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Sample records for absolute radiance standard

  1. Contributed Review: Absolute spectral radiance calibration of fiber-optic shock-temperature pyrometers using a coiled-coil irradiance standard lamp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fat'yanov, O. V.; Asimow, P. D.

    2015-10-01

    We describe an accurate and precise calibration procedure for multichannel optical pyrometers such as the 6-channel, 3-ns temporal resolution instrument used in the Caltech experimental geophysics laboratory. We begin with a review of calibration sources for shock temperatures in the 3000-30 000 K range. High-power, coiled tungsten halogen standards of spectral irradiance appear to be the only practical alternative to NIST-traceable tungsten ribbon lamps, which are no longer available with large enough calibrated area. However, non-uniform radiance complicates the use of such coiled lamps for reliable and reproducible calibration of pyrometers that employ imaging or relay optics. Careful analysis of documented methods of shock pyrometer calibration to coiled irradiance standard lamps shows that only one technique, not directly applicable in our case, is free of major radiometric errors. We provide a detailed description of the modified Caltech pyrometer instrument and a procedure for its absolute spectral radiance calibration, accurate to ±5%. We employ a designated central area of a 0.7× demagnified image of a coiled-coil tungsten halogen lamp filament, cross-calibrated against a NIST-traceable tungsten ribbon lamp. We give the results of the cross-calibration along with descriptions of the optical arrangement, data acquisition, and processing. We describe a procedure to characterize the difference between the static and dynamic response of amplified photodetectors, allowing time-dependent photodiode correction factors for spectral radiance histories from shock experiments. We validate correct operation of the modified Caltech pyrometer with actual shock temperature experiments on single-crystal NaCl and MgO and obtain very good agreement with the literature data for these substances. We conclude with a summary of the most essential requirements for error-free calibration of a fiber-optic shock-temperature pyrometer using a high-power coiled tungsten halogen

  2. Contributed Review: Absolute spectral radiance calibration of fiber-optic shock-temperature pyrometers using a coiled-coil irradiance standard lamp

    SciTech Connect

    Fat’yanov, O. V. Asimow, P. D.

    2015-10-15

    We describe an accurate and precise calibration procedure for multichannel optical pyrometers such as the 6-channel, 3-ns temporal resolution instrument used in the Caltech experimental geophysics laboratory. We begin with a review of calibration sources for shock temperatures in the 3000-30 000 K range. High-power, coiled tungsten halogen standards of spectral irradiance appear to be the only practical alternative to NIST-traceable tungsten ribbon lamps, which are no longer available with large enough calibrated area. However, non-uniform radiance complicates the use of such coiled lamps for reliable and reproducible calibration of pyrometers that employ imaging or relay optics. Careful analysis of documented methods of shock pyrometer calibration to coiled irradiance standard lamps shows that only one technique, not directly applicable in our case, is free of major radiometric errors. We provide a detailed description of the modified Caltech pyrometer instrument and a procedure for its absolute spectral radiance calibration, accurate to ±5%. We employ a designated central area of a 0.7× demagnified image of a coiled-coil tungsten halogen lamp filament, cross-calibrated against a NIST-traceable tungsten ribbon lamp. We give the results of the cross-calibration along with descriptions of the optical arrangement, data acquisition, and processing. We describe a procedure to characterize the difference between the static and dynamic response of amplified photodetectors, allowing time-dependent photodiode correction factors for spectral radiance histories from shock experiments. We validate correct operation of the modified Caltech pyrometer with actual shock temperature experiments on single-crystal NaCl and MgO and obtain very good agreement with the literature data for these substances. We conclude with a summary of the most essential requirements for error-free calibration of a fiber-optic shock-temperature pyrometer using a high-power coiled tungsten halogen

  3. Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leckey, John P.

    2015-01-01

    The Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO) is a mission, led and developed by NASA, that will measure a variety of climate variables with an unprecedented accuracy to quantify and attribute climate change. CLARREO consists of three separate instruments: an infrared (IR) spectrometer, a reflected solar (RS) spectrometer, and a radio occultation (RO) instrument. The mission will contain orbiting radiometers with sufficient accuracy, including on orbit verification, to calibrate other space-based instrumentation, increasing their respective accuracy by as much as an order of magnitude. The IR spectrometer is a Fourier Transform spectrometer (FTS) working in the 5 to 50 microns wavelength region with a goal of 0.1 K (k = 3) accuracy. The FTS will achieve this accuracy using phase change cells to verify thermistor accuracy and heated halos to verify blackbody emissivity, both on orbit. The RS spectrometer will measure the reflectance of the atmosphere in the 0.32 to 2.3 microns wavelength region with an accuracy of 0.3% (k = 2). The status of the instrumentation packages and potential mission options will be presented.

  4. Validation of spectral radiance assignments to integrating sphere radiance standards for the Advanced Baseline Imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, B. C.; Maxwell, Stephen; Shirley, Eric; Slack, Kim; Graham, Gary D.

    2014-09-01

    The Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI) is the next-generation imaging sensor for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA's) operational meteorological satellites in geostationary orbit. One pathway for traceability to reference standards of the visible and near-infrared radiometric response for ABI is to a 1.65 m diameter integrating sphere source standard of spectral radiance. This source illuminates the full entrance pupil via the ABI Earth-view port, thus determining the absolute spectral radiance responsivity in the visible and shortwave infrared. The spectral radiance values of the large sphere are assigned by Exelis using a double monochromator and a 15.24 cm diameter integrating sphere source standard that is calibrated by NIST. As part of the ABI program, Exelis was required by NASA to have the spectral radiance values assigned by Exelis to the large sphere be validated by NIST. Here we report the results of that activity, which took place in April, 2013. During the week of April 8, Exelis calibrated the 1.65 m diameter sphere at all 24 levels that correspond to the ABI calibration protocol. During the week of April 15, the NIST validation exercise for five selected levels took place. NIST deployed a portable spectral radiance source, a filter radiometer restricted to the visible and near-infrared, and two spectroradiometers that covered from 350 nm to 2500 nm. The NIST sphere source served as the validation standard. The comparison results, which are reported at the ABI bands, agreed to within the combined uncertainties. We describe the methodology, results, and uncertainty estimates related to this effort.

  5. Absolute Standards for Climate Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leckey, J.

    2016-10-01

    In a world of changing climate, political uncertainty, and ever-changing budgets, the benefit of measurements traceable to SI standards increases by the day. To truly resolve climate change trends on a decadal time scale, on-orbit measurements need to be referenced to something that is both absolute and unchanging. One such mission is the Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO) that will measure a variety of climate variables with an unprecedented accuracy to definitively quantify climate change. In the CLARREO mission, we will utilize phase change cells in which a material is melted to calibrate the temperature of a blackbody that can then be observed by a spectrometer. A material's melting point is an unchanging physical constant that, through a series of transfers, can ultimately calibrate a spectrometer on an absolute scale. CLARREO consists of two primary instruments: an infrared (IR) spectrometer and a reflected solar (RS) spectrometer. The mission will contain orbiting radiometers with sufficient accuracy to calibrate other space-based instrumentation and thus transferring the absolute traceability. The status of various mission options will be presented.

  6. Establishing the moon as a spectral radiance standard

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kieffer, H.H.; Wildey, R.L.

    1996-01-01

    A new automated observatory dedicated to the radiometry of the moon has been constructed to provide new radiance information for calibration of earth-orbiting imaging instruments, particularly Earth Observing System instruments. Instrumentation includes an imaging photometer with 4.5-in. resolution on a fully digital mount and a full-aperture radiance calibration source. Interference filters within 0.35-0.95 ??m correspond to standard stellar magnitude systems, accommodate wavelengths of lunar spectral contrast, and approximate some band-passes of planned earth-orbiting instruments (ASTER, Landsat-7 ETM, MISR, MODIS, and SeaWIFS). The same equipment is used for lunar and stellar observations, with the use of an aperture stop in lunar imaging to comply with Nyquist's theorem and lengthen exposure times to avoid scintillation effects. A typical robotic night run involves observation of about 60 photometric standard stars and the moon; about 10 of the standard stars are observed repeatedly to determine atmospheric extinction, and the moon is observed several times. Observations are to be made on every photometric night during the bright half of the month for at least 4.5 years to adequately cover phase and libration variation. Each lunar image is reduced to absolute exoatmospheric radiance and reprojected to a fixed selenographic grid system. The collection of these images at various librations and phase angles will be reduced to photometric models for each of the approximately 120 000 points in the lunar grid for each filter. Radiance models of the moon can then be produced for the precise geometry of an orbiting instrument observation. Expected errors are under 1% relative and 2.5% absolute. A second telescope operating from 1.0 to 2.5 ??m is planned.

  7. Calibration of the Reflected Solar Instrument for the Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thome, Kurtis; Barnes, Robert; Baize, Rosemary; O'Connell, Joseph; Hair, Jason

    2010-01-01

    The Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO) plans to observe climate change trends over decadal time scales to determine the accuracy of climate projections. The project relies on spaceborne earth observations of SI-traceable variables sensitive to key decadal change parameters. The mission includes a reflected solar instrument retrieving at-sensor reflectance over the 320 to 2300 nm spectral range with 500-m spatial resolution and 100-km swath. Reflectance is obtained from the ratio of measurements of the earth s surface to those while viewing the sun relying on a calibration approach that retrieves reflectance with uncertainties less than 0.3%. The calibration is predicated on heritage hardware, reduction of sensor complexity, adherence to detector-based calibration standards, and an ability to simulate in the laboratory on-orbit sources in both size and brightness to provide the basis of a transfer to orbit of the laboratory calibration including a link to absolute solar irradiance measurements.

  8. Preliminary error budget for the reflected solar instrument for the Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thome, K.; Gubbels, T.; Barnes, R.

    2011-10-01

    The Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO) mission addresses the need to observe highaccuracy, long-term climate change trends and to use decadal change observations as the most critical method to determine the accuracy of climate change. The CLARREO Project will implement a spaceborne earth observation mission designed to provide rigorous SI-traceable observations (i.e., radiance, reflectance, and refractivity) that are sensitive to a wide range of key decadal change variables. The instrument suite includes emitted infrared spectrometers, global navigation receivers for radio occultation, and reflected solar spectrometers. The measurements will be acquired for a period of five years and will enable follow-on missions to extend the climate record over the decades needed to understand climate change. This work describes a preliminary error budget for the RS sensor. The RS sensor will retrieve at-sensor reflectance over the spectral range from 320 to 2300 nm with 500-m GIFOV and a 100-km swath width. The current design is based on an Offner spectrometer with two separate focal planes each with its own entrance aperture and grating covering spectral ranges of 320-640, 600-2300 nm. Reflectance is obtained from the ratio of measurements of radiance while viewing the earth's surface to measurements of irradiance while viewing the sun. The requirement for the RS instrument is that the reflectance must be traceable to SI standards at an absolute uncertainty <0.3%. The calibration approach to achieve the ambitious 0.3% absolute calibration uncertainty is predicated on a reliance on heritage hardware, reduction of sensor complexity, and adherence to detector-based calibration standards. The design above has been used to develop a preliminary error budget that meets the 0.3% absolute requirement. Key components in the error budget are geometry differences between the solar and earth views, knowledge of attenuator behavior when viewing the sun, and

  9. Demonstrating the Error Budget for the Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory Through Solar Irradiance Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thome, Kurtis; McCorkel, Joel; McAndrew, Brendan

    2016-01-01

    The Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO) mission addresses the need to observe highaccuracy, long-term climate change trends and to use decadal change observations as a method to determine the accuracy of climate change. A CLARREO objective is to improve the accuracy of SI-traceable, absolute calibration at infrared and reflected solar wavelengths to reach on-orbit accuracies required to allow climate change observations to survive data gaps and observe climate change at the limit of natural variability. Such an effort will also demonstrate National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) approaches for use in future spaceborne instruments. The current work describes the results of laboratory and field measurements with the Solar, Lunar for Absolute Reflectance Imaging Spectroradiometer (SOLARIS) which is the calibration demonstration system (CDS) for the reflected solar portion of CLARREO. SOLARIS allows testing and evaluation of calibration approaches, alternate design and/or implementation approaches and components for the CLARREO mission. SOLARIS also provides a test-bed for detector technologies, non-linearity determination and uncertainties, and application of future technology developments and suggested spacecraft instrument design modifications. Results of laboratory calibration measurements are provided to demonstrate key assumptions about instrument behavior that are needed to achieve CLARREO's climate measurement requirements. Absolute radiometric response is determined using laser-based calibration sources and applied to direct solar views for comparison with accepted solar irradiance models to demonstrate accuracy values giving confidence in the error budget for the CLARREO reflectance retrieval.

  10. Preliminary Error Budget for the Reflected Solar Instrument for the Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thome, Kurtis; Gubbels, Timothy; Barnes, Robert

    2011-01-01

    The Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO) plans to observe climate change trends over decadal time scales to determine the accuracy of climate projections. The project relies on spaceborne earth observations of SI-traceable variables sensitive to key decadal change parameters. The mission includes a reflected solar instrument retrieving at-sensor reflectance over the 320 to 2300 nm spectral range with 500-m spatial resolution and 100-km swath. Reflectance is obtained from the ratio of measurements of the earth s surface to those while viewing the sun relying on a calibration approach that retrieves reflectance with uncertainties less than 0.3%. The calibration is predicated on heritage hardware, reduction of sensor complexity, adherence to detector-based calibration standards, and an ability to simulate in the laboratory on-orbit sources in both size and brightness to provide the basis of a transfer to orbit of the laboratory calibration including a link to absolute solar irradiance measurements. The Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO) mission addresses the need to observe high-accuracy, long-term climate change trends and to use decadal change observations as the most critical method to determine the accuracy of climate change projections such as those in the IPCC Report. A rigorously known accuracy of both decadal change observations as well as climate projections is critical in order to enable sound policy decisions. The CLARREO Project will implement a spaceborne earth observation mission designed to provide rigorous SI traceable observations (i.e., radiance, reflectance, and refractivity) that are sensitive to a wide range of key decadal change variables, including: 1) Surface temperature and atmospheric temperature profile 2) Atmospheric water vapor profile 3) Far infrared water vapor greenhouse 4) Aerosol properties and anthropogenic aerosol direct radiative forcing 5) Total and spectral solar

  11. Instrumentation and First Results of the Reflected Solar Demonstration System for the Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCorkel, Joel; Thome, Kurtis; Hair, Jason; McAndrew, Brendan; Jennings, Don; Rabin, Douglas; Daw, Adrian; Lundsford, Allen

    2012-01-01

    The Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO) mission key goals include enabling observation of high accuracy long-term climate change trends, use of these observations to test and improve climate forecasts, and calibration of operational and research sensors. The spaceborne instrument suites include a reflected solar spectroradiometer, emitted infrared spectroradiometer, and radio occultation receivers. The requirement for the RS instrument is that derived reflectance must be traceable to Sl standards with an absolute uncertainty of <0.3% and the error budget that achieves this requirement is described in previo1L5 work. This work describes the Solar/Lunar Absolute Reflectance Imaging Spectroradiometer (SOLARIS), a calibration demonstration system for RS instrument, and presents initial calibration and characterization methods and results. SOLARIS is an Offner spectrometer with two separate focal planes each with its own entrance aperture and grating covering spectral ranges of 320-640, 600-2300 nm over a full field-of-view of 10 degrees with 0.27 milliradian sampling. Results from laboratory measurements including use of integrating spheres, transfer radiometers and spectral standards combined with field-based solar and lunar acquisitions are presented. These results will be used to assess the accuracy and repeatability of the radiometric and spectral characteristics of SOLARIS, which will be presented against the sensor-level requirements addressed in the CLARREO RS instrument error budget.

  12. Demonstrating the error budget for the climate absolute radiance and refractivity observatory through solar irradiance measurements (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thome, Kurtis J.; McCorkel, Joel; Angal, Amit

    2016-09-01

    The goal of the Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO) mission is to provide high-accuracy data for evaluation of long-term climate change trends. Essential to the CLARREO project is demonstration of SI-traceable, reflected measurements that are a factor of 10 more accurate than current state-of-the-art sensors. The CLARREO approach relies on accurate, monochromatic absolute radiance calibration in the laboratory transferred to orbit via solar irradiance knowledge. The current work describes the results of field measurements with the Solar, Lunar for Absolute Reflectance Imaging Spectroradiometer (SOLARIS) that is the calibration demonstration system (CDS) for the reflected solar portion of CLARREO. Recent measurements of absolute spectral solar irradiance using SOLARIS are presented. The ground-based SOLARIS data are corrected to top-of-atmosphere values using AERONET data collected within 5 km of the SOLARIS operation. The SOLARIS data are converted to absolute irradiance using laboratory calibrations based on the Goddard Laser for Absolute Measurement of Radiance (GLAMR). Results are compared to accepted solar irradiance models to demonstrate accuracy values giving confidence in the error budget for the CLARREO reflectance retrieval.

  13. Monochromator-Based Absolute Calibration of a Standard Radiation Thermometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantilla, J. M.; Hernanz, M. L.; Campos, J.; Martín, M. J.; Pons, A.; del Campo, D.

    2014-04-01

    Centro Español de Metrología (CEM) is disseminating the International Temperature Scale (ITS-90), at high temperatures, by using the fixed points of Ag and Cu and a standard radiation thermometer. However, the future mise-en-pratique for the definition of the kelvin ( MeP-K) will include the dissemination of the kelvin by primary methods and by indirect approximations capable of exceptionally low uncertainties or increased reliability. Primary radiometry is, at present, able to achieve uncertainties competitive with the ITS-90 above the silver point with one of the possible techniques the calibration for radiance responsivity of an imaging radiometer (radiance method). In order to carry out this calibration, IO-CSIC (Spanish Designated Institute for luminous intensity and luminous flux) has collaborated with CEM, allowing traceability to its cryogenic radiometer. A monochromator integrating sphere-based spectral comparator facility has been used to calibrate one of the CEM standard radiation thermometers. The absolute calibrated standard radiation thermometer has been used to determine the temperatures of the fixed points of Cu, Co-C, Pt-C, and Re-C. The results obtained are 1357.80 K, 1597.10 K, 2011.66 K, and 2747.64 K, respectively, with uncertainties ranging from 0.4 K to 1.1 K.

  14. The University of Wisconsin Space Science and Engineering Center Absolute Radiance Interferometer (ARI): instrument overview and radiometric performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Joseph K.; Revercomb, Henry E.; Best, Fred A.; Gero, P. Jonathan; Genest, Jerome; Buijs, Henry; Grandmont, Frederic J.; Tobin, David C.; Knuteson, Robert O.

    2014-11-01

    Spectrally resolved infrared (IR) and far infrared (FIR) radiances measured from orbit with extremely high absolute accuracy are a critical observation for future climate benchmark missions. For the infrared radiance spectra, it has been determined that a measurement accuracy, expressed as an equivalent brightness temperature error, of 0.1 K (k = 3) confirmed on orbit is required for signal detection above natural variability for decadal climate signatures [1, 2]. The challenge in the sensor development for a climate benchmark measurement mission is to achieve ultra-high accuracy with a design that can be flight qualified, has long design life, and is reasonably small, simple, and affordable. The required simplicity is achievable due to the large differences in the sampling and noise requirements for the benchmark climate measurement from those of the typical remote sensing infrared sounders for weather research or operational weather prediction. The University of Wisconsin Space Science and Engineering Center, with funding from the NASA Instrument Incubator Program (IIP), developed the Absolute Radiance Interferometer (ARI), which is designed to meet the uncertainty requirements needed to establish spectrally resolved thermal infrared climate benchmark measurements from space. The ARI is a prototype instrument designed to have a short upgrade path to a spaceflight instrument. Recent vacuum testing of the ARI, conducted under funding from the NASA Earth Science Technology Office, has demonstrated the capability to meet the 0.1 K (k = 3) uncertainty requirement on-orbit. An overview of the instrument design and summary of the radiometric performance verification of the UW-SSEC ARI will be presented.

  15. Instrument development for atmospheric radiation measurement (ARM): Status of the Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer - extended Resolution (AERI-X), the Solar Radiance Transmission Interferometer (SORTI), and the Absolute Solar Transmission Inferometer (ASTI)

    SciTech Connect

    Murcray, F.; Stephen, T.; Kosters, J.

    1996-04-01

    This paper describes three instruments currently under developemnt for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program at the University of Denver: the AERI-X (Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer-Extended Resolution) and the SORTI (Solar R adiance Transmission Interferometer), and ASTI (Absolute Solar transmission Interferometer).

  16. Error Budget for a Calibration Demonstration System for the Reflected Solar Instrument for the Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thome, Kurtis; McCorkel, Joel; McAndrew, Brendan

    2013-01-01

    A goal of the Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO) mission is to observe highaccuracy, long-term climate change trends over decadal time scales. The key to such a goal is to improving the accuracy of SI traceable absolute calibration across infrared and reflected solar wavelengths allowing climate change to be separated from the limit of natural variability. The advances required to reach on-orbit absolute accuracy to allow climate change observations to survive data gaps exist at NIST in the laboratory, but still need demonstration that the advances can move successfully from to NASA and/or instrument vendor capabilities for spaceborne instruments. The current work describes the radiometric calibration error budget for the Solar, Lunar for Absolute Reflectance Imaging Spectroradiometer (SOLARIS) which is the calibration demonstration system (CDS) for the reflected solar portion of CLARREO. The goal of the CDS is to allow the testing and evaluation of calibration approaches, alternate design and/or implementation approaches and components for the CLARREO mission. SOLARIS also provides a test-bed for detector technologies, non-linearity determination and uncertainties, and application of future technology developments and suggested spacecraft instrument design modifications. The resulting SI-traceable error budget for reflectance retrieval using solar irradiance as a reference and methods for laboratory-based, absolute calibration suitable for climatequality data collections is given. Key components in the error budget are geometry differences between the solar and earth views, knowledge of attenuator behavior when viewing the sun, and sensor behavior such as detector linearity and noise behavior. Methods for demonstrating this error budget are also presented.

  17. Standardization of the cumulative absolute velocity

    SciTech Connect

    O'Hara, T.F.; Jacobson, J.P. )

    1991-12-01

    EPRI NP-5930, A Criterion for Determining Exceedance of the Operating Basis Earthquake,'' was published in July 1988. As defined in that report, the Operating Basis Earthquake (OBE) is exceeded when both a response spectrum parameter and a second damage parameter, referred to as the Cumulative Absolute Velocity (CAV), are exceeded. In the review process of the above report, it was noted that the calculation of CAV could be confounded by time history records of long duration containing low (nondamaging) acceleration. Therefore, it is necessary to standardize the method of calculating CAV to account for record length. This standardized methodology allows consistent comparisons between future CAV calculations and the adjusted CAV threshold value based upon applying the standardized methodology to the data set presented in EPRI NP-5930. The recommended method to standardize the CAV calculation is to window its calculation on a second-by-second basis for a given time history. If the absolute acceleration exceeds 0.025g at any time during each one second interval, the earthquake records used in EPRI NP-5930 have been reanalyzed and the adjusted threshold of damage for CAV was found to be 0.16g-set.

  18. Test Plan for a Calibration Demonstration System for the Reflected Solar Instrument for the Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thome, Kurtis; McCorkel, Joel; Hair, Jason; McAndrew, Brendan; Daw, Adrian; Jennings, Donald; Rabin, Douglas

    2012-01-01

    The Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO) mission addresses the need to observe high-accuracy, long-term climate change trends and to use decadal change observations as the most critical method to determine the accuracy of climate change. One of the major objectives of CLARREO is to advance the accuracy of SI traceable absolute calibration at infrared and reflected solar wavelengths. This advance is required to reach the on-orbit absolute accuracy required to allow climate change observations to survive data gaps while remaining sufficiently accurate to observe climate change to within the uncertainty of the limit of natural variability. While these capabilities exist at NIST in the laboratory, there is a need to demonstrate that it can move successfully from NIST to NASA and/or instrument vendor capabilities for future spaceborne instruments. The current work describes the test plan for the Solar, Lunar for Absolute Reflectance Imaging Spectroradiometer (SOLARIS) which is the calibration demonstration system (CDS) for the reflected solar portion of CLARREO. The goal of the CDS is to allow the testing and evaluation of calibration approaches , alternate design and/or implementation approaches and components for the CLARREO mission. SOLARIS also provides a test-bed for detector technologies, non-linearity determination and uncertainties, and application of future technology developments and suggested spacecraft instrument design modifications. The end result of efforts with the SOLARIS CDS will be an SI-traceable error budget for reflectance retrieval using solar irradiance as a reference and methods for laboratory-based, absolute calibration suitable for climate-quality data collections. The CLARREO mission addresses the need to observe high-accuracy, long-term climate change trends and advance the accuracy of SI traceable absolute calibration. The current work describes the test plan for the SOLARIS which is the calibration demonstration

  19. Characterization of the Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO) ability to serve as an infrared satellite intercalibration reference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobin, David; Holz, Robert; Nagle, Fred; Revercomb, Henry

    2016-04-01

    Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO) is a future mission employing an infrared spectrometer with unprecedented calibration accuracy and the ability to assess its calibration on-orbit using a novel verification system. Utilizing this capability for satellite intercalibration is a primary objective of the mission. This paper presents a new infrared intercalibration methodology that minimizes the intercalibration uncertainties and provides uncertainty estimates resulting from the scene variability and instrument noise. Results of a simulation study to characterize realistic spatial and temporal matching differences for simultaneous nadir overpasses (SNOs) of CLARREO and existing hyperspectral sounders are presented. This study, along with experience with intercalibration of real data, finds that intercalibration uncertainties are minimized when the SNOs are not screened for sky conditions but instead weighted based on the observed scene variability. Intercalibration performance is investigated for a 90° polar orbit mission and for a Pathfinder mission on the International Space Station, for various potential CLARREO footprint sizes, and as a function of mission length, scene brightness temperature, and wavelength. The results are encouraging and suggest that biases between CLARREO and sounder observations can be determined with low uncertainty and with high time frequency during a CLARREO mission. For example, the simulations suggest that a CLARREO footprint of 50 to 100 km in diameter is optimal for intercalibration, and that the 3 sigma intercalibration uncertainty is less than 0.1 K for channels at infrared window wavelengths using 2 months of accumulated SNOs, and for more absorbing channels with less scene variability the uncertainties are less than 50 mK.

  20. Quantitative standards for absolute linguistic universals.

    PubMed

    Piantadosi, Steven T; Gibson, Edward

    2014-01-01

    Absolute linguistic universals are often justified by cross-linguistic analysis: If all observed languages exhibit a property, the property is taken to be a likely universal, perhaps specified in the cognitive or linguistic systems of language learners and users. In many cases, these patterns are then taken to motivate linguistic theory. Here, we show that cross-linguistic analysis will very rarely be able to statistically justify absolute, inviolable patterns in language. We formalize two statistical methods--frequentist and Bayesian--and show that in both it is possible to find strict linguistic universals, but that the numbers of independent languages necessary to do so is generally unachievable. This suggests that methods other than typological statistics are necessary to establish absolute properties of human language, and thus that many of the purported universals in linguistics have not received sufficient empirical justification.

  1. Radiance calibration of spherical integrators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclean, James T.; Guenther, Bruce W.

    1989-01-01

    Techniques for improving the knowledge of the radiance of large area spherical and hemispherical integrating energy sources have been investigated. Such sources are used to calibrate numerous aircraft and spacecraft remote sensing instruments. Comparisons are made between using a standard source based calibration method and a quantum efficient detector (QED) based calibration method. The uncertainty involved in transferring the calibrated values of the point source standard lamp to the extended source is estimated to be 5 to 10 percent. The use of the QED allows an improvement in the uncertainty to 1 to 2 percent for the measurement of absolute radiance from a spherical integrator source.

  2. Absolute calibration of 10Be AMS standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiizumi, Kunihiko; Imamura, Mineo; Caffee, Marc W.; Southon, John R.; Finkel, Robert C.; McAninch, Jeffrey

    2007-05-01

    The increased detection sensitivity offered by AMS has dramatically expanded the utility of 10Be. As these applications become more sophisticated attention has focused on the accuracy of the 10Be standards used to calibrate the AMS measurements. In recent years it has become apparent that there is a discrepancy between two of the most widely used 10Be AMS standards, the ICN 10Be standard and the NIST 10Be standard. The ICN (ICN Chemical & Radioisotope Division) 10Be AMS standard was calibrated by radioactive decay counting. Dilutions, ranging from 5 × 10 -13 to 3 × 10 -1110Be/Be, have been prepared and are extensively used in many AMS laboratories. The NIST 10Be standard, prepared at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), is calibrated by mass spectrometric isotope ratio measurements. To provide an independent calibration of the 10Be standards we implanted a known number of 10Be atoms in both Si detectors and Be foil targets. The 10Be concentrations in these targets were measured by AMS. The results were compared with both the ICN and NIST AMS standards. Our 10Be measurements indicate that the 10Be/ 9Be isotopic ratio of the ICN AMS standard, which is based on a 10Be half-life of 1.5 × 10 6 yr, is 1.106 ± 0.012 times lower than the nominal value. Since the decay rate of the ICN standard is well determined, the decrease in 10Be/ 9Be ratio requires that the 10Be half-life be reduced to (1.36 ± 0.07) × 10 6 yr. The quoted uncertainty includes a ±5% uncertainty in the activity measurement carried out by ICN. In a similar fashion, we determined that the value of the NIST 10Be standard (SRM4325) is (2.79 ± 0.03) × 10 -1110Be/ 9Be, within error of the certified value of (2.68 ± 0.14) × 10 -11. The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) internal standards were also included in this study. We conclude that the 9Be(n, γ) neutron cross section is 7.8 ± 0.23 mb, without taking into account the uncertainty in the neutron irradiation.

  3. Exploring a Black Body Source as an Absolute Radiometric Calibration Standard and Comparison with a NIST Traced Lamp Standard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Robert O.; Chrien, Thomas; Sarture, Chuck

    2001-01-01

    Radiometric calibration of the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) is required for the scientific research and application objectives pursued with the spectroscopic measurements. Specifically calibration is required for: inter-comparison of AVIRIS data measured at different locations and at different times; analysis of AVIRIS data with data measured by other instruments; and analysis of AVIRIS data in conjunction with computer models. The primary effect of radiometric calibration is conversion of AVIRIS instrument response values (digitized numbers, or DN) to units of absolute radiance. For example, a figure shows the instrument response spectrum measured by AVIRIS over a portion of Rogers Dry Lake, California, and another figure shows the same spectrum calibrated to radiance. Only the calibrated spectrum may be quantitatively analyzed for science research and application objectives. Since the initial development of the AVIRIS instrument-radiometric calibration has been based upon a 1000-W irradiance lamp with a calibration traced to the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). There are several advantages to this irradiance-lamp calibration approach. First, the considerable effort of NIST backs up the calibration. Second, by changing the distance to the lamp, the output can closely span the radiance levels measured by AVIRIS. Third, this type of standard is widely used. Fourth, these calibrated lamps are comparatively inexpensive. Conversely, there are several disadvantages to this approach as well. First, the lamp is not a primary standard. Second, the lamp output characteristics may change in an unknown manner through time. Third, it is difficult to assess, constrain, or improve the calibration uncertainty delivered with the lamp. In an attempt to explore the effect and potentially address some of these disadvantages a set of analyses and measurements comparing an irradiance lamp with a black-body source have been completed

  4. Absolute flux calibration of optical spectrophotometric standard stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colina, Luis; Bohlin, Ralph C.

    1994-01-01

    A method based on Landolt photometry in B and V is developed to correct for a wavelength independent offset of the absolute flux level of optical spectrophotometric standards. The method is based on synthetic photometry techniques in B and V and is accurate to approximately 1%. The correction method is verified by Hubble Space Telescope Faint Object Spectrograph absolute fluxes for five calibration stars, which agree with Landolt photometry to 0.5% in B and V.

  5. Analysis of standard reference materials by absolute INAA

    SciTech Connect

    Heft, R.E.; Koszykowski, R.F.

    1981-07-01

    Three standard reference materials, flyash, soil, and ASI 4340 steel, were analyzed by a method of absolute instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA). Two different light water pool-type reactors were used to produce equivalent analytical results even though the epithermal to thermal flux ratio in one reactor was higher than that in the other by a factor of two.

  6. Standardization of the cumulative absolute velocity. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    O`Hara, T.F.; Jacobson, J.P.

    1991-12-01

    EPRI NP-5930, ``A Criterion for Determining Exceedance of the Operating Basis Earthquake,`` was published in July 1988. As defined in that report, the Operating Basis Earthquake (OBE) is exceeded when both a response spectrum parameter and a second damage parameter, referred to as the Cumulative Absolute Velocity (CAV), are exceeded. In the review process of the above report, it was noted that the calculation of CAV could be confounded by time history records of long duration containing low (nondamaging) acceleration. Therefore, it is necessary to standardize the method of calculating CAV to account for record length. This standardized methodology allows consistent comparisons between future CAV calculations and the adjusted CAV threshold value based upon applying the standardized methodology to the data set presented in EPRI NP-5930. The recommended method to standardize the CAV calculation is to window its calculation on a second-by-second basis for a given time history. If the absolute acceleration exceeds 0.025g at any time during each one second interval, the earthquake records used in EPRI NP-5930 have been reanalyzed and the adjusted threshold of damage for CAV was found to be 0.16g-set.

  7. HST Stellar Standards with 1% Accuracy in Absolute Flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohlin, R. C.

    2007-04-01

    Free of any atmospheric contamination, the {Hubble Space Telescope} provides the best available spectrophotometry from the far-UV to the near-IR for stars as faint as V˜16. The HST CALSPEC standard star network is based on three standard candles: the hot, pure hydrogen white dwarf (WD) stars G 191B2B, GD 153, and GD 71, which have Hubeny NLTE flux calculations that require the atomic physics for only one atom. These model flux distributions are normalized to the absolute flux for Vega of 3.46×10-9 erg cm-2 s-1 Å-1 at 5556 Å using precise Landolt V band photometry and the V bandpass function corrected for atmospheric transmission by M. Cohen. The three primary WD standards provide absolute flux calibrations for FOS, STIS and NICMOS spectrophotometry from these instruments on the HST. About 32 stellar spectral energy distributions (SEDs) have been constructed with a primary pedigree from the STIS data, which extends from 1150 Å for the hot stars to a long wavelength limit of 1 μm. NICMOS grism spectrophotometry provides an extension to 1.9 μm in the IR for 17 of the HST standards and longward to 2.5 μm for a few of the brighter stars. Included among these HST standards are Vega, the Sloan standard BD+17 4708, three bright solar analog candidates, three cool stars of type M or later, and five hot WDs. In addition, four K giants and four main sequence A-stars have NICMOS spectrophotometry from 0.8-2.5 μm. The WD fluxes are compared to their modeled SEDs and demonstrate an internal precision of 1-2%, while the A-stars agree with the Cohen IR fluxes to ˜2%. Three solar analog candidate stars differ from the solar spectrum by up to 10% in the region of heavy line blanketing from 3000-4000 Å and show differences in shape of ˜5% in the IR around 1.8 μm.

  8. Lunar Spectral Irradiance and Radiance (LUSI): New Instrumentation to Characterize the Moon as a Space-Based Radiometric Standard.

    PubMed

    Smith, Allan W; Lorentz, Steven R; Stone, Thomas C; Datla, Raju V

    2012-01-01

    The need to understand and monitor climate change has led to proposed radiometric accuracy requirements for space-based remote sensing instruments that are very stringent and currently outside the capabilities of many Earth orbiting instruments. A major problem is quantifying changes in sensor performance that occur from launch and during the mission. To address this problem on-orbit calibrators and monitors have been developed, but they too can suffer changes from launch and the harsh space environment. One solution is to use the Moon as a calibration reference source. Already the Moon has been used to remove post-launch drift and to cross-calibrate different instruments, but further work is needed to develop a new model with low absolute uncertainties capable of climate-quality absolute calibration of Earth observing instruments on orbit. To this end, we are proposing an Earth-based instrument suite to measure the absolute lunar spectral irradiance to an uncertainty(1) of 0.5 % (k=1) over the spectral range from 320 nm to 2500 nm with a spectral resolution of approximately 0.3 %. Absolute measurements of lunar radiance will also be acquired to facilitate calibration of high spatial resolution sensors. The instruments will be deployed at high elevation astronomical observatories and flown on high-altitude balloons in order to mitigate the effects of the Earth's atmosphere on the lunar observations. Periodic calibrations using instrumentation and techniques available from NIST will ensure traceability to the International System of Units (SI) and low absolute radiometric uncertainties.

  9. Lunar Spectral Irradiance and Radiance (LUSI): New Instrumentation to Characterize the Moon as a Space-Based Radiometric Standard

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Allan W.; Lorentz, Steven R.; Stone, Thomas C.; Datla, Raju V.

    2012-01-01

    The need to understand and monitor climate change has led to proposed radiometric accuracy requirements for space-based remote sensing instruments that are very stringent and currently outside the capabilities of many Earth orbiting instruments. A major problem is quantifying changes in sensor performance that occur from launch and during the mission. To address this problem on-orbit calibrators and monitors have been developed, but they too can suffer changes from launch and the harsh space environment. One solution is to use the Moon as a calibration reference source. Already the Moon has been used to remove post-launch drift and to cross-calibrate different instruments, but further work is needed to develop a new model with low absolute uncertainties capable of climate-quality absolute calibration of Earth observing instruments on orbit. To this end, we are proposing an Earth-based instrument suite to measure the absolute lunar spectral irradiance to an uncertainty1 of 0.5 % (k=1) over the spectral range from 320 nm to 2500 nm with a spectral resolution of approximately 0.3 %. Absolute measurements of lunar radiance will also be acquired to facilitate calibration of high spatial resolution sensors. The instruments will be deployed at high elevation astronomical observatories and flown on high-altitude balloons in order to mitigate the effects of the Earth’s atmosphere on the lunar observations. Periodic calibrations using instrumentation and techniques available from NIST will ensure traceability to the International System of Units (SI) and low absolute radiometric uncertainties. PMID:26900523

  10. Set standard deviation, repeatability and offset of absolute gravimeter A10-008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schmerge, D.; Francis, O.

    2006-01-01

    The set standard deviation, repeatability and offset of absolute gravimeter A10-008 were assessed at the Walferdange Underground Laboratory for Geodynamics (WULG) in Luxembourg. Analysis of the data indicates that the instrument performed within the specifications of the manufacturer. For A10-008, the average set standard deviation was (1.6 0.6) ??Gal (1Gal ??? 1 cm s -2), the average repeatability was (2.9 1.5) ??Gal, and the average offset compared to absolute gravimeter FG5-216 was (3.2 3.5) ??Gal. ?? 2006 BIPM and IOP Publishing Ltd.

  11. Absolute Infrared Calibration of Standard Stars by the Midcourse Space Experiment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-04-01

    fluxes of standard stars. Using standard stars to calibrate space- and ground-based observations of astronomical sources and Earth satellites has the... Satellite (IRAS). "* Cohen et al. (1 992a; Paper I) derived the absolute infrared flux for a Lyr by extrapolating the recommended visual flux of Hayes... characterized spectral bands. Cohen et al. (1992a) assigned the 1.45 percent uncertainty derived by Hayes (1985) for the calibration in the visual to the

  12. STANDARDIZING TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA ABSOLUTE MAGNITUDES USING GAUSSIAN PROCESS DATA REGRESSION

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, A. G.; Aldering, G.; Aragon, C.; Bailey, S.; Childress, M.; Fakhouri, H. K.; Nordin, J.; Thomas, R. C.; Antilogus, P.; Bongard, S.; Canto, A.; Cellier-Holzem, F.; Guy, J.; Baltay, C.; Buton, C.; Kerschhaggl, M.; Kowalski, M.; Chotard, N.; Copin, Y.; Gangler, E.; and others

    2013-04-01

    We present a novel class of models for Type Ia supernova time-evolving spectral energy distributions (SEDs) and absolute magnitudes: they are each modeled as stochastic functions described by Gaussian processes. The values of the SED and absolute magnitudes are defined through well-defined regression prescriptions, so that data directly inform the models. As a proof of concept, we implement a model for synthetic photometry built from the spectrophotometric time series from the Nearby Supernova Factory. Absolute magnitudes at peak B brightness are calibrated to 0.13 mag in the g band and to as low as 0.09 mag in the z = 0.25 blueshifted i band, where the dispersion includes contributions from measurement uncertainties and peculiar velocities. The methodology can be applied to spectrophotometric time series of supernovae that span a range of redshifts to simultaneously standardize supernovae together with fitting cosmological parameters.

  13. Intercomparison of the LBIR Absolute Cryogenic Radiometers to the NIST Optical Power Measurement Standard

    PubMed Central

    Fedchak, James A.; Carter, Adriaan C.; Datla, Raju

    2006-01-01

    The Low Background Infrared calibration (LBIR) facility at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) presently maintains four absolute cryogenic radiometers (ACRs) which serve as standard reference detectors for infrared calibrations performed by the facility. The primary standard for optical power measurements at NIST-Gaithersburg has been the High Accuracy Cryogenic Radiometer (HACR). Recently, an improved radiometer, the Primary Optical Watt Radiometer (POWR), has replaced the HACR as the primary standard. In this paper, we present the results of comparisons between the radiometric powers measured by the four ACRs presently maintained by the LBIR facility to that measured by the HACR and POWR. This was done by using a Si photodiode light-trapping detector as a secondary transfer standard to compare the primary national standards to the ACRs maintained by the LBIR facility. The technique used to compare an ACR to the trap detector is described in detail. The absolute optical power measurements are found to be within 0.1 % of the primary standard for all the ACRs examined in this study. PMID:27274936

  14. Modeling the Radiance of the Moon for On-orbit Calibration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stone, T.C.; Kieffer, H.H.; Becker, K.J.; ,

    2003-01-01

    The RObotic Lunar Observatory (ROLO) project has developed radiometric models of the Moon for disk-integrated irradiance and spatially resolved radiance. Although the brightness of the Moon varies spatially and with complex dependencies upon illumination and viewing geometry, the surface photometric properties are extremely stable, and therefore potentially knowable to high accuracy. The ROLO project has acquired 5+ years of spatially resolved lunar images in 23 VNIR and 9 SWIR filter bands at phase angles up to 90??. These images are calibrated to exoatmospheric radiance using nightly stellar observations in a band-coupled extinction algorithm and a radiometric scale based upon observations of the star Vega. An effort is currently underway to establish an absolute scale with direct traceability to NIST radiometric standards. The ROLO radiance model performs linear fitting of the spatially resolved lunar image data on an individual pixel basis. The results are radiance images directly comparable to spacecraft observations of the Moon. Model-generated radiance images have been produced for the ASTER lunar view conducted on 14 April 2003. The radiance model is still experimental - simplified photometric functions have been used, and initial results show evidence of computational instabilities, particularly at the lunar poles. The ROLO lunar image dataset is unique and extensive and presents opportunities for development of novel approaches to lunar photometric modeling.

  15. Prospects for the Moon as an SI-Traceable Absolute Spectroradiometric Standard for Satellite Remote Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cramer, C. E.; Stone, T. C.; Lykke, K.; Woodward, J. T.

    2015-12-01

    The Earth's Moon has many physical properties that make it suitable for use as a reference light source for radiometric calibration of remote sensing satellite instruments. Lunar calibration has been successfully applied to many imagers in orbit, including both MODIS instruments and NPP-VIIRS, using the USGS ROLO model to predict the reference exoatmospheric lunar irradiance. Sensor response trending was developed for SeaWIFS with a relative accuracy better than 0.1 % per year with lunar calibration techniques. However, the Moon rarely is used as an absolute reference for on-orbit calibration, primarily due to uncertainties in the ROLO model absolute scale of 5%-10%. But this limitation lies only with the models - the Moon itself is radiometrically stable, and development of a high-accuracy absolute lunar reference is inherently feasible. A program has been undertaken by NIST to collect absolute measurements of the lunar spectral irradiance with absolute accuracy <1 % (k=2), traceable to SI radiometric units. Initial Moon observations were acquired from the Whipple Observatory on Mt. Hopkins, Arizona, elevation 2367 meters, with continuous spectral coverage from 380 nm to 1040 nm at ~3 nm resolution. The lunar spectrometer acquired calibration measurements several times each observing night by pointing to a calibrated integrating sphere source. The lunar spectral irradiance at the top of the atmosphere was derived from a time series of ground-based measurements by a Langley analysis that incorporated measured atmospheric conditions and ROLO model predictions for the change in irradiance resulting from the changing Sun-Moon-Observer geometry throughout each night. Two nights were selected for further study. An extensive error analysis, which includes instrument calibration and atmospheric correction terms, shows a combined standard uncertainty under 1 % over most of the spectral range. Comparison of these two nights' spectral irradiance measurements with predictions

  16. Dreams of a Final System: Origins of the Quest for an Absolute Standard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crease, Robert

    2012-02-01

    The first attempts to find unchanging phenomena that could be used to evaluate the accuracy of standards and recreate them if lost predated the metric system. As early as the seventeenth century, members of the French Academy and British Royal Society sought to use the seconds pendulum and the Earth's meridian as tethers for length standards. These efforts ultimately failed. The vision of an absolute standard was revived in the 1870s, when C. S. Peirce was the first to experimentally tie a unit, the meter, to a natural standard, the wavelength of a spectral line, using a diffraction grating. This work inspired A. Michelson and E. Morley, in the 1880s, to apply the interferometer with which they were attempting to detect ether drift to this purpose. Michelson further pursued this work at the BIPM in 1892, which set the stage for the later redefinition, in 1960, of the meter in terms of the wavelength of a spectral line.

  17. Absolute fluorescence measurements > 1000 nm: setup design, calibration and standards (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resch-Genger, Ute; Würth, Christian; Pauli, Jutta; Hatami, Soheil; Kaiser, Martin

    2016-03-01

    There is an increasing interest in optical reporters like semiconductor quantum dots and upconversion nanophosphors with emission < 1000 nm for bioanalysis, medical diagnostics, and safety barcodes and hence, in reliable fluorescence measurements in this wavelength region, e.g., for the comparison of material performance and the rational design of new nanomaterials with improved properties [1-4]. The performance of fluorescence measurements < 800 nm and especially < 1000 nm is currently hampered by the lack of suitable methods and standards for the simple determination of the wavelength-dependent spectral responsivity of fluorescence measuring systems and the control of measured emission spectra and intensities [3-5]. This is of special relevance for nanocrystalline emitters like quantum dots and rods as well as for upconversion nanocrystals, where surface states and the accessibility of emissive states by quenchers largely control accomplishable quantum yields and hence, signal sizes and detection sensitivities from the reporter side. Here, we present the design of an integrating sphere setup for the absolute measurement of emission spectra and quantum yields in the wavelength region of 650 to 1600 nm and its calibration as well as examples for potential fluorescence standards from different reporter classes for the control of the reliability of such measurements [5]. This includes new spectral fluorescence standards for the wavelength region of 650 nm to 1000 nm as well as a set of quantum yield standards covering the wavelength region from 400 nm to 1000 nm.

  18. Constraint on Absolute Accuracy of Metacomprehension Assessments: The Anchoring and Adjustment Model vs. the Standards Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kwon, Heekyung

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study is to provide a systematic account of three typical phenomena surrounding absolute accuracy of metacomprehension assessments: (1) the absolute accuracy of predictions is typically quite low; (2) there exist individual differences in absolute accuracy of predictions as a function of reading skill; and (3) postdictions…

  19. NIST Standard Reference Material 3600: Absolute Intensity Calibration Standard for Small-Angle X-ray Scattering

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fan; Kline, R. Joseph; Guthrie, William F.; Ilavsky, Jan

    2017-01-01

    The certification of a new standard reference material for small-angle scattering [NIST Standard Reference Material (SRM) 3600: Absolute Intensity Calibration Standard for Small-Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS)], based on glassy carbon, is presented. Creation of this SRM relies on the intrinsic primary calibration capabilities of the ultra-small-angle X-ray scattering technique. This article describes how the intensity calibration has been achieved and validated in the certified Q range, Q = 0.008–0.25 Å−1, together with the purpose, use and availability of the SRM. The intensity calibration afforded by this robust and stable SRM should be applicable universally to all SAXS instruments that employ a transmission measurement geometry, working with a wide range of X-ray energies or wavelengths. The validation of the SRM SAXS intensity calibration using small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) is discussed, together with the prospects for including SANS in a future renewal certification. PMID:28381972

  20. A BAYESIAN METHOD FOR CALCULATING REAL-TIME QUANTITATIVE PCR CALIBRATION CURVES USING ABSOLUTE PLASMID DNA STANDARDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In real-time quantitative PCR studies using absolute plasmid DNA standards, a calibration curve is developed to estimate an unknown DNA concentration. However, potential differences in the amplification performance of plasmid DNA compared to genomic DNA standards are often ignore...

  1. Absolute irradiance of the Moon for on-orbit calibration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stone, T.C.; Kieffer, H.H.; ,

    2002-01-01

    The recognized need for on-orbit calibration of remote sensing imaging instruments drives the ROLO project effort to characterize the Moon for use as an absolute radiance source. For over 5 years the ground-based ROLO telescopes have acquired spatially-resolved lunar images in 23 VNIR (Moon diameter ???500 pixels) and 9 SWIR (???250 pixels) passbands at phase angles within ??90 degrees. A numerical model for lunar irradiance has been developed which fits hundreds of ROLO images in each band, corrected for atmospheric extinction and calibrated to absolute radiance, then integrated to irradiance. The band-coupled extinction algorithm uses absorption spectra of several gases and aerosols derived from MODTRAN to fit time-dependent component abundances to nightly observations of standard stars. The absolute radiance scale is based upon independent telescopic measurements of the star Vega. The fitting process yields uncertainties in lunar relative irradiance over small ranges of phase angle and the full range of lunar libration well under 0.5%. A larger source of uncertainty enters in the absolute solar spectral irradiance, especially in the SWIR, where solar models disagree by up to 6%. Results of ROLO model direct comparisons to spacecraft observations demonstrate the ability of the technique to track sensor responsivity drifts to sub-percent precision. Intercomparisons among instruments provide key insights into both calibration issues and the absolute scale for lunar irradiance.

  2. Earth Limb Radiance Transformation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-03-02

    AD-A097 523 AEROSPACE CORP EL SEGUNDO CA CHEMISTRY AND PHYSICS LAB F/G 4/1 EARTH LIMB RADIANCE TRANSFORMATION (U) MAR AI S 4 YOUNG F0701-80 -C-0081... Earth Limb Radiance Trafisformation Prepared by S. J. YOUNG Chemistr and Physics Laboratory Laboratory Operations The Aerospace Corporation S.El...ITLEK (and Subtitle) TYPE OF REPORT & P53100 COVERED Earth Limb Radiance Transformation. ( Interim ./ / /TR-OJ081(697j7-g4)-l-- i7.Step hen J. Young

  3. Absolute Radiation Thermometry in the NIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bünger, L.; Taubert, R. D.; Gutschwager, B.; Anhalt, K.; Briaudeau, S.; Sadli, M.

    2017-04-01

    A near infrared (NIR) radiation thermometer (RT) for temperature measurements in the range from 773 K up to 1235 K was characterized and calibrated in terms of the "Mise en Pratique for the definition of the Kelvin" (MeP-K) by measuring its absolute spectral radiance responsivity. Using Planck's law of thermal radiation allows the direct measurement of the thermodynamic temperature independently of any ITS-90 fixed-point. To determine the absolute spectral radiance responsivity of the radiation thermometer in the NIR spectral region, an existing PTB monochromator-based calibration setup was upgraded with a supercontinuum laser system (0.45 μm to 2.4 μm) resulting in a significantly improved signal-to-noise ratio. The RT was characterized with respect to its nonlinearity, size-of-source effect, distance effect, and the consistency of its individual temperature measuring ranges. To further improve the calibration setup, a new tool for the aperture alignment and distance measurement was developed. Furthermore, the diffraction correction as well as the impedance correction of the current-to-voltage converter is considered. The calibration scheme and the corresponding uncertainty budget of the absolute spectral responsivity are presented. A relative standard uncertainty of 0.1 % (k=1) for the absolute spectral radiance responsivity was achieved. The absolute radiometric calibration was validated at four temperature values with respect to the ITS-90 via a variable temperature heatpipe blackbody (773 K ...1235 K) and at a gold fixed-point blackbody radiator (1337.33 K).

  4. Thermodynamic Temperature Measurement to the Indium Point Based on Radiance Comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamada, Y.

    2017-04-01

    A multi-national project (the EMRP InK project) was completed recently, which successfully determined the thermodynamic temperatures of several of the high-temperature fixed points above the copper point. The National Metrology Institute of Japan contributed to this project with its newly established absolute spectral radiance calibration capability. In the current study, we have extended the range of thermodynamic temperature measurement to below the copper point and measured the thermodynamic temperatures of the indium point (T_{90} = 429.748 5 K), tin point (505.078 K), zinc point (692.677 K), aluminum point (933.473 K) and the silver point (1 234.93 K) by radiance comparison against the copper point, with a set of radiation thermometers having center wavelengths ranging from 0.65 μm to 1.6 μm. The copper-point temperature was measured by the absolute radiation thermometer which was calibrated by radiance method traceable to the electrical substitution cryogenic radiometer. The radiance of the fixed-point blackbodies was measured by standard radiation thermometers whose spectral responsivity and nonlinearity are precisely evaluated, and then the thermodynamic temperatures were determined from radiance ratios to the copper point. The values of T-T_{90} for the silver-, aluminum-, zinc-, tin- and indium-point cells were determined as -4 mK (U = 104 mK, k=2), -99 mK (88 mK), -76 mK (76 mK), -68 mK (163 mK) and -42 mK (279 mK), respectively.

  5. Monochromator-Based Absolute Calibration of Radiation Thermometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keawprasert, T.; Anhalt, K.; Taubert, D. R.; Hartmann, J.

    2011-08-01

    A monochromator integrating-sphere-based spectral comparator facility has been developed to calibrate standard radiation thermometers in terms of the absolute spectral radiance responsivity, traceable to the PTB cryogenic radiometer. The absolute responsivity calibration has been improved using a 75 W xenon lamp with a reflective mirror and imaging optics to a relative standard uncertainty at the peak wavelength of approximately 0.17 % ( k = 1). Via a relative measurement of the out-of-band responsivity, the spectral responsivity of radiation thermometers can be fully characterized. To verify the calibration accuracy, the absolutely calibrated radiation thermometer is used to measure Au and Cu freezing-point temperatures and then to compare the obtained results with the values obtained by absolute methods, resulting in T - T 90 values of +52 mK and -50 mK for the gold and copper fixed points, respectively.

  6. 'Florida Radiance' strawberry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    'Florida Radiance' strawberry (Fragaria xananassa Duch.) is a new strawberry cultivar released by the University of Florida. It appears to be a good cultivar to complement the current commercial cultivar 'Strawberry Festival' during the early part of the production season as its yields are higher wh...

  7. Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Demirgian, J; Dedecker, R

    2005-01-01

    The atmospheric emitted radiance interferometer (AERI) measures the absolute infrared (IR) spectral radiance (watts per square meter per steradian per wavenumber) of the sky directly above the instrument. The spectral measurement range of the instrument is 3300 to 520 wavenumbers (cm-1) or 3-19.2 microns for the normal-range instruments and 3300 to 400 cm-1 or 3-25 microns, for the extended-range polar instruments. Spectral resolution is 1.0 cm-1. Instrument field-of-view is 1.3 degrees. A calibrated sky radiance spectrum is produced every 8 minutes in normal mode and every minute in rapid sampling mode. The actual sample scan time is 20-30 sec in rapid sampling mode with periodic gaps when the instrument is looking at the blackbodies. Rapid sampling will become available in all AERIs. Rapid sampling time will eventually be reduced to data every 20 seconds. The AERI data can be used for 1) evaluating line-by-line radiative transport codes, 2) detecting/quantifying cloud effects on ground-based measurements of infrared spectral radiance (and hence is valuable for cloud property retrievals), and 3) calculating vertical atmospheric profiles of temperature and water vapor and the detection of trace gases.

  8. Radiance Measurement for Low Density Mars Entry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruden, Brett A.

    2012-01-01

    We report measurements of radiance behind a shock wave in Martian simulant (96% CO2, 4% N2) atmosphere at conditions relevant for aerodynamic decelerators. Shock waves are generated in the NASA Ames Electric Arc Shock Tube (EAST) facility at velocities from 6-8 km/s and freestream densities from 1.2-5.9 x 10(exp -4) kilograms per cubic meter (0.05-0.25 Torr, corresponding to 35-50 km altitude). Absolute radiance is measured as a function of wavelength and position in the shock. Radiance measurements extend from the vacuum ultraviolet to near infrared (120-1650 nm). As at higher density/velocity, radiation is dominate by CO 4th positive radiation in the vacuum ultraviolet, though CN contribution is also significant. At most low density conditions, the shock does not relax to equilibrium over several centimeters. A small number of measurements in the mid-infrared were performed to quantify radiation from the fundamental vibrational transition in CO, and this is found to be a minor contributor to the overall radiance at these speeds. Efforts to extend test time and reliability in the 60 cm (24) shock tube will be discussed in the full paper.

  9. Assimilation of SAPHIR radiance: impact on hyperspectral radiances in 4D-VAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Indira Rani, S.; Doherty, Amy; Atkinson, Nigel; Bell, William; Newman, Stuart; Renshaw, Richard; George, John P.; Rajagopal, E. N.

    2016-04-01

    Assimilation of a new observation dataset in an NWP system may affect the quality of an existing observation data set against the model background (short forecast), which in-turn influence the use of an existing observation in the NWP system. Effect of the use of one data set on the use of another data set can be quantified as positive, negative or neutral. Impact of the addition of new dataset is defined as positive if the number of assimilated observations of an existing type of observation increases, and bias and standard deviation decreases compared to the control (without the new dataset) experiment. Recently a new dataset, Megha Tropiques SAPHIR radiances, which provides atmospheric humidity information, is added in the Unified Model 4D-VAR assimilation system. In this paper we discuss the impact of SAPHIR on the assimilation of hyper-spectral radiances like AIRS, IASI and CrIS. Though SAPHIR is a Microwave instrument, its impact can be clearly seen in the use of hyper-spectral radiances in the 4D-VAR data assimilation systems in addition to other Microwave and InfraRed observation. SAPHIR assimilation decreased the standard deviation of the spectral channels of wave number from 650 -1600 cm-1 in all the three hyperspectral radiances. Similar impact on the hyperspectral radiances can be seen due to the assimilation of other Microwave radiances like from AMSR2 and SSMIS Imager.

  10. The NBS scale of radiance temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waters, William R.; Walker, James H.; Hattenburg, Albert T.

    1988-01-01

    The measurement methods and instrumentation used in the realization and transfer of the International Practical Temperature Scale (IPTS-68) above the temperature of freezing gold are described. The determination of the ratios of spectral radiance of tungsten-strip lamps to a gold-point blackbody at a wavelength of 654.6 nm is detailed. The response linearity, spectral responsivity, scattering error, and polarization properties of the instrumentation are described. The analysis of the sources of error and estimates of uncertainty are presented. The assigned uncertainties (three standard deviations) in radiance temperature range from + or - 2 K at 2573 K to + or - 0.5 K at 1073 K.

  11. Absolute standardization of the impurity (121)Te associated to the production of the radiopharmaceutical (123)I.

    PubMed

    Araújo, M T F; Poledna, R; Delgado, J U; Silva, R L; Iwahara, A; da Silva, C J; Tauhata, L; Oliveira, A E; de Almeida, M C M; Lopes, R T

    2016-03-01

    (123)I is widely used for radiodiagnostic procedures. It is produced by reaction of (124)Xe (p,2n) (123)Cs →(123)Xe →(123)I in cyclotrons. (121)Te and (125)I appear in a photon energy spectrum as impurities. An activity of (121)Te was calibrated absolutely by sum-peak method and its photon emitting probability was estimated, whose results were consistent with published results.

  12. SOLAR/SOLSPEC: Scientific Objectives, Instrument Performance and Its Absolute Calibration Using a Blackbody as Primary Standard Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thuillier, G.; Foujols, T.; Bolsée, D.; Gillotay, D.; Hersé, M.; Peetermans, W.; Decuyper, W.; Mandel, H.; Sperfeld, P.; Pape, S.; Taubert, D. R.; Hartmann, J.

    2009-06-01

    SOLAR is a set of three solar instruments measuring the total and spectral absolute irradiance from 16 nm to 3080 nm for solar, atmospheric and climatology physics. It is an external payload for the COLUMBUS laboratory launched on 7 February 2008. The mission’s primary objective is the measurement of the solar irradiance with the highest possible accuracy, and its variability using the following instruments: SOL-ACES (SOLar Auto-Calibrating EUV/UV Spectrophotometers) consists of four grazing incidence planar gratings measuring from 16 nm to 220 nm; SOLSPEC (SOLar SPECtrum) consists of three double gratings spectrometers, covering the range 165 nm to 3080 nm; and SOVIM (SOlar Variability Irradiance Monitor) is combining two types of absolute radiometers and three-channel filter - radiometers. SOLSPEC and SOL-ACES have been calibrated by primary standard radiation sources of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB). Below we describe SOLSPEC, and its performance.

  13. Comparison of spectral radiance responsivity calibration techniques used for backscatter ultraviolet satellite instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalewski, M. G.; Janz, S. J.

    2015-02-01

    Methods of absolute radiometric calibration of backscatter ultraviolet (BUV) satellite instruments are compared as part of an effort to minimize pre-launch calibration uncertainties. An internally illuminated integrating sphere source has been used for the Shuttle Solar BUV, Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer, Ozone Mapping Instrument, and Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment 2 using standardized procedures traceable to national standards. These sphere-based spectral responsivities agree to within the derived combined standard uncertainty of 1.87% relative to calibrations performed using an external diffuser illuminated by standard irradiance sources, the customary spectral radiance responsivity calibration method for BUV instruments. The combined standard uncertainty for these calibration techniques as implemented at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center’s Radiometric Calibration and Development Laboratory is shown to less than 2% at 250 nm when using a single traceable calibration standard.

  14. Comparison of Spectral Radiance Calibration Techniques Used for Backscatter Ultraviolet Satellite Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kowalewski, Matthew G.; Janz, Scott

    2014-01-01

    Methods for determining the absolute radiometric calibration sensitivities of backscatter ultraviolet (BUV) satellite instruments are compared as part of an effort to minimize pre-launch calibration errors. An internally illuminated integrating sphere source has been used for the Shuttle Solar BUV (SSBUV), Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS), Ozone Mapping Instrument (OMI), and Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment 2 (GOME-2) using standardized procedures traceable to national standards. These sphere-based sensitivities agree to within three percent [k equals 2] relative to calibrations performed using an external diffuser illuminated by standard irradiance sources, the customary radiance calibration method for BUV instruments. The uncertainty for these calibration techniques as implemented at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Centers Radiometric Calibration and Development Laboratory is shown to be 4 percent at 250nm [k equals 2] when using a single traceable calibration standard. Significant reduction in the uncertainty of nearly 1 percent is demonstrated when multiple calibration standards are used.

  15. Absolute quantitation of stevioside and rebaudioside A in commercial standards by quantitative NMR.

    PubMed

    Tada, Atsuko; Takahashi, Kana; Ishizuki, Kyoko; Sugimoto, Naoki; Suematsu, Takako; Arifuku, Kazunori; Tahara, Maiko; Akiyama, Takumi; Ito, Yusai; Yamazaki, Takeshi; Akiyama, Hiroshi; Kawamura, Yoko

    2013-01-01

    The extract prepared from the leaves of Stevia rebaudiana BERTONI (Asteraceae) contains sweet steviol glycosides, mainly stevioside and rebaudioside A. Highly purified stevia extracts have become popular worldwide as a natural, low-calorie sweetener. They contain various types of steviol glycosides, and their main components are stevioside and rebaudioside A. The content of each steviol glycoside is quantified by comparing the ratios of the molecular weights and the chromatographic peak areas of the samples to those of stevioside or rebaudioside A standards of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO)/World Health Organization (WHO) Joint Expert Committee on Food Additives (JECFA) and other specifications. However, various commercial standard reagents of stevioside and rebaudioside A are available. Their purities are different and their exact purities are not indicated. Therefore, the measured values of stevioside and rebaudioside A contained in a sample vary according to the standard used for the quantification. In this study, we utilized an accurate method, quantitative NMR (qNMR), for determining the contents of stevioside and rebaudioside A in standards, with traceability to the International System of Units (SI units). The purities of several commercial standards were determined to confirm their actual values.

  16. The IAG solar flux atlas: Accurate wavelengths and absolute convective blueshift in standard solar spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiners, A.; Mrotzek, N.; Lemke, U.; Hinrichs, J.; Reinsch, K.

    2016-03-01

    We present a new solar flux atlas with the aim of understanding wavelength precision and accuracy in solar benchmark data. The atlas covers the wavelength range 405-2300 nm and was observed at the Institut für Astrophysik, Göttingen (IAG), with a Fourier transform spectrograph (FTS). In contrast to other FTS atlases, the entire visible wavelength range was observed simultaneously using only one spectrograph setting. We compare the wavelength solution of the new atlas to the Kitt Peak solar flux atlases and to the HARPS frequency-comb calibrated solar atlas. Comparison reveals systematics in the two Kitt Peak FTS atlases resulting from their wavelength scale construction, and shows consistency between the IAG and the HARPS atlas. We conclude that the IAG atlas is precise and accurate on the order of ± 10 m s-1 in the wavelength range 405-1065 nm, while the Kitt Peak atlases show deviations as large as several ten to 100 m s-1. We determine absolute convective blueshift across the spectrum from the IAG atlas and report slight differences relative to results from the Kitt Peak atlas that we attribute to the differences between wavelength scales. We conclude that benchmark solar data with accurate wavelength solution are crucial to better understand the effect of convection on stellar radial velocity measurements, which is one of the main limitations of Doppler spectroscopy at m s -1 precision. Data (FITS files of the spectra) and Table A.1 are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/587/A65

  17. Absolute np and pp cross section determinations aimed at improving the standard for cross section measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Laptev, Alexander B; Haight, Robert C; Tovesson, Fredrik; Arndt, Richard A; Briscoe, William J; Paris, Mark W; Strakovsky, Igor I; Workman, Ron L

    2010-01-01

    Purpose of present research is a keeping improvement of the standard for cross section measurements of neutron-induced reactions. The cross sections for np and pp scattering below 1000 MeV are determined based on partial-wave analyses (PW As) of nucleon-nucleon scattering data. These cross sections are compared with the most recent ENDF/B-V11.0 and JENDL-4.0 data files, and the Nijmegen PWA. Also a comparison of evaluated data with recent experimental data was made to check a quality of evaluation. Excellent agreement was found between the new experimental data and our PWA predictions.

  18. Absolute np and pp Cross Section Determinations Aimed At Improving The Standard For Cross Section Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Laptev, A. B.; Haight, R. C.; Tovesson, F.; Arndt, R. A.; Briscoe, W. J.; Paris, M. W.; Strakovsky, I. I.; Workman, R. L.

    2011-06-01

    Purpose of present research is a keeping improvement of the standard for cross section measurements of neutron-induced reactions. The cross sections for np and pp scattering below 1 GeV are determined based on partial-wave analyses (PWAs) of nucleon-nucleon scattering data. These cross sections are compared with the most recent ENDF/B-VII.0 and JENDL-4.0 data files, and the Nijmegen PWA. Also a comparison of evaluated data with recent experimental data was made to check a quality of evaluation. Excellent agreement was found between the new experimental data and our PWA predictions.

  19. Absolute standardization of 241Pu by the TDCR technique and effect of the beta spectral shape.

    PubMed

    van Wyngaardt, W M; Simpson, B R S; van Staden, M J; Lubbe, J

    2012-09-01

    The NMISA participated in the 2010 international key comparison of (241)Pu, standardizing the inter-comparison solution by the TDCR efficiency calculation technique. Special attention was paid to ensure accurate efficiency calculation for this low-energy, pure beta-emitter: in particular the effect of low-energy stopping powers on the calculation of ionization quenching was assessed and an optimal value for the quench parameter, kB, was determined. In addition, phototube efficiency mismatch was accounted for by a software minimization technique. The effect of the beta spectral shape on the activity extracted from data analysis was assessed and found to be significant. Based on the results of this work we propose a new value for the average beta-particle energy.

  20. Easy Absolute Values? Absolutely

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Sharon E.; Mittag, Kathleen Cage

    2015-01-01

    The authors teach a problem-solving course for preservice middle-grades education majors that includes concepts dealing with absolute-value computations, equations, and inequalities. Many of these students like mathematics and plan to teach it, so they are adept at symbolic manipulations. Getting them to think differently about a concept that they…

  1. Simultaneous Determination of Absolute Configuration and Quantity of Lipopeptides Using Chiral Liquid Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry and Diastereomeric Internal Standards.

    PubMed

    Nemati, Reza; Dietz, Christopher; Anstadt, Emily; Clark, Robert; Smith, Michael; Nichols, Frank; Yao, Xudong

    2017-02-28

    Lipopeptides promote innate immune response and are related to disease pathology. To investigate the newly emerging roles of lipopeptides, accurate measurements of stereoisomers with multiple chiral centers are essential yet challenging. This work uses (3R)- and (3S)-(15-methyl-3-((13-methyltetradecanoyl)oxy)hexadecanoyl)glycyl-l-serine, abbreviated as l-serine-(R+S)-Lipid 654, to develop a method that combines chiral liquid chromatography, a diastereomeric mixture of isotopically labeled internal standards, and multiple reaction monitoring mass spectrometry. The new method allows for simultaneously determining the absolute configuration and quantity of stereoisomers of bacteria-derived lipopeptides. Total lipid extracts of nine evaluated bacteria strains had different amounts, but only the (R)-isoform of l-serine-Lipid 654. The developed method also allowed for the first quantitative analysis of hydrolysis of a nonphospholipid as a novel substrate of honey bee venom phospholipase A2.

  2. Absolute Quantitation of Glycosylation Site Occupancy Using Isotopically Labeled Standards and LC-MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zhikai; Go, Eden P.; Desaire, Heather

    2014-06-01

    N-linked glycans are required to maintain appropriate biological functions on proteins. Underglycosylation leads to many diseases in plants and animals; therefore, characterizing the extent of glycosylation on proteins is an important step in understanding, diagnosing, and treating diseases. To determine the glycosylation site occupancy, protein N-glycosidase F (PNGase F) is typically used to detach the glycan from the protein, during which the formerly glycosylated asparagine undergoes deamidation to become an aspartic acid. By comparing the abundance of the resulting peptide containing aspartic acid against the one containing non-glycosylated asparagine, the glycosylation site occupancy can be evaluated. However, this approach can give inaccurate results when spontaneous chemical deamidation of the non-glycosylated asparagine occurs. To overcome this limitation, we developed a new method to measure the glycosylation site occupancy that does not rely on converting glycosylated peptides to their deglycosylated forms. Specifically, the overall protein concentration and the non-glycosylated portion of the protein are quantified simultaneously by using heavy isotope-labeled internal standards coupled with LC-MS analysis, and the extent of site occupancy is accurately determined. The efficacy of the method was demonstrated by quantifying the occupancy of a glycosylation site on bovine fetuin. The developed method is the first work that measures the glycosylation site occupancy without using PNGase F, and it can be done in parallel with glycopeptide analysis because the glycan remains intact throughout the workflow.

  3. Cross Calibration of TOMS, SBUV/2 and SCIAMACHY Radiances from Ground Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilsenrath, Ernest; Bhartia, P. K.; Bojkov, B.; Kowaleski, M.; Labow, G.; Ahmad, Z.

    2002-01-01

    We have shown that validation of radiances is a very effective means for correcting absolute accuracy and long term drifts of backscatter type satellite measurements. This method by-passes the algorithms used for both satellite and ground based measurements which are normally used to validate and correct the satellite data. A new method for satellite validation is planned which will compliment measurements from the existing ground-based networks. This method will employ very accurate comparisons between ground based zenith sky radiances and satellite nadir radiances. These comparisons will rely heavily on the experience derived from the Shuttle SBUV (SSBUV) program which provided a reference standard of radiance measurements for SBUV/2, TOMS, and GOME. This new measurement program, called 'Skyrad', employs two well established capabilities at the Goddard Space Flight Center, 1) the SSBUV calibration facilities and 2) the radiative transfer codes used for the TOMS and SBUV/2 algorithms and their subsequent refinements. Radiative transfer calculations show that ground based zenith sky and satellite nadir backscatter ultraviolet comparisons can be made very accurately under certain viewing conditions. The Skyrad instruments (SSBUV, Brewer spectrophotometers, and possibly others) will be calibrated and maintained to a precision of a few tenths of a percent. Skyrad data will then enable long term calibration of upcoming satellite instruments such as QuickTOMS, SBUV/2s and SCIAMACHY with a high degree of precision. This technique can be further employed to monitor the performance of future instruments such as GOMEZ, OMI, and OMPS. Additional information is included in the original extended abstract.

  4. Cross Calibration of TOMS, SBUV/2 and Sciamachy Radiances from Ground Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hillsenrath, Ernest; Ahmad, Ziauddin; Bhartia, Pawan K. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Verification of a stratospheric ozone recovery remains a high priority for environmental research and policy definition. Models predict an ozone recovery at a much lower rate than the measured depletion rate observed to date. Therefore improved precision of the satellite and ground ozone observing systems are required over the long term to verify recovery. We have shown that validation of radiances is the most effective means for correcting absolute accuracy and long term drifts of backscatter type satellite measurements. This method by-passes the algorithms used for both satellite and ground based measurements which are normally used to validate and correct the satellite data. Validation of radiances will also improve all higher level data products derived from the satellite observations. Backscatter algorithms suffer from several errors such as unrepresentative a-priori data and air mass factor corrections. Radiance comparisons employ forward models but are inherently more accurate and than inverse (retrieval) algorithms. A new method for satellite validation is planned which will compliment measurements from the existing ground-based networks. This method will employ very accurate comparisons between ground based zenith sky radiances and satellite nadir radiances. These comparisons will rely heavily on the experience derived from the Shuttle SBUV (SSBUV) program which provided a reference standard of radiance measurements for SBUV/2, TOMS, and GOME. This new measurement program, called "Skyrad", employs two well established capabilities at the Goddard Space Flight Center, 1) the SSBUV calibration facilities and 2) the radiative transfer codes used for the TOMS and SBUV/2 algorithms and their subsequent refinements. Radiative transfer calculations show that ground based zenith sky and satellite nadir backscatter ultraviolet comparisons can be made very accurately under certain viewing conditions. The Skyrad instruments (SSBUV, Brewer spectrophotometers, and

  5. Accurate Quantification of Cardiovascular Biomarkers in Serum Using Protein Standard Absolute Quantification (PSAQ™) and Selected Reaction Monitoring*

    PubMed Central

    Huillet, Céline; Adrait, Annie; Lebert, Dorothée; Picard, Guillaume; Trauchessec, Mathieu; Louwagie, Mathilde; Dupuis, Alain; Hittinger, Luc; Ghaleh, Bijan; Le Corvoisier, Philippe; Jaquinod, Michel; Garin, Jérôme; Bruley, Christophe; Brun, Virginie

    2012-01-01

    Development of new biomarkers needs to be significantly accelerated to improve diagnostic, prognostic, and toxicity monitoring as well as therapeutic follow-up. Biomarker evaluation is the main bottleneck in this development process. Selected Reaction Monitoring (SRM) combined with stable isotope dilution has emerged as a promising option to speed this step, particularly because of its multiplexing capacities. However, analytical variabilities because of upstream sample handling or incomplete trypsin digestion still need to be resolved. In 2007, we developed the PSAQ™ method (Protein Standard Absolute Quantification), which uses full-length isotope-labeled protein standards to quantify target proteins. In the present study we used clinically validated cardiovascular biomarkers (LDH-B, CKMB, myoglobin, and troponin I) to demonstrate that the combination of PSAQ and SRM (PSAQ-SRM) allows highly accurate biomarker quantification in serum samples. A multiplex PSAQ-SRM assay was used to quantify these biomarkers in clinical samples from myocardial infarction patients. Good correlation between PSAQ-SRM and ELISA assay results was found and demonstrated the consistency between these analytical approaches. Thus, PSAQ-SRM has the capacity to improve both accuracy and reproducibility in protein analysis. This will be a major contribution to efficient biomarker development strategies. PMID:22080464

  6. ABSOLUTE FLUX CALIBRATION OF THE IRAC INSTRUMENT ON THE SPITZER SPACE TELESCOPE USING HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE FLUX STANDARDS

    SciTech Connect

    Bohlin, R. C.; Gordon, K. D.; Deustua, S.; Ferguson, H. C.; Flanagan, K.; Kalirai, J.; Meixner, M.; Rieke, G. H.; Engelbracht, C.; Su, K. Y. L.; Ardila, D.; Tremblay, P.-E.

    2011-05-15

    The absolute flux calibration of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will be based on a set of stars observed by the Hubble and Spitzer Space Telescopes. In order to cross-calibrate the two facilities, several A, G, and white dwarf stars are observed with both Spitzer and Hubble and are the prototypes for a set of JWST calibration standards. The flux calibration constants for the four Spitzer IRAC bands 1-4 are derived from these stars and are 2.3%, 1.9%, 2.0%, and 0.5% lower than the official cold-mission IRAC calibration of Reach et al., i.e., in agreement within their estimated errors of {approx}2%. The causes of these differences lie primarily in the IRAC data reduction and secondarily in the spectral energy distributions of our standard stars. The independent IRAC 8 {mu}m band-4 fluxes of Rieke et al. are about 1.5% {+-} 2% higher than those of Reach et al. and are also in agreement with our 8 {mu}m result.

  7. Reducing the Standard Deviation in Multiple-Assay Experiments Where the Variation Matters but the Absolute Value Does Not

    PubMed Central

    Echenique-Robba, Pablo; Nelo-Bazán, María Alejandra; Carrodeguas, José A.

    2013-01-01

    When the value of a quantity for a number of systems (cells, molecules, people, chunks of metal, DNA vectors, so on) is measured and the aim is to replicate the whole set again for different trials or assays, despite the efforts for a near-equal design, scientists might often obtain quite different measurements. As a consequence, some systems’ averages present standard deviations that are too large to render statistically significant results. This work presents a novel correction method of a very low mathematical and numerical complexity that can reduce the standard deviation of such results and increase their statistical significance. Two conditions are to be met: the inter-system variations of matter while its absolute value does not, and a similar tendency in the values of must be present in the different assays (or in other words, the results corresponding to different assays must present a high linear correlation). We demonstrate the improvements this method offers with a cell biology experiment, but it can definitely be applied to any problem that conforms to the described structure and requirements and in any quantitative scientific field that deals with data subject to uncertainty. PMID:24205158

  8. The Pathfinder Mission for Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baize, R. R.; Boyer, C.; Cageao, R.; Currey, C.; Fleming, G. A.; Jackson, T.; Johnson, D. G.; Leckey, J.; Liu, X.; Lukashin, C.; McCorkel, J.; Mlynczak, M. G.; Shea, Y.; Thome, K. J.; Wielicki, B. A.; Sun, W.

    2016-01-01

    Warming of the climate system is unequivocal, and since the 1950s, many of the observed changes are unprecedented over decades to millennia. The atmosphere and ocean have warmed, the amounts of snow and ice have diminished, and sea level has risen.

  9. Absolute binding-free energies between standard RNA/DNA nucleobases and amino-acid sidechain analogs in different environments.

    PubMed

    de Ruiter, Anita; Zagrovic, Bojan

    2015-01-01

    Despite the great importance of nucleic acid-protein interactions in the cell, our understanding of their physico-chemical basis remains incomplete. In order to address this challenge, we have for the first time determined potentials of mean force and the associated absolute binding free energies between all standard RNA/DNA nucleobases and amino-acid sidechain analogs in high- and low-dielectric environments using molecular dynamics simulations and umbrella sampling. A comparison against a limited set of available experimental values for analogous systems attests to the quality of the computational approach and the force field used. Overall, our analysis provides a microscopic picture behind nucleobase/sidechain interaction preferences and creates a unified framework for understanding and sculpting nucleic acid-protein interactions in different contexts. Here, we use this framework to demonstrate a strong relationship between nucleobase density profiles of mRNAs and nucleobase affinity profiles of their cognate proteins and critically analyze a recent hypothesis that the two may be capable of direct, complementary interactions.

  10. Xenon arc lamp spectral radiance modelling for satellite instrument calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rolt, Stephen; Clark, Paul; Schmoll, Jürgen; Shaw, Benjamin J. R.

    2016-07-01

    Precise radiometric measurements play a central role in many areas of astronomical and terrestrial observation. We focus on the use of continuum light sources in the absolute radiometric calibration of detectors in an imaging spectrometer for space applications. The application, in this instance, revolves around the ground based calibration of the Sentinel-4/UVN instrument. This imaging spectrometer instrument is expected to be deployed in 2019 and will make spatially resolved spectroscopic measurements of atmospheric chemistry. The instrument, which operates across the UV/VIS and NIR spectrum from 305-775 nm, is designed to measure the absolute spectral radiance of the Earth and compare it with the absolute spectral irradiance of the Sun. Of key importance to the fidelity of these absolute measurements is the ground based calibration campaign. Continuum lamp sources that are temporally stable and are spatially well defined are central to this process. Xenon short arc lamps provide highly intense and efficient continuum illumination in a range extending from the ultra-violet to the infra-red and their spectrum is well matched to this specific application. Despite their widespread commercial use, certain aspects of their performance are not well documented in the literature. One of the important requirements in this calibration application is the delivery of highly uniform, collimated illumination at high radiance. In this process, it cannot be assumed that the xenon arc is a point source; the spatial distribution of the radiance must be characterised accurately. We present here careful measurements that thoroughly characterise the spatial distribution of the spectral radiance of a 1000W xenon lamp. A mathematical model is presented describing the spatial distribution. Temporal stability is another exceptionally important requirement in the calibration process. As such, the paper also describes strategies to re-inforce the temporal stability of the lamp output by

  11. NIST traceable measurements of radiance and luminance levels of night-vision-goggle test-instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eppeldauer, G. P.; Podobedov, V. B.

    2014-05-01

    In order to perform radiance and luminance level measurements of night-vision-goggle (NVG) test instruments, NIST developed new-generation transfer-standard radiometers (TR). The new TRs can perform low-level radiance and luminance measurements with SI traceability and low uncertainty. The TRs were calibrated against NIST detector/radiometer standards holding the NIST photometric and radiometric scales. An 815 nm diode laser was used at NIST for the radiance responsivity calibrations. A spectrally flat (constant) filter correction was made for the TRs to correct the spectral responsivity change of the built-in Si photodiode for LEDs peaking at different wavelengths in the different test sets. The radiance responsivity transfer to the test instruments (test-sets) is discussed. The radiance values of the test instruments were measured with the TRs. The TRs propagate the traceablity to the NIST detector-based reference scales. The radiance uncertainty obtained from three TR measurements was 4.6 % (𝑘=2) at a luminance of 3.43 x 10-4 cd/m2. The output radiance of the previously used IR sphere source and the radiance responsivity of a previously used secondary standard detector unit, which was originally calibrated against an IR sphere source, were also measured with the TRs. The performances of the NVG test instruments were evaluated and the manufacturer produced radiance and luminance levels were calibrated with SI/NIST traceability.

  12. Modelling TOVS radiances of synoptic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coe, Thomas Eddy

    1992-01-01

    Two operational analysis models, produced by ECMWF and NMC, are compared against observed satellite radiances by converting the analyzed variables into synthetic radiances using a radiative transfer model (RTM). Observed TOVS satellite radiances are used as a ground truth, since they are the only source of continuous, synoptic-scale resolution observations available over the data-sparse tropical Pacific Ocean. It is assumed that if the analysis models correctly simulate atmospheric conditions, the observed and modelled radiance fields will have similar patterns and magnitudes. In each of seven TOVS channels examined, the mean temperature difference between the models was small, but the differences between the models and the observations were large. The mean temperature difference within each channel was larger than the standard deviation in most cases. The moisture channels of the RTM were sensitive to changes in moisture content, but none of the channels were significantly affected by changes in temperature. Single-day modelled radiance analyses contain synoptic information similar to the satellite observations. ECMWF is often too noisy, producing features not verified by the satellite; NMC is often too smooth. NMC more closely resembles the TOVS contours. Modelled water vapor channel analyses resemble observed monthly and composited observations well, but do not accurately reproduce the highly-variable single-day fields. ECMWF generally has more accurate gradients. Neither model simulates the tropics well. The water vapor channels, especially channel eleven (weighted at 700 mb), most closely resembled the tropical plume composite described by McGuirk and Ulsh. The only plume evidence found in the thermal or microwave channels, in either the observations or the models, was a composite trough situated in the correct location, extending from the mid-latitudes into the subtropics. This feature was not readily discernable until the definition and mature stages

  13. Absolute radiometric calibration of advanced remote sensing systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, P. N.

    1982-01-01

    The distinction between the uses of relative and absolute spectroradiometric calibration of remote sensing systems is discussed. The advantages of detector-based absolute calibration are described, and the categories of relative and absolute system calibrations are listed. The limitations and problems associated with three common methods used for the absolute calibration of remote sensing systems are addressed. Two methods are proposed for the in-flight absolute calibration of advanced multispectral linear array systems. One makes use of a sun-illuminated panel in front of the sensor, the radiance of which is monitored by a spectrally flat pyroelectric radiometer. The other uses a large, uniform, high-radiance reference ground surface. The ground and atmospheric measurements required as input to a radiative transfer program to predict the radiance level at the entrance pupil of the orbital sensor are discussed, and the ground instrumentation is described.

  14. Spectral and Spatial UV Sky Radiance Measurements at a Seaside Resort Under Clear Sky and Slightly Overcast Conditions.

    PubMed

    Sandmann, Henner; Stick, Carsten

    2014-01-01

    Spatial measurements of the diffusely scattered sky radiance at a seaside resort under clear sky and slightly overcast conditions have been used to calculate the sky radiance distribution across the upper hemisphere. The measurements were done in the summer season when solar UV radiation is highest. The selected wavelengths were 307, 350 and 550 nm representing the UVB, UVA and VIS band. Absolute values of radiance differ considerably between the wavelengths. Normalizing the measured values by use of direct solar radiance made the spatial distributions of unequal sky radiance comparable. The results convey a spatial impression of the different distributions of the radiance at the three wavelengths. Relative scattered radiance intensity is one order of magnitude greater in UVB than in VIS, whereas in UVA lies roughly in between. Under slightly overcast conditions scattered radiance is increased at all three wavelengths by about one order of magnitude. These measurements taken at the seaside underline the importance of diffuse scattered radiance. The effect of shading parts of the sky can be estimated from the distribution of sky radiance. This knowledge might be useful for sun seekers and in the treatment of people staying at the seaside for therapeutic purposes.

  15. MISR Level 3 Radiance Versioning

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-11-04

    ... Data Product Specification Rev K  (PDF). Update to work with new format of the input PGE 1 files.   F02_0007 ... public release. Includes only all-radiance field at this time, which does contain clouds. Baseline ancillary files: ...

  16. Absolute elastic differential electron scattering cross sections for He - A proposed calibration standard from 5 to 200 eV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Register, D. F.; Trajmar, S.; Srivastava, S. K.

    1980-01-01

    Absolute differential, integral, and momentum-transfer cross sections for electrons elastically scattered from helium are reported for the impact energy range of 5 to 200 eV. Angular distributions for elastically scattered electrons are measured in a crossed-beam geometry using a collimated, differentially pumped atomic-beam source which requires no effective-path-length correction. Below the first inelastic threshold the angular distributions were placed on an absolute scale by use of a phase-shift analysis. Above this threshold, the angular distributions from 10 to 140 deg were fitted using the phase-shift technique, and the resulting integral cross sections were normalized to a semiempirically derived integral elastic cross section. Depending on the impact energy, the data are estimated to be accurate to within 5 to 9%.

  17. Achieving Climate Change Absolute Accuracy in Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wielicki, Bruce A.; Young, D. F.; Mlynczak, M. G.; Thome, K. J; Leroy, S.; Corliss, J.; Anderson, J. G.; Ao, C. O.; Bantges, R.; Best, F.; Bowman, K.; Brindley, H.; Butler, J. J.; Collins, W.; Dykema, J. A.; Doelling, D. R.; Feldman, D. R.; Fox, N.; Huang, X.; Holz, R.; Huang, Y.; Jennings, D.; Jin, Z.; Johnson, D. G.; Jucks, K.; Kato, S.; Kratz, D. P.; Liu, X.; Lukashin, C.; Mannucci, A. J.; Phojanamongkolkij, N.; Roithmayr, C. M.; Sandford, S.; Taylor, P. C.; Xiong, X.

    2013-01-01

    The Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO) mission will provide a calibration laboratory in orbit for the purpose of accurately measuring and attributing climate change. CLARREO measurements establish new climate change benchmarks with high absolute radiometric accuracy and high statistical confidence across a wide range of essential climate variables. CLARREO's inherently high absolute accuracy will be verified and traceable on orbit to Système Internationale (SI) units. The benchmarks established by CLARREO will be critical for assessing changes in the Earth system and climate model predictive capabilities for decades into the future as society works to meet the challenge of optimizing strategies for mitigating and adapting to climate change. The CLARREO benchmarks are derived from measurements of the Earth's thermal infrared spectrum (5-50 micron), the spectrum of solar radiation reflected by the Earth and its atmosphere (320-2300 nm), and radio occultation refractivity from which accurate temperature profiles are derived. The mission has the ability to provide new spectral fingerprints of climate change, as well as to provide the first orbiting radiometer with accuracy sufficient to serve as the reference transfer standard for other space sensors, in essence serving as a "NIST [National Institute of Standards and Technology] in orbit." CLARREO will greatly improve the accuracy and relevance of a wide range of space-borne instruments for decadal climate change. Finally, CLARREO has developed new metrics and methods for determining the accuracy requirements of climate observations for a wide range of climate variables and uncertainty sources. These methods should be useful for improving our understanding of observing requirements for most climate change observations.

  18. (18)F primary standard at ENEA-INMRI by three absolute techniques and calibration of a well-type IG11 ionization chamber.

    PubMed

    Capogni, Marco; Carconi, Pierluigi; De Felice, Pierino; Fazio, Aldo

    2016-03-01

    A new (18)F primary standardization carried out at ENEA-INMRI by three different absolute techniques, i.e. 4πγNaI(Tl)γ high-efficiency counting, TDCR and 4πβ(LS)-γ[NaI(Tl)] coincidence counting method, allowed the calibration of a fixed well-reentrant IG11 ionization chamber (IC), with an uncertainty lower than 1%, and to check the calibration factor of a portable well-type IC NPL-CRC model, previously calibrated. By the new standard the ENEA-INMRI was linked to the BIPM International Reference System (SIR) through the BIPM SIR Transfer Instrument (SIRTI).

  19. Novel isotopic N, N-Dimethyl Leucine (iDiLeu) Reagents Enable Absolute Quantification of Peptides and Proteins Using a Standard Curve Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greer, Tyler; Lietz, Christopher B.; Xiang, Feng; Li, Lingjun

    2015-01-01

    Absolute quantification of protein targets using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) is a key component of candidate biomarker validation. One popular method combines multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) using a triple quadrupole instrument with stable isotope-labeled standards (SIS) for absolute quantification (AQUA). LC-MRM AQUA assays are sensitive and specific, but they are also expensive because of the cost of synthesizing stable isotope peptide standards. While the chemical modification approach using mass differential tags for relative and absolute quantification (mTRAQ) represents a more economical approach when quantifying large numbers of peptides, these reagents are costly and still suffer from lower throughput because only two concentration values per peptide can be obtained in a single LC-MS run. Here, we have developed and applied a set of five novel mass difference reagents, isotopic N, N-dimethyl leucine (iDiLeu). These labels contain an amine reactive group, triazine ester, are cost effective because of their synthetic simplicity, and have increased throughput compared with previous LC-MS quantification methods by allowing construction of a four-point standard curve in one run. iDiLeu-labeled peptides show remarkably similar retention time shifts, slightly lower energy thresholds for higher-energy collisional dissociation (HCD) fragmentation, and high quantification accuracy for trypsin-digested protein samples (median errors <15%). By spiking in an iDiLeu-labeled neuropeptide, allatostatin, into mouse urine matrix, two quantification methods are validated. The first uses one labeled peptide as an internal standard to normalize labeled peptide peak areas across runs (<19% error), whereas the second enables standard curve creation and analyte quantification in one run (<8% error).

  20. Tree canopy radiance measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caldwell, William; Vanderbilt, V. C.

    1989-01-01

    A system is described for obtaining both an estimate of the spatial mean bidirectional reflectance factor (BRF) for a tree canopy (displaying a horizontally heterogeneous foliage distribution) and the statistical significance of that estimate. The system includes a manlift supporting a horizontal beam 7 m long on which are mounted four radiometers. These radiometers may be pointed, and radiance data acquired, in any of 11 view directions in the principal plane of the sun. A total of 80 data points, acquired in 3 min, were used to estimate the BRF of a walnut orchard 5 m tall and detect true differences of 12 percent of the mean approximately 90 percent of the time.

  1. Tree canopy radiance measurement system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caldwell, William; Vanderbilt, V. C.

    1989-11-01

    A system is described for obtaining both an estimate of the spatial mean bidirectional reflectance factor (BRF) for a tree canopy (displaying a horizontally heterogeneous foliage distribution) and the statistical significance of that estimate. The system includes a manlift supporting a horizontal beam 7 m long on which are mounted four radiometers. These radiometers may be pointed, and radiance data acquired, in any of 11 view directions in the principal plane of the sun. A total of 80 data points, acquired in 3 min, were used to estimate the BRF of a walnut orchard 5 m tall and detect true differences of 12 percent of the mean approximately 90 percent of the time.

  2. Absolute Frequency Measurements with a Set of Transportable HE-NE/CH4 Optical Frequency Standards and Prospects for Future Design and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gubin, M.; Kovalchuk, E.; Petrukhin, E.; Shelkovnikov, A.; Tyurikov, D.; Gamidov, R.; Erdogan, C.; Sahin, E.; Felder, R.; Gill, P.; Lea, S. N.; Kramer, G.; Lipphardt, B.

    2002-04-01

    The accumulated results of absolute frequency measurements (AFM) carried out in 1997-2000 with transportable double-mode He-Ne/CH4 optical frequency standards (λ = 3 .39μm) in a collaboration of several laboratories are presented. The performance of this secondary optical frequency standard is estimated on the level of 10-13 (in repeatability), and 1 × 10-14/s (in stability). The next steps towards He-Ne/CH4 standards with one order of magnitude better performance, including devices based on monolithic zerodur resonators, are discussed. Important applications of transportable He-Ne/CH4 optical frequency standards have appeared now due to dramatic progress in the field of optical frequency measurements. Used to stabilize the repetition rate of a Ti:Sa fs laser, these compact secondary standards can transfer their performance into the whole optical range covered by a fs comb. Thus they can play the role of a narrow spectrum interrogative oscillator for super-accurate optical or microwave frequency standards substituting in some tasks a H-maser or oscillators based on cryogenic sapphire resonators.

  3. Chemo-Enzymatic Synthesis of (13)C Labeled Complex N-Glycans As Internal Standards for the Absolute Glycan Quantification by Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Echeverria, Begoña; Etxebarria, Juan; Ruiz, Nerea; Hernandez, Álvaro; Calvo, Javier; Haberger, Markus; Reusch, Dietmar; Reichardt, Niels-Christian

    2015-11-17

    Methods for the absolute quantification of glycans are needed in glycoproteomics, during development and production of biopharmaceuticals and for the clinical analysis of glycan disease markers. Here we present a strategy for the chemo-enzymatic synthesis of (13)C labeled N-glycan libraries and provide an example for their use as internal standards in the profiling and absolute quantification of mAb glycans by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry. A synthetic biantennary glycan precursor was (13)C-labeled on all four amino sugar residues and enzymatically derivatized to produce a library of 15 glycan isotopologues with a mass increment of 8 Da over the natural products. Asymmetrically elongated glycans were accessible by performing enzymatic reactions on partially protected UV-absorbing intermediates, subsequent fractionation by preparative HPLC, and final hydrogenation. Using a preformulated mixture of eight internal standards, we quantified the glycans in a monoclonal therapeutic antibody with excellent precision and speed.

  4. Development of a low-level 39Ar calibration standard – Analysis by absolute gas counting measurements augmented with simulation

    DOE PAGES

    Williams, Richard M.; Aalseth, C. E.; Brandenberger, J. M.; ...

    2017-02-17

    Here, this paper describes the generation of 39Ar, via reactor irradiation of potassium carbonate, followed by quantitative analysis (length-compensated proportional counting) to yield two calibration standards that are respectively 50 and 3 times atmospheric background levels. Measurements were performed in Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's shallow underground counting laboratory studying the effect of gas density on beta-transport; these results are compared with simulation. The total expanded uncertainty of the specific activity for the ~50 × 39Ar in P10 standard is 3.6% (k=2).

  5. Estimation of spectral distribution of sky radiance using a commercial digital camera.

    PubMed

    Saito, Masanori; Iwabuchi, Hironobu; Murata, Isao

    2016-01-10

    Methods for estimating spectral distribution of sky radiance from images captured by a digital camera and for accurately estimating spectral responses of the camera are proposed. Spectral distribution of sky radiance is represented as a polynomial of the wavelength, with coefficients obtained from digital RGB counts by linear transformation. The spectral distribution of radiance as measured is consistent with that obtained by spectrometer and radiative transfer simulation for wavelengths of 430-680 nm, with standard deviation below 1%. Preliminary applications suggest this method is useful for detecting clouds and studying the relation between irradiance at the ground and cloud distribution.

  6. Application of the standard addition method for the absolute quantification of neutral lipids in microalgae using Nile red.

    PubMed

    Bertozzini, Elena; Galluzzi, Luca; Penna, Antonella; Magnani, Mauro

    2011-10-01

    Microalgae are considered one of the best candidates for biofuel production due to their high content in neutral lipids, therefore, an accurate quantification of these lipids in microalgae is fundamental for the identification of the better candidates as biodiesel source. Nile red is a fluorescent dye widely employed for the quantification of neutral lipids in microalgae. Usually, the fluorescence intensity of the stained samples is correlated to the neutral lipid content determined with standard methods, in order to draw a standard curve and deduce the neutral lipids concentration of the unknown samples positioning their fluorescence intensity values on the curve. Standard methods used for the neutral lipids determination are laborious and often implying solvent extraction and/or other transformation (i.e. saponification or transesterification) of the sample. These methods are also time consuming and may give rise to an underestimation of the lipid content due to variable extraction yields. The approach described in this paper combines the standard addition method and the fluorometric staining using Nile red, avoiding the association of traditional neutral lipids quantification methods to the fluorometric determination. After optimization of instrument parameters and staining conditions, a linear correlation between the fluorescence intensity of each sample stained with the Nile red and its neutral lipids content deduced with the standard addition method was identified. The obtained curve allowed the direct determination of neutral lipids content maintaining a linearity range from 0.12 to 12 μg of neutral lipids per ml of sample, without need of pre-concentration. This curve was then used in the quantification of the neutral lipids content in culture of Skeletonema marinoi (Bacillariophyceae) at different days from the inoculum. This method was also successfully applied on Chaetoceros socialis (Bacillariophyceae) and Alexandrium minutum (Dinophyceae).

  7. Absolute Zero

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnelly, Russell J.; Sheibley, D.; Belloni, M.; Stamper-Kurn, D.; Vinen, W. F.

    2006-12-01

    Absolute Zero is a two hour PBS special attempting to bring to the general public some of the advances made in 400 years of thermodynamics. It is based on the book “Absolute Zero and the Conquest of Cold” by Tom Shachtman. Absolute Zero will call long-overdue attention to the remarkable strides that have been made in low-temperature physics, a field that has produced 27 Nobel Prizes. It will explore the ongoing interplay between science and technology through historical examples including refrigerators, ice machines, frozen foods, liquid oxygen and nitrogen as well as much colder fluids such as liquid hydrogen and liquid helium. A website has been established to promote the series: www.absolutezerocampaign.org. It contains information on the series, aimed primarily at students at the middle school level. There is a wealth of material here and we hope interested teachers will draw their student’s attention to this website and its substantial contents, which have been carefully vetted for accuracy.

  8. Absolute neutrino mass scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capelli, Silvia; Di Bari, Pasquale

    2013-04-01

    Neutrino oscillation experiments firmly established non-vanishing neutrino masses, a result that can be regarded as a strong motivation to extend the Standard Model. In spite of being the lightest massive particles, neutrinos likely represent an important bridge to new physics at very high energies and offer new opportunities to address some of the current cosmological puzzles, such as the matter-antimatter asymmetry of the Universe and Dark Matter. In this context, the determination of the absolute neutrino mass scale is a key issue within modern High Energy Physics. The talks in this parallel session well describe the current exciting experimental activity aiming to determining the absolute neutrino mass scale and offer an overview of a few models beyond the Standard Model that have been proposed in order to explain the neutrino masses giving a prediction for the absolute neutrino mass scale and solving the cosmological puzzles.

  9. Radiance Data Products at the GES DAAC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savtchenko, A.; Ouzounov, D.; Acker, J.; Johnson, J.; Leptoukh, G.; Qin, J.; Rui, H.; Smith, P.; Teng, W.

    2004-01-01

    The Goddard Earth Sciences Distributed Active Archive Center (GES DAAC) has been archiving and distributing Radiance data, and serving science and application users of these data, for over 10 years now. The user-focused stewardship of the Radiance data from the AIRS, AVHRR, MODIS, SeaWiFS, SORCE, TOMS, TOVS, TRMM, and UARS instruments exemplifies the GES DAAC tradition and experience. Radiance data include raw radiance counts, onboard calibration data, geolocation products, radiometric calibrated and geolocated-calibrated radiance/reflectance. The number of science products archived at the GES DAAC is steadily increasing, as a result of more sophisticated sensors and new science algorithms. Thus, the main challenge for the GES DAAC is to guide users through the variety of Radiance data sets, provide tools to visualize and reduce the volume of the data, and provide uninterrupted access to the data. This presentation will describe the effort at the GES DAAC to build a bridge between multi-sensor data and the effective scientific use of the data, with an emphasis on the heritage of the science products. The intent is to inform users of the existence of this large collection of Radiance data; suggest starting points for cross-platform science projects and data mining activities; provide data services and tools information; and to give expert help in the science data formats and applications.

  10. Absolute Summ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Alfred, Jr.

    Summ means the entirety of the multiverse. It seems clear, from the inflation theories of A. Guth and others, that the creation of many universes is plausible. We argue that Absolute cosmological ideas, not unlike those of I. Newton, may be consistent with dynamic multiverse creations. As suggested in W. Heisenberg's uncertainty principle, and with the Anthropic Principle defended by S. Hawking, et al., human consciousness, buttressed by findings of neuroscience, may have to be considered in our models. Predictability, as A. Einstein realized with Invariants and General Relativity, may be required for new ideas to be part of physics. We present here a two postulate model geared to an Absolute Summ. The seedbed of this work is part of Akhnaton's philosophy (see S. Freud, Moses and Monotheism). Most important, however, is that the structure of human consciousness, manifest in Kenya's Rift Valley 200,000 years ago as Homo sapiens, who were the culmination of the six million year co-creation process of Hominins and Nature in Africa, allows us to do the physics that we do. .

  11. POLRADS: polarization radiance distribution measurement system.

    PubMed

    Voss, Kenneth J; Souaidia, Nordine

    2010-09-13

    While the upwelling radiance distribution in the ocean can be highly polarized, there are few measurements of this parameter in the open ocean. To obtain the polarized in-water upwelling spectral radiance distribution data we have developed the POLRADS instrument. This instrument is based on the NuRADS radiance distribution camera systems in which linear polarizer's have been installed. By combining simultaneous images from three NuRADS instruments, three Stokes parameters (I, Q, U) for the water leaving radiance can be obtained for all upwelling angles simultaneously. This system measures the Stokes parameters Q/I and U/I with a 0.05-0.06 uncertainty and I with a 7-10% uncertainty.

  12. Evaluation of daytime evaporative fraction from MODIS TOA radiances using FLUXNET observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Jian; Loew, Alexander

    2014-05-01

    The LST/NDVI (Land Surface Temperature/Vegetation Index) feature space has been widely used to estimate ET (Evapotranspiration) or EF (Evaporative Fraction, defined as the ratio of latent heat flux to surface available energy) in recent decades. Traditionally, it is essential to pre-process satellite TOA (top of atmosphere) radiances to obtain LST and NDVI before estimating EF. However, pre-processing TOA radiances is a cumbersome task including corrections for atmospheric, adjacency and directional effects. Based on the contextual relationship between LST and NDVI, some studies proposed the direct use of TOA radiances instead of satellite products to estimate EF, and found that use of TOA radiances is applicable in some regional studies. The purpose of the present study is to test the robustness of the TOA radiances based EF estimation scheme over different climatic and surface conditions. Flux measurements from 16 FLUXNET (a global network of eddy covariance towers) sites were used to validate the MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectro radiometer) TOA radiances estimated daytime EF. It is found that the EF estimates perform well across a wide variety of climate and biome types - grasslands, crops, cropland/natural vegetation mosaic, closed shrublands, mixed forest, deciduous broadleaf forest, and savannas. The overall BIAS (mean bias error), MAD (mean absolute difference), RMSD (root mean square difference) and R (correlation coefficient) values for all the sites are 0.018, 0.147, 0.178 and 0.590, respectively, which are comparable with published results in the literature. We conclude that the direct use of measured TOA radiances to estimate daytime EF is feasible and applicable, and would facilitate the relevant applications where minimum pre-processing is important.

  13. Modeling and Assimilating Ocean Color Radiances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregg, Watson

    2012-01-01

    Radiances are the source of information from ocean color sensors to produce estimates of biological and geochemical constituents. They potentially provide information on various other aspects of global biological and chemical systems, and there is considerable work involved in deriving new information from these signals. Each derived product, however, contains errors that are derived from the application of the radiances, above and beyond the radiance errors. A global biogeochemical model with an explicit spectral radiative transfer model is used to investigate the potential of assimilating radiances. The results indicate gaps in our understanding of radiative processes in the oceans and their relationships with biogeochemical variables. Most important, detritus optical properties are not well characterized and produce important effects of the simulated radiances. Specifically, there does not appear to be a relationship between detrital biomass and its optical properties, as there is for chlorophyll. Approximations are necessary to get beyond this problem. In this reprt we will discuss the challenges in modeling and assimilation water-leaving radiances and the prospects for improving our understanding of biogeochemical process by utilizing these signals.

  14. Absolute Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartig, George

    1990-12-01

    The absolute sensitivity of the FOS will be determined in SV by observing 2 stars at 3 epochs, first in 3 apertures (1.0", 0.5", and 0.3" circular) and then in 1 aperture (1.0" circular). In cycle 1, one star, BD+28D4211 will be observed in the 1.0" aperture to establish the stability of the sensitivity and flat field characteristics and improve the accuracy obtained in SV. This star will also be observed through the paired apertures since these are not calibrated in SV. The stars will be observed in most detector/grating combinations. The data will be averaged to form the inverse sensitivity functions required by RSDP.

  15. New PTB Setup for the Absolute Calibration of the Spectral Responsivity of Radiation Thermometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anhalt, K.; Zelenjuk, A.; Taubert, D. R.; Keawprasert, T.; Hartmann, J.

    2009-02-01

    The paper describes the new experimental setup assembled at the PTB for the absolute spectral responsivity measurement of radiation thermometers. The concept of this setup is to measure the relative spectral responsivity of the radiation thermometer using the conventional monochromator-based spectral comparator facility also used for the calibration of filter radiometers. The absolute spectral responsivity is subsequently measured at one wavelength, supplied by the radiation of a diode laser, using the new setup. The radiation of the diode laser is guided with an optical fiber into an integrating sphere source that is equipped with an aperture of absolutely known area. The spectral radiance of this integrating sphere source is determined via the spectral irradiance measured by a trap detector with an absolutely calibrated spectral responsivity traceable to the primary detector standard of the PTB, the cryogenic radiometer. First results of the spectral responsivity calibration of the radiation thermometer LP3 are presented, and a provisional uncertainty budget of the absolute spectral responsivity is given.

  16. Comparison measurements of 0:45 radiance factor and goniometrically determined diffuse reflectance

    SciTech Connect

    Holopainen, Silja; Manoocheri, Farshid; Ikonen, Erkki; Hauer, Kai-Olaf; Hoepe, Andreas

    2009-05-20

    A comparison between the absolute gonioreflectometric scales at the Helsinki University of Technology (TKK) and the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) has been accomplished. Six different reflection standards were measured for their 0:45 spectral radiance factor between 250 and 1650 nm in 10 nm intervals. Also, the 0:d reflectance factor between 400 and 1600 nm in 100 nm intervals was determined from goniometric reflectance measurements over polar angles with subsequent integration within the hemisphere above the sample. Goniometric comparisons covering such an extensive wavelength range and also several different sample materials are rarely implemented. For all but one sample, the difference between the results obtained at the TKK and the PTB was, with the exception of a couple of measurement points, within the expanded uncertainty (k=2) of the comparison at least up to a wavelength of 1400 nm. All differences between the measurement results can be understood, except for one translucent sample in the visible wavelength range. The effect of sample translucency was found to be significant in the NIR wavelength region. Also, a general tendency of an increase of the TKK values relative to the PTB values in the UV region was observed. Possible causes for this phenomenon are discussed.

  17. Radiance calibration of the High Altitude Observatory white-light coronagraph on Skylab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poland, A. I.; Macqueen, R. M.; Munro, R. H.; Gosling, J. T.

    1977-01-01

    The processing of over 35,000 photographs of the solar corona obtained by the white-light coronograph on Skylab is described. Calibration of the vast amount of data was complicated by temporal effects of radiation fog and latent image loss. These effects were compensated by imaging a calibration step wedge on each data frame. Absolute calibration of the wedge was accomplished through comparison with a set of previously calibrated glass opal filters. Analysis employed average characteristic curves derived from measurements of step wedges from many frames within a given camera half-load. The net absolute accuracy of a given radiance measurement is estimated to be 20%.

  18. Absolute realization of low BRDF value

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zilong; Liao, Ningfang; Li, Ping; Wang, Yu

    2010-10-01

    Low BRDF value is widespread used in many critical domains such as space and military fairs. These values below 0.1 Sr-1 . So the Absolute realization of these value is the most critical issue in the absolute measurement of BRDF. To develop the Absolute value realization theory of BRDF , defining an arithmetic operators of BRDF , achieving an absolute measurement Eq. of BRDF based on radiance. This is a new theory method to solve the realization problem of low BRDF value. This theory method is realized on a self-designed common double orientation structure in space. By designing an adding structure to extend the range of the measurement system and a control and processing software, Absolute realization of low BRDF value is achieved. A material of low BRDF value is measured in this measurement system and the spectral BRDF value are showed within different angles allover the space. All these values are below 0.4 Sr-1 . This process is a representative procedure about the measurement of low BRDF value. A corresponding uncertainty analysis of this measurement data is given depend on the new theory of absolute realization and the performance of the measurement system. The relative expand uncertainty of the measurement data is 0.078. This uncertainty analysis is suitable for all measurements using the new theory of absolute realization and the corresponding measurement system.

  19. Spectral radiance calibrations between 165-300 nm - An interlaboratory comparison

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bridges, J. M.; Ott, W. R.; Pitz, E.; Schulz, A.; Einfeld, D.; Stuck, D.

    1977-01-01

    The spectral radiance of deuterium lamps calibrated by the Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astronomie (MPI), by the U.S. National Bureau of Standards (NBS), and by the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) are compared to check the agreement of UV radiometric scales. The NBS group used the optically thin continuum radiation from a wall-stabilized hydrogen arc as its fundamental radiometric standard, while the MPI and PTB groups used the synchrotron radiation facility in DESY. It is found that the spectral radiance scales based upon the DESY synchrotron and the NBS hydrogen arc are consistent, at least for one wavelength relative to another.

  20. The impact of target luminance and radiance on night vision device visual performance testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marasco, Peter L.; Task, H. Lee

    2003-09-01

    Visual performance through night-vision devices (NVDs) is a function of many parameters such as target contrast, objective and eyepiece lens focus, signal/noise of the image intensifier tube, quality of the image intensifier, night-vision goggle (NVG) gain, and NVG output luminance to the eye. The NVG output luminance depends on the NVG sensitive radiance emitted (or reflected) from the visual acuity target (usually a vision testing chart). The primary topic of this paper is the standardization (or lack thereof) of the radiance levels used for NVG visual acuity testing. The visual acuity chart light level might be determined in either photometric (luminance) units or radiometric (radiance) units. The light levels are often described as "starlight," "quarter moon," or "optimum" light levels and may not actually provide any quantitative photometric or radiometric information. While these terms may be useful to pilots and the users of night-vision devices, they are inadequate for accurate visual performance testing. This is because there is no widely accepted agreement in the night vision community as to the radiance or luminance level of the target that corresponds to the various named light levels. This paper examines the range of values for "starlight," "quarter moon," and "optimum" light commonly used by the night vision community and referenced in the literature. The impact on performance testing of variations in target luminance/radiance levels is also examined. Arguments for standardizing on NVG-weighted radiometric units for testing night-vision devices instead of photometric units are presented. In addition, the differences between theoretical weighted radiance and actual weighted radiance are also discussed.

  1. Assimilation of the Microwave Limb Sounder Radiances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wargan, K.; Read, W.; Livesey, N.; Wagner, P.; Nguyen. H.; Pawson, S.

    2012-01-01

    It has been shown that the assimilation of limb-sounder data can significantly improve the representation of ozone in NASA's GEOS Data Assimilation Systems (GEOS-DAS), particularly in the stratosphere. The studies conducted so far utilized retrieved data from the MIPAS, POAM, ILAS and EOS Microwave Limb Sounder (EOS MLS) instruments. Direct assimilation of the radiance data can be seen as the natural next step to those studies. The motivation behind working with radiances is twofold. First, retrieval algorithms use a priori data which are either climatological or are obtained from previous analyses. This introduces additional uncertainty and, in some cases, may lead to "self-contamination"- when the a priori is taken from the same assimilation system in which subsequently ingests the retrieved observations. Second, radiances can be available in near real time thus providing an opportunity for operational assimilation, which could help improve the use of infrared radiance instruments from operational satellite instruments. In this presentation we summarize our ongoing work on an implementation of the assimilation of EOS MLS radiances into the GEOS-5 DAS. This work focuses on assimilation of band 7 brightness temperatures which are sensitive to ozone. Our implementation uses the MLS Callable Forward Model developed by the MLS team at NASA JPL as the observation operator. We will describe our approach and recent results which are not yet final. In particular, we will demonstrate that this approach has a potential to improve the vertical structure of ozone in the lower tropical stratosphere as compared with the retrieved MLS product. We will discuss the computational efficiency of this implementation.

  2. Modeling and experimental validation of angular radiance and distance-dependent radiance in a turbid medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lingling; Li, Chenxi; Zhao, Huijuan; Yi, Xi; Gao, Feng; Meng, Wei; Lu, Yiming

    2014-03-01

    Radiance is sensitive to the variations of tissue optical parameters, such as absorption coefficient μa, scattering coefficient μs, and anisotropy factor g. Therefore, similar to fluence, radiance can be used for tissue characterization. Compared with fluence, radiance has the advantage of offering the direction information of light intensity. Taking such advantage, the optical parameters can be determined by rotating the detector through 360 deg with only a single optode pair. Instead of the translation mode used in the fluence-based technologies, the Rotation mode has less invasiveness in the clinical diagnosis. This paper explores a new method to obtain the optical properties by measuring the distribution of light intensity in liquid phantom with only a single optode pair and the detector rotation through 360 deg. The angular radiance and distance-dependent radiance are verified by comparing experimental measurement data with Monte Carlo (MC) simulation for the short source-detector separations and diffusion approximation for the large source-detector separations. Detecting angular radiance with only a single optode pair under a certain source-detection separation will present a way for prostate diagnose and light dose calculation during the photon dynamic therapy (PDT).

  3. Activities of NIST (National Inst. of Standards and Technology)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The Radiometric Physics Division of the NIST is responsible for the national standards in radiation thermometry, spectroradiometry, photometry, and spectrophotometry; dissemination of these standards by providing measurement services to customers requiring calibrations of the highest accuracy; and conducting fundamental and applied research to develop the scientific basis for future measurement services. Its relevance to EOS/TIR calibration includes calibrating unknown blackbody for radiance using a well-characterized NIST blackbody source by matching the radiant fluxes with an IR radiometer. The TIR Round Robin is used to verify the calibration of the sources that are used for the absolute radiometric calibration of the individual EOS sensors.

  4. Database applicaton for absolute spectrophotometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bochkov, Valery V.; Shumko, Sergiy

    2002-12-01

    32-bit database application with multidocument interface for Windows has been developed to calculate absolute energy distributions of observed spectra. The original database contains wavelength calibrated observed spectra which had been already passed through apparatus reductions such as flatfielding, background and apparatus noise subtracting. Absolute energy distributions of observed spectra are defined in unique scale by means of registering them simultaneously with artificial intensity standard. Observations of sequence of spectrophotometric standards are used to define absolute energy of the artificial standard. Observations of spectrophotometric standards are used to define optical extinction in selected moments. FFT algorithm implemented in the application allows performing convolution (deconvolution) spectra with user-defined PSF. The object-oriented interface has been created using facilities of C++ libraries. Client/server model with Windows Socket functionality based on TCP/IP protocol is used to develop the application. It supports Dynamic Data Exchange conversation in server mode and uses Microsoft Exchange communication facilities.

  5. The effects of seasonal and latitudinal earth infrared radiance variations on ERBS attitude control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phenneger, M. C.; Dehen, J.; Foch, D.; Harvie, E.; Virdy, M.

    1989-01-01

    Analysis performed in the Flight Dynamics Facility by the Earth Radiation Budget Satellite (ERBS) Attitude Determination Support team illustrates the pitch attitude control motion and roll attitude errors induced by Earth infrared (IR) horizon radiance variations. IR scanner and inertial reference unit (IRU) pitch and roll flight data spanning 4 years of the ERBS mission are analyzed to illustrate the changes in the magnitude of the errors on time scales of the orbital period, months, and seasons. The analysis represents a unique opportunity to compare prelaunch estimates of radiance-induced attitude errors with flight measurements. As a consequence of this work the following additional information is obtained: an assessment of an average model of these errors and its standard deviation, a measurement to determine and verify previously proposed corrections to the current Earth IR radiance data base, and the possibility of a mean motion model derived from flight data in place of IRU data for ERBS fine attitude determination.

  6. Angular dependence models for radiance to flux conversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Richard N.; Suttles, John T.; Wielicki, Bruce A.

    1990-01-01

    Angular dependence models (ADM) used for converting the measured radiance to flux at the top of the atmosphere are reviewed, and emphasis is placed on the measure of their effectiveness and the implications of requiring the ADMs to satisfy reciprocity. The overall significance of the ADMs is figured out by analyzing the same satellite data with a single Lambertian model, single mean model, and the 12 Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) ADMs. It is shown that the Lambertian ADM is inadequate, while the mean ADM results in nearly unbiased fluxes but creates substantial differences for individual pixel fluxes. The standard ERBE ADM works well except for a 10-pct to 15-pct albedo growth across the scan; a modified ADM based on the standard ERBE ADM but forced to satisfy the principle of reciprocity increases the limb brightening and reduces the albedo growth but does not improve the scanner and nonscanner intercomparison.

  7. Spectral Dimensionality and Scale of Urban Radiance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Small, Christopher

    2001-01-01

    Characterization of urban radiance and reflectance is important for understanding the effects of solar energy flux on the urban environment as well as for satellite mapping of urban settlement patterns. Spectral mixture analyses of Landsat and Ikonos imagery suggest that the urban radiance field can very often be described with combinations of three or four spectral endmembers. Dimensionality estimates of Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) radiance measurements of urban areas reveal the existence of 30 to 60 spectral dimensions. The extent to which broadband imagery collected by operational satellites can represent the higher dimensional mixing space is a function of both the spatial and spectral resolution of the sensor. AVIRIS imagery offers the spatial and spectral resolution necessary to investigate the scale dependence of the spectral dimensionality. Dimensionality estimates derived from Minimum Noise Fraction (MNF) eigenvalue distributions show a distinct scale dependence for AVIRIS radiance measurements of Milpitas, California. Apparent dimensionality diminishes from almost 40 to less than 10 spectral dimensions between scales of 8000 m and 300 m. The 10 to 30 m scale of most features in urban mosaics results in substantial spectral mixing at the 20 m scale of high altitude AVIRIS pixels. Much of the variance at pixel scales is therefore likely to result from actual differences in surface reflectance at pixel scales. Spatial smoothing and spectral subsampling of AVIRIS spectra both result in substantial loss of information and reduction of apparent dimensionality, but the primary spectral endmembers in all cases are analogous to those found in global analyses of Landsat and Ikonos imagery of other urban areas.

  8. Cloud altitude determination from infrared spectral radiances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, William L.; Frey, Richard

    1990-01-01

    The CO2 slicing method is generally recognized as the most accurate means of inferring cloud altitude from passive infrared radiance observations. The method is applicable to semi-transparent and broken clouds. During the cirrus FIRE and COHMEX field experiments, CO2 channel radiance data suitable for cloud altitude specification were achieved from moderate spectral resolution satellite sounders (NOAA-TOVS and GOES-VAS) and from a High spectral resolution Interferometer Spectrometer (HIS) flown on the NASA U2/ER2 aircraft. Also aboard the ER2 was a down-looking active lidar unit capable of providing cloud top pressure verifications with high accuracy. A third instrument, the Multispectral Atmospheric Mapping Sensor (MAMS) provided 50 meter resolution infrared window data which is used wtih radiosonde data to verify the heights of middle and low level clouds. Comparisons of lidar and MAMS/radiosonde ground truth cloud heights are made with those determined from: high resolution (0.5/cm) HIS spectra, HIS spectra degraded to the moderate resolution (15/cm) of the VAS/TOVS instruments, and spectrally averaged HIS radiances for individual pairs of VAS spectral channels. The results show that the best results are achieved from high resolution spectra; the RMS difference with the ground truth is 23 mb. The RMS differences between the infrared radiance determination and ground truth increase by 35 percent when the spectral resolution is degraded to the moderate spectral resolution of the VAS/TOVS instruments and by 52 to 183 percent, depending upon channel combinations, when only two spectral channels at VAS/TOVS spectral resolution are used.

  9. Final report on EURAMET.M.P-K4.2010: Key and supplementary comparison of national pressure standards in the range 1 Pa to 15 kPa of absolute and gauge pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krajíček, Zdeněk; Bergoglio, Mercede; Jousten, Karl; Otal, Pierre; Sabuga, Wladimir; Saxholm, Sari; Pražák, Dominik; Vičar, Martin

    2014-01-01

    This report describes a EURAMET comparison of five European National Metrology Institutes in low gauge and absolute pressure in gas (nitrogen), denoted as EURAMET.M.P-K4.2010. Its main intention is to state equivalence of the pressure standards, in particular those based on the technology of force-balanced piston gauges such as e.g. FRS by Furness Controls, UK and FPG8601 by DHI-Fluke, USA. It covers the range from 1 Pa to 15 kPa, both gauge and absolute. The comparison in absolute mode serves as a EURAMET Key Comparison which can be linked to CCM.P-K4 and CCM.P-K2 via PTB. The comparison in gauge mode is a supplementary comparison. The comparison was carried out from September 2008 till October 2012. The participating laboratories were the following: CMI, INRIM, LNE, MIKES, PTB-Berlin (absolute pressure 1 kPa and below) and PTB-Braunschweig (absolute pressure 1 kPa and above and gauge pressure). CMI was the pilot laboratory and provided a transfer standard for the comparison. This transfer standard was also the laboratory standard of CMI at the same time, which resulted in a unique and logistically difficult star comparison. Both in gauge and absolute pressures all the participating institutes successfully proved their equivalence with respect to the reference value and all also proved mutual bilateral equivalences in all the points. All the participating laboratories are also equivalent with the reference values of CCM.P-K4 and CCM.P-K2 in the relevant points. The comparison also proved the ability of FPG8601 to serve as a transfer standard. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCM, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  10. Extraction of Profile Information from Cloud Contaminated Radiances. Appendixes 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, W. L.; Zhou, D. K.; Huang, H.-L.; Li, Jun; Liu, X.; Larar, A. M.

    2003-01-01

    Clouds act to reduce the signal level and may produce noise dependence on the complexity of the cloud properties and the manner in which they are treated in the profile retrieval process. There are essentially three ways to extract profile information from cloud contaminated radiances: (1) cloud-clearing using spatially adjacent cloud contaminated radiance measurements, (2) retrieval based upon the assumption of opaque cloud conditions, and (3) retrieval or radiance assimilation using a physically correct cloud radiative transfer model which accounts for the absorption and scattering of the radiance observed. Cloud clearing extracts the radiance arising from the clear air portion of partly clouded fields of view permitting soundings to the surface or the assimilation of radiances as in the clear field of view case. However, the accuracy of the clear air radiance signal depends upon the cloud height and optical property uniformity across the two fields of view used in the cloud clearing process. The assumption of opaque clouds within the field of view permits relatively accurate profiles to be retrieved down to near cloud top levels, the accuracy near the cloud top level being dependent upon the actual microphysical properties of the cloud. The use of a physically correct cloud radiative transfer model enables accurate retrievals down to cloud top levels and below semi-transparent cloud layers (e.g., cirrus). It should also be possible to assimilate cloudy radiances directly into the model given a physically correct cloud radiative transfer model using geometric and microphysical cloud parameters retrieved from the radiance spectra as initial cloud variables in the radiance assimilation process. This presentation reviews the above three ways to extract profile information from cloud contaminated radiances. NPOESS Airborne Sounder Testbed-Interferometer radiance spectra and Aqua satellite AIRS radiance spectra are used to illustrate how cloudy radiances can be used

  11. Teaching Absolute Value Meaningfully

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wade, Angela

    2012-01-01

    What is the meaning of absolute value? And why do teachers teach students how to solve absolute value equations? Absolute value is a concept introduced in first-year algebra and then reinforced in later courses. Various authors have suggested instructional methods for teaching absolute value to high school students (Wei 2005; Stallings-Roberts…

  12. Four Years of Absolutely Calibrated Hyperspectral Data from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) on the Eos Aqua

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aumann, Hartmut H.; Broberg, Steve; Elliott, Denis; Gregorich, Dave

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews four years of absolute calibration of hyperspectral data from the AIRS instrument located on the EOS AQUA spacecraft. The following topics are discussed: 1) A quick overview of AIRS; 2) What absolute calibration accuracy and stability are required for climate applications?; 3) Validating of radiance accuracy and stability: Results from four years of AIRS data; and 4) Conclusions.

  13. [Study on the absolute spectral irradiation calibration method for far ultraviolet spectrometer in remote sensing].

    PubMed

    Yu, Lei; Lin, Guan-Yu; Chen, Bin

    2013-01-01

    The present paper studied spectral irradiation responsivities calibration method which can be applied to the far ultraviolet spectrometer for upper atmosphere remote sensing. It is difficult to realize the calibration for far ultraviolet spectrometer for many reasons. Standard instruments for far ultraviolet waveband calibration are few, the degree of the vacuum experiment system is required to be high, the stabilities of the experiment are hardly maintained, and the limitation of the far ultraviolet waveband makes traditional diffuser and the integrating sphere radiance calibration method difficult to be used. To solve these problems, a new absolute spectral irradiance calibration method was studied, which can be applied to the far ultraviolet calibration. We build a corresponding special vacuum experiment system to verify the calibration method. The light source system consists of a calibrated deuterium lamp, a vacuum ultraviolet monochromater and a collimating system. We used the calibrated detector to obtain the irradiance responsivities of it. The three instruments compose the calibration irradiance source. We used the "calibration irradiance source" to illuminate the spectrometer prototype and obtained the spectral irradiance responsivities. It realized the absolute spectral irradiance calibration for the far ultraviolet spectrometer utilizing the calibrated detector. The absolute uncertainty of the calibration is 7.7%. The method is significant for the ground irradiation calibration of the far ultraviolet spectrometer in upper atmosphere remote sensing.

  14. Absolute multilateration between spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muelaner, Jody; Wadsworth, William; Azini, Maria; Mullineux, Glen; Hughes, Ben; Reichold, Armin

    2017-04-01

    Environmental effects typically limit the accuracy of large scale coordinate measurements in applications such as aircraft production and particle accelerator alignment. This paper presents an initial design for a novel measurement technique with analysis and simulation showing that that it could overcome the environmental limitations to provide a step change in large scale coordinate measurement accuracy. Referred to as absolute multilateration between spheres (AMS), it involves using absolute distance interferometry to directly measure the distances between pairs of plain steel spheres. A large portion of each sphere remains accessible as a reference datum, while the laser path can be shielded from environmental disturbances. As a single scale bar this can provide accurate scale information to be used for instrument verification or network measurement scaling. Since spheres can be simultaneously measured from multiple directions, it also allows highly accurate multilateration-based coordinate measurements to act as a large scale datum structure for localized measurements, or to be integrated within assembly tooling, coordinate measurement machines or robotic machinery. Analysis and simulation show that AMS can be self-aligned to achieve a theoretical combined standard uncertainty for the independent uncertainties of an individual 1 m scale bar of approximately 0.49 µm. It is also shown that combined with a 1 µm m‑1 standard uncertainty in the central reference system this could result in coordinate standard uncertainty magnitudes of 42 µm over a slender 1 m by 20 m network. This would be a sufficient step change in accuracy to enable next generation aerospace structures with natural laminar flow and part-to-part interchangeability.

  15. Development of defined microbial population standards using fluorescence activated cell sorting for the absolute quantification of S. aureus using real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Martinon, Alice; Cronin, Ultan P; Wilkinson, Martin G

    2012-01-01

    In this article, four types of standards were assessed in a SYBR Green-based real-time PCR procedure for the quantification of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) in DNA samples. The standards were purified S. aureus genomic DNA (type A), circular plasmid DNA containing a thermonuclease (nuc) gene fragment (type B), DNA extracted from defined populations of S. aureus cells generated by Fluorescence Activated Cell Sorting (FACS) technology with (type C) or without purification of DNA by boiling (type D). The optimal efficiency of 2.016 was obtained on Roche LightCycler(®) 4.1. software for type C standards, whereas the lowest efficiency (1.682) corresponded to type D standards. Type C standards appeared to be more suitable for quantitative real-time PCR because of the use of defined populations for construction of standard curves. Overall, Fieller Confidence Interval algorithm may be improved for replicates having a low standard deviation in Cycle Threshold values such as found for type B and C standards. Stabilities of diluted PCR standards stored at -20°C were compared after 0, 7, 14 and 30 days and were lower for type A or C standards compared with type B standards. However, FACS generated standards may be useful for bacterial quantification in real-time PCR assays once optimal storage and temperature conditions are defined.

  16. Spectrally resolved infrared radiances from AIRS observation and GCM simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Y.; Ramaswamy, V.

    2007-12-01

    Global multi-year spectrally resolved infrared radiances observed by the Atmospheric Infrared Sound (AIRS) satellite instrument and simulated from the General Circulation Models (GCMs) of the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Lab (GFDL) are processed to obtain long-term global and regional means as well as the associated spatial and temporal variability. The accumulated radiance data comprise a host of phenomena that are still largely unrecognized but reveal important physical processes. For instance, the correlation between the radiances and the Sea Surface Temperatures (SSTs) discloses the roles of water vapor in both upper (via its v2 band) and lower (via the continuum in the window region) troposphere, and that of clouds regarding the so called "super greenhouse effect" in Tropics. A comparison between observed and simulated radiances demonstrates that radiance affords a stricter and more insightful metric than the broadband flux. A seemingly good agreement of OLR flux may arise from cancellation of errors of opposite signs in different spectral regions; radiance biases are indicative of physical causes because the radiances at each frequency are sensitive to factor(s) at different levels. Model validation at the radiance level thus provides a complementary and integrative perspective to that obtained using meteorological variables. It is demonstrated that the radiance discrepancies between the GFDL model and the observation are consistent with the model biases in temperature, water vapor and clouds.

  17. CrIS High Resolution Hyperspectral Radiances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hepplewhite, C. L.; Strow, L. L.; Motteler, H.; Desouza-Machado, S. G.; Tobin, D. C.; Martin, G.; Gumley, L.

    2014-12-01

    The CrIS hyperspectral sounder flying on Suomi-NPPpresently has reduced spectral resolution in the mid-wave andshort-wave spectral bands due to truncation of the interferograms inorbit. CrIS has occasionally downlinked full interferograms for thesebands (0.8 cm max path, or 0.625 cm-1 point spacing) for a feworbits up to a full day. Starting Oct.1, 2014 CrIS will be commandedto download full interferograms continuously for the remainder of themission, although NOAA will not immediately produce high-spectralresolution Sensor Data Records (SDRs). Although the originalmotivation for operating in high-resolution mode was improved spectralcalibration, these new data will also improve (1) vertical sensitivityto water vapor, and (2) greatly increase the CrIS sensitivity tocarbon monoxide. This should improve (1) NWP data assimilation ofwater vapor and (2) provide long-term continuity of carbon monoxideretrievals begun with MOPITT on EOS-TERRA and AIRS on EOS-AQUA. Wehave developed a SDR algorithm to produce calibrated high-spectralresolution radiances which includes several improvements to theexisting CrIS SDR algorithm, and will present validation of thesehigh-spectral resolution radiances using a variety of techniques,including bias evaluation versus NWP model data and inter-comparisonsto AIRS and IASI using simultaneous nadir overpasses (SNOs). Theauthors are presently working to implement this algorithm for NASASuomi NPP Program production of Earth System Data Records.

  18. Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) Handbook

    DOE Data Explorer

    Gero, Jonathan; Hackel, Denny; Garcia, Raymond

    2005-01-01

    The atmospheric emitted radiance interferometer (AERI) is a ground-based instrument that measures the downwelling infrared radiance from the Earth's atmosphere. The observations have broad spectral content and sufficient spectral resolution to discriminate among gaseous emitters (e.g., carbon dioxide and water vapor) and suspended matter (e.g., aerosols, water droplets, and ice crystals). These upward-looking surface observations can be used to obtain vertical profiles of tropospheric temperature and water vapor, as well as measurements of trace gases (e.g., ozone, carbon monoxide, and methane) and downwelling infrared spectral signatures of clouds and aerosols.The AERI is a passive remote sounding instrument, employing a Fourier transform spectrometer operating in the spectral range 3.3-19.2 μm (520-3020 cm-1) at an unapodized resolution of 0.5 cm-1 (max optical path difference of 1 cm). The extended-range AERI (ER-AERI) deployed in dry climates, like in Alaska, have a spectral range of 3.3-25.0 μm (400-3020 cm-1) that allow measurements in the far-infrared region. Typically, the AERI averages views of the sky over a 16-second interval and operates continuously.

  19. The Intercalibration of Geostationary Visible Imagers Using Operational Hyperspectral SCIAMACHY Radiances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doelling, David R.; Scarino, Benjamin R.; Morstad, Daniel; Gopalan, Arun; Bhatt, Rajendra; Lukashin, Constantine; Minnis, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Spectral band differences between sensors can complicate the process of intercalibration of a visible sensor against a reference sensor. This can be best addressed by using a hyperspectral reference sensor whenever possible because they can be used to accurately mitigate the band differences. This paper demonstrates the feasibility of using operational Scanning Imaging Absorption Spectrometer for Atmospheric Cartography (SCIAMACHY) large-footprint hyperspectral radiances to calibrate geostationary Earth-observing (GEO) sensors. Near simultaneous nadir overpass measurements were used to compare the temporal calibration of SCIAMACHY with Aqua Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer band radiances, which were found to be consistent to within 0.44% over seven years. An operational SCIAMACHY/GEO ray-matching technique was presented, along with enhancements to improve radiance pair sampling. These enhancements did not bias the underlying intercalibration and provided enough sampling to allow up to monthly monitoring of the GEO sensor degradation. The results of the SCIAMACHY/GEO intercalibration were compared with other operational four-year Meteosat-9 0.65-µm calibration coefficients and were found to be within 1% of the gain, and more importantly, it had one of the lowest temporal standard errors of all the methods. This is more than likely that the GEO spectral response function could be directly applied to the SCIAMACHY radiances, whereas the other operational methods inferred a spectral correction factor. This method allows the validation of the spectral corrections required by other methods.

  20. Platform and Environmental Effects on Above- and In-Water Determinations of Water-Leaving Radiances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hooker, Stanford B.; Morel, Andre; McClain, Charles R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A comparison of above- and in-water spectral measurements in Case-1 conditions showed the uncertainty in above-water determinations of water-leaving radiances depended on the pointing angle of the above-water instruments with respect to the side of the ship. Two above-water methods were used to create a diagnostic variable to quantify the presence of superstructure reflections which degraded the above-water intracomparisons of water-leaving radiances by 10.9-33.4% (for far-to-near viewing distances, respectively). The primary conclusions of the above- and in-water intercomparison of water-leaving radiances were as follows: a) the SeaWiFS 5% radiometric objective was achieved with the above-water approach, but reliably with only one method and only for about half the data; b) a decrease in water-leaving radiance values was seen in the presence of swell, although, wave crests were radiometrically brighter than the troughs; and c) standard band ratios used in ocean color algorithms remained severely affected, because of the relatively low signal and, thus, proportionally significant contamination at the 555nm wavelength.

  1. Deriving a relationship between the radiative power and the SWIR radiance for Gas Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caseiro, Alexandre; Kaiser, Johannes W.; Heil, Angelika; Rücker, Gernot; Tiemann, Joachim; Leimbach, David

    2016-04-01

    Flaring occurs in many regions and is a source of black carbon (BC) globally, among other pollutants. At higher latitudes, flaring is the main source of BC which, upon deposition on snow, lowers its albedo. Therefore, knowing the location and emissions of flares would be a valuable input to climate models. The main goal of this work is to derive a working relationship between Shortwave Infrared at 1.6 μm (SWIR) radiance and Radiative Power (RP). Such a relationship will be helpful in the processing chain use to determine the emissions from gas flares for upcoming instruments, such as the SLSTR on Sentinel-3. In order to derive the relationship between RP and SWIR, RP assigned to Gas Flares (GFs) observed by the small German satellite BIRD is related to the SWIR radiance time series as observed by AATSR at that location in a temporal window of ± 2 months around the BIRD observation. The SWIR signal was retrieved from the AATSR pixel where the GF was identified by BIRD. For each observation, the signal is considered as being above the detection limit if its value is above three times the background standard deviation. The background is a window of approximately 10 × 10 km2 around the GF location pixel. The reported SWIR radiance value is the radiance signal minus the background average. The SWIR radiance signal thus retrieved shows a large variation throughout the time window considered. Such a variation evidences temporal variation in the flaring intensity, possibly GFs are either inactive or active, with varying levels of intensity, throughout time. In a subsequent step, it is also determined whether the radiance at the GF location pixel is a local maximum (after excluding other possible GF locations within the surroundings). Then, a new average and standard deviation for each GF may be constructed, more representative of when the GF is actually on. Those figures are then compared to a normalized RP. The normalization is necessary because the BIRD fire processor

  2. Evaluation of ISCCP multisatellite radiance calibration for geostationary imager visible channels using the moon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stone, Thomas C.; William B. Rossow,; Joseph Ferrier,; Laura M. Hinkelman,

    2013-01-01

    Since 1983, the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) has collected Earth radiance data from the succession of geostationary and polar-orbiting meteorological satellites operated by weather agencies worldwide. Meeting the ISCCP goals of global coverage and decade-length time scales requires consistent and stable calibration of the participating satellites. For the geostationary imager visible channels, ISCCP calibration provides regular periodic updates from regressions of radiances measured from coincident and collocated observations taken by Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer instruments. As an independent check of the temporal stability and intersatellite consistency of ISCCP calibrations, we have applied lunar calibration techniques to geostationary imager visible channels using images of the Moon found in the ISCCP data archive. Lunar calibration enables using the reflected light from the Moon as a stable and consistent radiometric reference. Although the technique has general applicability, limitations of the archived image data have restricted the current study to Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite and Geostationary Meteorological Satellite series. The results of this lunar analysis confirm that ISCCP calibration exhibits negligible temporal trends in sensor response but have revealed apparent relative biases between the satellites at various levels. However, these biases amount to differences of only a few percent in measured absolute reflectances. Since the lunar analysis examines only the lower end of the radiance range, the results suggest that the ISCCP calibration regression approach does not precisely determine the intercept or the zero-radiance response level. We discuss the impact of these findings on the development of consistent calibration for multisatellite global data sets.

  3. Absolutely classical spin states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohnet-Waldraff, F.; Giraud, O.; Braun, D.

    2017-01-01

    We introduce the concept of "absolutely classical" spin states, in analogy to absolutely separable states of bipartite quantum systems. Absolutely classical states are states that remain classical (i.e., a convex sum of projectors on coherent states of a spin j ) under any unitary transformation applied to them. We investigate the maximal size of the ball of absolutely classical states centered on the maximally mixed state and derive a lower bound for its radius as a function of the total spin quantum number. We also obtain a numerical estimate of this maximal radius and compare it to the case of absolutely separable states.

  4. Absolute Radiometric Calibration of KOMPSAT-3A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, H. Y.; Shin, D. Y.; Kim, J. S.; Seo, D. C.; Choi, C. U.

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents a vicarious radiometric calibration of the Korea Multi-Purpose Satellite-3A (KOMPSAT-3A) performed by the Korea Aerospace Research Institute (KARI) and the Pukyong National University Remote Sensing Group (PKNU RSG) in 2015.The primary stages of this study are summarized as follows: (1) A field campaign to determine radiometric calibrated target fields was undertaken in Mongolia and South Korea. Surface reflectance data obtained in the campaign were input to a radiative transfer code that predicted at-sensor radiance. Through this process, equations and parameters were derived for the KOMPSAT-3A sensor to enable the conversion of calibrated DN to physical units, such as at-sensor radiance or TOA reflectance. (2) To validate the absolute calibration coefficients for the KOMPSAT-3A sensor, we performed a radiometric validation with a comparison of KOMPSAT-3A and Landsat-8 TOA reflectance using one of the six PICS (Libya 4). Correlations between top-of-atmosphere (TOA) radiances and the spectral band responses of the KOMPSAT-3A sensors at the Zuunmod, Mongolia and Goheung, South Korea sites were significant for multispectral bands. The average difference in TOA reflectance between KOMPSAT-3A and Landsat-8 image over the Libya 4, Libya site in the red-green-blue (RGB) region was under 3%, whereas in the NIR band, the TOA reflectance of KOMPSAT-3A was lower than the that of Landsat-8 due to the difference in the band passes of two sensors. The KOMPSAT-3Aensor includes a band pass near 940 nm that can be strongly absorbed by water vapor and therefore displayed low reflectance. Toovercome this, we need to undertake a detailed analysis using rescale methods, such as the spectral bandwidth adjustment factor.

  5. Transmittance and Radiance Computations for Rocket Engine Plume Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tejwani, Gopal D.

    2003-01-01

    Emission and absorption characteristics of several atmospheric and combustion species have been studied and are presented with reference to rocket engine plume environments. The effects of clous, rain, and fog on plume radiance/transmittance has also been studied.Preliminary results for the radiance from the exhaust plume of the space shuttle main engine are shown and discussed.

  6. Introducing the Mean Absolute Deviation "Effect" Size

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorard, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    This paper revisits the use of effect sizes in the analysis of experimental and similar results, and reminds readers of the relative advantages of the mean absolute deviation as a measure of variation, as opposed to the more complex standard deviation. The mean absolute deviation is easier to use and understand, and more tolerant of extreme…

  7. Diagnosis of human herpes virus 1 and 2 (HHV-1 and HHV-2): use of a synthetic standard curve for absolute quantification by real time polymerase chain reaction

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Lyana Rodrigues Pinto; da Silva, Amanda Perse; Schmidt-Chanasit, Jonas; de Paula, Vanessa Salete

    2017-01-01

    The use of quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) for herpesvirus detection has improved the sensitivity and specificity of diagnosis, as it is able to detect shedding episodes in the absence of clinical lesions and diagnose clinical specimens that have low viral loads. With an aim to improve the detection and quantification of herpesvirus by qPCR, synthetic standard curves for human herpesvirus 1 and 2 (HHV-1 and HHV-2) targeting regions gD and gG, respectively, were designed and evaluated. The results show that synthetic curves can replace DNA standard curves in diagnostic herpes qPCR. PMID:28225902

  8. Diagnosis of human herpes virus 1 and 2 (HHV-1 and HHV-2): use of a synthetic standard curve for absolute quantification by real time polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Lima, Lyana Rodrigues Pinto; Silva, Amanda Perse da; Schmidt-Chanasit, Jonas; Paula, Vanessa Salete de

    2017-02-16

    The use of quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) for herpesvirus detection has improved the sensitivity and specificity of diagnosis, as it is able to detect shedding episodes in the absence of clinical lesions and diagnose clinical specimens that have low viral loads. With an aim to improve the detection and quantification of herpesvirus by qPCR, synthetic standard curves for human herpesvirus 1 and 2 (HHV-1 and HHV-2) targeting regions gD and gG, respectively, were designed and evaluated. The results show that synthetic curves can replace DNA standard curves in diagnostic herpes qPCR.

  9. Diagnosis of human herpes virus 1 and 2 (HHV-1 and HHV-2): use of a synthetic standard curve for absolute quantification by real time polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Lima, Lyana Rodrigues Pinto; Silva, Amanda Perse da; Schmidt-Chanasit, Jonas; Paula, Vanessa Salete de

    2017-03-01

    The use of quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) for herpesvirus detection has improved the sensitivity and specificity of diagnosis, as it is able to detect shedding episodes in the absence of clinical lesions and diagnose clinical specimens that have low viral loads. With an aim to improve the detection and quantification of herpesvirus by qPCR, synthetic standard curves for human herpesvirus 1 and 2 (HHV-1 and HHV-2) targeting regions gD and gG, respectively, were designed and evaluated. The results show that synthetic curves can replace DNA standard curves in diagnostic herpes qPCR.

  10. Absolute nuclear material assay

    DOEpatents

    Prasad, Manoj K [Pleasanton, CA; Snyderman, Neal J [Berkeley, CA; Rowland, Mark S [Alamo, CA

    2012-05-15

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  11. Absolute nuclear material assay

    DOEpatents

    Prasad, Manoj K.; Snyderman, Neal J.; Rowland, Mark S.

    2010-07-13

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  12. Absolute Quantification of Prion Protein (90-231) Using Stable Isotope-Labeled Chymotryptic Peptide Standards in a LC-MRM AQUA Workflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sturm, Robert; Sheynkman, Gloria; Booth, Clarissa; Smith, Lloyd M.; Pedersen, Joel A.; Li, Lingjun

    2012-09-01

    Substantial evidence indicates that the disease-associated conformer of the prion protein (PrPTSE) constitutes the etiologic agent in prion diseases. These diseases affect multiple mammalian species. PrPTSE has the ability to convert the conformation of the normal prion protein (PrPC) into a β-sheet rich form resistant to proteinase K digestion. Common immunological techniques lack the sensitivity to detect PrPTSE at subfemtomole levels, whereas animal bioassays, cell culture, and in vitro conversion assays offer higher sensitivity but lack the high-throughput the immunological assays offer. Mass spectrometry is an attractive alternative to the above assays as it offers high-throughput, direct measurement of a protein's signature peptide, often with subfemtomole sensitivities. Although a liquid chromatography-multiple reaction monitoring (LC-MRM) method has been reported for PrPTSE, the chemical composition and lack of amino acid sequence conservation of the signature peptide may compromise its accuracy and make it difficult to apply to multiple species. Here, we demonstrate that an alternative protease (chymotrypsin) can produce signature peptides suitable for a LC-MRM absolute quantification (AQUA) experiment. The new method offers several advantages, including: (1) a chymotryptic signature peptide lacking chemically active residues (Cys, Met) that can confound assay accuracy; (2) low attomole limits of detection and quantitation (LOD and LOQ); and (3) a signature peptide retaining the same amino acid sequence across most mammals naturally susceptible to prion infection as well as important laboratory models. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report on the use of a non-tryptic peptide in a LC-MRM AQUA workflow.

  13. Searching for the Norm in a System of Absolutes: A Case Study of Standards-Based Accountability Reform in Pre-Kindergarten

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    Research Findings: The emergence of standards-based accountability reforms in early childhood education has created new challenges for the field. This article presents findings from a case study that explored how stakeholders in a large urban pre-kindergarten program struggled to implement an assessment tool that aligned the normative academic…

  14. A New Marine Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (M-AERI) for Shipboard Atmospheric and Oceanic Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gero, P. J.; Knuteson, R. O.; Hackel, D.; Best, F. A.; Garcia, R.; Phillips, C.; Revercomb, H. E.; Smith, W. L.; Verret, E.; Lantagne, S. M.; Roy, C. B.

    2014-12-01

    A new ship-based Fourier transform spectrometer has been developed to measure the atmospheric downwelling and reflected infrared radiance spectrum at the Earth's surface with high absolute accuracy. This instrument was designed and built by ABB (Québec, Canada) based on the heritage of the Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) designed by the University of Wisconsin Space Science and Engineering Center (UW-SSEC) for the Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program. Prior versions of the M-AERI have been operated by the University of Miami for over a decade on research ships transiting the Atlantic and Pacific in support of NASA and NOAA satellite validation. The M-AERI measures infrared radiance between 520-3020 cm-1 (3.3-19 μm), at a resolution of 1 cm-1, using two detectors cooled to cryogenic temperatures with a Stirling cycle cooler. A gold-coated rotating scene mirror allows the M-AERI to selectively view the atmospheric scene at zenith, and ocean/atmospheric scenes over a range of +/- 45° from the horizon. The AERI uses two high-emissivity blackbodies for radiometric calibration, which in conjunction with the instrument design and a suite of rigorous laboratory diagnostics, ensures the radiometric accuracy to be better than 1% (3σ) of the ambient radiance. The M-AERI radiance spectra can be used to retrieve profiles of temperature and water vapor in the troposphere, as well as measurements of trace gases, cloud properties, and ocean skin temperature. The M-AERI measurement of ocean skin temperature has a demonstrated accuracy of better than 0.1 K. The first marine deployment of the new M-AERI will be as part of the second ARM mobile facility (AMF-2) during the ARM Cloud Aerosol Precipitation Experiment (ACAPEX) on board the NOAA Ship Ronald H. Brown in early 2015, occurring jointly with the NOAA CalWater 2 experiment. This field campaign aims to improve understanding and modeling of large-scale dynamics and cloud

  15. Real-time RT-PCR for detection, identification and absolute quantification of viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus using different types of standards.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Vazquez, C; Bandín, I; Dopazo, C P

    2015-05-21

    In the present study, 2 systems of real-time RT-PCR-one based on SYBR Green and the other on TaqMan-were designed to detect strains from any genotype of viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV), with high sensitivity and repeatability/reproducibility. In addition, the method was optimized for quantitative purposes (qRT-PCR), and standard curves with different types of reference templates were constructed and compared. Specificity was tested against 26 isolates from 4 genotypes. The sensitivity of the procedures was first tested against cell culture isolation, obtaining a limit of detection (LD) of 100 TCID50 ml-1 (100-fold below the LD using cell culture), at a threshold cycle value (Ct) of 36. Sensitivity was also evaluated using RNA from crude (LD = 1 fg; 160 genome copies) and purified virus (100 ag; 16 copies), plasmid DNA (2 copies) and RNA transcript (15 copies). No differences between both chemistries were observed in sensitivity and dynamic range. To evaluate repeatability and reproducibility, all experiments were performed in triplicate and on 3 different days, by workers with different levels of experience, obtaining Ct values with coefficients of variation always <5. This fact, together with the high efficiency and R2 values of the standard curves, encouraged us to analyse the reliability of the method for viral quantification. The results not only demonstrated that the procedure can be used for detection, identification and quantification of this virus, but also demonstrated a clear correlation between the regression lines obtained with different standards, which will help scientists to compare sensitivity results between different studies.

  16. A New Measurement of the Absolute Spectral Reflectance of the Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawrence, S. J.; Lau, E.; Steutel, D.; Stopar, J. D.; Wilcox, B. B.; Lucey, P. G.

    2003-01-01

    The spectral reflectance of the Moon is an important property for studies of lunar geology, quantitative physical modeling of the moon, and in-flight calibration of spacecraft sensors. Previous studies have claimed that telescopic absolute reflectance values for the Moon are greater than laboratory reflectance measurements by a factor of two. In order to confirm these results, we performed ground-based observations of the lunar surface using a visible/near-infrared spectroradiometer and compared the measured lunar surface radiance to solar radiance corrected for atmospheric scattering and absorption. These data were compared to previously obtained laboratory reflectance measurements from Apollo soil samples.

  17. ISCCP reduced resolution satellite radiance data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossow, W.

    1986-01-01

    The International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) is the first active project of the World Climate Research Program. It is a multinational data collection project focused on collecting a data set that will improve the ability to predict and/or simulate the radiative effects of clouds on climate. For specified cloud parameters, the goals are to archieve values for 3-hour periods over the whole globe for 5 years at 30 km resolution. The task of collecting and processing radiance data from both geosynchronous and polar orbiting satellites began in July 1983. A diagram was shown illustrating the flow of data from the transmitting satellites to the various receiving institutions that handle it. The various stages of processing were then explained in detail, emphasizing Level B3-normalized, reformatted, reduced raw satellite data. The reduction of data by sampling is an essential step in the flow. By the time the ISCCP data reaches the Global Processing Center at Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS), the volume has been reduced by a factor of 1000. The Pilot Climate Data System (PLDS) will provide access to the ISCCP data set. It should prove to be one of the cleanest satellite data sets because it will have been through three filters--that of the operational agency, the Global Processing Center, and the PCDS. The ISCCP data set also includes other correlative data sets delivered in compatible format.

  18. Comprehensive Understanding for Vegetated Scene Radiance Relationships

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimes, D. S.; Deering, D. W.

    1984-01-01

    Directional reflectance distributions spanning the entire existent hemisphere were measured in two field studies; one using a Mark III 3-band radiometer and one using the rapid scanning bidirectional field instrument called PARABOLA. Surfaces measured included corn, soybeans, bare soils, grass lawn, orchard grass, alfalfa, cotton row crops, plowed field, annual grassland, stipa grass, hard wheat, salt plain shrubland, and irrigated wheat. Analysis of field data showed unique reflectance distributions ranging from bare soil to complete vegetation canopies. Physical mechanisms causing these trends were proposed. A 3-D model was developed and is unique in that it predicts: (1) the directional spectral reflectance factors as a function of the sensor's azimuth and zenith angles and the sensor's position above the canopy; (2) the spectral absorption as a function of location within the scene; and (3) the directional spectral radiance as a function of the sensor's location within the scene. Initial verification of the model as applied to a soybean row crop showed that the simulated directional data corresponded relatively well in gross trends to the measured data. The model was expanded to include the anisotropic scattering properties of leaves as a function of the leaf orientation distribution in both the zenith and azimuth angle modes.

  19. Wheat signature modeling and analysis for improved training statistics: Supplement. Simulated LANDSAT wheat radiances and radiance components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malila, W. A.; Cicone, R. C.; Gleason, J. M.

    1976-01-01

    Simulated scanner system data values generated in support of LACIE (Large Area Crop Inventory Experiment) research and development efforts are presented. Synthetic inband (LANDSAT) wheat radiances and radiance components were computed and are presented for various wheat canopy and atmospheric conditions and scanner view geometries. Values include: (1) inband bidirectional reflectances for seven stages of wheat crop growth; (2) inband atmospheric features; and (3) inband radiances corresponding to the various combinations of wheat canopy and atmospheric conditions. Analyses of these data values are presented in the main report.

  20. Plane parallel radiance transport for global illumination in vegetation

    SciTech Connect

    Max, N.; Mobley, C.; Keating, B.; Wu, E.H.

    1997-01-05

    This paper applies plane parallel radiance transport techniques to scattering from vegetation. The leaves, stems, and branches are represented as a volume density of scattering surfaces, depending only on height and the vertical component of the surface normal. Ordinary differential equations are written for the multiply scattered radiance as a function of the height above the ground, with the sky radiance and ground reflectance as boundary conditions. They are solved using a two-pass integration scheme to unify the two-point boundary conditions, and Fourier series for the dependence on the azimuthal angle. The resulting radiance distribution is used to precompute diffuse and specular `ambient` shading tables, as a function of height and surface normal, to be used in rendering, together with a z-buffer shadow algorithm for direct solar illumination.

  1. Theory of spectral radiance of pollutants at sea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Remote measurement of soluble pollutants that change the color of the water in the sea is reported. The sensor is a spectral radiometer that flies over the polluted area and compares its spectral radiance to that of surrounding clean seawater. A quantitative analysis of the concentration of pollutants using the measured radiance of the sea compared to laboratory measurements of reflection and transmission spectra of the pollutants is presented. The quantities involved are defined and means for measuring them are described. The equations for remote sensing with a low-flying aircraft, in which case the absorption and radiance of intervening air is negligible are derived. High-flying aircraft and satellites, in which case the radiance of intervening air is the major problem are applied.

  2. Theory of spectral radiance of pollutants at sea, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Remote measurement of pollutants dumped in the sea, not oil slicks, but soluble pollutants that change the color of the water, is addressed. The sensor is a spectral radiometer that flies over the polluted area and compares its spectral radiance (color) to that of surrounding clean seawater. The goal is to infer the concentration of pollutants using the measured radiance of the sea compared to laboratory measurements of reflection and transmission spectra of the pollutants. The subject is treated in three steps: (1) the quantities involved are defined and means for measuring them are described; (2) the equations for remote sensing with a low-flying aircraft are derived, in which wase the absorption and radiance of intervening air is negligible; and (3) high-flying aircraft and satellites are applied, in which case the radiance of intervening air is the major problem.

  3. Directional radiance measurements: Challenges in the sampling of landscapes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deering, D. W.

    1994-01-01

    Most earth surfaces, particularly those supporting natural vegetation ecosystems, constitute structurally and spectrally complex surfaces that are distinctly non-Lambertian reflectors. Obtaining meaningful measurements of the directional radiances of landscapes and obtaining estimates of the complete bidirectional reflectance distribution functions of ground targets with complex and variable landscape and radiometric features are challenging tasks. Reasons for the increased interest in directional radiance measurements are presented, and the issues that must be addressed when trying to acquire directional radiances for vegetated land surfaces from different types of remote sensing platforms are discussed. Priority research emphases are suggested, concerning field measurements of directional surface radiances and reflectances for future research. Primarily, emphasis must be given to the acquisition of more complete and directly associated radiometric and biometric parameter data sets that will empower the exploitation of the 'angular dimension' in remote sensing of vegetation through enabling the further development and rigorous validation of state of the art plant canopy models.

  4. Geophysical trends from 12+ years of AIRS radiance trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desouza-Machado, S. G.; Strow, L. L.; Tangborn, A.; Hepplewhite, C.; Motteler, H.

    2014-12-01

    AIRS has been providing low noise, stable top-of-the atmospherehyperspectral radiances since 2002. In this presentation we use tworadiance subsets; (1) clear-sky scenes over ocean and (2) all-skyscenes along the nadir track. The linear trends of the AIRS spectralradiances are used to retrieve a variety of geophysical trends usingan optimal estimation approach. These retrieved clear sky trendscompare favorably with ERA and MERRA re-analysis trends, and in-situtrends for the minor gases. Preliminary analysis of all-sky trends(using radiance time derivatives) agree better with ERA than eitherMERRA or the AIRS Level-2 retrievals. Trends in cloud radiativeforcing are also examined using probability distribution functions(pdfs) of the AIRS radiances for regional subsets. These are comparedto ERA simulated radiances. These radiance and radiance PDF trendsprovide highly accurate measurements of atmospheric variability witheasily understood error characteristics, unlike Level 2 retrievals.These analysis approaches should provide highly accurate measurementsof a variety of climate trends (temperature and humidity profiles,land surface temperature, cloud radiative forcing) as the AIRS (orAIRS + JPSS/CrIS) instrument time-series soon extends to 15+ years.

  5. Satellite radiance data assimilation for rainfall prediction in Java Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagita, Novvria; Hidayati, Rini; Hidayat, Rahmat; Gustari, Indra

    2017-01-01

    This study examined the influence of satellite radiance data assimilation for predicting two days of heavy rainfall in the Java region. The first case occurred from 22 to 23 on January 2015 while the second case occurred from 1 to 2 on February 2015. The analysis examined before and after data assimilation in the two cases study. The Global Forecast System (GFS) data were used as initial condition which was assimilated with several data such as surface observation data, radiance data from AMSUA sensor, radiance data from HIRS sensor, and radiance data from MHS sensor. Weather Research and Forecasting Data Assimilation (WRFDA) is a tool which is used in this study for assimilating process with Three Dimensional Variation (3D-Var) method. The Quantitative Precipitation Forecast (QPF) skill was used to evaluate influence data assimilation for rainfall prediction. The result of the study obtained different rainfall prediction with different data assimilation. In general, the surface observation data assimilation has lower QPF skill than the satellite radiance data assimilation. Even thought radiance data assimilation has slightly contribution on rainfall prediction, but it gave better accuracy on rainfall prediction for two heavy rainfall cases.

  6. Absolute quantitation of protein posttranslational modification isoform.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhu; Li, Ning

    2015-01-01

    Mass spectrometry has been widely applied in characterization and quantification of proteins from complex biological samples. Because the numbers of absolute amounts of proteins are needed in construction of mathematical models for molecular systems of various biological phenotypes and phenomena, a number of quantitative proteomic methods have been adopted to measure absolute quantities of proteins using mass spectrometry. The liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) coupled with internal peptide standards, i.e., the stable isotope-coded peptide dilution series, which was originated from the field of analytical chemistry, becomes a widely applied method in absolute quantitative proteomics research. This approach provides more and more absolute protein quantitation results of high confidence. As quantitative study of posttranslational modification (PTM) that modulates the biological activity of proteins is crucial for biological science and each isoform may contribute a unique biological function, degradation, and/or subcellular location, the absolute quantitation of protein PTM isoforms has become more relevant to its biological significance. In order to obtain the absolute cellular amount of a PTM isoform of a protein accurately, impacts of protein fractionation, protein enrichment, and proteolytic digestion yield should be taken into consideration and those effects before differentially stable isotope-coded PTM peptide standards are spiked into sample peptides have to be corrected. Assisted with stable isotope-labeled peptide standards, the absolute quantitation of isoforms of posttranslationally modified protein (AQUIP) method takes all these factors into account and determines the absolute amount of a protein PTM isoform from the absolute amount of the protein of interest and the PTM occupancy at the site of the protein. The absolute amount of the protein of interest is inferred by quantifying both the absolute amounts of a few PTM

  7. Absolute calibration of optical flats

    DOEpatents

    Sommargren, Gary E.

    2005-04-05

    The invention uses the phase shifting diffraction interferometer (PSDI) to provide a true point-by-point measurement of absolute flatness over the surface of optical flats. Beams exiting the fiber optics in a PSDI have perfect spherical wavefronts. The measurement beam is reflected from the optical flat and passed through an auxiliary optic to then be combined with the reference beam on a CCD. The combined beams include phase errors due to both the optic under test and the auxiliary optic. Standard phase extraction algorithms are used to calculate this combined phase error. The optical flat is then removed from the system and the measurement fiber is moved to recombine the two beams. The newly combined beams include only the phase errors due to the auxiliary optic. When the second phase measurement is subtracted from the first phase measurement, the absolute phase error of the optical flat is obtained.

  8. Evaluation of Long-Term Calibrations of the AVHRR Visible Radiances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossow, William B.; Ferrier, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Two systematic calibrations have been compiled for the visible radiances measured by the series of AVHRR instruments flown on the NOAA operational polar weather satellites: one by the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP), anchored on NASA ER-2 underflights in the 1980s and early 1990s and covering the period 1981-2009, and one by the PATMOS-x project, anchored on comparisons to the MODIS instruments on the Aqua and Terra satellites in the 2000s and covering the period 1979-2010 (this result also includes calibration for the near-IR channels). Both methods have had to extend their anchor calibrations over a long series of instruments using different vicarious approaches, so a comparison provides an opportunity to evaluate how well this extension works by cross-checking the results at the anchor points. The basic result of this comparison is that for the ''afternoon'' series of AVHRRs, the calibrations agree to within their mutual uncertainties. However, this retrospective evaluation also shows that the representation of the time variations can be simplified. The ISCCP procedure had much more difficulty extending the calibration to the ''morning'' series of AVHRRs with the calibrations for NOAA-15 and NOAA-17 exceeding the estimated uncertainties. Given the general agreement, a new calibration for all AVHRR visible radiances (except TIROS-N, NOAA-6, NOAA-19, and MetOp-A) is proposed that is based on the average of the best linear fits to the two time records. The estimated uncertainty of these calibrations is 63% absolute (scaled radiance units).

  9. Advances in simulating radiance signatures for dynamic air/water interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodenough, Adam A.; Brown, Scott D.; Gerace, Aaron

    2015-05-01

    The air-water interface poses a number of problems for both collecting and simulating imagery. At the surface, the magnitude of observed radiance can change by multiple orders of magnitude at high spatiotemporal frequency due to glinting effects. In the volume, similarly high frequency focusing of photons by a dynamic wave surface significantly changes the reflected radiance of in-water objects and the scattered return of the volume itself. These phenomena are often manifest as saturated pixels and artifacts in collected imagery (often enhanced by time delays between neighboring pixels or interpolation between adjacent filters) and as noise and greater required computation times in simulated imagery. This paper describes recent advances made to the Digital Image and Remote Sensing Image Generation (DIRSIG) model to address the simulation issues to better facilitate an understanding of a multi/hyper-spectral collection. Glint effects are simulated using a dynamic height field that can be driven by wave frequency models and generates a sea state at arbitrary time scales. The volume scattering problem is handled by coupling the geometry representing the surface (facetization by the height field) with the single scattering contribution at any point in the water. The problem is constrained somewhat by assuming that contributions come from a Snell's window above the scattering point and by assuming a direct source (sun). Diffuse single scattered and multiple scattered energy contributions are handled by Monte Carlo techniques employed previously. The model is compared to existing radiative transfer codes where possible, with the objective of providing a robust movel of time-dependent absolute radiance at many wavelengths.

  10. Equivalent Sensor Radiance Generation and Remote Sensing from Model Parameters. Part 1; Equivalent Sensor Radiance Formulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wind, Galina; DaSilva, Arlindo M.; Norris, Peter M.; Platnick, Steven E.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we describe a general procedure for calculating equivalent sensor radiances from variables output from a global atmospheric forecast model. In order to take proper account of the discrepancies between model resolution and sensor footprint the algorithm takes explicit account of the model subgrid variability, in particular its description of the probably density function of total water (vapor and cloud condensate.) The equivalent sensor radiances are then substituted into an operational remote sensing algorithm processing chain to produce a variety of remote sensing products that would normally be produced from actual sensor output. This output can then be used for a wide variety of purposes such as model parameter verification, remote sensing algorithm validation, testing of new retrieval methods and future sensor studies. We show a specific implementation using the GEOS-5 model, the MODIS instrument and the MODIS Adaptive Processing System (MODAPS) Data Collection 5.1 operational remote sensing cloud algorithm processing chain (including the cloud mask, cloud top properties and cloud optical and microphysical properties products.) We focus on clouds and cloud/aerosol interactions, because they are very important to model development and improvement.

  11. Generalized Eddington analytical model for azimuthally dependent radiance simulation in stratified media.

    PubMed

    Marzano, Frank S; Ferrauto, Giancarlo

    2005-10-01

    A fast analytical radiative transfer model to account for propagation of unpolarized monochromatic radiation in random media with a plane-parallel geometry is presented. The model employs an Eddington-like approach combined with the delta phase-function transformation technique. The Eddington approximation is extended in a form that allows us to unfold the azimuthal dependence of the radiance field. A first-order scattering correction to the azimuth-dependent Eddington radiative model solution is also performed to improve the model accuracy for low-scattering media and flexibility with respect to use of explicit arbitrary phase functions. The first-order scattering-corrected solution, called the generalized Eddington radiative model (GERM), is systematically tested against a numerical multistream discrete ordinate model for backscattered radiance at the top of the medium. The typical mean accuracy of the GERM solution is generally better than 10% with a standard deviation of 20% for radiance calculations over a wide range of independent input optical parameters and observation angles. GERM errors are shown to be comparable with the errors due to an input parameter uncertainty of precise numerical models. The proposed model can be applied in a quite arbitrary random medium, and the results are appealing in all cases where speed, accuracy, and/or closed-form solutions are requested. Its potentials, limitations, and further extensions are discussed.

  12. Release Path Temperatures of Shock-Compressed Tin from Dynamic Reflectance and Radiance Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    La Lone, B. M.; Stevens, G. D.; Turley, W. D.; Holtkamp, D. B.; Iverson, A. J.; Hixson, R. S.; Veeser, L. R.

    2013-08-01

    Dynamic reflectance and radiance measurements were conducted for tin samples shock compressed to 35 GPa and released to 15 GPa using high explosives. We determined the reflectance of the tin samples glued to lithium fluoride windows using an integrating sphere with an internal xenon flashlamp as an illumination source. The dynamic reflectance (R) was determined at near normal incidence in four spectral bands with coverage in visible and near-infrared spectra. Uncertainties in R/R0 are < 2%, and uncertainties in absolute reflectance are < 5%. In complementary experiments, thermal radiance from the tin/glue/lithium fluoride interface was recorded with similar shock stress and spectral coverage as the reflectance measurements. The two sets of experiments were combined to obtain the temperature history of the tin surface with an uncertainty of < 2%. The stress at the interface was determined from photonic Doppler velocimetry and combined with the temperatures to obtain temperature-stress release paths for tin. We discuss the relationship between the experimental release paths and release isentropes that begin on the principal shock Hugoniot.

  13. Release path temperatures of shock-compressed tin from dynamic reflectance and radiance measurements

    SciTech Connect

    La Lone, B. M. Stevens, G. D.; Turley, W. D.; Holtkamp, D. B.; Iverson, A. J.; Hixson, R. S.; Veeser, L. R.

    2013-08-14

    Dynamic reflectance and radiance measurements were conducted for tin samples shock compressed to 35 GPa and released to 15 GPa using high explosives. We determined the reflectance of the tin samples glued to lithium fluoride windows using an integrating sphere with an internal xenon flashlamp as an illumination source. The dynamic reflectance (R) was determined at near normal incidence in four spectral bands with coverage in visible and near-infrared spectra. Uncertainties in R/R{sub 0} are <2%, and uncertainties in absolute reflectance are <5%. In complementary experiments, thermal radiance from the tin/glue/lithium fluoride interface was recorded with similar shock stress and spectral coverage as the reflectance measurements. The two sets of experiments were combined to obtain the temperature history of the tin surface with an uncertainty of <2%. The stress at the interface was determined from photonic Doppler velocimetry and combined with the temperatures to obtain temperature-stress release paths for tin. We discuss the relationship between the experimental release paths and release isentropes that begin on the principal shock Hugoniot.

  14. A New Instrument for Measurement of the Solar Aureole Radiance Distribution from Unstable Platforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ritter, Joseph M.; Voss, Kenneth J.

    1999-01-01

    A novel imaging solar aureole radiometer, which can obtain absolute radiometric measurements of the solar aureole when operated on an unstable platform is described. A CCD array is used to image the aureole, while a neutral density occulter on a long pole blocks the direct solar radiation. This ensures accurate direction registration as the sun appears in acquired images, and the total circumsolar region is measured simultaneously. The imaging nature of this instrument along with a special triggering device permit acquisition of the circumsolar sky radiance within 7.5 degrees of the center of the solar disk, and within 1 degree of the edge of the solar disk. This innovation makes possible for the first time, reliable and accurate radiometric measurements of the solar aureole from unstable mobile platforms such as ships. This allows determination small angle atmospheric scattering. The instrument has been used in field studies of atmospheric aerosols and will be used in satellite validation and calibration campaigns.

  15. Absolute and relative blindsight.

    PubMed

    Balsdon, Tarryn; Azzopardi, Paul

    2015-03-01

    The concept of relative blindsight, referring to a difference in conscious awareness between conditions otherwise matched for performance, was introduced by Lau and Passingham (2006) as a way of identifying the neural correlates of consciousness (NCC) in fMRI experiments. By analogy, absolute blindsight refers to a difference between performance and awareness regardless of whether it is possible to match performance across conditions. Here, we address the question of whether relative and absolute blindsight in normal observers can be accounted for by response bias. In our replication of Lau and Passingham's experiment, the relative blindsight effect was abolished when performance was assessed by means of a bias-free 2AFC task or when the criterion for awareness was varied. Furthermore, there was no evidence of either relative or absolute blindsight when both performance and awareness were assessed with bias-free measures derived from confidence ratings using signal detection theory. This suggests that both relative and absolute blindsight in normal observers amount to no more than variations in response bias in the assessment of performance and awareness. Consideration of the properties of psychometric functions reveals a number of ways in which relative and absolute blindsight could arise trivially and elucidates a basis for the distinction between Type 1 and Type 2 blindsight.

  16. A Systematic Error Correction Method for TOVS Radiances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joiner, Joanna; Rokke, Laurie; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Treatment of systematic errors is crucial for the successful use of satellite data in a data assimilation system. Systematic errors in TOVS radiance measurements and radiative transfer calculations can be as large or larger than random instrument errors. The usual assumption in data assimilation is that observational errors are unbiased. If biases are not effectively removed prior to assimilation, the impact of satellite data will be lessened and can even be detrimental. Treatment of systematic errors is important for short-term forecast skill as well as the creation of climate data sets. A systematic error correction algorithm has been developed as part of a 1D radiance assimilation. This scheme corrects for spectroscopic errors, errors in the instrument response function, and other biases in the forward radiance calculation for TOVS. Such algorithms are often referred to as tuning of the radiances. The scheme is able to account for the complex, air-mass dependent biases that are seen in the differences between TOVS radiance observations and forward model calculations. We will show results of systematic error correction applied to the NOAA 15 Advanced TOVS as well as its predecessors. We will also discuss the ramifications of inter-instrument bias with a focus on stratospheric measurements.

  17. The absolute path command

    SciTech Connect

    Moody, A.

    2012-05-11

    The ap command traveres all symlinks in a given file, directory, or executable name to identify the final absolute path. It can print just the final path, each intermediate link along with the symlink chan, and the permissions and ownership of each directory component in the final path. It has functionality similar to "which", except that it shows the final path instead of the first path. It is also similar to "pwd", but it can provide the absolute path to a relative directory from the current working directory.

  18. A neural network method to correct bidirectional effects in water-leaving radiance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Yongzhen; Li, Wei; Voss, Kenneth J.; Gatebe, Charles K.; Stamnes, Knut

    2017-02-01

    The standard method to convert the measured water-leaving radiances from the observation direction to the nadir direction developed by Morel and coworkers requires knowledge of the chlorophyll concentration (CHL). Also, the standard method was developed for open ocean water, which makes it unsuitable for turbid coastal waters. We introduce a neural network method to convert the water-leaving radiance (or the corresponding remote sensing reflectance) from the observation direction to the nadir direction. This method does not require any prior knowledge of the water constituents or the inherent optical properties (IOPs). This method is fast, accurate and can be easily adapted to different remote sensing instruments. Validation using NuRADS measurements in different types of water shows that this method is suitable for both open ocean and coastal waters. In open ocean or chlorophyll-dominated waters, our neural network method produces corrections similar to those of the standard method. In turbid coastal waters, especially sediment-dominated waters, a significant improvement was obtained compared to the standard method.

  19. The importance and attainment of accurate absolute radiometric calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, P. N.

    1984-01-01

    The importance of accurate absolute radiometric calibration is discussed by reference to the needs of those wishing to validate or use models describing the interaction of electromagnetic radiation with the atmosphere and earth surface features. The in-flight calibration methods used for the Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) and the Systeme Probatoire d'Observation de la Terre, Haute Resolution visible (SPOT/HRV) systems are described and their limitations discussed. The questionable stability of in-flight absolute calibration methods suggests the use of a radiative transfer program to predict the apparent radiance, at the entrance pupil of the sensor, of a ground site of measured reflectance imaged through a well characterized atmosphere. The uncertainties of such a method are discussed.

  20. Water heat pipe blackbody as a reference spectral radiance source between 50°C and 250°C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noorma, M.; Mekhontsev, S.; Khromchenko, V.; Litorja, M.; Cagran, C.; Zeng, J.; Hanssen, L.

    2006-04-01

    Realization of a radiometric temperature scale for near ambient temperatures with accuracy at the 20 to 50 mK level is crucial for a number of demanding military and commercial applications. In support of such measurements, radiation sources with high stability and spatial uniformity must be developed as reference and working standards. Traditionally, the temperature scale, maintained at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), relies on water bath and oil bath blackbodies in this temperature range. Recently, a water heat pipe blackbody was used at NIST as a spectral radiance source in a spectral emissivity measurement facility. Now a new, more versatile high emissivity water heat pipe blackbody was designed and characterized to be used as a reference radiance source for the radiometric temperature scale realization between 50 °C and 250 °C. Furthermore, it will serve as a reference source for the infrared spectral radiance measurements between 2.5 μm and 20 μm. The calculated spectral emissivity of the painted copper alloy cavity was verified by reflectance measurements using a CO II laser at 10.6 μm wavelength. The spatial thermal uniformity and stability of the blackbody were characterized. Two independent realizations of the radiometric temperature scale were compared in order to verify the accuracy of the scale. Radiance temperature, calculated from the cavity temperature measured with a calibrated PRT contact thermometer and from the emissivity of the cavity, was compared to the radiance temperature, directly measured with a reference pyrometer, which was calibrated with a set of fixed point blackbodies. The difference was found to be within measurement uncertainties.

  1. Solar radiance models for determination of ERBE scanner filter factor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arduini, R. F.

    1985-01-01

    Shortwave spectral radiance models for use in the spectral correction algorithms for the ERBE Scanner Instrument are provided. The required data base was delivered to the ERBe Data Reduction Group in October 1984. It consisted of two sets of data files: (1) the spectral bidirectional angular models and (2) the spectral flux modes. The bidirectional models employ the angular characteristics of reflection by the Earth-atmosphere system and were derived from detailed radiance calculations using a finite difference model of the radiative transfer process. The spectral flux models were created through the use of a delta-Eddington model to economically simulate the effects of atmospheric variability. By combining these data sets, a wide range of radiances may be approximated for a number of scene types.

  2. Evaluation of upwelling infrared radiance from earth's atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, S. K.; Tiwari, S. N.

    1975-01-01

    Basic equations for calculating the upwelling atmospheric radiation are presented which account for various sources of radiation coming out at the top of the atmosphere. The theoretical formulation of the transmittance models (line-by-line and quasi-random band model) and the computational procedures used for the evaluation of the transmittance and radiance are discussed in detail. By employing the Lorentz line-by-line and quasi-random computer programs, model calculations were made to determine the upwelling radiance and signal change in the wave number interval of CO fundamental band. These results are useful in determining the effects of different interfering molecules, water vapor profiles, ground temperatures, and ground emittances on the upwelling radiance and signal change. This information is of vital importance in establishing the feasibility of measuring the concentrations of pollutants in the atmosphere from a gas filter correlation instrument flown on an aircraft or mounted on a satellite.

  3. Modeling directional thermal radiance from a forest canopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcguire, M. J.; Balick, L. K.; Smith, J. A.; Hutchison, B. A.

    1989-01-01

    The thermal vegetation canopy radiance model of Smith et al. (1981) is extended to account for the geometrically rough structure of a forest canopy. Fourier series expansion of a canopy height profile is used to calculate improved view facts which partially account for directional variations in canopy thermal radiance transfers. Predictions from the Smith model and the modified model are compared with experimental data obtained over a deciduous forest site in Tennessee. The results show that thermal radiance from a forest canopy depends on sensor viewing angle, solar position, and the degree of geometric roughness of the canopy surface. The maximum off-nadir angle variation in the original model was 1.6 deg C, compared with 4.4 C for the modified model.

  4. Effects of Raman scattering on the water-leaving radiance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waters, Kirk J.

    1995-01-01

    The contribution of Raman scattering to the water-leaving radiance is examined using Monte Carlo simulations. Exit angle information is retained, allowing a comparison of different satellite viewing directions. Chlorophyll values of 0.0, 0.01, 0.1, and 1.0 mg Chl/cu m are simulated. Little directional variability is found, with the exception of the direct solar backscatter direction. The wavelength variability is greatest for low chlorophyll concentrations and is negligible for 1.0 mg Chl/cu m. At 550 nm the Raman contribution ranges from approximately 18% of the total water-leaving radiance for pure water to 3% for 1.0 mg Chl/cu m. At 440 nm the range is from 6% to 2%, indicating that Raman scattering will impact radiance ratios for ocean color satellite algorithms.

  5. Impact of radiance variations on satellite sensor calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duggin, Michael J.

    1987-04-01

    The intercalibration of digital data from different sensors depends on systematic and random variations in factors controlling recorded radiance. Theoretical expressions are presented which describe the impact of random variations in those factors which control radiance incident on the sensor. Means of measuring or estimating the impact of random variations on intercalibration factors are discussed. Means of detecting and calibrating for systematic effects are also discussed. The optical-reflective, middle-infrared, and thermal infrared regions of the spectrum are considered. An example is presented whereby NOAA-7 and NOAA-8 advanced very high resolution radiometer (AVHRR) radiance data, obtained over the same test fields, are shown to depend on the differences in view angles used by the two satellites.

  6. The Effect of Clouds Upon Limb Scattered Radiances and the Retrieval of Ozone Profiles Using These Radiances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flittner, D. E.; McPeters, R. D.; Hilsenrath, E.; Janz, S. J.; Herman, B. M.; Loughman, R. P.

    1998-01-01

    The use of limb scattered radiance profiles to retrieve ozone profiles is currently being investigated. The goal is to produce ozone profiles with better vertical resolution than is available with the Backscattered Ultraviolet (BUV) technique and with much greater spatial and temporal coverage than with the solar occultation method (i.e. SAGE II). This method, which uses UV and visible light scattered from the earth's limb, has recently been proven to work for clear sky cases with data from the STS-87 flight of the Shuttle Ozone Sounding Limb Experiment/Limb Ozone Retrieval Experiment (SOLSE/LORE). As to be expected, clouds have a substantial impact upon the limb radiance (increasing the radiance as much as 80-100% is some cases). Here we use a variety of radiative transfer models and limited SOLSE/LORE data to investigate the effect of clouds upon the limb radiance at wavelengths used in the ozone retrieval (approximately 600 nm). Though the presence of clouds can greatly increase the limb radiance, they have a minimal effect upon the retrieved ozone profile, since the retrieval uses a differential absorption technique.

  7. Asteroid 951 Gaspra Near Infrared Mapping Spectrometer Radiance Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granahan, J. C., Jr.

    2015-12-01

    Five radiance spectra of asteroid 951 Gaspra have been archived in the Small Bodies Node of the NASA Planetary Data System [Granahan, 2014]. The radiance spectra were created from uncalibrated Galileo spacecraft Near Infrared Mapping Spectrometer files archived in the Imaging Node of the NASA Planetary Data System. The NASA Galileo spacecraft observed asteroid 951 Gaspra on October 29, 1991 with the Near Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (NIMS) at wavelengths ranging from 0.7 - 5.2 micrometers [Carlson et al., 1992]. The five radiance spectra consist of two 17, two 100, and one 329 spectral channel data sets. They record data that was acquired by NIMS at ranges between 27232.6 to 14723.8 kilometers from asteroid 951 Gaspra. The uncalibrated NIMS data were converted into radiance spectra using calibration coefficients obtained during the Galileo mission's first Earth encounter on December 8, 1990. The archived radiance spectral data is located at the URL (Universal Record Locator): http://sbn.psi.edu/pds/resource/gaspraspec.html and contains radiance, solar, incidence over flux, and data documentation. This archived data set contains a variety of spectral signatures. These signatures include absorptions near 1.0, 2.0, 2.8, 3.4, and 4.5 micrometers. The 1.0 and 2.0 micrometer features are indicators of olivine and pyroxene on the asteroid surface. The 2.8 micrometer feature has a shape similar to the combined spectra of multiple iron bearing phyllosilicates. The 3.4 micrometer feature is in the same location as absorptions created by a carbon-hydrogen bond. The 4.5 micrometer feature, present only in the 329 channel data set, corresponds in position to absorptions detected in sulfate minerals. Carlson, R. W., et al. (1992) Bull. of the A.A.S., 24, 932. Granahan, J. C. (2014), GO-A-NIMS-3-GASPRASPEC-V1.0, NASA Planetary Data System.

  8. Radiance limits of ceramic phosphors under high excitation fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenef, Alan; Kelso, John; Zheng, Yi; Tchoul, Maxim

    2013-09-01

    Ceramic phosphors, excited by high radiance pump sources, offer considerable potential for high radiance conversion. Interestingly, thermodynamic arguments suggest that the radiance of the luminescent spot can even exceed that of the incoming light source. In practice, however, thermal quenching and (non-thermal) optical saturation limit the maximum attainable radiance of the luminescent source. We present experimental data for Ce:YAG and Ce:GdYAG ceramics in which these limits have been investigated. High excitation fluxes are achieved using laser pumping. Optical pumping intensities exceeding 100W/mm2 have been shown to produce only modest efficiency depreciation at low overall pump powers because of the short Ce3+ lifetime, although additional limitations exist. When pump powers are higher, heat-transfer bottlenecks within the ceramic and heat-sink interfaces limit maximum pump intensities. We find that surface temperatures of these laser-pumped ceramics can reach well over 150°C, causing thermal-quenching losses. We also find that in some cases, the loss of quantum efficiency with increasing temperature can cause a thermal run-away effect, resulting in a rapid loss in converted light, possibly over-heating the sample or surrounding structures. While one can still obtain radiances on the order of many W/mm2/sr, temperature quenching effects ultimately limit converted light radiance. Finally, we use the diffusion-approximation radiation transport models and rate equation models to simulate some of these nonlinear optical pumping and heating effects in high-scattering ceramics.

  9. RADIANCE PROCESS EVALUATION FOR PARTICLE REMOVAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The microelectronics industry (wafer, flat panel displays, photomasks, and storage media) is transitioning to higher device densities and larger substrate formats. These changes will challenge standard cleaning methods and will require significant increases to the fabricator inf...

  10. Improved Strategies and Optimization of Calibration Models for Real-time PCR Absolute Quantification

    EPA Science Inventory

    Real-time PCR absolute quantification applications rely on the use of standard curves to make estimates of DNA target concentrations in unknown samples. Traditional absolute quantification approaches dictate that a standard curve must accompany each experimental run. However, t...

  11. Vertical Covariance Localization for Satellite Radiances in Ensemble Kalman Filters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    Vertical Covariance Localization for Satellite Radiances in Ensemble Kalman Filters WILLIAM F. CAMPBELL, CRAIG H. BISHOP, AND DANIEL HODYSS Naval...being used in the operational data assimila- tion system at Environment Canada for their ensemble Corresponding author address: Dr. William F...here. Acknowledgments. The authors thank Jeff Whitaker, Peter Houtekamer, Herschel Mitchell, and our anony- mous reviewer for their valuable comments. We

  12. Radiance-ratio algorithm wavelengths for remote oceanic chlorophyll determination.

    PubMed

    Hoge, F E; Wright, C W; Swift, R N

    1987-06-01

    Two-band radiance-ratio in-water algorithms in the visible spectrum have been evaluated for remote oceanic chlorophyll determination. Airborne active-passive (laser-solar) data from coastal, shelf-slope, and bluewater regions were used to generate 2-D chlorophyll-fluorescence and radiance-ratio statistical correlation matrices containing all possible two-band ratio combinations from the thirty-two available contiguous 11.25-nm passive bands. The principal finding was that closely spaced radiance-ratio bands yield chlorophyll estimates which are highly correlated with laser-induced chlorophyll fluorescence within several distinct regions of the ocean color spectrum. Band combinations in the yellow (~565/575-nm), orange-red (~675/685-nm), and red (~695/705-nm) spectral regions showed considerable promise for satisfactory chlorophyll pigment estimation in near-coastal Case II waters. Based on very limited data, pigment recovery in Case I waters was best accomplished using blue-green radiance ratios in the ~490/500-nm region.

  13. Spectral reflectance and radiance characteristics of water pollutants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wezernak, C. T.; Turner, R. E.; Lyzenga, D. R.

    1976-01-01

    Spectral reflectance characteristics of water pollutants and water bodies were compiled using the existing literature. Radiance calculations were performed at satellite altitude for selected illumination angles and atmospheric conditions. The work described in this report was limited to the reflective portion of the spectrum between 0.40 micrometer to 1.0 micrometer.

  14. Surface Emissivity Effects on Thermodynamic Retrieval of IR Spectral Radiance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, Daniel K.; Larar, Allen M.; Smith, William L.; Liu, Xu

    2006-01-01

    The surface emissivity effect on the thermodynamic parameters (e.g., the surface skin temperature, atmospheric temperature, and moisture) retrieved from satellite infrared (IR) spectral radiance is studied. Simulation analysis demonstrates that surface emissivity plays an important role in retrieval of surface skin temperature and terrestrial boundary layer (TBL) moisture. NAST-I ultraspectral data collected during the CLAMS field campaign are used to retrieve thermodynamic properties of the atmosphere and surface. The retrievals are then validated by coincident in-situ measurements, such as sea surface temperature, radiosonde temperature and moisture profiles. Retrieved surface emissivity is also validated by that computed from the observed radiance and calculated emissions based on the retrievals of surface temperature and atmospheric profiles. In addition, retrieved surface skin temperature and emissivity are validated together by radiance comparison between the observation and retrieval-based calculation in the window region where atmospheric contribution is minimized. Both simulation and validation results have lead to the conclusion that variable surface emissivity in the inversion process is needed to obtain accurate retrievals from satellite IR spectral radiance measurements. Retrieval examples are presented to reveal that surface emissivity plays a significant role in retrieving accurate surface skin temperature and TBL thermodynamic parameters.

  15. Geophysical trends from 12+ years of AIRS radiance trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeSouza-Machado, Sergio; Strow, Larrabee; Tangborn, Andrew; Hepplewhite, Chris; Motteler, Howard; Schou, Paul; Buczkowski, Steve

    2015-04-01

    NASA's Atmospheric Infrared Sounder has daily been providing low noise, stable top-of-the atmosphere hyperspectral radiances since 2002. Here we present analysis from 12 year linear radiance trends obtained from two AIRS radiance subsets : (1) clear-sky scenes over ocean and (2) all-sky scenes along the nadir track, which are used to retrieve a geophysical trends using an optimal estimation approach. The retrieved clear sky trends compare favorably with ERA and MERRA re-analysis trends, and in-situ trends for the minor gases. Analysis of all-sky trends show they agree better with ERA than either MERRA or the AIRS Level-2 retrievals. The radiance trends provide highly accurate measurements of atmospheric variability with easily understood error characteristics, unlike typical Level 2 retrievals. These approaches should provide highly accurate measurements of a variety of climate trends (temperature and humidity profiles, land surface temperature, cloud radiative forcing) as the AIRS (or AIRS + JPSS/CrIS + IASI) instrument time-series extends to 15+ years.

  16. Variance in radiance recorded from heterogeneous targets in the optical-reflective, middle-infrared, and thermal-infrared regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duggin, Michael J.

    1986-12-01

    In this paper, the variance in radiance recorded from heterogeneous scenes in the optical-reflective, middle-IR, and thermal-IR regions is considered. The impact of this variance on feature discrimination is considered. Equations are presented, by which the efficacy of standard analytical techniques for given feature mapping tasks may be evaluated using available data. It is also suggested that these equations may be helpful in development of mission-oriented sensors.

  17. Cloud discrimination and spectral radiance estimation from a digital sky images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, M.; Iwabuchi, H.; Murata, I.

    2015-12-01

    Clouds cover more than 60% of the globe with high impacts on incoming solar irradiance on the ground as well as the radiative energy transfer in the Earth-atmosphere system. Several method for detecting clouds from sky images have been developed, and digital signals available from the JPEG image have nonlinear relationship with the corresponding spectral radiances, which may lead to cloud misclassifications. In this work, a method for cloud discrimination from sky images in RAW format taken from a commercial digital camera is developed. The method uses the clear sky index (CSI). In order to take into account the spectral response in red-green-blue (RGB) channels of the camera as well as lens characteristics, these characteristics are first inferred very accurately with a laboratory experiment. Spectral radiance is represented in a simple form with spectra of incoming solar radiation at the top of atmosphere and ozone transmittance and a polynominal with three coefficients that include the intensity index, the molecular index (MI) and the small particle index (SPI). These coefficients can be obtained from the digital RGB RAW counts by linear transformation. The MI and the SPI can be converted to the CSI, which takes different value from that at clear sky and cloudy pixels. Simultaneous observations with the lidar and the digital camera at Tohoku University show that the CSI can discriminate cloud and clear sky at every pixel with correct discrimination rate more than 90%. Furthermore, spectral distribution of sky radiance can also be estimated at every pixel, and estimated ones are consistent with those from spectrometer and those from radiative transfer simulations under various sky conditions in a wavelength range of 430-680 nm with mean biases lower than 3% and bias standard deviations smaller than 1%.

  18. Electronic Absolute Cartesian Autocollimator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leviton, Douglas B.

    2006-01-01

    An electronic absolute Cartesian autocollimator performs the same basic optical function as does a conventional all-optical or a conventional electronic autocollimator but differs in the nature of its optical target and the manner in which the position of the image of the target is measured. The term absolute in the name of this apparatus reflects the nature of the position measurement, which, unlike in a conventional electronic autocollimator, is based absolutely on the position of the image rather than on an assumed proportionality between the position and the levels of processed analog electronic signals. The term Cartesian in the name of this apparatus reflects the nature of its optical target. Figure 1 depicts the electronic functional blocks of an electronic absolute Cartesian autocollimator along with its basic optical layout, which is the same as that of a conventional autocollimator. Referring first to the optical layout and functions only, this or any autocollimator is used to measure the compound angular deviation of a flat datum mirror with respect to the optical axis of the autocollimator itself. The optical components include an illuminated target, a beam splitter, an objective or collimating lens, and a viewer or detector (described in more detail below) at a viewing plane. The target and the viewing planes are focal planes of the lens. Target light reflected by the datum mirror is imaged on the viewing plane at unit magnification by the collimating lens. If the normal to the datum mirror is parallel to the optical axis of the autocollimator, then the target image is centered on the viewing plane. Any angular deviation of the normal from the optical axis manifests itself as a lateral displacement of the target image from the center. The magnitude of the displacement is proportional to the focal length and to the magnitude (assumed to be small) of the angular deviation. The direction of the displacement is perpendicular to the axis about which the

  19. Absolute airborne gravimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumann, Henri

    This work consists of a feasibility study of a first stage prototype airborne absolute gravimeter system. In contrast to relative systems, which are using spring gravimeters, the measurements acquired by absolute systems are uncorrelated and the instrument is not suffering from problems like instrumental drift, frequency response of the spring and possible variation of the calibration factor. The major problem we had to resolve were to reduce the influence of the non-gravitational accelerations included in the measurements. We studied two different approaches to resolve it: direct mechanical filtering, and post-processing digital compensation. The first part of the work describes in detail the different mechanical passive filters of vibrations, which were studied and tested in the laboratory and later in a small truck in movement. For these tests as well as for the airborne measurements an absolute gravimeter FG5-L from Micro-G Ltd was used together with an Inertial navigation system Litton-200, a vertical accelerometer EpiSensor, and GPS receivers for positioning. These tests showed that only the use of an optical table gives acceptable results. However, it is unable to compensate for the effects of the accelerations of the drag free chamber. The second part describes the strategy of the data processing. It is based on modeling the perturbing accelerations by means of GPS, EpiSensor and INS data. In the third part the airborne experiment is described in detail, from the mounting in the aircraft and data processing to the different problems encountered during the evaluation of the quality and accuracy of the results. In the part of data processing the different steps conducted from the raw apparent gravity data and the trajectories to the estimation of the true gravity are explained. A comparison between the estimated airborne data and those obtained by ground upward continuation at flight altitude allows to state that airborne absolute gravimetry is feasible and

  20. Cosmology with negative absolute temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieira, J. P. P.; Byrnes, Christian T.; Lewis, Antony

    2016-08-01

    Negative absolute temperatures (NAT) are an exotic thermodynamical consequence of quantum physics which has been known since the 1950's (having been achieved in the lab on a number of occasions). Recently, the work of Braun et al. [1] has rekindled interest in negative temperatures and hinted at a possibility of using NAT systems in the lab as dark energy analogues. This paper goes one step further, looking into the cosmological consequences of the existence of a NAT component in the Universe. NAT-dominated expanding Universes experience a borderline phantom expansion (w < -1) with no Big Rip, and their contracting counterparts are forced to bounce after the energy density becomes sufficiently large. Both scenarios might be used to solve horizon and flatness problems analogously to standard inflation and bouncing cosmologies. We discuss the difficulties in obtaining and ending a NAT-dominated epoch, and possible ways of obtaining density perturbations with an acceptable spectrum.

  1. Radiance Temperatures (in the Wavelength Range 530 to 1500 nm) of Nickel at Its Melting Point by a Pulse-Heating Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaschnitz, E.; McClure, J. L.; Cezairliyan, A.

    1998-11-01

    The radiance temperatures (at seven wavelengths in the range 530 to 1500 nm) of nickel at its melting point were measured by a pulse-heating technique. The method is based on rapid resistive self-heating of the specimen from room temperature to its melting point in less than 1 s and on simultaneously measuring specimen radiance temperatures every 0.5 ms. Melting of the specimen was manifested by a plateau in the radiance temperature-versus-time function for each wavelength. The melting-point radiance temperatures for a given specimen were determined by averaging the measured temperatures along the plateau at each wavelength. The melting-point radiance temperatures for nickel, as determined by averaging the results at each wavelength for 25 specimens, are: 1641 K at 530 nm, 1615 K at 627 nm, 1606 K at 657 nm, 1589 K at 722 nm, 1564 K at 812 nm, 1538 K at 908 nm, and 1381 K at 1500 nm. Based on uncertainties arising from pyrometry and specimen conditions, the combined uncertainty (two standard-deviation level) is about ± 6 K for the reported values in the range 530 to 900 nm and is about ± 8 K for the reported value at 1500 nm.

  2. Absolute-structure reports.

    PubMed

    Flack, Howard D

    2013-08-01

    All the 139 noncentrosymmetric crystal structures published in Acta Crystallographica Section C between January 2011 and November 2012 inclusive have been used as the basis of a detailed study of the reporting of absolute structure. These structure determinations cover a wide range of space groups, chemical composition and resonant-scattering contribution. Defining A and D as the average and difference of the intensities of Friedel opposites, their level of fit has been examined using 2AD and selected-D plots. It was found, regardless of the expected resonant-scattering contribution to Friedel opposites, that the Friedel-difference intensities are often dominated by random uncertainty and systematic error. An analysis of data collection strategy is provided. It is found that crystal-structure determinations resulting in a Flack parameter close to 0.5 may not necessarily be from crystals twinned by inversion. Friedifstat is shown to be a robust estimator of the resonant-scattering contribution to Friedel opposites, very little affected by the particular space group of a structure nor by the occupation of special positions. There is considerable confusion in the text of papers presenting achiral noncentrosymmetric crystal structures. Recommendations are provided for the optimal way of treating noncentrosymmetric crystal structures for which the experimenter has no interest in determining the absolute structure.

  3. Realization of a spectral radiance scale in the 40-250 nm spectral region based on a TROLL-type synchrotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anevsky, Sergey I.; Vernyi, Alexander E.; Khromchenko, Vladimir B.; Panasyuk, Vadim S.; Sapritsky, Victor I.

    1994-08-01

    An air and vacuum ultraviolet spectral radiance scale based on specialized table-top synchrotron radiation sources of the TROLL-type is described. The scale can be used to calibrate secondary-standard sources and receivers in a wide ultraviolet spectral range.

  4. Absolute Distance Measurement with the MSTAR Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lay, Oliver P.; Dubovitsky, Serge; Peters, Robert; Burger, Johan; Ahn, Seh-Won; Steier, William H.; Fetterman, Harrold R.; Chang, Yian

    2003-01-01

    The MSTAR sensor (Modulation Sideband Technology for Absolute Ranging) is a new system for measuring absolute distance, capable of resolving the integer cycle ambiguity of standard interferometers, and making it possible to measure distance with sub-nanometer accuracy. The sensor uses a single laser in conjunction with fast phase modulators and low frequency detectors. We describe the design of the system - the principle of operation, the metrology source, beamlaunching optics, and signal processing - and show results for target distances up to 1 meter. We then demonstrate how the system can be scaled to kilometer-scale distances.

  5. A Physical Model of Cirrus 8-13-micro Infrared Radiance.

    PubMed

    Hall, F F

    1968-11-01

    A simplified physical model of cirrus cloud 8-13-micro radiance is derived, in an attempt to explain measured cloud radiance characteristics. Thermal emission and scattering of irradiance from the earth are considered separately. The scattering diagram for a 50-micro radius ice sphere, which is opaque at these wavelengths, is computed from diffraction theory and specular surface reflection. Thermal emission is found to exceed scattered radiance significantly for all zenith angles, and computed radiance values are found to match measured cloud radiance closely.

  6. Determination of Unfiltered Radiances from the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loeb, N. G.; Priestley, K. J.; Kratz, D. P.; Geier, E. B.; Green, R. N.; Wielicki, B. A.; Hinton, P. OR.; Nolan, S. K.

    2001-01-01

    A new method for determining unfiltered shortwave (SW), longwave (LW) and window (W) radiances from filtered radiances measured by the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) satellite instrument is presented. The method uses theoretically derived regression coefficients between filtered and unfiltered radiances that are a function of viewing geometry, geotype and whether or not cloud is present. Relative errors in insta.ntaneous unfiltered radiances from this method are generally well below 1% for SW radiances (approx. 0.4% 1(sigma) or approx.l W/sq m equivalent flux), < 0.2% for LW radiances (approx. 0.1% 1(sigma) or approx.0.3 W/sq m equivalent flux) and < 0.2% (approx. 0.1% 1(sigma) for window channel radiances.

  7. Assimilation of hyperspectral satellite radiance observations within tropical cyclones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Haidao

    The availability of high resolution temperature and water vapor data is critical for the study of mesoscale scale weather phenomena (e.g., convective initiations, and tropical cyclones). As hyperspectral infrared sounders, the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) and Geosynchronous Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer (GIFTS) could provide high resolution atmospheric profiles by measuring radiations in many thousands of different channels. This work focuses on the assessment of the potential values of satellite hyperspectral radiance data on the study of convective initiations (CI) and the assimilation of AIRS radiance observations within tropical storms. First, the potential capability of hyperspectral infrared measurements (GIFTS) to provide convective precipitation forecasts has been studied and assessed. Using both the observed and the model-predicted profiles as input to the GIFTS radiative transfer model (RTM), it is shown that the simulated GIFTS radiance could capture the high vertical and temporal variability of the real and modeled atmosphere prior to a convective initiation, as well as the differences between observations and model forecasts. This study suggests the potential for hyperspectral infrared radiance data to make an important contribution to the improvement of the forecast skill of convective precipitation. Second, as the first step toward applying AIRS data to tropical cyclone (TC) prediction, a set of dropsonde profiles during Hurricane Rita (2005) is used to simulate AIRS radiance data and to assess the ability of AIRS data in capturing the vertical variability within TCs through one-dimensional variational (1D-Var) twin experiments. The AIRS observation errors and background errors are first estimated. Five sets of 1D-Var twin experiments are then performed using different combinations of AIRS channels. Finally, results from these 1D-Var experiments are analyzed. Major findings are: (1) AIRS radiance data contain useful information about

  8. Physical Retrieval of Surface Emissivity Spectrum from Hyperspectral Infrared Radiances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Jun; Weisz, Elisabeth; Zhou, Daniel K.

    2007-01-01

    Retrieval of temperature, moisture profiles and surface skin temperature from hyperspectral infrared (IR) radiances requires spectral information about the surface emissivity. Using constant or inaccurate surface emissivities typically results in large retrieval errors, particularly over semi-arid or arid areas where the variation in emissivity spectrum is large both spectrally and spatially. In this study, a physically based algorithm has been developed to retrieve a hyperspectral IR emissivity spectrum simultaneously with the temperature and moisture profiles, as well as the surface skin temperature. To make the solution stable and efficient, the hyperspectral emissivity spectrum is represented by eigenvectors, derived from the laboratory measured hyperspectral emissivity database, in the retrieval process. Experience with AIRS (Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder) radiances shows that a simultaneous retrieval of the emissivity spectrum and the sounding improves the surface skin temperature as well as temperature and moisture profiles, particularly in the near surface layer.

  9. Absolute Equilibrium Entropy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shebalin, John V.

    1997-01-01

    The entropy associated with absolute equilibrium ensemble theories of ideal, homogeneous, fluid and magneto-fluid turbulence is discussed and the three-dimensional fluid case is examined in detail. A sigma-function is defined, whose minimum value with respect to global parameters is the entropy. A comparison is made between the use of global functions sigma and phase functions H (associated with the development of various H-theorems of ideal turbulence). It is shown that the two approaches are complimentary though conceptually different: H-theorems show that an isolated system tends to equilibrium while sigma-functions allow the demonstration that entropy never decreases when two previously isolated systems are combined. This provides a more complete picture of entropy in the statistical mechanics of ideal fluids.

  10. Sun and Sky Radiance Measurements and Data Analysis Protocols. Chapter 5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frouin, Robert; Holben, Brent; Miller, Mark; Pietras, Christophe; Porter, John; Voss, Ken

    2001-01-01

    This chapter is concerned with two types of radiometric measurements essential to verify atmospheric correction algorithms and to calibrate vicariously satellite ocean color sensors. The first type is a photometric measurement of the direct solar beam to determine the optical thickness of the atmosphere. The intensity of the solar beam can be measured directly, or obtained indirectly from measurements of diffuse global upper hemispheric irradiance. The second type is a measurement of the solar aureole and sky radiance distribution using a CCD camera, or a scanning radiometer viewing in and perpendicular to the solar principal plane. From the two types of measurements, the optical properties of aerosols, highly variable in space and time, can be derived. Because of the high variability, the aerosol properties should be known at the time of satellite overpass. Atmospheric optics measurements, however, are not easy to perform at sea, from a ship or any platform. This complicates the measurement protocols and data analysis. Some instrumentation cannot be deployed at sea, and is limited to island and coastal sites. In the following, measurement protocols are described for radiometers commonly used to measure direct atmospheric transmittance and sky radiance, namely standard sun photometers, fast-rotating shadow-band radiometers, automated sky scanning systems, and CCD cameras. Methods and procedures to analyze and quality control the data are discussed, as well as proper measurement strategies for evaluation of atmospheric correction algorithms and satellite-derived ocean color.

  11. Design and implementation of real-time LED spatial radiance measurement systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Gao-Wei; Yeh, Zong-Mu; Liao, Chia-Cheng

    2007-02-01

    Light-emitting diodes (LEDs) have been recognized as a generation of new light sources because they possess the properties of energy-saving, environmental protection, long lifetime, and those lacking in conventional lighting. To satisfy the requirements for different applications (e.g., for large-scale displays), determining the spatial radiances of LEDs is important to identifying their viewing angle and utilizing their lighting efficiency. The objective of this paper is to build up a real-time spatial radiance measurement system for LEDs, on the basis of digital signal processing (DSP) techniques. In this paper, the system analysis is given to show the feasibility of this work. Two primary subsystems are devised to perform the real-time measurements. First, in the optoelectronic sensing and signal processing subsystem, a wide-bandwidth photodiode sensing circuit is employed to acquire optical signals at a high speed, and an automatic gain control (AGC) circuit is designed to increase the measurement range. To support high-speed data processing, a DSP-based platform is developed in the subsystem. Second, a light-source rotation scheme is used in the optomechanical subsystem. For performance evaluations, we adopt a standard calibrating light source to test and verify our system. Experimental results indicate that the proposed system gives satisfactory results.

  12. Radiance Research Particle Soot/Absorption Photometer Instrument Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Springston, S. R.

    2016-03-01

    Radiance Research PSAPs as described in this Handbook are deployed in the second ARM Mobile Facility (AMF2) Aerosol Observing System (AOS), the third ARM Mobile Facility (AMF3) AOS, ENA AOS and Mobile Aerosol Observing System (MAOS)-A. An earlier version of the PSAP is currently operated in the ARM Aerial Facility and at SGP. The older SGP instrument is covered in a separate Handbook.

  13. Separation of temperature and emittance in remotely sensed radiance measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahle, Anne B.; Alley, Ronald E.

    1992-01-01

    The remote determination of surface temperature and surface spectral emittance by use of airborne or satellite-borne thermal infrared instruments is not straightforward. The radiance measured is a function of surface temperature, the unknown surface spectral emittance, and absorption and emission in the intervening atmosphere. With a single measurement, the solution for temperature and spectral emittance is undedetermined. This article reviews two of the early approximate methods which have been fairly widely used to approach this problem.

  14. Predicting Upwelling Radiance on the West Florida Shelf

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-07

    5 to 10 day time horizon will require a numerical simulation that accurately forecasts the physical, ecological , and optical environment. Critical...to the ecological and optical forecast is the ability to directly compare the water-leaving radiance field to those being collected by aircraft and...satellite platforms. Our goal is to develop the ecological and optical models and computer codes to initialize, validate, and predict the IOPs and Lw

  15. Satellite Atmospheric Radiance Measurements in the Vacuum Ultraviolet.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-07-05

    night , as expected. In addition , the f igures demonstrate different relationships to the solar zenith angle among the filters. The tropical, or...spectrum is dominated by the com- bined effects of Rayleigh scattering of sunlight and absorption of the backscattered solar radiation by atmospheric ozone...1493 A NI line and solar scatter. The 1550 A filtcr global response curve shown in Figure 8 has the smallest day maximum and night minimum radiance

  16. Direct Comparisons of Radiances Measured by Independent Contemporary ERB Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haeffelin, Martial; Wielicki, Bruce; Priestley, Kory; Duvel, Jean Philippe; Viollier, Michel

    2001-01-01

    Comparisons of radiance measurements from overlapping independent Earth and cloud radiation budget (ERB) missions are an important contribution to the validation process of the these missions and are essential to the construction of a consistent long-term record of ERB observations. Measurements from the CERES instrument on TRMM are compared to ScaRaB on Resurs (Jan-Mar 1999) and CERES on Terra (Mar-Apr 2000).

  17. Quantitative Spectral Radiance Measurements in the HYMETS Arc Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danehy, Paul M.; Hires, Drew V.; Johansen, Craig T.; Bathel, Brett F.; Jones, Stephen B.; Gragg, Jeffrey G.; Splinter, Scott C.

    2012-01-01

    Calibrated spectral radiance measurements of gaseous emission spectra have been obtained from the HYMETS (Hypersonic Materials Environmental Test System) 400 kW arc-heated wind tunnel at NASA Langley Research Center. A fiber-optic coupled spectrometer collected natural luminosity from the flow. Spectral radiance measurements are reported between 340 and 1000 nm. Both Silicon Carbide (SiC) and Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator (PICA) samples were placed in the flow. Test gases studied included a mostly-N2 atmosphere (95% nitrogen, 5% argon), a simulated Earth Air atmosphere (75% nitrogen, 20% oxygen, 5% argon) and a simulated Martian atmosphere (71% carbon dioxide, 24% nitrogen, 5% argon). The bulk enthalpy of the flow was varied as was the location of the measurement. For the intermediate flow enthalpy tested (20 MJ/kg), emission from the Mars simulant gas was about 10 times higher than the Air flow and 15 times higher than the mostly-N2 atmosphere. Shock standoff distances were estimated from the spectral radiance measurements. Within-run, run-to-run and day-to-day repeatability of the emission were studied, with significant variations (15-100%) noted.

  18. A Microwave Radiance Assimilation Study for a Tundra Snowpack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Edward; Durand, Michael; Margulis, Steve; England, Anthony

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies have begun exploring the assimilation of microwave radiances for the modeling and retrieval of snow properties. At a point scale, and for short durations (i week), radiance assimilation (RA) results are encouraging. However, in order to determine how practical RA might be for snow retrievals when applied over longer durations, larger spatial scales, and/or different snow types, we must expand the scope of the tests. In this paper we use coincident microwave radiance measurements and station data from a tundra site on the North Slope of Alaska. The field data are from the 3rd Radio-brightness Energy Balance Experiment (REBEX-3) carried out in 1994-95 by the University of Michigan. This dataset will provide a test of RA over months instead of one week, and for a very different type of snow than previous snow RA studies. We will address the following questions: flow well can a snowpack physical model (SM), forced with local weather, match measured conditions for a tundra snowpack?; How well can a microwave emission model, driven by the snowpack model, match measured microwave brightnesses for a tundra snowpack?; How well does RA increase or decrease the fidelity of estimates of snow depth and temperatures for a tundra snowpack?

  19. Cross-calibration of Imaging Sensors using Model-based, SI-traceable Predictions of At-sensor Radiance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thome, Kurtis; McCorkel, Joel

    2012-01-01

    Many inter-consistency efforts force empirical agreement between sensors viewing a source nearly coincident in time and geometry that ensures consistency between sensors rather than obtain an SI-traceable calibration with documented error budgets. The method described here provides interconsistency via absolute radiometric calibration with defensible error budget avoiding systematic errors through prediction of at-sensor radiance for a site viewed by multiple sensors but not necessarily viewed at coincident times. The method predicts spectral radiance over a given surface site for arbitrary view and illumination angles and for any date dominated by clear-sky conditions. The foundation is a model-based, SI-traceable prediction of at-sensor radiance over selected sites based on physical understanding of the surface and atmosphere. The calibration of the ground site will include spatial, spectral, and sunview geometric effects based on satellite and ground-based data. The result is an interconsistency of hyperspectral and multispectral sensors spanning spatial resolutions from meters to kilometers all relative to the surface site rather than a single sensor. The source-centric philosophy of calibrating the site inherently accounts for footprint size mismatch, spectral band mismatch, and temporal and spatial sampling effects. The method for characterizing the test site allows its use for SI-traceable calibration of any sensor that can view the calibrated test site. Interconsistency is obtained through the traceability and error budget rather than coincident views. Such an approach to inter-consistency provides better understanding of biases between sensors as well producing more accurate results with documented SI-traceability that reduces the need for overlapping data sets.

  20. Downwelling and upwelling radiance distributions sampled under cloudless conditions in Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Cordero, Raul R; Damiani, Alessandro; Ferrer, Jorge; Rayas, Juan; Jorquera, Jose; Tobar, Mario; Labbe, Fernando; Laroze, David

    2013-09-01

    We have sampled both the downwelling and upwelling radiance distributions at a camp located in the southern Ellsworth Mountains on the broad expanse of Union Glacier (700 m altitude, 79° 46' S, 82° 52' W). The measurements (at 320-440 nm wavelength range) were carried out under cloudless conditions by using a sky scanner system, during a campaign (in December, 2012) meant to assess the effects of the high albedo on the radiance distribution. The angular variations observed in both the downwelling and upwelling radiance distributions increase with the wavelength. However, these variations were considerably greater in the case of the downwelling radiance than in the case of the upwelling radiance. Indeed, we found that downwelling radiance tends to be less isotropic than the corresponding upwelling radiance. Regardless of the solar zenith angle and the wavelength, the minima of the downwelling and the upwelling radiance distributions were measured close to the zenith and to the nadir, respectively. The downwelling (upwelling) radiance increased nearly monotonically toward the horizon and peaked at zenith (nadir) angles that ranged from 75° to 90°. Comparisons with the UVSPEC radiative transfer model were used to weight up the response of the downwelling radiance distribution to changes in the albedo.

  1. Quality assessment and assimilation of Megha-Tropiques SAPHIR radiances into WRF assimilation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Randhir; Ojha, Satya P.; Kishtawal, C. M.; Pal, P. K.

    2013-07-01

    This study presents an initial assessment of the quality of radiances measured from SAPHIR (Sounder for Probing Vertical Profiles of Humidity) on board Megha-Tropiques (Indo-French joint satellite), launched by the Indian Space Research Organisation on 12 October 2011. The radiances measured from SAPHIR are compared with those simulated by the radiative transfer model (RTM) using radiosondes measurements, Atmospheric Infrared Sounder retrievals, and National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) analyzed fields over the Indian subcontinent, during January to November 2012. The radiances from SAPHIR are also compared with the similar measurements available from Microwave Humidity Sounder (MHS) on board MetOp-A and NOAA-18/19 satellites, during January to November 2012. A limited comparison is also carried out between SAPHIR measured and the RTM computed radiances using European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts analyzed fields, during May and November 2012. The comparison of SAPHIR measured radiances with RTM simulated and MHS observed radiances reveals that SAPHIR observations are of good quality. After the initial assessment of the quality of the SAPHIR radiances, these radiances have been assimilated within the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) three-dimensional variational data assimilation system. Analysis/forecast cycling experiments with and without SAPHIR radiances are performed over the Indian region during the entire month of May 2012. The assimilation of SAPHIR radiances shows considerable improvements (with moisture analysis error reduction up to 30%) in the tropospheric analyses and forecast of moisture, temperature, and winds when compared to NCEP analyses and radiances measurement obtained from MHS, Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-A, and High Resolution Infrared Sounder. Assimilation of SAPHIR radiances also resulted in substantial improvement in the precipitation forecast skill when compared with satellite-derived rain. Overall

  2. Deriving clear-sky longwave spectral flux from spaceborne hyperspectral radiance measurements: a case study with AIRS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiuhong; Huang, Xianglei

    2016-12-01

    Previous studies have shown that longwave (LW) spectral fluxes have unique merit in climate studies. Using Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) radiances as a case study, this study presents an algorithm to derive the entire LW clear-sky spectral fluxes from spaceborne hyperspectral observations. No other auxiliary observations are needed in the algorithm. A clear-sky scene is identified using a three-step detection method. The identified clear-sky scenes are then categorized into different sub-scene types using information about precipitable water, lapse rate and surface temperature inferred from the AIRS radiances at six selected channels. A previously established algorithm is then used to invert AIRS radiances to spectral fluxes over the entire LW spectrum at 10 cm-1 spectral interval. Accuracy of the algorithms is evaluated against collocated Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) observations. For nadir-view observations, the mean difference between outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) derived by this algorithm and the collocated CERES OLR is 1.52 Wm-2 with a standard deviation of 2.46 Wm-2. When the algorithm is extended for viewing zenith angle up to 45°, the performance is comparable to that for nadir-view results.

  3. The Use of Transfer Radiometers in Validating the Visible through Shortwave Infrared Calibrations of Radiance Sources Used by Instruments in NASA's Earth Observing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, James J.; Barnes, Robert A.

    2002-01-01

    The detection and study of climate change over a time frame of decades requires successive generations of satellite, airborne, and ground-based instrumentation carefully calibrated against a common radiance scale. In NASA s Earth Observing System (EOS) program, the pre-launch radiometric calibration of these instruments in the wavelength region from 400 nm to 2500 nm is accomplished using internally illuminated integrating spheres and diffuse reflectance panels illuminated by irradiance standard lamps. Since 1995, the EOS Calibration Program operating within the EOS Project Science Office (PSO) has enlisted the expertise of national standards laboratories and government and university metrology laboratories in an effort to validate the radiance scales assigned to sphere and panel radiance sources by EOS instrument calibration facilities. This state-of-the-art program has been accomplished using ultra-stable transfer radiometers independently calibrated by the above participating institutions. In ten comparisons since February 1995, the agreement between the radiance measurements of the transfer radiometers is plus or minus 1.80% at 411 nm, plus or minus 1.31% at 552.5 nm, plus or minus 1.32% at 868.0 nm, plus or minus 2.54% at 1622nm, and plus or minus 2.81% at 2200nm (sigma =1).

  4. Estimating Absolute Site Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Malagnini, L; Mayeda, K M; Akinci, A; Bragato, P L

    2004-07-15

    The authors use previously determined direct-wave attenuation functions as well as stable, coda-derived source excitation spectra to isolate the absolute S-wave site effect for the horizontal and vertical components of weak ground motion. They used selected stations in the seismic network of the eastern Alps, and find the following: (1) all ''hard rock'' sites exhibited deamplification phenomena due to absorption at frequencies ranging between 0.5 and 12 Hz (the available bandwidth), on both the horizontal and vertical components; (2) ''hard rock'' site transfer functions showed large variability at high-frequency; (3) vertical-motion site transfer functions show strong frequency-dependence, and (4) H/V spectral ratios do not reproduce the characteristics of the true horizontal site transfer functions; (5) traditional, relative site terms obtained by using reference ''rock sites'' can be misleading in inferring the behaviors of true site transfer functions, since most rock sites have non-flat responses due to shallow heterogeneities resulting from varying degrees of weathering. They also use their stable source spectra to estimate total radiated seismic energy and compare against previous results. they find that the earthquakes in this region exhibit non-constant dynamic stress drop scaling which gives further support for a fundamental difference in rupture dynamics between small and large earthquakes. To correct the vertical and horizontal S-wave spectra for attenuation, they used detailed regional attenuation functions derived by Malagnini et al. (2002) who determined frequency-dependent geometrical spreading and Q for the region. These corrections account for the gross path effects (i.e., all distance-dependent effects), although the source and site effects are still present in the distance-corrected spectra. The main goal of this study is to isolate the absolute site effect (as a function of frequency) by removing the source spectrum (moment-rate spectrum) from

  5. RADIANCE AND PHOTON NOISE: Imaging in geometrical optics, physical optics, quantum optics and radiology.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Harrison H; Myers, Kyle J; Caucci, Luca

    2014-08-17

    A fundamental way of describing a photon-limited imaging system is in terms of a Poisson random process in spatial, angular and wavelength variables. The mean of this random process is the spectral radiance. The principle of conservation of radiance then allows a full characterization of the noise in the image (conditional on viewing a specified object). To elucidate these connections, we first review the definitions and basic properties of radiance as defined in terms of geometrical optics, radiology, physical optics and quantum optics. The propagation and conservation laws for radiance in each of these domains are reviewed. Then we distinguish four categories of imaging detectors that all respond in some way to the incident radiance, including the new category of photon-processing detectors. The relation between the radiance and the statistical properties of the detector output is discussed and related to task-based measures of image quality and the information content of a single detected photon.

  6. Cloud optical properties and phase discrimination using transmitted spectral radiance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LeBlanc, S. E.; Pilewskie, P.; Schmidt, S.; Coddington, O.

    2013-12-01

    Cloud optical thickness, effective radius, and thermodynamic phase are commonly retrieved from satellite measurements of reflected light. Reflected light is influenced most strongly by droplets and ice crystals near cloud top, whereas transmitted light has interacted with cloud particles throughout the entire layer. This transmitted spectral radiance is used in a new method to retrieve cloud thermodynamic phase, cloud optical thickness, and effective radius. The method uses 15 regions of the shortwave transmittance spectrum that are modulated by the spectral absorption and scattering by liquid water droplets and ice particles. Spectral features in these regions are characterized by their slope, normalized magnitude, spectral derivatives, spectral curvature, and second derivatives. We use an optimal estimation method to find the most likely set of cloud optical thickness, effective radius, and thermodynamic phase that produces the observed spectral features in transmitted radiance spectra. This retrieval's performance is evaluated using the GEneralized Nonlinear Retrieval Analysis (GENRA) with the Shannon information content. Results showed that the normalized Shannon information content for retrieved ice cloud properties was larger on average (84%) than for liquid water cloud properties (78%) in addition to having a smaller bias. The retrieval was applied to zenith spectral radiance measured with the ground-based Solar Spectral Flux Radiometer (SSFR) located at Boulder, Colorado for 10 cases that occurred between May 2012 and January 2013. Retrieved cloud optical thickness, effective radius, and their uncertainties are compared to those retrieved using two other methods. By using several spectral characterizations in a large number of spectral bands, the average uncertainty in retrieved optical thickness and effective radius is reduced below that of any other retrieval method based on cloud transmittance.

  7. Stratospheric thickness determined directly from satellite radiance measurements.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quiroz, R. S.; Gelman, M. E.

    1972-01-01

    Discussion of the use of satellite radiance data for determining the thickness of deep stratospheric layers. Empirical regression equations are shown to provide better estimates of stratospheric thickness than do mean weighted temperatures obtained from the Planck equation. The best regression equations were found for thick layers emitting a substantial portion of the CO2-band infrared radiation measured by satellites. By adding the layer thickness to the observed height field for the lower boundary, it is possible to construct constant-pressure maps at very high altitudes.

  8. Analytical Green's function of the radiative transfer radiance for the infinite medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liemert, André; Kienle, Alwin

    2011-03-01

    An analytical solution of the radiative transfer equation for the radiance caused by an isotropic source which is located in an infinitely extended medium was derived using the PN method. The results were compared with Monte Carlo simulations and excellent agreement was found. In addition, the radiance of the SPN approximation for the same geometry was derived. Comparison with Monte Carlo simulations showed that the SPN radiance, although being more exact than the radiance derived from diffusion theory, has relatively large errors in many relevant cases.

  9. The Effect of Cirrus Clouds on 8-13-micro Infrared Sky Radiance.

    PubMed

    Hall, F F

    1968-05-01

    An experimental investigation of ir sky radiance and radiance fluctuations in the 8-13-micro atmospheric window is reported. Measurements were made with ground-based, filtered bolometer detector radiometers under clear sky and cirrus overcast conditions. Sky radiance was measured very close to the limb of the sun to permit detection of the solar aureole caused by forward scattering by cirrus ice crystals. Polarized sky radiance was found at large zenith angles and is attributed to scattering by cirrus of thermal emission from the earth. The radiance due to tropospheric water vapor is predicted by means of a radiation chart. Measurements of clear sky radiance exceeded that predicted by the chart in all but one case. The radiance of visible cirrus greatly exceeds the radiation chart prediction. Diffraction about cirrus cloud particles leads to a prediction of a solar aureole of a size that corresponds to the measured aureole. It is concluded that even a cirrus haze, which is quite difficult for an unaided, observer to detect, can cause an excess zenith radiance of 0.1 mW cm(-2)sr(-1), which increases to twice this value at a zenith angle of 60 degrees . Even thin but visible cirrus clouds can easily produce an excess zenith radiance of 1 mW cm(-2)sr(-1), which increases by a factor 1.4 at a zenith angle of 60 degrees .

  10. Monte Carlo modelling of angular radiance in tissue phantoms and human prostate: PDT light dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Barajas, O; Ballangrud, A M; Miller, G G; Moore, R B; Tulip, J

    1997-09-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a promising technique for destroying tumours. Photosensitizing drugs presently available are not sufficiently tumour specific; hence, light dosimetry is required in order to control light exposure and thereby restrict cell kill to the target tissue to avoid damage to healthy tissue. Current light dosimetry methods rely on tissue optical characterization by fluence measurements at several points. Fluence-based tissue characterization is impractical for tumours in organs such as prostate where access by optical probes is limited and the tumours are highly optically inhomogeneous. This paper explores the potential of radiance-based light dosimetry as an alternative. Correlation is found between Monte Carlo simulation of radiance in a tissue phantom and radiance measurements made using a new radiance probe. Radiance is sensitive to variations in the tissue optical parameters, absorption coefficient mu(a), scattering coefficient mu(s), and anisotropy factor g, and therefore is potentially useful for tissue characterization. Radiance measurements have several advantages over fluence measurements. Radiance measurements provide more information from a single location, better spatial resolution of the tissue optical parameters, and higher sensitivity in discriminating between different media. However, the Monte Carlo method is too slow to be of practical value for tissue characterization by correlation of measured and simulated radiance. An analytical solution to the transport equation for radiance would be desirable as this would facilitate and increase the speed of tissue characterization.

  11. P161 Improved Impact of Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) Radiance Assimilation in Numerical Weather Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zavodsky, Bradley T.; Chou, Shih-Hung; Jedlovec, Gary J.

    2012-01-01

    For over 6 years, AIRS radiances have been assimilated operationally into National (e.g. Environmental Modeling Center (EMC)) and International (e.g. European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF)), operational centers; assimilated in the North American Mesoscale (NAM) since 2008. Due partly to data latency and operational constraints, hyperspectral radiance assimilation has had less impact on the Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation (GSI) system used in the NAM and GFS. Objective of this project is to use AIRS retrieved profiles as a proxy for the AIRS radiances in situations where AIRS radiances are unable to be assimilated in the current operational system by evaluating location and magnitude of analysis increments.

  12. Absolute method of measuring magnetic susceptibility

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorpe, A.; Senftle, F.E.

    1959-01-01

    An absolute method of standardization and measurement of the magnetic susceptibility of small samples is presented which can be applied to most techniques based on the Faraday method. The fact that the susceptibility is a function of the area under the curve of sample displacement versus distance of the magnet from the sample, offers a simple method of measuring the susceptibility without recourse to a standard sample. Typical results on a few substances are compared with reported values, and an error of less than 2% can be achieved. ?? 1959 The American Institute of Physics.

  13. Assimilation of hyperspectral radiances in the NCMRWF global forecast system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Sanjeev K.; Prasad, V. S.

    2016-04-01

    The availability of high resolution temperature and water vapor data is important for the study of mesoscale scale weather phenomena. As, Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), Cross-Track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) and European Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) provide high resolution atmospheric profiles by measuring radiations in many thousands of different channels. The AIRS, on the EOS-Aqua polar-orbiting satellite, was the first of a new generation of meteorological advanced sounders able to provide hyper- spectral data for operational and research use. The CrIS is a Fourier Transform Michelson interferometer instrument launched on board the Suomi National Polar- Orbiting Partnership (Suomi NPP) satellite on 28 October 2011. CrIS is a major step forward in the U.S. operational infrared (IR) sounding capability previously provided by the High-resolution Infrared Spectrometer (HIRS). The IASI is the most advanced instrument carried on the MetOp satellite on 19 October 2006. As a result, demonstration of the benefit of hyper-spectral data on Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) has been a high priority. This work focuses on the assessment of the potential values of satellite hyper-spectral radiance data in the NGFS (National Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasting-Global Forecast System). An Observing System Experiments (OSEs) has been conducted to examine the impact of hyper-spectral radiances and detail results are presented.

  14. Absolute cavity pyrgeometer

    DOEpatents

    Reda, Ibrahim

    2013-10-29

    Implementations of the present disclosure involve an apparatus and method to measure the long-wave irradiance of the atmosphere or long-wave source. The apparatus may involve a thermopile, a concentrator and temperature controller. The incoming long-wave irradiance may be reflected from the concentrator to a thermopile receiver located at the bottom of the concentrator to receive the reflected long-wave irradiance. In addition, the thermopile may be thermally connected to a temperature controller to control the device temperature. Through use of the apparatus, the long-wave irradiance of the atmosphere may be calculated from several measurements provided by the apparatus. In addition, the apparatus may provide an international standard of pyrgeometers' calibration that is traceable back to the International System of Units (SI) rather than to a blackbody atmospheric simulator.

  15. Correction for reflected sky radiance in low-altitude coastal hyperspectral images.

    PubMed

    Kim, Minsu; Park, Joong Yong; Kopilevich, Yuri; Tuell, Grady; Philpot, William

    2013-11-10

    Low-altitude coastal hyperspectral imagery is sensitive to reflections of sky radiance at the water surface. Even in the absence of sun glint, and for a calm water surface, the wide range of viewing angles may result in pronounced, low-frequency variations of the reflected sky radiance across the scan line depending on the solar position. The variation in reflected sky radiance can be obscured by strong high-spatial-frequency sun glint and at high altitude by path radiance. However, at low altitudes, the low-spatial-frequency sky radiance effect is frequently significant and is not removed effectively by the typical corrections for sun glint. The reflected sky radiance from the water surface observed by a low-altitude sensor can be modeled in the first approximation as the sum of multiple-scattered Rayleigh path radiance and the single-scattered direct-solar-beam radiance by the aerosol in the lower atmosphere. The path radiance from zenith to the half field of view (FOV) of a typical airborne spectroradiometer has relatively minimal variation and its reflected radiance to detector array results in a flat base. Therefore the along-track variation is mostly contributed by the forward single-scattered solar-beam radiance. The scattered solar-beam radiances arrive at the water surface with different incident angles. Thus the reflected radiance received at the detector array corresponds to a certain scattering angle, and its variation is most effectively parameterized using the downward scattering angle (DSA) of the solar beam. Computation of the DSA must account for the roll, pitch, and heading of the platform and the viewing geometry of the sensor along with the solar ephemeris. Once the DSA image is calculated, the near-infrared (NIR) radiance from selected water scan lines are compared, and a relationship between DSA and NIR radiance is derived. We then apply the relationship to the entire DSA image to create an NIR reference image. Using the NIR reference image

  16. From Hubble's NGSL to Absolute Fluxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heap, Sara R.; Lindler, Don

    2012-01-01

    Hubble's Next Generation Spectral Library (NGSL) consists of R-l000 spectra of 374 stars of assorted temperature, gravity, and metallicity. Each spectrum covers the wavelength range, 0.18-1.00 microns. The library can be viewed and/or downloaded from the website, http://archive.stsci.edu/prepds/stisngsll. Stars in the NGSL are now being used as absolute flux standards at ground-based observatories. However, the uncertainty in the absolute flux is about 2%, which does not meet the requirements of dark-energy surveys. We are therefore developing an observing procedure that should yield fluxes with uncertainties less than 1 % and will take part in an HST proposal to observe up to 15 stars using this new procedure.

  17. Establishing a New NIST Facility for the Primary Realization of both Spectral Radiance and Reflectance in the Mid-and Far-Infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mekhontsev, S.; Khromchenko, V.; Prokhorov, A.; Wilthan, B.; Hanssen, L.

    2009-12-01

    In the framework of the research initiative “Climate Change: Measurements & Standards”, a new primary standard facility is being established for realization of both spectral radiance and reflectance in the mid-and far-infrared. The objective of the CBS3 (which stands for Controlled Background Spectroradiometry and Spectrophotometry System) is to develop an advanced primary standard with proven accuracy and based on fundamental and reproducible physical standards to assure SI traceability. Derivation of the infrared spectral directional-hemispherical reflectance scale for materials and cavities is achieved using active control of radiation background directional-hemispherical reflectance. The measurements of diffuse reflectance will be supported for the wavelengths up to 50 micrometers, incidence angles up to 85 degrees, and temperatures from 200 K to 350 K. Derivation of spectral radiance and radiance temperature scale is based on use of primary blackbody sources, whose emissivity is defined via reflectometry as mentioned above, and temperature is defined by fundamental and reproducible properties of phase change processes of pure substances, including mercury, water and gallium. Along with derivation and dissemination of spectral radiance and reflectance scales, the facility will support additional tests for user sources, sensors and components, as well as continue support of NIST TXR radiometer. Controlled radiation background feature will also be used for prediction of performance of NIST transfer standards and user payloads at different environmental conditions. Specialized instrumentation will be developed, including primary blackbody sources, a test chamber, a far IR reflectometer, and a spectral comparator, as well as transfer standards to ensure dissemination of radiometric and spectrophotometric scales and their validation via international comparisons. A demonstration study and the conceptual design of core components of the facility have been

  18. Cryogenic, Absolute, High Pressure Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, John J. (Inventor); Shams. Qamar A. (Inventor); Powers, William T. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A pressure sensor is provided for cryogenic, high pressure applications. A highly doped silicon piezoresistive pressure sensor is bonded to a silicon substrate in an absolute pressure sensing configuration. The absolute pressure sensor is bonded to an aluminum nitride substrate. Aluminum nitride has appropriate coefficient of thermal expansion for use with highly doped silicon at cryogenic temperatures. A group of sensors, either two sensors on two substrates or four sensors on a single substrate are packaged in a pressure vessel.

  19. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY INITIATIVE: CHEMICAL-FREE CLEANING OF SEMICONDUCTORS BY THE RADIANCE PROCESS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Radiance Process is a patented dry process for removing contaminants from surfaces. It uses light, usually from a pulsed laser and a gas inert to the surface, to entrain released contaminants. The focus of this effort is to assess the applicability of the Radiance Process t...

  20. Validation of spectral sky radiance derived from all-sky camera images - a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tohsing, K.; Schrempf, M.; Riechelmann, S.; Seckmeyer, G.

    2014-01-01

    Spectral sky radiance (380-760 nm) is derived from measurements with a Hemispherical Sky Imager (HSI) system. The HSI consists of a commercial compact CCD (charge coupled device) camera equipped with a fish-eye lens and provides hemispherical sky images in three reference bands such as red, green and blue. To obtain the spectral sky radiance from these images non-linear regression functions for various sky conditions have been derived. The camera-based spectral sky radiance was validated by spectral sky radiance measured with a CCD spectroradiometer. The spectral sky radiance for complete distribution over the hemisphere between both instruments deviates by less than 20% at 500 nm for all sky conditions and for zenith angles less than 80°. The reconstructed spectra of the wavelength 380 nm to 760 nm between both instruments at various directions deviate by less then 20% for all sky conditions.

  1. Validation of spectral sky radiance derived from all-sky camera images - a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tohsing, K.; Schrempf, M.; Riechelmann, S.; Seckmeyer, G.

    2014-07-01

    Spectral sky radiance (380-760 nm) is derived from measurements with a hemispherical sky imager (HSI) system. The HSI consists of a commercial compact CCD (charge coupled device) camera equipped with a fish-eye lens and provides hemispherical sky images in three reference bands such as red, green and blue. To obtain the spectral sky radiance from these images, non-linear regression functions for various sky conditions have been derived. The camera-based spectral sky radiance was validated using spectral sky radiance measured with a CCD spectroradiometer. The spectral sky radiance for complete distribution over the hemisphere between both instruments deviates by less than 20% at 500 nm for all sky conditions and for zenith angles less than 80°. The reconstructed spectra of the wavelengths 380-760 nm between both instruments at various directions deviate by less than 20% for all sky conditions.

  2. Direct determination of the thickness of stratospheric layers from single-channel satellite radiance measurements.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quiroz, R. S.; Gelman, M. E.

    1972-01-01

    The direct use of measured radiances for determining the thickness of stratospheric layers is investigated. Layers based at 100-10 mb, with upper boundaries at 10-0.5 mb, are investigated using a carefully selected family of stratospheric temperature profiles and computed radiances. On the basis of physical reasoning, a high correlation of thickness with radiance is anticipated for deep layers, such as the 100- to 2-mb layer (from about 15 to 43 km), that emit a substantial part of the infrared energy reaching a satellite radiometer in a particular channel. Empirical regression curves relating thickness and radiance are developed and are compared with blackbody curves obtained by substituting the blackbody temperature in the hydrostatic equation. Maximum thickness-radiance correlation is found, for each infrared channel, for the layer having the best agreement of empirical and blackbody curves.

  3. Oceanic radiance model development and validation: application of airborne active-passive ocean color spectral measurements.

    PubMed

    Hoge, F E; Swift, R; Yungel, J

    1995-06-20

    It is shown that airborne active-passive (laser-solar) ocean color data can be used to develop and validate oceanic radiance models. The two principal inputs to the oceanic radiance model, chlorophyll pigment and incident solar irradiance, are obtained from a nadir-viewing laser-induced fluorescence spectrometer and a zenith-viewing radiometer, respectively. The computed water-leaving radiances are validated by comparison with the calibrated output of a separate nadir-viewing radiometer subsystem. In the North Atlantic Ocean, the calculated and the observed airborne radiances are found to compare very favorably for the 443-, 520-, and 550-nm wavelengths over an ∼ 170-km flight track east of St. John's, Newfoundland. The results further suggest that the semianalytical radiance model of ocean color, the airborne active (laser) fluorescence spectrometer, and the passive (solar) radiometric instrumentation are all remarkably precise.

  4. NIMS Radiance Point Spectra of Gaspra V1.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granahan, J. C.

    2014-10-01

    This data volume contains radiometrically corrected point spectra of asteroid 951 as acquired by the Galileo spacecraft Near Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (NIMS) on October 29, 1991. They record the spectra collected as the Galileo spacecraft approached the target asteroid. These data are products of the calibration of the raw data number files gap015tn.qub, gap035tn.qub, gap036tn.qub, gap037tn.qub, and gap038tn.qub (DATA SET ID ='GO-A-NIMS-3 TUBE-V1.0') with calibration factors acquired during the first Earth/Moon encounter of the Galileo mission. These raw data .qub files are archived in the Imaging Node of the NASA Planetary Data System (PDS). The calibrated spectra consist of radiance measurements for wavelengths between 0.7 - 5.2 micrometers.

  5. Satellite microwave radiances correlated with radar rain rates over land

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spencer, R. W.; Martin, D. W.; Hinton, B. B.; Weinman, J. A.

    1983-01-01

    The characteristics of upwelling microwave radiation from raindrops as measured by satellite sensors are examined. The scanning multichannel microwave radiometers on board the Nimbus 7 and Seasat satellites have the capability of quantifying the perpendicularly polarized antenna temperatures at 37, 21, 18, 10.7, and 6.6 GHz. The instruments scan the earth at a constant 50 deg angle to the surface with a footprint that varies from 20-70 km. Radar rainfall measurements have an accuracy of within 60 percent, whereas a series of test measurements using SMMR data in comparison with radar data for rainfall in the same areas showed that the microwave data depicted rainfall rates with less than 1.55 mm/h error. Details of the rainfall rate algorithms used to treat the satellite microwave data are provided, noting that the identification of rainfall rates is dependent on quantifying the amount the upwelling radiance is reduced due to rainfall.

  6. Elimination of environmental effects from Landsat radiance data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, S. T.; Smith, D. W.

    1979-01-01

    A critical problem involved in quantitative multi-temporal sensing of the physical processes with Landsat is the fact that variations in the spectral signatures for a given target of interest result from a combined effect of target properties and the environmental factors such as sun angles, atmospheric conditions, etc. at the time of an overpass. In an attempt to solve the problem, a transformation procedure is developed to remove the environmental effects from the MSS radiance data. Mathematical derivation of the transformation procedure is elaborated and an example of testing the procedure is illustrated using suspended sediments reflectance data obtained by Landsat MSS during four different overpasses over the lower Mississippi River valley.

  7. Effect of forest canopy closure on incoming solar radiance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dottavio, C. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1981-01-01

    In order to better understand the physical processes involved in defoliation assessment from remotely sensed data, a field study was designed to investigate the effect of forest canopy closure and other environmental variables on incoming solar radiation. Diffuse radiation measurements were recorded in red, infrared, and middle infrared wavelengths using the Mark 2 three band field radiometer. Results to date indicate that the percent canopy closure is the single most important variable affecting incoming solar radiation. In the visible and near infrared regions, interaction between time of day and date (defined later as solar zenith angle) also affect radiometric response. Aspect has only limited influence on radiance response. These same variables do not influence middle infrared response, however. Uniformity of the forest canopy appears to be more important. These results are compared to LANDSAT MSS classification results of gypsy moth defoliation.

  8. Effect of forest canopy closure on incoming solar radiance

    SciTech Connect

    Dottavio, C.L.

    1981-04-01

    In order to better understand the physical processes involved in defoliation assessment from remotely sensed data, a field study was designed to investigate the effect of forest canopy closure and other environmental variables on incoming solar radiation. Diffuse radiation measurements were recorded in red, infrared, and middle infrared wavelengths using the Mark 2 three band field radiometer. Results to date indicate that the percent canopy closure is the single most important variable affecting incoming solar radiation. In the visible and near infrared regions, interaction between time of day and date (defined later as solar zenith angle) also affect radiometric response. Aspect has only limited influence on radiance response. These same variables do not influence middle infrared response, however. Uniformity of the forest canopy appears to be more important. These results are compared to LANDSAT MSS classification results of gypsy moth defoliation.

  9. Remote sounding of stratospheric temperatures using high resolution radiance measurements from the IRIS-D. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallery, W. O.

    1974-01-01

    Remote sounding of stratospheric temperatures up to 3.2 millibars is attempted using high resolution (unapodized) radiance measurements in the 15 micron CO2 band from the Infrared Interferometer Spectrometer on Nimbus 4. Inversions are performed using the Chahine relaxation technique. Radiance data and simultaneous in situ temperature profiles are obtained from the Rocket/Nimbus Sounder Comparison. Numerical tests with synthetic radiance data show that the uncertainty in the retrieved temperatures due to random instrument noise is about 1.1 K when averaged over layers about 10 km thick. However, comparison of the measured radiances with the radiances calculated from the in situ profiles show the calculated radiances to be systematically higher than the measured radiances. The evidence indicates that systematic errors exist in both the radiance and the in situ measurements.

  10. Gravity Wave Variances and Propagation Derived from AIRS Radiances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gong, Jie; Wu, Dong L.; Eckermann, S. D.

    2012-01-01

    As the first gravity wave (GW) climatology study using nadir-viewing infrared sounders, 50 Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) radiance channels are selected to estimate GW variances at pressure levels between 2-100 hPa. The GW variance for each scan in the cross-track direction is derived from radiance perturbations in the scan, independently of adjacent scans along the orbit. Since the scanning swaths are perpendicular to the satellite orbits, which are inclined meridionally at most latitudes, the zonal component of GW propagation can be inferred by differencing the variances derived between the westmost and the eastmost viewing angles. Consistent with previous GW studies using various satellite instruments, monthly mean AIRS variance shows large enhancements over meridionally oriented mountain ranges as well as some islands at winter hemisphere high latitudes. Enhanced wave activities are also found above tropical deep convective regions. GWs prefer to propagate westward above mountain ranges, and eastward above deep convection. AIRS 90 field-of-views (FOVs), ranging from +48 deg. to -48 deg. off nadir, can detect large-amplitude GWs with a phase velocity propagating preferentially at steep angles (e.g., those from orographic and convective sources). The annual cycle dominates the GW variances and the preferred propagation directions for all latitudes. Indication of a weak two-year variation in the tropics is found, which is presumably related to the Quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO). AIRS geometry makes its out-tracks capable of detecting GWs with vertical wavelengths substantially shorter than the thickness of instrument weighting functions. The novel discovery of AIRS capability of observing shallow inertia GWs will expand the potential of satellite GW remote sensing and provide further constraints on the GW drag parameterization schemes in the general circulation models (GCMs).

  11. Infrared Spectral Radiance Intercomparisons With Satellite and Aircraft Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larar, Allen M.; Zhou, Daniel K.; Liu, Xu; Smith, William L.

    2014-01-01

    Measurement system validation is critical for advanced satellite sounders to reach their full potential of improving observations of the Earth's atmosphere, clouds, and surface for enabling enhancements in weather prediction, climate monitoring capability, and environmental change detection. Experimental field campaigns, focusing on satellite under-flights with well-calibrated FTS sensors aboard high-altitude aircraft, are an essential part of the validation task. Airborne FTS systems can enable an independent, SI-traceable measurement system validation by directly measuring the same level-1 parameters spatially and temporally coincident with the satellite sensor of interest. Continuation of aircraft under-flights for multiple satellites during multiple field campaigns enables long-term monitoring of system performance and inter-satellite cross-validation. The NASA / NPOESS Airborne Sounder Testbed - Interferometer (NAST-I) has been a significant contributor in this area by providing coincident high spectral/spatial resolution observations of infrared spectral radiances along with independently-retrieved geophysical products for comparison with like products from satellite sensors being validated. This presentation gives an overview of benefits achieved using airborne sensors such as NAST-I utilizing examples from recent field campaigns. The methodology implemented is not only beneficial to new sensors such as the Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) flying aboard the Suomi NPP and future JPSS satellites but also of significant benefit to sensors of longer flight heritage such as the Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder (AIRS) and the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) on the AQUA and METOP-A platforms, respectively, to ensure data quality continuity important for climate and other applications. Infrared spectral radiance inter-comparisons are discussed with a particular focus on usage of NAST-I data for enabling inter-platform cross-validation.

  12. System for absolute measurements by interferometric sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norton, Douglas A.

    1993-03-01

    The most common problem of interferometric sensors is their inability to measure absolute path imbalance. Presented in this paper is a signal processing system that gives absolute, unambiguous reading of optical path difference for almost any style of interferometric sensor. Key components are a wide band (incoherent) optical source, a polychromator, and FFT electronics. Advantages include no moving parts in the signal processor, no active components at the sensor location, and the use of standard single mode fiber for sensor illumination and signal transmission. Actual absolute path imbalance of the interferometer is determined without using fringe counting or other inferential techniques. The polychromator extracts the interference information that occurs at each discrete wavelength within the spectral band of the optical source. The signal processing consists of analog and digital filtering, Fast Fourier analysis, and a peak detection and interpolation algorithm. This system was originally designed for use in a remote pressure sensing application that employed a totally passive fiber optic interferometer. A performance qualification was made using a Fabry-Perot interferometer and a commercially available laser interferometer to measure the reference displacement.

  13. Chemical composition of French mimosa absolute oil.

    PubMed

    Perriot, Rodolphe; Breme, Katharina; Meierhenrich, Uwe J; Carenini, Elise; Ferrando, Georges; Baldovini, Nicolas

    2010-02-10

    Since decades mimosa (Acacia dealbata) absolute oil has been used in the flavor and perfume industry. Today, it finds an application in over 80 perfumes, and its worldwide industrial production is estimated five tons per year. Here we report on the chemical composition of French mimosa absolute oil. Straight-chain analogues from C6 to C26 with different functional groups (hydrocarbons, esters, aldehydes, diethyl acetals, alcohols, and ketones) were identified in the volatile fraction. Most of them are long-chain molecules: (Z)-heptadec-8-ene, heptadecane, nonadecane, and palmitic acid are the most abundant, and constituents such as 2-phenethyl alcohol, methyl anisate, and ethyl palmitate are present in smaller amounts. The heavier constituents were mainly triterpenoids such as lupenone and lupeol, which were identified as two of the main components. (Z)-Heptadec-8-ene, lupenone, and lupeol were quantified by GC-MS in SIM mode using external standards and represents 6%, 20%, and 7.8% (w/w) of the absolute oil. Moreover, odorant compounds were extracted by SPME and analyzed by GC-sniffing leading to the perception of 57 odorant zones, of which 37 compounds were identified by their odorant description, mass spectrum, retention index, and injection of the reference compound.

  14. Constrained adaptive bias correction for satellite radiances assimilation in the ECMWF 4D-Var

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Wei; Bormann, Niels

    2016-04-01

    Satellite radiance observations are typically affected by biases that arise from uncertainties in the absolute calibration, the radiative transfer modeling, or other aspects. These biases have to be removed for the successful assimilation of the data in NWP systems. Two key problems have been identified in bias correction: Firstly, bias corrections can drift towards unrealistic values in regions where there is strong model error and relatively few "anchor" observations, ie, observations that have little systematic error and therefore allow the separation between model and observation bias. Examples where this has been particularly problematic are channels sensitive to ozone or stratospheric temperature. Secondly, there is undesired interaction between the quality control and bias correction for observations where bias-corrected observation departures are used for quality control and where these departures show skewed distributions (e.g., in case of cloud detection). In the study, we investigated potential solutions to these problems by providing further constraints using potential available information, such as constraints on the size of the bias correction and innovative bias correction metrics using uncertainty estimation from calibration and radiative transfer. This has been studied in the full ECMWF global 4D-Var system, using data from microwave sounders which are sensitive to stratospheric temperature. The resulting enhanced bias corrections was assessed in the context of other assimilated observations (in particular radiosondes and GPS radio occultation measurements), and through comparisons of MLS temperature retrieval data in stratosphere and mesosphere. The constrained adaptive bias correction of AMSU-A stratospheric sounding channels reduces the biases in stratosphere and improves the medium range forecasts in both stratosphere and troposphere.

  15. Direct assimilation of Chinese FY-3C Microwave Temperature Sounder-2 radiances in the global GRAPES system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Juan; Liu, Guiqing

    2016-07-01

    FengYun-3C (FY-3C) is an operational polar-orbiting satellite carrying the new-generation microwave sounding instruments in China. This paper describes the assimilation of the FY-3C Microwave Temperature Sounder-2 (MWTS-2) radiances in the Global and Regional Assimilation and PrEdiction System (GRAPES) of China Meteorological Administration. A quality control (QC) procedure for the assimilation of MWTS-2 radiance is proposed. Extensive monitoring before assimilation shows that MWTS-2 observations exhibit a clear striping pattern. A technique combining principal component analysis (PCA) and ensemble empirical mode decomposition (EEMD) is applied to the observations to remove the striping noise. Cloudy field-of-views (FOVs) are identified by applying the Visible and InfrarRed Radiometer (VIRR) cloud fraction threshold of 76 %. Other QC steps are conducted in the follow order: (i) coastal FOVs are removed, (ii) eight outmost FOVs are not used, (iii) channel 5 data over sea ice and land are not used, (iv) channel 6 observations are not used if the terrain altitudes are higher than 500 m, and (v) outliers with large differences between observations and model simulations are removed. Approximately 83, 75, 40, and 40 % of the observations are removed by the proposed QC for channels 5-8, respectively. After QC, the global biases and standard deviations are reduced significantly. The assimilation of the MWTS-2 radiances shows a positive impact when the control experiment assimilates only conventional observations. The experiments also show that the analysis and forecast errors are slightly reduced when the striping noise is removed from the observations. The quality control scheme of extracting the striping noise may contribute to the analysis and forecast accuracy. The impact of MWTS-2 is neutral when the conventional data and other satellite data are all assimilated.

  16. Absolute classification with unsupervised clustering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeon, Byeungwoo; Landgrebe, D. A.

    1992-01-01

    An absolute classification algorithm is proposed in which the class definition through training samples or otherwise is required only for a particular class of interest. The absolute classification is considered as a problem of unsupervised clustering when one cluster is known initially. The definitions and statistics of the other classes are automatically developed through the weighted unsupervised clustering procedure, which is developed to keep the cluster corresponding to the class of interest from losing its identity as the class of interest. Once all the classes are developed, a conventional relative classifier such as the maximum-likelihood classifier is used in the classification.

  17. Impact of AIRS radiance in the NCUM 4D-VAR assimilation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivas, Desamsetti; Indira Rani, S.; Mallick, Swapan; George, John P.; Sharma, Priti

    2016-04-01

    The hyperspectral radiances from Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder (AIRS), on board NASA-AQUA satellite, have been processed through the Observation Processing System (OPS) and assimilated in the Variational Assimilation (VAR) System of NCMRWF Unified Model (NCUM). Numerical experiments are conducted in order to study the impact of the AIRS radiance in the NCUM analysis and forecast system. NCMRWF receives AIRS radiance from EUMETCAST through MOSDAC. AIRS is a grating spectrometer having 2378 channels covering the thermal infrared spectrum between 3 and 15 μm. Out of 2378 channels, 324 channels are selected for assimilation according to the peaking of weighting function and meteorological importance. According to the surface type and day-night conditions, some of the channels are not assimilated in the VAR. Observation Simulation Experiments (OSEs) are conducted for a period of 15 days to see the impact of AIRS radiances in NCUM. Statistical parameters like bias and RMSE are calculated to see the real impact of AIRS radiances in the assimilation system. Assimilation of AIRS in the NCUM system reduced the bias and RMSE in the radiances from instruments onboard other satellites. The impact of AIRS is clearly seen in the hyperspectral radiances like IASI and CrIS and also in infrared (HIRS) and microwave (AMSU, ATMS, etc.) sensors.

  18. Localizing the impact of satellite radiance observations using a global group ensemble filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Lili; Anderson, Jeffrey L.; Whitaker, Jeffrey S.

    2016-06-01

    Assimilation of satellite radiances has been proven to have positive impacts on the forecast skill, especially for regions with sparse conventional observations. Localization is an essential component to effectively assimilate satellite radiances in ensemble Kalman filters with affordable ensemble sizes. However, localizing the impact of radiance observations is not straightforward, since their location and separation from grid point model variables are not well defined. A global group filter (GGF) is applied here to provide a theoretical estimate of vertical localization functions for radiance observations being assimilated for global numerical weather prediction. As an extension of the hierarchical ensemble filter, the GGF uses groups of climatological ensembles to provide an estimated localization function that reduces the erroneous increments due to ensemble correlation sampling error. Results from an idealized simulation with known background error covariances show that the GGF localization function is superior to the optimal Gaspari and Cohn (GC) localization function. When the GGF is applied to the AMSU-A radiances, it can provide different localization functions for different channels, which indicates the complexity and large computational cost of tuning the localization scales for radiance observations. The GC, GGF, and fitted GGF (FGGF) localization functions are compared using experiments with the NCEP GFS and the NOAA operational EnKF. Verifications relative to the conventional observations, AMSU-A radiances, and the ECMWF analyses show that the GGF and FGGF have smaller errors than GC except in the tropics, and the advantages of the GGF and FGGF persist through 120 h forecast lead time.

  19. LADAR Performance Simulations with a High Spectral Resolution Atmospheric Transmittance and Radiance Model-LEEDR

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-01

    wavelengths of 1.064, 1.56 and 2.039 µm at a number of locations worldwide. Signal attenuation and background noise are characterized using LEEDR...presented primarily in the form of worldwide plots of notional signal to noise ratios, show a significant climate dependence, but large variances...between climatological and standard atmosphere assessments. An overall average absolute mean difference ratio of 1.03 is found when climatological signal

  20. Electroacoustical imaging technique for encoding incoherent radiance fields as Gabor elementary signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fales, C. L.; Huck, F. O.

    1985-01-01

    A technique is presented for directly encoding incoherent radiance fields as Gabor elementary signals. This technique uses an electro-acoustic sensor to modulate the electronic charges induced by the incident radiance field with the electric fields generated by Gaussian modulated sinusoidal acoustic waves. The resultant signal carries the amplitude and phase information required for localizing spatial frequencies of the radiance field. These localized spatial frequency representations provide a link between the either geometric or Fourier transform representations currently used in computer vision and pattern recognition.

  1. Factors limiting the discrimination and quantification of terrestrial features using remotely sensed radiance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duggin, M. J.

    1985-01-01

    In this paper, factors controlling the radiance incident on a remote-sensing device and the interaction of the sensor with upwelling radiance are considered. Attention is also given to systematic and random radiance variations across an image: while the former may be corrected for (to an extent) the latter may not, so that it is necessary to be aware of the impact of random variations on target identification, discrimination and quantification. Both the optical reflective and the thermal-infrared parts of the spectrum are considered. Equations are presented to concisely illustrate the processes involved.

  2. Absolute transition probabilities of phosphorus.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, M. H.; Roig, R. A.; Bengtson, R. D.

    1971-01-01

    Use of a gas-driven shock tube to measure the absolute strengths of 21 P I lines and 126 P II lines (from 3300 to 6900 A). Accuracy for prominent, isolated neutral and ionic lines is estimated to be 28 to 40% and 18 to 30%, respectively. The data and the corresponding theoretical predictions are examined for conformity with the sum rules.-

  3. Relativistic Absolutism in Moral Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vogt, W. Paul

    1982-01-01

    Discusses Emile Durkheim's "Moral Education: A Study in the Theory and Application of the Sociology of Education," which holds that morally healthy societies may vary in culture and organization but must possess absolute rules of moral behavior. Compares this moral theory with current theory and practice of American educators. (MJL)

  4. Vicarious absolute radiometric calibration of GF-2 PMS2 sensor using permanent artificial targets in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yaokai; Li, Chuanrong; Ma, Lingling; Wang, Ning; Qian, Yonggang; Tang, Lingli

    2016-10-01

    GF-2, launched on August 19 2014, is one of the high-resolution land resource observing satellite of the China GF series satellites plan. The radiometric performance evaluation of the onboard optical pan and multispectral (PMS2) sensor of GF-2 satellite is very important for the further application of the data. And, the vicarious absolute radiometric calibration approach is one of the most useful way to monitor the radiometric performance of the onboard optical sensors. In this study, the traditional reflectance-based method is used to vicarious radiometrically calibrate the onboard PMS2 sensor of GF-2 satellite using three black, gray and white reflected permanent artificial targets located in the AOE Baotou site in China. Vicarious field calibration campaign were carried out in the AOE-Baotou calibration site on 22 April 2016. And, the absolute radiometric calibration coefficients were determined with in situ measured atmospheric parameters and surface reflectance of the permanent artificial calibration targets. The predicted TOA radiance of a selected desert area with our determined calibrated coefficients were compared with the official distributed calibration coefficients. Comparison results show a good consistent and the mean relative difference of the multispectral channels is less than 5%. Uncertainty analysis was also carried out and a total uncertainty with 3.87% is determined of the TOA radiance.

  5. Absolute Spectrophotometry of 237 Open Cluster Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clampitt, L.; Burstein, D.

    1994-12-01

    We present absolute spectrophotometry of 237 stars in 7 nearby open clusters: Hyades, Pleiades, Alpha Persei, Praesepe, Coma Berenices, IC 4665, and M 39. The observations were taken using the Wampler single-channel scanner (Wampler 1966) on the Crossley 0.9m telescope at Lick Observatory from July 1973 through December 1974. 21 bandpasses spanning the spectral range 3500 Angstroms to 7780 Angstroms were observed for each star, with bandwiths ranging from 32Angstroms to 64 Angstroms. Data are standardized to the Hayes--Latham (1975) system. Our measurements are compared to filter colors on the Johnson BV, Stromgren ubvy, and Geneva U V B_1 B_2 V_1 G systems, as well as to spectrophotometry of a few stars published by Gunn, Stryker & Tinsley and in the Spectrophotometric Standards Catalog (Adelman; as distributed by the NSSDC). Both internal and external comparisons to the filter systems indicate a formal statistical accuracy per bandpass of 0.01 to 0.02 mag, with apparent larger ( ~ 0.03 mag) differences in absolute calibration between this data set and existing spectrophotometry. These data will comprise part of the spectrophotometry that will be used to calibrate the Beijing-Arizona-Taipei-Connecticut Color Survey of the Sky (see separate paper by Burstein et al. at this meeting).

  6. Absolute, Extreme-Ultraviolet, Solar Spectral Irradiance Monitor (AESSIM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huber, Martin C. E.; Smith, Peter L.; Parkinson, W. H.; Kuehne, M.; Kock, M.

    1988-01-01

    AESSIM, the Absolute, Extreme-Ultraviolet, Solar Spectral Irradiance Monitor, is designed to measure the absolute solar spectral irradiance at extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) wavelengths. The data are required for studies of the processes that occur in the earth's upper atmosphere and for predictions of atmospheric drag on space vehicles. AESSIM is comprised of sun-pointed spectrometers and newly-developed, secondary standards of spectral irradiance for the EUV. Use of the in-orbit standard sources will eliminate the uncertainties caused by changes in spectrometer efficiency that have plagued all previous measurements of the solar spectral EUV flux.

  7. A fast radiative transfer model for the assimilation of water vapor radiances from the Kalpana very high resolution radiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Randhir; Rayer, Peter; Saunders, Roger; Migliorini, Stefano; Brugge, Roger; O'Neill, Alan

    2009-04-01

    A fast radiative transfer model (RTM) to compute emitted infrared radiances for a very high resolution radiometer (VHRR), onboard the operational Indian geostationary satellite Kalpana has been developed and verified. This work is a step towards the assimilation of Kalpana water vapor (WV) radiances into numerical weather prediction models. The fast RTM uses a regression-based approach to parameterize channel-specific convolved level to space transmittances. A comparison between the fast RTM and the line-by-line RTM demonstrated that the fast RTM can simulate line-by-line radiances for the Kalpana WV channel to an accuracy better than the instrument noise, while offering more rapid radiance calculations. A comparison of clear sky radiances of the Kalpana WV channel with the ECMWF model first guess radiances is also presented, aiming to demonstrate the fast RTM performance with the real observations. In order to assimilate the radiances from Kalpana, a simple scheme for bias correction has been suggested.

  8. Examination of the use of narrowband radiances for earth radiation budget studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, David F.; Doelling, David R.; Minnis, Patrick; Harrison, Edwin F.

    1990-01-01

    The relationship between narrowband and broadband thermal radiances is explored to determine the accuracy of outgoing longwave radiation derived from narrowband data. Infrared window (11.5 microns) data from the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite are correlated with longwave (5.0 - 50.0 microns) data from the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment. A simple quadratic fit between the narrowband and longwave fluxes results in a standard error of the estimate of 4.5-5.3 percent for data which are matched closely in time and space. Use of matched regional flux data with temporal differences up to a half hour yield standard errors of 4.6-5.9 percent. About one fourth of the magnitude of the error may be attributed to limb-darkening and temporal differences in the matched fluxes. The relationship shows a significant dependence on the relative humidity of the atmosphere above the radiating surface. Although this dependency accounts for only about 2 percent of the standard error, it reduces the monthly mean regional errors by more than 10 percent. Data taken over land produced a slightly different relationship than data taken over water. The differences appear to be due to the higher altitudes of the land radiating surfaces. Cloud amount and height also influence the narrowband-broadband relationship. Inclusion of these parameters does not affect the standard errors but it reduces the montly mean regional errors by another 10 percent. Better humidity and temperature data and knowledge of cloud microphysics may be required to further improve the relationship. Using the best fits, it is concluded that the monthly mean outgoing flux may be determined with an rms uncertainty of 1.7 percent using a single infrared window channel with coincident cloud and humidity data. Regional concentrations of the errors, however, make the use of narrowband data too unreliable for monitoring the longwave flux for climate change studies.

  9. Inter-Comparison of Suomi NPP CrIS Radiances with AIRS and IASI toward Infrared Hyperspectral Benchmark Radiance Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L.; Han, Y.; Chen, Y.; Jin, X.; Tremblay, D. A.

    2013-12-01

    The Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) on the newly-launched Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (SNPP) and future Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) is a Fourier transform spectrometer that provides soundings of the atmosphere with 1305 spectral channels, over 3 wavelength ranges: LWIR (9.14 - 15.38 μm); MWIR (5.71 - 8.26 μm); and SWIR (3.92 - 4.64 μm). The SNPP CrIS, combined with the existed Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) on NASA Aqua and Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) on Metop-A and -B, will accumulate decades of hyperspectral spectral infrared measurements with high accuracy, which have potentials for climate monitoring and model assessments. In this presentation, we will 1) evaluate radiance consistency among AIRS, IASI, and CrIS, and 2) thus demonstrate that the CrIS SDR data from SNPP and JPSS can serve as a long-term reference benchmark for inter-calibration and climate-related study just like AIRS and IASI. In the first part of presentation, we will brief major postlaunch calibration and validation activities for SNPP CrIS performed by the NOAA STAR CrIS sensor data record (SDR) team, including the calibration parameter updates, instrument stability monitoring, and data processing quality assurance. Comprehensive assessments of the radiometric, spectral, geometric calibration of CrIS SDR will be presented. In addition, the preparation of CrIS SDR re-processing toward consistent Climate Data Records (CDRs) will be discussed. The purpose of this part is to provide a comprehensive overview of CrIS SDR data quality to the user community. In the second part, we will compare CrIS hyperspectral radiance measurements with the AIRS and IASI on Metop-A and -B to examine spectral and radiometric consistence and differences among three hyperspectral IR sounders. The SNPP CrIS, combined with AIRS and IASI, provide the first-ever inter-calibration opportunity because three hyperspectral IR sounders can observe the Earth and

  10. Determining index of refraction from polarimetric hyperspectral radiance measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Jacob A.; Gross, Kevin C.

    2015-09-01

    Polarimetric hyperspectral imaging (P-HSI) combines two of the most common remote sensing modalities. This work leverages the combination of these techniques to improve material classification. Classifying and identifying materials requires parameters which are invariant to changing viewing conditions, and most often a material's reflectivity or emissivity is used. Measuring these most often requires assumptions be made about the material and atmospheric conditions. Combining both polarimetric and hyperspectral imaging, we propose a method to remotely estimate the index of refraction of a material. In general, this is an underdetermined problem because both the real and imaginary components of index of refraction are unknown at every spectral point. By modeling the spectral variation of the index of refraction using a few parameters, however, the problem can be made overdetermined. A number of different functions can be used to describe this spectral variation, and some are discussed here. Reducing the number of spectral parameters to fit allows us to add parameters which estimate atmospheric downwelling radiance and transmittance. Additionally, the object temperature is added as a fit parameter. The set of these parameters that best replicate the measured data is then found using a bounded Nelder-Mead simplex search algorithm. Other search algorithms are also examined and discussed. Results show that this technique has promise but also some limitations, which are the subject of ongoing work.

  11. Aerosol retrieval in hazy atmosphere by using polarization and radiance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukai, S.; Sano, I.; Nakata, M.

    2014-12-01

    Aerosol retrieval is achieved by radiative transfer simulation in the Earth atmosphere model. This work intends to propose an algorithm for multiple light scattering simulations in the hazy polarized radiation field. We have already solved the scalar radiative transfer problem in the case of haze episodes with dense concentrations of atmospheric aerosols by the method of successive order of scattering, which is named scalar-MSOS. The term "scalar" indicates radiance alone in the treatment of radiative transfer problem against "vector" involving polarized radiation field. The satellite polarimetric sensor POLDER-1, 2, 3 has shown that the spectro-photopolarimetry of terrestrial atmosphere is very useful for observation of the Earth, especially for aerosols. JAXA has been developing the new Earth observing system, GCOM satellite. GCOM-C will board the polarimetric sensor SGLI in 2017. It is highly likely that large-scale aerosol episodes will continue to occur, because the air pollution becomes to be severe due to both the increasing emissions of the anthropogenic aerosols and the complicated behavior of natural aerosols. Then many potential applications for the kind of radiation simulation by MSOS considering the polarization information denoted by Stokes parameters (I, Q, U, V), named vector-MSOS, are desired. It is shown here that dense aerosol episodes can be well simulated by a semi-infinite radiation model composed of the proposed aerosol models. In addition our vector-MSOS is examined in practice by combination use of PARASOL/POLDER, GOSAT/CAI and Aqua/MODIS data.

  12. Infrared radiance analysis from the SNPP airborne field campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larar, Allen M.; Zhou, Daniel K.; Liu, Xu; Smith, William L.

    2014-11-01

    Experimental field campaigns, including satellite under-flights with well-calibrated FTS sensors aboard high-altitude aircraft, are an essential part of the satellite measurement system validation task aimed at improving observations of the Earth's atmosphere, clouds, and surface for enabling enhancements in weather prediction, climate monitoring capability, and environmental change detection. The Suomi NPP (SNPP) airborne field campaign was conducted during the 6 - 31 May, 2013 timeframe based out of Palmdale, CA, and focused on under-flights of the SNPP satellite with the NASA ER-2 aircraft in order to perform cal/val of the satellite instruments and their corresponding data products. Aircraft flight profiles were designed to under-fly multiple satellites within a single sortie, when feasible, to address satellite sensor validation and cross-validation; specifically, in addition to under-flying SNPP, flight profiles were defined to also obtain data coincident with the NASA A-train (i.e. AQUA), MetOP-A, and MetOP-B satellites to enable intercomparisons with instruments aboard those platforms (i.e. AIRS, IASI, and CrIS). This presentation focuses on radiance analysis from the SNPP airborne field campaign with a particular emphasis on NAST-I intercomparisons with the Crosstrack Infrared Sounder (CrIS).

  13. Geophysical Information from Advanced Sounder Infrared Spectral Radiance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larar, Allen M.; Zhou, Daniel K.; Liu, Xu; Smith, William L.

    2012-01-01

    Advanced satellite sensors are tasked with improving global observations of the Earth's atmosphere, clouds, and surface to enable enhancements in weather prediction, climate monitoring capability, and environmental change detection. Satisfying this type of improvement for inferred geophysical information from these observations requires optimal usage of data from current systems as well as enhancements to future sensors. This presentation addresses the information content present in infrared spectral radiance from advanced atmospheric sounders with an emphasis on knowledge of thermodynamic state and trace species. Results of trade-off studies conducted to evaluate the impact of spectral resolution, spectral coverage, instrument noise, and a priori knowledge on remote sensing system information content will be discussed. A focus is placed on information achievable from the Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder (AIRS) on the NASA EOS Aqua satellite in orbit since 2002, the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) aboard MetOp-A since 2006, and the Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) instrument aboard the NPP and JPSS series of satellites which began 28 October 2011.

  14. Interpretation of absorption bands in airborne hyperspectral radiance data.

    PubMed

    Szekielda, Karl H; Bowles, Jeffrey H; Gillis, David B; Miller, W David

    2009-01-01

    It is demonstrated that hyperspectral imagery can be used, without atmospheric correction, to determine the presence of accessory phytoplankton pigments in coastal waters using derivative techniques. However, care must be taken not to confuse other absorptions for those caused by the presence of pigments. Atmospheric correction, usually the first step to making products from hyperspectral data, may not completely remove Fraunhofer lines and atmospheric absorption bands and these absorptions may interfere with identification of phytoplankton accessory pigments. Furthermore, the ability to resolve absorption bands depends on the spectral resolution of the spectrometer, which for a fixed spectral range also determines the number of observed bands. Based on this information, a study was undertaken to determine under what circumstances a hyperspectral sensor may determine the presence of pigments. As part of the study a hyperspectral imager was used to take high spectral resolution data over two different water masses. In order to avoid the problems associated with atmospheric correction this data was analyzed as radiance data without atmospheric correction. Here, the purpose was to identify spectral regions that might be diagnostic for photosynthetic pigments. Two well proven techniques were used to aid in absorption band recognition, the continuum removal of the spectra and the fourth derivative. The findings in this study suggest that interpretation of absorption bands in remote sensing data, whether atmospherically corrected or not, have to be carefully reviewed when they are interpreted in terms of photosynthetic pigments.

  15. Interpretation of Absorption Bands in Airborne Hyperspectral Radiance Data

    PubMed Central

    Szekielda, Karl H.; Bowles, Jeffrey H.; Gillis, David B.; Miller, W. David

    2009-01-01

    It is demonstrated that hyperspectral imagery can be used, without atmospheric correction, to determine the presence of accessory phytoplankton pigments in coastal waters using derivative techniques. However, care must be taken not to confuse other absorptions for those caused by the presence of pigments. Atmospheric correction, usually the first step to making products from hyperspectral data, may not completely remove Fraunhofer lines and atmospheric absorption bands and these absorptions may interfere with identification of phytoplankton accessory pigments. Furthermore, the ability to resolve absorption bands depends on the spectral resolution of the spectrometer, which for a fixed spectral range also determines the number of observed bands. Based on this information, a study was undertaken to determine under what circumstances a hyperspectral sensor may determine the presence of pigments. As part of the study a hyperspectral imager was used to take high spectral resolution data over two different water masses. In order to avoid the problems associated with atmospheric correction this data was analyzed as radiance data without atmospheric correction. Here, the purpose was to identify spectral regions that might be diagnostic for photosynthetic pigments. Two well proven techniques were used to aid in absorption band recognition, the continuum removal of the spectra and the fourth derivative. The findings in this study suggest that interpretation of absorption bands in remote sensing data, whether atmospherically corrected or not, have to be carefully reviewed when they are interpreted in terms of photosynthetic pigments. PMID:22574053

  16. Absolute Radiometric Calibration of Narrow-Swath Imaging Sensors with Reference to Non-Coincident Wide-Swath Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCorkel, Joel; Thome, Kurtis; Lockwood, Ronald

    2012-01-01

    An inter-calibration method is developed to provide absolute radiometric calibration of narrow-swath imaging sensors with reference to non-coincident wide-swath sensors. The method predicts at-sensor radiance using non-coincident imagery from the reference sensor and knowledge of spectral reflectance of the test site. The imagery of the reference sensor is restricted to acquisitions that provide similar view and solar illumination geometry to reduce uncertainties due to directional reflectance effects. Spectral reflectance of the test site is found with a simple iterative radiative transfer method using radiance values of a well-understood wide-swath sensor and spectral shape information based on historical ground-based measurements. At-sensor radiance is calculated for the narrow-swath sensor using this spectral reflectance and atmospheric parameters that are also based on historical in situ measurements. Results of the inter-calibration method show agreement on the 2 5 percent level in most spectral regions with the vicarious calibration technique relying on coincident ground-based measurements referred to as the reflectance-based approach. While the variability of the inter-calibration method based on non-coincident image pairs is significantly larger, results are consistent with techniques relying on in situ measurements. The method is also insensitive to spectral differences between the sensors by transferring to surface spectral reflectance prior to prediction of at-sensor radiance. The utility of this inter-calibration method is made clear by its flexibility to utilize image pairings with acquisition dates differing in excess of 30 days allowing frequent absolute calibration comparisons between wide- and narrow-swath sensors.

  17. Spectral Invariant Behavior of Zenith Radiance Around Cloud Edges Observed by ARM SWS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshak, A.; Knyazikhin, Y.; Chiu, J. C.; Wiscombe, W. J.

    2009-01-01

    The ARM Shortwave Spectrometer (SWS) measures zenith radiance at 418 wavelengths between 350 and 2170 nm. Because of its 1-sec sampling resolution, the SWS provides a unique capability to study the transition zone between cloudy and clear sky areas. A spectral invariant behavior is found between ratios of zenith radiance spectra during the transition from cloudy to cloud-free. This behavior suggests that the spectral signature of the transition zone is a linear mixture between the two extremes (definitely cloudy and definitely clear). The weighting function of the linear mixture is a wavelength-independent characteristic of the transition zone. It is shown that the transition zone spectrum is fully determined by this function and zenith radiance spectra of clear and cloudy regions. An important result of these discoveries is that high temporal resolution radiance measurements in the clear-to-cloud transition zone can be well approximated by lower temporal resolution measurements plus linear interpolation.

  18. Market analysis, energy savings potential, and future development requirements for Radiance. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-10-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Conservation and Renewable Energy (CE), Building Equipment Division has funded the development of a sophisticated computer rendering program called Radiance at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratories (LBL). The project review study included: (1) Surveys of the lighting profession to determine how designers would use an improved, user-friendly Radiance, (2) Elucidation of features, including how Radiance could be used to save energy, which could be incorporated into Radiance to facilitate its more widespread use, (3) Outline of a development plan and determination of what costs the DOE might incur if it were to proceed with the development of an improved version, and (4) Weighing the anticipated development costs against anticipated energy-saving benefits.

  19. Effect of aerosol variation on radiance in the earth's atmosphere-ocean system.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plass, G. N.; Kattawar, G. W.

    1972-01-01

    Calculation of the radiance at the top and bottom of the atmosphere with a realistic model of both the atmosphere and ocean. It is found that the upward flux at the top of the atmosphere, as well as the angular distribution of the radiation, changes appreciably as the aerosol amount increases from normal to ten times normal. At the same time, the upward and downward radiance just above the ocean surface undergoes important changes. The radiance does not change appreciably with variations in the aerosol distribution with height so long as the total aerosol amount remains constant. Similarly, changes in the ozone amount cause only small changes in the radiance at the wavelengths considered (0.7, 0.9, and 1.67 micron). Very little radiation returns to the atmosphere from the ocean at 0.9 and 1.67 micron because of the high absorption of water at these wavelengths.

  20. ScaRaB: first results of absolute and cross calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trémas, Thierry L.; Aznay, Ouahid; Chomette, Olivier

    2015-10-01

    ScaRaB (SCAnner for RAdiation Budget) is the name of three radiometers whose two first flight models have been launched in 1994 and 1997. The instruments were mounted on-board Russian satellites, METEOR and RESURS. On October 12th 2011, a last model has been launched from the Indian site of Sriharikota. ScaRaB is a passenger of MEGHA-TROPIQUES, an Indo-French joint Satellite Mission for studying the water cycle and energy exchanges in the tropics. ScaRaB is composed of four parallel and independent channels. Channel-2 and channel-3 are considered as the main ones. Channel-1 is dedicated to measure solar radiance (0.5 to 0.7 μm) while channel-4 (10 to 13 μm) is an infrared window. The absolute calibration of ScaRab is assured by internal calibration sources (black bodies and a lamp for channel-1). However, during the commissioning phase, the lamp used for the absolute calibration of channel-1 revealed to be inaccurate. We propose here an alternative calibration method based on terrestrial targets. Due to the spectral range of channel-1, only calibration over desert sites (temporal monitoring) and clouds (cross band) is suitable. Desert sites have been widely used for sensor calibration since they have a stable spectral response over time. Because of their high reflectances, the atmospheric effect on the upward radiance is relatively minimal. In addition, they are spatially uniform. Their temporal instability without atmospheric correction has been determined to be less than 1-2% over a year. Very-high-altitude (10 km) bright clouds are good validation targets in the visible and near-infrared spectra because of their high spectrally consistent reflectance. If the clouds are very high, there is no need to correct aerosol scattering and water vapor absorption as both aerosol and water vapor are distributed near the surface. Only Rayleigh scattering and ozone absorption need to be considered. This method has been found to give a 4% uncertainty. Radiometric cross

  1. Accurate absolute GPS positioning through satellite clock error estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, S.-C.; Kwon, J. H.; Jekeli, C.

    2001-05-01

    An algorithm for very accurate absolute positioning through Global Positioning System (GPS) satellite clock estimation has been developed. Using International GPS Service (IGS) precise orbits and measurements, GPS clock errors were estimated at 30-s intervals. Compared to values determined by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, the agreement was at the level of about 0.1 ns (3 cm). The clock error estimates were then applied to an absolute positioning algorithm in both static and kinematic modes. For the static case, an IGS station was selected and the coordinates were estimated every 30 s. The estimated absolute position coordinates and the known values had a mean difference of up to 18 cm with standard deviation less than 2 cm. For the kinematic case, data obtained every second from a GPS buoy were tested and the result from the absolute positioning was compared to a differential GPS (DGPS) solution. The mean differences between the coordinates estimated by the two methods are less than 40 cm and the standard deviations are less than 25 cm. It was verified that this poorer standard deviation on 1-s position results is due to the clock error interpolation from 30-s estimates with Selective Availability (SA). After SA was turned off, higher-rate clock error estimates (such as 1 s) could be obtained by a simple interpolation with negligible corruption. Therefore, the proposed absolute positioning technique can be used to within a few centimeters' precision at any rate by estimating 30-s satellite clock errors and interpolating them.

  2. Assessment of the first radiances received from the VSSR Atmospheric Sounder (VAS) instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chesters, D.; Uccellini, L. W.; Montgomery, H.; Mostek, A.; Robinson, W.

    1981-01-01

    The first orderly, calibrated radiances from the VAS-D instrument on the GOES-4 satellite are examined for: image quality, radiometric precision, radiation transfer verification at clear air radiosonde sites, regression retrieval accuracy, and mesoscale analysis features. Postlaunch problems involving calibration and data processing irregularities of scientific or operational significance are included. The radiances provide good visual and relative radiometric data for empirically conditioned retrievals of mesoscale temperature and moisture fields in clear air.

  3. Spectral radiance measurements of exhaust plumes from scale model rocket engines.

    PubMed

    McCaa, D J

    1968-05-01

    A short duration experimental technique for investigating radiative properties of rocket exhaust plumes at high altitudes is described. Experimental measurements of the spectral radiance of two interacting exhaust plumes generated by 1/45 scale F-l engines burning gaseous ethylene and oxygen are presented. In addition, the spectral radiance characteristics of several Saturn auxiliary solid propellant rocket motors have also been measured and these results are included. The measurements were obtained with a rapid scanning ir spectrometer.

  4. Horizon Brightness Revisited: Measurements and a Model of Clear-Sky Radiances

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-07-20

    Clear daytime skies persistently display a subtle local maximum of radiance near the astronomical horizon. Spectroradiometry and digital image analysis confirm this maximum’s reality, and they show that its angular width and elevation vary with solar elevation, azimuth relative to the Sun, and aerosol optical depth. Many existing models of atmospheric scattering do not generate this near-horizon radiance maximum, but a simple second-order scattering model does, and it reproduces many of the maximum’s details.

  5. The Absolute Spectrum Polarimeter (ASP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kogut, A. J.

    2010-01-01

    The Absolute Spectrum Polarimeter (ASP) is an Explorer-class mission to map the absolute intensity and linear polarization of the cosmic microwave background and diffuse astrophysical foregrounds over the full sky from 30 GHz to 5 THz. The principal science goal is the detection and characterization of linear polarization from an inflationary epoch in the early universe, with tensor-to-scalar ratio r much greater than 1O(raised to the power of { -3}) and Compton distortion y < 10 (raised to the power of{-6}). We describe the ASP instrument and mission architecture needed to detect the signature of an inflationary epoch in the early universe using only 4 semiconductor bolometers.

  6. Physics of negative absolute temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, Eitan; Penrose, Oliver

    2017-01-01

    Negative absolute temperatures were introduced into experimental physics by Purcell and Pound, who successfully applied this concept to nuclear spins; nevertheless, the concept has proved controversial: a recent article aroused considerable interest by its claim, based on a classical entropy formula (the "volume entropy") due to Gibbs, that negative temperatures violated basic principles of statistical thermodynamics. Here we give a thermodynamic analysis that confirms the negative-temperature interpretation of the Purcell-Pound experiments. We also examine the principal arguments that have been advanced against the negative temperature concept; we find that these arguments are not logically compelling, and moreover that the underlying "volume" entropy formula leads to predictions inconsistent with existing experimental results on nuclear spins. We conclude that, despite the counterarguments, negative absolute temperatures make good theoretical sense and did occur in the experiments designed to produce them.

  7. Optomechanics for absolute rotation detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davuluri, Sankar

    2016-07-01

    In this article, we present an application of optomechanical cavity for the absolute rotation detection. The optomechanical cavity is arranged in a Michelson interferometer in such a way that the classical centrifugal force due to rotation changes the length of the optomechanical cavity. The change in the cavity length induces a shift in the frequency of the cavity mode. The phase shift corresponding to the frequency shift in the cavity mode is measured at the interferometer output to estimate the angular velocity of absolute rotation. We derived an analytic expression to estimate the minimum detectable rotation rate in our scheme for a given optomechanical cavity. Temperature dependence of the rotation detection sensitivity is studied.

  8. Bilateral Comparison Between CMI and CEM in Radiance Temperature Scale Realization from to

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martín, M. J.; Kňazovická, L.; del Campo, D.; Strnad, R.

    2014-04-01

    A bilateral comparison between the Centro Español de Metrología (CEM) and the Český Metrologický Institut (CMI) of radiance temperature scale realizations in the range from to was carried out during 2012 to support the calibration measurements capabilities of CMI in radiation thermometry. The CEM capabilities were demonstrated previously in a recent comparison of European laboratories over the range from to . A CMI KE-LP5 radiation thermometer, working at 1568 nm, was used as a traveling standard. CEM measurements were done at the fixed-points (FPs) of Zn, Ag, and Cu and, for the rest of the temperatures, variable temperature blackbodies (VTBBs) were used. CMI measurements were done at the FPs of Sn, Al, and Cu, and the rest of the temperatures were measured with VTBBs. The size-of-source effect was measured at CEM to decide whether or not the measurements from both laboratories should be corrected by this effect (when the diameter of the sources was different at each laboratory). CMI performed the measurement of the Al FP before and after CEM to evaluate the stability of the radiation thermometer. The results for both laboratories are summarized, and they agree within their expanded uncertainties.

  9. Implementation and application of an interactive user-friendly validation software for RADIANCE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundaram, Anand; Boonn, William W.; Kim, Woojin; Cook, Tessa S.

    2012-02-01

    RADIANCE extracts CT dose parameters from dose sheets using optical character recognition and stores the data in a relational database. To facilitate validation of RADIANCE's performance, a simple user interface was initially implemented and about 300 records were evaluated. Here, we extend this interface to achieve a wider variety of functions and perform a larger-scale validation. The validator uses some data from the RADIANCE database to prepopulate quality-testing fields, such as correspondence between calculated and reported total dose-length product. The interface also displays relevant parameters from the DICOM headers. A total of 5,098 dose sheets were used to test the performance accuracy of RADIANCE in dose data extraction. Several search criteria were implemented. All records were searchable by accession number, study date, or dose parameters beyond chosen thresholds. Validated records were searchable according to additional criteria from validation inputs. An error rate of 0.303% was demonstrated in the validation. Dose monitoring is increasingly important and RADIANCE provides an open-source solution with a high level of accuracy. The RADIANCE validator has been updated to enable users to test the integrity of their installation and verify that their dose monitoring is accurate and effective.

  10. Nonuniformity correction of infrared cameras by reading radiance temperatures with a spatially nonhomogeneous radiation source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutschwager, Berndt; Hollandt, Jörg

    2017-01-01

    We present a novel method of nonuniformity correction (NUC) of infrared cameras and focal plane arrays (FPA) in a wide optical spectral range by reading radiance temperatures and by applying a radiation source with an unknown and spatially nonhomogeneous radiance temperature distribution. The benefit of this novel method is that it works with the display and the calculation of radiance temperatures, it can be applied to radiation sources of arbitrary spatial radiance temperature distribution, and it only requires sufficient temporal stability of this distribution during the measurement process. In contrast to this method, an initially presented method described the calculation of NUC correction with the reading of monitored radiance values. Both methods are based on the recording of several (at least three) images of a radiation source and a purposeful row- and line-shift of these sequent images in relation to the first primary image. The mathematical procedure is explained in detail. Its numerical verification with a source of a predefined nonhomogeneous radiance temperature distribution and a thermal imager of a predefined nonuniform FPA responsivity is presented.

  11. Clock time is absolute and universal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Xinhang

    2015-09-01

    A critical error is found in the Special Theory of Relativity (STR): mixing up the concepts of the STR abstract time of a reference frame and the displayed time of a physical clock, which leads to use the properties of the abstract time to predict time dilation on physical clocks and all other physical processes. Actually, a clock can never directly measure the abstract time, but can only record the result of a physical process during a period of the abstract time such as the number of cycles of oscillation which is the multiplication of the abstract time and the frequency of oscillation. After Lorentz Transformation, the abstract time of a reference frame expands by a factor gamma, but the frequency of a clock decreases by the same factor gamma, and the resulting multiplication i.e. the displayed time of a moving clock remains unchanged. That is, the displayed time of any physical clock is an invariant of Lorentz Transformation. The Lorentz invariance of the displayed times of clocks can further prove within the framework of STR our earth based standard physical time is absolute, universal and independent of inertial reference frames as confirmed by both the physical fact of the universal synchronization of clocks on the GPS satellites and clocks on the earth, and the theoretical existence of the absolute and universal Galilean time in STR which has proved that time dilation and space contraction are pure illusions of STR. The existence of the absolute and universal time in STR has directly denied that the reference frame dependent abstract time of STR is the physical time, and therefore, STR is wrong and all its predictions can never happen in the physical world.

  12. Absolute Radiometric Calibration of EUNIS-06

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, R. J.; Rabin, D. M.; Kent, B. J.; Paustian, W.

    2007-01-01

    The Extreme-Ultraviolet Normal-Incidence Spectrometer (EUNIS) is a soundingrocket payload that obtains imaged high-resolution spectra of individual solar features, providing information about the Sun's corona and upper transition region. Shortly after its successful initial flight last year, a complete end-to-end calibration was carried out to determine the instrument's absolute radiometric response over its Longwave bandpass of 300 - 370A. The measurements were done at the Rutherford-Appleton Laboratory (RAL) in England, using the same vacuum facility and EUV radiation source used in the pre-flight calibrations of both SOHO/CDS and Hinode/EIS, as well as in three post-flight calibrations of our SERTS sounding rocket payload, the precursor to EUNIS. The unique radiation source provided by the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) had been calibrated to an absolute accuracy of 7% (l-sigma) at 12 wavelengths covering our bandpass directly against the Berlin electron storage ring BESSY, which is itself a primary radiometric source standard. Scans of the EUNIS aperture were made to determine the instrument's absolute spectral sensitivity to +- 25%, considering all sources of error, and demonstrate that EUNIS-06 was the most sensitive solar E W spectrometer yet flown. The results will be matched against prior calibrations which relied on combining measurements of individual optical components, and on comparisons with theoretically predicted 'insensitive' line ratios. Coordinated observations were made during the EUNIS-06 flight by SOHO/CDS and EIT that will allow re-calibrations of those instruments as well. In addition, future EUNIS flights will provide similar calibration updates for TRACE, Hinode/EIS, and STEREO/SECCHI/EUVI.

  13. Multi-RTM-based Radiance Assimilation to Improve Snow Estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Y.; Zhao, L.; Hoar, T. J.; Yang, Z. L.; Toure, A. M.

    2015-12-01

    Data assimilation of microwave brightness temperature (TB) observations (i.e., radiance assimilation (RA)) has been proven to improve snowpack characterization at relatively small scales. However, large-scale applications of RA require a considerable amount of further efforts. Our objective in this study is to explore global-scale snow RA. In a RA scheme, a radiative transfer model (RTM) is an observational operator predicting TB; therefore, the quality of the assimilation results may strongly depend upon the RTM used as well as the land surface model (LSM). Several existing RTMs show different sensitivities to snowpack properties and thus they simulate significantly different TB. At the global scale, snow physical properties vary widely with local climate conditions. No single RTM has been shown to be able to accurately reproduce the observed TB for such a wide range of snow conditions. In this study, therefore, we hypothesize that snow estimates using a microwave RA scheme can be improved through the use of multiple RTMs (i.e., multi-RTM-based approaches). As a first step, here we use two snowpack RTMs, i.e., the Dense Media Radiative Transfer-Multi Layers model (DMRT-ML) and the Microwave Emission Model for Layered Snowpacks (MEMLS). The Community Land Model version 4 (CLM4) is used to simulate snow dynamics. The assimilation process is conducted by the Data Assimilation Research Testbed (DART), which is a community facility developed by the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) for ensemble-based data assimilation studies. In the RA experiments, the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer-Earth Observing System (AMSR-E) TB at 18.7 and 36.5 GHz vertical polarization channels are assimilated into the RA system using the ensemble adjustment Kalman filter. The results are evaluated using the Canadian Meteorological Centre (CMC) daily snow depth, the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) snow cover fraction, and in-situ snowpack and river

  14. Interpreting millimeter-wave radiances over tropical convective clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haddad, Z. S.; Sawaya, R. C.; Kacimi, S.; Sy, O. O.; Turk, F. J.; Steward, J.

    2017-02-01

    Attempts to interpret the measurements of millimeter-wave radiometers over tropical storms must overcome the difficulty of modeling the scattering signatures of hydrometeors at these frequencies. Most approaches to date try to retrieve surface precipitation, to which the observations are not directly sensitive. In fact, millimeter wavelengths are most sensitive to the scattering from solid hydrometeors within the upper levels of the cloud. Millimeter-wavelength radiometers have a definite advantage over the lower frequency radiometers in that they have finer spatial resolution to resolve deep convection. Preliminary analyses summarized here indicate that the measurements are indeed sensitive to the depth and intensity of convection. The challenge is to derive a robust approach to make quantitative estimates of the characteristics of the convection directly from the observations, and conversely to derive a robust forward representation of the dependence of the radiances on the underlying moisture fields, to enable effective data assimilation. This is accomplished using a two-step semiempirical approach: first, nearly simultaneous coincident observations by millimeter-wave radiometers and orbiting atmospheric profiling radars are used to enforce unbiased consistency between modeled brightness temperatures and radar and radiometer observations; second, the departure from the first-step mean empirical relations are explained in terms of the moisture variables, using cloud-resolving simulations with different microphysical schemes, including an original microphysical representation that proves to be more consistent with remote sensing observations than existing schemes. The results are a retrieval approach and a forward representation that are unbiased by construction, with uncertainties quantified by the corresponding conditional variances.

  15. Climate Quality Broadband and Narrowband Solar Reflected Radiance Calibration Between Sensors in Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wielicki, Bruce A.; Doelling, David R.; Young, David F.; Loeb, Norman G.; Garber, Donald P.; MacDonnell, David G.

    2008-01-01

    vAs the potential impacts of global climate change become more clear [1], the need to determine the accuracy of climate prediction over decade-to-century time scales has become an urgent and critical challenge. The most critical tests of climate model predictions will occur using observations of decadal changes in climate forcing, response, and feedback variables. Many of these key climate variables are observed by remotely sensing the global distribution of reflected solar spectral and broadband radiance. These "reflected solar" variables include aerosols, clouds, radiative fluxes, snow, ice, vegetation, ocean color, and land cover. Achieving sufficient satellite instrument accuracy, stability, and overlap to rigorously observe decadal change signals has proven very difficult in most cases and has not yet been achieved in others [2]. One of the earliest efforts to make climate quality observations was for Earth Radiation Budget: Nimbus 6/7 in the late 1970s, ERBE in the 1980s/90s, and CERES in 2000s are examples of the most complete global records. The recent CERES data products have carried out the most extensive intercomparisons because if the need to merge data from up to 11 instruments (CERES, MODIS, geostationary imagers) on 7 spacecraft (Terra, Aqua, and 5 geostationary) for any given month. In order to achieve climate calibration for cloud feedbacks, the radiative effect of clear-sky, all-sky, and cloud radiative effect must all be made with very high stability and accuracy. For shortwave solar reflected flux, even the 1% CERES broadband absolute accuracy (1-sigma confidence bound) is not sufficient to allow gaps in the radiation record for decadal climate change. Typical absolute accuracy for the best narrowband sensors like SeaWiFS, MISR, and MODIS range from 2 to 4% (1-sigma). IPCC greenhouse gas radiative forcing is approx. 0.6 W/sq m per decade or 0.6% of the global mean shortwave reflected flux, so that a 50% cloud feedback would change the global

  16. Effects of Nighttime Light Radiance on the Sleep of the General Population

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohayon, Maurice M.; Milesi, Cristina

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of this study is to verify if the exposure to greater nighttime radiance is associated with changes in the sleep/wake schedule and with greater sleep disturbances. Methods: The target population was the adults (18 years and older) living in California, USA. This represents 24 million of inhabitants. A total of 3,104 subjects participated in the survey (participation rate 85.6%). The participants were interviewed by telephone using the Sleep-EVAL system. The interviews covered several topics including sleeping habits, sleep quality, sleep disturbances, physical symptoms related to menopause. Chronic insomnia was defined as difficulty initiating or maintaining sleep for at least 3 months. Global nighttime light emissions have been collected by the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program's Operational Linescan System (DMSP/OLS) sensors. We extracted the radiance calibrated nighttime lights corresponding to the date of the interviews for a three by three window centered on each coordinate corresponding to an interview address. Results: Dissatisfaction with sleep quantity and/or quality was associated with an increased nighttime radiance (p=0.02). Similarly, excessive sleepiness accompanied with impaired functioning was significantly associated with an increased nighttime radiance (p (is) less than 0.0001). The association remained significant after controlling for age, gender and use of a night lamp in the bedroom. Confusional arousals were also significantly associated with an increased nighttime radiance (p (is) less than 0.0001). Bedtime hour was linearly increasing with the intensity of nighttime radiance: the later the bedtime, the greater the nighttime radiance (p (is) less than 0.0001). Similarly, wakeup time became progressively later as the nighttime radiance increased (p (is) less than 0.0001). Both associations remained significant after controlling for age, gender and use of a night lamp in the bedroom. Circadian Rhythm Disorders were the

  17. Assimilation of AIRS radiances for short term regional forecasts using community models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Agnes Huei Ni

    With the hyperspectral sounder's capability of providing information about temperature and humidity of the atmosphere at increased vertical resolution, the assimilation of these radiances has proven to improve numerical weather prediction in global models. The current two hyperspectral infrared sounders in orbit, AIRS and IASI, each contributed to a 12% error reduction in the ECMWF global forecasts, emerging as the single space-borne sensor to contribute the largest forecast improvement in global models (Cardinali, 2009). In this study, regional assimilation of clear sky AIRS radiances was carried out using a community available data assimilation system GSI coupled with the WRF forecast model. As the systems used were not optimized, tuning was necessary prior to carrying out the assimilation. Components of the assimilation system that required tuning included the background error covariance matrix, the satellite radiance bias correction and quality control procedures for AIRS radiances. In addition, the forecast model vertical resolution had been increased with more levels included in the stratosphere. Adopting procedures used by NCEP's operational regional data assimilation, experiments with and without AIRS radiances were carried out for a period of 16 days to access the impact of including AIRS radiances. Diagnostics from the assimilation system showed that analyses had larger temperature biases for experiments ending at 06 and 18 UTC. In addition, biases were still significant after assimilation for satellite channels that were sensitive to surface properties and water vapor. Forecasts were verified with a wide range of datasets ranging from model analyses, radiosondes, observed satellite radiances and 24 hour accumulated precipitation. With assimilation of clear sky AIRS radiances, largest improvement in bias was observed when forecasts were verified with radiosondes and satellite observations. The 00 and 12 UTC forecast were typically of better quality than

  18. Sensor-based clear and cloud radiance calculations in the community radiative transfer model.

    PubMed

    Liu, Quanhua; Xue, Y; Li, C

    2013-07-10

    The community radiative transfer model (CRTM) has been implemented for clear and cloudy satellite radiance simulations in the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation data assimilation system for global and regional forecasting as well as reanalysis for climate studies. Clear-sky satellite radiances are successfully assimilated, while cloudy radiances need to be assimilated for improving precipitation and severe weather forecasting. However, cloud radiance calculations are much slower than the calculations for clear-sky radiance, and exceed our computational capacity for weather forecasting. In order to make cloud radiance assimilation affordable, cloud optical parameters at the band central wavelength are used in the CRTM (OPTRAN-CRTM) where the optical transmittance (OPTRAN) band model is applied. The approximation implies that only one radiative transfer solution for each band (i.e., channel) is needed, instead of typically more than 10,000 solutions that are required for a detailed line-by-line radiative transfer model (LBLRTM). This paper investigated the accuracy of the approximation and helps us to understand the error source. Two NOAA operational sensors, High Resolution Infrared Radiation Sounder/3 (HIRS/3) and Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU), have been chosen for this investigation with both clear and cloudy cases. By comparing the CRTM cloud radiance calculations with the LBLRTM simulations, we found that the CRTM cloud radiance model can achieve accuracy better than 0.4 K for the IR sensor and 0.1 K for the microwave sensor. The results suggest that the CRTM cloud radiance calculations may be adequate to the operational satellite radiance assimilation for numerical forecast model. The accuracy using OPTRAN is much better than using the scaling method (SCALING-CRTM). In clear-sky applications, the scaling of the optical depth derived at nadir

  19. Construction of a Matched Global Cloud and Radiance Product from LEO/GEO and EPIC Observations to Estimate Daytime Earth Radiation Budget from DSCOVR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duda, David P.; Khlopenkov, Konstantin V.; Thiemann, Mandana; Palikonda, Rabindra; Sun-Mack, Sunny; Minnis, Patrick; Su, Wenying

    2016-01-01

    With the launch of the Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR), new estimates of the daytime Earth radiation budget can be computed from a combination of measurements from the two Earth-observing sensors onboard the spacecraft, the Earth Polychromatic Imaging Camera (EPIC) and the National Institute of Standards and Technology Advanced Radiometer (NISTAR). Although these instruments can provide accurate top-of-atmosphere (TOA) radiance measurements, they lack sufficient resolution to provide details on small-scale surface and cloud properties. Previous studies have shown that these properties have a strong influence on the anisotropy of the radiation at the TOA, and ignoring such effects can result in large TOA-flux errors. To overcome these effects, high-resolution scene identification is needed for accurate Earth radiation budget estimation. Selected radiance and cloud property data measured and derived from several low earth orbit (LEO, including NASA Terra and Aqua MODIS, NOAA AVHRR) and geosynchronous (GEO, including GOES (east and west), METEOSAT, INSAT-3D, MTSAT-2, and HIMAWARI-8) satellite imagers were collected to create hourly 5-km resolution global composites of data necessary to compute angular distribution models (ADM) for reflected shortwave (SW) and longwave (LW) radiation. The satellite data provide an independent source of radiance measurements and scene identification information necessary to construct ADMs that are used to determine the daytime Earth radiation budget. To optimize spatial matching between EPIC measurements and the high-resolution composite cloud properties, LEO/GEO retrievals within the EPIC fields of view (FOV) are convolved to the EPIC point spread function (PSF) in a similar manner to the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) Single Scanner Footprint TOA/Surface Fluxes and Clouds (SSF) product. Examples of the merged LEO/GEO/EPIC product will be presented, describing the chosen radiance and cloud properties and

  20. A comparison of absolute calibrations of a radiation thermometer based on a monochromator and a tunable source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keawprasert, T.; Anhalt, K.; Taubert, D. R.; Sperling, A.; Schuster, M.; Nevas, S.

    2013-09-01

    An LP3 radiation thermometer was absolutely calibrated at a newly developed monochromator-based set-up and the TUneable Lasers in Photometry (TULIP) facility of PTB in the wavelength range from 400 nm to 1100 nm. At both facilities, the spectral radiation of the respective sources irradiates an integrating sphere, thus generating uniform radiance across its precision aperture. The spectral irradiance of the integrating sphere is determined via an effective area of a precision aperture and a Si trap detector, traceable to the primary cryogenic radiometer of PTB. Due to the limited output power from the monochromator, the absolute calibration was performed with the measurement uncertainty of 0.17 % (k = 1), while the respective uncertainty at the TULIP facility is 0.14 %. Calibration results obtained by the two facilities were compared in terms of spectral radiance responsivity, effective wavelength and integral responsivity. It was found that the measurement results in integral responsivity at the both facilities are in agreement within the expanded uncertainty (k = 2). To verify the calibration accuracy, the absolutely calibrated radiation thermometer was used to measure the thermodynamic freezing temperatures of the PTB gold fixed-point blackbody.

  1. A comparison of absolute calibrations of a radiation thermometer based on a monochromator and a tunable source

    SciTech Connect

    Keawprasert, T.; Anhalt, K.; Taubert, D. R.; Sperling, A.; Schuster, M.; Nevas, S.

    2013-09-11

    An LP3 radiation thermometer was absolutely calibrated at a newly developed monochromator-based set-up and the TUneable Lasers in Photometry (TULIP) facility of PTB in the wavelength range from 400 nm to 1100 nm. At both facilities, the spectral radiation of the respective sources irradiates an integrating sphere, thus generating uniform radiance across its precision aperture. The spectral irradiance of the integrating sphere is determined via an effective area of a precision aperture and a Si trap detector, traceable to the primary cryogenic radiometer of PTB. Due to the limited output power from the monochromator, the absolute calibration was performed with the measurement uncertainty of 0.17 % (k= 1), while the respective uncertainty at the TULIP facility is 0.14 %. Calibration results obtained by the two facilities were compared in terms of spectral radiance responsivity, effective wavelength and integral responsivity. It was found that the measurement results in integral responsivity at the both facilities are in agreement within the expanded uncertainty (k= 2). To verify the calibration accuracy, the absolutely calibrated radiation thermometer was used to measure the thermodynamic freezing temperatures of the PTB gold fixed-point blackbody.

  2. Absolute calibration of optical tweezers

    SciTech Connect

    Viana, N.B.; Mazolli, A.; Maia Neto, P.A.; Nussenzveig, H.M.; Rocha, M.S.; Mesquita, O.N.

    2006-03-27

    As a step toward absolute calibration of optical tweezers, a first-principles theory of trapping forces with no adjustable parameters, corrected for spherical aberration, is experimentally tested. Employing two very different setups, we find generally very good agreement for the transverse trap stiffness as a function of microsphere radius for a broad range of radii, including the values employed in practice, and at different sample chamber depths. The domain of validity of the WKB ('geometrical optics') approximation to the theory is verified. Theoretical predictions for the trapping threshold, peak position, depth variation, multiple equilibria, and 'jump' effects are also confirmed.

  3. Improved Impact of Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) Radiance Assimilation in Numerical Weather Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zavodsky, Bradley; Chou, Shih-Hung; Jedlovec, Gary

    2012-01-01

    Improvements to global and regional numerical weather prediction (NWP) have been demonstrated through assimilation of data from NASA s Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS). Current operational data assimilation systems use AIRS radiances, but impact on regional forecasts has been much smaller than for global forecasts. Retrieved profiles from AIRS contain much of the information that is contained in the radiances and may be able to reveal reasons for this reduced impact. Assimilating AIRS retrieved profiles in an identical analysis configuration to the radiances, tracking the quantity and quality of the assimilated data in each technique, and examining analysis increments and forecast impact from each data type can yield clues as to the reasons for the reduced impact. By doing this with regional scale models individual synoptic features (and the impact of AIRS on these features) can be more easily tracked. This project examines the assimilation of hyperspectral sounder data used in operational numerical weather prediction by comparing operational techniques used for AIRS radiances and research techniques used for AIRS retrieved profiles. Parallel versions of a configuration of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model with Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation (GSI) that mimics the analysis methodology, domain, and observational datasets for the regional North American Mesoscale (NAM) model run at the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP)/Environmental Modeling Center (EMC) are run to examine the impact of each type of AIRS data set. The first configuration will assimilate the AIRS radiance data along with other conventional and satellite data using techniques implemented within the operational system; the second configuration will assimilate AIRS retrieved profiles instead of AIRS radiances in the same manner. Preliminary results of this study will be presented and focus on the analysis impact of the radiances and profiles for selected cases.

  4. From Hubble's Next Generation Spectral Library (NGSL) to Absolute Fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heap, S. R.; Lindler, D.

    2016-05-01

    Hubble's Next Generation Spectral Library (NGSL) consists of R˜1000 spectra of 374 stars of assorted temperature, gravity, and metallicity. Each spectrum covers the wavelength range, 0.18-1.03 μ. The library can be viewed and/or downloaded from the website, http://archive.stsci.edu/prepds/stisngsl/. Stars in the NGSL are now being used as absolute flux standards at ground-based observatories. However, the uncertainty in the absolute flux is about 2%, which does not meet the requirements of dark-energy surveys. We have therefore developed an observing procedure, data-reduction procedure, and correction algorithms that should yield fluxes with uncertainties less than 1%.

  5. Absolute gain measurement by the image method under mismatched condition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Richard Q.; Baddour, Maurice F.

    1987-01-01

    Purcell's image method for measuring the absolute gain of an antenna is particularly attractive for small test antennas. The method is simple to use and utilizes only one antenna with a reflecting plane to provide an image for the receiving antenna. However, the method provides accurate results only if the antenna is matched to its waveguide. In this paper, a waveguide junction analysis is developed to determine the gain of an antenna under mismatched condition. Absolute gain measurements for two standard gain horn antennas have been carried out. Experimental results agree closely with published data.

  6. Rayleigh radiance computations for satellite remote sensing: accounting for the effect of sensor spectral response function.

    PubMed

    Wang, Menghua

    2016-05-30

    To understand and assess the effect of the sensor spectral response function (SRF) on the accuracy of the top of the atmosphere (TOA) Rayleigh-scattering radiance computation, new TOA Rayleigh radiance lookup tables (LUTs) over global oceans and inland waters have been generated. The new Rayleigh LUTs include spectral coverage of 335-2555 nm, all possible solar-sensor geometries, and surface wind speeds of 0-30 m/s. Using the new Rayleigh LUTs, the sensor SRF effect on the accuracy of the TOA Rayleigh radiance computation has been evaluated for spectral bands of the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) on the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (SNPP) satellite and the Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS)-1, showing some important uncertainties for VIIRS-SNPP particularly for large solar- and/or sensor-zenith angles as well as for large Rayleigh optical thicknesses (i.e., short wavelengths) and bands with broad spectral bandwidths. To accurately account for the sensor SRF effect, a new correction algorithm has been developed for VIIRS spectral bands, which improves the TOA Rayleigh radiance accuracy to ~0.01% even for the large solar-zenith angles of 70°-80°, compared with the error of ~0.7% without applying the correction for the VIIRS-SNPP 410 nm band. The same methodology that accounts for the sensor SRF effect on the Rayleigh radiance computation can be used for other satellite sensors. In addition, with the new Rayleigh LUTs, the effect of surface atmospheric pressure variation on the TOA Rayleigh radiance computation can be calculated precisely, and no specific atmospheric pressure correction algorithm is needed. There are some other important applications and advantages to using the new Rayleigh LUTs for satellite remote sensing, including an efficient and accurate TOA Rayleigh radiance computation for hyperspectral satellite remote sensing, detector-based TOA Rayleigh radiance computation, Rayleigh radiance calculations for high altitude

  7. Modeling of TOA radiance measured by CERES and SCIAMACHY over the East Antarctic Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radkevich, A.; Kato, S.; Lukashin, C.

    2015-12-01

    CERES and SCIAMACHY are satellite borne remote sensing instruments measuring solar-reflected and Earth-emitted radiation at the top-of-atmosphere (TOA). CERES instruments are designed to monitor the Earth's radiation budget by measuring radiation in 3 broad bands. SCIAMACHY sensor measured earth reflected radiation in the spectral range 0.24 to 2.38 um with fine spectral and coarse spatial resolutions. In this work we evaluate CERES shortwave (SW) TOA radiance over permanent clear sky snow in the East Antarctic Plateau to test consistency between modeled and observed radiances. We use SCIAMACHY observations to validate spectral performance of our radiative transfer (RT) model. We revisiting the issue reported by Hudson et al (2010) with another radiative transfer model and using instantaneous atmospheric profiles. That paper reported some overestimation of TOA albedo by their model in comparison with CERES observed SW radiances. As pointed out by Hudson et al., that comparison involves some uncertainties including errors in the modeled surface albedo and atmospheric properties. We use RT model based on DISORT coupled with a k-distribution approach (Kato et al 1999). We use the same approach for the lower boundary condition as in Hudson et al. (2010) with a modification related to modeling surface albedo. In this work we create atmospheric profiles for the individual CERES and SCIAMACHY observations from GEOS-4 reanalysis. A comparison between modeling and actual observations was performed for data from the CERES sensors onboard EOS Terra and Aqua, and Suomi-NPP. Similar to the study by Hudson et al. (2010), the model overestimates the TOA radiance. Modeled radiances are greater than observed ones from the CERES Single Satellite Footprint data by 4.6% for FM-1, 2, and FM-4, and by 3.6% for FM-5. Modeled and observed radiance correlates well: coefficient of determination R2 > 0.999. We compare modeled radiances SCIAMACHY radiances by spectrally integrating over the

  8. Assimilation of hyperspectral infrared sounder radiances under cloudy skies in a regional NWP model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Pei

    Satellite measurements are an important source of global observations in support of numerical weather prediction (NWP). The assimilation of satellite radiances under clear skies has greatly improved NWP forecast scores. Since most of the data assimilation models are used for the clear radiances assimilation, an important step for satellite radiances assimilation is the clear location detection. Good clear detection could effectively remove the cloud contamination and keep the clear observations for assimilation. In this dissertation, a new detection method uses collocated high spatial resolution imager data onboard the same platform as the satellite sounders to help IR sounders subpixel cloud detection, such as the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), the Crosstrack Infrared Sounder (CrIS) and Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS). The MODIS cloud mask provides a level of confidence for the observed skies to help AIRS Field-of-View (FOVs) cloud detection. By reducing the cloud contamination, a cold bias in the temperature field and a wet bias in the moisture field are corrected for the atmospheric analysis fields. These less cloud affected analysis fields further improve hurricane track and intensity forecast. The availability of satellite observations that can be assimilated in the model is limited if only the clear radiances are assimilation. An effective way to use the thermodynamic information under partially cloudy regions is to assimilate the "cloud-cleared" radiances (CCRs); CCRs are also called clear equivalent radiances. Because the CCRs are the equivalent clear radiances from the partially cloudy FOVs, they can be directly assimilated into the current data assimilation models without modifications. The AIRS CCRs are assimilated and compared with the AIRS using stand-alone cloud detection and collocated cloud detection. The assimilation of AIRS cloud-cleared radiances directly affects

  9. Advanced infrared sounder subpixel cloud detection with imagers and its impact on radiance assimilation in NWP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Pei; Li, Jun; Li, Jinlong; Li, Zhenglong; Schmit, Timothy J.; Bai, Wenguang

    2014-03-01

    Accurate cloud detection is very important for infrared (IR) radiance assimilation; improved cloud detection could reduce cloud contamination and hence improve the assimilation. Although operational numerical weather prediction (NWP) centers are using IR sounder radiance data for cloud detection, collocated high spatial resolution imager data could help sounder subpixel cloud detection and characterization. IR sounder radiances with improved cloud detection using Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS)/Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) were assimilated for Hurricane Sandy (2012). Forecast experiments were run with Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) as the forecast model and the Three-Dimensional Variational Assimilation (3DVAR)-based Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation (GSI) as the analysis system. Results indicate that forecasts of both hurricane track and intensity are substantially improved when the collocated high spatial resolution MODIS cloud mask is used for AIRS subpixel cloud detection for assimilating radiances. This methodology can be applied to process Crosstrack Infrared Sounder (CRIS)/Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) onboard Suomi-NPOESS Preparatory Project (NPP)/Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) and Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI)/Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) onboard the Metop series for improved radiance assimilation in NWP.

  10. Use of MODIS Cloud Top Pressure to Improve Assimilation Yields of AIRS Radiances in GSI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zavodsky, Bradley; Srikishen, Jayanthi

    2014-01-01

    Radiances from hyperspectral sounders such as the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) are routinely assimilated both globally and regionally in operational numerical weather prediction (NWP) systems using the Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation (GSI) data assimilation system. However, only thinned, cloud-free radiances from a 281-channel subset are used, so the overall percentage of these observations that are assimilated is somewhere on the order of 5%. Cloud checks are performed within GSI to determine which channels peak above cloud top; inaccuracies may lead to less assimilated radiances or introduction of biases from cloud-contaminated radiances.Relatively large footprint from AIRS may not optimally represent small-scale cloud features that might be better resolved by higher-resolution imagers like the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). Objective of this project is to "swap" the MODIS-derived cloud top pressure (CTP) for that designated by the AIRS-only quality control within GSI to test the hypothesis that better representation of cloud features will result in higher assimilated radiance yields and improved forecasts.

  11. A comparison of measured radiances from AIRS and HIRS across different cloud types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreier, M. M.; Kahn, B. H.; Staten, P.

    2015-12-01

    The observation of Earth's atmosphere with passive remote sensing instruments is ongoing for decades and resulting in a long-term global dataset. Two prominent examples are operational satellite platforms from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) or research platforms like NASA's Earth Observing System (EOS). The observed spectral ranges of these observations are often similar among the different platforms, but have large differences when it comes to resolution, accuracy and quality control. Our approach is to combine different kinds of instruments at the pixel-scale to improve the characterization of infrared radiances. We focus on data from the High-resolution Infrared Radiation Sounder (HIRS) and compare the observations to radiances from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) on Aqua. The high spectral resolution of AIRS is used to characterize and possibly recalibrate the observed radiances from HIRS. Our approach is unique in that we use additional information from other passive instruments on the same platforms including the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) and the MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). We will present comparisons of radiances from HIRS and AIRS within different types of clouds that are determined from the imagers. In this way, we can analyze and select the most homogeneous conditions for radiance comparisons and a possible re-calibration of HIRS. We hope to achieve a cloud-type-dependent calibration and quality control for HIRS, which can be extrapolated into the past via inter-calibration of the different HIRS instruments beyond the time of AIRS.

  12. Interstitial optical parameter quantification of turbid medium based on CW radiance measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lingling; Zhang, Limin; Gao, Feng; Zhao, Huijuan

    2016-10-01

    CW radiance measurements examine the light intensity at a single source-detector location from different detection directions to recover absorption coefficient and reduced scattering coefficient of the turbid medium which is important in treatment planning of minimally invasive laser therapies. In this paper, P9 approximation for radiance is used as the forward model for fitting by considering the balance between computational time and the correctness of the forward model at low albedo and small source detector separation (SDS). By fitting P9 approximation for radiance to the angular radiance Monte Carlo (MC) simulations used as the angular radiance measurements, optical parameters are recovered over a wide range of reduced albedo between 0.69 and 0.99 at small SDS 2mm. The recovery errors of absorption coefficient and reduced scattering coefficient are less than 11.96% and 2.63%, respectively. The effects of the maximum angle used for fitting on optical parameter recovery have been further studied. The results show that the recovery errors of absorption coefficient and reduced scattering coefficient are less than 12% and 3% respectively when the maximum angle is greater than 70 degree.

  13. Evaluation of the Impact of AIRS Radiance and Profile Data Assimilation in Partly Cloudy Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zavodsky, Bradley; Srikishen, Jayanthi; Jedlovec, Gary

    2013-01-01

    Improvements to global and regional numerical weather prediction have been demonstrated through assimilation of data from NASA s Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS). Current operational data assimilation systems use AIRS radiances, but impact on regional forecasts has been much smaller than for global forecasts. Retrieved profiles from AIRS contain much of the information that is contained in the radiances and may be able to reveal reasons for this reduced impact. Assimilating AIRS retrieved profiles in an identical analysis configuration to the radiances, tracking the quantity and quality of the assimilated data in each technique, and examining analysis increments and forecast impact from each data type can yield clues as to the reasons for the reduced impact. By doing this with regional scale models individual synoptic features (and the impact of AIRS on these features) can be more easily tracked. This project examines the assimilation of hyperspectral sounder data used in operational numerical weather prediction by comparing operational techniques used for AIRS radiances and research techniques used for AIRS retrieved profiles. Parallel versions of a configuration of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model with Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation (GSI) are run to examine the impact AIRS radiances and retrieved profiles. Statistical evaluation of a long-term series of forecast runs will be compared along with preliminary results of in-depth investigations for select case comparing the analysis increments in partly cloudy regions and short-term forecast impacts.

  14. Adjusting the tasseled cap brightness and greenness factors for atmospheric path radiance and absorption on a pixel by pixel basis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, R. D.; Slater, P. N.; Pinter, P. J. (Principal Investigator)

    1982-01-01

    A radiative transfer model was used to convert ground measured reflectances into the radiance at the top of the atmosphere, for several levels of atmospheric path radiance. The radiance in MSS7 (0.8 to 1.1 m) was multiplied by the transmission fraction for atmospheres having different levels of precipitable water. The radiance values were converted to simulated LANDSAT digital counts for four path radiance levels and four levels of precipitable water. These values were used to calculate the Kauth-Thomas brightness, greenness, yellowness, and nonsuch factors. Brightness was affected by surface conditions and path radiance. Greenness was affected by surface conditions, path radiance, and precipitable water. Yellowness was affected by path radiance and nonsuch by precipitable water, and both factors changed only slightly with surface conditions. Yellowness and nonsuch were used to adjust brightness and greenness to produce factors that were affected only by surface conditions such as soils and vegetation, and not by path radiance and precipitable water.

  15. Observational constraints on atmospheric radiaitve feedbacks: absolute accuracy and next-generation observing systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dykema, J. A.; Hanssen, L. M.; Mekhontsev, S.; Anderson, J.

    2012-12-01

    The central role of atmospheric radiative feedbacks to understanding and projecting climate change calls for a robust observational system. Recent studies have shown the value of space-based measurements for putting quantitative constraints on a range of radiative feedback processes through a fingerprinting method applied to long-term observational records. More recent work has suggested the value of demonstrably accurate measurements to disentangle model error from observational uncertainties within reanalysis systems, potentially yielding improved representations of feedback processes within just a few years. Both of these methods rely on space-based measurements that can be objectively tested for accuracy on-orbit. A new class of mission has been proposed that incorporates the same type of empirical tests for accuracy as used in the laboratory into a space-based sensor. One example of such a mission is the Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO), a new mission suggested by the 2006 National Research Council Decadal Survey. CLARREO includes three sensor types: thermal infrared, microwave, and reflected shortwave. This paper presents a laboratory demonstration of prototype systems for testing the on-orbit accuracy of a thermal infrared sensor for CLARREO. These systems utilize infrared lasers to provide monochromatic light sources to quantitatively determine the optical properties of materials. These infrared optical properties are major determinants of the on-orbit radiometric performance of a thermal infrared sensor. For this reason, reliable quantitative information (including uncertainty) that tracks any changes in relevant infrared materials over the mission lifetime is essential to objective assessment of instrument accuracy. The practicality of mid-infrared lasers for these applications is due to the availability and continued evolution of compact, high-efficiency Quantum Cascade Lasers (QCLs). These lasers can provide over 100 m

  16. Experimental validation of the MODTRAN 5.3 sea surface radiance model using MIRAMER campaign measurements.

    PubMed

    Ross, Vincent; Dion, Denis; St-Germain, Daniel

    2012-05-01

    Radiometric images taken in mid-wave and long-wave infrared bands are used as a basis for validating a sea surface bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) being implemented into MODTRAN 5 (Berk et al. [Proc. SPIE5806, 662 (2005)]). The images were obtained during the MIRAMER campaign that took place in May 2008 in the Mediterranean Sea near Toulon, France. When atmosphere radiances are matched at the horizon to remove possible calibration offsets, the implementation of the BRDF in MODTRAN produces good sea surface radiance agreement, usually within 2% and at worst 4% from off-glint azimuthally averaged measurements. Simulations also compare quite favorably to glint measurements. The observed sea radiance deviations between model and measurements are not systematic, and are well within expected experimental uncertainties. This is largely attributed to proper radiative coupling between the surface and the atmosphere implemented using the DISORT multiple scattering algorithm.

  17. A Study of Global Cirrus Cloud Morphology with AIRS Cloud-clear Radiances (CCRs)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Dong L.; Gong, Jie

    2012-01-01

    Version 6 (V6) AIRS cloud-clear radiances (CCR) are used to derive cloud-induced radiance (Tcir=Tb-CCR) at the infrared frequencies of weighting functions peaked in the middle troposphere. The significantly improved V 6 CCR product allows a more accurate estimation of the expected clear-sky radiance as if clouds are absent. In the case where strong cloud scattering is present, the CCR becomes unreliable, which is reflected by its estimated uncertainty, and interpolation is employed to replace this CCR value. We find that Tcir derived from this CCR method are much better than other methods and detect more clouds in the upper and lower troposphere as well as in the polar regions where cloud detection is particularly challenging. The cloud morphology derived from the V6 test month, as well as some artifacts, will be shown.

  18. The proper weighting function for retrieving temperatures from satellite measured radiances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arking, A.

    1976-01-01

    One class of methods for converting satellite measured radiances into atmospheric temperature profiles, involves a linearization of the radiative transfer equation: delta r = the sum of (W sub i) (delta T sub i) where (i=1...s) and where delta T sub i is the deviation of the temperature in layer i from that of a reference atmosphere, delta R is the difference in the radiance at satellite altitude from the corresponding radiance for the reference atmosphere, and W sub i is the discrete (or vector) form of the T-weighting (i.e., temperature weighting) function W(P), where P is pressure. The top layer of the atmosphere corresponds to i = 1, the bottom layer to i = s - 1, and i = s refers to the surface. Linearization in temperature (or some function of temperature) is at the heart of all linear or matrix methods. The weighting function that should be used is developed.

  19. Ocean color spectrum calculations. [theoretical models relating oceanographic parameters to upwelling radiances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccluney, W. R.

    1974-01-01

    The development is considered of procedures for measuring a number of subsurface oceanographic parameters using remotely sensed ocean color data. It is proposed that the first step in this effort should be the development of adequate theoretical models relating the desired oceanographic parameters to the upwelling radiances to be observed. A portion of a contributory theoretical model is shown to be described by a modified single scattering approach based upon a simple treatment of multiple scattering. The resulting quasi-single scattering model can be used to predict the upwelling distribution of spectral radiance emerging from the sea. The shape of the radiance spectrum predicted by this model for clear ocean water shows encouraging agreement with measurments made at the edge of the Sargasso Sea off Cape Hatteras.

  20. Spectral radiance measurements and calculated soot concentrations along the length of an experimental combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norgren, C. T.; Ingebo, R. D.

    1976-01-01

    Radiometric data were obtained over a range of parametric test conditions at three positions along the length of an experimental combustor segment corresponding to the primary, intermediate, and dilution zones. The concentration of soot entrained in the combustion gases was calculated by a technique using spectral radiance measurements. Tests were conducted primarily with Jet A fuel, although limited data were taken with two fuels having higher aromatic content, diesel oil number 2 and a blend of 40 percent tetralin in Jet A fuel. Radiometric observation of the combustion gases indicated that the maximum total radiance peaked at the intermediate zone, which was located immediately upstream of the dilution holes. Soot concentrations calculated from optical measurements in the dilution zone compared favorably with those obtained by in situ gas sampling at the exhaust. The total radiance increased with the higher aromatic content fuels.

  1. Radiative and microphysical properties of Arctic stratus clouds from multiangle downwelling infrared radiances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rathke, Carsten; Neshyba, Steven; Shupe, Matthew D.; Rowe, Penny; Rivers, Aaron

    2002-12-01

    The information content of multiangle downwelling infrared radiance spectra of stratus clouds is investigated. As an example, 76 sets of spectra were measured at angles of 0, 15, 30 and 45° from zenith, using an interferometer based at the Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic Ocean (SHEBA) drifting ice camp. Exploiting the angular variation of radiance in infrared microwindows, a "geometric" algorithm is used to determine cloud temperature and optical depth without auxiliary information. For comparison, a spectral method allows us to infer cloud microphysical properties for each angle; each multiangle set therefore constitutes a microphysical characterization of horizontal inhomogeneity of the cloudy scene. We show that cloud temperatures determined with both approaches agree with temperatures obtained from lidar/radiosonde data. The multiangle radiance observations can also be used to calculate the longwave flux reaching the surface. We find that up to 14 W m-2 of the overcast fluxes can be attributed to horizontal variations in cloud microphysical properties.

  2. Radiance and Jacobian Intercomparison of Radiative Transfer Models Applied to HIRS and AMSU Channels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garand, L.; Turner, D. S.; Larocque, M.; Bates, J.; Boukabara, S.; Brunel, P.; Chevallier, F.; Deblonde, G.; Engelen, R.; Hollingshead, M.; Goodman, H. Michael (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The goals of this study are the evaluation of current fast radiative transfer models (RTMs) and line-by-line (LBL) models. The intercomparison focuses on the modeling of 11 representative sounding channels routinely used at numerical weather prediction centers: 7 HIRS (High-resolution Infrared Sounder) and 4 AMSU (Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit) channels. Interest in this topic was evidenced by the participation of 24 scientists from 16 institutions. An ensemble of 42 diverse atmospheres was used and results compiled for 19 infrared models and 10 microwave models, including several LBL RTMs. For the first time, not only radiances, but also Jacobians (of temperature, water vapor and ozone) were compared to various LBL models for many channels. In the infrared, LBL models typically agree to within 0.05-0.15 K (standard deviation) in terms of top-of-the-atmosphere brightness temperature (BT). Individual differences up to 0.5 K still exist, systematic in some channels, and linked to the type of atmosphere in others. The best fast models emulate LBL BTs to within 0.25 K, but no model achieves this desirable level of success for all channels. The ozone modeling is particularly challenging, In the microwave, fast models generally do quite well against the LBL model to which they were tuned. However significant differences were noted among LBL models, Extending the intercomparison to the Jacobians proved very useful in detecting subtle and more obvious modeling errors. In addition, total and single gas optical depths were calculated, which provided additional insight on the nature of differences. Recommendations for future intercomparisons are suggested.

  3. Radiance and Jacobian Intercomparison of Radiative Transfer Models Applied to HIRS and AMSU Channels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garand, L.; Turner, D. S.; Larocque, M.; Bates, J.; Boukabara, S.; Brunel, P.; Chevallier, F.; Deblonde, G.; Engelen, R.; Atlas, Robert (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The goals of this study are the evaluation of current fast radiative transfer models (RTMs) and line-by-line (LBL) models. The intercomparison focuses on the modeling of 11 representative sounding channels routinely used at numerical weather prediction centers: seven HIRS (High-resolution Infrared Sounder) and four AMSU (Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit) channels. Interest in this topic was evidenced by the participation of 24 scientists from 16 institutions. An ensemble of 42 diverse atmospheres was used and results compiled for 19 infrared models and 10 microwave models, including several LBL RTMs. For the first time, not only radiances, but also Jacobians (of temperature, water vapor, and ozone) were compared to various LBL models for many channels. In the infrared, LBL models typically agree to within 0.05-0.15 K (standard deviation) in terms of top-of-the-atmosphere brightness temperature (BT). Individual differences up to 0.5 K still exist, systematic in some channels, and linked to the type of atmosphere in others. The best fast models emulate LBL BTs to within 0.25 K, but no model achieves this desirable level of success for all channels. The ozone modeling is particularly challenging. In the microwave, fast models generally do quite well against the LBL model to which they were tuned. However significant differences were noted among LBL models. Extending the intercomparison to the Jacobians proved very useful in detecting subtle and more obvious modeling errors. In addition, total and single gas optical depths were calculated, which provided additional insight on the nature of differences. Recommendations for future intercomparisons are suggested.

  4. Estimation of upward radiances and reflectances at the surface of the sea from above-surface measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleiv, Ø.; Folkestad, A.; Høkedal, J.; Sørensen, K.; Aas, E.

    2015-10-01

    During 4 field days in the years 2009-2011, 22 data sets of measurements were collected in the inner Oslofjord, Norway. The data consist of recordings of spectral nadir radiances in air and water as well as spectral downward irradiance in air. The studied wavelengths are 351, 400, 413, 443, 490, 510, 560, 620, 665, 681, 709 and 754 nm. The water-leaving radiance and the reflected radiance at the sea surface have been obtained from the measured nadir radiances in air and water, where the latter radiance has been extrapolated upwards to the surface. For comparison we present a simpler and much faster method that determines the water-leaving and reflected radiances solely from above-surface measurements of upward nadir radiance and downward irradiance. This new method is based on an assumption about similarity in spectral shape of the radiance reflected at the surface, and it makes use of the small ratio between water-leaving and reflected radiances at 351 and 754 nm in the Oslofjord. A comparison between the quantities determined by the two mentioned methods shows that the average relative deviations between their results are less than or equal to 15 % for the reflected radiance, at the studied wavelengths. The average relative deviation of the water-leaving radiance at 560 nm is 24 %. These results are obtained for a cloudiness range of 1-8 oktas (12.5-100 %) and solar zenith angles between 37 and 51°. We consider these to be acceptable uncertainties for a first check of satellite products in the inner Oslofjord.

  5. Upwelling radiance at 976 nm measured from space using the OPALS CCD camera on the ISS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Abhijit; Kovalik, Joseph M.; Oaida, Bogdan V.; Abrahamson, Matthew; Wright, Malcolm W.

    2015-03-01

    The Optical Payload for Lasercomm Science (OPALS) Flight System on-board the International Space Station uses a charge coupled device (CCD) camera to detect a beacon laser from Earth. Relative measurements of the background contributed by upwelling radiance under diverse illumination conditions and varying surface terrain is presented. In some cases clouds in the field-of-view allowed a comparison of terrestrial and cloud-top upwelling radiance. In this paper we will report these measurements and examine the extent of agreement with atmospheric model predictions.

  6. Retrieving Temperature and Moisture Profiles from AERI Radiance Observations. AERIPROF Value-Added Product Technical Description

    SciTech Connect

    Feltz, W. F.; Howell, H. B.; Comstock, J.; Mahon, R.; Turner, D. D.; Smith, W. L.; Woolf, H. M.; Halter, T.

    2007-04-01

    One of the goals of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is to collect a long-term series of radiative and atmospheric state observations to improve the parameterization of these processes in global climate models. The ARM Program intended to move away from the traditional approach of directly measuring profiles of temperature and moisture using radiosondes, which is expensive in terms of expendables and manpower, and develop methods to retrieve these profiles with ground-based remote sensors. The atmospheric emitted radiance interferometer (AERI), whose radiance data contains information on the vertical distribution of water vapor and temperature, is an integral part of the ARM profiling plan.

  7. Predicting top-of-atmosphere radiance for arbitrary viewing geometries from the visible to thermal infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cota, Steve A.; Kalman, Linda S.

    2010-08-01

    In an earlier paper [Cota et al., Proc. SPIE 7087, 1-31 (2008)] we described how The Aerospace Corporation's Parameterized Image Chain Analysis & Simulation SOftware (PICASSO) may be used with a reflectance calibrated input scene, in conjunction with a limited number of runs of AFRL's MODTRAN4 radiative transfer code, to quickly predict the top-of-atmosphere (TOA) radiance received by an earth viewing sensor, for any arbitrary combination of solar and sensor elevation angles. In the present paper, we extend the method to the short and midwave IR, where reflected solar and emitted thermal radiation both contribute to the TOA radiance received by a downlooking sensor.

  8. Stratospheric Temperature Trends in the 11 Years of AIRS Spectral Radiance Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, F.; Huang, X.; Chen, X.; Guo, H.

    2014-12-01

    The AIRS (Atmospheric Infrared Sounder) level-1b radiances have been shown to be well calibrated (~0.3K or higher) and have little secular drift (~4mK/year) since its operation started in 2002. Given the rich information contained in the spectral radiances, such impressive instrument performances make AIRS radiances a valuable data set in the study of stratospheric climate. We compile 11 years (Sep 2002- Aug 2013) of AIRS radiances at channels in the CO2 v2 band with weighting functions peaked in the stratosphere. Using a state-of-the-art fast and accurate radiance simulator based on the PCRTM (Principle Component-based Radiative Transfer Model), we also simulate synthetic AIRS radiances at these channels based on two types of inputs: one is simulations by a free-running GFDL AM3 model and the other is ECMWF ERA-interim reanalysis. AIRS lower-stratospheric channels indicate a cooling trend of no more than 0.23 K/decade while its middle-stratospheric channels show a statistically significant cooling trend as large as 0.58 K/decade. Compared with AIRS observations, GFDL AM3 simulations underestimate the cooling trends in the middle-stratospheric channels while overestimate in the lower-stratospheric channels. Further simulations with separately varying CO2 and SST suggest that the change of CO2 alone is responsible for majority of the cooling trend in the middle-stratospheric channels, but the contributions of time-varying CO2 and SST are comparable in the lower-stratospheric channels. In contrast, the synthetic radiances based on ERA-interim reanalysis show statistically significant positive trends in virtually all stratospheric channels. We also compare the zonal-mean trends estimated from observed and synthetic AIRS spectral radiances and climate data records based on multi-decade SSU (Stratospheric Sounding Unit) measurements. Though discrepancies exist in terms of magnitude and seasonality of the cooling, they all show that most cooling occurs in the tropics

  9. The Goddard Snow Radiance Assimilation Project: An Integrated Snow Radiance and Snow Physics Modeling Framework for Snow/cold Land Surface Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, E.; Tedesco, M.; Reichle, R.; Choudhury, B.; Peters-Lidard C.; Foster, J.; Hall, D.; Riggs, G.

    2006-01-01

    Microwave-based retrievals of snow parameters from satellite observations have a long heritage and have so far been generated primarily by regression-based empirical "inversion" methods based on snapshots in time. Direct assimilation of microwave radiance into physical land surface models can be used to avoid errors associated with such retrieval/inversion methods, instead utilizing more straightforward forward models and temporal information. This approach has been used for years for atmospheric parameters by the operational weather forecasting community with great success. Recent developments in forward radiative transfer modeling, physical land surface modeling, and land data assimilation are converging to allow the assembly of an integrated framework for snow/cold lands modeling and radiance assimilation. The objective of the Goddard snow radiance assimilation project is to develop such a framework and explore its capabilities. The key elements of this framework include: a forward radiative transfer model (FRTM) for snow, a snowpack physical model, a land surface water/energy cycle model, and a data assimilation scheme. In fact, multiple models are available for each element enabling optimization to match the needs of a particular study. Together these form a modular and flexible framework for self-consistent, physically-based remote sensing and water/energy cycle studies. In this paper we will describe the elements and the integration plan. All modules will operate within the framework of the Land Information System (LIS), a land surface modeling framework with data assimilation capabilities running on a parallel-node computing cluster. Capabilities for assimilation of snow retrieval products are already under development for LIS. We will describe plans to add radiance-based assimilation capabilities. Plans for validation activities using field measurements will also be discussed.

  10. Pan-spectral observing system simulation experiments of shortwave reflectance and long-wave radiance for climate model evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldman, D. R.; Collins, W. D.; Paige, J. L.

    2015-07-01

    Top-of-atmosphere (TOA) spectrally resolved shortwave reflectances and long-wave radiances describe the response of the Earth's surface and atmosphere to feedback processes and human-induced forcings. In order to evaluate proposed long-duration spectral measurements, we have projected 21st Century changes from the Community Climate System Model (CCSM3.0) conducted for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) A2 Emissions Scenario onto shortwave reflectance spectra from 300 to 2500 nm and long-wave radiance spectra from 2000 to 200 cm-1 at 8 nm and 1 cm-1 resolution, respectively. The radiative transfer calculations have been rigorously validated against published standards and produce complementary signals describing the climate system forcings and feedbacks. Additional demonstration experiments were performed with the Model for Interdisciplinary Research on Climate (MIROC5) and Hadley Centre Global Environment Model version 2 Earth System (HadGEM2-ES) models for the Representative Concentration Pathway 8.5 (RCP8.5) scenario. The calculations contain readily distinguishable signatures of low clouds, snow/ice, aerosols, temperature gradients, and water vapour distributions. The goal of this effort is to understand both how climate change alters reflected solar and emitted infrared spectra of the Earth and determine whether spectral measurements enhance our detection and attribution of climate change. This effort also presents a path forward to understand the characteristics of hyperspectral observational records needed to confront models and inline instrument simulation. Such simulation will enable a diverse set of comparisons between model results from coupled model intercomparisons and existing and proposed satellite instrument measurement systems.

  11. Assessment of a Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Correction of Above-Water and Satellite Water-Leaving Radiance in Coastal Waters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hlaing, Soe; Gilerson, Alexander; Harmal, Tristan; Tonizzo, Alberto; Weidemann, Alan; Arnone, Robert; Ahmed, Samir

    2012-01-01

    Water-leaving radiances, retrieved from in situ or satellite measurements, need to be corrected for the bidirectional properties of the measured light in order to standardize the data and make them comparable with each other. The current operational algorithm for the correction of bidirectional effects from the satellite ocean color data is optimized for typical oceanic waters. However, versions of bidirectional reflectance correction algorithms specifically tuned for typical coastal waters and other case 2 conditions are particularly needed to improve the overall quality of those data. In order to analyze the bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) of case 2 waters, a dataset of typical remote sensing reflectances was generated through radiative transfer simulations for a large range of viewing and illumination geometries. Based on this simulated dataset, a case 2 water focused remote sensing reflectance model is proposed to correct above-water and satellite water-leaving radiance data for bidirectional effects. The proposed model is first validated with a one year time series of in situ above-water measurements acquired by collocated multispectral and hyperspectral radiometers, which have different viewing geometries installed at the Long Island Sound Coastal Observatory (LISCO). Match-ups and intercomparisons performed on these concurrent measurements show that the proposed algorithm outperforms the algorithm currently in use at all wavelengths, with average improvement of 2.4% over the spectral range. LISCO's time series data have also been used to evaluate improvements in match-up comparisons of Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer satellite data when the proposed BRDF correction is used in lieu of the current algorithm. It is shown that the discrepancies between coincident in-situ sea-based and satellite data decreased by 3.15% with the use of the proposed algorithm.

  12. Pre-Launch Absolute Calibration of CCD/CBERS-2B Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Ponzoni, Flávio Jorge; Albuquerque, Bráulio Fonseca Carneiro

    2008-01-01

    Pre-launch absolute calibration coefficients for the CCD/CBERS-2B sensor have been calculated from radiometric measurements performed in a satellite integration and test hall in the Chinese Academy of Space Technology (CAST) headquarters, located in Beijing, China. An illuminated integrating sphere was positioned in the test hall facilities to allow the CCD/CBERS-2B imagery of the entire sphere aperture. Calibration images were recorded and a relative calibration procedure adopted exclusively in Brazil was applied to equalize the detectors responses. Averages of digital numbers (DN) from these images were determined and correlated to their respective radiance levels in order to calculate the absolute calibration coefficients. It has been the first time these pre-launch absolute calibration coefficients have been calculated considering the Brazilian image processing criteria. Now it will be possible to compare them to those that will be calculated from vicarious calibration campaigns. This comparison will permit the CCD/CBERS-2B monitoring and the frequently data updating to the user community. PMID:27873886

  13. Pre-Launch Absolute Calibration of CCD/CBERS-2B Sensor.

    PubMed

    Ponzoni, Flávio Jorge; Albuquerque, Bráulio Fonseca Carneiro

    2008-10-23

    Pre-launch absolute calibration coefficients for the CCD/CBERS-2B sensor have been calculated from radiometric measurements performed in a satellite integration and test hall in the Chinese Academy of Space Technology (CAST) headquarters, located in Beijing, China. An illuminated integrating sphere was positioned in the test hall facilities to allow the CCD/CBERS-2B imagery of the entire sphere aperture. Calibration images were recorded and a relative calibration procedure adopted exclusively in Brazil was applied to equalize the detectors responses. Averages of digital numbers (DN) from these images were determined and correlated to their respective radiance levels in order to calculate the absolute calibration coefficients. It has been the first time these pre-launch absolute calibration coefficients have been calculated considering the Brazilian image processing criteria. Now it will be possible to compare them to those that will be calculated from vicarious calibration campaigns. This comparison will permit the CCD/CBERS-2B monitoring and the frequently data updating to the user community.

  14. MSTAR: an absolute metrology sensor with sub-micron accuracy for space-based applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, Robert D.; Lay, Oliver P.; Dubovitsky, Serge; Burger, Johan P.; Jeganathan, Muthu

    2004-01-01

    The MSTAR sensor is a new system for measuring absolute distance, capable of resolving the integer cycle ambiguity of standard interferometers, and making it possible to measure distance with subnanometer accuracy.

  15. Sun glitter radiance and radar cross-section modulations of the sea bed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennings, Ingo; Matthews, John; Metzner, Margitta

    1994-08-01

    Aircraft and satellite-borne multispectral sensors such as ocean color scanners, spectrometers, and scanning Lidar's have proved to be effective in detecting submarine shallow-water bottom topography in clear coastal waters. For such studies the blue-green band of the visible electromagnetic spectrum (wavelength between 400 and 580 nm) is used, because natural light in this range has the deepest penetration into the water column. However, if the water becomes turbid, the reflection from the submarine sea bed disappears. In this case the only possible mechanism available in the optical range of the electromagnetic spectrum for detecting surface signatures of shallow water bottom topography is through the observation of direct sunlight specularly reflected from a roughened sea surface, known as sun glitter radiance. As the tidal flow over irregularities on the submarine sea bed creates surface roughness variations, sun glitter imagery can be used to detect such features. In this paper a first-order theory of the sun glitter imaging mechanism of submerged sand waves is presented. The results of sun glitter radiance modulations are compared with simulations of P band radar cross-section modulations and with experimental data. Calculations of both the constant background sun glitter radiance and the sun glitter radiance modulation show that these parameters are very sensitive to wind speed, to view angle with respect to acquisition time, and to observation geometry as a whole.

  16. Initial analyses of surface spectral radiance between observations and Line-By-Line calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, P.D.; Clough, S.A.; Miller, N.E.; Shippert, T.R.; Turner, D.D.

    1996-04-01

    The evaluation an improvement of radiative transfer calculations are essential to attain improved performance of general circulation models (GCMs) for climate change applications. A Quality Measurement Experiment (QME) is being conducted to analyze the spectral residuals between the downwelling longwave radiance measured by the University of Wisconsin Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) and spectral radiance calculated by the Line-By-Line Radiative Transfer Model (LBLRTM). The three critical components of this study are (1) the assessment of the quality of the high resolution AERI measurements, (2) the assessment of the ability to define the atmospheric state in the radiating column, and (3) the evaluation of the capability of LBLRTM. Validations have been performed on spectral radiance data, obtained from April 1994 through July 1994, through the analysis of the spectral interval and physical process. The results are archived as a function of time, enabling the retrieval of specific data and facilitating investigations and diurnal effects, seasonal effects, and longer-term trends. While the initial focus is restricted to clear-sky analyses, efforts are under way to include the effects of clouds and aerosols. Plans are well formulated for the extension of the current approach to the shortwave. An overview of the concept of the QME is described by Miller et al. (1994), and a detailed description of this study is provided by Clough et al. (1994).

  17. -30° C to 960° C Variable Temperature Blackbody (VTBB) Radiance Temperature Calibration Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Z.; Wang, J.; Hao, X.; Wang, T.; Dong, W.

    2015-12-01

    A blackbody radiance temperature calibration facility (RTCF) has recently been established at the National Institute of Metrology, China, offering calibration and verification services for variable temperature blackbody (VTBB) radiation sources. The RTCF includes reference VTBBs in the range of -30° C to 960° C and consists of a stirred liquid bath blackbody of -30° C to 80° C and water, cesium, and sodium heat-pipe blackbodies spanning 50° C to 960° C. In addition, the facility is equipped with a set of radiation thermometers with different working wavelengths (or wavebands); these thermometers are used to transfer radiance temperatures from the reference to customers' VTBBs. Cavities with V-notch grooves in the inner surface have an estimated emissivity from 0.99986 to 0.99994. The temperature control stability and temperature uniformity of VTBBs are characterized. Furthermore, we test the difference between a cavity and thermometer well temperatures and compare the radiance temperatures of the Cs and Na heat-pipe blackbodies. The expanded uncertainty (k = 2) of VTBBs' radiance temperatures at 10 \\upmu m (8 \\upmu m to 14 \\upmu m) is evaluated from 0.016° C to 0.23° C. The facility has been used to calibrate and characterize customers' VTBBs.

  18. Remote Sensing of Cloud Properties using Ground-based Measurements of Zenith Radiance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiu, J. Christine; Marshak, Alexander; Knyazikhin, Yuri; Wiscombe, Warren J.; Barker, Howard W.; Barnard, James C.; Luo, Yi

    2006-01-01

    An extensive verification of cloud property retrievals has been conducted for two algorithms using zenith radiances measured by the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program ground-based passive two-channel (673 and 870 nm) Narrow Field-Of-View Radiometer. The underlying principle of these algorithms is that clouds have nearly identical optical properties at these wavelengths, but corresponding spectral surface reflectances (for vegetated surfaces) differ significantly. The first algorithm, the RED vs. NIR, works for a fully three-dimensional cloud situation. It retrieves not only cloud optical depth, but also an effective radiative cloud fraction. Importantly, due to one-second time resolution of radiance measurements, we are able, for the first time, to capture detailed changes in cloud structure at the natural time scale of cloud evolution. The cloud optical depths tau retrieved by this algorithm are comparable to those inferred from both downward fluxes in overcast situations and microwave brightness temperatures for broken clouds. Moreover, it can retrieve tau for thin patchy clouds, where flux and microwave observations fail to detect them. The second algorithm, referred to as COUPLED, couples zenith radiances with simultaneous fluxes to infer 2. In general, the COUPLED and RED vs. NIR algorithms retrieve consistent values of tau. However, the COUPLED algorithm is more sensitive to the accuracies of measured radiance, flux, and surface reflectance than the RED vs. NIR algorithm. This is especially true for thick overcast clouds where it may substantially overestimate z.

  19. Nimbus 7 Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet (SBUV) spectral scan solar irradiance and Earth radiance product user's guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlesinger, Barry M.; Cebula, Richard P.; Heath, Donald F.; Fleig, Albert J.

    1988-01-01

    The archived tape products from the spectral scan mode measurements of solar irradiance (SUNC tapes) and Earth radiance (EARTH tapes) by the Solar Backscatter UV (SBUV) instrument aboard Nimbus 7 are described. Incoming radiation from 160 to 400 nm is measured at intervals of 0.2 nm. The scan-to-scan repeatability of the solar irradiance measurements ranges from approximately 0.5 to 1 percent longward of 280 nm, to 2 percent around 210 nm and 4 percent near 175 nm. The repeatability of the Earth radiance values ranges from 2 to 3 percent at longer wavelengths and low zenith angles to 10 percent at shorter wavelengths and high zenith angles. The tape formats are described in detail, including file structure and contents of each type of record. Catalogs of the tapes and the time period covered are provided, along with lists of the days lacking solar irradiance measurements and the days dedicated to Earth radiance measurements. The method for production of the tapes is outlined and quality control measures are described. How radiances and irradiances are derived from the raw counts, the corrections for changes in instrument sensitivity, and related uncertainties are discussed.

  20. Effect of volcanic aerosols on stratospheric radiance at wavelengths between 8 and 13 microm.

    PubMed

    Halperin, B; Murcray, D G

    1987-06-01

    A set of stratospheric aerosol optical models is employed in a radiative-transfer computation to study the effects of postvolcanic particle size distributions and compositions on the spectral radiance in the 8-13-microm window region. The models are based on direct measurements of post El Chichon aerosol size distributions and vertical profiles. They represent various maturity states of aerosols composed of sulfuric acid aqueous solutions, formed and evolved in the stratosphere following a massive volcanic eruption. Comparisons are made with concurrent radiance observations obtained on balloon flights 6 months after the eruption and 1 yr later. Most of the calculations are done using the LOWTRAN-6 code (either alone or combined with a multiple scattering calculation), revised so as to include the appropriate aerosol optical models. A better quantitative agreement is found between the calculated and observed spectral radiances when the aerosol loading is relatively high, indicating that additional minor radiance sources of a yet unresolved nature should be incorporated in the present version of the calculation.

  1. Using sky radiances measured by ground based AERONET Sun-Radiometers for cirrus cloud detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinyuk, A.; Holben, B. N.; Eck, T. F.; Slutsker, I.; Lewis, J. R.

    2013-12-01

    Screening of cirrus clouds using observations of optical depth (OD) only has proven to be a difficult task due mostly to some clouds having temporally and spatially stable OD. On the other hand, the sky radiances measurements which in AERONET protocol are taken throughout the day may contain additional cloud information. In this work the potential of using sky radiances for cirrus cloud detection is investigated. The detection is based on differences in the angular shape of sky radiances due to cirrus clouds and aerosol (see Figure). The range of scattering angles from 3 to 6 degrees was selected due to two primary reasons: high sensitivity to cirrus clouds presence, and close proximity to the Sun. The angular shape of sky radiances was parametrized by its curvature, which is a parameter defined as a combination of the first and second derivatives as a function of scattering angle. We demonstrate that a slope of the logarithm of curvature versus logarithm of scattering angle in this selected range of scattering angles is sensitive to cirrus cloud presence. We also demonstrate that restricting the values of the slope below some threshold value can be used for cirrus cloud screening. The threshold value of the slope was estimated using collocated measurements of AERONET data and MPLNET lidars.

  2. Bidirectional reflectance of oceanic waters: A comparison of modeled and measured upward radiance fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morel, Andre; Voss, Kenneth J.; Gentili, Bernard

    1995-01-01

    The bidirectional reflectance of oceanic waters is conveniently described in a normalized way by forming the ratio of the upwelling irradiance E(sub u) to any upwelling radiance L(sub u)(theta prime, phi). This ratio, Q (theta prime, theta(sub 0), (phi(sub 0) - phi), where theta prime, phi are the nadir and azimuth angles for the upward radiance and theta(sub 0), phi(sub 0) are the zenith and azimuth angles of the Sun, has been determined from measurements at sea and computed via Monte Carlo simulations using the inherent optical properties measured in the field and appropriate boundary conditions (clear sky, no wind, varying Sun angle). Experimental ad computed Q values are in excellent agreement. This successful comparison confirms the importance of the bidirectional character of ocean reflectance, already pointed out from a purely numerical approach without field validation, and corroborates the extended range of the Q variations. The later point is of importance when interpreting the marine signals detected by an ocean color satellite-borne sensor. The validation is extended by considering the historical data for the radiance distributions in Lake Pend Oreille determined at various depths. The closure issue in ocean optics is examined by solving the direct problem of radiative transfer and through a model-data comparison in terms of radiance field.

  3. Use of near infrared/red radiance ratios for estimating vegetation biomass and physiological status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, C. J.

    1977-01-01

    The application of photographic infrared/red (ir/red) reflectance or radiance ratios for the estimation of vegetation biomass and physiological status were investigated by analyzing in situ spectral reflectance data from experimental grass plots. Canopy biological samples were taken for total wet biomass, total dry biomass, leaf water content, dry green biomass, dry brown biomass, and total chlorophyll content at each sampling date. Integrated red and photographic infrared radiances were regressed against the various canopy or plot variables to determine the relative significance between the red, photographic infrared, and the ir/red ratio and the canopy variables. The ir/red ratio is sensitive to the photosynthetically active or green biomass, the rate of primary production, and actually measures the interaction between the green biomass and the rate of primary production within a given species type. The ir/red ratio resulted in improved regression significance over the red or the ir/radiances taken separately. Only slight differences were found between ir/red ratio, the ir-red difference, the vegetation index, and the transformed vegetation index. The asymptotic spectral radiance properties of the ir, red, ir/red ratio, and the various transformations were evaluated.

  4. Interior radiances in optically deep absorbing media. 3: Scattering from Haze L

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kattawar, G. W.; Plass, G. N.

    1974-01-01

    The interior radiances are calculated within an optically deep absorbing medium scattering according to the Haze L phase function. The dependence on the solar zenith angle, the single scattering albedo, and the optical depth within the medium is calculated by the matrix operator method. The development of the asymptotic angular distribution of the radiance in the diffusion region is illustrated through a number of examples; it depends only on the single scattering albedo and on the phase function for single scattering. The exact values of the radiance in the diffusion region are compared with values calculated from the approximate equations proposed by Van de Hulst. The variation of the radiance near the lower boundary of an optically thick medium is illustrated with examples. The attenuation length is calculated for various single scattering albedos and compared with the corresponding values for Rayleigh scattering. The ratio of the upward to the downward flux is found to be remarkably constant within the medium. The heating rate is calculated and found to have a maximum value at an optical depth of two within a Haze L layer when the sun is at the zenith.

  5. Radiance and atmosphere propagation-based method for the target range estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Hoonkyung; Chun, Joohwan

    2012-06-01

    Target range estimation is traditionally based on radar and active sonar systems in modern combat system. However, the performance of such active sensor devices is degraded tremendously by jamming signal from the enemy. This paper proposes a simple range estimation method between the target and the sensor. Passive IR sensors measures infrared (IR) light radiance radiating from objects in dierent wavelength and this method shows robustness against electromagnetic jamming. The measured target radiance of each wavelength at the IR sensor depends on the emissive properties of target material and is attenuated by various factors, in particular the distance between the sensor and the target and atmosphere environment. MODTRAN is a tool that models atmospheric propagation of electromagnetic radiation. Based on the result from MODTRAN and measured radiance, the target range is estimated. To statistically analyze the performance of proposed method, we use maximum likelihood estimation (MLE) and evaluate the Cramer-Rao Lower Bound (CRLB) via the probability density function of measured radiance. And we also compare CRLB and the variance of and ML estimation using Monte-Carlo.

  6. Quantum Cloning for Absolute Radiometry

    SciTech Connect

    Sanguinetti, Bruno; Pomarico, Enrico; Sekatski, Pavel; Zbinden, Hugo; Gisin, Nicolas

    2010-08-20

    In the quantum regime information can be copied with only a finite fidelity. This fidelity gradually increases to 1 as the system becomes classical. In this Letter we show how this fact can be used to directly measure the amount of radiated power. We demonstrate how these principles can be used to build a practical primary standard.

  7. Absolute Gravity Datum in the Age of Cold Atom Gravimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Childers, V. A.; Eckl, M. C.

    2014-12-01

    The international gravity datum is defined today by the International Gravity Standardization Net of 1971 (IGSN-71). The data supporting this network was measured in the 1950s and 60s using pendulum and spring-based gravimeter ties (plus some new ballistic absolute meters) to replace the prior protocol of referencing all gravity values to the earlier Potsdam value. Since this time, gravimeter technology has advanced significantly with the development and refinement of the FG-5 (the current standard of the industry) and again with the soon-to-be-available cold atom interferometric absolute gravimeters. This latest development is anticipated to provide improvement in the range of two orders of magnitude as compared to the measurement accuracy of technology utilized to develop ISGN-71. In this presentation, we will explore how the IGSN-71 might best be "modernized" given today's requirements and available instruments and resources. The National Geodetic Survey (NGS), along with other relevant US Government agencies, is concerned about establishing gravity control to establish and maintain high order geodetic networks as part of the nation's essential infrastructure. The need to modernize the nation's geodetic infrastructure was highlighted in "Precise Geodetic Infrastructure, National Requirements for a Shared Resource" National Academy of Science, 2010. The NGS mission, as dictated by Congress, is to establish and maintain the National Spatial Reference System, which includes gravity measurements. Absolute gravimeters measure the total gravity field directly and do not involve ties to other measurements. Periodic "intercomparisons" of multiple absolute gravimeters at reference gravity sites are used to constrain the behavior of the instruments to ensure that each would yield reasonably similar measurements of the same location (i.e. yield a sufficiently consistent datum when measured in disparate locales). New atomic interferometric gravimeters promise a significant

  8. An absolute photometric system at 10 and 20 microns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rieke, G. H.; Lebofsky, M. J.; Low, F. J.

    1985-01-01

    Two new direct calibrations at 10 and 20 microns are presented in which terrestrial flux standards are referred to infrared standard stars. These measurements give both good agreement and higher accuracy when compared with previous direct calibrations. As a result, the absolute calibrations at 10 and 20 microns have now been determined with accuracies of 3 and 8 percent, respectively. A variety of absolute calibrations based on extrapolation of stellar spectra from the visible to 10 microns are reviewed. Current atmospheric models of A-type stars underestimate their fluxes by about 10 percent at 10 microns, whereas models of solar-type stars agree well with the direct calibrations. The calibration at 20 microns can probably be determined to about 5 percent by extrapolation from the more accurate result at 10 microns. The photometric system at 10 and 20 microns is updated to reflect the new absolute calibration, to base its zero point directly on the colors of A0 stars, and to improve the accuracy in the comparison of the standard stars.

  9. Study on inverse estimation of radiative properties from directional radiances by using statistical RPSO algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Kuk-Il; Kim, Do-Hwi; Choi, Jun-Hyuk; Kim, Tae-Kuk; Shin, Jong-Jin

    2016-09-01

    Infrared signals are widely used to discriminate objects against the background. Prediction of infrared signal from an object surface is essential in evaluating the detectability of the object. Appropriate and easy method of procurement of the radiative properties such as the surface emissivity, bidirectional reflectivity is important in estimating infrared signals. Direct measurement can be a good choice but a costly and time consuming way of obtaining the radiative properties for surfaces coated with many different newly developed paints. Especially measurement of the bidirectional reflectivity usually expressed by the bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) is the most costly job. In this paper we are presenting an inverse estimation method of the radiative properties by using the directional radiances from the surface of concern. The inverse estimation method used in this study is the statistical repulsive particle swarm optimization (RPSO) algorithm which uses the randomly picked directional radiance data emitted and reflected from the surface. In this paper, we test the proposed inverse method by considering the radiation from a steel plate surface coated with different paints at a clear sunny day condition. For convenience, the directional radiance data from the steel plate within a spectral band of concern are obtained from the simulation using the commercial software, RadthermIR, instead of the field measurement. A widely used BRDF model called as the Sandford-Robertson(S-R) model is considered and the RPSO process is then used to find the best fitted model parameters for the S-R model. The results obtained from this study show an excellent agreement with the reference property data used for the simulation for directional radiances. The proposed process can be a useful way of obtaining the radiative properties from field measured directional radiance data for surfaces coated with or without various kinds of paints of unknown radiative

  10. View-angle-dependent AIRS Cloudiness and Radiance Variance: Analysis and Interpretation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gong, Jie; Wu, Dong L.

    2013-01-01

    Upper tropospheric clouds play an important role in the global energy budget and hydrological cycle. Significant view-angle asymmetry has been observed in upper-level tropical clouds derived from eight years of Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) 15 um radiances. Here, we find that the asymmetry also exists in the extra-tropics. It is larger during day than that during night, more prominent near elevated terrain, and closely associated with deep convection and wind shear. The cloud radiance variance, a proxy for cloud inhomogeneity, has consistent characteristics of the asymmetry to those in the AIRS cloudiness. The leading causes of the view-dependent cloudiness asymmetry are the local time difference and small-scale organized cloud structures. The local time difference (1-1.5 hr) of upper-level (UL) clouds between two AIRS outermost views can create parts of the observed asymmetry. On the other hand, small-scale tilted and banded structures of the UL clouds can induce about half of the observed view-angle dependent differences in the AIRS cloud radiances and their variances. This estimate is inferred from analogous study using Microwave Humidity Sounder (MHS) radiances observed during the period of time when there were simultaneous measurements at two different view-angles from NOAA-18 and -19 satellites. The existence of tilted cloud structures and asymmetric 15 um and 6.7 um cloud radiances implies that cloud statistics would be view-angle dependent, and should be taken into account in radiative transfer calculations, measurement uncertainty evaluations and cloud climatology investigations. In addition, the momentum forcing in the upper troposphere from tilted clouds is also likely asymmetric, which can affect atmospheric circulation anisotropically.

  11. Statistical model for atmospheric limb radiance structure: application to airborne infrared surveillance systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quang, Carine; Dalaudier, Francis; Roblin, Antoine; Rialland, Valérie; Chervet, Patrick

    2008-10-01

    Infrared (IR) detectors can be used as airborne limb-viewing surveillance systems for missile detection. These systems' performances are impacted by the atmospheric inhomogeneous background. In fact, the probability of target detection can be heavily affected. Consequently, the knowledge of these radiance small-scale fluctuations and their statistical properties is required to assess these systems' detection capability. A model of two-dimensional radiance spatial fluctuations autocorrelation function (ACF) is developed. This model is dedicated to airborne limb-viewing conditions in the thermal IR. In the stratosphere and in clear-sky conditions, the structured background is mainly due to internal-gravity-wave-induced temperature and density spatial fluctuations. Moreover, in the particular case of water vapour absorption bands, the mass fraction fluctuations play a non negligible role on the radiative field. Thereby, considering the temperature field and the water vapour field as stochastic processes, the radiance ACF can be expressed as a function of the temperature ACF and the water vapor mass fraction ACF. A local thermodynamic equilibrium model is sufficient for stratospheric conditions and sunlight scattering is neglected in the thermal IR. In addition, determination of the radiance fluctuations ACF requires the knowledge of the absorption coefficient and its first derivatives with respect to the temperature and water vapour mass fraction. Thus, a line-by-line model specific to water vapor absorption bands has been developed. This model is used to precalculate the absorption coefficients and their derivatives. This look-up table method allows circumventing the computational cost of a line-by-line calculation. A detailed description of the radiance fluctuations ACF model is presented and first results are discussed.

  12. Absolute optical metrology : nanometers to kilometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dubovitsky, Serge; Lay, O. P.; Peters, R. D.; Liebe, C. C.

    2005-01-01

    We provide and overview of the developments in the field of high-accuracy absolute optical metrology with emphasis on space-based applications. Specific work on the Modulation Sideband Technology for Absolute Ranging (MSTAR) sensor is described along with novel applications of the sensor.

  13. ON A SUFFICIENT CONDITION FOR ABSOLUTE CONTINUITY.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The formulation of a condition which yields absolute continuity when combined with continuity and bounded variation is the problem considered in the...Briefly, the formulation is achieved through a discussion which develops a proof by contradiction of a sufficiently theorem for absolute continuity which uses in its hypothesis the condition of continuity and bounded variation .

  14. Monolithically integrated absolute frequency comb laser system

    SciTech Connect

    Wanke, Michael C.

    2016-07-12

    Rather than down-convert optical frequencies, a QCL laser system directly generates a THz frequency comb in a compact monolithically integrated chip that can be locked to an absolute frequency without the need of a frequency-comb synthesizer. The monolithic, absolute frequency comb can provide a THz frequency reference and tool for high-resolution broad band spectroscopy.

  15. Atmospheric Transmittance/Radiance: Computer Code LOWTRAN 6

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-08-01

    Radiative Transfer 28 4. 3 Verification of the Single Scattering Algorithm 32 4. 4 Phase Functions for Scattering by Atmospheric Aerosols and...Molecules 33 4. 4. 1 Aerosol Angular Scattering Functions 35 4. 4.2 Standard LOWTRAN Phase Functions 35 4.4.3 Henyey - Greenstein Phase Function 35 4. 4.4 User... Henyey - Greenstein type phase function , with a specified value for the asymmetry parameter; (3) They can input

  16. Absolute instability of the Gaussian wake profile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hultgren, Lennart S.; Aggarwal, Arun K.

    1987-01-01

    Linear parallel-flow stability theory has been used to investigate the effect of viscosity on the local absolute instability of a family of wake profiles with a Gaussian velocity distribution. The type of local instability, i.e., convective or absolute, is determined by the location of a branch-point singularity with zero group velocity of the complex dispersion relation for the instability waves. The effects of viscosity were found to be weak for values of the wake Reynolds number, based on the center-line velocity defect and the wake half-width, larger than about 400. Absolute instability occurs only for sufficiently large values of the center-line wake defect. The critical value of this parameter increases with decreasing wake Reynolds number, thereby indicating a shrinking region of absolute instability with decreasing wake Reynolds number. If backflow is not allowed, absolute instability does not occur for wake Reynolds numbers smaller than about 38.

  17. Establishing ion ratio thresholds based on absolute peak area for absolute protein quantification using protein cleavage isotope dilution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Loziuk, Philip L; Sederoff, Ronald R; Chiang, Vincent L; Muddiman, David C

    2014-11-07

    Quantitative mass spectrometry has become central to the field of proteomics and metabolomics. Selected reaction monitoring is a widely used method for the absolute quantification of proteins and metabolites. This method renders high specificity using several product ions measured simultaneously. With growing interest in quantification of molecular species in complex biological samples, confident identification and quantitation has been of particular concern. A method to confirm purity or contamination of product ion spectra has become necessary for achieving accurate and precise quantification. Ion abundance ratio assessments were introduced to alleviate some of these issues. Ion abundance ratios are based on the consistent relative abundance (RA) of specific product ions with respect to the total abundance of all product ions. To date, no standardized method of implementing ion abundance ratios has been established. Thresholds by which product ion contamination is confirmed vary widely and are often arbitrary. This study sought to establish criteria by which the relative abundance of product ions can be evaluated in an absolute quantification experiment. These findings suggest that evaluation of the absolute ion abundance for any given transition is necessary in order to effectively implement RA thresholds. Overall, the variation of the RA value was observed to be relatively constant beyond an absolute threshold ion abundance. Finally, these RA values were observed to fluctuate significantly over a 3 year period, suggesting that these values should be assessed as close as possible to the time at which data is collected for quantification.

  18. Quantum Efficient Detectors for Use in Absolute Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faust, Jessica; Eastwood, Michael; Pavri, Betina; Raney, James

    1998-01-01

    The trap or quantum efficient detector has a quantum efficiency of greater than 0.98 for the region from 450 to 900 nm. The region of flattest response is from 600 to 900 nm. The QED consists of three windowless Hamamatsu silicon detectors. The QED was mounted below AVIRIS to monitor the Spectralon panel for changes in radiance during radiometric calibration. The next step is to permanently mount the detector to AVIRIS and monitor the overall radiance of scenes along with calibration.

  19. Neutron activation analysis of certified samples by the absolute method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadem, F.; Belouadah, N.; Idiri, Z.

    2015-07-01

    The nuclear reactions analysis technique is mainly based on the relative method or the use of activation cross sections. In order to validate nuclear data for the calculated cross section evaluated from systematic studies, we used the neutron activation analysis technique (NAA) to determine the various constituent concentrations of certified samples for animal blood, milk and hay. In this analysis, the absolute method is used. The neutron activation technique involves irradiating the sample and subsequently performing a measurement of the activity of the sample. The fundamental equation of the activation connects several physical parameters including the cross section that is essential for the quantitative determination of the different elements composing the sample without resorting to the use of standard sample. Called the absolute method, it allows a measurement as accurate as the relative method. The results obtained by the absolute method showed that the values are as precise as the relative method requiring the use of standard sample for each element to be quantified.

  20. Atmospheric Transmittance/Radiance: Computer Code LOWTRAN 4

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-02-28

    far a downward looking path (J12< I1l) when two paths are possible for the samte input parameters. In such a ecase, a comtputer prinitout , state ...ertical Paths to Space and the 1962 11.S. Standard Atmosphere 30 MOth i 1)0 w 0 Al. 40 1 - ~4! 4 .’- 00, .1 ) ,0U C .U • . 0.0 ,-4 0.0 wU0l) .4 .(U.U 1...tadiatice codle tieset ibt’t abovec, tilt’ :gigr’ it’etttt bt’ wett tt’aii’’ittt .tt~ii tadiiattet’ kcaiilatt~otis sitowit ill i nir~tt’s’ ILI ttt’otlýIl

  1. Networks of Absolute Calibration Stars for SST, AKARI, and WISE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, M.

    2007-04-01

    I describe the Cohen-Walker-Witteborn (CWW) network of absolute calibration stars built to support ground-based, airborne, and space-based sensors, and how they are used to calibrate instruments on the SPITZER Space Telescope (SST and Japan's AKARI (formerly ASTRO-F), and to support NASA's planned MidEx WISE (the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer). All missions using this common calibration share a self-consistent framework embracing photometry and low-resolution spectroscopy. CWW also underpins COBE/DIRBE several instruments used on the Kuiper Airborne Observatory ({KAO}), the joint Japan-USA ``IR Telescope in Space" (IRTS) Near-IR and Mid-IR spectrometers, the European Space Agency's IR Space Observatory (ISO), and the US Department of Defense's Midcourse Space eXperiment (MSX). This calibration now spans the far-UV to mid-infrared range with Sirius (one specific Kurucz synthetic spectrum) as basis, and zero magnitude defined from another Kurucz spectrum intended to represent an ideal Vega (not the actual star with its pole-on orientation and mid-infrared dust excess emission). Precision 4-29 μm radiometric measurements on MSX validate CWW's absolute Kurucz spectrum of Sirius, the primary, and a set of bright K/MIII secondary standards. Sirius is measured to be 1.0% higher than predicted. CWW's definitions of IR zero magnitudes lie within 1.1% absolute of MSX measurements. The US Air Force Research Laboratory's independent analysis of on-orbit {MSX} stellar observations compared with emissive reference spheres show CWW primary and empirical secondary spectra lie well within the ±1.45% absolute uncertainty associated with this 15-year effort. Our associated absolute calibration for the InfraRed Array Camera (IRAC) on the SST lies within ˜2% of the recent extension of the calibration of the Hubble Space Telescope's STIS instrument to NICMOS (Bohlin, these Proceedings), showing the closeness of these two independent approaches to calibration.

  2. Multi-sensor Cloud Retrieval Simulator and Remote Sensing from Model Parameters . Pt. 1; Synthetic Sensor Radiance Formulation; [Synthetic Sensor Radiance Formulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wind, G.; DaSilva, A. M.; Norris, P. M.; Platnick, S.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we describe a general procedure for calculating synthetic sensor radiances from variable output from a global atmospheric forecast model. In order to take proper account of the discrepancies between model resolution and sensor footprint, the algorithm takes explicit account of the model subgrid variability, in particular its description of the probability density function of total water (vapor and cloud condensate.) The simulated sensor radiances are then substituted into an operational remote sensing algorithm processing chain to produce a variety of remote sensing products that would normally be produced from actual sensor output. This output can then be used for a wide variety of purposes such as model parameter verification, remote sensing algorithm validation, testing of new retrieval methods and future sensor studies.We show a specific implementation using the GEOS-5 model, the MODIS instrument and the MODIS Adaptive Processing System (MODAPS) Data Collection 5.1 operational remote sensing cloud algorithm processing chain (including the cloud mask, cloud top properties and cloud optical and microphysical properties products). We focus on clouds because they are very important to model development and improvement.

  3. Consistent set of nuclear parameters values for absolute INAA

    SciTech Connect

    Heft, R.E.

    1980-01-01

    Gamma spectral analysis of irradiated material can be used to determine absolute disintegration rates for specific radionuclides. These data, together with measured values for the thermal and epithermal neutron fluxes, and irradiation, cooling and counting time values, are all the experimental information required to do absolute Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis. The calculations required to go from product photon emission rate to target nuclide amount depend upon values used for the thermal neutron capture cross-section, the resonance absorption integral, the half-life and photon branching ratios. Values for these parameters were determined by irradiating and analyzing a series of elemental standards. The results of these measurements were combined with values reported by other workers to arrive at a set of recommended values for the constants. Values for 114 nuclides are listed.

  4. Comparisons of absolute gravimeters (COOMET.M.G-S1)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinnichenko, Mr Alexander; Germak, Alessandro, Dr

    2017-01-01

    This report describes the results of the RMO supplementary comparison COOMET.M.G-S1 (also known as bilateral comparison COOMET 634/UA/14). The comparison measurements between the two participants NSC 'IM' (pilot laboratory) and INRIM were started in December 2015 and finished in January 2016. Participants of comparisons were conducted at their national standards the measurements of the free fall acceleration in gravimetric point laboratory of absolute gravimetry of INRIM named INRiM.2. Absolute measurements of gravimetric acceleration were conducted by ballistic gravimeters. The agreement between the two participants is good. Main text To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCM, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  5. Self consistent, absolute calibration technique for photon number resolving detectors.

    PubMed

    Avella, A; Brida, G; Degiovanni, I P; Genovese, M; Gramegna, M; Lolli, L; Monticone, E; Portesi, C; Rajteri, M; Rastello, M L; Taralli, E; Traina, P; White, M

    2011-11-07

    Well characterized photon number resolving detectors are a requirement for many applications ranging from quantum information and quantum metrology to the foundations of quantum mechanics. This prompts the necessity for reliable calibration techniques at the single photon level. In this paper we propose an innovative absolute calibration technique for photon number resolving detectors, using a pulsed heralded photon source based on parametric down conversion. The technique, being absolute, does not require reference standards and is independent upon the performances of the heralding detector. The method provides the results of quantum efficiency for the heralded detector as a function of detected photon numbers. Furthermore, we prove its validity by performing the calibration of a Transition Edge Sensor based detector, a real photon number resolving detector that has recently demonstrated its effectiveness in various quantum information protocols.

  6. Laboratory measurements of radiance and reflectance spectra of dilute secondary-treated sewage sludge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witte, W. G.; Usry, J. W.; Whitlock, C. H.; Gurganus, E. A.

    1977-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), in cooperation with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), conducted a research program to evaluate the feasibility of remotely monitoring ocean dumping of waste products such as acid and sewage sludge. One aspect of the research program involved the measurements of upwelled spectral signatures for sewage-sludge mixtures of different concentrations in an 11600-liter tank. This paper describes the laboratory arrangement and presents radiance and reflectance spectra in the visible and near-infrared ranges for concentrations ranging from 9.7 to 180 ppm of secondary-treated sewage sludge mixed with two types of base water. Results indicate that upwelled radiance varies in a near-linear manner with concentration and that the sludge has a practically flat signal response between 420 and 970 nm. Reflectance spectra were obtained for the sewage-sludge mixtures at all wavelengths and concentrations.

  7. Thermal lensing characterization of a high-radiance 946nm planar waveguide laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, S. P.; Mackenzie, J. I.

    2012-06-01

    We present the characterization of the in-plane thermal lens in a quasi-four-level Nd:YAG planar waveguide (PW) laser configured for high-radiance operation with an external stable-cavity. Our approach utilises the measurement of the laser's output irradiance distribution at the near- and far-field positions concurrently in order to obtain the "real time" beam propagation parameter and thus beam quality factor, M2. Coupled with the knowledge of the intra-cavity-thermal-lens- dependent beam sizes at an intra-cavity beam waist, the power dependent effective thermal lens focal length was characterized. A thermal lens focal length of >450 mm was obtained at all incident pump powers up to the maximum level of 87 W. This characterization enabled the build of a 29 W 946 nm PW laser with a record output radiance of 4.3 TWm-2sr-1.

  8. Power and radiance scaling of a 946 nm Nd:YAG planar waveguide laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, S. P.; Mackenzie, J. I.

    2012-03-01

    We present a diode-end-pumped Nd:YAG planar waveguide laser operating on neodymium's quasi-four-level transition at a wavelength of 946 nm. Two modes of operation are described: a high-power multi-mode monolithic cavity generating 105 for 210 W of incident pump power with a slope efficiency of ˜54%, and secondly, a high-radiance configuration employing an external stable resonator producing a maximum output power of 29.2 for 86.5 W of incident pump-power, with a slope efficiency of 33%. The output beam quality values of the external cavity were M2 of 3.2 by 2.4, leading to a maximum radiance of 0.43 GW cm-2 sr-1.

  9. ISCCP global radiance data set - A new resource for climate research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schiffer, R. A.; Rossow, W. B.

    1985-01-01

    The operational data-collection phase of the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) began in July 1983 as an element of the World Climate Research Program (WCRP). Since then, raw images from an international network of operational geostationary and polar-orbiting meteorological satellites have been routinely processed to develop a global data set of calibrated radiances and derived cloud parameters for climate research. This report outlines the key steps involved in producing the basic ISCCP reduced-resolution global radiance (B3) data set, describes the main features of the data set, and indicates the principal point of contact for obtaining copies of the data tapes. A future paper will focus on the derived cloud properties and their utilization.

  10. Atmospheric emitted radiance interferometer (AERI): Status and the aerosol explanation for extra window region emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Revercomb, H.E.; Knuteson, R.O.; Best, F.A.; Dirkx, T.P.

    1996-04-01

    High spectral resolution observations of downwelling emission from 3 to 19 microns have been made by the Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) Prototype at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Cloud and Radiative Testbed (CART) site for over two years. The spectral data set from AERI provides a basis for improving clear sky radiative transfer; determining the radiative impact of clouds, including the derivation of cloud radiative properties; defining the influences of aerosols in the window regions; and retrieving boundary layer state properties, including temperature, water vapor, and other trace gases. The data stream of radiometrically and spectrally calibrated radiances is routinely provided by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to those science teams requesting it, and further information on the instrument and data characteristics is available in the ARM Science Team proceedings for 1993 and 1994 and in several conference publications. This paper describes the AERI status, calibration, field experiment wit a new AERI-01 and schedule, window region emissions, and future AERI plans.

  11. Process of preparing metal parts to be heated by means of infrared radiance

    DOEpatents

    Mayer, Howard Robinson; Blue, Craig A.

    2009-06-09

    A method for preparing metal for heating by infrared radiance to enable uniform and consistent heating. The surface of one or more metal parts, such as aluminum or aluminum alloy parts, is treated to alter the surface finish to affect the reflectivity of the surface. The surface reflectivity is evaluated, such as by taking measurements at one or more points on the surface, to determine if a desired reflectivity has been achieved. The treating and measuring are performed until the measuring indicates that the desired reflectivity has been achieved. Once the treating has altered the surface finish to achieve the desired reflectivity, the metal part may then be exposed to infrared radiance to heat the metal part to a desired temperature, and that heating will be substantially consistent throughout by virtue of the desired reflectivity.

  12. Interior radiances in optically deep absorbing media. 1: Exact solutions for one-dimensional model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kattawar, G. W.; Plass, G. N.

    1973-01-01

    The exact solutions are obtained for a one dimensional model of a scattering and absorbing medium. The results are given for both the reflected and transmitted radiance for any arbitrary surface albedo as well as for the interior radiance. These same quantities are calculated by the matrix operator method. The relative error of the solutions is obtained by comparison with the exact solutions as well as by an error analysis of the equations. The importance of an accurate starting value for the reflection and transmission operators is shown. A fourth order Runge-Kutta method can be used to solve the differential equations satisfied by these operators in order to obtain such accurate starting values.

  13. Laboratory upwelled radiance and reflectance spectra of Kerr reservoir sediment waters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witte, W. G.; Whitlock, C. H.; Morris, W. D.; Gurganus, E. A.

    1982-01-01

    Reflectance, chromaticity, and several other physical and chemical properties were measured for various water mixtures of bottom sediments taken from two sites at Kerr Reservoir, Virginia. Mixture concentrations ranged from 5 to 1000 ppm by weight of total suspended solids (TSS) in filtered deionized tap water. The two sets of radiance and reflectance spectra obtained were similar in shape and magnitude for comparable values of TSS. Upwelled reflectance was observed to be a nonlinear function of TSS with the degree of curvature a function of wavelength. Sediment from the downstream site contained a greater amount of particulate organic carbon than from the upstream site. No strong conclusions can be made regarding the effects of this difference on the radiance and reflectance spectra. Near-infrared wavelengths appear useful for measuring highly turbid water with concentrations up to 1000 ppm or more. Chromaticity characteristics do not appear useful for monitoring sediment loads above 150 ppm.

  14. Time-cumulated visible and infrared radiance histograms used as descriptors of surface and cloud variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seze, Genevieve; Rossow, William B.

    1991-01-01

    The spatial and temporal stability of the distributions of satellite-measured visible and infrared radiances, caused by variations in clouds and surfaces, are investigated using bidimensional and monodimensional histograms and time-composite images. Similar analysis of the histograms of the original and time-composite images provides separation of the contributions of the space and time variations to the total variations. The variability of both the surfaces and clouds is found to be larger at scales much larger than the minimum resolved by satellite imagery. This study shows that the shapes of these histograms are distinctive characteristics of the different climate regimes and that particular attributes of these histograms can be related to several general, though not universal, properties of clouds and surface variations at regional and synoptic scales. There are also significant exceptions to these relationships in particular climate regimes. The characteristics of these radiance histograms provide a stable well defined descriptor of the cloud and surface properties.

  15. A New Gimmick for Assigning Absolute Configuration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ayorinde, F. O.

    1983-01-01

    A five-step procedure is provided to help students in making the assignment absolute configuration less bothersome. Examples for both single (2-butanol) and multi-chiral carbon (3-chloro-2-butanol) molecules are included. (JN)

  16. Magnifying absolute instruments for optically homogeneous regions

    SciTech Connect

    Tyc, Tomas

    2011-09-15

    We propose a class of magnifying absolute optical instruments with a positive isotropic refractive index. They create magnified stigmatic images, either virtual or real, of optically homogeneous three-dimensional spatial regions within geometrical optics.

  17. The Simplicity Argument and Absolute Morality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mijuskovic, Ben

    1975-01-01

    In this paper the author has maintained that there is a similarity of thought to be found in the writings of Cudworth, Emerson, and Husserl in his investigation of an absolute system of morality. (Author/RK)

  18. THE ABSOLUTE MAGNITUDES OF TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE IN THE ULTRAVIOLET

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Peter J.; Roming, Peter W. A.; Ciardullo, Robin; Gronwall, Caryl; Hoversten, Erik A.; Pritchard, Tyler; Milne, Peter; Bufano, Filomena; Mazzali, Paolo; Elias-Rosa, Nancy; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Li Weidong; Foley, Ryan J.; Hicken, Malcolm; Kirshner, Robert P.; Gehrels, Neil; Holland, Stephen T.; Immler, Stefan; Phillips, Mark M.; Still, Martin

    2010-10-01

    We examine the absolute magnitudes and light-curve shapes of 14 nearby (redshift z = 0.004-0.027) Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) observed in the ultraviolet (UV) with the Swift Ultraviolet/Optical Telescope. Colors and absolute magnitudes are calculated using both a standard Milky Way extinction law and one for the Large Magellanic Cloud that has been modified by circumstellar scattering. We find very different behavior in the near-UV filters (uvw1{sub rc} covering {approx}2600-3300 A after removing optical light, and u {approx} 3000-4000 A) compared to a mid-UV filter (uvm2 {approx}2000-2400 A). The uvw1{sub rc} - b colors show a scatter of {approx}0.3 mag while uvm2-b scatters by nearly 0.9 mag. Similarly, while the scatter in colors between neighboring filters is small in the optical and somewhat larger in the near-UV, the large scatter in the uvm2 - uvw1 colors implies significantly larger spectral variability below 2600 A. We find that in the near-UV the absolute magnitudes at peak brightness of normal SNe Ia in our sample are correlated with the optical decay rate with a scatter of 0.4 mag, comparable to that found for the optical in our sample. However, in the mid-UV the scatter is larger, {approx}1 mag, possibly indicating differences in metallicity. We find no strong correlation between either the UV light-curve shapes or the UV colors and the UV absolute magnitudes. With larger samples, the UV luminosity might be useful as an additional constraint to help determine distance, extinction, and metallicity in order to improve the utility of SNe Ia as standardized candles.

  19. Crystal structure of meteoritic schreibersites: determination of absolute structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skála, Roman; Císařová, Ivana

    Minerals of the schreibersite nickelphosphide series (Fe,Ni)3P crystallize in the non-centrosymmetric space group Ibar 4. As a consequence, they can possess two different spatial arrangements of the constituting atoms within the unit cell, related by the inversion symmetry operation. Here, we present the crystal structure refinements from single crystal X-ray diffraction data for schreibersite grains from iron meteorites Acuña, Carlton, Hex River Mts. (three different crystals), Odessa (two different crystals), Sikhote Alin, and Toluca aiming for the determination of the absolute structure of the examined crystals. The crystals studied cover the composition range from 58 mol% to 80 mol% Fe3P end-member. Unit-cell parameter a and volume of the unit cell V, as well as certain topological structural parameters tightly correlate with Fe3P content. Unit-cell parameter c, on the other hand, does not show such strong correlation. Eight of the nine crystal structure refinements allowed unambiguous absolute structure assignment. The single crystal extracted from Toluca is, however, of poor quality and consequently the structure refinement did not provide as good results as the rest of the materials. Also, this crystal has only weak inversion distinguishing power to provide unequivocal absolute structure determination. Six of the eight unambiguous absolute structure determinations indicated inverted atomic arrangement compared to that reported in earlier structure refinements (here called standard). Only two grains, one taken from Odessa iron and the other from the Hex River Mts. meteorite, reveal the dominance of standard crystal structure setting.

  20. Optically-Thin Cirrus Cloud Radiance Bias in Satellite Radiometric Sea Surface Temperature Retrieval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marquis, J. W.; Bogdanoff, A.; Campbell, J. R.; Cummings, J. A.; Westphal, D. L.; Smith, N. J.; Zhang, J.

    2015-12-01

    Satellite-based retrievals of sea surface temperature (SST) are highly sensitive to the optical properties of the atmosphere, including clouds. Cloudy pixels, in particular, are screened in order to avoid potential retrieval contamination in their presence. Due to the lack of continuous in-situ observations across the global oceans, though, SSTs calculated from satellite radiances are often the most practical way to obtain a sufficient global estimate. Cloud clearing techniques struggle to flag cloudy retrievals from passive radiometers with cloud optical depths less than 0.3. These optically-thin clouds are almost exclusively cirrus. Corresponding radiance biases associated with unscreened cirrus can be significant due to their inherently cold cloud top temperatures. To investigate frequency of such cloud contamination, 1-km SST observations over tropical oceans (±30° latitude) from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer aboard NASA's Aqua satellite (AQUA-MODIS) are collocated with cloud profiles from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) instrument aboard NASA's CALIPSO satellite. Potential SST biases based on radiance retrievals for MODIS, AVHRR and VIIRS are solved using a radiative transfer model (RTM) with integrated cirrus cloud properties of varying cloud top height and optical depth. Frequencies of occurrence for each cloud top height and optical depth from the collocated CALIOP/AQUA-MODIS data are superimposed upon the conceptual cloud SST radiance bias models to estimate potential net bias. Using the CALIPSO-MODIS collocations, clouds of all types are found to be present in the best quality AQUA-MODIS Level-2 data at a frequency of 25%, with over 90% of those clouds being cirrus. The RTM simulations suggest that when cirrus are present, the mean SST bias due only to cloud is over 0.6°C over the tropical oceans.

  1. A Novel Method of Measuring Upwelling Radiance in the Hydrographic Sub-Hull

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rüssmeier, N.; Zielinski, O.

    2016-01-01

    In this study we present a new method useful in collecting upwelling radiance (Lu) from a platform submerged in a hydrographic sub-hull or moon pool of a research vessel. The information analyzed here was obtained during a field campaign in the Northwestern European shelf seas aboard the new research vessel SONNE. As the platform was located at the center of the ship, there is minimal effect from pitch and roll which is known to influence upwelling radiance observations. A comparison of the measurements from this platform with a free falling hyperspectral profiler was performed to determine the degree of uncertainty that results from ship shadow. For given Lu(λ) in situ data we observed ±33% intensity deviations compared to profiling measurements that can be attributed to instrument shading during moon pool installation and environmental perturbations. Furthermore Lu(λ) in situ spectra variations were observed at lower wavelengths, therefore a form fitting algorithm was adapted to receive corresponding depths with identical spectral form from Lu(z, λ) profiler casts. During an east to west transect in North Sea with a schedule speed up to 12 knots in situ radiance reflectance rrs(7, λ) measurements at 7 meter depth were performed with this novel radiometer setup. In spite of any restrictions originating from the sub-hull installation, water masses mixing zone from CDOM dominated coastal waters in the Skagerrak Strait towards the open North Sea were successfully derived thus offering an underway applicable upwelling radiance sensing not suffering from sun glint or other typical restrictions of above water radiometer installations.

  2. Pilot Comparison of Radiance Temperature Scale Realization Between NIMT and NMIJ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keawprasert, T.; Yamada, Y.; Ishii, J.

    2015-03-01

    A pilot comparison of radiance temperature scale realizations between the National Institute of Metrology Thailand (NIMT) and the National Metrology Institute of Japan (NMIJ) was conducted. At the two national metrology institutes (NMIs), a 900 nm radiation thermometer, used as the transfer artifact, was calibrated by a means of a multiple fixed-point method using the fixed-point blackbody of Zn, Al, Ag, and Cu points, and by means of relative spectral responsivity measurements according to the International Temperature Scale of 1990 (ITS-90) definition. The Sakuma-Hattori equation is used for interpolating the radiance temperature scale between the four fixed points and also for extrapolating the ITS-90 temperature scale to 2000 C. This paper compares the calibration results in terms of fixed-point measurements, relative spectral responsivity, and finally the radiance temperature scale. Good agreement for the fixed-point measurements was found in case a correction for the change of the internal temperature of the artifact was applied using the temperature coefficient measured at the NMIJ. For the realized radiance temperature range from 400 C to 1100 C, the resulting scale differences between the two NMIs are well within the combined scale comparison uncertainty of 0.12 C (). The resulting spectral responsivity measured at the NIMT has a comparable curve to that measured at the NMIJ especially in the out-of-band region, yielding a ITS-90 scale difference within 1.0 C from the Cu point to 2000 C, whereas the realization comparison uncertainty of NIMT and NMIJ combined is 1.2 C () at 2000 C.

  3. Simultaneous measurement of irradiance and reflected radiance in field determination of spectra reflectance

    SciTech Connect

    Duggin, M.J.

    1981-11-15

    The effects of irradiation fluctuations on measured reflectance values have been determined to evaluate whether data collected in sunny or partly cloudy conditions are sufficiently in agreement that they may be used for remote or satellite sensing data collection (e.g. op discuss quantification). Simultaneous measurements were obtained of irradiance and reflected radiance using two Exotech GTR 100 mode Landsat ground-truth radiometers. (AIP)

  4. An integrated radiance throughput model for hypersonic interceptor seeker performance evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyman, Charles L.; Andrzejewski, Joseph; Calhoun, Ronnie

    1992-05-01

    The integrated radiance throughput model is discussed that encompasses the trajectory dynamics and the atmospheric interactions involved in hypersonic endoatmospheric interceptors for strategic and theater missile defenses. The model is intended for medium fidelity performance analysis to enable overall systems performance evaluations and trades. The model is implemented to provide rapid results for numerous mission scenarios and geometries using various emerging window and seeker technologies.

  5. BOREAS RSS-2 Level-1B ASAS Image Data: At-Sensor Radiance in BSQ Format

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, C.; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Nickeson, Jaime (Editor); Dabney, P. W.; Kovalick, W.; Graham, D.; Bur, Michael; Irons, James R.; Tierney, M.

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS RSS-2 team used the ASAS instrument, mounted on the NASA C-130 aircraft, to create at-sensor radiance images of various sites as a function of spectral wavelength, view geometry (combinations of view zenith angle, view azimuth angle, solar zenith angle, and solar azimuth angle), and altitude. The level-1b ASAS images of the BOREAS study areas were collected from April to September 1994 and March to July 1996.

  6. Absolute cross sections of compound nucleus reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capurro, O. A.

    1993-11-01

    The program SEEF is a Fortran IV computer code for the extraction of absolute cross sections of compound nucleus reactions. When the evaporation residue is fed by its parents, only cumulative cross sections will be obtained from off-line gamma ray measurements. But, if one has the parent excitation function (experimental or calculated), this code will make it possible to determine absolute cross sections of any exit channel.

  7. Kelvin and the absolute temperature scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erlichson, Herman

    2001-07-01

    This paper describes the absolute temperature scale of Kelvin (William Thomson). Kelvin found that Carnot's axiom about heat being a conserved quantity had to be abandoned. Nevertheless, he found that Carnot's fundamental work on heat engines was correct. Using the concept of a Carnot engine Kelvin found that Q1/Q2 = T1/T2. Thermometers are not used to obtain absolute temperatures since they are calculated temperatures.

  8. Principal component and sensitivity analysis of cirrus clouds using high-resolution IR radiance spectra: simulations and observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eldering, A.; Braverman, A.; Fetzer, E. J.

    2003-01-01

    A set of simulated and observed nadir-oriented high-resolution infrared emission spectra of synthetic cirrus clouds is analyzed to assess the spectrally dependent variability of radiance from the adjustment of some microphysical and bulk cirrus cloud properties.

  9. The delta-Sobolev approach for modeling solar spectral irradiance and radiance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Xuwu

    The development and evaluation of a solar radiation model is reported, which gives irradiance and radiance results at the bottom and top of an atmosphere of specified optical depth for each of 145 spectral intervals from 0.29 to 4.05 microns. Absorption by water vapor, aerosols, ozone, and uniformly mixed gases; scattering by molecules and aerosols; and non-Lambertian surface reflectance are included in the model. For solving the radiative transfer equation, an innovative delta-Sobolev method is developed. It applies a delta-function modification to the conventional Sobolev solutions in a way analogous to the delta-Eddington method. The irradiance solution by the delta-Sobolev method turns out to be mathematically identical to the delta-Eddington approximation. The radiance solution by the delta-Sobolov method provides a convenient way to obtain the directional distribution pattern of the radiation transfer field, a feature unable to be obtained by most commonly used approximation methods. Such radiance solutions are also especially useful in models for satellite remote sensing. The model is tested against the rigorous Dave model, which solves the radiation transfer problem by the spherical harmonic method, an accurate but very time consuming process. Good agreement between the current model results and those of Dave's model are observed. The advantages of the delta-Sobolev model are simplicity, reasonable accuracy and capability for implementation on a minicomputer or microcomputer.

  10. The Delta-Sobolev Approach for Modeling Solar Spectral Irradiance and Radiance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Xuwu

    This dissertation reports the development and evaluation of a solar radiation model, which gives irradiance and radiance results at the bottom and top of an atmosphere of specified optical depth for each of 145 spectral intervals from 0.29 to 4.05 mum. Absorption by water vapor, aerosols, ozone and uniformly mixed gases; scattering by molecules and aerosols; and non-Lambertian surface reflectance are included in the model. For solving the radiative transfer equation, an innovative delta-Sobolev method is developed. It applies a delta-function modification to the conventional Sobolev solutions in a way analogous to the delta-Eddington method. The irradiance solution by the delta-Sobolev method turns out to be mathematically identical to the delta-Eddington approximation. The radiance solution by the delta-Sobolev method provides a convenient way to obtain the directional distribution pattern of the radiation transfer field, a feature unable to be obtained by most commonly used approximate methods. Such radiance solutions are also especially useful in models for satellite remote sensing. The model is tested against the rigorous Dave model, which solves the radiative transfer problem by the Spherical Harmonic method, an accurate but very time consuming process. Good agreement between the current model results and those of Dave's model are observed. The advantages of the delta-Sobolev model are simplicity, reasonable accuracy and capability for implementation on a minicomputer or microcomputer.

  11. Use of MODIS Cloud Top Pressure to Improve Assimilation Yields of AIRS Radiances in GSI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zavodsky, Bradley; Srikishen, Jayanthi

    2014-01-01

    Improvements to global and regional numerical weather prediction have been demonstrated through assimilation of data from NASA's Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS). Current operational data assimilation systems use AIRS radiances, but impact on regional forecasts has been much smaller than for global forecasts. Previously, it has been shown that cloud top designation associated with quality control procedures within the Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation (GSI) system used operationally by a number of Joint Center for Satellite Data Assimilation (JCSDA) partners may not provide the best representation of cloud top pressure (CTP). Because this designated CTP determines which channels are cloud-free and, thus, available for assimilation, ensuring the most accurate representation of this value is imperative to obtaining the greatest impact from satellite radiances. This paper examines the assimilation of hyperspectral sounder data used in operational numerical weather prediction by comparing analysis increments and numerical forecasts generated using operational techniques with a research technique that swaps CTP from the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) for the value of CTP calculated from the radiances within GSI.

  12. Assimilation of SBUV Version 8 Radiances into the GEOS Ozone DAS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, Martin D.; Stajner, Ivanka; Bhartia, Pawan K.

    2004-01-01

    In operational weather forecasting, the assimilation of brightness temperatures from satellite sounders, instead of assimilation of 1D-retrievals has become increasingly common practice over the last two decades. Compared to these systems, assimilation of trace gases is still at a relatively early stage of development, and efforts to directly assimilate radiances instead of retrieved products have just begun a few years ago, partially because it requires much more computation power due to the employment of a radiative transport forward model (FM). This paper will focus on a method to assimilate SBUV/2 radiances (albedos) into the Global Earth Observation System Ozone Data Assimilation Scheme (GEOS-03DAS). While SBUV-type instruments cannot compete with newer sensors in terms of spectral and horizontal resolution, they feature a continuous data record back to 1978, which makes them very valuable for trend studies. Assimilation can help spreading their ground coverage over the whole globe, as has been previously demonstrated with the GEOS-03DAS using SBUV Version 6 ozone profiles. Now, the DAS has been updated to use the newly released SBUV Version 8 data. We will compare pre]lmlnarv results of SBUV radiance assimilation with the assimilation of retrieved ozone profiles, discuss methods to deal with the increased computational load, and try to assess the error characteristics and future potential of the new approach.

  13. An Investigation of the Characterization of Cloud Contamination in Hyperspectral Radiances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCarty, William; Jedlovec, Gary J.; LeMarshall, John

    2007-01-01

    In regions lacking direct observations, the assimilation of radiances from infrared and microwave sounders is the primary method for characterizing the atmosphere in the analysis process. In recent years, technological advances have led to the launching of more advanced sounders, particularly in the thermal infrared spectrum. With the advent of these hyperspectral sounders, the amount of data available for the analysis process has and will continue to be dramatically increased. However, the utilization of infrared radiances in variational assimilation can be problematic in the presence of clouds; specifically the assessment of the presence of clouds in an instantaneous field of view (IFOV) and the contamination in the individual channels within the IFOV. Various techniques have been developed to determine if a channel is contaminated by clouds. The work presented in this paper and subsequent presentation will investigate traditional techniques and compare them to a new technique, the C02 sorting technique, which utilizes the high spectral resolution of the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) within the framework of the Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation (GSI) 3DVAR system. Ultimately, this work is done in preparation for the assessment of short-term forecast impacts with the regional assimilation of AIRS radiances within the analysis fields of the Weather Research and Forecast Nonhydrostatic Mesoscale Model (WRF-NMM) at the NASA Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPORT) Center.

  14. Impact of horizontal and vertical localization scales on microwave sounder SAPHIR radiance assimilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnamoorthy, C.; Balaji, C.

    2016-05-01

    In the present study, the effect of horizontal and vertical localization scales on the assimilation of direct SAPHIR radiances is studied. An Artificial Neural Network (ANN) has been used as a surrogate for the forward radiative calculations. The training input dataset for ANN consists of vertical layers of atmospheric pressure, temperature, relative humidity and other hydrometeor profiles with 6 channel Brightness Temperatures (BTs) as output. The best neural network architecture has been arrived at, by a neuron independence study. Since vertical localization of radiance data requires weighting functions, a ANN has been trained for this purpose. The radiances were ingested into the NWP using the Ensemble Kalman Filter (EnKF) technique. The horizontal localization has been taken care of, by using a Gaussian localization function centered around the observed coordinates. Similarly, the vertical localization is accomplished by assuming a function which depends on the weighting function of the channel to be assimilated. The effect of both horizontal and vertical localizations has been studied in terms of ensemble spread in the precipitation. Aditionally, improvements in 24 hr forecast from assimilation are also reported.

  15. Detection of localized inclusions of gold nanoparticles in Intralipid-1% by point-radiance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Grabtchak, Serge; Palmer, Tyler J; Whelan, William M

    2011-07-01

    Interstitial fiber-optic-based approaches used in both diagnostic and therapeutic applications rely on localized light-tissue interactions. We present an optical technique to identify spectrally and spatially specific exogenous chromophores in highly scattering turbid media. Point radiance spectroscopy is based on directional light collection at a single point with a side-firing fiber that can be rotated up to 360 deg. A side firing fiber accepts light within a well-defined, solid angle, thus potentially providing an improved spatial resolution. Measurements were performed using an 800-μm diameter isotropic spherical diffuser coupled to a halogen light source and a 600 μm, ∼43 deg cleaved fiber (i.e., radiance detector). The background liquid-based scattering phantom was fabricated using 1% Intralipid. Light was collected with 1 deg increments through 360 deg-segment. Gold nanoparticles , placed into a 3.5-mm diameter capillary tube were used as localized scatterers and absorbers introduced into the liquid phantom both on- and off-axis between source and detector. The localized optical inhomogeneity was detectable as an angular-resolved variation in the radiance polar plots. This technique is being investigated as a potential noninvasive optical modality for prostate cancer monitoring.

  16. Preliminary Research on Radiance Fog Detection based on time series MTSAT data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, X.; Li, Z.; Zhang, S.; Shen, S.; Hu, D.; Xiao, X.

    2015-04-01

    Fog is a kind of disastrous weather phenomenon. In this paper, the geostationary satellite MTSAT imagery is selected as the main data source to radiance fog detection. According to the unique feature of radiance fog from its generation to dissipation, especially considering the difference between clouds and fog during their lifecycle, the characteristics in frequency domain was constructed to discriminate fog from clouds, The time series MTSAT images were register with a modified Gauss Newton optimization method firstly, then, the Savitzky-Golay smoothing filter was applied to the time series remote sensing imageries to process the noises in the original signal, after that the non-orthogonal Haar wavelets was applied to convert the signal from time domain into frequency domain. The coefficient of high frequency component, including the properties: "max", "min", "the location of the min", "the interval length between the max and min", "the coefficient of linear fit for the high frequency", these properties are selected as the characteristic parameters to distinguish fog from clouds. The experiment shows that using the algorithm proposed in this paper, the radiance fog could be monitored effectively, and it is found that although it is difficult to calculate the thickness of the fog directly, while the duration of fog could be obtained by using the frequency feature.

  17. RADIANCE: An automated, enterprise-wide solution for archiving and reporting CT radiation dose estimates.

    PubMed

    Cook, Tessa S; Zimmerman, Stefan L; Steingall, Scott R; Maidment, Andrew D A; Kim, Woojin; Boonn, William W

    2011-01-01

    There is growing interest in the ability to monitor, track, and report exposure to radiation from medical imaging. Historically, however, dose information has been stored on an image-based dose sheet, an arrangement that precludes widespread indexing. Although scanner manufacturers are beginning to include dose-related parameters in the Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) headers of imaging studies, there remains a vast repository of retrospective computed tomographic (CT) data with image-based dose sheets. Consequently, it is difficult for imaging centers to monitor their dose estimates or participate in the American College of Radiology (ACR) Dose Index Registry. An automated extraction software pipeline known as Radiation Dose Intelligent Analytics for CT Examinations (RADIANCE) has been designed that quickly and accurately parses CT dose sheets to extract and archive dose-related parameters. Optical character recognition of information in the dose sheet leads to creation of a text file, which along with the DICOM study header is parsed to extract dose-related data. The data are then stored in a relational database that can be queried for dose monitoring and report creation. RADIANCE allows efficient dose analysis of CT examinations and more effective education of technologists, radiologists, and referring physicians regarding patient exposure to radiation at CT. RADIANCE also allows compliance with the ACR's dose reporting guidelines and greater awareness of patient radiation dose, ultimately resulting in improved patient care and treatment.

  18. The spectral amplification effect of clouds to the night sky radiance in Madrid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubé, M.; Kocifaj, M.; Zamorano, J.; Solano Lamphar, H. A.; Sanchez de Miguel, A.

    2016-09-01

    Artificial Light at Night (ALAN) may have various environmental impacts ranging from compromising the visibility of astronomical objects to the perturbation of circadian cycles in animals and humans. In the past much research has been carried out to study the impact of ALAN on the radiance of the night sky during clear sky conditions. This was mainly justified by the need for a better understanding of the behavior of ALAN propagation into the environment in order to protect world-class astronomical facilities. More recently, alongside to the threat to the natural starry sky, many issues have emerged from the biological science community. It has been shown that, nearby or inside cities, the presence of cloud cover generally acts as an amplifier for artificial sky radiance while clouds behave as attenuators for remote observers. In this paper we show the spectral behavior of the zenith sky radiance amplification factor exerted by clouds inside a city. We compare in-situ measurements made with the spectrometer SAND-4 with a numerical model applied to the specific geographical context of the Universidad Complutense de Madrid in Spain.

  19. High-radiance LDP source: clean, reliable, and stable EUV source for mask inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teramoto, Yusuke; Santos, Bárbara; Mertens, Guido; Kops, Ralf; Kops, Margarete; von Wezyk, Alexander; Bergmann, Klaus; Yabuta, Hironobu; Nagano, Akihisa; Ashizawa, Noritaka; Taniguchi, Yuta; Shirai, Takahiro; Nakamura, Kiyotada; Aoki, Kazuya; Kasama, Kunihiko

    2016-03-01

    High-throughput and -resolution actinic mask inspection tools are needed as EUVL begins to enter into volume production phase. To realize such inspection tools, a high-radiance EUV source is necessary. Ushio's laser-assisted discharge-produced plasma (LDP) source is able to meet industry's requirements in radiance, cleanliness, stability and reliability. Ushio's LDP source has shown the peak radiance at plasma of 180 W/mm2/sr and the area-averaged radiance in a 200-μm-diameter circle behind the debris mitigation system of 120 W/mm2/sr. A new version of the debris mitigation system is in testing phase. Its optical transmission was confirmed to be 73 %, which is 4 % lower than that of the previous version and therefore will be improved. Cleanliness of the system is evaluated by exposing Ru mirrors placed behind the debris mitigation system. Ru sputter rate was proven to be sufficiently low as 3~5 nm/Gpulse at 7 kHz, whereas frequency-dependent sputter rate was 1~3 nm/Gpulse at 5~9 kHz as previously reported. Sn deposition remained very low (< 0.05 nm) and did not grow over time. A new technique to suppress debris was tested and preliminary results were promising. Time-of-flight signal of fast ions was completely suppressed and Ru sputter rate of exposed mirrors at 3 kHz was approximately 1.3 nm/Gpulse, whereas the conventional mitigation system (new version) resulted in Ru sputter rate of 0.7 nm/Gpulse. This new technique also allows increasing the radiance efficiency by 30 %. Stability tests were done at several different discharge frequencies. Pulse energy stability was approximately 10 %. Dose energy stability dropped from approximately 2 % to 0.1 % when feedback control was activated. EUV emission position stability was studied at 3 kHz. Deviation of the plasma center of gravity was 6 μm, which is 3 % of plasma diameter and therefore considered to be negligible. Reliability tests were performed on both R and D and prototype machines and up to 200 hours of non

  20. Clinical effects of an oral supplement rich in antioxidants on skin radiance in women

    PubMed Central

    Dumoulin, Marion; Gaudout, David; Lemaire, Benoit

    2016-01-01

    Background Environmental factors impact the skin aging resulting in decrease of skin radiance. Nutrition and particularly antioxidants could help to fight against skin degradation. Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of an oral supplement rich in specific antioxidants, SkinAx2TM, on the improvement of the skin radiance in women. Methods The open-label clinical study enrolled 35 women, aged 40–70, with facial dull complexion. Subjects were supplemented orally with a daily dosage of 150 mg of an antioxidant-rich formulation containing superoxide dismutase-rich melon concentrate, grape seed extract rich in monomers of flavanols, vitamin C, and zinc for 8 weeks. Each subject served as her own control. The C.L.B.T.™ test has been used to evaluate facial skin coloring (C), luminosity (L), brightness (B), and transparency (T) involved in skin radiance. Facial skin imperfections have been assessed by clinical assessment. Firmness has been evaluated by clinical assessment and cutometer measurement. Finally, an auto-questionnaire has been carried out in order to evaluate the satisfaction of the subjects concerning different parameters involved in skin radiance and the global efficacy of the supplement. Results Skin “red pink” and “olive” colors were significantly improved after supplementation (P<0.0001). Luminosity was increased by 25.9% (P<0.0001) whereas brightness and transparency were not affected by the supplementation. Facial skin imperfections were significantly reduced after the antioxidant-rich formulation intake (global reduction: −18.0%; P<0.0001). Indeed, dark circles, redness, and spots significantly diminished after oral treatment. Firmness and elasticity have been shown to be improved. Subjects were globally satisfied by the product (82.4%) and have found improvements on their facial skin. Furthermore, 64.7% reported to look better at the end of the supplementation. Conclusion The oral supplement containing the

  1. Jasminum flexile flower absolute from India--a detailed comparison with three other jasmine absolutes.

    PubMed

    Braun, Norbert A; Kohlenberg, Birgit; Sim, Sherina; Meier, Manfred; Hammerschmidt, Franz-Josef

    2009-09-01

    Jasminum flexile flower absolute from the south of India and the corresponding vacuum headspace (VHS) sample of the absolute were analyzed using GC and GC-MS. Three other commercially available Indian jasmine absolutes from the species: J. sambac, J. officinale subsp. grandiflorum, and J. auriculatum and the respective VHS samples were used for comparison purposes. One hundred and twenty-one compounds were characterized in J. flexile flower absolute, with methyl linolate, benzyl salicylate, benzyl benzoate, (2E,6E)-farnesol, and benzyl acetate as the main constituents. A detailed olfactory evaluation was also performed.

  2. On measuring the absolute scale of baryon acoustic oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutherland, Will

    2012-10-01

    The baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) feature in the distribution of galaxies provides a fundamental standard ruler which is widely used to constrain cosmological parameters. In most analyses, the comoving length of the ruler is inferred from a combination of cosmic microwave background (CMB) observations and theory. However, this inferred length may be biased by various non-standard effects in early universe physics; this can lead to biased inferences of cosmological parameters such as H0, Ωm and w, so it would be valuable to measure the absolute BAO length by combining a galaxy redshift survey and a suitable direct low-z distance measurement. One obstacle is that low-redshift BAO surveys mainly constrain the ratio rS/DV(z), where DV is a dilation scale which is not directly observable by standard candles. Here, we find a new approximation DV(z)≃34DL(43z)(1+43z)-1(1-0.02455 z3+0.0105 z4) which connects DV to the standard luminosity distance DL at a somewhat higher redshift; this is shown to be very accurate (relative error <0.2 per cent) for all Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe compatible Friedmann models at z < 0.4, with very weak dependence on cosmological parameters H0, Ωm, Ωk, w. This provides a route to measure the absolute BAO length using only observations at z ≲ 0.3, including Type Ia supernovae, and potentially future H0-free physical distance indicators such as gravitational lenses or gravitational wave standard sirens. This would provide a zero-parameter check of the standard cosmology at 103 ≲ z ≲ 105, and can constrain the number of relativistic species Neff with fewer degeneracies than the CMB.

  3. Universal Cosmic Absolute and Modern Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostro, Ludwik

    The official Sciences, especially all natural sciences, respect in their researches the principle of methodic naturalism i.e. they consider all phenomena as entirely natural and therefore in their scientific explanations they do never adduce or cite supernatural entities and forces. The purpose of this paper is to show that Modern Science has its own self-existent, self-acting, and self-sufficient Natural All-in Being or Omni-Being i.e. the entire Nature as a Whole that justifies the scientific methodic naturalism. Since this Natural All-in Being is one and only It should be considered as the own scientifically justified Natural Absolute of Science and should be called, in my opinion, the Universal Cosmic Absolute of Modern Science. It will be also shown that the Universal Cosmic Absolute is ontologically enormously stratified and is in its ultimate i.e. in its most fundamental stratum trans-reistic and trans-personal. It means that in its basic stratum. It is neither a Thing or a Person although It contains in Itself all things and persons with all other sentient and conscious individuals as well, On the turn of the 20th century the Science has begun to look for a theory of everything, for a final theory, for a master theory. In my opinion the natural Universal Cosmic Absolute will constitute in such a theory the radical all penetrating Ultimate Basic Reality and will substitute step by step the traditional supernatural personal Absolute.

  4. Absolutely relative or relatively absolute: violations of value invariance in human decision making.

    PubMed

    Teodorescu, Andrei R; Moran, Rani; Usher, Marius

    2016-02-01

    Making decisions based on relative rather than absolute information processing is tied to choice optimality via the accumulation of evidence differences and to canonical neural processing via accumulation of evidence ratios. These theoretical frameworks predict invariance of decision latencies to absolute intensities that maintain differences and ratios, respectively. While information about the absolute values of the choice alternatives is not necessary for choosing the best alternative, it may nevertheless hold valuable information about the context of the decision. To test the sensitivity of human decision making to absolute values, we manipulated the intensities of brightness stimuli pairs while preserving either their differences or their ratios. Although asked to choose the brighter alternative relative to the other, participants responded faster to higher absolute values. Thus, our results provide empirical evidence for human sensitivity to task irrelevant absolute values indicating a hard-wired mechanism that precedes executive control. Computational investigations of several modelling architectures reveal two alternative accounts for this phenomenon, which combine absolute and relative processing. One account involves accumulation of differences with activation dependent processing noise and the other emerges from accumulation of absolute values subject to the temporal dynamics of lateral inhibition. The potential adaptive role of such choice mechanisms is discussed.

  5. Observations of Tropospheric Ozone Profiles Using Simultaneously Measured UV and IR Radiances from OMI and TES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, D.; Worden, J.; Kulawik, S.; Bowman, K. W.; Sander, S. P.; Liu, X.

    2011-12-01

    Ozone is a radiativelly and chemically important trace gas in the atmosphere. Accurate monitoring of ozone vertical distributions is crucial for a better understanding of air quality and climate change. The Geostationary Coastal and Air Pollution Events (GEO-CAPE) mission, an Earth Science Decadal Survey mission that has been recommended for launch in the 2013-2016 time frame by National Research Council, will measure tropospheric ozone and its precursors relating to air quality over the Americas. To improve current capability of tropospheric ozone sounding in terms of spatial and temporal resolution, GEO-CAPE mission calls for an instrument(s) that is sensitive over multiple spectral regions. Prior to the launch of GEO-CAPE satellite, using simultaneous measurements of multiple sensors of an ongoing satellite mission provide an alternative way to improve tropospheric ozone sounding and help in the evaluations of suitable spectral regions for the GEO-CAPE mission. The Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) and the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) are both on the Earth Observing System Aura satellite in orbit. They are providing ozone concentration profiles measurements respectively. OMI is a nadir-viewing pushbroom ultraviolet-visible (UV-VIS) imaging spectrograph that measures backscattered radiances covering the 270-500 nm wavelength range. TES is a Fourier transform spectrometer that measures the thermal infrared (TIR) light radiances emitted by Earth's surface and by gases and particles in spectral range 650 - 3050 cm-1. We present an approach to combine simultaneously measured OMI UV and TES TIR radiances to improve the tropospheric ozone sounding. The results from combination of these measurements are presented and discussed. The improvements on tropospheric ozone profiles from the UV+TIR joint retrievals, as compared with either spectral region alone, are charterized using the ozonesonde measurements.

  6. Self-Shading Correction for Upwelling Sea-Surface Radiance Measurements Made With Buoyed Instruments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-05-01

    cobop/cobop.html. (C) 2001 OSA 7 May 2001 / Vol. 8, No. 10 / OPTICS EXPRESS 561 # 32933 - $15.00 US Received April 17, 2001; Revised May 01, 2001...C) 2001 OSA 7 May 2001 / Vol. 8, No. 10 / OPTICS EXPRESS 562 # 32933 - $15.00 US Received April 17, 2001; Revised May 01, 2001 where a is the...OPTICS EXPRESS 563 # 32933 - $15.00 US Received April 17, 2001; Revised May 01, 2001 this to be insignificant for upwelling radiance measurements. The

  7. Preliminary Results from an Assimilation of Saharan Dust Using TOMS Radiances and the GOCART Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weaver, C. J.; daSilva, Arlindo; Ginoux, Paul; Torres, Omar; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    At NASA Goddard we are developing a global aerosol data assimilation system that combines advances in remote sensing and modeling of atmospheric aerosols. The goal is to provide high resolution, 3-D aerosol distributions to the research community. Our first step is to develop a simple assimilation system for Saharan mineral aerosol. The Goddard Chemistry and Aerosol Radiation model (GOCART) provides accurate 3-D mineral aerosol size distributions. Surface mobilization, wet and dry deposition, convective and long-range transport are all driven by assimilated fields from the Goddard Earth Observing System Data Assimilation System, GEOS-DAS. Our version of GOCART transports sizes from .08-10 microns and only simulates Saharan dust. We draw the assimilation to two observables in this study: the TOMS aerosol index (Al) which is directly related to the ratio of the 340 and 380 radiances and the 380 radiance alone. The forward model that simulates the observables requires the aerosol optical thickness, the single scattering albedo and the height of the aerosol layer from the GOCART fields. The forward model also requires a refractive index for the dust. We test three index values to see which best fits the TOMS observables. These are 1) for Saharan dust reported by Patterson, 2) for a mixture of Saharan dust and a highly reflective material (sea salt or sulfate) and 3) for pure illite. The assimilation works best assuming either pure illite or the dust mixture. Our assimilation cycle first determines values of the aerosol index (Al) and the radiance at 380 nm based on the GOCART aerosol fields. Differences between the observed and GOCART model calculated Al and 380 nm radiance are first analyzed horizontally using the Physical-space Statistical Analysis System (PSAS). A quasi-Newton iteration is then performed to produce analyzed 3D aerosol fields according to parameterized background and observation error covariances. We only assimilate observations into the the GOCART

  8. SU-E-T-470: Beam Performance of the Radiance 330 Proton Therapy System

    SciTech Connect

    Nazaryan, H; Nazaryan, V; Wang, F; Flanz, J; Alexandrov, V

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The ProTom Radiance 330 proton radiotherapy system is a fully functional, compact proton radiotherapy system that provides advanced proton delivery capabilities. It supports three-dimensional beam scanning with energy and intensity modulation. A series of measurements have been conducted to characterize the beam performance of the first installation of the system at the McLaren Proton Therapy Center in Flint, Michigan. These measurements were part of the technical commissioning of the system. Select measurements and results are presented. Methods: The Radiance 330 proton beam energy range is 70–250 MeV for treatment, and up to 330 MeV for proton tomography and radiography. Its 3-D scanning capability, together with a small beam emittance and momentum spread, provides a highly efficient beam delivery. During the technical commissioning, treatment plans were created to deliver uniform maps at various energies to perform Gamma Index analysis. EBT3 Gafchromic films were irradiated using the Planned irradiation maps. Bragg Peak chamber was used to test the dynamic range during a scan in one layer for high (250 MeV) and Low (70 MeV) energies. The maximum and minimum range, range adjustment and modulation, distal dose falloff (80%–20%), pencil beam spot size, spot placement accuracy were also measured. The accuracy testing included acquiring images, image registration, receiving correction vectors and applying the corrections to the robotic patient positioner. Results: Gamma Index analysis of the Treatment Planning System (TPS) data vs. Measured data showed more than 90% of points within (3%, 3mm) for the maps created by the TPS. At Isocenter Beam Size (One sigma) < 3mm at highest energy (250 MeV) in air. Beam delivery was within 0.6 mm of the intended target at the entrance and the exit of the beam, through the phantom. Conclusion: The Radiance 330 Beam Performance Measurements have confirmed that the system operates as designed with excellent clinical

  9. Simulating the Daylight Performance of Complex Fenestration Systems Using Bidirectional Scattering Distribution Functions within Radiance

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, Gregory; Mistrick, Ph.D., Richard; Lee, Eleanor; McNeil, Andrew; Jonsson, Ph.D., Jacob

    2011-01-21

    We describe two methods which rely on bidirectional scattering distribution functions (BSDFs) to model the daylighting performance of complex fenestration systems (CFS), enabling greater flexibility and accuracy in evaluating arbitrary assemblies of glazing, shading, and other optically-complex coplanar window systems. Two tools within Radiance enable a) efficient annual performance evaluations of CFS, and b) accurate renderings of CFS despite the loss of spatial resolution associated with low-resolution BSDF datasets for inhomogeneous systems. Validation, accuracy, and limitations of the methods are discussed.

  10. A regression technique for determining temperature profiles in the upper stratosphere from satellite-measured radiances.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gelman, M. E.; Miller, A. J.; Woolf, H. M.

    1972-01-01

    A technique is described whose application makes it possible to almost double the altitude range over which useful temperature profiles may be obtained. For a wide range of atmospheric temperature profiles, the temperature structure between 30 and 55 km may be derived with an expected error of less than 3 C at 30 km to less than 10 C at 55 km, given the temperature structure in the lower 30 km of the profile, and given a consistent and accurate set of radiance observations. For strongly anomalous conditions in the stratosphere, the accuracy of retrievals at tropospheric levels may also be substantially improved.

  11. Acceleration of Radiance for Lighting Simulation by Using Parallel Computing with OpenCL

    SciTech Connect

    Zuo, Wangda; McNeil, Andrew; Wetter, Michael; Lee, Eleanor

    2011-09-06

    We report on the acceleration of annual daylighting simulations for fenestration systems in the Radiance ray-tracing program. The algorithm was optimized to reduce both the redundant data input/output operations and the floating-point operations. To further accelerate the simulation speed, the calculation for matrix multiplications was implemented using parallel computing on a graphics processing unit. We used OpenCL, which is a cross-platform parallel programming language. Numerical experiments show that the combination of the above measures can speed up the annual daylighting simulations 101.7 times or 28.6 times when the sky vector has 146 or 2306 elements, respectively.

  12. Global Distribution of Stratospheric NO2 Retrieved from UARS/CLAES Limb Radiance Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopalan, A.; Gopalan, A.; Gille, J. C.

    2001-12-01

    The Cryogenic Limb Array Etalon Spectrometer (CLAES) aboard the Upper Atmospheric Research Satellite (UARS) has made extensive measurements of thermal infrared emission from Earths Limb during the period of Sept. 1991 to May 1993. We describe the development and application of a maximum likelihood retrieval algorithm to the UARS/CLAES Blocker-3 6.23 micron radiance measurements.These data provide the first near-global diurnal view of stratospheric NO2 since the 1979 LIMS instrument. We also discuss data quality through an analysis of estimated uncertainties,and biases resulting from our retrieval algorithm, comparison with correlative NO2 measurements and an examination of known limitations.

  13. Model calculations for the retrieval of aerosols from satellite and aircraft radiances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hickman, George D.; Souders, C.; Shettle, Eric P.; Duggin, Michael J.; Sweet, J. A.

    1993-09-01

    Model calculations of upwelling spectral radiances at aircraft and satellite altitudes have been made to assess the capability of different current and planned sensors to extract information on the atmospheric aerosols. The visible and near infrared channels on the AVHRR, CZCS, and SeaWiFS satellite sensors were used, as well as hypothetical multichannel instruments covering 400 - 1000 nm with bandwidths of 100, 20, or 10 nm. The sensitivity to the aerosol and environmental properties increased as the bandwidth of the channel decreased.

  14. Comparative vs. Absolute Judgments of Trait Desirability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hofstee, Willem K. B.

    1970-01-01

    Reversals of trait desirability are studied. Terms indicating conservativw behavior appeared to be judged relatively desirable in comparative judgement, while traits indicating dynamic and expansive behavior benefited from absolute judgement. The reversal effect was shown to be a general one, i.e. reversals were not dependent upon the specific…

  15. New Techniques for Absolute Gravity Measurements.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-01-07

    Hammond, J.A. (1978) Bollettino Di Geofisica Teorica ed Applicata Vol. XX. 8. Hammond, J. A., and Iliff, R. L. (1979) The AFGL absolute gravity system...International Gravimetric Bureau, No. L:I-43. 7. Hammond. J.A. (1978) Bollettino Di Geofisica Teorica ed Applicata Vol. XX. 8. Hammond, J.A., and

  16. An Absolute Electrometer for the Physics Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Straulino, S.; Cartacci, A.

    2009-01-01

    A low-cost, easy-to-use absolute electrometer is presented: two thin metallic plates and an electronic balance, usually available in a laboratory, are used. We report on the very good performance of the device that allows precise measurements of the force acting between two charged plates. (Contains 5 footnotes, 2 tables, and 6 figures.)

  17. Stimulus Probability Effects in Absolute Identification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kent, Christopher; Lamberts, Koen

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of stimulus presentation probability on accuracy and response times in an absolute identification task. Three schedules of presentation were used to investigate the interaction between presentation probability and stimulus position within the set. Data from individual participants indicated strong effects of…

  18. Absolute Positioning Using the Global Positioning System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-04-01

    Global Positioning System ( GPS ) has becom a useful tool In providing relativ survey...Includes the development of a low cost navigator for wheeled vehicles. ABSTRACT The Global Positioning System ( GPS ) has become a useful tool In providing...technique of absolute or point positioning involves the use of a single Global Positioning System ( GPS ) receiver to determine the three-dimenslonal

  19. Selected Reaction Monitoring Mass Spectrometry for Absolute Protein Quantification.

    PubMed

    Manes, Nathan P; Mann, Jessica M; Nita-Lazar, Aleksandra

    2015-08-17

    Absolute quantification of target proteins within complex biological samples is critical to a wide range of research and clinical applications. This protocol provides step-by-step instructions for the development and application of quantitative assays using selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mass spectrometry (MS). First, likely quantotypic target peptides are identified based on numerous criteria. This includes identifying proteotypic peptides, avoiding sites of posttranslational modification, and analyzing the uniqueness of the target peptide to the target protein. Next, crude external peptide standards are synthesized and used to develop SRM assays, and the resulting assays are used to perform qualitative analyses of the biological samples. Finally, purified, quantified, heavy isotope labeled internal peptide standards are prepared and used to perform isotope dilution series SRM assays. Analysis of all of the resulting MS data is presented. This protocol was used to accurately assay the absolute abundance of proteins of the chemotaxis signaling pathway within RAW 264.7 cells (a mouse monocyte/macrophage cell line). The quantification of Gi2 (a heterotrimeric G-protein α-subunit) is described in detail.

  20. Determination of the responsivity non-uniformity of an infrared camera with regard to the measurement of radiance temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutschwager, Berndt; Cárdenas-García, Daniel; Hollandt, Jörg

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents a method to accurately determine the responsivity non-uniformity of the pixels of an infrared camera. Mandatory for the use of infrared cameras for measurements of radiance temperatures with small uncertainties is the knowledge of this responsivity non-uniformity and the resulting ability to correct the responsivity non-uniformity of the measured image. Infrared cameras are optically and electronically more complex than radiation thermometers. For the calibration of infrared cameras a large-area source with a known radiance distribution is required. Practical implementations of such large-area sources are plate radiators, which generally have a non-homogeneous distribution of the radiance and of the radiance temperature over their surface. The determination of the non-uniformity of the radiance temperature of a plate radiator is mandatory for the accurate calibration of infrared cameras, i.e. for the determination and adequate consideration of the responsivity non-uniformity of all pixels of an infrared camera.

  1. Evaluation of the Impact of Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) Radiance and Profile Data Assimilation in Partly Cloudy Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zavodsky, Bradley; Srikishen, Jayanthi; Jedlovec, Gary

    2013-01-01

    Improvements to global and regional numerical weather prediction have been demonstrated through assimilation of data from NASA s Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS). Current operational data assimilation systems use AIRS radiances, but impact on regional forecasts has been much smaller than for global forecasts. Retrieved profiles from AIRS contain much of the information that is contained in the radiances and may be able to reveal reasons for this reduced impact. Assimilating AIRS retrieved profiles in an identical analysis configuration to the radiances, tracking the quantity and quality of the assimilated data in each technique, and examining analysis increments and forecast impact from each data type can yield clues as to the reasons for the reduced impact. By doing this with regional scale models individual synoptic features (and the impact of AIRS on these features) can be more easily tracked. This project examines the assimilation of hyperspectral sounder data used in operational numerical weather prediction by comparing operational techniques used for AIRS radiances and research techniques used for AIRS retrieved profiles. Parallel versions of a configuration of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model with Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation (GSI) are run to examine the impact AIRS radiances and retrieved profiles. Statistical evaluation of 6 weeks of forecast runs will be compared along with preliminary results of in-depth investigations for select case comparing the analysis increments in partly cloudy regions and short-term forecast impacts.

  2. Lunar eclipse photometry: absolute luminance measurements and modeling.

    PubMed

    Hernitschek, Nina; Schmidt, Elmar; Vollmer, Michael

    2008-12-01

    The Moon's time-dependent luminance was determined during the 9 February 1990 and 3 March 2007 total lunar eclipses by using calibrated, industry standard photometers. After the results were corrected to unit air mass and to standard distances for both Moon and Sun, an absolute calibration was accomplished by using the Sun's known luminance and a pre-eclipse lunar albedo of approximately 13.5%. The measured minimum level of brightness in the total phase of both eclipses was relatively high, namely -3.32 m(vis) and -1.7 m(vis), which hints at the absence of pronounced stratospheric aerosol. The light curves were modeled in such a way as to let the Moon move through an artificial Earth shadow composed of a multitude of disk and ring zones, containing a relative luminance data set from an atmospheric radiative transfer calculation.

  3. The new Absolute Quantum Gravimeter (AQG): first results and perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonvalot, Sylvain; Le Moigne, Nicolas; Merlet, Sebastien; Desruelle, Bruno; Lautier-Gaud, Jean; Menoret, Vincent; Vermeulen, Pierre

    2016-04-01

    the AQG01. This paper summarizes the latest results obtained from these experiments. The evaluation of the AQG01 is still in progress but this study confirmed that the AQG01 enables absolute gravity measurements with a sensitivity of 2 μGal standard deviation after 1000 s of data integration. Perspectives of expected instrumental developments for monitoring both spatial and temporal gravity variations at the microGal level in both laboratory and field conditions will be also discussed.

  4. A method for retrieving clouds with satellite infrared radiances using the particle filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Dongmei; Auligné, Thomas; Descombes, Gaël; Snyder, Chris

    2016-11-01

    Ensemble-based techniques have been widely utilized in estimating uncertainties in various problems of interest in geophysical applications. A new cloud retrieval method is proposed based on the particle filter (PF) by using ensembles of cloud information in the framework of Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation (GSI) system. The PF cloud retrieval method is compared with the Multivariate Minimum Residual (MMR) method that was previously established and verified. Cloud retrieval experiments involving a variety of cloudy types are conducted with the PF and MMR methods with measurements of infrared radiances on multi-sensors onboard both geostationary and polar satellites, respectively. It is found that the retrieved cloud masks with both methods are consistent with other independent cloud products. MMR is prone to producing ambiguous small-fraction clouds, while PF detects clearer cloud signals, yielding closer heights of cloud top and cloud base to other references. More collections of small-fraction particles are able to effectively estimate the semi-transparent high clouds. It is found that radiances with high spectral resolutions contribute to quantitative cloud top and cloud base retrievals. In addition, a different way of resolving the filtering problem over each model grid is tested to better aggregate the weights with all available sensors considered, which is proven to be less constrained by the ordering of sensors. Compared to the MMR method, the PF method is overall more computationally efficient, and the cost of the model grid-based PF method scales more directly with the number of computing nodes.

  5. Thermal radiance observations of an active lava flow during the June 1984 eruption of Mount Etna

    SciTech Connect

    Pieri, D.C.; Glaze, L.S.; Abrams, M.J. )

    1990-10-01

    The thermal budget of an active lava flow observed on 20 June 1984 from the Southeast crater of Mount Etna, Sicily, Italy, was analyzed from data taken by the Landsat Thematic Mapper. The Thematic Mapper images constitute one of the few satellite data sets of sufficient spatial and spectral resolution to allow calibrated measurements on the distribution and intensity of thermal radiation from active lava flows. Using radiance data from two reflective infrared channels, we can estimate the temperature and areas of the hottest parts of the active flow, which correspond to hot (>500{degree}C) fractures or zones at the flow surface. Using this techniques, we estimate that only 10%-20% of the total radiated thermal power output is emitted by hot zones or fractures, which constitute less than 1% of the observed surface area. Generally, it seems that only where hot fractures or zones constitute greater than about 1% of the surface area of the flow will losses from such features significantly reduce internal flow temperatures. Using our radiance observations as boundary conditions for a multicomponent thermal model of flow interior temperature, we infer that, for the parts of this flow subject to analysis, the boundary layer and flow thickness effects dominate over radiant zones in controlling the depression of core temperature.

  6. Modeling forest defoliation using simulated BRDF and assessing its effect on reflectance and sensor reaching radiance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rengarajan, Rajagopalan; Schott, John R.

    2016-09-01

    Remote sensing techniques such as change detection are widely used for mapping and monitoring forest cover to detect the declining health and vigor of forests. These techniques rely on the assumption that the biophysical variation in the forest introduces a corresponding variation in its reflectance. The biophysical variations are assessed by foresters, but these assessment techniques are expensive and cannot be performed frequently to identify a specific level of change in the forest, for example, infection due to gypsy moths that results in forest defoliation. Further, the interaction of atmosphere, sensor characteristics, and phenology that are inherent in the remotely sensed images makes it difficult to separate biophysical changes from observational effects. We have addressed these limitations by developing a method to model the spectral reflectance properties of forests with varying degrees of defoliation using the Digital Image and Remote Sensing Image Generation (DIRSIG) tool. This paper discusses the in-canopy radiative approach and the impact of defoliation on the reflectance and radiance observed by sensors such as Landsat. The results indicate that the relative variation in forest reflectance between a non-defoliated and a 30% defoliated deciduous forest can be as high as 10% in the NIR spectral band. A function can be fit to predict the level of defoliation from the relative variation in radiance. The modeling and analysis techniques can be extended to assess the impact of atmospheric factors and sensor characteristics relative to the biophysical changes as well as for assessing other biophysical variables in forests.

  7. A comparison of measured and calculated upwelling radiance over water as a function of sensor altitude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coney, T. A.; Salzman, J. A.

    1979-01-01

    A comparison is made between remote sensing data measured over water at altitudes ranging from 30 m to 15.2 km and data calculated for corresponding altitudes using surface measurements and an atmospheric radiative transfer model. Data were acquired on June 22, 1978 in Lake Erie, a cloudless, calm, near haze free day. Suspended solids and chlorophyll concentrations were 0.59 + or - 0.02 mg/1 and 2.42 + or - 0.03 micrograms/1 respectively throughout the duration of the experiment. Remote sensor data were acquired by two multispectral scanners each having 10 bands between 410 nm and 1040 nm. Calculated and measured nadir radiances for altitudes of 152 m and 12.5 km agree to within 16% and 14% respectively. The variation in measured radiance with look angle was poorly simulated by the model. It was concluded that an accurate assessment of the source of error will require the inclusion in the analysis of the contributions made by the sea state and specular sky reflectance.

  8. Determination of Cloud Phase From Multi-Angular Radiance Measurements Over the Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Um, J.; McFarquhar, G. M.

    2006-12-01

    The cloud thermodynamic phase and ice crystal habit have substantial impacts on vertical profiles of radiative heating. However, reliable retrievals of these quantities from remote sensing measurements are still difficult. During the 2004 Mixed-Phase Arctic Clouds Experiment (M-PACE) at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program's North Slope of Alaska (NSA) site, the Diffuse Field Camera (DFC), consisting of a pair of nadir-mounted digital cameras with hemispheric field-of-view lenses with 620-670 nm and 1580-1640 nm pass filters, was mounted on the Proteus aircraft and measured multi-angular cloud radiance fields. Based on the observed cloud radiance, cloud reflectance fields are calculated using the solar zenith angle and relative azimuth angle from the sun to the Proteus. The cloud thermodynamic phase (i.e., water, ice or mixed) is identified by comparing the directional dependence of observed reflectance against theoretical reflectance fields of water and ice clouds computed using a 2D radiative transfer model. The impacts of ice crystal habit and of cloud inhomogeneity on the cloud reflectance field are also investigated using a 3D radiative transfer model.

  9. Improving Forecast Skill by Assimilation of AIRS Cloud Cleared Radiances RiCC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Susskind, Joel; Rosenberg, Robert I.; Iredell, Lena

    2015-01-01

    ECMWF, NCEP, and GMAO routinely assimilate radiosonde and other in-situ observations along with satellite IR and MW Sounder radiance observations. NCEP and GMAO use the NCEP GSI Data Assimilation System (DAS).GSI DAS assimilates AIRS, CrIS, IASI channel radiances Ri on a channel-by-channel, case-by-case basis, only for those channels i thought to be unaffected by cloud cover. This test excludes Ri for most tropospheric sounding channels under partial cloud cover conditions. AIRS Version-6 RiCC is a derived quantity representative of what AIRS channel i would have seen if the AIRS FOR were cloud free. All values of RiCC have case-by-case error estimates RiCC associated with them. Our experiments present to the GSI QCd values of AIRS RiCC in place of AIRS Ri observations. GSI DAS assimilates only those values of RiCC it thinks are cloud free. This potentially allows for better coverage of assimilated QCd values of RiCC as compared to Ri.

  10. EPIC Radiance Simulator for Deep Space Climate ObserVatoRy (DSCOVR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyapustin, Alexei; Marshak, Alexander; Wang, Yujie; Korkin, Sergey; Herman, Jay

    2011-01-01

    The Deep Space Climate ObserVatoRy (DSCOVR) is a planned space weather mission for the Sun and Earth observations from the Lagrangian L1 point. Onboard of DSCOVR is a multispectral imager EPIC designed for unique observations of the full illuminated disk of the Earth with high temporal and 10 km spatial resolution. Depending on latitude, EPIC will observe the same Earth surface area during the course of the day in a wide range of solar and view zenith angles in the backscattering view geometry with the scattering angle of 164-172 . To understand the information content of EPIC data for analysis of the Earth clouds, aerosols and surface properties, an EPIC radiance Simulator was developed covering the UV -VIS-NIR range including the oxygen A and B-bands (A=340, 388, 443, 555, 680, 779.5, 687.7, 763.3 nm). The Simulator uses ancillary data (surface pressure/height, NCEP wind speed) as well as MODIS-based geophysical fields such as spectral surface bidirectional reflectance, column water vapor, and properties of aerosols and clouds including optical depth, effective radius, phase and cloud top height. The original simulations are conducted at 1 km resolution using the look-up table approach and then are averaged to 10 km EPIC radiances. This talk will give an overview of the EPIC Simulator with analysis of results over the continental USA and northern Atlantic.

  11. Determination of Saharan dust radiance and chlorophyll from CZCS imagery. [Coastal Zone Color Scanner

    SciTech Connect

    Carder, K.L.; Gregg, W.W.; Costello, D.K. ); Haddad, K. ); Prospero, J.M. )

    1991-03-20

    An atmospheric correction algorithm is derived for oceanic areas of low chlorophyll a plus phaeophytin a concentrations ({l angle}C{r angle} {le} 0.25 mg/m{sup 3}). The algorithm simultaneously corrects for the radiance effects of two different aerosol types observed in coastal zone color scanner (CZCS) imagery. The algorithm, called the two-component method, is applied to data from a time series of CZCS orbits during which both Saharan dust and a bluish haze were present. The method is evaluated by comparing the ocean chlorophyll concentrations after atmospheric correction to those measured in situ and to those determined by single-component methods from CZCS imagery. Reasonable agreement is found between the chlorophyll values estimated by the two-component method and in situ values, and the derived chlorophyll values for a Sargasso Sea region varied by less than 6% during a major influx of Saharan dust to the region. Aerosol and chloropyll fields appeared confounded in imagery derived using single-component methods when multiple aerosol types were present, but no confounding was observed for imagery generated by the two-component method. The time series of aerosol radiance values due to Saharan dust was consistent with the changes in dust concentration and particle size measurements from an adjacent aerosol collection site on the Florida coast.

  12. HYDROGEN Lyalpha AND Lybeta RADIANCES AND PROFILES IN POLAR CORONAL HOLES

    SciTech Connect

    Tian Hui; Teriaca, Luca; Curdt, Werner; Vial, Jean-Claude

    2009-10-01

    The hydrogen Lyalpha plays a dominant role in the radiative energy transport in the lower transition region, and is important for the studies of transition-region structure as well as solar wind origin. We investigate the Lyalpha profiles obtained by the Solar Ultraviolet Measurement of Emitted Radiation spectrograph on the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory spacecraft in coronal holes and the quiet Sun. In a subset of these observations, the H I Lybeta, Si III, and O VI lines were also (quasi-)simultaneously recorded. We find that the distances between the two peaks of Lyalpha profiles are larger in coronal holes than in the quiet Sun, indicating a larger opacity in coronal holes. This difference might result from the different magnetic structures or the different radiation fields in the two regions. Most of the Lybeta profiles in the coronal hole have a stronger blue peak, in contrast to those in quiet-Sun regions while in both regions the Lyalpha profiles are stronger in the blue peak. Although the asymmetries are likely to be produced by differential flows in the solar atmosphere, their detailed formation processes are still unclear. The radiance ratio between Lyalpha and Lybeta decreases toward the limb in the coronal hole, which might be due to the different opacity of the two lines. We also find that the radiance distributions of the four lines are set by a combined effect of limb brightening and the different emission level between coronal holes and the quiet Sun.

  13. A model for the directional distribution of the diffuse sky radiance with an application to a CPC collector

    SciTech Connect

    Siala, F.M.F. ); Hooper, F.C. )

    1990-01-01

    The development of a new, semi-empirical model for the directional distribution of the diffuse radiance is reported. The proposed regression-type model, with the form of its base functions obtained from physical principles, is based on a combination of the purely physical reasoning approach and the purely empirical approach. Direct multiple-scattering calculations are circumvented through the use of the method of successive orders of scattering. The model is calibrated for the mean diffuse radiance estimated under all sky conditions reported in a large and comprehensive diffuse radiance data set. It is found that only a small increase in accuracy is gained by including higher orders of scattering, and this increase does not justify the complexity of the resulting model. Therefore, the single scattering approximation is recommended. The use of the model is illustrated in a typical application, in which the fraction of diffuse radiation intercepted by the receive of a compound parabolic concentrator is computed.

  14. Acceleration of the matrix multiplication of Radiance three phase daylighting simulations with parallel computing on heterogeneous hardware of personal computer

    SciTech Connect

    Zuo, Wangda; McNeil, Andrew; Wetter, Michael; Lee, Eleanor S.

    2013-05-23

    Building designers are increasingly relying on complex fenestration systems to reduce energy consumed for lighting and HVAC in low energy buildings. Radiance, a lighting simulation program, has been used to conduct daylighting simulations for complex fenestration systems. Depending on the configurations, the simulation can take hours or even days using a personal computer. This paper describes how to accelerate the matrix multiplication portion of a Radiance three-phase daylight simulation by conducting parallel computing on heterogeneous hardware of a personal computer. The algorithm was optimized and the computational part was implemented in parallel using OpenCL. The speed of new approach was evaluated using various daylighting simulation cases on a multicore central processing unit and a graphics processing unit. Based on the measurements and analysis of the time usage for the Radiance daylighting simulation, further speedups can be achieved by using fast I/O devices and storing the data in a binary format.

  15. High Altitude Measurements of Radiance at High Spectral and Spatial Resolution for SIMBIOS Sensor Calibration, Validation, and Intercomparisons. Chapter 11

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Robert O.; Pavri, Betina; Chrien, Thomas G.

    2001-01-01

    The successful combination of data from different ocean color sensors depends on the correct interpretation of signal from each of these sensors. Ideally, the sensor measured signals are calibrated to geophysical units of spectral radiance, and sensor artifacts are removed and corrected. The calibration process resamples the signal into a common radiometric data space so that subsequent ocean color algorithms that are applied to the data are based on physical processes and are inherently sensor independent. The objective of this project is to calibrate and validate the on-orbit radiometric characteristics of Sea-Viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) with underflights of NASA's calibrated Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS). This objective is feasible because AVIRIS measures the same spectral range as SeaWIFS at higher spectral resolution. In addition to satellite sensor underflights, the AVIRIS project has supported comparison and analysis of the radiometric calibration standards used for AVIRIS and SeaWIFS. To date, both the OCTS and SeaWIFS satellite sensors have been underflown by AVIRIS with matching spectral, spatial, geometric, radiometric, and temporal domains. The calibration and validation objective of this project is pursued for the following reasons: (1) Calibration is essential for the quantitative use of SeaWIFS and other SIMBIOS (Sensor Intercomparison and Merger for Biological and Interdisciplinary Oceanic Studies) sensor data; (2) Calibration in the laboratory of spaceborne sensors is challenging; (3) Satellite sensors are subjected aging on the ground and to trauma during launch; (4) The Earth orbit environment is significantly different than the laboratory calibration environment; (5) Through years of effort AVIRIS has been demonstrated to be well calibrated; and (6) AVIRIS can match the spectral and spatial observation characteristics near the top of the atmosphere at the time of SeaWIFS measurements.

  16. Estimation of anisotropic radiance from a glacier surface by comparing zenith measurements to satellite-derived albedos - preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendriks, J.; Pellikka, P.; Peltoniemi, J.

    2003-04-01

    A glacier surface comprises mainly snow, firn and ice together with various transition features depending on the level of dirt content. Due to different physical characteristics of surface materials, neighbouring surface patches on a glacier show distinct reflection patterns. Furthermore, anisotropic reflection occurs and depends on the water content. This causes a serious problem when classifying glacier surfaces by means of remote sensing methods as the greater part of the sensors does not record multi angular data. Under ideal conditions, the albedo can be calculated when both all incoming and outgoing radiative fluxes from a surface have been measured. Thereafter a correction is applied for directional anisotropic reflection described by Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Functions (BRDFs). Here, simple ground-based zenith measurements of surface radiation were carried out on the Hintereisferner (Austria) using a portable spectrometer. In order to investigate anisotropic reflectance, a radiative transfer model was used to calculate the global irradiance at the surface and the effective transmissivity of the atmosphere. The ratios between the global irradiance at the surface and outgoing solar radiative fluxes in zenith direction were compared to satellite-derived albedos. This was done for the broadband and in two narrowbands, namely Thematic Mapper (TM) Bands 2 and 4. Parameterised equations were constructed to portion the albedo in zenith direction for bands TM2 and TM4. It is expected that the functions of the ratio between parametres, used to portion reflected vertical radiance, resemble the albedo functions for snow, firn and ice calculated from satellite images. In this case, labour-intensive and extensive albedo calculations could be avoided. Only standard multiplication factors would be needed to convert TM4/TM2 ratios into estimations of albedo on glacier surfaces.

  17. Data impact of pre-GPM constellation microwave radiances in the Goddard WRF ensemble data assimilation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, S. Q.; Chambon, P.; Lin, X.; Hou, A. Y.

    2012-12-01

    The forthcoming Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission will make precipitation observations available from a constellation of space-borne observing systems. Assimilation of precipitation-affected radiances into numerical forecast models has shown promising potential in improving atmospheric analyses and forecasts. In the meantime it also raises new challenges to data assimilation systems. In order to effectively use these observations, a data assimilation system needs to have a forecast error covariance capturing temporal and spatial variability of precipitation and clouds, and an observation operator adequately representing non-linear microphysics and radiative transfer in presence of clouds and precipitation. We present a data impact study of microwave radiance observations in precipitating areas using Goddard WRF ensemble data assimilation system (Goddard-EDAS). This regional data assimilation system is designed to assimilate precipitation information into WRF model at high resolution, with a flow-dependent forecast error covariance and a non-linear all-sky radiance observation operator. A series of experiments are carried out assimilating microwave radiances from a pre-GPM constellation (SSMIS/DMSP-F16, -F17, -F18; AMSR-E/AQUA; MHS/NOAA-18, -19, Metop-A and TMI). Sensitivities to observation error specifications, number of ensemble members and selected channel of observations are examined through "single observation" assimilation experiments. A bias correction scheme for precipitation-affected radiance is developed based on innovation statistics and scattering index over land. The data impact is assessed in case studies of storms occurred over Western Europe and a tropical storm after landfall in the US. Results show that the assimilation of multiple-instrument radiances in precipitating areas has a positive impact on the accumulated rain forecasts verified by ground-based radar rain estimates, and a profound influence to the distribution of

  18. Assimilation of precipitation-affected microwave radiances in a cloud-resolving WRF ensemble data assimilation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Sara; Zupanski, Dusanka; Zupanski, Milija; Hou, Arthur; Cheung, Samson

    2010-05-01

    In the last decade the progress in satellite precipitation estimation and the advance in precipitation assimilation techniques proved to have positive impact on the quality of atmospheric analyses and forecasts. Direct assimilation of rain-affected radiances presents new challenge to optimal utilization of satellite precipitation observations. Currently operational and research experiences in using precipitation observations have focused on a global model resolution with prescribed static forecast error statistics, while a high-resolution with cloud-resolving physics and flow-dependent forecast error information are needed for applications such as for downscaling precipitation information from rain-affected radiances and for improving hydrological forecasts. To address some of these challenges, a WRF ensemble data assimilation system (WRF-EDAS) at cloud-resolving scales has been developed jointly by NASA/GSFC and Colorado State University. The high-resolution WRF-EDAS is designed to assimilate precipitation-affected radiances in addition to the NOAA/NCEP operational data stream of in-situ data and clear-sky satellite observations. The ensemble data assimilation technique opens a new pathway to provide dynamically updated background error covariance, and to utilize full nonlinear microphysics and radiative transfer model in precipitation observation operators. The high resolution of nested domain WRF model first guess allows more realistic representation of precipitation distribution in the field of view (FOV) of microwave radiance observations in low and medium range of frequencies. We present experimental results of assimilating AMSR-E microwave radiances in case studies of summer storm events over land. The assimilation of precipitation-affected radiances from multiple channels of AMSR-E has shown positive impact on the downscaled precipitation analysis and short term forecast of microphysical variables. The sensitivity of precipitation analyses to the

  19. The Impact of Assimilating Precipitation-affected Radiance on Cloud and Precipitation in Goddard WRF-EDAS Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Xin; Zhang, Sara Q.; Zupanski, M.; Hou, Arthur Y.; Zhang, J.

    2015-01-01

    High-frequency TMI and AMSR-E radiances, which are sensitive to precipitation over land, are assimilated into the Goddard Weather Research and Forecasting Model- Ensemble Data Assimilation System (WRF-EDAS) for a few heavy rain events over the continental US. Independent observations from surface rainfall, satellite IR brightness temperatures, as well as ground-radar reflectivity profiles are used to evaluate the impact of assimilating rain-sensitive radiances on cloud and precipitation within WRF-EDAS. The evaluations go beyond comparisons of forecast skills and domain-mean statistics, and focus on studying the cloud and precipitation features in the jointed rainradiance and rain-cloud space, with particular attentions on vertical distributions of height-dependent cloud types and collective effect of cloud hydrometers. Such a methodology is very helpful to understand limitations and sources of errors in rainaffected radiance assimilations. It is found that the assimilation of rain-sensitive radiances can reduce the mismatch between model analyses and observations by reasonably enhancing/reducing convective intensity over areas where the observation indicates precipitation, and suppressing convection over areas where the model forecast indicates rain but the observation does not. It is also noted that instead of generating sufficient low-level warmrain clouds as in observations, the model analysis tends to produce many spurious upperlevel clouds containing small amount of ice water content. This discrepancy is associated with insufficient information in ice-water-sensitive radiances to address the vertical distribution of clouds with small amount of ice water content. Such a problem will likely be mitigated when multi-channel multi-frequency radiances/reflectivity are assimilated over land along with sufficiently accurate surface emissivity information to better constrain the vertical distribution of cloud hydrometers.

  20. Consistent thermostatistics forbids negative absolute temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunkel, Jörn; Hilbert, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Over the past 60 years, a considerable number of theories and experiments have claimed the existence of negative absolute temperature in spin systems and ultracold quantum gases. This has led to speculation that ultracold gases may be dark-energy analogues and also suggests the feasibility of heat engines with efficiencies larger than one. Here, we prove that all previous negative temperature claims and their implications are invalid as they arise from the use of an entropy definition that is inconsistent both mathematically and thermodynamically. We show that the underlying conceptual deficiencies can be overcome if one adopts a microcanonical entropy functional originally derived by Gibbs. The resulting thermodynamic framework is self-consistent and implies that absolute temperature remains positive even for systems with a bounded spectrum. In addition, we propose a minimal quantum thermometer that can be implemented with available experimental techniques.

  1. Absolute measurement of length with nanometric resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apostol, D.; Garoi, F.; Timcu, A.; Damian, V.; Logofatu, P. C.; Nascov, V.

    2005-08-01

    Laser interferometer displacement measuring transducers have a well-defined traceability route to the definition of the meter. The laser interferometer is de-facto length scale for applications in micro and nano technologies. However their physical unit -half lambda is too large for nanometric resolution. Fringe interpolation-usual technique to improve the resolution-lack of reproducibility could be avoided using the principles of absolute distance measurement. Absolute distance refers to the use of interferometric techniques for determining the position of an object without the necessity of measuring continuous displacements between points. The interference pattern as produced by the interference of two point-like coherent sources is fitted to a geometric model so as to determine the longitudinal location of the target by minimizing least square errors. The longitudinal coordinate of the target was measured with accuracy better than 1 nm, for a target position range of 0.4μm.

  2. Asteroid absolute magnitudes and slope parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tedesco, Edward F.

    1991-01-01

    A new listing of absolute magnitudes (H) and slope parameters (G) has been created and published in the Minor Planet Circulars; this same listing will appear in the 1992 Ephemerides of Minor Planets. Unlike previous listings, the values of the current list were derived from fits of data at the V band. All observations were reduced in the same fashion using, where appropriate, a single basis default value of 0.15 for the slope parameter. Distances and phase angles were computed for each observation. The data for 113 asteroids was of sufficiently high quality to permit derivation of their H and G. These improved absolute magnitudes and slope parameters will be used to deduce the most reliable bias-corrected asteroid size-frequency distribution yet made.

  3. Computer processing of spectrograms for absolute intensities.

    PubMed

    Guttman, A; Golden, J; Galbraith, H J

    1967-09-01

    A computer program was developed to process photographically recorded spectra for absolute intensity. Test and calibration films are subjected to densitometric scans that provide digitally recorded densities on magnetic tapes. The nonlinear calibration data are fitted by least-squares cubic polynomials to yield a good approximation to the monochromatic H&D curves for commonly used emulsions (2475 recording film, Royal-X, Tri-X, 4-X). Several test cases were made. Results of these cases show that the machine processed absolute intensities are accurate to within 15%o. Arbitrarily raising the sensitivity threshold by 0.1 density units above gross fog yields cubic polynomial fits to the H&D curves that are radiometrically accurate within 10%. In addition, curves of gamma vs wavelength for 2475, Tri-X, and 4-X emulsions were made. These data show slight evidence of the photographic Purkinje effect in the 2475 emulsion.

  4. An absolute measure for a key currency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oya, Shunsuke; Aihara, Kazuyuki; Hirata, Yoshito

    It is generally considered that the US dollar and the euro are the key currencies in the world and in Europe, respectively. However, there is no absolute general measure for a key currency. Here, we investigate the 24-hour periodicity of foreign exchange markets using a recurrence plot, and define an absolute measure for a key currency based on the strength of the periodicity. Moreover, we analyze the time evolution of this measure. The results show that the credibility of the US dollar has not decreased significantly since the Lehman shock, when the Lehman Brothers bankrupted and influenced the economic markets, and has increased even relatively better than that of the euro and that of the Japanese yen.

  5. Probing absolute spin polarization at the nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Eltschka, Matthias; Jäck, Berthold; Assig, Maximilian; Kondrashov, Oleg V; Skvortsov, Mikhail A; Etzkorn, Markus; Ast, Christian R; Kern, Klaus

    2014-12-10

    Probing absolute values of spin polarization at the nanoscale offers insight into the fundamental mechanisms of spin-dependent transport. Employing the Zeeman splitting in superconducting tips (Meservey-Tedrow-Fulde effect), we introduce a novel spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy that combines the probing capability of the absolute values of spin polarization with precise control at the atomic scale. We utilize our novel approach to measure the locally resolved spin polarization of magnetic Co nanoislands on Cu(111). We find that the spin polarization is enhanced by 65% when increasing the width of the tunnel barrier by only 2.3 Å due to the different decay of the electron orbitals into vacuum.

  6. Absolute and relative dosimetry for ELIMED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cirrone, G. A. P.; Cuttone, G.; Candiano, G.; Carpinelli, M.; Leonora, E.; Lo Presti, D.; Musumarra, A.; Pisciotta, P.; Raffaele, L.; Randazzo, N.; Romano, F.; Schillaci, F.; Scuderi, V.; Tramontana, A.; Cirio, R.; Marchetto, F.; Sacchi, R.; Giordanengo, S.; Monaco, V.

    2013-07-01

    The definition of detectors, methods and procedures for the absolute and relative dosimetry of laser-driven proton beams is a crucial step toward the clinical use of this new kind of beams. Hence, one of the ELIMED task, will be the definition of procedures aiming to obtain an absolute dose measure at the end of the transport beamline with an accuracy as close as possible to the one required for clinical applications (i.e. of the order of 5% or less). Relative dosimetry procedures must be established, as well: they are necessary in order to determine and verify the beam dose distributions and to monitor the beam fluence and the energetic spectra during irradiations. Radiochromic films, CR39, Faraday Cup, Secondary Emission Monitor (SEM) and transmission ionization chamber will be considered, designed and studied in order to perform a fully dosimetric characterization of the ELIMED proton beam.

  7. All-sky radiance simulation of Megha-Tropiques SAPHIR microwave sensor using multiple scattering radiative transfer model for data assimilation applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madhulatha, A.; George, John P.; Rajagopal, E. N.

    2017-03-01

    Incorporation of cloud- and precipitation-affected radiances from microwave satellite sensors in data assimilation system has a great potential in improving the accuracy of numerical model forecasts over the regions of high impact weather. By employing the multiple scattering radiative transfer model RTTOV-SCATT, all-sky radiance (clear sky and cloudy sky) simulation has been performed for six channel microwave SAPHIR (Sounder for Atmospheric Profiling of Humidity in the Inter-tropics by Radiometry) sensors of Megha-Tropiques (MT) satellite. To investigate the importance of cloud-affected radiance data in severe weather conditions, all-sky radiance simulation is carried out for the severe cyclonic storm `Hudhud' formed over Bay of Bengal. Hydrometeors from NCMRWF unified model (NCUM) forecasts are used as input to the RTTOV model to simulate cloud-affected SAPHIR radiances. Horizontal and vertical distribution of all-sky simulated radiances agrees reasonably well with the SAPHIR observed radiances over cloudy regions during different stages of cyclone development. Simulated brightness temperatures of six SAPHIR channels indicate that the three dimensional humidity structure of tropical cyclone is well represented in all-sky computations. Improved correlation and reduced bias and root mean square error against SAPHIR observations are apparent. Probability distribution functions reveal that all-sky simulations are able to produce the cloud-affected lower brightness temperatures associated with cloudy regions. The density scatter plots infer that all-sky radiances are more consistent with observed radiances. Correlation between different types of hydrometeors and simulated brightness temperatures at respective atmospheric levels highlights the significance of inclusion of scattering effects from different hydrometeors in simulating the cloud-affected radiances in all-sky simulations. The results are promising and suggest that the inclusion of multiple scattering

  8. Silicon Absolute X-Ray Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Seely, John F.; Korde, Raj; Sprunck, Jacob; Medjoubi, Kadda; Hustache, Stephanie

    2010-06-23

    The responsivity of silicon photodiodes having no loss in the entrance window, measured using synchrotron radiation in the 1.75 to 60 keV range, was compared to the responsivity calculated using the silicon thickness measured using near-infrared light. The measured and calculated responsivities agree with an average difference of 1.3%. This enables their use as absolute x-ray detectors.

  9. Negative absolute temperature for mobile particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, Simon; Ronzheimer, Philipp; Schreiber, Michael; Hodgman, Sean; Bloch, Immanuel; Schneider, Ulrich

    2013-05-01

    Absolute temperature is usually bound to be strictly positive. However, negative absolute temperature states, where the occupation probability of states increases with their energy, are possible in systems with an upper energy bound. So far, such states have only been demonstrated in localized spin systems with finite, discrete spectra. We realized a negative absolute temperature state for motional degrees of freedom with ultracold bosonic 39K atoms in an optical lattice, by implementing the attractive Bose-Hubbard Hamiltonian. This new state strikingly revealed itself by a quasimomentum distribution that is peaked at maximum kinetic energy. The measured kinetic energy distribution and the extracted negative temperature indicate that the ensemble is close to degeneracy, with coherence over several lattice sites. The state is as stable as a corresponding positive temperature state: The negative temperature stabilizes the system against mean-field collapse driven by negative pressure. Negative temperatures open up new parameter regimes for cold atoms, enabling fundamentally new many-body states. Additionally, they give rise to several counterintuitive effects such as heat engines with above unity efficiency.

  10. Measurement of absolute gravity acceleration in Firenze

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Angelis, M.; Greco, F.; Pistorio, A.; Poli, N.; Prevedelli, M.; Saccorotti, G.; Sorrentino, F.; Tino, G. M.

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports the results from the accurate measurement of the acceleration of gravity g taken at two separate premises in the Polo Scientifico of the University of Firenze (Italy). In these laboratories, two separate experiments aiming at measuring the Newtonian constant and testing the Newtonian law at short distances are in progress. Both experiments require an independent knowledge on the local value of g. The only available datum, pertaining to the italian zero-order gravity network, was taken more than 20 years ago at a distance of more than 60 km from the study site. Gravity measurements were conducted using an FG5 absolute gravimeter, and accompanied by seismic recordings for evaluating the noise condition at the site. The absolute accelerations of gravity at the two laboratories are (980 492 160.6 ± 4.0) μGal and (980 492 048.3 ± 3.0) μGal for the European Laboratory for Non-Linear Spectroscopy (LENS) and Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, respectively. Other than for the two referenced experiments, the data here presented will serve as a benchmark for any future study requiring an accurate knowledge of the absolute value of the acceleration of gravity in the study region.

  11. Constrained Least Absolute Deviation Neural Networks

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhishun; Peterson, Bradley S.

    2008-01-01

    It is well known that least absolute deviation (LAD) criterion or L1-norm used for estimation of parameters is characterized by robustness, i.e., the estimated parameters are totally resistant (insensitive) to large changes in the sampled data. This is an extremely useful feature, especially, when the sampled data are known to be contaminated by occasionally occurring outliers or by spiky noise. In our previous works, we have proposed the least absolute deviation neural network (LADNN) to solve unconstrained LAD problems. The theoretical proofs and numerical simulations have shown that the LADNN is Lyapunov-stable and it can globally converge to the exact solution to a given unconstrained LAD problem. We have also demonstrated its excellent application value in time-delay estimation. More generally, a practical LAD application problem may contain some linear constraints, such as a set of equalities and/or inequalities, which is called constrained LAD problem, whereas the unconstrained LAD can be considered as a special form of the constrained LAD. In this paper, we present a new neural network called constrained least absolute deviation neural network (CLADNN) to solve general constrained LAD problems. Theoretical proofs and numerical simulations demonstrate that the proposed CLADNN is Lyapunov stable and globally converges to the exact solution to a given constrained LAD problem, independent of initial values. The numerical simulations have also illustrated that the proposed CLADNN can be used to robustly estimate parameters for nonlinear curve fitting, which is extensively used in signal and image processing. PMID:18269958

  12. Retrieving Temperature and Moisture Profiles from AERI Radiance Observations: AERIPROF Value-Added Product Technical Description Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    WF Feltz; HB Howell; RO Knuteson; JM Comstock; R Mahon; DD Turner; WL Smith; HM Woolf; C Sivaraman; TD Halter

    2007-04-30

    This document explains the procedure to retrieve temperature and moisture profiles from high-spectral resolution infrared radiance data measured by the U.S. Department Of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation (ARM) Program’s atmospheric emitted radiance interferometer (AERI) instrument. The technique has been named the AERIPROF thermodynamic retrieval algorithm. The software has been developed over the last decade at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and has matured into an ARM Value-Added Procedure. This document will describe the AERIPROF retrieval procedure, outline the algorithm routines, discuss the software heritage, and, finally, provide references with further documentation.

  13. Evaluation of the Impact of AlRS Radiance and Profile Data Assimilation in Partly Cloudy Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zavodsky, Bradely; Srikishen, Jayanthi; Jedlovec, Gary

    2013-01-01

    Parallel experiments using AIRS L1B and L2 retrieved profiles were run for 29 case study days for early Winter 2011. Forecasts over and downstream regions of low, opaque cloudy regions yield improved T and Z anomaly correlations when non-thinned set of profiles is assimilated instead of radiances. Initial results indicate that GSI does a good job on the whole of determining cloud-free radiances there are some areas coincident with areas of larger profile impact that are misrepresented (compared to MODIS) that may result in reduced analysis impact.

  14. Far-infrared sensor for cirrus (FIRSC): an aircraft-based Fourier-transform spectrometer to measure cloud radiance.

    PubMed

    Vanek, M D; Nolt, I G; Tappan, N D; Ade, P A; Gannaway, F C; Hamilton, P A; Lee, C; Davis, J E; Predko, S

    2001-05-01

    We describe an aircraft-based Fourier-transform spectrometer (FTS) designed to measure the Earth outgoing radiance spectrum in the far-infrared-submillimeter spectral range. The instrument features include a rapid-scan FTS to obtain high spatial resolution from a moving aircraft platform, a sensitive two-channel detector, and a CCD camera for recording the nadir cloud scene with each scan record. Such measurements demonstrate the sensitivity of Earth radiance to high clouds and provide spectral data for improving techniques for remote sensing and retrieval of atmospheric and cloud properties.

  15. Relationships between chlorophyll density and ocean radiance as measured by U2/OCS: Algorithms, examples and comparison

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, H. H.; Hart, W. D.

    1983-01-01

    An ocean atmosphere radiative transfer process computation method which is suitable for determining lower boundary ocean albedo and other radiation components from spectral measurements of upwelling radiance taken from a high altitude platform is described. The method was applied to a set of color scanner data taken from slope water of the South Atlantic Bight to determine the influence of cholorophyll-a pigments in the sea on the ratio of upwelling radiance to down welling irradiance as a function of wavelength. The resulting chlorophyll concentrations are compared with measurements made by ships stationed along the flight path.

  16. Thorough subcells diagnosis in a multi-junction solar cell via absolute electroluminescence-efficiency measurements.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shaoqiang; Zhu, Lin; Yoshita, Masahiro; Mochizuki, Toshimitsu; Kim, Changsu; Akiyama, Hidefumi; Imaizumi, Mitsuru; Kanemitsu, Yoshihiko

    2015-01-16

    World-wide studies on multi-junction (tandem) solar cells have led to record-breaking improvements in conversion efficiencies year after year. To obtain detailed and proper feedback for solar-cell design and fabrication, it is necessary to establish standard methods for diagnosing subcells in fabricated tandem devices. Here, we propose a potential standard method to quantify the detailed subcell properties of multi-junction solar cells based on absolute measurements of electroluminescence (EL) external quantum efficiency in addition to the conventional solar-cell external-quantum-efficiency measurements. We demonstrate that the absolute-EL-quantum-efficiency measurements provide I-V relations of individual subcells without the need for referencing measured I-V data, which is in stark contrast to previous works. Moreover, our measurements quantify the absolute rates of junction loss, non-radiative loss, radiative loss, and luminescence coupling in the subcells, which constitute the "balance sheets" of tandem solar cells.

  17. [In-flight absolute radiometric calibration of UAV hyperspectral camera and its validation analysis].

    PubMed

    Gou, Zhi-yang; Yan, Lei; Chen, Wei; Jing, Xin; Yin, Zhong-yi; Duan, Yi-ni

    2012-02-01

    With the data in Urad Front Banner, Inner Mongolia on November 14th, 2010, hyper-spectral camera on UAV was calibrated adopting reflectance-based method. During the in-flight absolute radiometric calibration, 6 hyper-spectral radiometric gray-scale targets were arranged in the validation field. These targets' reflectances are 4.5%, 20%, 30%, 40%, 50% and 60% separately. To validate the calibration result, four extra hyper-spectral targets with sharp-edge spectrum were arranged to simulate the reflection and absorption peaks in natural objectives. With these peaks, the apparent radiance calculated by radiation transfer model and that calculated through calibration coefficients are much different. The result shows that in the first 15 bands (blue bands), errors are somewhat huge due to the noises of equipment. In the rest bands with quite even spectrum, the errors are small, most of which are less than 10%. For those bands with sharp changes in spectral curves, the errors are quite considerable, varying from 10% to 25%.

  18. Estimation of absolute water surface temperature based on atmospherically corrected thermal infrared multispectral scanner digital data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, James E.

    1986-01-01

    Airborne remote sensing systems, as well as those on board Earth orbiting satellites, sample electromagnetic energy in discrete wavelength regions and convert the total energy sampled into data suitable for processing by digital computers. In general, however, the total amount of energy reaching a sensor system located at some distance from the target is composed not only of target related energy, but, in addition, contains a contribution originating from the atmosphere itself. Thus, some method must be devised for removing or at least minimizing the effects of the atmosphere. The LOWTRAN-6 Program was designed to estimate atmospheric transmittance and radiance for a given atmospheric path at moderate spectral resolution over an operational wavelength region from 0.25 to 28.5 microns. In order to compute the Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner (TIMS) digital values which were recorded in the absence of the atmosphere, the parameters derived from LOWTRAN-6 are used in a correction equation. The TIMS data were collected at 1:00 a.m. local time on November 21, 1983, over a recirculating cooling pond for a power plant in southeastern Mississippi. The TIMS data were analyzed before and after atmospheric corrections were applied using a band ratioing model to compute the absolute surface temperature of various points on the power plant cooling pond. The summarized results clearly demonstrate the desirability of applying atmospheric corrections.

  19. Assessment of Mars Atmospheric Temperature Retrievals from the Thermal Emission Spectrometer Radiances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, Matthew J.; Eluszkiewicz, Janusz; Weisenstein, Deborah; Uymin, Gennady; Moncet, Jean-Luc

    2012-01-01

    Motivated by the needs of Mars data assimilation. particularly quantification of measurement errors and generation of averaging kernels. we have evaluated atmospheric temperature retrievals from Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) radiances. Multiple sets of retrievals have been considered in this study; (1) retrievals available from the Planetary Data System (PDS), (2) retrievals based on variants of the retrieval algorithm used to generate the PDS retrievals, and (3) retrievals produced using the Mars 1-Dimensional Retrieval (M1R) algorithm based on the Optimal Spectral Sampling (OSS ) forward model. The retrieved temperature profiles are compared to the MGS Radio Science (RS) temperature profiles. For the samples tested, the M1R temperature profiles can be made to agree within 2 K with the RS temperature profiles, but only after tuning the prior and error statistics. Use of a global prior that does not take into account the seasonal dependence leads errors of up 6 K. In polar samples. errors relative to the RS temperature profiles are even larger. In these samples, the PDS temperature profiles also exhibit a poor fit with RS temperatures. This fit is worse than reported in previous studies, indicating that the lack of fit is due to a bias correction to TES radiances implemented after 2004. To explain the differences between the PDS and Ml R temperatures, the algorithms are compared directly, with the OSS forward model inserted into the PDS algorithm. Factors such as the filtering parameter, the use of linear versus nonlinear constrained inversion, and the choice of the forward model, are found to contribute heavily to the differences in the temperature profiles retrieved in the polar regions, resulting in uncertainties of up to 6 K. Even outside the poles, changes in the a priori statistics result in different profile shapes which all fit the radiances within the specified error. The importance of the a priori statistics prevents

  20. Absolute rotation detection by Coriolis force measurement using optomechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davuluri, Sankar; Li, Yong

    2016-10-01

    In this article, we present an application of the optomechanical cavities for absolute rotation detection. Two optomechanical cavities, one in each arm, are placed in a Michelson interferometer. The interferometer is placed on a rotating table and is moved with a uniform velocity of \\dot{\\bar{y}} with respect to the rotating table. The Coriolis force acting on the interferometer changes the length of the optomechanical cavity in one arm, while the length of the optomechanical cavity in the other arm is not changed. The phase shift corresponding to the change in the optomechanical cavity length is measured at the interferometer output to estimate the angular velocity of the absolute rotation. An analytic expression for the minimum detectable rotation rate corresponding to the standard quantum limit of measurable Coriolis force in the interferometer is derived. Squeezing technique is discussed to improve the rotation detection sensitivity by a factor of \\sqrt{{γ }m/{ω }m} at 0 K temperature, where {γ }m and {ω }m are the damping rate and angular frequency of the mechanical oscillator. The temperature dependence of the rotation detection sensitivity is studied.

  1. The Austrian absolute gravity base net: 27 years of spatial and temporal acquisition of gravity data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullrich, Christian; Ruess, Diethard

    2014-05-01

    Since 1987 the BEV (Federal Office of Metrology and Surveying) has been operating the absolute gravimeters JILAg-6 and FG5 which are used for basic measurements to determine or review fundamental gravity stations in Austria and abroad. Overall more than 70 absolute gravity stations were installed in Austria and neighbouring countries and some of them have been regularly monitored. A few stations are part of international projects like ECGN (European Combined Geodetic network) and UNIGRACE (Unification of Gravity System in Central and Eastern Europe). As a national metrology institute (NMI) the Metrology Service of the BEV maintains the national standards for the realisation of the legal units of measurement and ensures their international equivalence and recognition. Thus the BEV maintains the national standard for gravimetry in Austria, which is validated and confirmed by international comparisons. Since 1989 the Austrian absolute gravimeters participated seven times in the ICAG's (International Comparison of Absolute Gravimeters) at the BIPM in Paris and Luxemburg and as well participated three times at the ECAG (European Comparison of Absolute Gravimeters) in Luxemburg. The results of these ICAG's and especially the performance of the Austrian absolute gravimeter are reported in this presentation. We also present some examples and interpretation of long time monitoring stations of absolute gravity in several Austrian locations. Some stations are located in large cities like Vienna and Graz and some others are situated in mountainous regions. Mountain stations are at the Conrad Observatory where a SG (Superconducting Gravimeter) is permanently monitoring and in Obergurgl (Tyrolia) at an elevation of approx. 2000 m which is very strong influenced from the glacier retreat.

  2. Near-infrared organic light-emitting diodes with very high external quantum efficiency and radiance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuong Ly, Kiet; Chen-Cheng, Ren-Wu; Lin, Hao-Wu; Shiau, Yu-Jeng; Liu, Shih-Hung; Chou, Pi-Tai; Tsao, Cheng-Si; Huang, Yu-Ching; Chi, Yun

    2017-01-01

    Bright and efficient organic emitters of near-infrared light would be of use in applications ranging from biological imaging and medical therapy to night-vision devices. Here we report how a new class of Pt(II) complex phosphors have enabled the fabrication of organic light-emitting diodes that emit light at 740 nm with very high efficiency and radiance due to a high photoluminescence quantum yield of ∼81% and a highly preferred horizontal dipole orientation. The best devices exhibited an external quantum efficiency of 24 ± 1% in a normal planar organic light-emitting diode structure. The incorporation of a light out-coupling hemisphere structure further boosts the external quantum efficiency up to 55 ± 3%.

  3. BOREAS RSS-20 POLDER Radiance Images From the NASA C-130

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leroy, M.; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Nickeson, Jaime (Editor); Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    These Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Remote Sensing Science (RSS)-20 data are a subset of images collected by the Polarization and Directionality of Earth's Reflectance (POLDER) instrument over tower sites in the BOREAS study areas during the intensive field campaigns (IFCs) in 1994. The POLDER images presented here from the NASA ARC C-130 aircraft are made available for illustration purposes only. The data are stored in binary image-format files. The POLDER radiance images are available from the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  4. Laboratory measurements of radiance and reflectance spectra of dilute primary-treated sewage sludge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Usry, J. W.; Witte, W. G.; Whitlock, C. H.; Gurganus, E. A.

    1977-01-01

    The feasibility of remotely monitoring ocean dumping of waste products such as acid and sewage sludge is evaluated. The laboratory arrangement, solar simulator, and test results from three experiments conducted in the laboratory are described. Radiance and reflectance spectra are presented for primary-treated sewage sludge mixed with two types of base water. Results indicate that upwelled reflectance varies in a near-linear manner with concentration and that the sludge has a practically flat signal response between 420 and 970 nm. Well-defined upwelled reflectance spectra were obtained for the sewage-sludge mixtures at all wavelengths and concentrations. The spectral-reflectance values appeared to be influenced by the type of base water, but this influence was small, especially for the mixtures with low concentrations of sewage sludge.

  5. High Density, High Radiance $\\mu$ LED Matrix for Optogenetic Retinal Prostheses and Planar Neural Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Soltan, Ahmed; McGovern, Brian; Drakakis, Emmanuel; Neil, Mark; Maaskant, Pleun; Akhter, Mahbub; Lee, Jun Su; Degenaar, Patrick

    2017-04-01

    Optical neuron stimulation arrays are important for both in-vitro biology and retinal prosthetic biomedical applications. Hence, in this work, we present an 8100 pixel high radiance photonic stimulator. The chip module vertically combines custom made gallium nitride μ LEDs with a CMOS application specific integrated circuit. This is designed with active pixels to ensure random access and to allow continuous illumination of all required pixels. The μLEDs have been assembled on the chip using a solder ball flip-chip bonding technique which has allowed for reliable and repeatable manufacture. We have evaluated the performance of the matrix by measuring the different factors including the static, dynamic power consumption, the illumination, and the current consumption by each LED. We show that the power consumption is within a range suitable for portable use. Finally, the thermal behavior of the matrix is monitored and the matrix proved to be thermally stable.

  6. A new simple concept for ocean colour remote sensing using parallel polarisation radiance

    PubMed Central

    He, Xianqiang; Pan, Delu; Bai, Yan; Wang, Difeng; Hao, Zengzhou

    2014-01-01

    Ocean colour remote sensing has supported research on subjects ranging from marine ecosystems to climate change for almost 35 years. However, as the framework for ocean colour remote sensing is based on the radiation intensity at the top-of-atmosphere (TOA), the polarisation of the radiation, which contains additional information on atmospheric and water optical properties, has largely been neglected. In this study, we propose a new simple concept to ocean colour remote sensing that uses parallel polarisation radiance (PPR) instead of the traditional radiation intensity. We use vector radiative transfer simulation and polarimetric satellite sensing data to demonstrate that using PPR has two significant advantages in that it effectively diminishes the sun glint contamination and enhances the ocean colour signal at the TOA. This concept may open new doors for ocean colour remote sensing. We suggest that the next generation of ocean colour sensors should measure PPR to enhance observational capability. PMID:24434904

  7. Design of a radiance meter with predicted size of source and distance effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suárez-Romero, J. G.; Solorio-Leyva, J. C.; Hurtado-Ramos, J. B.

    2016-10-01

    In a previous work, we described the theoretical fundamentals for the design of radiance meters. There, we observed that the length between the first and the second aperture of the instrument plays an important role in the performance of the meter. Such a length is a parameter related with the instrument response to variations of the size of the source and of the distance between the instrument and the source. Such dependences are not predicted by the theory of geometrical optics, normally used in the instrument design. Even the approximation of wave optics gives a partial understanding of the propagation of optical radiation. A more general treatment, based in the theory of partial coherence, gives a better description of the propagation.

  8. BOREAS Level-3b Landsat TM Imagery: At-sensor Radiances in BSQ Format

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Nickeson, Jaime; Knapp, David; Newcomer, Jeffrey A.; Cihlar, Josef

    2000-01-01

    For BOREAS, the level-3b Landsat TM data, along with the other remotely sensed images, were collected in order to provide spatially extensive information over the primary study areas. This information includes radiant energy, detailed land cover, and biophysical parameter maps such as FPAR and LAI. Although very similar in content to the level-3a Landsat TM products, the level-3b images were created to provide users with a directly usable at-sensor radiance image. Geographically, the level-3b images cover the BOREAS NSA and SSA. Temporally, the images cover the period of 22-Jun-1984 to 09-Jul-1996. The images are available in binary, image format files.

  9. BOREAS Level-4b AVHRR-LAC Ten-Day Composite Images: At-sensor Radiance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cihlar, Josef; Chen, Jing; Nickerson, Jaime; Newcomer, Jeffrey A.; Huang, Feng-Ting; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    The BOReal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Staff Science Satellite Data Acquisition Program focused on providing the research teams with the remotely sensed satellite data products they needed to compare and spatially extend point results. Manitoba Remote Sensing Center (MRSC) and BOREAS Information System (BORIS) personnel acquired, processed, and archived data from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) instruments on the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA-11) and -14 satellites. The AVHRR data were acquired by CCRS and were provided to BORIS for use by BOREAS researchers. These AVHRR level-4b data are gridded, 10-day composites of at-sensor radiance values produced from sets of single-day images. Temporally, the 10- day compositing periods begin 11-Apr-1994 and end 10-Sep-1994. Spatially, the data cover the entire BOREAS region. The data are stored in binary image format files.

  10. BOREAS Level 3-b AVHRR-LAC Imagery: Scaled At-sensor Radiance in LGSOWG Format

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Nickeson, Jaime; Newcomer, Jeffrey A.; Cihlar, Josef

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS Staff Science Satellite Data Acquisition Program focused on providing the research teams with the remotely sensed satellite data products they needed to compare and spatially extend point results. Data acquired from the AVHRR instrument on the NOAA-9, -11, -12, and -14 satellites were processed and archived for the BOREAS region by the MRSC and BORIS. The data were acquired by CCRS and were provided for use by BOREAS researchers. A few winter acquisitions are available, but the archive contains primarily growing season imagery. These gridded, at-sensor radiance image data cover the period of 30-Jan-1994 to 18-Sep-1996. Geographically, the data cover the entire 1,000-km x 1,000-km BOREAS region. The data are stored in binary image format files.

  11. Impact of hyperspectral radiance in the simulation of tropical cyclone using NCUM model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Routray, A.; George, John P.; Singh, Vivek; Rani, Indira

    2016-05-01

    The socioeconomic aspects of life in coastal regions of India are significantly affected by tropical cyclones (TCs) over North Indian Ocean (NIO). It is well known that the lack of conventional observation over the ocean is a critical factor limiting the accuracy of the TC forecast. The goal of this study is to assess the impact of hyperspectral sounder measurements from Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) and Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) in the MetOp satellite on TC simulation using NCMRWF Unified Model (NCUM) with 17 km horizontal resolution. The results of the study indicate that the assimilation of hyperspectral radiance data has a positive impact on the prediction of track and intensity of TC.

  12. Studies of the net surface radiative flux from satellite radiances during FIFE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frouin, Robert

    1993-01-01

    Studies of the net surface radiative flux from satellite radiances during First ISLSCP Field Experiment (FIFE) are presented. Topics covered include: radiative transfer model validation; calibration of VISSR and AVHRR solar channels; development and refinement of algorithms to estimate downward solar and terrestrial irradiances at the surface, including photosynthetically available radiation (PAR) and surface albedo; verification of these algorithms using in situ measurements; production of maps of shortwave irradiance, surface albedo, and related products; analysis of the temporal variability of shortwave irradiance over the FIFE site; development of a spectroscopy technique to estimate atmospheric total water vapor amount; and study of optimum linear combinations of visible and near-infrared reflectances for estimating the fraction of PAR absorbed by plants.

  13. Impact assessment of additional predictors to the retrieval of atmospheric profiles from infrared radiances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Deming; Dong, Chaohua; Huo, Ruili; Cai, Ronghui

    2008-12-01

    Impacts of additional predictors on inverting atmospheric infrared radiance for temperature and humidity profiles are investigated using Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) real measurements and empirical orthogonal function expansion method (EOF). These predictors are microwave channels, latitude, topography, surface altitude, surface temperature, and surface air pressure. The results suggest that microwave channels can remarkably help the improvement of the accuracy of retrieved profiles at lower troposphere (below 800hPa) and have little effect on that above 800hPa. With dataset classified by latitude, better retrievals are obtained. The root mean square errors (RMSE) of retrieved temperature at complicated terrain are significantly greater than that at plat area. For humidity retrievals it was found that RMSE exhibit weak sensitivity to topography. By combined use of infrared measurements and additional predictors, great improvements have achieved in the retrieval of atmospheric temperature and humidity profiles at lower troposphere.

  14. Method and program product for determining a radiance field in an optical environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinersman, Phillip N. (Inventor); Carder, Kendall L. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A hybrid method is presented by which Monte Carlo techniques are combined with iterative relaxation techniques to solve the Radiative Transfer Equation in arbitrary one-, two- or three-dimensional optical environments. The optical environments are first divided into contiguous regions, or elements, with Monte Carlo techniques then being employed to determine the optical response function of each type of element. The elements are combined, and the iterative relaxation techniques are used to determine simultaneously the radiance field on the boundary and throughout the interior of the modeled environment. This hybrid model is capable of providing estimates of the under-water light field needed to expedite inspection of ship hulls and port facilities. It is also capable of providing estimates of the subaerial light field for structured, absorbing or non-absorbing environments such as shadows of mountain ranges within and without absorption spectral bands such as water vapor or CO.sub.2 bands.

  15. A new simple concept for ocean colour remote sensing using parallel polarisation radiance.

    PubMed

    He, Xianqiang; Pan, Delu; Bai, Yan; Wang, Difeng; Hao, Zengzhou

    2014-01-17

    Ocean colour remote sensing has supported research on subjects ranging from marine ecosystems to climate change for almost 35 years. However, as the framework for ocean colour remote sensing is based on the radiation intensity at the top-of-atmosphere (TOA), the polarisation of the radiation, which contains additional information on atmospheric and water optical properties, has largely been neglected. In this study, we propose a new simple concept to ocean colour remote sensing that uses parallel polarisation radiance (PPR) instead of the traditional radiation intensity. We use vector radiative transfer simulation and polarimetric satellite sensing data to demonstrate that using PPR has two significant advantages in that it effectively diminishes the sun glint contamination and enhances the ocean colour signal at the TOA. This concept may open new doors for ocean colour remote sensing. We suggest that the next generation of ocean colour sensors should measure PPR to enhance observational capability.

  16. Assimilation of Precipitation Measurement Missions Microwave Radiance Observations With GEOS-5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jin, Jianjun; Kim, Min-Jeong; McCarty, Will; Akella, Santha; Gu, Wei

    2015-01-01

    The Global Precipitation Mission (GPM) Core Observatory satellite was launched in February, 2014. The GPM Microwave Imager (GMI) is a conically scanning radiometer measuring 13 channels ranging from 10 to 183 GHz and sampling between 65 S 65 N. This instrument is a successor to the Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission (TRMM) Microwave Imager (TMI), which has observed 9 channels at frequencies ranging 10 to 85 GHz between 40 S 40 N since 1997. This presentation outlines the base procedures developed to assimilate GMI and TMI radiances in clear-sky conditions, including quality control methods, thinning decisions, and the estimation of, observation errors. This presentation also shows the impact of these observations when they are incorporated into the GEOS-5 atmospheric data assimilation system.

  17. Laboratory measurements of upwelled radiance and reflectance spectra of Calvert, Ball, Jordan, and Feldspar soil sediments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitlock, C. H.; Usry, J. W.; Witte, W. G.; Gurganus, E. A.

    1977-01-01

    An effort to investigate the potential of remote sensing for monitoring nonpoint source pollution was conducted. Spectral reflectance characteristics for four types of soil sediments were measured for mixture concentrations between 4 and 173 ppm. For measurements at a spectral resolution of 32 mm, the spectral reflectances of Calvert, Ball, Jordan, and Feldspar soil sediments were distinctly different over the wavelength range from 400 to 980 nm at each concentration tested. At high concentrations, spectral differences between the various sediments could be detected by measurements with a spectral resolution of 160 nm. At a low concentration, only small differences were observed between the various sediments when measurements were made with 160 nm spectral resolution. Radiance levels generally varied in a nonlinear manner with sediment concentration; linearity occurred in special cases, depending on sediment type, concentration range, and wavelength.

  18. Detection of nighttime atmospheric scattering of lunar UV radiances by the Nimbus 4 BUV instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stassinopoulos, E. G.; Goldberg, R. A.; Mcpeters, R. D.; Barth, J. M.

    1981-01-01

    Morphological studies of nighttime dark current data from the Nimbus 4 backscattered UV experiment indicate enhancements during the period of a full moon. The nature and magnitude of these lunar UV radiance enhancements are determined, and their potential use as a measure of nighttime ozone is considered. The data were grouped into five-day study intervals centered about each full moon sequence, and about each corresponding new moon interval. The analysis was performed in a magnetic frame of reference (McIlwain, 1961) in order to evaluate magnetospheric perturbation effects and to minimize the effects of charged energetic particle contamination or precipitation. All isolated elements showing spurious or abnormal enhancements were removed selectively (about 3%) to further screen the data. Results demonstrate the presence and uniqueness of a lunar signal, induced by atmospherically backscattered UV radiation. This signal was not sufficiently strong, however, to accurately map global nighttime ozone on the Nimbus 4 instrument.

  19. Cloud and aerosol optics by polarized micro pulse Lidar and ground based measurements of zenith radiance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delgadillo, Rodrigo

    Clouds impact Earth's climate through cloud transmission and reflection properties. Clouds reflect approximately 15 percent of the incoming solar radiation at the top of the atmosphere. A key cloud radiative variable is cloud optical depth, which gives information about how much light is transmitted through a cloud. Historically, remote measurements of cloud optical depth have been limited to uniform overcast conditions and had low temporal and spatial resolution. We present a novel method to measure cloud optical depth for coastal regions from spectral zenith radiance measurements for optically thin clouds, which removes some of these limitations. Our measurement site is part of South Florida's Cloud-Aerosol-Rain Observatory (CAROb), located on Virginia Key, FL (6 km from Miami). This work is based on Marshak et al.'s method for finding cloud optical depth from vegetative sites that provide a strong spectral contrast between red and near infrared surface albedo. However, given the unique nature of our site, which contains water, vegetation, beach, and urban surface types, we found no such spectral contrast at those wavelength pairs. We measured albedo, with hyperspectral resolution, for different surface types around our measurement site to estimate the effective spectral albedo for the area centered on the site with a 5km radius. From this analysis, we found the best possible albedo contrast (573.9 and 673.1 nm) for our site. We tested the derived cloud optical depth from zenith radiance at these two wavelengths against a concurrently running polarized micro pulse LIDAR (MPL) and found good agreement.

  20. Inter-Calibration and Concatenation of Climate Quality Infrared Cloudy Radiances from Multiple Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behrangi, Ali; Aumann, Hartmut H.

    2013-01-01

    A change in climate is not likely captured from any single instrument, since no single instrument can span decades of time. Therefore, to detect signals of global climate change, observations from many instruments on different platforms have to be concatenated. This requires careful and detailed consideration of instrumental differences such as footprint size, diurnal cycle of observations, and relative biases in the spectral brightness temperatures. Furthermore, a common basic assumption is that the data quality is independent of the observed scene and therefore can be determined using clear scene data. However, as will be demonstrated, this is not necessarily a valid assumption as the globe is mostly cloudy. In this study we highlight challenges in inter-calibration and concatenation of infrared radiances from multiple instruments by focusing on the analysis of deep convective or anvil clouds. TRMM/VIRS is potentially useful instrument to make correction for observational differences in the local time and foot print sizes, and thus could be applied retroactively to vintage instruments such as AIRS, IASI, IRIS, AVHRR, and HIRS. As the first step, in this study, we investigate and discuss to what extent AIRS and VIRS agree in capturing deep cloudy radiances at the same local time. The analysis also includes comparisons with one year observations from CrIS. It was found that the instruments show calibration differences of about 1K under deep cloudy scenes that can vary as a function of land type and local time of observation. The sensitivity of footprint size, view angle, and spectral band-pass differences cannot fully explain the observed differences. The observed discrepancies can be considered as a measure of the magnitude of issues which will arise in the comparison of legacy data with current data.

  1. Consistency of dimensional distributions and refractive indices of desert dust measured over Lampedusa with IASI radiances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liuzzi, Giuliano; Masiello, Guido; Serio, Carmine; Meloni, Daniela; Di Biagio, Claudia; Formenti, Paola

    2017-02-01

    In the context of the ChArMEx campaign, we present here some results concerning the quantitative comparison between simulated and observed radiances in the presence of atmospheric desert dust, between June and July 2013 in the southern Mediterranean Basin, in the air mass above the island of Lampedusa. In particular, comparisons have been performed between radiances as observed by the Infrared Atmospheric Sounder Interferometer (IASI) and those simulated using the σ-IASI-as radiative transfer model, which takes into account aerosol extinction effect through a set of fast parameterizations. Simulations have been carried out using different sets of input complex refractive indices, which take into account the parent soils of the aerosols. Their accuracy also relies on the quality of the characterization of desert dust microphysical properties, achieved through direct measurements in the ChArMEx experiment. On the one hand, the fact that the model can ingest such a variable input proves its feasibility. On the other hand, this work goes through a direct validation of different refractive index sets for desert dust in the thermal infrared, and pursues an assessment of the sensitivity of IASI data with respect to the dimensional distribution of desert dust particles. Results show a good consistency between calculations and observations, especially in the spectral interval 800-1000 cm-1; further, the comparison between calculations and observations suggests that further efforts are needed to better characterize desert dust optical properties in the shortwave (above 2000 cm-1). Whatever the case, we show that it is necessary to properly tune the refractive indices according to the geographical origin of the observed aerosol.

  2. Downwelling Far-Infrared Radiance Spectra Measured by FIRST at Cerro Toco, Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mast, J. C.; Mlynczak, M. G.; Cageao, R.; Kratz, D. P.; Latvakoski, H.; Johnson, D. G.; Mlawer, E. J.; Turner, D. D.

    2015-12-01

    The Far-Infrared Spectroscopy of the Troposphere (FIRST) instrument is a Fourier transform spectrometer developed by NASA Langley Research Center in collaboration with the Space Dynamics Laboratory and the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics. FIRST was initially developed for measuring the far-infrared portion of Earth's longwave spectrum as a balloon borne instrument and later was reconfigured to operate as a ground-based instrument. In its current ground-based configuration FIRST was deployed at 17500 ft on Cerro Toco, a mountain in the Atacama Desert of Chile, from August to October, 2009. There the integrated precipitable water (IPW) was as low as 0.02 cm. FIRST measurements from days with IPW between 0.024 and 0.035 cm during the campaign are presented here between 200 cm-1 and 800 cm-1. Significant spectral development in the far-IR is observed over the entire 200 cm-1 to 800 cm-1 band. Water vapor and temperature profiles from radiosonde and GVRP measurements are used as inputs to the AER Line-by-Line Radiative Transfer Model (LBLRTM) utilizing the AER v3.2 line parameter database. Uncertainties in both the measured and modeled radiances are accounted for in this study. The residual LBLRTM - FIRST is calculated to assess agreement between the measured and modeled spectra. Measured and model radiances generally agree to within the combined uncertainties for wavenumbers greater than 360 cm-1. At wavenumbers less than 360 cm-1 persistent troughs in the residual are present outside of the combined uncertainties. These features are present on different days and at different water vapor amounts. Possible solutions for these features are discussed.

  3. Spectral radiance estimates of leaf area and leaf phytomass of small grains and native vegetation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aase, J. K.; Brown, B. S.; Millard, J. P.

    1986-01-01

    Similarities and/or dissimilarities in radiance characteristics were studied among barley (Hordeum vulgare L.), oats (Avena fatua L.), spring and winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), and short-grass prairie vegetation. The site was a Williams loam soil (fine-loamy mixed, Typic Argiborolls) near Sidney, Montana. Radiances were measured with a truck-mounted radiometer. The radiometer was equipped with four wavelength bands: 0.45 to 0.52, 0.52 to 0.60, 0.63 to 0.69, and 0.76 to 0.90 micron. Airborne scanner measurements were made at an altitude of 600 m four times during the season under clear sky conditions. The airborne scanner was equipped with the same four bands as the truck-mounted radiometer plus the following: 1.00 to 1.30, 1.55 to 1.75, 2.08 to 2.35, and 10.4 to 12.5 microns. Comparisons using individual wave bands, the near IR/red, (0.76 to 0.90 micron)/(0.63 to 0.69 micron) ratio and the normalized difference vegetation index, ND = (IR - red)/(IR + red), showed that only during limited times during the growing season were some of the small grains distinguishable from one another and from native rangeland vegetation. There was a common relation for all small grains between leaf area index and green leaf phytomass and between leaf area index or green leaf phytomass and the IR/red ratio.

  4. Airborne observations of far-infrared upwelling radiance in the Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Libois, Quentin; Ivanescu, Liviu; Blanchet, Jean-Pierre; Schulz, Hannes; Bozem, Heiko; Leaitch, W. Richard; Burkart, Julia; Abbatt, Jonathan P. D.; Herber, Andreas B.; Aliabadi, Amir A.; Girard, Éric

    2016-12-01

    The first airborne measurements of the Far-InfraRed Radiometer (FIRR) were performed in April 2015 during the panarctic NETCARE campaign. Vertical profiles of spectral upwelling radiance in the range 8-50 µm were measured in clear and cloudy conditions from the surface up to 6 km. The clear sky profiles highlight the strong dependence of radiative fluxes to the temperature inversion typical of the Arctic. Measurements acquired for total column water vapour from 1.5 to 10.5 mm also underline the sensitivity of the far-infrared greenhouse effect to specific humidity. The cloudy cases show that optically thin ice clouds increase the cooling rate of the atmosphere, making them important pieces of the Arctic energy balance. One such cloud exhibited a very complex spatial structure, characterized by large horizontal heterogeneities at the kilometre scale. This emphasizes the difficulty of obtaining representative cloud observations with airborne measurements but also points out how challenging it is to model polar clouds radiative effects. These radiance measurements were successfully compared to simulations, suggesting that state-of-the-art radiative transfer models are suited to study the cold and dry Arctic atmosphere. Although FIRR in situ performances compare well to its laboratory performances, complementary simulations show that upgrading the FIRR radiometric resolution would greatly increase its sensitivity to atmospheric and cloud properties. Improved instrument temperature stability in flight and expected technological progress should help meet this objective. The campaign overall highlights the potential for airborne far-infrared radiometry and constitutes a relevant reference for future similar studies dedicated to the Arctic and for the development of spaceborne instruments.

  5. SIMBIOS Normalized Water-Leaving Radiance Calibration and Validation: Sensor Response, Atmospheric Corrections, Stray Light and Sun Glint. Chapter 14

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, James L.

    2001-01-01

    This Sensor Intercomparison and Merger for Biological and Interdisciplinary Oceanic Studies (SIMBIOS) contract supports acquisition of match up radiometric and bio-optical data for validation of Sea-Viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) and other ocean color satellites, and evaluation of uncertainty budgets and protocols for in situ measurements of normalized water leaving radiances.

  6. Validation of the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) over the Antarctic Plateau: Low Radiance, Low Humidity, and Thin Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tobin, David C.

    2005-01-01

    The main goal of the project has been to use specialized measurements collected at the Antarctic Plateau to provide validation of the Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder (AIRS) spectral radiances and some AIRS Level 2 products. As proposed, efforts conducted at the University of Wisconsin are focused on providing technical information, data, and software in support of the validation studies.

  7. Accurate modeling of spectral fine-structure in Earth radiance spectra measured with the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment.

    PubMed

    van Deelen, Rutger; Hasekamp, Otto P; Landgraf, Jochen

    2007-01-10

    We present what we believe to be a novel approach to simulating the spectral fine structure (<1 nm) in measurements of spectrometers such as the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME). GOME measures the Earth's radiance spectra and daily solar irradiance spectra from which a reflectivity spectrum is commonly extracted. The high-frequency structures contained in such a spectrum are, apart from atmospheric absorption, caused by Raman scattering and by a shift between the solar irradiance and the Earth's radiance spectrum. Normally, an a priori high-resolution solar spectrum is used to simulate these structures. We present an alternative method in which all the required information on the solar spectrum is retrieved from the GOME measurements. We investigate two approaches for the spectral range of 390-400 nm. First, a solar spectrum is reconstructed on a fine spectral grid from the GOME solar measurement. This approach leads to undersampling errors of up to 0.5% in the modeling of the Earth's radiance spectra. Second, a combination of the solar measurement and one of the Earth's radiance measurement is used to retrieve a solar spectrum. This approach effectively removes the undersampling error and results in residuals close to the GOME measurement noise of 0.1%.

  8. Retrieval of the columnar aerosol phase function and single-scattering albedo from sky radiance over the ocean - Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Menghua; Gordon, Howard R.

    1993-01-01

    Based on the fact that the part of downward radiance that depends on the optical properties of the aerosol in the atmosphere can be extracted from the measured sky radiance, a new scheme for retrieval of the aerosol phase function and the single-scattering albedo over the ocean is developed. This retrieval algorithm is tested with simulations for several cases. It is found that the retrieved aerosol phase function and the single-scattering albedo are virtually error-free if the vertical structure of the atmosphere is known and if the sky radiance and the aerosol optical thickness can be measured accurately. The robustness of the algorithm in realistic situations, in which the measurements are contaminated by calibration errors or noise, is examined. It is found that the retrieved value of omega(0) is usually in error by less than about 10 percent, and the phase function is accurately retrieved for theta less than about 90 deg. However, as the aerosol optical thickness becomes small, e.g., less than about 0.1, errors in the sky radiance measurement can lead to serious problems with the retrieval algorithm, especially in the blue. The use of the retrieval scheme should be limited to the red and near IR when the aerosol optical thickness is small.

  9. View-Angle Dependent AIRS Cloud Radiances and Fluctuations: Implications of Organized Cloud Structures for Tropical Circulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Dong L.; Gong, Jie

    2012-01-01

    Interactions between wave dynamics and moisture generate clouds in a wide range of scales. Organized cloud structures produce statistically asymmetric radiances and perturbations in AIRS and AMSU-B measurements. With high resolution (approx.14 km beamwidth) and high-sensitivity instruments, these wave-modulated cloud structures can be readily detected from calibrated Levell radiance data. In this study we analyzed eight-year (2003 - 2010) statistics of AIRS cloud-induced radiances and found that in tropical convective regions the ascending (13:30 LST) measurements reveal higher view-angle asymmetry in cloud radiance than the descending (1:30 LST). The daytime asymmetry suggests 10% more cloudiness when the instrument views east, implying tilted and banded structures in most of the anvil clouds to which AIRS is sensitive. Such banded cloud structures are likely a manifestation of embedded westward propagating gravity waves in tropical convective systems. More importantly, organized cloud structures carry asymmetric momentum fluxes in addition to energy fluxes, which must be taken into account for modeling wave-wave and wave-mean flow interactions in tropical circulations.

  10. Brownian motion: Absolute negative particle mobility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ros, Alexandra; Eichhorn, Ralf; Regtmeier, Jan; Duong, Thanh Tu; Reimann, Peter; Anselmetti, Dario

    2005-08-01

    Noise effects in technological applications, far from being a nuisance, can be exploited with advantage - for example, unavoidable thermal fluctuations have found application in the transport and sorting of colloidal particles and biomolecules. Here we use a microfluidic system to demonstrate a paradoxical migration mechanism in which particles always move in a direction opposite to the net acting force (`absolute negative mobility') as a result of an interplay between thermal noise, a periodic and symmetric microstructure, and a biased alternating-current electric field. This counterintuitive phenomenon could be used for bioanalytical purposes, for example in the separation and fractionation of colloids, biological molecules and cells.

  11. Arbitrary segments of absolute negative mobility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ruyin; Nie, Linru; Chen, Chongyang; Wang, Chaojie

    2017-01-01

    In previous research work, investigators have reported only one or two segments of absolute negative mobility (ANM) in a periodic potential. In fact, many segments of ANM also occur in the system considered here. We investigate transport of an inertial particle in a gating ratchet periodic potential subjected to a constant bias force. Our numerical results show that its mean velocity can decrease with the bias force increasing, i.e. ANM phenomenon. Furthermore, the ANM can take place arbitrary segments, even up to more than thirty. Intrinsic physical mechanism and conditions for arbitrary segments of ANM to occur are discussed in detail.

  12. Absolute quantification of myocardial blood flow.

    PubMed

    Yoshinaga, Keiichiro; Manabe, Osamu; Tamaki, Nagara

    2016-07-21

    With the increasing availability of positron emission tomography (PET) myocardial perfusion imaging, the absolute quantification of myocardial blood flow (MBF) has become popular in clinical settings. Quantitative MBF provides an important additional diagnostic or prognostic information over conventional visual assessment. The success of MBF quantification using PET/computed tomography (CT) has increased the demand for this quantitative diagnostic approach to be more accessible. In this regard, MBF quantification approaches have been developed using several other diagnostic imaging modalities including single-photon emission computed tomography, CT, and cardiac magnetic resonance. This review will address the clinical aspects of PET MBF quantification and the new approaches to MBF quantification.

  13. An absolute radius scale for Saturn's rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicholson, Philip D.; Cooke, Maren L.; Pelton, Emily

    1990-01-01

    Radio and stellar occultation observations of Saturn's rings made by the Voyager spacecraft are discussed. The data reveal systematic discrepancies of almost 10 km in some parts of the rings, limiting some of the investigations. A revised solution for Saturn's rotation pole has been proposed which removes the discrepancies between the stellar and radio occultation profiles. Corrections to previously published radii vary from -2 to -10 km for the radio occultation, and +5 to -6 km for the stellar occultation. An examination of spiral density waves in the outer A Ring supports that the revised absolute radii are in error by no more than 2 km.

  14. Absolute Rate Theories of Epigenetic Stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walczak, Aleksandra M.; Onuchic, Jose N.; Wolynes, Peter G.

    2006-03-01

    Spontaneous switching events in most characterized genetic switches are rare, resulting in extremely stable epigenetic properties. We show how simple arguments lead to theories of the rate of such events much like the absolute rate theory of chemical reactions corrected by a transmission factor. Both the probability of the rare cellular states that allow epigenetic escape, and the transmission factor, depend on the rates of DNA binding and unbinding events and on the rates of protein synthesis and degradation. Different mechanisms of escape from the stable attractors occur in the nonadiabatic, weakly adiabatic and strictly adiabatic regimes, characterized by the relative values of those input rates.

  15. Absolute rate theories of epigenetic stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walczak, Aleksandra M.; Onuchic, José N.; Wolynes, Peter G.

    2005-12-01

    Spontaneous switching events in most characterized genetic switches are rare, resulting in extremely stable epigenetic properties. We show how simple arguments lead to theories of the rate of such events much like the absolute rate theory of chemical reactions corrected by a transmission factor. Both the probability of the rare cellular states that allow epigenetic escape and the transmission factor depend on the rates of DNA binding and unbinding events and on the rates of protein synthesis and degradation. Different mechanisms of escape from the stable attractors occur in the nonadiabatic, weakly adiabatic, and strictly adiabatic regimes, characterized by the relative values of those input rates. rate theory | stochastic gene expression | gene switches

  16. Absolute Priority for a Vehicle in VANET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirani, Rostam; Hendessi, Faramarz; Montazeri, Mohammad Ali; Sheikh Zefreh, Mohammad

    In today's world, traffic jams waste hundreds of hours of our life. This causes many researchers try to resolve the problem with the idea of Intelligent Transportation System. For some applications like a travelling ambulance, it is important to reduce delay even for a second. In this paper, we propose a completely infrastructure-less approach for finding shortest path and controlling traffic light to provide absolute priority for an emergency vehicle. We use the idea of vehicular ad-hoc networking to reduce the imposed travelling time. Then, we simulate our proposed protocol and compare it with a centrally controlled traffic light system.

  17. ABSOLUTE PROPERTIES OF THE ECLIPSING BINARY STAR V335 SERPENTIS

    SciTech Connect

    Lacy, Claud H. Sandberg; Fekel, Francis C.; Claret, Antonio E-mail: fekel@evans.tsuniv.edu

    2012-08-15

    V335 Ser is now known to be an eccentric double-lined A1+A3 binary star with fairly deep (0.5 mag) partial eclipses. Previous studies of the system are improved with 7456 differential photometric observations from the URSA WebScope and 5666 from the NFO WebScope, and 67 high-resolution spectroscopic observations from the Tennessee State University 2 m automatic spectroscopic telescope. From dates of minima, the apsidal period is about 880 years. Accurate (better than 2%) masses and radii are determined from analysis of the two new light curves and the radial velocity curve. Theoretical models match the absolute properties of the stars at an age of about 380 Myr, though the age agreement for the two components is poor. Tidal theory correctly confirms that the orbit should still be eccentric, but we find that standard tidal theory is unable to match the observed asynchronous rotation rates of the components' surface layers.

  18. Absolute Calibration of the AXAF Telescope Effective Area

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kellogg, E.; Cohen, L.; Edgar, R.; Evans, I.; Freeman, M.; Gaetz, T.; Jerius, D.; McDermott, W. C.; McKinnon, P.; Murray, S.; Podgorski, W.; Schwartz, D.; VanSpeybroeck, L.; Wargelin, B.; Zombeck, M.; Weisskopf, M.; Elsner, R.; ODell, S.; Tennant, A.; Kolodziejczak, J.

    1997-01-01

    The prelaunch calibration of AXAF encompasses many aspects of the telescope. In principle, all that is needed is the complete point response function. This is, however, a function of energy, off-axis angle of the source, and operating mode of the facility. No single measurement would yield the entire result. Also, any calibration made prior to launch will be affected by changes in conditions after launch, such as the change from one g to zero g. The reflectivity of the mirror and perhaps even the detectors can change as well, for example by addition or removal of small amounts of material deposited on their surfaces. In this paper, we give a broad view of the issues in performing such a calibration, and discuss how they are being addressed in prelaunch preparation of AXAF. As our title indicates, we concentrate here on the total throughput of the observatory. This can be thought of as the integral of the point response function, i.e. the encircled energy, out ot the largest practical solid angle for an observation. Since there is no standard x-ray source in the sky whose flux is known to the -1% accuracy we are trying to achieve, we must do this calibration on the ground. we also must provide a means for monitoring any possible changes in this calibration from pre-launch until on-orbit operation can transfer the calibration to a celestial x-ray source whose emission is stable. In this paper, we analyze the elements of the absolute throughput calibration, which we call Effective Area. We review the requirements for calibrations of components or subsystems of the AXAF facility, including mirror, detectors, and gratings. We show how it is necessary to calibrate this ground-based detection system at standard man-made x-ray sources, such as electron storage rings. We present the status of all these calibrations, with indications of the measurements remaining to be done, even though the measurements on the AXAF flight optics and detectors will have been completed by the

  19. Aerosol properties derived from airborne sky radiance and direct beam measurements in recent NASA and DoE field campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redemann, J.; Flynn, C. J.; Shinozuka, Y.; Russell, P. B.; Kacenelenbogen, M. S.; Segal-Rosenhaimer, M.; Livingston, J. M.; Schmid, B.; Dunagan, S. E.; Johnson, R. R.; LeBlanc, S. E.; Schmidt, S.; Pilewskie, P.; Song, S.

    2014-12-01

    The AERONET (AErosol RObotic NETwork) ground-based suite of sunphotometers provides measurements of spectral aerosol optical depth (AOD), precipitable water and spectral sky radiance, which can be inverted to retrieve aerosol microphysical properties that are critical to assessments of aerosol-climate interactions. Because of data quality criteria and sampling constraints, there are significant limitations to the temporal and spatial coverage of AERONET data and their representativeness for global aerosol conditions. The 4STAR (Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research) instrument, jointly developed by NASA Ames and PNNL with NASA Goddard collaboration, combines airborne sun tracking and AERONET-like sky scanning with spectroscopic detection. Being an airborne instrument, 4STAR has the potential to fill gaps in the AERONET data set. The 4STAR instrument operated successfully in the SEAC4RS [Studies of Emissions and Atmospheric Composition, Clouds and Climate Coupling by Regional Surveys] experiment in Aug./Sep. 2013 aboard the NASA DC-8 and in the DoE [Department of Energy]-sponsored TCAP [Two Column Aerosol Project, July 2012 & Feb. 2013] experiment aboard the DoE G-1 aircraft. 4STAR provided direct beam measurements of hyperspectral AOD, columnar trace gas retrievals (H2O, O3, NO2), and the first ever airborne hyperspectral sky radiance scans, which can be inverted to yield the same products as AERONET ground-based observations. In this presentation, we provide an overview of the new 4STAR capabilities, with an emphasis on 26 high-quality sky radiance measurements carried out by 4STAR in SEAC4RS. We compare collocated 4STAR and AERONET sky radiances, as well as their retrievals of aerosol microphysical properties for a subset of the available case studies. We summarize the particle property and airmass characterization studies made possible by the combined 4STAR direct beam and sky radiance observations.

  20. Aerosol Properties Derived from Airborne Sky Radiance and Direct Beam Measurements in Recent NASA and DoE Field Campaigns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redemann, J.; Flynn, C. J.; Shinozuka, Y.; Russell, P. B.; Kacenelenbogen, M.; Segal-Rosenheimer, M.; Livingston, J. M.; Schmid, B.; Dunagan, S. E.; Johnson, R. R.; LeBlanc, S.; Schmidt, S.; Pilewskie, P.; Song, S.

    2014-01-01

    The AERONET (AErosol RObotic NETwork) ground-based suite of sunphotometers provides measurements of spectral aerosol optical depth (AOD), precipitable water and spectral sky radiance, which can be inverted to retrieve aerosol microphysical properties that are critical to assessments of aerosol-climate interactions. Because of data quality criteria and sampling constraints, there are significant limitations to the temporal and spatial coverage of AERONET data and their representativeness for global aerosol conditions.The 4STAR (Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research) instrument, jointly developed by NASA Ames and PNNL (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory) with NASA Goddard collaboration, combines airborne sun tracking and AERONET-like sky scanning with spectroscopic detection. Being an airborne instrument, 4STAR has the potential to fill gaps in the AERONET data set. The 4STAR instrument operated successfully in the SEAC4RS (Studies of Emissions and Atmospheric Composition, Clouds and Climate Coupling by Regional Surveys) experiment in Aug./Sep. 2013 aboard the NASA DC-8 and in the DoE (Department of Energy)-sponsored TCAP (Two Column Aerosol Project, July 2012 & Feb. 2013) experiment aboard the DoE G-1 aircraft. 4STAR provided direct beam measurements of hyperspectral AOD, columnar trace gas retrievals (H2O, O3, NO2), and the first ever airborne hyperspectral sky radiance scans, which can be inverted to yield the same products as AERONET ground-based observations. In this presentation, we provide an overview of the new 4STAR capabilities, with an emphasis on 26 high-quality sky radiance measurements carried out by 4STAR in SEAC4RS. We compare collocated 4STAR and AERONET sky radiances, as well as their retrievals of aerosol microphysical properties for a subset of the available case studies. We summarize the particle property and air-mass characterization studies made possible by the combined 4STAR direct beam and sky radiance

  1. Linear ultrasonic motor for absolute gravimeter.

    PubMed

    Jian, Yue; Yao, Zhiyuan; Silberschmidt, Vadim V

    2017-02-01

    Thanks to their compactness and suitability for vacuum applications, linear ultrasonic motors are considered as substitutes for classical electromagnetic motors as driving elements in absolute gravimeters. Still, their application is prevented by relatively low power output. To overcome this limitation and provide better stability, a V-type linear ultrasonic motor with a new clamping method is proposed for a gravimeter. In this paper, a mechanical model of stators with flexible clamping components is suggested, according to a design criterion for clamps of linear ultrasonic motors. After that, an effect of tangential and normal rigidity of the clamping components on mechanical output is studied. It is followed by discussion of a new clamping method with sufficient tangential rigidity and a capability to facilitate pre-load. Additionally, a prototype of the motor with the proposed clamping method was fabricated and the performance tests in vertical direction were implemented. Experimental results show that the suggested motor has structural stability and high dynamic performance, such as no-load speed of 1.4m/s and maximal thrust of 43N, meeting the requirements for absolute gravimeters.

  2. Why to compare absolute numbers of mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Sabine; Schulz, Sabine; Schropp, Eva-Maria; Eberhagen, Carola; Simmons, Alisha; Beisker, Wolfgang; Aichler, Michaela; Zischka, Hans

    2014-11-01

    Prompted by pronounced structural differences between rat liver and rat hepatocellular carcinoma mitochondria, we suspected these mitochondrial populations to differ massively in their molecular composition. Aiming to reveal these mitochondrial differences, we came across the issue on how to normalize such comparisons and decided to focus on the absolute number of mitochondria. To this end, fluorescently stained mitochondria were quantified by flow cytometry. For rat liver mitochondria, this approach resulted in mitochondrial protein contents comparable to earlier reports using alternative methods. We determined similar protein contents for rat liver, heart and kidney mitochondria. In contrast, however, lower protein contents were determined for rat brain mitochondria and for mitochondria from the rat hepatocellular carcinoma cell line McA 7777. This result challenges mitochondrial comparisons that rely on equal protein amounts as a typical normalization method. Exemplarily, we therefore compared the activity and susceptibility toward inhibition of complex II of rat liver and hepatocellular carcinoma mitochondria and obtained significant discrepancies by either normalizing to protein amount or to absolute mitochondrial number. Importantly, the latter normalization, in contrast to the former, demonstrated a lower complex II activity and higher susceptibility toward inhibition in hepatocellular carcinoma mitochondria compared to liver mitochondria. These findings demonstrate that solely normalizing to protein amount may obscure essential molecular differences between mitochondrial populations.

  3. The absolute threshold of cone vision

    PubMed Central

    Koeing, Darran; Hofer, Heidi

    2013-01-01

    We report measurements of the absolute threshold of cone vision, which has been previously underestimated due to sub-optimal conditions or overly strict subjective response criteria. We avoided these limitations by using optimized stimuli and experimental conditions while having subjects respond within a rating scale framework. Small (1′ fwhm), brief (34 msec), monochromatic (550 nm) stimuli were foveally presented at multiple intensities in dark-adapted retina for 5 subjects. For comparison, 4 subjects underwent similar testing with rod-optimized stimuli. Cone absolute threshold, that is, the minimum light energy for which subjects were just able to detect a visual stimulus with any response criterion, was 203 ± 38 photons at the cornea, ∼0.47 log units lower than previously reported. Two-alternative forced-choice measurements in a subset of subjects yielded consistent results. Cone thresholds were less responsive to criterion changes than rod thresholds, suggesting a limit to the stimulus information recoverable from the cone mosaic in addition to the limit imposed by Poisson noise. Results were consistent with expectations for detection in the face of stimulus uncertainty. We discuss implications of these findings for modeling the first stages of human cone vision and interpreting psychophysical data acquired with adaptive optics at the spatial scale of the receptor mosaic. PMID:21270115

  4. [Estimation of absolute risk for fracture].

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Saeko

    2009-03-01

    Osteoporosis treatment aims to prevent fractures and maintain the QOL of the elderly. However, persons at high risk of future fracture cannot be effectively identified on the basis of bone density (BMD) alone, although BMD is used as an diagnostic criterion. Therefore, the WHO recommended that absolute risk for fracture (10-year probability of fracture) for each individual be evaluated and used as an index for intervention threshold. The 10-year probability of fracture is calculated based on age, sex, BMD at the femoral neck (body mass index if BMD is not available), history of previous fractures, parental hip fracture history, smoking, steroid use, rheumatoid arthritis, secondary osteoporosis and alcohol consumption. The WHO has just announced the development of a calculation tool (FRAX: WHO Fracture Risk Assessment Tool) in February this year. Fractures could be prevented more effectively if, based on each country's medical circumstances, an absolute risk value for fracture to determine when to start medical treatment is established and persons at high risk of fracture are identified and treated accordingly.

  5. Absolute stereochemistry of altersolanol A and alterporriols.

    PubMed

    Kanamaru, Saki; Honma, Miho; Murakami, Takanori; Tsushima, Taro; Kudo, Shinji; Tanaka, Kazuaki; Nihei, Ken-Ichi; Nehira, Tatsuo; Hashimoto, Masaru

    2012-02-01

    The absolute stereochemistry of altersolanol A (1) was established by observing a positive exciton couplet in the circular dichroism (CD) spectrum of the C3,C4-O-bis(2-naphthoyl) derivative 10 and by chemical correlations with known compound 8. Before the discussion, the relative stereochemistry of 1 was confirmed by X-ray crystallographic analysis. The shielding effect at C7'-OMe group by C1-O-benzoylation established the relative stereochemical relationship between the C8-C8' axial bonding and the C1-C4/C1'-C4' polyol moieties of alterporriols E (3), an atropisomer of the C8-C8' dimer of 1. As 3 could be obtained by dimerization of 1 in vitro, the absolute configuration of its central chirality elements (C1-C4) must be identical to those of 1. Spectral comparison between the experimental and theoretical CD spectra supported the above conclusion. Axial stereochemistry of novel C4-O-deoxy dimeric derivatives, alterporriols F (4) and G (5), were also revealed by comparison of their CD spectra to those of 2 and 3.

  6. Absolute Electron Extraction Efficiency of Liquid Xenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamdin, Katayun; Mizrachi, Eli; Morad, James; Sorensen, Peter

    2016-03-01

    Dual phase liquid/gas xenon time projection chambers (TPCs) currently set the world's most sensitive limits on weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs), a favored dark matter candidate. These detectors rely on extracting electrons from liquid xenon into gaseous xenon, where they produce proportional scintillation. The proportional scintillation from the extracted electrons serves to internally amplify the WIMP signal; even a single extracted electron is detectable. Credible dark matter searches can proceed with electron extraction efficiency (EEE) lower than 100%. However, electrons systematically left at the liquid/gas boundary are a concern. Possible effects include spontaneous single or multi-electron proportional scintillation signals in the gas, or charging of the liquid/gas interface or detector materials. Understanding EEE is consequently a serious concern for this class of rare event search detectors. Previous EEE measurements have mostly been relative, not absolute, assuming efficiency plateaus at 100%. I will present an absolute EEE measurement with a small liquid/gas xenon TPC test bed located at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.

  7. Swarm's Absolute Scalar Magnetometers Burst Mode Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coisson, P.; Vigneron, P.; Hulot, G.; Crespo Grau, R.; Brocco, L.; Lalanne, X.; Sirol, O.; Leger, J. M.; Jager, T.; Bertrand, F.; Boness, A.; Fratter, I.

    2014-12-01

    Each of the three Swarm satellites embarks an Absolute Scalar Magnetometer (ASM) to provide absolute scalar measurements of the magnetic field with high accuracy and stability. Nominal data acquisition of these ASMs is 1 Hz. But they can also run in a so-called "burst mode" and provide data at 250 Hz. During the commissioning phase of the mission, seven burst mode acquisition campaigns have been run simultaneously for all satellites, obtaining a total of ten days of burs-mode data. These campaigns allowed the identification of issues related to the operations of the piezo-electric motor and the heaters connected to the ASM, that do not impact the nominal 1 Hz scalar data. We analyze the burst mode data to identify high frequency geomagnetic signals, focusing the analysis in two regions: the low latitudes, where we seek signatures of ionospheric irregularities, and the high latitudes, to identify high frequency signals related to polar region currents. Since these campaigns have been conducted during the initial months of the mission, the three satellites where still close to each other, allowing to analyze the spatial coherency of the signals. Wavelet analysis have revealed 31 Hz signals appearing in the night-side in the equatorial region.

  8. Absolute activity measurement of radon gas at IRA-METAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spring, Philippe; Nedjadi, Youcef; Bailat, Claude; Triscone, Gilles; Bochud, François

    2006-12-01

    This paper describes the system of the Swiss national metrological institute (IRA-METAS) for the absolute standardisation of radon gas. This method relies on condensing radon under vacuum conditions within a specified cold area using a cryogenerator, and detecting its alpha particles with an ion-implanted silicon detector, through a very accurately defined solid angle. The accuracy of this defined solid angle standardisation technique was corroborated by another primary measurement method involving 4 πγ NaI(Tl) integral counting and Monte Carlo efficiency calculations. The 222Rn standard submitted by IRA-METAS to the Système International de Référence (SIR) at the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures (BIPM) has also been found to be consistent with an analogous standard submitted by the German national metrological institute (PTB). IRA-METAS is able to deliver radon standards, with activities ranging from a few kBq to 350 kBq, in NIST-Type ampoules, and glass or steel containers usable for calibrating radon-measuring instruments.

  9. Extracting infrared absolute reflectance from relative reflectance measurements.

    PubMed

    Berets, Susan L; Milosevic, Milan

    2012-06-01

    Absolute reflectance measurements are valuable to the optics industry for development of new materials and optical coatings. Yet, absolute reflectance measurements are notoriously difficult to make. In this paper, we investigate the feasibility of extracting the absolute reflectance from a relative reflectance measurement using a reference material with known refractive index.

  10. A Conceptual Approach to Absolute Value Equations and Inequalities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Mark W.; Bryson, Janet L.

    2011-01-01

    The absolute value learning objective in high school mathematics requires students to solve far more complex absolute value equations and inequalities. When absolute value problems become more complex, students often do not have sufficient conceptual understanding to make any sense of what is happening mathematically. The authors suggest that the…

  11. Ultraviolet photometry from the Orbiting Astronomical Observatory. XXI - Absolute energy distribution of stars in the ultraviolet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bless, R. C.; Code, A. D.; Fairchild, E. T.

    1976-01-01

    The absolute energy distribution in the ultraviolet is given for the stars alpha Vir, eta UMa, and alpha Leo. The calibration is based on absolute heterochromatic photometry between 2920 and 1370 A carried out with an Aerobee sounding rocket. The fundamental radiation standard is the synchrotron radiation from 240-MeV electrons in a certain synchrotron storage ring. On the basis of the sounding-rocket calibration, the preliminary OAO-2 spectrometer calibration has been revised; the fluxes for the three program stars are tabulated in energy per second per square centimeter per unit wavelength interval.

  12. Absolute calibration of a soft X-ray spectrograph for X-ray laser research using white beam.

    PubMed

    Fujikawa, C; Kawachi, T; Ando, K; Yamaguchi, N; Hara, T

    1998-05-01

    Absolute calibration of a soft X-ray spectrograph has been performed using a white beam of synchrotron radiation. The calibrated spectrograph was a flat-field grazing-incidence spectrograph with an X-ray CCD detector for X-ray laser research. Absolute sensitivity of the spectrograph system can be obtained from transmitted spectra using filters made of several different materials, each providing an absorption-edge wavelength standard. The absolute sensitivity determined in this work shows nearly the same behaviour with wavelength as that in another calibration experiment using a laser-produced plasma as an X-ray source.

  13. Use of Absolute and Comparative Performance Feedback in Absolute and Comparative Judgments and Decisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Don A.; Klein, William M. P.

    2008-01-01

    Which matters more--beliefs about absolute ability or ability relative to others? This study set out to compare the effects of such beliefs on satisfaction with performance, self-evaluations, and bets on future performance. In Experiment 1, undergraduate participants were told they had answered 20% correct, 80% correct, or were not given their…

  14. Absolute nonlocality via distributed computing without communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czekaj, Ł.; Pawłowski, M.; Vértesi, T.; Grudka, A.; Horodecki, M.; Horodecki, R.

    2015-09-01

    Understanding the role that quantum entanglement plays as a resource in various information processing tasks is one of the crucial goals of quantum information theory. Here we propose an alternative perspective for studying quantum entanglement: distributed computation of functions without communication between nodes. To formalize this approach, we propose identity games. Surprisingly, despite no signaling, we obtain that nonlocal quantum strategies beat classical ones in terms of winning probability for identity games originating from certain bipartite and multipartite functions. Moreover we show that, for a majority of functions, access to general nonsignaling resources boosts success probability two times in comparison to classical ones for a number of large enough outputs. Because there are no constraints on the inputs and no processing of the outputs in the identity games, they detect very strong types of correlations: absolute nonlocality.

  15. In vivo absorption spectroscopy for absolute measurement.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Hiromitsu; Fukuda, Takashi

    2012-10-01

    In in vivo spectroscopy, there are differences between individual subjects in parameters such as tissue scattering and sample concentration. We propose a method that can provide the absolute value of a particular substance concentration, independent of these individual differences. Thus, it is not necessary to use the typical statistical calibration curve, which assumes an average level of scattering and an averaged concentration over individual subjects. This method is expected to greatly reduce the difficulties encountered during in vivo measurements. As an example, for in vivo absorption spectroscopy, the method was applied to the reflectance measurement in retinal vessels to monitor their oxygen saturation levels. This method was then validated by applying it to the tissue phantom under a variety of absorbance values and scattering efficiencies.

  16. Determining Absolute Zero Using a Tuning Fork

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldader, Jeffrey D.

    2008-04-01

    The Celsius and Kelvin temperature scales, we tell our students, are related. We explain that a change in temperature of 1°C corresponds to a change of 1 Kelvin and that atoms and molecules have zero kinetic energy at zero Kelvin, -273°C. In this paper, we will show how students can derive the relationship between the Celsius and Kelvin temperature scales using a simple, well-known physics experiment. By making multiple measurements of the speed of sound at different temperatures, using the classic physics experiment of determining the speed of sound with a tuning fork and variable-length tube, they can determine the temperature at which the speed of sound is zero—absolute zero.

  17. MAGSAT: Vector magnetometer absolute sensor alignment determination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acuna, M. H.

    1981-01-01

    A procedure is described for accurately determining the absolute alignment of the magnetic axes of a triaxial magnetometer sensor with respect to an external, fixed, reference coordinate system. The method does not require that the magnetic field vector orientation, as generated by a triaxial calibration coil system, be known to better than a few degrees from its true position, and minimizes the number of positions through which a sensor assembly must be rotated to obtain a solution. Computer simulations show that accuracies of better than 0.4 seconds of arc can be achieved under typical test conditions associated with existing magnetic test facilities. The basic approach is similar in nature to that presented by McPherron and Snare (1978) except that only three sensor positions are required and the system of equations to be solved is considerably simplified. Applications of the method to the case of the MAGSAT Vector Magnetometer are presented and the problems encountered discussed.

  18. An estimate of global absolute dynamic topography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tai, C.-K.; Wunsch, C.

    1984-01-01

    The absolute dynamic topography of the world ocean is estimated from the largest scales to a short-wavelength cutoff of about 6700 km for the period July through September, 1978. The data base consisted of the time-averaged sea-surface topography determined by Seasat and geoid estimates made at the Goddard Space Flight Center. The issues are those of accuracy and resolution. Use of the altimetric surface as a geoid estimate beyond the short-wavelength cutoff reduces the spectral leakage in the estimated dynamic topography from erroneous small-scale geoid estimates without contaminating the low wavenumbers. Comparison of the result with a similarly filtered version of Levitus' (1982) historical average dynamic topography shows good qualitative agreement. There is quantitative disagreement, but it is within the estimated errors of both methods of calculation.

  19. Micron Accurate Absolute Ranging System: Range Extension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalley, Larry L.; Smith, Kely L.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to investigate Fresnel diffraction as a means of obtaining absolute distance measurements with micron or greater accuracy. It is believed that such a system would prove useful to the Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST) as a non-intrusive, non-contact measuring system for use with secondary concentrator station-keeping systems. The present research attempts to validate past experiments and develop ways to apply the phenomena of Fresnel diffraction to micron accurate measurement. This report discusses past research on the phenomena, and the basis of the use Fresnel diffraction distance metrology. The apparatus used in the recent investigations, experimental procedures used, preliminary results are discussed in detail. Continued research and equipment requirements on the extension of the effective range of the Fresnel diffraction systems is also described.

  20. Absolute measurements of fast neutrons using yttrium.

    PubMed

    Roshan, M V; Springham, S V; Rawat, R S; Lee, P; Krishnan, M

    2010-08-01

    Yttrium is presented as an absolute neutron detector for pulsed neutron sources. It has high sensitivity for detecting fast neutrons. Yttrium has the property of generating a monoenergetic secondary radiation in the form of a 909 keV gamma-ray caused by inelastic neutron interaction. It was calibrated numerically using MCNPX and does not need periodic recalibration. The total yttrium efficiency for detecting 2.45 MeV neutrons was determined to be f(n) approximately 4.1x10(-4) with an uncertainty of about 0.27%. The yttrium detector was employed in the NX2 plasma focus experiments and showed the neutron yield of the order of 10(8) neutrons per discharge.