nahon, L.; Booth, J. P.

    2013-07-15

    Reactive atomic species play a key role in emerging cold atmospheric pressure plasma applications, in particular, in plasma medicine. Absolute densities of atomic oxygen and atomic nitrogen were measured in a radio-frequency driven non-equilibrium plasma operated at atmospheric pressure using vacuum ultra-violet (VUV) absorption spectroscopy. The experiment was conducted on the DESIRS synchrotron beamline using a unique VUV Fourier-transform spectrometer. Measurements were carried out in plasmas operated in helium with air-like N{sub 2}/O{sub 2} (4:1) admixtures. A maximum in the O-atom concentration of (9.1 {+-} 0.7) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 20} m{sup -3} was found at admixtures of 0.35 vol. %, while the N-atom concentration exhibits a maximum of (5.7 {+-} 0.4) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 19} m{sup -3} at 0.1 vol. %.

  4. Submarine rescue decompression procedure from hyperbaric exposures up to 6 bar of absolute pressure in man: effects on bubble formation and pulmonary function.

    PubMed

    Blatteau, Jean-Eric; Hugon, Julien; Castagna, Olivier; Meckler, Cédric; Vallée, Nicolas; Jammes, Yves; Hugon, Michel; Risberg, Jan; Pény, Christophe

    2013-01-01

    Recent advances in submarine rescue systems have allowed a transfer under pressure of crew members being rescued from a disabled submarine. The choice of a safe decompression procedure for pressurised rescuees has been previously discussed, but no schedule has been validated when the internal submarine pressure is significantly increased i.e. exceeding 2.8 bar absolute pressure. This study tested a saturation decompression procedure from hyperbaric exposures up to 6 bar, the maximum operating pressure of the NATO submarine rescue system. The objective was to investigate the incidence of decompression sickness (DCS) and clinical and spirometric indices of pulmonary oxygen toxicity. Two groups were exposed to a Nitrogen-Oxygen atmosphere (pO2 = 0.5 bar) at either 5 bar (N = 14) or 6 bar (N = 12) for 12 h followed by 56 h 40 min resp. 60 h of decompression. When chamber pressure reached 2.5 bar, the subjects breathed oxygen intermittently, otherwise compressed air. Repeated clinical examinations, ultrasound monitoring of venous gas embolism and spirometry were performed during decompression. During exposures to 5 bar, 3 subjects had minor subjective symptoms i.e. sensation of joint discomfort, regressing spontaneously, and after surfacing 2 subjects also experienced joint discomfort disappearing without treatment. Only 3 subjects had detectable intravascular bubbles during decompression (low grades). No bubbles were detected after surfacing. About 40% of subjects felt chest tightness when inspiring deeply during the initial phase of decompression. Precordial burning sensations were reported during oxygen periods. During decompression, vital capacity decreased by about 8% and forced expiratory flow rates decreased significantly. After surfacing, changes in the peripheral airways were still noticed; Lung Diffusion for carbon monoxide was slightly reduced by 1% while vital capacity was normalized. The procedure did not result in serious symptoms of DCS or

  5. Absolute method for the assay of oleuropein in olive oils by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    De Nino, Antonio; Di Donna, Leonardo; Mazzotti, Fabio; Muzzalupo, Enzo; Perri, Enzo; Sindona, Giovanni; Tagarelli, Antonio

    2005-09-15

    Oleuropein (OLP, 1), the active ingredient present (i) in food integrators extracted from olive leaves, (ii) in table olives, and (iii) in extra virgin olive oils is a nutraceutical whose health benefits have been widely documented. A new analytical method for its assay, which is based on the utilization of atmospheric pressure chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometry and on the use of a synthetic labeled analogue, the 4-trideuteriocarboxyoleuropein (2), as an internal standard, is presented. The results obtained with extra virgin olive oils from different cultivars and different Italian regions are discussed.

  6. Picosecond-TALIF and VUV absorption measurements of absolute atomic nitrogen densities from an RF atmospheric pressure plasma jet with He/O2/N2 gas mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, Andrew; Niemi, Kari; Schröter, Sandra; Bredin, Jerome; Gans, Timo; Wagenaars, Erik

    2015-09-01

    Reactive Oxygen and Nitrogen species (RONS) from RF atmospheric pressure plasma jets (APPJs) are important in biomedical applications as well as industrial plasma processing such as surface modification. Atomic oxygen has been well studied, whereas, despite its importance in the plasma chemistry, atomic nitrogen has been somewhat neglected due to its difficulty of measurement. We present absolute densities of atomic nitrogen in APPJs operating with He/O2/N2 gas mixtures in open air, using picosecond Two-photon Absorption Laser Induced Fluorescence (ps-TALIF) and vacuum ultra-violet (VUV) absorption spectroscopy. In order to apply the TALIF technique in complex, He/O2/N2 mixtures, we needed to directly measure the collisional quenching effects using picosecond pulse widths (32ps). Traditional calculated quenching corrections, used in nanosecond TALIF, are inadequate due to a lack of quenching data for complex mixtures. Absolute values for the densities were found by calibrating against a known density of Krypton. The VUV absorption experiments were conducted on the DESIRS synchrotron beamline using a unique VUV Fourier-transform spectrometer. Atomic nitrogen densities were on the order of 1020 m-3 with good agreement between TALIF and VUV absorption. UK EPSRC grant EP/K018388/1.

  7. Pressure dependence of the absolute rate constant for the reaction Cl + C2H2 from 210-361 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brunning, J.; Stief, L. J.

    1985-01-01

    In recent years, considerable attention has been given to the role of chlorine compounds in the catalytic destruction of stratospheric ozone. However, while some reactions have been studied extensively, the kinetic data for the reaction of Cl with C2H2 is sparse with only three known determinations of the rate constant k3. The reactions involved are Cl + C2H2 yields reversibly ClC2H2(asterisk) (3a) and ClC2H2(asterisk) + M yields ClC2H2 + M (3b). In the present study, flash photolysis coupled with chlorine atomic resonance fluorescence have been employed to determine the pressure and temperature dependence of k3 with the third body M = Ar. Room temperature values are also reported for M = N2. The pressure dependence observed in the experiments confirms the expectation that the reaction involves addition of Cl to the unsaturated C2H2 molecule followed by collisional stabilization of the resulting adduct radical.

  8. Bilateral key comparison CCM.P-K3.1 for absolute pressure measurements from 3 × 10-6 Pa to 9 × 10-4 Pa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedchak, J. A.; Bock, Th; Jousten, K.

    2014-01-01

    This report describes the bilateral key comparison CCM.P-K3.1 between the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) for absolute pressure in the range from 3 × 10-6 Pa to 9 × 10-4 Pa. This comparison was a follow-up to the comparison CCM.P-K3. Two ionization gauges and two spinning rotor gauges (SRGs) were used as the transfer standards for the comparison. The SRGs were used to compare the standards at a pressure of 9 × 10-4 Pa and to normalize the ionization gauge readings. The two ionization gauges were used to compare the standards in the pressure range of from 3 × 10-6 Pa to 3 × 10-4 Pa. Both laboratories used dynamic expansion chambers as standards in the comparison. The two labs showed excellent agreement with each other and with the CCM.P-K3 key comparison reference value (KCRV) over the entire range. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCM, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  9. Final Report on the Key Comparison CCM.P-K4.2012 in Absolute Pressure from 1 Pa to 10 kPa.

    PubMed

    Ricker, Jacob; Hendricks, Jay; Bock, Thomas; Dominik, Pražák; Kobata, Tokihiko; Torres, Jorge; Sadkovskaya, Irina

    2017-01-01

    The report summarizes the Consultative Committee for Mass (CCM) key comparison CCM.P-K4.2012 for absolute pressure spanning the range of 1 Pa to 10 000 Pa. The comparison was carried out at six National Metrology Institutes (NMIs), including National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), Czech Metrology Institute (CMI), National Metrology Institute of Japan (NMIJ), Centro Nacional de Metrología (CENAM), and DI Mendeleyev Institute for Metrology (VNIIM). The comparison was made via a calibrated transfer standard measured at each of the NMIs facilities using their laboratory standard during the period May 2012 to September 2013. The transfer package constructed for this comparison preformed as designed and provided a stable artifact to compare laboratory standards. Overall the participants were found to be statistically equivalent to the key comparison reference value.

  10. Absolute measurement of subnanometer scale vibration of cochlear partition of an excised guinea pig cochlea using spectral-domain phase-sensitive optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subhash, Hrebesh M.; Choudhury, Niloy; Jacques, Steven L.; Wang, Ruikang K.; Chen, Fangyi; Zha, Dingjun; Nuttall, Alfred L.

    2012-01-01

    Direct measurement of absolute vibration parameters from different locations within the mammalian organ of Corti is crucial for understanding the hearing mechanics such as how sound propagates through the cochlea and how sound stimulates the vibration of various structures of the cochlea, namely, basilar membrane (BM), recticular lamina, outer hair cells and tectorial membrane (TM). In this study we demonstrate the feasibility a modified phase-sensitive spectral domain optical coherence tomography system to provide subnanometer scale vibration information from multiple angles within the imaging beam. The system has the potential to provide depth resolved absolute vibration measurement of tissue microstructures from each of the delay-encoded vibration images with a noise floor of ~0.3nm at 200Hz.

  11. Absolute Zero

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnelly, Russell J.; Sheibley, D.; Belloni, M.; Stamper-Kurn, D.; Vinen, W. F.

    2006-12-01

    Absolute Zero is a two hour PBS special attempting to bring to the general public some of the advances made in 400 years of thermodynamics. It is based on the book “Absolute Zero and the Conquest of Cold” by Tom Shachtman. Absolute Zero will call long-overdue attention to the remarkable strides that have been made in low-temperature physics, a field that has produced 27 Nobel Prizes. It will explore the ongoing interplay between science and technology through historical examples including refrigerators, ice machines, frozen foods, liquid oxygen and nitrogen as well as much colder fluids such as liquid hydrogen and liquid helium. A website has been established to promote the series: www.absolutezerocampaign.org. It contains information on the series, aimed primarily at students at the middle school level. There is a wealth of material here and we hope interested teachers will draw their student’s attention to this website and its substantial contents, which have been carefully vetted for accuracy.

  12. Pilot Study of the Effects of Simulated Turbine Passage Pressure on Juvenile Chinook Salmon Acclimated with Access to Air at Absolute Pressures Greater than Atmospheric

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, Thomas J.; Abernethy, Cary S.

    2005-04-28

    The impacts of pressure on juvenile salmon who pass through the turbines of hydroelectric dams while migrating downstream on the Columbia and Snake rivers has not been well understood, especially as these impacts relate to injury to the fish's swim bladder. The laboratory studies described here were conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the US Army Corps of Engineers Portland District at PNNL's fisheries research laboratories in 2004 to investigate the impacts of simulated turbine passage pressure on fish permitted to achieve neutral buoyancy at pressures corresponding to depths at which they are typically observed during downstream migration. Two sizes of juvenile Chinook salmon were tested, 80-100mm and 125-145mm total length. Test fish were acclimated for 22 to 24 hours in hyperbaric chambers at pressures simulating depths of 15, 30, or 60 ft, with access to a large air bubble. High rates of deflated swim bladders and mortality were observed. Our results while in conclusive show that juvenile salmon are capable of drawing additional air into their swimbladder to compensate for the excess mass of implanted telemetry devices. However they may pay a price in terms of increased susceptibility to injury, predation, and death for this additional air.

  13. Articulated Multimedia Physics, Lesson 14, Gases, The Gas Laws, and Absolute Temperature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York Inst. of Tech., Old Westbury.

    As the fourteenth lesson of the Articulated Multimedia Physics Course, instructional materials are presented in this study guide with relation to gases, gas laws, and absolute temperature. The topics are concerned with the kinetic theory of gases, thermometric scales, Charles' law, ideal gases, Boyle's law, absolute zero, and gas pressures. The…

  14. NMR shielding constants in PH3, absolute shielding scale, and the nuclear magnetic moment of 31P.

    PubMed

    Lantto, Perttu; Jackowski, Karol; Makulski, Włodzimierz; Olejniczak, Małgorzata; Jaszuński, Michał

    2011-09-29

    Ab initio values of the absolute shielding constants of phosphorus and hydrogen in PH(3) were determined, and their accuracy is discussed. In particular, we analyzed the relativistic corrections to nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) shielding constants, comparing the constants computed using the four-component Dirac-Hartree-Fock approach, the four-component density functional theory (DFT), and the Breit-Pauli perturbation theory (BPPT) with nonrelativistic Hartree-Fock or DFT reference functions. For the equilibrium geometry, we obtained σ(P) = 624.309 ppm and σ(H) = 29.761 ppm. Resonance frequencies of both nuclei were measured in gas-phase NMR experiments, and the results were extrapolated to zero density to provide the frequency ratio for an isolated PH(3) molecule. This ratio, together with the computed shielding constants, was used to determine a new value of the nuclear magnetic dipole moment of (31)P: μ(P) = 1.1309246(50) μ(N).

  15. Absolute Summ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Alfred, Jr.

    Summ means the entirety of the multiverse. It seems clear, from the inflation theories of A. Guth and others, that the creation of many universes is plausible. We argue that Absolute cosmological ideas, not unlike those of I. Newton, may be consistent with dynamic multiverse creations. As suggested in W. Heisenberg's uncertainty principle, and with the Anthropic Principle defended by S. Hawking, et al., human consciousness, buttressed by findings of neuroscience, may have to be considered in our models. Predictability, as A. Einstein realized with Invariants and General Relativity, may be required for new ideas to be part of physics. We present here a two postulate model geared to an Absolute Summ. The seedbed of this work is part of Akhnaton's philosophy (see S. Freud, Moses and Monotheism). Most important, however, is that the structure of human consciousness, manifest in Kenya's Rift Valley 200,000 years ago as Homo sapiens, who were the culmination of the six million year co-creation process of Hominins and Nature in Africa, allows us to do the physics that we do. .

  16. Intraspecific scaling of arterial blood pressure in the Burmese python.

    PubMed

    Enok, Sanne; Slay, Christopher; Abe, Augusto S; Hicks, James W; Wang, Tobias

    2014-07-01

    Interspecific allometric analyses indicate that mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) increases with body mass of snakes and mammals. In snakes, MAP increases in proportion to the increased distance between the heart and the head, when the heart-head vertical distance is expressed as ρgh (where ρ is the density of blood, G: is acceleration due to gravity and h is the vertical distance above the heart), and the rise in MAP is associated with a larger heart to normalize wall stress in the ventricular wall. Based on measurements of MAP in Burmese pythons ranging from 0.9 to 3.7 m in length (0.20-27 kg), we demonstrate that although MAP increases with body mass, the rise in MAP is merely half of that predicted by heart-head distance. Scaling relationships within individual species, therefore, may not be accurately predicted by existing interspecific analyses.

  17. Long-range scaling behaviours of human colonic pressure activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Rongguo; Yan, Guozheng; Zhang, Wenqiang; Wang, Long

    2008-11-01

    The long-range scaling behaviours of human colonic pressure activities under normal physiological conditions are studied by using the method of detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA). The DFA is an effective period representation with a single quantitative scaling exponent α to accurately quantify long-range correlations naturally presented in a complex non-stationary time series. The method shows that the colonic activities of the healthy subjects exhibit long-range power-law correlations; however such correlations either will be destroyed if we randomly shuffle the original data or will cease to be of a power-law form if we chop some high-amplitude spikes off. These facts indicate that the colonic tissue or enteric nervous system (ENS) with a good functional motility has a good memory to its past behaviours and generates well-organized colonic spikes; however such good memory becomes too long to be remembered for the colonic activity of the slow transit constipation (STC) patient and colonic dysmotility occurs.

  18. Absolute Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartig, George

    1990-12-01

    The absolute sensitivity of the FOS will be determined in SV by observing 2 stars at 3 epochs, first in 3 apertures (1.0", 0.5", and 0.3" circular) and then in 1 aperture (1.0" circular). In cycle 1, one star, BD+28D4211 will be observed in the 1.0" aperture to establish the stability of the sensitivity and flat field characteristics and improve the accuracy obtained in SV. This star will also be observed through the paired apertures since these are not calibrated in SV. The stars will be observed in most detector/grating combinations. The data will be averaged to form the inverse sensitivity functions required by RSDP.

  19. Final report on the key comparison CCM.P-K4.2012 in absolute pressure from 1 Pa to 10 kPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricker, Jacob; Hendricks, Jay; Bock, Thomas; Dominik, Pražák; Kobata, Tokihiko; Torres, Jorge; Sadkovskaya, Irina

    2017-01-01

    The report summarizes the Consultative Committee for Mass (CCM) key comparison CCM.P-K4.2012 for absolute pressure spanning the range of 1 Pa to 10 000 Pa. The comparison was carried out at six National Metrology Institutes (NMIs), including National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), Czech Metrology Institute (CMI), National Metrology Institute of Japan (NMIJ), Centro Nacional de Metrología (CENAM), and DI Mendeleyev Institute for Metrology (VNIIM). The comparison was made via a calibrated transfer standard measured at each of the NMIs facilities using their laboratory standard during the period May 2012 to September 2013. The transfer package constructed for this comparison preformed as designed and provided a stable artifact to compare laboratory standards. Overall the participants were found to be statistically equivalent to the key comparison reference value. Main text To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCM, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  20. Absolute atomic oxygen density measurements for nanosecond-pulsed atmospheric-pressure plasma jets using two-photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, C.; Carter, C.

    2014-12-01

    Nanosecond-pulsed plasma jets that are generated under ambient air conditions and free from confinement of electrodes have become of great interest in recent years due to their promising applications in medicine and dentistry. Reactive oxygen species that are generated by nanosecond-pulsed, room-temperature non-equilibrium He-O2 plasma jets among others are believed to play an important role during the bactericidal or sterilization processes. We report here absolute measurements of atomic oxygen density in a 1 mm-diameter He/(1%)O2 plasma jet at atmospheric pressure using two-photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy. Oxygen number density on the order of 1013 cm-3 was obtained in a 150 ns, 6 kV single-pulsed plasma jet for an axial distance up to 5 mm above the device nozzle. Temporally resolved O density measurements showed that there are two maxima, separated in time by 60-70 µs, and a total pulse duration of 260-300 µs. Electrostatic modeling indicated that there are high-electric-field regions near the nozzle exit that may be responsible for the observed temporal behavior of the O production. Both the field-distribution-based estimation of the time interval for the O number density profile and a pulse-energy-dependence study confirmed that electric-field-dependent, direct and indirect electron-induced processes play important roles for O production.

  1. Atomic-scale electron microscopy at ambient pressure.

    PubMed

    Creemer, J F; Helveg, S; Hoveling, G H; Ullmann, S; Molenbroek, A M; Sarro, P M; Zandbergen, H W

    2008-08-01

    We demonstrate a novel nanoreactor for performing atomic-resolution environmental transmission electron microscopy (ETEM) of nanostructured materials during exposure to gases at ambient pressures and elevated temperatures. The nanoreactor is a microelectromechanical system (MEMS) and is functionalized with a micrometer-sized gas-flow channel, electron-transparent windows and a heating device. It fits into the tip of a dedicated sample holder that can be used in a normal CM microscope of Philips/FEI Company. The nanoreactor performance was demonstrated by ETEM imaging of a Cu/ZnO catalyst for methanol synthesis during exposure to hydrogen. Specifically, the nanoreactor facilitated the direct observation of Cu nanocrystal growth and mobility on a sub-second time scale during heating to 500 degrees C and exposure to 1.2 bar of H(2). For the same gas reaction environment, ETEM images show atomic lattice fringes in the Cu nanocrystals with spacing of 0.18 nm, attesting the spatial resolution limit of the system. The nanoreactor concept opens up new possibilities for in situ studies of nanomaterials and the ways they interact with their ambient working environment in diverse areas, such as heterogeneous catalysis, electrochemistry, nanofabrication, materials science and biology.

  2. Non-Axisymmetric Inflatable Pressure Structure (NAIPS) Full-Scale Pressure Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Thomas C.; Doggett, William R.; Warren, Jerry E.; Watson, Judith J.; Shariff, Khadijah; Makino, Alberto; Yount, Bryan C.

    2017-01-01

    Inflatable space structures have the potential to significantly reduce the required launch volume for large pressure vessels required for exploration applications including habitats, airlocks and tankage. In addition, mass savings can be achieved via the use of high specific strength softgoods materials, and the reduced design penalty from launching the structure in a densely packaged state. Large inclusions however, such as hatches, induce a high mass penalty at the interfaces with the softgoods and in the added rigid structure while reducing the packaging efficiency. A novel, Non-Axisymmetric Inflatable Pressure Structure (NAIPS) was designed and recently tested at NASA Langley Research Center to demonstrate an elongated inflatable architecture that could provide areas of low stress along a principal axis in the surface. These low stress zones will allow the integration of a flexible linear seal that substantially reduces the added mass and volume of a heritage rigid hatch structure. This paper describes the test of the first full-scale engineering demonstration unit (EDU) of the NAIPS geometry and a comparison of the results to finite element analysis.

  3. Large scale steam flow test: Pressure drop data and calculated pressure loss coefficients

    SciTech Connect

    Meadows, J.B.; Spears, J.R.; Feder, A.R.; Moore, B.P.; Young, C.E.

    1993-12-01

    This report presents the result of large scale steam flow testing, 3 million to 7 million lbs/hr., conducted at approximate steam qualities of 25, 45, 70 and 100 percent (dry, saturated). It is concluded from the test data that reasonable estimates of piping component pressure loss coefficients for single phase flow in complex piping geometries can be calculated using available engineering literature. This includes the effects of nearby upstream and downstream components, compressibility, and internal obstructions, such as splitters, and ladder rungs on individual piping components. Despite expected uncertainties in the data resulting from the complexity of the piping geometry and two-phase flow, the test data support the conclusion that the predicted dry steam K-factors are accurate and provide useful insight into the effect of entrained liquid on the flow resistance. The K-factors calculated from the wet steam test data were compared to two-phase K-factors based on the Martinelli-Nelson pressure drop correlations. This comparison supports the concept of a two-phase multiplier for estimating the resistance of piping with liquid entrained into the flow. The test data in general appears to be reasonably consistent with the shape of a curve based on the Martinelli-Nelson correlation over the tested range of steam quality.

  4. Absolute fragmentation cross sections in atom-molecule collisions: Scaling laws for non-statistical fragmentation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, T.; Gatchell, M.; Stockett, M. H.; Alexander, J. D.; Schmidt, H. T.; Cederquist, H.; Zettergren, H.; Zhang, Y.; Rousseau, P.; Maclot, S.; Delaunay, R.; Adoui, L.; Domaracka, A.; Huber, B. A.

    2014-06-14

    We present scaling laws for absolute cross sections for non-statistical fragmentation in collisions between Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAH/PAH{sup +}) and hydrogen or helium atoms with kinetic energies ranging from 50 eV to 10 keV. Further, we calculate the total fragmentation cross sections (including statistical fragmentation) for 110 eV PAH/PAH{sup +} + He collisions, and show that they compare well with experimental results. We demonstrate that non-statistical fragmentation becomes dominant for large PAHs and that it yields highly reactive fragments forming strong covalent bonds with atoms (H and N) and molecules (C{sub 6}H{sub 5}). Thus nonstatistical fragmentation may be an effective initial step in the formation of, e.g., Polycyclic Aromatic Nitrogen Heterocycles (PANHs). This relates to recent discussions on the evolution of PAHNs in space and the reactivities of defect graphene structures.

  5. Managing multiple diffuse pressures on water quality and ecological habitat: Spatially targeting effective mitigation actions at the landscape scale.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joyce, Hannah; Reaney, Sim

    2015-04-01

    than absolute sense at the landscape scale. Riparian woodland planting is proposed as one mitigation action to address these pressures. This planting disconnects the transfer of material from the landscape to the river channel by promoting increased infiltration and also provides river shading and hence decreases the rate of water heating. To identify the optimal locations for riparian woodland planting, a Monte Carlo based approach was used to identify multiple mitigation options and their influence on the pressures identified. These results were integrated into a decision support tool, which allows the user to explore the implications of individual and a set of pressures. This is achieved by allowing the user to change the importance of different pressures to identify the optimal locations for a custom combination of pressures. For example, reductions in flood risk can be prioritized over reductions in fine sediment. This approach provides an innovative way of identifying and targeting multiple diffuse pressures at the catchment scale simultaneously, which has presented a challenge in previous management efforts. The approach has been tested in the River Ribble Catchment, North West England.

  6. Cluster-continuum quasichemical theory calculation of the lithium ion solvation in water, acetonitrile and dimethyl sulfoxide: an absolute single-ion solvation free energy scale.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Nathalia F; Pliego, Josefredo R

    2015-10-28

    Absolute single-ion solvation free energy is a very useful property for understanding solution phase chemistry. The real solvation free energy of an ion depends on its interaction with the solvent molecules and on the net potential inside the solute cavity. The tetraphenyl arsonium-tetraphenyl borate (TATB) assumption as well as the cluster-continuum quasichemical theory (CC-QCT) approach for Li(+) solvation allows access to a solvation scale excluding the net potential. We have determined this free energy scale investigating the solvation of the lithium ion in water (H2O), acetonitrile (CH3CN) and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) solvents via the CC-QCT approach. Our calculations at the MP2 and MP4 levels with basis sets up to the QZVPP+diff quality, and including solvation of the clusters and solvent molecules by the dielectric continuum SMD method, predict the solvation free energy of Li(+) as -116.1, -120.6 and -123.6 kcal mol(-1) in H2O, CH3CN and DMSO solvents, respectively (1 mol L(-1) standard state). These values are compatible with the solvation free energy of the proton of -253.4, -253.2 and -261.1 kcal mol(-1) in H2O, CH3CN and DMSO solvents, respectively. Deviations from the experimental TATB scale are only 1.3 kcal mol(-1) in H2O and 1.8 kcal mol(-1) in DMSO solvents. However, in the case of CH3CN, the deviation reaches a value of 9.2 kcal mol(-1). The present study suggests that the experimental TATB scale is inconsistent for CH3CN. A total of 125 values of the solvation free energy of ions in these three solvents were obtained. These new data should be useful for the development of theoretical solvation models.

  7. Pressure versus current scaling in a blocked bore rail gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, B. D.; Eubank, Eric; Nunnally, W. C.

    1993-07-01

    The paper presents experimental results from a blocked bore plasma armature rail gun. A piezoelectric transducer mounted in the bore blocking structure recorded time-resolved pressures over a range of input currents from 50 to 150 kA. The bore block is located at four positions where peak current occurs for the four respective charging voltages to power the system. Problems associated with obtaining these measurements and the solutions employed are discussed. Average distances from the block face to the armature current centroid are estimated assuming a pressure balance between the magnetic and neutral pressures. The averages of the measured pressures were found to be proportional to the input current raised to the power of 1.655.

  8. Absolute multilateration between spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muelaner, Jody; Wadsworth, William; Azini, Maria; Mullineux, Glen; Hughes, Ben; Reichold, Armin

    2017-04-01

    Environmental effects typically limit the accuracy of large scale coordinate measurements in applications such as aircraft production and particle accelerator alignment. This paper presents an initial design for a novel measurement technique with analysis and simulation showing that that it could overcome the environmental limitations to provide a step change in large scale coordinate measurement accuracy. Referred to as absolute multilateration between spheres (AMS), it involves using absolute distance interferometry to directly measure the distances between pairs of plain steel spheres. A large portion of each sphere remains accessible as a reference datum, while the laser path can be shielded from environmental disturbances. As a single scale bar this can provide accurate scale information to be used for instrument verification or network measurement scaling. Since spheres can be simultaneously measured from multiple directions, it also allows highly accurate multilateration-based coordinate measurements to act as a large scale datum structure for localized measurements, or to be integrated within assembly tooling, coordinate measurement machines or robotic machinery. Analysis and simulation show that AMS can be self-aligned to achieve a theoretical combined standard uncertainty for the independent uncertainties of an individual 1 m scale bar of approximately 0.49 µm. It is also shown that combined with a 1 µm m‑1 standard uncertainty in the central reference system this could result in coordinate standard uncertainty magnitudes of 42 µm over a slender 1 m by 20 m network. This would be a sufficient step change in accuracy to enable next generation aerospace structures with natural laminar flow and part-to-part interchangeability.

  9. Small angle neutron scattering on an absolute intensity scale and the internal surface of diatom frustules from three species of differing morphologies.

    PubMed

    Garvey, C J; Strobl, M; Percot, A; Saroun, J; Haug, J; Vyverman, W; Chepurnov, V A; Ferris, J M

    2013-05-01

    The internal nanostructure of the diatoms Cyclotella meneghiniana, Seminavis robusta and Achnanthes subsessilis was investigated using small angle neutron scattering (SANS) to examine thin biosilica samples, consisting of isotropic (powder) from their isolated cell walls. The interpretation of SANS data was assisted by several other measurements. The N2 adsorption, interpreted within the Branuer-Emmet-Teller isotherm, yielded the specific surface area of the material. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and Raman spectroscopy indicates that the isolated material is amorphous silica with small amounts of organic cell wall materials acting as a filling material between the silica particles. A two-phase (air and amorphous silica) model was used to interpret small angle neutron scattering data. After correction for instrumental resolution, the measurements on two SANS instruments covered an extended range of scattering vectors 0.0011 nm(-1) < q < 5.6 nm(-1), giving an almost continuous SANS curve over a range of scattering vectors, q, on an absolute scale of intensity for each sample. Each of the samples gave a characteristic scattering curve where log (intensity) versus log (q) has a -4 dependence, with other features superimposed. In the high-q regime, departure from this behaviour was observed at a length-scales equivalent to the proposed unitary silica particle. The limiting Porod scattering law was used to determine the specific area per unit of volume of each sample illuminated by the neutron beam. The Porod behaviour, and divergence from this behaviour, is discussed in terms of various structural features and the proposed mechanisms for the bio-assembly of unitary silica particles in frustules.

  10. On scale and magnitude of pressure build-up induced by large-scale geologic storage of CO2

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Q.; Birkholzer, J. T.

    2011-05-01

    The scale and magnitude of pressure perturbation and brine migration induced by geologic carbon sequestration is discussed assuming a full-scale deployment scenario in which enough CO{sub 2} is captured and stored to make relevant contributions to global climate change mitigation. In this scenario, the volumetric rates and cumulative volumes of CO{sub 2} injection would be comparable to or higher than those related to existing deep-subsurface injection and extraction activities, such as oil production. Large-scale pressure build-up in response to the injection may limit the dynamic storage capacity of suitable formations, because over-pressurization may fracture the caprock, may drive CO{sub 2}/brine leakage through localized pathways, and may cause induced seismicity. On the other hand, laterally extensive sedimentary basins may be less affected by such limitations because (i) local pressure effects are moderated by pressure propagation and brine displacement into regions far away from the CO{sub 2} storage domain; and (ii) diffuse and/or localized brine migration into overlying and underlying formations allows for pressure bleed-off in the vertical direction. A quick analytical estimate of the extent of pressure build-up induced by industrial-scale CO{sub 2} storage projects is presented. Also discussed are pressure perturbation and attenuation effects simulated for two representative sedimentary basins in the USA: the laterally extensive Illinois Basin and the partially compartmentalized southern San Joaquin Basin in California. These studies show that the limiting effect of pressure build-up on dynamic storage capacity is not as significant as suggested by Ehlig-Economides and Economides, who considered closed systems without any attenuation effects.

  11. Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test Instrumentation for Acoustic and Pressure Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vargas, Magda B.; Counter, Douglas

    2011-01-01

    Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test (ASMAT) is a 5% scale model test of the Ares I vehicle, launch pad and support structures conducted at MSFC to verify acoustic and ignition environments and evaluate water suppression systems Test design considerations 5% measurements must be scaled to full scale requiring high frequency measurements Users had different frequencies of interest Acoustics: 200 - 2,000 Hz full scale equals 4,000 - 40,000 Hz model scale Ignition Transient: 0 - 100 Hz full scale equals 0 - 2,000 Hz model scale Environment exposure Weather exposure: heat, humidity, thunderstorms, rain, cold and snow Test environments: Plume impingement heat and pressure, and water deluge impingement Several types of sensors were used to measure the environments Different instrument mounts were used according to the location and exposure to the environment This presentation addresses the observed effects of the selected sensors and mount design on the acoustic and pressure measurements

  12. Teaching Absolute Value Meaningfully

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wade, Angela

    2012-01-01

    What is the meaning of absolute value? And why do teachers teach students how to solve absolute value equations? Absolute value is a concept introduced in first-year algebra and then reinforced in later courses. Various authors have suggested instructional methods for teaching absolute value to high school students (Wei 2005; Stallings-Roberts…

  13. A Review of Large-Scale Fracture Experiments Relevant to Pressure Vessel Integrity Under Pressurized Thermal Shock Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Pugh, C.E.

    2001-01-29

    Numerous large-scale fracture experiments have been performed over the past thirty years to advance fracture mechanics methodologies applicable to thick-wall pressure vessels. This report first identifies major factors important to nuclear reactor pressure vessel (RPV) integrity under pressurized thermal shock (PTS) conditions. It then covers 20 key experiments that have contributed to identifying fracture behavior of RPVs and to validating applicable assessment methodologies. The experiments are categorized according to four types of specimens: (1) cylindrical specimens, (2) pressurized vessels, (3) large plate specimens, and (4) thick beam specimens. These experiments were performed in laboratories in six different countries. This report serves as a summary of those experiments, and provides a guide to references for detailed information.

  14. Dissipation scaling in constant-pressure turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nedic, Jovan; Tavoularis, Stavros; Marusic, Ivan

    2016-11-01

    We use previous direct numerical simulations and experimental data to investigate the streamwise and wall-normal evolution of the dissipation parameter Cɛ (namely the dissipation rate scaled by appropriate powers of the local turbulent kinetic energy and integral length scale) in the outer region of spatially evolving turbulent boundary layers. For Reθ >= 10 , 000 , Cɛ is essentially constant in the streamwise direction, but varies measurably in the wall-normal direction. For lower Reθ , however, Cɛ changes in both directions. The constancy of Cɛ is a central assumption of turbulence models based on the eddy viscosity concept and so they would inadequately represent wall bounded flows as they evolve spatially, a scenario that is common in engineering and atmospheric science applications. Accounting for the dependence of Cɛ on the local Reλ provides a means for possibly improving such models. Funding provided by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC).

  15. Pressure coefficient of the glass transition temperature in the thermodynamic scaling regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koperwas, K.; Grzybowski, A.; Grzybowska, K.; Wojnarowska, Z.; Pionteck, J.; Sokolov, A. P.; Paluch, M.

    2012-10-01

    We report that the pressure coefficient of the glass transition temperature, dTg/dp, which is commonly used to determine the pressure sensitivity of the glass transition temperature Tg, can be predicted in the thermodynamic scaling regime. We show that the equation derived from the isochronal condition combined with the well-known scaling, TVγ = const, predicts successfully values of dTg/dp for a variety of glass-forming systems, including van der Waals liquids, polymers, and ionic liquids.

  16. Scaling regimes of thermocapillarity-driven dynamics of confined long bubbles: Effects of disjoining pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhury, Kaustav; Chakraborty, Suman

    2015-03-01

    During thermocapillary transport of a confined long bubble, we unveil the existence of a contrary-to-the-conventional disjoining-pressure-dominant scaling regime characterizing the dynamics of the thin liquid film engulfed between the bubble interface and the channel surface. Such a regime is realized for the limitingly small magnitude of the Marangoni stress (surface tension gradient) when the separating liquid region reaches an ultrathin dimension. Over this regime, we witness a severe breakdown of the seemingly intuitive scaling arguments based on the balance of viscous and capillary forces. Starting from competent balance criteria, we uncover the characteristic length scales involved, leading towards obtaining the new consistent scaling laws of the disjoining-pressure-dominant regime, in a simple closed form analytical fashion. Our scaling estimations are substantiated by full-scale numerical simulations of the pertinent thin-film equations. These new scaling laws appear to be convenient for implementing as a fundamental design basis for multiphase microfluidic systems.

  17. Dissipation scaling in constant-pressure turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nedić, Jovan; Tavoularis, Stavros; Marusic, Ivan

    2017-03-01

    Using results from previous direct numerical simulations and experiments in the outer region of spatially evolving turbulent boundary layers, we compute the streamwise evolution and the wall-normal variation of the dissipation parameter Cɛ, namely, the turbulent kinetic energy dissipation rate, normalized by appropriate powers of the local turbulent kinetic energy and integral length scale. For Reθ≳10 000 (Reθ is a Reynolds number on the freestream velocity and the local momentum thickness), Cɛ is essentially constant in the streamwise direction, but varies by up to 50% in the wall-normal direction. For Reθ<10000 , Cɛ is additionally found to vary in the streamwise direction and is inversely proportional to the local turbulence Reynolds number Reλ.

  18. Accuracy, Precision, Sensitivity, and Specificity of Noninvasive ICP Absolute Value Measurements.

    PubMed

    Krakauskaite, Solventa; Petkus, Vytautas; Bartusis, Laimonas; Zakelis, Rolandas; Chomskis, Romanas; Preiksaitis, Aidanas; Ragauskas, Arminas; Matijosaitis, Vaidas; Petrikonis, Kestutis; Rastenyte, Daiva

    2016-01-01

    An innovative absolute intracranial pressure (ICP) value measurement method has been validated by multicenter comparative clinical studies. The method is based on two-depth transcranial Doppler (TCD) technology and uses intracranial and extracranial segments of the ophthalmic artery as pressure sensors. The ophthalmic artery is used as a natural pair of "scales" that compares ICP with controlled pressure Pe, which is externally applied to the orbit. To balance the scales, ICP = Pe a special two-depth TCD device was used as a pressure balance indicator. The proposed method is the only noninvasive ICP measurement method that does not need patient-specific calibration.

  19. Large-scale volumetric pressure from tomographic PTV with HFSB tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneiders, Jan F. G.; Caridi, Giuseppe C. A.; Sciacchitano, Andrea; Scarano, Fulvio

    2016-11-01

    The instantaneous volumetric pressure in the near-wake of a truncated cylinder is measured by use of tomographic particle tracking velocimetry (PTV) using helium-filled soap bubbles (HFSB) as tracers. The measurement volume is several orders of magnitude larger than that reported in tomographic experiments dealing with pressure from particle image velocimetry (PIV). The near-wake of a truncated cylinder installed on a flat plate ( Re D = 3.5 × 104) features both wall-bounded turbulence and large-scale unsteady flow separation. The instantaneous pressure is calculated from the time-resolved 3D velocity distribution by invoking the momentum equation. The experiments are conducted simultaneously with surface pressure measurements intended for validation of the technique. The study shows that time-averaged pressure and root-mean-squared pressure fluctuations can be accurately measured both in the fluid domain and at the solid surface by large-scale tomographic PTV with HFSB as tracers, with significant reduction in manufacturing complexity for the wind-tunnel model and circumventing the need to install pressure taps or transducers. The measurement over a large volume eases the extension toward the free-stream regime, providing a reliable boundary condition for the solution of the Poisson equation for pressure. The work demonstrates, in the case of the flow past a truncated cylinder, the use of HFSB tracer particles for pressure measurement in air flows in a measurement volume that is two orders of magnitude larger than that of conventional tomographic PIV.

  20. Combustion Characteristics of Lignite Char in a Laboratory-scale Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, Takahiro; Suzuki, Yoshizo

    In a dual fluidized bed gasifier, the residual char after steam gasification is burnt in riser. The objectives of this work are to clarify the effect of parameters (temperature, pressure, and particle size of lignite char) of char combustion using a laboratory-scale pressurized fluidized bed combustor (PFBC). As a result, the burnout time of lignite char can be improved with increasing operating pressure, and temperature. In addition, the decrease in the particle size of char enhanced the effect on burnout time. The initial combustion rate of the char can be increased with increasing operating pressure. The effect was decreased with increasing operating temperature. However, the effect of operating pressure was slightly changed in small particle size, such as 0.5-1.0 mm. It takes about 20 sec to burn 50% of char in the operating pressure of 0.5 MPa and the particle size of 0.5-1.0 mm.

  1. Absolutely classical spin states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohnet-Waldraff, F.; Giraud, O.; Braun, D.

    2017-01-01

    We introduce the concept of "absolutely classical" spin states, in analogy to absolutely separable states of bipartite quantum systems. Absolutely classical states are states that remain classical (i.e., a convex sum of projectors on coherent states of a spin j ) under any unitary transformation applied to them. We investigate the maximal size of the ball of absolutely classical states centered on the maximally mixed state and derive a lower bound for its radius as a function of the total spin quantum number. We also obtain a numerical estimate of this maximal radius and compare it to the case of absolutely separable states.

  2. Reliability and validity of the Sexual Pressure Scale for Women-Revised.

    PubMed

    Jones, Rachel; Gulick, Elsie

    2009-02-01

    Sexual pressure among young urban women represents adherence to gender stereotypical expectations to engage in sex. Revision of the original five-factor Sexual Pressure Scale was undertaken in two studies to improve reliabilities in two of the five factors. In Study 1 the reliability of the Sexual Pressure Scale for Women-Revised (SPSW-R) was tested, and principal components analysis was performed in a sample of 325 young, urban women. A parsimonious 18-item, four-factor model explained 61% of the variance. In Study 2 the theory underlying sexual pressure was supported by confirmatory factor analysis using structural equation modeling in a sample of 181 women. Reliabilities of the SPSW-R total and subscales were very satisfactory, suggesting it may be used in intervention research.

  3. Database applicaton for absolute spectrophotometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bochkov, Valery V.; Shumko, Sergiy

    2002-12-01

    32-bit database application with multidocument interface for Windows has been developed to calculate absolute energy distributions of observed spectra. The original database contains wavelength calibrated observed spectra which had been already passed through apparatus reductions such as flatfielding, background and apparatus noise subtracting. Absolute energy distributions of observed spectra are defined in unique scale by means of registering them simultaneously with artificial intensity standard. Observations of sequence of spectrophotometric standards are used to define absolute energy of the artificial standard. Observations of spectrophotometric standards are used to define optical extinction in selected moments. FFT algorithm implemented in the application allows performing convolution (deconvolution) spectra with user-defined PSF. The object-oriented interface has been created using facilities of C++ libraries. Client/server model with Windows Socket functionality based on TCP/IP protocol is used to develop the application. It supports Dynamic Data Exchange conversation in server mode and uses Microsoft Exchange communication facilities.

  4. Evaluation of the pressure ulcers risk scales with critically ill patients: a prospective cohort study 1

    PubMed Central

    Borghardt, Andressa Tomazini; do Prado, Thiago Nascimento; de Araújo, Thiago Moura; Rogenski, Noemi Marisa Brunet; Bringuente, Maria Edla de Oliveira

    2015-01-01

    AIMS: to evaluate the accuracy of the Braden and Waterlow risk assessment scales in critically ill inpatients. METHOD: this prospective cohort study, with 55 patients in intensive care units, was performed through evaluation of sociodemographic and clinical variables, through the application of the scales (Braden and Waterlow) upon admission and every 48 hours; and through the evaluation and classification of the ulcers into categories. RESULTS: the pressure ulcer incidence was 30.9%, with the Braden and Waterlow scales presenting high sensitivity (41% and 71%) and low specificity (21% and 47%) respectively in the three evaluations. The cut off scores found in the first, second and third evaluations were 12, 12 and 11 in the Braden scale, and 16, 15 and 14 in the Waterlow scale. CONCLUSION: the Braden scale was shown to be a good screening instrument, and the Waterlow scale proved to have better predictive power. PMID:25806628

  5. Alexandrite as a high-temperature pressure calibrant, and implications for the ruby-fluorescence scale

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jahren, A. H.; Kruger, M. B.; Jeanloz, Raymond

    1992-01-01

    The wavelength shifts of the R1 and R2 fluorescence lines of alexandrite (BeAl2O4:Cr(+3)) have been experimentally calibrated against the ruby-fluorescence scale as a function of both hydrostatic and nonhydrostatic pressures between 0 and 50 GPa, and simultaneously as a function of temperatures between 290 and 550 K. It is found that the pressure-temperature cross derivative of the fluorescence wavelength shifts are negligible for both ruby and alexandrite.

  6. Entropy-scaling laws for diffusion coefficients in liquid metals under high pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Qi-Long Shao, Ju-Xiang; Wang, Fan-Hou; Wang, Pan-Pan

    2015-04-07

    Molecular dynamic simulations on the liquid copper and tungsten are used to investigate the empirical entropy-scaling laws D{sup *}=A exp(BS{sub ex}), proposed independently by Rosenfeld and Dzugutov for diffusion coefficient, under high pressure conditions. We show that the scaling laws hold rather well for them under high pressure conditions. Furthermore, both the original diffusion coefficients and the reduced diffusion coefficients exhibit an Arrhenius relationship D{sub M}=D{sub M}{sup 0} exp(−E{sub M}/K{sub B}T), (M=un,R,D) and the activation energy E{sub M} increases with increasing pressure, the diffusion pre-exponential factors (D{sub R}{sup 0} and D{sub D}{sup 0}) are nearly independent of the pressure and element. The pair correlation entropy, S{sub 2}, depends linearly on the reciprocal temperature S{sub 2}=−E{sub S}/T, and the activation energy, E{sub S}, increases with increasing pressure. In particular, the ratios of the activation energies (E{sub un}, E{sub R}, and E{sub D}) obtained from diffusion coefficients to the activation energy, E{sub S}, obtained from the entropy keep constants in the whole pressure range. Therefore, the entropy-scaling laws for the diffusion coefficients and the Arrhenius law are linked via the temperature dependence of entropy.

  7. Thermal equation of state of cubic boron nitride: Implications for a high-temperature pressure scale

    SciTech Connect

    Goncharov, Alexander F.; Crowhurst, Jonathan C.; Dewhurst, John K.; Sharma, Sangeeta; Sanloup, Chrystele; Gregoryanz, Eugene; Guignot, Nicolas; Mezouar, Mohamed

    2007-06-01

    The equation of state of cubic boron nitride (cBN) has been determined to a maximum temperature of 3300 K at a simultaneous static pressure of up to more than 70 GPa. Ab initio calculations to 80 GPa and 2000 K have also been performed. Our experimental data can be reconciled with theoretical results and with the known thermal expansion at 1 bar if we assume a small increase in pressure during heating relative to that measured at ambient temperature. The present data combined with the Raman measurements we presented earlier form the basis of a high-temperature pressure scale that is good to at least 3300 K.

  8. Ruby pressure scale in a low-temperature diamond anvil cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaoka, Hitoshi; Zekko, Yumiko; Jarrige, Ignace; Lin, Jung-Fu; Hiraoka, Nozomu; Ishii, Hirofumi; Tsuei, Ku-Ding; Mizuki, Jun'ichiro

    2012-12-01

    Laser-excited N and R fluorescence lines of heavily doped ruby have been studied up to 26 GPa at low temperatures. While the intensity of the R lines at ambient pressure significantly decreases with decreasing temperature, the intensity of N lines originating from exchange-coupled Cr ion pairs is enhanced at low temperatures. The pressure induced wavelength shift of the N lines at 19 K is well fitted with an empirical formula similar to the equation for the R1 line, showing that the intense N line could be used as an alternative pressure scale at low temperatures. We also observe continuous increase in non-hydrostaticity with increasing pressure at low temperatures when silicone oil and 4:1 mixture of methanol and ethanol are used as pressure media.

  9. Pressure effect on the sensitivity of quartz Bourdon tube gauges.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szaniszlo, A. J.

    1972-01-01

    The sensitivity change for a commercial fused quartz Bourdon tube precision pressure gauge, due to a change in absolute pressure level, has been analytically computed and experimentally confirmed. The computed differential pressure error is 2.5% of full scale at a 100 atm absolute pressure level. The experimental method compared the fused quartz Bourdon tube gauge digital output to the results obtained from a nitrogen gas pressure system which had a high pressure, well-type mercury manometer as the differential pressure reference.

  10. Absolute Standards for Climate Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leckey, J.

    2016-10-01

    In a world of changing climate, political uncertainty, and ever-changing budgets, the benefit of measurements traceable to SI standards increases by the day. To truly resolve climate change trends on a decadal time scale, on-orbit measurements need to be referenced to something that is both absolute and unchanging. One such mission is the Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO) that will measure a variety of climate variables with an unprecedented accuracy to definitively quantify climate change. In the CLARREO mission, we will utilize phase change cells in which a material is melted to calibrate the temperature of a blackbody that can then be observed by a spectrometer. A material's melting point is an unchanging physical constant that, through a series of transfers, can ultimately calibrate a spectrometer on an absolute scale. CLARREO consists of two primary instruments: an infrared (IR) spectrometer and a reflected solar (RS) spectrometer. The mission will contain orbiting radiometers with sufficient accuracy to calibrate other space-based instrumentation and thus transferring the absolute traceability. The status of various mission options will be presented.

  11. Evaluation of a 40 to 1 scale model of a low pressure engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, C. E., Jr.; Thoenes, J.

    1972-01-01

    An evaluation of a scale model of a low pressure rocket engine which is used for secondary injection studies was conducted. Specific objectives of the evaluation were to: (1) assess the test conditions required for full scale simulations; (2) recommend fluids to be used for both primary and secondary flows; and (3) recommend possible modifications to be made to the scale model and its test facility to achieve the highest possible degree of simulation. A discussion of the theoretical and empirical scaling laws which must be observed to apply scale model test data to full scale systems is included. A technique by which the side forces due to secondary injection can be analytically estimated is presented.

  12. Absolute nuclear material assay

    DOEpatents

    Prasad, Manoj K [Pleasanton, CA; Snyderman, Neal J [Berkeley, CA; Rowland, Mark S [Alamo, CA

    2012-05-15

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  13. Absolute nuclear material assay

    DOEpatents

    Prasad, Manoj K.; Snyderman, Neal J.; Rowland, Mark S.

    2010-07-13

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  14. A Large-Scale, Energetic Model of Cardiovascular Homeostasis Predicts Dynamics of Arterial Pressure in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Roytvarf, Alexander; Shusterman, Vladimir

    2008-01-01

    The energetic balance of forces in the cardiovascular system is vital to the stability of blood flow to all physiological systems in mammals. Yet, a large-scale, theoretical model, summarizing the energetic balance of major forces in a single, mathematically closed system has not been described. Although a number of computer simulations have been successfully performed with the use of analog models, the analysis of energetic balance of forces in such models is obscured by a big number of interacting elements. Hence, the goal of our study was to develop a theoretical model that represents large-scale, energetic balance in the cardiovascular system, including the energies of arterial pressure wave, blood flow, and the smooth muscle tone of arterial walls. Because the emphasis of our study was on tracking beat-to-beat changes in the balance of forces, we used a simplified representation of the blood pressure wave as a trapezoidal pressure-pulse with a strong-discontinuity leading front. This allowed significant reduction in the number of required parameters. Our approach has been validated using theoretical analysis, and its accuracy has been confirmed experimentally. The model predicted the dynamics of arterial pressure in human subjects undergoing physiological tests and provided insights into the relationships between arterial pressure and pressure wave velocity. PMID:18269976

  15. Estimating large-scale fracture permeability of unsaturatedrockusing barometric pressure data

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Yu-Shu; Zhang, Keni; Liu, Hui-Hai

    2005-05-17

    We present a three-dimensional modeling study of gas flow inthe unsaturated fractured rock of Yucca Mountain. Our objective is toestimate large-scale fracture permeability, using the changes insubsurface pneumatic pressure in response to barometric pressure changesat the land surface. We incorporate the field-measured pneumatic datainto a multiphase flow model for describing the coupled processes ofliquid and gas flow under ambient geothermal conditions. Comparison offield-measured pneumatic data with model-predicted gas pressures is foundto be a powerful technique for estimating the fracture permeability ofthe unsaturated fractured rock, which is otherwise extremely difficult todetermine on the large scales of interest. In addition, this studydemonstrates that the multi-dimensional-flow effect on estimatedpermeability values is significant and should be included whendetermining fracture permeability in heterogeneous fracturedmedia.

  16. Absolute shielding scales for Al, Ga, and In and revised nuclear magnetic dipole moments of {sup 27}Al, {sup 69}Ga, {sup 71}Ga, {sup 113}In, and {sup 115}In nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Antušek, A. Holka, F.

    2015-08-21

    We present coupled cluster calculations of NMR shielding constants of aluminum, gallium, and indium in water-ion clusters. In addition, relativistic and dynamical corrections and the influence of the second solvation shell are evaluated. The final NMR shielding constants define new absolute shielding scales, 600.0 ± 4.1 ppm, 2044.4 ± 31.4 ppm, and 4507.7 ± 63.7 ppm for aluminum, gallium, and indium, respectively. The nuclear magnetic dipole moments for {sup 27}Al, {sup 69}Ga, {sup 71}Ga, {sup 113}In, and {sup 115}In isotopes are corrected by combining the computed shielding constants with experimental NMR frequencies. The absolute magnitude of the correction increases along the series and for indium isotopes it reaches approximately −8.0 × 10{sup −3} of the nuclear magneton.

  17. Absolute nitrogen atom density measurements by two-photon laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy in atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharges of pure nitrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Es-Sebbar, Et-Touhami; Sarra-Bournet, Christian; Naude, Nicolas; Gherardi, Nicolas; Massines, Francoise

    2009-10-01

    In this paper, two-photon absorption laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy is used to follow the nitrogen atom density in flowing dielectric barrier discharges fed with pure nitrogen and operating at atmospheric pressure. Two different dielectric barrier discharge regimes are investigated: the Townsend regime, which is homogeneous although operating at atmospheric pressure, and the more common filamentary regime. In both regimes, densities as high as 3x10{sup 14}/cm{sup 3} are detected. However, the N atoms kinetic formation depends on the discharge regime. The saturation level is reached more rapidly with a filamentary discharge. For a given discharge regime, the N atom density depends strongly on the energy dissipated in the plasma between the gas inlet and the measurement position, whether the energy is varied by varying the position of the measurements, the gas flow, or the dissipated power. Experiments performed in the postdischarge show that the N atom decay cannot be simply attributed to three-body recombination of atomic nitrogen with nitrogen molecules, meaning that other mechanisms such as surface recombination or gas impurities play a role.

  18. Vehicle-scale investigation of a fluorine jet-pump liquid hydrogen tank pressurization system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cady, E. C.; Kendle, D. W.

    1972-01-01

    A comprehensive analytical and experimental program was performed to evaluate the performance of a fluorine-hydrogen jet-pump injector for main tank injection (MTI) pressurization of a liquid hydrogen (LH2) tank. The injector performance during pressurization and LH2 expulsion was determined by a series of seven tests of a full-scale injector and MTI pressure control system in a 28.3 cu m (1000 cu ft) flight-weight LH2 tank. Although the injector did not effectively jet-pump LH2 continuously, it showed improved pressurization performance compared to straight-pipe injectors tested under the same conditions in a previous program. The MTI computer code was modified to allow performance prediction for the jet-pump injector.

  19. Parametric scaling from species relative abundances to absolute abundances in the computation of biological diversity: a first proposal using Shannon's entropy.

    PubMed

    Ricotta, Carlo

    2003-01-01

    Traditional diversity measures such as the Shannon entropy are generally computed from the species' relative abundance vector of a given community to the exclusion of species' absolute abundances. In this paper, I first mention some examples where the total information content associated with a given community may be more adequate than Shannon's average information content for a better understanding of ecosystem functioning. Next, I propose a parametric measure of statistical information that contains both Shannon's entropy and total information content as special cases of this more general function.

  20. Report of pilot study CCM.P-P1 for international comparison of absolute pressure measurements in gas from 3 × 10-9 Pa to 9 × 10-4 Pa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Hajime; Arai, Kenta; Komatsu, Eiichi; Fujii, Kenichi; Bock, Thomas; Jousten, Karl

    2015-01-01

    A bilateral comparison of absolute gas pressure measurements from 3 × 10-9 Pa to 9 × 10-4 Pa was performed between the National Metrology Institute of Japan (NMIJ) and Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB). It is a pilot study CCM.P-P1 for the next international comparison in this pressure range to test the stability of ultrahigh vacuum gauges (UHV gauges) as transfer standards. Two spinning rotor gauges (SRGs), an axial-symmetric transmission gauge (ATG), and an extractor gauge (EXG) were used as transfer standards. The calibration ratio of one SRG was sufficiently stable, but the other was not. This result indicates that improvements in the transport mechanism for SRG are needed. The two ionization gauges ATG and EXG, on the other hand, were sufficiently stable. Provisional equivalence of the pressures realized by the primary standards at NMIJ and PTB was found. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by CCM-WGS.

  1. A novel scaling approach for sooting laminar coflow flames at elevated pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelgadir, Ahmed; Steinmetz, Scott A.; Attili, Antonio; Bisetti, Fabrizio; Roberts, William L.

    2016-11-01

    Laminar coflow diffusion flames are often used to study soot formation at elevated pressures due to their well-characterized configuration. In these expriments, these flames are operated at constant mass flow rate (constant Reynolds number) at increasing pressures. Due to the effect of gravity, the flame shape changes and as a results, the mixing field changes, which in return has a great effect on soot formation. In this study, a novel scaling approach of the flame at different pressures is proposed. In this approach, both the Reynolds and Grashof's numbers are kept constant so that the effect of gravity is the same at all pressures. In order to keep the Grashof number constant, the diameter of the nozzle is modified as pressure varies. We report both numerical and experimental data proving that this approach guarantees the same nondimensional flow fields over a broad range of pressures. In the range of conditions studied, the Damkoehler number, which varies when both Reynolds and Grashof numbers are kept constant, is shown to play a minor role. Hence, a set of suitable flames for investigating soot formation at pressure is identified. This research made use of the resources of IT Research Computing at King Abdullah University of Science & Technology (KAUST), Saudi Arabia.

  2. Pressures at larger spatial scales strongly influence the ecological status of heavily modified river water bodies in Germany.

    PubMed

    Kail, Jochem; Wolter, Christian

    2013-06-01

    River biota are influenced by anthropogenic pressures that operate at different spatial scales. Understanding which pressures at which spatial scales affect biota is essential to manage and restore degraded rivers. In Europe, many river reaches were designated as Heavily Modified Water Bodies (HMWB) according to the European Water Framework Directive (WFD), where the ecological potential might mainly be determined by pressures at larger spatial scales outside the HMWB (e.g. hydromorphological alterations at the river network and land use at the catchment scale). In Germany, hydromorphological alterations and diffuse pollution were the main pressures. Therefore, the three objectives of this study were to (i) identify the hydromorphological pressures at the site, reach, and river network scale, and land use categories at the catchment scale which significantly affect the ecological status of HMWB in Germany, (ii) quantify the relative importance of these pressures at different spatial scales, and (iii) analyse the differences in response between fish and macroinvertebrates. The results indicated that: (i) At the reach scale, fish were most strongly influenced by channel-bank conditions whilst the naturalness of channel-planform was the best proxy for the ecological status of macroinvertebrates. At the catchment scale, urbanization was the most detrimental land use. (ii) The pressures at larger spatial scales (catchment land use and hydromorphological alterations in the river network) generally were more important than hydromorphological alterations at the reach scale. (iii) Fish were affected equally by both, hydromorphological alterations at the reach scale and large-scale pressures whereas the latter were far more important for the ecological status of macroinvertebrates. In conclusion, these results indicated that large-scale pressures may often limit the efficiency of reach-scale restoration, especially for macroinvertebrates, even in the absence of saprobic

  3. Development of Dynamic Flow Field Pressure Probes Suitable for Use in Large Scale Supersonic Wind Tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porro, A. Robert

    2000-01-01

    A series of dynamic flow field pressure probes were developed for use in large-scale supersonic wind tunnels at NASA Glenn Research Center. These flow field probes include pitot, static, and five-hole conical pressure probes that are capable of capturing fast acting flow field pressure transients that occur on a millisecond time scale. The pitot and static probes can be used to determine local Mach number time histories during a transient event. The five-hole conical pressure probes are used primarily to determine local flow angularity, but can also determine local Mach number. These probes were designed, developed, and tested at the NASA Glenn Research Center. They were also used in a NASA Glenn 10-by 10-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel (SWT) test program where they successfully acquired flow field pressure data in the vicinity of a propulsion system during an engine compressor staff and inlet unstart transient event. Details of the design, development, and subsequent use of these probes are discussed in this report.

  4. Scaling laws of impact induced shock pressure and particle velocity in planetary mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monteux, J.; Arkani-Hamed, J.

    2016-01-01

    While major impacting bodies during accretion of a Mars type planet have very low velocities (<10 km/s), the characteristics of the shockwave propagation and, hence, the derived scaling laws are poorly known for these low velocity impacts. Here, we use iSALE-2D hydrocode simulations to calculate shock pressure and particle velocity in a Mars type body for impact velocities ranging from 4 to 10 km/s. Large impactors of 100-400 km in diameter, comparable to those impacted on Mars and created giant impact basins, are examined. To better represent the power law distribution of shock pressure and particle velocity as functions of distance from the impact site at the surface, we propose three distinct regions in the mantle: a near field regime, which extends to 1-3 times the projectile radius into the target, where the peak shock pressure and particle velocity decay very slowly with increasing distance, a mid field region, which extends to ∼4.5 times the impactor radius, where the pressure and particle velocity decay exponentially but moderately, and a more distant far field region where the pressure and particle velocity decay strongly with distance. These scaling laws are useful to determine impact heating of a growing proto-planet by numerous accreting bodies.

  5. Pressure Sensitive Paint Measurements on 15% Scale Rotor Blades in Hover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, Oliver D.; Watkins, Anthony Neal; Ingram, JoAnne L.

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes a proof of concept test to examine the feasibility of using pressure sensitive paint (PSP) to measure the pressure distributions on a rotor in hover. The test apparatus consisted of the US Army 2-meter Rotor Test Stand (2MRTS) and 15% scale swept tip rotor blades. Two camera/rotor separations were examined: 0.76 and 1.35 radii. The outer 15% of each blade was painted with PSP. Intensity and lifetime based PSP measurement techniques were attempted. Data were collected from all blades at thrust coefficients ranging from 0.004 to 0.009.

  6. Performance of a pilot-scale, steam-blown, pressurized fluidized bed biomass gasifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sweeney, Daniel Joseph

    With the discovery of vast fossil resources, and the subsequent development of the fossil fuel and petrochemical industry, the role of biomass-based products has declined. However, concerns about the finite and decreasing amount of fossil and mineral resources, in addition to health and climate impacts of fossil resource use, have elevated interest in innovative methods for converting renewable biomass resources into products that fit our modern lifestyle. Thermal conversion through gasification is an appealing method for utilizing biomass due to its operability using a wide variety of feedstocks at a wide range of scales, the product has a variety of uses (e.g., transportation fuel production, electricity production, chemicals synthesis), and in many cases, results in significantly lower greenhouse gas emissions. In spite of the advantages of gasification, several technical hurdles have hindered its commercial development. A number of studies have focused on laboratory-scale and atmospheric biomass gasification. However, few studies have reported on pilot-scale, woody biomass gasification under pressurized conditions. The purpose of this research is an assessment of the performance of a pilot-scale, steam-blown, pressurized fluidized bed biomass gasifier. The 200 kWth fluidized bed gasifier is capable of operation using solid feedstocks at feedrates up to 65 lb/hr, bed temperatures up to 1600°F, and pressures up to 8 atm. Gasifier performance was assessed under various temperatures, pressure, and feedstock (untreated woody biomass, dark and medium torrefied biomass) conditions by measuring product gas yield and composition, residue (e.g., tar and char) production, and mass and energy conversion efficiencies. Elevated temperature and pressure, and feedstock pretreatment were shown to have a significant influence on gasifier operability, tar production, carbon conversion, and process efficiency. High-pressure and temperature gasification of dark torrefied biomass

  7. A Retrospective Analysis of Pressure Ulcer Incidence and Modified Braden Scale Score Risk Classifications.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hong-Lin; Cao, Ying-Juan; Wang, Jing; Huai, Bao-Sha

    2015-09-01

    The Braden Scale is the most widely used pressure ulcer risk assessment in the world, but the currently used 5 risk classification groups do not accurately discriminate among their risk categories. To optimize risk classification based on Braden Scale scores, a retrospective analysis of all consecutively admitted patients in an acute care facility who were at risk for pressure ulcer development was performed between January 2013 and December 2013. Predicted pressure ulcer incidence first was calculated by logistic regression model based on original Braden score. Risk classification then was modified based on the predicted pressure ulcer incidence and compared between different risk categories in the modified (3-group) classification and the traditional (5-group) classification using chi-square test. Two thousand, six hundred, twenty-five (2,625) patients (mean age 59.8 ± 16.5, range 1 month to 98 years, 1,601 of whom were men) were included in the study; 81 patients (3.1%) developed a pressure ulcer. The predicted pressure ulcer incidence ranged from 0.1% to 49.7%. When the predicted pressure ulcer incidence was greater than 10.0% (high risk), the corresponding Braden scores were less than 11; when the predicted incidence ranged from 1.0% to 10.0% (moderate risk), the corresponding Braden scores ranged from 12 to 16; and when the predicted incidence was less than 1.0% (mild risk), the corresponding Braden scores were greater than 17. In the modified classification, observed pressure ulcer incidence was significantly different between each of the 3 risk categories (P less than 0.05). However, in the traditional classification, the observed incidence was not significantly different between the high-risk category and moderate-risk category (P less than 0.05) and between the mild-risk category and no-risk category (P less than 0.05). If future studies confirm the validity of these findings, pressure ulcer prevention protocols of care based on Braden Scale scores can

  8. Nonisothermal turbulent boundary-layer adverse pressure gradient large scale thermal structure measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Bagheri, N.; White, B.R.; Lei, T.

    1994-01-01

    Hot-wire anemometry measurements in an incompressible turbulent boundary-layer flow over a heated flat plate under equilibrium adverse-pressure-gradient conditions (beta = 1.8) were made for two different temperature difference cases (10 and 15 C) between the wall and the freestream. Space-time correlations of temperature fluctuations (T`) were obtained with a pair of subminiature temperature fluctuation probes. The mean convection velocities, the mean inclination angles, and coherence characteristics of the T` large-scale structure were determined. The present temperature structures measurements for a nonisothermal boundary layer are compared to the zero-pressure-gradient case with identical temperature differences previously reported, in which the mean convection velocity of the T` structure was a function of position y(sup +) and independent of the limited temperature-difference cases tested. The three major findings of the present study, as compared to the zero-pressure-gradient case, are (1) the mean convection speed of the T` structure under beta = 1.8 pressure-gradient conditions was found to be substantially lower in the logarithmic core region than the zero-pressure-gradient case. Additionally, the mean convection speed is felt by the authors to be a function of pressure-gradient parameter beta; (2) the mean inclination angle of the T` structure to the wall under the adverse-pressure-gradient flow was 32 deg, which compares favorably to the 30-deg value of the zero-pressure-gradient case; and (3) the limited data suggests that the mean convection velocity of the T` structure is a function of y(sup +) and independent of the limited temperature-difference cases tested. 11 refs.

  9. Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Tests Instrumentation for Acoustic and Pressure Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vargas, Magda B.; Counter, Douglas D.

    2011-01-01

    The Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test (ASMAT) was a development test performed at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) East Test Area (ETA) Test Stand 116. The test article included a 5% scale Ares I vehicle model and tower mounted on the Mobile Launcher. Acoustic and pressure data were measured by approximately 200 instruments located throughout the test article. There were four primary ASMAT instrument suites: ignition overpressure (IOP), lift-off acoustics (LOA), ground acoustics (GA), and spatial correlation (SC). Each instrumentation suite incorporated different sensor models which were selected based upon measurement requirements. These requirements included the type of measurement, exposure to the environment, instrumentation check-outs and data acquisition. The sensors were attached to the test article using different mounts and brackets dependent upon the location of the sensor. This presentation addresses the observed effect of the sensors and mounts on the acoustic and pressure measurements.

  10. Evolution of a typical ion-scale magnetic flux rope caused by thermal pressure enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teh, W.-L.; Nakamura, T. K. M.; Nakamura, R.; Baumjohann, W.; Russell, C. T.; Pollock, C.; Lindqvist, P.-A.; Ergun, R. E.; Burch, J. L.; Torbert, R. B.; Giles, B. L.

    2017-02-01

    With high time-resolution field and plasma measurements by the Magnetospheric Multiscale spacecraft, interior fine structures of two ion-scale magnetic flux ropes ( 5 and 11 ion inertial length radius) separated by 14 s are resolved. These two ion-scale flux ropes (FR1 and FR2) show non-frozen-in ion behavior and consist of a strong axial magnetic field at the reversal of the negative-then-positive bipolar field component. The negative bipolar field component of the FR2 is found to be depressed, where magnetic pressure and total pressure decrease, but ion and electron thermal pressures increase, a feature akin to a crater-like flux rope. The pressure enhancement is due to the magnetosheath plasma feeding into the flux rope along the field lines. Magnetic field draping and energetic electrons are also observed in the trailing part of the FR2. The ratio of perpendicular and parallel currents indicates that the FR1 appears force-free but the FR2 seems not. Moreover, the FR2 is time-dependent as a result of a low correlation coefficient (CC = 0.75) for the derivation of the deHoffmann-Teller frame using the direct measured electric fields, while the FR1 is in quasi-steady conditions (CC = 0.94). It is concluded that the crater formation within the FR2 can be interpreted by the analytical flux rope simulation as the evolution of typical flux rope to crater-like one due to the thermal pressure enhancement, which could be induced by the depression of transverse magnetic fields of the flux rope.

  11. Estimating Absolute Site Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Malagnini, L; Mayeda, K M; Akinci, A; Bragato, P L

    2004-07-15

    The authors use previously determined direct-wave attenuation functions as well as stable, coda-derived source excitation spectra to isolate the absolute S-wave site effect for the horizontal and vertical components of weak ground motion. They used selected stations in the seismic network of the eastern Alps, and find the following: (1) all ''hard rock'' sites exhibited deamplification phenomena due to absorption at frequencies ranging between 0.5 and 12 Hz (the available bandwidth), on both the horizontal and vertical components; (2) ''hard rock'' site transfer functions showed large variability at high-frequency; (3) vertical-motion site transfer functions show strong frequency-dependence, and (4) H/V spectral ratios do not reproduce the characteristics of the true horizontal site transfer functions; (5) traditional, relative site terms obtained by using reference ''rock sites'' can be misleading in inferring the behaviors of true site transfer functions, since most rock sites have non-flat responses due to shallow heterogeneities resulting from varying degrees of weathering. They also use their stable source spectra to estimate total radiated seismic energy and compare against previous results. they find that the earthquakes in this region exhibit non-constant dynamic stress drop scaling which gives further support for a fundamental difference in rupture dynamics between small and large earthquakes. To correct the vertical and horizontal S-wave spectra for attenuation, they used detailed regional attenuation functions derived by Malagnini et al. (2002) who determined frequency-dependent geometrical spreading and Q for the region. These corrections account for the gross path effects (i.e., all distance-dependent effects), although the source and site effects are still present in the distance-corrected spectra. The main goal of this study is to isolate the absolute site effect (as a function of frequency) by removing the source spectrum (moment-rate spectrum) from

  12. Climate and Human Pressure Constraints Co-Explain Regional Plant Invasion at Different Spatial Scales

    PubMed Central

    García-Baquero, Gonzalo; Caño, Lidia; Biurrun, Idoia; García-Mijangos, Itziar; Loidi, Javier; Herrera, Mercedes

    2016-01-01

    Alien species invasion represents a global threat to biodiversity and ecosystems. Explaining invasion patterns in terms of environmental constraints will help us to assess invasion risks and plan control strategies. We aim to identify plant invasion patterns in the Basque Country (Spain), and to determine the effects of climate and human pressure on that pattern. We modeled the regional distribution of 89 invasive plant species using two approaches. First, distance-based Moran’s eigenvector maps were used to partition variation in the invasive species richness, S, into spatial components at broad and fine scales; redundancy analysis was then used to explain those components on the basis of climate and human pressure descriptors. Second, we used generalized additive mixed modeling to fit species-specific responses to the same descriptors. Climate and human pressure descriptors have different effects on S at different spatial scales. Broad-scale spatially structured temperature and precipitation, and fine-scale spatially structured human population density and percentage of natural and semi-natural areas, explained altogether 38.7% of the total variance. The distribution of 84% of the individually tested species was related to either temperature, precipitation or both, and 68% was related to either population density or natural and semi-natural areas, displaying similar responses. The spatial pattern of the invasive species richness is strongly environmentally forced, mainly by climate factors. Since individual species responses were proved to be both similarly constrained in shape and explained variance by the same environmental factors, we conclude that the pattern of invasive species richness results from individual species’ environmental preferences. PMID:27741276

  13. Climate and Human Pressure Constraints Co-Explain Regional Plant Invasion at Different Spatial Scales.

    PubMed

    Campos, Juan Antonio; García-Baquero, Gonzalo; Caño, Lidia; Biurrun, Idoia; García-Mijangos, Itziar; Loidi, Javier; Herrera, Mercedes

    2016-01-01

    Alien species invasion represents a global threat to biodiversity and ecosystems. Explaining invasion patterns in terms of environmental constraints will help us to assess invasion risks and plan control strategies. We aim to identify plant invasion patterns in the Basque Country (Spain), and to determine the effects of climate and human pressure on that pattern. We modeled the regional distribution of 89 invasive plant species using two approaches. First, distance-based Moran's eigenvector maps were used to partition variation in the invasive species richness, S, into spatial components at broad and fine scales; redundancy analysis was then used to explain those components on the basis of climate and human pressure descriptors. Second, we used generalized additive mixed modeling to fit species-specific responses to the same descriptors. Climate and human pressure descriptors have different effects on S at different spatial scales. Broad-scale spatially structured temperature and precipitation, and fine-scale spatially structured human population density and percentage of natural and semi-natural areas, explained altogether 38.7% of the total variance. The distribution of 84% of the individually tested species was related to either temperature, precipitation or both, and 68% was related to either population density or natural and semi-natural areas, displaying similar responses. The spatial pattern of the invasive species richness is strongly environmentally forced, mainly by climate factors. Since individual species responses were proved to be both similarly constrained in shape and explained variance by the same environmental factors, we conclude that the pattern of invasive species richness results from individual species' environmental preferences.

  14. Absolute and relative blindsight.

    PubMed

    Balsdon, Tarryn; Azzopardi, Paul

    2015-03-01

    The concept of relative blindsight, referring to a difference in conscious awareness between conditions otherwise matched for performance, was introduced by Lau and Passingham (2006) as a way of identifying the neural correlates of consciousness (NCC) in fMRI experiments. By analogy, absolute blindsight refers to a difference between performance and awareness regardless of whether it is possible to match performance across conditions. Here, we address the question of whether relative and absolute blindsight in normal observers can be accounted for by response bias. In our replication of Lau and Passingham's experiment, the relative blindsight effect was abolished when performance was assessed by means of a bias-free 2AFC task or when the criterion for awareness was varied. Furthermore, there was no evidence of either relative or absolute blindsight when both performance and awareness were assessed with bias-free measures derived from confidence ratings using signal detection theory. This suggests that both relative and absolute blindsight in normal observers amount to no more than variations in response bias in the assessment of performance and awareness. Consideration of the properties of psychometric functions reveals a number of ways in which relative and absolute blindsight could arise trivially and elucidates a basis for the distinction between Type 1 and Type 2 blindsight.

  15. Role of borehole pressure containment on surface ground vibration levels at close scaled distances

    SciTech Connect

    Taqieddin, S.A.

    1982-01-01

    A total of 84 reduced-scale single-hole test blasts were conducted to study the effects of collar stemming length, primer location, geophone orientation, and indirectly the borehole and detonation pressures on the generation of ground vibrations. Extra 60% dynamite and black powder explosives were tested. Charges of 144.5 and 276.5 gm having diameters of 0.5-, 0.75-, and 1.00-inch were confined within holes drilled in Jefferson City dolomite rock. Three collar stemming lengths, bottom and collar priming and two different orientation of joints were employed. Particle velocity measured by a recording seismograph, with its geophone placed at constant 15 feet, was used throughout this study. It was found at the close scaled-distances employed in this study that collar stemming length has a reciprocal relationship with the levels of ground vibration up to an optimum value beyond which it has minimal effect. Also, the length of collar stemming needed to suppress ground vibration is less than that needed to contain air blast and was dependent on charge diameter. It was also found that collar-primed charges produced higher levels of ground vibration than did the bottom-primed charges, and ground vibrations attenuated more rapidly parallel to the geologic jointing direction. Lastly it was found that the primary cause of ground vibrations was the explosive borehole pressure with little or no effect produced by detonation pressure.

  16. Well integrity assessment under temperature and pressure stresses by a 1:1 scale wellbore experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manceau, J. C.; Tremosa, J.; Audigane, P.; Lerouge, C.; Claret, F.; Lettry, Y.; Fierz, T.; Nussbaum, C.

    2015-08-01

    A new in situ experiment is proposed for observing and understanding well integrity evolution, potentially due to changes that could occur during a well lifetime. The focus is put on temperature and pressure stresses. A small section of a well is reproduced at scale 1:1 in the Opalinus Clay formation, representative of a low permeable caprock formation (in Mont Terri Underground Rock Laboratory, Switzerland). The well-system behavior is characterized over time both by performing hydro-tests to quantify the hydraulic properties of the well and their evolution, and sampling the fluids to monitor the chemical composition and its changes. This paper presents the well integrity assessment under different imposed temperature (17-52°C) and pressure (10-28 bar) conditions. The results obtained in this study confirm the ability of the chosen design and observation scale to estimate the evolution of the well integrity over time, the characteristics of the flow along the well-system and the reasons of the observed evolution. In particular, the estimated effective well permeability is higher than cement or caprock intrinsic permeability, which suggest preferential flow pathways at interfaces especially at the very beginning of the experiment; the significant variations of the effective well permeability observed after setting pressure and temperature stresses indicate that operations could influence well integrity in similar proportions than the cementing process.

  17. Scaling Law for Cross-stream Diffusion in Microchannels under Combined Electroosmotic and Pressure Driven Flow.

    PubMed

    Song, Hongjun; Wang, Yi; Pant, Kapil

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents an analytical study of the cross-stream diffusion of an analyte in a rectangular microchannel under combined electroosmotic flow (EOF) and pressure driven flow to investigate the heterogeneous transport behavior and spatially-dependent diffusion scaling law. An analytical model capable of accurately describing 3D steady-state convection-diffusion in microchannels with arbitrary aspect ratios is developed based on the assumption of the thin Electric Double Layer (EDL). The model is verified against high-fidelity numerical simulation in terms of flow velocity and analyte concentration profiles with excellent agreement (<0.5% relative error). An extensive parametric analysis is then undertaken to interrogate the effect of the combined flow velocity field on the transport behavior in both the positive pressure gradient (PPG) and negative pressure gradient (NPG) cases. For the first time, the evolution from the spindle-shaped concentration profile in the PPG case, via the stripe-shaped profile (pure EOF), and finally to the butterfly-shaped profile in the PPG case is obtained using the analytical model along with a quantitative depiction of the spatially-dependent diffusion layer thickness and scaling law across a wide range of the parameter space.

  18. Predictive capacity of risk assessment scales and clinical judgment for pressure ulcers: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    García-Fernández, Francisco Pedro; Pancorbo-Hidalgo, Pedro L; Agreda, J Javier Soldevilla

    2014-01-01

    A systematic review with meta-analysis was completed to determine the capacity of risk assessment scales and nurses' clinical judgment to predict pressure ulcer (PU) development. Electronic databases were searched for prospective studies on the validity and predictive capacity of PUs risk assessment scales published between 1962 and 2010 in English, Spanish, Portuguese, Korean, German, and Greek. We excluded gray literature sources, integrative review articles, and retrospective or cross-sectional studies. The methodological quality of the studies was assessed according to the guidelines of the Critical Appraisal Skills Program. Predictive capacity was measured as relative risk (RR) with 95% confidence intervals. When 2 or more valid original studies were found, a meta-analysis was conducted using a random-effect model and sensitivity analysis. We identified 57 studies, including 31 that included a validation study. We also retrieved 4 studies that tested clinical judgment as a risk prediction factor. Meta-analysis produced the following pooled predictive capacity indicators: Braden (RR = 4.26); Norton (RR = 3.69); Waterlow (RR = 2.66); Cubbin-Jackson (RR = 8.63); EMINA (RR = 6.17); Pressure Sore Predictor Scale (RR = 21.4); and clinical judgment (RR = 1.89). Pooled analysis of 11 studies found adequate risk prediction capacity in various clinical settings; the Braden, Norton, EMINA (mEntal state, Mobility, Incontinence, Nutrition, Activity), Waterlow, and Cubbin-Jackson scales showed the highest predictive capacity. The clinical judgment of nurses was found to achieve inadequate predictive capacity when used alone, and should be used in combination with a validated scale.

  19. Large eddy simulation of zero-pressure-gradient turbulent boundary layer based on different scaling laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Wan; Samtaney, Ravi

    2013-11-01

    We present results of large eddy simulation (LES) for a smooth-wall, zero-pressure-gradient turbulent boundary layer. We employ the stretched vortex sub-grid-scale model in the simulations augmented by a wall model. Our wall model is based on the virtual-wall model introduced by Chung & Pullin (J. Fluid Mech 2009). An essential component of their wall model is an ODE governing the local wall-normal velocity gradient obtained using inner-scaling ansatz. We test two variants of the wall model based on different similarity laws: one is based on a log-law and the other on a power-law. The specific form of the power law scaling utilized is that proposed by George & Castillo (Appl. Mech. Rev. 1997), dubbed the ``GC Law''. Turbulent inflow conditions are generated by a recycling method, and applying scaling laws corresponding to the two variants of the wall model, and a uniform way to determine the inlet friction velocity. For Reynolds number based on momentum thickness, Reθ , ranging from 104 to 1012 it is found that the velocity profiles generally follow the log law form rather than the power law. For large Reynolds number asymptotic behavior, LES based on different scaling laws the boundary layer thickness and turbulent intensities do not show much difference. Supported by a KAUST funded project on large eddy simulation of turbulent flows. The IBM Blue Gene P Shaheen at KAUST was utilized for the simulations.

  20. Simulations of nanocrystals under pressure: Combining electronic enthalpy and linear-scaling density-functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Corsini, Niccolò R. C. Greco, Andrea; Haynes, Peter D.; Hine, Nicholas D. M.; Molteni, Carla

    2013-08-28

    We present an implementation in a linear-scaling density-functional theory code of an electronic enthalpy method, which has been found to be natural and efficient for the ab initio calculation of finite systems under hydrostatic pressure. Based on a definition of the system volume as that enclosed within an electronic density isosurface [M. Cococcioni, F. Mauri, G. Ceder, and N. Marzari, Phys. Rev. Lett.94, 145501 (2005)], it supports both geometry optimizations and molecular dynamics simulations. We introduce an approach for calibrating the parameters defining the volume in the context of geometry optimizations and discuss their significance. Results in good agreement with simulations using explicit solvents are obtained, validating our approach. Size-dependent pressure-induced structural transformations and variations in the energy gap of hydrogenated silicon nanocrystals are investigated, including one comparable in size to recent experiments. A detailed analysis of the polyamorphic transformations reveals three types of amorphous structures and their persistence on depressurization is assessed.

  1. Simulations of nanocrystals under pressure: combining electronic enthalpy and linear-scaling density-functional theory.

    PubMed

    Corsini, Niccolò R C; Greco, Andrea; Hine, Nicholas D M; Molteni, Carla; Haynes, Peter D

    2013-08-28

    We present an implementation in a linear-scaling density-functional theory code of an electronic enthalpy method, which has been found to be natural and efficient for the ab initio calculation of finite systems under hydrostatic pressure. Based on a definition of the system volume as that enclosed within an electronic density isosurface [M. Cococcioni, F. Mauri, G. Ceder, and N. Marzari, Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 145501 (2005)], it supports both geometry optimizations and molecular dynamics simulations. We introduce an approach for calibrating the parameters defining the volume in the context of geometry optimizations and discuss their significance. Results in good agreement with simulations using explicit solvents are obtained, validating our approach. Size-dependent pressure-induced structural transformations and variations in the energy gap of hydrogenated silicon nanocrystals are investigated, including one comparable in size to recent experiments. A detailed analysis of the polyamorphic transformations reveals three types of amorphous structures and their persistence on depressurization is assessed.

  2. The absolute path command

    SciTech Connect

    Moody, A.

    2012-05-11

    The ap command traveres all symlinks in a given file, directory, or executable name to identify the final absolute path. It can print just the final path, each intermediate link along with the symlink chan, and the permissions and ownership of each directory component in the final path. It has functionality similar to "which", except that it shows the final path instead of the first path. It is also similar to "pwd", but it can provide the absolute path to a relative directory from the current working directory.

  3. Mesos-scale modeling of irradiation in pressurized water reactor concrete biological shields

    SciTech Connect

    Le Pape, Yann; Huang, Hai

    2016-01-01

    Neutron irradiation exposure causes aggregate expansion, namely radiation-induced volumetric expansion (RIVE). The structural significance of RIVE on a portion of a prototypical pressurized water reactor (PWR) concrete biological shield (CBS) is investigated by using a meso- scale nonlinear concrete model with inputs from an irradiation transport code and a coupled moisture transport-heat transfer code. RIVE-induced severe cracking onset appears to be triggered by the ini- tial shrinkage-induced cracking and propagates to a depth of > 10 cm at extended operation of 80 years. Relaxation of the cement paste stresses results in delaying the crack propagation by about 10 years.

  4. Large-scale multiplex absolute protein quantification of drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters in human intestine, liver, and kidney microsomes by SWATH-MS: Comparison with MRM/SRM and HR-MRM/PRM.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Kenji; Hirayama-Kurogi, Mio; Ito, Shingo; Kuno, Takuya; Yoneyama, Toshihiro; Obuchi, Wataru; Terasaki, Tetsuya; Ohtsuki, Sumio

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine simultaneously the absolute protein amounts of 152 membrane and membrane-associated proteins, including 30 metabolizing enzymes and 107 transporters, in pooled microsomal fractions of human liver, kidney, and intestine by means of SWATH-MS with stable isotope-labeled internal standard peptides, and to compare the results with those obtained by MRM/SRM and high resolution (HR)-MRM/PRM. The protein expression levels of 27 metabolizing enzymes, 54 transporters, and six other membrane proteins were quantitated by SWATH-MS; other targets were below the lower limits of quantitation. Most of the values determined by SWATH-MS differed by less than 50% from those obtained by MRM/SRM or HR-MRM/PRM. Various metabolizing enzymes were expressed in liver microsomes more abundantly than in other microsomes. Ten, 13, and eight transporters listed as important for drugs by International Transporter Consortium were quantified in liver, kidney, and intestinal microsomes, respectively. Our results indicate that SWATH-MS enables large-scale multiplex absolute protein quantification while retaining similar quantitative capability to MRM/SRM or HR-MRM/PRM. SWATH-MS is expected to be useful methodology in the context of drug development for elucidating the molecular mechanisms of drug absorption, metabolism, and excretion in the human body based on protein profile information.

  5. Pressure spectra for vortex models of fine-scale homogeneous turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pullin, D. I.

    1995-04-01

    Pressure spectra at large wave numbers are calculated for Lundgren-Townsend vortex models of the fine scales of homogeneous turbulence. Specific results are given for the Burgers vortex and also for the Lundgren-strained spiral vortex. For the latter case, it is found that the contribution to the shell-summed spectrum produced by the interaction between the axisymmetric and nonaxisymmetric components of the velocity field is proportional to k-7/3 (k=‖k‖ is the modulus of the wave number) in agreement with Kolmogorov-type dimensional arguments. Numerical estimates of the dimensionless prefactors for this component are obtained in Kolmogorov scaling variables and comparisons are made with results from the Batchelor-Kolmogorov theory, and with experimental measurement.

  6. Scaling properties of the mean wall-normal velocity in zero-pressure-gradient boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Tie; Klewicki, Joseph

    2016-12-01

    The scaling properties of the mean wall-normal velocity V (x ,y ) in zero-pressure-gradient laminar and turbulent boundary-layer flows are investigated using numerical simulation data, physical experiment data, and integral analyses of the governing equations. The maximum mean wall-normal velocity V∞ and the boundary-layer thickness δ are evidenced to be the proper scaling for V over most if not all of the boundary layer. This is different from the behavior of the mean streamwise velocity U or the turbulent shear stress T =-ρ , which depend on different characteristic length scales in the regions near and away from the surface, respectively. The reason for this apparent difference in scaling behaviors is described physically relative to the downstream development of the U velocity profile and the mechanisms of boundary-layer growth. Insights pertaining to this are further surmised from an analytical relationship for the ratio of the displacement to momentum thickness, i.e., shape factor H . Integral analyses using the continuity and mean momentum equation show that U∞V∞/uτ2=H , where uτ is the friction velocity. Both the laminar similarity solution and direct numerical simulation data in post-transitional flows convincingly support this relation. Over the transitional regime, data of sufficiently high quality are lacking to check if this relation remains valid.

  7. Pressure-induced structural transformations in nanomaterials: a linear-scaling DFT investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corsini, Niccolo; Haynes, Peter; Molteni, Carla; Hine, Nicholas; CDT TSM Collaboration

    2014-03-01

    Semiconductor nanomaterials display a number of peculiar and tunable properties that distinguish them from their bulk counterparts. Of particular interest is their response to applied pressure, as they transform from one crystalline or amorphous structure to another. Accurate simulations are important for understanding finite size effects in the atomistic mechanisms of phase transformations (difficult to observe clearly in macroscopic experiments), for the opportunity to uncover novel metastable phases stabilized in finite systems, and for potentially innovative applications of nanomaterials. First-principles methods are essential to accurately describe the bond breaking/making in phase transformations and the realistic description of surfaces (often covered by complex surfactants). However the computational cost limits both the length- and time-scales attainable. We have combined an O(N) density functional theory code for large systems and an electronic-enthalpy method[1] to apply pressure to finite systems to model with quantum mechanical precision processes induced by pressure in nanomaterials under realistic conditions. The focus is on Si, Ge and CdS nanocrystals that are currently favoured for technological applications. Centre for Doctoral Training in Theory and Simulation of Materials Imperial College London via EPSRC grant.

  8. Dispersion in deep polar firn driven by synoptic-scale surface pressure variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buizert, Christo; Severinghaus, Jeffrey P.

    2016-09-01

    Commonly, three mechanisms of firn air transport are distinguished: molecular diffusion, advection, and near-surface convective mixing. Here we identify and describe a fourth mechanism, namely dispersion driven by synoptic-scale surface pressure variability (or barometric pumping). We use published gas chromatography experiments on firn samples to derive the along-flow dispersivity of firn, and combine this dispersivity with a dynamical air pressure propagation model forced by surface air pressure time series to estimate the magnitude of dispersive mixing in the firn. We show that dispersion dominates mixing within the firn lock-in zone. Trace gas concentrations measured in firn air samples from various polar sites confirm that dispersive mixing occurs. Including dispersive mixing in a firn air transport model suggests that our theoretical estimates have the correct order of magnitude, yet may overestimate the true dispersion. We further show that strong barometric pumping, such as at the Law Dome site, may reduce the gravitational enrichment of δ15N-N2 and other tracers below gravitational equilibrium, questioning the traditional definition of the lock-in depth as the depth where δ15N enrichment ceases. Last, we propose that 86Kr excess may act as a proxy for past synoptic activity (or paleo-storminess) at the site.

  9. Absolute Distance Measurement with the MSTAR Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lay, Oliver P.; Dubovitsky, Serge; Peters, Robert; Burger, Johan; Ahn, Seh-Won; Steier, William H.; Fetterman, Harrold R.; Chang, Yian

    2003-01-01

    The MSTAR sensor (Modulation Sideband Technology for Absolute Ranging) is a new system for measuring absolute distance, capable of resolving the integer cycle ambiguity of standard interferometers, and making it possible to measure distance with sub-nanometer accuracy. The sensor uses a single laser in conjunction with fast phase modulators and low frequency detectors. We describe the design of the system - the principle of operation, the metrology source, beamlaunching optics, and signal processing - and show results for target distances up to 1 meter. We then demonstrate how the system can be scaled to kilometer-scale distances.

  10. The hyperfine structure in the rotational spectra of D2(17)O and HD(17)O: Confirmation of the absolute nuclear magnetic shielding scale for oxygen.

    PubMed

    Puzzarini, Cristina; Cazzoli, Gabriele; Harding, Michael E; Vázquez, Juana; Gauss, Jürgen

    2015-03-28

    Guided by theoretical predictions, the hyperfine structures of the rotational spectra of mono- and bideuterated-water containing (17)O have been experimentally investigated. To reach sub-Doppler resolution, required to resolve the hyperfine structure due to deuterium quadrupole coupling as well as to spin-rotation (SR) and dipolar spin-spin couplings, the Lamb-dip technique has been employed. The experimental investigation and in particular, the spectral analysis have been supported by high-level quantum-chemical computations employing coupled-cluster techniques and, for the first time, a complete experimental determination of the hyperfine parameters involved was possible. The experimentally determined (17)O spin-rotation constants of D2 (17)O and HD(17)O were used to derive the paramagnetic part of the corresponding nuclear magnetic shielding constants. Together with the computed diamagnetic contributions as well as the vibrational and temperature corrections, the latter constants have been employed to confirm the oxygen nuclear magnetic shielding scale, recently established on the basis of spin-rotation data for H2 (17)O [Puzzarini et al., J. Chem. Phys. 131, 234304 (2009)].

  11. Human cortical bone: Computer method for physical behavior at nano scale constant pressure assumption.

    PubMed

    Racila, M; Crolet, J M

    2006-01-01

    It is well known that long term behavior of implants depends on bone remodeling. In the absence of a model of this phenomenon, few numerical simulations take into account bone remodeling. Some laws have been proposed but they cannot be used in the essential area surrounding the implant. We propose a multi-scale approach: cortical bone is structured in a hierarchical way consisting of five levels. The cortical part of a given bone is made up of various areas having different physical properties adapted to locally existing conditions. A Bony Elementary Volume denotes the elementary part of such a zone which constitutes our first level. The other levels are in conformity with our previous studies: osteon, lamella, fibre and fibril. This latter is composed by collagen and hydroxyapatite (Hap) occurring in a viscous liquid containing mineral ions. Mathematical homogenisation theory is used to determine equivalent macroscopic properties of a BEV, knowing the physical properties of collagen and Hap and the architectural description of this bony structure. For improving the performance of our simulation software, a new behavior law has been introduced with no continuity between the various levels. The effect of the fluid at the nanoscopic scale is modeled by a constant pressure. Recent developments allow us to determine the magnitude of various entities at nanoscopic scale from information at the macroscopic level. Realized simulations show that the assumption of constant pressure is not sufficient to characterize the nanoscopic mechanical behaviour. This point needs a more complex model with the introduction of a coupling between structure and fluid. This aspect is in development.

  12. Scale-4 Analysis of Pressurized Water Reactor Critical Configurations: Volume 3-Surry Unit 1 Cycle 2

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, S.M.

    1995-01-01

    The requirements of ANSI/ANS 8.1 specify that calculational methods for away-from-reactor criticality safety analyses be validated against experimental measurements. If credit for the negative reactivity of the depleted (or spent) fuel isotopics is desired, it is necessary to benchmark computational methods against spent fuel critical configurations. This report summarizes a portion of the ongoing effort to benchmark away-from-reactor criticality analysis methods using selected critical configurations from commercial pressurized-water reactors. The analysis methodology selected for all the calculations in this report is based on the codes and data provided in the SCALE-4 code system. The isotopic densities for the spent fuel assemblies in the critical configurations were calculated using the SAS2H analytical sequence of the SCALE-4 system. The sources of data and the procedures for deriving SAS2H input parameters are described in detail. The SNIKR code module was used to extract the necessary isotopic densities from the SAS2H results and to provide the data in the format required by the SCALE criticality analysis modules. The CSASN analytical sequence in SCALE-4 was used to perform resonance processing of the cross sections. The KENO V.a module of SCALE-4 was used to calculate the effective multiplication factor (k{sub eff}) of each case. The SCALE-4 27-group burnup library containing ENDF/B-IV (actinides) and ENDF/B-V (fission products) data was used for all the calculations. This volume of the report documents the SCALE system analysis of two reactor critical configurations for Surry Unit 1 Cycle 2. This unit and cycle were chosen for a previous analysis using a different methodology because detailed isotopics from multidimensional reactor calculations were available from the Virginia Power Company. These data permitted a direct comparison of criticality calculations using the utility-calculated isotopics with those using the isotopics generated by the SCALE-4

  13. The Pressure-Activation-Stress scale in relation to ADHD and cortisol.

    PubMed

    Isaksson, J; Nilsson, K W; Lindblad, F

    2015-02-01

    The Pressure-Activation-Stress (PAS) scale is a self-report questionnaire for children concerning perceived stress. To explore behavioral and physiological correlates, we investigated if scores discriminate between a group prone to perceive high levels of stress [children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)] and a healthy school sample, and if they are associated with diurnal cortisol levels. The PAS scale was filled in at home by children (11-17 years) with clinically confirmed ADHD (n = 102) and non-affected comparisons (n = 146). Saliva samples were collected four times during a regular school day for radioimmunoassay analysis of cortisol. Subtypes and severity of ADHD symptoms were determined using parental rating scales. Children with ADHD scored higher on the PAS scale than a school sample. The PAS scores were similar over ages in the ADHD group while they increased with age in the healthy group. Female sex was associated with higher stress in both groups but no gender interaction was found. No association was found between PAS scores and cortisol levels in neither group. Children in the ADHD group had a lower ratio of cortisol levels/perceived stress on all sampling occasions, built up both by the higher PAS scores and the lower cortisol levels in children with ADHD. The higher PAS scores in children with ADHD support the validity of the scale. The lack of association between PAS scores and diurnal cortisol levels is intriguing and illustrates the complexity of the stress concept. Stress-related fragility seems to accompany ADHD during childhood.

  14. Statistical parametric mapping of the regional distribution and ontogenetic scaling of foot pressures during walking in Asian elephants (Elephas maximus).

    PubMed

    Panagiotopoulou, Olga; Pataky, Todd C; Hill, Zoe; Hutchinson, John R

    2012-05-01

    Foot pressure distributions during locomotion have causal links with the anatomical and structural configurations of the foot tissues and the mechanics of locomotion. Elephant feet have five toes bound in a flexible pad of fibrous tissue (digital cushion). Does this specialized foot design control peak foot pressures in such giant animals? And how does body size, such as during ontogenetic growth, influence foot pressures? We addressed these questions by studying foot pressure distributions in elephant feet and their correlation with body mass and centre of pressure trajectories, using statistical parametric mapping (SPM), a neuro-imaging technology. Our results show a positive correlation between body mass and peak pressures, with the highest pressures dominated by the distal ends of the lateral toes (digits 3, 4 and 5). We also demonstrate that pressure reduction in the elephant digital cushion is a complex interaction of its viscoelastic tissue structure and its centre of pressure trajectories, because there is a tendency to avoid rear 'heel' contact as an elephant grows. Using SPM, we present a complete map of pressure distributions in elephant feet during ontogeny by performing statistical analysis at the pixel level across the entire plantar/palmar surface. We hope that our study will build confidence in the potential clinical and scaling applications of mammalian foot pressures, given our findings in support of a link between regional peak pressures and pathogenesis in elephant feet.

  15. Time-resolved transglottal pressure measurements in a scaled up vocal fold model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ringenberg, Hunter; Krane, Michael; Rogers, Dylan; Misfeldt, Mitchel; Wei, Timothy

    2016-11-01

    Experimental measurements of flow through a scaled up dynamic human vocal fold model are presented. The simplified 10x scale vocal fold model from Krane, et al. (2007) was used to examine fundamental features of vocal fold oscillatory motion. Of particular interest was the temporal variation of transglottal pressure multiplied by the volume flow rate through the glottis throughout an oscillation cycle. Experiments were dynamically scaled to examine a range of frequencies, 100 - 200 Hz, corresponding to the male and female voice. By using water as the working fluid, very high resolution, both spatial and temporal resolution, was achieved. Time resolved movies of flow through symmetrically oscillating vocal folds will be presented. Both individual realizations as well as phase-averaged data will be shown. Key features, such as randomness and development time of the Coanda effect, vortex shedding, and volume flow rate data have been presented in previous APS-DFD meetings. This talk will focus more on the relation between the flow and aeroacoustics associated with vocal fold oscillations. Supported by the NIH.

  16. Scaling properties of the mean wall-normal velocity in the zero pressure gradient boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Tie; Klewicki, Joseph

    2016-11-01

    The scaling properties of the mean wall-normal velocity, V (x , y) , in zero-pressure-gradient laminar and turbulent boundary layer flows is investigated using numerical simulation data, physical experiment data, and integral analyses of governing equations. The maximum mean wall-normal velocity, V∞, and the boundary layer thickness, δ, are evidenced to be the proper scaling for V over most if not the entire boundary layer. This is different from the behavior of the mean streamwise velocity (U) or the turbulent shear stress (T = - ρ < uv >), which depend on different characteristic length scales in the regions near to and away from the surface. Insights pertaining to this are further surmised from an analytical relationship for the ratio of the displacement to momentum thickness, i.e., shape factor, H. Integral analyses using the continuity and mean momentum equation show that (U∞V∞) /uτ2 = H , where uτ is the friction velocity. Both the laminar similarity solution and DNS data in post-transitional flows convincingly support this relation. Over the transitional regime, sufficiently high quality data is still lacking to check if this relation remains valid.

  17. NASA/GE Energy Efficient Engine low pressure turbine scaled test vehicle performance report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bridgeman, M. J.; Cherry, D. G.; Pedersen, J.

    1983-01-01

    The low pressure turbine for the NASA/General Electric Energy Efficient Engine is a highly loaded five-stage design featuring high outer wall slope, controlled vortex aerodynamics, low stage flow coefficient, and reduced clearances. An assessment of the performance of the LPT has been made based on a series of scaled air-turbine tests divided into two phases: Block 1 and Block 2. The transition duct and the first two stages of the turbine were evaluated during the Block 1 phase from March through August 1979. The full five-stage scale model, representing the final integrated core/low spool (ICLS) design and incorporating redesigns of stages 1 and 2 based on Block 1 data analysis, was tested as Block 2 in June through September 1981. Results from the scaled air-turbine tests, reviewed herein, indicate that the five-stage turbine designed for the ICLS application will attain an efficiency level of 91.5 percent at the Mach 0.8/10.67-km (35,000-ft), max-climb design point. This is relative to program goals of 91.1 percent for the ICLS and 91.7 percent for the flight propulsion system (FPS).

  18. Scaling the Morphology of Sapping and Pressurized Groundwater Experiments to Martian Valleys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marra, W. A.; Kleinhans, M. G.

    2013-12-01

    Various valleys exist on Mars, which shows the former existence of fluvial activity and thus liquid water at the surface. Although these valleys show similarities with some valleys on Earth, many morphological features are unique for Mars or are very rare on Earth. Therefore, we lack knowledge about the formative processes of these enigmatic valleys. In this study, we explored possible groundwater scenarios for the formation of these valleys using flume experiments, as there are no pure Earth analogues for these systems. We aim to infer their formative processes from morphological properties. A series of flume experiments were carried out in a 4x6x1 m experimental setup, where we observed the valley formation as result from seeping groundwater by both local and distal groundwater sources and by pressurized groundwater release. Time-lapse imagery and DEMs of the experiments show the morphological development, associated processes, and landscape evolution. Indicators of the processes where we particularly looked at were changes in valley slope, cross-sectional shape, the relations between valley dimensions, and regional landscape properties as drainage density and valley size distributions. Hydrological modelling assists in scaling the observed experimental features to real-world systems. Additionally, we looked at valleys on Earth in the Atacama Desert, at Box canyon in Idaho, valleys around Kohala on Hawaii and Apalachicola bluffs in Florida to test the applicability of our methods to real-world systems. In the seeping groundwater valleys, valleys develop due to a combination of mass-wasting failures, mudflows and fluvial flow. The latter two processes are expressed in the final morphology by a break in slope. The mass wasting processes result in U-shaped valleys, which are more pronounced in distal groundwater cases. However, in real-world cases of similar shaped valleys, the cross-sectional shape seems strongly influenced by the strength of the material as well

  19. Scale-4 Analysis of Pressurized Water Reactor Critical Configurations: Volume 2-Sequoyah Unit 2 Cycle 3

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, S.M.

    1995-01-01

    The requirements of ANSI/ANS 8.1 specify that calculational methods for away-from-reactor criticality safety analyses be validated against experimental measurements. If credit for the negative reactivity of the depleted (or spent) fuel isotopics is desired, it is necessary to benchmark computational methods against spent fuel critical configurations. This report summarizes a portion of the ongoing effort to benchmark away-from-reactor criticality analysis methods using critical configurations from commercial pressurized-water reactors. The analysis methodology selected for all the calculations reported herein is based on the codes and data provided in the SCALE-4 code system. The isotopic densities for the spent fuel assemblies in the critical configurations were calculated using the SAS2H analytical sequence of the SCALE-4 system. The sources of data and the procedures for deriving SAS2H input parameters are described in detail. The SNIKR code module was used to extract the necessary isotopic densities from the SAS2H results and provide the data in the format required by the SCALE criticality analysis modules. The CSASN analytical sequence in SCALE-4 was used to perform resonance processing of the cross sections. The KENO V.a module of SCALE-4 was used to calculate the effective multiplication factor (k{sub eff}) of each case. The SCALE-4 27-group burnup library containing ENDF/B-IV (actinides) and ENDF/B-V (fission products) data was used for all the calculations. This volume of the report documents the SCALE system analysis of three reactor critical configurations for the Sequoyah Unit 2 Cycle 3. This unit and cycle were chosen because of the relevance in spent fuel benchmark applications: (1) the unit had a significantly long downtime of 2.7 years during the middle of cycle (MOC) 3, and (2) the core consisted entirely of burned fuel at the MOC restart. The first benchmark critical calculation was the MOC restart at hot, full-power (HFP) critical conditions. The

  20. Testing of Full Scale Flight Qualified Kevlar Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greene, Nathanael; Saulsberry, Regor; Yoder, Tommy; Forsyth, Brad; Thesken, John; Phoenix, Leigh

    2007-01-01

    Many decades ago NASA identified a need for low-mass pressure vessels for carrying various fluids aboard rockets, spacecraft, and satellites. A pressure vessel design known as the composite overwrapped pressure vessel (COPV) was identified to provide a weight savings over traditional single-material pressure vessels typically made of metal and this technology has been in use for space flight applications since the 1970's. A typical vessel design consisted of a thin liner material, typically a metal, overwrapped with a continuous fiber yarn impregnated with epoxy. Most designs were such that the overwrapped fiber would carry a majority of load at normal operating pressures. The weight advantage for a COPV versus a traditional singlematerial pressure vessel contributed to widespread use of COPVs by NASA, the military, and industry. This technology is currently used for personal breathing supply storage, fuel storage for auto and mass transport vehicles and for various space flight and aircraft applications. The NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) was recently asked to review the operation of Kevlar 2 and carbon COPVs to ensure they are safely operated on NASA space flight vehicles. A request was made to evaluate the life remaining on the Kevlar COPVs used on the Space Shuttle for helium and nitrogen storage. This paper provides a review of Kevlar COPV testing relevant to the NESC assessment. Also discussed are some key findings, observations, and recommendations that may be applicable to the COPV user community. Questions raised during the investigations have revealed the need for testing to better understand the stress rupture life and age life of COPVs. The focus of this paper is to describe burst testing of Kevlar COPVs that has been completed as a part of an the effort to evaluate the effects of ageing and shelf life on full scale COPVs. The test articles evaluated in this discussion had a diameter of 22 inches for S/N 014 and 40 inches for S/N 011. The

  1. Energetics and energy scaling of quasi-monoenergetic protons in laser radiation pressure acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Tungchang; Shao Xi; Liu Chuansheng; Su Jaojang; Dudnikova, Galina; Sagdeev, Roald Z.; Eliasson, Bengt; Tripathi, Vipin

    2011-12-15

    Theoretical and computational studies of the ion energy scaling of the radiation pressure acceleration of an ultra-thin foil by short pulse intense laser irradiation are presented. To obtain a quasi-monoenergetic ion beam with an energy spread of less than 20%, two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations show that the maximum energy of the quasi-monoenergetic ion beam is limited by self-induced transparency at the density minima caused by the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. For foils of optimal thickness, the time over which Rayleigh-Taylor instability fully develops and transparency occurs is almost independent of the laser amplitude. With a laser power of about one petawatt, quasi-monogenetic protons with 200 MeV and carbon ions with 100 MeV per nucleon can be obtained, suitable for particle therapy applications.

  2. Small-Scale Metal Tanks for High Pressure Storage of Fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    London, Adam (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Small scale metal tanks for high-pressure storage of fluids having tank factors of more than 5000 meters and volumes of ten cubic inches or less featuring arrays of interconnected internal chambers having at least inner walls thinner than gage limitations allow. The chambers may be arranged as multiple internal independent vessels. Walls of chambers that are also portions of external tank walls may be arcuate on the internal and/or external surfaces, including domed. The tanks may be shaped adaptively and/or conformally to an application, including, for example, having one or more flat outer walls and/or having an annular shape. The tanks may have dual-purpose inlet/outlet conduits of may have separate inlet and outlet conduits. The tanks are made by fusion bonding etched metal foil layers patterned from slices of a CAD model of the tank. The fusion bonded foil stack may be further machined.

  3. {sup 3}He melting pressure temperature scale below 25 mK

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, E.D.; Ni, W.; Xia, J.S.

    1995-04-01

    Using {sup 60}Co {gamma} ray anisotropy radiation as a primary thermometer, with a Pt NMR susceptibility secondary thermometer, the authors have made high precision measurements of the {sup 3}He melting pressure versus temperature from 500 {mu}K to 25 mK. Temperatures obtained for the fixed points on the melting curve are: the superfluid A transition T{sub A} = 2.505 mK, the A-B transition T{sub AB} = 1.948 mK, and the solid ordering temperature T{sub N} = 0.934 mK. The authors provide a functional form for P(T), which, with the fixed points, constitutes a convenient temperature scale, based on a primary thermometer, usable to well below 1 mK.

  4. Allometry and Scaling of the Intraocular Pressure and Aqueous Humour Flow Rate in Vertebrate Eyes

    PubMed Central

    Zouache, Moussa A.; Eames, Ian; Samsudin, Amir

    2016-01-01

    In vertebrates, intraocular pressure (IOP) is required to maintain the eye into a shape allowing it to function as an optical instrument. It is sustained by the balance between the production of aqueous humour by the ciliary body and the resistance to its outflow from the eye. Dysregulation of the IOP is often pathological to vision. High IOP may lead to glaucoma, which is in man the second most prevalent cause of blindness. Here, we examine the importance of the IOP and rate of formation of aqueous humour in the development of vertebrate eyes by performing allometric and scaling analyses of the forces acting on the eye during head movement and the energy demands of the cornea, and testing the predictions of the models against a list of measurements in vertebrates collated through a systematic review. We show that the IOP has a weak dependence on body mass, and that in order to maintain the focal length of the eye, it needs to be an order of magnitude greater than the pressure drop across the eye resulting from gravity or head movement. This constitutes an evolutionary constraint that is common to all vertebrates. In animals with cornea-based optics, this constraint also represents a condition to maintain visual acuity. Estimated IOPs were found to increase with the evolution of terrestrial animals. The rate of formation of aqueous humour was found to be adjusted to the metabolic requirements of the cornea, scaling as Vac0.67, where Vac is the volume of the anterior chamber. The present work highlights an interdependence between IOP and aqueous flow rate crucial to ocular function that must be considered to understand the evolution of the dioptric apparatus. It should also be taken into consideration in the prevention and treatment of glaucoma. PMID:26990431

  5. A Theoretical Investigation of Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessel (COPV) Mechanics Applied to NASA Full Scale Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greene, N.; Thesken, J. C.; Murthy, P. L. N.; Phoenix, S. L.; Palko, J.; Eldridge, J.; Sutter, J.; Saulsberry, R.; Beeson, H.

    2006-01-01

    A theoretical investigation of the factors controlling the stress rupture life of the National Aeronautics and Space Agency's (NASA) composite overwrapped pressure vessels (COPVs) continues. Kevlar(TradeMark) fiber overwrapped tanks are of particular concern due to their long usage and the poorly understood stress rupture process in Kevlar(TradeMark) filaments. Existing long term data show that the rupture process is a function of stress, temperature and time. However, due to the presence of a load sharing liner, the manufacturing induced residual stresses and the complex mechanical response, the state of actual fiber stress in flight hardware and test articles is not clearly known. This paper is a companion to the experimental investigation reported in [1] and develops a theoretical framework necessary to design full-scale pathfinder experiments and accurately interpret the experimentally observed deformation and failure mechanisms leading up to static burst in COPVs. The fundamental mechanical response of COPVs is described using linear elasticity and thin shell theory and discussed in comparison to existing experimental observations. These comparisons reveal discrepancies between physical data and the current analytical results and suggest that the vessel's residual stress state and the spatial stress distribution as a function of pressure may be completely different from predictions based upon existing linear elastic analyses. The 3D elasticity of transversely isotropic spherical shells demonstrates that an overly compliant transverse stiffness relative to membrane stiffness can account for some of this by shifting a thin shell problem well into the realm of thick shell response. The use of calibration procedures are demonstrated as calibrated thin shell model results and finite element results are shown to be in good agreement with the experimental results. The successes reported here have lead to continuing work with full scale testing of larger NASA COPV

  6. A Theoretical Investigation of Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessel (COPV) Mechanics Applied to NASA Full Scale Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thesken, John C.; Murthy, Pappu L. N.; Phoenix, S. L.; Greene, N.; Palko, Joseph L.; Eldridge, Jeffrey; Sutter, James; Saulsberry, R.; Beeson, H.

    2009-01-01

    A theoretical investigation of the factors controlling the stress rupture life of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) composite overwrapped pressure vessels (COPVs) continues. Kevlar (DuPont) fiber overwrapped tanks are of particular concern due to their long usage and the poorly understood stress rupture process in Kevlar filaments. Existing long term data show that the rupture process is a function of stress, temperature and time. However due to the presence of a load sharing liner, the manufacturing induced residual stresses and the complex mechanical response, the state of actual fiber stress in flight hardware and test articles is not clearly known. This paper is a companion to a previously reported experimental investigation and develops a theoretical framework necessary to design full-scale pathfinder experiments and accurately interpret the experimentally observed deformation and failure mechanisms leading up to static burst in COPVs. The fundamental mechanical response of COPVs is described using linear elasticity and thin shell theory and discussed in comparison to existing experimental observations. These comparisons reveal discrepancies between physical data and the current analytical results and suggest that the vessel s residual stress state and the spatial stress distribution as a function of pressure may be completely different from predictions based upon existing linear elastic analyses. The 3D elasticity of transversely isotropic spherical shells demonstrates that an overly compliant transverse stiffness relative to membrane stiffness can account for some of this by shifting a thin shell problem well into the realm of thick shell response. The use of calibration procedures are demonstrated as calibrated thin shell model results and finite element results are shown to be in good agreement with the experimental results. The successes reported here have lead to continuing work with full scale testing of larger NASA COPV

  7. Allometry and Scaling of the Intraocular Pressure and Aqueous Humour Flow Rate in Vertebrate Eyes.

    PubMed

    Zouache, Moussa A; Eames, Ian; Samsudin, Amir

    2016-01-01

    In vertebrates, intraocular pressure (IOP) is required to maintain the eye into a shape allowing it to function as an optical instrument. It is sustained by the balance between the production of aqueous humour by the ciliary body and the resistance to its outflow from the eye. Dysregulation of the IOP is often pathological to vision. High IOP may lead to glaucoma, which is in man the second most prevalent cause of blindness. Here, we examine the importance of the IOP and rate of formation of aqueous humour in the development of vertebrate eyes by performing allometric and scaling analyses of the forces acting on the eye during head movement and the energy demands of the cornea, and testing the predictions of the models against a list of measurements in vertebrates collated through a systematic review. We show that the IOP has a weak dependence on body mass, and that in order to maintain the focal length of the eye, it needs to be an order of magnitude greater than the pressure drop across the eye resulting from gravity or head movement. This constitutes an evolutionary constraint that is common to all vertebrates. In animals with cornea-based optics, this constraint also represents a condition to maintain visual acuity. Estimated IOPs were found to increase with the evolution of terrestrial animals. The rate of formation of aqueous humour was found to be adjusted to the metabolic requirements of the cornea, scaling as Vac(0.67), where Vac is the volume of the anterior chamber. The present work highlights an interdependence between IOP and aqueous flow rate crucial to ocular function that must be considered to understand the evolution of the dioptric apparatus. It should also be taken into consideration in the prevention and treatment of glaucoma.

  8. Imparting Barely Visible Impact Damage to a Stitched Composite Large-Scale Pressure Box

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovejoy, Andrew E.; Przekop, Adam

    2016-01-01

    The Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure (PRSEUS) is a concept that was developed by The Boeing Company to address the complex structural design aspects associated with a pressurized hybrid wing body (HWB) aircraft configuration, which has been a focus of the NASA Environmentally Responsible Aviation Project. The NASA-Boeing structural development for the HWB aircraft culminated in testing of the multi-bay box, which is an 80%-scale representation of the pressurized center-body section. This structure was tested in the NASA Langley Research Center Combined Loads Test System facility. As part of this testing, barely visible impact damage was imparted to the interior and exterior of the test article to demonstrate compliance with a condition representative of the requirements for Category 1 damaged composite structure as defined by the Federal Aviation Regulations. Interior impacts were imparted using an existing spring-loaded impactor, while the exterior impacts were imparted using a newly designed, gravity-driven impactor. This paper describes the impacts to the test article, and the design of the gravitydriven guided-weight impactor. The guided-weight impactor proved to be a very reliable method to impart barely visible impact damage in locations which are not easily accessible for a traditional drop-weight impactor, while at the same time having the capability to be highly configurable for use on other aircraft structures.

  9. Testing of a Stitched Composite Large-Scale Multi-Bay Pressure Box

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jegley, Dawn; Rouse, Marshall; Przekop, Adam; Lovejoy, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    NASA has created the Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) Project to develop technologies to reduce aviation's impact on the environment. A critical aspect of this pursuit is the development of a lighter, more robust airframe to enable the introduction of unconventional aircraft configurations. NASA and The Boeing Company have worked together to develop a structural concept that is lightweight and an advancement beyond state-of-the-art composite structures. The Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure (PRSEUS) is an integrally stiffened panel design where elements are stitched together. The PRSEUS concept is designed to maintain residual load carrying capabilities under a variety of damage scenarios. A series of building block tests were evaluated to explore the fundamental assumptions related to the capability and advantages of PRSEUS panels. The final step in the building block series is an 80%-scale pressure box representing a portion of the center section of a Hybrid Wing Body (HWB) transport aircraft. The testing of this article under maneuver load and internal pressure load conditions is the subject of this paper. The experimental evaluation of this article, along with the other building block tests and the accompanying analyses, has demonstrated the viability of a PRSEUS center body for the HWB vehicle. Additionally, much of the development effort is also applicable to traditional tube-and-wing aircraft, advanced aircraft configurations, and other structures where weight and through-the-thickness strength are design considerations.

  10. O absorption measurements in an engineering-scale high-pressure coal gasifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Kai; Sur, Ritobrata; Jeffries, Jay B.; Hanson, Ronald K.; Clark, Tommy; Anthony, Justin; Machovec, Scott; Northington, John

    2014-10-01

    A real-time, in situ water vapor (H2O) sensor using a tunable diode laser near 1,352 nm was developed to continuously monitor water vapor in the synthesis gas of an engineering-scale high-pressure coal gasifier. Wavelength-scanned wavelength-modulation spectroscopy with second harmonic detection (WMS-2 f) was used to determine the absorption magnitude. The 1 f-normalized, WMS-2 f signal (WMS-2 f/1 f) was insensitive to non-absorption transmission losses including beam steering and light scattering by the particulate in the synthesis gas. A fitting strategy was used to simultaneously determine the water vapor mole fraction and the collisional-broadening width of the transition from the scanned 1 f-normalized WMS-2 f waveform at pressures up to 15 atm, which can be used for large absorbance values. This strategy is analogous to the fitting strategy for wavelength-scanned direct absorption measurements. In a test campaign at the US National Carbon Capture Center, the sensor demonstrated a water vapor detection limit of ~800 ppm (25 Hz bandwidth) at conditions with more than 99.99 % non-absorption transmission losses. Successful unattended monitoring was demonstrated over a 435 h period. Strong correlations between the sensor measurements and transient gasifier operation conditions were observed, demonstrating the capability of laser absorption to monitor the gasification process.

  11. Subject-specific biomechanics of trunk: musculoskeletal scaling, internal loads and intradiscal pressure estimation.

    PubMed

    Ghezelbash, F; Shirazi-Adl, A; Arjmand, N; El-Ouaaid, Z; Plamondon, A

    2016-12-01

    Development of a subject-specific computational musculoskeletal trunk model (accounting for age, sex, body weight and body height), estimation of muscle forces and internal loads as well as subsequent validation by comparison with measured intradiscal pressure in various lifting tasks are novel, important and challenging. The objective of the present study is twofold. First, it aims to update and personalize the passive and active structures in an existing musculoskeletal kinematics-driven finite element model. The scaling scheme used an existing imaging database and biomechanical principles to adjust muscle geometries/cross-sectional-areas and passive joint geometry/properties in accordance with subjects' sex, age, body weight and body height. Second, using predictions of a detailed passive finite element model of the ligamentous lumbar spine, a novel nonlinear regression equation was proposed that relates the intradiscal pressure (IDP) at the L4-L5 disc to its compression force and intersegmental flexion rotation. Predicted IDPs and muscle activities of the personalized models under various tasks are found in good-to-excellent agreement with reported measurements. Results indicate the importance of personal parameters when computing muscle forces and spinal loads especially at larger trunk flexion angles as minor changes in individual parameters yielded up to 30 % differences in spinal forces. For more accurate subject-specific estimation of spinal loads and muscle activities, such a comprehensive trunk model should be used that accounts for subject's personalized features on active musculature and passive spinal structure.

  12. Scaling Laws for Magnetic Reconnection when Electron Pressure Anisotropy is near the Firehose Threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohia, Obioma; Egedal, Jan; Lukin, Vyacheslav S.; Daughton, William; Le, Ari

    2015-11-01

    Magnetic reconnection in weakly-collisional, a process linked to solar flares, coronal mass ejections, and magnetic substorms, has been widely studied through fluid and kinetic simulations. While two-fluid models often reproduce the fast reconnection rate of kinetic simulations, significant differences are observed in the structure of the reconnection regions. Recently, new equations of state that accurately account for the development of anisotropic electron pressure due to the electric and magnetic trapping of electrons have been developed. Guide-field, fluid simulations using these equations of state have been shown to reproduce the detailed reconnection region observed in kinetic simulations. Implementing this two-fluid simulation using the HiFi framework, we describe a mechanism for regulation of electron pressure anisotropy as well as study force balance of the electron layers in guide-field reconnection. Scaling laws for the heating observed in these layers based on upstream conditions are derived. Formerly of U.S. Naval Research Laboratory. Any opinions, findings, conclusions and/or recommendations are those of author and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.

  13. Determination of Absolute Zero Using a Computer-Based Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amrani, D.

    2007-01-01

    We present a simple computer-based laboratory experiment for evaluating absolute zero in degrees Celsius, which can be performed in college and undergraduate physical sciences laboratory courses. With a computer, absolute zero apparatus can help demonstrators or students to observe the relationship between temperature and pressure and use…

  14. A priori analysis of subgrid scale pressure and heat flux in high pressure mixing and reacting shear layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Zhiyuan; Korucu, Ayse; Miller, Richard Steven

    2015-11-01

    Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) data on high pressure H2/O2 and H2/air flames using the compressible flow formulation, detailed kinetics, a real fluid equation of state, and generalised diffusion are analysed. The DNS is filtered over a range of filter widths to provide exact terms in the Large Eddy Simulation (LES) governing equations, including unclosed terms. The filtered pressure and the filtered heat flux vector are extensively compared with the pressure and the heat flux vector calculated as a function of the filtered primitive variables (i.e. the exact LES term is compared with its form available within an actual LES). The difference between these forms defines the subgrid pressure and the subgrid heat flux vector. The analyses are done both globally across the entire flame, as well as by conditionally averaging over specific regions of the flame; including regions of large subgrid kinetic energy, subgrid scalar dissipation, subgrid temperature variance, flame temperature, etc. In this work, although negligible for purely mixing cases, the gradient of the subgrid pressure is shown to be of the same order as, and larger than, the corresponding divergence of the turbulent subgrid stresses for reacting cases. This is despite the fact that all species behave essentially as ideal gases for this flame and holds true even when the ideal gas law is used to calculate the pressure. The ratio of the subgrid pressure gradient to the subgrid stress tensor divergence is shown to increase with increasing Reynolds number. Both the subgrid heat flux vector and its divergence are found to be substantially larger in reacting flows in comparison with mixing due to the associated larger temperature gradients. However, the divergence of the subgrid heat flux vector tends to be significantly smaller than other unclosed terms in the energy equation with decreasing significance with increasing Reynolds number.

  15. Electronic Absolute Cartesian Autocollimator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leviton, Douglas B.

    2006-01-01

    An electronic absolute Cartesian autocollimator performs the same basic optical function as does a conventional all-optical or a conventional electronic autocollimator but differs in the nature of its optical target and the manner in which the position of the image of the target is measured. The term absolute in the name of this apparatus reflects the nature of the position measurement, which, unlike in a conventional electronic autocollimator, is based absolutely on the position of the image rather than on an assumed proportionality between the position and the levels of processed analog electronic signals. The term Cartesian in the name of this apparatus reflects the nature of its optical target. Figure 1 depicts the electronic functional blocks of an electronic absolute Cartesian autocollimator along with its basic optical layout, which is the same as that of a conventional autocollimator. Referring first to the optical layout and functions only, this or any autocollimator is used to measure the compound angular deviation of a flat datum mirror with respect to the optical axis of the autocollimator itself. The optical components include an illuminated target, a beam splitter, an objective or collimating lens, and a viewer or detector (described in more detail below) at a viewing plane. The target and the viewing planes are focal planes of the lens. Target light reflected by the datum mirror is imaged on the viewing plane at unit magnification by the collimating lens. If the normal to the datum mirror is parallel to the optical axis of the autocollimator, then the target image is centered on the viewing plane. Any angular deviation of the normal from the optical axis manifests itself as a lateral displacement of the target image from the center. The magnitude of the displacement is proportional to the focal length and to the magnitude (assumed to be small) of the angular deviation. The direction of the displacement is perpendicular to the axis about which the

  16. Absolute airborne gravimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumann, Henri

    This work consists of a feasibility study of a first stage prototype airborne absolute gravimeter system. In contrast to relative systems, which are using spring gravimeters, the measurements acquired by absolute systems are uncorrelated and the instrument is not suffering from problems like instrumental drift, frequency response of the spring and possible variation of the calibration factor. The major problem we had to resolve were to reduce the influence of the non-gravitational accelerations included in the measurements. We studied two different approaches to resolve it: direct mechanical filtering, and post-processing digital compensation. The first part of the work describes in detail the different mechanical passive filters of vibrations, which were studied and tested in the laboratory and later in a small truck in movement. For these tests as well as for the airborne measurements an absolute gravimeter FG5-L from Micro-G Ltd was used together with an Inertial navigation system Litton-200, a vertical accelerometer EpiSensor, and GPS receivers for positioning. These tests showed that only the use of an optical table gives acceptable results. However, it is unable to compensate for the effects of the accelerations of the drag free chamber. The second part describes the strategy of the data processing. It is based on modeling the perturbing accelerations by means of GPS, EpiSensor and INS data. In the third part the airborne experiment is described in detail, from the mounting in the aircraft and data processing to the different problems encountered during the evaluation of the quality and accuracy of the results. In the part of data processing the different steps conducted from the raw apparent gravity data and the trajectories to the estimation of the true gravity are explained. A comparison between the estimated airborne data and those obtained by ground upward continuation at flight altitude allows to state that airborne absolute gravimetry is feasible and

  17. Pressure Decay Testing Methodology for Quantifying Leak Rates of Full-Scale Docking System Seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunlap, Patrick H., Jr.; Daniels, Christopher C.; Wasowski, Janice L.; Garafolo, Nicholas G.; Penney, Nicholas; Steinetz, Bruce M.

    2010-01-01

    NASA is developing a new docking system to support future space exploration missions to low-Earth orbit and the Moon. This system, called the Low Impact Docking System, is a mechanism designed to connect the Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle to the International Space Station, the lunar lander (Altair), and other future Constellation Project vehicles. NASA Glenn Research Center is playing a key role in developing the main interface seal for this docking system. This seal will be relatively large with an outside diameter in the range of 54 to 58 in. (137 to 147 cm). As part of this effort, a new test apparatus has been designed, fabricated, and installed to measure leak rates of candidate full-scale seals under simulated thermal, vacuum, and engagement conditions. Using this test apparatus, a pressure decay testing and data processing methodology has been developed to quantify full-scale seal leak rates. Tests performed on untreated 54 in. diameter seals at room temperature in a fully compressed state resulted in leak rates lower than the requirement of less than 0.0025 lbm, air per day (0.0011 kg/day).

  18. Developing a pressure ulcer risk assessment scale for patients in long-term care.

    PubMed

    Lepisto, Mervi; Eriksson, Elina; Hietanen, Helvi; Lepisto, Jyri; Lauri, Sirkka

    2006-02-01

    Previous pressure ulcer risk assessment scales appear to have relied on opinions about risk factors and are based on care setting rather than research evidence. Utilizing 21 existing risk assessment scales and relevant risk factor literature, an instrument was developed by Finnish researchers that takes into account individual patient risk factors, devices and methods applied in nursing care, and organizational characteristics. The instrument underwent two pilot tests to assess the relevance and clarity of the instrument: the first involved 43 nurses and six patients; the second involved 50 nurses with expertise in wound care. Changes to questionnaire items deemed necessary as a result of descriptive analysis and agreement percentages were completed. After pilot testing, the final instrument addressed the following issues: 1) patient risks: activity, mobility in bed, mental status, nutrition, urinary incontinence, fecal incontinence, sensory perception, and skin condition; 2) devices and methods used in patient care: technical devices, bed type, mattress, overlay, seat cushions, and care methods; and 3) staff number and structure, maximum number of beds, and beds in use (the last group of questions were included to ensure participants understood the items; results were not analyzed). The phases of the study provided an expeditious means of data collection and a suitable opportunity to assess how the instrument would function in practice. Instrument reliability and validity were improved as a result of the pilot testing and can be enhanced further with continued use and assessment.

  19. Risks assessment of water pollution by pesticides at local scale (PESTEAUX project): study of polluting pressure.

    PubMed

    Noel, Stéphanie; Billo Bah, Boubacar

    2009-01-01

    Pollution of water resources (surface waters and ground waters) by pesticide uses is one of the key point of the European policy with the implementation of the Water Frame Work Directive (2000/60/EC) and the thematic Strategy on the Sustainable use of pesticides. According to this legislation, the Member States must initiate measures to limit environmental and toxicological effects caused by pesticide uses. The Agricultural Research Centre of Wallonia (CRA-W) emphasized the need of a tool for spatial risk analysis and develOPs it within the framework of PESTEAUX project. The originality of the approach proposed by the CRA-W is to generate maps to identify the risk of pollution at locale scale (agricultural parcel). The risk will be assessed according to the study of different factors, grouped under 3 data's layers: polluting pressure, vulnerability of the physical environment (soil) and meteorological data. This approach is directly based on the risk's definition which takes into account the polluting pressure, linked to the human activities, and the vulnerability of the soil, defined by factors of physical environment which characterize the water flow in the parcel. Moreover, meteorological data influence the intensity and likelihood flow of water, and indirectly pesticide by leaching or runoff. The PESTEAUX's approach to study the pollution is based on the model "source-vector-target". The source is the polluting pressure, in other words, the pesticides which could reach the targets. The main vector is the water which vehicles the pesticide on and trough the soil until the target which are the surface waters or ground waters. In this paper we introduce the factors contributing to the polluting pressure. These factors are linking to the human activities and more precisely, to the pesticide uses. The factors considered have an influence on pesticide's transport by water (in its solid state or in dissolved state by leaching, run-off, or erosion) but also on a set of

  20. Absolute-structure reports.

    PubMed

    Flack, Howard D

    2013-08-01

    All the 139 noncentrosymmetric crystal structures published in Acta Crystallographica Section C between January 2011 and November 2012 inclusive have been used as the basis of a detailed study of the reporting of absolute structure. These structure determinations cover a wide range of space groups, chemical composition and resonant-scattering contribution. Defining A and D as the average and difference of the intensities of Friedel opposites, their level of fit has been examined using 2AD and selected-D plots. It was found, regardless of the expected resonant-scattering contribution to Friedel opposites, that the Friedel-difference intensities are often dominated by random uncertainty and systematic error. An analysis of data collection strategy is provided. It is found that crystal-structure determinations resulting in a Flack parameter close to 0.5 may not necessarily be from crystals twinned by inversion. Friedifstat is shown to be a robust estimator of the resonant-scattering contribution to Friedel opposites, very little affected by the particular space group of a structure nor by the occupation of special positions. There is considerable confusion in the text of papers presenting achiral noncentrosymmetric crystal structures. Recommendations are provided for the optimal way of treating noncentrosymmetric crystal structures for which the experimenter has no interest in determining the absolute structure.

  1. Cross-Cultural Validation of the High Blood Pressure Health Literacy Scale in a Chinese Community

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qinghua; Huang, Feifei; Liu, Zaoling; Zhang, Na; Mahapatra, Tanmay; Tang, Weiming; Lei, Yang; Dai, Yali; Tang, Songyuan; Zhang, Jingping

    2016-01-01

    Background Considering the importance of health literacy (HL) for the maximum yield from the hypertension control programs, development of a reliable and valid instrument of hypertension-related HL is critical. This study aimed to translate and validate the High Blood Pressure-Health Literacy Scale (HBP-HLS) into Chinese (C-HBP-HLS) and evaluate its psychometric properties in Chinese context. Method Between June 2013 and January 2014, a cross-sectional study was conducted among recruited hypertensive patients belonging to the Han and Kazakh-Chinese communities in Urumqi, Xinjiang, China. Results A pilot sample (n = 242) was selected for the exploratory factor analysis of the translated and modified instrument. Another sample (n = 308) was recruited for the confirmatory factor analysis. C-HBP-HLS consisted of five dimensions (Print Health Literacy, Medication Label, Understanding Ability, Newest Vital Sign Test, and Avoiding Food Allergy) containing 15 items, accounting for 77.7% of the total variance. The 5-factor model demonstrated a good overall fit. The scale-level content validity index was 0.85. Cronbach’s alpha of the overall scale was 0.78 and test-retest reliability was 0.96. Education level had a strong positive correlation with the scores for items Q1, Q2, and Q3(r = 0.481, 0.492, 0.475, respectively). Health Literacy scores among Kazakh patients were significantly lower than Han (7.13±7.90 vs. 30.10±13.42, Z = -14.573, P<0.001). Conclusion C-HBP-HLS demonstrated suitable factor structure and robust psychometric properties for measuring health literacy level among hypertensive patients in China. PMID:27116336

  2. Probing the Absolute Mass Scale of Neutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    Prof. Joseph A. Formaggio

    2011-10-12

    The experimental efforts of the Neutrino Physics Group at MIT center primarily around the exploration of neutrino mass and its significance within the context of nuclear physics, particle physics, and cosmology. The group has played a prominent role in the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory, a neutrino experiment dedicated to measure neutrino oscillations from 8B neutrinos created in the sun. The group is now focusing its efforts in the measurement of the neutrino mass directly via the use of tritium beta decay. The MIT group has primary responsibilities in the Karlsruhe Tritium Neutrino mass experiment, expected to begin data taking by 2013. Specifically, the MIT group is responsible for the design and development of the global Monte Carlo framework to be used by the KATRIN collaboration, as well as responsibilities directly associated with the construction of the focal plane detector. In addition, the MIT group is sponsoring a new research endeavor for neutrino mass measurements, known as Project 8, to push beyond the limitations of current neutrino mass experiments.

  3. The Impact of Planetary-Scale Thermal Forcing and Small-Scale Topography on the Diurnal Cycle of Martian Surface Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, R. J.; Murphy, J. R.

    2015-12-01

    The ongoing acquisition of high-precision surface pressure data in Gale crater by the MSL meteorology package motivates our investigation of how to interpret the observed diurnal variations in surface pressure in terms of seasonal changes in planetary-scale thermal forcing. We utilize a very high resolution Mars global circulation model (15 and 7.5 km resolution) that simulates diurnal variabilty at scales ranging from the crater scale to the planetary scale to address the issue of distinguishing the pressure signature of small-scale topographically-driven circulations from the global tide field. We define the latter as that resulting from a resynthesis of surface pressure using a compact set of tide modes derived from a space-time analysis of suitably normalized simulated surface pressure. This field includes the migrating tides, resonantly enhanced Kelvin waves and a small set of additional nonmigrating tides. The resulting residual pressure field is found to be highly localized and clearly influenced by topography. In particular, there are enhancements in the diurnal period tide amplitude of ~ 8-15 Pa in the majority of "small" scale craters. The enhancement in Gale crater is very similar to that found in a mesoscale model study by Tyler and Barnes [2013]. The phasing of the peak residual diurnal tide amplitude is invariably 6-8 am local solar time (LST) and is due to nighttime downlope/daytime upslope circulations. Slope wind effects are not simply localized to craters, but impact larger basin-like regions as well, including Hellas, Argyre, Isidis, and Solis Planum. A notable feature of the MSL pressure record is the seasonally-evolving appearance of sharply peaked features at 0800 and 2000 LST that reflect the presence of four and six hour harmonics. We find that these modes correspond to migrating (sun-synchronous) tides and the observed seasonal cycle can be well matched by models with suitably evolving radiative forcing by aerosols. In short, these tide

  4. The Behavior of a Stitched Composite Large-Scale Multi-Bay Pressure Box

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jegley, Dawn C.; Rouse, Marshall; Przekop, Adam; Lovejoy, Andrew E.

    2016-01-01

    NASA has created the Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) Project to develop technologies to reduce impact of aviation on the environment. A critical aspect of this pursuit is the development of a lighter, more robust airframe to enable the introduction of unconventional aircraft configurations. NASA and The Boeing Company have worked together to develop a structural concept that is lightweight and an advancement beyond state-of-the-art composite structures. The Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure (PRSEUS) is an integrally stiffened panel design where elements are stitched together and designed to maintain residual load-carrying capabilities under a variety of damage scenarios. With the PRSEUS concept, through-the-thickness stitches are applied through dry fabric prior to resin infusion, and replace fasteners throughout each integral panel. Through-the-thickness reinforcement at discontinuities, such as along flange edges, has been shown to suppress delamination and turn cracks, which expands the design space and leads to lighter designs. The pultruded rod provides stiffening away from the more vulnerable skin surface and improves bending stiffness. A series of building block tests were evaluated to explore the fundamental assumptions related to the capability and advantages of PRSEUS panels. The final step in the building block series of tests is an 80%-scale pressure box representing a portion of the center section of a Hybrid Wing Body (HWB) transport aircraft. The testing of this test article under maneuver and internal pressure loading conditions is the subject of this paper. The experimental evaluation of this article, along with the other building block tests and the accompanying analyses, has demonstrated the viability of a PRSEUS center body for the HWB vehicle. Additionally, much of the development effort is also applicable to traditional tube-and-wing aircraft, advanced aircraft configurations, and other structures where weight and

  5. Genetic stability of genome-scale deoptimized RNA virus vaccine candidates under selective pressure

    PubMed Central

    Le Nouën, Cyril; McCarty, Thomas; Brown, Michael; Smith, Melissa Laird; Lleras, Roberto; Dolan, Michael A.; Mehedi, Masfique; Yang, Lijuan; Luongo, Cindy; Liang, Bo; Munir, Shirin; DiNapoli, Joshua M.; Mueller, Steffen; Wimmer, Eckard; Collins, Peter L.; Buchholz, Ursula J.

    2017-01-01

    Recoding viral genomes by numerous synonymous but suboptimal substitutions provides live attenuated vaccine candidates. These vaccine candidates should have a low risk of deattenuation because of the many changes involved. However, their genetic stability under selective pressure is largely unknown. We evaluated phenotypic reversion of deoptimized human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) vaccine candidates in the context of strong selective pressure. Codon pair deoptimized (CPD) versions of RSV were attenuated and temperature-sensitive. During serial passage at progressively increasing temperature, a CPD RSV containing 2,692 synonymous mutations in 9 of 11 ORFs did not lose temperature sensitivity, remained genetically stable, and was restricted at temperatures of 34 °C/35 °C and above. However, a CPD RSV containing 1,378 synonymous mutations solely in the polymerase L ORF quickly lost substantial attenuation. Comprehensive sequence analysis of virus populations identified many different potentially deattenuating mutations in the L ORF as well as, surprisingly, many appearing in other ORFs. Phenotypic analysis revealed that either of two competing mutations in the virus transcription antitermination factor M2-1, outside of the CPD area, substantially reversed defective transcription of the CPD L gene and substantially restored virus fitness in vitro and in case of one of these two mutations, also in vivo. Paradoxically, the introduction into Min L of one mutation each in the M2-1, N, P, and L proteins resulted in a virus with increased attenuation in vivo but increased immunogenicity. Thus, in addition to providing insights on the adaptability of genome-scale deoptimized RNA viruses, stability studies can yield improved synthetic RNA virus vaccine candidates. PMID:28049853

  6. Absolute Equilibrium Entropy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shebalin, John V.

    1997-01-01

    The entropy associated with absolute equilibrium ensemble theories of ideal, homogeneous, fluid and magneto-fluid turbulence is discussed and the three-dimensional fluid case is examined in detail. A sigma-function is defined, whose minimum value with respect to global parameters is the entropy. A comparison is made between the use of global functions sigma and phase functions H (associated with the development of various H-theorems of ideal turbulence). It is shown that the two approaches are complimentary though conceptually different: H-theorems show that an isolated system tends to equilibrium while sigma-functions allow the demonstration that entropy never decreases when two previously isolated systems are combined. This provides a more complete picture of entropy in the statistical mechanics of ideal fluids.

  7. The big squeeze: scaling of constriction pressure in two of the world's largest snakes, Python reticulatus and Python molurus bivittatus.

    PubMed

    Penning, David A; Dartez, Schuyler F; Moon, Brad R

    2015-11-01

    Snakes are important predators that have radiated throughout many ecosystems, and constriction was important in their radiation. Constrictors immobilize and kill prey by using body loops to exert pressure on their prey. Despite its importance, little is known about constriction performance or its full effects on prey. We studied the scaling of constriction performance in two species of giant pythons (Python reticulatus and Python molurus bivittatus) and propose a new mechanism of prey death by constriction. In both species, peak constriction pressure increased significantly with snake diameter. These and other constrictors can exert pressures dramatically higher than their prey's blood pressure, suggesting that constriction can stop circulatory function and perhaps kill prey rapidly by over-pressurizing the brain and disrupting neural function. We propose the latter 'red-out effect' as another possible mechanism of prey death from constriction. These effects may be important to recognize and treat properly in rare cases when constrictors injure humans.

  8. Revised calibration of the Sm:SrB{sub 4}O{sub 7} pressure sensor using the Sm-doped yttrium-aluminum garnet primary pressure scale

    SciTech Connect

    Rashchenko, Sergey V. Litasov, Konstantin D.; Kurnosov, Alexander; Dubrovinsky, Leonid

    2015-04-14

    The pressure-induced shift of Sm:SrB{sub 4}O{sub 7} fluorescence was calibrated in a quasi-hydrostatic helium medium up to 60 GPa using the recent Sm-doped yttrium-aluminum garnet primary pressure scale as a reference. The resulting calibration can be written as P = −2836/14.3 [(1 + Δλ/685.51){sup −14.3 }− 1]. Previous calibrations based on the internally inconsistent primary scales are revised, and, after appropriate correction, found to agree with the proposed one. The calibration extended to 120 GPa was also performed using corrected previous data and can be written as P = 4.20 Δλ (1 + 0.020 Δλ)/(1 + 0.036 Δλ)

  9. Simulating the gas hydrate production test at Mallik using the pilot scale pressure reservoir LARS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heeschen, Katja; Spangenberg, Erik; Schicks, Judith M.; Priegnitz, Mike; Giese, Ronny; Luzi-Helbing, Manja

    2014-05-01

    LARS, the LArge Reservoir Simulator, allows for one of the few pilot scale simulations of gas hydrate formation and dissociation under controlled conditions with a high resolution sensor network to enable the detection of spatial variations. It was designed and built within the German project SUGAR (submarine gas hydrate reservoirs) for sediment samples with a diameter of 0.45 m and a length of 1.3 m. During the project, LARS already served for a number of experiments simulating the production of gas from hydrate-bearing sediments using thermal stimulation and/or depressurization. The latest test simulated the methane production test from gas hydrate-bearing sediments at the Mallik test site, Canada, in 2008 (Uddin et al., 2011). Thus, the starting conditions of 11.5 MPa and 11°C and environmental parameters were set to fit the Mallik test site. The experimental gas hydrate saturation of 90% of the total pore volume (70 l) was slightly higher than volumes found in gas hydrate-bearing formations in the field (70 - 80%). However, the resulting permeability of a few millidarcy was comparable. The depressurization driven gas production at Mallik was conducted in three steps at 7.0 MPa - 5.0 MPa - 4.2 MPa all of which were used in the laboratory experiments. In the lab the pressure was controlled using a back pressure regulator while the confining pressure was stable. All but one of the 12 temperature sensors showed a rapid decrease in temperature throughout the sediment sample, which accompanied the pressure changes as a result of gas hydrate dissociation. During step 1 and 2 they continued up to the point where gas hydrate stability was regained. The pressure decreases and gas hydrate dissociation led to highly variable two phase fluid flow throughout the duration of the simulated production test. The flow rates were measured continuously (gas) and discontinuously (liquid), respectively. Next to being discussed here, both rates were used to verify a model of gas

  10. An automated thermophoretic soot sampling device for laboratory-scale high-pressure flames.

    PubMed

    Leschowski, M; Dreier, T; Schulz, C

    2014-04-01

    Studying soot particle morphology in high-pressure flames via thermophoretic sampling critically depends on sampling precision, speed, and reproducibility. This is mainly limited by the challenges of applying pneumatically driven devices for burner chamber pressures higher than the pneumatic pressure. We present a pneumatically driven device for high-pressure applications up to 90 bars. The novelty is to separate the pneumatic driver section from the high-pressure environment in the burner chamber. The device was tested by sampling soot from a laminar high-pressure flame at 20 bars.

  11. Pressure scaled water impact test of a 12.5 inch diameter model of the Space Shuttle solid rocket booster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    A total of 59 tail first drops were made. Model entry conditions simulated full scale vertical velocities of approximately 75 to 110 ft/sec with horizontal velocities up to 45 ft/sec and impact angles to + or - 10 deg. These tests were conducted at scaled atmospheric pressures (1.26 psia or 65 mm.Hg). The model, test program, test facility, test equipment, instrumentation system, data reduction procedures, and test results are described.

  12. Pressure and impulse scaling methods for wall impact in ICF (inertial confinement fusion)

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, J.C.; Chen, X.M.; Schrock, V.E. . Dept. of Nuclear Engineering); Orth, C.D. )

    1990-01-01

    The design of the first structural wall (FSW) in an inertial confinement fusion (ICF) reactor requires some knowledge of the expected wall loading produced by x-ray and neutron deposition; specifically in the High Yield Lithium Injection Fusion Energy (HYLIFE) reactor, wall loading results from two sources -- gas shock and liquid impact. Gas shock is derived from x-ray deposition in the thin layers of exposed blanket material, producing ionized vapor, which will generate gas shock on the FSW. Liquid impact, on the other hand, results from the acceleration of liquid blanket material by two possible forces -- the drag from vapor expansion through the blanket material and the neutron-induced isochoric disassembly process. Both impacts, however, are coupled by the interaction of hot gas expanding through the liquid blanket. This paper discusses scaling methods for estimating pressure and impulse on the HYLIFE FSW from these impacts. In particular, this paper reviews simple analytical and numerical techniques, and the use of experimental results in the estimation of wall impacts for the HYLIFE blanket geometry. Considered important in the analyses are supersonic flow through jet arrays and isochoric disassembly. Given the same initial parameters as those used in previous HYLIFE studies, the techniques described here yield results comparable to the previous studies utilizing heavy numerical simulation.

  13. A Comparison of Pressure Measurements Between a Full-Scale and a 1/6-Scale F/A-18 Twin Tail During Buffet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moses, Robert W.; Pendleton, Ed

    1996-01-01

    In 1993, tail buffet tests were performed on a full-scale, production model F/A-18 in the 80 x 120-foot Wind Tunnel at NASA Ames Research Center. Steady and unsteady pressures were recorded on both sides of the starboard vertical tail for an angle-of-attack range of 20 to 40 degrees and at a sideslip range of -1 6 to 16 degrees at freestream velocities up to 100 knots (Mach 0.15, Reynolds number 1.23 x 10(exp 7). The aircraft was equipped with removable leading edge extension (LEX) fences that are used in flight to reduce tail buffet loads. In 1995, tail buffet tests were performed on a 1/6-scale F-18 A/B model in the Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT) at NASA Langley Research Center. Steady and unsteady pressures were recorded on both sides of both vertical tails for an angle-of-attack range of 7 to 37 degrees at freestream velocities up to 65 knots (Mach 0.10). Comparisons of steady and unsteady pressures and root bending moments are presented for these wind-tunnel models for selected test cases. Representative pressure and root bending moment power spectra are also discussed, as are selected pressure cross-spectral densities.

  14. Fuselage and nozzle pressure distributions on a 1/12-scale F-15 propulsion model at transonic speeds. [conducted in langley 16 foot transonic tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pendergraft, O. C., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    Static pressure coefficient distributions on the forebody, afterbody, and nozzles of a 1/12 scale F-15 propulsion model were determined. The effects of nozzle power setting and horizontal tail deflection angle on the pressure coefficient distributions were investigated.

  15. Fractional rate of change of swim-bladder volume is reliably related to absolute depth during vertical displacements in teleost fish.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Graham K; Holbrook, Robert Iain; de Perera, Theresa Burt

    2010-09-06

    Fish must orient in three dimensions as they navigate through space, but it is unknown whether they are assisted by a sense of depth. In principle, depth can be estimated directly from hydrostatic pressure, but although teleost fish are exquisitely sensitive to changes in pressure, they appear unable to measure absolute pressure. Teleosts sense changes in pressure via changes in the volume of their gas-filled swim-bladder, but because the amount of gas it contains is varied to regulate buoyancy, this cannot act as a long-term steady reference for inferring absolute pressure. In consequence, it is generally thought that teleosts are unable to sense depth using hydrostatic pressure. Here, we overturn this received wisdom by showing from a theoretical physical perspective that absolute depth could be estimated during fast, steady vertical displacements by combining a measurement of vertical speed with a measurement of the fractional rate of change of swim-bladder volume. This mechanism works even if the amount of gas in the swim-bladder varies, provided that this variation occurs over much longer time scales than changes in volume during displacements. There is therefore no a priori physical justification for assuming that teleost fish cannot sense absolute depth by using hydrostatic pressure cues.

  16. Experimental study on spectrum and multi-scale nature of wall pressure and velocity in turbulent boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Xiao-Bo; Jiang, Nan

    2015-06-01

    When using a miniature single sensor boundary layer probe, the time sequences of the stream-wise velocity in the turbulent boundary layer (TBL) are measured by using a hot wire anemometer. Beneath the fully developed TBL, the wall pressure fluctuations are attained by a microphone mechanism with high spatial resolution. Analysis on the statistic and spectrum properties of velocity and wall pressure reveals the relationship between the wall pressure fluctuation and the energy-containing structure in the buffer layer of the TBL. Wavelet transform shows the multi-scale natures of coherent structures contained in both signals of velocity and pressure. The most intermittent wall pressure scale is associated with the coherent structure in the buffer layer. Meanwhile the most energetic scale of velocity fluctuation at y+ = 14 provides a specific frequency f9 ≈ 147 Hz for wall actuating control with Reτ = 996. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant Nos. 2012CB720101 and 2012CB720103) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11272233, 11332006, and 11411130150).

  17. Investigation of surface fluctuating pressures on a 1/4 scale YC-14 upper surface blown flap model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pappa, R. S.

    1979-01-01

    Fluctuating pressures were measured at 30 positions on the surface of a 1/4-scale YC-14 wing and fuselage model during an outdoor static testing program. These data were obtained as part of a NASA program to study the fluctuating loads imposed on STOL aircraft configurations and to further the understanding of the scaling laws of unsteady surface pressure fields. Fluctuating pressure data were recorded at several discrete engine thrust settings for each of 16 configurations of the model. These data were reduced using the technique of random data analysis to obtain auto-and cross-spectral density functions and coherence functions for frequencies from 0 to 10 kHz, and cross-correlation functions for time delays from 0 to 10.24 ms. Results of this program provide the following items of particular interest: (1) Good collapse of normalized PSD functions on the USB flap was found using a technique applied by Lilley and Hodgson to data from a laboratory wall-jet apparatus. (2) Results indicate that the fluctuating pressure loading on surfaces washed by the jet exhaust flow was dominated by hydrodynamic pressure variations, loading on surface well outside the flow region dominated by acoustic pressure variations, and loading near the flow boundaries from a mixture of the two.

  18. Prehospital Heart Rate and Blood Pressure Increase the Positive Predictive Value of the Glasgow Coma Scale for High-Mortality Traumatic Brain Injury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-05-15

    Prehospital Heart Rate and Blood Pressure Increase the Positive Predictive Value of the Glasgow Coma Scale for High-Mortality Traumatic Brain Injury...pressures have both been associated with higher mortality for patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI). We undertook a retrospective analysis of 1384...pressure; Glasgow Coma Scale; heart rate; prehospital; traumatic brain injury Introduction The Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) was developed to stan-dardize the

  19. Large-scale self-assembly of uniform submicron silver sulfide material driven by precise pressure control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Juanjuan; Chen, Ke; Zhang, Shuhao; Yang, Yun; Guo, Lin; Yang, Shihe

    2017-03-01

    The controllable self-assembly of nanosized building blocks into larger specific structures can provide an efficient method of synthesizing novel materials with excellent properties. The self-assembly of nanocrystals by assisted means is becoming an extremely active area of research, because it provides a method of producing large-scale advanced functional materials with potential applications in the areas of energy, electronics, optics, and biologics. In this study, we applied an efficient strategy, namely, the use of ‘pressure control’ to the assembly of silver sulfide (Ag2S) nanospheres with a diameter of approximately 33 nm into large-scale, uniform Ag2S sub-microspheres with a size of about 0.33 μm. More importantly, this strategy realizes the online control of the overall reaction system, including the pressure, reaction time, and temperature, and could also be used to easily fabricate other functional materials on an industrial scale. Moreover, the thermodynamics and kinetics parameters for the thermal decomposition of silver diethyldithiocarbamate (Ag(DDTC)) are also investigated to explore the formation mechanism of the Ag2S nanosized building blocks which can be assembled into uniform sub-micron scale architecture. As a method of producing sub-micron Ag2S particles by means of the pressure-controlled self-assembly of nanoparticles, we foresee this strategy being an efficient and universally applicable option for constructing other new building blocks and assembling novel and large functional micromaterials on an industrial scale.

  20. Large-scale self-assembly of uniform submicron silver sulfide material driven by precise pressure control.

    PubMed

    Qi, Juanjuan; Chen, Ke; Zhang, Shuhao; Yang, Yun; Guo, Lin; Yang, Shihe

    2017-03-10

    The controllable self-assembly of nanosized building blocks into larger specific structures can provide an efficient method of synthesizing novel materials with excellent properties. The self-assembly of nanocrystals by assisted means is becoming an extremely active area of research, because it provides a method of producing large-scale advanced functional materials with potential applications in the areas of energy, electronics, optics, and biologics. In this study, we applied an efficient strategy, namely, the use of 'pressure control' to the assembly of silver sulfide (Ag2S) nanospheres  with a diameter of approximately 33 nm into large-scale, uniform Ag2S sub-microspheres with a size of about 0.33 μm. More importantly, this strategy realizes the online control of the overall reaction system, including the pressure, reaction time, and temperature, and could also be used to easily fabricate other functional materials on an industrial scale. Moreover, the thermodynamics and kinetics parameters for the thermal decomposition of silver diethyldithiocarbamate (Ag(DDTC)) are also investigated to explore the formation mechanism of the Ag2S nanosized building blocks which can be assembled into uniform sub-micron scale architecture. As a method of producing sub-micron Ag2S particles by means of the pressure-controlled self-assembly of nanoparticles, we foresee this strategy being an efficient and universally applicable option for constructing other new building blocks and assembling novel and large functional micromaterials on an industrial scale.

  1. Surface force at the nano-scale: observation of non-monotonic surface tension and disjoining pressure.

    PubMed

    Peng, Tiefeng; Firouzi, Mahshid; Li, Qibin; Peng, Kang

    2015-08-28

    Nano bubbles and films are important in theory and various applications, such as the specific ion effect of bubble coalescence, flotation and porous medium seepage; these rely greatly on the fundamental aspects of extended-DLVO surface forces. However, the origin and validation of the non-DLVO forces are still obscure, especially at the nano scale (1-5 nm). Herein, we report the first determination of the disjoining pressures of aqueous electrolyte nano-films using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Our results showed that adding salt does not lead to a decrease in the disjoining pressure. On the contrary, higher concentrations results in greater disjoining pressures. In addition, the temperature was found to significantly change the pattern of the disjoining pressure isotherm. These results aid the understanding of a number of underlying mechanisms, involving nano solid-liquid-gas surfaces.

  2. Pressure-Driven Quantum Criticality and T/H Scaling in the Icosahedral Au-Al-Yb Approximant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsukawa, Shuya; Deguchi, Kazuhiko; Imura, Keiichiro; Ishimasa, Tsutomu; Sato, Noriaki K.

    2016-06-01

    We report on ac magnetic susceptibility measurements under pressure of the Au-Al-Yb alloy, a crystalline approximant to the icosahedral quasicrystal that shows unconventional quantum criticality. In describing the susceptibility as χ(T)-1 - χ(0)-1 ∝ Tγ, we find that χ(0)-1 decreases with increasing pressure and vanishes to zero at the critical pressure Pc ≃ 2 GPa, with γ ( ≃ 0.5) unchanged. We suggest that this quantum criticality emerges owing to critical valence fluctuations. Above Pc, the approximant undergoes a magnetic transition at T ≃ 100 mK. These results are contrasted with the fact that, in the quasicrystal, the quantum criticality is robust against the application of pressure. The applicability of the so-called T/H scaling to the approximant is also discussed.

  3. Solar wind dynamic pressure effect on planetary wave propagation and synoptic-scale Rossby wave breaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Hua; Franzke, Christian; Martius, Olivia; Jarvis, Martin J.; Phillips, Tony

    2013-05-01

    We provide statistical evidence of the effect of the solar wind dynamic pressure (Psw) on the northern winter and spring circulations. We find that the vertical structure of the Northern Annular Mode (NAM), the zonal mean circulation, and Eliassen-Palm (EP)-flux anomalies show a dynamically consistent pattern of downward propagation over a period of ~45 days in response to positive Psw anomalies. When the solar irradiance is high, the signature of Psw is marked by a positive NAM anomaly descending from the stratosphere to the surface during winter. When the solar irradiance is low, the Psw signal has the opposite sign, occurs in spring, and is confined to the stratosphere. The negative Psw signal in the NAM under low solar irradiance conditions is primarily governed by enhanced vertical EP-flux divergence and a warmer polar region. The winter Psw signal under high solar irradiance conditions is associated with positive anomalies of the horizontal EP-flux divergence at 55°N-75°N and negative anomalies at 25°N-45°N, which corresponds to the positive NAM anomaly. The EP-flux divergence anomalies occur ~15 days ahead of the mean-flow changes. A significant equatorward shift of synoptic-scale Rossby wave breaking (RWB) near the tropopause is detected during January-March, corresponding to increased anticyclonic RWB and a decrease in cyclonic RWB. We suggest that the barotropic instability associated with asymmetric ozone in the upper stratosphere and the baroclinic instability associated with the polar vortex in the middle and lower stratosphere play a critical role for the winter signal and its downward propagation.

  4. Global Autocorrelation Scales of the Partial Pressure of Oceanic CO2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Zhen; Adamec, David; Takahashi, Taro; Sutherland, Stewart C.

    2004-01-01

    A global database of approximately 1.7 million observations of the partial pressure of carbon dioxide in surface ocean waters (pCO2) collected between 1970 and 2003 is used to estimate its spatial autocorrelation structure. The patterns of the lag distance where the autocorrelation exceeds 0.8 is similar to patterns in the spatial distribution of the first baroclinic Rossby radius of deformation indicating that ocean circulation processes play a significant role in determining the spatial variability of pCO2. For example, the global maximum of the distance at which autocorrelations exceed 0.8 averages about 140 km in the equatorial Pacific. Also, the lag distance at which the autocorrelation exceed 0.8 is greater in the vicinity of the Gulf Stream than it is near the Kuroshio, approximately 50 km near the Gulf Stream as opposed to 20 km near the Kuroshio. Separate calculations for times when the sun is north and south of the equator revealed no obvious seasonal dependence of the spatial autocorrelation scales. The pCO2 measurements at Ocean Weather Station (OWS) 'P', in the eastern subarctic Pacific (50 N, 145 W) is the only fixed location where an uninterrupted time series of sufficient length exists to calculate a meaningful temporal autocorrelation function for lags greater than a few days. The estimated temporal autocorrelation function at OWS 'P', is highly variable. A spectral analysis of the longest four pCO2 time series indicates a high level of variability occurring over periods from the atmospheric synoptic to the maximum length of the time series, in this case 42 days. It is likely that a relative peak in variability with a period of 3-6 days is related to atmospheric synoptic period variability and ocean mixing events due to wind stirring. However, the short length of available time series makes identifying temporal relationships between pCO2 and atmospheric or ocean processes problematic.

  5. Large Scale Triboelectric Nanogenerator and Self-Powered Pressure Sensor Array Using Low Cost Roll-to-Roll UV Embossing

    PubMed Central

    Dhakar, Lokesh; Gudla, Sudeep; Shan, Xuechuan; Wang, Zhiping; Tay, Francis Eng Hock; Heng, Chun-Huat; Lee, Chengkuo

    2016-01-01

    Triboelectric nanogenerators (TENGs) have emerged as a potential solution for mechanical energy harvesting over conventional mechanisms such as piezoelectric and electromagnetic, due to easy fabrication, high efficiency and wider choice of materials. Traditional fabrication techniques used to realize TENGs involve plasma etching, soft lithography and nanoparticle deposition for higher performance. But lack of truly scalable fabrication processes still remains a critical challenge and bottleneck in the path of bringing TENGs to commercial production. In this paper, we demonstrate fabrication of large scale triboelectric nanogenerator (LS-TENG) using roll-to-roll ultraviolet embossing to pattern polyethylene terephthalate sheets. These LS-TENGs can be used to harvest energy from human motion and vehicle motion from embedded devices in floors and roads, respectively. LS-TENG generated a power density of 62.5 mW m−2. Using roll-to-roll processing technique, we also demonstrate a large scale triboelectric pressure sensor array with pressure detection sensitivity of 1.33 V kPa−1. The large scale pressure sensor array has applications in self-powered motion tracking, posture monitoring and electronic skin applications. This work demonstrates scalable fabrication of TENGs and self-powered pressure sensor arrays, which will lead to extremely low cost and bring them closer to commercial production. PMID:26905285

  6. Large Scale Triboelectric Nanogenerator and Self-Powered Pressure Sensor Array Using Low Cost Roll-to-Roll UV Embossing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhakar, Lokesh; Gudla, Sudeep; Shan, Xuechuan; Wang, Zhiping; Tay, Francis Eng Hock; Heng, Chun-Huat; Lee, Chengkuo

    2016-02-01

    Triboelectric nanogenerators (TENGs) have emerged as a potential solution for mechanical energy harvesting over conventional mechanisms such as piezoelectric and electromagnetic, due to easy fabrication, high efficiency and wider choice of materials. Traditional fabrication techniques used to realize TENGs involve plasma etching, soft lithography and nanoparticle deposition for higher performance. But lack of truly scalable fabrication processes still remains a critical challenge and bottleneck in the path of bringing TENGs to commercial production. In this paper, we demonstrate fabrication of large scale triboelectric nanogenerator (LS-TENG) using roll-to-roll ultraviolet embossing to pattern polyethylene terephthalate sheets. These LS-TENGs can be used to harvest energy from human motion and vehicle motion from embedded devices in floors and roads, respectively. LS-TENG generated a power density of 62.5 mW m‑2. Using roll-to-roll processing technique, we also demonstrate a large scale triboelectric pressure sensor array with pressure detection sensitivity of 1.33 V kPa‑1. The large scale pressure sensor array has applications in self-powered motion tracking, posture monitoring and electronic skin applications. This work demonstrates scalable fabrication of TENGs and self-powered pressure sensor arrays, which will lead to extremely low cost and bring them closer to commercial production.

  7. Large Scale Triboelectric Nanogenerator and Self-Powered Pressure Sensor Array Using Low Cost Roll-to-Roll UV Embossing.

    PubMed

    Dhakar, Lokesh; Gudla, Sudeep; Shan, Xuechuan; Wang, Zhiping; Tay, Francis Eng Hock; Heng, Chun-Huat; Lee, Chengkuo

    2016-02-24

    Triboelectric nanogenerators (TENGs) have emerged as a potential solution for mechanical energy harvesting over conventional mechanisms such as piezoelectric and electromagnetic, due to easy fabrication, high efficiency and wider choice of materials. Traditional fabrication techniques used to realize TENGs involve plasma etching, soft lithography and nanoparticle deposition for higher performance. But lack of truly scalable fabrication processes still remains a critical challenge and bottleneck in the path of bringing TENGs to commercial production. In this paper, we demonstrate fabrication of large scale triboelectric nanogenerator (LS-TENG) using roll-to-roll ultraviolet embossing to pattern polyethylene terephthalate sheets. These LS-TENGs can be used to harvest energy from human motion and vehicle motion from embedded devices in floors and roads, respectively. LS-TENG generated a power density of 62.5 mW m(-2). Using roll-to-roll processing technique, we also demonstrate a large scale triboelectric pressure sensor array with pressure detection sensitivity of 1.33 V kPa(-1). The large scale pressure sensor array has applications in self-powered motion tracking, posture monitoring and electronic skin applications. This work demonstrates scalable fabrication of TENGs and self-powered pressure sensor arrays, which will lead to extremely low cost and bring them closer to commercial production.

  8. A multi-scale analysis of the impact of pressure on melting of crystalline phase change material germanium telluride

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Jie

    2014-10-27

    The impact of the moderate pressure (about 10{sup 0 }GPa) on the melting of crystalline (c-) phase change material (PCM) germanium telluride (GeTe) is analyzed, by combining the heat transfer equation in the PCM device scale (10{sup 1}–10{sup 2 }nm and beyond), and the ab initio molecular dynamics and the nudged elastic band simulations in the atomistic scale (10{sup −1}–10{sup 0 }nm). The multi-scale analysis unravels that a pressure P = 1.0 GPa can increase the melting temperature of c-GeTe and the PCM device “reset” operation energy consumption by 6%–7%. It is shown that the melting temperature increase originates from the pressure-induced raise of the energy barrier of the umbrella-flip transition of the Ge atom from the octahedral symmetry site to the tetrahedral symmetry site. It is revealed that when P > 1.0 GPa, which is normal in PCM devices, the “reset” energy will be increased even by more. Based on the analysis, suggestions to alleviate pressure-induced raise of melting temperature and “reset” energy are provided.

  9. SMALL-SCALE PRESSURE-BALANCED STRUCTURES DRIVEN BY OBLIQUE SLOW MODE WAVES MEASURED IN THE SOLAR WIND

    SciTech Connect

    Yao Shuo; He, J.-S.; Tu, C.-Y.; Wang, L.-H.; Marsch, E.

    2013-09-01

    Recently, small-scale pressure-balanced structures (PBSs) were identified in the solar wind, but their formation mechanism remains unclear. This work aims to reveal the dependence of the properties of small-scale PBSs on the background magnetic field (B{sub 0}) direction and thus to corroborate the in situ mechanism that forms them. We analyze the plasma and magnetic field data obtained by WIND in the quiet solar wind at 1 AU. First, we use a developed moving-average method to obtain B{sub 0}(s, t) for every temporal scale (s) at each time moment (t). By wavelet cross-coherence analysis, we obtain the correlation coefficients between the thermal pressure P{sub th} and the magnetic pressure P{sub B}, distributing against the temporal scale and the angle {theta}{sub xB} between B{sub 0}(s, t) and Geocentric Solar Ecliptic coordinates (GSE)-x. We note that the angle coverage of a PBS decreases with shorter temporal scale, but the occurrence of the PBSs is independent of {theta}{sub xB}. Suspecting that the isolated small PBSs are formed by compressive waves in situ, we continue this study by testing the wave modes forming a small-scale PBS with B{sub 0}(s, t) quasi-parallel to GSE-x. As a result, we identify that the cross-helicity and the compressibility attain values for a slow mode from theoretical calculations. The wave vector is derived from minimum variance analysis. Besides, the proton temperatures obey T < T{sub Parallel-To} derived from the velocity distribution functions, excluding a mirror mode, which is the other candidate for the formation of PBSs in situ. Thus, a small-scale PBS is shown to be driven by oblique, slow-mode waves in the solar wind.

  10. Analysis of Frequency Response and Scale-Factor of Tuning Fork Micro-Gyroscope Operating at Atmospheric Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Xukai; Li, Hongsheng; Ni, Yunfang; Sang, Pengcheng

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a study of the frequency response and the scale-factor of a tuning fork micro-gyroscope operating at atmospheric pressure in the presence of an interference sense mode by utilizing the approximate transfer function. The optimal demodulation phase (ODP), which is always ignored in vacuum packaged micro-gyroscopes but quite important in gyroscopes operating at atmospheric pressure, is obtained through the transfer function of the sense mode, including the primary mode and the interference mode. The approximate transfer function of the micro-gyroscope is deduced in consideration of the interference mode and the ODP. Then, the equation describing the scale-factor of the gyroscope is also obtained. The impacts of the interference mode and Q-factor on the frequency response and the scale-factor of the gyroscope are analyzed through numerical simulations. The relationship between the scale-factor and the demodulation phase is also illustrated and gives an effective way to find out the ODP in practice. The simulation results predicted by the transfer functions are in close agreement with the results of the experiments. The analyses and simulations can provide constructive guidance on bandwidth and sensitivity designs of the micro-gyroscopes operating at atmospheric pressure. PMID:25621614

  11. Analysis of frequency response and scale-factor of tuning fork micro-gyroscope operating at atmospheric pressure.

    PubMed

    Ding, Xukai; Li, Hongsheng; Ni, Yunfang; Sang, Pengcheng

    2015-01-22

    This paper presents a study of the frequency response and the scale-factor of a tuning fork micro-gyroscope operating at atmospheric pressure in the presence of an interference sense mode by utilizing the approximate transfer function. The optimal demodulation phase (ODP), which is always ignored in vacuum packaged micro-gyroscopes but quite important in gyroscopes operating at atmospheric pressure, is obtained through the transfer function of the sense mode, including the primary mode and the interference mode. The approximate transfer function of the micro-gyroscope is deduced in consideration of the interference mode and the ODP. Then, the equation describing the scale-factor of the gyroscope is also obtained. The impacts of the interference mode and Q-factor on the frequency response and the scale-factor of the gyroscope are analyzed through numerical simulations. The relationship between the scale-factor and the demodulation phase is also illustrated and gives an effective way to find out the ODP in practice. The simulation results predicted by the transfer functions are in close agreement with the results of the experiments. The analyses and simulations can provide constructive guidance on bandwidth and sensitivity designs of the micro-gyroscopes operating at atmospheric pressure.

  12. An investigation of string cavitation in a true-scale fuel injector flow geometry at high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, B. A.; Hargrave, G. K.; Garner, C. P.; Wigley, G.

    2010-03-01

    String cavitation has been studied in an optical automotive size fuel injector with true-scale flow geometry at injection pressures of up to 2050 bar. The multihole nozzle geometry studied allowed observation of the hole-to-hole vortex interaction and, in particular, that of a bridging vortex in the sac region between the holes. A dependency on Reynolds number was observed in the formation of the visible, vapor filled vortex cores. Above a threshold Reynolds number, their formation and appearance during a 2 ms injection event was repeatable and independent of upstream pressure and cavitation number.

  13. Optimal input experiment design and parameter estimation in core-scale pressure oscillation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potters, M. G.; Mansoori, M.; Bombois, X.; Jansen, J. D.; Van den Hof, P. M. J.

    2016-03-01

    This paper considers Pressure Oscillation (PO) experiments for which we find the minimum experiment time that guarantees user-imposed parameter variance upper bounds and honours actuator limits. The parameters permeability and porosity are estimated with a classical least-squares estimation method for which an expression of the covariance matrix of the estimates is calculated. This expression is used to tackle the optimization problem. We study the Dynamic Darcy Cell experiment set-up (Heller et al., 2002) and focus on data generation using square wave actuator signals, which, as we shall prove, deliver shorter experiment times than sinusoidal ones. Parameter identification is achieved using either inlet pressure/outlet pressure measurements (Heller et al., 2002) or actuator position/outlet pressure measurements, where the latter is a novel approach. The solution to the optimization problem reveals that for both measurement methods an optimal excitation frequency, an optimal inlet volume, and an optimal outlet volume exist. We find that under the same parameter variance bounds and actuator constraints, actuator position/outlet pressure measurements result in required experiment times that are a factor fourteen smaller compared to inlet pressure/outlet pressure measurements. This result is analysed in detail and we find that the dominant effect driving this difference originates from an identifiability problem when using inlet-outlet pressure measurements for joint estimation of permeability and porosity. We illustrate our results with numerical simulations, and show excellent agreement with theoretical expectations.

  14. Design and research on reliability-validity for 3S intraoperative risk assessment scale of pressure sore.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xing-lian; Hu, Juan-juan; Ma, Qiong; Wu, He-yu; Wang, Zeng-yan; Li, Ting-ting; Shen, Jian-hui; Yang, Ying

    2015-04-01

    The reliability and validity of risk assessment scale (RAS) of pressure sore during 3S surgery were investigated. RAS of pressure sore was designed independently during 3S surgery. Five operating room nursing experts were selected to consult and detect face validity. Convenient and purposive sampling of 707 samples was conducted. Cronbach's alpha was used to measure content reliability and evaluate the internal consistence of RAS. The structural reliability was investigated by exploratory factor analysis method. The results showed that the content validity index was 0.92, and Cronbach's alpha of content reliability was 0.71. Structural validity, detected by Bartlett sphericity test, was 135.3 for 707 samples with the difference being statistically significant (P<0.01). KMO value was 0.729. The accumulative variance contribution ratio of common factor was 64.63%. The exploratory factor analysis showed the factor load of every clause was larger than 0.596. It was concluded that RAS of pressure sore for 3S surgery has better validity and reliability, and it could be used for evaluating and screening the high risk patients with pressure sores during surgery in order to efficiently reduce the occurrence of pressure sore during surgery. RAS of pressure sore for 3S surgery is worth to be popularized.

  15. Correlation of Fin Buffet Pressures on an F/A-18 with Scaled Wind-Tunnel Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moses, Robert W.; Shah, Gautam H.

    1999-01-01

    Buffeting is an aeroelastic phenomenon occurring at high angles of attack that plagues high performance aircraft, especially those with twin vertical tails. Previous wind-tunnel and flight tests were conducted to characterize the buffet loads on the vertical tails by measuring surface pressures, bending moments, and accelerations. Following these tests, buffeting responses were computed using the measured buffet pressures and compared to the measured buffeting responses. The calculated results did not match the measured data because the assumed spatial correlation of the buffet pressures was not correct. A better understanding of the partial (spatial) correlation of the differential buffet pressures on the tail was necessary to improve the buffeting predictions. Several wind-tunnel investigations were conducted for this purpose. When compared, the results of these tests show that the partial correlation scales with flight conditions. One of the remaining questions is whether the wind-tunnel data is consistent with flight data. Presented herein, cross-spectra and coherence functions calculated from pressures that were measured on the High Alpha Research Vehicle indicate that the partial correlation of the buffet pressures in flight agrees with the partial correlation observed in the wind tunnel.

  16. Sediment budget variation at watershed scale due to anthropogenic pressures, and its relationship to coastal erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aiello, Antonello; Adamo, Maria; Canora, Filomena

    2014-05-01

    The transfer of sediments from hydrographic basins towards the coast is a significant pathway of material transfer on Earth. In sedimentary environment, the main portion of sediment that enters the coastal areas is derived originally from erosion in the coastal watersheds. Extensive anthropogenic pressures carried out within coastal basins have long shown negative impacts on littoral environments. In fluvial systems, sediments trapped behind dams and in-stream gravel mining cause the reduction in sediment supply to the coast. Along the Jonian littoral of the Basilicata Region (southern Italy), natural coastal processes have been severely disrupted since the second half of the 20th century as a result of riverbed sand and gravel mining and dam construction, when economic advantages were measured in terms of the development of infrastructure, water storage, and hydropower production for the agricultural, industrial and socio-economic development of the area. Particularly, the large numbers of dams and impoundments that have been built in the hydrographic basins have led a signi?cant reduction on river sediment loads. As a result, the Jonian littoral is experiencing a catalysed erosion phenomenon. In order to increase understanding of the morpho-dynamics of the Jonian littoral environment and more fully appreciate the amount of coastal erosion, an evaluation of the sediment budget change due to dam construction within the hydrographic basins of the Basilicata Region needs to be explored. Since quantitative data on decadal trends in river sediment supply before and after dam construction are lacking, as well as updated dam silting values, river basin assessment of the spatial patterns and estimated amount of sediment erosion and deposition are important in evaluating changes in the sediment budget. As coastal areas are being affected by an increasing number of population and socio-economic activities, the amount of sediment deficit at the littoral can permit to

  17. Full-scale Force and Pressure-distribution Tests on a Tapered U.S.A. 45 Airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parsons, John F

    1935-01-01

    This report presents the results of force and pressure-distribution tests on a 2:1 tapered USA 45 airfoil as determined in the full-scale wind tunnel. The airfoil has a constant-chord center section and rounded tips and is tapered in thickness from 18 percent at the root to 9 percent at the tip. Force tests were made throughout a Reynolds Number range of approximately 2,000,000 to 8,000,000 providing data on the scale effect in addition to the conventional characteristics. Pressure-distribution data were obtained from tests at a Reynolds Number of approximately 4,000,000. The aerodynamic characteristics given by the usual dimensionless coefficients are presented graphically.

  18. Scaling of Pressure with Intensity in Laser-Driven Shocks and Effects of Hot X-ray Preheat

    SciTech Connect

    Colvin, J D; Kalantar, D H

    2005-08-29

    To drive shocks into solids with a laser we either illuminate the material directly, or to get higher pressures, illuminate a plastic ablator that overlays the material of interest. In both cases the illumination intensity is low, <<10{sup 13} W/cm{sup 2}, compared to that for traditional laser fusion targets. In this regime, the laser beam creates and interacts with a collisional, rather than a collisionless, plasma. We present scaling relationships for shock pressure with intensity derived from simulations for this low-intensity collisional plasma regime. In addition, sometimes the plastic-ablator targets have a thin flashcoating of Al on the plastic surface as a shine-through barrier; this Al layer can be a source of hot x-ray preheat. We discuss how the preheat affects the shock pressure, with application to simulating VISAR measurements from experiments conducted on various lasers on shock compression of Fe.

  19. Water content dynamics at plot scale - comparison of time-lapse electrical resistivity tomography monitoring and pore pressure modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zieher, Thomas; Markart, Gerhard; Ottowitz, David; Römer, Alexander; Rutzinger, Martin; Meißl, Gertraud; Geitner, Clemens

    2017-01-01

    Physically-based dynamic modelling of shallow landslide susceptibility rests on several assumptions and simplifications. However, the applicability of physically-based models is only rarely tested in the field at the appropriate scale. This paper presents results of a spray irrigation experiment conducted on a plot of 100 m2 on an Alpine slope susceptible to shallow landsliding. Infiltrating precipitation applied at a constant rate (27.5 mm/h for 5.3 h) was monitored by means of 2D time-lapse electrical resistivity tomography, combined with time-domain reflectometry sensors installed at various depths. In addition, regolith characteristics were assessed by dynamic cone penetration tests using a light-weight cone penetrometer. The spray irrigation experiment resulted in a vertically progressing wetting front to a depth of 80-100 cm. Below that, the unconsolidated material was already saturated by rainfall in the previous days. The observed mean resistivity reduction attributed to infiltrating water during irrigation was scaled to pressure head. Mean variations in pore pressure were reproduced by a linear diffusion model also used in physically-based dynamic landslide susceptibility modelling. Sensitive parameters (hydraulic conductivity and specific storage) were tested over selected value ranges and calibrated. Calibrated parameter values are within published and experimentally derived ranges. The results of the comparison of observations and model results suggest that the model is capable of reproducing mean changes of pore pressure at a suitable scale for physically-based modelling of shallow landslide susceptibility. However, small-scale variations in pore pressure that may facilitate the triggering of shallow landslides are not captured by the model.

  20. Large scale modelling of salmon lice (Lepeophtheirus salmonis) infection pressure based on lice monitoring data from Norwegian salmonid farms.

    PubMed

    Kristoffersen, Anja B; Jimenez, Daniel; Viljugrein, Hildegunn; Grøntvedt, Randi; Stien, Audun; Jansen, Peder A

    2014-12-01

    Infection by parasitic sea lice is a substantial problem in industrial scale salmon farming. To control the problem, Norwegian salmonid farms are not permitted to exceed a threshold level of infection on their fish, and farms are required to monitor and report lice levels on a weekly basis to ensure compliance with the regulation. In the present study, we combine the monitoring data with a deterministic model for salmon lice population dynamics to estimate farm production of infectious lice stages. Furthermore, we use an empirical estimate of the relative risk of salmon lice transmission between farms, that depend on inter-farm distances, to estimate the external infection pressure at a farm site, i.e. the infection pressure from infective salmon lice of neighbouring farm origin. Finally, we test whether our estimates of infection pressure from neighbouring farms as well as internal within farm infection pressure, predicts subsequent development of infection in cohorts of farmed salmonids in their initial phase of marine production. We find that estimated external infection pressure is a main predictor of salmon lice population dynamics in newly stocked cohorts of salmonids. Our results emphasize the importance of keeping the production of infectious lice stages at low levels within local networks of salmon farms. Our model can easily be implemented for real time estimation of infection pressure at the national scale, utilizing the masses of data generated through the compulsory lice monitoring in salmon farms. The implementation of such a system should give the salmon industry greater predictability with respect to salmon lice infection levels, and aid the decision making process when the development of new farm sites are planned.

  1. Absolute measurement of length with nanometric resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apostol, D.; Garoi, F.; Timcu, A.; Damian, V.; Logofatu, P. C.; Nascov, V.

    2005-08-01

    Laser interferometer displacement measuring transducers have a well-defined traceability route to the definition of the meter. The laser interferometer is de-facto length scale for applications in micro and nano technologies. However their physical unit -half lambda is too large for nanometric resolution. Fringe interpolation-usual technique to improve the resolution-lack of reproducibility could be avoided using the principles of absolute distance measurement. Absolute distance refers to the use of interferometric techniques for determining the position of an object without the necessity of measuring continuous displacements between points. The interference pattern as produced by the interference of two point-like coherent sources is fitted to a geometric model so as to determine the longitudinal location of the target by minimizing least square errors. The longitudinal coordinate of the target was measured with accuracy better than 1 nm, for a target position range of 0.4μm.

  2. Probing absolute spin polarization at the nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Eltschka, Matthias; Jäck, Berthold; Assig, Maximilian; Kondrashov, Oleg V; Skvortsov, Mikhail A; Etzkorn, Markus; Ast, Christian R; Kern, Klaus

    2014-12-10

    Probing absolute values of spin polarization at the nanoscale offers insight into the fundamental mechanisms of spin-dependent transport. Employing the Zeeman splitting in superconducting tips (Meservey-Tedrow-Fulde effect), we introduce a novel spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy that combines the probing capability of the absolute values of spin polarization with precise control at the atomic scale. We utilize our novel approach to measure the locally resolved spin polarization of magnetic Co nanoislands on Cu(111). We find that the spin polarization is enhanced by 65% when increasing the width of the tunnel barrier by only 2.3 Å due to the different decay of the electron orbitals into vacuum.

  3. Evaluation of wind-induced internal pressure in low-rise buildings: A multi scale experimental and numerical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tecle, Amanuel Sebhatu

    Hurricane is one of the most destructive and costly natural hazard to the built environment and its impact on low-rise buildings, particularity, is beyond acceptable. The major objective of this research was to perform a parametric evaluation of internal pressure (IP) for wind-resistant design of low-rise buildings and wind-driven natural ventilation applications. For this purpose, a multi-scale experimental, i.e. full-scale at Wall of Wind (WoW) and small-scale at Boundary Layer Wind Tunnel (BLWT), and a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) approach was adopted. This provided new capability to assess wind pressures realistically on internal volumes ranging from small spaces formed between roof tiles and its deck to attic to room partitions. Effects of sudden breaching, existing dominant openings on building envelopes as well as compartmentalization of building interior on the IP were systematically investigated. Results of this research indicated: (i) for sudden breaching of dominant openings, the transient overshooting response was lower than the subsequent steady state peak IP and internal volume correction for low-wind-speed testing facilities was necessary. For example a building without volume correction experienced a response four times faster and exhibited 30--40% lower mean and peak IP; (ii) for existing openings, vent openings uniformly distributed along the roof alleviated, whereas one sided openings aggravated the IP; (iii) larger dominant openings exhibited a higher IP on the building envelope, and an off-center opening on the wall exhibited (30--40%) higher IP than center located openings; (iv) compartmentalization amplified the intensity of IP and; (v) significant underneath pressure was measured for field tiles, warranting its consideration during net pressure evaluations. The study aimed at wind driven natural ventilation indicated: (i) the IP due to cross ventilation was 1.5 to 2.5 times higher for Ainlet/Aoutlet>1 compared to cases where Ainlet

  4. A priori testing of subgrid-scale models for the velocity-pressure and vorticity-velocity formulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winckelmans, G. S.; Lund, T. S.; Carati, D.; Wray, A. A.

    1996-01-01

    Subgrid-scale models for Large Eddy Simulation (LES) in both the velocity-pressure and the vorticity-velocity formulations were evaluated and compared in a priori tests using spectral Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) databases of isotropic turbulence: 128(exp 3) DNS of forced turbulence (Re(sub(lambda))=95.8) filtered, using the sharp cutoff filter, to both 32(exp 3) and 16(exp 3) synthetic LES fields; 512(exp 3) DNS of decaying turbulence (Re(sub(Lambda))=63.5) filtered to both 64(exp 3) and 32(exp 3) LES fields. Gaussian and top-hat filters were also used with the 128(exp 3) database. Different LES models were evaluated for each formulation: eddy-viscosity models, hyper eddy-viscosity models, mixed models, and scale-similarity models. Correlations between exact versus modeled subgrid-scale quantities were measured at three levels: tensor (traceless), vector (solenoidal 'force'), and scalar (dissipation) levels, and for both cases of uniform and variable coefficient(s). Different choices for the 1/T scaling appearing in the eddy-viscosity were also evaluated. It was found that the models for the vorticity-velocity formulation produce higher correlations with the filtered DNS data than their counterpart in the velocity-pressure formulation. It was also found that the hyper eddy-viscosity model performs better than the eddy viscosity model, in both formulations.

  5. Negative absolute temperature for mobile particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, Simon; Ronzheimer, Philipp; Schreiber, Michael; Hodgman, Sean; Bloch, Immanuel; Schneider, Ulrich

    2013-05-01

    Absolute temperature is usually bound to be strictly positive. However, negative absolute temperature states, where the occupation probability of states increases with their energy, are possible in systems with an upper energy bound. So far, such states have only been demonstrated in localized spin systems with finite, discrete spectra. We realized a negative absolute temperature state for motional degrees of freedom with ultracold bosonic 39K atoms in an optical lattice, by implementing the attractive Bose-Hubbard Hamiltonian. This new state strikingly revealed itself by a quasimomentum distribution that is peaked at maximum kinetic energy. The measured kinetic energy distribution and the extracted negative temperature indicate that the ensemble is close to degeneracy, with coherence over several lattice sites. The state is as stable as a corresponding positive temperature state: The negative temperature stabilizes the system against mean-field collapse driven by negative pressure. Negative temperatures open up new parameter regimes for cold atoms, enabling fundamentally new many-body states. Additionally, they give rise to several counterintuitive effects such as heat engines with above unity efficiency.

  6. System for absolute measurements by interferometric sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norton, Douglas A.

    1993-03-01

    The most common problem of interferometric sensors is their inability to measure absolute path imbalance. Presented in this paper is a signal processing system that gives absolute, unambiguous reading of optical path difference for almost any style of interferometric sensor. Key components are a wide band (incoherent) optical source, a polychromator, and FFT electronics. Advantages include no moving parts in the signal processor, no active components at the sensor location, and the use of standard single mode fiber for sensor illumination and signal transmission. Actual absolute path imbalance of the interferometer is determined without using fringe counting or other inferential techniques. The polychromator extracts the interference information that occurs at each discrete wavelength within the spectral band of the optical source. The signal processing consists of analog and digital filtering, Fast Fourier analysis, and a peak detection and interpolation algorithm. This system was originally designed for use in a remote pressure sensing application that employed a totally passive fiber optic interferometer. A performance qualification was made using a Fabry-Perot interferometer and a commercially available laser interferometer to measure the reference displacement.

  7. Environmental data from laboratory- and bench-scale Pressurized Fluidized-Bed Hydroretorting of Eastern oil shale

    SciTech Connect

    Mensinger, M.C.; Rue, D.M.; Roberts, M.J.

    1991-01-01

    As part of a 3-year program to develop the Pressurized Fluidized-Bed Hydroretorting (PFH) Process for Eastern oil shales, IGT conducted tests in laboratory-scale batch and continuous units as well as a 45-kg/h bench-scale unit to generate a data base for 6 Eastern shales. Data were collected during PFH processing of raw Alabama and Indiana shales and a beneficiated Indiana shale for environmental mitigation analyses. The data generated include trace element analyses of the raw feeds and spent shales, product oils, and sour waters. The sulfur compounds present in the product gas and trace components in the sour water were also determined. In addition, the leaching characteristics of the feed and residue solids were determined. The data obtained were used to evaluate the environmental impact of a shale processing plant based on the PFH process. This paper presents the environmental data obtained from bench-scale tests conducted during the program.

  8. Environmental data from laboratory- and bench-scale Pressurized Fluidized-Bed Hydroretorting of Eastern oil shale

    SciTech Connect

    Mensinger, M.C.; Rue, D.M.; Roberts, M.J.

    1991-12-31

    As part of a 3-year program to develop the Pressurized Fluidized-Bed Hydroretorting (PFH) Process for Eastern oil shales, IGT conducted tests in laboratory-scale batch and continuous units as well as a 45-kg/h bench-scale unit to generate a data base for 6 Eastern shales. Data were collected during PFH processing of raw Alabama and Indiana shales and a beneficiated Indiana shale for environmental mitigation analyses. The data generated include trace element analyses of the raw feeds and spent shales, product oils, and sour waters. The sulfur compounds present in the product gas and trace components in the sour water were also determined. In addition, the leaching characteristics of the feed and residue solids were determined. The data obtained were used to evaluate the environmental impact of a shale processing plant based on the PFH process. This paper presents the environmental data obtained from bench-scale tests conducted during the program.

  9. Unsteady blade-surface pressures on a large-scale advanced propeller: Prediction and data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nallasamy, M.; Groeneweg, J. F.

    1990-01-01

    An unsteady 3-D Euler analysis technique is employed to compute the flow field of an advanced propeller operating at an angle of attack. The predicted blade pressure waveforms are compared with wind tunnel data at two Mach numbers, 0.5 and 0.2. The inflow angle is three degrees. For an inflow Mach number of 0.5, the predicted pressure response is in fair agreement with data: the predicted phases of the waveforms are in close agreement with data while the magnitudes are underpredicted. At the low Mach number of 0.2 (takeoff), the numerical solution shows the formation of a leading edge vortex which is in qualitative agreement with measurements. However, the highly nonlinear pressure response measured on the blade suction surface is not captured in the present inviscid analysis.

  10. Unsteady blade surface pressures on a large-scale advanced propeller - Prediction and data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nallasamy, M.; Groeneweg, J. F.

    1990-01-01

    An unsteady three dimensional Euler analysis technique is employed to compute the flowfield of an advanced propeller operating at an angle of attack. The predicted blade pressure waveforms are compared with wind tunnel data at two Mach numbers, 0.5 and 0.2. The inflow angle is three degrees. For an inflow Mach number of 0.5, the predicted pressure response is in fair agreement with data: the predicted phases of the waveforms are in close agreement with data while the magnitudes are underpredicted. At the low Mach number of 0.2 (take-off) the numerical solution shows the formation of a leading edge vortex which is in qualitative agreement with measurements. However, the highly nonlinear pressure response measured on the blade suction surface is not captured in the present inviscid analysis.

  11. On Porosity Formation in Metal Matrix Composites Made with Dual-Scale Fiber Reinforcements Using Pressure Infiltration Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etemadi, Reihaneh; Pillai, Krishna M.; Rohatgi, Pradeep K.; Hamidi, Sajad Ahmad

    2015-05-01

    This is the first such study on porosity formation phenomena observed in dual-scale fiber preforms during the synthesis of metal matrix composites (MMCs) using the gas pressure infiltration process. In this paper, different mechanisms of porosity formation during pressure infiltration of Al-Si alloys into Nextel™ 3D-woven ceramic fabric reinforcements (a dual-porosity or dual-scale porous medium) are studied. The effect of processing conditions on porosity content of the ceramic fabric infiltrated by the alloys through the gas PIP (PIP stands for "Pressure Infiltration Process" in which liquid metal is injected under pressure into a mold packed with reinforcing fibers.) is investigated. Relative density (RD), defined as the ratio of the actual MMC density and the density obtained at ideal 100 pct saturation of the preform, was used to quantify the overall porosity. Increasing the infiltration temperature led to an increase in RD due to reduced viscosity of liquid metal and enhanced wettability leading to improved feedability of the liquid metal. Similarly, increasing the infiltration pressure led to enhanced penetration of fiber tows and resulted in higher RD and reduced porosity. For the first time, the modified Capillary number ( Ca*), which is found to predict formation of porosity in polymer matrix composites quite well, is employed to study porosity in MMCs made using PIP. It is observed that in the high Ca* regime which is common in PIP, the overall porosity shows a strong downward trend with increasing Ca*. In addition, the effect of matrix shrinkage on porosity content of the samples is studied through using a zero-shrinkage Al-Si alloy as the matrix; usage of this alloy as the matrix led to a reduction in porosity content.

  12. Scaling of viscosity with rate, pressure, and temperature: Linking simulations to experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jadhao, Vikram; Robbins, Mark

    Elastohydrodynamic lubrication (EHL) is important in many practical devices and produces extreme pressures (> 1 GPa) and shear rates (105 -107 s-1). This makes EHL fluids ideal candidates for bridging the gap between experimental and simulation studies of viscosity. There is an ongoing debate about whether the high-rate response of simple molecules like squalane follows a power-law Carreau model or a thermal activation based Eyring model. We use molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the rheological response of squalane for a wide range of rates (105 -1010 s-1), pressures (0.1 MPa to 3 GPa), and temperatures (100 - 313 K). We find that experimental and theoretical results can be collapsed onto a master curve consistent with Eyring theory over more than 20 orders of magnitude in rate. Extrapolating Eyring fits to simulations at 107 s-1 and above yields Newtonian viscosities η0 that are consistent with available low-rate experiments, and allows predictions to much higher pressures and lower temperatures. There is no indication of a diverging viscosity at finite stress, since log η0 rises sublinearly with pressure up to 6 GPa and η0 >1012 Pa-s. Correlations between chain conformations and Eyring parameters are also presented. This research was performed within the Center for Materials in Extreme Dynamic Environments (CMEDE) under the Hopkins Extreme Materials Institute at Johns Hopkins University. Financial support was provided by Grant W911NF-12-2-0022.

  13. Interpolating a consumption variable for scaling and generalizing potential population pressure on urbanizing natural areas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Varanka, Dalia; Jiang, Bin; Yao, Xiaobai

    2010-01-01

    Measures of population pressure, referring in general to the stress upon the environment by human consumption of resources, are imperative for environmental sustainability studies and management. Development based on resource consumption is the predominant factor of population pressure. This paper presents a spatial model of population pressure by linking consumption associated with regional urbanism and ecosystem services. Maps representing relative geographic degree and extent of natural resource consumption and degree and extent of impacts on surrounding areas are new, and this research represents the theoretical research toward this goal. With development, such maps offer a visualization tool for planners of various services, amenities for people, and conservation planning for ecologist. Urbanization is commonly generalized by census numbers or impervious surface area. The potential geographical extent of urbanism encompasses the environmental resources of the surrounding region that sustain cities. This extent is interpolated using kriging of a variable based on population wealth data from the U.S. Census Bureau. When overlayed with land-use/land-cover data, the results indicate that the greatest estimates of population pressure fall within mixed forest areas. Mixed forest areas result from the spread of cedar woods in previously disturbed areas where further disturbance is then suppressed. Low density areas, such as suburbanization and abandoned farmland are characteristic of mixed forest areas.

  14. Absolute integrated intensity for the nu-1 sulfur dioxide band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pilon, P. J.; Young, C.

    1976-01-01

    The absolute integrated intensity of the IR vibration-rotation nu-1 SO2 band was measured using the linear portion of the curve of growth. Infrared spectroscopic-absorption cell measurements were performed on sulfur dioxide at partial pressures less than 0.15 torr with nitrogen added to give a total pressure of 705 torr, the path length being 4 mm. The absolute integrated intensity was determined to be 112.0 plus or minus 2.6/cm/sq (atm cm) at 296 K at the 95% confidence level.

  15. Absolute photon-flux measurements in the vacuum ultraviolet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samson, J. A. R.; Haddad, G. N.

    1974-01-01

    Absolute photon-flux measurements in the vacuum ultraviolet have extended to short wavelengths by use of rare-gas ionization chambers. The technique involves the measurement of the ion current as a function of the gas pressure in the ion chamber. The true value of the ion current, and hence the absolute photon flux, is obtained by extrapolating the ion current to zero gas pressure. Examples are given at 162 and 266 A. The short-wavelength limit is determined only by the sensitivity of the current-measuring apparatus and by present knowledge of the photoionization processes that occur in the rate gases.

  16. Cryogenic High Pressure Sensor Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, John J. (Inventor); Shams, Qamar A. (Inventor); Powers, William T. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A pressure sensor is provided for cryogenic, high pressure applications. A highly doped silicon piezoresistive pressure sensor is bonded to a silicon substrate in an absolute pressure sensing configuration. The absolute pressure sensor is bonded to an aluminum nitride substrate. Aluminum nitride has appropriate coefficient of thermal expansion for use with highly doped silicon at cryogenic temperatures. A group of sensors, either two sensors on two substrates or four sensors on a single substrate are packaged in a pressure vessel.

  17. Staged, High-Pressure Oxy-Combustion Technology: Development and Scale-Up

    SciTech Connect

    Axelbaum, Richard; Xia, Fei; Gopan, Akshay; Kumfer, Benjamin

    2014-09-30

    Washington University in St. Louis and its project partners are developing a unique pressurized oxy-combustion process that aims to improve efficiency and costs by reducing the recycling of flue gas to near zero. Normally, in the absence of recycled flue gas or another inert gas, combustion of fuel and oxygen results in a dramatic increase in temperature of the combustion products and radiant energy, as compared to combustion in air. High heat flux to the boiler tubes may result in a tube surface temperatures that exceed safe operating limits. In the Staged Pressurized Oxy-Combustion (SPOC) process, this problem is addressed by staging the delivery of fuel and by novel combustion design that allows control of heat flux. In addition, the main mode of heat transfer to the steam cycle is by radiation, as opposed to convection. Therefore, the requirement for recycling large amounts of flue gas, for temperature control or to improve convective heat transfer, is eliminated, resulting in a reduction in auxiliary loads. The following report contains a detailed summary of scientific findings and accomplishments for the period of Oct. 1, 2013 to Sept 30, 2014. Results of ASPEN process and CFD modelling activities aimed at improving the SPOC process and boiler design are presented. The effects of combustion pressure and fuel moisture on the plant efficiency are discussed. Combustor pressure is found to have only a minor impact beyond 16 bar. For fuels with moisture content greater than approx 30%, e.g. coal/water slurries, the amount of latent heat of condensation exceeds that which can be utilized in the steam cycle and plant efficiency is reduced significantly. An improved boiler design is presented that achieves a more uniform heat flux profile. In addition, a fundamental study of radiation in high-temperature, high-pressure, particle-laden flows is summarized which provides a more complete understanding of heat transfer in these unusual conditions and to allow for

  18. Method and apparatus for two-dimensional absolute optical encoding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leviton, Douglas B. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    This invention presents a two-dimensional absolute optical encoder and a method for determining position of an object in accordance with information from the encoder. The encoder of the present invention comprises a scale having a pattern being predetermined to indicate an absolute location on the scale, means for illuminating the scale, means for forming an image of the pattern; and detector means for outputting signals derived from the portion of the image of the pattern which lies within a field of view of the detector means, the field of view defining an image reference coordinate system, and analyzing means, receiving the signals from the detector means, for determining the absolute location of the object. There are two types of scale patterns presented in this invention: grid type and starfield type.

  19. Evaluation of pressure and thermal data from a wind tunnel test of a large-scale, powered, STOL fighter model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howell, G. A.; Crosthwait, E. L.; Witte, M. C.

    1981-01-01

    A STOL fighter model employing the vectored-engine-over wing concept was tested at low speeds in the NASA/Ames 40 by 80-foot wind tunnel. The model, approximately 0.75 scale of an operational fighter, was powered by two General Electric J-97 turbojet engines. Limited pressure and thermal instrumentation were provided to measure power effects (chordwise and spanwise blowing) and control-surface-deflection effects. An indepth study of the pressure and temperature data revealed many flow field features - the foremost being wing and canard leading-edge vortices. These vortices delineated regions of attached and separated flow, and their movements were often keys to an understanding of flow field changes caused by power and control-surface variations. Chordwise blowing increased wing lift and caused a modest aft shift in the center of pressure. The induced effects of chordwise blowing extended forward to the canard and significantly increased the canard lift when the surface was stalled. Spanwise blowing effectively enhanced the wing leading-edge vortex, thereby increasing lift and causing a forward shift in the center of pressure.

  20. A Full-Scale Tunnel Sealing Demonstration using Concrete and Clay Bulkheads Exposed to Elevated Temperatures and Pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Martino, J.B.; Dixon, D.A.; Vignal, B.; Fujita, T.

    2006-07-01

    The Tunnel Sealing Experiment (TSX), a major international research and development project, demonstrating technologies for tunnel sealing at full-scale, was conducted at Atomic Energy of Canada Limited's Underground Research Laboratory (URL). The objective of the experiment was to demonstrate technologies for construction of bentonite and concrete bulkheads, to quantify the performance of each bulkhead and to document the factors that affect the performance. It was not the purpose of the experiment to demonstrate an optimized sealing bulkhead. Two bulkheads, one composed of low heat high performance concrete and the other of highly compacted sand-bentonite material, were constructed in a tunnel in unfractured granitic rock at the URL. The chamber between the two bulkheads was pressurized with water to 4 MPa in a series of steps over a two-year period. The ultimate pressure is representative of the ambient pore pressures in the rock at a depth of 420 m. The first phase of the TSX was conducted at ambient temperature (15 deg. C) while a second phase involved heating the pressurized water between the bulkheads to temperatures that ultimately reached 65 deg. C at thermistors near the upstream face of both bulkheads. Instrumentation in the experiment was used to monitor parameters that are important indicators for bulkhead performance. Seepage was measured at both bulkheads and at any leakage points from the tunnel to maintain a water balance. The paper provides an overview of the project and its results. (authors)

  1. Universal scaling law for energy and pressure in a shearing fluid.

    PubMed

    Desgranges, Caroline; Delhommelle, Jerome

    2009-05-01

    Using nonequilibrium molecular-dynamics simulation, we study the shear-rate dependence of pressure and potential energy in a liquid metal subjected to shear. We show that both thermodynamic properties vary according to a power law gamma[over ];{beta} of the shear rate gamma[over ] , in which the exponent beta is a simple linear function of temperature and density. Moreover, we establish that the coefficients for this linear law are the same as those previously obtained for a Lennard-Jones fluid by Ge [Phys. Rev. E 67, 061201 (2003)]. This is a strong indication that these coefficients, as well as the linear law for beta , could be applicable to any atomic fluid. It is also an important step toward the determination of a nonequilibrium equation of state, which would predict the value of pressure and energy of a shearing fluid for any state point and any value of the applied shear rate.

  2. Prediction of Solids Circulation Rate of Cork Particles in an Ambient-Pressure Pilot-Scale Circulating Fluidized Bed

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Yue; Turton, Richard; Famouri, Parviz; Boyle, Edward J.

    2009-01-07

    Circulating fluidized beds (CFB) are currently used in many industrial processes for noncatalytic and catalytic because its effective control is the key to smooth operation of a CFB system. This paper presents a method for solids flow metering from pressure drop measurements in the standpipe dense phase. A model based on the Ergun equation is developed to predict the solids flow rate and voidage in the dense phase of the standpipe. The profile of the solids flow rate under unsteady state is also presented. With the use of this method, the dynamic response time at different locations along the standpipe of a pilot-scale fluidized bed operating at ambient conditions with 812 mu m cork particles is estimated successfully. Through the use of a pressure balance analysis, solids flow models for the standpipe, riser, and other sections of the flow loop are combined to give an integrated CFB model.

  3. Construct Validity of the Braden Scale for Pressure Ulcer Assessment in Acute Care: A Structural Equation Modeling Approach.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hong-Lin; Cao, Ying-Juan; Shen, Wang-Qin; Zhu, Bin

    2017-02-01

    The Braden Scale is the most widely used pressure ulcer risk assessment system in the world. To investigate its construct validity using structural equation modeling (SEM), a secondary analysis of retrospective data of patients admitted to an acute care facility was conducted using the records of 2588 patients who were at risk for pressure ulcers and admitted between January 2013 and December 2013. Data were extracted to an Excel sheet and analyzed, including demographic characteristics (ie, patients age, gender, weight, and disease spectrum), as well as total Braden scores and subscale scores. The SEM was set according to modification indices suggestion. The original Braden Scale model was supported by χ2(9) = 22.854, CFI = 0.902, GFI = 0.974, root mean square error of approximation (RMSEA) = 0.092, indicating inadequate model fit. After modification according to software indices, χ2(2) = 2.052, CFI = 0.999, GFI = 0.999, RMSEA = 0.020 indicated an acceptable fit of the model (final model). The factor loadings of 6 subscales were all significant (P <.001), with .147 for nutrition, .137 for activity, .167 for friction and shear, .825 for sensory perception, .626 for mobility, and .556 for moisture subscale. The nutrition, activity, and friction and shear subscales were corrected to examine their relationships with other Braden Scale subscales (nutrition with activity [φ -0.063], activity with friction/shear [φ 0.136], and nutrition (φ friction/shear [0.159]). The factor loadings ranged from -0.067 to 0.159. These findings suggest the original Braden Scale has inadequate construct validity for acute care patients and that new risk-predicting scales should be designed based on data mining. Second, according to the factor loadings in the SEM, the most important risk factor in the Braden Scale for this patient population is sensory perception, followed by mobility and moisture. This suggests practitioners should pay particular attention to pressure ulcer prevention

  4. Nearfield Unsteady Pressures at Cruise Mach Numbers for a Model Scale Counter-Rotation Open Rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, David B.

    2012-01-01

    An open rotor experiment was conducted at cruise Mach numbers and the unsteady pressure in the nearfield was measured. The system included extensive performance measurements, which can help provide insight into the noise generating mechanisms in the absence of flow measurements. A set of data acquired at a constant blade pitch angle but various rotor speeds was examined. The tone levels generated by the front and rear rotor were found to be nearly equal when the thrust was evenly balanced between rotors.

  5. Absolute NMR shielding scales and nuclear spin–rotation constants in {sup 175}LuX and {sup 197}AuX (X = {sup 19}F, {sup 35}Cl, {sup 79}Br and {sup 127}I)

    SciTech Connect

    Demissie, Taye B. Komorovsky, Stanislav; Repisky, Michal; Ruud, Kenneth; Jaszuński, Michał

    2015-10-28

    We present nuclear spin–rotation constants, absolute nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) shielding constants, and shielding spans of all the nuclei in {sup 175}LuX and {sup 197}AuX (X = {sup 19}F, {sup 35}Cl, {sup 79}Br, {sup 127}I), calculated using coupled-cluster singles-and-doubles with a perturbative triples (CCSD(T)) correction theory, four-component relativistic density functional theory (relativistic DFT), and non-relativistic DFT. The total nuclear spin–rotation constants determined by adding the relativistic corrections obtained from DFT calculations to the CCSD(T) values are in general in agreement with available experimental data, indicating that the computational approach followed in this study allows us to predict reliable results for the unknown spin–rotation constants in these molecules. The total NMR absolute shielding constants are determined for all the nuclei following the same approach as that applied for the nuclear spin–rotation constants. In most of the molecules, relativistic effects significantly change the computed shielding constants, demonstrating that straightforward application of the non-relativistic formula relating the electronic contribution to the nuclear spin–rotation constants and the paramagnetic contribution to the shielding constants does not yield correct results. We also analyze the origin of the unusually large absolute shielding constant and its relativistic correction of gold in AuF compared to the other gold monohalides.

  6. Absolute NMR shielding scales and nuclear spin-rotation constants in (175)LuX and (197)AuX (X = (19)F, (35)Cl, (79)Br and (127)I).

    PubMed

    Demissie, Taye B; Jaszuński, Michał; Komorovsky, Stanislav; Repisky, Michal; Ruud, Kenneth

    2015-10-28

    We present nuclear spin-rotation constants, absolute nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) shielding constants, and shielding spans of all the nuclei in (175)LuX and (197)AuX (X = (19)F, (35)Cl, (79)Br, (127)I), calculated using coupled-cluster singles-and-doubles with a perturbative triples (CCSD(T)) correction theory, four-component relativistic density functional theory (relativistic DFT), and non-relativistic DFT. The total nuclear spin-rotation constants determined by adding the relativistic corrections obtained from DFT calculations to the CCSD(T) values are in general in agreement with available experimental data, indicating that the computational approach followed in this study allows us to predict reliable results for the unknown spin-rotation constants in these molecules. The total NMR absolute shielding constants are determined for all the nuclei following the same approach as that applied for the nuclear spin-rotation constants. In most of the molecules, relativistic effects significantly change the computed shielding constants, demonstrating that straightforward application of the non-relativistic formula relating the electronic contribution to the nuclear spin-rotation constants and the paramagnetic contribution to the shielding constants does not yield correct results. We also analyze the origin of the unusually large absolute shielding constant and its relativistic correction of gold in AuF compared to the other gold monohalides.

  7. Absolute NMR shielding scales and nuclear spin-rotation constants in 175LuX and 197AuX (X = 19F, 35Cl, 79Br and 127I)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demissie, Taye B.; Jaszuński, Michał; Komorovsky, Stanislav; Repisky, Michal; Ruud, Kenneth

    2015-10-01

    We present nuclear spin-rotation constants, absolute nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) shielding constants, and shielding spans of all the nuclei in 175LuX and 197AuX (X = 19F, 35Cl, 79Br, 127I), calculated using coupled-cluster singles-and-doubles with a perturbative triples (CCSD(T)) correction theory, four-component relativistic density functional theory (relativistic DFT), and non-relativistic DFT. The total nuclear spin-rotation constants determined by adding the relativistic corrections obtained from DFT calculations to the CCSD(T) values are in general in agreement with available experimental data, indicating that the computational approach followed in this study allows us to predict reliable results for the unknown spin-rotation constants in these molecules. The total NMR absolute shielding constants are determined for all the nuclei following the same approach as that applied for the nuclear spin-rotation constants. In most of the molecules, relativistic effects significantly change the computed shielding constants, demonstrating that straightforward application of the non-relativistic formula relating the electronic contribution to the nuclear spin-rotation constants and the paramagnetic contribution to the shielding constants does not yield correct results. We also analyze the origin of the unusually large absolute shielding constant and its relativistic correction of gold in AuF compared to the other gold monohalides.

  8. Spatial Variation of Pressure in the Lyophilization Product Chamber Part 2: Experimental Measurements and Implications for Scale-up and Batch Uniformity.

    PubMed

    Sane, Pooja; Varma, Nikhil; Ganguly, Arnab; Pikal, Michael; Alexeenko, Alina; Bogner, Robin H

    2017-02-01

    Product temperature during the primary drying step of freeze-drying is controlled by a set point chamber pressure and shelf temperature. However, recent computational modeling suggests a possible variation in local chamber pressure. The current work presents an experimental verification of the local chamber pressure gradients in a lab-scale freeze-dryer. Pressure differences between the center and the edges of a lab-scale freeze-dryer shelf were measured as a function of sublimation flux and clearance between the sublimation front and the shelf above. A modest 3-mTorr difference in pressure was observed as the sublimation flux was doubled from 0.5 to 1.0 kg·h(-1)·m(-2) at a clearance of 2.6 cm. Further, at a constant sublimation flux of 1.0 kg·h(-1)·m(-2), an 8-fold increase in the pressure drop was observed across the shelf as the clearance was decreased from 4 to 1.6 cm. Scale-up of the pressure variation from lab- to a manufacturing-scale freeze-dryer predicted an increased uniformity in drying rates across the batch for two frequently used pharmaceutical excipients (mannitol and sucrose at 5% w/w). However, at an atypical condition of shelf temperature of +10°C and chamber pressure of 50 mTorr, the product temperature in the center vials was calculated to be a degree higher than the edge vial for a low resistance product, thus reversing the typical edge and center vial behavior. Thus, the effect of local pressure variation is more significant at the manufacturing-scale than at a lab-scale and accounting for the contribution of variations in the local chamber pressures can improve success in scale-up.

  9. Realization of the 3He Vapor-Pressure Temperature Scale and Development of a Liquid-He-Free Calibration Apparatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimazaki, T.; Toyoda, K.; Tamura, O.

    2011-12-01

    The 3He vapor-pressure temperature scale was realized using an apparatus based on a continuously operating 3He cryostat at the National Metrology Institute of Japan (NMIJ), National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST). The cryostat has two operational modes: a 3He circulation mode and a 1 K pot mode. The 3He circulation mode can be used for 3He vapor-pressure measurements below 1.6 K, and the 1 K pot mode can be used for measurements above 1.3 K. Either mode can be selected for measurements from 1.3 K to 1.6 K. The realization of the 3He vapor-pressure temperature scale in this study fully covers its defined temperature range from 0.65 K to 3.2 K in the International Temperature Scale of 1990. The latest realization results are presented in this article. In addition, a liquid-He-free calibration apparatus was developed. It does not require liquid helium as a cryogen, which usually entails cumbersome handling and periodic refilling. The apparatus was designed for the calibration of capsule-type resistance thermometers from 0.65 K to 24.5561 K (the triple point of neon). The cooling system of the apparatus consists of a commercially available pulse-tube refrigerator and a 3He Joule-Thomson (JT) cooling circuit developed at NMIJ/AIST. The pulse-tube refrigerator is used in a pre-cooling stage and cools the apparatus to approximately 5 K. The 3He JT cooling circuit is used to cool the apparatus from 5 K to below 0.65 K. Since the 3He JT cooling circuit is a closed circuit, the apparatus can run continuously with only simple maintenance required. The basic characteristics of the apparatus are described.

  10. Absolute classification with unsupervised clustering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeon, Byeungwoo; Landgrebe, D. A.

    1992-01-01

    An absolute classification algorithm is proposed in which the class definition through training samples or otherwise is required only for a particular class of interest. The absolute classification is considered as a problem of unsupervised clustering when one cluster is known initially. The definitions and statistics of the other classes are automatically developed through the weighted unsupervised clustering procedure, which is developed to keep the cluster corresponding to the class of interest from losing its identity as the class of interest. Once all the classes are developed, a conventional relative classifier such as the maximum-likelihood classifier is used in the classification.

  11. A Preliminary Model Study of the Large-Scale Seasonal Cycle in Bottom Pressure Over the Global Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponte, Rui M.

    1998-01-01

    Output from the primitive equation model of Semtner and Chervin is used to examine the seasonal cycle in bottom pressure (Pb) over the global ocean. Effects of the volume-conserving formulation of the model on the calculation Of Pb are considered. The estimated seasonal, large-scale Pb signals have amplitudes ranging from less than 1 cm over most of the deep ocean to several centimeters over shallow, boundary regions. Variability generally increases toward the western sides of the basins, and is also larger in some Southern Ocean regions. An oscillation between subtropical and higher latitudes in the North Pacific is clear. Comparison with barotropic simulations indicates that, on basin scales, seasonal Pb variability is related to barotropic dynamics and the seasonal cycle in Ekman pumping, and results from a small, net residual in mass divergence from the balance between Ekman and Sverdrup flows.

  12. Energy penetration into arrays of aligned nanowires irradiated with relativistic intensities: Scaling to terabar pressures.

    PubMed

    Bargsten, Clayton; Hollinger, Reed; Capeluto, Maria Gabriela; Kaymak, Vural; Pukhov, Alexander; Wang, Shoujun; Rockwood, Alex; Wang, Yong; Keiss, David; Tommasini, Riccardo; London, Richard; Park, Jaebum; Busquet, Michel; Klapisch, Marcel; Shlyaptsev, Vyacheslav N; Rocca, Jorge J

    2017-01-01

    Ultrahigh-energy density (UHED) matter, characterized by energy densities >1 × 10(8) J cm(-3) and pressures greater than a gigabar, is encountered in the center of stars and inertial confinement fusion capsules driven by the world's largest lasers. Similar conditions can be obtained with compact, ultrahigh contrast, femtosecond lasers focused to relativistic intensities onto targets composed of aligned nanowire arrays. We report the measurement of the key physical process in determining the energy density deposited in high-aspect-ratio nanowire array plasmas: the energy penetration. By monitoring the x-ray emission from buried Co tracer segments in Ni nanowire arrays irradiated at an intensity of 4 × 10(19) W cm(-2), we demonstrate energy penetration depths of several micrometers, leading to UHED plasmas of that size. Relativistic three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, validated by these measurements, predict that irradiation of nanostructures at intensities of >1 × 10(22) W cm(-2) will lead to a virtually unexplored extreme UHED plasma regime characterized by energy densities in excess of 8 × 10(10) J cm(-3), equivalent to a pressure of 0.35 Tbar.

  13. Flight Tests on U.S.S. Los Angeles. Part I : Full Scale Pressure Distribution Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De France, S J

    1930-01-01

    The primary purpose of this investigation was to obtain simultaneous data on the loads and stress experience in flight by the U. S. S. Los Angeles which could be used in rigid airship structure design. A secondary object of the investigation was to determine the turning and drag characteristics of the airship. The aerodynamic loading was obtained by measuring the pressure at 95 locations on the tail surfaces, 54 on the hull, and 5 on the passenger car. These measurements were made during a series of maneuvers consisting of turns and reversals in smooth air and during a cruise in rough air which was just short of squall proportions. The results of the pressure measurements on the hull indicate that the forces on the forebody of an airship are relatively small. The tail surface measurements show conclusively that the forces caused by gusts are much greater than those caused by horizontal maneuvers. In this investigation the tail surface loadings caused by gusts closely approached the designed loads of the tail structure. The turning and drag characteristics will be reported in separate reports.

  14. Scaling up of High-Pressure Sliding (HPS) for Grain Refinement and Superplasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takizawa, Yoichi; Masuda, Takahiro; Fujimitsu, Kazushige; Kajita, Takahiro; Watanabe, Kyohei; Yumoto, Manabu; Otagiri, Yoshiharu; Horita, Zenji

    2016-09-01

    The process of high-pressure sliding (HPS) is a method of severe plastic deformation developed recently for grain refinement of metallic materials under high pressure. The sample for HPS is used with a form of sheet or rod. In this study, an HPS facility with capacities of 500 tonnes for vertical pressing and of 500 and 300 tonnes for horizontal forward and backward pressings, respectively, was newly built and applied for grain refinement of a Mg alloy as AZ61, Al alloys such as Al-Mg-Sc, A2024 and A7075 alloys, a Ti alloy as ASTM-F1295, and a Ni-based superalloy as Inconel 718. Sheet samples with dimensions of 10 to 30 mm width, 100 mm length, and 1 mm thickness were processed at room temperature and ultrafine grains with sizes of ~200 to 300 nm were successfully produced in the alloys. Tensile testing at elevated temperatures confirmed the advent of superplasticity with total elongations of more than 400 pct in all the alloys. It is demonstrated that the HPS can make all the alloys superplastic through processing at room temperature with a form of rectangular sheets.

  15. Energy penetration into arrays of aligned nanowires irradiated with relativistic intensities: Scaling to terabar pressures

    PubMed Central

    Bargsten, Clayton; Hollinger, Reed; Capeluto, Maria Gabriela; Kaymak, Vural; Pukhov, Alexander; Wang, Shoujun; Rockwood, Alex; Wang, Yong; Keiss, David; Tommasini, Riccardo; London, Richard; Park, Jaebum; Busquet, Michel; Klapisch, Marcel; Shlyaptsev, Vyacheslav N.; Rocca, Jorge J.

    2017-01-01

    Ultrahigh-energy density (UHED) matter, characterized by energy densities >1 × 108 J cm−3 and pressures greater than a gigabar, is encountered in the center of stars and inertial confinement fusion capsules driven by the world’s largest lasers. Similar conditions can be obtained with compact, ultrahigh contrast, femtosecond lasers focused to relativistic intensities onto targets composed of aligned nanowire arrays. We report the measurement of the key physical process in determining the energy density deposited in high-aspect-ratio nanowire array plasmas: the energy penetration. By monitoring the x-ray emission from buried Co tracer segments in Ni nanowire arrays irradiated at an intensity of 4 × 1019 W cm−2, we demonstrate energy penetration depths of several micrometers, leading to UHED plasmas of that size. Relativistic three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, validated by these measurements, predict that irradiation of nanostructures at intensities of >1 × 1022 W cm−2 will lead to a virtually unexplored extreme UHED plasma regime characterized by energy densities in excess of 8 × 1010 J cm−3, equivalent to a pressure of 0.35 Tbar. PMID:28097218

  16. Absolute transition probabilities of phosphorus.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, M. H.; Roig, R. A.; Bengtson, R. D.

    1971-01-01

    Use of a gas-driven shock tube to measure the absolute strengths of 21 P I lines and 126 P II lines (from 3300 to 6900 A). Accuracy for prominent, isolated neutral and ionic lines is estimated to be 28 to 40% and 18 to 30%, respectively. The data and the corresponding theoretical predictions are examined for conformity with the sum rules.-

  17. Relativistic Absolutism in Moral Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vogt, W. Paul

    1982-01-01

    Discusses Emile Durkheim's "Moral Education: A Study in the Theory and Application of the Sociology of Education," which holds that morally healthy societies may vary in culture and organization but must possess absolute rules of moral behavior. Compares this moral theory with current theory and practice of American educators. (MJL)

  18. Diode laser heterodyne interferometry for refractive index measurement of small-scale plasmas in high pressure gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urabe, Keiichiro; Muneoka, Hitoshi; Stauss, Sven; Terashima, Kazuo

    2013-09-01

    The electron density is one of the most important plasma parameters; however, the behavior of the electron density in high-pressure small-scale plasmas (so-called microplasmas) is still not well understood. We have studied the electron density in direct-current microplasmas operated at atmospheric pressure by using laser heterodyne interferometry and reported some results using CO2 laser as a light source. By measuring the temporal evolutions of the refractive index of the plasmas by the interferometer, the temporal changes of the electron and gas number densities can be derived. Because of its shorter wavelength, using near-infrared diode laser (890 nm) as a light source allows improving the spatial resolution of the measurement over that obtained using a CO2 laser (10.6 μm). Furthermore, by replacing a lock-in amplifier used in our previous CO2-laser interferometry by a custom-made phase detecting module, the response time and temporal resolution of the measurements could be improved. Finally, we discuss potentials of the diode laser interferometry for the measurement of electron and gas number densities with the measurement results of pulsed microplasmas operated in atmospheric and higher pressure gases. This work was supported financially in part by a Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research on Innovative Areas (No. 21110002) from the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science, and Technology of Japan.

  19. Pressures and temperatures on the lower surfaces of an externally blown flap system during full-scale ground tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, D. L.

    1973-01-01

    Full-scale ground tests of an externally blown flap system were made using the wing of an F-111B airplane and a CF700 engine. Pressure and temperature distributions were determined on the undersurface of the wing, vane, and flap for two engine exhaust nozzles (conical and daisy) at several engine power levels and engine/wing positions. The test were made with no airflow over the wing. The wing sweep angle was fixed at e6 deg; and the angle of incidence between the engine and the wing was fixed at 3 deg; and the flap was in the retracted, deflected 35 deg, and deflected 60 deg positions. The pressure load obtained by integrating the local pressures on the undersurface of the flap, F sub p was approximately three times greater at the 60 deg flap position than at the 35 deg flap position. At the 60 deg flap position, F sub p was between 40 percent and 55 percent of the engine thrust over the measured range of thrust. More than 90 percent of F sub p was contained within plus or minus 20 percent of the flap span centered around the engine exhaust centerline with both nozzle configurations. Maximum temperatures recorded on the flaps were 218 C (424 F) and 180 C (356 F) for the conical and daisy nozzles, repectively,

  20. Evaluation of Scale-Model Ceramic Pressure Housing for Deep Submergence Service: Fifth Generation Housings

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-03-01

    hold at peak served as attachment points for ballast (figure 17). Type 2 ceramic hemi- pressures e tsphere and on the other etesting arrangement was...C2f CS2 � ARON, C.RCUmF’ERENC.t 2 ’ AGE -OC2f 1 -xr. Z S--2 2 -A- 2: 2D-C-r..’ fS. - 22t’C2’E 2S222 4.y SAC~Z5X EOA&L, SPACE:D 2-~ BLX k 2’ 9 CR~C...ROSETTE 37 73 -1821 74 1876 -22523 23777 𔃼 GAGE ROSETTE 38 75 -1224 76 1771 -12240 2242 G2 AGE ROSETTE 29 77 -1711 78 2185 -18760 -. 0o 2 BABE ROSETTE

  1. The absolute threshold of cone vision

    PubMed Central

    Koeing, Darran; Hofer, Heidi

    2013-01-01

    We report measurements of the absolute threshold of cone vision, which has been previously underestimated due to sub-optimal conditions or overly strict subjective response criteria. We avoided these limitations by using optimized stimuli and experimental conditions while having subjects respond within a rating scale framework. Small (1′ fwhm), brief (34 msec), monochromatic (550 nm) stimuli were foveally presented at multiple intensities in dark-adapted retina for 5 subjects. For comparison, 4 subjects underwent similar testing with rod-optimized stimuli. Cone absolute threshold, that is, the minimum light energy for which subjects were just able to detect a visual stimulus with any response criterion, was 203 ± 38 photons at the cornea, ∼0.47 log units lower than previously reported. Two-alternative forced-choice measurements in a subset of subjects yielded consistent results. Cone thresholds were less responsive to criterion changes than rod thresholds, suggesting a limit to the stimulus information recoverable from the cone mosaic in addition to the limit imposed by Poisson noise. Results were consistent with expectations for detection in the face of stimulus uncertainty. We discuss implications of these findings for modeling the first stages of human cone vision and interpreting psychophysical data acquired with adaptive optics at the spatial scale of the receptor mosaic. PMID:21270115

  2. Experimental results from pressure testing a 1:6-scale nuclear power plant containment

    SciTech Connect

    Horschel, D.S.

    1992-01-01

    This report discusses the testing of a 1:6-scale, reinforced-concrete containment building at Sandia National Laboratories, in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The scale-model, Light Water Reactor (LWR) containment building was designed and built to the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) code by United Engineers and Constructors, Inc., and was instrumented with over 1200 transducers to prepare for the test. The containment model was tested to failure to determine its response to static internal overpressurization. As part of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s program on containment integrity, the test results will be used to assess the capability of analytical methods to predict the performance of containments under severe-accident loads. The scaled dimensions of the cylindrical wall and hemispherical dome were typical of a full-size containment. Other typical features included in the heavily reinforced model were equipment hatches, personnel air locks, several small piping penetrations, and a ihin steel liner that was attached to the concrete by headed studs. In addition to the transducers attached to the model, an acoustic detection system and several video and still cameras were used during testing to gather data and to aid in the conduct of the test. The model and its instrumentation are briefly discussed, and is followed by the testing procedures and measured response of the containment model. A summary discussion is included to aid in understanding the significance of the test as it applies to real world reinforced concrete containment structures. The data gathered during SIT and overpressure testing are included as an appendix.

  3. Determining Absolute Zero Using a Tuning Fork

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldader, Jeffrey D.

    2008-04-01

    The Celsius and Kelvin temperature scales, we tell our students, are related. We explain that a change in temperature of 1°C corresponds to a change of 1 Kelvin and that atoms and molecules have zero kinetic energy at zero Kelvin, -273°C. In this paper, we will show how students can derive the relationship between the Celsius and Kelvin temperature scales using a simple, well-known physics experiment. By making multiple measurements of the speed of sound at different temperatures, using the classic physics experiment of determining the speed of sound with a tuning fork and variable-length tube, they can determine the temperature at which the speed of sound is zero—absolute zero.

  4. An estimate of global absolute dynamic topography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tai, C.-K.; Wunsch, C.

    1984-01-01

    The absolute dynamic topography of the world ocean is estimated from the largest scales to a short-wavelength cutoff of about 6700 km for the period July through September, 1978. The data base consisted of the time-averaged sea-surface topography determined by Seasat and geoid estimates made at the Goddard Space Flight Center. The issues are those of accuracy and resolution. Use of the altimetric surface as a geoid estimate beyond the short-wavelength cutoff reduces the spectral leakage in the estimated dynamic topography from erroneous small-scale geoid estimates without contaminating the low wavenumbers. Comparison of the result with a similarly filtered version of Levitus' (1982) historical average dynamic topography shows good qualitative agreement. There is quantitative disagreement, but it is within the estimated errors of both methods of calculation.

  5. Scrape-off Layer Flows With Pressure Gradient Scale Length ~ {rho}{sub p}

    SciTech Connect

    Robert J. Goldston

    2013-03-08

    A heuristic model for the plasma scrape-off width balances magnetic drifts against parallel loss at c{sub s} /2, resulting in a SOL width ~ {rho}{sub p}. T{sub sep} is calculated from Spitzer–Härm parallel thermal conduction. This results in a prediction for the power scrape-off width in quantitative agreement both in magnitude and scaling with recent experimental data. To achieve the ~ c{sub s} /2 flow assumed in this model and measured experimentally sets requirements on the ratio of upstream to total SOL particle sources, relative to the square-root of the ratio of target to upstream temperature. The Pfisch-Schlüter model for equilibrium flows has been modified to allow near-sonic flows, appropriate for gradient scale lengths of order {rho}{sub p}, resulting in a new quadrupole radial flow pattern. The strong parallel flows and plasma charging implied by this model suggest a mechanism for H-mode transition, consistent with many observations

  6. A study of energy-size relationship and wear rate in a lab-scale high pressure grinding rolls unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashidi Dashtbayaz, Samira

    This study is focused on two independent topics of energy-size relationship and wear-rate measurements on a lab-scale high pressure grinding rolls (HPGR). The first part of this study has been aimed to investigate the influence of the operating parameters and the feed characteristics on the particle-bed breakage using four different ore samples in a 200 mm x 100 mm lab-scale HPGR. Additionally, multistage grinding, scale-up from a lab-scale HPGR, and prediction of the particle size distributions have been studied in detail. The results obtained from energy-size relationship studies help with better understanding of the factors contributing to more energy-efficient grinding. It will be shown that the energy efficiency of the two configurations of locked-cycle and open multipass is completely dependent on the ore properties. A test procedure to produce the scale-up data is presented. The comparison of the scale-up factors between the data obtained on the University of Utah lab-scale HPGR and the industrial machine at the Newmont Boddington plant confirmed the applicability of lab-scale machines for trade-off studies. The population balance model for the simulation of product size distributions has shown to work well with the breakage function estimated through tests performed on the HPGR at high rotational speed. Selection function has been estimated by back calculation of population balance model with the help of the experimental data. This is considered to be a major step towards advancing current research on the simulation of particle size distribution by using the HPGR machine for determining the breakage function. Developing a technique/setup to measure the wear rate of the HPGR rolls' surface is the objective of the second topic of this dissertation. A mockup was initially designed to assess the application of the linear displacement sensors for measuring the rolls' weight loss. Upon the analysis of that technique and considering the corresponding sources of

  7. Scale-4 Analysis of Pressurized Water Reactor Critical Configurations: Volume 5 - North Anna Unit 1 Cycle 5

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, S.M.

    1993-01-01

    The requirements of ANSI/ANS 8.1 specify that calculational methods for away-from-reactor (AFR) criticality safety analyses be validated against experimental measurements. If credit for the negative reactivity of the depleted (or spent) fuel isotopics is desired, it is necessary to benchmark computational methods against spent fuel critical configurations. This report summarizes a portion of the ongoing effort to benchmark AFR criticality analysis methods using selected critical configurations from commercial pressurized-water reactors (PWR). The analysis methodology selected for all calculations reported herein was the codes and data provided in the SCALE-4 code system. The isotopic densities for the spent fuel assemblies in the critical configurations were calculated using the SAS2H analytical sequence of the SCALE-4 system. The sources of data and the procedures for deriving SAS2H input parameters are described in detail. The SNIKR code module was used to extract the necessary isotopic densities from the SAS2H results and to provide the data in the format required by the SCALE criticality analysis modules. The CSASN analytical sequence in SCALE-4 was used to perform resonance processing of the cross sections. The KENO V.a module of SCALE-4 was used to calculate the effective multiplication factor (k{sub eff}) of each case. The SCALE-4 27-group burnup library containing ENDF/B-IV (actinides) and ENDF/B-V (fission products) data was used for all the calculations. This volume of the report documents the SCALE system analysis of one reactor critical configuration for North Anna Unit 1 Cycle 5. This unit and cycle were chosen for a previous analysis using a different methodology because detailed isotopics from multidimensional reactor calculations were available from the Virginia Power Company. These data permitted comparison of criticality calculations directly using the utility-calculated isotopics to those using the isotopics generated by the SCALE-4 SAS2H

  8. Weighing Scale-Based Pulse Transit Time is a Superior Marker of Blood Pressure than Conventional Pulse Arrival Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Stephanie L.-O.; Carek, Andrew M.; Kim, Chang-Sei; Ashouri, Hazar; Inan, Omer T.; Hahn, Jin-Oh; Mukkamala, Ramakrishna

    2016-12-01

    Pulse transit time (PTT) is being widely pursued for cuff-less blood pressure (BP) monitoring. Most efforts have employed the time delay between ECG and finger photoplethysmography (PPG) waveforms as a convenient surrogate of PTT. However, these conventional pulse arrival time (PAT) measurements include the pre-ejection period (PEP) and the time delay through small, muscular arteries and may thus be an unreliable marker of BP. We assessed a bathroom weighing scale-like system for convenient measurement of ballistocardiography and foot PPG waveforms – and thus PTT through larger, more elastic arteries – in terms of its ability to improve tracking of BP in individual subjects. We measured “scale PTT”, conventional PAT, and cuff BP in humans during interventions that increased BP but changed PEP and smooth muscle contraction differently. Scale PTT tracked the diastolic BP changes well, with correlation coefficient of ‑0.80 ± 0.02 (mean ± SE) and root-mean-squared-error of 7.6 ± 0.5 mmHg after a best-case calibration. Conventional PAT was significantly inferior in tracking these changes, with correlation coefficient of ‑0.60 ± 0.04 and root-mean-squared-error of 14.6 ± 1.5 mmHg (p < 0.05). Scale PTT also tracked the systolic BP changes better than conventional PAT but not to an acceptable level. With further development, scale PTT may permit reliable, convenient measurement of BP.

  9. Weighing Scale-Based Pulse Transit Time is a Superior Marker of Blood Pressure than Conventional Pulse Arrival Time

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Stephanie L.-O.; Carek, Andrew M.; Kim, Chang-Sei; Ashouri, Hazar; Inan, Omer T.; Hahn, Jin-Oh; Mukkamala, Ramakrishna

    2016-01-01

    Pulse transit time (PTT) is being widely pursued for cuff-less blood pressure (BP) monitoring. Most efforts have employed the time delay between ECG and finger photoplethysmography (PPG) waveforms as a convenient surrogate of PTT. However, these conventional pulse arrival time (PAT) measurements include the pre-ejection period (PEP) and the time delay through small, muscular arteries and may thus be an unreliable marker of BP. We assessed a bathroom weighing scale-like system for convenient measurement of ballistocardiography and foot PPG waveforms – and thus PTT through larger, more elastic arteries – in terms of its ability to improve tracking of BP in individual subjects. We measured “scale PTT”, conventional PAT, and cuff BP in humans during interventions that increased BP but changed PEP and smooth muscle contraction differently. Scale PTT tracked the diastolic BP changes well, with correlation coefficient of −0.80 ± 0.02 (mean ± SE) and root-mean-squared-error of 7.6 ± 0.5 mmHg after a best-case calibration. Conventional PAT was significantly inferior in tracking these changes, with correlation coefficient of −0.60 ± 0.04 and root-mean-squared-error of 14.6 ± 1.5 mmHg (p < 0.05). Scale PTT also tracked the systolic BP changes better than conventional PAT but not to an acceptable level. With further development, scale PTT may permit reliable, convenient measurement of BP. PMID:27976741

  10. Scale exponents of blood pressure and heart rate during autonomic blockade as assessed by detrended fluctuation analysis.

    PubMed

    Castiglioni, Paolo; Parati, Gianfranco; Di Rienzo, Marco; Carabalona, Roberta; Cividjian, Andrei; Quintin, Luc

    2011-01-15

    How the autonomic nervous system influences the fractal dynamics of heart rate (HR) and blood pressure (BP) remains unclear. The purpose of our study was to separately assess cardiac vagal and sympathetic (cardiac vs. vascular) influences on fractal properties of HR and BP as described by scale exponents of detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA). R-R intervals, systolic and diastolic BP were measured in nine supine volunteers before and after administration of autonomic blocking agents (atropine, propranolol, atropine+propranolol, clonidine). Spectra of DFA scale exponents, α(t), were calculated for scales between 5 and 100 s. HR and BP scale structures differed at baseline, being α(t) of HR <1, with a minimum between 10 and 20 s followed by a higher plateau between 40 to 80 s, while α(t) of BP decreased with t from values >1. Comparison of atropine and propranolol with baseline and combined cardiac parasympathetic and sympathetic blockade (atropine+propranolol) indicated opposite influences of vagal and cardiac sympathetic outflows on HR exponents. The vagal outflow adds white-noise components, amplifying differences with BP exponents; the cardiac sympathetic outflow adds Brownian motion components at short scales and contributes to the plateau between 40 and 80 s. Overall sympathetic inhibition by clonidine decreased short- and long-term exponents of HR, and short-term exponents of BP, so that their α(t) spectra had different means but similar profiles. Therefore, cardiac vagal, cardiac sympathetic and vascular sympathetic outflows contribute differently to HR and BP fractal structures. Results are explained by different distribution and dynamics of acetylcholine receptors and of α- and β-adrenergic receptors between heart and vasculature.

  11. Large-Scale, Short-Lived Subduction of the Western Gneiss Region Ultrahigh-Pressure Terrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kylander-Clark, A. R.; Hacker, B. R.; Corfu, F.

    2006-12-01

    The Western Gneiss Region (WGR) of Norway includes one of Earth's giant ultrahigh-pressure (UHP) terranes. Understanding the subduction and exhumation of this >60,000 km2 area is relevant to a range of processes, including collisional orogenesis, reworking of the continents, and the global geochemical cycle. Important aspects that remain unanswered include the spatial and temporal style of subduction. Was the crust subducted as smaller slivers one at a time, or as one larger unit, all at the same time? The WGR exhibits consistent ages of ~415-400 Ma, 100+ km along strike, but no ages have been identified at an equivalent distance across strike. To address this issue we have determined the age of one of the easternmost eclogites identified in the WGR, a retrogressed eclogite from Lesja. Seven fractions of this sample were analyzed; six of them yield identical U/Pb ages, however, they are slightly discordant. The seventh fraction is anomalously young and interpreted to have suffered lead loss. A weighted-mean 206Pb/238U age of 408.0 ± 1.7 Ma is obtained from the six older fractions; an age that is within the range of U/Pb, Sm/Nd, and Lu/Hf ages from the western portion of the WGR. The similarity in ages from 100+ km north to south and 100+ km east to west indicate that large portions of the continental crust were subducted in a short-lived event, if not en masse.

  12. Examining the validity of pressure ulcer risk assessment scales: developing and using illustrated patient simulations to collect the data.

    PubMed

    Gould, D; Kelly, D; Goldstone, L; Gammon, J

    2001-09-01

    Simulations are of particular advantage in research studies where large samples are necessary to achieve statistical power and the information must be collected under uniform conditions in order to aid interpretation. In the study reported below, simulation was achieved through the use of medical photography accompanied by case studies of the same patients. All information was collected on the same day. The purpose of the study was to determine the validity of the three pressure ulcer risk assessment scales most commonly used in clinical nursing practice in the UK. Each clinical nurse assessed the same four patients using three risk assessment scales and a visual analogue scale designed to capture their own clinical judgement. External validity was assessed by a panel of tissue viability experts who provided independent ratings. Data were obtained from 236 clinical nurses, yielding 941 risk assessments. Experience with this approach to data collection suggests that it requires careful planning. This should include measures to ensure that the simulated information is valid and that all data collectors have been adequately trained and are able to motivate the nurses participating in the study. Providing consideration is given to these issues, the use of simulation can help to collect data that would be difficult to obtain by more conventional means. It is also important to recognize that clinical decisions are de-contextualized in simulations because they are reduced to verbal and visual summaries. The decision to use simulations should thus be taken only if this is acknowledged.

  13. Use of large-scale acoustic monitoring to assess anthropogenic pressures on Orthoptera communities.

    PubMed

    Penone, Caterina; Le Viol, Isabelle; Pellissier, Vincent; Julien, Jean-François; Bas, Yves; Kerbiriou, Christian

    2013-10-01

    Biodiversity monitoring at large spatial and temporal scales is greatly needed in the context of global changes. Although insects are a species-rich group and are important for ecosystem functioning, they have been largely neglected in conservation studies and policies, mainly due to technical and methodological constraints. Sound detection, a nondestructive method, is easily applied within a citizen-science framework and could be an interesting solution for insect monitoring. However, it has not yet been tested at a large scale. We assessed the value of a citizen-science program in which Orthoptera species (Tettigoniidae) were monitored acoustically along roads. We used Bayesian model-averaging analyses to test whether we could detect widely known patterns of anthropogenic effects on insects, such as the negative effects of urbanization or intensive agriculture on Orthoptera populations and communities. We also examined site-abundance correlations between years and estimated the biases in species detection to evaluate and improve the protocol. Urbanization and intensive agricultural landscapes negatively affected Orthoptera species richness, diversity, and abundance. This finding is consistent with results of previous studies of Orthoptera, vertebrates, carabids, and butterflies. The average mass of communities decreased as urbanization increased. The dispersal ability of communities increased as the percentage of agricultural land and, to a lesser extent, urban area increased. Despite changes in abundances over time, we found significant correlations between yearly abundances. We identified biases linked to the protocol (e.g., car speed or temperature) that can be accounted for ease in analyses. We argue that acoustic monitoring of Orthoptera along roads offers several advantages for assessing Orthoptera biodiversity at large spatial and temporal extents, particularly in a citizen science framework.

  14. Absolute calibration of optical flats

    DOEpatents

    Sommargren, Gary E.

    2005-04-05

    The invention uses the phase shifting diffraction interferometer (PSDI) to provide a true point-by-point measurement of absolute flatness over the surface of optical flats. Beams exiting the fiber optics in a PSDI have perfect spherical wavefronts. The measurement beam is reflected from the optical flat and passed through an auxiliary optic to then be combined with the reference beam on a CCD. The combined beams include phase errors due to both the optic under test and the auxiliary optic. Standard phase extraction algorithms are used to calculate this combined phase error. The optical flat is then removed from the system and the measurement fiber is moved to recombine the two beams. The newly combined beams include only the phase errors due to the auxiliary optic. When the second phase measurement is subtracted from the first phase measurement, the absolute phase error of the optical flat is obtained.

  15. The Absolute Spectrum Polarimeter (ASP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kogut, A. J.

    2010-01-01

    The Absolute Spectrum Polarimeter (ASP) is an Explorer-class mission to map the absolute intensity and linear polarization of the cosmic microwave background and diffuse astrophysical foregrounds over the full sky from 30 GHz to 5 THz. The principal science goal is the detection and characterization of linear polarization from an inflationary epoch in the early universe, with tensor-to-scalar ratio r much greater than 1O(raised to the power of { -3}) and Compton distortion y < 10 (raised to the power of{-6}). We describe the ASP instrument and mission architecture needed to detect the signature of an inflationary epoch in the early universe using only 4 semiconductor bolometers.

  16. Physics of negative absolute temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, Eitan; Penrose, Oliver

    2017-01-01

    Negative absolute temperatures were introduced into experimental physics by Purcell and Pound, who successfully applied this concept to nuclear spins; nevertheless, the concept has proved controversial: a recent article aroused considerable interest by its claim, based on a classical entropy formula (the "volume entropy") due to Gibbs, that negative temperatures violated basic principles of statistical thermodynamics. Here we give a thermodynamic analysis that confirms the negative-temperature interpretation of the Purcell-Pound experiments. We also examine the principal arguments that have been advanced against the negative temperature concept; we find that these arguments are not logically compelling, and moreover that the underlying "volume" entropy formula leads to predictions inconsistent with existing experimental results on nuclear spins. We conclude that, despite the counterarguments, negative absolute temperatures make good theoretical sense and did occur in the experiments designed to produce them.

  17. Optomechanics for absolute rotation detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davuluri, Sankar

    2016-07-01

    In this article, we present an application of optomechanical cavity for the absolute rotation detection. The optomechanical cavity is arranged in a Michelson interferometer in such a way that the classical centrifugal force due to rotation changes the length of the optomechanical cavity. The change in the cavity length induces a shift in the frequency of the cavity mode. The phase shift corresponding to the frequency shift in the cavity mode is measured at the interferometer output to estimate the angular velocity of absolute rotation. We derived an analytic expression to estimate the minimum detectable rotation rate in our scheme for a given optomechanical cavity. Temperature dependence of the rotation detection sensitivity is studied.

  18. Characteristics of meter-scale surface electrical discharge propagating along water surface at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffer, Petr; Sugiyama, Yuki; Hosseini, S. Hamid R.; Akiyama, Hidenori; Lukes, Petr; Akiyama, Masahiro

    2016-10-01

    This paper reports physical characteristics of water surface discharges. Discharges were produced by metal needle-to-water surface geometry, with the needle electrode driven by 47 kV (FWHM) positive voltage pulses of 2 µs duration. Propagation of discharges along the water surface was confined between glass plates with 2 mm separation. This allowed generation of highly reproducible 634 mm-long plasma filaments. Experiments were performed using different atmospheres: air, N2, and O2, each at atmospheric pressure. Time- and spatially-resolved spectroscopic measurements revealed that early spectra of discharges in air and nitrogen atmospheres were dominated by N2 2nd positive system. N2 radiation disappeared after approx. 150 ns, replaced by emissions from atomic hydrogen. Spectra of discharges in O2 atmosphere were dominated by emissions from atomic oxygen. Time- and spatially-resolved emission spectra were used to determine temperatures in plasma. Atomic hydrogen emissions showed excitation temperature of discharges in air to be about 2  ×  104 K. Electron number densities determined by Stark broadening of the hydrogen H β line reached a maximum value of ~1018 cm-3 just after plasma initiation. Electron number densities and temperatures depended only slightly on distance from needle electrode, indicating formation of high conductivity leader channels. Direct observation of discharges by high speed camera showed that the average leader head propagation speed was 412 km · s-1, which is substantially higher value than that observed in experiments with shorter streamers driven by lower voltages.

  19. Unifying expression scale for peptide hydrophobicity in proteomic reversed phase high-pressure liquid chromatography experiments.

    PubMed

    Grigoryan, Marine; Shamshurin, Dmitry; Spicer, Victor; Krokhin, Oleg V

    2013-11-19

    As an initial step in our efforts to unify the expression of peptide retention times in proteomic liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) experiments, we aligned the chromatographic properties of a number of peptide retention standards against a collection of peptides commonly observed in proteomic experiments. The standard peptide mixtures and tryptic digests of samples of different origins were separated under the identical chromatographic condition most commonly employed in proteomics: 100 Å C18 sorbent with 0.1% formic acid as an ion-pairing modifier. Following our original approach (Krokhin, O. V.; Spicer, V. Anal. Chem. 2009, 81, 9522-9530) the retention characteristics of these standards and collection of tryptic peptides were mapped into hydrophobicity index (HI) or acetonitrile percentage units. This scale allows for direct visualization of the chromatographic outcome of LC-MS acquisitions, monitors the performance of the gradient LC system, and simplifies method development and interlaboratory data alignment. Wide adoption of this approach would significantly aid understanding the basic principles of gradient peptide RP-HPLC and solidify our collective efforts in acquiring confident peptide retention libraries, a key component in the development of targeted proteomic approaches.

  20. Scales

    MedlinePlus

    Scales are a visible peeling or flaking of outer skin layers. These layers are called the stratum ... Scales may be caused by dry skin, certain inflammatory skin conditions, or infections. Eczema , ringworm , and psoriasis ...

  1. Global direct pressures on biodiversity by large-scale metal mining: Spatial distribution and implications for conservation.

    PubMed

    Murguía, Diego I; Bringezu, Stefan; Schaldach, Rüdiger

    2016-09-15

    Biodiversity loss is widely recognized as a serious global environmental change process. While large-scale metal mining activities do not belong to the top drivers of such change, these operations exert or may intensify pressures on biodiversity by adversely changing habitats, directly and indirectly, at local and regional scales. So far, analyses of global spatial dynamics of mining and its burden on biodiversity focused on the overlap between mines and protected areas or areas of high value for conservation. However, it is less clear how operating metal mines are globally exerting pressure on zones of different biodiversity richness; a similar gap exists for unmined but known mineral deposits. By using vascular plants' diversity as a proxy to quantify overall biodiversity, this study provides a first examination of the global spatial distribution of mines and deposits for five key metals across different biodiversity zones. The results indicate that mines and deposits are not randomly distributed, but concentrated within intermediate and high diversity zones, especially bauxite and silver. In contrast, iron, gold, and copper mines and deposits are closer to a more proportional distribution while showing a high concentration in the intermediate biodiversity zone. Considering the five metals together, 63% and 61% of available mines and deposits, respectively, are located in intermediate diversity zones, comprising 52% of the global land terrestrial surface. 23% of mines and 20% of ore deposits are located in areas of high plant diversity, covering 17% of the land. 13% of mines and 19% of deposits are in areas of low plant diversity, comprising 31% of the land surface. Thus, there seems to be potential for opening new mines in areas of low biodiversity in the future.

  2. Large-Scale Absence of Sharks on Reefs in the Greater-Caribbean: A Footprint of Human Pressures

    PubMed Central

    Ward-Paige, Christine A.; Mora, Camilo; Lotze, Heike K.; Pattengill-Semmens, Christy; McClenachan, Loren; Arias-Castro, Ery

    2010-01-01

    Background In recent decades, large pelagic and coastal shark populations have declined dramatically with increased fishing; however, the status of sharks in other systems such as coral reefs remains largely unassessed despite a long history of exploitation. Here we explore the contemporary distribution and sighting frequency of sharks on reefs in the greater-Caribbean and assess the possible role of human pressures on observed patterns. Methodology/Principal Findings We analyzed 76,340 underwater surveys carried out by trained volunteer divers between 1993 and 2008. Surveys were grouped within one km2 cells, which allowed us to determine the contemporary geographical distribution and sighting frequency of sharks. Sighting frequency was calculated as the ratio of surveys with sharks to the total number of surveys in each cell. We compared sighting frequency to the number of people in the cell vicinity and used population viability analyses to assess the effects of exploitation on population trends. Sharks, with the exception of nurse sharks occurred mainly in areas with very low human population or strong fishing regulations and marine conservation. Population viability analysis suggests that exploitation alone could explain the large-scale absence; however, this pattern is likely to be exacerbated by additional anthropogenic stressors, such as pollution and habitat degradation, that also correlate with human population. Conclusions/Significance Human pressures in coastal zones have lead to the broad-scale absence of sharks on reefs in the greater-Caribbean. Preventing further loss of sharks requires urgent management measures to curb fishing mortality and to mitigate other anthropogenic stressors to protect sites where sharks still exist. The fact that sharks still occur in some densely populated areas where strong fishing regulations are in place indicates the possibility of success and encourages the implementation of conservation measures. PMID:20700530

  3. Development of a sub-scale dynamics model for pressure relaxation of multi-material cells in Lagrangian hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, Alan K; Shashkov, Mikhail J; Fung, Jimmy; Canfield, Thomas R; Kamm, James R

    2010-10-14

    We have extended the Sub-Scale Dynamics (SSD) closure model for multi-fluid computational cells. Volume exchange between two materials is based on the interface area and a notional interface translation velocity, which is derived from a linearized Riemann solution. We have extended the model to cells with any number of materials, computing pressure-difference-driven volume and energy exchange as the algebraic sum of pairwise interactions. In multiple dimensions, we rely on interface reconstruction to provide interface areas and orientations, and centroids of material polygons. In order to prevent unphysically large or unmanageably small material volumes, we have used a flux-corrected transport (FCT) approach to limit the pressure-driven part of the volume exchange. We describe the implementation of this model in two dimensions in the FLAG hydrodynamics code. We also report on Lagrangian test calculations, comparing them with others made using a mixed-zone closure model due to Tipton, and with corresponding calculations made with only single-material cells. We find that in some cases, the SSD model more accurately predicts the state of material in mixed cells. By comparing the algebraic forms of both models, we identify similar dependencies on state and dynamical variables, and propose explanations for the apparent higher fidelity of the SSD model.

  4. Pressure distributions on a 0.02-scale Space Shuttle orbiter nose at Mach 21.5 in helium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashby, George C., Jr.; Bernot, Peter T.; Woods, William C.

    1994-01-01

    Pressure distributions on a 0.02-scale model of the Space Shuttle orbiter forward fuselage were obtained in the 22-inch aerodynamic leg of the Langley Hypersonic Helium Tunnel Facility at a nominal free-stream Mach number of 21.5 and a ratio of specific heats of 1.67 for inclusion in the database of the Shuttle entry air data system (SEADS). The data were measured at model angles of attack of 0 deg to 50 deg in 5 deg increments for zero sideslip angle and at model sideslip angles of -5 deg to 5 deg for angles of attack equal to 5, 20, 35, and 40 deg. These data displayed trends similar to those observed in other wind tunnels at Mach 6 and 10 in air. Specifically noted is a shift in the location of the stagnation point at angles of attack above 15 deg; this effect did not, however, occur in flight. By comparison, the data obtained at Mach 6 in the Langley Hypersonic CF4 Tunnel, corresponding to a lower ratio of specific heats in the postshock region than those in helium and air, showed some reduction of the stagnation point shift at the higher angles of attack. The differences between flight and wind tunnel pressure distributions are believed due primarily to high-temperature gas chemistry effects in flight, which include lower effective specific heat ratios but which were not completely duplicated in the wind tunnels.

  5. Mathematical Model for Absolute Magnetic Measuring Systems in Industrial Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fügenschuh, Armin; Fügenschuh, Marzena; Ludszuweit, Marina; Mojsic, Aleksandar; Sokół, Joanna

    2015-09-01

    Scales for measuring systems are either based on incremental or absolute measuring methods. Incremental scales need to initialize a measurement cycle at a reference point. From there, the position is computed by counting increments of a periodic graduation. Absolute methods do not need reference points, since the position can be read directly from the scale. The positions on the complete scales are encoded using two incremental tracks with different graduation. We present a new method for absolute measuring using only one track for position encoding up to micrometre range. Instead of the common perpendicular magnetic areas, we use a pattern of trapezoidal magnetic areas, to store more complex information. For positioning, we use the magnetic field where every position is characterized by a set of values measured by a hall sensor array. We implement a method for reconstruction of absolute positions from the set of unique measured values. We compare two patterns with respect to uniqueness, accuracy, stability and robustness of positioning. We discuss how stability and robustness are influenced by different errors during the measurement in real applications and how those errors can be compensated.

  6. Absolute calibration of optical tweezers

    SciTech Connect

    Viana, N.B.; Mazolli, A.; Maia Neto, P.A.; Nussenzveig, H.M.; Rocha, M.S.; Mesquita, O.N.

    2006-03-27

    As a step toward absolute calibration of optical tweezers, a first-principles theory of trapping forces with no adjustable parameters, corrected for spherical aberration, is experimentally tested. Employing two very different setups, we find generally very good agreement for the transverse trap stiffness as a function of microsphere radius for a broad range of radii, including the values employed in practice, and at different sample chamber depths. The domain of validity of the WKB ('geometrical optics') approximation to the theory is verified. Theoretical predictions for the trapping threshold, peak position, depth variation, multiple equilibria, and 'jump' effects are also confirmed.

  7. Absolute irradiance of the Moon for on-orbit calibration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stone, T.C.; Kieffer, H.H.; ,

    2002-01-01

    The recognized need for on-orbit calibration of remote sensing imaging instruments drives the ROLO project effort to characterize the Moon for use as an absolute radiance source. For over 5 years the ground-based ROLO telescopes have acquired spatially-resolved lunar images in 23 VNIR (Moon diameter ???500 pixels) and 9 SWIR (???250 pixels) passbands at phase angles within ??90 degrees. A numerical model for lunar irradiance has been developed which fits hundreds of ROLO images in each band, corrected for atmospheric extinction and calibrated to absolute radiance, then integrated to irradiance. The band-coupled extinction algorithm uses absorption spectra of several gases and aerosols derived from MODTRAN to fit time-dependent component abundances to nightly observations of standard stars. The absolute radiance scale is based upon independent telescopic measurements of the star Vega. The fitting process yields uncertainties in lunar relative irradiance over small ranges of phase angle and the full range of lunar libration well under 0.5%. A larger source of uncertainty enters in the absolute solar spectral irradiance, especially in the SWIR, where solar models disagree by up to 6%. Results of ROLO model direct comparisons to spacecraft observations demonstrate the ability of the technique to track sensor responsivity drifts to sub-percent precision. Intercomparisons among instruments provide key insights into both calibration issues and the absolute scale for lunar irradiance.

  8. Comparison of pressure distributions on model and full-scale NACA 64-621 airfoils with ailerons for wind turbine application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregorek, G. M.; Kuniega, R. J.; Nyland, T. W.

    1988-01-01

    The aerodynamic similarity between a small (4-inch chord) wind tunnel model and a full-scale wind turbine blade (24-foot tip section with a 36-inch chord) was evaluated by comparing selected pressure distributions around the geometrically similar cross sections. The airfoils were NACA 64-621 sections, including trailing-edge ailerons with a width equal to 38 percent of the airfoil chord. The model airfoil was tested in the OSU 6- by 12-inch High Reynolds Number Wind Tunnel; the full-scale blade section was tested in the NASA Langley Research Center 30- by 60-foot Subsonic Wind Tunnel. The model airfoil contained 61 pressure taps connected by embedded tubes to pressure transducers. A belt containing 29 pressure taps was fixed to the full-scale section at midspan to obtain surface pressure data. Lift coefficients were obtained by integrating pressures, and corrections were made for the 3-D effects of blade twist and downwash in the blade tip section. The results of the two different experimental methods correlated well for angles of attack from minus 4 to 36 degrees and aileron reflections from 0 to 90 degrees.

  9. Gas kinematics on giant molecular cloud scales in M51 with PAWS: Cloud stabilization through dynamical pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Meidt, Sharon E.; Schinnerer, Eva; Hughes, Annie; Colombo, Dario; Pety, Jérôme; Schuster, Karl F.; Dumas, Galle; Dobbs, Clare L.; Kramer, Carsten; Leroy, Adam K.; Thompson, Todd A.

    2013-12-10

    We use the high spatial and spectral resolution of the PAWS CO(1-0) survey of the inner 9 kpc of the iconic spiral galaxy M51 to examine the effects of gas streaming motions on the star-forming properties of individual giant molecular clouds (GMCs). We compare our view of gas flows in M51—which arise due to departures from axisymmetry in the gravitational potential (i.e., the nuclear bar and spiral arms)—with the global pattern of star formation as traced by Hα and 24 μm emission. We find that the dynamical environment of GMCs strongly affects their ability to form stars, in the sense that GMCs situated in regions with large streaming motions can be stabilized, while similarly massive GMCs in regions without streaming go on to efficiently form stars. We argue that this is the result of reduced surface pressure felt by clouds embedded in an ambient medium undergoing large streaming motions, which prevent collapse. Indeed, the variation in gas depletion time expected based on the observed streaming motions throughout the disk of M51 quantitatively agrees with the variation in the observed gas depletion time scale. The example of M51 shows that streaming motions, triggered by gravitational instabilities in the form of bars and spiral arms, can alter the star formation law; this can explain the variation in gas depletion time among galaxies with different masses and morphologies. In particular, we can explain the long gas depletion times in spiral galaxies compared with dwarf galaxies and starbursts. We suggest that adding a dynamical pressure term to the canonical free-fall time produces a single star formation law that can be applied to all star-forming regions and galaxies across cosmic time.

  10. Fuselage and nozzle pressure distributions of a 1/12-scale F-15 propulsion model at transonic speeds. Effect of fuselage modifications and nozzle variables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pendergraft, O. C., Jr.; Carson, G. T., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Static pressure coefficient distributions on the forebody, afterbody, and nozzles of a 1/12 scale F-15 propulsion model was determined in the 16 foot transonic tunnel for Mach numbers from 0.60 to 1.20, angles of attack from -2 deg to 7 deg and ratio of jet total pressure to free stream static pressure from 1 up to about 7, depending on Mach number. The effects of nozzle geometry and horizontal tail deflection on the pressure distributions were investigated. Boundary layer total pressure profiles were determined at two locations ahead of the nozzles on the top nacelle surface. Reynolds number varied from about 1.0 x 10 to the 7th power per meter, depending on Mach number.

  11. Cosmology with negative absolute temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieira, J. P. P.; Byrnes, Christian T.; Lewis, Antony

    2016-08-01

    Negative absolute temperatures (NAT) are an exotic thermodynamical consequence of quantum physics which has been known since the 1950's (having been achieved in the lab on a number of occasions). Recently, the work of Braun et al. [1] has rekindled interest in negative temperatures and hinted at a possibility of using NAT systems in the lab as dark energy analogues. This paper goes one step further, looking into the cosmological consequences of the existence of a NAT component in the Universe. NAT-dominated expanding Universes experience a borderline phantom expansion (w < -1) with no Big Rip, and their contracting counterparts are forced to bounce after the energy density becomes sufficiently large. Both scenarios might be used to solve horizon and flatness problems analogously to standard inflation and bouncing cosmologies. We discuss the difficulties in obtaining and ending a NAT-dominated epoch, and possible ways of obtaining density perturbations with an acceptable spectrum.

  12. Methods to calibrate the absolute receive sensitivity of single-element, focused transducers.

    PubMed

    Rich, Kyle T; Mast, T Douglas

    2015-09-01

    Absolute pressure measurements of acoustic emissions by single-element, focused passive cavitation detectors would be facilitated by improved wideband receive calibration techniques. Here, calibration methods were developed to characterize the absolute, frequency-dependent receive sensitivity of a spherically focused, single-element transducer using pulse-echo and pitch-catch techniques. Validation of these calibration methods on a focused receiver were made by generating a pulse from a small diameter source at the focus of the transducer and comparing the absolute pressure measured by a calibrated hydrophone to that of the focused transducer using the receive sensitivities determined here.

  13. SAPHIR - a multi-scale, multi-resolution modeling environment targeting blood pressure regulation and fluid homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Thomas, S; Abdulhay, Enas; Baconnier, Pierre; Fontecave, Julie; Francoise, Jean-Pierre; Guillaud, Francois; Hannaert, Patrick; Hernandez, Alfredo; Le Rolle, Virginie; Maziere, Pierre; Tahi, Fariza; Zehraoui, Farida

    2007-01-01

    We present progress on a comprehensive, modular, interactive modeling environment centered on overall regulation of blood pressure and body fluid homeostasis. We call the project SAPHIR, for "a Systems Approach for PHysiological Integration of Renal, cardiac, and respiratory functions". The project uses state-of-the-art multi-scale simulation methods. The basic core model will give succinct input-output (reduced-dimension) descriptions of all relevant organ systems and regulatory processes, and it will be modular, multi-resolution, and extensible, in the sense that detailed submodules of any process(es) can be "plugged-in" to the basic model in order to explore, eg. system-level implications of local perturbations. The goal is to keep the basic core model compact enough to insure fast execution time (in view of eventual use in the clinic) and yet to allow elaborate detailed modules of target tissues or organs in order to focus on the problem area while maintaining the system-level regulatory compensations.

  14. Laser anemometry measurements of natural circulation flow in a scale model PWR reactor system. [Pressurized Water Reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kadambi, J. R.; Schneider, S. J.; Stewart, W. A.

    1986-01-01

    The natural circulation of a single phase fluid in a scale model of a pressurized water reactor system during a postulated grade core accident is analyzed. The fluids utilized were water and SF6. The design of the reactor model and the similitude requirements are described. Four LDA tests were conducted: water with 28 kW of heat in the simulated core, with and without the participation of simulated steam generators; water with 28 kW of heat in the simulated core, with the participation of simulated steam generators and with cold upflow of 12 lbm/min from the lower plenum; and SF6 with 0.9 kW of heat in the simulated core and without the participation of the simulated steam generators. For the water tests, the velocity of the water in the center of the core increases with vertical height and continues to increase in the upper plenum. For SF6, it is observed that the velocities are an order of magnitude higher than those of water; however, the velocity patterns are similar.

  15. Effect of medium-pressure UV irradiation on bromate concentrations in drinking water, a pilot-scale study.

    PubMed

    Peldszus, Sigrid; Andrews, Susan A; Souza, Rosana; Smith, Franklyn; Douglas, Ian; Bolton, Jim; Huck, Peter M

    2004-01-01

    This study investigated the potential for bromate removal from drinking water on irradiation with medium-pressure UV lamps-a technique gaining considerable interest for drinking water disinfection. Waters from two different sources were spiked with 20microg/L of bromate and irradiated with UV fluences up to 718mJ/cm(2) utilizing a pilot-scale reactor (Calgon Carbon Corp.) at a flow of 76L/min (20 gallon/min). Essentially no removal was observed in one of the source waters. Limited bromate removal, up to 19%, was observed in the second source water at high UV fluences (696mJ/cm(2)) and a fluence-response relationship was clearly evident. All removals would be negligible at UV fluences anticipated for drinking water disinfection (< or =40mJ/cm(2)). Different water characteristics, in particular competitive absorption by nitrate and possibly DOC, were most likely responsible for the differences in bromate removal in the waters tested. The source water that did not show any removal had a higher nitrate concentration (4 vs. 0.1mg N/L) and also a higher DOC concentration (4.1 vs. 3.1mg C/L) than the other source water which showed 19% bromate removal.

  16. Pilot scale evaluation of biological and pressure clarification processes for the removal of high level of iron and manganese

    SciTech Connect

    Yannoni, C.C.; Kinsley, B.P.; Marston, T.R.

    1996-11-01

    Iron and manganese originating from groundwater supplies have a long history of causing consumer complaints in water distribution systems. Although iron and manganese are not public health concerns, they are a major concern from an aesthetic standpoint. The elevated awareness of consumers in regard to the quality of drinking water, an increase in regulations requiring additional treatment and the cost associated with developing new sources of supply, has required many utilities to implement improvements to existing facilities. Historical water quality data collected from the Connecticut Water Company`s (CWC) Westbrook Well revealed an increasing trend in iron and manganese concentrations. As a result, the existing greensand filtration facility located at the well, provides insufficient removal rates and inefficient operating cycles. Variations in operating procedures were not successful in correcting these problems. A water treatment feasibility study recommended evaluation of biological and pressure clarification processes to reduce iron (9 mg/l) and manganese (1.5 mg/l) levels below the secondary maximum contaminant levels of 0.30 and 0.05 mg/l, respectively. Assessment of these processes was accomplished through the construction and operation of a 5 gallon per minute (gpm) capacity pilot plant at the Westbrook Water Treatment Plant. Application of biological treatment for iron removal was then piloted on the existing full-scale treatment facility.

  17. Measured and modelled absolute gravity in Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, E.; Forsberg, R.; Strykowski, G.

    2012-12-01

    Present day changes in the ice volume in glaciated areas like Greenland will change the load on the Earth and to this change the lithosphere will respond elastically. The Earth also responds to changes in the ice volume over a millennial time scale. This response is due to the viscous properties of the mantle and is known as Glaical Isostatic Adjustment (GIA). Both signals are present in GPS and absolute gravity (AG) measurements and they will give an uncertainty in mass balance estimates calculated from these data types. It is possible to separate the two signals if both gravity and Global Positioning System (GPS) time series are available. DTU Space acquired an A10 absolute gravimeter in 2008. One purpose of this instrument is to establish AG time series in Greenland and the first measurements were conducted in 2009. Since then are 18 different Greenland GPS Network (GNET) stations visited and six of these are visited more then once. The gravity signal consists of three signals; the elastic signal, the viscous signal and the direct attraction from the ice masses. All of these signals can be modelled using various techniques. The viscous signal is modelled by solving the Sea Level Equation with an appropriate ice history and Earth model. The free code SELEN is used for this. The elastic signal is modelled as a convolution of the elastic Greens function for gravity and a model of present day ice mass changes. The direct attraction is the same as the Newtonian attraction and is calculated as this. Here we will present the preliminary results of the AG measurements in Greenland. We will also present modelled estimates of the direct attraction, the elastic and the viscous signals.

  18. A corrosion control concept by scale engineering: a novel green inhibitor applied for high temperature and pressure aqueous supercritical CO2 systems

    SciTech Connect

    Jiabin, Han; Carey, James W; Zhang, Jinsuo

    2011-01-27

    Traditional corrosion inhibitors are bio-toxic chemicals with organic components that bond to the fresh metal surface and thus isolate them from corrosive environments. The shortcoming of these inhibitors is that they are less effective in high-temperature and high-pressure environments, and where corrosion scale is formed or particulates are deposited. In this paper, we describe a novel green inorganic inhibitor made of environmentally friendly and cost-effective geo-material that was developed for high-temperature and high-pressure environments, particularly under scale-forming conditions. It inhibits corrosion by enhancing the protectiveness of corrosion scale. In contrast to traditional corrosion inhibitors which are efficient for bare surface corrosion but not effective with scale, the novel inhibitor has no effect on bare surface corrosion but greatly improves corrosion inhibition under scale-formation conditions. This is because a homogeneous scale doped with inhibitor component forms. This enhanced corrosion scale demonstrated excellent protection against corrosion. In high-pressure CO{sub 2} systems (pCO{sub 2}=10 Mpa, T=50 C and [NaCl]=1 wt%) without inhibitor, the bare-surface corrosion rate decreases from ca. 10 mm/y to 0.3 mm/year due to formation of scale. Application of a six hundred ppm solution ofthe new inorganic inhibitor reduced the corrosion rate to 0.01 mm/year, an additional factor of 30. The current inhibitor product was designed for application to CO{sub 2} systems that form corrosion scale, including but not limited to oil and gas wells, offshore production of oil and gas, CO{sub 2} sequestration and enhanced geothermal production involving CO{sub 2}.

  19. Absolute Spatially- and Temporally-Resolved Optical Emission Measurements of rf Glow Discharges in Argon

    PubMed Central

    Djurović, S.; Roberts, J. R.; Sobolewski, M. A.; Olthoff, J. K.

    1993-01-01

    Spatially- and temporally-resolved measurements of optical emission intensities are presented from rf discharges in argon over a wide range of pressures (6.7 to 133 Pa) and applied rf voltages (75 to 200 V). Results of measurements of emission intensities are presented for both an atomic transition (Ar I, 750.4 nm) and an ionic transition (Ar II, 434.8 nm). The absolute scale of these optical emissions has been determined by comparison with the optical emission from a calibrated standard lamp. All measurements were made in a well-defined rf reactor. They provide detailed characterization of local time-resolved plasma conditions suitable for the comparison with results from other experiments and theoretical models. These measurements represent a new level of detail in diagnostic measurements of rf plasmas, and provide insight into the electron transport properties of rf discharges. PMID:28053464

  20. In flight measurement of steady and unsteady blade surface pressure of a single rotation large scale advanced prop-fan installed on the PTA aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parzych, D.; Boyd, L.; Meissner, W.; Wyrostek, A.

    1991-01-01

    An experiment was performed by Hamilton Standard, Division of United Technologies Corporation, under contract by LeRC, to measure the blade surface pressure of a large scale, 8 blade model prop-fan in flight. The test bed was the Gulfstream 2 Prop-Fan Test Assessment (PTA) aircraft. The objective of the test was to measure the steady and periodic blade surface pressure resulting from three different Prop-Fan air inflow angles at various takeoff and cruise conditions. The inflow angles were obtained by varying the nacelle tilt angles, which ranged from -3 to +2 degrees. A range of power loadings, tip speeds, and altitudes were tested at each nacelle tilt angle over the flight Mach number range of 0.30 to 0.80. Unsteady blade pressure data tabulated as Fourier coefficients for the first 35 harmonics of shaft rotational frequency and the steady (non-varying) pressure component are presented.

  1. Pressure-Distribution Measurements on the Hull and Fins of a 1/40-Scale Model of the U. S. Airship "Akron."

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeman, Hugh B

    1934-01-01

    This report presents the results of measurements of pressure distribution conducted in the propeller-research wind tunnel of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics on a 1/40-scale model of the U. S. Airship "Akron" (ZRS-4). The pressures, which were measured simultaneously at nearly 400 orifices located at 26 stations along one side of the hull, were recorded by two photographic multiple manometers placed inside the model. The hull pressures were measured both with and without the tail surfaces and the control car for eight angles of pitch varying from 0 degree to 20 degrees and at air speeds of approximately 70 and 100 miles per hour. The pressures were also measured at approximately 160 orifices on one horizontal fin for the above speeds and pitch angles and for nine elevator angles.

  2. Method of differential-phase/absolute-amplitude QAM

    DOEpatents

    Dimsdle, Jeffrey William

    2008-10-21

    A method of quadrature amplitude modulation involving encoding phase differentially and amplitude absolutely, allowing for a high data rate and spectral efficiency in data transmission and other communication applications, and allowing for amplitude scaling to facilitate data recovery; amplitude scale tracking to track-out rapid and severe scale variations and facilitate successful demodulation and data retrieval; 2.sup.N power carrier recovery; incoherent demodulation where coherent carrier recovery is not possible or practical due to signal degradation; coherent demodulation; multipath equalization to equalize frequency dependent multipath; and demodulation filtering.

  3. Method of differential-phase/absolute-amplitude QAM

    DOEpatents

    Dimsdle, Jeffrey William

    2007-07-03

    A method of quadrature amplitude modulation involving encoding phase differentially and amplitude absolutely, allowing for a high data rate and spectral efficiency in data transmission and other communication applications, and allowing for amplitude scaling to facilitate data recovery; amplitude scale tracking to track-out rapid and severe scale variations and facilitate successful demodulation and data retrieval; 2.sup.N power carrier recovery; incoherent demodulation where coherent carrier recovery is not possible or practical due to signal degradation; coherent demodulation; multipath equalization to equalize frequency dependent multipath; and demodulation filtering.

  4. Method of differential-phase/absolute-amplitude QAM

    DOEpatents

    Dimsdle, Jeffrey William

    2007-10-02

    A method of quadrature amplitude modulation involving encoding phase differentially and amplitude absolutely, allowing for a high data rate and spectral efficiency in data transmission and other communication applications, and allowing for amplitude scaling to facilitate data recovery; amplitude scale tracking to track-out rapid and severe scale variations and facilitate successful demodulation and data retrieval; 2.sup.N power carrier recovery; incoherent demodulation where coherent carrier recovery is not possible or practical due to signal degradation; coherent demodulation; multipath equalization to equalize frequency dependent multipath; and demodulation filtering.

  5. Method of differential-phase/absolute-amplitude QAM

    SciTech Connect

    Dimsdle, Jeffrey William

    2009-09-01

    A method of quadrature amplitude modulation involving encoding phase differentially and amplitude absolutely, allowing for a high data rate and spectral efficiency in data transmission and other communication applications, and allowing for amplitude scaling to facilitate data recovery; amplitude scale tracking to track-out rapid and severe scale variations and facilitate successful demodulation and data retrieval; 2.sup.N power carrier recovery; incoherent demodulation where coherent carrier recovery is not possible or practical due to signal degradation; coherent demodulation; multipath equalization to equalize frequency dependent multipath; and demodulation filtering.

  6. Method of differential-phase/absolute-amplitude QAM

    DOEpatents

    Dimsdle, Jeffrey William

    2007-07-17

    A method of quadrature amplitude modulation involving encoding phase differentially and amplitude absolutely, allowing for a high data rate and spectral efficiency in data transmission and other communication applications, and allowing for amplitude scaling to facilitate data recovery; amplitude scale tracking to track-out rapid and severe scale variations and facilitate successful demodulation and data retrieval; 2.sup.N power carrier recovery; incoherent demodulation where coherent carrier recovery is not possible or practical due to signal degradation; coherent demodulation; multipath equalization to equalize frequency dependent multipath; and demodulation filtering.

  7. Evaluation of the Absolute Regional Temperature Potential

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shindell, D. T.

    2012-01-01

    The Absolute Regional Temperature Potential (ARTP) is one of the few climate metrics that provides estimates of impacts at a sub-global scale. The ARTP presented here gives the time-dependent temperature response in four latitude bands (90-28degS, 28degS-28degN, 28-60degN and 60-90degN) as a function of emissions based on the forcing in those bands caused by the emissions. It is based on a large set of simulations performed with a single atmosphere-ocean climate model to derive regional forcing/response relationships. Here I evaluate the robustness of those relationships using the forcing/response portion of the ARTP to estimate regional temperature responses to the historic aerosol forcing in three independent climate models. These ARTP results are in good accord with the actual responses in those models. Nearly all ARTP estimates fall within +/-20%of the actual responses, though there are some exceptions for 90-28degS and the Arctic, and in the latter the ARTP may vary with forcing agent. However, for the tropics and the Northern Hemisphere mid-latitudes in particular, the +/-20% range appears to be roughly consistent with the 95% confidence interval. Land areas within these two bands respond 39-45% and 9-39% more than the latitude band as a whole. The ARTP, presented here in a slightly revised form, thus appears to provide a relatively robust estimate for the responses of large-scale latitude bands and land areas within those bands to inhomogeneous radiative forcing and thus potentially to emissions as well. Hence this metric could allow rapid evaluation of the effects of emissions policies at a finer scale than global metrics without requiring use of a full climate model.

  8. The hyperfine structure in the rotational spectra of D{sub 2}{sup 17}O and HD{sup 17}O: Confirmation of the absolute nuclear magnetic shielding scale for oxygen

    SciTech Connect

    Puzzarini, Cristina Cazzoli, Gabriele; Harding, Michael E.; Vázquez, Juana; Gauss, Jürgen

    2015-03-28

    Guided by theoretical predictions, the hyperfine structures of the rotational spectra of mono- and bideuterated-water containing {sup 17}O have been experimentally investigated. To reach sub-Doppler resolution, required to resolve the hyperfine structure due to deuterium quadrupole coupling as well as to spin-rotation (SR) and dipolar spin-spin couplings, the Lamb-dip technique has been employed. The experimental investigation and in particular, the spectral analysis have been supported by high-level quantum-chemical computations employing coupled-cluster techniques and, for the first time, a complete experimental determination of the hyperfine parameters involved was possible. The experimentally determined {sup 17}O spin-rotation constants of D{sub 2}{sup 17}O and HD{sup 17}O were used to derive the paramagnetic part of the corresponding nuclear magnetic shielding constants. Together with the computed diamagnetic contributions as well as the vibrational and temperature corrections, the latter constants have been employed to confirm the oxygen nuclear magnetic shielding scale, recently established on the basis of spin-rotation data for H{sub 2}{sup 17}O [Puzzarini et al., J. Chem. Phys. 131, 234304 (2009)].

  9. Scales

    ScienceCinema

    Murray Gibson

    2016-07-12

    Musical scales involve notes that, sounded simultaneously (chords), sound good together. The result is the left brain meeting the right brain — a Pythagorean interval of overlapping notes. This synergy would suggest less difference between the working of the right brain and the left brain than common wisdom would dictate. The pleasing sound of harmony comes when two notes share a common harmonic, meaning that their frequencies are in simple integer ratios, such as 3/2 (G/C) or 5/4 (E/C).

  10. Scales

    SciTech Connect

    Murray Gibson

    2007-04-27

    Musical scales involve notes that, sounded simultaneously (chords), sound good together. The result is the left brain meeting the right brain — a Pythagorean interval of overlapping notes. This synergy would suggest less difference between the working of the right brain and the left brain than common wisdom would dictate. The pleasing sound of harmony comes when two notes share a common harmonic, meaning that their frequencies are in simple integer ratios, such as 3/2 (G/C) or 5/4 (E/C).

  11. Investigation of steady and fluctuating pressures associated with the transonic buffeting and wing rock of a one-seventh scale model of the F-5A aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, C.; Pi, W. S.

    1978-01-01

    A wind tunnel test of a 1/7 scale F-5A model is described. The pressure, force, and dynamic response measurements during buffet and wing rock are evaluated. Effects of Mach number, angle of attack, sideslip angle, and control surface settings were investigated. The mean and fluctuating static pressure data are presented and correlated with some corresponding flight test data of a F-5A aircraft. Details of the instrumentation and the specially designed support system which allowed the model to oscillate in roll to simulate wing rock are also described. A limit cycle mechanism causing wing rock was identified from this study, and this mechanism is presented.

  12. A method for predicting full scale buffet response with rigid wind tunnel model fluctuating pressure data. Volume 1: Prediction method development and assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunningham, A. M., Jr.; Benepe, D. B.; Watts, D.; Waner, P. G.

    1978-01-01

    The method requires unsteady aerodynamic forces, natural airplane modes, and the measured pressure data as input. A gust response computer program is used to calculate buffet response due to the forcing function posed by the measured pressure data. By calculating both symmetric and antisymmetric solutions, upper and lower bounds on full-scale buffet response are formed. Comparisons of predictions with flight test results are made and the effects of horizontal tail loads and static aeroelasticity are shown. Discussions are also presented on the effects of primary wing torsion modes, chordwise and spanwise phase angles, and altitude.

  13. Fast, Computer Supported Experimental Determination of Absolute Zero Temperature at School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bogacz, Bogdan F.; Pedziwiatr, Antoni T.

    2014-01-01

    A simple and fast experimental method of determining absolute zero temperature is presented. Air gas thermometer coupled with pressure sensor and data acquisition system COACH is applied in a wide range of temperature. By constructing a pressure vs temperature plot for air under constant volume it is possible to obtain--by extrapolation to zero…

  14. Absolute optical metrology : nanometers to kilometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dubovitsky, Serge; Lay, O. P.; Peters, R. D.; Liebe, C. C.

    2005-01-01

    We provide and overview of the developments in the field of high-accuracy absolute optical metrology with emphasis on space-based applications. Specific work on the Modulation Sideband Technology for Absolute Ranging (MSTAR) sensor is described along with novel applications of the sensor.

  15. ON A SUFFICIENT CONDITION FOR ABSOLUTE CONTINUITY.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The formulation of a condition which yields absolute continuity when combined with continuity and bounded variation is the problem considered in the...Briefly, the formulation is achieved through a discussion which develops a proof by contradiction of a sufficiently theorem for absolute continuity which uses in its hypothesis the condition of continuity and bounded variation .

  16. Introducing the Mean Absolute Deviation "Effect" Size

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorard, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    This paper revisits the use of effect sizes in the analysis of experimental and similar results, and reminds readers of the relative advantages of the mean absolute deviation as a measure of variation, as opposed to the more complex standard deviation. The mean absolute deviation is easier to use and understand, and more tolerant of extreme…

  17. Monolithically integrated absolute frequency comb laser system

    SciTech Connect

    Wanke, Michael C.

    2016-07-12

    Rather than down-convert optical frequencies, a QCL laser system directly generates a THz frequency comb in a compact monolithically integrated chip that can be locked to an absolute frequency without the need of a frequency-comb synthesizer. The monolithic, absolute frequency comb can provide a THz frequency reference and tool for high-resolution broad band spectroscopy.

  18. Absolute instability of the Gaussian wake profile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hultgren, Lennart S.; Aggarwal, Arun K.

    1987-01-01

    Linear parallel-flow stability theory has been used to investigate the effect of viscosity on the local absolute instability of a family of wake profiles with a Gaussian velocity distribution. The type of local instability, i.e., convective or absolute, is determined by the location of a branch-point singularity with zero group velocity of the complex dispersion relation for the instability waves. The effects of viscosity were found to be weak for values of the wake Reynolds number, based on the center-line velocity defect and the wake half-width, larger than about 400. Absolute instability occurs only for sufficiently large values of the center-line wake defect. The critical value of this parameter increases with decreasing wake Reynolds number, thereby indicating a shrinking region of absolute instability with decreasing wake Reynolds number. If backflow is not allowed, absolute instability does not occur for wake Reynolds numbers smaller than about 38.

  19. 49 CFR 178.814 - Hydrostatic pressure test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... following methods: (A) The gauge pressure (pressure in the IBC above ambient atmospheric pressure) measured...); (B) If absolute pressure (vapor pressure of the hazardous material plus atmospheric pressure) is used... atmospheric pressure) is used, 1.75 multiplied by the vapor pressure of the hazardous material at 50......

  20. Tabulated Pressure Coefficient Data from a Tail Loads Investigation on a 1/15-Scale Model of the Goodyear XZP5K Airship

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cannon, Michael D.

    1956-01-01

    This paper contains tail and hull loads data obtained in an investigation of a l/15-scale model of the Goodyear XZP5K airship. Data are presented in the form of tabulated pressure coefficients over a pitch and yaw range of +/-20 deg and 0 deg to 30 deg respectively, with various rudder and elevator deflections. Two tail configurations of different plan forms were tested on the model. The investigation was conducted in the Langley full-scale tunnel at a Reynolds number of approximately 16.5 x 10(exp 6) based on hull length, which corresponds to a Mach number of about 0.12.

  1. The EM-POGO: A simple, absolute velocity profiler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terker, S. R.; Sanford, T. B.; Dunlap, J. H.; Girton, J. B.

    2013-01-01

    Electromagnetic current instrumentation has been added to the Bathy Systems, Inc. POGO transport sondes to produce a free-falling absolute velocity profiler called EM-POGO. The POGO is a free-fall profiler that measures a depth-averaged velocity using GPS fixes at the beginning and end of a round trip to the ocean floor (or a preset depth). The EM-POGO adds a velocity profile determined from measurements of motionally induced electric fields generated by the ocean current moving through the vertical component of the Earth's magnetic field. In addition to providing information about the vertical structure of the velocity, the depth-dependent measurements improve transport measurements by correcting for the non-constant fall-rate. Neglecting the variable fall rate results in errors O (1 cm s-1). The transition from POGO to EM-POGO included electrically isolating the POGO and electric-field-measuring circuits, installing a functional GPS receiver, finding a pressure case that provided an optimal balance among crush-depth, price and size, and incorporating the electrodes, electrode collar, and the circuitry required for the electric field measurement. The first EM-POGO sea-trial was in July 1999. In August 2006 a refurbished EM-POGO collected 15 absolute velocity profiles; relative and absolute velocity uncertainty was ˜1cms-1 and 0.5-5 cm s-1, respectively, at a vertical resolution of 25 m. Absolute velocity from the EM-POGO compared to shipboard ADCP measurements differed by ˜ 1-2 cm s-1, comparable to the uncertainty in absolute velocity from the ADCP. The EM-POGO is thus a low-cost, easy to deploy and recover, and accurate velocity profiler.

  2. Absolute calibration in the 1750 - 3350 A region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strongylis, G. J.; Bohlin, R. C.

    1977-01-01

    The absolute flux measurements in the rocket ultraviolet made by Bohlin, Frimout, and Lillie (BFL) are revised using a more correct treatment of the air extinction that enters the air calibration of their instrument. The absorption by molecular oxygen and ozone, Rayleigh scattering, and extinction by aerosols is tabulated for general use in ultraviolet calibrations performed in air. The revised absolute flux of eta UMa and final fluxes for alpha Lyr and zeta Oph are presented in the 1750-3350 A region. The absolute flux of the star eta UMa is compared to four other independent determinations in the 1200-3400 A region and a maximum difference of 35% is found near 1500 A between the OAO-2 and Apollo 17 fluxes. The rocket measurements of BFL, the ANS and TD-1 satellite data, and the Apollo 17 data are compared to the ultraviolet fluxes from the OAO-2, demonstrating a photometric reproducibility of about + or - 3 percent. Therefore, all four sets of spectrophotometry can be reduced to a common absolute scale.

  3. Combined single crystal polarized XAFS and XRD at high pressure: probing the interplay between lattice distortions and electronic order at multiple length scales in high T c cuprates

    DOE PAGES

    Fabbris, G.; Hücker, M.; Gu, G. D.; ...

    2016-07-14

    Some of the most exotic material properties derive from electronic states with short correlation length (~10-500 Å), suggesting that the local structural symmetry may play a relevant role in their behavior. In this study, we discuss the combined use of polarized x-ray absorption fine structure and x-ray diffraction at high pressure as a powerful method to tune and probe structural and electronic orders at multiple length scales. Besides addressing some of the technical challenges associated with such experiments, we illustrate this approach with results obtained in the cuprate La1.875Ba0.125CuO4, in which the response of electronic order to pressure can onlymore » be understood by probing the structure at the relevant length scales.« less

  4. Low-cost and gram-scale synthesis of water-soluble Cu-In-S/ZnS core/shell quantum dots in an electric pressure cooker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yanyan; Li, Shenjie; Huang, Lijian; Pan, Daocheng

    2014-01-01

    We report an electric pressure cooker for large-scale synthesis of water-soluble Cu-In-S/ZnS core/shell quantum dots. Low-cost thioglycolic acid and sodium citrate were used as the dual stabilizers. ~3 grams of quantum dots with a tunable emission from 545 to 610 nm and quantum yield up to 40% were obtained in a batch.We report an electric pressure cooker for large-scale synthesis of water-soluble Cu-In-S/ZnS core/shell quantum dots. Low-cost thioglycolic acid and sodium citrate were used as the dual stabilizers. ~3 grams of quantum dots with a tunable emission from 545 to 610 nm and quantum yield up to 40% were obtained in a batch. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental details, PL decay curves, PL lifetimes, EDS spectra, chemical composition, cost analysis. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr05014a

  5. Combined single crystal polarized XAFS and XRD at high pressure: probing the interplay between lattice distortions and electronic order at multiple length scales in high Tc cuprates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabbris, G.; Hücker, M.; Gu, G. D.; Tranquada, J. M.; Haskel, D.

    2016-07-01

    Some of the most exotic material properties derive from electronic states with short correlation length (~10-500 {\\AA}), suggesting that the local structural symmetry may play a relevant role in their behavior. Here we discuss the combined use of polarized x-ray absorption fine structure and x-ray diffraction at high pressure as a powerful method to tune and probe structural and electronic orders at multiple length scales. Besides addressing some of the technical challenges associated with such experiments, we illustrate this approach with results obtained in the cuprate La$_{1.875}$Ba$_{0.125}$CuO$_4$, in which the response of electronic order to pressure can only be understood by probing the structure at the relevant length scales.

  6. Pressure distributions obtained on a 0.10-scale model of the space shuttle Orbiter's forebody in the AEDC 16T propulsion wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siemers, P. M., III; Henry, M. W.

    1986-01-01

    Pressure distribution test data obtained on a 0.10-scale model of the forward fuselage of the Space Shuttle Orbiter are presented without analysis. The tests were completed in the AEDC 16T Propulsion Wind Tunnel. The 0.10-scale model was tested at angles of attack from -2 deg to 18 deg and angles of side slip from -6 to 6 deg at Mach numbers from 0.25 to 1/5 deg. The tests were conducted in support of the development of the Shuttle Entry Air Data System (SEADS). In addition to modeling the 20 SEADS orifices, the wind-tunnel model was also instrumented with orifices to match Development Flight Instrumentation (DFI) port locations that existed on the Space Shuttle Orbiter Columbia (OV-102) during the Orbiter Flight Test program. This DFI simulation has provided a means of comparisons between reentry flight pressure data and wind-tunnel and computational data.

  7. A Meta-analysis to Evaluate the Predictive Validity of the Braden Scale for Pressure Ulcer Risk Assessment in Long-term Care.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hong-Lin; Shen, Wang-Qin; Liu, Peng

    2016-09-01

    Although it is among the most commonly used pressure ulcer risk assessment tools, the Braden Scale may lack strong predictive validity when used in the long-term care setting. A meta-analysis was conducted of English-language articles published in the PubMed database and Web of Science from the indices' inception through July 2015 to assess the predictive validity of the Braden Scale for pressure ulcers in long-term care residents. Search terms included pressure ulcer, pressure sore, bedsore, decubitus, long-term care, nursing home, skilled nursing facility, hospice, and Braden. Data extracted from the publications included sample and setting characteristics and predictive value indices. The pooled sensitivities, specificities, diagnostic odds ratios (DOR), and constructed summary receiver operating characteristic (SROC) curves were calculated. Eight studies (2 prospective cohorts and 6 cross-sectional studies) with 41 489 residents met selection criteria for inclusion in the analysis. The pooled sensitivity and specificity were 0.80 (95% CI: 0.79-0.81) and 0.42 (95% CI: 0.42-0.43), respectively, yielding a combined DOR of 5.66 (95% CI: 3.77-8.48). The area under the ROC curve (AUC) was 0.7686 ± 0.0478 (95% CI: 0.6749-0.8623), and the overall diagnostic accuracy (Q*) was 0.7090 ± 0.0402 (95% CI: 0.6302-0.7878). Significant heterogeneity was noted among the included studies; Q value was 302.54 (P = 0.000), and I2 for pooled sensitivity, pooled specificity, and pooled DOR was 97.4%, 98.7% and 96.4%, respectively. Meta-regression analysis showed no heterogeneity was noted among Braden scale cut-offs (P = 0.123) and pressure ulcer prevalence P = 0.547). The evidence showed the Braden Scale has moderate predictive validity and low predictive specificity for pressure ulcers in long-term care residents. The development and testing of new risk assessment scales for this population is warranted.

  8. Low-cost and gram-scale synthesis of water-soluble Cu-In-S/ZnS core/shell quantum dots in an electric pressure cooker.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yanyan; Li, Shenjie; Huang, Lijian; Pan, Daocheng

    2014-01-01

    We report an electric pressure cooker for large-scale synthesis of water-soluble Cu-In-S/ZnS core/shell quantum dots. Low-cost thioglycolic acid and sodium citrate were used as the dual stabilizers. ∼3 grams of quantum dots with a tunable emission from 545 to 610 nm and quantum yield up to 40% were obtained in a batch.

  9. Assessing anthropogenic pressures on coastal marine ecosystems using stable CNS isotopes: State of the art, knowledge gaps, and community-scale perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancinelli, Giorgio; Vizzini, Salvatrice

    2015-04-01

    In recent decades, the analysis of carbon, nitrogen and sulfur stable isotopes (SIA) has emerged as a powerful, viable methodology for examining food web structure and dynamics, as well as addressing a number of applied issues. Here, we provide a state-of-the-art review of the use of SIA for assessing anthropogenic pressures on natural ecosystems, in order to establish current knowledge gaps and identify promising applications for evaluating the ecological status of marine coastal waters. Specifically, the potential of SIA to provide food web-scale indicators for estimating cumulative anthropogenic pressures is addressed. The review indicates that the methodology has been used for virtually the whole spectrum of human pressures known to influence marine ecosystems. However, only the effects of chemical pollution, release of dissolved and particulate nutrients, and invasive species have been extensively investigated. For the first two pressures, substantial efforts have been made to implement isotopic quantitative approaches and metrics for inter-system comparisons; however, with the exception of nutrient release, the majority of aquatic studies have been carried out in freshwater systems, and only limited information is available on marine environments. In particular, the effects of invasive species on coastal habitats have received scant attention. Trophic position of indicator species emerges as the isotopic metric most ubiquitously adopted for measuring the impact of anthropogenic pressures. Conversely, the application of other recently implemented metrics, proven to be highly effective in integrating information on the spatial-temporal dynamics of aquatic food webs, is to date still limited. The potential of stable isotope analysis to provide a unifying methodological-theoretical framework for effective, inter-ecosystem comparisons of both single and multiple anthropogenic pressures is emphasised. Additionally, a plea for the implementation and intercalibration

  10. Absolute quantitation of protein posttranslational modification isoform.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhu; Li, Ning

    2015-01-01

    Mass spectrometry has been widely applied in characterization and quantification of proteins from complex biological samples. Because the numbers of absolute amounts of proteins are needed in construction of mathematical models for molecular systems of various biological phenotypes and phenomena, a number of quantitative proteomic methods have been adopted to measure absolute quantities of proteins using mass spectrometry. The liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) coupled with internal peptide standards, i.e., the stable isotope-coded peptide dilution series, which was originated from the field of analytical chemistry, becomes a widely applied method in absolute quantitative proteomics research. This approach provides more and more absolute protein quantitation results of high confidence. As quantitative study of posttranslational modification (PTM) that modulates the biological activity of proteins is crucial for biological science and each isoform may contribute a unique biological function, degradation, and/or subcellular location, the absolute quantitation of protein PTM isoforms has become more relevant to its biological significance. In order to obtain the absolute cellular amount of a PTM isoform of a protein accurately, impacts of protein fractionation, protein enrichment, and proteolytic digestion yield should be taken into consideration and those effects before differentially stable isotope-coded PTM peptide standards are spiked into sample peptides have to be corrected. Assisted with stable isotope-labeled peptide standards, the absolute quantitation of isoforms of posttranslationally modified protein (AQUIP) method takes all these factors into account and determines the absolute amount of a protein PTM isoform from the absolute amount of the protein of interest and the PTM occupancy at the site of the protein. The absolute amount of the protein of interest is inferred by quantifying both the absolute amounts of a few PTM

  11. CO2 Exsolution from CO2 Saturated Water: Core-Scale Experiments and Focus on Impacts of Pressure Variations.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ruina; Li, Rong; Ma, Jin; Jiang, Peixue

    2015-12-15

    For CO2 sequestration and utilization in the shallow reservoirs, reservoir pressure changes are due to the injection rate changing, a leakage event, and brine withdrawal for reservoir pressure balance. The amounts of exsolved CO2 which are influenced by the pressure reduction and the subsequent secondary imbibition process have a significant effect on the stability and capacity of CO2 sequestration and utilization. In this study, exsolution behavior of the CO2 has been studied experimentally using a core flooding system in combination with NMR/MRI equipment. Three series of pressure variation profiles, including depletion followed by imbibitions without or with repressurization and repetitive depletion and repressurization/imbibition cycles, were designed to investigate the exsolution responses for these complex pressure variation profiles. We found that the exsolved CO2 phase preferentially occupies the larger pores and exhibits a uniform spatial distribution. The mobility of CO2 is low during the imbibition process, and the residual trapping ratio is extraordinarily high. During the cyclic pressure variation process, the first cycle has the largest contribution to the amount of exsolved CO2. The low CO2 mobility implies a certain degree of self-sealing during a possible reservoir depletion.

  12. Absolute realization of low BRDF value

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zilong; Liao, Ningfang; Li, Ping; Wang, Yu

    2010-10-01

    Low BRDF value is widespread used in many critical domains such as space and military fairs. These values below 0.1 Sr-1 . So the Absolute realization of these value is the most critical issue in the absolute measurement of BRDF. To develop the Absolute value realization theory of BRDF , defining an arithmetic operators of BRDF , achieving an absolute measurement Eq. of BRDF based on radiance. This is a new theory method to solve the realization problem of low BRDF value. This theory method is realized on a self-designed common double orientation structure in space. By designing an adding structure to extend the range of the measurement system and a control and processing software, Absolute realization of low BRDF value is achieved. A material of low BRDF value is measured in this measurement system and the spectral BRDF value are showed within different angles allover the space. All these values are below 0.4 Sr-1 . This process is a representative procedure about the measurement of low BRDF value. A corresponding uncertainty analysis of this measurement data is given depend on the new theory of absolute realization and the performance of the measurement system. The relative expand uncertainty of the measurement data is 0.078. This uncertainty analysis is suitable for all measurements using the new theory of absolute realization and the corresponding measurement system.

  13. The role of fine material and grain size distribution on excess pore pressure dissipation and particle support mechanisms in granular deposits based in large-scale physical experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palucis, M. C.; Kaitna, R.; Tewoldebrhan, B.; Hill, K. M.; Dietrich, W. E.

    2011-12-01

    The dominant mechanisms behind sustained mobilization in granular debris flows are poorly understood, and experiments are needed to determine the conditions under which the fluid can fully support the coarse fraction. However, field-scale studies are difficult to instrument and constrain and laboratory studies suffer from scaling issues. A 4-m rotating drum located at UC Berkeley's Richmond Field Station allowed us to perform reproducible experiments with materials similar to those in the field to explore mechanisms relevant to slow pore fluid pressure dissipation. Specifically, we performed a series of experiments to assess the role of fines and grain size distribution on the rate of pore fluid pressure dissipation upon deposition of a granular mass. For each experiment we kept the total mass of the gravel particles constant and varied the amount of fines (from no fines to amounts found in an actual debris flow deposit) and the gravel particle size distribution (from a single grain size to a range found in natural flows). We first rotated each mixture in the drum, during which we monitored fluid pressures at the base of the flows (near the wall of the drum and at the center). Then we stopped the drum and continued to monitor the fluid pressures. Immediately upon stopping, the pore fluid pressure was nearly hydrostatic for the gravel-water flows, and any elevated pore pressure quickly dissipated. On the other hand, the mixtures with fines contents close to those found in actual debris flows had elevated pore pressures indicating they were almost fully liquefied. Furthermore, the rate of pore pressure dissipation was an order of magnitude slower than when no fines were present; the grain size distribution of the coarse fraction did not strongly influence the dissipation rates in either case. We also placed a cobble upon a fines-rich mixture after cessation of motion above the center pressure sensor, and observed that the pore fluid pressure rose instantly, bearing

  14. Deconstructing European Poverty Measures: What Relative and Absolute Scales Measure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burkhauser, Richard V.

    2009-01-01

    Forster and d'Ercole (2009) outline the dominant method of conceptualization and operationalization of European poverty measures that informed the EU in its development of the questionnaire for the European Union--Survey of Income and Living Conditions (EU-SILC). They do so in the context of their explanation of how the Organization for Economic…

  15. Shuttle model tailcone pressure distribution at low subsonic speeds of a 0.03614-scale model in the NASA/LaRC low-turbulence pressure tunnel (LA81), volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ball, J. W.; Lindahl, R. H.

    1976-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in the NASA/LaRC Low-Turbulence Pressure Tunnel on a 0.03614-scale orbiter model of a 089B configuration with a 139B configuration nose forward of F.S. 500. The tailcone was the TC sub 4 design and was instrumented with eighty-nine pressure orifices. Control surfaces were deflected and three wind tunnel mounting techniques were investigated over an angle-of-attack range from -2 deg to a maximum of 18 deg. In order to determine the sensitivity of the tailcone to changes in Reynolds number, most of the test was made at a Mach number of 0.20 over a Reynolds number range of 2.0 to 10 million per foot. A few runs were made at a Mach number of 0.30 at Reynolds numbers of 4.0, 6.0, and 8 million per foot.

  16. A multi-scale cardiovascular system model can account for the load-dependence of the end-systolic pressure-volume relationship

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The end-systolic pressure-volume relationship is often considered as a load-independent property of the heart and, for this reason, is widely used as an index of ventricular contractility. However, many criticisms have been expressed against this index and the underlying time-varying elastance theory: first, it does not consider the phenomena underlying contraction and second, the end-systolic pressure volume relationship has been experimentally shown to be load-dependent. Methods In place of the time-varying elastance theory, a microscopic model of sarcomere contraction is used to infer the pressure generated by the contraction of the left ventricle, considered as a spherical assembling of sarcomere units. The left ventricle model is inserted into a closed-loop model of the cardiovascular system. Finally, parameters of the modified cardiovascular system model are identified to reproduce the hemodynamics of a normal dog. Results Experiments that have proven the limitations of the time-varying elastance theory are reproduced with our model: (1) preload reductions, (2) afterload increases, (3) the same experiments with increased ventricular contractility, (4) isovolumic contractions and (5) flow-clamps. All experiments simulated with the model generate different end-systolic pressure-volume relationships, showing that this relationship is actually load-dependent. Furthermore, we show that the results of our simulations are in good agreement with experiments. Conclusions We implemented a multi-scale model of the cardiovascular system, in which ventricular contraction is described by a detailed sarcomere model. Using this model, we successfully reproduced a number of experiments that have shown the failing points of the time-varying elastance theory. In particular, the developed multi-scale model of the cardiovascular system can capture the load-dependence of the end-systolic pressure-volume relationship. PMID:23363818

  17. Oblique-incidence sounder measurements with absolute propagation delay timing

    SciTech Connect

    Daehler, M.

    1990-05-03

    Timing from the Global Position Satellite (GPS) system has been applied to HF oblique incidence sounder measurements to produce ionograms whose propagation delay time scale is absolutely calibrated. Such a calibration is useful for interpreting ionograms in terms of the electron density true-height profile for the ionosphere responsible for the propagation. Use of the time variations in the shape of the electron density profile, in conjunction with an HF propagation model, is expected to provide better near-term (1-24 hour) HF propagation forecasts than are available from current updating systems, which use only the MUF. Such a capability may provide the basis for HF frequency management techniques which are more efficient than current methods. Absolute timing and other techniques applicable to automatic extraction of the electron-density profile from an ionogram will be discussed.

  18. A New Gimmick for Assigning Absolute Configuration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ayorinde, F. O.

    1983-01-01

    A five-step procedure is provided to help students in making the assignment absolute configuration less bothersome. Examples for both single (2-butanol) and multi-chiral carbon (3-chloro-2-butanol) molecules are included. (JN)

  19. Magnifying absolute instruments for optically homogeneous regions

    SciTech Connect

    Tyc, Tomas

    2011-09-15

    We propose a class of magnifying absolute optical instruments with a positive isotropic refractive index. They create magnified stigmatic images, either virtual or real, of optically homogeneous three-dimensional spatial regions within geometrical optics.

  20. The Simplicity Argument and Absolute Morality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mijuskovic, Ben

    1975-01-01

    In this paper the author has maintained that there is a similarity of thought to be found in the writings of Cudworth, Emerson, and Husserl in his investigation of an absolute system of morality. (Author/RK)

  1. Orion Absolute Navigation System Progress and Challenge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holt, Greg N.; D'Souza, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    The absolute navigation design of NASA's Orion vehicle is described. It has undergone several iterations and modifications since its inception, and continues as a work-in-progress. This paper seeks to benchmark the current state of the design and some of the rationale and analysis behind it. There are specific challenges to address when preparing a timely and effective design for the Exploration Flight Test (EFT-1), while still looking ahead and providing software extensibility for future exploration missions. The primary onboard measurements in a Near-Earth or Mid-Earth environment consist of GPS pseudo-range and delta-range, but for future explorations missions the use of star-tracker and optical navigation sources need to be considered. Discussions are presented for state size and composition, processing techniques, and consider states. A presentation is given for the processing technique using the computationally stable and robust UDU formulation with an Agee-Turner Rank-One update. This allows for computational savings when dealing with many parameters which are modeled as slowly varying Gauss-Markov processes. Preliminary analysis shows up to a 50% reduction in computation versus a more traditional formulation. Several state elements are discussed and evaluated, including position, velocity, attitude, clock bias/drift, and GPS measurement biases in addition to bias, scale factor, misalignment, and non-orthogonalities of the accelerometers and gyroscopes. Another consideration is the initialization of the EKF in various scenarios. Scenarios such as single-event upset, ground command, and cold start are discussed as are strategies for whole and partial state updates as well as covariance considerations. Strategies are given for dealing with latent measurements and high-rate propagation using multi-rate architecture. The details of the rate groups and the data ow between the elements is discussed and evaluated.

  2. Absolute cross sections of compound nucleus reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capurro, O. A.

    1993-11-01

    The program SEEF is a Fortran IV computer code for the extraction of absolute cross sections of compound nucleus reactions. When the evaporation residue is fed by its parents, only cumulative cross sections will be obtained from off-line gamma ray measurements. But, if one has the parent excitation function (experimental or calculated), this code will make it possible to determine absolute cross sections of any exit channel.

  3. Experimental Investigation of Natural-Circulation Flow Behavior Under Low-Power/Low-Pressure Conditions in the Large-Scale PANDA Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Auban, Olivier; Paladino, Domenico; Zboray, Robert

    2004-12-15

    Twenty-five tests have been carried out in the large-scale thermal-hydraulic facility PANDA to investigate natural-circulation and stability behavior under low-pressure/low-power conditions, when void flashing might play an important role. This work, which extends the current experimental database to a large geometric scale, is of interest notably with regard to the start-up procedures in natural-circulation-cooled boiling water reactors. It should help the understanding of the physical phenomena that may cause flow instability in such conditions and can be used for validation of thermal-hydraulics system codes. The tests were performed at a constant power, balanced by a specific condenser heat removal capacity. The test matrix allowed the reactor pressure vessel power and pressure to be varied, as well as other parameters influencing the natural-circulation flow. The power spectra of flow oscillations showed in a few tests a major and unique resonance peak, and decay ratios between 0.5 and 0.9 have been found. The remainder of the tests showed an even more pronounced stable behavior. A classification of the tests is presented according to the circulation modes (from single-phase to two-phase flow) that could be assumed and particularly to the importance and the localization of the flashing phenomenon.

  4. The Challenge of Planning Conservation Strategies in Threatened Seascapes: Understanding the Role of Fine Scale Assessments of Community Response to Cumulative Human Pressures.

    PubMed

    Guarnieri, Giuseppe; Bevilacqua, Stanislao; De Leo, Francesco; Farella, Giulio; Maffia, Anna; Terlizzi, Antonio; Fraschetti, Simonetta

    2016-01-01

    Assessing the distribution and intensity of human threats to biodiversity is a prerequisite for effective spatial planning, harmonizing conservation purposes with sustainable development. In the Mediterranean Sea, the management of Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) is rarely based on explicit consideration of the distribution of multiple stressors, with direct assessment of their effects on ecosystems. This gap limits the effectiveness of protection and is conducive to conflicts among stakeholders. Here, a fine scale assessment of the potential effects of different combinations of stressors (both land- and marine-based) on vulnerable rocky habitats (i.e. lower midlittoral and shallow infralittoral) along 40 km of coast in the western Mediterranean (Ionian Sea) has been carried out. The study area is a paradigmatic example of socio-ecological interactions, where several human uses and conservation measures collide. Significant differences in the structure of assemblages according to different combinations of threats were observed, indicating distinct responses of marine habitats to different sets of human pressures. A more complex three-dimensional structure, higher taxon richness and β-diversity characterized assemblages subject to low versus high levels of human pressure, consistently across habitats. In addition, the main drivers of change were: closeness to the harbour, water quality, and the relative extension of beaches. Our findings suggest that, although efforts to assess cumulative impacts at large scale may help in individuating priority areas for conservation purposes, the fact that such evaluations are often based on expert opinions and not on actual studies limits their ability to represent real environmental conditions at local scale. Systematic evaluations of local scale effects of anthropogenic drivers of change on biological communities should complement broad scale management strategies to achieve effective sustainability of human exploitation of

  5. The Challenge of Planning Conservation Strategies in Threatened Seascapes: Understanding the Role of Fine Scale Assessments of Community Response to Cumulative Human Pressures

    PubMed Central

    Guarnieri, Giuseppe; Bevilacqua, Stanislao; De Leo, Francesco; Farella, Giulio; Maffia, Anna; Terlizzi, Antonio; Fraschetti, Simonetta

    2016-01-01

    Assessing the distribution and intensity of human threats to biodiversity is a prerequisite for effective spatial planning, harmonizing conservation purposes with sustainable development. In the Mediterranean Sea, the management of Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) is rarely based on explicit consideration of the distribution of multiple stressors, with direct assessment of their effects on ecosystems. This gap limits the effectiveness of protection and is conducive to conflicts among stakeholders. Here, a fine scale assessment of the potential effects of different combinations of stressors (both land- and marine-based) on vulnerable rocky habitats (i.e. lower midlittoral and shallow infralittoral) along 40 km of coast in the western Mediterranean (Ionian Sea) has been carried out. The study area is a paradigmatic example of socio-ecological interactions, where several human uses and conservation measures collide. Significant differences in the structure of assemblages according to different combinations of threats were observed, indicating distinct responses of marine habitats to different sets of human pressures. A more complex three-dimensional structure, higher taxon richness and β-diversity characterized assemblages subject to low versus high levels of human pressure, consistently across habitats. In addition, the main drivers of change were: closeness to the harbour, water quality, and the relative extension of beaches. Our findings suggest that, although efforts to assess cumulative impacts at large scale may help in individuating priority areas for conservation purposes, the fact that such evaluations are often based on expert opinions and not on actual studies limits their ability to represent real environmental conditions at local scale. Systematic evaluations of local scale effects of anthropogenic drivers of change on biological communities should complement broad scale management strategies to achieve effective sustainability of human exploitation of

  6. Results of the 0.015 scale space shuttle vehicle orbiter test (OA17) in the NASA low turbulence pressure tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milam, M. D.; Petrozzi, M. T.

    1974-01-01

    Experimental aerodynamic investigations were conducted on a 0.015 scale model of the Space Shuttle Orbiter in a low turbulence pressure tunnel. Six component static aerodynamic force and moment data were recorded while the model was pitched from -2 deg to +26 deg angle of attack. The yaw angles during these pitch sweeps were 0 deg, -5 deg, and 7 1/2 deg. Base, sting cavity, vertical tail, wing trailing edge, and elevon pressures, as well as elevon and rudder hinge moment data were also obtained. The tests were conducted at a nominal Mach number of 0.25. The Reynolds number was varied throughout the test program from 2.5 million to 4.7 million to 10.0 million to 12.5 million.

  7. Single and two-phase natural circulation in Westinghouse pressurized water reactor simulators: Phenomena, analysis and scaling

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, R.R.; Chapman, J.C.; Kukita, Y.; Motley, F.E.; Stumpf, H.; Chen, Y.S.; Tasaka, K.

    1987-01-01

    Natural circulation data obtained in the 1/48 scale W four loop PWR simulator - the Large Scale Test Facility (LSTF) are discussed and summarized. Core cooling modes, the primary fluid state, the primary loop mass flow and localized natural circulation phenomena occurring in the steam generator are presented. TRAC-PF1 LSTF model (using both a 1 U-tube and a 3 U-tube steam generator model) analyses of the LSTF natural circulation data including the SG recirculation patterns are presented and compared to the data. The LSTF data are then compared to similar natural circulation data obtained in the Primarkreislaufe (PKL) and the Semiscale facilities. Based on the 1/48 to 1/1705 scaling range which exists between the facilities, the implications of these data towrard natural circulation behavior in commercial plants are briefly discussed.

  8. Absolute Plate Velocities from Seismic Anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreemer, Corné; Zheng, Lin; Gordon, Richard

    2015-04-01

    lithosphere (σ=14.7° ). Two of the slowest-moving plates, Antarctica (vRMS=4 mm a-1, σ=29° ) and Eurasia (vRMS=3 mm a-1, σ=33° ), have two of the largest within-plate dispersions, which may indicate that a plate must move faster than ˜5 mm a-1 to result in seismic anisotropy useful for estimating plate motion. We will investigate if these relationships still hold with the new expanded data set and with the alternative set of relative plate angular velocities. We have found systematic differences between the SKS orientations and our predicted plate motion azimuths underneath the Arabia plate, which suggests to us either plate-scale mantle flow process not directly associated with that plate's absolute motion or intrinsic lithospheric anisotropy. We will discuss more of such discrepancies underneath other plates using the enlarged data set.

  9. Jasminum flexile flower absolute from India--a detailed comparison with three other jasmine absolutes.

    PubMed

    Braun, Norbert A; Kohlenberg, Birgit; Sim, Sherina; Meier, Manfred; Hammerschmidt, Franz-Josef

    2009-09-01

    Jasminum flexile flower absolute from the south of India and the corresponding vacuum headspace (VHS) sample of the absolute were analyzed using GC and GC-MS. Three other commercially available Indian jasmine absolutes from the species: J. sambac, J. officinale subsp. grandiflorum, and J. auriculatum and the respective VHS samples were used for comparison purposes. One hundred and twenty-one compounds were characterized in J. flexile flower absolute, with methyl linolate, benzyl salicylate, benzyl benzoate, (2E,6E)-farnesol, and benzyl acetate as the main constituents. A detailed olfactory evaluation was also performed.

  10. Scale-4 analysis of pressurized water reactor critical configurations: Volume 5, North Anna Unit 1 Cycle 5

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, S.M.; Suto, T. |

    1996-10-01

    ANSI/ANS 8.1 requires that calculational methods for away-from- reactor (AFR) criticality safety analyses be validated against experiment. This report summarizes part of the ongoing effort to benchmark AFR criticality analysis methods using selected critical configurations from commercial PWRs. Codes and data in the SCALE-4 code system were used. This volume documents the SCALE system analysis of one reactor critical configuration for North Anna Unit 1 Cycle 5. The KENO V.a criticality calculations for the North Anna 1 Cycle 5 beginning-of-cycle model yielded a value for k{sub eff} of 1. 0040{+-}0.0005.

  11. Large-scale synthesis of well-dispersed copper nanowires in an electric pressure cooker and their application in transparent and conductive networks.

    PubMed

    Li, Shenjie; Chen, Yanyan; Huang, Lijian; Pan, Daocheng

    2014-05-05

    We present a novel large-scale synthetic method for well-separated copper nanowires (CuNWs) in a commercial electric pressure cooker under mild reaction conditions. CuNWs (∼2.1 g) can be prepared in a batch with the cost of $4.20/g. Well-dispersed polyvinylpyrrolidone-capped CuNWs were obtained via a ligand-exchange method. The transparent and conductive CuNW networks with excellent electrical conductivity and high optical transmittance (30 Ω/□ at 86% transmittance, respectively) were fabricated by a spin-coating process.

  12. Universal Cosmic Absolute and Modern Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostro, Ludwik

    The official Sciences, especially all natural sciences, respect in their researches the principle of methodic naturalism i.e. they consider all phenomena as entirely natural and therefore in their scientific explanations they do never adduce or cite supernatural entities and forces. The purpose of this paper is to show that Modern Science has its own self-existent, self-acting, and self-sufficient Natural All-in Being or Omni-Being i.e. the entire Nature as a Whole that justifies the scientific methodic naturalism. Since this Natural All-in Being is one and only It should be considered as the own scientifically justified Natural Absolute of Science and should be called, in my opinion, the Universal Cosmic Absolute of Modern Science. It will be also shown that the Universal Cosmic Absolute is ontologically enormously stratified and is in its ultimate i.e. in its most fundamental stratum trans-reistic and trans-personal. It means that in its basic stratum. It is neither a Thing or a Person although It contains in Itself all things and persons with all other sentient and conscious individuals as well, On the turn of the 20th century the Science has begun to look for a theory of everything, for a final theory, for a master theory. In my opinion the natural Universal Cosmic Absolute will constitute in such a theory the radical all penetrating Ultimate Basic Reality and will substitute step by step the traditional supernatural personal Absolute.

  13. Quantum bath refrigeration towards absolute zero: challenging the unattainability principle.

    PubMed

    Kolář, M; Gelbwaser-Klimovsky, D; Alicki, R; Kurizki, G

    2012-08-31

    A minimal model of a quantum refrigerator, i.e., a periodically phase-flipped two-level system permanently coupled to a finite-capacity bath (cold bath) and an infinite heat dump (hot bath), is introduced and used to investigate the cooling of the cold bath towards absolute zero (T=0). Remarkably, the temperature scaling of the cold-bath cooling rate reveals that it does not vanish as T→0 for certain realistic quantized baths, e.g., phonons in strongly disordered media (fractons) or quantized spin waves in ferromagnets (magnons). This result challenges Nernst's third-law formulation known as the unattainability principle.

  14. Quantitative standards for absolute linguistic universals.

    PubMed

    Piantadosi, Steven T; Gibson, Edward

    2014-01-01

    Absolute linguistic universals are often justified by cross-linguistic analysis: If all observed languages exhibit a property, the property is taken to be a likely universal, perhaps specified in the cognitive or linguistic systems of language learners and users. In many cases, these patterns are then taken to motivate linguistic theory. Here, we show that cross-linguistic analysis will very rarely be able to statistically justify absolute, inviolable patterns in language. We formalize two statistical methods--frequentist and Bayesian--and show that in both it is possible to find strict linguistic universals, but that the numbers of independent languages necessary to do so is generally unachievable. This suggests that methods other than typological statistics are necessary to establish absolute properties of human language, and thus that many of the purported universals in linguistics have not received sufficient empirical justification.

  15. Deuterium-Tritium Beta-Layering Within a National Ignition Facility Scale Polymer Target in the LANL Cryogenic Pressure Loader

    SciTech Connect

    Ebey, Peter S.; Dole, James M.; Geller, Drew A.; Hoffer, James K.; Nobile, Arthur; Sheliak, John D.

    2005-11-15

    Beta-layering, the process of beta-decay heat-driven mass redistribution, has been demonstrated in a deuterium-tritium (D-T)-filled polymer sphere of the type required for fusion ignition experiments at the National Ignition Facility. This is the first report, to the best of the authors' knowledge, of a D-T layer formed in a permeation-filled sphere. The 2-mm-diam sphere was filled with D-T by permeation; cooled to cryogenic temperatures while in the high-pressure permeation vessel; and, while cold, removed to an optical axis where the D-T was frozen, melted, and beta-layered in a series of experiments over several weeks' time. This work was performed in the Los Alamos National Laboratory cryogenic pressure loader system. The beta-layering time constant was 24.0 {+-} 2.5 min, less than the theoretical value of 26.8 min, and not showing the significant increase due to build-up of {sup 3}He often observed in beta-layered samples. Supercooling of the liquid D-T was observed. Neither the polymer target nor its tenting material showed visual signs of degradation after 5 weeks of exposure to D-T. Small external thermal gradients were used to shift the D-T material back and forth within the sphere.

  16. Voltage and Pressure Scaling of Streamer Dynamics in a Helium Plasma Jet With N2 CO-Flow (Postprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-14

    of measurements since it allowed us to measure streamer scaling properties over a wide voltage range with- out surface flashover in our configuration...allows the formation of a non-stochastic active discharge extending beyond the anodic electrode uses a capillary dielectric tube with helium gas flow...of discharge behaves like a cath- ode directed streamer propagation. This plasma jet uses a dielectric barrier configuration with annular anode

  17. Absolutely relative or relatively absolute: violations of value invariance in human decision making.

    PubMed

    Teodorescu, Andrei R; Moran, Rani; Usher, Marius

    2016-02-01

    Making decisions based on relative rather than absolute information processing is tied to choice optimality via the accumulation of evidence differences and to canonical neural processing via accumulation of evidence ratios. These theoretical frameworks predict invariance of decision latencies to absolute intensities that maintain differences and ratios, respectively. While information about the absolute values of the choice alternatives is not necessary for choosing the best alternative, it may nevertheless hold valuable information about the context of the decision. To test the sensitivity of human decision making to absolute values, we manipulated the intensities of brightness stimuli pairs while preserving either their differences or their ratios. Although asked to choose the brighter alternative relative to the other, participants responded faster to higher absolute values. Thus, our results provide empirical evidence for human sensitivity to task irrelevant absolute values indicating a hard-wired mechanism that precedes executive control. Computational investigations of several modelling architectures reveal two alternative accounts for this phenomenon, which combine absolute and relative processing. One account involves accumulation of differences with activation dependent processing noise and the other emerges from accumulation of absolute values subject to the temporal dynamics of lateral inhibition. The potential adaptive role of such choice mechanisms is discussed.

  18. Survey of wing and flap lower-surface temperatures and pressures during full-scale ground tests of an externally blown flap system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, D. L.

    1972-01-01

    Full-scale ground tests of an externally blown flap system were made using the wing of an F-111B airplane and a CF700 engine. Pressure and temperature distributions were determined on the undersurface of the wing, vane, and flap for two engine exhaust nozzles (conical and daisy) at several engine power and engine/wing positions. The tests were made with no airflow over the wing. The leading-edge wing sweep angle was fixed at 26 deg, the angle of incidence between the engine and the wing was fixed at 3 deg, and the tests were conducted with the flap retracted, extended and deflected 35 deg, and extended and deflected 60 deg. The integrated local pressures on the undersurface of the flap produced loads approximately three times as great at the 60 deg flap position as at the 35 deg flap position. With both nozzle configurations, more than 90 percent of the integrated pressure loads were contained within plus or minus 20 percent of the flap span centered around the engine exhaust centerline. The maximum temperature recorded on the flaps was 218 C (424 F) for the conical nozzle and 180 C (356 F) for the daisy nozzle.

  19. The Statistical Relationship between the Synoptic-Scale Pressure Field and the Development and Morning Transition of Surface Inversions at Two Rural Sites.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiess, Raymond B.; Riordan, Allen J.

    1987-08-01

    The association between the synoptic-scale sea level pressure field and the behavior of the morning inversion at two 60-m tower sites in North and South Carolina is investigated. Daily gridded pressure data for 1976 through 1982 for the eastern third of the United States are objectively classified according to their similarity with one of four basic eigenvector patterns developed for the dataset.The occurrence and site-to-site correlation of predawn inversion strength at the two tower locations, as well as the transition time between sunrise and inversion breakdown are then compared and contrasted for the different synoptic types. Results show a statistically significant relationship between inversion strength and synoptic type. As expected, strong inversions are most common when anticyclones are centered over the region. However, strong inversions are also found when anticyclones are centered southwest of the sites. The synoptic association is very similar for both tower sites expect for conditions when local care of a lake near one site lead to obvious modifications there. Transition times are only occasionally related to the synoptic type and relate best when the pressure gradient is weakest (long transition) or strongest (short transition).

  20. Pressure distributions on a 0.04-scale model of the Space Shuttle Orbiter's forward fuselage in the Langley unitary plan wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradley, P. F.; Siemers, P. M., III; Flanagan, P. F.; Henry, M. W.

    1983-01-01

    Pressure distribution tests on a 0.04-scale model of the forward fuselage of the Space Shuttle Orbiter are presented without analysis. The tests were completed in the Langley Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel (UPWT). The UPWT has two different test sections operating in the continuous mode. Each test section has its own Mach number range. The model was tested at angles of attack from -2.5 deg to 30 deg and angles of sideslip from -5 deg to 5 deg in both test sections. The test Reynolds number was 6.6 x 10 to the 6th power per meter. The tests were conducted in support of the development of the Shuttle Entry Air Data System (SEADS). In addition to modeling the 20 SEADS pressure orifices, the wind-tunnel model was also instrumented with orifices to match Development Flight Instrumentation (DFI) port locations currently existing on the Space Shuttle Orbiter Columbia (OV-102). This DFI simulation has provided a means for comparisons between reentry flight pressure data and wind-tunnel data.

  1. Reduction of the uncertainty of the PTB vacuum pressure scale by a new large area non-rotating piston gauge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bock, Th; Ahrendt, H.; Jousten, K.

    2009-10-01

    This paper describes the metrological characterization of a new large area piston gauge (FRS5, Furness Rosenberg Standard) installed at the vacuum metrology laboratory of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB). The operational procedure and the uncertainty budget for pressures between 30 Pa and 11 kPa are given. Comparisons between the FRS5 and a mercury manometer, a rotary piston gauge and a force-balanced piston gauge are described. We show that the reproducibility of the calibration values of capacitance diaphragm gauges is enhanced by a factor of 6 compared with a static expansion primary standard (SE2). Improvements of the SE2 performance by reducing the number of expansions and smaller uncertainties of expansion ratios are discussed.

  2. Test Report for MSFC Test No. 83-2: Pressure scaled water impact test of a 12.5 inch diameter model of the Space Shuttle solid rocket booster filament wound case and external TVC PCD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Water impact tests using a 12.5 inch diameter model representing a 8.56 percent scale of the Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster configuration were conducted. The two primary objectives of this SRB scale model water impact test program were: 1. Obtain cavity collapse applied pressure distributions for the 8.56 percent rigid body scale model FWC pressure magnitudes as a function of full-scale initial impact conditions at vertical velocities from 65 to 85 ft/sec, horizontal velocities from 0 to 45 ft/sec, and angles from -10 to +10 degrees. 2. Obtain rigid body applied pressures on the TVC pod and aft skirt internal stiffener rings at initial impact and cavity collapse loading events. In addition, nozzle loads were measured. Full scale vertical velocities of 65 to 85 ft/sec, horizontal velocities of 0 to 45 ft/sec, and impact angles from -10 to +10 degrees simulated.

  3. An Investigation of Organic and Inorganic Mercury Exposure and Blood Pressure in a Small-Scale Gold Mining Community in Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Rajaee, Mozhgon; Sánchez, Brisa N.; Renne, Elisha P.; Basu, Niladri

    2015-01-01

    There is increasing concern about the cardiovascular effects of mercury (Hg) exposure, and that organic methylmercury and inorganic Hg2+ may affect the cardiovascular system and blood pressure differentially. In small-scale gold mining communities where inorganic, elemental Hg exposures are high, little is known about the effects of Hg on blood pressure. In 2011, we assessed the relationship between Hg exposure and blood pressure (BP) in a cross-sectional study of adults from a small-scale gold mining community, Kejetia, and subsistence farming community, Gorogo, in Ghana’s Upper East Region. Participants’ resting heart rate and BP were measured, and hair and urine samples were provided to serve as biomarkers of organic and inorganic Hg exposure, respectively. Participants included 70 miners and 26 non-miners from Kejetia and 75 non-miners from Gorogo. Total specific gravity-adjusted urinary and hair Hg was higher among Kejetia miners than Kejetia non-miners and Gorogo participants (median urinary Hg: 5.17, 1.18, and 0.154 µg/L, respectively; hair Hg: 0.945, 0.419, and 0.181 µg/g, respectively). Hypertension was prevalent in 17.7% of Kejetia and 21.3% of Gorogo participants. Urinary and hair Hg were not significantly associated with systolic or diastolic BP for Kejetia or Gorogo participants while adjusting for sex, age, and smoking status. Although our results follow trends seen in other studies, the associations were not of statistical significance. Given the unique study population and high exposures to inorganic Hg, the work contained here will help increase our understanding of the cardiovascular effects of Hg. PMID:26308023

  4. An Investigation of Organic and Inorganic Mercury Exposure and Blood Pressure in a Small-Scale Gold Mining Community in Ghana.

    PubMed

    Rajaee, Mozhgon; Sánchez, Brisa N; Renne, Elisha P; Basu, Niladri

    2015-08-21

    There is increasing concern about the cardiovascular effects of mercury (Hg) exposure, and that organic methylmercury and inorganic Hg(2+) may affect the cardiovascular system and blood pressure differentially. In small-scale gold mining communities where inorganic, elemental Hg exposures are high, little is known about the effects of Hg on blood pressure. In 2011, we assessed the relationship between Hg exposure and blood pressure (BP) in a cross-sectional study of adults from a small-scale gold mining community, Kejetia, and subsistence farming community, Gorogo, in Ghana's Upper East Region. Participants' resting heart rate and BP were measured, and hair and urine samples were provided to serve as biomarkers of organic and inorganic Hg exposure, respectively. Participants included 70 miners and 26 non-miners from Kejetia and 75 non-miners from Gorogo. Total specific gravity-adjusted urinary and hair Hg was higher among Kejetia miners than Kejetia non-miners and Gorogo participants (median urinary Hg: 5.17, 1.18, and 0.154 µg/L, respectively; hair Hg: 0.945, 0.419, and 0.181 µg/g, respectively). Hypertension was prevalent in 17.7% of Kejetia and 21.3% of Gorogo participants. Urinary and hair Hg were not significantly associated with systolic or diastolic BP for Kejetia or Gorogo participants while adjusting for sex, age, and smoking status. Although our results follow trends seen in other studies, the associations were not of statistical significance. Given the unique study population and high exposures to inorganic Hg, the work contained here will help increase our understanding of the cardiovascular effects of Hg.

  5. Luminescent Paints Used for Rotating Temperature and Pressure Measurements on Scale-Model High-Bypass-Ratio Fans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bencic, Timothy J.

    1998-01-01

    NASA Lewis Research Center is a leader in the application of temperature- and pressuresensitive paints (TSP and PSP) in rotating environments. Tests were recently completed on several scale model, high-bypass-ratio turbofans in Lewis' 9- by 15-Foot Low-Speed Wind Tunnel. Two of the test objectives were to determine the aerodynamic and acoustic performance of the fan designs. Using TSP and PSP, researchers successfully achieved fullfield aerodynamic loading profiles. The visualized loading profiles may help researchers identify factors contributing to the fans' performance and to the acoustic characteristics associated with the flow physics on the surface of the blades.

  6. Comparative vs. Absolute Judgments of Trait Desirability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hofstee, Willem K. B.

    1970-01-01

    Reversals of trait desirability are studied. Terms indicating conservativw behavior appeared to be judged relatively desirable in comparative judgement, while traits indicating dynamic and expansive behavior benefited from absolute judgement. The reversal effect was shown to be a general one, i.e. reversals were not dependent upon the specific…

  7. New Techniques for Absolute Gravity Measurements.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-01-07

    Hammond, J.A. (1978) Bollettino Di Geofisica Teorica ed Applicata Vol. XX. 8. Hammond, J. A., and Iliff, R. L. (1979) The AFGL absolute gravity system...International Gravimetric Bureau, No. L:I-43. 7. Hammond. J.A. (1978) Bollettino Di Geofisica Teorica ed Applicata Vol. XX. 8. Hammond, J.A., and

  8. An Absolute Electrometer for the Physics Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Straulino, S.; Cartacci, A.

    2009-01-01

    A low-cost, easy-to-use absolute electrometer is presented: two thin metallic plates and an electronic balance, usually available in a laboratory, are used. We report on the very good performance of the device that allows precise measurements of the force acting between two charged plates. (Contains 5 footnotes, 2 tables, and 6 figures.)

  9. Stimulus Probability Effects in Absolute Identification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kent, Christopher; Lamberts, Koen

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of stimulus presentation probability on accuracy and response times in an absolute identification task. Three schedules of presentation were used to investigate the interaction between presentation probability and stimulus position within the set. Data from individual participants indicated strong effects of…

  10. Absolute Positioning Using the Global Positioning System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-04-01

    Global Positioning System ( GPS ) has becom a useful tool In providing relativ survey...Includes the development of a low cost navigator for wheeled vehicles. ABSTRACT The Global Positioning System ( GPS ) has become a useful tool In providing...technique of absolute or point positioning involves the use of a single Global Positioning System ( GPS ) receiver to determine the three-dimenslonal

  11. Trophic Scaling and Occupancy Analysis Reveals a Lion Population Limited by Top-Down Anthropogenic Pressure in the Limpopo National Park, Mozambique

    PubMed Central

    Everatt, Kristoffer T.; Andresen, Leah; Somers, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    The African lion (Panthera Leo) has suffered drastic population and range declines over the last few decades and is listed by the IUCN as vulnerable to extinction. Conservation management requires reliable population estimates, however these data are lacking for many of the continent's remaining populations. It is possible to estimate lion abundance using a trophic scaling approach. However, such inferences assume that a predator population is subject only to bottom-up regulation, and are thus likely to produce biased estimates in systems experiencing top-down anthropogenic pressures. Here we provide baseline data on the status of lions in a developing National Park in Mozambique that is impacted by humans and livestock. We compare a direct density estimate with an estimate derived from trophic scaling. We then use replicated detection/non-detection surveys to estimate the proportion of area occupied by lions, and hierarchical ranking of covariates to provide inferences on the relative contribution of prey resources and anthropogenic factors influencing lion occurrence. The direct density estimate was less than 1/3 of the estimate derived from prey resources (0.99 lions/100 km2 vs. 3.05 lions/100 km2). The proportion of area occupied by lions was Ψ = 0.439 (SE = 0.121), or approximately 44% of a 2 400 km2 sample of potential habitat. Although lions were strongly predicted by a greater probability of encountering prey resources, the greatest contributing factor to lion occurrence was a strong negative association with settlements. Finally, our empirical abundance estimate is approximately 1/3 of a published abundance estimate derived from opinion surveys. Altogether, our results describe a lion population held below resource-based carrying capacity by anthropogenic factors and highlight the limitations of trophic scaling and opinion surveys for estimating predator populations exposed to anthropogenic pressures. Our study provides the first empirical

  12. Trophic scaling and occupancy analysis reveals a lion population limited by top-down anthropogenic pressure in the Limpopo National Park, Mozambique.

    PubMed

    Everatt, Kristoffer T; Andresen, Leah; Somers, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    The African lion (Panthera Leo) has suffered drastic population and range declines over the last few decades and is listed by the IUCN as vulnerable to extinction. Conservation management requires reliable population estimates, however these data are lacking for many of the continent's remaining populations. It is possible to estimate lion abundance using a trophic scaling approach. However, such inferences assume that a predator population is subject only to bottom-up regulation, and are thus likely to produce biased estimates in systems experiencing top-down anthropogenic pressures. Here we provide baseline data on the status of lions in a developing National Park in Mozambique that is impacted by humans and livestock. We compare a direct density estimate with an estimate derived from trophic scaling. We then use replicated detection/non-detection surveys to estimate the proportion of area occupied by lions, and hierarchical ranking of covariates to provide inferences on the relative contribution of prey resources and anthropogenic factors influencing lion occurrence. The direct density estimate was less than 1/3 of the estimate derived from prey resources (0.99 lions/100 km² vs. 3.05 lions/100 km²). The proportion of area occupied by lions was Ψ = 0.439 (SE = 0.121), or approximately 44% of a 2,400 km2 sample of potential habitat. Although lions were strongly predicted by a greater probability of encountering prey resources, the greatest contributing factor to lion occurrence was a strong negative association with settlements. Finally, our empirical abundance estimate is approximately 1/3 of a published abundance estimate derived from opinion surveys. Altogether, our results describe a lion population held below resource-based carrying capacity by anthropogenic factors and highlight the limitations of trophic scaling and opinion surveys for estimating predator populations exposed to anthropogenic pressures. Our study provides the first empirical

  13. Absolute Radiation Thermometry in the NIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bünger, L.; Taubert, R. D.; Gutschwager, B.; Anhalt, K.; Briaudeau, S.; Sadli, M.

    2017-04-01

    A near infrared (NIR) radiation thermometer (RT) for temperature measurements in the range from 773 K up to 1235 K was characterized and calibrated in terms of the "Mise en Pratique for the definition of the Kelvin" (MeP-K) by measuring its absolute spectral radiance responsivity. Using Planck's law of thermal radiation allows the direct measurement of the thermodynamic temperature independently of any ITS-90 fixed-point. To determine the absolute spectral radiance responsivity of the radiation thermometer in the NIR spectral region, an existing PTB monochromator-based calibration setup was upgraded with a supercontinuum laser system (0.45 μm to 2.4 μm) resulting in a significantly improved signal-to-noise ratio. The RT was characterized with respect to its nonlinearity, size-of-source effect, distance effect, and the consistency of its individual temperature measuring ranges. To further improve the calibration setup, a new tool for the aperture alignment and distance measurement was developed. Furthermore, the diffraction correction as well as the impedance correction of the current-to-voltage converter is considered. The calibration scheme and the corresponding uncertainty budget of the absolute spectral responsivity are presented. A relative standard uncertainty of 0.1 % (k=1) for the absolute spectral radiance responsivity was achieved. The absolute radiometric calibration was validated at four temperature values with respect to the ITS-90 via a variable temperature heatpipe blackbody (773 K ...1235 K) and at a gold fixed-point blackbody radiator (1337.33 K).

  14. Understanding CO2 Plume Behavior and Basin-Scale Pressure Changes during Sequestration Projects through the use of Reservoir Fluid Modeling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leetaru, H.E.; Frailey, S.M.; Damico, J.; Mehnert, E.; Birkholzer, J.; Zhou, Q.; Jordan, P.D.

    2009-01-01

    Large scale geologic sequestration tests are in the planning stages around the world. The liability and safety issues of the migration of CO2 away from the primary injection site and/or reservoir are of significant concerns for these sequestration tests. Reservoir models for simulating single or multi-phase fluid flow are used to understand the migration of CO2 in the subsurface. These models can also help evaluate concerns related to brine migration and basin-scale pressure increases that occur due to the injection of additional fluid volumes into the subsurface. The current paper presents different modeling examples addressing these issues, ranging from simple geometric models to more complex reservoir fluid models with single-site and basin-scale applications. Simple geometric models assuming a homogeneous geologic reservoir and piston-like displacement have been used for understanding pressure changes and fluid migration around each CO2 storage site. These geometric models are useful only as broad approximations because they do not account for the variation in porosity, permeability, asymmetry of the reservoir, and dip of the beds. In addition, these simple models are not capable of predicting the interference between different injection sites within the same reservoir. A more realistic model of CO2 plume behavior can be produced using reservoir fluid models. Reservoir simulation of natural gas storage reservoirs in the Illinois Basin Cambrian-age Mt. Simon Sandstone suggest that reservoir heterogeneity will be an important factor for evaluating storage capacity. The Mt. Simon Sandstone is a thick sandstone that underlies many significant coal fired power plants (emitting at least 1 million tonnes per year) in the midwestern United States including the states of Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Michigan, and Ohio. The initial commercial sequestration sites are expected to inject 1 to 2 million tonnes of CO2 per year. Depending on the geologic structure and

  15. Ecosystem Health Assessment at County-Scale Using the Pressure-State-Response Framework on the Loess Plateau, China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Delin; Hao, Shilong

    2016-12-22

    Assessing ecosystem health is helpful to determine reasonable eco-environmental restoration and resource management strategies. Based on a pressure-state-response (PSR) framework, a set of comprehensive indicators including natural, social and economic aspects was proposed and applied for assessing the ecosystem health of Yuanzhou County, Loess Plateau, Ningxia Province, China. The basic data used to calculate the values of the assessment indicators include Landsat TM image and socio-economic data, and remote sensing (RS) and the geographic information system (GIS) were used to process image data. The results showed that the ecosystem health conditions of most townships in Yuanzhou County were at the moderately healthy level, three townships were at the healthy level, and only two townships were at the unhelathy level; the areas (percentage) at the unhealthy, moderately healthy and healthy levels were 443.91 km² (12.66%), 2438.75 km² (69.54%) and 624.50 km² (17.81%), respectively. The results could provide useful information for local residents and the government to take measures to improve the health conditions of their township ecosystem.

  16. Ecosystem Health Assessment at County-Scale Using the Pressure-State-Response Framework on the Loess Plateau, China

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Delin; Hao, Shilong

    2016-01-01

    Assessing ecosystem health is helpful to determine reasonable eco-environmental restoration and resource management strategies. Based on a pressure-state-response (PSR) framework, a set of comprehensive indicators including natural, social and economic aspects was proposed and applied for assessing the ecosystem health of Yuanzhou County, Loess Plateau, Ningxia Province, China. The basic data used to calculate the values of the assessment indicators include Landsat TM image and socio-economic data, and remote sensing (RS) and the geographic information system (GIS) were used to process image data. The results showed that the ecosystem health conditions of most townships in Yuanzhou County were at the moderately healthy level, three townships were at the healthy level, and only two townships were at the unhelathy level; the areas (percentage) at the unhealthy, moderately healthy and healthy levels were 443.91 km2 (12.66%), 2438.75 km2 (69.54%) and 624.50 km2 (17.81%), respectively. The results could provide useful information for local residents and the government to take measures to improve the health conditions of their township ecosystem. PMID:28025518

  17. Low pressure hand made PVD system for high crystalline metal thin film preparation in micro-nanometer scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosikhin, Ahmad; Hidayat, Aulia Fikri; Marimpul, Rinaldo; Syuhada, Ibnu; Winata, Toto

    2016-02-01

    High crystalline metal thin film preparation in application both for catalyst substrate or electrode in any electronic devices always to be considered in material functional material research and development. As a substrate catalyst, this metal take a role as guidance for material growth in order to resulted in proper surface structure although at the end it will be removed via etching process. Meanwhile as electrodes, it will dragging charges to be collected inside. This brief discussion will elaborate general fundamental principle of physical vapor deposition (PVD) system for metal thin film preparation in micro-nanometer scale. The influence of thermodynamic parameters and metal characteristic such as melting point and particle size will be elucidated. Physical description of deposition process in the chamber can be simplified by schematic evaporation phenomena which is supported by experimental measurement such as SEM and XRD.

  18. Low pressure hand made PVD system for high crystalline metal thin film preparation in micro-nanometer scale

    SciTech Connect

    Rosikhin, Ahmad Hidayat, Aulia Fikri; Marimpul, Rinaldo; Syuhada, Ibnu; Winata, Toto

    2016-02-08

    High crystalline metal thin film preparation in application both for catalyst substrate or electrode in any electronic devices always to be considered in material functional material research and development. As a substrate catalyst, this metal take a role as guidance for material growth in order to resulted in proper surface structure although at the end it will be removed via etching process. Meanwhile as electrodes, it will dragging charges to be collected inside. This brief discussion will elaborate general fundamental principle of physical vapor deposition (PVD) system for metal thin film preparation in micro-nanometer scale. The influence of thermodynamic parameters and metal characteristic such as melting point and particle size will be elucidated. Physical description of deposition process in the chamber can be simplified by schematic evaporation phenomena which is supported by experimental measurement such as SEM and XRD.

  19. An investigation to determine the static pressure distribution of the 0.00548 scale shuttle solid rocket booster (MSFC model number 468) during reentry in the NASA/MSFC 14 inch trisonic wind tunnel (SA28F)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braddock, W. F.; Streby, G. D.

    1977-01-01

    The results of a pressure test of a .00548 scale 146 inch Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) with and without protuberances, conducted in a 14 x 14 inch trisonic wind tunnel are presented. Static pressure distributions for the SRB at reentry attitudes and flight conditions were obtained. Local longitudinal and ring pressure distributions are presented in tabulated form. Integration of the pressure data was performed. The test was conducted at Mach numbers of 0.40 to 4.45 over an angle of attack range from 60 to 185 degrees. Roll angles of 0, 45, 90 and 315 degrees were investigated. Reynolds numbers per foot varied for selected Mach numbers.

  20. Historic and projected changes in vapor pressure deficit suggest a continental-scale drying of the United States atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ficklin, Darren L.; Novick, Kimberly A.

    2017-02-01

    Via air temperature increases and relative humidity changes, climate change will modify vapor pressure deficit (VPD), which is an important determinant of water vapor and CO2 exchange between the land surface and atmosphere. VPD is the difference between the water vapor the air can hold at saturation (es) and the actual amount of water vapor (ea). Here we assess changes in VPD, es, and ea in the United States (U.S.) for the recent past (1979-2013) and the future (2065-2099) using gridded, observed climate data and output from general circulation models. Historically, VPD has increased for all seasons, driven by increases in es and declines in ea. The spring, summer, and fall seasons exhibited the largest areal extent of significant increases in VPD, which was largely concentrated in the western and southern portions of the U.S. The changes in VPD stemmed from recent air temperature increases and relative humidity decreases. Projections indicate similar, amplified patterns into the future. For the summer, the general circulation model ensemble median showed a 51% projected increase (quartile range of 39 and 64%) in summer VPD for the U.S., reflecting temperature-driven increases in es but decreases or minimal changes in relative humidity that promotes negligible changes in ea. Using a simple model for plant hydraulic functioning, we also show that in the absence of stomatal acclimation, future changes in VPD can reduce stomatal conductance by 9-51%, which is a magnitude comparable to the expected decline in stomatal conductance from rising CO2.

  1. Correction to "Achieving Absolute Negative Pressures in Liquids: Precipitation Phenomena in Solution" (J. Chem. Educ. 2002, 79, 869) 1203 Book and Media Reviews Spectroscopy for Schools and Colleges [CD-ROM] (by the Royal Society of Chemistry and GlaxoWellcome)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eberlein, Thomas H.

    2002-10-01

    Figure 2. Stage-presentation of the Berthelot's experiment using a 1.8% (w/w) solution of 25,000 polystyrene in acetone. A: Two-phase region at positive pressure (vapor pressure of the solution); cloudiness appears from the bottom, but the bubble is present at the top. B: Transparent, homogeneous solution, recovered by heating. C: Capillary at the filling temperature (T = Tfill); bubble disappears. D: Final point of the prepressurization stage; filled capillary at moderately high positive pressure. E: Phase transition (cloud point) at negative pressure; cloudiness rises from the bottom, no bubble is present (T = Tcp < Tfill). F: Collapse of the metastable liquid at negative pressure, where a small bubble starts to form at the top, while the system is on its way to a totally stable state, at positive pressure (vapor pressure).

  2. Absolute Measurements of Radiation Damage in Nanometer Thick Films

    PubMed Central

    Alizadeh, Elahe; Sanche, Léon

    2013-01-01

    We address the problem of absolute measurements of radiation damage in films of nanometer thicknesses. Thin films of DNA (~ 2–160nm) are deposited onto glass substrates and irradiated with varying doses of 1.5 keV X-rays under dry N2 at atmospheric pressure and room temperature. For each different thickness, the damage is assessed by measuring the loss of the supercoiled configuration as a function of incident photon fluence. From the exposure curves, the G-values are deduced, assuming that X-ray photons interacting with DNA, deposit all of their energy in the film. The results show that the G-value (i.e., damage per unit of deposited energy) increases with film thickness and reaches a plateau at 30±5 nm. This thickness dependence provides a correction factor to estimate the actual G-value for films with thicknesses below 30nm thickness. Thus, the absolute values of damage can be compared with that of films of any thickness under different experimental conditions. PMID:22562941

  3. Comparison of pilot and industrial scale atmospheric pressure glow discharge systems including a novel electro-acoustic technique for process monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tynan, J.; Law, V. J.; Ward, P.; Hynes, A. M.; Cullen, J.; Byrne, G.; Daniels, S.; Dowling, D. P.

    2010-02-01

    A comparison of a pilot and industrial scale atmospheric pressure polymer processing plasma system has been carried out using process-monitoring diagnostic tools during treatment of amorphous polyethylene terephthalate. These systems have been compared using optical emission spectroscopy (OES), photodiode (PD) analysis and multi-variate analysis of the applied electrical and emitted electro-acoustic signals to facilitate scale up operations from the pilot to the industrial scale system. The voltage, current, electro-acoustic intensity and frequency of the plasma systems were found to change systematically with an increase in applied plasma power and addition of oxygen (O2) into a helium (He) plasma. The plasma drive frequency was pulled by the plasma reactance from approximately 26 to 16 kHz on the pilot system and from approximately 36 to 32 kHz on the industrial system, for an increase in applied plasma power and addition of O2. The OES analysis revealed a number of peaks associated with nitrogen (N2) species between 250 and 450 nm due to the presence of air within the He plasma. Temporally resolved analysis of the discharge emission carried out using a PD showed an increase in the number of discharge events per power cycle with an increase in power and a decrease in emission intensity for addition of O2 into the He plasma for both the pilot and industrial scale systems. Using these diagnostic tools both plasma stability and run to run variations were assessed. A visual analysis of the 1.2 m wide plasma was also carried out where a more homogeneous plasma was observed at higher powers.

  4. Results of a wind tunnel/flight test program to compare afterbody/nozzle pressures on a 1/12 scale model and an F-15 aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pendergraft, O. C., Jr.; Nugent, J.

    1984-01-01

    In 1975 NASA Dryden Flight Research Facility received the No. 2 prototype F-15 aircraft from the USAF to conduct the F-15 Propulsion/Airframe Interactions Program. About the same time, NASA Langley Research Center acquired a 1/12 scale F-15 propulsion model, whose size made it suitable for detailed afterbody/nozzle static pressure distribution studies. Close coordination between Langley and Dryden assured identical orifice locations and nozzle geometries on the model and aircraft. This paper discusses the sequence of the test programs and how retesting the model after completion of the flight tests greatly increased the ability to match hardware and test conditions. The experience gained over the past decade from involvement in the program should prove valuable to any future programs attempting to match wind tunnel and flight test conditions and hardware.

  5. From Hubble's NGSL to Absolute Fluxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heap, Sara R.; Lindler, Don

    2012-01-01

    Hubble's Next Generation Spectral Library (NGSL) consists of R-l000 spectra of 374 stars of assorted temperature, gravity, and metallicity. Each spectrum covers the wavelength range, 0.18-1.00 microns. The library can be viewed and/or downloaded from the website, http://archive.stsci.edu/prepds/stisngsll. Stars in the NGSL are now being used as absolute flux standards at ground-based observatories. However, the uncertainty in the absolute flux is about 2%, which does not meet the requirements of dark-energy surveys. We are therefore developing an observing procedure that should yield fluxes with uncertainties less than 1 % and will take part in an HST proposal to observe up to 15 stars using this new procedure.

  6. Consistent thermostatistics forbids negative absolute temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunkel, Jörn; Hilbert, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Over the past 60 years, a considerable number of theories and experiments have claimed the existence of negative absolute temperature in spin systems and ultracold quantum gases. This has led to speculation that ultracold gases may be dark-energy analogues and also suggests the feasibility of heat engines with efficiencies larger than one. Here, we prove that all previous negative temperature claims and their implications are invalid as they arise from the use of an entropy definition that is inconsistent both mathematically and thermodynamically. We show that the underlying conceptual deficiencies can be overcome if one adopts a microcanonical entropy functional originally derived by Gibbs. The resulting thermodynamic framework is self-consistent and implies that absolute temperature remains positive even for systems with a bounded spectrum. In addition, we propose a minimal quantum thermometer that can be implemented with available experimental techniques.

  7. Asteroid absolute magnitudes and slope parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tedesco, Edward F.

    1991-01-01

    A new listing of absolute magnitudes (H) and slope parameters (G) has been created and published in the Minor Planet Circulars; this same listing will appear in the 1992 Ephemerides of Minor Planets. Unlike previous listings, the values of the current list were derived from fits of data at the V band. All observations were reduced in the same fashion using, where appropriate, a single basis default value of 0.15 for the slope parameter. Distances and phase angles were computed for each observation. The data for 113 asteroids was of sufficiently high quality to permit derivation of their H and G. These improved absolute magnitudes and slope parameters will be used to deduce the most reliable bias-corrected asteroid size-frequency distribution yet made.

  8. Computer processing of spectrograms for absolute intensities.

    PubMed

    Guttman, A; Golden, J; Galbraith, H J

    1967-09-01

    A computer program was developed to process photographically recorded spectra for absolute intensity. Test and calibration films are subjected to densitometric scans that provide digitally recorded densities on magnetic tapes. The nonlinear calibration data are fitted by least-squares cubic polynomials to yield a good approximation to the monochromatic H&D curves for commonly used emulsions (2475 recording film, Royal-X, Tri-X, 4-X). Several test cases were made. Results of these cases show that the machine processed absolute intensities are accurate to within 15%o. Arbitrarily raising the sensitivity threshold by 0.1 density units above gross fog yields cubic polynomial fits to the H&D curves that are radiometrically accurate within 10%. In addition, curves of gamma vs wavelength for 2475, Tri-X, and 4-X emulsions were made. These data show slight evidence of the photographic Purkinje effect in the 2475 emulsion.

  9. An absolute measure for a key currency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oya, Shunsuke; Aihara, Kazuyuki; Hirata, Yoshito

    It is generally considered that the US dollar and the euro are the key currencies in the world and in Europe, respectively. However, there is no absolute general measure for a key currency. Here, we investigate the 24-hour periodicity of foreign exchange markets using a recurrence plot, and define an absolute measure for a key currency based on the strength of the periodicity. Moreover, we analyze the time evolution of this measure. The results show that the credibility of the US dollar has not decreased significantly since the Lehman shock, when the Lehman Brothers bankrupted and influenced the economic markets, and has increased even relatively better than that of the euro and that of the Japanese yen.

  10. Absolute and relative dosimetry for ELIMED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cirrone, G. A. P.; Cuttone, G.; Candiano, G.; Carpinelli, M.; Leonora, E.; Lo Presti, D.; Musumarra, A.; Pisciotta, P.; Raffaele, L.; Randazzo, N.; Romano, F.; Schillaci, F.; Scuderi, V.; Tramontana, A.; Cirio, R.; Marchetto, F.; Sacchi, R.; Giordanengo, S.; Monaco, V.

    2013-07-01

    The definition of detectors, methods and procedures for the absolute and relative dosimetry of laser-driven proton beams is a crucial step toward the clinical use of this new kind of beams. Hence, one of the ELIMED task, will be the definition of procedures aiming to obtain an absolute dose measure at the end of the transport beamline with an accuracy as close as possible to the one required for clinical applications (i.e. of the order of 5% or less). Relative dosimetry procedures must be established, as well: they are necessary in order to determine and verify the beam dose distributions and to monitor the beam fluence and the energetic spectra during irradiations. Radiochromic films, CR39, Faraday Cup, Secondary Emission Monitor (SEM) and transmission ionization chamber will be considered, designed and studied in order to perform a fully dosimetric characterization of the ELIMED proton beam.

  11. Silicon Absolute X-Ray Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Seely, John F.; Korde, Raj; Sprunck, Jacob; Medjoubi, Kadda; Hustache, Stephanie

    2010-06-23

    The responsivity of silicon photodiodes having no loss in the entrance window, measured using synchrotron radiation in the 1.75 to 60 keV range, was compared to the responsivity calculated using the silicon thickness measured using near-infrared light. The measured and calculated responsivities agree with an average difference of 1.3%. This enables their use as absolute x-ray detectors.

  12. Effect of the selective pressure of sub-lethal level of heavy metals on the fate and distribution of ARGs in the catchment scale.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yan; Xu, Jian; Mao, Daqing; Luo, Yi

    2017-01-01

    Our previous study demonstrated that high levels of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) in the Haihe River were directly attributed to the excessive use of antibiotics in animal agriculture. The antibiotic residues of the Xiangjiang River determined in this study were much lower than those of the Haihe River, but the relative abundance of 16 detected ARGs (sul1, sul2 and sul3, qepA, qnrA, qnrB, qnrD and qnrS, tetA, tetB, tetW, tetM, tetQ and tetO, ermB and ermC), were as high as the Haihe River particularly in the downstream of the Xiangjiang River which is close to the extensive metal mining. The ARGs discharged from the pharmaceutical wastewater treatment plant (PWWTP) are a major source of ARGs in the upstream of the Xiangjiang River. In the downstream, selective stress of heavy metals rather than source release had a significant influence on the distinct distribution pattern of ARGs. Some heavy metals showed a positive correlation with certain ARG subtypes. Additionally, there is a positive correlation between individual ARG subtypes and heavy metal resistance genes, suggesting that heavy metals may co select the ARGs on the same plasmid of antibiotic resistant bacteria. The co-selection mechanism between specific metal and antibiotic resistance was further confirmed by these isolations encoding the resistance genotypes to antibiotics and metals. To our knowledge, this is the first study on the fate and distribution of ARGs under the selective pressure exerted by heavy metals in the catchment scale. These results are beneficial to understand the fate, and to discern the contributors of ARGs from either the source release or the selective pressure by sub-lethal levels of environmental stressors during their transport on a river catchment scale.

  13. A Semi-Analytical Solution for Large-Scale Injection-Induced PressurePerturbation and Leakage in a Laterally Bounded Aquifer-AquitardSystem

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Quanlin; Birkholzer, Jens T.; Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2008-07-15

    A number of (semi-)analytical solutions are available to drawdown analysis and leakage estimation of shallow aquifer-aquitard systems. These solutions assume that the systems are laterally infinite. When a large-scale pumping from (or injection into) an aquifer-aquitard system of lower specific storativity occurs, induced pressure perturbation (or hydraulic head drawdown/rise) may reach the lateral boundary of the aquifer. We developed semi-analytical solutions to address the induced pressure perturbation and vertical leakage in a 'laterally bounded' system consisting of an aquifer and an overlying/underlying aquitard. A one-dimensional radial flow equation for the aquifer was coupled with a one-dimensional vertical flow equation for the aquitard, with a no-flow condition imposed on the outer radial boundary. Analytical solutions were obtained for (1) the Laplace-transform hydraulic head drawdown/rise in the aquifer and in the aquitard, (2) the Laplace-transform rate and volume of leakage through the aquifer-aquitard interface integrated up to an arbitrary radial distance, (3) the transformed total leakage rate and volume for the entire interface, and (4) the transformed horizontal flux at any radius. The total leakage rate and volume depend only on the hydrogeologic properties and thicknesses of the aquifer and aquitard, as well as the duration of pumping or injection. It was proven that the total leakage rate and volume are independent of the aquifer's radial extent and wellbore radius. The derived analytical solutions for bounded systems are the generalized solutions of infinite systems. Laplace-transform solutions were numerically inverted to obtain the hydraulic head drawdown/rise, leakage rate, leakage volume, and horizontal flux for given hydrogeologic and geometric conditions of the aquifer-aquitard system, as well as injection/pumping scenarios. Application to a large-scale injection-and-storage problem in a bounded system was demonstrated.

  14. Negative absolute temperature for motional degrees of freedom.

    PubMed

    Braun, S; Ronzheimer, J P; Schreiber, M; Hodgman, S S; Rom, T; Bloch, I; Schneider, U

    2013-01-04

    Absolute temperature is usually bound to be positive. Under special conditions, however, negative temperatures-in which high-energy states are more occupied than low-energy states-are also possible. Such states have been demonstrated in localized systems with finite, discrete spectra. Here, we prepared a negative temperature state for motional degrees of freedom. By tailoring the Bose-Hubbard Hamiltonian, we created an attractively interacting ensemble of ultracold bosons at negative temperature that is stable against collapse for arbitrary atom numbers. The quasimomentum distribution develops sharp peaks at the upper band edge, revealing thermal equilibrium and bosonic coherence over several lattice sites. Negative temperatures imply negative pressures and open up new parameter regimes for cold atoms, enabling fundamentally new many-body states.

  15. Absolute calibration of Apollo lunar orbital mass spectrometer.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeager, P. R.; Smith, A.; Jackson, J. J.; Hoffman, J. H.

    1973-01-01

    Recent experiments were conducted in Langley Research Center's molecular beam system to perform an absolute calibration of the lunar orbital mass spectrometer which was flown on the Apollo 15 and 16 missions. Tests were performed with several models of the instrument using two test gases, argon and neon, in the 1 ntorr to .1 picotorr range. Sensitivity to argon at spacecraft orbital velocity was .00028 A/torr enabling partial pressures in the .01-picotorr range to be measured at the spacecraft altitude. Neon sensitivity was nearly a factor of 5 less. Test data support the feasibility of using the lunar orbital mass spectrometer as a tool to gather information about the lunar atmosphere.

  16. Utility of Braden Scale Nutrition Subscale Ratings as an Indicator of Dietary Intake and Weight Outcomes among Nursing Home Residents at Risk for Pressure Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Kennerly, Susan; Boss, Lisa; Yap, Tracey L.; Batchelor-Murphy, Melissa; Horn, Susan D.; Barrett, Ryan; Bergstrom, Nancy

    2015-01-01

    The Braden Scale for Pressure Sore Risk© is a screening tool to determine overall risk of pressure ulcer development and estimate severity of specific risk factors for individual residents. Nurses often use the Braden nutrition subscale to screen nursing home (NH) residents for nutritional risk, and then recommend a more comprehensive nutritional assessment as indicated. Secondary data analysis from the Turn for Ulcer ReductioN (TURN) study’s investigation of U.S. and Canadian NH residents (n = 690) considered at moderate or high pressure ulcer (PrU) risk was used to evaluate the subscale’s utility for identifying nutritional intake risk factors. Associations were examined between Braden Nutritional Risk subscale screening, dietary intake (mean % meal intake and by meal timing, mean number of protein servings, protein sources, % intake of supplements and snacks), weight outcomes, and new PrU incidence. Of moderate and high PrU risk residents, 61.9% and 59.2% ate a mean meal % of <75. Fewer than 18% overall ate <50% of meals or refused meals. No significant differences were observed in weight differences by nutrition subscale risk or in mean number protein servings per meal (1.4 (SD = 0.58) versus 1.3 (SD = 0.53)) for moderate versus high PrU risk residents. The nutrition subscale approximates subsequent estimated dietary intake and can provide insight into meal intake patterns for those at either moderate or high PrU risk. Findings support the Braden Scale’s use as a preliminary screening method to identify focused areas for potential intervention. PMID:27417802

  17. Space and time analysis of the nanosecond scale discharges in atmospheric pressure air: I. Gas temperature and vibrational distribution function of N2 and O2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, A.; Cessou, A.; Boubert, P.; Vervisch, P.

    2014-03-01

    Reliable experimental data on nanosecond discharge plasmas in air become more and more crucial considering their interest in a wide field of applications. However, the investigations on such nonequilibrium plasmas are made difficult by the spatial non-homogeneities, in particular under atmospheric pressure, the wide range of time scales, and the complexity of multi-physics processes involved therein. In this study, we report spatiotemporal experimental analysis on the gas temperature and the vibrational excitation of N2 and O2 in their ground electronic state during the post-discharge of an overvoltage nanosecond-pulsed discharge generated in a pin-to-plane gap of air at atmospheric pressure. The gas temperature during the pulsed discharge is measured by optical emission spectroscopy related to the rotational bands of the 0-0 vibrational transition N2(C 3 Πu, v = 0) → N2(B3 Πg, v = 0) of nitrogen. The results show a rapid gas heating up to 700 K in tens of nanoseconds after the current rise. This fast gas heating leads to a high gas temperature up to 1000 K measured at 150 ns in the first stages of the post-discharge using spontaneous Raman scattering (SRS). The spatiotemporal measurements of the gas temperature and the vibrational distribution function of N2 and O2, also obtained by SRS, over the post-discharge show the spatial expansion of the high vibrational excitation of N2, and the gas heating during the post-discharge. The present measurements, focused on thermal and energetic aspect of the discharge, provide a base for spatiotemporal analysis of gas number densities of N2, O2 and O atoms and hydrodynamic effects achieved during the post-discharge in part II of this investigation. All these results provide space and time database for the validation of plasma chemical models for nanosecond-pulsed discharges at atmospheric pressure air.

  18. Pressure distributions obtained on a 0.10-scale model of the Space Shuttle Orbiter's forebody in the Ames Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siemers, P. M., III; Henry, M. W.

    1986-01-01

    Pressure distribution test data obtained on a 0.10-scale model of the forward fuselage of the Space Shuttle Orbiter are presented without analysis. The tests were completed in the Ames Unitary Wind Tunnel (UPWT). The UPWT tests were conducted in two different test sections operating in the continuous mode, the 8 x 7 feet and 9 x 7 feet test sections. Each test section has its own Mach number range, 1.6 to 2.5 and 2.5 to 3.5 for the 9 x 7 feet and 8 x 7 feet test section, respectively. The test Reynolds number ranged from 1.6 to 2.5 x 10 to the 6th power ft and 0.6 to 2.0 x 10 to the 6th power ft, respectively. The tests were conducted in support of the development of the Shuttle Entry Air Data System (SEADS). In addition to modeling the 20 SEADS orifices, the wind-tunnel model was also instrumented with orifices to match Development Flight Instrumentation (DFI) port locations that existed on the Space Shuttle Columbia (OV-102) during the Orbiter Flight test program. This DFI simulation has provided a means for comparisons between reentry flight pressure data and wind-tunnel and computational data.

  19. A Mechanical Model to Interpret Cell-Scale Indentation Experiments on Plant Tissues in Terms of Cell Wall Elasticity and Turgor Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Malgat, Richard; Faure, François; Boudaoud, Arezki

    2016-01-01

    Morphogenesis in plants is directly linked to the mechanical elements of growing tissues, namely cell wall and inner cell pressure. Studies of these structural elements are now often performed using indentation methods such as atomic force microscopy. In these methods, a probe applies a force to the tissue surface at a subcellular scale and its displacement is monitored, yielding force-displacement curves that reflect tissue mechanics. However, the interpretation of these curves is challenging as they may depend not only on the cell probed, but also on neighboring cells, or even on the whole tissue. Here, we build a realistic three-dimensional model of the indentation of a flower bud using SOFA (Simulation Open Framework Architecture), in order to provide a framework for the analysis of force-displacement curves obtained experimentally. We find that the shape of indentation curves mostly depends on the ratio between cell pressure and wall modulus. Hysteresis in force-displacement curves can be accounted for by a viscoelastic behavior of the cell wall. We consider differences in elastic modulus between cell layers and we show that, according to the location of indentation and to the size of the probe, force-displacement curves are sensitive with different weights to the mechanical components of the two most external cell layers. Our results confirm most of the interpretations of previous experiments and provide a guide to future experimental work. PMID:27656191

  20. Measurement of absolute gravity acceleration in Firenze

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Angelis, M.; Greco, F.; Pistorio, A.; Poli, N.; Prevedelli, M.; Saccorotti, G.; Sorrentino, F.; Tino, G. M.

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports the results from the accurate measurement of the acceleration of gravity g taken at two separate premises in the Polo Scientifico of the University of Firenze (Italy). In these laboratories, two separate experiments aiming at measuring the Newtonian constant and testing the Newtonian law at short distances are in progress. Both experiments require an independent knowledge on the local value of g. The only available datum, pertaining to the italian zero-order gravity network, was taken more than 20 years ago at a distance of more than 60 km from the study site. Gravity measurements were conducted using an FG5 absolute gravimeter, and accompanied by seismic recordings for evaluating the noise condition at the site. The absolute accelerations of gravity at the two laboratories are (980 492 160.6 ± 4.0) μGal and (980 492 048.3 ± 3.0) μGal for the European Laboratory for Non-Linear Spectroscopy (LENS) and Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, respectively. Other than for the two referenced experiments, the data here presented will serve as a benchmark for any future study requiring an accurate knowledge of the absolute value of the acceleration of gravity in the study region.

  1. Chemical composition of French mimosa absolute oil.

    PubMed

    Perriot, Rodolphe; Breme, Katharina; Meierhenrich, Uwe J; Carenini, Elise; Ferrando, Georges; Baldovini, Nicolas

    2010-02-10

    Since decades mimosa (Acacia dealbata) absolute oil has been used in the flavor and perfume industry. Today, it finds an application in over 80 perfumes, and its worldwide industrial production is estimated five tons per year. Here we report on the chemical composition of French mimosa absolute oil. Straight-chain analogues from C6 to C26 with different functional groups (hydrocarbons, esters, aldehydes, diethyl acetals, alcohols, and ketones) were identified in the volatile fraction. Most of them are long-chain molecules: (Z)-heptadec-8-ene, heptadecane, nonadecane, and palmitic acid are the most abundant, and constituents such as 2-phenethyl alcohol, methyl anisate, and ethyl palmitate are present in smaller amounts. The heavier constituents were mainly triterpenoids such as lupenone and lupeol, which were identified as two of the main components. (Z)-Heptadec-8-ene, lupenone, and lupeol were quantified by GC-MS in SIM mode using external standards and represents 6%, 20%, and 7.8% (w/w) of the absolute oil. Moreover, odorant compounds were extracted by SPME and analyzed by GC-sniffing leading to the perception of 57 odorant zones, of which 37 compounds were identified by their odorant description, mass spectrum, retention index, and injection of the reference compound.

  2. Constrained Least Absolute Deviation Neural Networks

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhishun; Peterson, Bradley S.

    2008-01-01

    It is well known that least absolute deviation (LAD) criterion or L1-norm used for estimation of parameters is characterized by robustness, i.e., the estimated parameters are totally resistant (insensitive) to large changes in the sampled data. This is an extremely useful feature, especially, when the sampled data are known to be contaminated by occasionally occurring outliers or by spiky noise. In our previous works, we have proposed the least absolute deviation neural network (LADNN) to solve unconstrained LAD problems. The theoretical proofs and numerical simulations have shown that the LADNN is Lyapunov-stable and it can globally converge to the exact solution to a given unconstrained LAD problem. We have also demonstrated its excellent application value in time-delay estimation. More generally, a practical LAD application problem may contain some linear constraints, such as a set of equalities and/or inequalities, which is called constrained LAD problem, whereas the unconstrained LAD can be considered as a special form of the constrained LAD. In this paper, we present a new neural network called constrained least absolute deviation neural network (CLADNN) to solve general constrained LAD problems. Theoretical proofs and numerical simulations demonstrate that the proposed CLADNN is Lyapunov stable and globally converges to the exact solution to a given constrained LAD problem, independent of initial values. The numerical simulations have also illustrated that the proposed CLADNN can be used to robustly estimate parameters for nonlinear curve fitting, which is extensively used in signal and image processing. PMID:18269958

  3. Bench-Scale Development of a Hot Carbonate Absorption Process with Crystallization-Enabled High-Pressure Stripping for Post-Combustion CO{sub 2} Capture

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Yongqi; DeVries, Nicholas; Ruhter, David; Manoranjan, Sahu; Ye, Qing; Ye, Xinhuai; Zhang, Shihan; Chen, Scott; Li, Zhiwei; O'Brien, Kevin

    2014-03-31

    A novel Hot Carbonate Absorption Process with Crystallization-Enabled High-Pressure Stripping (Hot-CAP) has been developed by the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and Carbon Capture Scientific, LLC in this three-year, bench-scale project. The Hot-CAP features a concentrated carbonate solution (e.g., K{sub 2}CO{sub 3}) for CO{sub 2} absorption and a bicarbonate slurry (e.g., KHCO{sub 3}) for high-pressure CO{sub 2} stripping to overcome the energy use and other disadvantages associated with the benchmark monoethanolamine (MEA) process. The project was aimed at performing laboratory- and bench-scale experiments to prove its technical feasibility and generate process engineering and scale-up data, and conducting a techno-economic analysis (TEA) to demonstrate its energy use and cost competitiveness over MEA. To meet project goals and objectives, a combination of experimental, modeling, process simulation, and economic analysis studies were applied. Carefully designed and intensive experiments were conducted to measure thermodynamic and reaction engineering data relevant to four major unit operations in the Hot-CAP (i.e., CO{sub 2} absorption, CO{sub 2} stripping, bicarbonate crystallization, and sulfate reclamation). The rate promoters that could accelerate the CO{sub 2} absorption rate into the potassium carbonate/bicarbonate (PCB) solution to a level greater than that into the 5 M MEA solution were identified, and the superior performance of CO{sub 2} absorption into PCB was demonstrated in a bench-scale packed-bed column. Kinetic data on bicarbonate crystallization were developed and applied for crystallizer design and sizing. Parametric testing of high-pressure CO{sub 2} stripping with concentrated bicarbonate-dominant slurries at high temperatures ({>=}140{degrees}C) in a bench-scale stripping column demonstrated lower heat use than with MEA. The feasibility of a modified process for combining SO{sub 2} removal with CO{sub 2} capture was preliminarily

  4. Absolute Memory for Tempo in Musicians and Non-Musicians.

    PubMed

    Gratton, Irene; Brandimonte, Maria A; Bruno, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    The ability to remember tempo (the perceived frequency of musical pulse) without external references may be defined, by analogy with the notion of absolute pitch, as absolute tempo (AT). Anecdotal reports and sparse empirical evidence suggest that at least some individuals possess AT. However, to our knowledge, no systematic assessments of AT have been performed using laboratory tasks comparable to those assessing absolute pitch. In the present study, we operationalize AT as the ability to identify and reproduce tempo in the absence of rhythmic or melodic frames of reference and assess these abilities in musically trained and untrained participants. We asked 15 musicians and 15 non-musicians to listen to a seven-step `tempo scale' of metronome beats, each associated to a numerical label, and then to perform two memory tasks. In the first task, participants heard one of the tempi and attempted to report the correct label (identification task), in the second, they saw one label and attempted to tap the correct tempo (production task). A musical and visual excerpt was presented between successive trials as a distractor to prevent participants from using previous tempi as anchors. Thus, participants needed to encode tempo information with the corresponding label, store the information, and recall it to give the response. We found that more than half were able to perform above chance in at least one of the tasks, and that musical training differentiated between participants in identification, but not in production. These results suggest that AT is relatively wide-spread, relatively independent of musical training in tempo production, but further refined by training in tempo identification. We propose that at least in production, the underlying motor representations are related to tactus, a basic internal rhythmic period that may provide a body-based reference for encoding tempo.

  5. Scaling of the beam plasma discharge for low magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papadopoulos, K.

    1986-01-01

    A theoretical analysis of the scaling law and the value of the threshold current for beam plasma discharge (BPD) is presented, based on the requirement for an absolute instability near the plasma frequency. It is shown that both the scaling law as well as the numerical values of Ic are consistent with the experimental data, in the low pressure regimes and for weak magnetic field experiments if the dominant particle loss mechanism is due to Bohm diffusion. The implications of the findings to electron injection in space are discussed.

  6. Smoluchowski Equations for Agglomeration in Conditions of Variable Temperature and Pressure and a New Scaling of Rate Constants: Application to Nozzle-Beam Expansion.

    PubMed

    Chaiken, J; Goodisman, J; Kornilov, O

    2015-07-09

    The Smoluchowski equations provide a rigorous and efficient means for including multiple kinetic pathways when modeling coalescence growth systems. Originally written for a constant temperature and volume system, the equations must be modified if temperature and pressure vary during the coalescence time. In this paper, the equations are generalized, and adaptations appropriate to the situation presented by supersonic nozzle beam expansions are described. Given rate constants for all the cluster-cluster reactions, solution of the Smoluchowski equations would yield the abundances of clusters of all sizes at all times. This is unlikely, but we show that if these rate constants scale with the sizes of the reacting partners, the asymptotic (large size and large time) form of the cluster size distribution can be predicted. Experimentally determined distributions for He fit the predicted asymptotic distribution very well. Deviations between predicted and observed distributions allow identification of special cluster sizes that is, magic numbers. Furthermore, fitting an observed distribution to the theoretical form yields the base agglomeration cross section, from which all cluster-cluster rate constants may be obtained by scaling. Comparing the base cross section to measures of size and reactivity gives information about the coalescence process.

  7. Acoustic testing of a 1.5 pressure ratio low tip speed fan with a serrated rotor (QEP fan B scale model). [reduction of engine noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazin, S. B.; Paas, J. E.; Minzner, W. R.

    1973-01-01

    A scale model of the bypass flow region of a 1.5 pressure ratio, single stage, low tip speed fan was tested with a serrated rotor leading edge to determine its effects on noise generation. The serrated rotor was produced by cutting teeth into the leading edge of the nominal rotor blades. The effects of speed and exhaust nozzle area on the scale models noise characteristics were investigated with both the nominal rotor and serrated rotor. Acoustic results indicate the serrations reduced front quadrant PNL's at takeoff power. In particular, the 200 foot (61.0 m) sideline noise was reduced from 3 to 4 PNdb at 40 deg for nominal and large nozzle operation. However, the rear quadrant maximum sideline PNL's were increased 1.5 to 3 PNdb at approach thust and up to 2 PNdb at takeoff thust with these serrated rotor blades. The configuration with the serrated rotor produced the lowest maximum 200 foot (61.0 m) sideline PNL for any given thust when the large nozzle (116% of design area) was employed.

  8. Automatic section thickness determination using an absolute gradient focus function.

    PubMed

    Elozory, D T; Kramer, K A; Chaudhuri, B; Bonam, O P; Goldgof, D B; Hall, L O; Mouton, P R

    2012-12-01

    Quantitative analysis of microstructures using computerized stereology systems is an essential tool in many disciplines of bioscience research. Section thickness determination in current nonautomated approaches requires manual location of upper and lower surfaces of tissue sections. In contrast to conventional autofocus functions that locate the optimally focused optical plane using the global maximum on a focus curve, this study identified by two sharp 'knees' on the focus curve as the transition from unfocused to focused optical planes. Analysis of 14 grey-scale focus functions showed, the thresholded absolute gradient function, was best for finding detectable bends that closely correspond to the bounding optical planes at the upper and lower tissue surfaces. Modifications to this function generated four novel functions that outperformed the original. The 'modified absolute gradient count' function outperformed all others with an average error of 0.56 μm on a test set of images similar to the training set; and, an average error of 0.39 μm on a test set comprised of images captured from a different case, that is, different staining methods on a different brain region from a different subject rat. We describe a novel algorithm that allows for automatic section thickness determination based on just out-of-focus planes, a prerequisite for fully automatic computerized stereology.

  9. Conceptual dead weight device to provide pressure calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karcher, G.; Olson, G.

    1968-01-01

    Dead weight testing device uses a common force plane piston manometer to set accurate gage pressure in pounds per square inch. An additional piston gage easily adapts the device for absolute pressure calibration.

  10. Scaling-up in the vicinity of wells in heterogeneous field

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Y.

    1995-12-31

    It is well known that the equivalent gridblock permeability obtained by the scaling-up procedure from fine gridblocks depends on the boundary conditions. In the literature, most boundary conditions considered represent a ``linear`` flow pattern, while in reservoir simulation, ``radial`` flow plays an important role and is related directly to well production forecasts. In this paper, the authors will show the need for a specific treatment of the scaling-up procedure in the vicinity of wells due to the ``radial`` flow pattern with a high pressure gradient. On reservoir field scale, two types of flow should be considered: (1) the ``linear`` flow pattern, which usually represents a low pressure gradient region; and (2) the ``radial`` flow pattern, which usually represents a high pressure gradient region. The determination of the equivalent absolute permeabilities by ``radial`` flow patterns is discussed in this paper. The scaled-up parameters consist of transmissibility and numerical productivity index (PI).

  11. Measuring Time-Averaged Blood Pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothman, Neil S.

    1988-01-01

    Device measures time-averaged component of absolute blood pressure in artery. Includes compliant cuff around artery and external monitoring unit. Ceramic construction in monitoring unit suppresses ebb and flow of pressure-transmitting fluid in sensor chamber. Transducer measures only static component of blood pressure.

  12. Clock time is absolute and universal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Xinhang

    2015-09-01

    A critical error is found in the Special Theory of Relativity (STR): mixing up the concepts of the STR abstract time of a reference frame and the displayed time of a physical clock, which leads to use the properties of the abstract time to predict time dilation on physical clocks and all other physical processes. Actually, a clock can never directly measure the abstract time, but can only record the result of a physical process during a period of the abstract time such as the number of cycles of oscillation which is the multiplication of the abstract time and the frequency of oscillation. After Lorentz Transformation, the abstract time of a reference frame expands by a factor gamma, but the frequency of a clock decreases by the same factor gamma, and the resulting multiplication i.e. the displayed time of a moving clock remains unchanged. That is, the displayed time of any physical clock is an invariant of Lorentz Transformation. The Lorentz invariance of the displayed times of clocks can further prove within the framework of STR our earth based standard physical time is absolute, universal and independent of inertial reference frames as confirmed by both the physical fact of the universal synchronization of clocks on the GPS satellites and clocks on the earth, and the theoretical existence of the absolute and universal Galilean time in STR which has proved that time dilation and space contraction are pure illusions of STR. The existence of the absolute and universal time in STR has directly denied that the reference frame dependent abstract time of STR is the physical time, and therefore, STR is wrong and all its predictions can never happen in the physical world.

  13. Absolute Radiometric Calibration of EUNIS-06

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, R. J.; Rabin, D. M.; Kent, B. J.; Paustian, W.

    2007-01-01

    The Extreme-Ultraviolet Normal-Incidence Spectrometer (EUNIS) is a soundingrocket payload that obtains imaged high-resolution spectra of individual solar features, providing information about the Sun's corona and upper transition region. Shortly after its successful initial flight last year, a complete end-to-end calibration was carried out to determine the instrument's absolute radiometric response over its Longwave bandpass of 300 - 370A. The measurements were done at the Rutherford-Appleton Laboratory (RAL) in England, using the same vacuum facility and EUV radiation source used in the pre-flight calibrations of both SOHO/CDS and Hinode/EIS, as well as in three post-flight calibrations of our SERTS sounding rocket payload, the precursor to EUNIS. The unique radiation source provided by the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) had been calibrated to an absolute accuracy of 7% (l-sigma) at 12 wavelengths covering our bandpass directly against the Berlin electron storage ring BESSY, which is itself a primary radiometric source standard. Scans of the EUNIS aperture were made to determine the instrument's absolute spectral sensitivity to +- 25%, considering all sources of error, and demonstrate that EUNIS-06 was the most sensitive solar E W spectrometer yet flown. The results will be matched against prior calibrations which relied on combining measurements of individual optical components, and on comparisons with theoretically predicted 'insensitive' line ratios. Coordinated observations were made during the EUNIS-06 flight by SOHO/CDS and EIT that will allow re-calibrations of those instruments as well. In addition, future EUNIS flights will provide similar calibration updates for TRACE, Hinode/EIS, and STEREO/SECCHI/EUVI.

  14. Achieving Climate Change Absolute Accuracy in Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wielicki, Bruce A.; Young, D. F.; Mlynczak, M. G.; Thome, K. J; Leroy, S.; Corliss, J.; Anderson, J. G.; Ao, C. O.; Bantges, R.; Best, F.; Bowman, K.; Brindley, H.; Butler, J. J.; Collins, W.; Dykema, J. A.; Doelling, D. R.; Feldman, D. R.; Fox, N.; Huang, X.; Holz, R.; Huang, Y.; Jennings, D.; Jin, Z.; Johnson, D. G.; Jucks, K.; Kato, S.; Kratz, D. P.; Liu, X.; Lukashin, C.; Mannucci, A. J.; Phojanamongkolkij, N.; Roithmayr, C. M.; Sandford, S.; Taylor, P. C.; Xiong, X.

    2013-01-01

    The Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO) mission will provide a calibration laboratory in orbit for the purpose of accurately measuring and attributing climate change. CLARREO measurements establish new climate change benchmarks with high absolute radiometric accuracy and high statistical confidence across a wide range of essential climate variables. CLARREO's inherently high absolute accuracy will be verified and traceable on orbit to Système Internationale (SI) units. The benchmarks established by CLARREO will be critical for assessing changes in the Earth system and climate model predictive capabilities for decades into the future as society works to meet the challenge of optimizing strategies for mitigating and adapting to climate change. The CLARREO benchmarks are derived from measurements of the Earth's thermal infrared spectrum (5-50 micron), the spectrum of solar radiation reflected by the Earth and its atmosphere (320-2300 nm), and radio occultation refractivity from which accurate temperature profiles are derived. The mission has the ability to provide new spectral fingerprints of climate change, as well as to provide the first orbiting radiometer with accuracy sufficient to serve as the reference transfer standard for other space sensors, in essence serving as a "NIST [National Institute of Standards and Technology] in orbit." CLARREO will greatly improve the accuracy and relevance of a wide range of space-borne instruments for decadal climate change. Finally, CLARREO has developed new metrics and methods for determining the accuracy requirements of climate observations for a wide range of climate variables and uncertainty sources. These methods should be useful for improving our understanding of observing requirements for most climate change observations.

  15. Brownian motion: Absolute negative particle mobility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ros, Alexandra; Eichhorn, Ralf; Regtmeier, Jan; Duong, Thanh Tu; Reimann, Peter; Anselmetti, Dario

    2005-08-01

    Noise effects in technological applications, far from being a nuisance, can be exploited with advantage - for example, unavoidable thermal fluctuations have found application in the transport and sorting of colloidal particles and biomolecules. Here we use a microfluidic system to demonstrate a paradoxical migration mechanism in which particles always move in a direction opposite to the net acting force (`absolute negative mobility') as a result of an interplay between thermal noise, a periodic and symmetric microstructure, and a biased alternating-current electric field. This counterintuitive phenomenon could be used for bioanalytical purposes, for example in the separation and fractionation of colloids, biological molecules and cells.

  16. Arbitrary segments of absolute negative mobility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ruyin; Nie, Linru; Chen, Chongyang; Wang, Chaojie

    2017-01-01

    In previous research work, investigators have reported only one or two segments of absolute negative mobility (ANM) in a periodic potential. In fact, many segments of ANM also occur in the system considered here. We investigate transport of an inertial particle in a gating ratchet periodic potential subjected to a constant bias force. Our numerical results show that its mean velocity can decrease with the bias force increasing, i.e. ANM phenomenon. Furthermore, the ANM can take place arbitrary segments, even up to more than thirty. Intrinsic physical mechanism and conditions for arbitrary segments of ANM to occur are discussed in detail.

  17. Absolute quantification of myocardial blood flow.

    PubMed

    Yoshinaga, Keiichiro; Manabe, Osamu; Tamaki, Nagara

    2016-07-21

    With the increasing availability of positron emission tomography (PET) myocardial perfusion imaging, the absolute quantification of myocardial blood flow (MBF) has become popular in clinical settings. Quantitative MBF provides an important additional diagnostic or prognostic information over conventional visual assessment. The success of MBF quantification using PET/computed tomography (CT) has increased the demand for this quantitative diagnostic approach to be more accessible. In this regard, MBF quantification approaches have been developed using several other diagnostic imaging modalities including single-photon emission computed tomography, CT, and cardiac magnetic resonance. This review will address the clinical aspects of PET MBF quantification and the new approaches to MBF quantification.

  18. Absolute Rate Theories of Epigenetic Stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walczak, Aleksandra M.; Onuchic, Jose N.; Wolynes, Peter G.

    2006-03-01

    Spontaneous switching events in most characterized genetic switches are rare, resulting in extremely stable epigenetic properties. We show how simple arguments lead to theories of the rate of such events much like the absolute rate theory of chemical reactions corrected by a transmission factor. Both the probability of the rare cellular states that allow epigenetic escape, and the transmission factor, depend on the rates of DNA binding and unbinding events and on the rates of protein synthesis and degradation. Different mechanisms of escape from the stable attractors occur in the nonadiabatic, weakly adiabatic and strictly adiabatic regimes, characterized by the relative values of those input rates.

  19. Absolute rate theories of epigenetic stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walczak, Aleksandra M.; Onuchic, José N.; Wolynes, Peter G.

    2005-12-01

    Spontaneous switching events in most characterized genetic switches are rare, resulting in extremely stable epigenetic properties. We show how simple arguments lead to theories of the rate of such events much like the absolute rate theory of chemical reactions corrected by a transmission factor. Both the probability of the rare cellular states that allow epigenetic escape and the transmission factor depend on the rates of DNA binding and unbinding events and on the rates of protein synthesis and degradation. Different mechanisms of escape from the stable attractors occur in the nonadiabatic, weakly adiabatic, and strictly adiabatic regimes, characterized by the relative values of those input rates. rate theory | stochastic gene expression | gene switches

  20. Absolute method of measuring magnetic susceptibility

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorpe, A.; Senftle, F.E.

    1959-01-01

    An absolute method of standardization and measurement of the magnetic susceptibility of small samples is presented which can be applied to most techniques based on the Faraday method. The fact that the susceptibility is a function of the area under the curve of sample displacement versus distance of the magnet from the sample, offers a simple method of measuring the susceptibility without recourse to a standard sample. Typical results on a few substances are compared with reported values, and an error of less than 2% can be achieved. ?? 1959 The American Institute of Physics.

  1. Absolute Priority for a Vehicle in VANET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirani, Rostam; Hendessi, Faramarz; Montazeri, Mohammad Ali; Sheikh Zefreh, Mohammad

    In today's world, traffic jams waste hundreds of hours of our life. This causes many researchers try to resolve the problem with the idea of Intelligent Transportation System. For some applications like a travelling ambulance, it is important to reduce delay even for a second. In this paper, we propose a completely infrastructure-less approach for finding shortest path and controlling traffic light to provide absolute priority for an emergency vehicle. We use the idea of vehicular ad-hoc networking to reduce the imposed travelling time. Then, we simulate our proposed protocol and compare it with a centrally controlled traffic light system.

  2. Absolute measurement of undulator radiation in the extreme ultraviolet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maezawa, H.; Mitani, S.; Suzuki, Y.; Kanamori, H.; Tamamushi, S.; Mikuni, A.; Kitamura, H.; Sasaki, T.

    1983-04-01

    The spectral brightness of undulator radiation emitted by the model PMU-1 incorporated in the SOR-RING, the dedicated synchrotron radiation source in Tokyo, has been studied in the extreme ultraviolet region from 21.6 to 72.9 eV as a function of the electron energy γ, the field parameter K, and the angle of observation ϴ in the absolute scale. A series of measurements covering the first and the second harmonic component of undulator radiation was compared with the fundamental formula λ n= {λ 0}/{2nγ 2}( {1+K 2}/{2}+γϴ 2 and the effects of finite emittance were studied. The brightness at the first peak was smaller than the theoretical value, while an enhanced second harmonic component was observed.

  3. Sub-nanometer periodic nonlinearity error in absolute distance interferometers.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hongxing; Huang, Kaiqi; Hu, Pengcheng; Zhu, Pengfei; Tan, Jiubin; Fan, Zhigang

    2015-05-01

    Periodic nonlinearity which can result in error in nanometer scale has become a main problem limiting the absolute distance measurement accuracy. In order to eliminate this error, a new integrated interferometer with non-polarizing beam splitter is developed. This leads to disappearing of the frequency and/or polarization mixing. Furthermore, a strict requirement on the laser source polarization is highly reduced. By combining retro-reflector and angel prism, reference and measuring beams can be spatially separated, and therefore, their optical paths are not overlapped. So, the main cause of the periodic nonlinearity error, i.e., the frequency and/or polarization mixing and leakage of beam, is eliminated. Experimental results indicate that the periodic phase error is kept within 0.0018°.

  4. Reliability and Validity of the Therapy Intensity Level Scale: Analysis of Clinimetric Properties of a Novel Approach to Assess Management of Intracranial Pressure in Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Zuercher, Patrick; Groen, Justus L; Aries, Marcel J H; Steyerberg, Ewout W; Maas, Andrew I R; Ercole, Ari; Menon, David K

    2016-10-01

    We aimed to assess the reliability and validity of the Therapy Intensity Level scale (TIL) for intracranial pressure (ICP) management. We reviewed the medical records of 31 patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) in two European intensive care units (ICUs). The ICP TIL was derived over a 4-day period for 4-h (TIL4) and 24-h epochs (TIL24). TIL scores were compared with historical schemes for TIL measurement, with each other, and with clinical variables. TIL24 scores in ICU patients with TBI were compared with two control groups: patients with extracranial trauma necessitating intensive care (Trauma_ICU; n = 20) and patients with TBI not needing ICU care (TBI_WARD; n = 19), to further determine the discriminative validity of the TIL for ICP-related ICU interventions. Interrater and intraobserver agreement were excellent for TIL4 and TIL24 (Cohen κ: 0.98-0.99; intraclass correlation coefficient: 0.99-1; p < 0.0005). The mean + standard deviation (SD) TIL24 in the ICU TBI cohort was significantly higher than the Trauma_ICU patients and the TBI_WARD patients (8.2 ± 3.2 vs. 2.2 ± 0.9 and 0.1 ± 0.1, respectively; p < 0.005 for both comparisons). Correlations between the TIL scale scores and historical TIL scores, between TIL24 and the Glasgow Coma Scale, and between a range of TIL metrics and summary measures of ICP over the 4-day period, were all highly significant (p < 0.01). The results were consistent with the expected direction. A linear mixed effect analysis, accounting for within-subjects repeated measures, showed strong correlation between TIL4 and 4-h ICP (p < 0.0000005). The TIL scale is a reliable measurement instrument with a high degree of validity for assessing the therapeutic intensity level of ICP management in patients with TBI.

  5. Full-Scale Testing of the Ambient Pressure, Acid-Dissolution Front-End Process for the Current 99Mo Recovery Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Jerden, James L.; Bailey, James; Hafenrichter, Lohman; Vandegrift, George F.

    2013-01-31

    The Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) Conversion Program is actively developing technologies for converting civilian facilities that use high enriched uranium (HEU) to low enriched uranium (LEU) fuels and targets. The conversion of conventional HEU targets to LEU for the production of 99Mo production requires approximately five times the uranium in a target to maintain the 99Mo yield on a per-target basis. Under GTRI, Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne) is developing two frontend options for current 99Mo production processes to allow the use of LEU-foil targets. In both processes, the aim is to produce a frontend product that is compatible with current 99Mo purification operations and will provide the same or a higher yield of 99Mo for the same number of irradiated targets. The two frontend processes under development as part of this project are (1) the dissolution of irradiated LEU foil (up to 250 g in a single batch) and nickel fission recoil barrier in nitric acid at ambient pressure; and (2) the electrochemical dissolution of LEU foil in series of steps that produces an alkaline (basic) solution feed for 99Mo purification. This report describes results from performance tests and design optimization of the ambient pressure, nitric-acid-dissolver system. The design, fabrication, and performance test planning for this system are described in more detail in previous reports (Jerden et al. 2011a,b, 2012). Full-scale demonstrations of both of the frontend processes using irradiated uranium foils are planned to be performed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory this fiscal year.

  6. Gene-age interactions in blood pressure regulation: a large-scale investigation with the CHARGE, Global BPgen, and ICBP Consortia.

    PubMed

    Simino, Jeannette; Shi, Gang; Bis, Joshua C; Chasman, Daniel I; Ehret, Georg B; Gu, Xiangjun; Guo, Xiuqing; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Sijbrands, Eric; Smith, Albert V; Verwoert, Germaine C; Bragg-Gresham, Jennifer L; Cadby, Gemma; Chen, Peng; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Corre, Tanguy; de Boer, Rudolf A; Goel, Anuj; Johnson, Toby; Khor, Chiea-Chuen; Lluís-Ganella, Carla; Luan, Jian'an; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Nolte, Ilja M; Sim, Xueling; Sõber, Siim; van der Most, Peter J; Verweij, Niek; Zhao, Jing Hua; Amin, Najaf; Boerwinkle, Eric; Bouchard, Claude; Dehghan, Abbas; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Elosua, Roberto; Franco, Oscar H; Gieger, Christian; Harris, Tamara B; Hercberg, Serge; Hofman, Albert; James, Alan L; Johnson, Andrew D; Kähönen, Mika; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kutalik, Zoltan; Larson, Martin G; Launer, Lenore J; Li, Guo; Liu, Jianjun; Liu, Kiang; Morrison, Alanna C; Navis, Gerjan; Ong, Rick Twee-Hee; Papanicolau, George J; Penninx, Brenda W; Psaty, Bruce M; Raffel, Leslie J; Raitakari, Olli T; Rice, Kenneth; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Rose, Lynda M; Sanna, Serena; Scott, Robert A; Siscovick, David S; Stolk, Ronald P; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Vaidya, Dhananjay; van der Klauw, Melanie M; Vasan, Ramachandran S; Vithana, Eranga Nishanthie; Völker, Uwe; Völzke, Henry; Watkins, Hugh; Young, Terri L; Aung, Tin; Bochud, Murielle; Farrall, Martin; Hartman, Catharina A; Laan, Maris; Lakatta, Edward G; Lehtimäki, Terho; Loos, Ruth J F; Lucas, Gavin; Meneton, Pierre; Palmer, Lyle J; Rettig, Rainer; Snieder, Harold; Tai, E Shyong; Teo, Yik-Ying; van der Harst, Pim; Wareham, Nicholas J; Wijmenga, Cisca; Wong, Tien Yin; Fornage, Myriam; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Levy, Daniel; Palmas, Walter; Ridker, Paul M; Rotter, Jerome I; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Witteman, Jacqueline C M; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Rao, Dabeeru C

    2014-07-03

    Although age-dependent effects on blood pressure (BP) have been reported, they have not been systematically investigated in large-scale genome-wide association studies (GWASs). We leveraged the infrastructure of three well-established consortia (CHARGE, GBPgen, and ICBP) and a nonstandard approach (age stratification and metaregression) to conduct a genome-wide search of common variants with age-dependent effects on systolic (SBP), diastolic (DBP), mean arterial (MAP), and pulse (PP) pressure. In a two-staged design using 99,241 individuals of European ancestry, we identified 20 genome-wide significant (p ≤ 5 × 10(-8)) loci by using joint tests of the SNP main effect and SNP-age interaction. Nine of the significant loci demonstrated nominal evidence of age-dependent effects on BP by tests of the interactions alone. Index SNPs in the EHBP1L1 (DBP and MAP), CASZ1 (SBP and MAP), and GOSR2 (PP) loci exhibited the largest age interactions, with opposite directions of effect in the young versus the old. The changes in the genetic effects over time were small but nonnegligible (up to 1.58 mm Hg over 60 years). The EHBP1L1 locus was discovered through gene-age interactions only in whites but had DBP main effects replicated (p = 8.3 × 10(-4)) in 8,682 Asians from Singapore, indicating potential interethnic heterogeneity. A secondary analysis revealed 22 loci with evidence of age-specific effects (e.g., only in 20 to 29-year-olds). Age can be used to select samples with larger genetic effect sizes and more homogenous phenotypes, which may increase statistical power. Age-dependent effects identified through novel statistical approaches can provide insight into the biology and temporal regulation underlying BP associations.

  7. The major influence of the atmosphere on intracranial pressure: an observational study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbowski, Leszek

    2017-01-01

    The impact of the atmosphere on human physiology has been studied widely within the last years. In practice, intracranial pressure is a pressure difference between intracranial compartments and the surrounding atmosphere. This means that gauge intracranial pressure uses atmospheric pressure as its zero point, and therefore, this method of pressure measurement excludes the effects of barometric pressure's fluctuation. The comparison of these two physical quantities can only take place through their absolute value relationship. The aim of this study is to investigate the direct effect of barometric pressure on the absolute intracranial pressure homeostasis. A prospective observational cross-sectional open study was conducted in Szczecin, Poland. In 28 neurosurgical patients with suspected normal-pressure hydrocephalus, intracranial intraventricular pressure was monitored in a sitting position. A total of 168 intracranial pressure and atmospheric pressure measurements were performed. Absolute atmospheric pressure was recorded directly. All values of intracranial gauge pressure were converted to absolute pressure (the sum of gauge intracranial pressure and local absolute atmospheric pressure). The average absolute mean intracranial pressure in the patients is 1006.6 hPa (95 % CI 1004.5 to 1008.8 hPa, SEM 1.1), and the mean absolute atmospheric pressure is 1007.9 hPa (95 % CI 1006.3 to 1009.6 hPa, SEM 0.8). The observed association between atmospheric and intracranial pressure is strongly significant (Spearman correlation r = 0.87, p < 0.05) and all the measurements are perfectly reliable (Bland-Altman coefficient is 4.8 %). It appears from this study that changes in absolute intracranial pressure are related to seasonal variation. Absolute intracranial pressure is shown to be impacted positively by atmospheric pressure.

  8. The major influence of the atmosphere on intracranial pressure: an observational study.

    PubMed

    Herbowski, Leszek

    2017-01-01

    The impact of the atmosphere on human physiology has been studied widely within the last years. In practice, intracranial pressure is a pressure difference between intracranial compartments and the surrounding atmosphere. This means that gauge intracranial pressure uses atmospheric pressure as its zero point, and therefore, this method of pressure measurement excludes the effects of barometric pressure's fluctuation. The comparison of these two physical quantities can only take place through their absolute value relationship. The aim of this study is to investigate the direct effect of barometric pressure on the absolute intracranial pressure homeostasis. A prospective observational cross-sectional open study was conducted in Szczecin, Poland. In 28 neurosurgical patients with suspected normal-pressure hydrocephalus, intracranial intraventricular pressure was monitored in a sitting position. A total of 168 intracranial pressure and atmospheric pressure measurements were performed. Absolute atmospheric pressure was recorded directly. All values of intracranial gauge pressure were converted to absolute pressure (the sum of gauge intracranial pressure and local absolute atmospheric pressure). The average absolute mean intracranial pressure in the patients is 1006.6 hPa (95 % CI 1004.5 to 1008.8 hPa, SEM 1.1), and the mean absolute atmospheric pressure is 1007.9 hPa (95 % CI 1006.3 to 1009.6 hPa, SEM 0.8). The observed association between atmospheric and intracranial pressure is strongly significant (Spearman correlation r = 0.87, p < 0.05) and all the measurements are perfectly reliable (Bland-Altman coefficient is 4.8 %). It appears from this study that changes in absolute intracranial pressure are related to seasonal variation. Absolute intracranial pressure is shown to be impacted positively by atmospheric pressure.

  9. Absolute Spectrophotometry of 237 Open Cluster Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clampitt, L.; Burstein, D.

    1994-12-01

    We present absolute spectrophotometry of 237 stars in 7 nearby open clusters: Hyades, Pleiades, Alpha Persei, Praesepe, Coma Berenices, IC 4665, and M 39. The observations were taken using the Wampler single-channel scanner (Wampler 1966) on the Crossley 0.9m telescope at Lick Observatory from July 1973 through December 1974. 21 bandpasses spanning the spectral range 3500 Angstroms to 7780 Angstroms were observed for each star, with bandwiths ranging from 32Angstroms to 64 Angstroms. Data are standardized to the Hayes--Latham (1975) system. Our measurements are compared to filter colors on the Johnson BV, Stromgren ubvy, and Geneva U V B_1 B_2 V_1 G systems, as well as to spectrophotometry of a few stars published by Gunn, Stryker & Tinsley and in the Spectrophotometric Standards Catalog (Adelman; as distributed by the NSSDC). Both internal and external comparisons to the filter systems indicate a formal statistical accuracy per bandpass of 0.01 to 0.02 mag, with apparent larger ( ~ 0.03 mag) differences in absolute calibration between this data set and existing spectrophotometry. These data will comprise part of the spectrophotometry that will be used to calibrate the Beijing-Arizona-Taipei-Connecticut Color Survey of the Sky (see separate paper by Burstein et al. at this meeting).

  10. Linear ultrasonic motor for absolute gravimeter.

    PubMed

    Jian, Yue; Yao, Zhiyuan; Silberschmidt, Vadim V

    2017-02-01

    Thanks to their compactness and suitability for vacuum applications, linear ultrasonic motors are considered as substitutes for classical electromagnetic motors as driving elements in absolute gravimeters. Still, their application is prevented by relatively low power output. To overcome this limitation and provide better stability, a V-type linear ultrasonic motor with a new clamping method is proposed for a gravimeter. In this paper, a mechanical model of stators with flexible clamping components is suggested, according to a design criterion for clamps of linear ultrasonic motors. After that, an effect of tangential and normal rigidity of the clamping components on mechanical output is studied. It is followed by discussion of a new clamping method with sufficient tangential rigidity and a capability to facilitate pre-load. Additionally, a prototype of the motor with the proposed clamping method was fabricated and the performance tests in vertical direction were implemented. Experimental results show that the suggested motor has structural stability and high dynamic performance, such as no-load speed of 1.4m/s and maximal thrust of 43N, meeting the requirements for absolute gravimeters.

  11. Why to compare absolute numbers of mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Sabine; Schulz, Sabine; Schropp, Eva-Maria; Eberhagen, Carola; Simmons, Alisha; Beisker, Wolfgang; Aichler, Michaela; Zischka, Hans

    2014-11-01

    Prompted by pronounced structural differences between rat liver and rat hepatocellular carcinoma mitochondria, we suspected these mitochondrial populations to differ massively in their molecular composition. Aiming to reveal these mitochondrial differences, we came across the issue on how to normalize such comparisons and decided to focus on the absolute number of mitochondria. To this end, fluorescently stained mitochondria were quantified by flow cytometry. For rat liver mitochondria, this approach resulted in mitochondrial protein contents comparable to earlier reports using alternative methods. We determined similar protein contents for rat liver, heart and kidney mitochondria. In contrast, however, lower protein contents were determined for rat brain mitochondria and for mitochondria from the rat hepatocellular carcinoma cell line McA 7777. This result challenges mitochondrial comparisons that rely on equal protein amounts as a typical normalization method. Exemplarily, we therefore compared the activity and susceptibility toward inhibition of complex II of rat liver and hepatocellular carcinoma mitochondria and obtained significant discrepancies by either normalizing to protein amount or to absolute mitochondrial number. Importantly, the latter normalization, in contrast to the former, demonstrated a lower complex II activity and higher susceptibility toward inhibition in hepatocellular carcinoma mitochondria compared to liver mitochondria. These findings demonstrate that solely normalizing to protein amount may obscure essential molecular differences between mitochondrial populations.

  12. [Estimation of absolute risk for fracture].

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Saeko

    2009-03-01

    Osteoporosis treatment aims to prevent fractures and maintain the QOL of the elderly. However, persons at high risk of future fracture cannot be effectively identified on the basis of bone density (BMD) alone, although BMD is used as an diagnostic criterion. Therefore, the WHO recommended that absolute risk for fracture (10-year probability of fracture) for each individual be evaluated and used as an index for intervention threshold. The 10-year probability of fracture is calculated based on age, sex, BMD at the femoral neck (body mass index if BMD is not available), history of previous fractures, parental hip fracture history, smoking, steroid use, rheumatoid arthritis, secondary osteoporosis and alcohol consumption. The WHO has just announced the development of a calculation tool (FRAX: WHO Fracture Risk Assessment Tool) in February this year. Fractures could be prevented more effectively if, based on each country's medical circumstances, an absolute risk value for fracture to determine when to start medical treatment is established and persons at high risk of fracture are identified and treated accordingly.

  13. Absolute stereochemistry of altersolanol A and alterporriols.

    PubMed

    Kanamaru, Saki; Honma, Miho; Murakami, Takanori; Tsushima, Taro; Kudo, Shinji; Tanaka, Kazuaki; Nihei, Ken-Ichi; Nehira, Tatsuo; Hashimoto, Masaru

    2012-02-01

    The absolute stereochemistry of altersolanol A (1) was established by observing a positive exciton couplet in the circular dichroism (CD) spectrum of the C3,C4-O-bis(2-naphthoyl) derivative 10 and by chemical correlations with known compound 8. Before the discussion, the relative stereochemistry of 1 was confirmed by X-ray crystallographic analysis. The shielding effect at C7'-OMe group by C1-O-benzoylation established the relative stereochemical relationship between the C8-C8' axial bonding and the C1-C4/C1'-C4' polyol moieties of alterporriols E (3), an atropisomer of the C8-C8' dimer of 1. As 3 could be obtained by dimerization of 1 in vitro, the absolute configuration of its central chirality elements (C1-C4) must be identical to those of 1. Spectral comparison between the experimental and theoretical CD spectra supported the above conclusion. Axial stereochemistry of novel C4-O-deoxy dimeric derivatives, alterporriols F (4) and G (5), were also revealed by comparison of their CD spectra to those of 2 and 3.

  14. Absolute Electron Extraction Efficiency of Liquid Xenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamdin, Katayun; Mizrachi, Eli; Morad, James; Sorensen, Peter

    2016-03-01

    Dual phase liquid/gas xenon time projection chambers (TPCs) currently set the world's most sensitive limits on weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs), a favored dark matter candidate. These detectors rely on extracting electrons from liquid xenon into gaseous xenon, where they produce proportional scintillation. The proportional scintillation from the extracted electrons serves to internally amplify the WIMP signal; even a single extracted electron is detectable. Credible dark matter searches can proceed with electron extraction efficiency (EEE) lower than 100%. However, electrons systematically left at the liquid/gas boundary are a concern. Possible effects include spontaneous single or multi-electron proportional scintillation signals in the gas, or charging of the liquid/gas interface or detector materials. Understanding EEE is consequently a serious concern for this class of rare event search detectors. Previous EEE measurements have mostly been relative, not absolute, assuming efficiency plateaus at 100%. I will present an absolute EEE measurement with a small liquid/gas xenon TPC test bed located at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.

  15. Standardization of the cumulative absolute velocity

    SciTech Connect

    O'Hara, T.F.; Jacobson, J.P. )

    1991-12-01

    EPRI NP-5930, A Criterion for Determining Exceedance of the Operating Basis Earthquake,'' was published in July 1988. As defined in that report, the Operating Basis Earthquake (OBE) is exceeded when both a response spectrum parameter and a second damage parameter, referred to as the Cumulative Absolute Velocity (CAV), are exceeded. In the review process of the above report, it was noted that the calculation of CAV could be confounded by time history records of long duration containing low (nondamaging) acceleration. Therefore, it is necessary to standardize the method of calculating CAV to account for record length. This standardized methodology allows consistent comparisons between future CAV calculations and the adjusted CAV threshold value based upon applying the standardized methodology to the data set presented in EPRI NP-5930. The recommended method to standardize the CAV calculation is to window its calculation on a second-by-second basis for a given time history. If the absolute acceleration exceeds 0.025g at any time during each one second interval, the earthquake records used in EPRI NP-5930 have been reanalyzed and the adjusted threshold of damage for CAV was found to be 0.16g-set.

  16. Swarm's Absolute Scalar Magnetometers Burst Mode Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coisson, P.; Vigneron, P.; Hulot, G.; Crespo Grau, R.; Brocco, L.; Lalanne, X.; Sirol, O.; Leger, J. M.; Jager, T.; Bertrand, F.; Boness, A.; Fratter, I.

    2014-12-01

    Each of the three Swarm satellites embarks an Absolute Scalar Magnetometer (ASM) to provide absolute scalar measurements of the magnetic field with high accuracy and stability. Nominal data acquisition of these ASMs is 1 Hz. But they can also run in a so-called "burst mode" and provide data at 250 Hz. During the commissioning phase of the mission, seven burst mode acquisition campaigns have been run simultaneously for all satellites, obtaining a total of ten days of burs-mode data. These campaigns allowed the identification of issues related to the operations of the piezo-electric motor and the heaters connected to the ASM, that do not impact the nominal 1 Hz scalar data. We analyze the burst mode data to identify high frequency geomagnetic signals, focusing the analysis in two regions: the low latitudes, where we seek signatures of ionospheric irregularities, and the high latitudes, to identify high frequency signals related to polar region currents. Since these campaigns have been conducted during the initial months of the mission, the three satellites where still close to each other, allowing to analyze the spatial coherency of the signals. Wavelet analysis have revealed 31 Hz signals appearing in the night-side in the equatorial region.

  17. Extracting infrared absolute reflectance from relative reflectance measurements.

    PubMed

    Berets, Susan L; Milosevic, Milan

    2012-06-01

    Absolute reflectance measurements are valuable to the optics industry for development of new materials and optical coatings. Yet, absolute reflectance measurements are notoriously difficult to make. In this paper, we investigate the feasibility of extracting the absolute reflectance from a relative reflectance measurement using a reference material with known refractive index.

  18. A Conceptual Approach to Absolute Value Equations and Inequalities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Mark W.; Bryson, Janet L.

    2011-01-01

    The absolute value learning objective in high school mathematics requires students to solve far more complex absolute value equations and inequalities. When absolute value problems become more complex, students often do not have sufficient conceptual understanding to make any sense of what is happening mathematically. The authors suggest that the…

  19. An evaluation of methods for scaling aircraft noise perception

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ollerhead, J. B.

    1971-01-01

    One hundred and twenty recorded sounds, including jets, turboprops, piston engined aircraft and helicopters were rated by a panel of subjects in a paired comparison test. The results were analyzed to evaluate a number of noise rating procedures in terms of their ability to accurately estimate both relative and absolute perceived noise levels. It was found that the complex procedures developed by Stevens, Zwicker and Kryter are superior to other scales. The main advantage of these methods over the more convenient weighted sound pressure level scales lies in their ability to cope with signals over a wide range of bandwidth. However, Stevens' loudness level scale and the perceived noise level scale both overestimate the growth of perceived level with intensity because of an apparent deficiency in the band level summation rule. A simple correction is proposed which will enable these scales to properly account for the experimental observations.

  20. Absolute UV absorption cross sections of dimethyl substituted Criegee intermediate (CH3)2COO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Yuan-Pin; Chang, Chun-Hung; Takahashi, Kaito; Lin, Jim-Min, Jr.

    2016-06-01

    The absolute absorption cross sections of (CH3)2COO under a jet-cooled condition were measured via laser depletion to be (1.32 ± 0.10) × 10-17 cm2 molecule-1 at 308 nm and (9.6 ± 0.8) × 10-18 cm2 molecule-1 at 352 nm. The peak UV cross section is estimated to be (1.75 ± 0.14) × 10-17 cm2 molecule-1 at 330 nm, according to the UV spectrum of (CH3)2COO (Huang et al., 2015) scaled to the absolute cross section at 308 nm.

  1. Measuring Growth with Vertical Scales

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Briggs, Derek C.

    2013-01-01

    A vertical score scale is needed to measure growth across multiple tests in terms of absolute changes in magnitude. Since the warrant for subsequent growth interpretations depends upon the assumption that the scale has interval properties, the validation of a vertical scale would seem to require methods for distinguishing interval scales from…

  2. Acoustic testing of a 1.5 pressure ratio low tip speed fan with casing tip bleed (QEP Fan B scale model)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazin, S. B.; Minzner, W. R.; Paas, J. E.

    1971-01-01

    A scale model of the bypass flow region of a 1.5 pressure ratio, single stage, low tip speed fan was tested with a rotor tip casing bleed slot to determine its effects on noise generation. The bleed slot was located 1/2 inch (1.3 cm) upstream of the rotor leading edge and was configured to be a continuous opening around the circumference. The bleed manifold system was operated over a range of bleed rates corresponding to as much as 6% of the fan flow at approach thrust and 4.25% of the fan flow at takeoff thrust. Acoustic results indicate that a bleed rate of 4% of the fan flow reduces the fan maximum approach 200 foot (61.0 m) sideline PNL 0.5 PNdB and the corresponding takeoff thrust noise 1.1 PNdB below the level with zero bleed. However, comparison of the standard casing (no bleed slot) and the slotted bleed casing with zero bleed shows that the bleed slot itself caused a noise increase.

  3. Tests of a 1/7-Scale Semispan Model of the XB-35 Airplane in the Langley 19-Foot Pressure Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teplitz, Jerome; Kayten, Gerald G.; Cancro, Patrick A.

    1946-01-01

    A 1/7 scale semispan model of the XB-35 airplane was tested in the Langley 10 foot pressure tunnel, primarily for the purpose of investigating the effectiveness of a leading-edge slot for alleviation of stick-fixed longitudinal instability at high angles of attack caused by early tip stalling and a device for relief of stick-free instability caused by elevon up-floating tendencies at high angles of attack. Results indicated that the slot was not adequate to provide the desired improvement in stick-fixed stability. The tab-flipper device provided improvement in stick-free stability abd two of the linkage combinations tested gave satisfactory variations of control force with airspeed for all conditions except that in which the wing-tip "pitch-control" flap was fully deflected. However, the improvement in control force characteristics was accompanied by a detrimental effect on stick-fixed stability because of the pitching moments produced by the elevon tab deflection.

  4. Effects of Ionization, Thermal Transport, and Radiation on Scaling Performance for Peak Pressure in Imploding Plasma Liners Formed by Converging Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanic, Milos; Cassibry, Jason; Hsu, Scott

    2012-10-01

    This paper is an extension of work done by (Cassibry et.al., in preparation) who performed similar research using Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics Code (SPHC) with an ideal gas equation of state model, neglecting electron-thermal conduction, radiation conduction and radiation losses (in cases of optically thin plasma). SPHC has been modified to use a tabular equation of state, accounting for ionization effects and to include the mentioned thermal transport models. Series of simulations have been carried out and the results were analyzed in terms of recognizing the scaling laws for peak pressure and dwell time. Comparison with the previous work of (Cassibry et.al., in preparation) has also been carried out in an attempt to isolate and recognize the effects of ionization and thermal transport models. The work has been done in support of the Plasma Liner Experiment (PLX), which is a multi-institutional project working on validation of the imploding plasma liner concept for reaching High Energy Density (HEDP) regimes and a possible stand-off solution for Plasma Jet driven Magneto-Inertial Fusion (PJMIF).

  5. Use of Absolute and Comparative Performance Feedback in Absolute and Comparative Judgments and Decisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Don A.; Klein, William M. P.

    2008-01-01

    Which matters more--beliefs about absolute ability or ability relative to others? This study set out to compare the effects of such beliefs on satisfaction with performance, self-evaluations, and bets on future performance. In Experiment 1, undergraduate participants were told they had answered 20% correct, 80% correct, or were not given their…

  6. Absolute nonlocality via distributed computing without communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czekaj, Ł.; Pawłowski, M.; Vértesi, T.; Grudka, A.; Horodecki, M.; Horodecki, R.

    2015-09-01

    Understanding the role that quantum entanglement plays as a resource in various information processing tasks is one of the crucial goals of quantum information theory. Here we propose an alternative perspective for studying quantum entanglement: distributed computation of functions without communication between nodes. To formalize this approach, we propose identity games. Surprisingly, despite no signaling, we obtain that nonlocal quantum strategies beat classical ones in terms of winning probability for identity games originating from certain bipartite and multipartite functions. Moreover we show that, for a majority of functions, access to general nonsignaling resources boosts success probability two times in comparison to classical ones for a number of large enough outputs. Because there are no constraints on the inputs and no processing of the outputs in the identity games, they detect very strong types of correlations: absolute nonlocality.

  7. In vivo absorption spectroscopy for absolute measurement.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Hiromitsu; Fukuda, Takashi

    2012-10-01

    In in vivo spectroscopy, there are differences between individual subjects in parameters such as tissue scattering and sample concentration. We propose a method that can provide the absolute value of a particular substance concentration, independent of these individual differences. Thus, it is not necessary to use the typical statistical calibration curve, which assumes an average level of scattering and an averaged concentration over individual subjects. This method is expected to greatly reduce the difficulties encountered during in vivo measurements. As an example, for in vivo absorption spectroscopy, the method was applied to the reflectance measurement in retinal vessels to monitor their oxygen saturation levels. This method was then validated by applying it to the tissue phantom under a variety of absorbance values and scattering efficiencies.

  8. MAGSAT: Vector magnetometer absolute sensor alignment determination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acuna, M. H.

    1981-01-01

    A procedure is described for accurately determining the absolute alignment of the magnetic axes of a triaxial magnetometer sensor with respect to an external, fixed, reference coordinate system. The method does not require that the magnetic field vector orientation, as generated by a triaxial calibration coil system, be known to better than a few degrees from its true position, and minimizes the number of positions through which a sensor assembly must be rotated to obtain a solution. Computer simulations show that accuracies of better than 0.4 seconds of arc can be achieved under typical test conditions associated with existing magnetic test facilities. The basic approach is similar in nature to that presented by McPherron and Snare (1978) except that only three sensor positions are required and the system of equations to be solved is considerably simplified. Applications of the method to the case of the MAGSAT Vector Magnetometer are presented and the problems encountered discussed.

  9. Micron Accurate Absolute Ranging System: Range Extension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalley, Larry L.; Smith, Kely L.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to investigate Fresnel diffraction as a means of obtaining absolute distance measurements with micron or greater accuracy. It is believed that such a system would prove useful to the Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST) as a non-intrusive, non-contact measuring system for use with secondary concentrator station-keeping systems. The present research attempts to validate past experiments and develop ways to apply the phenomena of Fresnel diffraction to micron accurate measurement. This report discusses past research on the phenomena, and the basis of the use Fresnel diffraction distance metrology. The apparatus used in the recent investigations, experimental procedures used, preliminary results are discussed in detail. Continued research and equipment requirements on the extension of the effective range of the Fresnel diffraction systems is also described.

  10. Absolute measurements of fast neutrons using yttrium.

    PubMed

    Roshan, M V; Springham, S V; Rawat, R S; Lee, P; Krishnan, M

    2010-08-01

    Yttrium is presented as an absolute neutron detector for pulsed neutron sources. It has high sensitivity for detecting fast neutrons. Yttrium has the property of generating a monoenergetic secondary radiation in the form of a 909 keV gamma-ray caused by inelastic neutron interaction. It was calibrated numerically using MCNPX and does not need periodic recalibration. The total yttrium efficiency for detecting 2.45 MeV neutrons was determined to be f(n) approximately 4.1x10(-4) with an uncertainty of about 0.27%. The yttrium detector was employed in the NX2 plasma focus experiments and showed the neutron yield of the order of 10(8) neutrons per discharge.

  11. Developing absolute shock wave equation of state measurements on the NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celliers, Peter; Fratanduono, D. E.; Lazicki, A.; London, R. A.; Brygoo, S.; Swift, D. C.; Coppari, F.; Millot, M.; Peterson, J. L.; Meezan, N. B.; Fernandez-Panella, A.; Erskine, D. J.; Ali, S.; Collins, G. W.

    2016-10-01

    The National Ignition Facility provides an unprecedented capability to generate ultra-high pressure planar shock waves (around 10 TPa) in solid samples. We are currently fielding impedance match equation of state (EOS) experiments to determine the shock Hugoniot of various samples relative to EOS standards, such as aluminum and quartz. However, the equations of state of the standards at multi-TPa shock pressures are not yet well-established. Absolute techniques are needed to provide the data needed to establish the Hugoniots of the standards, and also to measure the state of a sample directly. We are pursuing several approaches using absolute techniques. These approaches will be discussed. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by LLNL under contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  12. Absolute bioavailability of quinine formulations in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Babalola, C P; Bolaji, O O; Ogunbona, F A; Ezeomah, E

    2004-09-01

    This study compared the absolute bioavailability of quinine sulphate as capsule and as tablet against the intravenous (i.v.) infusion of the drug in twelve male volunteers. Six of the volunteers received intravenous infusion over 4 h as well as the capsule formulation of the drug in a cross-over manner, while the other six received the tablet formulation. Blood samples were taken at predetermined time intervals and plasma analysed for quinine (QN) using reversed-phase HPLC method. QN was rapidly absorbed after the two oral formulations with average t(max) of 2.67 h for both capsule and tablet. The mean elimination half-life of QN from the i.v. and oral dosage forms varied between 10 and 13.5 hr and were not statistically different (P > 0.05). On the contrary, the maximum plasma concentration (C(max)) and area under the curve (AUC) from capsule were comparable to those from i.v. (P > 0.05), while these values were markedly higher than values from tablet formulation (P < 0.05). The therapeutic QN plasma levels were not achieved with the tablet formulation. The absolute bioavailability (F) were 73% (C.l., 53.3 - 92.4%) and 39 % (C.I., 21.7 - 56.6%) for the capsule and tablet respectively and the difference was significant (P < 0.05). The subtherapeutic levels obtained from the tablet form used in this study may cause treatment failure during malaria and caution should be taken when predictions are made from results obtained from different formulations of QN.

  13. Absolute GPS Positioning Using Genetic Algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramillien, G.

    A new inverse approach for restoring the absolute coordinates of a ground -based station from three or four observed GPS pseudo-ranges is proposed. This stochastic method is based on simulations of natural evolution named genetic algorithms (GA). These iterative procedures provide fairly good and robust estimates of the absolute positions in the Earth's geocentric reference system. For comparison/validation, GA results are compared to the ones obtained using the classical linearized least-square scheme for the determination of the XYZ location proposed by Bancroft (1985) which is strongly limited by the number of available observations (i.e. here, the number of input pseudo-ranges must be four). The r.m.s. accuracy of the non -linear cost function reached by this latter method is typically ~10-4 m2 corresponding to ~300-500-m accuracies for each geocentric coordinate. However, GA can provide more acceptable solutions (r.m.s. errors < 10-5 m2), even when only three instantaneous pseudo-ranges are used, such as a lost of lock during a GPS survey. Tuned GA parameters used in different simulations are N=1000 starting individuals, as well as Pc=60-70% and Pm=30-40% for the crossover probability and mutation rate, respectively. Statistical tests on the ability of GA to recover acceptable coordinates in presence of important levels of noise are made simulating nearly 3000 random samples of erroneous pseudo-ranges. Here, two main sources of measurement errors are considered in the inversion: (1) typical satellite-clock errors and/or 300-metre variance atmospheric delays, and (2) Geometrical Dilution of Precision (GDOP) due to the particular GPS satellite configuration at the time of acquisition. Extracting valuable information and even from low-quality starting range observations, GA offer an interesting alternative for high -precision GPS positioning.

  14. Absolute integrated intensity for the 3.44-microns NO2 band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shafer, J. H.; Young, C.

    1976-01-01

    A grating monochromator infrared spectrometer and a curve of growth technique were used to obtain the absolute integrated intensity for the 3.44 micron NO2 vibration-rotation band at very small NO2 partial pressures. The intensity was found to be 78.9 plus or minus 1.6/cm/(atm cm) at 296 K at the 95% confidence level. The study has relevance to the infrared spectral measurement of atmospheric NO2.

  15. Large-scale survey of rates of achieving targets for blood glucose, blood pressure, and lipids and prevalence of complications in type 2 diabetes (JDDM 40)

    PubMed Central

    Yokoyama, Hiroki; Oishi, Mariko; Takamura, Hiroshi; Yamasaki, Katsuya; Shirabe, Shin-ichiro; Uchida, Daigaku; Sugimoto, Hidekatsu; Kurihara, Yoshio; Araki, Shin-ichi; Maegawa, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Objective The fact that population with type 2 diabetes mellitus and bodyweight of patients are increasing but diabetes care is improving makes it important to explore the up-to-date rates of achieving treatment targets and prevalence of complications. We investigated the prevalence of microvascular/macrovascular complications and rates of achieving treatment targets through a large-scale multicenter-based cohort. Research design and methods A cross-sectional nationwide survey was performed on 9956 subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus who consecutively attended primary care clinics. The prevalence of nephropathy, retinopathy, neuropathy, and macrovascular complications and rates of achieving targets of glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) <7.0%, blood pressure <130/80 mm Hg, and lipids of low-density/high-density lipoprotein cholesterol <3.1/≥1.0 mmol/L and non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol <3.8 mmol/L were investigated. Results The rates of achieving targets for HbA1c, blood pressure, and lipids were 52.9%, 46.8% and 65.5%, respectively. The prevalence of microvascular complications was ∼28% each, 6.4% of which had all microvascular complications, while that of macrovascular complications was 12.6%. With an increasing duration of diabetes, the rate of achieving target HbA1c decreased and the prevalence of each complication increased despite increased use of diabetes medication. The prevalence of each complication decreased according to the number achieving the 3 treatment targets and was lower in subjects without macrovascular complications than those with. Adjustments for considerable covariates exhibited that each complication was closely inter-related, and the achievement of each target was significantly associated with being free of each complication. Conclusions Almost half of the subjects examined did not meet the recommended targets. The risk of each complication was significantly affected by 1 on-target treatment (inversely) and the

  16. Utilizing a reference material for assessing absolute tumor mechanical properties in modality independent elastography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dong Kyu; Weis, Jared A.; Yankeelov, Thomas E.; Miga, Michael I.

    2014-03-01

    There is currently no reliable method for early characterization of breast cancer response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) [1,2]. Given that disruption of normal structural architecture occurs in cancer-bearing tissue, we hypothesize that further structural changes occur in response to NAC. Consequently, we are investigating the use of modalityindependent elastography (MIE) [3-8] as a method for monitoring mechanical integrity to predict long term outcomes in NAC. Recently, we have utilized a Demons non-rigid image registration method that allows 3D elasticity reconstruction in abnormal tissue geometries, making it particularly amenable to the evaluation of breast cancer mechanical properties. While past work has reflected relative elasticity contrast ratios [3], this study improves upon that work by utilizing a known stiffness reference material within the reconstruction framework such that a stiffness map becomes an absolute measure. To test, a polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) cryogel phantom and a silicone rubber mock mouse tumor phantom were constructed with varying mechanical stiffness. Results showed that an absolute measure of stiffness could be obtained based on a reference value. This reference technique demonstrates the ability to generate accurate measurements of absolute stiffness to characterize response to NAC. These results support that `referenced MIE' has the potential to reliably differentiate absolute tumor stiffness with significant contrast from that of surrounding tissue. The use of referenced MIE to obtain absolute quantification of biomarkers is also translatable across length scales such that the characterization method is mechanics-consistent at the small animal and human application.

  17. Use of ethyl lactate to extract bioactive compounds from Cytisus scoparius: Comparison of pressurized liquid extraction and medium scale ambient temperature systems.

    PubMed

    Lores, Marta; Pájaro, Marta; Álvarez-Casas, Marta; Domínguez, Jorge; García-Jares, Carmen

    2015-08-01

    An important trend in the extraction of chemical compounds is the application of new environmentally friendly, food grade solvents. Ethyl lactate (ethyl 2-hydroxypropanoate), produced by fermentation of carbohydrates, is miscible with both hydrophilic and hydrophobic compounds being a potentially good solvent for bioactive compounds. Despite its relatively wide use as a general solvent, the utilization of ethyl lactate as an extraction solvent has only recently been considered. Here, we evaluate the possible use of ethyl lactate to extract phenolic compounds from wild plants belonging to Cytisus scoparius, and we compare the characteristics of the extracts obtained by Pressurized Solvent Extraction (the total phenolics content, the antioxidant activity and the concentration of the major polyphenols) with those of other extracts obtained with methanol. In order to explore the industrial production of the ethyl lactate Cytisus extract, we also evaluate medium scale ambient temperature setups. The whole plant and the different parts (flowers, branches, and seed pods) were evaluated separately as potential sources of polyphenols. All extracts were analyzed by LC-MS/MS for accurate identification of the major polyphenols. Similar phenolic profiles were obtained when using ethyl lactate or methanol. The main bioactives found in the Cytisus extract were the non-flavonoid phenolic compounds caffeic and protocatechuic acids and 3,4-dihydroxybenzaldehyde; the flavonoids rutin, kaempferol and quercetin; the flavones chrysin, orientin and apigenin; and the alkaloid lupanine. Regarding the comparison of the extraction systems, although the performance of the PLE was much better than that of the ambient-temperature columns, the energy consumption was also much higher. Ethyl lactate has resulted an efficient extraction solvent for polyphenols from C. scoparius, yielding extracts with high levels of plant phenolics and antioxidant activity. The antimicrobial activity of these

  18. PERFORM 60 - Prediction of the effects of radiation for reactor pressure vessel and in-core materials using multi-scale modelling - 60 years foreseen plant lifetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leclercq, Sylvain; Lidbury, David; Van Dyck, Steven; Moinereau, Dominique; Alamo, Ana; Mazouzi, Abdou Al

    2010-11-01

    In nuclear power plants, materials may undergo degradation due to severe irradiation conditions that may limit their operational life. Utilities that operate these reactors need to quantify the ageing and the potential degradations of some essential structures of the power plant to ensure safe and reliable plant operation. So far, the material databases needed to take account of these degradations in the design and safe operation of installations mainly rely on long-term irradiation programs in test reactors as well as on mechanical or corrosion testing in specialized hot cells. Continuous progress in the physical understanding of the phenomena involved in irradiation damage and continuous progress in computer sciences have now made possible the development of multi-scale numerical tools able to simulate the effects of irradiation on materials microstructure. A first step towards this goal has been successfully reached through the development of the RPV-2 and Toughness Module numerical tools by the scientific community created around the FP6 PERFECT project. These tools allow to simulate irradiation effects on the constitutive behaviour of the reactor pressure vessel low alloy steel, and also on its failure properties. Relying on the existing PERFECT Roadmap, the 4 years Collaborative Project PERFORM 60 has mainly for objective to develop multi-scale tools aimed at predicting the combined effects of irradiation and corrosion on internals (austenitic stainless steels) and also to improve existing ones on RPV (bainitic steels). PERFORM 60 is based on two technical sub-projects: (i) RPV and (ii) internals. In addition to these technical sub-projects, the Users' Group and Training sub-project shall allow representatives of constructors, utilities, research organizations… from Europe, USA and Japan to receive the information and training to get their own appraisal on limits and potentialities of the developed tools. An important effort will also be made to teach young

  19. Time scale dependence of the center of pressure entropy: What characteristics of the neuromuscular postural control system influence stabilographic entropic half-life?

    PubMed

    Federolf, Peter; Zandiyeh, Payam; von Tscharner, Vinzenz

    2015-12-01

    The center of pressure (COP) movement in studies of postural control reveals a highly regular structure (low entropy) over short time periods and a highly irregular structure over large time scales (high entropy). Entropic half-life (EnHL) is a novel measure that quantifies the time over which short-term temporal correlations in a time series deteriorate to an uncorrelated, random structure. The current study suggested and tested three hypotheses about how characteristics of the neuromuscular postural control system may affect stabilometric EnHL: (H1) control system activity hypothesis: EnHL decreases with increased frequency of control system interventions adjusting COP motion; (H2) abundance of states hypothesis: EnHL decreases with increased number of mechanically equivalent states available to the postural system; and (H3) neurologic process hierarchy hypothesis: EnHL increases if postural control functions shift from the spinal level to the motor cortex. Thirty healthy participants performed quiet stance tests for 90 s in 18 different conditions: stance (bipedal, one-legged, and tandem); footwear (bare foot, regular sports shoe, and rocker sole shoes); and simultaneous cognitive task (two-back working memory task, no challenge). A four-way repeated-measures ANOVA revealed significant changes in EnHL for the different stance positions and for different movement directions (medio-lateral, anterior-posterior). These changes support H1 and H2. Significant differences were also found between rocker sole shoes and normal or barefoot standing, which supports H3. This study contributes to the understanding of how and why EnHL is a useful measure to monitor neuromuscular control of balance.

  20. Determining Absolute Zero in the Kitchen Sink.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Otani, Robert; Siegel, Peter

    1991-01-01

    Presents an experiment to demonstrate Charles's Law of Ideal Gases by creating a constant-pressure thermometer from materials that can be found in the kitchen. Discusses the underlying mathematical relationships and a step-by-step description of the experiment. (MDH)

  1. Prelaunch absolute radiometric calibration of the reflective bands on the LANDSAT-4 protoflight Thematic Mapper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barker, J. L.; Ball, D. L.; Leung, K. C.; Walker, J. A.

    1984-01-01

    The results of the absolute radiometric calibration of the LANDSAT 4 thematic mapper, as determined during pre-launch tests with a 122 cm integrating sphere, are presented. Detailed results for the best calibration of the protoflight TM are given, as well as summaries of other tests performed on the sensor. The dynamic range of the TM is within a few per cent of that required in all bands, except bands 1 and 3. Three detectors failed to pass the minimum SNR specified for their respective bands: band 5, channel 3 (dead), band 2, and channels 2 and 4 (noisy or slow response). Estimates of the absolute calibration accuracy for the TM show that the detectors are typically calibrated to 5% absolute error for the reflective bands; 10% full-scale accuracy was specified. Ten tests performed to transfer the detector absolute calibration to the internal calibrator show a 5% range at full scale in the transfer calibration; however, in two cases band 5 showed a 10% and a 7% difference.

  2. Absolute calibration of forces in optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutra, R. S.; Viana, N. B.; Maia Neto, P. A.; Nussenzveig, H. M.

    2014-07-01

    Optical tweezers are highly versatile laser traps for neutral microparticles, with fundamental applications in physics and in single molecule cell biology. Force measurements are performed by converting the stiffness response to displacement of trapped transparent microspheres, employed as force transducers. Usually, calibration is indirect, by comparison with fluid drag forces. This can lead to discrepancies by sizable factors. Progress achieved in a program aiming at absolute calibration, conducted over the past 15 years, is briefly reviewed. Here we overcome its last major obstacle, a theoretical overestimation of the peak stiffness, within the most employed range for applications, and we perform experimental validation. The discrepancy is traced to the effect of primary aberrations of the optical system, which are now included in the theory. All required experimental parameters are readily accessible. Astigmatism, the dominant effect, is measured by analyzing reflected images of the focused laser spot, adapting frequently employed video microscopy techniques. Combined with interface spherical aberration, it reveals a previously unknown window of instability for trapping. Comparison with experimental data leads to an overall agreement within error bars, with no fitting, for a broad range of microsphere radii, from the Rayleigh regime to the ray optics one, for different polarizations and trapping heights, including all commonly employed parameter domains. Besides signaling full first-principles theoretical understanding of optical tweezers operation, the results may lead to improved instrument design and control over experiments, as well as to an extended domain of applicability, allowing reliable force measurements, in principle, from femtonewtons to nanonewtons.

  3. What is Needed for Absolute Paleointensity?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valet, J. P.

    2015-12-01

    Many alternative approaches to the Thellier and Thellier technique for absolute paleointensity have been proposed during the past twenty years. One reason is the time consuming aspect of the experiments. Another reason is to avoid uncertainties in determinations of the paleofield which are mostly linked to the presence of multidomain grains. Despite great care taken by these new techniques, there is no indication that they always provide the right answer and in fact sometimes fail. We are convinced that the most valid approach remains the original double heating Thellier protocol provided that natural remanence is controlled by pure magnetite with a narrow distribution of small grain sizes, mostly single domains. The presence of titanium, even in small amount generates biases which yield incorrect field values. Single domain grains frequently dominate the magnetization of glass samples, which explains the success of this selective approach. They are also present in volcanic lava flows but much less frequently, and therefore contribute to the low success rate of most experiments. However the loss of at least 70% of the magnetization at very high temperatures prior to the Curie point appears to be an essential prerequisite that increases the success rate to almost 100% and has been validated from historical flows and from recent studies. This requirement can easily be tested by thermal demagnetization while low temperature experiments can document the detection of single domain magnetite using the δFC/δZFC parameter as suggested (Moskowitz et al, 1993) for biogenic magnetite.

  4. Gyrokinetic Statistical Absolute Equilibrium and Turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Jian-Zhou Zhu and Gregory W. Hammett

    2011-01-10

    A paradigm based on the absolute equilibrium of Galerkin-truncated inviscid systems to aid in understanding turbulence [T.-D. Lee, "On some statistical properties of hydrodynamical and magnetohydrodynamical fields," Q. Appl. Math. 10, 69 (1952)] is taken to study gyrokinetic plasma turbulence: A finite set of Fourier modes of the collisionless gyrokinetic equations are kept and the statistical equilibria are calculated; possible implications for plasma turbulence in various situations are discussed. For the case of two spatial and one velocity dimension, in the calculation with discretization also of velocity v with N grid points (where N + 1 quantities are conserved, corresponding to an energy invariant and N entropy-related invariants), the negative temperature states, corresponding to the condensation of the generalized energy into the lowest modes, are found. This indicates a generic feature of inverse energy cascade. Comparisons are made with some classical results, such as those of Charney-Hasegawa-Mima in the cold-ion limit. There is a universal shape for statistical equilibrium of gyrokinetics in three spatial and two velocity dimensions with just one conserved quantity. Possible physical relevance to turbulence, such as ITG zonal flows, and to a critical balance hypothesis are also discussed.

  5. Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leckey, John P.

    2015-01-01

    The Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO) is a mission, led and developed by NASA, that will measure a variety of climate variables with an unprecedented accuracy to quantify and attribute climate change. CLARREO consists of three separate instruments: an infrared (IR) spectrometer, a reflected solar (RS) spectrometer, and a radio occultation (RO) instrument. The mission will contain orbiting radiometers with sufficient accuracy, including on orbit verification, to calibrate other space-based instrumentation, increasing their respective accuracy by as much as an order of magnitude. The IR spectrometer is a Fourier Transform spectrometer (FTS) working in the 5 to 50 microns wavelength region with a goal of 0.1 K (k = 3) accuracy. The FTS will achieve this accuracy using phase change cells to verify thermistor accuracy and heated halos to verify blackbody emissivity, both on orbit. The RS spectrometer will measure the reflectance of the atmosphere in the 0.32 to 2.3 microns wavelength region with an accuracy of 0.3% (k = 2). The status of the instrumentation packages and potential mission options will be presented.

  6. Absolute flux measurements for swift atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fink, M.; Kohl, D. A.; Keto, J. W.; Antoniewicz, P.

    1987-01-01

    While a torsion balance in vacuum can easily measure the momentum transfer from a gas beam impinging on a surface attached to the balance, this measurement depends on the accommodation coefficients of the atoms with the surface and the distribution of the recoil. A torsion balance is described for making absolute flux measurements independent of recoil effects. The torsion balance is a conventional taut suspension wire design and the Young modulus of the wire determines the relationship between the displacement and the applied torque. A compensating magnetic field is applied to maintain zero displacement and provide critical damping. The unique feature is to couple the impinging gas beam to the torsion balance via a Wood's horn, i.e., a thin wall tube with a gradual 90 deg bend. Just as light is trapped in a Wood's horn by specular reflection from the curved surfaces, the gas beam diffuses through the tube. Instead of trapping the beam, the end of the tube is open so that the atoms exit the tube at 90 deg to their original direction. Therefore, all of the forward momentum of the gas beam is transferred to the torsion balance independent of the angle of reflection from the surfaces inside the tube.

  7. Analysis of absolute flatness testing in sub-stitching interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Xin; Xu, Fuchao; Xie, Weimin; Xing, Tingwen

    2016-09-01

    Sub-aperture stitching is an effective way to extend the lateral and vertical dynamic range of a conventional interferometer. The test accuracy can be achieved by removing the error of reference surface by the absolute testing method. When the testing accuracy (repeatability and reproducibility) is close to 1nm, in addition to the reference surface, other factors will also affect the measuring accuracy such as environment, zoom magnification, stitching precision, tooling and fixture, the characteristics of optical materials and so on. In the thousand level cleanroom, we establish a good environment system. Long time stability, temperature controlled at 22°+/-0.02°.The humidity and noise are controlled in a certain range. We establish a stitching system in the clean room. The vibration testing system is used to test the vibration. The air pressure testing system is also used. In the motion system, we control the tilt error no more than 4 second to reduce the error. The angle error can be tested by the autocollimator and double grating reading head.

  8. Absolute nuclear material assay using count distribution (LAMBDA) space

    DOEpatents

    Prasad, Mano K.; Snyderman, Neal J.; Rowland, Mark S.

    2015-12-01

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  9. Absolute nuclear material assay using count distribution (LAMBDA) space

    DOEpatents

    Prasad, Manoj K [Pleasanton, CA; Snyderman, Neal J [Berkeley, CA; Rowland, Mark S [Alamo, CA

    2012-06-05

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  10. Positioning, alignment and absolute pointing of the ANTARES neutrino telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fehr, F.; Distefano, C.; Antares Collaboration

    2010-01-01

    A precise detector alignment and absolute pointing is crucial for point-source searches. The ANTARES neutrino telescope utilises an array of hydrophones, tiltmeters and compasses for the relative positioning of the optical sensors. The absolute calibration is accomplished by long-baseline low-frequency triangulation of the acoustic reference devices in the deep-sea with a differential GPS system at the sea surface. The absolute pointing can be independently verified by detecting the shadow of the Moon in cosmic rays.

  11. Absolute Thermal SST Measurements over the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Good, W. S.; Warden, R.; Kaptchen, P. F.; Finch, T.; Emery, W. J.

    2010-12-01

    Climate monitoring and natural disaster rapid assessment require baseline measurements that can be tracked over time to distinguish anthropogenic versus natural changes to the Earth system. Disasters like the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill require constant monitoring to assess the potential environmental and economic impacts. Absolute calibration and validation of Earth-observing sensors is needed to allow for comparison of temporally separated data sets and provide accurate information to policy makers. The Ball Experimental Sea Surface Temperature (BESST) radiometer was designed and built by Ball Aerospace to provide a well calibrated measure of sea surface temperature (SST) from an unmanned aerial system (UAS). Currently, emissive skin SST observed by satellite infrared radiometers is validated by shipborne instruments that are expensive to deploy and can only take a few data samples along the ship track to overlap within a single satellite pixel. Implementation on a UAS will allow BESST to map the full footprint of a satellite pixel and perform averaging to remove any local variability due to the difference in footprint size of the instruments. It also enables the capability to study this sub-pixel variability to determine if smaller scale effects need to be accounted for in models to improve forecasting of ocean events. In addition to satellite sensor validation, BESST can distinguish meter scale variations in SST which could be used to remotely monitor and assess thermal pollution in rivers and coastal areas as well as study diurnal and seasonal changes to bodies of water that impact the ocean ecosystem. BESST was recently deployed on a conventional Twin Otter airplane for measurements over the Gulf of Mexico to access the thermal properties of the ocean surface being affected by the oil spill. Results of these measurements will be presented along with ancillary sensor data used to eliminate false signals including UV and Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR

  12. Absolute and Convective Instability of a Liquid Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, S. P.; Hudman, M.; Chen, J. N.

    1999-01-01

    The existence of absolute instability in a liquid jet has been predicted for some time. The disturbance grows in time and propagates both upstream and downstream in an absolutely unstable liquid jet. The image of absolute instability is captured in the NASA 2.2 sec drop tower and reported here. The transition from convective to absolute instability is observed experimentally. The experimental results are compared with the theoretical predictions on the transition Weber number as functions of the Reynolds number. The role of interfacial shear relative to all other relevant forces which cause the onset of jet breakup is explained.

  13. An Analysis of Model Scale Data Transformation to Full Scale Flight Using Chevron Nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Clifford; Bridges, James

    2003-01-01

    Ground-based model scale aeroacoustic data is frequently used to predict the results of flight tests while saving time and money. The value of a model scale test is therefore dependent on how well the data can be transformed to the full scale conditions. In the spring of 2000, a model scale test was conducted to prove the value of chevron nozzles as a noise reduction device for turbojet applications. The chevron nozzle reduced noise by 2 EPNdB at an engine pressure ratio of 2.3 compared to that of the standard conic nozzle. This result led to a full scale flyover test in the spring of 2001 to verify these results. The flyover test confirmed the 2 EPNdB reduction predicted by the model scale test one year earlier. However, further analysis of the data revealed that the spectra and directivity, both on an OASPL and PNL basis, do not agree in either shape or absolute level. This paper explores these differences in an effort to improve the data transformation from model scale to full scale.

  14. Absolute determination of local tropospheric OH concentrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armerding, Wolfgang; Comes, Franz-Josef

    1994-01-01

    Long path absorption (LPA) according to Lambert Beer's law is a method to determine absolute concentrations of trace gases such as tropospheric OH. We have developed a LPA instrument which is based on a rapid tuning of the light source which is a frequency doubled dye laser. The laser is tuned across two or three OH absorption features around 308 nm with a scanning speed of 0.07 cm(exp -1)/microsecond and a repetition rate of 1.3 kHz. This high scanning speed greatly reduces the fluctuation of the light intensity caused by the atmosphere. To obtain the required high sensitivity the laser output power is additionally made constant and stabilized by an electro-optical modulator. The present sensitivity is of the order of a few times 10(exp 5) OH per cm(exp 3) for an acquisition time of a minute and an absorption path length of only 1200 meters so that a folding of the optical path in a multireflection cell was possible leading to a lateral dimension of the cell of a few meters. This allows local measurements to be made. Tropospheric measurements have been carried out in 1991 resulting in the determination of OH diurnal variation at specific days in late summer. Comparison with model calculations have been made. Interferences are mainly due to SO2 absorption. The problem of OH self generation in the multireflection cell is of minor extent. This could be shown by using different experimental methods. The minimum-maximum signal to noise ratio is about 8 x 10(exp -4) for a single scan. Due to the small size of the absorption cell the realization of an open air laboratory is possible in which by use of an additional UV light source or by additional fluxes of trace gases the chemistry can be changed under controlled conditions allowing kinetic studies of tropospheric photochemistry to be made in open air.

  15. Absolute Radiometric Calibration of KOMPSAT-3A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, H. Y.; Shin, D. Y.; Kim, J. S.; Seo, D. C.; Choi, C. U.

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents a vicarious radiometric calibration of the Korea Multi-Purpose Satellite-3A (KOMPSAT-3A) performed by the Korea Aerospace Research Institute (KARI) and the Pukyong National University Remote Sensing Group (PKNU RSG) in 2015.The primary stages of this study are summarized as follows: (1) A field campaign to determine radiometric calibrated target fields was undertaken in Mongolia and South Korea. Surface reflectance data obtained in the campaign were input to a radiative transfer code that predicted at-sensor radiance. Through this process, equations and parameters were derived for the KOMPSAT-3A sensor to enable the conversion of calibrated DN to physical units, such as at-sensor radiance or TOA reflectance. (2) To validate the absolute calibration coefficients for the KOMPSAT-3A sensor, we performed a radiometric validation with a comparison of KOMPSAT-3A and Landsat-8 TOA reflectance using one of the six PICS (Libya 4). Correlations between top-of-atmosphere (TOA) radiances and the spectral band responses of the KOMPSAT-3A sensors at the Zuunmod, Mongolia and Goheung, South Korea sites were significant for multispectral bands. The average difference in TOA reflectance between KOMPSAT-3A and Landsat-8 image over the Libya 4, Libya site in the red-green-blue (RGB) region was under 3%, whereas in the NIR band, the TOA reflectance of KOMPSAT-3A was lower than the that of Landsat-8 due to the difference in the band passes of two sensors. The KOMPSAT-3Aensor includes a band pass near 940 nm that can be strongly absorbed by water vapor and therefore displayed low reflectance. Toovercome this, we need to undertake a detailed analysis using rescale methods, such as the spectral bandwidth adjustment factor.

  16. The coupling between inner and outer scales in a zero pressure boundary layer evaluated using a Hölder exponent framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keylock, Christopher J.; Ganapathasubramani, Bharath; Monty, Jason; Hutchins, Nick; Marusic, Ivan

    2016-04-01

    This work considers the connectivity between large and small scales in boundary-layer turbulence by formalizing the modulation effect of the small scales by the large in terms of the pointwise Hölder condition for the small scales. We re-investigate a previously published dataset from this perspective and are able to characterize the coupling effectively using the (cross-)correlative relations between the large scale velocity and the small scale Hölder exponents. The nature of this coupling varies as a function of dimensionless distance from the wall based on inner-scaling, {y}+, as well as on the boundary-layer height, δ. In terms of the fundamental change in the sign of the coupling between large and small scales, the critical height appears to be {y}+∼ 1000. Below this height, small scale structures are associated with (and occur earlier than) maxima in the large scale velocity. Above this height, while the lag is similar in magnitude, the small scale structures are associated with minima in the large scale velocity. To consider these results further, we introduce a modified quadrant analysis and show that it is the coupling to the large scale low velocity state that is critical for the dynamics.

  17. Absolute magnitude estimation and relative judgement approaches to subjective workload assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vidulich, Michael A.; Tsang, Pamela S.

    1987-01-01

    Two rating scale techniques employing an absolute magnitude estimation method, were compared to a relative judgment method for assessing subjective workload. One of the absolute estimation techniques used was an unidimensional overall workload scale and the other was the multidimensional NASA-Task Load Index technique. Thomas Saaty's Analytic Hierarchy Process was the unidimensional relative judgment method used. These techniques were used to assess the subjective workload of various single- and dual-tracking conditions. The validity of the techniques was defined as their ability to detect the same phenomena observed in the tracking performance. Reliability was assessed by calculating test-retest correlations. Within the context of the experiment, the Saaty Analytic Hierarchy Process was found to be superior in validity and reliability. These findings suggest that the relative judgment method would be an effective addition to the currently available subjective workload assessment techniques.

  18. Determining Absolute Zero Using a Tuning Fork

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldader, Jeffrey D.

    2008-01-01

    The Celsius and Kelvin temperature scales, we tell our students, are related. We explain that a change in temperature of 1 degree C corresponds to a change of 1 Kelvin and that atoms and molecules have zero kinetic energy at zero Kelvin, -273 degrees C. In this paper, we will show how students can derive the relationship between the Celsius and…

  19. The effects of wettability and trapping on relationships between interfacial area, capillary pressure and saturation in porous media: A pore-scale network modeling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raeesi, Behrooz; Piri, Mohammad

    2009-10-01

    SummaryWe use a three-dimensional mixed-wet random pore-scale network model to investigate the impact of wettability and trapping on the relationship between interfacial area, capillary pressure and saturation in two-phase drainage and imbibition processes. The model is a three-dimensional network of interconnected pores and throats of various geometrical shapes. It allows multiple phases to be present in each capillary element in wetting and spreading layers, as well as occupying the center of the pore space. Two different random networks that represent the pore space in Berea and a Saudi Arabia reservoir sandstone are used in this study. We allow the wettability of the rock surfaces contacted by oil to alter after primary drainage. The model takes into account both contact angle and trapping hystereses. We model primary oil drainage and water flooding for mixed-wet conditions, and secondary oil injection for a water-wet system. The total interfacial area for pores and throats are calculated when the system is at capillary equilibrium. They include contributions from the arc menisci (AMs) between the bulk and corner fluids, and from the main terminal menisci (MTMs) between different bulk fluids. We investigate hysteresis in these relationships by performing water injection into systems of varying wettability and initial water saturation. We show that trapping and contact angle hystereses significantly affect the interfacial area. In a strongly water-wet system, a sharp increase is observed at the beginning of water flood, which shifts the area to a higher level than primary drainage. As we change the wettability of the system from strongly water-wet to strongly oil-wet, the trapped oil saturation decreases significantly. Starting water flood from intermediate water saturations, greater than the irreducible water saturation, can also affect the non-wetting phase entrapment, resulting in different interfacial area behaviors. This can increase the interfacial area

  20. Numerical modeling of the simulated gas hydrate production test at Mallik 2L-38 in the pilot scale pressure reservoir LARS - Applying the "foamy oil" model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abendroth, Sven; Thaler, Jan; Klump, Jens; Schicks, Judith; Uddin, Mafiz

    2014-05-01

    In the context of the German joint project SUGAR (Submarine Gas Hydrate Reservoirs: exploration, extraction and transport) we conducted a series of experiments in the LArge Reservoir Simulator (LARS) at the German Research Centre of Geosciences Potsdam. These experiments allow us to investigate the formation and dissociation of hydrates at large scale laboratory conditions. We performed an experiment similar to the field-test conditions of the production test in the Mallik gas hydrate field (Mallik 2L-38) in the Beaufort Mackenzie Delta of the Canadian Arctic. The aim of this experiment was to study the transport behavior of fluids in gas hydrate reservoirs during depressurization (see also Heeschen et al. and Priegnitz et al., this volume). The experimental results from LARS are used to provide details about processes inside the pressure vessel, to validate the models through history matching, and to feed back into the design of future experiments. In experiments in LARS the amount of methane produced from gas hydrates was much lower than expected. Previously published models predict a methane production rate higher than the one observed in experiments and field studies (Uddin et al. 2010; Wright et al. 2011). The authors of the aforementioned studies point out that the current modeling approach overestimates the gas production rate when modeling gas production by depressurization. They suggest that trapping of gas bubbles inside the porous medium is responsible for the reduced gas production rate. They point out that this behavior of multi-phase flow is not well explained by a "residual oil" model, but rather resembles a "foamy oil" model. Our study applies Uddin's (2010) "foamy oil" model and combines it with history matches of our experiments in LARS. Our results indicate a better agreement between experimental and model results when using the "foamy oil" model instead of conventional models of gas flow in water. References Uddin M., Wright J.F. and Coombe D