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Sample records for absolute pressure transducer

  1. COMPARISON OF VENTED AND ABSOLUTE PRESSURE TRANSDUCERS FOR WATER-LEVEL MONITORING IN HANFORD SITE CENTRAL PLATEAU WELLS

    SciTech Connect

    MCDONALD JP

    2011-09-08

    Automated water-level data collected using vented pressure transducers deployed in Hanford Site Central Plateau wells commonly display more variability than manual tape measurements in response to barometric pressure fluctuations. To explain this difference, it was hypothesized that vented pressure transducers installed in some wells are subject to barometric pressure effects that reduce water-level measurement accuracy. Vented pressure transducers use a vent tube, which is open to the atmosphere at land surface, to supply air pressure to the transducer housing for barometric compensation so the transducer measurements will represent only the water pressure. When using vented transducers, the assumption is made that the air pressure between land surface and the well bore is in equilibrium. By comparison, absolute pressure transducers directly measure the air pressure within the wellbore. Barometric compensation is achieved by subtracting the well bore air pressure measurement from the total pressure measured by a second transducer submerged in the water. Thus, no assumption of air pressure equilibrium is needed. In this study, water-level measurements were collected from the same Central Plateau wells using both vented and absolute pressure transducers to evaluate the different methods of barometric compensation. Manual tape measurements were also collected to evaluate the transducers. Measurements collected during this study demonstrated that the vented pressure transducers over-responded to barometric pressure fluctuations due to a pressure disequilibrium between the air within the wellbores and the atmosphere at land surface. The disequilibrium is thought to be caused by the relatively long time required for barometric pressure changes to equilibrate between land surface and the deep vadose zone and may be exacerbated by the restriction of air flow between the well bore and the atmosphere due to the presence of sample pump landing plates and well caps. The

  2. PRESSURE TRANSDUCER

    DOEpatents

    Sander, H.H.

    1959-10-01

    A pressure or mechanical force transducer particularly adaptable to miniature telemetering systems is described. Basically the device consists of a transistor located within a magnetic field adapted to change in response to mechanical force. The conduction characteristics of the transistor in turn vary proportionally with changes in the magnetic flux across the transistor such that the output (either frequency of amplitude) of the transistor circuit is proportional to mechanical force or pressure.

  3. Pressure transducer

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Thomas T.; Roop, Conard J.; Schmidt, Kenneth J.; Gunchin, Elmer R.

    1989-01-01

    A pressure transducer suitable for use in high temperature environments includes two pairs of induction coils, each pair being bifilarly wound together, and each pair of coils connected as opposite arms of a four arm circuit; an electrically conductive target moveably positioned between the coil pairs and connected to a diaphragm such that deflection of the diaphragm causes axial movement of the target and an unbalance in the bridge output.

  4. Pressure transducer

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, T.T.; Roop, C.J.; Schmidt, K.J.; Gunchin, E.R.

    1987-02-13

    A pressure transducer suitable for use in high temperature environments includes two pairs of induction coils, each pair being bifilarly wound together, and each pair of coils connected as opposite arms of a four arm circuit; an electrically conductive target moveably positioned between the coil pairs and connected to a diaphragm such that deflection of the diaphragm causes axial movement of the target and an unbalance in the bridge output. 7 figs.

  5. Inertia diaphragm pressure transducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seegmiller, H. L. B.

    1971-01-01

    Transducer measures gas pressure profiles in high temperature, short duration, gas flows usually found in devices where pressure pulses may have durations of few microseconds to several milliseconds. Assembly includes fluid delay line, delay chamber, and flow restrictor for equalizing steady state pressure on diaphragm's sides

  6. Wellbore pressure transducer

    DOEpatents

    Shuck, Lowell Z.

    1979-01-01

    Subterranean earth formations containing energy values are subjected to hydraulic fracturing procedures to enhance the recovery of the energy values. These fractures are induced in the earth formation by pumping liquid into the wellbore penetrating the earth formation until the pressure of the liquid is sufficient to fracture the earth formation adjacent to the wellbore. The present invention is directed to a transducer which is positionable within the wellbore to generate a signal indicative of the fracture initiation useful for providing a timing signal to equipment for seismic mapping of the fracture as it occurs and for providing a measurement of the pressure at which the fracture is initiated.

  7. System for calibrating pressure transducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rollins, G. N. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A system for calibrating a pressure transducer which has a reference portion and an active portion is reported. A miniature selector valve is positioned immediately adjacent the pressure transducer. A reference pressure, known pressure, and unknown pressure can be selectively admitted to the active side of the pressure transducer by the selector valve to enable calibration of the transducer. A valve admits pressure to the selector valve which has a piston and floating piston arrangement which allows proper selection with very small linear movement.

  8. Methods to calibrate the absolute receive sensitivity of single-element, focused transducers

    PubMed Central

    Rich, Kyle T.; Mast, T. Douglas

    2015-01-01

    Absolute pressure measurements of acoustic emissions by single-element, focused passive cavitation detectors would be facilitated by improved wideband receive calibration techniques. Here, calibration methods were developed to characterize the absolute, frequency-dependent receive sensitivity of a spherically focused, single-element transducer using pulse-echo and pitch-catch techniques. Validation of these calibration methods on a focused receiver were made by generating a pulse from a small diameter source at the focus of the transducer and comparing the absolute pressure measured by a calibrated hydrophone to that of the focused transducer using the receive sensitivities determined here. PMID:26428812

  9. Methods to calibrate the absolute receive sensitivity of single-element, focused transducers.

    PubMed

    Rich, Kyle T; Mast, T Douglas

    2015-09-01

    Absolute pressure measurements of acoustic emissions by single-element, focused passive cavitation detectors would be facilitated by improved wideband receive calibration techniques. Here, calibration methods were developed to characterize the absolute, frequency-dependent receive sensitivity of a spherically focused, single-element transducer using pulse-echo and pitch-catch techniques. Validation of these calibration methods on a focused receiver were made by generating a pulse from a small diameter source at the focus of the transducer and comparing the absolute pressure measured by a calibrated hydrophone to that of the focused transducer using the receive sensitivities determined here. PMID:26428812

  10. Arterial pulse wave pressure transducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, C.; Gorelick, D.; Chen, W. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    An arterial pulse wave pressure transducer is introduced. The transducer is comprised of a fluid filled cavity having a flexible membrane disposed over the cavity and adapted to be placed on the skin over an artery. An arterial pulse wave creates pressure pulses in the fluid which are transduced, by a pressure sensitive transistor in direct contact with the fluid, into an electric signal. The electrical signal is representative of the pulse waves and can be recorded so as to monitor changes in the elasticity of the arterial walls.

  11. Dynamic Calibration of Pressure Transducers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hess, R. W.; Davis, W. T.; Davis, P. A.

    1985-01-01

    Sinusoidal calibration signal produced in 4- to 100-Hz range. Portable oscillating-pressure device measures dynamic characteristics of pressure transducers installed in models or aircraft at frequency and oscillating-pressure ranges encountered during unsteady-pressure-measurement tests. Calibration is over range of frequencies and amplitudes not available with commercial acoustic calibration devices.

  12. Absolute calibration technique for broadband ultrasonic transducers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yost, William T. (Inventor); Cantrell, John H. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    Calibrating an ultrasonic transducer can be performed with a reduced number of calculations and testing. A wide-band pulser is connected to an ultrasonic transducer under test to generate ultrasonic waves in a liquid. A single frequency is transmitted to the electrostatic acoustic transducer (ESAT) and the voltage change produced is monitored. Then a broadband ultrasonic pulse is generated by the ultrasonic transducer and received by the ESAT. The output of the ESAT is amplified and input to a digitized oscilloscope for fast Fourier transform. The resulting plot is normalized with the monitored signal from the single frequency pulse. The plot is then corrected for characteristics of the membrane and diffraction effects. The transfer function of the final plot is determined. The transfer function gives the final sensitivity of the ultrasonic transducer as a function of frequency. The advantage of the system is the speed of calibrating the transducer by a reduced number of measurements and removal of the membrane and diffraction effects.

  13. Automatic calibration system for pressure transducers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1968-01-01

    Fifty-channel automatic pressure transducer calibration system increases quantity and accuracy for test evaluation calibration. The pressure transducers are installed in an environmental tests chamber and manifolded to connect them to a pressure balance which is uniform.

  14. Self-Calibrating Pressure Transducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lueck, Dale E. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A self-calibrating pressure transducer is disclosed. The device uses an embedded zirconia membrane which pumps a determined quantity of oxygen into the device. The associated pressure can be determined, and thus, the transducer pressure readings can be calibrated. The zirconia membrane obtains oxygen .from the surrounding environment when possible. Otherwise, an oxygen reservoir or other source is utilized. In another embodiment, a reversible fuel cell assembly is used to pump oxygen and hydrogen into the system. Since a known amount of gas is pumped across the cell, the pressure produced can be determined, and thus, the device can be calibrated. An isolation valve system is used to allow the device to be calibrated in situ. Calibration is optionally automated so that calibration can be continuously monitored. The device is preferably a fully integrated MEMS device. Since the device can be calibrated without removing it from the process, reductions in costs and down time are realized.

  15. Low-Stress Sealing of Pressure Transducers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kroy, R. E.

    1985-01-01

    Compliant washer seals high pressures without excessive compressive stress on transducer. Conformal washer serves as effective seal for transducer passing through walls of pressure vessel. Washer makes it unnecessary to tighten mounting nut to high torque, which could damage transducer or adversely affect accuracy. Washer also used to seal mountings for temperature sensors and other devices.

  16. Thermodynamic Pressure/Temperature Transducer Health Check

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Immer, Christopher D. (Inventor); Eckhoff, Anthony (Inventor); Medelius, Pedro J. (Inventor); Deyoe, Richard T. (Inventor); Starr, Stanley O. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A device and procedure for checking the health of a pressure transducer in situ is provided. The procedure includes measuring a fixed change in pressure above ambient pressure and a fixed change in pressure below ambient pressure. This is done by first sealing an enclosed volume around the transducer with a valve. A piston inside the sealed volume is increasing the pressure. A fixed pressure below ambient pressure is obtained by opening the valve, driving the piston The output of the pressure transducer is recorded for both the overpressuring and the underpressuring. By comparing this data with data taken during a preoperative calibration, the health of the transducer is determined from the linearity, the hysteresis, and the repeatability of its output. The further addition of a thermometer allows constant offset error in the transducer output to be determined.

  17. AUTOMATIC CALIBRATING SYSTEM FOR PRESSURE TRANSDUCERS

    DOEpatents

    Amonette, E.L.; Rodgers, G.W.

    1958-01-01

    An automatic system for calibrating a number of pressure transducers is described. The disclosed embodiment of the invention uses a mercurial manometer to measure the air pressure applied to the transducer. A servo system follows the top of the mercury column as the pressure is changed and operates an analog- to-digital converter This converter furnishes electrical pulses, each representing an increment of pressure change, to a reversible counterThe transducer furnishes a signal at each calibration point, causing an electric typewriter and a card-punch machine to record the pressure at the instant as indicated by the counter. Another counter keeps track of the calibration points so that a number identifying each point is recorded with the corresponding pressure. A special relay control system controls the pressure trend and programs the sequential calibration of several transducers.

  18. Portable high precision pressure transducer system

    DOEpatents

    Piper, Thomas C.; Morgan, John P.; Marchant, Norman J.; Bolton, Steven M.

    1994-01-01

    A high precision pressure transducer system for checking the reliability of a second pressure transducer system used to monitor the level of a fluid confined in a holding tank. Since the response of the pressure transducer is temperature sensitive, it is continually housed in an battery powered oven which is configured to provide a temperature stable environment at specified temperature for an extended period of time. Further, a high precision temperature stabilized oscillator and counter are coupled to a single board computer to accurately determine the pressure transducer oscillation frequency and convert it to an applied pressure. All of the components are powered by the batteries which during periods of availability of line power are charged by an on board battery charger. The pressure readings outputs are transmitted to a line printer and a vacuum florescent display.

  19. Portable high precision pressure transducer system

    DOEpatents

    Piper, T.C.; Morgan, J.P.; Marchant, N.J.; Bolton, S.M.

    1994-04-26

    A high precision pressure transducer system is described for checking the reliability of a second pressure transducer system used to monitor the level of a fluid confined in a holding tank. Since the response of the pressure transducer is temperature sensitive, it is continually housed in an battery powered oven which is configured to provide a temperature stable environment at specified temperature for an extended period of time. Further, a high precision temperature stabilized oscillator and counter are coupled to a single board computer to accurately determine the pressure transducer oscillation frequency and convert it to an applied pressure. All of the components are powered by the batteries which during periods of availability of line power are charged by an on board battery charger. The pressure readings outputs are transmitted to a line printer and a vacuum fluorescent display. 2 figures.

  20. Pressure transducer and system for cryogenic environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, John J. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A silicon pressure die is bonded to a borosilicate substrate above the pneumatic port. A Wheatstone bridge circuit is formed on the silicon pressure die and has bridge elements of silicon doped with boron to a deposit density level of approximately 1 x 10(exp 19)-10(exp 21) boron/cc. A current source is provided to excite the Wheatstone bridge circuit. In addition, a temperature sensor is provided to provide temperature readings. An array may be formed of the resulting pressure transducers. This unique solution of materials permits operation of a pressure transducer in cryogenic environments.

  1. Flutter spectral measurements using stationary pressure transducers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurkov, A. P.

    1980-01-01

    Engine-order sampling was used to eliminate the integral harmonics from the flutter spectra corresponding to a case-mounted static pressure transducer. Using the optical displacement data, it was demonstrated that the blade-order sampling of pressure data may yield erroneous results due to the interference caused by blade vibration. Two methods are presented which effectively eliminate this interference yielding the blade-pressure-difference spectra. The phase difference between the differential-pressure and the displacement spectra was evaluated.

  2. High pressure, high temperature transducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vrolyk, John J. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    The pressure measurement system utilizes two bourdon tubes with an active side connected to a test specimen and a reference side connected to an outside source. The tubes are attached to a single extensometer measuring relative displacement. The active side deflects when gases vent a specimen failure. The reference side is independently pressurized to a test pressure and provides a zero reference while providing a pressure calibration reference for the active side. The deflection noted by the active side at specimen failure is duplicated on the reference side by venting until an appropriate magnitude of pressure versus deflection is determined. In this way the pressure which existed inside the specimen prior to failure can be determined.

  3. Pressure transducer system is force-balanced, has digital output

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Forced-balanced pressure transducer and associated circuitry controls pressure testing of space equipment systems under actual operating conditions. The transducer and circuitry automatically converts the sensed pressure to digital form.

  4. New type pressure transducer for severe thermal environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    Pressure transducer used in a rocket motor chamber to measure the amplitudes and frequencies of dynamic pressures /exceeding 2000 psi/ occurring during unstable combustion. the transducer utilizes a transpirational cooled porous beryllium plug and pressure transmitting column.

  5. Evolvable Cryogenics (ECRYO) Pressure Transducer Calibration Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diaz, Carlos E., Jr.

    2015-01-01

    This paper provides a summary of the findings of recent activities conducted by Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC) In-Space Propulsion Branch and MSFC's Metrology and Calibration Lab to assess the performance of current "state of the art" pressure transducers for use in long duration storage and transfer of cryogenic propellants. A brief historical narrative in this paper describes the Evolvable Cryogenics program and the relevance of these activities to the program. This paper also provides a review of three separate test activities performed throughout this effort, including: (1) the calibration of several pressure transducer designs in a liquid nitrogen cryogenic environmental chamber, (2) the calibration of a pressure transducer in a liquid helium Dewar, and (3) the calibration of several pressure transducers at temperatures ranging from 20 to 70 degrees Kelvin (K) using a "cryostat" environmental chamber. These three separate test activities allowed for study of the sensors along a temperature range from 4 to 300 K. The combined data shows that both the slope and intercept of the sensor's calibration curve vary as a function of temperature. This homogeneous function is contrary to the linearly decreasing relationship assumed at the start of this investigation. Consequently, the data demonstrates the need for lookup tables to change the slope and intercept used by any data acquisition system. This ultimately would allow for more accurate pressure measurements at the desired temperature range. This paper concludes with a review of a request for information (RFI) survey conducted amongst different suppliers to determine the availability of current "state of the art" flight-qualified pressure transducers. The survey identifies requirements that are most difficult for the suppliers to meet, most notably the capability to validate the sensor's performance at temperatures below 70 K.

  6. "Zero-Mass" Noninvasive Pressure Transducers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartley, Frank T.

    2009-01-01

    Extremely lightweight, compact, noninvasive, rugged, relatively inexpensive strain-gauge transducers have been developed for use in measuring pressures of fluids in tubes. These gauges were originally intended for measuring pressures of spacecraft-propulsion fluids, but they are also attractive for use in numerous terrestrial applications especially those involving fluids that are extremely chemically reactive, fluids that must be isolated for hygienic purposes, fluids that must be allowed to flow without obstruction, and fluid-containing tubes exposed to severe environments. A basic pressure transducer of this type comprises one or more pair(s) of thin-film strain gauges integral with a tube that contains the fluid of interest. Following established strain-gauge practice, the gauges in each pair are connected into opposite arms of a Wheatstone bridge (see figure). Typically, each pressure transducer includes one pair (the active pair) of strain gauges for measuring the hoop stress proportional to the pressure of the fluid in the tube and another pair (the dummy pair) of strain gauges that are nominally unstrained: The dummy gauges are mounted on a substrate that is made of the same material as that of the tube. The substrate is welded to the tube at only one spot so that stresses and strains are not coupled from the tube into the substrate. The dummy strain gauges measure neutral strains (basically, strains associated with thermal expansion), so that the neutral-strain contribution can be subtracted out of the final gauge reading.

  7. 21 CFR 870.2870 - Catheter tip pressure transducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Catheter tip pressure transducer. 870.2870 Section... pressure transducer. (a) Identification. A catheter tip pressure transducer is a device incorporated into... change in relation to changes in blood pressure. These changes are transmitted to accessory equipment...

  8. 21 CFR 870.2870 - Catheter tip pressure transducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Catheter tip pressure transducer. 870.2870 Section... pressure transducer. (a) Identification. A catheter tip pressure transducer is a device incorporated into... change in relation to changes in blood pressure. These changes are transmitted to accessory equipment...

  9. 21 CFR 870.2870 - Catheter tip pressure transducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Catheter tip pressure transducer. 870.2870 Section... pressure transducer. (a) Identification. A catheter tip pressure transducer is a device incorporated into... change in relation to changes in blood pressure. These changes are transmitted to accessory equipment...

  10. 21 CFR 870.2850 - Extravascular blood pressure transducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Extravascular blood pressure transducer. 870.2850... blood pressure transducer. (a) Identification. An extravascular blood pressure transducer is a device used to measure blood pressure by changes in the mechanical or electrical properties of the device....

  11. 21 CFR 870.2850 - Extravascular blood pressure transducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Extravascular blood pressure transducer. 870.2850... blood pressure transducer. (a) Identification. An extravascular blood pressure transducer is a device used to measure blood pressure by changes in the mechanical or electrical properties of the device....

  12. 21 CFR 870.2850 - Extravascular blood pressure transducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Extravascular blood pressure transducer. 870.2850... blood pressure transducer. (a) Identification. An extravascular blood pressure transducer is a device used to measure blood pressure by changes in the mechanical or electrical properties of the device....

  13. 21 CFR 870.2850 - Extravascular blood pressure transducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Extravascular blood pressure transducer. 870.2850... blood pressure transducer. (a) Identification. An extravascular blood pressure transducer is a device used to measure blood pressure by changes in the mechanical or electrical properties of the device....

  14. 21 CFR 870.2850 - Extravascular blood pressure transducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Extravascular blood pressure transducer. 870.2850... blood pressure transducer. (a) Identification. An extravascular blood pressure transducer is a device used to measure blood pressure by changes in the mechanical or electrical properties of the device....

  15. 21 CFR 870.2870 - Catheter tip pressure transducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... change in relation to changes in blood pressure. These changes are transmitted to accessory equipment for... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Catheter tip pressure transducer. 870.2870 Section... pressure transducer. (a) Identification. A catheter tip pressure transducer is a device incorporated...

  16. Infrared mapping of ultrasound fields generated by medical transducers: Feasibility of determining absolute intensity levels

    PubMed Central

    Khokhlova, Vera A.; Shmeleva, Svetlana M.; Gavrilov, Leonid R.; Martin, Eleanor; Sadhoo, Neelaksh; Shaw, Adam

    2013-01-01

    Considerable progress has been achieved in the use of infrared (IR) techniques for qualitative mapping of acoustic fields of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) transducers. The authors have previously developed and demonstrated a method based on IR camera measurement of the temperature rise induced in an absorber less than 2 mm thick by ultrasonic bursts of less than 1 s duration. The goal of this paper was to make the method more quantitative and estimate the absolute intensity distributions by determining an overall calibration factor for the absorber and camera system. The implemented approach involved correlating the temperature rise measured in an absorber using an IR camera with the pressure distribution measured in water using a hydrophone. The measurements were conducted for two HIFU transducers and a flat physiotherapy transducer of 1 MHz frequency. Corresponding correction factors between the free field intensity and temperature were obtained and allowed the conversion of temperature images to intensity distributions. The system described here was able to map in good detail focused and unfocused ultrasound fields with sub-millimeter structure and with local time average intensity from below 0.1 W/cm2 to at least 50 W/cm2. Significantly higher intensities could be measured simply by reducing the duty cycle. PMID:23927199

  17. Infrared mapping of ultrasound fields generated by medical transducers: feasibility of determining absolute intensity levels.

    PubMed

    Khokhlova, Vera A; Shmeleva, Svetlana M; Gavrilov, Leonid R; Martin, Eleanor; Sadhoo, Neelaksh; Shaw, Adam

    2013-08-01

    Considerable progress has been achieved in the use of infrared (IR) techniques for qualitative mapping of acoustic fields of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) transducers. The authors have previously developed and demonstrated a method based on IR camera measurement of the temperature rise induced in an absorber less than 2 mm thick by ultrasonic bursts of less than 1 s duration. The goal of this paper was to make the method more quantitative and estimate the absolute intensity distributions by determining an overall calibration factor for the absorber and camera system. The implemented approach involved correlating the temperature rise measured in an absorber using an IR camera with the pressure distribution measured in water using a hydrophone. The measurements were conducted for two HIFU transducers and a flat physiotherapy transducer of 1 MHz frequency. Corresponding correction factors between the free field intensity and temperature were obtained and allowed the conversion of temperature images to intensity distributions. The system described here was able to map in good detail focused and unfocused ultrasound fields with sub-millimeter structure and with local time average intensity from below 0.1 W/cm(2) to at least 50 W/cm(2). Significantly higher intensities could be measured simply by reducing the duty cycle. PMID:23927199

  18. A dynamic pressure source for the calibration of pressure transducers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vezzetti, C. F.; Hilten, J. S.; Mayo-Wells, J. F.; Lederer, P. S.

    1976-01-01

    A dynamic pressure source is described for producing sinusoidally varying pressures of up to 34 kPa zero to peak, over the frequency range of approximately 50 Hz to 2 kHz. The source is intended for the dynamic calibration of pressure transducers. The transducer to be calibrated is mounted near the base of the thick walled aluminum tube forming the vessel so that the pressure sensitive element is in contact with the liquid in the tube. A section of the tube is filled with small steel balls to damp the motion of the 10-St dimethyl siloxane working fluid in order to extend the useful frquency range to higher frequencies than would be provided by an undamped system. The dynamic response of six transducers provided by the sponsor was evaluated using the pressure sources; the results of these calibrations are given.

  19. 21 CFR 868.2900 - Gas pressure transducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Gas pressure transducer. 868.2900 Section 868.2900...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2900 Gas pressure transducer. (a) Identification. A gas pressure transducer is a device intended for medical purposes that is used to convert...

  20. 21 CFR 868.2875 - Differential pressure transducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Differential pressure transducer. 868.2875 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2875 Differential pressure transducer. (a) Identification. A differential pressure transducer is a two-chambered device intended...

  1. 21 CFR 868.2900 - Gas pressure transducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Gas pressure transducer. 868.2900 Section 868.2900...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2900 Gas pressure transducer. (a) Identification. A gas pressure transducer is a device intended for medical purposes that is used to convert...

  2. 21 CFR 868.2900 - Gas pressure transducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Gas pressure transducer. 868.2900 Section 868.2900...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2900 Gas pressure transducer. (a) Identification. A gas pressure transducer is a device intended for medical purposes that is used to convert...

  3. 21 CFR 868.2875 - Differential pressure transducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Differential pressure transducer. 868.2875 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2875 Differential pressure transducer. (a) Identification. A differential pressure transducer is a two-chambered device intended...

  4. 21 CFR 868.2900 - Gas pressure transducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Gas pressure transducer. 868.2900 Section 868.2900...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2900 Gas pressure transducer. (a) Identification. A gas pressure transducer is a device intended for medical purposes that is used to convert...

  5. 21 CFR 868.2875 - Differential pressure transducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Differential pressure transducer. 868.2875 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2875 Differential pressure transducer. (a) Identification. A differential pressure transducer is a two-chambered device intended...

  6. A high-temperature wideband pressure transducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuckerwar, A. J.

    1975-01-01

    Progress in the development of a pressure transducer for measurement of the pressure fluctuations in the high temperature environment of a jet exhaust is reported. A condenser microphone carrier system was adapted to meet the specifications. A theoretical analysis is presented which describes the operation of the condenser microphone in terms of geometry, materials, and other physical properties. The analysis was used as the basis for design of a prototype high temperature microphone. The feasibility of connecting the microphone to a converter over a high temperature cable operating as a half-wavelength transmission line was also examined.

  7. A symmetrical low temperature pressure transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helvensteijn, B. P. M.; VanSciver, S. W.

    1990-03-01

    The design and operating characteristics of a fully differential pressure transducer are described. The device is intended for use with He II heat transfer experiments where it operates in vacuum and at low temperatures (T<4.2 K). A movable electrode is attached to two sets of miniature bellows such that the electrode position is determined by the differential pressure across the device. The movable electrode is located between two fixed electrodes, thus forming a pair of variable capacitors. A dedicated charge amplifier is used to convert the pressure induced capacitance change to an ac output voltage. The sensitivity is roughly 5 μV/Pa. For the present application, the capacitor and electronics have acceptable performance, with a mean noise level of ±5 Pa.

  8. Does temperature affect the accuracy of vented pressure transducer in fine-scale water level measurement?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Z.; Higgins, C. W.

    2015-03-01

    Submersible pressure transducers have been utilized for collecting water level data since the early 1960s. Together with a digital data logger, it is a convenient way to record water level fluctuations for long-term monitoring. Despite the wide use of pressure transducers for water level monitoring, little has been reported regarding their accuracy and performance under field conditions. The effects of temperature fluctuations on the output of vented pressure transducers were considered in this study. The pressure transducers were tested under both laboratory and field conditions. The results of this study indicate that temperature fluctuation has a strong effect on the transducer output. Rapid changes in temperature introduce noise and fluctuations in the water level readings under a constant hydraulic head while the absolute temperature is also related to sensor errors. The former is attributed to venting and the latter is attributed to temperature compensation effects in the strain gauges. Individual pressure transducers responded differently to the thermal fluctuations in the same testing environment. In the field of surface hydrology, especially when monitoring fine-scale water level fluctuations, ignoring or failing to compensate for the temperature effect can introduce considerable error into pressure transducer readings. It is recommended that a performance test for the pressure transducer is conducted before field deployment.

  9. Does temperature affect the accuracy of vented pressure transducer in fine-scale water level measurement?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Z.; Higgins, C. W.

    2014-09-01

    Submersible pressure transducers have been utilized for collecting water level data since early 1960s. Together with a digital datalogger, it is a convenient way to record water level fluctuations for long-term monitoring. Despite the widely use of pressure transducers for water level monitoring, little has been reported for their accuracy and performance under field conditions. The effect of temperature fluctuations on the output of vented pressure transducers were discussed in this study. The pressure transducer was tested under both laboratory and field conditions. The results of this study indicate that temperature fluctuation has a strong effect on the transducer output. Rapid changes in temperature introduce noise and fluctuations in the water level readings under a constant hydraulic head while the absolute temperature is also related to sensor errors. The former is attributed to venting and the latter is attributed to temperature compensation effect in the strain gauges. Individual pressure transducers responded differently to the thermal fluctuations in the same testing environment. In the field of surface hydrology, especially when monitoring fine-scale water level fluctuations, ignoring or failing to compensate for the temperature effect can introduce considerable error into pressure transducer readings. It is recommended that a performance test for the pressure transducer is conducted before field deployment.

  10. An absolute method for determination of misalignment of an immersion ultrasonic transducer.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, M M; Singh, Narender; Kumar, Anish; Babu Rao, C; Jayakumar, T

    2014-12-01

    An absolute methodology has been developed for quantification of misalignment of an ultrasonic transducer using a corner-cube retroreflector. The amplitude based and the time of flight (TOF) based C-scans of the reflector are obtained for various misalignments of the transducer. At zero degree orientation of the transducer, the vertical positions of the maximum amplitude and the minimum TOF in the C-scan coincide. At any other orientation of the transducer with the horizontal plane, there is a vertical shift in the position of the maximum amplitude with respect to the minimum TOF. The position of the minimum (TOF) remains the same irrespective of the orientation of the transducer and hence is used as a reference for any misalignment of the transducer. With the measurement of the vertical shift and the horizontal distance between the transducer and the vertex of the reflector, the misalignment of the transducer is quantified. Based on the methodology developed in the present study, retroreflectors are placed in the Indian 500MWe Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor for assessment of the orientation of the ultrasonic transducer prior to the under-sodium ultrasonic scanning for detection of any protrusion of the subassemblies. PMID:25041979

  11. Electronic scanning pressure measuring system and transducer package

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coe, C. F. (Inventor); Parra, G. T.

    1984-01-01

    An electronic scanning pressure system that includes a plurality of pressure transducers is examined. A means obtains an electrical signal indicative of a pressure measurement from each of the plurality of pressure transducers. A multiplexing means is connected for selectivity supplying inputs from the plurality of pressure transducers to the signal obtaining means. A data bus connects the plurality of pressure transducers to the multiplexing means. A latch circuit is connected to supply control inputs to the multiplexing means. An address bus is connected to supply an address signal of a selected one of the plurality of pressure transducers to the latch circuit. In operation, each of the pressure transducers is successively scanned by the multiplexing means in response to address signals supplied on the address bus to the latch circuit.

  12. SHOOT flowmeter and pressure transducers. [for Superfluid Helium On-Orbit Transfer system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kashani, A.; Wilcox, R. A.; Spivak, A. L.; Daney, D. E.; Woodhouse, C. E.

    1990-01-01

    A venturi flowmeter has been designed and constructed for the Superfluid Helium On-Orbit Transfer (SHOOT) experiment. The calibration results obtained from the SHOOT venturi demonstrate the ability of the flowmeter to meet the requirements of the SHOOT experiment. Flow rates as low as 20 cu dm/h and as high as 800 cu dm/h have been measured. Performances of the SHOOT differential and absolute pressure transducers, which have undergone calibration and vibration tests, are also included. Throughout the tests, the responses of the transducers remained linear and repeatable to within + or - 1 percent of the full scales of the transducers.

  13. 21 CFR 868.2900 - Gas pressure transducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Gas pressure transducer. 868.2900 Section 868.2900 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2900 Gas pressure transducer....

  14. Use of submersible pressure transducers in water-resources investigations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Freeman, Lawrence A.; Carpenter, Michael C.; Rosenberry, Donald O.; Rousseau, Joseph P.; Unger, Randy; McLean, John S.

    2004-01-01

    Submersible pressure transducers, developed in the early 1960s, have made the collection of water-level and pressure data much more convenient than former methods. Submersible pressure transducers, when combined with electronic data recorders have made it possible to collect continuous or nearly continuous water-level or pressure data from wells, piezometers, soil-moisture tensiometers, and surface water gages. These more frequent measurements have led to an improved understanding of the hydraulic processes in streams, soils, and aquifers. This manual describes the operational theory behind submersible pressure transducers and provides information about their use in hydrologic investigations conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey.

  15. Durability investigation of a group of strain gage pressure transducers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lederer, P. S.; Hilten, J. S.

    1972-01-01

    A durability investigation was conducted on a group of eighteen bonded-wire strain gage pressure transducers with ranges of 0 to 15 psig and 0 to 100 psig using an improved version of a previously developed technique. Some of the transducers were subjected to 40 million pressure cycles at a 5-Hz rate at laboratory ambient conditions, others were cycled at a temperature of 150 F (65.6 C). The largest change in sensitivity observed was 0.22% for a 100-psig transducer subjected to 40 million pressure cycles at 150 F. The largest change in zero pressure output observed was 0.91% FS for the same transducer. None of the transducers failed completely as a result of cycling at or below full scale pressure.

  16. A dynamic calibration method for the pressure transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhongyu; Wang, Zhuoran; Li, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Pressure transducer is widely used in the field of industry. A calibrated pressure transducer can increase the performance of precision instruments in the closed mechanical relationship. Calibration is the key to ensure the pressure transducer with a high precision and dynamic characteristic. Unfortunately, the current calibration method can usually be used in the laboratory with a good condition and only one pressure transducer can be calibrated at each time. Therefore the calibration efficiency is hard to meet the requirement of modern industry with high efficiency. A dynamic and fast calibration technology with a calibration device and a corresponding data processing method is proposed in this paper. Firstly, the pressure transducer to be calibrated is placed in the small cavity chamber. The calibration process only contains a single loop. The outputs of each calibrated transducer are recorded automatically by the control terminal. Secondly, LabView programming is used for the information acquisition and data processing. The performance of the repeatability and nonlinear indicators can be figured out directly. At last the pressure transducers are calibrated simultaneously in the experiment to verify the suggested calibration technology. The experimental result shows this method can be used to calibrate the pressure transducer in the practical engineering measurement.

  17. Blood pressure targets and absolute cardiovascular risk.

    PubMed

    Odutayo, Ayodele; Rahimi, Kazem; Hsiao, Allan J; Emdin, Connor A

    2015-08-01

    In the Eighth Joint National Committee guideline on hypertension, the threshold for the initiation of blood pressure-lowering treatment for elderly adults (≥60 years) without chronic kidney disease or diabetes mellitus was raised from 140/90 mm Hg to 150/90 mm Hg. However, the committee was not unanimous in this decision, particularly because a large proportion of adults ≥60 years may be at high cardiovascular risk. On the basis of Eighth Joint National Committee guideline, we sought to determine the absolute 10-year risk of cardiovascular disease among these adults through analyzing the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (2005-2012). The primary outcome measure was the proportion of adults who were at ≥20% predicted absolute cardiovascular risk and above goals for the Seventh Joint National Committee guideline but reclassified as at target under the Eighth Joint National Committee guideline (reclassified). The Framingham General Cardiovascular Disease Risk Score was used. From 2005 to 2012, the surveys included 12 963 adults aged 30 to 74 years with blood pressure measurements, of which 914 were reclassified based on the guideline. Among individuals reclassified as not in need of additional treatment, the proportion of adults 60 to 74 years without chronic kidney disease or diabetes mellitus at ≥20% absolute risk was 44.8%. This corresponds to 0.8 million adults. The proportion at high cardiovascular risk remained sizable among adults who were not receiving blood pressure-lowering treatment. Taken together, a sizable proportion of reclassified adults 60 to 74 years without chronic kidney disease or diabetes mellitus was at ≥20% absolute cardiovascular risk. PMID:26056340

  18. Frequency response calibration of recess-mounted pressure transducers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marcolini, M. A.; Lorber, P. F.; Miller, W. T., Jr.; Covino, A. F., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    A technique is described for measuring the frequency response of pressure transducers mounted inside a model, where a narrow pipette leads to an orifice at the surface. An acoustic driver is mounted to a small chamber which has an opening at the opposite end with an O-ring seal to place over the orifice. A 3.18 mm (1/8 inch) reference microphone is mounted to one side of the chamber. The acoustic driver receives an input of white noise, and the transducer and reference microphone outputs are compared to obtain the frequency response of the pressure transducer. Selected results are presented in the form of power spectra for both the transducer and the reference, as well as the amplitude variation and phase shift between the two signals as a function of frequency. The effect of pipette length and the use of this technique for identifying both blocked orifices and faulty transducers are described.

  19. Improved variable-reluctance transducer measures transient pressures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morton, R. W.; Patterson, J. L.

    1964-01-01

    A flush-diaphragm pickup and a feedback stabilized carrier amplifier are among the features incorporated into an improved variable-reluctance transducer. This low impedance device responds to steady-state as well as transient pressures.

  20. Performance Evaluation of Pressure Transducers for Water Impacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vassilakos, Gregory J.; Stegall, David E.; Treadway, Sean

    2012-01-01

    The Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle is being designed for water landings. In order to benchmark the ability of engineering tools to predict water landing loads, test programs are underway for scale model and full-scale water impacts. These test programs are predicated on the reliable measurement of impact pressure histories. Tests have been performed with a variety of pressure transducers from various manufacturers. Both piezoelectric and piezoresistive devices have been tested. Effects such as thermal shock, pinching of the transducer head, and flushness of the transducer mounting have been studied. Data acquisition issues such as sampling rate and anti-aliasing filtering also have been studied. The response of pressure transducers have been compared side-by-side on an impulse test rig and on a 20-inch diameter hemisphere dropped into a pool of water. The results have identified a range of viable configurations for pressure measurement dependent on the objectives of the test program.

  1. Development of a high temperature capacitive pressure transducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egger, R. L.

    1977-01-01

    High temperature pressure transducers capable of continuous operation while exposed to 650 C were developed and evaluated over a full-scale differential pressure range of + or - 69 kPa. The design of the pressure transducers was based on the use of a diaphragm to respond to pressure, variable capacitive elements arranged to operate as a differential capacitor to measure diaphragm response and on the use of fused silica for the diaphragm and its supporting assembly. The uncertainty associated with measuring + or - 69 kPa pressures between 20C and 650C was less than + or - 6%.

  2. Ultrasonic transducer with Gaussian radial pressure distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Claus, R. O.; Zerwekh, P. S. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    An ultrasonic transducer that produces an output that is a symmetrical function comprises a piezoelectric crystal with several concentric ring electrodes on one side of the crystal. A resistor network applies different amplitudes of an ac source to each of the several electrodes. A plot of the different amplitudes from the outermost electrode to the innermost electrode is the first half of a Gaussian function. Consequently, the output of the crystal from the side opposite the electrodes has a Gaussian profile.

  3. Teledyne Taber 206-1000 and 2210-3000 pressure transducer proof test and burst test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ricks, G. A.

    1989-01-01

    The range accuracy and structural integrity of the Teledyne Taber 206-1000 and 2210-3000 pressure transducers are verified and multiple uses are studied to determine is they have a significant effect on the transducers. Burst pressure for these transducers was also established. The Teledyne Taber 206-1000 pressure transducer is used to measure chamber pressure on full-scale space shuttle rocket motors. The Teledyne Taber 2210-3000 pressure transducer is used to measure igniter pressure. The Teledyne Taber transducer has very good temperature stability and was used on all full-scale solid rocket motors, so there is a large data base established using this transducer.

  4. A follow-on study for miniature solid-state pressure transducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The activities of a developmental program to design, fabricate and test an absolute pressure transducer based upon the piezojunction properties of silicon are summarized. The prime problem addressed is the development of a housing capable of applying the high stress levels needed for sensitive piezojunction operation but at the same, free from the creep effects and the fragility that limit the usefulness of previous designs. The first part of the report describes the initial fabrication and test and reviews the theory of sensor performance. The second part incorporates two recommendations of the first part (the use of commercially manufactured silicon planar mesa diodes and the adoption of an all-silicon structure for loading) and presents some preliminary test data on the transducers thus fabricated. These initial measurements show much improved performance over any previously fabricated piezojunction transducers but testing is incomplete and several problems in manufacturing technology remain.

  5. A highly sensitive fiber Bragg grating diaphragm pressure transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allwood, Gary; Wild, Graham; Lubansky, Alex; Hinckley, Steven

    2015-10-01

    In this work, a novel diaphragm based pressure transducer with high sensitivity is described, including the physical design structure, in-depth analysis of optical response to changes in pressure, and a discussion of practical implementation and limitations. A flat circular rubber membrane bonded to a cylinder forms the body of the transducer. A fiber Bragg grating bonded to the center of the diaphragm structure enables the fractional change in pressure to be determined by analyzing the change in Bragg wavelength of the reflected spectra. Extensive evaluation of the physical properties and optical characteristics of the transducer has been performed through experimentation, and modeling using small deformation theory. The results show the transducer has a sensitivity of 0.116 nm/kPa, across a range of 15 kPa. Ultra-low cost interrogation of the optical signal was achieved through the use of an optically mismatched Bragg grating acting as an edge filter to convert the spectral change into an intensity change. A numerical model of the intensity based interrogation was implemented in order to validate the experimental results. Utilizing this interrogation technique and housing both the sensing and reference Bragg gratings within the main body of the transducer means it is effectively temperature insensitive and easily connected to electronic systems.

  6. Absolute ultrasonic displacement amplitude measurements with a submersible electrostatic acoustic transducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yost, William T.; Cantrell, John H.

    1992-01-01

    An experimental technique for absolute measurement of ultrasonic wave particle displacement amplitudes in liquids is reported. The technique is capable of measurements over a frequency range of two decades with a sensitivity less than one angstrom. The technique utilizes a previously reported submersible electrostatic acoustic transducer (ESAT) featuring a conductive membrane stretched over a recessed electrode. An uncertainty analysis shows that the displacement amplitude of an ultrasonic plane wave incident on the ESAT can be experimentally determined to better than 2.3-4 percent, depending on frequency, in the frequency range of 0.5-15 MHz. Membranes with lower and more uniform areal densities can improve the accuracy and extend the operation to higher frequencies.

  7. 21 CFR 890.1615 - Miniature pressure transducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Miniature pressure transducer. 890.1615 Section 890.1615 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Diagnostic Devices §...

  8. 21 CFR 890.1615 - Miniature pressure transducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Miniature pressure transducer. 890.1615 Section 890.1615 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Diagnostic Devices §...

  9. 21 CFR 890.1615 - Miniature pressure transducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Miniature pressure transducer. 890.1615 Section 890.1615 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Diagnostic Devices §...

  10. 21 CFR 890.1615 - Miniature pressure transducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Miniature pressure transducer. 890.1615 Section 890.1615 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Diagnostic Devices §...

  11. 21 CFR 890.1615 - Miniature pressure transducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Miniature pressure transducer. 890.1615 Section 890.1615 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Diagnostic Devices §...

  12. Direct force-measuring transducer used in blood pressure research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eige, J. J.; Newgard, P. M.; Pressman, G. L.

    1965-01-01

    Direct force measuring transducer acts as an arterial tonometer, gives a direct readout to instrumentation, and is unaffected by ambient noise. It uses a semiconductor strain gage which is deflected by pressure pulses in the artery. The deflection changes the resistance of the gage and alters the voltage reading on the associated instrumentation.

  13. Design and Development of a Pressure Transducer for High Hydrostatic Pressure Measurements up to 200 MPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Anuj; Yadav, Sanjay; Agarwal, Ravinder

    2016-06-01

    A number of pressure transducers, based on strain gauge, capacitance/inductance type, frequency resonators, are commercially available and are being used for sensing and producing an electrical output proportional to applied pressure. These sensors have their own advantages and limitations due to operational ease, measurement uncertainty and the costs. Strain gauge type transducers are now well established devices for accurate and precise measurement of pressure within measurement uncertainty up to 0.1 % of full scale. In the present research work, an indigenous strain gauge pressure transducer has been designed, developed, tested and calibrated for pressure measurement up to 200 MPa. The measurement uncertainty estimated using the pressure transducer was found better than 0.1 % of full scale. This transducer was developed using four foil type strain gauges, bonded, two in axial direction while other two in radial direction, to the controlled stress zones of a tubular maraging steel active cylinder working also as diaphragm. The strain gages were then connected to a Wheatstone bridge arrangement to measure stress generated strains. The pressure was applied through matching connector designed in the same tubular transducer active element. The threaded unique design in a single piece through collar, ferule and tubing arrangement provides leak proof pressure connections with external devices without using additional seals. The calibration and performance checking of the pressure transducer was carried out using dead weight type national pressure standard using the internationally accepted calibration procedure.

  14. A high-temperature wideband pressure transducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuckerwar, A. J.

    1977-01-01

    A condenser microphone AM carrier system, which has been developed to measure pressure fluctuations at elevated temperatures, consists of the following components: a condenser microphone designed for operation at elevated temperatures; existing carrier electronics developed under two previous research grants but adapted to meet present requirements; a 6 m cable operating as a half-wavelength transmission line between the microphone and carrier electronics; and a voltage-controlled oscillator used in a feedback loop for automatic tuning control. Both theoretical and practical aspects of the development program are considered. The three predominant effects of temperature changes are changes in the membrane-backplate gap, membrane tension, and air viscosity. The microphone is designed so that changes in gap and membrane tension tend to have compensating effects upon the microphone sensitivity.

  15. Portable dynamic pressure generator for static and dynamic calibration of in situ pressure transducers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bolt, P. A.; Hess, R. W.; Davis, W. T.

    1983-01-01

    A portable dynamic pressure generator was developed to meet the requirements of determining the dynamic sensitivities of in situ pressure transducers at low frequencies. The device is designed to operate in a frequency range of 0 to 100 Hz, although it was only tested up to 30 Hz, and to generate dynamic pressures up to 13.8 kPa (2 psi). A description of the operating characteristics and instrumentation used for pressure, frequency, and displacement measurements is given. The pressure generator was used to statically and dynamically calibrate transducers. Test results demonstrated that a difference an exist between the static and dynamic sensitivity of a transducer, confirming the need for dynamic calibrations of in situ pressure transducers.

  16. Measurement component technology. Volume 1: Cryogenic pressure measurement technology, high pressure flange seals, hydrogen embrittlement of pressure transducer material, close coupled versus remote transducer installation and temperature compensation of pressure transducers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayakawa, K. K.; Udell, D. R.; Iwata, M. M.; Lytle, C. F.; Chrisco, R. M.; Greenough, C. S.; Walling, J. A.

    1972-01-01

    The results are presented of an investigation into the availability and performance capability of measurement components in the area of cryogenic temperature, pressure, flow and liquid detection components and high temperature strain gages. In addition, technical subjects allied to the components were researched and discussed. These selected areas of investigation were: (1) high pressure flange seals, (2) hydrogen embrittlement of pressure transducer diaphragms, (3) The effects of close-coupled versus remote transducer installation on pressure measurement, (4) temperature transducer configuration effects on measurements, and (5) techniques in temperature compensation of strain gage pressure transducers. The purpose of the program was to investigate the latest design and application techniques in measurement component technology and to document this information along with recommendations for upgrading measurement component designs for future S-2 derivative applications. Recommendations are provided for upgrading existing state-of-the-art in component design, where required, to satisfy performance requirements of S-2 derivative vehicles.

  17. Design of piezoresistive MEMS absolute pressure sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, S.; Pant, B. D.

    2012-10-01

    MEMS pressure sensors are one of the most widely commercialized microsensors in the MEMS industry. They have a plethora of applications in various fields including the automobile, space, biomedical, aviation and military sectors. One of the simplest and most efficient methods in MEMS pressure sensors for measuring pressure is to use the phenomenon of piezoresistance. The piezoresistive effect causes change in the resistance of certain doped materials when they are subjected to stress, as a result of energy band deformation. Piezoresistive pressure sensors consist of piezoresistors placed over a thin diaphragm which deflects under the action of the pressure to be measured. The result of this deflection causes the piezoresistors to change their resistance due to the stress experienced by them. The change is converted into electrical signals and measured in order to find the value of applied pressure. In this work, a high range (30 Bar) pressure sensor is designed based on the principle of piezoresistivity. The inaccuracies in the analytical models that are generally used to model the pressure sensor diaphragm have also been analysed. Thus, the Finite Element Method (FEM) is adopted to optimize the pressure sensor for parameters like sensitivity and linearity. This is achieved by choosing the proper shape of piezoresistor, thickness of diaphragm and the position of the piezoresistor on the pressure sensor diaphragm. For the square diaphragm, sensitivity of 5.18 mV/V/Bar and a linearity error of 0.02% are obtained. For the circular diaphragm, sensitivity of 3.69 mV/V/Bar and a linearity error of 0.011% are obtained.

  18. Model Robust Calibration: Method and Application to Electronically-Scanned Pressure Transducers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, Eric L.; Starnes, B. Alden; Birch, Jeffery B.; Mays, James E.

    2010-01-01

    This article presents the application of a recently developed statistical regression method to the controlled instrument calibration problem. The statistical method of Model Robust Regression (MRR), developed by Mays, Birch, and Starnes, is shown to improve instrument calibration by reducing the reliance of the calibration on a predetermined parametric (e.g. polynomial, exponential, logarithmic) model. This is accomplished by allowing fits from the predetermined parametric model to be augmented by a certain portion of a fit to the residuals from the initial regression using a nonparametric (locally parametric) regression technique. The method is demonstrated for the absolute scale calibration of silicon-based pressure transducers.

  19. Non-Invasive Method of Determining Absolute Intracranial Pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yost, William T. (Inventor); Cantrell, John H., Jr. (Inventor); Hargens, Alan E. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A method is presented for determining absolute intracranial pressure (ICP) in a patient. Skull expansion is monitored while changes in ICP are induced. The patient's blood pressure is measured when skull expansion is approximately zero. The measured blood pressure is indicative of a reference ICP value. Subsequently, the method causes a known change in ICP and measured the change in skull expansion associated therewith. The absolute ICP is a function of the reference ICP value, the known change in ICP and its associated change in skull expansion; and a measured change in skull expansion.

  20. Test and evaluation of pressure transducers for a reentry vehicle pressure measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, Lorelei S.; Sealey, Bradley S.

    1993-01-01

    The Pressure Distribution and Air Data System experiment was designed to obtain accurate pressure measurements on the windward surface of an aeroassist flight research vehicle during its aeropass through the earth's atmosphere. These pressure measurements were intended to provide air data and support CFD code validation for future aeroassist orbital transfer vehicle designs. The system consisted of a flush orifice configuration connected by tubing to a specially ranged and selected pressure transducer. The purpose of this paper is to describe the flight acceptance test program and test results leading to the selection of flight transducers.

  1. A Integrated Circuit for a Biomedical Capacitive Pressure Transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Michael John Sebastian

    Medical research has an urgent need for a small, accurate, stable, low-power, biocompatible and inexpensive pressure sensor with a zero to full-scale range of 0-300 mmHg. An integrated circuit (IC) for use with a capacitive pressure transducer was designed, built and tested. The random pressure measurement error due to resolution and non-linearity is (+OR-)0.4 mmHg (at mid-range with a full -scale of 300 mmHg). The long-term systematic error due to falling battery voltage is (+OR-)0.6 mmHg. These figures were calculated from measurements of temperature, supply dependence and non-linearity on completed integrated circuits. The sensor IC allows measurement of temperature to (+OR-)0.1(DEGREES)C to allow for temperature compensation of the transducer. Novel micropower circuit design of the system components enabled these levels of accuracy to be reached. Capacitance is measured by a new ratiometric scheme employing an on -chip reference capacitor. This method greatly reduces the effects of voltage supply, temperature and manufacturing variations on the sensor circuit performance. The limits on performance of the bandgap reference circuit fabricated with a standard bipolar process using ion-implanted resistors were determined. Measurements confirm the limits of temperature stability as approximately (+OR-)300 ppm/(DEGREES)C. An exact analytical expression for the period of the Schmitt trigger oscillator, accounting for non-constant capacitor charging current, was formulated. Experiments to test agreement with theory showed that prediction of the oscillator period was very accurate. The interaction of fundamental and practical limits on the scaling of the transducer size was investigated including a correction to previous theoretical analysis of jitter in an RC oscillator. An areal reduction of 4 times should be achievable.

  2. 40 CFR 1065.215 - Pressure transducers, temperature sensors, and dewpoint sensors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    .... For atmospheric pressure or other precision pressure measurements, we recommend either capacitance... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Pressure transducers, temperature... Measurement of Engine Parameters and Ambient Conditions § 1065.215 Pressure transducers, temperature...

  3. 40 CFR 1065.215 - Pressure transducers, temperature sensors, and dewpoint sensors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    .... For atmospheric pressure or other precision pressure measurements, we recommend either capacitance... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Pressure transducers, temperature... Measurement of Engine Parameters and Ambient Conditions § 1065.215 Pressure transducers, temperature...

  4. 40 CFR 1065.215 - Pressure transducers, temperature sensors, and dewpoint sensors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    .... For atmospheric pressure or other precision pressure measurements, we recommend either capacitance... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Pressure transducers, temperature... Measurement of Engine Parameters and Ambient Conditions § 1065.215 Pressure transducers, temperature...

  5. 40 CFR 1065.215 - Pressure transducers, temperature sensors, and dewpoint sensors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    .... For atmospheric pressure or other precision pressure measurements, we recommend either capacitance... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Pressure transducers, temperature... Measurement of Engine Parameters and Ambient Conditions § 1065.215 Pressure transducers, temperature...

  6. Technology trends in high temperature pressure transducers: The impact of micromachining

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mallon, Joseph R., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    This paper discusses the implications of micromachining technology on the development of high temperature pressure transducers. The introduction puts forth the thesis that micromachining will be the technology of choice for the next generation of extended temperature range pressure transducers. The term micromachining is defined, the technology is discussed and examples are presented. Several technologies for high temperature pressure transducers are discussed, including silicon on insulator, capacitive, optical, and vibrating element. Specific conclusions are presented along with recommendations for development of the technology.

  7. Mounting technique for pressure transducers minimizes measurement interferences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lanham, R. N.; Taylor, C. E.; Balmer, C. E.; Hwang, C.

    1975-01-01

    Miniaturized transducers are fabricated from commercially available four-arm semiconductor gages; transducers are connected as bridge circuit and mounted on internal face of small diaphragm. Jacket made of conductive plastic may be needed to avoid buildup or static charges.

  8. REPRODUCIBILITY OF INTRA-ABDOMINAL PRESSURE MEASURED DURING PHYSICAL ACTIVITIES VIA A WIRELESS VAGINAL TRANSDUCER

    PubMed Central

    Egger, Marlene J.; Hamad, Nadia M.; Hitchcock, Robert W.; Coleman, Tanner J.; Shaw, Janet M.; Hsu, Yvonne; Nygaard, Ingrid E.

    2014-01-01

    Aims In the urodynamics laboratory setting, a wireless pressure transducer, developed to facilitate research exploring intra-abdominal pressure (IAP) and pelvic floor disorders, was highly accurate. We aimed to study reproducibility of IAP measured using this transducer in women during activities performed in an exercise science laboratory. Methods Fifty seven women (mean ± SD: age 30.4 ±9.3 years; body mass index=22.4 ± 2.68 kg/m2) completed two standardized activity sessions using the same transducer at least three days apart. Pressure data for 31 activities were transmitted wirelessly to a base station and analyzed for mean net maximal IAP, area under the curve (AUC) and first moment of the area (FMA.) Activities included typical exercises, lifting 13.6 to 18.2 kg, and simulated household tasks. Analysis for test-retest reliability included Bland-Altman plots with absolute limits of agreement (ALOA), Wilcoxon signed rank tests to assess significant differences between sessions, intraclass correlations, and kappa statistics to assess inter-session agreement in highest vs. other quintiles of maximal IAP. Results Few activities exhibited significant differences between sessions in maximal IAP, or in AUC and FMA values. For 13 activities, the agreement between repeat measures of maximal IAP was better than ± 10 cm H20; for 20 activities, better than ± 15 cm H20. ALOA increased with mean IAP. The highest quintile of IAP demonstrated fair/substantial agreement between sessions in 25 of 30 activities. Conclusion Reproducibility of IAP depends on the activity undertaken. Interventions geared towards lowering IAP should account for this, and maximize efforts to improve IAP reproducibility. PMID:25730430

  9. Effects of Transducer Installation on Unsteady Pressure Measurements on Oscillating Blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lepicovsky, Jan

    2006-01-01

    Unsteady pressures were measured above the suction side of a blade that was oscillated to simulate blade stall flutter. Measurements were made at blade oscillation frequencies up to 500 Hz. Two types of miniature pressure transducers were used: surface-mounted flat custom-made, and conventional miniature, body-mounted transducers. The signals of the surface-mounted transducers are significantly affected by blade acceleration, whereas the signals of body-mounted transducers are practically free of this distortion. A procedure was introduced to correct the signals of surface-mounted transducers to rectify the signal distortion due to blade acceleration. The signals from body-mounted transducers, and corrected signals from surface-mounted transducers represent true unsteady pressure signals on the surface of a blade subjected to forced oscillations. However, the use of body-mounted conventional transducers is preferred for the following reasons: no signal corrections are needed for blade acceleration, the conventional transducers are noticeably less expensive than custom-made flat transducers, the survival rate of body-mounted transducers is much higher, and finally installation of body-mounted transducers does not disturb the blade surface of interest.

  10. Bio-Inspired Stretchable Absolute Pressure Sensor Network

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yue; Li, Yu-Hung; Guo, Zhiqiang; Kim, Kyunglok; Chang, Fu-Kuo; Wang, Shan X.

    2016-01-01

    A bio-inspired absolute pressure sensor network has been developed. Absolute pressure sensors, distributed on multiple silicon islands, are connected as a network by stretchable polyimide wires. This sensor network, made on a 4’’ wafer, has 77 nodes and can be mounted on various curved surfaces to cover an area up to 0.64 m × 0.64 m, which is 100 times larger than its original size. Due to Micro Electro-Mechanical system (MEMS) surface micromachining technology, ultrathin sensing nodes can be realized with thicknesses of less than 100 µm. Additionally, good linearity and high sensitivity (~14 mV/V/bar) have been achieved. Since the MEMS sensor process has also been well integrated with a flexible polymer substrate process, the entire sensor network can be fabricated in a time-efficient and cost-effective manner. Moreover, an accurate pressure contour can be obtained from the sensor network. Therefore, this absolute pressure sensor network holds significant promise for smart vehicle applications, especially for unmanned aerial vehicles. PMID:26729134

  11. Bio-Inspired Stretchable Absolute Pressure Sensor Network.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yue; Li, Yu-Hung; Guo, Zhiqiang; Kim, Kyunglok; Chang, Fu-Kuo; Wang, Shan X

    2016-01-01

    A bio-inspired absolute pressure sensor network has been developed. Absolute pressure sensors, distributed on multiple silicon islands, are connected as a network by stretchable polyimide wires. This sensor network, made on a 4'' wafer, has 77 nodes and can be mounted on various curved surfaces to cover an area up to 0.64 m × 0.64 m, which is 100 times larger than its original size. Due to Micro Electro-Mechanical system (MEMS) surface micromachining technology, ultrathin sensing nodes can be realized with thicknesses of less than 100 µm. Additionally, good linearity and high sensitivity (~14 mV/V/bar) have been achieved. Since the MEMS sensor process has also been well integrated with a flexible polymer substrate process, the entire sensor network can be fabricated in a time-efficient and cost-effective manner. Moreover, an accurate pressure contour can be obtained from the sensor network. Therefore, this absolute pressure sensor network holds significant promise for smart vehicle applications, especially for unmanned aerial vehicles. PMID:26729134

  12. Effect of Pressure Transmission Lines on the Frequency Response of Pressure Transducers

    SciTech Connect

    G.J. Kirouac

    2000-11-13

    It is well known that the length and diameter of the transmission lines between a pressure transducer and the pressure source can significantly affect the dynamic frequency response of the transducer. A new lumped parameter model has been developed to predict the time and frequency response of any number of different transducers connected in parallel in a manifold. While the model is simple to apply, it can provide quantitative information given the transducer and transmission line characteristic parameters. More importantly, the model can be used to evaluate the measured, in-situ response. this provides the natural frequency and the effective damping which can then be used to generate a frequency response curve. The model is also useful for designing a new pressure transmission system, which will have the required frequency response. The model was qualified by comparison to measurements of the step-function pressure response of a number of different transducers and test installations. With the aid of the model, the system resonant frequency and damping can be determined. Additional damping can be added if necessary to prevent ringing of the signal and to assure an accurate pressure measurement with a flat frequency response. For all of the experimental systems evaluated in this work, the response at the natural frequency was significantly underdamped and ringing was observed. This means that to perform accurate measurements damping needs to be added to the system. It was observed that the use of flexible pressure lines versus hard lines does increase the damping and may therefore be useful in certain situations. Equations were developed to permit sizing an orifice to be added to the system to provide the necessary damping.

  13. Intra-abdominal pressures during activity in women using an intra-vaginal pressure transducer.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Janet M; Hamad, Nadia M; Coleman, Tanner J; Egger, Marlene J; Hsu, Yvonne; Hitchcock, Robert; Nygaard, Ingrid E

    2014-01-01

    Strenuous physical activity has been linked to pelvic floor disorders in women. Using a novel wireless intra-vaginal pressure transducer, intra-abdominal pressure was measured during diverse activities in a laboratory. Fifty-seven women performed a prescribed protocol using the intra-vaginal pressure transducer. We calculated maximal, area under the curve and first moment of the area intra-abdominal pressure for each activity. Planned comparisons of pressure were made between levels of walking and cycling and between activities with reported high pressure in the literature. Findings indicate variability in intra-abdominal pressure amongst individuals doing the same activity, especially in activities that required regulation of effort. There were statistically significant differences in maximal pressure between levels of walking, cycling and high pressure activities. Results for area under the curve and first moment of the area were not always consistent with maximal pressure. Coughing had the highest maximal pressure, but had lower area under the curve and first moment of the area compared to most activities. Our data reflect novel findings of maximal, area under the curve and first moment of the area measures of intra-abdominal pressure, which may have clinical relevance for how physical activity relates to pelvic floor dysfunction. PMID:24575741

  14. 78 FR 1735 - Airworthiness Directives; Honeywell International Inc. Air Data Pressure Transducers

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-09

    ... Executive Order 12866, (2) Is not a ``significant rule'' under DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR... International Inc. Air Data Pressure Transducers AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION... certain Honeywell International Inc. air data pressure transducers as installed on various aircraft....

  15. Ultrasound pressure distributions generated by high frequency transducers in large reactors.

    PubMed

    Leong, Thomas; Coventry, Michael; Swiergon, Piotr; Knoerzer, Kai; Juliano, Pablo

    2015-11-01

    The performance of an ultrasound reactor chamber relies on the sound pressure level achieved throughout the system. The active volume of a high frequency ultrasound chamber can be determined by the sound pressure penetration and distribution provided by the transducers. This work evaluated the sound pressure levels and uniformity achieved in water by selected commercial scale high frequency plate transducers without and with reflector plates. Sound pressure produced by ultrasonic plate transducers vertically operating at frequencies of 400 kHz (120 W) and 2 MHz (128 W) was characterized with hydrophones in a 2 m long chamber and their effective operating distance across the chamber's vertical cross section was determined. The 2 MHz transducer produced the highest pressure amplitude near the transducer surface, with a sharp decline of approximately 40% of the sound pressure occurring in the range between 55 and 155 mm from the transducer. The placement of a reflector plate 500 mm from the surface of the transducer was shown to improve the sound pressure uniformity of 2 MHz ultrasound. Ultrasound at 400 kHz was found to penetrate the fluid up to 2 m without significant losses. Furthermore, 400 kHz ultrasound generated a more uniform sound pressure distribution regardless of the presence or absence of a reflector plate. The choice of the transducer distance to the opposite reactor wall therefore depends on the transducer plate frequency selected. Based on pressure measurements in water, large scale 400 kHz reactor designs can consider larger transducer distance to opposite wall and larger active cross-section, and therefore can reach higher volumes than when using 2 MHz transducer plates. PMID:26186816

  16. Fluctuating surface pressure measurements on USB wing using two types of transducers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, J. B.

    1975-01-01

    Measurements of the fluctuating pressures on the wing surface of an upper-surface-blown powered-lift model and a JT15 engine were obtained using two types of pressure transducers. The pressures were measured using overall-fluctuating pressures and power spectral density analyses for various thrust settings and two jet impingement angles. Comparison of the data from the two transducers indicate that similar results are obtained in the lower frequency ranges for both transducers. The data also indicate that for this configuration, the highest pressure levels occur at frequencies below 2000 Hz.

  17. Effects of confining pressure, pore pressure and temperature on absolute permeability. SUPRI TR-27

    SciTech Connect

    Gobran, B.D.; Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Brigham, W.E.

    1981-10-01

    This study investigates absolute permeability of consolidated sandstone and unconsolidated sand cores to distilled water as a function of the confining pressure on the core, the pore pressure of the flowing fluid and the temperature of the system. Since permeability measurements are usually made in the laboratory under conditions very different from those in the reservoir, it is important to know the effect of various parameters on the measured value of permeability. All studies on the effect of confining pressure on absolute permeability have found that when the confining pressure is increased, the permeability is reduced. The studies on the effect of temperature have shown much less consistency. This work contradicts the past Stanford studies by finding no effect of temperature on the absolute permeability of unconsolidated sand or sandstones to distilled water. The probable causes of the past errors are discussed. It has been found that inaccurate measurement of temperature at ambient conditions and non-equilibrium of temperature in the core can lead to a fictitious permeability reduction with temperature increase. The results of this study on the effect of confining pressure and pore pressure support the theory that as confining pressure is increased or pore pressure decreased, the permeability is reduced. The effects of confining pressure and pore pressure changes on absolute permeability are given explicitly so that measurements made under one set of confining pressure/pore pressure conditions in the laboratory can be extrapolated to conditions more representative of the reservoir.

  18. Measurement of a piezoelectric d constant for poly(vinylidene fluoride) transducers using pressure pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bur, Anthony J.; Roth, Steven C.

    1985-01-01

    The hydrostatic piezoelectric coefficient dh has been measured for biaxially-oriented poly(vinylidene fluoride) transducers using pressure pulses having peak values of 1.8×107 Pa (2600 psi) and a pulse width of approximately 10 ms. For these measurements, the sample was placed in an oil pressure chamber at room temperature and the pressure pulse was initiated by dropping a 16-kg mass onto a plunger in the chamber. Since adiabatic compressional heating accompanies the pressure pulse, temperature compensation of the transducer was necessary. This was achieved by incorporating a thermocouple in the bilaminate configuration of the transducer and by amplifying the thermocouple signal appropriately to account for the pyroelectric response due to adiabatic heating, which was approximately 15% of the transducer signal. The calculation of dh shows that the response of the bilaminate transducer is linear up to 1.8×107 Pa (2600 psi).

  19. Implications of Dynamic Pressure Transducer Mounting Variations on Measurements in Pyrotechnic Test Apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dibbern, Andreas; Crisafulli, Jeffrey; Hagopia, Michael; McDougle, Stephen H.; Saulsberry, Regor L.

    2009-01-01

    Accurate dynamic pressure measurements are often difficult to make within small pyrotechnic devices, and transducer mounting difficulties can cause data anomalies that lead to erroneous conclusions. Delayed initial pressure response followed by data ringing has been observed when using miniaturized pressure transducer mounting adapters required to interface transducers to small test chambers. This delayed pressure response and ringing, combined with a high data acquisition rate, has complicated data analysis. This paper compares the output signal characteristics from different pressure transducer mounting options, where the passage distance from the transducer face to the pyrotechnic chamber is varied in length and diameter. By analyzing the data and understating the associated system dynamics, a more realistic understanding of the actual dynamic pressure variations is achieved. Three pressure transducer mounting configurations (elongated, standard, and face/flush mount) were simultaneously tested using NASA standard initiators in closed volume pressure bombs. This paper also presents results of these pressure transducer mounting configurations as a result of a larger NASA Engineering and Safety Center pyrovalve test project. Results from these tests indicate the improved performance of using face/flush mounted pressure transducers in this application. This type of mounting improved initial pressure measurement response time by approximately 19 s over standard adapter mounting, eliminating most of the lag time; provided a near step-function type initial pressure increase; and greatly reduced data ringing in high data acquisition rate systems. The paper goes on to discuss other issues associated with the firing and instrumentation that are important for the tester to understand.

  20. Effect of Transducer Flushness on Measured Surface Pressure Fluctuations in Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Efimtsov, B. M.; Golubev, A. Yu.; Kuznetsov, V. B.; Rizzi, S. A.; Andersson, A. O.; Racki, R. G.; Andrianov, E. V

    2004-01-01

    The procedure for investigating the effect of deviation from flush mounting of pressure transducers on the exterior of Tu-144LL in flight is described. Experimental data in the mach-number range 0.58 - 2.0 are presented for distortion of the measured wall-pressure fluctuation spectra of the turbulent boundary layer by recessed and protruding transducers. The results of flight experiments are compared with data of wind tunnel experiments. The distortion of measured turbulent boundary layer wall pressure fluctuations caused by transducer-surface deviation from the surrounding surface as a function of dimensionless parameters is predicted and presented on the basis of dimensional analysis.

  1. Statistical Characterization of Environmental Error Sources Affecting Electronically Scanned Pressure Transducers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Del L.; Walker, Eric L.; Everhart, Joel L.

    2006-01-01

    Minimization of uncertainty is essential to extend the usable range of the 15-psid Electronically Scanned Pressure [ESP) transducer measurements to the low free-stream static pressures found in hypersonic wind tunnels. Statistical characterization of environmental error sources inducing much of this uncertainty requires a well defined and controlled calibration method. Employing such a controlled calibration system, several studies were conducted that provide quantitative information detailing the required controls needed to minimize environmental and human induced error sources. Results of temperature, environmental pressure, over-pressurization, and set point randomization studies for the 15-psid transducers are presented along with a comparison of two regression methods using data acquired with both 0.36-psid and 15-psid transducers. Together these results provide insight into procedural and environmental controls required for long term high-accuracy pressure measurements near 0.01 psia in the hypersonic testing environment using 15-psid ESP transducers.

  2. Statistical Characterization of Environmental Error Sources Affecting Electronically Scanned Pressure Transducers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Del L.; Walker, Eric L.; Everhart, Joel L.

    2006-01-01

    Minimization of uncertainty is essential to extend the usable range of the 15-psid Electronically Scanned Pressure (ESP) transducer measurements to the low free-stream static pressures found in hypersonic wind tunnels. Statistical characterization of environmental error sources inducing much of this uncertainty requires a well defined and controlled calibration method. Employing such a controlled calibration system, several studies were conducted that provide quantitative information detailing the required controls needed to minimize environmental and human induced error sources. Results of temperature, environmental pressure, over-pressurization, and set point randomization studies for the 15-psid transducers are presented along with a comparison of two regression methods using data acquired with both 0.36-psid and 15-psid transducers. Together these results provide insight into procedural and environmental controls required for long term high-accuracy pressure measurements near 0.01 psia in the hypersonic testing environment using 15-psid ESP transducers.

  3. Evaluation of pressure transducers to measure surface level in the waste storage tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, T.J.; Colson, J.B.

    1994-06-01

    This report describes the results of tests conducted at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to determine if pressure transducers can be used to measure the surface level in the waste tanks. A survey was first conducted to evaluate which, if any, commercially available pressure transducers were available that could meet the requirements for use in the waste tanks. More than 35 companies were contacted to determine if they manufactured a pressure transducer that could be used in the 101-SY waste tank. The three basic requirements for a pressure transducer for this application were that they were radiation-hardened, could withstand a caustic environment, and were certified to be intrinsically safe. No manufacturer was able to meet all three of these requirements with a commercially available product. Seven companies were able to meet the requirements for being radiation-hardened and being able to withstand the caustic environment. However, only two of the nine companies were willing to supply a pressure transducer for laboratory testing. The two pressure transducers that were tested in this program were the VEGA D36-38 from HiTech Technologies, Inc., and the KP-1911-A from Kaman Instrumentation Corporation. Pressure transducers operate on the principle that the pressure at the location of a sensor increases directly with the depth of the liquid above it. A liquid is required in order for these devices to operate. For these tests, water was first used to determine the ideal operation of the devices, then the devices were placed in a 101-SY waste tank simulant. The simulant had a specific gravity of 1.96 and had the consistency similar to the convective layer in the 101-SY waste tank. In order to determine the surface level with pressure transducers, the density of the material needs to be known.

  4. Explosive Event in MON-3 Oxidizer System Resulting from Pressure Transducer Failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, David L.; Reynolds, Michael; Anderson, John

    2006-01-01

    In 2003, a Druck(Registered Trademark) pressure transducer failed catastrophically in a test system circulating nitrogen tetroxide at NASA Johnson Space Center White Sands Test Facility. The cause of the explosion was not immediately obvious since the wetted areas of the pressure transducer were constructed of materials compatible with nitrogen tetroxide. Chemical analysis of the resulting residue and a materials analysis of the diaphragm and its weld zones were used to determine the chain of events that led to the catastrophic failure. Due to excessive dynamic pressure loading in the test system, the diaphragm in the pressure transducer suffered cyclic failure and allowed the silicon oil located behind the isolation diaphragm to mix with the nitrogen tetroxide. The reaction between these two chemicals formed a combination of 2,4-di and 2,4,6-trinitrophenol, which are shock sensitive explosives that caused the failure of the pressure transducer. Further research indicated numerous manufacturers offer similar pressure transducers with silicone oil separated from the test fluid by a thin stainless steel isolation diaphragm. Caution must be exercised when purchasing a pressure transducer for a particular system to avoid costly failures and test system contamination.

  5. Automated tester permits precise calibration of pressure transducers from 0 to 1050 psi

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brinda, J.; Kristoff, L.; Shaw, J.; Vuckovich, M.

    1967-01-01

    Automated portable checker allows last-minute calibration of pressure transducers before testing. It uses a pressure console and equipment that can produce test pressures of 0-1050 psi. The console can be connected to other apparatus for measurement and visual display of the electrical output.

  6. Pressure transducer 3/8-inch in size can be faired into surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaffer, R. J.

    1964-01-01

    To measure fluid pressure with minimum disturbance to fluid flow, a miniature pressure transducer can be imbedded and faired into the test surface. Incorporated in the design are piezoresistive elements mounted on a diaphragm, which transform pressure strains into an electrical signal.

  7. Transducer modeling and compensation in high-pressure dynamic calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Chikun; Li, Yongxin

    2005-12-01

    When the RBF neural network is used to establish and compensate the transducer model, the numbers of cluster need to be given in advance by using Kohonen algorithm, the RLS algorithm is complicated and the computational burden is much heavier by using it to regulate the output weights. In order to overcome the weakness, a new approach is proposed. The cluster center is decided by the subtractive clustering, and LMS algorithm is used to regulate the output weights. The noise elimination with correlative threshold plus wavelet packet transformation is used to improve the SNR. The study result shows that the network structure is simple and astringency is fast, the modeling and compensation by using the new algorithm is effective to correct the nonlinear dynamic character of transducer, and noise elimination with correlative threshold plus wavelet packet transformation is superior to conventional noise elimination methods.

  8. Development of an infrared absorption transducer to monitor partial pressure of carbon dioxide for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lutz, Glenn; Margiott, Victoria; Murray, Sean; Schaff, James

    1993-01-01

    An infrared (IR) carbon dioxide (CO2) transducers has been designed, developed, and produced for space applications. The transducer provides measurement of partial pressure of CO2 in life support applications, including the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU), Space Shuttle Orbiter and Spacehab. The electrochemical sensor presently used for these applications has a slow reponse time and has reliability concerns due to the electrolyte. The new microprocessor based unit has a fast response time and can be tailored to other space applications.

  9. A novel high pressure, high temperature vessel used to conduct long-term stability measurements of silicon MEMS pressure transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wisniewiski, David

    2014-03-01

    The need to quantify and to improve long-term stability of pressure transducers is a persistent requirement from the aerospace sector. Specifically, the incorporation of real-time pressure monitoring in aircraft landing gear, as exemplified in Tire Pressure Monitoring Systems (TPMS), has placed greater demand on the pressure transducer for improved performance and increased reliability which is manifested in low lifecycle cost and minimal maintenance downtime through fuel savings and increased life of the tire. Piezoresistive (PR) silicon MEMS pressure transducers are the primary choice as a transduction method for this measurement owing to their ability to be designed for the harsh environment seen in aircraft landing gear. However, these pressure transducers are only as valuable as the long-term stability they possess to ensure reliable, real-time monitoring over tens of years. The "heart" of the pressure transducer is the silicon MEMS element, and it is at this basic level where the long-term stability is established and needs to be quantified. A novel High Pressure, High Temperature (HPHT) vessel has been designed and constructed to facilitate this critical measurement of the silicon MEMS element directly through a process of mechanically "floating" the silicon MEMS element while being subjected to the extreme environments of pressure and temperature, simultaneously. Furthermore, the HPHT vessel is scalable to permit up to fifty specimens to be tested at one time to provide a statistically significant data population on which to draw reasonable conclusions on long-term stability. With the knowledge gained on the silicon MEMS element, higher level assembly to the pressure transducer envelope package can also be quantified as to the build-effects contribution to long-term stability in the same HPHT vessel due to its accommodating size. Accordingly, a HPHT vessel offering multiple levels of configurability and robustness in data measurement is presented, along

  10. Very high temperature silicon on silicon pressure transducers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurtz, Anthony D.; Nunn, Timothy A.; Briggs, Stephen A.; Ned, Alexander

    1992-01-01

    A silicon on silicon pressure sensor has been developed for use at very high temperatures (1000 F). The design principles used to fabricate the pressure sensor are outlined and results are presented of its high temperature performance.

  11. Candida parapsilosis fungemia associated with parenteral nutrition and contaminated blood pressure transducers.

    PubMed

    Weems, J J; Chamberland, M E; Ward, J; Willy, M; Padhye, A A; Solomon, S L

    1987-06-01

    During the period September 1983 through May 1985, Candida parapsilosis was isolated from intravascular sites (blood or vascular catheter tips) in 12 patients at a pediatric hospital. Of 205 patients with cultures of any site positive for Candida species, 32 (16%) had cultures positive for C. parapsilosis. In contrast, of 23 patients with intravascular cultures positive for Candida species, 12 (51%) had cultures positive for C. parapsilosis (P less than 0.001, Fisher's exact test). The 12 patients with intravascular cultures positive for C. parapsilosis were more likely to have received central venous nutrition therapy (10 of 12 versus 7 of 23; P less than 0.01, Mantel-Haenzel chi-square test) and had a longer duration of exposure to blood pressure transducers (P less than 0.08, paired t test) than the 23 ward- and age-matched controls. C. parapsilosis was isolated from 11 (32%) of 34 in-use and stored blood pressure transducers. After ethylene oxide sterilization of blood pressure transducers was begun, in-use pressure transducers showed no growth of C. parapsilosis. This study emphasizes the role of C. parapsilosis as a nosocomial pathogen associated with invasive devices and parenteral nutrition; it also emphasizes the importance of adhering to recommended procedures for sterilizing blood pressure transducers. PMID:3110206

  12. Comparison of Transducers and Intraoral Placement Options for Measuring Lingua-Palatal Contact Pressure during Speech

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Searl, Jeffrey P.

    2003-01-01

    Two studies were completed that focused on instrumentation and procedural issues associated with measurement of lingua-palatal contact pressure (LPCP) during speech. In the first experiment, physical features and response characteristics of 2 miniature pressure transducers (Entran EPI-BO and Precision Measurement 60S) were evaluated to identify a…

  13. Digital pressure transducer for use at high temperatures

    DOEpatents

    Karplus, H.H.B.

    A digital pressure sensor for measuring fluid pressures at relatively high temperatures includes an electrically conducting fiber coupled to the fluid by a force disc that causes tension in the fiber to be a function of fluid pressure. The tension causes changes in the mechanical resonant frequency of the fiber, which is caused to vibrate in a magnetic field to produce an electrical signal from a positive-feedback amplifier at the resonant frequency. A count of this frequency provides a measure of the fluid pressure.

  14. Digital pressure transducer for use at high temperatures

    DOEpatents

    Karplus, Henry H. B.

    1981-01-01

    A digital pressure sensor for measuring fluid pressures at relatively high temperatures includes an electrically conducting fiber coupled to the fluid by a force disc that causes tension in the fiber to be a function of fluid pressure. The tension causes changes in the mechanical resonant frequency of the fiber, which is caused to vibrate in a magnetic field to produce an electrical signal from a positive-feedback amplifier at the resonant frequency. A count of this frequency provides a measure of the fluid pressure.

  15. Noise in pressure transducer readings produced by variations in solar radiation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cain, S. F., III; Davis, G.A.; Loheide, S.P., II; Butler, J.J., Jr.

    2004-01-01

    Variations in solar radiation can produce noise in readings from gauge pressure transducers when the transducer cable is exposed to direct sunlight. This noise is a result of insolation-induced heating and cooling of the air column in the vent tube of the transducer cable. A controlled experiment was performed to assess the impact of variations in solar radiation on transducer readings. This experiment demonstrated that insolation-induced fluctuations in apparent pressure head can be as large as 0.03 m. The magnitude of these fluctuations is dependent on cable color, the diameter of the vent tube, and the length of the transducer cable. The most effective means of minimizing insolation-induced noise is to use integrated transducer-data logger units that fit within a well. Failure to address this source of noise can introduce considerable uncertainty into analyses of hydraulic tests when the head change is relatively small, as is often the case for tests in highly permeable aquifers or for tests using distant observation wells.

  16. Noise in pressure transducer readings produced by variations in solar radiation.

    PubMed

    Cain, Samuel F; Davis, Gregory A; Loheide, Steven P; Butler, James J

    2004-01-01

    Variations in solar radiation can produce noise in readings from gauge pressure transducers when the transducer cable is exposed to direct sunlight. This noise is a result of insolation-induced heating and cooling of the air column in the vent tube of the transducer cable. A controlled experiment was performed to assess the impact of variations in solar radiation on transducer readings. This experiment demonstrated that insolation-induced fluctuations in apparent pressure head can be as large as 0.03 m. The magnitude of these fluctuations is dependent on cable color, the diameter of the vent tube, and the length of the transducer cable. The most effective means of minimizing insolation-induced noise is to use integrated transducer-data logger units that fit within a well. Failure to address this source of noise can introduce considerable uncertainty into analyses of hydraulic tests when the head change is relatively small, as is often the case for tests in highly permeable aquifers or for tests using distant observation wells. PMID:15584307

  17. 21 CFR 868.2875 - Differential pressure transducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... medical purposes that is often used during pulmonary function testing. It generates an electrical signal for subsequent display or processing that is proportional to the difference in gas pressures in...

  18. 21 CFR 868.2875 - Differential pressure transducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... medical purposes that is often used during pulmonary function testing. It generates an electrical signal for subsequent display or processing that is proportional to the difference in gas pressures in...

  19. Nonintrusive FBG tube pressure transducers with high overpressure ability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saxena, Indu F.; Hui, Kaleonui J.

    2010-04-01

    Fiber optic sensors offer several advantages over their electrical counterparts, especially for applications in hostile, spark-sensitive environments, because no electrical power is required at the sensors. In addition, the installation of fiber sensors external to fluid carrying conduits facilitates access for troubleshooting and replacement, unlike in-line diaphragm-based sensors. Furthermore, glass fiber pressure sensors have a much higher operating temperature range, which makes them more practical for flammability-prone environments. Multiple fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors can be multiplexed along a single fiber optic cable, as opposed to traditional resistive strain gauges, which require individual shielded metal cabling. Applications for such fiber-optic pressure detection systems include the pressure monitoring of flow in fuel lines and their pressure valves. This paper characterizes the application of FBG sensors, with remote access capability, for the nonintrusive pressure monitoring of different types of metallic pipes. We show that pressure changes smaller than one psi can be detected with a tunable diode laser-based detection system. Standard metal pipes of steel, inconel, copper-nickel alloy and titanium are characterized, and the resilience of FBG sensors to an overpressure of up to 1500 psi is demonstrated.

  20. Electronically scanned multichannel pressure transducer system for cryogenic environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, John J.

    1990-01-01

    Research into the application of custom doped piezoresistive silicon pressure sensors has led to a multichannel pressure sensor design that will operate accurately and reliably at cryogenic temperatures. The thermal effects upon multichannel pressure sensors are mapped by thermal calibrations and are represented by sets of nth order coefficients specific to each sensor. The thermal offset and sensitivity variations are corrected by computer algorithms which scan the sensors, recall correction coefficients from thermally induced sensor variations, and apply these to correct the sensor's output measurement uncertainty to within 0.5 percent of full scale output for combined offset and sensitivity. A prototype sensor system has been fabricated, and performance test data are presented.

  1. Reliable, Low Mass, Non-Invasive Pressure Transducers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartley, F.; Tovey, M.

    1999-01-01

    Mass is a major driver for future spacecraft and missions exposed to high radiation levels (i.e. Europa Orbiter) present even more challenge. A variety of non-invasive measurement techniques are in development that enables determination of pressures within a propulsion network.

  2. Evaluation of Data-Logging Transducer to Passively Collect Pressure Vessel p/T History

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wnuk, Stephen P.; Le, Son; Loew, Raymond A.

    2013-01-01

    Pressure vessels owned and operated by NASA are required to be regularly certified per agency policy. Certification requires an assessment of damage mechanisms and an estimation of vessel remaining life. Since detail service histories are not typically available for most pressure vessels, a conservative estimate of vessel pressure/temperature excursions is typically used in assessing fatigue life. This paper details trial use of a data-logging transducer to passively obtain actual pressure and temperature service histories of pressure vessels. The approach was found to have some potential for cost savings and other benefits in certain cases.

  3. 40 CFR 1065.215 - Pressure transducers, temperature sensors, and dewpoint sensors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... sensors, and dewpoint sensors. 1065.215 Section 1065.215 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Measurement of Engine Parameters and Ambient Conditions § 1065.215 Pressure transducers, temperature sensors, and dewpoint sensors. (a) Application. Use instruments as specified in this section to...

  4. Development of a wireless intra-vaginal transducer for monitoring intra-abdominal pressure in women

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, Tanner J.; Thomsen, Jens C.; Maass, Sean D.; Hsu, Yvonne; Nygaard, Ingrid E.

    2011-01-01

    Pelvic floor disorders (PFD) affect one of every four women in the United States. Elevated intra-abdominal pressure (IAP) during daily activity or strenuous physical activity has been identified as a risk factor in the prevalence of PFD. However, the relationship between IAP and physical activity is poorly understood and oftentimes activity restrictions are prescribed by physicians without clinical evidence linking various activities to elevated IAP. There are currently no pressure transducers capable of monitoring IAP non-invasively out of a clinical environment. To overcome this shortcoming, a novel intra-vaginal pressure transducer (IVT) was developed to continuously monitor IAP. Improvements were made to the first generation IVT by incorporating wireless capability to enhance the device’s mobility while creating a more robust IAP monitoring system. To ensure the changes maintained the functionality of the original device design, comparison testing with standard clinical pressure transducers in both bench top and clinical settings was conducted. The wireless device was found to have high linearity, robust signal transmission, and dynamic response that outperforms the clinical standard rectal transducer and is similar to the original first generation non-wireless design. The wireless IVT presented here is a mobile wireless device capable of measuring, storing and transmitting IAP data during various physical activities. PMID:22147020

  5. Data quality assurance in pressure transducer-based automatic water level monitoring

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Submersible pressure transducers integrated with data loggers have become relatively common water-level measuring devices used in flow or well water elevation measurements. However, drift, linearity, hysteresis and other problems can lead to erroneous data. Researchers at the USDA-ARS in Watkinsvill...

  6. Calibration and use of a rugged new piezoresistive pressure transducer

    SciTech Connect

    Lucht, R.A.; Charest, J.A.

    1995-09-01

    A new 50-ohm piezoresistive pressure gauge has been developed and calibrated in the range 0 to 4.0 GPa. This ``pinducer`` consists of one half of 100 ohm, one quarter watt, carbon composition resistor mounted coaxially at the end of a small brass tube. Three techniques have been used to calibrate this new gauge. Good agreement is found between all calibration data, and a smooth curve is fit through all resistance change versus pressure data up to 1.5 GPa. The gauges exhibit rise times of about 0.5 {mu}s. They offer advantages in raggedness, cost, and flexibility of application. The pinducer can be successfully used in divergent flows, harsh environments, and positions where lead protection would be impossible with thin-film gauges. A unique application is demonstrated.

  7. Does the accuracy of fine-scale water level measurements by vented pressure transducers permit for diurnal evapotranspiration estimation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gribovszki, Zoltán; Kalicz, Péter; Szilágyi, József

    2013-04-01

    Evapotranspiration (ET) estimation methods based on diurnal water level (surface or groundwater) fluctuations are sensitive to measurement accuracy (McLaughlin and Cohen, 2011; Cuevas et al., 2010). Water level fluctuations are often measured by pressure transducers of varying design and precision. Available total pressure transducers require a compensation for barometric pressure change supplied by barometric pressure transducers. Recently McLaughlin and Cohen (2011) as well as Cuevas et al. (2010) analyzed the 'thermal artifacts' of such transducer-pair data questioning the applicability of sub-daily water level measurements in non-buffered thermal mode for diurnal ET estimation. Similar problems should not, in principle, occur for so-called vented pressure transducers. With the help of ancillary manual measurements, this study verifies the accuracy of vented pressure transducer obtained ultra-fine scale (temporal resolution of 1-10 min) stream- and groundwater level data. Thermal effects were examined by a statistical analysis of concurrent water level and temperature data. The results support the thermal artifact-free nature of vented pressure transducers and therefore their suitability for diurnal ET estimation purposes when proper maintenance and periodic calibrations are provided. In the lack of such measures, diurnal temperature changes can induce errors in vented pressure transducer readings as well.

  8. Response of a piezoelectric pressure transducer to IR laser beam impingement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, William C.; Leiweke, Robert J.; Beeson, Harold

    1992-01-01

    The non-pressure response of a PCB Model 113A transducer to a far infrared radiation impulse from a carbon dioxide laser was investigated. Incident radiation was applied both to the bare transducer diaphragm and to coated diaphragms. Coatings included two common ablative materials and a reflective gold coating. High-flux radiation impulses induced an immediate brief negative output followed by a longer-duration positive output. Both timing and amplitude of the responses will be discussed, and the effects of coatings will be compared. Bursts of blackbody radiation from a 1500 K source produced qualitatively similar responses.

  9. PVDF water-shock pressure transducer with 200-ns response

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, D.E.; Hogeland, S.R.; Nelson, L.S.

    1992-12-01

    The design, calibration, and preliminary test results for an underwater shock gauge are presented. The active element is a 25-{mu}m thick polyvinylidene fluoride shock sensor providing rise times as short as 50 ns. Fast rise time is essential to accurate recording of shock pulses with durations of only a few microseconds. The piezoelectric polymer provides a self-generating pressure sensor requiring neither amplification nor additional active electronic circuitry. The gauge package is designed to minimize electromagnetic interference from the high-voltage fire set used to power the exploding bridge wire pressure source. The gauge package is constructed to withstand the initial water shock as well as subsequent reactions in the water that result in strong water motion and bubble generation. Thin-film diaphragm sensors are not sturdy enough to withstand this environment. Initial tests show that the gauge responds in 200 ns in water and that low-frequency response is sufficient to allow recording for at least 40 {mu}s after the initial shock arrival.

  10. Clinical comparison of the Spiegelberg parenchymal transducer and ventricular fluid pressure

    PubMed Central

    Chambers, I; Siddique, M; Banister, K; Mendelow, A

    2001-01-01

    The Spiegelberg brain pressure catheter is a low cost implantable intracranial pressure measuring system which has the unique ability to perform regular automatic zeroing. A new version of the catheter has become available with a subdural bolt fixation to allow insertion of the device into the brain parenchyma. The accuracy of this system has been evaluated in comparison with a ventricular fluid pressure method in a series of patients to determine its accuracy and utility in the clinical environment.
 Hourly readings from the Spiegelberg system have been compared with those obtained using a standard pressure transducer connected to an external ventricular drain. Measurements continued while there was a clinical need for CSF drainage.
 Eleven patients were recruited to the study and data were recorded for periods ranging from 40 to 111 hours. A good agreement between the two systems was obtained. In 10 cases the mean difference was less than ±1.5 mm Hg and the dynamic changes in value were contemporaneous. In one case an intracerebral haemorrhage developed around the tips of the Spiegelberg catheter and significant differences occurred between the two methods of measurement.
 In conclusion, the Spiegelberg parenchymal transducer provides an accurate measurement of intracranial pressure when compared with ventricular pressure. The transducer was found to be robust in the clinical environment and very popular with the nursing staff. Further studies may determine whether the complication rate of this system is comparable with other available devices.

 PMID:11511715

  11. Measurement system support at the JAERI-CRT Facility: pressure transducers. [Containment Research Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Shay, W.M. Jr.; McCauley, E.W.

    1981-11-01

    As part of a continuing liaison between the US NRC and foreigh full scale containment research programs, measurements assistance in the form of the loan of 30 flush diaphram pressure transducers has been provided to the JAERI-CRT MK II research program at Tokai-Mura, Japan. Procedures developed earlier at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) under similar research work sponsored by the US NRC were used by LLNL to successfully complete final installation and in-situ end-to-end calibration of the transducers in the CRT facility. The results from this calibration showed a very close agreement between sensitivities and linearities calculated at LLNL and the ones calculated at JAERI and indicate the transducers should give valid data during future testing.

  12. Use of diaphragm transducers in the measurement of pressures on soft materials.

    PubMed

    Jhoun, J H; Childress, D S

    1998-11-01

    Diaphragm pressure transducers are designed to measure pressures in fluids, but have also been applied to measuring pressures on soft materials, such as at the interface between the residual limb of a lower-limb amputee and the supporting surface defined by the prosthetic socket. The reliability and accuracy of Kulite XTM-190 transducer as a pressure monitor on soft materials, such as silicone and Pelite was evaluated in three physical model set-ups. The evaluations included the uniform loading of solid disks of silicone and Pelite, the application of air pressure to the core of a contained thick-walled cylinder made of silicone, and the dynamic indentation of a contained solid silicone cylinder. Sensor measurements in all situations were similar to analytical, iterative or finite element solutions when certain conditions were met. These conditions include: (i) lubricating the interface between the soft material and the supporting structure; (ii) calibrating the transducers under surface and material conditions used during measurements; and (iii) using compatible soft materials (e.g. silicone but not Pelite). PMID:10367471

  13. Capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer for ultra-low pressure measurement: Theoretical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhikang; Zhao, Libo; Jiang, Zhuangde; Akhbari, Sina; Ding, Jianjun; Zhao, Yihe; Zhao, Yulong; Lin, Liwei

    2015-12-01

    Ultra-low pressure measurement is necessary in many areas, such as high-vacuum environment monitoring, process control and biomedical applications. This paper presents a novel approach for ultra-low pressure measurement where capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducers (CMUTs) are used as the sensing elements. The working principle is based on the resonant frequency shift of the membrane under the applied pressure. The membranes of the biased CMUTs can produce a larger resonant frequency shift than the diaphragms with no DC bias in the state-of-the-art resonant pressure sensors, which contributes to pressure sensitivity improvement. The theoretical analysis and finite element method (FEM) simulation were employed to study the relationship between the resonant frequency and the pressure. The results demonstrated excellent capability of the CMUTs for ultra-low pressure measurement. It is shown that the resonant frequency of the CMUT varies linearly with the applied pressure. A sensitivity of more than 6.33 ppm/Pa (68 kHz/kPa) was obtained within a pressure range of 0 to 100 Pa when the CMUTs were biased at a DC voltage of 90% of the collapse voltage. It was also demonstrated that the pressure sensitivity can be adjusted by the DC bias voltage. In addition, the effects of air damping and ambient temperature on the resonant frequency were also studied. The effect of air damping is negligible for the pressures below 1000 Pa. To eliminate the temperature effect on the resonant frequency, a temperature compensating method was proposed.

  14. Absolute pressure transducers for space shuttle and orbiter propulsion and control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bolta, J. J.

    1974-01-01

    A preliminary design was completed, reviewing of such subjects as: the trade studies for media isolation and one sensor vs. two sensors for two bridges; compensation resistors; unit design; hydrogen embrittlement; sealing techniques and test station design. A design substantiation phase was finished, consisting of testing of a prototype unit and fabrication technique studies. A cryogenic test station was implemented and prototype sensor cells were fabricated, sensors assembled, and cryogenic tests performed.

  15. An advanced solid state pressure transducer for high reliability SSME application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R. L.; Wamstad, D. B.

    1985-01-01

    New methods to advance the state-of-the-art of pressure sensors for the Space Shuttle Main Engine were demonstrated. The results of the feasibility and breadboard demonstration phase and the current status of the research development prototype follow-on phase are presented. A technology breakthrough utilizing silicon piezoresistive technology was achieved in the first phase. A transducer design concept for the SSME application utilizes packaging materials with similar thermal coefficients of expansion and maintains the transducer seals primarily in compression. The silicon chip design will provide dual sensing outputs with laser trimmable integrated compensating electronics. The silicon resistor ion implant dose was customized for the SSME temperature requirement. A basic acoustic modeling software program was developed to evaluate the frequency response characteristics for the package design.

  16. Comparison of the Effects of using Tygon Tubing in Rocket Propulsion Ground Test Pressure Transducer Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farr, Rebecca A.; Wiley, John T.; Vitarius, Patrick

    2005-01-01

    This paper documents acoustics environments data collected during liquid oxygen- ethanol hot-fire rocket testing at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center in November- December 2003. The test program was conducted during development testing of the RS-88 development engine thrust chamber assembly in support of the Orbital Space Plane Crew Escape System Propulsion Program Pad Abort Demonstrator. In addition to induced environments analysis support, coincident data collected using other sensors and methods has allowed benchmarking of specific acoustics test measurement methodologies during propulsion tests. Qualitative effects on data characteristics caused by using tygon sense lines of various lengths in pressure transducer measurements is discussed here.

  17. Conductance valve and pressure-to-conductance transducer method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Schoeniger, Joseph S.; Cummings, Eric B.; Brennan, James S.

    2005-01-18

    A device for interrupting or throttling undesired ionic transport through a fluid network is disclosed. The device acts as a fluid valve by reversibly generating a fixed "bubble" in the conducting solvent solution carried by the network. The device comprises a porous hydrophobic structure filling a portion of a connecting channel within the network and optionally incorporates flow restrictor elements at either end of the porous structure that function as pressure isolation barriers, and a fluid reservoir connected to the region of the channel containing the porous structure. Also included is a pressure pump connected to the fluid reservoir. The device operates by causing the pump to vary the hydraulic pressure to a quantity of solvent solution held within the reservoir and porous structure. At high pressures, most or all of the pores of the structure are filled with conducting liquid so the ionic conductance is high. At lower pressures, only a fraction of the pores are filled with liquid, so ionic conductivity is lower. Below a threshold pressure, the porous structure contains only vapor, so there is no liquid conduction path. The device therefore effectively throttles ionic transport through the porous structure and acts as a "conductance valve" or "pressure-to-conductance" transducer within the network.

  18. A modal test method using sound pressure transducers based on vibro-acoustic reciprocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, W. D.; Liu, J. M.; Xu, Y. F.; Ying, H. Q.

    2014-06-01

    A modal test method that uses sound pressure transducers at fixed locations and an impact hammer roving over a test structure is developed in this work. Since sound pressure transducers are used, the current method deals with a coupled structural-acoustic system. Based on the vibro-acoustic reciprocity, the method is equivalent to one, where acoustic excitations at fixed locations are given and the resulting acceleration of the test structure is measured. The current method can eliminate mass loading due to use of accelerometers, which can destroy existence of repeated or close natural frequencies of a symmetric structure. It can also avoid effects of a nodal line of a mode and an inactive area of a local mode, and measure all the out-of-plane modes within a frequency range of interest, including global and local ones. The coupling between the structure and the acoustic field in a structural-acoustic system introduces asymmetry in the model formulation. An equivalent state space formulation is used for a damped structural-acoustic system and the associated eigenvalue problem is derived. The biorthonormality relations between the left and right eigenvectors and the relations between the structural and acoustic components in the left and right eigenvectors are proved. The frequency response functions associated with the current method are derived and their physical meanings are explained. The guidelines for using the current method, including the types of structures that are suitable for the method, the positions of the sound pressure transducers, and the orientation of the test structure relative to the transducers, are provided. Modal tests were carried out on an automotive disk brake using the traditional and current methods, where multiple accelerometers and microphones were used to measure its dynamic responses induced by impacts, respectively. The differences between the measured natural frequencies using the current method and those from the finite element

  19. Current Pressure Transducer Application of Model-based Prognostics Using Steady State Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teubert, Christopher; Daigle, Matthew J.

    2014-01-01

    Prognostics is the process of predicting a system's future states, health degradation/wear, and remaining useful life (RUL). This information plays an important role in preventing failure, reducing downtime, scheduling maintenance, and improving system utility. Prognostics relies heavily on wear estimation. In some components, the sensors used to estimate wear may not be fast enough to capture brief transient states that are indicative of wear. For this reason it is beneficial to be capable of detecting and estimating the extent of component wear using steady-state measurements. This paper details a method for estimating component wear using steady-state measurements, describes how this is used to predict future states, and presents a case study of a current/pressure (I/P) Transducer. I/P Transducer nominal and off-nominal behaviors are characterized using a physics-based model, and validated against expected and observed component behavior. This model is used to map observed steady-state responses to corresponding fault parameter values in the form of a lookup table. This method was chosen because of its fast, efficient nature, and its ability to be applied to both linear and non-linear systems. Using measurements of the steady state output, and the lookup table, wear is estimated. A regression is used to estimate the wear propagation parameter and characterize the damage progression function, which are used to predict future states and the remaining useful life of the system.

  20. Measurement of arterial pressure using catheter-transducer systems. Improvement using the Accudynamic.

    PubMed

    Allan, M W; Gray, W M; Asbury, A J

    1988-03-01

    The dynamic performance of arterial manometers depends upon the values of the natural frequency fo and the damping factor beta. Satisfactory reproduction of all arterial waveforms requires that fo should be greater than about 13 Hz; for an fo of 13 Hz, beta should have a value of 0.5, but, as fo increases, an increasing range of beta values is permissible. We measured fo and beta for two pressure transducers (Gould P23 Statham and Gould Disposable) in combination with Portex or Gould catheter tubing of lengths varying from 100 cm to 300 cm. All combinations were considerably underdamped, with the best having an fo of 30 Hz and a beta of 0.1. We also investigated the performance of a commercial device, the Accudynamic, designed to allow beta to be increased without affecting fo. We found that the Accudynamic worked well, allowing acceptable performance to be obtained from the Gould Disposable transducer with catheters up to 200 cm in length. PMID:3355737

  1. An inexpensive pressure transducer for the measurement of low amplitude unsteady pressure signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, R. T.; Sullivan, J. P.

    1994-04-01

    Electret microphones were evaluated for use in an experiment to investigate the surface pressures of a wing immersed in a propeller slipstream. Calibration of a typical electret microphone over a range of 50 to 6000 hz showed that at each individual frequency there is less than 1.1% error in linearity for low pressures, but some variation of sensitivity occurs over the range of frequencies tested. This variation of sensitivity with frequency can be corrected using standard signal processing techniques.

  2. Calibration and assessment of a fluid-filled catheter-transducer system for the measurement of ventricular diastolic pressures.

    PubMed

    Brennan, E G; O'Hare, N J

    1998-08-01

    A concise set of experiments is described which detail the calibration of a fluid-filled catheter-transducer system and the assessment of a widely used industrial algorithm for determining end-diastolic pressures using that system. First, the static response of the catheter-transducer system was evaluated in vitro by inserting the catheter into a graduated cylinder of saline. Twelve observations revealed a systematic undervaluation of pressure by the system of 1.78 mmHg with 95% limits of agreement ranging from -6.22 to 2.66 mmHg. Next, the dynamic response was evaluated in vivo by performing a transient step-response test. The system had an adequate dynamic response (fn = 11.12 Hz) for intraventricular pressure waveform replication but was considerably underdamped (beta = 0.16). Finally, the ability of the analysis software to detect the point of end-diastole and evaluate end-diastolic pressure was assessed by comparing system output with manual measurements of end-diastolic pressure in 12 patients. The mean difference between manually determined end-diastolic pressure and system output was 0.83 +/- 1.68 mm Hg. This difference is clinically insignificant and shows that the more noteworthy source of error is in the manometer-transducer emphasizing the importance of calibration and quality assurance of fluid-filled catheter-transducer systems for use in clinical cardiology or research. PMID:9735891

  3. Brachial artery vasomotion and transducer pressure effect on measurements by active contour segmentation on ultrasound

    SciTech Connect

    Cary, Theodore W.; Sultan, Laith R.; Sehgal, Chandra M.; Reamer, Courtney B.; Mohler, Emile R.

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: To use feed-forward active contours (snakes) to track and measure brachial artery vasomotion on ultrasound images recorded in both transverse and longitudinal views; and to compare the algorithm's performance in each view. Methods: Longitudinal and transverse view ultrasound image sequences of 45 brachial arteries were segmented by feed-forward active contour (FFAC). The segmented regions were used to measure vasomotion artery diameter, cross-sectional area, and distention both as peak-to-peak diameter and as area. ECG waveforms were also simultaneously extracted frame-by-frame by thresholding a running finite-difference image between consecutive images. The arterial and ECG waveforms were compared as they traced each phase of the cardiac cycle. Results: FFAC successfully segmented arteries in longitudinal and transverse views in all 45 cases. The automated analysis took significantly less time than manual tracing, but produced superior, well-behaved arterial waveforms. Automated arterial measurements also had lower interobserver variability as measured by correlation, difference in mean values, and coefficient of variation. Although FFAC successfully segmented both the longitudinal and transverse images, transverse measurements were less variable. The cross-sectional area computed from the longitudinal images was 27% lower than the area measured from transverse images, possibly due to the compression of the artery along the image depth by transducer pressure. Conclusions: FFAC is a robust and sensitive vasomotion segmentation algorithm in both transverse and longitudinal views. Transverse imaging may offer advantages over longitudinal imaging: transverse measurements are more consistent, possibly because the method is less sensitive to variations in transducer pressure during imaging.

  4. Fabrication of capacitive absolute pressure sensors by thin film vacuum encapsulation on SOI substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belsito, Luca; Mancarella, Fulvio; Roncaglia, Alberto

    2016-09-01

    The paper reports on the fabrication and characterization of absolute capacitive pressure sensors fabricated by polysilicon low-pressure chemical vapour deposition vacuum packaging on silicon-on-insulator substrates. The fabrication process proposed is carried out at wafer level and allows obtaining a large number of miniaturized sensors per substrate on 1  ×  2 mm2 chips with high yield. The sensors present average pressure sensitivity of 8.3 pF/bar and average pressure resolution limit of 0.24 mbar within the measurement range 200–1200 mbar. The temperature drift of the sensor prototypes was also measured in the temperature range 25–45 °C, yielding an average temperature sensitivity of 67 fF K‑1 at ambient pressure.

  5. Shock tube investigation of dynamic response of pressure transducers for validation of rotor performance measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bershader, Daniel

    1988-01-01

    For some time now, NASA has had a program under way to aid in the validation of rotor performance and acoustics codes associated with the UH-60 rotary-wing aircraft; and to correlate results of such studies with those obtained from investigations of other selected aircraft rotor performance. A central feature of these studies concerns the dynamic measurement of surface pressure at various locations up to frequencies of 25 KHz. For this purpose, fast-response gauges of the Kulite type are employed. The latter need to be buried in the rotor; they record surface pressures which are transmitted by a pipette connected to the gauge. The other end of the pipette is cut flush with the surface. In certain locations, the pipette configuration includes a rather sharp right-angle bend. The natural question has arisen in this connection: In what way are the pipettes modifying the signals received at the rotor surface and subsequently transmitted to the sensitive Kulite transducer element. The basic details and results of the program performed and recently completed in the High Pressure Shock Tube Laboratory of the Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics at Stanford University are given.

  6. Continuous ambulatory pulmonary artery pressure monitoring. A new method using a transducer tipped catheter and a simple recording system.

    PubMed

    Levy, R D; Cunningham, D; Shapiro, L M; Wright, C; Mockus, L; Fox, K M

    1986-04-01

    A transducer tipped catheter and simple recording system were used for the continuous measurement of ambulatory pulmonary artery pressure. The pulmonary artery pressure was recorded on a miniaturised tape recorder and replayed via an optical writer. Pulmonary arterial systolic and diastolic pressures can be analysed on a beat to beat basis. Continuous ambulatory monitoring was performed for a total 288 hours in 13 patients who were undergoing routine investigation for coronary artery disease. There was less than 1% zero drift and 0.25% linearity error per full scale pressure. The frequency response of the entire system was flat to 8 Hz with a linear phase delay. The transducer tipped catheter and a conventional fluid-filled system were used to measure left ventricular and pulmonary artery end diastolic pressures in eight patients. The correlation between the results obtained by the two methods was excellent. This method could be used at any centre equipped for ambulatory electrocardiographic monitoring. PMID:3964499

  7. Epidural Intracranial Pressure Measurement in Rats Using a Fiber-optic Pressure Transducer

    PubMed Central

    Murtha, Lucy; McLeod, Damian; Spratt, Neil

    2012-01-01

    Elevated intracranial pressure (ICP) is a significant problem in several forms of ischemic brain injury including stroke, traumatic brain injury and cardiac arrest. This elevation may result in further neurological injury, in the form of transtentorial herniation1,2,3,4, midbrain compression, neurological deficit or increased cerebral infarct2,4. Current therapies are often inadequate to control elevated ICP in the clinical setting5,6,7 . Thus there is a need for accurate methods of ICP measurement in animal models to further our understanding of the basic mechanisms and to develop new treatments for elevated ICP. In both the clinical and experimental setting ICP cannot be estimated without direct measurement. Several methods of ICP catheter insertion currently exist. Of these the intraventricular catheter has become the clinical 'gold standard' of ICP measurement in humans8. This method involves the partial removal of skull and the instrumentation of the catheter through brain tissue. Consequently, intraventricular catheters have an infection rate of 6-11%9. For this reason, subdural and epidural cannulations have become the preferred methods in animal models of ischemic injury. Various ICP measurement techniques have been adapted for animal models, and of these, fluid-filled telemetry catheters10 and solid state catheters are the most frequently used11,12,13,14,15. The fluid-filled systems are prone to developing air bubbles in the line, resulting in false ICP readings. Solid state probes avoid this problem (Figure 1). An additional problem is fitting catheters under the skull or into the ventricles without causing any brain injury that might alter the experimental outcomes. Therefore, we have developed a method that places an ICP catheter contiguous with the epidural space, but avoids the need to insert it between skull and brain. An optic fibre pressure catheter (420LP, SAMBA Sensors, Sweden) was used to measure ICP at the epidural location because the location

  8. Rapid Transient Pressure Field Computations in the Nearfield of Circular Transducers using Frequency Domain Time-Space Decomposition

    PubMed Central

    Alles, E. J.; Zhu, Y.; van Dongen, K. W. A.; McGough, R. J.

    2013-01-01

    The fast nearfield method, when combined with time-space decomposition, is a rapid and accurate approach for calculating transient nearfield pressures generated by ultrasound transducers. However, the standard time-space decomposition approach is only applicable to certain analytical representations of the temporal transducer surface velocity that, when applied to the fast nearfield method, are expressed as a finite sum of products of separate temporal and spatial terms. To extend time-space decomposition such that accelerated transient field simulations are enabled in the nearfield for an arbitrary transducer surface velocity, a new transient simulation method, frequency domain time-space decomposition (FDTSD), is derived. With this method, the temporal transducer surface velocity is transformed into the frequency domain, and then each complex-valued term is processed separately. Further improvements are achieved by spectral clipping, which reduces the number of terms and the computation time. Trade-offs between speed and accuracy are established for FDTSD calculations, and pressure fields obtained with the FDTSD method for a circular transducer are compared to those obtained with Field II and the impulse response method. The FDTSD approach, when combined with the fast nearfield method and spectral clipping, consistently achieves smaller errors in less time and requires less memory than Field II or the impulse response method. PMID:23160476

  9. SAPT units turn-on in an interference-dominant environment. [Stand Alone Pressure Transducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peng, W.-C.; Yang, C.-C.; Lichtenberg, C.

    1990-01-01

    A stand alone pressure transducer (SAPT) is a credit-card-sized smart pressure sensor inserted between the tile and the aluminum skin of a space shuttle. Reliably initiating the SAPT units via RF signals in a prelaunch environment is a challenging problem. Multiple-source interference may exist if more than one GSE (ground support equipment) antenna is turned on at the same time to meet the simultaneity requirement of 10 ms. A polygon model for orbiter, external tank, solid rocket booster, and tail service masts is used to simulate the prelaunch environment. Geometric optics is then applied to identify the coverage areas and the areas which are vulnerable to multipath and/or multiple-source interference. Simulation results show that the underside areas of an orbiter have incidence angles exceeding 80 deg. For multipath interference, both sides of the cargo bay areas are found to be vulnerable to a worst-case multipath loss exceeding 20 dB. Multiple-source interference areas are also identified. Mitigation methods for the coverage and interference problem are described. It is shown that multiple-source interference can be eliminated (or controlled) using the time-division-multiplexing method or the time-stamp approach.

  10. New apparatus for calibrations in the range of 2 kPa absolute pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, S. Y.; Choi, I. M.

    2005-12-01

    Capacitance diaphragm gauges (CDGs) are precise electromechanical pressure sensors in which the displacement of a stretched thin metal diaphragm is detected by the measurement of a capacitance. These are very accurate gauges, and are frequently used as transfer gauges. To calibrate such accurate low-pressure gauges, precise mercury manometers have been used. However, complexity, concern about mercury vapour, and cost of mercury manometers have made it difficult to use these manometers in many industrial calibration laboratories. As a substitute, gas-operated piston gauges can be used for the calibration of such low-pressure gauges. However, the minimum pressure that is necessary to balance the tare weight, which generally corresponds to a pressure of several kilopascals, is a major obstacle. To reduce this minimum operating pressure, we adopted a variable bell-jar pressure method. To realize this method effectively, we developed a new mass-handling device that makes it possible to add or remove weights up to 200 g easily, with a resolution of 10 g, without breaking the vacuum during the calibration. This calibration system can be used to measure pressures from 100 Pa to 2 kPa in the absolute mode. In this paper, we also present the calibration results for two types of CDGs with full-scale ranges of 1330 Pa and 1000 Pa, respectively.

  11. A new primary standard oil manometer for absolute pressure up to 10 kPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yanhua; Yang, Yuanchao; Wang, Jinku; Sun, Junfeng

    2015-02-01

    The National Institute of Metrology has developed a new oil manometer that covers the absolute pressure range from 100 Pa up to 10 kPa. The manometer is based on the ultrasonic measurement of transit time in oil columns, and a novel dual U-tube system has been designed to measure the speed of sound in real time as the pressure changes. The working fluid, di-2-ethylhexyl sebacate, was chosen for its sufficiently low vapor pressure and low sound attenuation. Each tube has a coating of Teflon to resist wetting by the oil. To obtain a uniform and stable temperature environment, the dual U-tube system is located inside a guard vacuum chamber that is wrapped with foam and aluminium foil. A vertical temperature difference of less than 20 mK, a horizontal temperature difference of less than 5 mK and a temperature stability better than 10 mK were achieved. The overall standard (k = 1) uncertainty of the oil manometer is estimated to be approximately (0.015 + 1.63  ×  10-5 p Pa-1) Pa for absolute pressure measurements.

  12. Blade Surface Pressure Distributions in a Rocket Engine Turbine: Experimental Work With On-Blade Pressure Transducers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, Susan T.; Zoladz, Thomas F.; Griffin, Lisa W.; Turner, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Understanding the unsteady aspects of turbine rotor flowfields is critical to successful future turbine designs. A technology program was conducted at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center to increase the understanding of unsteady environments for rocket engine turbines. The experimental program involved instrumenting turbine rotor blades with surface-mounted high frequency response pressure transducers. The turbine model was then tested to measure the unsteady pressures on the rotor blades. The data obtained from the experimental program is unique in three respects. First, much more unsteady data was obtained (several minutes per set point) than has been possible in the past. Also, two independent unsteady data acquisition systems and fundamental signal processing approaches were used. Finally, an extensive steady performance database existed for the turbine model. This allowed an evaluation of the effect of the on-blade instrumentation on the turbine's performance. This unique data set, the lessons learned for acquiring this type of data, and the improvements made to the data analysis and prediction tools will contribute to future turbine programs such as those for reusable launch vehicles.

  13. Absolute OH density determination by laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy in an atmospheric pressure RF plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Q.; Nikiforov, A. Yu.; Li, L.; Vanraes, P.; Britun, N.; Snyders, R.; Lu, X. P.; Leys, C.

    2012-11-01

    In this paper, the ground state OH density is measured in high pressure plasma by laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) spectroscopy. The OH density determination is based on the simulation of the intensity fraction of fluorescence from the laser-excited level of OH (A) in the total detected LIF signal. The validity of this approach is verified in an atmospheric pressure Ar + H2O plasma jet sustained by a 13.56 MHz power supply. The transition line P1 (4) from OH (A, v' = 1, J' = 3) → OH (X, v'' = 0, J'' = 4) is used for the LIF excitation. The absolute OH density is determined to be 2.5 × 1019 m-3 at 1 mm away from the jet nozzle. It corresponds to a dissociation of 0.06% of the water vapor in the working gas. Different mechanisms of OH (X) production in the core of the plasma jet are discussed and analyzed.

  14. Low-pressure line-shape study in molecular oxygen with absolute frequency reference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domysławska, J.; Wójtewicz, S.; Cygan, A.; Bielska, K.; Lisak, D.; Masłowski, P.; Trawiński, R. S.; Ciuryło, R.

    2013-11-01

    We present a line-shape analysis of the rovibronic R1 Q2 transition of the oxygen B band resolved by the Pound-Drever-Hall-locked frequency-stabilized cavity ring-down spectroscopy technique in the low pressure range. The frequency axis of the spectra is linked by the ultra-narrow diode laser to the optical frequency comb in order to measure the absolute frequency at each point of the recorded spectra. Experimental spectra are fitted with various line-shape models: the Voigt profile, the Galatry profile, the Nelkin-Ghatak profile, the speed-dependent Voigt profile, and the speed-dependent Nelkin-Ghatak profile with quadratic and hypergeometric approximations for the speed dependence of collisional broadening and shifting. The influences of Dicke narrowing, speed-dependent effects, and correlation between phase- and velocity-changing collisions on the line shape are investigated. Values of line-shape parameters, including the absolute frequency of the transition 435685.24828(46) GHz, are reported.

  15. Transducer applications, a compilation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The characteristics and applications of transducers are discussed. Subjects presented are: (1) thermal measurements, (2) liquid level and fluid flow measurements, (3) pressure transducers, (4) stress-strain measurements, (5) acceleration and velocity measurements, (6) displacement and angular rotation, and (7) transducer test and calibration methods.

  16. Fabrication of capacitive absolute pressure sensor using Si-Au eutectic bonding in SOI wafer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryeol Lee, Kang; Kim, Kunnyun; Park, Hyo-Derk; Kim, Yong Kook; Choi, Seung-Woo; Choi, Woo-Beom

    2006-04-01

    A capacitive absolute pressure sensor was fabricated using a large deflected diaphragm with a sealed vacuum cavity formed by removing handling silicon wafer and oxide layers from a SOI wafer after eutectic bonding of a silicon wafer to the SOI wafer. The deflected displacements of the diaphragm formed by the vacuum cavity in the fabricated sensor were similar to simulation results. Initial capacitance values were about 2.18pF and 3.65pF under normal atmosphere, where the thicknesses of the diaphragm used to fabricate the vacuum cavity were 20 µm and 30 µm, respectively. Also, it was confirmed that the differences of capacitance value from 1000hPa to 5hPa were about 2.57pF and 5.35pF, respectively.

  17. The 2ν3 Raman overtone of sulfur hexafluoride: Absolute spectra, pressure effects, and polarizability properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chrysos, M.; Rachet, F.; Kremer, D.

    2014-03-01

    Of the six normal vibrations of SF6, ν3 has a key role in the mechanisms of radiative forcing. This vibration, though inactive in Raman, shows up through the transition 2ν3 allowing for a complementary view on the asymmetric stretch of the molecule. Here, we look back into this topic, which has already caught some interest in the past but with some points been left out. We make a systematic incoherent-light-scattering analysis of the overtone with the use of different gas pressures and polarization orientations for the incident beam. Absolute-scale isotropic and anisotropic spectra are reported along with natural and pressure-induced widths and shifts, and other spectral features such as the peaks corresponding to the (experimentally indistinguishable) interfering channels Eg and F2g hitherto seen solely as two-photon IR-absorption features. We make the first-ever prediction of the SF6 polarizability second derivative with respect to the ν3-mode coordinate and we develop a heuristic argument to explain why the superposition of the three degenerate stretching motions that are related to the ν3 mode cannot but generate a polarized Raman band.

  18. Evaluation of Round Window Stimulation Using the Floating Mass Transducer by Intracochlear Sound Pressure Measurements in Human Temporal Bones

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Hideko Heidi; Dong, Wei; Olson, Elizabeth S.; Rosowski, John J.; Ravicz, Michael E.; Merchant, Saumil N.

    2009-01-01

    Hypothesis Round window (RW) stimulation with a floating mass transducer (FMT) can be studied experimentally and optimized to enhance auditory transduction. Background The FMT (MED-EL Vibrant Soundbridge) has been recently implanted in patients with refractory conductive or mixed hearing loss to stimulate the RW with varying degrees of success. The mechanics of RW stimulation with the FMT have not been studied in a systematic manner. Methods In cadaveric human temporal bones, measurements of stapes velocity with laser vibrometry in response to FMT-RW stimulation were used to optimize FMT insertion. The effect of RW stimulation on hearing was estimated using simultaneous measurements of intracochlear pressures in both perilymphatic scalae with micro-optical pressure transducers. This enabled calculation of the differential pressure across the cochlear partition, which is directly tied to auditory transduction. Results The best coupling between the FMT and RW was achieved with a piece of fascia placed between the RW and the FMT, and by "bracing" the free end of the FMT against the hypotympanic wall with dental impression material. FMT-RW stimulation provided differential pressures comparable to sound-induced oval window stimulation above 1 kHz. However, below 1 kHz the FMT was less capable. Conclusions Measurements of stapes velocity and intracochlear sound pressures in scala vestibuli and scala tympani enabled experimental evaluation of FMT stimulation of the RW. The efficacy of FMT-RW coupling was influenced significantly by technical and surgical factors, which can be optimized. This temporal bone preparation also lays the foundation for future studies to investigate multiple issues of relevance to both basic and clinical science such as RW stimulation in stapes fixation, non-aerated middle-ears and third-window lesions, and to answer basic questions regarding bone conduction. PMID:19841600

  19. Application of rotor mounted pressure transducers to analysis of inlet turbulence. [flow distortion in turbofan engine inlet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, D. B.

    1976-01-01

    Miniature pressure transducers installed near the leading edge of a fan blade were used to diagnose the non-uniform flow entering a subsonic tip speed turbofan on a static test stand. The pressure response of the blade to the inlet flow variations was plotted in a form which shows the space-time history of disturbances ingested by the rotor. Also, periodically sampled data values were auto- and cross-correlated as if they had been acquired from fixed hot wire anemometers at 150 equally spaced angles around the inlet. With a clean inlet and low wind, evidence of long, narrow turbulence eddies was easily found both in the boundary layer of the fan duct and outside the boundary layer. The role of the boundary layer was to follow and amplify disturbances in the outer flow. These eddies frequently moved around the inlet with a corkscrew motion as they passed through.

  20. Dynamic response of a transducer mounted at one end of an acoustical cavity which is subjected to a specified pressure at the open end of the cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Benedetti, G.A.; Benson, J.Z.

    1994-11-01

    The purpose of this report is to develop a mathematical model for a pressure transducer mounted in a fluid filled cavity (a system) and examine the pressure ``measurement`` error of the cavity and transducer by computing the dynamic response (output pressure) of the system to a specified pressure time history (input pressure). The ``measurement`` error is determined by comparing the calculated output pressure to the specified input pressure. The dynamic response of a transducer mounted at one end of a one-dimensional acoustical cavity is determined. The cavity is filled with a compressible isentropic fluid, and the fluid at the open end of the cavity (i.e., the boundary at x = 0) is subjected to a specified uniform axial input pressure. At the other end of the cavity the transducer is represented as a mass, spring, and damper system. Consequently, the boundary condition at x = {ell} is also time dependent. The general solution to the boundary value problem, as well as the steady state solution for periodic excitation, is obtained by integrating a coupled set of ordinary differential equations.

  1. Measurement and Control of the Variability of Scanning Pressure Transducer Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhl, David D.; Everhart, Joel L.; Hallissy, James B.

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes the new wall pressure measurement system and data-quality monitoring software installed at 14x22 Ft subsonic tunnel at the NASA Langley Research Center. The monitoring software was developed to enable measurement and control of the variability of the reference pressures and approximately 400 tunnel wall pressure measurements. Variability of the system, based upon data acquired over a year of wind tunnel tests and calibrations, is presented. The level of variation of the wall pressure measurements is shown to be predictable.

  2. A fiber-optic frequency transducer of variable pressure in gaseous and liquid media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egorov, F. A.; Potapov, V. T.; Melkumov, M. A.; Amelichev, V. V.; Generalov, S. S.; Shamanaev, S. V.

    2016-05-01

    Fiber-optic sensors of variable pressure are proposed and implemented on fiber lasers with microoptomechanical resonance structures generating in automodulation regimes. Possibilities of sound pressure monitoring in gaseous and liquid media are considered, and the sensitivity of these fiber-optic sensors is estimated.

  3. Experimental program to determine long term characteristics of the MDE pressure transducers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, C. D.

    1973-01-01

    The pressure cell sensors developed for the Pioneer 10/G meteoroid detection experiments (MDE) were investigated to enhance their application and their potential as a sensor in other MDE applications. Their Paschen characteristics were also investigated, and the effects of variations in geometry, Ni-63 platings (for initial ionizations) and sealing pressures were determined. The effects of extensive pre-flight testing and proton and heavy ion space radiation were investigated. Flight-quality pressure panels/cells were committed to long term testing to demonstrate their suitability for the Pioneer 10/G Missions.

  4. Test and development of inflatable spheres instrumented with miniaturized thermistors, accelerometers and pressure transducers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luers, J. K.

    1978-01-01

    Instrumentation was developed for the high altitude inflatable sphere to measure its skin temperature, acceleration and internal pressure. The sphere without instrumentation has routinely been used over the past 10 years to provide measurements of winds, density, temperature and pressure between 100 Km and 30 Km altitude. With the miniaturized instrumentation package onboard, the system offers the potential for providing meteorological information as well as a better understanding of sphere performance and dynamics during its descent. Of the six launches of instrumented spheres only one provided telemetry data. However, many of the objectives of the program were achieved.

  5. Establishment of a force balanced piston gauge for very low gauge and absolute pressure measurements at NPL, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijayakumar, D. Arun; Prakash, Om; Sharma, R. K.

    2012-11-01

    National Physical Laboratory, the National Metrology Institute (NMI) of India is maintaining Primary standards of pressure that cover several decades of pressure, starting from 3.0E-06 Pa to 1.0 GPa. Among which a recent addition is a Force Balanced Piston Gauge, the non-rotating piston type, having better resolution and zero stability compared to any other primary pressure standards commercially available in the range 1.0 Pa to 15.0 kPa (abs and gauge). The characterization of this FPG is done against Ultrasonic Interferometer Manometer (UIM), the National Primary pressure standard, working in the range 1.0 Pa to 130.0 kPa (abs and diff) and Air Piston Gauge (APG), a Transfer Pressure Standard, working in the range 6.5 kPa to 360 kPa (abs and gauge), in their overlapping pressure regions covering both absolute and gauge pressures. As NPL being one of the signatories to the CIPM MRA, the Calibration and Measurement Capabilities (CMC) of both the reference standards (UIM & APG), are Peer reviewed and notified in the Key Comparison Data Base (KCDB) of BIPM. The estimated mean effective area of the Piston Cylinder assembly of this FPG against UIM (980.457 mm2) and APG (980.463 mm2) are well within 4 ppm and 10 ppm agreement respectively, with the manufacturer's reported value (980.453 mm2). The expanded uncertainty of this FPG, Q(0.012 Pa, 0.0025% of reading), evaluated against UIM as reference standard, is well within the reported value of the manufacturer, Q(0.008 Pa, 0.003% of reading) at k = 2. The results of the characterization along with experimental setup & measurement conditions (for gauge and absolute pressure measurements), uncertainty budget preparation and evaluation of measurement uncertainty are discussed in detail in this paper.

  6. Dynamic pressure sensing with a fiber-optic polarimetric pressure transducer with two-wavelength passive quadrature readout.

    PubMed

    Fürstenau, N; Schmidt, M; Bock, W J; Urbanczyk, W

    1998-02-01

    We describe the combination of a polarimetric pressure sensor with a two-wavelength passive quadrature demodulation system allowing for dynamic pressure sensing in the 10-MPa range with unambiguous fringe counting. Furthermore, continuous phase measurement with the arctan method applied to the quadrature interference signals after automatic offset subtraction is demonstrated for the first time, to our knowledge. A single low-coherent superluminescent diode is used as a light source, and a polarizing beam splitter in combination with two adjustable interference filters of slightly different central wavelengths serves for the creation of the quadrature signals. Results of initial experiments with 60-ms pressure relaxation-time constants with the fringe-counting technique demonstrate the performance that was predicted theoretically. The measured pressure sensitivity exhibits excellent agreement with the previous research of Bock and Urbanczyk [IEEE Trans. Instrum. Meas. 44, 694-697 (1995)] using a polarimetric readout. The fringe-contrast variation and the measurement range obtained experimentally show the fiber dispersion to influence dephasing (deviation from quadrature) and visibility decrease significantly with increasing pressure. PMID:18268638

  7. Characterization of Pressure Fields of Focused Transducers at TÜBİTAK UME

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karaböce, B.; Şahin, A.; İnce, A. T.; Skarlatos, Y.

    Field radiated by HIFU (High Intensity Focused Ultrasound) has been investigated by measuring its pressure field and mapping in 2-D and 3-D. A new ultrasound pressure measurement system has been designed and constructed at TÜBİTAK UME (The Scientific and Technological Research Council of Turkey, the National Metrology Institute). System consists of a water tank, positioning system, measurement devices and a controlling program. The hydrophone was attached to a 3-axis, computer-controlled positioning system for alignment with the ultrasound source. The signal was captured and analyzed by the commercially available LabVIEW 8.1 software. The measurements of the ultrasound field were carried out with a needle hydrophone. For each waveform, p, p+ and p-pressures have been calculated. Wave behaviors produced by the KZK model and from experiments look like similar in general. In p, p+, p- the focal point, zero point after the primary peak (focus) and extremum points in the near field well match.

  8. Transducer characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Cross, B. T.; Eoff, J. M.; Schuetz, L. J.; Cunningham, K. R.

    1980-07-02

    This report has been prepared specifically for ultrasonic transducer users within the Nondestructive Testing Evaluation (NDE) community of the weapons complex. The purpose of the report is to establish an initial set of uniform procedures for measuring and recording transducer performance data, and to establish a common foundation on which more comprehensive transducer performance evaluations may be added as future transducer performance criteria expands. Transducer parameters and the problems with measuring them are discussed and procedures for measuring transducer performance are recommended with special precautionary notes regarding critical aspects of each measurement. An important consideration regarding the recommended procedures is the cost of implementation. There are two distinct needs for transducer performance characterization in the complex. Production oriented users need a quick, reliable means to check a transducer to ascertain its suitability for continued service. Development groups and the Transducer Center need a comprehensive characterization means to collect adequate data to evaluate theoretical concepts or to build exact replacement transducers. The instrumentation, equipment, and procedures recommended for monitoring production transducers are utilitarian and provide only that information needed to determine transducer condition.

  9. Effect of Static Pressure on Absolute Paleointesity Determinations with Implications for Meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volk, M.; Gilder, S. A.

    2015-12-01

    Meteorites store information about the magnetic fields present in the solar system. However, most meteorites have experienced pressure/shock, which will influence the magnetic properties of the remanence carrying minerals. Here, we quantify the effect that relatively low pressure has on paleointensity recording with relevance to meteorites that have no petrographic evidence for shock. Thellier-type experiments were carried out on 40 samples containing thermally stable titanomagnetite similar to that found in some achondrites. Pressure cycling was performed under hydrostatic and non-hydrostatic conditions. We also tested the effect of pressure cycling when the maximum compression axis was imposed parallel and perpendicular to the magnetization direction. The initial zero pressure experiment correctly reproduced the laboratory field imparted on the samples. Paleointensity values decrease 10%/GPa under hydrostatic conditions with no observable directional dependence between the direction of the magnetization with the maximum compression axis. Non-hydrostatic pressures have a significantly greater effect - paleointensity decreases 20%/GPa on average, with only a slight difference when pressure is imposed parallel to the magnetization direction, whereas the pressure demagnetization effect is more substantial. Interestingly, the data become more linear (higher quality factors) as pressure increases. We explain this phenomenon through a numerical model that shows the mean blocking temperatures become lower with increasing pressure. This reduces the difference between mean blocking and unblocking, which eliminates the sagging (curvature) seen in Arai plots.Considering that samples from meteorites classified as unshocked may have experienced pressures up to 5 GPa, paleointensity estimates derived from meteorites should be considered as minimum values.

  10. Elasticity of MgO to 11 GPa with an independent absolute pressure scale: Implications for pressure calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Li, B.; Woody, K; Kung, J

    2006-01-01

    P and S wave velocities and unit cell parameters (density) of MgO are measured simultaneously up to 11 GPa using combined ultrasonic interferometry and in situ X-ray diffraction techniques. The elastic bulk and shear moduli as well as their pressure derivatives are obtained by fitting the measured velocity and density data to the third-order finite strain equations, yielding K0S = 163.5(11) GPa, K'0S = 4.20(10), G0 = 129.8(6) GPa, and G'0 = 2.42(6), independent of pressure. These properties are subsequently used in a Birch-Murnaghan equation of state to determine the sample pressures at the observed strains. Comparison of the 300K isothermal compression of MgO indicates that current pressure scales from recent studies are in better than 1.5% agreement. We find that pressures derived from secondary pressure standards (NaCl, ruby fluorescence) at 300K are lower than those from current MgO scales by 5-8% ({approx}6% on average) in the entire pressure range of the current experiment. If this is taken into account, discrepancy in previous static compression studies on MgO at 300K can be reconciled, and a better agreement with the present study can be achieved.

  11. Pressure dependence of the absolute rate constant for the reaction OH + C2H2 from 228 to 413K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michael, J. V.; Nava, D. F.; Borokowski, R. P.; Payne, W. A.; Stief, L. J.

    1980-01-01

    The pressure dependence of absolute rate constants for the reaction of OH + C2H2 yields products has been examined at five temperatures ranging from 228 to 413 K. The experimental techniques which was used is flash photolysis-resonance fluoresence. OH was produced by water photolysis and hydroxyl resonance fluorescent photons were measured by multiscaling techniques. The results indicate that the low pressure bimolecular rate constant is 4 x 10 the the minus 13th power cu cm molecule (-1) s(-1) over the temperature range studied. A substantial increase in the bimolecular rate constant with an increase in pressure was observed at all temperatures except 228 K. This indicates the importance of initial adduct formation and subsequent stablization. The high pressure results are well represented by the Arrhenius expression (k sub bi) sub infinity = (6.83 + or - 1.19) x 10 to the minus 12th power exp(-646 + or - 47/T)cu cm molecule (-1) s(-1). The results are compared to previous investigated and are theoretically discussed. The implications of these results on modeling of terrestrial and planetary atmospheres and also in combustion chemistry are discussed.

  12. Measuring Time-Averaged Blood Pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothman, Neil S.

    1988-01-01

    Device measures time-averaged component of absolute blood pressure in artery. Includes compliant cuff around artery and external monitoring unit. Ceramic construction in monitoring unit suppresses ebb and flow of pressure-transmitting fluid in sensor chamber. Transducer measures only static component of blood pressure.

  13. Temperature and pressure dependence of the absolute rate constant for the reactions of NH2 radicals with acetylene and ethylene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bosco, S. R.; Nava, D. F.; Brobst, W. D.; Stief, L. J.

    1984-01-01

    The absolute rate constants for the reaction between the NH2 free radical and acetylene and ethylene is measured experimentally using a flash photolysis technique. The constant is considered to be a function of temperature and pressure. At each temperature level of the experiment, the observed pseudo-first-order rate constants were assumed to be independent of flash intensity. The results of the experiment indicate that the bimolecular rate constant for the NH2 + C2H2 reaction increases with pressure at 373 K and 459 K but not at lower temperatures. Results near the pressure limit conform to an Arrhenius expression of 1.11 (+ or -) 0.36 x 10 to the -13th over the temperature range from 241 to 459 K. For the reaction NH2 + C2H4, a smaller rate of increase in the bimolecular rate constant was observed over the temperature range 250-465 K. The implications of these results for current theoretical models of NH2 + C2H2 (or H4) reactions in the atmospheres of Jupiter and Saturn are discussed.

  14. Microinterferometer transducer

    DOEpatents

    Corey, III, Harry S.

    1979-01-01

    An air-bearing microinterferometer transducer is provided for increased accuracy, range and linearity over conventional displacement transducers. A microinterferometer system is housed within a small compartment of an air-bearing displacement transducer housing. A movable cube corner reflector of the interferometer is mounted to move with the displacement gauging probe of the transducer. The probe is disposed for axial displacement by means of an air-bearing. Light from a single frequency laser is directed into an interferometer system within the transducer housing by means of a self-focusing fiber optic cable to maintain light coherency. Separate fringe patterns are monitored by a pair of fiber optic cables which transmit the patterns to a detecting system. The detecting system includes a bidirectional counter which counts the light pattern fringes according to the direction of movement of the probe during a displacement gauging operation.

  15. A Technique to Measure Energy Partitioning and Absolute Gas Pressures of Strombolian Explosions Using Doppler Radar at Erebus Volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerst, A.; Hort, M.; Kyle, P. R.; Voege, M.

    2008-12-01

    In 2005/06 we deployed three 24GHz (K-Band) continuous wave Doppler radar instruments at the crater rim of Erebus volcano in Antarctica. At the time there was a ~40 m wide, ~1000°C hot convecting phonolite lava lake, which was the source of ~0-6 Strombolian gas bubble explosions per day. We measured the velocities of ~50 explosions using a sample rate of 1-15 Hz. Data were downloaded in real-time through a wireless network. The measurements provide new insights into the still largely unknown mechanism of Strombolian eruptions, and help improve existing eruption models. We present a technique for a quasi in-situ measurement of the absolute pressure inside an eruption gas bubble. Pressures were derived using a simple eruption model and measured high resolution bubble surface velocities during explosions. Additionally, this technique allows us to present a comprehensive energy budget of a volcanic explosion as a time series of all important energy terms (i.e. potential, kinetic, dissipative, infrasonic, surface, seismic and thermal energy output). The absolute gas pressure inside rising expanding gas bubbles rapidly drops from ~3-10 atm (at the time when the lake starts to bulge) to ~1 atm before the bubble bursts, which usually occurs at radii of ~15-20m. These pressures are significantly lower than previously assumed for such explosions. The according internal energy of the gas agrees well with the observed total energy output. The results show that large explosions released about 109 to 1010 J each (equivalent to about 200-2000 kg of TNT), at a peak discharge rate frequently exceeding 109 W (the power output of a typical nuclear power plant). This dynamic output is mainly controlled by the kinetic and potential energy of the exploding magma shell, while other energy types were found to be much smaller (with the exception of thermal energy). Remarkably, most explosions at Erebus show two distinct surface acceleration peaks separated by ~0.3 seconds. This suggests

  16. Easy Absolute Values? Absolutely

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Sharon E.; Mittag, Kathleen Cage

    2015-01-01

    The authors teach a problem-solving course for preservice middle-grades education majors that includes concepts dealing with absolute-value computations, equations, and inequalities. Many of these students like mathematics and plan to teach it, so they are adept at symbolic manipulations. Getting them to think differently about a concept that they…

  17. Crack orientation and depth estimation in a low-pressure turbine disc using a phased array ultrasonic transducer and an artificial neural network.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaoxia; Chen, Shili; Jin, Shijiu; Chang, Wenshuang

    2013-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracks (SCC) in low-pressure steam turbine discs are serious hidden dangers to production safety in the power plants, and knowing the orientation and depth of the initial cracks is essential for the evaluation of the crack growth rate, propagation direction and working life of the turbine disc. In this paper, a method based on phased array ultrasonic transducer and artificial neural network (ANN), is proposed to estimate both the depth and orientation of initial cracks in the turbine discs. Echo signals from cracks with different depths and orientations were collected by a phased array ultrasonic transducer, and the feature vectors were extracted by wavelet packet, fractal technology and peak amplitude methods. The radial basis function (RBF) neural network was investigated and used in this application. The final results demonstrated that the method presented was efficient in crack estimation tasks. PMID:24064602

  18. Crack Orientation and Depth Estimation in a Low-Pressure Turbine Disc Using a Phased Array Ultrasonic Transducer and an Artificial Neural Network

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiaoxia; Chen, Shili; Jin, Shijiu; Chang, Wenshuang

    2013-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracks (SCC) in low-pressure steam turbine discs are serious hidden dangers to production safety in the power plants, and knowing the orientation and depth of the initial cracks is essential for the evaluation of the crack growth rate, propagation direction and working life of the turbine disc. In this paper, a method based on phased array ultrasonic transducer and artificial neural network (ANN), is proposed to estimate both the depth and orientation of initial cracks in the turbine discs. Echo signals from cracks with different depths and orientations were collected by a phased array ultrasonic transducer, and the feature vectors were extracted by wavelet packet, fractal technology and peak amplitude methods. The radial basis function (RBF) neural network was investigated and used in this application. The final results demonstrated that the method presented was efficient in crack estimation tasks. PMID:24064602

  19. The 2ν{sub 3} Raman overtone of sulfur hexafluoride: Absolute spectra, pressure effects, and polarizability properties

    SciTech Connect

    Chrysos, M. Rachet, F.; Kremer, D.

    2014-03-28

    Of the six normal vibrations of SF{sub 6}, ν{sub 3} has a key role in the mechanisms of radiative forcing. This vibration, though inactive in Raman, shows up through the transition 2ν{sub 3} allowing for a complementary view on the asymmetric stretch of the molecule. Here, we look back into this topic, which has already caught some interest in the past but with some points been left out. We make a systematic incoherent-light-scattering analysis of the overtone with the use of different gas pressures and polarization orientations for the incident beam. Absolute-scale isotropic and anisotropic spectra are reported along with natural and pressure-induced widths and shifts, and other spectral features such as the peaks corresponding to the (experimentally indistinguishable) interfering channels E{sub g} and F{sub 2g} hitherto seen solely as two-photon IR-absorption features. We make the first-ever prediction of the SF{sub 6} polarizability second derivative with respect to the ν{sub 3}-mode coordinate and we develop a heuristic argument to explain why the superposition of the three degenerate stretching motions that are related to the ν{sub 3} mode cannot but generate a polarized Raman band.

  20. Multiplexing Transducers Based on Tunnel-Diode Oscillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chui, Talso; Penanen, Konstantin; Young, Joseph

    2006-01-01

    Multiplexing and differential transducers based on tunnel-diode oscillators (TDOs) would be developed, according to a proposal, for operation at very low and/or widely varying temperatures in applications that involve requirements to minimize the power and mass of transducer electronic circuitry. It has been known since 1975 that TDOs are useful for making high-resolution (of the order of 10(exp -9)) measurements at low temperatures. Since that time, TDO transducers have been found to offer the following additional advantages, which the present proposal is intended to exploit: TDO transducers can operate at temperatures ranging from 1 K to about 400 K. Most electronic components other than tunnel diodes do not operate over such a wide temperature range. TDO transducers can be made to operate at very low power - typically, <1 mW. Inasmuch as the response of a TDO transducer is a small change in an arbitrarily set oscillation frequency, the outputs of many TDOs operating at sufficiently different set frequencies can be multiplexed through a single wire. Inasmuch as frequencies can be easily subtracted by means of mixing circuitry, one can easily use two TDOs to make differential measurements. Differential measurements are generally more precise and less susceptible to environmental variations than are absolute measurements. TDO transducers are tolerant to ionizing radiation. Ultimately, the response of a TDO transducer is measured by use of a frequency counter. Because frequency counting can be easily implemented by use of clock signals available from most microprocessors, it is not necessary to incorporate additional readout circuitry that would, if included, add to the mass and power consumption of the transducer circuitry. In one example of many potential variations on the basic theme of the proposal, the figure schematically depicts a conceptual differential-pressure transducer containing a symmetrical pair of TDOs. The differential pressure would be exerted on

  1. Acoustic transducer

    DOEpatents

    Drumheller, Douglas S.

    2000-01-01

    An active acoustic transducer tool for use down-hole applications. The tool includes a single cylindrical mandrel including a shoulder defining the boundary of a narrowed portion over which is placed a sandwich-style piezoelectric tranducer assembly. The piezoelectric transducer assembly is prestressed by being placed in a thermal interference fit between the shoulder of the mandrel and the base of an anvil which is likewise positioned over the narrower portion of the mandrel. In the preferred embodiment, assembly of the tool is accomplished using a hydraulic jack to stretch the mandrel prior to emplacement of the cylindrical sandwich-style piezoelectric transducer assembly and anvil. After those elements are positioned and secured, the stretched mandrel is allowed to return substantially to its original (pre-stretch) dimensions with the result that the piezoelectric transducer elements are compressed between the anvil and the shoulder of the mandrel.

  2. Absolute and relative emission spectroscopy study of 3 cm wide planar radio frequency atmospheric pressure bio-plasma source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Xiaolong; Nikiforov, Anton Yu; Ionita, Eusebiu-Rosini; Dinescu, Gheorghe; Leys, Christophe

    2015-08-01

    The dynamics of low power atmospheric pressure radio frequency discharge generated in Ar gas in long gap of 3 cm is investigated. This plasma source is characterized and analyzed for possible large scale biomedical applications where low gas temperature and potential-less effluent are required. The discharge forms a homogenous glow-like afterglow in ambient air at input power of 30 W with low gas temperature of 330 K, which is desirable in biomedical applications. With absolute calibrated spectroscopy of the discharge, electron density of 0.4 × 1018 m-3 and electron temperature of 1.5 eV are obtained from continuum Bremsstrahlung radiation of the source. Time and spatial resolved emission spectroscopy is used to analyze discharge generation mechanism and active species formation. It is found that discharge dynamics strongly correlates with the discharge current waveform. Strong Ar(2p) excited states emission is observed nearby the electrodes surface on a distance up to 200 μm in the plasma sheath region at 10 ns after the current peak, whereas OH(A) emission is uniform along of the interelectrode gap.

  3. Acoustic transducer

    DOEpatents

    Drumheller, D.S.

    1997-12-30

    An acoustic transducer is described comprising a one-piece hollow mandrel into the outer surface of which is formed a recess with sides perpendicular to the central axis of the mandrel and separated by a first distance and with a bottom parallel to the central axis and within which recess are a plurality of washer-shaped discs of a piezoelectric material and at least one disc of a temperature-compensating material with the discs being captured between the sides of the recess in a pre-stressed interference fit, typically at 2,000 psi of compressive stress. The transducer also includes a power supply and means to connect to a measurement device. The transducer is intended to be used for telemetry between a measurement device located downhole in an oil or gas well and the surface. The transducer is of an construction that is stronger with fewer joints that could leak fluids into the recess holding the piezoelectric elements than is found in previous acoustic transducers. 4 figs.

  4. Acoustic transducer

    DOEpatents

    Drumheller, Douglas S.

    1997-01-01

    An acoustic transducer comprising a one-piece hollow mandrel into the outer surface of which is formed a recess with sides perpendicular to the central axis of the mandrel and separated by a first distance and with a bottom parallel to the central axis and within which recess are a plurality of washer-shaped discs of a piezoelectric material and at least one disc of a temperature-compensating material with the discs being captured between the sides of the recess in a pre-stressed interference fit, typically at 2000 psi of compressive stress. The transducer also includes a power supply and means to connect to a measurement device. The transducer is intended to be used for telemetry between a measurement device located downhole in an oil or gas well and the surface. The transducer is of an construction that is stronger with fewer joints that could leak fluids into the recess holding the piezoelectric elements than is found in previous acoustic transducers.

  5. Ultrasonic transducer

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Steven C.; Kraft, Nancy C.

    2007-03-13

    An ultrasonic transducer having an effective center frequency of about 42 MHz; a bandwidth of greater than 85% at 6 dB; a spherical focus of at least 0.5 inches in water; an F4 lens; a resolution sufficient to be able to detect and separate a 0.005 inch flat-bottomed hole at 0.005 inches below surface; and a beam size of approximately 0.006–0.008 inches measured off a 11/2 mm ball in water at the transducer's focal point.

  6. Comparison of concurrent strain gage- and pressure transducer-measured flight loads on a lifting reentry vehicle and correlation with wind tunnel predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, M. H.; Sefic, W. J.; Sheldon, R. G.

    1978-01-01

    Concurrent strain gage and pressure transducer measured flight loads on a lifting reentry vehicle are compared and correlated with wind tunnel-predicted loads. Subsonic, transonic, and supersonic aerodynamic loads are presented for the left fin and control surfaces of the X-24B lifting reentry vehicle. Typical left fin pressure distributions are shown. The effects of variations in angle of attack, angle of sideslip, and Mach number on the left fin loads and rudder hinge moments are presented in coefficient form. Also presented are the effects of variations in angle of attack and Mach number on the upper flap, lower flap, and aileron hinge-moment coefficients. The effects of variations in lower flap hinge moments due to changes in lower flap deflection and Mach number are presented in terms of coefficient slopes.

  7. Variations of absolute gravity accompanying earthquake-induced changes in subsurface pore water pressure at the Mizunami Underground Research Institute construction site, central Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, T.; Salden, W.; Martin, A. J.; Saegusa, H.; Asai, Y.; Fujita, Y.; Aoki, H.

    2006-03-01

    The Tono Research Institute of Earthquake Science has been measuring gravity using an FG5 absolute gravimeter located at the Mizunami Geoscience Academy (MGA) in central Japan since January 2004. Measured gravity decreased immediately following the 2004 earthquake off the Kii peninsula (MJMA 7.4) by about 6 μGal. Here, we investigate the empirical relationship between pore water pressure change in a borehole near the MGA and gravity change measured at the MGA. We reveal that (1) gravity change correlates inversely with pore water pressure change at 81 m below the surface at a particular borehole and (2) several different sets of conversion coefficients from pressure head to gravity can be used to explain 60-70% of gravity variations with less than 2 μGal uncertainty. These newly identified relationships may suggest that an absolute gravimeter alone could be used to observe the change of groundwater quantity.

  8. Multi sensor transducer and weight factor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Immer, Christopher D. (Inventor); Lane, John (Inventor); Eckhoff, Anthony J. (Inventor); Perotti, Jose M. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A multi-sensor transducer and processing method allow insitu monitoring of the senor accuracy and transducer `health`. In one embodiment, the transducer has multiple sensors to provide corresponding output signals in response to a stimulus, such as pressure. A processor applies individual weight factors to reach of the output signals and provide a single transducer output that reduces the contribution from inaccurate sensors. The weight factors can be updated and stored. The processor can use the weight factors to provide a `health` of the transducer based upon the number of accurate versus in-accurate sensors in the transducer.

  9. Environmental control system transducer development study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brudnicki, M. J.

    1973-01-01

    A failure evaluation of the transducers used in the environmental control systems of the Apollo command service module, lunar module, and portable life support system is presented in matrix form for several generic categories of transducers to enable identification of chronic failure modes. Transducer vendors were contacted and asked to supply detailed information. The evaluation data generated for each category of transducer were compiled and published in failure design evaluation reports. The evaluation reports also present a review of the failure and design data for the transducers and suggest both design criteria to improve reliability of the transducers and, where necessary, design concepts for required redesign of the transducers. Remedial designs were implemented on a family of pressure transducers and on the oxygen flow transducer. The design concepts were subjected to analysis, breadboard fabrication, and verification testing.

  10. Nano-optomechanical transducer

    DOEpatents

    Rakich, Peter T; El-Kady, Ihab F; Olsson, Roy H; Su, Mehmet Fatih; Reinke, Charles; Camacho, Ryan; Wang, Zheng; Davids, Paul

    2013-12-03

    A nano-optomechanical transducer provides ultrabroadband coherent optomechanical transduction based on Mach-wave emission that uses enhanced photon-phonon coupling efficiencies by low impedance effective phononic medium, both electrostriction and radiation pressure to boost and tailor optomechanical forces, and highly dispersive electromagnetic modes that amplify both electrostriction and radiation pressure. The optomechanical transducer provides a large operating bandwidth and high efficiency while simultaneously having a small size and minimal power consumption, enabling a host of transformative phonon and signal processing capabilities. These capabilities include optomechanical transduction via pulsed phonon emission and up-conversion, broadband stimulated phonon emission and amplification, picosecond pulsed phonon lasers, broadband phononic modulators, and ultrahigh bandwidth true time delay and signal processing technologies.

  11. Investigation of 10-Stage Axial-Flow X24C-2 Compressor. 1; Performance at Inlet Pressure of 21 Inches Mercury Absolute and Inlet Temperature of 538 R

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schum, Harold J.; Buckner, Howard A., Jr.

    1947-01-01

    The performance at inlet pressure of 21 inches mercury absolute and inlet temperature of 538 R for the 10-stage axial-flow X24C-2 compressor from the X24C-2 turbojet engine was investigated. the peak adiabatic temperature-rise efficiency for a given speed generally occurred at values of pressure coefficient fairly close to 0.35.For this compressor, the efficiency data at various speeds could be correlated on two converging curves by the use of a polytropic loss factor derived.

  12. Fixture for holding testing transducer

    DOEpatents

    Wagner, T.A.; Engel, H.P.

    A fixture for mounting an ultrasonic transducer against the end of a threaded bolt or stud to test the same for flaws. A base means threadedly secured to the side of the bolt has a rotating ring thereon. A post rising up from the ring (parallel to the axis of the workpiece) pivotally mounts a variable length cross arm, on the inner end of which is mounted the transducer. A spring means acts between the cross arm and the base to apply the testing transducer against the workpiece at a constant pressure. The device maintains constant for successive tests the radial and circumferential positions of the testing transducer and its contact pressure against the end of the workpiece.

  13. Fixture for holding testing transducer

    DOEpatents

    Wagner, Thomas A.; Engel, Herbert P.

    1984-01-01

    A fixture for mounting an ultrasonic transducer against the end of a threaded bolt or stud to test the same for flaws. A base means threadedly secured to the side of the bolt has a rotating ring thereon. A post rising up from the ring (parallel to the axis of the workpiece) pivotally mounts a variable length cross arm, on the inner end of which is mounted the transducer. A spring means acts between the cross arm and the base to apply the testing transducer against the workpiece at a constant pressure. The device maintains constant for successive tests the radial and circumferential positions of the testing transducer and its contact pressure against the end of the workpiece.

  14. Multifunctional transducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldstein, C.; Lewis, G. W.; Culler, V. H.; Merrbaum, S. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    Several parameters of a small region of a muscle tissue or other object, can be simultaneously measured using with minimal traumatizing or damage of the object, a trifunctional transducer which can determine the force applied by a muscle fiber, the displacement of the fiber, and the change in thickness of the fiber. The transducer has three legs with inner ends joined together and outer ends formed to piece the tissue and remain within it. Two of the legs are relatively stiff, to measure force applied by the tissue, and a third leg is relatively flexible to measure displacement of the tissue relative to one or both stiff legs, and with the three legs lying in a common plane so that the force and displacement measurements all relate to the same direction of muscle movements. A flexible loop is attached to one of the stiff legs to measure changes in muscle thickness, with the upper end of the loop fixed to the leg and the lower end of the loop bearing against the surface of the tissue and being free to slide on the leg.

  15. Focal Length Controllable Ultrasonic Array Transducer with Adjustable Curvature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jungsoon; Kim, Moojoon; Ha, Kanglyel

    2012-07-01

    In the underwater imaging field, the control of the focal length of a transducer is very useful. As one of the control methods, we suggested an ultrasonic array transducer with adjustable curvature by using air pressure. The curvature of the transducer was investigated according to the air pressure level in the back space of the transducer. Concave-, planar-, and convex-type transducers were obtained with different air pressure levels. The acoustic fields of the transducer were measured for different shapes of the radiation surface.

  16. Student Award Finalist: Reactive species generated in atmospheric-pressure plasmas with water admixtures for biomedical applications: Absolute measurements and numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröter, Sandra; Bredin, J.; West, A.; Niemi, K.; Dedrick, J.; de Oliveira, N.; Joyeux, D.; Nahon, L.; Foucher, M.; Booth, J.-P.; Wagenaars, E.; Gans, T.; O'Connell, D.

    2015-09-01

    We investigate the production of atomic oxygen (O), hydroxyl (OH) and atomic hydrogen (H) in an rf atmospheric-pressure plasma operated in helium with water admixtures. These species, and their longer-lived products, are known to influence biological systems. Absolute measurements of species densities are required to develop these plasmas for therapeutics. Accurate determination of radical densities is challenging at elevated pressures in complex gas mixtures due to collisional quenching. We measure radical densities using VUV high-resolution Fourier-transform absorption spectroscopy with synchrotron radiation, UV broadband absorption spectroscopy, and picosecond two-photon absorption laser induced fluorescence (ps-TALIF). These diagnostics are the most suitable techniques allowing direct, absolute and 2-dimensional spatial resolution measurements at atmospheric pressure. Ps-TALIF also enables measurements of the lifetimes of laser-excited states of O and H, providing insight into the chemical kinetics and ambient air diffusion into the plasma jet region. Good agreement has been found between the measurements and a numerical chemical-kinetic simulation. Funding from the UK EPSRC (EP/K018388/1 & EP/H003797/1), the York-Paris Low Temperature Plasma Collaborative Research Centre and financial state aid managed by the laboratory of excellence Plas@Par (ANR-11-IDEX-0004-02).

  17. Final report on EURAMET.M.P-K4.2010: Key and supplementary comparison of national pressure standards in the range 1 Pa to 15 kPa of absolute and gauge pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krajíček, Zdeněk; Bergoglio, Mercede; Jousten, Karl; Otal, Pierre; Sabuga, Wladimir; Saxholm, Sari; Pražák, Dominik; Vičar, Martin

    2014-01-01

    This report describes a EURAMET comparison of five European National Metrology Institutes in low gauge and absolute pressure in gas (nitrogen), denoted as EURAMET.M.P-K4.2010. Its main intention is to state equivalence of the pressure standards, in particular those based on the technology of force-balanced piston gauges such as e.g. FRS by Furness Controls, UK and FPG8601 by DHI-Fluke, USA. It covers the range from 1 Pa to 15 kPa, both gauge and absolute. The comparison in absolute mode serves as a EURAMET Key Comparison which can be linked to CCM.P-K4 and CCM.P-K2 via PTB. The comparison in gauge mode is a supplementary comparison. The comparison was carried out from September 2008 till October 2012. The participating laboratories were the following: CMI, INRIM, LNE, MIKES, PTB-Berlin (absolute pressure 1 kPa and below) and PTB-Braunschweig (absolute pressure 1 kPa and above and gauge pressure). CMI was the pilot laboratory and provided a transfer standard for the comparison. This transfer standard was also the laboratory standard of CMI at the same time, which resulted in a unique and logistically difficult star comparison. Both in gauge and absolute pressures all the participating institutes successfully proved their equivalence with respect to the reference value and all also proved mutual bilateral equivalences in all the points. All the participating laboratories are also equivalent with the reference values of CCM.P-K4 and CCM.P-K2 in the relevant points. The comparison also proved the ability of FPG8601 to serve as a transfer standard. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCM, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  18. Robust spot-poled membrane hydrophones for measurement of large amplitude pressure waveforms generated by high intensity therapeutic ultrasonic transducers.

    PubMed

    Wilkens, Volker; Sonntag, Sven; Georg, Olga

    2016-03-01

    The output characterization of medical high intensity therapeutic ultrasonic devices poses several challenges for the hydrophones to be used for pressure measurements. For measurements at clinical levels in the focal region, extreme robustness, broad bandwidth, large dynamic range, and small receiving element size are all needed. Conventional spot-poled membrane hydrophones, in principle, meet some of these features and were used to detect large amplitude ultrasonic fields to investigate their applicability. Cavitation in water was the limiting effect causing damage to the electrodes and membrane. A new hydrophone design comprising a steel foil front protection layer has been developed, manufactured, characterized, tested, and optimized. The latest prototypes additionally incorporate a low absorption and acoustic impedance matched backing, and could be used for maximum peak rarefactional and peak compressional pressure measurements of 15 and 75 MPa, respectively, at 1.06 MHz driving frequency. Axial and lateral beam profiles were measured also for a higher driving frequency of 3.32 MHz to demonstrate the applicability for output beam characterization at the focal region at clinical levels. The experimental results were compared with results of numerical nonlinear sound field simulations and good agreement was found if detection bandwidth and spatial averaging were taken into account. PMID:27036269

  19. Absolute rate of the reaction of atomic hydrogen with ethylene from 198 to 320 K at high pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, J. H.; Michael, J. V.; Payne, W. A.; Stief, L. J.

    1978-01-01

    The rate constant for the H+C2H4 reaction has been measured as a function of temperature. Experiments were performed with high pressures of Ar heat bath gas at seven temperatures from 198 to 320 K with the flash photolysis-resonance fluorescence (FP-RF) technique. Pressures were chosen so as to isolate the addition rate constant k1. The results are well represented by an Arrhenius expression. The results are compared with other studies and are theoretically discussed.

  20. Absolute atomic oxygen and nitrogen densities in radio-frequency driven atmospheric pressure cold plasmas: Synchrotron vacuum ultra-violet high-resolution Fourier-transform absorption measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Niemi, K.; O'Connell, D.; Gans, T.; Oliveira, N. de; Joyeux, D.; Nahon, L.; Booth, J. P.

    2013-07-15

    Reactive atomic species play a key role in emerging cold atmospheric pressure plasma applications, in particular, in plasma medicine. Absolute densities of atomic oxygen and atomic nitrogen were measured in a radio-frequency driven non-equilibrium plasma operated at atmospheric pressure using vacuum ultra-violet (VUV) absorption spectroscopy. The experiment was conducted on the DESIRS synchrotron beamline using a unique VUV Fourier-transform spectrometer. Measurements were carried out in plasmas operated in helium with air-like N{sub 2}/O{sub 2} (4:1) admixtures. A maximum in the O-atom concentration of (9.1 {+-} 0.7) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 20} m{sup -3} was found at admixtures of 0.35 vol. %, while the N-atom concentration exhibits a maximum of (5.7 {+-} 0.4) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 19} m{sup -3} at 0.1 vol. %.

  1. Improved Micromachined Transducers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartley, Frank T.; Wise, James H.

    1994-01-01

    Sensor systems of proposed type incorporate micromachined silicon-based structures as electrostatic force and displacement actuators and micromachined quantum-mechanical-tunneling electrodes as one form of displacement transducers, along with electronic circuits providing multiple electrical stimuli to displacement electrodes for measurement, calibration, monitoring of sensor status, and adjustment. Concept applicable to accelerometers, seismometers, geophones, magnetometers, pressure gauges, and other sensors in which phenomena of interest measured in terms of forces on, and/or displacements of, structural components. Provides completely remote measurement, control, health monitoring, treatment, and like, using telemetry commands.

  2. Modulation of gastric motility by brain-gut peptides using a novel non-invasive miniaturized pressure transducer method in anesthetized rodents

    PubMed Central

    Gourcerol, Guillaume; Adelson, David; Million, Mulugeta; Wang, Lixin; Taché, Yvette

    2011-01-01

    Acute in vivo measurements are often the initial, most practicable approach used to investigate the effects of novel compounds or genetic manipulations on the regulation of gastric motility. Such acute methods typically involve either surgical implantation of devices or require intragastric perfusion of solutions, which can substantially alter gastric activity and may require extended periods of time to allow stabilization or recovery of the preparation. We validated a simple, non-invasive novel method to measure acutely gastric contractility, using a solid-state catheter pressure transducer inserted orally into the gastric corpus, in fasted, anesthetized rats or mice. The area under the curve of the phasic component (pAUC) of intragastric pressure (IGP) was obtained from continuous manometric recordings of basal activity and in responses to central or peripheral activation of cholinergic pathways, or to abdominal surgery. In rats, intravenous ghrelin or intracisternal injection of the thyrotropin-releasing hormone agonist, RX-77368, significantly increased pAUC while coeliotomy and caecal palpation induced a rapid onset inhibition of phasic activity lasting for the 1-h recording period. In mice, RX-77368 injected into the lateral brain ventricle induced high-amplitude contractions, and carbachol injected intraperitoneally increased pAUC significantly, while coeliotomy and caecal palpation inhibited baseline contractile activity. In wild-type mice, cold exposure (15-min) increased gastric phasic activity and tone, while there was no gastric response in corticotorpin releasing factor (CRF)-over-expressing mice, a model of chronic stress. Thus, the novel solid-state manometric approach provides a simple, reliable means for acute pharmacological studies of gastric motility effects in rodents. Using this method we established in mice that the gastric motility response to central vagal activation is impaired under chronic expression of CRF. PMID:21262308

  3. Transducer-Mounting Fixture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spiegel, Kirk W.

    1990-01-01

    Transducer-mounting fixture holds transducer securely against stud. Projects only slightly beyond stud after installation. Flanged transducer fits into fixture when hinged halves open. When halves reclosed, fixture tightened onto threaded stud until stud makes contact with transducer. Knurled area on fixture aids in tightening fixture on stud.

  4. Oxygen at 2 atmospheres absolute pressure does not increase the radiation sensitivity of normal brain in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Routh, A.; Kapp, J.P.; Smith, E.E.; Bebin, J.; Barnes, T.; Hickman, B.T.

    1984-07-01

    Cranial radiation was administered to CD Fisher rats at 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 atmospheres oxygen pressure. Life span following radiation was recorded. Surviving animals were killed at 28 weeks and the brains were examined independently by two neuropathologists. Survival time was significantly less in animals receiving higher doses of radiation but showed no relationship to the oxygen pressure in the environment of the animal at the time radiation was administered. Microscopic examination of the brain did not reveal any differences in animals radiated in a normobaric or hyperbaric oxygen environment. It is concluded that hyperbaric oxygen does not sensitize the normal brain to the effects of ionizing radiation.

  5. Ultrasonic Transducer Irradiation Test Results

    SciTech Connect

    Daw, Joshua; Palmer, Joe; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Keller, Paul; Montgomery, Robert; Chien, Hual-Te; Kohse, Gordon; Tittmann, Bernhard; Reinhardt, Brian; Rempe, Joy

    2015-02-01

    Ultrasonic technologies offer the potential for high-accuracy and -resolution in-pile measurement of a range of parameters, including geometry changes, temperature, crack initiation and growth, gas pressure and composition, and microstructural changes. Many Department of Energy-Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) programs are exploring the use of ultrasonic technologies to provide enhanced sensors for in-pile instrumentation during irradiation testing. For example, the ability of small diameter ultrasonic thermometers (UTs) to provide a temperature profile in candidate metallic and oxide fuel would provide much needed data for validating new fuel performance models. Other ongoing efforts include an ultrasonic technique to detect morphology changes (such as crack initiation and growth) and acoustic techniques to evaluate fission gas composition and pressure. These efforts are limited by the lack of identified ultrasonic transducer materials capable of long term performance under irradiation test conditions. For this reason, the Pennsylvania State University (PSU) was awarded an ATR NSUF project to evaluate the performance of promising magnetostrictive and piezoelectric transducers in the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Research Reactor (MITR) up to a fast fluence of at least 1021 n/cm2. The goal of this research is to characterize and demonstrate magnetostrictive and piezoelectric transducer operation during irradiation, enabling the development of novel radiation-tolerant ultrasonic sensors for use in Material Testing Reactors (MTRs). As such, this test is an instrumented lead test and real-time transducer performance data is collected along with temperature and neutron and gamma flux data. The current work bridges the gap between proven out-of-pile ultrasonic techniques and in-pile deployment of ultrasonic sensors by acquiring the data necessary to demonstrate the performance of ultrasonic transducers. To date, one piezoelectric

  6. Photoelastic transducer for high-temperature applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redner, A. S.; Adamovsky, Grigory; Wesson, L. N.

    1990-01-01

    A design for a birefringence transducer for high-temperature applications is described. The spring element and the readout instrumentation are addressed. A pressure transducer based on the concept has been built and successfully tested at temperatures up to 600 C.

  7. Submarine rescue decompression procedure from hyperbaric exposures up to 6 bar of absolute pressure in man: effects on bubble formation and pulmonary function.

    PubMed

    Blatteau, Jean-Eric; Hugon, Julien; Castagna, Olivier; Meckler, Cédric; Vallée, Nicolas; Jammes, Yves; Hugon, Michel; Risberg, Jan; Pény, Christophe

    2013-01-01

    Recent advances in submarine rescue systems have allowed a transfer under pressure of crew members being rescued from a disabled submarine. The choice of a safe decompression procedure for pressurised rescuees has been previously discussed, but no schedule has been validated when the internal submarine pressure is significantly increased i.e. exceeding 2.8 bar absolute pressure. This study tested a saturation decompression procedure from hyperbaric exposures up to 6 bar, the maximum operating pressure of the NATO submarine rescue system. The objective was to investigate the incidence of decompression sickness (DCS) and clinical and spirometric indices of pulmonary oxygen toxicity. Two groups were exposed to a Nitrogen-Oxygen atmosphere (pO2 = 0.5 bar) at either 5 bar (N = 14) or 6 bar (N = 12) for 12 h followed by 56 h 40 min resp. 60 h of decompression. When chamber pressure reached 2.5 bar, the subjects breathed oxygen intermittently, otherwise compressed air. Repeated clinical examinations, ultrasound monitoring of venous gas embolism and spirometry were performed during decompression. During exposures to 5 bar, 3 subjects had minor subjective symptoms i.e. sensation of joint discomfort, regressing spontaneously, and after surfacing 2 subjects also experienced joint discomfort disappearing without treatment. Only 3 subjects had detectable intravascular bubbles during decompression (low grades). No bubbles were detected after surfacing. About 40% of subjects felt chest tightness when inspiring deeply during the initial phase of decompression. Precordial burning sensations were reported during oxygen periods. During decompression, vital capacity decreased by about 8% and forced expiratory flow rates decreased significantly. After surfacing, changes in the peripheral airways were still noticed; Lung Diffusion for carbon monoxide was slightly reduced by 1% while vital capacity was normalized. The procedure did not result in serious symptoms of DCS or

  8. Submarine Rescue Decompression Procedure from Hyperbaric Exposures up to 6 Bar of Absolute Pressure in Man: Effects on Bubble Formation and Pulmonary Function

    PubMed Central

    Blatteau, Jean-Eric; Hugon, Julien; Castagna, Olivier; Meckler, Cédric; Vallée, Nicolas; Jammes, Yves; Hugon, Michel; Risberg, Jan; Pény, Christophe

    2013-01-01

    Recent advances in submarine rescue systems have allowed a transfer under pressure of crew members being rescued from a disabled submarine. The choice of a safe decompression procedure for pressurised rescuees has been previously discussed, but no schedule has been validated when the internal submarine pressure is significantly increased i.e. exceeding 2.8 bar absolute pressure. This study tested a saturation decompression procedure from hyperbaric exposures up to 6 bar, the maximum operating pressure of the NATO submarine rescue system. The objective was to investigate the incidence of decompression sickness (DCS) and clinical and spirometric indices of pulmonary oxygen toxicity. Two groups were exposed to a Nitrogen-Oxygen atmosphere (pO2 = 0.5 bar) at either 5 bar (N = 14) or 6 bar (N = 12) for 12 h followed by 56 h 40 min resp. 60 h of decompression. When chamber pressure reached 2.5 bar, the subjects breathed oxygen intermittently, otherwise compressed air. Repeated clinical examinations, ultrasound monitoring of venous gas embolism and spirometry were performed during decompression. During exposures to 5 bar, 3 subjects had minor subjective symptoms i.e. sensation of joint discomfort, regressing spontaneously, and after surfacing 2 subjects also experienced joint discomfort disappearing without treatment. Only 3 subjects had detectable intravascular bubbles during decompression (low grades). No bubbles were detected after surfacing. About 40% of subjects felt chest tightness when inspiring deeply during the initial phase of decompression. Precordial burning sensations were reported during oxygen periods. During decompression, vital capacity decreased by about 8% and forced expiratory flow rates decreased significantly. After surfacing, changes in the peripheral airways were still noticed; Lung Diffusion for carbon monoxide was slightly reduced by 1% while vital capacity was normalized. The procedure did not result in serious symptoms of DCS or

  9. Fault diagnosis for manifold absolute pressure sensor(MAP) of diesel engine based on Elman neural network observer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yingmin; Zhang, Fujun; Cui, Tao; Zhou, Jinlong

    2016-03-01

    Intake system of diesel engine is a strong nonlinear system, and it is difficult to establish accurate model of intake system; and bias fault and precision degradation fault of MAP of diesel engine can't be diagnosed easily using model-based methods. Thus, a fault diagnosis method based on Elman neural network observer is proposed. By comparing simulation results of intake pressure based on BP network and Elman neural network, lower sampling error magnitude is gained using Elman neural network, and the error is less volatile. Forecast accuracy is between 0.015-0.017 5 and sample error is controlled within 0-0.07. Considering the output stability and complexity of solving comprehensively, Elman neural network with a single hidden layer and with 44 nodes is presented as intake system observer. By comparing the relations of confidence intervals of the residual value between the measured and predicted values, error variance and failures in various fault types. Then four typical MAP faults of diesel engine can be diagnosed: complete failure fault, bias fault, precision degradation fault and drift fault. The simulation results show: intake pressure is observable and selection of diagnostic strategy parameter reasonably can increase the accuracy of diagnosis; the proposed fault diagnosis method only depends on data and structural parameters of observer, not depends on the nonlinear model of air intake system. A fault diagnosis method is proposed not depending system model to observe intake pressure, and bias fault and precision degradation fault of MAP of diesel engine can be diagnosed based on residuals.

  10. Absolute concentration of free volume-type defects in ultrafine-grained Fe prepared by high-pressure torsion

    PubMed Central

    Oberdorfer, Bernd; Lorenzoni, Bernd; Unger, Katrin; Sprengel, Wolfgang; Zehetbauer, Michael; Pippan, Reinhard; Würschum, Roland

    2010-01-01

    A maximum excess volume ΔV/V ≈ 1.9 × 10−3 in ultrafine-grained Fe prepared by high-pressure torsion is determined by measurements of the irreversible length change upon annealing employing a high-resolution differential dilatometer. Since dislocations and equilibrium-type grain boundaries cannot fully account for the observed released excess volume, the present study yields evidence for a high concentration of free volume-type defects inherent to nanophase materials, which is considered to be the main source of their particular properties, such as strongly enhanced diffusivities. PMID:21785571

  11. Advanced Geothermal Optical Transducer (AGOT)

    SciTech Connect

    2004-09-01

    Today's geothermal pressure-temperature measuring tools are short endurance, high value instruments, used sparingly because their loss is a major expense. In this project LEL offered to build and test a rugged, affordable, downhole sensor capable ofretuming an uninterrupted data stream at pressures and of 10,000 psi and temperatures up to 250 C, thus permitting continuous deep-well logging. It was proposed to meet the need by specializing LEL's patented 'Twin Column Transducer' technology to satisfy the demands of geothermal pressure/temperature measurements. TCT transducers have very few parts, none of which are moving parts, and all of which can be fabricated from high-temperature super alloys or from ceramics; the result is an extremely rugged device, essentially impervious to chemical attack and readily modified to operate at high pressure and temperature. To measure pressure and temperature they capitalize on the relative expansion of optical elements subjected to thermal or mechanical stresses; if one element is maintained at a reference pressure while the other is opened to ambient, the differential displacement then serves as a measure of pressure. A transducer responding to temperature rather than pressure is neatly created by 'inverting' the pressure-measuring design so that both deflecting structures see identical temperatures and temperature gradients, but whose thermal expansion coefficients are deliberately mismatched to give differential expansion. The starting point for development of a PT Tool was the company's model DPT feedback-stabilized 5,000 psi sensor (U.S. Patent 5,311,014, 'Optical Transducer for Measuring Downhole Pressure', claiming a pressure transducer capable of measuring static, dynamic, and true bi-directional differential pressure at high temperatures), shown in the upper portion of Figure 1. The DPT occupies a 1 x 2 x 4-inch volume, weighs 14 ounces, and is accurate to 1 percent of full scale. Employing a pair of identical, low

  12. Picosecond-TALIF and VUV absorption measurements of absolute atomic nitrogen densities from an RF atmospheric pressure plasma jet with He/O2/N2 gas mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, Andrew; Niemi, Kari; Schröter, Sandra; Bredin, Jerome; Gans, Timo; Wagenaars, Erik

    2015-09-01

    Reactive Oxygen and Nitrogen species (RONS) from RF atmospheric pressure plasma jets (APPJs) are important in biomedical applications as well as industrial plasma processing such as surface modification. Atomic oxygen has been well studied, whereas, despite its importance in the plasma chemistry, atomic nitrogen has been somewhat neglected due to its difficulty of measurement. We present absolute densities of atomic nitrogen in APPJs operating with He/O2/N2 gas mixtures in open air, using picosecond Two-photon Absorption Laser Induced Fluorescence (ps-TALIF) and vacuum ultra-violet (VUV) absorption spectroscopy. In order to apply the TALIF technique in complex, He/O2/N2 mixtures, we needed to directly measure the collisional quenching effects using picosecond pulse widths (32ps). Traditional calculated quenching corrections, used in nanosecond TALIF, are inadequate due to a lack of quenching data for complex mixtures. Absolute values for the densities were found by calibrating against a known density of Krypton. The VUV absorption experiments were conducted on the DESIRS synchrotron beamline using a unique VUV Fourier-transform spectrometer. Atomic nitrogen densities were on the order of 1020 m-3 with good agreement between TALIF and VUV absorption. UK EPSRC grant EP/K018388/1.

  13. Absolute integrated intensities of vapor-phase hydrogen peroxide (H202) in the mid-infrared at atmospheric pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Timothy J.; Sams, Robert L.; Burton, Sarah D.; Blake, Thomas A.

    2009-09-01

    We report quantitative broadband infrared spectra of vapor-phase hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) with all spectra pressure broadened to atmospheric pressure. The spectra were generated by flowing a concentrated solution (83 weight%) of H2O2 into a gently heated disseminator and diluting with a flow of pure nitrogen carrier gas. The water vapor lines were subtracted from the resulting spectra to yield the spectrum of pure H2O2. Comparison with previous results for the ν6 band strength (including hot bands) compares favorably with the results of Klee et al. [(1999) J. Mol. Spectr. 195, 154] as well as HITRAN. The present results are 433 and 467 cm-2 atm-1 (±8% and ±3% at 298 and 323 K, respectively) for the band strength, matching well the Klee value (S = 467 cm-2 atm-1 at 296 K) for the integrated band. Other bands in the 520-7500 cm-1 interval and their potential for atmospheric monitoring are discussed.

  14. Pressure dependence of the absolute rate constant for the reaction Cl + C2H2 from 210-361 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brunning, J.; Stief, L. J.

    1985-01-01

    In recent years, considerable attention has been given to the role of chlorine compounds in the catalytic destruction of stratospheric ozone. However, while some reactions have been studied extensively, the kinetic data for the reaction of Cl with C2H2 is sparse with only three known determinations of the rate constant k3. The reactions involved are Cl + C2H2 yields reversibly ClC2H2(asterisk) (3a) and ClC2H2(asterisk) + M yields ClC2H2 + M (3b). In the present study, flash photolysis coupled with chlorine atomic resonance fluorescence have been employed to determine the pressure and temperature dependence of k3 with the third body M = Ar. Room temperature values are also reported for M = N2. The pressure dependence observed in the experiments confirms the expectation that the reaction involves addition of Cl to the unsaturated C2H2 molecule followed by collisional stabilization of the resulting adduct radical.

  15. Absolute calibration of OH density in a nanosecond pulsed plasma filament in atmospheric pressure He-H2O: comparison of independent calibration methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verreycken, T.; van der Horst, R. M.; Sadeghi, N.; Bruggeman, P. J.

    2013-11-01

    The absolute density of OH radicals generated in a nanosecond pulsed filamentary discharge in atmospheric pressure He +0.84% H2O is measured independently by UV absorption and laser induced fluorescence (LIF) calibrated with Rayleigh scattering. For the calibration of LIF with Rayleigh scattering, two LIF models, with six levels and four levels, are studied to investigate the influence of the rotational and vibrational energy transfers. In addition, a chemical model is used to deduce the OH density in the afterglow from the relative LIF intensity as function of time. The different models show good correspondence and by comparing these different methods, the accuracy and the effect of assumptions on the obtained OH density are discussed in detail. This analysis includes an analysis of the sensitivity to parameters used in the LIF models.

  16. Bilateral key comparison CCM.P-K3.1 for absolute pressure measurements from 3 × 10-6 Pa to 9 × 10-4 Pa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedchak, J. A.; Bock, Th; Jousten, K.

    2014-01-01

    This report describes the bilateral key comparison CCM.P-K3.1 between the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) for absolute pressure in the range from 3 × 10-6 Pa to 9 × 10-4 Pa. This comparison was a follow-up to the comparison CCM.P-K3. Two ionization gauges and two spinning rotor gauges (SRGs) were used as the transfer standards for the comparison. The SRGs were used to compare the standards at a pressure of 9 × 10-4 Pa and to normalize the ionization gauge readings. The two ionization gauges were used to compare the standards in the pressure range of from 3 × 10-6 Pa to 3 × 10-4 Pa. Both laboratories used dynamic expansion chambers as standards in the comparison. The two labs showed excellent agreement with each other and with the CCM.P-K3 key comparison reference value (KCRV) over the entire range. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCM, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  17. Absolute Zero

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnelly, Russell J.; Sheibley, D.; Belloni, M.; Stamper-Kurn, D.; Vinen, W. F.

    2006-12-01

    Absolute Zero is a two hour PBS special attempting to bring to the general public some of the advances made in 400 years of thermodynamics. It is based on the book “Absolute Zero and the Conquest of Cold” by Tom Shachtman. Absolute Zero will call long-overdue attention to the remarkable strides that have been made in low-temperature physics, a field that has produced 27 Nobel Prizes. It will explore the ongoing interplay between science and technology through historical examples including refrigerators, ice machines, frozen foods, liquid oxygen and nitrogen as well as much colder fluids such as liquid hydrogen and liquid helium. A website has been established to promote the series: www.absolutezerocampaign.org. It contains information on the series, aimed primarily at students at the middle school level. There is a wealth of material here and we hope interested teachers will draw their student’s attention to this website and its substantial contents, which have been carefully vetted for accuracy.

  18. Pilot Study of the Effects of Simulated Turbine Passage Pressure on Juvenile Chinook Salmon Acclimated with Access to Air at Absolute Pressures Greater than Atmospheric

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, Thomas J.; Abernethy, Cary S.

    2005-04-28

    The impacts of pressure on juvenile salmon who pass through the turbines of hydroelectric dams while migrating downstream on the Columbia and Snake rivers has not been well understood, especially as these impacts relate to injury to the fish's swim bladder. The laboratory studies described here were conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the US Army Corps of Engineers Portland District at PNNL's fisheries research laboratories in 2004 to investigate the impacts of simulated turbine passage pressure on fish permitted to achieve neutral buoyancy at pressures corresponding to depths at which they are typically observed during downstream migration. Two sizes of juvenile Chinook salmon were tested, 80-100mm and 125-145mm total length. Test fish were acclimated for 22 to 24 hours in hyperbaric chambers at pressures simulating depths of 15, 30, or 60 ft, with access to a large air bubble. High rates of deflated swim bladders and mortality were observed. Our results while in conclusive show that juvenile salmon are capable of drawing additional air into their swimbladder to compensate for the excess mass of implanted telemetry devices. However they may pay a price in terms of increased susceptibility to injury, predation, and death for this additional air.

  19. Optical measuring displacement transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dich, L. Z.

    1994-09-01

    Trends in the development and production of photoelectric displacement transducers are analyzed. The technical characteristics of certain transducers are briefly presented. A table of comparisons is given, based on available information sources.

  20. Absolute Summ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Alfred, Jr.

    Summ means the entirety of the multiverse. It seems clear, from the inflation theories of A. Guth and others, that the creation of many universes is plausible. We argue that Absolute cosmological ideas, not unlike those of I. Newton, may be consistent with dynamic multiverse creations. As suggested in W. Heisenberg's uncertainty principle, and with the Anthropic Principle defended by S. Hawking, et al., human consciousness, buttressed by findings of neuroscience, may have to be considered in our models. Predictability, as A. Einstein realized with Invariants and General Relativity, may be required for new ideas to be part of physics. We present here a two postulate model geared to an Absolute Summ. The seedbed of this work is part of Akhnaton's philosophy (see S. Freud, Moses and Monotheism). Most important, however, is that the structure of human consciousness, manifest in Kenya's Rift Valley 200,000 years ago as Homo sapiens, who were the culmination of the six million year co-creation process of Hominins and Nature in Africa, allows us to do the physics that we do. .

  1. Irradiation Testing of Ultrasonic Transducers

    SciTech Connect

    Daw, Joshua; Tittmann, Bernhard; Reinhardt, Brian; Kohse, Gordon E.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Montgomery, Robert O.; Chien, Hual-Te; Villard, Jean-Francois; Palmer, Joe; Rempe, Joy

    2014-07-30

    Ultrasonic technologies offer the potential for high accuracy and resolution in-pile measurement of a range of parameters, including geometry changes, temperature, crack initiation and growth, gas pressure and composition, and microstructural changes. Many Department of Energy-Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) programs are exploring the use of ultrasonic technologies to provide enhanced sensors for in-pile instrumentation during irradiation testing. For example, the ability of single, small diameter ultrasonic thermometers (UTs) to provide a temperature profile in candidate metallic and oxide fuel would provide much needed data for validating new fuel performance models. Other efforts include an ultrasonic technique to detect morphology changes (such as crack initiation and growth) and acoustic techniques to evaluate fission gas composition and pressure. These efforts are limited by the lack of existing knowledge of ultrasonic transducer material survivability under irradiation conditions. For this reason, the Pennsylvania State University (PSU) was awarded an Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF) project to evaluate promising magnetostrictive and piezoelectric transducer performance in the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Research Reactor (MITR) up to a fast fluence of at least 1021 n/cm2 (E> 0.1 MeV). The goal of this research is to characterize magnetostrictive and piezoelectric transducer survivability during irradiation, enabling the development of novel radiation tolerant ultrasonic sensors for use in Material and Test Reactors (MTRs). As such, this test will be an instrumented lead test and real-time transducer performance data will be collected along with temperature and neutron and gamma flux data. The current work bridges the gap between proven out-of-pile ultrasonic techniques and in-pile deployment of ultrasonic sensors by acquiring the data necessary to demonstrate the performance of ultrasonic transducers.

  2. Irradiation Testing of Ultrasonic Transducers

    SciTech Connect

    Daw, Joshua; Tittmann, Bernhard; Reinhardt, Brian; Kohse, Gordon E.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Montgomery, Robert O.; Chien, Hual-Te; Villard, Jean-Francois; Palmer, Joe; Rempe, Joy

    2013-12-01

    Ultrasonic technologies offer the potential for high accuracy and resolution in-pile measurement of a range of parameters, including geometry changes, temperature, crack initiation and growth, gas pressure and composition, and microstructural changes. Many Department of Energy-Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) programs are exploring the use of ultrasonic technologies to provide enhanced sensors for in-pile instrumentation during irradiation testing. For example, the ability of single, small diameter ultrasonic thermometers (UTs) to provide a temperature profile in candidate metallic and oxide fuel would provide much needed data for validating new fuel performance models. Other efforts include an ultrasonic technique to detect morphology changes (such as crack initiation and growth) and acoustic techniques to evaluate fission gas composition and pressure. These efforts are limited by the lack of existing knowledge of ultrasonic transducer material survivability under irradiation conditions. For this reason, the Pennsylvania State University (PSU) was awarded an Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF) project to evaluate promising magnetostrictive and piezoelectric transducer performance in the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Research Reactor (MITR) up to a fast fluence of at least 1021 n/cm2 (E> 0.1 MeV). The goal of this research is to characterize magnetostrictive and piezoelectric transducer survivability during irradiation, enabling the development of novel radiation tolerant ultrasonic sensors for use in Material and Test Reactors (MTRs). As such, this test will be an instrumented lead test and real-time transducer performance data will be collected along with temperature and neutron and gamma flux data. The current work bridges the gap between proven out-of-pile ultrasonic techniques and in-pile deployment of ultrasonic sensors by acquiring the data necessary to demonstrate the performance of ultrasonic transducers.

  3. Absolute and relative emission spectroscopy study of 3 cm wide planar radio frequency atmospheric pressure bio-plasma source

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Xiaolong; Nikiforov, Anton Yu Leys, Christophe; Ionita, Eusebiu-Rosini; Dinescu, Gheorghe

    2015-08-03

    The dynamics of low power atmospheric pressure radio frequency discharge generated in Ar gas in long gap of 3 cm is investigated. This plasma source is characterized and analyzed for possible large scale biomedical applications where low gas temperature and potential-less effluent are required. The discharge forms a homogenous glow-like afterglow in ambient air at input power of 30 W with low gas temperature of 330 K, which is desirable in biomedical applications. With absolute calibrated spectroscopy of the discharge, electron density of 0.4 × 10{sup 18} m{sup −3} and electron temperature of 1.5 eV are obtained from continuum Bremsstrahlung radiation of the source. Time and spatial resolved emission spectroscopy is used to analyze discharge generation mechanism and active species formation. It is found that discharge dynamics strongly correlates with the discharge current waveform. Strong Ar(2p) excited states emission is observed nearby the electrodes surface on a distance up to 200 μm in the plasma sheath region at 10 ns after the current peak, whereas OH(A) emission is uniform along of the interelectrode gap.

  4. A full-dimensional model of ozone forming reaction: the absolute value of the recombination rate coefficient, its pressure and temperature dependencies.

    PubMed

    Teplukhin, Alexander; Babikov, Dmitri

    2016-07-28

    Rigorous calculations of scattering resonances in ozone are carried out for a broad range of rotational excitations. The accurate potential energy surface of Dawes is adopted, and a new efficient method for calculations of ro-vibrational energies, wave functions and resonance lifetimes is employed (which uses hyper-spherical coordinates, the sequential diagonalization/truncation approach, grid optimization and complex absorbing potential). A detailed analysis is carried out to characterize distributions of resonance energies and lifetimes, their rotational/vibrational content and their positions with respect to the centrifugal barrier. Emphasis is on the contribution of these resonances to the recombination process that forms ozone. It is found that major contributions come from localized resonances at energies near the top of the barrier. Delocalized resonances at higher energies should also be taken into account, while very narrow resonances at low energies (trapped far behind the centrifugal barrier) should be treated as bound states. The absolute value of the recombination rate coefficient, its pressure and temperature dependencies are obtained using the energy-transfer model developed in the earlier work. Good agreement with experimental data is obtained if one follows the suggestion of Troe, who argued that the energy transfer mechanism of recombination is responsible only for 55% of the recombination rate (with the remaining 45% coming from the competing chaperon mechanism). PMID:27364351

  5. Absolute atomic oxygen density measurements for nanosecond-pulsed atmospheric-pressure plasma jets using two-photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, C.; Carter, C.

    2014-12-01

    Nanosecond-pulsed plasma jets that are generated under ambient air conditions and free from confinement of electrodes have become of great interest in recent years due to their promising applications in medicine and dentistry. Reactive oxygen species that are generated by nanosecond-pulsed, room-temperature non-equilibrium He-O2 plasma jets among others are believed to play an important role during the bactericidal or sterilization processes. We report here absolute measurements of atomic oxygen density in a 1 mm-diameter He/(1%)O2 plasma jet at atmospheric pressure using two-photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy. Oxygen number density on the order of 1013 cm-3 was obtained in a 150 ns, 6 kV single-pulsed plasma jet for an axial distance up to 5 mm above the device nozzle. Temporally resolved O density measurements showed that there are two maxima, separated in time by 60-70 µs, and a total pulse duration of 260-300 µs. Electrostatic modeling indicated that there are high-electric-field regions near the nozzle exit that may be responsible for the observed temporal behavior of the O production. Both the field-distribution-based estimation of the time interval for the O number density profile and a pulse-energy-dependence study confirmed that electric-field-dependent, direct and indirect electron-induced processes play important roles for O production.

  6. Absolute OH density measurements in the effluent of a cold atmospheric-pressure Ar-H2O RF plasma jet in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verreycken, Tiny; Mensink, Rob; van der Horst, Ruud; Sadeghi, Nader; Bruggeman, Peter J.

    2013-10-01

    Absolute OH densities are obtained in a radio-frequency-driven Ar-H2O atmospheric-pressure plasma jet by laser-induced fluorescence (LIF), calibrated by Rayleigh scattering and by UV broadband absorption. The measurements are carried out in ambient air and the effect of air entrainment into the Ar jet is measured by analyzing the time-resolved fluorescence signals. The OH densities are obtained for different water vapor concentrations admixed to the Ar and as a function of the axial distance from the nozzle. A sensitivity analysis to deduce the accuracy of the model-calculated OH density from the LIF measurement is reported. It is found that the UV absorption and the LIF results correspond within experimental accuracy close to the nozzle and deviate in the far effluent. The possible reasons are discussed. The OH densities found in the plasma jet are in the range (0.1-2.5) × 1021 m-3 depending on the water concentration and plasma conditions.

  7. Model of a Piezoelectric Transducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodenow, Debra

    2004-01-01

    It's difficult to control liquid and gas in propellant tanks in zero gravity. A possible a design would utilize acoustic liquid manipulation (ALM) technology which uses ultrasonic beams conducted through a liquid and solid media, to push gas bubbles in the liquid to desirable locations. We can propel and control the bubble with acoustic radiation pressure by aiming the acoustic waves on the bubble s surface. This allows us to design a so called smart tank in which the ALM devices transfer the gas to the outer wall of the tank and isolating the liquid in the center. Because the heat transfer rate of a gas is lower of that of the liquid it would substantially decrease boil off and provide of for a longer storage life. The ALM beam is composed of little wavelets which are individual waves that constructively interfere with each other to produce a single, combined acoustic wave front. This is accomplished by using a set of synchronized ultrasound transducers arranged in an array. A slight phase offset of these elements allows us to focus and steer the beam. The device that we are using to produce the acoustic beam is called the piezoelectric transducer. This device converts electrical energy to mechanical energy, which appears in the form of acoustic energy. Therefore the behavior of the device is dependent on both the mechanical characteristics, such as its density, cross-sectional area, and its electrical characteristics, such as, electric flux permittivity and coupling factor. These devices can also be set up in a number of modes which are determined by the way the piezoelectric device is arranged, and the shape of the transducer. For this application we are using the longitudinal or thickness mode for our operation. The transducer also vibrates in the lateral mode, and one of the goals of my project is to decrease the amount of energy lost to the lateral mode. To model the behavior of the transducers I will be using Pspice, electric circuit modeling tool, to

  8. Opto-acoustic transducer for medical applications

    DOEpatents

    Benett, William; Celliers, Peter; Da Silva, Luiz; Glinsky, Michael; London, Richard; Maitland, Duncan; Matthews, Dennis; Krulevich, Peter; Lee, Abraham

    1999-01-01

    This invention is an optically activated transducer for generating acoustic vibrations in a biological medium. The transducer is located at the end of a fiber optic which may be located within a catheter. Energy for operating the transducer is provided optically by laser light transmitted through the fiber optic to the transducer. Pulsed laser light is absorbed in the working fluid of the transducer to generate a thermal pressure and consequent adiabatic expansion of the transducer head such that it does work against the ambient medium. The transducer returns to its original state by a process of thermal cooling. The motion of the transducer within the ambient medium couples acoustic energy into the medium. By pulsing the laser at a high repetition rate (which may vary from CW to 100 kHz) an ultrasonic radiation field can be established locally in the medium. This method of producing ultrasonic vibrations can be used in vivo for the treatment of stroke-related conditions in humans, particularly for dissolving thrombus. The catheter may also incorporate anti-thrombolytic drug treatments as an adjunct therapy and it may be operated in conjunction with ultrasonic detection equipment for imaging and feedback control.

  9. Opto-acoustic transducer for medical applications

    DOEpatents

    Benett, W.; Celliers, P.; Da Silva, L.; Glinsky, M.; London, R.; Maitland, D.; Matthews, D.; Krulevich, P.; Lee, A.

    1999-08-31

    This invention is an optically activated transducer for generating acoustic vibrations in a biological medium. The transducer is located at the end of a fiber optic which may be located within a catheter. Energy for operating the transducer is provided optically by laser light transmitted through the fiber optic to the transducer. Pulsed laser light is absorbed in the working fluid of the transducer to generate a thermal pressure and consequent adiabatic expansion of the transducer head such that it does work against the ambient medium. The transducer returns to its original state by a process of thermal cooling. The motion of the transducer within the ambient medium couples acoustic energy into the medium. By pulsing the laser at a high repetition rate (which may vary from CW to 100 kHz) an ultrasonic radiation field can be established locally in the medium. This method of producing ultrasonic vibrations can be used in vivo for the treatment of stroke-related conditions in humans, particularly for dissolving thrombus. The catheter may also incorporate anti-thrombolytic drug treatments as an adjunct therapy and it may be operated in conjunction with ultrasonic detection equipment for imaging and feedback control. 7 figs.

  10. Opto-acoustic transducer for medical applications

    DOEpatents

    Benett, William; Celliers, Peter; Da Silva, Luiz; Glinsky, Michael; London, Richard; Maitland, Duncan; Matthews, Dennis; Krulevich, Peter; Lee, Abraham

    2002-01-01

    This invention is an optically activated transducer for generating acoustic vibrations in a biological medium. The transducer is located at the end of a fiber optic which may be located within a catheter. Energy for operating the transducer is provided optically by laser light transmitted through the fiber optic to the transducer. Pulsed laser light is absorbed in the working fluid of the transducer to generate a thermal pressure and consequent adiabatic expansion of the transducer head such that it does work against the ambient medium. The transducer returns to its original state by a process of thermal cooling. The motion of the transducer within the ambient medium couples acoustic energy into the medium. By pulsing the laser at a high repetition rate (which may vary from CW to 100 kHz) an ultrasonic radiation field can be established locally in the medium. This method of producing ultrasonic vibrations can be used in vivo for the treatment of stroke-related conditions in humans, particularly for dissolving thrombus. The catheter may also incorporate anti-thrombolytic drug treatments as an adjunct therapy and it may be operated in conjunction with ultrasonic detection equipment for imaging and feedback control.

  11. Phase insensitive acoustoelectric transducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyman, J. S.

    1978-01-01

    Conventional ultrasonic transducers transform acoustic waves into electrical signals preserving phase and amplitude information. When the acoustic wavelength is significantly smaller than the transducer diameter, severe phase modulation of the electrical signal can occur. This results in anomalous attenuation measurements, background noise in nondestructive evaluation, and in general complicates data interpretation. This article describes and evaluates a phase-insensitive transducer based on the acoustoelectric effect. Theory of operation of the acoustoelectric transducer (AET) is discussed, and some optimization procedures outlined for its use. Directivity data for the AET are contrasted with a conventional piezoelectric transducer. In addition, transmission scanning data of phantom flaws in metal plates are presented for both transducers and demonstrate a significant improvement in resolution with the AET.

  12. Ultrasensitive ultrasonic transducer studies

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, R.; Darling, T.; Migliori, A.

    1996-09-01

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This project sought to continue development of the ultrasensitive ultrasonic transducers that won a 1994 R&D 100 Award. These transducers have a very smooth response across a broad frequency range and thus are extremely well- suited for resonant ultrasound spectroscopy as well as pulsed-echo and acoustic-emission applications. Current work on these transducers has indicated that bonding the piezoelectric and wear surface to a metal foil and attaching the foil to a body is less expensive and produces a transducer that is as good or better than commercially produced transducers. We have diffusion- bonded piezoelectric crystals and backings to stainless-steel-foil and wear surfaces. These are then attached onto stainless-steel tubes with electrical connectors to form the transducers. The transducers have been characterized using a reciprocity technique, electrical response, and optical interferometry. After characterization, the transducers have been compared to existing transducers by measuring and testing identical properties.

  13. OH kinetic in high-pressure plasmas of atmospheric gases containing C2H6 studied by absolute measurement of the radical density in a pulsed homogeneous discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magne, L.; Pasquiers, S.; Gadonna, K.; Jeanney, P.; Blin-Simiand, N.; Jorand, F.; Postel, C.

    2009-08-01

    The absolute value of the hydroxyl radical was measured in the afterglow of an homogeneous photo-triggered discharge generated in N2/O2/H2O/C2H6 mixtures, using a UV absorption diagnostic synchronized with the discharge current pulse. Measurements show that OH is efficiently produced even in the absence of water vapour in the mixture, and that the radical production is closely linked to the degradation kinetic of the hydrocarbon. Experimental results for dry mixtures, both for OH and for the removal of ethane in the discharge volume, are compared with predictions of a self-consistent 0D discharge and the kinetic model. It appears that the oxidation reaction of the ethane molecule by O(3P) atoms plays a minor role. Dissociation of the hydrocarbon through quenching collisions of the nitrogen metastable states are of great importance for a low oxygen concentration value. Also, the oxidation of ethane by O(1D) cannot be neglected at high oxygen concentration. The most probable exit channel for N2 states quenching collisions by ethane is the production of ethene and hydrogen molecules. Afterwards C2H4 should be dissociated to produce H and H2. As previously suggested from the study of the OH density time evolution in relative value, the recombination of H and O atoms appears as a main process for the production of OH in transient low temperature plasmas generated in atmospheric gases at high pressure. Another important reaction is the reduction of the HO2 radical by O, this radical coming from the addition of H on the oxygen molecule. H atoms come from numerous kinetic processes, amongst which is the dissociation of ethene.

  14. Using FOCUS to determine the radiation impedance for square transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jennings, Matthew R.; McGough, Robert J.

    2012-10-01

    The power radiated by an ultrasound transducer is calculated with the radiation resistance, which is the real part of the radiation impedance. For circular transducers, an analytical solution for the radiation impedance is known, but an analytical expression for the radiation impedance is not available for rectangular or square transducers. To determine the radiation resistance in FOCUS, the pressure on the surface of a square transducer is computed with the fast nearfield method, and then the force on the transducer face is computed by integrating the pressure. Results using this approach are numerically evaluated for a range of ka values from 0.1 to 16. The pressure on the transducer face is also computed with the Rayleigh-Sommerfeld integral, and the results are compared. The numerical value of the radiation resistance computed with FOCUS and with the Rayleigh-Sommerfeld integral converge to the same value, although FOCUS calculates the same result in about one-quarter of the time.

  15. Experiments with Ultrasonic Transducers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenslade, Thomas R., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    Discusses the use of 40 kHz ultrasonic transducers to study wave phenomena. Determines that the resulting wavelength of 9 mm allows acoustic experiments to be performed on a tabletop. Includes transducer characteristics and activities on speed of sound, reflection, double- and single-slit diffraction, standing waves, acoustical zone plate, and…

  16. Crossflow force transducer. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Mulcahy, T M

    1982-05-01

    A force transducer for measuring lift and drag coefficients for a circular cylinder in turbulent water flow is presented. In addition to describing the actual design and construction of the strain-gauged force- ring based transducer, requirements for obtained valid fluid force test data are discussed, and pertinent flow test experience is related.

  17. Fundamentals of heat measurement. [heat flux transducers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerashchenko, O. A.

    1979-01-01

    Various methods and devices for obtaining experimental data on heat flux density over wide ranges of temperature and pressure are examined. Laboratory tests and device fabrication details are supplemented by theoretical analyses of heat-conduction and thermoelectric effects, providing design guidelines and information relevant to further research and development. A theory defining the measure of correspondence between transducer signal and the measured heat flux is established for individual (isolated) heat flux transducers subject to space and time-dependent loading. An analysis of the properties of stacked (series-connected) transducers of various types (sandwich-type, plane, and spiral) is used to derive a similarity theory providing general governing relationships. The transducers examined are used in 36 types of derivative devices involving direct heat loss measurements, heat conduction studies, radiation pyrometry, calorimetry in medicine and industry and nuclear reactor dosimetry.

  18. Environmental control system transducer development study. [for space shuttles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brudnicki, M. J.

    1974-01-01

    A development test program of transducers for aerospace projects is described. Stability and performance of existing transducers, and improvements compatible with shuttle ECS requirements are investigated. These requirements incorporate design and development features into the transducers, and include the following: (1) improvement of overall transducer ruggedness and reliability; (2) common transducers for all ECS fluids that will be unaffected by long quiescent periods in the space environment, that will require no maintenance or refurbishing for at least 100 launches; and (3) appropriate self-check features that simplify checkout and maintenance. Models of three different transducers, a three-way valve for pressure transducers from closed liquid loops, surface-type platinum-wire resistance temperature sensors, and a nuclenics gaging system are evaluated. Tests and development improvements are described.

  19. Spark ultrasonic transducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoop, J. M.

    1972-01-01

    Nondestructive testing by spark transducer induces ultrasonic pulses in materials without physical contact. High power pulse generator connected to step up transformer produces sparking between two tungsten rods and ultrasonic energy pulses in test samples placed between rods.

  20. Improved myocardium transducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Culler, V. H.; Feldstein, C.; Lewis, G. W.

    1979-01-01

    Method of implanting myocardium transducer uses special indented pins that are caught and securely held by epicardial fibers. Pins are small enough to cause minimum of trauma to myocardium during implantation or removal.

  1. Absolute number density calibration of the absorption by ground-state lead atoms of the 283. 3-nm resonance line from a high-intensity lead hollow cathode lamp and the calculated effect of argon pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Simons, J.W.; McClean, R.E. ); Oldenborg, R.C. )

    1991-03-21

    The absolute number density calibration for the absorption by ground-state lead atoms of the 283.3-nm resonance line from a high-intensity lead hollow cathode lamp (Photron superlamp) is determined and found to be the same as that of a standard hollow cathode lamp. Comparisons of the calibrations to theoretical calculations are found to be quite satisfactory. The effects of argon pressures in the absorption cell on the calibration are examined theoretically by using a simple Lorentzian broadening and shifting model. These calculations show the expected reduction in sensitivity and increasing linearity of Beer-Lambert plots with increasing argon pressure.

  2. Seedlings Transduce the Depth and Mechanical Pressure of Covering Soil Using COP1 and Ethylene to Regulate EBF1/EBF2 for Soil Emergence.

    PubMed

    Shi, Hui; Liu, Renlu; Xue, Chang; Shen, Xing; Wei, Ning; Deng, Xing Wang; Zhong, Shangwei

    2016-01-25

    The survival of seed plants in natural environments requires the successful emergence from the soil. In this process, the ethylene signaling pathway is utilized by plants to sense and respond to the mechanical resistance of the soil. Here, we report that constitutive photomorphogenesis 1 (COP1), a central repressor of light signaling, is a key component required for seedlings to sense the depth of soil overlay. Mutation in COP1 causes severe defects in penetrating soil, due to decreased level of EIN3, a master transcription factor in ethylene pathway that mediates seedling emergence. We show that COP1 directly targets the F box proteins EBF1 and EBF2 for ubiquitination and degradation, thus stabilizing EIN3. As seedlings grow toward the surface, the depth of soil overlay decreases, resulting in a gradual increase of light fluences. COP1 channels the light signals, while ethylene transduces the information on soil mechanical conditions, which cooperatively control EIN3 protein levels to promote seedling emergence from the soil. The COP1-EBF1/2-EIN3 module reveals a mechanism by which plants sense the depth to surface and uncovers a novel regulatory paradigm of an ubiquitin E3 ligase cascade. PMID:26748855

  3. High energy, low frequency, ultrasonic transducer

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Albert E.

    2000-01-01

    A wide bandwidth, ultrasonic transducer to generate nondispersive, extensional, pulsed acoustic pressure waves into concrete reinforced rods and tendons. The wave propagation distance is limited to double the length of the rod. The transducer acoustic impedance is matched to the rod impedance for maximum transfer of acoustic energy. The efficiency of the transducer is approximately 60 percent, depending upon the type of active elements used in the transducer. The transducer input energy is, for example, approximately 1 mJ. Ultrasonic reflections will occur at points along the rod where there are changes of one percent of a wavelength in the rod diameter. A reduction in the rod diameter will reflect a phase reversed echo, as compared with the reflection from an incremental increase in diameter. Echo signal processing of the stored waveform permits a reconstruction of those echoes into an image of the rod. The ultrasonic transducer has use in the acoustic inspection of long (40+foot) architectural reinforcements and structural supporting members, such as in bridges and dams.

  4. Resonant capacitive MEMS acoustic emission transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozevin, D.; Greve, D. W.; Oppenheim, I. J.; Pessiki, S. P.

    2006-12-01

    We describe resonant capacitive MEMS transducers developed for use as acoustic emission (AE) detectors, fabricated in the commercial three-layer polysilicon surface micromachining process (MUMPs). The 1 cm square device contains six independent transducers in the frequency range between 100 and 500 kHz, and a seventh transducer at 1 MHz. Each transducer is a parallel plate capacitor with one plate free to vibrate, thereby causing a capacitance change which creates an output signal in the form of a current under a dc bias voltage. With the geometric proportions we employed, each transducer responds with two distinct resonant frequencies. In our design the etch hole spacing was chosen to limit squeeze film damping and thereby produce an underdamped vibration when operated at atmospheric pressure. Characterization experiments obtained by capacitance and admittance measurements are presented, and transducer responses to physically simulated AE source are discussed. Finally, we report our use of the device to detect acoustic emissions associated with crack initiation and growth in weld metal.

  5. Teaching Absolute Value Meaningfully

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wade, Angela

    2012-01-01

    What is the meaning of absolute value? And why do teachers teach students how to solve absolute value equations? Absolute value is a concept introduced in first-year algebra and then reinforced in later courses. Various authors have suggested instructional methods for teaching absolute value to high school students (Wei 2005; Stallings-Roberts…

  6. Electrical characterization of coupled and uncoupled MEMS ultrasonic transducers.

    PubMed

    Oppenheim, Irving J; Jain, Akash; Greve, David W

    2003-03-01

    We report electrical characterization of micromachined polysilicon capacitive diaphragms for use as ultrasonic transducers. Admittance measurements yield insight into the resonant behavior and also the damping resulting from ultrasonic radiation and frictional forces caused by the etch release holes. Unbonded transducers exhibit sharp resonances with Q values that increase with decreasing air pressure. We also report for the first time direct bonding of these transducers to solid surfaces. Transducers survive the bonding process and show distinctly different displacement in response to applied dc bias. Finally, a single-degree-of-freedom model is used to obtain insight into the various contributions to damping. PMID:12699163

  7. Microfiber interferometric acoustic transducers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiuxin; Jin, Long; Li, Jie; Ran, Yang; Guan, Bai-Ou

    2014-04-01

    Acoustic and ultrasonic transducers are key components in biomedical information technology, which has been applied in medical diagnosis, photoacoustic endoscopy and photoacoustic imaging. In this paper, an acoustic transducer based on Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI) fabricated in a microscaled optical fiber is demonstrated. The transducer is fabricated by forming two wavelength-matched Bragg gratings into the microfiber by means of side illumination with a 193nm excimer laser. When placing the transducer in water, the applied acoustic signal periodically changes the refractive index (RI) of the surrounding liquid and modulates the transmission of the FPI based on the evanescent-field interaction between the liquid and the transmitting light. As a result, the acoustic signal can be constructed with a tunable laser whose output wavelength is located at the slope of the inteferometric fringes. The transducer presents a sensitivity of 10 times higher than the counterparts fabricated in conventional singlemode fibers and has great potential to achieve higher resolution for photoacoustic imaging due to its reduced diameter. PMID:24718189

  8. Miniature biaxial strain transducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, I. S. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A reusable miniature strain transducer for use in the measurement of static or quasi-static, high level, biaxial strain on the surface of test specimens or structures was studied. Two cantilever arms, constructed by machining the material to appropriate flexibility, are self-aligning and constitute the transducing elements of the device. Used in conjunction with strain gages, the device enables testing beyond normal gage limits for high strains and number of load cycles. The device does not require conversion computations since the electrical output of the strain gages is directly proportional to the strain measured.

  9. Diode-quad bridge for reactive transducers and FM discriminators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, D. R.; Dimeff, J.

    1972-01-01

    Diode-quad bridge circuit was developed for use with pressure-sensitive capacitive transducers, liquid-level measuring devices, proximity deflection sensors, and inductive displacement sensors. It may also be used as FM discriminator and as universal impedance bridge.

  10. Eosinophil count - absolute

    MedlinePlus

    Eosinophils; Absolute eosinophil count ... the white blood cell count to give the absolute eosinophil count. ... than 500 cells per microliter (cells/mcL). Normal value ranges may vary slightly among different laboratories. Talk ...

  11. Broadband Ultrasonic Transducers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyser, R. C.

    1986-01-01

    New geometry spreads out resonance region of piezoelectric crystal. In new transducer, crystal surfaces made nonparallel. One surface planar; other, concave. Geometry designed to produce nearly uniform response over a predetermined band of frequencies and to attenuate strongly frequencies outside band. Greater bandwidth improves accuracy of sonar and ultrasonic imaging equipment.

  12. Ultrasonic Transducer Analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grounds, M. K.

    1982-01-01

    Ultrasonic transducer-beam-intensity distributions are determined by analyzing echoes from a spherical ball. Computers control equipment and process data. Important beam characteristics, such as location of best beam focus and beam diameter at focus, can be determined quickly from extensive set of plots generated by apparatus.

  13. Ultrasonic comb transducer for smart materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, J. L.

    1998-04-01

    Installation of a small multi-element comb type ultrasonic transducer is proposed as a component of a smart structure. It can be used in either an active or passive mode in carrying out ultrasonic bulk or guided wave nondestructive evaluation. Theoretical methods are developed and experimental results are presented for guided wave generation and mode control with this very efficient and versatile novel comb type ultrasonic transducer. Excitation and probe design is crucial in mode selection. The comb transducer generates waves that are influenced by such parameters as number of elements, spacing between elements, dimension, pulsing sequence, and pressure distribution. The excited elastic field depends on the excitation frequency, plate thickness, and elastic properties. Techniques are studied to optimize the applied loading and the comb transducer design parameters so that only modes that are most sensitive to particular material characteristics can be generated. Complete understanding of the comb transducer parameters and their impact on the elastic field allows us to efficiently generate higher order modes as well as low phase velocity modes which are valuable in composite material characterization. Sample experiments are presented for various plate and tube like structures.

  14. TRPC channels as signal transducers.

    PubMed

    Glazebrook, Patricia A; Schilling, William P; Kunze, Diana L

    2005-10-01

    The study of the TRPC cation channels as signal transducers in sensory neurons is in its infancy. Mechanoreceptors that monitor arterial pressure are prime candidates for the involvement of TRPC channels as either primary mechanical transducers or as modulators of the transduction process. Their activity patterns can be regulated by growth factors such as BDNF and by a variety of ligands that activate Gq-coupled receptors, mechanisms that have been shown in heterologous expression systems to activate TRPC channels. We investigated the distribution of TRPC1 and TRPC3-7 in nodose sensory neurons and in their peripheral axons that terminate as mechanosensitive receptors in the aortic arch of the rat. Using immunocytochemical techniques we identified these six TRPC proteins in the soma of the nodose neurons but only TRPC1 and TRPC3-5 were found to distribute to the peripheral axons and the mechanosensory terminals. TRPC1 and TRPC3 extended into the low threshold complex sensory endings with very strong labeling. In contrast, TRPC4 and TRPC5 were found primarily in major branches of the receptor but immunoreactivity was weak in the region where mechanotransduction is presumed to occur. Terminals arising from unmyelinated fibers also expressed TRPC1 and TRPC3-5 but not all fibers expressed all of the channels suggesting that specific TRPC protein may be aligned with previously described subclasses of the unmyelinated C-fibers. PMID:15971079

  15. Histotripsy Lesion Formation using an Ultrasound Imaging Probe Enabled by a Low-Frequency Pump Transducer

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Kuang-Wei; Hall, Timothy L.; Xu, Zhen; Cain, Charles A.

    2015-01-01

    When applying histotripsy pulses shorter than 2 cycles, the formation of a dense bubble cloud only relies on the applied peak negative pressure (p-) exceeding the “intrinsic threshold” of the medium (absolute value of 26 – 30 MPa in most soft tissue). A previous study conducted by our research group showed that a sub-threshold high-frequency probe pulse (3 MHz) can be enabled by a sub-threshold low-frequency pump pulse (500 kHz) where the sum exceeds the intrinsic threshold, thus generating lesion-producing dense bubble clouds (“dual-beam histotripsy”). This paper investigates the feasibility of using an imaging transducer to provide the high-frequency probe pulse in the dual-beam histotripsy approach. More specifically, an ATL L7–4 imaging transducer, pulsed by a Verasonics V-1 Data Acquisition System, was used to generate the high-frequency probe pulses. The low-frequency pump pulses were generated by a 20-element 345 kHz array transducer, driven by a custom high voltage pulser. These dual-beam histotripsy pulses were applied to red-blood-cell (RBC) tissue-mimicking phantoms at a pulse repetition frequency of 1 Hz, and optical imaging was used to visualize bubble clouds and lesions generated in the RBC phantoms. The results showed that dense bubble clouds (and resulting lesions) were generated when the p- of the sub-threshold pump and probe pulses combined constructively to exceed the intrinsic threshold. The average size of the smallest reproducible lesions using the imaging probe pulse enabled by the sub-threshold pump pulse was 0.7 × 1.7 mm while that using the supra-threshold pump pulse alone was 1.4 × 3.7 mm. When the imaging transducer was steered laterally, bubble clouds and lesions were steered correspondingly until the combined p- no longer exceeded the intrinsic threshold. These results were also validated with ex vivo porcine liver experiments. Using an imaging transducer for dual-beam histotripsy can have two advantages, 1) lesion

  16. Histotripsy Lesion Formation Using an Ultrasound Imaging Probe Enabled by a Low-Frequency Pump Transducer.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kuang-Wei; Hall, Timothy L; Xu, Zhen; Cain, Charles A

    2015-08-01

    When histotripsy pulses shorter than 2 cycles are applied, the formation of a dense bubble cloud relies only on the applied peak negative pressure (p-) exceeding the "intrinsic threshold" of the medium (absolute value of 26-30 MPa in most soft tissues). It has been found that a sub-threshold high-frequency probe pulse (3 MHz) can be enabled by a sub-threshold low-frequency pump pulse (500 kHz) where the sum exceeds the intrinsic threshold, thus generating lesion-producing dense bubble clouds ("dual-beam histotripsy"). Here, the feasibility of using an imaging transducer to provide the high-frequency probe pulse in the dual-beam histotripsy approach is investigated. More specifically, an ATL L7-4 imaging transducer (Philips Healthcare, Andover, MA, USA), pulsed by a V-1 Data Acquisition System (Verasonics, Redmond, WA, USA), was used to generate the high-frequency probe pulses. The low-frequency pump pulses were generated by a 20-element 345-kHz array transducer, driven by a custom high-voltage pulser. These dual-beam histotripsy pulses were applied to red blood cell tissue-mimicking phantoms at a pulse repetition frequency of 1 Hz, and optical imaging was used to visualize bubble clouds and lesions generated in the red blood cell phantoms. The results indicated that dense bubble clouds (and resulting lesions) were generated when the p- of the sub-threshold pump and probe pulses combined constructively to exceed the intrinsic threshold. The average size of the smallest reproducible lesions using the imaging probe pulse enabled by the sub-threshold pump pulse was 0.7 × 1.7 mm, whereas that using the supra-threshold pump pulse alone was 1.4 × 3.7 mm. When the imaging transducer was steered laterally, bubble clouds and lesions were steered correspondingly until the combined p- no longer exceeded the intrinsic threshold. These results were also validated with ex vivo porcine liver experiments. Using an imaging transducer for dual-beam histotripsy can have two

  17. Glass-windowed ultrasound transducers.

    PubMed

    Yddal, Tostein; Gilja, Odd Helge; Cochran, Sandy; Postema, Michiel; Kotopoulis, Spiros

    2016-05-01

    In research and industrial processes, it is increasingly common practice to combine multiple measurement modalities. Nevertheless, experimental tools that allow the co-linear combination of optical and ultrasonic transmission have rarely been reported. The aim of this study was to develop and characterise a water-matched ultrasound transducer architecture using standard components, with a central optical window larger than 10 mm in diameter allowing for optical transmission. The window can be used to place illumination or imaging apparatus such as light guides, miniature cameras, or microscope objectives, simplifying experimental setups. Four design variations of a basic architecture were fabricated and characterised with the objective to assess whether the variations influence the acoustic output. The basic architecture consisted of a piezoelectric ring and a glass disc, with an aluminium casing. The designs differed in piezoelectric element dimensions: inner diameter, ID=10 mm, outer diameter, OD=25 mm, thickness, TH=4 mm or ID=20 mm, OD=40 mm, TH=5 mm; glass disc dimensions OD=20-50 mm, TH=2-4 mm; and details of assembly. The transducers' frequency responses were characterised using electrical impedance spectroscopy and pulse-echo measurements, the acoustic propagation pattern using acoustic pressure field scans, the acoustic power output using radiation force balance measurements, and the acoustic pressure using a needle hydrophone. Depending on the design and piezoelectric element dimensions, the resonance frequency was in the range 350-630 kHz, the -6 dB bandwidth was in the range 87-97%, acoustic output power exceeded 1 W, and acoustic pressure exceeded 1 MPa peak-to-peak. 3D stress simulations were performed to predict the isostatic pressure required to induce material failure and 4D acoustic simulations. The pressure simulations indicated that specific design variations could sustain isostatic pressures up to 4.8 MPa.The acoustic simulations were able to

  18. Future needs for biomedical transducers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wooten, F. T.

    1971-01-01

    In summary there are three major classes of transducer improvements required: improvements in existing transducers, needs for unexploited physical science phenomena in transducer design, and needs for unutilized physiological phenomena in transducer design. During the next decade, increasing emphasis will be placed on noninvasive measurement in all of these areas. Patient safety, patient comfort, and the need for efficient utilization of the time of both patient and physician requires that noninvasive methods of monitoring be developed.

  19. In-flight measurement of static pressures and boundary layer state with integrated sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greff, E.

    The reliable, integrated sensors for control-system feedback required by advanced transport aircraft wing designs incorporating adaptive geometry features for load control and performance optimization are presently evaluated. Absolute pressure transducers from various manufacturers were tested and adapted to the flight test environment; both laboratory and flight test results indicate steady measurement capabilities. It is shown that the sensing of pressure fluctuations in the wing-buffet regime will improve the prediction of operational limits. The pressure transducers were also used to investigate the laminar/turbulent transition in the attachment-line flow of a swept wing. A comparison of these results with those of hot film probes shows the transducers' effectiveness.

  20. Three dimensional transducer

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, Oden Lee; Asif, Syed Amanulla Syed; Oh, Yunje; Feng, Yuxin; Cyrankowski, Edward; Major, Ryan

    2014-09-30

    A testing instrument for mechanical testing at nano or micron scale includes a transducer body, and a coupling shaft coupled with a probe tip. A transducer body houses a capacitor. The capacitor includes first and second counter electrodes and a center electrode assembly interposed therebetween. The center electrode assembly is movable with the coupling shaft relative to the first and second counter electrodes, for instance in one or more of dimensions including laterally and normally. The center electrode assembly includes a center plate coupled with the coupling shaft and one or more springs extending from the center plate. Upper and lower plates are coupled with the center plate and cover the center plate and the one or more springs. A shaft support assembly includes one or more support elements coupled along the coupling shaft. The shaft support assembly provides lateral support to the coupling shaft.

  1. Stress wave focusing transducers

    SciTech Connect

    Visuri, S.R., LLNL

    1998-05-15

    Conversion of laser radiation to mechanical energy is the fundamental process behind many medical laser procedures, particularly those involving tissue destruction and removal. Stress waves can be generated with laser radiation in several ways: creation of a plasma and subsequent launch of a shock wave, thermoelastic expansion of the target tissue, vapor bubble collapse, and ablation recoil. Thermoelastic generation of stress waves generally requires short laser pulse durations and high energy density. Thermoelastic stress waves can be formed when the laser pulse duration is shorter than the acoustic transit time of the material: {tau}{sub c} = d/c{sub s} where d = absorption depth or spot diameter, whichever is smaller, and c{sub s} = sound speed in the material. The stress wave due to thermoelastic expansion travels at the sound speed (approximately 1500 m/s in tissue) and leaves the site of irradiation well before subsequent thermal events can be initiated. These stress waves, often evolving into shock waves, can be used to disrupt tissue. Shock waves are used in ophthalmology to perform intraocular microsurgery and photodisruptive procedures as well as in lithotripsy to fragment stones. We have explored a variety of transducers that can efficiently convert optical to mechanical energy. One such class of transducers allows a shock wave to be focused within a material such that the stress magnitude can be greatly increased compared to conventional geometries. Some transducer tips could be made to operate regardless of the absorption properties of the ambient media. The size and nature of the devices enable easy delivery, potentially minimally-invasive procedures, and precise tissue- targeting while limiting thermal loading. The transducer tips may have applications in lithotripsy, ophthalmology, drug delivery, and cardiology.

  2. Horizontal geophone transducer assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Hefer, F.W.

    1985-06-25

    The geophone transducer comprises in combination: a geophone capable of detecting horizontal seismic waves, and a rigid casing having a gimbal chamber. A gimbal is provided inside the chamber on which the geophone is mounted for limited free angular movement in one direction only. The gimbal includes in one preferred embodiment a viscous liquid in which the geophone is only partially submerged while it is supported by a U-shaped bracket which is mounted for rotation about a fixed axis.

  3. Polymer film composite transducer

    DOEpatents

    Owen, Thomas E.

    2005-09-20

    A composite piezoelectric transducer, whose piezoeletric element is a "ribbon wound" film of piezolectric material. As the film is excited, it expands and contracts, which results in expansion and contraction of the diameter of the entire ribbon winding. This is accompanied by expansion and contraction of the thickness of the ribbon winding, such that the sound radiating plate may be placed on the side of the winding.

  4. Fluid force transducer

    DOEpatents

    Jendrzejczyk, Joseph A.

    1982-01-01

    An electrical fluid force transducer for measuring the magnitude and direction of fluid forces caused by lateral fluid flow, includes a movable sleeve which is deflectable in response to the movement of fluid, and a rod fixed to the sleeve to translate forces applied to the sleeve to strain gauges attached to the rod, the strain gauges being connected in a bridge circuit arrangement enabling generation of a signal output indicative of the magnitude and direction of the force applied to the sleeve.

  5. Rapid prototyping fabrication of focused ultrasound transducers.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yohan; Maxwell, Adam D; Hall, Timothy L; Xu, Zhen; Lin, Kuang-Wei; Cain, Charles A

    2014-09-01

    Rapid prototyping (RP) fabrication techniques are currently widely used in diverse industrial and medical fields, providing substantial advantages in development time and costs in comparison to more traditional manufacturing processes. This paper presents a new method for the fabrication of high-intensity focused ultrasound transducers using RP technology. The construction of a large-aperture hemispherical transducer designed by computer software is described to demonstrate the process. The transducer was conceived as a modular design consisting of 32 individually focused 50.8-mm (2-in) PZT-8 element modules distributed in a 300-mm hemispherical scaffold with a geometric focus of 150 mm. The entire structure of the array, including the module housings and the hemispherical scaffold was fabricated through a stereolithography (SLA) system using a proprietary photopolymer. The PZT elements were bonded to the lenses through a quarter-wave tungsten-epoxy matching layer developed in-house specifically for this purpose. Modules constructed in this manner displayed a high degree of electroacoustic consistency, with an electrical impedance mean and standard deviation of 109 ± 10.2 Ω for the 32 elements. Time-of-flight measurements for individually pulsed modules mounted on the hemispherical scaffold showed that all pulses arrived at the focus within a 350 ns range, indicating a good degree of element alignment. Pressure profile measurements of the fully assembled transducer also showed close agreement with simulated results. The measured focal beam FWHM dimensions were 1.9 × 4.0 mm (1.9 × 3.9 mm simulated) in the transversal and axial directions respectively. Total material expenses associated with the construction of the transducer were approximately 5000 USD (as of 2011). The versatility and lower fabrication costs afforded by RP methods may be beneficial in the development of complex transducer geometries suitable for a variety of research and clinical applications

  6. Absolute nuclear material assay

    DOEpatents

    Prasad, Manoj K.; Snyderman, Neal J.; Rowland, Mark S.

    2012-05-15

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  7. Absolute nuclear material assay

    DOEpatents

    Prasad, Manoj K.; Snyderman, Neal J.; Rowland, Mark S.

    2010-07-13

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  8. Robust Acoustic Transducers for Bubble Chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, Jonathan

    2015-04-01

    The PICO collaboration utilizes bubble chambers filled with various superheated liquids as targets for dark matter. Acoustic sensors have proved able to distinguish nuclear recoils from radioactive background on an event-by-event basis. We have recently produced a more robust transducer which should be able to operate for years, rather than months, in the challenging environment of a heated high pressure hydraulic fluid outside these chambers. Indiana University South Bend.

  9. Characterization of transducer cavities to oscillatory inputs

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, J.D.; Hollingshead, J.R.

    1993-12-31

    The design and use of measurement systems must ensure that the data are not computed by the measurement system. A wide variety of sources can be responsible for compromising the integrity of test data. Among the sources of error are transducer calibration errors, signal conditioning problems, recording problems, and characteristics of the mechanical system which introduce errors. In this paper, the characteristics of an acoustic cavity are discussed as they apply to a pressure measurement problem.

  10. Transducers for ultrasonic limb plethysmography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nickell, W. T.; Wu, V. C.; Bhagat, P. K.

    1983-01-01

    The design, construction, and performance characteristics of ultasonic transducers suitable for limb plethysmography are presented. Both 3-mm-diameter flat-plate and 12-mm-diameter hemispheric ceramic transducers operating at 2 MHz were fitted in 1-mm thick epoxy-resin lens/acoustic-coupling structures and mounted in exercie-EKG electrode housings for placement on the calf using adhesive collars. The effects of transducer directional characteristics on performance under off-axis rotation and the electrical impedances of the transducers were measured: The flat transducer was found to be sensitive to rotation and have an impedance of 800 ohms; the hemispheric transducer, to be unaffected by rotation and have an impedance of 80 ohms. The use of hemispheric transducers as both transmitter and receiver, or of a flat transducer as transmitter and a hemispheric transducer as receiver, was found to produce adequate dimensional measurements, with minimum care in transducer placement, in short-term physiological experiments and long-term (up to 7-day) attachment tests.

  11. An electromechanical displacement transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villiers, Marius; Mahboob, Imran; Nishiguchi, Katsuhiko; Hatanaka, Daiki; Fujiwara, Akira; Yamaguchi, Hiroshi

    2016-08-01

    Two modes of an electromechanical resonator are coupled through the strain inside the structure with a cooperativity as high as 107, a state-of-the-art value for purely mechanical systems, which enables the observation of normal-mode splitting. This coupling is exploited to transduce the resonator’s fundamental mode into the bandwidth of the second flexural mode, which is 1.4 MHz higher in frequency. Thus, an all-mechanical heterodyne detection scheme is implemented that can be developed into a high-precision displacement sensor.

  12. Thin film strain transducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rand, J. L. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A strain transducer system and process for making the same is disclosed. A beryllium copper ring having four strain gages is electrically connected in Wheatstone bridge fashion to the output instrumentation. Tabs are bonded to a balloon or like surface with strain on the surface causing bending of a ring which provides an electrical signal through the gages proportional to the surface strain. A photographic pattern of a one half ring segment as placed on a sheet of beryllium copper for chem-mill etch formation is illustrated.

  13. RADIO-ACTIVE TRANSDUCER

    DOEpatents

    Wanetick, S.

    1962-03-01

    ABS>ure the change in velocity of a moving object. The transducer includes a radioactive source having a collimated beam of radioactive particles, a shield which can block the passage of the radioactive beam, and a scintillation detector to measure the number of radioactive particles in the beam which are not blocked by the shield. The shield is operatively placed across the radioactive beam so that any motion normal to the beam will cause the shield to move in the opposite direction thereby allowing more radioactive particles to reach the detector. The number of particles detected indicates the acceleration. (AEC)

  14. An IVUS Transducer for Microbubble Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Kilroy, Joseph P.; Patil, Abhay V.; Rychak, Joshua J.; Hossack, John A.

    2014-01-01

    There is interest in examining the potential of modified intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) catheters to facilitate dual diagnostic and therapeutic roles using ultrasound plus microbubbles for localized drug delivery to the vessel wall. The goal of this study was to design, prototype, and validate an IVUS transducer for microbubble-based drug delivery. A 1-D acoustic radiation force model and finite element analysis guided the design of a 1.5-MHz IVUS transducer. Using the IVUS transducer, biotinylated microbubbles were displaced in water and bovine whole blood to the streptavidin-coated wall of a flow phantom by a 1.5-MHz center frequency, peak negative pressure = 70 kPa pulse with varying pulse repetition frequency (PRF) while monitoring microbubble adhesion with ultrasound. A fit was applied to the RF data to extract a time constant (τ). As PRF was increased in water, the time constant decreased (τ = 32.6 s, 1 kHz vs. τ = 8.2 s, 6 kHz), whereas in bovine whole blood an adhesion–no adhesion transition was found for PRFs ≥ 8 kHz. Finally, a fluorophore was delivered to an ex vivo swine artery using microbubbles and the IVUS transducer, resulting in a 6.6-fold increase in fluorescence. These results indicate the importance of PRF (or duty factor) for IVUS acoustic radiation force microbubble displacement and the potential for IVUS and microbubbles to provide localized drug delivery. PMID:24569249

  15. Absolute CH radical concentrations in rich low-pressure methane-oxygen-argon flames via cavity ringdown spectroscopy of the A transition

    SciTech Connect

    John W. Thomas, Jr; Andrew McIlroy

    1999-11-22

    We measure cavity ringdown spectra of the A{sup 2}{Delta}-X{sup 2}II transition of the methylidyne (CH) radical in a series of rich low-pressure methane-oxygen-argon flames and demonstrate that the technique is sensitive, quantitative, and straightforward in its implementation and interpretation. As a line-of-sight technique, it complements imaging techniques, such as planar laser-induced fluorescence. Our results generally agree with chemical kinetic models for methane oxidation that have appeared in the literature, but suggest some refinements are necessary. Additional examination of the CH + O{sub 2} reaction rate as a function of temperature is advised. Our results are consistent with those of Derzy et al. using the C{sup 2}{Sigma}{sup +}-X{sup 2}II transition for stoichiometric, low-pressure flames which include nitrogen. Our results for rich flames, as with earlier experiments for singlet methylene, suggest that flame chemical kinetic models need to be adjusted to account for flame chemistry for stoichiometries richer than {phi} = 1.5.

  16. Transducer selection and application in magnetoacoustic tomography with magnetic induction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yuqi; Wang, Jiawei; Sun, Xiaodong; Ma, Qingyu; Zhang, Dong

    2016-03-01

    As an acoustic receiver, transducer plays a vital role in signal acquisition and image reconstruction for magnetoacoustic tomography with magnetic induction (MAT-MI). In order to optimize signal acquisition, the expressions of acoustic pressure detection and waveform collection are theoretically studied based on the radiation theory of acoustic dipole and the reception pattern of transducer. Pressure distributions are simulated for a cylindrical phantom model using a planar piston transducer with different radii and bandwidths. The proposed theory is also verified by the experimental measurements of acoustic waveform detection for an aluminum foil cylinder. It is proved that acoustic pressure with sharp and clear boundary peaks can be detected by the large-radius transducer with wide bandwidth, reflecting the differential of the induced Lorentz force accurately, which is helpful for precise conductivity reconstruction. To detect acoustic pressure with acceptable pressure amplitude, peak pressure ratio, amplitude ratio, and improved signal to noise ratio, the scanning radius of 5-10 times the radius of the object should be selected to improve the accuracy of image reconstruction. This study provides a theoretical and experimental basis for transducer selection and application in MAT-MI to obtain reconstructed images with improved resolution and definition.

  17. Report of pilot study CCM.P-P1 for international comparison of absolute pressure measurements in gas from 3 × 10-9 Pa to 9 × 10-4 Pa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Hajime; Arai, Kenta; Komatsu, Eiichi; Fujii, Kenichi; Bock, Thomas; Jousten, Karl

    2015-01-01

    A bilateral comparison of absolute gas pressure measurements from 3 × 10-9 Pa to 9 × 10-4 Pa was performed between the National Metrology Institute of Japan (NMIJ) and Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB). It is a pilot study CCM.P-P1 for the next international comparison in this pressure range to test the stability of ultrahigh vacuum gauges (UHV gauges) as transfer standards. Two spinning rotor gauges (SRGs), an axial-symmetric transmission gauge (ATG), and an extractor gauge (EXG) were used as transfer standards. The calibration ratio of one SRG was sufficiently stable, but the other was not. This result indicates that improvements in the transport mechanism for SRG are needed. The two ionization gauges ATG and EXG, on the other hand, were sufficiently stable. Provisional equivalence of the pressures realized by the primary standards at NMIJ and PTB was found. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by CCM-WGS.

  18. A high-temperature wideband pressure transducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuckerwar, A. J.

    1976-01-01

    The problem of operating a condenser microphone as a terminal element of a half wavelength transmission line was dealt with; the environment in which the microphone operates necessitates a 25 foot separation from its supporting electronics. A theoretical analysis of the microphone-cable system, substantiated by laboratory tests, provided criteria to optimize system gain.

  19. Transducer of linear displacements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malamed, Y. R.

    1984-02-01

    The basic PLP transducer is designed for a UIM-29 microscope and a 2-coordinate measuring instrument with electronic digital readout. Its optical system consists of an AL-107B light-emitting diode as light source, two condenser lenses, a special wedge carrying two pairs of joined receiver lenses, a prism-mirror, a photoreceiver, a wedge-shape transparent replica of a twin diffraction grating which prevents light reflected by the air-glass interface from focusing on the receiver photodiodes, and a reflective replica of a diffraction grating on a movable carriage. The already available three models of this transducer are PLP1-0.2, PLP1-0.5, and PLP1-1.0 with respectively 625, 250, 125 lines/mm on the transparent replica and respectively 312.5, 125, 62.5 lines/mm on the reflective replica. The scale of moire-interference fringes characterizing the shift between both diffraction gratings per grating period (9.16 mm in each model) is respectively 0.8, 2.0, 4.0 microns and the angle between the two arrays of grating lines on the transparent replica is respectively 36 + or - 4 deg, 90 + or - 10 deg, 190 + or - 20 deg.

  20. Absolute OH and O radical densities in effluent of a He/H2O micro-scaled atmospheric pressure plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedikt, J.; Schröder, D.; Schneider, S.; Willems, G.; Pajdarová, A.; Vlček, J.; Schulz-von der Gathen, V.

    2016-08-01

    The effluent of a micro-scaled atmospheric pressure plasma jet (μ-APPJ) operated in helium with admixtures of water vapor (≲ {{10}4} ppm) has been analyzed by means of cavity ring-down laser absorption spectroscopy and molecular beam mass spectrometry to measure hydroxyl (OH) radical densities, and by two-photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy to measure atomic oxygen (O) densities. Additionally, the performance of the bubbler as a source of water vapor in the helium feed gas has been carefully characterized and calibrated. The largest OH and O densities in the effluent of 2× {{10}14}~\\text{c}{{\\text{m}}-3} and 3.2× {{10}13}~\\text{c}{{\\text{m}}-3} , respectively, have been measured at around 6000 ppm. The highest selectivity is reached around 1500 ppm, where the OH density is at  ∼63% of its maximum value and is 14 times larger than the O density. The measured density profiles and distance variations are compared to the results of a 2D axially symmetric fluid model of species transport and reaction kinetics in the plasma effluent. It is shown that the main loss of OH radicals in the effluent is their mutual reaction. In the case of O, reactions with other species than OH also have to be considered to explain the density decay in the effluent. The results presented here provide additional information for understanding the plasma-chemical processes in non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasmas. They also open the way to applying μ-APPJ with He/H2O as a selective source of OH radicals.

  1. Spatial averaging effects of hydrophone on field characterization of planar transducer using Fresnel approximation.

    PubMed

    Xing, Guangzhen; Yang, Ping; He, Longbiao; Feng, Xiujuan

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this work was to improve the existing models that allow spatial averaging effects of piezoelectric hydrophones to be accounted for. The model derived in the present study is valid for a planar source and was verified using transducers operating at 5 and 20MHz. It is based on Fresnel approximation and enables corrections for both on-axis and off-axis measurements. A single-integral approximate formula for the axial acoustic pressure was derived, and the validity of the Fresnel approximation in the near field of the planar transducer was examined. The numerical results obtained using 5 and 20MHz planar transmitters with an effective diameter of 12.7mm showed that the derived model could account for spatial averaging effects to within 0.2% with Beissner's exact integral (Beissner, 1981), for k(a+b)2≫π (where k is the circular wavenumber, and a and b are the effective radii of the transmitter and hydrophone, respectively). The field distributions along the acoustic axis and the beam directivity patterns are also included in the model. The spatial averaging effects of the hydrophone were generally observed to cause underestimation of the absolute pressure amplitudes of the acoustic beam, and overestimation of the cross-sectional size of the beam directivity pattern. However, the cross-sectional size of the directivity pattern was also found to be underestimated in the "far zone" (beyond Y0=a(2)/λ) of the transmitter. The results of this study indicate that the spatial averaging effect on the beam directivity pattern is negligible for π(γ(2)+4γ)s≪1 (where γ=b/a, and s is the normalized distance to the planar transducer). PMID:27268164

  2. Pressure Controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1981-01-01

    EPIC is Electronic Pressure Indicating Controller produced by North American Manufacturing Company. It is a high-sensitivity device for improving combustion efficiency in industrial furnaces that interprets a signal from a pressure transducer on a furnace and regulates furnace pressure accordingly. A controller can provide savings of from five to 25 percent of an industrial user's annual furnace fuel bill.

  3. Improved Piezoelectric Loudspeakers And Transducers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Regan, Curtis Randall; Jalink, Antony; Hellbaum, Richard F.; Rohrbach, Wayne W.

    1995-01-01

    Loudspeakers and related acoustic transducers of improved type feature both light weight and energy efficiency of piezoelectric transducers and mechanical coupling efficiency. Active component of transducer made from wafer of "rainbow" piezoelectric material, ceramic piezoelectric material chemically reduced on one face. Chemical treatment forms wafer into dishlike shallow section of sphere. Both faces then coated with electrically conductive surface layers serving as electrodes. Applications include high-fidelity loudspeakers, and underwater echo ranging devices.

  4. Reducing the Effect of Transducer Mount Induced Noise on Aeroacoustic Wind Tunnel Testing Data with a New Transducer Mount Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herron, Andrew J.; Reed, Darren K.; Nance, Donald K.

    2015-01-01

    Flight vehicle aeroacoustic environments induced during transonic and supersonic flight are usually predicted by subscale wind tunnel testing utilizing high frequency miniature pressure transducers. In order to minimize noise induced by the measurement itself, transducer flush mounting with the model surface is very important. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has accomplished flushness in recent testing campaigns via use of a transducer holder that can be machined and sanded. A single hole in the holder allows the flow medium to interact with the transducer diaphragm. Noise is induced by the resulting cavity however, and is a challenge to remove in post-processing. A new holder design has been developed that minimizes the effects of this transducer mount induced noise (XMIN) by reducing the resonance amplitude or increasing its resonance frequency beyond the range of interest. This paper describes a test conducted at the NASA/George C. Marshall Space Flight Center Trisonic Wind Tunnel intended to verify the effectiveness of this design. The results from this test show that this new transducer holder design does significantly reduce the influence of XMIN on measured fluctuating pressure levels without degrading a transducer's ability to accurately measure the noise external to the model.

  5. Ultrasonic Transducers for Fourier Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenslade, Thomas B., Jr.

    1995-01-01

    Describes an experiment that uses the ultrasonic transducer for demonstrating the Fourier components of waveshapes such as the square and triangular waves produced by laboratory function generators. (JRH)

  6. Miniature multimode monolithic flextensional transducers.

    PubMed

    Hladky-Hennion, Anne-Christine; Uzgur, A Erman; Markley, Douglas C; Safari, Ahmad; Cochran, Joe K; Newnham, Robert E

    2007-10-01

    Traditional flextensional transducers classified in seven groups based on their designs have been used extensively in 1-100 kHz range for mine hunting, fish finding, oil explorations, and biomedical applications. In this study, a new family of small, low cost underwater, and biomedical transducers has been developed. After the fabrication of transducers, finite-elements analysis (FEA) was used extensively in order to optimize these miniature versions of high-power, low-frequency flextensional transducer designs to achieve broad bandwidth for both transmitting and receiving, engineered vibration modes, and optimized acoustic directivity patterns. Transducer topologies with various shapes, cross sections, and symmetries can be fabricated through high-volume, low-cost ceramic and metal extrusion processes. Miniaturized transducers posses resonance frequencies in the range of above 1 MHz to below 10 kHz. Symmetry and design of the transducer, polling patterns, driving and receiving electrode geometries, and driving conditions have a strong effect on the vibration modes, resonance frequencies, and radiation patterns. This paper is devoted to small, multimode flextensional transducers with active shells, which combine the advantages of small size and low-cost manufacturing with control of the shape of the acoustic radiation/receive pattern. The performance of the transducers is emphasized. PMID:18019236

  7. Electromagnetic acoustic transducer

    DOEpatents

    Alers, George A.; Burns, Jr., Leigh R.; MacLauchlan, Daniel T.

    1988-01-01

    A noncontact ultrasonic transducer for studying the acoustic properties of a metal workpiece includes a generally planar magnetizing coil positioned above the surface of the workpiece, and a generally planar eddy current coil between the magnetizing coil and the workpiece. When a large current is passed through the magnetizing coil, a large magnetic field is applied to the near-surface regions of the workpiece. The eddy current coil can then be operated as a transmitter by passing an alternating current therethrough to excite ultrasonic waves in the surface of the workpiece, or operated as a passive receiver to sense ultrasonic waves in the surface by measuring the output signal. The geometries of the two coils can be varied widely to be effective for different types of ultrasonic waves. The coils are preferably packaged in a housing which does not interfere with their operation, but protects them from a variety of adverse environmental conditions.

  8. Optically transduced MEMS magnetometer

    SciTech Connect

    Nielson, Gregory N; Langlois, Eric

    2014-03-18

    MEMS magnetometers with optically transduced resonator displacement are described herein. Improved sensitivity, crosstalk reduction, and extended dynamic range may be achieved with devices including a deflectable resonator suspended from the support, a first grating extending from the support and disposed over the resonator, a pair of drive electrodes to drive an alternating current through the resonator, and a second grating in the resonator overlapping the first grating to form a multi-layer grating having apertures that vary dimensionally in response to deflection occurring as the resonator mechanically resonates in a plane parallel to the first grating in the presence of a magnetic field as a function of the Lorentz force resulting from the alternating current. A plurality of such multi-layer gratings may be disposed across a length of the resonator to provide greater dynamic range and/or accommodate fabrication tolerances.

  9. An opening electromagnetic transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yanhua; Kang, Yihua

    2013-12-01

    Tubular solenoids have been widely used without any change since an electrical wire was discovered to create magnetic fields by Hans Christian Oersted in 1820 and thereby the wire was first coiled as a helix into a solenoid coil by William Sturgeon in 1823 and was improved by Joseph Henry in 1829 [see http://www.myetymology.com/encyclopedia/History_of_the_electricity.html; J. M. D. Coey, Magnetism and Magnetic Materials (Cambridge University Press, New York, 2010); and F. Winterberg, Plasma Phys. 8, 541553 (1996)]. A magnetic control method of C-shaped carrying-current wire is proposed, and thereby a new opening electromagnetic transducer evidently differing from the traditional tubular solenoid is created, capable of directly encircling and centering the acted objects in it, bringing about convenient and innovative electromagnetic energy conversion for electromagnetic heating, electromagnetic excitation, physical information capture, and electro-mechanical motion used in science research, industry, and even biomedical activities.

  10. Bonded ultrasonic transducer and method for making

    DOEpatents

    Dixon, R.D.; Roe, L.H.; Migliori, A.

    1995-11-14

    An ultrasonic transducer is formed as a diffusion bonded assembly of piezoelectric crystal, backing material, and, optionally, a ceramic wear surface. The mating surfaces of each component are silver films that are diffusion bonded together under the application of pressure and heat. Each mating surface may also be coated with a reactive metal, such as hafnium, to increase the adhesion of the silver films to the component surfaces. Only thin silver films are deposited, e.g., a thickness of about 0.00635 mm, to form a substantially non-compliant bond between surfaces. The resulting transducer assembly is substantially free of self-resonances over normal operating ranges for taking resonant ultrasound measurements. 12 figs.

  11. Bonded ultrasonic transducer and method for making

    DOEpatents

    Dixon, Raymond D.; Roe, Lawrence H.; Migliori, Albert

    1995-01-01

    An ultrasonic transducer is formed as a diffusion bonded assembly of piezoelectric crystal, backing material, and, optionally, a ceramic wear surface. The mating surfaces of each component are silver films that are diffusion bonded together under the application of pressure and heat. Each mating surface may also be coated with a reactive metal, such as hafnium, to increase the adhesion of the silver films to the component surfaces. Only thin silver films are deposited, e.g., a thickness of about 0.00635 mm, to form a substantially non-compliant bond between surfaces. The resulting transducer assembly is substantially free of self-resonances over normal operating ranges for taking resonant ultrasound measurements.

  12. Absolute biological needs.

    PubMed

    McLeod, Stephen

    2014-07-01

    Absolute needs (as against instrumental needs) are independent of the ends, goals and purposes of personal agents. Against the view that the only needs are instrumental needs, David Wiggins and Garrett Thomson have defended absolute needs on the grounds that the verb 'need' has instrumental and absolute senses. While remaining neutral about it, this article does not adopt that approach. Instead, it suggests that there are absolute biological needs. The absolute nature of these needs is defended by appeal to: their objectivity (as against mind-dependence); the universality of the phenomenon of needing across the plant and animal kingdoms; the impossibility that biological needs depend wholly upon the exercise of the abilities characteristic of personal agency; the contention that the possession of biological needs is prior to the possession of the abilities characteristic of personal agency. Finally, three philosophical usages of 'normative' are distinguished. On two of these, to describe a phenomenon or claim as 'normative' is to describe it as value-dependent. A description of a phenomenon or claim as 'normative' in the third sense does not entail such value-dependency, though it leaves open the possibility that value depends upon the phenomenon or upon the truth of the claim. It is argued that while survival needs (or claims about them) may well be normative in this third sense, they are normative in neither of the first two. Thus, the idea of absolute need is not inherently normative in either of the first two senses. PMID:23586876

  13. Adjustable holder for transducer mounting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deotsch, R. C.

    1980-01-01

    Positioning of acoustic sensor, strain gage, or similar transducer is facilitated by adjustable holder. Developed for installation on Space Shuttle, it includes springs for maintaining uniform load on transducer with adjustable threaded cap for precisely controlling position of sensor with respect to surrounding structure.

  14. Amperometric biosensors based on carbon composite transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Fang

    1998-12-01

    supply of oxygen of a Kel-F/carbon paste enzyme transducer, even for microsensor, is not depleted over a prolonged operation under oxygen-deficient conditions. The oxygen effect upon the kinetic parameters of the enzyme-based carbon paste is examined for a variety of pasting binders. Such attention to the oxygen dependence of enzyme-based transducers addresses numerous practical biosensing applications, involving the oxygen demand and micro-probe in monitoring of glucose. Novel biocomposites based on the incorporation of the tyrosinase into a graphite-epoxy resin and a metal-dispersed carbon paste matrix, were used for the effective biosensing of phenolic compounds. The enzyme retains its bioactivity on confinement in these carbon composite environments. Hence, convenient quantification of micromolar concentrations is feasible at the electrochemical reduction of phenolic compounds with a fast, sensitive and reproducible response compared to conventional tyrosinase-based biosensors. The influence of various experimental variables was explored for optimum biosensing performance in flow-injection monitoring of phenolic compounds. A dual-biosensor detector provides a suitable method for detecting phenolic compounds in environmental samples after HPLC separation. Amperometric detection using a dual-biosesnor thin-layer cell in the parallel configuration aided in the identification of unknown phenolic components in complicated environmental samples. As a result, detection of eluting phenolic compounds is improved with respect to further selectivity and stability in liquid chromatography. Selectivity is enhanced by obtaining two chromatograms of parallel opposed detectors. Stability is improved by using solid paraffin transducer composition that can be operated well under the conditions of high pressure and high content of organic solvent. This method has proven suitable for analysis of phenolic compounds in environmental samples.

  15. Experimental Evaluation of Three Designs of Electrodynamic Flexural Transducers.

    PubMed

    Eriksson, Tobias J R; Laws, Michael; Kang, Lei; Fan, Yichao; Ramadas, Sivaram N; Dixon, Steve

    2016-01-01

    Three designs for electrodynamic flexural transducers (EDFT) for air-coupled ultrasonics are presented and compared. An all-metal housing was used for robustness, which makes the designs more suitable for industrial applications. The housing is designed such that there is a thin metal plate at the front, with a fundamental flexural vibration mode at ∼50 kHz. By using a flexural resonance mode, good coupling to the load medium was achieved without the use of matching layers. The front radiating plate is actuated electrodynamically by a spiral coil inside the transducer, which produces an induced magnetic field when an AC current is applied to it. The transducers operate without the use of piezoelectric materials, which can simplify manufacturing and prolong the lifetime of the transducers, as well as open up possibilities for high-temperature applications. The results show that different designs perform best for the generation and reception of ultrasound. All three designs produced large acoustic pressure outputs, with a recorded sound pressure level (SPL) above 120 dB at a 40 cm distance from the highest output transducer. The sensitivity of the transducers was low, however, with single shot signal-to-noise ratio ( SNR ) ≃ 15 dB in transmit-receive mode, with transmitter and receiver 40 cm apart. PMID:27571075

  16. Circuit for Driving Piezoelectric Transducers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Randall, David P.; Chapsky, Jacob

    2009-01-01

    The figure schematically depicts an oscillator circuit for driving a piezoelectric transducer to excite vibrations in a mechanical structure. The circuit was designed and built to satisfy application-specific requirements to drive a selected one of 16 such transducers at a regulated amplitude and frequency chosen to optimize the amount of work performed by the transducer and to compensate for both (1) temporal variations of the resonance frequency and damping time of each transducer and (2) initially unknown differences among the resonance frequencies and damping times of different transducers. In other words, the circuit is designed to adjust itself to optimize the performance of whichever transducer is selected at any given time. The basic design concept may be adaptable to other applications that involve the use of piezoelectric transducers in ultrasonic cleaners and other apparatuses in which high-frequency mechanical drives are utilized. This circuit includes three resistor-capacitor networks that, together with the selected piezoelectric transducer, constitute a band-pass filter having a peak response at a frequency of about 2 kHz, which is approximately the resonance frequency of the piezoelectric transducers. Gain for generating oscillations is provided by a power hybrid operational amplifier (U1). A junction field-effect transistor (Q1) in combination with a resistor (R4) is used as a voltage-variable resistor to control the magnitude of the oscillation. The voltage-variable resistor is part of a feedback control loop: Part of the output of the oscillator is rectified and filtered for use as a slow negative feedback to the gate of Q1 to keep the output amplitude constant. The response of this control loop is much slower than 2 kHz and, therefore, does not introduce significant distortion of the oscillator output, which is a fairly clean sine wave. The positive AC feedback needed to sustain oscillations is derived from sampling the current through the

  17. Capacitive Micromachined Ultrasonic Transducers (CMUTs) for Underwater Imaging Applications.

    PubMed

    Song, Jinlong; Xue, Chenyang; He, Changde; Zhang, Rui; Mu, Linfeng; Cui, Juan; Miao, Jing; Liu, Yuan; Zhang, Wendong

    2015-01-01

    A capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer structure for use in underwater imaging is designed, fabricated and tested in this paper. In this structure, a silicon dioxide insulation layer is inserted between the top electrodes and the vibration membrane to prevent ohmic contact. The capacitance-voltage (C-V) characteristic curve shows that the transducer offers suitable levels of hysteresis and repeatability performance. The -6 dB center frequency is 540 kHz and the transducer has a bandwidth of 840 kHz for a relative bandwidth of 155%. Underwater pressure of 143.43 Pa is achieved 1 m away from the capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer under 20 Vpp excitation. Two-dimensional underwater ultrasonic imaging, which is able to prove that a rectangular object is present underwater, is achieved. The results presented here indicate that our work will be highly beneficial for the establishment of an underwater ultrasonic imaging system. PMID:26389902

  18. Capacitive Micromachined Ultrasonic Transducers (CMUTs) for Underwater Imaging Applications

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jinlong; Xue, Chenyang; He, Changde; Zhang, Rui; Mu, Linfeng; Cui, Juan; Miao, Jing; Liu, Yuan; Zhang, Wendong

    2015-01-01

    A capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer structure for use in underwater imaging is designed, fabricated and tested in this paper. In this structure, a silicon dioxide insulation layer is inserted between the top electrodes and the vibration membrane to prevent ohmic contact. The capacitance-voltage (C-V) characteristic curve shows that the transducer offers suitable levels of hysteresis and repeatability performance. The −6 dB center frequency is 540 kHz and the transducer has a bandwidth of 840 kHz for a relative bandwidth of 155%. Underwater pressure of 143.43 Pa is achieved 1 m away from the capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer under 20 Vpp excitation. Two-dimensional underwater ultrasonic imaging, which is able to prove that a rectangular object is present underwater, is achieved. The results presented here indicate that our work will be highly beneficial for the establishment of an underwater ultrasonic imaging system. PMID:26389902

  19. COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF SELECTED EDDY CURRENT TRANSDUCERS FOR TITANIUM ALLOY EVALUATION

    SciTech Connect

    Chady, T.; Sikora, R.; Baniukiewicz, P.; Lopato, P.; Kowalczyk, J.; Psuj, G.; Caryk, M.

    2010-02-22

    Titanium alloy based details due to their mechanical properties continue to be in extensive use in various structures (mainly aerospace, automotive and petro-chemical industrial applications). In this paper comparative study of various types of eddy current NDT transducers for testing titanium elements was done. Probes of absolute, differential and array configurations were constructed and analyzed. Two and three dimensional numerical analysis (FEM) were done in order to find the best type and configuration of the proposed transducers.

  20. Comparative Analysis of Selected Eddy Current Transducers for Titanium Alloy Evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chady, T.; Sikora, R.; Baniukiewicz, P.; Lopato, P.; Kowalczyk, J.; Psuj, G.; Caryk, M.

    2010-02-01

    Titanium alloy based details due to their mechanical properties continue to be in extensive use in various structures (mainly aerospace, automotive and petro-chemical industrial applications). In this paper comparative study of various types of eddy current NDT transducers for testing titanium elements was done. Probes of absolute, differential and array configurations were constructed and analyzed. Two and three dimensional numerical analysis (FEM) were done in order to find the best type and configuration of the proposed transducers.

  1. Micromachined silicon seismic transducers

    SciTech Connect

    Barron, C.C.; Fleming, J.G.; Sniegowski, J.J.; Armour, D.L.; Fleming, R.P.

    1995-08-01

    Batch-fabricated silicon seismic transducers could revolutionize the discipline of CTBT monitoring by providing inexpensive, easily depolyable sensor arrays. Although our goal is to fabricate seismic sensors that provide the same performance level as the current state-of-the-art ``macro`` systems, if necessary one could deploy a larger number of these small sensors at closer proximity to the location being monitored in order to compensate for lower performance. We have chosen a modified pendulum design and are manufacturing prototypes in two different silicon micromachining fabrication technologies. The first set of prototypes, fabricated in our advanced surface- micromachining technology, are currently being packaged for testing in servo circuits -- we anticipate that these devices, which have masses in the 1--10 {mu}g range, will resolve sub-mG signals. Concurrently, we are developing a novel ``mold`` micromachining technology that promises to make proof masses in the 1--10 mg range possible -- our calculations indicate that devices made in this new technology will resolve down to at least sub-{mu}G signals, and may even approach to 10{sup {minus}10} G/{radical}Hz acceleration levels found in the low-earth-noise model.

  2. Passive wireless ultrasonic transducer systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, C. H.; Croxford, A. J.; Wilcox, P. D.

    2014-02-01

    Inductive coupling and capacitive coupling both offer simple solutions to wirelessly probe ultrasonic transducers. This paper investigates the theory and feasibility of such system in the context of non-destructive evaluation (NDE) applications. Firstly, the physical principles and construction of an inductively coupled transducer system (ICTS) and a capacitively coupled transducer system (CCTS) are introduced. Then the development of a transmission line model with the measured impedance of a bonded piezoelectric ceramic disc representing a sensor attached to an arbitrary solid substrate for both systems is described. The models are validated experimentally. Several applications of CCTS are presented, such CCTS for the underwater and through-composite testing.

  3. The absolute path command

    2012-05-11

    The ap command traveres all symlinks in a given file, directory, or executable name to identify the final absolute path. It can print just the final path, each intermediate link along with the symlink chan, and the permissions and ownership of each directory component in the final path. It has functionality similar to "which", except that it shows the final path instead of the first path. It is also similar to "pwd", but it canmore » provide the absolute path to a relative directory from the current working directory.« less

  4. The absolute path command

    SciTech Connect

    Moody, A.

    2012-05-11

    The ap command traveres all symlinks in a given file, directory, or executable name to identify the final absolute path. It can print just the final path, each intermediate link along with the symlink chan, and the permissions and ownership of each directory component in the final path. It has functionality similar to "which", except that it shows the final path instead of the first path. It is also similar to "pwd", but it can provide the absolute path to a relative directory from the current working directory.

  5. Optically selective, acoustically resonant gas detecting transducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dimeff, J. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A gas analyzer is disclosed which responds to the resonant absorption or emission spectrum of a specific gas by producing an acoustic resonance in a chamber containing a sample of that gas, and which measures the amount of that emission or absorption by measuring the strength of that acoustic resonance, e.g., the maximum periodic pressure, velocity or density achieved. In the preferred embodiment, a light beam is modulated periodically at the acoustical resonance frequency of a closed chamber which contains an optically dense sample of the gas of interest. Periodic heating of the absorbing gas by the light beam causes a cyclic expansion, movement, and pressure within the gas. An amplitude is reached where the increased losses were the cyclic radiation energy received. A transducing system is inclined for converting the pressure variations of the resonant gas into electronic readout signals.

  6. High intensity ultrasound transducer used in gene transfection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, Kyle P.; Keilman, George W.; Noble, Misty L.; Brayman, Andrew A.; Miao, Carol H.

    2012-11-01

    This paper describes a novel therapeutic high intensity non-focused ultrasound (HIU) transducer designed with uniform pressure distribution to aid in accelerated gene transfer in large animal liver tissues in vivo. The underlying HIU transducer was used to initiate homogeneous cavitation throughout the tissue while delivering up to 2.7 MPa at 1.1 MHz across its radiating surface. The HIU transducer was built into a 6 cm diameter x 1.3 cm tall housing ergonomically designed to avoid collateral damage to the surrounding anatomy during dynamic motion. The ultrasound (US) radiation was applied in a 'paintbrush-like' manner to the surface of the liver. The layers and geometry of the transducer were carefully selected to maximize the active diameter (5.74 cm), maximize the electrical to acoustic conversion efficiency (85%) to achieve 2.7 MPa of peak negative pressure, maximize the frequency operating band at the fundamental resonance to within a power transfer delta of 1 dB, and reduce the pressure delta to within 2 dB across the radiating surface. For maximum peak voltage into the transducer, a high performance piezoceramic was chosen and a DC bias circuit was built integral to the system. An apodized two element annular pattern was made from a single piezoceramic element, resulting in significant pressure uniformity enhancement. In addition to using apodization for pressure uniformity, a proprietary multi-layered structure was used to improve efficiency while sustaining an operating band from 900 kHz to 1.3 MHz. The resultant operating band allowed for dithering techniques using frequency modulation. The underlying HIU transducer for use in large animals enhances gene expression up to 6300-fold.

  7. An enzyme logic bioprotonic transducer

    SciTech Connect

    Miyake, Takeo; Keene, Scott; Deng, Yingxin; Rolandi, Marco; Josberger, Erik E.

    2015-01-01

    Translating ionic currents into measureable electronic signals is essential for the integration of bioelectronic devices with biological systems. We demonstrate the use of a Pd/PdH{sub x} electrode as a bioprotonic transducer that connects H{sup +} currents in solution into an electronic signal. This transducer exploits the reversible formation of PdH{sub x} in solution according to PdH↔Pd + H{sup +} + e{sup −}, and the dependence of this formation on solution pH and applied potential. We integrate the protonic transducer with glucose dehydrogenase as an enzymatic AND gate for glucose and NAD{sup +}. PdH{sub x} formation and associated electronic current monitors the output drop in pH, thus transducing a biological function into a measurable electronic output.

  8. An enzyme logic bioprotonic transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyake, Takeo; Josberger, Erik E.; Keene, Scott; Deng, Yingxin; Rolandi, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Translating ionic currents into measureable electronic signals is essential for the integration of bioelectronic devices with biological systems. We demonstrate the use of a Pd/PdHx electrode as a bioprotonic transducer that connects H+ currents in solution into an electronic signal. This transducer exploits the reversible formation of PdHx in solution according to PdH↔Pd + H+ + e-, and the dependence of this formation on solution pH and applied potential. We integrate the protonic transducer with glucose dehydrogenase as an enzymatic and gate for glucose and NAD+. PdHx formation and associated electronic current monitors the output drop in pH, thus transducing a biological function into a measurable electronic output.

  9. Acoustic transducer with damping means

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Richard W.; Adamson, Gerald E.

    1976-11-02

    An ultrasonic transducer specifically suited to high temperature sodium applications is described. A piezoelectric active element is joined to the transducer faceplate by coating the faceplate and juxtaposed active element face with wetting agents specifically compatible with the bonding procedure employed to achieve the joint. The opposite face of the active element is fitted with a backing member designed to assure continued electrical continuity during adverse operating conditions which can result in the fracturing of the active element. The fit is achieved employing a spring-loaded electrode operably arranged to electrically couple the internal transducer components, enclosed in a hermetically sealed housing, to accessory components normally employed in transducer applications. Two alternative backing members are taught for assuring electrical continuity. The first employs a resilient, discrete multipoint contact electrode in electrical communication with the active element face. The second employs a resilient, elastomeric, electrically conductive, damped member in electrical communication with the active element face in a manner to effect ring-down of the transducer. Each embodiment provides continued electrical continuity within the transducer in the event the active element fractures, while the second provides the added benefit of damping.

  10. Integrated transducer for color distinction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Hisao; Kojima, Masahiko; Yoshida, Akira

    1983-06-01

    A method for fabricating the improved version of an integrated transducer for color distinction is proposed. It consists of three SnO2(n)-Si(n) photodiodes on a Si wafer and a trichromatic filter prepared by arranging filters of the three primary colors (Eastman Kodak gelatin filters; Nos. 47B, 58, and 25) on an infrared glass filter (Hoya Glass; B-460). Its photoelectric characteristics and dependence of error of color distinction on the dimension of the transducer are reported. The photodiodes employed in this conversion assembly are produced by the simple spray method and are most suitable for detecting the low illumination. Since this transducer adapts the trichromatic color resolution method, highly accurate color distinction is possible. With this type of transducer, three photodiodes sensitive to the primary colors, red, green, and blue, respectively, are arranged on a plane. An error in color distinction can occur due to the differences in the strength of the light incident upon the respective photodiodes. This problem is reduced by making the transducer more compact. Finally, 11 kinds of colors are discerned in this experiment as an application of the transducer.

  11. Asymmetric Ultrasonic Pulse Radiation Using Electromagnetic-Induction Transducer and PZT(Pb(Zr-Ti)O3) Transducer with Wave Synthesis Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endoh, Nobuyuki; Yamamoto, Koji

    1993-05-01

    In medical applications, especially in urology, we use a fragmentation calculus technique with shock waves. This technique is very profitable because of no abdominal surgery for a human being. Large negative sound amplitude pulses, however, can cause problems such as internal hemorrhage or pain in the human body. The final goal of this study is to develop a means to project an intense positive unipolar pulse without negative sound pressure. We improved a composite transducer consisting of an electromagnetic-induction-type (EMI) transducer and PZT (Pb(Zr-Ti)O3) transducers. An EMI transducer consisting of a metal coil and vibration membrane can project intense sound pulses into water. In order to suppress its negative sound pressure, we project a compensation pulse with PZT transducers using an inverse filtering method. An asymmetric pulse whose P+ to P- amplitude ratio was very high was projected in water.

  12. An absolute instrument for determination of the speed of sound in water.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhiwei; Zhu, Junchao; Li, Tao; Zhang, Baofeng

    2016-05-01

    An apparatus for the absolute determination of the sound speed in water based on the time-of-flight technique is described. The time measurement is realized by hardware circuits and the distance measurement by a double-beam plane-mirror interferometer. A highly accurate time chip, with a resolution of approximately 90 ps, is employed for time measurements. The acoustic path length is adjustable and can be measured directly. Two transducers are used for transmitting and receiving ultrasonic signals without reflection. The transducers are immersed in a thermostatic vessel that maintains bath temperature with high stability. The speed of sound in pure water was measured at ambient pressure and at the temperatures 308 K, 303 K, 298 K, and 293 K. The achieved measurement uncertainties are 2 mK for temperature and 0.045 m/s for speed of sound. The results are compared to data from the literature, equation of state models, and measurements by two commercial sensors in the same experiment, showing excellent agreement among them. PMID:27250470

  13. Computerized Techniques for Calibrating Pressure Balances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, D. I.

    1994-01-01

    Pressure balances are generally calibrated by the cross-floating technique, where the forces acting on two similar devices in hydrostatic equilibrium are compared. It is a skilled and time-consuming process which has not previously lent itself to significant automation; computers have mostly been used only to calculate results after measurements have been taken. The objective of the present work was to develop real-time computerized measurement techniques to ease the calibration task, which would fully integrate into a single package with versatile software for calculating and displaying results. The calibration process is now conducted by studying graphical computer displays which derive their inputs from differential-pressure transducers and capacitance or optical displacement sensors. The mass imbalance between oil-operated pressure balances is calculated by interpolating between changes in piston rate-of-fall. Differential-pressure transducers are used to estimate mass imbalances between gas-operated balances, and a quick in situ method for determining their sensitivity has been developed. The new techniques have been successfully applied to a variety of pressure balance designs and substantial reductions in calibration times have been achieved. Reduced levels of scatter have revealed small systematic differences between gauge and absolute modes of operation.

  14. Auto-positioning ultrasonic transducer system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buchanan, Randy K. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An ultrasonic transducer apparatus and process for determining the optimal transducer position for flow measurement along a conduit outer surface. The apparatus includes a transmitting transducer for transmitting an ultrasonic signal, said transducer affixed to a conduit outer surface; a guide rail attached to a receiving transducer for guiding movement of a receiving transducer along the conduit outer surface, wherein the receiving transducer receives an ultrasonic signal from the transmitting transducer and sends a signal to a data acquisition system; and a motor for moving the receiving transducer along the guide rail, wherein the motor is controlled by a controller. The method includes affixing a transmitting transducer to an outer surface of a conduit; moving a receiving transducer on the conduit outer surface, wherein the receiving transducer is moved along a guide rail by a motor; transmitting an ultrasonic signal from the transmitting transducer that is received by the receiving transducer; communicating the signal received by the receiving transducer to a data acquisition and control system; and repeating the moving, transmitting, and communicating along a length of the conduit.

  15. Comprehensive helicopter rotor instrumentation - A retrofit approach using miniature transducers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacklin, Stephen A.; Mort, Ray; Morrison, Dwayne

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports an approach used to retrofit a set of full-scale main rotor blades with 290 miniature pressure transducers, 46 strain gages, and 24 miniature accelerometers. Normally, in order to avoid disturbing the aerodynamics of the rotor flow field, the pressure instrumentation must be integrally built into the body of the rotor blades. However, using a method developed with NASA, miniature pressure transducers are mounted to the blade exterior surface without degrading the quality of the blade aerodynamics. Moreover, it is estimated that this approach reduced costs by more than 50 percent over building a set of pressure instrumented blades. The aerodynamic measurement objectives are presented as are instrumentation design considerations, type of instrumentation used, assembly process, and the installed instrumentation characteristics.

  16. A low-frequency directional flextensional transducer and line array

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, S.C.; Butler, J.L.; Butler, A.L.; Cavanagh, G.H.

    1997-07-01

    A unique low-frequency (900 Hz) class IV flextensional transducer that produces an enhanced far-field pressure on one side and canceled far-field pressure on the other side has been developed. The transducer radiating surface consists of a thick-walled elliptical aluminum shell and a U.S. Navy type III piezoelectric stack along its major axis with two active sections and one inactive section. The directionality is achieved by simultaneously exciting the shell into an omnidirectional and dipole operation by driving stack into both extensional and bending modes. Both measurements and modeling on this device show a front to back pressure ratio of more than 30 dB, producing cardioid-type radiation patterns over an octave band, for a single transducer element. The transducers measured mechanical Q is 8, coupling coefficient is 0.25, and electroacoustic efficiency is 80{percent} and produced a source level of 215 dB {ital re:} 1 {mu}Pa at 1 m when driven at a field limit of 394 kV/m (10 kV/in.) at resonance. The uniqueness of this transducer is its directional beam patterns (directivity index=3.4 dB) and high acoustic output power from a small (less than a third of a wavelength) single element. Six of these transducers were placed in a closely packed line array two-wavelengths long. The array successfully produced narrow directional sound beams (directivity index=8.7 dB) with a front to back ratio greater than 30 dB and a source level of 225 dB {ital re:} 1 {mu}Pa at 1 m. {copyright} {ital 1997 Acoustical Society of America.}

  17. Rugged Direct-Current Transducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclyman, W. T.

    1991-01-01

    Direct-current transducer withstands thermal and mechanical shocks. Operates from single, nominally 15-V power supply and nearly insensitive to both large variations in temperature and variations of as much as plus or minus 5 V in supply voltage. Its output voltage highly linear function of sensed current, with full-scale value of about 3 Vdc and offset of about 0.1 Vdc at 0 sensed current. Ruggedness of transducer due in large part to novel magnetic core, machined from solid block of nickel/iron high-permeability, low-hysteresis alloy.

  18. Electronic Absolute Cartesian Autocollimator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leviton, Douglas B.

    2006-01-01

    An electronic absolute Cartesian autocollimator performs the same basic optical function as does a conventional all-optical or a conventional electronic autocollimator but differs in the nature of its optical target and the manner in which the position of the image of the target is measured. The term absolute in the name of this apparatus reflects the nature of the position measurement, which, unlike in a conventional electronic autocollimator, is based absolutely on the position of the image rather than on an assumed proportionality between the position and the levels of processed analog electronic signals. The term Cartesian in the name of this apparatus reflects the nature of its optical target. Figure 1 depicts the electronic functional blocks of an electronic absolute Cartesian autocollimator along with its basic optical layout, which is the same as that of a conventional autocollimator. Referring first to the optical layout and functions only, this or any autocollimator is used to measure the compound angular deviation of a flat datum mirror with respect to the optical axis of the autocollimator itself. The optical components include an illuminated target, a beam splitter, an objective or collimating lens, and a viewer or detector (described in more detail below) at a viewing plane. The target and the viewing planes are focal planes of the lens. Target light reflected by the datum mirror is imaged on the viewing plane at unit magnification by the collimating lens. If the normal to the datum mirror is parallel to the optical axis of the autocollimator, then the target image is centered on the viewing plane. Any angular deviation of the normal from the optical axis manifests itself as a lateral displacement of the target image from the center. The magnitude of the displacement is proportional to the focal length and to the magnitude (assumed to be small) of the angular deviation. The direction of the displacement is perpendicular to the axis about which the

  19. Reducing the Effect of Transducer Mount Induced Noise on Aeroacoustic Wind Tunnel Testing Data with a New Transducer Mount Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herron, A. J.; Reed, D. K.; Nance, D. K.

    2015-01-01

    Characterization of launch vehicle unsteady aerodynamics is a field best studied through experimentation, which is often carried out in the form of large scale wind tunnel testing. Measurement of the fluctuating pressures induced by the boundary layer noise is customarily made with miniature pressure transducers installed into a model of the vehicle of interest. Literature shows that noise level increases between two to five decibels (dB referenced to 20 micropascal) can be induced when the transducer surface is not mounted perfectly flush with the model outer surface. To reduce this artificially induced noise, special transducer holders have been used for aeroacoustic wind tunnel testing by NASA. This holder is a sleeve into which the transducer fits, with a cap that allows it to be mounted in a recessed hole in the model. A single hole in the holder allows the transport of the tunnel medium so the transducer can discriminate the fluctuating pressure due to the turbulent boundary layer noise. The holder is first dry fitted into the model and any difference in height between the holder and the model surface can be sanded flush. The holder is then removed from the model, the transducer glued inside the holder, and the holder replaced in the model, secured also with glue, thus eliminating the problem of noise level increases due to lack of flushness. In order to work with this holder design, special transducers have been ordered with their standard screen removed and the diaphragm moved as close to the top of the casing as possible to minimize any cavity volume. Although this greatly reduces induced noise due to the transducers being out of flush, the holders can also induce a cavity resonance that is usually at a very high frequency. This noise is termed transducer mount induced noise (XMIN). The peak of the mode can vary with the cavity depth, boundary layer noise that can excite the mode, tunnel flow medium, and the build of the transducers. Because the boundary

  20. ABSOLUTE POLARIMETRY AT RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    OKADA; BRAVAR, A.; BUNCE, G.; GILL, R.; HUANG, H.; MAKDISI, Y.; NASS, A.; WOOD, J.; ZELENSKI, Z.; ET AL.

    2007-09-10

    Precise and absolute beam polarization measurements are critical for the RHIC spin physics program. Because all experimental spin-dependent results are normalized by beam polarization, the normalization uncertainty contributes directly to final physics uncertainties. We aimed to perform the beam polarization measurement to an accuracy Of {Delta}P{sub beam}/P{sub beam} < 5%. The absolute polarimeter consists of Polarized Atomic Hydrogen Gas Jet Target and left-right pairs of silicon strip detectors and was installed in the RHIC-ring in 2004. This system features proton-proton elastic scattering in the Coulomb nuclear interference (CNI) region. Precise measurements of the analyzing power A{sub N} of this process has allowed us to achieve {Delta}P{sub beam}/P{sub beam} = 4.2% in 2005 for the first long spin-physics run. In this report, we describe the entire set up and performance of the system. The procedure of beam polarization measurement and analysis results from 2004-2005 are described. Physics topics of AN in the CNI region (four-momentum transfer squared 0.001 < -t < 0.032 (GeV/c){sup 2}) are also discussed. We point out the current issues and expected optimum accuracy in 2006 and the future.

  1. ASRDI oxygen technology survey. Volume 8: Pressure measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arvidson, J. M.; Brennan, J. A.

    1975-01-01

    Pressure transducers and their current uses with gaseous or liquid oxygen are reviewed. All transducer types such as strain gage, capacitance, potentiometric, piezoelectric, etc., are included. Topics covered include: cryogenic pressure measurement; material compatibility with gaseous and liquid oxygen; cleaning procedures; pressure tap connections; transducer types and descriptions; and calibration techniques.

  2. Measurement of two-phase flow momentum with force transducers

    SciTech Connect

    Hardy, J.E.; Smith, J.E.

    1990-01-01

    Two strain-gage-based drag transducers were developed to measure two-phase flow in simulated pressurized water reactor (PWR) test facilities. One transducer, a drag body (DB), was designed to measure the bidirectional average momentum flux passing through an end box. The second drag sensor, a break through detector (BTD), was designed to sense liquid downflow from the upper plenum to the core region. After prototype sensors passed numerous acceptance tests, transducers were fabricated and installed in two experimental test facilities, one in Japan and one in West Germany. High-quality data were extracted from both the DBs and BTDs for a variety of loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) scenarios. The information collected from these sensors has added to the understanding of the thermohydraulic phenomena that occur during the refill/reflood stage of a LOCA in a PWR. 9 refs., 15 figs.

  3. Remote electrically passive position transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ducharme, Alfred D.; Markos, Constantine T.; Rieder, R. J.; Wijntjes, Geert J.

    1999-02-01

    We will report on the design and testing of a precision, remote, via fiber optics position transducer suitable for incorporation in a closed loop fly-by-light positioning system. The design is based on Visidyne developed technology for an ultra high resolution optical radar based on Continuous Wave modulated light at a frequency of 1 GHz. It produces digital position data with 12 bit precision e.g., for a travel distance, stroke of 6 inches or greater at a bandwidth, update rate of 1 KHz. The passive nature of the transducer at the actuator location and the high operating frequency makes it highly tolerant to even extreme levels of Electro Magnetic Interference and when constructed from high temperature material is can operate at temperatures well in excess of 300 degrees C. We will discuss transducer performance, precision and position stability with particular emphasis on the effects of length changes within the multi-mode optical fibers used to deliver and collect the light to and from the transducer. We will also discuss cost aspects of the design and their effect on overcoming market entry barriers.

  4. Acoustic transducer for acoustic microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T.; Chou, Ching H.

    1990-01-01

    A shear acoustic transducer-lens system in which a shear polarized piezoelectric material excites shear polarized waves at one end of a buffer rod having a lens at the other end which excites longitudinal waves in a coupling medium by mode conversion at selected locations on the lens.

  5. Acoustic transducer for acoustic microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Khuri-Yakub, B.T.; Chou, C.H.

    1990-03-20

    A shear acoustic transducer-lens system is described in which a shear polarized piezoelectric material excites shear polarized waves at one end of a buffer rod having a lens at the other end which excites longitudinal waves in a coupling medium by mode conversion at selected locations on the lens. 9 figs.

  6. Non-bonded ultrasonic transducer

    DOEpatents

    Eoff, J.M.

    1984-07-06

    A mechanically assembled non-bonded ultrasonic transducer includes a substrate, a piezoelectric film, a wetting agent, a thin metal electrode, and a lens held in intimate contact by a mechanical clamp. No epoxy or glue is used in the assembly of this device.

  7. Acoustic lens for capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Chienliu; Firouzi, Kamyar; Park, Kwan Kyu; Sarioglu, Ali Fatih; Nikoozadeh, Amin; Yoon, Hyo-Seon; Vaithilingam, Srikant; Carver, Thomas; Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T.

    2014-08-01

    Capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducers (CMUTs) have great potential to compete with traditional piezoelectric transducers in therapeutic ultrasound applications. In this paper we have designed, fabricated and developed an acoustic lens formed on the CMUT to mechanically focus ultrasound. The acoustic lens was designed based on the paraxial theory and made of silicone rubber for acoustic impedance matching and encapsulation. The CMUT was fabricated based on the local oxidation of silicon (LOCOS) and fusion-bonding. The fabricated CMUT was verified to behave like an electromechanical resonator in air and exhibited wideband response with a center frequency of 2.2 MHz in immersion. The fabrication for the acoustic lens contained two consecutive mold castings and directly formed on the surface of the CMUT. Applied with ac burst input voltages at the center frequency, the CMUT with the acoustic lens generated an output pressure of 1.89 MPa (peak-to-peak) at the focal point with an effective focal gain of 3.43 in immersion. Compared to the same CMUT without a lens, the CMUT with the acoustic lens demonstrated the ability to successfully focus ultrasound and provided a viable solution to the miniaturization of the multi-modality forward-looking endoscopes without electrical focusing.

  8. Implants as absolute anchorage.

    PubMed

    Rungcharassaeng, Kitichai; Kan, Joseph Y K; Caruso, Joseph M

    2005-11-01

    Anchorage control is essential for successful orthodontic treatment. Each tooth has its own anchorage potential as well as propensity to move when force is applied. When teeth are used as anchorage, the untoward movements of the anchoring units may result in the prolonged treatment time, and unpredictable or less-than-ideal outcome. To maximize tooth-related anchorage, techniques such as differential torque, placing roots into the cortex of the bone, the use of various intraoral devices and/or extraoral appliances have been implemented. Implants, as they are in direct contact with bone, do not possess a periodontal ligament. As a result, they do not move when orthodontic/orthopedic force is applied, and therefore can be used as "absolute anchorage." This article describes different types of implants that have been used as orthodontic anchorage. Their clinical applications and limitations are also discussed. PMID:16463910

  9. Absolute Equilibrium Entropy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shebalin, John V.

    1997-01-01

    The entropy associated with absolute equilibrium ensemble theories of ideal, homogeneous, fluid and magneto-fluid turbulence is discussed and the three-dimensional fluid case is examined in detail. A sigma-function is defined, whose minimum value with respect to global parameters is the entropy. A comparison is made between the use of global functions sigma and phase functions H (associated with the development of various H-theorems of ideal turbulence). It is shown that the two approaches are complimentary though conceptually different: H-theorems show that an isolated system tends to equilibrium while sigma-functions allow the demonstration that entropy never decreases when two previously isolated systems are combined. This provides a more complete picture of entropy in the statistical mechanics of ideal fluids.

  10. Seismic transducer measures small horizontal displacements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenwood, T. L.

    1965-01-01

    Pendular seismic transducer mounted on base plate measures small horizontal displacements of structures subjected to vibration where no fixed reference point is available. Enclosure of transducer in transparent plastic case prevents air currents from disturbing the pendulum balance.

  11. Wideband Single Crystal Transducer for Bone Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sahul, Raffi

    2015-01-01

    Phase II objectives: Optimize the Phase I transducer for sensitivity; Test different transmit signals for optimum performance; Demonstrate compatibility with electronics; Confirm additional transducer capabilities over conventional systems by calibrating with other methods.

  12. Magnetometer with miniature transducer and automatic transducer scanning apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breckenridge, R. A.; Debnam, W. J., Jr.; Fales, C. L.; Pohm, A. V.

    1974-01-01

    Magnetometer is simple to operate and has fast response. Transducer is rugged and flat and can measure magnetic fields as close as 0.08 mm from any relatively flat surface. Magnetometer has active region of approximately 0.64 by 0.76 mm and is capable of good spatial resolution of magnetic fields as low as 0.02 Oe (1.6 A/m).

  13. Electronically-Scanned Pressure Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coe, C. F.; Parra, G. T.; Kauffman, R. C.

    1984-01-01

    Sensors not pneumatically switched. Electronic pressure-transducer scanning system constructed in modular form. Pressure transducer modules and analog to digital converter module small enough to fit within cavities of average-sized wind-tunnel models. All switching done electronically. Temperature controlled environment maintained within sensor modules so accuracy maintained while ambient temperature varies.

  14. Intradiscal pressure measurements: A challenge or a routine?

    PubMed

    Bashkuev, Maxim; Vergroesen, Pieter-Paul A; Dreischarf, Marcel; Schilling, Christoph; van der Veen, Albert J; Schmidt, Hendrik; Kingma, Idsart

    2016-04-11

    Intradiscal pressure (IDP) is an essential biomechanical parameter and has been the subject of numerous in vivo and in vitro investigations. Although currently available sensors differ in size and measurement principles, no data exist regarding inter-sensor reliability in measuring IDP. Moreover, although discs of various species vary significantly in size and mechanics, the possible effects of sensor insertion on the IDP have never been investigated. The present in vitro study aimed to address these issues. The synchronized signals of two differently sized pressure transducers (Ø1.33 and Ø0.36mm) obtained during the measurements in two species (bovine and caprine) and their influence on the measured pressure were compared. First, the discs were subjected to three loading periods, and the pressure was measured simultaneously to assess the inter-sensor reliability. In the second test, the effect of the sensor size was evaluated by alternatingly inserting one transducer into the disc while recording the resulting pressure change with the second transducer. Although both sensors yielded similar pressure values (ICC: consistency: 0.964-0.999; absolute agreement: 0.845-0.996) when used simultaneously, the sensor size was determined to influence the measured pressure during the insertion tests. The magnitude of the effect differed between species; it was insignificant in the bovine specimens but significant in the caprine specimens, with a pressure increase of 0.31-0.64MPa (median: 0.43MPa) obtained when the larger sensor was inserted. The results suggest that sensor selection for IDP measurements requires special attention and can be crucial for species with smaller disc sizes. PMID:26655591

  15. Measuring Thicknesses With In Situ Ultrasonic Transducers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunn, Daniel E.; Cerino, Joseph R.

    1995-01-01

    Several pulsed ultrasonic transducers attached to workpiece for measurement of changes in thicknesses of workpiece at transducer locations during grinding and polishing, according to proposal. Once attached, each transducer remains attached at original position until all grinding and polishing operations complete. In typical application, workpiece glass or ceramic blank destined to become component of optical system.

  16. 21 CFR 870.2880 - Ultrasonic transducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ultrasonic transducer. 870.2880 Section 870.2880...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Monitoring Devices § 870.2880 Ultrasonic transducer. (a) Identification. An ultrasonic transducer is a device applied to the skin to transmit and...

  17. 21 CFR 870.2880 - Ultrasonic transducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ultrasonic transducer. 870.2880 Section 870.2880...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Monitoring Devices § 870.2880 Ultrasonic transducer. (a) Identification. An ultrasonic transducer is a device applied to the skin to transmit and...

  18. 21 CFR 870.2880 - Ultrasonic transducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ultrasonic transducer. 870.2880 Section 870.2880...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Monitoring Devices § 870.2880 Ultrasonic transducer. (a) Identification. An ultrasonic transducer is a device applied to the skin to transmit and...

  19. 21 CFR 870.2880 - Ultrasonic transducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ultrasonic transducer. 870.2880 Section 870.2880...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Monitoring Devices § 870.2880 Ultrasonic transducer. (a) Identification. An ultrasonic transducer is a device applied to the skin to transmit and...

  20. 21 CFR 870.2880 - Ultrasonic transducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ultrasonic transducer. 870.2880 Section 870.2880...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Monitoring Devices § 870.2880 Ultrasonic transducer. (a) Identification. An ultrasonic transducer is a device applied to the skin to transmit and...

  1. Reducing the Effect of Transducer Mount Induced Noise (XMIN) on Aeroacoustic Wind Tunnel Testing Data with a New Transducer Mount Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herron, Andrew J.; Reed, Darren K.; Nance, Donald K.

    2015-01-01

    Characterization of flight vehicle unsteady aerodynamics is often studied via large scale wind tunnel testing. Boundary layer noise is measured by miniature pressure transducers installed in a model. Noise levels (2-5 dB ref. 20 µPa) can be induced when transducer is mounted out of flush with model outer surface. This effect must be minimized to accurately determine aerodynamically induced acoustic environments.

  2. Highly reliable multisensor array (MSA) smart transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perotti, José; Lucena, Angel; Mackey, Paul; Mata, Carlos; Immer, Christopher

    2006-05-01

    Many developments in the field of multisensor array (MSA) transducers have taken place in the last few years. Advancements in fabrication technology, such as Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) and nanotechnology, have made implementation of MSA devices a reality. NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC) has been developing this type of technology because of the increases in safety, reliability, and performance and the reduction in operational and maintenance costs that can be achieved with these devices. To demonstrate the MSA technology benefits, KSC quantified the relationship between the number of sensors (N) and the associated improvement in sensor life and reliability. A software algorithm was developed to monitor and assess the health of each element and the overall MSA. Furthermore, the software algorithm implemented criteria on how these elements would contribute to the MSA-calculated output to ensure required performance. The hypothesis was that a greater number of statistically independent sensor elements would provide a measurable increase in measurement reliability. A computer simulation was created to answer this question. An array of N sensors underwent random failures in the simulation and a life extension factor (LEF equals the percentage of the life of a single sensor) was calculated by the program. When LEF was plotted as a function of N, a quasiexponential behavior was detected with marginal improvement above N = 30. The hypothesis and follow-on simulation results were then corroborated experimentally. An array composed of eight independent pressure sensors was fabricated. To accelerate sensor life cycle and failure and to simulate degradation over time, the MSA was exposed to an environmental tem-perature of 125°C. Every 24 hours, the experiment's environmental temperature was returned to ambient temperature (27°C), and the outputs of all the MSA sensor elements were measured. Once per week, the MSA calibration was verified at five different

  3. Indicator system provides complete data of engine cylinder pressure variation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mc Jones, R. W.; Morgan, N. E.

    1966-01-01

    Varying reference pressure used together with a balanced pressure pickup /a diaphragm switch/ to switch the electric output of the pressure transducer in a reference pressure line obtains precise engine cylinder pressure data from a high speed internal combustion engine.

  4. Elongation Transducer For Tensile Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Paul W.; Stokes, Thomas R.

    1994-01-01

    Extensometer transducer measures elongation of tensile-test specimen with negligible distortion of test results. Used in stress-versus-strain tests of small specimens of composite materials. Clamping stress distributed more evenly. Specimen clamped gently between jaw and facing surface of housing. Friction force of load points on conical tips onto specimen depends on compression of spring, adjusted by turning cover on housing. Limp, light nylon-insulated electrical leads impose minimal extraneous loads on measuring elements.

  5. Absolute neutrino mass measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, Joachim

    2011-10-01

    The neutrino mass plays an important role in particle physics, astrophysics and cosmology. In recent years the detection of neutrino flavour oscillations proved that neutrinos carry mass. However, oscillation experiments are only sensitive to the mass-squared difference of the mass eigenvalues. In contrast to cosmological observations and neutrino-less double beta decay (0v2β) searches, single β-decay experiments provide a direct, model-independent way to determine the absolute neutrino mass by measuring the energy spectrum of decay electrons at the endpoint region with high accuracy. Currently the best kinematic upper limits on the neutrino mass of 2.2eV have been set by two experiments in Mainz and Troitsk, using tritium as beta emitter. The next generation tritium β-experiment KATRIN is currently under construction in Karlsruhe/Germany by an international collaboration. KATRIN intends to improve the sensitivity by one order of magnitude to 0.2eV. The investigation of a second isotope (137Rh) is being pursued by the international MARE collaboration using micro-calorimeters to measure the beta spectrum. The technology needed to reach 0.2eV sensitivity is still in the R&D phase. This paper reviews the present status of neutrino-mass measurements with cosmological data, 0v2β decay and single β-decay.

  6. Absolute neutrino mass measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, Joachim

    2011-10-06

    The neutrino mass plays an important role in particle physics, astrophysics and cosmology. In recent years the detection of neutrino flavour oscillations proved that neutrinos carry mass. However, oscillation experiments are only sensitive to the mass-squared difference of the mass eigenvalues. In contrast to cosmological observations and neutrino-less double beta decay (0v2{beta}) searches, single {beta}-decay experiments provide a direct, model-independent way to determine the absolute neutrino mass by measuring the energy spectrum of decay electrons at the endpoint region with high accuracy.Currently the best kinematic upper limits on the neutrino mass of 2.2eV have been set by two experiments in Mainz and Troitsk, using tritium as beta emitter. The next generation tritium {beta}-experiment KATRIN is currently under construction in Karlsruhe/Germany by an international collaboration. KATRIN intends to improve the sensitivity by one order of magnitude to 0.2eV. The investigation of a second isotope ({sup 137}Rh) is being pursued by the international MARE collaboration using micro-calorimeters to measure the beta spectrum. The technology needed to reach 0.2eV sensitivity is still in the R and D phase. This paper reviews the present status of neutrino-mass measurements with cosmological data, 0v2{beta} decay and single {beta}-decay.

  7. Split-mode ultrasonic transducer.

    PubMed

    Ostrovskii, Igor; Cremaldi, Lucien

    2013-08-01

    A split-mode ultrasonic transducer is investigated in both theory and experiment. This transducer is a two-dimensional structure of periodically poled domains in a ferroelectric wafer with free surfaces. The acoustic vibrations are excited by a radio frequency electric current applied along the length of the wafer, which allows the basal-plane surfaces to be free of metal coatings and thus ready for further biomedical applications. A specific physical property of this transducer consists of the multiple acousto-electric resonances, which occur due to an acoustic mode split when the acoustic half-wavelength is equal to the domain length. Possible applications include ultrasonic generation and detection at the micro-scale, intravascular sonification and visualization, ultrasound therapy of localized small areas such as the eye, biomedical applications for cell cultures, and traditional nondestructive testing including bones and tissues. A potential use of a non-metallized wafer is a therapeutic application with double action that is both ultrasound itself and an electric field over the wafer. The experimental measurements and theoretical calculations are in good agreement. PMID:23927212

  8. Wideband focused transducer array for optoacoustic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonova, V. A.; Khokhlova, T. D.; Karabutov, A. A.

    2009-11-01

    The calculation procedure of the parameters of a multielement transducer array for the optoacoustic tomography of biological objects with high spatial resolution values is proposed. A multielement transducer with given spatial resolution values in three dimensions has been developed based on the proposed procedure for the early detection of breast cancer. The transducer array consists of a set of 8 linear PVDF piezoelectric films located on a plane and a focusing cylindrical acoustic lens. A map of the transducer’s focal area and point spread function have been measured using the constructed transducer array. Spatial resolutions of the transducer array obtained experimentally are in agreement with their calculated values.

  9. Acoustic transducer for nuclear reactor monitoring

    DOEpatents

    Ahlgren, Frederic F.; Scott, Paul F.

    1977-01-01

    A transducer to monitor a parameter and produce an acoustic signal from which the monitored parameter can be recovered. The transducer comprises a modified Galton whistle which emits a narrow band acoustic signal having a frequency dependent upon the parameter being monitored, such as the temperature of the cooling media of a nuclear reactor. Multiple locations within a reactor are monitored simultaneously by a remote acoustic receiver by providing a plurality of transducers each designed so that the acoustic signal it emits has a frequency distinct from the frequencies of signals emitted by the other transducers, whereby each signal can be unambiguously related to a particular transducer.

  10. Model-based optimization of ultrasonic transducers.

    PubMed

    Heikkola, Erkki; Laitinen, Mika

    2005-01-01

    Numerical simulation and automated optimization of Langevin-type ultrasonic transducers are investigated. These kind of transducers are standard components in various applications of high-power ultrasonics such as ultrasonic cleaning and chemical processing. Vibration of the transducer is simulated numerically by standard finite element method and the dimensions and shape parameters of a transducer are optimized with respect to different criteria. The novelty value of this work is the combination of the simulation model and the optimization problem by efficient automatic differentiation techniques. The capabilities of this approach are demonstrated with practical test cases in which various aspects of the operation of a transducer are improved. PMID:15474952

  11. Research and development of capacitive transducer with linear acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korobova, Natalia; Kochurina, Elena; Timoshenkov, Sergey; Chaplygin, Yuriy; Anchutin, Stepan; Kosolapov, Andrey

    2015-05-01

    Paper presents the study results and modeling of functional characteristics of the linear acceleration transducers, enabling sensors creation with the specified parameters. Sensing element made for linear acceleration transducer with torsion cruciform section has been proposed on the based design and technological principles. It allows minimizing the impact of cross-acceleration and gives the maximum of center mass displacement for high sensors sensitivity in the given dimensions. The range of measured acceleration from ± 0.2g to ± 50g was provided by changing the torsion bar thickness n = 34 ÷ 56 microns. The transducers frequency range of linear acceleration 100-150 Hz depends on the gas pressure P = 700-800Pa in which the sensor element was located. Methods converting displacement of sensing element in the sensor output have been provided. On their basis the linear acceleration transducers with analog output signal having a predetermined frequency range and high linearity of the transformation (nonlinearity 0.2-1.5%) was developed. Also the linear acceleration transducers with digital signal consuming little (no more than 850 μA), low noisy (standard deviation to 0.1mg/rt-Hz) and high sensitivity (up to 0.1mg) to the accelerations was made. Errors in manufacturing process of sensitive elements and operating environment temperature affect the changes in the characteristics of the linear acceleration transducers. It has been established that different plate thickness up to 3.6% leads to the scale factor error to 4.7%. Irreproducibility of depth anisotropic etching of silicon up to 6.6% introduces an error in the output signal of 2.9 ... 13.8mg.

  12. A Low Frequency Broadband Flextensional Ultrasonic Transducer Array.

    PubMed

    Savoia, Alessandro Stuart; Mauti, Barbara; Caliano, Giosuè

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we propose the design and the fabrication of a multicell, piezoelectrically actuated, flextensional transducer array structure, characterized by a low mechanical impedance, thus allowing wideband and high-sensitivity immersion operation in the low ultrasonic frequency range. The transducer structure, consisting of a plurality of circular elementary cells orderly arranged according to a periodic hexagonal tiling, features a high flexibility in the definition of the active area shape and size. We investigate, by finite element modeling (FEM), the influence of different piezoelectric and elastic materials for the flexural plate, for the plate support and for the backing, on the transducer electroacoustic behavior. We carry out the dimensioning of the transducer components and cell layout, in terms of materials and geometry, respectively, by aiming at a circular active area of 80-mm diameter and broadband operation in the 30-100-kHz frequency range in immersion. PZT-5H ceramic disks and a calibrated thickness stainless steel plate are chosen for the vibrating structure, and FR-4 laminates and a brass plate, respectively, for the plate support and the backing. The diameter of the individual cells is set to 6 mm resulting in 121 cells describing a quasi-circular area, and the total thickness of the transducer is less than 10 mm. We report on the fabrication process flow for the accurate assembly of the transducer, based, respectively, on epoxy resin and wire bonding for the mechanical and electrical interconnection of the individual parts. The results of the electrical impedance and transmit pressure field characterization are finally reported and discussed. PMID:26540680

  13. Characterization of dielectric electroactive polymer transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, Dennis; Møller, Martin B.; Sarban, Rahimullah; Lassen, Benny; Knott, Arnold; Andersen, Michael A. E.

    2014-03-01

    Throughout this paper, a small-signal model of the Dielectric Electro Active Polymer (DEAP) transducer is analyzed. The DEAP transducer have been proposed as an alternative to the electrodynamic transducer in sound reproduction systems. In order to understand how the DEAP transducer works, and provide guidelines for design optimization, accurate characterization of the transducer must be established. A small signal model of the DEAP transducer is derived and its validity is investigated using impedance measurements. Impedance measurements are shown for a push-pull DEAP based loudspeaker, and the dependency of the biasing voltage is explained. A measuring setup is proposed, which allows the impedance to be measured, while the DEAP transducer is connected to its biasing source.

  14. Absolute Identification by Relative Judgment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Neil; Brown, Gordon D. A.; Chater, Nick

    2005-01-01

    In unidimensional absolute identification tasks, participants identify stimuli that vary along a single dimension. Performance is surprisingly poor compared with discrimination of the same stimuli. Existing models assume that identification is achieved using long-term representations of absolute magnitudes. The authors propose an alternative…

  15. Be Resolute about Absolute Value

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kidd, Margaret L.

    2007-01-01

    This article explores how conceptualization of absolute value can start long before it is introduced. The manner in which absolute value is introduced to students in middle school has far-reaching consequences for their future mathematical understanding. It begins to lay the foundation for students' understanding of algebra, which can change…

  16. Solar cell angular position transducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandford, M. C.; Gray, D. L. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    An angular position transducer utilizing photocells and a light source is disclosed. The device uses a fully rotatable baffle which is connected via an actuator shaft to the body whose rotational displacement is to be measured. The baffle blocks the light path between the light source and the photocells so that a constant semicircular beam of light reaches the photocells. The current produced by the photocells is fed through a resistor, a differential amplifier measures the voltage drop across the resistor which indicates the angular position of the actuator shaft and hence of the object.

  17. Shear wave transducer for boreholes

    DOEpatents

    Mao, N.H.

    1984-08-23

    A technique and apparatus is provided for estimating in situ stresses by measuring stress-induced velocity anisotropy around a borehole. Two sets each of radially and tangentially polarized transducers are placed inside the hole with displacement directions either parallel or perpendicular to the principal stress directions. With this configuration, relative travel times are measured by both a pulsed phase-locked loop technique and a cross correlation of digitized waveforms. The biaxial velocity data are used to back-calculate the applied stress.

  18. Ionic liquids as novel solvents for ionic polymer transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, Matthew D.; Leo, Donald J.

    2004-07-01

    The use of ionic liquids as solvents for ionic polymer (specifically, Nafion) transducers is demonstrated. Ionic liquids are attractive for this application because of their high inherent stability. Ionic liquids are salts that exist as liquids at room temperature and have no measureable vapor pressure. Therefore, the use of ionic liquids as solvents for ionic polymer transducers can eliminate the traditional problem of water evaporation in these devices. Another benefit of the use of ionic liquids in this way is the reduction or elimination of the characteristic back-relaxation common in water-solvated ionic polymer actuators. The results demonstrate that the viscosity of the ionic liquid and the degree to which the ionic liquid swells the membrane are the important physical parameters to consider. Five ionic liquids were studied, based on substituted pyrrolidinium, phosphonium, or imidazolium cations and fluoroanions. Of these five ionic liquids, transduction is demonstrated in three of them and the best results are obtained with 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium trifluoromethanesulfonate ionic liquid. This substance has an electrochemical stability window of 4.1 V, a melting point of -10 °C, and a viscosity of 35-45 cP [19]. Results demonstrate that platinum-plated Nafion transducers solvated with this ionic liquid exhibit sensing and actuation responses and that these transducers are stable in air. Endurance testing of this sample reveals a decrease in the free strain of only 25 % after 250,000 actuation cycles in air.

  19. Brain Pressure Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A transducer originally used to measure air pressure in aircraft wind tunnel tests is the basis for a development important in diagnosis and treatment of certain types of brain damage. A totally implantable device, tbe intracranial pressure monitor measures and reports brain pressure by telemetry.

  20. Analog circuit for controlling acoustic transducer arrays

    DOEpatents

    Drumheller, Douglas S.

    1991-01-01

    A simplified ananlog circuit is presented for controlling electromechanical transducer pairs in an acoustic telemetry system. The analog circuit of this invention comprises a single electrical resistor which replaces all of the digital components in a known digital circuit. In accordance with this invention, a first transducer in a transducer pair of array is driven in series with the resistor. The voltage drop across this resistor is then amplified and used to drive the second transducer. The voltage drop across the resistor is proportional and in phase with the current to the transducer. This current is approximately 90 degrees out of phase with the driving voltage to the transducer. This phase shift replaces the digital delay required by the digital control circuit of the prior art.

  1. ERROR COMPENSATOR FOR A POSITION TRANSDUCER

    DOEpatents

    Fowler, A.H.

    1962-06-12

    A device is designed for eliminating the effect of leadscrew errors in positioning machines in which linear motion of a slide is effected from rotary motion of a leadscrew. This is accomplished by providing a corrector cam mounted on the slide, a cam follower, and a transducer housing rotatable by the follower to compensate for all the reproducible errors in the transducer signal which can be related to the slide position. The transducer has an inner part which is movable with respect to the transducer housing. The transducer inner part is coupled to the means for rotating the leadscrew such that relative movement between this part and its housing will provide an output signal proportional to the position of the slide. The corrector cam and its follower perform the compensation by changing the angular position of the transducer housing by an amount that is a function of the slide position and the error at that position. (AEC)

  2. Silicon Integrated Cavity Optomechanical Transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Jie; Miao, Houxun; Michels, Thomas; Liu, Yuxiang; Srinivasan, Kartik; Aksyuk, Vladimir

    2013-03-01

    Cavity optomechanics enables measurements of mechanical motion at the fundamental limits of precision imposed by quantum mechanics. However, the need to align and couple devices to off-chip optical components hinders development, miniaturization and broader application of ultrahigh sensitivity chip-scale optomechanical transducers. Here we demonstrate a fully integrated and optical fiber pigtailed optomechanical transducer with a high Q silicon micro-disk cavity near-field coupled to a nanoscale cantilever. We detect the motion of the cantilever by measuring the resonant frequency shift of the whispering gallery mode of the micro-disk. The sensitivity near the standard quantum limit can be reached with sub-uW optical power. Our on-chip approach combines compactness and stability with great design flexibility: the geometry of the micro-disk and cantilever can be tailored to optimize the mechanical/optical Q factors and tune the mechanical frequency over two orders of magnitudes. Electrical transduction in addition to optical transduction was also demonstrated and both can be used to effectively cool the cantilever. Moreover, cantilevers with sharp tips overhanging the chip edge were fabricated to potentially allow the mechanical cantilever to be coupled to a wide range of off-chip systems, such as spins, DNA, nanostructures and atoms on clean surfaces.

  3. Two-Element Transducer for Ultrasound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lecroissette, D. H.; Heyser, R. C.

    1986-01-01

    Separation of transmitting and receiving units improves probing of deep tissue. Ultrasonic transducer has dual elements to increase depth at which sonic images are made of biological tissue. Transducer uses separate transmitting and receiving elements, and frequency response of receiving element independently designed to accommodate attenuation of higher frequencies by tissue. New transducer intended for pulse-echo ultrasonic systems in which reflected sound pulses reveal features in tissue.

  4. PVDF piezofilm transducer for measuring the parameters of shock waves in focused systems

    SciTech Connect

    Yakushev, V.V.; Uvarov, V.A.; Maslennikov, S.P.

    1995-11-01

    A description is given of the construction and testing of a pressure transducer for measuring shock wave parameters in water, as applied to lithotripters and other focused systems. The sensitive element is made from a PVDF piezofilm, with a working area of 2 mm diameter. The transducer sensitivity is 0.2 V/MPa, and the rise time is not greater than 50 nsec.

  5. Absolute calibration of forces in optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutra, R. S.; Viana, N. B.; Maia Neto, P. A.; Nussenzveig, H. M.

    2014-07-01

    Optical tweezers are highly versatile laser traps for neutral microparticles, with fundamental applications in physics and in single molecule cell biology. Force measurements are performed by converting the stiffness response to displacement of trapped transparent microspheres, employed as force transducers. Usually, calibration is indirect, by comparison with fluid drag forces. This can lead to discrepancies by sizable factors. Progress achieved in a program aiming at absolute calibration, conducted over the past 15 years, is briefly reviewed. Here we overcome its last major obstacle, a theoretical overestimation of the peak stiffness, within the most employed range for applications, and we perform experimental validation. The discrepancy is traced to the effect of primary aberrations of the optical system, which are now included in the theory. All required experimental parameters are readily accessible. Astigmatism, the dominant effect, is measured by analyzing reflected images of the focused laser spot, adapting frequently employed video microscopy techniques. Combined with interface spherical aberration, it reveals a previously unknown window of instability for trapping. Comparison with experimental data leads to an overall agreement within error bars, with no fitting, for a broad range of microsphere radii, from the Rayleigh regime to the ray optics one, for different polarizations and trapping heights, including all commonly employed parameter domains. Besides signaling full first-principles theoretical understanding of optical tweezers operation, the results may lead to improved instrument design and control over experiments, as well as to an extended domain of applicability, allowing reliable force measurements, in principle, from femtonewtons to nanonewtons.

  6. Measurement methods of ultrasonic transducer sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Dingguo; Fan, Qiong; Xu, Chunguang; Zhang, Xiuhua

    2016-05-01

    Sensitivity is an important parameter to describe the electro-acoustic energy conversion efficiency of ultrasonic transducer. In this paper, the definition of sensitivity and reciprocity of ultrasonic transducer is studied. The frequency response function of a transducer is the spectrum of its sensitivity, which reflects the response sensitivity of the transducer for input signals at different frequencies. Four common methods which are used to measure the disc-vibrator transducer sensitivity are discussed in current investigation. The reciprocity method and the pulse-echo method are based on the reciprocity of the transducer. In the laser vibrometer method measurement, the normal velocity on the transducer radiating surface is directly measured by a laser vibrometer. In the measurement process of the hydrophone method, a calibrated hydrophone is used to measure the transmitted field. The validity of these methods is checked by experimental test. All of the four methods described are sufficiently accurate for transducer sensitivity measurement, while each method has its advantages and limitations. In practical applications, the appropriate method to measure transducer sensitivity should be selected based on actual conditions. PMID:26953638

  7. Influence of the fabrication process on the functionality of piezoceramic patch transducers embedded in aluminum die castings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klassen, Alexander; Rübner, Matthias; Ilg, Jürgen; Rupitsch, Stefan J.; Lerch, Reinhard; Singer, Robert F.; Körner, Carolin

    2012-11-01

    Piezoceramic patch transducers are integrated into aluminum components using high-pressure die casting. Expanded metal has proven suitable as a supporting structure for placing the patch transducers inside the die cavity and for stabilization during the injection of molten metal. However, difficulties arise when the transducers are positioned off the neutral axis within the wall of the casting. Numerical simulations of the die filling are performed to analyse the evolution of the integration process. The asymmetric infiltration of the supporting structure is identified as the major factor contributing to the formation of cracks and perforations inside the piezoceramic transducer. By means of measurements and numerical calculations of the electrical impedance of the transducer, a close relation is established between mechanical damage patterns observed in radiographs of the patch transducers and loss of performance.

  8. Nuclear Radiation Tolerance of Single Crystal Aluminum Nitride Ultrasonic Transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinhard, Brian; Tittmann, Bernhard R.; Suprock, Andrew

    Ultrasonic technologies offer the potential for high accuracy and resolution in-pile measurement of a range of parameters, including geometry changes, temperature, crack initiation and growth, gas pressure and composition, and microstructural changes. Many Department of Energy-Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) programs are exploring the use of ultrasonic technologies to provide enhanced sensors for in-pile instrumentation during irradiation testing. For example, the ability of small diameter ultrasonic thermometers (UTs) to provide a temperature profile in candidate metallic and oxide fuel would provide much needed data for validating new fuel performance models, (Rempe et al., 2011; Kazys et al., 2005). These efforts are limited by the lack of identified ultrasonic transducer materials capable of long term performance under irradiation test conditions. To address this need, the Pennsylvania State University (PSU) was awarded an Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF) project to evaluate the performance of promising magnetostrictive and piezoelectric transducers in the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Research Reactor (MITR) up to a fast fluence of at least 1021 n/cm2. The irradiation is also supported by a multi-National Laboratory collaboration funded by the Nuclear Energy Enabling Technologies Advanced Sensors and Instrumentation (NEET ASI) program. The results from this irradiation, which started in February 2014, offer the potential to enable the development of novel radiation tolerant ultrasonic sensors for use in Material Testing Reactors (MTRs). As such, this test is an instrumented lead test and real-time transducer performance data is collected along with temperature and neutron and gamma flux data. Hence, results from this irradiation offer the potential to bridge the gap between proven out-of-pile ultrasonic techniques and in-pile deployment of ultrasonic sensors by acquiring the data necessary to demonstrate the

  9. Standards for dielectric elastomer transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpi, Federico; Anderson, Iain; Bauer, Siegfried; Frediani, Gabriele; Gallone, Giuseppe; Gei, Massimiliano; Graaf, Christian; Jean-Mistral, Claire; Kaal, William; Kofod, Guggi; Kollosche, Matthias; Kornbluh, Roy; Lassen, Benny; Matysek, Marc; Michel, Silvain; Nowak, Stephan; O'Brien, Benjamin; Pei, Qibing; Pelrine, Ron; Rechenbach, Björn; Rosset, Samuel; Shea, Herbert

    2015-10-01

    Dielectric elastomer transducers consist of thin electrically insulating elastomeric membranes coated on both sides with compliant electrodes. They are a promising electromechanically active polymer technology that may be used for actuators, strain sensors, and electrical generators that harvest mechanical energy. The rapid development of this field calls for the first standards, collecting guidelines on how to assess and compare the performance of materials and devices. This paper addresses this need, presenting standardized methods for material characterisation, device testing and performance measurement. These proposed standards are intended to have a general scope and a broad applicability to different material types and device configurations. Nevertheless, they also intentionally exclude some aspects where knowledge and/or consensus in the literature were deemed to be insufficient. This is a sign of a young and vital field, whose research development is expected to benefit from this effort towards standardisation.

  10. Measuring unsteady pressure on rotating compressor blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Englund, D. R.; Grant, H. P.; Lanati, G. A.

    1979-01-01

    Miniature semiconductor strain gage pressure transducers mounted in several arrangements were studied. Both surface mountings and recessed flush mountings were tested. Test parameters included mounting arrangement, blade material, temperature, local strain in the acceleration normal to the transducer diaphragm, centripetal acceleration, and pressure. Test results show no failures of transducers or mountings and indicate an uncertainty of unsteady pressure measurement of approximately + or - 6 percent + 0.1 kPa for a typical application. Two configurations were used on a rotating fan flutter program. Examples of transducer data and correction factors are presented.

  11. Fiber optic ultrasound transducers with carbon/PDMS composite coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosse, Charles A.; Colchester, Richard J.; Bhachu, Davinder S.; Zhang, Edward Z.; Papakonstantinou, Ioannis; Desjardins, Adrien E.

    2014-03-01

    Novel ultrasound transducers were created with a composite of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) that was dip coated onto the end faces of optical fibers. The CNTs were functionalized with oleylamine to allow for their dissolution in xylene, a solvent of PDMS. Ultrasound pulses were generated by illuminating the composite coating with pulsed laser light. At distances of 2 to 16 mm from the end faces, ultrasound pressures ranged from 0.81 to 0.07 MPa and from 0.27 to 0.03 MPa with 105 and 200 μm core fibers, respectively. Using an optical fiber hydrophone positioned adjacent to the coated 200 µm core optical fiber, ultrasound reflectance measurements were obtained from the outer surface of a sheep heart ventricle. The results of this study suggest that ultrasound transducers that comprise optical fibers with CNT-PDMS composite coatings may be suitable for miniature medical imaging probes.

  12. Hot foil transducer skin friction sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vranas, T. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    The device utilizes foil transducers with only one edge exposed to the fluid flow. The surfaces are polished producing a foil transducer that does not generate turbulence while sufficiently thick to carry the required electrical current for high temperature fluid flow. The assembly utilizes a precut layered metal sandwich with attached electrodes eliminating a need for welding and individual sensor calibration.

  13. Capacitive Micromachined Ultrasonic Transducers for Therapeutic Ultrasound Applications

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Serena H.; Kupnik, Mario; Watkins, Ronald D.; Butts-Pauly, Kim; Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T.

    2014-01-01

    Therapeutic ultrasound guided by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive treatment that potentially reduces mortality, lowers medical costs, and widens accessibility of treatments for patients. Recent developments in the design and fabrication of capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducers (CMUTs) have made them competitive with piezoelectric transducers for use in therapeutic ultrasound applications. In this paper, we present the first designs and prototypes of an 8-element, concentric-ring, CMUT array to treat upper abdominal cancers. This array was simulated and designed to focus 30–50 mm into tissue and ablate a 2–3 cm diameter tumor within 1 hour. Assuming a surface acoustic output pressure of 1 MPa peak to peak (8.5 W/cm2) at 2.5 MHz, we simulated an array that produced a focal intensity of 680 W/cm2 when focusing to 35 mm. CMUT cells were then designed to meet these frequency and surface acoustic intensity specifications. These cell designs were fabricated as 2.5 mm by 2.5 mm test transducers and used to verify our models. The test transducers were shown to operate at 2.5 MHz with an output pressure of 1.4 MPa peak to peak (16.3 W/cm2). With this CMUT cell design, we fabricated a full 8-element array. Due to yield issues, we only developed electronics to focus the four center elements of the array. The beam profile of the measured array deviated from the simulated because of crosstalk effects; the beamwidth matched within 10% and sidelobes increased by 2 times, which caused the measured gain to be 16.6 compared to 27.4. PMID:19628448

  14. Absolute photon-flux measurements in the vacuum ultraviolet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samson, J. A. R.; Haddad, G. N.

    1974-01-01

    Absolute photon-flux measurements in the vacuum ultraviolet have extended to short wavelengths by use of rare-gas ionization chambers. The technique involves the measurement of the ion current as a function of the gas pressure in the ion chamber. The true value of the ion current, and hence the absolute photon flux, is obtained by extrapolating the ion current to zero gas pressure. Examples are given at 162 and 266 A. The short-wavelength limit is determined only by the sensitivity of the current-measuring apparatus and by present knowledge of the photoionization processes that occur in the rate gases.

  15. Piezoelectric materials used in underwater acoustic transducers

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Huidong; Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.

    2012-07-07

    Piezoelectric materials have been used in underwater acoustic transducers for nearly a century. In this paper, we reviewed four different types of piezoelectric materials: piezoelectric ceramics, single crystals, composites, and polymers, which are widely used in underwater acoustic transducers nowadays. Piezoelectric ceramics are the most dominant material type and are used as a single-phase material or one of the end members in composites. Piezoelectric single crystals offer outstanding electromechanical response but are limited by their manufacturing cost. Piezoelectric polymers provide excellent acoustic impedance matching and transducer fabrication flexibility although their piezoelectric properties are not as good as ceramics and single crystals. Composites combined the merits of ceramics and polymers and are receiving increased attention. The typical structure and electromechanical properties of each type of materials are introduced and discussed with respect to underwater acoustic transducer applications. Their advantages and disadvantages are summarized. Some of the critical design considerations when developing underwater acoustic transducers with these materials are also touched upon.

  16. Phased annular array transducers for omnidirectional guided wave mode control in isotropic plate like structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koduru, Jaya P.; Momeni, Sepandarmaz; Rose, Joseph L.

    2013-12-01

    Ultrasonic guided waves are fast emerging as a reliable tool for continuous structural health monitoring. Their multi-modal nature along with their long range propagation characteristics offer several possibilities for interrogating structures. Transducers commonly used to generate guided waves in structures excite multiple modes at any frequency; their complex scattering and reflection from defects and boundaries often complicates the extraction of useful information. Often it is desirable to control the guided wave modes propagating in a structure to take advantage of their unique properties for different applications. Earlier attempts at guided wave mode control involved developing fixed wavelength linear and annular array transducers. Their only disadvantage is that the transducer is limited to a particular wavelength and a change in wavelength necessitates a change in the transducer. In this paper, we propose the development of an annular array transducer that can generate mode controlled omnidirectional guided waves by independently controlling the amplitude and phase of the array elements. A simplified actuator model that approximates the transducer loading on the structure to a constant pressure load under the array elements is assumed and an optimization problem is set up to compute the excitation voltage and phase of the elements. A five element annular array transducer is designed utilizing 1-3 type piezocomposite materials. The theoretical computations are experimentally verified on an aluminum plate like structure by exciting A0 and S0 guided wave modes.

  17. Using Portable Transducers to Measure Tremor Severity

    PubMed Central

    Elble, Rodger J.; McNames, James

    2016-01-01

    Background Portable motion transducers, suitable for measuring tremor, are now available at a reasonable cost. The use of these transducers requires knowledge of their limitations and data analysis. The purpose of this review is to provide a practical overview and example software for using portable motion transducers in the quantification of tremor. Methods Medline was searched via PubMed.gov in December 2015 using the Boolean expression “tremor AND (accelerometer OR accelerometry OR gyroscope OR inertial measurement unit OR digitizing tablet OR transducer).” Abstracts of 419 papers dating back to 1964 were reviewed for relevant portable transducers and methods of tremor analysis, and 105 papers written in English were reviewed in detail. Results Accelerometers, gyroscopes, and digitizing tablets are used most commonly, but few are sold for the purpose of measuring tremor. Consequently, most software for tremor analysis is developed by the user. Wearable transducers are capable of recording tremor continuously, in the absence of a clinician. Tremor amplitude, frequency, and occurrence (percentage of time with tremor) can be computed. Tremor amplitude and occurrence correlate strongly with clinical ratings of tremor severity. Discussion Transducers provide measurements of tremor amplitude that are objective, precise, and valid, but the precision and accuracy of transducers are mitigated by natural variability in tremor amplitude. This variability is so great that the minimum detectable change in amplitude, exceeding random variability, is comparable for scales and transducers. Research is needed to determine the feasibility of detecting smaller change using averaged data from continuous long-term recordings with wearable transducers. PMID:27257514

  18. Non-destructive evaluation method employing dielectric electrostatic ultrasonic transducers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yost, William T. (Inventor); Cantrell, Jr., John H. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    An acoustic nonlinearity parameter (.beta.) measurement method and system for Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE) of materials and structural members novelly employs a loosely mounted dielectric electrostatic ultrasonic transducer (DEUT) to receive and convert ultrasonic energy into an electrical signal which can be analyzed to determine the .beta. of the test material. The dielectric material is ferroelectric with a high dielectric constant .di-elect cons.. A computer-controlled measurement system coupled to the DEUT contains an excitation signal generator section and a measurement and analysis section. As a result, the DEUT measures the absolute particle displacement amplitudes in test material, leading to derivation of the nonlinearity parameter (.beta.) without the costly, low field reliability methods of the prior art.

  19. Laboratory Connections. Gas Monitoring Transducers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powers, Michael H.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses three types of sensors; pressure, gas detection, and relative humidity. Explains their use for laboratory measurements of gas pressure and detection of specific gaseous species. Shows diagrams of devices and circuits along with examples and applications including microcomputer interfacing. (RT)

  20. Cryogenic High Pressure Sensor Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, John J. (Inventor); Shams, Qamar A. (Inventor); Powers, William T. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A pressure sensor is provided for cryogenic, high pressure applications. A highly doped silicon piezoresistive pressure sensor is bonded to a silicon substrate in an absolute pressure sensing configuration. The absolute pressure sensor is bonded to an aluminum nitride substrate. Aluminum nitride has appropriate coefficient of thermal expansion for use with highly doped silicon at cryogenic temperatures. A group of sensors, either two sensors on two substrates or four sensors on a single substrate are packaged in a pressure vessel.

  1. Research on pressure sensors for biomedical instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angell, J. B.

    1975-01-01

    The development of a piezo-resistive pressure transducer is discussed suitable for recording pressures typically encountered in biomedical applications. The pressure transducer consists of a thin silicon diaphragm containing four strain-sensitive resistors, and is fabricated using silicon monolithic integrated-circuit technology. The pressure transducers can be as small as 0.7 mm outer diameter, and are, as a result, suitable for mounting at the tip of a catheter. Pressure-induced stress in the diaphragm is sensed by the resistors, which are interconnected to form a Wheatstone bridge.

  2. Pressure Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Pressure Systems, Inc.'s DPT 6400 is a system designed to increase productivity in industrial processes where there is a need for making multiple pressure measurements quickly and with high accuracy. It is applicable in controlling industrial processes in plants that are being upgraded to automated status. In order to automate such plants the pressures at the many loops must be measured, converted to digital information and transmitted to the plant's process control computer. The DPT 6400 serves that function. By employing solid-state pressure sensing transducers whose errors are automatically corrected by a microprocessor, it is capable of highly accurate pressure measurements. Basic DPT 6400 has 64 channels, but the system can be expanded to 256 channels by the addition of "slave" units.

  3. Single crystal cylinder transducers for sonar applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Harold; Stevens, Gerald; Buffman, Martin; Powers, James

    2005-04-01

    A segmented cylinder transducer constructed of single crystal lead magnesium niobate-lead titanate (PMN-PT) has been under development at NUWC and EDO Corporation for several years. The purpose of this development was to provide an extremely compact, high power broadband source. By virtue of their extraordinary material properties, ferroelectric single crystals are the ideal transduction material for developing such compact broadband systems. This presentation shall review the evolution of the transducer design as well as present the results of a successful in-water test conducted at NUWC in October of 2003. It shall be shown that design changes intended to eliminate spurious modes limiting the transducer bandwidth first observed in 2002 were successful, resulting in a transducer with a clean frequency response and an effective coupling factor of 0.85. The measured transducer admittance was in nearly exact agreement with theoretical predictions. The NUWC in-water tests demonstrated that the single crystal cylinder achieved an admittance bandwidth (based on the Stansfield criterion) of over 100%, while the tuned power factor was 0.8 or more over 2.5 octaves of frequency. Additionally, the transducer produced 12 dB higher source levels than a similarly sized PZT transducer. [Work sponsored by DARPA.

  4. Low power consumption current transducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclyman, W. T. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A low power consumption current transducer utilizes a saturable core reactor which includes a pair of opposed gate windings and a control winding. The control winding of the saturable reactor is arranged to receive the current to be measured. A square wave generator is connected to the gate winding of the transformer connected across the square wave generator and the secondary connected in series with the gate windings of the reactor. A full wave rectifier is connected to the gate windings and a resistor is connected across the rectifier to provide a DC voltage to cross it representative of the current flow through the control winding. A DC power supply is provided to supply power to the square wave voltage source. A diode is connected between each end of the primary winding of the transformer and one polarity of the DC power supply to commutate the reactive current resulting from the counter emf generated in the reactor back to the DC supply to eliminate potentially damaging reactive voltage spikes which would otherwise appear at the output of the square wave generator and conserve energy.

  5. Seismic transducer modeling using ABAQUS

    SciTech Connect

    Stephen R. Novascone

    2004-05-01

    A seismic transducer, known as an orbital vibrator, consists of a rotating imbalance driven by an electric motor. When suspended in a liquid-filled wellbore, vibrations of the device are coupled to the surrounding geologic media. In this mode, an orbital vibrator can be used as an efficient rotating dipole source for seismic imaging. Alternately, the motion of an orbital vibrator is affected by the physical properties of the surrounding media. From this point of view, an orbital vibrator can be used as a stand-alone sensor. The reaction to the surroundings can be sensed and recorded by geophones inside the orbital vibrator. These reactions are a function of the media’s physical properties such as modulus, damping, and density, thereby identifying the rock type. This presentation shows how the orbital vibrator and surroundings were modeled with an ABAQUS acoustic FEM. The FEM is found to compare favorably with theoretical predictions. A 2D FEM and analytical model are compared to an experimental data set. Each model compares favorably with the data set.

  6. Dual-frequency super harmonic imaging piezoelectric transducers for transrectal ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jinwook; Li, Sibo; Kasoji, Sandeep; Dayton, Paul A.; Jiang, Xiaoning

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, a 2/14 MHz dual-frequency single-element transducer and a 2/22 MHz sub-array (16/48-elements linear array) transducer were developed for contrast enhanced super-harmonic ultrasound imaging of prostate cancer with the low frequency ultrasound transducer as a transmitter for contrast agent (microbubble) excitation and the high frequency transducer as a receiver for detection of nonlinear responses from microbubbles. The 1-3 piezoelectric composite was used as active materials of the single-element transducers due to its low acoustic impedance and high coupling factor. A high dielectric constant PZT ceramic was used for the sub-array transducer due to its high dielectric property induced relatively low electrical impedance. The possible resonance modes of the active elements were estimated using finite element analysis (FEA). The pulse-echo response, peak-negative pressure and bubble response were tested, followed by in vitro contrast imaging tests using a graphite-gelatin tissue-mimicking phantom. The single-element dual frequency transducer (8 × 4 × 2 mm3) showed a -6 dB fractional bandwidth of 56.5% for the transmitter, and 41.8% for the receiver. A 2 MHz-transmitter (730 μm pitch and 6.5 mm elevation aperture) and a 22 MHz-receiver (240 μm pitch and 1.5 mm aperture) of the sub-array transducer exhibited -6 dB fractional bandwidth of 51.0% and 40.2%, respectively. The peak negative pressure at the far field was about -1.3 MPa with 200 Vpp, 1-cycle 2 MHz burst, which is high enough to excite microbubbles for nonlinear responses. The 7th harmonic responses from micro bubbles were successfully detected in the phantom imaging test showing a contrast-to-tissue ratio (CTR) of 16 dB.

  7. A dc magnetic field distribution transducer (abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hristoforou, E.

    1991-04-01

    A new way of measuring magnetic field distribution is proposed, based on the change of the response of a magnetostrictive delay line (MDL) to varying dc magnetic field. The principal idea runs as follows: an array of wires Ci, transmitting pulsed current Ie, crosses at 45° an array of MDL Lj. The resulting pulsed field at the crossing points Pij excites an acoustic pulses in the lines, detected by short coils placed close to one end, in terms of voltage Voij. If a dc magnetic field Hdc is applied at the point Pij, the acoustic pulse and hence Voij change. Experimental results are given, showing the dependence of V0 on the applied dc field under various values of Ie for the case of a 1 mm wide Metglas 2605SC MDL. The function of Vom vs Hdc under various values of Ie is also given, where Vom is the maximum value of the absolute positive and negative peaks of V0. The first derivative of this function equals zero for two values of Hdc, corresponding to approximately equal positive and negative peaks of V0. So, having divided this function in 4 parts, comparison of these two peaks and experimental data are used to find the orientation and magnitude of the dc field on the MDL axis. It was also found that V0, corresponding to an Hdc applied at an angle v to the MDL equals the response of a dc field having a magnitude Hdc cos(v) and applied along the length of the line. So, by having another array of delay lines L'i identical but orthogonal to the previous MDL array Lj and crossing in 45° the conducting wires array Ci, we can keep the same number of crossing points. Hence, measurements from two delay lines Li and L'i corresponding to Pij, give a 2-d vector of the dc magnetic field applied at this point. The uniformity and the resolution of such a transducer can be improved by using the recently developed FeSiB wires after stress annealing. Future work is to be done to increase the frequency and the range of the measurable dc field.

  8. Lens-focused transducer modeling using an extended KLM model.

    PubMed

    Maréchal, Pierre; Levassort, Franck; Tran-Huu-Hue, Louis-Pascal; Lethiecq, Marc

    2007-05-01

    The goal of this work was to develop an extended ultrasound transducer model that would optimize the trade-off between accuracy of the calculation and computational time. The derivations are presented for a generalized transducer model, that is center frequency, pulse duration and physical dimensions are all normalized. The paper presents a computationally efficient model for lens-focused, circular (axisymmetric) single element piezoelectric ultrasound transducer. Specifically, the goal of the model is to determine the lens effect on the electro-acoustic response, both on focusing and on matching acoustic properties. The effective focal distance depends on the lens geometry and refraction index, but also on the near field limit, i.e. wavelength and source radius, and on the spectrum bandwidth of the ultrasound source. The broadband (80%) source generated by the transducer was therefore considered in this work. A new model based on a longitudinal-wave assumption is presented and the error introduced by this assumption is discussed in terms of its maximum value (16%) and mean value (5.9%). The simplified model was based on an extension of the classical KLM model for transducer structures and on the related assumptions. The validity of the implemented extended KLM model was evaluated by comparison with finite element modeling, itself previously validated analytically for the one-dimensional planar geometry considered. The pressure field was then propagated using the adequate formulation of the Rayleigh integral for both the extended KLM and finite element results. The simplified approach based on the KLM model delivered the focused response with good accuracy, and hundred-fold lower calculation time in comparison with a mode comprehensive FEM method. The trade-off between precision and time thus becomes compatible with an iterative procedure, used here for the optimization of the acoustic impedance of the lens for the chosen configuration. An experimental comparison

  9. A solid-state phase-insensitive ultrasonic transducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyman, J. S.

    1979-01-01

    Photoconductive acoustoelectric transducer (AET) functions as phase-insensitive ultrasonic transducer. Device is easy to use and requires no additional noisy components such as light or thermal source.

  10. Hybrid piezoelectric energy harvesting transducer system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, Tian-Bing (Inventor); Jiang, Xiaoning (Inventor); Su, Ji (Inventor); Rehrig, Paul W. (Inventor); Hackenberger, Wesley S. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A hybrid piezoelectric energy harvesting transducer system includes: (a) first and second symmetric, pre-curved piezoelectric elements mounted separately on a frame so that their concave major surfaces are positioned opposite to each other; and (b) a linear piezoelectric element mounted separately on the frame and positioned between the pre-curved piezoelectric elements. The pre-curved piezoelectric elements and the linear piezoelectric element are spaced from one another and communicate with energy harvesting circuitry having contact points on the frame. The hybrid piezoelectric energy harvesting transducer system has a higher electromechanical energy conversion efficiency than any known piezoelectric transducer.

  11. Absolute transition probabilities of phosphorus.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, M. H.; Roig, R. A.; Bengtson, R. D.

    1971-01-01

    Use of a gas-driven shock tube to measure the absolute strengths of 21 P I lines and 126 P II lines (from 3300 to 6900 A). Accuracy for prominent, isolated neutral and ionic lines is estimated to be 28 to 40% and 18 to 30%, respectively. The data and the corresponding theoretical predictions are examined for conformity with the sum rules.-

  12. Comparability and reproducibility of apex cardiogram recorded with six different transducer systems.

    PubMed Central

    Willems, J L; Denef, B; Kesteloot, H; De Geest, H

    1979-01-01

    A comparison was made in 7 dogs of the results obtained by 6 different apex cardiographic transducers applied before, during, and after controlled infusion of angiotensin and isoprenaline. The electrocardiogram, internal phonocardiogram, aortic and left ventricular pressure using a Telco micromanometer, and apex cardiogram were recorded simultaneously on magnetic tape and paper. Digital computer techniques were used to derive various measurements. The comparison of the 6 transducer systems was made expecially with respect to measurements derived from the normalised derivative, calculated using total as well as developed pressure or displacement. Measurements derived from left ventricular pressure were very reproducible. Differences in results of 'contractility' indices varied between 0.5 and 1.9 per cent. Indices from the apex cardiogram using 6 different transducer systems showed variations up to 20 per cent, with mean values varying between 3.2 and 8.1 per cent. There was a systematic deviation for one transducer system, which was responsible for a significant part of the observed variability. It may be concluded that in order to assure maximal reproducibility, technical characteristics of the apex cardiograph transducer should be taken into account and an optimal recording technique should be used. PMID:465246

  13. Investigation of focused and unfocused transducer beam patterns in moderately nonlinear absorbing media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharin, Nikolay A.

    2001-05-01

    The novel solution of the KZK equation for acoustic pressure of the second harmonic in slightly focused beam of a circular transducer was obtained in a closed form for moderately nonlinear absorbing media (Gol'dberg numbers ~ 1). The solution is based on the method of slowly changing wave profile in combination with the method of successive approximations. Two pairs of transducers (Valpey-Fisher Corp.) Were compared to investigate the influence of focusing on the applicability of the moderate nonlinearity approach. The first pair was of 0.25' diameter and the second was of 0.5' diameter. Both pairs has one transducer with flat surface and the other geometrically focused at 4'. The central frequency for all transducers was 5 MHz. Measurements were undertaken in the blood-mimicking solution of water and glycerine. The results demonstrated that for slightly focused transducers with circular apertures, the moderate nonlinearity approach is still valid, as it was proved for flat sources with the same source level, despite the higher pressures in the focal region. The peak pressure for the weakly focused system occurs at a shorter range than focal length.

  14. Innovations in piezoelectric materials for ultrasound transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrout, Thomas R.; Park, Seung Eek E.; Lopath, Patrick D.; Meyer, Richard J., Jr.; Ritter, Timothy A.; Shung, K. Kirk

    1998-05-01

    Piezoelectric material lie at the heart of ultrasonic transducers. Recent advances in materials development include submicron piezoelectric ceramics (PZT) which lead to improvements in feature size, i.e. aspect ratio, element width, etc., for linear arrays and high frequency transducers. In contrast to fine grain ceramics, single crystal materials based on Relaxor-PT ferroelectrics offer electromechanical coupling coefficients > 90 percent with a range of dielectric permittivity allowing flexibility in transducer engineering in regard to electrical impedance matching. Using KLM modeling, very high bandwidth performance > 120 percent is projected. Specific examples of high frequency 1-3 composites and 1D linear array transducers fabricated from new piezoelectric materials, including sol-gel derived PZT fibers, are presented.

  15. Improved transducer for squeeze-film bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoogenbloom, L.

    1971-01-01

    Transducer amplifies vibrations produced by piezoelectric drivers, creating greater amplitudes than were possible with direct drive devices. Drivers isolated from bearing surfaces result in bearings with high axial load capacity and stiffness, thus, wear on ceramic cylinders is reduced.

  16. A magnifying scratch-gage force transducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, C. E.

    1969-01-01

    Single-component scratch-gage transducer incorporates a unique motion magnification scheme to increase the magnitude of the load measuring scratch approximately 15 times over that of conventional models. It is small, load carrying and high in natural frequency.

  17. Micromachined Tunneling Displacement Transducers for Physical Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenny, T. W.; Kaiser, W. J.; Podosek, J. A.; Rockstad, H. K.; Reynolds, J. K.; Vote, E. C.

    1993-01-01

    We have designed and constructed a series of tunneling sensors which take advantage of the extreme position sensitivity of electron tunneling. In these sensors, a tunneling displacement transducer, based on scanning tunneling microscopy principles, is used to detect the signal-induced motion of a sensor element. Through the use of high-resonant frequency mechanical elements for the transducer, sensors may be constructed which offer wide bandwidth, and are robust and easily operated. Silicon micromachining may be used to fabricate the transducer elements, allowing integration of sensor and control electronics. Examples of tunneling accelerometers and infrared detectors will be discussed. In each case, the use of the tunneling transducer allows miniaturization of the sensor as well as enhancement of the sensor performance.

  18. Guided wave applications of piezocomposite transducers

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, P.A.; Rose, J.L.

    1996-12-31

    The majority of ultrasonic nondestructive testing applications in use today utilize longitudinal wave techniques. These are very effective for flaw detection and thickness measurement in scanning applications. In sheet and tube type materials, however, a more rapid technique has been developed utilizing Guided Wave Inspection. This method is capable of interrogating large areas of the material without extensive transducer scanning. An important requirement in this method is the ability to utilize relatively broad bandwidth transducers in the test. This paper presents the concepts on which Guided Wave Inspection is based as well as piezocomposite transducer incorporate a combination of piezoelectric ceramics and polymers to enhance the ultrasonic performance of the device. Additionally, the transducer can be designed to match to non-planar surfaces increasing its versatility when a difficult shape is involved.

  19. Development of an inherently digital transducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richard, R. R.

    1972-01-01

    The term digital transducer normally implies the combination of conventional analog sensors with encoders or analog-to-digital converters. Because of the objectionable characteristics of most digital transducers, a program was instituted to investigate the possibility of producing a transducer that is inherently digital, instead of a transducer that is digital in the usual sense. Such a device would have improved accuracy and reliability and would have reduced power and bulk requirements because two processes, sensing and conditioning, would be combined into one processes. A Curie-point-temperature sensor is described that represents realization of the stated goal. Also, a metal-insulator semiconductor is described that does not conform precisely to the program goals but that appears to have applications as a new and interesting transduction device.

  20. Development of a tethered satellite force transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhew, Ray D.

    The SEDS (Small Expendable Deployer System)/Delta II is a demonstration flight of a tethered satellite deployer system. The satellite or end mass payload, which is deployed and tethered to the Delta II rocket, is instrumented to determine its dynamics during deployment. A three-component force transducer or strain-gage balance was developed to measure tether tension on the end-mass side of the tether. The transducer was designed to measure tensions up to 20N in each direction and resolve tensions as low as 0.002N. In addition, the transducer was required to withstand the shock, vibration, and temperature excursions of the mission. The development of the transducer from design to testing and integration is discussed.

  1. Ultrasonic transducer for extreme temperature environments

    DOEpatents

    Light, Glenn M.; Cervantes, Richard A.; Alcazar, David G.

    1993-03-23

    An ultrasonic piezoelectric transducer that is operable in very high and very low temperatures. The transducer has a dual housing structure that isolates the expansion and contraction of the piezoelectric element from the expansion and contraction of the housing. Also, the internal components are made from materials having similar coefficients of expansion so that they do not interfere with the motion of the piezoelectric element.

  2. Optomechanics for absolute rotation detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davuluri, Sankar

    2016-07-01

    In this article, we present an application of optomechanical cavity for the absolute rotation detection. The optomechanical cavity is arranged in a Michelson interferometer in such a way that the classical centrifugal force due to rotation changes the length of the optomechanical cavity. The change in the cavity length induces a shift in the frequency of the cavity mode. The phase shift corresponding to the frequency shift in the cavity mode is measured at the interferometer output to estimate the angular velocity of absolute rotation. We derived an analytic expression to estimate the minimum detectable rotation rate in our scheme for a given optomechanical cavity. Temperature dependence of the rotation detection sensitivity is studied.

  3. The Absolute Spectrum Polarimeter (ASP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kogut, A. J.

    2010-01-01

    The Absolute Spectrum Polarimeter (ASP) is an Explorer-class mission to map the absolute intensity and linear polarization of the cosmic microwave background and diffuse astrophysical foregrounds over the full sky from 30 GHz to 5 THz. The principal science goal is the detection and characterization of linear polarization from an inflationary epoch in the early universe, with tensor-to-scalar ratio r much greater than 1O(raised to the power of { -3}) and Compton distortion y < 10 (raised to the power of{-6}). We describe the ASP instrument and mission architecture needed to detect the signature of an inflationary epoch in the early universe using only 4 semiconductor bolometers.

  4. Absolute calibration of optical flats

    DOEpatents

    Sommargren, Gary E.

    2005-04-05

    The invention uses the phase shifting diffraction interferometer (PSDI) to provide a true point-by-point measurement of absolute flatness over the surface of optical flats. Beams exiting the fiber optics in a PSDI have perfect spherical wavefronts. The measurement beam is reflected from the optical flat and passed through an auxiliary optic to then be combined with the reference beam on a CCD. The combined beams include phase errors due to both the optic under test and the auxiliary optic. Standard phase extraction algorithms are used to calculate this combined phase error. The optical flat is then removed from the system and the measurement fiber is moved to recombine the two beams. The newly combined beams include only the phase errors due to the auxiliary optic. When the second phase measurement is subtracted from the first phase measurement, the absolute phase error of the optical flat is obtained.

  5. Application of Shaping Deconvolution to the Generation of Arbitrary Acoustic Pulses with Conventional Sonar Transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cobo, P.

    1995-11-01

    Conventionally, a transducer driven with an electrical tone burst responds with a pressure wave whose exact waveform is determined by the impulse response of the transducer and the physical properties of the medium to which it is coupled. However, for some active sonar applications it is often desirable to have very specific transmitted acoustic signals rather than simply gated or swept sinusoids. By modelling the underwater transducer as a linear filter and estimating its transfer function it is possible to derive the required time history of the input voltage for a given output spectrum. There is the complication that because the transducer is inevitably band-limited in its frequency reponse, a regularization parameter has to be introduced to avoid division by zero. The feasibility of the method is demonstrated by generating, with the same underwater transducer, zero-phase cosine-magnitude, bionic, Guassian and low transient pulses. The input voltage necessary to generate each pulse is synthesized with a programmable arbitrary waveform generator. The main worth of this method is the versatility it affords in the use of conventional transducers.

  6. Three-Dimensional Quantitative Optical Measurement of Asymmetrically Focused Ultrasound Pressure Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimazaki, Yuta; Harigane, Soichiro; Yoshizawa, Shin; Umemura, Shin-ichiro

    2012-07-01

    High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is used for the treatment of tumors such as prostate cancer. In the development of this technique, an accurate and fast measurement of the HIFU pressure field is important. A hydrophone is generally used for the measurement, but it might disturb the pressure field and scanning it in the field takes a long time. On the other hand, optical ultrasonic field mapping has the advantages of speed and its nature of not by interfering with the acoustic field. In this study, we reconstructed an asymmetric ultrasound field by optical measurement using a computed tomography (CT) algorithm. The asymmetric field was generated by a focused transducer with four elements. Also, the absolute measurement of ultrasonic pressure was checked by measuring the center of the field of the charge-coupled device (CCD) camera. The results showed overall agreement with those of hydrophone measurement.

  7. 21 CFR 870.2860 - Heart sound transducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Heart sound transducer. 870.2860 Section 870.2860...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Monitoring Devices § 870.2860 Heart sound transducer. (a) Identification. A heart sound transducer is an external transducer that exhibits a change...

  8. 21 CFR 870.2860 - Heart sound transducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Heart sound transducer. 870.2860 Section 870.2860...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Monitoring Devices § 870.2860 Heart sound transducer. (a) Identification. A heart sound transducer is an external transducer that exhibits a change...

  9. 21 CFR 870.2860 - Heart sound transducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Heart sound transducer. 870.2860 Section 870.2860...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Monitoring Devices § 870.2860 Heart sound transducer. (a) Identification. A heart sound transducer is an external transducer that exhibits a change...

  10. 21 CFR 870.2860 - Heart sound transducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Heart sound transducer. 870.2860 Section 870.2860...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Monitoring Devices § 870.2860 Heart sound transducer. (a) Identification. A heart sound transducer is an external transducer that exhibits a change...

  11. 21 CFR 870.2860 - Heart sound transducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Heart sound transducer. 870.2860 Section 870.2860...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Monitoring Devices § 870.2860 Heart sound transducer. (a) Identification. A heart sound transducer is an external transducer that exhibits a change...

  12. 21 CFR 870.2890 - Vessel occlusion transducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Vessel occlusion transducer. 870.2890 Section 870... transducer. (a) Identification. A vessel occlusion transducer is a device used to provide an electrical..., sound, and ultrasonic transducers. (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards)....

  13. 21 CFR 870.2890 - Vessel occlusion transducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Vessel occlusion transducer. 870.2890 Section 870... transducer. (a) Identification. A vessel occlusion transducer is a device used to provide an electrical..., sound, and ultrasonic transducers. (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards)....

  14. 21 CFR 870.2890 - Vessel occlusion transducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Vessel occlusion transducer. 870.2890 Section 870... transducer. (a) Identification. A vessel occlusion transducer is a device used to provide an electrical..., sound, and ultrasonic transducers. (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards)....

  15. 21 CFR 870.2890 - Vessel occlusion transducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Vessel occlusion transducer. 870.2890 Section 870... transducer. (a) Identification. A vessel occlusion transducer is a device used to provide an electrical..., sound, and ultrasonic transducers. (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards)....

  16. 21 CFR 870.2890 - Vessel occlusion transducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Vessel occlusion transducer. 870.2890 Section 870... transducer. (a) Identification. A vessel occlusion transducer is a device used to provide an electrical..., sound, and ultrasonic transducers. (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards)....

  17. The transducer vibratory profile effects on the detection of the transient ultrasonic field scattered by a rigid point reflector.

    PubMed

    Khelladi, Hassina; Djelouah, Hakim

    2010-04-01

    In this study a generalized approach, based on the impulse response technique, is developed to evaluate the transient ultrasonic field scattered by a rigid point reflector and detected by a planar circular transducer characterized by a non-uniform vibratory profile. For this purpose, several analytical functions are used to represent the non-uniform vibration amplitude of the transducer. All these functions have maximum amplitude at the transducer's center and decrease monotonically away from axis. The amplitude variation of these functions has a direct effect on the shape of the average pressure detected by the transducer. Some numerical results are presented to illustrate the effects of a non-uniformly vibrating source on the detected transient pressure. The results show the relative importance of the edge wave modifications in the case of source having non-uniform vibration amplitude distribution. PMID:19906391

  18. Review on Acoustic Transducers for Resonant Ultrasound Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, N.; Ogi, H.; Hirao, M.

    2015-08-01

    Determination of elastic constants using resonant ultrasound spectroscopy requires transducers that can measure resonance frequencies accurately and identify the vibrational mode of each resonance frequency. We developed three transducers, namely an electromagnetic acoustic transducer, a tripod piezoelectric transducer coupled with a laser Doppler interferometer, and an antenna transmission transducer, for use with various materials and in different measurement circumstances. Their capability in resonant ultrasound spectroscopy and their applications are described.

  19. Measuring Clogging with Pressure Transducers in Permeable Pavement Strips

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two issues that have a negative affect on the long term hydrologic performance of permeable pavement systems are surface clogging and clogging at the interface with the underlying soil. Surface clogging limits infiltration capacity and results in bypass if runoff rate exceeds in...

  20. Ceramic-to-metal bonding for pressure transducers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackenzie, J. D.

    1984-01-01

    A solid-state diffusion technique involving the placement of a gold foil between INCONEL X-750 and a machinable glass-ceramic "MACOR" was shown to be successful in bonding these two materials. This technique was selected after an exhaustive literature search on ceramic-metal bonding methods. Small expansion mismatch between the Inconel and the MACOR resulted in fracture of the MACOR when the bonded body was subjected to tensile stress of 535 psi. The bonded parts were submitted to a cyclic loading test in an air atmosphere at 1 Hz from 0 to 60 KPa. Failure was observed after 700,000 cycles at 650 C. Ceramic-Inconel bonding was not achieved with this method for boron nitride and silica glass.

  1. High Temperature, High Power Piezoelectric Composite Transducers

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyeong Jae; Zhang, Shujun; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Sherrit, StewarT.

    2014-01-01

    Piezoelectric composites are a class of functional materials consisting of piezoelectric active materials and non-piezoelectric passive polymers, mechanically attached together to form different connectivities. These composites have several advantages compared to conventional piezoelectric ceramics and polymers, including improved electromechanical properties, mechanical flexibility and the ability to tailor properties by using several different connectivity patterns. These advantages have led to the improvement of overall transducer performance, such as transducer sensitivity and bandwidth, resulting in rapid implementation of piezoelectric composites in medical imaging ultrasounds and other acoustic transducers. Recently, new piezoelectric composite transducers have been developed with optimized composite components that have improved thermal stability and mechanical quality factors, making them promising candidates for high temperature, high power transducer applications, such as therapeutic ultrasound, high power ultrasonic wirebonding, high temperature non-destructive testing, and downhole energy harvesting. This paper will present recent developments of piezoelectric composite technology for high temperature and high power applications. The concerns and limitations of using piezoelectric composites will also be discussed, and the expected future research directions will be outlined. PMID:25111242

  2. High temperature, high power piezoelectric composite transducers.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyeong Jae; Zhang, Shujun; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Sherrit, Stewart

    2014-01-01

    Piezoelectric composites are a class of functional materials consisting of piezoelectric active materials and non-piezoelectric passive polymers, mechanically attached together to form different connectivities. These composites have several advantages compared to conventional piezoelectric ceramics and polymers, including improved electromechanical properties, mechanical flexibility and the ability to tailor properties by using several different connectivity patterns. These advantages have led to the improvement of overall transducer performance, such as transducer sensitivity and bandwidth, resulting in rapid implementation of piezoelectric composites in medical imaging ultrasounds and other acoustic transducers. Recently, new piezoelectric composite transducers have been developed with optimized composite components that have improved thermal stability and mechanical quality factors, making them promising candidates for high temperature, high power transducer applications, such as therapeutic ultrasound, high power ultrasonic wirebonding, high temperature non-destructive testing, and downhole energy harvesting. This paper will present recent developments of piezoelectric composite technology for high temperature and high power applications. The concerns and limitations of using piezoelectric composites will also be discussed, and the expected future research directions will be outlined. PMID:25111242

  3. Advanced Bode Plot Techniques for Ultrasonic Transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeAngelis, D. A.; Schulze, G. W.

    The Bode plot, displayed as either impedance or admittance versus frequency, is the most basic test used by ultrasonic transducer designers. With simplicity and ease-of-use, Bode plots are ideal for baseline comparisons such as spacing of parasitic modes or impedance, but quite often the subtleties that manifest as poor process control are hard to interpret or are nonexistence. In-process testing of transducers is time consuming for quantifying statistical aberrations, and assessments made indirectly via the workpiece are difficult. This research investigates the use of advanced Bode plot techniques to compare ultrasonic transducers with known "good" and known "bad" process performance, with the goal of a-priori process assessment. These advanced techniques expand from the basic constant voltage versus frequency sweep to include constant current and constant velocity interrogated locally on transducer or tool; they also include up and down directional frequency sweeps to quantify hysteresis effects like jumping and dropping phenomena. The investigation focuses solely on the common PZT8 piezoelectric material used with welding transducers for semiconductor wire bonding. Several metrics are investigated such as impedance, displacement/current gain, velocity/current gain, displacement/voltage gain and velocity/voltage gain. The experimental and theoretical research methods include Bode plots, admittance loops, laser vibrometry and coupled-field finite element analysis.

  4. Piezoelectric transducer design via multiobjective optimization.

    PubMed

    Fu, B; Hemsel, T; Wallaschek, J

    2006-12-22

    The design of piezoelectric transducers is usually based on single-objective optimization only. In most practical applications of piezoelectric transducers, however, there exist multiple design objectives that often are contradictory to each other by their very nature. It is impossible to find a solution at which each objective function gets its optimal value simultaneously. Our design approach is to first find a set of Pareto-optimal solutions, which can be considered to be best compromises among multiple design objectives. Among these Pareto-optimal solutions, the designer can then select the one solution which he considers to be the best one. In this paper we investigate the optimal design of a Langevin transducer. The design problem is formulated mathematically as a constrained multiobjective optimization problem. The maximum vibration amplitude and the minimum electrical input power are considered as optimization objectives. Design variables involve continuous variables (dimensions of the transducer) and discrete variables (the number of piezoelectric rings and material types). In order to formulate the optimization problem, the behavior of piezoelectric transducers is modeled using the transfer matrix method based on analytical models. Multiobjective evolutionary algorithms are applied in the optimization process and a set of Pareto-optimal designs is calculated. The optimized results are analyzed and the preferred design is determined. PMID:16814826

  5. Articulated Multimedia Physics, Lesson 14, Gases, The Gas Laws, and Absolute Temperature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York Inst. of Tech., Old Westbury.

    As the fourteenth lesson of the Articulated Multimedia Physics Course, instructional materials are presented in this study guide with relation to gases, gas laws, and absolute temperature. The topics are concerned with the kinetic theory of gases, thermometric scales, Charles' law, ideal gases, Boyle's law, absolute zero, and gas pressures. The…

  6. The AFGL absolute gravity program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammond, J. A.; Iliff, R. L.

    1978-01-01

    A brief discussion of the AFGL's (Air Force Geophysics Laboratory) program in absolute gravity is presented. Support of outside work and in-house studies relating to gravity instrumentation are discussed. A description of the current transportable system is included and the latest results are presented. These results show good agreement with measurements at the AFGL site by an Italian system. The accuracy obtained by the transportable apparatus is better than 0.1 microns sq sec 10 microgal and agreement with previous measurements is within the combined uncertainties of the measurements.

  7. Miniature, Cooled Pressure-Measuring Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashby, George C., Jr.; Eves, John W.; White, David R.

    1994-01-01

    Probe designed to reduce settling time dramatically. Pressure-sensing transducer mounted in probe and connected to tip by short tube having cross-sectional area substantially smaller than conventional connecting tubes. Probe includes stainless-steel cylindrical exterior housing holding closed pressure chamber in which piezoelectric pressure transducer mounted. Open connecting tube passes portion of high-velocity, high-temperature fluid stream into closed pressure chamber. Any change of pressure in sampled stream propagates into closed pressure chamber with settling time inversely proportional to cross-sectional area of connecting tube. Cooling chamber formed around pressure chamber connected to source of water or other cooling fluid via inlet and outlet tubes.

  8. Acoustooptic pulse-echo transducer system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Claus, R. O.; Wade, J. C.

    1983-01-01

    A pulse-echo transducer system which uses an ultrasonic generating element and an optical detection technique is described. The transmitting transducer consists of a concentric ring electrode pattern deposited on a circular, X-cut quartz substrate with a circular hole in the center. The rings are independently pulsed with a sequence high voltage signals phased in such a way that the ultrasonic waves generated by the separate rings superimpose to produce a composite field which is focused at a controllable distance below the surface of the specimen. The amplitude of the field reflected from this focus position is determined by the local reflection coefficient of the medium at the effective focal point. By processing the signals received for a range of ultrasonic transducer array focal lengths, the system can be used to locate and size anomalies within solids and liquids. Applications in both nondestructive evaluation and biomedical scanning are suggested.

  9. Design and simulation of an ultrasonic transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zhenxian; Shi, Yanru; Hsu, Hung-Yao; Kong, Lingxue

    2005-12-01

    This paper presents a novel ultrasonic transducer which can be used as a liquid ejector to release drug. The ultrasonic transducer is based on the design of a flextensional transducer, which is composed of interdigital piezoelectric rings and a vibration membrane. The device works at an axisymmetric resonant mode to produce maximum amplitude at the center of the vibration membrane in axial direction. For the usage of multi piezoelectric rings, the flexural plate waves can be generated by applying two out-of-phase signals. The power consumption is of primary importance in the design of this device and the usage of single-ring or multi-ring piezoelectric material instead of bulk piezo material can therefore reduce the power consumption. An optimum working frequency, at which least power is required by the device, can be found by the piezoelectric, coupled field capability of the ANSYS/Multiphysics product.

  10. Cryogenic magnetostrictive transducers and devices for commercial, military, and space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisensel, G. N.; McMasters, O. D.; Chave, Robert G.

    1998-06-01

    The unique attributes of magnetostrictive materials have been used to develop a wide variety of electromechanical transducers and devices. Most of these applications have been at or above room temperature. However, many applications at cryogenic temperatures also require high authority, high precision, efficient actuation. Other technologies, including all piezoelectric systems, tend to be inoperable or impractical and unreliable at cryogenic temperatures. Magnetostrictive materials have already demonstrated improved performance at low temperature down to near absolute zero with strains as high as 1% possible. These unique material attributes combine with novel magnetic field generation, transducer and mechanism concepts to meet the challenges of resolution, size, weight, power, thermal and reliability requirements of actuators for many cryogenic applications. Positioning and shaping optics in space, cryogen valving and pumping, heat switches, industrial processing, and active vibration control are just some examples of the many commercial, military and space applications where cryogenic magnetostrictive technologies are overcoming barriers to provide solutions.

  11. Sub-wavelength ultrasonic therapy using a spherical cavity transducer with open ends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Faqi; Wang, Hua; Zeng, Deping; Fan, Tingbo; Geng, Hao; Tu, Juan; Guo, Xiasheng; Gong, Xiaobo; Zhao, Chunliang; Wang, Zhilong; Zhang, Dong; Wang, Zhibiao

    2013-05-01

    High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) focusing precision is limited by conventional focusing ultrasound methods. The aim of this study is to develop an ultrasonic focusing modality by using a spherical cavity transducer with open ends. Experimental measurements and numerical simulations were performed to study the acoustic field and the induced tissue lesion using this transducer. The results demonstrate that the focusing zone is smaller while the focusing gain of sound pressure is higher (about 3 times) than the conventional concave focusing method. The results demonstrate great clinical potentials of enhancing the precision of HIFU therapy to the sub-wavelength level.

  12. Using XBee transducers for wireless data collection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayars, Eric; Lai, Estella

    2010-07-01

    This article describes how to use XBee transducers to create small and lightweight wireless sensors, which send data to a base station for collection and analysis. Data collection is limited to 10-bit accuracy by the XBee hardware. Depending on the type of XBee used, up to six data channels can be transmitted over a range of up to 15 miles. We describe the technical details of the process using the low-power version of the XBee transducer and a three-axis accelerometer chip.

  13. Ultrasonic transducer with laminated coupling wedge

    DOEpatents

    Karplus, Henry H. B.

    1976-08-03

    An ultrasonic transducer capable of use in a high-temperature environment incorporates a laminated metal coupling wedge including a reflecting edge shaped as a double sloping roof and a transducer crystal backed by a laminated metal sound absorber disposed so as to direct sound waves through the coupling wedge and into a work piece, reflections from the interface between the coupling wedge and the work piece passing to the reflecting edge. Preferably the angle of inclination of the two halves of the reflecting edge are different.

  14. Mechano-electric optoisolator transducer with hysteresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciuruş, I. M.; Dimian, M.; Graur, A.

    2011-01-01

    This article presents a theoretical and experimental study of designing a mechano-electric optoisolator transducer with hysteresis. Our research is centred upon designing transducers on the basis of optical sensors, as photoelectric conversions eliminate the influence of electromagnetic disturbances. Conversion of the rotation/translation motions into electric signals is performed with the help of a LED-photoresistor Polaroid optocoupler. The driver of the optocoupler's transmitter module is an independent current source. The signal conditioning circuit is a Schmitt trigger circuit. The device is designed to be applied in the field of automation and mechatronics.

  15. Development of Absolute Calibration of the Phase Contrast Imaging Diagnostic and Experimental Tests in Alcator C-Mod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsujii, N.; Porkolab, M.; Edlund, E. M.; Lin, L.

    2007-11-01

    The Phase Contrast Imaging (PCI) system in Alcator C-Mod is used to measure density perturbations from MHD modes, turbulence and RF waves. Recently, an absolutely calibrated system has been installed. This system consists of a set of transducers which cover frequency from 30 kHz to 200 kHz, and wavenumber from 5.5 cm-1 to 36.6 cm-1. The amplitude and phase of the transducer wavefronts are measured using a calibrated microphone. We will present the system design and modeling of this calibration system. Initial results, including a comparison with experimental measurements will also be discussed, if available.

  16. Simulation of absolute amplitudes of ultrasound signals using equivalent circuits.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Jonny; Martinsson, Pär-Erik; Delsing, Jerker

    2007-10-01

    Equivalent circuits for piezoelectric devices and ultrasonic transmission media can be used to cosimulate electronics and ultrasound parts in simulators originally intended for electronics. To achieve efficient system-level optimization, it is important to simulate correct, absolute amplitude of the ultrasound signal in the system, as this determines the requirements on the electronics regarding dynamic range, circuit noise, and power consumption. This paper presents methods to achieve correct, absolute amplitude of an ultrasound signal in a simulation of a pulse-echo system using equivalent circuits. This is achieved by taking into consideration loss due to diffraction and the effect of the cable that connects the electronics and the piezoelectric transducer. The conductive loss in the transmission line that models the propagation media of the ultrasound pulse is used to model the loss due to diffraction. Results show that the simulated amplitude of the echo follows measured values well in both near and far fields, with an offset of about 10%. The use of a coaxial cable introduces inductance and capacitance that affect the amplitude of a received echo. Amplitude variations of 60% were observed when the cable length was varied between 0.07 m and 2.3 m, with simulations predicting similar variations. The high precision in the achieved results show that electronic design and system optimization can rely on system simulations alone. This will simplify the development of integrated electronics aimed at ultrasound systems. PMID:18019234

  17. Advanced piezoelectric single crystal based transducers for naval sonar applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snook, Kevin A.; Rehrig, Paul W.; Hackenberger, Wesley S.; Jiang, Xiaoning; Meyer, Richard J., Jr.; Markley, Douglas

    2005-05-01

    TRS is developing new transducers based on single crystal piezoelectric materials such as Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)x-1TixO3 (PMN-PT). Single crystal piezoelectrics such as PMN-PT exhibit very high piezoelectric coefficients (d33 ~ 1800 to >2000 pC/N) and electromechanical coupling factors (k33 > 0.9), respectively, which may be exploited for improving the performance of broad bandwidth and high frequency sonar. Apart from basic performance, much research has been done on reducing the size and increasing the output power of tonpilz transducers for sonar applications. Results are presented from two different studies. "33" mode single crystal tonpilz transducers have reduced stack lengths due to their low elastic stiffness relative to PZTs, however, this produces non-ideal aspect ratios due to large lateral dimensions. Alternative "31" resonance mode tonpilz elements are proposed to improve performance over these "33" designs. d32 values as high as 1600 pC/N have been observed, and since prestress is applied perpendicular to the poling direction, "31" mode Tonpilz elements exhibit lower loss and higher reliability than "33" mode designs. Planar high power tonpilz arrays are the optimum way to obtain the required acoustic pressure and bandwidth for small footprint, high power sensors. An important issue for these sensors is temperature and prestress stability, since fluctuations in tonpilz properties affects power delivery and sensing electronic design. TRS used the approach of modifying the composition of PMN-PT to improve the temperature dependence of properties of the material. Results show up to a 50% decrease in temperature change while losing minimal source level.

  18. Ultrasound Thermotherapy of Breast: Theoretical Design of Transducer and Numerical Simulation of Procedure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohrab, Behnia; Farzan, Ghalichi; Ashkan, Bonabi; Amin, Jafari

    2006-03-01

    The absorbed ultrasound energy is changed into heat in a dissipative medium. This could be of great advantage in treating tumors in a noninvasive manner, by raising their temperature to cytotoxic levels. In this study we investigated whether using a fixed-focus transducer can destroy breast tumor cells, especially in early stages, in a cost-effective manner and reduce treatment time significantly. An appropriate fixed-focus transducer was designed, and the resultant acoustic pressure was calculated by solving the Rayleigh integral. A two-dimensional breast model was constructed from the magnetic resonance image (MRI) of a cancerous breast. Then, the induced temperature elevation was calculated using the bioheat equation and applying the finite element method (FEM) to the model. Results demonstrate that this transducer can generate a temperature of up to 61 °C in 3 s, which is sufficient to destroy cancer cells, particularly in early stages.

  19. Cosmology with negative absolute temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieira, J. P. P.; Byrnes, Christian T.; Lewis, Antony

    2016-08-01

    Negative absolute temperatures (NAT) are an exotic thermodynamical consequence of quantum physics which has been known since the 1950's (having been achieved in the lab on a number of occasions). Recently, the work of Braun et al. [1] has rekindled interest in negative temperatures and hinted at a possibility of using NAT systems in the lab as dark energy analogues. This paper goes one step further, looking into the cosmological consequences of the existence of a NAT component in the Universe. NAT-dominated expanding Universes experience a borderline phantom expansion (w < ‑1) with no Big Rip, and their contracting counterparts are forced to bounce after the energy density becomes sufficiently large. Both scenarios might be used to solve horizon and flatness problems analogously to standard inflation and bouncing cosmologies. We discuss the difficulties in obtaining and ending a NAT-dominated epoch, and possible ways of obtaining density perturbations with an acceptable spectrum.

  20. Transducer Joint for Kidney-Stone Ultrasonics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angulo, E. D.

    1983-01-01

    Ultrasonic therapy for kidney stones improved by new way of connecting wire-probe ultrasonic waveguide to transducer. Improved mounting allows joint to last long enough for effective treatment. Sheath and rubber dampers constrain lateral vibration of wire waveguide. Combination of V-shaped mounting groove, sheath, and rubber dampers increases life expectancy of wire 15 times or more.

  1. Electropneumatic transducer automatically limits motor current

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovitt, T. F.

    1966-01-01

    Pneumatic controller regulates the load on a centrifugal freon compressor in a water cooling system, thus limiting the current input to an electric motor driving it. An electromechanical transducer monitoring the motor input current sends out air signals which indicate changes in the current to the pneumatic controller.

  2. In sodium tests of ultrasonic transducers

    SciTech Connect

    Lhuillier, C.; Descombin, O.; Baque, F.; Marchand, B.; Saillant, J. F.

    2011-07-01

    Ultrasonic techniques are seen as suitable candidates for the in-service inspection and for the continuous surveillance of sodium cooled reactors (SFR). These techniques need the development and the qualification of immersed ultrasonic transducers, and materials. This paper presents some developments performed by CEA (DTN and LIST) and AREVA (NDE Solutions), and some results. (authors)

  3. Thermoacoustic power conversion using a piezoelectric transducer.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Carl; Raspet, Richard

    2010-07-01

    The predicted efficiency of a simple thermoacoustic waste heat power conversion device has been investigated as part of a collaborative effort combining a thermoacoustic engine with a piezoelectric transducer. Symko et al. [Microelectron. J. 35, 185-191 (2004)] at the University of Utah built high frequency demonstration engines for this application, and Lynn [ASMDC report, accession number ADA491030 (2008)] at the University of Washington designed and built a high efficiency piezoelectric unimorph transducer for electroacoustic conversion. The design presented in this paper is put forward to investigate the potential of a simple high frequency, air filled, standing wave thermoacoustic device to be competitive with other small generator technologies such as thermoelectric devices. The thermoacoustic generator is simulated using a low-amplitude approximation for thermoacoustics and the acoustic impedance of the transducer is modeled using an equivalent circuit model calculated from the transducer's mechanical and electrical properties. The calculations demonstrate that a device performance of around 10% of Carnot efficiency could be expected from the design which is competitive with currently available thermoelectric generators. PMID:20649205

  4. Ferroelectret non-contact ultrasonic transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bovtun, V.; Döring, J.; Bartusch, J.; Beck, U.; Erhard, A.; Yakymenko, Y.

    2007-09-01

    Dielectric and electromechanical properties of the cellular polypropylene ferroelectret films (EMFIT), combining strong piezoelectric response with a low density and softness, evidence their high potential for the air-coupled ultrasonic applications. The disadvantage of the low coupling factor is compensated by the extremely low acoustic impedance, which provides excellent matching to air and promises efficient sound transmission through the air transducer interface. The influence of the electrodes on the electromechanical properties was investigated. Electron beam evaporation technology was adapted to the EMFIT films, and films with both-sided Au and Al electrodes were prepared without reducing or suppressing of the electromechanical properties. Finally, prototype transducers based on the EMFIT films were developed. In spite of the simple construction and absence of matching layers, high sensitivity of the EMFIT transducers was proved in the air-coupled ultrasonic experiment. Amplitude and delay time scanned images of the polyethylene step wedge with holes, obtained in both pulse-echo and transmission modes, demonstrate that non-contact ultrasonic imaging and testing with EMFIT transducers is possible.

  5. Improved Ultrasonic Transducer For Measuring Cryogenic Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barkhoudarian, Sarkis

    1991-01-01

    Improved ultrasonic transducer used to measure flow of cryogenic fluid. Includes wedge made nonintrusive by machining it out of bulk material of duct carrying fluid. Skewed surfaces of wedge suppress standing waves, thus reducing ringing and increasing signal-to-noise ratio. Increases accuracy of measurements of times of arrival of ultrasonic pulses, from which times flow inferred.

  6. Broadband, High-Temperature Ultrasonic Transducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, F. Raymond; Winfree, William P.; Barrows, Danny A.

    1995-01-01

    Materials chosen for endurance at high temperatures and acoustic coupling and damping. Acoustic transducer designed to exhibit broad frequency response and to survive temperatures close to melting points of brazing alloys. Attached directly and continuously to hot object monitored ultrasonically: for example, it can be attached to relatively cool spot on workpiece during brazing for taking ultrasonic quality-control measurements.

  7. Analysis of multifrequency langevin composite ultrasonic transducers.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shuyu

    2009-09-01

    The multimode coupled vibration of Langevin composite ultrasonic transducers with conical metal mass of large cross-section is analyzed. The coupled resonance and anti-resonance frequency equations are derived and the effective electromechanical coupling coefficient is analyzed. The effect of the geometrical dimensions on the resonance frequency, the anti-resonance frequency, and the effective electromechanical coupling coefficient is studied. It is illustrated that when the radial dimension is large compared with the longitudinal dimension, the vibration of the Langevin transducer becomes a multifrequency multimode coupled vibration. Numerical methods are used to simulate the coupled vibration; the simulated results are in good agreement with those from the analytical results. Some Langevin transducers of large cross-section are designed and manufactured and their resonance frequencies are measured. It can be seen that the resonance frequencies obtained from the coupled resonance frequency equations are in good agreement with the measured results. It is expected that by properly choosing the dimensions, multifrequency Langevin transducers can be designed and used in ultrasonic cleaning, ultrasonic sonochemistry, and other applications. PMID:19812002

  8. Reliable, self-calibrating vibration transducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mc Kinney, R. L.

    1968-01-01

    Transducer system measures the uniaxial vibration amplitudes /deflections/ and frequency of a body subjected to mechanical vibration. The basic system is self-calibrating and provides an output which unambiguously indicates the direction as well as the magnitude of the uniaxial deflections.

  9. Attaching strain transducers to fragile materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duggan, M. F.

    1979-01-01

    A-shaped clamp prevents damage to thin, brittle specimens and supports displacement transducer away from heated zone. Also it defines reference points for strain measurement on specimen surface thus preventing specimen cracking due to unequal thermal expansion between clamp and holder.

  10. Myocardium wall thickness transducer and measuring method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldstein, C.; Lewis, G. W.; Silver, R. H.; Culler, V. H. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A miniature transducer for measuring changes of thickness of the myocardium is described. The device is easily implantable without traumatizing the subject, without affecting the normal muscle behavior, and is removable and implantable at a different muscle location. Operating features of the device are described.

  11. Non-bonded piezoelectric ultrasonic transducer

    DOEpatents

    Eoff, James M.

    1985-01-01

    A mechanically assembled non-bonded ultrasonic transducer includes a substrate, a piezoelectric film, a wetting agent, a thin metal electrode, and a lens held in intimate contact by a mechanical clamp. No epoxy or glue is used in the assembly of this device.

  12. Unified Technical Concepts. Module 10: Transducers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Technical Education Research Center, Waco, TX.

    This concept module on transducers is one of thirteen modules that provide a flexible, laboratory-based physics instructional package designed to meet the specialized needs of students in two-year, postsecondary technical schools. Each of the thirteen concept modules discusses a single physics concept and how it is applied to each energy system.…

  13. Improved convergence of electromechanical transducer element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sattler, Robert; Wachutka, Gerhard

    2002-04-01

    Electrostatic attraction is a favored principle of actuation in MEMS (e.g. mirrors, relays, membrane devices). In this work we use an electrostatically actuated membrane as demonstrator. Physically based device models require the coupling of the electrostatic and the two domains. One way to reduce this expense consists in reduced order modeling by introducing a local approximation of the electric field using the Differential-Plate-Capacitor-Approximation (DPCA). This semi-analytical approximation can be directly (matrix coupled transducer element) or sequentially (load vector coupling) coupled with the mechanical solver. Both approaches yield results which agree well with those of coupled 3D-field solvers. It turns out that the transducer element converges much faster than the sequentially coupled relaxation scheme, as ong as the voltage is not close to the pull-in voltage. If this is the case then the transducer element has problems to find the equilibrium state at all. To avoid this difficulty we propose the use of a homotopy method to give the transducer element the same accuracy and robustness in the stable and the unstable regions of the operating area. The electrostatic charge and the electrostatic force turn out to be proper homotopy parameters for the given example.

  14. TOPICAL REVIEW: Capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer arrays for minimally invasive medical ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jingkuang

    2010-02-01

    This paper reviews the minimally invasive capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer (CMUT) arrays for medical diagnosis and therapy. While piezoelectric transducers dominate today's medical ultrasound market, the capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer has recently emerged as a promising alternative which delivers a comparable device performance to its piezoelectric counterparts, is compatible with front-end circuit integration, allows high-density imager integration and is relative easy in miniaturization. Utilizing MEMS technology, the substrate of CMUT arrays can be micromachined into miniature platforms with various geometrical shapes, which include needles, three-dimensional prisms, as well as other flexible-substrate configurations. These arrays are useful for reaching deep inside the tissue or an organ with a minimally invasive approach. Due to the close proximity of the transducers to the target organ/tissue, a higher resolution/accuracy of diagnostic information can be achieved. In addition to pulse-echo and photoacoustic imaging, high-power CMUT devices capable of delivering ultrasounds with a pressure greater than 1.0 MPa have been monolithically integrated with imager CMUTs for image-guided therapy (IGT). Such miniature devices would facilitate diagnostic and therapy interventions not possible with conventional piezoelectric transducers.

  15. Analytical modeling and optimization of DEAP-based multilayer stack-transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffstadt, Thorben; Maas, Jürgen

    2015-09-01

    Transducers based on dielectric electroactive polymers (DEAP) use electrostatic pressure to convert electrical into mechanical energy or vice versa. To scale up the actuation or the energy gain, multilayer transducers like DEAP stack transducers are appropriate. Within this contribution, a model of such a stack transducer is derived and experimentally validated. The model is based on a multi-domain approach to describe the mechanical dynamics and the electrical behavior of the DEAP. Since these two domains influence each other they are coupled afterwards by a novel approach using interchanging power flows. To parametrize this model, tensile and compression tests for different polymer materials were performed under static and transient considerations. The results of these experiments show that the parameters obtained from the tensile test sufficiently describe the compression mode and can therefore be used for the model. Based on this transducer model the overall energy and the different parts of the multi-domain are analytically determined for arbitrary operating points. These expressions for the energies are finally used to optimize well-defined coupling coefficients, by which a maximum part of the electrical input energy is converted to mechanical energy, especially mechanical work.

  16. Endoscopic Therapeutic Device Using Focused Ultrasonic Small Transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasui, Akihiro; Haga, Yoichi; Chen, Jiun-Jie; Iseki, Hiroshi; Esashi, Masayoshi; Wada, Hiroshi

    In this research, an ultrasonic probe (5.5 mm in diameter), which has a concave PZT transducer at its tip, was fabricated for ultrasonic treatments such as sonoporation and sonodynamic therapy in the human body using a catheter and/or endoscope. Ultrasound has the potential to enhance cytotoxicity of drugs such as porphyrins, a process referred to as sonodynamic therapy, and also to deliver macromolecules such as plasmid DNA, a process referred to as sonoporation. The fabricated probe was then experimentally characterized by measuring the acoustic intensity distribution around the focal point, using a PVDF needle-type ultrasonic hydrophone. When the PZT transducer was driven by a 120 Volts peak-to-peak AC signal at 1.83 MHz, the ultrasound output was successfully focused at the focal point, with a peak intensity of 24.9 W/cm2 (0.87 MPa). Using the fabricated probe, cultured Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells were exposed to ultrasound (1.83 MHz, continuous wave, peak acoustic pressure of 0.5 MPa) for 2 s in the presence of microbubbles MB-3 and Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) plasmid DNA. As a result of sonication, the expression of GFP was observed in CHO cells.

  17. Optimization of transmitting beam patterns of a conformal transducer array.

    PubMed

    He, Zhengyao; Ma, Yuanliang

    2008-05-01

    A method is presented to calculate the driving-voltage weighting vector of a conformal array of underwater acoustic transmitting transducers to obtain a low-sidelobe beam pattern based on the measured receiving array manifold. The relationship among three quantities is given, which are, respectively, the radiated acoustic field, the measured receiving array manifold matrix and the driving-voltage weighting vector of the transducer array. Then, the driving-voltage weighting vector of the array is calculated using the optimization method to obtain a low-sidelobe transmitting beam pattern. At the frequency of 12.5 kHz, the receiving array manifold matrix of a 27-element conformal array is measured in an anechoic water tank. The driving-voltage weighting vector of the array is calculated using the proposed method. In addition, the computer simulation and experiments are carried out. The results agree well and show that the proposed method can obtain a low-sidelobe transmitting beam pattern and at the same time provide the largest amplitude of pressure in the axial direction when the maximum amplitude of the driving voltages of the array elements keeps unchanged. PMID:18529175

  18. Transducer Development and Characterization for Underwater Acoustic Neutrino Detection Calibration.

    PubMed

    Saldaña, María; Llorens, Carlos D; Felis, Ivan; Martínez-Mora, Juan Antonio; Ardid, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    A short bipolar pressure pulse with "pancake" directivity is produced and propagated when an Ultra-High Energy (UHE) neutrino interacts with a nucleus in water. Nowadays, acoustic sensor networks are being deployed in deep seas to detect this phenomenon as a first step toward building a neutrino telescope. In order to study the feasibility of the method, it is critical to have a calibrator that is able to mimic the neutrino signature. In previous works the possibility of using the acoustic parametric technique for this aim was proven. In this study, the array is operated at a high frequency and, by means of the parametric effect, the emission of the low-frequency acoustic bipolar pulse is generated mimicking the UHE neutrino acoustic pulse. To this end, the development of the transducer to be used in the parametric array is described in all its phases. The transducer design process, the characterization tests for the bare piezoelectric ceramic, and the addition of backing and matching layers are presented. The efficiencies and directivity patterns obtained for both primary and parametric beams confirm that the design of the proposed calibrator meets all the requirements for the emitter. PMID:27490547

  19. Post-operative cranial pressure monitoring system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fager, C. A., Jr.; Long, L. E.; Trent, R. L.

    1970-01-01

    System for monitoring of fluidic pressures in cranial cavity uses a miniaturized pressure sensing transducer, combined with suitable amplification means, a meter with scale calibrated in terms of pressures between minus 100 and plus 900 millimeters of water, and a miniaturized chart recorder covering similar range of pressures.

  20. Engine performance and the determination of absolute ceiling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diehl, Walter S

    1924-01-01

    This report contains a brief study of the variation of engine power with temperature and pressure. The variation of propeller efficiency in standard atmosphere is obtained from the general efficiency curve which is developed in NACA report no. 168. The variation of both power available and power required are then determined and curves plotted, so that the absolute ceiling may be read directly from any known sea-level value of the ratio of power available to power required.

  1. Experimental investigation of thermal effects in HIFU-based external valvuloplasty with a non-spherical transducer, using high-resolution MR thermometry.

    PubMed

    Petrusca, Lorena; Salomir, Rares; Milleret, Réné; Pichot, Olivier; Rata, Mihaela; Cotton, François; Chapelon, Jean-Yves

    2009-09-01

    Real-time image-guided extracorporeal high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) has been suggested for minimally invasive treatment of valvular dysfunction in the saphenous vein. Local application of heat on the perimeter of the valve zone was previously reported to induce a partial shrinkage of the collagen, which may correct valvular function. In our study, a novel MR compatible HIFU device has been investigated. This device is based on a non-spherical geometry, with two active elements that create a focusing line which is orthogonal to the beam main axis, aiming to cover the valve longitudinally. The prototype performance was characterized by electro-acoustical measurements of the pressure field and by high-resolution MR thermometry. Pressure and thermal fields were found in good agreement with the theoretical predictions. To investigate the therapeutic potential, fresh samples of excised human veins were filled with an agarose gel, embedded in porcine muscle and exposed to HIFU. The power level applied during a fixed duration of 30 s was varied such that the absolute temperature at focus ranged between 52 degrees C and 83 degrees C. Targeting was achieved under MR guidance using a MR compatible XZ positioning system. A dedicated waterproof miniature loop coil was specifically built to achieve high-resolution MRI image-based targeting (0.25 mm x 0.25 mm x 3 mm voxel) and thermometry (0.4 mm x 0.4 mm x 4 mm voxel). The vein wall was clearly identified on MR images before and after HIFU treatment. The thermal buildup created by the non-spherical transducer could be characterized from MR thermometry data. Shrinkage of the vein wall (above 65 degrees C) was determined by absolute temperature and was not a cumulative thermal dose effect. PMID:19661567

  2. Pressure measurement on rotating machinery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pemberton, Addison; Harris, Louis R.

    The objective of this paper is to describe the use of pressure scanners for measuring multiple unknown pressures in rotating machinery. Pressure scanners consist of stepper driven selector valves, which sequentially connect unknown pressures and apply these pressures to a single pressure transducer. This generates analog voltage signals which can be computerized and plotted while a pressure test is in progress. When an electrical selector switch on the same stepper driven shaft is added, thermocouple signals can be brought out of a rotating machine synchronously with pressure data.

  3. ICP measurement accuracy: the effect of temperature drift. Design of a laboratory test for assessment of ICP transducers.

    PubMed

    Morgalla, M H; Mettenleiter, H; Katzenberger, T

    1999-01-01

    Intracranial pressure (ICP) monitoring has become the mainstay of multimodal neuromonitoring of comatous patients after head injury. In the presence of rising ICP and faced with pressures, difficult to control, aggressive measures, such as hypothermia may be used. The ICP readings should not be influenced by temperature changes. A laboratory test was designed to simulate temperature variations between 20 degrees C and 45 degrees C at different pressure levels under physiological conditions. Five types of transducers were examined: Epidyn Braun Melsungen, ICT/B-Titan Gaeltec, Camino-OLM-110-4B, Codman MicroSensor ICP-Transducer, Neurovent ICP transducer Rehau Ag+Co. Tests were performed at 6 different pressure levels between 0 mmHg and 50 mmHg. The results show very low drifts of less than 0.15 mmHg degree C-1 for Codman, Epidyn and Neurovent. Gaeltec and Camino exhibited higher drifts of 0.18 mmHg and 0.2 mmHg degree C-1 respectively. Within the temperature range from 35 degrees C to 42 degrees C all probes tested show insignificant temperature drift. Whether these results also apply to other types of transducers needs further evaluation. Problems and requirements related to the design of a laboratory test for the in vitro assessment of ICP transducers are discussed in detail. PMID:10202697

  4. Dependence of photoacoustic signal generation on the transducer and source type

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bravo-Miranda, C. A.; González-Vega, A.; Gutiérrez-Juárez, G.

    2014-03-01

    The influence of size, geometry, temporal response of finite sensors and source geometry on the detected photoacoustic pressure is explored. We started considering the transducer simulated by a mesh of point-like sensors connected in parallel, which implies that appropriate modeling of pressure depends on the discretization size of the sensing surface. On the other hand, in analogy with the approach for the finite sensor, a finite source can be considered as a set of point like sources. We simulated the pressure produced by the linear, cylindrical and spherical source geometries, located at certain position over an axis perpendicular to the sensing surface. In order to simulate the photoacoustic signal, the computed pressure was convolved with the impulse response of two kind of commercial sensors: a low frequency transducer (3.5 MHz) and a high frequency transducer (125 MHz). Taking a fixed coordinate system we investigated the signal variations when the translational degree of freedom was modified. We found that simulated pressure generated by the different geometries using the proposed approach clearly differs from the point-like detection model.

  5. Transducer technology transfer to bio-engineering applications. [aerospace stress transducer for heart function analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duran, E. N.; Lewis, G. W.; Feldstein, C.; Corday, E.; Meerbaum, S.; Lang, T.

    1973-01-01

    The results of a technology transfer of a miniature unidirectional stress transducer, developed for experimental stress analysis in the aerospace field, to applications in bioengineering are reported. By modification of the basic design and innovations in attachment techniques, the transducer was successfully used in vivo on the myocardium of large dogs to record the change in contractile force due to coronary occlusion, reperfusion, and intervention.

  6. Length mode piezoelectric ultrasonic transducer for inspection of solid objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, R. B. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    The transducer is constructed from individual transducer elements arranged in an array and configured to exhibit a predominant, longitudinal mode transversely to the array. The elements are interconnected through thin flexible sheets. Each element is individually damped, and the transducer as a whole is electrically damped through resonance with the clamped capacitance and dissipation. Electrical control permits inphase operation of all transducer elements or control with preselected phase differences.

  7. Development of a CMOS MEMS pressure sensor with a mechanical force-displacement transduction structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Chao-Lin; Chang, Heng-Chung; Chang, Chun-I.; Fang, Weileun

    2015-12-01

    This study presents a capacitive pressure sensor with a mechanical force-displacement transduction structure based on the commercially available standard CMOS process (the TSMC 0.18 μm 1P6M CMOS process). The pressure sensor has a deformable diaphragm to support a movable plate with an embedded sensing electrode. As the diaphragm is deformed by the ambient pressure, the movable plate and its embedded sensing electrode are displaced. Thus, the pressure is detected from the capacitance change between the movable and fixed electrodes. The undeformed movable electrode will increase the effective sensing area between the sensing electrodes, thereby improving the sensitivity. Experimental results show that the proposed pressure sensor with a force-displacement transducer will increase the sensitivity by 126% within the 20 kPa-300 kPa absolute pressure range. Moreover, this study extends the design to add pillars inside the pressure sensor to further increase its sensing area as well as sensitivity. A sensitivity improvement of 117% is also demonstrated for a pressure sensor with an enlarged sensing electrode (the overlap area is increased two fold).

  8. Signal processing schemes for optical voltage transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jinling; Xie, Delin; Chen, Hongbin; Xie, Latang; Song, Jianhe; Luo, Xiaoni

    2006-02-01

    This paper describes an optical voltage transducer(OVT) for a 35kV system based on Pockels effect in a BGO(Bi 4Ge 3O 12) crystal. OVT used to measure the voltage of power are superior to conventional electromagnet-induced voltage transducer in many aspects, thus it has great potential to applications. It has some advantages. These advantages are: 1)Optics provides total galvanic separation between the measuring point at high voltage (HV) potential and the measuring equipment at ground potential. 2)Transmission of measuring signals in optical fibers is immune to induced electromagnetic noise even in EMI-environment of switchyards and other high voltage installations. 3)Optics and especially optical fibers make the insulation costs independent of voltage levels thus giving an economical advantage at voltage levels above 100kV. 4)The use of optics is expected to reduce the weight of the transducers. 5)Optical transducers are expected to have a large bandwidth than conventional transducers. 6)The output-signals from an optical transducer are easily interfaced with computers and electronically operated equipment such as digital relays. New techniques developed in electronics and optical field including fiber optic technology bring new contributions to the measurement of voltage and electric field. A Pockels voltage sensor has been widely introduced to electrical power transmission and distribution systems and some advantage of the optical voltage measuring techniques are reported. In this paper, a brief summary of electro-optic effects and the principle of OVT is proposed. The signal processing schemes of different optical path and features are analyzed. The basic principle of OVT is to modulate the irradiance of the light-directed to OVT by an optical fiber-according to the potential difference between the HV-line and the ground potential. The modulation of the light is accomplished by placing a material-that has an optical property (the birefringence), which is

  9. Adhesion promoters for large scale fabrication of dielectric elastomer stack transducers (DESTs) made of pre-fabricated dielectric films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grotepaß, T.; Förster-Zügel, F.; Mößinger, H.; Schlaak, H. F.

    2015-04-01

    Multilayer dielectric elastomer stack transducers (DESTs) are a promising new transducer technology with many applications in different industry sectors, like medical devices, human-machine-interaction, etc. Stacked dielectric elastomer transducers show larger thickness contraction driven by lower voltages than transducers made from a single dielectric layer. Traditionally multilayered DESTs are produced by repeatedly cross-linking a liquid elastomeric pre-polymer into the required shape. Our recent research focusses on a novel fabrication method for large scale stack transducers with a surface area over 200 x 300 mm by processing pre-fabricated elastomeric thin films of less than 50 μm thicknesses. The thin films are provided as two- or three-layer composites, where the elastomer is sandwiched between one or two sacrificial liners. Separating the elastomeric film from the residual layers and assembling them into dielectric elastomer stack transducers poses many challenges concerning adhesion, since the dielectric film merely separates from the liner if the adhesive forces between them are overcome. Conversely, during the assembly of a dielectric elastomer stack transducer, adhesive forces have to be established between two elastomeric layers or between the dielectric and the electrode layer. The very low Young's modulus of at least one adhesion partner requires suitable means of increasing the adhesive forces between the different adhesive layers of a dielectric elastomer stack transducer to prevent a delamination of the transducer during its lifetime. This work evaluates different surface activation treatments - corona, low-pressure plasma and UV-light - and their applicability in the production of large scale DESTs made from pre-fabricated elastomeric films.

  10. Force measurements in aerodynamics using piezoelectric multicomponent force transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schewe, G.

    The present paper is concerned with a device for the measurement of steady and unsteady aerodynamic forces in a wind tunnel test. The paper represents a continuation of an article written by Schewe (1982) about a multicomponent balance consisting of piezoelectric force transducers for a high-pressure wind tunnel. Advantages of the piezoelectric force-measuring technique compared to other techniques are related to the high rigidity of the quartz crystal sensor elements, taking into account low interference (cross talk) for multicomponent measurements, high natural frequency, and broad dynamic range. It is pointed out that the limitations with respect to quasi-static measurements imposed by the drift of the zero point are not as extensive as generally believed, while drift correction methods improve the measurement accuracy.

  11. Improving HST Pointing & Absolute Astrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lallo, Matthew; Nelan, E.; Kimmer, E.; Cox, C.; Casertano, S.

    2007-05-01

    Accurate absolute astrometry is becoming increasingly important in an era of multi-mission archives and virtual observatories. Hubble Space Telescope's (HST's) Guidestar Catalog II (GSC2) has reduced coordinate error to around 0.25 arcsecond, a factor 2 or more compared with GSC1. With this reduced catalog error, special attention must be given to calibrate and maintain the Fine Guidance Sensors (FGSs) and Science Instruments (SIs) alignments in HST to a level well below this in order to ensure that the accuracy of science product's astrometry keywords and target positioning are limited only by the catalog errors. After HST Servicing Mission 4, such calibrations' improvement in "blind" pointing accuracy will allow for more efficient COS acquisitions. Multiple SIs and FGSs each have their own footprints in the spatially shared HST focal plane. It is the small changes over time in primarily the whole-body positions & orientations of these instruments & guiders relative to one another that is addressed by this work. We describe the HST Cycle 15 program CAL/OTA 11021 which, along with future variants of it, determines and maintains positions and orientations of the SIs and FGSs to better than 50 milli- arcseconds and 0.04 to 0.004 degrees of roll, putting errors associated with the alignment sufficiently below GSC2 errors. We present recent alignment results and assess their errors, illustrate trends, and describe where and how the observer sees benefit from these calibrations when using HST.

  12. Absolute oral bioavailability of ciprofloxacin.

    PubMed

    Drusano, G L; Standiford, H C; Plaisance, K; Forrest, A; Leslie, J; Caldwell, J

    1986-09-01

    We evaluated the absolute bioavailability of ciprofloxacin, a new quinoline carboxylic acid, in 12 healthy male volunteers. Doses of 200 mg were given to each of the volunteers in a randomized, crossover manner 1 week apart orally and as a 10-min intravenous infusion. Half-lives (mean +/- standard deviation) for the intravenous and oral administration arms were 4.2 +/- 0.77 and 4.11 +/- 0.74 h, respectively. The serum clearance rate averaged 28.5 +/- 4.7 liters/h per 1.73 m2 for the intravenous administration arm. The renal clearance rate accounted for approximately 60% of the corresponding serum clearance rate and was 16.9 +/- 3.0 liters/h per 1.73 m2 for the intravenous arm and 17.0 +/- 2.86 liters/h per 1.73 m2 for the oral administration arm. Absorption was rapid, with peak concentrations in serum occurring at 0.71 +/- 0.15 h. Bioavailability, defined as the ratio of the area under the curve from 0 h to infinity for the oral to the intravenous dose, was 69 +/- 7%. We conclude that ciprofloxacin is rapidly absorbed and reliably bioavailable in these healthy volunteers. Further studies with ciprofloxacin should be undertaken in target patient populations under actual clinical circumstances. PMID:3777908

  13. 21 CFR 868.2885 - Gas flow transducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Gas flow transducer. 868.2885 Section 868.2885...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2885 Gas flow transducer. (a) Identification. A gas flow transducer is a device intended for medical purposes that is used to convert gas...

  14. 21 CFR 868.2885 - Gas flow transducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Gas flow transducer. 868.2885 Section 868.2885...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2885 Gas flow transducer. (a) Identification. A gas flow transducer is a device intended for medical purposes that is used to convert gas...

  15. 21 CFR 868.2885 - Gas flow transducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Gas flow transducer. 868.2885 Section 868.2885...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2885 Gas flow transducer. (a) Identification. A gas flow transducer is a device intended for medical purposes that is used to convert gas...

  16. 21 CFR 868.2885 - Gas flow transducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Gas flow transducer. 868.2885 Section 868.2885...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2885 Gas flow transducer. (a) Identification. A gas flow transducer is a device intended for medical purposes that is used to convert gas...

  17. 21 CFR 868.2885 - Gas flow transducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Gas flow transducer. 868.2885 Section 868.2885 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2885 Gas flow transducer. (a) Identification. A gas flow transducer is a device intended...

  18. 21 CFR 870.2060 - Transducer signal amplifier and conditioner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Transducer signal amplifier and conditioner. 870.2060 Section 870.2060 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Transducer signal amplifier and conditioner. (a) Identification. A transducer signal amplifier...

  19. 21 CFR 870.2060 - Transducer signal amplifier and conditioner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Transducer signal amplifier and conditioner. 870.2060 Section 870.2060 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Transducer signal amplifier and conditioner. (a) Identification. A transducer signal amplifier...

  20. 21 CFR 870.2060 - Transducer signal amplifier and conditioner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Transducer signal amplifier and conditioner. 870.2060 Section 870.2060 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Transducer signal amplifier and conditioner. (a) Identification. A transducer signal amplifier...

  1. 21 CFR 870.2060 - Transducer signal amplifier and conditioner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Transducer signal amplifier and conditioner. 870.2060 Section 870.2060 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Transducer signal amplifier and conditioner. (a) Identification. A transducer signal amplifier...

  2. 21 CFR 870.2060 - Transducer signal amplifier and conditioner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Transducer signal amplifier and conditioner. 870.2060 Section 870.2060 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Transducer signal amplifier and conditioner. (a) Identification. A transducer signal amplifier...

  3. 21 CFR 884.2960 - Obstetric ultrasonic transducer and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Obstetric ultrasonic transducer and accessories... Monitoring Devices § 884.2960 Obstetric ultrasonic transducer and accessories. (a) Identification. An obstetric ultrasonic transducer is a device used to apply ultrasonic energy to, and to receive...

  4. 21 CFR 884.2960 - Obstetric ultrasonic transducer and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Obstetric ultrasonic transducer and accessories... Monitoring Devices § 884.2960 Obstetric ultrasonic transducer and accessories. (a) Identification. An obstetric ultrasonic transducer is a device used to apply ultrasonic energy to, and to receive...

  5. 21 CFR 884.2960 - Obstetric ultrasonic transducer and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Obstetric ultrasonic transducer and accessories... Monitoring Devices § 884.2960 Obstetric ultrasonic transducer and accessories. (a) Identification. An obstetric ultrasonic transducer is a device used to apply ultrasonic energy to, and to receive...

  6. 21 CFR 884.2960 - Obstetric ultrasonic transducer and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Obstetric ultrasonic transducer and accessories... Monitoring Devices § 884.2960 Obstetric ultrasonic transducer and accessories. (a) Identification. An obstetric ultrasonic transducer is a device used to apply ultrasonic energy to, and to receive...

  7. 21 CFR 884.2960 - Obstetric ultrasonic transducer and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Obstetric ultrasonic transducer and accessories... Monitoring Devices § 884.2960 Obstetric ultrasonic transducer and accessories. (a) Identification. An obstetric ultrasonic transducer is a device used to apply ultrasonic energy to, and to receive...

  8. 21 CFR 892.1570 - Diagnostic ultrasonic transducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Diagnostic ultrasonic transducer. 892.1570 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1570 Diagnostic ultrasonic transducer. (a) Identification. A diagnostic ultrasonic transducer is a device made of a piezoelectric...

  9. Absolute Instability in Coupled-Cavity TWTs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, D. M. H.; Rittersdorf, I. M.; Zhang, Peng; Lau, Y. Y.; Simon, D. H.; Gilgenbach, R. M.; Chernin, D.; Antonsen, T. M., Jr.

    2014-10-01

    This paper will present results of our analysis of absolute instability in a coupled-cavity traveling wave tube (TWT). The structure mode at the lower and upper band edges are respectively approximated by a hyperbola in the (omega, k) plane. When the Briggs-Bers criterion is applied, a threshold current for onset of absolute instability is observed at the upper band edge, but not the lower band edge. The nonexistence of absolute instability at the lower band edge is mathematically similar to the nonexistence of absolute instability that we recently demonstrated for a dielectric TWT. The existence of absolute instability at the upper band edge is mathematically similar to the existence of absolute instability in a gyroton traveling wave amplifier. These interesting observations will be discussed, and the practical implications will be explored. This work was supported by AFOSR, ONR, and L-3 Communications Electron Devices.

  10. Wide-range dynamic pressure sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dimeff, J.; Lane, J. W.

    1972-01-01

    Transducer measures pressure by sensing the damping of a vibrating diaphragm immersed in the atmosphere to be measured. Improved sensor can be included in rugged, lightweight package for use aboard aircraft, meteorological vehicles, and space probes.

  11. Remotely-powered intracranial pressure monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fryer, T. B.

    1979-01-01

    Implantable RF powered monitor uses capacitive transducer and stiff metal diaphragm that gives high stability for long term intracranial pressure monitoring. Design of monitor reduces risk of infection while improving patient comfort and mobility.

  12. Absolute negative mobility of interacting Brownian particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ou, Ya-li; Hu, Cai-tian; Wu, Jian-chun; Ai, Bao-quan

    2015-12-01

    Transport of interacting Brownian particles in a periodic potential is investigated in the presence of an ac force and a dc force. From Brownian dynamic simulations, we find that both the interaction between particles and the thermal fluctuations play key roles in the absolute negative mobility (the particle noisily moves backwards against a small constant bias). When no the interaction acts, there is only one region where the absolute negative mobility occurs. In the presence of the interaction, the absolute negative mobility may appear in multiple regions. The weak interaction can be helpful for the absolute negative mobility, while the strong interaction has a destructive impact on it.

  13. Electromechanical transducer for acoustic telemetry system

    DOEpatents

    Drumheller, Douglas S.

    1993-01-01

    An improved electromechanical transducer is provided for use in an acoustic telemetry system. The transducer of this invention comprises a stack of ferroelectric ceramic disks interleaved with a plurality of spaced electrodes which are used to electrically pole the ceramic disks. The ceramic stack is housed in a metal tubular drill collar segment. The electrodes are preferably alternatively connected to ground potential and driving potential. This alternating connection of electrodes to ground and driving potential subjects each disk to an equal electric field; and the direction of the field alternates to match the alternating direction of polarization of the ceramic disks. Preferably, a thin metal foil is sandwiched between electrodes to facilitate the electrical connection. Alternatively, a thicker metal spacer plate is selectively used in place of the metal foil in order to promote thermal cooling of the ceramic stack.

  14. Acoustic transducer apparatus with reduced thermal conduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lierke, Ernst G. (Inventor); Leung, Emily W. (Inventor); Bhat, Balakrishna T. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A horn is described for transmitting sound from a transducer to a heated chamber containing an object which is levitated by acoustic energy while it is heated to a molten state, which minimizes heat transfer to thereby minimize heating of the transducer, minimize temperature variation in the chamber, and minimize loss of heat from the chamber. The forward portion of the horn, which is the portion closest to the chamber, has holes that reduce its cross-sectional area to minimize the conduction of heat along the length of the horn, with the entire front portion of the horn being rigid and having an even front face to efficiently transfer high frequency acoustic energy to fluid in the chamber. In one arrangement, the horn has numerous rows of holes extending perpendicular to the length of horn, with alternate rows extending perpendicular to one another to form a sinuous path for the conduction of heat along the length of the horn.

  15. Electromechanical transducer for acoustic telemetry system

    DOEpatents

    Drumheller, D.S.

    1993-06-22

    An improved electromechanical transducer is provided for use in an acoustic telemetry system. The transducer of this invention comprises a stack of ferroelectric ceramic disks interleaved with a plurality of spaced electrodes which are used to electrically pole the ceramic disks. The ceramic stack is housed in a metal tubular drill collar segment. The electrodes are preferably alternatively connected to ground potential and driving potential. This alternating connection of electrodes to ground and driving potential subjects each disk to an equal electric field; and the direction of the field alternates to match the alternating direction of polarization of the ceramic disks. Preferably, a thin metal foil is sandwiched between electrodes to facilitate the electrical connection. Alternatively, a thicker metal spacer plate is selectively used in place of the metal foil in order to promote thermal cooling of the ceramic stack.

  16. Gel-Filled Holders For Ultrasonic Transducers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Companion, John A.

    1992-01-01

    In new technique, ultrasonic transducer embedded in rubbery, castable, low-loss gel to enable transducer to "look" into surface of test object or human body at any desired angle. Composed of solution of water and ethylene glycol in collagen matrix. Provides total contact of water bath, also used on bodies or objects too large for water baths, even if moving. Also provides look angles of poly(methyl methacrylate) angle block with potential of reduced acoustic impedance and refraction. Custom-tailored to task at hand, and gel sufficiently inexpensive to be discarded upon completion. Easy to couple ultrasound in and out of gel, minimizing losses and artifacts of other types of standoffs employed in ultrasonic testing.

  17. Modeling a magnetostrictive transducer using genetic algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almeida, L. A. L.; Deep, G. S.; Lima, A. M. N.; Neff, H.

    2001-05-01

    This work reports on the applicability of the genetic algorithm (GA) to the problem of parameter determination of magnetostrictive transducers. A combination of the Jiles-Atherton hysteresis model with a quadratic moment rotation model is simulated using known parameters of a sensor. The simulated sensor data are then used as input data for the GA parameter calculation method. Taking the previously known parameters, the accuracy of the GA parameter calculation method can be evaluated.

  18. Marine transducing bacteriophage attacking a luminous bacterium.

    PubMed

    Keynan, A; Nealson, K; Sideropoulos, H; Hastings, J W

    1974-08-01

    The isolation and partial characterization of a marine bacteriophage attacking a strain of luminous bacteria is described, including some physical, biological, and genetic properties. It is a DNA phage of density of 1.52 with a long flexible tail and an apparently icosohedral head. With respect to stability in suspension, it has a rather specific requirement for the sodium ion in high concentration; it is further stabilized by the addition of calcium and magnesium ions. These same ions are likewise all required for both good plating efficiency and plaque uniformity. Although it goes through a typical lytic growth cycle (about 45 min), with a burst size of 100, and no stable lysogens have been isolated, it is nevertheless a transducing phage specifically for the tryptophan region, transducing several, but not all, independently isolated Trp(-) auxotrophs to protrophy. No other auxotrophs of a variety of amino acids were transduced by this phage to prototrophy. Phage infection does not change the normal expression of the luminescent system, and light remains at near normal levels until cell lysis occurs. PMID:16789143

  19. Simultaneous muscle force and displacement transducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldstein, C.; Lewis, G. W.; Culler, V. H. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A myocardial transducer for simultaneously measuring force and displacement within a very small area of myocardium is disclosed. The transducer comprised of an elongated body forked at one end to form an inverted Y shaped beam with each branch of the beam constituting a low compliant tine for penetrating the myocardium to a predetermined depth. Bonded to one of the low compliance tines is a small piezoresistive element for converting a force acting on the beam into an electrical signal. A third high compliant tine of the transducer, which measures displacement of the myocardium in a direction in line with the two low compliant tines, is of a length that just pierces the surface membrane. A small piezoresistive element is bonded to the third tine at its upper end where its bending is greatest. Displacement of the myocardium causes a deformation in curvature of the third tine, and the second small piezoresistive element bonded to the surface of its curved end converts its deformation into an electrical signal.

  20. Sector array transducers for vibro-acoustography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Glauber; Chen, Shigao; Kinnick, Randall; Greenleaf, James; Fatemi, Mostafa

    2003-10-01

    Vibro-acoustography is an imaging technique that maps the acoustic response of an object to a localized harmonic radiation force. This force is generated by two interfering continuous-wave ultrasound beams at slightly different frequencies f1 and f2. The system point-spread function (PSF) is related to the radiation force on a point-target. Imaging artifacts depend on the PSF sidelobes, which can be reduced by mismatching the sidelobes of each ultrasound beam. Here, we propose a beamforming approach based on an 8-element sector transducer with consecutive elements alternately driven at f1 and f2. The transducer generates two ultrasound beams skewed by 22.5° with respect to each other. The system PSF is analytically derived. The theory is validated by experiments using a small steel sphere (radius =0.2 mm) as a point-target. A laser vibrometer is used to measure the vibration of the sphere and evaluate the PSF of the system. Theoretically, the PSF sidelobes are under -15.8 dB in eight spots circularly distributed and separated by 22.5°, which agrees with the experimental results. Simulation shows that with 16 elements sidelobes are under -35.2 dB. In conclusion, sector transducers for vibro-acoustography may have lower sidelobes as the number of array elements is increased. [Work supported by Grant Nos. EB00535-01, EB2640, and IMG0100744.