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Sample records for absolute rate coefficients

  1. Absolute rate coefficients for photorecombination of beryllium-like and boron-like silicon ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernhardt, D.; Becker, A.; Brandau, C.; Grieser, M.; Hahn, M.; Krantz, C.; Lestinsky, M.; Novotný, O.; Repnow, R.; Savin, D. W.; Spruck, K.; Wolf, A.; Müller, A.; Schippers, S.

    2016-04-01

    We report measured rate coefficients for electron-ion recombination of Si10+ forming Si9+ and of Si9+ forming Si8+, respectively. The measurements were performed using the electron-ion merged-beams technique at a heavy-ion storage ring. Electron-ion collision energies ranged from 0 to 50 eV for Si9+ and from 0 to 2000 eV for Si10+, thus, extending previous measurements for Si10+ (Orban et al 2010 Astrophys. J. 721 1603) to much higher energies. Experimentally derived rate coefficients for the recombination of Si9+ and Si10+ ions in a plasma are presented along with simple parameterizations. These rate coefficients are useful for the modeling of the charge balance of silicon in photoionized plasmas (Si9+ and Si10+) and in collisionally ionized plasmas (Si10+ only). In the corresponding temperature ranges, the experimentally derived rate coefficients agree with the latest corresponding theoretical results within the experimental uncertainties.

  2. Recombination of W19 + ions with electrons: Absolute rate coefficients from a storage-ring experiment and from theoretical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badnell, N. R.; Spruck, K.; Krantz, C.; Novotný, O.; Becker, A.; Bernhardt, D.; Grieser, M.; Hahn, M.; Repnow, R.; Savin, D. W.; Wolf, A.; Müller, A.; Schippers, S.

    2016-05-01

    Experimentally measured and theoretically calculated rate coefficients for the recombination of W19 +([Kr ] 4 d10 4 f9 ) ions with free electrons (forming W18 +) are presented. At low electron-ion collision energies, the merged-beam rate coefficient is dominated by strong, mutually overlapping, recombination resonances as already found previously for the neighboring charge-state ions W18 + and W20 +. In the temperature range where W19 + is expected to form in a collisionally ionized plasma, the experimentally derived recombination rate coefficient deviates by up to a factor of about 20 from the theoretical rate coefficient obtained from the Atomic Data and Analysis Structure database. The present calculations, which employ a Breit-Wigner redistributive partitioning of autoionizing widths for dielectronic recombination via multi-electron resonances, reproduce the experimental findings over the entire temperature range.

  3. A full-dimensional model of ozone forming reaction: the absolute value of the recombination rate coefficient, its pressure and temperature dependencies.

    PubMed

    Teplukhin, Alexander; Babikov, Dmitri

    2016-07-28

    Rigorous calculations of scattering resonances in ozone are carried out for a broad range of rotational excitations. The accurate potential energy surface of Dawes is adopted, and a new efficient method for calculations of ro-vibrational energies, wave functions and resonance lifetimes is employed (which uses hyper-spherical coordinates, the sequential diagonalization/truncation approach, grid optimization and complex absorbing potential). A detailed analysis is carried out to characterize distributions of resonance energies and lifetimes, their rotational/vibrational content and their positions with respect to the centrifugal barrier. Emphasis is on the contribution of these resonances to the recombination process that forms ozone. It is found that major contributions come from localized resonances at energies near the top of the barrier. Delocalized resonances at higher energies should also be taken into account, while very narrow resonances at low energies (trapped far behind the centrifugal barrier) should be treated as bound states. The absolute value of the recombination rate coefficient, its pressure and temperature dependencies are obtained using the energy-transfer model developed in the earlier work. Good agreement with experimental data is obtained if one follows the suggestion of Troe, who argued that the energy transfer mechanism of recombination is responsible only for 55% of the recombination rate (with the remaining 45% coming from the competing chaperon mechanism). PMID:27364351

  4. Determination of absolute internal conversion coefficients using the SAGE spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorri, J.; Greenlees, P. T.; Papadakis, P.; Konki, J.; Cox, D. M.; Auranen, K.; Partanen, J.; Sandzelius, M.; Pakarinen, J.; Rahkila, P.; Uusitalo, J.; Herzberg, R.-D.; Smallcombe, J.; Davies, P. J.; Barton, C. J.; Jenkins, D. G.

    2016-03-01

    A non-reference based method to determine internal conversion coefficients using the SAGE spectrometer is carried out for transitions in the nuclei of 154Sm, 152Sm and 166Yb. The Normalised-Peak-to-Gamma method is in general an efficient tool to extract internal conversion coefficients. However, in many cases the required well-known reference transitions are not available. The data analysis steps required to determine absolute internal conversion coefficients with the SAGE spectrometer are presented. In addition, several background suppression methods are introduced and an example of how ancillary detectors can be used to select specific reaction products is given. The results obtained for ground-state band E2 transitions show that the absolute internal conversion coefficients can be extracted using the methods described with a reasonable accuracy. In some cases of less intense transitions only an upper limit for the internal conversion coefficient could be given.

  5. Absolute magnitudes and phase coefficients of trans-Neptunian objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez-Candal, A.; Pinilla-Alonso, N.; Ortiz, J. L.; Duffard, R.; Morales, N.; Santos-Sanz, P.; Thirouin, A.; Silva, J. S.

    2016-02-01

    Context. Accurate measurements of diameters of trans-Neptunian objects (TNOs) are extremely difficult to obtain. Thermal modeling can provide good results, but accurate absolute magnitudes are needed to constrain the thermal models and derive diameters and geometric albedos. The absolute magnitude, HV, is defined as the magnitude of the object reduced to unit helio- and geocentric distances and a zero solar phase angle and is determined using phase curves. Phase coefficients can also be obtained from phase curves. These are related to surface properties, but only few are known. Aims: Our objective is to measure accurate V-band absolute magnitudes and phase coefficients for a sample of TNOs, many of which have been observed and modeled within the program "TNOs are cool", which is one of the Herschel Space Observatory key projects. Methods: We observed 56 objects using the V and R filters. These data, along with those available in the literature, were used to obtain phase curves and measure V-band absolute magnitudes and phase coefficients by assuming a linear trend of the phase curves and considering a magnitude variability that is due to the rotational light-curve. Results: We obtained 237 new magnitudes for the 56 objects, six of which were without previously reported measurements. Including the data from the literature, we report a total of 110 absolute magnitudes with their respective phase coefficients. The average value of HV is 6.39, bracketed by a minimum of 14.60 and a maximum of -1.12. For the phase coefficients we report a median value of 0.10 mag per degree and a very large dispersion, ranging from -0.88 up to 1.35 mag per degree.

  6. Absolute rates of hole transfer in DNA.

    PubMed

    Senthilkumar, Kittusamy; Grozema, Ferdinand C; Guerra, Célia Fonseca; Bickelhaupt, F Matthias; Lewis, Frederick D; Berlin, Yuri A; Ratner, Mark A; Siebbeles, Laurens D A

    2005-10-26

    Absolute rates of hole transfer between guanine nucleobases separated by one or two A:T base pairs in stilbenedicarboxamide-linked DNA hairpins were obtained by improved kinetic analysis of experimental data. The charge-transfer rates in four different DNA sequences were calculated using a density-functional-based tight-binding model and a semiclassical superexchange model. Site energies and charge-transfer integrals were calculated directly as the diagonal and off-diagonal matrix elements of the Kohn-Sham Hamiltonian, respectively, for all possible combinations of nucleobases. Taking into account the Coulomb interaction between the negative charge on the stilbenedicarboxamide linker and the hole on the DNA strand as well as effects of base pair twisting, the relative order of the experimental rates for hole transfer in different hairpins could be reproduced by tight-binding calculations. To reproduce quantitatively the absolute values of the measured rate constants, the effect of the reorganization energy was taken into account within the semiclassical superexchange model for charge transfer. The experimental rates could be reproduced with reorganization energies near 1 eV. The quantum chemical data obtained were used to discuss charge carrier mobility and hole-transport equilibria in DNA. PMID:16231945

  7. The Absolute Rate of LGRB Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, J. F.; Schady, P.

    2016-06-01

    We estimate the long-duration gamma-ray burst (LGRB) progenitor rate using our recent work on the effects of environmental metallically on LGRB formation in concert with supernovae (SNe) statistics via an approach patterned loosely off the Drake equation. Beginning with the cosmic star formation history, we consider the expected number of broad-line Type Ic events (the SNe type associated with LGRBs) that are in low-metallicity host environments adjusted by the contribution of high-metallicity host environments at a much reduced rate. We then compare this estimate to the observed LGRB rate corrected for instrumental selection effects to provide a combined estimate of the efficiency fraction of these progenitors to produce LGRBs and the fraction of which are beamed in our direction. From this we estimate that an aligned LGRB occurs for approximately every 4000 ± 2000 low-metallically broad-lined SNe Ic. Therefore, if one assumes a semi-nominal beaming factor of 100, then only about one such supernova out of 40 produce an LGRB. Finally, we propose an off-axis LGRB search strategy of targeting only broad-line Type Ic events that occur in low-metallicity hosts for radio observation.

  8. Experimental Mg IX photorecombination rate coefficient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schippers, S.; Schnell, M.; Brandau, C.; Kieslich, S.; Müller, A.; Wolf, A.

    2004-07-01

    The rate coefficient for radiative and dielectronic recombination of beryllium-like magnesium ions was measured with high resolution at the Heidelberg heavy-ion storage ring TSR. In the electron-ion collision energy range 0-207 eV resonances due to 2s -> 2p (Δ N = 0) and 2s -> 3l (Δ N=1) core excitations were detected. At low energies below 0.15 eV the recombination rate coefficient is dominated by strong 1s2 (2s 2p 3P) 7l resonances with the strongest one occuring at an energy of only 21 meV. These resonances decisively influence the Mg IX recombination rate coefficient in a low temperature plasma. The experimentally derived Mg IX dielectronic recombination rate coefficient (±15% systematical uncertainty) is compared with the recommendation by Mazzotta et al. (1998, A&AS, 133, 403) and the recent calculations by Gu (2003, ApJ, 590, 1131) and by Colgan et al. (2003, A&A, 412, 597). These results deviate from the experimental rate coefficient by 130%, 82% and 25%, respectively, at the temperature where the fractional abundance of Mg IX is expected to peak in a photoionized plasma. At this temperature a theoretical uncertainty in the 1s2 (2s 2p 3P) 7l resonance positions of only 100 meV would translate into an uncertainty of the plasma rate coefficient of almost a factor 3. This finding emphasizes that an accurate theoretical calculation of the Mg IX recombination rate coefficient from first principles is challenging.

  9. Determination of RW3-to-water mass-energy absorption coefficient ratio for absolute dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Seet, Katrina Y T; Hanlon, Peta M; Charles, Paul H

    2011-12-01

    The measurement of absorbed dose to water in a solid-phantom may require a conversion factor because it may not be radiologically equivalent to water. One phantom developed for the use of dosimetry is a solid water, RW3 white-polystyrene material by IBA. This has a lower mass-energy absorption coefficient than water due to high bremsstrahlung yield, which affects the accuracy of absolute dosimetry measurements. In this paper, we demonstrate the calculation of mass-energy absorption coefficient ratios, relative to water, from measurements in plastic water and RW3 with an Elekta Synergy linear accelerator (6 and 10 MV photon beams) as well as Monte Carlo modeling in BEAMnrc and DOSXYZnrc. From this, the solid-phantom-to-water correction factor was determined for plastic water and RW3. PMID:21960410

  10. Flow rate calibration for absolute cell counting rationale and design.

    PubMed

    Walker, Clare; Barnett, David

    2006-05-01

    There is a need for absolute leukocyte enumeration in the clinical setting, and accurate, reliable (and affordable) technology to determine absolute leukocyte counts has been developed. Such technology includes single platform and dual platform approaches. Derivations of these counts commonly incorporate the addition of a known number of latex microsphere beads to a blood sample, although it has been suggested that the addition of beads to a sample may only be required to act as an internal quality control procedure for assessing the pipetting error. This unit provides the technical details for undertaking flow rate calibration that obviates the need to add reference beads to each sample. It is envisaged that this report will provide the basis for subsequent clinical evaluations of this novel approach. PMID:18770842

  11. Nanoscale Thermoelectrics: A Study of the Absolute Seebeck Coefficient of Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, Sarah J.

    measure, S, as a function of temperature using a micro-machined thermal isolation platform consisting of a suspended, patterned SiN membrane. By measuring a series of thicknesses of metallic films up to the infinitely thin film limit, in which the electrical resistivity is no longer decreasing with increasing film thickness, but still not at bulk values, along with the effective electron mean free path, we are able to show the contribution of the leads needed to measure this property. Having a comprehensive understanding of the background contribution we are able to determine the absolute Seebeck coefficient of a wide variety of thin films. The nature of the design of the SiN membrane also allows the ability to accurately and directly measure thermal and electrical transport of the thin films yielding a comprehensive measurement of the three quantities that characterize a material's efficiency. This can serve to further the development of thermoelectric materials through precise measurements of the material properties that dictate efficiency.

  12. Experimental electron-impact excitation rate coefficients for lithium-like Si XII

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    König, R.; Kolk, K.-H.; Kunze, H.-J.

    1993-07-01

    Absolute excitation rate coefficients have been determined experimentally for all excited states up to 1s25f of the lithium-like ion Si XII using a well diagnosed theta-pinch plasma. A new method has been developed to determine the most crucial quantity of these measurements, the absolute concentration of the silicon ions in the plasma. For this we made use of the fact that sufficiently high lying levels are in partial local thermodynamic equilibrium (PLTE) with the ground state of the next higher ionization stage. A theoretical population model has been developed to study the influence of the different processes that might contribute to the population of the different levels at our plasma parameters. For most levels the theoretical excitation rate coefficients were found to be in fair agreement with the theoretical ones. The error of the experimentally determined excitation rate coefficients is of the order of ±50%.

  13. Excitation rate coefficient measurements of Cu xiii and Cu xvii ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datla, R. U.; Roberts, J. R.; Rowan, W. L.; Mann, J. B.

    1986-12-01

    The absolute excitation rate coefficients for Cu xiii and Cu xvii optically allowed transitions have been measured using the Texas Experimental Tokamak (TEXT) tokamak. Cu is injected by the laser-ablation method at a time when the plasma has attained steady-state temperature and density profiles. The absolute intensities of the magnetic-dipole-forbidden transitions within the Cu xiii 3s23p5 and the Cu xvii 3s23p ground configurations are measured. The intensities of optically allowed vacuum-ultraviolet lines within the 3p43d-3p5 transition array of Cu xiii and within the 3d-3p transition array of Cu xvii are measured with a 2.2-m grazing incidence spectrometer. This instrument is radiometrically calibrated in situ by using the branching-ratio technique. The absolute excitation rate coefficients are deduced from these measurements, assuming coronal equilibrium, optically thin line emission, and statistical population within the ground configuration. The experimental rate coefficients for these transition arrays are found to be 2.84×10-8 cm3 s-1 for Cu xiii at an electron temperature of 127 eV and 3.5×10-8 cm3 s-1 for Cu xvii at an electron temperature of 240 eV. These results are in good agreement with excitation rate coefficients computed in a distorted-wave approximation. The estimated uncertainty in the experimental values is +/-70%.

  14. Experimental Excitation Rate Coefficients for Ne VIII Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, C. C.; Greve, P.; Kolk, K.-H.; Kunze, H.-J.

    1984-02-01

    From the line emission of a pure neon plasma produced in a theta pinch discharge rate coefficients for the excitation of the n = 3 and 4 levels in Ne VIII ions are derived and compared with theoretical calculations and previous measurements. The general agreement between theory and all measurements is rather satisfactory for the excitation to the n = 3 levels, the measured rate coefficients to the 4p and 4d levels, however, being consistently too low.

  15. RECOMBINATION RATE COEFFICIENTS OF BORON-LIKE Ne

    SciTech Connect

    Mahmood, S.; Orban, I.; Ali, S.; Schuch, R.; Glans, P.; Bleda, E. A.; Altun, Z.

    2013-07-10

    Recombination of Ne{sup 5+} was measured in a merged-beam type experiment at the heavy-ion storage ring CRYRING. In the collision energy range 0-110 eV resonances due to 2s {sup 2}2p {yields} 2s2p {sup 2} ({Delta}n = 0) and 2s {sup 2}2p {yields} 2s {sup 2}3l ({Delta}n = 1), core excitations were observed. The experimentally derived rate coefficients agree well with the calculations obtained using AUTOSTRUCTURE. At low energies, recombination is dominated by resonances belonging to the spin-forbidden 2s2p {sup 2}({sup 4} P{sub J})nl series. The energy-dependent rate coefficients were convoluted with a Maxwell-Boltzmann electron energy distribution to obtain plasma recombination rate coefficients. The data from the literature deviate from the measured results at low temperature.

  16. RECOMBINATION RATE COEFFICIENTS OF Be-LIKE Si

    SciTech Connect

    Orban, I.; Boehm, S.; Schuch, R.; Loch, S. D.

    2010-10-01

    Recombination of Be-like Si{sup 10+} over the 0-43 eV electron-ion energy range is measured at the CRYRING electron cooler. In addition to radiative and dielectronic recombination, the recombination spectrum also shows strong contributions from trielectronic recombination. Below 100 meV, several very strong resonances associated with a spin-flip of the excited electron dominate the spectrum and also dominate the recombination in the photoionized plasma. The resonant plasma rate coefficients corrected for the experimental field ionization are in good agreement with calculated results by Gu and with AUTOSTRUCTURE calculations. All other calculations significantly underestimate the plasma rate coefficients at low temperatures.

  17. ROVIBRATIONAL QUENCHING RATE COEFFICIENTS OF HD IN COLLISIONS WITH He

    SciTech Connect

    Nolte, J. L.; Stancil, P. C.; Lee, T.-G.; Balakrishnan, N.; Forrey, R. C. E-mail: stancil@physast.uga.edu E-mail: naduvala@unlv.nevada.edu

    2012-01-01

    Along with H{sub 2}, HD has been found to play an important role in the cooling of the primordial gas for the formation of the first stars and galaxies. It has also been observed in a variety of cool molecular astrophysical environments. The rate of cooling by HD molecules requires knowledge of collisional rate coefficients with the primary impactors, H, He, and H{sub 2}. To improve knowledge of the collisional properties of HD, we present rate coefficients for the He-HD collision system over a range of collision energies from 10{sup -5} to 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 3} cm{sup -1}. Fully quantum mechanical scattering calculations were performed for initial HD rovibrational states of j = 0 and 1 for v = 0-17 which utilized accurate diatom rovibrational wave functions. Rate coefficients of all {Delta}v = 0, -1, and -2 transitions are reported. Significant discrepancies with previous calculations, which adopted a small basis and harmonic HD wave functions for excited vibrational levels, were found for the highest previously considered vibrational state of v = 3. Applications of the He-HD rate coefficients in various astrophysical environments are briefly discussed.

  18. Experimental electron-impact excitation rate coefficients for beryllium-like Si XI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    König, R.; Kolk, K.-H.; Kunze, H.-J.

    1996-06-01

    Absolute excitation rate coefficients for a large number of levels (up to n = 4) of the singlet and triplet system of Si XI have been experimentally determined in a well-diagnosed theta-pinch plasma with the plasma spectroscopic method. The population of the metastable triplet ground state has been derived from the intensity of the intercombination line. A theoretical population model has been developed to investigate whether collisional coupling of the levels and cascading affected the measurements. The model has also been used to calculate line intensity ratios of strongly density or temperature dependent line pairs which can be used for plasma diagnostic purposes. The measured effective excitation rate coefficients are accurate to about ±50%. All of them, apart from the value for the 2s4s 3S1 level, agreed within the error margins with existing theoretical data.

  19. Gas-phase rate coefficients of the reaction of ozone with four sesquiterpenes at 295 ± 2 K.

    PubMed

    Richters, Stefanie; Herrmann, Hartmut; Berndt, Torsten

    2015-05-01

    The rate coefficients of the reaction of ozone with the four atmospherically relevant sesquiterpenes β-caryophyllene, α-humulene, α-cedrene and isolongifolene were investigated at 295 ± 2 K and atmospheric pressure by at least two independent experimental investigations for each reaction. Relative rate experiments were carried out in a flow tube using two different experimental approaches with GC-MS detection (RR 1) and PTR-MS analysis (RR 2) as the analytical techniques. Absolute rate coefficients were determined in a stopped-flow experiment following the ozone depletion by means of UV spectroscopy. The average rate coefficients from the combined investigations representing the mean values of the different experimental methods are (unit: cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1)): k(O3+β-caryophyllene) = (1.1 ± 0.3) × 10(-14) (methods: RR 1, RR 2, absolute), k(O3+α-humulene) = (1.2 ± 0.3) × 10(-14) (RR 1, RR 2), k(O3+α-cedrene) = (1.7 ± 0.5) × 10(-16) (RR 2, absolute) and k(O3+isolongifolene) = (1.1 ± 0.5) × 10(-17) (RR 2, absolute). The high ozonolysis rate coefficients for β-caryophyllene and α-humulene agree well with the results by Shu and Atkinson (Int. J. Chem. Kinet., 1994, 26) and lead to short atmospheric lifetimes of about two minutes with respect to the ozone reaction. The relatively small rate coefficients for α-cedrene and isolongifolene differ from the available literature values by a factor of about 2.5-6. Possible reasons for the deviations are discussed. Finally, calibrated sesquiterpene FT-IR spectra were recorded for the first time. PMID:25866852

  20. Sensitivity to relative reinforcer rate in concurrent schedules: independence from relative and absolute reinforcer duration.

    PubMed Central

    McLean, A P; Blampied, N M

    2001-01-01

    Twelve pigeons responded on two keys under concurrent variable-interval (VI) schedules. Over several series of conditions, relative and absolute magnitudes of reinforcement were varied. Within each series, relative rate of reinforcement was varied and sensitivity of behavior ratios to reinforcer-rate ratios was assessed. When responding at both alternatives was maintained by equal-sized small reinforcers, sensitivity to variation in reinforcer-rate ratios was the same as when large reinforcers were used. This result was observed when the overall rate of reinforcement was constant over conditions, and also in another series of concurrent schedules in which one schedule was kept constant at VI ached 120 s. Similarly, reinforcer magnitude did not affect the rate at which response allocation approached asymptote within a condition. When reinforcer magnitudes differred between the two responses and reinforcer-rate ratios were varied, sensitivity of behavior allocation was unaffected although response bias favored the schedule that arranged the larger reinforcers. Analysis of absolute response rates ratio sensitivity to reinforcement occurrred on the two keys showed that this invariance of response despite changes in reinforcement interaction that were observed in absolute response rates on the constant VI 120-s schedule. Response rate on the constant VI 120-s schedule was inversely related to reinforcer rate on the varied key and the strength of this relation depended on the relative magnitude of reinforcers arranged on varied key. Independence of sensitivity to reinforcer-rate ratios from relative and absolute reinforcer magnitude is consistent with the relativity and independence assumtions of the matching law. PMID:11256865

  1. Absolute and Relative Reliability of Percentage of Syllables Stuttered and Severity Rating Scales

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karimi, Hamid; O'Brian, Sue; Onslow, Mark; Jones, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Percentage of syllables stuttered (%SS) and severity rating (SR) scales are measures in common use to quantify stuttering severity and its changes during basic and clinical research conditions. However, their reliability has not been assessed with indices measuring both relative and absolute reliability. This study was designed to provide…

  2. FFTF (Fast Flux Test Facility) Reactor Characterization Program: Absolute Fission-rate Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Fuller, J.L.; Gilliam, D.M.; Grundl, J.A.; Rawlins, J.A.; Daughtry, J.W.

    1981-05-01

    Absolute fission rate measurements using modified National Bureau of Standards fission chambers were performed in the Fast Flux Test Facility at two core locations for isotopic deposits of {sup 232}Th, {sup 233}U, {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U, {sup 237}Np, {sup 239}Pu, {sup 240}Pu, and {sup 241}Pu. Monitor chamber results at a third location were analyzed to support other experiments involving passive dosimeter fission rate determinations.

  3. FFTF (FAST FLUX TEST FACILITY) REACTOR CHARACTERIZATION PROGRAM ABSOLUTE FISSION RATE MEASUREMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    FULLER JL; GILLIAM DM; GRUNDL JA; RAWLINS JA; DAUGHTRY JW

    1981-05-01

    Absolute fission rate measurements using modified National Bureau of Standards fission chambers were performed in the Fast Flux Test Facility at two core locations for isotopic deposits of {sup 232}Th, {sup 233}U, {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U, {sup 237}Np, {sup 239}Pu, {sup 240}Pu, and {sup 241}Pu. Monitor chamber results at a third location were analyzed to support other experiments involving passive dosimeter fission rate determinations.

  4. Effective light absorption and absolute electron transport rates in the coral Pocillopora damicornis.

    PubMed

    Szabó, Milán; Wangpraseurt, Daniel; Tamburic, Bojan; Larkum, Anthony W D; Schreiber, Ulrich; Suggett, David J; Kühl, Michael; Ralph, Peter J

    2014-10-01

    Pulse Amplitude Modulation (PAM) fluorometry has been widely used to estimate the relative photosynthetic efficiency of corals. However, both the optical properties of intact corals as well as past technical constrains to PAM fluorometers have prevented calculations of the electron turnover rate of PSII. We used a new Multi-colour PAM (MC-PAM) in parallel with light microsensors to determine for the first time the wavelength-specific effective absorption cross-section of PSII photochemistry, σII(λ), and thus PAM-based absolute electron transport rates of the coral photosymbiont Symbiodinium both in culture and in hospite in the coral Pocillopora damicornis. In both cases, σII of Symbiodinium was highest in the blue spectral region and showed a progressive decrease towards red wavelengths. Absolute values for σII at 440 nm were up to 1.5-times higher in culture than in hospite. Scalar irradiance within the living coral tissue was reduced by 20% in the blue when compared to the incident downwelling irradiance. Absolute electron transport rates of P. damicornis at 440 nm revealed a maximum PSII turnover rate of ca. 250 electrons PSII(-1) s(-1), consistent with one PSII turnover for every 4 photons absorbed by PSII; this likely reflects the limiting steps in electron transfer between PSII and PSI. Our results show that optical properties of the coral host strongly affect light use efficiency of Symbiodinium. Therefore, relative electron transport rates do not reflect the productivity rates (or indeed how the photosynthesis-light response is parameterised). Here we provide a non-invasive approach to estimate absolute electron transport rates in corals. PMID:25146689

  5. Temperature Dependence of the O + HO2 Rate Coefficient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicovich, J. M.; Wine, P. H.

    1997-01-01

    A pulsed laser photolysis technique has been employed to investigate the kinetics of the radical-radical reaction O((sup 3)P) + HO2 OH + O2 over the temperature range 266-391 K in 80 Torr of N2 diluent gas. O((sup 3)P) was produced by 248.5-nm KrF laser photolysis of O3 followed by rapid quenching of O(1D) to O((sup 3)P) while HO2 was produced by simultaneous photolysis of H2O2 to create OH radicals which, in turn, reacted with H2O2 to yield HO2. The O((sup 3)P) temporal profile was monitored by using time-resolved resonance fluorescence spectroscopy. The HO2 concentration was calculated based on experimentally measured parameters. The following Arrhenius expression describes our experimental results: k(sub 1)(T) equals (2.91 +/- 0.70) x 10(exp -11) exp[(228 +/- 75)/T] where the errors are 2 sigma and represent precision only. The absolute uncertainty in k, at any temperature within the range 266-391 K is estimated to be +/- 22 percent. Our results are in excellent agreement with a discharge flow study of the temperature dependence of k(sub 1) in 1 Torr of He diluent reported by Keyser, and significantly reduce the uncertainty in the rate of this important stratospheric reaction at subambient temperatures.

  6. Extended Simulations of Graphene Growth with Updated Rate Coefficients

    SciTech Connect

    Whitesides, R; You, X; Frenklach, M

    2010-03-18

    New simulations of graphene growth in flame environments are presented. The simulations employ a kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) algorithm coupled to molecular mechanics (MM) geometry optimization to track individual graphenic species as they evolve. Focus is given to incorporation of five-member rings and resulting curvature and edge defects. The model code has been re-written to be more computationally efficient enabling a larger set of simulations to be run, decreasing stochastic fluctuations in the averaged results. The model also includes updated rate coefficients for graphene edge reactions recently published in the literature. The new simulations are compared to results from the previous model as well as to hydrogen to carbon ratios recorded in experiment and calculated with alternate models.

  7. Cosmological Implications of the Uncertainty in Astrochemical Rate Coefficients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glover, S. C. O.; Savin, D. W.; Jappsen, A.-K.

    2006-01-01

    The cooling of neutral gas of primordial composition, or with very low levels of metal enrichment, depends crucially on the formation of molecular coolants, such as H2 and HD within the gas. Although the chemical reactions involved in the formation and destruction of these molecules are well known, the same cannot be said for the rate coefficients of these reactions, some of which are uncertain by an order of magnitude. Here we discuss two reactions for which large uncertainties exist the formation of H2 by associative detachment of H- with H and the destruction of H- by mutual neutralization with protons. We show that these uncertainties can have a dramatic impact on the effectiveness of cooling during protogalactic collapse.

  8. Absolute rate of the reaction of hydrogen atoms with ozone from 219-360 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, J. H.; Michael, J. V.; Payne, W. A.; Stief, L. J.

    1978-01-01

    Absolute rate constants for the reaction of atomic hydrogen with ozone were obtained over the temperature range 219-360 K by the flash photolysis-resonance fluorescence technique. The results can be expressed in Arrhenius form by K = (1.33 plus or minus 0.32)x10 to the minus 10 power exp (-449 plus or minus 58/T) cu cm/molecule/s (two standard deviations). The present work is compared to two previous determinations and is discussed theoretically.

  9. Experimental and modeling study of thermal rate coefficients and cross sections for electron attachment to C(60).

    PubMed

    Viggiano, Albert A; Friedman, Jeffrey F; Shuman, Nicholas S; Miller, Thomas M; Schaffer, Linda C; Troe, Jürgen

    2010-05-21

    Thermal electron attachment to C(60) has been studied by relative rate measurements in a flowing afterglow Langmuir probe apparatus. The rate coefficients of the attachment k(1) are shown to be close to 10(-6) cm(3) s(-1) with a small negative temperature coefficient. These results supersede measurements from the 1990s which led to much smaller values of k(1) with a large positive temperature coefficient suggesting an activation barrier. Theoretical modeling of k(1) in terms of generalized Vogt-Wannier capture theory shows that k(1) now looks more consistent with measurements of absolute attachment cross sections sigma(at) than before. The comparison of capture theory and experimental rate or cross section data leads to empirical correction factors, accounting for "intramolecular vibrational relaxation" or "electron-phonon coupling," which reduce k(1) below the capture results and which, on a partial wave-selected level, decrease with increasing electron energy. PMID:20499963

  10. Photolysis Rate Coefficient Calculations in Support of SOLVE II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swartz, William H.

    2005-01-01

    A quantitative understanding of photolysis rate coefficients (or "j-values") is essential to determining the photochemical reaction rates that define ozone loss and other crucial processes in the atmosphere. j-Values can be calculated with radiative transfer models, derived from actinic flux observations, or inferred from trace gas measurements. The primary objective of the present effort was the accurate calculation of j-values in the Arctic twilight along NASA DC-8 flight tracks during the second SAGE III Ozone Loss and Validation Experiment (SOLVE II), based in Kiruna, Sweden (68 degrees N, 20 degrees E) during January-February 2003. The JHU/APL radiative transfer model was utilized to produce a large suite of j-values for photolysis processes (over 70 reactions) relevant to the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere. The calculations take into account the actual changes in ozone abundance and apparent albedo of clouds and the Earth surface along the aircraft flight tracks as observed by in situ and remote sensing platforms (e.g., EP-TOMS). A secondary objective was to analyze solar irradiance data from NCAR s Direct beam Irradiance Atmospheric Spectrometer (DIAS) on-board the NASA DC-8 and to start the development of a flexible, multi-species spectral fitting technique for the independent retrieval of O3,O2.02, and aerosol optical properties.

  11. Absolute Density Calibration Cell for Laser Induced Fluorescence Erosion Rate Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Domonkos, Matthew T.; Stevens, Richard E.

    2001-01-01

    Flight qualification of ion thrusters typically requires testing on the order of 10,000 hours. Extensive knowledge of wear mechanisms and rates is necessary to establish design confidence prior to long duration tests. Consequently, real-time erosion rate measurements offer the potential both to reduce development costs and to enhance knowledge of the dependency of component wear on operating conditions. Several previous studies have used laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) to measure real-time, in situ erosion rates of ion thruster accelerator grids. Those studies provided only relative measurements of the erosion rate. In the present investigation, a molybdenum tube was resistively heated such that the evaporation rate yielded densities within the tube on the order of those expected from accelerator grid erosion. This work examines the suitability of the density cell as an absolute calibration source for LIF measurements, and the intrinsic error was evaluated.

  12. Proton Transfer Rate Coefficient Measurements of Selected Volatile Organic Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooke, G.; Popović, S.; Vušković, L.

    2002-05-01

    We have developed an apparatus based on the selected ion flow tube (SIFT)footnote D. Smith and N.G. Adams, Ads. At. Mol. Phys. 24, 1 (1987). that allows the study of proton transfer between various positive ions and volatile organic molecules. Reactions in the flow tube occur at pressures of approximately 300 mTorr, eliminating the requirement of thermal beam production. The proton donor molecule H_3O^+ has been produced using several types of electrical discharges in water vapor, such as a capacitively coupled RF discharge and a DC hollow cathode discharge. Presently we are developing an Asmussen-type microwave cavity discharge using the components of a standard microwave oven that has the advantages of simple design and operation, as well as low cost. We will be presenting the results of the microwave cavity ion source to produce H_3O^+, and compare it to the other studied sources. In addition, we will be presenting a preliminary measurement of the proton transfer rate coefficient in the reaction of H_3O^+ with acetone and methanol.

  13. Photolysis Rate Coefficient Calculations in Support of SOLVE Campaign

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lloyd, Steven A.; Swartz, William H.

    2001-01-01

    The objectives for this SOLVE project were 3-fold. First, we sought to calculate a complete set of photolysis rate coefficients (j-values) for the campaign along the ER-2 and DC-8 flight tracks. En route to this goal, it would be necessary to develop a comprehensive set of input geophysical conditions (e.g., ozone profiles), derived from various climatological, aircraft, and remotely sensed datasets, in order to model the radiative transfer of the atmosphere accurately. These j-values would then need validation by comparison with flux-derived j-value measurements. The second objective was to analyze chemistry along back trajectories using the NASA/Goddard chemistry trajectory model initialized with measurements of trace atmospheric constituents. This modeling effort would provide insight into the completeness of current measurements and the chemistry of Arctic wintertime ozone loss. Finally, we sought to coordinate stellar occultation measurements of ozone (and thus ozone loss) during SOLVE using the MSX/UVISI satellite instrument. Such measurements would determine ozone loss during the Arctic polar night and represent the first significant science application of space-based stellar occultation in the Earth's atmosphere.

  14. Photolysis Rate Coefficient Calculations in Support of SOLVE Campaign

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lloyd, Steven A.; Swartz, William H.

    2001-01-01

    The objectives for this SOLVE project were 3-fold. First, we sought to calculate a complete set of photolysis rate coefficients (j-values) for the campaign along the ER-2 and DC-8 flight tracks. En route to this goal, it would be necessary to develop a comprehensive set of input geophysical conditions (e.g., ozone profiles), derived from various climatological, aircraft, and remotely sensed datasets, in order to model the radiative transfer of the atmosphere accurately. These j-values would then need validation by comparison with flux-derived j-value measurements. The second objective was to analyze chemistry along back trajectories using the NASA/Goddard chemistry trajectory model initialized with measurements of trace atmospheric constituents. This modeling effort would provide insight into the completeness of current measurements and the chemistry of Arctic wintertime ozone loss. Finally, we sought to coordinate stellar occultation measurements of ozone (and thus ozone loss) during SOLVE using the Midcourse Space Experiment(MSX)/Ultraviolet and Visible Imagers and Spectrographic Imagers (UVISI) satellite instrument. Such measurements would determine ozone loss during the Arctic polar night and represent the first significant science application of space-based stellar occultation in the Earth's atmosphere.

  15. A Coefficient for Measuring the Agreement on Bipolar Rating Scales.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Viernstein, Nikolaus

    1990-01-01

    A new coefficient--psi-star--is presented for measuring agreement on bidirectional response continua. The coefficient is designed to measure agreement in larger square contingency tables with even numbers of rows and columns. Advantages of the procedure are discussed. (SLD)

  16. Rate coefficients for N2(+)(v) dissociative recombination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bates, D. R.; Mitchell, J. B. A.

    1991-09-01

    The data of Zipf (1980) on N2(+)(v) dissociative recombination are analyzed taking into account the fact that there is coupling due to reversible symmetrical resonance charge transfer, N2(+)(v) + N2(0) yields N2(+)(0) + N2(v). The vibrational deactivation in N2(+)(v)-Ne collisions is also considered. A reported experimental value of the vibrational deactivation coefficient is found to be much higher than can be reconciled with the results of Zipf and it is therefore rejected. The analysis shows that the recombination coefficient for N2(+)(0) is about 2.6 x 10 exp-7 cu cm/s at 300 K and that recombination coefficients for N2(+)(1) and N2(+)(2) are substantially smaller. It is concluded that these coefficients conflict with the dissociative recombination cross section vs energy curve obtained by the merged beam method.

  17. Absolute rate parameters for the reaction of atomic hydrogen with hydrazine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stief, L. J.; Payne, W. A.

    1976-01-01

    Absolute rate parameters for the reaction of atomic hydrogen with hydrazine H + N2H4 yields H2 + N2H3 have been determined in a direct manner using flash photolysis of dilute mixtures of hydrazine in helium and time dependent observation of H via resonance fluorescence. By measuring the H-atom decay under pseudo-first-order conditions, the bimolecular rate constant K sub 1 was obtained over the temperature range 228-400 K. The data were fitted with good linearity to the Arrhenius expression K sub 1 = (9.87 plus or minus 1.17) x 10 to the -12th exp(-2380 plus or minus 100/RT) cu cm/molecule/s. The data were shown to be free of any contributions from secondary reactions involving H as a reactant or product.

  18. Einstein A coefficients and absolute line intensities for the E2Π-X2Σ+ transition of CaH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Gang; Harrison, Jeremy J.; Ram, Ram S.; Western, Colin M.; Bernath, Peter F.

    2012-01-01

    Einstein A coefficients and absolute line intensities have been calculated for the E2Π-X2Σ+ transition of CaH. Using wavefunctions derived from the Rydberg-Klein-Rees (RKR) method and electronic transition dipole moment functions obtained from high-level ab initio calculations, rotationless transition dipole moment matrix elements have been calculated for all 10 bands involving v‧=0,1 of the E2Π state and v″=0,1,2,3,4 of the X2Σ state. The rotational line strength factors (Hönl-London factors) are derived for the intermediate coupling case between Hund's case (a) and (b) for the E2Π-X2Σ+ transition. The computed transition dipole moments and the spectroscopic constants from a recent study [Ram et al., Journal of Molecular Spectroscopy 2011;266:86-91] have been combined to generate line lists containing Einstein A coefficients and absolute line intensities for 10 bands of the E2Π-X2Σ+ transition of CaH for J-values up to 50.5. The absolute line intensities have been used to determine a rotational temperature of 778±3 °C for the CaH sample in the recent study.

  19. Rate Coefficient Determinations for H + NO2 → OH + NO from High Pressure Flow Reactor Measurements.

    PubMed

    Haas, Francis M; Dryer, Frederick L

    2015-07-16

    Rate coefficients for the reaction H + NO2 → OH + NO (R1) have been determined over the nominal temperature and pressure ranges of 737-882 K and 10-20 atm, respectively, from measurements in two different flow reactor facilities: one laminar and one turbulent. Considering the existing database of experimental k1 measurements, the present conditions add measurements of k1 at previously unconsidered temperatures between ∼820-880 K, as well as at pressures that exceed existing measurements by over an order of magnitude. Experimental measurements of NOx-perturbed H2 oxidation have been interpreted by a quasi-steady state NOx plateau (QSSP) method. At the QSSP conditions considered here, overall reactivity is sensitive only to the rates of R1 and H + O2 + M → HO2 + M (R2.M). Consequently, the ratio of k1 to k2.M may be extracted as a simple algebraic function of measured NO2, O2, and total gas concentrations with only minimal complication (within measurement uncertainty) due to treatment of overall gas composition M that differs slightly from pure bath gas B. Absolute values of k1 have been determined with reference to the relatively well-known, pressure-dependent rate coefficients of R2.B for B = Ar and N2. Rate coefficients for the title reaction determined from present experimental interpretation of both laminar and turbulent flow reactor results appear to be in very good agreement around a representative value of 1.05 × 10(14) cm(3) mol(-1) s(-1) (1.74 × 10(-10) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1)). Further, the results of this study agree both with existing low pressure flash photolysis k1 determinations of Ko and Fontijn (J. Phys. Chem. 95 3984) near 760 K as well as a present fit to the theoretical expression of Su et al. (J. Phys. Chem. A 106 8261). These results indicate that, over the temperature range considered in this study and up to at least 20 atm, net chemistry due to stabilization of the H-NO2 reaction intermediate to form isomers of HNO2 may proceed at

  20. Membrane electroporation: The absolute rate equation and nanosecond time scale pore creation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasilkoski, Zlatko; Esser, Axel T.; Gowrishankar, T. R.; Weaver, James C.

    2006-08-01

    The recent applications of nanosecond, megavolt-per-meter electric field pulses to biological systems show striking cellular and subcellular electric field induced effects and revive the interest in the biophysical mechanism of electroporation. We first show that the absolute rate theory, with experimentally based parameter input, is consistent with membrane pore creation on a nanosecond time scale. Secondly we use a Smoluchowski equation-based model to formulate a self-consistent theoretical approach. The analysis is carried out for a planar cell membrane patch exposed to a 10ns trapezoidal pulse with 1.5ns rise and fall times. Results demonstrate reversible supraelectroporation behavior in terms of transmembrane voltage, pore density, membrane conductance, fractional aqueous area, pore distribution, and average pore radius. We further motivate and justify the use of Krassowska’s asymptotic electroporation model for analyzing nanosecond pulses, showing that pore creation dominates the electrical response and that pore expansion is a negligible effect on this time scale.

  1. EVAPOTRANSPIRATION RATES AND CROP COEFFICIENTS FOR LOWBUSH BLUEBERRY (Vaccinium angustifolium)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lowbush blueberry (Vaccinium angustifolium) yield is strongly influenced by water availability; however, growers need more specific irrigation recommendations in order to optimize water use efficiency. Weighing lysimeters were used to determine actual evapotranspiration (ET) rates of lowbush bluebe...

  2. Absolute absorption coefficient of C6H2 in the mid-UV range at low temperature; implications for the interpretation of Titan atmospheric spectra.

    PubMed

    Bénilan, Y; Bruston, P; Raulin, F; Courtin, R; Guillemin, J C

    1995-01-01

    The interpretation of mid-UV albedo spectra of planetary atmospheres, especially that of Titan, is the main goal of the SIPAT (Spectroscopie uv d'Interet Prebiologique dans l'Atmosphere de Titan) research program. This laboratory experiment has been developed in order to systematically determine the absorption coefficients of molecular compounds which are potential absorbers of scattered sunlight in planetary atmospheres, with high spectral resolution, and at various temperatures below room temperature. From photochemical modelling and experimental simulations, we may expect triacetylene (C6H2) to be present in the atmosphere of Titan, even though it has not yet been detected. We present here the first determination of the absolute absorption coefficient of that compound in the 200-300 nm range and at two temperatures (296 K and 233 K). The temperature dependence of the C6H2 absorption coefficient in that wavelength range is compared to that previously observed in the case of cyanoacetylene (HC3N). We then discuss the implications of the present results for the interpretation of Titan UV spectra, where it appears that large uncertainities can be introduced either by the presence of trace impurities in laboratory samples or by the variations of absorption coefficients with temperature. PMID:11538441

  3. Temperature dependences of rate coefficients for electron catalyzed mutual neutralization

    SciTech Connect

    Shuman, Nicholas S.; Miller, Thomas M.; Friedman, Jeffrey F.; Viggiano, Albert A.; Maeda, Satoshi; Morokuma, Keiji

    2011-07-14

    The flowing afterglow technique of variable electron and neutral density attachment mass spectrometry (VENDAMS) has recently yielded evidence for a novel plasma charge loss process, electron catalyzed mutual neutralization (ECMN), i.e., A{sup +}+ B{sup -}+ e{sup -}{yields} A + B + e{sup -}. Here, rate constants for ECMN of two polyatomic species (POCl{sub 3}{sup -} and POCl{sub 2}{sup -}) and one diatomic species (Br{sub 2}{sup -}) each with two monatomic cations (Ar{sup +}and Kr{sup +}) are measured using VENDAMS over the temperature range 300 K-500 K. All rate constants show a steep negative temperature dependence, consistent with that expected for a three body process involving two ions and an electron. No variation in rate constants as a function of the cation type is observed outside of uncertainty; however, rate constants of the polyatomic anions ({approx}1 x 10{sup -18} cm{sup 6} s{sup -1} at 300 K) are measurably higher than that for Br{sub 2}{sup -}[(5.5 {+-} 2) x 10{sup -19} cm{sup 6} s{sup -1} at 300 K].

  4. Refinement of the aeronomically determined rate coefficient for the reaction of N2/+/ with O

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torr, D. G.

    1979-01-01

    An earlier aeronomic determination of the rate coefficient for the reaction N2(+) + O yields NO(+) + N using Atmosphere Explorer data indicated a small increase in the rate coefficient with ion temperature, contrary to laboratory observations. This was incorrectly attributed to neglect of an increase in the N2(+) recombination rate with vibrational excitation. Recent aeronomical results have shown that the rate coefficient for charge exchange of O(+)(2D) with N2 is about an order of magnitude smaller at thermal temperatures than at energies greater than 0.5 eV (i.e., energies at which laboratory measurements have been made). It is shown that the use of the smaller charge exchange rate coefficient coupled with recent results on N2 quenching of O(+)(2D) yields a temperature dependence in excellent agreement with the laboratory results for the rate coefficient.

  5. Subjective evaluation of HDTV stereoscopic videos in IPTV scenarios using absolute category rating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, K.; Barkowsky, M.; Cousseau, R.; Brunnström, K.; Olsson, R.; Le Callet, P.; Sjöström, M.

    2011-03-01

    Broadcasting of high definition (HD) stereobased 3D (S3D) TV are planned, or has already begun, in Europe, the US, and Japan. Specific data processing operations such as compression and temporal and spatial resampling are commonly used tools for saving network bandwidth when IPTV is the distribution form, as this results in more efficient recording and transmission of 3DTV signals, however at the same time it inevitably brings quality degradations to the processed video. This paper investigated observers quality judgments of state of the art video coding schemes (simulcast H.264/AVC or H.264/MVC), with or without added temporal and spatial resolution reduction of S3D videos, by subjective experiments using the Absolute Category Rating method (ACR) method. The results showed that a certain spatial resolution reduction working together with high quality video compressing was the most bandwidth efficient way of processing video data when the required video quality is to be judged as "good" quality. As the subjective experiment was performed in two different laboratories in two different countries in parallel, a detailed analysis of the interlab differences was performed.

  6. Coordinate-dependent diffusion coefficients: Decay rate in open quantum systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sargsyan, V. V.; Palchikov, Yu. V.; Antonenko, N. V.; Kanokov, Z.; Adamian, G. G.

    2007-06-15

    Based on a master equation for the reduced density matrix of an open quantum collective system, the influence of coordinate-dependent microscopical diffusion coefficients on the decay rate from a metastable state is treated. For various frictions and temperatures larger than a crossover temperature, the quasistationary decay rates obtained with the coordinate-dependent microscopical set of diffusion coefficients are compared with those obtained with the coordinate-independent microscopical set of diffusion coefficients and coordinate-independent and -dependent phenomenological sets of diffusion coefficients. Neglecting the coordinate dependence of diffusion coefficients, one can strongly overestimate or underestimate the decay rate at low temperature. The coordinate-dependent phenomenological diffusion coefficient in momentum are shown to be suitable for applications.

  7. Correlation analysis of optical absorption cross section and rate coefficient measurements in reacting systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hessler, J.P.; Ogren, P.J.

    1992-08-31

    A technique was developed for determining relative importance and correlation between reactions making up a complex kinetic system. This technique was used to investigate measurements of optical absorption cross sections and the correlation between cross sections and measured rate coefficients. It is concluded that (1) species, initial conditions, and temporal regions may be identified where cross sections may be measured without interference from the kinetic behavior of the observed species and (2) experiments designed to measure rate coefficients will always be correlated with the absorption cross section of the observed species. This correlation may reduce the accuracy of rate coefficient measurements.

  8. Simultaneous estimation of lithospheric uplift rates and absolute sea level change in southwest Scandinavia from inversion of sea level data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, Lars; Hansen, Jens Morten; Hede, Mikkel Ulfeldt; Clemmensen, Lars B.; Pejrup, Morten; Noe-Nygaard, Nanna

    2014-11-01

    Relative sea level curves contain coupled information about absolute sea level change and vertical lithospheric movement. Such curves may be constructed based on, for example tide gauge data for the most recent times and different types of geological data for ancient times. Correct account for vertical lithospheric movement is essential for estimation of reliable values of absolute sea level change from relative sea level data and vise versa. For modern times, estimates of vertical lithospheric movement may be constrained by data (e.g. GPS-based measurements), which are independent from the relative sea level data. Similar independent data do not exist for ancient times. The purpose of this study is to test two simple inversion approaches for simultaneous estimation of lithospheric uplift rates and absolute sea level change rates for ancient times in areas where a dense coverage of relative sea level data exists and well-constrained average lithospheric movement values are known from, for example glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA) models. The inversion approaches are tested and used for simultaneous estimation of lithospheric uplift rates and absolute sea level change rates in southwest Scandinavia from modern relative sea level data series that cover the period from 1900 to 2000. In both approaches, a priori information is required to solve the inverse problem. A priori information about the average vertical lithospheric movement in the area of interest is critical for the quality of the obtained results. The two tested inversion schemes result in estimated absolute sea level rise of ˜1.2/1.3 mm yr-1 and vertical uplift rates ranging from approximately -1.4/-1.2 mm yr-1 (subsidence) to about 5.0/5.2 mm yr-1 if an a priori value of 1 mm yr-1 is used for the vertical lithospheric movement throughout the study area. In case the studied time interval is broken into two time intervals (before and after 1970), absolute sea level rise values of ˜0.8/1.2 mm yr-1 (before

  9. Rate Coefficient Measurements of the Reaction CH3 + O2 = CH3O + O

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, S. M.; Ryu, Si-Ok; DeWitt, K. J.; Rabinowitz, M. J.

    1999-01-01

    Rate coefficients for the reaction CH3 + O2 = CH3O + O were measured behind reflected shock waves in a series of lean CH4-O2-Ar mixtures using hydroxyl and methyl radical diagnostics. The rate coefficients are well represented by an Arrhenius expression given as k = (1.60(sup +0.67, sub -0.47 ) x 10(exp 13) e(-15813 +/- 587 K/T)/cubic cm.mol.s. This expression, which is valid in the temperature range 1575-1822 K, supports the downward trend in the rate coefficients that has been reported in recent determinations. All measurements to date, including the present study, have been to some extent affected by secondary reactions. The complications due to secondary reactions, choice of thermochemical data, and shock-boundary layer interactions that affect the determination of the rate coefficients are examined.

  10. Rate Coefficient Measurements of the Reaction CH3+O2+CH3O+O

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, S. M.; Ryu, Si-Ok; DeWitt, K. J.; Rabinowitz, M. J.

    1999-01-01

    Rate coefficients for the reaction CH3 + O2 = CH3O + O were measured behind reflected shock waves in a series of lean CH4-O2-Ar mixtures using hydroxyl and methyl radical diagnostics. The rate coefficients are well represented by an Arrhenius expression given as k = (1.60(sup +0.67, -0.47)) X 10(exp 13) exp(- 15813 +/- 587 K/T)cc/mol s. This expression, which is valid in the temperature range 1575-1822 K, supports the downward trend in the rate coefficients that has been reported in recent determinations. All measurements to date, including the present study, have been to some extent affected by secondary reactions. The complications due to secondary reactions, choice of thermochemical data, and shock-boundary layer interactions that affect the determination of the rate coefficients are examined.

  11. Rate Coefficients for the OH + (CHO)2 (Glyoxal) Reaction Between 240 and 400 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feierabend, K. J.; Talukdar, R. K.; Zhu, L.; Ravishankara, A. R.; Burkholder, J. B.

    2006-12-01

    Glyoxal (CHO)2, the simplest dialdehyde, is an end product formed in the atmospheric oxidation of biogenic hydrocarbons, for example, isoprene. As such, glyoxal plays a role in regional air quality and ozone production in certain locations. Glyoxal is lost in the atmosphere via UV photolysis and reaction with OH. However, the currently available rate coefficient data for the OH + glyoxal reaction is limited to a single room- temperature measurement made using the relative rate method. A determination of the rate coefficient temperature dependence is therefore needed for a more complete interpretation of the atmospheric processing of glyoxal. This study reports the rate coefficient for the OH + (CHO)2 reaction measured under pseudo- first-order conditions in OH ([(CHO)2] > 1000 [OH]0). OH radicals were produced using 248 nm pulsed laser photolysis of H2O2 or HNO3 and detected by pulsed laser induced fluorescence. The concentration of glyoxal in the reactor was determined using three independent techniques; gas flow rates as well as in situ UV and IR absorption. The total pressure in the reactor was varied from 40 to 300 Torr (He), and the rate coefficient was found to be independent of pressure over the temperature range studied. The rate coefficient exhibits a negative temperature dependence between 240 and 400 K consistent with the dependence previously observed for many other aldehydes. Our room-temperature rate coefficient is smaller than the relative rate value that is currently recommended for use in atmospheric model calculations. Our measured rate coefficients are discussed with respect to those for other aldehydes. The atmospheric implications of our work will also be discussed.

  12. Rate coefficients of hydroxyl radical reactions with pesticide molecules and related compounds: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojnárovits, László; Takács, Erzsébet

    2014-03-01

    Rate coefficients published in the literature on hydroxyl radical reactions with pesticides and related compounds are discussed together with the experimental methods and the basic reaction mechanisms. Recommendations are made for the most probable values. Most of the molecules whose rate coefficients are discussed have aromatic ring: their rate coefficients are in the range of 2×109-1×1010 mol-1 dm3 s-1. The rate coefficients show some variation with the electron withdrawing-donating nature of the substituent on the ring. The rate coefficients for triazine pesticides (simazine, atrazine, prometon) are all around 2.5×109 mol-1 dm3 s-1. The values do not show variation with the substituent on the s-triazine ring. The rate coefficients for the non-aromatic molecules which have C=C double bonds or several C-H bonds may also be above 1×109 mol-1 dm3 s-1. However, the values for molecules without C=C double bonds or several C-H bonds are in the 1×107-1×109 mol-1 dm3 s-1 range.

  13. HTO washout model: on the relationship between exchange rate and washout coefficient

    SciTech Connect

    Golubev, A.; Balashov, Y.; Mavrin, S.; Golubeva, V.; Galeriu, D.

    2015-03-15

    Washout coefficient Λ is widely used as a parameter in washout models. These models describes overall HTO washout with rain by a first-order kinetic equation, while washout coefficient Λ depends on the type of rain event and rain intensity and empirical parameters a, b. The washout coefficient is a macroscopic parameter and we have considered in this paper its relationship with a microscopic rate K of HTO isotopic exchange in atmospheric humidity and drops of rainwater. We have shown that the empirical parameters a, b can be represented through the rain event characteristics using the relationships of molecular impact rate, rain intensity and specific rain water content while washout coefficient Λ can be represented through the exchange rate K, rain intensity, raindrop diameter and terminal raindrop velocity.

  14. Determination of subjective similarity for pairs of masses and pairs of clustered microcalcifications on mammograms: Comparison of similarity ranking scores and absolute similarity ratings

    SciTech Connect

    Muramatsu, Chisako; Li Qiang; Schmidt, Robert A.; Shiraishi, Junji; Suzuki, Kenji; Newstead, Gillian M.; Doi, Kunio

    2007-07-15

    The presentation of images that are similar to that of an unknown lesion seen on a mammogram may be helpful for radiologists to correctly diagnose that lesion. For similar images to be useful, they must be quite similar from the radiologists' point of view. We have been trying to quantify the radiologists' impression of similarity for pairs of lesions and to establish a ''gold standard'' for development and evaluation of a computerized scheme for selecting such similar images. However, it is considered difficult to reliably and accurately determine similarity ratings, because they are subjective. In this study, we compared the subjective similarities obtained by two different methods, an absolute rating method and a 2-alternative forced-choice (2AFC) method, to demonstrate that reliable similarity ratings can be determined by the responses of a group of radiologists. The absolute similarity ratings were previously obtained for pairs of masses and pairs of microcalcifications from five and nine radiologists, respectively. In this study, similarity ranking scores for eight pairs of masses and eight pairs of microcalcifications were determined by use of the 2AFC method. In the first session, the eight pairs of masses and eight pairs of microcalcifications were grouped and compared separately for determining the similarity ranking scores. In the second session, another similarity ranking score was determined by use of mixed pairs, i.e., by comparison of the similarity of a mass pair with that of a calcification pair. Four pairs of masses and four pairs of microcalcifications were grouped together to create two sets of eight pairs. The average absolute similarity ratings and the average similarity ranking scores showed very good correlations in the first study (Pearson's correlation coefficients: 0.94 and 0.98 for masses and microcalcifications, respectively). Moreover, in the second study, the correlations between the absolute ratings and the ranking scores were also

  15. Quantum Calculation of Inelastic CO Collisions with H. III. Rate Coefficients for Ro-vibrational Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, L.; Balakrishnan, N.; Walker, K. M.; Stancil, P. C.; Thi, W. F.; Kamp, I.; van der Avoird, A.; Groenenboom, G. C.

    2015-11-01

    We present calculated rate coefficients for ro-vibrational transitions of CO in collisions with H atoms for a gas temperature range of 10 K ≤ T ≤ 3000 K, based on the recent three-dimensional ab initio H-CO interaction potential of Song et al. Rate coefficients for ro-vibrational v=1,j=0-30\\to v\\prime =0,j\\prime transitions were obtained from scattering cross sections previously computed with the close-coupling (CC) method by Song et al. Combining these with the rate coefficients for vibrational v=1-5\\to v\\prime \\lt v quenching obtained with the infinite-order sudden approximation, we propose a new extrapolation scheme that yields the rate coefficients for ro-vibrational v=2-5,j=0-30\\to v\\prime ,j\\prime de-excitation. Cross sections and rate coefficients for ro-vibrational v=2,j=0-30\\to v\\prime =1,j\\prime transitions calculated with the CC method confirm the effectiveness of this extrapolation scheme. Our calculated and extrapolated rates are very different from those that have been adopted in the modeling of many astrophysical environments. The current work provides the most comprehensive and accurate set of ro-vibrational de-excitation rate coefficients for the astrophysical modeling of the H-CO collision system. The application of the previously available and new data sets in astrophysical slab models shows that the line fluxes typically change by 20%-70% in high temperature environments (800 K) with an H/H2 ratio of 1; larger changes occur for lower temperatures.

  16. Absolute rate constant of the reaction between chlorine /2P/ atoms and hydrogen peroxide from 298 to 424 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keyser, L. F.

    1980-01-01

    The absolute rate constant of the reaction between chlorine (2P) atoms and hydrogen peroxide was determined from 298 to 424 K, using the discharge flow resonance fluorescence technique. Pseudo-first-order conditions were used with hydrogen peroxide in large excess. A fast flow-sampling procedure limited hydrogen peroxide decomposition to less than 5% over the temperature range studied. At 298 K, the rate constant is (4.1 plus or minus 0.2) x 10 to the minus 13th cu cm/molecule-sec.

  17. RATE COEFFICIENTS FOR THE COLLISIONAL EXCITATION OF MOLECULES: ESTIMATES FROM AN ARTIFICIAL NEURAL NETWORK

    SciTech Connect

    Neufeld, David A.

    2010-01-01

    An artificial neural network (ANN) is investigated as a tool for estimating rate coefficients for the collisional excitation of molecules. The performance of such a tool can be evaluated by testing it on a data set of collisionally induced transitions for which rate coefficients are already known: the network is trained on a subset of that data set and tested on the remainder. Results obtained by this method are typically accurate to within a factor of approx2.1 (median value) for transitions with low excitation rates and approx1.7 for those with medium or high excitation rates, although 4% of the ANN outputs are discrepant by a factor of 10 or more. The results suggest that ANNs will be valuable in extrapolating a data set of collisional rate coefficients to include high-lying transitions that have not yet been calculated. For the asymmetric top molecules considered in this paper, the favored architecture is a cascade-correlation network that creates 16 hidden neurons during the course of training, with three input neurons to characterize the nature of the transition and one output neuron to provide the logarithm of the rate coefficient.

  18. Absolute Rate Constants for the Reaction of OH with [|#11#|]Cyclopentane and Cycloheptane from 230-350 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dransfield, T. J.; Gennaco, M. M.; Huang, Y.; Hannun, R. A.

    2011-12-01

    We report absolute measurements of the rate constants of the reaction of hydroxyl radical (OH) with cyclopentane and cycloheptane in 6-8 Torr of nitrogen from 230-350 K using Harvard's High Pressure Flow System. Ethane's reactivity was simultaneously measured as a test of experimental performance. Hydroxyl concentrations were measured using Laser-Induced Fluorescence, and alkane concentrations were measured using Fourier-Transform Infrared Spectroscopy. Recent work on this flow system has suggested that cyclohexane has a significantly higher activation energy to reaction with OH than does cyclo-octane, a result which is not suggested by our understanding of hydrocarbon reactivity nor predicted by structure-activity relationships. This work examines the temperature dependent rates for two other similarly-sized cycloalkanes to determine whether they behave as cyclohexane or as cyclooctane. While several previous experiments have studied the reaction with cyclopentane, there is significant scatter in the room temperature rates, and only four absolute rate measurements are available at non-ambient temperatures. There are only two absolute rate measurements available for the reaction with cycloheptane; only one of these reports a temperature dependence, and that study is limited to temperatures above 298 K. Thus, this work significantly expands the available data set for both reactions. The data for the reactions of OH with ethane, cyclopentane, cyclohexane, and cycloheptane are all modeled using a simple Arrhenius fit, and also with a modified Arrhenius equation based on transition state theory, ignoring tunneling. Results from the latter fit indicate that the activation barriers for both title reactions are greater than that of OH + cyclo-octane. The measured activation energy for OH + cyclopentane actually exceeds that of OH + cyclohexane.

  19. Kinetic models for coagulation processes: determination of rate coefficients in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearce, John A.; Cheong, Wai-Fung; Pandit, Kirit; McMurray, Tom J.; Thomsen, Sharon L.

    1991-06-01

    Kinetic models of thermal damage in tissues can be used to describe histologic end points obtained with laser irradiation. In this study, thermographic measurements of skin surface temperature distributions during laser impingement were used to derive a temperature history for the lesion site. Lesions were evaluated at 48 h after laser irradiation to determine the radius of purpura formation. The temperature histories at the maximum radius of purpura formation (threshold temperatures) were analyzed and plotted on Arrhenius axes to estimate rate coefficients for the process. As expected, transient in vivo thermal history data yielded a noisy Arrhenius plot; however, estimates of the appropriate rate coefficients for purpura formation in vivo could be made.

  20. Easy Absolute Values? Absolutely

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Sharon E.; Mittag, Kathleen Cage

    2015-01-01

    The authors teach a problem-solving course for preservice middle-grades education majors that includes concepts dealing with absolute-value computations, equations, and inequalities. Many of these students like mathematics and plan to teach it, so they are adept at symbolic manipulations. Getting them to think differently about a concept that they…

  1. Global rate coefficients for ionization and recombination of carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, and argon

    SciTech Connect

    Annaloro, Julien; Morel, Vincent; Bultel, Arnaud; Omaly, Pierre

    2012-07-15

    The flow field modeling of planetary entry plasmas, laser-induced plasmas, inductively coupled plasmas, arcjets, etc., requires to use Navier-Stokes codes. The kinetic mechanisms implemented in these codes involve global (effective) rate coefficients. These rate coefficients result from the excited states coupling during a quasi-steady state. In order to obtain these global rate coefficients over a wide electron temperature (T{sub e}) range for ionization and recombination of carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, and argon, the behavior of their excited states is investigated using a zero-dimensional (time-dependent) code. The population number densities of these electronic states are considered as independent species. Their relaxation is studied within the range 3000 K{<=}T{sub e}{<=}20 000 K and leads to the determination of the ionization (k{sub i}) and recombination (k{sub r}) global rate coefficients. Comparisons with existing data are performed. Finally, the ratio k{sub i}/k{sub r} is compared with the Saha equilibrium constant. This ratio increases more rapidly than the equilibrium constant for T{sub e}>15 000 K.

  2. Partial and total dielectronic recombination rate coefficients for W73+ to W56+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preval, S. P.; Badnell, N. R.; O'Mullane, M. G.

    2016-04-01

    Dielectronic recombination (DR) is a key atomic process that affects the spectroscopic diagnostic modeling of tungsten, most of whose ionization stages will be found somewhere in the ITER fusion reactor: in the edge, divertor, or core plasma. Accurate DR data are sparse while complete DR coverage is unsophisticated (e.g., average-atom or Burgess General Formula), as illustrated by the large uncertainties that currently exist in the tungsten ionization balance. To this end, we present a series of partial final-state-resolved and total DR rate coefficients for W73+ to W56+ tungsten ions. This is part of a wider effort within The Tungsten Project to calculate accurate dielectronic recombination rate coefficients for the tungsten isonuclear sequence for use in collisional-radiative modeling of finite-density tokamak plasmas. The recombination rate coefficients have been calculated with autostructure using κ -averaged relativistic wave unctions in level resolution (intermediate coupling) and configuration resolution (configuration average). Comparison with previous calculations of total DR rate coefficients for W63+ and W56+ yield agreement to within 20% and 10%, respectively, at peak temperature. It is also seen that the Jüttner correction to the Maxwell distribution has a significant effect on the ionization balance of tungsten at the highest charge states, changing both the peak abundance temperatures and the ionization fractions of several ions.

  3. Hydrocarbon rate coefficients for proton and electron impact ionization, dissociation, and recombination in a hydrogen plasma.

    SciTech Connect

    Alman, D.A.; Brooks, J.N.; Ruzic, D.N.; Wang, Z.

    1999-07-21

    We estimate cross sections and rate coefficients for proton and electron impact ionization, dissociation, and recombination of neutral and ionized hydrocarbon molecules and fragments of the form C{sub x}H{sub y}{sup k}, x = 1-3, y = 1-6, k = 0,1 in a thermalized hydrogen-electron plasma.

  4. Exact results on the temperature dependence of the specific equilibrium recombination rate coefficient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mickens, R. E.

    1978-01-01

    Two theorems based on Laplace transforms are used to relate threshold and high energy behavior to a temperature dependent variable. A recombination reaction involving electrically neutral species is presented to illustrate the dynamics of the activation energy and the associated rate coefficient. The distribution functions are shown to correspond with those predicted by Boltzmann's equations.

  5. Effects of Motility and Adsorption Rate Coefficient on Transport of Bacteria through Saturated Porous Media

    PubMed Central

    Camper, Anne K.; Hayes, Jason T.; Sturman, Paul J.; Jones, Warren L.; Cunningham, Alfred B.

    1993-01-01

    Three strains of Pseudomonas fluorescens with different motility rates and adsorption rate coefficients were injected into porous-medium reactors packed with l-mm-diameter glass spheres. Cell breakthrough, time to peak concentration, tailing, and cell recovery were measured at three interstitial pore velocities (higher than, lower than, and much lower than the maximal bacterial motility rate). All experiments were done with distilled water to reduce the effects of growth and chemotaxis. Contrary to expectations, motility did not result in either early breakthrough or early time to peak concentration at flow velocities below the motility rate. Bacterial size exclusion effects were shown to affect breakthrough curve shape at the very low flow velocity, but no such effect was seen at the higher flow velocity. The tendency of bacteria to adsorb to porous-medium surfaces, as measured by adsorption rate coefficients, profoundly influenced transport characteristics. Cell recoveries were shown to be correlated with the ratio of advective to adsorptive transport in the reactors. Adsorption rate coefficients were found to be better predictors of microbial transport phenomena than individual characteristics, such as size, motility, or porous-medium hydrodynamics. PMID:16349075

  6. Detecting absolute human knee angle and angular velocity using accelerometers and rate gyroscopes.

    PubMed

    Williamson, R; Andrews, B J

    2001-05-01

    Knee joint angle and angular velocity were calculated in real time during standing up and sitting down. Two small modules comprising rate gyroscopes and accelerometers were attached to the thigh and shank of two able-bodied volunteers and one T5 ASIA(A) paraplegic assisted by functional electrical stimulation (FES). The offset and drift of the rate gyroscopes was compensated for by auto-resetting and auto-nulling algorithms. The tilt of the limb segments was calculated by combining the signals of the accelerometer and the rate gyroscope. The joint angle was calculated as the difference in tilt of the segments. The modules were also tested on a two-dimensional model. The mean differences between the rate gyroscope-accelerometer system and the reference goniometer for the model, able-bodied and paraplegic standing trials were 2.1 degrees, 2.4 degrees and 2.3 degrees respectively for knee angle and 2.3 degrees s(-1), 5.0 degrees s(-1) and 11.8 degrees s(-1) respectively for knee velocity. The rate gyroscope-accelerometer system was more accurate than using the accelerometer as a tilt meter, possibly due to the greater bandwidth of the rate gyroscope-accelerometer system. PMID:11465883

  7. Noninvasive optical quantification of absolute blood flow, blood oxygenation, and oxygen consumption rate in exercising skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Gurley, Katelyn; Shang, Yu; Yu, Guoqiang

    2012-07-01

    This study investigates a method using novel hybrid diffuse optical spectroscopies [near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) and diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS)] to obtain continuous, noninvasive measurement of absolute blood flow (BF), blood oxygenation, and oxygen consumption rate (V̇O(2)) in exercising skeletal muscle. Healthy subjects (n=9) performed a handgrip exercise to increase BF and V̇O(2) in forearm flexor muscles, while a hybrid optical probe on the skin surface directly monitored oxy-, deoxy-, and total hemoglobin concentrations ([HbO(2)], [Hb], and THC), tissue oxygen saturation (S(t)O(2)), relative BF (rBF), and relative oxygen consumption rate (rV̇O(2)). The rBF and rV̇O(2) signals were calibrated with absolute baseline BF and V̇O(2) obtained through venous and arterial occlusions, respectively. Known problems with muscle-fiber motion artifacts in optical measurements during exercise were mitigated using a novel gating algorithm that determined muscle contraction status based on control signals from a dynamometer. Results were consistent with previous findings in the literature. This study supports the application of NIRS/DCS technology to quantitatively evaluate hemodynamic and metabolic parameters in exercising skeletal muscle and holds promise for improving diagnosis and treatment evaluation for patients suffering from diseases affecting skeletal muscle and advancing fundamental understanding of muscle and exercise physiology. PMID:22894482

  8. Noninvasive optical quantification of absolute blood flow, blood oxygenation, and oxygen consumption rate in exercising skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Gurley, Katelyn; Shang, Yu

    2012-01-01

    Abstract. This study investigates a method using novel hybrid diffuse optical spectroscopies [near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) and diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS)] to obtain continuous, noninvasive measurement of absolute blood flow (BF), blood oxygenation, and oxygen consumption rate (V˙O2) in exercising skeletal muscle. Healthy subjects (n=9) performed a handgrip exercise to increase BF and V˙O2 in forearm flexor muscles, while a hybrid optical probe on the skin surface directly monitored oxy-, deoxy-, and total hemoglobin concentrations ([HbO2], [Hb], and THC), tissue oxygen saturation (StO2), relative BF (rBF), and relative oxygen consumption rate (rV˙O2). The rBF and rV˙O2 signals were calibrated with absolute baseline BF and V˙O2 obtained through venous and arterial occlusions, respectively. Known problems with muscle-fiber motion artifacts in optical measurements during exercise were mitigated using a novel gating algorithm that determined muscle contraction status based on control signals from a dynamometer. Results were consistent with previous findings in the literature. This study supports the application of NIRS/DCS technology to quantitatively evaluate hemodynamic and metabolic parameters in exercising skeletal muscle and holds promise for improving diagnosis and treatment evaluation for patients suffering from diseases affecting skeletal muscle and advancing fundamental understanding of muscle and exercise physiology. PMID:22894482

  9. Noninvasive optical quantification of absolute blood flow, blood oxygenation, and oxygen consumption rate in exercising skeletal muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurley, Katelyn; Shang, Yu; Yu, Guoqiang

    2012-07-01

    This study investigates a method using novel hybrid diffuse optical spectroscopies [near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) and diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS)] to obtain continuous, noninvasive measurement of absolute blood flow (BF), blood oxygenation, and oxygen consumption rate (\\Vdot O2) in exercising skeletal muscle. Healthy subjects (n=9) performed a handgrip exercise to increase BF and \\Vdot O2 in forearm flexor muscles, while a hybrid optical probe on the skin surface directly monitored oxy-, deoxy-, and total hemoglobin concentrations ([HbO2], [Hb], and THC), tissue oxygen saturation (StO2), relative BF (rBF), and relative oxygen consumption rate (r\\Vdot O2). The rBF and r\\Vdot O2 signals were calibrated with absolute baseline BF and \\Vdot O2 obtained through venous and arterial occlusions, respectively. Known problems with muscle-fiber motion artifacts in optical measurements during exercise were mitigated using a novel gating algorithm that determined muscle contraction status based on control signals from a dynamometer. Results were consistent with previous findings in the literature. This study supports the application of NIRS/DCS technology to quantitatively evaluate hemodynamic and metabolic parameters in exercising skeletal muscle and holds promise for improving diagnosis and treatment evaluation for patients suffering from diseases affecting skeletal muscle and advancing fundamental understanding of muscle and exercise physiology.

  10. Measurement of 129Xe -Cs binary spin-exchange rate coefficient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jau, Yuan-Yu; Kuzma, Nicholas N.; Happer, William

    2004-06-01

    We report the first measurement of the spin-exchange rate coefficient for binary collisions between Cs and 129Xe atoms in the temperature range 110rate 1/ T1 of 129Xe gas. We measured 1/ T1 of a thermally polarized Xe gas using the saturation-recovery of conventional nuclear magnetic resonance. We also directly measured the Cs atomic number density [Cs] by using Faraday rotation of the linear polarization of a probing laser beam passing through the sample. The measured rate coefficient is κ (9.4 T) = d (1/ T1 ) / d [Cs] = (2.81±0.2) × 10-16 cm3 /s , which is about a factor of 1.6 higher than the previously measured spin-exchange rate coefficient of 129Xe -Rb binary collisions. Using a calculated magnetic decoupling factor, we extrapolate our result to zero magnetic field: κ (0 T) = (4.1±0.3) × 10-16 cm3 /s .

  11. Unified Electron-Ion Recombination Rate Coefficients of Silicon and Sulfur Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nahar, Sultana N.; Pradhan, Anil K.

    1995-07-01

    Total recombination rate coefficients for the astrophysically important Si and S ions, Si I, Si II, Si IX, S II, and S III, are obtained employing a new unified treatment developed for electron-ion recombination. The treatment incorporates both the radiative and the dielectronic recombination processes in the close coupling approximation from atomic collision theory, and the calculations are carried out using the R-matrix method as developed for the Opacity Project. All recombined states from the ground state to n = ∞ are considered. The states are divided into two groups, a low-n and a high-n group. Detailed partial photoionization cross sections into the ground state of the recombining ion, including autoionizing resonances due to coupling to excited states of the ion, are calculated for all bound states in the low-n group, and the Milne relation is used to calculate the corresponding contribution to the recombination rate coefficient. For the high-n group, collision strengths for dielectronic recombination, both detailed and resonance averaged, are obtained using the precise theory of Bell & Seaton. Total recombination rate coefficients are computed over a wide range of temperatures for practical purposes. A discussion of the atomic effects that determine the accuracy of the recombination rates is presented, in particular as a function of the increase in the eigenfunction expansion for the recombining ion, studied for e + Si X → Si IX. Comparison is made with earlier works.

  12. Absolute depth-dose-rate measurements for an {sup 192}Ir HDR brachytherapy source in water using MOSFET detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Zilio, Valery Olivier; Joneja, Om Parkash; Popowski, Youri; Rosenfeld, Anatoly; Chawla, Rakesh

    2006-06-15

    Reported MOSFET measurements concern mostly external radiotherapy and in vivo dosimetry. In this paper, we apply the technique for absolute dosimetry in the context of HDR brachytherapy using an {sup 192}Ir source. Measured radial dose rate distributions in water for different planes perpendicular to the source axis are presented and special attention is paid to the calibration of the R and K type detectors, and to the determination of appropriate correction factors for the sensitivity variation with the increase of the threshold voltage and the energy dependence. The experimental results are compared with Monte Carlo simulated dose rate distributions. The experimental results show a good agreement with the Monte Carlo simulations: the discrepancy between experimental and Monte Carlo results being within 5% for 82% of the points and within 10% for 95% of the points. Moreover, all points except two are found to lie within the experimental uncertainties, confirming thereby the quality of the results obtained.

  13. Transitions in genetic toggle switches driven by dynamic disorder in rate coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hang; Thill, Peter; Cao, Jianshu

    2016-05-01

    In biochemical systems, intrinsic noise may drive the system switch from one stable state to another. We investigate how kinetic switching between stable states in a bistable network is influenced by dynamic disorder, i.e., fluctuations in the rate coefficients. Using the geometric minimum action method, we first investigate the optimal transition paths and the corresponding minimum actions based on a genetic toggle switch model in which reaction coefficients draw from a discrete probability distribution. For the continuous probability distribution of the rate coefficient, we then consider two models of dynamic disorder in which reaction coefficients undergo different stochastic processes with the same stationary distribution. In one, the kinetic parameters follow a discrete Markov process and in the other they follow continuous Langevin dynamics. We find that regulation of the parameters modulating the dynamic disorder, as has been demonstrated to occur through allosteric control in bistable networks in the immune system, can be crucial in shaping the statistics of optimal transition paths, transition probabilities, and the stationary probability distribution of the network.

  14. Transitions in genetic toggle switches driven by dynamic disorder in rate coefficients.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hang; Thill, Peter; Cao, Jianshu

    2016-05-01

    In biochemical systems, intrinsic noise may drive the system switch from one stable state to another. We investigate how kinetic switching between stable states in a bistable network is influenced by dynamic disorder, i.e., fluctuations in the rate coefficients. Using the geometric minimum action method, we first investigate the optimal transition paths and the corresponding minimum actions based on a genetic toggle switch model in which reaction coefficients draw from a discrete probability distribution. For the continuous probability distribution of the rate coefficient, we then consider two models of dynamic disorder in which reaction coefficients undergo different stochastic processes with the same stationary distribution. In one, the kinetic parameters follow a discrete Markov process and in the other they follow continuous Langevin dynamics. We find that regulation of the parameters modulating the dynamic disorder, as has been demonstrated to occur through allosteric control in bistable networks in the immune system, can be crucial in shaping the statistics of optimal transition paths, transition probabilities, and the stationary probability distribution of the network. PMID:27155656

  15. Absolute rate constant for the O plus NO chemiluminescence in the near infrared

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golde, M. F.; Roche, A. E.; Kaufman, F.

    1973-01-01

    Infrared chemiluminescence from the process O + NO (+M) NO2 + hv (+M) has been studied between 1.3 and 4.1 micrometer. The wavelength dependence of the continuum between 1.3 and 3.3 micrometer is in fair agreement with previous studies and the measured radiative rate constant at 1.51 micrometer establishes the NO-O glow in this spectral range as a secondary emission standard. Comparison with previous studies of the visible region of the glow implies that the overall radiative rate constant lies in the range (9.4 to 11.2) x 10 to the minus 17 power cu cm sec/1. In the region 3.3 to 4.1 micrometer, the previously observed broad band, peaking at 3.7 micrometer, shows a complex kinetic dependence on O and M.

  16. Absolute rate of the reaction of bromine atoms with ozone from 200-360 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michael, J. V.; Lee, J. H.; Payne, W. A.; Stief, L. J.

    1978-01-01

    The rate constant for the reaction Br + O3 yields BrO + O2 was measured from 200 to 360 K by the technique of flash photolysis coupled to time resolved detection of bromine atoms by resonance fluorescence (FP-RF). Br atoms were produced by the flash photolysis of CH3Br at lambda 165nm.O3 was monitored continuously under reaction conditions by absorption at 253.7 nm. At each of five temperatures the results were independent of substantial variations in O3, total pressure and limited variations in flash intensity. The measured rate constants obeyed the Arrhenius expression, where the error quoted is two standard deviations. Results are compared with previous determinations which employed the discharge flow-mass spectrometric technique.

  17. Absolute rate constants for the reaction of atomic hydrogen with ketene from 298 to 500 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michael, J. V.; Nava, D. F.; Payne, W. A.; Stief, L. J.

    1979-01-01

    Rate constants for the reaction of atomic hydrogen with ketene have been measured at room temperature by two techniques, flash photolysis-resonance fluorescence and discharge flow-resonance fluorescence. The measured values are (6.19 + or - 1.68) x 10 to the -14th and (7.3 + or - 1.3) x 10 to the -14th cu cm/molecule/s, respectively. In addition, rate constants as a function of temperature have been measured over the range 298-500 K using the FP-RF technique. The results are best represented by the Arrhenius expression k = (1.88 + or - 1.12) x 10 to the -11th exp(-1725 + or - 190/T) cu cm/molecule/s, where the indicated errors are at the two standard deviation level.

  18. Absolute rate of the reaction of bromine atoms with ozone from 200 to 360 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michael, J. V.; Lee, J. H.; Payne, W. A.; Stief, L. J.

    1978-01-01

    The rate constant for the reaction Br + O3 yields BrO + O2 has been measured from 200 to 360 K by the technique of flash photolysis coupled to time resolved detection of bromine atoms by resonance fluorescence (FP-RF). Br atoms were produced by the flash photolysis of CH3Br at a wavelength of 165 nm. O3 concentration was monitored continuously under reaction conditions by absorption at 253.7 nm. At each of five temperatures the results were independent of substantial variations in O3 concentration, total pressure (Ar), and limited variations in flash intensity (i.e., initial Br concentration). The measured rate constants obey the Arrhenius expression, k = (7.74 plus or minus 0.50) x 10 to the -12th exp(-603 plus or minus 16/T) cu cm/molecule/sec, where the error quoted is two standard deviations.

  19. Radiative rates and electron impact excitation rate coefficients for Ne-like selenium, Se XXV

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, K.; Chen, C.Y. Huang, M.; Wang, Y.S.; Zou, Y.M.

    2011-07-15

    In this article we report calculations of energy levels, radiative rates, electron impact collision strengths, and effective collision strengths for transitions among the 241 fine-structure levels arising from 2l{sup 8} and 2l{sup 7}n{sup '}l{sup '} (n{sup '{<=}}6 and l{sup '{<=}}n{sup '}-1) configurations of Ne-like Se XXV using the Flexible Atomic Code. Energy levels and radiative rates are calculated within the relativistic configuration-interaction method. Direct excitation collision strengths are calculated using the relativistic distorted-wave approximation and high-energy collision strengths are obtained in the relativistic plane-wave approximation. Resonance contributions through the relevant Na-like doubly-excited configurations 2l{sup 7}n'l'n''l'' (3{<=}n'{<=}7, l'{<=}n'-1, n'{<=}n''{<=}50, and l''{<=}8) are explicitly taken into account via the independent-process and isolated-resonance approximation using distorted waves. Resonant stabilizing transitions and possibly important radiative decays from the resonances toward low-lying autoionizing levels are considered. In addition, the resonance contributions from Na-like 2l{sup 6}3l'3l'''n''' (n'''=3-6) configurations are included and found to be predominant for many transitions among the singly-excited states in Ne-like Se XXV. We present the radiative rates, oscillator strengths, and line strengths for all electric dipole, magnetic dipole, electric quadrupole, magnetic quadrupole, electric octopole, and magnetic octopole transitions among the 241 levels. The effective collision strengths are reported for all 28920 transitions among the 241 levels over a wide temperature range up to 10 keV. To assess the reliability and accuracy of the present collisional data, we have performed a 27-state close-coupling calculation, employing the Dirac R-matrix theory. The results from the close-coupling calculation and the independent-process calculation for the identical target states are found to be in good agreement

  20. Friction coefficients and wear rates of different orthodontic archwires in artificial saliva.

    PubMed

    Alfonso, M V; Espinar, E; Llamas, J M; Rupérez, E; Manero, J M; Barrera, J M; Solano, E; Gil, F J

    2013-05-01

    The aim of this paper is to analyze the influence of the nature of the orthodontic archwires on the friction coefficient and wear rate against materials used commonly as brackets (Ti-6Al-4V and 316L Stainless Steel). The materials selected as orthodontic archwires were ASI304 stainless steel, NiTi, Ti, TiMo and NiTiCu. The array archwire's materials selected presented very similar roughness but different hardness. Materials were chosen from lower and higher hardness degrees than that of the brackets. Wear tests were carried out at in artificial saliva at 37 °C. Results show a linear relationship between the hardness of the materials and the friction coefficients. The material that showed lower wear rate was the ASI304 stainless steel. To prevent wear, the wire and the brackets have high hardness values and in the same order of magnitude. PMID:23440428

  1. Electron-impact excitation rate-coefficients and polarization of subsequent emission for Ar+ ion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dipti; Srivastava, Rajesh

    2016-06-01

    Electron impact excitation in Ar+ ions has been studied by using fully relativistic distorted wave theory. Calculations are performed to obtain the excitation cross-sections and rate-coefficients for the transitions from the ground state 3p5 (J=3/2) to fine-structure levels of excited states 3p44s, 3p44p, 3p45s, 3p45p, 3p43d and 3p44d. Polarization of the radiation following the excitation has been calculated using the obtained magnetic sub-level cross-sections. Comparison of the present rate-coefficients is also done with the previously reported theoretical results for some unresolved fine structure transitions.

  2. Recommended Thermal Rate Coefficients for the C + H3+ Reaction and Some Astrochemical Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vissapragada, Shreyas; Buzard, Cam; Miller, Kenneth A.; O'Connor, Aodh; De Ruette, Nathalie; Urbain, Xavier; Savin, Daniel Wolf

    2016-06-01

    We have incorporated our experimentally derived thermal rate coefficients for C + H3+ forming CH+ and CH2+ into a commonly used astrochemical model. We find that the Arrhenius-Kooij equation typically used in chemical models does not accurately fit our data and use instead a more versatile fitting formula. At a temperature of 10 K and a density of 104 cm-3, we find no significant differences in the predicted abundances, but at higher temperatures of 50, 100, and 300 K we find up to factor of 2 changes. Additionally, we find that the relatively small error on our measurements (~15%) significantly reduces the uncertainties on the predicted abundances compared to those obtained using the currently implemented Langevin rate coefficient with its estimated factor of 2 uncertainty.

  3. Rate-coefficients and polarization results for the electron-impact excitation of Ar+ ion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Rajesh; Dipti, Dipti

    2016-05-01

    A fully relativistic distorted wave theory has been employed to study the electron impact excitation in Ar+ ion. Results have been obtained for the excitation cross-sections and rate-coefficients for the transitions from the ground state 3p5 (J = 3/2) to fine-structure levels of excited states 3p4 4 s, 3p4 4 p , 3p4 5 s, 3p4 5 p, 3p4 3 d and 3p4 4 d. Polarization of the radiation following the excitation has been calculated using the obtained magnetic sub-level cross-sections. Comparison of the present rate-coefficients is also done with the previously reported theoretical results for some unresolved fine structure transitions. Work is supported by DAE-BRNS Mumbai and CSIR, New Delhi.

  4. Absolute vertical uplift rates in western Washington inferred from historical leveling and tide gauge data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alba, S.; Weldon, R.; Livelybrooks, D.; Schmidt, D. A.

    2009-12-01

    We present a new uplift rate map for western Washington based on reanalysis of water levels from the 12 major NOAA tide gauges, three new water level series that combine NOAA’s historical records and our temporarily deployed gauges (at Cape Disappointment, Olympia, and Point Grenville), and reinterpretation of repeated 1st and 2nd order NGS leveling lines. As previous studies have concluded, EW gradients in the vertical deformation field are consistent with strain accumulation across the Cascadia subduction zone interface; however, uplift rates are highly variable along the outer Washington coast, ranging from approximately +4 to -2 mm/yr, suggesting significant changes in the depth of locking along strike. Improved measure of uplift rates from water level changes are accomplished by aggressively editing available hourly data and applying a transfer function approach to better remove tides, ocean and atmospheric “noise”. The analysis allows uplift to be determined from shorter and less complete records and in some cases permits the identification of transients like slow earthquakes. As we found in a similar study in Oregon (Burgette et al, JGR, 2009), releveled lines need to be anchored to as many tide gauges as possible to remove systematic error, and repeated releveling (especially of tidal benchmarks) is required to identify the few stable benchmarks that link water levels at the tidal stations to each other through time and to the regional NGS leveling lines. A portion of the westernmost Washington coast, from an approximate latitude of 47.4 to 47.9 N, is subsiding, and tilts suggest that the peak in uplift rate is well onshore, indicating that the locked zone extends onshore, in contrast to most previous studies. To the north, the peak in uplift approximately passes through Neah Bay (the NW corner of the Olympic Peninsula, lat. 48.3 N), and to the south the peak is offshore from Grays Harbor (lat. 47 N) to the Columbia River (lat. 46.2 N). A north

  5. Absolute rate parameters for the reaction of ground state atomic oxygen with dimethyl sulfide and episulfide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, J. H.; Timmons, R. B.; Stief, L. J.

    1976-01-01

    It is pointed out that the investigated reaction of oxygen with dimethyl sulfide may play an important role in photochemical smog formation and in the chemical evolution of dense interstellar clouds. Kinetic data were obtained with the aid of the flash photolysis-resonance fluorescence method. The photodecomposition of molecular oxygen provided the oxygen atoms for the experiments. The decay of atomic oxygen was studied on the basis of resonance fluorescence observations. Both reactions investigated were found to be fast processes. A negative temperature dependence of the rate constants for reactions with dimethyl sulfide was observed.

  6. Absolute rate constants of alkoxyl radical reactions in aqueous solution. [Tert-butyl hydroperoxide

    SciTech Connect

    Erben-Russ, M.; Michel, C.; Bors, W.; Saran, M.

    1987-04-23

    The pulse radiolysis technique was used to generate the alkoxyl radical derived from tert-butyl hydroperoxide (/sup t/BuOOH) in aqueous solution. The reactions of this radical with 2,2'-azinobis(3-ethyl-6-benzothiazolinesulfonate) (ABTS) and promethazine were monitored by kinetic spectroscopy. The unimolecular decay rate constant of the tert-butoxyl radical (/sup t/BuO) was determined to be 1.4 x 10/sup 6/ s/sup -1/. On the basis of this value, the rate constants for /sup t/BuO attack on quercetin, crocin, crocetin, ascorbate, isoascorbate, trolox c, glutathione, thymidine, adenosine, guanosine, and unsaturated fatty acids were determined. In addition, the reaction of /sup t/BuO with the polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) was observed by directly monitoring the formation of the fatty acid pentadienyl radicals. Interestingly, the attack of /sup t/BuO on PUFA was found to be faster by about one order of magnitude as compared to the same reaction in a nonpolar solvent.

  7. The rate coefficients of the chemi-ionization processes in slow Li*(n) + Na collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ignjatović, Lj M.; Mihajlov, A. A.; Klyucharev, A. N.

    2008-01-01

    The semi-classical method for determining the rate coefficients of the chemi-ionization processes in slow non-symmetric atom-Rydberg atom collisions is applied to the Li*(n) + Na case. Calculated rate coefficients are compared with the existing experimental data from the literature. Obtained results have confirmed that resonant mechanism of non-elastic processes in atom-Rydberg atom collisions are fully applicable to non-symmetric chemi-ionization processes. The rate coefficients of such processes in Li*(n) + Na collisions are determined in the regions of principal quantum number and temperature 4 <= n <= 20 and 700 K <= T <= 1100 K which can be of interest for possible further experiments. Also, the potential curves of several lowest Σ states of the molecular ion LiNa+, as well as the values of the square of dipole matrix element for the transition between X2Σ+- and A2Σ+-states, are presented in this paper.

  8. Laboratory Studies of Low Temperature Rate Coefficients: The Atmospheric Chemistry of the Outer Planets and Titan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogan, Denis

    1999-01-01

    Laboratory measurements have been carried out to determine low temperature chemical rate coefficients of ethynyl radical (C2H) for the atmospheres of the outer planets and their satellites. This effort is directly related to the Cassini mission which will explore Saturn and Titan. A laser-based photolysis/infrared laser probe setup was used to measure the temperature dependence of kinetic rate coefficients from approx. equal to 150 to 350 K for C2H radicals with H2, C2H2, CH4, CD4, C2H4, C2H6, C3H8, n-C4H10, i-C4H10, neo-C5H12, C3H4 (methylacetylene and allene), HCN, and CH3CN. The results revealed discrepancies of an order of magnitude or more compared with the low temperature rate coefficients used in present models. A new Laval nozzle, low Mach number supersonic expansion kinetics apparatus has been constructed, resulting in the first measurements of neutral C2H radical kinetics at 90 K and permitting studies on condensable gases with insufficient vapor pressure at low temperatures. New studies of C 2H with acetylene have been completed.

  9. Temperature and pressure dependence of the absolute rate constant for the reactions of NH2 radicals with acetylene and ethylene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bosco, S. R.; Nava, D. F.; Brobst, W. D.; Stief, L. J.

    1984-01-01

    The absolute rate constants for the reaction between the NH2 free radical and acetylene and ethylene is measured experimentally using a flash photolysis technique. The constant is considered to be a function of temperature and pressure. At each temperature level of the experiment, the observed pseudo-first-order rate constants were assumed to be independent of flash intensity. The results of the experiment indicate that the bimolecular rate constant for the NH2 + C2H2 reaction increases with pressure at 373 K and 459 K but not at lower temperatures. Results near the pressure limit conform to an Arrhenius expression of 1.11 (+ or -) 0.36 x 10 to the -13th over the temperature range from 241 to 459 K. For the reaction NH2 + C2H4, a smaller rate of increase in the bimolecular rate constant was observed over the temperature range 250-465 K. The implications of these results for current theoretical models of NH2 + C2H2 (or H4) reactions in the atmospheres of Jupiter and Saturn are discussed.

  10. Re-evaluation of the reaction rate coefficient of CH3Br + OH with implications for the atmospheric budget of methyl bromide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsson, E. J. K.; Joelsson, L. M. T.; Heimdal, J.; Johnson, M. S.; Nielsen, O. J.

    2013-12-01

    The reaction rate coefficient k(CH3Br + OH) has been determined in the temperature range 298-373 K, using pulse radiolysis/UV kinetic spectroscopy, and at 298 K using a relative rate method. The Arrhenius expression obtained from a fit to the experimental results is (2.9 ± 0.9) × 10-12 exp(-(1230 ± 125)/T) cm3 molecule-1 s-1, which is greater than the expression currently recommended. The relative rate experiments give k(298 K) = (4.13 ± 0.63) × 10-14 cm3 molecule-1 s-1. The results of the absolute and relative rate experiments indicate that the source budget of atmospheric CH3Br should be reinvestigated, as was recently done for CH3Cl.

  11. Derivation of the chemical-equilibrium rate coefficient using scattering theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mickens, R. E.

    1977-01-01

    Scattering theory is applied to derive the equilibrium rate coefficient for a general homogeneous chemical reaction involving ideal gases. The reaction rate is expressed in terms of the product of a number of normalized momentum distribution functions, the product of the number of molecules with a given internal energy state, and the spin-averaged T-matrix elements. An expression for momentum distribution at equilibrium for an arbitrary molecule is presented, and the number of molecules with a given internal-energy state is represented by an expression which includes the partition function.

  12. The functional correlation between rainfall rate and extinction coefficient for frequencies from 3 to 10 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jameson, A. R.

    1990-01-01

    The relationship between the rainfall rate (R) obtained from radiometric brightness temperatures and the extinction coefficient (k sub e) is investigated by computing the values of k sub e over a wide range of rainfall rates, for frequencies from 3 to 25 GHz. The results show that the strength of the relation between the R and the k sub e values exhibits considerable variation for frequencies at this range. Practical suggestions are made concerning the selection of particular frequencies for rain measurements to minimize the error in R determinations.

  13. Solid-state track recorder dosimetry device to measure absolute reaction rates and neutron fluence as a function of time

    DOEpatents

    Gold, Raymond; Roberts, James H.

    1989-01-01

    A solid state track recording type dosimeter is disclosed to measure the time dependence of the absolute fission rates of nuclides or neutron fluence over a period of time. In a primary species an inner recording drum is rotatably contained within an exterior housing drum that defines a series of collimating slit apertures overlying windows defined in the stationary drum through which radiation can enter. Film type solid state track recorders are positioned circumferentially about the surface of the internal recording drum to record such radiation or its secondary products during relative rotation of the two elements. In another species both the recording element and the aperture element assume the configuration of adjacent disks. Based on slit size of apertures and relative rotational velocity of the inner drum, radiation parameters within a test area may be measured as a function of time and spectra deduced therefrom.

  14. Electron-Ion Recombination Rate Coefficient Measurements in a Flowing Afterglow Plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gougousi, Theodosia; Golde, Michael F.; Johnsen, Rainer

    1996-01-01

    The flowing-afterglow technique in conjunction with computer modeling of the flowing plasma has been used to determine accurate dissociative-recombination rate coefficients alpha for the ions O2(+), HCO(+), CH5(+), C2H5(+), H3O(+), CO2(+), HCO2(+), HN2O(+), and N2O(+) at 295 K. We find that the simple form of data analysis that was employed in earlier experiments was adequate and we largely confirm earlier results. In the case of HCO(+) ions, published coefficients range from 1.1 X 10(exp -7) to 2.8 x 10(exp -7) cu cm/S, while our measurements give a value of 1.9 x 10(exp -7) cu cm/S.

  15. Laboratory studies of low temperature rate coefficients: The atmospheric chemistry of the outer planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leone, Stephen R.

    1993-01-01

    The objectives are to measure laboratory rate coefficients for key reactions of hydrocarbon molecules and radicals at low temperatures, which are relevant to the atmospheric photochemistry of Saturn, Jupiter, and Titan. Upcoming NASA planetary missions, such as Cassini, will probe the atmosphere of Titan in more detail, offering an excellent opportunity to test kinetic models and to establish fiducial standards for using kinetic models to interpret various parameters of the outer planets. Accurate low temperature kinetic data, which are presently lacking, may require crucial revisions to the rates of formation and destruction and are of utmost importance to the success of these efforts. In this program, several key reactions of ethynyl radicals (C2H) with acetylene (C2H2), methane (CH4), and oxygen (O2), down to temperatures of 170 K were successfully investigated. The experimental apparatus developed in our laboratory for measuring reaction kinetics at low temperatures consists of a laser photolysis/infrared probe laser setup. The rate measurements are carried out as a function of (low) temperature with a transverse flow cell designed specifically for these studies. A 193 nm argon fluoride pulsed excimer laser is used to photolyze a suitable precursor molecule, such as acetylene to produce C2H, and a high resolution, tunable infrared F-center laser (2.3-3.35 mu m) probes the transient concentrations of the radical species directly in absorption to extract the kinetic rate coefficients.

  16. Indirectly estimated absolute lung cancer mortality rates by smoking status and histological type based on a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background National smoking-specific lung cancer mortality rates are unavailable, and studies presenting estimates are limited, particularly by histology. This hinders interpretation. We attempted to rectify this by deriving estimates indirectly, combining data from national rates and epidemiological studies. Methods We estimated study-specific absolute mortality rates and variances by histology and smoking habit (never/ever/current/former) based on relative risk estimates derived from studies published in the 20th century, coupled with WHO mortality data for age 70–74 for the relevant country and period. Studies with populations grossly unrepresentative nationally were excluded. 70–74 was chosen based on analyses of large cohort studies presenting rates by smoking and age. Variations by sex, period and region were assessed by meta-analysis and meta-regression. Results 148 studies provided estimates (Europe 59, America 54, China 22, other Asia 13), 54 providing estimates by histology (squamous cell carcinoma, adenocarcinoma). For all smoking habits and lung cancer types, mortality rates were higher in males, the excess less evident for never smokers. Never smoker rates were clearly highest in China, and showed some increasing time trend, particularly for adenocarcinoma. Ever smoker rates were higher in parts of Europe and America than in China, with the time trend very clear, especially for adenocarcinoma. Variations by time trend and continent were clear for current smokers (rates being higher in Europe and America than Asia), but less clear for former smokers. Models involving continent and trend explained much variability, but non-linearity was sometimes seen (with rates lower in 1991–99 than 1981–90), and there was regional variation within continent (with rates in Europe often high in UK and low in Scandinavia, and higher in North than South America). Conclusions The indirect method may be questioned, because of variations in definition of smoking and

  17. The reaction H + C4H2 - Absolute rate constant measurement and implication for atmospheric modeling of Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nava, D. F.; Mitchell, M. B.; Stief, L. J.

    1986-04-01

    The absolute rate constant for the reaction H + C4H2 has been measured over the temperature (T) interval 210-423 K, using the technique of flash photolysis-resonance fluorescence. At each of the five temperatures employed, the results were independent of variations in C4H2 concentration, total pressure of Ar or N2, and flash intensity (i.e., the initial H concentration). The rate constant, k, was found to be equal to 1.39 x 10 to the -10th exp (-1184/T) cu cm/s, with an error of one standard deviation. The Arrhenius parameters at the high pressure limit determined here for the H + C4H2 reaction are consistent with those for the corresponding reactions of H with C2H2 and C3H4. Implications of the kinetic carbon chemistry results, particularly those at low temperature, are considered for models of the atmospheric carbon chemistry of Titan. The rate of this reaction, relative to that of the analogous, but slower, reaction of H + C2H2, appears to make H + C4H2 a very feasible reaction pathway for effective conversion of H atoms to molecular hydrogen in the stratosphere of Titan.

  18. Pressure dependence of the absolute rate constant for the reaction OH + C2H2 from 228 to 413K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michael, J. V.; Nava, D. F.; Borokowski, R. P.; Payne, W. A.; Stief, L. J.

    1980-01-01

    The pressure dependence of absolute rate constants for the reaction of OH + C2H2 yields products has been examined at five temperatures ranging from 228 to 413 K. The experimental techniques which was used is flash photolysis-resonance fluoresence. OH was produced by water photolysis and hydroxyl resonance fluorescent photons were measured by multiscaling techniques. The results indicate that the low pressure bimolecular rate constant is 4 x 10 the the minus 13th power cu cm molecule (-1) s(-1) over the temperature range studied. A substantial increase in the bimolecular rate constant with an increase in pressure was observed at all temperatures except 228 K. This indicates the importance of initial adduct formation and subsequent stablization. The high pressure results are well represented by the Arrhenius expression (k sub bi) sub infinity = (6.83 + or - 1.19) x 10 to the minus 12th power exp(-646 + or - 47/T)cu cm molecule (-1) s(-1). The results are compared to previous investigated and are theoretically discussed. The implications of these results on modeling of terrestrial and planetary atmospheres and also in combustion chemistry are discussed.

  19. Absolute measurement of cerebral optical coefficients, hemoglobin concentration and oxygen saturation in old and young adults with near-infrared spectroscopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We present near-infrared spectroscopy measurement of absolute cerebral hemoglobin concentration and saturation in a large sample of 36 healthy elderly (mean age, 85 ± 6 years) and 19 young adults (mean age, 28 ± 4 years). Non-invasive measurements were obtained on the forehead using a commercially a...

  20. A rare gas optics-free absolute photon flux and energy analyzer to provide absolute photoionization rates of inflowing interstellar neutrals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Judge, Darrell L.

    1994-01-01

    A prototype spectrometer has been developed for space applications requiring long term absolute EUV photon flux measurements. The energy spectrum of the incoming photons is transformed directly into an electron energy spectrum by taking advantage of the photoelectric effect in one of several rare gases at low pressures. Using an electron energy spectrometer, followed by an electron multiplier detector, pulses due to individual electrons are counted. The overall efficiency of this process can be made essentially independent of gain drifts in the signal path, and the secular degradation of optical components which is often a problem in other techniques is avoided. A very important feature of this approach is its freedom from the problem of overlapping spectral orders that plagues grating EUV spectrometers. An instrument with these features has not been flown before, but is essential to further advances in our understanding of solar EUV flux dynamics, and the coupled dynamics of terrestrial and planetary atmospheres. The detailed characteristics of this optics-free spectrometer are presented in the publications section.

  1. Temperature dependent rate coefficients for the reaction of OH radicals with dimethylbenzoquinones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bejan, Iustinian; Barnes, Ian; Wiesen, Peter; Wenger, John C.

    2015-10-01

    Rate coefficients for the gas-phase reaction of hydroxyl (OH) radicals with two methylated benzoquinones have been measured at atmospheric pressure over the temperature range 284-313 K using the relative rate method. The following Arrhenius expressions (in cm3 molecule-1 s-1) have been obtained: k(25DMBQ) = (8.59 ± 4.70) × 10-12exp[(228 ± 163)/T] and k(26DMBQ) = (5.11 ± 2.79) × 10-12exp[(399 ± 165)/T] for 2,5-dimethylbenzoquinone (2,5DMBQ) and 2,6-dimethylbenzoquinone (2,6DMBQ), respectively, with corresponding values at 298 K: k(25DMBQ) = (2.05 ± 0.46) × 10-11 and k(26DMBQ) = (1.93 ± 0.12) × 10-11. The rate coefficients are compared to those reported for similar compounds and discussed in terms of structure-activity relationships. The results are also used to calculate atmospheric lifetimes for 2,5DMBQ and 2,6DMBQ with respect to reaction with OH radicals.

  2. Excitation rate coefficients and line ratios for the optical and ultraviolet transitions in S II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cai, Wei; Pradhan, Anil K.

    1993-01-01

    New calculations are reported for electron excitation collision strengths, rate coefficients, transition probabilities, and line ratios for the astrophysically important optical and UV lines in S II. The collision strengths are calculated in the close coupling approximation using the R-matrix method. The present calculations are more extensive than previous ones, including all transitions among the 12 lowest LS terms and the corresponding 28 fine-structure levels in the collisional-radiative model for S II. While the present rate coefficients for electron impact excitation are within 10-30 percent of the previous values for the low-lying optical transitions employed as density diagnostics of H II regions and nebulae, the excitation rates for the UV transitions 4S super 0 sub 3/2 - 4Psub 1/2,3/2,5/2 differ significantly from earlier calculations, by up to factor of 2. We describe temperature and density sensitive flux ratios for a number of UV lines. The present UV results are likely to be of interest in a more accurate interpretation of S II emission from the Io plasma torus in the magnetosphere of Jupiter, as well as other UV sources observed from the IUE, ASTRO 1, and the HST.

  3. Optimised geometry to calculate dose rate conversion coefficient for external exposure to photons.

    PubMed

    Askri, B; Manai, K; Trabelsi, A; Baccari, B

    2008-01-01

    A single-parameter geometry to describe soil is achieved for Monte Carlo calculation of absorbed dose rate in air for photon emitters from natural radionuclides. This optimised geometry based on physical assumptions consists of the soil part whose emitted radiation has a given minimum probability to reach the detector. This geometry was implemented in Geant4 toolkit and a significant reduction in computation time was achieved. Simulation tests have shown that for soil represented by a cylinder of 40 m radius and 1 m deep, >98% of the calculated dose rate conversion coefficients in air at 1 m above the ground is generated by only 6% of the soil volume in the case of uniform distribution of radioactivity, and >99.2% of the calculated dose rate for an exponential distribution. When the soil is represented by the entire optimised geometry, 99% of the conversion coefficients values are reached for a soil depth of 1 m and 100% for that of approximately 2 m. PMID:17959610

  4. On the accuracy of the rate coefficients used in plasma fluid models for breakdown in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kourtzanidis, Konstantinos; Raja, Laxminarayan L.

    2016-07-01

    The electrical breakdown of air depends on the balance between creation and loss of charged particles. In fluid models, datasets of the rate coefficients used are obtained either from fits to experimental data or by solutions of the Boltzmann equation. Here, we study the accuracy of the commonly used models for ionization and attachment frequencies and their impact on the prediction of the breakdown threshold for air. We show that large errors can occur depending on the model and propose the most accurate dataset available for modeling of air breakdown phenomena.

  5. Laboratory studies of low temperature rate coefficients: The atmospheric chemistry of the outer planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leone, Stephen R.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of the project is to perform laboratory measurements of reaction rate coefficients at low temperature. The reactions and temperatures of interest are those that are important in the chemistry of the hydrocarbon rich atmospheres of the outer planets and their satellites. In this stage of the study we are investigating reactions of ethynyl radicals, C2H, with acetylene (C2H2), methane (CH4), and hydrogen (H2). In the previous status report from 24 Jan. 1992, we reported on the development of the experimental apparatus and the first, preliminary data for the C2H + C2H2 reaction.

  6. Calculation of the gain coefficient in cryogenically cooled Yb : YAG disks at high heat generation rates

    SciTech Connect

    Vadimova, O L; Mukhin, I B; Kuznetsov, I I; Palashov, O V; Perevezentsev, E A; Khazanov, Efim A

    2013-03-31

    We have calculated the stored energy and gain coefficient in disk gain elements cooled to cryogenic temperatures. The problem has been solved with allowance for intense heat generation, amplified spontaneous emission and parasitic lasing, without averaging over any spatial coordinate. The numerical simulation results agree well with experimental data, in particular at high heat generation rates. Experimental data and theoretical analysis indicate that composite disk gain elements containing an undoped region can store considerably more energy due to suppression of amplified spontaneous emission and parasitic lasing. (extreme light fields and their applications)

  7. Quantum-reflection model for Penning ionization rate coefficients in cold collisions of metastable helium and rubidium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickinson, A. S.

    2010-11-01

    A quantum-reflection model is employed to calculate the rate coefficient for the Penning ionization of rubidium by cold metastable helium atoms in unpolarized collisions. Various results for the p-wave transmission coefficient on a 1/R6 long-range potential are discussed. The dispersion coefficient for the interaction of these atoms is estimated as 3540 au. The calculated value of the rate coefficient is about four times lower than the recently measured value (Byron et al 2010a Phys. Rev. A 81 013405) for this process when both atoms are held in magneto-optical traps.

  8. Determination of the global recombination rate coefficient for the ISX-B Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Langley, R.A.; Howe, H.C.

    1983-01-01

    The global recombination rate coefficient for hydrogen has been measured for the ISX-B tokamak vacuum vessel for various surface conditions. The measurements were performed by observing the rate of decrease of gas pressure in the vessel during a glow discharge. The parameters of the glow discharge and the complete experimental method are described. Previously published analytic and numerical models are used for data analysis. The effects of surface contamination on the results are described. For ''unclean'' wall conditions sigmak/sub r/ = 1.8 x 10/sup -28/ cm/sup 4//atom.s at 296 K and increases to sigmak/sub r/ = 4.4 x 10/sup -28/ cm/sup 4//atoms.s for ''clean'' conditions and remains constant until subsequent exposure to air.

  9. High-field measurement of the 129Xe-Cs binary spin-exchange rate coefficient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jau, Yuan-Yu; Kuzma, Nicholas N.; Happer, William

    2004-03-01

    We report the first measurement of the binary spin-exchange rate coefficient κ in the ^129Xe-Cs system. Data were taken using ^129Xe NMR in glass cells containing isotopically enriched xenon gas at pressures on the order of atmospheres and a small amount of liquid Cs metal, in the temperature range from 120 to 140^rcC and at a magnetic field of 9.4 T. The contribution of CsXe van der Waals molecules to spin exchange should have been nearly eliminated by the high magnetic field, as confirmed by our measurements of the ^129Xe longitudinal relaxation time T1 in a series of cells with various densities of xenon. The Cs atomic number density [Cs] was controlled by the cell temperature, and was experimentally determined by analysis of the Faraday rotation of linearly polarized probe laser light. We measured κ = d (T_1-1)/d[Cs]= (2.81± 0.2) × 10-16 cm^3 s-1 . This is about 60% larger than the previously measured rate coefficient for the ^129Xe-Rb system(Y.-Y. Jau, N. N. Kuzma, and W. Happer, Phys. Rev. A 66, 052710 (2002).), κ =d (T_1-1)/d[Rb]= (1.75± 0.12) × 10-16 cm^3 s-1 . A comparison with theory(Y.-Y. Jau, N. N. Kuzma, and W. Happer, Phys. Rev. A 67, 022720 (2003).) will be discussed.

  10. Estimating Reaction Rate Coefficients Within a Travel-Time Modeling Framework

    SciTech Connect

    Gong, R; Lu, C; Luo, Jian; Wu, Wei-min; Cheng, H.; Criddle, Craig; Kitanidis, Peter K.; Gu, Baohua; Watson, David B; Jardine, Philip M; Brooks, Scott C

    2011-03-01

    A generalized, efficient, and practical approach based on the travel-time modeling framework is developed to estimate in situ reaction rate coefficients for groundwater remediation in heterogeneous aquifers. The required information for this approach can be obtained by conducting tracer tests with injection of a mixture of conservative and reactive tracers and measurements of both breakthrough curves (BTCs). The conservative BTC is used to infer the travel-time distribution from the injection point to the observation point. For advection-dominant reactive transport with well-mixed reactive species and a constant travel-time distribution, the reactive BTC is obtained by integrating the solutions to advective-reactive transport over the entire travel-time distribution, and then is used in optimization to determine the in situ reaction rate coefficients. By directly working on the conservative and reactive BTCs, this approach avoids costly aquifer characterization and improves the estimation for transport in heterogeneous aquifers which may not be sufficiently described by traditional mechanistic transport models with constant transport parameters. Simplified schemes are proposed for reactive transport with zero-, first-, nth-order, and Michaelis-Menten reactions. The proposed approach is validated by a reactive transport case in a two-dimensional synthetic heterogeneous aquifer and a field-scale bioremediation experiment conducted at Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The field application indicates that ethanol degradation for U(VI)-bioremediation is better approximated by zero-order reaction kinetics than first-order reaction kinetics.

  11. On the temperature dependence of the rate coefficient of formation of C2+ from C + CH+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rampino, S.; Pastore, M.; Garcia, E.; Pacifici, L.; Laganà, A.

    2016-08-01

    We carry out quasi-classical trajectory calculations for the C + CH+→ C_2^+ + H reaction on an ad hoc computed high-level ab initio potential energy surface. Thermal rate coefficients at the temperatures of relevance in cold interstellar clouds are derived and compared with the assumed, temperature-independent estimates publicly available in kinetic data bases KIDA and UDfA. For a temperature of 10 K the data base value overestimates by a factor of 2 the one obtained by us (thus improperly enhancing the destruction route of CH+ in astrochemical kinetic models) which is seen to double in the temperature range 5-300 K with a sharp increase in the first 50 K. The computed values are fitted via the popular Arrhenius-Kooij formula and best-fitting parameters α = 1.32 × 10-9 cm3 s-1, β = 0.1 and γ = 2.19 K to be included in the online mentioned data bases are provided. Further investigation shows that the temperature dependence of the thermal rate coefficient better conforms to the recently proposed so-called `deformed Arrhenius' law by Aquilanti and Mundim.

  12. Laboratory studies of low temperature rate coefficients: The atmospheric chemistry of the outer planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leone, Stephen R.

    1995-01-01

    The objectives of the research are to measure low temperature laboratory rate coefficients for key reactions relevant to the atmospheres of Titan and Saturn. These reactions are, for example, C2H + H2, CH4, C2H2, and other hydrocarbons which need to be measured at low temperatures, down to approximately 150 K. The results of this work are provided to NASA specialists who study modeling of the hydrocarbon chemistry of the outer planets. The apparatus for this work consists of a pulsed laser photolysis system and a tunable F-center probe laser to monitor the disappearance of C2H. A low temperature cell with a cryogenic circulating fluid in the outer jacket provides the gas handling system for this work. These elements have been described in detail in previous reports. Several new results are completed and the publications are just being prepared. The reaction of C2H with C2H2 has been measured with an improved apparatus down to 154 K. An Arrhenius plot indicates a clear increase in the rate coefficient at the lowest temperatures, most likely because of the long-lived (C4H3) intermediate. The capability to achieve the lowest temperatures in this work was made possible by construction of a new cell and addition of a multipass arrangement for the probe laser, as well as improvements to the laser system.

  13. Behavior of rate coefficients for ion-ion mutual neutralization, 300-550 K

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Thomas M.; Shuman, Nicholas S.; Viggiano, A. A.

    2012-05-28

    Rate coefficients k{sub MN} have been measured for a number of anion neutralization reactions with Ar{sup +} and Kr{sup +} over the temperature range 300-550 K. For the first time, the data set includes anions of radicals and other short-lived species. In the present paper, we review these results and make note of correlations with reduced mass, electron binding energy of the anion (equivalent to the electron affinity of the corresponding neutral), and temperature, and compare with expectations from absorbing sphere models. An intriguing result is that the data for diatomic anions neutralized by Ar{sup +} and Kr{sup +} have k{sub MN} values close to 3 x 10{sup -8} cm{sup 3} s{sup -1} at 300 K, a figure which is lower than those for all of the polyatomic anions at 300 K except for SF{sub 5}{sup -}+ Kr{sup +}. For the polyatomic anions studied here, neutralized by Ar{sup +} and Kr{sup +}, the reduced mass dependence agrees with theory, on average, but we find a stronger temperature dependence of T{sup -0.9} than expected from the theoretical E{sup -0.5} energy dependence of the rate coefficient at thermal energies. The k{sub MN} show a weak dependence on the electron binding energy of the anion for the polyatomic species studied.

  14. Determining discharge-coefficient ratings for selected coastal control structures in Broward and Palm Beach counties, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tillis, G.M.; Swain, E.D.

    1998-01-01

    Discharges through 10 selected coastal control structures in Broward and Palm Beach Counties, Florida, are presently computed using the theoretical discharge-coefficient ratings developed from scale modeling, theoretical discharge coefficients, and some field calibrations whose accuracies for specific sites are unknown. To achieve more accurate discharge-coefficient ratings for the coastal control structures, field discharge measurements were taken with an Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler at the coastal control structures under a variety of flow conditions. These measurements were used to determine computed discharge-coefficient ratings for the coastal control structures under different flow regimes: submerged orifice flow, submerged weir flow, free orifice flow, and free weir flow. Theoretical and computed discharge-coefficient ratings for submerged orifice and weir flows were determined at seven coastal control structures, and discharge ratings for free orifice and weir flows were determined at three coastal control structures. The difference between the theoretical and computed discharge-coefficient ratings varied from structure to structure. The theoretical and computed dischargecoefficient ratings for submerged orifice flow were within 10 percent at four of seven coastal control structures; however, differences greater than 20 percent were found at two of the seven structures. The theoretical and computed discharge-coefficient ratings for submerged weir flow were within 10 percent at three of seven coastal control structures; however, differences greater than 20 percent were found at four of the seven coastal control structures. The difference between theoretical and computed discharge-coefficient ratings for free orifice and free weir flows ranged from 5 to 32 percent. Some differences between the theoretical and computed discharge-coefficient ratings could be better defined with more data collected over a greater distribution of measuring conditions.

  15. Kramers-Moyal coefficients in the analysis and modeling of heart rate variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petelczyc, M.; Żebrowski, J. J.; Baranowski, R.

    2009-09-01

    Modeling of recorded time series may be used as a method of analysis for heart rate variability studies. In particular, the extraction of the first two Kramers-Moyal coefficients has been used in this context. Recently, the method was applied to a wide range of signal analysis: from financial data to physiological and biological time series. Modeling of the signal is important for the prediction and interpretation of the dynamics underlying the process. The method requires the determination of the Markov time. Obtaining the drift and diffusion term of the Kramers-Moyal expansion is crucial for the modeling of the original time series with the Langevin equation. Both Tabar [Comput. Sci. Eng. 8, 54 (2006)] and T. Kuusela [Phys. Rev. E 69, 031916 (2004)] suggested that these terms may be used to distinguish healthy subjects from those with heart failure. The research groups applied a somewhat different methodology and obtained substantially different ranges of the Markov time. We show that the two studies may be considered consistent with each other as Kuusela analyzed 24 h recordings while Tabar analyzed daytime and nighttime recordings, separately. However, both groups suggested using the Langevin equation for modeling of time series which requires the fluctuation force to be a Gaussian. We analyzed heart rate variability recordings for ten young male (age 26-4+3y ) healthy subjects. 24 h recordings were analyzed and 6-h-long daytime and nighttime fragments were selected. Similar properties of the data were observed in all recordings but all the nighttime data and seven of the ten 24 h series exhibited higher-order, non-negligible Kramers-Moyal coefficients. In such a case, the reconstruction of the time series using the Langevin equation is impossible. The non-negligible higher-order coefficients are due to autocorrelation in the data. This effect may be interpreted as a result of a physiological phenomenon (especially occurring for nighttime data): respiratory

  16. Continuous, online measurement of the absolute plasma refill rate during hemodialysis using feedback regulated ultrafiltration: preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Brummelhuis, Walter J; van Schelven, Leonard J; Boer, Walther H

    2008-01-01

    Methods to continuously measure absolute refill during dialysis are not available. It would be useful to have such a method because it would allow investigating the mechanism of refill the effect of interventions. We designed a feedback algorithm that adjusts ultrafiltration rate (QUF) according to hemoglobin (Hb) concentration changes in such a way that relative blood volume (BV) remains constant within a narrow target range. In this situation, the generated QUF quantitatively reflects refill. Refill patterns were studied in five hypotension prone patients. In addition, on separate occasions, we studied the effect of antiembolism stockings (AES) and infusion of hydroxy-ethylated starch (HAES) on refill in these patients. Refill during the first hour fell significantly from 21 +/- 3 ml/min to 9 +/- 2 ml/min (p < 0.05). In the second hour, refill decreased further and became zero in four out of five patients. Neither AES nor HAES measurably affected refill. The marked and rapid fall in refill in the early stages of dialysis suggests untimely depletion of the interstitial compartment and underestimation of dry weight. We propose that continuous, online measurement of refill patterns may be of value for accurate estimation of dry weight in dialysis patients. PMID:18204322

  17. Characterization of the reaction rate coefficient of DNA with the hydroxyl radical

    SciTech Connect

    Milligan, J.R.; Ward, J.F.; Aguilera, J.A.

    1996-11-01

    Using agarose gel electrophoresis, we have measured the yield of single-strand breaks (SSBs) induced by {sup 137}Cs {gamma} irradiation in a variety of plasmid DNA substrates ranging in size from 2.7 kb to 38 kb irradiated in aerobic aqueous solution in the presence of the hydroxyl radical scavenger dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). Under these conditions DNA SSBs are caused mainly by the hydroxyl radical. Using the competition between DMSO and DNA for the hydroxyl radical, we have estimated the rate coefficient for the reaction of the hydroxyl radical with DNA. The results cannot be characterized by conventional steady-state competition kinetics. However, it is possible to describe the second-order rate constant for the reaction as a function of the scavenging capacity of the solution. The second-order rate constant increases with increasing scavenging capacity, rising from about 5x10{sup 8} dm{sup 3} mol{sup -1} s{sup -1} at 10{sup 5} s{sup -1} to about 10{sup 10} dm{sup 3} mol{sup -1} s{sup -1} at 10{sup 10} s{sup -1}. This dependence of the second-order rate constant on the scavenging capacity appears to be more pronounced for larger plasmids. 17 refs., 4 figs.

  18. Revised rate coefficients for H2 and H- destruction by realistic stellar spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal, Bhaskar; Khochfar, Sadegh

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the processes that can destroy H2 and H- species is quintessential in governing the formation of the first stars, black holes and galaxies. In this study, we compute the reaction rate coefficients for H2 photodissociation by Lyman-Werner photons (11.2-13.6 eV) and H- photodetachment by 0.76 eV photons emanating from self-consistent stellar populations that we model using publicly available stellar synthesis codes. So far, studies that include chemical networks for the formation of molecular hydrogen take these processes into account by assuming that the source spectra can be approximated by a power-law dependence or a blackbody spectrum at 104 or 105 K. We show that using spectra generated from realistic stellar population models can alter the reaction rates for photodissociation, kdi, and photodetachment, kde, significantly. In particular, kde can be up to ˜2-4 orders of magnitude lower in the case of realistic stellar spectra suggesting that previous calculations have overestimated the impact that radiation has on lowering H2 abundances. In contrast to burst modes of star formation, we find that models with continuous star formation predict increasing kde and kdi, which makes it necessary to include the star formation history of sources to derive self-consistent reaction rates, and that it is not enough to just calculate J21 for the background. For models with constant star formation rate, the change in shape of the spectral energy distribution leads to a non-negligible late-time contribution to kde and kdi, and we present self-consistently derived cosmological reaction rates based on star formation rates consistent with observations of the high-redshift Universe.

  19. Functional adaptation in long bones: establishing in vivo values for surface remodeling rate coefficients.

    PubMed

    Cowin, S C; Hart, R T; Balser, J R; Kohn, D H

    1985-01-01

    In this paper we describe a computational means, based on beam theory, for application of the theory of adaptive elasticity to examples of real bone geometries. The results of the animal experiments were taken from the literature, and each documented the temporal evolution of a change in bone shape after a significant change in the mechanical loading environment of the bone. For each of these studies, we establish preliminary estimates of the in vivo values of the surface remodeling rate coefficients--the key parameters in the theory of surface remodeling. Our preliminary parameter estimates are established by comparison of published animal experimental results with surface remodeling theory predictions generated by the computational method. PMID:4077864

  20. Temperature dependence of the atmospheric photolysis rate coefficient for NO2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shetter, Richard E.; Davidson, James A.; Cantrell, Christopher A.; Burzysnki, Norbert J., Jr.; Calvert, Jack G.

    1988-01-01

    Accurate values for the photolysis rate coefficient of NO2 (j1) are required for studies related to the observed imbalance in the photostationary state of O3, NO, and NO2 in the troposphere. Direct measurements of the temperature dependence of j1 at temperatures from -70 to 30 C were made in sunlight for relatively cloudless summer days in Boulder, Colorado. The ratios of j1 (30 C)/j1 (T C) for T = -10 C and -70 C, respectively, were 1.046 + or - 0.040 and 1.070 + or - 0.031. The j1 ratios were independent of solar zenith angle. Theoretical estimates of the temperature-dependent j1 ratios based upon recently reported cross section (sigma) and quantum yield (phi) data are more consistent with these experimental measurements than those based upon the currently accepted sigma and phi data.

  1. Absolute Rovibrational Intensities, Self-Broadening and Self-Shift Coefficients for the X(sup 1) Sigma(+) V=3 (left arrow) V=0 Band (C-12)(O-16)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chackerian, Charles, Jr.; Freedman, R.; Giver, L. P.; Brown, L. R.

    2001-01-01

    The rotationless transition moment squared for the x(sup 1) sigma (sup +) v=3 (left arrow) v=0 band of CO is measured to be the absolute value of R (sub 3-0) squared = 1.7127(25)x 10(exp -7) Debye squared. This value is about 8.6 percent smaller than the value assumed for HITRAN 2000. The Herman-Wallis intensity factor of this band is F=1+0.01168(11)m+0.0001065(79)m squared. The determination of self-broadening coefficients is improved with the inclusion of line narrowing; self-shifts are also reported.

  2. Determination of collisional quenching rate coefficient of N2(A^3σu^+ )

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koizumi, Yuusuke; Suzuki, Susumu; Itoh, Haruo

    2012-10-01

    We have previously determined the collisional quenching rate coefficient of N2(A^3σu^+ ) by an air pollutant gas [1-4]. In this paper we report the collisional quenching rate coefficient k' of N2(A^3σu^+ ) by p-xylene (C8H10), which was determined to be (6.5±0.9)x10-9 cm^3/s. In addition, through repeated experiments it was found that by-products of p-xylene were deposited on the cathode, similarly to the cases of m-xylene and o-xylene previously reported [4], and then the current-voltage curves consistently shifed to a higher-E/p0 region. To clarify the reason for this behavior, we confirmed by Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) that these changes in the current-voltage curves were caused by the deposition of a thin film of by-product of decomposed xylene on the cathode surface. According to the results of AES, C atoms were detected in a sample exposed to an electrical discharge, and we confirmed that the deposit of C was thickest in the case of electrical discharge in p-xylene. According to the results of FTIR, it was found that CH2 and CH were obtained from the deposition of p-xylene. [4pt] [1] S. Suzuki, H. Itoh, H. Sekizawa and N. Ikuta, J. Phys. Soc. Jpn., 62, No.8, 2692-2697 (1993)[0pt] [2] S. Suzuki, H. Itoh, H. Sekizawa and N. Ikuta, Jpn. J. Appl. Phys., 36, 4744-4746 (1997)[0pt] [3] S. Suzuki, T. Suzuki and H. Itoh, Cont. of HAKONE X Saga, Japan, 132-135 (2006)[0pt] [4] S. Suzuki, H. Itoh, Proc. of 30th ICPIG (Belfast, UK), A1-12 (2011)

  3. Distribution coefficients (Kd) and desorption rates of 137Cs and 241Am in Black Sea sediments.

    PubMed

    Topcuoğlu, S; Güngör, N; Kirbaşoğlu, C

    2002-12-01

    The distribution coefficients (Kd) and desorption rates of 137Cs and 241Am radionuclides in bottom sediments at different locations in the Black Sea were studied under laboratory conditions. The Kd values were found to be 500 for 137Cs and 3800 for 241Am at the steady state and described exponential curves. Rapid uptake of the radionuclides occurred during the initial period and little accumulation happened after four days. The desorption rates for 137Cs in different bottom sediments were best described by a three-component exponential model. The desorption half-times of 137Cs ranged from 26 to 50 d at the slow components. However, the desorption rate of 241Am described one component for all sediment samples and desorption half-time was found to be 75 d. In general, the results showed that the 241Am radionuclide is more effectively transferred to bottom sediment and has longer turnover time than 137Cs under Black Sea conditions. PMID:12489734

  4. Rate coefficients for dissociative attachment and resonant electron-impact dissociation involving vibrationally excited O{sub 2} molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Laporta, V.; Celiberto, R.; Tennyson, J.

    2014-12-09

    Rate coefficients for dissociative electron attachment and electron-impact dissociation processes, involving vibrationally excited molecular oxygen, are presented. Analytical fits of the calculated numerical data, useful in the applications, are also provided.

  5. New potential energy surface for the HCS{sup +}–He system and inelastic rate coefficients

    SciTech Connect

    Dubernet, Marie-Lise; Quintas-Sánchez, Ernesto; Tuckey, Philip

    2015-07-28

    A new high quality potential energy surface is calculated at a coupled-cluster single double triple level with an aug-cc-pV5Z basis set for the HCS{sup +}–He system. This potential energy surface is used in low energy quantum scattering calculations to provide a set of (de)-excitation cross sections and rate coefficients among the first 20 rotational levels of HCS{sup +} by He in the range of temperature from 5 K to 100 K. The paper discusses the impact of the new ab initio potential energy surface on the cross sections at low energy and provides a comparison with the HCO{sup +}–He system. The HCS{sup +}–He rate coefficients for the strongest transitions differ by factors of up to 2.5 from previous rate coefficients; thus, analysis of astrophysical spectra should be reconsidered with the new rate coefficients.

  6. Cyclosporin A does not affect the absolute rate of cortical bone resorption at the organ level in the growing rat.

    PubMed

    Klein, L; Lemel, M S; Wolfe, M S; Shaffer, J

    1994-10-01

    The weanling rat, an animal model of rapid bone turnover, was used to evaluate the effects of various doses of cyclosporin A (CsA) on various bones during different time periods. Sprague-Dawley male rats were extensively prelabeled with 3H-tetracycline during 1-3 weeks of age. At 4 weeks of age, four groups of rats were given daily subcutaneous injections: vehicle or CsA--low dose (10 mg/kg), intermediary dose (20 mg/kg), or high dose (30 mg/kg) for 7, 14, or 28 days. Three different whole bones--the femur (low turnover), scapula (moderate turnover), and lumbar-6 vertebra (high turnover) were harvested intact at 4, 5, 6, and 8 weeks of age. The whole bones were assayed weekly for total dry defatted weight, calcium mass (formation), and loss of 3H-tetracycline (bone resorption) following treatment with CsA. Serum CsA levels, calcium creatinine, and alkaline phosphatase were measured weekly. Significant decreases in serum calcium and alkaline phosphatase were observed at 1 and 2 weeks, and were normalized by 4 weeks of treatment. No significant changes in serum creatinine were noted. For all three doses of CsA, no effect was observed on the absolute rate of cortical bone resorption of three different, whole bones over three time periods. Body weight and bone formation in treated animals was significantly smaller in a dose- and time-related fashion compared with control animals at sacrifice. However, compared with the initial control animals, body weights and bone masses of the final treated animals were much larger, suggesting that the smaller bone masses were due to insufficient growth and slow gain in bone mass.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7820781

  7. OH{sup +} in astrophysical media: state-to-state formation rates, Einstein coefficients and inelastic collision rates with He

    SciTech Connect

    Gómez-Carrasco, Susana; Godard, Benjamin; Lique, François; Bulut, Niyazi; Kłos, Jacek; Roncero, Octavio; Aguado, Alfredo; Aoiz, F. Javier; Castillo, Jesús F.; Goicoechea, Javier R.; Etxaluze, Mireya; Cernicharo, José

    2014-10-10

    The rate constants required to model the OH{sup +} observations in different regions of the interstellar medium have been determined using state of the art quantum methods. First, state-to-state rate constants for the H{sub 2}(v = 0, J = 0, 1) + O{sup +}({sup 4} S) → H + OH{sup +}(X {sup 3}Σ{sup –}, v', N) reaction have been obtained using a quantum wave packet method. The calculations have been compared with time-independent results to assess the accuracy of reaction probabilities at collision energies of about 1 meV. The good agreement between the simulations and the existing experimental cross sections in the 0.01-1 eV energy range shows the quality of the results. The calculated state-to-state rate constants have been fitted to an analytical form. Second, the Einstein coefficients of OH{sup +} have been obtained for all astronomically significant rovibrational bands involving the X {sup 3}Σ{sup –} and/or A {sup 3}Π electronic states. For this purpose, the potential energy curves and electric dipole transition moments for seven electronic states of OH{sup +} are calculated with ab initio methods at the highest level, including spin-orbit terms, and the rovibrational levels have been calculated including the empirical spin-rotation and spin-spin terms. Third, the state-to-state rate constants for inelastic collisions between He and OH{sup +}(X {sup 3}Σ{sup –}) have been calculated using a time-independent close coupling method on a new potential energy surface. All these rates have been implemented in detailed chemical and radiative transfer models. Applications of these models to various astronomical sources show that inelastic collisions dominate the excitation of the rotational levels of OH{sup +}. In the models considered, the excitation resulting from the chemical formation of OH{sup +} increases the line fluxes by about 10% or less depending on the density of the gas.

  8. Ar II Emission Processes and Emission Rate Coefficients in ASTRAL Helicon Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boivin, R. F.; Gardner, A.; Kamar, O.; Kesterson, A.; Loch, S.; Munoz, J.; Ballance, C.

    2008-11-01

    Emission processes for Ar II line emission are described for low temperature plasmas (Te < 10 eV). It is found that Ar II emission results primarily from Ar ion ground state excitation rather than from any Ar neutral state. This suggests that Ar II emission results from stepping processes which includes ionization and then excitation of the neutral Ar atom filling the vacuum chamber. The Ar II emission rate coefficients are measured in the ASTRAL helicon plasma source using a 0.33 m monochromator and a CCD camera. ASTRAL produces Ar plasmas with the following parameters: ne = 1E11 -- 1E13 cm-3 and Te = 2 - 10 eV, B-field <= 1.3 kGauss, rf power <= 2 kWatt. RF compensated Langmuir probes are used to measure Te and ne. In this experiment, Ar II transitions are monitored as a function of Te while ne is kept constant. Experimental emission rates are obtained as a function of Te and compared to theoretical predictions. Theoretical predictions make use of the ADAS suite of codes as well as recent R-matrix electron-impact excitation calculations that includes pseudo-states contributions. Our collisional-radiative formalism assumes that the excited levels are in quasi-static equilibrium with the ground and metastable populations.

  9. Estimate of effective recombination rate and average selection coefficient for HIV in chronic infection

    PubMed Central

    Batorsky, Rebecca; Kearney, Mary F.; Palmer, Sarah E.; Maldarelli, Frank; Rouzine, Igor M.; Coffin, John M.

    2011-01-01

    HIV adaptation to a host in chronic infection is simulated by means of a Monte-Carlo algorithm that includes the evolutionary factors of mutation, positive selection with varying strength among sites, random genetic drift, linkage, and recombination. By comparing two sensitive measures of linkage disequilibrium (LD) and the number of diverse sites measured in simulation to patient data from one-time samples of pol gene obtained by single-genome sequencing from representative untreated patients, we estimate the effective recombination rate and the average selection coefficient to be on the order of 1% per genome per generation (10−5 per base per generation) and 0.5%, respectively. The adaptation rate is twofold higher and fourfold lower than predicted in the absence of recombination and in the limit of very frequent recombination, respectively. The level of LD and the number of diverse sites observed in data also range between the values predicted in simulation for these two limiting cases. These results demonstrate the critical importance of finite population size, linkage, and recombination in HIV evolution. PMID:21436045

  10. Regression Splines in the Time-Dependent Coefficient Rates Model for Recurrent Event Data

    PubMed Central

    Amorim, Leila D.; Cai, Jianwen; Zeng, Donglin; Barreto, Maurício L.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Many epidemiologic studies involve the occurrence of recurrent events and much attention has been given for the development of modelling techniques that take into account the dependence structure of multiple event data. This paper presents a time-dependent coefficient rates model that incorporates regression splines in its estimation procedure. Such method would be appropriate in situations where the effect of an exposure or covariates changes over time in recurrent event data settings. The finite sample properties of the estimators are studied via simulation. Using data from a randomized community trial that was designed to evaluate the effect of vitamin A supplementation on recurrent diarrheal episodes in small children, we model the functional form of the treatment effect on the time to the occurrence of diarrhea. The results describe how this effect varies over time. In summary, we observed a major impact of the vitamin A supplementation on diarrhea after 2 months of the dosage, with the effect diminishing after the third dosage. The proposed method can be viewed as a flexible alternative to the marginal rates model with constant effect in situations where the effect of interest may vary over time. PMID:18696748

  11. MODELING MULTI-WAVELENGTH STELLAR ASTROMETRY. II. DETERMINING ABSOLUTE INCLINATIONS, GRAVITY-DARKENING COEFFICIENTS, AND SPOT PARAMETERS OF SINGLE STARS WITH SIM LITE

    SciTech Connect

    Coughlin, Jeffrey L.; Harrison, Thomas E.; Gelino, Dawn M.

    2010-11-10

    We present a novel technique to determine the absolute inclination of single stars using multi-wavelength submilliarcsecond astrometry. The technique exploits the effect of gravity darkening, which causes a wavelength-dependent astrometric displacement parallel to a star's projected rotation axis. We find that this effect is clearly detectable using SIM Lite for various giant stars and rapid rotators, and present detailed models for multiple systems using the REFLUX code. We also explore the multi-wavelength astrometric reflex motion induced by spots on single stars. We find that it should be possible to determine spot size, relative temperature, and some positional information for both giant and nearby main-sequence stars utilizing multi-wavelength SIM Lite data. These data will be extremely useful in stellar and exoplanet astrophysics, as well as supporting the primary SIM Lite mission through proper multi-wavelength calibration of the giant star astrometric reference frame, and reduction of noise introduced by starspots when searching for extrasolar planets.

  12. Determination of the reaction rate coefficient of sulphide mine tailings deposited under water.

    PubMed

    Awoh, Akué Sylvette; Mbonimpa, Mamert; Bussière, Bruno

    2013-10-15

    The efficiency of a water cover to limit dissolved oxygen (DO) availability to underlying acid-generating mine tailings can be assessed by calculating the DO flux at the tailings-water interface. Fick's equations, which are generally used to calculate this flux, require knowing the effective DO diffusion coefficient (Dw) and the reaction (consumption) rate coefficient (Kr) of the tailings, or the DO concentration profile. Whereas Dw can be accurately estimated, few studies have measured the parameter Kr for submerged sulphide tailings. The objective of this study was to determine Kr for underwater sulphide tailings in a laboratory experiment. Samples of sulphide mine tailings (an approximately 6 cm layer) were placed in a cell under a water cover (approximately 2 cm) maintained at constant DO concentration. Two tailings were studied: TA1 with high sulphide content (83% pyrite) and TA2 with low sulphide content (2.8% pyrite). DO concentration was measured with a microelectrode at various depths above and below the tailings-water interface at 1 mm intervals. Results indicate that steady-state condition was rapidly attained. As expected, a diffusive boundary layer (DBL) was observed in all cases. An iterative back-calculation process using the numerical code POLLUTEv6 and taking the DBL into account provided the Kr values used to match calculated and experimental concentration profiles. Kr obtained for tailings TA1 and TA2 was about 80 d(-1) and 6.5 d(-1), respectively. For comparison purposes, Kr obtained from cell tests on tailings TA1 was lower than Kr calculated from the sulphate production rate obtained from shake-flask tests. Steady-state DO flux at the water-tailings interface was then calculated with POLLUTEv6 using tailings characteristics Dw and Kr. For the tested conditions, DO flux ranged from 608 to 758 mg O2/m(2)/d for tailings TA1 and from 177 to 221 mg O2/m(2)/d for tailings TA2. The impact of placing a protective layer of inert material over

  13. Ionization cross sections and rate coefficients for CFCl3 molecule by electron impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Satyendra; Kumar, Neeraj

    2013-09-01

    Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) or freons are important industrial material with wide-ranging applications as refrigerant, aerosol propellant and semiconductor etchant, etc. The large-scale industrial consumption is of particular environmental concern because of its potential for ozone destruction in the stratosphere. The present work reports the calculations for differential cross sections as a function of secondary/ ejected electron energy and the scattering angle in the ionization of CFCl3 by electron collision leading to the production of various cations viz. CCl3+,CFCl2+,CCl2+,CFCl+, CCl+, Cl+, CF+, F+, and C+ through direct and dissociative ionization processes at a fixed incident electron energy of 200 eV. A modified Jain-Khare semi-empirical formalism based on oscillator strength has been employed. To the best of our knowledge, no experimental and/or theoretical data is available for comparison of the present results for differential cross sections. The corresponding derived integral cross sections in terms of the partial ionization cross sections corresponding to these cations, in the energy range varying from ionization threshold to 1000 eV, revealed a reasonably good agreement with the experimental and theoretical data, wherever available. In addition to the differential and integral ionization cross sections, we have also calculated the ionization rate coefficients using the evaluated partial ionization cross sections and the Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution as a function of electron energy.

  14. Electron Impact Ionization Cross Sections and Rate Coefficients for Single Carbon Freon Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Satyendra; Kumar, Neeraj

    2015-09-01

    Single carbon Freon molecules or chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) are important industrial material with wide-ranging applications as refrigerant, aerosol propellant and semiconductor etchant, etc. The large-scale industrial consumption is of particular environmental concern because of its potential for ozone destruction in the stratosphere. In the present work, we have extended and generalized the modified Jain-Khare (JK) semi-empirical formalism for the evaluation of the total ionization cross sections corresponding to the formation of the cations in the electron impact ionization of molecules to the electron impact ionization of single carbon freon molecules, viz. CFCl3, CF2Cl2 and CF3Cl. The integral partial and the total ionization cross sections as function of incident electron energy are evaluated in the energy range varying from ionization threshold to 1000 eV. In absence of available differential cross sections, the corresponding derived partial and total ionization cross sections revealed a reasonably good agreement with the experimental and theoretical data, wherever available. In addition to the differential and integral ionization cross sections, we have also calculated the ionization rate coefficients using the evaluated partial ionization cross sections and the Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution as a function of electron temperature/energy. The work is supported by DST, New Delhi, India.

  15. Uptake rate constants and partition coefficients for vapor phase organic chemicals using semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cranor, W.L.; Alvarez, D.A.; Huckins, J.N.; Petty, J.D.

    2009-01-01

    To fully utilize semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs) as passive samplers in air monitoring, data are required to accurately estimate airborne concentrations of environmental contaminants. Limited uptake rate constants (kua) and no SPMD air partitioning coefficient (Ksa) existed for vapor-phase contaminants. This research was conducted to expand the existing body of kinetic data for SPMD air sampling by determining kua and Ksa for a number of airborne contaminants including the chemical classes: polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, organochlorine pesticides, brominated diphenyl ethers, phthalate esters, synthetic pyrethroids, and organophosphate/organosulfur pesticides. The kuas were obtained for 48 of 50 chemicals investigated and ranged from 0.03 to 3.07??m3??g-1??d-1. In cases where uptake was approaching equilibrium, Ksas were approximated. Ksa values (no units) were determined or estimated for 48 of the chemicals investigated and ranging from 3.84E+5 to 7.34E+7. This research utilized a test system (United States Patent 6,877,724 B1) which afforded the capability to generate and maintain constant concentrations of vapor-phase chemical mixtures. The test system and experimental design employed gave reproducible results during experimental runs spanning more than two years. This reproducibility was shown by obtaining mean kua values (n??=??3) of anthracene and p,p???-DDE at 0.96 and 1.57??m3??g-1??d-1 with relative standard deviations of 8.4% and 8.6% respectively.

  16. Uptake rate constants and partition coefficients for vapor phase organic chemicals using semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cranor, Walter L.; Alvarez, David A.; Huckins, James N.; Petty, Jimmie D.

    To fully utilize semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs) as passive samplers in air monitoring, data are required to accurately estimate airborne concentrations of environmental contaminants. Limited uptake rate constants ( kua) and no SPMD air partitioning coefficient ( Ksa) existed for vapor-phase contaminants. This research was conducted to expand the existing body of kinetic data for SPMD air sampling by determining kua and Ksa for a number of airborne contaminants including the chemical classes: polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, organochlorine pesticides, brominated diphenyl ethers, phthalate esters, synthetic pyrethroids, and organophosphate/organosulfur pesticides. The kuas were obtained for 48 of 50 chemicals investigated and ranged from 0.03 to 3.07 m 3 g -1 d -1. In cases where uptake was approaching equilibrium, Ksas were approximated. Ksa values (no units) were determined or estimated for 48 of the chemicals investigated and ranging from 3.84E+5 to 7.34E+7. This research utilized a test system (United States Patent 6,877,724 B1) which afforded the capability to generate and maintain constant concentrations of vapor-phase chemical mixtures. The test system and experimental design employed gave reproducible results during experimental runs spanning more than two years. This reproducibility was shown by obtaining mean kua values ( n = 3) of anthracene and p, p'-DDE at 0.96 and 1.57 m 3 g -1 d -1 with relative standard deviations of 8.4% and 8.6% respectively.

  17. Measurement of diffusion coefficients important in modeling the absorption rate of carbon dioxide into aqueous N-methyldiethanolamine

    SciTech Connect

    Rowley, R.L.; Adams, M.E.; Marshall, T.L.; Oscarson, J.L.; Wilding, W.V.; Anderson, D.J.

    1997-03-01

    Natural gas processors use amine treating processes to remove the acid gases H{sub 2}S and CO{sub 2} from gas streams. Absorption rates of gaseous CO{sub 2} into aqueous N-methyldiethanolamine (MDEA) solutions were measured in a quiescent, inverted-tube diffusiometer by monitoring the rate of pressure drop. The absorption rate was found to be insensitive to the diffusion coefficient of CO{sub 2} in solution but very sensitive to the diffusion rate of bicarbonate and protonated MDEA ions. Evidence also suggested that chemical reaction equilibrium is rapid relative to diffusion. A numerical model was developed on the basis of these observations. The model was used to regress diffusion coefficients of bicarbonate and protonated amine, which must be equivalent by electroneutrality arguments, from measured absorption rates. Complete modeling of the absorption process also required data for the diffusion coefficient of MDEA in water. These were measured using a Taylor dispersion apparatus. CO{sub 2} absorption rates and diffusion coefficients of bicarbonate and protonated MDEA were obtained at 298.2 K and 318.2 K in solutions containing 20, 35, and 50 mass % MDEA in water.

  18. Absolute and relative nonlinear optical coefficients of KDP, KD(asterisk)P, BaB2O4, LiIO3, MgO:LiNbO3, and KTP measured by phase-matched second-harmonic generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckardt, Robert C.; Byer, Robert L.; Masuda, Hisashi; Fan, Yuan Xuan

    1990-01-01

    Both absolute and relative nonlinear optical coefficients of six nonlinear materials measured by second-harmonic generation are discussed. A single-mode, injection-seeded, Q-switched Nd:YAG laser with spatially filtered output was used to generate the 1.064-micron fundamental radiation. The following results were obtained: d36(KDP) = 0.38 pm/V, d36(KD/asterisk/P) = 0.37 pm/V, (parallel)d22(BaB2O4)(parallel) = 2.2 pm/V, d31(LiIO3) = -4.1 pm/V, d31(5 percentMgO:MgO LiNbO3) = -4.7 pm/V, and d(eff)(KTP) = 3.2 pm/V. The accuracy of these measurements is estimated to be better than 10 percent.

  19. Rate Coefficients of the HCl + OH → Cl + H2O Reaction from Ring Polymer Molecular Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Junxiang; Li, Yongle; Guo, Hua; Xie, Daiqian

    2016-05-26

    Thermal rate coefficients at temperatures between 200 and 1000 K are calculated for the HCl + OH → Cl + H2O reaction on a recently developed permutation invariant potential energy surface, using ring polymer molecular dynamics (RPMD). Large deviations from the Arrhenius limit are found at low temperatures, suggesting significant quantum tunneling. Agreement with available experimental rate coefficients is generally satisfactory, although the deviation becomes larger at lower temperatures. The theory-experiment discrepancy is attributed to the remaining errors in the potential energy surface, which is known to slightly overestimate the barrier. In the deep tunneling region, RPMD performs better than traditional transition-state theory with semiclassical tunneling corrections. PMID:27149243

  20. The stabilization rate of a solution to the Cauchy problem for parabolic equation with lower order coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denisov, Vasilii

    2016-08-01

    In this report, we study sufficient conditions on the lower order coefficients of a parabolic equation guaranteeing the power rate of the uniform stabilization to zero of the solution to the Cauchy problem on every compact K in RN and for any bounded initial function.

  1. COMPARISON OF MICROBIAL TRANSFORMATION RATE COEFFICIENTS OF XENOBIOTIC CHEMICALS BETWEEN FIELD-COLLECTED AND LABORATORY MICROCOSM MICROBIOTA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two second-order transformation rate coefficients--kb, based on total plate counts, and kA, based on periphyton-colonized surface areas--were used to compare xenobiotic chemical transformation by laboratory-developed (microcosm) and by field-collected microbiota. Similarity of tr...

  2. Temperature dependence of the rate coefficient for charge exchange of metastable O/+//2D/ with N2. [in atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torr, M. R.; Torr, D. G.

    1980-01-01

    Using a data base of aeronomical parameters measured on board the Atmosphere Explorer-C satellite, temperature dependence of the reaction rate coefficient is deduced for the charge exchange of O(+)(2D) with N2. The results indicate the Explorer values determined over the temperature range from 700 to 1900 K are not in conflict with laboratory measurements made at higher temperatures.

  3. Ion Storage Ring Measurements of Low Temperature Dielectronic Recombination Rate Coefficients for Modeling X-Ray Photoionized Cosmic Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savin, D. W.; Gwinner, G.; Schwalm, D.; Wolf, A.; Mueller, A.; Schippers, S.

    2002-01-01

    Low temperature dielectronic recombination (DR) is the dominant recombination mechanism for most ions in X-ray photoionized cosmic plasmas. Reliably modeling and interpreting spectra from these plasmas requires accurate low temperature DR rate Coefficients. Of particular importance are the DR rate coefficients for the iron L-shell ions (Fe XVII-Fe XXIV). These ions are predicted to play an important role in determining the thermal structure and line emission of X-ray photoionized plasmas, which form in the media surrounding accretion powered sources such as X-ray binaries (XRBs), active galactic nuclei (AGN), and cataclysmic variables (Savin et al., 2000). The need for reliable DR data of iron L-shell ions has become particularly urgent after the launches of Chandra and XMM-Newton. These satellites are now providing high-resolution X-ray spectra from a wide range of X-ray photoionized sources. Interpreting the spectra from these sources requires reliable DR rate coefficients. However, at the temperatures relevant, for X-ray photoionized plasmas, existing theoretical DR rate coefficients can differ from one another by factors of two to orders of magnitudes.

  4. Do large rate coefficients for ion-polar neutral reactions have a serious effect on chemical models of dense clouds?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herbst, E.; Leung, C. M.

    1986-01-01

    In order to incorporate large ion-polar neutral rate coefficients into existing gas phase reaction networks, it is necessary to utilize simplified theoretical treatments because of the significant number of rate coefficients needed. The authors have used two simple theoretical treatments: the locked dipole approach of Moran and Hamill for linear polar neutrals and the trajectory scaling approach of Su and Chesnavich for nonlinear polar neutrals. The former approach is suitable for linear species because in the interstellar medium these are rotationally relaxed to a large extent and the incoming charged reactants can lock their dipoles into the lowest energy configuration. The latter approach is a better approximation for nonlinear neutral species, in which rotational relaxation is normally less severe and the incoming charged reactants are not as effective at locking the dipoles. The treatments are in reasonable agreement with more detailed long range theories and predict an inverse square root dependence on kinetic temperature for the rate coefficient. Compared with the locked dipole method, the trajectory scaling approach results in rate coefficients smaller by a factor of approximately 2.5.

  5. Ion Storage Ring Measurements of Low Temperature Dielectronic Recombination Rate Coefficients for Modeling X-Ray Photoionized Cosmic Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savin, D. W.; Gwinner, G.; Schwalm, D.; Wolf, A.; Müller, A.; Schippers, S.

    2002-11-01

    Low temperature dielectronic recombination (DR) is the dominant recombination mechanism for most ions in X-ray photoionized cosmic plasmas. Reliably modeling and interpreting spectra from these plasmas requires accurate low temperature DR rate coefficients. Of particular importance are the DR rate coefficients for the iron L-shell ions (Fe XVII -Fe XXIV). These ions are predicted to play an important role in determining the thermal structure and line emission of X-ray photoionized plasmas, which form in the media surrounding accretion powered sources such as X-ray binaries (XRBs), active galactic nuclei (AGN), and cataclysmic variables (Savin et al. 2000). The need for reliable DR data of iron L-shell ions has become particularly urgent after the launches of Chandra and XMM-Newton. These satellites are now providing high-resolution X-ray spectra from a wide range of X-ray photoionized sources. Interpreting the spectra from these sources requires reliable DR rate coefficients. However, at the temperatures relevant for X-ray photoionized plasmas, existing theoretical DR rate coefficients can differ from one another by factors of two to orders of magnitudes. To address the need for accurate low temperature DR rate coefficients of the iron L-shell ions, we have initiated a program of measurements for DR via 2 to 2 core excitations using the heavy-ion Test Storage Ring located at the Max-Planck-Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg, Germany. To date measurements have been carried out for Fe XVIII (Savin et al. 1997, 1999), Fe XIX (Savin et al. 1999), Fe XX (Savin et al. 2002), Fe XXI, Fe XXII, and Fe XXIV. Here we review our work to date, discuss the implications of our results, and map out our future research efforts. This work was supported in part by NASA SARA Program grant NAG5-5261, the German Federal Minister for Education and Research (BMBF), and the German Research Council (DFG).

  6. LABORATORY STUDY OF RATE COEFFICIENTS FOR H{sub 2}O:He INELASTIC COLLISIONS BETWEEN 20 AND 120 K

    SciTech Connect

    Tejeda, G.; Moreno, E.; Fernández, J. M.; Montero, S.; Carmona-Novillo, E.; Hernández, M. I.

    2015-01-01

    State-to-state rate coefficients for ortho-H{sub 2}O:He and para-H{sub 2}O:He inelastic collisions in the 20-120 K thermal range are investigated by means of an improved experimental procedure. This procedure is based on the use of a kinetic master equation (MEQ) which describes the evolution of populations of H{sub 2}O rotational levels along a supersonic jet of H{sub 2}O highly diluted in helium. The MEQ is expressed in terms of experimental observables and rate coefficients for H{sub 2}O:He inelastic collisions. The primary experimental observables are the local number density and the populations of the rotational energy levels of H{sub 2}O, quantities which are determined along the jet with unprecedented accuracy by means of Raman spectroscopy with high space resolution. Sets of rate coefficients from the literature and from present close-coupling calculations using two different potential energy surfaces (PESs) have been tested against the experiment. The Green et al. rate coefficients are up to 50% too low compared to the experiment, while most rates calculated here from the Hodges et al. PES and the Patkowski et al. PES are much closer to the experimental values. Experimental rates with an estimated accuracy on the order of 10% have been obtained for ortho-H{sub 2}O:He and para-H{sub 2}O:He inelastic collisions between 20 and 120 K by scaling and averaging the theoretical rates to the experiment.

  7. Absolute Zero

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnelly, Russell J.; Sheibley, D.; Belloni, M.; Stamper-Kurn, D.; Vinen, W. F.

    2006-12-01

    Absolute Zero is a two hour PBS special attempting to bring to the general public some of the advances made in 400 years of thermodynamics. It is based on the book “Absolute Zero and the Conquest of Cold” by Tom Shachtman. Absolute Zero will call long-overdue attention to the remarkable strides that have been made in low-temperature physics, a field that has produced 27 Nobel Prizes. It will explore the ongoing interplay between science and technology through historical examples including refrigerators, ice machines, frozen foods, liquid oxygen and nitrogen as well as much colder fluids such as liquid hydrogen and liquid helium. A website has been established to promote the series: www.absolutezerocampaign.org. It contains information on the series, aimed primarily at students at the middle school level. There is a wealth of material here and we hope interested teachers will draw their student’s attention to this website and its substantial contents, which have been carefully vetted for accuracy.

  8. Direct measurement and theoretical calculation of the rate coefficient for Cl + CH3 from T = 202 - 298 K.

    SciTech Connect

    Payne, Walter A.; Harding, Lawrence B.; Stief, Louis J.; Parker, James F. , 1925-; Klippenstein, Stephen J.; Nesbitt, Fred L.; Cody, Regina J.

    2004-10-01

    The rate coefficient has been measured under pseudo-first-order conditions for the Cl + CH{sub 3} association reaction at T = 202, 250, and 298 K and P = 0.3-2.0 Torr helium using the technique of discharge-flow mass spectrometry with low-energy (12-eV) electron-impact ionization and collision-free sampling. Cl and CH{sub 3} were generated rapidly and simultaneously by reaction of F with HCl and CH{sub 4}, respectively. Fluorine atoms were produced by microwave discharge in an approximately 1% mixture of F{sub 2} in He. The decay of CH{sub 3} was monitored under pseudo-first-order conditions with the Cl-atom concentration in large excess over the CH{sub 3} concentration ([Cl]{sub 0}/[CH{sub 3}]{sub 0} = 9-67). Small corrections were made for both axial and radial diffusion and minor secondary chemistry. The rate coefficient was found to be in the falloff regime over the range of pressures studied. For example, at T = 202 K, the rate coefficient increases from 8.4 x 10{sup -12} at P = 0.30 Torr He to 1.8 x 10{sup -11} at P = 2.00 Torr He, both in units of cm{sup 3} molecule{sup -1} s{sup -1}. A combination of ab initio quantum chemistry, variational transition-state theory, and master-equation simulations was employed in developing a theoretical model for the temperature and pressure dependence of the rate coefficient. Reasonable empirical representations of energy transfer and of the effect of spin-orbit interactions yield a temperature- and pressure-dependent rate coefficient that is in excellent agreement with the present experimental results. The high-pressure limiting rate coefficient from the RRKM calculations is k{sub 2} = 6.0 x 10{sup -11} cm{sup 3} molecule{sup -1} s{sup -1}, independent of temperature in the range from 200 to 300 K.

  9. An efficient nonclassical quadrature for the calculation of nonresonant nuclear fusion reaction rate coefficients from cross section data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shizgal, Bernie D.

    2016-08-01

    Nonclassical quadratures based on a new set of half-range polynomials, Tn(x) , orthogonal with respect to w(x) =e - x - b /√{ x } for x ∈ [ 0 , ∞) are employed in the efficient calculation of the nuclear fusion reaction rate coefficients from cross section data. The parameter b = B /√{kB T } in the weight function is temperature dependent and B is the Gamow factor. The polynomials Tn(x) satisfy a three term recurrence relation defined by two sets of recurrence coefficients, αn and βn. These recurrence coefficients define in turn the tridiagonal Jacobi matrix whose eigenvalues are the quadrature points and the weights are calculated from the first components of the eigenfunctions. For nonresonant nuclear reactions for which the astrophysical function can be expressed as a lower order polynomial in the relative energy, the convergence of the thermal average of the reactive cross section with this nonclassical quadrature is extremely rapid requiring in many cases 2-4 quadrature points. The results are compared with other libraries of nuclear reaction rate coefficient data reported in the literature.

  10. Measurement of Charge Transfer Rate Coefficient Between Ground-State N(2+) Ion and He at Electron-Volt Energies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fang, Z.; Kwong, Victor H. S.

    1997-01-01

    The charge transfer rate coefficient for the reaction N(2+)(2p(sup 2)P(sup 0)) + He yields products is measured by recording the time dependence of the N(2+) ions stored in an ion trap. A cylindrical radio-frequency ion trap was used to store N(2+) ions produced by laser ablation of a solid titanium nitride target. The decay of the ion signals was analyzed by single exponential least-squares fits to the data. The measured rate coefficient is 8.67(0.76) x 10(exp -11)sq cm/s. The N(2+) ions were at a mean energy of 2.7 eV while He gas was at room temperature, corresponding to an equivalent temperature of 3.9 x 10(exp 3) K. The measured value is in good agreement with a recent calculation.

  11. Elementary stage rate coefficients of heterogeneous catalytic recombination of dissociated air on thermal protective surfaces from ab initio approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchachenko, A. A.; Kroupnov, A. A.; Kovalev, V. L.

    2015-08-01

    Elementary stage rate coefficients of the full system of kinetic equations describing heterogeneous catalytic recombination of the dissociated air on the surfaces of thermal protective ceramic coatings of β-cristobalite and α-Al2O3 are determined using the quantum-mechanical calculations within the framework of cluster models and literature data. Both the impact and associative recombination processes of adsorbed oxygen and nitrogen atoms are taken into account.

  12. Rate coefficient for H + O2 + M = HO2 + M evaluated from shock tube measurements of induction times

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slack, M. W.

    1977-01-01

    Shock tube experiments measured hydrogen-air induction times near the second explosion limit. By matching these experimental results with numerically predicted induction times, the rate coefficient for the reaction H + O2 + M = HO2 + M was evaluated as k-sub 4,N2 = 3.3 (plus or minus .6) x 10 to the 15 cm to the 6th/sq mole/s.

  13. Absolute rate of the reaction of atomic hydrogen with ethylene from 198 to 320 K at high pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, J. H.; Michael, J. V.; Payne, W. A.; Stief, L. J.

    1978-01-01

    The rate constant for the H+C2H4 reaction has been measured as a function of temperature. Experiments were performed with high pressures of Ar heat bath gas at seven temperatures from 198 to 320 K with the flash photolysis-resonance fluorescence (FP-RF) technique. Pressures were chosen so as to isolate the addition rate constant k1. The results are well represented by an Arrhenius expression. The results are compared with other studies and are theoretically discussed.

  14. Absolute rate of the reaction of Cl(p-2) with molecular hydrogen from 200 - 500 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whytock, D. A.; Lee, J. H.; Michael, J. V.; Payne, W. A.; Stief, L. J.

    1976-01-01

    Rate constants for the reaction of atomic chlorine with hydrogen are measured from 200 - 500 K using the flash photolysis-resonance fluorescence technique. The results are compared with previous work and are discussed with particular reference to the equilibrium constant for the reaction and to relative rate data for chlorine atom reactions. Theoretical calculations, using the BEBO method with tunneling, give excellent agreement with experiment.

  15. Absolute Summ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Alfred, Jr.

    Summ means the entirety of the multiverse. It seems clear, from the inflation theories of A. Guth and others, that the creation of many universes is plausible. We argue that Absolute cosmological ideas, not unlike those of I. Newton, may be consistent with dynamic multiverse creations. As suggested in W. Heisenberg's uncertainty principle, and with the Anthropic Principle defended by S. Hawking, et al., human consciousness, buttressed by findings of neuroscience, may have to be considered in our models. Predictability, as A. Einstein realized with Invariants and General Relativity, may be required for new ideas to be part of physics. We present here a two postulate model geared to an Absolute Summ. The seedbed of this work is part of Akhnaton's philosophy (see S. Freud, Moses and Monotheism). Most important, however, is that the structure of human consciousness, manifest in Kenya's Rift Valley 200,000 years ago as Homo sapiens, who were the culmination of the six million year co-creation process of Hominins and Nature in Africa, allows us to do the physics that we do. .

  16. Relationship between the Averaged Deposition Rate Coefficients for Colloids in a Single Pore and Various Pore-scale Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayanan, S.; Mohan Kumar, M.; Hassanizadeh, S. M.; Raoof, A.

    2014-12-01

    The colloid deposition behavior observed at the Darcy scale represents an average of the processes occurring at the pore scale. Hence, a better understanding of the processes occurring at the Darcy scale can be obtained by studying colloid transport at the pore-scale and then upscaling the results. In this study, we have developed a mathematical model to simulate the transport of colloids in a cylindrical pore by considering various processes such as advection, diffusion, colloid-soil surface interactions and hydrodynamic wall effects. The pore space is divided into three different regions, namely, the bulk, diffusion and potential regions, based on the dominant processes acting in each of these regions. In the bulk region, colloid transport is governed by advection and diffusion; whereas in the diffusion region, colloid mobility due to diffusion is retarded by hydrodynamic wall effects. Colloid-solid interaction forces dominate the transport in the potential region where colloid deposition occurs and are calculated using DLVO theory. The expressions for mass transfer rate coefficients between the diffusion and potential regions have been derived for different DLVO energy profiles. These are incorporated in the pore-scale equations in the form of a boundary condition at the diffusion-potential region interface. The model results are used to obtain the colloid breakthrough curve at the end of a long pore, and then it is fitted with 1D advection-dispersion-adsorption model so as to determine the averaged attachment and detachment rate coefficients at the scale of a single pore. A sensitivity analysis of the model to six pore-scale parameters (colloid and wall surface potentials, solution ionic strength, average pore-water velocity, colloid radius, and pore radius) is carried out so as to find the relation between the averaged deposition rate coefficients at pore scale vs the pore-scale parameters. We found an hyper exponential relation between the colloid attachment

  17. Absolute rate constant of the reaction OH + H2O2 yields HO2 + H2O from 245 to 423 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keyser, L. F.

    1980-01-01

    The absolute rate constant of the reaction between the hydroxyl radical and hydrogen peroxide was measured by using the discharge-flow resonance fluorescence technique at total pressure between 1 and 4 torr. At 298 K the result is (1.64 + or - 0.32) x 10 to the -12th cu cm/molecule s. The observed rate constant is independent of pressure, surface-to-volume ratio, the addition of vibrational quenchers, and the source of OH. The temperature dependence has also been determined between 245 and 423 K; the resulting Arrhenius expression is k cu cm/molecule s is equal to (2.51 + or - 0.6) x 10 to the -12th exp(-126 + or - 76/T).

  18. Simulating the formation of massive seed black holes in the early Universe - II. Impact of rate coefficient uncertainties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glover, Simon C. O.

    2015-11-01

    We investigate how uncertainties in the chemical and cooling rate coefficients relevant for a metal-free gas influence our ability to determine the critical ultraviolet field strength required to suppress H2 cooling in high-redshift atomic cooling haloes. The suppression of H2 cooling is a necessary prerequisite for the gas to undergo direct collapse and form an intermediate mass black hole. These black holes can then act as seeds for the growth of the supermassive black holes (SMBHs) observed at redshifts z ˜ 6. The viability of this model for SMBH formation depends on the critical ultraviolet field strength, Jcrit: if this is too large, then too few seeds will form to explain the observed number density of SMBHs. We show in this paper that there are five key chemical reactions whose rate coefficients are uncertain enough to significantly affect Jcrit. The most important of these is the collisional ionization of hydrogen by collisions with other hydrogen atoms, as the rate for this process is very poorly constrained at the low energies relevant for direct collapse. The total uncertainty introduced into Jcrit by this and the other four reactions could in the worst case approach a factor of five. We also show that the use of outdated or inappropriate values for the rates of some chemical reactions in previous studies of the direct collapse mechanism may have significantly affected the values of Jcrit determined by these studies.

  19. Absolute rate constants for O + NO + M /= He, Ne, Ar, Kr/ yields NO2 + M from 217-500 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michael, J. V.; Payne, W. A.; Whytock, D. A.

    1976-01-01

    Rate constants for the reaction O + NO + M yields NO2 + M have been obtained at temperatures from 217-500 K in four different rare gases by a method combining flash photolysis with time resolved detection of O(3-P) by resonance fluorescence. The measured rate constants in Arrhenius form are (10.8 plus or minus 1.2) x 10 to the -33rd exp(1040 plus or minus 60/1.987 T) for helium; (9.01 plus or minus 1.16) x 10 to the -33rd exp(1180 plus or minus 70/1.987 T) for argon; (9.33 plus or minus 1.10) x 10 to the -33rd exp(1030 plus or minus 60/1.987 T) for neon; and (9.52 plus or minus 1.10) x 10 to the -33rd exp(1140 plus or minus 70/1.987 T) for krypton in units of cm to the 6th/sq molecule/s.

  20. The effect of microbubbles on gas-liquid mass transfer coefficient and degradation rate of COD in wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Yao, Kangning; Chi, Yong; Wang, Fei; Yan, Jianhua; Ni, Mingjiang; Cen, Kefa

    2016-01-01

    A commonly used aeration device at present has the disadvantages of low mass transfer rate because the generated bubbles are several millimeters in diameter which are much bigger than microbubbles. Therefore, the effect of a microbubble on gas-liquid mass transfer and wastewater treatment process was investigated. To evaluate the effect of each bubble type, the volumetric mass transfer coefficients for microbubbles and conventional bubbles were determined. The volumetric mass transfer coefficient was 0.02905 s(-1) and 0.02191 s(-1) at a gas flow rate of 0.67 L min(-1) in tap water for microbubbles and conventional bubbles, respectively. The degradation rate of simulated municipal wastewater was also investigated, using aerobic activated sludge and ozone. Compared with the conventional bubble generator, the chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal rate was 2.04, 5.9, 3.26 times higher than those of the conventional bubble contactor at the same initial COD concentration of COD 200 mg L(-1), 400 mg L(-1), and 600 mg L(-1), while aerobic activated sludge was used. For the ozonation process, the rate of COD removal using microbubble generator was 2.38, 2.51, 2.89 times of those of the conventional bubble generator. Based on the results, the effect of initial COD concentration on the specific COD degradation rate were discussed in different systems. Thus, the results revealed that microbubbles could enhance mass transfer in wastewater treatment and be an effective method to improve the degradation of wastewater. PMID:27120652

  1. Non-Gaussian dynamics from a simulation of a short peptide: Loop closure rates and effective diffusion coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portman, John J.

    2003-02-01

    Intrachain contact formation rates, fundamental to the dynamics of biopolymer self-organization such as protein folding, can be monitored in the laboratory through fluorescence quenching measurements. The common approximations for the intrachain contact rate given by the theory of Szabo, Schulten, and Schulten (SSS) [J. Chem. Phys. 72, 4350 (1980)] and Wilemski-Fixman (WF) [J. Chem. Phys. 60, 878 (1973)] are shown to be complementary variational bounds: The SSS and WF approximations are lower and upper bounds, respectively, on the mean first contact times. As reported in the literature, the SSS approximation requires an effective diffusion coefficient 10 to 100 times smaller than expected to fit experimentally measured quenching rates. An all atom molecular dynamics simulation of an eleven residue peptide sequence in explicit water is analyzed to investigate the source of this surprising parameter value. The simulated diffusion limited contact time is ≈6 ns for a reaction radius of 4 Å for solvent viscosity corresponding to that of water at 293 K and 1 atm (η=1.0 cP). In analytical work, the polymer is typically modeled by a Gaussian chain of effective monomers. Compared to Gaussian dynamics, the simulated end-to-end distance autocorrelation has a much slower relaxation. The long time behavior of the distance autocorrelation function can be approximated by a Gaussian model in which the monomer diffusion coefficient D0 is reduced to D0/6. This value of the diffusion coefficient brings the mean end-to-end contact time from analytical approximations and simulation into agreement in the sense that the SSS and WF approximations bracket the simulated mean first contact time.

  2. Experimental and theoretical studies of rate coefficients for the reaction O(3P)+CH3OH at high temperatures.

    PubMed

    Lu, Chih-Wei; Chou, Shen-Long; Lee, Yuan-Pern; Xu, Shucheng; Xu, Z F; Lin, M C

    2005-06-22

    Rate coefficients of the reaction O((3)P) + CH(3)OH in the temperature range of 835-1777 K were determined using a diaphragmless shock tube. O atoms were generated by photolysis of SO(2) with a KrF excimer laser at 248 nm or an ArF excimer laser at 193 nm; their concentrations were monitored via atomic resonance absorption excited by emission from a microwave-discharged mixture of O(2) and He. The rate coefficients determined for the temperature range can be represented by the Arrhenius equation, k(T) = (2.29 +/- 0.18) x 10(-10) exp[-(4210 +/- 100)T] cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1); unless otherwise noted, all the listed errors represent one standard deviation in fitting. Combination of these and previous data at lower temperature shows a non-Arrhenius behavior described as the three-parameter equation, k(T) = (2.74 +/- 0.07) x 10(-18)T(2.25 +/- 0.13) exp[-(1500 +/- 90)T] cm(3)molecule(-1) s(-1). Theoretical calculations at the Becke-3-Lee-Yang-Parr (B3LYP)6-311 + G(3df,2p) level locate three transition states. Based on the energies computed with coupled clusters singles, doubles (triples) [CCSD(T)]/6-311 + G(3df,2p)B3LYP6-311 + G(3df,2p), the rate coefficients predicted with canonical variational transition state theory with small curvature tunneling corrections agree satisfactorily with the experimental observations. The branching ratios of two accessible reaction channels forming OH + CH(2)OH (1a) and OH + CH(3)O (1b) are predicted to vary strongly with temperature. At 300 K, reaction (1a) dominates, whereas reaction (1b) becomes more important than reaction (1a) above 1700 K. PMID:16035764

  3. Gravity field and solar component of the precession rate and nutation coefficients of Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lhotka, C.; Reimond, S.; Souchay, J.; Baur, O.

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study is first to determine the gravity field of the comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko and second to derive the solar component of the precession rate and nutation coefficients of the spin-axis of the comet nucleus, i.e. without the direct, usually larger, effect of outgassing. The gravity field and related moments of inertia are obtained from two polyhedra, which are provided by the Optical, Spectroscopic, and Infrared Remote Imaging System (OSIRIS) and NAVigation CAMera (NAVCAM) experiments on Rosetta, and are based on the assumption of uniform density for the comet nucleus. We also calculate the forced precession rate as well as the nutation coefficients on the basis of Kinoshita's theory of rotation of the rigid Earth and adapted it to be able to indirectly include the effect of outgassing on the rotational parameters. The second degree denormalized Stokes coefficients of comet 67P/C-G turn out to be (bracketed numbers refer to second shape model) C20 ≃ -6.74 [-7.93] × 10-2, C22 ≃ 2.60 [2.71] × 10-2, consistent with normalized principal moments of inertia A/MR2 ≃ 0.13 [0.11], B/MR2 ≃ 0.23 [0.22], with polar moment c = C/MR2 ≃ 0.25, depending on the choice of the polyhedron model. The obliquity between the rotation axis and the mean orbit normal is ε ≃ 52°, and the precession rate only due to solar torques becomes dot{ψ }in [20,30] arcsec yr^{-1}. Oscillations in longitude caused by the gravitational pull of the Sun turn out to be of the order of Δψ ≃ 1 arcmin, and oscillations in obliquity can be estimated to be of the order of Δε ≃ 0.5 arcmin.

  4. Evaluation of the factors controlling the time-dependent inactivation rate coefficients of bacteriophage MS2 and PRD1

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anders, R.; Chrysikopoulos, C.V.

    2006-01-01

    Static and dynamic batch experiments were conducted to study the effects of temperature and the presence of sand on the inactivation of bacteriophage MS2 and PRD1. The experimental data suggested that the inactivation process can be satisfactorily represented by a pseudo-first-order expression with time-dependent rate coefficients. The time-dependent rate coefficients were used to determine pertinent thermodynamic properties required for the analysis of the molecular processes involved in the inactivation of each bacteriophage. A combination of high temperature and the presence of sand appears to produce the greatest disruption to the surrounding protein coat of MS2. However, the lower activation energies for PRD1 indicate a weaker dependence of the inactivation rate on temperature. Instead, the presence of air-liquid and air-solid interfaces appears to produce the greatest damage to specific viral components that are related to infection. These results indicate the importance of using thermodynamic parameters based on the time-dependent inactivation model to better predict the inactivation of viruses in groundwater. ?? 2006 American Chemical Society.

  5. Evapotranspiration rates and crop coefficients for a restored marsh in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, California, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Drexler, J.Z.; Anderson, F.E.; Snyder, R.L.

    2008-01-01

    The surface renewal method was used to estimate evapotranspiration (ET) for a restored marsh on Twitchell Island in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, California, USA. ET estimates for the marsh, together with reference ET measurements from a nearby climate station, were used to determine crop coefficients over a 3-year period during the growing season. The mean ET rate for the study period was 6 mm day-1, which is high compared with other marshes with similar vegetation. High ET rates at the marsh may be due to the windy, semi-arid Mediterranean climate of the region, and the permanently flooded nature of the marsh, which results in very low surface resistance of the vegetation. Crop coefficient (Kc) values for the marsh ranged from 0.73 to 1.18. The mean Kc value over the entire study period was 0-95. The daily Kc values for any given month varied from year to year, and the standard deviation of daily Kc values varied between months. Although several climate variables were undoubtedly responsible for this variation, our analysis revealed that wind direction and the temperature of standing water in the wetland were of particular importance in determining ET rates and Kc values.

  6. Determining phenomenological rate coefficients from a time-dependent, multiple-well master equation: "species reduction" at high temperatures.

    PubMed

    Miller, James A; Klippenstein, Stephen J

    2013-04-01

    In this article we discuss at length the determination of phenomenological rate coefficients from the solution to a time-dependent, multiple-well master equation. Both conservative and non-conservative formulations are considered. The emphasis is placed on how to handle the situation when a CSE (chemically significant eigenvalue of the transition matrix) merges with the quasi-continuum of IEREs (internal energy relaxation eigenvalues), indicating that one or more chemical reactions begin to take place on vibrational-rotational relaxation time scales. The methodology is illustrated with four examples. PMID:23435763

  7. Optically based quantification of absolute cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) with high spatial resolution in rodents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaseen, Mohammad A.; Srinivasan, Vivek J.; Sakadžić, Sava; Vinogradov, Sergei A.; Boas, David A.

    2010-02-01

    Measuring oxygen delivery in brain tissue is important for identifying the pathophysiological changes associated with brain injury and various diseases such as cancer, stroke, and Alzheimer's disease. We have developed a multi-modal imaging system for minimally invasive measurement of cerebral oxygenation and blood flow in small animals with high spatial resolution. The system allows for simultaneous measurement of blood flow using Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography, and oxygen partial pressure (pO2) using either confocal or multiphoton phosphorescence lifetime imaging with exogenous porphyrin-based dyes sensitive to dissolved oxygen. Here we present the changes in pO2 and blood flow in superficial cortical vessels of Sprague Dawley rats in response to conditions such as hypoxia, hyperoxia, and functional stimulation. pO2 measurements display considerable heterogeneity over distances that cannot be resolved with more widely used oxygen-monitoring techniques such as BOLD-fMRI. Large increases in blood flow are observed in response to functional stimulation and hypoxia. Our system allows for quantification of cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) with high spatial resolution, providing a better understanding of metabolic dynamics during functional stimulation and under various neuropathologies. Ultimately, better insight into the underlying mechanisms of neuropathologies will facilitate the development of improved therapeutic strategies to minimize damage to brain tissue.

  8. Pressure dependence of the absolute rate constant for the reaction Cl + C2H2 from 210-361 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brunning, J.; Stief, L. J.

    1985-01-01

    In recent years, considerable attention has been given to the role of chlorine compounds in the catalytic destruction of stratospheric ozone. However, while some reactions have been studied extensively, the kinetic data for the reaction of Cl with C2H2 is sparse with only three known determinations of the rate constant k3. The reactions involved are Cl + C2H2 yields reversibly ClC2H2(asterisk) (3a) and ClC2H2(asterisk) + M yields ClC2H2 + M (3b). In the present study, flash photolysis coupled with chlorine atomic resonance fluorescence have been employed to determine the pressure and temperature dependence of k3 with the third body M = Ar. Room temperature values are also reported for M = N2. The pressure dependence observed in the experiments confirms the expectation that the reaction involves addition of Cl to the unsaturated C2H2 molecule followed by collisional stabilization of the resulting adduct radical.

  9. Absolute level-to-level rate constants for inelastic collisions and exchange reactions in lithium + gaseous lithium(v,j) going to gaseous lithium(v',j') + lithium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coppage, Steven Danforth

    We report 644 absolute level-to-level inelastic and reactive constants for the L7i*2 A1S+u (nui, ji) + 7Li → L7i*2 A1S+u (nu', j') + 7Li system with initial molecular quantum numbers nui = 2 and ji = 3, 11, and 19. We collected 87 rate constants for rotationally inelastic and vibrationally elastic collisions, 281 rate constants for vibrationally inelastic collisions, and 276 constants for exchange reactions with final vibrational levels from nu f = 0 to nuf = 3. Inelastic collisions are characterized by even changes in rotational quantum number, j , and exchange reactions are identified by odd Deltaj. Level-to-level rate constants for even Deltaj inelastic collisions show distributions similar to those in rare gas collisions with the excited Li2 molecule. The ECS (energy corrected sudden) scaling law of DePristo, et al., fit the vibrationally elastic data well. Reactive rate constant results are characterized by a statistical distribution for Deltanu of 0, -1, and -2 at a substantially reduced effective temperature consistent with a kinematic model proposed by Picconatto et al. Fitting quasiclassical trajectory studies to the data using a modified LEPS potential surface provide first insights into the parameters of the excited-state Li3* three-body potential.

  10. Gas-Phase Reaction Pathways and Rate Coefficients for the Dichlorosilane-Hydrogen and Trichlorosilane-Hydrogen Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dateo, Christopher E.; Walch, Stephen P.

    2002-01-01

    As part of NASA Ames Research Center's Integrated Process Team on Device/Process Modeling and Nanotechnology our goal is to create/contribute to a gas-phase chemical database for use in modeling microelectronics devices. In particular, we use ab initio methods to determine chemical reaction pathways and to evaluate reaction rate coefficients. Our initial studies concern reactions involved in the dichlorosilane-hydrogen (SiCl2H2--H2) and trichlorosilane-hydrogen (SiCl2H-H2) systems. Reactant, saddle point (transition state), and product geometries and their vibrational harmonic frequencies are determined using the complete-active-space self-consistent-field (CASSCF) electronic structure method with the correlation consistent polarized valence double-zeta basis set (cc-pVDZ). Reaction pathways are constructed by following the imaginary frequency mode of the saddle point to both the reactant and product. Accurate energetics are determined using the singles and doubles coupled-cluster method that includes a perturbational estimate of the effects of connected triple excitations (CCSD(T)) extrapolated to the complete basis set limit. Using the data from the electronic structure calculations, reaction rate coefficients are obtained using conventional and variational transition state and RRKM theories.

  11. On the time dependence of rate coefficients of irreversible reactions between reactants with anisotropic reactivity in liquid solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Konstantin L.; Lukzen, Nikita N.; Doktorov, Alexander B.

    2016-08-01

    Time dependence of the rate coefficients of sterically specific reactions is analyzed theoretically. Generally, such reactions exhibit a non-trivial dependence of their rate constant on the steric factor, f < 1, which is defined as the fraction of reactive surface area. Notably, the rate constant of a diffusion-controlled reaction is proportional not to f but, counter-intuitively, to √{ f } due to partial averaging of the reaction anisotropy by translational diffusion. Here we demonstrate that the effective steric factor of a diffusion-influenced reaction is strongly time-dependent, increasing from f to √{ f } . When reactants have several active sites, these sites "interfere" each other in the sense that the rate constant depends on their relative positions. We demonstrate that such an interference effect is strongly time-dependent as well: it is absent at t = 0 but builds up with time. We argue that the outlined effects are also of importance for calculating the fluorescence quenching rate constants.

  12. Collisional quenching reaction rate coefficients of N2 (A3Σu+) by C2F6 and C3F8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Susumu; Kuboaki, Masaru; Itoh, Haruo

    2015-09-01

    The collisional quenching reaction rate coefficient of N2 (A3Σu+) by various air pollutant gases were determined from the measurement of the effective lifetime of N2 (A3Σu+) in pure N2 (5-nine) with a small amount of air pollutant gases as an admixture. Derivation of the rate coefficient was performed the waveform analysis of the transient ionization current after turning off the UV light in the Townsend discharge. In this paper, we report that the obtained collisional quenching reaction rate coefficients of N2 (A3Σu+) by C2F6 and C3F8 are (2.3 +/- 1.8) × 10-15 cm3/s and (1.6 +/- 0.8) × 10-14 cm3/s, respectively. Furthermore, we investigate the relationship between the rate coefficient and the mass number of their quenching molecular gases. Firstly, it is confirmed that the rate coefficient take large value with an increase in the mass number of the quenching gases. Secondly, if H atom is included in the gas molecules such as CH4, C2F6 and C3F8 the rate coefficient take large value, but if the molecules including F atom such as C2F6 and C3F8 instead of H atom in this study, more smaller values of the collisional quenching reaction rate coefficient are observed.

  13. Correlation Between Bacterial Attachment Rate Coefficients and Hydraulic Conductivity and its Effect on Field-Scale Bacterial Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Scheibe, Timothy D.; Dong, Hailiang; Xie, YuLong

    2007-06-01

    It has been widely observed in field experiments that the apparent rate of bacterial attachment, particularly as parameterized by the collision efficiency in filtration-based models, decreases with transport distance (i.e., exhibits scale-dependency). This effect has previously been attributed to microbial heterogeneity; that is, variability in cell-surface properties within a single monoclonal population. We demonstrate that this effect could also be interpreted as a field-scale manifestation of local-scale correlation between physical heterogeneity (hydraulic conductivity variability) and reaction heterogeneity (attachment rate coefficient variability). A field-scale model of bacterial transport developed for the South Oyster field research site located near Oyster, Virginia, and observations from field experiments performed at that site, are used as the basis for this study. Three-dimensional Monte Carlo simulations of bacterial transport were performed under four alternative scenarios: 1) homogeneous hydraulic conductivity (K) and attachment rate coefficient (Kf), 2) heterogeneous K, homogeneous Kf, 3) heterogeneous K and Kf with local correlation based on empirical and theoretical relationships, and 4) heterogeneous K and Kf without local correlation. The results of the 3D simulations were analyzed using 1D model approximations following conventional methods of field data analysis. An apparent decrease with transport distance of effective collision efficiency was observed only in the case where the local properties were both heterogeneous and correlated. This effect was observed despite the fact that the local collision efficiency was specified as a constant in the 3D model, and can therefore be interpreted as a scale effect associated with the local correlated heterogeneity as manifested at the field scale.

  14. OH-initiated degradation of a series of hexenols in the troposphere. Rate coefficients at 298 K and 1 atm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibilisco, Rodrigo G.; Santiago, Ana N.; Teruel, Mariano A.

    2013-10-01

    The kinetics of the reactions of OH radicals with three C6 unsaturated alcohols at 298 K and atmospheric pressure were investigated using solid phase microextraction (SPME) with GC-FID detection of organic compounds. Rate coefficients (in cm3 molecule-1 s-1) of k1(OH + (E)-CH2OHCHdbnd CH(CH2)2CH3) = (1.0 ± 0.3) × 10-10, k2(OH + (E)-CH2OHCH2CHdbnd CHCH2CH3) = (1.2 ± 0.2) × 10-10 and k3(OH + (Z)-CH2OHCH2CHdbnd CHCH2CH3) = (1.4 ± 0.3) × 10-10 were obtained by the relative rate method using methyl methacrylate and (E)-2-buten-1-ol as references. Rate coefficients were compared with previous determinations and reactivity trends were developed and rationalized in terms of the effect and position of substituents in the unsaturated alcohol. A correlation between the reactivity of unsaturated alcohols toward OH radicals and the energy of the HOMO of the unsaturated alcohol is presented. Additionally, product identification under atmospheric conditions was performed for the first time for these unsaturated C6 alcohols by the GC-MS technique. Butanal was observed as the main degradation product of OH with (E)-2-hexen-1-ol, in accordance with the decomposition of the 2,3-hydroxyalcoxy radicals formed. On the basis of our kinetic measurements, tropospheric lifetimes of the studied unsaturated compounds are estimated.

  15. Low-Temperature Rate Coefficients of C2H with CH4 and CD4 from 154 to 359 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Opansky, Brian J.; Leone, Stephen R.

    1996-01-01

    Rate coefficients for the reaction C2H + CH4 yields C2H2 + CH3 and C2H + CD4 yields C2HD + CD3 are measured over the temperature range 154-359 K using transient infrared laser absorption spectroscopy. Ethynyl radicals are produced by pulsed laser photolysis of C2H2 in a variable temperature flow cell, and a tunable color center laser probes the transient removal of C2H (Chi(exp 2) Sigma(+) (0,0,0)) in absorption. The rate coefficients for the reactions of C2H with CH4 and CD4 both show a positive temperature dependence over the range 154-359 K, which can be expressed as k(sub CH4) = (1.2 +/- 0.1) x 10(exp -11) exp((-491 +/- 12)/T) and k(sub CD4) = (8.7 +/- 1.8) x 10(exp -12) exp((-650 +/- 61)/T) cm(exp 3) molecule(exp -1) s(exp -1), respectively. The reaction of C2H + CH4 exhibits a significant kinetic isotope effect at 300 K of k(sub CH4)/k(sub CD4) = 2.5 +/- 0.2. Temperature dependent rate constants for C2H + C2H2 were also remeasured over an increased temperature range from 143 to 359 K and found to show a slight negative temperature dependence, which can be expressed as k(sub C2H2) = 8.6 x 10(exp -16) T(exp 1.8) exp((474 +/- 90)/T) cm(exp 3) molecule(exp -1) s(exp -1).

  16. Correlations Among Ice Measurements, Impingement Rates Icing Conditions, and Drag Coefficients for Unswept NACA 65A004 Airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, Vernon H.

    1958-01-01

    An empirical relation has been obtained by which the change in drag coefficient caused by ice formations on an unswept NACA 65AO04 airfoil section can be determined from the following icing and operating conditions: icing time, airspeed, air total temperature, liquid-water content, cloud droplet impingement efficiencies, airfoil chord length, and angles of attack. The correlation was obtained by use of measured ice heights and ice angles. These measurements were obtained from a variety of ice formations, which were carefully photographed, cross-sectioned, and weighed. Ice weights increased at a constant rate with icing time in a rime icing condition and at progressively increasing rates in glaze icing conditions. Initial rates of ice collection agreed reasonably well with values predicted from droplet impingement data. Experimental droplet impingement rates obtained on this airfoil section agreed with previous theoretical calculations for angles of attack of 40 or less. Disagreement at higher angles of attack was attributed to flow separation from the upper surface of the experimental airfoil model.

  17. Determination of the Rate Coefficients of the SO2 plus O plus M yields SO3 plus M Reaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, S. M.; Cooke, J. A.; De Witt, K. J.; Rabinowitz, M. J.

    2010-01-01

    Rate coefficients of the title reaction R(sub 31) (SO2 +O+M yields SO3 +M) and R(sub 56) (SO2 + HO2 yields SO3 +OH), important in the conversion of S(IV) to S(VI),were obtained at T =970-1150 K and rho (sub ave) = 16.2 micro mol/cubic cm behind reflected shock waves by a perturbation method. Shock-heated H2/ O2/Ar mixtures were perturbed by adding small amounts of SO2 (1%, 2%, and 3%) and the OH temporal profiles were then measured using laser absorption spectroscopy. Reaction rate coefficients were elucidated by matching the characteristic reaction times acquired from the individual experimental absorption profiles via simultaneous optimization of k(sub 31) and k(sub 56) values in the reaction modeling (for satisfactory matches to the observed characteristic times, it was necessary to take into account R(sub 56)). In the experimental conditions of this study, R(sub 31) is in the low-pressure limit. The rate coefficient expressions fitted using the combined data of this study and the previous experimental results are k(sub 31,0)/[Ar] = 2.9 10(exp 35) T(exp ?6.0) exp(?4780 K/T ) + 6.1 10(exp 24) T(exp ?3.0) exp(?1980 K/T ) cm(sup 6) mol(exp ?2)/ s at T = 300-2500 K; k(sub 56) = 1.36 10(exp 11) exp(?3420 K/T ) cm(exp 3)/mol/s at T = 970-1150 K. Computer simulations of typical aircraft engine environments, using the reaction mechanism with the above k(sub 31,0) and k(sub 56) expressions, gave the maximum S(IV) to S(VI) conversion yield of ca. 3.5% and 2.5% for the constant density and constant pressure flow condition, respectively. Moreover, maximum conversions occur at rather higher temperatures (?1200 K) than that where the maximum k(sub 31,0) value is located (approximately 800 K). This is because the conversion yield is dependent upon not only the k(sup 31,0) and k(sup 56) values (production flux) but also the availability of H, O, and HO2 in the system (consumption flux).

  18. Cross sections and rate coefficients for inner-shell excitation of Li-like ions with 6 < Z < 42

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safronova, U. I.; Safronova, M. S.; Kato, T.

    1996-07-01

    Excitation cross sections and rate coefficients by electron impact were calculated for the 1s22s-1s2s2p, 1s22s-1s2s2 and 1s22s-1s2p2 transitions of the Li-like ions (C IV, N V, O VI, Ne VIII, Mg X, Al XI, Si XII, S XIV, Ar XVI, Ca XVIII, Ti XX, Fe XXIV, Ni XXVI, Zn XXVIII, Ge XXX, Se XXXII, Kr XXXIV and Mo XXXX) in the Coulomb-Born approximation with exchange including relativistic effects and configuration interaction. Level energies, mixing coefficients and transition wavelengths and probabilities were also computed. Calculations performed by the 1/Z perturbation theory and Coulomb-Born approximation are compared with the R-matrix method and the distorted-wave approximation were Z is the nuclear charge. Formulae obtained for the angular factors of n-electron atomic system allow one to generalize this method to an arbitrary system of highly charged ions.

  19. NON-EQUILIBRIUM H{sub 2} FORMATION IN THE EARLY UNIVERSE: ENERGY EXCHANGES, RATE COEFFICIENTS, AND SPECTRAL DISTORTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Coppola, C. M.; Longo, S.; D'Introno, R.; Galli, D.; Tennyson, J.

    2012-03-01

    Energy exchange processes play a crucial role in the early universe, affecting the thermal balance and the dynamical evolution of the primordial gas. In the present work we focus on the consequences of a non-thermal distribution of the level populations of H{sub 2}: first, we determine the excitation temperatures of vibrational transitions and the non-equilibrium heat transfer; second, we compare the modifications to chemical reaction rate coefficients with respect to the values obtained assuming local thermodynamic equilibrium; and third, we compute the spectral distortions to the cosmic background radiation generated by the formation of H{sub 2} in vibrationally excited levels. We conclude that non-equilibrium processes cannot be ignored in cosmological simulations of the evolution of baryons, although their observational signatures remain below current limits of detection. New fits to the equilibrium and non-equilibrium heat transfer functions are provided.

  20. CO2(ν2)-O Quenching Rate Coefficient Derived From Coincidental Fort Collins Lidar and SABER Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feofilov, A.; Kutepov, A.; She, C.; Smith, A. K.; Pesnell, W. D.; Goldberg, R. A.

    2009-12-01

    Among the processes governing the energy balance in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT), the quenching of CO2(ν2) vibrational levels in collisions with oxygen atoms plays an important role. However, neither the rate coefficient of this process (k(CO2-O)) nor the atomic oxygen concentrations ([O]) in the MLT are well known. The discrepancy between k(CO2-O) measured in the lab and retrieved from atmospheric measurements is of about factor of 2.5. At the same time, the discrepancy between [O] in the MLT measured by different instruments is of the same order of magnitude. In this work we combine temperature data from a ground based lidar with limb radiances from a satellite infrared radiometer to estimate k(CO2-O). We used the night- and daytime temperatures between 80 and 110 km measured by the Colorado State University narrow-band sodium (Na) lidar located at Fort Collins, Colorado (41N, 255E) as ground truth of the SABER/TIMED nearly simultaneous (±10 minutes ) and common volume (within ±1 degree in latitude, ±2 degrees in longitude) observations. We used ALI-ARMS non-LTE research code designed to calculate the non-equilibrium radiance in planetary atmospheres to retrieve the product of k(CO2-O) x [O] from 15 μm CO2 limb radiance measured by SABER. The values retrieved for all overlapping measurements were then used to estimate the k(CO2-O) rate coefficient and its possible variation range by utilizing the [O] values measured by the SABER and other instruments.

  1. Absolute Determination for the Sodium-22(p,gamma)Magnesium-23 Reaction Rate: Consequences for Nucleosynthesis of Sodium-22 in Novae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sallaska, Anne L.

    2010-11-01

    Hydrodynamic simulations of classical novae on ONe white dwarfs predict substantial production of 22Na. Observation of 22Na decay should be correlated with the corresponding nova because the half life of 22Na is only 2.6 years. The 1275-keV gamma ray from the beta decay of 22Na is, therefore, an excellent diagnostic for the nova phenomenon and a long-sought target of gamma-ray telescopes. Nova simulations determine the maximum 22Na-detection distance to be < 1 kpc for the INTEGRAL spectrometer SPI, consistent with its non-observation to date. However, model estimates are strongly dependent on the thermonuclear rate of the 22Na(p, gamma)23Mg reaction, which is the main destruction mechanism of 22Na in novae. The 22Na(p,gamma)23Mg rate is expected to be dominated by narrow, isolated resonances with Ep < 300 key. The currently employed rate is based on a single set of absolute resonance-strength measurements with Ep ≥ 290 keV, and one relative measurement of resonances with Ep ≥ 214 keV. Recently, a new level has been found in 23Mg which would correspond to a resonance at Ep = 198 keV that might dominate the reaction rate at nova temperatures. We have measured the 22Na(p, gamma) 23Mg resonance strengths directly and absolutely, in addition to resonance energies and branches. Proton beams were produced at the University of Washington and delivered to a specially designed beam line that included rastering and cold vacuum protection of the 22Na-implanted targets (fabricated at TRIUMF-ISAC). Two high-purity germanium detectors were employed and surrounded by anticoincidence shields to reduce cosmic backgrounds. Measurements were made on known 22Na+p resonances, which we observed at laboratory energies Ep = 213, 288, 454, 610 keV and on proposed resonances at Ep = 198, 209, and 232 key. The proposed resonances were not observed, and the upper limit placed on the 198-keV resonance strength indicates that the resonance at Ep = 213 keV still dominates the reaction rate

  2. Absolute intensities and foreign gas broadening coefficients of the 11(sub 1,10) from 11(sub 2,10) and 18(sub 0,18) from 18(sub 1,18) lines in the nu(sub 7) band of C2H4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reuter, Dennis C.; Sirota, J. Marcos

    1993-01-01

    Absolute intensities and foreign gas broadening coefficients of the 18(sub 0,18) from 18(sub 1,18) and 11(sub 1,10) from 11(sub 2,10) transitions in the nu(sub 7) band of C2H4 near 948/cm have been measured at a spectral resolution of approximately 5 x 10(exp -4)/cm using tunable diode laser spectrometry. Ar, He, N2, O2 were used as the broadening gases. In order to determine the temperature dependence of the broadening coefficient, data were obtained at temperatures ranging from 150 to 296 K. The absolute intensity of the 5(sub 0,5) from 5(sub 1,5) transition was also found at 296 K. A band strength of 330 +/- 10/sq cm/atm was obtained from weighted averages of the individual line intensities and a rigid asymmetric top calculation.

  3. Determination of equilibrium electron temperature and times using an electron swarm model with BOLSIG+ calculated collision frequencies and rate coefficients

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Pusateri, Elise N.; Morris, Heidi E.; Nelson, Eric M.; Ji, Wei

    2015-08-04

    Electromagnetic pulse (EMP) events produce low-energy conduction electrons from Compton electron or photoelectron ionizations with air. It is important to understand how conduction electrons interact with air in order to accurately predict EMP evolution and propagation. An electron swarm model can be used to monitor the time evolution of conduction electrons in an environment characterized by electric field and pressure. Here a swarm model is developed that is based on the coupled ordinary differential equations (ODEs) described by Higgins et al. (1973), hereinafter HLO. The ODEs characterize the swarm electric field, electron temperature, electron number density, and drift velocity. Importantmore » swarm parameters, the momentum transfer collision frequency, energy transfer collision frequency, and ionization rate, are calculated and compared to the previously reported fitted functions given in HLO. These swarm parameters are found using BOLSIG+, a two term Boltzmann solver developed by Hagelaar and Pitchford (2005), which utilizes updated cross sections from the LXcat website created by Pancheshnyi et al. (2012). We validate the swarm model by comparing to experimental effective ionization coefficient data in Dutton (1975) and drift velocity data in Ruiz-Vargas et al. (2010). In addition, we report on electron equilibrium temperatures and times for a uniform electric field of 1 StatV/cm for atmospheric heights from 0 to 40 km. We show that the equilibrium temperature and time are sensitive to the modifications in the collision frequencies and ionization rate based on the updated electron interaction cross sections.« less

  4. Determination of equilibrium electron temperature and times using an electron swarm model with BOLSIG+ calculated collision frequencies and rate coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pusateri, Elise N.; Morris, Heidi E.; Nelson, Eric M.; Ji, Wei

    2015-08-01

    Electromagnetic pulse (EMP) events produce low-energy conduction electrons from Compton electron or photoelectron ionizations with air. It is important to understand how conduction electrons interact with air in order to accurately predict EMP evolution and propagation. An electron swarm model can be used to monitor the time evolution of conduction electrons in an environment characterized by electric field and pressure. Here a swarm model is developed that is based on the coupled ordinary differential equations (ODEs) described by Higgins et al. (1973), hereinafter HLO. The ODEs characterize the swarm electric field, electron temperature, electron number density, and drift velocity. Important swarm parameters, the momentum transfer collision frequency, energy transfer collision frequency, and ionization rate, are calculated and compared to the previously reported fitted functions given in HLO. These swarm parameters are found using BOLSIG+, a two term Boltzmann solver developed by Hagelaar and Pitchford (2005), which utilizes updated cross sections from the LXcat website created by Pancheshnyi et al. (2012). We validate the swarm model by comparing to experimental effective ionization coefficient data in Dutton (1975) and drift velocity data in Ruiz-Vargas et al. (2010). In addition, we report on electron equilibrium temperatures and times for a uniform electric field of 1 StatV/cm for atmospheric heights from 0 to 40 km. It is shown that the equilibrium temperature and time are sensitive to the modifications in the collision frequencies and ionization rate based on the updated electron interaction cross sections.

  5. Determining Free-Radical Propagation Rate Coefficients with High-Frequency Lasers: Current Status and Future Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Kockler, Katrin B; Haehnel, Alexander P; Junkers, Thomas; Barner-Kowollik, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Detailed knowledge of the polymerization mechanisms and kinetics of academically and industrially relevant monomers is mandatory for the precision synthesis of tailor-made polymers. The IUPAC-recommended pulsed-laser polymerization-size exclusion chromatography (PLP-SEC) approach is the method of choice for the determination of propagation rate coefficients and the associated Arrhenius parameters for free radical polymerization processes. With regard to specific monomer classes-such as acrylate-type monomers, which are very important from a materials point of view-high laser frequencies of up to 500 Hz are mandatory to prevent the formation of mid-chain radicals and the occurrence of chain-breaking events by chain transfer, if industrially relevant temperatures are to be reached and wide temperature ranges are to be explored (up to 70 °C). Herein the progress and state-of-the-art of high-frequency PLP-SEC with pulse repetition rates of 500 Hz is reported, with a critical collection of to-date investigated 500 Hz data as well as future perspectives for the field. PMID:26479174

  6. Rate coefficients from quantum and quasi-classical cumulative reaction probabilities for the S(1D) + H2 reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jambrina, P. G.; Lara, Manuel; Menéndez, M.; Launay, J.-M.; Aoiz, F. J.

    2012-10-01

    Cumulative reaction probabilities (CRPs) at various total angular momenta have been calculated for the barrierless reaction S(1D) + H2 → SH + H at total energies up to 1.2 eV using three different theoretical approaches: time-independent quantum mechanics (QM), quasiclassical trajectories (QCT), and statistical quasiclassical trajectories (SQCT). The calculations have been carried out on the widely used potential energy surface (PES) by Ho et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 116, 4124 (2002), 10.1063/1.1431280] as well as on the recent PES developed by Song et al. [J. Phys. Chem. A 113, 9213 (2009), 10.1021/jp903790h]. The results show that the differences between these two PES are relatively minor and mostly related to the different topologies of the well. In addition, the agreement between the three theoretical methodologies is good, even for the highest total angular momenta and energies. In particular, the good accordance between the CRPs obtained with dynamical methods (QM and QCT) and the statistical model (SQCT) indicates that the reaction can be considered statistical in the whole range of energies in contrast with the findings for other prototypical barrierless reactions. In addition, total CRPs and rate coefficients in the range of 20-1000 K have been calculated using the QCT and SQCT methods and have been found somewhat smaller than the experimental total removal rates of S(1D).

  7. Determination of equilibrium electron temperature and times using an electron swarm model with BOLSIG+ calculated collision frequencies and rate coefficients

    SciTech Connect

    Pusateri, Elise N.; Morris, Heidi E.; Nelson, Eric M.; Ji, Wei

    2015-08-04

    Electromagnetic pulse (EMP) events produce low-energy conduction electrons from Compton electron or photoelectron ionizations with air. It is important to understand how conduction electrons interact with air in order to accurately predict EMP evolution and propagation. An electron swarm model can be used to monitor the time evolution of conduction electrons in an environment characterized by electric field and pressure. Here a swarm model is developed that is based on the coupled ordinary differential equations (ODEs) described by Higgins et al. (1973), hereinafter HLO. The ODEs characterize the swarm electric field, electron temperature, electron number density, and drift velocity. Important swarm parameters, the momentum transfer collision frequency, energy transfer collision frequency, and ionization rate, are calculated and compared to the previously reported fitted functions given in HLO. These swarm parameters are found using BOLSIG+, a two term Boltzmann solver developed by Hagelaar and Pitchford (2005), which utilizes updated cross sections from the LXcat website created by Pancheshnyi et al. (2012). We validate the swarm model by comparing to experimental effective ionization coefficient data in Dutton (1975) and drift velocity data in Ruiz-Vargas et al. (2010). In addition, we report on electron equilibrium temperatures and times for a uniform electric field of 1 StatV/cm for atmospheric heights from 0 to 40 km. We show that the equilibrium temperature and time are sensitive to the modifications in the collision frequencies and ionization rate based on the updated electron interaction cross sections.

  8. Rotational (de-)excitation of HNS by He: three-dimensional potential energy surface and collision rate coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajili, Y.; Abdallah, D. Ben; Al-Mogren, M. Mogren; Francisco, J. S.; Hochlaf, M.

    2016-05-01

    Three-dimensional potential energy surface (3D-PES) of the HNS-He interacting system in Jacobi coordinates is mapped using high-level ab initio theory. These computations are performed at the explicitly correlated coupled cluster method with single, double and perturbative triple excitations (CCSD(T)-F12) in conjunction with the augmented correlation-consistent aug-cc-pVTZ basis set. The 3D-PES is incorporated into quantum dynamical computations to treat the nuclear motions, where HNS is considered as a rigid rotator colliding with He. Cross-sections for transitions among the first twenty nine rotational levels of HNS (up to jKaKc = 92,8) are calculated using the quantum exact close-coupling method for total energies <1000 cm-1 and using the coupled state approximation for higher energies. Collisional rate constants for temperatures ranging from 5 to 200 K are deduced. A clear propensity rule in favour of Δj = -2 rotational transitions is observed. These rate coefficients are of great importance for the detection of HNS in interstellar medium.

  9. Evaluation of the Factors that Control the Time-Dependent Inactivation Rate Coefficients of Bacteriophage MS2 and PRD1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anders, R.; Chrysikopoulos, C. V.

    2004-12-01

    Batch experiments were conducted under both static and dynamic conditions to study the effects of temperature and the presence of sand on the inactivation process of viruses. The male--specific RNA coliphage, MS2, and the Salmonella typhimurium phage, PRD1, were used as model viruses for this study. Over 100 oven--baked borosilicate glass bottles with or without Monterey sand were filled with a low--ionic--strength phosphate buffered saline solution containing both bacteriophage and incubated at temperatures of 4o, 15o, or 25oC. The results of the batch experiments indicate that the inactivation process can be represented by a pseudo first-order expression with time--dependent rate coefficients. A combination of high temperature and the presence of sand appears to produce the greatest disruption to the surrounding protein coat of MS2. However, for PRD1, the lower activation energies derived from Arrhenius plots indicate a weaker dependence of the inactivation rate on temperature. Furthermore, the presence of an air--liquid--solid interface in the dynamic batch experiment containing sand produces the greatest damage to specific viral components of PRD1 that are required for infection. These results indicate the use of thermodynamic parameters based on the pseudo first--order inactivation expression allows better prediction of the inactivation of viruses in the environment.

  10. EFFECTS OF COVAPORS ON ADSORPTION RATE COEFFICIENTS OF ORGANIC VAPORS ADSORBED ONTO ACTIVATED CARBON FROM FLOWING AIR

    SciTech Connect

    G. WOOD

    2000-12-01

    Published breakthrough time, adsorption rate, and capacity data for components of organic vapor mixtures adsorbed from flows through fixed activated carbon beds have been analyzed. Capacities (as stoichiometric centers of constant pattern breakthrough curves) yielded stoichiometric times {tau}, which are useful for determining elution orders of mixture components. We also calculated adsorption rate coefficients k{sub v} of the Wheeler (or, more general Reaction Kinetic) breakthrough curve equation, when not reported, from breakthrough times and {tau}. Ninety-five k{sub v} (in mixture)/ k{sub v} (single vapor) ratios at similar vapor concentrations were calculated and averaged for elution order categories. For 43 first-eluting vapors the average ratio (1.07) was statistically no different (0.21 standard deviation) than unity, so that we recommend using the single-vapor k{sub v} for such. Forty-seven second-eluting vapor ratios averaged 0.85 (0.24 standard deviation), also not significantly different from unity; however, other evidence and considerations lead us recommend using k{sub v} (in mixture) = 0.85 k{sub v} (single vapor). Five third- and fourth-eluting vapors gave an average of 0.56 (0.16 standard deviation) for a recommended k{sub v} (in mixture) = 0.56 k{sub v} (single vapor) for such.

  11. OH Radical Reaction Rate Coefficients, Infrared Spectrum, and Global Warming Potential of (CF3)2CFCH═CHF (HFO-1438ezy(E)).

    PubMed

    Papadimitriou, Vassileios C; Burkholder, James B

    2016-08-25

    Rate coefficients, k(T), for the OH radical + (E)-(CF3)2CFCH═CHF ((E)-1,3,4,4,4-pentafluoro-3-(trifluoromethyl)-1-butene, HFO-1438ezy(E)) gas-phase reaction were measured using pulsed laser photolysis-laser-induced fluorescence (PLP-LIF) between 214 and 380 K and 50 and 450 Torr (He or N2 bath gas) and with a relative rate method at 296 K between 100 and 400 Torr (synthetic air). Over the range of pressures included in this study, no pressure dependence in k(T) was observed. k(296 K) obtained using the two techniques agreed to within ∼3% with (3.26 ± 0.26) × 10(-13) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) (2σ absolute uncertainty) obtained using the PLP-LIF technique. k(T) displayed non-Arrhenius behavior that is reproduced by (7.34 ± 0.30) × 10(-19)T(2) exp[(481 ± 10)/T) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1). With respect to OH reactive loss, the atmospheric lifetime of HFO-1438ezy(E) is estimated to be ∼36 days and HFO-1438ezy(E) is considered a very short-lived substance (VSLS) (the actual lifetime will depend on the time and location of the HFO-1438ezy(E) emission). On the basis of the HFO-1438ezy(E) infrared absorption spectrum measured in this work and its estimated lifetime, a radiative efficiency of 0.306 W m(-2) ppb(-1) (well-mixed gas) was calculated and its 100-year time-horizon global warming potential, GWP100, was estimated to be 8.6. CF3CFO, HC(O)F, and CF2O were identified using infrared spectroscopy as stable end products in the oxidation of HFO-1438ezy(E) in the presence of O2. Two additional fluorinated products were observed and theoretical calculations of the infrared spectra of likely degradation products are presented. The photochemical ozone creation potential of HFO-1438ezy(E) was estimated to be ∼2.15. PMID:27482844

  12. Relative rate coefficient measurements of OH radical reactions with (Z)-2-hexen-1-ol and (E)-3-hexen-1-ol under simulated atmospheric conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peirone, Silvina A.; Barrera, Javier A.; Taccone, Raúl A.; Cometto, Pablo M.; Lane, Silvia I.

    2014-03-01

    The relative rate technique was used to determine the rate coefficients of the reactions of OH radicals with (Z)-2-hexen-1-ol (k1), and (E)-3-hexen-1-ol (k2), at (296 ± 2) K and (750 ± 10) Torr of N2 or pure air. The reactions were investigated using a 200 L Teflon reaction chamber and a gas chromatograph coupled with flame-ionization detection. The following rate coefficients were derived, in units of cm3 mol-1 s-1: k1 = (1.1 ± 0.4) × 10-10 and k2 = (0.8 ± 0.1) × 10-10. This is the first experimental determination of k1 and k2. A comparison between the experimental rate coefficients (kexp) and the calculated rate coefficients using the structure-activity relationship (SAR) method (kSAR), for the reaction of different unsaturated alcohols with OH radicals is presented. The atmospheric lifetimes of the studied alcohols were estimated considering the rate coefficients of their reactions with OH and NO3 radicals. The radiative efficiencies (REs) were obtained from the infrared spectra of the two hexenols and the global warming potentials (GWPs) were then estimated. Atmospheric implications of the alcohols emission are briefly discussed.

  13. HCFC-133a (CF3CH2Cl): OH rate coefficient, UV and infrared absorption spectra, and atmospheric implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGillen, Max R.; Bernard, François; Fleming, Eric L.; Burkholder, James B.

    2015-07-01

    HCFC-133a (CF3CH2Cl), an ozone-depleting substance, is primarily removed from the atmosphere by gas-phase reaction with OH radicals and by UV photolysis. The rate coefficient, k, for the OH + HCFC-133a reaction was measured between 233 and 379 K and is given by k(T) = (9.32 ± 0.8) × 10-13 exp(-(1296 ± 28)/T), where k(296 K) was measured to be (1.10 ± 0.02) × 10-14 (cm3 molecule-1 s-1) (2σ precision uncertainty). The HCFC-133a UV absorption spectrum was measured between 184.95 and 240 nm at 213-323 K, and a spectrum parameterization is presented. The HCFC-133a atmospheric loss processes, lifetime, ozone depletion potential, and uncertainties were evaluated using a 2-D atmospheric model. The global annually averaged steady state lifetime and ozone depletion potential (ODP) were determined to be 4.45 (4.04-4.90) years and 0.017 (±0.001), respectively, where the ranges are based solely on the 2σ uncertainty in the kinetic and photochemical parameters. The infrared absorption spectrum of HCFC-133a was measured, and its global warming potential was determined to be 380 on the 100 year time horizon.

  14. Statistical-theoretical investigation of the thermal rate coefficient and branching ratio for the reaction O + HCN. -->. products

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.A.; Parrish, C.; Brown, N.J.

    1986-07-17

    Using the BAC-MP4 potential surface parameters of Melius and Binkley, we have predicted the thermal rate coefficients for the two reactions: O + HCN ..-->.. NCO + H (a) and O + HCN ..-->.. NH + CO (b). Several levels of approximation are used in the theoretical treatment: a, canonical theory; b, canonical theory with Wigner tunneling correction; c, microcanonical theory (energy conserving); d, microcanonical/J-conservative theory (conserves both energy and angular momentum); e, microcanonical/J-conservative theory with one-dimensional tunneling. At high temperature the available experimental results are predicted accurately by even the crudest theoretical treatment (canonical theory). At lower temperature the theoretical predictions using the basic BAC-MP4 parameters are too low. However, adjustments to the BAC-MP4 energy barriers within their stated error limits lead to satisfactory agreement with experiment over the entire temperature range where experimental results are available (500 to 2500 K). The most important results of the investigation concern the dependence of the predictions on the level of approximation. Each successive refinement in the theory produces larger values of k/sub b/. The details of the theoretical treatment and comparisons with experiment are described in detail.

  15. Investigation of Relationships Between Transverse Relaxation Rate, Diffusion Coefficient, and Labeled Cell Concentration in Ischemic Rat Brain Using MRI

    PubMed Central

    Athiraman, Hemanthkumar; Jiang, Quan; Ding, Guang Liang; Zhang, Li; Zhang, Zheng Gang; Wang, Lei; Arbab, Ali S.; Li, Qingjiang; Panda, Swayam; Ledbetter, Karen; Rad, Ali M.; Chopp, Michael

    2009-01-01

    MRI has been used to evaluate labeled cell migration and distribution. However, quantitative determination of labeled cell concentration using MRI has not been systematically investigated. In the current study, we investigated the relationships between labeled cell concentration and MRI parameters of transverse relaxation rate, R2, and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), in vitro in phantoms and in vivo in rats after stroke. Significant correlations were detected between iron concentration or labeled cell concentration and MRI measurements of R2, ADC, and ADC×R2 in vitro. In contrast, in vivo labeled cell concentration did not significantly correlate with R2, ADC, and ADC×R2. A major factor for the absence of a significant correlation between labeled cell concentration and MRI measurements in vivo may be attributed to background effects of ischemic tissue. By correcting the background effects caused by ischemic damage, ΔR2 (difference in R2 values in the ischemic tissue with and without labeled cells) exhibited a significant correlation to labeled cell concentration. Our study suggests that MRI parameters have the potential to quantitatively determine labeled cell concentration in vivo. PMID:19107898

  16. C02(nu2)-0 Quenching Rate Coefficient Derived from Coincidental Fort Collins Lidar and SABER Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feofilov, A. G.; Kutepov, A. A.; She, C. Y.; Smith, A. K.; Pesnell, W. D.; Goldberg, R. A.

    2009-01-01

    Among the processes governing the energy balance in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT), the quenching of CO2(V2) vibrational levels in collisions with oxygen atoms plays an important role. However, neither the rate coefficient of this process (k(CO2O)) nor the atomic oxygen concentrations ([O]) in the MLT are well known. The discrepancy between k(CO2O) measured in the lab and retrieved from atmospheric measurements is of about factor of 2.5. At the same time, the discrepancy between [O] in the MLT measured by different instruments is of the same order of magnitude. In this work we used a synergy of a ground based lidar and satellite infrared radiometer to make a further step in understanding of the physics of the region. In this study we apply the night- and daytime temperatures between 80 and 110 km measured by the Colorado State University narrow-band sodium (Na) lidar located at Fort Collins, Colorado for retrieving the product of k(CO2-O) x [O] from the limb radiances in the 15 micron channel measured by the SABER/TIMED instrument for nearly simultaneous common volume measurements of both instruments within +/-1 degree in latitude, +/-2 degrees in longitude and +/-10 minutes in time. We derive k(CO2-O) and its possible variation range from the retrieved product by utilizing the [O] values measured by the SABER and other instruments.

  17. Teaching Absolute Value Meaningfully

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wade, Angela

    2012-01-01

    What is the meaning of absolute value? And why do teachers teach students how to solve absolute value equations? Absolute value is a concept introduced in first-year algebra and then reinforced in later courses. Various authors have suggested instructional methods for teaching absolute value to high school students (Wei 2005; Stallings-Roberts…

  18. Rotational excitation of AlCl induced by its collision with helium: cross sections and collisional rate coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pamboundom, Mama; Tchakoua, Théophile; Nsangou, Mama

    2016-04-01

    In this work, inelastic rotational collision of AlCl with helium was studied. The CCSD(T) method was used for the computation of an accurate two dimensional potential energy surface (PES). In the calculation of the PES, Al-Cl bond was frozen at the experimental value 4.02678 a0. The aug-cc-pVQZ basis sets of Dunning was used throughout the computational process. This basis was completed with a set of 3s3p2d2f1g bond functions placed at mid-distance between the center of mass of AlCl and He atom for a better description of the van der Waals interaction energy. The PES of AlCl-He was found to have a global minimum at (R=8.65 a0, θ=0 degree), a local minimum at (R=7.45 a0, θ=82 degree) and a saddle point at (R=7.9 a0, θ=56 degree). The depths of the minima were 20.2 cm^{-1} and 19.8 cm^{-1} respectively for θ=0 and 84 degrees. The height of the saddle point with respect to the global minimum was 1.3 cm^{-1}. The PES, the result of an analytical fit, was expanded in terms of Legendre polynomials, then used for the evaluation of state-to-state rotational integral cross sections for the collision of AlCl with He in the close coupling approach. The collisional cross sections for the transitions occurring among the 17 first rotational levels of AlCl were calculated for kinetic energies up to 4000 cm^{-1}. Collisional rate coefficients between these rotational levels were computed for low and moderate kinetic temperatures ranging from 30 to 500 K. A propensity rule that favors odd Δ j transitions was found.

  19. Validation of absolute axial neutron flux distribution calculations with MCNP with 197Au(n,γ)198Au reaction rate distribution measurements at the JSI TRIGA Mark II reactor.

    PubMed

    Radulović, Vladimir; Štancar, Žiga; Snoj, Luka; Trkov, Andrej

    2014-02-01

    The calculation of axial neutron flux distributions with the MCNP code at the JSI TRIGA Mark II reactor has been validated with experimental measurements of the (197)Au(n,γ)(198)Au reaction rate. The calculated absolute reaction rate values, scaled according to the reactor power and corrected for the flux redistribution effect, are in good agreement with the experimental results. The effect of different cross-section libraries on the calculations has been investigated and shown to be minor. PMID:24316530

  20. Direct measurement and theoretical calculation of the rate coefficient for Cl+CH3 in the range from T=202-298 K.

    PubMed

    Parker, James K; Payne, Walter A; Cody, Regina J; Nesbitt, Fred L; Stief, Louis J; Klippenstein, Stephen J; Harding, Lawrence B

    2007-02-15

    The rate coefficient has been measured under pseudo-first-order conditions for the Cl+CH3 association reaction at T=202, 250, and 298 K and P=0.3-2.0 Torr helium using the technique of discharge-flow mass spectrometry with low-energy (12-eV) electron-impact ionization and collision-free sampling. Cl and CH3 were generated rapidly and simultaneously by reaction of F with HCl and CH4, respectively. Fluorine atoms were produced by microwave discharge in an approximately 1% mixture of F2 in He. The decay of CH3 was monitored under pseudo-first-order conditions with the Cl-atom concentration in large excess over the CH3 concentration ([Cl]0/[CH3]0=9-67). Small corrections were made for both axial and radial diffusion and minor secondary chemistry. The rate coefficient was found to be in the falloff regime over the range of pressures studied. For example, at T=202 K, the rate coefficient increases from 8.4x10(-12) at P=0.30 Torr He to 1.8x10(-11) at P=2.00 Torr He, both in units of cm3 molecule-1 s-1. A combination of ab initio quantum chemistry, variational transition-state theory, and master-equation simulations was employed in developing a theoretical model for the temperature and pressure dependence of the rate coefficient. Reasonable empirical representations of energy transfer and of the effect of spin-orbit interactions yield a temperature- and pressure-dependent rate coefficient that is in excellent agreement with the present experimental results. The high-pressure limiting rate coefficient from the RRKM calculations is k2=6.0x10(-11) cm3 molecule-1 s-1, independent of temperature in the range from 200 to 300 K. PMID:17253663

  1. The effect of N2/+/ recombination on the aeronomic determination of the charge exchange rate coefficient of O/+//2D/ with N2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torr, D. G.; Orsini, N.

    1978-01-01

    The Atmosphere Explorer (AE) data are reexamined in the light of new laboratory measurements of the N2(+) recombination rate coefficient alpha. The new measurements support earlier measurements which yielded values of alpha significantly lower than the AE values. It is found that the values for alpha determined from the satellite data can be reconciled with the laboratory measurements, if the charge exchange rate coefficient for O(+)(2D) with N2 is less than one-quarter of that derived in the laboratory by Rutherford and Vroom (1971).

  2. Atmospheric chemistry of CF3CF═CH2 and (Z)-CF3CF═CHF: Cl and NO3 rate coefficients, Cl reaction product yields, and thermochemical calculations.

    PubMed

    Papadimitriou, Vassileios C; Lazarou, Yannis G; Talukdar, Ranajit K; Burkholder, James B

    2011-01-20

    Rate coefficients, k, for the gas-phase reactions of Cl atoms and NO(3) radicals with 2,3,3,3-tetrafluoropropene, CF(3)CF═CH(2) (HFO-1234yf), and 1,2,3,3,3-pentafluoropropene, (Z)-CF(3)CF═CHF (HFO-1225ye), are reported. Cl-atom rate coefficients were measured in the fall-off region as a function of temperature (220-380 K) and pressure (50-630 Torr; N(2), O(2), and synthetic air) using a relative rate method. The measured rate coefficients are well represented by the fall-off parameters k(0)(T) = 6.5 × 10(-28) (T/300)(-6.9) cm(6) molecule(-2) s(-1) and k(∞)(T) = 7.7 × 10(-11) (T/300)(-0.65) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) for CF(3)CF═CH(2) and k(0)(T) = 3 × 10(-27) (T/300)(-6.5) cm(6) molecule(-2) s(-1) and k(∞)(T) = 4.15 × 10(-11) (T/300)(-0.5) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) for (Z)-CF(3)C═CHF with F(c) = 0.6. Reaction product yields were measured in the presence of O(2) to be (98 ± 7)% for CF(3)C(O)F and (61 ± 4)% for HC(O)Cl in the CF(3)CF═CH(2) reaction and (108 ± 8)% for CF(3)C(O)F and (112 ± 8)% for HC(O)F in the (Z)-CF(3)CF═CHF reaction, where the quoted uncertainties are 2σ (95% confidence level) and include estimated systematic errors. NO(3) reaction rate coefficients were determined using absolute and relative rate methods. Absolute measurements yielded upper limits for both reactions between 233 and 353 K, while the relative rate measurements yielded k(3)(295 K) = (2.6 ± 0.25) × 10(-17) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) and k(4)(295 K) = (4.2 ± 0.5) × 10(-18) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) for CF(3)CF═CH(2) and (Z)-CF(3)CF═CHF, respectively. The Cl-atom reaction with CF(3)CF═CH(2) and (Z)-CF(3)CF═CHF leads to decreases in their atmospheric lifetimes and global warming potentials and formation of a chlorine-containing product, HC(O)Cl, for CF(3)CF═CH(2). The NO(3) reaction has been shown to have a negligible impact on the atmospheric lifetimes of CF(3)CF═CH(2) and (Z)-CF(3)CF═CHF. The energetics for the reaction of Cl, NO(3), and OH with CF

  3. Greater absolute rates of N2O production and consumption with soil warming dwarf variations in denitrification enzyme temperature sensitivities across seasons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiemann, L. K.; Billings, S. A.

    2010-12-01

    Investigators appreciate the important role that nitrate (NO3-) and soil moisture availability can play in governing net N2O production from soils. However, a large knowledge gap remains surrounding the drivers of soil N2O consumption and the role of microbial adaptation to changing environmental conditions in governing both N2O production and consumption. Net N2O soil efflux can be correlated with temperature, but little is known about the influence of temperature on gross rates of N2O production vs. consumption. Further, we do not understand how microbial communities responsible for these processes adapt or acclimate to soil warming. To investigate whether temperature alters the denitrifier-mediated fate of NO3- lost via N2O or N2, and if any such effect changes across seasons, we incubated soil collected in three seasons at four temperatures with and without 15N-enriched nitrate for 26 hours. Incubations were conducted in an anaerobic environment flushed with helium to permit detection of N2O and N2, and those gases’ δ15N. Temperature positively influenced CO2 production resulting from anaerobic processes. Maximum values of net N2O production were positively influenced by incubation and seasonal temperature, and the maximum rate of net N2O production occurred relatively early at warmer incubation temperatures. We also observed greater N2O:N2 ratios early in the incubations at warmer incubation temperatures. Isotope data are consistent with these trends. For those soils receiving the 15N label, differences in δ15N2O between early and late in the incubations were increasingly negative, and differences in δ15N2 increasingly positive, as temperature increased. Q10 values for N2O production and consumption exhibited increasing similarities as seasons progressed, with June N2O production and consumption Q10 values being nearly identical. These data provide convincing evidence that: a) increasing temperatures can induce denitrifying communities to perform complete

  4. Eosinophil count - absolute

    MedlinePlus

    Eosinophils; Absolute eosinophil count ... the white blood cell count to give the absolute eosinophil count. ... than 500 cells per microliter (cells/mcL). Normal value ranges may vary slightly among different laboratories. Talk ...

  5. Artificial Neural Networks-Based Software for Measuring Heat Collection Rate and Heat Loss Coefficient of Water-in-Glass Evacuated Tube Solar Water Heaters.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhijian; Liu, Kejun; Li, Hao; Zhang, Xinyu; Jin, Guangya; Cheng, Kewei

    2015-01-01

    Measurements of heat collection rate and heat loss coefficient are crucial for the evaluation of in service water-in-glass evacuated tube solar water heaters. However, conventional measurement requires expensive detection devices and undergoes a series of complicated procedures. To simplify the measurement and reduce the cost, software based on artificial neural networks for measuring heat collection rate and heat loss coefficient of water-in-glass evacuated tube solar water heaters was developed. Using multilayer feed-forward neural networks with back-propagation algorithm, we developed and tested our program on the basis of 915 measured samples of water-in-glass evacuated tube solar water heaters. This artificial neural networks-based software program automatically obtained accurate heat collection rate and heat loss coefficient using simply "portable test instruments" acquired parameters, including tube length, number of tubes, tube center distance, heat water mass in tank, collector area, angle between tubes and ground and final temperature. Our results show that this software (on both personal computer and Android platforms) is efficient and convenient to predict the heat collection rate and heat loss coefficient due to it slow root mean square errors in prediction. The software now can be downloaded from http://t.cn/RLPKF08. PMID:26624613

  6. The dependence of rate coefficients and product yields upon fluence, intensity, and time in unimolecular reactions induced by monochromatic infrared radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quack, M.; Humbert, P.; van den Bergh, H.

    1980-07-01

    The influence of the three parameters (with two degrees of freedom) fluence, intensity, and time on rate coefficients and product yields in collisionless Unimolecular Reactions Induced by Monochromatic Infrared Radiation (URIMIR) is discussed in some detail in terms of the recently proposed logarithmic reactant fluence plots. Model calculations for several archetypes of such plots are presented, based on solutions of the Pauli master equation and solutions of the quantum mechanical equations of motion for spectra involving many states at each level of excitation. Linear diagrams, turnups, and turnovers are found and are discussed systematically. Experimental examples re-evaluated from the literature and new measurements on the laser induced decomposition of CF2HCl are reported which nicely illustrate the various theoretical possibilities. Steady state rate coefficients for six molecules are evaluated and summarized. In some situations the intrinsic nonlinear intensity dependence of the steady state rate coefficients and deviations from simple fluence dependence of the product yields both before and at steady state are shown to be important theoretically and experimentally. The role of the reducibility of the rate coefficient matrix is discussed in connection with turnovers and with the strong influence of initial temperature that is found in the laser induced decomposition of CF2HCl.

  7. The Impact of Outliers on Cronbach's Coefficient Alpha Estimate of Reliability: Ordinal/Rating Scale Item Responses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Yan; Wu, Amery D.; Zumbo, Bruno D.

    2010-01-01

    In a recent Monte Carlo simulation study, Liu and Zumbo showed that outliers can severely inflate the estimates of Cronbach's coefficient alpha for continuous item response data--visual analogue response format. Little, however, is known about the effect of outliers for ordinal item response data--also commonly referred to as Likert, Likert-type,…

  8. Determination of state-to-state electron-impact rate coefficients between Ar excited states: a review of combined diagnostic experiments in afterglow plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xi-Ming; Cheng, Zhi-Wen; Carbone, Emile; Pu, Yi-Kang; Czarnetzki, Uwe

    2016-08-01

    Electron-impact excitation processes play an important role in low-temperature plasma physics. Cross section and rate coefficient data for electron-impact processes from the ground state to excited states or between two excited states are required for both diagnostics and modeling works. However, the collisional processes between excited states are much less investigated than the ones involving the ground state due to various experimental challenges. Recently, a method for determining electron excitation rate coefficients between Ar excited states in afterglow plasmas was successfully implemented and further developed to obtain large sets of collisional data. This method combines diagnostics for electron temperature, electron density, and excited species densities and kinetic modeling of excited species, from which the electron excitation rate coefficients from one of the 1s states to the other 1s states or to one of 2p or 3p states are determined (states are in Paschen’s notation). This paper reviews the above method—namely the combined diagnostics and modeling in afterglow plasmas. The results from other important approaches, including electron-beam measurement of cross sections, laser pump-probe technique for measuring rate coefficients, and theoretical calculations by R-matrix and distorted-wave models are also discussed. From a comparative study of these results, a fitted mathematical expression of excitation rate coefficients is obtained for the electron temperature range of 1–5 eV, which can be used for the collisional-radiative modeling of low-temperature Ar plasmas. At last, we report the limitations in the present dataset and give some suggestions for future work in this area.

  9. Low temperature rate coefficients of the H + CH(+) → C(+) + H2 reaction: New potential energy surface and time-independent quantum scattering.

    PubMed

    Werfelli, Ghofran; Halvick, Philippe; Honvault, Pascal; Kerkeni, Boutheïna; Stoecklin, Thierry

    2015-09-21

    The observed abundances of the methylidyne cation, CH(+), in diffuse molecular clouds can be two orders of magnitude higher than the prediction of the standard gas-phase models which, in turn, predict rather well the abundances of neutral CH. It is therefore necessary to investigate all the possible formation and destruction processes of CH(+) in the interstellar medium with the most abundant species H, H2, and e(-). In this work, we address the destruction process of CH(+) by hydrogen abstraction. We report a new calculation of the low temperature rate coefficients for the abstraction reaction, using accurate time-independent quantum scattering and a new high-level ab initio global potential energy surface including a realistic model of the long-range interaction between the reactants H and CH(+). The calculated thermal rate coefficient is in good agreement with the experimental data in the range 50 K-800 K. However, at lower temperatures, the experimental rate coefficient takes exceedingly small values which are not reproduced by the calculated rate coefficient. Instead, the latter rate coefficient is close to the one given by the Langevin capture model, as expected for a reaction involving an ion and a neutral species. Several recent theoretical works have reported a seemingly good agreement with the experiment below 50 K, but an analysis of these works show that they are based on potential energy surfaces with incorrect long-range behavior. The experimental results were explained by a loss of reactivity of the lowest rotational states of the reactant; however, the quantum scattering calculations show the opposite, namely, a reactivity enhancement with rotational excitation. PMID:26395702

  10. Cross sections and rate coefficients for excitation of Δn = 1 transitions in Li-like ions with 6 < Z < 42.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safronova, U. I.; Safronova, M. S.; Kato, T.

    Excitation cross sections and rate coefficients by electron impact were calculated for the 1s22s - 1s2s2p, 1s22s - 1s2s2 and 1s22s - 1s2p2 transitions of the Li-like ions (C IV, N V, O VI, Ne VIII, Mg X, Al XI, Si XII, S XIV, Ar XVI, Ca XVIII, Ti XX, Fe XXIV, Ni XXVI, Zn XXVIII, Ge XXX, Se XXXII, Kr XXXIIV and Mo XXXX) by a Coulomb-Born approximation with exchange and including relativistic effects and configuration interactions. Level energies, mixing coefficients and transition wavelengths and probabilities were also computed.

  11. Artificial Neural Networks-Based Software for Measuring Heat Collection Rate and Heat Loss Coefficient of Water-in-Glass Evacuated Tube Solar Water Heaters

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhijian; Liu, Kejun; Li, Hao; Zhang, Xinyu; Jin, Guangya; Cheng, Kewei

    2015-01-01

    Measurements of heat collection rate and heat loss coefficient are crucial for the evaluation of in service water-in-glass evacuated tube solar water heaters. However, conventional measurement requires expensive detection devices and undergoes a series of complicated procedures. To simplify the measurement and reduce the cost, software based on artificial neural networks for measuring heat collection rate and heat loss coefficient of water-in-glass evacuated tube solar water heaters was developed. Using multilayer feed-forward neural networks with back-propagation algorithm, we developed and tested our program on the basis of 915measuredsamples of water-in-glass evacuated tube solar water heaters. This artificial neural networks-based software program automatically obtained accurate heat collection rateand heat loss coefficient using simply "portable test instruments" acquired parameters, including tube length, number of tubes, tube center distance, heat water mass in tank, collector area, angle between tubes and ground and final temperature. Our results show that this software (on both personal computer and Android platforms) is efficient and convenient to predict the heat collection rate and heat loss coefficient due to it slow root mean square errors in prediction. The software now can be downloaded from http://t.cn/RLPKF08. PMID:26624613

  12. Low temperature diffusion coefficients in the Fe-Ni and FeNiP systems: Application to meteorite cooling rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dean, D. C.; Goldstein, J. I.

    1984-01-01

    The interdiffusion coefficient of FeNi in fcc taenite (gamma) of Fe-Ni and Fe-Ni-0.2 P alloys was measured as a function of temperature between 600 and 900 C. This temperature range is directly applicable to the nucleation and growth of the Widmanstatten pattern in iron meteorites and metal regions of stony and stony-iron meteorites. Diffusion couples were made from FeNi or FeNiP alloys which ensured that the couples were in the taenite phase at the diffusion temperature. The presence or absence of grain boundary diffusion was determined by measuring the Ni profile normal to the existing grain boundaries with the AEM. Ignoring any variation of interdiffusion coefficient with composition, the measured data was plotted versus the reciprocal of the diffusion temperature. The FeNi data generally follow the extrapolated Goldstein, et al. (1965) data from high temperatures. The FeNiP data indicates that small additions of P (0.2 wt%) cause a 3 to 10 fold increase in the FeNi interdifussion coefficient increasing with decreasing temperature. This increase is about the same as that predicted by Narayan and Goldstein (1983) at the Widmanstatten growth temperature.

  13. Communication: Rigorous quantum dynamics of O + O{sub 2} exchange reactions on an ab initio potential energy surface substantiate the negative temperature dependence of rate coefficients

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yaqin; Sun, Zhigang E-mail: dawesr@mst.edu; Jiang, Bin; Guo, Hua E-mail: dawesr@mst.edu; Xie, Daiqian; Dawes, Richard E-mail: dawesr@mst.edu

    2014-08-28

    The kinetics and dynamics of several O + O{sub 2} isotope exchange reactions have been investigated on a recently determined accurate global O{sub 3} potential energy surface using a time-dependent wave packet method. The agreement between calculated and measured rate coefficients is significantly improved over previous work. More importantly, the experimentally observed negative temperature dependence of the rate coefficients is for the first time rigorously reproduced theoretically. This negative temperature dependence can be attributed to the absence in the new potential energy surface of a submerged “reef” structure, which was present in all previous potential energy surfaces. In addition, contributions of rotational excited states of the diatomic reactant further accentuate the negative temperature dependence.

  14. Coefficients for Interrater Agreement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zegers, Frits E.

    1991-01-01

    The degree of agreement between two raters rating several objects for a single characteristic can be expressed through an association coefficient, such as the Pearson product-moment correlation. How to select an appropriate association coefficient, and the desirable properties and uses of a class of such coefficients--the Euclidean…

  15. Absolute nuclear material assay

    DOEpatents

    Prasad, Manoj K.; Snyderman, Neal J.; Rowland, Mark S.

    2012-05-15

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  16. Absolute nuclear material assay

    DOEpatents

    Prasad, Manoj K.; Snyderman, Neal J.; Rowland, Mark S.

    2010-07-13

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  17. Rotationally inelastic dynamics of LiH (X(1)Σ(+), v = 0) in collisions with Ar: State-to-state inelastic rotational rate coefficients.

    PubMed

    Niane, Aliou; Dath, Cheikh Amadou Bamba; Faye, Ndèye Arame Boye; Hammami, Kamel; Jaidane, Nejm-Eddine

    2014-01-01

    A theoretical study of rotational collision of LiH(X(1)Σ(+),v = 0, J) with Ar has been carried out. The ab initio potential energy surface (PES) describing the interaction between the Ar atom and the rotating LiH molecule has been calculated very accurately and already discussed in our previous work [Computational and Theoretical Chemistry 993 (2012) 20-25]. This PES is employed to evaluate the de-excitation cross sections. The ab initio PES for the LiH(X(1)Σ(+))-Ar((1)S) Van der waals system is calculated at the coupled-cluster [CCSD(T)] approximation for a LiH length fixed to an experimental value of 3.0139 bohrs. The basis set superposition error (BSSE) is corrected and the bond functions are placed at mid-distance between the center of mass of LiH and the Ar atom. The cross sections are then derived in the close coupling (CC) approach and rate coefficients are inferred by averaging these cross sections over a Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution of kinetic energies. The 11 first rotational levels of rate coefficients are evaluated for temperatures ranging from 10 to 300 K. We notice that the de-excitation rate coefficients appear large in the order 10(-10) cm(-3) s(-1) and show very low temperature dependence. The rate coefficients magnify significantly the propensity toward ∆ J = -1 transitions. These results confirm the same propensity already noted for the cross sections. PMID:24808997

  18. Cyanides/isocyanides abundances in the interstellar medium - IV. Temperature dependence of SiCN/SiNC rate coefficients and astrophysical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández Vera, M.; Lique, F.; Kłos, J.; Dumouchel, F.; Rubayo Soneira, J.

    2015-08-01

    Accurate determination of collisional rate coefficients is an essential step in the estimation of the SiCN and SiNC abundances in the interstellar and circumstellar media. In this paper, we carry out calculations of rate coefficients for the rotational (de-)excitation of SiCN and SiNC molecules in collision with He. The calculations are based on new two-dimensional potential energy surfaces obtained from highly correlated ab initio calculations. Coupled-States quantum approximation was used in the scattering calculations to obtain collisional (de-)excitation cross-sections of SiCN and SiNC by He. The spin-orbit coupling and Λ-doublet splitting of SiCN and SiNC levels were taken into account explicitly. Rate coefficients for transitions among the first 92 rotational levels of SiCN and SiNC were calculated for temperatures ranging from 5 to 100 K. Moderate differences exist between the rate coefficients of both isomers. Subsequently, the new collisional data are used to simulate the excitation of SiCN and SiNC in the circumstellar gas. We obtain the brightness and excitation temperatures of selected lines frequently observed towards the circumstellar envelopes and we find that local thermodynamic equilibrium conditions are not fulfilled for these species. Radiative transfer calculations are then needed in order to accurately determine their abundances. Our results also show that previous estimations of the cyanides/isocyanides abundance ratios were incorrect and the present calculations show that SiCN, the most stable isomer, is more abundant than SiNC. This shows again the evidence of selective cyanide chemistry.

  19. Modeling X-Ray Photoionized Plasmas: Ion Storage Ring Measurements of Low Temperature Dielectronic Recombination Rate Coefficients for L-Shell Iron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savin, D. W.; Badnell, N. R.; Bartsch, T.; Brandau, C.; Chen, M. H.; Grieser, M.; Gwinner, G.; Hoffknecht, A.; Kahn, S. M.; Linkemann, J.

    2000-01-01

    Iron L-shell ions (Fe XVII to Fe XXIV) play an important role in determining the line emission and thermal and ionization structures of photoionized gases. Existing uncertainties in the theoretical low temperature dielectronic recombination (DR) rate coefficients for these ions significantly affects our ability to model and interpret observations of photoionized plasmas. To help address this issue, we have initiated a laboratory program to produce reliable low temperature DR rates. Here, we present some of our recent results and discuss some of their astrophysical implications.

  20. Measurements of the Coefficient of Restitution of Quartz Sand on Basalt: Implications for Abrasion Rates on Earth and Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, M.; Bridges, N. T.; Benzit, M.

    2005-01-01

    Knowledge of the rates at which rocks abrade from the impact of saltating sand provides important input into estimating the age and degree of modification of arid surfaces on Earth and Mars. Previous work has relied on measuring mass loss rates in the field and the laboratory. The susceptibility of rocks and other natural materials has been quantified on a relative scale from laboratory studies.

  1. Assessment of external heat transfer coefficient during oocyte vitrification in liquid and slush nitrogen using numerical simulations to determine cooling rates.

    PubMed

    Santos, M V; Sansinena, M; Zaritzky, N; Chirife, J

    2012-01-01

    In oocyte vitrification, plunging directly into liquid nitrogen favor film boiling and strong nitrogen vaporization. A survey of literature values of heat transfer coefficients (h) for film boiling of small metal objects with different geometries plunged in liquid nitrogen revealed values between 125 to 1000 W per per square m per K. These h values were used in a numerical simulation of cooling rates of two oocyte vitrification devices (open-pulled straw and Cryotop), plunged in liquid and slush nitrogen conditions. Heat conduction equation with convective boundary condition was considered a linear mathematical problem and was solved using the finite element method applying the variational formulation. COMSOL Multiphysics was used to simulate the cooling process of the systems. Predicted cooling rates for OPS and Cryotop when cooled at -196 degree C (liquid nitrogen) or -207 degree C (average for slush nitrogen) for heat transfer coefficients estimated to be representative of film boiling, indicated lowering the cooling temperature produces only a maximum 10 percent increase in cooling rates; confirming the main benefit of plunging in slush over liquid nitrogen does not arise from their temperature difference. Numerical simulations also demonstrated that a hypothetical four-fold increase in the cooling rate of vitrification devices when plunging in slush nitrogen would be explained by an increase in heat transfer coefficient. This improvement in heat transfer (i.e., high cooling rates) in slush nitrogen is attributed to less or null film boiling when a sample is placed in slush (mixture of liquid and solid nitrogen) because it first melts the solid nitrogen before causing the liquid to boil and form a film. PMID:22434120

  2. Transfer coefficients for L-valine and the rate of incorporation of L-(1-/sup 14/C) valine into proteins in normal adult rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Kirikae, M.; Diksic, M.; Yamamoto, Y.L.

    1988-08-01

    An autoradiographic method for the measurement of the rate of valine incorporation into brain proteins is described. The transfer coefficients for valine into and out of the brain and the rate of valine incorporation into normal rat brain proteins are given. The valine incorporation and the transfer constants of valine between different biological compartments are provided for 14 gray matter and 2 white matter structures of an adult rat brain. The rate of valine incorporation varies between 0.52 +/- 0.19 nmol/g/min in white matter and 1.94 +/- 0.47 in inferior colliculus (gray matter). Generally, the rate of valine incorporation is about three to four times higher in the gray matter than in the white matter structures.

  3. Communication: Rate coefficients of the H + CH4 → H2 + CH3 reaction from ring polymer molecular dynamics on a highly accurate potential energy surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Qingyong; Chen, Jun; Zhang, Dong H.

    2015-09-01

    The ring polymer molecular dynamics (RPMD) calculations are performed to calculate rate constants for the title reaction on the recently constructed potential energy surface based on permutation invariant polynomial (PIP) neural-network (NN) fitting [J. Li et al., J. Chem. Phys. 142, 204302 (2015)]. By inspecting convergence, 16 beads are used in computing free-energy barriers at 300 K ≤ T ≤ 1000 K, while different numbers of beads are used for transmission coefficients. The present RPMD rates are in excellent agreement with quantum rates computed on the same potential energy surface, as well as with the experimental measurements, demonstrating further that the RPMD is capable of producing accurate rates for polyatomic chemical reactions even at rather low temperatures.

  4. A METHOD FOR ESTIMATING DISTRIBUTIONS OF MASS TRANSFER RATE COEFFICIENTS WITH APPLICATION TO PURGING AND BATCH EXPERIMENTS. (R825825)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mass transfer between aquifer material and groundwater is often modeled as first-order rate-limited sorption or diffusive exchange between mobile zones and immobile zones with idealized geometries. Recent improvements in experimental techniques and advances in our understanding o...

  5. Rate Coefficient for the (4)Heμ + CH4 Reaction at 500 K: Comparison between Theory and Experiment.

    PubMed

    Arseneau, Donald J; Fleming, Donald G; Li, Yongle; Li, Jun; Suleimanov, Yury V; Guo, Hua

    2016-03-01

    The rate constant for the H atom abstraction reaction from methane by the muonic helium atom, Heμ + CH4 → HeμH + CH3, is reported at 500 K and compared with theory, providing an important test of both the potential energy surface (PES) and reaction rate theory for the prototypical polyatomic CH5 reaction system. The theory used to characterize this reaction includes both variational transition-state (CVT/μOMT) theory (VTST) and ring polymer molecular dynamics (RPMD) calculations on a recently developed PES, which are compared as well with earlier calculations on different PESs for the H, D, and Mu + CH4 reactions, the latter, in particular, providing for a variation in atomic mass by a factor of 36. Though rigorous quantum calculations have been carried out for the H + CH4 reaction, these have not yet been extended to the isotopologues of this reaction (in contrast to H3), so it is important to provide tests of less rigorous theories in comparison with kinetic isotope effects measured by experiment. In this regard, the agreement between the VTST and RPMD calculations and experiment for the rate constant of the Heμ + CH4 reaction at 500 K is excellent, within 10% in both cases, which overlaps with experimental error. PMID:26484648

  6. Atmospheric Chemistry of Six Methyl-perfluoroheptene-ethers Used as Heat Transfer Fluid Replacement Compounds: Measured OH Radical Reaction Rate Coefficients, Atmospheric Lifetimes, and Global Warming Potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jubb, A. M.; Gierczak, T.; Baasandorj, M.; Waterland, R. L.; Burkholder, J. B.

    2013-12-01

    Mixtures of methyl-perfluoroheptene-ethers (C7F13OCH3, MPHEs) are currently in use as a replacement for perfluorinated alkane (PFC) and polyether mixtures (both persistent greenhouse gases with atmospheric lifetimes >1000 years) used as heat transfer fluids. Currently, the atmospheric fate of the MPHE isomers are not well characterized, however, reaction with the OH radical is expected to be a dominant tropospheric loss process for these compounds. In order to assess the atmospheric lifetimes and environmental implications of MPHE use, rate coefficients for MPHE isomers' reaction with OH radicals are desired. In the work presented here, rate coefficients, k, for the gas-phase reaction of the OH radical with six MPHEs commonly used in commercial mixtures (isomers and stereoisomers) and their deuterated analogs (d3-MPHE) were determined at 296 K using a relative rate method with combined gas-chromatography/IR spectroscopy detection. A range of OH rate coefficient values was observed, up to a factor of 20× different, between the MPHE isomers with the (E)-stereoisomers exhibiting the greatest reactivity. The measured OH reaction rate coefficients for the d3-MPHE isomers were lower than the observed MPHE values although a large range of k values between isomers was still observed. The reduction in reactivity with deuteration signifies that the MPHE + OH reaction proceeds via both addition to the olefinic C=C bond and H-abstraction from the methyl ester group. OH addition to the C=C bond was determined to be the primary reaction channel. Atmospheric lifetimes with respect to the OH reaction for the six MPHE isomers were found to be in the range of days to months. The short lifetimes indicate that MPHE use will primarily impact tropospheric local and regional air quality. A MPHE atmospheric degradation mechanism will be presented. As part of this work, radiative efficiencies and global warming potentials (GWPs) for the MPHE isomers were estimated based on measured

  7. The Influence of Cooling Rate During Crystallization on the Effective Partitioning Coefficient in High-Entropy Alloys from Al-Ti-Co-Ni-Fe System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Górecki, Kamil; Bala, Piotr; Cios, Grzegorz; Koziel, Tomasz; Stępień, Milena; Wieczerzak, Krzysztof

    2016-07-01

    An influence of two different cooling rates on the microstructure and dispersion of the components of high-entropy alloy from Al-Ti-Co-Ni-Fe system has been examined. For investigated alloys, the effective partitioning coefficient has been calculated. This factor indicates the degree of segregation of elements and allows for the specification of the differences between dendrites and interdendritic regions. The obtained results allow for the conclusion that the cooling rate substantially affect the growth of dendrites and the volume fraction of interdendritic regions as well as the partitioning of elements in the alloy. Furthermore, the obtained results made it possible to compare the influence of the cooling rate and the chemical composition on the dispersion of the alloying elements.

  8. The Influence of Cooling Rate During Crystallization on the Effective Partitioning Coefficient in High-Entropy Alloys from Al-Ti-Co-Ni-Fe System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Górecki, Kamil; Bala, Piotr; Cios, Grzegorz; Koziel, Tomasz; Stępień, Milena; Wieczerzak, Krzysztof

    2016-04-01

    An influence of two different cooling rates on the microstructure and dispersion of the components of high-entropy alloy from Al-Ti-Co-Ni-Fe system has been examined. For investigated alloys, the effective partitioning coefficient has been calculated. This factor indicates the degree of segregation of elements and allows for the specification of the differences between dendrites and interdendritic regions. The obtained results allow for the conclusion that the cooling rate substantially affect the growth of dendrites and the volume fraction of interdendritic regions as well as the partitioning of elements in the alloy. Furthermore, the obtained results made it possible to compare the influence of the cooling rate and the chemical composition on the dispersion of the alloying elements.

  9. Correlation Between Heterogeneous Bacterial Attachment Rate Coefficients and Hydraulic Conductivity and Impacts on Field-Scale Bacterial Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Scheibe, Timothy D.

    2002-10-28

    In granular porous media, bacterial transport is often modeled using the advection-dispersion transport equation, modified to account for interactions between the bacteria and grain surfaces (attachment and detachment) using a linear kinetic reaction model. In this paper we examine the relationships among the parameters of the above model in the context of bacterial transport for bioaugmentation. In this context, we wish to quantify the distance to which significant concentrations of bacteria can be transported, as well as the uniformity with which they can be distributed within the subsurface. Because kinetic detachment rates (Kr) are typically much smaller than corresponding attachment rates (Kf), the attachment rate exerts primary control on the distance of bacterial transport. Hydraulic conductivity (K) also plays a significant role because of its direct relationship to the advective velocity and its typically high degree of spatial variability at field scales. Because Kf is related to the velocity, grain size, and porosity of the medium, as is K, we expect that there exists correlation between these two parameters. Previous investigators have assumed a form of correlation between Kf and ln(K) based in part on reparameterization of clean-bed filtration equations in terms of published relations between grain size, effective porosity, and ln(K). The hypotheses examined here are that (1) field-scale relationships between K and Kf can be developed by combining a number of theoretical and empirical results in the context of a heterogeneous aquifer flow model (following a similar approach to previous investigators with some extensions), and (2) correlation between K and Kf will enhance the distance of field-scale bacterial transport in granular aquifers. We test these hypotheses using detailed numerical models and observations of field-scale bacterial transport in a shallow sandy aquifer within the South Oyster Site near Oyster, Virginia, USA.

  10. Structures for attaching or sealing a space between components having different coefficients or rates of thermal expansion

    DOEpatents

    Corman, Gregory Scot; Dean, Anthony John; Tognarelli, Leonardo; Pecchioli, Mario

    2005-06-28

    A structure for attaching together or sealing a space between a first component and a second component that have different rates or amounts of dimensional change upon being exposed to temperatures other than ambient temperature. The structure comprises a first attachment structure associated with the first component that slidably engages a second attachment structure associated with the second component, thereby allowing for an independent floating movement of the second component relative to the first component. The structure can comprise split rings, laminar rings, or multiple split rings.

  11. Rate Coefficients for Reactions of Ethynyl Radical (C2H) With HCN and CH3CN: Implications for the Formation of Comples Nitriles on Titan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoobler, Ray J.; Leone, Stephen R.

    1997-01-01

    Rate coefficients for the reactions of C2H + HCN yields products and C2H + CH3CN yields products have been measured over the temperature range 262-360 K. These experiments represent an ongoing effort to accurately measure reaction rate coefficients of the ethynyl radical, C2H, relevant to planetary atmospheres such as those of Jupiter and Saturn and its satellite Titan. Laser photolysis of C2H2 is used to produce C2H, and transient infrared laser absorption is employed to measure the decay of C2H to obtain the subsequent reaction rates in a transverse flow cell. Rate constants for the reaction C2H + HCN yields products are found to increase significantly with increasing temperature and are measured to be (3.9-6.2) x 10(exp 13) cm(exp 3) molecules(exp -1) s(exp -1) over the temperature range of 297-360 K. The rate constants for the reaction C2H + CH3CN yields products are also found to increase substantially with increasing temperature and are measured to be (1.0-2.1) x 10(exp -12) cm(exp 3) molecules(exp -1) s(exp -1) over the temperature range of 262-360 K. For the reaction C2H + HCN yields products, ab initio calculations of transition state structures are used to infer that the major products form via an addition/elimination pathway. The measured rate constants for the reaction of C2H + HCN yields products are significantly smaller than values currently employed in photochemical models of Titan, which will affect the HC3N distribution.

  12. Analyte-receptor binding kinetics for biosensor applications. An analysis of the influence of the fractal dimension on the binding rate coefficient.

    PubMed

    Sadana, A

    1998-01-01

    The diffusion-limited binding kinetics of antigen (analyte), in solution with antibody (receptor) immobilized on a biosensor surface, is analyzed within a fractal framework. Most of the data presented is adequately described by a single-fractal analysis. This was indicated by the regression analysis provided by Sigmaplot. A single example of a dual-fractal analysis is also presented. It is of interest to note that the binding-rate coefficient (k) and the fractal dimension (Df) both exhibit changes in the same and in the reverse direction for the antigen-antibody systems analyzed. Binding-rate coefficient expressions, as a function of the Df developed for the antigen-antibody binding systems, indicate the high sensitivity of the k on the Df when both a single- and a dual-fractal analysis are used. For example, for a single-fractal analysis, and for the binding of antibody Mab 0.5 beta in solution to gp120 peptide immobilized on a BIAcore biosensor, the order of dependence on the Df was 4.0926. For a dual-fractal analysis, and for the binding of 25-100 ng/mL TRITC-LPS (lipopolysaccharide) in solution with polymyxin B immobilized on a fiberoptic biosensor, the order of dependence of the binding-rate coefficients, k1 and k2, on the fractal dimensions, Df1 and Df2, were 7.6335 and -11.55, respectively. The fractional order of dependence of the k(s) on the Df(s) further reinforces the fractal nature of the system. The k(s) expressions developed as a function of the Df(s) are of particular value, since they provide a means to better control biosensor performance, by linking it to the heterogeneity on the surface, and further emphasize, in a quantitative sense, the importance of the nature of the surface in biosensor performance. PMID:9779572

  13. Relative kinetic measurements of rate coefficients for the gas-phase reactions of Cl atoms and OH radicals with a series of methyl alkyl esters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schütze, Nicole; Zhong, Xiaoyin; Kirschbaum, Stefan; Bejan, Iustinian; Barnes, Ian; Benter, Thorsten

    2010-12-01

    Relative kinetic studies have been performed on the reactions of Cl atoms with a series of methyl alkyl esters in a 405-liter borosilicate glass chamber at (298 ± 3) K and one atmosphere of synthetic air using in situ FTIR spectroscopy to monitor the reactants. Rate coefficients (in units of cm 3 molecule -1 s -1) were determined for the following compounds: methyl acetate (2.48 ± 0.58) × 10 -12; methyl propanoate (1.68 ± 0.36) × 10 -11; methyl butanoate (4.77 ± 0.87) × 10 -11; methyl pentanoate (7.84 ± 1.15) × 10 -11; methyl hexanoate (1.09 ± 0.31) × 10 -10; methyl heptanoate (1.56 ± 0.37) × 10 -10; methyl cyclohexane carboxylate (3.32 ± 0.76) × 10 -10; methyl-2-methyl butanoate (9.41 ± 1.39) × 10 -11. In addition rate coefficients (in units of 10 -11 cm 3 molecule -1 s -1) have been obtained for the reactions of OH radicals with the following compounds: methyl butanoate (3.55 ± 0.71), methyl pentanoate (5.41 ± 1.08), and methyl-2-methyl butanoate (4.08 ± 0.82). Using the kinetic rate data tropospheric lifetimes for the methyl alkyl esters with respect to their reactions with OH, and Cl have been estimated for typical ambient air concentrations of these oxidants.

  14. Synthetic modeling of a fluid injection-induced fault rupture with slip-rate dependent friction coefficient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urpi, Luca; Rinaldi, Antonio Pio; Rutqvist, Jonny; Cappa, Frédéric; Spiers, Christopher J.

    2016-04-01

    Poro-elastic stress and effective stress reduction associated with deep underground fluid injection can potentially trigger shear rupture along pre-existing faults. We modeled an idealized CO2 injection scenario, to assess the effects on faults of the first phase of a generic CO2 aquifer storage operation. We used coupled multiphase fluid flow and geomechanical numerical modeling to evaluate the stress and pressure perturbations induced by fluid injection and the response of a nearby normal fault. Slip-rate dependent friction and inertial effects have been aken into account during rupture. Contact elements have been used to take into account the frictional behavior of the rupture plane. We investigated different scenarios of injection rate to induce rupture on the fault, employing various fault rheologies. Published laboratory data on CO2-saturated intact and crushed rock samples, representative of a potential target aquifer, sealing formation and fault gouge, have been used to define a scenario where different fault rheologies apply at different depths. Nucleation of fault rupture takes place at the bottom of the reservoir, in agreement with analytical poro-elastic stress calculations, considering injection-induced reservoir inflation and the tectonic scenario. For the stress state here considered, the first triggered rupture always produces the largest rupture length and slip magnitude, correlated with the fault rheology. Velocity weakening produces larger ruptures and generates larger magnitude seismic events. Heterogeneous faults have been considered including velocity-weakening or velocity strengthening sections inside and below the aquifer, while upper sections being velocity-neutral. Nucleation of rupture in a velocity strengthening section results in a limited rupture extension, both in terms of maximum slip and rupture length. For a heterogeneous fault with nucleation in a velocity-weakening section, the rupture may propagate into the overlying velocity

  15. Absolute biological needs.

    PubMed

    McLeod, Stephen

    2014-07-01

    Absolute needs (as against instrumental needs) are independent of the ends, goals and purposes of personal agents. Against the view that the only needs are instrumental needs, David Wiggins and Garrett Thomson have defended absolute needs on the grounds that the verb 'need' has instrumental and absolute senses. While remaining neutral about it, this article does not adopt that approach. Instead, it suggests that there are absolute biological needs. The absolute nature of these needs is defended by appeal to: their objectivity (as against mind-dependence); the universality of the phenomenon of needing across the plant and animal kingdoms; the impossibility that biological needs depend wholly upon the exercise of the abilities characteristic of personal agency; the contention that the possession of biological needs is prior to the possession of the abilities characteristic of personal agency. Finally, three philosophical usages of 'normative' are distinguished. On two of these, to describe a phenomenon or claim as 'normative' is to describe it as value-dependent. A description of a phenomenon or claim as 'normative' in the third sense does not entail such value-dependency, though it leaves open the possibility that value depends upon the phenomenon or upon the truth of the claim. It is argued that while survival needs (or claims about them) may well be normative in this third sense, they are normative in neither of the first two. Thus, the idea of absolute need is not inherently normative in either of the first two senses. PMID:23586876

  16. Electron-Iron Recombination Rate Coefficients and Photoionization Cross Section for S XIV and SXV for X-ray and UV modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nahar, Sultana N.

    2008-03-01

    The inverse process of photoionization and electron-ion recombination of (h +SXIV SXV+e) and (h +SXV SXVI +e) are studied in details using ab into unified method that provides self-consistent sets of results for these processes. Results are presented for large number of fine structure levels where n 10 and 0 l 9; 98 levels for Li-likes S XIV with 1/2 J 17/2 and 188 levels for He-like S XV with 0 J 10. Photoionization cross section, :PI, of the levels of both S XIV and SXV decay smoothly in the lower region. However, narrow and high peak autoionizing Rhydberg series resonances belonging to various excited core levels appear in the high energy region and enhance the background cross section of the excited levels. The resonance series of n=2 core levels dominate while they become weaker with higher n. The prominent feature is the enhacement of the background cross section at n=2 core thresholds due to K-shell ionization leaving the ion in excited 2p states. PI also show wide PEG (photo-excitation-of-core) resonances at the photon energies that equal to the core excitation energies, Level-specific photoionization cross sections, PI(nSLJ), and recombination rate coefficients, σRC(nSLJ),are obtained for the first time for these ions. Currently available results correspond to photoionization for 18 terms with missing features and to only total recombination rate coefficients. Present σRc(nSLJ) incorporates both the radiative recombination (RR) and dielectronic recombination (DR), and show a "bump" or "shoulder" in the high temperature region due to DR dominace. The total unified recombination rate coefficients show good agreement with the available RR, and DR rates. Recombination rates photoelectron energy are presented for the astrophysical and laboratory plasma applications. Total recombination rates for H-like S XVI are given for completeness. The The results should be accurate within 10-15% based on the unified method that includes important atomic effects such as

  17. Altitude Variation of the CO2(V2)-O Quenching Rate Coefficient in Mesosphere and Lower Thermosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feofilov, A.; Kutepov, A.; She, C.; Smith, A. K.; Pesnell, W. D.; Goldberg, R. A.

    2010-01-01

    Among the processes governing the energy balance in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT), the quenching of CO2(v2) vibrational levels by collisions with oxygen atoms plays an important role. However, the k(CO2-O) values measured in the lab and retrieved from atmospheric measurements vary from 1.5 x 10(exp -12)cu cm/s through 9.0 x 10(exp -12)cu cm/s that requires further studying. In this work we used synergistic data from a ground based lidar and a satellite infrared radiometer to estimate k(CO2-O). We used the night- and daytime temperatures between 80 and 110 km measured by the Colorado State University narrow-band sodium (Na) lidar located at Fort Collins, Colorado (41 N, 255E) as ground truth of the SABER/TIMED nearly simultaneous ( +/-10 minutes) and common volume (within +/-1 degree in latitude, +/-2 degrees in longitude) observations. For each altitude in 80-110 km interval we estimate an 'optimal" value of k(CO2-O) needed to minimize the discrepancy between the simulated 15 micron CO2 radiance and that measured by the SABER/TIMED instrument. The k(CO2-O) obtained in this way varies in altitude from 3.5 x 10(exp -12)cu cm/s at 80 km to 5.2 x 10(exp -12)cu cm/s for altitudes above 95 km. We discuss this variation of the rate constant and its impact on temperature retrievals from 15 pm radiance measurements and on the energy budget of MLT.

  18. Altitude Variation of the CO2 (V2)-O Quenching Rate Coefficient in Mesosphere and Lower Thermosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feofilovi, Artem; Kutepov, Alexander; She, Chiao-Yao; Smith, Anne K.; Pesnell, William Dean; Goldberg, Richard A.

    2010-01-01

    Among the processes governing the energy balance in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere (mlt), the quenching of CO2(N2) vibrational levels by collisions with oxygen atoms plays an important role. However, the k(CO2-O) values measured in the lab and retrieved from atmospheric measurements vary from 1.5 x 10(exp -12) cubic centimeters per second through 9.0 x 10(exp -12) cubic centimeters per second that requires further studying. In this work we used synergistic data from a ground based lidar and a satellite infrared radiometer to estimate K(CO2-O). We used the night- and daytime temperatures between 80 and 110 km measured by the colorado state university narrow-band sodium (Na) lidar located at fort collins, colorado (41N, 255E) as ground truth of the saber/timed nearly simultaneous (plus or minus 10 minutes) and common volume (within plus or minus 1 degree in latitude, plus or minus 2 degrees in longitude) observations. For each altitude in 80-110 km interval we estimate an "optimal" value of K(CO2-O) needed to minimize the discrepancy between the simulated 15 mm CO2 radiance and that measured by the saber/timed instrument. The K(CO2-O) obtained in this way varies in altitude from 3.5 x 10(exp -12) cubic centimeters per second at 80 km to 5.2 x 10(exp -12) cubic centimeters pers second for altitudes above 95 km. We discuss this variation of the rate constant and its impact on temperature retrievals from 15 mm radiance measurements and on the energy budget of mlt.

  19. Absolute rate constant for the reaction of atomic chlorine with hydrogen peroxide vapor over the temperature range 265-400 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michael, J. V.; Whytock, D. A.; Lee, J. H.; Payne, W. A.; Stief, L. J.

    1977-01-01

    Rate constants for the reaction of atomic chlorine with hydrogen peroxide were measured from 265-400 K using the flash photolysis-resonance fluorescence technique. Analytical techniques were developed to measure H2O2 under reaction conditions. Due to ambiguity in the interpretation of the analytical results, the data combine to give two equally acceptable representations of the temperature dependence. The results are compared to previous work at 298 K and are theoretically discussed in terms of the mechanism of the reaction. Additional experiments on the H + H2O2 reaction at 298 and 359 K are compared with earlier results from this laboratory and give a slightly revised bimolecular rate constant.

  20. The calculation of quenching rate coefficients of O2 Herzberg states in collisions with CO2, CO, N2, O2 molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirillov, A. S.

    2014-01-01

    The removal rates of Herzberg states of molecular oxygen O2(cΣu-, v = 0-16), O2(AΔu, v = 0-11), O2(AΣu+, v = 0-10) in the collisions with ground-state CO2, CO, N2, O2 molecules are calculated according to analytical expressions. The study includes a consideration of intramolecular electron energy transfers without and with vibrational excitation of target molecules and intermolecular processes. The preliminary calculations show important role of electronic-vibrational energy transfer processes in the quenching O2(AΣu+, v) + CO2; O2(cΣu-, v) + CO2, CO, N2; O2(AΔu, v) + O2. Reasonable agreement of the calculated rate coefficients with data of laser experimental measurements is obtained.

  1. Radiation damping effects on L-shell photoionization cross-sections of O-like Fe XIX and N-like recombination rate coefficients for Fe XX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLaughlin, B. M.; Gorczyca, T. W.; Keenan, F. P.; Bell, K. L.

    2001-12-01

    Photoionization cross-sections out of the fine-structure levels (2s22p4 3P2,0,1) of the O-like Fe ion FeXIX have been reinvestigated. Data for photoionization out of each of these fine-structure levels have been obtained, where the calculations have been performed with and without the inclusion of radiation damping on the resonance structure in order to assess the importance of this process. Recombination rate coefficients are determined using the Milne relation, for the case of an electron recombining with N-like Fe ions (FeXX) in the ground state to form O-like Fe (FeXIX) existing in each of the fine-structure ground-state levels. Recombination rates are presented over a temperature range ~4.0<=logTe<=7.0, of importance to the modelling of X-ray emission plasmas.

  2. Analytic expressions for perturbations and partial derivatives of range and range rate of a spacecraft with respect to the coefficient of the second harmonic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Georgevic, R. M.

    1973-01-01

    Closed-form analytic expressions for the time variations of instantaneous orbital parameters and of the topocentric range and range rate of a spacecraft moving in the gravitational field of an oblate large body are derived using a first-order variation of parameters technique. In addition, the closed-form analytic expressions for the partial derivatives of the topocentric range and range rate are obtained, with respect to the coefficient of the second harmonic of the potential of the central body (J sub 2). The results are applied to the motion of a point-mass spacecraft moving in the orbit around the equatorially elliptic, oblate sun, with J sub 2 approximately equal to .000027.

  3. Computational Study of the Rate Coefficients for the Reactions of NO2 with CH3NHNH, CH3NNH2, and CH2NHNH2.

    PubMed

    Kanno, Nozomu; Tani, Hiroumi; Daimon, Yu; Terashima, Hiroshi; Yoshikawa, Norihiko; Koshi, Mitsuo

    2015-07-16

    The reactions of NO2 with cis-/trans-CH3NHNH, CH3NNH2 and CH2NHNH2 have been studied theoretically by quantum chemical calculations and steady-state unimolecular master equation analysis based on RRKM theory. The barrier heights for the roaming transition states between nitro (RNO2) and nitrite (RONO) isomerization reactions and those for the concerted HONO and HNO2 elimination reactions from RNO2 and RONO, affect the pressure dependences of the product-specific rate coefficients. At ambient temperature and pressure, the dominant product of the reactions of NO2 with cis-/trans-CH3NHNH and CH2NHNH2 would be expected to be HONO with trans-CH3NNH and CH2NNH2, respectively, whereas it is CH3N(NH2)NO2 for CH3NNH2 + NO2. The product-specific rate coefficients for the titled and related reactions on the same potential energy surfaces were proposed for kinetics modeling. PMID:25970048

  4. Ring polymer molecular dynamics fast computation of rate coefficients on accurate potential energy surfaces in local configuration space: Application to the abstraction of hydrogen from methane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Qingyong; Chen, Jun; Zhang, Dong H.

    2016-04-01

    To fast and accurately compute rate coefficients of the H/D + CH4 → H2/HD + CH3 reactions, we propose a segmented strategy for fitting suitable potential energy surface (PES), on which ring-polymer molecular dynamics (RPMD) simulations are performed. On the basis of recently developed permutation invariant polynomial neural-network approach [J. Li et al., J. Chem. Phys. 142, 204302 (2015)], PESs in local configuration spaces are constructed. In this strategy, global PES is divided into three parts, including asymptotic, intermediate, and interaction parts, along the reaction coordinate. Since less fitting parameters are involved in the local PESs, the computational efficiency for operating the PES routine is largely enhanced by a factor of ˜20, comparing with that for global PES. On interaction part, the RPMD computational time for the transmission coefficient can be further efficiently reduced by cutting off the redundant part of the child trajectories. For H + CH4, good agreements among the present RPMD rates and those from previous simulations as well as experimental results are found. For D + CH4, on the other hand, qualitative agreement between present RPMD and experimental results is predicted.

  5. Using Sulfur Hexafluoride to Quantify the Gas Leakage Rate within the Landscape Evolution Observatory (LEO) and the Diffusion Coefficient of the Crushed Basalt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barta, J.; Costa, M.; Van Haren, J. L. M.; Pangle, L. A.; Troch, P. A. A.

    2014-12-01

    In order to understand the biological processes taking place on an experimental hillslope with vegetation, it is important to know the amount of gasses such as oxygen and carbon dioxide being produced and consumed. When studying the gas exchange rates in a closed system like the Landscape Evolution Observatory (LEO), one must take into account gas that is being lost or gained from other sources. Aside from biogeochemical processes, gas concentrations in the LEO atmosphere may change due to leakage to the outside environment and diffusion into the soil. To quantify these fluxes, two constants must be determined experimentally: the gas leakage constant L and the coefficient of diffusion for the hillslope soil. To accomplish this, a tracer gas, sulfur hexafluoride, was injected into the sealed east bay chamber and syringes were used to take samples periodically from the airspace and from the hillslope soil. The relative sulfur hexafluoride concentrations were then analyzed with a SRI 8610c gas chromatograph. By analyzing both the the airspace concentration decay as well as the concentration in the soil, the chamber's leakage constant was determined to be and the soil diffusion coefficient was also determined. Once these values are experimentally quantified, they can be used in equations to quantify the rate of gas leakage and soil diffusion of more important gases such as carbon dioxide and oxygen.

  6. Co2(nu2)-o Quenching Rate Coefficient Derived from Coincidental SABER-TIMED and Fort Collins Lidar Observations of the Mesosphere and Lower Thermosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feofilov, A. G.; Kutepov, A. A.; She, C.-Y.; Smith, A. K.; Pesnell, W. D.; Goldberg, R. A.

    2012-01-01

    Among the processes governing the energy balance in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT), the quenching of CO2(nu2) vibrational levels by collisions with O atoms plays an important role. However, there is a factor of 3-4 discrepancy between the laboratory measurements of the CO2-O quenching rate coefficient, k(sub VT),and its value estimated from the atmospheric observations. In this study, we retrieve k(sub VT) in the altitude region85-105 km from the coincident SABER/TIMED and Fort Collins sodium lidar observations by minimizing the difference between measured and simulated broadband limb 15 micron radiation. The averaged k(sub VT) value obtained in this work is 6.5 +/- 1.5 X 10(exp -12) cubic cm/s that is close to other estimates of this coefficient from the atmospheric observations.However, the retrieved k(sub VT) also shows altitude dependence and varies from 5.5 1 +/-1 10(exp -12) cubic cm/s at 90 km to 7.9 +/- 1.2 10(exp -12) cubic cm/s at 105 km. Obtained results demonstrate the deficiency in current non-LTE modeling of the atmospheric 15 micron radiation, based on the application of the CO2-O quenching and excitation rates, which are linked by the detailed balance relation. We discuss the possible model improvements, among them accounting for the interaction of the non-thermal oxygen atoms with CO2 molecules.

  7. Absolute Value Boundedness, Operator Decomposition, and Stochastic Media and Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adomian, G.; Miao, C. C.

    1973-01-01

    The research accomplished during this period is reported. Published abstracts and technical reports are listed. Articles presented include: boundedness of absolute values of generalized Fourier coefficients, propagation in stochastic media, and stationary conditions for stochastic differential equations.

  8. Kinetic parameters, collision rates, energy exchanges and transport coefficients of non-thermal electrons in premixed flames at sub-breakdown electric field strengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisetti, Fabrizio; El Morsli, Mbark

    2014-01-01

    The effects of an electric field on the collision rates, energy exchanges and transport properties of electrons in premixed flames are investigated via solutions to the Boltzmann kinetic equation. The case of high electric field strength, which results in high-energy, non-thermal electrons, is analysed in detail at sub-breakdown conditions. The rates of inelastic collisions and the energy exchange between electrons and neutrals in the reaction zone of the flame are characterised quantitatively. The analysis includes attachment, ionisation, impact dissociation, and vibrational and electronic excitation processes. Our results suggest that Townsend breakdown occurs for E/N = 140 Td. Vibrational excitation is the dominant process up to breakdown, despite important rates of electronic excitation of CO, CO2 and N2 as well as impact dissociation of O2 being apparent from 50 Td onwards. Ohmic heating in the reaction zone is found to be negligible (less than 2% of peak heat release rate) up to breakdown field strengths for realistic electron densities equal to 1010 cm-3. The observed trends are largely independent of equivalence ratio. In the non-thermal regime, electron transport coefficients are insensitive to mixture composition and approximately constant across the flame, but are highly dependent on the electric field strength. In the thermal limit, kinetic parameters and transport coefficients vary substantially across the flame due to the spatially inhomogeneous concentration of water vapour. A practical approach for identifying the plasma regime (thermal versus non-thermal) in studies of electric field effects on flames is proposed.

  9. Optomechanics for absolute rotation detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davuluri, Sankar

    2016-07-01

    In this article, we present an application of optomechanical cavity for the absolute rotation detection. The optomechanical cavity is arranged in a Michelson interferometer in such a way that the classical centrifugal force due to rotation changes the length of the optomechanical cavity. The change in the cavity length induces a shift in the frequency of the cavity mode. The phase shift corresponding to the frequency shift in the cavity mode is measured at the interferometer output to estimate the angular velocity of absolute rotation. We derived an analytic expression to estimate the minimum detectable rotation rate in our scheme for a given optomechanical cavity. Temperature dependence of the rotation detection sensitivity is studied.

  10. Atmospheric chemistry of (CF3)2C=CH2: OH radicals, Cl atoms and O3 rate coefficients, oxidation end-products and IR spectra.

    PubMed

    Papadimitriou, Vassileios C; Spitieri, Christina S; Papagiannakopoulos, Panos; Cazaunau, Mathieu; Lendar, Maria; Daële, Véronique; Mellouki, Abdelwahid

    2015-10-14

    The rate coefficients for the gas phase reactions of OH radicals, k1, Cl atoms, k2, and O3, k3, with 3,3,3-trifluoro-2(trifluoromethyl)-1-propene ((CF3)2C=CH2, hexafluoroisobutylene, HFIB) were determined at room temperature and atmospheric pressure employing the relative rate method and using two atmospheric simulation chambers and a static photochemical reactor. OH and Cl rate coefficients obtained by both techniques were indistinguishable, within experimental precision, and the average values were k1 = (7.82 ± 0.55) × 10(-13) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) and k2 = (3.45 ± 0.24) × 10(-11) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1), respectively. The quoted uncertainties are at 95% level of confidence and include the estimated systematic uncertainties. An upper limit for the O3 rate coefficient was determined to be k3 < 9.0 × 10(-22) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1). In global warming potential (GWP) calculations, radiative efficiency (RE) was determined from the measured IR absorption cross-sections and treating HFIB both as long (LLC) and short (SLC) lived compounds, including estimated lifetime dependent factors in the SLC case. The HFIB lifetime was estimated from kinetic measurements considering merely the OH reaction, τOH = 14.8 days and including both OH and Cl chemistry, τeff = 10.3 days. Therefore, GWP(HFIB,OH) and GWP(HFIB,eff) were estimated to be 4.1 (LLC) and 0.6 (SLC), as well as 2.8 (LLC) and 0.3 (SLC) for a hundred year time horizon. Moreover, the estimated photochemical ozone creation potential (ε(POCP)) of HFIB was calculated to be 4.60. Finally, HCHO and (CF3)2C(O) were identified as final oxidation products in both OH- and Cl-initiated oxidation, while HC(O)Cl was additionally observed in the Cl-initiated oxidation. PMID:26372403

  11. Rate coefficients for the gas-phase reactions of the nitrate radical with (Z)-3-hexenol (`leaf alcohol`) and its isomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfrang, C.; Kasyutich, V. L.; Canosa-Mas, C. E.; Vaughan, S.; Wayne, R. P.

    2003-04-01

    The nitrate radical, NO_3, is a key species in the night-time tropospheric oxidation of a variety of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), including those emitted by living vegetation. In addition to the VOC emissions from intact plants, it is well known that wounding induces the release of a series of C_6 aldehydes and C_6 alcohols, as can be readily sensed in the odour of freshly mown grass. Large emissions of the "leaf alcohol", (Z)-3-hexenol, have been observed after wounding, during drying, and following pathogen attack, while (Z)-2-hexenol has been reported as an emission from clipped clover. Rate coefficients for the gas-phase reactions of the nitrate radical with these two isomeric compounds have been measured using the discharge-flow technique at room temperature. Because of the relatively low volatility of these compounds, it is necessary to employ low concentrations of NO_3 in order to determine the kinetics satisfactorily. To this end, we used a technique not hitherto applied in kinetic experiments on NO_3: that of off-axis continuous-wave cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy (CW CEAS) for the detection of NO_3, using a broadband absorption line at λ = 662 nm. A noise-equivalent detection sensitivity of 5.5 × 10^9 molecule cm-3 for the nitrate radical (Kasyutich et al., Appl. Phys. B, 2002, 75, 755--761) enabled us to work with the hexenol compounds in excess over NO_3. The rate coefficients were determined to be (2.80 ± 0.12) × 10-13 cm^3 molecule-1 s-1 and (1.36 ± 0.08) × 10-13 cm^3 molecule-1 s-1, respectively, for (Z)-3-hexenol and (Z)-2-hexenol. The rate constant for reaction with (Z)-3-hexenol lies within the combined error limits of the single measurement of the rate coefficient using relative rate methods of (2.72 ± 0.83) × 10-13 cm^3 molecule-1 s-1 (Atkinson et al., Int. J. Chem. Kinetics, 1995, 27, 941--955). However, for (Z)-3-hexenol there is some evidence for upward curvature of the second-order plot at longer contact times, and

  12. The absolute path command

    2012-05-11

    The ap command traveres all symlinks in a given file, directory, or executable name to identify the final absolute path. It can print just the final path, each intermediate link along with the symlink chan, and the permissions and ownership of each directory component in the final path. It has functionality similar to "which", except that it shows the final path instead of the first path. It is also similar to "pwd", but it canmore » provide the absolute path to a relative directory from the current working directory.« less

  13. The absolute path command

    SciTech Connect

    Moody, A.

    2012-05-11

    The ap command traveres all symlinks in a given file, directory, or executable name to identify the final absolute path. It can print just the final path, each intermediate link along with the symlink chan, and the permissions and ownership of each directory component in the final path. It has functionality similar to "which", except that it shows the final path instead of the first path. It is also similar to "pwd", but it can provide the absolute path to a relative directory from the current working directory.

  14. Prediction of stream volatilization coefficients

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rathbun, Ronald E.

    1990-01-01

    Equations are developed for predicting the liquid-film and gas-film reference-substance parameters for quantifying volatilization of organic solutes from streams. Molecular weight and molecular-diffusion coefficients of the solute are used as correlating parameters. Equations for predicting molecular-diffusion coefficients of organic solutes in water and air are developed, with molecular weight and molal volume as parameters. Mean absolute errors of prediction for diffusion coefficients in water are 9.97% for the molecular-weight equation, 6.45% for the molal-volume equation. The mean absolute error for the diffusion coefficient in air is 5.79% for the molal-volume equation. Molecular weight is not a satisfactory correlating parameter for diffusion in air because two equations are necessary to describe the values in the data set. The best predictive equation for the liquid-film reference-substance parameter has a mean absolute error of 5.74%, with molal volume as the correlating parameter. The best equation for the gas-film parameter has a mean absolute error of 7.80%, with molecular weight as the correlating parameter.

  15. Laboratory measurements of the O+/2D/ + N2 and O+/2D/ + O2 reaction rate coefficients and their ionospheric implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnsen, R.; Biondi, M. A.

    1980-01-01

    Rate coefficients which have been measured at thermal energies for the charge transfer reactions of metastable O+/2D/ ions with N2 and O2 are reported. It is found that at an effective temperature of about 550 K, k(n2) = (8 + or - 2) x 10 to the -10 cu cm/sec and k(O2) = (7 + or - 2) x 10 to the -10 cu cm/sec. Drift tube-mass spectrometer measurements employ the reaction He(+) + O2 as the source of metastable O+ ions, showing that the ions produced in this manner are in the 2D state rather than the 2P state, a possible alternative identification. Finally, consideration is given to the ionospheric implications of the laboratory measurements.

  16. First principles transport coefficients and reaction rates of Ar{sub 2}{sup +} ions in argon for cold plasma jet modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Chicheportiche, Alexandre; Benhenni, Malika; Yousfi, Mohammed; Stachoň, Martin; Kalus, René; Gadéa, Florent Xavier

    2014-10-07

    Momentum-transfer collision cross-sections and integral collision cross-sections for the collision-induced dissociation are calculated for collisions of ionized argon dimers with argon atoms using a nonadiabatic semiclassical method with the electronic Hamiltonian calculated on the fly via a diatomics-in-molecules semiempirical model as well as inverse-method modeling based on simple isotropic rigid-core potential. The collision cross-sections are then used in an optimized Monte Carlo code for evaluations of the Ar{sub 2}{sup +} mobility in argon gas, longitudinal diffusion coefficient, and collision-induced dissociation rates. A thorough comparison of various theoretical calculations as well as with available experimental data on the Ar{sub 2}{sup +} mobility and collision cross-sections is performed. Good agreement is found between both theoretical approaches and the experiment. Analysis of the role of inelastic processes in Ar{sub 2}{sup +}/Ar collisions is also provided.

  17. Mortality risk coefficients for radiation-induced cancer at high doses and dose-rates, and extrapolation to the low dose domain.

    PubMed

    Liniecki, J

    1989-01-01

    Risk coefficients for life-long excessive mortality due to radiation-induced cancers are presented, as derived in 1988 by the U.N. Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR), principally on the basis of follow-up from A-bomb survivors in Japan, over the period from 1950 through 1985. The data are based on the new, revised dosimetry (DS 86) in the two cities, and reflect the effects of high and intermediate doses of basically low LET radiation delivered instantaneously. The author presents arguments relevant to the extrapolation of the risk to the low dose (dose rate) domain, as outlined by UNSCEAR in its 1986, and the NCRP (USA) in its 1980, (no 64), reports. The arguments are based on models and dose-response relationships for radiation action, derived from data on cellular radiobiology, animal experiments on radiation-induced cancers and life shortening, as well as the available limited human epidemiological evidence. The available information points to the lower effectiveness of sparsely ionizing radiation at low doses and low dose-rates, as compared with that observed for high, acutely delivered doses. The possible range of the reduction values (DREF) is presented. For high LET radiations, the evidence is less extensive and sometimes contradictory; however, it does not point to a reduction of the effectiveness at low doses/dose-rates, relative to the high dose domain. Practical consequences of these facts are considered. PMID:2489419

  18. The Absolute Rates of the Solution Phase Addition of Atomic Hydrogen to a Vinyl Ether and a Vinyl Ester. The Effect of Oxygen Substitution on Hydrogen Atom Reactivity with Olefins

    SciTech Connect

    Tanner, D. D.; Kandanarachchi, P.; Das, N. C.; Franz, James A.

    2003-04-08

    The reactions of vinyl butyl ether and vinyl butyrate with atomic hydrogen and deuterium lead to addition of atomic hydrogen to the terminal position of the olefins. This observation is consistent with the reactions carried out earlier with other olefins. Both the absolute rates of addition to vinylbutyl ether and vinyl butyrate in acetone and hexane were carried out at several temperatures. The relative rates are consistent with only modest stabilization of the transition state of the radical adduct by the ??-o substituent compared with hydrogen atom addition to 1-octene. The relative rates measured in acetone and hexane indicate no significant differential solvation of ground state relative to the transition structures of the hydrogen atom addition. The kinetics reveal that the early transition states of hydrogen atom addition exhibit little selectivity (vinyl ether versus simple olefin) in either abstraction of hydrogen ??- to the oxygen or by terminal addition to the olefinic ether, reflecting the modest influence of the increased enthalpy of reaction associated with resonance stabilization by the oxygen substituent at the developing radical site.

  19. Absolute Rates of the Solution-Phase Addition of Atomic Hydrogen to a Vinyl Ether and a Vinyl Ester: Effect of Oxygen Substitution on Hydrogen Atom Reactivity with Olefins

    SciTech Connect

    Tanner, D D.; Kandanarachchi, P; Das, N. C.; Franz, James A.

    2003-04-08

    The reactions of vinyl butyl ether and vinyl butyrate with atomic hydrogen and deuterium lead to addition at the terminal position of the olefins. This observation is consistent with the reactions carried out earlier with other olefins. Both of the absolute rates of addition to vinylbutyl ether and vinyl butyrate, in acetone and hexane, were measured at several temperatures. The relative rates are consistent with only modest stabilization of the transition state of the radical adduct by the R-O substituent compared with that of hydrogen atom addition to 1-octene. The relative rates measured in acetone and hexane indicate no significant differential solvation of the ground state relative to the transition structures of the hydrogen atom addition. The kinetics reveal that the early transition states for hydrogen atom addition exhibit little selectivity (vinyl ether versus simple olefin) in either the abstraction of hydrogen R to the oxygen or by terminal addition to the olefinic ether and reflects the modest influence of the increased enthalpy of reaction associated with resonance stabilization by the oxygen substituent at the developing radical site.

  20. Absolute calibration of sniffer probes on Wendelstein 7-X.

    PubMed

    Moseev, D; Laqua, H P; Marsen, S; Stange, T; Braune, H; Erckmann, V; Gellert, F; Oosterbeek, J W

    2016-08-01

    Here we report the first measurements of the power levels of stray radiation in the vacuum vessel of Wendelstein 7-X using absolutely calibrated sniffer probes. The absolute calibration is achieved by using calibrated sources of stray radiation and the implicit measurement of the quality factor of the Wendelstein 7-X empty vacuum vessel. Normalized absolute calibration coefficients agree with the cross-calibration coefficients that are obtained by the direct measurements, indicating that the measured absolute calibration coefficients and stray radiation levels in the vessel are valid. Close to the launcher, the stray radiation in the empty vessel reaches power levels up to 340 kW/m(2) per MW injected beam power. Furthest away from the launcher, i.e., half a toroidal turn, still 90 kW/m(2) per MW injected beam power is measured. PMID:27587121

  1. Absolute calibration of sniffer probes on Wendelstein 7-X

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moseev, D.; Laqua, H. P.; Marsen, S.; Stange, T.; Braune, H.; Erckmann, V.; Gellert, F.; Oosterbeek, J. W.

    2016-08-01

    Here we report the first measurements of the power levels of stray radiation in the vacuum vessel of Wendelstein 7-X using absolutely calibrated sniffer probes. The absolute calibration is achieved by using calibrated sources of stray radiation and the implicit measurement of the quality factor of the Wendelstein 7-X empty vacuum vessel. Normalized absolute calibration coefficients agree with the cross-calibration coefficients that are obtained by the direct measurements, indicating that the measured absolute calibration coefficients and stray radiation levels in the vessel are valid. Close to the launcher, the stray radiation in the empty vessel reaches power levels up to 340 kW/m2 per MW injected beam power. Furthest away from the launcher, i.e., half a toroidal turn, still 90 kW/m2 per MW injected beam power is measured.

  2. (CF3)2CFCH=CHF (HFO-1438ezy): OH Radical Rate Coefficient, Infrared Spectrum Measurements and Estimated Global Warming Potentials and Photochemical Ozone Creation Potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papadimitriou, V.; Burkholder, J. B.

    2015-12-01

    Short-lived hydrofluoroolefins (HFOs) are proposed replacement compounds for ozone depleting substances (ODSs) and longer-lived greenhouse gases that are used in various industrial and technological applications. HFOs are not ODSs and the presence of the highly reactive unsaturated bond toward the common atmospheric oxidants (OH, Cl, NO3 and O3) is expected to lead to shorter tropospheric lifetimes relative to those of saturated hydrofluorocarbons. The shorter lifetime reduces their direct contribution to Climate Change. In this study, rate coefficients for the gas-phase reaction of the OH radical with (CF3)2CFCH=CHF (HFO-1438ezy), between 214 and 380 K and 50-450 Torr (He, N2), were measured using pulsed laser photolysis-laser induced fluorescence (PLP/LIF) and relative rate methods. No pressure dependence was observed within this measurement range. The reaction displays a non-Arrhenius temperature dependence over this temperature range with a slightly positive temperature dependence above 280 K and near temperature independence at lower temperatures. The infrared spectrum of HFO-1438ezy was measured as part of this work. On the basis of the present measurements, the atmospheric lifetime of HFO-1438ezy as well as its radiative efficiency, global warming potential and photochemical ozone creation potential were estimated.

  3. Improvement of oxygen transfer coefficient during Penicillium canescens culture. Influence of turbine design, agitation speed, and air flow rate on xylanase production.

    PubMed

    Gaspar, A; Strodiot, L; Thonart, P

    1998-01-01

    To improve xylanase productivity from Penicillium canescens 10-10c culture, an optimization of oxygen supply is required. Because the strain is sensitive to shear forces, leading to lower xylanase productivity as to morphological alteration, vigorous mixing is not desired. The influence of turbine design, agitation speed, and air flow rate on K1a (global mass transfer coefficient, h(-1)) and enzyme production is discussed. K1a values increased with agitation speed and air flow rate, whatever the impeller, in our assay conditions. Agitation had more influence on K1a values than air flow, when a disk-mounted blade's impeller (DT) is used; an opposite result was obtained with a hub-mounted pitched blade's impeller (PBT). Xylanase production appeared as a function of specific power (W/m3), and an optimum was found in 20 and 100 L STRs fitted with DT impellers. On the other hand, the use of a hub-mounted pitched blade impeller (PBT8), instead of a disk-mounted blade impeller (DT4), reduced the lag time of hemicellulase production and increased xylanase productivity 1.3-fold. PMID:18576019

  4. Experimental Investigation of the Effect of Cooling Rate on Melilite/Liquid Distribution Coefficients for Sr, Ba, and TI in Type B Refractory Inclusion Melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, S. B.; Davis, A. M.; Richter, F. M.; Grossman, L.

    1996-03-01

    It is well established that Type B1 refractory inclusions were once at least partially molten. These inclusions are thought to represent closed magmatic systems, but attempts to model the trace element contents in melilite in these CAIs have not met with much success. Observed abundances of most trace elements tend to be significantly higher than those predicted using equilibrium melilite/liquid distribution coefficients. Boundary layers have been proposed as an explanation, but in the case of Sr, its D of ~0.8 is too high to give rise to boundary layers sufficiently enriched in Sr to account for the observed enrichments. We have investigated the possibility that Ds increase with increasing cooling rate. We found that Ds for Ti, Sr and Ba are virtually invariant with akermanite and with cooling rate, and the models still do not fit the observations, especially for Ba, which is off by a factor of ~20. The results indicate that a process occurred during the crystallization of melilite that we have yet to understand. _

  5. The in vitro permeability coefficient and short-term absorption rates for vinyl toluene using human cadaver skin mounted in a static diffusion cell model.

    PubMed

    Fasano, William J; Baer, Kevin N

    2006-01-01

    Vinyl toluene is one of several methylstyrene monomers that provide improved performance in resins for specialty paints, hydrocarbon resins for adhesives, specialty polymers, and unsaturated polyester resins. The purpose of this study was to determine a permeability coefficient (Kp) and short-term absorption rate for vinyl toluene using human cadaver skin mounted in an in vitro static diffusion cell model with an exposure area of 0.64 cm2. For the Kp determination, vinyl toluene was applied at a rate of 100 microL/cm2 to 6 skin replicates representing 4 human subjects. Serial receptor fluid samples were collected at 1, 2, 4, 8, 12, 24, 36, and 48 h postapplication and analyzed for vinyl toluene by HPLC-UV. Based on the slope at steady-state (203.3 microg cm(-2) h(-1) +/- 120.0 microg cm(-2) h(-1)) and the concentration of the applied dose of vinyl toluene, taken as its density (894,600 microg/cm3), the Kp was calculated to be 2.27 x 10(-4) cm/h (+/-1.34 x 10(-4) cm/h). For the short-term absorption experiments, 12 skin replicates representing 3 human subjects were employed. Following 10- and 60-min exposures to a finite dose of vinyl toluene (10 microL/cm2), the respective short-term absorption rates were calculated to be 66.0 (+/-29.9) and 104.2 (+/-63.0) microg cm(-2) h(-1). These data provide industrial hygienists and safety personnel values to estimate the amount of vinyl toluene that may be absorbed via the dermal exposure route, given a variety of exposure scenarios, and the time it takes (skin absorption time) to reach a body burden equal to the Occupational Safety and Health Administrative permissible exposure level (OSHA PEL) or ACGIH TLV. PMID:16455589

  6. Analyte-Receptor Binding Kinetics for Biosensor Applications: A Single-Fractal and a Dual-Fractal Analysis of the Influence of the Fractal Dimension on the Binding Rate Coefficient.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishnan; Sadana

    1998-12-15

    The diffusion-limited binding kinetics of antigen (analyte) in solution to antibody (receptor) immobilized on a biosensor surface is analyzed within a fractal framework. Most of the data presented are adequately described by a single-fractal analysis. This was indicated by the regression analysis provided by Sigmaplot ("Scientific Graphing Procedure, User's Manual," Jandel Scientific, San Rafael, CA, 1993). A couple of examples of a dual-fractal analysis are also presented. It is of interest to note that the binding rate coefficient and the fractal dimension both exhibit changes in the same direction for the analyte-receptor systems analyzed. Binding rate coefficient expressions as a function of the fractal dimension developed for the analyte-receptor binding systems indicate the high sensitivity of the binding rate coefficient on the fractal dimension when both a single- and a dual-fractal analysis are used. For example, for a single-fractal analysis and for the binding of cell surface proteins from Helicobacter pylori strain in solution to sialyl-(alpha-2,3)-lactose-conjugated (20 mol%) polyacrylamide immobilized on a resonant mirror biosensor (S. Hirmo et al., Anal. Biochem. 257, 63, 1998), the order of dependence of the binding rate coefficient, k, on the fractal dimension, Df, was 14.15. The fractional order of dependence of the binding rate coefficient(s) on the fractal dimension(s) further reinforces the fractal nature of the system. The binding rate coefficient(s) expressions developed as a function of the fractal dimension(s) are of particular value since they provide a means to better control biosensor performance by linking it to the heterogeneity on the surface and further emphasize in a quantitative sense the importance of the nature of the surface in biosensor performance. Copyright 1998 Academic Press. PMID:9845690

  7. On the solar cycle variation in the barometer coefficients of high latitude neutron monitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kusunose, M.; Ogita, N.

    1985-01-01

    Evaluation of barometer coefficients of neutron monitors located at high latitudes has been performed by using the results of the spherical harmonic analysis based on the records from around twenty stations for twelve years from January 1966 to December 1977. The average of data at eight stations, where continuous records are available for twelve years, show that the absolute value of barometer coefficient is in positive correlation with the cosmic ray neutron intensity. The variation rate of the barometer coefficient to the cosmic ray neutron intensity is influenced by the changes in the cutoff rigidity and in the primary spectrum.

  8. Comparison of effective rate coefficients for high energy charge-exchange with measurements of the Rydberg series of Ar16+ at the tokamak TEXTOR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlummer, T.; Marchuk, O.; Schultz, D. R.; Bertschinger, G.; Biel, W.; Reiter, D.; the TEXTOR-Team

    2015-07-01

    The charge-exchange (CX) rate coefficients for highly ionized impurity ions play a crucial role in fusion plasma diagnostics. However, till today a substantial difference exists in data for the nl-resolved cross-sections based on the different approximations underlying the classical trajectory Monte Carlo (CTMC) calculations either based on the standard initial momentum distribution of target electron orbits (pCTMC, as in the CX data provided by Whyte et al (1998 Phys. Plasmas 5 3694) and Schultz et al (2010 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 43 144002) or based on the alternate initial radial distribution of orbits (rCTMC, as in the calculations of Errea et al (2006 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 39 L91). In this paper, results of new pCTMC and rCTMC calculations for CX in 16.7, 25, and 50 keV/u Ar17+ + H(1s), H(2s), and H(2p) are compared against X-ray line measurements performed at the tokamak TEXTOR. The Rydberg series (1snp-1s2) and the Kα-spectrum (1s2l-1s2) of He-like argon were measured directly in the beam-line of a 16.7-50 keV/u hydrogen injector. The intensities of the spectral lines are compared to the effective CX rate coefficients utilizing both sets of cross sections. While both data sets show good agreement with respect to the observed impact on the Kα transition, only the pCTMC data allow a consistent description of the CX ‘resonance’ observed on the Rydberg lines around n ≈ 8, 9. Similar to the case of low energy ion-atom interactions reported from different tokamaks, the observed influence of CX is separable into contributions from beam particles in the ground and excited states, respectively. It is shown, that the number of beam excited states nh contributing to the CX signal, where nh is the principal quantum number, is limited to nh ≲ 10, confirming the results of recent collisional-radiative models of beam atoms in parabolic states.

  9. Electronic Absolute Cartesian Autocollimator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leviton, Douglas B.

    2006-01-01

    An electronic absolute Cartesian autocollimator performs the same basic optical function as does a conventional all-optical or a conventional electronic autocollimator but differs in the nature of its optical target and the manner in which the position of the image of the target is measured. The term absolute in the name of this apparatus reflects the nature of the position measurement, which, unlike in a conventional electronic autocollimator, is based absolutely on the position of the image rather than on an assumed proportionality between the position and the levels of processed analog electronic signals. The term Cartesian in the name of this apparatus reflects the nature of its optical target. Figure 1 depicts the electronic functional blocks of an electronic absolute Cartesian autocollimator along with its basic optical layout, which is the same as that of a conventional autocollimator. Referring first to the optical layout and functions only, this or any autocollimator is used to measure the compound angular deviation of a flat datum mirror with respect to the optical axis of the autocollimator itself. The optical components include an illuminated target, a beam splitter, an objective or collimating lens, and a viewer or detector (described in more detail below) at a viewing plane. The target and the viewing planes are focal planes of the lens. Target light reflected by the datum mirror is imaged on the viewing plane at unit magnification by the collimating lens. If the normal to the datum mirror is parallel to the optical axis of the autocollimator, then the target image is centered on the viewing plane. Any angular deviation of the normal from the optical axis manifests itself as a lateral displacement of the target image from the center. The magnitude of the displacement is proportional to the focal length and to the magnitude (assumed to be small) of the angular deviation. The direction of the displacement is perpendicular to the axis about which the

  10. Experimental measurements of low temperature rate coefficients for neutral-neutral reactions of interest for atmospheric chemistry of Titan, Pluto and Triton: reactions of the CN radical.

    PubMed

    Morales, Sébastien B; Le Picard, Sébastien D; Canosa, André; Sims, Ian R

    2010-01-01

    The kinetics of the reactions of cyano radical, CN (X2sigma+) with three hydrocarbons, propane (CH3CH2CH3), propene (CH3CH=CH2) and 1-butyne (CH[triple band]CCH2CH3) have been studied over the temperature range of 23-298 K using a CRESU (Cinétique de Réaction en Ecoulement Supersonique Uniforme or Reaction Kinetics in Uniform Supersonic Flow) apparatus combined with the pulsed laser photolysis-laser induced fluorescence technique. These reactions are of interest for the cold atmospheres of Titan, Pluto and Triton, as they might participate in the formation of nitrogen and carbon bearing molecules, including nitriles, that are thought to play an important role in the formation of hazes and biological molecules. All three reactions are rapid with rate coefficients in excess of 10(-10) cm3 molecule(-1) s(-1) at the lowest temperatures of this study and show behaviour characteristic of barrierless reactions. Temperature dependences, different for each reaction, are compared to those used in the most recent photochemical models of Titan's atmosphere. PMID:21302546

  11. Rovibrational energy transfer in the He-C3 collision: rigid bender treatment of the bending-rotation interaction and rate coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoecklin, Thierry; Denis-Alpizar, Otoniel; Halvick, Philippe

    2015-06-01

    C3 is a molecular chain which has been observed in interstellar clouds and in comets. It is also a very floppy molecule for which the vibrational bending transitions are in the same energy range as the rotational transitions. In this paper, we apply our recently developed quantum scattering method for treating atom rigid bender inelastic collisions at the Close Coupling level to the collision of C3 by helium. This method allows us to compute the rovibrational transitions induced by collisions. The purely rotational transitions have been also calculated, using the rigid monomer approximation. The accuracy of this last approximation in the case of a system with a significant vibrational-rotational coupling is discussed. The first evaluation of the cross-sections associated with the rovibrational transitions between levels belonging to different vibrational bending levels is also presented. We observe that the propensity rule for the rovibrational transitions is a competition between the smallest Δj and the smallest transition energy. As a consequence, cross-sections and rate coefficients of vibrationally inelastic transitions can be several orders of magnitude larger than for purely rotational transitions.

  12. ABSOLUTE POLARIMETRY AT RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    OKADA; BRAVAR, A.; BUNCE, G.; GILL, R.; HUANG, H.; MAKDISI, Y.; NASS, A.; WOOD, J.; ZELENSKI, Z.; ET AL.

    2007-09-10

    Precise and absolute beam polarization measurements are critical for the RHIC spin physics program. Because all experimental spin-dependent results are normalized by beam polarization, the normalization uncertainty contributes directly to final physics uncertainties. We aimed to perform the beam polarization measurement to an accuracy Of {Delta}P{sub beam}/P{sub beam} < 5%. The absolute polarimeter consists of Polarized Atomic Hydrogen Gas Jet Target and left-right pairs of silicon strip detectors and was installed in the RHIC-ring in 2004. This system features proton-proton elastic scattering in the Coulomb nuclear interference (CNI) region. Precise measurements of the analyzing power A{sub N} of this process has allowed us to achieve {Delta}P{sub beam}/P{sub beam} = 4.2% in 2005 for the first long spin-physics run. In this report, we describe the entire set up and performance of the system. The procedure of beam polarization measurement and analysis results from 2004-2005 are described. Physics topics of AN in the CNI region (four-momentum transfer squared 0.001 < -t < 0.032 (GeV/c){sup 2}) are also discussed. We point out the current issues and expected optimum accuracy in 2006 and the future.

  13. Combined Use of Absolute and Differential Seismic Arrival Time Data to Improve Absolute Event Location

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, S.; Johannesson, G.

    2012-12-01

    Arrival time measurements based on waveform cross correlation are becoming more common as advanced signal processing methods are applied to seismic data archives and real-time data streams. Waveform correlation can precisely measure the time difference between the arrival of two phases, and differential time data can be used to constrain relative location of events. Absolute locations are needed for many applications, which generally requires the use of absolute time data. Current methods for measuring absolute time data are approximately two orders of magnitude less precise than differential time measurements. To exploit the strengths of both absolute and differential time data, we extend our multiple-event location method Bayesloc, which previously used absolute time data only, to include the use of differential time measurements that are based on waveform cross correlation. Fundamentally, Bayesloc is a formulation of the joint probability over all parameters comprising the multiple event location system. The Markov-Chain Monte Carlo method is used to sample from the joint probability distribution given arrival data sets. The differential time component of Bayesloc includes scaling a stochastic estimate of differential time measurement precision based the waveform correlation coefficient for each datum. For a regional-distance synthetic data set with absolute and differential time measurement error of 0.25 seconds and 0.01 second, respectively, epicenter location accuracy is improved from and average of 1.05 km when solely absolute time data are used to 0.28 km when absolute and differential time data are used jointly (73% improvement). The improvement in absolute location accuracy is the result of conditionally limiting absolute location probability regions based on the precise relative position with respect to neighboring events. Bayesloc estimates of data precision are found to be accurate for the synthetic test, with absolute and differential time measurement

  14. Implants as absolute anchorage.

    PubMed

    Rungcharassaeng, Kitichai; Kan, Joseph Y K; Caruso, Joseph M

    2005-11-01

    Anchorage control is essential for successful orthodontic treatment. Each tooth has its own anchorage potential as well as propensity to move when force is applied. When teeth are used as anchorage, the untoward movements of the anchoring units may result in the prolonged treatment time, and unpredictable or less-than-ideal outcome. To maximize tooth-related anchorage, techniques such as differential torque, placing roots into the cortex of the bone, the use of various intraoral devices and/or extraoral appliances have been implemented. Implants, as they are in direct contact with bone, do not possess a periodontal ligament. As a result, they do not move when orthodontic/orthopedic force is applied, and therefore can be used as "absolute anchorage." This article describes different types of implants that have been used as orthodontic anchorage. Their clinical applications and limitations are also discussed. PMID:16463910

  15. Absolute Equilibrium Entropy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shebalin, John V.

    1997-01-01

    The entropy associated with absolute equilibrium ensemble theories of ideal, homogeneous, fluid and magneto-fluid turbulence is discussed and the three-dimensional fluid case is examined in detail. A sigma-function is defined, whose minimum value with respect to global parameters is the entropy. A comparison is made between the use of global functions sigma and phase functions H (associated with the development of various H-theorems of ideal turbulence). It is shown that the two approaches are complimentary though conceptually different: H-theorems show that an isolated system tends to equilibrium while sigma-functions allow the demonstration that entropy never decreases when two previously isolated systems are combined. This provides a more complete picture of entropy in the statistical mechanics of ideal fluids.

  16. The impact of aerosol hygroscopic growth on the single-scattering albedo and its application on the NO2 photolysis rate coefficient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Jiangchuan; Zhao, Chunsheng

    2016-04-01

    Hygroscopic growth of aerosol particles can significantly affect their single-scattering albedo (ω), and consequently alters the aerosol effect on tropospheric photochemistry. In this study, the impact of aerosol hygroscopic growth on ω and its application to the NO2 photolysis rate coefficient (JNO2) are investigated for a typical aerosol particle population in the North China Plain (NCP). The variations of aerosol optical properties with relative humidity (RH) are calculated using a Mie theory aerosol optical model, on the basis of field measurements of number-size distribution and hygroscopic growth factor (at RH values above 90 %) from the 2009 HaChi (Haze in China) project. Results demonstrate that ambient ω has pronouncedly different diurnal patterns from ω measured at dry state, and is highly sensitive to the ambient RHs. Ambient ω in the NCP can be described by a dry state ω value of 0.863, increasing with the RH following a characteristic RH dependence curve. A Monte Carlo simulation shows that the uncertainty ofω from the propagation of uncertainties in the input parameters decreases from 0.03 (at dry state) to 0.015 (RHs > 90 %). The impact of hygroscopic growth on ω is further applied in the calculation of the radiative transfer process. Hygroscopic growth of the studied aerosol particle population generally inhibits the photolysis of NO2 at the ground level, whereas accelerates it above the moist planetary boundary layer. Compared with dry state, the calculated JNO2 at RH of 98 % at the height of 1 km increases by 30.4 %, because of the enhancement of ultraviolet radiation by the humidified scattering-dominant aerosol particles. The increase of JNO2 due to the aerosol hygroscopic growth above the upper boundary layer may affect the tropospheric photochemical processes and this needs to be taken into account in the atmospheric chemical models.

  17. Rate Coefficients of C2H with C2H4, C2H6, and H2 from 150 to 359 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Opansky, Brian J.; Leone, Stephen R.

    1996-01-01

    Rate coefficients for the reactions C2H with C2H4, C2H6, and H2 are measured over the temperature range 150-359 K using transient infrared laser absorption spectroscopy. The ethynyl radical is formed by photolysis of C2H2 with a pulsed excimer laser at 193 nm, and its transient absorption is monitored with a color center laser on the Q(sub 11)(9) line of the A(sup 2) Pi-Chi(sup 2) Sigma transition at 3593.68 cm(exp -1). Over the experimental temperature range 150-359 K the rate constants of C2H with C2H4, C2H6, and H2 can be fitted to the Arrhenius expressions k(sub C2H4) = (7.8 +/- 0.6) x 10(exp -11) exp[(134 +/- 44)/T], k(sub C2H6) = (3.5 +/- 0.3) x 10(exp -11) exp[(2.9 +/- 16)/T], and k(sub H2) = (1.2 +/- 0.3) x 10(exp -11) exp[(-998 +/- 57)]/T cm(exp 3) molecule(exp -1) sec(exp -1). The data for C2H with C2H4 and C2H6 indicate a negligible activation energy to product formation shown by the mild negative temperature dependence of both reactions. When the H2 data are plotted together with the most recent high-temperature results from 295 to 854 K, a slight curvature is observed. The H2 data can be fit to the non-Arrhenius form k(sub H2) = 9.2 x 10(exp -18) T(sup 2.17 +/- 0.50) exp[(-478 +/- 165)/T] cm(exp 3) molecules(exp -1) sec(exp -1). The curvature in the Arrhenius plot is discussed in terms of both quantum mechanical tunneling of the H atom from H2 to the C2H radical and bending mode contributions to the partition function.

  18. Comparing spatially varying coefficient models: a case study examining violent crime rates and their relationships to alcohol outlets and illegal drug arrests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, David C.; Waller, Lance A.

    2009-03-01

    In this paper, we compare and contrast a Bayesian spatially varying coefficient process (SVCP) model with a geographically weighted regression (GWR) model for the estimation of the potentially spatially varying regression effects of alcohol outlets and illegal drug activity on violent crime in Houston, Texas. In addition, we focus on the inherent coefficient shrinkage properties of the Bayesian SVCP model as a way to address increased coefficient variance that follows from collinearity in GWR models. We outline the advantages of the Bayesian model in terms of reducing inflated coefficient variance, enhanced model flexibility, and more formal measuring of model uncertainty for prediction. We find spatially varying effects for alcohol outlets and drug violations, but the amount of variation depends on the type of model used. For the Bayesian model, this variation is controllable through the amount of prior influence placed on the variance of the coefficients. For example, the spatial pattern of coefficients is similar for the GWR and Bayesian models when a relatively large prior variance is used in the Bayesian model.

  19. Absolute oral bioavailability of ciprofloxacin.

    PubMed

    Drusano, G L; Standiford, H C; Plaisance, K; Forrest, A; Leslie, J; Caldwell, J

    1986-09-01

    We evaluated the absolute bioavailability of ciprofloxacin, a new quinoline carboxylic acid, in 12 healthy male volunteers. Doses of 200 mg were given to each of the volunteers in a randomized, crossover manner 1 week apart orally and as a 10-min intravenous infusion. Half-lives (mean +/- standard deviation) for the intravenous and oral administration arms were 4.2 +/- 0.77 and 4.11 +/- 0.74 h, respectively. The serum clearance rate averaged 28.5 +/- 4.7 liters/h per 1.73 m2 for the intravenous administration arm. The renal clearance rate accounted for approximately 60% of the corresponding serum clearance rate and was 16.9 +/- 3.0 liters/h per 1.73 m2 for the intravenous arm and 17.0 +/- 2.86 liters/h per 1.73 m2 for the oral administration arm. Absorption was rapid, with peak concentrations in serum occurring at 0.71 +/- 0.15 h. Bioavailability, defined as the ratio of the area under the curve from 0 h to infinity for the oral to the intravenous dose, was 69 +/- 7%. We conclude that ciprofloxacin is rapidly absorbed and reliably bioavailable in these healthy volunteers. Further studies with ciprofloxacin should be undertaken in target patient populations under actual clinical circumstances. PMID:3777908

  20. Absolute neutrino mass measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, Joachim

    2011-10-01

    The neutrino mass plays an important role in particle physics, astrophysics and cosmology. In recent years the detection of neutrino flavour oscillations proved that neutrinos carry mass. However, oscillation experiments are only sensitive to the mass-squared difference of the mass eigenvalues. In contrast to cosmological observations and neutrino-less double beta decay (0v2β) searches, single β-decay experiments provide a direct, model-independent way to determine the absolute neutrino mass by measuring the energy spectrum of decay electrons at the endpoint region with high accuracy. Currently the best kinematic upper limits on the neutrino mass of 2.2eV have been set by two experiments in Mainz and Troitsk, using tritium as beta emitter. The next generation tritium β-experiment KATRIN is currently under construction in Karlsruhe/Germany by an international collaboration. KATRIN intends to improve the sensitivity by one order of magnitude to 0.2eV. The investigation of a second isotope (137Rh) is being pursued by the international MARE collaboration using micro-calorimeters to measure the beta spectrum. The technology needed to reach 0.2eV sensitivity is still in the R&D phase. This paper reviews the present status of neutrino-mass measurements with cosmological data, 0v2β decay and single β-decay.

  1. Absolute neutrino mass measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, Joachim

    2011-10-06

    The neutrino mass plays an important role in particle physics, astrophysics and cosmology. In recent years the detection of neutrino flavour oscillations proved that neutrinos carry mass. However, oscillation experiments are only sensitive to the mass-squared difference of the mass eigenvalues. In contrast to cosmological observations and neutrino-less double beta decay (0v2{beta}) searches, single {beta}-decay experiments provide a direct, model-independent way to determine the absolute neutrino mass by measuring the energy spectrum of decay electrons at the endpoint region with high accuracy.Currently the best kinematic upper limits on the neutrino mass of 2.2eV have been set by two experiments in Mainz and Troitsk, using tritium as beta emitter. The next generation tritium {beta}-experiment KATRIN is currently under construction in Karlsruhe/Germany by an international collaboration. KATRIN intends to improve the sensitivity by one order of magnitude to 0.2eV. The investigation of a second isotope ({sup 137}Rh) is being pursued by the international MARE collaboration using micro-calorimeters to measure the beta spectrum. The technology needed to reach 0.2eV sensitivity is still in the R and D phase. This paper reviews the present status of neutrino-mass measurements with cosmological data, 0v2{beta} decay and single {beta}-decay.

  2. Noninvasive absolute cerebral oximetry with frequency-domain near-infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallacoglu, Bertan

    Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) measurements of absolute concentrations of oxy-hemoglobin and deoxy-hemoglobin in the human brain can provide critical information about cerebral physiology in terms of cerebral blood volume, blood flow, oxygen delivery, and metabolic rate of oxygen. We developed several frequency domain NIRS data acquisition and analysis methods aimed at absolute measurements of hemoglobin concentration and saturation in cerebral tissue of adult human subjects. Extensive experimental investigations were carried out in various homogenous and two-layered tissue-mimicking phantoms, and biological tissues. The advantages and limitations of commonly used homogenous models and inversion strategies were thoroughly investigated. Prior to human subjects, extensive studies were carried out in in vivo animal models. In rabbits, absolute hemoglobin oxygen desaturation was shown to depend strongly on surgically induced testicular torsion. Methods developed in this study were then adapted for measurements in the rat brain. Absolute values were demonstrated to discern cerebrovascular impairment in a rat model of diet-induced vascular cognitive impairment. These results facilitated the development of clinically useful optical measures of cerebrovascular health. In a large group of human subjects, employing a homogeneous model for absolute measurements was shown to be reliable and robust. However, it was also shown to be limited due to the relatively thick extracerebral tissue. The procedure we develop in this work and the thesis thereof performs a nonlinear inversion procedure with six unknown parameters with no other prior knowledge for the retrieval of the optical coefficients and top layer thickness with high accuracy on two-layered media. Our absolute measurements of cerebral hemoglobin concentration and saturation are based on the discrimination of extracerebral and cerebral tissue layers, and they can enhance the impact of NIRS for cerebral hemodynamics and

  3. Secondary kinetics of methanol decomposition : theoretical rate coefficients for {sup 3}CH{sub 2} + OH, {sup 3}CH{sub 2} + {sup 3}CH{sub 2}, and {sup 3}CH{sub 2} + CH{sub 3}.

    SciTech Connect

    Jasper, A. W.; Klippenstein, S. J.; Harding, L. B.; Chemistry

    2007-09-06

    Direct variable reaction coordinate transition state theory (VRC-TST) rate coefficients are reported for the {sup 3}CH{sub 2} + OH, {sup 3}CH{sub 2} + {sup 3}CH{sub 2}, and {sup 3}CH{sub 2} + CH{sub 3} barrierless association reactions. The predicted rate coefficient for the {sup 3}CH{sub 2} + OH reaction ({approx} 1.2 x 10{sup -10} cm{sup 3} molecule{sup -1} s{sup -1} for 300-2500 K) is 4-5 times larger than previous estimates, indicating that this reaction may be an important sink for OH in many combustion systems. The predicted rate coefficients for the {sup 3}CH{sub 2} + CH{sub 3} and {sup 3}CH{sub 2} + {sup 3}CH{sub 2} reactions are found to be in good agreement with the range of available experimental measurements. Product branching in the self-reaction of methylene is discussed, and the C{sub 2}H{sub 2} + 2H and C{sub 2}H{sub 2} + H{sub 2} products are predicted in a ratio of 4:1. The effect of the present set of rate coefficients on modeling the secondary kinetics of methanol decomposition is briefly considered. Finally, the present set of rate coefficients, along with previous VRC-TST determinations of the rate coefficients for the self-reactions of CH{sub 3} and OH and for the CH{sub 3} + OH reaction, are used to test the geometric mean rule for the CH{sub 3}, {sup 3}CH{sub 2}, and OH fragments. The geometric mean rule is found to predict the cross-combination rate coefficients for the {sup 3}CH{sub 2} + OH and {sup 3}CH{sub 2} + CH{sub 3} reactions to better than 20%, with a larger (up to 50%) error for the CH{sub 3} + OH reaction.

  4. Low temperature rate coefficients of the H + CH{sup +} → C{sup +} + H{sub 2} reaction: New potential energy surface and time-independent quantum scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Werfelli, Ghofran; Halvick, Philippe; Stoecklin, Thierry; Honvault, Pascal; Kerkeni, Boutheïna

    2015-09-21

    The observed abundances of the methylidyne cation, CH{sup +}, in diffuse molecular clouds can be two orders of magnitude higher than the prediction of the standard gas-phase models which, in turn, predict rather well the abundances of neutral CH. It is therefore necessary to investigate all the possible formation and destruction processes of CH{sup +} in the interstellar medium with the most abundant species H, H{sub 2}, and e{sup −}. In this work, we address the destruction process of CH{sup +} by hydrogen abstraction. We report a new calculation of the low temperature rate coefficients for the abstraction reaction, using accurate time-independent quantum scattering and a new high-level ab initio global potential energy surface including a realistic model of the long-range interaction between the reactants H and CH{sup +}. The calculated thermal rate coefficient is in good agreement with the experimental data in the range 50 K–800 K. However, at lower temperatures, the experimental rate coefficient takes exceedingly small values which are not reproduced by the calculated rate coefficient. Instead, the latter rate coefficient is close to the one given by the Langevin capture model, as expected for a reaction involving an ion and a neutral species. Several recent theoretical works have reported a seemingly good agreement with the experiment below 50 K, but an analysis of these works show that they are based on potential energy surfaces with incorrect long-range behavior. The experimental results were explained by a loss of reactivity of the lowest rotational states of the reactant; however, the quantum scattering calculations show the opposite, namely, a reactivity enhancement with rotational excitation.

  5. Absolute Identification by Relative Judgment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Neil; Brown, Gordon D. A.; Chater, Nick

    2005-01-01

    In unidimensional absolute identification tasks, participants identify stimuli that vary along a single dimension. Performance is surprisingly poor compared with discrimination of the same stimuli. Existing models assume that identification is achieved using long-term representations of absolute magnitudes. The authors propose an alternative…

  6. Be Resolute about Absolute Value

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kidd, Margaret L.

    2007-01-01

    This article explores how conceptualization of absolute value can start long before it is introduced. The manner in which absolute value is introduced to students in middle school has far-reaching consequences for their future mathematical understanding. It begins to lay the foundation for students' understanding of algebra, which can change…

  7. Weighted Wilcoxon-type Smoothly Clipped Absolute Deviation Method

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lan; Li, Runze

    2009-01-01

    Summary Shrinkage-type variable selection procedures have recently seen increasing applications in biomedical research. However, their performance can be adversely influenced by outliers in either the response or the covariate space. This paper proposes a weighted Wilcoxon-type smoothly clipped absolute deviation (WW-SCAD) method, which deals with robust variable selection and robust estimation simultaneously. The new procedure can be conveniently implemented with the statistical software R. We establish that the WW-SCAD correctly identifies the set of zero coefficients with probability approaching one and estimates the nonzero coefficients with the rate n−1/2. Moreover, with appropriately chosen weights the WW-SCAD is robust with respect to outliers in both the x and y directions. The important special case with constant weights yields an oracle-type estimator with high efficiency at the presence of heavier-tailed random errors. The robustness of the WW-SCAD is partly justified by its asymptotic performance under local shrinking contamination. We propose a BIC-type tuning parameter selector for the WW-SCAD. The performance of the WW-SCAD is demonstrated via simulations and by an application to a study that investigates the effects of personal characteristics and dietary factors on plasma beta-carotene level. PMID:18647294

  8. Diffusion coefficients significant in modeling the absorption rate of carbon dioxide into aqueous blends of N-methyldiethanolamine and diethanolamine and of hydrogen sulfide into aqueous N-methyldiethanolamine

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, M.E.; Marshall, T.L.; Rowley, R.L.

    1998-07-01

    Absorption rates of gaseous CO{sub 2} into aqueous blends of N-methyldiethanolamine (MDEA) and diethanolamine (DEA) and of gaseous H{sub 2}S into aqueous MDEA were measured in a quiescent, inverted-tube diffusiometer by monitoring the rate of pressure drop. A numerical model for absorption, diffusion, and reaction of CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S in blends of MDEA, DEA, and water was developed. The model was used to regress diffusion coefficients of bicarbonate, carbamate, and MDEAH{sub 2}CO{sub 3} for the case of CO{sub 2} absorption and of bisulfide ion for the case of H{sub 2}S absorption from measured absorption rates. CO{sub 2} absorption rates and diffusion coefficients of bicarbonate, carbamate, and MDEAH{sub 2}CO{sub 3} were obtained at 298.2 K and 318.2 K in aqueous solutions containing 50 mass % total amine at DEA:MDEA mole ratios of 1:20, 1:4, 1L3, and 2:3. H{sub 2}S absorption rates and diffusion coefficients of bisulfide ion were obtained at 298.2 K and 318.2 K in aqueous solutions containing 20, 35, and 50 mass % MDEA.

  9. Recombination Coefficient Measurements of O and N radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Harmeet; Coburn, John; Graves, David

    1999-10-01

    Surface recombination of radicals in low-pressure high-density plasmas has direct influence on the neutral and ionic composition of the plasma. While, electron impact dissociation of molecules is the dominant mechanism for creation of radicals, the surface recombination of radicals is often expected to be the dominant loss mechanism. We have a combination of measurements and a model to determine the recombination coefficients of O and N, to O2 and N2, respectively on the stainless steel walls of our inductively coupled plasma chamber. The radial variation of the electron energy distribution function (EEDF) is measured using a tuned, cylindrical Langmuir probe. The number density of the molecular species is measured using line-of-sight modulated beam mass spectrometry. The mass spectrometer is differentially pumped in three stages to ensure a good beam to background signal ratio. The radical absolute number density is measured using appearance potential mass spectrometry with the aforementioned mass spectrometer. The recombination coefficient is calculated using a balance of the volume-generation and surface-loss rates of the radicals in the plasma. The generation rate of the radicals is calculated using the number density measurements of the parent molecule and the spatially resolved EEDFs. At approximately 330 K on stainless steel, the recombination coefficient for O is 0.16, and recombination coefficient for N is 0.07.

  10. Distortion of bulk-ion distribution function due to nuclear elastic scattering and its effect on T(d,n){sup 4}He reaction rate coefficient in neutral-beam-injected deuterium-tritium plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuura, H.; Nakao, Y.

    2007-05-15

    An effect of nuclear elastic scattering on the rate coefficient of fusion reaction between field deuteron and triton in the presence of neutral beam injection heating is studied. Without assuming a Maxwellian for bulk-ion distribution function, the Boltzmann-Fokker-Planck (BFP) equations for field (bulk) deuteron, field (bulk) triton, {alpha}-particle, and beam deuteron are simultaneously solved in an ITER-like deuterium-tritium thermonuclear plasma [R. Aymar, Fusion Eng. Des. 55, 107 (2001)]. The BFP calculation shows that enhancement of the reaction rate coefficient due to knock-on tail formation in fuel-ion distribution functions becomes appreciable, especially in the case of low-density operations.

  11. Calculation of State Specific Rate Coefficients for Non-Equilibrium Hypersonics Applications: from H(Psi) = E(Psi) to k(T) = A *exp(-E(sub a)/RT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffe, Richard; Schwenke, David; Chaban, Galina; Panesi, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Development of High-Fidelity Physics-Based Models to describe hypersonic flight through the atmospheres of Earth and Mars is underway at NASA Ames Research Center. The goal is to construct chemistry models of the collisional and radiative processes that occur in the bow shock and boundary layers of spacecraft during atmospheric entry that are free of empiricism. In this talk I will discuss our philosophy and describe some of our progress. Topics to be covered include thermochemistry, internal energy relaxation, collisional dissociation and radiative emission and absorption. For this work we start by solving the Schrodinger equation to obtain accurate interaction potentials and radiative properties. Then we invoke classical mechanics to compute state-specific heavy particle collision cross sections and reaction rate coefficients. Finally, phenomenological rate coefficients and relaxation times are determined from master equation solutions.

  12. Absolute Humidity and the Seasonality of Influenza (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaman, J. L.; Pitzer, V.; Viboud, C.; Grenfell, B.; Goldstein, E.; Lipsitch, M.

    2010-12-01

    Much of the observed wintertime increase of mortality in temperate regions is attributed to seasonal influenza. A recent re-analysis of laboratory experiments indicates that absolute humidity strongly modulates the airborne survival and transmission of the influenza virus. Here we show that the onset of increased wintertime influenza-related mortality in the United States is associated with anomalously low absolute humidity levels during the prior weeks. We then use an epidemiological model, in which observed absolute humidity conditions temper influenza transmission rates, to successfully simulate the seasonal cycle of observed influenza-related mortality. The model results indicate that direct modulation of influenza transmissibility by absolute humidity alone is sufficient to produce this observed seasonality. These findings provide epidemiological support for the hypothesis that absolute humidity drives seasonal variations of influenza transmission in temperate regions. In addition, we show that variations of the basic and effective reproductive numbers for influenza, caused by seasonal changes in absolute humidity, are consistent with the general timing of pandemic influenza outbreaks observed for 2009 A/H1N1 in temperate regions. Indeed, absolute humidity conditions correctly identify the region of the United States vulnerable to a third, wintertime wave of pandemic influenza. These findings suggest that the timing of pandemic influenza outbreaks is controlled by a combination of absolute humidity conditions, levels of susceptibility and changes in population mixing and contact rates.

  13. [Geriatrics: an absolute necessity].

    PubMed

    Oostvogel, F J

    1982-02-01

    The medical care for elderly people could be greatly improved. If no specific attention is paid immediately, namely through the various training courses and by way of further and part-time schooling, then this medical care will remain unsatisfactory. This situation worsens continually due to the growing number of elderly people and, within this group, a much higher rate of very aged people. Increasing the care in institutions is altogether unsatisfactory. The problem should be dealt with structurally and the emphasis placed upon prevention and early-diagnosis. There is an urgent need for an integrated method, keeping in mind the limits of the elderly person, from the physical, psychological and social aspects. This demands teamwork in a multidisciplinary system inside as well as outside the institutions. It demands a thorough knowledge of geriatrics based upon gerontology. Geriatricians are urgently needed in this development together with doctors in nursing homes, general practitioners and specialists, so that the necessary care may be established as quickly as possible. PMID:7101393

  14. Absolute radiometry and the solar constant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willson, R. C.

    1974-01-01

    A series of active cavity radiometers (ACRs) are described which have been developed as standard detectors for the accurate measurement of irradiance in absolute units. It is noted that the ACR is an electrical substitution calorimeter, is designed for automatic remote operation in any environment, and can make irradiance measurements in the range from low-level IR fluxes up to 30 solar constants with small absolute uncertainty. The instrument operates in a differential mode by chopping the radiant flux to be measured at a slow rate, and irradiance is determined from two electrical power measurements together with the instrumental constant. Results are reported for measurements of the solar constant with two types of ACRs. The more accurate measurement yielded a value of 136.6 plus or minus 0.7 mW/sq cm (1.958 plus or minus 0.010 cal/sq cm per min).

  15. Absolute calibration of TFTR helium proportional counters

    SciTech Connect

    Strachan, J.D.; Diesso, M.; Jassby, D.; Johnson, L.; McCauley, S.; Munsat, T.; Roquemore, A.L.; Barnes, C.W. |; Loughlin, M. |

    1995-06-01

    The TFTR helium proportional counters are located in the central five (5) channels of the TFTR multichannel neutron collimator. These detectors were absolutely calibrated using a 14 MeV neutron generator positioned at the horizontal midplane of the TFTR vacuum vessel. The neutron generator position was scanned in centimeter steps to determine the collimator aperture width to 14 MeV neutrons and the absolute sensitivity of each channel. Neutron profiles were measured for TFTR plasmas with time resolution between 5 msec and 50 msec depending upon count rates. The He detectors were used to measure the burnup of 1 MeV tritons in deuterium plasmas, the transport of tritium in trace tritium experiments, and the residual tritium levels in plasmas following 50:50 DT experiments.

  16. Absolute Strength of the San Andreas Fault Inferred from Tectonic Loading Simulation and CMT Data Inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terakawa, T.; Matsu'Ura, M.

    2006-12-01

    In order to estimate the absolute strength of the big-bend segment (BBS) of the San Andreas Fault (SAF) we combined two different approaches, one of which is the numerical simulation of tectonic stress accumulation at and around plate boundaries and the other is the inversion analysis of seismic events to estimate tectonic stress release. With the 3-D tectonic loading model based on elastic dislocation theory, we numerically computed the absolute tectonic stress fields at and around BBS for six representative cases with different friction coefficients (0.6, 0.3 and 0.1) of SAF and surrounding thrust faults. In order to compare the theoretical results with seismological observations, we extracted only the stress field related to shear faulting (seismogenic stress field) from the computed absolute stress field. The patterns of the stress field for the representative cases are significantly different from each other within the distance range of 50 km from BBS. In this range, the rotation angle of the maximum horizontal compressive principal stress axis measured from the strike of BBS changes from 45o to 90o with distance from BBS. The range of the stress rotation becomes broader as the absolute strength of BBS becomes higher. The expected type of faulting in this range also depends on the absolute strength of BBS. On the other hand, we obtained the pattern of seismogenic stress field around BBS through an inversion analysis with CMT data. The type of faulting expected from the inverted stress field changes with distance from BBS as follows: thrust faulting with a strike oblique to BBS in the vicinity of BBS, thrust faulting with the dip-angle of 45o and a strike parallel to BBS in the range of 50-100 km from BBS, and vertical strike-slip faulting with a strike oblique to BBS in the region farther than 100 km. From the inverted stress field we can find a fault-parallel zone with high moment release rates at about 40 km southwest of BBS, which can be considered to play

  17. On the emission coefficient of uranium plasmas.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, R. T.; Campbell, H. D.; Mack, J. M.

    1973-01-01

    The emission coefficient for uranium plasmas (temperature: 8000 K) was measured for the wavelength range from 1200 to 6000 A. The results were compared to theoretical calculations and other measurements. Reasonable agreement between theoretical predictions and our measurements was found in the region from 1200 to 2000 A. Although it was difficult to make absolute comparisons among the different reported measurements, considerable disagreement was found for the higher wavelength region. A short discussion regarding the overall comparisons is given, and final suggestions are made as to the most appropriate emission coefficient values to be used in future design calculations. The absorption coefficient for the same wavelength interval is also reported.

  18. Atomic data from the iron project. 3: Rate coefficients for electron impact excitation of boron-like ions: Ne VI, Mg VIII, Al IX, Si X, S XII, Ar XIV, Ca XVI and Fe XXII

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Hong Lin; Graziani, Mark; Pradhan, Anil K.

    1994-01-01

    Collison strengths and maxwellian averaged rate coefficients have been calculated for the 105 transitions among all 15 fine structure levels of the 8 LS terms 2s(sup 2) 2 P(P-2(sup 0 sub 1/, 3/2)), 2s2p(sup 2)(P-4(sub 1/2,3/2,5/2), D-2(sub 3/2, 5/2), S-2(sub 1/2), P-2(sub 1/2, 3/2)), 2p(sup 3)(S-4(sup 0)(sub 3/2), D-2(sup 0 sub 3/2, 5/2), P-2(sup 0 sub 1/2, 3/2)) in highly- charged B-like Ne, Mg, Al, Si, S, Ar, Ca and Fe. Rate coefficients have been tabulated at a wide range of temperatures, depending on the ion charge and abundance in plasma sources. Earlier work for O IV has also been extended to include the high temperature range. A brief discussion of the calculations, sample results, and comparison with earlier works is also given. While much of the new data should be applicable to UV spectral diagnostics, the new rates for the important ground state fine structure transition P-2(sup 0 sub 1/2)-P-2(sup 0 sub 3/2) should result in significant revision of the IR cooling rates in plasmas where B-like ions are prominent constituents, since the new rate coefficients are generally higher by several factors compared with the older data.

  19. Communication: Rate coefficients of the H + CH{sub 4} → H{sub 2} + CH{sub 3} reaction from ring polymer molecular dynamics on a highly accurate potential energy surface

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, Qingyong Chen, Jun Zhang, Dong H.

    2015-09-14

    The ring polymer molecular dynamics (RPMD) calculations are performed to calculate rate constants for the title reaction on the recently constructed potential energy surface based on permutation invariant polynomial (PIP) neural-network (NN) fitting [J. Li et al., J. Chem. Phys. 142, 204302 (2015)]. By inspecting convergence, 16 beads are used in computing free-energy barriers at 300 K ≤ T ≤ 1000 K, while different numbers of beads are used for transmission coefficients. The present RPMD rates are in excellent agreement with quantum rates computed on the same potential energy surface, as well as with the experimental measurements, demonstrating further that the RPMD is capable of producing accurate rates for polyatomic chemical reactions even at rather low temperatures.

  20. Sentinel-2/MSI absolute calibration: first results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lonjou, V.; Lachérade, S.; Fougnie, B.; Gamet, P.; Marcq, S.; Raynaud, J.-L.; Tremas, T.

    2015-10-01

    Sentinel-2 is an optical imaging mission devoted to the operational monitoring of land and coastal areas. It is developed in partnership between the European Commission and the European Space Agency. The Sentinel-2 mission is based on a satellites constellation deployed in polar sun-synchronous orbit. It will offer a unique combination of global coverage with a wide field of view (290km), a high revisit (5 days with two satellites), a high resolution (10m, 20m and 60m) and multi-spectral imagery (13 spectral bands in visible and shortwave infra-red domains). CNES is involved in the instrument commissioning in collaboration with ESA. This paper reviews all the techniques that will be used to insure an absolute calibration of the 13 spectral bands better than 5% (target 3%), and will present the first results if available. First, the nominal calibration technique, based on an on-board sun diffuser, is detailed. Then, we show how vicarious calibration methods based on acquisitions over natural targets (oceans, deserts, and Antarctica during winter) will be used to check and improve the accuracy of the absolute calibration coefficients. Finally, the verification scheme, exploiting photometer in-situ measurements over Lacrau plain, is described. A synthesis, including spectral coherence, inter-methods agreement and temporal evolution, will conclude the paper.

  1. CAN WE DETERMINE PENETRATION COEFFICIENTS AND DEPOSITION RATES FROM FIELD STUDIES? RESULTS OF A 37-PERSON PANEL STUDY IN NORTH CAROLINA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The contribution of outdoor particles to indoor concentrations is governed by three physical processes: air exchange, penetration, and deposition. Air exchange rates can be measured during field studies, but the other two parameters must be estimated. Over the past few years,...

  2. Robust control design with real parameter uncertainty using absolute stability theory. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    How, Jonathan P.; Hall, Steven R.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis is to investigate an extension of mu theory for robust control design by considering systems with linear and nonlinear real parameter uncertainties. In the process, explicit connections are made between mixed mu and absolute stability theory. In particular, it is shown that the upper bounds for mixed mu are a generalization of results from absolute stability theory. Both state space and frequency domain criteria are developed for several nonlinearities and stability multipliers using the wealth of literature on absolute stability theory and the concepts of supply rates and storage functions. The state space conditions are expressed in terms of Riccati equations and parameter-dependent Lyapunov functions. For controller synthesis, these stability conditions are used to form an overbound of the H2 performance objective. A geometric interpretation of the equivalent frequency domain criteria in terms of off-axis circles clarifies the important role of the multiplier and shows that both the magnitude and phase of the uncertainty are considered. A numerical algorithm is developed to design robust controllers that minimize the bound on an H2 cost functional and satisfy an analysis test based on the Popov stability multiplier. The controller and multiplier coefficients are optimized simultaneously, which avoids the iteration and curve-fitting procedures required by the D-K procedure of mu synthesis. Several benchmark problems and experiments on the Middeck Active Control Experiment at M.I.T. demonstrate that these controllers achieve good robust performance and guaranteed stability bounds.

  3. An agreement coefficient for image comparison

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ji, L.; Gallo, K.

    2006-01-01

    Combination of datasets acquired from different sensor systems is necessary to construct a long time-series dataset for remotely sensed land-surface variables. Assessment of the agreement of the data derived from various sources is an important issue in understanding the data continuity through the time-series. Some traditional measures, including correlation coefficient, coefficient of determination, mean absolute error, and root mean square error, are not always optimal for evaluating the data agreement. For this reason, we developed a new agreement coefficient for comparing two different images. The agreement coefficient has the following properties: non-dimensional, bounded, symmetric, and distinguishable between systematic and unsystematic differences. The paper provides examples of agreement analyses for hypothetical data and actual remotely sensed data. The results demonstrate that the agreement coefficient does include the above properties, and therefore is a useful tool for image comparison. ?? 2006 American Society for Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing.

  4. Absolute transition probabilities of phosphorus.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, M. H.; Roig, R. A.; Bengtson, R. D.

    1971-01-01

    Use of a gas-driven shock tube to measure the absolute strengths of 21 P I lines and 126 P II lines (from 3300 to 6900 A). Accuracy for prominent, isolated neutral and ionic lines is estimated to be 28 to 40% and 18 to 30%, respectively. The data and the corresponding theoretical predictions are examined for conformity with the sum rules.-

  5. The rate coefficient for the reaction NO2 + NO3 yielding NO + NO2 + O2 from 273 to 313 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantrell, Chris A.; Shetter, Richard E.; Mcdaniel, Anthony H.; Calvert, Jack G.

    1990-01-01

    The ratio of rate constants for the reaction NO3 + NO yielding 2 NO2 (k3) and the reaction NO2 + NO3 yielding NO + NO2 + O2 (k4) were determined by measuring of NO and NO2 concentrations of NO and NO2 in an N2O5/NO2/N2 mixture over the temperature range 273-313 K. The measured ratio was found to be expressed by the equation k3/k4 = 387 exp(-1375/T). The results are consistent with those of Hammer et al. (1986).

  6. Gas-phase rate coefficients for the OH + n-, i-, s-, and t-butanol reactions measured between 220 and 380 K: non-Arrhenius behavior and site-specific reactivity.

    PubMed

    McGillen, Max R; Baasandorj, Munkhbayar; Burkholder, James B

    2013-06-01

    Butanol (C4H9OH) is a potential biofuel alternative in fossil fuel gasoline and diesel formulations. The usage of butanol would necessarily lead to direct emissions into the atmosphere; thus, an understanding of its atmospheric processing and environmental impact is desired. Reaction with the OH radical is expected to be the predominant atmospheric removal process for the four aliphatic isomers of butanol. In this work, rate coefficients, k, for the gas-phase reaction of the n-, i-, s-, and t-butanol isomers with the OH radical were measured under pseudo-first-order conditions in OH using pulsed laser photolysis to produce OH radicals and laser induced fluorescence to monitor its temporal profile. Rate coefficients were measured over the temperature range 221-381 K at total pressures between 50 and 200 Torr (He). The reactions exhibited non-Arrhenius behavior over this temperature range and no dependence on total pressure with k(296 K) values of (9.68 ± 0.75), (9.72 ± 0.72), (8.88 ± 0.69), and (1.04 ± 0.08) (in units of 10(-12) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1)) for n-, i-, s-, and t-butanol, respectively. The quoted uncertainties are at the 2σ level and include estimated systematic errors. The observed non-Arrhenius behavior is interpreted here to result from a competition between the available H-atom abstraction reactive sites, which have different activation energies and pre-exponential factors. The present results are compared with results from previous kinetic studies, structure-activity relationships (SARs), and theoretical calculations and the discrepancies are discussed. Results from this work were combined with available high temperature (1200-1800 K) rate coefficient data and room temperature reaction end-product yields, where available, to derive a self-consistent site-specific set of reaction rate coefficients of the form AT(n) exp(-E/RT) for use in atmospheric and combustion chemistry modeling. PMID:23627621

  7. The Absolute Spectrum Polarimeter (ASP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kogut, A. J.

    2010-01-01

    The Absolute Spectrum Polarimeter (ASP) is an Explorer-class mission to map the absolute intensity and linear polarization of the cosmic microwave background and diffuse astrophysical foregrounds over the full sky from 30 GHz to 5 THz. The principal science goal is the detection and characterization of linear polarization from an inflationary epoch in the early universe, with tensor-to-scalar ratio r much greater than 1O(raised to the power of { -3}) and Compton distortion y < 10 (raised to the power of{-6}). We describe the ASP instrument and mission architecture needed to detect the signature of an inflationary epoch in the early universe using only 4 semiconductor bolometers.

  8. Absolute calibration of optical flats

    DOEpatents

    Sommargren, Gary E.

    2005-04-05

    The invention uses the phase shifting diffraction interferometer (PSDI) to provide a true point-by-point measurement of absolute flatness over the surface of optical flats. Beams exiting the fiber optics in a PSDI have perfect spherical wavefronts. The measurement beam is reflected from the optical flat and passed through an auxiliary optic to then be combined with the reference beam on a CCD. The combined beams include phase errors due to both the optic under test and the auxiliary optic. Standard phase extraction algorithms are used to calculate this combined phase error. The optical flat is then removed from the system and the measurement fiber is moved to recombine the two beams. The newly combined beams include only the phase errors due to the auxiliary optic. When the second phase measurement is subtracted from the first phase measurement, the absolute phase error of the optical flat is obtained.

  9. Low temperature rate coefficients for the reactions of 1CH2 with reactive and non-reactive species, and the implications for Titan's atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglas, Kevin; Slater, Eloise; Blitz, Mark; Plane, John; Heard, Dwayne; Seakins, Paul

    2016-04-01

    The Cassini-Huygens mission to Titan revealed unexpectedly large amounts of benzene in the troposphere, and confirmed the absence of a global ethane ocean as predicted by photochemical models of methane conversion over the lifetime of the solar system. An important chemical intermediate in both the production and loss of benzene and ethane is the first electronically excited state of methylene, 1CH2. For example, at room temperature an important reaction of 1CH2 is with acetylene (R1a), leading to the formation of propargyl (C3H3)[1]. The subsequent recombination of propargyl radicals is the major suggested route to benzene in Titan's atmosphere (R2)[2]. In addition to reaction of 1CH2 leading to products, there is also competition between inelastic electronic relaxation to form the ground triplet state 3CH2 (R1b). This ground state 3CH2 has a markedly different reactivity to the singlet, reacting primarily with methyl radicals (CH3) to form ethene (R3). As methyl radical recombination is the primary route to ethane (R4)[3], reactions of 1CH2 will also heavily influence the ethane budget on Titan. 1CH2 + C2H2 → C3H3 + H (R1a) 1CH2 + C2H2 → 3CH2 + C2H2 (R1b) C3H3 + C3H3 → C6H6 (R2) 3CH2 + CH3 → C2H4 + H (R3) CH3 + CH3 (+ M) → C2H6 (R4) Thus this competition between chemical reaction and electronic relaxation in the reactions of 1CH2 with H2, CH4, C2H4, and C2H6 will play an important role in determining the benzene and ethane budgets on Titan. Despite this there are no measurements of any rate constants for 1CH2 at temperatures relevant to Titan's atmosphere (60 - 170 K). Using a pulsed Laval nozzle apparatus coupled with pulsed laser photolysis laser-induced fluorescence, the low temperature reaction kinetics for the removal of 1CH2 with nitrogen, hydrogen, methane, ethane, ethene, acetylene, and oxygen, have been studied. The results revealed an increase in the removal rate of 1CH2 at temperatures below 200 K, with a sharp increase of around a factor of

  10. Factor Scores, Structure Coefficients, and Communality Coefficients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodwyn, Fara

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents heuristic explanations of factor scores, structure coefficients, and communality coefficients. Common misconceptions regarding these topics are clarified. In addition, (a) the regression (b) Bartlett, (c) Anderson-Rubin, and (d) Thompson methods for calculating factor scores are reviewed. Syntax necessary to execute all four…

  11. Communication: Equilibrium rate coefficients from atomistic simulations: The O((3)P) + NO((2)Π) → O2(X(3)Σg(-)) + N((4)S) reaction at temperatures relevant to the hypersonic flight regime.

    PubMed

    Castro-Palacio, Juan Carlos; Bemish, Raymond J; Meuwly, Markus

    2015-03-01

    The O((3)P) + NO((2)Π) → O2(X(3)Σg(-)) + N((4)S) reaction is among the N- and O- involving reactions that dominate the energetics of the reactive air flow around spacecraft during hypersonic atmospheric re-entry. In this regime, the temperature in the bow shock typically ranges from 1000 to 20,000 K. The forward and reverse rate coefficients for this reaction derived directly from trajectory calculations over this range of temperature are reported in this letter. Results compare well with the established equilibrium constants for the same reaction from thermodynamic quantities derived from spectroscopy in the gas phase which paves the way for large-scale in silico investigations of equilibrium rates under extreme conditions. PMID:25747053

  12. Determination of the photolysis rate coefficient of monochlorodimethyl sulfide (MClDMS) in the atmosphere and its implications for the enhancement of SO2 production from the DMS + Cl2 reaction.

    PubMed

    Copeland, G; Lee, E P F; Williams, R G; Archibald, A T; Shallcross, D E; Dyke, J M

    2014-01-01

    In this work, the photolysis rate coefficient of CH3SCH2Cl (MClDMS) in the lower atmosphere has been determined and has been used in a marine boundary layer (MBL) box model to determine the enhancement of SO2 production arising from the reaction DMS + Cl2. Absorption cross sections measured in the 28000-34000 cm(-1) region have been used to determine photolysis rate coefficients of MClDMS in the troposphere at 10 solar zenith angles (SZAs). These have been used to determine the lifetimes of MClDMS in the troposphere. At 0° SZA, a photolysis lifetime of 3-4 h has been obtained. The results show that the photolysis lifetime of MClDMS is significantly smaller than the lifetimes with respect to reaction with OH (≈ 4.6 days) and with Cl atoms (≈ 1.2 days). It has also been shown, using experimentally derived dissociation energies with supporting quantum-chemical calculations, that the dominant photodissocation route of MClDMS is dissociation of the C-S bond to give CH3S and CH2Cl. MBL box modeling calculations show that buildup of MClDMS at night from the Cl2 + DMS reaction leads to enhanced SO2 production during the day. The extra SO2 arises from photolysis of MClDMS to give CH3S and CH2Cl, followed by subsequent oxidation of CH3S. PMID:24280000

  13. The AFGL absolute gravity program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammond, J. A.; Iliff, R. L.

    1978-01-01

    A brief discussion of the AFGL's (Air Force Geophysics Laboratory) program in absolute gravity is presented. Support of outside work and in-house studies relating to gravity instrumentation are discussed. A description of the current transportable system is included and the latest results are presented. These results show good agreement with measurements at the AFGL site by an Italian system. The accuracy obtained by the transportable apparatus is better than 0.1 microns sq sec 10 microgal and agreement with previous measurements is within the combined uncertainties of the measurements.

  14. Channel specific rate constants for reactions of O(1D) with HCl and HBr

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wine, P. H.; Wells, J. R.; Ravishankara, A. R.

    1986-01-01

    The absolute rate coefficients and product yields for reactions of O(1D) with HCl(1) and HBr(2) at 287 K are presently determined by means of the time-resolved resonance fluorescence detection of O(3P) and H(2S) in conjunction with pulsed laser photolysis of O3/HX/He mixtures. Total rate coefficients for O(1D) removal are found to be, in units of 10 to the -10th cu cm/molecule per sec, k(1) = 1.50 + or - 0.18 and k(2) 1.48 + or - 0.16; the absolute accuracy of these rate coefficients is estimated to be + or - 20 percent.

  15. Transient absolute robustness in stochastic biochemical networks.

    PubMed

    Enciso, German A

    2016-08-01

    Absolute robustness allows biochemical networks to sustain a consistent steady-state output in the face of protein concentration variability from cell to cell. This property is structural and can be determined from the topology of the network alone regardless of rate parameters. An important question regarding these systems is the effect of discrete biochemical noise in the dynamical behaviour. In this paper, a variable freezing technique is developed to show that under mild hypotheses the corresponding stochastic system has a transiently robust behaviour. Specifically, after finite time the distribution of the output approximates a Poisson distribution, centred around the deterministic mean. The approximation becomes increasingly accurate, and it holds for increasingly long finite times, as the total protein concentrations grow to infinity. In particular, the stochastic system retains a transient, absolutely robust behaviour corresponding to the deterministic case. This result contrasts with the long-term dynamics of the stochastic system, which eventually must undergo an extinction event that eliminates robustness and is completely different from the deterministic dynamics. The transiently robust behaviour may be sufficient to carry out many forms of robust signal transduction and cellular decision-making in cellular organisms. PMID:27581485

  16. Ring-polymer molecular dynamics: Rate coefficient calculations for energetically symmetric (near thermoneutral) insertion reactions (X + H{sub 2}) → HX + H(X = C({sup 1}D), S({sup 1}D))

    SciTech Connect

    Suleimanov, Yury V.; Kong, Wendi J.; Green, William H.; Guo, Hua

    2014-12-28

    Following our previous study of prototypical insertion reactions of energetically asymmetric type with the RPMD (Ring-Polymer Molecular Dynamics) method [Y. Li, Y. Suleimanov, and H. Guo, J. Phys. Chem. Lett. 5, 700 (2014)], we extend it to two other prototypical insertion reactions with much less exothermicity (near thermoneutral), namely, X + H{sub 2} → HX + H where X = C({sup 1}D), S({sup 1}D), in order to assess the accuracy of this method for calculating thermal rate coefficients for this class of reactions. For both chemical reactions, RPMD displays remarkable accuracy and agreement with the previous quantum dynamic results that make it encouraging for the future application of the RPMD to other barrier-less, complex-forming reactions involving polyatomic reactants with any exothermicity.

  17. Absolute/convective instability of planar viscoelastic jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Prasun K.; Zaki, Tamer A.

    2015-01-01

    Spatiotemporal linear stability analysis is used to investigate the onset of local absolute instability in planar viscoelastic jets. The influence of viscoelasticity in dilute polymer solutions is modeled with the FENE-P constitutive equation which requires the specification of a non-dimensional polymer relaxation time (the Weissenberg number, We), the maximum polymer extensibility, L, and the ratio of solvent and solution viscosities, β. A two-parameter family of velocity profiles is used as the base state with the parameter, S, controlling the amount of co- or counter-flow while N-1 sets the thickness of the jet shear layer. We examine how the variation of these fluid and flow parameters affects the minimum value of S at which the flow becomes locally absolutely unstable. Initially setting the Reynolds number to Re = 500, we find that the first varicose jet-column mode dictates the presence of absolute instability, and increasing the Weissenberg number produces important changes in the nature of the instability. The region of absolute instability shifts towards thin shear layers, and the amount of back-flow needed for absolute instability decreases (i.e., the influence of viscoelasticity is destabilizing). Additionally, when We is sufficiently large and N-1 is sufficiently small, single-stream jets become absolutely unstable. Numerical experiments with approximate equations show that both the polymer and solvent contributions to the stress become destabilizing when the scaled shear rate, η = /W e dU¯1/dx 2L ( /d U ¯ 1 d x 2 is the base-state velocity gradient), is sufficiently large. These qualitative trends are largely unchanged when the Reynolds number is reduced; however, the relative importance of the destabilizing stresses increases tangibly. Consequently, absolute instability is substantially enhanced, and single-stream jets become absolutely unstable over a sizable portion of the parameter space.

  18. The reaction NH2 + PH3 yields NH3 + PH2: Absolute rate constant measurement and implication for NH3 and PH3 photochemistry in the atmosphere of Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bosco, S. R.; Brobst, W. D.; Nava, D. F.; Stief, L. J.

    1983-01-01

    The rate constant is measured over the temperature interval 218-456 K using the technique of flash photolysis-laser-induced fluorescence. NH2 radicals are produced by the flash photolysis of ammonia highly diluted in argon, and the decay of fluorescent NH2 photons is measured by multiscaling techniques. For each of the five temperatures employed in the study, the results are shown to be independent of variations in PH3 concentration, total pressure (argon), and flash intensity. It is found that the rate constant results are best represented for T between 218 and 456 K by the expression k = (1.52 + or - 0.16) x 10 to the -12th exp(-928 + or - 56/T) cu cm per molecule per sec; the error quoted is 1 standard deviation. This is the first determination of the rate constant for the reaction NH2 + PH3. The data are compared with an estimate made in order to explain results of the radiolysis of NH3-PH3 mixtures. The Arrhenius parameters determined here for NH2 + PH3 are then constrasted with those for the corresponding reactions of H and OH with PH3.

  19. Cosmology with negative absolute temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieira, J. P. P.; Byrnes, Christian T.; Lewis, Antony

    2016-08-01

    Negative absolute temperatures (NAT) are an exotic thermodynamical consequence of quantum physics which has been known since the 1950's (having been achieved in the lab on a number of occasions). Recently, the work of Braun et al. [1] has rekindled interest in negative temperatures and hinted at a possibility of using NAT systems in the lab as dark energy analogues. This paper goes one step further, looking into the cosmological consequences of the existence of a NAT component in the Universe. NAT-dominated expanding Universes experience a borderline phantom expansion (w < ‑1) with no Big Rip, and their contracting counterparts are forced to bounce after the energy density becomes sufficiently large. Both scenarios might be used to solve horizon and flatness problems analogously to standard inflation and bouncing cosmologies. We discuss the difficulties in obtaining and ending a NAT-dominated epoch, and possible ways of obtaining density perturbations with an acceptable spectrum.

  20. Swarm's Absolute Scalar Magnetometer metrological performances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leger, J.; Fratter, I.; Bertrand, F.; Jager, T.; Morales, S.

    2012-12-01

    The Absolute Scalar Magnetometer (ASM) has been developed for the ESA Earth Observation Swarm mission, planned for launch in November 2012. As its Overhauser magnetometers forerunners flown on Oersted and Champ satellites, it will deliver high resolution scalar measurements for the in-flight calibration of the Vector Field Magnetometer manufactured by the Danish Technical University. Latest results of the ground tests carried out to fully characterize all parameters that may affect its accuracy, both at instrument and satellite level, will be presented. In addition to its baseline function, the ASM can be operated either at a much higher sampling rate (burst mode at 250 Hz) or in a dual mode where it also delivers vector field measurements as a by-product. The calibration procedure and the relevant vector performances will be discussed.

  1. Absolute photon-flux measurements in the vacuum ultraviolet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samson, J. A. R.; Haddad, G. N.

    1974-01-01

    Absolute photon-flux measurements in the vacuum ultraviolet have extended to short wavelengths by use of rare-gas ionization chambers. The technique involves the measurement of the ion current as a function of the gas pressure in the ion chamber. The true value of the ion current, and hence the absolute photon flux, is obtained by extrapolating the ion current to zero gas pressure. Examples are given at 162 and 266 A. The short-wavelength limit is determined only by the sensitivity of the current-measuring apparatus and by present knowledge of the photoionization processes that occur in the rate gases.

  2. Rate of strontium sorption and the effects of variable aqueous concentrations of sodium and potassium on strontium distribution coefficients of a surficial sediment at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bunde, R.L.; Rosentreter, J.J.; Liszewski, M.J.

    1998-01-01

    The rate of strontium sorption and the effects of variable aqueous concentrations of sodium and potassium on strontium sorption were measured as part of an investigation to determine strontium chemical transport properties of a surficial sediment at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), Idaho. Batch experimental techniques were used to determine the rate of strontium sorption and strontium distribution coefficients (K(d)s) between aqueous and solid phases. Rate experiments indicate that strontium in solution reached an apparent equilibrium with the sediment in 26 h. K(d)s were derived using the linear isotherm model at initial sodium concentrations from 100 to 5,000 mg/l and initial potassium concentrations from 2 to 150 mg/l. K(d)s ranged from 56 ?? 2 to 62 ?? 3 ml/g at initial aqueous concentrations of sodium and potassium equal to or less than 300 and 150 mg/l, respectively. K(d)s hinged from 4.7 ?? 0.2 to 19 ?? 1 ml/g with initial aqueous concentrations of sodium between 1,000 and 5,000 mg/l. These data indicate that sodium concentrations greater than 300 mg/l in wastewater increase the availability of strontium for transport beneath waste disposal ponds at the INEL by decreasing strontium sorption on the surficial sediment. Wastewater concentrations of sodium and potassium less than 300 and 150 mg/l, respectively, have little effect on the availability of strontium for transport.The rate of strontium sorption and the effects of variable aqueous concentrations of sodium and potassium on strontium sorption were measured as part of an investigation to determine strontium chemical transport properties of a surficial sediment at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), Idaho. Batch experimental techniques were used to determine the rate of strontium sorption and strontium distribution coefficients (Kds) between aqueous and solid phases. Rate experiments indicate that strontium in solution reached an apparent equilibrium with the sediment in 26

  3. Improving HST Pointing & Absolute Astrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lallo, Matthew; Nelan, E.; Kimmer, E.; Cox, C.; Casertano, S.

    2007-05-01

    Accurate absolute astrometry is becoming increasingly important in an era of multi-mission archives and virtual observatories. Hubble Space Telescope's (HST's) Guidestar Catalog II (GSC2) has reduced coordinate error to around 0.25 arcsecond, a factor 2 or more compared with GSC1. With this reduced catalog error, special attention must be given to calibrate and maintain the Fine Guidance Sensors (FGSs) and Science Instruments (SIs) alignments in HST to a level well below this in order to ensure that the accuracy of science product's astrometry keywords and target positioning are limited only by the catalog errors. After HST Servicing Mission 4, such calibrations' improvement in "blind" pointing accuracy will allow for more efficient COS acquisitions. Multiple SIs and FGSs each have their own footprints in the spatially shared HST focal plane. It is the small changes over time in primarily the whole-body positions & orientations of these instruments & guiders relative to one another that is addressed by this work. We describe the HST Cycle 15 program CAL/OTA 11021 which, along with future variants of it, determines and maintains positions and orientations of the SIs and FGSs to better than 50 milli- arcseconds and 0.04 to 0.004 degrees of roll, putting errors associated with the alignment sufficiently below GSC2 errors. We present recent alignment results and assess their errors, illustrate trends, and describe where and how the observer sees benefit from these calibrations when using HST.

  4. Absolute Instability in Coupled-Cavity TWTs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, D. M. H.; Rittersdorf, I. M.; Zhang, Peng; Lau, Y. Y.; Simon, D. H.; Gilgenbach, R. M.; Chernin, D.; Antonsen, T. M., Jr.

    2014-10-01

    This paper will present results of our analysis of absolute instability in a coupled-cavity traveling wave tube (TWT). The structure mode at the lower and upper band edges are respectively approximated by a hyperbola in the (omega, k) plane. When the Briggs-Bers criterion is applied, a threshold current for onset of absolute instability is observed at the upper band edge, but not the lower band edge. The nonexistence of absolute instability at the lower band edge is mathematically similar to the nonexistence of absolute instability that we recently demonstrated for a dielectric TWT. The existence of absolute instability at the upper band edge is mathematically similar to the existence of absolute instability in a gyroton traveling wave amplifier. These interesting observations will be discussed, and the practical implications will be explored. This work was supported by AFOSR, ONR, and L-3 Communications Electron Devices.

  5. Absolute negative mobility of interacting Brownian particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ou, Ya-li; Hu, Cai-tian; Wu, Jian-chun; Ai, Bao-quan

    2015-12-01

    Transport of interacting Brownian particles in a periodic potential is investigated in the presence of an ac force and a dc force. From Brownian dynamic simulations, we find that both the interaction between particles and the thermal fluctuations play key roles in the absolute negative mobility (the particle noisily moves backwards against a small constant bias). When no the interaction acts, there is only one region where the absolute negative mobility occurs. In the presence of the interaction, the absolute negative mobility may appear in multiple regions. The weak interaction can be helpful for the absolute negative mobility, while the strong interaction has a destructive impact on it.

  6. Absolute Radiometric Calibration of KOMPSAT-3A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, H. Y.; Shin, D. Y.; Kim, J. S.; Seo, D. C.; Choi, C. U.

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents a vicarious radiometric calibration of the Korea Multi-Purpose Satellite-3A (KOMPSAT-3A) performed by the Korea Aerospace Research Institute (KARI) and the Pukyong National University Remote Sensing Group (PKNU RSG) in 2015.The primary stages of this study are summarized as follows: (1) A field campaign to determine radiometric calibrated target fields was undertaken in Mongolia and South Korea. Surface reflectance data obtained in the campaign were input to a radiative transfer code that predicted at-sensor radiance. Through this process, equations and parameters were derived for the KOMPSAT-3A sensor to enable the conversion of calibrated DN to physical units, such as at-sensor radiance or TOA reflectance. (2) To validate the absolute calibration coefficients for the KOMPSAT-3A sensor, we performed a radiometric validation with a comparison of KOMPSAT-3A and Landsat-8 TOA reflectance using one of the six PICS (Libya 4). Correlations between top-of-atmosphere (TOA) radiances and the spectral band responses of the KOMPSAT-3A sensors at the Zuunmod, Mongolia and Goheung, South Korea sites were significant for multispectral bands. The average difference in TOA reflectance between KOMPSAT-3A and Landsat-8 image over the Libya 4, Libya site in the red-green-blue (RGB) region was under 3%, whereas in the NIR band, the TOA reflectance of KOMPSAT-3A was lower than the that of Landsat-8 due to the difference in the band passes of two sensors. The KOMPSAT-3Aensor includes a band pass near 940 nm that can be strongly absorbed by water vapor and therefore displayed low reflectance. Toovercome this, we need to undertake a detailed analysis using rescale methods, such as the spectral bandwidth adjustment factor.

  7. A gain-coefficient switched Alexandrite laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chris J.; van der Slot, Peter J. M.; Boller, Klaus-J.

    2013-01-01

    We report on a gain-coefficient switched Alexandrite laser. An electro-optic modulator is used to switch between high and low gain states by making use of the polarization dependent gain of Alexandrite. In gain-coefficient switched mode, the laser produces 85 ns pulses with a pulse energy of 240 mJ at a repetition rate of 5 Hz.

  8. Overspecification of color, pattern, and size: salience, absoluteness, and consistency

    PubMed Central

    Tarenskeen, Sammie; Broersma, Mirjam; Geurts, Bart

    2015-01-01

    The rates of overspecification of color, pattern, and size are compared, to investigate how salience and absoluteness contribute to the production of overspecification. Color and pattern are absolute and salient attributes, whereas size is relative and less salient. Additionally, a tendency toward consistent responses is assessed. Using a within-participants design, we find similar rates of color and pattern overspecification, which are both higher than the rate of size overspecification. Using a between-participants design, however, we find similar rates of pattern and size overspecification, which are both lower than the rate of color overspecification. This indicates that although many speakers are more likely to include color than pattern (probably because color is more salient), they may also treat pattern like color due to a tendency toward consistency. We find no increase in size overspecification when the salience of size is increased, suggesting that speakers are more likely to include absolute than relative attributes. However, we do find an increase in size overspecification when mentioning the attributes is triggered, which again shows that speakers tend to refer in a consistent manner, and that there are circumstances in which even size overspecification is frequently produced. PMID:26594190

  9. Inequalities, Absolute Value, and Logical Connectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parish, Charles R.

    1992-01-01

    Presents an approach to the concept of absolute value that alleviates students' problems with the traditional definition and the use of logical connectives in solving related problems. Uses a model that maps numbers from a horizontal number line to a vertical ray originating from the origin. Provides examples solving absolute value equations and…

  10. Absolute optical metrology : nanometers to kilometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dubovitsky, Serge; Lay, O. P.; Peters, R. D.; Liebe, C. C.

    2005-01-01

    We provide and overview of the developments in the field of high-accuracy absolute optical metrology with emphasis on space-based applications. Specific work on the Modulation Sideband Technology for Absolute Ranging (MSTAR) sensor is described along with novel applications of the sensor.

  11. Monolithically integrated absolute frequency comb laser system

    DOEpatents

    Wanke, Michael C.

    2016-07-12

    Rather than down-convert optical frequencies, a QCL laser system directly generates a THz frequency comb in a compact monolithically integrated chip that can be locked to an absolute frequency without the need of a frequency-comb synthesizer. The monolithic, absolute frequency comb can provide a THz frequency reference and tool for high-resolution broad band spectroscopy.

  12. Introducing the Mean Absolute Deviation "Effect" Size

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorard, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    This paper revisits the use of effect sizes in the analysis of experimental and similar results, and reminds readers of the relative advantages of the mean absolute deviation as a measure of variation, as opposed to the more complex standard deviation. The mean absolute deviation is easier to use and understand, and more tolerant of extreme…

  13. Investigating Absolute Value: A Real World Application

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kidd, Margaret; Pagni, David

    2009-01-01

    Making connections between various representations is important in mathematics. In this article, the authors discuss the numeric, algebraic, and graphical representations of sums of absolute values of linear functions. The initial explanations are accessible to all students who have experience graphing and who understand that absolute value simply…

  14. Absolute Income, Relative Income, and Happiness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ball, Richard; Chernova, Kateryna

    2008-01-01

    This paper uses data from the World Values Survey to investigate how an individual's self-reported happiness is related to (i) the level of her income in absolute terms, and (ii) the level of her income relative to other people in her country. The main findings are that (i) both absolute and relative income are positively and significantly…

  15. Son preference in Indian families: absolute versus relative wealth effects.

    PubMed

    Gaudin, Sylvestre

    2011-02-01

    The desire for male children is prevalent in India, where son preference has been shown to affect fertility behavior and intrahousehold allocation of resources. Economic theory predicts less gender discrimination in wealthier households, but demographers and sociologists have argued that wealth can exacerbate bias in the Indian context. I argue that these apparently conflicting theories can be reconciled and simultaneously tested if one considers that they are based on two different notions of wealth: one related to resource constraints (absolute wealth), and the other to notions of local status (relative wealth). Using cross-sectional data from the 1998-1999 and 2005-2006 National Family and Health Surveys, I construct measures of absolute and relative wealth by using principal components analysis. A series of statistical models of son preference is estimated by using multilevel methods. Results consistently show that higher absolute wealth is strongly associated with lower son preference, and the effect is 20%-40% stronger when the household's community-specific wealth score is included in the regression. Coefficients on relative wealth are positive and significant although lower in magnitude. Results are robust to using different samples, alternative groupings of households in local areas, different estimation methods, and alternative dependent variables. PMID:21302027

  16. Absolute instability of the Gaussian wake profile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hultgren, Lennart S.; Aggarwal, Arun K.

    1987-01-01

    Linear parallel-flow stability theory has been used to investigate the effect of viscosity on the local absolute instability of a family of wake profiles with a Gaussian velocity distribution. The type of local instability, i.e., convective or absolute, is determined by the location of a branch-point singularity with zero group velocity of the complex dispersion relation for the instability waves. The effects of viscosity were found to be weak for values of the wake Reynolds number, based on the center-line velocity defect and the wake half-width, larger than about 400. Absolute instability occurs only for sufficiently large values of the center-line wake defect. The critical value of this parameter increases with decreasing wake Reynolds number, thereby indicating a shrinking region of absolute instability with decreasing wake Reynolds number. If backflow is not allowed, absolute instability does not occur for wake Reynolds numbers smaller than about 38.

  17. Coefficients of Effective Length.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Roger H.

    1981-01-01

    Under certain conditions, a validity Coefficient of Effective Length (CEL) can produce highly misleading results. A modified coefficent is suggested for use when empirical studies indicate that underlying assumptions have been violated. (Author/BW)

  18. Orion Absolute Navigation System Progress and Challenge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holt, Greg N.; D'Souza, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    The absolute navigation design of NASA's Orion vehicle is described. It has undergone several iterations and modifications since its inception, and continues as a work-in-progress. This paper seeks to benchmark the current state of the design and some of the rationale and analysis behind it. There are specific challenges to address when preparing a timely and effective design for the Exploration Flight Test (EFT-1), while still looking ahead and providing software extensibility for future exploration missions. The primary onboard measurements in a Near-Earth or Mid-Earth environment consist of GPS pseudo-range and delta-range, but for future explorations missions the use of star-tracker and optical navigation sources need to be considered. Discussions are presented for state size and composition, processing techniques, and consider states. A presentation is given for the processing technique using the computationally stable and robust UDU formulation with an Agee-Turner Rank-One update. This allows for computational savings when dealing with many parameters which are modeled as slowly varying Gauss-Markov processes. Preliminary analysis shows up to a 50% reduction in computation versus a more traditional formulation. Several state elements are discussed and evaluated, including position, velocity, attitude, clock bias/drift, and GPS measurement biases in addition to bias, scale factor, misalignment, and non-orthogonalities of the accelerometers and gyroscopes. Another consideration is the initialization of the EKF in various scenarios. Scenarios such as single-event upset, ground command, and cold start are discussed as are strategies for whole and partial state updates as well as covariance considerations. Strategies are given for dealing with latent measurements and high-rate propagation using multi-rate architecture. The details of the rate groups and the data ow between the elements is discussed and evaluated.

  19. Hydroxyl radical reaction rate coefficients as a function of temperature and IR absorption cross sections for CF3CH=CH2 (HFO-1243zf), potential replacement of CF3CH2F (HFC-134a).

    PubMed

    González, Sergio; Jiménez, Elena; Ballesteros, Bernabé; Martínez, Ernesto; Albaladejo, José

    2015-04-01

    CF3CH=CH2 (hydrofluoroolefin, HFO-1243zf) is a potential replacement of high global-warming potential (GWP) hydrofluorocarbon (HFC-134a, CF3CFH2). Both the atmospheric lifetime and the radiative efficiency of HFO-1243zf are parameters needed for estimating the GWP of this species. Therefore, the aim of this work is (i) to estimate the atmospheric lifetime of HFO-1243zf from the reported OH rate coefficients, k OH, determined under tropospheric conditions and (ii) to calculate its radiative efficiency from the reported IR absorption cross sections. The OH rate coefficient at 298 K also allows the estimation of the photochemical ozone creation potential (ε(POCP)). The pulsed laser photolysis coupled to a laser-induced fluorescence technique was used to determine k OH for the reaction of OH radicals with HFO-1243zf as a function of pressure (50-650 Torr of He) and temperature (263-358 K). Gas-phase IR spectra of HFO-1243zf were recorded at room temperature using a Fourier transform IR spectrometer between 500 and 4,000 cm(-1). At all temperatures, k OH did not depend on bath gas concentration (i.e., on the total pressure between 50 and 650 Torr of He). A slight but noticeable T dependence of k OH was observed in the temperature range investigated. The observed behavior is well described by the following Arrhenius expression: k OH(T) = (7.65 ± 0.26) × 10(-13) exp [(165 ± 10) / T] cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1). Negligible IR absorption of HFO-1243zf was observed at wavenumbers greater than 1,700 cm(-1). Therefore, IR absorption cross sections, [Formula: see text], were determined in the 500-1,700 cm(-1) range. Integrated [Formula: see text] were determined between 650 and 1,800 cm(-1) for comparison purposes. The main diurnal removal pathway for HFO-1243zf is the reaction with OH radicals, which accounts for 64% of the overall loss by homogeneous reactions at 298 K. Globally, the lifetime due to OH reaction (τ OH) was estimated to be 8.7 days under

  20. Rate coefficients of combustion/fuel conversion reactions by high-temperature photochemistry. Progress report, September 1, 1979-August 31, 1980. [400 to 1700 K and 1200 to 2600 K

    SciTech Connect

    Felder, W.

    1980-09-01

    Reliable kinetic data on isolated elementary combustion reactions spanning a broad temperature range are required for modeling and scaling studies aimed at improving the performance of, and reducing the pollutant formation from, fossil-fuel burning devices. Such data are generally not available. In the present work a new technique, High Temperature Photochemistry (HTP), has been developed to provide such data. It combines the technology of the high-temperature, fast-flow reactors (HTFFR) we developed to study kinetics of metal atom/oxide reactions in the 300 to 1900 K range with the methodology of the flash photolysis technique which, although used widely for study of such combustion reactions, has previously been limited to studies at or near room temperature. This report discusses aspects of the complete HTP study on the benchmark reaction, O + CH/sub 4/ ..-->../sup (1)/ OH + CH/sub 3/, including new data in the 1500 to 1700 K range obtained in the present contract year. The data which extend from 400 to 1700 K overlap the previous low temperature (250 to 950 K) and high temperature (1200 to 2600 K) measurements of k/sub 1/(T) and show a curved Arrhenius plot, in excellent agreement with the more reliable work of others and with recent theoretical work. The HTP data can be fit by an empirical rate coefficient expression which is given. The HTP apparatus has been modified to conduct measurements on the reaction OH + C/sub 6/H/sub 6/ and these experiments have been initiated.

  1. Absolute optical instruments without spherical symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyc, Tomáš; Dao, H. L.; Danner, Aaron J.

    2015-11-01

    Until now, the known set of absolute optical instruments has been limited to those containing high levels of symmetry. Here, we demonstrate a method of mathematically constructing refractive index profiles that result in asymmetric absolute optical instruments. The method is based on the analogy between geometrical optics and classical mechanics and employs Lagrangians that separate in Cartesian coordinates. In addition, our method can be used to construct the index profiles of most previously known absolute optical instruments, as well as infinitely many different ones.

  2. On the Absolute Continuity of the Blackwell Measure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bárány, Balázs; Kolossváry, István

    2015-04-01

    In 1957, Blackwell expressed the entropy of hidden Markov chains using a measure which can be characterised as an invariant measure for an iterated function system with place-dependent weights. This measure, called the Blackwell measure, plays a central role in understanding the entropy rate and other important characteristics of fundamental models in information theory. We show that for a suitable set of parameter values the Blackwell measure is absolutely continuous for almost every parameter in the case of binary symmetric channels.

  3. Absolute magnitudes of trans-neptunian objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duffard, R.; Alvarez-candal, A.; Pinilla-Alonso, N.; Ortiz, J. L.; Morales, N.; Santos-Sanz, P.; Thirouin, A.

    2015-10-01

    Accurate measurements of diameters of trans- Neptunian objects are extremely complicated to obtain. Radiomatric techniques applied to thermal measurements can provide good results, but precise absolute magnitudes are needed to constrain diameters and albedos. Our objective is to measure accurate absolute magnitudes for a sample of trans- Neptunian objects, many of which have been observed, and modelled, by the "TNOs are cool" team, one of Herschel Space Observatory key projects grantes with ~ 400 hours of observing time. We observed 56 objects in filters V and R, if possible. These data, along with data available in the literature, was used to obtain phase curves and to measure absolute magnitudes by assuming a linear trend of the phase curves and considering magnitude variability due to rotational light-curve. In total we obtained 234 new magnitudes for the 56 objects, 6 of them with no reported previous measurements. Including the data from the literature we report a total of 109 absolute magnitudes.

  4. A New Gimmick for Assigning Absolute Configuration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ayorinde, F. O.

    1983-01-01

    A five-step procedure is provided to help students in making the assignment absolute configuration less bothersome. Examples for both single (2-butanol) and multi-chiral carbon (3-chloro-2-butanol) molecules are included. (JN)

  5. Measuring Seebeck Coefficient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, G. Jeffrey (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A high temperature Seebeck coefficient measurement apparatus and method with various features to minimize typical sources of errors is described. Common sources of temperature and voltage measurement errors which may impact accurate measurement are identified and reduced. Applying the identified principles, a high temperature Seebeck measurement apparatus and method employing a uniaxial, four-point geometry is described to operate from room temperature up to 1300K. These techniques for non-destructive Seebeck coefficient measurements are simple to operate, and are suitable for bulk samples with a broad range of physical types and shapes.

  6. Bounding the Bogoliubov coefficients

    SciTech Connect

    Boonserm, Petarpa; Visser, Matt

    2008-11-15

    While over the last century or more considerable effort has been put into the problem of finding approximate solutions for wave equations in general, and quantum mechanical problems in particular, it appears that as yet relatively little work seems to have been put into the complementary problem of establishing rigourous bounds on the exact solutions. We have in mind either bounds on parametric amplification and the related quantum phenomenon of particle production (as encoded in the Bogoliubov coefficients), or bounds on transmission and reflection coefficients. Modifying and streamlining an approach developed by one of the present authors [M. Visser, Phys. Rev. A 59 (1999) 427-438, (arXiv:quant-ph/9901030)], we investigate this question by developing a formal but exact solution for the appropriate second-order linear ODE in terms of a time-ordered exponential of 2x2 matrices, then relating the Bogoliubov coefficients to certain invariants of this matrix. By bounding the matrix in an appropriate manner, we can thereby bound the Bogoliubov coefficients.

  7. Direct comparisons between absolute and relative geomagnetic paleointensities: Absolute calibration of a relative paleointensity stack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mochizuki, N.; Yamamoto, Y.; Hatakeyama, T.; Shibuya, H.

    2013-12-01

    Absolute geomagnetic paleointensities (APIs) have been estimated from igneous rocks, while relative paleomagnetic intensities (RPIs) have been reported from sediment cores. These two datasets have been treated separately, as correlations between APIs and RPIs are difficult on account of age uncertainties. High-resolution RPI stacks have been constructed from globally distributed sediment cores with high sedimentation rates. Previous studies often assumed that the RPI stacks have a linear relationship with geomagnetic axial dipole moments, and calibrated the RPI values to API values. However, the assumption of a linear relationship between APIs and RPIs has not been evaluated. Also, a quantitative calibration method for the RPI is lacking. We present a procedure for directly comparing API and RPI stacks, thus allowing reliable calibrations of RPIs. Direct comparisons between APIs and RPIs were conducted with virtually no associated age errors using both tephrochronologic correlations and RPI minima. Using the stratigraphic positions of tephra layers in oxygen isotope stratigraphic records, we directly compared the RPIs and APIs reported from welded tuffs contemporaneously extruded with the tephra layers. In addition, RPI minima during geomagnetic reversals and excursions were compared with APIs corresponding to the reversals and excursions. The comparison of APIs and RPIs at these exact points allowed a reliable calibration of the RPI values. We applied this direct comparison procedure to the global RPI stack PISO-1500. For six independent calibration points, virtual axial dipole moments (VADMs) from the corresponding APIs and RPIs of the PISO-1500 stack showed a near-linear relationship. On the basis of the linear relationship, RPIs of the stack were successfully calibrated to the VADMs. The direct comparison procedure provides an absolute calibration method that will contribute to the recovery of temporal variations and distributions of geomagnetic axial dipole

  8. Absolute determination of local tropospheric OH concentrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armerding, Wolfgang; Comes, Franz-Josef

    1994-01-01

    Long path absorption (LPA) according to Lambert Beer's law is a method to determine absolute concentrations of trace gases such as tropospheric OH. We have developed a LPA instrument which is based on a rapid tuning of the light source which is a frequency doubled dye laser. The laser is tuned across two or three OH absorption features around 308 nm with a scanning speed of 0.07 cm(exp -1)/microsecond and a repetition rate of 1.3 kHz. This high scanning speed greatly reduces the fluctuation of the light intensity caused by the atmosphere. To obtain the required high sensitivity the laser output power is additionally made constant and stabilized by an electro-optical modulator. The present sensitivity is of the order of a few times 10(exp 5) OH per cm(exp 3) for an acquisition time of a minute and an absorption path length of only 1200 meters so that a folding of the optical path in a multireflection cell was possible leading to a lateral dimension of the cell of a few meters. This allows local measurements to be made. Tropospheric measurements have been carried out in 1991 resulting in the determination of OH diurnal variation at specific days in late summer. Comparison with model calculations have been made. Interferences are mainly due to SO2 absorption. The problem of OH self generation in the multireflection cell is of minor extent. This could be shown by using different experimental methods. The minimum-maximum signal to noise ratio is about 8 x 10(exp -4) for a single scan. Due to the small size of the absorption cell the realization of an open air laboratory is possible in which by use of an additional UV light source or by additional fluxes of trace gases the chemistry can be changed under controlled conditions allowing kinetic studies of tropospheric photochemistry to be made in open air.

  9. Uncertainty Analysis for Photovoltaic Degradation Rates (Poster)

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, D.; Kurtz, S.; Hansen, C.

    2014-04-01

    Dependable and predictable energy production is the key to the long-term success of the PV industry. PV systems show over the lifetime of their exposure a gradual decline that depends on many different factors such as module technology, module type, mounting configuration, climate etc. When degradation rates are determined from continuous data the statistical uncertainty is easily calculated from the regression coefficients. However, total uncertainty that includes measurement uncertainty and instrumentation drift is far more difficult to determine. A Monte Carlo simulation approach was chosen to investigate a comprehensive uncertainty analysis. The most important effect for degradation rates is to avoid instrumentation that changes over time in the field. For instance, a drifting irradiance sensor, which can be achieved through regular calibration, can lead to a substantially erroneous degradation rates. However, the accuracy of the irradiance sensor has negligible impact on degradation rate uncertainty emphasizing that precision (relative accuracy) is more important than absolute accuracy.

  10. Jasminum flexile flower absolute from India--a detailed comparison with three other jasmine absolutes.

    PubMed

    Braun, Norbert A; Kohlenberg, Birgit; Sim, Sherina; Meier, Manfred; Hammerschmidt, Franz-Josef

    2009-09-01

    Jasminum flexile flower absolute from the south of India and the corresponding vacuum headspace (VHS) sample of the absolute were analyzed using GC and GC-MS. Three other commercially available Indian jasmine absolutes from the species: J. sambac, J. officinale subsp. grandiflorum, and J. auriculatum and the respective VHS samples were used for comparison purposes. One hundred and twenty-one compounds were characterized in J. flexile flower absolute, with methyl linolate, benzyl salicylate, benzyl benzoate, (2E,6E)-farnesol, and benzyl acetate as the main constituents. A detailed olfactory evaluation was also performed. PMID:19831037

  11. Enumeration of absolute cell counts using immunophenotypic techniques.

    PubMed

    Mandy, F; Brando, B

    2001-05-01

    Absolute counting of cells or cell subsets has a number of significant clinical applications: monitoring the disease status of HIV-infected patients, enumerating residual white blood cells in leukoreduced blood products, and assessing immunodeficiency in a variety of situations. The single-platform method (flow cytometry alone) has emerged as the method of choice for absolute cell enumeration. This technology counts only the cells of interest in a precisely determined blood volume. Exact cell identification is accomplished by a logical electronic gating algorithm capable of identifying lineage-specific immunofluorescent markers. Exclusion of unwanted cells is automatic. This extensive and detailed unit presents protocols for both volumetric and flow-rate determination of residual white blood cells and of leukocyte subsets. PMID:18770719

  12. Diffusion coefficients of several aqueous alkanolamine solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Snijder, E.D.; Riele, M.J.M. te; Versteeg, G.F.; Swaaij, W.P.M. van . Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1993-07-01

    In absorption processes of acid gases (H[sub 2]S, CO[sub 2], COS) in alkanolamine solutions, diffusion coefficients are used for the calculation of the mass transfer rate. The Taylor dispersion technique was applied for the determination of diffusion coefficients of various systems. Experiments with the system KCl in water showed that the experimental setup provides accurate data. For the alkanolamines monoethanolamine (MEA), diethanolamine (DEA), methyldiethanolamine (MDEA), and di-2-propanolamine (DIPA), correlations for the diffusion coefficient as a function of temperature at different concentrations are given. A single relation for every amine has been derived which correlates the diffusion coefficients as a function of temperature and concentration. The temperature was varied between 298 and 348 K, and the concentration between 0 and 4000-5000 mol/m[sup 3]. Furthermore, a modified Stokes-Einstein relation is presented for the prediction of the diffusion coefficients in the alkanolamines in relation to the viscosity of the solvent and the diffusion coefficient at infinite dilution. The diffusion coefficients at low concentrations are compared with some available relations for the estimation of diffusion coefficients at infinite dilution, and it appears that the agreement is fairly good.

  13. Universal Cosmic Absolute and Modern Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostro, Ludwik

    The official Sciences, especially all natural sciences, respect in their researches the principle of methodic naturalism i.e. they consider all phenomena as entirely natural and therefore in their scientific explanations they do never adduce or cite supernatural entities and forces. The purpose of this paper is to show that Modern Science has its own self-existent, self-acting, and self-sufficient Natural All-in Being or Omni-Being i.e. the entire Nature as a Whole that justifies the scientific methodic naturalism. Since this Natural All-in Being is one and only It should be considered as the own scientifically justified Natural Absolute of Science and should be called, in my opinion, the Universal Cosmic Absolute of Modern Science. It will be also shown that the Universal Cosmic Absolute is ontologically enormously stratified and is in its ultimate i.e. in its most fundamental stratum trans-reistic and trans-personal. It means that in its basic stratum. It is neither a Thing or a Person although It contains in Itself all things and persons with all other sentient and conscious individuals as well, On the turn of the 20th century the Science has begun to look for a theory of everything, for a final theory, for a master theory. In my opinion the natural Universal Cosmic Absolute will constitute in such a theory the radical all penetrating Ultimate Basic Reality and will substitute step by step the traditional supernatural personal Absolute.

  14. Entropy production rate as a constraint for collisionless fluid closures

    SciTech Connect

    Fleurence, E.; Sarazin, Y.; Garbet, X.; Dif-Pradalier, G.; Ghendrih, Ph.; Grandgirard, V.; Ottaviani, M.

    2006-11-30

    A novel method is proposed to construct collisionless fluid closures accounting for some kinetic properties. The first dropped fluid moment is assumed to be a linear function of the lower order ones. Optimizing the agreement between the fluid and kinetic entropy production rates is used to constrain the coefficients of the linear development. This procedure is applied to a reduced version of the interchange instability. The closure, involving the absolute value of the wave vector, is non-local in real space. In this case, the linear instability thresholds are the same, and the linear growth rates exhibit similar characteristics. Such a method is applicable to other models and classes of instabilities.

  15. A three-axis SQUID-based absolute vector magnetometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schönau, T.; Zakosarenko, V.; Schmelz, M.; Stolz, R.; Anders, S.; Linzen, S.; Meyer, M.; Meyer, H.-G.

    2015-10-01

    We report on the development of a three-axis absolute vector magnetometer suited for mobile operation in the Earth's magnetic field. It is based on low critical temperature dc superconducting quantum interference devices (LTS dc SQUIDs) with sub-micrometer sized cross-type Josephson junctions and exhibits a white noise level of about 10 fT/Hz1/2. The width of superconducting strip lines is restricted to less than 6 μm in order to avoid flux trapping during cool-down in magnetically unshielded environment. The long-term stability of the flux-to-voltage transfer coefficients of the SQUID electronics is investigated in detail and a method is presented to significantly increase their reproducibility. We further demonstrate the long-term operation of the setup in a magnetic field varying by about 200 μT amplitude without the need for recalibration.

  16. A three-axis SQUID-based absolute vector magnetometer

    SciTech Connect

    Schönau, T.; Schmelz, M.; Stolz, R.; Anders, S.; Linzen, S.; Meyer, H.-G.; Zakosarenko, V.; Meyer, M.

    2015-10-15

    We report on the development of a three-axis absolute vector magnetometer suited for mobile operation in the Earth’s magnetic field. It is based on low critical temperature dc superconducting quantum interference devices (LTS dc SQUIDs) with sub-micrometer sized cross-type Josephson junctions and exhibits a white noise level of about 10 fT/Hz{sup 1/2}. The width of superconducting strip lines is restricted to less than 6 μm in order to avoid flux trapping during cool-down in magnetically unshielded environment. The long-term stability of the flux-to-voltage transfer coefficients of the SQUID electronics is investigated in detail and a method is presented to significantly increase their reproducibility. We further demonstrate the long-term operation of the setup in a magnetic field varying by about 200 μT amplitude without the need for recalibration.

  17. Absolute isotopic abundances of TI in meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niederer, F. R.; Papanastassiou, D. A.; Wasserburg, G. J.

    1985-03-01

    The absolute isotope abundance of Ti has been determined in Ca-Al-rich inclusions from the Allende and Leoville meteorites and in samples of whole meteorites. The absolute Ti isotope abundances differ by a significant mass dependent isotope fractionation transformation from the previously reported abundances, which were normalized for fractionation using 46Ti/48Ti. Therefore, the absolute compositions define distinct nucleosynthetic components from those previously identified or reflect the existence of significant mass dependent isotope fractionation in nature. The authors provide a general formalism for determining the possible isotope compositions of the exotic Ti from the measured composition, for different values of isotope fractionation in nature and for different mixing ratios of the exotic and normal components.

  18. Molecular iodine absolute frequencies. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Sansonetti, C.J.

    1990-06-25

    Fifty specified lines of {sup 127}I{sub 2} were studied by Doppler-free frequency modulation spectroscopy. For each line the classification of the molecular transition was determined, hyperfine components were identified, and one well-resolved component was selected for precise determination of its absolute frequency. In 3 cases, a nearby alternate line was selected for measurement because no well-resolved component was found for the specified line. Absolute frequency determinations were made with an estimated uncertainty of 1.1 MHz by locking a dye laser to the selected hyperfine component and measuring its wave number with a high-precision Fabry-Perot wavemeter. For each line results of the absolute measurement, the line classification, and a Doppler-free spectrum are given.

  19. Stimulus probability effects in absolute identification.

    PubMed

    Kent, Christopher; Lamberts, Koen

    2016-05-01

    This study investigated the effect of stimulus presentation probability on accuracy and response times in an absolute identification task. Three schedules of presentation were used to investigate the interaction between presentation probability and stimulus position within the set. Data from individual participants indicated strong effects of presentation probability on both proportion correct and response times. The effects were moderated by the ubiquitous stimulus position effect. The accuracy and response time data were predicted by an exemplar-based model of perceptual cognition (Kent & Lamberts, 2005). The bow in discriminability was also attenuated when presentation probability for middle items was relatively high, an effect that will constrain future model development. The study provides evidence for item-specific learning in absolute identification. Implications for other theories of absolute identification are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26478959

  20. Absolute calibration in vivo measurement systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kruchten, D.A.; Hickman, D.P.

    1991-02-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is currently investigating a new method for obtaining absolute calibration factors for radiation measurement systems used to measure internally deposited radionuclides in vivo. Absolute calibration of in vivo measurement systems will eliminate the need to generate a series of human surrogate structures (i.e., phantoms) for calibrating in vivo measurement systems. The absolute calibration of in vivo measurement systems utilizes magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to define physiological structure, size, and composition. The MRI image provides a digitized representation of the physiological structure, which allows for any mathematical distribution of radionuclides within the body. Using Monte Carlo transport codes, the emission spectrum from the body is predicted. The in vivo measurement equipment is calibrated using the Monte Carlo code and adjusting for the intrinsic properties of the detection system. The calibration factors are verified using measurements of existing phantoms and previously obtained measurements of human volunteers. 8 refs.

  1. Precise Measurement of the Absolute Fluorescence Yield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ave, M.; Bohacova, M.; Daumiller, K.; Di Carlo, P.; di Giulio, C.; San Luis, P. Facal; Gonzales, D.; Hojvat, C.; Hörandel, J. R.; Hrabovsky, M.; Iarlori, M.; Keilhauer, B.; Klages, H.; Kleifges, M.; Kuehn, F.; Monasor, M.; Nozka, L.; Palatka, M.; Petrera, S.; Privitera, P.; Ridky, J.; Rizi, V.; D'Orfeuil, B. Rouille; Salamida, F.; Schovanek, P.; Smida, R.; Spinka, H.; Ulrich, A.; Verzi, V.; Williams, C.

    2011-09-01

    We present preliminary results of the absolute yield of fluorescence emission in atmospheric gases. Measurements were performed at the Fermilab Test Beam Facility with a variety of beam particles and gases. Absolute calibration of the fluorescence yield to 5% level was achieved by comparison with two known light sources--the Cherenkov light emitted by the beam particles, and a calibrated nitrogen laser. The uncertainty of the energy scale of current Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Rays experiments will be significantly improved by the AIRFLY measurement.

  2. Absolutely relative or relatively absolute: violations of value invariance in human decision making.

    PubMed

    Teodorescu, Andrei R; Moran, Rani; Usher, Marius

    2016-02-01

    Making decisions based on relative rather than absolute information processing is tied to choice optimality via the accumulation of evidence differences and to canonical neural processing via accumulation of evidence ratios. These theoretical frameworks predict invariance of decision latencies to absolute intensities that maintain differences and ratios, respectively. While information about the absolute values of the choice alternatives is not necessary for choosing the best alternative, it may nevertheless hold valuable information about the context of the decision. To test the sensitivity of human decision making to absolute values, we manipulated the intensities of brightness stimuli pairs while preserving either their differences or their ratios. Although asked to choose the brighter alternative relative to the other, participants responded faster to higher absolute values. Thus, our results provide empirical evidence for human sensitivity to task irrelevant absolute values indicating a hard-wired mechanism that precedes executive control. Computational investigations of several modelling architectures reveal two alternative accounts for this phenomenon, which combine absolute and relative processing. One account involves accumulation of differences with activation dependent processing noise and the other emerges from accumulation of absolute values subject to the temporal dynamics of lateral inhibition. The potential adaptive role of such choice mechanisms is discussed. PMID:26022836

  3. THE ABSOLUTE MAGNITUDES OF TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE IN THE ULTRAVIOLET

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Peter J.; Roming, Peter W. A.; Ciardullo, Robin; Gronwall, Caryl; Hoversten, Erik A.; Pritchard, Tyler; Milne, Peter; Bufano, Filomena; Mazzali, Paolo; Elias-Rosa, Nancy; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Li Weidong; Foley, Ryan J.; Hicken, Malcolm; Kirshner, Robert P.; Gehrels, Neil; Holland, Stephen T.; Immler, Stefan; Phillips, Mark M.; Still, Martin

    2010-10-01

    We examine the absolute magnitudes and light-curve shapes of 14 nearby (redshift z = 0.004-0.027) Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) observed in the ultraviolet (UV) with the Swift Ultraviolet/Optical Telescope. Colors and absolute magnitudes are calculated using both a standard Milky Way extinction law and one for the Large Magellanic Cloud that has been modified by circumstellar scattering. We find very different behavior in the near-UV filters (uvw1{sub rc} covering {approx}2600-3300 A after removing optical light, and u {approx} 3000-4000 A) compared to a mid-UV filter (uvm2 {approx}2000-2400 A). The uvw1{sub rc} - b colors show a scatter of {approx}0.3 mag while uvm2-b scatters by nearly 0.9 mag. Similarly, while the scatter in colors between neighboring filters is small in the optical and somewhat larger in the near-UV, the large scatter in the uvm2 - uvw1 colors implies significantly larger spectral variability below 2600 A. We find that in the near-UV the absolute magnitudes at peak brightness of normal SNe Ia in our sample are correlated with the optical decay rate with a scatter of 0.4 mag, comparable to that found for the optical in our sample. However, in the mid-UV the scatter is larger, {approx}1 mag, possibly indicating differences in metallicity. We find no strong correlation between either the UV light-curve shapes or the UV colors and the UV absolute magnitudes. With larger samples, the UV luminosity might be useful as an additional constraint to help determine distance, extinction, and metallicity in order to improve the utility of SNe Ia as standardized candles.

  4. Absolute partial photoionization cross sections of ozone.

    SciTech Connect

    Berkowitz, J.; Chemistry

    2008-04-01

    Despite the current concerns about ozone, absolute partial photoionization cross sections for this molecule in the vacuum ultraviolet (valence) region have been unavailable. By eclectic re-evaluation of old/new data and plausible assumptions, such cross sections have been assembled to fill this void.

  5. Solving Absolute Value Equations Algebraically and Geometrically

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shiyuan, Wei

    2005-01-01

    The way in which students can improve their comprehension by understanding the geometrical meaning of algebraic equations or solving algebraic equation geometrically is described. Students can experiment with the conditions of the absolute value equation presented, for an interesting way to form an overall understanding of the concept.

  6. Teaching Absolute Value Inequalities to Mature Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sierpinska, Anna; Bobos, Georgeana; Pruncut, Andreea

    2011-01-01

    This paper gives an account of a teaching experiment on absolute value inequalities, whose aim was to identify characteristics of an approach that would realize the potential of the topic to develop theoretical thinking in students enrolled in prerequisite mathematics courses at a large, urban North American university. The potential is…

  7. Increasing Capacity: Practice Effects in Absolute Identification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dodds, Pennie; Donkin, Christopher; Brown, Scott D.; Heathcote, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    In most of the long history of the study of absolute identification--since Miller's (1956) seminal article--a severe limit on performance has been observed, and this limit has resisted improvement even by extensive practice. In a startling result, Rouder, Morey, Cowan, and Pfaltz (2004) found substantially improved performance with practice in the…

  8. On Relative and Absolute Conviction in Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weber, Keith; Mejia-Ramos, Juan Pablo

    2015-01-01

    Conviction is a central construct in mathematics education research on justification and proof. In this paper, we claim that it is important to distinguish between absolute conviction and relative conviction. We argue that researchers in mathematics education frequently have not done so and this has lead to researchers making unwarranted claims…

  9. Absolute Points for Multiple Assignment Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adlakha, V.; Kowalski, K.

    2006-01-01

    An algorithm is presented to solve multiple assignment problems in which a cost is incurred only when an assignment is made at a given cell. The proposed method recursively searches for single/group absolute points to identify cells that must be loaded in any optimal solution. Unlike other methods, the first solution is the optimal solution. The…

  10. Nonequilibrium equalities in absolutely irreversible processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murashita, Yuto; Funo, Ken; Ueda, Masahito

    2015-03-01

    Nonequilibrium equalities have attracted considerable attention in the context of statistical mechanics and information thermodynamics. Integral nonequilibrium equalities reveal an ensemble property of the entropy production σ as = 1 . Although nonequilibrium equalities apply to rather general nonequilibrium situations, they break down in absolutely irreversible processes, where the forward-path probability vanishes and the entropy production diverges. We identify the mathematical origins of this inapplicability as the singularity of probability measure. As a result, we generalize conventional integral nonequilibrium equalities to absolutely irreversible processes as = 1 -λS , where λS is the probability of the singular part defined based on Lebesgue's decomposition theorem. The acquired equality contains two physical quantities related to irreversibility: σ characterizing ordinary irreversibility and λS describing absolute irreversibility. An inequality derived from the obtained equality demonstrates the absolute irreversibility leads to the fundamental lower bound on the entropy production. We demonstrate the validity of the obtained equality for a simple model.

  11. Stimulus Probability Effects in Absolute Identification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kent, Christopher; Lamberts, Koen

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of stimulus presentation probability on accuracy and response times in an absolute identification task. Three schedules of presentation were used to investigate the interaction between presentation probability and stimulus position within the set. Data from individual participants indicated strong effects of…

  12. Precision absolute positional measurement of laser beams.

    PubMed

    Fitzsimons, Ewan D; Bogenstahl, Johanna; Hough, James; Killow, Christian J; Perreur-Lloyd, Michael; Robertson, David I; Ward, Henry

    2013-04-20

    We describe an instrument which, coupled with a suitable coordinate measuring machine, facilitates the absolute measurement within the machine frame of the propagation direction of a millimeter-scale laser beam to an accuracy of around ±4 μm in position and ±20 μrad in angle. PMID:23669658

  13. Centrifugal step emulsification applied for absolute quantification of nucleic acids by digital droplet RPA.

    PubMed

    Schuler, Friedrich; Schwemmer, Frank; Trotter, Martin; Wadle, Simon; Zengerle, Roland; von Stetten, Felix; Paust, Nils

    2015-07-01

    Aqueous microdroplets provide miniaturized reaction compartments for numerous chemical, biochemical or pharmaceutical applications. We introduce centrifugal step emulsification for the fast and easy production of monodisperse droplets. Homogenous droplets with pre-selectable diameters in a range from 120 μm to 170 μm were generated with coefficients of variation of 2-4% and zero run-in time or dead volume. The droplet diameter depends on the nozzle geometry (depth, width, and step size) and interfacial tensions only. Droplet size is demonstrated to be independent of the dispersed phase flow rate between 0.01 and 1 μl s(-1), proving the robustness of the centrifugal approach. Centrifugal step emulsification can easily be combined with existing centrifugal microfluidic unit operations, is compatible to scalable manufacturing technologies such as thermoforming or injection moulding and enables fast emulsification (>500 droplets per second and nozzle) with minimal handling effort (2-3 pipetting steps). The centrifugal microfluidic droplet generation was used to perform the first digital droplet recombinase polymerase amplification (ddRPA). It was used for absolute quantification of Listeria monocytogenes DNA concentration standards with a total analysis time below 30 min. Compared to digital droplet polymerase chain reaction (ddPCR), with processing times of about 2 hours, the overall processing time of digital analysis was reduced by more than a factor of 4. PMID:25947077

  14. Astigmatism error modification for absolute shape reconstruction using Fourier transform method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yuhang; Li, Qiang; Gao, Bo; Liu, Ang; Xu, Kaiyuan; Wei, Xiaohong; Chai, Liqun

    2014-12-01

    A method is proposed to modify astigmatism errors in absolute shape reconstruction of optical plane using Fourier transform method. If a transmission and reflection flat are used in an absolute test, two translation measurements lead to obtain the absolute shapes by making use of the characteristic relationship between the differential and original shapes in spatial frequency domain. However, because the translation device cannot guarantee the test and reference flats rigidly parallel to each other after the translations, a tilt error exists in the obtained differential data, which caused power and astigmatism errors in the reconstructed shapes. In order to modify the astigmatism errors, a rotation measurement is added. Based on the rotation invariability of the form of Zernike polynomial in circular domain, the astigmatism terms are calculated by solving polynomial coefficient equations related to the rotation differential data, and subsequently the astigmatism terms including error are modified. Computer simulation proves the validity of the proposed method.

  15. Method of differential-phase/absolute-amplitude QAM

    DOEpatents

    Dimsdle, Jeffrey William

    2007-07-03

    A method of quadrature amplitude modulation involving encoding phase differentially and amplitude absolutely, allowing for a high data rate and spectral efficiency in data transmission and other communication applications, and allowing for amplitude scaling to facilitate data recovery; amplitude scale tracking to track-out rapid and severe scale variations and facilitate successful demodulation and data retrieval; 2.sup.N power carrier recovery; incoherent demodulation where coherent carrier recovery is not possible or practical due to signal degradation; coherent demodulation; multipath equalization to equalize frequency dependent multipath; and demodulation filtering.

  16. Method of differential-phase/absolute-amplitude QAM

    DOEpatents

    Dimsdle, Jeffrey William

    2008-10-21

    A method of quadrature amplitude modulation involving encoding phase differentially and amplitude absolutely, allowing for a high data rate and spectral efficiency in data transmission and other communication applications, and allowing for amplitude scaling to facilitate data recovery; amplitude scale tracking to track-out rapid and severe scale variations and facilitate successful demodulation and data retrieval; 2.sup.N power carrier recovery; incoherent demodulation where coherent carrier recovery is not possible or practical due to signal degradation; coherent demodulation; multipath equalization to equalize frequency dependent multipath; and demodulation filtering.

  17. Method of differential-phase/absolute-amplitude QAM

    DOEpatents

    Dimsdle, Jeffrey William

    2007-07-17

    A method of quadrature amplitude modulation involving encoding phase differentially and amplitude absolutely, allowing for a high data rate and spectral efficiency in data transmission and other communication applications, and allowing for amplitude scaling to facilitate data recovery; amplitude scale tracking to track-out rapid and severe scale variations and facilitate successful demodulation and data retrieval; 2.sup.N power carrier recovery; incoherent demodulation where coherent carrier recovery is not possible or practical due to signal degradation; coherent demodulation; multipath equalization to equalize frequency dependent multipath; and demodulation filtering.

  18. Method of differential-phase/absolute-amplitude QAM

    DOEpatents

    Dimsdle, Jeffrey William

    2007-10-02

    A method of quadrature amplitude modulation involving encoding phase differentially and amplitude absolutely, allowing for a high data rate and spectral efficiency in data transmission and other communication applications, and allowing for amplitude scaling to facilitate data recovery; amplitude scale tracking to track-out rapid and severe scale variations and facilitate successful demodulation and data retrieval; 2.sup.N power carrier recovery; incoherent demodulation where coherent carrier recovery is not possible or practical due to signal degradation; coherent demodulation; multipath equalization to equalize frequency dependent multipath; and demodulation filtering.

  19. Method of differential-phase/absolute-amplitude QAM

    DOEpatents

    Dimsdle, Jeffrey William

    2009-09-01

    A method of quadrature amplitude modulation involving encoding phase differentially and amplitude absolutely, allowing for a high data rate and spectral efficiency in data transmission and other communication applications, and allowing for amplitude scaling to facilitate data recovery; amplitude scale tracking to track-out rapid and severe scale variations and facilitate successful demodulation and data retrieval; 2.sup.N power carrier recovery; incoherent demodulation where coherent carrier recovery is not possible or practical due to signal degradation; coherent demodulation; multipath equalization to equalize frequency dependent multipath; and demodulation filtering.

  20. Albendazole sulfoxide enantiomers: preparative chiral separation and absolute stereochemistry.

    PubMed

    Lourenço, Tiago C; Batista, João M; Furlan, Maysa; He, Yanan; Nafie, Laurence A; Santana, Cesar C; Cass, Quezia B

    2012-03-23

    The enantiomeric separation of albendazole sulfoxide was carried out by simulated moving bed chromatography with variable zones (VARICOL). An overall recovery of 97% was achieved and enantiomeric ratios of 99.5% for raffinate and 99.0% for extract were attained. A total of 880 mg of (+)-albendazol sulfoxide and 930 mg of its antipode were collected after 55 cycles or 11 h of process, resulting in a mass rate of 2 g/day. Furthermore the absolute configuration of the enantiopure compounds was determined for the first time by vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) with the aid of theoretical calculations as (-)-(S) and (+)-(R)-albendazole sulfoxide. PMID:22341660

  1. Quantifying colocalization by correlation: the Pearson correlation coefficient is superior to the Mander's overlap coefficient.

    PubMed

    Adler, Jeremy; Parmryd, Ingela

    2010-08-01

    The Pearson correlation coefficient (PCC) and the Mander's overlap coefficient (MOC) are used to quantify the degree of colocalization between fluorophores. The MOC was introduced to overcome perceived problems with the PCC. The two coefficients are mathematically similar, differing in the use of either the absolute intensities (MOC) or of the deviation from the mean (PCC). A range of correlated datasets, which extend to the limits of the PCC, only evoked a limited response from the MOC. The PCC is unaffected by changes to the offset while the MOC increases when the offset is positive. Both coefficients are independent of gain. The MOC is a confusing hybrid measurement, that combines correlation with a heavily weighted form of co-occurrence, favors high intensity combinations, downplays combinations in which either or both intensities are low and ignores blank pixels. The PCC only measures correlation. A surprising finding was that the addition of a second uncorrelated population can substantially increase the measured correlation, demonstrating the importance of excluding background pixels. Overall, since the MOC is unresponsive to substantial changes in the data and is hard to interpret, it is neither an alternative to nor a useful substitute for the PCC. The MOC is not suitable for making measurements of colocalization either by correlation or co-occurrence. PMID:20653013

  2. High Accuracy, Absolute, Cryogenic Refractive Index Measurements of Infrared Lens Materials for JWST NIRCam using CHARMS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leviton, Douglas; Frey, Bradley

    2005-01-01

    The current refractive optical design of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Near Infrared Camera (NIRCam) uses three infrared materials in its lenses: LiF, BaF2, and ZnSe. In order to provide the instrument s optical designers with accurate, heretofore unavailable data for absolute refractive index based on actual cryogenic measurements, two prismatic samples of each material were measured using the cryogenic, high accuracy, refraction measuring system (CHARMS) at NASA GSFC, densely covering the temperature range from 15 to 320 K and wavelength range from 0.4 to 5.6 microns. Measurement methods are discussed and graphical and tabulated data for absolute refractive index, dispersion, and thermo-optic coefficient for these three materials are presented along with estimates of uncertainty. Coefficients for second order polynomial fits of measured index to temperature are provided for many wavelengths to allow accurate interpolation of index to other wavelengths and temperatures.

  3. Absolute and relative dosimetry for ELIMED

    SciTech Connect

    Cirrone, G. A. P.; Schillaci, F.; Scuderi, V.; Cuttone, G.; Candiano, G.; Musumarra, A.; Pisciotta, P.; Romano, F.; Carpinelli, M.; Presti, D. Lo; Raffaele, L.; Tramontana, A.; Cirio, R.; Sacchi, R.; Monaco, V.; Marchetto, F.; Giordanengo, S.

    2013-07-26

    The definition of detectors, methods and procedures for the absolute and relative dosimetry of laser-driven proton beams is a crucial step toward the clinical use of this new kind of beams. Hence, one of the ELIMED task, will be the definition of procedures aiming to obtain an absolute dose measure at the end of the transport beamline with an accuracy as close as possible to the one required for clinical applications (i.e. of the order of 5% or less). Relative dosimetry procedures must be established, as well: they are necessary in order to determine and verify the beam dose distributions and to monitor the beam fluence and the energetic spectra during irradiations. Radiochromic films, CR39, Faraday Cup, Secondary Emission Monitor (SEM) and transmission ionization chamber will be considered, designed and studied in order to perform a fully dosimetric characterization of the ELIMED proton beam.

  4. Probing absolute spin polarization at the nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Eltschka, Matthias; Jäck, Berthold; Assig, Maximilian; Kondrashov, Oleg V; Skvortsov, Mikhail A; Etzkorn, Markus; Ast, Christian R; Kern, Klaus

    2014-12-10

    Probing absolute values of spin polarization at the nanoscale offers insight into the fundamental mechanisms of spin-dependent transport. Employing the Zeeman splitting in superconducting tips (Meservey-Tedrow-Fulde effect), we introduce a novel spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy that combines the probing capability of the absolute values of spin polarization with precise control at the atomic scale. We utilize our novel approach to measure the locally resolved spin polarization of magnetic Co nanoislands on Cu(111). We find that the spin polarization is enhanced by 65% when increasing the width of the tunnel barrier by only 2.3 Å due to the different decay of the electron orbitals into vacuum. PMID:25423049

  5. Absolute-magnitude distributions of supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, Dean; Wright, John; Jenkins III, Robert L.; Maddox, Larry

    2014-05-01

    The absolute-magnitude distributions of seven supernova (SN) types are presented. The data used here were primarily taken from the Asiago Supernova Catalogue, but were supplemented with additional data. We accounted for both foreground and host-galaxy extinction. A bootstrap method is used to correct the samples for Malmquist bias. Separately, we generate volume-limited samples, restricted to events within 100 Mpc. We find that the superluminous events (M{sub B} < –21) make up only about 0.1% of all SNe in the bias-corrected sample. The subluminous events (M{sub B} > –15) make up about 3%. The normal Ia distribution was the brightest with a mean absolute blue magnitude of –19.25. The IIP distribution was the dimmest at –16.75.

  6. Asteroid absolute magnitudes and slope parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tedesco, Edward F.

    1991-01-01

    A new listing of absolute magnitudes (H) and slope parameters (G) has been created and published in the Minor Planet Circulars; this same listing will appear in the 1992 Ephemerides of Minor Planets. Unlike previous listings, the values of the current list were derived from fits of data at the V band. All observations were reduced in the same fashion using, where appropriate, a single basis default value of 0.15 for the slope parameter. Distances and phase angles were computed for each observation. The data for 113 asteroids was of sufficiently high quality to permit derivation of their H and G. These improved absolute magnitudes and slope parameters will be used to deduce the most reliable bias-corrected asteroid size-frequency distribution yet made.

  7. Absolute enantioselective separation: optical activity ex machina.

    PubMed

    Bielski, Roman; Tencer, Michal

    2005-11-01

    The paper describes methodology of using three independent macroscopic factors affecting molecular orientation to accomplish separation of a racemic mixture without the presence of any other chiral compounds, i. e., absolute enantioselective separation (AES) which is an extension of a concept of applying these factors to absolute asymmetric synthesis. The three factors may be applied simultaneously or, if their effects can be retained, consecutively. The resulting three mutually orthogonal or near orthogonal directors constitute a true chiral influence and their scalar triple product is the measure of the chirality of the system. AES can be executed in a chromatography-like microfluidic process in the presence of an electric field. It may be carried out on a chemically modified flat surface, a monolithic polymer column made of a mesoporous material, each having imparted directional properties. Separation parameters were estimated for these media and possible implications for the natural homochirality are discussed. PMID:16342798

  8. An absolute measure for a key currency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oya, Shunsuke; Aihara, Kazuyuki; Hirata, Yoshito

    It is generally considered that the US dollar and the euro are the key currencies in the world and in Europe, respectively. However, there is no absolute general measure for a key currency. Here, we investigate the 24-hour periodicity of foreign exchange markets using a recurrence plot, and define an absolute measure for a key currency based on the strength of the periodicity. Moreover, we analyze the time evolution of this measure. The results show that the credibility of the US dollar has not decreased significantly since the Lehman shock, when the Lehman Brothers bankrupted and influenced the economic markets, and has increased even relatively better than that of the euro and that of the Japanese yen.

  9. From Hubble's NGSL to Absolute Fluxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heap, Sara R.; Lindler, Don

    2012-01-01

    Hubble's Next Generation Spectral Library (NGSL) consists of R-l000 spectra of 374 stars of assorted temperature, gravity, and metallicity. Each spectrum covers the wavelength range, 0.18-1.00 microns. The library can be viewed and/or downloaded from the website, http://archive.stsci.edu/prepds/stisngsll. Stars in the NGSL are now being used as absolute flux standards at ground-based observatories. However, the uncertainty in the absolute flux is about 2%, which does not meet the requirements of dark-energy surveys. We are therefore developing an observing procedure that should yield fluxes with uncertainties less than 1 % and will take part in an HST proposal to observe up to 15 stars using this new procedure.

  10. Averaging Internal Consistency Reliability Coefficients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feldt, Leonard S.; Charter, Richard A.

    2006-01-01

    Seven approaches to averaging reliability coefficients are presented. Each approach starts with a unique definition of the concept of "average," and no approach is more correct than the others. Six of the approaches are applicable to internal consistency coefficients. The seventh approach is specific to alternate-forms coefficients. Although the…

  11. Temperature-dependent Absolute Refractive Index Measurements of Synthetic Fused Silica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leviton, Douglas B.; Frey, Bradley J.

    2006-01-01

    Using the Cryogenic, High-Accuracy Refraction Measuring System (CHARMS) at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, we have measured the absolute refractive index of five specimens taken from a very large boule of Corning 7980 fused silica from temperatures ranging from 30 to 310 K at wavelengths from 0.4 to 2.6 microns with an absolute uncertainty of plus or minus 1 x 10 (exp -5). Statistical variations in derived values of the thermo-optic coefficient (dn/dT) are at the plus or minus 2 x 10 (exp -8)/K level. Graphical and tabulated data for absolute refractive index, dispersion, and thermo-optic coefficient are presented for selected wavelengths and temperatures along with estimates of uncertainty in index. Coefficients for temperature-dependent Sellmeier fits of measured refractive index are also presented to allow accurate interpolation of index to other wavelengths and temperatures. We compare our results to those from an independent investigation (which used an interferometric technique for measuring index changes as a function of temperature) whose samples were prepared from the same slugs of material from which our prisms were prepared in support of the Kepler mission. We also compare our results with sparse cryogenic index data from measurements of this material from the literature.

  12. Metallic Magnetic Calorimeters for Absolute Activity Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loidl, M.; Leblanc, E.; Rodrigues, M.; Bouchard, J.; Censier, B.; Branger, T.; Lacour, D.

    2008-05-01

    We present a prototype of metallic magnetic calorimeters that we are developing for absolute activity measurements of low energy emitting radionuclides. We give a detailed description of the realization of the prototype, containing an 55Fe source inside the detector absorber. We present the analysis of first data taken with this detector and compare the result of activity measurement with liquid scintillation counting. We also propose some ways for reducing the uncertainty on the activity determination with this new technique.

  13. Absolute photoionization cross sections of atomic oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samson, J. A. R.; Pareek, P. N.

    1985-01-01

    The absolute values of photoionization cross sections of atomic oxygen were measured from the ionization threshold to 120 A. An auto-ionizing resonance belonging to the 2S2P4(4P)3P(3Do, 3So) transition was observed at 479.43 A and another line at 389.97 A. The experimental data is in excellent agreement with rigorous close-coupling calculations that include electron correlations in both the initial and final states.

  14. Absolute photoionization cross sections of atomic oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samson, J. A. R.; Pareek, P. N.

    1982-01-01

    The absolute values of photoionization cross sections of atomic oxygen were measured from the ionization threshold to 120 A. An auto-ionizing resonance belonging to the 2S2P4(4P)3P(3Do, 3So) transition was observed at 479.43 A and another line at 389.97 A. The experimental data is in excellent agreement with rigorous close-coupling calculations that include electron correlations in both the initial and final states.

  15. Silicon Absolute X-Ray Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Seely, John F.; Korde, Raj; Sprunck, Jacob; Medjoubi, Kadda; Hustache, Stephanie

    2010-06-23

    The responsivity of silicon photodiodes having no loss in the entrance window, measured using synchrotron radiation in the 1.75 to 60 keV range, was compared to the responsivity calculated using the silicon thickness measured using near-infrared light. The measured and calculated responsivities agree with an average difference of 1.3%. This enables their use as absolute x-ray detectors.

  16. Blood pressure targets and absolute cardiovascular risk.

    PubMed

    Odutayo, Ayodele; Rahimi, Kazem; Hsiao, Allan J; Emdin, Connor A

    2015-08-01

    In the Eighth Joint National Committee guideline on hypertension, the threshold for the initiation of blood pressure-lowering treatment for elderly adults (≥60 years) without chronic kidney disease or diabetes mellitus was raised from 140/90 mm Hg to 150/90 mm Hg. However, the committee was not unanimous in this decision, particularly because a large proportion of adults ≥60 years may be at high cardiovascular risk. On the basis of Eighth Joint National Committee guideline, we sought to determine the absolute 10-year risk of cardiovascular disease among these adults through analyzing the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (2005-2012). The primary outcome measure was the proportion of adults who were at ≥20% predicted absolute cardiovascular risk and above goals for the Seventh Joint National Committee guideline but reclassified as at target under the Eighth Joint National Committee guideline (reclassified). The Framingham General Cardiovascular Disease Risk Score was used. From 2005 to 2012, the surveys included 12 963 adults aged 30 to 74 years with blood pressure measurements, of which 914 were reclassified based on the guideline. Among individuals reclassified as not in need of additional treatment, the proportion of adults 60 to 74 years without chronic kidney disease or diabetes mellitus at ≥20% absolute risk was 44.8%. This corresponds to 0.8 million adults. The proportion at high cardiovascular risk remained sizable among adults who were not receiving blood pressure-lowering treatment. Taken together, a sizable proportion of reclassified adults 60 to 74 years without chronic kidney disease or diabetes mellitus was at ≥20% absolute cardiovascular risk. PMID:26056340

  17. Relative errors can cue absolute visuomotor mappings.

    PubMed

    van Dam, Loes C J; Ernst, Marc O

    2015-12-01

    When repeatedly switching between two visuomotor mappings, e.g. in a reaching or pointing task, adaptation tends to speed up over time. That is, when the error in the feedback corresponds to a mapping switch, fast adaptation occurs. Yet, what is learned, the relative error or the absolute mappings? When switching between mappings, errors with a size corresponding to the relative difference between the mappings will occur more often than other large errors. Thus, we could learn to correct more for errors with this familiar size (Error Learning). On the other hand, it has been shown that the human visuomotor system can store several absolute visuomotor mappings (Mapping Learning) and can use associated contextual cues to retrieve them. Thus, when contextual information is present, no error feedback is needed to switch between mappings. Using a rapid pointing task, we investigated how these two types of learning may each contribute when repeatedly switching between mappings in the absence of task-irrelevant contextual cues. After training, we examined how participants changed their behaviour when a single error probe indicated either the often-experienced error (Error Learning) or one of the previously experienced absolute mappings (Mapping Learning). Results were consistent with Mapping Learning despite the relative nature of the error information in the feedback. This shows that errors in the feedback can have a double role in visuomotor behaviour: they drive the general adaptation process by making corrections possible on subsequent movements, as well as serve as contextual cues that can signal a learned absolute mapping. PMID:26280315

  18. Absolute distance measurements by variable wavelength interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bien, F.; Camac, M.; Caulfield, H. J.; Ezekiel, S.

    1981-02-01

    This paper describes a laser interferometer which provides absolute distance measurements using tunable lasers. An active feedback loop system, in which the laser frequency is locked to the optical path length difference of the interferometer, is used to tune the laser wavelengths. If the two wavelengths are very close, electronic frequency counters can be used to measure the beat frequency between the two laser frequencies and thus to determine the optical path difference between the two legs of the interferometer.

  19. Absolute dosimetry for extreme-ultraviolet lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Kurt W.; Campiotti, Richard H.

    2000-06-01

    The accurate measurement of an exposure dose reaching the wafer on an extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithographic system has been a technical challenge directly applicable to the evaluation of candidate EUV resist materials and calculating lithography system throughputs. We have developed a dose monitoring sensor system that can directly measure EUV intensities at the wafer plane of a prototype EUV lithographic system. This sensor system, located on the wafer stage adjacent to the electrostatic chuck used to grip wafers, operates by translating the sensor into the aerial image, typically illuminating an 'open' (unpatterned) area on the reticle. The absolute signal strength can be related to energy density at the wafer, and thus used to determine resist sensitivity, and the signal as a function of position can be used to determine illumination uniformity at the wafer plane. Spectral filtering to enhance the detection of 13.4 nm radiation was incorporated into the sensor. Other critical design parameters include the packaging and amplification technologies required to place this device into the space and vacuum constraints of a EUV lithography environment. We describe two approaches used to determine the absolute calibration of this sensor. The first conventional approach requires separate characterization of each element of the sensor. A second novel approach uses x-ray emission from a mildly radioactive iron source to calibrate the absolute response of the entire sensor system (detector and electronics) in a single measurement.

  20. Drag Coefficient of Hexadecane Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakao, Yoshinobu; Hishida, Makoto; Kajimoto, Sadaaki; Tanaka, Gaku

    This paper deals with the drag coefficient of solidified hexadecane particles and their free rising velocity in liquid. The drag coefficient was experimentally investigated in Reynolds number range of about 40-300. The present experimental results are summarized in the following; (1) the drag coefficient of solidified hexadecane particles formed in liquid coolant by direct contact cooling is higher than that of a smooth surface sphere, this high drag coefficient seems to be attributed to the non-smooth surface of the solidified hexadecane particles, (2) experimental correlation for the drag coefficient of the solidified hexadecane particles was proposed, (3 ) the measured rising velocity of the solidified hexadecane particle agrees well with the calculated one, (4) the drag coefficients of hexadecane particles that were made by pouring hexadecane liquid into a solid hollow sphere agreed well with the drag coefficient of smooth surface sphere.

  1. Direct Measurements of the Pressure Coefficient, Partial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    del Cueto, Joseph Antonio

    1984-06-01

    The pressure coefficient of liquid ('3)He-('4)He mixtures was coupled to directly, with a strain gauge capacitative cell. The cell was filled, pressurized and isolated with a mixture, of ('3)He mole fraction x between 0.50-0.80. The elastic properties of the cell effected a capacitance change in an LC tank circuit driven to oscillation by a Tunnel Diode. The frequency of the circuit, as well as the balance point of an AC Wheatstone circuit sensing a cryo-resistor mounted on the cell, were sampled by a data acquisition(DAS) system, to obtain pressure vs. temperature increments data. The DAS was enabled to perform temperature ramps and cycles with amplitudes of (TURN) (+OR-) 50-100 mK, while concurrently sampling pressure vs. temperature data. It is found that (PAR-DIFF)P/(PAR-DIFF)T)(,v,x) is a piecewise smooth function in the temperature T. For x < x(,t)(P), the data indicate a cusp discontinuity at the lambda temperature of the mixture T(,(lamda))(x,v(p(,(lamda)))), and a simple discontinuity at the onset of phase separation temperature T(,S)(x,v(p(,S))). For x > x(,t)(P), only the phase separation breaks the monotonic behaviour of the pressure coefficient. Where x(,t)(P) is the tricritical concentration at pressure P, referred to in the above. The data for the pressure coefficients are parametrized by smooth functions in appendix 5. This parametrization allows for further thermodynamic analysis, as that of appendix 6, the change in chemical potential difference upon compression. The thermodynamic implications of the measured step in (PAR -DIFF)P/(PAR-DIFF)T)(,v,x), across the onset separation temperature, are explored in appendix 4. The 'volume' minima at the pressures the isochores cross at their pressure minima in temperature, are plotted and analysed to imply that for some concentrations x, the entropy of the mixture is a double valued function of absolute pressure.

  2. Clock time is absolute and universal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Xinhang

    2015-09-01

    A critical error is found in the Special Theory of Relativity (STR): mixing up the concepts of the STR abstract time of a reference frame and the displayed time of a physical clock, which leads to use the properties of the abstract time to predict time dilation on physical clocks and all other physical processes. Actually, a clock can never directly measure the abstract time, but can only record the result of a physical process during a period of the abstract time such as the number of cycles of oscillation which is the multiplication of the abstract time and the frequency of oscillation. After Lorentz Transformation, the abstract time of a reference frame expands by a factor gamma, but the frequency of a clock decreases by the same factor gamma, and the resulting multiplication i.e. the displayed time of a moving clock remains unchanged. That is, the displayed time of any physical clock is an invariant of Lorentz Transformation. The Lorentz invariance of the displayed times of clocks can further prove within the framework of STR our earth based standard physical time is absolute, universal and independent of inertial reference frames as confirmed by both the physical fact of the universal synchronization of clocks on the GPS satellites and clocks on the earth, and the theoretical existence of the absolute and universal Galilean time in STR which has proved that time dilation and space contraction are pure illusions of STR. The existence of the absolute and universal time in STR has directly denied that the reference frame dependent abstract time of STR is the physical time, and therefore, STR is wrong and all its predictions can never happen in the physical world.

  3. Achieving Climate Change Absolute Accuracy in Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wielicki, Bruce A.; Young, D. F.; Mlynczak, M. G.; Thome, K. J; Leroy, S.; Corliss, J.; Anderson, J. G.; Ao, C. O.; Bantges, R.; Best, F.; Bowman, K.; Brindley, H.; Butler, J. J.; Collins, W.; Dykema, J. A.; Doelling, D. R.; Feldman, D. R.; Fox, N.; Huang, X.; Holz, R.; Huang, Y.; Jennings, D.; Jin, Z.; Johnson, D. G.; Jucks, K.; Kato, S.; Kratz, D. P.; Liu, X.; Lukashin, C.; Mannucci, A. J.; Phojanamongkolkij, N.; Roithmayr, C. M.; Sandford, S.; Taylor, P. C.; Xiong, X.

    2013-01-01

    The Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO) mission will provide a calibration laboratory in orbit for the purpose of accurately measuring and attributing climate change. CLARREO measurements establish new climate change benchmarks with high absolute radiometric accuracy and high statistical confidence across a wide range of essential climate variables. CLARREO's inherently high absolute accuracy will be verified and traceable on orbit to Système Internationale (SI) units. The benchmarks established by CLARREO will be critical for assessing changes in the Earth system and climate model predictive capabilities for decades into the future as society works to meet the challenge of optimizing strategies for mitigating and adapting to climate change. The CLARREO benchmarks are derived from measurements of the Earth's thermal infrared spectrum (5-50 micron), the spectrum of solar radiation reflected by the Earth and its atmosphere (320-2300 nm), and radio occultation refractivity from which accurate temperature profiles are derived. The mission has the ability to provide new spectral fingerprints of climate change, as well as to provide the first orbiting radiometer with accuracy sufficient to serve as the reference transfer standard for other space sensors, in essence serving as a "NIST [National Institute of Standards and Technology] in orbit." CLARREO will greatly improve the accuracy and relevance of a wide range of space-borne instruments for decadal climate change. Finally, CLARREO has developed new metrics and methods for determining the accuracy requirements of climate observations for a wide range of climate variables and uncertainty sources. These methods should be useful for improving our understanding of observing requirements for most climate change observations.

  4. On determination of sign of the piezo-optic coefficients using torsion method.

    PubMed

    Vasylkiv, Yurij; Savaryn, Viktoriya; Smaga, Ihor; Skab, Ihor; Vlokh, Rostyslav

    2011-06-10

    We have shown that a high-accuracy torsion method recently developed by the authors for measuring piezo-optic coefficients allows determining not only the absolute value of the coefficients but also their sign. The techniques and experimental procedures used for determination of the sign are described in detail and proven based on studies of α-BaB2O4 and LiNbO3 crystals. The piezo-optic coefficients are determined for both crystals, and a combination of the corresponding photoelastic coefficients is determined for the case of α-BaB2O4 crystals. PMID:21673752

  5. The National Geodetic Survey absolute gravity program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peter, George; Moose, Robert E.; Wessells, Claude W.

    1989-03-01

    The National Geodetic Survey absolute gravity program will utilize the high precision afforded by the JILAG-4 instrument to support geodetic and geophysical research, which involves studies of vertical motions, identification and modeling of other temporal variations, and establishment of reference values. The scientific rationale of these objectives is given, the procedures used to collect gravity and environmental data in the field are defined, and the steps necessary to correct and remove unwanted environmental effects are stated. In addition, site selection criteria, methods of concomitant environmental data collection and relative gravity observations, and schedule and logistics are discussed.

  6. An absolute radius scale for Saturn's rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicholson, Philip D.; Cooke, Maren L.; Pelton, Emily

    1990-01-01

    Radio and stellar occultation observations of Saturn's rings made by the Voyager spacecraft are discussed. The data reveal systematic discrepancies of almost 10 km in some parts of the rings, limiting some of the investigations. A revised solution for Saturn's rotation pole has been proposed which removes the discrepancies between the stellar and radio occultation profiles. Corrections to previously published radii vary from -2 to -10 km for the radio occultation, and +5 to -6 km for the stellar occultation. An examination of spiral density waves in the outer A Ring supports that the revised absolute radii are in error by no more than 2 km.

  7. Characterization of the DARA solar absolute radiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finsterle, W.; Suter, M.; Fehlmann, A.; Kopp, G.

    2011-12-01

    The Davos Absolute Radiometer (DARA) prototype is an Electrical Substitution Radiometer (ESR) which has been developed as a successor of the PMO6 type on future space missions and ground based TSI measurements. The DARA implements an improved thermal design of the cavity detector and heat sink assembly to minimize air-vacuum differences and to maximize thermal symmetry of measuring and compensating cavity. The DARA also employs an inverted viewing geometry to reduce internal stray light. We will report on the characterization and calibration experiments which were carried out at PMOD/WRC and LASP (TRF).

  8. Absolute calibration of the Auger fluorescence detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Bauleo, P.; Brack, J.; Garrard, L.; Harton, J.; Knapik, R.; Meyhandan, R.; Rovero, A.C.; Tamashiro, A.; Warner, D.

    2005-07-01

    Absolute calibration of the Pierre Auger Observatory fluorescence detectors uses a light source at the telescope aperture. The technique accounts for the combined effects of all detector components in a single measurement. The calibrated 2.5 m diameter light source fills the aperture, providing uniform illumination to each pixel. The known flux from the light source and the response of the acquisition system give the required calibration for each pixel. In the lab, light source uniformity is studied using CCD images and the intensity is measured relative to NIST-calibrated photodiodes. Overall uncertainties are presently 12%, and are dominated by systematics.

  9. Absolute angular positioning in ultrahigh vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Schief, H.; Marsico, V.; Kern, K.

    1996-05-01

    Commercially available angular resolvers, which are routinely used in machine tools and robotics, are modified and adapted to be used under ultrahigh-vacuum (UHV) conditions. They provide straightforward and reliable measurements of angular positions for any kind of UHV sample manipulators. The corresponding absolute reproducibility is on the order of 0.005{degree}, whereas the relative resolution is better than 0.001{degree}, as demonstrated by high-resolution helium-reflectivity measurements. The mechanical setup and possible applications are discussed. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  10. Absolute method of measuring magnetic susceptibility

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorpe, A.; Senftle, F.E.

    1959-01-01

    An absolute method of standardization and measurement of the magnetic susceptibility of small samples is presented which can be applied to most techniques based on the Faraday method. The fact that the susceptibility is a function of the area under the curve of sample displacement versus distance of the magnet from the sample, offers a simple method of measuring the susceptibility without recourse to a standard sample. Typical results on a few substances are compared with reported values, and an error of less than 2% can be achieved. ?? 1959 The American Institute of Physics.

  11. Absolute Priority for a Vehicle in VANET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirani, Rostam; Hendessi, Faramarz; Montazeri, Mohammad Ali; Sheikh Zefreh, Mohammad

    In today's world, traffic jams waste hundreds of hours of our life. This causes many researchers try to resolve the problem with the idea of Intelligent Transportation System. For some applications like a travelling ambulance, it is important to reduce delay even for a second. In this paper, we propose a completely infrastructure-less approach for finding shortest path and controlling traffic light to provide absolute priority for an emergency vehicle. We use the idea of vehicular ad-hoc networking to reduce the imposed travelling time. Then, we simulate our proposed protocol and compare it with a centrally controlled traffic light system.

  12. Determination of the absolute contours of optical flats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Primak, W.

    1969-01-01

    Emersons procedure is used to determine true absolute contours of optical flats. Absolute contours of standard flats are determined and a comparison is then made between standard and unknown flats. Contour differences are determined by deviation of Fizeau fringe.

  13. Quadrature formulas for Fourier coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bojanov, Borislav; Petrova, Guergana

    2009-09-01

    We consider quadrature formulas of high degree of precision for the computation of the Fourier coefficients in expansions of functions with respect to a system of orthogonal polynomials. In particular, we show the uniqueness of a multiple node formula for the Fourier-Tchebycheff coefficients given by Micchelli and Sharma and construct new Gaussian formulas for the Fourier coefficients of a function, based on the values of the function and its derivatives.

  14. Coefficient Alpha: A Reliability Coefficient for the 21st Century?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Yanyun; Green, Samuel B.

    2011-01-01

    Coefficient alpha is almost universally applied to assess reliability of scales in psychology. We argue that researchers should consider alternatives to coefficient alpha. Our preference is for structural equation modeling (SEM) estimates of reliability because they are informative and allow for an empirical evaluation of the assumptions…

  15. Standardization of the cumulative absolute velocity

    SciTech Connect

    O'Hara, T.F.; Jacobson, J.P. )

    1991-12-01

    EPRI NP-5930, A Criterion for Determining Exceedance of the Operating Basis Earthquake,'' was published in July 1988. As defined in that report, the Operating Basis Earthquake (OBE) is exceeded when both a response spectrum parameter and a second damage parameter, referred to as the Cumulative Absolute Velocity (CAV), are exceeded. In the review process of the above report, it was noted that the calculation of CAV could be confounded by time history records of long duration containing low (nondamaging) acceleration. Therefore, it is necessary to standardize the method of calculating CAV to account for record length. This standardized methodology allows consistent comparisons between future CAV calculations and the adjusted CAV threshold value based upon applying the standardized methodology to the data set presented in EPRI NP-5930. The recommended method to standardize the CAV calculation is to window its calculation on a second-by-second basis for a given time history. If the absolute acceleration exceeds 0.025g at any time during each one second interval, the earthquake records used in EPRI NP-5930 have been reanalyzed and the adjusted threshold of damage for CAV was found to be 0.16g-set.

  16. Absolute Electron Extraction Efficiency of Liquid Xenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamdin, Katayun; Mizrachi, Eli; Morad, James; Sorensen, Peter

    2016-03-01

    Dual phase liquid/gas xenon time projection chambers (TPCs) currently set the world's most sensitive limits on weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs), a favored dark matter candidate. These detectors rely on extracting electrons from liquid xenon into gaseous xenon, where they produce proportional scintillation. The proportional scintillation from the extracted electrons serves to internally amplify the WIMP signal; even a single extracted electron is detectable. Credible dark matter searches can proceed with electron extraction efficiency (EEE) lower than 100%. However, electrons systematically left at the liquid/gas boundary are a concern. Possible effects include spontaneous single or multi-electron proportional scintillation signals in the gas, or charging of the liquid/gas interface or detector materials. Understanding EEE is consequently a serious concern for this class of rare event search detectors. Previous EEE measurements have mostly been relative, not absolute, assuming efficiency plateaus at 100%. I will present an absolute EEE measurement with a small liquid/gas xenon TPC test bed located at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.

  17. Absolute Spectrophotometry of 237 Open Cluster Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clampitt, L.; Burstein, D.

    1994-12-01

    We present absolute spectrophotometry of 237 stars in 7 nearby open clusters: Hyades, Pleiades, Alpha Persei, Praesepe, Coma Berenices, IC 4665, and M 39. The observations were taken using the Wampler single-channel scanner (Wampler 1966) on the Crossley 0.9m telescope at Lick Observatory from July 1973 through December 1974. 21 bandpasses spanning the spectral range 3500 Angstroms to 7780 Angstroms were observed for each star, with bandwiths ranging from 32Angstroms to 64 Angstroms. Data are standardized to the Hayes--Latham (1975) system. Our measurements are compared to filter colors on the Johnson BV, Stromgren ubvy, and Geneva U V B_1 B_2 V_1 G systems, as well as to spectrophotometry of a few stars published by Gunn, Stryker & Tinsley and in the Spectrophotometric Standards Catalog (Adelman; as distributed by the NSSDC). Both internal and external comparisons to the filter systems indicate a formal statistical accuracy per bandpass of 0.01 to 0.02 mag, with apparent larger ( ~ 0.03 mag) differences in absolute calibration between this data set and existing spectrophotometry. These data will comprise part of the spectrophotometry that will be used to calibrate the Beijing-Arizona-Taipei-Connecticut Color Survey of the Sky (see separate paper by Burstein et al. at this meeting).

  18. Absolute surface energies, fracture toughness, and cracking in nitrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreyer, Cyrus E.; Janotti, Anderson; van de Walle, Chris G.

    2014-03-01

    Growth of high quality single crystals and epitaxial layers of GaN is critical for producing high-efficiency optoelectronic and power electronic devices. One of the fundamental material properties that govern growth of single crystals is the absolute surface energy of the crystallographic planes. Knowledge of these energies is required to understand and optimize growth rates of different facets in GaN, and provide fracture toughnesses for brittle fracture. By means of hybrid functional calculations, we have determined absolute surface energies for the non-polar {11-20} a and {10-10} m planes, and approximated values for polar (0001) + c and (000-1) - c planes in wurtzite GaN. For all surfaces, we consider low-energy bare and hydrogenated reconstructions under a variety of conditions relevant to experimental growth techniques. We find that the energies of the m and a planes are similar, and constant over the range of conditions studied. In contrast, the energies of the polar planes are strongly condition dependent. Even so, we find that the + c polar plane is systematically lower in energy than the - c plane. We have used our surface energies to determine brittle fracture toughnesses in AlN and GaN, as well as the critical thickness for cracking of AlGaN on GaN.

  19. Dependence of the osmotic coefficients and average ionic activity coefficients on hydrophobic hydration in solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergievskii, V. V.; Rudakov, A. M.

    2016-08-01

    The model that considers the nonideality of aqueous solutions of electrolytes with allowance for independent contributions of hydration of ions of various types and electrostatic interactions was substantiated using the cluster ion model. The empirical parameters in the model equations were found to be the hydrophilic and hydrophobic hydration numbers of ions in the standard state and the dispersion of their distribution over the stoichiometric coefficients. A mathematically adequate description of the concentration dependences of the osmotic coefficients and average ion activity coefficients of electrolytes was given for several systems. The difference in the rate of the decrease in the hydrophilic and hydrophobic hydration numbers of ions leads to extremum concentration dependences of the osmotic coefficients, which were determined by other authors from isopiestic data for many electrolytes and did not find explanation.

  20. A Conceptual Approach to Absolute Value Equations and Inequalities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Mark W.; Bryson, Janet L.

    2011-01-01

    The absolute value learning objective in high school mathematics requires students to solve far more complex absolute value equations and inequalities. When absolute value problems become more complex, students often do not have sufficient conceptual understanding to make any sense of what is happening mathematically. The authors suggest that the…

  1. Using, Seeing, Feeling, and Doing Absolute Value for Deeper Understanding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ponce, Gregorio A.

    2008-01-01

    Using sticky notes and number lines, a hands-on activity is shared that anchors initial student thinking about absolute value. The initial point of reference should help students successfully evaluate numeric problems involving absolute value. They should also be able to solve absolute value equations and inequalities that are typically found in…

  2. 20 CFR 404.1205 - Absolute coverage groups.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Absolute coverage groups. 404.1205 Section... INSURANCE (1950- ) Coverage of Employees of State and Local Governments What Groups of Employees May Be Covered § 404.1205 Absolute coverage groups. (a) General. An absolute coverage group is a...

  3. Using absolute gravimeter data to determine vertical gravity gradients

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robertson, D.S.

    2001-01-01

    The position versus time data from a free-fall absolute gravimeter can be used to estimate the vertical gravity gradient in addition to the gravity value itself. Hipkin has reported success in estimating the vertical gradient value using a data set of unusually good quality. This paper explores techniques that may be applicable to a broader class of data that may be contaminated with "system response" errors of larger magnitude than were evident in the data used by Hipkin. This system response function is usually modelled as a sum of exponentially decaying sinusoidal components. The technique employed here involves combining the x0, v0 and g parameters from all the drops made during a site occupation into a single least-squares solution, and including the value of the vertical gradient and the coefficients of system response function in the same solution. The resulting non-linear equations must be solved iteratively and convergence presents some difficulties. Sparse matrix techniques are used to make the least-squares problem computationally tractable.

  4. Absolute position total internal reflection microscopy with an optical tweezer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lulu; Woolf, Alexander; Rodriguez, Alejandro W.; Capasso, Federico

    2014-01-01

    A noninvasive, in situ calibration method for total internal reflection microscopy (TIRM) based on optical tweezing is presented, which greatly expands the capabilities of this technique. We show that by making only simple modifications to the basic TIRM sensing setup and procedure, a probe particle’s absolute position relative to a dielectric interface may be known with better than 10 nm precision out to a distance greater than 1 μm from the surface. This represents an approximate 10× improvement in error and 3× improvement in measurement range over conventional TIRM methods. The technique’s advantage is in the direct measurement of the probe particle’s scattering intensity vs. height profile in situ, rather than relying on assumptions, inexact system analogs, or detailed knowledge of system parameters for calibration. To demonstrate the improved versatility of the TIRM method in terms of tunability, precision, and range, we show our results for the hindered near-wall diffusion coefficient for a spherical dielectric particle. PMID:25512542

  5. RADIONUCLIDE RISK COEFFICIENT UNCERTAINTY REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA has published excess cancer risk coefficients for the US population in Federal Guidance Report 13 (FGR 13). FGR 13 gives separate risk coefficients for food ingestion, water ingestion, inhalation, and external exposure for each of over 800 radionuclides. Some information on...

  6. Standardized Discriminant Coefficients: A Rejoinder.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mueller, Ralph O.; Cozad, James B.

    1993-01-01

    Although comments of D.J. Nordlund and R. Nagel are welcomed, their arguments are not sufficient to accept the recommendation of using total variance estimates to standardize canonical discriminant function coefficients. If standardized coefficients are used to help interpret a discriminant analysis, pooled within-group variance estimates should…

  7. Use of Absolute and Comparative Performance Feedback in Absolute and Comparative Judgments and Decisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Don A.; Klein, William M. P.

    2008-01-01

    Which matters more--beliefs about absolute ability or ability relative to others? This study set out to compare the effects of such beliefs on satisfaction with performance, self-evaluations, and bets on future performance. In Experiment 1, undergraduate participants were told they had answered 20% correct, 80% correct, or were not given their…

  8. Absolute calibration of ultraviolet filter photometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bless, R. C.; Fairchild, T.; Code, A. D.

    1972-01-01

    The essential features of the calibration procedure can be divided into three parts. First, the shape of the bandpass of each photometer was determined by measuring the transmissions of the individual optical components and also by measuring the response of the photometer as a whole. Secondly, each photometer was placed in the essentially-collimated synchrotron radiation bundle maintained at a constant intensity level, and the output signal was determined from about 100 points on the objective. Finally, two or three points on the objective were illuminated by synchrotron radiation at several different intensity levels covering the dynamic range of the photometers. The output signals were placed on an absolute basis by the electron counting technique described earlier.

  9. MAGSAT: Vector magnetometer absolute sensor alignment determination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acuna, M. H.

    1981-01-01

    A procedure is described for accurately determining the absolute alignment of the magnetic axes of a triaxial magnetometer sensor with respect to an external, fixed, reference coordinate system. The method does not require that the magnetic field vector orientation, as generated by a triaxial calibration coil system, be known to better than a few degrees from its true position, and minimizes the number of positions through which a sensor assembly must be rotated to obtain a solution. Computer simulations show that accuracies of better than 0.4 seconds of arc can be achieved under typical test conditions associated with existing magnetic test facilities. The basic approach is similar in nature to that presented by McPherron and Snare (1978) except that only three sensor positions are required and the system of equations to be solved is considerably simplified. Applications of the method to the case of the MAGSAT Vector Magnetometer are presented and the problems encountered discussed.

  10. Absolute geostrophic currents in global tropical oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Lina; Yuan, Dongliang

    2016-03-01

    A set of absolute geostrophic current (AGC) data for the period January 2004 to December 2012 are calculated using the P-vector method based on monthly gridded Argo profiles in the world tropical oceans. The AGCs agree well with altimeter geostrophic currents, Ocean Surface Current Analysis-Real time currents, and moored current-meter measurements at 10-m depth, based on which the classical Sverdrup circulation theory is evaluated. Calculations have shown that errors of wind stress calculation, AGC transport, and depth ranges of vertical integration cannot explain non-Sverdrup transport, which is mainly in the subtropical western ocean basins and equatorial currents near the Equator in each ocean basin (except the North Indian Ocean, where the circulation is dominated by monsoons). The identified non-Sverdrup transport is thereby robust and attributed to the joint effect of baroclinicity and relief of the bottom (JEBAR) and mesoscale eddy nonlinearity.

  11. Absolute Measurement of Electron Cloud Density

    SciTech Connect

    Covo, M K; Molvik, A W; Cohen, R H; Friedman, A; Seidl, P A; Logan, G; Bieniosek, F; Baca, D; Vay, J; Orlando, E; Vujic, J L

    2007-06-21

    Beam interaction with background gas and walls produces ubiquitous clouds of stray electrons that frequently limit the performance of particle accelerator and storage rings. Counterintuitively we obtained the electron cloud accumulation by measuring the expelled ions that are originated from the beam-background gas interaction, rather than by measuring electrons that reach the walls. The kinetic ion energy measured with a retarding field analyzer (RFA) maps the depressed beam space-charge potential and provides the dynamic electron cloud density. Clearing electrode current measurements give the static electron cloud background that complements and corroborates with the RFA measurements, providing an absolute measurement of electron cloud density during a 5 {micro}s duration beam pulse in a drift region of the magnetic transport section of the High-Current Experiment (HCX) at LBNL.

  12. Absolute instability of a viscous hollow jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gañán-Calvo, Alfonso M.

    2007-02-01

    An investigation of the spatiotemporal stability of hollow jets in unbounded coflowing liquids, using a general dispersion relation previously derived, shows them to be absolutely unstable for all physical values of the Reynolds and Weber numbers. The roots of the symmetry breakdown with respect to the liquid jet case, and the validity of asymptotic models are here studied in detail. Asymptotic analyses for low and high Reynolds numbers are provided, showing that old and well-established limiting dispersion relations [J. W. S. Rayleigh, The Theory of Sound (Dover, New York, 1945); S. Chandrasekhar, Hydrodynamic and Hydromagnetic Stability (Dover, New York, 1961)] should be used with caution. In the creeping flow limit, the analysis shows that, if the hollow jet is filled with any finite density and viscosity fluid, a steady jet could be made arbitrarily small (compatible with the continuum hypothesis) if the coflowing liquid moves faster than a critical velocity.

  13. Stitching interferometry: recent results and absolute calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bray, Michael

    2004-02-01

    Stitching Interferometry is a method of analysing large optical components using a standard "small" interferometer. This result is obtained by taking multiple overlapping images of the large component, and numerically "stitching" these sub-apertures together. We have already reported the industrial use our Stitching Interferometry systems (Previous SPIE symposia), but experimental results had been lacking because this technique is still new, and users needed to get accustomed to it before producing reliable measurements. We now have more results. We will report user comments and show new, unpublished results. We will discuss sources of error, and show how some of these can be reduced to arbitrarily small values. These will be discussed in some detail. We conclude with a few graphical examples of absolute measurements performed by us.

  14. Absolute nonlocality via distributed computing without communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czekaj, Ł.; Pawłowski, M.; Vértesi, T.; Grudka, A.; Horodecki, M.; Horodecki, R.

    2015-09-01

    Understanding the role that quantum entanglement plays as a resource in various information processing tasks is one of the crucial goals of quantum information theory. Here we propose an alternative perspective for studying quantum entanglement: distributed computation of functions without communication between nodes. To formalize this approach, we propose identity games. Surprisingly, despite no signaling, we obtain that nonlocal quantum strategies beat classical ones in terms of winning probability for identity games originating from certain bipartite and multipartite functions. Moreover we show that, for a majority of functions, access to general nonsignaling resources boosts success probability two times in comparison to classical ones for a number of large enough outputs. Because there are no constraints on the inputs and no processing of the outputs in the identity games, they detect very strong types of correlations: absolute nonlocality.

  15. An Alpha-Gamma Counter for Absolute Neutron Flux Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, A.; Greene, G.; Dewey, M.; Gilliam, D.; Nico, J.; Laptev, A.

    2012-03-01

    An alpha-gamma counter was used to measure the absolute neutron flux of a monochromatic cold neutron beam to sub-0.1,% precision. Simultaneously, the counter was used to calibrate a thin neutron flux monitor based on neutron absorption on ^6Li to the same precision. This monitor was used in the most precise beam-based measurement of the neutron lifetime, where the limiting systematic effect was the uncertainty in the neutron counting efficiency (0.3,%). The counter uses a thick target of ^10B-enriched boron carbide to completely absorb the beam. The rate of absorbed neutrons is determined by counting 478 keV gamma rays from neutron capture on ^10B with calibrated high-purity germanium detectors. The calibration results and the implications for the neutron lifetime will be discussed.

  16. Absolute properties of the eclipsing binary star IM Persei

    SciTech Connect

    Lacy, Claud H. Sandberg; Torres, Guillermo; Fekel, Francis C.; Muterspaugh, Matthew W.; Southworth, John E-mail: gtorres@cfa.harvard.edu E-mail: matthew1@coe.tsuniv.edu

    2015-01-01

    IM Per is a detached A7 eccentric eclipsing binary star. We have obtained extensive measurements of the light curve (28,225 differential magnitude observations) and radial velocity curve (81 spectroscopic observations) which allow us to fit orbits and determine the absolute properties of the components very accurately: masses of 1.7831 ± 0.0094 and 1.7741 ± 0.0097 solar masses, and radii of 2.409 ± 0.018 and 2.366 ± 0.017 solar radii. The orbital period is 2.25422694(15) days and the eccentricity is 0.0473(26). A faint third component was detected in the analysis of the light curves, and also directly observed in the spectra. The observed rate of apsidal motion is consistent with theory (U = 151.4 ± 8.4 year). We determine a distance to the system of 566 ± 46 pc.

  17. ABSOLUTE PROPERTIES OF THE ECLIPSING BINARY STAR V335 SERPENTIS

    SciTech Connect

    Lacy, Claud H. Sandberg; Fekel, Francis C.; Claret, Antonio E-mail: fekel@evans.tsuniv.edu

    2012-08-15

    V335 Ser is now known to be an eccentric double-lined A1+A3 binary star with fairly deep (0.5 mag) partial eclipses. Previous studies of the system are improved with 7456 differential photometric observations from the URSA WebScope and 5666 from the NFO WebScope, and 67 high-resolution spectroscopic observations from the Tennessee State University 2 m automatic spectroscopic telescope. From dates of minima, the apsidal period is about 880 years. Accurate (better than 2%) masses and radii are determined from analysis of the two new light curves and the radial velocity curve. Theoretical models match the absolute properties of the stars at an age of about 380 Myr, though the age agreement for the two components is poor. Tidal theory correctly confirms that the orbit should still be eccentric, but we find that standard tidal theory is unable to match the observed asynchronous rotation rates of the components' surface layers.

  18. Sedimentation Coefficient, Frictional Coefficient, and Molecular Weight: A Preparative Ultracentrifuge Experiment for the Advanced Undergraduate Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halsall, H. B.; Wermeling, J. R.

    1982-01-01

    Describes an experiment using a high-speed preparative centrifuge and calculator to demonstrate effects of the frictional coefficient of a macromolecule on its rate of transport in a force field and to estimate molecular weight of the macromolecule using an empirical relationship. Background information, procedures, and discussion of results are…

  19. Communication: Equilibrium rate coefficients from atomistic simulations: The O({sup 3}P) + NO({sup 2}Π) → O{sub 2}(X{sup 3}Σ{sub g}{sup −}) + N({sup 4}S) reaction at temperatures relevant to the hypersonic flight regime

    SciTech Connect

    Castro-Palacio, Juan Carlos; Bemish, Raymond J.; Meuwly, Markus

    2015-03-07

    The O({sup 3}P) + NO({sup 2}Π) → O{sub 2}(X{sup 3}Σ{sub g}{sup −}) + N({sup 4}S) reaction is among the N- and O- involving reactions that dominate the energetics of the reactive air flow around spacecraft during hypersonic atmospheric re-entry. In this regime, the temperature in the bow shock typically ranges from 1000 to 20 000 K. The forward and reverse rate coefficients for this reaction derived directly from trajectory calculations over this range of temperature are reported in this letter. Results compare well with the established equilibrium constants for the same reaction from thermodynamic quantities derived from spectroscopy in the gas phase which paves the way for large-scale in silico investigations of equilibrium rates under extreme conditions.

  20. Calculation of coupling coefficients for equations of multipoint kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ioannisian, M. V.

    2013-12-01

    The multipoint kinetics equations for fission reaction rate are developed. The algorithm for computation of coupling coefficients is implemented within the MCU-5 code. Results from approbation of the method using the model problem and experimental data are presented.

  1. Bayes and Empirical Bayes Shrinkage Estimation of Regression Coefficients: A Cross-Validation Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nebebe, Fassil; Stroud, T. W. F.

    1988-01-01

    Bayesian and empirical Bayes approaches to shrinkage estimation of regression coefficients and uses of these in prediction (i.e., analyzing intelligence test data of children with learning problems) are investigated. The two methods are consistently better at predicting response variables than are either least squares or least absolute deviations.…

  2. [Study on germination rate of zoysia (Zoysia japonica Steud.) seeds using near infrared reflectance spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Liang, Xiao-Hong; Zhang, Li-Juan; Fan, Bo; Mao, Wen-Hua; Mao, Wen-Hua; Puyang, Xue-Hua; Han, Lie-Bao

    2013-10-01

    With 37 zoysia seed samples with different germination rates ranging from 58.5% to 92%, harvested in different years from 2009 to 2011 and from different locations of China, a model for determining germination rate of zoysia seeds was tried to be built by near infrared reflectance spectroscopy with quantitative partial least squares (QPLS). All the seeds samples were divided into two groups: calibration set (including 28 samples) and validation set (including 9 samples). The results showed that with the spectral range from 6 000 to 7 000 cm(-1) and 6 main components, there was a better fitting between the predictive value and true value. Determination coefficients (R2) of calibration and validation sets are 90.73% and 91.80%, the coefficients of correlation are 0.986 6 and 0.987 2, the standard errors are 9.80 and 9.47, and the average absolute errors are 7.64% and 6.98% respectively. Even with different calibration samples, the models have a high determination coefficient (R2 over building of NIR model for determining 90%), low standard errors (about 10.00) and low absolute errors (about 8.00%). The building of NIR model for determining germination rate of zoysia seeds could promote the application of high quality seeds in production. PMID:24409708

  3. A new method on recycling coefficient measurement using impurity pellet injection in a large helical device

    SciTech Connect

    Nozato, Hideaki; Morita, Shigeru; Goto, Motoshi

    2005-07-15

    Recycling coefficients of carbon, aluminum, and titanium were evaluated using a new technique combining impurity pellet injection with high-spatial resolution bremsstrahlung measurement in hydrogen and helium plasmas on the large helical device. The recycling coefficient of impurities was investigated by measuring absolute intensities with the visible bremsstrahlung array. The time evolution of the bremsstrahlung signals was modeled by an impurity transport code adjusting the diffusion coefficient, convective velocity, and recycling coefficient. As a result, a finite value of the recycling coefficient was required in the case of carbon, whereas aluminum and titanium were explained as nonrecycled particles. It was also clarified that the recycling coefficient of carbon had a larger value in hydrogen plasmas (R=0.5-0.65) than in helium plasmas (R=0-0.2), suggesting the formation of hydrogen molecules.

  4. Personal dose-equivalent conversion coefficients for 1252 radionuclides.

    PubMed

    Otto, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Dose conversion coefficients for radionuclides are useful for routine calculations in radiation protection in industry, medicine and research. They give a simple and often sufficient estimate of dose rates during production, handling and storage of radionuclide sources, based solely on the source's activity. The latest compilation of such conversion coefficients dates from 20 y ago, based on nuclear decay data published 30 y ago. The present publication provides radionuclide-specific conversion coefficients to personal dose based on the most recent evaluations of nuclear decay data for 1252 radionuclides and fluence-to-dose-equivalent conversion coefficients for monoenergetic radiations. It contains previously unknown conversion coefficients for >400 nuclides and corrects those conversion coefficients that were based on erroneous decay schemes. For the first time, estimates for the protection quantity Hp(3) are included. PMID:25349458

  5. Wrong Signs in Regression Coefficients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGee, Holly

    1999-01-01

    When using parametric cost estimation, it is important to note the possibility of the regression coefficients having the wrong sign. A wrong sign is defined as a sign on the regression coefficient opposite to the researcher's intuition and experience. Some possible causes for the wrong sign discussed in this paper are a small range of x's, leverage points, missing variables, multicollinearity, and computational error. Additionally, techniques for determining the cause of the wrong sign are given.

  6. Fuel Temperature Coefficient of Reactivity

    SciTech Connect

    Loewe, W.E.

    2001-07-31

    A method for measuring the fuel temperature coefficient of reactivity in a heterogeneous nuclear reactor is presented. The method, which is used during normal operation, requires that calibrated control rods be oscillated in a special way at a high reactor power level. The value of the fuel temperature coefficient of reactivity is found from the measured flux responses to these oscillations. Application of the method in a Savannah River reactor charged with natural uranium is discussed.

  7. Determination of Local Experimental Heat-Transfer Coefficients on Combustion Side of an Ammonia-Oxygen Rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liebert, Curt H.; Ehlers, Robert C.

    1961-01-01

    Local experimental heat-transfer coefficients were measured in the chamber and throat of a 2400-pound-thrust ammonia-oxygen rocket engine with a nominal chamber pressure of 600 pounds per square inch absolute. Three injector configurations were used. The rocket engine was run over a range of oxidant-fuel ratio and chamber pressure. The injector that achieved the best performance also produced the highest rates of heat flux at design conditions. The heat-transfer data from the best-performing injector agreed well with the simplified equation developed by Bartz at the throat region. A large spread of data was observed for the chamber. This spread was attributed generally to the variations of combustion processes. The spread was least evident, however, with the best-performing injector.

  8. Swarm Absolute Scalar Magnetometers first in-orbit results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fratter, Isabelle; Léger, Jean-Michel; Bertrand, François; Jager, Thomas; Hulot, Gauthier; Brocco, Laura; Vigneron, Pierre

    2016-04-01

    The ESA Swarm mission will provide the best ever survey of the Earth's magnetic field and its temporal evolution. This will be achieved by a constellation of three identical satellites, launched together on the 22nd of November 2013. In order to observe the magnetic field thoroughly, each satellite carries two magnetometers: a Vector Field Magnetometer (VFM) coupled with a star tracker camera, to measure the direction of the magnetic field in space, and an Absolute Scalar Magnetometer (ASM), to measure its intensity. The ASM is the French contribution to the Swarm mission. This new generation instrument was designed by CEA-Leti and developed in close partnership with CNES, with scientific support from IPGP. Its operating principle is based on the atomic spectroscopy of the helium 4 metastable state. It makes use of the Zeeman's effect to transduce the magnetic field into a frequency, the signal being amplified by optical pumping. The primary role of the ASM is to provide absolute measurements of the magnetic field's strength at 1 Hz, for the in-flight calibration of the VFM. As the Swarm magnetic reference, the ASM scalar performance is crucial for the mission's success. Thanks to its innovative design, the ASM offers the best precision, resolution and absolute accuracy ever attained in space, with similar performance all along the orbit. In addition, thanks to an original architecture, the ASM implements on an experimental basis a capacity for providing simultaneously vector measurements at 1 Hz. This new feature makes it the first instrument capable of delivering both scalar and vector measurements simultaneously at the same point. Swarm offers a unique opportunity to validate the ASM vector data in orbit by comparison with the VFM's. Furthermore, the ASM can provide scalar data at a much higher sampling rate, when run in "burst" mode at 250 Hz, with a 100 Hz measurement bandwidth. An analysis of the spectral content of the magnetic field above 1 Hz becomes thus

  9. Absolute Gravimetry in Fennoscandia - A Contribution to Understanding Postglacial Uplift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pettersen, B. R.; Timmen, L.; Gitlein, O.; Muller, J.; Denker, H.; Makinen, J.; Bilker, M.; Lysaker, D. I.; Omang, O. C.; Svendsen, J. G.; Wilmes, H.; Falk, R.; Reinhold, A.; Hoppe, W.; Scherneck, H.; Lidberg, M.; Engen, B.; Kristiansen, O.; Engfeldt, A.; Strykowski, G.; Forsberg, R.; Klopping, F.; Sasagawa, G.

    2005-12-01

    The Fennoscandian postglacial uplift has been mapped geometrically using precise levelling, tide gauges, and networks of permanent GPS stations. The results identify major uplift rates at sites located around the northern part of the Gulf of Bothnia. The vertical motions decay in all directions away from this central location. An oval shaped zero uplift isoline tracks the general western and northern coastline of Norway and the Kola peninsula. It returns southwest through Russian Karelia and touches the southern tip of Sweden and northern Denmark. The uplift area (as measured by present day motions) has its major axis in the direction of southwest to northeast and covers a distance of about 2000 km. Absolute gravimetry was made in Finland and Norway in 1976 with a rise-and fall instrument. A decade later the number of gravity stations was expanded by JILAg-5, in Finland from 1988, in Norway from 1991, and in Sweden from 1992. FG5 was introduced in these three countries in 1993 (7 stations) and continued with an extended campaign in 1995 (12 stations). In 2003 a project was initiated by IfE, Hannover to collect observations simultaneously with GRACE on an annual cycle. New instruments were acquired by IfE (FG5-220), FGI (FG5-221), and UMB (FG5-226). New absolute gravity stations were established by the national mapping agencies in Denmark, Norway, and Sweden. The total number of prepared sites in Fennoscandia is now about 30. Most of them are co-located with permanent GPS, for many of which time series of several years are now available. Along the coast there are nearby tide gauge stations, many of which have time series of several decades. We describe the observing network, procedures, auxiliary observations, and discuss results obtained for selected sites. We compare the gravity results from different instruments and discuss the challenges of combining and validating such data products. Examples are shown where temporal gravity change may be compared to

  10. Viscous linear stability of axisymmetric low-density jets: Parameters influencing absolute instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, V.; Hallberg, M. P.; Strykowski, P. J.

    2010-02-01

    Viscous linear stability calculations are presented for model low-density axisymmetric jet flows. Absolute growth transitions for the jet column mode are mapped out in a parametric space including velocity ratio, density ratio, Reynolds number, momentum thickness, and subtle differences between velocity and density profiles. Strictly speaking, the profiles used in most jet stability studies to date are only applicable to unity Prandtl numbers and zero pressure gradient flows—the present work relaxes this requirement. Results reveal how subtle differences between the velocity and density profiles generally used in jet stability theory can dramatically alter the absolute growth rate of the jet column mode in these low-density flows. The results suggest heating/cooling or mass diffusion at the outer nozzle surface can suppress absolute instability and potentially global instability in low-density jets.

  11. Thorough subcells diagnosis in a multi-junction solar cell via absolute electroluminescence-efficiency measurements.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shaoqiang; Zhu, Lin; Yoshita, Masahiro; Mochizuki, Toshimitsu; Kim, Changsu; Akiyama, Hidefumi; Imaizumi, Mitsuru; Kanemitsu, Yoshihiko

    2015-01-01

    World-wide studies on multi-junction (tandem) solar cells have led to record-breaking improvements in conversion efficiencies year after year. To obtain detailed and proper feedback for solar-cell design and fabrication, it is necessary to establish standard methods for diagnosing subcells in fabricated tandem devices. Here, we propose a potential standard method to quantify the detailed subcell properties of multi-junction solar cells based on absolute measurements of electroluminescence (EL) external quantum efficiency in addition to the conventional solar-cell external-quantum-efficiency measurements. We demonstrate that the absolute-EL-quantum-efficiency measurements provide I-V relations of individual subcells without the need for referencing measured I-V data, which is in stark contrast to previous works. Moreover, our measurements quantify the absolute rates of junction loss, non-radiative loss, radiative loss, and luminescence coupling in the subcells, which constitute the "balance sheets" of tandem solar cells. PMID:25592484

  12. Gyrokinetic Statistical Absolute Equilibrium and Turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Jian-Zhou Zhu and Gregory W. Hammett

    2011-01-10

    A paradigm based on the absolute equilibrium of Galerkin-truncated inviscid systems to aid in understanding turbulence [T.-D. Lee, "On some statistical properties of hydrodynamical and magnetohydrodynamical fields," Q. Appl. Math. 10, 69 (1952)] is taken to study gyrokinetic plasma turbulence: A finite set of Fourier modes of the collisionless gyrokinetic equations are kept and the statistical equilibria are calculated; possible implications for plasma turbulence in various situations are discussed. For the case of two spatial and one velocity dimension, in the calculation with discretization also of velocity v with N grid points (where N + 1 quantities are conserved, corresponding to an energy invariant and N entropy-related invariants), the negative temperature states, corresponding to the condensation of the generalized energy into the lowest modes, are found. This indicates a generic feature of inverse energy cascade. Comparisons are made with some classical results, such as those of Charney-Hasegawa-Mima in the cold-ion limit. There is a universal shape for statistical equilibrium of gyrokinetics in three spatial and two velocity dimensions with just one conserved quantity. Possible physical relevance to turbulence, such as ITG zonal flows, and to a critical balance hypothesis are also discussed.

  13. Absolute surface energy for zincblende semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, S. B.; Wei, Su-Huai

    2003-03-01

    Recent advance in nanosciences requires the determination of surface (or facet) energy of semiconductors, which is often difficult due to the polar nature of some of the most important surfaces such as the (111)A/(111)B surfaces. Several approaches have been developed in the past [1-3] to deal with the problem but an unambiguous division of the polar surface energies is yet to come [2]. Here we show that an accurate division is indeed possible for the zincblende semiconductors and will present the results for GaAs, ZnSe, and CuInSe2 [4], respectively. A general trend emerges, relating the absolute surface energy to the ionicity of the bulk materials. [1] N. Chetty and R. M. Martin, Phys. Rev. B 45, 6074 (1992). [2] N. Moll, et al., Phys. Rev. B 54, 8844 (1996). [3] S. Mankefors, Phys. Rev. B 59, 13151 (1999). [4] S. B. Zhang and S.-H. Wei, Phys. Rev. B 65, 081402 (2002).

  14. Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leckey, John P.

    2015-01-01

    The Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO) is a mission, led and developed by NASA, that will measure a variety of climate variables with an unprecedented accuracy to quantify and attribute climate change. CLARREO consists of three separate instruments: an infrared (IR) spectrometer, a reflected solar (RS) spectrometer, and a radio occultation (RO) instrument. The mission will contain orbiting radiometers with sufficient accuracy, including on orbit verification, to calibrate other space-based instrumentation, increasing their respective accuracy by as much as an order of magnitude. The IR spectrometer is a Fourier Transform spectrometer (FTS) working in the 5 to 50 microns wavelength region with a goal of 0.1 K (k = 3) accuracy. The FTS will achieve this accuracy using phase change cells to verify thermistor accuracy and heated halos to verify blackbody emissivity, both on orbit. The RS spectrometer will measure the reflectance of the atmosphere in the 0.32 to 2.3 microns wavelength region with an accuracy of 0.3% (k = 2). The status of the instrumentation packages and potential mission options will be presented.

  15. Absolute decay width measurements in 16O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheldon, C.; Ashwood, N. I.; Barr, M.; Curtis, N.; Freer, M.; Kokalova, Tz; Malcolm, J. D.; Spencer, S. J.; Ziman, V. A.; Faestermann, Th; Krücken, R.; Wirth, H.-F.; Hertenberger, R.; Lutter, R.; Bergmaier, A.

    2012-09-01

    The reaction 126C(63Li, d)168O* at a 6Li bombarding energy of 42 MeV has been used to populate excited states in 16O. The deuteron ejectiles were measured using the high-resolution Munich Q3D spectrograph. A large-acceptance silicon-strip detector array was used to register the recoil and break-up products. This complete kinematic set-up has enabled absolute α-decay widths to be measured with high-resolution in the 13.9 to 15.9 MeV excitation energy regime in 16O; many for the first time. This energy region spans the 14.4 MeV four-α breakup threshold. Monte-Carlo simulations of the detector geometry and break-up processes yield detection efficiencies for the two dominant decay modes of 40% and 37% for the α+12C(g.s.) and a+12C(2+1) break-up channels respectively.

  16. Absolute calibration of forces in optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutra, R. S.; Viana, N. B.; Maia Neto, P. A.; Nussenzveig, H. M.

    2014-07-01

    Optical tweezers are highly versatile laser traps for neutral microparticles, with fundamental applications in physics and in single molecule cell biology. Force measurements are performed by converting the stiffness response to displacement of trapped transparent microspheres, employed as force transducers. Usually, calibration is indirect, by comparison with fluid drag forces. This can lead to discrepancies by sizable factors. Progress achieved in a program aiming at absolute calibration, conducted over the past 15 years, is briefly reviewed. Here we overcome its last major obstacle, a theoretical overestimation of the peak stiffness, within the most employed range for applications, and we perform experimental validation. The discrepancy is traced to the effect of primary aberrations of the optical system, which are now included in the theory. All required experimental parameters are readily accessible. Astigmatism, the dominant effect, is measured by analyzing reflected images of the focused laser spot, adapting frequently employed video microscopy techniques. Combined with interface spherical aberration, it reveals a previously unknown window of instability for trapping. Comparison with experimental data leads to an overall agreement within error bars, with no fitting, for a broad range of microsphere radii, from the Rayleigh regime to the ray optics one, for different polarizations and trapping heights, including all commonly employed parameter domains. Besides signaling full first-principles theoretical understanding of optical tweezers operation, the results may lead to improved instrument design and control over experiments, as well as to an extended domain of applicability, allowing reliable force measurements, in principle, from femtonewtons to nanonewtons.

  17. Absolute spectrophotometry of northern compact planetary nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, S. A.; Corradi, R. L. M.; Perinotto, M.

    2005-06-01

    We present medium-dispersion spectra and narrowband images of six northern compact planetary nebulae (PNe): BoBn 1, DdDm 1, IC 5117, M 1-5, M 1-71, and NGC 6833. From broad-slit spectra, total absolute fluxes and equivalent widths were measured for all observable emission lines. High signal-to-noise emission line fluxes of Hα, Hβ, [Oiii], [Nii], and HeI may serve as emission line flux standards for northern hemisphere observers. From narrow-slit spectra, we derive systemic radial velocities. For four PNe, available emission line fluxes were measured with sufficient signal-to-noise to probe the physical properties of their electron densities, temperatures, and chemical abundances. BoBn 1 and DdDm 1, both type IV PNe, have an Hβ flux over three sigma away from previous measurements. We report the first abundance measurements of M 1-71. NGC 6833 measured radial velocity and galactic coordinates suggest that it is associated with the outer arm or possibly the galactic halo, and its low abundance ([O/H]=1.3× 10-4) may be indicative of low metallicity within that region.

  18. Observing absolute gravity change in the Fennoscandian postglacial rebound area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mäkinen, J.; Engfeldt, A.; Gitlein, O.; Kaminskis, J.; Klopping, F.; Oja, T.; Paršeliunas, E.; Pettersen, B. R.; Strykowski, G.; Wilmes, H.

    2009-04-01

    Absolute gravity measurements in the Fennoscandian postglacial rebound area started already in 1976 when a team from Istituto di Metrología "G. Colonnetti" (Torino) measured six stations with the rise-and-fall gravimeter IMGC (Cannizzo et al., 1978). In 1980 two stations were measured by the team of the AN SSSR from Novosibirsk, using the gravimeter GABL (Arnautov et al., 1982). From the beginning the goal was to establish reference values for future remeasurement in order to detect gravity change due to the postglacial rebound. The maximum uplift rates are 1 cm/yr, which implies a surface gravity change of about -2 microgal/yr. In 1988, regular repeat measurements were began by the Finnish Geodetic Institute (FGI) with the JILAg-5. An important advance was the introduction of FG5 gravimeters into the work by BKG (Frankfurt a/M) and NOAA (Boulder, CO) in 1993. In 2003 annual large-scale campaigns with FG5 gravimeters started, coordinated by the Working Group for Geodynamics of the Nordic Geodetic Commission (NKG). This was prompted by the launch of the GRACE satellite gravity mission, which made it important to collect a comprehensive set of ground-truth values of gravity change during the lifetime of the satellite pair. The initial participation by gravimeter teams of Leibniz Universität Hannover, FGI and BKG has since expanded to include the University of Life Sciences (Ås, Norway) and Lantmäteriet (Gävle, Sweden). At present some 50 sites have repeated absolute measurements and most of them are co-located with continuous GPS. We give an overview of the sites, instrumentation and campaigns, and show examples of results achieved so far.

  19. Absolute nuclear material assay using count distribution (LAMBDA) space

    DOEpatents

    Prasad, Mano K.; Snyderman, Neal J.; Rowland, Mark S.

    2015-12-01

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  20. Absolute nuclear material assay using count distribution (LAMBDA) space

    DOEpatents

    Prasad, Manoj K.; Snyderman, Neal J.; Rowland, Mark S.

    2012-06-05

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  1. A high absorption coefficient DL-MPP imitating owl skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Lijun; Zhao, Zhan; Kong, Deyi; Wu, Shaohua; Du, Lidong; Fang, Zhen

    2012-11-01

    This paper proposes a high absorption coefficient micro-perforated panel (MPP) imitating owl skin structure for acoustic noise reduction. Compared to the traditional micro-perforated panel, this device has two unique characteristics-simulating the owl skin structure, its radius of perforated apertures even can be as small as 55μ, and its material is silicon and fabricated by micro-electrical mechanical system (MEMS) technology; So that its absorption coefficients of acoustic noise for normal incidence sound wave whose frequencies arrange from 1.5 kHz to 6.0 kHz are all above 0.8 which is the owl's hunts sensitivity frequency band. Double leaf MPP fabricated by MEMS technology is an absolutely bionic success in functional-imitation.

  2. The absolute disparity anomaly and the mechanism of relative disparities.

    PubMed

    Chopin, Adrien; Levi, Dennis; Knill, David; Bavelier, Daphne

    2016-06-01

    There has been a long-standing debate about the mechanisms underlying the perception of stereoscopic depth and the computation of the relative disparities that it relies on. Relative disparities between visual objects could be computed in two ways: (a) using the difference in the object's absolute disparities (Hypothesis 1) or (b) using relative disparities based on the differences in the monocular separations between objects (Hypothesis 2). To differentiate between these hypotheses, we measured stereoscopic discrimination thresholds for lines with different absolute and relative disparities. Participants were asked to judge the depth of two lines presented at the same distance from the fixation plane (absolute disparity) or the depth between two lines presented at different distances (relative disparity). We used a single stimulus method involving a unique memory component for both conditions, and no extraneous references were available. We also measured vergence noise using Nonius lines. Stereo thresholds were substantially worse for absolute disparities than for relative disparities, and the difference could not be explained by vergence noise. We attribute this difference to an absence of conscious readout of absolute disparities, termed the absolute disparity anomaly. We further show that the pattern of correlations between vergence noise and absolute and relative disparity acuities can be explained jointly by the existence of the absolute disparity anomaly and by the assumption that relative disparity information is computed from absolute disparities (Hypothesis 1). PMID:27248566

  3. The absolute disparity anomaly and the mechanism of relative disparities

    PubMed Central

    Chopin, Adrien; Levi, Dennis; Knill, David; Bavelier, Daphne

    2016-01-01

    There has been a long-standing debate about the mechanisms underlying the perception of stereoscopic depth and the computation of the relative disparities that it relies on. Relative disparities between visual objects could be computed in two ways: (a) using the difference in the object's absolute disparities (Hypothesis 1) or (b) using relative disparities based on the differences in the monocular separations between objects (Hypothesis 2). To differentiate between these hypotheses, we measured stereoscopic discrimination thresholds for lines with different absolute and relative disparities. Participants were asked to judge the depth of two lines presented at the same distance from the fixation plane (absolute disparity) or the depth between two lines presented at different distances (relative disparity). We used a single stimulus method involving a unique memory component for both conditions, and no extraneous references were available. We also measured vergence noise using Nonius lines. Stereo thresholds were substantially worse for absolute disparities than for relative disparities, and the difference could not be explained by vergence noise. We attribute this difference to an absence of conscious readout of absolute disparities, termed the absolute disparity anomaly. We further show that the pattern of correlations between vergence noise and absolute and relative disparity acuities can be explained jointly by the existence of the absolute disparity anomaly and by the assumption that relative disparity information is computed from absolute disparities (Hypothesis 1). PMID:27248566

  4. Absolute Cavity Pyrgeometer to Measure the Absolute Outdoor Longwave Irradiance with Traceability to International System of Units, SI

    SciTech Connect

    Reda, I.; Zeng, J.; Scheuch, J.; Hanssen, L.; Wilthan, B.; Myers, D.; Stoffel, T.

    2012-03-01

    This article describes a method of measuring the absolute outdoor longwave irradiance using an absolute cavity pyrgeometer (ACP), U.S. Patent application no. 13/049, 275. The ACP consists of domeless thermopile pyrgeometer, gold-plated concentrator, temperature controller, and data acquisition. The dome was removed from the pyrgeometer to remove errors associated with dome transmittance and the dome correction factor. To avoid thermal convection and wind effect errors resulting from using a domeless thermopile, the gold-plated concentrator was placed above the thermopile. The concentrator is a dual compound parabolic concentrator (CPC) with 180{sup o} view angle to measure the outdoor incoming longwave irradiance from the atmosphere. The incoming irradiance is reflected from the specular gold surface of the CPC and concentrated on the 11 mm diameter of the pyrgeometer's blackened thermopile. The CPC's interior surface design and the resulting cavitation result in a throughput value that was characterized by the National Institute of Standards and Technology. The ACP was installed horizontally outdoor on an aluminum plate connected to the temperature controller to control the pyrgeometer's case temperature. The responsivity of the pyrgeometer's thermopile detector was determined by lowering the case temperature and calculating the rate of change of the thermopile output voltage versus the changing net irradiance. The responsivity is then used to calculate the absolute atmospheric longwave irradiance with an uncertainty estimate (U{sub 95}) of {+-}3.96 W m{sup 02} with traceability to the International System of Units, SI. The measured irradiance was compared with the irradiance measured by two pyrgeometers calibrated by the World Radiation Center with traceability to the Interim World Infrared Standard Group, WISG. A total of 408 readings were collected over three different nights. The calculated irradiance measured by the ACP was 1.5 W/m{sup 2} lower than that

  5. An absolute cavity pyrgeometer to measure the absolute outdoor longwave irradiance with traceability to international system of units, SI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reda, Ibrahim; Zeng, Jinan; Scheuch, Jonathan; Hanssen, Leonard; Wilthan, Boris; Myers, Daryl; Stoffel, Tom

    2012-03-01

    This article describes a method of measuring the absolute outdoor longwave irradiance using an absolute cavity pyrgeometer (ACP), U.S. Patent application no. 13/049, 275. The ACP consists of domeless thermopile pyrgeometer, gold-plated concentrator, temperature controller, and data acquisition. The dome was removed from the pyrgeometer to remove errors associated with dome transmittance and the dome correction factor. To avoid thermal convection and wind effect errors resulting from using a domeless thermopile, the gold-plated concentrator was placed above the thermopile. The concentrator is a dual compound parabolic concentrator (CPC) with 180° view angle to measure the outdoor incoming longwave irradiance from the atmosphere. The incoming irradiance is reflected from the specular gold surface of the CPC and concentrated on the 11 mm diameter of the pyrgeometer's blackened thermopile. The CPC's interior surface design and the resulting cavitation result in a throughput value that was characterized by the National Institute of Standards and Technology. The ACP was installed horizontally outdoor on an aluminum plate connected to the temperature controller to control the pyrgeometer's case temperature. The responsivity of the pyrgeometer's thermopile detector was determined by lowering the case temperature and calculating the rate of change of the thermopile output voltage versus the changing net irradiance. The responsivity is then used to calculate the absolute atmospheric longwave irradiance with an uncertainty estimate (U95) of ±3.96 W m-2 with traceability to the International System of Units, SI. The measured irradiance was compared with the irradiance measured by two pyrgeometers calibrated by the World Radiation Center with traceability to the Interim World Infrared Standard Group, WISG. A total of 408 readings were collected over three different nights. The calculated irradiance measured by the ACP was 1.5 W/m2 lower than that measured by the two

  6. Transport coefficients of heavy baryons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolos, Laura; Torres-Rincon, Juan M.; Das, Santosh K.

    2016-08-01

    We compute the transport coefficients (drag and momentum diffusion) of the low-lying heavy baryons Λc and Λb in a medium of light mesons formed at the later stages of high-energy heavy-ion collisions. We employ the Fokker-Planck approach to obtain the transport coefficients from unitarized baryon-meson interactions based on effective field theories that respect chiral and heavy-quark symmetries. We provide the transport coefficients as a function of temperature and heavy-baryon momentum, and analyze the applicability of certain nonrelativistic estimates. Moreover we compare our outcome for the spatial diffusion coefficient to the one coming from the solution of the Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck transport equation, and we find a very good agreement between both calculations. The transport coefficients for Λc and Λb in a thermal bath will be used in a subsequent publication as input in a Langevin evolution code for the generation and propagation of heavy particles in heavy-ion collisions at LHC and RHIC energies.

  7. Evaluation of the Absolute Regional Temperature Potential

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shindell, D. T.

    2012-01-01

    The Absolute Regional Temperature Potential (ARTP) is one of the few climate metrics that provides estimates of impacts at a sub-global scale. The ARTP presented here gives the time-dependent temperature response in four latitude bands (90-28degS, 28degS-28degN, 28-60degN and 60-90degN) as a function of emissions based on the forcing in those bands caused by the emissions. It is based on a large set of simulations performed with a single atmosphere-ocean climate model to derive regional forcing/response relationships. Here I evaluate the robustness of those relationships using the forcing/response portion of the ARTP to estimate regional temperature responses to the historic aerosol forcing in three independent climate models. These ARTP results are in good accord with the actual responses in those models. Nearly all ARTP estimates fall within +/-20%of the actual responses, though there are some exceptions for 90-28degS and the Arctic, and in the latter the ARTP may vary with forcing agent. However, for the tropics and the Northern Hemisphere mid-latitudes in particular, the +/-20% range appears to be roughly consistent with the 95% confidence interval. Land areas within these two bands respond 39-45% and 9-39% more than the latitude band as a whole. The ARTP, presented here in a slightly revised form, thus appears to provide a relatively robust estimate for the responses of large-scale latitude bands and land areas within those bands to inhomogeneous radiative forcing and thus potentially to emissions as well. Hence this metric could allow rapid evaluation of the effects of emissions policies at a finer scale than global metrics without requiring use of a full climate model.

  8. Absolute optical surface measurement with deflectometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wansong; Sandner, Marc; Gesierich, Achim; Burke, Jan

    Deflectometry utilises the deformation and displacement of a sample pattern after reflection from a test surface to infer the surface slopes. Differentiation of the measurement data leads to a curvature map, which is very useful for surface quality checks with sensitivity down to the nanometre range. Integration of the data allows reconstruction of the absolute surface shape, but the procedure is very error-prone because systematic errors may add up to large shape deviations. In addition, there are infinitely many combinations for slope and object distance that satisfy a given observation. One solution for this ambiguity is to include information on the object's distance. It must be known very accurately. Two laser pointers can be used for positioning the object, and we also show how a confocal chromatic distance sensor can be used to define a reference point on a smooth surface from which the integration can be started. The used integration algorithm works without symmetry constraints and is therefore suitable for free-form surfaces as well. Unlike null testing, deflectometry also determines radius of curvature (ROC) or focal lengths as a direct result of the 3D surface reconstruction. This is shown by the example of a 200 mm diameter telescope mirror, whose ROC measurements by coordinate measurement machine and deflectometry coincide to within 0.27 mm (or a sag error of 1.3μm). By the example of a diamond-turned off-axis parabolic mirror, we demonstrate that the figure measurement uncertainty comes close to a well-calibrated Fizeau interferometer.

  9. Absolute Quantification of Individual Biomass Concentrations in a Methanogenic Coculture

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Identification of individual biomass concentrations is a crucial step towards an improved understanding of anaerobic digestion processes and mixed microbial conversions in general. The knowledge of individual biomass concentrations allows for the calculation of biomass specific conversion rates which form the basis of anaerobic digestion models. Only few attempts addressed the absolute quantification of individual biomass concentrations in methanogenic microbial ecosystems which has so far impaired the calculation of biomass specific conversion rates and thus model validation. This study proposes a quantitative PCR (qPCR) approach for the direct determination of individual biomass concentrations in methanogenic microbial associations by correlating the native qPCR signal (cycle threshold, Ct) to individual biomass concentrations (mg dry matter/L). Unlike existing methods, the proposed approach circumvents error-prone conversion factors that are typically used to convert gene copy numbers or cell concentrations into actual biomass concentrations. The newly developed method was assessed and deemed suitable for the determination of individual biomass concentrations in a defined coculture of Desulfovibrio sp. G11 and Methanospirillum hungatei JF1. The obtained calibration curves showed high accuracy, indicating that the new approach is well suited for any engineering applications where the knowledge of individual biomass concentrations is required. PMID:24949269

  10. Analysis of internal conversion coefficients

    PubMed

    Coursol; Gorozhankin; Yakushev; Briancon; Vylov

    2000-03-01

    An extensive database has been assembled that contains the three most widely used sets of calculated internal conversion coefficients (ICC): [Hager R.S., Seltzer E.C., 1968. Internal conversion tables. K-, L-, M-shell Conversion coefficients for Z = 30 to Z = 103, Nucl. Data Tables A4, 1-237; Band I.M., Trzhaskovskaya M.B., 1978. Tables of gamma-ray internal conversion coefficients for the K-, L- and M-shells, 10 < or = Z < or = 104, Special Report of Leningrad Nuclear Physics Institute; Rosel F., Fries H.M., Alder K., Pauli H.C., 1978. Internal conversion coefficients for all atomic shells, At. Data Nucl. Data Tables 21, 91-289] and also includes new Dirac Fock calculations [Band I.M. and Trzhaskovskaya M.B., 1993. Internal conversion coefficients for low-energy nuclear transitions, At. Data Nucl. Data Tables 55, 43-61]. This database is linked to a computer program to plot ICCs and their combinations (sums and ratios) as a function of Z and energy, as well as relative deviations of ICC or their combinations for any pair of tabulated data. Examples of these analyses are presented for the K-shell and total ICCs of the gamma-ray standards [Hansen H.H., 1985. Evaluation of K-shell and total internal conversion coefficients for some selected nuclear transitions, Eur. Appl. Res. Rept. Nucl. Sci. Tech. 11.6 (4) 777-816] and for the K-shell and total ICCs of high multipolarity transitions (total, K-, L-, M-shells of E3 and M3 and K-shell of M4). Experimental data sets are also compared with the theoretical values of these specific calculations. PMID:10724406

  11. Mid-infrared absolute spectral responsivity scale based on an absolute cryogenic radiometer and an optical parametric oscillator laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Kun; Shi, Xueshun; Chen, Haidong; Liu, Yulong; Liu, Changming; Chen, Kunfeng; Li, Ligong; Gan, Haiyong; Ma, Chong

    2016-06-01

    We are reporting on a laser-based absolute spectral responsivity scale in the mid-infrared spectral range. By using a mid-infrared tunable optical parametric oscillator as the laser source, the absolute responsivity scale has been established by calibrating thin-film thermopile detectors against an absolute cryogenic radiometer. The thin-film thermopile detectors can be then used as transfer standard detectors. The extended uncertainty of the absolute spectral responsivity measurement has been analyzed to be 0.58%–0.68% (k  =  2).

  12. Seebeck coefficient of one electron

    SciTech Connect

    Durrani, Zahid A. K.

    2014-03-07

    The Seebeck coefficient of one electron, driven thermally into a semiconductor single-electron box, is investigated theoretically. With a finite temperature difference ΔT between the source and charging island, a single electron can charge the island in equilibrium, directly generating a Seebeck effect. Seebeck coefficients for small and finite ΔT are calculated and a thermally driven Coulomb staircase is predicted. Single-electron Seebeck oscillations occur with increasing ΔT, as one electron at a time charges the box. A method is proposed for experimental verification of these effects.

  13. Gender equality and women's absolute status: a test of the feminist models of rape.

    PubMed

    Martin, Kimberly; Vieraitis, Lynne M; Britto, Sarah

    2006-04-01

    Feminist theory predicts both a positive and negative relationship between gender equality and rape rates. Although liberal and radical feminist theory predicts that gender equality should ameliorate rape victimization, radical feminist theorists have argued that gender equality may increase rape in the form of male backlash. Alternatively, Marxist criminologists focus on women's absolute socioeconomic status rather than gender equality as a predictor of rape rates, whereas socialist feminists combine both radical and Marxist perspectives. This study uses factor analysis to overcome multicollinearity limitations of past studies while exploring the relationship between women's absolute and relative socioeconomic status on rape rates in major U.S. cities using 2000 census data. The findings indicate support for both the Marxist and radical feminist explanations of rape but no support for the ameliorative hypothesis. These findings support a more inclusive socialist feminist theory that takes both Marxist and radical feminist hypotheses into account. PMID:16567334

  14. Determination of the asymptotic normalization coefficients for 14C + n <--> 15C, the 14C(n, gamma)15C reaction rate, and evaluation of a new method to determine spectroscopic factors

    SciTech Connect

    McCleskey, M.; Mukhamedzhanov, A. M.; Trache, L.; Tribble, R. E.; Banu, A.; Eremenko, V.; Goldberg, V. Z.; Lui, Y. W.; McCleskey, E.; Roeder, B. T.; Spiridon, A.; Carstoiu, F.; Burjan, V.; Hons, Z.; Thompson, I. J.

    2014-04-17

    The 14C + n <--> 15C system has been used as a test case in the evaluation of a new method to determine spectroscopic factors that uses the asymptotic normalization coefficient (ANC). The method proved to be unsuccessful for this case. As part of this experimental program, the ANCs for the 15C ground state and first excited state were determined using a heavy-ion neutron transfer reaction as well as the inverse kinematics (d,p) reaction, measured at the Texas A&M Cyclotron Institute. The ANCs were used to evaluate the astrophysical direct neutron capture rate on 14C, which was then compared with the most recent direct measurement and found to be in good agreement. A study of the 15C SF via its mirror nucleus 15F and a new insight into deuteron stripping theory are also presented.

  15. Supplementary and Enrichment Series: Absolute Value. Teachers' Commentary. SP-25.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bridgess, M. Philbrick, Ed.

    This is one in a series of manuals for teachers using SMSG high school supplementary materials. The pamphlet includes commentaries on the sections of the student's booklet, answers to the exercises, and sample test questions. Topics covered include addition and multiplication in terms of absolute value, graphs of absolute value in the Cartesian…

  16. Supplementary and Enrichment Series: Absolute Value. SP-24.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bridgess, M. Philbrick, Ed.

    This is one in a series of SMSG supplementary and enrichment pamphlets for high school students. This series is designed to make material for the study of topics of special interest to students readily accessible in classroom quantity. Topics covered include absolute value, addition and multiplication in terms of absolute value, graphs of absolute…

  17. Novalis' Poetic Uncertainty: A "Bildung" with the Absolute

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mika, Carl

    2016-01-01

    Novalis, the Early German Romantic poet and philosopher, had at the core of his work a mysterious depiction of the "absolute." The absolute is Novalis' name for a substance that defies precise knowledge yet calls for a tentative and sensitive speculation. How one asserts a truth, represents an object, and sets about encountering things…

  18. Karst Water System Investigated by Absolute Gravimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinif, Y.; Meus, P.; van Camp, M.; Kaufmann, O.; van Ruymbeke, M.; Vandiepenbeeck, M.; Camelbeeck, T.

    2006-12-01

    The highly anisotropic and heterogeneous hydrogeological characteristics of karst aquifers are difficult to characterize and present challenges for modeling of storage capacities. Little is known about the surface and groundwater interconnection, about the connection between the porous formations and the draining cave and conduits, and about the variability of groundwater volume within the system. Usually, an aquifer is considered as a black box, where water fluxes are monitored as input and output. However, water inflow and outflow are highly variable and cannot be measured directly. A recent project, begun in 2006 sought to constrain the water budget in a Belgian karst aquifer and to assess the porosity and water dynamics, combining absolute gravity (AG) measurements and piezometric levels around the Rochefort cave. The advantage of gravity measurements is that they integrate all the subsystems in the karst system. This is not the case with traditional geophysical tools like boring or monitoring wells, which are soundings affected by their near environment and its heterogeneity. The investigated cave results from the meander cutoff system of the Lomme River. The main inputs are swallow holes of the river crossing the limestone massif. The river is canalized and the karst system is partly disconnected from the hydraulic system. In February and March 2006, when the river spilled over its dyke and sank into the most important swallow hole, this resulted in dramatic and nearly instantaneous increases in the piezometric levels in the cave, reaching up to 13 meters. Meanwhile, gravity increased by 50 and 90 nms-2 in February and March, respectively. A first conclusion is that during these sudden floods, the pores and fine fissures were poorly connected with the enlarged fractures, cave, and conduits. With a rise of 13 meters in the water level and a 5% porosity, a gravity change of 250 nms-2 should have been expected. This moderate gravity variation suggests either a

  19. Reactive sticking coefficients of silane on silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Buss, R.J.; Ho, P.; Breiland, W.G.; Coltrin, M.E.

    1988-09-15

    Reactive sticking coefficients (RSCs) were measured for silane and disilane on polycrystalline silicon for a wide range of temperature and flux (pressure) conditions. The data were obtained from deposition rate measurements using molecular beam scattering and a very low pressure cold wall reactor. The RSCs have non-Arrhenius temperature dependences and decreases with increasing flux at low (710/sup 0/) temperatures. A simple model involving dissociative adsorption of silane is consistent with these results. The results are compared with previous studies of the SiH/sub 4//Si(s) reaction.

  20. Integer Solutions of Binomial Coefficients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbertson, Nicholas J.

    2016-01-01

    A good formula is like a good story, rich in description, powerful in communication, and eye-opening to readers. The formula presented in this article for determining the coefficients of the binomial expansion of (x + y)n is one such "good read." The beauty of this formula is in its simplicity--both describing a quantitative situation…

  1. Tables of the coefficients A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandra, N.

    1974-01-01

    Numerical coefficients required to express the angular distribution for the rotationally elastic or inelastic scattering of electrons from a diatomic molecule were tabulated for the case of nitrogen and in the energy range from 0.20 eV to 10.0 eV. Five different rotational states are considered.

  2. Estimating the Polyserial Correlation Coefficient.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bedrick, Edward J.; Breslin, Frederick C.

    1996-01-01

    Simple noniterative estimators of the polyserial correlation coefficient are developed by exploiting a general relationship between the polyserial correlation and the point polyserial correlation to give extensions of the biserial estimators of K. Pearson (1909), H. E. Brogden (1949), and F. M. Lord (1963) to the multicategory setting. (SLD)

  3. Absolute Position Encoders With Vertical Image Binning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leviton, Douglas B.

    2005-01-01

    Improved optoelectronic patternrecognition encoders that measure rotary and linear 1-dimensional positions at conversion rates (numbers of readings per unit time) exceeding 20 kHz have been invented. Heretofore, optoelectronic pattern-recognition absoluteposition encoders have been limited to conversion rates <15 Hz -- too low for emerging industrial applications in which conversion rates ranging from 1 kHz to as much as 100 kHz are required. The high conversion rates of the improved encoders are made possible, in part, by use of vertically compressible or binnable (as described below) scale patterns in combination with modified readout sequences of the image sensors [charge-coupled devices (CCDs)] used to read the scale patterns. The modified readout sequences and the processing of the images thus read out are amenable to implementation by use of modern, high-speed, ultra-compact microprocessors and digital signal processors or field-programmable gate arrays. This combination of improvements makes it possible to greatly increase conversion rates through substantial reductions in all three components of conversion time: exposure time, image-readout time, and image-processing time.

  4. Absolute radiometric calibration of advanced remote sensing systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, P. N.

    1982-01-01

    The distinction between the uses of relative and absolute spectroradiometric calibration of remote sensing systems is discussed. The advantages of detector-based absolute calibration are described, and the categories of relative and absolute system calibrations are listed. The limitations and problems associated with three common methods used for the absolute calibration of remote sensing systems are addressed. Two methods are proposed for the in-flight absolute calibration of advanced multispectral linear array systems. One makes use of a sun-illuminated panel in front of the sensor, the radiance of which is monitored by a spectrally flat pyroelectric radiometer. The other uses a large, uniform, high-radiance reference ground surface. The ground and atmospheric measurements required as input to a radiative transfer program to predict the radiance level at the entrance pupil of the orbital sensor are discussed, and the ground instrumentation is described.

  5. Testing the quasi-absolute method in photon activation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Z. J.; Wells, D.; Starovoitova, V.; Segebade, C.

    2013-04-19

    In photon activation analysis (PAA), relative methods are widely used because of their accuracy and precision. Absolute methods, which are conducted without any assistance from calibration materials, are seldom applied for the difficulty in obtaining photon flux in measurements. This research is an attempt to perform a new absolute approach in PAA - quasi-absolute method - by retrieving photon flux in the sample through Monte Carlo simulation. With simulated photon flux and database of experimental cross sections, it is possible to calculate the concentration of target elements in the sample directly. The QA/QC procedures to solidify the research are discussed in detail. Our results show that the accuracy of the method for certain elements is close to a useful level in practice. Furthermore, the future results from the quasi-absolute method can also serve as a validation technique for experimental data on cross sections. The quasi-absolute method looks promising.

  6. Learning in the temporal bisection task: Relative or absolute?

    PubMed

    de Carvalho, Marilia Pinheiro; Machado, Armando; Tonneau, François

    2016-01-01

    We examined whether temporal learning in a bisection task is absolute or relational. Eight pigeons learned to choose a red key after a t-seconds sample and a green key after a 3t-seconds sample. To determine whether they had learned a relative mapping (short→Red, long→Green) or an absolute mapping (t-seconds→Red, 3t-seconds→Green), the pigeons then learned a series of new discriminations in which either the relative or the absolute mapping was maintained. Results showed that the generalization gradient obtained at the end of a discrimination predicted the pattern of choices made during the first session of a new discrimination. Moreover, most acquisition curves and generalization gradients were consistent with the predictions of the learning-to-time model, a Spencean model that instantiates absolute learning with temporal generalization. In the bisection task, the basis of temporal discrimination seems to be absolute, not relational. PMID:26752233

  7. Absolute Geodetic Rotation Measurement Using Atom Interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Stockton, J. K.; Takase, K.; Kasevich, M. A.

    2011-09-23

    We demonstrate a cold-atom interferometer gyroscope which overcomes accuracy and dynamic range limitations of previous atom interferometer gyroscopes. We show how the instrument can be used for precise determination of latitude, azimuth (true north), and Earth's rotation rate. Spurious noise terms related to multiple-path interferences are suppressed by employing a novel time-skewed pulse sequence. Extended versions of this instrument appear capable of meeting the stringent requirements for inertial navigation, geodetic applications of Earth's rotation rate determination, and tests of general relativity.

  8. Absolute geodetic rotation measurement using atom interferometry.

    PubMed

    Stockton, J K; Takase, K; Kasevich, M A

    2011-09-23

    We demonstrate a cold-atom interferometer gyroscope which overcomes accuracy and dynamic range limitations of previous atom interferometer gyroscopes. We show how the instrument can be used for precise determination of latitude, azimuth (true north), and Earth's rotation rate. Spurious noise terms related to multiple-path interferences are suppressed by employing a novel time-skewed pulse sequence. Extended versions of this instrument appear capable of meeting the stringent requirements for inertial navigation, geodetic applications of Earth's rotation rate determination, and tests of general relativity. PMID:22026848

  9. Absolute and relative reliability of lumbar interspinous process ultrasound imaging measurements

    PubMed Central

    Tozawa, Ryosuke; Katoh, Munenori; Aramaki, Hidefumi; Kawasaki, Tsubasa; Nishikawa, Yuichi; Kumamoto, Tsuneo; Fujinawa, Osamu

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The intra- and inter-examiner reliabilities of lumbar interspinous process distances measured by ultrasound imaging were examined. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 10 males who had no history of orthopedic diseases or dysfunctions. Ten lumbar interspinous images from 360 images captured from 10 subjects were selected. The 10 images were measured by nine examiners. The lumbar interspinous process distance measurements were performed five times by each examiner. In addition, four of the nine examiners measured the distances again after 4 days for test-retest analysis. In statistical analysis, the intraclass correlation coefficient was used to investigate relative reliability, and Bland-Altman analysis was used to investigate absolute reliability. [Results] The intraclass correlation coefficients (1, 1) for intra-examiner reliability ranged from 0.985 to 0.998. For inter-rater reliability, the intraclass correlation coefficient (2, 1) was 0.969. The intraclass correlation coefficients (1, 2) for test-retest reliability ranged from 0.991 to 0.999. The Bland-Altman analysis results indicated no systematic error. [Conclusion] The results indicate that ultrasound measurements of interspinous process distance are highly reliable even when measured only once by a single person.

  10. Thermal coefficients of technology assimilation by natural systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, R. F.

    1971-01-01

    Estimates of thermal coefficients of the rates of technology assimilation processes was made. Consideration of such processes as vegetation and soil recovery and pollution assimilation indicates that these processes proceed ten to several hundred times more slowly in earth's cold regions than in temperate regions. It was suggested that these differential assimilation rates are important data in planning for technological expansion in Arctic regions.

  11. Evaluation of the FACSPresto, a New Point of Care Device for the Enumeration of CD4% and Absolute CD4+ T Cell Counts in HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Makadzange, Azure Tariro; Bogezi, Carola; Boyd, Kathryn; Gumbo, Anesu; Mukura, Dorinda; Matubu, Allen; Ndhlovu, Chiratidzo Ellen

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Enumeration of CD4+ T lymphocytes is important for pre-ART disease staging and screening for opportunistic infections, however access to CD4 testing in resource limited settings is poor. Point of care (POC) technologies can facilitate improved access to CD4 testing. We evaluated the analytical performance of a novel POC device the FACSPresto compared to the FACSCalibur as a reference standard and to the PIMA, a POC device in widespread use in sub-Saharan Africa. Method Specimens were obtained from 253 HIV infected adults. Venous blood samples were analyzed on the FACSPresto and the FACSCalibur, in a subset of 41 samples additional analysis was done on the PIMA. Results The absolute CD4 count results obtained on the FACSPresto were comparable to those on the FACSCalibur with low absolute (9.5cells/μl) and relative bias (3.2%). Bias in CD4% values was also low (1.06%) with a relative bias of 4.9%. The sensitivity was lower at a CD4 count threshold of ≤350cells/μl compared with ≤500cells/μl (84.9% vs. 92.8%) resulting in a high upward misclassification rate at low CD4 counts. Specificity at thresholds of ≤350cells/μl and ≤500cells/μl were 96.6% and 96.8% respectively. The PIMA had a high absolute (-68.6cells/μl) and relative bias (-10.5%) when compared with the FACSCalibur. At thresholds of ≤350cells/μl and ≤500cells/μl the sensitivity was 100% and 95.5% respectively; specificity was 85.7% and 84.2% respectively. The coefficients of repeatability were 4.13%, 5.29% and 9.8% respectively. Discussion The analytic performance of the FACSPresto against the reference standard was very good with better agreement and precision than the PIMA. The FACSPresto had comparable sensitivity at a threshold of 500 cells/μl and better specificity than the PIMA. However the FACSPresto showed reduced sensitivity at low CD4 count thresholds. Conclusion The FACSPresto can be reliably used as a POC device for enumerating absolute CD4 count and CD4% values

  12. Temperature dependence of Soret and diffusion coefficients for toluene-cyclohexane mixture measured in convection-free environment.

    PubMed

    Mialdun, A; Shevtsova, V

    2015-12-14

    We report on the measurement of diffusion (D), Soret (S(T)), and thermodiffusion (D(T)) coefficients in toluene-cyclohexane mixture with mass fraction of toluene 0.40 onboard of the International Space Station. The coefficients were measured in the range of the mean temperatures between 20 °C and 34 °C. The Soret coefficient is negative within the investigated temperature range and its absolute value |S(T)| decreases with increasing temperature. The diffusion coefficient for this system increases with temperature rising. For comparison, the temperature dependence of diffusion coefficient was measured in ground laboratory using counter-flow cell technique and revealed a good agreement with microgravity results. A non-direct comparison of the measured onboard Soret coefficients with different systems indicated a similar trend for the temperature dependent behavior. Unexpected experimental finding is that for this system the thermodiffusion coefficient D(T) does not depend on temperature. PMID:26671399

  13. Temperature dependence of Soret and diffusion coefficients for toluene-cyclohexane mixture measured in convection-free environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mialdun, A.; Shevtsova, V.

    2015-12-01

    We report on the measurement of diffusion (D), Soret (ST), and thermodiffusion (DT) coefficients in toluene-cyclohexane mixture with mass fraction of toluene 0.40 onboard of the International Space Station. The coefficients were measured in the range of the mean temperatures between 20 °C and 34 °C. The Soret coefficient is negative within the investigated temperature range and its absolute value |ST| decreases with increasing temperature. The diffusion coefficient for this system increases with temperature rising. For comparison, the temperature dependence of diffusion coefficient was measured in ground laboratory using counter-flow cell technique and revealed a good agreement with microgravity results. A non-direct comparison of the measured onboard Soret coefficients with different systems indicated a similar trend for the temperature dependent behavior. Unexpected experimental finding is that for this system the thermodiffusion coefficient DT does not depend on temperature.

  14. Absolute absorption on the potassium D lines: theory and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanley, Ryan K.; Gregory, Philip D.; Hughes, Ifan G.; Cornish, Simon L.

    2015-10-01

    We present a detailed study of the absolute Doppler-broadened absorption of a probe beam scanned across the potassium D lines in a thermal vapour. Spectra using a weak probe were measured on the 4S \\to 4P transition and compared to the theoretical model of the electric susceptibility detailed by Zentile et al (2015 Comput. Phys. Commun. 189 162-74) in the code named ElecSus. Comparisons were also made on the 4S \\to 5P transition with an adapted version of ElecSus. This is the first experimental test of ElecSus on an atom with a ground state hyperfine splitting smaller than that of the Doppler width. An excellent agreement was found between ElecSus and experimental measurements at a variety of temperatures with rms errors ˜ {10}-3. We have also demonstrated the use of ElecSus as an atomic vapour thermometry tool, and present a possible new measurement technique of transition decay rates which we predict to have a precision of ˜3 {kHz}.

  15. ABSOLUTE PROPERTIES OF THE ECLIPSING BINARY STAR BF DRACONIS

    SciTech Connect

    Sandberg Lacy, Claud H.; Torres, Guillermo; Fekel, Francis C.; Sabby, Jeffrey A.; Claret, Antonio E-mail: gtorres@cfa.harvard.edu E-mail: jsabby@siue.edu

    2012-06-15

    BF Dra is now known to be an eccentric double-lined F6+F6 binary star with relatively deep (0.7 mag) partial eclipses. Previous studies of the system are improved with 7494 differential photometric observations from the URSA WebScope and 9700 from the NFO WebScope, 106 high-resolution spectroscopic observations from the Tennessee State University 2 m automatic spectroscopic telescope and the 1 m coude-feed spectrometer at Kitt Peak National Observatory, and 31 accurate radial velocities from the CfA. Very accurate (better than 0.6%) masses and radii are determined from analysis of the two new light curves and four radial velocity curves. Theoretical models match the absolute properties of the stars at an age of about 2.72 Gyr and [Fe/H] = -0.17, and tidal theory correctly confirms that the orbit should still be eccentric. Our observations of BF Dra constrain the convective core overshooting parameter to be larger than about 0.13 H{sub p}. We find, however, that standard tidal theory is unable to match the observed slow rotation rates of the components' surface layers.

  16. Cosmic backgrounds of relic gravitons and their absolute normalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giovannini, Massimo

    2014-11-01

    Provided the consistency relations are not violated, the recent BICEP2 observations pin down the absolute normalization, the spectral slope and the maximal frequency of the cosmic graviton background produced during inflation. The properly normalized spectra are hereby computed from the lowest frequencies (of the order of the present Hubble rate) up to the highest frequency range in the GHz region. Deviations from the conventional paradigm cannot be excluded and are examined by allowing for different physical possibilities including, in particular, a running of the tensor spectral index, an explicit breaking of the consistency relations and a spike in the high-frequency tail of the spectrum coming either from a post-inflationary phase dominated by a stiff fluid or from the contribution of waterfall fields in a hybrid inflationary context. The direct determinations of the tensor to scalar ratio at low frequencies, if confirmed by the forthcoming observations, will also affect and constrain the high-frequency uncertainties. The limits on the cosmic graviton backgrounds coming from wide-band interferometers (such as LIGO/Virgo, LISA and BBO/DECIGO) together with a more accurate scrutiny of the tensor B-mode polarization at low frequencies will set direct bounds on the post-inflationary evolution and on other unconventional completions of the standard lore.

  17. High temperature Seebeck coefficient metrology

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, J.; Tritt, T.; Uher, C.

    2010-12-15

    We present an overview of the challenges and practices of thermoelectric metrology on bulk materials at high temperature (300 to 1300 K). The Seebeck coefficient, when combined with thermal and electrical conductivity, is an essential property measurement for evaluating the potential performance of novel thermoelectric materials. However, there is some question as to which measurement technique(s) provides the most accurate determination of the Seebeck coefficient at high temperature. This has led to the implementation of nonideal practices that have further complicated the confirmation of reported high ZT materials. To ensure meaningful interlaboratory comparison of data, thermoelectric measurements must be reliable, accurate, and consistent. This article will summarize and compare the relevant measurement techniques and apparatus designs required to effectively manage uncertainty, while also providing a reference resource of previous advances in high temperature thermoelectric metrology.

  18. Portable vapor diffusion coefficient meter

    DOEpatents

    Ho, Clifford K.

    2007-06-12

    An apparatus for measuring the effective vapor diffusion coefficient of a test vapor diffusing through a sample of porous media contained within a test chamber. A chemical sensor measures the time-varying concentration of vapor that has diffused a known distance through the porous media. A data processor contained within the apparatus compares the measured sensor data with analytical predictions of the response curve based on the transient diffusion equation using Fick's Law, iterating on the choice of an effective vapor diffusion coefficient until the difference between the predicted and measured curves is minimized. Optionally, a purge fluid can forced through the porous media, permitting the apparatus to also measure a gas-phase permeability. The apparatus can be made lightweight, self-powered, and portable for use in the field.

  19. Estimating biokinetic coefficients in the PACT™ system.

    PubMed

    Shen, Zhiyao; Arbuckle, Wm Brian

    2016-02-01

    When powdered activated carbon (PAC) is continuously added to the aeration tank of an activated sludge reactor, the modification is called a PACT™ process (for powdered activated carbon treatment). The PAC provides many benefits, but complicates the determination of biological phenomena. Determination of bio-oxidation kinetics in a PACT system is a key to fully understanding enhanced biological mechanisms resulting from PAC addition. A model is developed to account for the main mechanisms involved in the PACT system -- adsorption, air stripping and bio-oxidation. The model enables the investigation of biokinetic information, including possible synergistic effects. Six parallel reactors were used to treat a synthetic waste; three activated sludge and three PACT. The PACT reactors provided significantly reduced effluent TOC (total organic carbon). Biokinetic coefficients were obtained from steady-state data using averaged reactor data and by using all data (22 points for each reactor). As expected, the PACT reactors resulted in a substantial reduction in the effluent concentration of non-biodegradable total organic carbon. The Monod equation's half-saturation coefficient (Ks) was reduced significantly in the PACT reactors, resulting in higher growth rates at lower concentrations. The maximum specific substrate utilization (qm) rate was also reduced about 25% using the averaged data and remained unchanged using all the data. The substrate utilization values are affected by errors in biomass determination and more research is needed to accurately determine biomass. PMID:26613352

  20. Ionization coefficient measurements in DC microplasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefanovic, Ilija; Kuschel, Thomas; Winter, Joerg; Maric, Dragana; Petrovic, Zoran Lj.

    2012-10-01

    While steady state Townsend discharges may provide data for ionization coefficients those are often not as accurate as those produced in dedicated pulsed current growth experiments. In this paper we show that one may be able to measure ionization coefficients in DC microdischarges that are of excellent quality. Measurements were made for argon and argon/nitrogen mixtures with different gas flow rates. The technique based measuring the spatial profile of emission a Townsend discharge. In spite of having the drift length of only 1 mm, excellent agreement has been found between our new measurements and the data for low-pressure, larger dimension (2-4cm) discharges in argon (Jelenak et al) for the E/N in the range from 300 Td to 4000 Td, where E/N is normalized electrical field strength. Below 300 Td our measured values are larger then those by Jelenak et al. This discrepancy with previous measurements will be discussed. The influence of the gas flow-rate and nitrogen concentration on the radial discharge profile in the Townsend mode will also be presented and discussed. Jelenak et al 1993 Phys. Rev. E 47 3566