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Sample records for absolute quantum yield

  1. Size-dependent absolute quantum yields for size-separated colloidally-stable silicon nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Mastronardi, Melanie L; Maier-Flaig, Florian; Faulkner, Daniel; Henderson, Eric J; Kübel, Christian; Lemmer, Uli; Ozin, Geoffrey A

    2012-01-11

    Size-selective precipitation was used to successfully separate colloidally stable allylbenzene-capped silicon nanocrystals into several visible emitting monodisperse fractions traversing the quantum size effect range of 1-5 nm. This enabled the measurement of the absolute quantum yield and lifetime of photoluminescence of allylbenzene-capped silicon nanocrystals as a function of size. The absolute quantum yield and lifetime are found to monotonically decrease with decreasing nanocrystal size, which implies that nonradiative vibrational and surface defect effects overwhelm spatial confinement effects that favor radiative relaxation. Visible emission absolute quantum yields as high as 43% speak well for the development of "green" silicon nanocrystal color-tunable light emitting diodes that can potentially match the performance of their toxic heavy metal chalcogenide counterparts.

  2. Absolute 1* quantum yields for the ICN A state by diode laser gain versus absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hess, Wayne P.; Leone, Stephen R.

    1987-01-01

    Absolute I* quantum yields were measured as a function of wavelength for room temperature photodissociation of the ICN A state continuum. The temperature yields are obtained by the technique of time-resolved diode laser gain-versus-absorption spectroscopy. Quantum yields are evaluated at seven wavelengths from 248 to 284 nm. The yield at 266 nm is 66.0 +/- 2% and it falls off to 53.4 +/- 2% and 44.0 +/- 4% at 284 and 248 respectively. The latter values are significantly higher than those obtained by previous workers using infrared fluorescence. Estimates of I* quantum yields obtained from analysis of CN photofragment rotational distributions, as discussed by other workers, are in good agreement with the I* yields. The results are considered in conjunction with recent theoretical and experimental work on the CN rotational distributions and with previous I* yield results.

  3. [Calculation method of absolute quantum yields in photocatalytic slurry reactor based on cylindrical light].

    PubMed

    Shen, Xun-wei; Yuan, Chun-wei

    2005-01-01

    Heterogeneous photocatalysis in slurry reactors have the particular characteristic that the catalyst particles not only absorb but also scatter photons so the radiation scattering can not be neglected. However, it is very difficult in mathematics to obtain the rigorous solution of the radiative transfer equation. Consequently present methods, in which the apparent quantum yields can be calculated by employing the incident radiation intensity, always underestimate quantum yields calculations. In this paper, a method is developed to produce absolute values of photocatalytic quantum yields in slurry reactor based on cylindrical UV light source. In a typical laboratory reactor (diameter equal to 5.6 cm and length equal to 10 cm) the values for the photocatalytic degradation of phenol are reported under precisely defined conditions. The true value of the local volumetric rate of photon absorption (LVRPA) can be obtained. It was shown that apparent quantum yields differ from true quantum yields 7.08% and that for the same geometric arrangement, vanishing fraction accounts for 1.1% of the incident radiation. The method can be used to compare reactivity of different catalysts or, for a given catalyst, reactivity with different model compounds and as a principle to design a reactor.

  4. Absolute I(asterisk) quantum yields for the ICN A state by diode laser gain-vs-absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hess, Wayne P.; Leone, Stephen R.

    1987-01-01

    Absolute I(asterisk) quantum yields have been measured as a function of wavelength for room temperature photodissociation of the ICN A state continuum. The yields are obtained by the technique of time-resolved diode laser gain-vs-absorption spectroscopy. Quantum yields are evaluated at seven wavelengths from 248 to 284 nm. The yield at 266 nm is 66.0 + or - 2 percent and it falls off to 53.4 + or - 2 percent and 44.0 + or - 4 percent at 284 and 248 nm, respectively. The latter values are significantly higher than those obtained by previous workers using infrared fluorescence. Estimates of I(asterisk) quantum yields obtained from analysis of CN photofragment rotational distributions, as discussed by other workers, are in good agreement with the I(asterisk) yields reported here. The results are considered in conjunction with recent theoretical and experimental work on the CN rotational distributions and with previous I(asterisk) quantum yield results.

  5. Absolute Photoluminescence Quantum Yields of IR-26 Dye, PbS, and PbSe Quantum Dots

    SciTech Connect

    Semonin, Octavi Escala; Johnson, Justin C; Luther, Joseph M; Midgett, Aaron G; Nozik, Arthur J; Beard, Matthew C

    2010-08-19

    In this study, we have directly measured the photoluminescence quantum yield (Φ{sub PL}) of IR-26 at a range of concentrations and the Φ{sub PL} of PbS and PbSe QDs for a range of sizes. We find that the Φ{sub PL} of IR-26 has a weak concentration dependence due to reabsorption, with a Φ{sub PL} of 0.048 ± 0.002% for low concentrations, lower than previous reports by a full order of magnitude. We also find that there is a dramatic size dependence for both PbS and PbSe QDs, with the smallest dots exhibiting a Φ{sub PL} in excess of 60%, while larger dots fall below 3%. A model, including nonradiative transition between electronic states and energy transfer to ligand vibrations, appears to explain this size dependence. These findings provide both a better characterization of photoluminescence for near-infrared emitters and some insight into how improved QDs can be developed.

  6. Measurement procedure for absolute broadband infrared up-conversion photoluminescent quantum yields: Correcting for absorption/re-emission

    SciTech Connect

    MacDougall, Sean K. W.; Ivaturi, Aruna; Marques-Hueso, Jose; Richards, Bryce S.

    2014-06-15

    The internal photoluminescent quantum yield (iPLQY) – defined as the ratio of emitted photons to those absorbed – is an important parameter in the evaluation and application of luminescent materials. The iPLQY is rarely reported due to the complexities in the calibration of such a measurement. Herein, an experimental method is proposed to correct for re-emission, which leads to an underestimation of the absorption under broadband excitation. Although traditionally the iPLQY is measured using monochromatic sources for linear materials, this advancement is necessary for nonlinear materials with wavelength dependent iPLQY, such as the application of up-conversion to solar energy harvesting. The method requires an additional measurement of the emission line shape that overlaps with the excitation and absorption spectra. Through scaling of the emission spectrum, at the long wavelength edge where an overlap of excitation does not occur, it is possible to better estimate the value of iPLQY. The method has been evaluated for a range of nonlinear material concentrations and under various irradiances to analyze the necessity and boundary conditions that favor the proposed method. Use of this refined method is important for a reliable measurement of iPLQY under a broad illumination source such as the Sun.

  7. [Impulse photoconductance of solutions of chlorophyll and its analogs. IV. Absolute quantum yield of ion radical formation during photooxidation of chlorophyll a by n-benzoquinone].

    PubMed

    Gudkov, N D; Stolovitskiĭ, Iu M; Evstigneev, V B

    1978-01-01

    The values of absolute quantum yield phi of the formation of free ion-radicals during the illumination of alkohol solutions of chlorophyll alpha (Chl) and rho-benzoquinone (Q) at room temperature were obtained by the method of impulse photoconductance. With an increase of the dielectric constant epsilon of the solvent from approximately 6 to approximately 25 phi increases by two orders ( approximately 10(-3)--approximately 10(-1). That obtained relationship phi (epsilon) is explained by epsilon effect on the efficiency of dissociation of "solvent-shared" ion-radical pair Chls+. Os-. The comparison of experimental data and theoretically expected ones allowed the estimation of some parameters to be obtained which characterize the ion-radical pair: interionic distance (10 A), the dissociation velocity constant ( approximately 10(5)--10(8) s-1), the velocity constant of reverse electron transfer (10(8) s-1), the life time approximately 10(-8) s).

  8. Ultraviolet photochemistry of buta-1,3- and buta-1,2-dienes: laser spectroscopic absolute hydrogen atom quantum yield and translational energy distribution measurements.

    PubMed

    Hanf, A; Volpp, H-R; Sharma, P; Mittal, J P; Vatsa, R K

    2010-07-14

    Using pulsed H-atom Lyman-alpha laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy along with a photolytic calibration approach, absolute H-atom product quantum yields of phi(H-b13d) = (0.32+/-0.04) and phi(H-b12d) = (0.36+/-0.04) were measured under collision-free conditions for the 193 nm gas-phase laser flash photolysis of buta-1,3- and buta-1,2-diene at room temperature, which demonstrate that nascent H-atom formation is of comparable importance for both parent molecules. Comparison of the available energy fraction, f(T-b13d) = (0.22+/-0.03) and f(T-b12d) = (0.13+/-0.01), released as H+C(4)H(5) product translational energy with results of impulsive and statistical energy partitioning modeling calculations indicates that for both, buta-1,3- and buta-1,2-diene, H-atom formation is preceded by internal conversion to the respective electronic ground state (S(0)) potential energy surfaces. In addition, values of sigma(b-1,3-d-L alpha) = (3.5+/-0.2)x10(-17) cm(2) and sigma(b-1,2-d-L alpha) = (4.4+/-0.2)x10(-17) cm(2) for the previously unknown Lyman-alpha (121.6 nm) radiation photoabsorption cross sections of buta-1,3- and buta-1,2-diene in the gas-phase were determined.

  9. Quantum theory allows for absolute maximal contextuality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaral, Barbara; Cunha, Marcelo Terra; Cabello, Adán

    2015-12-01

    Contextuality is a fundamental feature of quantum theory and a necessary resource for quantum computation and communication. It is therefore important to investigate how large contextuality can be in quantum theory. Linear contextuality witnesses can be expressed as a sum S of n probabilities, and the independence number α and the Tsirelson-like number ϑ of the corresponding exclusivity graph are, respectively, the maximum of S for noncontextual theories and for the theory under consideration. A theory allows for absolute maximal contextuality if it has scenarios in which ϑ /α approaches n . Here we show that quantum theory allows for absolute maximal contextuality despite what is suggested by the examination of the quantum violations of Bell and noncontextuality inequalities considered in the past. Our proof is not constructive and does not single out explicit scenarios. Nevertheless, we identify scenarios in which quantum theory allows for almost-absolute-maximal contextuality.

  10. Quantum Cloning for Absolute Radiometry

    SciTech Connect

    Sanguinetti, Bruno; Pomarico, Enrico; Sekatski, Pavel; Zbinden, Hugo; Gisin, Nicolas

    2010-08-20

    In the quantum regime information can be copied with only a finite fidelity. This fidelity gradually increases to 1 as the system becomes classical. In this Letter we show how this fact can be used to directly measure the amount of radiated power. We demonstrate how these principles can be used to build a practical primary standard.

  11. Absolute chlorine and hydrogen atom quantum yield measurements in the 193.3 nm photodissociation of CH3CFCl2 (HCFC-141b)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Läuter, Almuth; Suresh, Dhanya; Volpp, Hans-Robert

    2003-04-01

    The dynamics of chlorine and hydrogen atom formation in the 193.3 nm gas-phase laser photolysis of room-temperature 1,1-dichloro-1-fluoroethane, CH3CFCl2 (HCFC-141b), were studied by means of the pulsed-laser-photolysis and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) "pump-and-probe" technique. Nascent ground-state Cl(2P3/2) and spin-orbit excited Cl*(2P1/2) as well as H(2S) atom photofragments were detected under collision-free conditions by pulsed Doppler-resolved laser-induced fluorescence measurements employing narrow-band vacuum ultraviolet probe laser radiation, generated via resonant third-order sum-difference frequency conversion of dye laser radiation in krypton. Using HCl photolysis as a reference source of well-defined Cl(2P3/2), Cl*(2P1/2), and H atom concentrations, values for the chlorine-atom spin-orbit branching ratio [Cl*]/[Cl]=0.36±0.08, the total chlorine atom quantum yield (ΦCl+Cl*=1.01±0.14), and the H atom quantum yield (ΦH=0.04±0.01) were determined by means of a photolytic calibration method. From the measured Cl and Cl* atom Doppler profiles the mean relative translational energy of the chlorine fragments could be determined to be ET(Cl)=157±12 kJ/mol and ET(Cl*)=165±12 kJ/mol. The corresponding average values 0.56 and 0.62 of the fraction of total available energy channeled into CH3CFCl+Cl/Cl* product translational energy were found to lie between the limiting values 0.36 and 0.85 predicted by a soft impulsive and a rigid rotor model of the CH3CFCl2→CH3CFCl+Cl/Cl* dissociation processes, respectively. The measured total chlorine atom quantum yield along with the rather small H atom quantum yield as well as the observed energy disposal indicates that direct C-Cl bond cleavage is the most important primary fragmentation mechanism for CH3CFCl2 after photoexcitation in the first absorption band.

  12. Spectroscopic characterization of coumarin-stained beads: quantification of the number of fluorophores per particle with solid-state 19F-NMR and measurement of absolute fluorescence quantum yields.

    PubMed

    Huber, Alexandra; Behnke, Thomas; Würth, Christian; Jaeger, Christian; Resch-Genger, Ute

    2012-04-17

    The rational design of nano- and micrometer-sized particles with tailor-made optical properties for biological, diagnostic, and photonic applications requires tools to characterize the signal-relevant properties of these typically scattering bead suspensions. This includes methods for the preferably nondestructive quantification of the number of fluorophores per particle and the measurement of absolute fluorescence quantum yields and absorption coefficients of suspensions of fluorescent beads for material performance optimization and comparison. Here, as a first proof-of-concept, we present the first time determination of the number of dye molecules per bead using nondestructive quantitative ((19)F) NMR spectroscopy and 1000 nm-sized carboxylated polystyrene particles loaded with varying concentrations of the laser dye coumarin 153 containing a CF(3) group. Additionally, the signal-relevant optical properties of these dye-loaded particles were determined in aqueous suspension in comparison to the free dye in solvents of different polarity with a custom-built integrating sphere setup that enables spectrally resolved measurements of emission, transmission, and reflectance as well absolute fluorescence quantum yields. These measurements present an important step toward absolute brightness values and quantitative fluorescence analysis with particle systems that can be exploited, for example, for optical imaging techniques and different fluorescence assays as well as for the metrological traceability of fluorescence methods. PMID:22404690

  13. On determining absolute entropy without quantum theory or the third law of thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steane, Andrew M.

    2016-04-01

    We employ classical thermodynamics to gain information about absolute entropy, without recourse to statistical methods, quantum mechanics or the third law of thermodynamics. The Gibbs–Duhem equation yields various simple methods to determine the absolute entropy of a fluid. We also study the entropy of an ideal gas and the ionization of a plasma in thermal equilibrium. A single measurement of the degree of ionization can be used to determine an unknown constant in the entropy equation, and thus determine the absolute entropy of a gas. It follows from all these examples that the value of entropy at absolute zero temperature does not need to be assigned by postulate, but can be deduced empirically.

  14. Photoelectron Quantum Yields of the Amino Acids

    PubMed Central

    Dam, Rudy J.; Burke, Charles A.; Griffith, O. Hayes

    1974-01-01

    The photoelectron quantum yields of 21 common amino acids and 15 polyamino acids were measured in the 180-240 nm wavelength region. On the average, the quantum yields of these two groups exhibit quite similar wavelength dependence. For λ > 220 nm all amino acid and polyamino acid quantum yields are ≤10-7 electrons/(incident) photon. The mean yields increase to about 5 × 10-7 electrons/photon at 200 nm and 5 × 10-6 electrons/photon at 180 nm. L-tryptophan, L-tyrosine, and poly-L-tryptophan exhibit above average yields between 180 and 200 nm. Comparison with the dye phthalocyanine indicates that the quantum yield of the dye is two orders of magnitude greater than that of the amino acids from 200 to 240 nm, suggesting the feasibility of photoelectron labeling studies of biological surfaces. PMID:4836100

  15. The new Absolute Quantum Gravimeter (AQG): first results and perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonvalot, Sylvain; Le Moigne, Nicolas; Merlet, Sebastien; Desruelle, Bruno; Lautier-Gaud, Jean; Menoret, Vincent; Vermeulen, Pierre

    2016-04-01

    Cold atom gravimetry represents one of the most innovative evolution in gravity instrumentation since the last 20 years. The concept of measuring the gravitational acceleration by dropping atoms and the development of the first instrumental devices during this last decade quickly revealed the promising perspectives of this new generation of gravity meters enabling accurate and absolute measurements of the Earth's gravity field for a wide range of applications (geophysics, geodesy, metrology, etc.). The Absolute Quantum Gravimeter (AQG) gravity meter, developed by MUQUANS (Talence, France - http://www.muquans.com/) with the support of RESIF, the French Seismologic and Geodetic Network (http://www.resif.fr/) belongs to this new generation of instruments. It also represents the first commercial device based on the utilization of advanced matter-wave interferometry techniques, which allow to characterize precisely the vertical acceleration experienced by a cloud of cold atoms. Recently, the first operational unit (AQG01) has been achieved as a compact transportable gravimeter with the aim of satisfying absolute gravity measurements in laboratory conditions under the following specifications: measurements the μGal level at a few Hz cycling frequency, sensitivity of 50μGal/√Hz, immunity to ground vibrations, easy and quickness of operation, automated continuous data acquisition for several months, etc. In order to evaluate the current performances of the AQG01, several experiments are carried out in collaboration between RESIF user's teams and the MUQUANS manufacturer on different reference gravity sites and laboratories in France. These measurements performed in indoor conditions including simultaneous observations with classical reference gravity instruments (corner-cube absolute gravity meters, relative superconducting meters) as well with the Cold Atom Gravity meter (CAG) developed by LNE-SYRTE, lead to a first objective characterization of the performances of

  16. Spectroscopy characterization and quantum yield determination of quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contreras Ortiz, S. N.; Mejía Ospino, E.; Cabanzo, R.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper we show the characterization of two kinds of quantum dots: hydrophilic and hydrophobic, with core and core/shell respectively, using spectroscopy techniques such as UV-Vis, fluorescence and Raman. We determined the quantum yield in the quantum dots using the quinine sulphate as standard. This salt is commonly used because of its quantum yield (56%) and stability. For the CdTe excitation, we used a wavelength of 549nm and for the CdSe/ZnS excitation a wavelength of 527nm. The results show that CdSe/ZnS (49%) has better fluorescence, better quantum dots, and confirm the fluorescence result. The quantum dots have shown a good fluorescence performance, so this property will be used to replace dyes, with the advantage that quantum dots are less toxic than some dyes like the rhodamine. In addition, in this work we show different techniques to find the quantum dots emission: fluorescence spectrum, synchronous spectrum and Raman spectrum.

  17. Quantum Yield of Gold-Cathode Photomultipliers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Childs, Charles B.

    1961-01-01

    Two gold-cathode EMI 6255G tubes have been investigated for their quantum yield between 3100 and 1900 A. The tubes had cathodes of different appearances. One of these, numbered 3012, had a slight bluish tinge and was very transparent to visible light; the other, numbered 3021, had a definite gold coloration. The relative quantum yield of each tube was determined with the aid of a Cary model 14 recording spectrophotometer used as a monochromator. The monochromator relative-energy output was determined from the current output of a sodium-salicylate-coated RCA 1P21 photomultiplier. Each gold-cathode tube was then operated at 3000 v, and the central 1.8 cm cube of the cathode was exposed to the monochromator output.

  18. Measuring the absolute DT neutron yield using the Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer at OMEGA and the NIF

    SciTech Connect

    Mackinnon, A; Casey, D; Frenje, J A; Johnson, M G; Seguin, F H; Li, C K; Petrasso, R D; Glebov, V Y; Katz, J; Knauer, J; Meyerhofer, D; Sangster, T; Bionta, R; Bleuel, D; Hachett, S P; Hartouni, E; Lepape, S; Mckernan, M; Moran, M; Yeamans, C

    2012-05-03

    A Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer (MRS) has been installed and extensively used on OMEGA and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) for measurements of the absolute neutron spectrum from inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions. From the neutron spectrum measured with the MRS, many critical implosion parameters are determined including the primary DT neutron yield, the ion temperature, and the down-scattered neutron yield. As the MRS detection efficiency is determined from first principles, the absolute DT neutron yield is obtained without cross-calibration to other techniques. The MRS primary DT neutron measurements at OMEGA and the NIF are shown to be in excellent agreement with previously established yield diagnostics on OMEGA, and with the newly commissioned nuclear activation diagnostics on the NIF.

  19. Precise Measurement of the Absolute Yield of Fluorescence Photons in Atmospheric Gases

    SciTech Connect

    Ave, M.; Bohacova, M.; Daumiller, K.; Di Carlo, P.; Di Giulio, C.; Luis, P.Facal San; Gonzales, D.; Hojvat, C.; Horandel, J.R.; Hrabovsky, M.; Iarlori, M.; /INFN, Aquila /Karlsruhe, Inst. Technol.

    2011-01-01

    We have performed a measurement of the absolute yield of fluorescence photons at the Fermilab Test Beam. A systematic uncertainty at 5% level was achieved by the use of Cherenkov radiation as a reference calibration light source. A cross-check was performed by an independent calibration using a laser light source. A significant improvement on the energy scale uncertainty of Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Rays is expected.

  20. Quantum Efficient Detectors for Use in Absolute Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faust, Jessica; Eastwood, Michael; Pavri, Betina; Raney, James

    1998-01-01

    The trap or quantum efficient detector has a quantum efficiency of greater than 0.98 for the region from 450 to 900 nm. The region of flattest response is from 600 to 900 nm. The QED consists of three windowless Hamamatsu silicon detectors. The QED was mounted below AVIRIS to monitor the Spectralon panel for changes in radiance during radiometric calibration. The next step is to permanently mount the detector to AVIRIS and monitor the overall radiance of scenes along with calibration.

  1. Absolute calibration method for laser megajoule neutron yield measurement by activation diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landoas, Olivier; Yu Glebov, Vladimir; Rossé, Bertrand; Briat, Michelle; Disdier, Laurent; Sangster, Thomas C.; Duffy, Tim; Marmouget, Jean Gabriel; Varignon, Cyril; Ledoux, Xavier; Caillaud, Tony; Thfoin, Isabelle; Bourgade, Jean-Luc

    2011-07-01

    The laser megajoule (LMJ) and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) plan to demonstrate thermonuclear ignition using inertial confinement fusion (ICF). The neutron yield is one of the most important parameters to characterize ICF experiment performance. For decades, the activation diagnostic was chosen as a reference at ICF facilities and is now planned to be the first nuclear diagnostic on LMJ, measuring both 2.45 MeV and 14.1 MeV neutron yields. Challenges for the activation diagnostic development are absolute calibration, accuracy, range requirement, and harsh environment. At this time, copper and zirconium material are identified for 14.1 MeV neutron yield measurement and indium material for 2.45 MeV neutrons. A series of calibrations were performed at Commissariat à l'Energie Atomique (CEA) on a Van de Graff facility to determine activation diagnostics efficiencies and to compare them with results from calculations. The CEA copper activation diagnostic was tested on the OMEGA facility during DT implosion. Experiments showed that CEA and Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) diagnostics agree to better than 1% on the neutron yield measurement, with an independent calibration for each system. Also, experimental sensitivities are in good agreement with simulations and allow us to scale activation diagnostics for the LMJ measurement range.

  2. Absolutely continuous spectrum implies ballistic transport for quantum particles in a random potential on tree graphs

    SciTech Connect

    Aizenman, Michael; Warzel, Simone

    2012-09-15

    We discuss the dynamical implications of the recent proof that for a quantum particle in a random potential on a regular tree graph absolutely continuous (ac) spectrum occurs non-perturbatively through rare fluctuation-enabled resonances. The main result is spelled in the title.

  3. Absolute prompt-gamma yield measurements for ion beam therapy monitoring.

    PubMed

    Pinto, M; Bajard, M; Brons, S; Chevallier, M; Dauvergne, D; Dedes, G; De Rydt, M; Freud, N; Krimmer, J; La Tessa, C; Létang, J M; Parodi, K; Pleskač, R; Prieels, D; Ray, C; Rinaldi, I; Roellinghoff, F; Schardt, D; Testa, E; Testa, M

    2015-01-21

    Prompt-gamma emission detection is a promising technique for hadrontherapy monitoring purposes. In this regard, obtaining prompt-gamma yields that can be used to develop monitoring systems based on this principle is of utmost importance since any camera design must cope with the available signal. Herein, a comprehensive study of the data from ten single-slit experiments is presented, five consisting in the irradiation of either PMMA or water targets with lower and higher energy carbon ions, and another five experiments using PMMA targets and proton beams. Analysis techniques such as background subtraction methods, geometrical normalization, and systematic uncertainty estimation were applied to the data in order to obtain absolute prompt-gamma yields in units of prompt-gamma counts per incident ion, unit of field of view, and unit of solid angle. At the entrance of a PMMA target, where the contribution of secondary nuclear reactions is negligible, prompt-gamma counts per incident ion, per millimetre and per steradian equal to (124 ± 0.7stat ± 30sys) × 10(-6) for 95 MeV u(-1) carbon ions, (79 ± 2stat ± 23sys) × 10(-6) for 310 MeV u(-1) carbon ions, and (16 ± 0.07stat ± 1sys) × 10(-6) for 160 MeV protons were found for prompt gammas with energies higher than 1 MeV. This shows a factor 5 between the yields of two different ions species with the same range in water (160 MeV protons and 310 MeV u(-1) carbon ions). The target composition was also found to influence the prompt-gamma yield since, for 300/310 MeV u(-1) carbon ions, a 42% greater yield ((112 ± 1stat ± 22sys) × 10(-6) counts ion(-1) mm(-1) sr(-1)) was obtained with a water target compared to a PMMA one. PMID:25548833

  4. Assignment of absolute stereostructures through quantum mechanics electronic and vibrational circular dichroism calculations.

    PubMed

    Dai, Peng; Jiang, Nan; Tan, Ren-Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Elucidation of absolute configuration of chiral molecules including structurally complex natural products remains a challenging problem in organic chemistry. A reliable method for assigning the absolute stereostructure is to combine the experimental circular dichroism (CD) techniques such as electronic and vibrational CD (ECD and VCD), with quantum mechanics (QM) ECD and VCD calculations. The traditional QM methods as well as their continuing developments make them more applicable with accuracy. Taking some chiral natural products with diverse conformations as examples, this review describes the basic concepts and new developments of QM approaches for ECD and VCD calculations in solution and solid states.

  5. Approximating relational observables by absolute quantities: a quantum accuracy-size trade-off

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyadera, Takayuki; Loveridge, Leon; Busch, Paul

    2016-05-01

    The notion that any physical quantity is defined and measured relative to a reference frame is traditionally not explicitly reflected in the theoretical description of physical experiments where, instead, the relevant observables are typically represented as ‘absolute’ quantities. However, the emergence of the resource theory of quantum reference frames as a new branch of quantum information science in recent years has highlighted the need to identify the physical conditions under which a quantum system can serve as a good reference. Here we investigate the conditions under which, in quantum theory, an account in terms of absolute quantities can provide a good approximation of relative quantities. We find that this requires the reference system to be large in a suitable sense.

  6. Determination of absolute quantum efficiency of X-ray nano phosphors by thin film photovoltaic cells.

    PubMed

    Davidson, R Andrew; Sugiyama, Chad; Guo, Ting

    2014-10-21

    The absolute optical power at 611 nm emitting from Eu doped Gd2O3 nano phosphors upon X-ray excitation from a microfocus X-ray source operated at 100 kV was measured with thin film photovoltaic cells (TFPCs), whose optical response was calibrated using an He-Ne laser at 632 nm. The same TFPCs were also used to determine the absorbed X-ray power by the nano phosphors. These measurements provided a convenient and inexpensive way to determine the absolute quantum efficiency of nano phosphors, normally a difficult task. The measured absolute X-ray-to-optical fluorescence efficiency of the nano phosphors annealed at 1100 °C was 3.2%. This is the first time such efficiency for Eu/Gd2O3 nano phosphors is determined, and the measured efficiency is a fraction of the theoretically predicted maximum efficiency of 10% reported in the literature.

  7. Quantum Yield Heterogeneity among Single Nonblinking Quantum Dots Revealed by Atomic Structure-Quantum Optics Correlation.

    PubMed

    Orfield, Noah J; McBride, James R; Wang, Feng; Buck, Matthew R; Keene, Joseph D; Reid, Kemar R; Htoon, Han; Hollingsworth, Jennifer A; Rosenthal, Sandra J

    2016-02-23

    Physical variations in colloidal nanostructures give rise to heterogeneity in expressed optical behavior. This correlation between nanoscale structure and function demands interrogation of both atomic structure and photophysics at the level of single nanostructures to be fully understood. Herein, by conducting detailed analyses of fine atomic structure, chemical composition, and time-resolved single-photon photoluminescence data for the same individual nanocrystals, we reveal inhomogeneity in the quantum yields of single nonblinking "giant" CdSe/CdS core/shell quantum dots (g-QDs). We find that each g-QD possesses distinctive single exciton and biexciton quantum yields that result mainly from variations in the degree of charging, rather than from volume or structure inhomogeneity. We further establish that there is a very limited nonemissive "dark" fraction (<2%) among the studied g-QDs and present direct evidence that the g-QD core must lack inorganic passivation for the g-QD to be "dark". Therefore, in contrast to conventional QDs, ensemble photoluminescence quantum yield is principally defined by charging processes rather than the existence of dark g-QDs.

  8. Measuring the absolute deuterium-tritium neutron yield using the magnetic recoil spectrometer at OMEGA and the NIF.

    PubMed

    Casey, D T; Frenje, J A; Gatu Johnson, M; Séguin, F H; Li, C K; Petrasso, R D; Glebov, V Yu; Katz, J; Knauer, J P; Meyerhofer, D D; Sangster, T C; Bionta, R M; Bleuel, D L; Döppner, T; Glenzer, S; Hartouni, E; Hatchett, S P; Le Pape, S; Ma, T; MacKinnon, A; McKernan, M A; Moran, M; Moses, E; Park, H-S; Ralph, J; Remington, B A; Smalyuk, V; Yeamans, C B; Kline, J; Kyrala, G; Chandler, G A; Leeper, R J; Ruiz, C L; Cooper, G W; Nelson, A J; Fletcher, K; Kilkenny, J; Farrell, M; Jasion, D; Paguio, R

    2012-10-01

    A magnetic recoil spectrometer (MRS) has been installed and extensively used on OMEGA and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) for measurements of the absolute neutron spectrum from inertial confinement fusion implosions. From the neutron spectrum measured with the MRS, many critical implosion parameters are determined including the primary DT neutron yield, the ion temperature, and the down-scattered neutron yield. As the MRS detection efficiency is determined from first principles, the absolute DT neutron yield is obtained without cross-calibration to other techniques. The MRS primary DT neutron measurements at OMEGA and the NIF are shown to be in excellent agreement with previously established yield diagnostics on OMEGA, and with the newly commissioned nuclear activation diagnostics on the NIF.

  9. Control of the external photoluminescent quantum yield of emitters coupled to nanoantenna phased arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Ke; Verschuuren, Marc A.; Lozano, Gabriel

    2015-08-21

    Optical losses in metals represent the largest limitation to the external quantum yield of emitters coupled to plasmonic antennas. These losses can be at the emission wavelength, but they can be more important at shorter wavelengths, i.e., at the excitation wavelength of the emitters, where the conductivity of metals is usually lower. We present accurate measurements of the absolute external photoluminescent quantum yield of a thin layer of emitting material deposited over a periodic nanoantenna phased array. Emission and absorptance measurements of the sample are performed using a custom-made setup including an integrating sphere and variable angle excitation. The measurements reveal a strong dependence of the external quantum yield on the angle at which the optical field excites the sample. Such behavior is attributed to the coupling between far-field illumination and near-field excitation mediated by the collective resonances supported by the array. Numerical simulations confirm that the inherent losses associated with the metal can be greatly reduced by selecting an optimum angle of illumination, which boosts the light conversion efficiency in the emitting layer. This combined experimental and numerical characterization of the emission from plasmonic arrays reveals the need to carefully design the illumination to achieve the maximum external quantum yield.

  10. On the photoelectric quantum yield of small dust particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Hiroshi

    2016-07-01

    Photoelectron emission is crucial to electric charging of dust particles around main-sequence stars and gas heating in various dusty environments. An estimate of the photoelectric processes contains an ill-defined parameter called the photoelectric quantum yield, which is the total number of electrons ejected from a dust particle per absorbed photon. Here we revisit the so-called small particle effect of photoelectron emission and provide an analytical model to estimate photoelectric quantum yields of small dust particles in sizes down to nanometers. We show that the small particle effect elevates the photoelectric quantum yields of nanoparticles up to by a factor of 103 for carbon, water ice, and organics, and a factor of 102 for silicate, silicon carbide, and iron. We conclude the surface curvature of the particles is a quantity of great importance to the small particle effect, unless the particles are submicrometers in radius or larger.

  11. Unity quantum yield of photogenerated charges and band-like transport in quantum-dot solids.

    PubMed

    Talgorn, Elise; Gao, Yunan; Aerts, Michiel; Kunneman, Lucas T; Schins, Juleon M; Savenije, T J; van Huis, Marijn A; van der Zant, Herre S J; Houtepen, Arjan J; Siebbeles, Laurens D A

    2011-09-25

    Solid films of colloidal quantum dots show promise in the manufacture of photodetectors and solar cells. These devices require high yields of photogenerated charges and high carrier mobilities, which are difficult to achieve in quantum-dot films owing to a strong electron-hole interaction and quantum confinement. Here, we show that the quantum yield of photogenerated charges in strongly coupled PbSe quantum-dot films is unity over a large temperature range. At high photoexcitation density, a transition takes place from hopping between localized states to band-like transport. These strongly coupled quantum-dot films have electrical properties that approach those of crystalline bulk semiconductors, while retaining the size tunability and cheap processing properties of colloidal quantum dots.

  12. High quantum yield ZnO quantum dots synthesizing via an ultrasonication microreactor method.

    PubMed

    Yang, Weimin; Yang, Huafang; Ding, Wenhao; Zhang, Bing; Zhang, Le; Wang, Lixi; Yu, Mingxun; Zhang, Qitu

    2016-11-01

    Green emission ZnO quantum dots were synthesized by an ultrasonic microreactor. Ultrasonic radiation brought bubbles through ultrasonic cavitation. These bubbles built microreactor inside the microreactor. The photoluminescence properties of ZnO quantum dots synthesized with different flow rate, ultrasonic power and temperature were discussed. Flow rate, ultrasonic power and temperature would influence the type and quantity of defects in ZnO quantum dots. The sizes of ZnO quantum dots would be controlled by those conditions as well. Flow rate affected the reaction time. With the increasing of flow rate, the sizes of ZnO quantum dots decreased and the quantum yields first increased then decreased. Ultrasonic power changed the ultrasonic cavitation intensity, which affected the reaction energy and the separation of the solution. With the increasing of ultrasonic power, sizes of ZnO quantum dots first decreased then increased, while the quantum yields kept increasing. The effect of ultrasonic temperature on the photoluminescence properties of ZnO quantum dots was influenced by the flow rate. Different flow rate related to opposite changing trend. Moreover, the quantum yields of ZnO QDs synthesized by ultrasonic microreactor could reach 64.7%, which is higher than those synthesized only under ultrasonic radiation or only by microreactor. PMID:27245962

  13. High quantum yield ZnO quantum dots synthesizing via an ultrasonication microreactor method.

    PubMed

    Yang, Weimin; Yang, Huafang; Ding, Wenhao; Zhang, Bing; Zhang, Le; Wang, Lixi; Yu, Mingxun; Zhang, Qitu

    2016-11-01

    Green emission ZnO quantum dots were synthesized by an ultrasonic microreactor. Ultrasonic radiation brought bubbles through ultrasonic cavitation. These bubbles built microreactor inside the microreactor. The photoluminescence properties of ZnO quantum dots synthesized with different flow rate, ultrasonic power and temperature were discussed. Flow rate, ultrasonic power and temperature would influence the type and quantity of defects in ZnO quantum dots. The sizes of ZnO quantum dots would be controlled by those conditions as well. Flow rate affected the reaction time. With the increasing of flow rate, the sizes of ZnO quantum dots decreased and the quantum yields first increased then decreased. Ultrasonic power changed the ultrasonic cavitation intensity, which affected the reaction energy and the separation of the solution. With the increasing of ultrasonic power, sizes of ZnO quantum dots first decreased then increased, while the quantum yields kept increasing. The effect of ultrasonic temperature on the photoluminescence properties of ZnO quantum dots was influenced by the flow rate. Different flow rate related to opposite changing trend. Moreover, the quantum yields of ZnO QDs synthesized by ultrasonic microreactor could reach 64.7%, which is higher than those synthesized only under ultrasonic radiation or only by microreactor.

  14. Quantum Yield of Single Surface Plasmons Generated by a Quantum Dot Coupled with a Silver Nanowire.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiang; Wei, Hong; Xu, Hongxing

    2015-12-01

    The interactions between surface plasmons (SPs) in metal nanostructures and excitons in quantum emitters (QEs) lead to many interesting phenomena and potential applications that are strongly dependent on the quantum yield of SPs. The difficulty in distinguishing all the possible exciton recombination channels hinders the experimental determination of SP quantum yield. Here, we experimentally measured for the first time the quantum yield of single SPs generated by the exciton-plasmon coupling in a system composed of a single quantum dot and a silver nanowire (NW). By utilizing the SP guiding property of the NW, the decay rates of all the exciton recombination channels, i.e., direct free space radiation channel, SP generation channel, and nonradiative damping channel, are quantitatively obtained. It is determined that the optimum emitter-NW coupling distance for the largest SP quantum yield is about 10 nm, resulting from the different distance-dependent decay rates of the three channels. These results are important for manipulating the coupling between plasmonic nanostructures and QEs and developing on-chip quantum plasmonic devices for potential nanophotonic and quantum information applications.

  15. Photoluminescence quantum yield of PbS nanocrystals in colloidal suspensions

    SciTech Connect

    Greben, M.; Fucikova, A.; Valenta, J.

    2015-04-14

    The absolute photoluminescence (PL) quantum yield (QY) of oleic acid-capped colloidal PbS quantum dots (QDs) in toluene is thoroughly investigated as function of QD size, concentration, excitation photon energy, and conditions of storage. We observed anomalous decrease of QY with decreasing concentration for highly diluted suspensions. The ligand desorption and QD-oxidation are demonstrated to be responsible for this phenomenon. Excess of oleic acid in suspensions makes the QY values concentration-independent over the entire reabsorption-free range. The PL emission is shown to be dominated by surface-related recombinations with some contribution from QD-core transitions. We demonstrate that QD colloidal suspension stability improves with increasing the concentration and size of PbS QDs.

  16. Quantum yield of conversion of the dental photoinitiator camphorquinone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yin-Chu; Ferracane, Jack L.; Prahl, Scott A.

    2005-06-01

    The primary absorber in dental resins is the photoinitiators, which start the photo polymerization process. We studied the quantum yield of conversion of camphorquinone (CQ), a blue light photoinitiator, using 3M FreeLight LED lamp as the light curing unit. The molar extinction coefficient, ɛ469, of CQ was measured to be 46+/-2 cm-1/(mol/L) at 469 nm. The absorption coefficient change to the radiant exposure was measured at three different irradiances. The relationship between the CQ absorption coefficient and curing lamp radiant exposure was the same for different irradiances and fit an exponential function: μa469(H)= μao exp(-H/Hthreshold), where μao is 4.46+/-0.05 cm-1, and Hthreshold=43+/-4 J/cm2. Combining this exponential relationship with CQ molar extinction coefficient and the absorbed photon energy (i.e., the product of the radiant exposure with the absorption coefficient), we plotted CQ concentration [number of molecules/cm3] as a function of the accumulated absorbed photons per volume. The slope of the relationship is the quantum yield of the CQ conversion. Therefore, in our formulation (0.7 w% CQ with reducing agents 0.35 w% DMAEMA and 0.05 w% BHT) the quantum yield was solved to be 0.07+/-0.01 CQ conversion per absorbed photon.

  17. Miniature high-throughput chemosensing of yield, ee, and absolute configuration from crude reaction mixtures

    PubMed Central

    Bentley, Keith W.; Zhang, Peng; Wolf, Christian

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput experimentation (HTE) has emerged as a widely used technology that accelerates discovery and optimization processes with parallel small-scale reaction setups. A high-throughput screening (HTS) method capable of comprehensive analysis of crude asymmetric reaction mixtures (eliminating product derivatization or isolation) would provide transformative impact by matching the pace of HTE. We report how spontaneous in situ construction of stereodynamic metal probes from readily available, inexpensive starting materials can be applied to chiroptical chemosensing of the total amount, enantiomeric excess (ee), and absolute configuration of a wide variety of amines, diamines, amino alcohols, amino acids, carboxylic acids, α-hydroxy acids, and diols. This advance and HTS potential are highlighted with the analysis of 1 mg of crude reaction mixtures of a catalytic asymmetric reaction. This operationally simple assay uses a robust mix-and-measure protocol, is amenable to microscale platforms and automation, and provides critical time efficiency and sustainability advantages over traditional serial methods. PMID:26933684

  18. Absolute density measurement of SD radicals in a supersonic jet at the quantum-noise-limit.

    PubMed

    Mizouri, Arin; Deng, L Z; Eardley, Jack S; Nahler, N Hendrik; Wrede, Eckart; Carty, David

    2013-12-01

    The absolute density of SD radicals in a supersonic jet has been measured down to (1.1 ± 0.1) × 10(5) cm(-3) in a modestly specified apparatus that uses a cross-correlated combination of cavity ring-down and laser-induced fluorescence detection. Such a density corresponds to 215 ± 21 molecules in the probe volume at any given time. The minimum detectable absorption coefficient was quantum-noise-limited and measured to be (7.9 ± 0.6) × 10(-11) cm(-1), in 200 s of acquisition time, corresponding to a noise-equivalent absorption sensitivity for the apparatus of (1.6 ± 0.1) × 10(-9) cm(-1) Hz(-1/2).

  19. Absolute quantum cutting efficiency of Tb{sup 3+}-Yb{sup 3+} co-doped glass

    SciTech Connect

    Duan, Qianqian; Qin, Feng; Zhang, Zhiguo; Zhao, Hua; Cao, Wenwu

    2013-12-07

    The absolute quantum cutting efficiency of Tb{sup 3+}-Yb{sup 3+} co-doped glass was quantitatively measured by an integrating sphere detection system, which is independent of the excitation power. As the Yb{sup 3+} concentration increases, the near infrared quantum efficiency exhibited an exponential growth with an upper limit of 13.5%, but the visible light efficiency was reduced rapidly. As a result, the total quantum efficiency monotonically decreases rather than increases as theory predicted. In fact, the absolute quantum efficiency was far less than the theoretical value due to the low radiative efficiency of Tb{sup 3+} (<61%) and significant cross-relaxation nonradiative loss between Yb{sup 3+} ions.

  20. Accurate fluorescence quantum yield determination by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kempe, Daryan; Schöne, Antonie; Fitter, Jörg; Gabba, Matteo

    2015-04-01

    Here, we present a comparative method for the accurate determination of fluorescence quantum yields (QYs) by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. By exploiting the high sensitivity of single-molecule spectroscopy, we obtain the QYs of samples in the microliter range and at (sub)nanomolar concentrations. Additionally, in combination with fluorescence lifetime measurements, our method allows the quantification of both static and collisional quenching constants. Thus, besides being simple and fast, our method opens up the possibility to photophysically characterize labeled biomolecules under application-relevant conditions and with low sample consumption, which is often important in single-molecule studies.

  1. Measurements of absolute delayed neutron yield and group constants in the fast fission of {sup 235}U and {sup 237}Np

    SciTech Connect

    Loaiza, D.J.; Brunson, G.; Sanchez, R.; Butterfield, K.

    1998-03-01

    The delayed neutron activity resulting from the fast induced fission of {sup 235}U and {sup 237}Np has been studied. The six-group decay constants, relative abundances, and absolute yield of delayed neutrons from fast fission of {sup 235}U and {sup 237}Np were measured using the Godiva IV fast assembly at the Los Alamos Critical Experiments Facility. The absolute yield measured for {sup 235}U was 0.0163 {+-} 0.0008 neutron/fission. This value compares very well with the well-established Keepin absolute yield of 0.0165 {+-} 0.0005. The absolute yield value measured for {sup 237}Np was 0.0126 {+-} 0.0007. The measured delayed neutron parameters for {sup 235}U are corroborated with period (e-folding time) versus reactivity calculations.

  2. Spatial mapping of fluorophore quantum yield in diffusive media.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yanyu; Roblyer, Darren

    2015-08-01

    Fluorescence quantum yield (QY) indicates the efficiency of the fluorescence process. The QY of many fluorophores is sensitive to local tissue environments, highlighting the possibility of using QY as an indicator of important parameters such as pH or temperature. QY is commonly measured by comparison to a well-known standard in nonscattering media. We propose a new imaging method, called quantum yield imaging (QYI), to spatially map the QY of a fluorophore within an optically diffusive media. QYI utilizes the wide-field diffuse optical technique spatial frequency domain imaging (SFDI) as well as planar fluorescence imaging. SFDI is used to measure the optical properties of the background media and the absorption contributed by the fluorophore. The unknown QY is then calculated by combining information from both modalities. A fluorescent sample with known QY is used to account for instrument response. To demonstrate QYI, rhodamine B and SNARF-5 were imaged in liquid phantoms with different background optical properties. The methanol:water ratio and pH were changed for rhodamine B and SNARF-5 solvents, respectively, altering the QY of each through a wide range. QY was determined with an agreement of 0.021 and 0.012 for rhodamine B and SNARF-5, respectively. PMID:26308165

  3. Selective and absolute quantification of endogenous hypochlorous acid with quantum-dot conjugated microbeads.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yi-Cyun; Lu, Hsueh-Han; Wang, Wei-Ti; Liau, Ian

    2011-11-01

    Endogenous hypochlorous acid (HOCl) secreted by leukocytes plays a critical role in both the immune defense of mammalians and the pathogenesis of various diseases intimately related to inflammation. We report the first selective and absolute quantification of endogenous HOCl produced by leukocytes in vitro and in vivo with a novel quantum dot-based sensor. An activated human neutrophil secreted 6.5 ± 0.9 × 10(8) HOCl molecules into its phagosome, and kinetic measurement for the secretions showed that the extracellular generation of HOCl was temporally retarded, but the quantity eventually attained a level comparable with its intraphagosomal counterpart with a delay of about 1.5 h. The quantity of HOCl secreted from the hepatic leukocytes of rats with or without stimulation of lipopolysaccharide was also determined. These results indicate a possibility to extend our approach to not only clinical settings for quantitative assessment of the bactericidal capability of isolated leukocytes of patients but also fundamental biomedical research that requires critical evaluation of the inflammatory response of animals. PMID:21950322

  4. Synthesis of Luminescent Graphene Quantum Dots with High Quantum Yield and Their Toxicity Study

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Dan; Chen, Yunping; Li, Na; Li, Wen; Wang, Zhenguo; Zhu, Jingli; Zhang, Hong; Liu, Bin; Xu, Shan

    2015-01-01

    High fluorescence quantum yield graphene quantum dots (GQDs) have showed up as a new generation for bioimaging. In this work, luminescent GQDs were prepared by an ameliorative photo-Fenton reaction and a subsequent hydrothermal process using graphene oxide sheets as the precursor. The as-prepared GQDs were nanomaterials with size ranging from 2.3 to 6.4 nm and emitted intense green luminescence in water. The fluorescence quantum yield was as high as 24.6% (excited at 340 nm) and the fluorescence was strongest at pH 7. Moreover, the influences of low-concentration (12.5, 25 μg/mL) GQDs on the morphology, viability, membrane integrity, internal cellular reactive oxygen species level and mortality of HeLa cells were relatively weak, and the in vitro imaging demonstrated GQDs were mainly in the cytoplasm region. More strikingly, zebrafish embryos were co-cultured with GQDs for in vivo imaging, and the results of heart rate test showed the intake of small amounts of GQDs brought little harm to the cardiovascular of zebrafish. GQDs with high quantum yield and strong photoluminescence show good biocompatibility, thus they show good promising for cell imaging, biolabeling and other biomedical applications. PMID:26709828

  5. Luminescence quantum yields of gold nanoparticles varying with excitation wavelengths.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yuqing; Lu, Guowei; He, Yingbo; Shen, Hongming; Zhao, Jingyi; Xia, Keyu; Gong, Qihuang

    2016-01-28

    Luminescence quantum yields (QYs) of gold nanoparticles including nanorods, nanobipyramids and nanospheres are measured elaborately at a single nanoparticle level with different excitation wavelengths. It is found that the QYs of the nanostructures are essentially dependent on the excitation wavelength. The QY is higher when the excitation wavelength is blue-detuned and close to the nanoparticles' surface plasmon resonance peak. A phenomenological model based on the plasmonic resonator concept is proposed to understand the experimental findings. The excitation wavelength dependent QY is attributed to the wavelength dependent coupling efficiency between the free electron oscillation and the intrinsic plasmon resonant radiative mode. These studies should contribute to the understanding of one-photon luminescence from metallic nanostructures and plasmonic surface enhanced spectroscopy. PMID:26731570

  6. Luminescence quantum yields of gold nanoparticles varying with excitation wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Yuqing; Lu, Guowei; He, Yingbo; Shen, Hongming; Zhao, Jingyi; Xia, Keyu; Gong, Qihuang

    2016-01-01

    Luminescence quantum yields (QYs) of gold nanoparticles including nanorods, nanobipyramids and nanospheres are measured elaborately at a single nanoparticle level with different excitation wavelengths. It is found that the QYs of the nanostructures are essentially dependent on the excitation wavelength. The QY is higher when the excitation wavelength is blue-detuned and close to the nanoparticles' surface plasmon resonance peak. A phenomenological model based on the plasmonic resonator concept is proposed to understand the experimental findings. The excitation wavelength dependent QY is attributed to the wavelength dependent coupling efficiency between the free electron oscillation and the intrinsic plasmon resonant radiative mode. These studies should contribute to the understanding of one-photon luminescence from metallic nanostructures and plasmonic surface enhanced spectroscopy.

  7. Film quantum yields of EUV& ultra-high PAG photoresists

    SciTech Connect

    Hassanein, Elsayed; Higgins, Craig; Naulleau, Patrick; Matyi, Richard; Gallatin, Greg; Denbeaux, Gregory; Antohe, Alin; Thackery, Jim; Spear, Kathleen; Szmanda, Charles; Anderson, Christopher N.; Niakoula, Dimitra; Malloy, Matthew; Khurshid, Anwar; Montgomery, Cecilia; Piscani, Emil C.; Rudack, Andrew; Byers, Jeff; Ma, Andy; Dean, Kim; Brainard, Robert

    2008-01-10

    Base titration methods are used to determine C-parameters for three industrial EUV photoresist platforms (EUV-2D, MET-2D, XP5496) and twenty academic EUV photoresist platforms. X-ray reflectometry is used to measure the density of these resists, and leads to the determination of absorbance and film quantum yields (FQY). Ultrahigh levels ofPAG show divergent mechanisms for production of photo acids beyond PAG concentrations of 0.35 moles/liter. The FQY of sulfonium PAGs level off, whereas resists prepared with iodonium PAG show FQY s that increase beyond PAG concentrations of 0.35 moles/liter, reaching record highs of 8-13 acids generatedlEUV photons absorbed.

  8. Progress in obtaining an absolute calibration of a total deuterium-tritium neutron yield diagnostic based on copper activationa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz, C. L.; Chandler, G. A.; Cooper, G. W.; Fehl, D. L.; Hahn, K. D.; Leeper, R. J.; McWatters, B. R.; Nelson, A. J.; Smelser, R. M.; Snow, C. S.; Torres, J. A.

    2012-10-01

    The 350-keV Cockroft-Walton accelerator at Sandia National laboratory's Ion Beam facility is being used to calibrate absolutely a total DT neutron yield diagnostic based on the 63Cu(n,2n)62Cu(β+) reaction. These investigations have led to first-order uncertainties approaching 5% or better. The experiments employ the associated-particle technique. Deuterons at 175 keV impinge a 2.6 μm thick erbium tritide target producing 14.1 MeV neutrons from the T(d,n)4He reaction. The alpha particles emitted are measured at two angles relative to the beam direction and used to infer the neutron flux on a copper sample. The induced 62Cu activity is then measured and related to the neutron flux. This method is known as the F-factor technique. Description of the associated-particle method, copper sample geometries employed, and the present estimates of the uncertainties to the F-factor obtained are given.

  9. Absolute rate constant and O(3P) yield for the O(1D)+N2O reaction in the temperature range 227 K to 719 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vranckx, S.; Peeters, J.; Carl, S. A.

    2008-10-01

    The absolute rate constant for the reaction that is the major source of stratospheric NOx, O(1D)+N2O → products, has been determined in the temperature range 227 K to 719 K, and, in the temperature range 248 K to 600 K, the fraction of the reaction that yields O(3P). Both the rate constants and product yields were determined using a recently-developed chemiluminescence technique for monitoring O(1D) that allows for higher precision determinations for both rate constants, and, particularly, O(3P) yields, than do other methods. We found the rate constant, kR1, to be essentially independent of temperature between 400 K and 227 K, having a value of (1.37±0.11)×10-10 cm3 s-1, and for temperatures greater than 450 K a marked decrease in rate constant was observed, with a rate constant of only (0.94±0.11)×10-10 cm3 s-1 at 719 K. The rate constants determined over the 227 K 400 K range show very low scatter and are significantly greater, by 20% at room temperature and 15% at 227 K, than the current recommended values. The fraction of O(3P) produced in this reaction was determined to be 0.002±0.002 at 250 K rising steadily to 0.010±0.004 at 600 K, thus the channel producing O(3P) can be entirely neglected in atmospheric kinetic modeling calculations. A further result of this study is an expression of the relative quantum yields as a function of temperature for the chemiluminescence reactions (kCL1)C2H + O(1D) → CH(A) + CO and (kCL2)C2H + O(3P) → CH(A) + CO, both followed by CH(A) → CH(X) + hν, as kCL1(T)/kCL2(T)=(32.8T-3050)/(6.29T+398).

  10. Absolute rate constant and O(3P) yield for the O(1D)+N2O reaction in the temperature range 227 K to 719 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vranckx, S.; Peeters, J.; Carl, S. A.

    2008-05-01

    We have determined, in the temperature range 227 K to 719 K, the absolute rate constant for the reaction O(1D)+N2O → products and, in the temperature range 248 K to 600 K, the fraction of the reaction that yields O(3P). Both the rate constants and product yields were determined using a recently-developed chemiluminescence technique for monitoring O(1D) that allows for higher precision determinations for both rate constants, and, particularly, O(3P) yields, than do other methods. We found the rate constant, kR1, to be essentially independent of temperature between 400 K and 227 K, having a value of (1.37±0.09)×10-10 cm3 s-1. For temperatures greater than 450 K a marked decrease in value was observed, with a rate constant of only (0.94±0.11)×10-10 cm3 s-1 at 719 K. The rate constants determined over the 227 K-400 K range show very low scatter and are significantly greater, by 20% at room temperature and by 15% at 227 K, than the current recommended values. The fraction of O(3P) produced in this reaction was determined to be 0.002±0.002 at 250 K rising steadily to 0.010±0.004 at 600 K, thus the channel producing O(3P) can be entirely neglected in atmospheric kinetic modeling calculations. A further result of this study is an expression of the relative quantum yields as a function of temperature for the chemiluminescence reactions (kCL1) C2H+O(1D) → CH(A)+CO and (kCL2) C2H+O(3P) → CH(A)+CO, both followed by CH(A) → CH(X)+hν, as kCL1(T)/kCL2(T)=(32.8T-3050)/(6.29T+398).

  11. Atom-chip based quantum gravimetry for the precise determination of absolute local gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abend, S.

    2015-12-01

    We present a novel technique for the precise measurement of absolute local gravity based on cold atom interferometry. Atom interferometry utilizes the interference of matter waves interrogated by laser light to read out inertial forces. Today's generation of these devices typically operate with test mass samples, that consists of ensembles of laser cooled atoms. Their performance is limited by the velocity spread and finite-size of the test masses that impose systematic uncertainties at the level of a few μGal. Rather than laser cooled atoms we employ quantum degenerate ensembles, so called Bose-Einstein condensates, as ultra-sensitive probes for gravity. These sources offer unique properties in temperature as well as in ensemble size that will allow to overcome the current limitations with the next generation of sensors. Furthermore, atom-chip technologies offer the possibility to generate Bose-Einstein condensates in a fast and reliable way. We show a lab-based prototype that uses the atom-chip itself to retro-reflect the interrogation laser and thus serving as inertial reference inside the vacuum. With this setup it is possible to demonstrate all necessary steps to measure gravity, including the preparation of the source, spanning an interferometer as well as the detection of the output signal, within an area of 1 cm3 right below the atom-chip and to analyze relevant systematic effects. In the framework of the center of excellence geoQ a next generation device is under construction at the Institut für Quantenoptik, that will allow for in-field measurements. This device will feature a state-of-the-art atom-chip source with a high-flux of ultra-cold atoms at a repetition rate of 1-2 Hz. In cooperation with the Müller group at the Institut für Erdmessung the sensor will be characterized in the laboratory first, to be ultimately employed in campaigns to measure the Fennoscandian uplift at the level of 1 μGal. The presented work is part of the center of

  12. Near-unity photoluminescence quantum yield in MoS₂.

    PubMed

    Amani, Matin; Lien, Der-Hsien; Kiriya, Daisuke; Xiao, Jun; Azcatl, Angelica; Noh, Jiyoung; Madhvapathy, Surabhi R; Addou, Rafik; KC, Santosh; Dubey, Madan; Cho, Kyeongjae; Wallace, Robert M; Lee, Si-Chen; He, Jr-Hau; Ager, Joel W; Zhang, Xiang; Yablonovitch, Eli; Javey, Ali

    2015-11-27

    Two-dimensional (2D) transition metal dichalcogenides have emerged as a promising material system for optoelectronic applications, but their primary figure of merit, the room-temperature photoluminescence quantum yield (QY), is extremely low. The prototypical 2D material molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) is reported to have a maximum QY of 0.6%, which indicates a considerable defect density. Here we report on an air-stable, solution-based chemical treatment by an organic superacid, which uniformly enhances the photoluminescence and minority carrier lifetime of MoS2 monolayers by more than two orders of magnitude. The treatment eliminates defect-mediated nonradiative recombination, thus resulting in a final QY of more than 95%, with a longest-observed lifetime of 10.8 ± 0.6 nanoseconds. Our ability to obtain optoelectronic monolayers with near-perfect properties opens the door for the development of highly efficient light-emitting diodes, lasers, and solar cells based on 2D materials.

  13. Near-unity photoluminescence quantum yield in MoS₂.

    PubMed

    Amani, Matin; Lien, Der-Hsien; Kiriya, Daisuke; Xiao, Jun; Azcatl, Angelica; Noh, Jiyoung; Madhvapathy, Surabhi R; Addou, Rafik; KC, Santosh; Dubey, Madan; Cho, Kyeongjae; Wallace, Robert M; Lee, Si-Chen; He, Jr-Hau; Ager, Joel W; Zhang, Xiang; Yablonovitch, Eli; Javey, Ali

    2015-11-27

    Two-dimensional (2D) transition metal dichalcogenides have emerged as a promising material system for optoelectronic applications, but their primary figure of merit, the room-temperature photoluminescence quantum yield (QY), is extremely low. The prototypical 2D material molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) is reported to have a maximum QY of 0.6%, which indicates a considerable defect density. Here we report on an air-stable, solution-based chemical treatment by an organic superacid, which uniformly enhances the photoluminescence and minority carrier lifetime of MoS2 monolayers by more than two orders of magnitude. The treatment eliminates defect-mediated nonradiative recombination, thus resulting in a final QY of more than 95%, with a longest-observed lifetime of 10.8 ± 0.6 nanoseconds. Our ability to obtain optoelectronic monolayers with near-perfect properties opens the door for the development of highly efficient light-emitting diodes, lasers, and solar cells based on 2D materials. PMID:26612948

  14. Near-unity quantum yields from chloride treated CdTe colloidal quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Page, Robert C; Espinobarro-Velazquez, Daniel; Leontiadou, Marina A; Smith, Charles; Lewis, Edward A; Haigh, Sarah J; Li, Chen; Radtke, Hanna; Pengpad, Atip; Bondino, Federica; Magnano, Elena; Pis, Igor; Flavell, Wendy R; O'Brien, Paul; Binks, David J

    2015-04-01

    Colloidal quantum dots (CQDs) are promising materials for novel light sources and solar energy conversion. However, trap states associated with the CQD surface can produce non-radiative charge recombination that significantly reduces device performance. Here a facile post-synthetic treatment of CdTe CQDs is demonstrated that uses chloride ions to achieve near-complete suppression of surface trapping, resulting in an increase of photoluminescence (PL) quantum yield (QY) from ca. 5% to up to 97.2 ± 2.5%. The effect of the treatment is characterised by absorption and PL spectroscopy, PL decay, scanning transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. This process also dramatically improves the air-stability of the CQDs: before treatment the PL is largely quenched after 1 hour of air-exposure, whilst the treated samples showed a PL QY of nearly 50% after more than 12 hours.

  15. Are Fluorescence Quantum Yields So Tricky to Measure? A Demonstration Using Familiar Stationery Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fery-Forgues*, Suzanne; Lavabre, Dominique

    1999-09-01

    Fluorescence quantum yields are used to quantify the efficiency of the emission process. In spite of the importance of these data, experimental directions for their acquisition are rarely given. A general procedure for determining the relative fluorescence quantum yield of solutions is described here, drawing attention to the many pitfalls that students may encounter. Starting materials are common yellow and pink highlighter pens.

  16. Local Density Fluctuations Predict Photoisomerization Quantum Yield of Azobenzene-Modified DNA.

    PubMed

    Kingsland, Addie; Samai, Soumyadyuti; Yan, Yunqi; Ginger, David S; Maibaum, Lutz

    2016-08-01

    Azobenzene incorporated into DNA has a photoisomerization quantum yield that depends on the DNA sequence near the azobenzene attachment site. We use Molecular Dynamics computer simulations to elucidate which physical properties of the modified DNA determine the quantum yield. We show for a wide range of DNA sequences that the photoisomerization quantum yield is strongly correlated with the variance of the number of atoms in close proximity to the outer phenyl ring of the azobenzene group. We infer that quantum yield is controlled by the availability of fluctuations that enable the conformational change. We demonstrate that these simulations can be used as a qualitative predictive tool by calculating the quantum yield for several novel DNA sequences, and confirming these predictions using UV-vis spectroscopy. Our results will be useful for the development of a wide range of applications of photoresponsive DNA nanotechnology. PMID:27428569

  17. Effects of inter-nanocrystal distance on luminescence quantum yield in ensembles of Si nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Valenta, J. Greben, M.; Gutsch, S.; Hiller, D.; Zacharias, M.

    2014-12-15

    The absolute photoluminescence (PL) quantum yield (QY) of multilayers of Silicon nanocrystals (SiNCs) separated by SiO{sub 2} barriers were thoroughly studied as function of the barrier thickness, excitation wavelength, and temperature. By mastering the plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition growth, we produce a series of samples with the same size-distribution of SiNCs but variable interlayer barrier distance. These samples enable us to clearly demonstrate that the increase of barrier thickness from ∼1 to larger than 2 nm induces doubling of the PL QY value, which corresponds to the change of number of close neighbors in the hcp structure. The temperature dependence of PL QY suggests that the PL QY changes are due to a thermally activated transport of excitation into non-radiative centers in dark NCs or in the matrix. We estimate that dark NCs represent about 68% of the ensemble of NCs. The PL QY excitation spectra show no significant changes upon changing the barrier thickness and no clear carrier multiplication effects. The dominant effect is the gradual decrease of the PL QY with increasing excitation photon energy.

  18. Creating high yield water soluble luminescent graphene quantum dots via exfoliating and disintegrating carbon nanotubes and graphite flakes.

    PubMed

    Lin, Liangxu; Zhang, Shaowei

    2012-10-21

    We have developed an effective method to exfoliate and disintegrate multi-walled carbon nanotubes and graphite flakes. With this technique, high yield production of luminescent graphene quantum dots with high quantum yield and low oxidization can be achieved.

  19. Electron quantum yields from a barium photocathode illuminated with polarized light

    SciTech Connect

    Conde, M.E.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Kim, K.J.; Kwon, S.I.; Leung, K.N.; Young, A.T.

    1993-05-01

    Photoemission measurements with a barium photo-cathode and a nitrogen laser are reported. The cathode is prepared by evaporating barium onto a copper disc. Radiation from a nitrogen laser (337 nm, 10 ns) is polarized and strikes the cathode surface at variable angles. An electron quantum yield as high as 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}3} is observed. The dependence of the quantum yield on the beam polarization and angle of incidence is investigated. The results indicate that higher quantum yields are achieved when the laser beam is incident at an angle of {approximately}55{degree} and is polarized perpendicular to the plane of incidence.

  20. Gradient CdSe/CdS Quantum Dots with Room Temperature Biexciton Unity Quantum Yield.

    PubMed

    Nasilowski, Michel; Spinicelli, Piernicola; Patriarche, Gilles; Dubertret, Benoît

    2015-06-10

    Auger recombination is a major limitation for the fluorescent emission of quantum dots (QDs). It is the main source of QDs fluorescence blinking at the single-particle level. At high-power excitation, when several charge carriers are formed inside a QD, Auger becomes more efficient and severely decreases the quantum yield (QY) of multiexcitons. This limits the efficiency and the use of colloidal QDs in applications where intense light output is required. Here, we present a new generation of thick-shell CdSe/CdS QDs with dimensions >40 nm and a composition gradient between the core and the shell that exhibits 100% QY for the emission of both the monoexciton and the biexciton in air and at room temperature for all the QDs we have observed. The fluorescence emission of these QDs is perfectly Poissonian at the single-particle level at different excitation levels and temperatures, from 30 to 300 K. In these QDs, the emission of high-order (>2) multiexcitons is quite efficient, and we observe white light emission at the single-QD level when high excitation power is used. These gradient thick shell QDs confirm the suppression of Auger recombination in gradient core/shell structures and help further establish the colloidal QDs with a gradient shell as a very stable source of light even under high excitation.

  1. Gradient CdSe/CdS Quantum Dots with Room Temperature Biexciton Unity Quantum Yield.

    PubMed

    Nasilowski, Michel; Spinicelli, Piernicola; Patriarche, Gilles; Dubertret, Benoît

    2015-06-10

    Auger recombination is a major limitation for the fluorescent emission of quantum dots (QDs). It is the main source of QDs fluorescence blinking at the single-particle level. At high-power excitation, when several charge carriers are formed inside a QD, Auger becomes more efficient and severely decreases the quantum yield (QY) of multiexcitons. This limits the efficiency and the use of colloidal QDs in applications where intense light output is required. Here, we present a new generation of thick-shell CdSe/CdS QDs with dimensions >40 nm and a composition gradient between the core and the shell that exhibits 100% QY for the emission of both the monoexciton and the biexciton in air and at room temperature for all the QDs we have observed. The fluorescence emission of these QDs is perfectly Poissonian at the single-particle level at different excitation levels and temperatures, from 30 to 300 K. In these QDs, the emission of high-order (>2) multiexcitons is quite efficient, and we observe white light emission at the single-QD level when high excitation power is used. These gradient thick shell QDs confirm the suppression of Auger recombination in gradient core/shell structures and help further establish the colloidal QDs with a gradient shell as a very stable source of light even under high excitation. PMID:25990468

  2. High quantum yield graphene quantum dots decorated TiO2 nanotubes for enhancing photocatalytic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Ailan; Xie, Haolong; Xu, Xinmei; Zhang, Yangyu; Wen, Shengwu; Cui, Yifan

    2016-07-01

    Graphene quantum dots (GQDs) with high quantum yield (about 23.6% at an excitation wavelength of 320 nm) and GQDs/TiO2 nanotubes (GQDs/TiO2 NTs) composites were achieved by a simple hydrothermal method at low temperature. Photoluminescence characterization showed that the GQDs exhibited the down-conversion PL features at excitation from 300 to 420 nm and up-conversion photoluminescence in the range of 600-800 nm. The photocatalytic activity of prepared GQDs/TiO2 NTs composites on the degradation of methyl orange (MO) was significantly enhanced compared with that of pure TiO2 nanotubes (TiO2 NTs). For the composites coupling with 1.5%, 2.5% and 3.5% GQDs, the degradation of MO after 20 min irradiation under UV-vis light irradiation (λ = 380-780 nm) were 80.52%, 94.64% and 51.91%, respectively, which are much higher than that of pure TiO2 NTs (35.41%). It was inferred from the results of characterization that the improved photocatalytic activity of the GQDs/TiO2 NTs composites was attributed to the synergetic effect of up-conversion properties of the GQDs, enhanced visible light absorption and efficient separation of photogenerated electron-holes of the GQDs/TiO2 composite.

  3. Quantum yield and lifetime data analysis for the UV curable quantum dot nanocomposites

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Qi; Liu, Cui; Wei, Wenjun; Xu, Heng; You, Qingliang; Zou, Linling; Liu, Xueqing; Liu, Jiyan; Cao, Yuan-Cheng; Zheng, Guang

    2016-01-01

    The quantum yield (QY) and lifetime are the important parameters for the photoluminescent materials. The data here report the changes of the QY and lifetime for the quantum dot (QD) nanocomposite after the UV curing of the urethane acrylate prepolymer. The data were collected based on the water soluble CdTe QDs and urethane acrylate prepolymer. Colloidal QDs were in various concentration from 0.5×10−3 molL−1 to 10×10−3 molL−1, and 1% (wt%) 1173 was the photoinitiator. The QY before the curing was 56.3%, 57.8% and 58.6% for the QDs 510 nm, 540 nm and 620 nm, respectively. The QY after the curing was changed to 8.9%, 9.6% and 13.4% for the QDs 510 nm, 540 nm and 620 nm, respectively. Lifetime data showed that the lifetime was changed from 23.71 ns, 24.55 ns, 23.52 ns to 1.29 ns, 2.74 ns, 2.45 ns for the QDs 510 nm, 540 nm and 620 nm, respectively. PMID:26909375

  4. A method for in situ absolute DD yield calibration of neutron time-of-flight detectors on OMEGA using CR-39-based proton detectors.

    PubMed

    Waugh, C J; Rosenberg, M J; Zylstra, A B; Frenje, J A; Séguin, F H; Petrasso, R D; Glebov, V Yu; Sangster, T C; Stoeckl, C

    2015-05-01

    Neutron time of flight (nTOF) detectors are used routinely to measure the absolute DD neutron yield at OMEGA. To check the DD yield calibration of these detectors, originally calibrated using indium activation systems, which in turn were cross-calibrated to NOVA nTOF detectors in the early 1990s, a direct in situ calibration method using CR-39 range filter proton detectors has been successfully developed. By measuring DD neutron and proton yields from a series of exploding pusher implosions at OMEGA, a yield calibration coefficient of 1.09 ± 0.02 (relative to the previous coefficient) was determined for the 3m nTOF detector. In addition, comparison of these and other shots indicates that significant reduction in charged particle flux anisotropies is achieved when bang time occurs significantly (on the order of 500 ps) after the trailing edge of the laser pulse. This is an important observation as the main source of the yield calibration error is due to particle anisotropies caused by field effects. The results indicate that the CR-39-nTOF in situ calibration method can serve as a valuable technique for calibrating and reducing the uncertainty in the DD absolute yield calibration of nTOF detector systems on OMEGA, the National Ignition Facility, and laser megajoule. PMID:26026524

  5. A method for in situ absolute DD yield calibration of neutron time-of-flight detectors on OMEGA using CR-39-based proton detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Waugh, C. J. Zylstra, A. B.; Frenje, J. A.; Séguin, F. H.; Petrasso, R. D.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Sangster, T. C.; Stoeckl, C.

    2015-05-15

    Neutron time of flight (nTOF) detectors are used routinely to measure the absolute DD neutron yield at OMEGA. To check the DD yield calibration of these detectors, originally calibrated using indium activation systems, which in turn were cross-calibrated to NOVA nTOF detectors in the early 1990s, a direct in situ calibration method using CR-39 range filter proton detectors has been successfully developed. By measuring DD neutron and proton yields from a series of exploding pusher implosions at OMEGA, a yield calibration coefficient of 1.09 ± 0.02 (relative to the previous coefficient) was determined for the 3m nTOF detector. In addition, comparison of these and other shots indicates that significant reduction in charged particle flux anisotropies is achieved when bang time occurs significantly (on the order of 500 ps) after the trailing edge of the laser pulse. This is an important observation as the main source of the yield calibration error is due to particle anisotropies caused by field effects. The results indicate that the CR-39-nTOF in situ calibration method can serve as a valuable technique for calibrating and reducing the uncertainty in the DD absolute yield calibration of nTOF detector systems on OMEGA, the National Ignition Facility, and laser megajoule.

  6. A method for in situ absolute DD yield calibration of neutron time-of-flight detectors on OMEGA using CR-39-based proton detectors

    DOE PAGES

    Waugh, C. J.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Zylstra, A. B.; Frenje, J. A.; Seguin, F. H.; Petrasso, R. D.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Sangster, T. C.; Stoeckl, C.

    2015-05-27

    Neutron time of flight (nTOF) detectors are used routinely to measure the absolute DD neutron yield at OMEGA. To check the DD yield calibration of these detectors, originally calibrated using indium activation systems, which in turn were cross-calibrated to NOVA nTOF detectors in the early 1990s, a direct in situ calibration method using CR-39 range filter proton detectors has been successfully developed. By measuring DD neutron and proton yields from a series of exploding pusher implosions at OMEGA, a yield calibration coefficient of 1.09 ± 0.02 (relative to the previous coefficient) was determined for the 3m nTOF detector. In addition,more » comparison of these and other shots indicates that significant reduction in charged particle flux anisotropies is achieved when bang time occurs significantly (on the order of 500 ps) after the trailing edge of the laser pulse. This is an important observation as the main source of the yield calibration error is due to particle anisotropies caused by field effects. The results indicate that the CR-39-nTOF in situ calibration method can serve as a valuable technique for calibrating and reducing the uncertainty in the DD absolute yield calibration of nTOF detector systems on OMEGA, the National Ignition Facility, and laser megajoule.« less

  7. A method for in situ absolute DD yield calibration of neutron time-of-flight detectors on OMEGA using CR-39-based proton detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Waugh, C. J.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Zylstra, A. B.; Frenje, J. A.; Seguin, F. H.; Petrasso, R. D.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Sangster, T. C.; Stoeckl, C.

    2015-05-27

    Neutron time of flight (nTOF) detectors are used routinely to measure the absolute DD neutron yield at OMEGA. To check the DD yield calibration of these detectors, originally calibrated using indium activation systems, which in turn were cross-calibrated to NOVA nTOF detectors in the early 1990s, a direct in situ calibration method using CR-39 range filter proton detectors has been successfully developed. By measuring DD neutron and proton yields from a series of exploding pusher implosions at OMEGA, a yield calibration coefficient of 1.09 ± 0.02 (relative to the previous coefficient) was determined for the 3m nTOF detector. In addition, comparison of these and other shots indicates that significant reduction in charged particle flux anisotropies is achieved when bang time occurs significantly (on the order of 500 ps) after the trailing edge of the laser pulse. This is an important observation as the main source of the yield calibration error is due to particle anisotropies caused by field effects. The results indicate that the CR-39-nTOF in situ calibration method can serve as a valuable technique for calibrating and reducing the uncertainty in the DD absolute yield calibration of nTOF detector systems on OMEGA, the National Ignition Facility, and laser megajoule.

  8. DETERMINATION OF APPARENT QUANTUM YIELD SPECTRA FOR THE FORMATION OF BIOLOGICALLY LABILE PHOTOPRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Quantum yield spectra for the photochemical formation of biologically labile photoproducts from dissolved organic matter (DOM) have not been available previously, although they would greatly facilitate attempts to model photoproduct formation rates across latitudinal, seasonal, a...

  9. Comparison of photoluminescence quantum yield of single gold nanobipyramids and gold nanorods.

    PubMed

    Rao, Wenye; Li, Qiang; Wang, Yuanzhao; Li, Tao; Wu, Lijun

    2015-03-24

    Fluorescent gold nanoparticles with high quantum yield are highly desirable for optical imaging in the fields of biology and materials science. We investigate the one-photon photoluminescence (PL) properties of individual gold nanobipyramids (GNBs) and find they are analogous to those of the extensively studied gold nanorods (GNRs). By combining PL and atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements with discrete dipole approximation (DDA) simulations, we obtain the PL quantum yield of single GNRs and GNBs. Compared to GNRs in the similar surface plasmon resonance range, the PL quantum yield of GNBs is found to be doubled. The stronger field intensity around GNBs can explain their higher PL quantum yields. Our research would provide deeper understanding of the mechanism of PL from gold nanoparticles as well as be beneficial for finding out optical imaging labels with high contrast.

  10. Primary quantum yields of ketyl radicals in photoreduction by amines. Abstraction of H from N

    SciTech Connect

    Inbar, S.; Linschitz, H.; Cohen, S.G.

    1980-02-13

    Results of laser flash photolysis studies of the primary reaction of benzophenone triplet with aliphatic amines in benzene solution are reported. Quantum yield of formation of benzophenone ketyl radical was 0.9 - 1.0. Quantum yields for reduction of ketone also were determined for various amines, and the effects of tert-butyl alcohol on radical formation was investigated. Data indicated that H is not abstracted from -CH/sub 3/ but is abstracted efficiently from -NH/sub 2/. The very high quantum yields observed with tertiary and secondary amines were thought to imply exciplex formation, but lower quantum yields with primary amines were conditionally attributed to higher ionization potentials. (BLM)

  11. Absolute determination of photoluminescence quantum efficiency using an integrating sphere setup

    SciTech Connect

    Leyre, S.; Coutino-Gonzalez, E.; Hofkens, J.; Joos, J. J.; Poelman, D.; Smet, P. F.; Ryckaert, J.; Meuret, Y.; Durinck, G.; Hanselaer, P.

    2014-12-15

    An integrating sphere-based setup to obtain a quick and reliable determination of the internal quantum efficiency of strongly scattering luminescent materials is presented. In literature, two distinct but similar measurement procedures are frequently mentioned: a “two measurement” and a “three measurement” approach. Both methods are evaluated by applying the rigorous integrating sphere theory. It was found that both measurement procedures are valid. Additionally, the two methods are compared with respect to the uncertainty budget of the obtained values of the quantum efficiency. An inter-laboratory validation using the two distinct procedures was performed. The conclusions from the theoretical study were confirmed by the experimental data.

  12. On the possibility of long-wavelength long-lifetime high-quantum-yield luminophores.

    PubMed

    Lakowicz, J R; Piszczek, G; Kang, J S

    2001-01-01

    We describe an approach to creating a new class of luminophores which display both long wavelength emissions exceeding 600 nm and long lifetimes. These luminophores are based on resonance energy transfer (RET) from a long lifetime donor to a short lifetime but long wavelength acceptor. We demonstrated the possibility of obtaining these desirable spectral properties using donors and acceptors noncovalently bound to DNA. The donor was a ruthenium (Ru) metal-ligand complex in which one of the diimine ligands intercalated into double-helix DNA. The acceptors were either nile blue, TOTO-3, or TO-PRO-3. Upon binding of the acceptor to donor-labeled DNA, we found that the acceptor quantum yield was remarkably enhanced so that the wavelength-integrated intensities of the donor and acceptor bound to DNA were many-fold greater than the intensity of the donor and acceptor alone when separately bound to DNA. The origin of this effect is efficient energy transfer from the donor. Under these conditions the effective overall quantum yield approaches that of the acceptor. Importantly, the increased quantum yield can be obtained while maintaining usefully long apparent acceptor lifetimes of 30 to 80 ns. The effect of an increased quantum yield from a low quantum yield donor may find use in assays to detect macromolecular binding interactions. These results suggest the synthesis of covalently linked donor-acceptor pairs with the desirable spectral properties of long wavelength emission, high quantum yield, and moderately long lifetimes for gated detection.

  13. Absolute Rb one-color two-photon ionization cross-section measurement near a quantum interference

    SciTech Connect

    Takekoshi, T.; Brooke, G.M.; Patterson, B.M.; Knize, R.J.

    2004-05-01

    We observe destructive interference in the ground-state Rb two-photon ionization cross section when the single photon energy is tuned between the 5S{yields}5P and 5S{yields}6P transition energies. The minimum cross section is 5.9(1.5)x10{sup -52} cm{sup 4} s and it occurs at a wavelength of 441.0(3) nm (in vacuo). Relative measurements of these cross sections are made at various wavelengths by counting ions produced when magneto-optically trapped Rb atoms are exposed to light from a tunable pulsed laser. This relative curve is calibrated to an absolute cross-section measurement at 532 nm using the trap loss method. A simple calculation agrees reasonably with our results.

  14. Measurements of barium photocathode quantum yields at four excimer laser wavelengths

    SciTech Connect

    Van Loy, M.D.; Young, A.T.; Leung, K.N.

    1992-06-01

    The electron quantum yields from barium cathodes excited by excimer laser radiation at 193, 248, 308, and 351 nm have been determined. Experiments with different cathode surface preparation techniques reveal that deposition of barium film a few microns thick on a clean copper surface under moderate vacuum conditions achieves relatively high quantum efficiencies. Quantum yields measured from surfaces prepared in this manner are 2.3 x 10{sup -3} at 193 nm, 7.6 x 10{sup - 4} at 248 nm, 6.1 x 10{sup -4} at 308 nm, and 4.0 x 10{sup -4} at 351 nm. Other preparation techniques, such as laser cleaning of a solid barium surface, produced quantum yields that were at least an order of magnitude lower than these values.

  15. Ensemble brightening and enhanced quantum yield in size-purified silicon nanocrystals

    DOE PAGES

    Miller, Joseph B.; Van Sickle, Austin R.; Anthony, Rebecca J.; Kroll, Daniel M.; Kortshagen, Uwe R.; Hobbie, Erik K.

    2012-07-18

    Here, we report on the quantum yield, photoluminescence (PL) lifetime and ensemble photoluminescent stability of highly monodisperse plasma-synthesized silicon nanocrystals (SiNCs) prepared though density-gradient ultracentrifugation in mixed organic solvents. Improved size uniformity leads to a reduction in PL line width and the emergence of entropic order in dry nanocrystal films. We find excellent agreement with the anticipated trends of quantum confinement in nanocrystalline silicon, with a solution quantum yield that is independent of nanocrystal size for the larger fractions but decreases dramatically with size for the smaller fractions. We also find a significant PL enhancement in films assembled from themore » fractions, and we use a combination of measurement, simulation and modeling to link this ‘brightening’ to a temporally enhanced quantum yield arising from SiNC interactions in ordered ensembles of monodisperse nanocrystals. Using an appropriate excitation scheme, we exploit this enhancement to achieve photostable emission.« less

  16. Ensemble brightening and enhanced quantum yield in size-purified silicon nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Joseph B.; Van Sickle, Austin R.; Anthony, Rebecca J.; Kroll, Daniel M.; Kortshagen, Uwe R.; Hobbie, Erik K.

    2012-07-18

    Here, we report on the quantum yield, photoluminescence (PL) lifetime and ensemble photoluminescent stability of highly monodisperse plasma-synthesized silicon nanocrystals (SiNCs) prepared though density-gradient ultracentrifugation in mixed organic solvents. Improved size uniformity leads to a reduction in PL line width and the emergence of entropic order in dry nanocrystal films. We find excellent agreement with the anticipated trends of quantum confinement in nanocrystalline silicon, with a solution quantum yield that is independent of nanocrystal size for the larger fractions but decreases dramatically with size for the smaller fractions. We also find a significant PL enhancement in films assembled from the fractions, and we use a combination of measurement, simulation and modeling to link this ‘brightening’ to a temporally enhanced quantum yield arising from SiNC interactions in ordered ensembles of monodisperse nanocrystals. Using an appropriate excitation scheme, we exploit this enhancement to achieve photostable emission.

  17. Increasing quantum yield of sodium salicylate above 80 eV photon energy: Implications for photoemission cross sections

    SciTech Connect

    Lindle, D.W.; Ferrett, T.A.; Heimann, P.A.; Shirley, D.A.

    1986-08-01

    The quantum yield of the visible scintillator sodium salicylate is found to increase in the incident photon-energy range 80--270 eV. Because of its use as a photon-flux monitor in recent gas-phase photoelectron spectroscopy measurements, previously reported partial cross sections for Hg (4f-italic, 5p-italic, and 5d-italic subshells) and CH/sub 3/I (I 4d-italic subshell) in this energy range are corrected, and new values are reported. For Hg, the correction brings the experimental data into better overall agreement with theory. However, considerable uncertainty remains in the absolute scale derived from previous Hg photoabsorption measurements, and no single rescaling of the subshell cross sections could simultaneously bring all three into agreement with available theoretical calculations.

  18. Spectral Properties of THz Quantum-Cascade Lasers: Frequency Noise, Phase-Locking and Absolute Frequency Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravaro, Marco; Jagtap, Vishal; Manquest, Christophe; Gellie, Pierre; Santarelli, Giorgio; Sirtori, Carlo; Khanna, Suraj P.; Linfield, Edmund H.; Barbieri, Stefano

    2013-06-01

    Quantum cascade lasers combine desirable features, namely high optical power and compactness, as no other coherent source in the field of THz generation. While their maximum operating temperature is progressively increasing, getting close to the range accessible by Peltier cooling, their range of application is expanding into new fields, such us molecular spectroscopy and their use as local oscillators. These applications would benefit from the investigation and improvement of the laser coherence properties. In this contribution we report the exploitation of electro-optic coherent detection based on a near-IR frequency comb to measure the frequency noise of a free running 2.5 THz quantum cascade laser. An intrinsic linewidth quantum limit of ~230 Hz has been measured, in good agreement with the Schawlow-Townes theoretical prediction. The same detection scheme is then exploited to phase-lock the quantum cascade laser line to a multiple of the comb tooth spacing, while a second comb allows to precisely measure the THz frequency. Such a dual frequency comb experimental setup thus yields a narrow line THz emission traceable to a microwave frequency standard.

  19. Determination of Phosphorescence Quantum Yield of Singlet Oxygen O 2( 1Δ g) Photosensitized by Phenalenone in Air-Saturated Carbon Tetrachloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, Okiyasu; Watanabe, Jun; Imakubo, Keiichi; Naito, Shizuo

    1998-11-01

    The phosphorescence quantum yield Φ P (=einsteins emitted/einsteins absorbed by sensitizer) of singlet oxygen (1O2) was measured for an air-saturated CCl4 solution of phenalenone (PH) used as a photosensitizer, by means of a photon-counting technique based on the use of a near-IR-sensitive photomultiplier. Employment of steady-state excitation allowed for the determination of the absolute quantum yield of Φ P=(1.38±0.05)×10-3 in CCl4. The result was obtained by direct comparison of the areas under the corrected emission spectra of 1O2 and of quinine bisulfate (QBS) in 1N H2SO4 as a luminescence standard.

  20. Quantum Yields of CAM Plants Measured by Photosynthetic O(2) Exchange.

    PubMed

    Adams, W W; Nishida, K; Osmond, C B

    1986-05-01

    The quantum yield of photosynthetic O(2) exchange was measured in eight species of leaf succulents representative of both malic enzyme type and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase type CAM plants. Measurements were made at 25 degrees C and CO(2) saturation using a leaf disc O(2) electrode system, either during or after deacidification. The mean quantum yield was 0.095 +/- 0.012 (sd) moles O(2) per mole quanta, which compared with 0.094 +/- 0.006 (sd) moles O(2) per mole quanta for spinach leaf discs measured under the same conditions. There were no consistent differences in quantum yield between decarboxylation types or during different phases of CAM metabolism. On the basis of current notions of compartmentation of CAM biochemistry, our observations are interpreted to indicate that CO(2) refixation is energetically independent of gluconeogenesis during deacidification.

  1. Easy Absolute Values? Absolutely

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Sharon E.; Mittag, Kathleen Cage

    2015-01-01

    The authors teach a problem-solving course for preservice middle-grades education majors that includes concepts dealing with absolute-value computations, equations, and inequalities. Many of these students like mathematics and plan to teach it, so they are adept at symbolic manipulations. Getting them to think differently about a concept that they…

  2. Absolute structural elucidation of natural products--a focus on quantum-mechanical calculations of solid-state CD spectra.

    PubMed

    Pescitelli, Gennaro; Kurtán, Tibor; Flörke, Ulrich; Krohn, Karsten

    2009-01-01

    In this review article we examine state-of-the-art techniques for the structural elucidation of organic compounds isolated from natural sources. In particular, we focus on the determination of absolute configuration (AC), perhaps the most challenging but inevitable step in the whole process, especially when newly isolated compounds are screened for biological activity. Among the many methods employed for AC assignment that we review, special attention is paid to electronic circular dichroism (CD) and to the modern tools available for quantum-mechanics CD predictions, including TDDFT. In this context, we stress that conformational flexibility often poses a limit to practical CD calculations of solution CD spectra. Many crystalline natural products suitable for X-ray analysis do not contain heavy atoms for a confidential AC assignment by resonant scattering. However, their CD spectra can be recorded in the solid state, for example with the KCl pellet technique, and analyzed possibly by nonempirical means to provide stereochemical information. In particular, solid-state CD spectra can be compared with those calculated with TDDFT or other high-level methods, using the X-ray geometry as input. The solid-state CD/TDDFT approach, described in detail, represents a quick and reliable tool for AC assignment of natural products.

  3. Photosynthetic Quantum Yield Dynamics: From Photosystems to Leaves[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Hogewoning, Sander W.; Wientjes, Emilie; Douwstra, Peter; Trouwborst, Govert; van Ieperen, Wim; Croce, Roberta; Harbinson, Jeremy

    2012-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying the wavelength dependence of the quantum yield for CO2 fixation (α) and its acclimation to the growth-light spectrum are quantitatively addressed, combining in vivo physiological and in vitro molecular methods. Cucumber (Cucumis sativus) was grown under an artificial sunlight spectrum, shade light spectrum, and blue light, and the quantum yield for photosystem I (PSI) and photosystem II (PSII) electron transport and α were simultaneously measured in vivo at 20 different wavelengths. The wavelength dependence of the photosystem excitation balance was calculated from both these in vivo data and in vitro from the photosystem composition and spectroscopic properties. Measuring wavelengths overexciting PSI produced a higher α for leaves grown under the shade light spectrum (i.e., PSI light), whereas wavelengths overexciting PSII produced a higher α for the sun and blue leaves. The shade spectrum produced the lowest PSI:PSII ratio. The photosystem excitation balance calculated from both in vivo and in vitro data was substantially similar and was shown to determine α at those wavelengths where absorption by carotenoids and nonphotosynthetic pigments is insignificant (i.e., >580 nm). We show quantitatively that leaves acclimate their photosystem composition to their growth light spectrum and how this changes the wavelength dependence of the photosystem excitation balance and quantum yield for CO2 fixation. This also proves that combining different wavelengths can enhance quantum yields substantially. PMID:22623496

  4. Picosecond Lifetimes with High Quantum Yields from Single-Photon-Emitting Colloidal Nanostructures at Room Temperature.

    PubMed

    Bidault, Sébastien; Devilez, Alexis; Maillard, Vincent; Lermusiaux, Laurent; Guigner, Jean-Michel; Bonod, Nicolas; Wenger, Jérôme

    2016-04-26

    Minimizing the luminescence lifetime while maintaining a high emission quantum yield is paramount in optimizing the excitation cross-section, radiative decay rate, and brightness of quantum solid-state light sources, particularly at room temperature, where nonradiative processes can dominate. We demonstrate here that DNA-templated 60 and 80 nm diameter gold nanoparticle dimers, featuring one fluorescent molecule, provide single-photon emission with lifetimes that can fall below 10 ps and typical quantum yields in a 45-70% range. Since these colloidal nanostructures are obtained as a purified aqueous suspension, fluorescence spectroscopy can be performed on both fixed and freely diffusing nanostructures to quantitatively estimate the distributions of decay rate and fluorescence intensity enhancements. These data are in excellent agreement with theoretical calculations and demonstrate that millions of bright fluorescent nanostructures, with radiative lifetimes below 100 ps, can be produced in parallel. PMID:26972678

  5. Impact of Vibrational Coherence on the Quantum Yield at a Conical Intersection.

    PubMed

    Duan, Hong-Guang; Miller, R J Dwayne; Thorwart, Michael

    2016-09-01

    We study the vibrationally coherent quantum dynamics of an electronic wave packet in the vicinity of a conical intersection within a three-state two-mode model. By transforming the coherent tuning and coupling modes into the bath, the underdamped dynamics of the resulting effective three-state model is solved efficiently by the numerically exact hierarchy equation of motion approach. The transient excited-state absorption and two-dimensional spectra reveal the impact of vibrational coherence on the relaxation pathways of the wave packet. We find that both the quantum yield and the isomerization rate are crucially influenced by the vibrational coherence of the wave packet. A less coherent wave packet can traverse the conical intersection more rapidly, while the resulting quantum yield is smaller. Finally, we show that repeated passages of the wave packet through the conical intersection can lead to measurable interference effects in the form of Stueckelberg oscillations. PMID:27547995

  6. Absolute rate constants for O + NO + M /= He, Ne, Ar, Kr/ yields NO2 + M from 217-500 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michael, J. V.; Payne, W. A.; Whytock, D. A.

    1976-01-01

    Rate constants for the reaction O + NO + M yields NO2 + M have been obtained at temperatures from 217-500 K in four different rare gases by a method combining flash photolysis with time resolved detection of O(3-P) by resonance fluorescence. The measured rate constants in Arrhenius form are (10.8 plus or minus 1.2) x 10 to the -33rd exp(1040 plus or minus 60/1.987 T) for helium; (9.01 plus or minus 1.16) x 10 to the -33rd exp(1180 plus or minus 70/1.987 T) for argon; (9.33 plus or minus 1.10) x 10 to the -33rd exp(1030 plus or minus 60/1.987 T) for neon; and (9.52 plus or minus 1.10) x 10 to the -33rd exp(1140 plus or minus 70/1.987 T) for krypton in units of cm to the 6th/sq molecule/s.

  7. Quantum yield for carbon monoxide production in the 248 nm photodissociation of carbonyl sulfide (OCS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhao, Z.; Stickel, R. E.; Wine, P. H.

    1995-01-01

    Tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy has been coupled with excimer laser flash photolysis to measure the quantum yield for CO production from 248 nm photodissociation of carbonyl sulfide (OCS) relative to the well-known quantum yield for CO production from 248 nm photolysis of phosgene (Cl2CO2). The temporal resolution of the experiments was sufficient to distinguish CO formed directly by photodissociation from that formed by subsequent S((sup 3)P(sub J)) reaction with OCS. Under the experimental conditions employed, CO formation via the fast S((sup 1)D(sub 2)) + OCS reaction was minimal. Measurements at 297K and total pressures from 4 to 100 Torr N2 + N2O show the CO yield to be greater than 0.95 and most likely unity. This result suggests that the contribution of OCS as a precursor to the lower stratospheric sulfate aerosol layer is somewhat larger than previously thought.

  8. Fluorescence Quantum Yield Measurements of Fluorescent Proteins: A Laboratory Experiment for a Biochemistry or Molecular Biophysics Laboratory Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wall, Kathryn P.; Dillon, Rebecca; Knowles, Michelle K.

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescent proteins are commonly used in cell biology to assess where proteins are within a cell as a function of time and provide insight into intracellular protein function. However, the usefulness of a fluorescent protein depends directly on the quantum yield. The quantum yield relates the efficiency at which a fluorescent molecule converts…

  9. An experimental and theoretical mechanistic study of biexciton quantum yield enhancement in single quantum dots near gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, Swayandipta; Zhou, Yadong; Tian, Xiangdong; Jenkins, Julie A.; Chen, Ou; Zou, Shengli; Zhao, Jing

    2015-04-01

    In this work, we systematically investigated the plasmonic effect on blinking, photon antibunching behavior and biexciton emission of single CdSe/CdS core/shell quantum dots (QDs) near gold nanoparticles (NPs) with a silica shell (Au@SiO2). In order to obtain a strong interaction between the plasmons and excitons, the Au@SiO2 NPs and CdSe/CdS QDs of appropriate sizes were chosen so that the plasmon resonance overlaps with the absorption and emission of the QDs. We observed that in the regime of a low excitation power, the photon antibunching and blinking properties of single QDs were modified significantly when the QDs were on the Au@SiO2 substrates compared to those on glass. Most significantly, second-order photon intensity correlation data show that the presence of plasmons increases the ratio of the biexciton quantum yield over the exciton quantum yield (QYBX/QYX). An electrodynamics model was developed to quantify the effect of plasmons on the lifetime, quantum yield, and emission intensity of the biexcitons for the QDs. Good agreement was obtained between the experimentally measured and calculated changes in QYBX/QYX due to Au@SiO2 NPs, showing the validity of the developed model. The theoretical studies also indicated that the relative position of the QDs to the Au NPs and the orientation of the electric field are important factors that regulate the emission properties of the excitons and biexcitons of QDs. The study suggests that the multiexciton emission efficiency in QD systems can be manipulated by employing properly designed plasmonic structures.In this work, we systematically investigated the plasmonic effect on blinking, photon antibunching behavior and biexciton emission of single CdSe/CdS core/shell quantum dots (QDs) near gold nanoparticles (NPs) with a silica shell (Au@SiO2). In order to obtain a strong interaction between the plasmons and excitons, the Au@SiO2 NPs and CdSe/CdS QDs of appropriate sizes were chosen so that the plasmon resonance

  10. An experimental and theoretical mechanistic study of biexciton quantum yield enhancement in single quantum dots near gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Dey, Swayandipta; Zhou, Yadong; Tian, Xiangdong; Jenkins, Julie A; Chen, Ou; Zou, Shengli; Zhao, Jing

    2015-04-21

    In this work, we systematically investigated the plasmonic effect on blinking, photon antibunching behavior and biexciton emission of single CdSe/CdS core/shell quantum dots (QDs) near gold nanoparticles (NPs) with a silica shell (Au@SiO2). In order to obtain a strong interaction between the plasmons and excitons, the Au@SiO2 NPs and CdSe/CdS QDs of appropriate sizes were chosen so that the plasmon resonance overlaps with the absorption and emission of the QDs. We observed that in the regime of a low excitation power, the photon antibunching and blinking properties of single QDs were modified significantly when the QDs were on the Au@SiO2 substrates compared to those on glass. Most significantly, second-order photon intensity correlation data show that the presence of plasmons increases the ratio of the biexciton quantum yield over the exciton quantum yield (QYBX/QYX). An electrodynamics model was developed to quantify the effect of plasmons on the lifetime, quantum yield, and emission intensity of the biexcitons for the QDs. Good agreement was obtained between the experimentally measured and calculated changes in QYBX/QYX due to Au@SiO2 NPs, showing the validity of the developed model. The theoretical studies also indicated that the relative position of the QDs to the Au NPs and the orientation of the electric field are important factors that regulate the emission properties of the excitons and biexcitons of QDs. The study suggests that the multiexciton emission efficiency in QD systems can be manipulated by employing properly designed plasmonic structures. PMID:25806486

  11. An experimental and theoretical mechanistic study of biexciton quantum yield enhancement in single quantum dots near gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Dey, Swayandipta; Zhou, Yadong; Tian, Xiangdong; Jenkins, Julie A; Chen, Ou; Zou, Shengli; Zhao, Jing

    2015-04-21

    In this work, we systematically investigated the plasmonic effect on blinking, photon antibunching behavior and biexciton emission of single CdSe/CdS core/shell quantum dots (QDs) near gold nanoparticles (NPs) with a silica shell (Au@SiO2). In order to obtain a strong interaction between the plasmons and excitons, the Au@SiO2 NPs and CdSe/CdS QDs of appropriate sizes were chosen so that the plasmon resonance overlaps with the absorption and emission of the QDs. We observed that in the regime of a low excitation power, the photon antibunching and blinking properties of single QDs were modified significantly when the QDs were on the Au@SiO2 substrates compared to those on glass. Most significantly, second-order photon intensity correlation data show that the presence of plasmons increases the ratio of the biexciton quantum yield over the exciton quantum yield (QYBX/QYX). An electrodynamics model was developed to quantify the effect of plasmons on the lifetime, quantum yield, and emission intensity of the biexcitons for the QDs. Good agreement was obtained between the experimentally measured and calculated changes in QYBX/QYX due to Au@SiO2 NPs, showing the validity of the developed model. The theoretical studies also indicated that the relative position of the QDs to the Au NPs and the orientation of the electric field are important factors that regulate the emission properties of the excitons and biexcitons of QDs. The study suggests that the multiexciton emission efficiency in QD systems can be manipulated by employing properly designed plasmonic structures.

  12. Preparation of carbon quantum dots with a high quantum yield and the application in labeling bovine serum albumin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Pengpeng; Zhang, Changchang; Liu, Xiang; Cui, Ping

    2016-04-01

    An economic and green approach of manufacturing carbon quantum dots (CQDs) with a high quantum yield (denoted with HQY-CQDs) and the application in labeling bovine serum albumin (BSA) were described in detail in this work. Firstly, the cheap resources of citric acid and glycine were pyrolysed in drying oven for preparing the CQDs. Then the product was immersed in tetrahydrofuran for 8 h. HQY-CQDs were obtained by removing tetrahydrofuran from the supernate and were evaluated that they possessed a much higher quantum yield compared with that without dealing with tetrahydrofuran and a wonderful photo-bleaching resistance. Such HQY-CQDs could be functionalized by N-hydroxysuccinimide and successively combined with BSA covalently. Thus fluorescent labeling on BSA was realized. The HQY-CQDs were demonstrated with transmission electron microscopy and the chemical modification with N-hydroxysuccinimide was proved by infrared and X-ray photoelectron spectra. Labeling BSA with the HQY-CQDs was confirmed by gel electrophoresis and fluorescence imaging.

  13. Photolysis of CH₃CHO at 248 nm: evidence of triple fragmentation from primary quantum yield of CH₃ and HCO radicals and H atoms.

    PubMed

    Morajkar, Pranay; Bossolasco, Adriana; Schoemaecker, Coralie; Fittschen, Christa

    2014-06-01

    Radical quantum yields have been measured following the 248 nm photolysis of acetaldehyde, CH3CHO. HCO radical and H atom yields have been quantified by time resolved continuous wave Cavity Ring Down Spectroscopy in the near infrared following their conversion to HO2 radicals by reaction with O2. The CH3 radical yield has been determined using the same technique following their conversion into CH3O2. Absolute yields have been deduced for HCO radicals and H atoms through fitting of time resolved HO2 profiles, obtained under various O2 concentrations, to a complex model, while the CH3 yield has been determined relative to the CH3 yield from 248 nm photolysis of CH3I. Time resolved HO2 profiles under very low O2 concentrations suggest that another unknown HO2 forming reaction path exists in this reaction system besides the conversion of HCO radicals and H atoms by reaction with O2. HO2 profiles can be well reproduced under a large range of experimental conditions with the following quantum yields: CH3CHO + hν(248nm) → CH3CHO*, CH3CHO* → CH3 + HCO ϕ(1a) = 0.125 ± 0.03, CH3CHO* → CH3 + H + CO ϕ(1e) = 0.205 ± 0.04, CH3CHO*[Formula: see text]CH3CO + HO2 ϕ(1f) = 0.07 ± 0.01. The CH3O2 quantum yield has been determined in separate experiments as ϕ(CH₃) = 0.33 ± 0.03 and is in excellent agreement with the CH3 yields derived from the HO2 measurements considering that the triple fragmentation (R1e) is an important reaction path in the 248 nm photolysis of CH3CHO. From arithmetic considerations taking into account the HO2 and CH3 measurements we deduce a remaining quantum yield for the molecular pathway: CH3CHO* → CH4 + CO ϕ(1b) = 0.6. All experiments can be consistently explained with absence of the formerly considered pathway: CH3CHO* → CH3CO + H ϕ(1c) = 0. PMID:24908009

  14. Quantum yield and excitation rate of single molecules close to metallic nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Holzmeister, Phil; Pibiri, Enrico; Schmied, Jürgen J; Sen, Tapasi; Acuna, Guillermo P; Tinnefeld, Philip

    2014-01-01

    The interaction of dyes and metallic nanostructures strongly affects the fluorescence and can lead to significant fluorescence enhancement at plasmonic hot spots, but also to quenching. Here we present a method to distinguish the individual contributions to the changes of the excitation, radiative and non-radiative rate and use this information to determine the quantum yields for single molecules. The method is validated by precisely placing single fluorescent dyes with respect to gold nanoparticles as well as with respect to the excitation polarization using DNA origami nanostructures. Following validation, measurements in zeromode waveguides reveal that suppression of the radiative rate and enhancement of the non-radiative rate lead to a reduced quantum yield. Because the method exploits the intrinsic blinking of dyes, it can generally be applied to fluorescence measurements in arbitrary nanophotonic environments. PMID:25370834

  15. Quantum yield and excitation rate of single molecules close to metallic nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Holzmeister, Phil; Pibiri, Enrico; Schmied, Jürgen J; Sen, Tapasi; Acuna, Guillermo P; Tinnefeld, Philip

    2014-11-05

    The interaction of dyes and metallic nanostructures strongly affects the fluorescence and can lead to significant fluorescence enhancement at plasmonic hot spots, but also to quenching. Here we present a method to distinguish the individual contributions to the changes of the excitation, radiative and non-radiative rate and use this information to determine the quantum yields for single molecules. The method is validated by precisely placing single fluorescent dyes with respect to gold nanoparticles as well as with respect to the excitation polarization using DNA origami nanostructures. Following validation, measurements in zeromode waveguides reveal that suppression of the radiative rate and enhancement of the non-radiative rate lead to a reduced quantum yield. Because the method exploits the intrinsic blinking of dyes, it can generally be applied to fluorescence measurements in arbitrary nanophotonic environments.

  16. Sample-averaged biexciton quantum yield measured by solution-phase photon correlation.

    PubMed

    Beyler, Andrew P; Bischof, Thomas S; Cui, Jian; Coropceanu, Igor; Harris, Daniel K; Bawendi, Moungi G

    2014-12-10

    The brightness of nanoscale optical materials such as semiconductor nanocrystals is currently limited in high excitation flux applications by inefficient multiexciton fluorescence. We have devised a solution-phase photon correlation measurement that can conveniently and reliably measure the average biexciton-to-exciton quantum yield ratio of an entire sample without user selection bias. This technique can be used to investigate the multiexciton recombination dynamics of a broad scope of synthetically underdeveloped materials, including those with low exciton quantum yields and poor fluorescence stability. Here, we have applied this method to measure weak biexciton fluorescence in samples of visible-emitting InP/ZnS and InAs/ZnS core/shell nanocrystals, and to demonstrate that a rapid CdS shell growth procedure can markedly increase the biexciton fluorescence of CdSe nanocrystals.

  17. A quantum yield determination of O/1D/ production from ozone via laser flash photolysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Philen, D. L.; Davis, D. D.; Watson, R. T.

    1977-01-01

    The quantum yield of electronically excited atomic oxygen produced from ozone photolysis was measured at 298 K from wavelengths of 293.0 to 316.5 nm. The reaction of the atomic oxygen with N2O to form excited NO2 was used to monitor the O production; a frequency-doubled flashlamp-pumped dye laser which provided tunable ultraviolet in the desired spectral region with 0.1-nm linewidth served as the photolysis source. The atomic oxygen quantum yield was found to be constant below 300 nm, with a sharp decrease centered at 308 nm and a diminution to less than one tenth of the constant value by 313.5 nm.

  18. Photo-dissociation quantum yields of mammalian oxyhemoglobin investigated by a nanosecond laser technique

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Ningli; Zhang Shuyi . E-mail: zhangsy@nju.edu.cn; Kuo Paokuang; Qu Min; Fang Jianwen; Li Jiahuang; Hua Zichun

    2007-02-23

    The photo-dissociations of oxyhemoglobin of several mammals, such as human, bovine, pig, horse, and rabbit, have been studied. By means of optical pump-probe technique, the quantum yields for photo-dissociation of these oxyhemoglobin have been determined at pH 7 and 20 {sup o}C. A nanosecond laser at 532 nm is used as the pumping source, and a xenon lamp through a monochrometer provides a probe light at 432 nm. The experimental results show that the quantum yields of these mammalian oxyhemoglobin are different from each other, especially for that of rabbit. By analyzing the amino acid sequences and tetramer structures as well as the flexibility and hydrophobicity of the different hemoglobin, possible explanations for the differences are proposed.

  19. Sample-Averaged Biexciton Quantum Yield Measured by Solution-Phase Photon Correlation

    PubMed Central

    Beyler, Andrew P.; Bischof, Thomas S.; Cui, Jian; Coropceanu, Igor; Harris, Daniel K.; Bawendi, Moungi G.

    2015-01-01

    The brightness of nanoscale optical materials such as semiconductor nanocrystals is currently limited in high excitation flux applications by inefficient multiexciton fluorescence. We have devised a solution-phase photon correlation measurement that can conveniently and reliably measure the average biexciton-to-exciton quantum yield ratio of an entire sample without user selection bias. This technique can be used to investigate the multiexciton recombination dynamics of a broad scope of synthetically underdeveloped materials, including those with low exciton quantum yields and poor fluorescence stability. Here, we have applied this method to measure weak biexciton fluorescence in samples of visible-emitting InP/ZnS and InAs/ZnS core/shell nanocrystals, and to demonstrate that a rapid CdS shell growth procedure can markedly increase the biexciton fluorescence of CdSe nanocrystals. PMID:25409496

  20. Quantum yield and excitation rate of single molecules close to metallic nanostructures

    PubMed Central

    Holzmeister, Phil; Pibiri, Enrico; Schmied, Jürgen J.; Sen, Tapasi; Acuna, Guillermo P.; Tinnefeld, Philip

    2014-01-01

    The interaction of dyes and metallic nanostructures strongly affects the fluorescence and can lead to significant fluorescence enhancement at plasmonic hot spots, but also to quenching. Here we present a method to distinguish the individual contributions to the changes of the excitation, radiative and non-radiative rate and use this information to determine the quantum yields for single molecules. The method is validated by precisely placing single fluorescent dyes with respect to gold nanoparticles as well as with respect to the excitation polarization using DNA origami nanostructures. Following validation, measurements in zeromode waveguides reveal that suppression of the radiative rate and enhancement of the non-radiative rate lead to a reduced quantum yield. Because the method exploits the intrinsic blinking of dyes, it can generally be applied to fluorescence measurements in arbitrary nanophotonic environments. PMID:25370834

  1. Photocurrent Quantum Yield in Suspended Carbon Nanotube p-n Junctions.

    PubMed

    Aspitarte, Lee; McCulley, Daniel R; Minot, Ethan D

    2016-09-14

    We study photocurrent generation in individual suspended carbon nanotube p-n junctions using spectrally resolved scanning photocurrent microscopy. Spatial maps of the photocurrent allow us to determine the length of the p-n junction intrinsic region, as well as the role of the n-type Schottky barrier. We show that reverse-bias operation eliminates complications caused by the n-type Schottky barrier and increases the length of the intrinsic region. The absorption cross-section of the CNT is calculated using an empirically verified model, and the effect of substrate reflection is determined using FDTD simulations. We find that the room temperature photocurrent quantum yield is approximately 30% when exciting the carbon nanotube at the S44 and S55 excitonic transitions. The quantum yield value is an order of magnitude larger than previous estimates. PMID:27575386

  2. Photosensitized electron transport across lipid vesicle walls: enhancement of quantum yield by ionophores and transmembrane potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Laane, C.; Ford, W.E.; Otvos, J.W.; Calvin, M.

    1981-04-01

    The photosensitized reduction of heptylviologen in the bulk aqueous phase of phosphatidylcholine vesicles containing EDTA inside and a membrane-bound tris(2,2'-bipyridine)ruthenium(2+) derivative is enhanced by a factor of 6.5 by the addition of valinomycin in the presence of K/sup +/. A 3-fold stimulation by gramicidin and carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone is observed. The results suggest that, under these conditions, the rate of photoinduced electron transfer across vesicle walls in the absence of ion carriers is limited by cotransport of cations. The rate of electron transfer across vesicle walls could be influenced further by generating transmembrane potentials with K/sup +/ gradients inatthe presence of valinomycin. When vesicles are made with transmembrane potentials, interior more negative, the quantum yield of heptylviologen reduction is doubled, and, converseley, when vesicles are made with transmembrane potentials, interior more positive, the quantum yield is decreased and approaches the value found in the absence of valinomycin.

  3. Luminescent carbon quantum dots with high quantum yield as a single white converter for white light emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, X. T.; Zhang, Y.; Liu, X. G.; Zhang, F.; Wang, Y. L.; Yang, Y. Z.

    2015-11-23

    Carbon quantum dots (CQDs) with high quantum yield (51.4%) were synthesized by a one-step hydrothermal method using thiosalicylic acid and ethylenediamine as precursor. The CQDs have the average diameter of 2.3 nm and possess excitation-independent emission wavelength in the range from 320 to 440 nm excitation. Under an ultraviolet (UV) excitation, the CQDs aqueous solutions emit bright blue fluorescence directly and exhibit broad emission with a high spectral component ratio of 67.4% (blue to red intensity to total intensity). We applied the CQDs as a single white-light converter for white light emitting diodes (WLEDs) using a UV-LED chip as the excitation light source. The resulted WLED shows superior performance with corresponding color temperature of 5227 K and the color coordinates of (0.34, 0.38) belonging to the white gamut.

  4. Quantum Yield Determination Based on Photon Number Measurement, Protocols for Firefly Bioluminescence Reactions.

    PubMed

    Niwa, Kazuki

    2016-01-01

    Quantum yield (QY), which is defined as the probability of photon production by a single bio/chemiluminescence reaction, is an important factor to characterize luminescence light intensity emitted diffusively from the reaction solution mixture. Here, methods to measure number of photons to determine QY according to the techniques of national radiometry standards are described. As an example, experiments using firefly bioluminescence reactions are introduced. PMID:27424895

  5. Quantum Yield Determination Based on Photon Number Measurement, Protocols for Firefly Bioluminescence Reactions.

    PubMed

    Niwa, Kazuki

    2016-01-01

    Quantum yield (QY), which is defined as the probability of photon production by a single bio/chemiluminescence reaction, is an important factor to characterize luminescence light intensity emitted diffusively from the reaction solution mixture. Here, methods to measure number of photons to determine QY according to the techniques of national radiometry standards are described. As an example, experiments using firefly bioluminescence reactions are introduced.

  6. Quantum yield for O-atom production in the VUV photodissociation of CO2 using the time-sliced velocity-mapped imaging (TS-VMI) method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, William M.

    2016-10-01

    VUV photodissociation above 10.5 eV is considered the primary region for photochemical destruction of CO2 by solar radiation. There is enough photon energy in this region so that in addition to ground state O(3PJ) and CO(1Σ +) that can be produced during photodissociation excited species such as atomic oxygen O(1D) and O(1S), as well as excited carbon monoxide CO(a3Π, a'3Σ+) also can be formed. Electronic excited oxygen atom and carbon monoxide are the species that are responsible for the airglows in atmospheres of the solar planets and comets. Therefore, detail photodissociation quantum yields for these excited species from CO2 are critical in interpreting the chemistry in these solar system bodies. We have previously shown that the time-sliced velocity-mapped imaging (TS-VMI) technique can provide detailed branching ratio information about photodissociation of diatomic molecules.1, 2 However, to date we have not been able to show how this technique can be use to determine absolute quantum yields for the products produced in the VUV photodissociation of CO2. In this talk we will describe how the known quantum yields for the photodissociation O2 to O(3P2), O(3P1), O(3P0) and O(1D) can be used to determine quantum yields of similar products in the photodissociation of CO2.[1] Yu Song, Hong Gao, Yih Chung Chang, D. Hammouténe, H. Ndome, M. Hochlaf, William M. Jackson, and C. Y. Ng, Ap. J., 819:23 (13pp), 2016; doi:10.3847/0004-637X/819/1/23.[2] Hong Gao, Yu Song, William M. Jackson and C. Y. Ng, J. Chem. Phys, 138, 191102, 2013.

  7. High Photoluminescence Quantum Yield in Band Gap Tunable Bromide Containing Mixed Halide Perovskites.

    PubMed

    Sutter-Fella, Carolin M; Li, Yanbo; Amani, Matin; Ager, Joel W; Toma, Francesca M; Yablonovitch, Eli; Sharp, Ian D; Javey, Ali

    2016-01-13

    Hybrid organic-inorganic halide perovskite based semiconductor materials are attractive for use in a wide range of optoelectronic devices because they combine the advantages of suitable optoelectronic attributes and simultaneously low-cost solution processability. Here, we present a two-step low-pressure vapor-assisted solution process to grow high quality homogeneous CH3NH3PbI3-xBrx perovskite films over the full band gap range of 1.6-2.3 eV. Photoluminescence light-in versus light-out characterization techniques are used to provide new insights into the optoelectronic properties of Br-containing hybrid organic-inorganic perovskites as a function of optical carrier injection by employing pump-powers over a 6 orders of magnitude dynamic range. The internal luminescence quantum yield of wide band gap perovskites reaches impressive values up to 30%. This high quantum yield translates into substantial quasi-Fermi level splitting and high "luminescence or optically implied" open-circuit voltage. Most importantly, both attributes, high internal quantum yield and high optically implied open-circuit voltage, are demonstrated over the entire band gap range (1.6 eV ≤ Eg ≤ 2.3 eV). These results establish the versatility of Br-containing perovskite semiconductors for a variety of applications and especially for the use as high-quality top cell in tandem photovoltaic devices in combination with industry dominant Si bottom cells. PMID:26691065

  8. Diffusion limited photoluminescence quantum yields in 1-D semiconductors: single-wall carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Hertel, Tobias; Himmelein, Sabine; Ackermann, Thomas; Stich, Dominik; Crochet, Jared

    2010-12-28

    Photoluminescence quantum yields and nonradiative decay of the excitonic S(1) state in length fractionated (6,5) single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are studied by continuous wave and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. The experimental data are modeled by diffusion limited contact quenching of excitons at stationary quenching sites including tube ends. A combined analysis of the time-resolved photoluminescence decay and the length dependence of photoluminescence quantum yields (PL QYs) from SWNTs in sodium cholate suspensions allows to determine the exciton diffusion coefficient D = 10.7 ± 0.4 cm(2)s(-1) and lifetime τ(PL) for long tubes of 20 ± 1 ps. PL quantum yields Φ(PL) are found to scale with the inverse diffusion coefficient and the square of the mean quenching site distance, here l(d) = 120 ± 25 nm. The results suggest that low PL QYs of SWNTs are due to the combination of high-diffusive exciton mobility with the presence of only a few quenching sites.

  9. Excitation-emission spectra and fluorescence quantum yields for fresh and aged biogenic secondary organic aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Hyun Ji; Laskin, Alexander; Laskin, Julia; Nizkorodov, Sergey A.

    2013-05-10

    Certain biogenic secondary organic aerosols (SOA) become absorbent and fluorescent when exposed to reduced nitrogen compounds such as ammonia, amines and their salts. Fluorescent SOA may potentially be mistaken for biological particles by detection methods relying on fluorescence. This work quantifies the spectral distribution and effective quantum yields of fluorescence of SOA generated from two monoterpenes, limonene and a-pinene, and two different oxidants, ozone (O3) and hydroxyl radical (OH). The SOA was generated in a smog chamber, collected on substrates, and aged by exposure to ~100 ppb ammonia vapor in air saturated with water vapor. Absorption and excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectra of aqueous extracts of aged and control SOA samples were measured, and the effective absorption coefficients and fluorescence quantum yields (~0.005 for 349 nm excitation) were determined from the data. The strongest fluorescence for the limonene-derived SOA was observed for excitation = 420+- 50 nm and emission = 475 +- 38 nm. The window of the strongest fluorescence shifted to excitation = 320 +- 25 nm and emission = 425 +- 38 nm for the a-pinene-derived SOA. Both regions overlap with the excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectra of some of the fluorophores found in primary biological aerosols. Our study suggests that, despite the low quantum yield, the aged SOA particles should have sufficient fluorescence intensities to interfere with the fluorescence detection of common bioaerosols.

  10. Excitation-emission spectra and fluorescence quantum yields for fresh and aged biogenic secondary organic aerosols.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun Ji Julie; Laskin, Alexander; Laskin, Julia; Nizkorodov, Sergey A

    2013-06-01

    Certain biogenic secondary organic aerosols (SOA) become absorbent and fluorescent when exposed to reduced nitrogen compounds such as ammonia, amines, and their salts. Fluorescent SOA may potentially be mistaken for biological particles by detection methods relying on fluorescence. This work quantifies the spectral distribution and effective quantum yields of fluorescence of water-soluble SOA generated from two monoterpenes, limonene and α-pinene, and two different oxidants, ozone (O3) and hydroxyl radical (OH). The SOA was generated in a smog chamber, collected on substrates, and aged by exposure to ∼100 ppb ammonia in air saturated with water vapor. Absorption and excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectra of aqueous extracts of aged and control SOA samples were measured, and the effective absorption coefficients and fluorescence quantum yields (∼0.005 for 349 nm excitation) were determined from the data. The strongest fluorescence for the limonene-derived SOA was observed for λexcitation = 420 ± 50 nm and λemission = 475 ± 38 nm. The window of the strongest fluorescence shifted to λexcitation = 320 ± 25 nm and λemission = 425 ± 38 nm for the α-pinene-derived SOA. Both regions overlap with the EEM spectra of some of the fluorophores found in primary biological aerosols. Despite the low quantum yield, the aged SOA particles may have sufficient fluorescence intensities to interfere with the fluorescence detection of common bioaerosols.

  11. Quantum yield of photosensitized singlet oxygen (a[sup 1][Delta][sub g]) production in solid polystyrene

    SciTech Connect

    Scurlock, R.D.; Martire, D.O.; Ogilby, P.R. . Dept. of Chemistry); Taylor, V.L.; Clough, R.L. )

    1994-08-15

    The quantum yield of singlet oxygen (a[sup 1][Delta][sub g]), produced by energy transfer from the photosensitizer acridine, has been determined by two independent spectroscopic methods in solid polystyrene. Upon 355-nm pulsed-laser irradiation of acridine at 1.3 mJ/pulse, the O[sub 2](a[sup 1][Delta][sub g]) quantum yield in polystyrene [[phi][sub [Delta

  12. Carbon dots with high fluorescence quantum yield: the fluorescence originates from organic fluorophores.

    PubMed

    Shi, Lei; Yang, Jian Hai; Zeng, Hai Bo; Chen, Yong Mei; Yang, Sheng Chun; Wu, Chao; Zeng, Hao; Yoshihito, Osada; Zhang, Qiqing

    2016-08-14

    In this contribution, we have shown that the organic fluorophores, 5-oxo-3,5-dihydro-2H-thiazolo [3,2-a] pyridine-3,7-dicarboxylic acid (TPDCA) and 5-oxo-3,5-dihydro-2H-thiazolo [3,2-a] pyridine-7-carboxylic acid (TPCA), are the main ingredients and fluorescence origins of N,S-CDs via systematic analyses. It inspires us to deeply analyze and understand the fluorescence origins of carbon dots with high fluorescence quantum yields, which will expand their applications. PMID:27426926

  13. The relationship between photooxidation defects and quantum yield loss in a liquid crystalline oligofluorene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wesely, E. Jane; Rothberg, Lewis; Geng, Yanhou; Chen, Shaw

    2004-03-01

    We have studied the photophysics of a liquid crystalline oligofluorene which emits blue light with a quantum efficiency of forty-nine percent.( Y. Geng, S. Culligan, A. Trajkovska, J. Wallace and S. Chen, Chem. Mater; 2003, 15, 542-549.) The fluorescent yield is reduced when the film has been exposed to ultra-violet light and air. The resulting photooxidation creates luminescent defects that have previously been observed in some polyfluorenes.( E. J. W. List, R. Guentner, P. Scanducci de Freitas, and U. Scherf, Adv Mater., 2002, 14, 374-378.) The defects decrease the overall fluorescent yield because they divert energy away from the blue-emitting chromophores and emit at longer wavelengths with low efficiency. In contrast with previous studies of photooxidized polyfluorenes, we observe two emission peaks associated with defects that have distinct intensity dependence and decay dynamics.

  14. Carbon dots with high fluorescence quantum yield: the fluorescence originates from organic fluorophores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Lei; Yang, Jian Hai; Zeng, Hai Bo; Chen, Yong Mei; Yang, Sheng Chun; Wu, Chao; Zeng, Hao; Yoshihito, Osada; Zhang, Qiqing

    2016-07-01

    In this contribution, we have shown that the organic fluorophores, 5-oxo-3,5-dihydro-2H-thiazolo [3,2-a] pyridine-3,7-dicarboxylic acid (TPDCA) and 5-oxo-3,5-dihydro-2H-thiazolo [3,2-a] pyridine-7-carboxylic acid (TPCA), are the main ingredients and fluorescence origins of N,S-CDs via systematic analyses. It inspires us to deeply analyze and understand the fluorescence origins of carbon dots with high fluorescence quantum yields, which will expand their applications.In this contribution, we have shown that the organic fluorophores, 5-oxo-3,5-dihydro-2H-thiazolo [3,2-a] pyridine-3,7-dicarboxylic acid (TPDCA) and 5-oxo-3,5-dihydro-2H-thiazolo [3,2-a] pyridine-7-carboxylic acid (TPCA), are the main ingredients and fluorescence origins of N,S-CDs via systematic analyses. It inspires us to deeply analyze and understand the fluorescence origins of carbon dots with high fluorescence quantum yields, which will expand their applications. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr00451b

  15. Solvent effect on the relative quantum yield and fluorescence quenching of 2DAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagaraja, D.; Melavanki, R. M.; Patil, N. R.; Kusanur, R. A.

    2014-09-01

    The relative quantum yield of diethyl 2-acetamido-2-((3-oxo-3H-benzo[f]chromen-1-yl)methyl) malonate [2DAM] is estimated using single point method with quinine sulfate as standard reference. The quantum yield varies between 0.1161 and 0.3181 depending on the nature of the solvent. The rates of radiative and non radiative decay constants are also calculated. The fluorescence quenching of [2DAM] by aniline is studied at room temperature, by steady state, in five different solvents namely acetonitrile (AN), 1,4 dioxane (DX), 1,2 dichloroethane (DCE), tetrahydrofuran (THF) and toluene (TOL), in order to explore various possible quenching mechanisms. The experimental results show a positive deviation in Stern Volmer plots for all solvents. Various parameters for the quenching process are determined by ground state complex, sphere of action static quenching model and finite sink approximation model. The magnitudes of these rate parameters indicate that positive deviation in the Stern Volmer (SV) plot is due to both static and dynamic processes. Further, finite sink approximation model is used to check whether these bimolecular reactions were diffusion limited or not. The values of distance parameter R‧ and diffusion co efficient D are determined and then compared with the values of encounter distance R and diffusion coefficient D calculated using Stokes-Einstein equation.

  16. Solvent effect on the relative quantum yield and fluorescence quenching of a newly synthesized coumarin derivative.

    PubMed

    Nagaraja, D; Melavanki, R M; Patil, N R; Geethanjali, H S; Kusanur, R A

    2015-08-01

    We estimated the relative florescence quantum yield (Φ) of 8-methoxy-3-[1-(4,5-dicarbomethoxy-1,2,3-triazoloacetyl)]coumarin [8MDTC] using a single-point method with quinine sulfate in 0.1 M of sulfuric acid used as a standard reference. The fluorescence lifetimes, radiative and non-radiative decay rate constants are calculated. Relative quantum yields were found to be less in the non-polar solvents, indicating that the solute exhibits less fluorescence in a non-polar environment. The fluorescence quenching of [8MDTC] by aniline was studied at room temperature by examining the steady state in five different solvents in order to explore various possible quenching mechanisms. The experimental results show a positive deviation in Stern-Volmer plots in all solvents. Ground state complex and sphere of action static quenching models were used to interpret the results. Many quenching rate parameters were calculated using these models. The values of these parameters suggest that the sphere of action static quenching model agrees well with the experimental results. Further, a finite sink approximation model was used to check whether these bimolecular reactions were diffusion limited or not. The values of the distance parameter R' and the diffusion coefficient D were determined and are compared with the values of the encounter distance R and diffusion coefficient D calculated using the Stokes-Einstein equation.

  17. Investigation of the CO2 Dependence of Quantum Yield and Respiration in Eucalyptus pauciflora

    PubMed Central

    Kirschbaum, Miko U. F.; Farquhar, Graham D.

    1987-01-01

    In leaves of C3 plants, the rate of nonphotorespiratory respiration appears to be higher in darkness than in the light. This change from a high to a low rate of carbon loss with increasing photon flux density leads to an increase in the apparent quantum yield of photosynthetic CO2 assimilation at low photon flux densities (Kok effect). The mechanism of this suppression of nonphotorespiratory respiration is not understood, but biochemical evidence and the observation that a Kok effect is often not observed under low O2, has led to the suggestion that photorespiration might be involved in some way. This hypothesis was tested with snowgum (Eucalyptus pauciflora Sieb. ex Spreng.) using gas exchange methods. The test was based on the assumption that if photorespiration were involved, then it would be expected that the intercellular partial pressure of CO2 would also have an influence on the Kok effect. Under normal atmospheric levels of CO2 and O2, a Kok effect was found. Changing the intercellular partial pressure of CO2, however, did not affect the estimate of nonphotorespiratory respiraton, and it was concluded that its decrease with increasing photon flux density did not involve photorespiration. Concurrent measurements showed that the quantum yield of net assimilation of CO2 increased with increasing intercellular partial pressure of CO2, and this increase agreed closely with predictions based on recent models of photosynthesis. PMID:16665319

  18. Absolute rate constant determinations for the deactivation of O/1D/ by time resolved decay of O/1D/ yields O/3P/ emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, J. A.; Sadowski, C. M.; Schiff, H. I.; Howard, C. J.; Schmeltekopf, A. L.; Jennings, D. A.; Streit, G. E.

    1976-01-01

    Absolute rate constants for the deactivation of O(1D) atoms by some atmospheric gases have been determined by observing the time-resolved emission of O(1D) at 630 nm. O(1D) atoms were produced by the dissociation of ozone via repetitive laser pulses at 266 nm. Absolute rate constants for the relaxation of O(1D) at 298 K are reported for N2, O2, CO2, O3, H2, D2, CH4, HCl, NH3, H2O, N2O, and Ne. The results obtained are compared with previous relative and absolute measurements reported in the literature.

  19. Accuracy of quantum sensors measuring yield photon flux and photosynthetic photon flux

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, C.; Tibbitts, T.; Sager, J.; Deitzer, G.; Bubenheim, D.; Koerner, G.; Bugbee, B.; Knott, W. M. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    Photosynthesis is fundamentally driven by photon flux rather than energy flux, but not all absorbed photons yield equal amounts of photosynthesis. Thus, two measures of photosynthetically active radiation have emerged: photosynthetic photon flux (PPF), which values all photons from 400 to 700 nm equally, and yield photon flux (YPF), which weights photons in the range from 360 to 760 nm according to plant photosynthetic response. We selected seven common radiation sources and measured YPF and PPF from each source with a spectroradiometer. We then compared these measurements with measurements from three quantum sensors designed to measure YPF, and from six quantum sensors designed to measure PPF. There were few differences among sensors within a group (usually <5%), but YPF values from sensors were consistently lower (3% to 20%) than YPF values calculated from spectroradiometric measurements. Quantum sensor measurements of PPF also were consistently lower than PPF values calculated from spectroradiometric measurements, but the differences were <7% for all sources, except red-light-emitting diodes. The sensors were most accurate for broad-band sources and least accurate for narrow-band sources. According to spectroradiometric measurements, YPF sensors were significantly less accurate (>9% difference) than PPF sensors under metal halide, high-pressure sodium, and low-pressure sodium lamps. Both sensor types were inaccurate (>18% error) under red-light-emitting diodes. Because both YPF and PPF sensors are imperfect integrators, and because spectroradiometers can measure photosynthetically active radiation much more accurately, researchers should consider developing calibration factors from spectroradiometric data for some specific radiation sources to improve the accuracy of integrating sensors.

  20. Accuracy of quantum sensors measuring yield photon flux and photosynthetic photon flux.

    PubMed

    Barnes, C; Tibbitts, T; Sager, J; Deitzer, G; Bubenheim, D; Koerner, G; Bugbee, B

    1993-12-01

    Photosynthesis is fundamentally driven by photon flux rather than energy flux, but not all absorbed photons yield equal amounts of photosynthesis. Thus, two measures of photosynthetically active radiation have emerged: photosynthetic photon flux (PPF), which values all photons from 400 to 700 nm equally, and yield photon flux (YPF), which weights photons in the range from 360 to 760 nm according to plant photosynthetic response. We selected seven common radiation sources and measured YPF and PPF from each source with a spectroradiometer. We then compared these measurements with measurements from three quantum sensors designed to measure YPF, and from six quantum sensors designed to measure PPF. There were few differences among sensors within a group (usually <5%), but YPF values from sensors were consistently lower (3% to 20%) than YPF values calculated from spectroradiometric measurements. Quantum sensor measurements of PPF also were consistently lower than PPF values calculated from spectroradiometric measurements, but the differences were <7% for all sources, except red-light-emitting diodes. The sensors were most accurate for broad-band sources and least accurate for narrow-band sources. According to spectroradiometric measurements, YPF sensors were significantly less accurate (>9% difference) than PPF sensors under metal halide, high-pressure sodium, and low-pressure sodium lamps. Both sensor types were inaccurate (>18% error) under red-light-emitting diodes. Because both YPF and PPF sensors are imperfect integrators, and because spectroradiometers can measure photosynthetically active radiation much more accurately, researchers should consider developing calibration factors from spectroradiometric data for some specific radiation sources to improve the accuracy of integrating sensors.

  1. Determination of the phosphorescence quantum yield of singlet molecular oxygen ( sup 1. Delta. sub g ) in five different solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, R.; Seikel, K.; Brauer, H.D. )

    1989-06-01

    The quantum yield of singlet oxygen ({sup 1}O{sub 2}) {sup 1}{Delta}{sub g} (v = 0) {yields} {sup 1}{Sigma}{sub g}{sup {minus}} (v = O) phosphorescence was determined in acetonitrile, chloroform, carbon disulfide, carbon tetrachloride, and Freon 113 relative to the respective emission in benzene, using the known {sup 1}O{sub 2} phosphorescence quantum yield in benzene as standard. Quantum yields were not found to depend on sensitizer (dicyanoanthracene, rubicene, tetraphenylporphine) but to depend strongly on solvent. The {sup 1}O{sub 2} phosphorescence quantum yields are surprisingly large. The maximum value measured is Qp (Freon 113) = 0.15. The emission quantum yields correlate linearly with {sup 1}O{sub 2} lifetimes for all solvents, including benzene. Consequently the rate constant of {sup 1}O{sub 2} phosphorescence is independent of solvent. It amounts to k{sub p} = 1.3 s{sup {minus}1}. Thus the radiative rate constant is approximately 5000 times larger in liquid solution than for an isolated {sup 1}O{sub 2} molecule.

  2. Effect of PMMA impregnation on the fluorescence quantum yield of sol-gel glasses doped with quinine sulfate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meneses-Nava, M. A.; Barbosa-García, O.; Díaz-Torres, L. A.; Chávez-Cerda, S.; Torres-Cisneros, M.; King, T. A.

    2001-08-01

    The fluorescence quantum yield of quinine sulfate in sol-gel and PMMA impregnated glasses is measured. The observed quantum yield improvement in the sol-gel matrix, compared to ethanol, is interpreted as a reduction of non-radiative relaxation channels by isolation of the molecules by the cage of the glass. PMMA impregnated sol-gel glasses show an extra improvement of the fluorescence yield, which is interpreted as a reduction of the free space and the rigid fixation of the molecules to the matrix.

  3. Photochromic conversion in a red/green cyanobacteriochrome from Synechocystis PCC6803: quantum yields in solution and photoswitching dynamics in living E. coli cells.

    PubMed

    Pennacchietti, Francesca; Losi, Aba; Xu, Xiu-ling; Zhao, Kai-hong; Gärtner, Wolfgang; Viappiani, Cristiano; Cella, Francesca; Diaspro, Alberto; Abbruzzetti, Stefania

    2015-02-01

    The protein encoded by the gene slr1393 from the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 (Slr1393) is composed of three GAF domains, a PAS domain, and a histidine kinase motif. The third GAF domain (referred to as GAF3) was previously characterized as the sole domain in this protein, being able to carry phycocyanobilin (PCB) as the chromophore and to accomplish photochemistry. GAF3 shows photochromicity, and is able to switch between a red-absorbing parental state (GAF3R, λmax = 649 nm) and a green-absorbing photoproduct state (GAF3G, λmax = 536 nm) upon appropriate irradiation. In this study we have determined the photochemical quantum yields for the interconversion between both forms using two methods: an "absolute" method and a reference-based control. The latter is a comparative procedure which exploits a well-characterized blue-light photoreceptor, YtvA from Bacillus subtilis, and the cyanobacterial phytochrome Cph1 as actinometers. The former is an ad hoc developed, four laser-based setup where two cw lasers provide the pump beams to induce photoswitching (red to green and green to red, respectively) and two cw lasers simultaneously monitor the appearance and disappearance of the two species. Interestingly, fit analysis of the recorded transient absorbance changes provided a quantum yield for the green → red conversion (≈0.3) at least three times larger than for the red → green conversion (≈0.08). These data are in agreement with the results from the comparative method documenting the usefulness of the 'direct' method developed here for quantum yields' determination. The light-induced switching capability of this photochromic protein allowed measuring the kinetics of GAF3 immobilized on a glass plate, and within living, overexpressing Escherichia coli cells. PMID:25358617

  4. SU-E-T-191: First Principle Calculation of Quantum Yield in Photodynamic Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Abolfath, R; Guo, F; Chen, Z; Nath, R

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: We present a first-principle method to calculate the spin transfer efficiency in oxygen induced by any photon fields especially in MeV energy range. The optical pumping is mediated through photosensitizers, e.g., porphyrin and/or ensemble of quantum dots. Methods: Under normal conditions, oxygen molecules are in the relatively non-reactive triplet state. In the presence of certain photosensitizer compounds such as porphyrins, electromagnetic radiation of specific wavelengths can excite oxygen to highly reactive singlet state. With selective uptake of photosensitizers by certain malignant cells, photon irradiation of phosensitized tumors can lead to selective killing of cancer cells. This is the basis of photodynamic therapy (PDT). Despite several attempts, PDT has not been clinically successful except in limited superficial cancers. Many parameters such as photon energy, conjugation with quantum dots etc. can be potentially combined with PDT in order to extend the role of PDT in cancer management. The key quantity for this optimization is the spin transfer efficiency in oxygen by any photon field. The first principle calculation model presented here, is an attempt to fill this need. We employ stochastic density matrix description of the quantum jumps and the rate equation methods in quantum optics based on Markov/Poisson processes and calculate time evolution of the population of the optically pumped singlet oxygen. Results: The results demonstrate the feasibility of our model in showing the dependence of the optical yield in generating spin-singlet oxygen on the experimental conditions. The adjustable variables can be tuned to maximize the population of the singlet oxygen hence the efficacy of the photodynamic therapy. Conclusion: The present model can be employed to fit and analyze the experimental data and possibly to assist researchers in optimizing the experimental conditions in photodynamic therapy.

  5. Effect of capsid proteins to ICG mass ratio on fluorescent quantum yield of virus-resembling optical nano-materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Sharad; Ico, Gerardo; Matsumura, Paul; Rao, A. L. N.; Vullev, Valentine; Anvari, Bahman

    2012-03-01

    We recently reported construction of a new type of optical nano-construct composed of genome-depleted plant infecting brome mosaic virus (BMV) doped with Indocyanine green (ICG), an FDA-approved chromophore. We refer to these constructs as optical viral ghosts (OVGs) since only the capsid protein (CP) subunits of BMV remain to encapsulate ICG. To utilize OVGs as effective nano-probes in fluorescence imaging applications, their fluorescence quantum yield needs to be maximized. In this study, we investigate the effect of altering the CP to ICG mass ratio on the fluorescent quantum yield of OVGs. Results of this study provide the basis for construction of OVGs with optimal amounts of CP and ICG to yield maximal fluorescence quantum yield.

  6. Possibility of the effect of absolute negative conductivity in quantum superlattice exposed to the high-frequency electromagnetic radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kryuchkov, S. V.; Kukhar', E. I.

    2015-07-01

    Current density in superlattice placed in quantizing electric field and in high-frequency field of electromagnetic wave was calculated. The calculations were performed by taking into account an inelastic scattering of charge carriers by phonons. Possibility of the effect of absolute negative conductivity, i.e. the effect of appearance of electric current flowing in opposite direction than that of vector of quantizing electric field intensity, was shown. Such effect in graphene superlattices was discussed.

  7. Detection of 15 dB Squeezed States of Light and their Application for the Absolute Calibration of Photoelectric Quantum Efficiency.

    PubMed

    Vahlbruch, Henning; Mehmet, Moritz; Danzmann, Karsten; Schnabel, Roman

    2016-09-01

    Squeezed states of light belong to the most prominent nonclassical resources. They have compelling applications in metrology, which has been demonstrated by their routine exploitation for improving the sensitivity of a gravitational-wave detector since 2010. Here, we report on the direct measurement of 15 dB squeezed vacuum states of light and their application to calibrate the quantum efficiency of photoelectric detection. The object of calibration is a customized InGaAs positive intrinsic negative (p-i-n) photodiode optimized for high external quantum efficiency. The calibration yields a value of 99.5% with a 0.5% (k=2) uncertainty for a photon flux of the order 10^{17}  s^{-1} at a wavelength of 1064 nm. The calibration neither requires any standard nor knowledge of the incident light power and thus represents a valuable application of squeezed states of light in quantum metrology. PMID:27661673

  8. Detection of 15 dB Squeezed States of Light and their Application for the Absolute Calibration of Photoelectric Quantum Efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vahlbruch, Henning; Mehmet, Moritz; Danzmann, Karsten; Schnabel, Roman

    2016-09-01

    Squeezed states of light belong to the most prominent nonclassical resources. They have compelling applications in metrology, which has been demonstrated by their routine exploitation for improving the sensitivity of a gravitational-wave detector since 2010. Here, we report on the direct measurement of 15 dB squeezed vacuum states of light and their application to calibrate the quantum efficiency of photoelectric detection. The object of calibration is a customized InGaAs positive intrinsic negative (p-i-n) photodiode optimized for high external quantum efficiency. The calibration yields a value of 99.5% with a 0.5% (k =2 ) uncertainty for a photon flux of the order 1 017 s-1 at a wavelength of 1064 nm. The calibration neither requires any standard nor knowledge of the incident light power and thus represents a valuable application of squeezed states of light in quantum metrology.

  9. Fluorescence quantum yield measurements of fluorescent proteins: a laboratory experiment for a biochemistry or molecular biophysics laboratory course.

    PubMed

    Wall, Kathryn P; Dillon, Rebecca; Knowles, Michelle K

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescent proteins are commonly used in cell biology to assess where proteins are within a cell as a function of time and provide insight into intracellular protein function. However, the usefulness of a fluorescent protein depends directly on the quantum yield. The quantum yield relates the efficiency at which a fluorescent molecule converts absorbed photons into emitted photons and it is necessary to know for assessing what fluorescent protein is the most appropriate for a particular application. In this work, we have designed an upper-level, biochemistry laboratory experiment where students measure the fluorescence quantum yields of fluorescent proteins relative to a standard organic dye. Four fluorescent protein variants, enhanced cyan fluorescent protein (ECFP), enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP), mCitrine, and mCherry, were used, however the methods described are useful for the characterization of any fluorescent protein or could be expanded to fluorescent quantum yield measurements of organic dye molecules. The laboratory is designed as a guided inquiry project and takes two, 4 hr laboratory periods. During the first day students design the experiment by selecting the excitation wavelength, choosing the standard, and determining the concentration needed for the quantum yield experiment that takes place in the second laboratory period. Overall, this laboratory provides students with a guided inquiry learning experience and introduces concepts of fluorescence biophysics into a biochemistry laboratory curriculum.

  10. Quantum yields for the light adaptations in Anabaena sensory rhodopsin and bacteriorhodopsin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wada, Yoichiro; Kawanabe, Akira; Furutani, Yuji; Kandori, Hideki; Ohtani, Hiroyuki

    2008-02-01

    Archael-type rhodopsin has an all- trans or a 13- cis retinal. The light-induced interconversion between these two forms has been found in Anabaena sensory rhodopsin, even though only the photoreaction from the 13- cis form to the all- trans form exists in bacteriorhodopsin. In this study, we obtained the quantum yields for the 13- cis → all- trans and all- trans → 13- cis reactions of Anabaena sensory rhodopsin (0.24 ± 0.03 and 0.38 ± 0.07, respectively) and concluded that these values were independent of the wavelength of the excitation light as well as bacteriorhodopsin. In other words, no excess energy effects can be found in these reactions.

  11. Surface structures for enhancement of quantum yield in broad spectrum emission nanocrystals

    DOEpatents

    Schreuder, Michael A.; McBride, James R.; Rosenthal, Sandra J.

    2014-07-22

    Disclosed are inorganic nanoparticles comprising a body comprising cadmium and/or zinc crystallized with selenium, sulfur, and/or tellurium; a multiplicity of phosphonic acid ligands comprising at least about 20% of the total surface ligand coverage; wherein the nanocrystal is capable of absorbing energy from a first electromagnetic region and capable of emitting light in a second electromagnetic region, wherein the maximum absorbance wavelength of the first electromagnetic region is different from the maximum emission wavelength of the second electromagnetic region, thereby providing a Stokes shift of at least about 20 nm, wherein the second electromagnetic region comprises an at least about 100 nm wide band of wavelengths, and wherein the nanoparticle exhibits has a quantum yield of at least about 10%. This abstract is intended as a scanning tool for purposes of searching in the particular art and is not intended to be limiting of the present invention.

  12. Photonic effects on the radiative decay rate and luminescence quantum yield of doped nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Senden, Tim; Rabouw, Freddy T; Meijerink, Andries

    2015-02-24

    Nanocrystals (NCs) doped with luminescent ions form an emerging class of materials. In contrast to excitonic transitions in semiconductor NCs, the optical transitions are localized and not affected by quantum confinement. The radiative decay rates of the dopant emission in NCs are nevertheless different from their bulk analogues due to photonic effects, and also the luminescence quantum yield (QY, important for applications) is affected. In the past, different theoretical models have been proposed to describe the photonic effects for dopant emission in NCs, with little experimental validation. In this work we investigate the photonic effects on the radiative decay rate of luminescent doped NCs using 4 nm LaPO4 NCs doped with Ce(3+) or Tb(3+) ions in different refractive index solvents and bulk crystals. We demonstrate that the measured influence of the refractive index on the radiative decay rate of the Ce(3+) emission, having near unity QY, is in excellent agreement with the theoretical nanocrystal-cavity model. Furthermore, we show how the nanocrystal-cavity model can be used to quantify the nonunity QY of Tb(3+)-doped LaPO4 NCs and demonstrate that, as a general rule, the QY is higher in media with higher refractive index.

  13. Nanosecond flash studies of reduction of benzophenone by aliphatic amines. Quantum yields and kinetic isotope effects

    SciTech Connect

    Inbar, S.; Linschitz, H.; Cohen, S.G.

    1981-03-11

    Nanosecond flash photolysis, steady irradiation, and deuterium substitution studies have been carried out on solutions of benzophenone with added reductants. Quantum yields (phi/sub ketyl/) for reduction in benzene of benzophenone triplet to ketyl radical, based on phi = 2 for benzhydrol (I), were approx. 1 for cyclohexane (II), tert-butylamine (III), 2-aminobutane (IV), cyclohexylamine (V), di-n-propylamine (VI), and triethylamine (VII), approx. 0.7 for 1,4-diazabicyclo(2.2.2)octane (VIII), and approx. 0 for tert-butyl alcohol (IX). Thus, quenching, without radical formation by H abstraction from N and/or ..cap alpha..-C, does not occur with common aliphatic amines but does with Dabco (VIII). The latter quenching is markedly increased by small additions of acetonitrile; the flash spectrum from this compound indicates formation of a triplet amine CT complex or radical ion pair. Triplet-reductant interaction rate constants, k/sur ir/, are high for the amines (approx. 10/sup 8/-10/sup 9/ M/sup -1/ s/sup -1/) but also show significant deuterium kinetic isotope effects: 1.9 with III-N-d/sub 2/; 1.4 with IV-N-d/sub 2/; 1.2-1.3 with IV-..cap alpha..-C-d. It is proposed that k/sub ir/ measures H atom abstraction, favored in the transition state by an initial charge-transfer interaction. Overall steady irradiation quantum yields of reduction by amines, phi/sub Red/, are much lower than phi/sub ketyl/. This is attributed to disproportionationreactions of ketyl and alkylaminyl radicals for primary and secondary amines, and, possibly, aminoalkyl radicals for tertiary amines. In the case of tert-butylamine, the rate constant for disproportionation is obtained from the decay kinetics of ketyl radical and leads to phi/sub Red/ in agreement with that directly measured.

  14. Aeronomical determinations of the quantum yields of O (1S) and O (1D) from dissociative recombination of O2(+)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yee, Jeng-Hwa; Abreu, Vincent J.; Colwell, William B.

    1989-01-01

    Data from the visible-airglow experiment on the Atmosphere Explorer-E satellite have been used to determine the quantum yields of O (1S) and O (1D) from the dissociative recombination of O2(+) based on a constant total recombination rate from each vibrational level. A range of values between 0.05 and 0.18 has been obtained for the quantum yield of O (1S) and shows a positive correlation with the extent of the vibrational excitation of O2(+). The quantum yield of O (1D) has been measured to be 0.9 + or - 0.2, with no apparent dependence on the vibrational distribution of O2(+).

  15. Solution-based synthesis of high yield CZTS (Cu2ZnSnS4) spherical quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajesh, G.; Muthukumarasamy, N.; Subramanian, E. P.; Venkatraman, M. R.; Agilan, S.; Ragavendran, V.; Thambidurai, M.; Velumani, S.; Yi, Junsin; Velauthapillai, Dhayalan

    2015-01-01

    High yield CZTS quantum dots have been synthesized using simple precursors by chemical precipitation technique. Formation mechanism of CZTS spherical quantum dots also has been investigated. According to the mechanism, copper sulfide nuclei firstly forms, and serves as the starting point for the nucleation and growth of CZTS. X-ray diffraction pattern, X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS) and Raman spectra reveals the formation of pure kesterite structure Cu2ZnSnS4 nanoparticles. HRTEM analysis reveals the formation of CZTS quantum dots with an average particle size of ∼8.3 nm. The elemental distribution of CZTS quantum dots studied using STEM elemental mapping reveals that Cu, Zn, Sn and S are present in the sample. The photoluminescence spectra of CZTS exhibit a broad red emission band at 657 nm. The optical band gap is shifted to the higher energy side and it shows the presence of quantum confinement effect.

  16. The Effect of Varying Short-Chain Alkyl Substitution on the Molar Absorptivity and Quantum Yield of Cyanine Dyes

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, Gala; Henary, Maged; Patonay, Gabor

    2011-01-01

    The effect of varying short-chain alkyl substitution of the indole nitrogens on the spectroscopic properties of cyanine dyes was examined. Molar absorptivities and fluorescence quantum yields were determined for a set of pentamethine dyes and a set of heptamethine dyes for which the substitution of the indole nitrogen was varied. For both sets of dyes, increasing alkyl chain length resulted in no significant change in quantum yield or molar absorptivity. These results may be useful in designing new cyanine dyes for analytical applications and predicting their spectroscopic properties. PMID:21760707

  17. Determination of the Fluorescence Quantum Yield by Oceanic Phytoplankton in Their Natural Habitat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maritorena, Stéphane; Morel, André; Gentili, Bernard

    2000-12-01

    Sun-stimulated chlorophyll a fluorescence has been measured in situ , within the upward and downward light fields, in oceanic waters with chlorophyll concentrations of 0.04 3 mg m 3 . We combined these signals with phytoplankton absorption spectra to derive the fluorescence quantum yield, (number of photons emitted by fluorescence number of absorbed photons). was derived separately from hyperspectral (upward and downward) irradiance measurements (with a LI-COR Instruments spectroradiometer) and from nadir radiance near 683 nm (with a Biospherical Instruments profiler). The contribution of inelastic Raman scattering to the signal in the red band was assessed and subtracted. Raman-corrected values derived from the two instruments compared well. Vertical profiles were strongly structured, with maximal (5 6%) values at depth, whereas was 1% in near-surface waters (measurements made approximately at solar noon). These near-surface values are needed for interpretation of remotely sensed fluorescence signals. This optical study shows that the fluorescence yield of algae in their natural environment can be accurately derived in a nonintrusive way with available instrumentation and adequate protocols.

  18. Revised Absolute Configuration of Sibiricumin A: Substituent Effects in Simplified Model Structures Used for Quantum Mechanical Predictions of Chiroptical Properties.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Dan; Li, Zheng-Qiu; Cao, Fei; Liang, Miao-Miao; Pittman, Charles U; Zhu, Hua-Jie; Li, Li; Yu, Shi-Shan

    2016-08-01

    This study discusses the choice of different simplified models used in computations of electronic circular dichroism (ECD) spectra and other chiroptical characteristics used to determine the absolute configuration (AC) of the complex natural product sibiricumin A. Sections of molecules containing one chiral center with one near an aromatic group have large effects on the ECD spectra. Conversely, when the phenyl group is present on a substituent without a nonstereogenic center, removal of this section will have little effect on ECD spectra. However, these nonstereogenic-center-containing sections have large effects on calculated optical rotations (OR) values since the OR value is more sensitive to the geometries of sections in a molecule. In this study, the wrong AC of sibiricumin A was reassigned as (7R,8S,1'R,7'R,8'S)-. Chirality 28:612-617, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27428019

  19. A compact proton spectrometer for measurement of the absolute DD proton spectrum from which yield and ρR are determined in thin-shell inertial-confinement-fusion implosions.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, M J; Zylstra, A B; Frenje, J A; Rinderknecht, H G; Johnson, M Gatu; Waugh, C J; Séguin, F H; Sio, H; Sinenian, N; Li, C K; Petrasso, R D; Glebov, V Yu; Hohenberger, M; Stoeckl, C; Sangster, T C; Yeamans, C B; LePape, S; Mackinnon, A J; Bionta, R M; Talison, B; Casey, D T; Landen, O L; Moran, M J; Zacharias, R A; Kilkenny, J D; Nikroo, A

    2014-10-01

    A compact, step range filter proton spectrometer has been developed for the measurement of the absolute DD proton spectrum, from which yield and areal density (ρR) are inferred for deuterium-filled thin-shell inertial confinement fusion implosions. This spectrometer, which is based on tantalum step-range filters, is sensitive to protons in the energy range 1-9 MeV and can be used to measure proton spectra at mean energies of ∼1-3 MeV. It has been developed and implemented using a linear accelerator and applied to experiments at the OMEGA laser facility and the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Modeling of the proton slowing in the filters is necessary to construct the spectrum, and the yield and energy uncertainties are ±<10% in yield and ±120 keV, respectively. This spectrometer can be used for in situ calibration of DD-neutron yield diagnostics at the NIF. PMID:25362390

  20. A compact proton spectrometer for measurement of the absolute DD proton spectrum from which yield and pR are determined in thin-shell inertial-confinement-fusion implosions

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenberg, M. J.; Zylstra, A. B.; Frenje, J. A.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Waugh, C. J.; Seguin, F. H.; Sio, H.; Sinenian, N.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Hohenberger, M.; Stoeckl, C.; Sangster, T. C.; Yeamans, C. B.; LePape, S.; Mackinnon, A. J.; Bionta, R. M.; Talison, B.; Casey, D. T.; Landen, O. L.; Moran, M. J.; Zacharias, R. A.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Nikroo, A.

    2014-10-10

    A compact, step range filter proton spectrometer has been developed for the measurement of the absolute DD proton spectrum, from which yield and areal density (ρR) are inferred for deuterium-filled thin-shell inertial confinement fusion implosions. This spectrometer, which is based on tantalum step-range filters, is sensitive to protons in the energy range 1-9 MeV and can be used to measure proton spectra at mean energies of ~1-3 MeV. It has been developed and implemented using a linear accelerator and applied to experiments at the OMEGA laser facility and the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Modeling of the proton slowing in the filters is necessary to construct the spectrum, and the yield and energy uncertainties are ±<10% in yield and ±120 keV, respectively. This spectrometer can be used for in situ calibration of DD-neutron yield diagnostics at the NIF

  1. A compact proton spectrometer for measurement of the absolute DD proton spectrum from which yield and ρR are determined in thin-shell inertial-confinement-fusion implosions

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenberg, M. J. Zylstra, A. B.; Frenje, J. A.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Waugh, C. J.; Séguin, F. H.; Sio, H.; Sinenian, N.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Hohenberger, M.; Stoeckl, C.; Sangster, T. C.; Yeamans, C. B.; LePape, S.; Mackinnon, A. J.; Bionta, R. M.; Talison, B.; and others

    2014-10-01

    A compact, step range filter proton spectrometer has been developed for the measurement of the absolute DD proton spectrum, from which yield and areal density (ρR) are inferred for deuterium-filled thin-shell inertial confinement fusion implosions. This spectrometer, which is based on tantalum step-range filters, is sensitive to protons in the energy range 1-9 MeV and can be used to measure proton spectra at mean energies of ~1-3 MeV. It has been developed and implemented using a linear accelerator and applied to experiments at the OMEGA laser facility and the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Modeling of the proton slowing in the filters is necessary to construct the spectrum, and the yield and energy uncertainties are ±<10% in yield and ±120 keV, respectively. This spectrometer can be used for in situ calibration of DD-neutron yield diagnostics at the NIF.

  2. A compact proton spectrometer for measurement of the absolute DD proton spectrum from which yield and ρR are determined in thin-shell inertial-confinement-fusion implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenberg, M. J.; Zylstra, A. B.; Frenje, J. A.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Waugh, C. J.; Séguin, F. H.; Sio, H.; Sinenian, N.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Hohenberger, M.; Stoeckl, C.; Sangster, T. C.; Yeamans, C. B.; LePape, S.; Mackinnon, A. J.; Bionta, R. M.; Talison, B.; Casey, D. T.; Landen, O. L.; Moran, M. J.; Zacharias, R. A.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Nikroo, A.

    2014-10-01

    A compact, step range filter proton spectrometer has been developed for the measurement of the absolute DD proton spectrum, from which yield and areal density (ρR) are inferred for deuterium-filled thin-shell inertial confinement fusion implosions. This spectrometer, which is based on tantalum step-range filters, is sensitive to protons in the energy range 1-9 MeV and can be used to measure proton spectra at mean energies of ˜1-3 MeV. It has been developed and implemented using a linear accelerator and applied to experiments at the OMEGA laser facility and the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Modeling of the proton slowing in the filters is necessary to construct the spectrum, and the yield and energy uncertainties are ±<10% in yield and ±120 keV, respectively. This spectrometer can be used for in situ calibration of DD-neutron yield diagnostics at the NIF.

  3. Identification of GABA A receptor modulators in Kadsura longipedunculata and assignment of absolute configurations by quantum-chemical ECD calculations

    PubMed Central

    Zaugg, Janine; Ebrahimi, Samad Nejad; Smiesko, Martin; Baburin, Igor; Hering, Steffen; Hamburger, Matthias

    2011-01-01

    A petroleum ether extract of Kadsura longipedunculata enhanced the GABA-induced chloride current (IGABA) by 122.5 ± 0.3% (n = 2) when tested at 100 μg/ml in Xenopus laevis oocytes expressing GABA A receptors (α1β2γ2S subtype) in two-microelectrode voltage clamp measurements. Thirteen compounds were subsequently identified by HPLC-based activity profiling as responsible for GABA A receptor activity and purified in preparative scale. 6-Cinnamoyl-6,7-dihydro-7-myrceneol and 5,6-dihydrocuparenic acid were thereby isolated for the first time. The determination of the absolute stereochemistry of these compounds was achieved by comparison of experimental and calculated ECD spectra. All but one of the 13 isolated compounds from K. longipedunculata potentiated IGABA through GABA A receptors composed of α1β2γ2S subunits in a concentration-dependent manner. Potencies ranged from 12.8 ± 3.1 to 135.6 ± 85.7 μM, and efficiencies ranged from 129.7 ± 36.8% to 885.8 ± 291.2%. The phytochemical profiles of petroleum ether extracts of Kadsura japonica fruits (114.1 ± 2.6% potentiation of IGABA at 100 μg/ml, n = 2), and Schisandra chinensis fruits (inactive at 100 μg/ml) were compared by HPLC-PDA-ESIMS with that of K. longipedunculata. PMID:21889177

  4. ABSORBANCE, ABSORPTION COEFFICIENT, AND APPARENT QUANTUM YIELD: A COMMENT ON AMBIGUITY IN THE USE OF THESE OPTICAL CONCEPTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Several important optical terms such as "absorbance" and "absorption coefficient" are frequently used ambiguously in the current peer-reviewed literature. Since they are important terms that are required to derive other quantities such as the "apparent quantum yield" of photoprod...

  5. Fluorescence quantum yield of carbon dioxide for quantitative UV laser-induced fluorescence in high-pressure flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, T.; Bessler, W. G.; Yoo, J.; Schulz, C.; Jeffries, J. B.; Hanson, R. K.

    2008-11-01

    The fluorescence quantum yield for ultraviolet laser-induced fluorescence of CO2 is determined for selected excitation wavelengths in the range 215-250 nm. Wavelength-resolved laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) spectra of CO2, NO, and O2 are measured in the burned gases of a laminar CH4/air flame ( φ=0.9 and 1.1) at 20 bar with additional NO seeded into the flow. The fluorescence spectra are fit to determine the relative contribution of the three species to infer an estimate of fluorescence quantum yield for CO2 that ranges from 2-8×10-6 depending on temperature and excitation wavelength with an estimated uncertainty of ±0.5×10-6. The CO2 fluorescence signal increases linearly with gas pressure for flames with constant CO2 mole fraction for the 10 to 60 bar range, indicating that collisional quenching is not an important contributor to the CO2 fluorescence quantum yield. Spectral simulation calculations are used to choose two wavelengths for excitation of CO2, 239.34 and 242.14 nm, which minimize interference from LIF of NO and O2. Quantitative LIF images of CO2 are demonstrated using these two excitation wavelengths and the measured fluorescence quantum yield.

  6. MnBr₂/18-crown-6 coordination complexes showing high room temperature luminescence and quantum yield.

    PubMed

    Hausmann, David; Kuzmanoski, Ana; Feldmann, Claus

    2016-04-21

    The reaction of manganese(ii) bromide and the crown ether 18-crown-6 in the ionic liquid [(n-Bu)3MeN][N(Tf)2] under mild conditions (80-130 °C) resulted in the formation of three different coordination compounds: MnBr2(18-crown-6) (), Mn3Br6(18-crown-6)2 () and Mn3Br6(18-crown-6) (). In general, the local coordination and the crystal structure of all compounds are driven by the mismatch between the small radius of the Mn(2+) cation (83 pm) and the ring opening of 18-crown-6 as a chelating ligand (about 300 pm). This improper situation leads to different types of coordination and bonding. MnBr2(18-crown-6) represents a molecular compound with Mn(2+) coordinated by two bromine atoms and only five oxygen atoms of 18-crown-6. Mn3Br6(18-crown-6)2 falls into a [MnBr(18-crown-6)](+) cation - with Mn(2+) coordinated by six oxygen atoms and Br - and a [MnBr(18-crown-6)MnBr4](-) anion. In this anion, Mn(2+) is coordinated by five oxygen atoms of the crown ether as well as by two bromine atoms, one of them bridging to an isolated (MnBr4) tetrahedron. Mn3Br6(18-crown-6), finally, forms an infinite, non-charged [Mn2(18-crown-6)(MnBr6)] chain. Herein, 18-crown-6 is exocyclically coordinated by two Mn(2+) cations. All compounds show intense luminescence in the yellow to red spectral range and exhibit remarkable quantum yields of 70% (Mn3Br6(18-crown-6)) and 98% (Mn3Br6(18-crown-6)2). The excellent quantum yield of Mn3Br6(18-crown-6)2 and its differentiation from MnBr2(18-crown-6) and Mn3Br6(18-crown-6) can be directly correlated to the local coordination. PMID:26956783

  7. Oxalyl chloride, ClC(O)C(O)Cl: UV/vis spectrum and Cl atom photolysis quantum yields at 193, 248, and 351 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Buddhadeb; Papanastasiou, Dimitrios K.; Burkholder, James B.

    2012-10-28

    Oxalyl chloride, (ClCO){sub 2}, has been used as a Cl atom photolytic precursor in numerous laboratory kinetic and photochemical studies. In this study, the UV/vis absorption spectrum of (ClCO){sub 2} and the Cl atom quantum yields in its photolysis at 193, 248, and 351 nm are reported. The UV/vis spectrum was measured between 200 and 450 nm at 296 K using diode array spectroscopy in conjunction with an absolute cross section obtained at 213.9 nm. Our results are in agreement with the spectrum reported by Baklanov and Krasnoperov [J. Phys. Chem. A 105, 97-103 (2001)], which was obtained at 11 discrete wavelengths between 193.3 and 390 nm. Cl atom quantum yields, {Phi}({lambda}), were measured using pulsed laser photolysis coupled with time resolved atomic resonance fluorescence detection of Cl. The UV photolysis of (ClCO){sub 2} has been shown in previous studies to occur via an impulsive three-body dissociation mechanism, (COCl){sub 2}+ hv{yields} ClCO*+ Cl + CO (2), where the excited ClCO radical, ClCO*, either dissociates or stabilizes ClCO*{yields} Cl + CO (3a), {yields} ClCO (3b). ClCO is thermally unstable at the temperatures (253-298 K) and total pressures (13-128 Torr) used in our experiments ClCO + M {yields} Cl + CO + M (4) leading to the formation of a secondary Cl atom that was resolvable in the Cl atom temporal profiles obtained in the 248 and 351 nm photolysis of (ClCO){sub 2}. {Phi}(193 nm) was found to be 2.07 {+-} 0.37 independent of bath gas pressure (25.8-105.7 Torr, N{sub 2}), i.e., the branching ratio for channel 2a or the direct formation of 2Cl + 2CO in the photolysis of (ClCO){sub 2} is >0.95. At 248 nm, the branching ratio for channel 2a was determined to be 0.79 {+-} 0.15, while the total Cl atom yield, i.e., following the completion of reaction (4), was found to be 1.98 {+-} 0.26 independent of bath gas pressure (15-70 Torr, N{sub 2}). {Phi}(351 nm) was found to be pressure dependent between 7.8 and 122.4 Torr (He, N{sub 2}). The low

  8. Ultrasmall Organic Nanoparticles with Aggregation-Induced Emission and Enhanced Quantum Yield for Fluorescence Cell Imaging.

    PubMed

    Xu, Suying; Bai, Xilin; Ma, Jingwen; Xu, Minmin; Hu, Gaofei; James, Tony D; Wang, Leyu

    2016-08-01

    The use of fluorescence probes for biomedical imaging has attracted significant attention over recent years owing to their high resolution at cellular level. The probes are available in many formats including small particle size based imaging agents which are considered to be promising candidates, due to their excellent stabilities. Yet, concerns over the potential cytotoxicity effects of inorganic luminescent particles have led to questions about their suitability for imaging applications. Exploration of alternatives inspired us to use organic fluorophores with aggregation-induced emission (AIE), prepared by functionalizing the amine group on tetraphenylethene with 3,5-bis(trifluoromethyl)phenyl isocyanate. The as-synthesized novel AIE fluorophore (TPE-F) display enhanced quantum yield and longer lifetime as compared with its counterparts (4,4',4″,4‴-(ethene-1,1,2,2-tetrayl)tetraaniline, TPE-AM). Furthermore, the TPE-F was encapsulated into small-size organic nanoparticles (NPs; dynamic light scattering size, ∼10 nm) with polysuccinimide (PSI). The biocompatibility, excellent stability, bright fluorescence, and selective cell targeting of these NPs enable the as-prepared TPE-F NPs to be suitable for specific fluorescence cell imaging. PMID:27349933

  9. 100 fs photo-isomerization with vibrational coherences but low quantum yield in Anabaena Sensory Rhodopsin.

    PubMed

    Cheminal, Alexandre; Léonard, Jérémie; Kim, So-Young; Jung, Kwang-Hwan; Kandori, Hideki; Haacke, Stefan

    2015-10-14

    Anabaena Sensory Rhodopsin (ASR) stands out among the microbial retinal proteins in that, under light-adaptation (LA) conditions, it binds both the 13-cis isomer and the all-trans isomer of the protonated Schiff base of retinal (PSBR). In the dark-adapted (DA) state, more than 95% of the proteins bear all-trans PSBR, and the protein environment adopts a different equilibrium state. We report the excited state and photo-isomerization kinetics of ASR under different LA conditions. The full data set allows confirming that the photoisomerization of the 13C isomer occurs within 100 fs and indications of an excited and ground state wavepacket launched by the ultrafast non-adiabatic reaction are reported. Even though this recalls the record isomerization time and the coherent reaction scenario of 11-cis PSBR in rhodopsin, the photoisomerization quantum yield (QY) is much lower, actually the lowest value ever reported for retinal proteins (<15%). Noticeably, in ASR the excited state lifetime (ESL) is at least five times larger and the QY is more than twice as large for AT PSBR as compared to 13C PSBR. We argue that ESL and QY cannot be expected to be correlated at all, but that the latter is decided on, as often anticipated, by the wavepacket pathways leading to the conical intersection seam.

  10. White carbon: Fluorescent carbon nanoparticles with tunable quantum yield in a reproducible green synthesis.

    PubMed

    Meiling, Till T; Cywiński, Piotr J; Bald, Ilko

    2016-01-01

    In this study, a new reliable, economic, and environmentally-friendly one-step synthesis is established to obtain carbon nanodots (CNDs) with well-defined and reproducible photoluminescence (PL) properties via the microwave-assisted hydrothermal treatment of starch and Tris-acetate-EDTA (TAE) buffer as carbon sources. Three kinds of CNDs are prepared using different sets of above mentioned starting materials. The as-synthesized CNDs: C-CND (starch only), N-CND 1 (starch in TAE) and N-CND 2 (TAE only) exhibit highly homogenous PL and are ready to use without need for further purification. The CNDs are stable over a long period of time (>1 year) either in solution or as freeze-dried powder. Depending on starting material, CNDs with PL quantum yield (PLQY) ranging from less than 1% up to 28% are obtained. The influence of the precursor concentration, reaction time and type of additives on the optical properties (UV-Vis absorption, PL emission spectrum and PLQY) is carefully investigated, providing insight into the chemical processes that occur during CND formation. Remarkably, upon freeze-drying the initially brown CND-solution turns into a non-fluorescent white/slightly brown powder which recovers PL in aqueous solution and can potentially be applied as fluorescent marker in bio-imaging, as a reduction agent or as a photocatalyst. PMID:27334409

  11. Novel photocatalytic reactor for the destruction of airborne pollutants reaction kinetics and quantum yields

    SciTech Connect

    Ibrahim, H.; Lasa, H. de

    1999-09-01

    Photocatalytic conversion of a model pollutant (toluene) is studied in a newly designed batch photoreactor, called Photo-CREC-Air. In this unit TiO{sub 2} is supported on a filter mesh with good contact with near UV light, TiO{sub 2}, and air. Photo-CREC-Air is designed with special features including a Venturi section and a heated perforated plate. The heated perforated plate minimizes water adsorption on the mesh and consequently water effects on the reaction rate. The system performance is examined for different toluene concentrations and two humidity levels. After assessing the insignificant toluene adsorption observed under the selected operating conditions, a pseudohomogeneous model is postulated for kinetics modeling. Initial photodegradation rates of toluene at 100 C in Photo-CREC-Air, in the range of model pollutant concentrations and humidity level studied, were 0.005--0.05 {mu}mol/(gcat s). Apparent quantum yields were estimated to be in many cases greater than 100% and as high as 450%.

  12. Integrated semiconductor quantum dot scintillation detector: Ultimate limit for speed and light yield

    DOE PAGES

    Oktyabrsky, Serge; Yakimov, Michael; Tokranov, Vadim; Murat, Pavel

    2016-03-30

    Here, a picosecond-range timing of charged particles and photons is a long-standing challenge for many high-energy physics, biophysics, medical and security applications. We present a design, technological pathway and challenges, and some properties important for realization of an ultrafast high-efficient room-temperature semiconductor scintillator based on self-assembled InAs quantum dots (QD) embedded in a GaAs matrix. Low QD density (<; 1015 cm-3), fast (~5 ps) electron capture, luminescence peak redshifted by 0.2-0.3 eV from GaAs absorption edge with fast decay time (0.5-1 ns) along with the efficient energy transfer in the GaAs matrix (4.2 eV/pair) allows for fabrication of a semiconductormore » scintillator with the unsurpassed performance parameters. The major technological challenge is fabrication of a large volume (> 1 cm3 ) of epitaxial QD medium. This requires multiple film separation and bonding, likely using separate epitaxial films as waveguides for improved light coupling. Compared to traditional inorganic scintillators, the semiconductor-QD based scintillators could have about 5x higher light yield and 20x faster decay time, opening a way to gamma detectors with the energy resolution better than 1% and sustaining counting rates MHz. Picosecond-scale timing requires segmented low-capacitance photodiodes integrated with the scintillator. For photons, the proposed detector inherently provides the depth-of-interaction information.« less

  13. Girdling effects on fruit set and quantum yield efficiency of PSII in two Citrus cultivars.

    PubMed

    Rivas, F; Gravina, A; Agustí, M

    2007-04-01

    Girdling effects on fruitlet abscission, leaf chlorophyll, chlorophyll a fluorescence and carbohydrate concentration in various flowering and vegetative shoots were studied during natural fruit drop in two Citrus cultivars. Irrespective of shoot type, girdling delayed fruitlet abscission, but only fruitlets borne on leafy shoots had increased final fruit set. Chlorophyll a fluorescence analysis revealed differences in quantum yield efficiency of photosystem II of light adapted leaves (Phi(PSII)) among shoot types and in response to girdling. In young leaves of vegetative shoots, girdling decreased Phi(PSII), whereas Phi(PSII) increased from Day 30 after girdling in young leaves of leafy flowering shoots; however, Phi(PSII) did not change in mature leaves during fruit set in either control or girdled trees. Girdling altered leaf carbohydrate concentrations and the photosynthetic performance of the various shoot types. Our results indicate that, in Citrus, several carbohydrate-based regulatory mechanisms of photosynthesis coexist during carbohydrate accumulation brought about by girdling. It is concluded that the delay in fruitlet abscission and the increase in Phi(PSII )observed in girdled leafy flowering shoots are the mechanisms underlying the enhancement of fruit set after girdling.

  14. White carbon: Fluorescent carbon nanoparticles with tunable quantum yield in a reproducible green synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Meiling, Till T.; Cywiński, Piotr J.; Bald, Ilko

    2016-01-01

    In this study, a new reliable, economic, and environmentally-friendly one-step synthesis is established to obtain carbon nanodots (CNDs) with well-defined and reproducible photoluminescence (PL) properties via the microwave-assisted hydrothermal treatment of starch and Tris-acetate-EDTA (TAE) buffer as carbon sources. Three kinds of CNDs are prepared using different sets of above mentioned starting materials. The as-synthesized CNDs: C-CND (starch only), N-CND 1 (starch in TAE) and N-CND 2 (TAE only) exhibit highly homogenous PL and are ready to use without need for further purification. The CNDs are stable over a long period of time (>1 year) either in solution or as freeze-dried powder. Depending on starting material, CNDs with PL quantum yield (PLQY) ranging from less than 1% up to 28% are obtained. The influence of the precursor concentration, reaction time and type of additives on the optical properties (UV-Vis absorption, PL emission spectrum and PLQY) is carefully investigated, providing insight into the chemical processes that occur during CND formation. Remarkably, upon freeze-drying the initially brown CND-solution turns into a non-fluorescent white/slightly brown powder which recovers PL in aqueous solution and can potentially be applied as fluorescent marker in bio-imaging, as a reduction agent or as a photocatalyst. PMID:27334409

  15. White carbon: Fluorescent carbon nanoparticles with tunable quantum yield in a reproducible green synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meiling, Till T.; Cywiński, Piotr J.; Bald, Ilko

    2016-06-01

    In this study, a new reliable, economic, and environmentally-friendly one-step synthesis is established to obtain carbon nanodots (CNDs) with well-defined and reproducible photoluminescence (PL) properties via the microwave-assisted hydrothermal treatment of starch and Tris-acetate-EDTA (TAE) buffer as carbon sources. Three kinds of CNDs are prepared using different sets of above mentioned starting materials. The as-synthesized CNDs: C-CND (starch only), N-CND 1 (starch in TAE) and N-CND 2 (TAE only) exhibit highly homogenous PL and are ready to use without need for further purification. The CNDs are stable over a long period of time (>1 year) either in solution or as freeze-dried powder. Depending on starting material, CNDs with PL quantum yield (PLQY) ranging from less than 1% up to 28% are obtained. The influence of the precursor concentration, reaction time and type of additives on the optical properties (UV-Vis absorption, PL emission spectrum and PLQY) is carefully investigated, providing insight into the chemical processes that occur during CND formation. Remarkably, upon freeze-drying the initially brown CND-solution turns into a non-fluorescent white/slightly brown powder which recovers PL in aqueous solution and can potentially be applied as fluorescent marker in bio-imaging, as a reduction agent or as a photocatalyst.

  16. Quantum Yields and Rate Constants of Photochemical and Nonphotochemical Excitation Quenching (Experiment and Model).

    PubMed Central

    Laisk, A.; Oja, V.; Rasulov, B.; Eichelmann, H.; Sumberg, A.

    1997-01-01

    Sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.), cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.), tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.), sorghum (Sorghum bicolor Moench.), amaranth (Amaranthus cruentus L.), and cytochrome b6f complex-deficient transgenic tobacco leaves were used to test the response of plants exposed to differnt light intensities and CO2 concentrations before and after photoinhibition at 4000 [mu]mol photons m-2 s-1 and to thermoinhibition up to 45[deg]C. Quantum yields of photochemical and nonphotochemical excitation quenching (YP and YN) and the corresponding relative rate constants for excitation capture from the antenna-primary radical pair equilibrium system (k[prime]P and k[prime]N) were calculated from measured fluorescence parameters. The above treatments resulted in decreases in YP and K[prime]P and in approximately complementary increases in YN and K[prime]N under normal and inhibitory conditions. The results were reproduced by a mathematical model of electron/proton transport and O2 evolution/CO2 assimilation in photosynthesis based on budget equations for the intermediates of photosynthesis. Quantitative differences between model predictions and experiments are explainable, assuming that electron transport is organized into domains that contain relatively complete electron and proton transport chains (e.g. thylakoids). With the complementation that occurs between the photochemical and nonphotochemical excitation quenching, the regulatory system can constantly maintain the shortest lifetime of excitation necessary to avoid the formation of chlorophyll triplet states and singlet oxygen. PMID:12223845

  17. Girdling effects on fruit set and quantum yield efficiency of PSII in two Citrus cultivars.

    PubMed

    Rivas, F; Gravina, A; Agustí, M

    2007-04-01

    Girdling effects on fruitlet abscission, leaf chlorophyll, chlorophyll a fluorescence and carbohydrate concentration in various flowering and vegetative shoots were studied during natural fruit drop in two Citrus cultivars. Irrespective of shoot type, girdling delayed fruitlet abscission, but only fruitlets borne on leafy shoots had increased final fruit set. Chlorophyll a fluorescence analysis revealed differences in quantum yield efficiency of photosystem II of light adapted leaves (Phi(PSII)) among shoot types and in response to girdling. In young leaves of vegetative shoots, girdling decreased Phi(PSII), whereas Phi(PSII) increased from Day 30 after girdling in young leaves of leafy flowering shoots; however, Phi(PSII) did not change in mature leaves during fruit set in either control or girdled trees. Girdling altered leaf carbohydrate concentrations and the photosynthetic performance of the various shoot types. Our results indicate that, in Citrus, several carbohydrate-based regulatory mechanisms of photosynthesis coexist during carbohydrate accumulation brought about by girdling. It is concluded that the delay in fruitlet abscission and the increase in Phi(PSII )observed in girdled leafy flowering shoots are the mechanisms underlying the enhancement of fruit set after girdling. PMID:17241995

  18. Action spectra of photosystems II and I and quantum yield of photosynthesis in leaves in State 1.

    PubMed

    Laisk, Agu; Oja, Vello; Eichelmann, Hillar; Dall'Osto, Luca

    2014-02-01

    The spectral global quantum yield (YII, electrons/photons absorbed) of photosystem II (PSII) was measured in sunflower leaves in State 1 using monochromatic light. The global quantum yield of PSI (YI) was measured using low-intensity monochromatic light flashes and the associated transmittance change at 810nm. The 810-nm signal change was calibrated based on the number of electrons generated by PSII during the flash (4·O2 evolution) which arrived at the PSI donor side after a delay of 2ms. The intrinsic quantum yield of PSI (yI, electrons per photon absorbed by PSI) was measured at 712nm, where photon absorption by PSII was small. The results were used to resolve the individual spectra of the excitation partitioning coefficients between PSI (aI) and PSII (aII) in leaves. For comparison, pigment-protein complexes for PSII and PSI were isolated, separated by sucrose density ultracentrifugation, and their optical density was measured. A good correlation was obtained for the spectral excitation partitioning coefficients measured by these different methods. The intrinsic yield of PSI was high (yI=0.88), but it absorbed only about 1/3 of quanta; consequently, about 2/3 of quanta were absorbed by PSII, but processed with the low intrinsic yield yII=0.63. In PSII, the quantum yield of charge separation was 0.89 as detected by variable fluorescence Fv/Fm, but 29% of separated charges recombined (Laisk A, Eichelmann H and Oja V, Photosynth. Res. 113, 145-155). At wavelengths less than 580nm about 30% of excitation is absorbed by pigments poorly connected to either photosystem, most likely carotenoids bound in pigment-protein complexes.

  19. A redetermination of the sup 1 B sub 2u yields sup 1 A sub 1g fluorescence quantum yield of benzene vapor

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, D.B.; Lipsky, S. )

    1991-05-02

    The fluorescence quantum yield of benzene vapor excited at 253.7 nm and at pressures from 10 to 50 Torr has been determined at 22C by comparison with the fluorescence from a dilute solution of benzene in cyclohexane. The value thus obtained is 0.044 {plus minus} 0.006, which is significantly lower than has been reported in all previous investigations. Although the origin of the discrepancy remains unknown, a theoretical argument is presented that tends to support the lower value.

  20. Measurement of the Absolute Branching Fraction of D{sub s}{sup +}{yields}{tau}{sup +}{nu}{sub {tau}} Decay

    SciTech Connect

    Ecklund, K. M.; Love, W.; Savinov, V.; Lopez, A.; Mendez, H.; Ramirez, J.; Ge, J. Y.; Miller, D. H.; Shipsey, I. P. J.; Xin, B.; Adams, G. S.; Anderson, M.; Cummings, J. P.; Danko, I.; Hu, D.; Moziak, B.; Napolitano, J.; He, Q.; Insler, J.; Muramatsu, H.

    2008-04-25

    Using a sample of tagged D{sub s}{sup +} decays collected near the D{sub s}*{sup {+-}}D{sub s}{sup {+-}} peak production energy in e{sup +}e{sup -} collisions with the CLEO-c detector, we study the leptonic decay D{sub s}{sup +}{yields}{tau}{sup +}{nu}{sub {tau}} via the decay channel {tau}{sup +}{yields}e{sup +}{nu}{sub e}{nu}{sub {tau}}. We measure B(D{sub s}{sup +}{yields}{tau}{sup +}{nu}{sub {tau}})=(6.17{+-}0.71{+-}0.34)%, where the first error is statistical and the second systematic. Combining this result with our measurements of D{sub s}{sup +}{yields}{mu}{sup +}{nu}{sub {mu}} and D{sub s}{sup +}{yields}{tau}{sup +}{nu}{sub {tau}} (via {tau}{sup +}{yields}{pi}{sup +}{nu}{sub {tau}}), we determine f{sub D{sub s}}=(274{+-}10{+-}5) MeV.

  1. Biosolar cells: global artificial photosynthesis needs responsive matrices with quantum coherent kinetic control for high yield.

    PubMed

    Purchase, R L; de Groot, H J M

    2015-06-01

    This contribution discusses why we should consider developing artificial photosynthesis with the tandem approach followed by the Dutch BioSolar Cells consortium, a current operational paradigm for a global artificial photosynthesis project. We weigh the advantages and disadvantages of a tandem converter against other approaches, including biomass. Owing to the low density of solar energy per unit area, artificial photosynthetic systems must operate at high efficiency to minimize the land (or sea) area required. In particular, tandem converters are a much better option than biomass for densely populated countries and use two photons per electron extracted from water as the raw material into chemical conversion to hydrogen, or carbon-based fuel when CO2 is also used. For the average total light sum of 40 mol m(-2) d(-1) for The Netherlands, the upper limits are many tons of hydrogen or carbon-based fuel per hectare per year. A principal challenge is to forge materials for quantitative conversion of photons to chemical products within the physical limitation of an internal potential of ca 2.9 V. When going from electric charge in the tandem to hydrogen and back to electricity, only the energy equivalent to 1.23 V can be stored in the fuel and regained. A critical step is then to learn from nature how to use the remaining difference of ca 1.7 V effectively by triple use of one overpotential for preventing recombination, kinetic stabilization of catalytic intermediates and finally generating targeted heat for the release of oxygen. Probably the only way to achieve this is by using bioinspired responsive matrices that have quantum-classical pathways for a coherent conversion of photons to fuels, similar to what has been achieved by natural selection in evolution. In appendix A for the expert, we derive a propagator that describes how catalytic reactions can proceed coherently by a convergence of time scales of quantum electron dynamics and classical nuclear dynamics. We

  2. Biosolar cells: global artificial photosynthesis needs responsive matrices with quantum coherent kinetic control for high yield.

    PubMed

    Purchase, R L; de Groot, H J M

    2015-06-01

    This contribution discusses why we should consider developing artificial photosynthesis with the tandem approach followed by the Dutch BioSolar Cells consortium, a current operational paradigm for a global artificial photosynthesis project. We weigh the advantages and disadvantages of a tandem converter against other approaches, including biomass. Owing to the low density of solar energy per unit area, artificial photosynthetic systems must operate at high efficiency to minimize the land (or sea) area required. In particular, tandem converters are a much better option than biomass for densely populated countries and use two photons per electron extracted from water as the raw material into chemical conversion to hydrogen, or carbon-based fuel when CO2 is also used. For the average total light sum of 40 mol m(-2) d(-1) for The Netherlands, the upper limits are many tons of hydrogen or carbon-based fuel per hectare per year. A principal challenge is to forge materials for quantitative conversion of photons to chemical products within the physical limitation of an internal potential of ca 2.9 V. When going from electric charge in the tandem to hydrogen and back to electricity, only the energy equivalent to 1.23 V can be stored in the fuel and regained. A critical step is then to learn from nature how to use the remaining difference of ca 1.7 V effectively by triple use of one overpotential for preventing recombination, kinetic stabilization of catalytic intermediates and finally generating targeted heat for the release of oxygen. Probably the only way to achieve this is by using bioinspired responsive matrices that have quantum-classical pathways for a coherent conversion of photons to fuels, similar to what has been achieved by natural selection in evolution. In appendix A for the expert, we derive a propagator that describes how catalytic reactions can proceed coherently by a convergence of time scales of quantum electron dynamics and classical nuclear dynamics. We

  3. Adaptation to high CO2 concentration in an optimal environment: radiation capture, canopy quantum yield and carbon use efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monje, O.; Bugbee, B.

    1998-01-01

    The effect of elevated [CO2] on wheat (Triticum aestivum L. Veery 10) productivity was examined by analysing radiation capture, canopy quantum yield, canopy carbon use efficiency, harvest index and daily C gain. Canopies were grown at either 330 or 1200 micromoles mol-1 [CO2] in controlled environments, where root and shoot C fluxes were monitored continuously from emergence to harvest. A rapidly circulating hydroponic solution supplied nutrients, water and root zone oxygen. At harvest, dry mass predicted from gas exchange data was 102.8 +/- 4.7% of the observed dry mass in six trials. Neither radiation capture efficiency nor carbon use efficiency were affected by elevated [CO2], but yield increased by 13% due to a sustained increase in canopy quantum yield. CO2 enrichment increased root mass, tiller number and seed mass. Harvest index and chlorophyll concentration were unchanged, but CO2 enrichment increased average life cycle net photosynthesis (13%, P < 0.05) and root respiration (24%, P < 0.05). These data indicate that plant communities adapt to CO2 enrichment through changes in C allocation. Elevated [CO2] increases sink strength in optimal environments, resulting in sustained increases in photosynthetic capacity, canopy quantum yield and daily C gain throughout the life cycle.

  4. Adaptation to high CO2 concentration in an optimal environment: radiation capture, canopy quantum yield and carbon use efficiency.

    PubMed

    Monje, O; Bugbee, B

    1998-01-01

    The effect of elevated [CO2] on wheat (Triticum aestivum L. Veery 10) productivity was examined by analysing radiation capture, canopy quantum yield, canopy carbon use efficiency, harvest index and daily C gain. Canopies were grown at either 330 or 1200 micromoles mol-1 [CO2] in controlled environments, where root and shoot C fluxes were monitored continuously from emergence to harvest. A rapidly circulating hydroponic solution supplied nutrients, water and root zone oxygen. At harvest, dry mass predicted from gas exchange data was 102.8 +/- 4.7% of the observed dry mass in six trials. Neither radiation capture efficiency nor carbon use efficiency were affected by elevated [CO2], but yield increased by 13% due to a sustained increase in canopy quantum yield. CO2 enrichment increased root mass, tiller number and seed mass. Harvest index and chlorophyll concentration were unchanged, but CO2 enrichment increased average life cycle net photosynthesis (13%, P < 0.05) and root respiration (24%, P < 0.05). These data indicate that plant communities adapt to CO2 enrichment through changes in C allocation. Elevated [CO2] increases sink strength in optimal environments, resulting in sustained increases in photosynthetic capacity, canopy quantum yield and daily C gain throughout the life cycle.

  5. Absolute rate constant of the reaction OH + H2O2 yields HO2 + H2O from 245 to 423 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keyser, L. F.

    1980-01-01

    The absolute rate constant of the reaction between the hydroxyl radical and hydrogen peroxide was measured by using the discharge-flow resonance fluorescence technique at total pressure between 1 and 4 torr. At 298 K the result is (1.64 + or - 0.32) x 10 to the -12th cu cm/molecule s. The observed rate constant is independent of pressure, surface-to-volume ratio, the addition of vibrational quenchers, and the source of OH. The temperature dependence has also been determined between 245 and 423 K; the resulting Arrhenius expression is k cu cm/molecule s is equal to (2.51 + or - 0.6) x 10 to the -12th exp(-126 + or - 76/T).

  6. Improved measurement of absolute branching fraction of D{sub s}{sup +}{yields}{tau}{sup +}{nu}{sub {tau}}

    SciTech Connect

    Onyisi, P. U. E.; Rosner, J. L.; Alexander, J. P.; Cassel, D. G.; Duboscq, J. E.; Ehrlich, R.; Fields, L.; Galik, R. S.; Gibbons, L.; Gray, R.; Gray, S. W.; Hartill, D. L.; Heltsley, B. K.; Hertz, D.; Hunt, J. M.; Kandaswamy, J.; Kreinick, D. L.; Kuznetsov, V. E.; Ledoux, J.; Mahlke-Krueger, H.

    2009-03-01

    We have studied the leptonic decay D{sub s}{sup +}{yields}{tau}{sup +}{nu}{sub {tau}}, via the decay channel {tau}{sup +}{yields}e{sup +}{nu}{sub e}{nu}{sub {tau}}, using a sample of tagged D{sub s}{sup +} decays collected near the D{sub s}*{sup {+-}}D{sub s}{sup {+-}} peak production energy in e{sup +}e{sup -} collisions with the CLEO-c detector. We obtain B(D{sub s}{sup +}{yields}{tau}{sup +}{nu}{sub {tau}})=(5.30{+-}0.47{+-}0.22)% and determine the decay constant f{sub D{sub s}}=(252.5{+-}11.1{+-}5.2) MeV, where the first uncertainties are statistical and the second are systematic.

  7. Assessment of experimental d-PIGE γ-ray production cross sections for 12C, 14N and 16O and comparison with absolute thick target yields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Csedreki, L.; Halász, Z.; Kiss, Á. Z.

    2016-08-01

    Measured differential cross sections for deuteron induced γ-ray emission from the reactions 12C(d,pγ)13C, (Eγ = 3089 keV), 14N(d,pγ)15N (Eγ = 8310 keV) and 16O(d,pγ)17O (Eγ = 871 keV) available in the literature were assessed. In order to cross check the assessed γ-ray production cross section data, thick target γ-yields calculated from the differential cross sections were compared with available measured thick target yields. Recommended differential cross section data for each reaction were deduced for particle induced γ-ray emission (PIGE) applications.

  8. Influence of temperature and photon energy on quantum yield of photoemission from real iron surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Momose, Yoshihiro; Suzuki, Daisuke; Sakurai, Takao; Nakayama, Keiji

    2014-07-01

    The influence of temperature and incident photon energy on the photoemission quantum yield, Y s, of real iron surfaces has been investigated by thermally assisted photoemission (TAPE). Measurements were carried out using a Geiger counter under a gaseous atmosphere of He containing 1 % isobutane vapor at normal atmospheric pressure in the temperature range 25-353 °C under UV irradiation with wavelengths of 200, 210, 220, and 230 nm. The Y s obtained under irradiation at a given wavelength was found to increase with temperature, particularly more rapidly with wavelengths of greater photon energy. From the Arrhenius plots, the Y s values were found to have activation energies of 0.112-0.040 eV, depending on the photon energy. The chemical composition of the surfaces after TAPE measurements at different temperatures was examined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The intensity of species thermally removed from the surface was also measured by temperature desorption spectroscopy (TDS). XPS and TDS results showed the removal of the surface water and weakly bound carbon material from the surface with temperature. It was concluded that the removal of these species with increasing temperature enabled the incident light to penetrate through the surface into the metal, causing the increase in the Y s. The dependence of the activation energies on the photon energy was explained by the change of UV light absorption spectra of the surface water, and the enhancement of the Y s with temperature was also attributed to the influence of iron cations (Fe3+) corresponding to positive holes produced in the surface oxide layer by UV light.

  9. Measurement of Quantum Yield, Quantum Requirement, and Energetic Efficiency of the O2-Evolving System of Photosynthesis by a Simple Dye Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ros Barcelò, A.; Zapata, J. M.

    1996-11-01

    Photosynthesis is the conversion of absorbed radiant energy from sunlight into various forms of chemical energy by the chloroplasts of higher green plants. The overall process of photosynthesis consists of the oxidation of water (with the release of O2 as a product) and the reduction of CO2 to form carbohydrates. In the test tube electrons produced by the photolytic cleavage of H2) may be deviated from their true acceptor by inserting a suitable dye in the electron chain; i.e.; 2,6-dichlorophenol indophenol (DCPIP) (E'o = + 0.217 V), which is blue in the oxidized quinone form and which becomes colorless when reduced to the phenolic form. This dye-electrom acceptor also has the advantage that it accepts electroms directly from the quinone (Qa) electron-acceptor of the photosystem II< the reaction center associated with the O2-evolving (or water-slplitting) system. Based in the bleaching of DCPIP by illuminated spinach leaf chloroplasts, a classroom laboratory protocol has been developed to determine the quantum yield (QY = micromol O2 s-1 / micromol photons s-1, the quantum requirement (1/QY) and the energetic efficiency (f = chemical energy stored / light energy supplied) of the O2-evolving system of photosynthesis. Although values for the quantum yield, the quantum requirement and the energetic efficiency calculated in the classroom laboratory differ widely from those expected theoretically, these calculations are useful for illustrating the transformation of light energy into chemical energy by the chloroplasts of green plants.

  10. Measurement of quantum yield of up-conversion Luminescence in Er(3+)-doped nano-glass-ceramics.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, V D; Tikhomirov, V K; Méndez-Ramos, J; del-Castillo, J; Görller-Walrand, C

    2009-03-01

    A measurement of quantum yield of up-conversion luminescence has been done for the Er(3+)-doped transparent oxyfluoride glass-ceramics 32(SiO,)9(AlO1.5)31.5(CdF2)18.5(PbF2)5.5(ZnF2): 3.5(ErF3) mol%, where most of Er3+ dopants partition in 8 nm diameter nano-crystals Er10Pb25F65. The yield was found by newly proposed method using the pump power dependence of the resonant luminescence. The result of the measurement points out that a theoretical maximum of 50% may be reached for the up-conversion luminescence yield in this material. This high yield is shown to be due to low phonon energy and short inter-dopant distances in the nano-crystals.

  11. Rigidifying Fluorescent Linkers by Metal–Organic Framework Formation for Fluorescence Blue Shift and Quantum Yield Enhancement

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Zhangwen; Gu, Zhi-Yuan; Arvapally, Ravi K.; Chen, Ying-Pin; Ivy, Joshua F.; Yakovenko, Andrey A.; Feng, Dawei; Omary, Mohammad A.; Zhou, Hong-Cai

    2014-06-11

    We demonstrate that rigidifying the structure of fluorescent linkers by structurally constraining them in metal–organic frameworks (MOFs) to control their conformation effectively tunes the fluorescence energy and enhances the quantum yield. Thus, a new tetraphenylethylene-based zirconium MOF exhibits a deep-blue fluorescent emission at 470 nm with a unity quantum yield (99.9 ± 0.5%) under Ar, representing ca. 3600 cm⁻¹ blue shift and doubled radiative decay efficiency vs the linker precursor. An anomalous increase in the fluorescence lifetime and relative intensity takes place upon heating the solid MOF from cryogenic to ambient temperatures. The origin of these unusual photoluminescence properties is attributed to twisted linker conformation, intramolecular hindrance, and framework rigidity.

  12. Rigidifying Fluorescent Linkers by Metal-Organic Framework Formation for Fluorescence Blue Shift and Quantum Yield Enhancement

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, ZW; Gu, ZY; Arvapally, RK; Chen, YP; McDougald, RN; Ivy, JF; Yakovenko, AA; Feng, DW; Omary, MA; Zhou, HC

    2014-06-11

    We demonstrate that rigidifying the structure of fluorescent linkers by structurally constraining them in metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) to control their conformation effectively tunes the fluorescence energy and enhances the quantum yield. Thus, a new tetraphenylethylene-based zirconium MOF exhibits a deep-blue fluorescent emission at 470 nm with a unity quantum yield (99.9 +/- 0.5%) under Ar, representing ca. 3600 cm(-1) blue shift and doubled radiative decay efficiency vs the linker precursor. An anomalous increase in the fluorescence lifetime and relative intensity takes place upon heating the solid MOF from cryogenic to ambient temperatures. The origin of these unusual photoluminescence properties is attributed to twisted linker conformation, intramolecular hindrance, and framework rigidity.

  13. Challenge to the Charging Model of Semiconductor-Nanocrystal Fluorescence Intermittency from Off-State Quantum Yields and Multiexciton Blinking

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Jing; Nair, Gautham; Fisher, Brent R.; Bawendi, Moungi G.

    2010-04-16

    Semiconductor nanocrystals emit light intermittently; i.e., they “blink,” under steady illumination. The dark periods have been widely assumed to be due to photoluminescence (PL) quenching by an Auger-like process involving a single additional charge present in the nanocrystal. Our results challenge this long-standing assumption. Close examination of exciton PL intensity time traces of single CdSe(CdZnS) core(shell) nanocrystals reveals that the dark state PL quantum yield can be 10 times less than the biexciton PL quantum yield. In addition, we observe spectrally resolved multiexciton emission and find that it also blinks with an on/off ratio greater than 10:1 . These results directly contradict the predictions of the charging model.

  14. Structure-Triggered High Quantum Yield Luminescence and Switchable Dielectric Properties in Manganese(II) Based Hybrid Compounds.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhong-Xia; Li, Peng-Fei; Liao, Wei-Qiang; Tang, Yuanyuan; Ye, Heng-Yun; Zhang, Yi

    2016-04-01

    Two new manganese(II) based organic-inorganic hybrid compounds, C11H21Cl3MnN2 (1) and C11H22Cl4MnN2 (2), with prominent photoluminescence and dielectric properties were synthesized by solvent modulation. Compound 1 with novel trigonal bipyramidal geometry exhibits bright red luminescence with a lifetime of 2.47 ms and high quantum yield of 35.8 %. Compound 2 with tetrahedral geometry displays intense long-lived (1.54 ms) green light emission with higher quantum yield of 92.3 %, accompanied by reversible solid-state phase transition at 170 K and a distinct switchable dielectric property. The better performance of 2 results from the structure, including a discrete organic cation moiety and inorganic metal anion framework, which gives the cations large freedom of motion.

  15. Calculated quantum yield of photosynthesis of phytoplankton in the Marine Light-Mixed Layers (59 deg N, 21 deg W)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carder, K. L.; Lee, Z. P.; Marra, John; Steward, R. G.; Perry, M. J.

    1995-01-01

    The quantum yield of photosynthesis (mol C/mol photons) was calculated at six depths for the waters of the Marine Light-Mixed Layer (MLML) cruise of May 1991. As there were photosynthetically available radiation (PAR) but no spectral irradiance measurements for the primary production incubations, three ways are presented here for the calculation of the absorbed photons (AP) by phytoplankton for the purpose of calculating phi. The first is based on a simple, nonspectral model; the second is based on a nonlinear regression using measured PAR values with depth; and the third is derived through remote sensing measurements. We show that the results of phi calculated using the nonlinear regreesion method and those using remote sensing are in good agreement with each other, and are consistent with the reported values of other studies. In deep waters, however, the simple nonspectral model may cause quantum yield values much higher than theoretically possible.

  16. Silicon Nanoparticles with Surface Nitrogen: 90% Quantum Yield with Narrow Luminescence Bandwidth and the Ligand Structure Based Energy Law.

    PubMed

    Li, Qi; Luo, Tian-Yi; Zhou, Meng; Abroshan, Hadi; Huang, Jingchun; Kim, Hyung J; Rosi, Nathaniel L; Shao, Zhengzhong; Jin, Rongchao

    2016-09-27

    Silicon nanoparticles (NPs) have been widely accepted as an alternative material for typical quantum dots and commercial organic dyes in light-emitting and bioimaging applications owing to silicon's intrinsic merits of least toxicity, low cost, and high abundance. However, to date, how to improve Si nanoparticle photoluminescence (PL) performance (such as ultrahigh quantum yield, sharp emission peak, high stability) is still a major issue. Herein, we report surface nitrogen-capped Si NPs with PL quantum yield up to 90% and narrow PL bandwidth (full width at half-maximum (fwhm) ≈ 40 nm), which can compete with commercial dyes and typical quantum dots. Comprehensive studies have been conducted to unveil the influence of particle size, structure, and amount of surface ligand on the PL of Si NPs. Especially, a general ligand-structure-based PL energy law for surface nitrogen-capped Si NPs is identified in both experimental and theoretical analyses, and the underlying PL mechanisms are further discussed. PMID:27548639

  17. Absolute Summ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Alfred, Jr.

    Summ means the entirety of the multiverse. It seems clear, from the inflation theories of A. Guth and others, that the creation of many universes is plausible. We argue that Absolute cosmological ideas, not unlike those of I. Newton, may be consistent with dynamic multiverse creations. As suggested in W. Heisenberg's uncertainty principle, and with the Anthropic Principle defended by S. Hawking, et al., human consciousness, buttressed by findings of neuroscience, may have to be considered in our models. Predictability, as A. Einstein realized with Invariants and General Relativity, may be required for new ideas to be part of physics. We present here a two postulate model geared to an Absolute Summ. The seedbed of this work is part of Akhnaton's philosophy (see S. Freud, Moses and Monotheism). Most important, however, is that the structure of human consciousness, manifest in Kenya's Rift Valley 200,000 years ago as Homo sapiens, who were the culmination of the six million year co-creation process of Hominins and Nature in Africa, allows us to do the physics that we do. .

  18. Linear optical implementation of ancilla-free 1{yields}3 optimal phase covariant quantum cloning machines for the equatorial qubits

    SciTech Connect

    Zou Xubo; Mathis, W.

    2005-08-15

    We propose experimental schemes to implement ancilla-free 1{yields}3 optimal phase covariant quantum cloning machines for x-y and x-z equatorial qubits by interfering a polarized photon, which we wish to clone, with different light resources at a six-port symmetric beam splitter. The scheme requires linear optical elements and three-photon coincidence detection, and is feasible with current experimental technology.

  19. Can we Predict Quantum Yields Using Excited State Density Functional Theory for New Families of Fluorescent Dyes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohn, Alexander W.; Lin, Zhou; Shepherd, James J.; Van Voorhis, Troy

    2016-06-01

    For a fluorescent dye, the quantum yield characterizes the efficiency of energy transfer from the absorbed light to the emitted fluorescence. In the screening among potential families of dyes, those with higher quantum yields are expected to have more advantages. From the perspective of theoreticians, an efficient prediction of the quantum yield using a universal excited state electronic structure theory is in demand but still challenging. The most representative examples for such excited state theory include time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) and restricted open-shell Kohn-Sham (ROKS). In the present study, we explore the possibility of predicting the quantum yields for conventional and new families of organic dyes using a combination of TDDFT and ROKS. We focus on radiative (kr) and nonradiative (knr) rates for the decay of the first singlet excited state (S_1) into the ground state (S_0) in accordance with Kasha's rule. M. Kasha, Discuss. Faraday Soc., 9, 14 (1950). For each dye compound, kr is calculated with the S_1-S_0 energy gap and transition dipole moment obtained using ROKS and TDDFT respectively at the relaxed S_1 geometry. Our predicted kr agrees well with the experimental value, so long as the order of energy levels is correctly predicted. Evaluation of knr is less straightforward as multiple processes are involved. Our study focuses on the S_1-T_1 intersystem crossing (ISC) and the S_1-S_0 internal conversion (IC): we investigate the properties that allow us to model the knr value using a Marcus-like expression, such as the Stokes shift, the reorganization energy, and the S_1-T_1 and S_1-S_0 energy gaps. Taking these factors into consideration, we compare our results with those obtained using the actual Marcus theory and provide explanation for discrepancy. T. Kowalczyk, T. Tsuchimochi, L. Top, P.-T. Chen, and T. Van Voorhis, J. Chem. Phys., 138, 164101 (2013). M. Kasha, Discuss. Faraday Soc., 9, 14 (1950).

  20. Laboratory study of nitrate photolysis in Antarctic snow. I. Observed quantum yield, domain of photolysis, and secondary chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Meusinger, Carl; Johnson, Matthew S.; Berhanu, Tesfaye A.; Erbland, Joseph; Savarino, Joel

    2014-06-28

    Post-depositional processes alter nitrate concentration and nitrate isotopic composition in the top layers of snow at sites with low snow accumulation rates, such as Dome C, Antarctica. Available nitrate ice core records can provide input for studying past atmospheres and climate if such processes are understood. It has been shown that photolysis of nitrate in the snowpack plays a major role in nitrate loss and that the photolysis products have a significant influence on the local troposphere as well as on other species in the snow. Reported quantum yields for the main reaction spans orders of magnitude – apparently a result of whether nitrate is located at the air-ice interface or in the ice matrix – constituting the largest uncertainty in models of snowpack NO{sub x} emissions. Here, a laboratory study is presented that uses snow from Dome C and minimizes effects of desorption and recombination by flushing the snow during irradiation with UV light. A selection of UV filters allowed examination of the effects of the 200 and 305 nm absorption bands of nitrate. Nitrate concentration and photon flux were measured in the snow. The quantum yield for loss of nitrate was observed to decrease from 0.44 to 0.003 within what corresponds to days of UV exposure in Antarctica. The superposition of photolysis in two photochemical domains of nitrate in snow is proposed: one of photolabile nitrate, and one of buried nitrate. The difference lies in the ability of reaction products to escape the snow crystal, versus undergoing secondary (recombination) chemistry. Modeled NO{sub x} emissions may increase significantly above measured values due to the observed quantum yield in this study. The apparent quantum yield in the 200 nm band was found to be ∼1%, much lower than reported for aqueous chemistry. A companion paper presents an analysis of the change in isotopic composition of snowpack nitrate based on the same samples as in this study.

  1. Calibration of diffuse correlation spectroscopy with a time-resolved near-infrared technique to yield absolute cerebral blood flow measurements

    PubMed Central

    Diop, Mamadou; Verdecchia, Kyle; Lee, Ting-Yim; St Lawrence, Keith

    2011-01-01

    A primary focus of neurointensive care is the prevention of secondary brain injury, mainly caused by ischemia. A noninvasive bedside technique for continuous monitoring of cerebral blood flow (CBF) could improve patient management by detecting ischemia before brain injury occurs. A promising technique for this purpose is diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS) since it can continuously monitor relative perfusion changes in deep tissue. In this study, DCS was combined with a time-resolved near-infrared technique (TR-NIR) that can directly measure CBF using indocyanine green as a flow tracer. With this combination, the TR-NIR technique can be used to convert DCS data into absolute CBF measurements. The agreement between the two techniques was assessed by concurrent measurements of CBF changes in piglets. A strong correlation between CBF changes measured by TR-NIR and changes in the scaled diffusion coefficient measured by DCS was observed (R2 = 0.93) with a slope of 1.05 ± 0.06 and an intercept of 6.4 ± 4.3% (mean ± standard error). PMID:21750781

  2. Actinometry in monochromatic flash photolysis: the extinction coefficient of triplet benzophenone and quantum yield of triplet zinc tetraphenyl porphyrin

    SciTech Connect

    Hurley, J.K.; Sinai, N.; Linschitz, H.

    1982-11-15

    The extinction coefficient epsilon/sub T/, of triplet benzophenone in benzene has been directly determined by absolute measurements of absorbed energy and triplet absorbance, ..delta..D/sup 0//sub T/, under demonstrably linear conditions where incident excitation energy, E/sub 0/, and ground state absorbance, A/sub 0/, are both extrapolated to zero. The result, 7220 +- 320 M/sup -1/ cm/sup -1/ at 530 nm, validates and corrects many measurements of triplet and radical extinctions and yields, using the energy-transfer method. As E/sub 0/ and A/sub 0/ both decrease, ..delta..D/sup 0//sub T/ becomes proportional to their product. In this situation, the ratio R = (1/A/sub 0/) (d..delta..D/sup 0//sub T//dE/sub 0/) = (epsilon/sub T/ /sup -/ epsilon/sub G/)phi/sub T/. Measurements of R, referred to benzophenone, give (epsilon/sub T/ - epsilon/sub G/)phi/sub T/ for any substance, without necessity for absolute energy calibration. Both absolute and relative laser flash measurements on zinc tetraphenyl porphyrin (epsilon/sub T/ - epsilon/sub G/ at 470 nm = 7.3 x 10/sup 4/ M/sup -1/ cm/sup -1/) give phi/sub T/ = 0.83 +- 0.04. 6 figures, 2 tables.

  3. Synthesis and characterization of (3-Aminopropyl)trimethoxy-silane (APTMS) functionalized Gd2O3:Eu3+ red phosphor with enhanced quantum yield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Akhil; Hirata, G. A.; Farías, M. H.; Castillón, F. F.

    2016-02-01

    We report the surface modification of nanocrystalline Gd2O3:Eu3+ phosphor by (3-Aminopropyl)trimethoxysilane (APTMS). The nanoparticles were first coated with silica using the Stöber process, and then annealed at 650 °C for 2 h. Afterwards, APTMS was functionalized onto the silica layer to obtain Gd2O3:Eu3+ nanoparticles bearing amine groups on the surface. The effect of silica coating, and the subsequent annealing process on the crystallization of the nanophosphor were analyzed by x-ray diffraction (XRD). High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) confirmed the presence of a silica layer of ∼45 nm thickness. X-ray photoelectron (XPS) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy confirmed the presence of silica and the amine groups. Photoluminescence (PL) analysis demonstrated an increased emission after functionalization of nanoparticles. Absolute quantum yield (QY) measurements revealed an 18% enhancement in QY in functionalized nanoparticles compared with unmodified nanoparticles, which is of great importance for their biomedical applications.

  4. Synthesis and characterization of (3-Aminopropyl)trimethoxy-silane (APTMS) functionalized Gd2O3:Eu(3+) red phosphor with enhanced quantum yield.

    PubMed

    Jain, Akhil; Hirata, G A; Farías, M H; Castillón, F F

    2016-02-12

    We report the surface modification of nanocrystalline Gd2O3:Eu(3+) phosphor by (3-Aminopropyl)trimethoxysilane (APTMS). The nanoparticles were first coated with silica using the Stöber process, and then annealed at 650 °C for 2 h. Afterwards, APTMS was functionalized onto the silica layer to obtain Gd2O3:Eu(3+) nanoparticles bearing amine groups on the surface. The effect of silica coating, and the subsequent annealing process on the crystallization of the nanophosphor were analyzed by x-ray diffraction (XRD). High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) confirmed the presence of a silica layer of ∼45 nm thickness. X-ray photoelectron (XPS) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy confirmed the presence of silica and the amine groups. Photoluminescence (PL) analysis demonstrated an increased emission after functionalization of nanoparticles. Absolute quantum yield (QY) measurements revealed an 18% enhancement in QY in functionalized nanoparticles compared with unmodified nanoparticles, which is of great importance for their biomedical applications. PMID:26684579

  5. Biosolar cells: global artificial photosynthesis needs responsive matrices with quantum coherent kinetic control for high yield

    PubMed Central

    Purchase, R. L.; de Groot, H. J. M.

    2015-01-01

    This contribution discusses why we should consider developing artificial photosynthesis with the tandem approach followed by the Dutch BioSolar Cells consortium, a current operational paradigm for a global artificial photosynthesis project. We weigh the advantages and disadvantages of a tandem converter against other approaches, including biomass. Owing to the low density of solar energy per unit area, artificial photosynthetic systems must operate at high efficiency to minimize the land (or sea) area required. In particular, tandem converters are a much better option than biomass for densely populated countries and use two photons per electron extracted from water as the raw material into chemical conversion to hydrogen, or carbon-based fuel when CO2 is also used. For the average total light sum of 40 mol m−2 d−1 for The Netherlands, the upper limits are many tons of hydrogen or carbon-based fuel per hectare per year. A principal challenge is to forge materials for quantitative conversion of photons to chemical products within the physical limitation of an internal potential of ca 2.9 V. When going from electric charge in the tandem to hydrogen and back to electricity, only the energy equivalent to 1.23 V can be stored in the fuel and regained. A critical step is then to learn from nature how to use the remaining difference of ca 1.7 V effectively by triple use of one overpotential for preventing recombination, kinetic stabilization of catalytic intermediates and finally generating targeted heat for the release of oxygen. Probably the only way to achieve this is by using bioinspired responsive matrices that have quantum–classical pathways for a coherent conversion of photons to fuels, similar to what has been achieved by natural selection in evolution. In appendix A for the expert, we derive a propagator that describes how catalytic reactions can proceed coherently by a convergence of time scales of quantum electron dynamics and classical nuclear dynamics

  6. Oxalyl chloride, ClC(O)C(O)Cl: UV/vis spectrum and Cl atom photolysis quantum yields at 193, 248, and 351 nm.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Buddhadeb; Papanastasiou, Dimitrios K; Burkholder, James B

    2012-10-28

    Oxalyl chloride, (ClCO)(2), has been used as a Cl atom photolytic precursor in numerous laboratory kinetic and photochemical studies. In this study, the UV/vis absorption spectrum of (ClCO)(2) and the Cl atom quantum yields in its photolysis at 193, 248, and 351 nm are reported. The UV∕vis spectrum was measured between 200 and 450 nm at 296 K using diode array spectroscopy in conjunction with an absolute cross section obtained at 213.9 nm. Our results are in agreement with the spectrum reported by Baklanov and Krasnoperov [J. Phys. Chem. A 105, 97-103 (2001)], which was obtained at 11 discrete wavelengths between 193.3 and 390 nm. Cl atom quantum yields, Φ(λ), were measured using pulsed laser photolysis coupled with time resolved atomic resonance fluorescence detection of Cl. The UV photolysis of (ClCO)(2) has been shown in previous studies to occur via an impulsive three-body dissociation mechanism, (COCl)(2) + hv → ClCO* + Cl + CO (2), where the excited ClCO radical, ClCO*, either dissociates or stabilizes ClCO* → Cl + CO (3a), → ClCO (3b). ClCO is thermally unstable at the temperatures (253-298 K) and total pressures (13-128 Torr) used in our experiments ClCO + M → Cl + CO + M (4) leading to the formation of a secondary Cl atom that was resolvable in the Cl atom temporal profiles obtained in the 248 and 351 nm photolysis of (ClCO)(2). Φ(193 nm) was found to be 2.07 ± 0.37 independent of bath gas pressure (25.8-105.7 Torr, N(2)), i.e., the branching ratio for channel 2a or the direct formation of 2Cl + 2CO in the photolysis of (ClCO)(2) is >0.95. At 248 nm, the branching ratio for channel 2a was determined to be 0.79 ± 0.15, while the total Cl atom yield, i.e., following the completion of reaction (4), was found to be 1.98 ± 0.26 independent of bath gas pressure (15-70 Torr, N(2)). Φ(351 nm) was found to be pressure dependent between 7.8 and 122.4 Torr (He, N(2)). The low-pressure limit of the total Cl atom quantum yield, Φ(0)(351 nm), was 2

  7. A compact proton spectrometer for measurement of the absolute DD proton spectrum from which yield and pR are determined in thin-shell inertial-confinement-fusion implosions

    DOE PAGES

    Rosenberg, M. J.; Zylstra, A. B.; Frenje, J. A.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Waugh, C. J.; Seguin, F. H.; Sio, H.; Sinenian, N.; Li, C. K.; et al

    2014-10-10

    A compact, step range filter proton spectrometer has been developed for the measurement of the absolute DD proton spectrum, from which yield and areal density (ρR) are inferred for deuterium-filled thin-shell inertial confinement fusion implosions. This spectrometer, which is based on tantalum step-range filters, is sensitive to protons in the energy range 1-9 MeV and can be used to measure proton spectra at mean energies of ~1-3 MeV. It has been developed and implemented using a linear accelerator and applied to experiments at the OMEGA laser facility and the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Modeling of the proton slowing in themore » filters is necessary to construct the spectrum, and the yield and energy uncertainties are ±<10% in yield and ±120 keV, respectively. This spectrometer can be used for in situ calibration of DD-neutron yield diagnostics at the NIF« less

  8. Absolute frequencies of the {sup 6,7}Li 2S {sup 2}S{sub 1/2}{yields}3S {sup 2}S{sub 1/2} transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Lien, Yu-Hung; Lo, Kuan-Ju; Chen, Jun-Ren; Liu, Yi-Wei; Chen, Hsuan-Chen; Tian, Jyun-Yu; Shy, Jow-Tsong

    2011-10-15

    The measurement of the absolute frequencies of the 2S{yields}3S of atomic lithium is reported. To reduce systematic effects, we employed a frequency-comb-stabilized excitation laser, a weakly collimated atomic beam, and the cascading 2P{yields}2S 670 nm fluorescence as the signal. The transition frequencies, including two isotopes ({sup 6,7}Li), were measured to an accuracy of < 330 kHz. In comparison with the previous GSI Group experiment, the frequency of the 2S{sub 1/2}{yields}3S{sub 1/2} transition of {sup 7}Li is 815 618 181.45(9) MHz, which is improved by a factor of 2. The resultant hyperfine constants of the 3S state and the deduced difference of the nuclear charge radii {delta} from the isotope shift are in good agreement with previous results. Since a more straightforward methodology is adopted, our measurement is less model dependent and serves as an independent investigation of the reported transitions.

  9. Mapping quantum yield for (Fe-Zn-Sn-Ti)Ox photoabsorbers using a high throughput photoelectrochemical screening system.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Chengxiang; Haber, Joel; Marcin, Martin; Mitrovic, Slobodan; Jin, Jian; Gregoire, John M

    2014-03-10

    Combinatorial synthesis and screening of light absorbers are critical to material discoveries for photovoltaic and photoelectrochemical applications. One of the most effective ways to evaluate the energy-conversion properties of a semiconducting light absorber is to form an asymmetric junction and investigate the photogeneration, transport and recombination processes at the semiconductor interface. This standard photoelectrochemical measurement is readily made on a semiconductor sample with a back-side metallic contact (working electrode) and front-side solution contact. In a typical combinatorial material library, each sample shares a common back contact, requiring novel instrumentation to provide spatially resolved and thus sample-resolved measurements. We developed a multiplexing counter electrode with a thin layer assembly, in which a rectifying semiconductor/liquid junction was formed and the short-circuit photocurrent was measured under chopped illumination for each sample in a material library. The multiplexing counter electrode assembly demonstrated a photocurrent sensitivity of sub-10 μA cm(-2) with an external quantum yield sensitivity of 0.5% for each semiconductor sample under a monochromatic ultraviolet illumination source. The combination of cell architecture and multiplexing allows high-throughput modes of operation, including both fast-serial and parallel measurements. To demonstrate the performance of the instrument, the external quantum yields of 1819 different compositions from a pseudoquaternary metal oxide library, (Fe-Zn-Sn-Ti)Ox, at 385 nm were collected in scanning serial mode with a throughput of as fast as 1 s per sample. Preliminary screening results identified a promising ternary composition region centered at Fe0.894Sn0.103Ti0.0034Ox, with an external quantum yield of 6.7% at 385 nm.

  10. In cellulo Evaluation of Phototransformation Quantum Yields in Fluorescent Proteins Used As Markers for Single-Molecule Localization Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Avilov, Sergiy; Berardozzi, Romain; Gunewardene, Mudalige S.; Adam, Virgile; Hess, Samuel T.; Bourgeois, Dominique

    2014-01-01

    Single-molecule localization microscopy of biological samples requires a precise knowledge of the employed fluorescent labels. Photoactivation, photoblinking and photobleaching of phototransformable fluorescent proteins influence the data acquisition and data processing strategies to be used in (Fluorescence) Photoactivation Localization Microscopy ((F)-PALM), notably for reliable molecular counting. As these parameters might depend on the local environment, they should be measured in cellulo in biologically relevant experimental conditions. Here, we measured phototransformation quantum yields for Dendra2 fused to actin in fixed mammalian cells in typical (F)-PALM experiments. To this aim, we developed a data processing strategy based on the clustering optimization procedure proposed by Lee et al (PNAS 109, 17436–17441, 2012). Using simulations, we estimated the range of experimental parameters (molecular density, molecular orientation, background level, laser power, frametime) adequate for an accurate determination of the phototransformation yields. Under illumination at 561 nm in PBS buffer at pH 7.4, the photobleaching yield of Dendra2 fused to actin was measured to be (2.5±0.4)×10−5, whereas the blinking-off yield and thermally-activated blinking-on rate were measured to be (2.3±0.2)×10−5 and 11.7±0.5 s−1, respectively. These phototransformation yields differed from those measured in poly-vinyl alcohol (PVA) and were strongly affected by addition of the antifading agent 1,4-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]octane (DABCO). In the presence of DABCO, the photobleaching yield was reduced 2-fold, the blinking-off yield was decreased more than 3-fold, and the blinking-on rate was increased 2-fold. Therefore, DABCO largely improved Dendra2 photostability in fixed mammalian cells. These findings are consistent with redox-based bleaching and blinking mechanisms under (F)-PALM experimental conditions. Finally, the green-to-red photoconversion quantum yield of Dendra2 was

  11. CO quantum yield in the photolysis of CO2 at wavelength 1470 and wavelengths 1500-1670.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Inn, E. C. Y.

    1972-01-01

    The results of carbon monoxide quantum yield measurements of carbon dioxide photolysis by radiation at 1470 A and in the region from 1500 to 1670 A are presented in tabular form. The experimental technique and equipment developed by Inn and Heimerl (1971) were used. These measurements, together with some previously reported ones for a longer wavelength region, are intended to provide a uniform set of values based on the same experimental technique for the entire spectral region that is relevant to the carbon-dioxide photochemistry in the atmospheres of Mars and Venus.

  12. Active and silent chromophore isoforms for phytochrome Pr photoisomerization: An alternative evolutionary strategy to optimize photoreaction quantum yields.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Linke, Martin; von Haimberger, Theodore; Matute, Ricardo; González, Leticia; Schmieder, Peter; Heyne, Karsten

    2014-01-01

    Photoisomerization of a protein bound chromophore is the basis of light sensing of many photoreceptors. We tracked Z-to-E photoisomerization of Cph1 phytochrome chromophore PCB in the Pr form in real-time. Two different phycocyanobilin (PCB) ground state geometries with different ring D orientations have been identified. The pre-twisted and hydrogen bonded PCB(a) geometry exhibits a time constant of 30 ps and a quantum yield of photoproduct formation of 29%, about six times slower and ten times higher than that for the non-hydrogen bonded PCB(b) geometry. This new mechanism of pre-twisting the chromophore by protein-cofactor interaction optimizes yields of slow photoreactions and provides a scaffold for photoreceptor engineering. PMID:26798771

  13. Graphene oxide-phosphor hybrid nanoscrolls with high luminescent quantum yield: synthesis, structural, and X-ray absorption studies.

    PubMed

    Rani, Janardhanan R; Oh, Se-I; Woo, Jeong Min; Tarwal, Nilesh L; Kim, Hyun-Woong; Mun, Bongjin Simon; Lee, Sungbae; Kim, Ki-Jeong; Jang, Jae-Hyung

    2015-03-18

    Highly luminescent graphene oxide (GO)-phosphor hybrid thin films with a maximum quantum yield of 9.6% were synthesized via a simple chemical method. An intense luminescence emission peak at 537 nm and a broad emission peak at 400 nm were observed from the GO-phosphor hybrid films. The maximum quantum yield of the emissions from the hybrid films was found to be 9.6%, which is 48 times higher than that of pristine GO films. The GO-phosphor hybrids were prepared via spin-coating and subsequent postannealing of the films, resulting in scrolling of the GO sheets. The resulting GO nanoscrolls exhibited a length of ∼2 μm with nanoscale interior cavities. Transmission electron microscopy and selected-area electron diffraction analyses revealed that the lattice structure of the tubular scrolls is similar to that of carbon nanotubes. While pristine GO films are p-type, in the GO-phosphor hybrids, the Fermi level shifted upward and fell between the HOMO-LUMO gap due to phosphor attachment via C-N bonding. The highly luminescent GO-phosphor hybrids will find important applications in graphene-based optoelectronic devices.

  14. Enhanced fluorescence yields through cavity quantum-electrodynamic effects in microdroplets

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, M.D.; Whitten, W.B.; Ramsey, J.M. )

    1994-07-01

    Measurements of the integrated fluorescence yield per molecule of Rhodamine 6G (R6G) in 4--16-[mu]m-diameter levitated microdroplets show a size dependence that is attributed to a net increase in the fluorescence decay rate for the smaller (4--5-[mu]m) droplets. The average fluorescence yield in 4-[mu]m droplets (for which we have previously observed emission-rate enhancement) is approximately a factor of 2 larger than the yield measured for larger droplets for which emission-rate enhancement does not occur. These results suggest that there is little emission-rate inhibition in this system, even though the fluorescence emission spectrum overlaps several cavity resonances. A mechanism based on spectral diffusion is postulated for the apparent absence of cavity-inhibited emission and is illustrated by Monte Carlo calculations using time-dependent line-shape functions.

  15. Photogeneration of reactive transient species upon irradiation of natural water samples: Formation quantum yields in different spectral intervals, and implications for the photochemistry of surface waters.

    PubMed

    Marchisio, Andrea; Minella, Marco; Maurino, Valter; Minero, Claudio; Vione, Davide

    2015-04-15

    Chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) in surface waters is a photochemical source of several transient species such as CDOM triplet states ((3)CDOM*), singlet oxygen ((1)O2) and the hydroxyl radical (OH). By irradiation of lake water samples, it is shown here that the quantum yields for the formation of these transients by CDOM vary depending on the irradiation wavelength range, in the order UVB > UVA > blue. A possible explanation is that radiation at longer wavelengths is preferentially absorbed by the larger CDOM fractions, which show lesser photoactivity compared to smaller CDOM moieties. The quantum yield variations in different spectral ranges were definitely more marked for (3)CDOM* and OH compared to (1)O2. The decrease of the quantum yields with increasing wavelength has important implications for the photochemistry of surface waters, because long-wavelength radiation penetrates deeper in water columns compared to short-wavelength radiation. The average steady-state concentrations of the transients ((3)CDOM*, (1)O2 and OH) were modelled in water columns of different depths, based on the experimentally determined wavelength trends of the formation quantum yields. Important differences were found between such modelling results and those obtained in a wavelength-independent quantum yield scenario.

  16. Low-Pressure Photolysis of 2,3-Pentanedione in Air: Quantum Yields and Reaction Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Bouzidi, Hichem; Djehiche, Mokhtar; Gierczak, Tomasz; Morajkar, Pranay; Fittschen, Christa; Coddeville, Patrice; Tomas, Alexandre

    2015-12-24

    Dicarbonyls in the atmosphere mainly arise from secondary sources as reaction products in the degradation of a large number of volatile organic compounds (VOC). Because of their sensitivity to solar radiation, photodissociation of dicarbonyls can dominate the fate of these VOC and impact the atmospheric radical budget. The photolysis of 2,3-pentanedione (PTD) has been investigated for the first time as a function of pressure in a static reactor equipped with continuous wave cavity ring-down spectroscopy to measure the HO2 radical photostationary concentrations along with stable species. We showed that (i) Stern-Volmer plots are consistent with low OH-radical formation yields in RCO + O2 reactions, (ii) the decrease of the photodissociation rate due to pressure increase from 26 to 1000 mbar is of about 30%, (iii) similarly to other dicarbonyls, the Stern-Volmer analysis shows a curvature at the lower pressure investigated, which may be assigned to the existence of excited singlet and triplet PTD states, (iv) PTD photolysis at 66 mbar leads to CO2, CH2O and CO with yields of (1.16 ± 0.04), (0.33 ± 0.02) and (0.070 ± 0.005), respectively, with CH2O yield independent of pressure up to 132 mbar and CO yield in agreement with that obtained at atmospheric pressure by Bouzidi et al. (2014), and (v) the PTD photolysis mechanism remains unchanged between atmospheric pressure and 66 mbar. As a part of this work, the O2 broadening coefficient for the absorption line of HO2 radicals at 6638.21 cm(-1) has been determined (γO2 = 0.0289 cm(-1) atm(-1)). PMID:26608471

  17. Iridium Cyclometalated Complexes in Host-Guest Chemistry: A Strategy for Maximizing Quantum Yield in Aqueous Media.

    PubMed

    Alrawashdeh, Lubna R; Cronin, Michael P; Woodward, Clifford E; Day, Anthony I; Wallace, Lynne

    2016-07-01

    The weaker emission typically seen for iridium(III) cyclometalated complexes in aqueous medium can be reversed via encapsulation in cucurbit[10]uril (Q[10]). The Q[10] cavity is shown to effectively maximize quantum yields for the complexes, compared to any other medium. This may provide significant advantages for a number of sensor applications. NMR studies show that the complexes are accommodated similarly within the host molecule, even with cationic substituents attached to the ppy ligands, indicating that the hydrophobic effect is the dominant driving force for binding. Cavity-encapsulated 1:1 host-guest species dominate the emission, but 1:2 species are also indicated, which also give some enhancement of intensity. Results demonstrate that the enhancement is due primarily to much lower rates of nonradiative decay but also suggest that the encapsulation can cause a change in character of the emitting state.

  18. The quantum yield of photosynthesis in Porphyridium cruentum, and the role of chlorophyll a in the photosynthesis of red algae.

    PubMed

    BRODY, M; EMERSON, R

    1959-11-01

    Quantum yield measurements were made with the red alga Porphyridium cruentum, cultured so as to give different proportions of chlorophyll and phycobilins. Totally absorbing suspensions were used so that there was no uncertainty in the amount of energy absorbed. These measurements have shown that chlorophyll, in this alga, has a photosynthetic efficiency as high as in other algal groups, and higher than the phycobilins-at least at wave lengths shorter than about 650 mmicro. Wave lengths longer than this are beyond the range of maximum efficiency of chlorophyll. Under specified conditions of temperature and supplementary light full efficiency may be extended to longer wave lengths. The results of these measurements have made it unnecessary to suppose that in red algae chlorophyll plays a minor role while the phycobilins are the photosynthetic sensitizers of primary importance.

  19. Thiophene based europium β-diketonate complexes: effect of the ligand structure on the emission quantum yield.

    PubMed

    Freund, Christelle; Porzio, William; Giovanella, Umberto; Vignali, Francesco; Pasini, Mariacecilia; Destri, Silvia; Mech, Agnieszka; Di Pietro, Sebastiano; Di Bari, Lorenzo; Mineo, Placido

    2011-06-20

    The synthesis and the molecular and photophysical characterization, together with solid state and solution structure analysis, of a series of europium complexes based on β-diketonate ligands are reported. The Eu(III) complex emission, specifically its photoluminescence quantum yield (PL-QY), can be tuned by changing ligands which finely modifies the environment of the metal ion. Steady-state and time-resolved emission spectroscopy and overall PL-QY measurements are reported and related to geometrical features observed in crystal structures of some selected compounds. Moreover, paramagnetic NMR, based on the analogous complexes with other lanthanides, are use to demonstrate that there is a significant structural reorganization upon dissolution, which justifies the observed differences in the emission properties between solid and solution states. The energy of the triplet levels of the ligands and the occurrence of nonradiative deactivation processes clearly account for the luminescence efficiencies of the complexes in the series.

  20. Hydrogen quantum yields in the 360 nm photolysis of Eu/2+/ solutions and their relationship to photochemical fuel formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryason, P. R.

    1977-01-01

    Water decomposition by a cyclic photoredox process is discussed in general terms. Thermodynamics determines the wavelength of the charge-transfer band corresponding to electron transfer to or from water of hydration of a cation. These relationships indicate that it is unlikely that a photoreduction reaction resulting in water decomposition will occur in the sea-level solar range of wavelengths. Such is not the case for photooxidation, and an example is known: the photolysis of Eu(2+) in aqueous solution. Hydrogen quantum yields have been determined for this reaction. They are sufficiently high (about 0.3) as to offer encourangement for the further exploration of photoredox reactions as a means of solar energy conversion.

  1. Iridium Cyclometalated Complexes in Host-Guest Chemistry: A Strategy for Maximizing Quantum Yield in Aqueous Media.

    PubMed

    Alrawashdeh, Lubna R; Cronin, Michael P; Woodward, Clifford E; Day, Anthony I; Wallace, Lynne

    2016-07-01

    The weaker emission typically seen for iridium(III) cyclometalated complexes in aqueous medium can be reversed via encapsulation in cucurbit[10]uril (Q[10]). The Q[10] cavity is shown to effectively maximize quantum yields for the complexes, compared to any other medium. This may provide significant advantages for a number of sensor applications. NMR studies show that the complexes are accommodated similarly within the host molecule, even with cationic substituents attached to the ppy ligands, indicating that the hydrophobic effect is the dominant driving force for binding. Cavity-encapsulated 1:1 host-guest species dominate the emission, but 1:2 species are also indicated, which also give some enhancement of intensity. Results demonstrate that the enhancement is due primarily to much lower rates of nonradiative decay but also suggest that the encapsulation can cause a change in character of the emitting state. PMID:27315543

  2. Diurnal changes of photosynthetic quantum yield in the intertidal macroalga Sargassum thunbergii under simulated tidal emersion conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yong Qiang; Zhang, Quan Sheng; Tang, Yong Zheng; Li, Xue Meng; Liu, Hong Liang; Li, Li Xia

    2013-07-01

    In this study, a three-way factorial experimental design was used to investigate the diurnal changes of photosynthetic activity of the intertidal macroalga Sargassum thunbergii in response to temperature, tidal pattern and desiccation during a simulated diurnal light cycle. The maximum (Fv/Fm) and effective (ΦPSII) quantum yields of photosystem II (PSII) were estimated by chlorophyll fluorescence using a pulse amplitude modulated fluorometer. Results showed that this species exhibited sun-adapted characteristics, as evidenced by the daily variation of Fv/Fm and ΦPSII. Both yield values decreased with increasing irradiance towards noon and recovered rapidly in the afternoon suggesting a dynamic photoinhibition. The photosynthetic quantum yield of S. thunbergii thalli varied significantly with temperature, tidal pattern and desiccation. Thalli were more susceptible to light-induced damage at high temperature of 25 °C and showed complete recovery of photosynthetic activity only when exposed to 8 °C. In contrast with the mid-morning low tide period, although there was an initial increase in photosynthetic yield during emersion, thalli showed a greater degree of decline at the end of emersion and remained less able to recover when low tide occurred at mid-afternoon. Short-term air exposure of 2 h did not significantly influence the photosynthesis. However, when exposed to moderate conditions (4 h desiccation at 15 °C or 6 h desiccation at 8 °C), a significant inhibition of photosynthesis was followed by partial or complete recovery upon re-immersion in late afternoon. Only extreme conditions (4 h desiccation at 25 °C or 6 h desiccation at 15 °C or 25 °C) resulted in the complete inhibition, with little indication of recovery until the following morning, implying the occurrence of chronic PSII damage. Based on the magnitude of effect, desiccation was the predominant negative factor affecting the photosynthesis under the simulated daytime irradiance period. These

  3. Phosphorescent Iridium(III) Complexes Bearing Fluorinated Aromatic Sulfonyl Group with Nearly Unity Phosphorescent Quantum Yields and Outstanding Electroluminescent Properties.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jiang; Yu, Yue; Yang, Xiaolong; Yan, Xiaogang; Zhang, Huiming; Xu, Xianbin; Zhou, Guijiang; Wu, Zhaoxin; Ren, Yixia; Wong, Wai-Yeung

    2015-11-11

    A series of heteroleptic functional Ir(III) complexes bearing different fluorinated aromatic sulfonyl groups has been synthesized. Their photophysical features, electrochemical behaviors, and electroluminescent (EL) properties have been characterized in detail. These complexes emit intense yellow phosphorescence with exceptionally high quantum yields (ΦP > 0.9) at room temperature, and the emission maxima of these complexes can be finely tuned depending upon the number of the fluorine substituents on the pendant phenyl ring of the sulfonyl group. Furthermore, the electrochemical properties and electron injection/transporting (EI/ET) abilities of these Ir(III) phosphors can also be effectively tuned by the fluorinated aromatic sulfonyl group to furnish some desired characters for enhancing the EL performance. Hence, the maximum luminance efficiency (ηL) of 81.2 cd A(-1), corresponding to power efficiency (ηP) of 64.5 lm W(-1) and external quantum efficiency (ηext) of 19.3%, has been achieved, indicating the great potential of these novel phosphors in the field of organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). Furthermore, a clear picture has been drawn for the relationship between their optoelectronic properties and chemical structures. These results should provide important information for developing highly efficient phosphors. PMID:26458215

  4. Phosphorescent Iridium(III) Complexes Bearing Fluorinated Aromatic Sulfonyl Group with Nearly Unity Phosphorescent Quantum Yields and Outstanding Electroluminescent Properties.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jiang; Yu, Yue; Yang, Xiaolong; Yan, Xiaogang; Zhang, Huiming; Xu, Xianbin; Zhou, Guijiang; Wu, Zhaoxin; Ren, Yixia; Wong, Wai-Yeung

    2015-11-11

    A series of heteroleptic functional Ir(III) complexes bearing different fluorinated aromatic sulfonyl groups has been synthesized. Their photophysical features, electrochemical behaviors, and electroluminescent (EL) properties have been characterized in detail. These complexes emit intense yellow phosphorescence with exceptionally high quantum yields (ΦP > 0.9) at room temperature, and the emission maxima of these complexes can be finely tuned depending upon the number of the fluorine substituents on the pendant phenyl ring of the sulfonyl group. Furthermore, the electrochemical properties and electron injection/transporting (EI/ET) abilities of these Ir(III) phosphors can also be effectively tuned by the fluorinated aromatic sulfonyl group to furnish some desired characters for enhancing the EL performance. Hence, the maximum luminance efficiency (ηL) of 81.2 cd A(-1), corresponding to power efficiency (ηP) of 64.5 lm W(-1) and external quantum efficiency (ηext) of 19.3%, has been achieved, indicating the great potential of these novel phosphors in the field of organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). Furthermore, a clear picture has been drawn for the relationship between their optoelectronic properties and chemical structures. These results should provide important information for developing highly efficient phosphors.

  5. Acetylene bridged porphyrin-monophthalocyaninato ytterbium(III) hybrids with strong two-photon absorption and high singlet oxygen quantum yield.

    PubMed

    Ke, Hanzhong; Li, Wenbin; Zhang, Tao; Zhu, Xunjin; Tam, Hoi-Lam; Hou, Anxin; Kwong, Daniel W J; Wong, Wai-Kwok

    2012-04-21

    Several acetylene bridged porphyrin-monophthalocyaninato ytterbium(III) hybrids, PZn-PcYb, PH(2)-PcYb and PPd-PcYb, have been prepared and characterized by (1)H and (31)P NMR, mass spectrometry, and UV-vis spectroscopy. Their photophysical and photochemical properties, especially the relative singlet oxygen ((1)O(2)) quantum yields and the two-photon absorption cross-section (σ(2)), were investigated. These three newly synthesized compounds exhibited very large σ(2) values and substantial (1)O(2) quantum yields upon photo-excitation, making them potential candidates as one- and two-photon photodynamic therapeutic agents.

  6. Photolysis of CH{sub 3}CHO at 248 nm: Evidence of triple fragmentation from primary quantum yield of CH{sub 3} and HCO radicals and H atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Morajkar, Pranay; Schoemaecker, Coralie; Fittschen, Christa; Bossolasco, Adriana

    2014-06-07

    Radical quantum yields have been measured following the 248 nm photolysis of acetaldehyde, CH{sub 3}CHO. HCO radical and H atom yields have been quantified by time resolved continuous wave Cavity Ring Down Spectroscopy in the near infrared following their conversion to HO{sub 2} radicals by reaction with O{sub 2}. The CH{sub 3} radical yield has been determined using the same technique following their conversion into CH{sub 3}O{sub 2}. Absolute yields have been deduced for HCO radicals and H atoms through fitting of time resolved HO{sub 2} profiles, obtained under various O{sub 2} concentrations, to a complex model, while the CH{sub 3} yield has been determined relative to the CH{sub 3} yield from 248 nm photolysis of CH{sub 3}I. Time resolved HO{sub 2} profiles under very low O{sub 2} concentrations suggest that another unknown HO{sub 2} forming reaction path exists in this reaction system besides the conversion of HCO radicals and H atoms by reaction with O{sub 2}. HO{sub 2} profiles can be well reproduced under a large range of experimental conditions with the following quantum yields: CH{sub 3}CHO + hν{sub 248nm} → CH{sub 3}CHO{sup *}, CH{sub 3}CHO{sup *} → CH{sub 3} + HCO ϕ{sub 1a} = 0.125 ± 0.03, CH{sub 3}CHO{sup *} → CH{sub 3} + H + CO ϕ{sub 1e} = 0.205 ± 0.04, CH{sub 3}CHO{sup *}→{sup o{sub 2}}CH{sub 3}CO + HO{sub 2} ϕ{sub 1f} = 0.07 ± 0.01. The CH{sub 3}O{sub 2} quantum yield has been determined in separate experiments as ϕ{sub CH{sub 3}} = 0.33 ± 0.03 and is in excellent agreement with the CH{sub 3} yields derived from the HO{sub 2} measurements considering that the triple fragmentation (R1e) is an important reaction path in the 248 nm photolysis of CH{sub 3}CHO. From arithmetic considerations taking into account the HO{sub 2} and CH{sub 3} measurements we deduce a remaining quantum yield for the molecular pathway: CH{sub 3}CHO{sup *} → CH{sub 4} + CO ϕ{sub 1b} = 0.6. All experiments can be

  7. Teaching Absolute Value Meaningfully

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wade, Angela

    2012-01-01

    What is the meaning of absolute value? And why do teachers teach students how to solve absolute value equations? Absolute value is a concept introduced in first-year algebra and then reinforced in later courses. Various authors have suggested instructional methods for teaching absolute value to high school students (Wei 2005; Stallings-Roberts…

  8. The Broken Ring: Reduced Aromaticity in Lys-Trp Cations and High pH Tautomer Correlates with Lower Quantum Yield and Shorter Lifetimes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Several nonradiative processes compete with tryptophan fluorescence emission. The difficulty in spectral interpretation lies in associating specific molecular environmental features with these processes and thereby utilizing the fluorescence spectral data to identify the local environment of tryptophan. Here, spectroscopic and molecular modeling study of Lys-Trp dipeptide charged species shows that backbone-ring interactions are undistinguished. Instead, quantum mechanical ground state isosurfaces reveal variations in indole π electron distribution and density that parallel charge (as a function of pK1, pK2, and pKR) on the backbone and residues. A pattern of aromaticity-associated quantum yield and fluorescence lifetime changes emerges. Where quantum yield is high, isosurfaces have a charge distribution similar to the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) of indole, which is the dominant fluorescent ground state of the 1La transition dipole moment. Where quantum yield is low, isosurface charge distribution over the ring is uneven, diminished, and even found off ring. At pH 13, the indole amine is deprotonated, and Lys-Trp quantum yield is extremely low due to tautomer structure that concentrates charge on the indole amine; the isosurface charge distribution bears scant resemblance to the indole HOMO. Such greatly diminished fluorescence has been observed for proteins where the indole nitrogen is hydrogen bonded, lending credence to the association of aromaticity changes with diminished quantum yield in proteins as well. Thus tryptophan ground state isosurfaces are an indicator of indole aromaticity, signaling the partition of excitation energy between radiative and nonradiative processes. PMID:24882092

  9. A Novel Method For Predicting Carbon Monoxide Apparent Quantum Yield Spectra in Coastal Water Using Remote Sensing Reflectance Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reader, H. E.; Miller, W. L.

    2010-12-01

    Photochemical oxidation of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) is the major source of carbon monoxide to the surface ocean. Bacterial consumption and air-sea exchange comprise the two known sinks for CO in marine systems. Though the two loss terms are relatively efficient, CO remains supersaturated with respect to the atmosphere in the surface ocean. Global oceanic estimates of CO photoproduction range from 30-84Tg CO/year (Zafiriou 2003, Fichot and Miller 2010). The variation in estimates is largely due to the difficulty in predicting the efficiency of photoproduction (i.e. Apparent Quantum Yield; AQY). Though the AQY for CO photoproduction appears to be relatively constant, there is indication that terrestrially derived sources, such as those found in estuarine environments, produce CO more efficiently than marine derived sources (Ziolkowski 2000). Since variation among sources is likely in the global ocean, accurate assignment of AQY to variable water types is required to accurately predict CO photoproduction. Deriving the correct apparent quantum yield from remotely sensed data would lead to better predictions of large scale CO photoproduction from optical data. Thirty-eight (38) AQY spectra for CO photoproduction were determined by monthly sampling during spring tides in three dark water locations on the coast of Georgia, USA, from November 2008 to September 2009. Sapelo Sound, a marine dominated system, receives little to no freshwater input over the year, while Altamaha Sound drains the largest watershed in the state of Georgia, and has largely variably freshwater input. Doboy Sound, situated between Sapelo Sound and Altamaha Sound, is largely marine dominated, though in periods of high flow on the Altamaha River, receives some fresh water overflow. The coast of Georgia is dominated by Spartina alterniflora salt marshes, and thus also has a strong non-point source of terrestrially derived carbon. CO apparent quantum yields were determined by

  10. Molar Absorptivity and Concentration-Dependent Quantum Yield of Fe(II) Photo-Formation for the Aqueous Solutions of Fe(III)-Dicarboxylate Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hitomi, Y.; Arakaki, T.

    2009-12-01

    Redox cycles of iron in the aquatic environment affect formation of reactive oxygen species such as hydrogen peroxide and hydroxyl radicals, which in turn determines lifetimes of many organic compounds. Although aqueous Fe(III)-dicarboxylate complexes are considered to be important sources of photo-formed Fe(II), molar absorptivity and quantum yield of Fe(II) formation for individual species are not well understood. We initiated a study to characterize Fe(II) photo-formation from Fe(III)-dicarboxylates with the concentration ranges that are relevant to the natural aquatic environment. The Visual MINTEQ computer program was used to calculate the equilibrium concentrations of individual Fe(III)-dicarboxylate species. The molar absorptivity of Fe(III)-dicarboxylate species was obtained by UV-VIS spectrophotometer, and the product of the quantum yield and the molar absorptivity of Fe(III)-dicarboxylate species were obtained from photochemical experiments. These experimental data were combined with the calculated equilibrium Fe(III)-dicarboxylate concentrations to determine individual molar absorptivity and quantum yield of Fe(II) photo-formation for a specific Fe(III)-dicarboxylate species. We used initial concentrations of less than 10 micromolar Fe(III) to study the photochemical formation of Fe(II). Dicarboxylate compounds studied include oxalate, malonate, succinate, malate, and phthalate. We report molar absorptivity and concentration-dependent quantum yields of Fe(II) photo-formation of individual Fe(III)-dicarboxylates.

  11. Synthesis and formation mechanistic investigation of nitrogen-doped carbon dots with high quantum yields and yellowish-green fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Juan; Wang, Wei; Zhou, Tianyu; Wang, Bo; Li, Huiyu; Ding, Lan

    2016-05-01

    Heteroatom doped carbon dots (CDs) have received increasing attention due to their unique properties and related applications. However, previously reported CDs generally show strong emission only in the blue-light region, thus restricting their further applications. And the fundamental investigation on the preparation process is always neglected. Herein, we have developed a simple and solvent-free synthetic strategy to fabricate nitrogen-doped CDs (N-CDs) from citric acid and dicyandiamide. The as-prepared N-CDs exhibited a uniform size distribution, strong yellowish-green fluorescence emission and a high quantum yield of 73.2%. The products obtained at different formation stages were detailedly characterized by transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction spectrometer, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and UV absorbance spectroscopy. A possible formation mechanism has thus been proposed including dehydration, polymerization and carbonization. Furthermore, the N-CDs could serve as a facile and label-free probe for the detection of iron and fluorine ions with detection limits of 50 nmol L-1 and 75 nmol L-1, respectively.Heteroatom doped carbon dots (CDs) have received increasing attention due to their unique properties and related applications. However, previously reported CDs generally show strong emission only in the blue-light region, thus restricting their further applications. And the fundamental investigation on the preparation process is always neglected. Herein, we have developed a simple and solvent-free synthetic strategy to fabricate nitrogen-doped CDs (N-CDs) from citric acid and dicyandiamide. The as-prepared N-CDs exhibited a uniform size distribution, strong yellowish-green fluorescence emission and a high quantum yield of 73.2%. The products obtained at different formation stages were detailedly characterized by transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction spectrometer, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and UV absorbance spectroscopy. A

  12. LASER APPLICATIONS AND OTHER TOPICS IN QUANTUM ELECTRONICS: Comparison of the absolute frequencies of He—Ne/CH4 lasers with a transportable M101 laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domnin, Yurii S.; Tatarenkov, V. M.

    1994-07-01

    The correctness of the determination of the laser frequencies recommended for reproduction of the unit of length was checked by absolute and relative comparisons of the frequencies with the aid of an M101 laser at the All-Russia Scientific-Research Institute of Physicotechnical and Radio Engineering Measurements. The frequency of this laser was measured with a laser chain at this Institute and also with apparatus from other countries. The results of the comparison confirmed the correctness of the recommended reference frequencies of the lasers.

  13. Low cost 3D-printing used in an undergraduate project: an integrating sphere for measurement of photoluminescence quantum yield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomes, John J.; Finlayson, Chris E.

    2016-09-01

    We report upon the exploitation of the latest 3D printing technologies to provide low-cost instrumentation solutions, for use in an undergraduate level final-year project. The project addresses prescient research issues in optoelectronics, which would otherwise be inaccessible to such undergraduate student projects. The experimental use of an integrating sphere in conjunction with a desktop spectrometer presents opportunities to use easily handled, low cost materials as a means to illustrate many areas of physics such as spectroscopy, lasers, optics, simple circuits, black body radiation and data gathering. Presented here is a 3rd year undergraduate physics project which developed a low cost (£25) method to manufacture an experimentally accurate integrating sphere by 3D printing. Details are given of both a homemade internal reflectance coating formulated from readily available materials, and a robust instrument calibration method using a tungsten bulb. The instrument is demonstrated to give accurate and reproducible experimental measurements of luminescence quantum yield of various semiconducting fluorophores, in excellent agreement with literature values.

  14. Controls of the quantum yield and saturation light of isoprene emission in different-aged aspen leaves.

    PubMed

    Niinemets, Ülo; Sun, Zhihong; Talts, Eero

    2015-12-01

    Leaf age alters the balance between the use of end-product of plastidic isoprenoid synthesis pathway, dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMADP), in prenyltransferase reactions leading to synthesis of pigments of photosynthetic machinery and in isoprene synthesis, but the implications of such changes on environmental responses of isoprene emission have not been studied. Because under light-limited conditions, isoprene emission rate is controlled by DMADP pool size (SDMADP ), shifts in the share of different processes are expected to particularly strongly alter the light dependency of isoprene emission. We examined light responses of isoprene emission in young fully expanded, mature and old non-senescent leaves of hybrid aspen (Populus tremula x P. tremuloides) and estimated in vivo SDMADP and isoprene synthase activity from post-illumination isoprene release. Isoprene emission capacity was 1.5-fold larger in mature than in young and old leaves. The initial quantum yield of isoprene emission (αI ) increased by 2.5-fold with increasing leaf age primarily as the result of increasing SDMADP . The saturating light intensity (QI90 ) decreased by 2.3-fold with increasing leaf age, and this mainly reflected limited light-dependent increase of SDMADP possibly due to feedback inhibition by DMADP. These major age-dependent changes in the shape of the light response need consideration in modelling canopy isoprene emission.

  15. Implications of interveinal distance for quantum yield in C4 grasses: a modeling and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Ogle, Kiona

    2003-08-01

    The distance between veins has the potential to affect photosynthesis in C(4) grasses because photon capture and photosynthetic carbon reduction are primarily restricted to vascular bundle sheath cells (BSC). For example, BSC density should increase as interveinal distance (IVD) decreases, and thus IVD may influence photon capture and photosynthesis in C(4) grasses. The objective of this study is to evaluate the potential importance of IVD to the function of C(4) grasses, and a literature survey is conducted to test the hypothesis that quantum yield of photosynthesis (Phi) increases with decreasing IVD. First, a meta-analysis of Phi and IVD values obtained for 12 C(4) grass species supports this hypothesis as Phi and IVD are significantly negatively correlated (r=-0.61). Second, a regression of carbon isotope discrimination (delta) versus IVD was conducted and the regression equation was used in a simple biochemical model that relates Phi to Delta and leakage of CO(2) from the BSC. The modeling analysis also supports the hypothesis that Phi decreases with increasing IVD in C(4) grasses. C(4) grasses are virtually absent from shaded habitats, and the biochemical model is employed to examine the implications of IVD for shade-tolerance in C(4) grasses. The model predicts that only those species with uncommonly small IVD values are able to tolerate prolonged shade.

  16. Facile Synthesis of pH-sensitive Germanium Nanocrystals with High Quantum Yield for Intracellular Acidic Compartment Imaging.

    PubMed

    Li, Feng; Wang, Jing; Sun, Shuqing; Wang, Hai; Tang, Zhiyong; Nie, Guangjun

    2015-04-24

    A green-light emitting germanium nanocrystal-based biosensor to monitor lysosomal pH changes is developed. The Ge nanocrystals are synthesized in an aqueous solution with a significantly enhanced photoluminescence quantum yield of 26%. This synthesis involves a facile solution based route which avoided the use of toxic or environmentally unfriendly agents. Importantly, the photoluminescence intensity of the synthesized Ge nanocrystals is particularly sensitive to changes in pH between 5 and 6. When incubated with cultured cells, the nanocrystals are internalized and subsequently translocated via the lysosomal pathway, and the Ge nanocrystals' fluorescence are greatly enhanced, even when the lysosomal pH is only slightly increased. These results reveal that the Ge nanocrystals possess high pH sensitivity compared to a commercially available dye, LysoSensor Green DND-189. The fluorescent properties of the Ge nanocrystals are demonstrated to be dependent on both the crystal form and their surface chemistry. The superior fluorescence properties and bioapplicability of the Ge nanocrystals makes them a promising intracellular bioimaging probe for monitoring various pH-sensitive processes in cells.

  17. Quantum yield spectra and I-V properties of a GaAs solar cell grown on a Ge substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Partain, L. D.; Virshup, G. F.; Kaminar, N. R.

    A measured quantum yield spectrum showed a weak Ge junction in tandem with a strong GaAs junction for a heteroface p/n GaAs junction grown by MOCVD (metal-organic chemical vapor deposition) on an n-Ge substrate. In natural sunlight, this device had a notched-shaped I-V that limited its fill factor (FF) to 0.612 and its efficiency to 18 percent AM2.6D, which are values below those typical of similar heteroface p/n GaAs junctions grown on n-GaAs substrates. The notch disappeared and the FF increased to 0.806 under infrared-rich incandescent light. The notch deepened and the FF decreased to 0.606 under infrared-poor xenon light. This is modeled as a Ge junction with a soft I-V in tandem with a standard GaAs p/n junction. Calculations of the relative infrared content of sunlight predicts that this cell's FF should progressively decrease as the air mass spectrum progressively loses infrared content in going from AM2.6 through AM1.5 to AM0. The best model found for the Ge junction transport properties is an n-GaAs/n-Ge isotype heterojunction possibly controlled by space-charge-limited-current mechanisms.

  18. Synthesis and formation mechanistic investigation of nitrogen-doped carbon dots with high quantum yields and yellowish-green fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Hou, Juan; Wang, Wei; Zhou, Tianyu; Wang, Bo; Li, Huiyu; Ding, Lan

    2016-06-01

    Heteroatom doped carbon dots (CDs) have received increasing attention due to their unique properties and related applications. However, previously reported CDs generally show strong emission only in the blue-light region, thus restricting their further applications. And the fundamental investigation on the preparation process is always neglected. Herein, we have developed a simple and solvent-free synthetic strategy to fabricate nitrogen-doped CDs (N-CDs) from citric acid and dicyandiamide. The as-prepared N-CDs exhibited a uniform size distribution, strong yellowish-green fluorescence emission and a high quantum yield of 73.2%. The products obtained at different formation stages were detailedly characterized by transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction spectrometer, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and UV absorbance spectroscopy. A possible formation mechanism has thus been proposed including dehydration, polymerization and carbonization. Furthermore, the N-CDs could serve as a facile and label-free probe for the detection of iron and fluorine ions with detection limits of 50 nmol L(-1) and 75 nmol L(-1), respectively. PMID:27180833

  19. Eosinophil count - absolute

    MedlinePlus

    Eosinophils; Absolute eosinophil count ... the white blood cell count to give the absolute eosinophil count. ... than 500 cells per microliter (cells/mcL). Normal value ranges may vary slightly among different laboratories. Talk ...

  20. Kinetics and quantum yield of photoluminescence of EuFOD{sub 3} doped into a nanoporous glass with the help of supercritical CO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Bagratashvili, V N; Tsypina, S I; Chutko, E A; Gerasimova, V I; Gordienko, V M

    2008-08-31

    The kinetics of photoluminescence of a EuFOD{sub 3} metalloorganic compound doped into a nanoporous Vycor glass by the method of supercritical fluid impregnation is studied. The lifetime of luminescence of EuFOD{sub 3} molecules in pores excited by an excimer XeCl laser was 40 {mu}s, which is considerably smaller than this lifetime (150-890 {mu}s) in solutions. The quantum yield of luminescence of EuFOD{sub 3} was estimate as {approx}4x10{sup -4}. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  1. The enhancement of fluorescence quantum yields of anilino naphthalene sulfonic acids by inclusion of various cyclodextrins and cucurbit[7]uril

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sueishi, Yoshimi; Fujita, Tomonori; Nakatani, Shinichiro; Inazumi, Naoya; Osawa, Yoshihiro

    2013-10-01

    The association constants (K) for the inclusion complexation of four kinds of cyclodextrins (CDs (β- and γ-), 2,6-di-O-methylated β-CD, and 2,3,6-tri-O-methylated β-CD) and cucurbit[7]uril (CB[7]) with 1,8- and 2,6-anilinonaphthalene sulfonic acids (ANSs) were determined from fluorescence spectra enhanced by inclusion. Various CDs and CB[7] form stable 1:1 inclusion complexes with 1,8- and 2,6-ANSs: K = 80-11 700 M-1 for 2,6-ANS and 50-195 M-1 for 1,8-ANS. The high stability of the inclusion complexes of 2,6-ANS with CB[7] and 2,6-di-O-methylated β-CD is shown. Further, we determined the fluorescence quantum yields (Φ values) for the inclusion complexes of ANSs by using a fluorescence spectrophotometer equipped with a half-moon unit. The Φ values of 1,8- and 2,6-ANSs were largely enhanced by the inclusion of methylated β-CDs and did not correlate with the degree of stability (K) of the inclusion complexes. We characterized the structures of the inclusion complexes by 2D ROESY-NMR measurements. In addition, the microenvironmental polarity inside the hydrophobic CD and CB[7] cavities was evaluated using the fluorescence probe 2,6-ANS. Based on the emission mechanism and the aspect of inclusion in a hydrophobic cavity, we have suggested that the microenvironmental polarity and viscosity for the excited state of ANS plays an important role for the Φ values of inclusion complexes.

  2. The enhancement of fluorescence quantum yields of anilino naphthalene sulfonic acids by inclusion of various cyclodextrins and cucurbit[7]uril.

    PubMed

    Sueishi, Yoshimi; Fujita, Tomonori; Nakatani, Shinichiro; Inazumi, Naoya; Osawa, Yoshihiro

    2013-10-01

    The association constants (K) for the inclusion complexation of four kinds of cyclodextrins (CDs (β- and γ-), 2,6-di-O-methylated β-CD, and 2,3,6-tri-O-methylated β-CD) and cucurbit[7]uril (CB[7]) with 1,8- and 2,6-anilinonaphthalene sulfonic acids (ANSs) were determined from fluorescence spectra enhanced by inclusion. Various CDs and CB[7] form stable 1:1 inclusion complexes with 1,8- and 2,6-ANSs: K=80-11700 M(-1) for 2,6-ANS and 50-195 M(-1) for 1,8-ANS. The high stability of the inclusion complexes of 2,6-ANS with CB[7] and 2,6-di-O-methylated β-CD is shown. Further, we determined the fluorescence quantum yields (Φ values) for the inclusion complexes of ANSs by using a fluorescence spectrophotometer equipped with a half-moon unit. The Φ values of 1,8- and 2,6-ANSs were largely enhanced by the inclusion of methylated β-CDs and did not correlate with the degree of stability (K) of the inclusion complexes. We characterized the structures of the inclusion complexes by 2D ROESY-NMR measurements. In addition, the microenvironmental polarity inside the hydrophobic CD and CB[7] cavities was evaluated using the fluorescence probe 2,6-ANS. Based on the emission mechanism and the aspect of inclusion in a hydrophobic cavity, we have suggested that the microenvironmental polarity and viscosity for the excited state of ANS plays an important role for the Φ values of inclusion complexes.

  3. Upconverting core-shell nanocrystals with high quantum yield under low irradiance: On the role of isotropic and thick shells

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, Stefan; Goldschmidt, Jan Christoph; Johnson, Noah J. J.; Pichaandi, Jothirmayanantham; Veggel, Frank C. J. M. van

    2015-11-21

    Colloidal upconverter nanocrystals (UCNCs) that convert near-infrared photons to higher energies are promising for applications ranging from life sciences to solar energy harvesting. However, practical applications of UCNCs are hindered by their low upconversion quantum yield (UCQY) and the high irradiances necessary to produce relevant upconversion luminescence. Achieving high UCQY under practically relevant irradiance remains a major challenge. The UCQY is severely limited due to non-radiative surface quenching processes. We present a rate equation model for migration of the excitation energy to show that surface quenching does not only affect the lanthanide ions directly at the surface but also many other lanthanide ions quite far away from the surface. The average migration path length is on the order of several nanometers and depends on the doping as well as the irradiance of the excitation. Using Er{sup 3+}-doped β-NaYF{sub 4} UCNCs, we show that very isotropic and thick (∼10 nm) β-NaLuF{sub 4} inert shells dramatically reduce the surface-related quenching processes, resulting in much brighter upconversion luminescence at simultaneously considerably lower irradiances. For these UCNCs embedded in poly(methyl methacrylate), we determined an internal UCQY of 2.0% ± 0.2% using an irradiance of only 0.43 ± 0.03 W/cm{sup 2} at 1523 nm. Normalized to the irradiance, this UCQY is 120× higher than the highest values of comparable nanomaterials in the literature. Our findings demonstrate the important role of isotropic and thick shells in achieving high UCQY at low irradiances from UCNCs. Additionally, we measured the additional short-circuit current due to upconversion in silicon solar cell devices as a proof of concept and to support our findings determined using optical measurements.

  4. Absolute determination of charge-coupled device quantum detection efficiency using Si K-edge x-ray absorption fine structure

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, J; Steel, A B

    2012-05-06

    We report a method to determine the quantum detection efficiency and the absorbing layers on a front-illuminated charge-coupled device (CCD). The CCD under study, as part of a crystal spectrometer, measures intense continuum x-ray emission from a picosecond laser-produced plasma and spectrally resolves the Si K-edge x-ray absorption fine structure features due to the electrode gate structure of the device. The CCD response across the Si K-edge shows a large discontinuity as well as a number of oscillations that are identified individually and uniquely from Si, SiO{sub 2}, and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} layers. From the spectral analysis of the structure and K-edge discontinuity, the active layer thickness and the different absorbing layers thickness can be determined precisely. A precise CCD detection model from 0.2-10 keV can be deduced from this highly sensitive technique.

  5. Absolute nuclear material assay

    DOEpatents

    Prasad, Manoj K.; Snyderman, Neal J.; Rowland, Mark S.

    2012-05-15

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  6. Absolute nuclear material assay

    DOEpatents

    Prasad, Manoj K.; Snyderman, Neal J.; Rowland, Mark S.

    2010-07-13

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  7. High yield and ultrafast sources of electrically triggered entangled-photon pairs based on strain-tunable quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jiaxiang; Wildmann, Johannes S.; Ding, Fei; Trotta, Rinaldo; Huo, Yongheng; Zallo, Eugenio; Huber, Daniel; Rastelli, Armando; Schmidt, Oliver G.

    2015-12-01

    Triggered sources of entangled photon pairs are key components in most quantum communication protocols. For practical quantum applications, electrical triggering would allow the realization of compact and deterministic sources of entangled photons. Entangled-light-emitting-diodes based on semiconductor quantum dots are among the most promising sources that can potentially address this task. However, entangled-light-emitting-diodes are plagued by a source of randomness, which results in a very low probability of finding quantum dots with sufficiently small fine structure splitting for entangled-photon generation (~10-2). Here we introduce strain-tunable entangled-light-emitting-diodes that exploit piezoelectric-induced strains to tune quantum dots for entangled-photon generation. We demonstrate that up to 30% of the quantum dots in strain-tunable entangled-light-emitting-diodes emit polarization-entangled photons. An entanglement fidelity as high as 0.83 is achieved with fast temporal post selection. Driven at high speed, that is 400 MHz, strain-tunable entangled-light-emitting-diodes emerge as promising devices for high data-rate quantum applications.

  8. High yield and ultrafast sources of electrically triggered entangled-photon pairs based on strain-tunable quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiaxiang; Wildmann, Johannes S; Ding, Fei; Trotta, Rinaldo; Huo, Yongheng; Zallo, Eugenio; Huber, Daniel; Rastelli, Armando; Schmidt, Oliver G

    2015-01-01

    Triggered sources of entangled photon pairs are key components in most quantum communication protocols. For practical quantum applications, electrical triggering would allow the realization of compact and deterministic sources of entangled photons. Entangled-light-emitting-diodes based on semiconductor quantum dots are among the most promising sources that can potentially address this task. However, entangled-light-emitting-diodes are plagued by a source of randomness, which results in a very low probability of finding quantum dots with sufficiently small fine structure splitting for entangled-photon generation (∼10(-2)). Here we introduce strain-tunable entangled-light-emitting-diodes that exploit piezoelectric-induced strains to tune quantum dots for entangled-photon generation. We demonstrate that up to 30% of the quantum dots in strain-tunable entangled-light-emitting-diodes emit polarization-entangled photons. An entanglement fidelity as high as 0.83 is achieved with fast temporal post selection. Driven at high speed, that is 400 MHz, strain-tunable entangled-light-emitting-diodes emerge as promising devices for high data-rate quantum applications.

  9. High yield and ultrafast sources of electrically triggered entangled-photon pairs based on strain-tunable quantum dots

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jiaxiang; Wildmann, Johannes S.; Ding, Fei; Trotta, Rinaldo; Huo, Yongheng; Zallo, Eugenio; Huber, Daniel; Rastelli, Armando; Schmidt, Oliver G.

    2015-01-01

    Triggered sources of entangled photon pairs are key components in most quantum communication protocols. For practical quantum applications, electrical triggering would allow the realization of compact and deterministic sources of entangled photons. Entangled-light-emitting-diodes based on semiconductor quantum dots are among the most promising sources that can potentially address this task. However, entangled-light-emitting-diodes are plagued by a source of randomness, which results in a very low probability of finding quantum dots with sufficiently small fine structure splitting for entangled-photon generation (∼10−2). Here we introduce strain-tunable entangled-light-emitting-diodes that exploit piezoelectric-induced strains to tune quantum dots for entangled-photon generation. We demonstrate that up to 30% of the quantum dots in strain-tunable entangled-light-emitting-diodes emit polarization-entangled photons. An entanglement fidelity as high as 0.83 is achieved with fast temporal post selection. Driven at high speed, that is 400 MHz, strain-tunable entangled-light-emitting-diodes emerge as promising devices for high data-rate quantum applications. PMID:26621073

  10. Diffusion-enhanced Förster resonance energy transfer and the effects of external quenchers and the donor quantum yield.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Maik H; Dsouza, Roy N; Ghosh, Indrajit; Norouzy, Amir; Schwarzlose, Thomas; Nau, Werner M

    2013-01-10

    effective FRET rate and the recovered donor-acceptor distance depend on the quantum yield, most strongly in the absence of diffusion, which has to be accounted for in the interpretation of distance trends monitored by FRET.

  11. Temperature dependence of the phosphorescence quantum yield of various alpha-lactalbumins and of hen egg-white lysozyme.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, C A; Maki, A H

    1993-01-01

    The radiative quantum yield, phi op, of the triplet state of human alpha-lactalbumin (HLA) has been measured in the temperature range between 6 K and the softening point of the aqueous glass (approximately 150 K). phi op has little temperature dependence below approximately 30 K, but above this it decreases sharply with increasing temperature. The unusual temperature dependence is fitted by a phenomenological two-state model in which the phosphorescence originates primarily from a donor, tryptophan (Trp) 104, and an acceptor, Trp 60, the populations of which are coupled by a thermally activated triplet-triplet energy transfer process. The model assumes that the acceptor (Trp 60) triplet state undergoes radiationless deactivation by a proximal disulfide residue, while the donor (Trp 104) has no such extrinsic quencher. The decrease of phi op with increasing temperature is accounted for by the thermally activated triplet-triplet energy transfer process. The disulfide quenching rate constant itself is assumed to be temperature independent, in accord with recent measurements of simple disulfide quenching in long chain snake venom neurotoxins (Schlyer, B. D., E. Lau, and A. H. Maki. 1992. Biochemistry. 31:4375-4383; Li, Z., A. Bruce, and W. C. Galley. 1992. Biophys. J. 61:1364-1371). We find that the phosphorescence quenching in HLA occurs with an activation energy of 97 cm-1, which we associate with a barrier to the energy transfer process. The data are fit well by the model if we assume a value for the temperature-independent disulfide quenching constant of kQ > 3 s-1 that is consistent with recent measurements on indole-disulfide model systems (Li, Z., A. Bruce, and W. C. Galley. 1992. Biophys. J. 61:1364-1371). Similar results are reported for bovine alpha-lactalbumin (BLA) and for hen egg-white lysozyme (HEWL) that contains the structural equivalents of Trp 104 and Trp 60 of HLA. HLA provides the best agreement with calculations since it is the simplest, lacking

  12. Switching-on quantum size effects in silicon nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wei; Qian, Chenxi; Wang, Liwei; Wei, Muan; Mastronardi, Melanie L; Casillas, Gilberto; Breu, Josef; Ozin, Geoffrey A

    2015-01-27

    The size-dependence of the absolute luminescence quantum yield of size-separated silicon nanocrystals reveals a "volcano" behavior, which switches on around 5 nm, peaks at near 3.7-3.9 nm, and decreases thereafter. These three regions respectively define: i) the transition from bulk to strongly quantum confined emissive silicon, ii) increasing confinement enhancing radiative recombination, and iii) increasing contributions favoring non-radiative recombination.

  13. High resolution spectroscopy of silane with an external-cavity quantum cascade laser: Absolute line strengths of the ν3 fundamental band at 4.6 μm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Helden, J. H.; Lopatik, D.; Nave, A.; Lang, N.; Davies, P. B.; Röpcke, J.

    2015-01-01

    The introduction of room temperature continuous wave external-cavity quantum cascade lasers (EC-QCLs) with narrow linewidths has greatly facilitated high resolution spectroscopy over wide spectral ranges in the mid-infrared (MIR) region. Using the wide tuning range of an EC-QCL we have measured the absolute line strengths of many P-branch transitions of the stretching dyad of the ν3 fundamental band of 28SiH4 between 2096 and 2178 cm-1. Furthermore, the high spectral resolution available has enabled us to resolve and measure representative examples of the tetrahedral splittings associated with each component of the P-branch. The positions of these components are in excellent agreement with spherical top data system (STDS) predictions and theoretical transitions from the TDS spectroscopic database for spherical top molecules. These are the first measurements of these line strengths of 28SiH4 and are an example of the applicability of high-powered, widely tunable EC-QCLs to high resolution spectroscopy.

  14. Absolute biological needs.

    PubMed

    McLeod, Stephen

    2014-07-01

    Absolute needs (as against instrumental needs) are independent of the ends, goals and purposes of personal agents. Against the view that the only needs are instrumental needs, David Wiggins and Garrett Thomson have defended absolute needs on the grounds that the verb 'need' has instrumental and absolute senses. While remaining neutral about it, this article does not adopt that approach. Instead, it suggests that there are absolute biological needs. The absolute nature of these needs is defended by appeal to: their objectivity (as against mind-dependence); the universality of the phenomenon of needing across the plant and animal kingdoms; the impossibility that biological needs depend wholly upon the exercise of the abilities characteristic of personal agency; the contention that the possession of biological needs is prior to the possession of the abilities characteristic of personal agency. Finally, three philosophical usages of 'normative' are distinguished. On two of these, to describe a phenomenon or claim as 'normative' is to describe it as value-dependent. A description of a phenomenon or claim as 'normative' in the third sense does not entail such value-dependency, though it leaves open the possibility that value depends upon the phenomenon or upon the truth of the claim. It is argued that while survival needs (or claims about them) may well be normative in this third sense, they are normative in neither of the first two. Thus, the idea of absolute need is not inherently normative in either of the first two senses. PMID:23586876

  15. Absolute biological needs.

    PubMed

    McLeod, Stephen

    2014-07-01

    Absolute needs (as against instrumental needs) are independent of the ends, goals and purposes of personal agents. Against the view that the only needs are instrumental needs, David Wiggins and Garrett Thomson have defended absolute needs on the grounds that the verb 'need' has instrumental and absolute senses. While remaining neutral about it, this article does not adopt that approach. Instead, it suggests that there are absolute biological needs. The absolute nature of these needs is defended by appeal to: their objectivity (as against mind-dependence); the universality of the phenomenon of needing across the plant and animal kingdoms; the impossibility that biological needs depend wholly upon the exercise of the abilities characteristic of personal agency; the contention that the possession of biological needs is prior to the possession of the abilities characteristic of personal agency. Finally, three philosophical usages of 'normative' are distinguished. On two of these, to describe a phenomenon or claim as 'normative' is to describe it as value-dependent. A description of a phenomenon or claim as 'normative' in the third sense does not entail such value-dependency, though it leaves open the possibility that value depends upon the phenomenon or upon the truth of the claim. It is argued that while survival needs (or claims about them) may well be normative in this third sense, they are normative in neither of the first two. Thus, the idea of absolute need is not inherently normative in either of the first two senses.

  16. Q-Machine Plasmas Yielding New Experimental Methodologies of Sheared-Flow and Nano-Quantum Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Hatakeyama, Rikizo; Kaneko, Toshiro

    2008-10-15

    The traditional Q machine has been modified in accordance with the evolution of experimental methodologies ranging from modern plasma physics to extreme nanoscience. A special emphasis is placed on physics of sheared-flow related electron-temperature-gradient modes and nano-quantum physics or electronics based on fullerene and carbon nanotubes.

  17. Controllable chrominance and highly improved luminescent quantum yield of YV(1-x)P(x)O4: Tm, Dy, Eu inverse opal white light phosphors.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Pingwei; Zhu, Yongsheng; Xu, Wen; Xu, Lin; Song, Hongwei

    2013-11-01

    In this work, rare earth (RE) ions tri-doped YV(1-x)P(x)O(4): RE(3+) (RE = Tm, Dy, Eu) inverse opal photonic crystals (IOPCs) were fabricated by the PMMA template method, which demonstrated efficient white light emissions under ultraviolet excitation. It is significant to observe that the chrominance of the white light could be largely modulated by the photonic stop band of the IOPCs. And more, the photoluminescence quantum yield in the IOPCs was largely improved over the grinded reference (REF) because the undesired energy transfer (ET) process was effectively restrained. PMID:24216800

  18. A water-soluble ESIPT fluorescent probe with high quantum yield and red emission for ratiometric detection of inorganic and organic palladium.

    PubMed

    Gao, Tang; Xu, Pengfei; Liu, Meihui; Bi, Anyao; Hu, Pengzhi; Ye, Bin; Wang, Wei; Zeng, Wenbin

    2015-05-01

    A novel fluorescent probe with a high quantum yield (0.41), large Stokes shifts (255 nm), and red emission (635 nm) was designed to detect all typical oxidation states of palladium species (0, +2, +4) by palladium-mediated terminal propargyl ethers cleavage reaction in water solution without any organic media. The probe showed a high selectivity and excellent sensitivity for palladium species, with a detection as low as 57 nM (6.2 μg L(-1)).

  19. Cosmology with negative absolute temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieira, J. P. P.; Byrnes, Christian T.; Lewis, Antony

    2016-08-01

    Negative absolute temperatures (NAT) are an exotic thermodynamical consequence of quantum physics which has been known since the 1950's (having been achieved in the lab on a number of occasions). Recently, the work of Braun et al. [1] has rekindled interest in negative temperatures and hinted at a possibility of using NAT systems in the lab as dark energy analogues. This paper goes one step further, looking into the cosmological consequences of the existence of a NAT component in the Universe. NAT-dominated expanding Universes experience a borderline phantom expansion (w < ‑1) with no Big Rip, and their contracting counterparts are forced to bounce after the energy density becomes sufficiently large. Both scenarios might be used to solve horizon and flatness problems analogously to standard inflation and bouncing cosmologies. We discuss the difficulties in obtaining and ending a NAT-dominated epoch, and possible ways of obtaining density perturbations with an acceptable spectrum.

  20. Cosmology with negative absolute temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieira, J. P. P.; Byrnes, Christian T.; Lewis, Antony

    2016-08-01

    Negative absolute temperatures (NAT) are an exotic thermodynamical consequence of quantum physics which has been known since the 1950's (having been achieved in the lab on a number of occasions). Recently, the work of Braun et al. [1] has rekindled interest in negative temperatures and hinted at a possibility of using NAT systems in the lab as dark energy analogues. This paper goes one step further, looking into the cosmological consequences of the existence of a NAT component in the Universe. NAT-dominated expanding Universes experience a borderline phantom expansion (w < -1) with no Big Rip, and their contracting counterparts are forced to bounce after the energy density becomes sufficiently large. Both scenarios might be used to solve horizon and flatness problems analogously to standard inflation and bouncing cosmologies. We discuss the difficulties in obtaining and ending a NAT-dominated epoch, and possible ways of obtaining density perturbations with an acceptable spectrum.

  1. Determination of the Strong Phase in D{sup 0}{yields}K{sup +}{pi}{sup -} Using Quantum-Correlated Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Rosner, J. L.; Alexander, J. P.; Cassel, D. G.; Duboscq, J. E.; Ehrlich, R.; Fields, L.; Gibbons, L.; Gray, R.; Gray, S. W.; Hartill, D. L.; Heltsley, B. K.; Hertz, D.; Jones, C. D.; Kandaswamy, J.; Kreinick, D. L.; Kuznetsov, V. E.; Mahlke-Krueger, H.; Mohapatra, D.; Onyisi, P. U. E.; Patterson, J. R.

    2008-06-06

    We exploit the quantum coherence between pair-produced D{sup 0} and D{sup 0} in {psi}(3770) decays to study charm mixing, which is characterized by the parameters x and y, and to make a first determination of the relative strong phase {delta} between D{sup 0}{yields}K{sup +}{pi}{sup -} and D{sup 0}{yields}K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}. Using 281 pb{sup -1} of e{sup +}e{sup -} collision data collected with the CLEO-c detector at E{sub cm}=3.77 GeV, as well as branching fraction input and time-integrated measurements of R{sub M}{identical_to}(x{sup 2}+y{sup 2})/2 and R{sub WS}{identical_to}{gamma}(D{sup 0}{yields}K{sup +}{pi}{sup -})/{gamma}(D{sup 0}{yields}K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}) from other experiments, we find cos{delta}=1.03{sub -0.17}{sup +0.31}{+-}0.06, where the uncertainties are statistical and systematic, respectively. By further including other mixing parameter measurements, we obtain an alternate measurement of cos{delta}=1.10{+-}0.35{+-}0.07, as well as xsin{delta}=(4.4{sub -1.8}{sup +2.7}{+-}2.9)x10{sup -3} and {delta}=(22{sub -12-11}{sup +11+9}) deg.

  2. The absolute path command

    2012-05-11

    The ap command traveres all symlinks in a given file, directory, or executable name to identify the final absolute path. It can print just the final path, each intermediate link along with the symlink chan, and the permissions and ownership of each directory component in the final path. It has functionality similar to "which", except that it shows the final path instead of the first path. It is also similar to "pwd", but it canmore » provide the absolute path to a relative directory from the current working directory.« less

  3. The absolute path command

    SciTech Connect

    Moody, A.

    2012-05-11

    The ap command traveres all symlinks in a given file, directory, or executable name to identify the final absolute path. It can print just the final path, each intermediate link along with the symlink chan, and the permissions and ownership of each directory component in the final path. It has functionality similar to "which", except that it shows the final path instead of the first path. It is also similar to "pwd", but it can provide the absolute path to a relative directory from the current working directory.

  4. The absolute yield, angular distribution and resonance widths of the 6.13, 6.92 and 7.12 MeV photons from the 340.5 keV resonance of the 19F(p,αγ) 16O reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croft, S.

    1991-10-01

    Although the low lying resonances in the 19F(p,αγ) 16O reaction have been studied by many investigators in the past, only a few absolute determinations of the gamma-ray yield and branching ratios have been made. This is somewhat surprising in view of the widespread use of this reaction for the quantitative microanalysis of fluorine concentration profiles in the near surface regions of materials and for the calibration of gamma-ray detectors. In this work we report an absolute measurement of the yield, angular distribution and resonance widths of the 6.13, 6.92 and 7.12 MeV photons from the 340.5 keV resonance of the 19F(p,αγ) 16O reaction. Photons were produced by bombarding a semithick target of CaF 2 with protons from the Harwell 6 MV Van de Graaff accelerator. A 113 cm 3 HPGe spectrometer, with an energy resolution of 6.8 keV at 6129 keV, was used as the photon detector. This detector had previously been calibrated absolutely using a combination of radionuclide and thermal neutron capture gamma-ray sources at the neutron facility Badger, adjacent to the Harwell reactor DIDO. Measurements were made at seven angles in the range 0° - 150° permitting both differential and integral cross-sections to be derived. Geometrical correction factors were calculated using the Monte Carlo code EGS-4. A value for the reaction width was determined from the excitation curve. With conventional notation the principal results are as follows: γ1 : γ2 : γ3 = 0.9701:0.0033:0.0266; ΓCM = (2.08±0.13) keV; and Y( γ1) = (8.72±0.37)×10 4 6129 keV γμC -1as.

  5. Temperature Dependence of the Linkage of Quantum Yield of Photosystem II to CO2 Fixation in C4 and C3 Plants.

    PubMed

    Oberhuber, W.; Edwards, G. E.

    1993-02-01

    The temperature dependence of quantum yields of electron transport from photosystem II (PSII) ([phi]II, determined from chlorophyll a fluorescence) and CO2 assimilation ([phi]CO2, apparent quantum yield for CO2 assimilation) were determined simultaneously in vivo. With C4 species representing NADP-malic enzyme, NAD-malic enzyme, and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase subgroups, the ratio of [phi]II/[phi]CO2 was constant over the temperature range from 15 to 40[deg]C at high light intensity (1100 [mu]mol quanta m-2 s-1). A similar response was obtained at low light intensity (300 [mu]mol quanta m-2 s-1), except the ratio of [phi]II/[phi]CO2 increased at high temperature. When the true quantum yield for CO2 fixation ([phi]CO2*) was calculated by correcting for respiration in the light (estimated from temperature dependence of dark respiration), the ratio of [phi]II/[phi]C02* remained constant with varying temperature and under both light intensities in all C4 species examined. Because the [phi]II/[phi]CO2* ratio was the same in C4 monocots representing the three subgroups, the ratio was not affected by differences in the bio-chemical mechanism of concentrating CO2 in the bundle sheath cells. The results suggest that PSII activity is closely linked to the true rate of CO2 fixation in C4 plants. The close relationship between [phi]II and [phi]CO2* in C4 species under varying temperature and light intensity conditions is apparently due to a common low level of photorespiration and a primary requirement for reductive power in the C3 pathway. In contrast, in a C3 plant the [phi] II/[phi]CO2* ratio is higher under normal atmospheric conditions than under nonphotorespiratory conditions and it increases with rising temperature. This decrease in efficiency in utilizing energy derived from PSII for CO2 fixation is due to an increase in photorespiration. In both the C3 and C4 species, photochemistry is limited under low temperature, and thus excess energy must be dissipated by

  6. A DPF Analysis Yields Quantum Mechanically Accurate Analytic Potential Energy Functions for the a ^1Σ^+ and X ^1Σ^+ States of NaH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Roy, Robert J.; Walji, Sadru; Sentjens, Katherine

    2013-06-01

    Alkali hydride diatomic molecules have long been the object of spectroscopic studies. However, their small reduced mass makes them species for which the conventional semiclassical-based methods of analysis tend to have the largest errors. To date, the only quantum-mechanically accurate direct-potential-fit (DPF) analysis for one of these molecules was the one for LiH reported by Coxon and Dickinson. The present paper extends this level of analysis to NaH, and reports a DPF analysis of all available spectroscopic data for the A ^1Σ^+-X ^1Σ^+ system of NaH which yields analytic potential energy functions for these two states that account for those data (on average) to within the experimental uncertainties. W.C. Stwalley, W.T. Zemke and S.C. Yang, J. Phys. Chem. Ref. Data {20}, 153-187 (1991). J.A. Coxon and C.S. Dickinson, J. Chem. Phys. {121}, 8378 (2004).

  7. Slow-Injection Growth of Seeded CdSe/CdS Nanorods with Unity Fluorescence Quantum Yield and Complete Shell to Core Energy Transfer.

    PubMed

    Coropceanu, Igor; Rossinelli, Aurelio; Caram, Justin R; Freyria, Francesca S; Bawendi, Moungi G

    2016-03-22

    A two-step process has been developed for growing the shell of CdSe/CdS core/shell nanorods. The method combines an established fast-injection-based step to create the initial elongated shell with a second slow-injection growth that allows for a systematic variation of the shell thickness while maintaining a high degree of monodispersity at the batch level and enhancing the uniformity at the single-nanorod level. The second growth step resulted in nanorods exhibiting a fluorescence quantum yield up to 100% as well as effectively complete energy transfer from the shell to the core. This improvement suggests that the second step is associated with a strong suppression of the nonradiative channels operating both before and after the thermalization of the exciton. This hypothesis is supported by the suppression of a defect band, ubiquitous to CdSe-based nanocrystals after the second growth.

  8. Improved photoluminescence quantum yield and stability of CdSe-TOP, CdSe-ODA-TOPO, CdSe/CdS and CdSe/EP nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Shutian; Zhu, Zhilin; Wang, Zhixiao; Wei, Gugangfen; Wang, Pingjian; Li, Hai; Hua, Zhen; Lin, Zhonghai

    2016-07-01

    Size-controllable monodisperse CdSe nanocrystals with different organic capping were prepared based on the hot-injection method. The effective separation of nucleation and growth was achieved by rapidly mixing two highly reactive precursors. As a contrast, we prepared CdSe/CdS nanocrystals (NCs) successfully based on the selective ion layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) technique. This inorganic capping obtained higher photoluminescence quantum yield (PLQY) of 59.3% compared with organic capping of 40.8%. Furthermore, the CdSe-epoxy resin (EP) composites were prepared by adopting a flexible ex situ method, and showed excellent stability in the ambient environment for one year. So the composites with both high PLQY of nanocrystals and excellent stability are very promising to device application.

  9. Changes in quantum yield of photosynthesis in the red alga Porphyridium cruentum caused by stepwise reduction in the intensity of light preferentially absorbed by the phycobilins.

    PubMed

    THOMAS, J B; GOVINDJEE

    1960-09-01

    This paper describes the relation between the quantum yield of photosynthesis in the red alga Porphyridium cruentum, and the spectral composition of light, changed by filtering white light through aqueous phycobilin solutions of increasing optical density. At sufficiently high densities of the filter solution, no measurable photosynthesis can be observed, although chlorophyll a molecules are still being excited at a significant rate, as can be proved by calculations from spectral distribution curves, and is confirmed by the occurrence of a "second Emerson effect" upon addition of orange light. An interpretation of this result, based on other experiments, will be given in a subsequent paper. A modification of the opal glass technique for reducing the effect of scattering when measuring absorption, was developed in connection with this research, and also is described in the paper.

  10. The nature and role of quantized transition states in the accurate quantum dynamics of the reaction O + H2 yields OH + H

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chatfield, David C.; Friedman, Ronald S.; Lynch, Gillian C.; Truhlar, Donald G.; Schwenke, David W.

    1993-01-01

    Accurate quantum mechanical dynamics calculations are reported for the reaction probabilities of O(3P) + H2 yields OH + H with zero total angular momentum on a single potential energy surface. The results show that the reactive flux is gated by quantized transition states up to the highest energy studied, which corresponds to a total energy of 1.90 eV. The quantized transition states are assigned and compared to vibrationally adiabatic barrier maxima; their widths and transmission coefficients are determined; and they are classified as variational, supernumerary of the first kind, and supernumerary of the second kind. Their effects on state-selected and state-to-state reactivity are discussed in detail.

  11. A Time-Dependent Quantum Dynamics Study of the H2 + CH3 yields H + CH4 Reaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Dunyou; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We present a time-dependent wave-packet propagation calculation for the H2 + CH3 yields H + CH4 reaction in six degrees of freedom and for zero total angular momentum. Initial state selected reaction probability for different initial rotational-vibrational states are presented in this study. The cumulative reaction probability (CRP) is obtained by summing over initial-state-selected reaction probability. The energy-shift approximation to account for the contribution of degrees of freedom missing in the 6D calculation is employed to obtain an approximate full-dimensional CRP. Thermal rate constant is compared with different experiment results.

  12. Luminescent pincer platinum(II) complexes with emission quantum yields up to almost unity: photophysics, photoreductive C-C bond formation, and materials applications.

    PubMed

    Chow, Pui-Keong; Cheng, Gang; Tong, Glenna So Ming; To, Wai-Pong; Kwong, Wai-Lun; Low, Kam-Hung; Kwok, Chi-Chung; Ma, Chensheng; Che, Chi-Ming

    2015-02-01

    Luminescent pincer-type Pt(II)  complexes supported by C-deprotonated π-extended tridentate RC^N^NR' ligands and pentafluorophenylacetylide ligands show emission quantum yields up to almost unity. Femtosecond time-resolved fluorescence measurements and time-dependent DFT calculations together reveal the dependence of excited-state structural distortions of [Pt(RC^N^NR')(CC-C6 F5 )] on the positional isomers of the tridentate ligand. Pt complexes [Pt(R-C^N^NR')(CC-Ar)] are efficient photocatalysts for visible-light-induced reductive CC bond formation. The [Pt(R-C^N^NR')(CC-C6 F5 )] complexes perform strongly as phosphorescent dopants for green- and red-emitting organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) with external quantum efficiency values over 22.1 %. These complexes are also applied in two-photon cellular imaging when incorporated into mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs).

  13. Study on the Ultrahigh Quantum Yield of Fluorescent P,O-g-C3 N4 Nanodots and its Application in Cell Imaging.

    PubMed

    Rong, Mingcong; Cai, Zhixiong; Xie, Lei; Lin, Chunshui; Song, Xinhong; Luo, Feng; Wang, Yiru; Chen, Xi

    2016-06-27

    Graphitic carbon nitride nanodots (g-C3 N4 nanodots), as a new kind of heavy-metal-free quantum dots, have attracted considerable attention because of their unique physical and chemical properties. Although various methods to obtain g-C3 N4 nanodots have been reported, it is still a challenge to synthesize g-C3 N4 nanodots with ultrahigh fluorescence quantum yield (QY). In this study, highly fluorescent phosphorus/oxygen-doped graphitic carbon nitride (P,O-g-C3 N4 ) nanodots were prepared by chemical oxidation and hydrothermal etching of bulk P-g-C3 N4 derived from the pyrolysis of phytic acid and melamine. The as-prepared P,O-g-C3 N4 nanodots showed strong blue fluorescence and a relatively high QY of up to 90.2 %, which can be ascribed to intrinsic phosphorus/oxygen-containing groups, and surface-oxidation-related fluorescence enhancement. In addition, the P,O-g-C3 N4 nanodots were explored for cell imaging with excellent stability and biocompatibility, which suggest that they have great potential in biological applications. PMID:27249019

  14. Photoluminescence quantum yields of PbSe and PbS QDs in the range of 1000 nm to 2000 nm (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beard, Matthew C.; Semonin, Octavi E.; Johnson, Justin C.; Marshall, Ashley; Zhang, Jianbing; Chernomordik, Boris D.

    2016-03-01

    PbS and PbSe quantum dots (QDs) are promising strong infrared emitters. We have developed several synthetic routes to producing PbS and PbSe QDs with a variety of sizes such that the bandgap can be continuously tuned from 2000 to 1000 nm. We provide a simple and accurate synthetic route to reproducibly produce PbS QDs with a narrow size-distribution and high chemical yield. The different synthetic routes lead to differences in their surface chemistry and to differences in their air stability and photoluminescence quantum yields (PLQY). To characterize the PLQY we directly measured the PLQY IR-26 (a standard IR emitting organic dye) at a range of concentrations as well as the PLQY of PbS and PbSe QDs for a range of sizes. We find that the PLQY of IR-26 has a weak concentration dependence due to reabsorption, with a PLQY of 0:048_0:002% for low concentrations, lower than previous reports by a full order of magnitude. We also find a dramatic size dependence for both PbS and PbSe QDs, with the smallest dots exhibiting a PLQY in excess of 60% while larger dots fall below 3%. A model, including nonradiative transition between electronic states and energy transfer to ligand vibrations, appears to explain this size dependence. These findings provide both a better characterization of photoluminescence for near infrared emitters. Halogen surface passivation provides both a larger PLQY (~ 30% improvement) as well as increased air stability.

  15. Arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis ameliorates the optimum quantum yield of photosystem II and reduces non-photochemical quenching in rice plants subjected to salt stress.

    PubMed

    Porcel, Rosa; Redondo-Gómez, Susana; Mateos-Naranjo, Enrique; Aroca, Ricardo; Garcia, Rosalva; Ruiz-Lozano, Juan Manuel

    2015-08-01

    Rice is the most important food crop in the world and is a primary source of food for more than half of the world population. However, salinity is considered the most common abiotic stress reducing its productivity. Soil salinity inhibits photosynthetic processes, which can induce an over-reduction of the reaction centres in photosystem II (PSII), damaging the photosynthetic machinery. The arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis may improve host plant tolerance to salinity, but it is not clear how the AM symbiosis affects the plant photosynthetic capacity, particularly the efficiency of PSII. This study aimed at determining the influence of the AM symbiosis on the performance of PSII in rice plants subjected to salinity. Photosynthetic activity, plant gas-exchange parameters, accumulation of photosynthetic pigments and rubisco activity and gene expression were also measured in order to analyse comprehensively the response of the photosynthetic processes to AM symbiosis and salinity. Results showed that the AM symbiosis enhanced the actual quantum yield of PSII photochemistry and reduced the quantum yield of non-photochemical quenching in rice plants subjected to salinity. AM rice plants maintained higher net photosynthetic rate, stomatal conductance and transpiration rate than nonAM plants. Thus, we propose that AM rice plants had a higher photochemical efficiency for CO2 fixation and solar energy utilization and this increases plant salt tolerance by preventing the injury to the photosystems reaction centres and by allowing a better utilization of light energy in photochemical processes. All these processes translated into higher photosynthetic and rubisco activities in AM rice plants and improved plant biomass production under salinity.

  16. Arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis ameliorates the optimum quantum yield of photosystem II and reduces non-photochemical quenching in rice plants subjected to salt stress.

    PubMed

    Porcel, Rosa; Redondo-Gómez, Susana; Mateos-Naranjo, Enrique; Aroca, Ricardo; Garcia, Rosalva; Ruiz-Lozano, Juan Manuel

    2015-08-01

    Rice is the most important food crop in the world and is a primary source of food for more than half of the world population. However, salinity is considered the most common abiotic stress reducing its productivity. Soil salinity inhibits photosynthetic processes, which can induce an over-reduction of the reaction centres in photosystem II (PSII), damaging the photosynthetic machinery. The arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis may improve host plant tolerance to salinity, but it is not clear how the AM symbiosis affects the plant photosynthetic capacity, particularly the efficiency of PSII. This study aimed at determining the influence of the AM symbiosis on the performance of PSII in rice plants subjected to salinity. Photosynthetic activity, plant gas-exchange parameters, accumulation of photosynthetic pigments and rubisco activity and gene expression were also measured in order to analyse comprehensively the response of the photosynthetic processes to AM symbiosis and salinity. Results showed that the AM symbiosis enhanced the actual quantum yield of PSII photochemistry and reduced the quantum yield of non-photochemical quenching in rice plants subjected to salinity. AM rice plants maintained higher net photosynthetic rate, stomatal conductance and transpiration rate than nonAM plants. Thus, we propose that AM rice plants had a higher photochemical efficiency for CO2 fixation and solar energy utilization and this increases plant salt tolerance by preventing the injury to the photosystems reaction centres and by allowing a better utilization of light energy in photochemical processes. All these processes translated into higher photosynthetic and rubisco activities in AM rice plants and improved plant biomass production under salinity. PMID:26291919

  17. Optical-feedback cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy with a quantum-cascade laser yields the lowest formaldehyde detection limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorrotxategi-Carbajo, P.; Fasci, E.; Ventrillard, I.; Carras, M.; Maisons, G.; Romanini, D.

    2013-03-01

    We report on the first application of Optical Feedback-Cavity Enhanced Absorption Spectroscopy to formaldehyde trace gas analysis at mid-infrared wavelengths. A continuous-wave room-temperature, distributed-feedback quantum cascade laser emitting around 1,769 cm-1 has been successfully coupled to an optical cavity with finesse 10,000 in an OF-CEAS spectrometer operating on the ν2 fundamental absorption band of formaldehyde. This compact setup (easily transportable) is able to monitor H2CO at ambient concentrations within few seconds, presently limited by the sample exchange rate. The minimum detectable absorption is 1.6 × 10-9 cm-1 for a single laser scan (100 ms, 100 data points), with a detectable H2CO mixing ratio of 60 pptv at 10 Hz. The corresponding detection limit at 1 Hz is 5 × 10-10 cm-1, with a normalized figure of merit of 5 × 10-11cm^{-1}/sqrtHz (100 data points recorded in each spectrum taken at 10 Hz rate). A preliminary Allan variance analysis shows white noise averaging down to a minimum detection limit of 5 pptv at an optimal integration time of 10 s, which is significantly better than previous results based on multi-pass or cavity-enhanced tunable QCL absorption spectroscopy.

  18. ABSOLUTE POLARIMETRY AT RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    OKADA; BRAVAR, A.; BUNCE, G.; GILL, R.; HUANG, H.; MAKDISI, Y.; NASS, A.; WOOD, J.; ZELENSKI, Z.; ET AL.

    2007-09-10

    Precise and absolute beam polarization measurements are critical for the RHIC spin physics program. Because all experimental spin-dependent results are normalized by beam polarization, the normalization uncertainty contributes directly to final physics uncertainties. We aimed to perform the beam polarization measurement to an accuracy Of {Delta}P{sub beam}/P{sub beam} < 5%. The absolute polarimeter consists of Polarized Atomic Hydrogen Gas Jet Target and left-right pairs of silicon strip detectors and was installed in the RHIC-ring in 2004. This system features proton-proton elastic scattering in the Coulomb nuclear interference (CNI) region. Precise measurements of the analyzing power A{sub N} of this process has allowed us to achieve {Delta}P{sub beam}/P{sub beam} = 4.2% in 2005 for the first long spin-physics run. In this report, we describe the entire set up and performance of the system. The procedure of beam polarization measurement and analysis results from 2004-2005 are described. Physics topics of AN in the CNI region (four-momentum transfer squared 0.001 < -t < 0.032 (GeV/c){sup 2}) are also discussed. We point out the current issues and expected optimum accuracy in 2006 and the future.

  19. High quantum-yield CdSexS1-x/ZnS core/shell quantum dots for warm white light-emitting diodes with good color rendering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Hongyan; Jiang, Yang; Zhang, Yugang; Sun, Dapeng; Liu, Chao; Huang, Jian; Lan, Xinzheng; Zhou, Hongyang; Chen, Lei; Zhong, Honghai

    2013-07-01

    Composition-controllable ternary CdSexS1-x quantum dots (QDs) with multiple emission colors were obtained via a hot-injection-like method at a relatively low injection temperature (230 ° C) in octadecene. Then highly fluorescent CdSexS1-x/ZnS core/shell (CS) QDs were synthesized by a facile single-molecular precursor approach. The fluorescent quantum yield of the resulting green (λem = 523 nm), yellow (λem = 565 nm) and red (λem = 621 nm) emission of CS QDs in toluene reached up to 85%, 55% and 39%, respectively. Moreover, a QDs white light-emitting diode (QDs-WLED) was fabricated by hybridizing green-, yellow- and red-emitting CdSexS1-x/ZnS CS QDs/epoxy composites on a blue InGaN chip. The resulting four-band RYGB QDs-WLED showed good performance with CIE-1931 coordinates of (0.4137, 0.3955), an Ra of 81, and a Tc of 3360 K at 30 mA, which indicated the combination of multiple-color QDs with high fluorescence QYs in LEDs as a promising approach to obtain warm WLEDs with good color rendering.

  20. Absolutely maximally entangled states, combinatorial designs, and multiunitary matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goyeneche, Dardo; Alsina, Daniel; Latorre, José I.; Riera, Arnau; Życzkowski, Karol

    2015-09-01

    Absolutely maximally entangled (AME) states are those multipartite quantum states that carry absolute maximum entanglement in all possible bipartitions. AME states are known to play a relevant role in multipartite teleportation, in quantum secret sharing, and they provide the basis novel tensor networks related to holography. We present alternative constructions of AME states and show their link with combinatorial designs. We also analyze a key property of AME states, namely, their relation to tensors, which can be understood as unitary transformations in all of their bipartitions. We call this property multiunitarity.

  1. Absolute Equilibrium Entropy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shebalin, John V.

    1997-01-01

    The entropy associated with absolute equilibrium ensemble theories of ideal, homogeneous, fluid and magneto-fluid turbulence is discussed and the three-dimensional fluid case is examined in detail. A sigma-function is defined, whose minimum value with respect to global parameters is the entropy. A comparison is made between the use of global functions sigma and phase functions H (associated with the development of various H-theorems of ideal turbulence). It is shown that the two approaches are complimentary though conceptually different: H-theorems show that an isolated system tends to equilibrium while sigma-functions allow the demonstration that entropy never decreases when two previously isolated systems are combined. This provides a more complete picture of entropy in the statistical mechanics of ideal fluids.

  2. Predawn and high intensity application of supplemental blue light decreases the quantum yield of PSII and enhances the amount of phenolic acids, flavonoids, and pigments in Lactuca sativa

    PubMed Central

    Ouzounis, Theoharis; Razi Parjikolaei, Behnaz; Fretté, Xavier; Rosenqvist, Eva; Ottosen, Carl-Otto

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of blue light intensity and timing, two cultivars of lettuce [Lactuca sativa cv. “Batavia” (green) and cv. “Lollo Rossa” (red)] were grown in a greenhouse compartment in late winter under natural light and supplemental high pressure sodium (SON-T) lamps yielding 90 (±10) μmol m−2 s−1 for up to 20 h, but never between 17:00 and 21:00. The temperature in the greenhouse compartments was 22/11°C day/night, respectively. The five light-emitting diode (LED) light treatments were Control (no blue addition), 1B 06-08 (Blue light at 45 μmol m−2 s−1 from 06:00 to 08:00), 1B 21-08 (Blue light at 45 μmol m−2 s−1 from 21:00 to 08:00), 2B 17-19 (Blue at 80 μmol m−2 s−1 from 17:00 to 19:00), and 1B 17-19 (Blue at 45 μmol m−2 s−1 from 17:00 to 19:00). Total fresh and dry weight was not affected with additional blue light; however, plants treated with additional blue light were more compact. The stomatal conductance in the green lettuce cultivar was higher for all treatments with blue light compared to the Control. Photosynthetic yields measured with chlorophyll fluorescence showed different response between the cultivars; in red lettuce, the quantum yield of PSII decreased and the yield of non-photochemical quenching increased with increasing blue light, whereas in green lettuce no difference was observed. Quantification of secondary metabolites showed that all four treatments with additional blue light had higher amount of pigments, phenolic acids, and flavonoids compared to the Control. The effect was more prominent in red lettuce, highlighting that the results vary among treatments and compounds. Our results indicate that not only high light level triggers photoprotective heat dissipation in the plant, but also the specific spectral composition of the light itself at low intensities. However, these plant responses to light are cultivar dependent. PMID:25767473

  3. Four-dimensional quantum study on exothermic complex-forming reactions: Cl{sup -}+CH{sub 3}Br{yields}ClCH{sub 3}+Br{sup -}

    SciTech Connect

    Hennig, Carsten; Schmatz, Stefan

    2005-06-15

    The exothermic gas-phase bimolecular nucleophilic substitution (S{sub N}2) reaction Cl{sup -}+CH{sub 3}Br ({upsilon}{sub 1}{sup '},{upsilon}{sub 2}{sup '},{upsilon}{sub 3}{sup '}){yields}ClCH{sub 3} ({upsilon}{sub 1},{upsilon}{sub 2},{upsilon}{sub 3})+Br{sup -} and the corresponding endothermic reverse reaction have been studied by time-independent quantum scattering calculations in hyperspherical coordinates on a coupled-cluster potential-energy surface. The dimensionality-reduced model takes four degrees of freedom into account [Cl-C and C-Br stretching modes (quantum numbers {upsilon}{sub 3}{sup '} and {upsilon}{sub 3}); totally symmetric modes of the methyl group, i.e., C-H stretching ({upsilon}{sub 1}{sup '} and {upsilon}{sub 1}) and umbrella bending vibrations ({upsilon}{sub 2}{sup '} and {upsilon}{sub 2})]. Diagonalization of the Hamiltonian was performed employing the Lanczos algorithm with a variation of partial reorthogonalization. A narrow grid in the total energy was employed so that long-living resonance states could be resolved and extracted. While excitation of the reactant umbrella bending mode already leads to a considerable enhancement of the reaction probability, its combination with vibrational excitation of the broken C-Br bond, (0, 1, 1), results in a strong synergic effect that can be rationalized by the similarity with the classical transitional normal mode. Exciting the C-H stretch has a non-negligible effect on the reaction probability, while for larger translational energies this mode follows the expected spectatorlike behavior. Combination of C-Br stretch and symmetric C-H, (1,0,1), stretch does not show a cooperative effect. Contrary to the spectator mode concept, energy originally stored in the C-H stretching mode is by no means conserved, but almost completely released in other modes of the reaction products. Products are most likely formed in states with a high degree of excitation in the new C-Cl bond, while the internal modes of

  4. Dynamics of cover, UV-protective pigments, and quantum yield in biological soil crust communities of an undisturbed Mojave Desert shrubland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Belnap, J.; Phillips, S.L.; Smith, S.D.

    2007-01-01

    Biological soil crusts are an integral part of dryland ecosystems. We monitored the cover of lichens and mosses, cyanobacterial biomass, concentrations of UV-protective pigments in both free-living and lichenized cyanobacteria, and quantum yield in the soil lichen species Collema in an undisturbed Mojave Desert shrubland. During our sampling time, the site received historically high and low levels of precipitation, whereas temperatures were close to normal. Lichen cover, dominated by Collema tenax and C. coccophorum, and moss cover, dominated by Syntrichia caninervis, responded to both increases and decreases in precipitation. This finding for Collema spp. at a hot Mojave Desert site is in contrast to a similar study conducted at a cool desert site on the Colorado Plateau in SE Utah, USA, where Collema spp. cover dropped in response to elevated temperatures, but did not respond to changes in rainfall. The concentrations of UV-protective pigments in free-living cyanobacteria at the Mojave Desert site were also strongly and positively related to rainfall received between sampling times (R2 values ranged from 0.78 to 0.99). However, pigment levels in the lichenized cyanobacteria showed little correlation with rainfall. Quantum yield in Collema spp. was closely correlated with rainfall. Climate models in this region predict a 3.5-4.0 ??C rise in temperature and a 15-20% decline in winter precipitation by 2099. Based on our data, this rise in temperature is unlikely to have a strong effect on the dominant species of the soil crusts. However, the predicted drop in precipitation will likely lead to a decrease in soil lichen and moss cover, and high stress or mortality in soil cyanobacteria as levels of UV-protective pigments decline. In addition, surface-disturbing activities (e.g., recreation, military activities, fire) are rapidly increasing in the Mojave Desert, and these disturbances quickly remove soil lichens and mosses. These stresses combined are likely to lead to

  5. Are Very Small Emission Quantum Yields Characteristic of Pure Metal-to-Ligand Charge-Transfer Excited States of Ruthenium(II)-(Acceptor Ligand) Chromophores?

    PubMed

    Tsai, Chia Nung; Mazumder, Shivnath; Zhang, Xiu Zhu; Schlegel, H Bernhard; Chen, Yuan Jang; Endicott, John F

    2016-08-01

    Metal to ligand charge-transfer (MLCT) excited state emission quantum yields, ϕem, are reported in 77 K glasses for a series of pentaammine and tetraammine ruthenium(II) complexes with monodentate aromatic acceptor ligands (Ru-MDA) such as pyridine and pyrazine. These quantum yields are only about 0.2-1% of those found for their Ru-bpy (bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine) analogs in similar excited state energy ranges (hνem). The excited state energy dependencies of the emission intensity are characterized by mean radiative decay rate constants, kRAD, resolved from ϕem/τobs = kRAD (τobs = the observed emission decay lifetime; τobs(-1) = kRAD + kNRD; kNRD = nonradiative decay rate constant). Except for the Ru-pz chromophores in alcohol glasses, the values of kNRD for the Ru-MDA chromophores are slightly smaller, and their dependences on excited state energies are very similar to those of related Ru-bpy chromophores. In principle, one expects kRAD to be proportional to the product of (hνem)(3) and the square of the transition dipole moment (Me,g).(2) However, from experimental studies of Ru-bpy chromophores, an additional hνem dependence has been found that originates in an intensity stealing from a higher energy excited state with a much larger value of Me,g. This additional hνem dependence is not present in the kRAD energy dependence for Ru-MDA chromophores in the same energy regime. Intensity stealing in the phosphorescence of these complexes is necessary since the triplet-to-singlet transition is only allowed through spin-orbit coupling and since the density functional theory modeling implicates configurational mixing between states in the triplet spin manifold; this is treated by setting Me,g equal to the product of a mixing coefficient and the difference between the molecular dipole moments of the states involved, which implicates an experimental first order dependence of kRAD on hνem. The failure to observe intensity stealing for the Ru-MDA complexes suggests

  6. Are Very Small Emission Quantum Yields Characteristic of Pure Metal-to-Ligand Charge-Transfer Excited States of Ruthenium(II)-(Acceptor Ligand) Chromophores?

    PubMed

    Tsai, Chia Nung; Mazumder, Shivnath; Zhang, Xiu Zhu; Schlegel, H Bernhard; Chen, Yuan Jang; Endicott, John F

    2016-08-01

    Metal to ligand charge-transfer (MLCT) excited state emission quantum yields, ϕem, are reported in 77 K glasses for a series of pentaammine and tetraammine ruthenium(II) complexes with monodentate aromatic acceptor ligands (Ru-MDA) such as pyridine and pyrazine. These quantum yields are only about 0.2-1% of those found for their Ru-bpy (bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine) analogs in similar excited state energy ranges (hνem). The excited state energy dependencies of the emission intensity are characterized by mean radiative decay rate constants, kRAD, resolved from ϕem/τobs = kRAD (τobs = the observed emission decay lifetime; τobs(-1) = kRAD + kNRD; kNRD = nonradiative decay rate constant). Except for the Ru-pz chromophores in alcohol glasses, the values of kNRD for the Ru-MDA chromophores are slightly smaller, and their dependences on excited state energies are very similar to those of related Ru-bpy chromophores. In principle, one expects kRAD to be proportional to the product of (hνem)(3) and the square of the transition dipole moment (Me,g).(2) However, from experimental studies of Ru-bpy chromophores, an additional hνem dependence has been found that originates in an intensity stealing from a higher energy excited state with a much larger value of Me,g. This additional hνem dependence is not present in the kRAD energy dependence for Ru-MDA chromophores in the same energy regime. Intensity stealing in the phosphorescence of these complexes is necessary since the triplet-to-singlet transition is only allowed through spin-orbit coupling and since the density functional theory modeling implicates configurational mixing between states in the triplet spin manifold; this is treated by setting Me,g equal to the product of a mixing coefficient and the difference between the molecular dipole moments of the states involved, which implicates an experimental first order dependence of kRAD on hνem. The failure to observe intensity stealing for the Ru-MDA complexes suggests

  7. The Oxygen quantum yield in diverse algae and cyanobacteria is controlled by partitioning of flux between linear and cyclic electron flow within photosystem II.

    PubMed

    Ananyev, Gennady; Gates, Colin; Dismukes, G Charles

    2016-09-01

    We have measured flash-induced oxygen quantum yields (O2-QYs) and primary charge separation (Chl variable fluorescence yield, Fv/Fm) in vivo among phylogenetically diverse microalgae and cyanobacteria. Higher O2-QYs can be attained in cells by releasing constraints on charge transfer at the Photosystem II (PSII) acceptor side by adding membrane-permeable benzoquinone (BQ) derivatives that oxidize plastosemiquinone QB(-) and QBH2. This method allows uncoupling PSII turnover from its natural regulation in living cells, without artifacts of isolating PSII complexes. This approach reveals different extents of regulation across species, controlled at the QB(-) acceptor site. Arthrospira maxima is confirmed as the most efficient PSII-WOC (water oxidizing complex) and exhibits the least regulation of flux. Thermosynechococcus elongatus exhibits an O2-QY of 30%, suggesting strong downregulation. WOC cycle simulations with the most accurate model (VZAD) show that a light-driven backward transition (net addition of an electron to the WOC, distinct from recombination) occurs in up to 25% of native PSIIs in the S2 and S3 states, while adding BQ prevents backward transitions and increases the lifetime of S2 and S3 by 10-fold. Backward transitions occur in PSIIs that have plastosemiquinone radicals in the QB site and are postulated to be physiologically regulated pathways for storing light energy as proton gradient through direct PSII-cyclic electron flow (PSII-CEF). PSII-CEF is independent of classical PSI/cyt-b6f-CEF and provides an alternative proton translocation pathway for energy conversion. PSII-CEF enables variable fluxes between linear and cyclic electron pathways, thus accommodating species-dependent needs for redox and ion-gradient energy sources powered by a single photosystem.

  8. The Oxygen quantum yield in diverse algae and cyanobacteria is controlled by partitioning of flux between linear and cyclic electron flow within photosystem II.

    PubMed

    Ananyev, Gennady; Gates, Colin; Dismukes, G Charles

    2016-09-01

    We have measured flash-induced oxygen quantum yields (O2-QYs) and primary charge separation (Chl variable fluorescence yield, Fv/Fm) in vivo among phylogenetically diverse microalgae and cyanobacteria. Higher O2-QYs can be attained in cells by releasing constraints on charge transfer at the Photosystem II (PSII) acceptor side by adding membrane-permeable benzoquinone (BQ) derivatives that oxidize plastosemiquinone QB(-) and QBH2. This method allows uncoupling PSII turnover from its natural regulation in living cells, without artifacts of isolating PSII complexes. This approach reveals different extents of regulation across species, controlled at the QB(-) acceptor site. Arthrospira maxima is confirmed as the most efficient PSII-WOC (water oxidizing complex) and exhibits the least regulation of flux. Thermosynechococcus elongatus exhibits an O2-QY of 30%, suggesting strong downregulation. WOC cycle simulations with the most accurate model (VZAD) show that a light-driven backward transition (net addition of an electron to the WOC, distinct from recombination) occurs in up to 25% of native PSIIs in the S2 and S3 states, while adding BQ prevents backward transitions and increases the lifetime of S2 and S3 by 10-fold. Backward transitions occur in PSIIs that have plastosemiquinone radicals in the QB site and are postulated to be physiologically regulated pathways for storing light energy as proton gradient through direct PSII-cyclic electron flow (PSII-CEF). PSII-CEF is independent of classical PSI/cyt-b6f-CEF and provides an alternative proton translocation pathway for energy conversion. PSII-CEF enables variable fluxes between linear and cyclic electron pathways, thus accommodating species-dependent needs for redox and ion-gradient energy sources powered by a single photosystem. PMID:27117512

  9. One-step microwave synthesis of N-doped hydroxyl-functionalized carbon dots with ultra-high fluorescence quantum yields.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yongqiang; Liu, Xingyuan; Fan, Yi; Guo, Xiaoyang; Zhou, Lei; Lv, Ying; Lin, Jie

    2016-08-18

    A one-step microwave synthesis of N-doped hydroxyl-functionalized carbon dots (CDs) with ultra-high fluorescence quantum yields (QYs) of 99% is reported. These ultra-high QY CDs were synthesized using citric acid and amino compound-containing hydroxyls like ethanolamine and tris(hydroxylmethyl)aminomethane. Amino and carboxyl moieties can form amides through dehydration condensation reactions, and these amides act as bridges between carboxyl and hydroxyl groups, and modify hydroxyl groups on the surface of the CDs. The entire reaction can be carried out within 5 min. When the molar ratio of reactants is 1 : 1, the hydroxyl and graphitic nitrogen content is the highest, and the synergy leads to a high ratio between the radiative transition rate and nonradiative transition rate as well as a high QY. The developed pathway to N-doped hydroxyl-functionalized CDs can provide unambiguous and remarkable insights into the design of highly luminescent functionalized carbon dots, and expedite the applications of CDs. PMID:27500530

  10. A Facile and Low-Cost Method to Enhance the Internal Quantum Yield and External Light-Extraction Efficiency for Flexible Light-Emitting Carbon-Dot Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Z. C.; Lin, T. N.; Lin, H. T.; Talite, M. J.; Tzeng, T. T.; Hsu, C. L.; Chiu, K. P.; Lin, C. A. J.; Shen, J. L.; Yuan, C. T.

    2016-01-01

    Solution-processed, non-toxic carbon dots (CDs) have attracted much attention due to their unique photoluminescence (PL) properties. They are promising emissive layers for flexible light-emitting devices. To this end, the CDs in pristine aqueous solutions need to be transferred to form solid-state thin films without sacrificing their original PL characteristics. Unfortunately, solid-state PL quenching induced by extra non-radiative (NR) energy transfer among CDs would significantly hinder their practical applications in optoelectronics. Here, a facile, low-cost and effective method has been utilized to fabricate high-performance CD/polymer light-emitting flexible films with submicron-structured patterns. The patterned polymers can serve as a solid matrix to disperse and passivate CDs, thus achieving high internal quantum yields of 61%. In addition, they can act as an out-coupler to mitigate the waveguide-mode losses, approximately doubling the external light-extraction efficiency. Such CD/polymer composites also exhibit good photo-stability, and thus can be used as eco-friendly, low-cost phosphors for solid-state lighting.

  11. Control of interchain contacts, solid-state fluorescence quantum yield, and charge transport of cationic conjugated polyelectrolytes by choice of anion.

    PubMed

    Yang, Renqiang; Garcia, Andres; Korystov, Dmitry; Mikhailovsky, Alexander; Bazan, Guillermo C; Nguyen, Thuc-Quyen

    2006-12-27

    Simple procedures are provided for exchanging charge-compensating ions in conjugated polyelectrolytes by progressive dilution of the original species and for determining the degree of ion exchange by using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. By using these methods, the bromide ions in poly[(9,9-bis(6'-N,N,N-trimethylammoniumbromide)hexyl)fluorene-co-alt-4,7-(2,1,3-benzothiadiazole)]were exchanged with BF4-, CF3SO3-, PF6-, BPh4-, and B(3,5-(CF3)2C6H3)4- (BArF4-). Absorption, photoluminescence (PL), and PL quantum yields (Phi) were measured in different solvents and in solid films cast from methanol. Examination of the resulting trends, together with the spectral bandshapes in different solvents, suggests that increasing the counteranion (CA) size decreases interchain contacts and aggregation and leads to a substantial increase of Phi in the bulk. Size analysis of polymers containing Br- and BArF4- in water by dynamic light scattering techniques indicates suppression of aggregation by BArF4-. Nanoscale current-voltage measurements of films using conducting atomic force microscopy show that hole mobilities and, more significantly, charge injection barriers are CA dependent. These results show that it is possible to significantly modify the optoelectronic properties of conjugated polyelectrolytes by choosing different counterions. A parent conjugated backbone can thus be fine-tuned for specific applications. PMID:17177402

  12. A Facile and Low-Cost Method to Enhance the Internal Quantum Yield and External Light-Extraction Efficiency for Flexible Light-Emitting Carbon-Dot Films

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Z. C.; Lin, T. N.; Lin, H. T.; Talite, M. J.; Tzeng, T. T.; Hsu, C. L.; Chiu, K. P.; Lin, C. A. J.; Shen, J. L.; Yuan, C. T.

    2016-01-01

    Solution-processed, non-toxic carbon dots (CDs) have attracted much attention due to their unique photoluminescence (PL) properties. They are promising emissive layers for flexible light-emitting devices. To this end, the CDs in pristine aqueous solutions need to be transferred to form solid-state thin films without sacrificing their original PL characteristics. Unfortunately, solid-state PL quenching induced by extra non-radiative (NR) energy transfer among CDs would significantly hinder their practical applications in optoelectronics. Here, a facile, low-cost and effective method has been utilized to fabricate high-performance CD/polymer light-emitting flexible films with submicron-structured patterns. The patterned polymers can serve as a solid matrix to disperse and passivate CDs, thus achieving high internal quantum yields of 61%. In addition, they can act as an out-coupler to mitigate the waveguide-mode losses, approximately doubling the external light-extraction efficiency. Such CD/polymer composites also exhibit good photo-stability, and thus can be used as eco-friendly, low-cost phosphors for solid-state lighting. PMID:26822337

  13. A Brown Mesoporous TiO2-x /MCF Composite with an Extremely High Quantum Yield of Solar Energy Photocatalysis for H2 Evolution.

    PubMed

    Xing, Mingyang; Zhang, Jinlong; Qiu, Bocheng; Tian, Baozhu; Anpo, Masakazu; Che, Michel

    2015-04-24

    A brown mesoporous TiO2-x /MCF composite with a high fluorine dopant concentration (8.01 at%) is synthesized by a vacuum activation method. It exhibits an excellent solar absorption and a record-breaking quantum yield (Φ = 46%) and a high photon-hydrogen energy conversion efficiency (η = 34%,) for solar photocatalytic H2 production, which are all higher than that of the black hydrogen-doped TiO2 (Φ = 35%, η = 24%). The MCFs serve to improve the adsorption of F atoms onto the TiO2 /MCF composite surface, which after the formation of oxygen vacancies by vacuum activation, facilitate the abundant substitution of these vacancies with F atoms. The decrease of recombination sites induced by high-concentration F doping and the synergistic effect between lattice Ti(3+)-F and surface Ti(3+)-F are responsible for the enhanced lifetime of electrons, the observed excellent absorption of solar light, and the photocatalytic production of H2 for these catalysts. The as-prepared F-doped composite is an ideal solar light-driven photocatalyst with great potential for applications ranging from the remediation of environmental pollution to the harnessing of solar energy for H2 production.

  14. Luminescence, lifetime, and quantum yield studies of redispersible Eu3+-doped GdPO4 crystalline nanoneedles: Core-shell and concentration effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaiphaba, N.; Ningthoujam, R. S.; Singh, N. Shanta; Vatsa, R. K.; Singh, N. Rajmuhon; Dhara, Sangita; Misra, N. L.; Tewari, R.

    2010-02-01

    Crystalline nanoneedles of Eu3+-doped GdPO4 and Eu3+-doped GdPO4 covered with GdPO4 shell (core shell) have been prepared at relatively low temperature of 150 °C in ethylene glycol medium. From luminescence study, asymmetric ratio of Eu3+ emission at 612 nm (electric dipole transition) to 592 nm (magnetic dipole transition) is found to be less than one. Maximum luminescence was observed from the nanoparticles with Eu3+ concentration of 5 at. %. For a fixed concentration of Eu3+ doping, there is an improvement in emission intensity for core-shell nanoparticles compared to that for core. This has been attributed to effective removal of surface inhomogeneities around Eu3+ ions present on the surface of core as well as the passivation of inevitable surface states, defects or capping ligand (ethylene glycol) of core nanoparticles by bonding to the shell. Lifetime for D50 level of Eu3+ was found to increase three times for core-shell nanoparticles compared to that for core confirming the more Eu3+ ions with symmetry environment in core shell. For 5 at. % Eu3+-doped GdPO4, quantum yield of 19% is obtained. These nanoparticles are redispersible in water, ethanol, or chloroform and thus will be useful in biological labeling. The dispersed particles are incorporated in polymer-based films that will be useful in display devices.

  15. A Facile and Low-Cost Method to Enhance the Internal Quantum Yield and External Light-Extraction Efficiency for Flexible Light-Emitting Carbon-Dot Films.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Z C; Lin, T N; Lin, H T; Talite, M J; Tzeng, T T; Hsu, C L; Chiu, K P; Lin, C A J; Shen, J L; Yuan, C T

    2016-01-01

    Solution-processed, non-toxic carbon dots (CDs) have attracted much attention due to their unique photoluminescence (PL) properties. They are promising emissive layers for flexible light-emitting devices. To this end, the CDs in pristine aqueous solutions need to be transferred to form solid-state thin films without sacrificing their original PL characteristics. Unfortunately, solid-state PL quenching induced by extra non-radiative (NR) energy transfer among CDs would significantly hinder their practical applications in optoelectronics. Here, a facile, low-cost and effective method has been utilized to fabricate high-performance CD/polymer light-emitting flexible films with submicron-structured patterns. The patterned polymers can serve as a solid matrix to disperse and passivate CDs, thus achieving high internal quantum yields of 61%. In addition, they can act as an out-coupler to mitigate the waveguide-mode losses, approximately doubling the external light-extraction efficiency. Such CD/polymer composites also exhibit good photo-stability, and thus can be used as eco-friendly, low-cost phosphors for solid-state lighting. PMID:26822337

  16. Measurement of Quantum Yield and Upconversion Brightness in Red, Blue and Green on NIR Excited M2O2S:Yb/Er/Ho/Tm Phosphors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beeks, Ivan; Kumar, Ajith G.; Sardar, Dhiraj K.

    2015-03-01

    A series of broadly color tunable upconversion phosphors were synthesized from M2O2S (M=Y,Gd,La) using a flux fusion method. We investigate their upconversion properties as a function of the dopant concentrations and excitation power density. The phosphor compositions were determined for their upconversion characteristics under 800, 980 and 1550 nm excitations. By measuring the quantum yield and luminous brightness, we investigate their potential applications in biomedical imaging as well as NIR display applications. Results are compared with the well-known upconversion phosphor NaYF4:Yb/Er/Ho/Tm and found that the M2O2S phosphor systems are more efficient compared to NaYF4. By adopting various synthesis protocols, we were able to examine M2O2S in the size range of 10 nm to 10 μm. This research is supported by the National Science Foundation Partnerships for Research and Education in Materials (NSF-PREM) Grant N0-DMR-0934218.

  17. Host-Guest Chemistry between Perylene Diimide (PDI) Derivatives and 18-Crown-6: Enhancement in Luminescence Quantum Yield and Electrical Conductivity.

    PubMed

    Lasitha, P; Prasad, Edamana

    2016-07-18

    Perylene diimide (PDI) derivatives exhibit a high propensity for aggregation, which causes the aggregation-induced quenching of emission from the system. Host-guest chemistry is one of the best-known methods for preventing aggregation through the encapsulation of guest molecules. Herein we report the use of 18-crown-6 (18-C-6) as a host system to disaggregate suitably substituted PDI derivatives in methanol. 18-C-6 formed complexes with amino-substituted PDIs in methanol, which led to disaggregation and enhanced emission from the systems. Furthermore, the embedding of the PDI⋅18-C-6 complexes in poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) films generated remarkably high emission quantum yields (60-70 %) from the PDI derivatives. More importantly, the host-guest systems were tested for their ability to conduct electricity in PVA films. The electrical conductivities of the self-assembled systems in PVA were measured by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and the highest conductivity observed was 2.42×10(-5)  S cm(-1) .

  18. Absolute neutrino mass measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, Joachim

    2011-10-06

    The neutrino mass plays an important role in particle physics, astrophysics and cosmology. In recent years the detection of neutrino flavour oscillations proved that neutrinos carry mass. However, oscillation experiments are only sensitive to the mass-squared difference of the mass eigenvalues. In contrast to cosmological observations and neutrino-less double beta decay (0v2{beta}) searches, single {beta}-decay experiments provide a direct, model-independent way to determine the absolute neutrino mass by measuring the energy spectrum of decay electrons at the endpoint region with high accuracy.Currently the best kinematic upper limits on the neutrino mass of 2.2eV have been set by two experiments in Mainz and Troitsk, using tritium as beta emitter. The next generation tritium {beta}-experiment KATRIN is currently under construction in Karlsruhe/Germany by an international collaboration. KATRIN intends to improve the sensitivity by one order of magnitude to 0.2eV. The investigation of a second isotope ({sup 137}Rh) is being pursued by the international MARE collaboration using micro-calorimeters to measure the beta spectrum. The technology needed to reach 0.2eV sensitivity is still in the R and D phase. This paper reviews the present status of neutrino-mass measurements with cosmological data, 0v2{beta} decay and single {beta}-decay.

  19. Adiabatically implementing quantum gates

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Jie; Lu, Songfeng Liu, Fang

    2014-06-14

    We show that, through the approach of quantum adiabatic evolution, all of the usual quantum gates can be implemented efficiently, yielding running time of order O(1). This may be considered as a useful alternative to the standard quantum computing approach, which involves quantum gates transforming quantum states during the computing process.

  20. Lyman alpha SMM/UVSP absolute calibration and geocoronal correction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fontenla, Juan M.; Reichmann, Edwin J.

    1987-01-01

    Lyman alpha observations from the Ultraviolet Spectrometer Polarimeter (UVSP) instrument of the Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) spacecraft were analyzed and provide instrumental calibration details. Specific values of the instrument quantum efficiency, Lyman alpha absolute intensity, and correction for geocoronal absorption are presented.

  1. Absolute radiometry and the solar constant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willson, R. C.

    1974-01-01

    A series of active cavity radiometers (ACRs) are described which have been developed as standard detectors for the accurate measurement of irradiance in absolute units. It is noted that the ACR is an electrical substitution calorimeter, is designed for automatic remote operation in any environment, and can make irradiance measurements in the range from low-level IR fluxes up to 30 solar constants with small absolute uncertainty. The instrument operates in a differential mode by chopping the radiant flux to be measured at a slow rate, and irradiance is determined from two electrical power measurements together with the instrumental constant. Results are reported for measurements of the solar constant with two types of ACRs. The more accurate measurement yielded a value of 136.6 plus or minus 0.7 mW/sq cm (1.958 plus or minus 0.010 cal/sq cm per min).

  2. From Hubble's NGSL to Absolute Fluxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heap, Sara R.; Lindler, Don

    2012-01-01

    Hubble's Next Generation Spectral Library (NGSL) consists of R-l000 spectra of 374 stars of assorted temperature, gravity, and metallicity. Each spectrum covers the wavelength range, 0.18-1.00 microns. The library can be viewed and/or downloaded from the website, http://archive.stsci.edu/prepds/stisngsll. Stars in the NGSL are now being used as absolute flux standards at ground-based observatories. However, the uncertainty in the absolute flux is about 2%, which does not meet the requirements of dark-energy surveys. We are therefore developing an observing procedure that should yield fluxes with uncertainties less than 1 % and will take part in an HST proposal to observe up to 15 stars using this new procedure.

  3. Absolute Identification by Relative Judgment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Neil; Brown, Gordon D. A.; Chater, Nick

    2005-01-01

    In unidimensional absolute identification tasks, participants identify stimuli that vary along a single dimension. Performance is surprisingly poor compared with discrimination of the same stimuli. Existing models assume that identification is achieved using long-term representations of absolute magnitudes. The authors propose an alternative…

  4. Be Resolute about Absolute Value

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kidd, Margaret L.

    2007-01-01

    This article explores how conceptualization of absolute value can start long before it is introduced. The manner in which absolute value is introduced to students in middle school has far-reaching consequences for their future mathematical understanding. It begins to lay the foundation for students' understanding of algebra, which can change…

  5. UV-Light-Induced Improvement of Fluorescence Quantum Yield of DNA-Templated Gold Nanoclusters: Application to Ratiometric Fluorescent Sensing of Nucleic Acids.

    PubMed

    Li, Zong-Yu; Wu, Yun-Tse; Tseng, Wei-Lung

    2015-10-28

    The use of DNA as a template has been demonstrated as an effective method for synthesizing different-sized silver nanoclusters. Although DNA-templated silver nanoclusters show outstanding performance as fluorescent probes for chemical sensing and cellular imaging, the synthesis of DNA-stabilized gold nanoclusters (AuNCs) with high fluorescence intensity remains a challenge. Here a facile, reproducible, scalable, NaBH4-free, UV-light-assisted method was developed to prepare AuNCs using repeats of 30 adenosine nucleotides (A30). The maximal fluorescence of A30-stabilized AuNCs appeared at 475 nm with moderate quantum yield, two fluorescence lifetimes, and a small amount of Au(+) on the surface of the Au core. Results of size-exclusion chromatography revealed that A30-stabilized AuNCs were more compact than A30. A series of control experiments showed that UV light played a dual role in the reduction of gold-ion precursors and the decomposition of citrate ions. A30 also acted as a stabilizer to prevent the aggregation of AuNCs. In addition, single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) consisting of an AuNC-nucleation sequence and a hybridization sequence was utilized to develop a AuNC-based ratiometric fluorescent probe in the presence of the double-strand-chelating dye SYBR Green I (SG). Under conditions of single-wavelength excitation, the combination of AuNC/SG-bearing ssDNA and perfectly matched DNA emitted fluorescence at 475 and 525 nm, respectively. The formed AuNC/SG-bearing ssDNA enabled the sensitive, selective, and ratiometric detection of specific nucleic acid targets. Finally, the AuNC-based ratiometric probes were successfully applied to determine specific nucleic acid targets in human serum.

  6. X-ray induced singlet oxygen generation by nanoparticle-photosensitizer conjugates for photodynamic therapy: determination of singlet oxygen quantum yield.

    PubMed

    Clement, Sandhya; Deng, Wei; Camilleri, Elizabeth; Wilson, Brian C; Goldys, Ewa M

    2016-01-01

    Singlet oxygen is a primary cytotoxic agent in photodynamic therapy. We show that CeF3 nanoparticles, pure as well as conjugated through electrostatic interaction with the photosensitizer verteporfin, are able to generate singlet oxygen as a result of UV light and 8 keV X-ray irradiation. The X-ray stimulated singlet oxygen quantum yield was determined to be 0.79 ± 0.05 for the conjugate with 31 verteporfin molecules per CeF3 nanoparticle, the highest conjugation level used. From this result we estimate the singlet oxygen dose generated from CeF3-verteporfin conjugates for a therapeutic dose of 60 Gy of ionizing radiation at energies of 6 MeV and 30 keV to be (1.2 ± 0.7) × 10(8) and (2.0 ± 0.1) × 10(9) singlet oxygen molecules per cell, respectively. These are comparable with cytotoxic doses of 5 × 10(7)-2 × 10(9) singlet oxygen molecules per cell reported in the literature for photodynamic therapy using light activation. We confirmed that the CeF3-VP conjugates enhanced cell killing with 6 MeV radiation. This work confirms the feasibility of using X- or γ- ray activated nanoparticle-photosensitizer conjugates, either to supplement the radiation treatment of cancer, or as an independent treatment modality.

  7. X-ray induced singlet oxygen generation by nanoparticle-photosensitizer conjugates for photodynamic therapy: determination of singlet oxygen quantum yield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clement, Sandhya; Deng, Wei; Camilleri, Elizabeth; Wilson, Brian C.; Goldys, Ewa M.

    2016-01-01

    Singlet oxygen is a primary cytotoxic agent in photodynamic therapy. We show that CeF3 nanoparticles, pure as well as conjugated through electrostatic interaction with the photosensitizer verteporfin, are able to generate singlet oxygen as a result of UV light and 8 keV X-ray irradiation. The X-ray stimulated singlet oxygen quantum yield was determined to be 0.79 ± 0.05 for the conjugate with 31 verteporfin molecules per CeF3 nanoparticle, the highest conjugation level used. From this result we estimate the singlet oxygen dose generated from CeF3-verteporfin conjugates for a therapeutic dose of 60 Gy of ionizing radiation at energies of 6 MeV and 30 keV to be (1.2 ± 0.7) × 108 and (2.0 ± 0.1) × 109 singlet oxygen molecules per cell, respectively. These are comparable with cytotoxic doses of 5 × 107-2 × 109 singlet oxygen molecules per cell reported in the literature for photodynamic therapy using light activation. We confirmed that the CeF3-VP conjugates enhanced cell killing with 6 MeV radiation. This work confirms the feasibility of using X- or γ- ray activated nanoparticle-photosensitizer conjugates, either to supplement the radiation treatment of cancer, or as an independent treatment modality.

  8. X-ray induced singlet oxygen generation by nanoparticle-photosensitizer conjugates for photodynamic therapy: determination of singlet oxygen quantum yield

    PubMed Central

    Clement, Sandhya; Deng, Wei; Camilleri, Elizabeth; Wilson, Brian C.; Goldys, Ewa M.

    2016-01-01

    Singlet oxygen is a primary cytotoxic agent in photodynamic therapy. We show that CeF3 nanoparticles, pure as well as conjugated through electrostatic interaction with the photosensitizer verteporfin, are able to generate singlet oxygen as a result of UV light and 8 keV X-ray irradiation. The X-ray stimulated singlet oxygen quantum yield was determined to be 0.79 ± 0.05 for the conjugate with 31 verteporfin molecules per CeF3 nanoparticle, the highest conjugation level used. From this result we estimate the singlet oxygen dose generated from CeF3-verteporfin conjugates for a therapeutic dose of 60 Gy of ionizing radiation at energies of 6 MeV and 30 keV to be (1.2 ± 0.7) × 108 and (2.0 ± 0.1) × 109 singlet oxygen molecules per cell, respectively. These are comparable with cytotoxic doses of 5 × 107–2 × 109 singlet oxygen molecules per cell reported in the literature for photodynamic therapy using light activation. We confirmed that the CeF3-VP conjugates enhanced cell killing with 6 MeV radiation. This work confirms the feasibility of using X- or γ- ray activated nanoparticle-photosensitizer conjugates, either to supplement the radiation treatment of cancer, or as an independent treatment modality. PMID:26818819

  9. Measurement of Disintegration Rates and Absolute {gamma}-ray Intensities

    SciTech Connect

    DeVries, Daniel J.; Griffin, Henry C.

    2006-03-13

    The majority of practical radioactive materials decay by modes that include {gamma}-ray emission. For questions of 'how much' or 'how pure', one must know the absolute intensities of the major radiations. We are using liquid scintillation counting (LSC) to measurements of disintegration rates, coupled with {gamma}-ray spectroscopy to measure absolute {gamma}-ray emission probabilities. Described is a study of the 227Th chain yielding absolute {gamma}-ray intensities with {approx}0.5% accuracy and information on LSC efficiencies.

  10. Spacetime and Quantum Propagation From Digital Clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ord, Garnet. N.

    2013-09-01

    Minkowski spacetime predates quantum mechanics and is frequently regarded as an extension of the classical paradigm of Newtonian physics, rather than a harbinger of quantum mechanics. By inspecting how discrete clocks operate in a relativistic world we show that this view is misleading. Discrete relativistic clocks implicate classical spacetime provided a continuum limit is taken in such a way that successive ticks of the clock yield a smooth worldline. The classical picture emerges but does so by confining unitary propagation into spacetime regions between ticks that have zero area in the continuum limit. Clocks allowed a continuum limit that does not force inter-event intervals to zero, satisfy the Dirac equation. This strongly suggests that the origin of quantum propagation is to be found in the shift from Newton's absolute time to Minkowski's frame dependent time and is ultimately relativistic in origin.

  11. Singular perturbation of absolute stability.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siljak, D. D.

    1972-01-01

    It was previously shown (author, 1969) that the regions of absolute stability in the parameter space can be determined when the parameters appear on the right-hand side of the system equations, i.e., the regular case. Here, the effect on absolute stability of a small parameter attached to higher derivatives in the equations (the singular case) is studied. The Lur'e-Postnikov class of nonlinear systems is considered.

  12. Using the quantum yields of photosystem II and the rate of net photosynthesis to monitor high irradiance and temperature stress in chrysanthemum (Dendranthema grandiflora).

    PubMed

    Janka, Eshetu; Körner, Oliver; Rosenqvist, Eva; Ottosen, Carl-Otto

    2015-05-01

    Under a dynamic greenhouse climate control regime, temperature is adjusted to optimise plant physiological responses to prevailing irradiance levels; thus, both temperature and irradiance are used by the plant to maximise the rate of photosynthesis, assuming other factors are not limiting. The control regime may be optimised by monitoring plant responses, and may be promptly adjusted when plant performance is affected by extreme microclimatic conditions, such as high irradiance or temperature. To determine the stress indicators of plants based on their physiological responses, net photosynthesis (Pn) and four chlorophyll-a fluorescence parameters: maximum photochemical efficiency of PSII [Fv/Fm], electron transport rate [ETR], PSII operating efficiency [F'q/F'm], and non-photochemical quenching [NPQ] were assessed for potted chrysanthemum (Dendranthema grandiflora Tzvelev) 'Coral Charm' under different temperature (20, 24, 28, 32, 36 °C) and daily light integrals (DLI; 11, 20, 31, and 43 mol m(-2) created by a PAR of 171, 311, 485 and 667 μmol m(-2) s(-1) for 16 h). High irradiance (667 μmol m(-2) s(-1)) combined with high temperature (>32 °C) significantly (p < 0.05) decreased Fv/Fm. Under high irradiance, the maximum Pn and ETR were reached at 24 °C. Increased irradiance decreased the PSII operating efficiency and increased NPQ, while both high irradiance and temperature had a significant effect on the PSII operating efficiency at temperatures >28 °C. Under high irradiance and temperature, changes in the NPQ determined the PSII operating efficiency, with no major change in the fraction of open PSII centres (qL) (indicating a QA redox state). We conclude that 1) chrysanthemum plants cope with excess irradiance by non-radiative dissipation or a reversible stress response, with the effect on the Pn and quantum yield of PSII remaining low until the temperature reaches 28 °C and 2) the integration of online measurements to monitor photosynthesis and PSII

  13. On the absolute thermodynamics of water from computer simulations: A comparison of first-principles molecular dynamics, reactive and empirical force fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascal, Tod A.; Schärf, Daniel; Jung, Yousung; Kühne, Thomas D.

    2012-12-01

    We present the absolute enthalpy, entropy, heat capacity, and free energy of liquid water at ambient conditions calculated by the two-phase thermodynamic method applied to ab initio, reactive and classical molecular dynamics simulations. We find that the absolute entropy and heat capacity of liquid water from ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) is underestimated, but falls within the range of the flexible empirical as well as the reactive force fields. The origin of the low absolute entropy of liquid water from AIMD simulations is due to an underestimation of the translational entropy by 20% and the rotational entropy by 40% compared to the TIP3P classical water model, consistent with previous studies that reports low diffusivity and increased ordering of liquid water from AIMD simulations. Classical MD simulations with rigid water models tend to be in better agreement with experiment (in particular TIP3P yielding the best agreement), although the TIP4P-ice water model, the only empirical force field that reproduces the experimental melting temperature, has the lowest entropy, perhaps expectedly. This reiterates the limitations of existing empirical water models in simultaneously capturing the thermodynamics of solid and liquid phases. We find that the quantum corrections to heat capacity of water can be as large as 60%. Although certain water models are computed to yield good absolute free energies of water compared to experiments, they are often due to the fortuitous enthalpy-entropy cancellation, but not necessarily due to the correct descriptions of enthalpy and entropy separately.

  14. Quantum Uniqueness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sych, Denis; Leuchs, Gerd

    2015-12-01

    Classical physics allows for the existence of pairs of absolutely identical systems. Pairwise application of identical measurements to each of those systems always leads to exactly alike results irrespectively of the choice of measurements. Here we ask a question how the picture looks like in the quantum domain. Surprisingly, we get a counterintuitive outcome. Pairwise application of identical (but a priori unknown) measurements cannot always lead to exactly alike results. We interpret this as quantum uniqueness—a feature that has no classical analog.

  15. Absolute flux scale for radioastronomy

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, V.P.; Stankevich, K.S.

    1986-07-01

    The authors propose and provide support for a new absolute flux scale for radio astronomy, which is not encumbered with the inadequacies of the previous scales. In constructing it the method of relative spectra was used (a powerful tool for choosing reference spectra). A review is given of previous flux scales. The authors compare the AIS scale with the scale they propose. Both scales are based on absolute measurements by the ''artificial moon'' method, and they are practically coincident in the range from 0.96 to 6 GHz. At frequencies above 6 GHz, 0.96 GHz, the AIS scale is overestimated because of incorrect extrapolation of the spectra of the primary and secondary standards. The major results which have emerged from this review of absolute scales in radio astronomy are summarized.

  16. Possibility of absolute calibration of analog detectors by using parametric downconversion: a systematic study

    SciTech Connect

    Brida, Giorgio; Genovese, Marco; Ruo-Berchera, Ivano; Chekhova, Maria; Penin, Alexander

    2006-10-15

    Prompted by the need for various studies ranging from quantum information to foundations of quantum mechanics, we systematically study the possibility of the absolute calibration of analog photodetectors based on the properties of parametric amplifiers. Our results show that such a method can be effectively developed with interesting possible applications in metrology.

  17. Relativistic Absolutism in Moral Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vogt, W. Paul

    1982-01-01

    Discusses Emile Durkheim's "Moral Education: A Study in the Theory and Application of the Sociology of Education," which holds that morally healthy societies may vary in culture and organization but must possess absolute rules of moral behavior. Compares this moral theory with current theory and practice of American educators. (MJL)

  18. Absolute transition probabilities of phosphorus.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, M. H.; Roig, R. A.; Bengtson, R. D.

    1971-01-01

    Use of a gas-driven shock tube to measure the absolute strengths of 21 P I lines and 126 P II lines (from 3300 to 6900 A). Accuracy for prominent, isolated neutral and ionic lines is estimated to be 28 to 40% and 18 to 30%, respectively. The data and the corresponding theoretical predictions are examined for conformity with the sum rules.-

  19. Enhanced quantum yield of yellow photoluminescence of Dy{sup 3+} ions in nonlinear optical Ba{sub 2}TiSi{sub 2}O{sub 8} nanocrystals formed in glass

    SciTech Connect

    Maruyama, N.; Honma, T.; Komatsu, T.

    2009-02-15

    Transparent crystallized glasses consisting of nonlinear optical Ba{sub 2}TiSi{sub 2}O{sub 8} nanocrystals (diameter: {approx}100 nm) are prepared through the crystallization of 40BaO-20TiO{sub 2}-40SiO{sub 2}-0.5Dy{sub 2}O{sub 3} glass (in the molar ratio), and photoluminescence quantum yields of Dy{sup 3+} ions in the visible region are evaluated directly by using a photoluminescence spectrometer with an integrating sphere. The incorporation of Dy{sup 3+} ions into Ba{sub 2}TiSi{sub 2}O{sub 8} nanocrystals is confirmed from the X-ray diffraction analyses. The total quantum yields of the emissions at the bands of {sup 4}F{sub 9/2}{yields}{sup 6}H{sub 15/2} (blue: 484 nm), {sup 4}F{sub 9/2}{yields}{sup 6}H{sub 13/2} (yellow: 575 nm), and {sup 4}F{sub 9/2}{yields}{sup 6}H{sub 11/2} (red: 669 nm) in the crystallized glasses are {approx}15%, being about four times larger compared with the precursor glass. It is found that the intensity of yellow (575 nm) emissions and the branching ratio of the yellow (575 nm)/blue (484 nm) intensity ratio increase largely due to the crystallization. It is suggested from Judd-Ofelt analyses that the site symmetry of Dy{sup 3+} ions in the crystallized glasses is largely distorted, giving a large increase in the yellow emissions. It is proposed that Dy{sup 3+} ions substitute Ba{sup 2+} sites in Ba{sub 2}TiSi{sub 2}O{sub 8} nanocrystals. - Grapical abstract: This figure shows the photoluminescence spectra of Dy{sup 3+} ions in the range of 450-700 nm obtained in the quantum field measurements for the precursor BTS and crystallized (at 770 and 790 deg. C, for 30 min) glasses. The wavelength of the excitation light was 352 nm. By incorporating into Ba{sub 2}TiSi{sub 2}O{sub 8} nanocrystals, the emission intensity of the yellow band of Dy{sup 3+} ions is largely enhanced. This would give an impact in the science and technology of photoluminescence materials.

  20. Absolute measurements of fast neutrons using yttrium

    SciTech Connect

    Roshan, M. V.; Springham, S. V.; Rawat, R. S.; Lee, P.; Krishnan, M.

    2010-08-15

    Yttrium is presented as an absolute neutron detector for pulsed neutron sources. It has high sensitivity for detecting fast neutrons. Yttrium has the property of generating a monoenergetic secondary radiation in the form of a 909 keV gamma-ray caused by inelastic neutron interaction. It was calibrated numerically using MCNPX and does not need periodic recalibration. The total yttrium efficiency for detecting 2.45 MeV neutrons was determined to be f{sub n}{approx}4.1x10{sup -4} with an uncertainty of about 0.27%. The yttrium detector was employed in the NX2 plasma focus experiments and showed the neutron yield of the order of 10{sup 8} neutrons per discharge.

  1. From Hubble's Next Generation Spectral Library (NGSL) to Absolute Fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heap, S. R.; Lindler, D.

    2016-05-01

    Hubble's Next Generation Spectral Library (NGSL) consists of R˜1000 spectra of 374 stars of assorted temperature, gravity, and metallicity. Each spectrum covers the wavelength range, 0.18-1.03 μ. The library can be viewed and/or downloaded from the website, http://archive.stsci.edu/prepds/stisngsl/. Stars in the NGSL are now being used as absolute flux standards at ground-based observatories. However, the uncertainty in the absolute flux is about 2%, which does not meet the requirements of dark-energy surveys. We have therefore developed an observing procedure, data-reduction procedure, and correction algorithms that should yield fluxes with uncertainties less than 1%.

  2. Optomechanics for absolute rotation detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davuluri, Sankar

    2016-07-01

    In this article, we present an application of optomechanical cavity for the absolute rotation detection. The optomechanical cavity is arranged in a Michelson interferometer in such a way that the classical centrifugal force due to rotation changes the length of the optomechanical cavity. The change in the cavity length induces a shift in the frequency of the cavity mode. The phase shift corresponding to the frequency shift in the cavity mode is measured at the interferometer output to estimate the angular velocity of absolute rotation. We derived an analytic expression to estimate the minimum detectable rotation rate in our scheme for a given optomechanical cavity. Temperature dependence of the rotation detection sensitivity is studied.

  3. Moral absolutism and ectopic pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Kaczor, C

    2001-02-01

    If one accepts a version of absolutism that excludes the intentional killing of any innocent human person from conception to natural death, ectopic pregnancy poses vexing difficulties. Given that the embryonic life almost certainly will die anyway, how can one retain one's moral principle and yet adequately respond to a situation that gravely threatens the life of the mother and her future fertility? The four options of treatment most often discussed in the literature are non-intervention, salpingectomy (removal of tube with embryo), salpingostomy (removal of embryo alone), and use of methotrexate (MXT). In this essay, I review these four options and introduce a fifth (the milking technique). In order to assess these options in terms of the absolutism mentioned, it will also be necessary to discuss various accounts of the intention/foresight distinction. I conclude that salpingectomy, salpingostomy, and the milking technique are compatible with absolutist presuppositions, but not the use of methotrexate.

  4. Moral absolutism and ectopic pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Kaczor, C

    2001-02-01

    If one accepts a version of absolutism that excludes the intentional killing of any innocent human person from conception to natural death, ectopic pregnancy poses vexing difficulties. Given that the embryonic life almost certainly will die anyway, how can one retain one's moral principle and yet adequately respond to a situation that gravely threatens the life of the mother and her future fertility? The four options of treatment most often discussed in the literature are non-intervention, salpingectomy (removal of tube with embryo), salpingostomy (removal of embryo alone), and use of methotrexate (MXT). In this essay, I review these four options and introduce a fifth (the milking technique). In order to assess these options in terms of the absolutism mentioned, it will also be necessary to discuss various accounts of the intention/foresight distinction. I conclude that salpingectomy, salpingostomy, and the milking technique are compatible with absolutist presuppositions, but not the use of methotrexate. PMID:11262641

  5. The Absolute Spectrum Polarimeter (ASP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kogut, A. J.

    2010-01-01

    The Absolute Spectrum Polarimeter (ASP) is an Explorer-class mission to map the absolute intensity and linear polarization of the cosmic microwave background and diffuse astrophysical foregrounds over the full sky from 30 GHz to 5 THz. The principal science goal is the detection and characterization of linear polarization from an inflationary epoch in the early universe, with tensor-to-scalar ratio r much greater than 1O(raised to the power of { -3}) and Compton distortion y < 10 (raised to the power of{-6}). We describe the ASP instrument and mission architecture needed to detect the signature of an inflationary epoch in the early universe using only 4 semiconductor bolometers.

  6. Classification images predict absolute efficiency.

    PubMed

    Murray, Richard F; Bennett, Patrick J; Sekuler, Allison B

    2005-02-24

    How well do classification images characterize human observers' strategies in perceptual tasks? We show mathematically that from the classification image of a noisy linear observer, it is possible to recover the observer's absolute efficiency. If we could similarly predict human observers' performance from their classification images, this would suggest that the linear model that underlies use of the classification image method is adequate over the small range of stimuli typically encountered in a classification image experiment, and that a classification image captures most important aspects of human observers' performance over this range. In a contrast discrimination task and in a shape discrimination task, we found that observers' absolute efficiencies were generally well predicted by their classification images, although consistently slightly (approximately 13%) higher than predicted. We consider whether a number of plausible nonlinearities can account for the slight under prediction, and of these we find that only a form of phase uncertainty can account for the discrepancy.

  7. Absolute calibration of optical flats

    DOEpatents

    Sommargren, Gary E.

    2005-04-05

    The invention uses the phase shifting diffraction interferometer (PSDI) to provide a true point-by-point measurement of absolute flatness over the surface of optical flats. Beams exiting the fiber optics in a PSDI have perfect spherical wavefronts. The measurement beam is reflected from the optical flat and passed through an auxiliary optic to then be combined with the reference beam on a CCD. The combined beams include phase errors due to both the optic under test and the auxiliary optic. Standard phase extraction algorithms are used to calculate this combined phase error. The optical flat is then removed from the system and the measurement fiber is moved to recombine the two beams. The newly combined beams include only the phase errors due to the auxiliary optic. When the second phase measurement is subtracted from the first phase measurement, the absolute phase error of the optical flat is obtained.

  8. State-transitions facilitate robust quantum yields and cause an over-estimation of electron transport in Dunaliella tertiolecta cells held at the CO₂ compensation point and re-supplied with DIC.

    PubMed

    Ihnken, Sven; Kromkamp, Jacco C; Beardall, John; Silsbe, Greg M

    2014-03-01

    Photosynthetic energy consumption and non-photosynthetic energy quenching processes are inherently linked. Both processes must be controlled by the cell to allow cell maintenance and growth, but also to avoid photodamage. We used the chlorophyte algae Dunaliella tertiolecta to investigate how the interactive regulation of photosynthetic and non-photosynthetic pathways varies along dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and photon flux gradients. Specifically, cells were transferred to DIC-deplete media to reach a CO₂ compensation before being re-supplied with DIC at various concentrations and different photon flux levels. Throughout these experiments we monitored and characterized the photophysiological responses using pulse amplitude modulated fluorescence, oxygen evolution, 77 K fluorescence emission spectra, and fast-repetition rate fluorometry. O₂ uptake was not significantly stimulated at DIC depletion, which suggests that O₂ production rates correspond to assimilatory photosynthesis. Fluorescence-based measures of relative electron transport rates (rETRs) over-estimated oxygen-based photosynthetic measures due to a strong state-transitional response that facilitated high effective quantum yields. Adoption of an alternative fluorescence-based rETR calculation that accounts for state-transitions resulted in improved linear oxygen versus rETR correlation. This study shows the extraordinary capacity of D. tertiolecta to maintain stable effective quantum yields by flexible regulation of state-transitions. Uncertainties about the control mechanisms of state-transitions are presented.

  9. Step-like increase of quantum yield of 1.5 μm Er-related emission in SiO{sub 2} doped with Si nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Saeed, S.; Jong, E. M. L. D. de; Gregorkiewicz, T.

    2015-02-14

    We investigate the excitation dependence of the efficiency of the Si nanocrystals-mediated photoluminescence from Er{sup 3+} ions embedded in a SiO{sub 2} matrix. We show that the quantum yield of this emission increases in a step-like manner with excitation energy. The subsequent thresholds of this characteristic dependence are approximately given by the sum of the Si nanocrystals bandgap energy and multiples of 0.8 eV, corresponding to the energy of the first excited state of Er{sup 3+} ions. By comparing differently prepared materials, we explicitly demonstrate that the actual values of the threshold energies and the rate of the observed increase of the external quantum yield depend on sample characteristics—the size, the optical activity and the concentration of Si nanocrystals as well Er{sup 3+} ions to Si nanocrystals concentration ratio. In that way, detailed insights into the efficient excitation of Er{sup 3+} ions are obtained. In particular, the essential role of the hot-carrier-mediated Er excitation route is established, with a possible application perspective for highly efficient future-generation photovoltaics.

  10. Synthesis and spectroscopic evaluation of PbS quantum dots emitting at 1300 nm for optimized imaging in optical window II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aydt, Alexander P.; Blair, Shane; Zhang, Hairong; Chernomordik, Boris D.; Beard, Matthew C.; Berezin, Mikhail Y.

    2016-03-01

    Contrast agents for optical imaging have traditionally been designed for the near-infrared (NIR) spectral range (700-900 nm, Optical Window I) where absorption and scattering of tissue are relatively low. Recently, another window beyond 1000 nm has been discovered known as Optical Window II or the extended Near Infrared (exNIR) with improved transparency. In this work, we present a method to synthesize quantum dots emitting at 1300 nanometers, the optimal wavelength. The quantum dots were synthesized in organic solvents, and a method of transforming them into water is discussed. Optical characterizations including absolute quantum yield and the fluorescence lifetime are presented.

  11. Decay kinetics and quantum yields of fluorescence in photosystem I from Synechococcus elongatus with P700 in the reduced and oxidized state: are the kinetics of excited state decay trap-limited or transfer-limited?

    PubMed Central

    Byrdin, M; Rimke, I; Schlodder, E; Stehlik, D; Roelofs, T A

    2000-01-01

    Transfer and trapping of excitation energy in photosystem I (PS I) trimers isolated from Synechococcus elongatus have been studied by an approach combining fluorescence induction experiments with picosecond time-resolved fluorescence measurements, both at room temperature (RT) and at low temperature (5 K). Special attention was paid to the influence of the oxidation state of the primary electron donor P700. A fluorescence induction effect has been observed, showing a approximately 12% increase in fluorescence quantum yield upon P700 oxidation at RT, whereas at temperatures below 160 K oxidation of P700 leads to a decrease in fluorescence quantum yield ( approximately 50% at 5 K). The fluorescence quantum yield for open PS I (with P700 reduced) at 5 K is increased by approximately 20-fold and that for closed PS I (with P700 oxidized) is increased by approximately 10-fold, as compared to RT. Picosecond fluorescence decay kinetics at RT reveal a difference in lifetime of the main decay component: 34 +/- 1 ps for open PS I and 37 +/- 1 ps for closed PS I. At 5 K the fluorescence yield is mainly associated with long-lived components (lifetimes of 401 ps and 1.5 ns in closed PS I and of 377 ps, 1.3 ns, and 4.1 ns in samples containing approximately 50% open and 50% closed PS I). The spectra associated with energy transfer and the steady-state emission spectra suggest that the excitation energy is not completely thermally equilibrated over the core-antenna-RC complex before being trapped. Structure-based modeling indicates that the so-called red antenna pigments (A708 and A720, i.e., those with absorption maxima at 708 nm and 720 nm, respectively) play a decisive role in the observed fluorescence kinetics. The A720 are preferentially located at the periphery of the PS I core-antenna-RC complex; the A708 must essentially connect the A720 to the reaction center. The excited-state decay kinetics turn out to be neither purely trap limited nor purely transfer (to the trap

  12. High Throughput, High Yield Fabrication of High Quantum Efficiency Back-Illuminated Photon Counting, Far UV, UV, and Visible Detector Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nikzad, Shouleh; Hoenk, M. E.; Carver, A. G.; Jones, T. J.; Greer, F.; Hamden, E.; Goodsall, T.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we discuss the high throughput end-to-end post fabrication processing of high performance delta-doped and superlattice-doped silicon imagers for UV, visible, and NIR applications. As an example, we present our results on far ultraviolet and ultraviolet quantum efficiency (QE) in a photon counting, detector array. We have improved the QE by nearly an order of magnitude over microchannel plates (MCPs) that are the state-of-the-art UV detectors for many NASA space missions as well as defense applications. These achievements are made possible by precision interface band engineering of Molecular Beam Epitaxy (MBE) and Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD).

  13. Using DNA origami nanostructures to determine absolute cross sections for UV photon-induced DNA strand breakage.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Stefanie; Rackwitz, Jenny; Schürman, Robin; Prinz, Julia; Milosavljević, Aleksandar R; Réfrégiers, Matthieu; Giuliani, Alexandre; Bald, Ilko

    2015-11-19

    We have characterized ultraviolet (UV) photon-induced DNA strand break processes by determination of absolute cross sections for photoabsorption and for sequence-specific DNA single strand breakage induced by photons in an energy range from 6.50 to 8.94 eV. These represent the lowest-energy photons able to induce DNA strand breaks. Oligonucleotide targets are immobilized on a UV transparent substrate in controlled quantities through attachment to DNA origami templates. Photon-induced dissociation of single DNA strands is visualized and quantified using atomic force microscopy. The obtained quantum yields for strand breakage vary between 0.06 and 0.5, indicating highly efficient DNA strand breakage by UV photons, which is clearly dependent on the photon energy. Above the ionization threshold strand breakage becomes clearly the dominant form of DNA radiation damage, which is then also dependent on the nucleotide sequence.

  14. The AFGL absolute gravity program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammond, J. A.; Iliff, R. L.

    1978-01-01

    A brief discussion of the AFGL's (Air Force Geophysics Laboratory) program in absolute gravity is presented. Support of outside work and in-house studies relating to gravity instrumentation are discussed. A description of the current transportable system is included and the latest results are presented. These results show good agreement with measurements at the AFGL site by an Italian system. The accuracy obtained by the transportable apparatus is better than 0.1 microns sq sec 10 microgal and agreement with previous measurements is within the combined uncertainties of the measurements.

  15. Familial Aggregation of Absolute Pitch

    PubMed Central

    Baharloo, Siamak; Service, Susan K.; Risch, Neil; Gitschier, Jane; Freimer, Nelson B.

    2000-01-01

    Absolute pitch (AP) is a behavioral trait that is defined as the ability to identify the pitch of tones in the absence of a reference pitch. AP is an ideal phenotype for investigation of gene and environment interactions in the development of complex human behaviors. Individuals who score exceptionally well on formalized auditory tests of pitch perception are designated as “AP-1.” As described in this report, auditory testing of siblings of AP-1 probands and of a control sample indicates that AP-1 aggregates in families. The implications of this finding for the mapping of loci for AP-1 predisposition are discussed. PMID:10924408

  16. Absolute irradiance of the Moon for on-orbit calibration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stone, T.C.; Kieffer, H.H.; ,

    2002-01-01

    The recognized need for on-orbit calibration of remote sensing imaging instruments drives the ROLO project effort to characterize the Moon for use as an absolute radiance source. For over 5 years the ground-based ROLO telescopes have acquired spatially-resolved lunar images in 23 VNIR (Moon diameter ???500 pixels) and 9 SWIR (???250 pixels) passbands at phase angles within ??90 degrees. A numerical model for lunar irradiance has been developed which fits hundreds of ROLO images in each band, corrected for atmospheric extinction and calibrated to absolute radiance, then integrated to irradiance. The band-coupled extinction algorithm uses absorption spectra of several gases and aerosols derived from MODTRAN to fit time-dependent component abundances to nightly observations of standard stars. The absolute radiance scale is based upon independent telescopic measurements of the star Vega. The fitting process yields uncertainties in lunar relative irradiance over small ranges of phase angle and the full range of lunar libration well under 0.5%. A larger source of uncertainty enters in the absolute solar spectral irradiance, especially in the SWIR, where solar models disagree by up to 6%. Results of ROLO model direct comparisons to spacecraft observations demonstrate the ability of the technique to track sensor responsivity drifts to sub-percent precision. Intercomparisons among instruments provide key insights into both calibration issues and the absolute scale for lunar irradiance.

  17. The effects of side-chain-induced disorder on the emission spectra and quantum yields of oligothiophene nano-aggregates. A combined experimental and MD-TDDFT study

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Jiyun; Jeon, SuKyung; Kim, Janice J.; Devi, Diane; Chacon-Madrid, Kelly; Lee, Wynee; Koo, Seung Moh; Wildeman, Jurjen; Sfeir, Matthew Y.; Peteanu, Linda A.; Wen, Jin; Ma, Jing

    2014-07-24

    Oligomeric thiophenes are commonly-used components in organic electronics and solar cells. These molecules stack and/or aggregate readily under the processing conditions used to form thin films for these applications, significantly altering their optical and charge-transport properties. To determine how these effects depend on the substitution pattern of the thiophene main chains, nano-aggregates of three sexi-thiophene (6T) oligomers having different alkyl substitution patterns were formed using solvent poisoning techniques and studied using steady-state and time-resolved emission spectroscopy. The results indicate the substantial role played by the side-chain substituents in determining the emissive properties of these species. Both the measured spectral changes and their dependence on substitution are well modeled by combined quantum chemistry and molecular dynamics simulations. The simulations connect the side-chain-induced disorder, which determines the favorable chain packing configurations within the aggregates, with their measured electronic spectra.

  18. Decay kinetics of the excited S{sub 1} state of the cyanine dye Cy{sup +}I{sup -} (thiacarbocyanine iodide): The computation of quantum yields for different pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Odinokov, A. V.; Basilevsky, M. V.; Petrov, N. Kh.

    2011-10-14

    This work explains the unordinary solvent effect which was observed in the photochemical decay kinetics for the cyanine dye thiacarbocyanine iodide (Cy{sup +}I{sup -}) in binary solvent mixtures toluene/dimethylsulfoxide. The interpretation is formulated in terms of the probability density F(R) describing the distribution of interionic distances R in the ion pair Cy{sup +}I{sup -} and depending on the solvent composition. The proper normalization of this distribution is expressed via the degree of association {alpha} for the ion pair in a given solvent mixture. The {alpha} values are, in turn, extracted by means of the mass action law from the ionic association constants computed in a separate publication. The detailed kinetic scheme includes the empirical parametrization of the R-dependent kinetic constants for different decay channels. The multiparameter fitting procedure represents, with the reasonable parameter values, the dependence of the observed quantum yields on the solvent composition.

  19. Time-dependent quantum wave packet study of the Ar+H{sub 2}{sup +}{yields}ArH{sup +}+H reaction on a new ab initio potential energy surface for the ground electronic state (1{sup 2}A Prime )

    SciTech Connect

    Hu Mei; Liu Xinguo; Tan Ruishan; Li Hongzheng; Xu Wenwu

    2013-05-07

    A new global potential energy surface for the ground electronic state (1{sup 2}A Prime ) of the Ar+H{sub 2}{sup +}{yields}ArH{sup +}+H reaction has been constructed by multi-reference configuration interaction method with Davidson correction and a basis set of aug-cc-pVQZ. Using 6080 ab initio single-point energies of all the regions for the dynamics, a many-body expansion function form has been used to fit these points. The quantum reactive scattering dynamics calculations taking into account the Coriolis coupling (CC) were carried out on the new potential energy surface over a range of collision energies (0.03-1.0 eV). The reaction probabilities and integral cross sections for the title reaction were calculated. The significance of including the CC quantum scattering calculation has been revealed by the comparison between the CC and the centrifugal sudden approximation calculation. The calculated cross section is in agreement with the experimental result at collision energy 1.0 eV.

  20. Carbonyliron-olefin photochemistry: Quantum yields for the sequential substitution of two CO groups in pentacarbonyliron by (E)-cyclooctene. Synthesis of the first stable (. eta. sup 2 -olefin) sub 3 Fe(CO) sub 2 complex

    SciTech Connect

    Angermund, H.; Bandyopadhyay, A.K.; Grevels, F.; Mark, F. )

    1989-06-21

    Multiple photosubstitution of CO groups in pentacarbonyliron by an olefin has been investigated by using (E)-cyclooctene as a model olefin exhibiting exceptional coordination properties. The quantum yields {Phi}{sub 1} and {Phi}{sub 2} for sequential conversion of Fe(CO){sub 5} into ({eta}{sup 2}-(E)-C{sub 8}H{sub 14})Fe(CO){sub 4} (1) and ({eta}{sup 2}-(E)-C{sub 8}H{sub 14}){sub 2}Fe(CO){sub 3} (2), respectively, when evaluated using the appropriate formalism for internal light filter corrections (presented in detail in the Appendix), are found to be constant up to high conversion: {Phi}{sub 1} = 0.80 at 302 nm and 0.77 at 254 nm, {Phi}{sub 2} = 0.59 at 302 nm and 0.82 at 254 nm. The wavelength dependence of {Phi}{sub 2} is interpreted in terms of 2 different ligand field excited states of 1, providing for varying CO vs olefin photodetachment. The overall quantum yield for the generation of 2 from Fe(CO){sub 5} (ca. 0.20 at 60% conversion of pentacarbonyliron) is discussed in the context of carbonyliron photocatalyzed olefin isomerization, which is known to involve (labile) ({eta}{sup 2}-olefin){sub 2}Fe(CO){sub 3} as the active catalyst. The synthesis of ({eta}{sup 2}-(E)-C{sub 8}H{sub 14}){sub 3}Fe(CO){sub 2} (3), which is the first isolated representative of this type of complex, is achieved by irradiation of 2 in the presence of excess (E)-cyclooctene, whereby liberated CO is required to be rigorously removed by an inert-gas stream.

  1. Apparatus for absolute pressure measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hecht, R. (Inventor)

    1969-01-01

    An absolute pressure sensor (e.g., the diaphragm of a capacitance manometer) was subjected to a superimposed potential to effectively reduce the mechanical stiffness of the sensor. This substantially increases the sensitivity of the sensor and is particularly useful in vacuum gauges. An oscillating component of the superimposed potential induced vibrations of the sensor. The phase of these vibrations with respect to that of the oscillating component was monitored, and served to initiate an automatic adjustment of the static component of the superimposed potential, so as to bring the sensor into resonance at the frequency of the oscillating component. This establishes a selected sensitivity for the sensor, since a definite relationship exists between resonant frequency and sensitivity.

  2. (+)- and (-)-mutisianthol: first total synthesis, absolute configuration, and antitumor activity.

    PubMed

    Bianco, Graziela G; Ferraz, Helena M C; Costa, Arinice M; Costa-Lotufo, Letícia V; Pessoa, Cláudia; de Moraes, Manoel O; Schrems, Marcus G; Pfaltz, Andreas; Silva, Luiz F

    2009-03-20

    The first synthesis of the natural product (+)-mutisianthol was accomplished in 11 steps and in 21% overall yield from 2-methylanisole. The synthesis of its enantiomer was also performed in a similar overall yield. The absolute configuration of the sesquiterpene (+)-mutisianthol was assigned as (1S,3R). Key steps in the route are the asymmetric hydrogenation of a nonfunctionalized olefin using chiral iridium catalysts and the ring contraction of 1,2-dihydronaphthalenes using thallium(III) or iodine(III). The target molecules show moderate activity against the human tumor cell lines SF-295, HCT-8, and MDA-MB-435.

  3. The effects of side-chain-induced disorder on the emission spectra and quantum yields of oligothiophene nano-aggregates. A combined experimental and MD-TDDFT study

    DOE PAGES

    Hong, Jiyun; Jeon, SuKyung; Kim, Janice J.; Devi, Diane; Chacon-Madrid, Kelly; Lee, Wynee; Koo, Seung Moh; Wildeman, Jurjen; Sfeir, Matthew Y.; Peteanu, Linda A.; et al

    2014-07-24

    Oligomeric thiophenes are commonly-used components in organic electronics and solar cells. These molecules stack and/or aggregate readily under the processing conditions used to form thin films for these applications, significantly altering their optical and charge-transport properties. To determine how these effects depend on the substitution pattern of the thiophene main chains, nano-aggregates of three sexi-thiophene (6T) oligomers having different alkyl substitution patterns were formed using solvent poisoning techniques and studied using steady-state and time-resolved emission spectroscopy. The results indicate the substantial role played by the side-chain substituents in determining the emissive properties of these species. Both the measured spectral changesmore » and their dependence on substitution are well modeled by combined quantum chemistry and molecular dynamics simulations. The simulations connect the side-chain-induced disorder, which determines the favorable chain packing configurations within the aggregates, with their measured electronic spectra.« less

  4. Quantum-chemical calculations of the metallofullerene yields in the X@C{sub 74}, L@C{sub 74}, and Z@C{sub 82} series

    SciTech Connect

    Uhlík, Filip; Slanina, Zdeněk; Nagase, Shigeru

    2015-01-22

    The contribution reports computations for Al@C{sub 82}, Sc@C{sub 82}, Y@C{sub 82} and La@C{sub 82} based on encapsulation into the IPR (isolated pentagon rule) C{sub 2ν} C{sub 82} cage and also on Mg@C{sub 74}, Ca@C{sub 74}, Sr@C{sub 74} and Ba@C{sub 74} based on encapsulation into the only C{sub 74} IPR cage as well as for three selected lanthanoids La@C{sub 74}, Yb@C{sub 74}, and Lu@C{sub 74}. Their structural and energetic characteristics are used for evaluations of the relative production yields, using the encapsulation Gibbs-energy and saturated metal pressures. It is shown that the results can be well related to the ionization potentials of the free metal atoms.

  5. Absolute Gravity Datum in the Age of Cold Atom Gravimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Childers, V. A.; Eckl, M. C.

    2014-12-01

    The international gravity datum is defined today by the International Gravity Standardization Net of 1971 (IGSN-71). The data supporting this network was measured in the 1950s and 60s using pendulum and spring-based gravimeter ties (plus some new ballistic absolute meters) to replace the prior protocol of referencing all gravity values to the earlier Potsdam value. Since this time, gravimeter technology has advanced significantly with the development and refinement of the FG-5 (the current standard of the industry) and again with the soon-to-be-available cold atom interferometric absolute gravimeters. This latest development is anticipated to provide improvement in the range of two orders of magnitude as compared to the measurement accuracy of technology utilized to develop ISGN-71. In this presentation, we will explore how the IGSN-71 might best be "modernized" given today's requirements and available instruments and resources. The National Geodetic Survey (NGS), along with other relevant US Government agencies, is concerned about establishing gravity control to establish and maintain high order geodetic networks as part of the nation's essential infrastructure. The need to modernize the nation's geodetic infrastructure was highlighted in "Precise Geodetic Infrastructure, National Requirements for a Shared Resource" National Academy of Science, 2010. The NGS mission, as dictated by Congress, is to establish and maintain the National Spatial Reference System, which includes gravity measurements. Absolute gravimeters measure the total gravity field directly and do not involve ties to other measurements. Periodic "intercomparisons" of multiple absolute gravimeters at reference gravity sites are used to constrain the behavior of the instruments to ensure that each would yield reasonably similar measurements of the same location (i.e. yield a sufficiently consistent datum when measured in disparate locales). New atomic interferometric gravimeters promise a significant

  6. Brightly Luminescent and Color-Tunable Colloidal CH3NH3PbX3 (X = Br, I, Cl) Quantum Dots: Potential Alternatives for Display Technology.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Feng; Zhong, Haizheng; Chen, Cheng; Wu, Xian-gang; Hu, Xiangmin; Huang, Hailong; Han, Junbo; Zou, Bingsuo; Dong, Yuping

    2015-04-28

    Organometal halide perovskites are inexpensive materials with desirable characteristics of color-tunable and narrow-band emissions for lighting and display technology, but they suffer from low photoluminescence quantum yields at low excitation fluencies. Here we developed a ligand-assisted reprecipitation strategy to fabricate brightly luminescent and color-tunable colloidal CH3NH3PbX3 (X = Br, I, Cl) quantum dots with absolute quantum yield up to 70% at room temperature and low excitation fluencies. To illustrate the photoluminescence enhancements in these quantum dots, we conducted comprehensive composition and surface characterizations and determined the time- and temperature-dependent photoluminescence spectra. Comparisons between small-sized CH3NH3PbBr3 quantum dots (average diameter 3.3 nm) and corresponding micrometer-sized bulk particles (2-8 μm) suggest that the intense increased photoluminescence quantum yield originates from the increase of exciton binding energy due to size reduction as well as proper chemical passivations of the Br-rich surface. We further demonstrated wide-color gamut white-light-emitting diodes using green emissive CH3NH3PbBr3 quantum dots and red emissive K2SiF6:Mn(4+) as color converters, providing enhanced color quality for display technology. Moreover, colloidal CH3NH3PbX3 quantum dots are expected to exhibit interesting nanoscale excitonic properties and also have other potential applications in lasers, electroluminescence devices, and optical sensors. PMID:25824283

  7. Absolute calibration of a charge-coupled device camera with twin beams

    SciTech Connect

    Meda, A.; Ruo-Berchera, I. Degiovanni, I. P.; Brida, G.; Rastello, M. L.; Genovese, M.

    2014-09-08

    We report on the absolute calibration of a Charge-Coupled Device (CCD) camera by exploiting quantum correlation. This method exploits a certain number of spatial pairwise quantum correlated modes produced by spontaneous parametric-down-conversion. We develop a measurement model accounting for all the uncertainty contributions, and we reach the relative uncertainty of 0.3% in low photon flux regime. This represents a significant step forward for the characterization of (scientific) CCDs used in mesoscopic light regime.

  8. Short-Term Responses in Maximum Quantum Yield of PSII (Fv/Fm) to ex situ Temperature Treatment of Populations of Bryophytes Originating from Different Sites in Hokkaido, Northern Japan

    PubMed Central

    Jägerbrand, Annika K.; Kudo, Gaku

    2016-01-01

    There is limited knowledge available on the thermal acclimation processes for bryophytes, especially when considering variation between populations or sites. This study investigated whether short-term ex situ thermal acclimation of different populations showed patterns of site dependency and whether the maximum quantum yield of PSII (Fv/Fm) could be used as an indicator of adaptation or temperature stress in two bryophyte species: Pleurozium schreberi (Willd. ex Brid.) Mitt. and Racomitrium lanuginosum (Hedw.) Brid. We sought to test the hypothesis that differences in the ability to acclimate to short-term temperature treatment would be revealed as differences in photosystem II maximum yield (Fv/Fm). Thermal treatments were applied to samples from 12 and 11 populations during 12 or 13 days in growth chambers and comprised: (1) 10/5 °C; (2) 20/10 °C; (3) 25/15 °C; (4) 30/20 °C (12 hours day/night temperature). In Pleurozium schreberi, there were no significant site-dependent differences before or after the experiment, while site dependencies were clearly shown in Racomitrium lanuginosum throughout the study. Fv/Fm in Pleurozium schreberi decreased at the highest and lowest temperature treatments, which can be interpreted as a stress response, but no similar trends were shown by Racomitrium lanuginosum. PMID:27135242

  9. Short-Term Responses in Maximum Quantum Yield of PSII (Fv/Fm) to ex situ Temperature Treatment of Populations of Bryophytes Originating from Different Sites in Hokkaido, Northern Japan.

    PubMed

    Jägerbrand, Annika K; Kudo, Gaku

    2016-01-01

    There is limited knowledge available on the thermal acclimation processes for bryophytes, especially when considering variation between populations or sites. This study investigated whether short-term ex situ thermal acclimation of different populations showed patterns of site dependency and whether the maximum quantum yield of PSII (Fv/Fm) could be used as an indicator of adaptation or temperature stress in two bryophyte species: Pleurozium schreberi (Willd. ex Brid.) Mitt. and Racomitrium lanuginosum (Hedw.) Brid. We sought to test the hypothesis that differences in the ability to acclimate to short-term temperature treatment would be revealed as differences in photosystem II maximum yield (Fv/Fm). Thermal treatments were applied to samples from 12 and 11 populations during 12 or 13 days in growth chambers and comprised: (1) 10/5 °C; (2) 20/10 °C; (3) 25/15 °C; (4) 30/20 °C (12 hours day/night temperature). In Pleurozium schreberi, there were no significant site-dependent differences before or after the experiment, while site dependencies were clearly shown in Racomitrium lanuginosum throughout the study. Fv/Fm in Pleurozium schreberi decreased at the highest and lowest temperature treatments, which can be interpreted as a stress response, but no similar trends were shown by Racomitrium lanuginosum. PMID:27135242

  10. Short-Term Responses in Maximum Quantum Yield of PSII (Fv/Fm) to ex situ Temperature Treatment of Populations of Bryophytes Originating from Different Sites in Hokkaido, Northern Japan.

    PubMed

    Jägerbrand, Annika K; Kudo, Gaku

    2016-04-26

    There is limited knowledge available on the thermal acclimation processes for bryophytes, especially when considering variation between populations or sites. This study investigated whether short-term ex situ thermal acclimation of different populations showed patterns of site dependency and whether the maximum quantum yield of PSII (Fv/Fm) could be used as an indicator of adaptation or temperature stress in two bryophyte species: Pleurozium schreberi (Willd. ex Brid.) Mitt. and Racomitrium lanuginosum (Hedw.) Brid. We sought to test the hypothesis that differences in the ability to acclimate to short-term temperature treatment would be revealed as differences in photosystem II maximum yield (Fv/Fm). Thermal treatments were applied to samples from 12 and 11 populations during 12 or 13 days in growth chambers and comprised: (1) 10/5 °C; (2) 20/10 °C; (3) 25/15 °C; (4) 30/20 °C (12 hours day/night temperature). In Pleurozium schreberi, there were no significant site-dependent differences before or after the experiment, while site dependencies were clearly shown in Racomitrium lanuginosum throughout the study. Fv/Fm in Pleurozium schreberi decreased at the highest and lowest temperature treatments, which can be interpreted as a stress response, but no similar trends were shown by Racomitrium lanuginosum.

  11. Absolute configuration of isovouacapenol C

    PubMed Central

    Fun, Hoong-Kun; Yodsaoue, Orapun; Karalai, Chatchanok; Chantrapromma, Suchada

    2010-01-01

    The title compound, C27H34O5 {systematic name: (4aR,5R,6R,6aS,7R,11aS,11bR)-4a,6-dihy­droxy-4,4,7,11b-tetra­methyl-1,2,3,4,4a,5,6,6a,7,11,11a,11b-dodeca­hydro­phenanthro[3,2-b]furan-5-yl benzoate}, is a cassane furan­oditerpene, which was isolated from the roots of Caesalpinia pulcherrima. The three cyclo­hexane rings are trans fused: two of these are in chair conformations with the third in a twisted half-chair conformation, whereas the furan ring is almost planar (r.m.s. deviation = 0.003 Å). An intra­molecular C—H⋯O inter­action generates an S(6) ring. The absolute configurations of the stereogenic centres at positions 4a, 5, 6, 6a, 7, 11a and 11b are R, R, R, S, R, S and R, respectively. In the crystal, mol­ecules are linked into infinite chains along [010] by O—H⋯O hydrogen bonds. C⋯O [3.306 (2)–3.347 (2) Å] short contacts and C—H⋯π inter­actions also occur. PMID:21588364

  12. Frequency-domain analysis of absolute gravimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svitlov, S.

    2012-12-01

    An absolute gravimeter is analysed as a linear time-invariant system in the frequency domain. Frequency responses of absolute gravimeters are derived analytically based on the propagation of the complex exponential signal through their linear measurement functions. Depending on the model of motion and the number of time-distance coordinates, an absolute gravimeter is considered as a second-order (three-level scheme) or third-order (multiple-level scheme) low-pass filter. It is shown that the behaviour of an atom absolute gravimeter in the frequency domain corresponds to that of the three-level corner-cube absolute gravimeter. Theoretical results are applied for evaluation of random and systematic measurement errors and optimization of an experiment. The developed theory agrees with known results of an absolute gravimeter analysis in the time and frequency domains and can be used for measurement uncertainty analyses, building of vibration-isolation systems and synthesis of digital filtering algorithms.

  13. Absolute photoionization cross-section of the propargyl radical

    SciTech Connect

    Savee, John D.; Welz, Oliver; Taatjes, Craig A.; Osborn, David L.; Soorkia, Satchin; Selby, Talitha M.

    2012-04-07

    Using synchrotron-generated vacuum-ultraviolet radiation and multiplexed time-resolved photoionization mass spectrometry we have measured the absolute photoionization cross-section for the propargyl (C{sub 3}H{sub 3}) radical, {sigma}{sub propargyl}{sup ion}(E), relative to the known absolute cross-section of the methyl (CH{sub 3}) radical. We generated a stoichiometric 1:1 ratio of C{sub 3}H{sub 3} : CH{sub 3} from 193 nm photolysis of two different C{sub 4}H{sub 6} isomers (1-butyne and 1,3-butadiene). Photolysis of 1-butyne yielded values of {sigma}{sub propargyl}{sup ion}(10.213 eV)=(26.1{+-}4.2) Mb and {sigma}{sub propargyl}{sup ion}(10.413 eV)=(23.4{+-}3.2) Mb, whereas photolysis of 1,3-butadiene yielded values of {sigma}{sub propargyl}{sup ion}(10.213 eV)=(23.6{+-}3.6) Mb and {sigma}{sub propargyl}{sup ion}(10.413 eV)=(25.1{+-}3.5) Mb. These measurements place our relative photoionization cross-section spectrum for propargyl on an absolute scale between 8.6 and 10.5 eV. The cross-section derived from our results is approximately a factor of three larger than previous determinations.

  14. Quantum phase slip noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenov, Andrew G.; Zaikin, Andrei D.

    2016-07-01

    Quantum phase slips (QPSs) generate voltage fluctuations in superconducting nanowires. Employing the Keldysh technique and making use of the phase-charge duality arguments, we develop a theory of QPS-induced voltage noise in such nanowires. We demonstrate that quantum tunneling of the magnetic flux quanta across the wire yields quantum shot noise which obeys Poisson statistics and is characterized by a power-law dependence of its spectrum SΩ on the external bias. In long wires, SΩ decreases with increasing frequency Ω and vanishes beyond a threshold value of Ω at T →0 . The quantum coherent nature of QPS noise yields nonmonotonous dependence of SΩ on T at small Ω .

  15. An Acoustic Charge Transport Imager for High Definition Television Applications: Reliability Modeling and Parametric Yield Prediction of GaAs Multiple Quantum Well Avalanche Photodiodes. Degree awarded Oct. 1997

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, W. D.; Brennan, K. F.; Summers, C. J.; Yun, Ilgu

    1994-01-01

    Reliability modeling and parametric yield prediction of GaAs/AlGaAs multiple quantum well (MQW) avalanche photodiodes (APDs), which are of interest as an ultra-low noise image capture mechanism for high definition systems, have been investigated. First, the effect of various doping methods on the reliability of GaAs/AlGaAs multiple quantum well (MQW) avalanche photodiode (APD) structures fabricated by molecular beam epitaxy is investigated. Reliability is examined by accelerated life tests by monitoring dark current and breakdown voltage. Median device lifetime and the activation energy of the degradation mechanism are computed for undoped, doped-barrier, and doped-well APD structures. Lifetimes for each device structure are examined via a statistically designed experiment. Analysis of variance shows that dark-current is affected primarily by device diameter, temperature and stressing time, and breakdown voltage depends on the diameter, stressing time and APD type. It is concluded that the undoped APD has the highest reliability, followed by the doped well and doped barrier devices, respectively. To determine the source of the degradation mechanism for each device structure, failure analysis using the electron-beam induced current method is performed. This analysis reveals some degree of device degradation caused by ionic impurities in the passivation layer, and energy-dispersive spectrometry subsequently verified the presence of ionic sodium as the primary contaminant. However, since all device structures are similarly passivated, sodium contamination alone does not account for the observed variation between the differently doped APDs. This effect is explained by the dopant migration during stressing, which is verified by free carrier concentration measurements using the capacitance-voltage technique.

  16. Intermediate quantum maps for quantum computation

    SciTech Connect

    Giraud, O.; Georgeot, B.

    2005-10-15

    We study quantum maps displaying spectral statistics intermediate between Poisson and Wigner-Dyson. It is shown that they can be simulated on a quantum computer with a small number of gates, and efficiently yield information about fidelity decay or spectral statistics. We study their matrix elements and entanglement production and show that they converge with time to distributions which differ from random matrix predictions. A randomized version of these maps can be implemented even more economically and yields pseudorandom operators with original properties, enabling, for example, one to produce fractal random vectors. These algorithms are within reach of present-day quantum computers.

  17. Absolute Income, Relative Income, and Happiness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ball, Richard; Chernova, Kateryna

    2008-01-01

    This paper uses data from the World Values Survey to investigate how an individual's self-reported happiness is related to (i) the level of her income in absolute terms, and (ii) the level of her income relative to other people in her country. The main findings are that (i) both absolute and relative income are positively and significantly…

  18. Investigating Absolute Value: A Real World Application

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kidd, Margaret; Pagni, David

    2009-01-01

    Making connections between various representations is important in mathematics. In this article, the authors discuss the numeric, algebraic, and graphical representations of sums of absolute values of linear functions. The initial explanations are accessible to all students who have experience graphing and who understand that absolute value simply…

  19. Preschoolers' Success at Coding Absolute Size Values.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, James

    1980-01-01

    Forty-five 2-year-old and forty-five 3-year-old children coded relative and absolute sizes using 1.5-inch, 6-inch, and 18-inch cardboard squares. Results indicate that absolute coding is possible for children of this age. (Author/RH)

  20. Introducing the Mean Absolute Deviation "Effect" Size

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorard, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    This paper revisits the use of effect sizes in the analysis of experimental and similar results, and reminds readers of the relative advantages of the mean absolute deviation as a measure of variation, as opposed to the more complex standard deviation. The mean absolute deviation is easier to use and understand, and more tolerant of extreme…

  1. Monolithically integrated absolute frequency comb laser system

    DOEpatents

    Wanke, Michael C.

    2016-07-12

    Rather than down-convert optical frequencies, a QCL laser system directly generates a THz frequency comb in a compact monolithically integrated chip that can be locked to an absolute frequency without the need of a frequency-comb synthesizer. The monolithic, absolute frequency comb can provide a THz frequency reference and tool for high-resolution broad band spectroscopy.

  2. Estimating the absolute wealth of households

    PubMed Central

    Gerkey, Drew; Hadley, Craig

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To estimate the absolute wealth of households using data from demographic and health surveys. Methods We developed a new metric, the absolute wealth estimate, based on the rank of each surveyed household according to its material assets and the assumed shape of the distribution of wealth among surveyed households. Using data from 156 demographic and health surveys in 66 countries, we calculated absolute wealth estimates for households. We validated the method by comparing the proportion of households defined as poor using our estimates with published World Bank poverty headcounts. We also compared the accuracy of absolute versus relative wealth estimates for the prediction of anthropometric measures. Findings The median absolute wealth estimates of 1 403 186 households were 2056 international dollars per capita (interquartile range: 723–6103). The proportion of poor households based on absolute wealth estimates were strongly correlated with World Bank estimates of populations living on less than 2.00 United States dollars per capita per day (R2 = 0.84). Absolute wealth estimates were better predictors of anthropometric measures than relative wealth indexes. Conclusion Absolute wealth estimates provide new opportunities for comparative research to assess the effects of economic resources on health and human capital, as well as the long-term health consequences of economic change and inequality. PMID:26170506

  3. Absolute optical metrology : nanometers to kilometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dubovitsky, Serge; Lay, O. P.; Peters, R. D.; Liebe, C. C.

    2005-01-01

    We provide and overview of the developments in the field of high-accuracy absolute optical metrology with emphasis on space-based applications. Specific work on the Modulation Sideband Technology for Absolute Ranging (MSTAR) sensor is described along with novel applications of the sensor.

  4. Absolute instability of the Gaussian wake profile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hultgren, Lennart S.; Aggarwal, Arun K.

    1987-01-01

    Linear parallel-flow stability theory has been used to investigate the effect of viscosity on the local absolute instability of a family of wake profiles with a Gaussian velocity distribution. The type of local instability, i.e., convective or absolute, is determined by the location of a branch-point singularity with zero group velocity of the complex dispersion relation for the instability waves. The effects of viscosity were found to be weak for values of the wake Reynolds number, based on the center-line velocity defect and the wake half-width, larger than about 400. Absolute instability occurs only for sufficiently large values of the center-line wake defect. The critical value of this parameter increases with decreasing wake Reynolds number, thereby indicating a shrinking region of absolute instability with decreasing wake Reynolds number. If backflow is not allowed, absolute instability does not occur for wake Reynolds numbers smaller than about 38.

  5. Photocatalytic activity of transition-metal-ion-doped coordination polymer (CP): photoresponse region extension and quantum yields enhancement via doping of transition metal ions into the framework of CPs.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xin-Xin; Cui, Zhong-Ping; Gao, Xin; Liu, Xiao-Xia

    2014-06-21

    To improve photocatalytic activity of a coordination polymer (CP) in the visible light region, five different transition metal ions (Fe(3+), Cr(3+), Ru(3+), Co(2+) and Ni(2+)) were introduced into its framework through an ion-exchange process. Among all the resulting transition metal ion doped coordination polymers (TMI/CPs), the one doped with Fe(3+) took on the most excellent photocatalytic activity and the highest quantum yields in the visible light region, decomposing 94% Rhodamine B (RhB) in 8 hours. It can be attributed to the doping of Fe(3+), which reduced the band gap (Eg) of the original CP, facilitating photocatalysis of the obtained polymer. Compared with the coordination polymer with Fe(3+) as a dopant, products doped with other metal ions presented weaker photocatalytic activities in the visible light region, while under the irradiation of ultraviolet light, they showed favorable photocatalytic properties. The results suggest that to dope transition metal ions into the framework of CPs would be an ideal option for enhancing the photocatalytic activity of coordination polymers.

  6. Applications of quantum cloning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pomarico, E.; Sanguinetti, B.; Sekatski, P.; Zbinden, H.; Gisin, N.

    2011-10-01

    Quantum Cloning Machines (QCMs) allow for the copying of information, within the limits imposed by quantum mechanics. These devices are particularly interesting in the high-gain regime, i.e., when one input qubit generates a state of many output qubits. In this regime, they allow for the study of certain aspects of the quantum to classical transition. The understanding of these aspects is the root of the two recent applications that we will review in this paper: the first one is the Quantum Cloning Radiometer, a device which is able to produce an absolute measure of spectral radiance. This device exploits the fact that in the quantum regime information can be copied with only finite fidelity, whereas when a state becomes macroscopic, this fidelity gradually increases to 1. Measuring the fidelity of the cloning operation then allows to precisely determine the absolute spectral radiance of the input optical source. We will then discuss whether a Quantum Cloning Machine could be used to produce a state visible by the naked human eye, and the possibility of a Bell Experiment with humans playing the role of detectors.

  7. Absolute surface reconstruction by slope metrology and photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Yue

    Developing the manufacture of aspheric and freeform optical elements requires an advanced metrology method which is capable of inspecting these elements with arbitrary freeform surfaces. In this dissertation, a new surface measurement scheme is investigated for such a purpose, which is to measure the absolute surface shape of an object under test through its surface slope information obtained by photogrammetric measurement. A laser beam propagating toward the object reflects on its surface while the vectors of the incident and reflected beams are evaluated from the four spots they leave on the two parallel transparent windows in front of the object. The spots' spatial coordinates are determined by photogrammetry. With the knowledge of the incident and reflected beam vectors, the local slope information of the object surface is obtained through vector calculus and finally yields the absolute object surface profile by a reconstruction algorithm. An experimental setup is designed and the proposed measuring principle is experimentally demonstrated by measuring the absolute surface shape of a spherical mirror. The measurement uncertainty is analyzed, and efforts for improvement are made accordingly. In particular, structured windows are designed and fabricated to generate uniform scattering spots left by the transmitted laser beams. Calibration of the fringe reflection instrument, another typical surface slope measurement method, is also reported in the dissertation. Finally, a method for uncertainty analysis of a photogrammetry measurement system by optical simulation is investigated.

  8. Absolute magnitudes of trans-neptunian objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duffard, R.; Alvarez-candal, A.; Pinilla-Alonso, N.; Ortiz, J. L.; Morales, N.; Santos-Sanz, P.; Thirouin, A.

    2015-10-01

    Accurate measurements of diameters of trans- Neptunian objects are extremely complicated to obtain. Radiomatric techniques applied to thermal measurements can provide good results, but precise absolute magnitudes are needed to constrain diameters and albedos. Our objective is to measure accurate absolute magnitudes for a sample of trans- Neptunian objects, many of which have been observed, and modelled, by the "TNOs are cool" team, one of Herschel Space Observatory key projects grantes with ~ 400 hours of observing time. We observed 56 objects in filters V and R, if possible. These data, along with data available in the literature, was used to obtain phase curves and to measure absolute magnitudes by assuming a linear trend of the phase curves and considering magnitude variability due to rotational light-curve. In total we obtained 234 new magnitudes for the 56 objects, 6 of them with no reported previous measurements. Including the data from the literature we report a total of 109 absolute magnitudes.

  9. A New Gimmick for Assigning Absolute Configuration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ayorinde, F. O.

    1983-01-01

    A five-step procedure is provided to help students in making the assignment absolute configuration less bothersome. Examples for both single (2-butanol) and multi-chiral carbon (3-chloro-2-butanol) molecules are included. (JN)

  10. The Simplicity Argument and Absolute Morality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mijuskovic, Ben

    1975-01-01

    In this paper the author has maintained that there is a similarity of thought to be found in the writings of Cudworth, Emerson, and Husserl in his investigation of an absolute system of morality. (Author/RK)

  11. Holographic Quantum States

    SciTech Connect

    Osborne, Tobias J.; Eisert, Jens; Verstraete, Frank

    2010-12-31

    We show how continuous matrix product states of quantum fields can be described in terms of the dissipative nonequilibrium dynamics of a lower-dimensional auxiliary boundary field by demonstrating that the spatial correlation functions of the bulk field correspond to the temporal statistics of the boundary field. This equivalence (1) illustrates an intimate connection between the theory of continuous quantum measurement and quantum field theory, (2) gives an explicit construction of the boundary field allowing the extension of real-space renormalization group methods to arbitrary dimensional quantum field theories without the introduction of a lattice parameter, and (3) yields a novel interpretation of recent cavity QED experiments in terms of quantum field theory, and hence paves the way toward observing genuine quantum phase transitions in such zero-dimensional driven quantum systems.

  12. First derivative versus absolute spectral reflectance of citrus varieties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blazquez, Carlos H.; Nigg, H. N.; Hedley, Lou E.; Ramos, L. E.; Sorrell, R. W.; Simpson, S. E.

    1996-06-01

    Spectral reflectance measurements from 400 to 800 nm were taken from immature and mature leaves of grapefruit ('McCarty' and 'Rio Red'), 'Minneola' tangelo, 'Satsuma' mandarin, 'Dancy' tangerine, 'Nagami' oval kumquat, and 'Valencia' sweet orange, at the Florida Citrus Arboretum, Division of Plant Industry, Winter Haven, Florida. Immature and mature leaves of 'Minneola' tangelo had greater percent reflectance in the 400 to 800 nm range than the other varieties and leaf ages measured. The slope of the citrus spectral curves in the 800 nm range was not as sharp as conventional spectrometers, but had a much higher reflectance value than those obtained with a DK-2 spectrometer. Statistical analyses of absolute spectral data yielded significant differences between mature and immature leaves and between varieties. First derivative data analyses did not yield significant differences between varieties.

  13. Classical and quantum-mechanical treatments of nonsequential double ionization with few-cycle laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figueira de Morisson Faria, C.; Liu, X.; Sanpera, A.; Lewenstein, M.

    2004-10-01

    We address nonsequential double ionization induced by strong, linearly polarized laser fields of only a few cycles, considering a physical mechanism in which the second electron is dislodged by the inelastic collision of the first electron with its parent ion. The problem is treated classically, using an ensemble model, and quantum mechanically, within the strong-field and uniform saddle-point approximations. In the latter case, the results are interpreted in terms of “quantum orbits,” which can be related to the trajectories of a classical electron in an electric field. We obtain highly asymmetric electron momentum distributions, which strongly depend on the absolute phase, i.e., on the phase difference between the pulse envelope and its carrier frequency. Around a particular value of this parameter, the distributions shift from the region of positive to that of negative momenta, or vice versa, in a radical fashion. This behavior is investigated in detail for several driving-field parameters, and provides a very efficient method for measuring the absolute phase. Both models yield very similar distributions, which share the same physical explanation. There exist, however, minor discrepancies due to the fact that, beyond the region for which electron-impact ionization is classically allowed, the yields from the quantum-mechanical computation decay exponentially, whereas their classical counterparts vanish.

  14. Effect of the long-term elevation of CO sub 2 concentration in the field on the quantum yield of photosynthesis of the C sub 3 sedge, Scirpus olneyi

    SciTech Connect

    Long, S.P. ); Drake, B.G. )

    1991-05-01

    CO{sub 2} concentration was elevated throughout 3 years around stands of the C{sub 3} sedge Scirpus olneyi on a tidal marsh of the Chesapeake Bay. The hypothesis that tissues developed in an elevated CO{sub 2} atmosphere will show an acclimatory decrease in photosynthetic capacity under light-limiting conditions was examined. The absorbed light quantum yield of CO{sub 2} uptake ({phi}{sub abs}) and the efficiency of photosystem II photochemistry were determined for plants which had developed in open top chambers with CO{sub 2} concentrations in air of 680 micromoles per mole, and of 351 micromoles per mole as controls. When measured in an atmosphere with 10 millimoles per mole O{sub 2} to suppress photorespiration, shoots showed a {phi}{sub abs} of 0.093 {plus minus} 0.003, with no statistically significant difference between shoots grown in elevated or control CO{sub 2} concentration. Efficiency of photosystem II photochemistry was also unchanged by development in an elevated CO{sub 2} atmosphere. Shoots grown and measured in 680 micromoles per mole of CO{sub 2} in air showed a {phi}{sub abs} of 0.078 {plus minus} 0.004 compared with 0.065 {plus minus} for leaves grown and measured in 351 micromoles per mole CO{sub 2} in air; a highly significant increase. In accordance with the change in {phi}{sub abs}, the light compensation point of photosynthesis decreased from 51 {plus minus} 3 to 31 {plus minus} 3 micromoles per square meter per second for stems grown and measured in 351 and 680 micromoles per mole of CO{sub 2} in air, respectively.

  15. A three-axis SQUID-based absolute vector magnetometer

    SciTech Connect

    Schönau, T.; Schmelz, M.; Stolz, R.; Anders, S.; Linzen, S.; Meyer, H.-G.; Zakosarenko, V.; Meyer, M.

    2015-10-15

    We report on the development of a three-axis absolute vector magnetometer suited for mobile operation in the Earth’s magnetic field. It is based on low critical temperature dc superconducting quantum interference devices (LTS dc SQUIDs) with sub-micrometer sized cross-type Josephson junctions and exhibits a white noise level of about 10 fT/Hz{sup 1/2}. The width of superconducting strip lines is restricted to less than 6 μm in order to avoid flux trapping during cool-down in magnetically unshielded environment. The long-term stability of the flux-to-voltage transfer coefficients of the SQUID electronics is investigated in detail and a method is presented to significantly increase their reproducibility. We further demonstrate the long-term operation of the setup in a magnetic field varying by about 200 μT amplitude without the need for recalibration.

  16. Absolute calibration of a laser system for atmospheric probing.

    PubMed

    Hall, F F; Ageno, H Y

    1970-08-01

    In order to obtain quantitative data on the backscatter function from laser irradiance backscattered from the atmosphere, the ratio of power transmitted to power received must be accurately known. No absolute measurements of power, optical system transmittance, detector quantum efficiency, or electronic gain are necessarily required. The technique of measuring the power ratio by irradiating a smoked or painted target of known diffuse reflectance at a fixed range is used to calibrate a complete lidar system. The relative area of the output power pulse is monitored by a fast response photodiode, and the relative area of the returned pulse is also recorded after passing through a filter of known high optical density. It is essential to control the temperatures of the laser rod and receiver interference prefilter to ensure proper spectral matching. Field experience gained using this technique is described, and examples of calibration measurements and backscatter functions for smog and cirrus clouds are presented.

  17. Conductance and Absolutely Continuous Spectrum of 1D Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruneau, L.; Jakšić, V.; Last, Y.; Pillet, C.-A.

    2016-06-01

    We characterize the absolutely continuous spectrum of the one-dimensional Schrödinger operators {h = -Δ + v} acting on {ℓ^2(mathbb{Z}_+)} in terms of the limiting behaviour of the Landauer-Büttiker and Thouless conductances of the associated finite samples. The finite sample is defined by restricting h to a finite interval {[1, L] \\cap mathbb{Z}_+} and the conductance refers to the charge current across the sample in the open quantum system obtained by attaching independent electronic reservoirs to the sample ends. Our main result is that the conductances associated to an energy interval {I} are non-vanishing in the limit {L to infty} iff {sp_ac(h) \\cap I neq emptyset}. We also discuss the relationship between this result and the Schrödinger Conjecture (Avila, J Am Math Soc 28:579-616, 2015; Bruneau et al., Commun Math Phys 319:501-513, 2013).

  18. A three-axis SQUID-based absolute vector magnetometer.

    PubMed

    Schönau, T; Zakosarenko, V; Schmelz, M; Stolz, R; Anders, S; Linzen, S; Meyer, M; Meyer, H-G

    2015-10-01

    We report on the development of a three-axis absolute vector magnetometer suited for mobile operation in the Earth's magnetic field. It is based on low critical temperature dc superconducting quantum interference devices (LTS dc SQUIDs) with sub-micrometer sized cross-type Josephson junctions and exhibits a white noise level of about 10 fT/Hz(1/2). The width of superconducting strip lines is restricted to less than 6 μm in order to avoid flux trapping during cool-down in magnetically unshielded environment. The long-term stability of the flux-to-voltage transfer coefficients of the SQUID electronics is investigated in detail and a method is presented to significantly increase their reproducibility. We further demonstrate the long-term operation of the setup in a magnetic field varying by about 200 μT amplitude without the need for recalibration.

  19. Use of intensity quotients and differences in absolute structure refinement.

    PubMed

    Parsons, Simon; Flack, Howard D; Wagner, Trixie

    2013-06-01

    Several methods for absolute structure refinement were tested using single-crystal X-ray diffraction data collected using Cu Kα radiation for 23 crystals with no element heavier than oxygen: conventional refinement using an inversion twin model, estimation using intensity quotients in SHELXL2012, estimation using Bayesian methods in PLATON, estimation using restraints consisting of numerical intensity differences in CRYSTALS and estimation using differences and quotients in TOPAS-Academic where both quantities were coded in terms of other structural parameters and implemented as restraints. The conventional refinement approach yielded accurate values of the Flack parameter, but with standard uncertainties ranging from 0.15 to 0.77. The other methods also yielded accurate values of the Flack parameter, but with much higher precision. Absolute structure was established in all cases, even for a hydrocarbon. The procedures in which restraints are coded explicitly in terms of other structural parameters enable the Flack parameter to correlate with these other parameters, so that it is determined along with those parameters during refinement. PMID:23719469

  20. Quantum computing of semiclassical formulas.

    PubMed

    Georgeot, B; Giraud, O

    2008-04-01

    We show that semiclassical formulas such as the Gutzwiller trace formula can be implemented on a quantum computer more efficiently than on a classical device. We give explicit quantum algorithms which yield quantum observables from classical trajectories, and which alternatively test the semiclassical approximation by computing classical actions from quantum evolution. The gain over classical computation is in general quadratic, and can be larger in some specific cases.

  1. Jasminum flexile flower absolute from India--a detailed comparison with three other jasmine absolutes.

    PubMed

    Braun, Norbert A; Kohlenberg, Birgit; Sim, Sherina; Meier, Manfred; Hammerschmidt, Franz-Josef

    2009-09-01

    Jasminum flexile flower absolute from the south of India and the corresponding vacuum headspace (VHS) sample of the absolute were analyzed using GC and GC-MS. Three other commercially available Indian jasmine absolutes from the species: J. sambac, J. officinale subsp. grandiflorum, and J. auriculatum and the respective VHS samples were used for comparison purposes. One hundred and twenty-one compounds were characterized in J. flexile flower absolute, with methyl linolate, benzyl salicylate, benzyl benzoate, (2E,6E)-farnesol, and benzyl acetate as the main constituents. A detailed olfactory evaluation was also performed.

  2. Universal Cosmic Absolute and Modern Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostro, Ludwik

    The official Sciences, especially all natural sciences, respect in their researches the principle of methodic naturalism i.e. they consider all phenomena as entirely natural and therefore in their scientific explanations they do never adduce or cite supernatural entities and forces. The purpose of this paper is to show that Modern Science has its own self-existent, self-acting, and self-sufficient Natural All-in Being or Omni-Being i.e. the entire Nature as a Whole that justifies the scientific methodic naturalism. Since this Natural All-in Being is one and only It should be considered as the own scientifically justified Natural Absolute of Science and should be called, in my opinion, the Universal Cosmic Absolute of Modern Science. It will be also shown that the Universal Cosmic Absolute is ontologically enormously stratified and is in its ultimate i.e. in its most fundamental stratum trans-reistic and trans-personal. It means that in its basic stratum. It is neither a Thing or a Person although It contains in Itself all things and persons with all other sentient and conscious individuals as well, On the turn of the 20th century the Science has begun to look for a theory of everything, for a final theory, for a master theory. In my opinion the natural Universal Cosmic Absolute will constitute in such a theory the radical all penetrating Ultimate Basic Reality and will substitute step by step the traditional supernatural personal Absolute.

  3. The Quantasyn, an improved quantum detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorstein, M.; Mc Williams, I. G.; Seward, H. H.

    1969-01-01

    Quantasyn provides absolute measurement of radiation flux in the range 1000 A to 4500 A and into the vacuum ultraviolet. This radiation detector cimbines the high quantum efficiency and inherent linearity of the silicon solar cell with the constant quantum response of the fluorescent organic compound liumogen.

  4. First measurements of the absolute neutron spectrum using the Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer (MRS) at the NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frenje, J.; Casey, D.; Li, C.; Seguin, F.; Petrasso, R.; Bionta, R.; Cerjan, C.; Eckart, M.; Haan, S.; Hatchett, S.; Khater, H.; Landen, O.; MacKinnon, A.; Moran, M.; Rygg, J.; Kilkenny, J.; Glebov, V.; Sangster, T.; Meyerhofer, D.; Magoon, J.; Fletcher, K.; Leeper, R.

    2010-11-01

    Proper assembly of capsule mass, as manifested through evolution of fuel areal density (ρR), is fundamentally important for achieving hot-spot ignition planned at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Experimental information about ρR and ρR asymmetries, Ti and yield is therefore essential for understanding how this assembly occurs. To obtain this information, a neutron spectrometer, called the Magnetic-Recoil Spectrometer (MRS) has been implemented on the NIF. Its primary objective is to measure the absolute neutron spectrum in the range 5 to 30 MeV, from which ρR, Ti and yield can be directly inferred for both low-yield tritium-hydrogen-deuterium (THD) and high-yield DT implosions. In this talk, the results from the first measurements of the absolute neutron spectrum produced in exploding pusher and THD implosions will be presented. This work was supported in part by the U.S. DOE, LLNL and LLE.

  5. Absolute calibration in vivo measurement systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kruchten, D.A.; Hickman, D.P.

    1991-02-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is currently investigating a new method for obtaining absolute calibration factors for radiation measurement systems used to measure internally deposited radionuclides in vivo. Absolute calibration of in vivo measurement systems will eliminate the need to generate a series of human surrogate structures (i.e., phantoms) for calibrating in vivo measurement systems. The absolute calibration of in vivo measurement systems utilizes magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to define physiological structure, size, and composition. The MRI image provides a digitized representation of the physiological structure, which allows for any mathematical distribution of radionuclides within the body. Using Monte Carlo transport codes, the emission spectrum from the body is predicted. The in vivo measurement equipment is calibrated using the Monte Carlo code and adjusting for the intrinsic properties of the detection system. The calibration factors are verified using measurements of existing phantoms and previously obtained measurements of human volunteers. 8 refs.

  6. Stimulus probability effects in absolute identification.

    PubMed

    Kent, Christopher; Lamberts, Koen

    2016-05-01

    This study investigated the effect of stimulus presentation probability on accuracy and response times in an absolute identification task. Three schedules of presentation were used to investigate the interaction between presentation probability and stimulus position within the set. Data from individual participants indicated strong effects of presentation probability on both proportion correct and response times. The effects were moderated by the ubiquitous stimulus position effect. The accuracy and response time data were predicted by an exemplar-based model of perceptual cognition (Kent & Lamberts, 2005). The bow in discriminability was also attenuated when presentation probability for middle items was relatively high, an effect that will constrain future model development. The study provides evidence for item-specific learning in absolute identification. Implications for other theories of absolute identification are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record

  7. Quantitative standards for absolute linguistic universals.

    PubMed

    Piantadosi, Steven T; Gibson, Edward

    2014-01-01

    Absolute linguistic universals are often justified by cross-linguistic analysis: If all observed languages exhibit a property, the property is taken to be a likely universal, perhaps specified in the cognitive or linguistic systems of language learners and users. In many cases, these patterns are then taken to motivate linguistic theory. Here, we show that cross-linguistic analysis will very rarely be able to statistically justify absolute, inviolable patterns in language. We formalize two statistical methods--frequentist and Bayesian--and show that in both it is possible to find strict linguistic universals, but that the numbers of independent languages necessary to do so is generally unachievable. This suggests that methods other than typological statistics are necessary to establish absolute properties of human language, and thus that many of the purported universals in linguistics have not received sufficient empirical justification.

  8. Absolute photoacoustic thermometry in deep tissue.

    PubMed

    Yao, Junjie; Ke, Haixin; Tai, Stephen; Zhou, Yong; Wang, Lihong V

    2013-12-15

    Photoacoustic thermography is a promising tool for temperature measurement in deep tissue. Here we propose an absolute temperature measurement method based on the dual temperature dependences of the Grüneisen parameter and the speed of sound in tissue. By taking ratiometric measurements at two adjacent temperatures, we can eliminate the factors that are temperature irrelevant but difficult to correct for in deep tissue. To validate our method, absolute temperatures of blood-filled tubes embedded ~9 mm deep in chicken tissue were measured in a biologically relevant range from 28°C to 46°C. The temperature measurement accuracy was ~0.6°C. The results suggest that our method can be potentially used for absolute temperature monitoring in deep tissue during thermotherapy.

  9. Molecular iodine absolute frequencies. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Sansonetti, C.J.

    1990-06-25

    Fifty specified lines of {sup 127}I{sub 2} were studied by Doppler-free frequency modulation spectroscopy. For each line the classification of the molecular transition was determined, hyperfine components were identified, and one well-resolved component was selected for precise determination of its absolute frequency. In 3 cases, a nearby alternate line was selected for measurement because no well-resolved component was found for the specified line. Absolute frequency determinations were made with an estimated uncertainty of 1.1 MHz by locking a dye laser to the selected hyperfine component and measuring its wave number with a high-precision Fabry-Perot wavemeter. For each line results of the absolute measurement, the line classification, and a Doppler-free spectrum are given.

  10. Relative and absolute level populations in beam-foil-excited neutral helium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, J.

    1975-01-01

    Relative and absolute populations of 19 levels in beam-foil-excited neutral helium at 0.275 MeV have been measured. The singlet angular-momentum sequences show dependences on principal quantum number consistent with n to the -3rd power, but the triplet sequences do not. Singlet and triplet angular-momentum sequences show similar dependences on level excitation energy. Excitation functions for six representative levels were measured in the range from 0.160 to 0.500 MeV. The absolute level populations increase with energy, whereas the neutral fraction of the beam decreases with energy. Further, the P angular-momentum levels are found to be overpopulated with respect to the S and D levels. The overpopulation decreases with increasing principal quantum number.

  11. Absolute Stability And Hyperstability In Hilbert Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wen, John Ting-Yung

    1989-01-01

    Theorems on stabilities of feedback control systems proved. Paper presents recent developments regarding theorems of absolute stability and hyperstability of feedforward-and-feedback control system. Theorems applied in analysis of nonlinear, adaptive, and robust control. Extended to provide sufficient conditions for stability in system including nonlinear feedback subsystem and linear time-invariant (LTI) feedforward subsystem, state space of which is Hilbert space, and input and output spaces having finite numbers of dimensions. (In case of absolute stability, feedback subsystem memoryless and possibly time varying. For hyperstability, feedback system dynamical system.)

  12. An Absolute Phase Space for the Physicality of Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Valentine, John S.

    2010-12-22

    We define an abstract and absolute phase space (''APS'') for sub-quantum intrinsic wave states, in three axes, each mapping directly to a duality having fundamental ontological basis. Many aspects of quantum physics emerge from the interaction algebra and a model deduced from principles of 'unique solvability' and 'identifiable entity', and we reconstruct previously abstract fundamental principles and phenomena from these new foundations. The physical model defines bosons as virtual continuous waves pairs in the APS, and fermions as real self-quantizing snapshots of those waves when simple conditions are met. The abstraction and physical model define a template for the constitution of all fermions, a template for all the standard fundamental bosons and their local interactions, in a common framework and compactified phase space for all forms of real matter and virtual vacuum energy, and a distinct algebra for observables and unobservables. To illustrate our scheme's potential, we provide examples of slit experiment variations (where the model finds theoretical basis for interference only occurring between two final sources), QCD (where we may model most attributes known to QCD, and a new view on entanglement), and we suggest approaches for other varied applications. We believe this is a viable candidate for further exploration as a foundational proposition for physics.

  13. An Absolute Phase Space for the Physicality of Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valentine, John S.

    2010-12-01

    We define an abstract and absolute phase space ("APS") for sub-quantum intrinsic wave states, in three axes, each mapping directly to a duality having fundamental ontological basis. Many aspects of quantum physics emerge from the interaction algebra and a model deduced from principles of `unique solvability' and `identifiable entity', and we reconstruct previously abstract fundamental principles and phenomena from these new foundations. The physical model defines bosons as virtual continuous waves pairs in the APS, and fermions as real self-quantizing snapshots of those waves when simple conditions are met. The abstraction and physical model define a template for the constitution of all fermions, a template for all the standard fundamental bosons and their local interactions, in a common framework and compactified phase space for all forms of real matter and virtual vacuum energy, and a distinct algebra for observables and unobservables. To illustrate our scheme's potential, we provide examples of slit experiment variations (where the model finds theoretical basis for interference only occurring between two final sources), QCD (where we may model most attributes known to QCD, and a new view on entanglement), and we suggest approaches for other varied applications. We believe this is a viable candidate for further exploration as a foundational proposition for physics.

  14. Sounding rocket measurement of the absolute solar EUV flux utilizing a silicon photodiode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogawa, H. S.; Mcmullin, D.; Judge, D. L.; Canfield, L. R.

    1990-01-01

    A newly developed stable and high quantum efficiency silicon photodiode was used to obtain an accurate measurement of the integrated absolute magnitude of the solar extreme UV photon flux in the spectral region between 50 and 800 A. The adjusted daily 10.7-cm solar radio flux and sunspot number were 168.4 and 121, respectively. The unattenuated absolute value of the solar EUV flux at 1 AU in the specified wavelength region was 6.81 x 10 to the 10th photons/sq cm per s. Based on a nominal probable error of 7 percent for National Institute of Standards and Technology detector efficiency measurements in the 50- to 500-A region (5 percent on longer wavelength measurements between 500 and 1216 A), and based on experimental errors associated with the present rocket instrumentation and analysis, a conservative total error estimate of about 14 percent is assigned to the absolute integral solar flux obtained.

  15. Absolute instability from linear conversion of counter-propagating positive and negative energy waves

    SciTech Connect

    Kaufman, A.N.; Brizard, A.J.; Morehead, J.J.; Tracy, E.R.

    1997-12-31

    The resonant interaction of a negative-energy wave with a positive-energy wave gives rise to a linear instability. Whereas a single crossing of rays in a nonuniform medium leads to a convectively saturated instability, we show that a double crossing can yield an absolute instability.

  16. Absolute calibration of photon-number-resolving detectors with an analog output using twin beams

    SciTech Connect

    Peřina, Jan; Haderka, Ondřej; Allevi, Alessia; Bondani, Maria

    2014-01-27

    A method for absolute calibration of a photon-number resolving detector producing analog signals as the output is developed using a twin beam. The method gives both analog-to-digital conversion parameters and quantum detection efficiency for the photon fields. Characteristics of the used twin beam are also obtained. A simplified variant of the method applicable to fields with high signal to noise ratios and suitable for more intense twin beams is suggested.

  17. Energy dispersive X-ray analysis on an absolute scale in scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Z; D'Alfonso, A J; Weyland, M; Taplin, D J; Allen, L J; Findlay, S D

    2015-10-01

    We demonstrate absolute scale agreement between the number of X-ray counts in energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy using an atomic-scale coherent electron probe and first-principles simulations. Scan-averaged spectra were collected across a range of thicknesses with precisely determined and controlled microscope parameters. Ionization cross-sections were calculated using the quantum excitation of phonons model, incorporating dynamical (multiple) electron scattering, which is seen to be important even for very thin specimens.

  18. Absolute Points for Multiple Assignment Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adlakha, V.; Kowalski, K.

    2006-01-01

    An algorithm is presented to solve multiple assignment problems in which a cost is incurred only when an assignment is made at a given cell. The proposed method recursively searches for single/group absolute points to identify cells that must be loaded in any optimal solution. Unlike other methods, the first solution is the optimal solution. The…

  19. Absolute partial photoionization cross sections of ozone.

    SciTech Connect

    Berkowitz, J.; Chemistry

    2008-04-01

    Despite the current concerns about ozone, absolute partial photoionization cross sections for this molecule in the vacuum ultraviolet (valence) region have been unavailable. By eclectic re-evaluation of old/new data and plausible assumptions, such cross sections have been assembled to fill this void.

  20. Stimulus Probability Effects in Absolute Identification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kent, Christopher; Lamberts, Koen

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of stimulus presentation probability on accuracy and response times in an absolute identification task. Three schedules of presentation were used to investigate the interaction between presentation probability and stimulus position within the set. Data from individual participants indicated strong effects of…

  1. Teaching Absolute Value Inequalities to Mature Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sierpinska, Anna; Bobos, Georgeana; Pruncut, Andreea

    2011-01-01

    This paper gives an account of a teaching experiment on absolute value inequalities, whose aim was to identify characteristics of an approach that would realize the potential of the topic to develop theoretical thinking in students enrolled in prerequisite mathematics courses at a large, urban North American university. The potential is…

  2. Solving Absolute Value Equations Algebraically and Geometrically

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shiyuan, Wei

    2005-01-01

    The way in which students can improve their comprehension by understanding the geometrical meaning of algebraic equations or solving algebraic equation geometrically is described. Students can experiment with the conditions of the absolute value equation presented, for an interesting way to form an overall understanding of the concept.

  3. Increasing Capacity: Practice Effects in Absolute Identification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dodds, Pennie; Donkin, Christopher; Brown, Scott D.; Heathcote, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    In most of the long history of the study of absolute identification--since Miller's (1956) seminal article--a severe limit on performance has been observed, and this limit has resisted improvement even by extensive practice. In a startling result, Rouder, Morey, Cowan, and Pfaltz (2004) found substantially improved performance with practice in the…

  4. Absolute Radiometric Calibration Of The Thematic Mapper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slater, P. N.; Biggar, S. F.; Holm, R. G.; Jackson, R. D.; Mao, Y.; Moran, M. S.; Palmer, J. M.; Yuan, B.

    1986-11-01

    The results are presented of five in-flight absolute radiometric calibrations, made in the period July 1984 to November 1985, at White Sands, New Mexico, of the solar reflective bands of the Landsat-5 Thematic Mapper (TM) . The 23 bandcalibrations made on the five dates show a ± 2.8% RMS variation from the mean as a percentage of the mean.

  5. On Relative and Absolute Conviction in Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weber, Keith; Mejia-Ramos, Juan Pablo

    2015-01-01

    Conviction is a central construct in mathematics education research on justification and proof. In this paper, we claim that it is important to distinguish between absolute conviction and relative conviction. We argue that researchers in mathematics education frequently have not done so and this has lead to researchers making unwarranted claims…

  6. Absolute continuity for operator valued completely positive maps on C*-algebras

    SciTech Connect

    Gheondea, Aurelian; Kavruk, Ali Samil

    2009-02-15

    Motivated by applicability to quantum operations, quantum information, and quantum probability, we investigate the notion of absolute continuity for operator valued completely positive maps on C*-algebras, previously introduced by Parthasarathy [in Athens Conference on Applied Probability and Time Series Analysis I (Springer-Verlag, Berlin, 1996), pp. 34-54]. We obtain an intrinsic definition of absolute continuity, we show that the Lebesgue decomposition defined by Parthasarathy is the maximal one among all other Lebesgue-type decompositions and that this maximal Lebesgue decomposition does not depend on the jointly dominating completely positive map, we obtain more flexible formulas for calculating the maximal Lebesgue decomposition, and we point out the nonuniqueness of the Lebesgue decomposition as well as a sufficient condition for uniqueness. In addition, we consider Radon-Nikodym derivatives for absolutely continuous completely positive maps that, in general, are unbounded positive self-adjoint operators affiliated to a certain von Neumann algebra, and we obtain a spectral approximation by bounded Radon-Nikodym derivatives. An application to the existence of the infimum of two completely positive maps is indicated, and formulas in terms of Choi's matrices for the Lebesgue decomposition of completely positive maps in matrix algebras are obtained.

  7. Thorough subcells diagnosis in a multi-junction solar cell via absolute electroluminescence-efficiency measurements

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shaoqiang; Zhu, Lin; Yoshita, Masahiro; Mochizuki, Toshimitsu; Kim, Changsu; Akiyama, Hidefumi; Imaizumi, Mitsuru; Kanemitsu, Yoshihiko

    2015-01-01

    World-wide studies on multi-junction (tandem) solar cells have led to record-breaking improvements in conversion efficiencies year after year. To obtain detailed and proper feedback for solar-cell design and fabrication, it is necessary to establish standard methods for diagnosing subcells in fabricated tandem devices. Here, we propose a potential standard method to quantify the detailed subcell properties of multi-junction solar cells based on absolute measurements of electroluminescence (EL) external quantum efficiency in addition to the conventional solar-cell external-quantum-efficiency measurements. We demonstrate that the absolute-EL-quantum-efficiency measurements provide I–V relations of individual subcells without the need for referencing measured I–V data, which is in stark contrast to previous works. Moreover, our measurements quantify the absolute rates of junction loss, non-radiative loss, radiative loss, and luminescence coupling in the subcells, which constitute the “balance sheets” of tandem solar cells. PMID:25592484

  8. Quantum computing

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shu-Shen; Long, Gui-Lu; Bai, Feng-Shan; Feng, Song-Lin; Zheng, Hou-Zhi

    2001-01-01

    Quantum computing is a quickly growing research field. This article introduces the basic concepts of quantum computing, recent developments in quantum searching, and decoherence in a possible quantum dot realization. PMID:11562459

  9. Combined Use of Absolute and Differential Seismic Arrival Time Data to Improve Absolute Event Location

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, S.; Johannesson, G.

    2012-12-01

    Arrival time measurements based on waveform cross correlation are becoming more common as advanced signal processing methods are applied to seismic data archives and real-time data streams. Waveform correlation can precisely measure the time difference between the arrival of two phases, and differential time data can be used to constrain relative location of events. Absolute locations are needed for many applications, which generally requires the use of absolute time data. Current methods for measuring absolute time data are approximately two orders of magnitude less precise than differential time measurements. To exploit the strengths of both absolute and differential time data, we extend our multiple-event location method Bayesloc, which previously used absolute time data only, to include the use of differential time measurements that are based on waveform cross correlation. Fundamentally, Bayesloc is a formulation of the joint probability over all parameters comprising the multiple event location system. The Markov-Chain Monte Carlo method is used to sample from the joint probability distribution given arrival data sets. The differential time component of Bayesloc includes scaling a stochastic estimate of differential time measurement precision based the waveform correlation coefficient for each datum. For a regional-distance synthetic data set with absolute and differential time measurement error of 0.25 seconds and 0.01 second, respectively, epicenter location accuracy is improved from and average of 1.05 km when solely absolute time data are used to 0.28 km when absolute and differential time data are used jointly (73% improvement). The improvement in absolute location accuracy is the result of conditionally limiting absolute location probability regions based on the precise relative position with respect to neighboring events. Bayesloc estimates of data precision are found to be accurate for the synthetic test, with absolute and differential time measurement

  10. Low cost varying synthetic wavelength technique for absolute distance measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Floch, S.; Salvadé, Y.

    2010-04-01

    A new low-cost superheterodyne configuration, without acousto-optic modulator, is applied to the two-wavelength interferometry for absolute distance measurement. The principle relies on a synchronized frequency sweep of two optical signals, but with different frequency excursions. The frequency difference between the two optical waves is highly accurate. This is realized by injecting a frequency modulated laser signal in an intensity modulator that is biased at halfwave voltage and driven by a digitally swept radio-frequency signal between 13 and 15 GHz. This latter is a continuous up and down ramp. The two synchronized optical signals emerging from the modulator produce in a Michelson interferometer a distance dependent superheterodyne signal, with a variable synthetic wavelength of about 10 mm. The superheterodyne frequency depends linearly on distance and on the radio-frequency excursion. The integration time for a distance measurement point corresponds to the duration of single sweep (i.e. one millisecond in our case). Absolute distance measurements from 1 to 15 meters yield an accuracy of +/-50 μm, showing the validity of the technique.

  11. Absolute photoionization cross-section of the methyl radical.

    SciTech Connect

    Taatjes, C. A.; Osborn, D. L.; Selby, T.; Meloni, G.; Fan, H.; Pratt, S. T.; Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division; SNL

    2008-01-01

    The absolute photoionization cross-section of the methyl radical has been measured using two completely independent methods. The CH{sub 3} photoionization cross-section was determined relative to that of acetone and methyl vinyl ketone at photon energies of 10.2 and 11.0 eV by using a pulsed laser-photolysis/time-resolved synchrotron photoionization mass spectrometry method. The time-resolved depletion of the acetone or methyl vinyl ketone precursor and the production of methyl radicals following 193 nm photolysis are monitored simultaneously by using time-resolved synchrotron photoionization mass spectrometry. Comparison of the initial methyl signal with the decrease in precursor signal, in combination with previously measured absolute photoionization cross-sections of the precursors, yields the absolute photoionization cross-section of the methyl radical; {sigma}{sub CH}(10.2 eV) = (5.7 {+-} 0.9) x 10{sup -18} cm{sup 2} and {sigma}{sub CH{sub 3}}(11.0 eV) = (6.0 {+-} 2.0) x 10{sup -18} cm{sup 2}. The photoionization cross-section for vinyl radical determined by photolysis of methyl vinyl ketone is in good agreement with previous measurements. The methyl radical photoionization cross-section was also independently measured relative to that of the iodine atom by comparison of ionization signals from CH{sub 3} and I fragments following 266 nm photolysis of methyl iodide in a molecular-beam ion-imaging apparatus. These measurements gave a cross-section of (5.4 {+-} 2.0) x 10{sup -18} cm{sup 2} at 10.460 eV, (5.5 {+-} 2.0) x 10{sup -18} cm{sup 2} at 10.466 eV, and (4.9 {+-} 2.0) x 10{sup -18} cm{sup 2} at 10.471 eV. The measurements allow relative photoionization efficiency spectra of methyl radical to be placed on an absolute scale and will facilitate quantitative measurements of methyl concentrations by photoionization mass spectrometry.

  12. An absolute measure for a key currency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oya, Shunsuke; Aihara, Kazuyuki; Hirata, Yoshito

    It is generally considered that the US dollar and the euro are the key currencies in the world and in Europe, respectively. However, there is no absolute general measure for a key currency. Here, we investigate the 24-hour periodicity of foreign exchange markets using a recurrence plot, and define an absolute measure for a key currency based on the strength of the periodicity. Moreover, we analyze the time evolution of this measure. The results show that the credibility of the US dollar has not decreased significantly since the Lehman shock, when the Lehman Brothers bankrupted and influenced the economic markets, and has increased even relatively better than that of the euro and that of the Japanese yen.

  13. Probing absolute spin polarization at the nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Eltschka, Matthias; Jäck, Berthold; Assig, Maximilian; Kondrashov, Oleg V; Skvortsov, Mikhail A; Etzkorn, Markus; Ast, Christian R; Kern, Klaus

    2014-12-10

    Probing absolute values of spin polarization at the nanoscale offers insight into the fundamental mechanisms of spin-dependent transport. Employing the Zeeman splitting in superconducting tips (Meservey-Tedrow-Fulde effect), we introduce a novel spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy that combines the probing capability of the absolute values of spin polarization with precise control at the atomic scale. We utilize our novel approach to measure the locally resolved spin polarization of magnetic Co nanoislands on Cu(111). We find that the spin polarization is enhanced by 65% when increasing the width of the tunnel barrier by only 2.3 Å due to the different decay of the electron orbitals into vacuum. PMID:25423049

  14. Impact of Winko on absolute discharges.

    PubMed

    Balachandra, Krishna; Swaminath, Sam; Litman, Larry C

    2004-01-01

    In Canada, case laws have had a significant impact on the way mentally ill offenders are managed, both in the criminal justice system and in the forensic mental health system. The Supreme Court of Canada's decision with respect to Winko has set a major precedent in the application of the test of significant risk to the safety of the public in making dispositions by the Ontario Review Board and granting absolute discharges to the mentally ill offenders in the forensic health system. Our study examines the impact of the Supreme Court of Canada's decision before and after Winko. The results show that the numbers of absolute discharges have increased post-Winko, which was statistically significant, but there could be other factors influencing this increase.

  15. Asteroid absolute magnitudes and slope parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tedesco, Edward F.

    1991-01-01

    A new listing of absolute magnitudes (H) and slope parameters (G) has been created and published in the Minor Planet Circulars; this same listing will appear in the 1992 Ephemerides of Minor Planets. Unlike previous listings, the values of the current list were derived from fits of data at the V band. All observations were reduced in the same fashion using, where appropriate, a single basis default value of 0.15 for the slope parameter. Distances and phase angles were computed for each observation. The data for 113 asteroids was of sufficiently high quality to permit derivation of their H and G. These improved absolute magnitudes and slope parameters will be used to deduce the most reliable bias-corrected asteroid size-frequency distribution yet made.

  16. Absolute-magnitude distributions of supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, Dean; Wright, John; Jenkins III, Robert L.; Maddox, Larry

    2014-05-01

    The absolute-magnitude distributions of seven supernova (SN) types are presented. The data used here were primarily taken from the Asiago Supernova Catalogue, but were supplemented with additional data. We accounted for both foreground and host-galaxy extinction. A bootstrap method is used to correct the samples for Malmquist bias. Separately, we generate volume-limited samples, restricted to events within 100 Mpc. We find that the superluminous events (M{sub B} < –21) make up only about 0.1% of all SNe in the bias-corrected sample. The subluminous events (M{sub B} > –15) make up about 3%. The normal Ia distribution was the brightest with a mean absolute blue magnitude of –19.25. The IIP distribution was the dimmest at –16.75.

  17. Absolute and relative dosimetry for ELIMED

    SciTech Connect

    Cirrone, G. A. P.; Schillaci, F.; Scuderi, V.; Cuttone, G.; Candiano, G.; Musumarra, A.; Pisciotta, P.; Romano, F.; Carpinelli, M.; Presti, D. Lo; Raffaele, L.; Tramontana, A.; Cirio, R.; Sacchi, R.; Monaco, V.; Marchetto, F.; Giordanengo, S.

    2013-07-26

    The definition of detectors, methods and procedures for the absolute and relative dosimetry of laser-driven proton beams is a crucial step toward the clinical use of this new kind of beams. Hence, one of the ELIMED task, will be the definition of procedures aiming to obtain an absolute dose measure at the end of the transport beamline with an accuracy as close as possible to the one required for clinical applications (i.e. of the order of 5% or less). Relative dosimetry procedures must be established, as well: they are necessary in order to determine and verify the beam dose distributions and to monitor the beam fluence and the energetic spectra during irradiations. Radiochromic films, CR39, Faraday Cup, Secondary Emission Monitor (SEM) and transmission ionization chamber will be considered, designed and studied in order to perform a fully dosimetric characterization of the ELIMED proton beam.

  18. Absolute photoionization cross sections of atomic oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samson, J. A. R.; Pareek, P. N.

    1985-01-01

    The absolute values of photoionization cross sections of atomic oxygen were measured from the ionization threshold to 120 A. An auto-ionizing resonance belonging to the 2S2P4(4P)3P(3Do, 3So) transition was observed at 479.43 A and another line at 389.97 A. The experimental data is in excellent agreement with rigorous close-coupling calculations that include electron correlations in both the initial and final states.

  19. Absolute photoionization cross sections of atomic oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samson, J. A. R.; Pareek, P. N.

    1982-01-01

    The absolute values of photoionization cross sections of atomic oxygen were measured from the ionization threshold to 120 A. An auto-ionizing resonance belonging to the 2S2P4(4P)3P(3Do, 3So) transition was observed at 479.43 A and another line at 389.97 A. The experimental data is in excellent agreement with rigorous close-coupling calculations that include electron correlations in both the initial and final states.

  20. Relative errors can cue absolute visuomotor mappings.

    PubMed

    van Dam, Loes C J; Ernst, Marc O

    2015-12-01

    When repeatedly switching between two visuomotor mappings, e.g. in a reaching or pointing task, adaptation tends to speed up over time. That is, when the error in the feedback corresponds to a mapping switch, fast adaptation occurs. Yet, what is learned, the relative error or the absolute mappings? When switching between mappings, errors with a size corresponding to the relative difference between the mappings will occur more often than other large errors. Thus, we could learn to correct more for errors with this familiar size (Error Learning). On the other hand, it has been shown that the human visuomotor system can store several absolute visuomotor mappings (Mapping Learning) and can use associated contextual cues to retrieve them. Thus, when contextual information is present, no error feedback is needed to switch between mappings. Using a rapid pointing task, we investigated how these two types of learning may each contribute when repeatedly switching between mappings in the absence of task-irrelevant contextual cues. After training, we examined how participants changed their behaviour when a single error probe indicated either the often-experienced error (Error Learning) or one of the previously experienced absolute mappings (Mapping Learning). Results were consistent with Mapping Learning despite the relative nature of the error information in the feedback. This shows that errors in the feedback can have a double role in visuomotor behaviour: they drive the general adaptation process by making corrections possible on subsequent movements, as well as serve as contextual cues that can signal a learned absolute mapping. PMID:26280315

  1. The absolute spectrophotometric catalog by Anita Cochran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burnashev, V. I.; Burnasheva, B. A.; Ruban, E. V.; Hagen-Torn, E. I.

    2014-06-01

    The absolute spectrophotometric catalog by Anita Cochran is presented in a machine-readable form. The catalog systematizes observations acquired at the McDonald Observatory in 1977-1978. The data are compared with other sources, in particular, the calculated broadband stellar magnitudes are compared with photometric observations by other authors, to show that the observational data given in the catalog are reliable and suitable for a variety of applications. Observations of variable stars of different types make Cochran's catalog especially valuable.

  2. Absolute magnitudes and kinematics of barium stars.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, A. E.; Luri, X.; Grenier, S.; Prevot, L.; Mennessier, M. O.; Figueras, F.; Torra, J.

    1997-03-01

    The absolute magnitude of barium stars has been obtained from kinematical data using a new algorithm based on the maximum-likelihood principle. The method allows to separate a sample into groups characterized by different mean absolute magnitudes, kinematics and z-scale heights. It also takes into account, simultaneously, the censorship in the sample and the errors on the observables. The method has been applied to a sample of 318 barium stars. Four groups have been detected. Three of them show a kinematical behaviour corresponding to disk population stars. The fourth group contains stars with halo kinematics. The luminosities of the disk population groups spread a large range. The intrinsically brightest one (M_v_=-1.5mag, σ_M_=0.5mag) seems to be an inhomogeneous group containing barium binaries as well as AGB single stars. The most numerous group (about 150 stars) has a mean absolute magnitude corresponding to stars in the red giant branch (M_v_=0.9mag, σ_M_=0.8mag). The third group contains barium dwarfs, the obtained mean absolute magnitude is characteristic of stars on the main sequence or on the subgiant branch (M_v_=3.3mag, σ_M_=0.5mag). The obtained mean luminosities as well as the kinematical results are compatible with an evolutionary link between barium dwarfs and classical barium giants. The highly luminous group is not linked with these last two groups. More high-resolution spectroscopic data will be necessary in order to better discriminate between barium and non-barium stars.

  3. Chemical composition of French mimosa absolute oil.

    PubMed

    Perriot, Rodolphe; Breme, Katharina; Meierhenrich, Uwe J; Carenini, Elise; Ferrando, Georges; Baldovini, Nicolas

    2010-02-10

    Since decades mimosa (Acacia dealbata) absolute oil has been used in the flavor and perfume industry. Today, it finds an application in over 80 perfumes, and its worldwide industrial production is estimated five tons per year. Here we report on the chemical composition of French mimosa absolute oil. Straight-chain analogues from C6 to C26 with different functional groups (hydrocarbons, esters, aldehydes, diethyl acetals, alcohols, and ketones) were identified in the volatile fraction. Most of them are long-chain molecules: (Z)-heptadec-8-ene, heptadecane, nonadecane, and palmitic acid are the most abundant, and constituents such as 2-phenethyl alcohol, methyl anisate, and ethyl palmitate are present in smaller amounts. The heavier constituents were mainly triterpenoids such as lupenone and lupeol, which were identified as two of the main components. (Z)-Heptadec-8-ene, lupenone, and lupeol were quantified by GC-MS in SIM mode using external standards and represents 6%, 20%, and 7.8% (w/w) of the absolute oil. Moreover, odorant compounds were extracted by SPME and analyzed by GC-sniffing leading to the perception of 57 odorant zones, of which 37 compounds were identified by their odorant description, mass spectrum, retention index, and injection of the reference compound. PMID:20070087

  4. Measurement of absolute gravity acceleration in Firenze

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Angelis, M.; Greco, F.; Pistorio, A.; Poli, N.; Prevedelli, M.; Saccorotti, G.; Sorrentino, F.; Tino, G. M.

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports the results from the accurate measurement of the acceleration of gravity g taken at two separate premises in the Polo Scientifico of the University of Firenze (Italy). In these laboratories, two separate experiments aiming at measuring the Newtonian constant and testing the Newtonian law at short distances are in progress. Both experiments require an independent knowledge on the local value of g. The only available datum, pertaining to the italian zero-order gravity network, was taken more than 20 years ago at a distance of more than 60 km from the study site. Gravity measurements were conducted using an FG5 absolute gravimeter, and accompanied by seismic recordings for evaluating the noise condition at the site. The absolute accelerations of gravity at the two laboratories are (980 492 160.6 ± 4.0) μGal and (980 492 048.3 ± 3.0) μGal for the European Laboratory for Non-Linear Spectroscopy (LENS) and Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, respectively. Other than for the two referenced experiments, the data here presented will serve as a benchmark for any future study requiring an accurate knowledge of the absolute value of the acceleration of gravity in the study region.

  5. A Methodology for Absolute Isotope Composition Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, J. J.; Lee, D.; Liang, W.

    2007-12-01

    Double spike technique was a well defined method for isotope composition measurement by TIMS of samples which have natural mass fractionation effect, but it is still a problem to define the isotope composition for double spike itself. In this study, we modified the old double spike technique and found that we could use the modified technique to solve the ¡§true¡¨ isotope composition of double spike itself. According the true isotope composition of double spike, we can measure the absolute isotope composition if the sample has natural fractionation effect. A new vector analytical method has been developed in order to obtain the true isotopic composition of a 42Ca-48Ca double spike, and this is achieved by using two different sample-spike mixtures combined with the double spike and the natural Ca data. Because the natural sample, the two mixtures, and the spike should all lie on a single mixing line, we are able to constrain the true isotopic composition of our double spike using this new approach. This method not only can be used in Ca system but also in Ti, Cr, Fe, Ni, Zn, Mo, Ba and Pb systems. The absolute double spike isotopic ratio is important, which can save a lot of time to check different reference standards. Especially for Pb, radiogenic isotope system, the decay systems embodied in three of four naturally occurring isotopes induce difficult to obtain true isotopic ratios for absolute dating.

  6. Chemical composition of French mimosa absolute oil.

    PubMed

    Perriot, Rodolphe; Breme, Katharina; Meierhenrich, Uwe J; Carenini, Elise; Ferrando, Georges; Baldovini, Nicolas

    2010-02-10

    Since decades mimosa (Acacia dealbata) absolute oil has been used in the flavor and perfume industry. Today, it finds an application in over 80 perfumes, and its worldwide industrial production is estimated five tons per year. Here we report on the chemical composition of French mimosa absolute oil. Straight-chain analogues from C6 to C26 with different functional groups (hydrocarbons, esters, aldehydes, diethyl acetals, alcohols, and ketones) were identified in the volatile fraction. Most of them are long-chain molecules: (Z)-heptadec-8-ene, heptadecane, nonadecane, and palmitic acid are the most abundant, and constituents such as 2-phenethyl alcohol, methyl anisate, and ethyl palmitate are present in smaller amounts. The heavier constituents were mainly triterpenoids such as lupenone and lupeol, which were identified as two of the main components. (Z)-Heptadec-8-ene, lupenone, and lupeol were quantified by GC-MS in SIM mode using external standards and represents 6%, 20%, and 7.8% (w/w) of the absolute oil. Moreover, odorant compounds were extracted by SPME and analyzed by GC-sniffing leading to the perception of 57 odorant zones, of which 37 compounds were identified by their odorant description, mass spectrum, retention index, and injection of the reference compound.

  7. The Carina Project: Absolute and Relative Calibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corsi, C. E.; Bono, G.; Walker, A. R.; Brocato, E.; Buonanno, R.; Caputo, F.; Castellani, M.; Castellani, V.; Dall'Ora, M.; Marconi, M.; Monelli, M.; Nonino, M.; Pulone, L.; Ripepi, V.; Smith, H. A.

    We discuss the reduction strategy adopted to perform the relative and the absolute calibration of the Wide Field Imager (WFI) available at the 2.2m ESO/MPI telescope and of the Mosaic Camera (MC) available at the 4m CTIO Blanco telescope. To properly constrain the occurrence of deceptive systematic errors in the relative calibration we observed with each chip the same set of stars. Current photometry seems to suggest that the WFI shows a positional effect when moving from the top to the bottom of individual chips. Preliminary results based on an independent data set collected with the MC suggest that this camera is only marginally affected by the same problem. To perform the absolute calibration we observed with each chip the same set of standard stars. The sample covers a wide color range and the accuracy both in the B and in the V-band appears to be of the order of a few hundredths of magnitude. Finally, we briefly outline the observing strategy to improve both relative and absolute calibrations of mosaic CCD cameras.

  8. Quantum Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auletta, Gennaro; Fortunato, Mauro; Parisi, Giorgio

    2014-01-01

    Introduction; Part I. Basic Features of Quantum Mechanics: 1. From classical mechanics to quantum mechanics; 2. Quantum observable and states; 3. Quantum dynamics; 4. Examples of quantum dynamics; 5. Density matrix; Part II. More Advanced Topics: 6. Angular momentum and spin; 7. Identical particles; 8. Symmetries and conservation laws; 9. The measurement problem; Part III. Matter and Light: 10. Perturbations and approximation methods; 11. Hydrogen and helium atoms; 12. Hydrogen molecular ion; 13. Quantum optics; Part IV. Quantum Information: State and Correlations: 14. Quantum theory of open systems; 15. State measurement in quantum mechanics; 16. Entanglement: non-separability; 17. Entanglement: quantum information; References; Index.

  9. Quantum plasmonic sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Wenjiang; Lawrie, Benjamin J.; Pooser, Raphael C.

    2015-11-01

    Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensors can reach the quantum noise limit of the optical readout field in various configurations. We demonstrate that two-mode intensity squeezed states produce a further enhancement in sensitivity compared with a classical optical readout when the quantum noise is used to transduce an SPR sensor signal in the Kretschmann configuration. The quantum noise reduction between the twin beams when incident at an angle away from the plasmonic resonance, combined with quantum noise resulting from quantum anticorrelations when on resonance, results in an effective SPR-mediated modulation that yields a measured sensitivity 5 dB better than that with a classical optical readout in this configuration. The theoretical potential of this technique points to resolving particle concentrations with more accuracy than is possible via classical approaches to optical transduction.

  10. Quantum plasmonic sensing

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Wenjiang; Lawrie, Benjamin J.; Pooser, Raphael C.

    2015-11-04

    Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensors can reach the quantum noise limit of the optical readout field in various configurations. We demonstrate that two-mode intensity squeezed states produce a further enhancement in sensitivity compared with a classical optical readout when the quantum noise is used to transduce an SPR sensor signal in the Kretschmann configuration. The quantum noise reduction between the twin beams when incident at an angle away from the plasmonic resonance, combined with quantum noise resulting from quantum anticorrelations when on resonance, results in an effective SPR-mediated modulation that yields a measured sensitivity 5 dB better than that with a classical optical readout in this configuration. Furthermore, the theoretical potential of this technique points to resolving particle concentrations with more accuracy than is possible via classical approaches to optical transduction.

  11. Quantum plasmonic sensing

    DOE PAGES

    Fan, Wenjiang; Lawrie, Benjamin J.; Pooser, Raphael C.

    2015-11-04

    Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensors can reach the quantum noise limit of the optical readout field in various configurations. We demonstrate that two-mode intensity squeezed states produce a further enhancement in sensitivity compared with a classical optical readout when the quantum noise is used to transduce an SPR sensor signal in the Kretschmann configuration. The quantum noise reduction between the twin beams when incident at an angle away from the plasmonic resonance, combined with quantum noise resulting from quantum anticorrelations when on resonance, results in an effective SPR-mediated modulation that yields a measured sensitivity 5 dB better than that withmore » a classical optical readout in this configuration. Furthermore, the theoretical potential of this technique points to resolving particle concentrations with more accuracy than is possible via classical approaches to optical transduction.« less

  12. On the quantum Zeno effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakazato, Hiromichi; Namiki, Mikio; Pascazio, Saverio; Rauch, Helmut

    1995-02-01

    The limit of infinitely frequent measurements (continuous observation), yielding the quantum Zeno paradox, is critically analyzed and shown to be unphysical. A specific example involving neutron spin is considered and some practical estimates are given.

  13. Absolute Radiometric Calibration of EUNIS-06

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, R. J.; Rabin, D. M.; Kent, B. J.; Paustian, W.

    2007-01-01

    The Extreme-Ultraviolet Normal-Incidence Spectrometer (EUNIS) is a soundingrocket payload that obtains imaged high-resolution spectra of individual solar features, providing information about the Sun's corona and upper transition region. Shortly after its successful initial flight last year, a complete end-to-end calibration was carried out to determine the instrument's absolute radiometric response over its Longwave bandpass of 300 - 370A. The measurements were done at the Rutherford-Appleton Laboratory (RAL) in England, using the same vacuum facility and EUV radiation source used in the pre-flight calibrations of both SOHO/CDS and Hinode/EIS, as well as in three post-flight calibrations of our SERTS sounding rocket payload, the precursor to EUNIS. The unique radiation source provided by the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) had been calibrated to an absolute accuracy of 7% (l-sigma) at 12 wavelengths covering our bandpass directly against the Berlin electron storage ring BESSY, which is itself a primary radiometric source standard. Scans of the EUNIS aperture were made to determine the instrument's absolute spectral sensitivity to +- 25%, considering all sources of error, and demonstrate that EUNIS-06 was the most sensitive solar E W spectrometer yet flown. The results will be matched against prior calibrations which relied on combining measurements of individual optical components, and on comparisons with theoretically predicted 'insensitive' line ratios. Coordinated observations were made during the EUNIS-06 flight by SOHO/CDS and EIT that will allow re-calibrations of those instruments as well. In addition, future EUNIS flights will provide similar calibration updates for TRACE, Hinode/EIS, and STEREO/SECCHI/EUVI.

  14. Clock time is absolute and universal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Xinhang

    2015-09-01

    A critical error is found in the Special Theory of Relativity (STR): mixing up the concepts of the STR abstract time of a reference frame and the displayed time of a physical clock, which leads to use the properties of the abstract time to predict time dilation on physical clocks and all other physical processes. Actually, a clock can never directly measure the abstract time, but can only record the result of a physical process during a period of the abstract time such as the number of cycles of oscillation which is the multiplication of the abstract time and the frequency of oscillation. After Lorentz Transformation, the abstract time of a reference frame expands by a factor gamma, but the frequency of a clock decreases by the same factor gamma, and the resulting multiplication i.e. the displayed time of a moving clock remains unchanged. That is, the displayed time of any physical clock is an invariant of Lorentz Transformation. The Lorentz invariance of the displayed times of clocks can further prove within the framework of STR our earth based standard physical time is absolute, universal and independent of inertial reference frames as confirmed by both the physical fact of the universal synchronization of clocks on the GPS satellites and clocks on the earth, and the theoretical existence of the absolute and universal Galilean time in STR which has proved that time dilation and space contraction are pure illusions of STR. The existence of the absolute and universal time in STR has directly denied that the reference frame dependent abstract time of STR is the physical time, and therefore, STR is wrong and all its predictions can never happen in the physical world.

  15. Achieving Climate Change Absolute Accuracy in Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wielicki, Bruce A.; Young, D. F.; Mlynczak, M. G.; Thome, K. J; Leroy, S.; Corliss, J.; Anderson, J. G.; Ao, C. O.; Bantges, R.; Best, F.; Bowman, K.; Brindley, H.; Butler, J. J.; Collins, W.; Dykema, J. A.; Doelling, D. R.; Feldman, D. R.; Fox, N.; Huang, X.; Holz, R.; Huang, Y.; Jennings, D.; Jin, Z.; Johnson, D. G.; Jucks, K.; Kato, S.; Kratz, D. P.; Liu, X.; Lukashin, C.; Mannucci, A. J.; Phojanamongkolkij, N.; Roithmayr, C. M.; Sandford, S.; Taylor, P. C.; Xiong, X.

    2013-01-01

    The Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO) mission will provide a calibration laboratory in orbit for the purpose of accurately measuring and attributing climate change. CLARREO measurements establish new climate change benchmarks with high absolute radiometric accuracy and high statistical confidence across a wide range of essential climate variables. CLARREO's inherently high absolute accuracy will be verified and traceable on orbit to Système Internationale (SI) units. The benchmarks established by CLARREO will be critical for assessing changes in the Earth system and climate model predictive capabilities for decades into the future as society works to meet the challenge of optimizing strategies for mitigating and adapting to climate change. The CLARREO benchmarks are derived from measurements of the Earth's thermal infrared spectrum (5-50 micron), the spectrum of solar radiation reflected by the Earth and its atmosphere (320-2300 nm), and radio occultation refractivity from which accurate temperature profiles are derived. The mission has the ability to provide new spectral fingerprints of climate change, as well as to provide the first orbiting radiometer with accuracy sufficient to serve as the reference transfer standard for other space sensors, in essence serving as a "NIST [National Institute of Standards and Technology] in orbit." CLARREO will greatly improve the accuracy and relevance of a wide range of space-borne instruments for decadal climate change. Finally, CLARREO has developed new metrics and methods for determining the accuracy requirements of climate observations for a wide range of climate variables and uncertainty sources. These methods should be useful for improving our understanding of observing requirements for most climate change observations.

  16. Absolute calibration of the Auger fluorescence detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Bauleo, P.; Brack, J.; Garrard, L.; Harton, J.; Knapik, R.; Meyhandan, R.; Rovero, A.C.; Tamashiro, A.; Warner, D.

    2005-07-01

    Absolute calibration of the Pierre Auger Observatory fluorescence detectors uses a light source at the telescope aperture. The technique accounts for the combined effects of all detector components in a single measurement. The calibrated 2.5 m diameter light source fills the aperture, providing uniform illumination to each pixel. The known flux from the light source and the response of the acquisition system give the required calibration for each pixel. In the lab, light source uniformity is studied using CCD images and the intensity is measured relative to NIST-calibrated photodiodes. Overall uncertainties are presently 12%, and are dominated by systematics.

  17. Absolute rate theories of epigenetic stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walczak, Aleksandra M.; Onuchic, José N.; Wolynes, Peter G.

    2005-12-01

    Spontaneous switching events in most characterized genetic switches are rare, resulting in extremely stable epigenetic properties. We show how simple arguments lead to theories of the rate of such events much like the absolute rate theory of chemical reactions corrected by a transmission factor. Both the probability of the rare cellular states that allow epigenetic escape and the transmission factor depend on the rates of DNA binding and unbinding events and on the rates of protein synthesis and degradation. Different mechanisms of escape from the stable attractors occur in the nonadiabatic, weakly adiabatic, and strictly adiabatic regimes, characterized by the relative values of those input rates. rate theory | stochastic gene expression | gene switches

  18. Characterization of the DARA solar absolute radiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finsterle, W.; Suter, M.; Fehlmann, A.; Kopp, G.

    2011-12-01

    The Davos Absolute Radiometer (DARA) prototype is an Electrical Substitution Radiometer (ESR) which has been developed as a successor of the PMO6 type on future space missions and ground based TSI measurements. The DARA implements an improved thermal design of the cavity detector and heat sink assembly to minimize air-vacuum differences and to maximize thermal symmetry of measuring and compensating cavity. The DARA also employs an inverted viewing geometry to reduce internal stray light. We will report on the characterization and calibration experiments which were carried out at PMOD/WRC and LASP (TRF).

  19. Absolute Priority for a Vehicle in VANET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirani, Rostam; Hendessi, Faramarz; Montazeri, Mohammad Ali; Sheikh Zefreh, Mohammad

    In today's world, traffic jams waste hundreds of hours of our life. This causes many researchers try to resolve the problem with the idea of Intelligent Transportation System. For some applications like a travelling ambulance, it is important to reduce delay even for a second. In this paper, we propose a completely infrastructure-less approach for finding shortest path and controlling traffic light to provide absolute priority for an emergency vehicle. We use the idea of vehicular ad-hoc networking to reduce the imposed travelling time. Then, we simulate our proposed protocol and compare it with a centrally controlled traffic light system.

  20. Absolute method of measuring magnetic susceptibility

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorpe, A.; Senftle, F.E.

    1959-01-01

    An absolute method of standardization and measurement of the magnetic susceptibility of small samples is presented which can be applied to most techniques based on the Faraday method. The fact that the susceptibility is a function of the area under the curve of sample displacement versus distance of the magnet from the sample, offers a simple method of measuring the susceptibility without recourse to a standard sample. Typical results on a few substances are compared with reported values, and an error of less than 2% can be achieved. ?? 1959 The American Institute of Physics.

  1. Quantum memory Quantum memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Gouët, Jean-Louis; Moiseev, Sergey

    2012-06-01

    Interaction of quantum radiation with multi-particle ensembles has sparked off intense research efforts during the past decade. Emblematic of this field is the quantum memory scheme, where a quantum state of light is mapped onto an ensemble of atoms and then recovered in its original shape. While opening new access to the basics of light-atom interaction, quantum memory also appears as a key element for information processing applications, such as linear optics quantum computation and long-distance quantum communication via quantum repeaters. Not surprisingly, it is far from trivial to practically recover a stored quantum state of light and, although impressive progress has already been accomplished, researchers are still struggling to reach this ambitious objective. This special issue provides an account of the state-of-the-art in a fast-moving research area that makes physicists, engineers and chemists work together at the forefront of their discipline, involving quantum fields and atoms in different media, magnetic resonance techniques and material science. Various strategies have been considered to store and retrieve quantum light. The explored designs belong to three main—while still overlapping—classes. In architectures derived from photon echo, information is mapped over the spectral components of inhomogeneously broadened absorption bands, such as those encountered in rare earth ion doped crystals and atomic gases in external gradient magnetic field. Protocols based on electromagnetic induced transparency also rely on resonant excitation and are ideally suited to the homogeneous absorption lines offered by laser cooled atomic clouds or ion Coulomb crystals. Finally off-resonance approaches are illustrated by Faraday and Raman processes. Coupling with an optical cavity may enhance the storage process, even for negligibly small atom number. Multiple scattering is also proposed as a way to enlarge the quantum interaction distance of light with matter. The

  2. The theory research of multi-user quantum access network with Measurement Device Independent quantum key distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Yi-Ming; Li, Yun-Xia; Shi, Lei; Meng, Wen; Cui, Shu-Min; Xu, Zhen-Yu

    2015-10-01

    Quantum access network can't guarantee the absolute security of multi-user detector and eavesdropper can get access to key information through time-shift attack and other ways. Measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution is immune from all the detection attacks, and accomplishes the safe sharing of quantum key. In this paper, that Measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution is used in the application of multi-user quantum access to the network is on the research. By adopting time-division multiplexing technology to achieve the sharing of multiuser detector, the system structure is simplified and the security of quantum key sharing is acquired.

  3. Sentinel-2/MSI absolute calibration: first results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lonjou, V.; Lachérade, S.; Fougnie, B.; Gamet, P.; Marcq, S.; Raynaud, J.-L.; Tremas, T.

    2015-10-01

    Sentinel-2 is an optical imaging mission devoted to the operational monitoring of land and coastal areas. It is developed in partnership between the European Commission and the European Space Agency. The Sentinel-2 mission is based on a satellites constellation deployed in polar sun-synchronous orbit. It will offer a unique combination of global coverage with a wide field of view (290km), a high revisit (5 days with two satellites), a high resolution (10m, 20m and 60m) and multi-spectral imagery (13 spectral bands in visible and shortwave infra-red domains). CNES is involved in the instrument commissioning in collaboration with ESA. This paper reviews all the techniques that will be used to insure an absolute calibration of the 13 spectral bands better than 5% (target 3%), and will present the first results if available. First, the nominal calibration technique, based on an on-board sun diffuser, is detailed. Then, we show how vicarious calibration methods based on acquisitions over natural targets (oceans, deserts, and Antarctica during winter) will be used to check and improve the accuracy of the absolute calibration coefficients. Finally, the verification scheme, exploiting photometer in-situ measurements over Lacrau plain, is described. A synthesis, including spectral coherence, inter-methods agreement and temporal evolution, will conclude the paper.

  4. Experimental results for absolute cylindrical wavefront testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reardon, Patrick J.; Alatawi, Ayshah

    2014-09-01

    Applications for Cylindrical and near-cylindrical surfaces are ever-increasing. However, fabrication of high quality cylindrical surfaces is limited by the difficulty of accurate and affordable metrology. Absolute testing of such surfaces represents a challenge to the optical testing community as cylindrical reference wavefronts are difficult to produce. In this paper, preliminary results for a new method of absolute testing of cylindrical wavefronts are presented. The method is based on the merging of the random ball test method with the fiber optic reference test. The random ball test assumes a large number of interferograms of a good quality sphere with errors that are statistically distributed such that the average of the errors goes to zero. The fiber optic reference test utilizes a specially processed optical fiber to provide a clean high quality reference wave from an incident line focus from the cylindrical wave under test. By taking measurements at different rotation and translations of the fiber, an analogous procedure can be employed to determine the quality of the converging cylindrical wavefront with high accuracy. This paper presents and discusses the results of recent tests of this method using a null optic formed by a COTS cylindrical lens and a free-form polished corrector element.

  5. Absolute Electron Extraction Efficiency of Liquid Xenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamdin, Katayun; Mizrachi, Eli; Morad, James; Sorensen, Peter

    2016-03-01

    Dual phase liquid/gas xenon time projection chambers (TPCs) currently set the world's most sensitive limits on weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs), a favored dark matter candidate. These detectors rely on extracting electrons from liquid xenon into gaseous xenon, where they produce proportional scintillation. The proportional scintillation from the extracted electrons serves to internally amplify the WIMP signal; even a single extracted electron is detectable. Credible dark matter searches can proceed with electron extraction efficiency (EEE) lower than 100%. However, electrons systematically left at the liquid/gas boundary are a concern. Possible effects include spontaneous single or multi-electron proportional scintillation signals in the gas, or charging of the liquid/gas interface or detector materials. Understanding EEE is consequently a serious concern for this class of rare event search detectors. Previous EEE measurements have mostly been relative, not absolute, assuming efficiency plateaus at 100%. I will present an absolute EEE measurement with a small liquid/gas xenon TPC test bed located at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.

  6. Why to compare absolute numbers of mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Sabine; Schulz, Sabine; Schropp, Eva-Maria; Eberhagen, Carola; Simmons, Alisha; Beisker, Wolfgang; Aichler, Michaela; Zischka, Hans

    2014-11-01

    Prompted by pronounced structural differences between rat liver and rat hepatocellular carcinoma mitochondria, we suspected these mitochondrial populations to differ massively in their molecular composition. Aiming to reveal these mitochondrial differences, we came across the issue on how to normalize such comparisons and decided to focus on the absolute number of mitochondria. To this end, fluorescently stained mitochondria were quantified by flow cytometry. For rat liver mitochondria, this approach resulted in mitochondrial protein contents comparable to earlier reports using alternative methods. We determined similar protein contents for rat liver, heart and kidney mitochondria. In contrast, however, lower protein contents were determined for rat brain mitochondria and for mitochondria from the rat hepatocellular carcinoma cell line McA 7777. This result challenges mitochondrial comparisons that rely on equal protein amounts as a typical normalization method. Exemplarily, we therefore compared the activity and susceptibility toward inhibition of complex II of rat liver and hepatocellular carcinoma mitochondria and obtained significant discrepancies by either normalizing to protein amount or to absolute mitochondrial number. Importantly, the latter normalization, in contrast to the former, demonstrated a lower complex II activity and higher susceptibility toward inhibition in hepatocellular carcinoma mitochondria compared to liver mitochondria. These findings demonstrate that solely normalizing to protein amount may obscure essential molecular differences between mitochondrial populations.

  7. Absolute Proper Motions of Southern Globular Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinescu, D. I.; Girard, T. M.; van Altena, W. F.

    1996-05-01

    Our program involves the determination of absolute proper motions with respect to galaxies for a sample of globular clusters situated in the southern sky. The plates cover a 6(deg) x 6(deg) area and are taken with the 51-cm double astrograph at Cesco Observatory in El Leoncito, Argentina. We have developed special methods to deal with the modelling error of the plate transformation and we correct for magnitude equation using the cluster stars. This careful astrometric treatment leads to accuracies of from 0.5 to 1.0 mas/yr for the absolute proper motion of each cluster, depending primarily on the number of measurable cluster stars which in turn is related to the cluster's distance. Space velocities are then derived which, in association with metallicities, provide key information for the formation scenario of the Galaxy, i.e. accretion and/or dissipational collapse. Here we present results for NGC 1851, NGC 6752, NGC 6584, NGC 6362 and NGC 288.

  8. Relational versus absolute representation in categorization.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Darren J; Pothos, Emmanuel M; Perlman, Amotz

    2012-01-01

    This study explores relational-like and absolute-like representations in categorization. Although there is much evidence that categorization processes can involve information about both the particular physical properties of studied instances and abstract (relational) properties, there has been little work on the factors that lead to one kind of representation as opposed to the other. We tested 370 participants in 6 experiments, in which participants had to classify new items into predefined artificial categories. In 4 experiments, we observed a predominantly relational-like mode of classification, and in 2 experiments we observed a shift toward an absolute-like mode of classification. These results suggest 3 factors that promote a relational-like mode of classification: fewer items per group, more training groups, and the presence of a time delay. Overall, we propose that less information about the distributional properties of a category or weaker memory traces for the category exemplars (induced, e.g., by having smaller categories or a time delay) can encourage relational-like categorization.

  9. Transient absolute robustness in stochastic biochemical networks.

    PubMed

    Enciso, German A

    2016-08-01

    Absolute robustness allows biochemical networks to sustain a consistent steady-state output in the face of protein concentration variability from cell to cell. This property is structural and can be determined from the topology of the network alone regardless of rate parameters. An important question regarding these systems is the effect of discrete biochemical noise in the dynamical behaviour. In this paper, a variable freezing technique is developed to show that under mild hypotheses the corresponding stochastic system has a transiently robust behaviour. Specifically, after finite time the distribution of the output approximates a Poisson distribution, centred around the deterministic mean. The approximation becomes increasingly accurate, and it holds for increasingly long finite times, as the total protein concentrations grow to infinity. In particular, the stochastic system retains a transient, absolutely robust behaviour corresponding to the deterministic case. This result contrasts with the long-term dynamics of the stochastic system, which eventually must undergo an extinction event that eliminates robustness and is completely different from the deterministic dynamics. The transiently robust behaviour may be sufficient to carry out many forms of robust signal transduction and cellular decision-making in cellular organisms. PMID:27581485

  10. Measurement of absolute T cell receptor rearrangement diversity.

    PubMed

    Baum, Paul D; Young, Jennifer J; McCune, Joseph M

    2011-05-31

    T cell receptor (TCR) diversity is critical for adaptive immunity. Existing methods for measuring such diversity are qualitative, expensive, and/or of uncertain accuracy. Here, we describe a method and associated reagents for estimating the absolute number of unique TCR Vβ rearrangements present in a given number of cells or volume of blood. Compared to next generation sequencing, this method is rapid, reproducible, and affordable. Diversity of a sample is calculated based on three independent measurements of one Vβ-Jβ family of TCR rearrangements at a time. The percentage of receptors using the given Vβ gene is determined by flow cytometric analysis of T cells stained with anti-Vβ family antibodies. The percentage of receptors using the Vβ gene in combination with the chosen Jβ gene is determined by quantitative PCR. Finally, the absolute clonal diversity of the Vβ-Jβ family is determined with the AmpliCot method of DNA hybridization kinetics, by interpolation relative to PCR standards of known sequence diversity. These three component measurements are reproducible and linear. Using titrations of known numbers of input cells, we show that the TCR diversity estimates obtained by this approach approximate expected values within a two-fold error, have a coefficient of variation of 20%, and yield similar results when different Vβ-Jβ pairs are chosen. The ability to obtain accurate measurements of the total number of different TCR gene rearrangements in a cell sample should be useful for basic studies of the adaptive immune system as well as in clinical studies of conditions such as HIV disease, transplantation, aging, and congenital immunodeficiencies. PMID:21385585

  11. Absolute doubly differential bremsstrahlung cross sections from rare gas atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portillo, Salvador

    The absolute doubly differential bremsstrahlung cross section has been measured for 28 and 50 keV electrons incident on the rare gases Xe, Kr, Ar and Ne. The cross sections are differential with respect to energy and photon emission. A SiLi solid state detector measured data at 90° with respect to the beam line. A thorough analysis of the experimental systematic error yielded a high degree of confidence in the experimental data. The absolute bremsstrahlung doubly differential cross sections provided for a rigorous test of the normal bremsstrahlung theory, tabulated by Kissel, Quarles and Pratt1 (KQP) and of the SA theory2 that includes the contribution from polarization bremsstrahlung. To test the theories a comparison of the overall magnitude of the cross section as well as comparison of the photon energy dependence was carried out. The KQP theoretical values underestimated the magnitude of the cross section for all targets and for both energies. The SA values were in excellent agreement with the 28 keV data. For the 50keV data the fit was also very good. However, there were energy regions where there was a small discrepancy between the theory and the data. This suggests that the Polarization Bremsstrahlung (PB) mechanism does contribute to the overall spectrum and is detectable in this parameter space. 1Kissel, L., Quarles, C. A., Pratt, R. H., Atom. Data Nucl. Data Tables 28, 381 (1983). 2Avdonina N. B., Pratt, R. H., J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 32 4261 (1999).

  12. A Conceptual Approach to Absolute Value Equations and Inequalities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Mark W.; Bryson, Janet L.

    2011-01-01

    The absolute value learning objective in high school mathematics requires students to solve far more complex absolute value equations and inequalities. When absolute value problems become more complex, students often do not have sufficient conceptual understanding to make any sense of what is happening mathematically. The authors suggest that the…

  13. Using, Seeing, Feeling, and Doing Absolute Value for Deeper Understanding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ponce, Gregorio A.

    2008-01-01

    Using sticky notes and number lines, a hands-on activity is shared that anchors initial student thinking about absolute value. The initial point of reference should help students successfully evaluate numeric problems involving absolute value. They should also be able to solve absolute value equations and inequalities that are typically found in…

  14. Quantum Communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinfurter, Harald; Zeilinger, Anton

    Quantum entanglement lies at the heart of the new field of quantum communication and computation. For a long time, entanglement was seen just as one of those fancy features which make quantum mechanics so counterintuitive. But recently, quantum information theory has shown the tremendous importance of quantum correlations for the formulation of new methods of information transfer and for algorithms exploiting the capabilities of quantum computers.This chapter describes the first experimental realizations of quantum communication schemes using entangled photon pairs. We show how to make communication secure against eavesdropping using entanglement-based quantum cryptography, how to increase the information capacity of a quantum channel by quantum dense coding and, finally, how to communicate quantum information itself in the process of quantum teleportation.

  15. Optical Resolution, Determination of Absolute Configuration, and Photoracemization of cis-RuL2(CN)2 (L = 2,2'-Bipyridine and Its Analogues).

    PubMed

    Aihara, Yusuke; Sato, Kyohei; Shinozaki, Kazuteru

    2016-09-01

    We synthesized neutral Ru(II) complexes cis-Ru(bpy)2(CN)2 (bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine), cis-Ru(dmb)2(CN)2 (dmb = 4,4'-dimethyl-2,2'-bipyridine), cis-Ru(dbb)2(CN)2 (dbb = 4,4'-di-tert-butyl-2,2'-bipyridine), and cis-Ru(phen)2(CN)2 (phen = 1,10-phenanthroline) and optically resolved them into respective enantiomers using high-performance liquid chromatography with a chiral column. The absolute configuration of enantiomer of cis-Ru(dbb)2(CN)2 was determined by an X-ray crystallography. Upon photoirradiation, the entire enantiomers of the complexes underwent the racemization with considerably slow rates (k = 1 × 10(-6) to 1 × 10(-5) s(-1)) and small quantum yields (ϕ = 1 × 10(-6) to 1 × 10(-5)). The photoracemization was concluded to proceed via a five-coordinate pyramidal intermediate with the base plane composed of Ru, bidentate polypyridine, and two cyanides and the axial ligand of monodentate polypyridine. We derived the equations for photoracemization rate and quantum yield by a kinetics analysis of the photoracemization reaction that depended on polypyridine ligand, solvent, temperature, wavelength and intensity of irradiation light, and emission lifetime. From the temperature-dependent photoracemization reaction, the energy gap between (3)MLCT (metal-to-ligand charge transfer) and (3)d-d* states was estimated as ΔE = 4000-5000 cm(-1), and the energy of invisible (3)d-d* state was estimated to be ca. 20 500 cm(-1), which was in good agreement with that of [Ru(bpy)3](2+). PMID:27518826

  16. The Absolute Radiometric Calibration of Space - Sensors.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holm, Ronald Gene

    1987-09-01

    The need for absolute radiometric calibration of space-based sensors will continue to increase as new generations of space sensors are developed. A reflectance -based in-flight calibration procedure is used to determine the radiance reaching the entrance pupil of the sensor. This procedure uses ground-based measurements coupled with a radiative transfer code to characterize the effects the atmosphere has on the signal reaching the sensor. The computed radiance is compared to the digital count output of the sensor associated with the image of a test site. This provides an update to the preflight calibration of the system and a check on the on-board internal calibrator. This calibration procedure was used to perform a series of five calibrations of the Landsat-5 Thematic Mapper (TM). For the 12 measurements made in TM bands 1-3, the RMS variation from the mean as a percentage of the mean is (+OR-) 1.9%, and for measurements in the IR, TM bands 4,5, and 7, the value is (+OR-) 3.4%. The RMS variation for all 23 measurements is (+OR-) 2.8%. The absolute calibration techniques were put to another test with a series of three calibration of the SPOT-1 High Resolution Visible, (HRV), sensors. The ratio, HRV-2/HRV-1, of absolute calibration coefficients compared very well with ratios of histogrammed data obtained when the cameras simultaneously imaged the same ground site. Bands PA, B1 and B3 agreed to within 3%, while band B2 showed a 7% difference. The procedure for performing a satellite calibration was then used to demonstrate how a calibrated satellite sensor can be used to quantitatively evaluate surface reflectance over a wide range of surface features. Predicted reflectance factors were compared to values obtained from aircraft -based radiometer data. This procedure was applied on four dates with two different surface conditions per date. A strong correlation, R('2) = .996, was shown between reflectance values determined from satellite imagery and low-flying aircraft

  17. Use of Absolute and Comparative Performance Feedback in Absolute and Comparative Judgments and Decisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Don A.; Klein, William M. P.

    2008-01-01

    Which matters more--beliefs about absolute ability or ability relative to others? This study set out to compare the effects of such beliefs on satisfaction with performance, self-evaluations, and bets on future performance. In Experiment 1, undergraduate participants were told they had answered 20% correct, 80% correct, or were not given their…

  18. Absolute radiometric calibration of the CCRS SAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulander, Lars M. H.; Hawkins, Robert K.; Livingstone, Charles E.; Lukowski, Tom I.

    1991-11-01

    Determining the radar scattering coefficients from SAR (synthetic aperture radar) image data requires absolute radiometric calibration of the SAR system. The authors describe an internal calibration methodology for the airborne Canada Centre for Remote Sensing (CCRS) SAR system, based on radar theory, a detailed model of the radar system, and measurements of system parameters. The methodology is verified by analyzing external calibration data acquired over a 6-month period in 1988 by the C-band radar using HH polarization. The results indicate that the overall error is +/- 0.8 dB (1-sigma) for incidence angles +/- 20 deg from antenna boresight. The dominant error contributions are due to the antenna radome and uncertainties in the elevation angle relative to the antenna boresight.

  19. Absolute calibration of ultraviolet filter photometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bless, R. C.; Fairchild, T.; Code, A. D.

    1972-01-01

    The essential features of the calibration procedure can be divided into three parts. First, the shape of the bandpass of each photometer was determined by measuring the transmissions of the individual optical components and also by measuring the response of the photometer as a whole. Secondly, each photometer was placed in the essentially-collimated synchrotron radiation bundle maintained at a constant intensity level, and the output signal was determined from about 100 points on the objective. Finally, two or three points on the objective were illuminated by synchrotron radiation at several different intensity levels covering the dynamic range of the photometers. The output signals were placed on an absolute basis by the electron counting technique described earlier.

  20. Absolute geostrophic currents in global tropical oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Lina; Yuan, Dongliang

    2016-11-01

    A set of absolute geostrophic current (AGC) data for the period January 2004 to December 2012 are calculated using the P-vector method based on monthly gridded Argo profiles in the world tropical oceans. The AGCs agree well with altimeter geostrophic currents, Ocean Surface Current Analysis-Real time currents, and moored current-meter measurements at 10-m depth, based on which the classical Sverdrup circulation theory is evaluated. Calculations have shown that errors of wind stress calculation, AGC transport, and depth ranges of vertical integration cannot explain non-Sverdrup transport, which is mainly in the subtropical western ocean basins and equatorial currents near the Equator in each ocean basin (except the North Indian Ocean, where the circulation is dominated by monsoons). The identified non-Sverdrup transport is thereby robust and attributed to the joint effect of baroclinicity and relief of the bottom (JEBAR) and mesoscale eddy nonlinearity.

  1. Absolute Measurement of Electron Cloud Density

    SciTech Connect

    Covo, M K; Molvik, A W; Cohen, R H; Friedman, A; Seidl, P A; Logan, G; Bieniosek, F; Baca, D; Vay, J; Orlando, E; Vujic, J L

    2007-06-21

    Beam interaction with background gas and walls produces ubiquitous clouds of stray electrons that frequently limit the performance of particle accelerator and storage rings. Counterintuitively we obtained the electron cloud accumulation by measuring the expelled ions that are originated from the beam-background gas interaction, rather than by measuring electrons that reach the walls. The kinetic ion energy measured with a retarding field analyzer (RFA) maps the depressed beam space-charge potential and provides the dynamic electron cloud density. Clearing electrode current measurements give the static electron cloud background that complements and corroborates with the RFA measurements, providing an absolute measurement of electron cloud density during a 5 {micro}s duration beam pulse in a drift region of the magnetic transport section of the High-Current Experiment (HCX) at LBNL.

  2. Micron Accurate Absolute Ranging System: Range Extension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalley, Larry L.; Smith, Kely L.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to investigate Fresnel diffraction as a means of obtaining absolute distance measurements with micron or greater accuracy. It is believed that such a system would prove useful to the Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST) as a non-intrusive, non-contact measuring system for use with secondary concentrator station-keeping systems. The present research attempts to validate past experiments and develop ways to apply the phenomena of Fresnel diffraction to micron accurate measurement. This report discusses past research on the phenomena, and the basis of the use Fresnel diffraction distance metrology. The apparatus used in the recent investigations, experimental procedures used, preliminary results are discussed in detail. Continued research and equipment requirements on the extension of the effective range of the Fresnel diffraction systems is also described.

  3. Absolute calibration of remote sensing instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biggar, S. F.; Bruegge, C. J.; Capron, B. A.; Castle, K. R.; Dinguirard, M. C.; Holm, R. G.; Lingg, L. J.; Mao, Y.; Palmer, J. M.; Phillips, A. L.

    1985-12-01

    Source-based and detector-based methods for the absolute radiometric calibration of a broadband field radiometer are described. Using such a radiometer, calibrated by both methods, the calibration of the integrating sphere used in the preflight calibration of the Thematic Mapper was redetermined. The results are presented. The in-flight calibration of space remote sensing instruments is discussed. A method which uses the results of ground-based reflectance and atmospheric measurements as input to a radiative transfer code to predict the radiance at the instrument is described. A calibrated, helicopter-mounted radiometer is used to determine the radiance levels at intermediate altitudes to check the code predictions. Results of such measurements for the calibration of the Thematic Mapper on Landsat 5 and an analysis that shows the value of such measurements are described.

  4. Absolute radiometric calibration of the Thematic Mapper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, P. N.; Biggar, S. F.; Holm, R. G.; Jackson, R. D.; Mao, Y.

    1986-01-01

    Calibration data for the solar reflective bands of the Landsat-5 TM obtained from five in-flight absolute radiometric calibrations from July 1984-November 1985 at White Sands, New Mexico are presented and analyzed. Ground reflectance and atmospheric data were utilized to predict the spectral radiance at the entrance pupil of the TM and the average number of digital counts in each TM band. The calibration of each of the TM solar reflective bands was calculated in terms of average digital counts/unit spectral radiance for each band. It is observed that for the 12 reflectance-based measurements the rms variation from the means as a percentage of the mean is + or - 1.9 percent; for the 11 measurements in the IR bands, it is + or - 3.4 percent; and the rms variation for all 23 measurements is + or - 2.8 percent.

  5. Swarm's Absolute Scalar Magnetometer metrological performances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leger, J.; Fratter, I.; Bertrand, F.; Jager, T.; Morales, S.

    2012-12-01

    The Absolute Scalar Magnetometer (ASM) has been developed for the ESA Earth Observation Swarm mission, planned for launch in November 2012. As its Overhauser magnetometers forerunners flown on Oersted and Champ satellites, it will deliver high resolution scalar measurements for the in-flight calibration of the Vector Field Magnetometer manufactured by the Danish Technical University. Latest results of the ground tests carried out to fully characterize all parameters that may affect its accuracy, both at instrument and satellite level, will be presented. In addition to its baseline function, the ASM can be operated either at a much higher sampling rate (burst mode at 250 Hz) or in a dual mode where it also delivers vector field measurements as a by-product. The calibration procedure and the relevant vector performances will be discussed.

  6. MAGSAT: Vector magnetometer absolute sensor alignment determination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acuna, M. H.

    1981-01-01

    A procedure is described for accurately determining the absolute alignment of the magnetic axes of a triaxial magnetometer sensor with respect to an external, fixed, reference coordinate system. The method does not require that the magnetic field vector orientation, as generated by a triaxial calibration coil system, be known to better than a few degrees from its true position, and minimizes the number of positions through which a sensor assembly must be rotated to obtain a solution. Computer simulations show that accuracies of better than 0.4 seconds of arc can be achieved under typical test conditions associated with existing magnetic test facilities. The basic approach is similar in nature to that presented by McPherron and Snare (1978) except that only three sensor positions are required and the system of equations to be solved is considerably simplified. Applications of the method to the case of the MAGSAT Vector Magnetometer are presented and the problems encountered discussed.

  7. Quantum simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgescu, I. M.; Ashhab, S.; Nori, Franco

    2014-01-01

    Simulating quantum mechanics is known to be a difficult computational problem, especially when dealing with large systems. However, this difficulty may be overcome by using some controllable quantum system to study another less controllable or accessible quantum system, i.e., quantum simulation. Quantum simulation promises to have applications in the study of many problems in, e.g., condensed-matter physics, high-energy physics, atomic physics, quantum chemistry, and cosmology. Quantum simulation could be implemented using quantum computers, but also with simpler, analog devices that would require less control, and therefore, would be easier to construct. A number of quantum systems such as neutral atoms, ions, polar molecules, electrons in semiconductors, superconducting circuits, nuclear spins, and photons have been proposed as quantum simulators. This review outlines the main theoretical and experimental aspects of quantum simulation and emphasizes some of the challenges and promises of this fast-growing field.

  8. Quantum Mechanics in Insulators

    SciTech Connect

    Aeppli, G.

    2009-08-20

    Atomic physics is undergoing a large revival because of the possibility of trapping and cooling ions and atoms both for individual quantum control as well as collective quantum states, such as Bose-Einstein condensates. The present lectures start from the 'atomic' physics of isolated atoms in semiconductors and insulators and proceed to coupling them together to yield magnets undergoing quantum phase transitions as well as displaying novel quantum states with no classical analogs. The lectures are based on: G.-Y. Xu et al., Science 317, 1049-1052 (2007); G. Aeppli, P. Warburton, C. Renner, BT Technology Journal, 24, 163-169 (2006); H. M. Ronnow et al., Science 308, 392-395 (2005) and N. Q. Vinh et al., PNAS 105, 10649-10653 (2008).

  9. Quantum Criticality and Black Holes

    SciTech Connect

    Sachdev, Subir

    2007-08-22

    I will describe the behavior of a variety of condensed matter systems in the vicinity of zero temperature quantum phase transitions. There is a remarkable analogy between the hydrodynamics of such systems and the quantum theory of black holes. I will show how insights from this analogy have shed light on recent experiments on the cuprate high temperature superconductors. Studies of new materials and trapped ultracold atoms are yielding new quantum phases, with novel forms of quantum entanglement. Some materials are of technological importance: e.g. high temperature superconductors. Exact solutions via black hole mapping have yielded first exact results for transport coefficients in interacting many-body systems, and were valuable in determining general structure of hydrodynamics. Theory of VBS order and Nernst effect in cuprates. Tabletop 'laboratories for the entire universe': quantum mechanics of black holes, quark-gluon plasma, neutrons stars, and big-bang physics.

  10. Quantum Criticality and Black Holes

    ScienceCinema

    Sachdev, Subir [Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States

    2016-07-12

    I will describe the behavior of a variety of condensed matter systems in the vicinity of zero temperature quantum phase transitions. There is a remarkable analogy between the hydrodynamics of such systems and the quantum theory of black holes. I will show how insights from this analogy have shed light on recent experiments on the cuprate high temperature superconductors. Studies of new materials and trapped ultracold atoms are yielding new quantum phases, with novel forms of quantum entanglement. Some materials are of technological importance: e.g. high temperature superconductors. Exact solutions via black hole mapping have yielded first exact results for transport coefficients in interacting many-body systems, and were valuable in determining general structure of hydrodynamics. Theory of VBS order and Nernst effect in cuprates. Tabletop 'laboratories for the entire universe': quantum mechanics of black holes, quark-gluon plasma, neutrons stars, and big-bang physics.

  11. Measurement of the Absolute Branching Fraction of D0 to K- pi+

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.; Bona, M.; Boutigny, D.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Lopez, L.; Palano, A.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Abrams, G.S.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Button-Shafer, J.; /LBL, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Munich, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /Frascati /Genoa U. /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Karlsruhe U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT, LNS /McGill U. /Maryland U. /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /Perugia U. /Pisa U. /Prairie View A-M /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DSM, DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /Turin U. /Trieste U. /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison /Yale U.

    2007-04-25

    The authors measure the absolute branching fraction for D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup -} {pi}{sup +} using partial reconstruction of {bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D*{sup +}X{ell}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {ell}} decays, in which only the charged lepton and the pion from the decay D*{sup +} {yields} D{sup 0}{pi}{sup +} are used. Based on a data sample of 230 million B{bar B} pairs collected at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B Factory at SLAC, they obtain {Beta}(D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}) = (4.007 {+-} 0.037 {+-} 0.070)%, where the first error is statistical and the second error is systematic.

  12. Exact quantum dynamics study of the O{sup +}+H{sub 2}(v=0,j=0){yields}OH{sup +}+H ion-molecule reaction and comparison with quasiclassical trajectory calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, Rodrigo; Lucas, Josep M.; Gimenez, Xavier; Aguilar, Antonio; Gonzalez, Miguel

    2006-04-14

    The close-coupling hyperspherical (CCH) exact quantum method was used to study the title barrierless reaction up to a collision energy (E{sub T}) of 0.75 eV, and the results compared with quasiclassical trajectory (QCT) calculations to determine the importance of quantum effects. The CCH integral cross section decreased with E{sub T} and, although the QCT results were in general quite similar to the CCH ones, they presented a significant deviation from the CCH data within the 0.2-0.6 eV collision energy range, where the QCT method did not correctly describe the reaction probability. A very good accord between both methods was obtained for the OH{sup +} vibrational distribution, where no inversion of population was found. For the OH{sup +} rotational distributions, the agreement between the CCH and QCT results was not as good as in the vibrational case, but it was satisfactory in many conditions. The kk{sup '} angular distribution showed a preferential forward character, and the CCH method produced higher forward peaks than the QCT one. All the results were interpreted considering the potential energy surface and plots of a representative sampling of reactive trajectories.

  13. Quantum reduction to Bianchi I models in loop quantum gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodendorfer, N.

    2015-04-01

    We propose a quantum symmetry reduction of loop quantum gravity to Bianchi I spacetimes. To this end, we choose the diagonal metric gauge for the spatial diffeomorphism constraint at the classical level, leading to an RBohr gauge theory, and quantize the resulting theory via loop quantum gravity methods. Constraints which lead classically to a suitable reduction are imposed at the quantum level. The dynamics of the resulting model turn out to be very simple and manifestly coincide with those of a polymer quantization of a Bianchi I model for the simplest choice of full theory quantum states compatible with the Bianchi I reduction. In particular, the "improved" μ ¯ dynamics of loop quantum cosmology can be obtained by modifying the regularization of the Hamiltonian constraint with similar ideas, in turn yielding insights into the full theory dynamics.

  14. A Concurrent Mixed Methods Approach to Examining the Quantitative and Qualitative Meaningfulness of Absolute Magnitude Estimation Scales in Survey Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koskey, Kristin L. K.; Stewart, Victoria C.

    2014-01-01

    This small "n" observational study used a concurrent mixed methods approach to address a void in the literature with regard to the qualitative meaningfulness of the data yielded by absolute magnitude estimation scaling (MES) used to rate subjective stimuli. We investigated whether respondents' scales progressed from less to more and…

  15. Single-step direct fabrication of luminescent Cu-doped Zn(x)Cd(1-x)S quantum dot thin films via a molecular precursor solution approach and their application in luminescent, transparent, and conductive thin films.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yanyan; Li, Shenjie; Huang, Lijian; Pan, Daocheng

    2014-08-21

    Luminescent Cu-doped ZnxCd1-xS quantum dot thin films have been directly fabricated via a facile solution method in open air. Cu2O, ZnO, and Cd(OH)2 were used as starting materials, and 3-mercaptopropionic acid was used as the capping agent. The effects of Cu dopant concentration, sintering temperature, and sintering time on the photoluminescence properties of Cu-doped ZnxCd1-xS nanocrystal thin films have been systematically investigated. As-prepared quantum dot thin films exhibit tunable emission covering the whole visible light region and the absolute photoluminescence quantum yields can reach as high as 25.5%, which have high potential for applications in luminescent, transparent, and conductive thin films.

  16. Cloning of a quantum measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Bisio, Alessandro; D'Ariano, Giacomo Mauro; Perinotti, Paolo; Sedlak, Michal

    2011-10-15

    We analyze quantum algorithms for cloning of a quantum measurement. Our aim is to mimic two uses of a device performing an unknown von Neumann measurement with a single use of the device. When the unknown device has to be used before the bipartite state to be measured is available we talk about 1{yields}2 learning of the measurement, otherwise the task is called 1{yields}2 cloning of a measurement. We perform the optimization for both learning and cloning for arbitrary dimension d of the Hilbert space. For 1{yields}2 cloning we also propose a simple quantum network that achieves the optimal fidelity. The optimal fidelity for 1{yields}2 learning just slightly outperforms the estimate and prepare strategy in which one first estimates the unknown measurement and depending on the result suitably prepares the duplicate.

  17. Quantum ontologies

    SciTech Connect

    Stapp, H.P.

    1988-12-01

    Quantum ontologies are conceptions of the constitution of the universe that are compatible with quantum theory. The ontological orientation is contrasted to the pragmatic orientation of science, and reasons are given for considering quantum ontologies both within science, and in broader contexts. The principal quantum ontologies are described and evaluated. Invited paper at conference: Bell's Theorem, Quantum Theory, and Conceptions of the Universe, George Mason University, October 20-21, 1988. 16 refs.

  18. Weighted Wilcoxon-type Smoothly Clipped Absolute Deviation Method

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lan; Li, Runze

    2009-01-01

    Summary Shrinkage-type variable selection procedures have recently seen increasing applications in biomedical research. However, their performance can be adversely influenced by outliers in either the response or the covariate space. This paper proposes a weighted Wilcoxon-type smoothly clipped absolute deviation (WW-SCAD) method, which deals with robust variable selection and robust estimation simultaneously. The new procedure can be conveniently implemented with the statistical software R. We establish that the WW-SCAD correctly identifies the set of zero coefficients with probability approaching one and estimates the nonzero coefficients with the rate n−1/2. Moreover, with appropriately chosen weights the WW-SCAD is robust with respect to outliers in both the x and y directions. The important special case with constant weights yields an oracle-type estimator with high efficiency at the presence of heavier-tailed random errors. The robustness of the WW-SCAD is partly justified by its asymptotic performance under local shrinking contamination. We propose a BIC-type tuning parameter selector for the WW-SCAD. The performance of the WW-SCAD is demonstrated via simulations and by an application to a study that investigates the effects of personal characteristics and dietary factors on plasma beta-carotene level. PMID:18647294

  19. Quantum Computer Games: Quantum Minesweeper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Michal; Gordon, Goren

    2010-01-01

    The computer game of quantum minesweeper is introduced as a quantum extension of the well-known classical minesweeper. Its main objective is to teach the unique concepts of quantum mechanics in a fun way. Quantum minesweeper demonstrates the effects of superposition, entanglement and their non-local characteristics. While in the classical…

  20. On the absolute alignment of GONG images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toner, C. G.

    2001-01-01

    In order to combine data from the six instruments in the GONG network the alignment of all of the images must be known to a fairly high precision (~0°.1 for GONG Classic and ~0°.01 for GONG+). The relative orientation is obtained using the angular cross-correlation method described by (Toner & Harvey, 1998). To obtain the absolute orientation the Project periodically records a day of drift scans, where the image of the Sun is allowed to drift across the CCD repeatedly throughout the day. These data are then analyzed to deduce the direction of Terrestrial East-West as a function of hour angle (i.e., time) for that instrument. The transit of Mercury on Nov. 15, 1999, which was recorded by three of the GONG instruments, provided an independent check on the current alignment procedures. Here we present a comparison of the alignment of GONG images as deduced from both drift scans and the Mercury transit for two GONG sites: Tucson (GONG+ camera) and Mauna Loa (GONG Classic camera). The agreement is within ~0°.01 for both cameras, however, the scatter is substantially larger for GONG Classic: ~0°.03 compared to ~0°.01 for GONG+.

  1. Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leckey, John P.

    2015-01-01

    The Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO) is a mission, led and developed by NASA, that will measure a variety of climate variables with an unprecedented accuracy to quantify and attribute climate change. CLARREO consists of three separate instruments: an infrared (IR) spectrometer, a reflected solar (RS) spectrometer, and a radio occultation (RO) instrument. The mission will contain orbiting radiometers with sufficient accuracy, including on orbit verification, to calibrate other space-based instrumentation, increasing their respective accuracy by as much as an order of magnitude. The IR spectrometer is a Fourier Transform spectrometer (FTS) working in the 5 to 50 microns wavelength region with a goal of 0.1 K (k = 3) accuracy. The FTS will achieve this accuracy using phase change cells to verify thermistor accuracy and heated halos to verify blackbody emissivity, both on orbit. The RS spectrometer will measure the reflectance of the atmosphere in the 0.32 to 2.3 microns wavelength region with an accuracy of 0.3% (k = 2). The status of the instrumentation packages and potential mission options will be presented.

  2. Absolute flux measurements for swift atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fink, M.; Kohl, D. A.; Keto, J. W.; Antoniewicz, P.

    1987-01-01

    While a torsion balance in vacuum can easily measure the momentum transfer from a gas beam impinging on a surface attached to the balance, this measurement depends on the accommodation coefficients of the atoms with the surface and the distribution of the recoil. A torsion balance is described for making absolute flux measurements independent of recoil effects. The torsion balance is a conventional taut suspension wire design and the Young modulus of the wire determines the relationship between the displacement and the applied torque. A compensating magnetic field is applied to maintain zero displacement and provide critical damping. The unique feature is to couple the impinging gas beam to the torsion balance via a Wood's horn, i.e., a thin wall tube with a gradual 90 deg bend. Just as light is trapped in a Wood's horn by specular reflection from the curved surfaces, the gas beam diffuses through the tube. Instead of trapping the beam, the end of the tube is open so that the atoms exit the tube at 90 deg to their original direction. Therefore, all of the forward momentum of the gas beam is transferred to the torsion balance independent of the angle of reflection from the surfaces inside the tube.

  3. Gyrokinetic Statistical Absolute Equilibrium and Turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Jian-Zhou Zhu and Gregory W. Hammett

    2011-01-10

    A paradigm based on the absolute equilibrium of Galerkin-truncated inviscid systems to aid in understanding turbulence [T.-D. Lee, "On some statistical properties of hydrodynamical and magnetohydrodynamical fields," Q. Appl. Math. 10, 69 (1952)] is taken to study gyrokinetic plasma turbulence: A finite set of Fourier modes of the collisionless gyrokinetic equations are kept and the statistical equilibria are calculated; possible implications for plasma turbulence in various situations are discussed. For the case of two spatial and one velocity dimension, in the calculation with discretization also of velocity v with N grid points (where N + 1 quantities are conserved, corresponding to an energy invariant and N entropy-related invariants), the negative temperature states, corresponding to the condensation of the generalized energy into the lowest modes, are found. This indicates a generic feature of inverse energy cascade. Comparisons are made with some classical results, such as those of Charney-Hasegawa-Mima in the cold-ion limit. There is a universal shape for statistical equilibrium of gyrokinetics in three spatial and two velocity dimensions with just one conserved quantity. Possible physical relevance to turbulence, such as ITG zonal flows, and to a critical balance hypothesis are also discussed.

  4. First experimental determination of the absolute gas-phase rate coefficient for the reaction of OH with 4-hydroxy-2-butanone (4H2B) at 294 K by vapor pressure measurements of 4H2B.

    PubMed

    El Dib, Gisèle; Sleiman, Chantal; Canosa, André; Travers, Daniel; Courbe, Jonathan; Sawaya, Terufat; Mokbel, Ilham; Chakir, Abdelkhaleq

    2013-01-10

    The reaction of the OH radicals with 4-hydroxy-2-butanone was investigated in the gas phase using an absolute rate method at room temperature and over the pressure range 10-330 Torr in He and air as diluent gases. The rate coefficients were measured using pulsed laser photolysis (PLP) of H(2)O(2) to produce OH and laser induced fluorescence (LIF) to measure the OH temporal profile. An average value of (4.8 ± 1.2) × 10(-12) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) was obtained. The OH quantum yield following the 266 nm pulsed laser photolysis of 4-hydroxy-2-butanone was measured for the first time and found to be about 0.3%. The investigated kinetic study required accurate measurements of the vapor pressure of 4-hydroxy-2-butanone, which was measured using a static apparatus. The vapor pressure was found to range from 0.056 to 7.11 Torr between 254 and 323 K. This work provides the first absolute rate coefficients for the reaction of 4-hydroxy-2-butanone with OH and the first experimental saturated vapor pressures of the studied compound below 311 K. The obtained results are compared to those of the literature and the effects of the experimental conditions on the reactivity are examined. The calculated tropospheric lifetime obtained in this work suggests that once emitted into the atmosphere, 4H2B may contribute to the photochemical pollution in a local or regional scale.

  5. Issues in Absolute Spectral Radiometric Calibration: Intercomparison of Eight Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goetz, Alexander F. H.; Kindel, Bruce; Pilewskie, Peter

    1998-01-01

    The application of atmospheric models to AVIRIS and other spectral imaging data to derive surface reflectance requires that the sensor output be calibrated to absolute radiance. Uncertainties in absolute calibration are to be expected, and claims of 92% accuracy have been published. Measurements of accurate surface albedos and cloud absorption to be used in radiative balance calculations depend critically on knowing the absolute spectral-radiometric response of the sensor. The Earth Observing System project is implementing a rigorous program of absolute radiometric calibration for all optical sensors. Since a number of imaging instruments that provide output in terms of absolute radiance are calibrated at different sites, it is important to determine the errors that can be expected among calibration sites. Another question exists about the errors in the absolute knowledge of the exoatmospheric spectral solar irradiance.

  6. Absolute nuclear material assay using count distribution (LAMBDA) space

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, Mano K.; Snyderman, Neal J.; Rowland, Mark S.

    2015-12-01

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  7. Absolute nuclear material assay using count distribution (LAMBDA) space

    DOEpatents

    Prasad, Manoj K.; Snyderman, Neal J.; Rowland, Mark S.

    2012-06-05

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  8. Antifungal activity of tuberose absolute and some of its constituents.

    PubMed

    Nidiry, Eugene Sebastian J; Babu, C S Bujji

    2005-05-01

    The antifungal activity of the absolute of tuberose (Polianthes tuberosa ) and some of its constituents were evaluated against the mycelial growth of Colletotrichum gloeosporioides on potato-dextrose-agar medium. Tuberose absolute showed only mild activity at a concentration of 500 mg/L. However, three constituents present in the absolute, namely geraniol, indole and methyl anthranilate exhibited significant activity showing total inhibition of the mycelial growth at this concentration.

  9. The accuracy of diffusion quantum Monte Carlo simulations in the determination of molecular equilibrium structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Shih-I.

    2004-12-01

    For a test set of 17 first-row small molecules, the equilibrium structures are calculated with Ornstein-Uhlenbeck diffusion quantum Monte Carlo simulations guiding by trial wave functions constructed from floating spherical Gaussian orbitals and spherical Gaussian geminals. To measure performance of the Monte Carlo calculations, the mean deviation, the mean absolute deviation, the maximum absolute deviation, and the standard deviation of Monte Carlo calculated equilibrium structures with respect to empirical equilibrium structures are given. This approach is found to yield results having a uniformly high quality, being consistent with empirical equilibrium structures and surpassing calculated values from the coupled cluster model with single, double, and noniterative triple excitations [CCSD(T)] with the basis sets of cc-pCVQZ and cc-pVQZ. The nonrelativistic equilibrium atomization energies are also presented to assess performance of the calculated methods. The mean absolute deviations regarding experimental atomization energy are 0.16 and 0.21 kcal/mol for the Monte Carlo and CCSD(T)/cc-pCV(56)Z calculations, respectively.

  10. Quantum memristors

    PubMed Central

    Pfeiffer, P.; Egusquiza, I. L.; Di Ventra, M.; Sanz, M.; Solano, E.

    2016-01-01

    Technology based on memristors, resistors with memory whose resistance depends on the history of the crossing charges, has lately enhanced the classical paradigm of computation with neuromorphic architectures. However, in contrast to the known quantized models of passive circuit elements, such as inductors, capacitors or resistors, the design and realization of a quantum memristor is still missing. Here, we introduce the concept of a quantum memristor as a quantum dissipative device, whose decoherence mechanism is controlled by a continuous-measurement feedback scheme, which accounts for the memory. Indeed, we provide numerical simulations showing that memory effects actually persist in the quantum regime. Our quantization method, specifically designed for superconducting circuits, may be extended to other quantum platforms, allowing for memristor-type constructions in different quantum technologies. The proposed quantum memristor is then a building block for neuromorphic quantum computation and quantum simulations of non-Markovian systems. PMID:27381511

  11. Quantum memristors.

    PubMed

    Pfeiffer, P; Egusquiza, I L; Di Ventra, M; Sanz, M; Solano, E

    2016-01-01

    Technology based on memristors, resistors with memory whose resistance depends on the history of the crossing charges, has lately enhanced the classical paradigm of computation with neuromorphic architectures. However, in contrast to the known quantized models of passive circuit elements, such as inductors, capacitors or resistors, the design and realization of a quantum memristor is still missing. Here, we introduce the concept of a quantum memristor as a quantum dissipative device, whose decoherence mechanism is controlled by a continuous-measurement feedback scheme, which accounts for the memory. Indeed, we provide numerical simulations showing that memory effects actually persist in the quantum regime. Our quantization method, specifically designed for superconducting circuits, may be extended to other quantum platforms, allowing for memristor-type constructions in different quantum technologies. The proposed quantum memristor is then a building block for neuromorphic quantum computation and quantum simulations of non-Markovian systems. PMID:27381511

  12. Quantum memristors.

    PubMed

    Pfeiffer, P; Egusquiza, I L; Di Ventra, M; Sanz, M; Solano, E

    2016-07-06

    Technology based on memristors, resistors with memory whose resistance depends on the history of the crossing charges, has lately enhanced the classical paradigm of computation with neuromorphic architectures. However, in contrast to the known quantized models of passive circuit elements, such as inductors, capacitors or resistors, the design and realization of a quantum memristor is still missing. Here, we introduce the concept of a quantum memristor as a quantum dissipative device, whose decoherence mechanism is controlled by a continuous-measurement feedback scheme, which accounts for the memory. Indeed, we provide numerical simulations showing that memory effects actually persist in the quantum regime. Our quantization method, specifically designed for superconducting circuits, may be extended to other quantum platforms, allowing for memristor-type constructions in different quantum technologies. The proposed quantum memristor is then a building block for neuromorphic quantum computation and quantum simulations of non-Markovian systems.

  13. Quantum memristors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfeiffer, P.; Egusquiza, I. L.; di Ventra, M.; Sanz, M.; Solano, E.

    2016-07-01

    Technology based on memristors, resistors with memory whose resistance depends on the history of the crossing charges, has lately enhanced the classical paradigm of computation with neuromorphic architectures. However, in contrast to the known quantized models of passive circuit elements, such as inductors, capacitors or resistors, the design and realization of a quantum memristor is still missing. Here, we introduce the concept of a quantum memristor as a quantum dissipative device, whose decoherence mechanism is controlled by a continuous-measurement feedback scheme, which accounts for the memory. Indeed, we provide numerical simulations showing that memory effects actually persist in the quantum regime. Our quantization method, specifically designed for superconducting circuits, may be extended to other quantum platforms, allowing for memristor-type constructions in different quantum technologies. The proposed quantum memristor is then a building block for neuromorphic quantum computation and quantum simulations of non-Markovian systems.

  14. The absolute disparity anomaly and the mechanism of relative disparities.

    PubMed

    Chopin, Adrien; Levi, Dennis; Knill, David; Bavelier, Daphne

    2016-06-01

    There has been a long-standing debate about the mechanisms underlying the perception of stereoscopic depth and the computation of the relative disparities that it relies on. Relative disparities between visual objects could be computed in two ways: (a) using the difference in the object's absolute disparities (Hypothesis 1) or (b) using relative disparities based on the differences in the monocular separations between objects (Hypothesis 2). To differentiate between these hypotheses, we measured stereoscopic discrimination thresholds for lines with different absolute and relative disparities. Participants were asked to judge the depth of two lines presented at the same distance from the fixation plane (absolute disparity) or the depth between two lines presented at different distances (relative disparity). We used a single stimulus method involving a unique memory component for both conditions, and no extraneous references were available. We also measured vergence noise using Nonius lines. Stereo thresholds were substantially worse for absolute disparities than for relative disparities, and the difference could not be explained by vergence noise. We attribute this difference to an absence of conscious readout of absolute disparities, termed the absolute disparity anomaly. We further show that the pattern of correlations between vergence noise and absolute and relative disparity acuities can be explained jointly by the existence of the absolute disparity anomaly and by the assumption that relative disparity information is computed from absolute disparities (Hypothesis 1).

  15. The absolute disparity anomaly and the mechanism of relative disparities

    PubMed Central

    Chopin, Adrien; Levi, Dennis; Knill, David; Bavelier, Daphne

    2016-01-01

    There has been a long-standing debate about the mechanisms underlying the perception of stereoscopic depth and the computation of the relative disparities that it relies on. Relative disparities between visual objects could be computed in two ways: (a) using the difference in the object's absolute disparities (Hypothesis 1) or (b) using relative disparities based on the differences in the monocular separations between objects (Hypothesis 2). To differentiate between these hypotheses, we measured stereoscopic discrimination thresholds for lines with different absolute and relative disparities. Participants were asked to judge the depth of two lines presented at the same distance from the fixation plane (absolute disparity) or the depth between two lines presented at different distances (relative disparity). We used a single stimulus method involving a unique memory component for both conditions, and no extraneous references were available. We also measured vergence noise using Nonius lines. Stereo thresholds were substantially worse for absolute disparities than for relative disparities, and the difference could not be explained by vergence noise. We attribute this difference to an absence of conscious readout of absolute disparities, termed the absolute disparity anomaly. We further show that the pattern of correlations between vergence noise and absolute and relative disparity acuities can be explained jointly by the existence of the absolute disparity anomaly and by the assumption that relative disparity information is computed from absolute disparities (Hypothesis 1). PMID:27248566

  16. Absolute Plate Velocities from Seismic Anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreemer, Corné; Zheng, Lin; Gordon, Richard

    2015-04-01

    The orientation of seismic anisotropy inferred beneath plate interiors may provide a means to estimate the motions of the plate relative to the sub-asthenospheric mantle. Here we analyze two global sets of shear-wave splitting data, that of Kreemer [2009] and an updated and expanded data set, to estimate plate motions and to better understand the dispersion of the data, correlations in the errors, and their relation to plate speed. We also explore the effect of using geologically current plate velocities (i.e., the MORVEL set of angular velocities [DeMets et al. 2010]) compared with geodetically current plate velocities (i.e., the GSRM v1.2 angular velocities [Kreemer et al. 2014]). We demonstrate that the errors in plate motion azimuths inferred from shear-wave splitting beneath any one tectonic plate are correlated with the errors of other azimuths from the same plate. To account for these correlations, we adopt a two-tier analysis: First, find the pole of rotation and confidence limits for each plate individually. Second, solve for the best fit to these poles while constraining relative plate angular velocities to consistency with the MORVEL relative plate angular velocities. The SKS-MORVEL absolute plate angular velocities (based on the Kreemer [2009] data set) are determined from the poles from eight plates weighted proportionally to the root-mean-square velocity of each plate. SKS-MORVEL indicates that eight plates (Amur, Antarctica, Caribbean, Eurasia, Lwandle, Somalia, Sundaland, and Yangtze) have angular velocities that differ insignificantly from zero. The net rotation of the lithosphere is 0.25±0.11° Ma-1 (95% confidence limits) right-handed about 57.1°S, 68.6°E. The within-plate dispersion of seismic anisotropy for oceanic lithosphere (σ=19.2° ) differs insignificantly from that for continental lithosphere (σ=21.6° ). The between-plate dispersion, however, is significantly smaller for oceanic lithosphere (σ=7.4° ) than for continental

  17. Application of an InGaAsP diode laser to probe photodissociation dynamics - I(asterisk) quantum yields from n- and i-C3F7I and CH3I by laser gain vs absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hess, W. P.; Kohler, S. J.; Haugen, H. K.; Leone, S. R.

    1986-01-01

    Initial measurements on I-asterisk yields of alkyl iodides at 266 nm are reported using gain vs. absorption spectroscopy with an InGaAsP diode probe laser. The results are 102 percent + or - 4 percent, 102 percent + or - 7 percent, and 73 percent + or - 4 percent for n-C3F7I, i-C3F7I, and CH3I respectively. Future prospects for the development of diode laser systems and for their use in dynamical studies are discussed.

  18. Evaluation of the Absolute Regional Temperature Potential

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shindell, D. T.

    2012-01-01

    The Absolute Regional Temperature Potential (ARTP) is one of the few climate metrics that provides estimates of impacts at a sub-global scale. The ARTP presented here gives the time-dependent temperature response in four latitude bands (90-28degS, 28degS-28degN, 28-60degN and 60-90degN) as a function of emissions based on the forcing in those bands caused by the emissions. It is based on a large set of simulations performed with a single atmosphere-ocean climate model to derive regional forcing/response relationships. Here I evaluate the robustness of those relationships using the forcing/response portion of the ARTP to estimate regional temperature responses to the historic aerosol forcing in three independent climate models. These ARTP results are in good accord with the actual responses in those models. Nearly all ARTP estimates fall within +/-20%of the actual responses, though there are some exceptions for 90-28degS and the Arctic, and in the latter the ARTP may vary with forcing agent. However, for the tropics and the Northern Hemisphere mid-latitudes in particular, the +/-20% range appears to be roughly consistent with the 95% confidence interval. Land areas within these two bands respond 39-45% and 9-39% more than the latitude band as a whole. The ARTP, presented here in a slightly revised form, thus appears to provide a relatively robust estimate for the responses of large-scale latitude bands and land areas within those bands to inhomogeneous radiative forcing and thus potentially to emissions as well. Hence this metric could allow rapid evaluation of the effects of emissions policies at a finer scale than global metrics without requiring use of a full climate model.

  19. Absolute Radiometric Calibration of KOMPSAT-3A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, H. Y.; Shin, D. Y.; Kim, J. S.; Seo, D. C.; Choi, C. U.

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents a vicarious radiometric calibration of the Korea Multi-Purpose Satellite-3A (KOMPSAT-3A) performed by the Korea Aerospace Research Institute (KARI) and the Pukyong National University Remote Sensing Group (PKNU RSG) in 2015.The primary stages of this study are summarized as follows: (1) A field campaign to determine radiometric calibrated target fields was undertaken in Mongolia and South Korea. Surface reflectance data obtained in the campaign were input to a radiative transfer code that predicted at-sensor radiance. Through this process, equations and parameters were derived for the KOMPSAT-3A sensor to enable the conversion of calibrated DN to physical units, such as at-sensor radiance or TOA reflectance. (2) To validate the absolute calibration coefficients for the KOMPSAT-3A sensor, we performed a radiometric validation with a comparison of KOMPSAT-3A and Landsat-8 TOA reflectance using one of the six PICS (Libya 4). Correlations between top-of-atmosphere (TOA) radiances and the spectral band responses of the KOMPSAT-3A sensors at the Zuunmod, Mongolia and Goheung, South Korea sites were significant for multispectral bands. The average difference in TOA reflectance between KOMPSAT-3A and Landsat-8 image over the Libya 4, Libya site in the red-green-blue (RGB) region was under 3%, whereas in the NIR band, the TOA reflectance of KOMPSAT-3A was lower than the that of Landsat-8 due to the difference in the band passes of two sensors. The KOMPSAT-3Aensor includes a band pass near 940 nm that can be strongly absorbed by water vapor and therefore displayed low reflectance. Toovercome this, we need to undertake a detailed analysis using rescale methods, such as the spectral bandwidth adjustment factor.

  20. Orion Absolute Navigation System Progress and Challenge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holt, Greg N.; D'Souza, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    The absolute navigation design of NASA's Orion vehicle is described. It has undergone several iterations and modifications since its inception, and continues as a work-in-progress. This paper seeks to benchmark the current state of the design and some of the rationale and analysis behind it. There are specific challenges to address when preparing a timely and effective design for the Exploration Flight Test (EFT-1), while still looking ahead and providing software extensibility for future exploration missions. The primary onboard measurements in a Near-Earth or Mid-Earth environment consist of GPS pseudo-range and delta-range, but for future explorations missions the use of star-tracker and optical navigation sources need to be considered. Discussions are presented for state size and composition, processing techniques, and consider states. A presentation is given for the processing technique using the computationally stable and robust UDU formulation with an Agee-Turner Rank-One update. This allows for computational savings when dealing with many parameters which are modeled as slowly varying Gauss-Markov processes. Preliminary analysis shows up to a 50% reduction in computation versus a more traditional formulation. Several state elements are discussed and evaluated, including position, velocity, attitude, clock bias/drift, and GPS measurement biases in addition to bias, scale factor, misalignment, and non-orthogonalities of the accelerometers and gyroscopes. Another consideration is the initialization of the EKF in various scenarios. Scenarios such as single-event upset, ground command, and cold start are discussed as are strategies for whole and partial state updates as well as covariance considerations. Strategies are given for dealing with latent measurements and high-rate propagation using multi-rate architecture. The details of the rate groups and the data ow between the elements is discussed and evaluated.

  1. Absolute determination of local tropospheric OH concentrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armerding, Wolfgang; Comes, Franz-Josef

    1994-01-01

    Long path absorption (LPA) according to Lambert Beer's law is a method to determine absolute concentrations of trace gases such as tropospheric OH. We have developed a LPA instrument which is based on a rapid tuning of the light source which is a frequency doubled dye laser. The laser is tuned across two or three OH absorption features around 308 nm with a scanning speed of 0.07 cm(exp -1)/microsecond and a repetition rate of 1.3 kHz. This high scanning speed greatly reduces the fluctuation of the light intensity caused by the atmosphere. To obtain the required high sensitivity the laser output power is additionally made constant and stabilized by an electro-optical modulator. The present sensitivity is of the order of a few times 10(exp 5) OH per cm(exp 3) for an acquisition time of a minute and an absorption path length of only 1200 meters so that a folding of the optical path in a multireflection cell was possible leading to a lateral dimension of the cell of a few meters. This allows local measurements to be made. Tropospheric measurements have been carried out in 1991 resulting in the determination of OH diurnal variation at specific days in late summer. Comparison with model calculations have been made. Interferences are mainly due to SO2 absorption. The problem of OH self generation in the multireflection cell is of minor extent. This could be shown by using different experimental methods. The minimum-maximum signal to noise ratio is about 8 x 10(exp -4) for a single scan. Due to the small size of the absorption cell the realization of an open air laboratory is possible in which by use of an additional UV light source or by additional fluxes of trace gases the chemistry can be changed under controlled conditions allowing kinetic studies of tropospheric photochemistry to be made in open air.

  2. Yield Improvement in Steel Casting (Yield II)

    SciTech Connect

    Richard A. Hardin; Christoph Beckermann; Tim Hays

    2002-02-18

    This report presents work conducted on the following main projects tasks undertaken in the Yield Improvement in Steel Casting research program: Improvement of Conventional Feeding and Risering Methods, Use of Unconventional Yield Improvement Techniques, and Case Studies in Yield Improvement. Casting trials were conducted and then simulated using the precise casting conditions as recorded by the participating SFSA foundries. These results present a statistically meaningful set of experimental data on soundness versus feeding length. Comparisons between these casting trials and casting trials performed more than forty years ago by Pellini and the SFSA are quite good and appear reasonable. Comparisons between the current SFSA feeding rules and feeding rules based on the minimum Niyama criterion reveal that the Niyama-based rules are generally less conservative. The niyama-based rules also agree better with both the trials presented here, and the casting trails performed by Pellini an d the SFSA years ago. Furthermore, the use of the Niyama criterion to predict centerline shrinkage for horizontally fed plate sections has a theoretical basis according to the casting literature reviewed here. These results strongly support the use of improved feeding rules for horizontal plate sections based on the Niyama criterion, which can be tailored to the casting conditions for a given alloy and to a desired level of soundness. The reliability and repeatability of ASTM shrinkage x-ray ratings was investigated in a statistical study performed on 128 x-rays, each of which were rated seven different times. A manual ''Feeding and Risering Guidelines for Steel Castings' is given in this final report. Results of casting trials performed to test unconventional techniques for improving casting yield are presented. These use a stacked arrangement of castings and riser pressurization to increase the casting yield. Riser pressurization was demonstrated to feed a casting up to four time s the

  3. Quantum Teardrops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brzeziński, Tomasz; Fairfax, Simon A.

    2012-11-01

    Algebras of functions on quantum weighted projective spaces are introduced, and the structure of quantum weighted projective lines or quantum teardrops is described in detail. In particular the presentation of the coordinate algebra of the quantum teardrop in terms of generators and relations and classification of irreducible *-representations are derived. The algebras are then analysed from the point of view of Hopf-Galois theory or the theory of quantum principal bundles. Fredholm modules and associated traces are constructed. C*-algebras of continuous functions on quantum weighted projective lines are described and their K-groups computed.

  4. Quantum yields of decomposition and homo-dimerization of solid L-alanine induced by 7.2 eV Vacuum ultraviolet light irradiation: an estimate of the half-life of L-alanine on the surface of space objects.

    PubMed

    Izumi, Yudai; Nakagawa, Kazumichi

    2011-08-01

    One of the leading hypotheses regarding the origin of prebiotic molecules on primitive Earth is that they formed from inorganic molecules in extraterrestrial environments and were delivered by meteorites, space dust and comets. To evaluate the availability of extraterrestrial amino acids, it is necessary to examine their decomposition and oligomerization rates as induced by extraterrestrial energy sources, such as vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) and X-ray photons and high energy particles. This paper reports the quantum yields of decomposition ((8.2 ± 0.7) × 10(-2) photon(-1)) and homo-dimerization ((1.2 ± 0.3) × 10(-3) photon(-1)) and decomposition of the dimer (0.24 ± 0.06 photon(-1)) of solid L-alanine (Ala) induced by VUV light with an energy of 7.2 eV. Using these quantum yields, the half-life of L-Ala on the surface of a space object in the present earth orbit was estimated to be about 52 days, even when only photons with an energy of 7.2 eV emitted from the present Sun were considered. The actual half-life of solid L-Ala on the surface of a space object orbit around the present day Earth would certainly be much shorter than our estimate, because of the added effect of photons and particles of other energies. Thus, we propose that L-Ala needs to be shielded from solar VUV in protected environments, such as the interior of a meteorite, within a time scale of days after synthesis to ensure its arrival on the primitive Earth.

  5. Atmospheric Nitrogen Fluorescence Yield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, J. H., Jr.; Christl, M. J.; Fountain, W. F.; Gregory, J. C.; Martens, K. U.; Sokolsky, Pierre; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Several existing and planned experiments estimate the energies of ultra-high energy cosmic rays from air showers using the atmospheric nitrogen fluorescence. The nitrogen fluorescence yield from air shower electrons depends on the atmospheric composition. We will discuss the uncertainties in the fluorescence yield form electrons in the real atmosphere and describe a concept for a small balloon payload to measure the atmospheric fluorescence yield as a function of attitude.

  6. Mid-infrared absolute spectral responsivity scale based on an absolute cryogenic radiometer and an optical parametric oscillator laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Kun; Shi, Xueshun; Chen, Haidong; Liu, Yulong; Liu, Changming; Chen, Kunfeng; Li, Ligong; Gan, Haiyong; Ma, Chong

    2016-06-01

    We are reporting on a laser-based absolute spectral responsivity scale in the mid-infrared spectral range. By using a mid-infrared tunable optical parametric oscillator as the laser source, the absolute responsivity scale has been established by calibrating thin-film thermopile detectors against an absolute cryogenic radiometer. The thin-film thermopile detectors can be then used as transfer standard detectors. The extended uncertainty of the absolute spectral responsivity measurement has been analyzed to be 0.58%–0.68% (k  =  2).

  7. Mid-infrared absolute spectral responsivity scale based on an absolute cryogenic radiometer and an optical parametric oscillator laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Kun; Shi, Xueshun; Chen, Haidong; Liu, Yulong; Liu, Changming; Chen, Kunfeng; Li, Ligong; Gan, Haiyong; Ma, Chong

    2016-06-01

    We are reporting on a laser-based absolute spectral responsivity scale in the mid-infrared spectral range. By using a mid-infrared tunable optical parametric oscillator as the laser source, the absolute responsivity scale has been established by calibrating thin-film thermopile detectors against an absolute cryogenic radiometer. The thin-film thermopile detectors can be then used as transfer standard detectors. The extended uncertainty of the absolute spectral responsivity measurement has been analyzed to be 0.58%-0.68% (k  =  2).

  8. Attention, Intention, and Will in Quantum Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Stapp, H.P.

    1999-05-01

    How is mind related to matter? This ancient question inphilosophy is rapidly becoming a core problem in science, perhaps themost important of all because it probes the essential nature of manhimself. The origin of the problem is a conflict between the mechanicalconception of human beings that arises from the precepts of classicalphysical theory and the very different idea that arises from ourintuition: the former reduces each of us to an automaton, while thelatter allows our thoughts to guide our actions. The dominantcontemporary approaches to the problem attempt to resolve this conflictby clinging to the classical concepts, and trying to explain away ourmisleading intuition. But a detailed argument given here shows why, in ascientific approach to this problem, it is necessary to use the morebasic principles of quantum physics, which bring the observer into thedynamics, rather than to accept classical precepts that are profoundlyincorrect precisely at the crucial point of the role of humanconsciousness in the dynamics of human brains. Adherence to the quantumprinciples yields a dynamical theory of the mind/brain/body system thatis in close accord with our intuitive idea of what we are. In particular,the need for a self-observing quantum system to pose certain questionscreates a causal opening that allowsmind/brain dynamics to have threedistinguishable but interlocked causal processes, one micro-local, onestochastic, and the third experiential. Passing to the classical limit inwhich the critical difference between zero and the finite actual value ofPlanck's constant is ignored not only eliminates the chemical processesthat are absolutely crucial to the functioning of actual brains, itsimultaneously blinds the resulting theoretical construct to the physicalfine structure wherein the effect of mind on matter lies: the use of thislimit in this context is totally unjustified from a physicsperspective.

  9. Radial velocity studies and absolute parameters of contact binaries. I - AB Andromedae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hrivnak, Bruce J.

    1988-01-01

    New radial velocity curves have been obtained for the contact binary AB And, using the cross-correlation technique. A mass ratio of 0.479 is determined, which is revised to 0.491 when the velocities are corrected for proximity effects using a light curve model. These values differ by less than ten percent from the photometric mass ratio. An analysis of the symmetric B and V light curves reported by Rigterink in 1973 using the spectroscopic mass ratio yields a consistent set of light and velocity curve elements. These also produce a reasonably good fit to the infrared J and K light curves reported by Jameson and Akinci in 1979. Absolute elements are determined, and these indicate that both components have a main-sequence internal structure. These absolute parameters, together with the Galactic kinematics, suggest an age for the system similar to or greater than that of the Sun.

  10. Quantifying discipline practices using absolute versus relative frequencies: clinical and research implications for child welfare.

    PubMed

    Lindhiem, Oliver; Shaffer, Anne; Kolko, David J

    2014-01-01

    In the parent intervention outcome literatures, discipline practices are generally quantified as absolute frequencies or, less commonly, as relative frequencies. These differences in methodology warrant direct comparison as they have critical implications for study results and conclusions among treatments targeted at reducing parental aggression and harsh discipline. In this study, we directly compared the absolute frequency method and the relative frequency method for quantifying physically aggressive, psychologically aggressive, and nonaggressive discipline practices. Longitudinal data over a 3-year period came from an existing data set of a clinical trial examining the effectiveness of a psychosocial treatment in reducing parental physical and psychological aggression and improving child behavior (N = 139). Discipline practices (aggressive and nonaggressive) were assessed using the Conflict Tactics Scale. The two methods yielded different patterns of results, particularly for nonaggressive discipline strategies. We suggest that each method makes its own unique contribution to a more complete understanding of the association between parental aggression and intervention effects.

  11. Quantum Darwinism

    SciTech Connect

    Zurek, Wojciech H

    2008-01-01

    Quantum Darwinism - proliferation, in the environment, of multiple records of selected states of the system (its information-theoretic progeny) - explains how quantum fragility of individual state can lead to classical robustness of their multitude.

  12. Quantum memristors

    DOE PAGES

    Pfeiffer, P.; Egusquiza, I. L.; Di Ventra, M.; Sanz, M.; Solano, E.

    2016-07-06

    Technology based on memristors, resistors with memory whose resistance depends on the history of the crossing charges, has lately enhanced the classical paradigm of computation with neuromorphic architectures. However, in contrast to the known quantized models of passive circuit elements, such as inductors, capacitors or resistors, the design and realization of a quantum memristor is still missing. Here, we introduce the concept of a quantum memristor as a quantum dissipative device, whose decoherence mechanism is controlled by a continuous-measurement feedback scheme, which accounts for the memory. Indeed, we provide numerical simulations showing that memory effects actually persist in the quantummore » regime. Our quantization method, specifically designed for superconducting circuits, may be extended to other quantum platforms, allowing for memristor-type constructions in different quantum technologies. As a result, the proposed quantum memristor is then a building block for neuromorphic quantum computation and quantum simulations of non-Markovian systems.« less

  13. Novalis' Poetic Uncertainty: A "Bildung" with the Absolute

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mika, Carl

    2016-01-01

    Novalis, the Early German Romantic poet and philosopher, had at the core of his work a mysterious depiction of the "absolute." The absolute is Novalis' name for a substance that defies precise knowledge yet calls for a tentative and sensitive speculation. How one asserts a truth, represents an object, and sets about encountering things…

  14. Absolute Pitch in Infant Auditory Learning: Evidence for Developmental Reorganization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saffran, Jenny R.; Griepentrog, Gregory J.

    2001-01-01

    Two experiments examined 8-month-olds' use of absolute and relative pitch cues in a tone-sequence statistical learning task. Results suggest that, given unsegmented stimuli that do not conform to rules of musical composition, infants are more likely to track patterns of absolute pitches than of relative pitches. A third experiment found that adult…

  15. Supplementary and Enrichment Series: Absolute Value. Teachers' Commentary. SP-25.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bridgess, M. Philbrick, Ed.

    This is one in a series of manuals for teachers using SMSG high school supplementary materials. The pamphlet includes commentaries on the sections of the student's booklet, answers to the exercises, and sample test questions. Topics covered include addition and multiplication in terms of absolute value, graphs of absolute value in the Cartesian…

  16. Supplementary and Enrichment Series: Absolute Value. SP-24.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bridgess, M. Philbrick, Ed.

    This is one in a series of SMSG supplementary and enrichment pamphlets for high school students. This series is designed to make material for the study of topics of special interest to students readily accessible in classroom quantity. Topics covered include absolute value, addition and multiplication in terms of absolute value, graphs of absolute…

  17. Absolute dimensions of unevolved O type close binaries

    SciTech Connect

    Doom, C.; de Loore, C.

    1984-03-15

    A method is presented to derive the absolute dimensions of early-type detached binaries by combining the observed parameters with results of evolutionary computations. The method is used to obtain the absolute dimensions of nine close binaries. We find that most systems have an initial masss ratio near 1.

  18. Absolute Humidity and the Seasonality of Influenza (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaman, J. L.; Pitzer, V.; Viboud, C.; Grenfell, B.; Goldstein, E.; Lipsitch, M.

    2010-12-01

    Much of the observed wintertime increase of mortality in temperate regions is attributed to seasonal influenza. A recent re-analysis of laboratory experiments indicates that absolute humidity strongly modulates the airborne survival and transmission of the influenza virus. Here we show that the onset of increased wintertime influenza-related mortality in the United States is associated with anomalously low absolute humidity levels during the prior weeks. We then use an epidemiological model, in which observed absolute humidity conditions temper influenza transmission rates, to successfully simulate the seasonal cycle of observed influenza-related mortality. The model results indicate that direct modulation of influenza transmissibility by absolute humidity alone is sufficient to produce this observed seasonality. These findings provide epidemiological support for the hypothesis that absolute humidity drives seasonal variations of influenza transmission in temperate regions. In addition, we show that variations of the basic and effective reproductive numbers for influenza, caused by seasonal changes in absolute humidity, are consistent with the general timing of pandemic influenza outbreaks observed for 2009 A/H1N1 in temperate regions. Indeed, absolute humidity conditions correctly identify the region of the United States vulnerable to a third, wintertime wave of pandemic influenza. These findings suggest that the timing of pandemic influenza outbreaks is controlled by a combination of absolute humidity conditions, levels of susceptibility and changes in population mixing and contact rates.

  19. Determination of Absolute Zero Using a Computer-Based Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amrani, D.

    2007-01-01

    We present a simple computer-based laboratory experiment for evaluating absolute zero in degrees Celsius, which can be performed in college and undergraduate physical sciences laboratory courses. With a computer, absolute zero apparatus can help demonstrators or students to observe the relationship between temperature and pressure and use…

  20. Absolute radiometric calibration of advanced remote sensing systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, P. N.

    1982-01-01

    The distinction between the uses of relative and absolute spectroradiometric calibration of remote sensing systems is discussed. The advantages of detector-based absolute calibration are described, and the categories of relative and absolute system calibrations are listed. The limitations and problems associated with three common methods used for the absolute calibration of remote sensing systems are addressed. Two methods are proposed for the in-flight absolute calibration of advanced multispectral linear array systems. One makes use of a sun-illuminated panel in front of the sensor, the radiance of which is monitored by a spectrally flat pyroelectric radiometer. The other uses a large, uniform, high-radiance reference ground surface. The ground and atmospheric measurements required as input to a radiative transfer program to predict the radiance level at the entrance pupil of the orbital sensor are discussed, and the ground instrumentation is described.