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Sample records for absolute radial velocities

  1. PRECISION RADIAL VELOCITIES WITH CSHELL

    SciTech Connect

    Crockett, Christopher J.; Prato, L.; Mahmud, Naved I.; Johns-Krull, Christopher M.; Jaffe, Daniel T.; Beichman, Charles A. E-mail: lprato@lowell.edu E-mail: cmj@rice.edu

    2011-07-10

    Radial velocity (RV) identification of extrasolar planets has historically been dominated by optical surveys. Interest in expanding exoplanet searches to M dwarfs and young stars, however, has motivated a push to improve the precision of near-infrared RV techniques. We present our methodology for achieving 58 m s{sup -1} precision in the K band on the M0 dwarf GJ 281 using the CSHELL spectrograph at the 3 m NASA Infrared Telescope Facility. We also demonstrate our ability to recover the known 4 M{sub JUP} exoplanet Gl 86 b and discuss the implications for success in detecting planets around 1-3 Myr old T Tauri stars.

  2. Tolerancing a radial velocity spectrometer within Zemax

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, Steven R.

    2016-08-01

    Techniques are described for tolerancing a radial velocity spectrometer system within Zemax, including: how to set up and verify the tolerancing model, performance metrics and tolerance operands used, as well as post- Zemax analysis methods. Use of the tolerancing model for various analyses will be discussed, such as: alignment sensitivity, radial velocity sensitivity, and sensitivity of the optical system to temperature changes. Tolerance results from the Keck Planet Finder project (a precision radial velocity spectrometer of asymmetric white pupil design) will be shown.

  3. The fundamental definition of ``radial velocity''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindegren, Lennart; Dravins, Dainis

    2003-04-01

    Accuracy levels of metres per second require the fundamental concept of ``radial velocity'' for stars and other distant objects to be examined, both as a physical velocity, and as measured by spectroscopic and astrometric techniques. Already in a classical (non-relativistic) framework the line-of-sight velocity component is an ambiguous concept, depending on whether, e.g., the time of light emission (at the object) or that of light detection (by the observer) is used for recording the time coordinate. Relativistic velocity effects and spectroscopic measurements made inside gravitational fields add further complications, causing wavelength shifts to depend, e.g., on the transverse velocity of the object and the gravitational potential at the source. Aiming at definitions that are unambiguous at accuracy levels of 1 m s-1, we analyse different concepts of radial velocity and their interrelations. At this accuracy level, a strict separation must be made between the purely geometric concepts on one hand, and the spectroscopic measurement on the other. Among the geometric concepts we define kinematic radial velocity, which corresponds most closely to the ``textbook definition'' of radial velocity as the line-of-sight component of space velocity; and astrometric radial velocity, which can be derived from astrometric observations. Consistent with these definitions, we propose strict definitions also of the complementary kinematic and astrometric quantities, namely transverse velocity and proper motion. The kinematic and astrometric radial velocities depend on the chosen spacetime metric, and are accurately related by simple coordinate transformations. On the other hand, the observational quantity that should result from accurate spectroscopic measurements is the barycentric radial-velocity measure. This is independent of the metric, and to first order equals the line-of-sight velocity. However, it is not a physical velocity, and cannot be accurately transformed to a

  4. Radial velocity studies of cool stars.

    PubMed

    Jones, Hugh R A; Barnes, John; Tuomi, Mikko; Jenkins, James S; Anglada-Escude, Guillem

    2014-04-28

    Our current view of exoplanets is one derived primarily from solar-like stars with a strong focus on understanding our Solar System. Our knowledge about the properties of exoplanets around the dominant stellar population by number, the so-called low-mass stars or M dwarfs, is much more cursory. Based on radial velocity discoveries, we find that the semi-major axis distribution of M dwarf planets appears to be broadly similar to those around more massive stars and thus formation and migration processes might be similar to heavier stars. However, we find that the mass of M dwarf planets is relatively much lower than the expected mass dependency based on stellar mass and thus infer that planet formation efficiency around low-mass stars is relatively impaired. We consider techniques to overcome the practical issue of obtaining good quality radial velocity data for M dwarfs despite their faintness and sustained activity and emphasize (i) the wavelength sensitivity of radial velocity signals, (ii) the combination of radial velocity data from different experiments for robust detection of small amplitude signals, and (iii) the selection of targets and radial velocity interpretation of late-type M dwarfs should consider Hα behaviour.

  5. Precise Near-Infrared Radial Velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plavchan, Peter; Gao, P.; Bottom, M.; Davison, C.; Mills, S.; Ciardi, D. R.; Brinkworth, C.; Tanner, A. M.; Beichman, C. A.; Catanzarite, J.; Crawford, S.; Wallace, J.; Mennesson, B.; Johnson, J. A.; White, R. J.; Anglada-Escudé, G.; von Braun, K.; Walp, B.; Vasisht, G.; Kane, S. R.; Prato, L. A.; NIRRVs

    2014-01-01

    We present precise radial velocity time-series from a 2.3 micron pilot survey to detect exoplanets around red, low mass, and young stars. We use the CSHELL spectrograph with an isotopic methane absorption gas cell for common optical path relative wavelength calibration at the NASA InfraRed Telescope Facility. We present an overview of our Nelder-Mead simplex optimization pipeline for extracting radial velocities. We will also present first light data at 1.6 microns from a near-infrared fiber scrambler used in tandem with our gas cell and CSHELL at IRTF. The fiber scrambler makes use of non-circular core fibers to stabilize the illumination of the slit and echelle grating against changes in seeing, focus, guiding and other sources of systematic radial velocity noise, complementing the wavelength calibration of a gas cell.

  6. Radial velocities of Planetary Nebulae revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vázquez, Roberto; Ayala, Sandra A.; Wendolyn Blanco Cárdenas, Mónica; Contreras, María E.; Gómez-Muñoz, Marco Antonio; Guillén, Pedro F.; Olguín, Lorenzo; Ramos-Larios, Gerardo; Sabin, Laurence; Zavala, Saúl A.

    2015-08-01

    We present a new determination of radial velocities of a sample of Galactic Planetary Nebulae (PNe) using a systematic method and the same instrumental setting: the long-slit high-dispersion Manchester Echelle Spectrograph (MES) on the 2.1-m telescope at the San Pedro Mártir Observatory (OAN-SPM; Mexico). This project was inspired by the work of Schneider et al. (1983, A&AS, 52, 399), which has been an important reference during the last decades. Radial velocities of gaseous nebulae can be obtained using the central wavelength of a Gaussian fit, even when there is an expansion velocity, as expected in PNe, but with not enough resolution to see a spectral line splitting. We have used the software SHAPE, a morpho-kinematic modeling and reconstruction tool for astrophysical objects (Steffen et al. 2011, IEEE Trans. Vis. Comput. Graphics, 17, 454), to prove that non-uniform density or brightness, on an expanding shell, can lead to mistaken conclusions about the radial velocity. To determine radial velocities, we only use the spectral data in which a spectral line-splitting is seen, avoiding thus the problem of the possible biased one-Gaussian fit. Cases when this method is not recommended are discussed.This project has been supported by grant PAPIIT-DGAPA-UNAM IN107914. MWB is in grateful receipt of a DGAPA-UNAM postdoctoral scholarship. MAG acknowledges CONACYT for his graduate scholarship.

  7. Absolute Plate Velocities from Seismic Anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreemer, Corné; Zheng, Lin; Gordon, Richard

    2015-04-01

    The orientation of seismic anisotropy inferred beneath plate interiors may provide a means to estimate the motions of the plate relative to the sub-asthenospheric mantle. Here we analyze two global sets of shear-wave splitting data, that of Kreemer [2009] and an updated and expanded data set, to estimate plate motions and to better understand the dispersion of the data, correlations in the errors, and their relation to plate speed. We also explore the effect of using geologically current plate velocities (i.e., the MORVEL set of angular velocities [DeMets et al. 2010]) compared with geodetically current plate velocities (i.e., the GSRM v1.2 angular velocities [Kreemer et al. 2014]). We demonstrate that the errors in plate motion azimuths inferred from shear-wave splitting beneath any one tectonic plate are correlated with the errors of other azimuths from the same plate. To account for these correlations, we adopt a two-tier analysis: First, find the pole of rotation and confidence limits for each plate individually. Second, solve for the best fit to these poles while constraining relative plate angular velocities to consistency with the MORVEL relative plate angular velocities. The SKS-MORVEL absolute plate angular velocities (based on the Kreemer [2009] data set) are determined from the poles from eight plates weighted proportionally to the root-mean-square velocity of each plate. SKS-MORVEL indicates that eight plates (Amur, Antarctica, Caribbean, Eurasia, Lwandle, Somalia, Sundaland, and Yangtze) have angular velocities that differ insignificantly from zero. The net rotation of the lithosphere is 0.25±0.11° Ma-1 (95% confidence limits) right-handed about 57.1°S, 68.6°E. The within-plate dispersion of seismic anisotropy for oceanic lithosphere (σ=19.2° ) differs insignificantly from that for continental lithosphere (σ=21.6° ). The between-plate dispersion, however, is significantly smaller for oceanic lithosphere (σ=7.4° ) than for continental

  8. Standardization of the cumulative absolute velocity

    SciTech Connect

    O'Hara, T.F.; Jacobson, J.P. )

    1991-12-01

    EPRI NP-5930, A Criterion for Determining Exceedance of the Operating Basis Earthquake,'' was published in July 1988. As defined in that report, the Operating Basis Earthquake (OBE) is exceeded when both a response spectrum parameter and a second damage parameter, referred to as the Cumulative Absolute Velocity (CAV), are exceeded. In the review process of the above report, it was noted that the calculation of CAV could be confounded by time history records of long duration containing low (nondamaging) acceleration. Therefore, it is necessary to standardize the method of calculating CAV to account for record length. This standardized methodology allows consistent comparisons between future CAV calculations and the adjusted CAV threshold value based upon applying the standardized methodology to the data set presented in EPRI NP-5930. The recommended method to standardize the CAV calculation is to window its calculation on a second-by-second basis for a given time history. If the absolute acceleration exceeds 0.025g at any time during each one second interval, the earthquake records used in EPRI NP-5930 have been reanalyzed and the adjusted threshold of damage for CAV was found to be 0.16g-set.

  9. Precise Near-Infrared Radial Velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plavchan, Peter; Gao, Peter; Gagne, Jonathan; Furlan, Elise; Brinkworth, Carolyn; Bottom, Michael; Tanner, Angelle; Anglada-Escude, Guillem; White, Russel; Davison, Cassy; Mills, Sean; Beichman, Chas; Johnson, John Asher; Ciardi, David; Wallace, Kent; Mennesson, Bertrand; Vasisht, Gautam; Prato, Lisa; Kane, Stephen; Crawford, Sam; Crawford, Tim; Sung, Keeyoon; Drouin, Brian; Lin, Sean; Leifer, Stephanie; Catanzarite, Joe; Henry, Todd; von Braun, Kaspar; Walp, Bernie; Geneser, Claire; Ogden, Nick; Stufflebeam, Andrew; Pohl, Garrett; Regan, Joe

    2016-01-01

    We present the results of two 2.3 μm near-infrared (NIR) radial velocity (RV) surveys to detect exoplanets around 36 nearby and young M dwarfs. We use the CSHELL spectrograph (R ~ 46,000) at the NASA InfraRed Telescope Facility (IRTF), combined with an isotopic methane absorption gas cell for common optical path relative wavelength calibration. We have developed a sophisticated RV forward modeling code that accounts for fringing and other instrumental artifacts present in the spectra. With a spectral grasp of only 5 nm, we are able to reach long-term radial velocity dispersions of ~20-30 m s-1 on our survey targets.

  10. Radial velocity measurements in the F corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beavers, W. I.; Eitter, J. J.; Carr, P. H.; Cook, B. C.

    1980-05-01

    A photoelectric radial velocity spectrometer was employed at the February 26, 1979 total solar eclipse in an attempt to detect motion in the F corona. Multiple dip features were recorded in scans made at points 3.2 and 4.3 solar radii west of the sun. By employing simple dynamic models these observations may be interpreted as evidence of the following two separate components of dust in the inner regions of the solar system: dust moving in prograde orbits outside the region beginning at about four solar radii from the sun, and dust falling into the sun with velocities from about 50 to 250 km/s.

  11. Radial Velocity Eclipse Mapping of Exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolov, Nikolay; Sainsbury-Martinez, Felix

    2015-07-01

    Planetary rotation rates and obliquities provide information regarding the history of planet formation, but have not yet been measured for evolved extrasolar planets. Here we investigate the theoretical and observational perspective of the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect during secondary eclipse (RMse) ingress and egress for transiting exoplanets. Near secondary eclipse, when the planet passes behind the parent star, the star sequentially obscures light from the approaching and receding parts of the rotating planetary surface. The temporal block of light emerging from the approaching (blueshifted) or receding (redshifted) parts of the planet causes a temporal distortion in the planet’s spectral line profiles resulting in an anomaly in the planet’s radial velocity curve. We demonstrate that the shape and the ratio of the ingress-to-egress radial velocity amplitudes depends on the planetary rotational rate, axial tilt, and impact factor (i.e., sky-projected planet spin-orbital alignment). In addition, line asymmetries originating from different layers in the atmosphere of the planet could provide information regarding zonal atmospheric winds and constraints on the hot spot shape for giant irradiated exoplanets. The effect is expected to be most-pronounced at near-infrared wavelengths, where the planet-to-star contrasts are large. We create synthetic near-infrared, high-dispersion spectroscopic data and demonstrate how the sky-projected spin axis orientation and equatorial velocity of the planet can be estimated. We conclude that the RMse effect could be a powerful method to measure exoplanet spins.

  12. RADIAL VELOCITY ECLIPSE MAPPING OF EXOPLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Nikolov, Nikolay; Sainsbury-Martinez, Felix

    2015-07-20

    Planetary rotation rates and obliquities provide information regarding the history of planet formation, but have not yet been measured for evolved extrasolar planets. Here we investigate the theoretical and observational perspective of the Rossiter–McLaughlin effect during secondary eclipse (RMse) ingress and egress for transiting exoplanets. Near secondary eclipse, when the planet passes behind the parent star, the star sequentially obscures light from the approaching and receding parts of the rotating planetary surface. The temporal block of light emerging from the approaching (blueshifted) or receding (redshifted) parts of the planet causes a temporal distortion in the planet’s spectral line profiles resulting in an anomaly in the planet’s radial velocity curve. We demonstrate that the shape and the ratio of the ingress-to-egress radial velocity amplitudes depends on the planetary rotational rate, axial tilt, and impact factor (i.e., sky-projected planet spin–orbital alignment). In addition, line asymmetries originating from different layers in the atmosphere of the planet could provide information regarding zonal atmospheric winds and constraints on the hot spot shape for giant irradiated exoplanets. The effect is expected to be most-pronounced at near-infrared wavelengths, where the planet-to-star contrasts are large. We create synthetic near-infrared, high-dispersion spectroscopic data and demonstrate how the sky-projected spin axis orientation and equatorial velocity of the planet can be estimated. We conclude that the RMse effect could be a powerful method to measure exoplanet spins.

  13. Combining Transit and Radial Velocity Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Leslie A.

    2016-10-01

    The Kepler Mission, combined with ground based radial velocity (RV) follow-up, has revolutionized the observational constraints on sub-Neptune-size planet compositions. Kepler's unprecedentedly large and homogeneous samples of planets with both mass and radius constraints open the possibility of statistical studies of the underlying planet composition distribution. This presentation describes the application of hierarchical Bayesian models to constrain the underlying planet composition distribution from a sample of noisy mass-radius measurements. This approach represents a promising avenue toward a quantitative measurement of the amount of physical scatter in small planet compositions, the identification of planet sub-populations that may be tied to distinct formation pathways, and empirical constraints on the dominant compositional trends in the planet sample. Both the transit and radial velocity techniques are subject to selection effects, and approaches to mitigate the resulting biases will be addressed. In addition to distilling composition-distribution insights from the current sample of Kepler planets with RV masses, this framework may be used to optimize the target selection for future transiting planet RV follow-up surveys.

  14. Precise radial velocities in the near infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redman, Stephen L.

    Since the first detection of a planet outside our Solar System byWolszczan & Frail (1992), over 500 exoplanets have been found to date2, none of which resemble the Earth. Most of these planets were discovered by measuring the radial velocity (hereafter, RV) of the host star, which wobbles under the gravitational influence of any existing planetary companions. However, this method has yet to achieve the sub-m/s precision necessary to detect an Earth-mass planet in the Habitable Zone (the region around a star that can support liquid water; hereafter, HZ) (Kasting et al. 1993) around a Solar-type star. Even though Kepler (Borucki et al. 2010) has announced several Earth-sized HZ candidates, these targets will be exceptionally difficult to confirm with current astrophysical spectrographs (Borucki et al. 2011). The fastest way to discover and confirm potentiallyhabitable Earth-mass planets is to observe stars with lower masses - in particular, late M dwarfs. While M dwarfs are readily abundant, comprising some 70% of the local stellar population, their low optical luminosity presents a formidable challenge to current optical RV instruments. By observing in the near-infrared (hereafter, NIR), where the flux from M dwarfs peaks, we can potentially reach low RV precisions with significantly less telescope time than would be required by a comparable optical instrument. However, NIR precision RV measurements are a relatively new idea and replete with challenges: IR arrays, unlike CCDs, are sensitive to the thermal background; modal noise is a bigger issue in the NIR than in the optical; and the NIR currently lacks the calibration sources like the very successful thorium-argon (hereafter, ThAr) hollow-cathode lamp and Iodine gas cell of the optical. The PSU Pathfinder (hereafter, Pathfinder) was designed to explore these technical issues with the intention of mitigating these problems for future NIR high-resolution spectrographs, such as the Habitable-Zone Planet Finder (HZPF

  15. Radial velocities of southern visual multiple stars

    SciTech Connect

    Tokovinin, Andrei; Pribulla, Theodor; Fischer, Debra E-mail: pribulla@ta3.sk

    2015-01-01

    High-resolution spectra of visual multiple stars were taken in 2008–2009 to detect or confirm spectroscopic subsystems and to determine their orbits. Radial velocities of 93 late-type stars belonging to visual multiple systems were measured by numerical cross-correlation. We provide the individual velocities, the width, and the amplitude of the Gaussians that approximate the correlations. The new information on the multiple systems resulting from these data is discussed. We discovered double-lined binaries in HD 41742B, HD 56593C, and HD 122613AB, confirmed several other known subsystems, and constrained the existence of subsystems in some visual binaries where both components turned out to have similar velocities. The orbits of double-lined subsystems with periods of 148 and 13 days are computed for HD 104471 Aa,Ab and HD 210349 Aa,Ab, respectively. We estimate individual magnitudes and masses of the components in these triple systems and update the outer orbit of HD 104471 AB.

  16. Spectrographs for the Measurement of Radial Velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranne, A.

    A radial-velocity measurement derives from a shift in position of spectral features at the focus of a spectrographic instrument. We do not often think about how small these shifts are. It is not generally appreciated that the accuracy to which this shift must be measured is a tiny fraction of a pixel. Or, if we prefer to calculate in microns a surprising minuteness. What precautions should we be taking for the measurement of such small shifts? It is true that, thanks to computers, modern reduction methods allows us to correct for a wide variety of pertubations, provided that these are foreseen and understood; but such reduction procedures will give the best results if such pertubations are kept very small. We must therefore analyse these pertubations and think about how we can control them. The correlation method initiated in its modern form by Roger Griffin, and which we developed further with an optical mask in CORAVEL twenty-five years ago and more recently with a numerical mask in ELODIE, has demonstrated its power. In terms of these methods, the problem of high precision is to improve the correlation peak. Can this be done? Does the correlation method allow us to distinguish the overall radial velocity of the object from possible distortions of the lines? This is certainly a major problem which must be solved. The luminous efficiency of high-precision spectrographs is low. If the use of an optical fibre with scrambling for feeding the spectrograph seems inevitable to us today, it seems to me that the transmission of this system can be considerably improved by a better choice of the F-ratio of the image beam of the telescope which is to be matched with that of the spectrograph. This problem, common to all spectrographs, could be resolved with a specialised focal-plane instrument, giving a much greater than usual F-ratio, resulting in a simplification of the spectrograph optics, and hence an improvement in transmission and a serious decrease in size (which is

  17. High precision radial velocities with GIANO spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carleo, I.; Sanna, N.; Gratton, R.; Benatti, S.; Bonavita, M.; Oliva, E.; Origlia, L.; Desidera, S.; Claudi, R.; Sissa, E.

    2016-06-01

    Radial velocities (RV) measured from near-infrared (NIR) spectra are a potentially excellent tool to search for extrasolar planets around cool or active stars. High resolution infrared (IR) spectrographs now available are reaching the high precision of visible instruments, with a constant improvement over time. GIANO is an infrared echelle spectrograph at the Telescopio Nazionale Galileo (TNG) and it is a powerful tool to provide high resolution spectra for accurate RV measurements of exoplanets and for chemical and dynamical studies of stellar or extragalactic objects. No other high spectral resolution IR instrument has GIANO's capability to cover the entire NIR wavelength range (0.95-2.45 μm) in a single exposure. In this paper we describe the ensemble of procedures that we have developed to measure high precision RVs on GIANO spectra acquired during the Science Verification (SV) run, using the telluric lines as wavelength reference. We used the Cross Correlation Function (CCF) method to determine the velocity for both the star and the telluric lines. For this purpose, we constructed two suitable digital masks that include about 2000 stellar lines, and a similar number of telluric lines. The method is applied to various targets with different spectral type, from K2V to M8 stars. We reached different precisions mainly depending on the H-magnitudes: for H ˜ 5 we obtain an rms scatter of ˜ 10 m s-1, while for H ˜ 9 the standard deviation increases to ˜ 50 ÷ 80 m s-1. The corresponding theoretical error expectations are ˜ 4 m s-1 and 30 m s-1, respectively. Finally we provide the RVs measured with our procedure for the targets observed during GIANO Science Verification.

  18. RADIAL VELOCITY VARIABILITY OF FIELD BROWN DWARFS

    SciTech Connect

    Prato, L.; Mace, G. N.; Rice, E. L.; McLean, I. S.; Kirkpatrick, J. Davy; Burgasser, A. J.; Kim, Sungsoo S.

    2015-07-20

    We present paper six of the NIRSPEC Brown Dwarf Spectroscopic Survey, an analysis of multi-epoch, high-resolution (R ∼ 20,000) spectra of 25 field dwarf systems (3 late-type M dwarfs, 16 L dwarfs, and 6 T dwarfs) taken with the NIRSPEC infrared spectrograph at the W. M. Keck Observatory. With a radial velocity (RV) precision of ∼2 km s{sup −1}, we are sensitive to brown dwarf companions in orbits with periods of a few years or less given a mass ratio of 0.5 or greater. We do not detect any spectroscopic binary brown dwarfs in the sample. Given our target properties, and the frequency and cadence of observations, we use a Monte Carlo simulation to determine the detection probability of our sample. Even with a null detection result, our 1σ upper limit for very low mass binary frequency is 18%. Our targets included seven known, wide brown dwarf binary systems. No significant RV variability was measured in our multi-epoch observations of these systems, even for those pairs for which our data spanned a significant fraction of the orbital period. Specialized techniques are required to reach the high precisions sensitive to motion in orbits of very low-mass systems. For eight objects, including six T dwarfs, we present the first published high-resolution spectra, many with high signal to noise, that will provide valuable comparison data for models of brown dwarf atmospheres.

  19. Precise radial velocities. II - A possible detection of oscillations or running waves in Aldebaran and Arcturus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, M. A.

    1983-02-01

    Reticon observations of Aldebaran and Arcturus were performed to detect any minute radial velocity modulations which could characterize the convective stellar envelopes. The observing procedure consisted of referencing small apparent shifts of the detected stellar lines near the 6300 A wavelength to telluric O2 lines in the stellar spectrum. Only radial velocity changes were sought, rather than absolute radial velocities. Measurements for the radial velocities of both stars were calculated to an accuracy within 7 m/sec. A quasiperiodicity within 16 minutes of 110 minutes was found for Aldebaran, and within 28 minutes of 97 minutes for Arcturus. The possibility of the observed global oscillations being similar to the 5-min oscillations present in the solar system sun are discussed, and further measurements are recommended.

  20. TRUE MASSES OF RADIAL-VELOCITY EXOPLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Robert A.

    2015-06-01

    We study the task of estimating the true masses of known radial-velocity (RV) exoplanets by means of direct astrometry on coronagraphic images to measure the apparent separation between exoplanet and host star. Initially, we assume perfect knowledge of the RV orbital parameters and that all errors are due to photon statistics. We construct design reference missions for four missions currently under study at NASA: EXO-S and WFIRST-S, with external star shades for starlight suppression, EXO-C and WFIRST-C, with internal coronagraphs. These DRMs reveal extreme scheduling constraints due to the combination of solar and anti-solar pointing restrictions, photometric and obscurational completeness, image blurring due to orbital motion, and the “nodal effect,” which is the independence of apparent separation and inclination when the planet crosses the plane of the sky through the host star. Next, we address the issue of nonzero uncertainties in RV orbital parameters by investigating their impact on the observations of 21 single-planet systems. Except for two—GJ 676 A b and 16 Cyg B b, which are observable only by the star-shade missions—we find that current uncertainties in orbital parameters generally prevent accurate, unbiased estimation of true planetary mass. For the coronagraphs, WFIRST-C and EXO-C, the most likely number of good estimators of true mass is currently zero. For the star shades, EXO-S and WFIRST-S, the most likely numbers of good estimators are three and four, respectively, including GJ 676 A b and 16 Cyg B b. We expect that uncertain orbital elements currently undermine all potential programs of direct imaging and spectroscopy of RV exoplanets.

  1. True Masses of Radial-Velocity Exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Robert A.

    2015-06-01

    We study the task of estimating the true masses of known radial-velocity (RV) exoplanets by means of direct astrometry on coronagraphic images to measure the apparent separation between exoplanet and host star. Initially, we assume perfect knowledge of the RV orbital parameters and that all errors are due to photon statistics. We construct design reference missions for four missions currently under study at NASA: EXO-S and WFIRST-S, with external star shades for starlight suppression, EXO-C and WFIRST-C, with internal coronagraphs. These DRMs reveal extreme scheduling constraints due to the combination of solar and anti-solar pointing restrictions, photometric and obscurational completeness, image blurring due to orbital motion, and the “nodal effect,” which is the independence of apparent separation and inclination when the planet crosses the plane of the sky through the host star. Next, we address the issue of nonzero uncertainties in RV orbital parameters by investigating their impact on the observations of 21 single-planet systems. Except for two—GJ 676 A b and 16 Cyg B b, which are observable only by the star-shade missions—we find that current uncertainties in orbital parameters generally prevent accurate, unbiased estimation of true planetary mass. For the coronagraphs, WFIRST-C and EXO-C, the most likely number of good estimators of true mass is currently zero. For the star shades, EXO-S and WFIRST-S, the most likely numbers of good estimators are three and four, respectively, including GJ 676 A b and 16 Cyg B b. We expect that uncertain orbital elements currently undermine all potential programs of direct imaging and spectroscopy of RV exoplanets.

  2. Radial Velocity Monitoring of Kepler Heartbeat Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shporer, Avi; Fuller, Jim; Isaacson, Howard; Hambleton, Kelly; Thompson, Susan E.; Prša, Andrej; Kurtz, Donald W.; Howard, Andrew W.; O'Leary, Ryan M.

    2016-09-01

    Heartbeat stars (HB stars) are a class of eccentric binary stars with close periastron passages. The characteristic photometric HB signal evident in their light curves is produced by a combination of tidal distortion, heating, and Doppler boosting near orbital periastron. Many HB stars continue to oscillate after periastron and along the entire orbit, indicative of the tidal excitation of oscillation modes within one or both stars. These systems are among the most eccentric binaries known, and they constitute astrophysical laboratories for the study of tidal effects. We have undertaken a radial velocity (RV) monitoring campaign of Kepler HB stars in order to measure their orbits. We present our first results here, including a sample of 22 Kepler HB systems, where for 19 of them we obtained the Keplerian orbit and for 3 other systems we did not detect a statistically significant RV variability. Results presented here are based on 218 spectra obtained with the Keck/HIRES spectrograph during the 2015 Kepler observing season, and they have allowed us to obtain the largest sample of HB stars with orbits measured using a single instrument, which roughly doubles the number of HB stars with an RV measured orbit. The 19 systems measured here have orbital periods from 7 to 90 days and eccentricities from 0.2 to 0.9. We show that HB stars draw the upper envelope of the eccentricity-period distribution. Therefore, HB stars likely represent a population of stars currently undergoing high eccentricity migration via tidal orbital circularization, and they will allow for new tests of high eccentricity migration theories. The data presented herein were obtained at the W.M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W.M. Keck Foundation.

  3. The Carina Project. IV. Radial Velocity Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabrizio, M.; Nonino, M.; Bono, G.; Ferraro, I.; François, P.; Iannicola, G.; Monelli, M.; Thévenin, F.; Stetson, P. B.; Walker, A. R.; Buonanno, R.; Caputo, F.; Corsi, C. E.; Dall’Ora, M.; Gilmozzi, R.; James, C. R.; Merle, T.; Pulone, L.; Romaniello, M.

    2011-04-01

    We present new and accurate radial velocity (RV) measurements of luminous stars of all ages (old horizontal branch, intermediate-age red clump, and young blue plume, as well as red giants of a range of ages: 20.6 ≤ V ≤ 22) in the Carina dwarf spheroidal galaxy, based on low-resolution spectra collected with the FORS2 multiobject slit spectrograph at the VLT. This data set was complemented by RV measurements based on medium- and high-resolution archive spectra of brighter (V ≲ 20.6) Carina targets collected with the GIRAFFE multiobject fiber spectrograph at the VLT. The combined sample includes more than 21,340 individual spectra of ≈2000 stars covering the entire body of the galaxy. The mean ( = 220.4 ± 0.1 km s-1) and the dispersion (σ = 11.7 ± 0.1 km s-1) of the RV distribution of candidate Carina stars (∼1210 objects, 180 ≤ RV ≤ 260 km s-1, 4σ) agree quite well with similar measurements available in the literature. To further improve the statistics, the accurate RV measurements recently provided by Walker et al. were also added to the current data set. We ended up with a sample of ∼1370 RV measurements of candidate Carina stars that is ≈75% larger than any previous Carina RV sample. We found that the hypothesis that the Carina RV distribution is Gaussian can be discarded at 99% confidence level. The mean RV across the body of the galaxy varies from ∼220 km s-1 at a distance of 7‧ (∼200 pc) from the center to ∼223 km s-1 at 13‧ (∼400 pc, 6σ level) and flattens out to a constant value of ∼221 km s-1 at larger distances (600 pc, 4σ level). Moreover, and even more importantly, we found that in the Carina regions where the mean RV is smaller, the dispersion is also smaller, and the RV distribution is more centrally peaked (i.e., the kurtosis attains larger values). The difference in mean RV is more than 4 km s-1 (9σ level) when moving from east to west and more than 3 km s-1 (∼7σ level) when moving from north to south

  4. The EM-POGO: A simple, absolute velocity profiler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terker, S. R.; Sanford, T. B.; Dunlap, J. H.; Girton, J. B.

    2013-01-01

    Electromagnetic current instrumentation has been added to the Bathy Systems, Inc. POGO transport sondes to produce a free-falling absolute velocity profiler called EM-POGO. The POGO is a free-fall profiler that measures a depth-averaged velocity using GPS fixes at the beginning and end of a round trip to the ocean floor (or a preset depth). The EM-POGO adds a velocity profile determined from measurements of motionally induced electric fields generated by the ocean current moving through the vertical component of the Earth's magnetic field. In addition to providing information about the vertical structure of the velocity, the depth-dependent measurements improve transport measurements by correcting for the non-constant fall-rate. Neglecting the variable fall rate results in errors O (1 cm s-1). The transition from POGO to EM-POGO included electrically isolating the POGO and electric-field-measuring circuits, installing a functional GPS receiver, finding a pressure case that provided an optimal balance among crush-depth, price and size, and incorporating the electrodes, electrode collar, and the circuitry required for the electric field measurement. The first EM-POGO sea-trial was in July 1999. In August 2006 a refurbished EM-POGO collected 15 absolute velocity profiles; relative and absolute velocity uncertainty was ˜1cms-1 and 0.5-5 cm s-1, respectively, at a vertical resolution of 25 m. Absolute velocity from the EM-POGO compared to shipboard ADCP measurements differed by ˜ 1-2 cm s-1, comparable to the uncertainty in absolute velocity from the ADCP. The EM-POGO is thus a low-cost, easy to deploy and recover, and accurate velocity profiler.

  5. MARVELS Radial Velocity Solutions to Seven Kepler Eclipsing Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heslar, Michael Francis; Thomas, Neil B.; Ge, Jian; Ma, Bo; Herczeg, Alec; Reyes, Alan; SDSS-III MARVELS Team

    2016-01-01

    Eclipsing binaries serve momentous purposes to improve the basis of understanding aspects of stellar astrophysics, such as the accurate calculation of the physical parameters of stars and the enigmatic mass-radius relationship of M and K dwarfs. We report the investigation results of 7 eclipsing binary candidates, initially identified by the Kepler mission, overlapped with the radial velocity observations from the SDSS-III Multi-Object APO Radial-Velocity Exoplanet Large-Area Survey (MARVELS). The RV extractions and spectroscopic solutions of these eclipsing binaries were generated by the University of Florida's 1D data pipeline with a median RV precision of ~60-100 m/s, which was utilized for the DR12 data release. We performed the cross-reference fitting of the MARVELS RV data and the Kepler photometric fluxes obtained from the Kepler Eclipsing Binary Catalog (V2) and modelled the 7 eclipsing binaries in the BinaryMaker3 and PHOEBE programs. This analysis accurately determined the absolute physical and orbital parameters of each binary. Most of the companion stars were determined to have masses of K and M dwarf stars (0.3-0.8 M⊙), and allowed for an investigation into the mass-radius relationship of M and K dwarfs. Among the cases are KIC 9163796, a 122.2 day period "heartbeat star", a recently-discovered class of eccentric binaries known for tidal distortions and pulsations, with a high eccentricity (e~0.75) and KIC 11244501, a 0.29 day period, contact binary with a double-lined spectrum and mass ratio (q~0.45). We also report on the possible reclassification of 2 Kepler eclipsing binary candidates as background eclipsing binaries based on the analysis of the flux measurements, flux ratios of the spectroscopic and photometric solutions, the differences in the FOVs, the image processing of Kepler, and RV and spectral analysis of MARVELS.

  6. Measuring Stellar Radial Velocities with a LISA Spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, David

    2016-05-01

    Conventional wisdom says it should not be possible to measure stellar radial velocities with a useful degree of precision with a spectrograph having spectral resolution of 1000. This paper will demonstrate that with a combination of careful observational technique and the use of cross correlation it is possible to far exceed initial expectations. This is confirmed by reproducing the known radial velocity of a catalogued SB1 star with a precision of 5.2 km/s. To demonstrate the scientific potential of such a spectrograph, we use radial velocity measurements to confirm the binary nature and measure the orbital period and parameters of a suspected post common envelope binary.

  7. Radial Velocities and Binarity of Southern SIM Grid Stars

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-01

    MNRAS 446, 2055–2058 (2015) doi:10.1093/mnras/stu2239 Radial velocities and binarity of southern SIM grid stars Valeri V. Makarov1‹ and Stephen C...ABSTRACT We present analysis of precision radial velocities (RV) of 1134 mostly red giant stars in the southern sky, selected as candidate astrometric...grid objects for the Space Interferometry Mis- sion (SIM). Only a few (typically, two or three) spectroscopic observations per star have been collected

  8. Precise Radial Velocity First Light Observations With iSHELL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cale, Bryson Lee; Plavchan, Peter; Nishimoto, America; Tanner, Angelle M.; Gagne, Jonathan; Gao, Peter; Furlan, Elise; White, Russel J.; Walp, Bernie; von Braun, Kaspar; Brinkworth, Carolyn; Johnson, John A.; Anglada-Escudé, Guillem; Henry, Todd J.; Catanzarite, Joseph; Kane, Stephen R.; Beichman, Charles; Ciardi, David R.; Wallace, J. Kent; Mennesson, Bertrand; Vasisht, Gautam

    2017-01-01

    We present our first light observations with the new iSHELL spectrograph at the NASA Infrared Telescope facility. iShell replaces the 25 year old CSHELL with improvements in spectral grasp (~40x), resolution (70,000 versus 46,000), throughput, optics, and detector characteristics. With CSHELL, we obtained a radial velocity precision of 3 m/s on a bright red giant and we identified several radial velocity variable M dwarfs for future follow up. Our goal with iSHELL is to characterize the precise radial velocity performance of the methane isotopologue absorption gas cell in the calibration unit. We observe bright nearby radial velocity standards to better understand the instrument and data reduction techniques. We have updated our CSHELL analysis code to handle multiple orders and the increased number of pixels. It is feasible that we will obtain a radial velocity precision of < 3 m/s, sufficient to detect terrestrial planets in the habitable zone of nearby M dwarfs. We will also follow up radial velocity variables we have discovered, along with transiting exoplanets orbiting M dwarfs identified with the K2 and TESS missions.

  9. Stellar Radial Velocities with IGRINS at McDonald Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mace, Gregory; Jaffe, Daniel; Park, Chan; Lee, Jae-Joon

    2016-06-01

    Exoplanet searches with dedicated instrumentation have made 1 m/s radial velocity (RV) precision routine.Yet, RVs for large samples of stars generally remain at the 1km/s level.TheImmersion Grating Infrared Spectrometer (IGRINS) is a revolutionary instrument that exploits broad spectral coverage at high-resolution in the near-infrared.IGRINS on the 2.7 meter Harlan J. Smith Telescope at McDonald Observatory is nearly as sensitive as CRIRES at the 8 meter Very Large Telescope. However, IGRINS at R=45,000 has more than 30 times the spectral grasp of CRIRES.The use of a silicon immersion grating facilitates a compact cryostat while providing simultaneous wavelength coverage from 1.45 - 2.45 microns. Wehave developed a pipeline to cross-correlate the more than 20,000 resolution elements in two IGRINS exposures and provide relative RVs with uncertainties of 50m/s (<1% of a resolution element). Absolute RVs are limited by thezero point uncertainty, which is 150m/s.IGRINS RVs will be provided for thousands of objects per year as a default procedure of the data reduction pipeline, creating a legacy product for multi-epoch studies of low-mass, stellar and substellar multiplicity.

  10. Radial velocities of remote globular clusters - stalking the missing mass

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, R.C.

    1985-10-01

    Measurements good to 25 km/s are presented of radial velocities of five remote galactic globular clusters, based on aperture-plate spectra of individual stars at 3.0 A resolution. Velocities with respect to the galactic rest-frame of two individual systems, Eridanus and Palomar 14, are large enough to suggest a total mass for the Galaxy of 1 trillion solar masses. A similar mass is inferred from the average of the galactocentric distance times velocity squared. 36 references.

  11. Absolute blood velocity measured with a modified fundus camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duncan, Donald D.; Lemaillet, Paul; Ibrahim, Mohamed; Nguyen, Quan Dong; Hiller, Matthias; Ramella-Roman, Jessica

    2010-09-01

    We present a new method for the quantitative estimation of blood flow velocity, based on the use of the Radon transform. The specific application is for measurement of blood flow velocity in the retina. Our modified fundus camera uses illumination from a green LED and captures imagery with a high-speed CCD camera. The basic theory is presented, and typical results are shown for an in vitro flow model using blood in a capillary tube. Subsequently, representative results are shown for representative fundus imagery. This approach provides absolute velocity and flow direction along the vessel centerline or any lateral displacement therefrom. We also provide an error analysis allowing estimation of confidence intervals for the estimated velocity.

  12. Radial velocity fitting challenge. I. Simulating the data set including realistic stellar radial-velocity signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumusque, X.

    2016-08-01

    Context. Stellar signals are the main limitation for precise radial-velocity (RV) measurements. These signals arise from the photosphere of the stars. The m s-1 perturbation created by these signals prevents the detection and mass characterization of small-mass planetary candidates such as Earth-twins. Several methods have been proposed to mitigate stellar signals in RV measurements. However, without precisely knowing the stellar and planetary signals in real observations, it is extremely difficult to test the efficiency of these methods. Aims: The goal of the RV fitting challenge is to generate simulated RV data including stellar and planetary signals and to perform a blind test within the community to test the efficiency of the different methods proposed to recover planetary signals despite stellar signals. Methods: In this first paper, we describe the simulation used to model the measurements of the RV fitting challenge. Each simulated planetary system includes the signals from instrumental noise, stellar oscillations, granulation, supergranulation, stellar activity, and observed and simulated planetary systems. In addition to RV variations, this simulation also models the effects of instrumental noise and stellar signals on activity observables obtained by HARPS-type high-resolution spectrographs, that is, the calcium activity index log (R'HK) and the bisector span and full width at half maximum of the cross-correlation function. Results: We publish the 15 systems used for the RV fitting challenge including the details about the planetary systems that were injected into each of them. Based on observations collected at the La Silla Parana Observatory, ESO (Chile), with the HARPS spectrograph at the 3.6-m telescope.The simulated data sets are available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/593/A5 and at the wiki of the RV fitting challenge http://https://rv-challenge.wikispaces.com.

  13. Long-term radial-velocity variations of the Sun as a star: The HARPS view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanza, A. F.; Molaro, P.; Monaco, L.; Haywood, R. D.

    2016-03-01

    Context. Stellar radial velocities play a fundamental role in the discovery of extrasolar planets and the measurement of their physical parameters as well as in the study of stellar physical properties. Aims: We investigate the impact of the solar activity on the radial velocity of the Sun using the HARPS spectrograph to obtain measurements that can be directly compared with those acquired in the extrasolar planet search programmes. Methods: We used the Moon, the Galilean satellites, and several asteroids as reflectors to measure the radial velocity of the Sun as a star and correlated this velocity with disc-integrated chromospheric and magnetic indexes of solar activity that are similar to stellar activity indexes. We discuss in detail the systematic effects that affect our measurements and the methods to account for them. Results: We find that the radial velocity of the Sun as a star is positively correlated with the level of its chromospheric activity at ~95 percent significance level. The amplitude of the long-term variation measured in the 2006-2014 period is 4.98 ± 1.44 m/s, which is in good agreement with model predictions. The standard deviation of the residuals obtained by subtracting a linear best fit is 2.82 m/s and is due to the rotation of the reflecting bodies and the intrinsic variability of the Sun on timescales shorter than the activity cycle. A correlation with a lower significance is detected between the radial velocity and the mean absolute value of the line-of-sight photospheric magnetic field flux density. Conclusions: Our results confirm similar correlations found in other late-type main-sequence stars and provide support to the predictions of radial velocity variations induced by stellar activity based on current models.

  14. High precision radial velocities: the case for NIR.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carleo, I.; Gratton, R.

    In the context of the preparation for the high resolution spectrograph HIRES for E-ELT, we are studying the possibility to derive high-precision radial velocities (RV) on a prototype:GIANO, the near-infrared (NIR) echelle spectrograph now available at the Telescopio Nazionale Galileo. Radial velocities measured from near-infrared spectra are a potential tool to search for extrasolar planets around cool stars. High resolution infrared spectrographs now available are reaching the high precision of visible instruments, with a constant improvement over time. In particular, no other IR instruments have GIANO's capability to cover the entire NIR wavelength range. We have developed an ensemble of IDL procedures to measure high precision radial velocities on GIANO spectra. Taking into account the achieved precisions with GIANO, we constrain the sample of targets for which GIANO is better than HARPS-N, but with the advent of GIARPS (GIANO+HARPS-N), GIANO will improve its performances and include a much larger sample of stars. The NIR range is the future of RV measurements, especially because the jitter due to the star surface activities is reduced in the NIR. As a consequence, HIRES working in NIR range might be very useful, and for a wide range of cases, it will be more efficient than HIRES working in the visible range, for detection and characterization of planets using radial velocity technique.

  15. Results on fibre scrambling for high accuracy radial velocity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avila, Gerardo; Singh, Paul; Chazelas, Bruno

    2010-07-01

    We present in this paper experimental data on fibres and scramblers to increase the photometrical stability of the spectrograph PSF. We have used round, square, octagonal fibres and beam homogenizers. This study is aimed to enhance the accuracy measurements of the radial velocities for ESO ESPRESSO (VLT) and CODEX (E-ELT) instruments.

  16. Radial velocity information in solar-type spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merline, W. J.

    1985-01-01

    A criterion is developed for determining the amount of radial velocity information theoretically available at the earth's surface from a star as a function of wavelength and spectral resolution. A description of the study is provided. The wavelength dependence is examined as well as the dependence on resolution, frequency information, and the problem of time-dependent astrophysical phenomena.

  17. Radial velocities in the globular cluster ω Centauri

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reijns, R. A.; Seitzer, P.; Arnold, R.; Freeman, K. C.; Ingerson, T.; van den Bosch, R. C. E.; van de Ven, G.; de Zeeuw, P. T.

    2006-01-01

    We have used the ARGUS multi-object spectrometer at the CTIO 4 m Blanco telescope to obtain 2756 radial velocity measurements for 1966 individual stars in the globular cluster ω Centauri brighter than blue photographic magnitude of about 16.5. Of these, 1589 stars are cluster members. A comparison with two independent radial velocity studies, carried out by Suntzeff & Kraft and by Mayor et al., demonstrates that the median error of our measurements is below 2 km s-1 for the stars brighter than B-magnitude 15, which constitute the bulk of the sample. The observed velocity dispersion decreases from about 15 km s-1 in the inner few arcmin to about 6 km s-1 at a radius of 25'. The cluster shows significant rotation, with a maximum amplitude of about 6 km s-1 in the radial zone between 6' and 10'. In a companion paper by van de Ven et al., we correct these radial velocities for the perspective rotation caused by the space motion of the cluster, and combine them with the internal proper motions of nearly 8000 cluster members measured by van Leeuwen et al., to construct a detailed dynamical model of ω Centauri and to measure its distance.

  18. RADIAL VELOCITIES OF GALACTIC HALO STARS IN VIRGO

    SciTech Connect

    Brink, Thomas G.; Mateo, Mario; Martinez-Delgado, David E-mail: mmateo@umich.ed

    2010-11-15

    We present multi-slit radial velocity measurements for 111 stars in the direction of the Virgo Stellar Stream (VSS). The stars were photometrically selected to be probable main-sequence stars in the Galactic halo. When compared with the radial velocity distribution expected for the halo of the Milky Way, as well as the distribution seen in a control field, we observe a significant excess of negative velocity stars in the field, which can likely be attributed to the presence of a stellar stream. This kinematic excess peaks at a Galactic standard of rest radial velocity of -75 km s{sup -1}. A rough distance estimate suggests that this feature extends from {approx}15 kpc out to, and possibly beyond, the {approx}30 kpc limit of the study. The mean velocity of these stars is incompatible with those of the VSS itself (V{sub gsr} {approx} 130 km s{sup -1}), which we weakly detect, but it is consistent with radial velocity measurements of nearby 2MASS M-giants and SDSS+SEGUE K/M-giants and blue horizontal branch stars that constitute the leading tidal tail of the Sagittarius dwarf spheroidal galaxy. Some oblate models for the shape of the Milky Way's dark matter halo predict that the leading arm of the Sagittarius Stream should pass through this volume, and have highly negative (V{sub gsr} {approx}< -200 km s{sup -1}) radial velocities, as it descends down from the northern Galactic hemisphere toward the Galactic plane. The kinematic feature observed in this study, if it is in fact Sagittarius debris, is not consistent with these predictions, and instead, like other leading stream radial velocity measurements, is consistent with a recently published triaxial halo model, or, if axisymmetry is imposed, favors a prolate shape for the Galactic halo potential. However, a rough distance estimate to the observed kinematic feature places it somewhat closer (D {approx} 15-30 kpc) than the Sagittarius models predict (D {approx} 35-45 kpc).

  19. State of the Field: Extreme Precision Radial Velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Debra A.; Anglada-Escude, Guillem; Arriagada, Pamela; Baluev, Roman V.; Bean, Jacob L.; Bouchy, Francois; Buchhave, Lars A.; Carroll, Thorsten; Chakraborty, Abhijit; Crepp, Justin R.; Dawson, Rebekah I.; Diddams, Scott A.; Dumusque, Xavier; Eastman, Jason D.; Endl, Michael; Figueira, Pedro; Ford, Eric B.; Foreman-Mackey, Daniel; Fournier, Paul; Fűrész, Gabor; Gaudi, B. Scott; Gregory, Philip C.; Grundahl, Frank; Hatzes, Artie P.; Hébrard, Guillaume; Herrero, Enrique; Hogg, David W.; Howard, Andrew W.; Johnson, John A.; Jorden, Paul; Jurgenson, Colby A.; Latham, David W.; Laughlin, Greg; Loredo, Thomas J.; Lovis, Christophe; Mahadevan, Suvrath; McCracken, Tyler M.; Pepe, Francesco; Perez, Mario; Phillips, David F.; Plavchan, Peter P.; Prato, Lisa; Quirrenbach, Andreas; Reiners, Ansgar; Robertson, Paul; Santos, Nuno C.; Sawyer, David; Segransan, Damien; Sozzetti, Alessandro; Steinmetz, Tilo; Szentgyorgyi, Andrew; Udry, Stéphane; Valenti, Jeff A.; Wang, Sharon X.; Wittenmyer, Robert A.; Wright, Jason T.

    2016-06-01

    The Second Workshop on Extreme Precision Radial Velocities defined circa 2015 the state of the art Doppler precision and identified the critical path challenges for reaching 10 cm s-1 measurement precision. The presentations and discussion of key issues for instrumentation and data analysis and the workshop recommendations for achieving this bold precision are summarized here. Beginning with the High Accuracy Radial Velocity Planet Searcher spectrograph, technological advances for precision radial velocity (RV) measurements have focused on building extremely stable instruments. To reach still higher precision, future spectrometers will need to improve upon the state of the art, producing even higher fidelity spectra. This should be possible with improved environmental control, greater stability in the illumination of the spectrometer optics, better detectors, more precise wavelength calibration, and broader bandwidth spectra. Key data analysis challenges for the precision RV community include distinguishing center of mass (COM) Keplerian motion from photospheric velocities (time correlated noise) and the proper treatment of telluric contamination. Success here is coupled to the instrument design, but also requires the implementation of robust statistical and modeling techniques. COM velocities produce Doppler shifts that affect every line identically, while photospheric velocities produce line profile asymmetries with wavelength and temporal dependencies that are different from Keplerian signals. Exoplanets are an important subfield of astronomy and there has been an impressive rate of discovery over the past two decades. However, higher precision RV measurements are required to serve as a discovery technique for potentially habitable worlds, to confirm and characterize detections from transit missions, and to provide mass measurements for other space-based missions. The future of exoplanet science has very different trajectories depending on the precision that can

  20. Radial velocity data analysis with compressed sensing techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hara, Nathan C.; Boué, G.; Laskar, J.; Correia, A. C. M.

    2017-01-01

    We present a novel approach for analysing radial velocity data that combines two features: all the planets are searched at once and the algorithm is fast. This is achieved by utilizing compressed sensing techniques, which are modified to be compatible with the Gaussian process framework. The resulting tool can be used like a Lomb-Scargle periodogram and has the same aspect but with much fewer peaks due to aliasing. The method is applied to five systems with published radial velocity data sets: HD 69830, HD 10180, 55 Cnc, GJ 876 and a simulated very active star. The results are fully compatible with previous analysis, though obtained more straightforwardly. We further show that 55 Cnc e and f could have been respectively detected and suspected in early measurements from the Lick Observatory and Hobby-Eberly Telescope available in 2004, and that frequencies due to dynamical interactions in GJ 876 can be seen.

  1. STARSPOT JITTER IN PHOTOMETRY, ASTROMETRY, AND RADIAL VELOCITY MEASUREMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Makarov, V. V.; Beichman, C. A.; Lebreton, J.; Malbet, F.; Catanzarite, J. H.; Shao, M.; Fischer, D. A.

    2009-12-10

    Analytical relations are derived for the amplitude of astrometric, photometric, and radial velocity (RV) perturbations caused by a single rotating spot. The relative power of the starspot jitter is estimated and compared with the available data for kappa{sup 1} Ceti and HD 166435, as well as with numerical simulations for kappa{sup 1} Ceti and the Sun. A Sun-like star inclined at i = 90 deg. at 10 pc is predicted to have an rms jitter of 0.087 muas in its astrometric position along the equator, and 0.38 m s{sup -1} in radial velocities. If the presence of spots due to stellar activity is the ultimate limiting factor for planet detection, the sensitivity of SIM Lite to Earth-like planets in habitable zones is about an order of magnitude higher than the sensitivity of prospective ultra-precise RV observations of nearby stars.

  2. Proxima Centauri reloaded: Unravelling the stellar noise in radial velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damasso, M.; Del Sordo, F.

    2017-03-01

    Context. The detection and characterisation of Earth-like planets with Doppler signals of the order of 1 m s-1 currently represent one of the greatest challenge for extrasolar-planet hunters. As results for such findings are often controversial, it is desirable to provide independent confirmations of the discoveries. Testing different models for the suppression of non-Keplerian stellar signals usually plaguing radial velocity data is essential to ensuring findings are robust and reproducible. Aims: Using an alternative treatment of the stellar noise to that discussed in the discovery paper, we re-analyse the radial velocity dataset that led to the detection of a candidate terrestrial planet orbiting the star Proxima Centauri. We aim to confirm the existence of this outstanding planet, and test the existence of a second planetary signal. Methods: Our technique jointly modelled Keplerian signals and residual correlated signals in radial velocities using Gaussian processes. We analysed only radial velocity measurements without including other ancillary data in the fitting procedure. In a second step, we have compared our outputs with results coming from photometry, to provide a consistent physical interpretation. Our analysis was performed in a Bayesian framework to quantify the robustness of our findings. Results: We show that the correlated noise can be successfully modelled as a Gaussian process regression, and contains a periodic term modulated on the stellar rotation period and characterised by an evolutionary timescale of the order of one year. Both findings appear to be robust when compared with results obtained from archival photometry, thus providing a reliable description of the noise properties. We confirm the existence of a coherent signal described by a Keplerian orbit equation that can be attributed to the planet Proxima b, and provide an independent estimate of the planetary parameters. Our Bayesian analysis dismisses the existence of a second planetary

  3. An extensive radial velocity survey towards NGC 6253

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montalto, M.; Melo, C. H. F.; Santos, N. C.; Queloz, D.; Piotto, G.; Desidera, S.; Bedin, L. R.; Momany, Y.; Saviane, I.

    2016-04-01

    The old and metal-rich open cluster NGC 6253 was observed with the Fibre Large Array Multi Element Spectrograph (FLAMES) multi-object spectrograph during an extensive radial velocity campaign monitoring 317 stars with a median of 15 epochs per object. All the targeted stars are located along the upper main sequence of the cluster between 14.8 < V < 16.5. Fifty nine stars are confirmed cluster members both by radial velocities and proper motions and do not show evidence of variability. We detected 45 variable stars among which 25 belong to NGC 6253. We were able to derive an orbital solution for four cluster members (and for two field stars) yielding minimum masses in between ˜90 MJ and ˜460 MJ and periods between 3 and 220 d. Simulations demonstrated that this survey was sensitive to objects down to 30 MJ at 10 days orbital periods with a detection efficiency equal to 50 per cent. On the basis of these results we concluded that the observed frequency of binaries down to the hydrogen burning limit and up to 20 d orbital period is around (1.5 ± 1.3) per cent in NGC 6253. The overall observed frequency of binaries around the sample of cluster stars is (13 ± 3) per cent. The median radial velocity precision achieved by the GIRAFFE spectrograph in this magnitude range was around ˜240 m s- 1 (˜180 m s- 1 for UVES). Based on a limited follow-up analysis of seven stars in our sample with the High Accuracy Radial velocity Planet Searcher (HARPS) spectrograph we determined that a precision of 35 m s- 1 can be reached in this magnitude range, offering the possibility to further extend the variability analysis into the substellar domain. Prospects are even more favourable once considering the upcoming ESPRESSO spectrograph at VLT.

  4. New measurements of radial velocities in clusters of galaxies. II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proust, D.; Mazure, A.; Sodre, L.; Capelato, H.; Lund, G.

    1988-03-01

    Heliocentric radial velocities are determined for 100 galaxies in five clusters, on the basis of 380-518-nm observations obtained using a CCD detector coupled by optical fibers to the OCTOPUS multiobject spectrograph at the Cassegrain focus of the 3.6-m telescope at ESO La Silla. The data-reduction procedures and error estimates are discussed, and the results are presented in tables and graphs and briefly characterized.

  5. Radial and latitudinal gradients in the solar internal angular velocity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhodes, Edward J., Jr.; Cacciani, Alessandro; Korzennik, Sylvain G.; Tomczyk, Steven; Ulrich, Roger K.; Woodard, Martin F.

    1988-01-01

    The frequency splittings of intermediate-degree (3 to 170 deg) p-mode oscillations obtained from a 16-day subset of observations were analyzed. Results show evidence for both radial and latitudinal gradients in the solar internal angular velocity. From 0.6 to 0.95 solar radii, the solar internal angular velocity increases systematically from 440 to 463 nHz, corresponding to a positive radial gradient of 66 nHz/solar radius for that portion of the solar interior. Analysis also indicates that the latitudinal differential rotation gradient which is seen at the solar surface persists throughout the convection zone, although there are indications that the differential rotation might disappear entirely below the base of the convection zone. The analysis was extended to include comparisons with additional observational studies and between earlier results and the results of additional inversions of several of the observational datasets. All the comparisons reinforce conclusions regarding the existence of radial and latitudinal gradients in the internal angular velocity.

  6. Standardization of the cumulative absolute velocity. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    O`Hara, T.F.; Jacobson, J.P.

    1991-12-01

    EPRI NP-5930, ``A Criterion for Determining Exceedance of the Operating Basis Earthquake,`` was published in July 1988. As defined in that report, the Operating Basis Earthquake (OBE) is exceeded when both a response spectrum parameter and a second damage parameter, referred to as the Cumulative Absolute Velocity (CAV), are exceeded. In the review process of the above report, it was noted that the calculation of CAV could be confounded by time history records of long duration containing low (nondamaging) acceleration. Therefore, it is necessary to standardize the method of calculating CAV to account for record length. This standardized methodology allows consistent comparisons between future CAV calculations and the adjusted CAV threshold value based upon applying the standardized methodology to the data set presented in EPRI NP-5930. The recommended method to standardize the CAV calculation is to window its calculation on a second-by-second basis for a given time history. If the absolute acceleration exceeds 0.025g at any time during each one second interval, the earthquake records used in EPRI NP-5930 have been reanalyzed and the adjusted threshold of damage for CAV was found to be 0.16g-set.

  7. Radial Velocity Detection of Extra-Solar Planetary Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cochran, William D.

    1998-01-01

    The McDonald Observatory Planetary Search (MOPS) was designed to search for Jovian-mass planets in orbit around solar-type stars by making high-precision measurements of the Radial Velocity (RV) of a star, to attempt to detect the reflex orbital motion of the star around the star-planet barycenter. In our solar system, the velocity of the Sun around the Sun-Jupiter barycenter averages 12.3 m/ s. The MOPS survey started operation in September 1987, and searches 36 bright, nearby, solar-type dwarfs to 10 m/s precision. The survey was started using telluric O2 absorption lines as the velocity reference metric. Observations use the McDonald Observatory 2.7-m Harlan Smith Telescope coude spectrograph with the six-foot camera. This spectrograph configuration isolates a single order of the echelle grating on a Texas Instruments 800 x 800 CCD. The telluric line method gave us a routine radial velocity precision of about 15 m/s for stars down to about 5-th magnitude. However, the data obtained with this technique suffered from some source of long-term systematic errors, which was probably the intrinsic velocity variability of the terrestrial atmosphere, i.e. winds. In order to eliminate this systematic error and to improve our overall measurement precision, we installed a stabilized I2 gas absorption cell as the velocity metric for the MOPS in October 1990. In use at the telescope, the cell is placed directly in front of the spectrograph entrance slit, with starlight passing through the cell. The use of this sealed stabilized I2 cell removes potential problems with possible long-term drifts in the velocity metric. The survey now includes a sample of 36 nearby F, G, and K type stars of luminosity class V or IV-V.

  8. Radial velocities of nearby K and M dwarfs

    SciTech Connect

    Tokovinin, A.A.

    1988-09-01

    A correlation radial-velocity meter was used during 1985-87 to make 931 measurements of the radial velocities of 206 nearby stars in Gliese's catalog. The characteristic accuracy was 0.5 km/sec. A homogeneous sample of 162 K and M dwarfs in the region delta > -10/degree/, 14/sup h/ < ..cap alpha.. < 3/sup h/ contains 41 stars with variable or probably variable velocity; 10 stars have been identified for the first time as spectroscopic binaries. The fraction of spectroscopic binaries in the classes K0-K2 is 17%, in the classes M0 and later 36%, and in the complete sample 27%. Among the systems with a period less than one year low-mass (M/sub 2/ sin i < 0.1Msub solar) satellites have not been found; for all stars the velocity spread exceeds 7 km/sec. For the systems GL 58.2 and 791.3, which have the greatest mass function, the lines of secondary components have been detected.

  9. RADIAL VELOCITY CONFIRMATION OF A BINARY DETECTED FROM PULSE TIMINGS

    SciTech Connect

    Barlow, B. N.; Dunlap, B. H.; Clemens, J. C.

    2011-08-10

    A periodic variation in the pulse timings of the pulsating hot subdwarf B (sdB) star CS 1246 was recently discovered via the observed minus calculated (O-C) diagram and suggests the presence of a binary companion with an orbital period of two weeks. Fits to this phase variation, when interpreted as orbital reflex motion, imply CS 1246 orbits a barycenter 11 lt-s away with a velocity of 16.6 km s{sup -1}. Using the Goodman spectrograph on the SOAR telescope, we decided to confirm this hypothesis by obtaining radial velocity measurements of the system over several months. Our spectra reveal a velocity variation with amplitude, period, and phase in accordance with the O-C diagram predictions. This corroboration demonstrates that the rapid pulsations of hot sdB stars can be adequate clocks for the discovery of binary companions via the pulse timing method.

  10. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Radial velocity and photometry for GJ3470 (Bonfils+, 2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonfils, X.; Gillon, M.; Udry, S.; Armstrong, D.; Bouchy, F.; Delfosse, X.; Forveille, T.; Fumel, A.; Jehin, E.; Lendl, M.; Lovis, C.; Mayor, M.; McCormac, J.; Neves, V.; Pepe, F.; Perrier, C.; Pollaco, D.; Queloz, D.; Santos, N. C.

    2012-11-01

    The tables contain radial-velocity and photometry time series of GJ3470. Radial velocities were obtained with he HARPS spectrograph. Photometry was obtained with TRAPPIST, EulerCam and NITES telescopes. (5 data files).

  11. The Radial Velocity Precision of Fiber-fed Spectrographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Gordon A. H.; Shkolnik, Evgenya; Bohlender, David A.; Yang, Stephenson

    2003-06-01

    We have measured the radial velocities of five 51 Peg-type stars and one star known to be constant in velocity. Our measurements, on 20 Å centered at 3947 Å, were conventional, using Th/Ar comparison spectra taken every 20 or 40 minutes between the stellar exposures. Existing IRAF routines were used for the reduction. We find σRV<=20 m s-1, provided that four measurements (out of 72) with residuals greater than 5 σRV are neglected. The observations were made on five nights with the CFHT Gecko spectrograph (R~110,000), fiber-fed by the CAFE system; σRV<=10 m s-1 seems possible with additional care. This study was incidental to the main observing program and is certainly not exhaustive, but the small value of σRV implies that the fiber feed/image slicer system on Gecko+CAFE essentially eliminates the long-standing problem of guiding errors in radial velocity measurements. We are not promoting this conventional approach for serious Doppler planet searches (especially with Gecko, which has such a small multiplex gain), but the precision is valuable for observations made in spectral regions remote from telluric lines or captive-gas fiducials. Instrument builders might consider the advantages of the CAFE optics, which incorporate agitation and invert the object and pupil to illuminate the slit and grating, respectively, in future spectrograph designs.

  12. ELODIE: A spectrograph for accurate radial velocity measurements.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranne, A.; Queloz, D.; Mayor, M.; Adrianzyk, G.; Knispel, G.; Kohler, D.; Lacroix, D.; Meunier, J.-P.; Rimbaud, G.; Vin, A.

    1996-10-01

    The fibre-fed echelle spectrograph of Observatoire de Haute-Provence, ELODIE, is presented. This instrument has been in operation since the end of 1993 on the 1.93 m telescope. ELODIE is designed as an updated version of the cross-correlation spectrometer CORAVEL, to perform very accurate radial velocity measurements such as needed in the search, by Doppler shift, for brown-dwarfs or giant planets orbiting around nearby stars. In one single exposure a spectrum at a resolution of 42000 (λ/{DELTA}λ) ranging from 3906A to 6811A is recorded on a 1024x1024 CCD. This performance is achieved by using a tanθ=4 echelle grating and a combination of a prism and a grism as cross-disperser. An automatic on-line data treatment reduces all the ELODIE echelle spectra and computes cross-correlation functions. The instrument design and the data reduction algorithms are described in this paper. The efficiency and accuracy of the instrument and its long term instrumental stability allow us to measure radial velocities with an accuracy better than 15m/s for stars up to 9th magnitude in less than 30 minutes exposure time. Observations of 16th magnitude stars are also possible to measure velocities at about 1km/s accuracy. For classic spectroscopic studies (S/N>100) 9th magnitude stars can be observed in one hour exposure time.

  13. Multifractal structures in radial velocity measurements for exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Sordo, Fabio; Sahil Agarwal, Debra A. Fischer, John S. Wettlaufer

    2015-01-01

    The radial velocity method is a powerful way to search for exoplanetary systems and it led to many discoveries of exoplanets in the last 20 years.Nevertheless, in order observe Earth-like planets, such method needs to be refined, i.e. one needs to improve the signal-to-noise ratio.On one hand this can be achieved by building spectrographs with better performances, but on the other hand it is also central to understand the noise present in the data.Radial-velocity data are time-series which contains the effect of planets as well as of stellar disturbances. Therefore, they are the result of different physical processes which operate on different time-scales, acting in a not always periodic fashionI present here a possible approach to such problem, which consists in looking for multifractal structures in the time-series coming from radial velocity measurements, identifying the underlying long-range correlations and fractal scaling properties, and connecting them to the underlying physical processes, like stellar oscillation, granulation, rotation, and magnetic activity.This method has been previously applied to satellite data related to Arctic sea albedo, relevant for identify trends and noise in the Arctic sea ice (Agarwal, Moon and Wettlaufer, Proc. R. Soc., 2012).Here we use such analysis for exoplanetary data related to possible Earth-like planets.Moreover, we apply the same procedure to synthetic data from numerical simulation of stellar dynamos, which give insight on the mechanism responsible for the noise. In such way we can therefore raise the signal-to-noise ratio in the data using the synthetic data as predicted noise to be subtracted from the observations.

  14. An Ongoing Program of Radial Velocities of Nearby Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sperauskas, J.; Boyle, R. P.; Harlow, J.; Jahreiss, H.; Upgren, A. R.

    2003-12-01

    The lists of stars found by Vyssotsky at the McCormick Observatory and the Fourth Edition of the Catalog of Nearby Stars (CNS4) complement each other. Each was limited in a different way, but together they can be used to evaluate sources of systematic error in either of them. The lists of Vyssotsky comprise almost 900 stars, brighter than a limiting visual magnitude of about 11.5. and thus form a magnitude-limited sample. The CNS4 includes all stars believed to be within 25 parsecs of the Sun, and thus forms a distance-limited group. Limits in magnitude are prone to the Malmquist bias by which stars of a given range in magnitude may average spuriously brighter than stars within a given distance range appropriate for the mean distance modulus. The CNS4 stars may be subject to a slight Lutz-Kelker effect. This also requires a correction that depends mainly on the ratios of the standard errors in the distances to the stars, to the distances, themselves. This is a status report on a survey seeking completeness in the six dynamical properties (positions along the three orthogonal axes, and their first time-derivatives). Parallax, proper motion and radial velocity are the stellar properties required for this information and, as is frequently the case among sets of faint stars, the radial velocities are not always available. We seek to obtain radial velocities for a full dynamical picture for more than one thousand nearby stars of which some two-thirds have been observed. It would be most desirable to follow with age-related measures for all stars

  15. Interpretation of F-corona radial velocity observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shestakova, L. I.

    1987-03-01

    The observations made during the July 31, 1981 solar eclipse of the F-corona radial velocities between 3 and 7 solar radii are interpreted, assuming direct circular Keplerian motion of dust grains. Diffraction and isotropic scattering are considered. If the grains are assumed to be of silica, a best fit to observations is found for grain radii of about 0.4 micron, a border of dust-free zone from 6 to 14 solar radii, or a high concentration of grains at the same interval of heliocentric distances.

  16. Radial velocity planet detection biases at the stellar rotational period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanderburg, Andrew; Plavchan, Peter; Johnson, John Asher; Ciardi, David R.; Swift, Jonathan; Kane, Stephen R.

    2016-07-01

    Future generations of precise radial velocity (RV) surveys aim to achieve sensitivity sufficient to detect Earth mass planets orbiting in their stars' habitable zones. A major obstacle to this goal is astrophysical RV noise caused by active areas moving across the stellar limb as a star rotates. In this paper, we quantify how stellar activity impacts exoplanet detection with radial velocities as a function of orbital and stellar rotational periods. We perform data-driven simulations of how stellar rotation affects planet detectability and compile and present relations for the typical time-scale and amplitude of stellar RV noise as a function of stellar mass. We show that the characteristic time-scales of quasi-periodic RV jitter from stellar rotational modulations coincides with the orbital period of habitable-zone exoplanets around early M-dwarfs. These coincident periods underscore the importance of monitoring the targets of RV habitable-zone planet surveys through simultaneous photometric measurements for determining rotation periods and activity signals, and mitigating activity signals using spectroscopic indicators and/or RV measurements at different wavelengths.

  17. Radial Velocity Variability of mid-F Dwarf Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cochran, W. D.; Hatzes, A. P.

    1994-05-01

    The McDonald Observatory Planetary Search program has been obtaining high precision (sigma ~ 10ms(-1) ) observations of a sample of 36 slowly rotating F, G, and K dwarfs since the fall of 1987. The primary purpose of this survey has been to detect sub-stellar companions to these stars. Most of the survey stars seem to have a level of intrinsic stellar radial velocity variability of about 20ms(-1) or less. However, the four stars of type F6 and earlier all seem to show significantly larger intrinsic variability of 40ms(-1) or more. These stars are pi (3) Orionis (F6V), alpha Canis Minoris A (F5IV-V), theta Ursae Majoris, and gamma Serpens. Stars of spectral type F8 and later do not seem to show this large level of radial velocity variability. One star of type F7V has recently been added to the survey, but we do not yet have sufficient data on it to determine its level of intrinsic variability. We present the observational data on these variable mid-F dwarfs, along with statistical analysis of the data in order to determine possible periodicities within the data. It is possible that these stars may represent the extreme ``tail end'' of the cool delta Scuti stars, or they may be a new class of variable stars in their own right.

  18. Improve Radial Velocity Precision with Better Data Analysis Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xuesong Wang, Sharon; Wright, Jason; Zhao, Ming

    2015-12-01

    The synergy between Kepler and the ground-based radial velocity (RV) surveys have made numerous discoveries of low-mass exoplanets, opening the age of Earth analogs. However, Earth analogs such as Kepler 452-b require a much higher RV precision ( ~ 10 cm/s) than the achievable with current instruments (~ 1 m/s) and understanding of stellar photosphere. This presentation will cover some of the instrumental and data issues that are currently hindering us from achieving the sub 1 m/s precision, as well as remedies and ways forward with future RV instruments. Highlights of our work include: (1) how telluric contamination affects RV precision and how to "telluric-proof" a Doppler pipeline; (2) how errors in the deconvolved stellar reference spectrum can mimic the signal of a super-Earth on a ~1 year orbit; (3) the battle with imperfections in the iodine reference spectra and how an ultra-high resolution (R ~ 500,000) echelle spectrum can help; (4) and a new RV extraction code in Python which incorporates MCMC and Gaussian Processes. This research is based on radial velocity data taken with iodine cell calibrators using Keck/HIRES and HET/HRS.

  19. Monolithic interferometer for high precision radial velocity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Xiaoke; Ge, Jian; Wang, Ji; Lee, Brian

    2009-08-01

    In high precision radial velocity (RV) measurements for extrasolar planets searching and studies, a stable wide field Michelson interferometer is very critical in Exoplanet Tracker (ET) instruments. Adopting a new design, monolithic interferometers are homogenous and continuous in thermal expansion, and field compensation and thermal compensation are both satisfied. Interferometer design and fabrication are decrypted in details. In performance evaluations, field angle is typically 22° and thermal sensitivity is typically -1.7 x 10-6/°C, which corresponds to ~500 m/s /°C in RV scale. In interferometer stability monitoring using a wavelength stabilized laser source, phase shift data was continuously recorded for nearly seven days. Appling a frequent calibration every 30 minutes as in typical star observations, the interferometer instability contributes less than 1.4 m/s in RV error, in a conservative estimation.

  20. Extinction, ejecta masses, and radial velocities of novae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Robert E.

    1994-01-01

    Interstellar reddening is determined for a number of recent novae based upon emission-line ratios which are generally observable using CCDs. Large values of extinction are found for most systems, possibly indicative of an intrinsic component of reddening in postoutburst novae. The unusual characteristics of the (O I) lines in novae, which are strong and optically thick, require a large population of very dense globules which are the likely sites of dust formation. These pyroclasts must be ejected from the white dwarf. The total mass of the neutral gas in the globules in some of the objects is substantially larger than the masses normally derived for the ionized ejecta of novae. The distribution of radial velocities of Galactic novae in the Tololo sample, although uncertain, shows an asymmetry in having predominantly negative values. Either high internal absorption in the expanding ejecta skews the emission lines to bluer wavelengths, or most of the novae are moving out from the center of the Galaxy.

  1. The symbiosis of photometry and radial-velocity measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cochran, William D.

    1994-01-01

    The FRESIP mission is optimized to detect the inner planets of a planetary system. According to the current paradigm of planet formation, these planets will probably be small Earth-sized objects. Ground-based radial-velocity programs now have the sensitivity to detect Jovian-mass planets in orbit around bright solar-type stars. We expect the more massive planets to form in the outer regions of a proto-stellar nebula. These two types of measurements will very nicely complement each other, as they have highest detection probability for very different types of planets. The combination of FRESIP photometry and ground-based spectra will provide independent confirmation of the existence of planetary systems in orbit around other stars. Such detection of both terrestrial and Jovian planets in orbit around the same star is essential to test our understanding of planet formation.

  2. Lyman-Alpha Observations of High Radial Velocity Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bookbinder, Jay

    1990-12-01

    H I LYMAN -ALPHA (LY-A) IS ONE OF THE MOST IMPORTANT LINES EMITTED BY PLASMA IN THE TEMPERATURE RANGE OF 7000 TO 10 TO THE FIFTH POWER K IN LATE-TYPE STARS. IT IS A MAJOR COMPONENT OF THE TOTAL RADIATIVE LOSS RATE, AND IT PLAYS A CRUCIAL ROLE IN DETERMINING THE ATMOSPHERIC STRUCTURE AND IN FLUORESCING OTHER UV LINES. YET IT IS ALSO THE LEAST STUDIED MAJOR LINE IN THE FAR UV, BECAUSE MOST OF THE LINE FLUX IS ABSORBED BY THE ISM ALONG THE LINE OF SIGHT AND BECAUSE IT IS STRONGLY COMTAMINATED BY THE GEOCORONAL BACKGROUND. A KNOWLEDGE OF THE Ly-A PROFILE IS ALSO IMPORTANT FOR STUDIES OF DEUTERIUM IN THE INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM. BY OBSERVING HIGH RADIAL VELOCITY STARS WE WILL OBTAIN FOR THE FIRST TIME HIGH RESOLUTION SPECTRA OF THE CORE OF A STELLAR H I LYMAN-A EMISSION LINE PROFILE.

  3. The Galactic Bulge Radial Velocity/Abundance Assay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rich, R. M.

    2012-08-01

    The Bulge Radial Velocity Assay (BRAVA) measured radial velocities for ˜ 9500 late-type giants in the Galactic bulge, predominantly from -10° < l < +10° and -2° < b < -10°. The project has discovered that the bulge exhibits cylindrical rotation characteristic of bars, and two studies of dynamics (Shen et al. 2010; Wang et al. 2012 MNRAS sub.) find that bar models- either N-body formed from an instability in a preexisting disk, or a self-consistent model- can account for the observed kinematics. Studies of the Plaut field at (l,b) = 0°, -8° show that alpha enhancement is found in bulge giants even 1 kpc from the nucleus. New infrared studies extending to within 0.25° = 35 pc of the Galactic Center find no iron or alpha gradient from Baade's Window (l,b) = 0.9°, -3.9° to our innermost field, in contrast to the marked gradient observed in the outer bulge. We consider the case of the remarkable globular cluster Terzan 5, which has a strongly bimodal iron and rm [α/Fe] within its members, and we consider evidence pro and con that the bulge was assembled from dissolved clusters. The Subaru telescope has the potential to contribute to study of the Galactic bulge, especially using the Hyper Superime-Cam and planned spectroscopic modes, as well as the high resolution spectrograph. The planned Jasmine satellite series may deliver a comprehensive survey of distances and proper motions of bulge stars, and insight into the origin and importance of the X-shaped bulge.

  4. New systemic radial velocities of suspected RR Lyrae binary stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guggenberger, E.; Barnes, T. G.; Kolenberg, K.

    2016-05-01

    Among the tens of thousands of known RR Lyrae stars there are only a handful that show indications of possible binarity. The question why this is the case is still unsolved, and has recently sparked several studies dedicated to the search for additional RR Lyraes in binary systems. Such systems are particularly valuable because they might allow to constrain the stellar mass. Most of the recent studies, however, are based on photometry by finding a light time effect in the timings of maximum light. This approach is a very promising and successful one, but it has a major drawback: by itself, it cannot serve as a definite proof of binarity, because other phenomena such as the Blazhko effect or intrinsic period changes could lead to similar results. Spectroscopic radial velocity measurements, on the other hand, can serve as definite proof of binarity. We have therefore started a project to study spectroscopically RR Lyrae stars that are suspected to be binaries. We have obtained radial velocity (RV) curves with the 2.1m telescope at McDonald observatory. From these we derive systemic RVs which we will compare to previous measurements in order to find changes induced by orbital motions. We also construct templates of the RV curves that can facilitate future studies. We also observed the most promising RR Lyrae binary candidate, TU UMa, as no recent spectroscopic measurements were available. We present a densely covered pulsational RV curve, which will be used to test the predictions of the orbit models that are based on the O - C variations.

  5. The Radial Velocity Experiment (RAVE): Fifth Data Release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunder, Andrea; Kordopatis, Georges; Steinmetz, Matthias; Zwitter, Tomaž; McMillan, Paul J.; Casagrande, Luca; Enke, Harry; Wojno, Jennifer; Valentini, Marica; Chiappini, Cristina; Matijevič, Gal; Siviero, Alessandro; de Laverny, Patrick; Recio-Blanco, Alejandra; Bijaoui, Albert; Wyse, Rosemary F. G.; Binney, James; Grebel, E. K.; Helmi, Amina; Jofre, Paula; Antoja, Teresa; Gilmore, Gerard; Siebert, Arnaud; Famaey, Benoit; Bienaymé, Olivier; Gibson, Brad K.; Freeman, Kenneth C.; Navarro, Julio F.; Munari, Ulisse; Seabroke, George; Anguiano, Borja; Žerjal, Maruša; Minchev, Ivan; Reid, Warren; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Kos, Janez; Sharma, Sanjib; Watson, Fred; Parker, Quentin A.; Scholz, Ralf-Dieter; Burton, Donna; Cass, Paul; Hartley, Malcolm; Fiegert, Kristin; Stupar, Milorad; Ritter, Andreas; Hawkins, Keith; Gerhard, Ortwin; Chaplin, W. J.; Davies, G. R.; Elsworth, Y. P.; Lund, M. N.; Miglio, A.; Mosser, B.

    2017-02-01

    Data Release 5 (DR5) of the Radial Velocity Experiment (RAVE) is the fifth data release from a magnitude-limited (9< I< 12) survey of stars randomly selected in the Southern Hemisphere. The RAVE medium-resolution spectra (R∼ 7500) covering the Ca-triplet region (8410–8795 Å) span the complete time frame from the start of RAVE observations in 2003 to their completion in 2013. Radial velocities from 520,781 spectra of 457,588 unique stars are presented, of which 255,922 stellar observations have parallaxes and proper motions from the Tycho-Gaia astrometric solution in Gaia DR1. For our main DR5 catalog, stellar parameters (effective temperature, surface gravity, and overall metallicity) are computed using the RAVE DR4 stellar pipeline, but calibrated using recent K2 Campaign 1 seismic gravities and Gaia benchmark stars, as well as results obtained from high-resolution studies. Also included are temperatures from the Infrared Flux Method, and we provide a catalog of red giant stars in the dereddened color {(J-{Ks})}0 interval (0.50, 0.85) for which the gravities were calibrated based only on seismology. Further data products for subsamples of the RAVE stars include individual abundances for Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Ti, Fe, and Ni, and distances found using isochrones. Each RAVE spectrum is complemented by an error spectrum, which has been used to determine uncertainties on the parameters. The data can be accessed via the RAVE Web site or the VizieR database.

  6. The radial velocities and physical parameters of ER Vul

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duemmler, R.; Doucet, C.; Formanek, F.; Ilyin, I.; Tuominen, I.

    2003-05-01

    ER Vul is an eclipsing binary consisting of two solar type stars in a very close orbit with a period of 0fd7 . Accordingly, the two stars rotate very fast, leading to a blending of many spectral features at all phases. Therefore, measuring the radial velocity curve without systematic errors is not trivial. Here, we use a two-dimensional cross-correlation method applied to 137 high quality spectra, collected over 3 years, in order to obtain the radial velocity curve and determine the orbital and some physical parameters of the system from it. Primarily, we improve the binary period to 0fd69809458 +/-0fd00000014 , and find that the two amplitudes are slightly smaller than those measured by others, while the mass ratio is still similar. While at least the primary almost fills its Roche lobe, the system is still detached, i.e. not yet a fully fledged W UMa-system. The behaviour of the Ca Ii IRT line at 8662 Å confirms that the secondary is the more active component, and that the chromospheric emission is not symmetrically distributed over the surfaces of either star. Based on observations made with the SOFIN échelle spectrograph at the Nordic Optical Telescope, operated on the island of La Palma jointly by Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden, in the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos of the Instituto Astrofisica de Canarias; and the coudé spectrograph at the 2 m-RCC-telescope of the National Astronomical Observatory at Rozhen, Bulgaria. Full Table \\ref{T-RV} is only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/402/745

  7. The radial velocity, velocity dispersion, and mass-to-light ratio of the Sculptor dwarf galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armandroff, T. E.; Da Costa, G. S.

    1986-01-01

    The radial velocity, velocity dispersion, and mass-to-light ratio for 16 K giants in the Sculptor dwarf galaxy are calculated. Spectra at the Ca II triplet are analyzed using cross-correlation techniques in order to obtain the mean velocity of + 107.4 + or - 2.0 km/s. The dimensional velocity dispersion estimated as 6.3 (+1.1, -1.3) km/s is combined with the calculated core radius and observed central surface brightness to produce a mass-to-light ratio of 6.0 in solar units. It is noted that the data indicate that the Sculptor contains a large amount of mass not found in globular clusters, and the mass is either in the form of remnant stars or low-mass dwarfs.

  8. KECK NIRSPEC RADIAL VELOCITY OBSERVATIONS OF LATE-M DWARFS

    SciTech Connect

    Tanner, Angelle; White, Russel; Bailey, John; Blake, Cullen; Blake, Geoffrey; Cruz, Kelle; Burgasser, Adam J.; Kraus, Adam

    2012-11-15

    We present the results of an infrared spectroscopic survey of 23 late-M dwarfs with the NIRSPEC echelle spectrometer on the Keck II telescope. Using telluric lines for wavelength calibration, we are able to achieve measurement precisions of down to 45 m s{sup -1} for our late-M dwarfs over a one- to four-year long baseline. Our sample contains two stars with radial velocity (RV) variations of >1000 m s{sup -1}. While we require more measurements to determine whether these RV variations are due to unseen planetary or stellar companions or are the result of starspots known to plague the surface of M dwarfs, we can place upper limits of <40 M{sub J} sin i on the masses of any companions around those two M dwarfs with RV variations of <160 m s{sup -1} at orbital periods of 10-100 days. We have also measured the rotational velocities for all the stars in our late-M dwarf sample and offer our multi-order, high-resolution spectra over 2.0-2.4 {mu}m to the atmospheric modeling community to better understand the atmospheres of late-M dwarfs.

  9. Correcting Radial Velocities for Long-Term Magnetic Activity Variations.

    PubMed

    Saar; Fischer

    2000-05-01

    We study stars in the Lick planetary survey for correlations between simultaneous measurements of high-precision radial velocities vr and magnetic activity (as measured in an SIR emission index from Ca ii lambda8662). We find significant correlations in approximately 30% of the stars. After removing linear trends between SIR and vr, we find that the dispersion in vr in these stars is decreased by an average of 17%, or approximately 45% of the dispersion above the measurement noise. F stars and less active stars with variable Ca ii H and K lines are the most successfully corrected. The magnitude of the slope of the SIR versus vr relations increases proportional to vsini and (excepting M dwarfs) tends to decrease with decreasing Teff. We argue that the main cause of these effects is modification of the mean line bisector shape brought on by long-term, magnetic activity-induced changes in the surface brightness and convective patterns. The correlations can be used to partially correct vr data for the effects of long-term activity variations, potentially permitting study of planets around some (higher mass) younger stars and planets producing smaller stellar reflex velocities.

  10. A radial velocity study of the intermediate polar EX Hydrae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Echevarría, J.; Ramírez-Torres, A.; Michel, R.; Hernández Santisteban, J. V.

    2016-09-01

    A study on the intermediate polar EX Hya is presented, based on simultaneous photometry and high-dispersion spectroscopic observations, during four consecutive nights. The strong photometric modulation related to the 67-min spin period of the primary star is clearly present, as well as the narrow eclipses associated with the orbital modulation. Since our eclipse timings have been obtained almost 91 000 cycles since the last reported observations, we present new linear ephemeris, although we cannot rule out a sinusoidal variation suggested by previous authors. The system shows double-peaked H α, H β and He I λ5876 Å emission lines, with almost no other lines present. As H α is the only line with enough S/N ratio in our observations, we have concentrated our efforts in its study, in order to obtain a reliable radial velocity semi-amplitude. From the profile of this line, we find two important components; one with a steep rise and velocities not larger than ˜1000 km s-1 and another broader component extending up to ˜2000 km s-1, which we interpret as coming mainly from the inner disc. A strong and variable hotspot is found and a stream-like structure is seen at times. We show that the best solution correspond to K1 = 58 ± 5 km s-1 from H α, from the two emission components, which are both in phase with the orbital modulation. We remark on a peculiar effect in the radial velocity curve around phase zero, which could be interpreted as a Rositter-MacLaughlin-like effect, which has been taken into account before deriving K1. This value is compatible with the values found in high resolution both in the ultraviolet and X-ray. Using the published inclination angle of i =78° ± 1° and semi-amplitude K2 = 432 ± 5 km s-1, we find: M1 = 0.78 ± 0.03 M⊙, M2 = 0.10 ± 0.02 M⊙ and a = 0.67 ± 0.01 R⊙. Doppler Tomography has been applied, to construct six Doppler tomograms for single orbital cycles spanning the four days of observations to support our conclusions

  11. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Abell 3733 radial velocities (Solanes+ 1998)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solanes, J. M.; Stein, P.

    1998-03-01

    Cross-correlation and emission-line heliocentric radial velocities for 112 galaxies observed with the MEFOS and OPTOPUS spectrographs in the field of the galaxy cluster A3733. The last column lists the final radial velocities which result form a weighted average of the velocity data in the previous columns. (1 data file).

  12. Searching for Radial Velocity Variations in eta Carinae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iping, R. C.; Sonneborn, G.; Gull, T. R.; Ivarsson, S.; Nielsen, K.

    2006-01-01

    A hot companion of eta Carinae has been detected using high resolution spectra (905 - 1180 A) obtained with the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) satellite (see poster by Sonneborn et al.). Analysis of the far-UV spectrum shows that eta Car B is a luminous hot star. The N II 1084-86 emission feature indicates that the star may be nitrogen rich. The FUV continuum and the S IV 1073 P-Cygni wind line suggest that the effective temperature of eta Car B is at least 25,000 K. FUV spectra of eta Carinae were obtained with the FUSE satellite at 9 epochs between 2000 February and 2005 July. The data consists of 12 observations taken with the LWRS aperture (30x30 arcsec), three with the HIRS aperture (1.25x20 arcsec), and one MRDS aperture (4x20 arcsec). In this paper we discuss the analysis of these spectra to search for radial velocity variations associated with the 5.54-year binary orbit of Eta Car AB.

  13. Estimating stellar radial velocity variability from Kepler and GALEX: Implications for the radial velocity confirmation of exoplanets

    SciTech Connect

    Cegla, H. M.; Watson, C. A.; Stassun, K. G.; Bastien, F. A.; Pepper, J.

    2014-01-01

    We cross match the GALEX and Kepler surveys to create a unique dataset with both ultraviolet (UV) measurements and highly precise photometric variability measurements in the visible light spectrum. As stellar activity is driven by magnetic field modulations, we have used UV emission from the magnetically heated gas in the stellar atmosphere to serve as our proxy for the more well-known stellar activity indicator, R' {sub HK}. The R' {sub HK} approximations were in turn used to estimate the level of astrophysical noise expected in radial velocity (RV) measurements and these were then searched for correlations with photometric variability. We find significant scatter in our attempts to estimate RV noise for magnetically active stars, which we attribute to variations in the phase and strength of the stellar magnetic cycle that drives the activity of these targets. However, for stars we deem to be magnetically quiet, we do find a clear correlation between photometric variability and estimated levels of RV noise (with variability up to ∼10 m s{sup –1}). We conclude that for these quiet stars, we can use photometric measurements as a proxy to estimate the RV noise expected. As a result, the procedure outlined in this paper may help select targets best-suited for RV follow-up necessary for planet confirmation.

  14. Absolute plate velocities from seismic anisotropy: Importance of correlated errors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Lin; Gordon, Richard G.; Kreemer, Corné

    2014-09-01

    The errors in plate motion azimuths inferred from shear wave splitting beneath any one tectonic plate are shown to be correlated with the errors of other azimuths from the same plate. To account for these correlations, we adopt a two-tier analysis: First, find the pole of rotation and confidence limits for each plate individually. Second, solve for the best fit to these poles while constraining relative plate angular velocities to consistency with the MORVEL relative plate angular velocities. Our preferred set of angular velocities, SKS-MORVEL, is determined from the poles from eight plates weighted proportionally to the root-mean-square velocity of each plate. SKS-MORVEL indicates that eight plates (Amur, Antarctica, Caribbean, Eurasia, Lwandle, Somalia, Sundaland, and Yangtze) have angular velocities that differ insignificantly from zero. The net rotation of the lithosphere is 0.25 ± 0.11° Ma-1 (95% confidence limits) right handed about 57.1°S, 68.6°E. The within-plate dispersion of seismic anisotropy for oceanic lithosphere (σ = 19.2°) differs insignificantly from that for continental lithosphere (σ = 21.6°). The between-plate dispersion, however, is significantly smaller for oceanic lithosphere (σ = 7.4°) than for continental lithosphere (σ = 14.7°). Two of the slowest-moving plates, Antarctica (vRMS = 4 mm a-1, σ = 29°) and Eurasia (vRMS = 3 mm a-1, σ = 33°), have two of the largest within-plate dispersions, which may indicate that a plate must move faster than ≈ 5 mm a-1 to result in seismic anisotropy useful for estimating plate motion. The tendency of observed azimuths on the Arabia plate to be counterclockwise of plate motion may provide information about the direction and amplitude of superposed asthenospheric flow or about anisotropy in the lithospheric mantle.

  15. Extreme Precision Environmental Control for Next Generation Radial Velocity Spectrographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefansson, Gudmundur K.; Hearty, Fred; Levi, Eric; Robertson, Paul; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Bender, Chad; Nelson, Matt; Halverson, Samuel

    2015-12-01

    Extreme radial velocity precisions of order 10cm/s will enable the discoveries of Earth-like planets around solar-type stars. Temperature and pressure variations inside a spectrograph can lead to thermomechanical instabilities in the optics and mounts, and refractive index variations in both the optical elements as well as the surrounding air. Together, these variations can easily induce instrumental drifts of several tens to hundreds of meters per second. Enclosing the full optical train in thermally stabilized high-vacuum environments minimizes such errors. In this talk, I will discuss the Environmental Control System (ECS) for the Habitable Zone Planet Finder (HPF) spectrograph: a near infrared (NIR) facility class instrument we will commission at the Hobby Eberly Telescope in 2016. The ECS will maintain the HPF optical bench stable at 180K at the sub milli-Kelvin level on the timescale of days, and at the few milli-Kelvin level over months to years. The entire spectrograph is kept under high-quality vacuum (<10-6 Torr), and environmental temperature fluctuations are compensated for with an actively controlled radiation shield outfitted with custom feedback electronics. High efficiency Multi-Layer Insulation (MLI) blankets, and a passive external thermal enclosure further isolate the optics from ambient perturbations. This environmental control scheme is versatile, suitable to stabilize both next generation NIR, and optical spectrographs. I will show how we are currently testing this control system for use with our design concept of the Extreme Precision Doppler Spectrograph (EPDS), the next generation optical spectrograph for the WIYN 3.5m telescope. Our most recent results from full-scale stability tests will be presented.

  16. Advanced structural design for precision radial velocity instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldwin, Dan; Szentgyorgyi, Andrew; Barnes, Stuart; Bean, Jacob; Ben-Ami, Sagi; Brennan, Patricia; Budynkiewicz, Jamie; Chun, Moo-Young; Conroy, Charlie; Crane, Jeffrey D.; Epps, Harland; Evans, Ian; Evans, Janet; Foster, Jeff; Frebel, Anna; Gauron, Thomas; Guzman, Dani; Hare, Tyson; Jang, Bi-Ho; Jang, Jeong-Gyun; Jordan, Andres; Kim, Jihun; Kim, Kang-Min; Mendes de Oliveira, Claudia; Lopez-Morales, Mercedes; McCracken, Kenneth; McMuldroch, Stuart; Miller, Joseph; Mueller, Mark; Oh, Jae Sok; Ordway, Mark; Park, Byeong-Gon; Park, Chan; Park, Sung-Joon; Paxson, Charles; Phillips, David; Plummer, David; Podgorski, William; Seifahrt, Andreas; Stark, Daniel; Steiner, Joao; Uomoto, Alan; Walsworth, Ronald; Yu, Young-Sam

    2016-07-01

    The GMT-Consortium Large Earth Finder (G-CLEF) is an echelle spectrograph with precision radial velocity (PRV) capability that will be a first light instrument for the Giant Magellan Telescope (GMT). G-CLEF has a PRV precision goal of 40 cm/sec (10 cm/s for multiple measurements) to enable detection of Earth-like exoplanets in the habitable zones of sun-like stars1. This precision is a primary driver of G-CLEF's structural design. Extreme stability is necessary to minimize image motions at the CCD detectors. Minute changes in temperature, pressure, and acceleration environments cause structural deformations, inducing image motions which degrade PRV precision. The instrument's structural design will ensure that the PRV goal is achieved under the environments G-CLEF will be subjected to as installed on the GMT azimuth platform, including: Millikelvin (0.001 °K) thermal soaks and gradients 10 millibar changes in ambient pressure Changes in acceleration due to instrument tip/tilt and telescope slewing Carbon fiber/cyanate composite was selected for the optical bench structure in order to meet performance goals. Low coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) and high stiffness-to-weight are key features of the composite optical bench design. Manufacturability and serviceability of the instrument are also drivers of the design. In this paper, we discuss analyses leading to technical choices made to minimize G-CLEF's sensitivity to changing environments. Finite element analysis (FEA) and image motion sensitivity studies were conducted to determine PRV performance under operational environments. We discuss the design of the optical bench structure to optimize stiffness-to-weight and minimize deformations due to inertial and pressure effects. We also discuss quasi-kinematic mounting of optical elements and assemblies, and optimization of these to ensure minimal image motion under thermal, pressure, and inertial loads expected during PRV observations.

  17. WHICH RADIAL VELOCITY EXOPLANETS HAVE UNDETECTED OUTER COMPANIONS?

    SciTech Connect

    Rodigas, Timothy J.; Hinz, Philip M.

    2009-09-01

    The observed radial velocity (RV) eccentricity distribution for extrasolar planets in single-planet systems shows that a significant fraction of planets are eccentric (e > 0.1). However, an RV planet's eccentricity, which comes from the Keplerian fitting, can be biased by low signal-to-noise ratio and poor sampling. Here, we investigate the effects on eccentricity produced by undetected outer companions. We have carried out Monte Carlo simulations of mock RV data to understand this effect and predict its impact on the observed distribution. We first quantify the statistical bias of known RV planets' eccentricities produced by undetected zero-eccentricity wide-separation companions and show that this effect alone cannot explain the observed distribution. We then modify the simulations to consist of two populations, one of zero-eccentricity planets in double-planet systems and the other of single planets drawn from an eccentric distribution. Our simulations show that a good fit to the observed distribution is obtained with 45% zero-eccentricity double planets and 55% single eccentric planets. Assuming that our two simulated populations of planets are a good approximation for the true RV population, matching the observed distribution allows us to determine the probability that a known RV planet's orbital eccentricity has been biased by an undetected wide-separation companion. Averaged over eccentricity we calculate this probability to be {approx}4%, suggesting that a small fraction of systems may have a yet to be discovered outer companion. Our simulations show that moderately eccentric planets, with 0.1 < e < 0.3 and 0.1 < e < 0.2, have a {approx}13% and {approx}19% probability, respectively, of having an undetected outer companion. We encourage both high-contrast direct imaging and RV follow-up surveys of known RV planets with moderate eccentricities to test our predictions and look for previously undetected outer companions.

  18. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Bibliography of stellar radial velocities (Abt+ 1972)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abt, H. A.; Biggs, E. S.

    2015-09-01

    The data file contains a bibliography of 44,000 radial velocities for about 25,000 stars, from a compilation of about 2340 publications (see the "Note (3)" below). The authors estimate that 99% of stellar radial velocities published by June 1970 are contained in the surveyed volumes. (1 data file).

  19. Absolute Plate Velocities from Seismic Anisotropy: Importance of Correlated Errors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, R. G.; Zheng, L.; Kreemer, C.

    2014-12-01

    The orientation of seismic anisotropy inferred beneath the interiors of plates may provide a means to estimate the motions of the plate relative to the deeper mantle. Here we analyze a global set of shear-wave splitting data to estimate plate motions and to better understand the dispersion of the data, correlations in the errors, and their relation to plate speed. The errors in plate motion azimuths inferred from shear-wave splitting beneath any one tectonic plate are shown to be correlated with the errors of other azimuths from the same plate. To account for these correlations, we adopt a two-tier analysis: First, find the pole of rotation and confidence limits for each plate individually. Second, solve for the best fit to these poles while constraining relative plate angular velocities to consistency with the MORVEL relative plate angular velocities. Our preferred set of angular velocities, SKS-MORVEL, is determined from the poles from eight plates weighted proportionally to the root-mean-square velocity of each plate. SKS-MORVEL indicates that eight plates (Amur, Antarctica, Caribbean, Eurasia, Lwandle, Somalia, Sundaland, and Yangtze) have angular velocities that differ insignificantly from zero. The net rotation of the lithosphere is 0.25±0.11º Ma-1 (95% confidence limits) right-handed about 57.1ºS, 68.6ºE. The within-plate dispersion of seismic anisotropy for oceanic lithosphere (σ=19.2°) differs insignificantly from that for continental lithosphere (σ=21.6°). The between-plate dispersion, however, is significantly smaller for oceanic lithosphere (σ=7.4°) than for continental lithosphere (σ=14.7°). Two of the slowest-moving plates, Antarctica (vRMS=4 mm a-1, σ=29°) and Eurasia (vRMS=3 mm a-1, σ=33°), have two of the largest within-plate dispersions, which may indicate that a plate must move faster than ≈5 mm a-1 to result in seismic anisotropy useful for estimating plate motion.

  20. Radial velocity variations in the young eruptive star EX Lupi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kóspál, Á.; Mohler-Fischer, M.; Sicilia-Aguilar, A.; Ábrahám, P.; Curé, M.; Henning, Th.; Kiss, Cs.; Launhardt, R.; Moór, A.; Müller, A.

    2014-01-01

    Context. EX Lup-type objects (EXors) are low-mass pre-main sequence objects characterized by optical and near-infrared outbursts attributed to highly enhanced accretion from the circumstellar disk onto the star. Aims: The trigger mechanism of EXor outbursts is still debated. One type of theory requires a close (sub)stellar companion that perturbs the inner part of the disk and triggers the onset of the enhanced accretion. Here, we study the radial velocity (RV) variations of EX Lup, the prototype of the EXor class, and test whether they can be related to a close companion. Methods: We conducted a five-year RV survey, collecting 54 observations with HARPS and FEROS. We analyzed the activity of EX Lup by checking the bisector, the equivalent width of the Ca 8662 Å line, the asymmetry of the Ca II K line, the activity indicator SFEROS, the asymmetry of the cross-correlation function, the line depth ratio of the VI/FeI lines, and the TiO, CaH 2, CaH 3, CaOH, and Hα indices. We complemented the RV measurements with a 14-day optical/infrared photometric monitoring to look for signatures of activity or varying accretion. Results: We found that the RV of EX Lup is periodic (P = 7.417 d), with stable period, semi-amplitude (2.2 km s-1), and phase over at least four years of observations. This period is not present in any of the above-mentioned activity indicators. However, the RVs of narrow metallic emission lines suggest the same period, but with an anti-correlating phase. The observed absorption line RVs can be fitted with a Keplerian solution around a 0.6 M⊙ central star with msini = (14.7 ± 0.7) MJup and eccentricity of e = 0.24. Alternatively, we attempted to model the observations with a cold or hot stellar spot as well. We found that in our simple model, the spot parameters needed to reproduce the RV semi-amplitude are in contradiction with the photometric variability, making the spot scenario unlikely. Conclusions: We qualitatively discuss two possibilities to

  1. Quasilinear model for energetic particle diffusion in radial and velocity space

    SciTech Connect

    Waltz, R. E.; Staebler, G. M.; Bass, E. M.

    2013-04-15

    A quasilinear model for passive energetic particle (EP) turbulent diffusion in radial and velocity space is fitted and tested against nonlinear gyrokinetic tokamak simulations with the GYRO code [J. Candy and R. E. Waltz, Phys. Rev. Lett. 91, 045001 (2003)]. Off diagonal elements of a symmetric positive definite 2 Multiplication-Sign 2 EP diffusion matrix account for fluxes up radial (energy) gradients driven by energy (radial) gradients of the EP velocity space distribution function. The quasilinear ratio kernel of the model is provided by a simple analytic formula for the EP radial and velocity space EP diffusivity relative to radial thermal ion energy diffusivity at each linear mode of the turbulence driven by the thermal plasma. The TGLF [G. M. Staebler, J. E. Kinsey, and R. E. Waltz, Phys. Plasmas 14, 0055909 (2007); ibid. 15, 0055908 (2008)] tokamak transport model provides the linear mode frequency and growth rates to the kernel as well as the nonlinear spectral weight for each mode.

  2. VizieR Online Data Catalog: WASP-80 photometric and radial velocity data (Triaud+, 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Triaud, A. H. M. J.; Anderson, D. R.; Collier, Cameron A.; Doyle, A. P.; Fumel, A.; Gillon, M.; Hellier, C.; Jehin, E.; Lendl, M.; Lovis, C.; Maxted, P. F. L.; Pepe, F.; Pollacco, D.; Queloz, D.; Segransan, D.; Smalley, B.; Smith, A. M. S.; Udry, S.; West, R. G.; Wheatley, P. J.

    2013-01-01

    The data is composed of one WASP photometric timeseries in a band similar to V+R, of two TRAPPIST photometric timeseries in the z band, and of one series from the EulerCam, in the Gunn r' filter. There is also one set of CORALIE radial velocities and one set of HARPS radial velocities. They give evidence of a planet orbiting and transiting WASP-80. (6 data files).

  3. ELLIPSOIDAL VARIABLE V1197 ORIONIS: ABSOLUTE LIGHT-VELOCITY ANALYSIS FOR KNOWN DISTANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, R. E.; Chochol, D.; KomzIk, R.; Van Hamme, W.; Pribulla, T.; Volkov, I.

    2009-09-01

    V1197 Orionis light curves from a long-term observing program for red giant binaries show ellipsoidal variation of small amplitude in the V and R{sub C} bands, although not clearly in U and B. Eclipses are not detected. All four bands show large irregular intrinsic variations, including fleeting quasi-periodicities identified by power spectra, that degrade analysis and may be caused by dynamical tides generated by orbital eccentricity. To deal with the absence of eclipses and consequent lack of astrophysical and geometrical information, direct use is made of the Hipparcos parallax distance while the V and R{sub C} light curves and (older) radial velocity curves are analyzed simultaneously in terms of absolute flux. The red giant's temperature is estimated from new spectra. This type of analysis, called Inverse Distance Estimation for brevity, is new and can also be applied to other ellipsoidal variables. Advantages gained by utilization of definite distance and temperature are discussed in regard to how radius, fractional lobe filling, and mass ratio information are expressed in the observations. The advantages were tested in solutions of noisy synthetic data. Also discussed and tested by simulations are ideas on the optimal number of light curves to be solved simultaneously under various conditions. The dim companion has not been observed or discussed in the literature but most solutions find its mass to be well below that of the red giant. Solutions show red giant masses that are too low for evolution to the red giant stage within the age of the Galaxy, although that result is probably an artifact of the intrinsic brightness fluctuations.

  4. Ellipsoidal Variable V1197 Orionis: Absolute Light-Velocity Analysis for Known Distance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, R. E.; Chochol, D.; Komžík, R.; Van Hamme, W.; Pribulla, T.; Volkov, I.

    2009-09-01

    V1197 Orionis light curves from a long-term observing program for red giant binaries show ellipsoidal variation of small amplitude in the V and RC bands, although not clearly in U and B. Eclipses are not detected. All four bands show large irregular intrinsic variations, including fleeting quasi-periodicities identified by power spectra, that degrade analysis and may be caused by dynamical tides generated by orbital eccentricity. To deal with the absence of eclipses and consequent lack of astrophysical and geometrical information, direct use is made of the Hipparcos parallax distance while the V and RC light curves and (older) radial velocity curves are analyzed simultaneously in terms of absolute flux. The red giant's temperature is estimated from new spectra. This type of analysis, called Inverse Distance Estimation for brevity, is new and can also be applied to other ellipsoidal variables. Advantages gained by utilization of definite distance and temperature are discussed in regard to how radius, fractional lobe filling, and mass ratio information are expressed in the observations. The advantages were tested in solutions of noisy synthetic data. Also discussed and tested by simulations are ideas on the optimal number of light curves to be solved simultaneously under various conditions. The dim companion has not been observed or discussed in the literature but most solutions find its mass to be well below that of the red giant. Solutions show red giant masses that are too low for evolution to the red giant stage within the age of the Galaxy, although that result is probably an artifact of the intrinsic brightness fluctuations.

  5. 3-D shear wave radially and azimuthally anisotropic velocity model of the North American upper mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Huaiyu; Romanowicz, Barbara; Fischer, Karen M.; Abt, David

    2011-03-01

    Using a combination of long period seismic waveforms and SKS splitting measurements, we have developed a 3-D upper-mantle model (SAWum_NA2) of North America that includes isotropic shear velocity, with a lateral resolution of ˜250 km, as well as radial and azimuthal anisotropy, with a lateral resolution of ˜500 km. Combining these results, we infer several key features of lithosphere and asthenosphere structure. A rapid change from thin (˜70-80 km) lithosphere in the western United States (WUS) to thick lithosphere (˜200 km) in the central, cratonic part of the continent closely follows the Rocky Mountain Front (RMF). Changes with depth of the fast axis direction of azimuthal anisotropy reveal the presence of two layers in the cratonic lithosphere, corresponding to the fast-to-slow discontinuity found in receiver functions. Below the lithosphere, azimuthal anisotropy manifests a maximum, stronger in the WUS than under the craton, and the fast axis of anisotropy aligns with the absolute plate motion, as described in the hotspot reference frame (HS3-NUVEL 1A). In the WUS, this zone is confined between 70 and 150 km, decreasing in strength with depth from the top, from the RMF to the San Andreas Fault system and the Juan de Fuca/Gorda ridges. This result suggests that shear associated with lithosphere-asthenosphere coupling dominates mantle deformation down to this depth in the western part of the continent. The depth extent of the zone of increased azimuthal anisotropy below the cratonic lithosphere is not well resolved in our study, although it is peaked around 270 km, a robust result. Radial anisotropy is such that, predominantly, ξ > 1, where ξ= (Vsh/Vsv)2, under the continent and its borders down to ˜200 km, with stronger ξ in the bordering oceanic regions. Across the continent and below 200 km, alternating zones of weaker and stronger radial anisotropy, with predominantly ξ < 1, correlate with zones of small lateral changes in the fast axis direction of

  6. Transit and radial velocity survey efficiency comparison for a habitable zone Earth

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, Christopher J.

    2014-09-01

    Transit and radial velocity searches are two techniques for identifying nearby extrasolar planets to Earth that transit bright stars. Identifying a robust sample of these exoplanets around bright stars for detailed atmospheric characterization is a major observational undertaking. In this study we describe a framework that answers the question of whether a transit or radial velocity survey is more efficient at finding transiting exoplanets given the same amount of observing time. Within the framework we show that a transit survey's window function can be approximated using the hypergeometric probability distribution. We estimate the observing time required for a transit survey to find a transiting Earth-sized exoplanet in the habitable zone (HZ) with an emphasis on late-type stars. We also estimate the radial velocity precision necessary to detect the equivalent HZ Earth-mass exoplanet that also transits when using an equal amount of observing time as the transit survey. We find that a radial velocity survey with σ{sub rv} ∼ 0.6 m s{sup –1} precision has comparable efficiency in terms of observing time to a transit survey with the requisite photometric precision σ{sub phot} ∼ 300 ppm to find a transiting Earth-sized exoplanet in the HZ of late M dwarfs. For super-Earths, a σ{sub rv} ∼ 2.0 m s{sup –1} precision radial velocity survey has comparable efficiency to a transit survey with σ{sub phot} ∼ 2300 ppm.

  7. RADIAL VELOCITIES FROM VLT-KMOS SPECTRA OF GIANT STARS IN THE GLOBULAR CLUSTER NGC 6388

    SciTech Connect

    Lapenna, E.; Mucciarelli, A.; Lanzoni, B.; Ferraro, F. R.; Dalessandro, E.; Valenti, E.; Cirasuolo, M.

    2015-01-01

    We present new radial velocity measurements for 82 stars, members of the Galactic globular cluster (GC) NGC 6388, obtained from ESO-VLT K-band Multi Object Spectrograph (KMOS) spectra acquired during the instrument Science Verification. The accuracy of the wavelength calibration is discussed and a number of tests of the KMOS response are presented. The cluster systemic velocity obtained (81.3 ± 1.5 km s{sup –1}) is in very good agreement with previous determinations. While a hint of ordered rotation is found between 9'' and 20'' from the cluster center, where the distribution of radial velocities is clearly bimodal, more data are needed before drawing any firm conclusions. The acquired sample of radial velocities has also been used to determine the cluster velocity dispersion (VD) profile between ∼9'' and 70'', supplementing previous measurements at r < 2'' and r > 60'' obtained with ESO-SINFONI and ESO-FLAMES spectroscopy, respectively. The new portion of the VD profile nicely matches the previous ones, better defining the knee of the distribution. The present work clearly shows the effectiveness of a deployable integral field unit in measuring the radial velocities of individual stars for determining the VD profile of Galactic GCs. It represents the pilot project for an ongoing large program with KMOS and FLAMES at the ESO-VLT, aimed at determining the next generation of VD and rotation profiles for a representative sample of GCs.

  8. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Radial velocities of K-M dwarfs (Sperauskas+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sperauskas, J.; Bartasiute, S.; Boyle, R. P.; Deveikis, V.; Raudeliunas, S.; Upgren, A. R.

    2016-09-01

    We analyzed nearly 3300 measurements of radial velocities for 1049 K-M dwarfs, that we obtained during the past decade with a CORAVEL-type instrument, with a primary emphasis on detecting and eliminating from kinematic calculations the spectroscopic binaries and binary candidates. We present the catalog of our observations of radial velocities for 959 stars which are not suspected of velocity variability. Of these, 776 stars are from the MCC sample and 173 stars are K-M dwarfs from the CNS4. The catalog consists of two parts: Table 2 lists the mean radial velocities, and Table 2a contains individual measurements. Our radial velocities agree with the best published standard stars to within 0.7km/s in precision. Combining these and supplementary radial-velocity data with Hipparcos/Tycho-2 astrometry (Table 4 summarizes input observational data) we calculated the space velocity components and parameters of the galactic orbits in a three-component model potential by Johnston K.V. et al. (1995ApJ...451..598J) for a total of 1088 K-M dwarfs (Table 5), that we use for kinematical analysis and for the identification of possible candidate members of nearby stellar kinematic groups. We identified 146 stars as possible candidate members of the classical moving groups and known or suspected subgroups (Table 7). We show that the distributions of space-velocity components, orbital eccentricities, and maximum distances from the Galactic plane for nearby K-M dwarfs are consistent with the presence of young, intermediate-age and old populations of the thin disk and a small fraction (3%) of stars with the thick disk kinematics. (7 data files).

  9. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Radial velocities in Omega Cen (NGC5139) (Reijns+, 2006)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reijns, R. A.; Seitzer, P.; Arnold, R.; Freeman, K. C.; Ingerson, T.; van den Bosch, R. C. E.; van de Ven, G.; de Zeeuw, P. T.

    2005-11-01

    List of 1966 radial velocity measurements of stars in globular cluster Omega Centauri (NGC 5139) taken with the ARGUS multi-object spectrometer at the CTIO 4m Blanco telescope. All the stars have a B magnitude brighter than 16.5. The median error is less than 2km/s. The stars are numbered using their LID (Leiden Identification Number) from van Leeuwen et.al. (2000, Cat. ). In a companion paper by van de Ven et al. (2006A&A...445..513V), we correct these radial velocities for the perspective rotation caused by the space motion of the cluster. Additionaly 339 stars where measured. These consist of (i) 87 stars with B-V<0.4, (ii) 252 stars not in the van Leeuwen et al. catalog. We suspect that that many of these stars have an erroneous value for their radial velocity. (2 data files).

  10. The OCCASO survey: presentation and radial velocities of 12 Milky Way open clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casamiquela, L.; Carrera, R.; Jordi, C.; Balaguer-Núñez, L.; Pancino, E.; Hidalgo, S. L.; Martínez-Vázquez, C. E.; Murabito, S.; del Pino, A.; Aparicio, A.; Blanco-Cuaresma, S.; Gallart, C.

    2016-05-01

    Open clusters (OCs) are crucial for studying the formation and evolution of the Galactic disc. However, the lack of a large number of OCs analysed homogeneously hampers the investigations about chemical patterns and the existence of Galactocentric radial and vertical gradients, or an age-metallicity relation. To overcome this, we have designed the Open Cluster Chemical Abundances from Spanish Observatories (OCCASO) survey. We aim to provide homogeneous radial velocities, physical parameters and individual chemical abundances of six or more red clump stars for a sample of 25 old and intermediate-age OCs visible from the Northern hemisphere. To do so, we use high-resolution spectroscopic facilities (R ≥ 62 000) available at Spanish observatories. We present the motivation, design and current status of the survey, together with the first data release of radial velocities for 77 stars in 12 OCs, which represents about 50 per cent of the survey. We include clusters never studied with high-resolution spectroscopy before (NGC 1907, NGC 6991, NGC 7762), and clusters in common with other large spectroscopic surveys like the Gaia-ESO Survey (NGC 6705) and Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (NGC 2682 and NGC 6819). We perform internal comparisons between instruments to evaluate and correct internal systematics of the results, and compare our radial velocities with previous determinations in the literature, when available. Finally, radial velocities for each cluster are used to perform a preliminary kinematic study in relation with the Galactic disc.

  11. Radial velocities of blue stragglers in the old open cluster NGC 7789

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drilling, J. S.; Schoenberner, D.

    NGC 7789 is a populous, old galactic cluster with a large number of blue stragglers. In an attempt to determine the stellar parameters of as many of these objects as possible in order to unravel their origin, the brighter blue stragglers of NGC 7789 were observed with the 4-meter echelle spectrograph at Kitt Peak and the 2.2-meter coude spectrograph at Calar Alto. This paper reports on the determination of radial velocities from these high resolution spectra. The results are compared with the previous radial velocity studies of Strom and Strom (1970) and Stryker and Hrivnak (1984).

  12. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Cepheid radial velocity amplitude modulations (Anderson, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, R. I.

    2014-06-01

    A total of 983 radial velocity measurements of the four Cepheids QZ Nor (125), V335 Pup (95), l Car (324), and RS Pup (439) are provided. The measurements are based on observations carried out between April 2011 and February 2014 that were obtained using the Coralie spectrograph, mounted to the Swiss 1.2m Euler telescope located at La Silla Observatory, Chile. For each Cepheid, a table with the barycentric Julian date of observation, radial velocity, and the measurement uncertainty are provided. In addition, a table containing the identifiers, coordinates, and pulsation periods used to phase-fold the data (see the figures in the article) is provided. (5 data files).

  13. Frequentist and Bayesian Orbital Parameter Estimaton from Radial Velocity Data Using RVLIN, BOOTTRAN, and RUN DMC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Benjamin Earl; Wright, Jason Thomas; Wang, Sharon

    2015-08-01

    For this hack session, we will present three tools used in analyses of radial velocity exoplanet systems. RVLIN is a set of IDL routines used to quickly fit an arbitrary number of Keplerian curves to radial velocity data to find adequate parameter point estimates. BOOTTRAN is an IDL-based extension of RVLIN to provide orbital parameter uncertainties using bootstrap based on a Keplerian model. RUN DMC is a highly parallelized Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm that employs an n-body model, primarily used for dynamically complex or poorly constrained exoplanet systems. We will compare the performance of these tools and their applications to various exoplanet systems.

  14. Fully distributed absolute blood flow velocity measurement for middle cerebral arteries using Doppler optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Li; Zhu, Jiang; Hancock, Aneeka M.; Dai, Cuixia; Zhang, Xuping; Frostig, Ron D.; Chen, Zhongping

    2016-01-01

    Doppler optical coherence tomography (DOCT) is considered one of the most promising functional imaging modalities for neuro biology research and has demonstrated the ability to quantify cerebral blood flow velocity at a high accuracy. However, the measurement of total absolute blood flow velocity (BFV) of major cerebral arteries is still a difficult problem since it is related to vessel geometry. In this paper, we present a volumetric vessel reconstruction approach that is capable of measuring the absolute BFV distributed along the entire middle cerebral artery (MCA) within a large field-of-view. The Doppler angle at each point of the MCA, representing the vessel geometry, is derived analytically by localizing the artery from pure DOCT images through vessel segmentation and skeletonization. Our approach could achieve automatic quantification of the fully distributed absolute BFV across different vessel branches. Experiments on rodents using swept-source optical coherence tomography showed that our approach was able to reveal the consequences of permanent MCA occlusion with absolute BFV measurement. PMID:26977365

  15. First Absolutely Calibrated Localized Measurements of Ion Velocity in the MST in Locked and Rotating Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baltzer, M.; Craig, D.; den Hartog, D. J.; Nornberg, M. D.; Munaretto, S.

    2015-11-01

    An Ion Doppler Spectrometer (IDS) is used on MST for high time-resolution passive and active measurements of impurity ion emission. Absolutely calibrated measurements of flow are difficult because the spectrometer records data within 0.3 nm of the C+5 line of interest, and commercial calibration lamps do not produce lines in this narrow range . A novel optical system was designed to absolutely calibrate the IDS. The device uses an UV LED to produce a broad emission curve in the desired region. A Fabry-Perot etalon filters this light, cutting transmittance peaks into the pattern of the LED emission. An optical train of fused silica lenses focuses the light into the IDS with f/4. A holographic diffuser blurs the light cone to increase homogeneity. Using this light source, the absolute Doppler shift of ion emissions can be measured in MST plasmas. In combination with charge exchange recombination spectroscopy, localized ion velocities can now be measured. Previously, a time-averaged measurement along the chord bisecting the poloidal plane was used to calibrate the IDS; the quality of these central chord calibrations can be characterized with our absolute calibration. Calibration errors may also be quantified and minimized by optimizing the curve-fitting process. Preliminary measurements of toroidal velocity in locked and rotating plasmas will be shown. This work has been supported by the US DOE.

  16. An Inexpensive Field-Widened Monolithic Michelson Interferometer for Precision Radial Velocity Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahadevan, Suvrath; Ge, Jian; Fleming, Scott W.; Wan, Xiaoke; DeWitt, Curtis; van Eyken, Julian C.; McDavitt, Dan

    2008-09-01

    We have constructed a thermally compensated field-widened monolithic Michelson interferometer that can be used with a medium-resolution spectrograph to measure precise Doppler radial velocities of stars. Our prototype monolithic fixed-delay interferometer is constructed with off-the-shelf components and assembled using a hydrolysis bonding technique. We installed and tested this interferometer in the Exoplanet Tracker (ET) instrument at the Kitt Peak 2.1 m telescope, an instrument built to demonstrate the principles of dispersed fixed-delay interferometry. An iodine cell allows the interferometer drift to be accurately calibrated, relaxing the stability requirements on the interferometer itself. When using our monolithic interferometer, the ET instrument has no moving parts (except the iodine cell), greatly simplifying its operation. We demonstrate differential radial velocity precision of a few m s-1 on well known radial velocity standards and planet bearing stars when using this interferometer. Such monolithic interferometers will make it possible to build relatively inexpensive instruments that are easy to operate and capable of precision radial velocity measurements. A larger multiobject version of the Exoplanet Tracker will be used to conduct a large scale survey for planetary systems as part of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III (SDSS III). Variants of the techniques and principles discussed in this paper can be directly applied to build large monolithic interferometers for such applications, enabling the construction of instruments capable of efficiently observing many stars simultaneously at high velocity precision.

  17. Mapping surface currents from HF radar radial velocity measurements using optimal interpolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sung Yong; Terrill, Eric J.; Cornuelle, Bruce D.

    2008-10-01

    An optimal interpolation (OI) method to compute surface vector current fields from radial velocity measurements derived from high-frequency (HF) radars is presented. The method assumes a smooth spatial covariance relationship between neighboring vector currents, in contrast to the more commonly used un-weighted least-squares fitting (UWLS) method, which assumes a constant vector velocity within a defined search radius. This OI method can directly compute any quantities linearly related to the radial velocities, such as vector currents and dynamic quantities (divergence and vorticity) as well as the uncertainties of those respective fields. The OI method is found to be more stable than the UWLS method and reduces spurious vector solutions near the baselines between HF radar installations. The OI method produces a covariance of the uncertainty of the estimated vector current fields. Three nondimensional uncertainty indices are introduced to characterize the uncertainty of the vector current at a point, representing an ellipse with directional characteristics. The vector current estimation using the OI method eliminates the need for multiple mapping steps and optimally fills intermittent coverage gaps. The effects of angular interpolation of radial velocities, a commonly used step in the preprocessing of radial velocity data prior to vector current computation in the UWLS method, are presented.

  18. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Coralie radial velocities for l Car (Anderson+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, R. I.; Merand, A.; Kervella, P.; Breitfelder, J.; Lebouquin, J.-B.; Eyer, L.; Gallenne, A.; Palaversa, L.; Semaan, T.; Saesen, S.; Mowlavi, N.

    2016-07-01

    360 radial velocity measurements (RVs) of {ell} Carinae are made publicly available. These RVs were measured using optical spectra observed with the Coralie spectrograph mounted to the 1.2m Swiss Euler telescope situated at La Silla Observatory, Chile. (1 data file).

  19. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Radial velocity monitoring of 5 FGK stars (Endl+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endl, M.; Brugamyer, E. J.; Cochran, W. D.; MacQueen, P. J.; Robertson, P.; Meschiari, S.; Ramirez, I.; Shetrone, M.; Gullikson, K.; Johnson, M. C.; Wittenmyer, R.; Horner, J.; Ciardi, D. R.; Horch, E.; Simon, A. E.; Howell, S. B.; Everett, M.; Caldwell, C.; Castanheira, B. G.

    2016-04-01

    Our radial velocity (RV) measurements were obtained using the 2.7m Harlan J. Smith Telescope (HJST; R=60000, 3750-10200Å). For HD 95872, we also obtained 10 precise RV measurements using the 10m Keck I and its HIRES spectrograph (R=50000). (6 data files).

  20. VizieR Online Data Catalog: WASP-117b photometry and radial velocities (Lendl+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lendl, M.; Triaud, A. H. M. J.; Anderson, D. R.; Collier-Cameron, A.; Delrez, L.; Doyle, A. P.; Gillon, M.; Hellier, C.; Jehin, E.; Maxted, P. F. L.; Neveu-Vanmalle, M.; Pepe, F.; Pollacco, D.; Queloz, D.; Segransan, D.; Smalley, B.; Smith, A. M. S.; Udry, S.; Van Grootel, V.; West, R.

    2014-08-01

    We present photometric time-series obtained with EulerCam and TRAPPIST during one and four transits of WASP-117, respectively. We also present radial velocity data from CORALIE and HARPS used to characterize the planetary orbit. (4 data files).

  1. Precise Radial Velocity Measurements for Kepler Giants Hosting Planetary Candidates: Kepler-91 and KOI-1894

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Bun'ei; Hirano, Teruyuki; Omiya, Masashi; Harakawa, Hiroki; Kobayashi, Atsushi; Hasegawa, Ryo; Takarada, Takuya; Kawauchi, Kiyoe; Masuda, Kento

    2015-03-01

    We present results of radial-velocity follow-up observations for the two Kepler evolved stars Kepler-91 (KOI-2133) and KOI-1894, which had been announced as candidates to host transiting giant planets, with the Subaru 8.2 m telescope and the High Dispersion Spectrograph (HDS). By global modeling of the high-precision radial-velocity data taken with Subaru/HDS and photometric data taken by the Kepler mission accounting for orbital brightness modulations (ellipsoidal variations, reflected/emitted light, etc.) of the host stars, we independently confirmed that Kepler-91 hosts a transiting planet with a mass of 0.66 {{M}Jup}(Kepler-91b), and newly detected an offset of ˜20 m s-1 between the radial velocities taken at ˜1 yr interval, suggesting the existence of an additional companion in the system. As for KOI-1894, we detected possible phased variations in the radial velocities and light curves with 2-3σ confidence level, which could be explained as a reflex motion and ellipsoidal variation of the star caused by a transiting sub-Saturn-mass (˜0.18 {{M}Jup}) planet.

  2. Daily variability of Ceres' albedo detected by means of radial velocities changes of the reflected sunlight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molaro, P.; Lanza, A. F.; Monaco, L.; Tosi, F.; Lo Curto, G.; Fulle, M.; Pasquini, L.

    2016-05-01

    Bright features have been recently discovered by Dawn on Ceres, which extend previous photometric and Space Telescope observations. These features should produce distortions of the line profiles of the reflected solar spectrum and therefore an apparent radial velocity variation modulated by the rotation of the dwarf planet. Here we report on two sequences of observations of Ceres performed in the nights of 2015 July 31, August 26 and 27 by means of the high-precision High Accuracy Radial Velocity Planet Searcher (HARPS) spectrograph at the 3.6 m La Silla European Southern Observatory (ESO) telescope. The observations revealed a quite complex behaviour which likely combines a radial velocity modulation due to the rotation with an amplitude of ≈±6 m s-1 and an unexpected diurnal effect. The latter changes imply changes in the albedo of Occator's bright features due to the blaze produced by the exposure to solar radiation. The short-term variability of Ceres' albedo is on time-scales ranging from hours to months and can both be confirmed and followed by means of dedicated radial velocity observations.

  3. VizieR Online Data Catalog: SEP stars radial velocities (Fremat+, 2017)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fremat, Y.; Altmann, M.; Pancino, E.; Soubiran, C.; Jofre, P.; Damerdji, Y.; Heiter, U.; Royer, F.; Seabroke, G.; Sordo, R.; Blanco-Cuaresma, S.; Jasniewicz, G.; Martayan, C.; Thevenin, F.; Vallenari, A.; Blomme, R.; David, M.; Gosset, E.; Katz, D.; Viala, Y.; Boudreault, S.; Cantat-Gaudin, T.; Lobel, A.; Meisenheimer, K.; Nordlander, T.; Raskin, G.; Royer, P.; Zorec, J.

    2016-10-01

    The tables contain a description of the observations we performed with the GIRAFFE and UVES spectrographs of a sample of targets found in the South Ecliptic Pole. Radial velocities and astrophysical parameters were derived, and the variability of the RVs was assessed. (7 data files).

  4. Absolute Geostrophic Velocity Inverted from World Ocean Atlas 2013 (WOAV13) with the P-Vector Method

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-11-01

    1 WOAV13: world ocean absolute geostrophic velocity Absolute Geostrophic Velocity Inverted from... World Ocean Atlas 2013 (WOAV13) with the P-Vector Method P. C. Chu* and C. W. Fan Naval Ocean Analysis and Prediction (NOAP) Laboratory...from World Ocean Atlas-2013 (WOA13) temperature and salinity fields using the P-vector method. It provides a climatological velocity field that is

  5. The first radial velocity measurements of a microlensing event: no evidence for the predicted binary⋆

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boisse, I.; Santerne, A.; Beaulieu, J.-P.; Fakhardji, W.; Santos, N. C.; Figueira, P.; Sousa, S. G.; Ranc, C.

    2015-10-01

    The gravitational microlensing technique allows the discovery of exoplanets around stars distributed in the disk of the galaxy towards the bulge. The alignment of two stars that led to the discovery is unique over the timescale of a human life, however, and cannot be re-observed. Moreover, the target host is often very faint and located in a crowded region. These difficulties hamper and often make impossible the follow up of the target and study of its possible companions. A radial-velocity curve was predicted for the binary system, OGLE-2011-BLG-0417, discovered and characterised from a microlensing event. We used the UVES spectrograph mounted at the VLT, ESO to derive precise radial-velocity measurements of OGLE-2011-BLG-0417. To gather high-precision radial velocities on faint targets of microlensing events, we proposed to use the source star as a reference to measure the lens radial velocities. We obtained ten radial velocities on the putative V = 18 lens with a dispersion of ~100 m s-1, spread over one year. Our measurements do not confirm the microlensing prediction for this binary system. The most likely scenario is that the putative V = 18 mag lens is actually a blend and not the primary lens which is 2 mag fainter. Further observations and analyses are needed to understand the microlensing observation and infer on the nature and characteristics of the lens itself. Based on observations made with ESO Telescope at the Paranal Observatory under program ID 092.C-0763(A) and 093.C-0532(A).Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  6. Modeling the Radial Velocity Curve of the Water Vapor Maser in VX UMa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salter, D. M.; Benson, P. J.; Strelnitski, V. S.

    1999-12-01

    VX UMa is a unique Mira-type star that demonstrates a triple-peaked spectrum of its 1.35-cm H2O maser emission. We used the high-precision curves of radial velocities of the spectral peaks, obtained by Benson & Little-Marenin from 1988 to 1992, as probes of the kinematics of the masing region. The pronounced periodicity of the radial velocity of the central component, with a period equal to the pulsational period of the optical variations, suggests the involvement of pulsations in the observed excursions of radial velocity. However, the radial velocity of the central spectral component produced by a symmetrical, pulsating spherical layer should be constantly zero. Rotation seems to be the most obvious mechanism to impart a small non-zero component to the central feature. We assume that the bulk of maser radiation originates in the equatorial "belt" around the star and approximate this region as a two-dimensional, rotating and pulsating ring. We found that any combination of rotation and pulsation produces a quadruple peaked, not a triple peaked spectrum. Therefore, some asymmetry in the disk or unequal absorption of the two central peaks by ionized gas (e.g. in the shock responsible for the maser emission) is needed. We demonstrate that one of the central peaks can then undergo periodic changes of its radial velocity with the period of pulsation, as observed. A VLBA experiment that may verify our model is under way. This project was supported by the NSF/REU grant AST-9820555.

  7. Radial-velocity variations in Alpha Ori, Alpha Sco, and Alpha Her

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, M.A.; Patten, B.M.; Goldberg, L. Computer Sciences Corp., Seabrook, MD Iowa State Univ., Ames )

    1989-12-01

    Radial-velocity observations of Alpha Ori, Alpha Sco A, and Alpha Her A are used to study radial-velocity periodicities in M supergiants. The data refer to several metallic lines in the H-alpha region and to H-alpha itself. It is shown that Alpha Ori and Alpha Sco A have cycle lengths of about 1 yr and semiamplitudes of 2 km/s. It is suggested that many semiregular red supergiant varibles such as Alpha Ori may be heading toward chaos. All three stars show short-term stochastic flucutations with an amplitude of 1-2 km/s. It is found that the long-term variability of H-alpha velocities may be a consequence of intermittent failed ejections. 58 refs.

  8. Comparison of CME radial velocities from a flux rope model and an ice cream cone model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, T.; Moon, Y.; Na, H.

    2011-12-01

    Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) on the Sun are the largest energy release process in the solar system and act as the primary driver of geomagnetic storms and other space weather phenomena on the Earth. So it is very important to infer their directions, velocities and three-dimensional structures. In this study, we choose two different models to infer radial velocities of halo CMEs since 2008 : (1) an ice cream cone model by Xue et al (2005) using SOHO/LASCO data, (2) a flux rope model by Thernisien et al. (2009) using the STEREO/SECCHI data. In addition, we use another flux rope model in which the separation angle of flux rope is zero, which is morphologically similar to the ice cream cone model. The comparison shows that the CME radial velocities from among each model have very good correlations (R>0.9). We will extending this comparison to other partial CMEs observed by STEREO and SOHO.

  9. A catalog of rotational and radial velocities for evolved stars. V. Southern stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Medeiros, J. R.; Alves, S.; Udry, S.; Andersen, J.; Nordström, B.; Mayor, M.

    2014-01-01

    Rotational and radial velocities have been measured for 1589 evolved stars of spectral types F, G, and K and luminosity classes IV, III, II, and Ib, based on observations carried out with the CORAVEL spectrometers. The precision in radial velocity is better than 0.30 km s-1 per observation, whereas rotational velocity uncertainties are typically 1.0 km s-1 for subgiants and giants and 2.0 km s-1 for class II giants and Ib supergiants. Based on observations collected at the Haute-Provence Observatory, Saint-Michel, France, and at the European Southern Observatory, La Silla, Chile.Table 1 is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/561/A126

  10. Celestial-mechanical interpretation of the two-way radio measurements of radial velocity of spacecraft for scientific applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komovkin, S. V.; Lavrenov, S. M.; Tuchin, A. G.; Tuchin, D. A.; Yaroshevsky, V. S.

    2016-12-01

    The article describes a model of the two-way measurements of radial velocity based on the Doppler effect. The relations are presented for the instantaneous value of the increment range at the time of measurement and the radial velocity of the mid-dimensional interval. The compensation of methodological errors of interpretation of the two-way Doppler measurements is considered.

  11. RADIAL VELOCITY ALONG THE VOYAGER 1 TRAJECTORY: THE EFFECT OF SOLAR CYCLE

    SciTech Connect

    Pogorelov, N. V.; Zank, G. P.; Borovikov, S. N.; Burlaga, L. F.; Decker, R. A.; Stone, E. C.

    2012-05-01

    As Voyager 1 and Voyager 2 are approaching the heliopause (HP)-the boundary between the solar wind (SW) and the local interstellar medium (LISM)-we expect new, unknown features of the heliospheric interface to be revealed. A seeming puzzle reported recently by Krimigis et al. concerns the unusually low, even negative, radial velocity components derived from the energetic ion distribution. Steady-state plasma models of the inner heliosheath (IHS) show that the radial velocity should not be equal to zero even at the surface of the HP. Here we demonstrate that the velocity distributions observed by Voyager 1 are consistent with time-dependent simulations of the SW-LISM interaction. In this Letter, we analyze the results from a numerical model of the large-scale heliosphere that includes solar cycle effects. Our simulations show that prolonged periods of low to negative radial velocity can exist in the IHS at substantial distances from the HP. It is also shown that Voyager 1 was more likely to observe such regions than Voyager 2.

  12. A California statewide three-dimensional seismic velocity model from both absolute and differential times

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lin, G.; Thurber, C.H.; Zhang, H.; Hauksson, E.; Shearer, P.M.; Waldhauser, F.; Brocher, T.M.; Hardebeck, J.

    2010-01-01

    We obtain a seismic velocity model of the California crust and uppermost mantle using a regional-scale double-difference tomography algorithm. We begin by using absolute arrival-time picks to solve for a coarse three-dimensional (3D) P velocity (VP) model with a uniform 30 km horizontal node spacing, which we then use as the starting model for a finer-scale inversion using double-difference tomography applied to absolute and differential pick times. For computational reasons, we split the state into 5 subregions with a grid spacing of 10 to 20 km and assemble our final statewide VP model by stitching together these local models. We also solve for a statewide S-wave model using S picks from both the Southern California Seismic Network and USArray, assuming a starting model based on the VP results and a VP=VS ratio of 1.732. Our new model has improved areal coverage compared with previous models, extending 570 km in the SW-NE directionand 1320 km in the NW-SE direction. It also extends to greater depth due to the inclusion of substantial data at large epicentral distances. Our VP model generally agrees with previous separate regional models for northern and southern California, but we also observe some new features, such as high-velocity anomalies at shallow depths in the Klamath Mountains and Mount Shasta area, somewhat slow velocities in the northern Coast Ranges, and slow anomalies beneath the Sierra Nevada at midcrustal and greater depths. This model can be applied to a variety of regional-scale studies in California, such as developing a unified statewide earthquake location catalog and performing regional waveform modeling.

  13. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Radial Velocities for 889 late-type stars (Nidever+, 2002)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nidever, D. L.; Marcy, G. W.; Butler, R. P.; Fischer, D. A.; Vogt, S. S.

    2002-04-01

    We report radial velocities for 844 FGKM-type main sequence and subgiant stars and 45 K giants, most of which had either low-precision velocity measurements or none at all. These velocities differ from the standard stars of Udry et al. (1999IAUCo.170..354U) by 0.035km/s (RMS) for the 26 FGK standard stars in common. The zero-point of our velocities differs from that of Udry et al.: =+0.053km/s. Thus these new velocities agree with the best known standard stars both in precision and zero-point, to well within 0.1km/s. Nonetheless, both these velocities and the standards suffer from three sources of systematic error, namely, convective blueshift, gravitational redshift, and spectral type mismatch of the reference spectrum. These systematic errors are here forced to be zero for G2V stars by using the Sun as reference, with Vesta and day sky as proxies. But for spectral types departing from solar, the systematic errors reach 0.3km/s in the F and K stars and 0.4km/s in M dwarfs. Multiple spectra were obtained for all 889 stars during four years, with the HIRES echelle spectrometer (Vogt et al., 1994, , Proc. Soc. Photo-Opt. Instr. Eng., 2198, 362) on the 10m Keck I telescope and with the "Hamilton" echelle spectrometer fed by either the 3m Shane or the 0.6m Coude Auxilliary (CAT) Telescopes (Vogt, 1987PASP...99.1214V), and 782 of them exhibit velocity scatter less than 0.1km/s. These stars may serve as radial velocity standards if they remain constant in velocity. We found 11 new spectroscopic binaries and report orbital parameters for them. (4 data files).

  14. Disentangling planetary orbits from stellar activity in radial-velocity surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haywood, R. D.; Cameron, A. Collier; Queloz, D.; Barros, S. C. C.; Deleuil, M.; Fares, R.; Gillon, M.; Hatzes, A.; Lanza, A. F.; Lovis, C.; Moutou, C.; Pepe, F.; Pollacco, D.; Santerne, A.; Ségransan, D.; Unruh, Y.

    2014-04-01

    The majority of extra-solar planets have been discovered (or confirmed after follow-up) through radial-velocity (RV) surveys. Using ground-based spectrographs such as High Accuracy Radial Velocity Planetary Search (HARPS) and HARPS-North, it is now possible to detect planets that are only a few times the mass of the Earth. However, the presence of dark spots on the stellar surface produces RV signals that are very similar in amplitude to those caused by orbiting low-mass planets. Disentangling these signals has thus become the biggest challenge in the detection of Earth-mass planets using RV surveys. To do so, we use the star's lightcurve to model the RV variations produced by spots. Here we present this method and show the results of its application to CoRoT-7.

  15. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Radial velocities of HD 6434 (Hinkel+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinkel, N. R.; Kane, S. R.; Pilyavsky, G.; Boyajian, T. S.; James, D. J.; Naef, D.; Fischer, D. A.; Udry, S.

    2016-04-01

    Previous radial velocity observations of HD6434 (Mayor et al. 2004, cat. J/A+A/415/391) were undertaken with the CORALIE spectrometer mounted on the 1.2m Euler Swiss telescope at La Silla. Those observations were conducted as part of the CORALIE exoplanet search program (Udry et al. 2000, cat. J/A+A/356/590). We continued to monitor HD6434 using CORALIE to improve the Keplerian orbital solution and provide an accurate transit ephemeris. The complete data set of 137 measurements is shown in Table2 including previously acquired measurements and 59 new measurements. These new measurements extend the overall time baseline for the radial velocity observations by a factor of ~3.6, for a total baseline of ~15 years. (1 data file).

  16. Radial velocity measurements of a sample of northern metal-deficient stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jasniewicz, G.; Mayor, M.

    1988-09-01

    Observations of 41 northern stars with Fe/H between -1.1 and -0.3, obtained with the Coravel radial-velocity scanner on the 1-m Swiss telescope at the Observatoire de Haute Provence during 1977-1986, are reported. The data are presented in extensive tables and graphs and characterized in detail. Seven stars are identified as spectroscopic binaries, and their distribution as a function of period is shown to be similar to that for a sample of metal-rich G stars. The present radial velocities are found to be in relatively good agreement with those of Carney and Latham (1987), but not with those of Stryker et al. (1985).

  17. The Radial Velocity Experiment (RAVE), a preview to what to expect from the Gaia RVS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinmetz, Matthias

    2015-08-01

    The Radial Velocity Experiment (RAVE) is a large wide-field spectroscopic stellar survey of the Milky Way. Over the period 2003-2013, 574,630 spectra for 483,330 stars have been amassed at a resolution of R=7500 in the Ca-triplet region of 8410-8795 Å. Wavelength coverage and resolution are thus comparable to that anticipated from the Gaia RVS. Derived data products of RAVE include radial velocities, stellar parameters, chemicals abundances for Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Ti, Fe, and Ni, and absorption measured based on the DIB at 8620 Å. Since more than 290000 RAVE targets are drawn from the Tycho-2 catalogue, RAVE will be interesting prototype for the anticipated full Gaia data releases, in particular when combined with the first Gaia data releases, in particular when combined with the early Gaia data releases, which contain astrometry but not yet stellar parameters and abundances.

  18. CARMENES: A New Visible/Near-IR Radial-Velocity Spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quirrenbach, Andreas; Carmenes Consortium

    2016-07-01

    CARMENES is a next-generation radial-velocity instrument that has been constructed for the 3.5m telescope at the Calar Alto Observatory by a consortium of eleven Spanish and German institutions. It consists of two separate échelle spectrographs covering the wavelength range from 0.55 to 1.7μm at a spectral resolution of R = 82,000, fed by fibers from the Cassegrain focus of the telescope. CARMENES saw "First Light" on Nov 9, 2015. We report on results from the commissioning and the first months of operation, and discuss the plans for the large M dwarf survey that is the core science program of CARMENES. With a bit of luck, CARMENES may find a few planets that are very well suited for characterization by JWST. In the longer run, CARMENES will be an excellent instrument for radial-velocity follow-up of transit survey missions such as TESS and PLATO.

  19. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Radial velocity and photometry in NGC 4372 (Kacharov+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kacharov, N.; Bianchini, P.; Koch, A.; Frank, M. J.; Martin, N. F.; van de Ven, G.; Puzia, T. H.; McDonald, I.; Johnson, C. I.; Zijlstra, A. A.

    2014-06-01

    We present the radial velocities of 220 stars in the field of the globular cluster NGC 4372 measured from high resolution FLAMES/GIRAFFE spectra. We have confirm 131 cluster member stars from radial velocity and metallicity constraints. The rest are foreground contaminants. We also present a BVI photometric catalogue in a field of view covering 30x30arcmin, centred on NGC 4372. We used archival imaging obtained with the Wide Field Imager (WFI) at the 2.2m MPG/ESO telescope at La Silla. We used the 2MASS point source catalog as astrometric reference. Photometric zero points were fixed to standard stars in the same field from the standard star database of Stetson (2000PASP..112..925S, 2005PASP..117..563S). We have estimated individual reddening for each star in the catalogue. (2 data files).

  20. Simulating a Radial Velocity Precurser Survey for Target Yield Optimization for a Future Direct Imaging Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, Patrick; Plavchan, Peter; Crepp, Justin R.; Dulz, Shannon; Stark, Chris; Kane, Stephen R.

    2017-01-01

    Future direct imaging mission concepts such as HabEx and LUVOIR aim to directly image and characterize Earth-analogs around nearby stars. With the scope and expense of these missions, the exoplanet yield is strongly dependent on the frequency of Earth-like planets and the a priori knowledge of which stars specifically host suitable planetary systems. Ground-based radial velocity surveys can potentially perform the pre-selection of direct imaging missions at a fraction of the cost of a blind direct imaging survey. We present a simulation of such a survey. We consider both the WIYN and Large Binocular Telescope, including weather conditions and limitations in telescope time, fitted with spectrometers of varying sensitivities including iLocator and NEID. We recover simulated planets and their orbital parameters, estimating the effectiveness of a pre-cursor radial velocity survey.

  1. Origins of Solar Systems: Removing Activity-Related Radial Velocity Noise To Improve Extrasolar Planet Searches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saar, Steven

    2002-01-01

    We have continued the super high resolution (R is approximately 200,000), high S/N ((greater than) 300) echelle study of joint line bisector and radial velocity variations using the McDonald 2-D (two dimensional) coude. Observing runs in October 2000 and March 2001 were plagued by poor weather, but runs in June and October 2001 were good. We have made a preliminary analysis of the limited data in hand, and find some tantalizing evidence for correlations between median line bisector displacement and radial velocity v (sub r). The correlation appears to be specific to the particular star being considered, probably since it is a function of both spectral type and rotation rate.

  2. The Joker: A custom Monte Carlo sampler for binary-star and exoplanet radial velocity data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price-Whelan, Adrian M.; Hogg, David W.; Foreman-Mackey, Daniel; Rix, Hans-Walter

    2017-01-01

    Given sparse or low-quality radial-velocity measurements of a star, there are often many qualitatively different stellar or exoplanet companion orbit models that are consistent with the data. The consequent multimodality of the likelihood function leads to extremely challenging search, optimization, and MCMC posterior sampling over the orbital parameters. The Joker is a custom-built Monte Carlo sampler that can produce a posterior sampling for orbital parameters given sparse or noisy radial-velocity measurements, even when the likelihood function is poorly behaved. The method produces correct samplings in orbital parameters for data that include as few as three epochs. The Joker can therefore be used to produce proper samplings of multimodal pdfs, which are still highly informative and can be used in hierarchical (population) modeling.

  3. Radial-velocity measures and the existence of astrophysical binaries in late-type dwarf stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bopp, B. W.; Meredith, R.

    1986-01-01

    Radial velocities with errors of 1-2 km/s are presented based on CCD scans obtained with the Kitt Peak National Observatory coude feed telescope between 1982 and 1985 of 48 dK-M stars that lack Balmer emission. Comparison with Gliese's (1969) values shows only two stars to be spectroscopic binary candidates with small velocity amplitudes. No evidence for any short period (less than 10 days) binaries is found, supporting the conclusions of Young et al. (1986) that there are no astrophysical binaries among these chromosherically inactive dM stars.

  4. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Kepler heartbeat star radial velocities (Shporer+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shporer, A.; Fuller, J.; Isaacson, H.; Hambleton, K.; Thompson, S. E.; Prsa, A.; Kurtz, D. W.; Howard, A. W.; O'Leary, R. M.

    2016-11-01

    The Keck/HIRES data analyzed and presented here includes 218 exposures obtained during 43 nights from May to October 2015 (R~60000). For each of the systems presented here we have obtained at least 7 radial velocity measurements, in order to fit a Keplerian orbital model that in our case includes 5 fitted parameters, since the orbital period is already precisely known from Kepler photometry (see more details in Section 2.3). (8 data files).

  5. Ground-based follow-up of the Gaia-RVS radial velocity standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soubiran, C.; Jasniewicz, G.; Zurbach, C.; Crifo, F.; Sartoretti, P.; Katz, D.; Marchal, O.; Panuzzo, P.; Udry, S.

    2016-12-01

    The RVS spectrograph on board of Gaia having no calibration device, radial velocity standards are needed to calibrate the zero-point of the instrument. We have prepared a list of 2798 such stars, well distributed over the sky, and compiled ˜25 000 individual RV measurements from ground-based velocimeters. For a fraction of these stars, their stability at the 300 ms level during the Gaia mission has still to be assessed. The catalogue and follow-up programme are presented.

  6. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Radial velocities of 76 M31 candidate clusters (Galleti+, 2006)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galleti, S.; Federici, L.; Bellazzini, M.; Buzzoni, A.; Fusi Pecci, F.

    2006-06-01

    We present the first results of a large spectroscopic survey of globular clusters and candidate globular clusters in the nearby M31 galaxy. The survey is aimed at the classification of known candidate M31 clusters and at the study of their kinematic properties. We obtained low-resolution spectroscopy for 133 targets, including 76 yet-to-be-confirmed candidate clusters (i.e. with no previous spectroscopic information), 55 already-confirmed genuine M31 clusters, and 2 uncertain candidates. Our observations allowed a reliable estimate of the target radial velocity, within a typical accuracy of ~+/-20Km/s. The observed candidates have been robustly classified according to their radial velocity and shape parameters that allowed us to confidently discriminate between point sources and extended objects even from low-spatial-resolution imagery. In our set of 76 candidate clusters we found: 42 newly-confirmed bona-fide M31 clusters, 12 background galaxies, 17 foreground Galactic stars, 2 HII regions belonging to M31 and 3 unclassified (possibly M31 clusters or foreground stars) objects. The classification of a few other candidates not included in our survey has been also reassessed on various observational bases. All the sources of radial velocity estimates for M31 known globular clusters available in the literature have been compared and checked, and a homogeneous general list has been obtained for 349 confirmed clusters with radial velocity. Our results suggest that a significant number of genuine clusters (~>100) is still hidden among the plethora of known candidates proposed by various authors. Hence our knowledge of the globular cluster system of the M31 galaxy is still far from complete even in terms of simple membership. (1 data file).

  7. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Radial velocity data of HD 59686 A (Ortiz+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz, M.; Reffert, S.; Trifonov, T.; Quirrenbach, A.; Mitchell, D. S.; Nowak, G.; Buenzli, E.; Zimmerman, N.; Bonnefoy, M.; Skemer, A.; Defrere, D.; Lee, M. H.; Fischer, D. A.; Hinz, P. M.

    2016-08-01

    Precise radial velocities of the giant star HD 59686 A are presented. The observations were taken with the Hamilton spectrograph at the Lick Observatory. The data were acquired and reduced using the iodine cell approach. In total, we have 88 RV measurements for HD 59686 A spanning a period of time of around 12 years. Typical exposure times were 20-min, and the signal-to-noise ratios for these observations are about 120-150. (1 data file).

  8. ELODIE & SOPHIE spectrographs: 20 years of continuous improvements in radial velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchy, F.

    2015-10-01

    From the first light of ELODIE spectrograph in 1993 up to the recent upgrade of SOPHIE, the radial-velocity precision was improved by an order of magnitude. The different steps of instrumental refinement are described and their impact on the detection and characterization of giant exoplanets are highlighted. Synergies of these two instruments with other detection technics like photometric transit and astrometry are presented with a special focus on the incoming space missions GAIA, CHEOPS, TESS and PLATO.

  9. VizieR Online Data Catalog: WASP-23 photometric and radial velocity data (Triaud+, 2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Triaud, A. H. M. J.; Queloz, D.; Hellier, C.; Gillon, M.; Smalley, B.; Hebb, L.; Collier, Cameron A.; Anderson, D.; Boisse, I.; Hebrard, G.; Jehin, E.; Lister, T.; Lovis, C.; Maxted, P. F. L.; Pepe, F.; Pollacco, D.; Segransan, D.; Simpson, E.; Udry, S.; West, R.

    2011-03-01

    The data is composed of 7 photometric timeseries and 2 set of radial velocities. 2 photometric timeseries originate from the WASP-South instrument, 2 from the Euler Telescope, 1 from the FTS telescope, 2 from the TRAPPIST telescope. The RVs come from the CORALIE spectrograph on the Euler Telescope, and from HARPS, on the ESO 3.6m They give evidence for the presence of a planet around WASP-23. (9 data files).

  10. Line-profile variations in radial-velocity measurements. Two alternative indicators for planetary searches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figueira, P.; Santos, N. C.; Pepe, F.; Lovis, C.; Nardetto, N.

    2013-09-01

    Aims: We introduce two methods to identify false-positive planetary signals in the context of radial-velocity exoplanet searches. The first is the bi-Gaussian cross-correlation function fitting (and monitoring of the parameters derived from it), and the second is the measurement of asymmetry in radial-velocity spectral line information content, Vasy. We assess the usefulness of each of these methods by comparing their results with those delivered by current indicators. Methods: We make a systematic analysis of the most used common line profile diagnosis, Bisector Inverse Slope and Velocity Span, along with the two proposed ones. We evaluate all these diagnosis methods following a set of well-defined common criteria and using both simulated and real data. We apply them to simulated cross-correlation functions that are created with the program SOAP and which are affected by the presence of stellar spots. We consider different spot properties on stars with different rotation profiles and simulate observations as obtained with high-resolution spectrographs. We then apply our methodology to real cross-correlation functions, which are computed from HARPS spectra, for stars with a signal originating in activity (thus spots) and for those with a signal rooted on a planet. Results: We demonstrate that the bi-Gaussian method allows a more precise characterization of the deformation of line profiles than the standard bisector inverse slope. The calculation of the deformation indicator is simpler and its interpretation more straightforward. More importantly, its amplitude can be up to 30% larger than that of the bisector span, allowing the detection of smaller-amplitude correlations with radial-velocity variations. However, a particular parametrization of the bisector inverse slope is shown to be more efficient on high-signal-to-noise data than both the standard bisector and the bi-Gaussian. The results of the Vasy method show that this indicator is more effective than any of

  11. The rotation of the halo of NGC 6822 from the radial velocities of carbon stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Graham P.; Ryan, Sean G.; Sibbons, Lisette F.

    2016-11-01

    Using spectra taken with the AAOmega spectrograph, we measure the radial velocities of over 100 stars, many of which are intermediate age carbon stars, in the direction of the dwarf irregular galaxy NGC 6822. Kinematic analysis suggests that the carbon stars in the sample are associated with NGC 6822, and estimates of its radial velocity and galactic rotation are made from a star-by-star analysis of its carbon star population. We calculate a heliocentric radial velocity for NGC 6822 of -51 ± 3 km s-1 and show that the population rotates with a mean rotation speed of 11.2 ± 2.1 km s-1 at a mean distance of 1.1 kpc from the galactic centre, about a rotation axis with a position angle of 26° ± 13°, as projected on the sky. This is close to the rotation axis of the H I gas disc and suggests that NGC 6822 is not a polar ring galaxy, but is dynamically closer to a late-type galaxy. However, the rotation axis is not aligned with the minor axis of the AGB isodensity profiles and this remains a mystery.

  12. Uncovering the planets and stellar activity of CoRoT-7 using only radial velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faria, J. P.; Haywood, R. D.; Brewer, B. J.; Figueira, P.; Oshagh, M.; Santerne, A.; Santos, N. C.

    2016-04-01

    Stellar activity can induce signals in the radial velocities of stars, complicating the detection of orbiting low-mass planets. We present a method to determine the number of planetary signals present in radial-velocity datasets of active stars, using only radial-velocity observations. Instead of considering separate fits with different number of planets, we use a birth-death Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm to infer the posterior distribution for the number of planets in a single run. In a natural way, the marginal distributions for the orbital parameters of all planets are also inferred. This method is applied to HARPS data of CoRoT-7. We confidently recover the orbits of both CoRoT-7b and CoRoT-7c although the data show evidence for the presence of additional signals. All data and software presented in this article are available online at http://https://github.com/j-faria/exoBD-CoRoT7

  13. A spectroscopic study of the radial velocity variations and accretion disks found in four dwarf novae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stover, R. J.

    Time resolved spectroscopic observations of the four dwarf novae SS Cyg, EM Cyg, U Gem, and RU Peg are presented. Although these systems were studied previously, all of the spectroscopic studies were done photographically. A linear response, digital detector is employed. Analytic techniques to the study of the radial velocity variations and emission line profiles found in dwarf novae are applied. In the study of SS Cyg cross-correlation techniques were used for the first time to measure the radial velocity variations of the secondary star absorption lines. In the study of U Gem, analysis of the accretion disk emission lines showed that the motion of the material in the disk cannot be described accurately by orbits defined within the three-body approximation. The observations of EM Cyg reveal an unstable accretion disk, with emission lines that vary erratically on timescales of minutes to days. New measurements of the radial velocity variations of the emission and absorption lines found in the spectrum of RU Peg agree with previous measurements but have a higher accuracy.

  14. Miniature Exoplanet Radial Velocity Array (MINERVA) I. Design, Commissioning, and First Science Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swift, Jonathan J.; Bottom, Michael; Johnson, John A.; Wright, Jason T.; McCrady, Nate; Wittenmyer, Robert A.; Plavchan, Peter; Riddle, Reed; Muirhead, Philip S.; Herzig, Erich; Myles, Justin; Blake, Cullen H.; Eastman, Jason; Beatty, Thomas G.; Barnes, Stuart I.; Gibson, Steven R.; Lin, Brian; Zhao, Ming; Gardner, Paul; Falco, Emilio; Criswell, Stephen; Nava, Chantanelle; Robinson, Connor; Sliski, David H.; Hedrick, Richard; Ivarsen, Kevin; Hjelstrom, Annie; de Vera, Jon; Szentgyorgyi, Andrew

    2015-04-01

    The Miniature Exoplanet Radial Velocity Array (MINERVA) is a U.S.-based observational facility dedicated to the discovery and characterization of exoplanets around a nearby sample of bright stars. MINERVA employs a robotic array of four 0.7-m telescopes outfitted for both high-resolution spectroscopy and photometry, and is designed for completely autonomous operation. The primary science program is a dedicated radial velocity survey and the secondary science objective is to obtain high-precision transit light curves. The modular design of the facility and the flexibility of our hardware allows for both science programs to be pursued simultaneously, while the robotic control software provides a robust and efficient means to carry out nightly observations. We describe the design of MINERVA, including major hardware components, software, and science goals. The telescopes and photometry cameras are characterized at our test facility on the Caltech campus in Pasadena, California, and their on-sky performance is validated. The design and simulated performance of the spectrograph is briefly discussed as we await its completion. New observations from our test facility demonstrate sub-mmag photometric precision of one of our radial velocity survey targets, and we present new transit observations and fits of WASP-52b-a known hot-Jupiter with an inflated radius and misaligned orbit. The process of relocating the MINERVA hardware to its final destination at the Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory in southern Arizona has begun, and science operations are expected to commence in 2015.

  15. Removing Activity-Related Radial Velocity Noise to Improve Extrasolar Planet Searches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saar, Steven; Lindstrom, David M. (Technical Monitor)

    2004-01-01

    We have made significant progress towards the proposal goals of understanding the causes and effects of magnetic activity-induced radial velocity (v_r) jitter and developing methods for correcting it. In the process, we have also made some significant discoveries in the fields of planet-induced stellar activity, planet detection methods, M dwarf convection, starspot properties, and magnetic dynamo cycles. We have obtained super high resolution (R approximately 200,000), high S / N (greater than 300) echelle study of joint line bisector and radial velocity variations using the McDonald 2-D coude. A long observing run in October 2002 in particular was quite successful (8 clear nights). We now have close to three years of data, which begins to sample a good fraction of the magnetic cycle timescales for some of our targets (e.g., kappa Ceti; P_cyc = 5.6 yrs). This will be very helpful in unraveling the complex relationships between plage and radial velocity (v-r) changes which we have uncovered. Preliminary analysis (Saar et al. 2003) of the data in hand, reveals correlations between median line bisector displacement and v_r. The correlation appears to be specific the the particular star being considered, probably since it is a function of both spectral type and rotation rate. Further analysis and interpretation will be in the context of evolving plage models and is in progress.

  16. CAESAR: Companion Assessment of Equatorial Stars with Astrometry and Radial Velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davison, C.; White, R.; Henry, T.; Bailey, J.; Jao, W.-C.; Riedel, A.; Cantrell, J.

    2011-12-01

    We would like to introduce our new program, CAESAR, a Companion Assessment of Equatorial Stars with both Astrometry and Radial velocity. With our dual method program, we are narrowing the prospective hiding places for companions around mid M dwarfs (0.35-0.15 solar masses) within 10 parsecs. To study these inherently faint stars, we are using CSHELL at NASA's IRTF to obtain high precision infrared radial velocity measurements to search for planets with short periods, close-in to their parent star. As a complement to our radial velocity (RV) program, we will are working in conjunction with the SMARTS CTIO Parallax Investigation program to search for more massive planets and brown dwarfs at distances out to 2 AU from the majority of our stars, which is past the snowline (where the massive planets formed in our Solar System). The combination of using both methods on the first-ever mid M-dwarf volume-limited survey, will allow us to place the strictest constraints on the companion frequency around these very low mass stars and will help differentiate between the most probable formation scenarios for planets to form.

  17. Kepler beaming binaries radial velocity follow-up with WIYN/Hydra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shporer, Avi; Stassun, Keivan; Faigler, Simchon; Boyajian, Tabetha; Mazeh, Tsevi; Tal-Or, Lev; Prsa, Andrej

    2015-12-01

    High-quality space-based time series photometry reveals the minute photometric modulations induced by orbital motion in short-period binary systems with stellar and substellar secondaries. Those modulations are induced by both gravitational and atmospheric processes. Gravitational processes include the beaming effect (aka Doppler boosting) and tidal ellipsoidal distortion, and the atmospheric processes include reflected light and thermal emission by the secondary atmosphere. Therefore, non-eclipsing (non-transiting) systems are detectable using photometry alone. The availability of Kepler data for a large sample of stars combined with the sensitivity to non-eclipsing systems (which are at least an order of magnitude more common than eclipsing systems) has the potential of transforming the Kepler survey into the equivalent of a radial velocity survey of a large sample of stars. This allows detecting intrinsically rare systems, where traditional approaches, e.g., radial velocity and transit surveys, are highly inefficient. Those include systems where the companion is a brown-dwarf or a massive planet, or even a white dwarf. As this approach is still in its infancy, we are carrying out radial velocity follow-up of Kepler photometric detections, to confirm the nature of the system and accurately measure the orbit and the companion’s mass. Here we present our results from an radial velocity campaign with the WIYN/Hydra multi-fiber spectrograph, where we used 26 nights during the 2014 and 2015 Kepler observing seasons to observe five Hydra one-degree diameter fields within the Kepler field. Our list of targets includes 131 Kepler beaming binaries, and we used additional fibers to observe 85 Kepler eclipsing binaries and 31 Kepler Objects of Interest (KOIs). A detailed comparison between the photometrically predicted companion’s mass and the mass measured through radial velocities will improve our understanding of this young approach, and will support similar projects

  18. Radial velocities of K-M dwarfs and local stellar kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sperauskas, J.; Bartašiūtė, S.; Boyle, R. P.; Deveikis, V.; Raudeliūnas, S.; Upgren, A. R.

    2016-12-01

    Aims: The goal of this paper is to present complete radial-velocity data for the spectroscopically selected McCormick sample of nearby K-M dwarfs and, based on these and supplementary data, to determine the space-velocity distributions of late-type stars in the solar neighborhood. Methods: We analyzed nearly 3300 measurements of radial velocities for 1049 K-M dwarfs, that we obtained during the past decade with a CORAVEL-type instrument, with a primary emphasis on detecting and eliminating from kinematic calculations the spectroscopic binaries and binary candidates. Combining radial-velocity data with Hipparcos/Tycho-2 astrometry we calculated the space-velocity components and parameters of the galactic orbits in a three-component model potential for the stars in the sample, that we use for kinematical analysis and for the identification of possible candidate members of nearby stellar kinematic groups. Results: We present the catalog of our observations of radial velocities for 959 stars which are not suspected of velocity variability, along with the catalog of U,V,W velocities and Galactic orbital parameters for a total of 1088 K-M stars which are used in the present kinematic analysis. Of these, 146 stars were identified as possible candidate members of the known nearby kinematic groups and suspected subgroups. The distributions of space-velocity components, orbital eccentricities, and maximum distances from the Galactic plane are consistent with the presence of young, intermediate-age and old populations of the thin disk and a small fraction ( 3%) of stars with the thick disk kinematics. The kinematic structure gives evidence that the bulk of K-M type stars in the immediate solar vicinity represents a dynamically relaxed stellar population. The star MCC 869 is found to be on a retrograde Galactic orbit (V = -262 km s-1) of low inclination (4°) and can be a member of stellar stream of some dissolved structure. The Sun's velocity with respect to the Local

  19. Radial velocity discriminated coronal photometric measurements at the July 11, 1991 total eclipse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beavers, Willet I.; Eitter, Joseph J.

    2009-03-01

    The results from a set of 12 solar corona radial velocity measurements in the 400-440 nm spectral band during the total solar eclipse of July 11, 1991 are reported. The measurements show that the orbital motion of the F-corona material near the sun in the ecliptic plane is consistent with Keplerian motion and predominantly, but not exclusively, prograde, as is usually assumed. This work demonstrates a method of using the measured radial velocities to sort out the relative amounts of K-corona, near-earth F-corona, near-solar F-corona, and scattered light in each measurement for each observation point W and E of the sun between 2.5 Ro(solar radii) and 5 Ro along the celestial equator and at three points north of the sun. The near-solar F-corona component is quite weak, contributing only 7-14% of the total signal in each case. The stronger diffraction component from near-earth F-corona is estimated to have been produced by particles with radii of about 11μ. In contrast, the scattered light component appears as strong zero-velocity features dominating all the measurements. The measurements W and E of the sun and near the ecliptic plane also show evidence of a red-shift velocity of at least 330 km s -1, suggestive of a high-speed dust outflow from the sun.

  20. [Velocity estimation of aortic propagation based on radial pulse wave analysis].

    PubMed

    Clara, Fernando; Blanco, Gustavo; Casarini, Alfredo; Corral, Pablo; Meschino, Gustavo; Scandurra, Adriana

    2011-01-01

    We analyzed the possibility of using the radial pulse wave morphology, obtained by a movement transducer, to evaluate the aortic pulse wave velocity. The radial pulse wave signals were obtained by using a transducer, located on the pulse palpation area, in 167 healthy normotensive male volunteers, ages 20 to 70. The reflected wave was identified in every case. Also, a speed coefficient was defined as the ratio between the individual's height and the time between the maximum systolic wave and the arrival time of the reflected wave. We found that the specified coefficient in normotensive individuals increased linearly with age, in a similar way to the increase in aortic propagation velocity measured by other methods. The procedure was repeated on another set of 125 individuals with hypertension, without other risk factors, aged between the 3rd and 7th decade. This time we found similar values to normotensive individuals only on the 3th decade, and a pronounced increase on the velocity coefficient at advanced ages was observed. These findings support the feasibility of using this type of signals to indirectly evaluate the propagation velocity together with the increase index, a parameter commonly used in pulse wave analysis.

  1. Radial velocities of stars in the globular cluster M4 and the cluster distance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, R. C.; Rees, Richard F.; Cudworth, Kyle M.

    1995-01-01

    The internal stellar velocity distribution of the globular cluster M4 is evaluated from nearly 200 new radial velocity measurements good to 1 km/s and a rederivation of existing proper motions. The mean radial velocity of the cluster is 70.9 +/- 0.6 km/s. The velocity dispersion is 3.5 +/- 0.3 km/s at the core, dropping marginally towards the outskirts. Such a low internal dispersion is somewhat at odds with the cluster's orbit, for which the perigalacticon is sufficiently close to the galactic center that the probability of cluster disruption is high; a tidal radius two-thirds the currently accepted value would eliminate the discrepancy. The cluster mass-to-light ratio is also small, M/L(sub V) = 1.0 +/- 0.4 in solar units. M4 thus joins M22 as a cluster of moderate and concentration with a mass-to-light ratio among the lowest known. The astrometric distance to the cluster is also smaller than expected, 1.72 +/- 0.14 kpc. This is only consistent with conventional estimates of the luminosity of horizontal branch stars provided an extinction law R = A(sub V)/E(B-V) approximately 4 is adopted, as has been suggested recently by several authors.

  2. Radial Velocities, Binarity, and Kinematic Membership in the Open Cluster NGC 2516

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, Jorge Federico; Lapasset, Emilio

    2000-05-01

    We present echelle spectroscopic observations for 36 bright (V<9.6) stars in the open cluster NGC 2516, including several blue straggler candidates and four red giants. Radial velocities are derived by cross-correlations using high signal-to-noise ratio standard spectra as templates. From 22 cluster members a mean cluster velocity of +22.0+/-0.2 km s-1 was derived. Membership probabilities of the observed stars are computed on the basis of their distance to the cluster center and kinematic criteria. We report the discovery of three double-lined spectroscopic binaries and several probable binaries among main-sequence stars. A binary frequency of more than 26% is found among the high-mass main-sequence stars. The blue straggler HD 66341 is a slowly rotating cluster member with constant velocity, while HD 66194 is a fast-rotating Be star with probable variations in radial velocity. Other blue straggler candidates, such as HD 65663, 65950, 66066, and 65987, must be considered turnoff stars. The observations presented here were obtained at the Complejo Astronómico El Leoncito (CASLEO), which is operated under agreement between the Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas de la República Argentina (CONICET) and the national universities of La Plata, Córdoba, and San Juan.

  3. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Radial velocities of 7 cataclysmic binaries (Halpern+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halpern, J. P.; Thorstensen, J. R.

    2016-04-01

    Our instrumentation, and reduction and analysis procedures are essentially identical to those described in Paper I (Thorstensen et al. 2013, cat. J/AJ/146/107). All of our optical data are from the MDM Observatory (http://mdm.kpno.noao.edu/index/Instrumentation.html), which comprises the 1.3m McGraw-Hill telescope and the 2.4m Hiltner telescope, both on the southwest ridge of Kitt Peak, Arizona. With a single exception, the radial velocity studies to search for the orbital periods were done on the 2.4m, while high-cadence photometry sensitive to spin periods was carried out on the 1.3m. All of our radial velocity studies used the modular spectrograph, as described in Paper I (Thorstensen et al. 2013, cat. J/AJ/146/107). Most of our velocities are from the the 2.4m telescope. Some spectra of Swift J2124.6+0500, and all the data we used for Swift J0939.7-3224, are from the McGraw-Hill 1.3m telescope, again with the modular spectrograph. For four newly identified objects we have only single spectra that were obtained on two observing runs on the 2.4m. These used the Boller and Chivens CCD spectrograph (CCDS) and the Ohio State Multi-Object Spectrograph (OSMOS). Descriptions of these instruments can be found on the MDM Observatory web page (http://mdm.kpno.noao.edu/index/Instrumentation.html). The objects observed are listed in Table1. Table2 lists the radial velocity data, and Table3 gives parameters of the best-fit sinusoids. (3 data files).

  4. SAR image registration in absolute coordinates using GPS carrier phase position and velocity information

    SciTech Connect

    Burgett, S.; Meindl, M.

    1994-09-01

    It is useful in a variety of military and commercial application to accurately register the position of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery in absolute coordinates. The two basic SAR measurements, range and doppler, can be used to solve for the position of the SAR image. Imprecise knowledge of the SAR collection platform`s position and velocity vectors introduce errors in the range and doppler measurements and can cause the apparent location of the SAR image on the ground to be in error by tens of meters. Recent advances in carrier phase GPS techniques can provide an accurate description of the collection vehicle`s trajectory during the image formation process. In this paper, highly accurate carrier phase GPS trajectory information is used in conjunction with SAR imagery to demonstrate a technique for accurate registration of SAR images in WGS-84 coordinates. Flight test data will be presented that demonstrates SAR image registration errors of less than 4 meters.

  5. [The radial velocity measurement accuracy of different spectral type low resolution stellar spectra at different signal-to-noise ratio].

    PubMed

    Wang, Feng-Fei; Luo, A-Li; Zhao, Yong-Heng

    2014-02-01

    The radial velocity of the star is very important for the study of the dynamics structure and chemistry evolution of the Milky Way, is also an useful tool for looking for variable or special objects. In the present work, we focus on calculating the radial velocity of different spectral types of low-resolution stellar spectra by adopting a template matching method, so as to provide effective and reliable reference to the different aspects of scientific research We choose high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) spectra of different spectral type stellar from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), and add different noise to simulate the stellar spectra with different SNR. Then we obtain theradial velocity measurement accuracy of different spectral type stellar spectra at different SNR by employing a template matching method. Meanwhile, the radial velocity measurement accuracy of white dwarf stars is analyzed as well. We concluded that the accuracy of radial velocity measurements of early-type stars is much higher than late-type ones. For example, the 1-sigma standard error of radial velocity measurements of A-type stars is 5-8 times as large as K-type and M-type stars. We discuss the reason and suggest that the very narrow lines of late-type stars ensure the accuracy of measurement of radial velocities, while the early-type stars with very wide Balmer lines, such as A-type stars, become sensitive to noise and obtain low accuracy of radial velocities. For the spectra of white dwarfs stars, the standard error of radial velocity measurement could be over 50 km x s(-1) because of their extremely wide Balmer lines. The above conclusion will provide a good reference for stellar scientific study.

  6. Radial and Azimuthal Velocity Profiles in Gas-Puff Z-Pinches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocco, Sophia; Engelbrecht, Joseph; Banasek, Jacob; de Grouchy, Philip; Qi, Niansheng; Hammer, David

    2016-10-01

    The dynamics of neon, argon, and krypton (either singly or in combination) gas puff z-pinch plasmas are studied on Cornell's 1MA, 100-200ns rise-time COBRA pulsed power generator. The triple-nozzle gas puff valve, consisting of two annular gas puffs and a central jet, allows radial tailoring of the gas puff mass-density profile and the use of 1, 2 or 3 different gases at different pressures. Interferometry supplies information on sheath thickness and electron density, variously filtered PCDs and silicon diodes measure hard and soft x-ray production, and multi frame visible and extreme UV imaging systems allow tracking of the morphology of the plasma. A 527nm, 10J Thomson scattering diagnostic system is used to determine radial and azimuthal velocities. Implosion velocities of 170km/s (Kr) and 300km/s (Ne/Ar) are observed. We are investigating the correlations between instability growth, plasma density profile, velocity partitioning as a function of radius, and radiation production. Research supported by the NNSA Stewardship Sciences Academic Programs under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-NA0001836.

  7. A test field for Gaia. Radial velocity catalogue of stars in the South Ecliptic Pole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frémat, Y.; Altmann, M.; Pancino, E.; Soubiran, C.; Jofré, P.; Damerdji, Y.; Heiter, U.; Royer, F.; Seabroke, G.; Sordo, R.; Blanco-Cuaresma, S.; Jasniewicz, G.; Martayan, C.; Thévenin, F.; Vallenari, A.; Blomme, R.; David, M.; Gosset, E.; Katz, D.; Viala, Y.; Boudreault, S.; Cantat-Gaudin, T.; Lobel, A.; Meisenheimer, K.; Nordlander, T.; Raskin, G.; Royer, P.; Zorec, J.

    2017-01-01

    Context. Gaia is a space mission that is currently measuring the five astrometric parameters, as well as spectrophotometry of at least 1 billion stars to G = 20.7 mag with unprecedented precision. The sixth parameter in phase space (i.e., radial velocity) is also measured thanks to medium-resolution spectroscopy that is being obtained for the 150 million brightest stars. During the commissioning phase, two fields, one around each ecliptic pole, have been repeatedly observed to assess and to improve the overall satellite performances, as well as the associated reduction and analysis software. A ground-based photometric and spectroscopic survey was therefore initiated in 2007, and is still running to gather as much information as possible about the stars in these fields. This work is of particular interest to the validation of the radial velocity spectrometer outputs. Aims: The paper presents the radial velocity measurements performed for the Southern targets in the 12-17 R magnitude range on high- to mid-resolution spectra obtained with the GIRAFFE and UVES spectrographs. Methods: Comparison of the South Ecliptic Pole (SEP) GIRAFFE data to spectroscopic templates observed with the HERMES (Mercator in La Palma, Spain) spectrograph enabled a first coarse characterisation of the 747 SEP targets. Radial velocities were then obtained by comparing the results of three different methods. Results: In this paper, we present an initial overview of the targets to be found in the 1 sq. deg SEP region that was observed repeatedly by Gaia ever since its commissioning. In our representative sample, we identified one galaxy, six LMC S-stars, nine candidate chromospherically active stars, and confirmed the status of 18 LMC Carbon stars. A careful study of the 3471 epoch radial velocity measurements led us to identify 145 RV constant stars with radial velocities varying by less than 1 km s-1. Seventy-eight stars show significant RV scatter, while nine stars show a composite spectrum

  8. Hide and Seek: Radial-Velocity Searches for Planets around Active Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haywood, Raphaëlle Dawn

    2015-11-01

    The detection of low-mass extra-solar planets through radial-velocity searches is currently limited by the intrinsic magnetic activity of the host stars. The correlated noise that arises from their natural radial-velocity variability can easily mimic or conceal the orbital signals of super-Earth and Earth-mass extra-solar planets. I developed an intuitive and robust data analysis framework in which the activity-induced variations are modelled with a Gaussian process that has the frequency structure of the photometric variations of the star, thus allowing me to determine precise and reliable planetary masses. I applied this technique to three recently discovered planetary systems: CoRoT-7, Kepler-78 and Kepler-10. I determined the masses of the transiting super-Earth CoRoT-7b and the small Neptune CoRoT-7c to be 4.73 ± 0.95 M⊕ and 13.56 ± 1.08 M⊕, respectively. The density of CoRoT-7b is 6.61 ± 1.72 g.cm-3, which is compatible with a rocky composition. I carried out Bayesian model selection to assess the nature of a previously identified signal at 9 days, and found that it is best interpreted as stellar activity. Despite the high levels of activity of its host star, I determined the mass of the Earth-sized planet Kepler-78b to be 1.76 ± 0.18 M⊕. With a density of 6.2(+1.8:-1.4) g.cm-3, it is also a rocky planet. I found the masses of Kepler-10b and Kepler-10c to be 3.31 ± 0.32 M⊕ and 16.25 ± 3.66 M⊕, respectively. Their densities, of 6.4(+1.1:-0.7) g.cm-3 and 8.1 ± 1.8 g.cm-3, imply that they are both of rocky composition - even the 2 Earth-radius planet Kepler-10c! In parallel, I deepened our understanding of the physical origin of stellar radial-velocity variability through the study of the Sun, which is the only star whose surface can be imaged at high resolution. I found that the full-disc magnetic flux is an excellent proxy for activity-induced radial-velocity variations; this result may become key to breaking the activity barrier in coming

  9. The Radial Variation of H I Velocity Dispersions in Dwarfs and Spirals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ianjamasimanana, R.; de Blok, W. J. G.; Walter, Fabian; Heald, George H.; Caldú-Primo, Anahi; Jarrett, Thomas H.

    2015-08-01

    Gas velocity dispersions provide important diagnostics of the forces counteracting gravity to prevent collapse of the gas. We use the 21 cm line of neutral atomic hydrogen (H i) to study H i velocity dispersion ({σ }{{H} {{I}}}) and H i phases as a function of galaxy morphology in 22 galaxies from The H i Nearby Galaxy Survey. We stack individual H i velocity profiles and decompose them into broad and narrow Gaussian components. We study the H i velocity dispersion and the H i surface density, {{{Σ }}}{{H} {{I}}}, as a function of radius. For spirals, the velocity dispersions of the narrow and broad components decline with radius and their radial profiles are well described by an exponential function. For dwarfs, however, the profiles are much flatter. The single Gaussian dispersion profiles are, in general, flatter than those of the narrow and broad components. In most cases, the dispersion profiles in the outer disks do not drop as fast as the star formation profiles derived in the literature. This indicates the importance of other energy sources in driving {σ }{{H} {{I}}} in the outer disks. The radial surface density profiles of spirals and dwarfs are similar. The surface density profiles of the narrow component decline more steeply than those of the broad component, but not as steep as what was found previously for the molecular component. As a consequence, the surface density ratio between the narrow and broad components, an estimate of the mass ratio between cold H i and warm H i, tends to decrease with radius. On average, this ratio is lower in dwarfs than in spirals. This lack of a narrow, cold H i component in dwarfs may explain their low star formation activity.

  10. A RADIAL VELOCITY AND CALCIUM TRIPLET ABUNDANCE SURVEY OF FIELD SMALL MAGELLANIC CLOUD GIANTS

    SciTech Connect

    De Propris, Roberto; Rich, R. Michael; Mallery, Ryan C.; Howard, Christian D.

    2010-05-10

    We present the results of a pilot wide-field radial velocity and metal abundance survey of red giants in 10 fields in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). The targets lie at projected distances of 0.9 and 1.9 kpc from the SMC center (m - M = 18.79) to the north, east, south, and west. Two more fields are to the east at distances of 3.9 and 5.1 kpc. In this last field, we find only a few to no SMC giants, suggesting that the edge of the SMC in this direction lies approximately at 6 kpc from its center. In all eastern fields, we observe a double peak in the radial velocities of stars, with a component at the classical SMC recession velocity of {approx}160 km s{sup -1} and a high-velocity component at about 200 km s{sup -1}, similar to observations in H I. In the most distant field (3.9 kpc), the low-velocity component is at 106 km s{sup -1}. The metal abundance distribution in all fields is broad and centered at about [Fe/H] {approx}-1.25, reaching to solar and possibly slightly supersolar values and down to [Fe/H] of about -2.5. In the two innermost (0.9 kpc) northern and southern fields, we observe a secondary peak at metallicities of about {approx}-0.6. This may be evidence of a second episode of star formation in the center, possibly triggered by the interactions that created the Stream and Bridge.

  11. Results of interferometric observations of the F-corona radial velocity field at the distances (3 - 7) R_sun;.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shcheglov, P. V.; Shestakova, L. I.; Ajmanov, A. K.

    The results of observations of the F-corona radial velocity field during July 31, 1981 are briefly given. The prograde and retrograde Keplerian motion of the circumsolar dust, the radial motion directed to the Sun and some ejections were obtained.

  12. Study on a multi-delay spectral interferometry for stellar radial velocity measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kai; Jiang, Haijiao; Tang, Jin; Ji, Hangxin; Zhu, Yongtian; Wang, Liang

    2014-08-01

    High accuracy radial velocity measurement isn't only one of the most important methods for detecting earth-like Exoplanets, but also one of the main developing fields of astronomical observation technologies in future. Externally dispersed interferometry (EDI) generates a kind of particular interference spectrum through combining a fixed-delay interferometer with a medium-resolution spectrograph. It effectively enhances radial velocity measuring accuracy by several times. Another further study on multi-delay interferometry was gradually developed after observation success with only a fixed-delay, and its relative instrumentation makes more impressive performance in near Infrared band. Multi-delay is capable of giving wider coverage from low to high frequency in Fourier field so that gives a higher accuracy in radial velocity measurement. To study on this new technology and verify its feasibility at Guo Shoujing telescope (LAMOST), an experimental instrumentation with single fixed-delay named MESSI has been built and tested at our lab. Another experimental study on multi-delay spectral interferometry given here is being done as well. Basically, this multi-delay experimental system is designed in according to the similar instrument named TEDI at Palomar observatory and the preliminary test result of MESSI. Due to existence of LAMOST spectrograph at lab, a multi-delay interferometer design actually dominates our work. It's generally composed of three parts, respectively science optics, phase-stabilizing optics and delay-calibrating optics. To switch different fixed delays smoothly during observation, the delay-calibrating optics is possibly useful to get high repeatability during switching motion through polychromatic interferometry. Although this metrology is based on white light interferometry in theory, it's different that integrates all of interference signals independently obtained by different monochromatic light in order to avoid dispersion error caused by

  13. Observations of the dust radial velocity field in the F-corona on March 29, 2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shestakova, L. I.; Demchenko, B. I.; Rspaev, F. K.; Chalabaev, A.

    2011-12-01

    The results of interferometer observations of the dust radial velocity field in the F-corona during the total solar eclipse of March 29, 2006, are presented. The observations were performed in the Mugalzhar settlement, Aqtobe region, Kazakhstan. The observation results indicated that the dust orbital motion is opposite to the planetary motion and is inclined at an angle of about 105° with respect to the ecliptic plane. It is assumed that the observed dust is genetically related to Kreutz comets falling on the Sun and registered with the SOHO spacecraft on March 28 and 31, 2006.

  14. VizieR Online Data Catalog: WASP-103b radial velocities and light curves (Gillon+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillon, M.; Anderson, D. R.; Collier-Cameron, A.; Delrez, L.; Hellier, C.; Jehin, E.; Lendl, M.; Maxted, P. F. L.; Pepe, F.; Pollacco, D.; Queloz, D.; Segransan, D.; Smith, A. M. S.; Smalley, B.; Southworth, J.; Triaud, A. H. M. J.; Udry, S.; Van Grootel, V.; West, R. G.

    2014-01-01

    The host star WASP-103 (1SWASPJ163715.59+071100.0 = 2MASS16371556+0711000; V=12.1, K=10.8) was observed by the southern station of the WASP survey during the 2010, 2011, and 2012 observing seasons, covering the intervals 2010 May 15 to Aug. 16, 2011 Mar. 26 to Aug. 20, and 2012 Mar. 25 to Jun. 28. Files wasp.dat, trappist.dat, euler.dat contain the photometric time-series presented in the paper. File rv.dat contains the radial velocity time-series presented in the paper. (4 data files).

  15. Near-infrared metallicities, radial velocities, and spectral types for 447 nearby M dwarfs

    SciTech Connect

    Newton, Elisabeth R.; Charbonneau, David; Irwin, Jonathan; Berta-Thompson, Zachory K.; Rojas-Ayala, Barbara; Covey, Kevin; Lloyd, James P.

    2014-01-01

    We present metallicities, radial velocities, and near-infrared (NIR) spectral types for 447 M dwarfs determined from moderate resolution (R ≈ 2000) NIR spectra obtained with the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF)/SpeX. These M dwarfs are primarily targets of the MEarth Survey, a transiting planet survey searching for super Earths around mid-to-late M dwarfs within 33 pc. We present NIR spectral types for each star and new spectral templates for the IRTF in the Y, J, H, and K-bands, created using M dwarfs with near-solar metallicities. We developed two spectroscopic distance calibrations that use NIR spectral type or an index based on the curvature of the K-band continuum. Our distance calibration has a scatter of 14%. We searched 27 NIR spectral lines and 10 spectral indices for metallicity sensitive features, taking into account correlated noise in our estimates of the errors on these parameters. We calibrated our relation using 36 M dwarfs in common proper pairs with an F-, G-, or K-type star of known metallicity. We validated the physical association of these pairs using proper motions, radial velocities, and spectroscopic distance estimates. Our resulting metallicity calibration uses the sodium doublet at 2.2 μm as the sole indicator for metallicity. It has an accuracy of 0.12 dex inferred from the scatter between the metallicities of the primaries and the estimated metallicities of the secondaries. Our relation is valid for NIR spectral types from M1V to M5V and for –1.0 dex < [Fe/H] < +0.35 dex. We present a new color-color metallicity relation using J – H and J – K colors that directly relates two observables: the distance from the M dwarf main sequence and equivalent width of the sodium line at 2.2 μm. We used radial velocities of M dwarf binaries, observations at different epochs, and comparison between our measurements and precisely measured radial velocities to demonstrate a 4 km s{sup –1} accuracy.

  16. PHASES Differential Astrometry and Iodine Cell Radial Velocities of the κ Pegasi Triple Star System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muterspaugh, Matthew W.; Lane, Benjamin F.; Konacki, Maciej; Wiktorowicz, Sloane; Burke, Bernard F.; Colavita, M. M.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Shao, M.

    2006-01-01

    κ Pegasi is a well-known, nearby triple star system. It consists of a ``wide'' pair with semimajor axis=235 mas, one component of which is a single-line spectroscopic binary (semimajor axis= 2.5 mas). Using high-precision differential astrometry and radial velocity observations, the masses for all three components are determined and the relative inclination between the wide and narrow pairs' orbits is found to be 43.8d+/-3.0d, just over the threshold for the three-body Kozai resonance. The system distance is determined to be 34.60+/-0.21 pc and is consistent with trigonometric parallax measurements.

  17. An astro-comb calibrated solar telescope to search for the radial velocity signature of Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, David F.; Glenday, Alex G.; Dumusque, Xavier; Buchschacher, Nicolas; Cameron, Andrew Collier; Cecconi, Massimo; Charbonneau, David; Cosentino, Rosario; Ghedina, Adriano; Haywood, Raphäelle; Latham, David W.; Li, Chih-Hao; Lodi, Marcello; Lovis, Christophe; Molinari, Emilio; Pepe, Francesco; Sasselov, Dimitar; Szentgyorgyi, Andrew; Udry, Stephane; Walsworth, Ronald L.

    2016-07-01

    We recently demonstrated sub-m/s sensitivity in measuring the radial velocity (RV) between the Earth and Sun using a simple solar telescope feeding the HARPS-N spectrograph at the Italian National Telescope, which is calibrated with a green astro-comb. We are using the solar telescope to characterize the effects of stellar (solar) RV jitter due to activity on the solar surface with the goal of detecting the solar RV signal from Venus, thereby demonstrating the sensitivity of these instruments to detect true Earth-twin exoplanets.

  18. Searching for IMBHs in Galactic globular clusters through radial velocities of individual stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanzoni, Barbara

    2016-02-01

    I present an overview of our ongoing project aimed at building a new generation of velocity dispersion profiles ad rotation curves for a representative sample of Galactic globular clusters, from the the radial velocity of hundreds of individual stars distributed at different distances from the cluster center. The innermost portion of the profiles will be used to constrain the possible presence of intermediate-mass black holes. The adopted methodology consists of combining spectroscopic observations acquired with three different instruments at the ESO-VLT: the adaptive-optics assisted, integral field unit (IFU) spectrograph SINFONI for the innermost and highly crowded cluster cores, the multi-IFU spectrograph KMOS for the intermediate regions, and the multi-fiber instrument FLAMES/GIRAFFE-MEDUSA for the outskirts. The case of NGC 6388, representing the pilot project that motivated the entire program, is described in some details.

  19. The Joker: A Custom Monte Carlo Sampler for Binary-star and Exoplanet Radial Velocity Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price-Whelan, Adrian M.; Hogg, David W.; Foreman-Mackey, Daniel; Rix, Hans-Walter

    2017-03-01

    Given sparse or low-quality radial velocity measurements of a star, there are often many qualitatively different stellar or exoplanet companion orbit models that are consistent with the data. The consequent multimodality of the likelihood function leads to extremely challenging search, optimization, and Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) posterior sampling over the orbital parameters. Here we create a custom Monte Carlo sampler for sparse or noisy radial velocity measurements of two-body systems that can produce posterior samples for orbital parameters even when the likelihood function is poorly behaved. The six standard orbital parameters for a binary system can be split into four nonlinear parameters (period, eccentricity, argument of pericenter, phase) and two linear parameters (velocity amplitude, barycenter velocity). We capitalize on this by building a sampling method in which we densely sample the prior probability density function (pdf) in the nonlinear parameters and perform rejection sampling using a likelihood function marginalized over the linear parameters. With sparse or uninformative data, the sampling obtained by this rejection sampling is generally multimodal and dense. With informative data, the sampling becomes effectively unimodal but too sparse: in these cases we follow the rejection sampling with standard MCMC. The method produces correct samplings in orbital parameters for data that include as few as three epochs. The Joker can therefore be used to produce proper samplings of multimodal pdfs, which are still informative and can be used in hierarchical (population) modeling. We give some examples that show how the posterior pdf depends sensitively on the number and time coverage of the observations and their uncertainties.

  20. The Milky Way's halo in 6D: Gaia's Radial Velocity Spectrometer performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seabroke, George; Cropper, Mark; Katz, David; Sartoretti, Paola; Panuzzo, Pasquale; Marchal, Olivier; Gueguen, Alain; Benson, Kevin; Dolding, Chris; Huckle, Howard; Smith, Mike; Baker, Steve

    2016-08-01

    Gaia's Radial Velocity Spectrometer (RVS) has been operating in routine phase for over one year since initial commissioning. RVS continues to work well but the higher than expected levels of straylight reduce the limiting magnitude. The end-of-mission radial-velocity (RV) performance requirement for G2V stars was 15 km s-1 at V = 16.5 mag. Instead, 15 km s-1 precision is achieved at 15 < V < 16 mag, consistent with simulations that predict a loss of 1.4 mag. Simulations also suggest that changes to Gaia's onboard software could recover ~0.14 mag of this loss. Consequently Gaia's onboard software was upgraded in April 2015. The status of this new commissioning period is presented, as well as the latest scientific performance of the on-ground processing of RVS spectra. We illustrate the implications of the RVS limiting magnitude on Gaia's view of the Milky Way's halo in 6D using the Gaia Universe Model Snapshot (GUMS).

  1. Recovering planet radial velocity signals in the presence of starspot activity in fully convective stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, J. R.; Jeffers, S. V.; Anglada-Escudé, G.; Haswell, C. A.; Jones, H. R. A.; Tuomi, M.; Feng, F.; Jenkins, J. S.; Petit, P.

    2017-04-01

    Accounting for stellar activity is a crucial component of the search for ever-smaller planets orbiting stars of all spectral types. We use Doppler imaging methods to demonstrate that starspot-induced radial velocity variability can be effectively reduced for moderately rotating, fully convective stars. Using starspot distributions extrapolated from sunspot observations, we adopt typical M dwarf starspot distributions with low contrast spots to synthesize line profile distortions. The distortions are recovered using maximum entropy regularized fitting and the corresponding stellar radial velocities are measured. The procedure is demonstrated that for a late-M star harbouring an orbiting planet in the habitable zone. The technique is effective for stars with v sin i = 1-10km s-1, reducing the stellar noise contribution by factors of nearly an order of magnitude. With a carefully chosen observing strategy, the technique can be used to determine the stellar rotation period and is robust to uncertainties such as unknown stellar inclination. While demonstrated for late-type M stars, the procedure is applicable to all spectral types.

  2. No Evidence for Activity Correlations in the Radial Velocities of Kapteyn’s Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anglada-Escudé, G.; Tuomi, M.; Arriagada, P.; Zechmeister, M.; Jenkins, J. S.; Ofir, A.; Dreizler, S.; Gerlach, E.; Marvin, C. J.; Reiners, A.; Jeffers, S. V.; Butler, R. Paul; Vogt, S. S.; Amado, P. J.; Rodríguez-López, C.; Berdiñas, Z. M.; Morin, J.; Crane, J. D.; Shectman, S. A.; Díaz, M. R.; Sarmiento, L. F.; Jones, H. R. A.

    2016-10-01

    Stellar activity may induce Doppler variability at the level of a few m s-1 which can then be confused by the Doppler signal of an exoplanet orbiting the star. To first order, linear correlations between radial velocity measurements and activity indices have been proposed to account for any such correlation. The likely presence of two super-Earths orbiting Kapteyn’s star was reported in Anglada-Escudé et al., but this claim was recently challenged by Robertson et al., who argued for evidence of a rotation period (143 days) at three times the orbital period of one of the proposed planets (Kapteyn’s b, P = 48.6 days) and the existence of strong linear correlations between its Doppler signal and activity data. By re-analyzing the data using global statistics and model comparison, we show that such a claim is incorrect given that (1) the choice of a rotation period at 143 days is unjustified, and (2) the presence of linear correlations is not supported by the data. We conclude that the radial velocity signals of Kapteyn’s star remain more simply explained by the presence of two super-Earth candidates orbiting it. We note that analysis of time series of activity indices must be executed with the same care as Doppler time series. We also advocate for the use of global optimization procedures and objective arguments, instead of claims based on residual analyses which are prone to biases and incorrect interpretations.

  3. Detection of radial velocity shifts due to black hole binaries near merger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKernan, B.; Ford, K. E. S.

    2015-09-01

    The barycenter of a massive black hole binary will lie outside the event horizon of the primary black hole for modest values of mass ratio and binary separation. Analogous to radial velocity shifts in stellar emission lines caused by the tug of planets, the radial velocity of the primary black hole around the barycenter can leave a tell-tale oscillation in the broad component of FeKα emission from accreting gas. Near-future X-ray telescopes such as Astro-H and Athena will have the energy resolution (δE/E ≲ 10-3) to search nearby active galactic nuclei (AGN) for the presence of binaries with mass ratios q ≳ 0.01, separated by several hundred gravitational radii. The general-relativistic and Lense-Thirring precession of the periapse of the secondary orbit imprints a detectable modulation on the oscillations. The lowest mass binaries in AGN will oscillate many times within typical X-ray exposures, leading to a broadening of the line wings and an overestimate of black hole spin in these sources. Detection of periodic oscillations in the AGN line centroid energy will reveal a massive black hole binary close to merger and will provide an early warning of gravitational radiation emission.

  4. Update from the ongoing precision radial velocity campaign to characterize the HD 3167 system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christiansen, Jessie; CHAI Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    HD 3167 is a bright (V=8.9, K=7.0), nearby (46pc) K0-type star in K2 campaign 8, which was recently announced to host two transiting planets - a 1.7 REarth super-Earth on a 0.95-day orbit, and a 3.0 REarth mini-Neptune on a 29.8-day orbit. The super-Earth planet is very close to the putative divide between rocky and volatile-rich planets, and joins a relatively small number of super-Earth planets with accurate masses obtainable with current precision radial velocity measurements. Both targets are particularly compelling for HST and JWST characterization, given the brightness of the host star, however accurate masses will be needed in order to interpret the observations. Here we present the latest results from our multi-instrument (Keck/HIRES, TNG/HARPS-N, and Lick/APF) precision radial velocity campaign to measure the masses of the planets in the HD 3167 system.

  5. Origins of Solar Systems: Removing Activity-Related Radial Velocity Noise to Improve Extrasolar Planet Searches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saar, Steven; Lindstrom, David (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    We have continued the super high resolution (R is approximately 200,000), high S/N (> 300) echelle study of joint line bisector and radial velocity variations using the McDonald 2-D coude. A long observing run in October 2002 was quite successful (8 clear nights). We now have close to three years of data, which begins to sample a good fraction of the magnetic cycle timescales for some of our targets (e.g., K Ceti; P(sub cyc)=5.6 yrs). This will be very helpful in unraveling the complex relationships between plage and v(sub r), changes which we have uncovered. A preliminary analysis of the limited data in hand, and find some tantalizing evidence for correlations between median line bisector displacement and radial velocity v(sub r). The correlation appears to be specific to the particular star being considered, probably since it is a function of both spectral type and rotation rate. Additional information regarding progress on the grant is included.

  6. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Radial velocities of 1 Gem (Lane+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lane, B. F.; Muterspaugh, M. W.; Griffin, R. F.; Scarfe, C. D.; Fekel, F. C.; Williamson, M. H.; Eaton, J. A.; Shao, M.; Colavita, M. M.; Konacki, M.

    2016-05-01

    Extensive radial-velocity measurements of the 1 Gem system have been obtained in four separate campaigns spanning 40yr, including data from eight different instruments. Between 1969 and 2009 R.F.G. acquired a total of 128 observations of 1 Gem using the original radial-velocity spectrometer at Cambridge; a second-generation, computerized instrument at Palomar; the CORAVEL spectrometer at Haute Provence Observatory (OHP), and most recently, the Cambridge CORAVEL. The "Cambridge CORAVEL" operates at the Coude focus of the 36inch reflector on the home site of the Cambridge Observatories, Madingley Road, Cambridge, England. The Cambridge and Palomar data are referred to as data set A, while the OHP data are labeled set B. The data for components A and Ba are provided in Table1. A series of observations of 1 Gem has been obtained by C.D.S. with the Dominion Astrophysical Observatory (DAO) radial-velocity spectrometer. Observations were begun early in 1980 and continued until the end of 2003. The DAO velocities of components A and Ba are listed in Table2. The total number of acceptable velocities from DAO radial-velocity scanner observations is 123 of the primary star and 107 of the brighter component of the close pair. The third component was not detectable in the DAO traces. We identify the DAO observations as data set C. >From 1983 through 2009 F.C.F. obtained observations at the Kitt Peak National Observatory (KPNO) with the 0.9m coude feed telescope, coude spectrograph, and several different CCD detectors. All of the spectrograms were acquired with a Texas Instruments (TI) CCD except for five that were obtained in 1983 with an RCA CCD and a single observation in 2008 September with a Tektronix CCD. All those observations were centered near 6430Å and had typical signal-to-noise ratios of about 250. The numerous TI CCD spectra have a wavelength range of just 84Å and a resolution of 0.21Å. The 86 velocities of component A and 80 of component Ba are listed in Table3

  7. Long-lived, long-period radial velocity variations in Aldebaran: A planetary companion and stellar activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatzes, A. P.; Cochran, W. D.; Endl, M.; Guenther, E. W.; MacQueen, P.; Hartmann, M.; Zechmeister, M.; Han, I.; Lee, B.-C.; Walker, G. A. H.; Yang, S.; Larson, A. M.; Kim, K.-M.; Mkrtichian, , D. E.; Döllinger, M.; Simon, , A. E.; Girardi, L.

    2015-08-01

    Aims: We investigate the nature of the long-period radial velocity variations in α Tau first reported over 20 yr ago. Methods: We analyzed precise stellar radial velocity measurements for α Tau spanning over 30 yr. An examination of the Hα and Ca II λ8662 spectral lines, and Hipparcos photometry was also done to help discern the nature of the long-period radial velocity variations. Results: Our radial velocity data show that the long-period, low amplitude radial velocity variations are long-lived and coherent. Furthermore, Hα equivalent width measurements and Hipparcos photometry show no significant variations with this period. Another investigation of this star established that there was no variability in the spectral line shapes with the radial velocity period. An orbital solution results in a period of P = 628.96 ± 0.90 d, eccentricity, e = 0.10 ± 0.05, and a radial velocity amplitude, K = 142.1 ± 7.2 m s-1. Evolutionary tracks yield a stellar mass of 1.13 ± 0.11 M⊙, which corresponds to a minimum companion mass of 6.47 ± 0.53 MJup with an orbital semi-major axis of a = 1.46 ± 0.27 AU. After removing the orbital motion of the companion, an additional period of ≈520 d is found in the radial velocity data, but only in some time spans. A similar period is found in the variations in the equivalent width of Hα and Ca II. Variations at one-third of this period are also found in the spectral line bisector measurements. The ~520 d period is interpreted as the rotation modulation by stellar surface structure. Its presence, however, may not be long-lived, and it only appears in epochs of the radial velocity data separated by ~10 yr. This might be due to an activity cycle. Conclusions: The data presented here provide further evidence of a planetary companion to α Tau, as well as activity-related radial velocity variations. Based in part on observations obtained at the 2-m-Alfred Jensch Telescope at the Thüringer Landessternwarte Tautenburg and the

  8. Absolute geostrophic velocities off the coast of Southern Peru as observed from glider data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietri, A.; Testor, P.; Echevin, V.; Chaigneau, A.; Mortier, L.; Eldin, G.; Grados, C.; Albert, A.

    2012-04-01

    The upwelling system off southern Peru has been observed using autonomous underwater vehicles (Slocum gliders) during two glider missions in October-November 2008 (Austral Spring) and April-May 2010 (Austral Autumn). Cross-front sections carried out in the intense upwelling cell near 14°S provide information on the geostrophic transport variability. During the first mission, the glider completed nine consecutive sections of ~100 km down to 200 m depth perpendicular to the continental slope, allowing to measure the equatorward surface jet. During the second one, six sections of ~100 km down to 1000 m deep allow to characterize the deeper vertical structure of the current system. Estimates of alongshore absolute geostrophic velocities were inferred from the density field and the glider drift between two dives. An equatorward surface current with a maximum of 30 cm/s was identified as the Peru Chile Current and a subsurface poleward current with a maximum of 15 cm/s as the Peru Chile Undercurrent. In April-May 2010, a remarkable subsurface equatorward current of ~ 10 cm/s was observed above the continental slope and between 250 and 1000 m deep. The coastal current system, more particularly the subsurface equatorward current, is tentatively linked to the signature of poleward propagating coastal trapped waves, as shown by regional model (ROMS) simulations.

  9. Theoretical and Experimental Study of Radial Velocity Generation for Extending Bandwidth of Magnetohydrodynamic Angular Rate Sensor at Low Frequency.

    PubMed

    Ji, Yue; Li, Xingfei; Wu, Tengfei; Chen, Cheng

    2015-12-15

    The magnetohydrodynamics angular rate sensor (MHD ARS) has received much attention for its ultra-low noise in ultra-broad bandwidth and its impact resistance in harsh environments; however, its poor performance at low frequency hinders its work in long time duration. The paper presents a modified MHD ARS combining Coriolis with MHD effect to extend the measurement scope throughout the whole bandwidth, in which an appropriate radial flow velocity should be provided to satisfy simplified model of the modified MHD ARS. A method that can generate radial velocity by an MHD pump in MHD ARS is proposed. A device is designed to study the radial flow velocity generated by the MHD pump. The influence of structure and physical parameters are studied by numerical simulation and experiment of the device. The analytic expression of the velocity generated by the energized current drawn from simulation and experiment are consistent, which demonstrates the effectiveness of the method generating radial velocity. The study can be applied to generate and control radial velocity in modified MHD ARS, which is essential for the two effects combination throughout the whole bandwidth.

  10. Theoretical and Experimental Study of Radial Velocity Generation for Extending Bandwidth of Magnetohydrodynamic Angular Rate Sensor at Low Frequency

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Yue; Li, Xingfei; Wu, Tengfei; Chen, Cheng

    2015-01-01

    The magnetohydrodynamics angular rate sensor (MHD ARS) has received much attention for its ultra-low noise in ultra-broad bandwidth and its impact resistance in harsh environments; however, its poor performance at low frequency hinders its work in long time duration. The paper presents a modified MHD ARS combining Coriolis with MHD effect to extend the measurement scope throughout the whole bandwidth, in which an appropriate radial flow velocity should be provided to satisfy simplified model of the modified MHD ARS. A method that can generate radial velocity by an MHD pump in MHD ARS is proposed. A device is designed to study the radial flow velocity generated by the MHD pump. The influence of structure and physical parameters are studied by numerical simulation and experiment of the device. The analytic expression of the velocity generated by the energized current drawn from simulation and experiment are consistent, which demonstrates the effectiveness of the method generating radial velocity. The study can be applied to generate and control radial velocity in modified MHD ARS, which is essential for the two effects combination throughout the whole bandwidth. PMID:26694393

  11. Radial Velocities and Kinematic Membership in the Open Cluster NGC 3114

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, Jorge Federico; Lapasset, Emilio

    2001-05-01

    Echelle spectroscopic observations for 30 bright stars in the field of the sparse open cluster NGC 3114 are presented. The sample includes main-sequence stars, yellow and red giants, and blue straggler candidates. Radial velocities are derived by cross-correlations using high signal-to-noise ratio standard spectra as templates. The cluster mean velocity is well defined from eight giants and several main-sequence stars whose average is =-3.52+/-0.25 km s-1. The membership probabilities of the observed stars are computed on the basis of the velocity distributions of the cluster and field stars, and the expected percentage of contamination at each position. We classified 19 cluster members and 10 nonmembers; the remaining star is a known spectroscopic binary for which no membership probability was assigned. Among the members, there is a bright yellow giant, seven red giants, and four blue straggler candidates, although they should be considered as turn-off stars. The location of two of them in the color-magnitude diagram (slightly blueward of the turn-off) can be explained by their low rotational velocities. No velocity variations were detected in the 16 stars measured more than once, which indicates that NGC 3114 possess an abnormally low binary frequency. From spectral types of cluster members, a distance modulus (V-Mv)=9.8+/-0.2 mag and a reddening E(B-V)=0.07+/-0.01 mag are derived. The cluster age is estimated to be 1.6×108 yr. The observations presented here were obtained at the Complejo Astronómico El Leoncito (CASLEO), which is operated under agreement between the Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas de la República Argentina (CONICET) and the National Universities of La Plata, Córdoba and San Juan.

  12. Radial Velocity of the Phoenix Dwarf Galaxy: Linking Stars and H I Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallart, C.; Martínez-Delgado, D.; Gómez-Flechoso, M. A.; Mateo, M.

    2001-05-01

    We present the first radial velocity measurement of the stellar component of the Local Group dwarf galaxy Phoenix, using the FORS1 instrument at the VLT's Unit Telescope 1 (Antu). From the spectra of 31 red giant branch stars, we derive a heliocentric optical radial velocity for Phoenix of Vsolar=-52+/-6 km s-1. On the basis of this velocity, and taking into account the results of a series of semianalytical and numerical simulations, we discuss the possible association of the H I clouds observed in the Phoenix vicinity. We conclude that the characteristics of the H I cloud with heliocentric velocity -23 km s-1 are consistent with this gas having been associated with Phoenix in the past and being lost by the galaxy after the last event of star formation in the galaxy, about 100 Myr ago. Two possible scenarios are discussed: the ejection of the gas by the energy released by the supernovae (SNe) produced in that last event of star formation and a ram pressure stripping scenario. We derive that the kinetic energy necessary to eject the gas is ESNe~2×1051 ergs and that the number of SNe necessary to transfer this amount of kinetic energy to the gas cloud is ~20. This is consistent with the number of SNe expected for the last event of star formation in Phoenix, according to the star formation history derived by Martínez-Delgado, Gallart, & Aparicio. The drawback of this scenario is the regular appearance of the H I cloud and its anisotropic distribution with respect to the stellar component. Another possibility is that the H I gas was stripped as a consequence of ram pressure by the intergalactic medium. In our simulations, the structure of the gas remains quite smooth as it is stripped from Phoenix, keeping a distribution similar to that of the observed H I cloud. Both in the SNe ejection case and in the ram pressure sweeping scenario, the distances and relative velocities imply that the H I cloud is not gravitationally bound to Phoenix, since this would require a

  13. Interferometric observation of the F-corona radial velocities fields between 3 and 7 solar radii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shcheglov, P. V.; Shestakova, L. I.; Aimanov, A. K.

    During the July 31, 1981 solar eclipse, F-corona interferograms near Mg I 5184 A were obtained using a Fabry-Perot etalon with an FWHM of 0.5 A (corresponding to 30 km/sec) and an image tube. Radial velocities V(r) of the interplanetary dust (ID) were measured in different directions. Both prograde and retrograde motions of ID in the ecliptic region is discovered. Most of velocity values do not exceed 50 km/sec. A negative velocity component appears after averaging all V(r) for all directions. Its average increases to -20 km/sec toward the sun. Some ejections are observed. The strongest (+130 km/sec) is located at the north ecliptic pole at a distance of 6 to 7 solar radii. From the lack of unshifted Fraunhofer lines in the scattered sky light, it is concluded that the sky brigntness continuous component is predominant and its source is K-corona scattered light in the earth's atmosphere.

  14. Radial velocities of very low mass stars and candidate brown dwarf members of the Hyades and Pleiades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stauffer, John R.; Liebert, James; Giampapa, Mark; Macintosh, Bruce; Reid, Neill; Hamilton, Donald

    1994-01-01

    We have determined H alpha equivalent widths and radial velocities with 1 sigma accuracies of approximately 5 km s(exp -1) for approximately 20 candidate very low mass members of the Hyades and Pleiades clusters. The radial velocities for the Hyades sample suggest that nearly all of these stars are indeed highly probable members of the Hyades. The faintest stars in the Hyades sample have masses of order 0.1 solar mass. We also obtained radial velocities for four candidate very low mass members of the Pleiades and two objects that are candidate BD Pleiads. All of these stars have apparent V magnitudes fainter than the Hyades stars we observed, and the resultant radial velocity accuracy is worse. We believe that the three brighter stars are indeed likely very low mass stellar members of the Pleiades, whereas the status of the two brown dwarf candidates is uncertain. The Hyades stars we have observed and the three Pleiades very low mass stars are the lowest mass members of any open cluster whose membership has been confirmed by radial velocities and whose chromospheric activity has been measured. We see no change in chromospheric activity at the boundary where stars are expected to become fully convective (M approximately equals 0.3 solar mass) in either cluster. In the Pleiades, however, there may be a decrease in chromospheric activity for stars with (V-I)(sub K) greater than 3.5 (M less than or equal to 0.1 solar mass).

  15. Analytical determination of orbital elements using Fourier analysis. I. The radial velocity case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delisle, J.-B.; Ségransan, D.; Buchschacher, N.; Alesina, F.

    2016-05-01

    We describe an analytical method for computing the orbital parameters of a planet from the periodogram of a radial velocity signal. The method is very efficient and provides a good approximation of the orbital parameters. The accuracy is mainly limited by the accuracy of the computation of the Fourier decomposition of the signal which is sensitive to sampling and noise. Our method is complementary with more accurate (and more expensive in computer time) numerical algorithms (e.g. Levenberg-Marquardt, Markov chain Monte Carlo, genetic algorithms). Indeed, the analytical approximation can be used as an initial condition to accelerate the convergence of these numerical methods. Our method can be applied iteratively to search for multiple planets in the same system.

  16. Bayesian Planet Searches for the 10 cm/s Radial Velocity Era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregory, Philip C.

    2016-10-01

    A new apodized Keplerian model is proposed for the analysis of precision radial velocity (RV) data to model both planetary and stellar activity (SA) induced RV signals. A symmetrical Gaussian apodization function with unknown width and center can distinguish planetary signals from SA signals on the basis of the width of the apodization function. The general model for m apodized Keplerian signals also includes a linear regression term between RV and the stellar activity diagnostic In (R'hk), as well as an extra Gaussian noise term with unknown standard deviation. The model parameters are explored using a Bayesian fusion MCMC code. A differential version of the Generalized Lomb-Scargle periodogram provides an additional way of distinguishing SA signals and helps guide the choice of new periods. Sample results are reported for a recent international RV blind challenge which included multiple state of the art simulated data sets supported by a variety of stellar activity diagnostics.

  17. Reanalysis of radial velocity data from the resonant planetary system HD128311

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rein, Hanno

    2015-03-01

    The multiplanetary system HD128311 hosts at least two planets. Its dynamical formation history has been studied extensively in the literature. We reanalyse the latest radial velocity data for this system with the affine-invariant Markov chain Monte Carlo sampler EMCEE. Using the high-order integrator IAS15, we perform a fully dynamical fit, allowing the planets to interact during the sampling process. A stability analysis using the Mean Exponential Growth of Nearby Orbits indicator reveals that the system is located in a stable island of the parameter space. In contrast to a previous study, we find that the system is locked in a 2:1 mean motion resonance. The resonant angle ϕ1 is librating with a libration amplitude of approximately 37°. The existence of mean motion resonances has important implication for planet formation theories. Our results confirm predictions of models involving planet migration and stochastic forces.

  18. SKARPS: The Search for Kuiper Belts around Radial-Velocity Planet Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryden, Geoffrey; Marshall, Jonathan; Stapelfeldt, Karl; Su, Kate; Wyatt, Mark

    2011-01-01

    The Search for Kuiper belts Around Radial-velocity Planet Stars - SKARPS -is a Herschel survey of solar-type stars known to have orbiting planets. When complete, the 100-star SKARPS sample will be large enough for a meaningful statistical comparison against stars not known to have planets. (This control sample has already been observed by Herschel's DUst around NEarby Stars - DUNES - key program). Initial results include previously known disks that are resolved for the first time and newly discovered disks that are fainter and colder than those typically detected by Spitzer. So far, with only half of the sample in hand, there is no measured correlation between inner RV planets and cold outer debris. While this is consistent with the results from Spitzer, it is in contrast with the relationship suggested by the prominent debris disks in imaged-planet systems.

  19. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Radial velocities of the Be star HR 2142 (Peters+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, G. J.; Wang, L.; Gies, D. R.; Grundstrom, E. D.

    2016-11-01

    Radial velocity measurements were made using the set of spectra summarized in Table 1. The main focus of this work is a set of 88 high resolution, SWP HIRES FUV spectra acquired over the lifetime of the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) observatory. These were downloaded from MAST and resampled. We also collected a set of 49 LWR and LWP near-UV spectra that were used to inspect the orbital variations in the MgII2796,2803 feature. The UV spectra were supplemented with a large collection of Hα spectra that we secured with the KPNO Coude Feed telescope and that were obtained by amateur astronomers participating in the Be Star Spectra database project (Pollmann 2007IBVS.5778....1P; Neiner et al. 2011AJ....142..149N). (2 data files).

  20. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Radial velocities of 51 Peg (Martins+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, J. H. C.; Santos, N. C.; Figueira, P.; Faria, J. P.; Montalto, M.; Boisse, I.; Ehrenreich, D.; Lovis, C.; Mayor, M.; Melo, C.; Pepe, F.; Sousa, S.; Udry, S.; Cunha, D.

    2015-04-01

    The table contains the radial velocity data for HARPS observations of 51 Peg. This data was collected with the HARPS spectrograph at ESO's 3.6-m Telescope at La Silla-Paranal Observatory, as part of ESO programme 091.C-0271. It consists of 91 spectra observed in seven different nights (2013-06-08, 2013-06-25, 2013-08-02, 2013-08-04, 2013-09-05, 2013-09-09 and 2013-09-30) totalling around 12.5h of observing time. The obtained spectra have a S/N on the 50th order (~5560Å) that varies between 122 and 388. The spectra cover the wavelengths range from roughly 3781Å to 6910Å. (1 data file).

  1. A WEAVE Radial Velocity Survey to Unravel the Nature of the Milky Way's Spiral Arms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monguió, M.; Figueras, F.; Grosbøl, P.

    2016-10-01

    The nature of the spiral arms of our Milky Way Galaxy is still a matter of debate. Different theories have been suggested (density waves, swing amplification, invariant manifolds...) which impose several constraints on the observables. For the first time it will be possible to disentangle these theories by combining Gaia and WEAVE data. Great advantage comes from the fact that WEAVE is in the Northern Hemisphere, that is with good coverage towards the galactic anticenter. We plan to quantify the kinematic perturbation induced by the Perseus spiral arm through radial velocity measurements. We show how, for the first time, we have detected the stellar overdensity associated with the Perseus arm using a Strömgren photometric survey with the Wide Field Camera on the Isaac Newton Telescope. This survey has allowed us to perform first tests on WEAVE capabilities.

  2. Radial velocity measurements of the chromospherically-active stars (2): HD 28591 = V492 Per

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dadonas, V.; Sperauskas, J.; Fekel, F. C.; Morton, M. D.

    1994-01-01

    From two sets of the spectroscopic observations covering a ten year period we have obtained 59 radial velocities of the chromospherically-active star HD 28591 = V492 Per. It is a G9III single-lined spectroscopic binary with a period of 21.2910 days and a circular orbit. The upsilon sin i of 24.6 km/sec, results in a minimum radius 10.3 solar radii. We estimate a distance of 165 +/- 40 pc and an orbital inclination of 65 +/- 25 degrees. The secondary is probably a mid to late-type K dwarf. The star is brighter than the limiting magnitude of the Bright Star Catalogue. The mean photometric and the orbital periods are identical within their uncertainties. Since the star fills a significant fraction of its Roche lobe, about 62%, the photometric light curve may be the result of starspots and a modest ellipticity effect.

  3. On the Determination of Transiting Planet Properties from Light and Radial Velocity Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Southworth, John

    2017-02-01

    A recent publication has suggested a method to determine the masses and radii of the components of an eclipsing system using only a light curve and radial velocities of one component. If true, this would have immediate impact in expediting the study of transiting extrasolar planet and brown dwarf systems. The method is intended for situations where the mass ratio is significantly different from zero, but implicitly also requires the assumption that the mass ratio is negligible. We investigate both cases, finding that when the mass ratio is significant the method is mathematically identical to existing approaches, and when the mass ratio is negligible the equations become undefined. We therefore conclude that the method cannot be used to measure the physical properties of such systems from observations alone.

  4. Extracting kinetic freeze-out temperature and radial flow velocity from an improved Tsallis distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lao, Hai-Ling; Liu, Fu-Hu; Lacey, Roy A.

    2017-03-01

    We analyze the transverse-momentum (pT) spectra of identified particles (π^{±}, K^{±}, p, and \\bar{p}) produced in gold-gold (Au-Au) and lead-lead (Pb-Pb) collisions over a √{s_{NN}} (center-of-mass energy per nucleon pair) range from 14.5 GeV (one of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) energies) to 2.76 TeV (one of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) energies). For the spectra with a narrow pT range, an improved Tsallis distribution which is in fact the Tsallis distribution with radial flow is used. For the spectra with a wide pT range, a superposition of the improved Tsallis distribution and an inverse power law is used. Both the extracted kinetic freeze-out temperature (T0) and radial flow velocity (βT) increase with the increase of √{s_{NN}}, which indicates a higher excitation and larger expansion of the interesting system at the LHC. Both the values of T0 and βT in central collisions are slightly larger than those in peripheral collisions, and they are independent of isospin and slightly dependent on mass.

  5. Radial-Velocity Analysis of the Post-AGB Star, HD101584

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz, F.; Hearnshaw, J.; Rosenzweig, P.; Guzman, E.; Sivarani, T.; Parthasarathy, M.

    2007-08-01

    This project concerns the analysis of the periodicity of the radial velocity of the peculiar emission-line supergiant star HD 101584 (F0 Ia), and also we propose a physical model to account for the observations. From its peculiarities, HD 101584 is a star that is in the post-AGB phase. This study is considered as a key to clarify the multiple aspects related with the evolution of the circum-stellar layer associated with this star's last phase. The star shows many lines with P Cygni profiles, including H-alpha, Na D lines in the IR Ca triplet, indicating a mass outflow. For HD 101584 we have performed a detailed study of its radial-velocity variations, using both emission and absorption lines over a wide range of wavelength. We have analyzed the variability and found a periodicity for all types of lines of 144 days, which must arise from the star's membership in a binary system. The data span a period of five consecutive years and were obtained using the 1-m telescope of Mt John Observatory, in New Zealand., with the echelle and Hercules high resolution spectrographs and CCD camera. HD101584 is known to be an IRAS source, and our model suggests it is a proto-planetary nebula, probably with a bipolar outflow and surrounded by a dusty disk as part of a binary system. We have found no evidence for HD101584 to contain a B9 star as found by Bakker et al (1996). A low resolution IUE spectrum shows the absence of any strong UV continuum that would be expected for a B star to be in this system.

  6. Technology for radial velocity search and characterisation of exoplanets in the 2020s and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ireland, Michael; Feger, Tobias; Bento, Joao; Rains, Adam

    2015-12-01

    In the past 20 years, radial velocity exoplanet instrumentation has been focussed on a small number of moderate sized (or moderate efficiency) telescopes. I will argue that there are two very different uses for radial velocity in the near future: transit follow-up and low-mass exoplanet detection around relatively nearby stars. For the first of these science goals, targets are relatively distant, and a high eficiency spectrograph on a large telescope is needed, for example the Gemini High-resolution Optical SpecTrograph (GHOST): a stabilised spectrograph fed by an array of multi-mode fibers at the final design stage. For the second of these goals, stellar noise due to pulsations, convective cells and activity provide a lower limit to the noise floor achievable for any given temporal sampling. I will argue through simple simulations that an array of small telescopes with precise spectrographs making a very large number of measurements is a much more effective way to detect the smallest exoplanets than instrumentation on large telescopes. I will describe the first results from the Replicable High-Resoluition Exoplanet and Asteroseismology (RHEA) spectrograph designed for 0.25 to 0.5m telescopes, which has single-epoch measurement uncertainties at the 1 m/s level and a total whole cost for detecting the smallest exoplanets that is significantly lower than medium to large telescope concepts. RHEA has an eyepiece-sized fast tip/tilt and mode reformatting system that efficiently injects a small array of single-mode fibers, feeding a <0.5m sized stabilised inexpensive spectrograph. I will show preliminary performance results from both stars and laboratory tests that verify the precision, and will discuss pathways to turn this into a broader community project.

  7. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Radial velocities of wide doubles (Halbwachs+, 2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halbwachs, J. L.; Mayor, M.; Udry, S.

    2012-04-01

    Wide binaries are tracers of the gravity field of the Galaxy, but their study requires some caution. A large list of common proper motion stars selected from the third Astronomischen Gesellschaft Katalog (AGK3) was monitored with the CORAVEL (for COrrelation RAdial VELocities) spectrovelocimeter, in order to prepare a sample of physical binaries with very wide separations. 66 stars received special attention, since their radial velocities (RV) seemed to be variable. These stars were monitored over several years in order to derive the elements of their spectroscopic orbits. In addition, 10 of them received accurate RV measurements from the SOPHIE spectrograph of the T193 telescope at the Observatory of Haute-Provence. For deriving the orbital elements of double-lined spectroscopic binaries (SB2), a new method was applied, which assumed that the RV of blended measurements are linear combinations of the RV of the components. 13 SB2 orbits were thus calculated. The orbital elements were eventually obtained for 52 spectroscopic binaries (SB), two of them making a triple system. 40 SB received their first orbit and the orbital elements were improved for 10 others. In addition, 11 SB were discovered with very long periods for which the orbital parameters were not found. The median period of the 40 first orbits is 1yr, and several SB should be resolved or should receive an astrometric orbit in future, providing the masses of the components. In addition, it appeared that HD 153252 has a close companion, which is a candidate brown dwarf with a minimum mass of 50 Jupiter masses. (4 data files).

  8. CHROMOSPHERICALLY ACTIVE STARS IN THE RADIAL VELOCITY EXPERIMENT (RAVE) SURVEY. I. THE CATALOG

    SciTech Connect

    Žerjal, M.; Zwitter, T.; Matijevič, G.; Strassmeier, K. G.; Siviero, A.; Steinmetz, M.; Bienaymé, O.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Boeche, C.; Grebel, E. K.; Freeman, K. C.; Kordopatis, G.; Munari, U.; Navarro, J. F.; Parker, Q. A.; Reid, W.; Seabroke, G.; Wyse, R. F. G.

    2013-10-20

    RAVE, the unbiased magnitude limited survey of southern sky stars, contained 456,676 medium-resolution spectra at the time of our analysis. Spectra cover the Ca II infrared triplet (IRT) range, which is a known indicator of chromospheric activity. Our previous work classified all spectra using locally linear embedding. It identified 53,347 cases with a suggested emission component in calcium lines. Here, we use a spectral subtraction technique to measure the properties of this emission. Synthetic templates are replaced by the observed spectra of non-active stars to bypass the difficult computations of non-local thermal equilibrium profiles of the line cores and stellar parameter dependence. We derive both the equivalent width of the excess emission for each calcium line on a 5 Å wide interval and their sum EW{sub IRT} for ∼44,000 candidate active dwarf stars with signal-to-noise ratio >20, with no cuts on the basis of the source of their emission flux. From these, ∼14,000 show a detectable chromospheric flux with at least a 2σ confidence level. Our set of active stars vastly enlarges previously known samples. Atmospheric parameters and, in some cases, radial velocities of active stars derived from automatic pipelines suffer from systematic shifts due to their shallower calcium lines. We re-estimate the effective temperature, metallicity, and radial velocities for candidate active stars. The overall distribution of activity levels shows a bimodal shape, with the first peak coinciding with non-active stars and the second with the pre-main-sequence cases. The catalog will be made publicly available with the next RAVE public data releases.

  9. The SDSS-III APOGEE radial velocity survey of M dwarfs. I. Description of the survey and science goals

    SciTech Connect

    Deshpande, R.; Bender, C. F.; Mahadevan, S.; Terrien, R. C.; Schneider, D. P.; Fleming, S. W.; Blake, C. H.; Carlberg, J. K.; Zasowski, G.; Hearty, F.; Crepp, J.; Rajpurohit, A. S.; Reylé, C.; Nidever, D. L.; Prieto, C. Allende; Hernández, J.; Bizyaev, D.; Ebelke, G.; Frinchaboy, P. M.; Ge, J.; and others

    2013-12-01

    We are carrying out a large ancillary program with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, SDSS-III, using the fiber-fed multi-object near-infrared APOGEE spectrograph, to obtain high-resolution H-band spectra of more than 1200 M dwarfs. These observations will be used to measure spectroscopic rotational velocities, radial velocities, physical stellar parameters, and variability of the target stars. Here, we describe the target selection for this survey, as well as results from the first year of scientific observations based on spectra that will be publicly available in the SDSS-III DR10 data release. As part of this paper we present radial velocities and rotational velocities of over 200 M dwarfs, with a vsin i precision of ∼2 km s{sup –1} and a measurement floor at vsin i = 4 km s{sup –1}. This survey significantly increases the number of M dwarfs studied for rotational velocities and radial velocity variability (at ∼100-200 m s{sup –1}), and will inform and advance the target selection for planned radial velocity and photometric searches for low-mass exoplanets around M dwarfs, such as the Habitable Zone Planet Finder, CARMENES, and TESS. Multiple epochs of radial velocity observations enable us to identify short period binaries, and adaptive optics imaging of a subset of stars enables the detection of possible stellar companions at larger separations. The high-resolution APOGEE spectra, covering the entire H band, provide the opportunity to measure physical stellar parameters such as effective temperatures and metallicities for many of these stars. At the culmination of this survey, we will have obtained multi-epoch spectra and radial velocities for over 1400 stars spanning the spectral range M0-L0, providing the largest set of near-infrared M dwarf spectra at high resolution, and more than doubling the number of known spectroscopic vsin i values for M dwarfs. Furthermore, by modeling telluric lines to correct for small instrumental radial velocity shifts, we

  10. The SLUGGS Survey: A Catalog of Over 4000 Globular Cluster Radial Velocities in 27 Nearby Early-type Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forbes, Duncan A.; Alabi, Adebusola; Brodie, Jean P.; Romanowsky, Aaron J.; Strader, Jay; Foster, Caroline; Usher, Christopher; Spitler, Lee; Bellstedt, Sabine; Pastorello, Nicola; Villaume, Alexa; Wasserman, Asher; Pota, Vincenzo

    2017-03-01

    Here, we present positions and radial velocities for over 4000 globular clusters (GCs) in 27 nearby early-type galaxies from the SLUGGS survey. The SLUGGS survey is designed to be representative of elliptical and lenticular galaxies in the stellar mass range 10 < log {M}* /M ⊙ < 11.7. The data have been obtained over many years, mostly using the very stable multi-object spectrograph DEIMOS on the Keck II 10 m telescope. Radial velocities are measured using the calcium triplet lines, with a velocity accuracy of ±10–15 km s‑1. We use phase space diagrams (i.e., velocity–position diagrams) to identify contaminants such as foreground stars and background galaxies, and to show that the contribution of GCs from neighboring galaxies is generally insignificant. Likely ultra-compact dwarfs are tabulated separately. We find that the mean velocity of the GC system is close to that of the host galaxy systemic velocity, indicating that the GC system is in overall dynamical equilibrium within the galaxy potential. We also find that the GC system velocity dispersion scales with host galaxy stellar mass, in a similar manner to the Faber–Jackson relation for the stellar velocity dispersion. Publication of these GC radial velocity catalogs should enable further studies in many areas, such as GC system substructure, kinematics, and host galaxy mass measurements.

  11. Binaries at Birth: Stellar multiplicity in embedded clusters from radial velocity variations in the IN-SYNC survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oskar Jaehnig, Karl; Stassun, Keivan; Tan, Jonathan C.; Covey, Kevin R.; Da Rio, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    We study the nature of stellar multiplicity in young stellar systems using the INfrared Spectroscopy of Young Nebulous Clusters (IN-SYNC) survey, carried out in SDSS III with the APOGEE spectrograph. Multi-epoch observations of thousands of low-mass stars in Orion A, NGC2264, NGC1333 and IC348 have been carried out, yielding H-band spectra with R=22,500 for sources with H<12 mag. Radial velocity sensitivities ~0.3 km/s can be achieved, depending on the spectral type of the star. We search the IN-SYNC radial velocity catalog to identify sources with radial velocity variations indicative of spectroscopically undetected companions, analyze their spectral properties and discuss the implications for the overall multiplicity of stellar populations in young, embedded star clusters.

  12. Accurate determination of pyridine-poly(amidoamine) dendrimer absolute binding constants with the OPLS-AA force field and direct integration of radial distribution functions.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yong; Kaminski, George A

    2005-08-11

    OPLS-AA force field and direct integration of intermolecular radial distribution functions (RDF) were employed to calculate absolute binding constants of pyridine molecules to amino group (NH2) and amide group hydrogen atoms in and first generation poly(amidoamine) dendrimers in chloroform. The average errors in the absolute and relative association constants, as predicted with the calculations, are 14.1% and 10.8%, respectively, which translate into ca. 0.08 and 0.06 kcal/mol errors in the absolute and relative binding free energies. We believe that this level of accuracy proves the applicability of the OPLS-AA, force field, in combination with the direct RDF integration, to reproducing and predicting absolute intermolecular association constants of low magnitudes (ca. 0.2-2.0 range).

  13. Accurate Determination of Pyridine -- Poly (Amidoamine) Dendrimer Absolute Binding Constants with the OPLS-AA Force Field and Direct Integration of Radial Distribution Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Yong; Kaminski, George

    2006-03-01

    OPLS-AA force field and direct integration of intermolecular radial distribution functions (RDF) were employed to calculate absolute binding constants of pyridine molecules to NH2 and amide group hydrogen atoms in 0th and 1st generation poly (amidoamine) dendrimers in chloroform. The average errors in the absolute and relative association constants, as predicted with the calculations, are 14.1% and 10.8%, respectively, which translate into ca. 0.08 kcal/mol and 0.06 kcal/mol errors in the absolute and relative binding free energies. We believe that this level of accuracy proves the applicability of the OPLS-AA, force field, in combination with the direct RDF integration, to reproducing and predicting absolute intermolecular association constants of low magnitudes (ca. 0.2 -- 2.0 range).

  14. Radial velocity measurements of a sample of northern metal-deficient stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jasniewicz, G.; Mayor, M.

    A sample of 41 northern metal-deficient stars composed of 14 stars with Fe/H less than -1.1, 11 stars with -1.1 less than or equal to Fe/H less than -0.6 and 16 stars with -0.6 less than or equal to Fe/H less than -0.3 was observed with the radial velocity scanner CORAVEL. Seven stars were discovered as certain or possible spectroscopic binaries (SBs). The measurements are in fair agreement with those of Carney and Latham (1987), but in disagreement with those of Stryker et al (1985). Spectroscopic orbits are determined for HD 108754 (period: 26d) and HD 153847 (period: 5d). The distribution of SBs as a function of period between this sample of metal-deficient stars and a sample of metal-rich G-type stars (Fe/H greater than or equal to -0.3) is proved to be statistically similar. For high-velocity and/or metal-deficient SBs, the distribution of orbital eccentricities versus logarithm of period is discussed in terms of tidal circularization.

  15. A Radial Velocity Study of Hot Subdwarf B Stars with Cool Main Sequence Companions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barlow, Brad; Wade, R. A.; Liss, S. E.; Stark, M. A.

    2012-01-01

    Many hot subdwarf B (sdB) stars show composite spectra and energy distributions indicative of G- or K-type main sequence companions. Binary population synthesis (BPS) models demonstrate such systems can be formed by Roche lobe overflow but disagree on whether the resulting orbital periods will be long (years) or short (days). Few studies have been carried out to assess the orbital parameters of these composite binaries; what little observations there are suggest the periods are long. To help address this problem, we selected fifteen moderately-bright (V 13) sdB stars with composite spectra for synoptic radial velocity (RV) monitoring. From January 2005 to July 2008, we acquired between 4 and 14 observations of each target using the bench-mounted Medium Resolution Spectrograph on the Hobby-Eberly Telescope. Cross-correlation techniques were used to measure RVs from the cool companion lines with 700 m/s precision. Here we present RV measurements and orbital parameter estimates (when appropriate) for all systems in our sample and discuss the constraints they place on BPS models. Preliminary measurements of PG 1701+359, the most well-studied object in our sample, indicate the orbit has neither a short period nor a high velocity amplitude. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. AST-0908642.

  16. Suppression of fiber modal noise induced radial velocity errors for bright emission-line calibration sources

    SciTech Connect

    Mahadevan, Suvrath; Halverson, Samuel; Ramsey, Lawrence; Venditti, Nick

    2014-05-01

    Modal noise in optical fibers imposes limits on the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) and velocity precision achievable with the next generation of astronomical spectrographs. This is an increasingly pressing problem for precision radial velocity spectrographs in the near-infrared (NIR) and optical that require both high stability of the observed line profiles and high S/N. Many of these spectrographs plan to use highly coherent emission-line calibration sources like laser frequency combs and Fabry-Perot etalons to achieve precision sufficient to detect terrestrial-mass planets. These high-precision calibration sources often use single-mode fibers or highly coherent sources. Coupling light from single-mode fibers to multi-mode fibers leads to only a very low number of modes being excited, thereby exacerbating the modal noise measured by the spectrograph. We present a commercial off-the-shelf solution that significantly mitigates modal noise at all optical and NIR wavelengths, and which can be applied to spectrograph calibration systems. Our solution uses an integrating sphere in conjunction with a diffuser that is moved rapidly using electrostrictive polymers, and is generally superior to most tested forms of mechanical fiber agitation. We demonstrate a high level of modal noise reduction with a narrow bandwidth 1550 nm laser. Our relatively inexpensive solution immediately enables spectrographs to take advantage of the innate precision of bright state-of-the art calibration sources by removing a major source of systematic noise.

  17. Eigenmodes of Ducted Flows With Radially-Dependent Axial and Swirl Velocity Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kousen, Kenneth A.

    1999-01-01

    This report characterizes the sets of small disturbances possible in cylindrical and annular ducts with mean flow whose axial and tangential components vary arbitrarily with radius. The linearized equations of motion are presented and discussed, and then exponential forms for the axial, circumferential, and time dependencies of any unsteady disturbances are assumed. The resultant equations form a generalized eigenvalue problem, the solution of which yields the axial wavenumbers and radial mode shapes of the unsteady disturbances. Two numerical discretizations are applied to the system of equations: (1) a spectral collocation technique based on Chebyshev polynomial expansions on the Gauss-Lobatto points, and (2) second and fourth order finite differences on uniform grids. The discretized equations are solved using a standard eigensystem package employing the QR algorithm. The eigenvalues fall into two primary categories: a discrete set (analogous to the acoustic modes found in uniform mean flows) and a continuous band (analogous to convected disturbances in uniform mean flows) where the phase velocities of the disturbances correspond to the local mean flow velocities. Sample mode shapes and eigensystem distributions are presented for both sheared axial and swirling flows. The physics of swirling flows is examined with reference to hydrodynamic stability and completeness of the eigensystem expansions. The effect of assuming exponential dependence in the axial direction is discussed.

  18. The M 4 Core Project with HST - IV. Internal kinematics from accurate radial velocities of 2771 cluster members★

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malavolta, L.; Piotto, G.; Bedin, L. R.; Sneden, C.; Nascimbeni, V.; Sommariva, V.

    2015-12-01

    We present a detailed study of the internal kinematics of the Galactic globular cluster M 4 (NGC 6121), by deriving the radial velocities from 7250 spectra for 2771 stars distributed from the upper part of the red giant branch down to the main sequence. We describe new approaches to determine the wavelength solution from day-time calibrations and to determine the radial velocity drifts that can occur between calibration and science observations when observing with the GIRAFFE spectrograph at Very Large Telescope. Two techniques to determine the radial velocity are compared, after a qualitative description of their advantages with respect to other commonly used algorithm, and a new approach to remove the sky contribution from the spectra obtained with fibre-fed spectrograph and further improve the radial velocity precision is presented. The average radial velocity of the cluster is = 71.08 ± 0.08 km s-1 with an average dispersion of μ _{v_c} = 3.97 km s-1. Using the same data set and the same statistical approach of previous analyses, 20 additional binary candidates are found, for a total of 87 candidates. A new determination of the internal radial velocity dispersion as a function of cluster distance is presented, resulting in a dispersion of 4.5 km s-1 within 2 arcmin from the centre of cluster and steadily decreasing outward. We statistically confirm the small amplitude of the cluster rotation, as suggested in the past by several authors. This new analysis represents a significant improvement with respect to previous results in literature and provides a fundamental observational input for the modelling of the cluster dynamics.

  19. On the nature of the radial velocity variability of Aldebaran - A search for spectral line bisector variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatzes, Artie P.; Cochran, William D.

    1998-02-01

    The shape of the Ti I 6303.8-A spectral line of Aldebaran as measured by the line bisector was investigated using high signal-to-noise ratio, high-resolution data. The goal of this study was to understand the nature of the 643-d period in the radial velocity for this star reported by Hatzes & Cochran. Variations in the line bisector with the radial velocity period would provide strong evidence in support of rotational modulation or stellar pulsations as the cause of the 643-d period. A lack of any bisector variability at this period would support the planet hypothesis. Variations in the line asymmetries are found with a period of 49.93 d. These variations are uncorrelated with the 643-d period found previously in the radial velocity measurements. It is demonstrated that this 50-d period is consistent with an m = 4 non-radial sectoral g-mode oscillation. The lack of spectral variability with the radial velocity period of 643 d may provide strong evidence in support of the hypothesis that this variability stems from the reflex motion of the central star due to a planetary companion having a mass of 11 Jupiter masses. However, this long-period variability may still be the result of a low-order (m = 2) pulsation mode as these would cause bisector variations of less than the error measurement.

  20. VizieR Online Data Catalog: IN-SYNC. III. Radial velocities of IC348 stars (Cottaar+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cottaar, M.; Covey, K. R.; Foster, J. B.; Meyer, M. R.; Tan, J. C.; Nidever, D. L.; Drew Chojnowski, S.; da Rio, N.; Flaherty, K. M.; Frinchaboy, P. M.; Majewski, S.; Skrutskie, M. F.; Wilson, J. C.; Zasowski, G.

    2015-11-01

    Cottaar et al. (Paper I, 2014, J/ApJ/794/125) describes the analysis of the high-resolution near-infrared spectra obtained by the APOGEE multi-object spectrograph from stars in IC 348, NGC 1333, NGC 2264, and Orion A as part of the INfrared Spectroscopy of Young Nebulous Clusters (IN-SYNC) ancillary program. Using radial velocities determined from APOGEE spectra of 380 likely cluster members, we have measured the radial velocity distribution of the young (2-6Myr) cluster IC 348. (2 data files).

  1. Astrometry, radial velocity, and photometry: the HD 128311 system remixed with data from HST, HET, and APT

    SciTech Connect

    McArthur, Barbara E.; Benedict, G. Fritz.; Cochran, William D.; Henry, Gregory W.; Hatzes, Artie; Harrison, Tom E.; Johns-Krull, Chris; Nelan, Ed

    2014-11-01

    We have used high-cadence radial velocity measurements from the Hobby-Eberly Telescope with published velocities from the Lick 3 m Shane Telescope, combined with astrometric data from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Fine Guidance Sensors to refine the orbital parameters of the HD 128311 system, and determine an inclination of 55.°95 ± 14.°55 and true mass of 3.789 {sub −0.432}{sup +0.924} M {sub JUP} for HD 128311 c. The combined radial velocity data also reveal a short period signal which could indicate a third planet in the system with an Msin i of 0.133 ± 0.005 M {sub JUP} or stellar phenomena. Photometry from the T12 0.8 m automatic photometric telescope at the Fairborn Observatory and HST are used to determine a photometric period close to, but not within the errors of the radial velocity signal. We performed a cross-correlation bisector analysis of the radial velocity data to look for correlations with the photometric period and found none. Dynamical integrations of the proposed system show long-term stability with the new orbital parameters of over 10 million years. Our new orbital elements do not support the claims of HD 128311 b and c being in mean motion resonance.

  2. VizieR Online Data Catalog: HIP binaries with radial velocities (Frankowski+, 2007)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frankowski, A.; Jancart, S.; Jorissen, A.

    2006-11-01

    The comparison of the proper motions constructed from positions spanning a short (Hipparcos) or long time (Tycho-2) makes it possible to uncover binaries with periods of the order of or somewhat larger than the short time span (in this case, the 3 yr duration of the Hipparcos mission), since the unrecognised orbital motion will then add to the proper motion. A list of candidate proper motion binaries is constructed from a chi-square test evaluating the statistical significance of the difference between the Tycho-2 and Hipparcos proper motions for 103134 stars in common between the two catalogues (excluding components of visual systems). The present paper focuses on the evaluation of the detection efficiency of proper-motion binaries, using different kinds of control data (mostly radial velocities). The detection rate for entries from the Ninth Catalogue of Spectroscopic Binary Orbits (SB9) is evaluated, as well as for stars like barium stars, which are known to be all binaries, and finally for spectroscopic binaries identified from radial velocity data in the Geneva-Copenhagen survey of F and G dwarfs in the solar neighbourhood. Proper motion binaries are efficiently detected for systems with parallaxes in excess of 20mas, and periods in the range 1000-30000d. The shortest periods in this range (1000-2000d, i.e., once to twice the duration of the Hipparcos mission) may appear only as DMSA/G binaries (accelerated proper motion in the Hipparcos Double and Multiple System Annex). Proper motion binaries detected among SB9 systems having periods shorter than about 400d hint at triple systems, the proper-motion binary involving a component with a longer orbital period. A list of 19 candidate triple systems is provided. Binaries suspected of having low-mass (brown-dwarf-like) companions are listed as well. Among the 37 barium stars with parallaxes larger than 5mas, only 7 exhibit no evidence for duplicity whatsoever (be it spectroscopic or astrometric). Finally, the

  3. Proper-motion binaries in the Hipparcos catalogue. Comparison with radial velocity data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frankowski, A.; Jancart, S.; Jorissen, A.

    2007-03-01

    Context: This paper is the last in a series devoted to the analysis of the binary content of the Hipparcos Catalogue. Aims: The comparison of the proper motions constructed from positions spanning a short (Hipparcos) or long time (Tycho-2) makes it possible to uncover binaries with periods of the order of or somewhat larger than the short time span (in this case, the 3 yr duration of the Hipparcos mission), since the unrecognised orbital motion will then add to the proper motion. Methods: A list of candidate proper motion binaries is constructed from a carefully designed χ2 test evaluating the statistical significance of the difference between the Tycho-2 and Hipparcos proper motions for 103 134 stars in common between the two catalogues (excluding components of visual systems). Since similar lists of proper-motion binaries have already been constructed, the present paper focuses on the evaluation of the detection efficiency of proper-motion binaries, using different kinds of control data (mostly radial velocities). The detection rate for entries from the Ninth Catalogue of Spectroscopic Binary Orbits (S_B^9) is evaluated, as well as for stars like barium stars, which are known to be all binaries, and finally for spectroscopic binaries identified from radial velocity data in the Geneva-Copenhagen survey of F and G dwarfs in the solar neighbourhood. Results: Proper motion binaries are efficiently detected for systems with parallaxes in excess of ~20 mas, and periods in the range 1000-30 000 d. The shortest periods in this range (1000-2000 d, i.e., once to twice the duration of the Hipparcos mission) may appear only as DMSA/G binaries (accelerated proper motion in the Hipparcos Double and Multiple System Annex). Proper motion binaries detected among S_B9 systems having periods shorter than about 400 d hint at triple systems, the proper-motion binary involving a component with a longer orbital period. A list of 19 candidate triple systems is provided. Binaries

  4. WIYN open cluster study. LIX. Radial velocity membership of the evolved population of the old open cluster NGC 6791

    SciTech Connect

    Tofflemire, Benjamin M.; Gosnell, Natalie M.; Mathieu, Robert D.; Platais, Imants E-mail: imants@pha.jhu.edu

    2014-10-01

    The open cluster NGC 6791 has been the focus of much recent study due to its intriguing combination of old age and high metallicity (∼8 Gyr, [Fe/H] = +0.30), as well as its location within the Kepler field. As part of the WIYN Open Cluster Study, we present precise (σ = 0.38 km s{sup –1}) radial velocities for proper motion candidate members of NGC 6791 from Platais et al. Our survey, extending down to g' ∼ 16.8, is comprised of the evolved cluster population, including blue stragglers, giants, and horizontal branch stars. Of the 280 proper-motion-selected stars above our magnitude limit, 93% have at least one radial velocity measurement and 79% have three measurements over the course of at least 200 days, sufficient for secure radial-velocity-determined membership of non-velocity-variable stars. The Platais et al. proper motion catalog includes 12 anomalous horizontal branch candidates blueward of the red clump, of which we find only 4 to be cluster members. Three fall slightly blueward of the red clump and the fourth is consistent with being a blue straggler. The cleaned color-magnitude diagram shows a richly populated red giant branch and a blue straggler population. Half of the blue stragglers are in binaries. From our radial velocity measurement distribution, we find the cluster's radial velocity dispersion to be σ {sub c} = 0.62 ± 0.10 km s{sup –1}. This corresponds to a dynamical mass of ∼4600 M {sub ☉}.

  5. Radial Velocity Monitoring of Composite-Spectra Hot Subdwarf Stars with the HET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barlow, Brad; Wade, R. A.; Liss, S.

    2014-01-01

    The enigmatic hot subdwarf B (sdB) stars represent one of the least-understood stages of stellar evolution. Theory shows that they likely formed from red giant branch stars that lost their outer envelopes due to Roche lobe overflow and common envelope interactions with a companion. Binary population synthesis models are generally successful at reproducing the observed orbital periods of sdB binaries with M dwarf and white dwarf companions; the story for sdB+F/G/K binaries, however, is still being written. Relatively few observational constraints have been published for these composite-spectra systems. We have been monitoring the radial velocities (RVs) of 15 sdB binaries with F-K dwarf companions since 2005 using the Medium and High Resolution Spectrographs on the Hobby-Eberly Telescope. Here we present RV measurements and orbital parameter estimates for selected systems in our sample. We also present an up-to-date orbital period histogram for all known sdB binaries, including both short- and long-period systems. Our results suggest that those with F-K main sequence companions have periods on the order of 1.5 to 3 years. Several of the long-period binaries show strong evidence for non-circular orbits, challenging the conventional Roche Lobe overflow formation channel for hot subdwarf stars. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. AST-0908642.

  6. Detecting planets around active stars: impact of magnetic fields on radial velocities and line bisectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hébrard, É. M.; Donati, J.-F.; Delfosse, X.; Morin, J.; Boisse, I.; Moutou, C.; Hébrard, G.

    2014-09-01

    Although technically challenging, detecting Earth-like planets around very low mass stars is in principle accessible to the existing velocimeters of highest radial-velocity (RV) precision. However, low-mass stars being active, they often feature dark spots and magnetic regions at their surfaces generating a noise level in RV curves (called activity jitter) that can severely limit our practical ability at detecting Earth-like planets. Whereas the impact of dark spots on RV data has been extensively studied in the literature, that of magnetic features only received little attention up to now. In this paper, we aim at quantifying the impact of magnetic fields (and the Zeeman broadening they induce) on line profiles, line bisectors and RV data. With a simple model, we quantitatively study the RV signals and bisector distortions that small magnetic regions or global magnetic dipoles can generate, especially at infrared wavelengths where the Zeeman broadening is much larger than that in the visible. We report in particular that the impact of magnetic features on line bisectors can be different from that of cool spots when the rotational broadening is comparable to or larger than the Zeeman broadening; more specifically, we find in this case that the top and bottom sections of the bisectors are anticorrelated, i.e. the opposite behaviour of what is observed for cool spots. We finally suggest new options to show and ultimately filter the impact of the magnetic activity on RV curves.

  7. GIARPS: the unique VIS-NIR high precision radial velocity facility in this world

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claudi, R.; Benatti, S.; Carleo, I.; Ghedina, A.; Molinari, E.; Oliva, E.; Tozzi, A.; Baruffolo, A.; Cecconi, M.; Cosentino, R.; Fantinel, D.; Fini, L.; Ghinassi, F.; Gonzalez, M.; Gratton, R.; Guerra, J.; Harutyunyan, A.; Hernandez, N.; Iuzzolino, M.; Lodi, M.; Malavolta, L.; Maldonado, J.; Micela, G.; Sanna, N.; Sanjuan, J.; Scuderi, S.; Sozzetti, A.; Pérez Ventura, H.; Diaz Marcos, H.; Galli, A.; Gonzalez, C.; Riverol, L.; Riverol, C.

    2016-08-01

    GIARPS (GIAno and haRPS) is a project devoted to have on the same focal station of the Telescopio Nazionale Galileo (TNG) both the high resolution spectrographs HARPS-N (VIS) and GIANO (NIR) working simultaneously. This could be considered the first and unique worldwide instrument providing cross-dispersed echelle spectroscopy at a high resolution (R=115,000 in the visual and R=50,000 in the IR) and over in a wide spectral range (0.383 - 2.45 μm) in a single exposure. The science case is very broad, given the versatility of such an instrument and the large wavelength range. A number of outstanding science cases encompassing mainly extra-solar planet science starting from rocky planet search and hot Jupiters, atmosphere characterization can be considered. Furthermore both instrument can measure high precision radial velocity by means the simultaneous thorium technique (HARPS - N) and absorbing cell technique (GIANO) in a single exposure. Other science cases are also possible. Young stars and proto- planetary disks, cool stars and stellar populations, moving minor bodies in the solar system, bursting young stellar objects, cataclysmic variables and X-ray binary transients in our Galaxy, supernovae up to gamma-ray bursts in the very distant and young Universe, can take advantage of the unicity of this facility both in terms of contemporaneous wide wavelength range and high resolution spectroscopy.

  8. High-contrast Imaging of Intermediate-mass Giants with Long-term Radial Velocity Trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Tsuguru; Sato, Bun'ei; Kuzuhara, Masayuki; Narita, Norio; Takahashi, Yasuhiro H.; Uyama, Taichi; Kudo, Tomoyuki; Kusakabe, Nobuhiko; Hashimoto, Jun; Omiya, Masashi; Harakawa, Hiroki; Abe, Lyu; Ando, Hiroyasu; Brandner, Wolfgang; Brandt, Timothy D.; Carson, Joseph C.; Currie, Thayne; Egner, Sebastian; Feldt, Markus; Goto, Miwa; Grady, Carol A.; Guyon, Olivier; Hayano, Yutaka; Hayashi, Masahiko; Hayashi, Saeko S.; Hełminiak, Krzysztof G.; Henning, Thomas; Hodapp, Klaus W.; Ida, Shigeru; Ishii, Miki; Itoh, Yoichi; Iye, Masanori; Izumiura, Hideyuki; Janson, Markus; Kambe, Eiji; Kandori, Ryo; Knapp, Gillian R.; Kokubo, Eiichiro; Kwon, Jungmi; Matsuo, Taro; Mayama, Satoshi; McElwain, Michael W.; Mede, Kyle; Miyama, Shoken; Morino, Jun-Ichi; Moro-Martin, Amaya; Nishimura, Tetsuo; Pyo, Tae-Soo; Serabyn, Eugene; Suenaga, Takuya; Suto, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Ryuji; Takami, Michihiro; Takato, Naruhisa; Takeda, Yoichi; Terada, Hiroshi; Thalmann, Christian; Turner, Edwin L.; Watanabe, Makoto; Wisniewski, John; Yamada, Toru; Yoshida, Michitoshi; Takami, Hideki; Usuda, Tomonori; Tamura, Motohide

    2016-07-01

    A radial velocity (RV) survey for intermediate-mass giants has been in operation for over a decade at Okayama Astrophysical Observatory (OAO). The OAO survey has revealed that some giants show long-term linear RV accelerations (RV trends), indicating the presence of outer companions. Direct-imaging observations can help clarify what objects generate these RV trends. We present the results of high-contrast imaging observations of six intermediate-mass giants with long-term RV trends using the Subaru Telescope and HiCIAO camera. We detected co-moving companions to γ Hya B ({0.61}-0.14+0.12{M}⊙ ), HD 5608 B (0.10+/- 0.01{M}⊙ ), and HD 109272 B (0.28+/- 0.06{M}⊙ ). For the remaining targets (ι Dra, 18 Del, and HD 14067), we exclude companions more massive than 30-60 M Jup at projected separations of 1″-7″. We examine whether these directly imaged companions or unidentified long-period companions can account for the RV trends observed around the six giants. We find that the Kozai mechanism can explain the high eccentricity of the inner planets ι Dra b, HD 5608 b, and HD 14067 b.

  9. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Small Kepler planets radial velocities (Marcy+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcy, G. W.; Isaacson, H.; Howard, A. W.; Rowe, J. F.; Jenkins, J. M.; Bryson, S. T.; Latham, D. W.; Howell, S. B.; Gautier, T. N., III; Batalha, N. M.; Rogers, L.; Ciardi, D.; Fischer, D. A.; Gilliland, R. L.; Kjeldsen, H.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J.; Huber, D.; Chaplin, W. J.; Basu, S.; Buchhave, L. A.; Quinn, S. N.; Borucki, W. J.; Koch, D. G.; Hunter, R.; Caldwell, D. A.; van Cleve, J.; Kolbl, R.; Weiss, L. M.; Petigura, E.; Seager, S.; Morton, T.; Johnson, J. A.; Ballard, S.; Burke, C.; Cochran, W. D.; Endl, M.; MacQueen, P.; Everett, M. E.; Lissauer, J. J.; Ford, E. B.; Torres, G.; Fressin, F.; Brown, T. M.; Steffen, J. H.; Charbonneau, D.; Basri, G. S.; Sasselov, D. D.; Winn, J.; Sanchis-Ojeda, R.; Christiansen, J.; Adams, E.; Henze, C.; Dupree, A.; Fabrycky, D. C.; Fortney, J. J.; Tarter, J.; Holman, M. J.; Tenenbaum, P.; Shporer, A.; Lucas, P. W.; Welsh, W. F.; Orosz, J. A.; Bedding, T. R.; Campante, T. L.; Davies, G. R.; Elsworth, Y.; Handberg, R.; Hekker, S.; Karoff, C.; Kawaler, S. D.; Lund, M. N.; Lundkvist, M.; Metcalfe, T. S.; Miglio, A.; Silva Aguirre, V.; Stello, D.; White, T. R.; Boss, A.; Devore, E.; Gould, A.; Prsa, A.; Agol, E.; Barclay, T.; Coughlin, J.; Brugamyer, E.; Mullally, F.; Quintana, E. V.; Still, M.; Thompson, S. E.; Morrison, D.; Twicken, J. D.; Desert, J.-M.; Carter, J.; Crepp, J. R.; Hebrard, G.; Santerne, A.; Moutou, C.; Sobeck, C.; Hudgins, D.; Haas, M. R.; Robertson, P.; Lillo-Box, J.; Barrado, D.

    2014-04-01

    Here we report measured masses, radii, and densities (or upper limits on those values) for 42 transiting planet candidates contained within 22 bright Kepler Objects of Interest (KOIs) from Batalha et al. (2013, Cat. J/ApJS/204/24). We carried out multiple Doppler-shift measurements of the host stars using the Keck 1 telescope. From the spectroscopy and Doppler measurements, we compute self-consistent measurements of stellar and planet radii, employing either stellar structure models or asteroseismology measurements from the Kepler photometry. We also search for (and report) 7 additional non-transiting planets revealed by the precise radial velocities (RVs), for a total of 49 planets. We carried out "reconnaissance" high-resolution spectroscopy on ~1000 KOIs with spectral resolution, R~50000, and S/N=20-100 per pixel. The dual goals were searching for false positives and refining the stellar parameters. We obtained one or two such reconnaissance spectra using one of four facilities: the McDonald Observatory 2.7m, the Tillinghast 1.5m on Mt. Hopkins, the Lick Observatory 3m, and the 2.6m Nordic Optical Telescope. Speckle imaging of each of the selected 22 KOIs was obtained using the two-color DSSI speckle camera at the WIYN 3.5m telescope on Kitt Peak. All 22 KOIs were observed with the Keck NIRC2-AO system. (3 data files).

  10. AN EFFICIENT, COMPACT, AND VERSATILE FIBER DOUBLE SCRAMBLER FOR HIGH PRECISION RADIAL VELOCITY INSTRUMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Halverson, Samuel; Roy, Arpita; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Ramsey, Lawrence; Levi, Eric; Schwab, Christian; Hearty, Fred; MacDonald, Nick E-mail: aur17@psu.edu

    2015-06-10

    We present the design and test results of a compact optical fiber double-scrambler for high-resolution Doppler radial velocity instruments. This device consists of a single optic: a high-index n ∼ 2 ball lens that exchanges the near and far fields between two fibers. When used in conjunction with octagonal fibers, this device yields very high scrambling gains (SGs) and greatly desensitizes the fiber output from any input illumination variations, thereby stabilizing the instrument profile of the spectrograph and improving the Doppler measurement precision. The system is also highly insensitive to input pupil variations, isolating the spectrograph from telescope illumination variations and seeing changes. By selecting the appropriate glass and lens diameter the highest efficiency is achieved when the fibers are practically in contact with the lens surface, greatly simplifying the alignment process when compared to classical double-scrambler systems. This prototype double-scrambler has demonstrated significant performance gains over previous systems, achieving SGs in excess of 10,000 with a throughput of ∼87% using uncoated Polymicro octagonal fibers. Adding a circular fiber to the fiber train further increases the SG to >20,000, limited by laboratory measurement error. While this fiber system is designed for the Habitable-zone Planet Finder spectrograph, it is more generally applicable to other instruments in the visible and near-infrared. Given the simplicity and low cost, this fiber scrambler could also easily be multiplexed for large multi-object instruments.

  11. Asymmetric orbital distribution near mean motion resonance: Application to planets observed by Kepler and radial velocities

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Ji-Wei E-mail: jwxie@astro.utoronto.ca

    2014-05-10

    Many multiple-planet systems have been found by the Kepler transit survey and various radial velocity (RV) surveys. Kepler planets show an asymmetric feature, namely, there are small but significant deficits/excesses of planet pairs with orbital period spacing slightly narrow/wide of the exact resonance, particularly near the first order mean motion resonance (MMR), such as 2:1 and 3:2 MMR. Similarly, if not exactly the same, an asymmetric feature (pileup wide of 2:1 MMR) is also seen in RV planets, but only for massive ones. We analytically and numerically study planets' orbital evolutions near and in the MMR. We find that their orbital period ratios could be asymmetrically distributed around the MMR center regardless of dissipation. In the case of no dissipation, Kepler planets' asymmetric orbital distribution could be partly reproduced for 3:2 MMR but not for 2:1 MMR, implying that dissipation might be more important to the latter. The pileup of massive RV planets just wide of 2:1 MMR is found to be consistent with the scenario that planets formed separately then migrated toward the MMR. The location of the pileup infers a K value of 1-100 on the order of magnitude for massive planets, where K is the damping rate ratio between orbital eccentricity and semimajor axis during planet migration.

  12. Detection of co-orbital planets by combining transit and radial-velocity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leleu, A.; Robutel, P.; Correia, A. C. M.; Lillo-Box, J.

    2017-03-01

    Co-orbital planets have not yet been discovered, although they constitute a frequent by-product of planetary formation and evolution models. This lack may be due to observational biases, since the main detection methods are unable to spot co-orbital companions when they are small or near the Lagrangian equilibrium points. However, for a system with one known transiting planet (with mass m1), we can detect a co-orbital companion (with mass m2) by combining the time of mid-transit with the radial-velocity data of the star. Here, we propose a simple method that allows the detection of co-orbital companions, valid for eccentric orbits, that relies on a single parameter α, which is proportional to the mass ratio m2/m1. Therefore, when α is statistically different from zero, we have a strong candidate to harbour a co-orbital companion. We also discuss the relevance of false positives generated by different planetary configurations.

  13. TOWARD UNDERSTANDING STELLAR RADIAL VELOCITY JITTER AS A FUNCTION OF WAVELENGTH: THE SUN AS A PROXY

    SciTech Connect

    Marchwinski, Robert C.; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Robertson, Paul; Ramsey, Lawrence; Harder, Jerald E-mail: suvrath@astro.psu.edu E-mail: lwr@psu.edu

    2015-01-01

    Using solar spectral irradiance measurements from the SORCE spacecraft and the F/F' technique, we have estimated the radial velocity (RV) scatter induced on the Sun by stellar activity as a function of wavelength. Our goal was to evaluate the potential advantages of using new near-infrared (NIR) spectrographs to search for low-mass planets around bright F, G, and K stars by beating down activity effects. Unlike M dwarfs, which have higher fluxes and therefore greater RV information content in the NIR, solar-type stars are brightest at visible wavelengths, and, based solely on information content, are better suited to traditional optical RV surveys. However, we find that the F/F' estimated RV noise induced by stellar activity is diminished by up to a factor of four in the NIR versus the visible. Observations with the upcoming future generation of NIR instruments can be a valuable addition to the search for low-mass planets around bright FGK stars in reducing the amount of stellar noise affecting RV measurements.

  14. A stable and inexpensive wavelength reference for precise wavelength calibration of radial velocity spectrographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feger, Tobias; Ireland, Michael J.; Bento, Joao; Bacigalupo, Carlos

    2014-08-01

    We present a stable, inexpensive wavelength reference, based on a white-light interferometer for the use on current and future (arrays of) diffraction-limited radial velocity (RV) spectrographs. The primary aim of using an interferometer is to obtain a dense sinusoidal wavelength reference with spectral coverage between 450-650 nm. Its basic setup consists of an unbalanced fiber Mach-Zehnder interferometer (FMZI) that creates an interference pattern in the spectral domain due to superposition of phase delayed light, set by a fixed optical path-length difference (OPD). To achieve long-term stability, the interferometer is actively locked to a stable atomic line. The system operates in closed-loop using a thermo-optic modulator as the phase feedback component. We conducted stability measurements by superimposing the wavelength reference with thorium-argon (ThAr) emission lines and found the differential RMS shift to be ~5 m s-1 within 30 minute bins in an experiment lasting 5 hours.

  15. Determination of U, V, and W from single station Doppler radar radial velocities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, W. L.; Green, J. L.; Warnock, J. M.

    1986-01-01

    The ST/MST (stratosphere troposphere/mesosphere stratosphere troposphere) clear air Doppler radar, or wind profiler, is an important tool in observational meteorology because of its capability to remote observe dynamic parameters of the atmosphere. There are difficulties in transforming the observed radial velocities into meteorological wind components. How this problem has been treated in the past is reviewed, and some of the analysis is recast to a form more suited to the high diagnostic abilities of a number of fixed beam configurations with reference to a linear wind field. The results, in conjunction with other works which treats problems such as the effects of finite sample volumes in the presence of nonhomogeneous atmospheric reflectivity, have implications important to the design of both individual MST/ST radars and MST/ST radar networks. The key parameters to uncoupling terms in the scaling equations are w sub x and w sub y. Whenever the stratiform condition, which states that these two parameters are negligible, is satisfied, a five beam ST radar may determine unbiased values of u, v, and w for sample volumes directly above the radar. The divergence and partial deformation of the flow may also be determined. Three beam systems can determine w and w sub z, but are unable to obtain u and v wind components uncontaminated by vertical sheer terms, even when the stratiform condition is satisfied.

  16. VizieR Online Data Catalog: HARPS-N radial velocities of KOI-70 (Buchhave+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchhave, L. A.; Dressing, C. D.; Dumusque, X.; Rice, K.; Vanderburg, A.; Mortier, A.; Lopez-Morales, M.; Lopez, E.; Lundkvist, M. S.; Kjeldsen, H.; Affer, L.; Bonomo, A. S.; Charbonneau, D.; Collier, Cameron A.; Cosentino, R.; Figueira, P.; Fiorenzano, A. F. M.; Harutyunyan, A.; Haywood, R. D.; Johnson, J. A.; Latham, D. W.; Lovis, C.; Malavolta, L.; Mayor, M.; Micela, G.; Molinari, E.; Motalebi, F.; Nascimbeni, V.; Pepe, F.; Phillips, D. F.; Piotto, G.; Pollacco, D.; Queloz, D.; Sasselov, D.; Segransan, D.; Sozzetti, A.; Udry, S.; Watson, C.

    2017-01-01

    We obtained 125 observations of Kepler-20 (KOI-70, KIC 6850504, 2MASS J19104752+4220194) with the HARPS-N spectrograph on the 3.58m Telescopio Nazionale Galileo (TNG) located at Roque de Los Muchachos Observatory, La Palma, Spain. HARPS-N is an updated version of the original HARPS spectrograph on the 3.6m telescope at the European Southern Observatory on La Silla, Chile. HARPS-N is an ultra-stable fiber-fed high-resolution (R=115000) spectrograph with an optical wavelength coverage from 383 to 693nm. We obtained 61 and 64 observations of Kepler-20 in the 2014 and 2015 observing seasons, respectively (125 observations in total). We rejected 21 observations obtained under poor observing conditions where the internal error estimate exceeded 5m/s leaving a total of 104 observations. Kepler-20 has a mV=12.5 and required 30 minute exposure times to build up an adequate signal-to-noise ratio (S/N). The average S/N per pixel of the observations at 550nm is 30, yielding an average internal uncertainty estimate of 3.66m/s. The radial velocities and their 1σ errors are shows in Table1. (1 data file).

  17. Retrieval of Precise Radial Velocities from High Resolution Near-Infrared Spectra of M Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Peter; Plavchan, Peter; Gagne, Jonathan; Furlan, Elise; Bottom, Michael; Anglada-Escudé, Guillem; White, Russel J.; Davison, Cassy; Mills, Sean; Beichman, Charles A.; Brinkworth, Carolyn; Johnson, John; Ciardi, David R.; Wallace, J. Kent; Mennesson, Bertrand; von Braun, Kaspar; Vasisht, Gautam; Prato, Lisa A.; Kane, Stephen R.; Tanner, Angelle M.; Walp, Bernie; Crawford, Sam; Lin, Sean

    2015-01-01

    We present a data analysis pipeline focused on obtaining precision radial velocities (RV) of M Dwarfs from spectra taken between 2.309 and 2.316 microns by the CSHELL spectrograph (R~46,000) at NASA's Infrared Telescope Facility with the aid of a methane isotopologue gas cell (see poster by Plavchan et al. at this meeting). The pipeline compares the observed spectra with a forward model defined by parameters that are optimized using a simplex amoeba algorithm. The stellar template is optimized simultaneously with the fit parameters in an iterative process. The pipeline accounts for temporal variations in the spectral wavelength solution, line spread function, and interference fringes due to instrumental effects. We apply our pipeline to the M Dwarfs GJ 15 A and GJ 876 and the M Giant SV Peg. For GJ 15 A, we are able to obtain 30 m/s RV precision. For the planet host GJ 876, the two most massive planets are easily retrievable from our RV curve. For SV Peg, the single night RV precision can be as low as 15 m/s, with < 5 m/s obtainable through data stacking.

  18. The Latest Results from Project NIRRVS: Precise Near Infrared Radial Velocity Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plavchan, Peter; NIRRVS Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    We will present the latest results from a prototype PRV survey with CSHELL. With CSHELL at the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility atop Mauna Kea (R~46,000), we have completed a PRV 2.3 micron survey to detect exoplanets around ~30 red, low mass, and young stars. We are able to reach long-term radial velocity dispersions of ~30 m/s on our survey targets. We are following up candidate RV variables, and have confirmed other previously known RV variables. With a spectral grasp of only 5 nm at 2.3 microns, this performance with CSHELL is limited by detector artifacts, and fringing in the data and flatfields. iSHELL will replace CSHELL at IRTF, with first light expected in April 2016. iSHELL is a 1.15-5.4 micron high spectral resolution (R~70,000) immersion grating, cross-dispersed, white pupil spectrograph. With iSHELL we should be able to obtain a precision of less than 5 m/s in the NIR with iSHELL from the improvements in spectral grasp alone.

  19. The Latest Results from Project NIRRVS: Precise Near Infrared Radial Velocity Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plavchan, Peter; NIRRVS Collaboration

    2016-06-01

    We will present the latest results from a prototype PRV survey with CSHELL. With CSHELL at the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility atop Mauna Kea (R~46,000), we have completed a PRV 2.3 micron survey to detect exoplanets around ~30 red, low mass, and young stars. We are able to reach long-term radial velocity dispersions of ~30 m/s on our survey targets. We are following up candidate RV variables, and have confirmed other previously known RV variables. With a spectral grasp of only 5 nm at 2.3 microns, this performance with CSHELL is limited by detector artifacts, and fringing in the data and flatfields. iSHELL will replace CSHELL at IRTF, with first light expected in May 2016. iSHELL is a 1.15-5.4 micron high spectral resolution (R~70,000) immersion grating, cross-dispersed, white pupil spectrograph. With iSHELL we should be able to obtain a precision of less than 5 m/s in the NIR with iSHELL from the improvements in spectral grasp alone.

  20. Constraining the Masses of the Kepler-11 Planets through Radial Velocity Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Lauren M.; Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Isaacson, Howard T.

    2015-01-01

    The six transiting planets of Kepler-11 have all been found to have ultra-low densities through N-body dynamical analysis of the transit timing variations (TTVs) of the six planets. Numerically reproducing TTVs has become a new method for solving the masses of planets, but this method is susceptible to certain dynamic degeneracies: the planet eccentricity is degenerate with the planet mass, and perturbations caused by non-transiting planets could be misattributed to the transiting planets. Furthermore, the masses of planets characterized by TTV analysis are systematically 2x lower than the masses (including non-detections) reported by radial velocity (RV) analysis for planets of the same radius. We address the discrepancy between the TTV- and RV-determined planet masses by measuring the RVs of Kepler-11 at opportunistic times, as determined by the ephemerides of the transiting planets. We place an upper limit on the masses of the Kepler-11 planets using RVs and preliminarily show that the RVs are consistent with the ultra-low mass scenario determined by the TTVs. The lack of disagreement between the TTVs and RVs in the Kepler-11 system bodes well for N-body simulations of TTVs for other Kepler systems that are too faint for RV follow-up.

  1. Sensitivity bias in the mass-radius distribution from transit timing variations and radial velocity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steffen, Jason H.

    2016-04-01

    Motivated by recent discussions, both in private and in the literature, we use a Monte Carlo simulation of planetary systems to investigate sources of bias in determining the mass-radius distribution of exoplanets for the two primary techniques used to measure planetary masses - radial velocities (RVs) and transit timing variations (TTVs). We assert that mass measurements derived from these two methods are comparably reliable - as the physics underlying their respective signals is well understood. Nevertheless, their sensitivity to planet mass varies with the properties of the planets themselves. We find that for a given planet size, the RV method tends to find planets with higher mass while the sensitivity of TTVs is more uniform. This `sensitivity bias' implies that a complete census of TTV systems is likely to yield a more robust estimate of the mass-radius distribution provided there are not important physical differences between planets near and far from mean-motion resonance. We discuss differences in the sensitivity of the two methods with orbital period and system architecture, which may compound the discrepancies between them (e.g. short-period planets detectable by RVs may be more dense due to atmospheric loss). We advocate for continued mass measurements using both approaches as a means both to measure the masses of more planets and to identify potential differences in planet structure that may result from their dynamical and environmental histories.

  2. Light Curves as Predictors of Good Radial Velocity Planet Search Targets in New Stellar Domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastien, Fabienne A.; Wright, Jason; Sigurdsson, Steinn; Dumusque, Xavier; Luhn, Jacob K.; Howard, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    As Kepler and K2 have collectively found thousands of exoplanet candidates, their discoveries have strained ground-based radial velocity (RV) follow-up resources, which are unable to simultaneously keep up with the pace of transit discoveries by measuring masses for all of the candidates and maintain vigorous RV searches for planets that do not transit their parent star. The burden to the RV community is expected to worsen with the upcoming TESS mission, even as new RV instruments are slated to come online in the coming years. Observations that can enable the RV community to prioritize targets on the basis of their stellar RV variability in advance and, ideally, independently of the RV instruments themselves, can therefore permit us to reserve our RV resources for the stars most likely to yield the highest payoff. We show that the light curves from space-based transit surveys may not only be used as predictors of good RV search targets for the stars predominantly targeted by the exoplanet community but also for stars usually avoided by both RV and transit surveys due to their high intrinsic levels of stellar variability. We also briefly present recommendations to the RV planet search community on how to improve prospects for finding Earth analogs from the recent workshop at the Aspen Center for Physics, “Approaching the Stellar Astrophysical Limits of Exoplanet Detection: Getting to 10cm/s.”

  3. A comprehensive radial velocity error budget for next generation Doppler spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halverson, Samuel; Terrien, Ryan; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Roy, Arpita; Bender, Chad; Stefánsson, Gudmundur K.; Monson, Andrew; Levi, Eric; Hearty, Fred; Blake, Cullen; McElwain, Michael; Schwab, Christian; Ramsey, Lawrence; Wright, Jason; Wang, Sharon; Gong, Qian; Roberston, Paul

    2016-08-01

    We describe a detailed radial velocity error budget for the NASA-NSF Extreme Precision Doppler Spectrometer instrument concept NEID (NN-explore Exoplanet Investigations with Doppler spectroscopy). Such an instrument performance budget is a necessity for both identifying the variety of noise sources currently limiting Doppler measurements, and estimating the achievable performance of next generation exoplanet hunting Doppler spectrometers. For these instruments, no single source of instrumental error is expected to set the overall measurement floor. Rather, the overall instrumental measurement precision is set by the contribution of many individual error sources. We use a combination of numerical simulations, educated estimates based on published materials, extrapolations of physical models, results from laboratory measurements of spectroscopic subsystems, and informed upper limits for a variety of error sources to identify likely sources of systematic error and construct our global instrument performance error budget. While natively focused on the performance of the NEID instrument, this modular performance budget is immediately adaptable to a number of current and future instruments. Such an approach is an important step in charting a path towards improving Doppler measurement precisions to the levels necessary for discovering Earth-like planets.

  4. Gravitational constant is likely dependent on the absolute velocity of galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shao-Guang

    ) , n = 1369, G = 6.66964*10 (-8) . G shall change follow the galaxy absolut velocity V = c / n, which shall influence Astronomy, Astrophysics and the cosmic science especially the estimation for dark matter and dark energy. The absolute velocity and G of galaxy centrality are far less than that of solar system, which is likely the origin of Galaxies’s abnormal speed-distance curve and dark matter, dark energy. But the spectrum not change with V because of the spectrum is only determined by the alphaα (1nuυ_{0} or _{0}nuυ + 9 nuυ_{0}(0) nuυ or _{0}nuυnuυ (0) ) and independent of the G ( (n) m_{0} or (n) \\underline{m }_{0}).

  5. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Aldebaran radial velocity variations (Hatzes+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatzes, A. P.; Cochran, W. D.; Endl, M.; Guenther, E. W.; MacQueen, P.; Hartmann, M.; Zechmeister, M.; Han, I.; Lee, B.-C.; Walker, G. A. H.; Yang, S.; Larson, A. M.; Kim, K.-M.; Mkrtichian, D. E.; Dollinger, M.; Simon, A. E.; Girardi, L.

    2015-07-01

    Seven independent data sets of high precision radial velocity data were used for our analysis. Precise RV measurements were also made with a Hydrogen-Fluoride (H-F) cell as part of the CFHT survey (hereafter the "CFHT" data set) of Walker et al. (1989ApJ...343L..21W) as well as additional measurements from the Dominion Astrophysical Observatory (hereafter "DAO" data set) using the same technique. See Campbell & Walker (1979PASP...91..540C) and Larson et al. (1993PASP..105..825L) for a description of the H-F measurements. For the remaining five RV data sets an iodine (I2) cell provided the wave- length reference. These include the original measurements using the McDonald Observatory 2.1m telescope (here-after "McD-2.1m" data set) and the coude spectrograph in the so-called "cs11" focus (hereafter "McD-CS11" data set) of the 2.7m telescope at McDonald Observatory. We should note that the we did not include the McDonald data that were used for the bisector measurements of Hatzes & Cochran (1998MNRAS.293..469H). These were taken using telluric lines as a wavelength reference which had a lower precision than the iodine wavelength calibration or H-F methods. The latest McDonald measurements were taken using the Tull Spectrograph at the so-called "cs23" focus (here-after the "McD-Tull" data set) as part of a long-term planet search program (e.g. Cochran et al., 1997ApJ...483..457C; Endl et al., 2004ApJ...611.1121E; Robertson et al., 2012ApJ...749...39R). (7 data files).

  6. Radial velocities of a sample of ob stars in the Sco-Cen association

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jilinski, E.; de La Reza, R.; Cunha, K.

    2003-08-01

    Radial velocities (RV) were derived for a sample of OB stars belonging to Lower Centaurus Crux (LCC), Upper Centaurus Lupus (UCL) and Upper Scorpius (US) sub-groups of the Sco-Cen OB association. The knowledge of RV of OB stars of these sub-groups is important for membership determinations and the study of the past evolution and formation of these sub-groups. To measure RV of some stars belonging to the above mentioned sub-groups, 67 exposures of 56 stars were obtained between May 17, 2002 and July 7, 2002 with the 1.52 m ESO telescope equipped with FEROS echelle spectrograph (resolving power 48000 and spectral range 3550 - 9210 Å). RV were measured line by line. The cross-correlation technique is usually used for precise RV determinations of late type stars. Its application for the measurements of RV of OB stars can be problematical. On the one hand, spectra of early type stars show few absorption lines and these lines are intrinsically broad (up to a few hundreds km/sec). They are often broadened by stellar rotation and sometimes they also show variability. On the other hand, the cross-correlation peak is very broad and contains important sub-structures caused by the mixing of spectral lines of different widths. Moreover, a lot of OB stars are binaries and their broadened lines do not permit to observe them as double-lined binaries. The resulting mean values were compared with other observations in order to find new binary systems or to obtain more accurate RV for single stars. The values of the internal and external precisions of line by line measured RV are estimated as +/- 3.1 km/sec and +/- 5 km/sec. The results of these observations permitted us to recognize some stars (HD 120307, HD 116087, HD 139365 and HD 142990) as being probable spectral binaries due to their significant RV variations.

  7. A NEW MULTI-BAND RADIAL VELOCITY TECHNIQUE FOR DETECTING EXOPLANETS AROUND ACTIVE STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Ma Bo; Ge Jian E-mail: jge@astrto.ufl.edu

    2012-05-10

    The radial velocity (RV) technique is one of the most efficient ways of detecting exoplanets. However, large RV jitters induced by starspots on an active star can inhibit detection of any exoplanet present or even lead to a false positive detection. This paper presents a new multi-band RV technique capable of substantially reducing starspot-induced RV jitters from stellar RV measurements to allow efficient and accurate extraction of RV signals caused by exoplanets. It takes full advantage of the correlation of RV jitters at different spectral bands and the independence of exoplanet signals at the corresponding bands. Simulations with a single-spot model and a multi-spot model have been conducted to investigate the RV jitter reduction capability of this method. The results show that this method can reduce the RV jitter amplitude by at least an order of magnitude, allowing detection of weaker exoplanet signals without significantly increasing RV observation time and cadence. This method can greatly reduce the observation time required to detect Earth-like planets around solar type stars with {approx}0.1 m s{sup -1} long term Doppler precision if spot-induced jitter is the dominant astrophysical noise source for RV measurements. This method can work efficiently for RV jitter removal if: (1) all the spots on a target star have approximately the same temperature during RV observations; (2) the RV jitter amplitude changes with wavelength, i.e., the RV jitter amplitude ratio, {alpha}, between two different spectral bands is not close to one; (3) the spot-induced RV jitter dominates the RV measurement error.

  8. A Spitzer search for transits of radial velocity detected super-Earths

    SciTech Connect

    Kammer, J. A.; Knutson, H. A.; Desert, J.-M.; Howard, A. W.; Laughlin, G. P.; Fortney, J. J.; Deming, D.; Todorov, K. O.; Agol, E.; Burrows, A.; Showman, A. P.; Lewis, N. K.

    2014-02-01

    Unlike hot Jupiters or other gas giants, super-Earths are expected to have a wide variety of compositions, ranging from terrestrial bodies like our own to more gaseous planets like Neptune. Observations of transiting systems, which allow us to directly measure planet masses and radii and constrain atmospheric properties, are key to understanding the compositional diversity of the planets in this mass range. Although Kepler has discovered hundreds of transiting super-Earth candidates over the past 4 yr, the majority of these planets orbit stars that are too far away and too faint to allow for detailed atmospheric characterization and reliable mass estimates. Ground-based transit surveys focus on much brighter stars, but most lack the sensitivity to detect planets in this size range. One way to get around the difficulty of finding these smaller planets in transit is to start by choosing targets that are already known to host super-Earth sized bodies detected using the radial velocity (RV) technique. Here we present results from a Spitzer program to observe six of the most favorable RV-detected super-Earth systems, including HD 1461, HD 7924, HD 156668, HIP 57274, and GJ 876. We find no evidence for transits in any of their 4.5 μm flux light curves, and place limits on the allowed transit depths and corresponding planet radii that rule out even the most dense and iron-rich compositions for these objects. We also observed HD 97658, but the observation window was based on a possible ground-based transit detection that was later ruled out; thus the window did not include the predicted time for the transit detection recently made by the Microvariability and Oscillations of Stars space telescope.

  9. DETECTING PLANETS AROUND VERY LOW MASS STARS WITH THE RADIAL VELOCITY METHOD

    SciTech Connect

    Reiners, A.; Bean, J. L.; Dreizler, S.; Seifahrt, A.; Huber, K. F.; Czesla, S.

    2010-02-10

    The detection of planets around very low-mass stars with the radial velocity (RV) method is hampered by the fact that these stars are very faint at optical wavelengths where the most high-precision spectrometers operate. We investigate the precision that can be achieved in RV measurements of low mass stars in the near-infrared (NIR) Y-, J-, and H-bands, and we compare it to the precision achievable in the optical assuming comparable telescope and instrument efficiencies. For early-M stars, RV measurements in the NIR offer no or only marginal advantage in comparison with optical measurements. Although they emit more flux in the NIR, the richness of spectral features in the optical outweighs the flux difference. We find that NIR measurement can be as precise as optical measurements in stars of spectral type {approx}M4, and from there the NIR gains in precision toward cooler objects. We studied potential calibration strategies in the NIR finding that a stable spectrograph with a ThAr calibration can offer enough wavelength stability for m s{sup -1} precision. Furthermore, we simulate the wavelength-dependent influence of activity (cool spots) on RV measurements from optical to NIR wavelengths. Our spot simulations reveal that the RV jitter does not decrease as dramatically toward longer wavelengths as often thought. The jitter strongly depends on the details of the spots, i.e., on spot temperature and the spectral appearance of the spot. At low temperature contrast ({approx}200 K), the jitter shows a decrease toward the NIR up to a factor of 10, but it decreases substantially less for larger temperature contrasts. Forthcoming NIR spectrographs will allow the search for planets with a particular advantage in mid- and late-M stars. Activity will remain an issue, but simultaneous observations at optical and NIR wavelengths can provide strong constraints on spot properties in active stars.

  10. METAL-POOR LITHIUM-RICH GIANTS IN THE RADIAL VELOCITY EXPERIMENT SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Ruchti, Gregory R.; Fulbright, Jon P.; Wyse, Rosemary F. G.; Gilmore, Gerard F.; Grebel, Eva K.; Bienayme, Olivier; Siebert, Arnaud; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Freeman, Ken C.; Gibson, Brad K.; Munari, Ulisse; Navarro, Julio F.; Parker, Quentin A.; Watson, Fred G.; Reid, Warren; Seabroke, George M.; Siviero, Alessandro; Steinmetz, Matthias; Williams, Mary; Zwitter, Tomaz

    2011-12-20

    We report the discovery of eight lithium-rich field giants found in a high-resolution spectroscopic sample of over 700 metal-poor stars ([Fe/H] < -0.5) selected from the Radial Velocity Experiment survey. The majority of the Li-rich giants in our sample are very metal-poor ([Fe/H] {approx}< -1.9), and have a Li abundance (in the form of {sup 7}Li), A(Li) = log (n(Li)/n(H)) + 12, between 2.30 and 3.63, well above the typical upper red giant branch (RGB) limit, A(Li) < 0.5, while two stars, with A(Li) {approx} 1.7-1.8, show similar lithium abundances to normal giants at the same gravity. We further included two metal-poor, Li-rich globular cluster giants in our sample, namely the previously discovered M3-IV101 and newly discovered (in this work) M68-A96. This comprises the largest sample of metal-poor Li-rich giants to date. We performed a detailed abundance analysis of all stars, finding that the majority of our sample stars have elemental abundances similar to that of Li-normal halo giants. Although the evolutionary phase of each Li-rich giant cannot be definitively determined, the Li-rich phase is likely connected to extra mixing at the RGB bump or early asymptotic giant branch that triggers cool bottom processing in which the bottom of the outer convective envelope is connected to the H-burning shell in the star. The surface of a star becomes Li-enhanced as {sup 7}Be (which burns to {sup 7}Li) is transported to the stellar surface via the Cameron-Fowler mechanism. We discuss and discriminate among several models for the extra mixing that can cause Li production, given the detailed abundances of the Li-rich giants in our sample.

  11. The iLocater cryostat: design and thermal control strategy for precision radial velocity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crass, Jonathan; Fantano, Louis G.; Hearty, Frederick R.; Crepp, Justin R.; Nelson, Matthew J.; Wall, Sheila M.; Cavalieri, David A.; Koca, Corina; King, David L.; Reynolds, Robert O.; Stapelfeldt, Karl R.

    2016-08-01

    The current generation of precision radial velocity (RV) spectrographs are seeing-limited instruments. In order to achieve high spectral resolution on 8m class telescopes, these spectrographs require large optics and in turn, large instrument volumes. Achieving milli-Kelvin thermal stability for these systems is challenging but is vital in order to obtain a single measurement RV precision of better than 1m/s. This precision is crucial to study Earth-like exoplanets within the habitable zone. iLocater is a next generation RV instrument being developed for the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT). Unlike seeinglimited RV instruments, iLocater uses adaptive optics (AO) to inject a diffraction-limited beam into single-mode fibers. These fibers illuminate the instrument spectrograph, facilitating a diffraction-limited design and a small instrument volume compared to present-day instruments. This enables intrinsic instrument stability and facilitates precision thermal control. We present the current design of the iLocater cryostat which houses the instrument spectrograph and the strategy for its thermal control. The spectrograph is situated within a pair of radiation shields mounted inside an MLI lined vacuum chamber. The outer radiation shield is actively controlled to maintain instrument stability at the sub-mK level and minimize effects of thermal changes from the external environment. An inner shield passively dampens any residual temperature fluctuations and is radiatively coupled to the optical board. To provide intrinsic stability, the optical board and optic mounts will be made from Invar and cooled to 58K to benefit from a zero coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) value at this temperature. Combined, the small footprint of the instrument spectrograph, the use of Invar, and precision thermal control will allow long-term sub-milliKelvin stability to facilitate precision RV measurements.

  12. Mass Constraints of the WASP-47 Planetary System from Radial Velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinukoff, Evan; Howard, Andrew W.; Petigura, Erik A.; Fulton, Benjamin J.; Isaacson, Howard; Weiss, Lauren M.; Brewer, John M.; Hansen, Brad M. S.; Hirsch, Lea; Christiansen, Jessie L.; Crepp, Justin R.; Crossfield, Ian J. M.; Schlieder, Joshua E.; Ciardi, David R.; Beichman, Charles A.; Knutson, Heather A.; Benneke, Bjoern; Dressing, Courtney D.; Livingston, John H.; Deck, Katherine M.; Lépine, Sébastien; Rogers, Leslie A.

    2017-02-01

    We report precise radial velocity (RV) measurements of WASP-47, a G star that hosts three transiting planets in close proximity (a hot Jupiter, a super-Earth, and a Neptune-sized planet) and a non-transiting planet at 1.4 au. Through a joint analysis of previously published RVs and our own Keck-HIRES RVs, we significantly improve the planet mass and bulk density measurements. For the super-Earth WASP-47e (P = 0.79 days), we measure a mass of 9.11+/- 1.17 M⊕, and a bulk density of 7.63+/- 1.90 g cm‑3, consistent with a rocky composition. For the hot Jupiter WASP-47b (P = 4.2 days), we measure a mass of 356+/- 12 M⊕ (1.12 ± 0.04 MJup) and constrain its eccentricity to < 0.021 at 3σ confidence. For the Neptune-size planet WASP-47d (P = 9.0 days), we measure a mass of 12.75+/- 2.70 M⊕ and a bulk density of 1.36+/- 0.42 g cm‑3, suggesting that it has a thick H/He envelope. For the outer non-transiting planet, we measure a minimum mass of 411+/- 18 M⊕ (1.29 ± 0.06 MJup), an orbital period of 595.7+/- 5.0 days, and an orbital eccentricity of 0.27+/- 0.04. Our new measurements are consistent with but two to four times more precise than previous mass measurements.

  13. THEORY OF DISPERSED FIXED-DELAY INTERFEROMETRY FOR RADIAL VELOCITY EXOPLANET SEARCHES

    SciTech Connect

    Van Eyken, Julian C.; Ge Jian; Mahadevan, Suvrath E-mail: jge@astro.ufl.ed

    2010-07-15

    The dispersed fixed-delay interferometer (DFDI) represents a new instrument concept for high-precision radial velocity (RV) surveys for extrasolar planets. A combination of a Michelson interferometer and a medium-resolution spectrograph, it has the potential for performing multi-object surveys, where most previous RV techniques have been limited to observing only one target at a time. Because of the large sample of extrasolar planets needed to better understand planetary formation, evolution, and prevalence, this new technique represents a logical next step in instrumentation for RV extrasolar planet searches, and has been proven with the single-object Exoplanet Tracker (ET) at Kitt Peak National Observatory, and the multi-object W. M. Keck/MARVELS Exoplanet Tracker at Apache Point Observatory. The development of the ET instruments has necessitated fleshing out a detailed understanding of the physical principles of the DFDI technique. Here we summarize the fundamental theoretical material needed to understand the technique and provide an overview of the physics underlying the instrument's working. We also derive some useful analytical formulae that can be used to estimate the level of various sources of error generic to the technique, such as photon shot noise when using a fiducial reference spectrum, contamination by secondary spectra (e.g., crowded sources, spectroscopic binaries, or moonlight contamination), residual interferometer comb, and reference cross-talk error. Following this, we show that the use of a traditional gas absorption fiducial reference with a DFDI can incur significant systematic errors that must be taken into account at the precision levels required to detect extrasolar planets.

  14. Structure and dynamics of the Milky Way disk as revealed from the radial velocity distributions of APOGEE red clump stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyouchi, Daisuke; Chiba, Masashi

    2017-03-01

    We investigate the structure and dynamics of the Milky Way (MW) disk stars based on the analysis of the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE) data, to infer the past evolution histories of the MW disk component(s) possibly affected by radial migration and/or satellite accretions. APOGEE is the first near-infrared spectroscopic survey for a large number of the MW disk stars, providing their radial velocities and chemical abundances without significant dust extinction effects. We here adopt red-clump (RC) stars (Bovy et al. 2014), for which the distances from the Sun are determined precisely, and analyze their radial velocities and chemical abundances in the MW disk regions covering from the Galactocentric distance, R, of 5 kpc to 14 kpc. We investigate their dynamical properties, such as mean rotational velocities, and velocity dispersions, as a function of R, based on the MCMC Bayesian method. We find that at all radii, the dynamics of alpha-poor stars, which are candidates of young disk stars, is much different from that of alpha-rich stars, which are candidates of old disk stars. We find that our Jeans analysis for our sample stars reveals characteristic spatial and dynamical properties of the MW disk, which are generally in agreement with the recent independent work by Bovy et al. (2015) but with a different method from ours.

  15. A Hectochelle Radial Velocity Survey of Cep OB3b: An ONC like cluster at late gas dispersal phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karnath, Nicole; Allen, Thomas; Prchlik, Jakub; Gutermuth, Robert A.; Megeath, Samuel Thomas; Pipher, Judith; Wolk, Scott J.

    2016-01-01

    Cep OB3b is a young (~3-5 Myr), late gas dispersal cluster of roughly 3000 members broken into two sub-clusters (Eastern and Western) at a distance of 700pc; it is a rare example of nearby cluster in the late stages of gas dispersal and appears to be a more evolved analog to the Orion Nebular Cluster. As part of an ongoing multi wavelength study, we focus on Hectochelle data from the MMT to measure the radial velocities of 499 stars. After removing binaries, outliers, and imposing a minimum R value to the cross correlation, we obtain radial velocities of 57 previously identified members, with an average error of 1.7 km/s. There is no observed variation in radial velocity across the cluster in right ascension or declination. The preferred mechanism for this type of kinematic evolution is that any initial kinematic structure from formation may have been erased and that minimal or no rotation is present in the cluster. However, the Eastern sub-cluster, containing the most massive star in the field, an O7 star, has a higher velocity dispersion than the Western sub-cluster, which contains several B stars. We will compare these results to CO maps of the residual gas in the cluster and discuss possible reasons for this difference. Finally, we will assess whether the cluster is bound or in a state of expansion.

  16. SGLOBE-rani: a new global whole-mantle model of isotropic and radially anisotropic shear-wave velocity structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, A.; Chang, S. J.

    2015-12-01

    We present a new global whole-mantle model of isotropic and radially anisotropic S velocity structure (SGLOBE-rani) based on ~43,000,000 surface-wave and ~420,000 bodywave travel time measurements, which is expanded in spherical harmonic basis functions up to degree 35. We incorporate crustal thickness perturbations as model parameters in the inversions to properly consider crustal effects and suppress the leakage of crustal structure into mantle structure. This is possible since we utilize short-period group velocity data with a period range down to 16 s, which are strongly sensitive to the crust. The isotropic S-velocity model shares common features with previous global S-velocity models and shows excellent consistency with several high-resolution upper mantle models. Our anisotropic model also agrees well with previous regional studies. Nevertheless, our new model of 3-D radial anisotropy shows some features not seen in previous whole-mantle models, such as faster SV velocity anomalies along subduction zones at transition zone depths and faster SH velocity beneath slabs in the lower mantle. The derived crustal thickness perturbations also bring potentially important information about the crustal thickness beneath oceanic crusts, which has been difficult to constrain due to poor access compared with continental crusts. We interpret our results in terms of mineralogy and geodynamical processes in the transition zone and uppermost lower mantle.

  17. Radial variation in sap velocity as a function of stem diameter and sapwood thickness in yellow-poplar trees.

    PubMed

    Wullschleger, Stan D.; King, Anthony W.

    2000-04-01

    Canopy transpiration and forest water use are frequently estimated as the product of sap velocity and cross-sectional sapwood area. Few studies, however, have considered whether radial variation in sap velocity and the proportion of sapwood active in water transport are significant sources of uncertainty in the extrapolation process. Therefore, radial profiles of sap velocity were examined as a function of stem diameter and sapwood thickness for yellow-poplar (Liriodendron tulipifera L.) trees growing on two adjacent watersheds in eastern Tennessee. The compensation heat pulse velocity technique was used to quantify sap velocity at four equal-area depths in 20 trees that ranged in stem diameter from 15 to 69 cm, and in sapwood thickness from 2.1 to 14.8 cm. Sap velocity was highly dependent on the depth of probe insertion into the sapwood. Rates of sap velocity were greatest for probes located in the two outer sapwood annuli (P1 and P2) and lowest for probes in closest proximity to the heartwood (P3 and P4). Relative sap velocities averaged 0.98 at P1, 0.66 at P2, 0.41 at P3 and 0.35 at P4. Tree-specific sap velocities measured at each of the four probe positions, divided by the maximum sap velocity measured (usually at P1 or P2), indicated that the fraction of sapwood functional in water transport (f(S)) varied between 0.49 and 0.96. There was no relationship between f(S) and sapwood thickness, or between f(S) and stem diameter. The fraction of functional sapwood averaged 0.66 +/- 0.13 for trees on which radial profiles were determined. No significant depth-related differences were observed for sapwood density, which averaged 469 kg m(-3) across all four probe positions. There was, however, a significant decline in sapwood water content between the two outer probe positions (1.04 versus 0.89 kg kg(-1)). This difference was not sufficient to account for the observed radial variation in sap velocity. A Monte-Carlo analysis indicated that the standard error in

  18. Eclipsing binaries and fast rotators in the Kepler sample. Characterization via radial velocity analysis from Calar Alto

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lillo-Box, J.; Barrado, D.; Mancini, L.; Henning, Th.; Figueira, P.; Ciceri, S.; Santos, N.

    2015-04-01

    Context. The Kepler mission has searched for planetary transits in more than two hundred thousand stars by obtaining very accurate photometric data over a long period of time. Among the thousands of detected candidates, the planetary nature of around 15% has been established or validated by different techniques. But additional data are needed to characterize the rest of the candidates and reject other possible configurations. Aims: We started a follow-up program to validate, confirm, and characterize some of the planet candidates. In this paper we present the radial velocity analysis of those that present large variations, which are compatible with being eclipsing binaries. We also study those showing high rotational velocities, which prevents us from reaching the necessary precision to detect planetary-like objects. Methods: We present new radial velocity results for 13 Kepler objects of interest (KOIs) obtained with the CAFE spectrograph at the Calar Alto Observatory and analyze their high-spatial resolution (lucky) images obtained with AstraLux and the Kepler light curves of some interesting cases. Results: We have found five spectroscopic and eclipsing binaries (group A). Among them, the case of KOI-3853 is of particular interest. This system is a new example of the so-called heartbeat stars, showing dynamic tidal distortions in the Kepler light curve. We have also detected duration and depth variations of the eclipse. We suggest possible scenarios to explain such an effect, including the presence of a third substellar body possibly detected in our radial velocity analysis. We also provide upper mass limits to the transiting companions of six other KOIs with high rotational velocities (group B). This property prevents the radial velocity method from achieving the necessary precision to detect planetary-like masses. Finally, we analyze the large radial velocity variations of two other KOIs, which are incompatible with the presence of planetary-mass objects

  19. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Radial velocities in 2006-2014 for HD 89758 (Lee+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, B.-C.; Han, I.; Park, M.-G.; Mkrtichian, D. E.; Hatzes, A. P.; Jeong, G.; Kim, K.-M.

    2016-07-01

    Observations were carried out using the fiber-fed high-resolution Bohyunsan Observatory Echelle Spectrograph (BOES) attached to the 1.8m telescope at Bohyunsan Optical Astronomy Observatory (BOAO) in Korea. One exposure with the BOES has a wavelength coverage 3500-10500Å distributed over ~80 spectral orders. In order to provide precise radial velocity measurements, we used the 80μm diameter fiber which yields a resolving power R=90000. Over the eight-year period from 2006 November to 2014 November (56 nights in total), 112 spectra for μ UMa were collected. The estimated signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) in the I2 region was about 250 with a typical exposure time ranging from 60 to 480s. We report our radial velocity data for μ UMa in Table2. (1 data file).

  20. Radial velocities of galaxies in the cluster Klemola 22 from observations with OPTOPUS, the ESO multiple object spectroscopy facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cristiani, S.; D'Odorico, S.; de Souza, R.; Lund, G.; Quintana, H.

    1987-06-01

    This paper presents the first results obtained with the ESO multiple fiber spectroscopic facility (OPTOPUS). Radial velocities and magnitudes are given for 44 galaxies in the cluster Klemola 22. The average redshift is 16160 km s-1 and the velocity dispersion 742 km s-1. The galaxy Kle 22/17 shows strong emission lines of [O III], with a FWHM of 850 km s-1, and is classified as a type 2 Seyfert. From these observations, the average efficiency of OPTOPUS, including telescope, spectrograph and detector, is computed as 1 detected photoelectron Å-1s-1 for an object of 15 B magnitude.

  1. Method of radial velocities for the estimation of aircraft wake vortex parameters from data measured by coherent Doppler lidar.

    PubMed

    Smalikho, I N; Banakh, V A; Holzäpfel, F; Rahm, S

    2015-09-21

    The method of radial velocities (RV) is applied to estimate aircraft wake vortex parameters from measurements conducted with pulsed coherent Doppler lidar (PCDL). Operations of the Stream Line lidar and the 2-µm PCDL are simulated numerically to analyze the accuracy of the estimated wake vortex parameters with the RV method. The RV method is also used to estimate wake vortex trajectories and circulation from lidar measurements at Tomsk and Munich airports. The method of velocity envelopes and the RV method are compared employing data gathered with the 2-µm PCDL. The domain of applicability of the RV method is determined.

  2. An updated survey of globular clusters in M 31. I. Classification and radial velocity for 76 candidate clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galleti, S.; Federici, L.; Bellazzini, M.; Buzzoni, A.; Fusi Pecci, F.

    2006-09-01

    Aims.We present the first results of a large spectroscopic survey of globular clusters and candidate globular clusters in the nearby M 31 galaxy. The survey is aimed at the classification of known candidate M 31 clusters and at the study of their kinematic properties. Methods: .We obtained low-resolution spectroscopy (λ/Δλ ≃ 800-1300) for 133 targets, including 76 yet-to-be-confirmed candidate clusters (i.e. with no previous spectroscopic information), 55 already-confirmed genuine M 31 clusters, and 2 uncertain candidates. Our observations allowed a reliable estimate of the target radial velocity, within a typical accuracy of ~± 20 km s-1. The observed candidates have been robustly classified according to their radial velocity and shape parameters that allowed us to confidently discriminate between point sources and extended objects even from low-spatial-resolution imagery. Results: .In our set of 76 candidate clusters we found: 42 newly-confirmed bona-fide M 31 clusters, 12 background galaxies, 17 foreground Galactic stars, 2 Hii regions belonging to M 31 and 3 unclassified (possibly M 31 clusters or foreground stars) objects. The classification of a few other candidates not included in our survey has been also reassessed on various observational bases. All the sources of radial velocity estimates for M 31 known globular clusters available in the literature have been compared and checked, and a homogeneous general list has been obtained for 349 confirmed clusters with radial velocity. Conclusions: .Our results suggest that a significant number of genuine clusters (≳100) is still hidden among the plethora of known candidates proposed by various authors. Hence our knowledge of the globular cluster system of the M 31 galaxy is still far from complete even in terms of simple membership.

  3. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Keck/HIRES radial velocity obs. of HD32963 (Rowan+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowan, D.; Meschiari, S.; Laughlin, G.; Vogt, S. S.; Butler, R. P.; Burt, J.; Wang, S.; Holden, B.; Hanson, R.; Arriagada, P.; Keiser, S.; Teske, J.; Diaz, M.

    2016-04-01

    The Lick-Carnegie Exoplanet Survey (LCES) is a search for exoplanets using the Keck I optical telescope of the W. M. Keck Observatory in Hawaii. We used the HIRES spectrometer telescope for all the radial velocity (RV) observations presented in this paper. Table 2 shows the complete set of our RV observations for HD 32963. Our data set comprises 109 measurements over approximately 16 years (5838 days); between 1998 January 24 and 2014 January 18. (1 data file).

  4. The disk-halo interface of the Milky Way as observed with the Radial Velocity Experiment (RAVE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinmetz, Matthias

    2015-08-01

    The Radial Velocity Experiment (RAVE) is the largest wide-field spectroscopic stellar survey of the Milky Way in the pre-Gaia era. Over the period of 2003-2013, 574,630 spectra for 483,330 stars have been amassed in the Ca triplet region at 8410-8795 Å with resolving power R ~ 7500. Spectral range and resolution are comparable to the RVS unit of the Gaia Satellite. Radial velocities at 2km/s accuracy have been derived as well as stellar parameters and chemical abundances for Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Ti, Fe, and Ni. Furthermore, distances have been derived by combining RAVE data with 2MASS and APASS photometry.RAVE data have been applied to a multitude of questions regarding the dynamical and chemical evolution of the Milky Way. In this presentation I will focus on the interface between the thin and thick disk(s) and the Galactic halo, respectively, presenting data on systematic changes in abundence and alpha enrichment of the respectice stellar population with their kinematical properties (rotation velocity, velocity dispersion) out to distances of several kpc from the Sun. Furthermore, systematic changes in the chemical gradients will be presented. An analysis of high velocity stars reveals that while most have abundance properties typical for halo stars, a few stars have more disk-like chemical abundance pattern indicative of that these stars were formed in the disk but later on ejected into the stellar halo.

  5. Investigation of Ultrasound-Measured Flow Velocity, Flow Rate and Wall Shear Rate in Radial and Ulnar Arteries Using Simulation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaowei; Xia, Chunming; Stephen, Gandy; Khan, Faisel; Corner, George A; Hoskins, Peter R; Huang, Zhihong

    2017-02-21

    Parameters of blood flow measured by ultrasound in radial and ulnar arteries, such as flow velocity, flow rate and wall shear rate, are widely used in clinical practice and clinical research. Investigation of these measurements is useful for evaluating accuracy and providing knowledge of error sources. A method for simulating the spectral Doppler ultrasound measurement process was developed with computational fluid dynamics providing flow-field data. Specific scanning factors were adjusted to investigate their influence on estimation of the maximum velocity waveform, and flow rate and wall shear rate were derived using the Womersley equation. The overestimation in maximum velocity increases greatly (peak systolic from about 10% to 30%, time-averaged from about 30% to 50%) when the beam-vessel angle is changed from 30° to 70°. The Womersley equation was able to estimate flow rate in both arteries with less than 3% error, but performed better in the radial artery (2.3% overestimation) than the ulnar artery (15.4% underestimation) in estimating wall shear rate. It is concluded that measurements of flow parameters in the radial and ulnar arteries with clinical ultrasound scanners are prone to clinically significant errors.

  6. Radial-velocity fitting challenge. II. First results of the analysis of the data set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumusque, X.; Borsa, F.; Damasso, M.; Díaz, R. F.; Gregory, P. C.; Hara, N. C.; Hatzes, A.; Rajpaul, V.; Tuomi, M.; Aigrain, S.; Anglada-Escudé, G.; Bonomo, A. S.; Boué, G.; Dauvergne, F.; Frustagli, G.; Giacobbe, P.; Haywood, R. D.; Jones, H. R. A.; Laskar, J.; Pinamonti, M.; Poretti, E.; Rainer, M.; Ségransan, D.; Sozzetti, A.; Udry, S.

    2017-02-01

    Context. Radial-velocity (RV) signals arising from stellar photospheric phenomena are the main limitation for precise RV measurements. Those signals induce RV variations an order of magnitude larger than the signal created by the orbit of Earth-twins, thus preventing their detection. Aims: Different methods have been developed to mitigate the impact of stellar RV signals. The goal of this paper is to compare the efficiency of these different methods to recover extremely low-mass planets despite stellar RV signals. However, because observed RV variations at the meter-per-second precision level or below is a combination of signals induced by unresolved orbiting planets, by the star, and by the instrument, performing such a comparison using real data is extremely challenging. Methods: To circumvent this problem, we generated simulated RV measurements including realistic stellar and planetary signals. Different teams analyzed blindly those simulated RV measurements, using their own method to recover planetary signals despite stellar RV signals. By comparing the results obtained by the different teams with the planetary and stellar parameters used to generate the simulated RVs, it is therefore possible to compare the efficiency of these different methods. Results: The most efficient methods to recover planetary signals take into account the different activity indicators, use red-noise models to account for stellar RV signals and a Bayesian framework to provide model comparison in a robust statistical approach. Using the most efficient methodology, planets can be found down to K/N= Kpl/RV_{rms×√{Nobs}=5} with a threshold of K/N = 7.5 at the level of 80-90% recovery rate found for a number of methods. These recovery rates drop dramatically for K/N smaller than this threshold. In addition, for the best teams, no false positives with K/N > 7.5 were detected, while a non-negligible fraction of them appear for smaller K/N. A limit of K/N = 7.5 seems therefore a safe

  7. Orbital characterization of multi-object exoplanetary systems with radial velocity observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Peng-Cheng

    Exoplanets are the planets around stars other than the sun. The detection and characterization of exoplanetary systems nowadays is one of the fields of the greatest interest in astronomy and planetary science. As various exoplanets detection programs have been keeping delivering observations of potential exoplanets, their database is growing rapidly in terms of the size and the detection precision. It is crucial to make the best use of these data, not only for discovering the exoplanets, but also for determining the most appropriate model for describing the data set and measuring the model parameters (e.g. masses and orbital parameters) more accurately. One of the most productive detection methods is the Radial Velocity (RV) method. It measures the Doppler shift of a stellar spectrum caused by the gravity perturbation of the orbiting planet(s). Dispersed Fixed-delay Interferometry (DFDI) is a technique to economically implement the RV detection. Chapter 2 describes my involvement in two instrumentation projects based on this technique and focus on a method of increasing the short-term stability of the instruments. When interpreting the reduced RV data, people usually use a Keplerian model to describe the orbits of exoplanets. However, if there is more than one planet in the system, the Keplerian model neglects the interaction between planets. Theoretically, an n-body simulation should be used for describing the system in terms of accuracy. However, the N-body model is much more computationally expensive. In an attempt to determine when a full N-body model is important, I compare the Keplerian model with N-body model for characterizing the orbits of a set of simulated interacting two planet systems, which is described in Chapter 3. Given a RV data, Markov Chain Monte Carlo provides a convenient tool to sample from the posterior distribution of the model parameters. One challenge that remains is computing the Marginal Likelihood of the Posterior or the Bayesian

  8. Hide and Seek: Radial-velocity searches for planets around active stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haywood, Raphaelle

    2017-01-01

    The ultimate obstacle to determining the masses of small, rocky exoplanets through radial-velocity (RV) monitoring is the intrinsic variability of the host stars themselves. For my PhD, I developed an intuitive and robust data analysis framework in which the activity-induced variations are modelled with a Gaussian process that has the frequency structure of the stellar magnetic activity. This allowed me to determine precise and accurate masses of the planets in the CoRoT-7, Kepler-78 and Kepler-10 systems. In parallel, I explored the physical origin of activity-induced RV variations of our best-known star: the Sun. I conducted the first systematic RV campaign of the Sun seen as an exoplanet host star using the 3.6m/HARPS spectrograph, by observing sunlight reflected off the bright asteroid 4/Vesta. I used images from the Solar Dynamics Observatory to reconstruct the RV signals incurred by individual surface features such as sunspots, faculae and granulation. I found that the activity-induced RV variations are driven by the suppression of convective blueshift arising dominantly from the presence of faculae. I also identified the full-disc magnetic flux as an excellent proxy for activity-induced RV variations.I am now pursuing my solar investigations using Sun-as-a-star RV observations acquired with the new solar telescope feed at HARPS-N. In particular, I am investigating the impact of magnetic surface features on the shapes of the spectral line profiles, rather than on the RVs themselves (which are a single moment of these lines). This work is key to developing physically-driven, better-tailored models for activity-induced RV variations, in preparation for the potentially habitable, Earth-like planets to be discovered and characterised in the coming years with TESS and GMT/G-CLEF.This work was funded by the Science and Technology Facilities Council in the United Kingdom and the John Templeton Foundation.

  9. PRECISE INFRARED RADIAL VELOCITIES FROM KECK/NIRSPEC AND THE SEARCH FOR YOUNG PLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, John I. III; White, Russel J.; Tanner, Angelle M.; Blake, Cullen H.; Charbonneau, Dave; Torres, Guillermo; Barman, Travis S. E-mail: white@chara.gsu.edu

    2012-04-10

    We present a high-precision infrared radial velocity (RV) study of late-type stars using spectra obtained with NIRSPEC at the W. M. Keck Observatory. RV precisions of 50 m s{sup -1} are achieved for old field mid-M dwarfs using telluric features for wavelength calibration. Using this technique, 20 young stars in the {beta} Pic (age {approx} 12 Myr) and TW Hya (age {approx} 8 Myr) Associations were monitored over several years to search for low-mass companions; we also included the chromospherically active field star GJ 873 (EV Lac) in this survey. Based on comparisons with previous optical observations of these young active stars, RV measurements at infrared wavelengths mitigate the RV noise caused by star spots by a factor of {approx}3. Nevertheless, star spot noise is still the dominant source of measurement error for young stars at 2.3 {mu}m, and limits the precision to {approx}77 m s{sup -1} for the slowest rotating stars (v sin i < 6 km s{sup -1}), increasing to {approx}168 m s{sup -1} for rapidly rotating stars (v sin i > 12 km s{sup -1}). The observations reveal both GJ 3305 and TWA 23 to be single-lined spectroscopic binaries; in the case of GJ 3305, the motion is likely caused by its 0.''09 companion, identified after this survey began. The large amplitude, short-timescale variations of TWA 13A are indicative of a hot Jupiter-like companion, but the available data are insufficient to confirm this. We label it as a candidate RV variable. For the remainder of the sample, these observations exclude the presence of any 'hot' (P < 3 days) companions more massive than 8 M{sub Jup} and any 'warm' (P < 30 days) companions more massive than 17 M{sub Jup}, on average. Assuming an edge-on orbit for the edge-on disk system AU Mic, these observations exclude the presence of any hot Jupiters more massive than 1.8 M{sub Jup} or warm Jupiters more massive than 3.9 M{sub Jup}.

  10. Radial velocity information content of M dwarf spectra in the near-infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figueira, P.; Adibekyan, V. Zh.; Oshagh, M.; Neal, J. J.; Rojas-Ayala, B.; Lovis, C.; Melo, C.; Pepe, F.; Santos, N. C.; Tsantaki, M.

    2016-02-01

    Aims: We evaluate the radial velocity (RV) information content and achievable precision on M0-M9 spectra covering the ZYJHK bands. We do so while considering both a perfect atmospheric transmission correction and discarding areas polluted by deep telluric features, as done in previous works. Methods: To simulate the M-dwarf spectra, PHOENIX-ACES model spectra were employed; they were convolved with rotational kernels and instrumental profiles to reproduce stars with a v sin i of 1.0, 5.0, and 10.0 km s-1 when observed at resolutions of 60 000, 80 000, and 100 000. We considered the RV precision as calculated on the whole spectra, after discarding strongly polluted areas, and after applying a perfect telluric correction. In the latter option, we took into account the reduction in the number of recorded photons due to a transmittance lower than unity and considered its effect on the noise of the recorded spectra. In our simulations we paid particular attention to the details of the convolution and sampling of the spectra, and we discuss their impact on the final spectra. Results: Our simulations show that the most important parameter ruling the difference in attainable precision between the considered bands is the spectral type. For M0-M3 stars, the bands that deliver the most precise RV measurements are the Z, Y, and H band, with relative merits depending on the parameters of the simulation. For M6-M9 stars, the bands show a difference in precision that is within a factor of ~2 and does not clearly depend on the band; this difference is reduced to a factor smaller than ~1.5 if we consider a non-rotating star seen at high resolution. We also show that an M6-M9 spectrum will deliver a precision about two times better as an M0-M3 spectra with the same signal-to-noise ratio. Finally, we note that the details of modeling the Earth atmosphere and interpreting the results have a significant impact on which wavelength regions are discarded when setting a limit threshold at

  11. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Radial velocities of 35 cataclysmic variables (Thorstensen+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorstensen, J. R.; Alper, E. H.; Weil, K. E.

    2017-02-01

    We present spectroscopic follow-up observations of 35 newly discovered cataclysmic variables (CVs), 32 of which were found by the Catalina Real Time Transient Surveys (CRTS; Drake et al. 2009, Cat. J/ApJ/696/870; Drake et al. 2014, Cat. J/MNRAS/441/1186; Breedt et al. 2014, Cat. J/MNRAS/443/3174), ASAS-SN (Shappee et al. 2014ApJ...788...48S), and/or MASTER (Lipunov et al. 2010AdAst2010E..30L). All our observations are from Michigan-Dartmouth-MIT (MDM) Observatory on Kitt Peak, Arizona. For nearly all the spectra, we used the "modspec" spectrograph (a description of the modspec can be found at http://mdm.kpno.noao.edu/Manuals/ModSpec/modspec_man.html) with a 600line/mm grating. We mostly used a SITe 20482 CCD detector, which yielded 2Å/pixel from 4210 to 7500Å, with declining throughput toward the ends of the spectral range. When this detector was unavailable, we used a very similar 10242 SITe detector ("Templeton"), which covered 4660 to 6730Å. The modspec was mounted mostly on the 2.4m Hiltner telescope, but for some of the brighter objects, we used the 1.3m McGraw-Hill telescope. For a few of the 1.3m spectra, we used the Mark III grism spectrograph, which covered 4580 to 6850Å at 2.3Å/pixel. On both telescopes and with both spectrographs, we used an Andor Ikon camera to view the reflective slit jaws through a microscope and guided the telescope with a separate off-axis guider. With this arrangement we could place any object that was bright enough for a usable spectrum in the slit and track it accurately even if the portion of the light spilling onto the slit jaws was invisible. Our emission-line radial velocities are almost entirely of Hα, since it almost always gives the best signal-to-noise ratio with our instrument. (3 data files).

  12. Reassessing the radial-velocity evidence for planets around CoRoT-7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pont, Frédéric; Aigrain, Suzanne; Zucker, Shay

    2011-03-01

    CoRoT-7 is an 11 th magnitude K-star whose light curve shows transits with a depth of 0.3 mmag and a period of 0.854 d, superimposed on variability at the 1 per cent level, due to the modulation of evolving active regions with the star's 23-d rotation period. In this paper, we revisit the published HARPS radial-velocity (RV) measurements of the object, which were previously used to estimate the companion mass, but have been the subject of ongoing debate. We build a realistic model of the star's activity during the HARPS observations, by fitting simultaneously the linewidth (as measured by the width of the cross-correlation function) and the line bisector, and use it to evaluate the contribution of activity to the RV variations. The data show clear evidence of errors above the level of the formal uncertainties, which are accounted for neither by activity nor by any plausible planet model and which increase rapidly with a decreasing signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) of the spectra. We cite evidence of similar systematics in mid-S/N spectra of other targets obtained with HARPS and other high-precision RV spectrographs, and discuss possible sources. Allowing for these, we re-evaluate the semi-amplitude of the CoRoT-7b signal, finding Kb= 1.6 ± 1.3 m s-1, a tentative detection with a much reduced significance (1.2σ) compared to previous estimates. We also argue that the combined presence of activity and additional errors precludes a meaningful search for additional low-mass companions, despite previous claims to the contrary. Taken at face value, our analysis points to a lower density for CoRoT-7b, the 1σ mass range spanning 1-4 M ⊕ and allowing for a wide range of bulk compositions. In particular, an ice-rich composition is compatible with the RV constraints. More generally, this study highlights the importance of a realistic treatment of both activity and uncertainties, particularly in the medium S/N regime, which applies to most small planet candidates from CoRoT and

  13. Kepler beaming binaries radial velocity follow-up with WIYN/Hydra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shporer, Avi; Stassun, Keivan; Faigler, Simchon; Mazeh, Tsevi; Boyajian, Tabetha S.; Tal-Or, Lev; Prsa, Andrej

    2016-01-01

    High-quality space-based time series photometry reveals the minute photometric modulations induced by orbital motion in short-period binary systems with stellar and substellar secondaries. Those modulations are induced by both gravitational and atmospheric processes. Gravitational processes include the beaming effect (aka Doppler boosting) and tidal ellipsoidal distortion, and the atmospheric processes include reflected light and thermal emission by the secondary atmosphere. Therefore, non-eclipsing systems are detectable using photometry alone. The availability of Kepler data for a large sample of stars combined with the sensitivity to non-eclipsing systems has the potential of transforming the Kepler survey into the equivalent of a radial velocity (RV) survey of a large sample of stars with a wide range of spectral type. This allows detecting intrinsically rare systems, where traditional approaches, e.g., RV and transit surveys, are highly inefficient. Those include systems where the companion is a brown-dwarf or a massive planet, or even a white dwarf. As this approach is still in its infancy, we are carrying out RV follow-up of Kepler photometric detections, to confirm the nature of the system and measure the orbit and the companion's mass. Here we present our results from an RV campaign with the WIYN/Hydra multi-fiber spectrograph, where we used 26 nights so far during the 2014 and 2015 Kepler observing seasons to observe 5 Hydra one-degree diameter fields within the Kepler field. Our list of targets includes 131 Kepler beaming binary candidates, and we used additional fibers to observe 85 Kepler eclipsing binaries and 31 KOIs. A detailed comparison between the photometrically predicted companion's mass and the mass measured through RVs will improve our understanding of this young approach, and will support similar projects using data from current and future space-based time series photometry missions including K2, TESS, and PLATO. Our primary long term goal

  14. Effects of Data Sampling on the Results of Fourier Analysis of Radial-Velocity Fields in Spiral-Galaxy Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burlak, A. N.; Zasov, A. V.; Fridman, A. M.; Khoruzhi, O. V.

    2000-12-01

    Our main goal is to investigate the effects of data incompleteness on the results of Fourier analysis of line-of-sight velocity fields in the disks of spiral galaxies. We have carried out a number of numerical experiments, first with an artificially created simple velocity field and then with the velocity fields of two real galaxies, which qualitatively differ in data filling: NGC 157 and NGC 3631 with good and bad data filling, respectively. The field of purely circular velocities is chosen as the simplest artificial velocity field, because the circular velocities of spiral galaxies are much high than the residual (noncircular) velocities. Superimposing a "mask" simulating blank spots (holes) in the map of observational data on this artificial field has no effect on the results of Fourier analysis of this simplest field. A similar result is obtained for real galaxies with good data filling of the observed velocity fields. Superimposing arbitrarily shaped masks on the observed velocity field of NGC 157 in such a way that the field was filled by a mere 50% (at each radius) could not change appreciably the radial variations of large-scale Fourier harmonics. The situation qualitatively changes in attempting to fill the holes in the observed velocity field of NGC 3631 in some way. When missing velocities are artificially introduced by using the simplest model of purely circular gas rotation, the amplitudes and phases of the principal Fourier harmonics are distorted. In particular, a substantial distortion of the third harmonic also causes an increase in the error when determining the corotation radius from data of the filled field. When the filling of the velocity field is increased by degrading the spatial resolution, the amplitudes of most harmonics decrease throughout the entire disk region; as a result, their radial variations are smoothed out and the behavior of harmonic phases in the range of moderately high initial amplitudes can be distorted. An abnormal

  15. Pulsation in the atmosphere of the roAp star HD 24712. I. Spectroscopic observations and radial velocity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryabchikova, T.; Sachkov, M.; Weiss, W. W.; Kallinger, T.; Kochukhov, O.; Bagnulo, S.; Ilyin, I.; Landstreet, J. D.; Leone, F.; Lo Curto, G.; Lüftinger, T.; Lyashko, D.; Magazzù, A.

    2007-02-01

    Aims:We have investigated the structure of the pulsating atmosphere of one of the best studied rapidly oscillating Ap stars, HD 24712. Methods: For this purpose we analyzed spectra collected during 2001-2004. An extensive data set was obtained in 2004 simultaneously with the photometry of the Canadian MOST mini-satellite. This allows us to connect directly atmospheric dynamics observed as radial velocity variations with light variations seen in photometry. Results: We directly derived for the first time and for different chemical elements, respectively ions, phase shifts between photometric and radial velocity pulsation maxima indicating, as we suggest, different line formation depths in the atmosphere. This allowed us to estimate for the first time the propagation velocity of a pulsation wave in the outer stellar atmosphere of a roAp star to be slightly lower than the sound speed. We confirm large pulsation amplitudes (150-400 m s-1) for REE lines and the Hα core, while spectral lines of the other elements (Mg, Si, Ca, and Fe-peak elements) have nearly constant velocities. We did not find different pulsation amplitudes and phases for the lines of rare-earth elements before and after the Balmer jump, which supports the hypothesis of REE concentration in the upper atmosphere above the hydrogen line-forming layers. We also discuss radial velocity amplitudes and phases measured for individual spectral lines as tools for a 3D tomography of the atmosphere of HD 24712. Based on observations collected at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT), at the Nordic Optical Telescope (NOT), at the European Southern Observatory, Paranal, Chile, (DDT-274.D-5011), at the Telescopio Nazionale Galileo (TNG), and from MOST, a Canadian Space Agency mission operated jointly by Dynacon, Inc., the University of Toronto Institute of Aerospace Studies, and the University of British Columbia, with assistance from the University of Vienna. Tables 4, 5 and Fig. 9 are only available in

  16. A Preliminary Analysis on Empirical Attenuation of Absolute Velocity Response Spectra (1 to 10s) in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhakal, Y. P.; Kunugi, T.; Suzuki, W.; Aoi, S.

    2013-12-01

    The Mw 9.1 Tohoku-oki earthquake caused strong shakings of super high rise and high rise buildings constructed on deep sedimentary basins in Japan. Many people felt difficulty in moving inside the high rise buildings even on the Osaka basin located at distances as far as 800 km from the epicentral area. Several empirical equations are proposed to estimate the peak ground motions and absolute acceleration response spectra applicable mainly within 300 to 500km from the source area. On the other hand, Japan Meteorological Agency has recently proposed four classes of absolute velocity response spectra as suitable indices to qualitatively describe the intensity of long-period ground motions based on the observed earthquake records, human experiences, and actual damages that occurred in the high rise and super high rise buildings. The empirical prediction equations have been used in disaster mitigation planning as well as earthquake early warning. In this study, we discuss the results of our preliminary analysis on attenuation relation of absolute velocity response spectra calculated from the observed strong motion records including those from the Mw 9.1 Tohoku-oki earthquake using simple regression models with various model parameters. We used earthquakes, having Mw 6.5 or greater, and focal depths shallower than 50km, which occurred in and around Japanese archipelago. We selected those earthquakes for which the good quality records are available over 50 observation sites combined from K-NET and KiK-net. After a visual inspection on approximately 21,000 three component records from 36 earthquakes, we used about 15,000 good quality records in the period range of 1 to 10s within the hypocentral distance (R) of 800km. We performed regression analyses assuming the following five regression models. (1) log10Y (T) = c+ aMw - log10R - bR (2) log10Y (T) = c+ aMw - log10R - bR +gS (3) log10Y (T) = c+ aMw - log10R - bR + hD (4) log10Y (T) = c+ aMw - log10R - bR +gS +hD (5) log10Y

  17. ON THE COMPETITION BETWEEN RADIAL EXPANSION AND COULOMB COLLISIONS IN SHAPING THE ELECTRON VELOCITY DISTRIBUTION FUNCTION: KINETIC SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Landi, S.; Matteini, L.; Pantellini, F.

    2012-12-01

    We present numerical simulations of the solar wind using a fully kinetic model which takes into account the effects of particle's binary collisions in a quasi-neutral plasma in spherical expansion. Starting from an isotropic Maxwellian velocity distribution function for the electrons, we show that the combined effect of expansion and Coulomb collisions leads to the formation of two populations: a collision-dominated cold and dense population almost isotropic in velocity space and a weakly collisional, tenuous field-aligned and antisunward drifting population generated by mirror force focusing in the radially decreasing magnetic field. The relative weights and drift velocities for the two populations observed in our simulations are in excellent agreement with the relative weights and drift velocities for both core and strahl populations observed in the real solar wind. The radial evolution of the main moments of the electron velocity distribution function is in the range observed in the solar wind. The electron temperature anisotropy with respect to the magnetic field direction is found to be related to the ratio between the collisional time and the solar wind expansion time. Even though collisions are found to shape the electron velocity distributions and regulate the properties of the strahl, it is found that the heat flux is conveniently described by a collisionless model where a fraction of the electron thermal energy is advected at the solar wind speed. This reinforces the currently largely admitted fact that collisions in the solar wind are clearly insufficient to force the electron heat flux obey the classical Spitzer-Haerm expression where heat flux and temperature gradient are proportional to each other. The presented results show that the electron dynamics in the solar wind cannot be understood without considering the role of collisions.

  18. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Radial velocities in seven globular clusters (Lardo+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lardo, C.; Pancino, E.; Bellazzini, M.; Bragaglia, A.; Donati, P.; Gilmore, G.; Randich, S.; Feltzing, S.; Jeffries, R. D.; Vallenari, A.; Alfaro, E. J.; Allende Prieto, C.; Flaccomio, E.; Koposov, S. E.; Recio-Blanco, A.; Bergemann, M.; Carraro, G.; Costado, M. T.; Damiani, F.; Hourihane, A.; Jofree, P.; de Laverny, P.; Marconi, G.; Masseron, T.; Morbidelli, L.; Sacco, G. G.; Worley, C. C.

    2014-11-01

    Velocities are given for 1826 stars in the field of the globular clusters NGC 1851, NGC 2808, NGC 4372, NGC 4833, NGC 5927, NGC 6752, and NGC 7078 observed with FLAMES/GIRAFFE@VLT. The table provides the individual identifications, coordinates, V magnitudes, velocities and their associated uncertainties for each star. (2 data files).

  19. Southern Milky Way carbon stars - New candidates, JHK photometry, and radial velocities

    SciTech Connect

    Blanco, V.M.; Cook, K.H.; Schechter, P.L.; Aaronson, M.; Steward Observatory, Tucson, AZ; Mount Wilson and Las Campanas Observatories, Pasadena, CA )

    1989-07-01

    Data are presented for low-latitude southern Milky Way carbon stars. Coordinates and cross identifications are given for carbon stars (67 of which are confirmed new discoveries) in seven fields deemed to be unusually transparent. JHK photometry is presented for 520 stars. Velocities are presented for 393 stars. Improved coordinates are presented for selected stars in Westerlund's catalog. Averaged photometry and velocities are presented for a sample of 336 stars. 26 refs.

  20. Northern Milky Way carbon stars - New candidates, JHK photometry, and radial velocities

    SciTech Connect

    Blanco, V.M.; Cook, K.H.; Olszewski, E.W.; Schechter, P.L.; Aaronson, M. Steward Observatory, Tucson, AZ Mount Wilson and Las Campanas Observatories, Pasadena, CA MIT, Cambridge, MA )

    1990-08-01

    Data are presented for low-latitude northern Milky Way carbon stars. Coordinates and cross identifications are given for carbon stars in nine fields thought to be unusually transparent. Of these, 142 are confirmed new discoveries. Five hundred thirty-eight JHK photometric observations are reported for 480 stars. Six hundred twenty velocity measurements are presented for 424 stars. Improved coordinates are given for many previously discovered stars. Averaged JHK photometry and velocities are summarized for a sample of 400 stars. 25 refs.

  1. The Göttingen Solar Radial Velocity Project: Sub-m s-1 Doppler Precision from FTS Observations of the Sun as a Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemke, U.; Reiners, A.

    2016-09-01

    Radial velocity observations of stars are entering the sub-m s-1 domain revealing fundamental barriers for Doppler precision experiments. Observations of the Sun as a star can easily overcome the m s-1 photon limit but face other obstacles. We introduce the Göttingen Solar Radial Velocity Project with the goal of obtaining high-precision (cm s-1) radial velocity measurements of the Sun as a star with a Fourier Transform Spectrograph. In this first paper, we present the project and first results. The photon limit of our 2 minute observations is at the 2 cm s-1 level but is currently limited by strong instrumental systematics. A drift of a few m s-1 hr-1 is visible in all observing days, probably caused by vignetting of the solar disk in our fiber-coupled setup, and imperfections of our guiding system add further offsets in our data. Binning the data into 30 minute groups shows m s-1 stability after correcting for a daily and linear instrumental trend. Our results show the potential of Sun-as-a-star radial velocity measurements that can possibly be achieved after a substantial upgrade of our spectrograph coupling strategy. Sun-as-a-star observations can provide crucial empirical information about the radial velocity signal of convective motion and stellar activity and on the wavelength dependence of radial velocity signals caused by stellar line profile variations.

  2. THE M31 VELOCITY VECTOR. II. RADIAL ORBIT TOWARD THE MILKY WAY AND IMPLIED LOCAL GROUP MASS

    SciTech Connect

    Van der Marel, Roeland P.; Sohn, Sangmo Tony; Anderson, Jay; Brown, Tom; Fardal, Mark; Besla, Gurtina; Beaton, Rachael L.; Guhathakurta, Puragra

    2012-07-01

    We determine the velocity vector of M31 with respect to the Milky Way and use this to constrain the mass of the Local Group, based on Hubble Space Telescope proper-motion measurements of three fields presented in Paper I. We construct N-body models for M31 to correct the measurements for the contributions from stellar motions internal to M31. This yields an unbiased estimate for the M31 center-of-mass motion. We also estimate the center-of-mass motion independently, using the kinematics of satellite galaxies of M31 and the Local Group, following previous work but with an expanded satellite sample. All estimates are mutually consistent, and imply a weighted average M31 heliocentric transverse velocity of (v{sub W} , v{sub N} ) = (- 125.2 {+-} 30.8, -73.8 {+-} 28.4) km s{sup -1}. We correct for the reflex motion of the Sun using the most recent insights into the solar motion within the Milky Way, which imply a larger azimuthal velocity than previously believed. This implies a radial velocity of M31 with respect to the Milky Way of V{sub rad,M31} = -109.3 {+-} 4.4 km s{sup -1}, and a tangential velocity of V{sub tan,M31} = 17.0 km s{sup -1}, with a 1{sigma} confidence region of V{sub tan,M31} {<=} 34.3 km s{sup -1}. Hence, the velocity vector of M31 is statistically consistent with a radial (head-on collision) orbit toward the Milky Way. We revise prior estimates for the Local Group timing mass, including corrections for cosmic bias and scatter, and obtain M{sub LG} {identical_to} M{sub MW,vir} + M{sub M31,vir} = (4.93 {+-} 1.63) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 12} M{sub Sun }. Summing known estimates for the individual masses of M31 and the Milky Way obtained from other dynamical methods yields smaller uncertainties. Bayesian combination of the different estimates demonstrates that the timing argument has too much (cosmic) scatter to help much in reducing uncertainties on the Local Group mass, but its inclusion does tend to increase other estimates by {approx}10%. We

  3. The Radial Velocity and Mass of the White Dwarf of EX Hydrae Measured with Chandra

    SciTech Connect

    Mauche, C W; Hoogerwerf, R; Brickhouse, N S

    2004-03-01

    We present the first detection of orbital motion in the cataclysmic variable EX Hydrae based on X-ray data from the Chandra X-Ray Observatory. The large collecting area of the telescope and the high resolution of the HETG spectrometers allow for an unprecedented velocity accuracy of {approx}km s{sup -1} in the X-ray wavelength regime. We find an emission line velocity amplitude of 58.2{+-}3.7 km s{sup -1} and infer a white dwarf mass of 0.49{+-}0.13 M{sub {circle_dot}}, in good agreement with previous studies using optical, ultraviolet, and far ultraviolet data.

  4. The Radial Velocity and Mass of the White Dwarf of EX Hydrae Measured with Chandra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoogerwerf, R.; Brickhouse, N. S.; Mauche, C. W.

    2004-07-01

    We present the first detection of orbital motion in the cataclysmic variable EX Hydrae based on X-ray data from Chandra. The large collecting area of the telescope and the high resolution of the HETG spectrometers allow for an unprecedented velocity accuracy of ~15 km s-1 in the X-ray wavelength regime. We find an emission line velocity amplitude of 58.2+/-3.7 km s-1 and infer a white dwarf mass of 0.49+/-0.13 Msolar, in good agreement with previous studies using optical, ultraviolet, and far-ultraviolet data.

  5. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Radial velocities in M67. I. 1278 candidate members (Geller+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geller, A. M.; Latham, D. W.; Mathieu, R. D.

    2015-10-01

    This is the first in a series of papers studying the dynamical state of the old open cluster M67 through precise radial velocities. This is also the paper LXVII of the WIYN Open Cluster Study. Our radial velocity survey of M67 began as part of the dissertation work of Mathieu (1983PhDT.........8M), taking advantage of the CfA Digital Speedometers (DS). Three nearly identical instruments were used, initially on the MMT (from HJD2445337 to HJD2450830) and 1.5m Tillinghast Reflector (from HJD2444184 to HJD2454958) at the Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory on Mount Hopins, Arizona, and then later on the 1.5m Wyeth Reflector (from HJD2445722 to HJD2453433) at the Oak Ridge Observatory in the Town of Harvard, Massachusetts. Subsequently the M67 target samples were expanded several times. Radial velocities measurements from other programs were integrated into the database, and our observational facilities were extended to include Hydra Multi-Object Spectrograph (MOS) at the WIYN Observatory (from HJD2453386 to HJD2456709) and the new Tillinghast Reflector Echelle Spectrograph (TRES) on the Tillinghast Reflector (from HJD2455143 to HJD2456801). Details about the telescopes, observing procedures, and data reductions of spectra obtained with the CfA DS can be found in Latham (1985srv..conf...21L, 1992ASPC...32..110L). The corresponding information for spectra obtained with Hydra at the WIYN Observatory can be found in Geller et al. 2008 (cat. J/AJ/135/2264), Geller et al. 2010 (cat. J/AJ/139/1383) and Hole et al. (2009). TRES is a stabilized fiber-fed echelle spectrograph with a CCD detector and resolution of 44000. The initial CfA sample was defined in 1982. The last surviving CfA Digital Speedometer, on the 1.5m Tillinghast Reflector, was retired in the summer of 2009. Over the following five observing seasons, TRES was used to continue the radial velocity observations of targets (mostly binaries) from both the CfA and the WIYN samples. Importantly, Roger Griffin and James

  6. Data reduction, radial velocities and stellar parameters from spectra in the very low signal-to-noise domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malavolta, Luca

    2013-10-01

    Large astronomical facilities usually provide data reduction pipeline designed to deliver ready-to-use scientific data, and too often as- tronomers are relying on this to avoid the most difficult part of an astronomer job Standard data reduction pipelines however are usu- ally designed and tested to have good performance on data with av- erage Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR) data, and the issues that are related with the reduction of data in the very low SNR domain are not taken int account properly. As a result, informations in data with low SNR are not optimally exploited. During the last decade our group has collected thousands of spec- tra using the GIRAFFE spectrograph at Very Large Telescope (Chile) of the European Southern Observatory (ESO) to determine the ge- ometrical distance and dynamical state of several Galactic Globular Clusters but ultimately the analysis has been hampered by system- atics in data reduction, calibration and radial velocity measurements. Moreover these data has never been exploited to get other informa- tions like temperature and metallicity of stars, because considered too noisy for these kind of analyses. In this thesis we focus our attention on data reduction and analysis of spectra with very low SNR. The dataset we analyze in this thesis comprises 7250 spectra for 2771 stars of the Globular Cluster M 4 (NGC 6121) in the wavelength region 5145-5360Å obtained with GIRAFFE. Stars from the upper Red Giant Branch down to the Main Sequence have been observed in very different conditions, including nights close to full moon, and reaching SNR - 10 for many spectra in the dataset. We will first review the basic steps of data reduction and spec- tral extraction, adapting techniques well tested in other field (like photometry) but still under-developed in spectroscopy. We improve the wavelength dispersion solution and the correction of radial veloc- ity shift between day-time calibrations and science observations by following a completely

  7. High-resolution spectroscopy of RGB stars in the Sagittarius streams. I. Radial velocities and chemical abundances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monaco, L.; Bellazzini, M.; Bonifacio, P.; Buzzoni, A.; Ferraro, F. R.; Marconi, G.; Sbordone, L.; Zaggia, S.

    2007-03-01

    Context: The Sagittarius (Sgr) dwarf spheroidal galaxy is currently being disrupted under the strain of the Milky Way. A reliable reconstruction of Sgr star formation history can only be obtained by combining core and stream information. Aims: We present radial velocities for 67 stars belonging to the Sgr Stream. For 12 stars in the sample we also present iron (Fe) and α-element (Mg, Ca) abundances. Methods: Spectra were secured using different high resolution facilities: UVES@VLT, HARPS@3.6 m, and SARG@TNG. Radial velocities are obtained through cross correlation with a template spectra. Concerning chemical analysis, for the various elements, selected line equivalent widths were measured and abundances computed using the WIDTH code and ATLAS model atmospheres. Results: The velocity dispersion of the trailing tail is found to be σ = 8.3 ± 0.9 km s-1, i.e., significantly lower than in the core of the Sgr galaxy and marginally lower than previous estimates in the same portion of the stream. Stream stars follow the same trend as Sgr main body stars in the [ α/Fe] vs. [Fe/H] plane. However, stars are, on average, more metal poor in the stream than in the main body. This effect is slightly stronger in stars belonging to more ancient wraps of the stream, according to currently accepted models of Sgr disruption. Based on observations taken at ESO VLT Kueyen telescope (Cerro Paranal, Chile, program: 075.B-0127(A)) and 3.6 m telescope (La Silla, Chile). Also based on spectroscopic observations taken at the Telescopio Nazionale Galileo, operated by the Fundación G. Galilei of INAF at the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos of the IAC (La Palma, Spain). Appendix A and Table [see full text] are only available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  8. Effects of radial and circumferential inlet velocity profile distortions on performance of a short-length double-annular ram induction combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schultz, D. F.; Perkins, P. J.

    1972-01-01

    Inlet air velocity profile tests were conducted on a full-scale short-length 102-centimeter-diameter annual combustor designed for advanced gas turbine engine applications. The inlet profiles studied include radial distortions that were center peaked, and tip peaked, as well as a circumferential distortion which was center peaked for one-third of the circumference and flat for the other two-thirds. An increase in combustor pressure loss was the most significant effect of the radial air velocity distortions. With the circumferential distortion, exit temperature pattern factor doubled when compared to a flat velocity profile.

  9. VizieR Online Data Catalog: M4 Core Project with HST. Radial velocities (Malavolta+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malavolta, L.; Piotto, G.; Bedin, L. R.; Sneden, C.; Nascimbeni, V.; Sommariva, V.

    2016-07-01

    The spectra for our project were originally used by Sommariva et al. (2009A&A...493..947S) to study the internal velocity dispersion of M4 and to search for spectroscopic binaries. A total of 2771 stars covering colour-magnitude diagram (CMD) positions from the upper RGB to about 1mag fainter than the main-sequence turnoff (TO) luminosity were observed between 2003 and 2009, including 306 new spectra obtained in 2009 and targeting MS stars already observed in the previous epochs. Determination of the M 4 velocity dispersion and binary star fraction were the prime motivators for obtaining these data. Therefore nearly all stars were observed at least twice, and three or more spectra were obtained for nearly 40 per cent of the sample. (2 data files).

  10. Chromospheric activity and rotation of FGK stars in the solar vicinity. An estimation of the radial velocity jitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Arnáiz, R.; Maldonado, J.; Montes, D.; Eiroa, C.; Montesinos, B.

    2010-09-01

    Context. Chromospheric activity produces both photometric and spectroscopic variations that can be mistaken as planets. Large spots crossing the stellar disc can produce planet-like periodic variations in the light curve of a star. These spots clearly affect the spectral line profiles, and their perturbations alter the line centroids creating a radial velocity jitter that might “contaminate” the variations induced by a planet. Precise chromospheric activity measurements are needed to estimate the activity-induced noise that should be expected for a given star. Aims: We obtain precise chromospheric activity measurements and projected rotational velocities for nearby (d ≤ 25 pc) cool (spectral types F to K) stars, to estimate their expected activity-related jitter. As a complementary objective, we attempt to obtain relationships between fluxes in different activity indicator lines, that permit a transformation of traditional activity indicators, i.e., Ca ii H & K lines, to others that hold noteworthy advantages. Methods: We used high resolution (~50 000) echelle optical spectra. Standard data reduction was performed using the IRAF echelle package. To determine the chromospheric emission of the stars in the sample, we used the spectral subtraction technique. We measured the equivalent widths of the chromospheric emission lines in the subtracted spectrum and transformed them into fluxes by applying empirical equivalent width and flux relationships. Rotational velocities were determined using the cross-correlation technique. To infer activity-related radial velocity (RV) jitter, we used empirical relationships between this jitter and the R'_HK index. Results: We measured chromospheric activity, as given by different indicators throughout the optical spectra, and projected rotational velocities for 371 nearby cool stars. We have built empirical relationships among the most important chromospheric emission lines. Finally, we used the measured chromospheric activity

  11. Radial velocity confirmation of Kepler-91 b. Additional evidence of its planetary nature using the Calar Alto/CAFE instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lillo-Box, J.; Barrado, D.; Henning, Th.; Mancini, L.; Ciceri, S.; Figueira, P.; Santos, N. C.; Aceituno, J.; Sánchez, S. F.

    2014-08-01

    The object transiting the star Kepler-91 was recently assessed as being of planetary nature. The confirmation was achieved by analysing the light-curve modulations observed in the Kepler data. However, quasi-simultaneous studies claimed a self-luminous nature for this object, thus rejecting it as a planet. In this work, we apply anindependent approach to confirm the planetary mass of Kepler-91b by using multi-epoch high-resolution spectroscopy obtained with the Calar Alto Fiber-fed Echelle spectrograph (CAFE). We obtain the physical and orbital parameters with the radial velocity technique. In particular, we derive a value of 1.09 ± 0.20 MJup for the mass of Kepler-91b, in excellent agreement with our previous estimate that was based on the orbital brightness modulation.

  12. Predicted space motions for hypervelocity and runaway stars: proper motions and radial velocities for the Gaia Era

    SciTech Connect

    Kenyon, Scott J.; Brown, Warren R.; Geller, Margaret J.; Bromley, Benjamin C. E-mail: wbrown@cfa.harvard.edu E-mail: bromley@physics.utah.edu

    2014-10-01

    We predict the distinctive three-dimensional space motions of hypervelocity stars (HVSs) and runaway stars moving in a realistic Galactic potential. For nearby stars with distances less than 10 kpc, unbound stars are rare; proper motions alone rarely isolate bound HVSs and runaways from indigenous halo stars. At large distances of 20-100 kpc, unbound HVSs are much more common than runaways; radial velocities easily distinguish both from indigenous halo stars. Comparisons of the predictions with existing observations are encouraging. Although the models fail to match observations of solar-type HVS candidates from SEGUE, they agree well with data for B-type HVS and runaways from other surveys. Complete samples of g ≲ 20 stars with Gaia should provide clear tests of formation models for HVSs and runaways and will enable accurate probes of the shape of the Galactic potential.

  13. Fishing in Tidal Streams: New Radial Velocity and Proper Motion Constraints on the Orbit of the Anticenter Stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grillmair, C. J.; Carlin, Jeffrey L.; Majewski, Steven R.

    2008-12-01

    We have obtained radial velocity measurements for stars in two widely separated fields in the Anticenter Stream. Combined with SDSS/USNO-B proper motions, the new measurements allow us to establish that the stream is on a nearly circular, somewhat inclined, prograde orbit around the Galaxy. While the orbital eccentricity is similar to that previously determined for the Monoceros stream, the sizes, inclinations, and positions of the orbits for the two systems differ significantly. Integrating our best-fitting Anticenter Stream orbit forward, we find that it is closely aligned along and lies almost on top of a streamlike feature previously designated the "Eastern Banded Structure." The position of this feature coincides with the apogalacticon of the orbit. We tentatively conclude that this feature is the next wrap of the Anticenter Stream.

  14. The Orbits of the Quadruple Star System 88 Tauri A from PHASES Differential Astrometry and Radial Velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lane, Benjamin F.; Muterspaugh, Matthew W.; Fekel, Francis C.; Williamson, Michael; Browne, Stanley; Konacki, Maciej; Burke, Bernard F.; Colavita, M. M.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Shao, M.

    2007-11-01

    We have used high-precision differential astrometry from the Palomar High-precision Astrometric Search for Exoplanet Systems (PHASES) project and radial velocity measurements covering a time span of 20 years to determine the orbital parameters of the 88 Tau A system. 88 Tau is a complex hierarchical multiple system comprising a total of six stars; we have studied the brightest four, consisting of two short-period pairs orbiting each other with an ~18 yr period. We present the first orbital solution for one of the short-period pairs, and determine the masses of the components and distance to the system to the level of a few percent. In addition, our astrometric measurements allow us to make the first determination of the mutual inclinations of the orbits. We find that the subsystems are not coplanar.

  15. An astro-comb calibrated solar telescope to study solar activity and search for the radial velocity signature of Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, David; HARPS-N Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    We recently demonstrated sub-m/s sensitivity in measuring the radial velocity (RV) between the Earth and Sun using a simple solar telescope feeding the HARPS-N spectrograph at the Italian National Telescope, which is calibrated with a laser frequency comb calibrator optimized for calibrating high resolution spectrographs and referred to as an astro-comb. We are using the solar telescope to characterize the effects of stellar (solar) RV jitter due to activity on the solar surface over the course of many hours every clear day. With the help of solar satellites such as the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), we are characterizing the correlation between observed RV and detailed imaging of the solar photosphere. We plan to use these tools to mitigate the effects of stellar jitter with the goal of the detection of Venus from its solar RV signature, thus showing the potential of the RV technique to detect true Earth-twins.

  16. “MODAL NOISE” IN SINGLE-MODE FIBERS: A CAUTIONARY NOTE FOR HIGH PRECISION RADIAL VELOCITY INSTRUMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Halverson, Samuel; Roy, Arpita; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Schwab, Christian

    2015-12-01

    Exploring the use of single-mode fibers (SMFs) in high precision Doppler spectrometers has become increasingly attractive since the advent of diffraction-limited adaptive optics systems on large-aperture telescopes. Spectrometers fed with these fibers can be made significantly smaller than typical “seeing-limited” instruments, greatly reducing cost and overall complexity. Importantly, classical mode interference and speckle issues associated with multi-mode fibers, also known as “modal noise,” are mitigated when using SMFs, which also provide perfect radial and azimuthal image scrambling. However, SMFs do support multiple polarization modes, an issue that is generally ignored for larger-core fibers given the large number of propagation modes. Since diffraction gratings used in most high resolution astronomical instruments have dispersive properties that are sensitive to incident polarization changes, any birefringence variations in the fiber can cause variations in the efficiency profile, degrading illumination stability. Here we present a cautionary note outlining how the polarization properties of SMFs can affect the radial velocity (RV) measurement precision of high resolution spectrographs. This work is immediately relevant to the rapidly expanding field of diffraction-limited, extreme precision RV spectrographs that are currently being designed and built by a number of groups.

  17. Precision velocimetry planet hunting with PARAS: current performance and lessons to inform future extreme precision radial velocity instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Arpita; Chakraborty, Abhijit; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Chaturvedi, Priyanka; Prasad, Neelam J. S. S. V.; Shah, Vishal; Pathan, F. M.; Anandarao, B. G.

    2016-08-01

    The PRL Advanced Radial-velocity Abu-sky Search (PARAS) instrument is a fiber-fed stabilized high-resolution cross-dispersed echelle spectrograph, located on the 1.2 m telescope in Mt. Abu India. Designed for exoplanet detection, PARAS is capable of single-shot spectral coverage of 3800 - 9600 Å, and currently achieving radial velocity (RV) precisions approaching 1 m s-1 over several months using simultaneous ThAr calibration. As such, it is one of the few dedicated stabilized fiber-fed spectrographs on small (1-2 m) telescopes that are able to fill an important niche in RV follow-up and stellar characterization. The success of ground-based RV surveys is motivating the push into extreme precisions, with goals of 10 cm s-1 in the optical and <1 m s-1 in the near-infrared (NIR). Lessons from existing instruments like PARAS are invaluable in informing hardware design, providing pipeline prototypes, and guiding scientific surveys. Here we present our current precision estimates of PARAS based on observations of bright RV standard stars, and describe the evolution of the data reduction and RV analysis pipeline as instrument characterization progresses and we gather longer baselines of data. Secondly, we discuss how our experience with PARAS is a critical component in the development of future cutting edge instruments like (1) the Habitable Zone Planet Finder (HPF), a near-infrared spectrograph optimized to look for planets around M dwarfs, scheduled to be commissioned on the Hobby Eberly Telescope in 2017, and (2) the NEID optical spectrograph, designed in response to the NN-EXPLORE call for an extreme precision Doppler spectrometer (EPDS) for the WIYN telescope. In anticipation of instruments like TESS and GAIA, the ground-based RV support system is being reinforced. We emphasize that instruments like PARAS will play an intrinsic role in providing both complementary follow-up and battlefront experience for these next generation of precision velocimeters.

  18. The VMC survey - XXIII. Model fitting of light and radial velocity curves of Small Magellanic Cloud classical Cepheids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marconi, M.; Molinaro, R.; Ripepi, V.; Cioni, M.-R. L.; Clementini, G.; Moretti, M. I.; Ragosta, F.; de Grijs, R.; Groenewegen, M. A. T.; Ivanov, V. D.

    2017-04-01

    We present the results of the χ2 minimization model fitting technique applied to optical and near-infrared photometric and radial velocity data for a sample of nine fundamental and three first overtone classical Cepheids in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). The near-infrared photometry (JK filters) was obtained by the European Southern Observatory (ESO) public survey 'VISTA near-infrared Y, J, Ks survey of the Magellanic Clouds system' (VMC). For each pulsator, isoperiodic model sequences have been computed by adopting a non-linear convective hydrodynamical code in order to reproduce the multifilter light and (when available) radial velocity curve amplitudes and morphological details. The inferred individual distances provide an intrinsic mean value for the SMC distance modulus of 19.01 mag and a standard deviation of 0.08 mag, in agreement with the literature. Moreover, the intrinsic masses and luminosities of the best-fitting model show that all these pulsators are brighter than the canonical evolutionary mass-luminosity relation (MLR), suggesting a significant efficiency of core overshooting and/or mass-loss. Assuming that the inferred deviation from the canonical MLR is only due to mass-loss, we derive the expected distribution of percentage mass-loss as a function of both the pulsation period and the canonical stellar mass. Finally, a good agreement is found between the predicted mean radii and current period-radius (PR) relations in the SMC available in the literature. The results of this investigation support the predictive capabilities of the adopted theoretical scenario and pave the way for the application to other extensive data bases at various chemical compositions, including the VMC Large Magellanic Cloud pulsators and Galactic Cepheids with Gaia parallaxes.

  19. RADIAL VELOCITY PLANETS DE-ALIASED: A NEW, SHORT PERIOD FOR SUPER-EARTH 55 Cnc e

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, Rebekah I.; Fabrycky, Daniel C. E-mail: daniel.fabrycky@gmail.co

    2010-10-10

    Radial velocity measurements of stellar reflex motion have revealed many extrasolar planets, but gaps in the observations produce aliases, spurious frequencies that are frequently confused with the planets' orbital frequencies. In the case of Gl 581 d, the distinction between an alias and the true frequency was the distinction between a frozen, dead planet and a planet possibly hospitable to life. To improve the characterization of planetary systems, we describe how aliases originate and present a new approach for distinguishing between orbital frequencies and their aliases. Our approach harnesses features in the spectral window function to compare the amplitude and phase of predicted aliases with peaks present in the data. We apply it to confirm prior alias distinctions for the planets GJ 876 d and HD 75898 b. We find that the true periods of Gl 581 d and HD 73526 b/c remain ambiguous. We revise the periods of HD 156668 b and 55 Cnc e, which were afflicted by daily aliases. For HD 156668 b, the correct period is 1.2699 days and the minimum mass is (3.1 {+-} 0.4) M{sub +}. For 55 Cnc e, the correct period is 0.7365 days-the shortest of any known planet-and the minimum mass is (8.3 {+-} 0.3) M{sub +}. This revision produces a significantly improved five-planet Keplerian fit for 55 Cnc, and a self-consistent dynamical fit describes the data just as well. As radial velocity techniques push to ever-smaller planets, often found in systems of multiple planets, distinguishing true periods from aliases will become increasingly important.

  20. First Results From The SDSS-III Multi-object APO Radial-velocity Exoplanet Large-area Survey (MARVELS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Jian; Mahadevan, S.; Lee, B.; Wan, X.; Groot, J.; Zhao, B.; Hearty, F.; van Eyken, J.; Chang, L.; Hanna, K.; Varosi, F.; Chen, Z.; Fleming, S.; Kane, S.; Malik, M.; Guo, P.; Leger, F.; Liu, J.; Ford, E. B.; Agol, E.; Gaudi, S.; Ford, H.; Schneider, D.; Holtzman, J.; Sivarani, T.; Walszczan, A.; Niedzielski, A.; Martin, E.; Snedden, S.; Pan, K.

    2008-09-01

    We present the first light results from the Multi-object APO Radial-Velocity Exoplanet Large-area Survey (MARVELS). MARVELS is part of the on-going Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) III survey which started in July 2008 and will end in July 2014. The data are taken with a multi-object fixed delay interferometer coupled to a R=11,000 spectrograph capable of acquiring precision radial velocities (3-20 m/s depending on V magnitudes) for 60 objects simultaneously in the 3 degree field of view of the SDSS telescope. MARVELS is to monitor a total of 11,000 V=8-12 relatively bright survey stars over 800 square degrees over the 6 years. The survey stars include about 90% F8 and later type main sequence stars and subgiants, and 10% G and K giants with V=7.6-12. MARVELS will produce the largest statistically well defined sample of giant planets drawn from a large of host stars with a diverse set of masses, compositions, and ages which will be used to study exoplanet diversity and planet formation, migration & dynamical evolution. It will also possibly discover rare planet systems and identify signposts for lower-mass or more distant planets. The first two year survey data will be released to the public in 2011. A new planet in a spectroscopic binary system discovered in the MARVELS pilot program will also be reported. We would like to thank the W.M. Keck Foundation, Sloan Foundation, NSF, NASA and UF for support.

  1. Results of interferometric observations of the F-corona radial velocity field between 3 and 7 solar radii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shcheglov, P. V.; Shestakova, L. I.; Aimanov, A. K.

    1987-02-01

    During the July 31, 1981 eclipse, F-corona interferograms were obtained near the 5184-A Mg I line covering the 3-7 solar radius region. A Fabry-Perot etalon in the exit pupil and a contact fiber-optic intensifier were used, the instrumental FWHM being 0.5 A = about 30 km/s. Radial velocities of interplanetary dust were obtained measuring Doppler shift of absorption lines. A prograde Keplerian velocity component was found, giving after averaging Vr = (5.4 + or - 0.7)R/solar radius + (5 + or - 4) km/s, as well as a retrograde motion. At 6-7 solar radius near the north coronal hole, a local stream with Vr = +130 km/s was observed. Although at large distances from the sun the sky brightness exceeds that of the F-corona, absorption lines are absent, so the sky brightness continuous component is predominant, and the K-corona scattered light may be its main source.

  2. Rotational and Radial Velocities of 1.3-2.2 M ⊙ Red Giants in Open Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlberg, Joleen K.

    2014-06-01

    This study presents the rotational distribution of red giant (RG) stars in 11 old to intermediate age open clusters. The masses of these stars are all above the Kraft break, so they lose negligible amounts of their birth angular momentum (AM) during the main-sequence (MS) evolution. However, they do span a mass range with quite different AM distributions imparted during formation, with the stars less massive than ~1.6M ⊙ arriving on the MS with lower rotation rates than the more massive stars. The majority of RGs in this study are slow rotators across the entire red giant branch regardless of mass, supporting the picture that intermediate-mass stars rapidly spin down when they evolve off the MS and develop convection zones capable of driving a magnetic dynamo. Nevertheless, a small fraction of RGs in open clusters show some level of enhanced rotation, and faster rotators are as common in these clusters as in the field RG population. Most of these enhanced rotators appear to be red clump stars, which is also true of the underlying stellar sample, while others are clearly RGs that are above or below the clump. In addition to rotational velocities, the radial velocities (RVs) and membership probabilities of individual stars are also presented. Cluster heliocentric RVs for NGC 6005 and Pismis 18 are reported for the first time.

  3. Rotational and radial velocities of 1.3-2.2 M {sub ☉} red giants in open clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Carlberg, Joleen K.

    2014-06-01

    This study presents the rotational distribution of red giant (RG) stars in 11 old to intermediate age open clusters. The masses of these stars are all above the Kraft break, so they lose negligible amounts of their birth angular momentum (AM) during the main-sequence (MS) evolution. However, they do span a mass range with quite different AM distributions imparted during formation, with the stars less massive than ∼1.6M {sub ☉} arriving on the MS with lower rotation rates than the more massive stars. The majority of RGs in this study are slow rotators across the entire red giant branch regardless of mass, supporting the picture that intermediate-mass stars rapidly spin down when they evolve off the MS and develop convection zones capable of driving a magnetic dynamo. Nevertheless, a small fraction of RGs in open clusters show some level of enhanced rotation, and faster rotators are as common in these clusters as in the field RG population. Most of these enhanced rotators appear to be red clump stars, which is also true of the underlying stellar sample, while others are clearly RGs that are above or below the clump. In addition to rotational velocities, the radial velocities (RVs) and membership probabilities of individual stars are also presented. Cluster heliocentric RVs for NGC 6005 and Pismis 18 are reported for the first time.

  4. Radial velocity observations of the 2015 Mar. 20 eclipse. A benchmark Rossiter-McLaughlin curve with zero free parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiners, A.; Lemke, U.; Bauer, F.; Beeck, B.; Huke, P.

    2016-10-01

    Spectroscopic observations of a solar eclipse can provide unique information for solar and exoplanet research; the huge amplitude of the Rossiter-McLaughlin (RM) effect during solar eclipse and the high precision of solar radial velocities (RVs) allow detailed comparison between observations and RV models, and they provide information about the solar surface and about spectral line formation that are otherwise difficult to obtain. On March 20, 2015, we obtained 159 spectra of the Sun as a star with the solar telescope and the Fourier Transform Spectrograph at the Institut für Astrophysik Göttingen, 76 spectra were taken during partial solar eclipse. We obtained RVs using I2 as wavelength reference and determined the RM curve with a peak-to-peak amplitude of almost 1.4 km s-1 at typical RV precision better than 1 m s-1. We modeled the disk-integrated solar RVs using well-determined parameterizations of solar surface velocities, limb darkening, and information about convective blueshift from 3D magnetohydrodynamic simulations. We confirm that convective blueshift is crucial to understand solar RVs during eclipse. Our best model reproduced the observations to within a relative precision of 10% with residuals lower than 30 m s-1. We cross-checked parameterizations of velocity fields using a Dopplergram from the Solar Dynamics Observatory and conclude that disk-integration of the Dopplergram does not provide correct information about convective blueshift necessary for m s-1 RV work. As main limitation for modeling RVs during eclipses, we identified limited knowledge about convective blueshift and line shape as functions of solar limb angle. We suspect that our model line profiles are too shallow at limb angles larger than μ = 0.6, resulting in incorrect weighting of the velocities across the solar disk. Alternative explanations cannot be excluded, such as suppression of convection in magnetic areas and undiscovered systematics during eclipse observations. To make

  5. ASTROMETRY AND RADIAL VELOCITIES OF THE PLANET HOST M DWARF GJ 317: NEW TRIGONOMETRIC DISTANCE, METALLICITY, AND UPPER LIMIT TO THE MASS OF GJ 317b

    SciTech Connect

    Anglada-Escude, Guillem; Boss, Alan P.; Weinberger, Alycia J.; Butler, R. Paul; Thompson, Ian B.; Vogt, Steven S.; Rivera, Eugenio J.

    2012-02-10

    We have obtained precision astrometry of the planet host M dwarf GJ 317 in the framework of the Carnegie Astrometric Planet Search project. The new astrometric measurements give a distance determination of 15.3 pc, 65% further than previous estimates. The resulting absolute magnitudes suggest that it is metal-rich and more massive than previously assumed. This result strengthens the correlation between high metallicity and the presence of gas giants around low-mass stars. At 15.3 pc, the minimal astrometric amplitude for planet candidate GJ 317b is 0.3 mas (edge-on orbit), just below our astrometric sensitivity. However, given the relatively large number of observations and good astrometric precision, a Bayesian Monte Carlo Markov Chain analysis indicates that the mass of planet b has to be smaller than twice the minimum mass with a 99% confidence level, with a most likely value of 2.5 M{sub Jup}. Additional radial velocity (RV) measurements obtained with Keck by the Lick-Carnegie Planet search program confirm the presence of an additional very long period planet candidate, with a period of 20 years or more. Even though such an object will imprint a large astrometric wobble on the star, its curvature is yet not evident in the astrometry. Given high metallicity, and the trend indicating that multiple systems are rich in low-mass companions, this system is likely to host additional low-mass planets in its habitable zone that can be readily detected with state-of-the-art optical and near-infrared RV measurements.

  6. Multiplexing Precision Radial Velocities with the Michigan/Magellan Fiber System: Searching for Hot Jupiters in Southern Open Star Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, John Ira; Mateo, Mario L.; White, Russel J.; Crane, Jeffrey D.; Shectman, Stephen A.; M2FS Instrument Team

    2017-01-01

    The Michigan/Magellan Fiber System enables multiplexed, precision radial velocity surveys of open star clusters for warm- and hot-Jupiter exoplanetary companions while simultaneously allowing detailed study of stellar properties to V~17. To create this capability, we developed a novel mechanism to improve its maximum resolving power from ~20,000 to ~60,000 along with an automated control system that enables users to rapidly reconfigure M2FS for different scientific programs. We report the results of a survey of 126 photometric FGK members of the young (141 Myr), nearby (346 pc) open star cluster NGC 2516 and 100 photometric FGK members plus 25 candidate members of the young (72 Myr), nearby (491 pc) open cluster NGC 2422 (M 47). Our results show M2FS can achieve RV precisions in the 20-60 m/s range for up to 128 stars simultaneously while our median RV precision of 80 m/s on individual epochs, which span a temporal baseline of 1.1 yrs, enables us to investigate membership and stellar binarity and search for sub-stellar companions. We also report the methods developed to make precise spectroscopic measurements of Teff (±30 K), [Fe/H] and [α/Fe] (±0.02 dex), and vr sin(i) (±0.3 km/s). We determine membership probabilities and RV variability probabilities for our sample along with candidate companion orbital periods for a select subset of stars. We identify 81 RV members in NGC 2516, 27 spectroscopic binaries (17 previously identified as photometric binaries), and 16 other stars that show significant RV variability after accounting for average stellar jitter found to be at the 74 m/s level. In NGC 2422 we identify 57 members, 11 spectroscopic binaries, and 3 other stars that show significant RV variability after accounting for an average jitter of 138 m/s. We use Monte Carlo simulations to verify our stellar jitter measurements, determine the proportion of exoplanets and stellar companions to which we are sensitive, and estimate companion mass limits for our

  7. High S/N Spectroscopy and Radial Velocities of Field BHB Tip Stars Similar to KIC 1718290

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, E.; O'Connell, C.; Fontaine, G.

    2014-04-01

    In a followup to Östensen et al.'s (2012) discovery of the first g-mode pulsator found on the classical blue horizontal branch (BHB), we present atmospheric parameters for ten blue field stars known to have similar effective temperatures and gravities, plus radial velocities for seven of them, as a first step towards investigating the overall properties of these stars. All of the field BHB tip stars have temperatures and gravities that place them in a narrow region below the main sequence and above the gap separating them from the hotter and more compact sdB stars. Interestingly, half of the ten BHB tip stars exhibit higher metallicities and greater than solar He abundances similar to, although not quite as high as, the BHB pulsator KIC 1718290, while the other half have much lower metallicities and He abundances, more typical of those observed in sdB stars. RV's determined from five or more MMT spectra each for KIC 1718290 and seven of the other BHB tip stars show that none exhibit significant RV variations at the 2 to 3 km s-1 level on time scales shorter than a day or two; the variations were no larger for two stars reobserved after an interval of two months nor for one star that was observed over two years. Such velocity variations are comparable to those we have measured previously for sdB stars with MS companions, several of which are now known to have orbital periods of the order of a couple of years. The magnitudes and galactic latitudes of the stars in our BHB tip sample are consistent with membership in the galactic disk, rather than the halo.

  8. Finding binaries from phase modulation of pulsating stars with Kepler - IV. Detection limits and radial velocity verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Simon J.; Shibahashi, Hiromoto; Bedding, Timothy R.

    2016-10-01

    We explore the detection limits of the phase modulation (PM) method of finding binary systems among multiperiodic pulsating stars. The method is an attractive way of finding non-transiting planets in the habitable zones of intermediate-mass stars, whose rapid rotation inhibits detections via the radial velocity (RV) method. While oscillation amplitudes of a few mmag are required to find planets, many δ Scuti stars have these amplitudes. In suboptimal cases where the signal to noise of the oscillations is lower, low-mass brown dwarfs (˜13MJup) are detectable at orbital periods longer than about 1 yr, and the lowest mass main-sequence stars (0.1-0.2 M⊙) are detectable at all orbital periods where the PM method can be applied. We use purpose-written Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) software for the calculation of the PM orbits, which offers robust uncertainties for comparison with RV solutions. Using Kepler data and ground-based RVs, we verify that these two methods are in agreement, even at short orbital periods where the PM method undersamples the orbit. We develop new theory to account for the undersampling of the time delays, which is also necessary for the inclusion of RVs as observational data in the MCMC software. We show that combining RVs with time delays substantially refines the orbits because of the complementarity of working in both the spatial (PM) and velocity (RV) domains simultaneously. Software outputs were tested through an extensive hare-and-hounds exercise, covering a wide range of orbital configurations including binaries containing two pulsators.

  9. The precision radial velocity error budget for the Gemini High-resolution Optical SpecTrograph (GHOST)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ireland, Michael J.; Artigau, Étienne; Burley, Greg; Edgar, Michael; Margheim, Steve; Robertson, Gordon; Pazder, John; McDermid, Richard; Zhelem, Ross

    2016-08-01

    The Gemini High-resolution Optical SpecTrograph (GHOST) is a fiber fed spectrograph primarily designed for high efficiency and broad wavelength coverage (363 -1000nm), with an anticipated commissioning early in 2018. The primary scientific goal of the Precision Radial Velocity (PRV) mode will be follow-up of relatively faint (R>12) transiting exoplanet targets, especially from the TESS mission. In the PRV mode, the 1.2 arcsec diameter stellar image will be split 19 ways, combined in a single slit with a simultaneous Th/Xe reference source, dispersed at a resolving power of 80,000 and imaged onto two detectors. The spectrograph will be thermally stabilized in the Gemini pier laboratory, and modal noise will be reduced below other sources through the use of a fiber agitator. Unlike other precision high resolution spectrographs, GHOST will not be pressure controlled (although pressure will be monitored precisely), and there will be no double scrambler or shaped (e.g. octagonal) fibers. Instead, GHOST will have to rely on simultaneous two-color imaging of the slit and the simultaneous Th/Xe fiber to correct for variable fiber illumination and focal-ratio degradation. This configuration presents unique challenges in estimating a PRV error budget.

  10. How eclipse time variations, eclipse duration variations, and radial velocities can reveal S-type planets in close eclipsing binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oshagh, M.; Heller, R.; Dreizler, S.

    2016-12-01

    While about a dozen transiting planets have been found in wide orbits around an inner, close stellar binary (so-called "P-type planets"), no planet has yet been detected orbiting only one star (a so-called "S-type planet") in an eclipsing binary. This is despite a large number of eclipsing binary systems discovered with the Kepler telescope. Here we propose a new detection method for these S-type planets, which uses a correlation between the stellar radial velocities (RVs), eclipse timing variations (ETVs), and eclipse duration variations (EDVs). We test the capability of this technique by simulating a realistic benchmark system and demonstrate its detectability with existing high-accuracy RV and photometry instruments. We illustrate that, with a small number of RV observations, the RV-ETV diagrams allows us to distinguish between prograde and retrograde planetary orbits and also the planetary mass can be estimated if the stellar cross-correlation functions can be disentangled. We also identify a new (though minimal) contribution of S-type planets to the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect in eclipsing stellar binaries. We finally explore possible detection of exomoons around transiting luminous giant planets and find that the precision required to detect moons in the RV curves of their host planets is of the order of cm s-1 and therefore not accessible with current instruments.

  11. On the potential of transit surveys in star clusters: impact of correlated noise and radial velocity follow-up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aigrain, Suzanne; Pont, Frédéric

    2007-06-01

    We present an extension of the formalism recently proposed by Pepper and Gaudi to evaluate the yield of transit surveys in homogeneous stellar systems, incorporating the impact of correlated noise on transit time-scales on the detectability of transits, and simultaneously incorporating the magnitude limits imposed by the need for radial velocity (RV) follow-up of transit candidates. New expressions are derived for the different contributions to the noise budget on transit time-scales and the least-squares detection statistic for box-shaped transits, and their behaviour as a function of stellar mass is re-examined. Correlated noise that is constant with apparent stellar magnitude implies a steep decrease in detection probability at the high-mass end which, when considered jointly with the RV requirements, can severely limit the potential of otherwise promising surveys in star clusters. However, we find that small-aperture, wide-field surveys may detect hot Neptunes whose RV signal can be measured with present-day instrumentation in very nearby (<100pc) clusters.

  12. ARE PROTO-PLANETARY NEBULAE SHAPED BY A BINARY? RESULTS OF A LONG-TERM RADIAL VELOCITY STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    Hrivnak, Bruce J.; Lu Wenxian; Bohlender, David; Morris, S. C.; Woodsworth, Andrew W.; Scarfe, C. D. E-mail: wen.lu@valpo.edu E-mail: David.Bohlender@nrc-cnrc.gc.ca

    2011-06-10

    The shaping of the nebula is currently one of the outstanding unsolved problems in planetary nebula (PN) research. Several mechanisms have been proposed, most of which require a binary companion. However, direct evidence for a binary companion is lacking in most PNs. We have addressed this problem by obtaining precise radial velocities of seven bright proto-planetary nebulae (PPNs), objects in transition from the asymptotic giant branch to the PN phases of stellar evolution. These have F-G spectral types and have the advantage over PNs of having more and sharper spectral lines, leading to better precision. Our observations were made in two observing intervals, 1991-1995 and 2007-2010, and we have included in our analysis some additional published and unpublished data. Only one of the PPNs, IRAS 22272+5435, shows a long-term variation that might tentatively be attributed to a binary companion, with P > 22 yr, and from this, limiting binary parameters are calculated. Selection effects are also discussed. These results set significant restrictions on the range of possible physical and orbital properties of any binary companions: they have periods greater than 25 yr or masses of brown dwarfs or super-Jupiters. While not ruling out the binary hypothesis, it seems fair to say that these results do not support it.

  13. SEVEN NEW BINARIES DISCOVERED IN THE KEPLER LIGHT CURVES THROUGH THE BEER METHOD CONFIRMED BY RADIAL-VELOCITY OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Faigler, S.; Mazeh, T.; Tal-Or, L.; Quinn, S. N.; Latham, D. W.

    2012-02-20

    We present seven newly discovered non-eclipsing short-period binary systems with low-mass companions, identified by the recently introduced BEER algorithm, applied to the publicly available 138-day photometric light curves obtained by the Kepler mission. The detection is based on the beaming effect (sometimes called Doppler boosting), which increases (decreases) the brightness of any light source approaching (receding from) the observer, enabling a prediction of the stellar Doppler radial-velocity (RV) modulation from its precise photometry. The BEER algorithm identifies the BEaming periodic modulation, with a combination of the well-known Ellipsoidal and Reflection/heating periodic effects, induced by short-period companions. The seven detections were confirmed by spectroscopic RV follow-up observations, indicating minimum secondary masses in the range 0.07-0.4 M{sub Sun }. The binaries discovered establish for the first time the feasibility of the BEER algorithm as a new detection method for short-period non-eclipsing binaries, with the potential to detect in the near future non-transiting brown-dwarf secondaries, or even massive planets.

  14. Search for Close-in Planets around Evolved Stars with Phase-curve variations and Radial Velocity Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirano, Teruyuki; Sato, Bun'ei; Masuda, Kento; Benomar, Othman Michel; Takeda, Yoichi; Omiya, Masashi; Harakawa, Hiroki

    2016-10-01

    Tidal interactions are a key process to understand the evolution history of close-in exoplanets. But tidals still have a large uncertainty in their prediction for the damping timescales of stellar obliquity and semi-major axis. We have worked on a search for transiting giant planets around evolved stars, for which few close-in planets were discovered. It has been reported that evolved stars lack close-in planets, which is often attributed to the tidal evolution and/or engulfment of close-in planets by the hosts. Meanwhile, Kepler has detected a certain fraction of transiting planet candidates around evolved stars. Confirming the planetary nature for these candidates is especially important since the comparison between the occurrence rates of close-in planets around main sequence stars and evolved stars provides a unique opportunity to discuss the final stage of close-in planets. With the aim of confirming KOI planet candidates around evolved stars, we measured precision radial velocities (RVs) for evolved stars with transiting planet candidates using Subaru/HDS. We also developed a new code which simultaneously models and fits the observed RVs and phase-curve variations in the Kepler data (e.g., transits, stellar ellipsoidal variations, and planet emission/reflected light). As a result of applying the global fit to KOI giants/subgiants, we confirmed two giant planets around evolved stars (Kepler-91 and KOI-1894), as well as revealed that KOI-977 is more likely a false positive.

  15. Measuring Masses and Densities of Small Planets found by NASA's Kepler Spacecraft with Radial Velocity Measurements from Keck/HIRES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaacson, Howard T.; Marcy, G.; Rowe, J.; Kepler Team

    2013-06-01

    We use the Keck telescope and HIRES spectrometer to measure the masses of Kepler planet candidates. Analysis of 22 Kepler-identified planetary systems, holding 42 transiting planets (candidates) and 8 newly discovered non-transiting planets are presented herein. Combining the planet radius measurements from Kepler with mass measurements from Keck, we constrain the bulk density of short period planets that range in size from 1.0 to 3.0 Earth radii. Extensive ground based observations made by the Kepler Follow-up Program (KFOP) have provided extensive details about each KOI. Reconnaissance spectroscopy was used to refine the stellar and planet properties of each KOI at an early stage. SME spectral analysis and asteroseismology, when available, are used to obtain the final stellar properties. Adaptive Optics and speckle imaging constrain the presence of background eclipsing binaries that could masquerade as transiting planets. By combining ground based follow-up observations with Kepler photometry, a false positive probability is calculated for each KOI. An MCMC analysis that combines both Kepler photometry and Keck radial velocity measurements determines the final orbital parameters and planet properties for each system. The resulting mass vs. radius diagram for the planets reveals that radii increase with mass monotonically, well represented by a power law for the smallest planets. This M-R relationship offers key insights about the internal composition of the planets and the division between rocky and gaseous planets.

  16. Seven New Binaries Discovered in the Kepler Light Curves through the BEER Method Confirmed by Radial-velocity Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faigler, S.; Mazeh, T.; Quinn, S. N.; Latham, D. W.; Tal-Or, L.

    2012-02-01

    We present seven newly discovered non-eclipsing short-period binary systems with low-mass companions, identified by the recently introduced BEER algorithm, applied to the publicly available 138-day photometric light curves obtained by the Kepler mission. The detection is based on the beaming effect (sometimes called Doppler boosting), which increases (decreases) the brightness of any light source approaching (receding from) the observer, enabling a prediction of the stellar Doppler radial-velocity (RV) modulation from its precise photometry. The BEER algorithm identifies the BEaming periodic modulation, with a combination of the well-known Ellipsoidal and Reflection/heating periodic effects, induced by short-period companions. The seven detections were confirmed by spectroscopic RV follow-up observations, indicating minimum secondary masses in the range 0.07-0.4 M ⊙. The binaries discovered establish for the first time the feasibility of the BEER algorithm as a new detection method for short-period non-eclipsing binaries, with the potential to detect in the near future non-transiting brown-dwarf secondaries, or even massive planets.

  17. A laser frequency comb that enables radial velocity measurements with a precision of 1 cm s(-1).

    PubMed

    Li, Chih-Hao; Benedick, Andrew J; Fendel, Peter; Glenday, Alexander G; Kärtner, Franz X; Phillips, David F; Sasselov, Dimitar; Szentgyorgyi, Andrew; Walsworth, Ronald L

    2008-04-03

    Searches for extrasolar planets using the periodic Doppler shift of stellar spectral lines have recently achieved a precision of 60 cm s(-1) (ref. 1), which is sufficient to find a 5-Earth-mass planet in a Mercury-like orbit around a Sun-like star. To find a 1-Earth-mass planet in an Earth-like orbit, a precision of approximately 5 cm s(-1) is necessary. The combination of a laser frequency comb with a Fabry-Pérot filtering cavity has been suggested as a promising approach to achieve such Doppler shift resolution via improved spectrograph wavelength calibration, with recent encouraging results. Here we report the fabrication of such a filtered laser comb with up to 40-GHz (approximately 1-A) line spacing, generated from a 1-GHz repetition-rate source, without compromising long-term stability, reproducibility or spectral resolution. This wide-line-spacing comb, or 'astro-comb', is well matched to the resolving power of high-resolution astrophysical spectrographs. The astro-comb should allow a precision as high as 1 cm s(-1) in astronomical radial velocity measurements.

  18. The Mass of HD 38529c from Hubble Space Telescope Astrometry and High-precision Radial Velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedict, G. Fritz; McArthur, Barbara E.; Bean, Jacob L.; Barnes, Rory; Harrison, Thomas E.; Hatzes, Artie; Martioli, Eder; Nelan, Edmund P.

    2010-05-01

    Hubble Space Telescope Fine Guidance Sensor astrometric observations of the G4 IV star HD 38529 are combined with the results of the analysis of extensive ground-based radial velocity (RV) data to determine the mass of the outermost of two previously known companions. Our new RVs obtained with the Hobby-Eberly Telescope and velocities from the Carnegie-California group now span over 11 yr. With these data we obtain improved RV orbital elements for both the inner companion, HD 38529b, and the outer companion, HD 38529c. We identify a rotational period of HD 38529 (P rot = 31.65 ± 0fd17) with Fine Guidance Sensor photometry. The inferred star spot fraction is consistent with the remaining scatter in velocities being caused by spot-related stellar activity. We then model the combined astrometric and RV measurements to obtain the parallax, proper motion, perturbation period, perturbation inclination, and perturbation size due to HD 38529c. For HD 38529c we find P = 2136.1 ± 0.3 d, perturbation semimajor axis α = 1.05 ± 0.06 mas, and inclination i = 48fdg3 ± 3fdg7. Assuming a primary mass M * = 1.48 M sun, we obtain a companion mass Mc = 17.6+1.5 -1.2 M Jup, 3σ above a 13 M Jup deuterium burning, brown dwarf lower limit. Dynamical simulations incorporating this accurate mass for HD 38529c indicate that a near-Saturn mass planet could exist between the two known companions. We find weak evidence of an additional low amplitude signal that can be modeled as a planetary-mass (~0.17 M Jup) companion at P ~194 days. Including this component in our modeling lowers the error of the mass determined for HD 38529c. Additional observations (RVs and/or Gaia astrometry) are required to validate an interpretation of HD 38529d as a planetary-mass companion. If confirmed, the resulting HD 38529 planetary system may be an example of a "Packed Planetary System." Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute

  19. Stellar Radial Velocities in the Old Open Cluster M67 (NGC 2682). I. Memberships, Binaries, and Kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geller, Aaron M.; Latham, David W.; Mathieu, Robert D.

    2015-09-01

    We present results from 13776 radial-velocity (RV) measurements of 1278 candidate members of the old (4 Gyr) open cluster M67 (NGC 2682). The measurements are the results of a long-term survey that includes data from seven telescopes with observations for some stars spanning over 40 years. For narrow-lined stars, RVs are measured with precisions ranging from about 0.1 to 0.8 km s-1. The combined stellar sample reaches from the brightest giants in the cluster down to about 4 mag below the main-sequence turnoff (V=16.5), covering a mass range of about 1.34 {M}⊙ to 0.76 {M}⊙ . Spatially, the sample extends to a radus of 30 arcmin (7.4 pc in projection at a distance of 850 pc or 6-7 core radii). We find M67 to have a mean RV of +33.64 km s-1 (with an internal precision of ±0.03 km s-1) well separated from the mean velocity of the field. For stars with ≥slant 3 measurements, we derive RV membership probabilities and identify RV variables, finding 562 cluster members, 142 of which show significant RV variability. We use these cluster members to construct a color-magnitude diagram and identify a rich sample of stars that lie far from the standard single star isochrone, including the well-known blue stragglers, sub-subgiants and yellow giants. These exotic stars have a binary frequency of (at least) 80%, more than three times that detected for stars in the remainder of the sample. We confirm that the cluster is mass segregated, finding the binaries to be more centrally concentrated than the single stars in our sample at the 99.8% confidence level (and at the 98.7% confidence level when only considering main-sequence stars). The blue stragglers are centrally concentrated as compared to the solar-type main-sequence single stars in the cluster at the 99.7% confidence level. Accounting for measurement precision, we derive an RV dispersion in M67 of 0.80 ± 0.04 km s-1 for our sample of single main-sequence stars, subgiants and giants with V≤slant 15.5. When corrected

  20. CHARACTERIZING THE ORBITAL AND DYNAMICAL STATE OF THE HD 82943 PLANETARY SYSTEM WITH KECK RADIAL VELOCITY DATA

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Xianyu; Lee, Man Hoi; Payne, Matthew J.; Ford, Eric B.; Howard, Andrew W.; Johnson, John A.; Marcy, Geoff W.; Wright, Jason T.

    2013-11-10

    We present an updated analysis of radial velocity data of the HD 82943 planetary system based on 10 yr of measurements obtained with the Keck telescope. Previous studies have shown that the HD 82943 system has two planets that are likely in 2:1 mean-motion resonance (MMR), with orbital periods about 220 and 440 days. However, alternative fits that are qualitatively different have also been suggested, with two planets in a 1:1 resonance or three planets in a Laplace 4:2:1 resonance. Here we use χ{sup 2} minimization combined with a parameter grid search to investigate the orbital parameters and dynamical states of the qualitatively different types of fits, and we compare the results to those obtained with the differential evolution Markov chain Monte Carlo method. Our results support the coplanar 2:1 MMR configuration for the HD 82943 system, and show no evidence for either the 1:1 or three-planet Laplace resonance fits. The inclination of the system with respect to the sky plane is well constrained at 20{sup +4.9}{sub -5.5} degrees, and the system contains two planets with masses of about 4.78 M{sub J} and 4.80 M{sub J} (where M{sub J} is the mass of Jupiter) and orbital periods of about 219 and 442 days for the inner and outer planet, respectively. The best fit is dynamically stable with both eccentricity-type resonant angles θ{sub 1} and θ{sub 2} librating around 0°.

  1. METAL ABUNDANCES, RADIAL VELOCITIES, AND OTHER PHYSICAL CHARACTERISTICS FOR THE RR LYRAE STARS IN THE KEPLER FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Nemec, James M.; Cohen, Judith G.; Sesar, Branimir; Ripepi, Vincenzo; Derekas, Aliz; Moskalik, Pawel; Chadid, Merieme; Bruntt, Hans E-mail: jmn@isr.bc.ca E-mail: bsesar@astro.caltech.edu E-mail: derekas@konkoly.hu E-mail: chadid@marseille.fr

    2013-08-20

    Spectroscopic iron-to-hydrogen ratios, radial velocities, atmospheric parameters, and new photometric analyses are presented for 41 RR Lyrae stars (and one probable high-amplitude {delta} Sct star) located in the field-of-view of the Kepler space telescope. Thirty-seven of the RR Lyrae stars are fundamental-mode pulsators (i.e., RRab stars) of which sixteen exhibit the Blazhko effect. Four of the stars are multiperiodic RRc pulsators oscillating primarily in the first-overtone mode. Spectroscopic [Fe/H] values for the 34 stars for which we were able to derive estimates range from -2.54 {+-} 0.13 (NR Lyr) to -0.05 {+-} 0.13 dex (V784 Cyg), and for the 19 Kepler-field non-Blazhko stars studied by Nemec et al. the abundances agree will with their photometric [Fe/H] values. Four non-Blazhko RR Lyrae stars that they identified as metal-rich (KIC 6100702, V2470 Cyg, V782 Cyg and V784 Cyg) are confirmed as such, and four additional stars (V839 Cyg, KIC 5520878, KIC 8832417, KIC 3868420) are also shown here to be metal-rich. Five of the non-Blazhko RRab stars are found to be more metal-rich than [Fe/H] {approx}-0.9 dex while all of the 16 Blazhko stars are more metal-poor than this value. New P-{phi}{sub 31}{sup s}-[Fe/H] relationships are derived based on {approx}970 days of quasi-continuous high-precision Q0-Q11 long- and short-cadence Kepler photometry. With the exception of some Blazhko stars, the spectroscopic and photometric [Fe/H] values are in good agreement. Several stars with unique photometric characteristics are identified, including a Blazhko variable with the smallest known amplitude and frequency modulations (V838 Cyg)

  2. Radial velocities of very low mass stars and candidate brown dwarf members of the Hyades and Pleiades, 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stauffer, John R.; Liebert, James; Giampapa, Mark

    1995-01-01

    We have determined H alpha equivalent widths and radial velocities with 1 sigma accuracies of approximately 5 km/s for approximately 20 candidate very low mass members of the Pleiades cluster and for a few proposed very low mass members of the Hyades. Most of the Pleiades targets were selected from the recent Hambly, Hawkins, and Jameson proper motion survey, where they were identified as probable Pleiades brown dwarfs with an age spread from 3 to 70 Myr. Our spectroscopic data and a reinterpretation of the photometric data confirm that these objects are indeed likely Pleiades members; however, we believe that they more likely have masses slightly above the hydrogen burning mass limit and that there is no firm evidence for an age spread amongst these stars. All of the very low mass Pleiades and Hyades members show H alpha in emission. However, the ratio of H alpha flux to biometric flux in the Pleiades shows a maximum near M(sub Bol) approximately equal to 9.5 (M approximately equal to 0.3 solar mass) and a sharp decrease to lower masses. This break occurs at the approximate mass where low mass stars are expected to become fully convective, and it is tempting to assume that the decrease in H alpha flux is caused by some change in the behavior of stellar dynamos at this mass. We do not see a similar break in activity at this mass in the Hyades. We discuss possible evolutionary explanations for this difference in the H alpha activity between the two clusters.

  3. Radial velocity variations of photometrically quiet, chromospherically inactive Kepler stars: A link between RV jitter and photometric flicker

    SciTech Connect

    Bastien, Fabienne A.; Stassun, Keivan G.; Pepper, Joshua; Wright, Jason T.; Aigrain, Suzanne; Basri, Gibor; Johnson, John A.; Howard, Andrew W.; Walkowicz, Lucianne M.

    2014-02-01

    We compare stellar photometric variability, as measured from Kepler light curves by Basri et al., with measurements of radial velocity (RV) rms variations of all California Planet Search overlap stars. We newly derive rotation periods from the Kepler light curves for all of the stars in our study sample. The RV variations reported herein range from less than 4 to 135 m s{sup –1}, yet the stars all have amplitudes of photometric variability less than 3 mmag, reflecting the preference of the RV program for chromospherically 'quiet' stars. Despite the small size of our sample, we find with high statistical significance that the RV rms manifests strongly in the Fourier power spectrum of the light curve: stars that are noisier in RV have a greater number of frequency components in the light curve. We also find that spot models of the observed light curves systematically underpredict the observed RV variations by factors of ∼2-1000, likely because the low-level photometric variations in our sample are driven by processes not included in simple spot models. The stars best fit by these models tend to have simpler light curves, dominated by a single relatively high-amplitude component of variability. Finally, we demonstrate that the RV rms behavior of our sample can be explained in the context of the photometric variability evolutionary diagram introduced by Bastien et al. We use this diagram to derive the surface gravities of the stars in our sample, revealing many of them to have moved off the main sequence. More generally, we find that the stars with the largest RV rms are those that have evolved onto the 'flicker floor' sequence in that diagram, characterized by relatively low amplitude but highly complex photometric variations which grow as the stars evolve to become subgiants.

  4. Search for Close-in Planets around Evoloved Stars with Phase-curve variations and Radial Velocity Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirano, Teruyuki; Sato, Bun'ei; Masuda, Kento; Benomar, Othman Michel; Takeda, Yoichi; Omiya, Masashi; Harakawa, Hiroki

    2015-08-01

    Tidal interactions are a key process to understand the evolution history of close-in exoplanets. But tidal interactions still have a large uncertainty in their prediction for the damping timescales of stellar obliquity and semi-major axis (e.g., Winn et al. 2010). In the past year, we have worked on a search for (transiting) giant planets around evolved stars, for which few close-in planets were discovered. It has been reported that evolved stars lack close-in planets, which is often attributed to the tidal evolution and/or engulfment of close-in planets by the hosts. Meanwhile, Kepler spacecraft has detected a significant fraction of transiting planet candidates around evolved stars. Confirming the planetary nature for these candidates is especially important in the sense that the comparion between the occurence rates of close-in planets around main sequence stars and evolved stars provides a unique opportunity to discuss the final stage of close-in planets, including tidal evolutions.In this presentation, we review our effort to search for close-in planets around evolved stars. With the aim of confirming KOI planet candidates around evolved stars, we measured precision radial velocities (RVs) for evoloved stars with transiting planet candidates using Subaru/HDS. We also developed a new code which simultaneously models and fits the observed RVs and phase-curve variations in the Kepler light curve data (e.g., transits, stellar ellipsoidal variations, and planet emission/reflected light). As a result of applying the global fit to KOI giants/subgiants, we confirmed a few giant planets around evolved stars (Kepler-91 and KOI-1894), as well as revealed that KOI-977 is more likely a false positive.

  5. Retrieval of Precise Radial Velocities from Near-infrared High-resolution Spectra of Low-mass Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Peter; Plavchan, P.; Gagné, J.; Furlan, E.; Bottom, M.; Anglada-Escudé, G.; White, R.; Davison, C. L.; Beichman, C.; Brinkworth, C.; Johnson, J.; Ciardi, D.; Wallace, K.; Mennesson, B.; von Braun, K.; Vasisht, G.; Prato, L.; Kane, S. R.; Tanner, A.; Crawford, T. J.; Latham, D.; Rougeot, R.; Geneser, C. S.; Catanzarite, J.

    2016-10-01

    Given that low-mass stars have intrinsically low luminosities at optical wavelengths and a propensity for stellar activity, it is advantageous for radial velocity (RV) surveys of these objects to use near-infrared (NIR) wavelengths. In this work, we describe and test a novel RV extraction pipeline dedicated to retrieving RVs from low-mass stars using NIR spectra taken by the CSHELL spectrograph at the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility, where a methane isotopologue gas cell is used for wavelength calibration. The pipeline minimizes the residuals between the observations and a spectral model composed of templates for the target star, the gas cell, and atmospheric telluric absorption; models of the line-spread function, continuum curvature, and sinusoidal fringing; and a parameterization of the wavelength solution. The stellar template is derived iteratively from the science observations themselves without a need for separate observations dedicated to retrieving it. Despite limitations from CSHELL’s narrow wavelength range and instrumental systematics, we are able to (1) obtain an RV precision of 35 m s-1 for the RV standard star GJ 15 A over a time baseline of 817 days, reaching the photon noise limit for our attained signal-to-noise ratio; (2) achieve ˜3 m s-1 RV precision for the M giant SV Peg over a baseline of several days and confirm its long-term RV trend due to stellar pulsations, as well as obtain nightly noise floors of ˜2-6 m s-1 and (3) show that our data are consistent with the known masses, periods, and orbital eccentricities of the two most massive planets orbiting GJ 876. Future applications of our pipeline to RV surveys using the next generation of NIR spectrographs, such as iSHELL, will enable the potential detection of super-Earths and mini-Neptunes in the habitable zones of M dwarfs.

  6. SOAP 2.0: a tool to estimate the photometric and radial velocity variations induced by stellar spots and plages

    SciTech Connect

    Dumusque, X.; Boisse, I.; Santos, N. C.

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents SOAP 2.0, a new version of the Spot Oscillation And Planet (SOAP) code that estimates in a simple way the photometric and radial velocity (RV) variations induced by active regions. The inhibition of the convective blueshift (CB) inside active regions is considered, as well as the limb brightening effect of plages, a quadratic limb darkening law, and a realistic spot and plage contrast ratio. SOAP 2.0 shows that the activity-induced variation of plages is dominated by the inhibition of the CB effect. For spots, this effect becomes significant only for slow rotators. In addition, in the case of a major active region dominating the activity-induced signal, the ratio between the FWHM and the RV peak-to-peak amplitudes of the cross correlation function can be used to infer the type of active region responsible for the signal for stars with v sin i ≤8 km s{sup –1}. A ratio smaller than three implies a spot, while a larger ratio implies a plage. Using the observation of HD 189733, we show that SOAP 2.0 manages to reproduce the activity variation as well as previous simulations when a spot is dominating the activity-induced variation. In addition, SOAP 2.0 also reproduces the activity variation induced by a plage on the slowly rotating star α Cen B, which is not possible using previous simulations. Following these results, SOAP 2.0 can be used to estimate the signal induced by spots and plages, but also to correct for it when a major active region is dominating the RV variation.

  7. Development of a Data Reduction Pipeline to Measure Stellar Radial Velocities Using Kutztown University's On-Campus Research Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, Odysseus; Reed, Phillip A.

    2016-01-01

    The Kutztown University Observatory (KUO) houses a 0.6m Ritchey-Chrétien telescope with a focal ratio of f/8. It is a dedicated observatory collecting data every clear night using the eShel model (Shelyak Instruments) echelle spectrograph. The spectral resolution is R = 11,000 and the final dispersion is 0.050 Å/pixel over the range of 4300 Å to 8100 Å.It is paramount to ensure accurate radial velocity (RV) measurements when conducting projects for research and education. RV measurements at KUO are used to determine the masses of spectroscopic binary stars, study pulsations of stellar photospheres (Cepheid variables), and to perform reconnaissance RV measurements of exoplanet candidates (reflex motion of host star).We present a data reduction pipeline program that produces RV measurements from observed spectra. After using the eShel's built in ThAr lamp for wavelength calibration, the program continuum normalizes the spectrum, creates a non-moving template (synthetic and/or observed spectrum), and corrects for barycentric motion. Finally, the program performs a cross correlation of the data and template to produce accurate RV measurements.Examples of completed and on-going projects at KUO are presented. We also demonstrate our ability to observe stellar RV's with uncertainties as good as 0.13 km/s. The eShel spectrograph is commercially available and is becoming popular among users of smaller telescopes. This data reduction pipeline will be useful to the increasing number of researchers utilizing the eShel spectrograph.

  8. Radial velocities and metallicities from infrared Ca ii triplet spectroscopy of open clusters. II. Berkeley 23, King 1, NGC 559, NGC 6603, and NGC 7245

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrera, R.; Casamiquela, L.; Ospina, N.; Balaguer-Núñez, L.; Jordi, C.; Monteagudo, L.

    2015-06-01

    Context. Open clusters are key to studying the formation and evolution of the Galactic disc. However, there is a deficiency of radial velocity and chemical abundance determinations for open clusters in the literature. Aims: We intend to increase the number of determinations of radial velocities and metallicities from spectroscopy for open clusters. Methods: We acquired medium-resolution spectra (R ~ 8000) in the infrared region Ca ii triplet lines (~8500 Å) for several stars in five open clusters with the long-slit IDS spectrograph on the 2.5 m Isaac Newton Telescope (Roque de los Muchachos Observatory, Spain). Radial velocities were obtained by cross-correlation fitting techniques. The relationships available in the literature between the strength of infrared Ca ii lines and metallicity were also used to derive the metallicity for each cluster. Results: We obtain ⟨Vr⟩ = 48.6 ± 3.4, -58.4 ± 6.8, 26.0 ± 4.3, and -65.3 ± 3.2 km s-1 for Berkeley 23, NGC 559, NGC 6603, and NGC 7245, respectively. We found [ Fe/H ] = -0.25 ± 0.14 and -0.15 ± 0.18 for NGC 559 and NGC 7245, respectively. Berkeley 23 has low metallicity, [ Fe/H ] = -0.42 ± 0.13, which is similar to other open clusters in the outskirts of the Galactic disc. In contrast, we derived high metallicity ([ Fe/H ] = +0.43 ± 0.15) for NGC 6603, which places this system among the most metal-rich known open clusters. To our knowledge, this is the first determination of radial velocities and metallicities from spectroscopy for these clusters, except NGC 6603, for which radial velocities had been previously determined. We have also analysed ten stars in the line of sight to King 1. Because of the large dispersion obtained in both radial velocity and metallicity, we cannot be sure that we have sampled true cluster members. Based on observations made with the 2.5 m Isaac Newton Telescope operated on the island of La Palma by the Isaac Newton Group in the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos of the

  9. In vivo visualization method by absolute blood flow velocity based on speckle and fringe pattern using two-beam multipoint laser Doppler velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyoden, Tomoaki; Naruki, Shoji; Akiguchi, Shunsuke; Ishida, Hiroki; Andoh, Tsugunobu; Takada, Yogo; Momose, Noboru; Homae, Tomotaka; Hachiga, Tadashi

    2016-08-01

    Two-beam multipoint laser Doppler velocimetry (two-beam MLDV) is a non-invasive imaging technique able to provide an image of two-dimensional blood flow and has potential for observing cancer as previously demonstrated in a mouse model. In two-beam MLDV, the blood flow velocity can be estimated from red blood cells passing through a fringe pattern generated in the skin. The fringe pattern is created at the intersection of two beams in conventional LDV and two-beam MLDV. Being able to choose the depth position is an advantage of two-beam MLDV, and the position of a blood vessel can be identified in a three-dimensional space using this technique. Initially, we observed the fringe pattern in the skin, and the undeveloped or developed speckle pattern generated in a deeper position of the skin. The validity of the absolute velocity value detected by two-beam MLDV was verified while changing the number of layers of skin around a transparent flow channel. The absolute velocity value independent of direction was detected using the developed speckle pattern, which is created by the skin construct and two beams in the flow channel. Finally, we showed the relationship between the signal intensity and the fringe pattern, undeveloped speckle, or developed speckle pattern based on the skin depth. The Doppler signals were not detected at deeper positions in the skin, which qualitatively indicates the depth limit for two-beam MLDV.

  10. Stellar population of the Small Magellanic Cloud near NGC 121. I - The mean metallicity, metallicity spread, and radial velocity of SMC halo giants

    SciTech Connect

    Suntzeff, N.B.; Friel, E.; Klemola, A.; Kraft, R.P.; Graham, J.A.

    1986-02-01

    Technological advances make it now possible to conduct CCD photometry studies of stars in the halo of the Magellanic Clouds, taking into account the age and chemical composition of the oldest stars, the star-formation rate, and the age-metallicity relations. Recent reserch demonstrates that these relationships are different in the Clouds and in the Galaxy. The present paper is concerned with an examination of the giant stars of the SMC halo in the vicinity of the SMC cluster NGC 121, giving attention to the chemical composition and radial velocity of these objects. Astrometry and photometry based on direct photographs are considered along with spectroscopic observations, taking into account reduction techniques, sample spectra, radial velocities, and spectrophotometric indices and metallicity spread of giants. 69 references.

  11. The CRIRES Search for Planets Around the Lowest-Mass Stars: High-Precision nIR Radial Velocities with a New Gas Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seifahrt, Andreas; Bean, J.; Hartman, H.; Nilsson, H.; Wiedemann, G.; Reiners, A.; Dreizler, S.; Henry, T.

    2010-01-01

    We are currently carrying out a search for planets around the lowest-mass stars using the CRIRES instrument at the VLT under the auspices of an ESO Large Programme. The main purposes of this work are to illuminate the correlation between stellar mass and planet formation, improve the census of planets, and identify new planets that can be followed-up for detailed study. We have developed, and are utilizing a new type of gas cell for obtaining high-precision radial velocities of late-type stars in the nIR spectral region. Observations in the nIR offer the advantages in that the targeted stars are bright enough for high-precision spectroscopy, and that the noise contribution from stellar activity is significantly reduced. We will describe the new gas cell and our radial velocity measurement algorithm, and present extensive tests of the obtained precision.

  12. Absolute total and partial cross sections for ionization of nucleobases by proton impact in the Bragg peak velocity range

    SciTech Connect

    Tabet, J.; Eden, S.; Feil, S.; Abdoul-Carime, H.; Farizon, B.; Farizon, M.; Ouaskit, S.; Maerk, T. D.

    2010-08-15

    We present experimental results for proton ionization of nucleobases (adenine, cytosine, thymine, and uracil) based on an event-by-event analysis of the different ions produced combined with an absolute target density determination. We are able to disentangle in detail the various proton ionization channels from mass-analyzed product ion signals in coincidence with the charge-analyzed projectile. In addition we are able to determine a complete set of cross sections for the ionization of these molecular targets by 20-150 keV protons including the total and partial cross sections and the direct-ionization and electron-capture cross sections.

  13. The α CrB binary system: A new radial velocity curve, apsidal motion, and the alignment of rotation and orbit axes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, J. H. M. M.; Schröder, K.-P.; Rauw, G.; Hempelmann, A.; Mittag, M.; González-Pérez, J. N.; Czesla, S.; Wolter, U.; Jack, D.

    2016-02-01

    We present a new radial velocity curve for the two components of the eclipsing spectroscopic binary α CrB. This binary consists of two main-sequence stars of types A and G in a 17.3599-day orbit, according to the data from our robotic TIGRE facility that is located in Guanajuato, Mexico. We used a high-resolution solar spectrum to determine the radial velocities of the weak secondary component by cross-correlation and wavelength referencing with telluric lines for the strongly rotationally broadened primary lines (v sin(i) = 138 km s-1) to obtain radial velocities with an accuracy of a few hundred m/s. We combined our new RV data with older measurements, dating back to 1908 in the case of the primary, to search for evidence of apsidal motion. We find an apsidal motion period between 6600 and 10 600 yr. This value is consistent with the available data for both the primary and secondary and is also consistent with the assumption that the system has aligned orbit and rotation axes.

  14. Constraining the Frequency of Free-floating Planets from a Synthesis of Microlensing, Radial Velocity, and Direct Imaging Survey Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clanton, Christian; Gaudi, B. Scott

    2017-01-01

    A microlensing survey by Sumi et al. exhibits an overabundance of short-timescale events (STEs; tE < 2 days) relative to what is expected from known stellar populations and a smooth power-law extrapolation down to the brown dwarf regime. This excess has been interpreted as a population of approximately Jupiter-mass objects that outnumber main-sequence stars nearly twofold; however the microlensing data alone cannot distinguish between events due to wide-separation (a ≳ 10 au) and free-floating planets. Assuming these STEs are indeed due to planetary-mass objects, we aim to constrain the fraction of these events that can be explained by bound but wide-separation planets. We fit the observed timescale distribution with a lens mass function comprised of brown dwarfs, main-sequence stars, and stellar remnants, finding and thus corroborating the initial identification of an excess of STEs. We then include a population of bound planets that are expected not to show signatures of the primary lens (host) in their microlensing light curves and that are also consistent with results from representative microlensing, radial velocity, and direct imaging surveys. We find that bound planets alone cannot explain the entire STE excess without violating the constraints from the surveys we consider and thus some fraction of these events must be due to free-floating planets, if our model for bound planets holds. We estimate a median fraction of STEs due to free-floating planets to be f = 0.67 (0.23 ≤ f ≤ 0.85 at 95% confidence) when assuming “hot-start” planet evolutionary models and f = 0.58 (0.14 ≤ f ≤ 0.83 at 95% confidence) for “cold-start” models. Assuming a delta-function distribution of free-floating planets of mass {m}p=2 {M}{Jup} yields a number of free-floating planets per main-sequence star of N = 1.4 (0.48 ≤ N ≤ 1.8 at 95% confidence) in the “hot-start” case and N = 1.2 (0.29 ≤ N ≤ 1.8 at 95% confidence) in the “cold-start” case.

  15. Metal Abundances, Radial Velocities, and Other Physical Characteristics for the RR Lyrae Stars in The Kepler Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemec, James M.; Cohen, Judith G.; Ripepi, Vincenzo; Derekas, Aliz; Moskalik, Pawel; Sesar, Branimir; Chadid, Merieme; Bruntt, Hans

    2013-08-01

    Spectroscopic iron-to-hydrogen ratios, radial velocities, atmospheric parameters, and new photometric analyses are presented for 41 RR Lyrae stars (and one probable high-amplitude δ Sct star) located in the field-of-view of the Kepler space telescope. Thirty-seven of the RR Lyrae stars are fundamental-mode pulsators (i.e., RRab stars) of which sixteen exhibit the Blazhko effect. Four of the stars are multiperiodic RRc pulsators oscillating primarily in the first-overtone mode. Spectroscopic [Fe/H] values for the 34 stars for which we were able to derive estimates range from -2.54 ± 0.13 (NR Lyr) to -0.05 ± 0.13 dex (V784 Cyg), and for the 19 Kepler-field non-Blazhko stars studied by Nemec et al. the abundances agree will with their photometric [Fe/H] values. Four non-Blazhko RR Lyrae stars that they identified as metal-rich (KIC 6100702, V2470 Cyg, V782 Cyg and V784 Cyg) are confirmed as such, and four additional stars (V839 Cyg, KIC 5520878, KIC 8832417, KIC 3868420) are also shown here to be metal-rich. Five of the non-Blazhko RRab stars are found to be more metal-rich than [Fe/H] ~-0.9 dex while all of the 16 Blazhko stars are more metal-poor than this value. New P-\\phi _31^s-[Fe/H] relationships are derived based on ~970 days of quasi-continuous high-precision Q0-Q11 long- and short-cadence Kepler photometry. With the exception of some Blazhko stars, the spectroscopic and photometric [Fe/H] values are in good agreement. Several stars with unique photometric characteristics are identified, including a Blazhko variable with the smallest known amplitude and frequency modulations (V838 Cyg). Based in part on observations made at the W.M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Keck Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W.M. Keck Foundation. Also, based in part on

  16. Synthesizing exoplanet demographics from radial velocity and microlensing surveys. II. The frequency of planets orbiting M dwarfs

    SciTech Connect

    Clanton, Christian; Gaudi, B. Scott

    2014-08-20

    In contrast to radial velocity (RV) surveys, results from microlensing surveys indicate that giant planets with masses greater than the critical mass for core accretion (∼0.1 M {sub Jup}) are relatively common around low-mass stars. Using the methodology developed in the first paper, we predict the sensitivity of M-dwarf RV surveys to analogs of the population of planets inferred by microlensing. We find that RV surveys should detect a handful of super-Jovian (>M {sub Jup}) planets at the longest periods being probed. These planets are indeed found by RV surveys, implying that the demographic constraints inferred from these two methods are consistent. Finally, we combine the results from both methods to estimate planet frequencies spanning wide regions of parameter space. We find that the frequency of Jupiters and super-Jupiters (1 ≲ m{sub p} sin i/M {sub Jup} ≲ 13) with periods 1 ≤ P/days ≤ 10{sup 4} is f{sub J}=0.029{sub −0.015}{sup +0.013}, a median factor of 4.3 (1.5-14 at 95% confidence) smaller than the inferred frequency of such planets around FGK stars of 0.11 ± 0.02. However, we find the frequency of all giant planets with 30 ≲ m{sub p} sin i/M {sub ⊕} ≲ 10{sup 4} and 1 ≤ P/days ≤ 10{sup 4} to be f{sub G}=0.15{sub −0.07}{sup +0.06}, only a median factor of 2.2 (0.73-5.9 at 95% confidence) smaller than the inferred frequency of such planets orbiting FGK stars of 0.31 ± 0.07. For a more conservative definition of giant planets (50 ≲ m{sub p} sin i/M {sub ⊕} ≲ 10{sup 4}), we find f{sub G{sup ′}}=0.11±0.05, a median factor of 2.2 (0.73-6.7 at 95% confidence) smaller than that inferred for FGK stars of 0.25 ± 0.05. Finally, we find the frequency of all planets with 1 ≤ m{sub p} sin i/M {sub ⊕} ≤ 10{sup 4} and 1 ≤ P/days ≤ 10{sup 4} to be f{sub p} = 1.9 ± 0.5.

  17. The Demographics of Exoplanetary Companions to M Dwarfs: Synthesizing Results from Microlensing, Radial Velocity, and Direct Imaging Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clanton, Christian Dwain

    Over the past 20 years, we have learned that exoplanets are ubiquitous throughout our Galaxy and show a diverse set of demographics, yet there is much work to be done to understand this diversity. Determining the distributions of the fundamental properties of exoplanets will provide vital clues regarding their formation and evolution. This is a difficult task, as exoplanet surveys are not uniformly sensitive to the full range of planet parameter space. Various observational biases and selection effects intrinsic to each of the different discovery techniques constrain the types of planets to which they are sensitive. Herein, I record a collection of the first studies to develop and apply the methodology of synthesizing results from multiple detection techniques to construct a statistically-complete census of planetary companions to M dwarfs that samples a wide region of their parameter space. I present a robust comparison of exoplanet discoveries from microlensing and radial velocity (RV) surveys of M dwarfs which infer giant planet frequencies that differ by more than an order of magnitude and are, prima facie, in direct conflict. I demonstrate that current, state-of-the-art RV surveys are capable of detecting only the high-mass tail of the population of planets beyond the ice line inferred by microlensing studies, engendering a large, apparent difference in giant planet frequency. This comparison further establishes that results from these types of surveys are, in fact, consistent over the region of parameter space wherein their sensitivities overlap. A synthesis of results from microlensing and RV surveys yields planet occurrence rates for M dwarfs that span several orders of magnitude in mass and orbital period. On average, each M dwarf hosts about two planets, and while Jupiter and super-Jupiter companions are relatively rare ( 3%), gas giants, in general, are quite common ( 15%). These occurrence rates are significantly lower than those inferred around FGK

  18. The Mass of the Candidate Exoplanet Companion to HD 33636 from Hubble Space Telescope Astrometry and High-Precision Radial Velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bean, Jacob L.; McArthur, Barbara E.; Benedict, G. Fritz; Harrison, Thomas E.; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Nelan, Edmund; Smith, Verne V.

    2007-08-01

    We have determined a dynamical mass for the companion to HD 33636 that indicates it is a low-mass star instead of an exoplanet. Our result is based on an analysis of Hubble Space Telescope (HST) astrometry and ground-based radial velocity data. We have obtained high-cadence radial velocity measurements spanning 1.3 yr of HD 33636 with the Hobby-Eberly Telescope at McDonald Observatory. We combined these data with previously published velocities to create a data set that spans 9 yr. We used this data set to search for, and place mass limits on, the existence of additional companions in the HD 33636 system. Our high-precision astrometric observations of the system with the HST Fine Guidance Sensor 1r span 1.2 yr. We simultaneously modeled the radial velocity and astrometry data to determine the parallax, proper motion, and perturbation orbit parameters of HD 33636. Our derived parallax, πabs=35.6+/-0.2 mas, agrees within the uncertainties with the Hipparcos value. We find a perturbation period P=2117.3+/-0.8 days, semimajor axis aA=14.2+/-0.2 mas, and system inclination i=4.1deg+/-0.1deg. Assuming the mass of the primary star to be MA=1.02+/-0.03 Msolar, we obtain a companion mass MB=142+/-11 MJup=0.14+/-0.01 Msolar. The much larger true mass of the companion relative to its minimum mass estimated from the spectroscopic orbit parameters (Msini=9.3 MJup) is due to the nearly face-on orbit orientation. This result demonstrates the value of follow-up astrometric observations to determine the true masses of exoplanet candidates detected with the radial velocity method. Based on data obtained with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and the Hobby-Eberly Telescope (HET). The HST observations were obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555. The HET is a joint project of the University of Texas at Austin, Pennsylvania State University, Stanford

  19. Space density distribution of galaxies in the absolute magnitude - rotation velocity plane: a volume-complete Tully-Fisher relation from CALIFA stellar kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekeraité, S.; Walcher, C. J.; Falcón-Barroso, J.; Garcia Lorenzo, B.; Lyubenova, M.; Sánchez, S. F.; Spekkens, K.; van de Ven, G.; Wisotzki, L.; Ziegler, B.; Aguerri, J. A. L.; Barrera-Ballesteros, J.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Catalán-Torrecilla, C.; García-Benito, R.

    2016-10-01

    We measured the distribution in absolute magnitude - circular velocity space for a well-defined sample of 199 rotating galaxies of the Calar Alto Legacy Integral Field Area Survey (CALIFA) using their stellar kinematics. Our aim in this analysis is to avoid subjective selection criteria and to take volume and large-scale structure factors into account. Using stellar velocity fields instead of gas emission line kinematics allows including rapidly rotating early-type galaxies. Our initial sample contains 277 galaxies with available stellar velocity fields and growth curve r-band photometry. After rejecting 51 velocity fields that could not be modelled because of the low number of bins, foreground contamination, or significant interaction, we performed Markov chain Monte Carlo modelling of the velocity fields, from which we obtained the rotation curve and kinematic parameters and their realistic uncertainties. We performed an extinction correction and calculated the circular velocity vcirc accounting for the pressure support of a given galaxy. The resulting galaxy distribution on the Mr-vcirc plane was then modelled as a mixture of two distinct populations, allowing robust and reproducible rejection of outliers, a significant fraction of which are slow rotators. The selection effects are understood well enough that we were able to correct for the incompleteness of the sample. The 199 galaxies were weighted by volume and large-scale structure factors, which enabled us to fit a volume-corrected Tully-Fisher relation (TFR). More importantly, we also provide the volume-corrected distribution of galaxies in the Mr-vcirc plane, which can be compared with cosmological simulations. The joint distribution of the luminosity and circular velocity space densities, representative over the range of -20 > Mr > -22 mag, can place more stringent constraints on the galaxy formation and evolution scenarios than linear TFR fit parameters or the luminosity function alone. Galaxies main

  20. EnKF OSSE Experiments Assessing the Impact of HIRAD Wind Speed and HIWRAP Radial Velocity Data on Analysis of Hurricane Karl (2010)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albers, Cerese; Sippel, Jason A.; Braun, Scott A.; Miller, Timothy

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies (e.g., Zhang et al. 2009, Weng et al. 2011) have shown that radial velocity data from airborne and ground-based radars can be assimilated into ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) systems to produce accurate analyses of tropical cyclone vortices, which can reduce forecast intensity error. Recently, wind speed data from SFMR technology has also been assimilated into the same types of systems and has been shown to improve the forecast intensity of mature tropical cyclones. Two instruments that measure these properties were present during the NASA Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP) field experiment in 2010 which sampled Hurricane Karl, and will next be co-located on the same aircraft for the subsequent NASA HS3 experiment. The High Altitude Wind and Rain Profiling Radar (HIWRAP) is a conically scanning Doppler radar mounted upon NASAs Global Hawk unmanned aerial vehicle, and the usefulness of its radial velocity data for assimilation has not been previously examined. Since the radar scans from above with a fairly large fixed elevation angle, it observes a large component of the vertical wind, which could degrade EnKF analyses compared to analyses with data taken from lesser elevation angles. The NASA Hurricane Imaging Radiometer (HIRAD) is a passive microwave radiometer similar to SFMR, and measures emissivity and retrieves hurricane surface wind speeds and rain rates over a much wider swath. Thus, this study examines the impact of assimilating simulated HIWRAP radial velocity data into an EnKF system, simulated HIRAD wind speed, and HIWRAP+HIRAD with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model and compares the results to no data assimilation and also to the Truth from which the data was simulated for both instruments.

  1. Friends of Hot Jupiters. I. A Radial Velocity Search for Massive, Long-period Companions to Close-in Gas Giant Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knutson, Heather A.; Fulton, Benjamin J.; Montet, Benjamin T.; Kao, Melodie; Ngo, Henry; Howard, Andrew W.; Crepp, Justin R.; Hinkley, Sasha; Bakos, Gaspar Á.; Batygin, Konstantin; Johnson, John Asher; Morton, Timothy D.; Muirhead, Philip S.

    2014-04-01

    In this paper we search for distant massive companions to known transiting gas giant planets that may have influenced the dynamical evolution of these systems. We present new radial velocity observations for a sample of 51 planets obtained using the Keck HIRES instrument, and find statistically significant accelerations in fifteen systems. Six of these systems have no previously reported accelerations in the published literature: HAT-P-10, HAT-P-22, HAT-P-29, HAT-P-32, WASP-10, and XO-2. We combine our radial velocity fits with Keck NIRC2 adaptive optics (AO) imaging data to place constraints on the allowed masses and orbital periods of the companions responsible for the detected accelerations. The estimated masses of the companions range between 1-500 M Jup, with orbital semi-major axes typically between 1-75 AU. A significant majority of the companions detected by our survey are constrained to have minimum masses comparable to or larger than those of the transiting planets in these systems, making them candidates for influencing the orbital evolution of the inner gas giant. We estimate a total occurrence rate of 51% ± 10% for companions with masses between 1-13 M Jup and orbital semi-major axes between 1-20 AU in our sample. We find no statistically significant difference between the frequency of companions to transiting planets with misaligned or eccentric orbits and those with well-aligned, circular orbits. We combine our expanded sample of radial velocity measurements with constraints from transit and secondary eclipse observations to provide improved measurements of the physical and orbital characteristics of all of the planets included in our survey.

  2. Friends of hot Jupiters. I. A radial velocity search for massive, long-period companions to close-in gas giant planets

    SciTech Connect

    Knutson, Heather A.; Ngo, Henry; Johnson, John Asher; Fulton, Benjamin J.; Howard, Andrew W.; Montet, Benjamin T.; Kao, Melodie; Hinkley, Sasha; Morton, Timothy D.; Muirhead, Philip S.; Crepp, Justin R.; Bakos, Gaspar Á.; Batygin, Konstantin

    2014-04-20

    In this paper we search for distant massive companions to known transiting gas giant planets that may have influenced the dynamical evolution of these systems. We present new radial velocity observations for a sample of 51 planets obtained using the Keck HIRES instrument, and find statistically significant accelerations in fifteen systems. Six of these systems have no previously reported accelerations in the published literature: HAT-P-10, HAT-P-22, HAT-P-29, HAT-P-32, WASP-10, and XO-2. We combine our radial velocity fits with Keck NIRC2 adaptive optics (AO) imaging data to place constraints on the allowed masses and orbital periods of the companions responsible for the detected accelerations. The estimated masses of the companions range between 1-500 M {sub Jup}, with orbital semi-major axes typically between 1-75 AU. A significant majority of the companions detected by our survey are constrained to have minimum masses comparable to or larger than those of the transiting planets in these systems, making them candidates for influencing the orbital evolution of the inner gas giant. We estimate a total occurrence rate of 51% ± 10% for companions with masses between 1-13 M {sub Jup} and orbital semi-major axes between 1-20 AU in our sample. We find no statistically significant difference between the frequency of companions to transiting planets with misaligned or eccentric orbits and those with well-aligned, circular orbits. We combine our expanded sample of radial velocity measurements with constraints from transit and secondary eclipse observations to provide improved measurements of the physical and orbital characteristics of all of the planets included in our survey.

  3. Frequency-modulated continuous-wave laser radar using dual vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser diodes for real-time measurements of distance and radial velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakuma, Seiichi

    2017-02-01

    A frequency-modulated continuous-wave (FMCW) laser radar capable of real-time displaying the distance to a target object and its radial velocity as their corresponding frequency spectra is developed. The system employs a pair of oppositely frequency-swept vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser diodes (VCSELs). This makes possible simultaneous detection of beat signals induced by the increment (up-ramp) and decrement (down-ramp) in laser frequencies. By mixing these two beat signals, their sum and difference frequencies are directly obtained without arithmetic processing such as averaging and subtraction. Results of the test experiments adopting axially moving block gauges as target objects show that both the distance and given velocities are accurately determined from the spectrum of the frequency mixer.

  4. Mass determination of K2-19b and K2-19c from radial velocities and transit timing variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nespral, D.; Gandolfi, D.; Deeg, H. J.

    2017-03-01

    We present FIES@NOT and HARPS-N@TNG radial velocity follow-up observations of K2-19, a compact planetary system hosting three planets, of which the two larger ones, namely K2-19b and K2-19c, are close to the 3:2 mean motion resonance. The masses of these larger planets have previously been derived from transit timing only. An analysis considering only the radial velocity measurements is able to detect only K2-19b, the largest and more massive planet in the system, with a mass of 71.7 ± 6.3 M_{Jupiter}. We also used the TRADES code to simultaneously model both our RV measurements and the existing transit-timing measurements. We derived a mass of K2-19b of 59.5^{+7.2} _{‑11.4} M_{Jupiter} and of K2-19c of 9.7 ^{+3.9} _{‑2.0} M_{oplus}. A prior K2-19b mass estimated by Barros et al. (2015), based exclusively on transit timing measurements, is only consistent with our combined TTV and RV analysis, but not with our analysis based purely on RV measurements. K2-19b supports the suspicion that planet masses and densities involving TTV data are systematically lower than those based purely on RV measurements.

  5. SOLAR-LIKE OSCILLATIONS AND ACTIVITY IN PROCYON: A COMPARISON OF THE 2007 MOST AND GROUND-BASED RADIAL VELOCITY CAMPAIGNS

    SciTech Connect

    Huber, Daniel; Bedding, Timothy R.; Stello, Dennis; Arentoft, Torben; Kjeldsen, Hans; Gruberbauer, Michael; Guenther, David B.; Houdek, Guenter; Kallinger, Thomas; Weiss, Werner W.; Matthews, Jaymie M.

    2011-04-20

    We compare the simultaneous 2007 space-based MOST photometry and ground-based radial velocity (RV) observations of the F5 star Procyon. We identify slow variations in the MOST data that are similar to those reported in the RV time series and confirm by comparison with the Sun that these variations are likely the signature of stellar activity. The MOST power spectrum yields clear evidence for individual oscillation frequencies that match those found in the RV data by Bedding et al. We identify the same ridges due to modes of different spherical degree in both data sets, but are not able to confirm a definite ridge identification using the MOST data. We measure the luminosity amplitude per radial mode A{sub l=0,phot} = 9.1 {+-} 0.5 ppm. Combined with the estimate for the RV data by Arentoft et al., this gives a mean amplitude ratio of A{sub l=0,phot}/A{sub l=0,RV} = 0.24 {+-} 0.02 ppm cm{sup -1} s, considerably higher than expected from scaling relations but in reasonable agreement with theoretical models by Houdek. We also compare the amplitude ratio as a function of frequency and find that the maximum of the oscillation envelope is shifted to higher frequencies in photometry than in velocity.

  6. Radial Velocity Observations and Light Curve Noise Modeling Confirm that Kepler-91b is a Giant Planet Orbiting a Giant Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barclay, Thomas; Endl, Michael; Huber, Daniel; Foreman-Mackey, Daniel; Cochran, William D.; MacQueen, Phillip J.; Rowe, Jason F.; Quintana, Elisa V.

    2015-02-01

    Kepler-91b is a rare example of a transiting hot Jupiter around a red giant star, providing the possibility to study the formation and composition of hot Jupiters under different conditions compared to main-sequence stars. However, the planetary nature of Kepler-91b, which was confirmed using phase-curve variations by Lillo-Box et al., was recently called into question based on a re-analysis of Kepler data. We have obtained ground-based radial velocity observations from the Hobby-Eberly Telescope and unambiguously confirm the planetary nature of Kepler-91b by simultaneously modeling the Kepler and radial velocity data. The star exhibits temporally correlated noise due to stellar granulation which we model as a Gaussian Process. We hypothesize that it is this noise component that led previous studies to suspect Kepler-91b to be a false positive. Our work confirms the conclusions presented by Lillo-Box et al. that Kepler-91b is a 0.73 ± 0.13 M Jup planet orbiting a red giant star. Based partly on observations obtained with the Hobby-Eberly Telescope, which is a joint project of the University of Texas at Austin, the Pennsylvania State University, Stanford University, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, and Georg-August-Universität Göttingen.

  7. The Exoplanet Simple Orbit Fitting Toolbox (ExoSOFT): An Open-source Tool for Efficient Fitting of Astrometric and Radial Velocity Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mede, Kyle; Brandt, Timothy D.

    2017-03-01

    We present the Exoplanet Simple Orbit Fitting Toolbox (ExoSOFT), a new, open-source suite to fit the orbital elements of planetary or stellar-mass companions to any combination of radial velocity and astrometric data. To explore the parameter space of Keplerian models, ExoSOFT may be operated with its own multistage sampling approach or interfaced with third-party tools such as emcee. In addition, ExoSOFT is packaged with a collection of post-processing tools to analyze and summarize the results. Although only a few systems have been observed with both radial velocity and direct imaging techniques, this number will increase, thanks to upcoming spacecraft and ground-based surveys. Providing both forms of data enables simultaneous fitting that can help break degeneracies in the orbital elements that arise when only one data type is available. The dynamical mass estimates this approach can produce are important when investigating the formation mechanisms and subsequent evolution of substellar companions. ExoSOFT was verified through fitting to artificial data and was implemented using the Python and Cython programming languages; it is available for public download at https://github.com/kylemede/ExoSOFT under GNU General Public License v3.

  8. RADIAL VELOCITY OBSERVATIONS AND LIGHT CURVE NOISE MODELING CONFIRM THAT KEPLER-91b IS A GIANT PLANET ORBITING A GIANT STAR

    SciTech Connect

    Barclay, Thomas; Huber, Daniel; Rowe, Jason F.; Quintana, Elisa V.; Foreman-Mackey, Daniel

    2015-02-10

    Kepler-91b is a rare example of a transiting hot Jupiter around a red giant star, providing the possibility to study the formation and composition of hot Jupiters under different conditions compared to main-sequence stars. However, the planetary nature of Kepler-91b, which was confirmed using phase-curve variations by Lillo-Box et al., was recently called into question based on a re-analysis of Kepler data. We have obtained ground-based radial velocity observations from the Hobby-Eberly Telescope and unambiguously confirm the planetary nature of Kepler-91b by simultaneously modeling the Kepler and radial velocity data. The star exhibits temporally correlated noise due to stellar granulation which we model as a Gaussian Process. We hypothesize that it is this noise component that led previous studies to suspect Kepler-91b to be a false positive. Our work confirms the conclusions presented by Lillo-Box et al. that Kepler-91b is a 0.73 ± 0.13 M {sub Jup} planet orbiting a red giant star.

  9. Easy Absolute Values? Absolutely

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Sharon E.; Mittag, Kathleen Cage

    2015-01-01

    The authors teach a problem-solving course for preservice middle-grades education majors that includes concepts dealing with absolute-value computations, equations, and inequalities. Many of these students like mathematics and plan to teach it, so they are adept at symbolic manipulations. Getting them to think differently about a concept that they…

  10. A RADIAL VELOCITY TEST FOR SUPERMASSIVE BLACK HOLE BINARIES AS AN EXPLANATION FOR BROAD, DOUBLE-PEAKED EMISSION LINES IN ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Jia; Halpern, Jules P.; Eracleous, Michael

    2016-01-20

    One of the proposed explanations for the broad, double-peaked Balmer emission lines observed in the spectra of some active galactic nuclei (AGNs) is that they are associated with sub-parsec supermassive black hole (SMBH) binaries. Here, we test the binary broad-line region hypothesis through several decades of monitoring of the velocity structure of double-peaked Hα emission lines in 13 low-redshift, mostly radio-loud AGNs. This is a much larger set of objects compared to an earlier test by Eracleous et al. and we use much longer time series for the three objects studied in that paper. Although systematic changes in radial velocity can be traced in many of their lines, they are demonstrably not like those of a spectroscopic binary in a circular orbit. Any spectroscopic binary period must therefore be much longer than the span of the monitoring (assuming a circular orbit), which in turn would require black hole masses that exceed by 1–2 orders of magnitude the values obtained for these objects using techniques such as reverberation mapping and stellar velocity dispersion. Moreover, the response of the double-peaked Balmer line profiles to fluctuations of the ionizing continuum and the shape of the Lyα profiles are incompatible with an SMBH binary. The binary broad-line region hypothesis is therefore disfavored. Other processes evidently shape these line profiles and cause the long-term velocity variations of the double peaks.

  11. BANYAN. III. Radial velocity, rotation, and X-ray emission of low-mass star candidates in nearby young kinematic groups

    SciTech Connect

    Malo, Lison; Artigau, Étienne; Doyon, René; Lafrenière, David; Albert, Loïc; Gagné, Jonathan E-mail: doyon@astro.umontreal.ca

    2014-06-10

    Based on high-resolution spectra obtained with PHOENIX at Gemini-South, CRIRES at VLT-UT1, and ESPaDOnS at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope, we present new measurements of the radial and projected rotational velocities of 219 low-mass stars. The target likely membership was initially established using the Bayesian analysis tool recently presented in Malo et al., taking into account only the position, proper motion, and photometry of the stars to assess their membership probability. In the present study, we include radial velocity as an additional input to our analysis, and in doing so we confirm the high membership probability for 130 candidates: 27 in β Pictoris, 22 in Tucana-Horologium, 25 in Columba, 7 in Carina, 18 in Argus and 18 in AB Doradus, and 13 with an ambiguous membership. Our analysis also confirms the membership of 57 stars proposed in the literature. A subsample of 16 candidates was observed at 3 or more epochs, allowing us to discover 6 new spectroscopic binaries. The fraction of binaries in our sample is 25%, consistent with values in the literature. Of the stars in our sample, 20% show projected rotational velocities (vsin i) higher than 30 km s{sup –1} and therefore are considered as fast rotators. A parallax and other youth indicators are still needed to fully confirm the 130 highly probable candidates identified here as new bona fide members. Finally, based on the X-ray emission of bona fide and highly probable group members, we show that for low-mass stars in the 12-120 Myr age range, the X-ray luminosity is an excellent indicator of youth and better than the more traditionally used R {sub X} parameter, the ratio of X-ray to bolometric luminosity.

  12. THE BROWN DWARF KINEMATICS PROJECT (BDKP). IV. RADIAL VELOCITIES OF 85 LATE-M AND L DWARFS WITH MagE

    SciTech Connect

    Burgasser, Adam J.; Logsdon, Sarah E.; Gagné, Jonathan; Bochanski, John J.; Faherty, Jaqueline K.; West, Andrew A.; Mamajek, Eric E.; Schmidt, Sarah J.; Cruz, Kelle L.

    2015-09-15

    Radial velocity measurements are presented for 85 late M- and L-type very low-mass stars and brown dwarfs obtained with the Magellan Echellette spectrograph. Targets primarily have distances within 20 pc of the Sun, with more distant sources selected for their unusual spectral energy distributions. We achieved precisions of 2–3 km s{sup −1}, and combined these with astrometric and spectrophotometric data to calculate UVW velocities. Most are members of the thin disk of the Galaxy, and velocity dispersions indicate a mean age of 5.2 ± 0.2 Gyr for sources within 20 pc. We find signficantly different kinematic ages between late-M dwarfs (4.0 ± 0.2 Gyr) and L dwarfs (6.5 ± 0.4 Gyr) in our sample that are contrary to predictions from prior simulations. This difference appears to be driven by a dispersed population of unusually blue L dwarfs which may be more prevalent in our local volume-limited sample than in deeper magnitude-limited surveys. The L dwarfs exhibit an asymmetric U velocity distribution with a net inward flow, similar to gradients recently detected in local stellar samples. Simulations incorporating brown dwarf evolution and Galactic orbital dynamics are unable to reproduce the velocity asymmetry, suggesting non-axisymmetric perturbations or two distinct L dwarf populations. We also find the L dwarfs to have a kinematic age-activity correlation similar to more massive stars. We identify several sources with low surface gravities, and two new substellar candidate members of nearby young moving groups: the astrometric binary DENIS J08230313–4912012AB, a low-probability member of the β Pictoris Moving Group; and 2MASS J15104786–2818174, a moderate-probability member of the 30–50 Myr Argus Association.

  13. An Orbital Radial Velocity Study of PG 1701+359, a Hot Subdwarf B Star with a Cool Main Sequence Companion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liss, Sandra; Wade, R. A.; Barlow, B. N.; Stark, M. A.

    2012-01-01

    Many hot subdwarf B (sdB) stars show composite spectra in which the companion is typically a G or K star. Binary population synthesis (BPS) models show that these systems can be formed by Roche lobe overflow but disagree on the resulting orbital parameters; some predict long periods (years) while others predict much shorter periods (days). Little evidence currently exists to support either theory, but the few observations made to date suggest the periods are not short. At Pennsylvania State University, we conducted observations to measure the orbital parameters of such systems using the Medium Resolution Spectrograph at the Hobby-Eberly Telescope with 700 m/s precision. Here we present radial velocity (RV) measurements of PG 1701+359, the most well-studied target in our sample. We observed 14 epochs from April 2005 to July 2008 and measured the velocity of the cool companion using cross-correlation techniques. Preliminary RV variations have been detected and indicate the binary has neither a short period nor a large velocity amplitude. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. AST-0908642.

  14. SOAP-T: a tool to study the light curve and radial velocity of a system with a transiting planet and a rotating spotted star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oshagh, M.; Boisse, I.; Boué, G.; Montalto, M.; Santos, N. C.; Bonfils, X.; Haghighipour, N.

    2013-01-01

    We present an improved version of SOAP named "SOAP-T", which can generate the radial velocity variations and light curves for systems consisting of a rotating spotted star with a transiting planet. This tool can be used to study the anomalies inside transit light curves and the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect, to better constrain the orbital configuration and properties of planetary systems and the active zones of their host stars. Tests of the code are presented to illustrate its performance and to validate its capability when compared with analytical models and real data. Finally, we apply SOAP-T to the active star, HAT-P-11, observed by the NASA Kepler space telescope and use this system to discuss the capability of this tool in analyzing light curves for the cases where the transiting planet overlaps with the star's spots. The tool's public interface is available at http://www.astro.up.pt/resources/soap-t/

  15. Observations of the radial velocity of the Sun as measured with the novel SONG spectrograph: results from a 1-week campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pallé, P. L.; Grundahl, F.; Triviño Hage, A.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J.; Frandsen, S.; García, R. A.; Uytterhoeven, K.; Andersen, M. F.; Rasmussen, P. K.; Sørensen, A. N.; Kjeldsen, H.; Spano, P.; Nilsson, H.; Hartman, H.; Jørgensen, U. G.; Skottfelt, J.; Harpsøe, K.; Andersen, M. I.

    2013-06-01

    Deployment of the prototype node of the SONG project took place in April 2012 at Observatorio del Teide (Canary Islands). Its key instrument (echelle spectrograph) was installed and operational a few weeks later while its 1 m feeding telescope suffered a considerable delay to meet the required specifications. Using a fibre-feed, solar light could be fed to the spectrograph and we carried out a 1-week observing campaign in June 2012 to evaluate its performance for measuring precision radial velocities. In this work we present the first results of this campaign by comparing the sensitivity of the SONG spectrograph with other helioseismology reference instruments (Mark-I and GOLF) when simultaneous data are considered.

  16. Synthesizing Exoplanet Demographics: A Single Population of Long-period Planetary Companions to M Dwarfs Consistent with Microlensing, Radial Velocity, and Direct Imaging Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clanton, Christian; Gaudi, B. Scott

    2016-03-01

    We present the first study to synthesize results from five different exoplanet surveys using three independent detection methods: microlensing, radial velocity, and direct imaging. The constraints derived herein represent the most comprehensive picture of the demographics of large-separation (≳2 AU) planets orbiting the most common stars in our Galaxy that has been constructed to date. We assume a simple, joint power-law planet distribution function of the form {d}2{N}{{pl}}/(d{log} {m}p d{log} a)={ A }{({m}p/{M}{{Sat}})}α {(a/2.5{{AU}})}β with an outer cutoff radius of the separation distribution function of aout. Generating populations of planets from these models and mapping them into the relevant observables for each survey, we use actual or estimated detection sensitivities to determine the expected observations for each survey. Comparing with the reported results, we derive constraints on the parameters \\{α ,β ,{ A },{a}{{out}}\\} that describe a single population of planets that is simultaneously consistent with the results of microlensing, radial velocity, and direct imaging surveys. We find median and 68% confindence intervals of α =-{0.86}-0.19+0.21 (-{0.85}-0.19+0.21), β ={1.1}-1.4+1.9 ({1.1}-1.3+1.9), { A }={0.21}-0.15+0.20 {{dex}}-2 ({0.21}-0.15+0.20 {{dex}}-2), and {a}{{out}}={10}-4.7+26 AU ({12}-6.2+50 AU) assuming “hot-start” (“cold-start”) planet evolutionary models. These values are consistent with all current knowledge of planets on orbits beyond ∼2 AU around single M dwarfs.

  17. Vetting Galactic Leavitt Law Calibrators Using Radial Velocities: On the Variability, Binarity, and Possible Parallax Error of 19 Long-period Cepheids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, R. I.; Casertano, S.; Riess, A. G.; Melis, C.; Holl, B.; Semaan, T.; Papics, P. I.; Blanco-Cuaresma, S.; Eyer, L.; Mowlavi, N.; Palaversa, L.; Roelens, M.

    2016-10-01

    We investigate the radial velocity (RV) variability and spectroscopic binarity of 19 Galactic long-period ({P}{puls} ≳ 10 days) classical Cepheid variable stars whose trigonometric parallaxes are being measured using the Hubble Space Telescope and Gaia. Our primary objective is to constrain possible parallax error due to undetected orbital motion. Using over 1600 high-precision RVs measured between 2011 and 2016, we find no indication of orbital motion on ≲5 year timescales for 18 Cepheids and determine upper limits on allowed configurations for a range of input orbital periods. The results constrain the unsigned parallax error due to orbital motion to <2% for 16 stars, and <4% for 18. We improve the orbital solution of the known binary YZ Carinae and show that the astrometric model must take into account orbital motion to avoid significant error (∼±100 μarcsec). We further investigate long-timescale ({P}{orb} > 10 years) variations in pulsation-averaged velocity v γ via a template fitting approach using both new and literature RVs. We discover the spectroscopic binarity of XZ Car and CD Cyg, find first tentative evidence for AQ Car, and reveal KN Cen’s orbital signature. Further (mostly tentative) evidence of time-variable v γ is found for SS CMa, VY Car, SZ Cyg, and X Pup. We briefly discuss considerations regarding a vetting process of Galactic Leavitt law calibrators and show that light contributions by companions are insignificant for most distance scale applications.

  18. TOWARD COMPLETE STATISTICS OF MASSIVE BINARY STARS: PENULTIMATE RESULTS FROM THE CYGNUS OB2 RADIAL VELOCITY SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Kobulnicky, Henry A.; Lundquist, Michael J.; Burke, Jamison; Chapman, James; Keller, Erica; Lester, Kathryn; Rolen, Emily K.; Topel, Eric; Bhattacharjee, Anirban; Smullen, Rachel A.; Álvarez, Carlos A. Vargas; Runnoe, Jessie C.; Dale, Daniel A.; Brotherton, Michael M.; Kiminki, Daniel C. E-mail: jburke2@swarthmore.edu E-mail: kelle22e@mtholyoke.edu E-mail: emily.k.rolen@vanderbilt.edu

    2014-08-01

    We analyze orbital solutions for 48 massive multiple-star systems in the Cygnus OB2 association, 23 of which are newly presented here, to find that the observed distribution of orbital periods is approximately uniform in log P for P < 45 days, but it is not scale-free. Inflections in the cumulative distribution near 6 days, 14 days, and 45 days suggest key physical scales of ≅0.2, ≅0.4, and ≅1 A.U. where yet-to-be-identified phenomena create distinct features. No single power law provides a statistically compelling prescription, but if features are ignored, a power law with exponent β ≅ –0.22 provides a crude approximation over P = 1.4-2000 days, as does a piece-wise linear function with a break near 45 days. The cumulative period distribution flattens at P > 45 days, even after correction for completeness, indicating either a lower binary fraction or a shift toward low-mass companions. A high degree of similarity (91% likelihood) between the Cyg OB2 period distribution and that of other surveys suggests that the binary properties at P ≲ 25 days are determined by local physics of disk/clump fragmentation and are relatively insensitive to environmental and evolutionary factors. Fully 30% of the unbiased parent sample is a binary with period P < 45 days. Completeness corrections imply a binary fraction near 55% for P < 5000 days. The observed distribution of mass ratios 0.2 < q < 1 is consistent with uniform, while the observed distribution of eccentricities 0.1 < e < 0.6 is consistent with uniform plus an excess of e ≅ 0 systems. We identify six stars, all supergiants, that exhibit aperiodic velocity variations of ∼30 km s{sup –1} attributed to atmospheric fluctuations.

  19. Using the Sun to estimate Earth-like planets detection capabilities. V. Parameterizing the impact of solar activity components on radial velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borgniet, S.; Meunier, N.; Lagrange, A.-M.

    2015-09-01

    Context. Stellar activity induced by active structures such as stellar spots and faculae is known to have a strong impact on the radial velocity (RV) time series. It is therefore a strong limitation to the detection of small planetary RV signals, such as that of an Earth-mass planet in the habitable zone of a solar-like star. In a series of previous papers, we have studied the detectability of such planets around the Sun observed as a star in an edge-on configuration. For this purpose, we computed the RV, photometric and astrometric variations induced by solar magnetic activity, using all active structures observed over one entire cycle. Aims: Our goal is to perform similar studies on stars with different physical and geometrical properties. As a first step, we focus on Sun-like stars seen with various inclinations, and on estimating detection capabilities with future instruments. Methods: To do so, we first parameterize the solar active structures with the most realistic pattern so as to obtain results consistent with the observed ones. We simulate the growth, evolution and decay of solar magnetic features (spots, faculae and network), using parameters and empiric laws derived from solar observations and literature. We generate the corresponding structure lists over a full solar cycle. We then build the resulting spectra and deduce the RV and photometric variations, first in the case of a sun seen edge-on and then with various inclinations. The produced RV signal takes into account the photometric contribution of spots and faculae as well as the attenuation of the convective blueshift in faculae. We then use these patterns to study solar-like stars with various inclinations. Results: The comparison between our simulated activity pattern and the observed pattern validates our model. We show that the inclination of the stellar rotation axis has a significant impact on the photometric and RV time series. Radial velocity long-term amplitudes and short-term jitters are

  20. Results from the APOGEE IN-SYNC Orion: parameters and radial velocities for thousands of young stars in the Orion Complex.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Da Rio, Nicola; SDSS Apogee IN-SYNC ancillary program Team

    2015-01-01

    I will present the results of our characterization of the dynamical status of the young stellar population in the Orion A star forming region. This is based on radial velocity measurements obtained within the SDSS-III Apogee IN-SYNC Orion Survey, which obtained high-resolution spectroscopy of ~3000 objects in the region, from the dense Orion Nebula Cluster - the prototypical nearby region of active massive star formation - to the low-density environments of the L1641 region. We find evidence for kinematic subclustering along the star forming filament, where the stellar component remains kinematically associated to the gas; in the ONC we find that the stellar population is supervirial and currently expanding. We rule out the existence of a controversial candidate foreground cluster to the south of the ONC. These results, complemented with an analysis of the spatial structure of the population, enables critical tests of theories that describe the formation and early evolution of Orion and young clusters in general.

  1. High-resolution H-band Spectroscopy of Be Stars with SDSS-III/APOGEE. II. Line Profile and Radial Velocity Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chojnowski, S. Drew; Wisniewski, John P.; Whelan, David G.; Labadie-Bartz, Jonathan; Borges Fernandes, Marcelo; Lin, Chien-Cheng; Majewski, Steven R.; Stringfellow, Guy S.; Mennickent, Ronald E.; Roman-Lopes, Alexandre; Tang, Baitian; Hearty, Fred. R.; Holtzman, Jon A.; Pepper, Joshua; Zasowski, Gail

    2017-04-01

    We report on the H-band spectral variability of classical Be stars observed over the course of the Apache Point Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE), one of four subsurveys comprising SDSS-III. As described in the first paper of this series, the APOGEE B-type emission-line (ABE) star sample was culled from the large number of blue stars observed as telluric standards during APOGEE observations. In this paper, we explore the multi-epoch ABE sample, consisting of 1100 spectra for 213 stars. These “snapshots” of the circumstellar disk activity have revealed a wealth of temporal variability including, but not limited to, gradual disappearance of the line emission and vice versa over both short and long timescales. Other forms of variability include variation in emission strength, emission peak intensity ratios, and emission peak separations. We also analyze radial velocities (RVs) of the emission lines for a subsample of 162 stars with sufficiently strong features, and we discuss on a case-by-case basis whether the RV variability exhibited by some stars is caused by binary motion versus dynamical processes in the circumstellar disks. Ten systems are identified as convincing candidates for binary Be stars with as of yet undetected companions.

  2. Assimilation of radar radial velocity data with the WRF Hybrid ETKF-3DVAR system for the prediction of Hurricane Ike (2008)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Feifei; Min, Jinzhong; Xu, Dongmei

    2016-03-01

    The impacts of assimilation of radar radial velocity (Vr) data for the application of analyses and forecasts for Hurricane Ike (2008) are investigated using hybrid ensemble transform Kalman filter-three-dimensional variational data assimilation method (Hybrid ETKF-3DVAR) in this study. Radar Vr observations are pre-processed with quality control procedures before they are assimilated using Weather Research and Forecasting and Data Assimilation model (WRFDA) with three-dimensional variational data assimilation (3DVAR) and hybrid method respectively. With the hybrid method, the ensemble mean is updated with the variational method, while the ensemble perturbations are updated by the ETKF. It seems that assimilating Radar Vr data with Hybrid ETKF-3DVAR method is able to adjust the hurricane initial position and dynamic structure significantly, yielding better track and intensity forecast in the data assimilation experiments. Positive temperature increments are found in Hybrid ETKF-3DVAR experiment, indicating a more realistic thermal structure of Hurricane Ike, while 3DVAR experiment produces much smoother and weaker increments with cold temperature increments near the hurricane vortex center at lower levels. Hybrid ETKF-3DVAR further improves the track and intensity forecast accuracy compared to 3DVAR. The ability of the hybrid method in providing flow-dependent background error covariance is the primary reason for its superior performance.

  3. Precise radial velocities of giant stars. IX. HD 59686 Ab: a massive circumstellar planet orbiting a giant star in a 13.6 au eccentric binary system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz, Mauricio; Reffert, Sabine; Trifonov, Trifon; Quirrenbach, Andreas; Mitchell, David S.; Nowak, Grzegorz; Buenzli, Esther; Zimmerman, Neil; Bonnefoy, Mickaël; Skemer, Andy; Defrère, Denis; Lee, Man Hoi; Fischer, Debra A.; Hinz, Philip M.

    2016-10-01

    Context. For over 12 yr, we have carried out a precise radial velocity (RV) survey of a sample of 373 G- and K-giant stars using the Hamilton Échelle Spectrograph at the Lick Observatory. There are, among others, a number of multiple planetary systems in our sample as well as several planetary candidates in stellar binaries. Aims: We aim at detecting and characterizing substellar and stellar companions to the giant star HD 59686 A (HR 2877, HIP 36616). Methods: We obtained high-precision RV measurements of the star HD 59686 A. By fitting a Keplerian model to the periodic changes in the RVs, we can assess the nature of companions in the system. To distinguish between RV variations that are due to non-radial pulsation or stellar spots, we used infrared RVs taken with the CRIRES spectrograph at the Very Large Telescope. Additionally, to characterize the system in more detail, we obtained high-resolution images with LMIRCam at the Large Binocular Telescope. Results: We report the probable discovery of a giant planet with a mass of mp sin i = 6.92-0.24+0.18 MJup orbiting at ap = 1.0860-0.0007+0.0006 au from the giant star HD 59686 A. In addition to the planetary signal, we discovered an eccentric (eB = 0.729-0.003+0.004) binary companion with a mass of mB sin i = 0.5296-0.0008+0.0011 M⊙ orbiting at a close separation from the giant primary with a semi-major axis of aB = 13.56-0.14+0.18 au. Conclusions: The existence of the planet HD 59686 Ab in a tight eccentric binary system severely challenges standard giant planet formation theories and requires substantial improvements to such theories in tight binaries. Otherwise, alternative planet formation scenarios such as second-generation planets or dynamical interactions in an early phase of the system's lifetime need to be seriously considered to better understand the origin of this enigmatic planet. Based on observations collected at the Lick Observatory, University of California.Based on observations collected at the

  4. THE RADIAL VELOCITY DETECTION OF EARTH-MASS PLANETS IN THE PRESENCE OF ACTIVITY NOISE: THE CASE OF {alpha} CENTAURI Bb

    SciTech Connect

    Hatzes, Artie P.

    2013-06-20

    We present an analysis of the publicly available HARPS radial velocity (RV) measurements for {alpha} Cen B, a star hosting an Earth-mass planet candidate in a 3.24 day orbit. The goal is to devise robust ways of extracting low-amplitude RV signals of low-mass planets in the presence of activity noise. Two approaches were used to remove the stellar activity signal which dominates the RV variations: (1) Fourier component analysis (pre-whitening), and (2) local trend filtering (LTF) of the activity using short time windows of the data. The Fourier procedure results in a signal at P = 3.236 days and K = 0.42 m s{sup -1}, which is consistent with the presence of an Earth-mass planet, but the false alarm probability for this signal is rather high at a few percent. The LTF results in no significant detection of the planet signal, although it is possible to detect a marginal planet signal with this method using a different choice of time windows and fitting functions. However, even in this case the significance of the 3.24 day signal depends on the details of how a time window containing only 10% of the data is filtered. Both methods should have detected the presence of {alpha} Cen Bb at a higher significance than is actually seen. We also investigated the influence of random noise with a standard deviation comparable to the HARPS data and sampled in the same way. The distribution of the noise peaks in the period range 2.8-3.3 days has a maximum of Almost-Equal-To 3.2 days and amplitudes approximately one-half of the K-amplitude for the planet. The presence of the activity signal may boost the velocity amplitude of these signals to values comparable to the planet. It may be premature to attribute the 3.24 day RV variations to an Earth-mass planet. A better understanding of the noise characteristics in the RV data as well as more measurements with better sampling will be needed to confirm this exoplanet.

  5. The conjectured S-type retrograde planet in ν Octantis: more evidence including four years of iodine-cell radial velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramm, D. J.; Nelson, B. E.; Endl, M.; Hearnshaw, J. B.; Wittenmyer, R. A.; Gunn, F.; Bergmann, C.; Kilmartin, P.; Brogt, E.

    2016-08-01

    We report 1212 radial-velocity (RV) measurements obtained in the years 2009-2013 using an iodine cell for the spectroscopic binary ν Octantis (K1 III/IV). This system (a_{bin} ˜ 2.6 au, P ˜ 1050 d) is conjectured to have a Jovian planet with a semimajor axis half that of the binary host. The extreme geometry only permits long-term stability if the planet is in a retrograde orbit. Whilst the reality of the planet (P ˜ 415 d) remains uncertain, other scenarios (stellar variability or apsidal motion caused by a yet unobserved third star) continue to appear substantially less credible based on cross-correlation function bisectors, line-depth ratios and many other independent details. If this evidence is validated but the planet is disproved, the claims of other planets using RVs will be seriously challenged. We also describe a significant revision to the previously published RVs and the full set of 1437 RVs now encompasses nearly 13 yr. The sensitive orbital dynamics allow us to constrain the 3D architecture with a broad prior probability distribution on the mutual inclination, which with posterior samples obtained from an N-body Markov chain Monte Carlo is found to be 152.5°±^{0.7}_{0.6}. None of these samples are dynamically stable beyond 106 yr. However, a grid search around the best-fitting solution finds a region that has many models stable for 107 yr, and includes one model within 1σ that is stable for at least 108 yr. The planet's exceptional nature demands robust independent verification and makes the theoretical understanding of its formation a worthy challenge.

  6. A High-precision Near-infrared Survey for Radial Velocity Variable Low-mass Stars Using CSHELL and a Methane Gas Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagné, Jonathan; Plavchan, Peter; Gao, Peter; Anglada-Escude, Guillem; Furlan, Elise; Davison, Cassy; Tanner, Angelle; Henry, Todd J.; Riedel, Adric R.; Brinkworth, Carolyn; Latham, David; Bottom, Michael; White, Russel; Mills, Sean; Beichman, Chas; Johnson, John A.; Ciardi, David R.; Wallace, Kent; Mennesson, Bertrand; von Braun, Kaspar; Vasisht, Gautam; Prato, Lisa; Kane, Stephen R.; Mamajek, Eric E.; Walp, Bernie; Crawford, Timothy J.; Rougeot, Raphaël; Geneser, Claire S.; Catanzarite, Joseph

    2016-05-01

    We present the results of a precise near-infrared (NIR) radial velocity (RV) survey of 32 low-mass stars with spectral types K2-M4 using CSHELL at the NASA InfraRed Telescope Facility in the K band with an isotopologue methane gas cell to achieve wavelength calibration and a novel, iterative RV extraction method. We surveyed 14 members of young (≈25-150 Myr) moving groups, the young field star ɛ Eridani, and 18 nearby (<25 pc) low-mass stars and achieved typical single-measurement precisions of 8-15 m s-1with a long-term stability of 15-50 m s-1 over longer baselines. We obtain the best NIR RV constraints to date on 27 targets in our sample, 19 of which were never followed by high-precision RV surveys. Our results indicate that very active stars can display long-term RV variations as low as ˜25-50 m s-1 at ≈2.3125 μm, thus constraining the effect of jitter at these wavelengths. We provide the first multiwavelength confirmation of GJ 876 bc and independently retrieve orbital parameters consistent with previous studies. We recovered RV variabilities for HD 160934 AB and GJ 725 AB that are consistent with their known binary orbits, and nine other targets are candidate RV variables with a statistical significance of 3σ-5σ. Our method, combined with the new iSHELL spectrograph, will yield long-term RV precisions of ≲5 m s-1 in the NIR, which will allow the detection of super-Earths near the habitable zone of mid-M dwarfs.

  7. The association of 25(OH)D with blood pressure, pulse pressure and carotid-radial pulse wave velocity in African women.

    PubMed

    Kruger, Iolanthé M; Kruger, Marlena C; Doak, Colleen M; Schutte, Aletta E; Huisman, Hugo W; Van Rooyen, Johannes M; Schutte, Rudolph; Malan, Leoné; Malan, Nicolaas T; Fourie, Carla M T; Kruger, Annamarie

    2013-01-01

    High susceptibility of the African population to develop cardiovascular disease obliges us to investigate possible contributing risk factors. Our aim was to determine whether low 25(OH)D status is associated with increased blood pressure and carotid-radial pulse wave velocity in black South African women. We studied 291 urban women (mean age: 57.56±9.00 yrs.). 25(OH)D status was determined by serum 25(OH)D levels. Women were stratified into sufficient (>30 ng/ml), and insufficient/deficient (<30 ng/ml) groups. Cardiovascular variables were compared between groups. Women with low 25(OH)D levels had significantly higher SBP (150.8±27.1 vs. 137.6±21.0), DBP (94.7±14.5 vs. 89.3±12.3) and PP (53.15(50.7;55.7) vs. 46.3(29.4;84.6)) compared to women with sufficient levels. No significant difference was observed with regards to c-rPWV. ANCOVA analyses still revealed significant differences between the two groups with regards to SBP, DBP as well as PP. Partial correlations revealed significant inverse association between SBP and 25(OH)D (p = .04;r = -.12). Women with low 25(OH)D levels were ∼2 times more likely to have high SBP (95% CI: 3.23;1.05). To conclude, women with deficient/insufficient 25(OH)D had significantly higher SBP compared to women with a sufficient 25(OH) status.

  8. Accurate Group Delay Measurement for Radial Velocity Instruments Using the Dispersed Fixed Delay Interferometer Method. II. Application of Heterodyne Combs Using an External Interferometer Filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ji; Ge, Jian; Wan, Xiaoke; De Lee, Nathan; Lee, Brian

    2012-11-01

    A fixed delay interferometer is the key component in a DFDI (dispersed fixed delay interferometer) instrument for an exoplanet search using the radial velocity (RV) technique. Although the group delay (GD) of the interferometer can be measured with white light combs (WLCs), the measurement precision is limited by the comb visibility, and the wavelength coverage is constrained by the comb sampling. For instance, this method can calibrate only half of the SDSS-III MARVELS spectra and reach a precision of 2.2 m s-1. This article introduces an innovative method using a sine source for precision delay calibration over very broad wavelengths. The sine source is made of a monolithic Michelson interferometer fed with white light. The interferometer modulated white light (in a sinusoidal form) is fed into a DFDI instrument for calibration. Due to an optimal GD of the sine source, Fourier components from the DFDI interferometer, the sine source, and their frequency beating can be clearly separated and effectively extracted with a chirped Fourier transform to allow precision measurements of the interferometer GD over the entire range of operation wavelengths. The measurements of the MARVELS interferometer with a sine source show that this new calibration method has improved the wavelength coverage by a factor of 2 and the precision by a factor of 3. The RV measurement error induced by GD measurement uncertainties is controlled to be less than 1 m s-1, which has met the requirements for MARVELS moderate-to-high Doppler precision (∼5–30 m s-1) for exoplanet search around V ∼ 8–12 solar-type stars. Heterodyne combs using an external interferometer source can be applied in other areas of optics measurement and calibration.

  9. On the Radial Velocity Detection of Additional Planets in Transiting, Slowly Rotating M-dwarf Systems: The Case of GJ 1132

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cloutier, Ryan; Doyon, René; Menou, Kristen; Delfosse, Xavier; Dumusque, Xavier; Artigau, Étienne

    2017-01-01

    M-dwarfs are known to commonly host high-multiplicity planetary systems. Therefore, M-dwarf planetary systems with a known transiting planet are expected to contain additional small planets (rp ≤ 4 R⊕, mp ≲ 20 M⊕) that are not seen in transit. In this study, we investigate the effort required to detect such planets using precision velocimetry around the sizable subset of M-dwarfs that are slowly rotating (Prot ≳ 40 days), and hence more likely to be inactive. We focus on the test case of GJ 1132. Specifically, we perform a suite of Monte-Carlo simulations of the star’s radial velocity signal, featuring astrophysical contributions from stellar jitter due to rotationally modulated active regions, as well as Keplerian signals from the known transiting planet and hypothetical additional planets not seen in transit. We then compute the detection completeness of non-transiting planets around GJ 1132 and consequently estimate the number of RV measurements required to detect those planets. We show that, with 1 m s‑1 precision per measurement, only ∼50 measurements are required to achieve a 50% detection completeness for all non-transiting planets in the system, as well as planets that are potentially habitable. Throughout this work, we advocate the use of Gaussian process regression as an effective tool for mitigating the effects of stellar jitter including stars with high activity. Given that GJ 1132 is representative of a large population of slowly rotating M-dwarfs, we conclude with a discussion of how our results may be extended to other systems with known transiting planets, such as those that will be discovered with TESS.

  10. KEPLER-18b, c, AND d: A SYSTEM OF THREE PLANETS CONFIRMED BY TRANSIT TIMING VARIATIONS, LIGHT CURVE VALIDATION, WARM-SPITZER PHOTOMETRY, AND RADIAL VELOCITY MEASUREMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Cochran, William D.; Fabrycky, Daniel C.; Fortney, Jonathan J.

    2011-11-01

    We report the detection of three transiting planets around a Sun-like star, which we designate Kepler-18. The transit signals were detected in photometric data from the Kepler satellite, and were confirmed to arise from planets using a combination of large transit-timing variations (TTVs), radial velocity variations, Warm-Spitzer observations, and statistical analysis of false-positive probabilities. The Kepler-18 star has a mass of 0.97 M{sub sun}, a radius of 1.1 R{sub sun}, an effective temperature of 5345 K, and an iron abundance of [Fe/H] = +0.19. The planets have orbital periods of approximately 3.5, 7.6, and 14.9 days. The innermost planet 'b' is a 'super-Earth' with a mass of 6.9 {+-} 3.4 M{sub +}, a radius of 2.00 {+-} 0.10 R{sub +}, and a mean density of 4.9 {+-} 2.4 g cm{sup 3}. The two outer planets 'c' and 'd' are both low-density Neptune-mass planets. Kepler-18c has a mass of 17.3 {+-} 1.9 M{sub +}, a radius of 5.49 {+-} 0.26 R{sub +}, and a mean density of 0.59 {+-} 0.07 g cm{sup 3}, while Kepler-18d has a mass of 16.4 {+-} 1.4 M{sub +}, a radius of 6.98 {+-} 0.33 R{sub +} and a mean density of 0.27 {+-} 0.03 g cm{sup 3}. Kepler-18c and Kepler-18d have orbital periods near a 2:1 mean-motion resonance, leading to large and readily detected TTVs.

  11. MARVELS-1: A Face-on Double-lined Binary Star Masquerading as a Resonant Planetary System and Consideration of Rare False Positives in Radial Velocity Planet Searches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Jason T.; Roy, Arpita; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Wang, Sharon X.; Ford, Eric B.; Payne, Matt; Lee, Brian L.; Wang, Ji; Crepp, Justin R.; Gaudi, B. Scott; Eastman, Jason; Pepper, Joshua; Ge, Jian; Fleming, Scott W.; Ghezzi, Luan; González-Hernández, Jonay I.; Cargile, Phillip; Stassun, Keivan G.; Wisniewski, John; Dutra-Ferreira, Leticia; Porto de Mello, Gustavo F.; Maia, Márcio A. G.; Nicolaci da Costa, Luiz; Ogando, Ricardo L. C.; Santiago, Basilio X.; Schneider, Donald P.; Hearty, Fred R.

    2013-06-01

    We have analyzed new and previously published radial velocity (RV) observations of MARVELS-1, known to have an ostensibly substellar companion in a ~6 day orbit. We find significant (~100 m s-1) residuals to the best-fit model for the companion, and these residuals are naïvely consistent with an interior giant planet with a P = 1.965 days in a nearly perfect 3:1 period commensurability (|Pb /Pc - 3| < 10-4). We have performed several tests for the reality of such a companion, including a dynamical analysis, a search for photometric variability, and a hunt for contaminating stellar spectra. We find many reasons to be critical of a planetary interpretation, including the fact that most of the three-body dynamical solutions are unstable. We find no evidence for transits, and no evidence of stellar photometric variability. We have discovered two apparent companions to MARVELS-1 with adaptive optics imaging at Keck; both are M dwarfs, one is likely bound, and the other is likely a foreground object. We explore false-alarm scenarios inspired by various curiosities in the data. Ultimately, a line profile and bisector analysis lead us to conclude that the ~100 m s-1 residuals are an artifact of spectral contamination from a stellar companion contributing ~15%-30% of the optical light in the system. We conclude that origin of this contamination is the previously detected RV companion to MARVELS-1, which is not, as previously reported, a brown dwarf, but in fact a G dwarf in a face-on orbit.

  12. Absolute and geometric parameters of contact binary BO Arietis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gürol, B.; Gürsoytrak, S. H.; Bradstreet, D. H.

    2015-08-01

    We present the results of our investigation on the geometrical and physical parameters of the W UMa type binary system BO Ari from analyzed CCD (BVRI) light curves and radial velocity data. The photometric data were obtained in 2009 and 2010 at Ankara University Observatory (AUO) and the spectroscopic observations were made in 2007 and 2010 at TUBITAK National Observatory (TUG). These light and radial velocity observations were analyzed simultaneously by using the Wilson-Devinney (2013 revision) code to obtain absolute and geometrical parameters. The system was determined to be an A-type W UMa system. Combining our photometric solution with the spectroscopic data we derived masses and radii of the eclipsing system to be M1 = 0.995M⊙,M2 = 0.189M⊙,R1 = 1.090R⊙ and R2 = 0.515R⊙ . Finally, we discuss the evolutionary status of the system.

  13. ABSOLUTE PROPERTIES OF THE TRIPLE STAR CF TAURI

    SciTech Connect

    Lacy, Claud H. Sandberg; Torres, Guillermo; Claret, Antonio E-mail: gtorres@cfa.harvard.edu

    2012-12-01

    CF Tau is now known to be an eclipsing triple star with relatively deep total and annular eclipses. New light and radial velocity curves as well as new times of minima were obtained and used for further modeling of the system. Very accurate (better than 0.9%) masses and radii of the eclipsing pair are determined from analysis of the two new light curves, the radial velocity curve, and the times of minimum light. The mass and luminosity of the distant third component is accurately determined as well. Theoretical models of the detached, evolved eclipsing pair match the observed absolute properties of the stars at an age of about 4.3 Gyr and [Fe/H] = -0.14.

  14. Revised FORTRAN program for calculating velocities and streamlines on the hub-shroud midchannel stream surface of an axial-, radial-, or mixed-flow turbomachine or annular duct. 2: Programmer's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katsanis, T.; Mcnally, W. D.

    1977-01-01

    A FORTRAN IV computer program has been developed that obtains a detailed subsonic or shock free transonic flow solution on the hub-shroud midchannel stream surface of a turbomachine. The blade row may be fixed or rotating, and the blades may be twisted and leaned. Flow may be axial, mixed, or radial. Upstream and downstream flow variables may vary from hub to shroud, and provisions are made to correct for loss of stagnation pressure. The results include velocities, streamlines, and flow angles on the stream surface and approximate blade surface velocities.

  15. THE RADIAL VELOCITY TATOOINE SEARCH FOR CIRCUMBINARY PLANETS: PLANET DETECTION LIMITS FOR A SAMPLE OF DOUBLE-LINED BINARY STARS-INITIAL RESULTS FROM KECK I/HIRES, SHANE/CAT/HAMSPEC, AND TNG/SARG OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Konacki, Maciej; Helminiak, Krzysztof G.; Muterspaugh, Matthew W.; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R.

    2009-10-10

    We present preliminary results of the first and on-going radial velocity survey for circumbinary planets. With a novel radial velocity technique employing an iodine absorption cell, we achieve an unprecedented radial velocity (RV) precision of up to 2 m s{sup -1} for double-lined binary stars. The high-resolution spectra collected with the Keck I/Hires, TNG/Sarg, and Shane/CAT/Hamspec telescopes/spectrographs over the years 2003-2008 allow us to derive RVs and compute planet detection limits for 10 double-lined binary stars. For this initial sample of targets, we can rule out planets on dynamically stable orbits with masses as small as approx0.3 to 3 M {sub Jup} for the orbital periods of up to approx5.3 years. Even though the presented sample of stars is too small to make any strong conclusions, it is clear that the search for circumbinary planets is now technique-wise possible and eventually will provide new constraints for the planet formation theories.

  16. Modelling the magnetic activity and filtering radial velocity curves of young Suns : the weak-line T Tauri star LkCa 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donati, J.-F.; Hébrard, E.; Hussain, G.; Moutou, C.; Grankin, K.; Boisse, I.; Morin, J.; Gregory, S. G.; Vidotto, A. A.; Bouvier, J.; Alencar, S. H. P.; Delfosse, X.; Doyon, R.; Takami, M.; Jardine, M. M.; Fares, R.; Cameron, A. C.; Ménard, F.; Dougados, C.; Herczeg, G.; Matysse Collaboration

    2014-11-01

    We report results of a spectropolarimetric and photometric monitoring of the weak-line T Tauri star LkCa 4 within the Magnetic Topologies of Young Stars and the Survival of close-in giant Exoplanets (MaTYSSE) programme, involving ESPaDOnS at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope. Despite an age of only 2 Myr and a similarity with prototypical classical T Tauri stars, LkCa 4 shows no evidence for accretion and probes an interesting transition stage for star and planet formation. Large profile distortions and Zeeman signatures are detected in the unpolarized and circularly polarized lines of LkCa 4 using Least-Squares Deconvolution (LSD), indicating the presence of brightness inhomogeneities and magnetic fields at the surface of LkCa 4. Using tomographic imaging, we reconstruct brightness and magnetic maps of LkCa 4 from sets of unpolarized and circularly polarized LSD profiles. The large-scale field is strong and mainly axisymmetric, featuring a ≃2 kG poloidal component and a ≃1 kG toroidal component encircling the star at equatorial latitudes - the latter making LkCa 4 markedly different from classical T Tauri stars of similar mass and age. The brightness map includes a dark spot overlapping the magnetic pole and a bright region at mid-latitudes - providing a good match to the contemporaneous photometry. We also find that differential rotation at the surface of LkCa 4 is small, typically ≃5.5 times weaker than that of the Sun, and compatible with solid-body rotation. Using our tomographic modelling, we are able to filter out the activity jitter in the radial velocity curve of LkCa 4 (of full amplitude 4.3 km s-1) down to an rms precision of 0.055 km s-1. Looking for hot Jupiters around young Sun-like stars thus appears feasible, even though we find no evidence for such planets around LkCa 4.

  17. A Versatile Technique to Enable Sub-milli-Kelvin Instrument Stability for Precise Radial Velocity Measurements: Tests with the Habitable-zone Planet Finder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefansson, Gudmundur; Hearty, Frederick; Robertson, Paul; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Anderson, Tyler; Levi, Eric; Bender, Chad; Nelson, Matthew; Monson, Andrew; Blank, Basil; Halverson, Samuel; Henderson, Chuck; Ramsey, Lawrence; Roy, Arpita; Schwab, Christian; Terrien, Ryan

    2016-12-01

    Insufficient instrument thermomechanical stability is one of the many roadblocks for achieving 10 cm s-1 Doppler radial velocity precision, the precision needed to detect Earth-twins orbiting solar-type stars. Highly temperature and pressure stabilized spectrographs allow us to better calibrate out instrumental drifts, thereby helping in distinguishing instrumental noise from astrophysical stellar signals. We present the design and performance of the Environmental Control System (ECS) for the Habitable-zone Planet Finder (HPF), a high-resolution (R = 50,000) fiber-fed near-infrared (NIR) spectrograph for the 10 {{m}} Hobby-Eberly Telescope at McDonald Observatory. HPF will operate at 180 {{K}}, driven by the choice of an H2RG NIR detector array with a 1.7 μ {{m}} cutoff. This ECS has demonstrated 0.6 {mK} rms stability over 15 days at both 180 and 300 {{K}}, and maintained high-quality vacuum (\\lt {10}-7 {Torr}) over months, during long-term stability tests conducted without a planned passive thermal enclosure surrounding the vacuum chamber. This control scheme is versatile and can be applied as a blueprint to stabilize future NIR and optical high-precision Doppler instruments over a wide temperature range from ˜77 {{K}} to elevated room temperatures. A similar ECS is being implemented to stabilize NEID, the NASA/NSF NN-EXPLORE spectrograph for the 3.5 {{m}} WIYN telescope at Kitt Peak, operating at 300 {{K}}. A [full SolidWorks 3D-CAD model] and a comprehensive parts list of the HPF ECS are included with this manuscript to facilitate the adaptation of this versatile environmental control scheme in the broader astronomical community. Certain commercial equipment, instruments, or materials are identified in this paper in order to specify the experimental procedure adequately. Such identification is not intended to imply recommendation or endorsement by the National Institute of Standards and Technology, nor is it intended to imply that the materials or equipment

  18. The Magellan PFS Planet Search Program: Radial Velocity and Stellar Abundance Analyses of the 360 au, Metal-poor Binary “Twins” HD 133131A & B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teske, Johanna K.; Shectman, Stephen A.; Vogt, Steve S.; Díaz, Matías; Butler, R. Paul; Crane, Jeffrey D.; Thompson, Ian B.; Arriagada, Pamela

    2016-12-01

    We present a new precision radial velocity (RV) data set that reveals multiple planets orbiting the stars in the ˜360 au, G2+G2 “twin” binary HD 133131AB. Our six years of high-resolution echelle observations from MIKE and five years from the Planet Finder Spectrograph (PFS) on the Magellan telescopes indicate the presence of two eccentric planets around HD 133131A with minimum masses of 1.43 ± 0.03 and 0.63 ± 0.15 {{ M }}{{J}} at 1.44 ± 0.005 and 4.79 ± 0.92 au, respectively. Additional PFS observations of HD 133131B spanning five years indicate the presence of one eccentric planet of minimum mass 2.50 ± 0.05 {{ M }}{{J}} at 6.40 ± 0.59 au, making it one of the longest-period planets detected with RV to date. These planets are the first to be reported primarily based on data taken with the PFS on Magellan, demonstrating the instrument’s precision and the advantage of long-baseline RV observations. We perform a differential analysis between the Sun and each star, and between the stars themselves, to derive stellar parameters and measure a suite of 21 abundances across a wide range of condensation temperatures. The host stars are old (likely ˜9.5 Gyr) and metal-poor ([Fe/H] ˜ -0.30), and we detect a ˜0.03 dex depletion in refractory elements in HD 133131A versus B (with standard errors ˜0.017). This detection and analysis adds to a small but growing sample of binary “twin” exoplanet host stars with precise abundances measured, and represents the most metal-poor and likely oldest in that sample. Overall, the planets around HD 133131A and B fall in an unexpected regime in planet mass-host star metallicity space and will serve as an important benchmark for the study of long-period giant planets. This paper includes data gathered with the 6.5 m Magellan Telescopes located at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile.

  19. Revised FORTRAN program for calculating velocities and streamlines on the hub-shroud midchannel stream surface of an axial-, radial-, or mixed-flow turbomachine or annular duct. 1: User's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katsanis, T.; Mcnally, W. D.

    1977-01-01

    A FORTRAN 4 computer program was developed that obtains a detailed subsonic or shock-free transonic flow solution on the hub-shroud midchannel stream surface of a turbomachine. The blade row may be fixed or rotating, and the blades may be twisted and leaned. Flow may be axial, mixed, or radial. Upstream and downstream flow variables may vary from hub to shroud, and provision is made to correct for loss of stagnation pressure. The results include velocities, streamlines, and flow angles on the stream surface as well as approximate blade surface velocities. Subsonic solutions are obtained by a finite-difference, stream-function solution. Transonic solutions are obtained by a velocity-gradient method that uses information from a finite-difference, stream-function solution at a reduced mass flow.

  20. WISDOM: the WIYN spectrograph for Doppler monitoring: a NASA-NSF concept for an extreme precision radial velocity instrument in support of TESS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fżrész, Gábor; Simcoe, Robert; Barnes, Stuart I.; Buchhave, Lars A.; Egan, Mark; Foster, Rick; Hellickson, Tim; Malonis, Andrew; Phillips, David; Shectman, Stephen; Walsworth, Ronald; Winn, Josh; Woods, Deborah

    2016-08-01

    The Kepler mission highlighted that precision radial velocity (PRV) follow-up is a real bottleneck in supporting transiting exoplanet surveys. The limited availability of PRV instruments, and the desire to break the "1 m/s" precision barrier, prompted the formation of a NASA-NSF collaboration `NN-EXPLORE' to call for proposals designing a new Extreme Precision Doppler Spectrograph (EPDS). By securing a significant fraction of telescope time on the 3.5m WIYN at Kitt Peak, and aiming for unprecedented long-term precision, the EPDS instrument will provide a unique tool for U.S. astronomers in characterizing exoplanet candidates identified by TESS. One of the two funded instrument concept studies is led by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, in consortium with Lincoln Laboratories, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics and the Carnegie Observatories. This paper describes the instrument concept WISDOM (WIYN Spectrograph for DOppler Monitoring) prepared by this team. WISDOM is a fiber fed, environmentally controlled, high resolution (R=110k), asymmetric white-pupil echelle spectrograph, covering a wide 380-1300nm wavelength region. Its R4 and R6 echelle gratings provide the main dispersion, symmetrically mounted on either side of a vertically aligned, vacuum-enclosed carbon fiber optical bench. Each grating feeds two cameras and thus the resulting wavelength range per camera is narrow enough that the VPHG cross-dispersers and employed anti-reflection coatings are highly efficient. The instrument operates near room temperature, and so thermal background for the near-infrared arm is mitigated by thermal blocking filters and a short (1.7μm) cutoff HgCdTe detector. To achieve high resolution while maintaining small overall instrument size (100/125mm beam diameter), imposed by the limited available space within the observatory building, we chose to slice the telescope pupil 6 ways before coupling light into fibers. An atmospheric dispersion corrector and fast

  1. Absolute Zero

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnelly, Russell J.; Sheibley, D.; Belloni, M.; Stamper-Kurn, D.; Vinen, W. F.

    2006-12-01

    Absolute Zero is a two hour PBS special attempting to bring to the general public some of the advances made in 400 years of thermodynamics. It is based on the book “Absolute Zero and the Conquest of Cold” by Tom Shachtman. Absolute Zero will call long-overdue attention to the remarkable strides that have been made in low-temperature physics, a field that has produced 27 Nobel Prizes. It will explore the ongoing interplay between science and technology through historical examples including refrigerators, ice machines, frozen foods, liquid oxygen and nitrogen as well as much colder fluids such as liquid hydrogen and liquid helium. A website has been established to promote the series: www.absolutezerocampaign.org. It contains information on the series, aimed primarily at students at the middle school level. There is a wealth of material here and we hope interested teachers will draw their student’s attention to this website and its substantial contents, which have been carefully vetted for accuracy.

  2. Absolute Summ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Alfred, Jr.

    Summ means the entirety of the multiverse. It seems clear, from the inflation theories of A. Guth and others, that the creation of many universes is plausible. We argue that Absolute cosmological ideas, not unlike those of I. Newton, may be consistent with dynamic multiverse creations. As suggested in W. Heisenberg's uncertainty principle, and with the Anthropic Principle defended by S. Hawking, et al., human consciousness, buttressed by findings of neuroscience, may have to be considered in our models. Predictability, as A. Einstein realized with Invariants and General Relativity, may be required for new ideas to be part of physics. We present here a two postulate model geared to an Absolute Summ. The seedbed of this work is part of Akhnaton's philosophy (see S. Freud, Moses and Monotheism). Most important, however, is that the structure of human consciousness, manifest in Kenya's Rift Valley 200,000 years ago as Homo sapiens, who were the culmination of the six million year co-creation process of Hominins and Nature in Africa, allows us to do the physics that we do. .

  3. Production, Outflow Velocity, and Radial Distribution of H2O and OH in the Coma of Comet C/1995 O1 [Hale-Bopp] from Wide Field Imaging of OH

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Walter M.; Scherb, Frank; Mierkiewicz, Edwin; Oliversen, Ronald; Morgenthaler, Jeffrey

    2001-01-01

    Observations of OH are a useful proxy of the water production rate (Q(sub H2O)) and outflow velocity (V(sub out)) in comets. We use wide field images taken on 03/28/1997 and 04/08/1997 that capture the entire scale length of the OH coma of comet C/1995O1 (Hale-Bopp) to obtain Q(sub H2O) from the model-independent method of aperture summation. We also extract the radial brightness profile of OH 3080 angstroms out to cometocentric distances of up to 10(exp 6) km using an adaptive ring summation algorithm. Radial profiles are obtained as azimuthal averages and in quadrants covering different position angles relative to the comet-Sun line. These profiles are fit using both fixed and variable velocity two-component spherical expansion models to determine VOH with increasing distance from the nucleus. The OH coma of Hale-Bopp was more spatially extended than in previous comets, and this extension is best matched by a variable acceleration of H2O and OH that acted across the entire coma, but was strongest within 1-2 x 10(exp 4) km from the nucleus. This acceleration led to VOH at 10(exp 6) km that was 2-3 times greater than that obtained from a 1P/Halleytype comet at 1 AU, a result that is consistent with gas-kinetic models, extrapolation from previous observations of OH in comets with Q(sub H2O) > 10(exp 29)/s, and radio measurements of the outer coma Hale-Bopp OH velocity profile. When the coma is broken down by quadrant, we find an azimuthal asymmetry in the radial distribution that is characterized by an increase in the spatial extent of OH in the region between the orbit-trailing and anti-sunward directions. Model fits to this area and comparison with radio OH measurements suggest greater acceleration in this region, with VOH UP to 1.5 times greater at 10(exp 6) km radial distance than elsewhere in the coma.

  4. Absolute Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartig, George

    1990-12-01

    The absolute sensitivity of the FOS will be determined in SV by observing 2 stars at 3 epochs, first in 3 apertures (1.0", 0.5", and 0.3" circular) and then in 1 aperture (1.0" circular). In cycle 1, one star, BD+28D4211 will be observed in the 1.0" aperture to establish the stability of the sensitivity and flat field characteristics and improve the accuracy obtained in SV. This star will also be observed through the paired apertures since these are not calibrated in SV. The stars will be observed in most detector/grating combinations. The data will be averaged to form the inverse sensitivity functions required by RSDP.

  5. Radial systems of dark globules

    SciTech Connect

    Gyul'budagyn, A.L.

    1986-03-01

    The author gives examples of radial systems consisting of dark globules and ''elephant trunks''. Besides already known systems, which contain hot stars at their center, data are given on three radial systems of a new kind, at the center of which there are stars of spectral types later than B. Data are given on 32 globules of radial systems of the association Cep OB2. On the basis of the observational data, it is concluded that at least some of the isolated Bok globules derive from elephant trunks and dark globules forming radial systems around hot stars. It is also suggested that the two molecular clouds situated near the Rosette nebula and possessing velocities differing by ca 20 km/sec from the velocity of the nebula could have been ejected in opposite directions from the center of the nebula. One of these clouds consists of dark globules forming the radial system of the Rosette nebula.

  6. Radial engine

    SciTech Connect

    Kmicikiewicz, M.A.

    1988-03-01

    A radial engine is described comprising: a housing; equally spaced openings disposed in ring-like arrangement on the periphery of the housing; a piston and cylinder arrangement in each of the opening, a piston rod for each arrangement fixed to and extending radially inwardly from its respective piston and through its respective opening; shoe means pivotally attached at the other end of each of the piston rod; radial guide means extending in the housing in line with each of the piston rods, and the shoe means provided with guide means followers to ensure radial reciprocal movement of the piston rods and shoe means; and a connecting ring journaled on a crankshaft for circular translation motion in the housing, the ring including a circular rim. Each shoe means includes an arcuate follower member being slidably connected to the rim of the connecting ring.

  7. A globular cluster toward M87 with a radial velocity < – 1000 km s{sup –1}: the first hypervelocity cluster

    SciTech Connect

    Caldwell, Nelson; Strader, Jay; Romanowsky, Aaron J.; Brodie, Jean P.; Moore, Ben; Diemand, Jurg; Martizzi, Davide

    2014-05-20

    We report the discovery of an object near M87 in the Virgo Cluster with an extraordinary blueshift of –1025 km s{sup –1}, offset from the systemic velocity by >2300 km s{sup –1}. Evaluation of photometric and spectroscopic data provides strong evidence that this object is a distant massive globular cluster, which we call HVGC-1 in analogy to Galactic hypervelocity stars. We consider but disfavor more exotic interpretations, such as a system of stars bound to a recoiling black hole. The odds of observing an outlier as extreme as HVGC-1 in a virialized distribution of intracluster objects are small; it appears more likely that the cluster was (or is being) ejected from Virgo following a three-body interaction. The nature of the interaction is unclear, and could involve either a subhalo or a binary supermassive black hole at the center of M87.

  8. Bias Properties of Extragalactic Distance Indicators. VII. Correlation of Absolute Luminosity and Rotational Velocity for SC Galaxies over the Range of Luminosity Class from I to III-IV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandage, Allan

    1999-01-01

    A distance-limited subset of the complete flux-limited sample of Sc galaxies in the Revised Shapley-Ames Catalog of Bright Galaxies is isolated by means of separate Spaenhauer diagrams for six individual van den Bergh luminosity class intervals from Sc I+I.2,.3 to Sc III-IV. The distribution functions of kinematic absolute B^0,i_T(220,50) magnitudes and 21 cm line widths, W_20, corrected to edge-on orientation, have been determined for the same six bins of luminosity class. The individual luminosity functions for each luminosity class are bounded on both the bright and faint ends, showing that the present sample includes no dwarf Sc spirals fainter than M(B_T)(220,50)=-18 belonging to luminosity classes I to III-IV, as defined by the regularity of the spiral pattern. Star-forming galaxies with spiral structures as regular as the ones found in these luminosity classes have absolute magnitudes brighter than M_B(H=50)=-18 and 21 cm line widths larger than W_20/sini=2v_rot(max)=165 km s^-1. Furthermore, the 21 cm line-width distributions move toward smaller rotational velocities as the luminosity classes change from I to III, showing that rotation is a principal parameter determining the regularity of the spiral pattern. Whether it is the only parameter awaits a similar investigation for spirals of all luminosity classes along the complete Hubble sequence. In particular, it has not yet been proved that all Im and Sm galaxies, where, by definition, the spiral arms are either lacking or are semichaotic, have absolute magnitudes that are fainter than M_B=-18 and whose 21 cm LWs are smaller than ~165 km s^-1, presumably because of smaller mass than the high-luminosity, regular spirals. The Teerikorpi ``cluster population incompleteness bias'' is demonstrated again. Here, however, as in Papers II-IV of this series, we use field galaxies to show that the slope and zero point of the Tully-Fisher (T-F) relation are systematically incorrect for flux-limited samples, the error

  9. Absolute and geometric parameters of the W UMa type contact binary V546 And

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gürol, Birol; Bradstreet, David H.; Okan, Abdullah

    2015-04-01

    We present the results of our investigation on the geometrical and physical parameters of the W UMa-type binary V546 And from analyzed CCD (BVRI) light curves and radial velocity data. The photometric data were obtained in 2010 and 2011 at Ankara University Observatory (AUO) and the spectroscopic observations were made in 2010 at TUBITAK National Observatory (TUG). Light and radial velocity observations were analyzed simultaneously by using the Wilson-Devinney (2013 revision) code to obtain absolute and geometrical parameters. The system was determined to be a W-type W UMa system. Combining our photometric solution with the spectroscopic data we derived masses and radii of the eclipsing system to be M1 = 0.275M⊙,M2 = 1.083M⊙,R1 = 0.661R⊙ and R2 = 1.229R⊙ . We finally discuss the evolutionary status of the system.

  10. Flow mechanism of Forchheimer's cubic equation in high-velocity radial gas flow through porous media. [High-velocity, high-pressure gas flow through porous media near the wellbore

    SciTech Connect

    Ezeudembah; Dranchuk, P.M.

    1982-09-01

    Until recently, the visco-inertial flow equation, which is an adaptation of Forchheimer's quadratic equation, has been used to describe gas flow behavior at higher flow rates and pressures. The inability of this equation, in some cases, to fully describe high-velocity, high-pressure gas flow behavior, especially around the well bore, led to the consideration of other empirical equations. In this paper, formal derivation of Forchheimer's cubic equation is made by considering the kinetic energy equation of mean flow and dimensional relations for one-dimensional, linear, incompressible fluid flow. By the addition of the cubic term, this equation is regarded as a modified Forchheimer's quadratic equation which accounts for the flow rates obtained beyond the laminar flow condition. The cubic equation spans a wide range of flow rates and regimes, i.e. Darcy type, inertial type, and turbulent. For suitable use in gas flow studies, this equation has been adapted, modified, and corrected for the gas slippage effect. The physical basis of the cubic term has been established by using boundary layer theory to explain the high-velocity, high-pressure flow behavior through a porous path. Gamma, the main parameter in the cubic term, is directly related to a characteristic, dimensionless shape factor which is significant at higher flow rates. It is inversely related to viscosity, but has no dependence on the gas slippage coefficient in the higher flow regime.

  11. Production, Outflow Velocity, and Radial Distribution of H2O and OH in the Coma of Comet C/1995 O1 [Hale-Bopp] from Wide Field Imaging of OH

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Walter M.; Scherb, Frank; Mierkiewicz, Edwin; Oliverson, Ronald; Morgenthaler, Jeffrey

    2003-01-01

    Observations of OH are a useful proxy of the water production rate (Q(sub H2O)) and outflow velocity (V(sub out)) in comets. From wide field images taken on 03/28/1997 and 04/08/1997 that capture the entire scale length of the OH coma of comet C/1995 O1 (Hale-Bopp), we obtain Q(sub H2O) from the model-independent method of aperture summation. With an adaptive ring summation algorithm, we extract the radial brightness distribution of OH 0-0 band emission out to cometocentric distances of up to 10(exp 6) km, both as azimuthal averages and in quadrants covering different position angles relative to the comet-Sun line. These profiles are fit using both fixed and variable velocity 2-component spherical expansion models to estimate V(sub OH) with increasing distance from the nucleus. The OH coma of Hale-Bopp was more spatially extended than previous comets, and this extension is best matched by a variable acceleration of H2O and OH that acted across the entire coma, but was strongest within 1-2 x 10(exp 4) km from the nucleus. Our models indicate that V(sub OH) at the edge of our detectable field of view (10(exp 6) km) was approx. 2-3 times greater in Hale-Bopp than for a 1P/Halley-class comet at 1 AU, which is consistent with the results of more sophisticated gas-kinetic models, extrapolation from previous observations of OH in comets with Q(sub H2O) greater than 10(exp 29)/s , and direct radio measurements of the outer coma Hale-Bopp OH velocity. The most probable source of this acceleration is thermalization of the excess energy of dissociation of H2O and OH over an extended collisional coma. When the coma is broken down by quadrants in position angle, we find an azimuthal asymmetry in the radial distribution that is characterized by an increase in the spatial extent of OH in the region between the orbit-trailing and anti-sunward directions. Model fits specific to this area and comparison with radio OH measurements suggest greater acceleration here, with V(sub OH

  12. Absolute instability of the Gaussian wake profile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hultgren, Lennart S.; Aggarwal, Arun K.

    1987-01-01

    Linear parallel-flow stability theory has been used to investigate the effect of viscosity on the local absolute instability of a family of wake profiles with a Gaussian velocity distribution. The type of local instability, i.e., convective or absolute, is determined by the location of a branch-point singularity with zero group velocity of the complex dispersion relation for the instability waves. The effects of viscosity were found to be weak for values of the wake Reynolds number, based on the center-line velocity defect and the wake half-width, larger than about 400. Absolute instability occurs only for sufficiently large values of the center-line wake defect. The critical value of this parameter increases with decreasing wake Reynolds number, thereby indicating a shrinking region of absolute instability with decreasing wake Reynolds number. If backflow is not allowed, absolute instability does not occur for wake Reynolds numbers smaller than about 38.

  13. ABSOLUTE PROPERTIES OF THE ECLIPSING BINARY STAR BF DRACONIS

    SciTech Connect

    Sandberg Lacy, Claud H.; Torres, Guillermo; Fekel, Francis C.; Sabby, Jeffrey A.; Claret, Antonio E-mail: gtorres@cfa.harvard.edu E-mail: jsabby@siue.edu

    2012-06-15

    BF Dra is now known to be an eccentric double-lined F6+F6 binary star with relatively deep (0.7 mag) partial eclipses. Previous studies of the system are improved with 7494 differential photometric observations from the URSA WebScope and 9700 from the NFO WebScope, 106 high-resolution spectroscopic observations from the Tennessee State University 2 m automatic spectroscopic telescope and the 1 m coude-feed spectrometer at Kitt Peak National Observatory, and 31 accurate radial velocities from the CfA. Very accurate (better than 0.6%) masses and radii are determined from analysis of the two new light curves and four radial velocity curves. Theoretical models match the absolute properties of the stars at an age of about 2.72 Gyr and [Fe/H] = -0.17, and tidal theory correctly confirms that the orbit should still be eccentric. Our observations of BF Dra constrain the convective core overshooting parameter to be larger than about 0.13 H{sub p}. We find, however, that standard tidal theory is unable to match the observed slow rotation rates of the components' surface layers.

  14. ABSOLUTE PROPERTIES OF THE ECLIPSING BINARY STAR V335 SERPENTIS

    SciTech Connect

    Lacy, Claud H. Sandberg; Fekel, Francis C.; Claret, Antonio E-mail: fekel@evans.tsuniv.edu

    2012-08-15

    V335 Ser is now known to be an eccentric double-lined A1+A3 binary star with fairly deep (0.5 mag) partial eclipses. Previous studies of the system are improved with 7456 differential photometric observations from the URSA WebScope and 5666 from the NFO WebScope, and 67 high-resolution spectroscopic observations from the Tennessee State University 2 m automatic spectroscopic telescope. From dates of minima, the apsidal period is about 880 years. Accurate (better than 2%) masses and radii are determined from analysis of the two new light curves and the radial velocity curve. Theoretical models match the absolute properties of the stars at an age of about 380 Myr, though the age agreement for the two components is poor. Tidal theory correctly confirms that the orbit should still be eccentric, but we find that standard tidal theory is unable to match the observed asynchronous rotation rates of the components' surface layers.

  15. ABSOLUTE PROPERTIES OF THE ECLIPSING BINARY STAR HY VIRGINIS

    SciTech Connect

    Sandberg Lacy, Claud H.; Fekel, Francis C. E-mail: fekel@evans.tsuniv.edu

    2011-12-15

    HY Vir is found to be a double-lined F0m+F5 binary star with relatively shallow (0.3 mag) partial eclipses. Previous studies of the system are improved with 7509 differential photometric observations from the URSA WebScope and 8862 from the NFO WebScope, and 68 high-resolution spectroscopic observations from the Tennessee State University 2 m automatic spectroscopic telescope, and the 1 m coude-feed spectrometer at Kitt Peak National Observatory. Very accurate (better than 0.5%) masses and radii are determined from analysis of the new light curves and radial velocity curves. Theoretical models match the absolute properties of the stars at an age of about 1.35 Gy.

  16. The impact of T-TREC-retrieved wind and radial velocity data assimilation using EnKF and effects of assimilation window on the analysis and prediction of Typhoon Jangmi (2008)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Mingjun; Xue, Ming; Zhao, Kun

    2016-01-01

    This study examines the relative impact of assimilating T-TREC-retrieved winds (VTREC) versus radial velocity (Vr) on the analysis and forecast of Typhoon Jangmi (2008) using an ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF). The VTREC and Vr data at 30 min intervals are assimilated into the ARPS model at 3 km grid spacing over four different assimilation windows that cover, respectively, 0000-0200, 0200-0400, 0400-0600, and 0000-0600 UTC, 28 September 2008. The assimilation of VTREC data produces better analyses of the typhoon structure and intensity than the assimilation of Vr data during the earlier assimilation windows, but during the later assimilation windows when the coverage of Vr data on the typhoon from four Doppler radars is much improved, the assimilation of Vr outperforms VTREC data. The combination of VTREC and Vr data, either by assimilating both VTREC and Vr data in all cycles or by assimilating VTREC in the first cycle and Vr in the remaining cycles (labeled VTFVR), further improves the analyses of the typhoon structure and intensity compared to assimilating VTREC or Vr data alone. Quantitative verifications of 24 h forecasts of the typhoon show that the VTFVR assimilation experiments produces forecasts that best match the best track data and also have the highest precipitation prediction skills. The track forecast errors in experiment that assimilate VTREC data through the later cycles are the largest. The behaviors are discussed based on the coverage, information content, and accuracy of the various forms of data.

  17. Teaching Absolute Value Meaningfully

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wade, Angela

    2012-01-01

    What is the meaning of absolute value? And why do teachers teach students how to solve absolute value equations? Absolute value is a concept introduced in first-year algebra and then reinforced in later courses. Various authors have suggested instructional methods for teaching absolute value to high school students (Wei 2005; Stallings-Roberts…

  18. Division IX: Commission 30: Radial Velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, Guillermo; Pourbaix, Dimitri; Udry, Stephane; Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Mathieu, Robert D.; Mazeh, Tsevi; Minniti, Dante; Moutou, Claire; Pepe, Francesco; Turon, Catherine; Zwitter, Tomaz

    2015-08-01

    The meeting was attended by the President and Vice-President of the Commission, along with approximately 15 other members. The President reported on the election of new officers that took place at the end of March 2012, for four new members of the Organizing Committee as well as a new Vice-President, and thanked the outgoing members. Tomaz Zwitter (Slovenia) was elected as the new VP (2012-2015), and the new OC members for the period 2012-2018 are Alceste Bonanos (Greece), Alain Jorissen (Belgium), David Katz (France), and Matthias Steinmetz (Germany). The current VP, Dimitri Pourbaix, became the President through 2015.

  19. Tangential Velocity Measurement Using Interferometric MTI Radar

    SciTech Connect

    DOERRY, ARMIN W.; MILESHOSKY, BRIAN P.; BICKEL, DOUGLAS L.

    2002-11-01

    An Interferometric Moving Target Indicator radar can be used to measure the tangential velocity component of a moving target. Multiple baselines, along with the conventional radial velocity measurement, allow estimating the true 3-D velocity vector of a target.

  20. Absolute densities, masses, and radii of the WASP-47 system determined dynamically

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almenara, J. M.; Díaz, R. F.; Bonfils, X.; Udry, S.

    2016-10-01

    We present a self-consistent modelling of the available light curve and radial velocity data of WASP-47 that takes into account the gravitational interactions between all known bodies in the system. The joint analysis of light curve and radial velocity data in a multi-planetary system allows deriving absolute densities, radii, and masses without the use of theoretical stellar models. For WASP-47 the precision is limited by the reduced dynamical information that is due to the short time span of the K2 light curve. We achieve a precision of around 22% for the radii of the star and the transiting planets, between 40% and 60% for their masses, and between 1.5% and 38% for their densities. All values agree with previously reported measurements. When theoretical stellar models are included, the system parameters are determined with a precision that exceeds that achieved by previous studies, thanks to the self-consistent modelling of light curve and radial velocity data.

  1. Radial-radial single rotor turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Platts, David A.

    2006-05-16

    A rotor for use in turbine applications has a radial compressor/pump having radially disposed spaced apart fins forming passages and a radial turbine having hollow turbine blades interleaved with the fins and through which fluid from the radial compressor/pump flows. The rotor can, in some applications, be used to produce electrical power.

  2. Radial Erosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    The ejecta surrounding the crater (off image to the left) in this image has undergone significant erosion by the wind. The wind has stripped the surface features from the ejecta and has started to winnow away the ejecta blanket. Near the margin of the ejecta the wind is eroding along a radial pattern -- taking advantage of radial emplacement. Note the steep margin of the ejecta blanket. Most, if not all, of the fine ejecta material has been removed and the wind in now working on the more massive continuous ejecta blanket.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 12.5, Longitude 197.4 East (162.6 West). 37 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  3. A radial velocity survey for post-common-envelope Wolf-Rayet central stars of planetary nebulae: first results and discovery of the close binary nucleus of NGC 5189

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manick, Rajeev; Miszalski, Brent; McBride, Vanessa

    2015-04-01

    The formation of Wolf-Rayet central stars of planetary nebulae ([WR] CSPNe) whose spectroscopic appearance mimics massive WR stars remains poorly understood. Least understood is the nature and frequency of binary companions to [WR] CSPNe that may explain their H-deficiency. We have conducted a systematic radial velocity (RV) study of six [WR] CSPNe to search for post-common-envelope (post-CE) [WR] binaries. We used a cross-correlation method to construct the RV time series as successfully done for massive close binary WR stars. No significant RV variability was detected for the late-[WC] type nuclei of Hen 2-113, Hen 3-1333, PMR 2 and Hen 2-99. Significant, large-amplitude variability was found in the [WC4] nucleus of NGC 5315. In the [WO1] nucleus of NGC 5189, we discovered significant periodic variability that reveals a close binary with Porb = 4.04 ± 0.1 d. We measured a semi-amplitude of 62.3 ± 1.3 km s-1 that gives a companion mass of m2 ≥ 0.5 M⊙ or m2 = 0.84 M⊙ (assuming i = 45°). The most plausible companion type is a massive white dwarf (WD) as found in Fleming 1. The spectacular nebular morphology of NGC 5189 fits the pattern of recently discovered post-CE PNe extremely well with its dominant low-ionization structures (e.g. as in NGC 6326) and collimated outflows (e.g. as in Fleming 1). The long 4.04 d orbital period is either anomalous (e.g. NGC 2346) or it may indicate that there is a sizeable population of [WR] binaries with massive WD companions in relatively wide orbits, perhaps influenced by interactions with the strong [WR] wind.

  4. Two New Long-period Giant Planets from the McDonald Observatory Planet Search and Two Stars with Long-period Radial Velocity Signals Related to Stellar Activity Cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endl, Michael; Brugamyer, Erik J.; Cochran, William D.; MacQueen, Phillip J.; Robertson, Paul; Meschiari, Stefano; Ramirez, Ivan; Shetrone, Matthew; Gullikson, Kevin; Johnson, Marshall C.; Wittenmyer, Robert; Horner, Jonathan; Ciardi, David R.; Horch, Elliott; Simon, Attila E.; Howell, Steve B.; Everett, Mark; Caldwell, Caroline; Castanheira, Barbara G.

    2016-02-01

    We report the detection of two new long-period giant planets orbiting the stars HD 95872 and HD 162004 (ψ1 Dra B) by the McDonald Observatory planet search. The planet HD 95872b has a minimum mass of 4.6 {M}{{Jup}} and an orbital semimajor axis of 5.2 AU. The giant planet ψ1 Dra Bb has a minimum mass of 1.5 {M}{{Jup}} and an orbital semimajor axis of 4.4 AU. Both of these planets qualify as Jupiter analogs. These results are based on over one and a half decades of precise radial velocity (RV) measurements collected by our program using the McDonald Observatory Tull Coude spectrograph at the 2.7 m Harlan J. Smith Telescope. In the case of ψ1 Dra B we also detect a long-term nonlinear trend in our data that indicates the presence of an additional giant planet, similar to the Jupiter-Saturn pair. The primary of the binary star system, ψ1 Dra A, exhibits a very large amplitude RV variation due to another stellar companion. We detect this additional member using speckle imaging. We also report two cases—HD 10086 and HD 102870 (β Virginis)—of significant RV variation consistent with the presence of a planet, but that are probably caused by stellar activity, rather than reflexive Keplerian motion. These two cases stress the importance of monitoring the magnetic activity level of a target star, as long-term activity cycles can mimic the presence of a Jupiter-analog planet.

  5. Are axial and radial flow chromatography different?

    PubMed

    Besselink, Tamara; van der Padt, Albert; Janssen, Anja E M; Boom, Remko M

    2013-01-04

    Radial flow chromatography can be a solution for scaling up a packed bed chromatographic process to larger processing volumes. In this study we compared axial and radial flow affinity chromatography both experimentally and theoretically. We used an axial flow column and a miniaturized radial flow column with a ratio of 1.8 between outer and inner surface area, both with a bed height of 5 cm. The columns were packed with affinity resin to adsorb BSA. The average velocity in the columns was set equal. No difference in performance between the two columns could be observed. To gain more insight into the design of a radial flow column, the velocity profile and resin distribution in the radial flow column were calculated. Using mathematical models we found that the breakthrough performance of radial flow chromatography is very similar to axial flow when the ratio between outer and inner radius of the radial flow column is around 2. When this ratio is increased, differences become more apparent, but remain small. However, the ratio does have a significant influence on the velocity profile inside the resin bed, which directly influences the pressure drop and potentially resin compression, especially at higher values for this ratio. The choice between axial and radial flow will be based on cost price, footprint and packing characteristics. For small-scale processes, axial flow chromatography is probably the best choice, for resin volumes of at least several tens of litres, radial flow chromatography may be preferable.

  6. Absolutely classical spin states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohnet-Waldraff, F.; Giraud, O.; Braun, D.

    2017-01-01

    We introduce the concept of "absolutely classical" spin states, in analogy to absolutely separable states of bipartite quantum systems. Absolutely classical states are states that remain classical (i.e., a convex sum of projectors on coherent states of a spin j ) under any unitary transformation applied to them. We investigate the maximal size of the ball of absolutely classical states centered on the maximally mixed state and derive a lower bound for its radius as a function of the total spin quantum number. We also obtain a numerical estimate of this maximal radius and compare it to the case of absolutely separable states.

  7. Optomechanics for absolute rotation detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davuluri, Sankar

    2016-07-01

    In this article, we present an application of optomechanical cavity for the absolute rotation detection. The optomechanical cavity is arranged in a Michelson interferometer in such a way that the classical centrifugal force due to rotation changes the length of the optomechanical cavity. The change in the cavity length induces a shift in the frequency of the cavity mode. The phase shift corresponding to the frequency shift in the cavity mode is measured at the interferometer output to estimate the angular velocity of absolute rotation. We derived an analytic expression to estimate the minimum detectable rotation rate in our scheme for a given optomechanical cavity. Temperature dependence of the rotation detection sensitivity is studied.

  8. ORBITAL SOLUTIONS AND ABSOLUTE ELEMENTS OF THE ECLIPSING BINARY EE AQUARII

    SciTech Connect

    Wronka, Marissa Diehl; Gold, Caitlin; Sowell, James R.; Williamon, Richard M. E-mail: rwilliamon@physics.emory.edu

    2010-04-15

    EE Aqr is a 7.9 mag Algol variable with a 12 hr orbital period. The Wilson-Devinney program is used to simultaneously solve 11 previously published light curves together with two existing radial velocity curves. The resulting masses are M {sub 1} = 2.24 {+-} 0.13 M {sub sun} and M {sub 2} = 0.72 {+-} 0.04 M {sub sun}, and the radii are R {sub 1} = 1.76 {+-} 0.03 R {sub sun} and R {sub 2} = 1.10 {+-} 0.02 R {sub sun}. The system has the lower-mass component completely filling its Roche lobe. Its distance from Hipparcos observations is 112 {+-} 10 pc. An improved ephemeris is derived, and no deviations in the period over time were seen. Light and velocity curve parameters, orbital elements, and absolute dimensions are presented, plus a comparison is made with previous solutions.

  9. Absolute nuclear material assay

    DOEpatents

    Prasad, Manoj K [Pleasanton, CA; Snyderman, Neal J [Berkeley, CA; Rowland, Mark S [Alamo, CA

    2012-05-15

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  10. Absolute nuclear material assay

    DOEpatents

    Prasad, Manoj K.; Snyderman, Neal J.; Rowland, Mark S.

    2010-07-13

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  11. Mean Velocity of Local Populations: Axiality, Age and Time Dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cubarsi, Rafael; Alcobé, Santiago

    2007-05-01

    The mean velocity of local stellar populations is analyzed by building a set of hierarchically selected samples from Hipparcos catalog, with the full space motions. The technique for scanning populations, MEMPHIS (Maximum Entropy of the Mixture Probability from HIerarchical Segregation), is a combination of two separate procedures: A sample selecting filter (Alcobé & Cubarsi 2005, A&A 442, 292) and a segregation method (Cubarsi & Alcobé 2004, A&A 427, 131). By continuously increasing the sampling parameter, in our case the absolute value of the stellar velocity, we build a set of nested subsamples containing an increasing number of populations. A bimodal pattern is then applied in order to identify differentiated kinematic populations. The resulting populations can be identified as early-type stars, young disk stars, old disk stars, and thick disk stars. Discontinuities of the velocity dispersion are found for early-type and thick disk stars, while young and old disk stars show a continuous trend that is asymptotically represented by the thin disk galactic component. Similarly, the mean velocity of early-type stars shows a particular behavior, while the remaining populations share a similar average motion. The later populations are studied on the basis of a time-dependent and non-axial Chandrasekhar model, allowing to estimate the degree of deviation from axial symmetry and steady-state hypotheses, as well as the average age of each population. According to this model, the no net radial movement point can be evaluated, having heliocentric velocities U=-18 ± 1 km/s in the radial direction, which is very close to the radial mean velocity of early-type stars, and V=-76 ± 2 km/s in rotation. The remaining populations share a common differential galactic movement, suggesting a common dynamical origin for the rupture of the axial symmetry.

  12. Absolute masses and radii determination in multiplanetary systems without stellar models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almenara, J. M.; Díaz, R. F.; Mardling, R.; Barros, S. C. C.; Damiani, C.; Bruno, G.; Bonfils, X.; Deleuil, M.

    2015-11-01

    The masses and radii of extrasolar planets are key observables for understanding their interior, formation and evolution. While transit photometry and Doppler spectroscopy are used to measure the radii and masses respectively of planets relative to those of their host star, estimates for the true values of these quantities rely on theoretical models of the host star which are known to suffer from systematic differences with observations. When a system is composed of more than two bodies, extra information is contained in the transit photometry and radial velocity data. Velocity information (finite speed-of-light, Doppler) is needed to break the Newtonian MR-3 degeneracy. We performed a photodynamical modelling of the two-planet transiting system Kepler-117 using all photometric and spectroscopic data available. We demonstrate how absolute masses and radii of single-star planetary systems can be obtained without resorting to stellar models. Limited by the precision of available radial velocities (38 m s-1), we achieve accuracies of 20 per cent in the radii and 70 per cent in the masses, while simulated 1 m s-1 precision radial velocities lower these to 1 per cent for the radii and 2 per cent for the masses. Since transiting multiplanet systems are common, this technique can be used to measure precisely the mass and radius of a large sample of stars and planets. We anticipate these measurements will become common when the TESS and PLATO mission provide high-precision light curves of a large sample of bright stars. These determinations will improve our knowledge about stars and planets, and provide strong constraints on theoretical models.

  13. THE ABSOLUTE MAGNITUDE OF RRc VARIABLES FROM STATISTICAL PARALLAX

    SciTech Connect

    Kollmeier, Juna A.; Burns, Christopher R.; Thompson, Ian B.; Preston, George W.; Crane, Jeffrey D.; Madore, Barry F.; Morrell, Nidia; Prieto, José L.; Shectman, Stephen; Simon, Joshua D.; Villanueva, Edward; Szczygieł, Dorota M.; Gould, Andrew; Sneden, Christopher; Dong, Subo

    2013-09-20

    We present the first definitive measurement of the absolute magnitude of RR Lyrae c-type variable stars (RRc) determined purely from statistical parallax. We use a sample of 242 RRc variables selected from the All Sky Automated Survey for which high-quality light curves, photometry, and proper motions are available. We obtain high-resolution echelle spectra for these objects to determine radial velocities and abundances as part of the Carnegie RR Lyrae Survey. We find that M{sub V,RRc} = 0.59 ± 0.10 at a mean metallicity of [Fe/H] = –1.59. This is to be compared with previous estimates for RRab stars (M{sub V,RRab} = 0.76 ± 0.12) and the only direct measurement of an RRc absolute magnitude (RZ Cephei, M{sub V,RRc} = 0.27 ± 0.17). We find the bulk velocity of the halo relative to the Sun to be (W{sub π}, W{sub θ}, W{sub z} ) = (12.0, –209.9, 3.0) km s{sup –1} in the radial, rotational, and vertical directions with dispersions (σ{sub W{sub π}},σ{sub W{sub θ}},σ{sub W{sub z}}) = (150.4, 106.1, 96.0) km s{sup -1}. For the disk, we find (W{sub π}, W{sub θ}, W{sub z} ) = (13.0, –42.0, –27.3) km s{sup –1} relative to the Sun with dispersions (σ{sub W{sub π}},σ{sub W{sub θ}},σ{sub W{sub z}}) = (67.7,59.2,54.9) km s{sup -1}. Finally, as a byproduct of our statistical framework, we are able to demonstrate that UCAC2 proper-motion errors are significantly overestimated as verified by UCAC4.

  14. Radial Artery Catheterization

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the radial artery for cardiac catheterization procedures. Advantages of Radial Artery Catheterization Any catheter placement into ... walk, and eat immediately. This is a particular advantage for patients with back problems because there is ...

  15. Fast radial flows in transition disk holes

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenfeld, Katherine A.; Andrews, Sean M.; Chiang, Eugene

    2014-02-20

    Protoplanetary 'transition' disks have large, mass-depleted central cavities, yet also deliver gas onto their host stars at rates comparable to disks without holes. The paradox of simultaneous transparency and accretion can be explained if gas flows inward at much higher radial speeds inside the cavity than outside the cavity, since surface density (and by extension optical depth) varies inversely with inflow velocity at fixed accretion rate. Radial speeds within the cavity might even have to approach free-fall values to explain the huge surface density contrasts inferred for transition disks. We identify observational diagnostics of fast radial inflow in channel maps made in optically thick spectral lines. Signatures include (1) twisted isophotes in maps made at low systemic velocities and (2) rotation of structures observed between maps made in high-velocity line wings. As a test case, we apply our new diagnostic tools to archival Atacama Large Millimeter Array data on the transition disk HD 142527 and uncover evidence for free-fall radial velocities inside its cavity. Although the observed kinematics are also consistent with a disk warp, the radial inflow scenario is preferred because it predicts low surface densities that appear consistent with recent observations of optically thin CO isotopologues in this disk. How material in the disk cavity sheds its angular momentum wholesale to fall freely onto the star is an unsolved problem; gravitational torques exerted by giant planets or brown dwarfs are briefly discussed as a candidate mechanism.

  16. Absolute and relative blindsight.

    PubMed

    Balsdon, Tarryn; Azzopardi, Paul

    2015-03-01

    The concept of relative blindsight, referring to a difference in conscious awareness between conditions otherwise matched for performance, was introduced by Lau and Passingham (2006) as a way of identifying the neural correlates of consciousness (NCC) in fMRI experiments. By analogy, absolute blindsight refers to a difference between performance and awareness regardless of whether it is possible to match performance across conditions. Here, we address the question of whether relative and absolute blindsight in normal observers can be accounted for by response bias. In our replication of Lau and Passingham's experiment, the relative blindsight effect was abolished when performance was assessed by means of a bias-free 2AFC task or when the criterion for awareness was varied. Furthermore, there was no evidence of either relative or absolute blindsight when both performance and awareness were assessed with bias-free measures derived from confidence ratings using signal detection theory. This suggests that both relative and absolute blindsight in normal observers amount to no more than variations in response bias in the assessment of performance and awareness. Consideration of the properties of psychometric functions reveals a number of ways in which relative and absolute blindsight could arise trivially and elucidates a basis for the distinction between Type 1 and Type 2 blindsight.

  17. Absolute neutrino mass scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capelli, Silvia; Di Bari, Pasquale

    2013-04-01

    Neutrino oscillation experiments firmly established non-vanishing neutrino masses, a result that can be regarded as a strong motivation to extend the Standard Model. In spite of being the lightest massive particles, neutrinos likely represent an important bridge to new physics at very high energies and offer new opportunities to address some of the current cosmological puzzles, such as the matter-antimatter asymmetry of the Universe and Dark Matter. In this context, the determination of the absolute neutrino mass scale is a key issue within modern High Energy Physics. The talks in this parallel session well describe the current exciting experimental activity aiming to determining the absolute neutrino mass scale and offer an overview of a few models beyond the Standard Model that have been proposed in order to explain the neutrino masses giving a prediction for the absolute neutrino mass scale and solving the cosmological puzzles.

  18. Photometric study and absolute parameters of the short-period eclipsing binary HH Bootis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gürol, B.; Bradstreet, D. H.; Demircan, Y.; Gürsoytrak, S. H.

    2015-11-01

    We present the results of our investigation on the geometrical and physical parameters of the W UMa type binary system HH Bootis from new CCD (BVRI) light curves and published radial velocity data. The photometric data were obtained in 2011 and 2012 at Ankara University Observatory (AUO). Light and radial velocity observations were analyzed simultaneously using the Wilson-Devinney (2013 revision) code to obtain absolute and geometrical parameters. The system was determined to be a W-type W UMa system of a type different from that suggested by Dal and Sipahi (2013). An interesting cyclic period variation in the time intervals between primary and secondary eclipses ("half-period variation") was discovered and analyzed and its possible cause is discussed. Combining our photometric solution with the spectroscopic data we derived masses and radii of the eclipsing system to be M1 = 0.627M⊙ , M2 = 1.068M⊙ , R1 = 0.782R⊙ and R2 = 0.997R⊙ . New light elements were derived and finally the evolutionary status of the system is discussed.

  19. The absolute path command

    SciTech Connect

    Moody, A.

    2012-05-11

    The ap command traveres all symlinks in a given file, directory, or executable name to identify the final absolute path. It can print just the final path, each intermediate link along with the symlink chan, and the permissions and ownership of each directory component in the final path. It has functionality similar to "which", except that it shows the final path instead of the first path. It is also similar to "pwd", but it can provide the absolute path to a relative directory from the current working directory.

  20. Absolute properties of the eclipsing binary star AP Andromedae

    SciTech Connect

    Sandberg Lacy, Claud H.; Torres, Guillermo; Fekel, Francis C.; Muterspaugh, Matthew W. E-mail: gtorres@cfa.harvard.edu E-mail: matthew1@coe.tsuniv.edu

    2014-06-01

    AP And is a well-detached F5 eclipsing binary star for which only a very limited amount of information was available before this publication. We have obtained very extensive measurements of the light curve (19,097 differential V magnitude observations) and a radial velocity curve (83 spectroscopic observations) which allow us to fit orbits and determine the absolute properties of the components very accurately: masses of 1.277 ± 0.004 and 1.251 ± 0.004 M {sub ☉}, radii of 1.233 ± 0.006 and 1.1953 ± 0.005 R {sub ☉}, and temperatures of 6565 ± 150 K and 6495 ± 150 K. The distance to the system is about 400 ± 30 pc. Comparison with the theoretical properties of the stellar evolutionary models of the Yonsei-Yale series of Yi et al. shows good agreement between the observations and the theory at an age of about 500 Myr and a slightly sub-solar metallicity.

  1. Radial arm strike rail

    DOEpatents

    McKeown, Mark H.; Beason, Steven C.

    1991-01-01

    The radial arm strike rail assembly is a system for measurement of bearings, directions, and stereophotography for geologic mapping, particularly where magnetic compasses are not appropriate. The radial arm, pivoting around a shaft axis, provides a reference direction determination for geologic mapping and bearing or direction determination. The centerable and levelable pedestal provide a base for the radial arm strike rail and the telescoping camera pedestal. The telescoping feature of the radial arm strike rail allows positioning the end of the rail for strike direction or bearing measurement with a goniometer.

  2. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Galactic RV Tauri stars velocities (Manick+, 2017)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manick, R.; van Winckel, H.; Kamath, D.; Hillen, M.; Escorza, A.

    2016-11-01

    We present the original radial velocities obtained at the Mercator and Swiss Leonhard Telescopes, together with the pulsation-cleaned radial velocities. The errors in the pulsation-cleaned radial velocities are assumed to be the same as in the ones in the original data. (7 data files).

  3. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Velocity curves of HD 40307 (Mayor+, 2009)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayor, M.; Udry, S.; Lovis, C.; Pepe, F.; Queloz, D.; Benz, W.; Bertaux, J.-L.; Bouchy, F.; Mordasini, C.; Segransan, D.

    2009-04-01

    HARPS high-precision radial velocities of the star HD 40307. The table contains 3 columns: barycentric Julian date , barycentric radial velocity (km/s) and uncertainty on radial velocity (km/s). The table gives the 129 measurements from which the final orbital parameters are obtained in the paper. (1 data file).

  4. Triple acting radial seal

    SciTech Connect

    Ebert, Todd A; Carella, John A

    2012-03-13

    A triple acting radial seal used as an interstage seal assembly in a gas turbine engine, where the seal assembly includes an interstage seal support extending from a stationary inner shroud of a vane ring, the interstage seal support includes a larger annular radial inward facing groove in which an outer annular floating seal assembly is secured for radial displacement, and the outer annular floating seal assembly includes a smaller annular radial inward facing groove in which an inner annular floating seal assembly is secured also for radial displacement. A compliant seal is secured to the inner annular floating seal assembly. The outer annular floating seal assembly encapsulates the inner annular floating seal assembly which is made from a very low alpha material in order to reduce thermal stress.

  5. Electronic Absolute Cartesian Autocollimator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leviton, Douglas B.

    2006-01-01

    An electronic absolute Cartesian autocollimator performs the same basic optical function as does a conventional all-optical or a conventional electronic autocollimator but differs in the nature of its optical target and the manner in which the position of the image of the target is measured. The term absolute in the name of this apparatus reflects the nature of the position measurement, which, unlike in a conventional electronic autocollimator, is based absolutely on the position of the image rather than on an assumed proportionality between the position and the levels of processed analog electronic signals. The term Cartesian in the name of this apparatus reflects the nature of its optical target. Figure 1 depicts the electronic functional blocks of an electronic absolute Cartesian autocollimator along with its basic optical layout, which is the same as that of a conventional autocollimator. Referring first to the optical layout and functions only, this or any autocollimator is used to measure the compound angular deviation of a flat datum mirror with respect to the optical axis of the autocollimator itself. The optical components include an illuminated target, a beam splitter, an objective or collimating lens, and a viewer or detector (described in more detail below) at a viewing plane. The target and the viewing planes are focal planes of the lens. Target light reflected by the datum mirror is imaged on the viewing plane at unit magnification by the collimating lens. If the normal to the datum mirror is parallel to the optical axis of the autocollimator, then the target image is centered on the viewing plane. Any angular deviation of the normal from the optical axis manifests itself as a lateral displacement of the target image from the center. The magnitude of the displacement is proportional to the focal length and to the magnitude (assumed to be small) of the angular deviation. The direction of the displacement is perpendicular to the axis about which the

  6. Absolute airborne gravimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumann, Henri

    This work consists of a feasibility study of a first stage prototype airborne absolute gravimeter system. In contrast to relative systems, which are using spring gravimeters, the measurements acquired by absolute systems are uncorrelated and the instrument is not suffering from problems like instrumental drift, frequency response of the spring and possible variation of the calibration factor. The major problem we had to resolve were to reduce the influence of the non-gravitational accelerations included in the measurements. We studied two different approaches to resolve it: direct mechanical filtering, and post-processing digital compensation. The first part of the work describes in detail the different mechanical passive filters of vibrations, which were studied and tested in the laboratory and later in a small truck in movement. For these tests as well as for the airborne measurements an absolute gravimeter FG5-L from Micro-G Ltd was used together with an Inertial navigation system Litton-200, a vertical accelerometer EpiSensor, and GPS receivers for positioning. These tests showed that only the use of an optical table gives acceptable results. However, it is unable to compensate for the effects of the accelerations of the drag free chamber. The second part describes the strategy of the data processing. It is based on modeling the perturbing accelerations by means of GPS, EpiSensor and INS data. In the third part the airborne experiment is described in detail, from the mounting in the aircraft and data processing to the different problems encountered during the evaluation of the quality and accuracy of the results. In the part of data processing the different steps conducted from the raw apparent gravity data and the trajectories to the estimation of the true gravity are explained. A comparison between the estimated airborne data and those obtained by ground upward continuation at flight altitude allows to state that airborne absolute gravimetry is feasible and

  7. Absolute-structure reports.

    PubMed

    Flack, Howard D

    2013-08-01

    All the 139 noncentrosymmetric crystal structures published in Acta Crystallographica Section C between January 2011 and November 2012 inclusive have been used as the basis of a detailed study of the reporting of absolute structure. These structure determinations cover a wide range of space groups, chemical composition and resonant-scattering contribution. Defining A and D as the average and difference of the intensities of Friedel opposites, their level of fit has been examined using 2AD and selected-D plots. It was found, regardless of the expected resonant-scattering contribution to Friedel opposites, that the Friedel-difference intensities are often dominated by random uncertainty and systematic error. An analysis of data collection strategy is provided. It is found that crystal-structure determinations resulting in a Flack parameter close to 0.5 may not necessarily be from crystals twinned by inversion. Friedifstat is shown to be a robust estimator of the resonant-scattering contribution to Friedel opposites, very little affected by the particular space group of a structure nor by the occupation of special positions. There is considerable confusion in the text of papers presenting achiral noncentrosymmetric crystal structures. Recommendations are provided for the optimal way of treating noncentrosymmetric crystal structures for which the experimenter has no interest in determining the absolute structure.

  8. Absolute Equilibrium Entropy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shebalin, John V.

    1997-01-01

    The entropy associated with absolute equilibrium ensemble theories of ideal, homogeneous, fluid and magneto-fluid turbulence is discussed and the three-dimensional fluid case is examined in detail. A sigma-function is defined, whose minimum value with respect to global parameters is the entropy. A comparison is made between the use of global functions sigma and phase functions H (associated with the development of various H-theorems of ideal turbulence). It is shown that the two approaches are complimentary though conceptually different: H-theorems show that an isolated system tends to equilibrium while sigma-functions allow the demonstration that entropy never decreases when two previously isolated systems are combined. This provides a more complete picture of entropy in the statistical mechanics of ideal fluids.

  9. Radial heat flux transformer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Basiulis, A.; Buzzard, R. J.

    1971-01-01

    Unit moves heat radially from small diameter shell to larger diameter shell, or vice versa, with negligible temperature drop, making device useful wherever heating or cooling of concentrically arranged materials, substances, and structures is desired.

  10. Radial head fracture - aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    Elbow fracture - radial head - aftercare ... to 2 weeks. If you have a small fracture and your bones did not move around much, ... to see a bone doctor (orthopedic surgeon). Some fractures require surgery to: Insert pins and plates to ...

  11. Absolute multilateration between spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muelaner, Jody; Wadsworth, William; Azini, Maria; Mullineux, Glen; Hughes, Ben; Reichold, Armin

    2017-04-01

    Environmental effects typically limit the accuracy of large scale coordinate measurements in applications such as aircraft production and particle accelerator alignment. This paper presents an initial design for a novel measurement technique with analysis and simulation showing that that it could overcome the environmental limitations to provide a step change in large scale coordinate measurement accuracy. Referred to as absolute multilateration between spheres (AMS), it involves using absolute distance interferometry to directly measure the distances between pairs of plain steel spheres. A large portion of each sphere remains accessible as a reference datum, while the laser path can be shielded from environmental disturbances. As a single scale bar this can provide accurate scale information to be used for instrument verification or network measurement scaling. Since spheres can be simultaneously measured from multiple directions, it also allows highly accurate multilateration-based coordinate measurements to act as a large scale datum structure for localized measurements, or to be integrated within assembly tooling, coordinate measurement machines or robotic machinery. Analysis and simulation show that AMS can be self-aligned to achieve a theoretical combined standard uncertainty for the independent uncertainties of an individual 1 m scale bar of approximately 0.49 µm. It is also shown that combined with a 1 µm m‑1 standard uncertainty in the central reference system this could result in coordinate standard uncertainty magnitudes of 42 µm over a slender 1 m by 20 m network. This would be a sufficient step change in accuracy to enable next generation aerospace structures with natural laminar flow and part-to-part interchangeability.

  12. Absolute parameters of the early-type double-lined eclipsing binary AL SCULPTORIS (HD 224113)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haefner, R.; Skillen, I.; de Groot, M.

    1987-06-01

    Orbital elements have been determined from measurements of forty-six high-dispersion spectrograms obtained between 1970 and 1980 of the double-lined eclipsing binary AL Scl, and the published radial-velocity data of Archer and Feast (1958) have been rediscussed. The orbit is confirmed to be non-circular (e = 0.074), and the components are shown to be rotating non-synchronously. The possibility of a third body is discussed but not firmly established. Approximately 2800 uvby observations, obtained between 1978 and 1981, form the basis of a photometric solution using the synthesis code LIGHT (Hill, 1979). The absolute dimensions derived for the B6 V primary component are in good agreement with the compilation of empirical data for early-type binaries given by Popper (1980), but the mass (1.71 M_sun;) derived for the B9 V secondary is lower than expected. A comparison of the absolute parameters with evolutionary tracks (Hejlesen, 1980) indicates the age of the system to be 1.6×108yr.

  13. Absolute parameter determination in low-mass eclipsing binaries - Radiative parameters for BH Vir, ZZ UMA and CR CAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clement, R.; Reglero, V.; Garcia, M.; Fabregat, J.; Bravo, A.; Suso, J.

    1993-01-01

    A new uvby and H-beta monitoring program of low mass eclipsing binaries is currently being carried out in the framework of a 5-yr observational program which also involves radial velocity determinations. The scope of this work is to provide very accurate absolute astrophysical parameters: mass, radius, and effective temperatures, for main-sequence late-type stars. One of the main goals is to improve the mass-luminosity relation in the low and intermediate mass range. A second objective is to perform accurate tests of the most recent grids of evolutionary models. This program is complementary to that currently being implemented by the Copenhagen group. In this contribution we present the photometric preliminary results obtained for three of the systems included in our long-term survey: BH Vir, ZZ UMa, and CR Cas for which primary eclipses have been observed. Particular attention is paid to the determination of reddening, distances, and radiative properties. A more detailed study will be carried out when the light curves and radial velocity measurements are completed.

  14. H0, q0 and the local velocity field. [Hubble and deceleration constants in Big Bang expansion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandage, A.; Tammann, G. A.

    1982-01-01

    An attempt is made to find a systematic deviation from linearity for distances that are under the control of the Virgo cluster, and to determine the value of the mean random motion about the systematic flow, in order to improve the measurement of the Hubble and the deceleration constants. The velocity-distance relation for large and intermediate distances is studied, and type I supernovae are calibrated relatively as distance indicators and absolutely to obtain a new value for the Hubble constant. Methods of determining the deceleration constant are assessed, including determination from direct measurement, mean luminosity density, virgocentric motion, and the time scale test. The very local velocity field is investigated, and a solution is preferred with a random peculiar radial velocity of very nearby field galaxies of 90-100 km/s, and a Virgocentric motion of the local group of 220 km/s, leading to an underlying expansion rate of 55, in satisfactory agreement with the global value.

  15. Arbitrary segments of absolute negative mobility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ruyin; Nie, Linru; Chen, Chongyang; Wang, Chaojie

    2017-01-01

    In previous research work, investigators have reported only one or two segments of absolute negative mobility (ANM) in a periodic potential. In fact, many segments of ANM also occur in the system considered here. We investigate transport of an inertial particle in a gating ratchet periodic potential subjected to a constant bias force. Our numerical results show that its mean velocity can decrease with the bias force increasing, i.e. ANM phenomenon. Furthermore, the ANM can take place arbitrary segments, even up to more than thirty. Intrinsic physical mechanism and conditions for arbitrary segments of ANM to occur are discussed in detail.

  16. Radial turbine cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roelke, Richard J.

    1992-01-01

    Radial turbines have been used extensively in many applications including small ground based electrical power generators, automotive engine turbochargers and aircraft auxiliary power units. In all of these applications the turbine inlet temperature is limited to a value commensurate with the material strength limitations and life requirements of uncooled metal rotors. To take advantage of all the benefits that higher temperatures offer, such as increased turbine specific power output or higher cycle thermal efficiency, requires improved high temperature materials and/or blade cooling. Extensive research is on-going to advance the material properties of high temperature superalloys as well as composite materials including ceramics. The use of ceramics with their high temperature potential and low cost is particularly appealing for radial turbines. However until these programs reach fruition the only way to make significant step increases beyond the present material temperature barriers is to cool the radial blading.

  17. Tangential velocity measurement using interferometric MTI radar

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin W.; Mileshosky, Brian P.; Bickel, Douglas L.

    2006-01-03

    Radar systems use time delay measurements between a transmitted signal and its echo to calculate range to a target. Ranges that change with time cause a Doppler offset in phase and frequency of the echo. Consequently, the closing velocity between target and radar can be measured by measuring the Doppler offset of the echo. The closing velocity is also known as radial velocity, or line-of-sight velocity. Doppler frequency is measured in a pulse-Doppler radar as a linear phase shift over a set of radar pulses during some Coherent Processing Interval (CPI). An Interferometric Moving Target Indicator (MTI) radar can be used to measure the tangential velocity component of a moving target. Multiple baselines, along with the conventional radial velocity measurement, allow estimating the true 3-D velocity of a target.

  18. Estimating Absolute Site Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Malagnini, L; Mayeda, K M; Akinci, A; Bragato, P L

    2004-07-15

    The authors use previously determined direct-wave attenuation functions as well as stable, coda-derived source excitation spectra to isolate the absolute S-wave site effect for the horizontal and vertical components of weak ground motion. They used selected stations in the seismic network of the eastern Alps, and find the following: (1) all ''hard rock'' sites exhibited deamplification phenomena due to absorption at frequencies ranging between 0.5 and 12 Hz (the available bandwidth), on both the horizontal and vertical components; (2) ''hard rock'' site transfer functions showed large variability at high-frequency; (3) vertical-motion site transfer functions show strong frequency-dependence, and (4) H/V spectral ratios do not reproduce the characteristics of the true horizontal site transfer functions; (5) traditional, relative site terms obtained by using reference ''rock sites'' can be misleading in inferring the behaviors of true site transfer functions, since most rock sites have non-flat responses due to shallow heterogeneities resulting from varying degrees of weathering. They also use their stable source spectra to estimate total radiated seismic energy and compare against previous results. they find that the earthquakes in this region exhibit non-constant dynamic stress drop scaling which gives further support for a fundamental difference in rupture dynamics between small and large earthquakes. To correct the vertical and horizontal S-wave spectra for attenuation, they used detailed regional attenuation functions derived by Malagnini et al. (2002) who determined frequency-dependent geometrical spreading and Q for the region. These corrections account for the gross path effects (i.e., all distance-dependent effects), although the source and site effects are still present in the distance-corrected spectra. The main goal of this study is to isolate the absolute site effect (as a function of frequency) by removing the source spectrum (moment-rate spectrum) from

  19. Crustal radial anisotropy beneath Cameroon from ambient noise tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ojo, Adebayo Oluwaseun; Ni, Sidao; Li, Zhiwei

    2017-01-01

    To increase the understanding of crustal deformation and crustal flow patterns due to tectonic processes in Cameroon, we study the lateral variability of the crustal isotropic velocity and radial anisotropy estimated using Ambient Noise Tomography (ANT). Rayleigh and Love wave Noise Correlation Functions (NCFs) were retrieved from the cross-correlation of seismic ambient noise data recorded in Cameroon, and phase velocities at periods of 8 to 30 s were measured to perform surface wave tomography. Joint inversion of Rayleigh and Love wave data for isotropic velocity models could not fit the observed dispersions simultaneously. We attribute the Love-Rayleigh discrepancy to the presence of radial anisotropy in the crust and estimated its magnitude. Our 3-D radial anisotropic model reveals the spatial variation of strong to weak positive (Vsh > Vsv) and negative (Vsv > Vsh) radial anisotropy in the crust. We observe negative radial anisotropy in the upper crust that is associated mainly with the location of a previously reported mantle plume. The anisotropy could be attributed to the vertical alignment of fossil microcracks or metamorphic foliations due to the upwelling of plume material. A strong positive radial anisotropy is centered at the location of an inferred boundary between the Congo Craton and the Oubanguides Belt that might be related to the preferred orientation of crustal anisotropic minerals associated with shearing in this fault zone. The middle crust is characterized by a widespread negative radial anisotropy that is likely caused by the flow-induced alignment of anisotropic minerals that crystallized during magma intrusion. The magnitude of the radial anisotropy varies systematically from predominantly negative in the middle crust to positive in the lower crust. The imaged patterns of the isotropic velocity and radial anisotropy are consistent with previous studies and agree with regional tectonics.

  20. Radial wedge flange clamp

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Karl H.

    2002-01-01

    A radial wedge flange clamp comprising a pair of flanges each comprising a plurality of peripheral flat wedge facets having flat wedge surfaces and opposed and mating flat surfaces attached to or otherwise engaged with two elements to be joined and including a series of generally U-shaped wedge clamps each having flat wedge interior surfaces and engaging one pair of said peripheral flat wedge facets. Each of said generally U-shaped wedge clamps has in its opposing extremities apertures for the tangential insertion of bolts to apply uniform radial force to said wedge clamps when assembled about said wedge segments.

  1. Radially uniform electron source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccomas, D.; Bame, S. J.

    1982-01-01

    A thermionic electron source capable of producing uniform count rates in a number of channel electron multipliers simultaneously was required for conditioning multipliers for an extended space mission. It was found that a straight tungsten filament in the center of a cylindrically symmetric geometry surrounded by an array of multipliers emits a radially asymmetric distribution of electrons that changes with time. A source was developed which successfully produces a time-independent radially uniform distribution of electrons by moving the filament out of the direct line of sight and replacing it with a centrally located electron 'cloud.'

  2. Absolute Properties of the Upper Main-Sequence Eclipsing Binary Star MU Cassiopeiae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacy, Claud H. Sandberg; Claret, Antonio; Sabby, Jeffrey A.

    2004-10-01

    We present 6151 differential observations in the V filter measured by a robotic telescope, as well as 29 pairs of radial velocities from high-resolution spectroscopic observations, of the detached, EA-type, 9.65 day period double-lined eclipsing binary star MU Cas. Absolute dimensions of the components are determined with good precision (better than 2% in the masses and radii) for the purpose of testing various aspects of theoretical modeling. We obtain 4.57+/-0.09 Msolar and 3.67+/-0.04 Rsolar for the hotter, but smaller, less massive and less luminous photometric primary (star A), and 4.66+/-0.10 Msolar and 4.19+/-0.05 Rsolar for the cooler, larger, more massive and more luminous photometric secondary (star B). The effective temperatures and interstellar reddening of the stars are accurately determined from uvbyβ photometry: 15,100+/-500 K for the primary, 14,750+/-500 K for the secondary-corresponding to spectral types of B5 and B5-and 0.356 mag for Eb-y. The stars are located at a distance of about 1.7 kpc near the plane of the Galactic disk. The orbits of the stars are eccentric, and spectral line widths give observed rotational velocities that are synchronous with the mean orbital motion for both components. The components of MU Cas are upper main-sequence stars with an age of about 65 Myr according to models.

  3. Radial Halbach Magnetic Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eichenberg, Dennis J.; Gallo, Christopher A.; Thompson, William K.

    2009-01-01

    Radial Halbach magnetic bearings have been investigated as part of an effort to develop increasingly reliable noncontact bearings for future high-speed rotary machines that may be used in such applications as aircraft, industrial, and land-vehicle power systems and in some medical and scientific instrumentation systems. Radial Halbach magnetic bearings are based on the same principle as that of axial Halbach magnetic bearings, differing in geometry as the names of these two types of bearings suggest. Both radial and axial Halbach magnetic bearings are passive in the sense that unlike most other magnetic bearings that have been developed in recent years, they effect stable magnetic levitation without need for complex active control. Axial Halbach magnetic bearings were described in Axial Halbach Magnetic Bearings (LEW-18066-1), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 32, No. 7 (July 2008), page 85. In the remainder of this article, the description of the principle of operation from the cited prior article is recapitulated and updated to incorporate the present radial geometry. In simplest terms, the basic principle of levitation in an axial or radial Halbach magnetic bearing is that of the repulsive electromagnetic force between (1) a moving permanent magnet and (2) an electric current induced in a stationary electrical conductor by the motion of the magnetic field. An axial or radial Halbach bearing includes multiple permanent magnets arranged in a Halbach array ("Halbach array" is defined below) in a rotor and multiple conductors in the form of wire coils in a stator, all arranged so the rotary motion produces an axial or radial repulsion that is sufficient to levitate the rotor. A basic Halbach array (see Figure 1) consists of a row of permanent magnets, each oriented so that its magnetic field is at a right angle to that of the adjacent magnet, and the right-angle turns are sequenced so as to maximize the magnitude of the magnetic flux density on one side of the row while

  4. A fully relativistic radial fall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spallicci, Alessandro D. A. M.; Ritter, Patxi

    2014-10-01

    Radial fall has historically played a momentous role. It is one of the most classical problems, the solutions of which represent the level of understanding of gravitation in a given epoch. A gedankenexperiment in a modern frame is given by a small body, like a compact star or a solar mass black hole, captured by a supermassive black hole. The mass of the small body itself and the emission of gravitational radiation cause the departure from the geodesic path due to the back-action, that is the self-force. For radial fall, as any other non-adiabatic motion, the instantaneous identity of the radiated energy and the loss of orbital energy cannot be imposed and provide the perturbed trajectory. In the first part of this paper, we present the effects due to the self-force computed on the geodesic trajectory in the background field. Compared to the latter trajectory, in the Regge-Wheeler, harmonic and all others smoothly related gauges, a far observer concludes that the self-force pushes inward (not outward) the falling body, with a strength proportional to the mass of the small body for a given large mass; further, the same observer notes a higher value of the maximal coordinate velocity, this value being reached earlier during infall. In the second part of this paper, we implement a self-consistent approach for which the trajectory is iteratively corrected by the self-force, this time computed on osculating geodesics. Finally, we compare the motion driven by the self-force without and with self-consistent orbital evolution. Subtle differences are noticeable, even if self-force effects have hardly the time to accumulate in such a short orbit.

  5. Interpolation of the Radial Velocity Data from Coastal HF Radars

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    respective fields Av, Acurlv and Adiw which enter the equation (4) in the form of the inverse variances W",WC and Wd. In the next section, the benefits of...simulated data set to assess the benefits of the GF technique. These simulated data sets were the following: 0) without the gaps a) with 1 -point...the benefits of the GF technique, we placed the gap at the location of an eddy-like structure seen in the mouth of the Monter- rey Bay around the

  6. Radial Inflow Turboexpander Redesign

    SciTech Connect

    William G. Price

    2001-09-24

    Steamboat Envirosystems, LLC (SELC) was awarded a grant in accordance with the DOE Enhanced Geothermal Systems Project Development. Atlas-Copco Rotoflow (ACR), a radial expansion turbine manufacturer, was responsible for the manufacturing of the turbine and the creation of the new computer program. SB Geo, Inc. (SBG), the facility operator, monitored and assisted ACR's activities as well as provided installation and startup assistance. The primary scope of the project is the redesign of an axial flow turbine to a radial inflow turboexpander to provide increased efficiency and reliability at an existing facility. In addition to the increased efficiency and reliability, the redesign includes an improved reduction gear design, and improved shaft seal design, and upgraded control system and a greater flexibility of application

  7. Variable stator radial turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogo, C.; Hajek, T.; Chen, A. G.

    1984-01-01

    A radial turbine stage with a variable area nozzle was investigated. A high work capacity turbine design with a known high performance base was modified to accept a fixed vane stagger angle moveable sidewall nozzle. The nozzle area was varied by moving the forward and rearward sidewalls. Diffusing and accelerating rotor inlet ramps were evaluated in combinations with hub and shroud rotor exit rings. Performance of contoured sidewalls and the location of the sidewall split line with respect to the rotor inlet was compared to the baseline. Performance and rotor exit survey data are presented for 31 different geometries. Detail survey data at the nozzle exit are given in contour plot format for five configurations. A data base is provided for a variable geometry concept that is a viable alternative to the more common pivoted vane variable geometry radial turbine.

  8. Radial pressure flange seal

    DOEpatents

    Batzer, Thomas H.; Call, Wayne R.

    1989-01-01

    This invention provides an all metal seal for vacuum or pressure vessels or systems. This invention does not use gaskets. The invention uses a flange which fits into a matching groove. Fluid pressure is applied in a chamber in the flange causing at least one of the flange walls to radially press against a side of the groove creating the seal between the flange wall and the groove side.

  9. Radial pressure flange seal

    DOEpatents

    Batzer, T.H.; Call, W.R.

    1989-01-24

    This invention provides an all metal seal for vacuum or pressure vessels or systems. This invention does not use gaskets. The invention uses a flange which fits into a matching groove. Fluid pressure is applied in a chamber in the flange causing at least one of the flange walls to radially press against a side of the groove creating the seal between the flange wall and the groove side. 5 figs.

  10. Radial Field Piezoelectric Diaphragms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, R. G.; Effinger, R. T., IV; Copeland, B. M., Jr.

    2002-01-01

    A series of active piezoelectric diaphragms were fabricated and patterned with several geometrically defined Inter-Circulating Electrodes "ICE" and Interdigitated Ring Electrodes "ICE". When a voltage potential is applied to the electrodes, the result is a radially distributed electric field that mechanically strains the piezoceramic along the Z-axis (perpendicular to the applied electric field). Unlike other piezoelectric bender actuators, these Radial Field Diaphragms (RFDs) strain concentrically yet afford high displacements (several times that of the equivalent Unimorph) while maintaining a constant circumference. One of the more intriguing aspects is that the radial strain field reverses itself along the radius of the RFD while the tangential strain remains relatively constant. The result is a Z-deflection that has a conical profile. This paper covers the fabrication and characterization of the 5 cm. (2 in.) diaphragms as a function of poling field strength, ceramic thickness, electrode type and line spacing, as well as the surface topography, the resulting strain field and displacement as a function of applied voltage at low frequencies. The unique features of these RFDs include the ability to be clamped about their perimeter with little or no change in displacement, the environmentally insulated packaging, and a highly repeatable fabrication process that uses commodity materials.

  11. Cryogenic, Absolute, High Pressure Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, John J. (Inventor); Shams. Qamar A. (Inventor); Powers, William T. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A pressure sensor is provided for cryogenic, high pressure applications. A highly doped silicon piezoresistive pressure sensor is bonded to a silicon substrate in an absolute pressure sensing configuration. The absolute pressure sensor is bonded to an aluminum nitride substrate. Aluminum nitride has appropriate coefficient of thermal expansion for use with highly doped silicon at cryogenic temperatures. A group of sensors, either two sensors on two substrates or four sensors on a single substrate are packaged in a pressure vessel.

  12. Antiproton compression and radial measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Andresen, G. B.; Bowe, P. D.; Hangst, J. S.; Bertsche, W.; Butler, E.; Charlton, M.; Humphries, A. J.; Jenkins, M. J.; Joergensen, L. V.; Madsen, N.; Werf, D. P. van der; Bray, C. C.; Chapman, S.; Fajans, J.; Povilus, A.; Wurtele, J. S.; Cesar, C. L.; Lambo, R.; Silveira, D. M.; Fujiwara, M. C.

    2008-08-08

    Control of the radial profile of trapped antiproton clouds is critical to trapping antihydrogen. We report detailed measurements of the radial manipulation of antiproton clouds, including areal density compressions by factors as large as ten, achieved by manipulating spatially overlapped electron plasmas. We show detailed measurements of the near-axis antiproton radial profile, and its relation to that of the electron plasma. We also measure the outer radial profile by ejecting antiprotons to the trap wall using an octupole magnet.

  13. Gyrokinetic Statistical Absolute Equilibrium and Turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Jian-Zhou Zhu and Gregory W. Hammett

    2011-01-10

    A paradigm based on the absolute equilibrium of Galerkin-truncated inviscid systems to aid in understanding turbulence [T.-D. Lee, "On some statistical properties of hydrodynamical and magnetohydrodynamical fields," Q. Appl. Math. 10, 69 (1952)] is taken to study gyrokinetic plasma turbulence: A finite set of Fourier modes of the collisionless gyrokinetic equations are kept and the statistical equilibria are calculated; possible implications for plasma turbulence in various situations are discussed. For the case of two spatial and one velocity dimension, in the calculation with discretization also of velocity v with N grid points (where N + 1 quantities are conserved, corresponding to an energy invariant and N entropy-related invariants), the negative temperature states, corresponding to the condensation of the generalized energy into the lowest modes, are found. This indicates a generic feature of inverse energy cascade. Comparisons are made with some classical results, such as those of Charney-Hasegawa-Mima in the cold-ion limit. There is a universal shape for statistical equilibrium of gyrokinetics in three spatial and two velocity dimensions with just one conserved quantity. Possible physical relevance to turbulence, such as ITG zonal flows, and to a critical balance hypothesis are also discussed.

  14. Radial Reflection diffraction tomorgraphy

    DOEpatents

    Lehman, Sean K

    2013-11-19

    A wave-based tomographic imaging method and apparatus based upon one or more rotating radially outward oriented transmitting and receiving elements have been developed for non-destructive evaluation. At successive angular locations at a fixed radius, a predetermined transmitting element can launch a primary field and one or more predetermined receiving elements can collect the backscattered field in a "pitch/catch" operation. A Hilbert space inverse wave (HSIW) algorithm can construct images of the received scattered energy waves using operating modes chosen for a particular application. Applications include, improved intravascular imaging, bore hole tomography, and non-destructive evaluation (NDE) of parts having existing access holes.

  15. Radial reflection diffraction tomography

    DOEpatents

    Lehman, Sean K.

    2012-12-18

    A wave-based tomographic imaging method and apparatus based upon one or more rotating radially outward oriented transmitting and receiving elements have been developed for non-destructive evaluation. At successive angular locations at a fixed radius, a predetermined transmitting element can launch a primary field and one or more predetermined receiving elements can collect the backscattered field in a "pitch/catch" operation. A Hilbert space inverse wave (HSIW) algorithm can construct images of the received scattered energy waves using operating modes chosen for a particular application. Applications include, improved intravascular imaging, bore hole tomography, and non-destructive evaluation (NDE) of parts having existing access holes.

  16. New radial pulsation constants for the Beta Cephei variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shobbrook, R. R.

    1985-05-01

    Recent new calibrations of luminosities, temperatures and bolometric corrections for B stars in terms of the β index and the Strömgren parameter c0 have necessitated the recalculation of the radial pulsation constants, Q, for the β Cephei (of β Canis Majoris) variable stars. Corrections for the effect of binaries on the absolute magnitudes, derived both from the luminosity calibration and from the mean distance moduli of those variables in clusters, are calculated in an Appendix. The mean value of Q, although determined from absolute magnitudes which are about 0.4 mag fainter than those from previous calibrations of the β index, still suggests that the majority of the variables are pulsating in the first overtone radial mode, as have most investigations in recent years.

  17. Database applicaton for absolute spectrophotometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bochkov, Valery V.; Shumko, Sergiy

    2002-12-01

    32-bit database application with multidocument interface for Windows has been developed to calculate absolute energy distributions of observed spectra. The original database contains wavelength calibrated observed spectra which had been already passed through apparatus reductions such as flatfielding, background and apparatus noise subtracting. Absolute energy distributions of observed spectra are defined in unique scale by means of registering them simultaneously with artificial intensity standard. Observations of sequence of spectrophotometric standards are used to define absolute energy of the artificial standard. Observations of spectrophotometric standards are used to define optical extinction in selected moments. FFT algorithm implemented in the application allows performing convolution (deconvolution) spectra with user-defined PSF. The object-oriented interface has been created using facilities of C++ libraries. Client/server model with Windows Socket functionality based on TCP/IP protocol is used to develop the application. It supports Dynamic Data Exchange conversation in server mode and uses Microsoft Exchange communication facilities.

  18. Absolute classification with unsupervised clustering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeon, Byeungwoo; Landgrebe, D. A.

    1992-01-01

    An absolute classification algorithm is proposed in which the class definition through training samples or otherwise is required only for a particular class of interest. The absolute classification is considered as a problem of unsupervised clustering when one cluster is known initially. The definitions and statistics of the other classes are automatically developed through the weighted unsupervised clustering procedure, which is developed to keep the cluster corresponding to the class of interest from losing its identity as the class of interest. Once all the classes are developed, a conventional relative classifier such as the maximum-likelihood classifier is used in the classification.

  19. Absolute Properties of the Spotted Eclipsing Binary Star CV Boötis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, Guillermo; Vaz, Luiz Paulo R.; Sandberg Lacy, Claud H.

    2008-11-01

    We present new V-band differential brightness measurements as well as new radial-velocity measurements of the detached, circular, 0.84 day period, double-lined eclipsing binary system, CV Boo. These data, along with other observations from the literature, are combined to derive improved absolute dimensions of the stars for the purpose of testing various aspects of theoretical modeling. Despite complications from intrinsic variability that we detect in the system, and despite the rapid rotation of the components, we are able to determine the absolute masses and radii to better than 1.3% and 2%, respectively. We obtain M A = 1.032 ± 0.013 M sun and R A = 1.262 ± 0.023 R sun for the hotter, larger, and more-massive primary (star A), and M B = 0.968 ± 0.012 M sun and R B = 1.173 ± 0.023 R sun for the secondary. The estimated effective temperatures are 5760 ± 150 K and 5670 ± 150 K, respectively. The intrinsic variability with a period ~1% shorter than the orbital period is interpreted as being due to modulation by spots on one or both components. This implies that the spotted star(s) must be rotating faster than the synchronous rate, which disagrees with predictions from current tidal evolution models according to which both stars should be synchronized. We also find that the radius of the secondary is larger than expected from stellar evolution calculations by ~10%, a discrepancy also seen in other (mostly lower-mass and active) eclipsing binaries. We estimate the age of the system to be approximately 9 Gyr. Both components are near the end of their main-sequence phase, and the primary may have started the shell hydrogen-burning stage.

  20. Transverse Velocity Shifts in Protostellar Jets: Rotation or Velocity Asymmetries?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Colle, Fabio; Cerqueira, Adriano H.; Riera, Angels

    2016-12-01

    Observations of several protostellar jets show systematic differences in radial velocity transverse to the jet propagation direction that have been interpreted as evidence of rotation in the jets. In this paper we discuss the origin of these velocity shifts, and show that they could originate from rotation in the flow, or from side-to-side asymmetries in the shock velocity, which could be due to asymmetries in the jet ejection velocity/density or in the ambient medium. For typical poloidal jet velocities (˜100-200 km s-1), an asymmetry ≳10% can produce velocity shifts comparable to those observed. We also present three-dimensional numerical simulations of rotating, precessing, and asymmetric jets, and show that, even though for a given jet there is a clear degeneracy between these effects, a statistical analysis of jets with different inclination angles can help to distinguish between the alternative origins of transverse velocity shifts (TVSs). Our analysis indicates that side-to-side velocitiy asymmetries could represent an important contribution to TVSs, being the most important contributor for large jet inclination angles (with respect the the plane of the sky), and cannot be neglected when interpreting the observations.

  1. Sodium Velocity Maps on Mercury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potter, A. E.; Killen, R. M.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of the current work was to measure two-dimensional maps of sodium velocities on the Mercury surface and examine the maps for evidence of sources or sinks of sodium on the surface. The McMath-Pierce Solar Telescope and the Stellar Spectrograph were used to measure Mercury spectra that were sampled at 7 milliAngstrom intervals. Observations were made each day during the period October 5-9, 2010. The dawn terminator was in view during that time. The velocity shift of the centroid of the Mercury emission line was measured relative to the solar sodium Fraunhofer line corrected for radial velocity of the Earth. The difference between the observed and calculated velocity shift was taken to be the velocity vector of the sodium relative to Earth. For each position of the spectrograph slit, a line of velocities across the planet was measured. Then, the spectrograph slit was stepped over the surface of Mercury at 1 arc second intervals. The position of Mercury was stabilized by an adaptive optics system. The collection of lines were assembled into an images of surface reflection, sodium emission intensities, and Earthward velocities over the surface of Mercury. The velocity map shows patches of higher velocity in the southern hemisphere, suggesting the existence of sodium sources there. The peak earthward velocity occurs in the equatorial region, and extends to the terminator. Since this was a dawn terminator, this might be an indication of dawn evaporation of sodium. Leblanc et al. (2008) have published a velocity map that is similar.

  2. Radial cold trap

    DOEpatents

    Grundy, Brian R.

    1981-01-01

    The radial cold trap comprises a housing having a plurality of mesh bands disposed therein. The mesh bands comprise concentrically arranged bands of mesh with the mesh specific surface area of each band increasing from the outermost mesh band to the innermost mesh band. An inlet nozzle is attached to the outside section of the housing while an outlet nozzle is attached to the inner portion of the housing so as to be concentrically connected to the innermost mesh band. An inlet baffle having orifices therein may be disposed around the outermost mesh band and within the housing for directing the flow of the fluid from the inlet nozzle to the outermost mesh band in a uniform manner. The flow of fluid passes through each consecutive mesh band and into the outlet nozzle. The circular pattern of the symmetrically arranged mesh packing allows for better utilization of the entire cold trap volume.

  3. Radial cold trap

    DOEpatents

    Grundy, B.R.

    1981-09-29

    The radial cold trap comprises a housing having a plurality of mesh bands disposed therein. The mesh bands comprise concentrically arranged bands of mesh with the mesh specific surface area of each band increasing from the outermost mesh band to the innermost mesh band. An inlet nozzle is attached to the outside section of the housing while an outlet nozzle is attached to the inner portion of the housing so as to be concentrically connected to the innermost mesh band. An inlet baffle having orifices therein may be disposed around the outermost mesh band and within the housing for directing the flow of the fluid from the inlet nozzle to the outermost mesh band in a uniform manner. The flow of fluid passes through each consecutive mesh band and into the outlet nozzle. The circular pattern of the symmetrically arranged mesh packing allows for better utilization of the entire cold trap volume. 2 figs.

  4. Radial propagation of geodesic acoustic modes

    SciTech Connect

    Hager, Robert; Hallatschek, Klaus

    2009-07-15

    The GAM group velocity is estimated from the ratio of the radial free energy flux to the total free energy applying gyrokinetic and two-fluid theory. This method is much more robust than approaches that calculate the group velocity directly and can be generalized to include additional physics, e.g., magnetic geometry. The results are verified with the gyrokinetic code GYRO[J. Candy and R. E. Waltz, J. Comput. Phys. 186, 545 (2003)], the two-fluid code NLET[K. Hallatschek and A. Zeiler, Phys. Plasmas 7, 2554 (2000)], and analytical calculations. GAM propagation must be kept in mind when discussing the windows of GAM activity observed experimentally and the match between linear theory and experimental GAM frequencies.

  5. THE SPIN EFFECT ON PLANETARY RADIAL VELOCIMETRY OF EXOPLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Kawahara, Hajime

    2012-11-20

    We consider the effect of planetary spin on the planetary radial velocity (PRV) in dayside spectra of exoplanets. To understand the spin effect qualitatively, we derive an analytic formula of the intensity-weighted radial velocity from the planetary surface on the following assumptions: (1) constant and solid rotation without precession, (2) stable and uniform distribution of molecules/atoms, (3) emission models from the dayside hemisphere, and (4) a circular orbit. On these assumptions, we find that the curve of the PRV is distorted by the planetary spin and this anomaly is characterized by the spin radial velocity at the equator and a projected angle on a celestial plane between the spin axis and the axis of orbital motion {lambda}{sub p} in a manner analogous to the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect. The latter can constrain the planetary obliquity. Creating mock PRV data with 3 km s{sup -1} accuracy, we demonstrate how {lambda}{sub p} and the spin radial velocity at the equator are estimated. We find that the stringent constraint of eccentricity is crucial to detect the spin effect. Though our formula is still qualitative, we conclude that the PRV in the dayside spectra will be a powerful means for constraining the planetary spin.

  6. Absolute transition probabilities of phosphorus.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, M. H.; Roig, R. A.; Bengtson, R. D.

    1971-01-01

    Use of a gas-driven shock tube to measure the absolute strengths of 21 P I lines and 126 P II lines (from 3300 to 6900 A). Accuracy for prominent, isolated neutral and ionic lines is estimated to be 28 to 40% and 18 to 30%, respectively. The data and the corresponding theoretical predictions are examined for conformity with the sum rules.-

  7. Relativistic Absolutism in Moral Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vogt, W. Paul

    1982-01-01

    Discusses Emile Durkheim's "Moral Education: A Study in the Theory and Application of the Sociology of Education," which holds that morally healthy societies may vary in culture and organization but must possess absolute rules of moral behavior. Compares this moral theory with current theory and practice of American educators. (MJL)

  8. Absolute Standards for Climate Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leckey, J.

    2016-10-01

    In a world of changing climate, political uncertainty, and ever-changing budgets, the benefit of measurements traceable to SI standards increases by the day. To truly resolve climate change trends on a decadal time scale, on-orbit measurements need to be referenced to something that is both absolute and unchanging. One such mission is the Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO) that will measure a variety of climate variables with an unprecedented accuracy to definitively quantify climate change. In the CLARREO mission, we will utilize phase change cells in which a material is melted to calibrate the temperature of a blackbody that can then be observed by a spectrometer. A material's melting point is an unchanging physical constant that, through a series of transfers, can ultimately calibrate a spectrometer on an absolute scale. CLARREO consists of two primary instruments: an infrared (IR) spectrometer and a reflected solar (RS) spectrometer. The mission will contain orbiting radiometers with sufficient accuracy to calibrate other space-based instrumentation and thus transferring the absolute traceability. The status of various mission options will be presented.

  9. Radial Distribution of Electron Spectra from High-Energy Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Katz, Robert; Wilson, John W.

    1998-01-01

    The average track model describes the response of physical and biological systems using radial dose distribution as the key physical descriptor. We report on an extension of this model to describe the average distribution of electron spectra as a function of radial distance from an ion. We present calculations of these spectra for ions of identical linear energy transfer (LET), but dissimilar charge and velocity to evaluate the differences in electron spectra from these ions. To illustrate the usefulness of the radial electron spectra for describing effects that are not described by electron dose, we consider the evaluation of the indirect events in microdosimetric distributions for ions. We show that folding our average electron spectra model with experimentally determined frequency distributions for photons or electrons provides a good representation of radial event spectra from high-energy ions in 0.5-2 micrometer sites.

  10. Simultaneous inversion for mantle shear velocity and the topography of transition zone discontinuities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Y. J.; Dziewonski, A. M.

    2001-05-01

    A method is presented for the simultaneous inversions of shear velocity in the mantle and the topography of transition zone discontinuities. Each travel time residual, corrected for crust and free surface topography, is modeled as resulting from contributions from three-dimensional shear velocity perturbations to a spherical Earth model and boundary undulations to the 410 and 660 km discontinuities. This approach minimizes tradeoffs between velocity and topography. We expand the lateral variations in velocity and the topography of each discontinuity using 362 spherical B-splines; we expand the radial variations using 14 cubic B-splines. To increase the reliability of the measurements, particularly in the undersampled southern hemisphere, we re-examine the topography of the 410- and 660 km discontinuities from more than 21,000 SH-component records. This new data set is significantly larger than those used earlier studies of SS precursors. The long-wavelength features of our new topography maps of the 410- and 660-km discontinuities are compatible with results of earlier studies: the large-scale patterns are dominated by low degree spherical harmonics, particularly at degrees 1 and 2. We also include an independent measurement of the global transition zone thickness for additional constraints on the structure in the transition zone. The best-fit model from the joint inversion reduces the variance of the absolute and differential travel times of S, SS and ScS by 40 to 70 %, and the differential travel times of SS precursors by up to 90%.

  11. Radial reactor for trichloroethylene steam reforming

    SciTech Connect

    Moates, F.C.; McMinn, T.E.; Richardson, J.T.

    1999-11-01

    A ceramic foam radial reactor was used to convert trichloroethylene by steam reforming, using 0.5 wt. % Pt as a catalyst. With a quartz enclosure heated externally by infrared lamps, the inlet temperature to the catalyst bed was low enough to suppress pyrolysis, but high conversions (0.99999 +) were achieved at the exit. Stable operation up to 600 h with a space velocity of 5.6 x 10{sup 4}h{sup {minus}1} was achieved, but reactant break-through then occurred, and the catalyst quickly deactivated. Although the deactivated catalyst was regenerated with carbon burning, activity decline was more rapid due to platinum sintering and washcoat degradation. Measured temperature profiles and model calculations indicated a large gradient in the bed and suggested that stable operation could be extended at lower space velocities. Axial temperature profiles were not uniform, since preferential flow occurred in the middle and lower regions of the radial bed. Potential improvements for future designs are suggested.

  12. Control of low-frequency plasma instabilities by a nonuniform radial electric field

    SciTech Connect

    Komori, A.; Watanabe, K.; Kawai, Y.

    1988-01-01

    Flute instability of a magnetoplasma is generated and controlled experimentally by a nonuniform weak radial electric field. Six concentric electrodes, biased separately, are used to change the radial electric field. The instability, which is different from the velocity shear flute instability, is observed in a plasma with well-type potential and hill-type density profiles.

  13. New Measurements of Radial Mode Eigenfrequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laske, G.; Masters, G.; Dziewonski, A. M.

    2001-12-01

    Radial mode eigenfrequencies are commonly thought to be measured with great ease and precision. The reason for this is that these modes have no geographic pattern so one should be able to measure frequencies from a spectrum observed at any station in the world. Yet, radial modes often seem inconsistent with spherical Earth models that fit all other mode frequencies. It turns out that radial modes are sometimes strongly coupled. The strongest coupling is predicted to be with l=2 modes which is caused by the Earth's hydrostatic ellipticity and aspherical structure of harmonic degree 2. In such cases, mode-coupling due to ellipticity alone can cause a frequency shift for the radial modes by more than 4 microHz. Given that mode frequencies can be measured to within 0.1 microHz, this shift is significant, and some singlets of l=2 modes have indeed been misidentified as the radial mode in the past. Including the spectra of the June 23, 2001 Southern Peru Earthquake we have re-analyzed radial mode eigenfrequencies and present a mode dataset that is internally more consistent than previous ones. We construct spherical Earth models that are consistent with our new data, the Earth's mass and moment of inertia and the current best estimates of ``Reference Normal Mode Data'' (available on the Reference Earth Model web site: //mahi.ucsd.edu/Gabi/rem.html). We seek the smallest perturbation to PREM but update the Q-structure as well as the depths of the upper mantle discontinuities (418~km and 660~km as first order discontinuities; 520~km as change in gradient). The best fitting 1D model is transversely isotropic but we also show isotropic models that fit the data to within their errors. We show that the 220~km discontinuity is not required in the isotropic model but that there exists a trade-off between high shear-velocities in the lid and a low-density zone beneath it. We also investigate ways of truncating transverse isotropy without the 220.

  14. Absolute calibration of optical flats

    DOEpatents

    Sommargren, Gary E.

    2005-04-05

    The invention uses the phase shifting diffraction interferometer (PSDI) to provide a true point-by-point measurement of absolute flatness over the surface of optical flats. Beams exiting the fiber optics in a PSDI have perfect spherical wavefronts. The measurement beam is reflected from the optical flat and passed through an auxiliary optic to then be combined with the reference beam on a CCD. The combined beams include phase errors due to both the optic under test and the auxiliary optic. Standard phase extraction algorithms are used to calculate this combined phase error. The optical flat is then removed from the system and the measurement fiber is moved to recombine the two beams. The newly combined beams include only the phase errors due to the auxiliary optic. When the second phase measurement is subtracted from the first phase measurement, the absolute phase error of the optical flat is obtained.

  15. The Absolute Spectrum Polarimeter (ASP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kogut, A. J.

    2010-01-01

    The Absolute Spectrum Polarimeter (ASP) is an Explorer-class mission to map the absolute intensity and linear polarization of the cosmic microwave background and diffuse astrophysical foregrounds over the full sky from 30 GHz to 5 THz. The principal science goal is the detection and characterization of linear polarization from an inflationary epoch in the early universe, with tensor-to-scalar ratio r much greater than 1O(raised to the power of { -3}) and Compton distortion y < 10 (raised to the power of{-6}). We describe the ASP instrument and mission architecture needed to detect the signature of an inflationary epoch in the early universe using only 4 semiconductor bolometers.

  16. Physics of negative absolute temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, Eitan; Penrose, Oliver

    2017-01-01

    Negative absolute temperatures were introduced into experimental physics by Purcell and Pound, who successfully applied this concept to nuclear spins; nevertheless, the concept has proved controversial: a recent article aroused considerable interest by its claim, based on a classical entropy formula (the "volume entropy") due to Gibbs, that negative temperatures violated basic principles of statistical thermodynamics. Here we give a thermodynamic analysis that confirms the negative-temperature interpretation of the Purcell-Pound experiments. We also examine the principal arguments that have been advanced against the negative temperature concept; we find that these arguments are not logically compelling, and moreover that the underlying "volume" entropy formula leads to predictions inconsistent with existing experimental results on nuclear spins. We conclude that, despite the counterarguments, negative absolute temperatures make good theoretical sense and did occur in the experiments designed to produce them.

  17. Absolute Properties of the Main-Sequence Eclipsing Binary Star V885 Cygni

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacy, Claud H. Sandberg; Vaz, Luiz Paulo Ribeiro; Claret, Antonio; Sabby, Jeffrey A.

    2004-09-01

    We present 4179 differential observations in the V filter measured by a robotic telescope, as well as 25 pairs of radial velocities from high-resolution spectroscopic observations, of the detached, EB-type, 1.69 day period double-lined eclipsing binary star V885 Cyg. Absolute dimensions of the components are determined with high precision (better than 1.5% in the masses and radii) for the purpose of testing various aspects of theoretical modeling. We obtain 2.005+/-0.029 Msolar and 2.345+/-0.012 Rsolar for the hotter, but smaller, less massive and less luminous photometric primary (star A), and 2.234+/-0.026 Msolar and 3.385+/-0.026 Rsolar for the cooler, larger, more massive and more luminous photometric secondary (star B). The effective temperatures and interstellar reddening of the stars are accurately determined from uvbyβ photometry: 8375+/-150 K for the primary, 8150+/-150 K for the secondary-corresponding to spectral types of A3m and A4m-and 0.058 mag for Eb-y. The metallic-lined character of the stars is revealed by high-resolution spectroscopy and uvbyβ photometry. The orbits are circular, and spectral line widths give observed rotational velocities that are synchronous with the orbital motion for both components. The components of V885 Cyg are main-sequence stars with an age of about 500 Myr according to models. Our estimate of the age of this system would seem to favor the hydrodynamic damping formalism of Tassoul & Tassoul in this particular case, since both the components' spins are synchronous and the orbit is circular.

  18. Turbine with radial acting seal

    SciTech Connect

    Eng, Darryl S; Ebert, Todd A

    2016-11-22

    A floating brush seal in a rim cavity of a turbine in a gas turbine engine, where the floating brush seal includes a seal holder in which the floating brush seal floats, and a expandable seal that fits within two radial extending seal slots that maintains a seal with radial displacement of the floating brush seal and the seal holder.

  19. The Central Velocity Distribution Function of Omega Centauri

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seitzer, Patrick

    1993-12-01

    Precise radial velocities have been obtained for 870 red giant stars within 4 arcminutes of the center of the globular cluster Omega Centauri (NGC\\ 5139) using the ARGUS multiple object echelle spectrometer at CTIO. The resulting distribution of radial velocities is analyzed to derive the line of sight velocity distribution function, and is compared with various models of relaxed star clusters. The truncation of the velocity function is due to the Galactic tidal field, and some hint of the form this truncation takes is available even with this small number of stars. Observations at two epochs are available for most of the stars and are used to constrain the fraction of binary stars.

  20. High speed image acquisition system of absolute encoder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Jianxiang; Chen, Xin; Chen, Xindu; Zhang, Fangjian; Wang, Han

    2017-01-01

    Absolute optical encoder as a product of optical, mechanical and electronic integration has been widely used in displacement measuring fields. However, how to improve the measurement velocity and reduce the manufacturing cost of absolute optical encoder is the key problem to be solved. To improve the measurement speed, a novel absolute optical encoder image acquisition system is proposed. The proposed acquisition system includes a linear CCD sensor is applied for capturing coding pattern images, an optical magnifying system is used for enlarging the grating stripes, an analog-digital conversion(ADC) module is used for processing the CCD analogy signal, a field programmable gate array(FPGA) device and other peripherals perform driving task. An absolute position measurement experiment was set up to verify and evaluate the proposed image acquisition system. The experimental result indicates that the proposed absolute optical encoder image acquisition system has the image acquisition speed of more than 9500fp/s with well reliability and lower manufacture cost.

  1. Interplanetary magnetic field power spectra - Mean field radial or perpendicular to radial

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sari, J. W.; Valley, G. C.

    1976-01-01

    A detailed frequency analysis of Pioneer-6 interplanetary magnetic field data is carried out for 5 to 15 hour periods during which the mean interplanetary field is approximately radial or perpendicular to radial. The reason why these data sets were chosen is that by making the usual assumption that the phase speed of any wave present is much less than the mean solar wind speed, the measured frequency spectra can be interpreted in terms of the wave number parallel or perpendicular to the mean field, without such additional assumptions as isotropy or the dominance of a particular mode and without measurements of velocity and density. The details of the calculation of the magnetic field power spectra, coherencies, and correlation functions are discussed, along with results obtained directly from the data (such as spectra, slopes, anisotropies, and coherencies). The results are interpreted in terms of MHD theory, and are related to work in other areas.

  2. Hitting the Bull's-Eye: The Radial Profile of Accretion and Star Formation in the Milky Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peek, J. E. G.

    2009-06-01

    Ongoing star formation in the Milky Way requires continuous gaseous fuel from accretion. Previous work has suggested that the accretion of dwarf galaxies could provide the needed gas for this process. In this work, we investigate whether dwarf galaxy accretion is consistent with the radial profile of star formation observed in the Milky Way, which is strongly concentrated toward the center of the gaseous disk of the Galaxy. Using realistic parameters for the Galactic potential, gaseous halo, Galactic disk, velocities of dwarf galaxies, and effects of drag on stripped gas in the halo, we model the distribution of radii at which dwarf galaxies accrete onto the Galactic disk. We also model the radial distribution of the accretion of gas that cools directly out of the halo by examining the results of recent simulations. We show that dwarf galaxies cannot reproduce the concentration of accretion toward the center of the Galaxy required by star formation. We also show that clouds that cool directly from the halo can reproduce this central concentration, and conclude that this difference is largely due to the discrepancy in absolute specific angular momentum between the two mechanisms.

  3. The Effect of Radial Migration on Galactic Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vera-Ciro, Carlos; D'Onghia, Elena; Navarro, Julio; Abadi, Mario

    2014-10-01

    We study the radial migration of stars driven by recurring multi-arm spiral features in an exponential disk embedded in a dark matter halo. The spiral perturbations redistribute angular momentum within the disk and lead to substantial radial displacements of individual stars, in a manner that largely preserves the circularity of their orbits and that results, after 5 Gyr (~40 full rotations at the disk scale length), in little radial heating and no appreciable changes to the vertical or radial structure of the disk. Our results clarify a number of issues related to the spatial distribution and kinematics of migrators. In particular, we find that migrators are a heavily biased subset of stars with preferentially low vertical velocity dispersions. This "provenance bias" for migrators is not surprising in hindsight, for stars with small vertical excursions spend more time near the disk plane, and thus respond more readily to non-axisymmetric perturbations. We also find that the vertical velocity dispersion of outward migrators always decreases, whereas the opposite holds for inward migrators. To first order, newly arrived migrators simply replace stars that have migrated off to other radii, thus inheriting the vertical bias of the latter. Extreme migrators might therefore be recognized, if present, by the unexpectedly small amplitude of their vertical excursions. Our results show that migration, understood as changes in angular momentum that preserve circularity, can strongly affect the thin disk, but cast doubts on models that envision the Galactic thick disk as a relic of radial migration.

  4. Accretion, radial flows and abundance gradients in spiral galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pezzulli, Gabriele; Fraternali, Filippo

    2016-01-01

    The metal-poor gas continuously accreting on to the discs of spiral galaxies is unlikely to arrive from the intergalactic medium (IGM) with exactly the same rotation velocity as the galaxy itself and even a small angular momentum mismatch inevitably drives radial gas flows within the disc, with significant consequences to galaxy evolution. Here, we provide some general analytic tools to compute accretion profiles, radial gas flows and abundance gradients in spiral galaxies as a function of the angular momentum of the accreting material. We generalize existing solutions for the decomposition of the gas flows, required to reproduce the structural properties of galaxy discs, into direct accretion from the IGM and a radial mass flux within the disc. We then solve the equation of metallicity evolution in the presence of radial gas flows with a novel method, based on characteristic lines, which greatly reduces the numerical demand on the computation and sheds light on the crucial role of boundary conditions on the abundance profiles predicted by theoretical models. We also discuss how structural and chemical constraints can be combined to disentangle the contributions of inside-out growth and radial flows in the development of abundance gradients in spiral galaxies. Illustrative examples are provided throughout with parameters plausible for the Milky Way. We find that the material accreting on the Milky Way should rotate at 70-80 per cent of the rotational velocity of the disc, in agreement with previous estimates.

  5. The effect of radial migration on galactic disks

    SciTech Connect

    Vera-Ciro, Carlos; D'Onghia, Elena; Navarro, Julio; Abadi, Mario

    2014-10-20

    We study the radial migration of stars driven by recurring multi-arm spiral features in an exponential disk embedded in a dark matter halo. The spiral perturbations redistribute angular momentum within the disk and lead to substantial radial displacements of individual stars, in a manner that largely preserves the circularity of their orbits and that results, after 5 Gyr (∼40 full rotations at the disk scale length), in little radial heating and no appreciable changes to the vertical or radial structure of the disk. Our results clarify a number of issues related to the spatial distribution and kinematics of migrators. In particular, we find that migrators are a heavily biased subset of stars with preferentially low vertical velocity dispersions. This 'provenance bias' for migrators is not surprising in hindsight, for stars with small vertical excursions spend more time near the disk plane, and thus respond more readily to non-axisymmetric perturbations. We also find that the vertical velocity dispersion of outward migrators always decreases, whereas the opposite holds for inward migrators. To first order, newly arrived migrators simply replace stars that have migrated off to other radii, thus inheriting the vertical bias of the latter. Extreme migrators might therefore be recognized, if present, by the unexpectedly small amplitude of their vertical excursions. Our results show that migration, understood as changes in angular momentum that preserve circularity, can strongly affect the thin disk, but cast doubts on models that envision the Galactic thick disk as a relic of radial migration.

  6. Radially sandwiched cylindrical piezoelectric transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Shuyu; Fu, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Xiaoli; Wang, Yong; Hu, Jing

    2013-01-01

    A new type of radially sandwiched piezoelectric short cylindrical transducer is developed and its radial vibration is studied. The transducer is composed of a solid metal disk, a radially polarized piezoelectric ceramic short tube and a metal tube. The radial vibrations of the solid metal disk, the radially polarized piezoelectric tube and the metal tube are analyzed and their electromechanical equivalent circuits are introduced. Based on the mechanical boundary conditions among the metal disk, the piezoelectric tube and the metal tube, a three-port electromechanical equivalent circuit for the radially sandwiched transducer is obtained and the frequency equation is given. The theoretical relationship of the resonance and anti-resonance frequencies and the effective electromechanical coupling coefficient with the geometrical dimensions is analyzed. The radial vibration of the sandwiched transducer is simulated by using two different numerical methods. It is shown that the analytical resonance and anti-resonance frequencies are in good agreement with the numerically simulated results. The transducer is expected to be used in piezoelectric resonators, actuators and ultrasonic radiators in ultrasonic and underwater sound applications.

  7. Causes of Secondary Radial Nerve Palsy and Results of Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Reichert, Paweł; Wnukiewicz, Witold; Witkowski, Jarosław; Bocheńska, Aneta; Mizia, Sylwia; Gosk, Jerzy; Zimmer, Krzysztof

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to analyze the causes that lead to secondary damage of the radial nerve and to discuss the results of reconstructive treatment. Material/Methods The study group consisted of 33 patients treated for radial nerve palsy after humeral fractures. Patients were diagnosed based on clinical examinations, ultrasonography, electromyography, or nerve conduction velocity. During each operation, the location and type of nerve damage were analyzed. During the reconstructive treatment, neurolysis, direct neurorrhaphy, or reconstruction with a sural nerve graft was used. The outcomes were evaluated using the Medical Research Council (MRC) scales and the quick DASH score. Results Secondary radial nerve palsy occurs after open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF) by plate, as well as by closed reduction and internal fixation (CRIF) by nail. In the case of ORIF, it most often occurs when the lateral approach is used, as in the case of CRIF with an insertion interlocking screws. The results of the surgical treatment were statistically significant and depended on the time between nerve injury and revision (reconstruction) surgery, type of damage to the radial nerve, surgery treatment, and type of fixation. Treatment results were not statistically significant, depending on the type of fracture or location of the nerve injury. Conclusions The potential risk of radial nerve neurotmesis justifies an operative intervention to treat neurological complications after a humeral fracture. Adequate surgical treatment in many of these cases allows for functional recovery of the radial nerve. PMID:26895570

  8. Absolute calibration of optical tweezers

    SciTech Connect

    Viana, N.B.; Mazolli, A.; Maia Neto, P.A.; Nussenzveig, H.M.; Rocha, M.S.; Mesquita, O.N.

    2006-03-27

    As a step toward absolute calibration of optical tweezers, a first-principles theory of trapping forces with no adjustable parameters, corrected for spherical aberration, is experimentally tested. Employing two very different setups, we find generally very good agreement for the transverse trap stiffness as a function of microsphere radius for a broad range of radii, including the values employed in practice, and at different sample chamber depths. The domain of validity of the WKB ('geometrical optics') approximation to the theory is verified. Theoretical predictions for the trapping threshold, peak position, depth variation, multiple equilibria, and 'jump' effects are also confirmed.

  9. ELECTROSTATIC MODE ASSOCIATED WITH PINCH VELOCITY IN RFPS

    SciTech Connect

    DELZANNO, GIAN LUCA; FINN, JOHN M.; CHACON, LUIS

    2007-02-08

    The existence of a new electrostatic instability is shown for RFP (reversed field pinch) equilibria. This mode arises due to the non-zero equilibrium radial flow (pinch flow). In RFP simulations with no-stress boundary conditions on the tangential velocity at the radial wall, this electrostatic mode is unstable and dominates the nonlinear dynamics, even in the presence of the MHD modes typically responsible for the reversal of the axial magnetic field at edge. Nonlinearly, this mode leads to two beams moving azimuthally towards each other, which eventually collide. The electrostatic mode can be controlled by using Dirichlet (no-slip) boundary conditions on the azimuthal velocity at the radial wall.

  10. VizieR Online Data Catalog: WASP-42 and WASP-49 photometry and velocities (Lendl+, 2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lendl, M.; Anderson, D. R.; Collier-Cameron, A.; Doyle, A. P.; Gillon, M.; Hellier, C.; Jehin, E.; Lister, T. A.; Maxted, P. F. L.; Pepe, F.; Pollacco, D.; Queloz, D.; Smalley, B.; Segransan, D.; Smith, A. M. S.; Triaud, A. H. M. J.; Udry, S.; West, R. G.; Wheatley, P. J.

    2012-07-01

    We present photometric time-series obtained by the Euler-Swiss, TRAPPIST and FTS telescopes obtained during transits of WASP-42 b and WASP-49 b. We also present radial-velocity measurements of WASP-42 obtained with HARPS and CORALIE radial-velocity measurements of WASP-42 and WASP-49. (2 data files).

  11. Radially dependent angular acceleration of twisted light.

    PubMed

    Webster, Jason; Rosales-Guzmán, Carmelo; Forbes, Andrew

    2017-02-15

    While photons travel in a straight line at constant velocity in free space, the intensity profile of structured light may be tailored for acceleration in any degree of freedom. Here we propose a simple approach to control the angular acceleration of light. Using Laguerre-Gaussian modes as our twisted beams carrying orbital angular momentum, we show that superpositions of opposite handedness result in a radially dependent angular acceleration as they pass through a focus (waist plane). Due to conservation of orbital angular momentum, we find that propagation dynamics are complex despite the free-space medium: the outer part of the beam (rings) rotates in an opposite direction to the inner part (petals), and while the outer part accelerates, the inner part decelerates. We outline the concepts theoretically and confirm them experimentally. Such exotic structured light beams are topical due to their many applications, for instance in optical trapping and tweezing, metrology, and fundamental studies in optics.

  12. Control of striking velocity by table tennis players.

    PubMed

    Marinovic, Welber; Iizuka, Cristina Akiko; Freudenheim, Andrea Michele

    2004-12-01

    This study investigated how 7 skilled table tennis players controlled velocity of a forehand drive stroke when the ball's trajectory, velocity, and spin were modified. They hit a target in response to balls launched under four different conditions. The relative and absolute times used in the backswing phase showed no significant differences among conditions. When subjects hit fastballs, there was a significant change in the time required for them to reach the peak of velocity in the forward swing phase. In addition, players decreased the velocity of their strokes to hit fast-approaching balls. These results indicate that highly skilled table tennis players need to adjust the striking velocity and striking time (relative and absolute) required to reach the peak of velocity in the forward swing phase for these task modifications. Since they used slower movement velocities to hit faster-approaching balls, skilled table tennis players may override this speed-coupling process.

  13. Possible role of external radial electric field on ion heating in an FRC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Deepak; Trask, E.; Korepanov, S.; Granstedt, E.; Osin, D.; Roche, T.; Deng, B.; Beall, M.; Zhai, K.; TAE Team

    2016-10-01

    In C-2/C-2U FRCs, a radial electric field is applied by either plasma guns or biased electrodes inside the divertors, at both ends of the machine. The electric field plays an important role in stabilizing the FRC; thus, providing a favorable target condition to a neutral beam injection. In addition, it is also observed that the application of radial electric field may lead to a heating of ions. Radial profile of impurity ion emission, azimuthal velocity and temperature are measured under different configurations. The conditions and evidences of ion heating due to the electric field biasing will be presented and discussed. Radial momentum balance equation of oxygen impurity ions is used with these measurements to estimate the radial electric field profile. Parameters affecting the ion heating due to biasing will also be discussed with some correlations. The external radial electric field is planned to be applied by biased electrodes and plasma guns in C-2W inner/outer divertors.

  14. Cosmology with negative absolute temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieira, J. P. P.; Byrnes, Christian T.; Lewis, Antony

    2016-08-01

    Negative absolute temperatures (NAT) are an exotic thermodynamical consequence of quantum physics which has been known since the 1950's (having been achieved in the lab on a number of occasions). Recently, the work of Braun et al. [1] has rekindled interest in negative temperatures and hinted at a possibility of using NAT systems in the lab as dark energy analogues. This paper goes one step further, looking into the cosmological consequences of the existence of a NAT component in the Universe. NAT-dominated expanding Universes experience a borderline phantom expansion (w < -1) with no Big Rip, and their contracting counterparts are forced to bounce after the energy density becomes sufficiently large. Both scenarios might be used to solve horizon and flatness problems analogously to standard inflation and bouncing cosmologies. We discuss the difficulties in obtaining and ending a NAT-dominated epoch, and possible ways of obtaining density perturbations with an acceptable spectrum.

  15. Solar-wind velocity decreases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geranios, A.

    1980-08-01

    A model is developed to account for the solar wind electron and proton temperature decreases observed following the passage of an interplanetary shock wave and during the velocity decrease of a solar wind stream. The equations of mass and energy conservation are solved for a fully ionized, electrically neutral plasma expanding radially and spherically symmetrically, taking into account the heat flux from the solor corona to the plasma along the open magnetic field lines, and the electron thermal conductivity. An analytical relationship between the temperature and the velocity of the solar wind plasma is obtained which is found to be in agreement with experimental measurements made by the Vela 5 and 6 and IMP 6 satellites from August 1969-May 1974. It is thus proposed that the observed low plasma temperatures are due to the fact that the temperature decrease of the expanding plasma exceeds the heat gain due to thermal conduction from the corona.

  16. Hawking Absorption and Planck Absolute Entropy of Kerr-Newman Black Hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, M. Hossain; Banu, Akhtara

    2006-03-01

    We find the existence of a quantum thermal effect, “Hawking absorption.” near the inner horizon of the Kerr Newman black hole. Redefining the entropy, temperature, angular velocity, and electric potential of the black hole, we give a new formulation of the Bekenstein Smarr formula. The redefined entropy vanishes for absolute zero temperature of the black hole and hence it is interpreted as the Planck absolute entropy of the KN black hole.

  17. Charge exchange recombination spectroscopy on a diagnostic hydrogen beam—measuring impurity rotation and radial electric field at the tokamak TEXTOR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coenen, J. W.; Schweer, B.; Clever, M.; Freutel, S.; Schmitz, O.; Stoschus, H.; Samm, U.; Unterberg, B.

    2010-07-01

    In this work we present an overview on the charge exchange recombination spectroscopy (CXRS) diagnostic operated with the modulated diagnostic hydrogen beam at the tokamak TEXTOR. The diagnostic setup combines two observation systems used for the measurement of the poloidal (vpol) and the toroidal (vtor) ion velocity component. At TEXTOR a differential Doppler spectroscopy approach (accurate absolute rotation scale) is combined with the high intensity and spatial resolution of a direct imaging system necessary for accurate poloidal rotation measurements on a shot-by-shot basis. This setup allows the full utilization of a 2D CCD detector in the spectral and radial direction. In the case of the poloidal system this allows spatial resolution in the range of mm to cm depending on the intensity requirements for the velocity. The toroidal system comprises a fibre-optic array. The combination of the two measurements with a low-power diagnostic beam can in principle be operated during any available heating scenario without interfering with the discharge. Time resolution is limited by the necessary averaging process; typically a stable plateau of 3 s during a TETXOR pulse is used. The TEXTOR tokamak has the ability to apply momentum input with two tangential neutral beam heating injectors, allowing for measurements under various heating and momentum input scenarios. With the presented diagnostic half the plasma minor radius at a spatial resolution of {\\sim} 1\\,\\rm cm is covered. With the CVI line at 529.053 nm an accuracy of 0.7\\, \\rm km\\,s^{-1} for the poloidal and ~5 \\rm km\\,s^{-1} for the toroidal system is given. The temperature is measured with an accuracy of a few eV. The presented work illustrates the capability of the system during a toroidal momentum scan, showing the self-consistent determination of the radial electric field from experimental CXRS data based on the radial force balance.

  18. On Beam-like Functions with Radial Symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Papanicolaou, N. C.; Christov, C. I.

    2008-10-30

    In this work, we introduce a complete orthonormal (CON) set of functions as the eigenfunctions of a fourth-order boundary problem with radial symmetry. We derive the relation for the spectrum of the problem and solve it numerically. For larger indices n of the eigenvalues we derive accurate asymptotic representations valid within o(n{sup -2}).Two model fourth order problems with radial symmetry which admit exact analytic solutions are featured: a simple problem involving only the fourth-order radial operator and a constant and the other also involving the second-order radial operator. We show that for both cases, the rate of convergence is O(N{sup -5}) which is compatible with theoretical predictions. The spectral and analytic solutions are found to be in excellent agreement. With 20 terms the absolute pointwise difference of the spectral and analytical solutions is of order 10{sup -7} which means that the fifth order algebraic rate of convergence is fully adequate.

  19. Gaussian Velocity Distributions in Avalanches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shattuck, Mark

    2004-03-01

    Imagine a world where gravity is so strong that if an ice cube is tilted the shear forces melt the surface and water avalanches down. Further imagine that the ambient temperature is so low that the water re-freezes almost immediately. This is the world of granular flows. As a granular solid is tilted the surface undergoes a sublimation phase transition and a granular gas avalanches down the surface, but the inelastic collisions rapidly remove energy from the flow lowering the granular temperature (kinetic energy per particle) until the gas solidifies again. It is under these extreme conditions that we attempt to uncover continuum granular flow properties. Typical continuum theories like Navier-Stokes equation for fluids follow the space-time evolution of the first few moments of the velocity distribution. We study continuously avalanching flow in a rotating two-dimensional granular drum using high-speed video imaging and extract the position and velocities of the particles. We find a universal near Gaussian velocity distribution throughout the flowing regions, which are characterized by a liquid-like radial distribution function. In the remaining regions, in which the radial distribution function develops sharp crystalline peaks, the velocity distribution has a Gaussian peak but is much broader in the tails. In a companion experiment on a vibrated two-dimensional granular fluid under constant pressure, we find a clear gas-solid phase transition in which both the temperature and density change discontinuously. This suggests that a low temperature crystal and a high temperature gas can coexist in steady state. This coexistence could result in a narrower, cooler, Gaussian peak and a broader, warmer, Gaussian tail like the non-Gaussian behavior seen in the crystalline portions of the rotating drum.

  20. Radial lean direct injection burner

    DOEpatents

    Khan, Abdul Rafey; Kraemer, Gilbert Otto; Stevenson, Christian Xavier

    2012-09-04

    A burner for use in a gas turbine engine includes a burner tube having an inlet end and an outlet end; a plurality of air passages extending axially in the burner tube configured to convey air flows from the inlet end to the outlet end; a plurality of fuel passages extending axially along the burner tube and spaced around the plurality of air passage configured to convey fuel from the inlet end to the outlet end; and a radial air swirler provided at the outlet end configured to direct the air flows radially toward the outlet end and impart swirl to the air flows. The radial air swirler includes a plurality of vanes to direct and swirl the air flows and an end plate. The end plate includes a plurality of fuel injection holes to inject the fuel radially into the swirling air flows. A method of mixing air and fuel in a burner of a gas turbine is also provided. The burner includes a burner tube including an inlet end, an outlet end, a plurality of axial air passages, and a plurality of axial fuel passages. The method includes introducing an air flow into the air passages at the inlet end; introducing a fuel into fuel passages; swirling the air flow at the outlet end; and radially injecting the fuel into the swirling air flow.

  1. Radial pump impeller measurements using a laser Doppler velocimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kannemans, H.

    1980-03-01

    A shrouded fully transparent radial pump impeller with thin backswept blades has been tested using a laser Doppler velocimeter. Two components of the velocity were measured relative to the laboratory reference frame in a plane perpendicular to the axis of rotation. The velocity distribution is presented relative to the blades at different radii and different flow rates over the whole blade passage. The results show that the flow is essentially unsteady and, at low flow rate, highly influenced by viscous effects. A comparison between the experimental data and a potential flow theory shows good agreement at high flow rates.

  2. Seismic velocities at the core-mantle boundary inferred from P waves diffracted around the core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sylvander, Matthieu; Ponce, Bruno; Souriau, Annie

    1997-05-01

    The very base of the mantle is investigated with core-diffracted P-wave (P diff) travel times published by the International Seismological Centre (ISC) for the period 1964-1987. Apparent slownesses are computed for two-station profiles using a difference method. As the short-period P diff mostly sample a very thin layer above the core-mantle boundary (CMB), a good approximation of the true velocity structure at the CMB can be derived from the apparent slownesses. More than 27000 profiles are built, and this provides an unprecedented P diff sampling of the CMB. The overall slowness distribution has an average value of 4.62 s/deg, which corresponds to a velocity more than 4% lower than that of most mean radial models. An analysis of the residuals of absolute ISC P and P diff travel times is independently carried out and confirms this result. It also shows that the degree of heterogeneities is significantly higher at the CMB than in the lower mantle. A search for lateral velocity variations is then undertaken; a first large-scale investigation reveals the presence of coherent slowness anomalies of very large dimensions of the order of 3000 km at the CMB. A tomographic inversion is then performed, which confirms the existence of pronounced (±8-10%) lateral velocity variations and provides a reliable map of the heterogeneities in the northern hemisphere. The influence of heterogeneity in the overlying mantle, of noise in the data and of CMB topography is evaluated; it seemingly proves minor compared with the contribution of heterogeneities at the CMB. Our results support the rising idea of a thin, low-velocity laterally varying boundary layer at the base of the D″ layer. The two principal candidate interpretations are the occurrence of partial melting, or the presence of a chemically distinct layer, featuring infiltrated core material.

  3. Losses in radial inflow turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khalil, I. M.; Tabakoff, W.; Hamed, A.

    1976-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine experimentally and theoretically the losses in radial inflow turbine nozzles. Extensive experimental data was obtained to investigate the flow behavior in a full-scale radial turbine stator annulus. A theoretical model to predict the losses in both the vaned and vaneless regions of the nozzle was developed. In this analysis, the interaction effects between the stator and the rotor are not considered. It was found that the losses incurred due to the end wall boundary layers can be significant, especially if they are characterized by a strong crossflow. The losses estimated using the analytical study are compared with the experimentally determined values.

  4. P wave azimuthal and radial anisotropy of the Hokkaido subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Xiongwei; Zhao, Dapeng; Li, Jiabiao; Ruan, Aiguo

    2016-04-01

    We present the first three-dimensional P wave radial anisotropy tomography of the Hokkaido subduction zone, as well as P wave azimuthal anisotropy and S wave tomography, which are determined by inverting 298,430 P wave and 233,934 S wave arrival times from 14,245 local earthquakes recorded by 344 seismic stations. Our results reveal significant velocity heterogeneity, seismic anisotropy, and upwelling flows beneath the study region. In the mantle wedge, prominent low-velocity (low-V) anomalies exhibit trench-normal fast-velocity directions (FVDs) and a negative radial anisotropy (i.e., vertical velocity > horizontal velocity), which may reflect upwelling mantle flows. Fan-shaped FVDs are found at depths of 65-90 km, and a detailed 3-D mantle flow pattern is revealed, which may be caused by a combination of oblique subduction of the Pacific plate and collision of the Kuril arc with the Honshu arc beneath southern Hokkaido. The radial anisotropy changes at ~100 km depth, which may reflect variations in temperature and fluid conditions there. The subducting Pacific slab exhibits a positive radial anisotropy (i.e., horizontal velocity > vertical velocity), which may reflect the original fossil anisotropy when the Pacific plate formed at the mid-ocean ridge.

  5. Absolute Proper Motions and Chemical Abundances of Stars Along the Sagittarius Trailing Tidal Tail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlin, Jeffrey L.; Majewski, S. R.; Casetti-Dinescu, D. I.; Patterson, R. J.

    2010-01-01

    We show results fro