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Sample records for absolute rate theory

  1. Absolute rate theories of epigenetic stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walczak, Aleksandra M.; Onuchic, José N.; Wolynes, Peter G.

    2005-12-01

    Spontaneous switching events in most characterized genetic switches are rare, resulting in extremely stable epigenetic properties. We show how simple arguments lead to theories of the rate of such events much like the absolute rate theory of chemical reactions corrected by a transmission factor. Both the probability of the rare cellular states that allow epigenetic escape and the transmission factor depend on the rates of DNA binding and unbinding events and on the rates of protein synthesis and degradation. Different mechanisms of escape from the stable attractors occur in the nonadiabatic, weakly adiabatic, and strictly adiabatic regimes, characterized by the relative values of those input rates. rate theory | stochastic gene expression | gene switches

  2. Absolute Rate Theories of Epigenetic Stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walczak, Aleksandra M.; Onuchic, Jose N.; Wolynes, Peter G.

    2006-03-01

    Spontaneous switching events in most characterized genetic switches are rare, resulting in extremely stable epigenetic properties. We show how simple arguments lead to theories of the rate of such events much like the absolute rate theory of chemical reactions corrected by a transmission factor. Both the probability of the rare cellular states that allow epigenetic escape, and the transmission factor, depend on the rates of DNA binding and unbinding events and on the rates of protein synthesis and degradation. Different mechanisms of escape from the stable attractors occur in the nonadiabatic, weakly adiabatic and strictly adiabatic regimes, characterized by the relative values of those input rates.

  3. Old and new research on the Absolute Parallelism theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhogin, I. L.

    2004-12-01

    Compatible equations, Singularities of solutions, Topological charges and quasi-charges. PhD thesis (translated frorm Russian). The book shows the sights of Absolute Parallelism (AP), and contains useful information on the problem of singularities, compatibility theory, homotopy groups (also relative and k-ad), topological quasi-charge groups and their morphisms. AP is a single (frame) field theory proposed by Einstein some 80 years ago; it embraces symmetries of both Special and General Relativity. The compatibility theory, if applied to the cases when the frame matrix degenerates, gives a covariant test on singularities of solutions. This gives a single variant (missed in Einstein-Mayer's list of compatible equations), the unique 5D equation (nothing, nor D, can be changed), which solutions are free of emerging singularities. SO4-symmetrical nonstationary solutions give rise to a cosmological model (relativistic surfing; anti-Milne model in FRW framework) with a specific reduction of the extra-dimension. Topological classification of localized field configurations, combinatorics of topological quasi-charges (quanta), is discussed in an attempt to imagine the Standard Model (and quantum theory itself; and, perhaps, to make some qualitative predictions, like the absence of spin zero elementary quanta).

  4. Robust control design with real parameter uncertainty using absolute stability theory. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    How, Jonathan P.; Hall, Steven R.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis is to investigate an extension of mu theory for robust control design by considering systems with linear and nonlinear real parameter uncertainties. In the process, explicit connections are made between mixed mu and absolute stability theory. In particular, it is shown that the upper bounds for mixed mu are a generalization of results from absolute stability theory. Both state space and frequency domain criteria are developed for several nonlinearities and stability multipliers using the wealth of literature on absolute stability theory and the concepts of supply rates and storage functions. The state space conditions are expressed in terms of Riccati equations and parameter-dependent Lyapunov functions. For controller synthesis, these stability conditions are used to form an overbound of the H2 performance objective. A geometric interpretation of the equivalent frequency domain criteria in terms of off-axis circles clarifies the important role of the multiplier and shows that both the magnitude and phase of the uncertainty are considered. A numerical algorithm is developed to design robust controllers that minimize the bound on an H2 cost functional and satisfy an analysis test based on the Popov stability multiplier. The controller and multiplier coefficients are optimized simultaneously, which avoids the iteration and curve-fitting procedures required by the D-K procedure of mu synthesis. Several benchmark problems and experiments on the Middeck Active Control Experiment at M.I.T. demonstrate that these controllers achieve good robust performance and guaranteed stability bounds.

  5. Game theory and evolution: finite size and absolute fitness measures.

    PubMed

    Demetrius, L; Gundlach, V M

    2000-11-01

    This article is concerned with the characterization and existence of evolutionarily stable strategies (ESS) in Games against Nature, a class of models described by finite size populations and absolute fitness measures. We address these problems in terms of a new formalism which revolves around the concept evolutionary entropy, a measure of the diversity of options associated with a strategy pure - strategies have zero entropy, mixed strategies positive entropy. We invoke this formalism to show that ESS are characterized by extremal states of entropy. We illustrate this characterization of ESS by an analysis of the evolution of the sex ratio and the evolution of seed size.

  6. Rate-distortion theory and human perception.

    PubMed

    Sims, Chris R

    2016-07-01

    The fundamental goal of perception is to aid in the achievement of behavioral objectives. This requires extracting and communicating useful information from noisy and uncertain sensory signals. At the same time, given the complexity of sensory information and the limitations of biological information processing, it is necessary that some information must be lost or discarded in the act of perception. Under these circumstances, what constitutes an 'optimal' perceptual system? This paper describes the mathematical framework of rate-distortion theory as the optimal solution to the problem of minimizing the costs of perceptual error subject to strong constraints on the ability to communicate or transmit information. Rate-distortion theory offers a general and principled theoretical framework for developing computational-level models of human perception (Marr, 1982). Models developed in this framework are capable of producing quantitatively precise explanations for human perceptual performance, while yielding new insights regarding the nature and goals of perception. This paper demonstrates the application of rate-distortion theory to two benchmark domains where capacity limits are especially salient in human perception: discrete categorization of stimuli (also known as absolute identification) and visual working memory. A software package written for the R statistical programming language is described that aids in the development of models based on rate-distortion theory.

  7. Absolute and Relative Reliability of Percentage of Syllables Stuttered and Severity Rating Scales

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karimi, Hamid; O'Brian, Sue; Onslow, Mark; Jones, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Percentage of syllables stuttered (%SS) and severity rating (SR) scales are measures in common use to quantify stuttering severity and its changes during basic and clinical research conditions. However, their reliability has not been assessed with indices measuring both relative and absolute reliability. This study was designed to provide…

  8. Leak rate estimation of a resistive plate chamber gap by monitoring absolute pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, S.; Datar, V. M.; Kalmani, S. D.; Majumder, G.; Mondal, N. K.; Satyanarayana, B.

    2016-11-01

    The differential pressure of a conventional manometer is highly dependent on the atmospheric pressure. The measurements with a manometer for an extended time period show a large variation due to solar atmospheric tides. However, the measurements of absolute pressure, both outside and inside of a resistive plate chamber (RPC), are independent of each other. By monitoring the absolute pressures, both outside and inside of a RPC, along with the temperature, its leakage rate can be estimated. During the test period, the supporting button spacers inside a RPC may get detached due to some manufacturing defect. This effect can be detected clearly by observing the sudden fall of pressure inside the chamber.

  9. On a Theory of Rates

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-04-01

    take two forms (that we know of): sexual and asexual . In asexual reproduction , one parent divides into two or more o¤spring. In sexual reproduction , two...parents must mate to produce one or more o¤spring, n. In terms of rates, asexual reproduction produces n o¤spring, where n may be the ex- pected...especially for the asexual reproduction forms. This is a rather obvious example where rate theory produces something strikingly di¤erent from what is

  10. Exact Theory of Optical Tweezers and Its Application to Absolute Calibration.

    PubMed

    Dutra, Rafael S; Viana, Nathan B; Neto, Paulo A Maia; Nussenzveig, H Moysés

    2017-01-01

    Optical tweezers have become a powerful tool for basic and applied research in cell biology. Here, we describe an experimentally verified theory for the trapping forces generated by optical tweezers based on first principles that allows absolute calibration. For pedagogical reasons, the steps that led to the development of the theory over the past 15 years are outlined. The results are applicable to a broad range of microsphere radii, from the Rayleigh regime to the ray optics one, for different polarizations and trapping heights, including all commonly employed parameter domains. Protocols for implementing absolute calibration are given, explaining how to measure all required experimental parameters, and including a link to an applet for stiffness calculations.

  11. Misconceptions in recent papers on special relativity and absolute space theories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torr, D. G.; Kolen, P.

    1982-01-01

    Several recent papers which purport to substantiate or negate arguments in favor of certain theories of absolute space have been based on fallacious principles. This paper discusses three related instances, indicating where misconceptions have arisen. It is established, contrary to popular belief, that the classical Lorentz ether theory accounts for all the experimental evidence which supports the special theory of relativity. It is demonstrated that the ether theory predicts the null results obtained from pulsar timing and Moessbauer experiments. It is concluded that a measurement of the one-way velocity of light has physical meaning within the context of the Lorentz theory, and it is argued that an adequately designed experiment to measure the one-way velocity of light should be attempted.

  12. Absolute rate of the reaction of hydrogen atoms with ozone from 219-360 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, J. H.; Michael, J. V.; Payne, W. A.; Stief, L. J.

    1978-01-01

    Absolute rate constants for the reaction of atomic hydrogen with ozone were obtained over the temperature range 219-360 K by the flash photolysis-resonance fluorescence technique. The results can be expressed in Arrhenius form by K = (1.33 plus or minus 0.32)x10 to the minus 10 power exp (-449 plus or minus 58/T) cu cm/molecule/s (two standard deviations). The present work is compared to two previous determinations and is discussed theoretically.

  13. Absolute Density Calibration Cell for Laser Induced Fluorescence Erosion Rate Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Domonkos, Matthew T.; Stevens, Richard E.

    2001-01-01

    Flight qualification of ion thrusters typically requires testing on the order of 10,000 hours. Extensive knowledge of wear mechanisms and rates is necessary to establish design confidence prior to long duration tests. Consequently, real-time erosion rate measurements offer the potential both to reduce development costs and to enhance knowledge of the dependency of component wear on operating conditions. Several previous studies have used laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) to measure real-time, in situ erosion rates of ion thruster accelerator grids. Those studies provided only relative measurements of the erosion rate. In the present investigation, a molybdenum tube was resistively heated such that the evaporation rate yielded densities within the tube on the order of those expected from accelerator grid erosion. This work examines the suitability of the density cell as an absolute calibration source for LIF measurements, and the intrinsic error was evaluated.

  14. Absolute rate coefficients for the recombination of open f-shell tungsten ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krantz, C.; Spruck, K.; Badnell, N. R.; Becker, A.; Bernhardt, D.; Grieser, M.; Hahn, M.; Novotný, O.; Repnow, R.; Savin, D. W.; Wolf, A.; Müller, A.; Schippers, S.

    2014-04-01

    We have carried out direct measurements of the absolute recombination rate coefficients of four charge states of tungsten in the range from W18+ to W21+ in a heavy ion storage ring. We find that the rich atomic fine structure of the open f-shell leads to very high resonant enhancement of the recombination rate at energies below ~50 eV. Even in the higher energy domain relevant to fusion plasma this leads to a recombination rate coefficient that is more than four times higher than predicted by the commonly used ADAS database of recombination rates. In addition to the experimental measurements we have carried out theoretical calculations using Autostructure. For W20+ these predict a plasma recombination rate coefficient that agrees much better with the measurement than the ADAS model but still fail to reproduce the experimental data in detail.

  15. Absolute rate constant for the reaction of Cl(/sup 2/P) with CINO

    SciTech Connect

    Nesbitt, F.L.; Nava, D.F.; Payne, W.A.; Stief, L.J.

    1987-09-24

    The room temperature rate constant for the reaction Cl + CINO yields Cl/sub 2/ + NO has been measured by the method of discharge flow mass spectrometry. The rate constant was determined from the decay of CINO in the presence of an excess of Cl atoms at a total pressure of 1 Torr. The rate constant obtained was (7.6 +/- 0.8) X 10/sup -11/ cm/sup 3/ s/sup -1/. This result is compared with previous determinations, the values of which ranged by more than an order of magnitude and all of which depended on knowledge of the absolute concentration of CINO. The authors suggest that the lack of agreement is attributable principally to uncertainties in (CINO) resulting from absorption of this reactive species on glass and metal surfaces. Our result does not depend directly on (CINO) and supports the highest values published for this rate constant.

  16. System for absolute measurement of electrolytic conductivity in aqueous solutions based on van der Pauw's theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bing; Lin, Zhen; Zhang, Xiao; Yu, Xiang; Wei, Jiali; Wang, Xiaoping

    2014-05-01

    Based on an innovative application of van der Pauw's theory, a system was developed for the absolute measurement of electrolytic conductivity in aqueous solutions. An electrolytic conductivity meter was designed that uses a four-electrode system with an axial-radial two-dimensional adjustment structure coupled to an ac voltage excitation source and signal collecting circuit. The measurement accuracy, resolution and repeatability of the measurement system were examined through a series of experiments. Moreover, the measurement system and a high-precision electrolytic conductivity meter were compared using some actual water samples.

  17. Absolute single photoionization cross-section measurements of Rb2+ ions: experiment and theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macaluso, D. A.; Bogolub, K.; Johnson, A.; Aguilar, A.; Kilcoyne, A. L. D.; Bilodeau, R. C.; Bautista, M.; Kerlin, A. B.; Sterling, N. C.

    2016-12-01

    Absolute single photoionization cross-section measurements of Rb2+ ions were performed using synchrotron radiation and the photo-ion, merged-beams technique at the Advanced Light Source at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Measurements were made at a photon energy resolution of 13.5 ± 2.5 meV from 37.31 to 44.08 eV spanning the 2P{}3/2o ground state and 2P{}1/2o metastable state ionization thresholds. Multiple autoionizing resonance series arising from each initial state are identified using quantum defect theory. The measurements are compared to Breit-Pauli R-matrix calculations with excellent agreement between theory and experiment.

  18. Absolute determination of the Na22(p,γ)Mg23 reaction rate in novae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sallaska, A. L.; Wrede, C.; García, A.; Storm, D. W.; Brown, T. A. D.; Ruiz, C.; Snover, K. A.; Ottewell, D. F.; Buchmann, L.; Vockenhuber, C.; Hutcheon, D. A.; Caggiano, J. A.; José, J.

    2011-03-01

    Gamma-ray telescopes in orbit around the earth are searching for evidence of the elusive radionuclide Na22 produced in novae. Previously published uncertainties in the dominant destructive reaction, Na22(p,γ)Mg23, indicated new measurements in the proton energy range of 150 to 300 keV were needed to constrain predictions. We have measured the resonance strengths, energies, and branches directly and absolutely by using protons from the University of Washington accelerator with a specially designed beam line, which included beam rastering and cold vacuum protection of the Na22 implanted targets. The targets, fabricated at TRIUMF-ISAC, displayed minimal degradation over a ~20 C bombardment as a result of protective layers. We avoided the need to know the absolute stopping power, and hence the target composition, by extracting resonance strengths from excitation functions integrated over proton energy. Our measurements revealed that resonance strengths for Ep=213, 288, 454, and 610 keV are stronger by factors of 2.4-3.2 than previously reported. Upper limits have been placed on proposed resonances at 198, 209, and 232 keV. These substantially reduce the uncertainty in the reaction rate. We have re-evaluated the Na22(p,γ) reaction rate, and our measurements indicate the resonance at 213 keV makes the most significant contribution to Na22 destruction in novae. Hydrodynamic simulations including our rate indicate that the expected abundance of Na22 ejecta from a classical nova is reduced by factors between 1.5 and 2, depending on the mass of the white-dwarf star hosting the nova explosion.

  19. The Br+HO 2 reaction revisited: Absolute determination of the rate constant at 298 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laverdet, G.; Le Bras, G.; Mellouki, A.; Poulet, G.

    1990-09-01

    The absolute determination of the rate constant for the reaction Br+HO 2→HBr+O 2 has been done at 298 K using the discharge-flor EPR method. The value k1 = (1.5±0.2) × 10 -12 cm 3 molecule -1 s -1 was obtained. Previous indirect measurements of k1 from a discharge-flow, LIF/mass spectrometric study of the Br/H 2CO/O 2 system have been reinterpreted, leading to values for k1 ranging from 1.0 × 10 -12 to 2.2 × 10 -12 cm 3 molecule -1 s -1 at 298 K. These results are discussed and compared with other literature values.

  20. Divided Saddle Theory: A New Idea for Rate Constant Calculation.

    PubMed

    Daru, János; Stirling, András

    2014-03-11

    We present a theory of rare events and derive an algorithm to obtain rates from postprocessing the numerical data of a free energy calculation and the corresponding committor analysis. The formalism is based on the division of the saddle region of the free energy profile of the rare event into two adjacent segments called saddle domains. The method is built on sampling the dynamics within these regions: auxiliary rate constants are defined for the saddle domains and the absolute forward and backward rates are obtained by proper reweighting. We call our approach divided saddle theory (DST). An important advantage of our approach is that it requires only standard computational techniques which are available in most molecular dynamics codes. We demonstrate the potential of DST numerically on two examples: rearrangement of alanine-dipeptide (CH3CO-Ala-NHCH3) conformers and the intramolecular Cope reaction of the fluxional barbaralane molecule.

  1. On A Theory of Rates

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-02-01

    asexual . In asexual reproduction , one parent divides into two or more o¤spring. In sexual reproduction , two parents must mate to produce one or more o...spring, n. In terms of rates, asexual reproduction produces n o¤spring, where n may be the ex- pected value of some random variable, so we have a rate of...increase of asexually reproducing population as rasexual n 1 t N (t) ; (210) where: t = the time between reproductions (assuming these times are

  2. Subjective evaluation of HDTV stereoscopic videos in IPTV scenarios using absolute category rating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, K.; Barkowsky, M.; Cousseau, R.; Brunnström, K.; Olsson, R.; Le Callet, P.; Sjöström, M.

    2011-03-01

    Broadcasting of high definition (HD) stereobased 3D (S3D) TV are planned, or has already begun, in Europe, the US, and Japan. Specific data processing operations such as compression and temporal and spatial resampling are commonly used tools for saving network bandwidth when IPTV is the distribution form, as this results in more efficient recording and transmission of 3DTV signals, however at the same time it inevitably brings quality degradations to the processed video. This paper investigated observers quality judgments of state of the art video coding schemes (simulcast H.264/AVC or H.264/MVC), with or without added temporal and spatial resolution reduction of S3D videos, by subjective experiments using the Absolute Category Rating method (ACR) method. The results showed that a certain spatial resolution reduction working together with high quality video compressing was the most bandwidth efficient way of processing video data when the required video quality is to be judged as "good" quality. As the subjective experiment was performed in two different laboratories in two different countries in parallel, a detailed analysis of the interlab differences was performed.

  3. Statistical theory of asteroid escape rates.

    PubMed

    Jaffé, Charles; Ross, Shane D; Lo, Martin W; Marsden, Jerrold; Farrelly, David; Uzer, T

    2002-07-01

    Transition states in phase space are identified and shown to regulate the rate of escape of asteroids temporarily captured in circumplanetary orbits. The transition states, similar to those occurring in chemical reaction dynamics, are then used to develop a statistical semianalytical theory for the rate of escape of asteroids temporarily captured by Mars. Theory and numerical simulations are found to agree to better than 1%. These calculations suggest that further development of transition state theory in celestial mechanics, as an alternative to large-scale numerical simulations, will be a fruitful approach to mass transport calculations.

  4. Deciding Optimal Noise Monitoring Sites with Matrix Gray Absolute Relation Degree Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Zhihua; Li, Yadan; Zhao, Limin; Wang, Shuangwei

    2015-08-01

    Noise maps are applied to assess noise level in cities all around the world. There are mainly two ways of producing noise maps: one way is producing noise maps through theoretical simulations with the surrounding conditions, such as traffic flow, building distribution, etc.; the other one is calculating noise level with actual measurement data from noise monitors. Currently literature mainly focuses on considering more factors that affect sound traveling during theoretical simulations and interpolation methods in producing noise maps based on measurements of noise. Although many factors were considered during simulation, noise maps have to be calibrated by actual noise measurements. Therefore, the way of obtaining noise data is significant to both producing and calibrating a noise map. However, there is little literature mentioned about rules of deciding the right monitoring sites when placed the specified number of noise sensors and given the deviation of a noise map produced with data from them. In this work, by utilizing matrix Gray Absolute Relation Degree Theory, we calculated the relation degrees between the most precise noise surface and those interpolated with different combinations of noise data with specified number. We found that surfaces plotted with different combinations of noise data produced different relation degrees with the most precise one. Then we decided the least significant one among the total and calculated the corresponding deviation when it was excluded in making a noise surface. Processing the left noise data in the same way, we found out the least significant datum among the left data one by one. With this method, we optimized the noise sensor’s distribution in an area about 2km2. And we also calculated the bias of surfaces with the least significant data removed. Our practice provides an optimistic solution to the situation faced by most governments that there is limited financial budget available for noise monitoring, especially in

  5. Simultaneous estimation of lithospheric uplift rates and absolute sea level change in southwest Scandinavia from inversion of sea level data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, Lars; Hansen, Jens Morten; Hede, Mikkel Ulfeldt; Clemmensen, Lars B.; Pejrup, Morten; Noe-Nygaard, Nanna

    2014-11-01

    Relative sea level curves contain coupled information about absolute sea level change and vertical lithospheric movement. Such curves may be constructed based on, for example tide gauge data for the most recent times and different types of geological data for ancient times. Correct account for vertical lithospheric movement is essential for estimation of reliable values of absolute sea level change from relative sea level data and vise versa. For modern times, estimates of vertical lithospheric movement may be constrained by data (e.g. GPS-based measurements), which are independent from the relative sea level data. Similar independent data do not exist for ancient times. The purpose of this study is to test two simple inversion approaches for simultaneous estimation of lithospheric uplift rates and absolute sea level change rates for ancient times in areas where a dense coverage of relative sea level data exists and well-constrained average lithospheric movement values are known from, for example glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA) models. The inversion approaches are tested and used for simultaneous estimation of lithospheric uplift rates and absolute sea level change rates in southwest Scandinavia from modern relative sea level data series that cover the period from 1900 to 2000. In both approaches, a priori information is required to solve the inverse problem. A priori information about the average vertical lithospheric movement in the area of interest is critical for the quality of the obtained results. The two tested inversion schemes result in estimated absolute sea level rise of ˜1.2/1.3 mm yr-1 and vertical uplift rates ranging from approximately -1.4/-1.2 mm yr-1 (subsidence) to about 5.0/5.2 mm yr-1 if an a priori value of 1 mm yr-1 is used for the vertical lithospheric movement throughout the study area. In case the studied time interval is broken into two time intervals (before and after 1970), absolute sea level rise values of ˜0.8/1.2 mm yr-1 (before

  6. On determining absolute entropy without quantum theory or the third law of thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steane, Andrew M.

    2016-04-01

    We employ classical thermodynamics to gain information about absolute entropy, without recourse to statistical methods, quantum mechanics or the third law of thermodynamics. The Gibbs-Duhem equation yields various simple methods to determine the absolute entropy of a fluid. We also study the entropy of an ideal gas and the ionization of a plasma in thermal equilibrium. A single measurement of the degree of ionization can be used to determine an unknown constant in the entropy equation, and thus determine the absolute entropy of a gas. It follows from all these examples that the value of entropy at absolute zero temperature does not need to be assigned by postulate, but can be deduced empirically.

  7. An analytical theory of planetary rotation rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, A. W.

    1977-01-01

    An approximate analytical theory is derived for the rate of rotation acquired by a planet as it grows from the solar nebula. This theory was motivated by a numerical study by Giuli, and yields fair agreement with his results. The periods of planetary rotation obtained are proportional to planetesimal encounter velocity, and appear to suggest lower values of this velocity than are commonly assumed to have existed during planetary formation.

  8. Determination of mantle upwelling rate beneath Taiyuan basin by using absolute gravity, GPS, groundwater and GLDAS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Lelin; Wang, Linhai; Hu, Minzhang

    2017-03-01

    The Taiyuan basin is in the Shanxi rift system of China. Results of tectonic studies indicate that the Moho is uplifted by 2-3 km under the Taiyuan basin. However, there is no quantitative evidence showing whether the rift is still in the status of mantle upwelling. Herein, we estimated mantle upwelling rate of Taiyuan basin by using absolute gravity, GPS, groundwater and GLDAS data in this paper. In order to utilize the absolute gravity measurements in terms of tectonic study it is necessary to reduce all disturbing environmental effects. Many of those can be modeled, such as tide, polar motion, ocean tidal loading and atmospheric mass components. The Taiyuan station located in the Taiyuan basin, and absolute gravity measurements with a FG5 instrument were performed from 2009 to 2014, a secular trend was obtained. In-situ GPS data was used to estimate the vertical motion rate since 2011, and the result indicated a land subsidence. In-situ groundwater level was collected with daily surveys from 2009 to 2015, and local hydrology impact on effect was made. The global terrestrial water storage loading effect on gravity at Taiyuan station was computed by using GLDAS global hydrology model. Furthermore there is a good agreement between GRACE results and GLDAS hydrological model results. Subtracting the gravity change rate attributable to the land subsidence, groundwater level and global hydrology from the absolute gravity change rate, the residual gravity change rate was obtained. It reflects mantle upwelling about 2.1 ± 2.6 cm/yr beneath Taiyuan basin.

  9. Absolute and relative blindsight.

    PubMed

    Balsdon, Tarryn; Azzopardi, Paul

    2015-03-01

    The concept of relative blindsight, referring to a difference in conscious awareness between conditions otherwise matched for performance, was introduced by Lau and Passingham (2006) as a way of identifying the neural correlates of consciousness (NCC) in fMRI experiments. By analogy, absolute blindsight refers to a difference between performance and awareness regardless of whether it is possible to match performance across conditions. Here, we address the question of whether relative and absolute blindsight in normal observers can be accounted for by response bias. In our replication of Lau and Passingham's experiment, the relative blindsight effect was abolished when performance was assessed by means of a bias-free 2AFC task or when the criterion for awareness was varied. Furthermore, there was no evidence of either relative or absolute blindsight when both performance and awareness were assessed with bias-free measures derived from confidence ratings using signal detection theory. This suggests that both relative and absolute blindsight in normal observers amount to no more than variations in response bias in the assessment of performance and awareness. Consideration of the properties of psychometric functions reveals a number of ways in which relative and absolute blindsight could arise trivially and elucidates a basis for the distinction between Type 1 and Type 2 blindsight.

  10. Absolute rate constant of the reaction between chlorine /2P/ atoms and hydrogen peroxide from 298 to 424 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keyser, L. F.

    1980-01-01

    The absolute rate constant of the reaction between chlorine (2P) atoms and hydrogen peroxide was determined from 298 to 424 K, using the discharge flow resonance fluorescence technique. Pseudo-first-order conditions were used with hydrogen peroxide in large excess. A fast flow-sampling procedure limited hydrogen peroxide decomposition to less than 5% over the temperature range studied. At 298 K, the rate constant is (4.1 plus or minus 0.2) x 10 to the minus 13th cu cm/molecule-sec.

  11. An approximate classical unimolecular reaction rate theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Meishan; Rice, Stuart A.

    1992-05-01

    We describe a classical theory of unimolecular reaction rate which is derived from the analysis of Davis and Gray by use of simplifying approximations. These approximations concern the calculation of the locations of, and the fluxes of phase points across, the bottlenecks to fragmentation and to intramolecular energy transfer. The bottleneck to fragment separation is represented as a vibration-rotation state dependent separatrix, which approximation is similar to but extends and improves the approximations for the separatrix introduced by Gray, Rice, and Davis and by Zhao and Rice. The novel feature in our analysis is the representation of the bottlenecks to intramolecular energy transfer as dividing surfaces in phase space; the locations of these dividing surfaces are determined by the same conditions as locate the remnants of robust tori with frequency ratios related to the golden mean (in a two degree of freedom system these are the cantori). The flux of phase points across each dividing surface is calculated with an analytic representation instead of a stroboscopic mapping. The rate of unimolecular reaction is identified with the net rate at which phase points escape from the region of quasiperiodic bounded motion to the region of free fragment motion by consecutively crossing the dividing surfaces for intramolecular energy exchange and the separatrix. This new theory generates predictions of the rates of predissociation of the van der Waals molecules HeI2, NeI2 and ArI2 which are in very good agreement with available experimental data.

  12. Absolute Helmholtz free energy of highly anharmonic crystals: theory vs Monte Carlo.

    PubMed

    Yakub, Lydia; Yakub, Eugene

    2012-04-14

    We discuss the problem of the quantitative theoretical prediction of the absolute free energy for classical highly anharmonic solids. Helmholtz free energy of the Lennard-Jones (LJ) crystal is calculated accurately while accounting for both the anharmonicity of atomic vibrations and the pair and triple correlations in displacements of the atoms from their lattice sites. The comparison with most precise computer simulation data on sublimation and melting lines revealed that theoretical predictions are in excellent agreement with Monte Carlo simulation data in the whole range of temperatures and densities studied.

  13. Easy Absolute Values? Absolutely

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Sharon E.; Mittag, Kathleen Cage

    2015-01-01

    The authors teach a problem-solving course for preservice middle-grades education majors that includes concepts dealing with absolute-value computations, equations, and inequalities. Many of these students like mathematics and plan to teach it, so they are adept at symbolic manipulations. Getting them to think differently about a concept that they…

  14. Absolute single-photoionization cross sections of Se2 +: Experiment and theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macaluso, D. A.; Aguilar, A.; Kilcoyne, A. L. D.; Red, E. C.; Bilodeau, R. C.; Phaneuf, R. A.; Sterling, N. C.; McLaughlin, B. M.

    2015-12-01

    Absolute single-photoionization cross-section measurements for Se2 + ions were performed at the Advanced Light Source at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory using the merged-beams photo-ion technique. Measurements were made at a photon energy resolution of 24 ±3 meV in the photon energy range 23.5-42.5 eV, spanning the ground state and low-lying metastable state ionization thresholds. To clearly resolve the resonant structure near the ground-state threshold, high-resolution measurements were made from 30.0 to 31.9 eV at a photon energy resolution of 6.7 ±0.7 meV. Numerous resonance features observed in the experimental spectra are assigned and their energies and quantum defects tabulated. The high-resolution cross-section measurements are compared with large-scale, state-of-the-art theoretical cross-section calculations obtained from the Dirac Coulomb R -matrix method. Suitable agreement is obtained over the entire photon energy range investigated. These results are an experimental determination of the absolute photoionization cross section of doubly ionized selenium and include a detailed analysis of the photoionization resonance spectrum of this ion.

  15. Implications of an absolute simultaneity theory for cosmology and universe acceleration.

    PubMed

    Kipreos, Edward T

    2014-01-01

    An alternate Lorentz transformation, Absolute Lorentz Transformation (ALT), has similar kinematics to special relativity yet maintains absolute simultaneity in the context of a preferred reference frame. In this study, it is shown that ALT is compatible with current experiments to test Lorentz invariance only if the proposed preferred reference frame is locally equivalent to the Earth-centered non-rotating inertial reference frame, with the inference that in an ALT framework, preferred reference frames are associated with centers of gravitational mass. Applying this theoretical framework to cosmological data produces a scenario of universal time contraction in the past. In this scenario, past time contraction would be associated with increased levels of blueshifted light emissions from cosmological objects when viewed from our current perspective. The observation that distant Type Ia supernovae are dimmer than predicted by linear Hubble expansion currently provides the most direct evidence for an accelerating universe. Adjusting for the effects of time contraction on a redshift-distance modulus diagram produces a linear distribution of supernovae over the full redshift spectrum that is consistent with a non-accelerating universe.

  16. Implications of an Absolute Simultaneity Theory for Cosmology and Universe Acceleration

    PubMed Central

    Kipreos, Edward T.

    2014-01-01

    An alternate Lorentz transformation, Absolute Lorentz Transformation (ALT), has similar kinematics to special relativity yet maintains absolute simultaneity in the context of a preferred reference frame. In this study, it is shown that ALT is compatible with current experiments to test Lorentz invariance only if the proposed preferred reference frame is locally equivalent to the Earth-centered non-rotating inertial reference frame, with the inference that in an ALT framework, preferred reference frames are associated with centers of gravitational mass. Applying this theoretical framework to cosmological data produces a scenario of universal time contraction in the past. In this scenario, past time contraction would be associated with increased levels of blueshifted light emissions from cosmological objects when viewed from our current perspective. The observation that distant Type Ia supernovae are dimmer than predicted by linear Hubble expansion currently provides the most direct evidence for an accelerating universe. Adjusting for the effects of time contraction on a redshift–distance modulus diagram produces a linear distribution of supernovae over the full redshift spectrum that is consistent with a non-accelerating universe. PMID:25536116

  17. Experimental verification of corrosive vapor deposition rate theory in high velocity burner rigs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gokoglu, S. A.; Santoro, G. J.

    1986-01-01

    The ability to predict deposition rates is required to facilitate modelling of high temperature corrosion by fused salt condensates in turbine engines. A corrosive salt vapor deposition theory based on multicomponent chemically frozen boundary layers (CFBL) has been successfully verified by high velocity burner rig experiments. The experiments involved internally air-impingement cooled, both rotating full and stationary segmented cylindrical collectors located in the crossflow of sodium-seeded combustion gases. Excellent agreement is found between the CFBL theory an the experimental measurements for both the absolute amounts of Na2SO4 deposition rates and the behavior of deposition rate with respect to collector temperature, mass flowrate (velocity) and Na concentration.

  18. Pressure dependence of the absolute rate constant for the reaction OH + C2H2 from 228 to 413 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michael, J. V.; Nava, D. F.; Payne, W. A.; Stief, L. J.; Borkowski, R. P.

    1980-01-01

    The pressure dependence of the absolute rate constant for the reaction of the hydroxyl radical with acetylene, important in both atmospheric and combustion chemistry, is determined for temperatures between 228 and 413 K. The flash photolysis-resonance fluorescence technique was employed at five temperatures over wide ranges of pressure and acetylene concentrations, with the OH produced by water photolysis and hydroxyl resonance fluorescent photons measured by multiscaling techniques. Results indicate that, except at the lowest temperature, the bimolecular rate constant for the reaction depends strongly on total pressure, with the pressure effect becoming more pronounced with increasing temperature. At limiting high pressures, the rate constant is found to be equal to 6.83 + or - 1.19 x 10 to the -12th exp (-646 + or - 47/T) cu cm/molecule per sec, where T is the temperature. Results thus demonstrate the importance of environmental conditions in theoretical studies of atmospheric and combustion product compositions

  19. Quantum theory of chemical reaction rates

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, W.H. |

    1994-10-01

    If one wishes to describe a chemical reaction at the most detailed level possible, i.e., its state-to-state differential scattering cross section, then it is necessary to solve the Schroedinger equation to obtain the S-matrix as a function of total energy E and total angular momentum J, in terms of which the cross sections can be calculated as given by equation (1) in the paper. All other physically observable attributes of the reaction can be derived from the cross sections. Often, in fact, one is primarily interested in the least detailed quantity which characterizes the reaction, namely its thermal rate constant, which is obtained by integrating Eq. (1) over all scattering angles, summing over all product quantum states, and Boltzmann-averaging over all initial quantum states of reactants. With the proper weighting factors, all of these averages are conveniently contained in the cumulative reaction probability (CRP), which is defined by equation (2) and in terms of which the thermal rate constant is given by equation (3). Thus, having carried out a full state-to-state scattering calculation to obtain the S-matrix, one can obtain the CRP from Eq. (2), and then rate constant from Eq. (3), but this seems like ``overkill``; i.e., if one only wants the rate constant, it would clearly be desirable to have a theory that allows one to calculate it, or the CRP, more directly than via Eq. (2), yet also correctly, i.e., without inherent approximations. Such a theory is the subject of this paper.

  20. Absolute rate parameters for the reaction of ground state atomic oxygen with carbonyl sulfide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klemm, R. B.; Stief, L. J.

    1974-01-01

    The rate parameters for the reaction of O(3P) with carbonyl sulfide, O(3P) + OCS yields CO + SO, have been determined directly by monitoring O(3P) using the flash photolysis-resonance fluorescence technique. The value for reaction rate was measured over a temperature range of 263-502 K and the data were fitted to an Arrhenius expression with good linearity. A comparison of the present results with those from previous studies of this reaction is also presented.

  1. Noninvasive optical quantification of absolute blood flow, blood oxygenation, and oxygen consumption rate in exercising skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Gurley, Katelyn; Shang, Yu

    2012-01-01

    Abstract. This study investigates a method using novel hybrid diffuse optical spectroscopies [near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) and diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS)] to obtain continuous, noninvasive measurement of absolute blood flow (BF), blood oxygenation, and oxygen consumption rate (V˙O2) in exercising skeletal muscle. Healthy subjects (n=9) performed a handgrip exercise to increase BF and V˙O2 in forearm flexor muscles, while a hybrid optical probe on the skin surface directly monitored oxy-, deoxy-, and total hemoglobin concentrations ([HbO2], [Hb], and THC), tissue oxygen saturation (StO2), relative BF (rBF), and relative oxygen consumption rate (rV˙O2). The rBF and rV˙O2 signals were calibrated with absolute baseline BF and V˙O2 obtained through venous and arterial occlusions, respectively. Known problems with muscle-fiber motion artifacts in optical measurements during exercise were mitigated using a novel gating algorithm that determined muscle contraction status based on control signals from a dynamometer. Results were consistent with previous findings in the literature. This study supports the application of NIRS/DCS technology to quantitatively evaluate hemodynamic and metabolic parameters in exercising skeletal muscle and holds promise for improving diagnosis and treatment evaluation for patients suffering from diseases affecting skeletal muscle and advancing fundamental understanding of muscle and exercise physiology. PMID:22894482

  2. Noninvasive optical quantification of absolute blood flow, blood oxygenation, and oxygen consumption rate in exercising skeletal muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurley, Katelyn; Shang, Yu; Yu, Guoqiang

    2012-07-01

    This study investigates a method using novel hybrid diffuse optical spectroscopies [near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) and diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS)] to obtain continuous, noninvasive measurement of absolute blood flow (BF), blood oxygenation, and oxygen consumption rate (\\Vdot O2) in exercising skeletal muscle. Healthy subjects (n=9) performed a handgrip exercise to increase BF and \\Vdot O2 in forearm flexor muscles, while a hybrid optical probe on the skin surface directly monitored oxy-, deoxy-, and total hemoglobin concentrations ([HbO2], [Hb], and THC), tissue oxygen saturation (StO2), relative BF (rBF), and relative oxygen consumption rate (r\\Vdot O2). The rBF and r\\Vdot O2 signals were calibrated with absolute baseline BF and \\Vdot O2 obtained through venous and arterial occlusions, respectively. Known problems with muscle-fiber motion artifacts in optical measurements during exercise were mitigated using a novel gating algorithm that determined muscle contraction status based on control signals from a dynamometer. Results were consistent with previous findings in the literature. This study supports the application of NIRS/DCS technology to quantitatively evaluate hemodynamic and metabolic parameters in exercising skeletal muscle and holds promise for improving diagnosis and treatment evaluation for patients suffering from diseases affecting skeletal muscle and advancing fundamental understanding of muscle and exercise physiology.

  3. Absolute rate coefficients for photorecombination of beryllium-like and boron-like silicon ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernhardt, D.; Becker, A.; Brandau, C.; Grieser, M.; Hahn, M.; Krantz, C.; Lestinsky, M.; Novotný, O.; Repnow, R.; Savin, D. W.; Spruck, K.; Wolf, A.; Müller, A.; Schippers, S.

    2016-04-01

    We report measured rate coefficients for electron-ion recombination of Si10+ forming Si9+ and of Si9+ forming Si8+, respectively. The measurements were performed using the electron-ion merged-beams technique at a heavy-ion storage ring. Electron-ion collision energies ranged from 0 to 50 eV for Si9+ and from 0 to 2000 eV for Si10+, thus, extending previous measurements for Si10+ (Orban et al 2010 Astrophys. J. 721 1603) to much higher energies. Experimentally derived rate coefficients for the recombination of Si9+ and Si10+ ions in a plasma are presented along with simple parameterizations. These rate coefficients are useful for the modeling of the charge balance of silicon in photoionized plasmas (Si9+ and Si10+) and in collisionally ionized plasmas (Si10+ only). In the corresponding temperature ranges, the experimentally derived rate coefficients agree with the latest corresponding theoretical results within the experimental uncertainties.

  4. Absolute depth-dose-rate measurements for an 192Ir HDR brachytherapy source in water using MOSFET detectors.

    PubMed

    Zilio, Valéry Olivier; Joneja, Om Parkash; Popowski, Youri; Rosenfeld, Anatoly; Chawla, Rakesh

    2006-06-01

    Reported MOSFET measurements concern mostly external radiotherapy and in vivo dosimetry. In this paper, we apply the technique for absolute dosimetry in the context of HDR brachytherapy using an 192Ir source. Measured radial dose rate distributions in water for different planes perpendicular to the source axis are presented and special attention is paid to the calibration of the R and K type detectors, and to the determination of appropriate correction factors for the sensitivity variation with the increase of the threshold voltage and the energy dependence. The experimental results are compared with Monte Carlo simulated dose rate distributions. The experimental results show a good agreement with the Monte Carlo simulations: the discrepancy between experimental and Monte Carlo results being within 5% for 82% of the points and within 10% for 95% of the points. Moreover, all points except two are found to lie within the experimental uncertainties, confirming thereby the quality of the results obtained.

  5. Absolute rate constants for the reaction of atomic hydrogen with ketene from 298 to 500 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michael, J. V.; Nava, D. F.; Payne, W. A.; Stief, L. J.

    1979-01-01

    Rate constants for the reaction of atomic hydrogen with ketene have been measured at room temperature by two techniques, flash photolysis-resonance fluorescence and discharge flow-resonance fluorescence. The measured values are (6.19 + or - 1.68) x 10 to the -14th and (7.3 + or - 1.3) x 10 to the -14th cu cm/molecule/s, respectively. In addition, rate constants as a function of temperature have been measured over the range 298-500 K using the FP-RF technique. The results are best represented by the Arrhenius expression k = (1.88 + or - 1.12) x 10 to the -11th exp(-1725 + or - 190/T) cu cm/molecule/s, where the indicated errors are at the two standard deviation level.

  6. Absolute rate of the reaction of bromine atoms with ozone from 200 to 360 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michael, J. V.; Lee, J. H.; Payne, W. A.; Stief, L. J.

    1978-01-01

    The rate constant for the reaction Br + O3 yields BrO + O2 has been measured from 200 to 360 K by the technique of flash photolysis coupled to time resolved detection of bromine atoms by resonance fluorescence (FP-RF). Br atoms were produced by the flash photolysis of CH3Br at a wavelength of 165 nm. O3 concentration was monitored continuously under reaction conditions by absorption at 253.7 nm. At each of five temperatures the results were independent of substantial variations in O3 concentration, total pressure (Ar), and limited variations in flash intensity (i.e., initial Br concentration). The measured rate constants obey the Arrhenius expression, k = (7.74 plus or minus 0.50) x 10 to the -12th exp(-603 plus or minus 16/T) cu cm/molecule/sec, where the error quoted is two standard deviations.

  7. Absolute rate constant for the O plus NO chemiluminescence in the near infrared

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golde, M. F.; Roche, A. E.; Kaufman, F.

    1973-01-01

    Infrared chemiluminescence from the process O + NO (+M) NO2 + hv (+M) has been studied between 1.3 and 4.1 micrometer. The wavelength dependence of the continuum between 1.3 and 3.3 micrometer is in fair agreement with previous studies and the measured radiative rate constant at 1.51 micrometer establishes the NO-O glow in this spectral range as a secondary emission standard. Comparison with previous studies of the visible region of the glow implies that the overall radiative rate constant lies in the range (9.4 to 11.2) x 10 to the minus 17 power cu cm sec/1. In the region 3.3 to 4.1 micrometer, the previously observed broad band, peaking at 3.7 micrometer, shows a complex kinetic dependence on O and M.

  8. Absolute rate constants of alkoxyl radical reactions in aqueous solution. [Tert-butyl hydroperoxide

    SciTech Connect

    Erben-Russ, M.; Michel, C.; Bors, W.; Saran, M.

    1987-04-23

    The pulse radiolysis technique was used to generate the alkoxyl radical derived from tert-butyl hydroperoxide (/sup t/BuOOH) in aqueous solution. The reactions of this radical with 2,2'-azinobis(3-ethyl-6-benzothiazolinesulfonate) (ABTS) and promethazine were monitored by kinetic spectroscopy. The unimolecular decay rate constant of the tert-butoxyl radical (/sup t/BuO) was determined to be 1.4 x 10/sup 6/ s/sup -1/. On the basis of this value, the rate constants for /sup t/BuO attack on quercetin, crocin, crocetin, ascorbate, isoascorbate, trolox c, glutathione, thymidine, adenosine, guanosine, and unsaturated fatty acids were determined. In addition, the reaction of /sup t/BuO with the polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) was observed by directly monitoring the formation of the fatty acid pentadienyl radicals. Interestingly, the attack of /sup t/BuO on PUFA was found to be faster by about one order of magnitude as compared to the same reaction in a nonpolar solvent.

  9. Temperature and pressure dependence of the absolute rate constant for the reactions of NH2 radicals with acetylene and ethylene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bosco, S. R.; Nava, D. F.; Brobst, W. D.; Stief, L. J.

    1984-01-01

    The absolute rate constants for the reaction between the NH2 free radical and acetylene and ethylene is measured experimentally using a flash photolysis technique. The constant is considered to be a function of temperature and pressure. At each temperature level of the experiment, the observed pseudo-first-order rate constants were assumed to be independent of flash intensity. The results of the experiment indicate that the bimolecular rate constant for the NH2 + C2H2 reaction increases with pressure at 373 K and 459 K but not at lower temperatures. Results near the pressure limit conform to an Arrhenius expression of 1.11 (+ or -) 0.36 x 10 to the -13th over the temperature range from 241 to 459 K. For the reaction NH2 + C2H4, a smaller rate of increase in the bimolecular rate constant was observed over the temperature range 250-465 K. The implications of these results for current theoretical models of NH2 + C2H2 (or H4) reactions in the atmospheres of Jupiter and Saturn are discussed.

  10. Solid-state track recorder dosimetry device to measure absolute reaction rates and neutron fluence as a function of time

    DOEpatents

    Gold, Raymond; Roberts, James H.

    1989-01-01

    A solid state track recording type dosimeter is disclosed to measure the time dependence of the absolute fission rates of nuclides or neutron fluence over a period of time. In a primary species an inner recording drum is rotatably contained within an exterior housing drum that defines a series of collimating slit apertures overlying windows defined in the stationary drum through which radiation can enter. Film type solid state track recorders are positioned circumferentially about the surface of the internal recording drum to record such radiation or its secondary products during relative rotation of the two elements. In another species both the recording element and the aperture element assume the configuration of adjacent disks. Based on slit size of apertures and relative rotational velocity of the inner drum, radiation parameters within a test area may be measured as a function of time and spectra deduced therefrom.

  11. Absolute Summ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Alfred, Jr.

    Summ means the entirety of the multiverse. It seems clear, from the inflation theories of A. Guth and others, that the creation of many universes is plausible. We argue that Absolute cosmological ideas, not unlike those of I. Newton, may be consistent with dynamic multiverse creations. As suggested in W. Heisenberg's uncertainty principle, and with the Anthropic Principle defended by S. Hawking, et al., human consciousness, buttressed by findings of neuroscience, may have to be considered in our models. Predictability, as A. Einstein realized with Invariants and General Relativity, may be required for new ideas to be part of physics. We present here a two postulate model geared to an Absolute Summ. The seedbed of this work is part of Akhnaton's philosophy (see S. Freud, Moses and Monotheism). Most important, however, is that the structure of human consciousness, manifest in Kenya's Rift Valley 200,000 years ago as Homo sapiens, who were the culmination of the six million year co-creation process of Hominins and Nature in Africa, allows us to do the physics that we do. .

  12. A rare gas optics-free absolute photon flux and energy analyzer to provide absolute photoionization rates of inflowing interstellar neutrals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Judge, Darrell L.

    1994-01-01

    A prototype spectrometer has been developed for space applications requiring long term absolute EUV photon flux measurements. The energy spectrum of the incoming photons is transformed directly into an electron energy spectrum by taking advantage of the photoelectric effect in one of several rare gases at low pressures. Using an electron energy spectrometer, followed by an electron multiplier detector, pulses due to individual electrons are counted. The overall efficiency of this process can be made essentially independent of gain drifts in the signal path, and the secular degradation of optical components which is often a problem in other techniques is avoided. A very important feature of this approach is its freedom from the problem of overlapping spectral orders that plagues grating EUV spectrometers. An instrument with these features has not been flown before, but is essential to further advances in our understanding of solar EUV flux dynamics, and the coupled dynamics of terrestrial and planetary atmospheres. The detailed characteristics of this optics-free spectrometer are presented in the publications section.

  13. Pressure dependence of the absolute rate constant for the reaction OH + C2H2 from 228 to 413K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michael, J. V.; Nava, D. F.; Borokowski, R. P.; Payne, W. A.; Stief, L. J.

    1980-01-01

    The pressure dependence of absolute rate constants for the reaction of OH + C2H2 yields products has been examined at five temperatures ranging from 228 to 413 K. The experimental techniques which was used is flash photolysis-resonance fluoresence. OH was produced by water photolysis and hydroxyl resonance fluorescent photons were measured by multiscaling techniques. The results indicate that the low pressure bimolecular rate constant is 4 x 10 the the minus 13th power cu cm molecule (-1) s(-1) over the temperature range studied. A substantial increase in the bimolecular rate constant with an increase in pressure was observed at all temperatures except 228 K. This indicates the importance of initial adduct formation and subsequent stablization. The high pressure results are well represented by the Arrhenius expression (k sub bi) sub infinity = (6.83 + or - 1.19) x 10 to the minus 12th power exp(-646 + or - 47/T)cu cm molecule (-1) s(-1). The results are compared to previous investigated and are theoretically discussed. The implications of these results on modeling of terrestrial and planetary atmospheres and also in combustion chemistry are discussed.

  14. The reaction H + C4H2 - Absolute rate constant measurement and implication for atmospheric modeling of Titan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nava, D. F.; Mitchell, M. B.; Stief, L. J.

    1986-01-01

    The absolute rate constant for the reaction H + C4H2 has been measured over the temperature (T) interval 210-423 K, using the technique of flash photolysis-resonance fluorescence. At each of the five temperatures employed, the results were independent of variations in C4H2 concentration, total pressure of Ar or N2, and flash intensity (i.e., the initial H concentration). The rate constant, k, was found to be equal to 1.39 x 10 to the -10th exp (-1184/T) cu cm/s, with an error of one standard deviation. The Arrhenius parameters at the high pressure limit determined here for the H + C4H2 reaction are consistent with those for the corresponding reactions of H with C2H2 and C3H4. Implications of the kinetic carbon chemistry results, particularly those at low temperature, are considered for models of the atmospheric carbon chemistry of Titan. The rate of this reaction, relative to that of the analogous, but slower, reaction of H + C2H2, appears to make H + C4H2 a very feasible reaction pathway for effective conversion of H atoms to molecular hydrogen in the stratosphere of Titan.

  15. The reaction H + C4H2 - Absolute rate constant measurement and implication for atmospheric modeling of Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nava, D. F.; Mitchell, M. B.; Stief, L. J.

    1986-04-01

    The absolute rate constant for the reaction H + C4H2 has been measured over the temperature (T) interval 210-423 K, using the technique of flash photolysis-resonance fluorescence. At each of the five temperatures employed, the results were independent of variations in C4H2 concentration, total pressure of Ar or N2, and flash intensity (i.e., the initial H concentration). The rate constant, k, was found to be equal to 1.39 x 10 to the -10th exp (-1184/T) cu cm/s, with an error of one standard deviation. The Arrhenius parameters at the high pressure limit determined here for the H + C4H2 reaction are consistent with those for the corresponding reactions of H with C2H2 and C3H4. Implications of the kinetic carbon chemistry results, particularly those at low temperature, are considered for models of the atmospheric carbon chemistry of Titan. The rate of this reaction, relative to that of the analogous, but slower, reaction of H + C2H2, appears to make H + C4H2 a very feasible reaction pathway for effective conversion of H atoms to molecular hydrogen in the stratosphere of Titan.

  16. Growth rate, population entropy, and perturbation theory.

    PubMed

    Demetrius, L

    1989-04-01

    This paper is concerned with the connection between two classes of population variables: measures of population growth rate--the Malthusian parameter, the net reproduction rate, the gross reproduction rate, and the mean life expectancy; and measures of demographic heterogeneity--population entropy. It is shown that the entropy functions predict the response of the growth rate parameters to perturbations in the age-specific fecundity and mortality schedule. These results are invoked to introduce the notion of environmental intensity. The intensity function, expressed in terms of the entropy parameters, is applied to give a comparative study of the effect of environmental factors on the dynamics of Swedish and French populations.

  17. Multidimensional reaction rate theory with anisotropic diffusion.

    PubMed

    Berezhkovskii, Alexander M; Szabo, Attila; Greives, Nicholas; Zhou, Huan-Xiang

    2014-11-28

    An analytical expression is derived for the rate constant that describes diffusive transitions between two deep wells of a multidimensional potential. The expression, in contrast to the Kramers-Langer formula for the rate constant, is valid even when the diffusion is highly anisotropic. Our approach is based on a variational principle for the reactive flux and uses a trial function for the splitting probability or commitor. The theoretical result is validated by Brownian dynamics simulations.

  18. An energy decomposition analysis for second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory based on absolutely localized molecular orbitals.

    PubMed

    Thirman, Jonathan; Head-Gordon, Martin

    2015-08-28

    An energy decomposition analysis (EDA) of intermolecular interactions is proposed for second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2) based on absolutely localized molecular orbitals (ALMOs), as an extension to a previous ALMO-based EDA for self-consistent field methods. It decomposes the canonical MP2 binding energy by dividing the double excitations that contribute to the MP2 wave function into classes based on how the excitations involve different molecules. The MP2 contribution to the binding energy is decomposed into four components: frozen interaction, polarization, charge transfer, and dispersion. Charge transfer is defined by excitations that change the number of electrons on a molecule, dispersion by intermolecular excitations that do not transfer charge, and polarization and frozen interactions by intra-molecular excitations. The final two are separated by evaluations of the frozen, isolated wave functions in the presence of the other molecules, with adjustments for orbital response. Unlike previous EDAs for electron correlation methods, this one includes components for the electrostatics, which is vital as adjustment to the electrostatic behavior of the system is in some cases the dominant effect of the treatment of electron correlation. The proposed EDA is then applied to a variety of different systems to demonstrate that all proposed components behave correctly. This includes systems with one molecule and an external electric perturbation to test the separation between polarization and frozen interactions and various bimolecular systems in the equilibrium range and beyond to test the rest of the EDA. We find that it performs well on these tests. We then apply the EDA to a halogen bonded system to investigate the nature of the halogen bond.

  19. An energy decomposition analysis for second-order Møller–Plesset perturbation theory based on absolutely localized molecular orbitals

    SciTech Connect

    Thirman, Jonathan Head-Gordon, Martin

    2015-08-28

    An energy decomposition analysis (EDA) of intermolecular interactions is proposed for second-order Møller–Plesset perturbation theory (MP2) based on absolutely localized molecular orbitals (ALMOs), as an extension to a previous ALMO-based EDA for self-consistent field methods. It decomposes the canonical MP2 binding energy by dividing the double excitations that contribute to the MP2 wave function into classes based on how the excitations involve different molecules. The MP2 contribution to the binding energy is decomposed into four components: frozen interaction, polarization, charge transfer, and dispersion. Charge transfer is defined by excitations that change the number of electrons on a molecule, dispersion by intermolecular excitations that do not transfer charge, and polarization and frozen interactions by intra-molecular excitations. The final two are separated by evaluations of the frozen, isolated wave functions in the presence of the other molecules, with adjustments for orbital response. Unlike previous EDAs for electron correlation methods, this one includes components for the electrostatics, which is vital as adjustment to the electrostatic behavior of the system is in some cases the dominant effect of the treatment of electron correlation. The proposed EDA is then applied to a variety of different systems to demonstrate that all proposed components behave correctly. This includes systems with one molecule and an external electric perturbation to test the separation between polarization and frozen interactions and various bimolecular systems in the equilibrium range and beyond to test the rest of the EDA. We find that it performs well on these tests. We then apply the EDA to a halogen bonded system to investigate the nature of the halogen bond.

  20. An energy decomposition analysis for second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory based on absolutely localized molecular orbitals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thirman, Jonathan; Head-Gordon, Martin

    2015-08-01

    An energy decomposition analysis (EDA) of intermolecular interactions is proposed for second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2) based on absolutely localized molecular orbitals (ALMOs), as an extension to a previous ALMO-based EDA for self-consistent field methods. It decomposes the canonical MP2 binding energy by dividing the double excitations that contribute to the MP2 wave function into classes based on how the excitations involve different molecules. The MP2 contribution to the binding energy is decomposed into four components: frozen interaction, polarization, charge transfer, and dispersion. Charge transfer is defined by excitations that change the number of electrons on a molecule, dispersion by intermolecular excitations that do not transfer charge, and polarization and frozen interactions by intra-molecular excitations. The final two are separated by evaluations of the frozen, isolated wave functions in the presence of the other molecules, with adjustments for orbital response. Unlike previous EDAs for electron correlation methods, this one includes components for the electrostatics, which is vital as adjustment to the electrostatic behavior of the system is in some cases the dominant effect of the treatment of electron correlation. The proposed EDA is then applied to a variety of different systems to demonstrate that all proposed components behave correctly. This includes systems with one molecule and an external electric perturbation to test the separation between polarization and frozen interactions and various bimolecular systems in the equilibrium range and beyond to test the rest of the EDA. We find that it performs well on these tests. We then apply the EDA to a halogen bonded system to investigate the nature of the halogen bond.

  1. A theory of exchange rate modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Alekseev, A.A.

    1995-09-01

    The article examines exchange rate modeling for two cases: (a) when the trading partners have mutual interests and (b) when the trading partners have antogonistic interests. Exchange rates in world markets are determined by supply and demand for the currency of each state, and states may control the exchange rate of their currency by changing the interest rate, the volume of credit, and product prices in both domestic and export markets. Abstracting from issues of production and technology in different countries and also ignoring various trade, institutional, and other barriers, we consider in this article only the effect of export and import prices on the exchange rate, we propose a new criterion of external trade activity: each trading partner earns a profit which is proportional to the volume of benefits enjoyed by the other partner. We consider a trading cycle that consists of four stages: (a) purchase of goods in the domestic market with the object of selling them abroad; (b) sale of the goods in foreign markets; (c) purchase of goods abroad with the object of selling them in the domestic market; (d) sale of the goods domestically.

  2. Quantum and semiclassical theories of chemical reaction rates

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, W.H. |

    1995-09-01

    A rigorous quantum mechanical theory (and a semiclassical approximation thereto) is described for calculating chemical reaction rates ``directly``, i.e., without having to solve the complete state-to-state reactive scattering problem. The approach has many vestiges of transition state theory, for which it may be thought of as the rigorous generalization.

  3. Fractional rate of change of swim-bladder volume is reliably related to absolute depth during vertical displacements in teleost fish.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Graham K; Holbrook, Robert Iain; de Perera, Theresa Burt

    2010-09-06

    Fish must orient in three dimensions as they navigate through space, but it is unknown whether they are assisted by a sense of depth. In principle, depth can be estimated directly from hydrostatic pressure, but although teleost fish are exquisitely sensitive to changes in pressure, they appear unable to measure absolute pressure. Teleosts sense changes in pressure via changes in the volume of their gas-filled swim-bladder, but because the amount of gas it contains is varied to regulate buoyancy, this cannot act as a long-term steady reference for inferring absolute pressure. In consequence, it is generally thought that teleosts are unable to sense depth using hydrostatic pressure. Here, we overturn this received wisdom by showing from a theoretical physical perspective that absolute depth could be estimated during fast, steady vertical displacements by combining a measurement of vertical speed with a measurement of the fractional rate of change of swim-bladder volume. This mechanism works even if the amount of gas in the swim-bladder varies, provided that this variation occurs over much longer time scales than changes in volume during displacements. There is therefore no a priori physical justification for assuming that teleost fish cannot sense absolute depth by using hydrostatic pressure cues.

  4. Derivation of instanton rate theory from first principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, Jeremy O.

    2016-03-01

    Instanton rate theory is used to study tunneling events in a wide range of systems including low-temperature chemical reactions. Despite many successful applications, the method has never been obtained from first principles, relying instead on the "Im F" premise. In this paper, the same expression for the rate of barrier penetration at finite temperature is rederived from quantum scattering theory [W. H. Miller, S. D. Schwartz, and J. W. Tromp, J. Chem. Phys. 79, 4889 (1983)] using a semiclassical Green's function formalism. This justifies the instanton approach and provides a route to deriving the rate of other processes.

  5. Rate theory on water exchange in aqueous uranyl ion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dang, Liem X.; Vo, Quynh N.; Nilsson, Mikael; Nguyen, Hung D.

    2017-03-01

    We report a classical rate theory approach to predict the exchange mechanism that occurs between water and aqueous uranyl ion. Using our water and ion-water polarizable force field and molecular dynamics techniques, we computed the potentials of mean force for the uranyl ion-water pair as a function of different pressures at ambient temperature. These potentials of mean force were used to calculate rate constants using transition rate theory; the transmission coefficients also were examined using the reactive flux method and Grote-Hynes approach. The computed activation volumes are positive; thus, the mechanism of this particular water-exchange is a dissociative process.

  6. Structural effects on the beta-scission reaction of alkoxyl radicals. Direct measurement of the absolute rate constants for ring opening of benzocycloalken-1-oxyl radicals.

    PubMed

    Bietti, Massimo; Lanzalunga, Osvaldo; Salamone, Michela

    2005-02-18

    [reaction: see text] The absolute rate constants for beta-scission of a series of benzocycloalken-1-oxyl radicals and of the 2-(4-methylphenyl)-2-butoxyl radical have been measured directly by laser flash photolysis. The benzocycloalken-1-oxyl radicals undergo ring opening with rates which parallel the ring strain of the corresponding cycloalkanes. In the 1-X-indan-1-oxyl radical series, ring opening is observed when X = H, Me, whereas exclusive C-X bond cleavage occurs when X = Et. The factors governing the fragmentation regioselectivity are discussed.

  7. Application of psychometric theory to the measurement of voice quality using rating scales.

    PubMed

    Shrivastav, Rahul; Sapienza, Christine M; Nandur, Vuday

    2005-04-01

    Rating scales are commonly used to study voice quality. However, recent research has demonstrated that perceptual measures of voice quality obtained using rating scales suffer from poor interjudge agreement and reliability, especially in the mid-range of the scale. These findings, along with those obtained using multidimensional scaling (MDS), have been interpreted to show that listeners perceive voice quality in an idiosyncratic manner. Based on psychometric theory, the present research explored an alternative explanation for the poor interlistener agreement observed in previous research. This approach suggests that poor agreement between listeners may result, in part, from measurement errors related to a variety of factors rather than true differences in the perception of voice quality. In this study, 10 listeners rated breathiness for 27 vowel stimuli using a 5-point rating scale. Each stimulus was presented to the listeners 10 times in random order. Interlistener agreement and reliability were calculated from these ratings. Agreement and reliability were observed to improve when multiple ratings of each stimulus from each listener were averaged and when standardized scores were used instead of absolute ratings. The probability of exact agreement was found to be approximately .9 when using averaged ratings and standardized scores. In contrast, the probability of exact agreement was only .4 when a single rating from each listener was used to measure agreement. These findings support the hypothesis that poor agreement reported in past research partly arises from errors in measurement rather than individual differences in the perception of voice quality.

  8. Modified Rate-Theory Predictions in Comparison to Microstructural Data

    SciTech Connect

    Surh, M P; Okita, T; Wolfer, W G

    2003-11-03

    Standard rate theory methods have recently been combined with experimental microstructures to successfully reproduce measured swelling behavior in ternary steels around 400 C. Fit parameters have reasonable values except possibly for the recombination radius, R{sub c}, which can be larger than expected. Numerical simulations of void nucleation and growth reveal the importance additional recombination processes at unstable clusters. Such extra recombination may reduce the range of possible values for R{sub c}. A modified rate theory is presented here that includes the effect of these undetectably small defect clusters. The fit values for R{sub c} are not appreciably altered, as the modification has little effect on the model behavior in the late steady state. It slightly improves the predictions for early transient times, when the sink strength of stable voids and dislocations is relatively small. Standard rate theory successfully explains steady swelling behavior in high purity stainless steel.

  9. The Temperature Optima and Temperature Sensitivity of Soil Respiration Explained By Macromolecular Rate Theory (MMRT).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schipper, L. A.; O'Neill, T.; Arcus, V. L.

    2014-12-01

    One of the most fundamental factors controlling all biological and chemical processes is changing temperature. Temperature dependence was originally described by the Arrhenius function in the 19th century. This function provides an excellent description of chemical reaction rates. However, the Arrhenius function does not predict the temperature optimum of biological rates that is clearly evident in laboratory and field measurements. Previously, the temperature optimum of biological processes has been ascribed to denaturation of enzymes but the observed temperature optima in soil are often rather modest, occurring at about 40-50°C and generally less than recognised temperatures for protein unfolding. We have modified the Arrhenius function incorporating a temperature-dependent activation energy derived directly from first principles from thermodynamics of macromolecules. MacroMolecular Rate Theory (MMRT) accounts for large changes in the flexibility of enzymes during catalysis that result in changes in heat capacity (∆C‡p) of the enzyme during the reaction. MMRT predicts an initially Arrhenius-like response followed by a temperature optimum without the need for enzyme denaturation (Hobbs et al., 2013. ACS Chemical Biology. 8: 2388-2393). Denaturation, of course, occurs at much higher temperatures. We have shown that MMRT fits biogeochemical data collected from laboratory and field studies with important implications for changes in absolute temperature sensitivity as temperature rises (Schipper et al., 2014. Global Change Biology). As the temperature optimum is approached the absolute temperature sensitivity of biological processes decreases to zero. Consequently, the absolute temperature-sensitivity of soil biological processes depends on both the change in ecosystem temperature and the temperature optimum of the biological process. MMRT also very clearly explains why Q10 values decline with increasing temperature more quickly than would be predicted from the

  10. Determination of subjective similarity for pairs of masses and pairs of clustered microcalcifications on mammograms: Comparison of similarity ranking scores and absolute similarity ratings

    SciTech Connect

    Muramatsu, Chisako; Li Qiang; Schmidt, Robert A.; Shiraishi, Junji; Suzuki, Kenji; Newstead, Gillian M.; Doi, Kunio

    2007-07-15

    The presentation of images that are similar to that of an unknown lesion seen on a mammogram may be helpful for radiologists to correctly diagnose that lesion. For similar images to be useful, they must be quite similar from the radiologists' point of view. We have been trying to quantify the radiologists' impression of similarity for pairs of lesions and to establish a ''gold standard'' for development and evaluation of a computerized scheme for selecting such similar images. However, it is considered difficult to reliably and accurately determine similarity ratings, because they are subjective. In this study, we compared the subjective similarities obtained by two different methods, an absolute rating method and a 2-alternative forced-choice (2AFC) method, to demonstrate that reliable similarity ratings can be determined by the responses of a group of radiologists. The absolute similarity ratings were previously obtained for pairs of masses and pairs of microcalcifications from five and nine radiologists, respectively. In this study, similarity ranking scores for eight pairs of masses and eight pairs of microcalcifications were determined by use of the 2AFC method. In the first session, the eight pairs of masses and eight pairs of microcalcifications were grouped and compared separately for determining the similarity ranking scores. In the second session, another similarity ranking score was determined by use of mixed pairs, i.e., by comparison of the similarity of a mass pair with that of a calcification pair. Four pairs of masses and four pairs of microcalcifications were grouped together to create two sets of eight pairs. The average absolute similarity ratings and the average similarity ranking scores showed very good correlations in the first study (Pearson's correlation coefficients: 0.94 and 0.98 for masses and microcalcifications, respectively). Moreover, in the second study, the correlations between the absolute ratings and the ranking scores were also

  11. Absolute Zero

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnelly, Russell J.; Sheibley, D.; Belloni, M.; Stamper-Kurn, D.; Vinen, W. F.

    2006-12-01

    Absolute Zero is a two hour PBS special attempting to bring to the general public some of the advances made in 400 years of thermodynamics. It is based on the book “Absolute Zero and the Conquest of Cold” by Tom Shachtman. Absolute Zero will call long-overdue attention to the remarkable strides that have been made in low-temperature physics, a field that has produced 27 Nobel Prizes. It will explore the ongoing interplay between science and technology through historical examples including refrigerators, ice machines, frozen foods, liquid oxygen and nitrogen as well as much colder fluids such as liquid hydrogen and liquid helium. A website has been established to promote the series: www.absolutezerocampaign.org. It contains information on the series, aimed primarily at students at the middle school level. There is a wealth of material here and we hope interested teachers will draw their student’s attention to this website and its substantial contents, which have been carefully vetted for accuracy.

  12. Spectral Rate Theory for Two-State Kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Prinz, Jan-Hendrik; Chodera, John D.; Noé, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Classical rate theories often fail in cases where the observable(s) or order parameter(s) used is a poor reaction coordinate or the observed signal is deteriorated by noise, such that no clear separation between reactants and products is possible. Here, we present a general spectral two-state rate theory for ergodic dynamical systems in thermal equilibrium that explicitly takes into account how the system is observed. The theory allows the systematic estimation errors made by standard rate theories to be understood and quantified. We also elucidate the connection of spectral rate theory with the popular Markov state modeling approach for molecular simulation studies. An optimal rate estimator is formulated that gives robust and unbiased results even for poor reaction coordinates and can be applied to both computer simulations and single-molecule experiments. No definition of a dividing surface is required. Another result of the theory is a model-free definition of the reaction coordinate quality. The reaction coordinate quality can be bounded from below by the directly computable observation quality, thus providing a measure allowing the reaction coordinate quality to be optimized by tuning the experimental setup. Additionally, the respective partial probability distributions can be obtained for the reactant and product states along the observed order parameter, even when these strongly overlap. The effects of both filtering (averaging) and uncorrelated noise are also examined. The approach is demonstrated on numerical examples and experimental single-molecule force-probe data of the p5ab RNA hairpin and the apo-myoglobin protein at low pH, focusing here on the case of two-state kinetics. PMID:25356374

  13. Intrinsic absolute bioavailability prediction in rats based on in situ absorption rate constants and/or in vitro partition coefficients: 6-fluoroquinolones.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Castaño, G; Ruíz-García, A; Bañón, N; Bermejo, M; Merino, V; Freixas, J; Garriguesx, T M; Plá-Delfina, J M

    2000-11-01

    A preliminary study attempting to predict the intrinsic absolute bioavailability of a group of antibacterial 6-fluoroquinolones-including true and imperfect homologues as well as heterologues-was carried out. The intrinsic absolute bioavailability of the test compounds, F, was assessed on permanently cannulated conscious rats by comparing the trapezoidal normalized areas under the plasma concentration-time curves obtained by intravenous and oral routes (n = 8-12). The high-performance liquid chromatography analytical methods used for plasma samples are described. Prediction of the absolute bioavailability of the compounds was based on their intrinsic rat gut in situ absorption rate constant, k(a). The working equation was: where T represents the mean absorbing time. A T value of 0.93 (+/-0.06) h provides the best correlation between predicted and experimentally obtained bioavailabilities (F' and F, respectively) when k(a) values are used (slope a = 1.10; intercept b = -0.05; r = 0.991). The k(a) values can also be expressed in function of the in vitro partition coefficients, P, between n-octanol and a phosphate buffer. In this case, theoretical k(a) values can be determined with the parameters of a standard k(a)/P correlation previously established for a group of model compounds. When P values are taken instead of k(a) values, reliable bioavailability predictions can also be made. These and other relevant features of the method are discussed.

  14. High-accuracy absolute rotation rate measurements with a large ring laser gyro: establishing the scale factor.

    PubMed

    Hurst, Robert B; Mayerbacher, Marinus; Gebauer, Andre; Schreiber, K Ulrich; Wells, Jon-Paul R

    2017-02-01

    Large ring lasers have exceeded the performance of navigational gyroscopes by several orders of magnitude and have become useful tools for geodesy. In order to apply them to tests in fundamental physics, remaining systematic errors have to be significantly reduced. We derive a modified expression for the Sagnac frequency of a square ring laser gyro under Earth rotation. The modifications include corrections for dispersion (of both the gain medium and the mirrors), for the Goos-Hänchen effect in the mirrors, and for refractive index of the gas filling the cavity. The corrections were measured and calculated for the 16  m2 Grossring laser located at the Geodetic Observatory Wettzell. The optical frequency and the free spectral range of this laser were measured, allowing unique determination of the longitudinal mode number, and measurement of the dispersion. Ultimately we find that the absolute scale factor of the gyroscope can be estimated to an accuracy of approximately 1 part in 108.

  15. [On the economy of "wealth of people": demographic-political theories in the Austria of enlightened absolutism].

    PubMed

    Wichtl, T

    1985-01-01

    "This essay focuses on mercantilist theories and interpretations of demographic trends [in Austria] in the late 18th century." The writings of several mercantilist authors are summarized, and the influence of their views on population policy is discussed. It is noted that the official population policy, which aimed at fast population growth to strengthen the economy and increase the number of soldiers, was based on the mercantilist theory that greater population size means higher per capita incomes. (summary in ENG)

  16. Multiple-bit-rate clock recovery circuit: theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplunenko, V.

    1999-11-01

    The multiple-bit-rate clock recovery circuit has been recently proposed as a part of the communications packet switch. All packets must be the same length and be preceded by the frequency header, which is a number of consecutive ones (return-to-zero mode). The header is compared with the internal clock, and the result is used to set output clock frequency. The clock rate is defined by a number of fluxons propagating in ring oscillator, which is a close circular Josephson transmission line. The theory gives a bit rate bandwidth as a function of internal clock frequency, header length and silence time (maximum number of consecutive zeros in the packet).

  17. Application of semiclassical methods to reaction rate theory

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez, Rigoberto

    1993-11-01

    This work is concerned with the development of approximate methods to describe relatively large chemical systems. This effort has been divided into two primary directions: First, we have extended and applied a semiclassical transition state theory (SCTST) originally proposed by Miller to obtain microcanonical and canonical (thermal) rates for chemical reactions described by a nonseparable Hamiltonian, i.e. most reactions. Second, we have developed a method to describe the fluctuations of decay rates of individual energy states from the average RRKM rate in systems where the direct calculation of individual rates would be impossible. Combined with the semiclassical theory this latter effort has provided a direct comparison to the experimental results of Moore and coworkers. In SCTST, the Hamiltonian is expanded about the barrier and the ``good`` action-angle variables are obtained perturbatively; a WKB analysis of the effectively one-dimensional reactive direction then provides the transmission probabilities. The advantages of this local approximate treatment are that it includes tunneling effects and anharmonicity, and it systematically provides a multi-dimensional dividing surface in phase space. The SCTST thermal rate expression has been reformulated providing increased numerical efficiency (as compared to a naive Boltzmann average), an appealing link to conventional transition state theory (involving a ``prereactive`` partition function depending on the action of the reactive mode), and the ability to go beyond the perturbative approximation.

  18. Absolute rate of the reaction of atomic hydrogen with ethylene from 198 to 320 K at high pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, J. H.; Michael, J. V.; Payne, W. A.; Stief, L. J.

    1978-01-01

    The rate constant for the H+C2H4 reaction has been measured as a function of temperature. Experiments were performed with high pressures of Ar heat bath gas at seven temperatures from 198 to 320 K with the flash photolysis-resonance fluorescence (FP-RF) technique. Pressures were chosen so as to isolate the addition rate constant k1. The results are well represented by an Arrhenius expression. The results are compared with other studies and are theoretically discussed.

  19. Absolute rate of the reaction of Cl(p-2) with molecular hydrogen from 200 - 500 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whytock, D. A.; Lee, J. H.; Michael, J. V.; Payne, W. A.; Stief, L. J.

    1976-01-01

    Rate constants for the reaction of atomic chlorine with hydrogen are measured from 200 - 500 K using the flash photolysis-resonance fluorescence technique. The results are compared with previous work and are discussed with particular reference to the equilibrium constant for the reaction and to relative rate data for chlorine atom reactions. Theoretical calculations, using the BEBO method with tunneling, give excellent agreement with experiment.

  20. Evaluation of a theory for pressure-strain rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinstock, J.; Shariff, K.

    1987-01-01

    A theoretical expression for the slow part (the nonlinear fluctuation part) of the pressure-strain rate is compared with simulations of anisotropic homogeneous flows. The objective is to determine the quantitative accuracy of the theory and to test its prediction that the generalized Rotta coefficient, a non-dimensionalized ratio of slow term to the Reynolds stress anisotropy, varies with direction and can be negative. Comparisons are made between theoretical and simulation values of the slow term itself and of the generalized Rotta coefficients. The implications of the comparison for two-point closure theories and for Reynolds stress modeling are pointed out.

  1. Absolute rate of the reaction of C l(2P) with methane from 200-500 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whytock, D. A.; Lee, J. H.; Michael, J. V.; Payne, W. A.; Stief, L. J.

    1976-01-01

    Rate constants for the reaction of atomic chlorine with methane have been measured from 200-500K using the flash photolysis-resonance fluorescence technique. When the results from fourteen equally spaced experimental determinations are plotted in Arrhenius form a definite curvature is noted. The results are compared to previous work and are theoretically discussed.

  2. Solvent exchange in liquid methanol and rate theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dang, Liem X.; Schenter, Gregory K.

    2016-01-01

    To enhance our understanding of the solvent exchange mechanism in liquid methanol, we report a systematic study using molecular dynamics simulations. We use transition state theory, the Impey-Madden-McDonald method, the reactive flux method, and Grote-Hynes theory to compute the rate constants for this process. Solvent coupling was found to dominate, resulting in a significantly small transmission coefficient. We predict a positive activation volume for methanol exchange. The essential features of the dynamics as well as the pressure dependence are recovered from a Generalized Langevin Equation description of the dynamics. We find that the response to anharmonicity can be decomposed into two time regimes, one corresponding to short time response (<0.1 ps) and long time response (>5 ps). An effective characterization of the process is obtained from launching dynamics from the planar hypersurface corresponding to Grote-Hynes theory, resulting in improved numerical convergence of correlation functions.

  3. Absolute Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartig, George

    1990-12-01

    The absolute sensitivity of the FOS will be determined in SV by observing 2 stars at 3 epochs, first in 3 apertures (1.0", 0.5", and 0.3" circular) and then in 1 aperture (1.0" circular). In cycle 1, one star, BD+28D4211 will be observed in the 1.0" aperture to establish the stability of the sensitivity and flat field characteristics and improve the accuracy obtained in SV. This star will also be observed through the paired apertures since these are not calibrated in SV. The stars will be observed in most detector/grating combinations. The data will be averaged to form the inverse sensitivity functions required by RSDP.

  4. Absolute rate constant of the reaction OH + H2O2 yields HO2 + H2O from 245 to 423 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keyser, L. F.

    1980-01-01

    The absolute rate constant of the reaction between the hydroxyl radical and hydrogen peroxide was measured by using the discharge-flow resonance fluorescence technique at total pressure between 1 and 4 torr. At 298 K the result is (1.64 + or - 0.32) x 10 to the -12th cu cm/molecule s. The observed rate constant is independent of pressure, surface-to-volume ratio, the addition of vibrational quenchers, and the source of OH. The temperature dependence has also been determined between 245 and 423 K; the resulting Arrhenius expression is k cu cm/molecule s is equal to (2.51 + or - 0.6) x 10 to the -12th exp(-126 + or - 76/T).

  5. Relativistic Absolutism in Moral Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vogt, W. Paul

    1982-01-01

    Discusses Emile Durkheim's "Moral Education: A Study in the Theory and Application of the Sociology of Education," which holds that morally healthy societies may vary in culture and organization but must possess absolute rules of moral behavior. Compares this moral theory with current theory and practice of American educators. (MJL)

  6. Absolute rate of the reaction of O/3-P/ with hydrogen sulfide over the temperature range 263 to 495 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whytock, D. A.; Timmons, R. B.; Lee, J. H.; Michael, J. V.; Payne, W. A.; Stief, L. J.

    1976-01-01

    The technique of flash photolysis coupled with time resolved detection of O via resonance fluorescence has been used to obtain rate constants for the reaction of O(3-P) with H2S at temperatures from 263 to 495 K and at pressures in the range 10-400 torr. Under conditions where secondary reactions are avoided, the measured rate constants for the primary step obey the Arrhenius equation k = (7.24 plus or minus 1.07) x 10 to the -12th exp(-3300 plus or minus 100/1.987 T) cu cm/molecules/s. Experiments with D2S show that the reaction exhibits a primary isotope effect, in support of a hydrogen abstraction mechanism.

  7. Absolute rate parameters for the reaction of ground state atomic oxygen with carbonyl sulfide. [using O(3P) monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klemm, R. B.; Stief, L. J.

    1974-01-01

    The rate parameters for the reaction of O(3P) with carbonyl sulfide, O(3P) + OCS yields CO + SO have been determined directly by monitoring O(3P) using the flash photolysis-resonance fluorescence technique. The value for k sub 1 was measured over a temperature range of 263 - 502 K and the data were fitted to an Arrhenuis expression with good linearity.

  8. Benchmark calculations of thermal reaction rates. I - Quantal scattering theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chatfield, David C.; Truhlar, Donald G.; Schwenke, David W.

    1991-01-01

    The thermal rate coefficient for the prototype reaction H + H2 yields H2 + H with zero total angular momentum is calculated by summing, averaging, and numerically integrating state-to-state reaction probabilities calculated by time-independent quantum-mechanical scattering theory. The results are very carefully converged with respect to all numerical parameters in order to provide high-precision benchmark results for confirming the accuracy of new methods and testing their efficiency.

  9. Absolute rate determinations and temperature dependences of the gas-phase reactions of O( 3P) with halogenated propenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cometto, Pablo M.; Teruel, Mariano A.; Taccone, Raúl A.; Lane, Silvia I.

    2006-01-01

    The rate constants for the gas-phase reactions of ground state oxygen atoms with CF 3CH dbnd CH 2 (1), CF 3CF dbnd CF 2 (2) and CF 3CCl dbnd CCl 2 (3) have been measured directly using a discharge flow tube employing the O( 3P) chemiluminescence titration method. The experiments were carried out under pseudo-first-order conditions with [O( 3P)] 0 ≪ [propene] 0. The temperature dependences of the reactions were studied for the first time in the range 298-363 K. The Arrhenius expressions obtained (in units of cm 3 molecule -1 s -1) were: k1 = (0.28 ± 0.09) × 10 -11 exp[-(10.4 ± 0.9) × 10 3/ RT], k2 = (1.57 ± 0.72) × 10 -11 exp[-(15.6 ± 1.3) × 10 3/ RT], k3 = (2.23 ± 1.27) × 10 -11 exp[-(16.0 ± 1.6) × 10 3/ RT]. All the rate coefficients display a positive temperature dependence which points to the importance of the irreversibility of the addition mechanism for these reactions. Halogen substitution in the alkenes is discussed in terms of reactivity with O( 3P) and its relation with the ionization potential.

  10. Integer, fractional, and anomalous quantum Hall effects explained with Eyring's rate process theory and free volume concept.

    PubMed

    Hao, Tian

    2017-02-22

    The Hall effects, especially the integer, fractional and anomalous quantum Hall effects, have been addressed using Eyring's rate process theory and free volume concept. The basic assumptions are that the conduction process is a common rate controlled "reaction" process that can be described with Eyring's absolute rate process theory; the mobility of electrons should be dependent on the free volume available for conduction electrons. The obtained Hall conductivity is clearly quantized as with prefactors related to both the magnetic flux quantum number and the magnetic quantum number via the azimuthal quantum number, with and without an externally applied magnetic field. This article focuses on two dimensional (2D) systems, but the approaches developed in this article can be extended to 3D systems.

  11. Pressure dependence of the absolute rate constant for the reaction Cl + C2H2 from 210-361 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brunning, J.; Stief, L. J.

    1985-01-01

    In recent years, considerable attention has been given to the role of chlorine compounds in the catalytic destruction of stratospheric ozone. However, while some reactions have been studied extensively, the kinetic data for the reaction of Cl with C2H2 is sparse with only three known determinations of the rate constant k3. The reactions involved are Cl + C2H2 yields reversibly ClC2H2(asterisk) (3a) and ClC2H2(asterisk) + M yields ClC2H2 + M (3b). In the present study, flash photolysis coupled with chlorine atomic resonance fluorescence have been employed to determine the pressure and temperature dependence of k3 with the third body M = Ar. Room temperature values are also reported for M = N2. The pressure dependence observed in the experiments confirms the expectation that the reaction involves addition of Cl to the unsaturated C2H2 molecule followed by collisional stabilization of the resulting adduct radical.

  12. Absolute rate constants for hydrogen atom transfer from tertiary amides to the cumyloxyl radical: evaluating the role of stereoelectronic effects.

    PubMed

    Salamone, Michela; Milan, Michela; DiLabio, Gino A; Bietti, Massimo

    2014-08-01

    A time-resolved kinetic study of the hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) reactions from a series of alkanamides to the cumyloxyl radical (CumO(•)) was carried out. With N,N-dialkylformamides HAT preferentially occurs from the formyl C-H bond, while in N-formylpyrrolidine HAT mostly occurs from the ring α-C-H bonds. With the acetamides and the alkanamides almost exclusive HAT from the C-H bonds that are α to nitrogen was observed. The results obtained show that alignment between the C-H bond being broken and the amide π-system can lead to significant increases in the HAT rate constant (kH). This finding points toward the important role of stereoelectronic effects on the HAT reactivity and selectivity. The highest kH values were measured for the reactions of CumO(•) with N-acylpyrrolidines. These substrates have ring α-C-H bonds that are held in a conformation that is optimally aligned with the amide π-system, thus allowing for the relatively facile HAT reaction. The lowest kH value was measured for the reaction of N,N-diisobutylacetamide, wherein the steric bulk associated with the N-isobutyl groups increases the energy barrier required to reach the most suitable conformation for HAT. The experimental results are well supported by the computed BDEs for the C-H bonds of the most representative substrates.

  13. Optically based quantification of absolute cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) with high spatial resolution in rodents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaseen, Mohammad A.; Srinivasan, Vivek J.; Sakadžić, Sava; Vinogradov, Sergei A.; Boas, David A.

    2010-02-01

    Measuring oxygen delivery in brain tissue is important for identifying the pathophysiological changes associated with brain injury and various diseases such as cancer, stroke, and Alzheimer's disease. We have developed a multi-modal imaging system for minimally invasive measurement of cerebral oxygenation and blood flow in small animals with high spatial resolution. The system allows for simultaneous measurement of blood flow using Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography, and oxygen partial pressure (pO2) using either confocal or multiphoton phosphorescence lifetime imaging with exogenous porphyrin-based dyes sensitive to dissolved oxygen. Here we present the changes in pO2 and blood flow in superficial cortical vessels of Sprague Dawley rats in response to conditions such as hypoxia, hyperoxia, and functional stimulation. pO2 measurements display considerable heterogeneity over distances that cannot be resolved with more widely used oxygen-monitoring techniques such as BOLD-fMRI. Large increases in blood flow are observed in response to functional stimulation and hypoxia. Our system allows for quantification of cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) with high spatial resolution, providing a better understanding of metabolic dynamics during functional stimulation and under various neuropathologies. Ultimately, better insight into the underlying mechanisms of neuropathologies will facilitate the development of improved therapeutic strategies to minimize damage to brain tissue.

  14. Modeling irradiation creep of graphite using rate theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Apu; Eapen, Jacob; Raj, Anant; Murty, K. L.; Burchell, T. D.

    2016-05-01

    We have examined irradiation induced creep of graphite in the framework of transition state rate theory. Experimental data for two grades of nuclear graphite (H-337 and AGOT) have been analyzed to determine the stress exponent (n) and activation energy (Q) for plastic flow under irradiation. We show that the mean activation energy lies between 0.14 and 0.32 eV with a mean stress-exponent of 1.0 ± 0.2. A stress exponent of unity and the unusually low activation energies strongly indicate a diffusive defect transport mechanism for neutron doses in the range of 3-4 × 1022 n/cm2.

  15. Rate constants from instanton theory via a microcanonical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McConnell, Sean R.; Löhle, Andreas; Kästner, Johannes

    2017-02-01

    Microcanonical instanton theory offers the promise of providing rate constants for chemical reactions including quantum tunneling of atoms over the whole temperature range. We discuss different rate expressions, which require the calculation of stability parameters of the instantons. The traditional way of obtaining these stability parameters is shown to be numerically unstable in practical applications. We provide three alternative algorithms to obtain such stability parameters for non-separable systems, i.e., systems in which the vibrational modes perpendicular to the instanton path couple to movement along the path. We show the applicability of our algorithms on two molecular systems: H2 + OH → H2O + H using a fitted potential energy surface and HNCO + H → NH2CO using a potential obtained on-the-fly from density functional calculations.

  16. Solvent Exchange in Liquid Methanol and Rate Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Dang, Liem X.; Schenter, Gregory K.

    2016-01-01

    To enhance our understanding of the solvent exchange mechanism in liquid methanol, we report a systematic study of this process using molecular dynamics simulations. We use transition state theory, the Impey-Madden-McDonald method, the reactive flux method, and Grote-Hynes theory to compute the rate constants for this process. Solvent coupling was found to dominate, resulting in a significantly small transmission coefficient. We predict a positive activation volume for the methanol exchange process. The essential features of the dynamics of the system as well as the pressure dependence are recovered from a Generalized Langevin Equation description of the dynamics. We find that the dynamics and response to anharmonicity can be decomposed into two time regimes, one corresponding to short time response (< 0.1 ps) and long time response (> 5 ps). An effective characterization of the process results from launching dynamics from the planar hypersurface corresponding to Grote-Hynes theory. This results in improved numerical convergence of correlation functions. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences. The calculations were carried out using computer resources provided by the Office of Basic Energy Sciences.

  17. Statistical rate theory and kinetic energy-resolved ion chemistry: theory and applications.

    PubMed

    Armentrout, P B; Ervin, Kent M; Rodgers, M T

    2008-10-16

    Ion chemistry, first discovered 100 years ago, has profitably been coupled with statistical rate theories, developed about 80 years ago and refined since. In this overview, the application of statistical rate theory to the analysis of kinetic-energy-dependent collision-induced dissociation (CID) reactions is reviewed. This procedure accounts for and quantifies the kinetic shifts that are observed as systems increase in size. The statistical approach developed allows straightforward extension to systems undergoing competitive or sequential dissociations. Such methods can also be applied to the reverse of the CID process, association reactions, as well as to quantitative analysis of ligand exchange processes. Examples of each of these types of reactions are provided and the literature surveyed for successful applications of this statistical approach to provide quantitative thermochemical information. Such applications include metal-ligand complexes, metal clusters, proton-bound complexes, organic intermediates, biological systems, saturated organometallic complexes, and hydrated and solvated species.

  18. Reaction rate theory of radiation exposure:Effects of dose rate on mutation frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bando, Masako; Nakamura, Issei; Manabe, Yuichiro

    2014-03-01

    We revisit the linear no threshold (LNT) hypothesis deduced from the prominent works done by H. J. Muller for the DNA mutation induced by the artificial radiation and by W. L. Russell and E. M. Kelly for that of mega-mouse experiments, developing a new kinetic reaction theory. While the existing theoretical models primarily rely on the dependence of the total dose D on the mutation frequency, the key ingredient in our theory is the dose rate d(t) that accounts for decrease in the mutation rate during the time course of the cellular reactions. The general form for the mutation frequency with the constant dose rate d is simply expressed as, dFm(t)/dt = A - BFm(t) , with A =a0 +a1(d +deff) and B =b0 +b1(d +deff) . We discuss the solution for a most likely case with B > 0 ; Fm(t) = [A/B -Fm(0) ] (1 -e-Bt) +Fm(0) with the control value Fm(0) . We show that all the data of mega-mouse experiments by Russel with different dose rates fall on the universal scaling function Φ(τ) ≡ [Fm(τ) -Fm(0) ]/[ A / B -Fm(0) ] = 1 - exp(- τ) with scaled time τ = Bt . The concept of such a scaling rule provides us with a strong tool to study different species in a unified manner.

  19. Efficiency and credit ratings: a permutation-information-theory analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez Bariviera, Aurelio; Zunino, Luciano; Belén Guercio, M.; Martinez, Lisana B.; Rosso, Osvaldo A.

    2013-08-01

    The role of credit rating agencies has been under severe scrutiny after the subprime crisis. In this paper we explore the relationship between credit ratings and informational efficiency of a sample of thirty nine corporate bonds of US oil and energy companies from April 2008 to November 2012. For this purpose we use a powerful statistical tool, relatively new in the financial literature: the complexity-entropy causality plane. This representation space allows us to graphically classify the different bonds according to their degree of informational efficiency. We find that this classification agrees with the credit ratings assigned by Moody’s. In particular, we detect the formation of two clusters, which correspond to the global categories of investment and speculative grades. Regarding the latter cluster, two subgroups reflect distinct levels of efficiency. Additionally, we also find an intriguing absence of correlation between informational efficiency and firm characteristics. This allows us to conclude that the proposed permutation-information-theory approach provides an alternative practical way to justify bond classification.

  20. Nonideal statistical rate theory formulation to predict evaporation rates from equations of state.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, Atam; Elliott, Janet A W

    2008-11-27

    A method of including nonideal effects in the statistical rate theory (SRT) formulation is presented and a generic equation-of-state based SRT model was developed for predicting evaporation rates. Further, taking the Peng-Robinson equation of state as an example, vapor phase pressures at which particular evaporation rates are expected were calculated, and the predictions were found to be in excellent agreement with the experimental observations for water and octane. A high temperature range (near the critical region) where the previously existing ideal SRT model is expected to yield inaccurate results was identified and predictions (for ethane and butane) were instead made with the Peng-Robinson based SRT model to correct for fluid nonidealities at high temperatures and pressures.

  1. Modeling irradiation creep of graphite using rate theory

    SciTech Connect

    Sarkar, Apu; Eapen, Jacob; Raj, Anant; Murty, K. L.; Burchell, T. D.

    2016-02-20

    In this work we examined irradiation induced creep of graphite in the framework of transition state rate theory. Experimental data for two grades of nuclear graphite (H-337 and AGOT) were analyzed to determine the stress exponent (n) and activation energy (Q) for plastic flow under irradiation. Here we show that the mean activation energy lies between 0.14 and 0.32 eV with a mean stress-exponent of 1.0 ± 0.2. A stress exponent of unity and the unusually low activation energies strongly indicate a diffusive defect transport mechanism for neutron doses in the range of 3-4 x 1022 n/cm2.

  2. Modeling irradiation creep of graphite using rate theory

    DOE PAGES

    Sarkar, Apu; Eapen, Jacob; Raj, Anant; ...

    2016-02-20

    In this work we examined irradiation induced creep of graphite in the framework of transition state rate theory. Experimental data for two grades of nuclear graphite (H-337 and AGOT) were analyzed to determine the stress exponent (n) and activation energy (Q) for plastic flow under irradiation. Here we show that the mean activation energy lies between 0.14 and 0.32 eV with a mean stress-exponent of 1.0 ± 0.2. A stress exponent of unity and the unusually low activation energies strongly indicate a diffusive defect transport mechanism for neutron doses in the range of 3-4 x 1022 n/cm2.

  3. Absolute Determination for the Sodium-22(p,gamma)Magnesium-23 Reaction Rate: Consequences for Nucleosynthesis of Sodium-22 in Novae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sallaska, Anne L.

    2010-11-01

    Hydrodynamic simulations of classical novae on ONe white dwarfs predict substantial production of 22Na. Observation of 22Na decay should be correlated with the corresponding nova because the half life of 22Na is only 2.6 years. The 1275-keV gamma ray from the beta decay of 22Na is, therefore, an excellent diagnostic for the nova phenomenon and a long-sought target of gamma-ray telescopes. Nova simulations determine the maximum 22Na-detection distance to be < 1 kpc for the INTEGRAL spectrometer SPI, consistent with its non-observation to date. However, model estimates are strongly dependent on the thermonuclear rate of the 22Na(p, gamma)23Mg reaction, which is the main destruction mechanism of 22Na in novae. The 22Na(p,gamma)23Mg rate is expected to be dominated by narrow, isolated resonances with Ep < 300 key. The currently employed rate is based on a single set of absolute resonance-strength measurements with Ep ≥ 290 keV, and one relative measurement of resonances with Ep ≥ 214 keV. Recently, a new level has been found in 23Mg which would correspond to a resonance at Ep = 198 keV that might dominate the reaction rate at nova temperatures. We have measured the 22Na(p, gamma) 23Mg resonance strengths directly and absolutely, in addition to resonance energies and branches. Proton beams were produced at the University of Washington and delivered to a specially designed beam line that included rastering and cold vacuum protection of the 22Na-implanted targets (fabricated at TRIUMF-ISAC). Two high-purity germanium detectors were employed and surrounded by anticoincidence shields to reduce cosmic backgrounds. Measurements were made on known 22Na+p resonances, which we observed at laboratory energies Ep = 213, 288, 454, 610 keV and on proposed resonances at Ep = 198, 209, and 232 key. The proposed resonances were not observed, and the upper limit placed on the 198-keV resonance strength indicates that the resonance at Ep = 213 keV still dominates the reaction rate

  4. A Theory of Rate Coding Control by Intrinsic Plasticity Effects

    PubMed Central

    Naudé, J.; Paz, J. T.; Berry, H.; Delord, B.

    2012-01-01

    Intrinsic plasticity (IP) is a ubiquitous activity-dependent process regulating neuronal excitability and a cellular correlate of behavioral learning and neuronal homeostasis. Because IP is induced rapidly and maintained long-term, it likely represents a major determinant of adaptive collective neuronal dynamics. However, assessing the exact impact of IP has remained elusive. Indeed, it is extremely difficult disentangling the complex non-linear interaction between IP effects, by which conductance changes alter neuronal activity, and IP rules, whereby activity modifies conductance via signaling pathways. Moreover, the two major IP effects on firing rate, threshold and gain modulation, remain unknown in their very mechanisms. Here, using extensive simulations and sensitivity analysis of Hodgkin-Huxley models, we show that threshold and gain modulation are accounted for by maximal conductance plasticity of conductance that situate in two separate domains of the parameter space corresponding to sub- and supra-threshold conductance (i.e. activating below or above the spike onset threshold potential). Analyzing equivalent integrate-and-fire models, we provide formal expressions of sensitivities relating to conductance parameters, unraveling unprecedented mechanisms governing IP effects. Our results generalize to the IP of other conductance parameters and allow strong inference for calcium-gated conductance, yielding a general picture that accounts for a large repertoire of experimental observations. The expressions we provide can be combined with IP rules in rate or spiking models, offering a general framework to systematically assess the computational consequences of IP of pharmacologically identified conductance with both fine grain description and mathematical tractability. We provide an example of such IP loop model addressing the important issue of the homeostatic regulation of spontaneous discharge. Because we do not formulate any assumptions on modification rules

  5. Cluster-continuum quasichemical theory calculation of the lithium ion solvation in water, acetonitrile and dimethyl sulfoxide: an absolute single-ion solvation free energy scale.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Nathalia F; Pliego, Josefredo R

    2015-10-28

    Absolute single-ion solvation free energy is a very useful property for understanding solution phase chemistry. The real solvation free energy of an ion depends on its interaction with the solvent molecules and on the net potential inside the solute cavity. The tetraphenyl arsonium-tetraphenyl borate (TATB) assumption as well as the cluster-continuum quasichemical theory (CC-QCT) approach for Li(+) solvation allows access to a solvation scale excluding the net potential. We have determined this free energy scale investigating the solvation of the lithium ion in water (H2O), acetonitrile (CH3CN) and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) solvents via the CC-QCT approach. Our calculations at the MP2 and MP4 levels with basis sets up to the QZVPP+diff quality, and including solvation of the clusters and solvent molecules by the dielectric continuum SMD method, predict the solvation free energy of Li(+) as -116.1, -120.6 and -123.6 kcal mol(-1) in H2O, CH3CN and DMSO solvents, respectively (1 mol L(-1) standard state). These values are compatible with the solvation free energy of the proton of -253.4, -253.2 and -261.1 kcal mol(-1) in H2O, CH3CN and DMSO solvents, respectively. Deviations from the experimental TATB scale are only 1.3 kcal mol(-1) in H2O and 1.8 kcal mol(-1) in DMSO solvents. However, in the case of CH3CN, the deviation reaches a value of 9.2 kcal mol(-1). The present study suggests that the experimental TATB scale is inconsistent for CH3CN. A total of 125 values of the solvation free energy of ions in these three solvents were obtained. These new data should be useful for the development of theoretical solvation models.

  6. Teaching Absolute Value Meaningfully

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wade, Angela

    2012-01-01

    What is the meaning of absolute value? And why do teachers teach students how to solve absolute value equations? Absolute value is a concept introduced in first-year algebra and then reinforced in later courses. Various authors have suggested instructional methods for teaching absolute value to high school students (Wei 2005; Stallings-Roberts…

  7. Validation of absolute axial neutron flux distribution calculations with MCNP with 197Au(n,γ)198Au reaction rate distribution measurements at the JSI TRIGA Mark II reactor.

    PubMed

    Radulović, Vladimir; Štancar, Žiga; Snoj, Luka; Trkov, Andrej

    2014-02-01

    The calculation of axial neutron flux distributions with the MCNP code at the JSI TRIGA Mark II reactor has been validated with experimental measurements of the (197)Au(n,γ)(198)Au reaction rate. The calculated absolute reaction rate values, scaled according to the reactor power and corrected for the flux redistribution effect, are in good agreement with the experimental results. The effect of different cross-section libraries on the calculations has been investigated and shown to be minor.

  8. Absolute Equilibrium Entropy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shebalin, John V.

    1997-01-01

    The entropy associated with absolute equilibrium ensemble theories of ideal, homogeneous, fluid and magneto-fluid turbulence is discussed and the three-dimensional fluid case is examined in detail. A sigma-function is defined, whose minimum value with respect to global parameters is the entropy. A comparison is made between the use of global functions sigma and phase functions H (associated with the development of various H-theorems of ideal turbulence). It is shown that the two approaches are complimentary though conceptually different: H-theorems show that an isolated system tends to equilibrium while sigma-functions allow the demonstration that entropy never decreases when two previously isolated systems are combined. This provides a more complete picture of entropy in the statistical mechanics of ideal fluids.

  9. Kinetics of low-temperature transitions and a reaction rate theory from non-equilibrium distributions.

    PubMed

    Aquilanti, Vincenzo; Coutinho, Nayara Dantas; Carvalho-Silva, Valter Henrique

    2017-04-28

    This article surveys the empirical information which originated both by laboratory experiments and by computational simulations, and expands previous understanding of the rates of chemical processes in the low-temperature range, where deviations from linearity of Arrhenius plots were revealed. The phenomenological two-parameter Arrhenius equation requires improvement for applications where interpolation or extrapolations are demanded in various areas of modern science. Based on Tolman's theorem, the dependence of the reciprocal of the apparent activation energy as a function of reciprocal absolute temperature permits the introduction of a deviation parameter d covering uniformly a variety of rate processes, from those where quantum mechanical tunnelling is significant and d < 0, to those where d > 0, corresponding to the Pareto-Tsallis statistical weights: these generalize the Boltzmann-Gibbs weight, which is recovered for d = 0. It is shown here how the weights arise, relaxing the thermodynamic equilibrium limit, either for a binomial distribution if d > 0 or for a negative binomial distribution if d < 0, formally corresponding to Fermion-like or Boson-like statistics, respectively. The current status of the phenomenology is illustrated emphasizing case studies; specifically (i) the super-Arrhenius kinetics, where transport phenomena accelerate processes as the temperature increases; (ii) the sub-Arrhenius kinetics, where quantum mechanical tunnelling propitiates low-temperature reactivity; (iii) the anti-Arrhenius kinetics, where processes with no energetic obstacles are rate-limited by molecular reorientation requirements. Particular attention is given for case (i) to the treatment of diffusion and viscosity, for case (ii) to formulation of a transition rate theory for chemical kinetics including quantum mechanical tunnelling, and for case (iii) to the stereodirectional specificity of the dynamics of reactions strongly hindered by the

  10. Item Response Theory Analyses of the Parent and Teacher Ratings of the DSM-IV ADHD Rating Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gomez, Rapson

    2008-01-01

    The graded response model (GRM), which is based on item response theory (IRT), was used to evaluate the psychometric properties of the inattention and hyperactivity/impulsivity symptoms in an ADHD rating scale. To accomplish this, parents and teachers completed the DSM-IV ADHD Rating Scale (DARS; Gomez et al., "Journal of Child Psychology and…

  11. Absolutely classical spin states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohnet-Waldraff, F.; Giraud, O.; Braun, D.

    2017-01-01

    We introduce the concept of "absolutely classical" spin states, in analogy to absolutely separable states of bipartite quantum systems. Absolutely classical states are states that remain classical (i.e., a convex sum of projectors on coherent states of a spin j ) under any unitary transformation applied to them. We investigate the maximal size of the ball of absolutely classical states centered on the maximally mixed state and derive a lower bound for its radius as a function of the total spin quantum number. We also obtain a numerical estimate of this maximal radius and compare it to the case of absolutely separable states.

  12. Absolute realization of low BRDF value

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zilong; Liao, Ningfang; Li, Ping; Wang, Yu

    2010-10-01

    Low BRDF value is widespread used in many critical domains such as space and military fairs. These values below 0.1 Sr-1 . So the Absolute realization of these value is the most critical issue in the absolute measurement of BRDF. To develop the Absolute value realization theory of BRDF , defining an arithmetic operators of BRDF , achieving an absolute measurement Eq. of BRDF based on radiance. This is a new theory method to solve the realization problem of low BRDF value. This theory method is realized on a self-designed common double orientation structure in space. By designing an adding structure to extend the range of the measurement system and a control and processing software, Absolute realization of low BRDF value is achieved. A material of low BRDF value is measured in this measurement system and the spectral BRDF value are showed within different angles allover the space. All these values are below 0.4 Sr-1 . This process is a representative procedure about the measurement of low BRDF value. A corresponding uncertainty analysis of this measurement data is given depend on the new theory of absolute realization and the performance of the measurement system. The relative expand uncertainty of the measurement data is 0.078. This uncertainty analysis is suitable for all measurements using the new theory of absolute realization and the corresponding measurement system.

  13. Wheeling rates based on marginal-cost theory

    SciTech Connect

    Merrill, H.M.; Erickson, B.W. )

    1989-11-01

    Knowledge of what rates for wheeling electric power would be, if based on marginal costs, is vital in the debate on how wheeling should be priced. This paper presents the first extensive computations of marginal costs of wheeling, and of rates based on these marginal costs. Sensitivities to losses, constraints, load levels, amount of power wheeled, revenue reconciliation, etc., are examined in the context of two case studies.

  14. MPAA Film Ratings and Film Attendance: A Test of Reactance Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Austin, Bruce A.

    Reactance theory predicts that when a behavioral freedom is restricted or eliminated an individual is motivationally aroused to restore that freedom. This theory served as the basis of a study that investigated whether motion picture ratings, specifically R and X ratings, acted as a source of reactance arousal for high school students. Subjects…

  15. Rating Quality Studies Using Rasch Measurement Theory. Research Report 2013-3

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engelhard, George, Jr.; Wind, Stefanie A.

    2013-01-01

    The major purpose of this study is to examine the quality of ratings assigned to CR (constructed-response) questions in large-scale assessments from the perspective of Rasch Measurement Theory. Rasch Measurement Theory provides a framework for the examination of rating scale category structure that can yield useful information for interpreting the…

  16. An Application of Durkheim's Theory of Suicide to Prison Suicide Rates in the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tartaro, Christine; Lester, David

    2005-01-01

    E. Durkheim (1897) suggested that the societal rate of suicide might be explained by societal factors, such as marriage, divorce, and birth rates. The current study examined male prison suicide rates and suicide rates for men in the total population in the United States and found that variables based on Durkheim's theory of suicide explained…

  17. The Hippocampal Rate Code: Anatomy, Physiology and Theory

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Omar J.; Mehta, Mayank R.

    2011-01-01

    Since the days of Cajal, the CA1 pyramidal cell has arguably received more attention than any other neuron in the mammalian brain. Hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells fire spikes with remarkable spatial and temporal precision, giving rise to the hippocampal rate and temporal codes. However, little is known about how different inputs interact during spatial behavior to generate such robust firing patterns. Here, we review the properties of the rodent hippocampal rate code, and synthesize work from several disciplines to understand the functional anatomy and excitation-inhibition balance that can produce the rate coded outputs of the CA1 pyramidal cell. We argue that both CA3 and entorhinal inputs are crucial for the formation of sharp, sparse CA1 place fields and that precisely timed and dominant inhibition is an equally important factor. PMID:19406485

  18. UNBIASED MOMENT-RATE SPECTRA AND ABSOLUTE SITE EFFECTS IN THE KACHCHH BASIN, INDIA, FROM THE ANALYSIS OF THE AFTERSHOCKS OF THE 2001 Mw 7.6 BHUJ EARTHQUAKE

    SciTech Connect

    Malagnini, L; Bodin, P; Mayeda, K; Akinci, A

    2005-05-04

    What can be learned about absolute site effects on ground motions and about earthquake source spectra from recordings at temporary seismic stations, none of which could be considered a 'reference' (hard rock) site, for which no geotechnical information is available, in a very poorly instrumented region? This challenge motivated our current study of aftershocks of the 2001 Mw 7.6 Bhuj earthquake, in Western India. Crustal attenuation and spreading relationships based on the same data used here were determined in an earlier study. In this paper we decouple the ambiguity between absolute source radiation and site effects by first computing robust estimates of moment-rate spectra of about 200 aftershocks in each of two depth ranges. Using these new estimates of sourcespectra, and our understanding of regional wave propagation, we extract the absolute site terms of the sites of the temporary deployment. Absolute site terms (one for each component of the ground motion, for each station) are computed in an average sense, via an L{sub 1}-norm minimization, and results for each site are averaged over wide ranges of azimuths and takeoff angles. The Bhuj deployment is characterized by a variable shallow geology, mostly of soft sedimentary units. Vertical site terms in the region were observed to be almost featureless and slightly < 1.0 within wide frequency ranges. As a result, H/V spectral ratios mimic the absolute behaviors of absolute horizontal site terms, and they generally overpredict them. On the contrary, with respect to the results for sedimentary rock sites (limestone, dolomite) obtained by Malagnini et al. (2004), H/V spectral ratios in their study did not have much in common with absolute horizontal site terms. Spectral ratios between the vector sum of the computed horizontal site terms for the temporary deployment with respect to the same quantity computed at the hardest rock station available, BAC1, are seriously biased by its non-flat, non-unitary site response

  19. Absolute nuclear material assay

    DOEpatents

    Prasad, Manoj K [Pleasanton, CA; Snyderman, Neal J [Berkeley, CA; Rowland, Mark S [Alamo, CA

    2012-05-15

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  20. Absolute nuclear material assay

    DOEpatents

    Prasad, Manoj K.; Snyderman, Neal J.; Rowland, Mark S.

    2010-07-13

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  1. Absolute calibration of optical tweezers

    SciTech Connect

    Viana, N.B.; Mazolli, A.; Maia Neto, P.A.; Nussenzveig, H.M.; Rocha, M.S.; Mesquita, O.N.

    2006-03-27

    As a step toward absolute calibration of optical tweezers, a first-principles theory of trapping forces with no adjustable parameters, corrected for spherical aberration, is experimentally tested. Employing two very different setups, we find generally very good agreement for the transverse trap stiffness as a function of microsphere radius for a broad range of radii, including the values employed in practice, and at different sample chamber depths. The domain of validity of the WKB ('geometrical optics') approximation to the theory is verified. Theoretical predictions for the trapping threshold, peak position, depth variation, multiple equilibria, and 'jump' effects are also confirmed.

  2. Black hole accretion versus star formation rate: theory confronts observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volonteri, Marta; Capelo, Pedro R.; Netzer, Hagai; Bellovary, Jillian; Dotti, Massimo; Governato, Fabio

    2015-09-01

    We use a suite of hydrodynamical simulations of galaxy mergers to compare star formation rate (SFR) and black hole accretion rate (BHAR) for galaxies before the interaction (`stochastic' phase), during the `merger' proper, lasting ˜0.2-0.3 Gyr, and in the `remnant' phase. We calculate the bivariate distribution of SFR and BHAR and define the regions in the SFR-BHAR plane that the three phases occupy. No strong correlation between BHAR and galaxy-wide SFR is found. A possible exception are galaxies with the highest SFR and the highest BHAR. We also bin the data in the same way used in several observational studies, by either measuring the mean SFR for AGN in different luminosity bins, or the mean BHAR for galaxies in bins of SFR. We find that the apparent contradiction or SFR versus BHAR for observed samples of AGN and star-forming galaxies is actually caused by binning effects. The two types of samples use different projections of the full bivariate distribution, and the full information would lead to unambiguous interpretation. We also find that a galaxy can be classified as AGN-dominated up to 1.5 Gyr after the merger-driven starburst took place. Our study is consistent with the suggestion that most low-luminosity AGN hosts do not show morphological disturbances.

  3. Elevated rates of atypical handedness in paedophilia: theory and implications.

    PubMed

    Fazio, Rachel L; Lykins, Amy D; Cantor, James M

    2014-01-01

    Multiple factors determine handedness including genetics, prenatal stress and post-natal environmental conditions. Atypical handedness, whether manifest as increased sinistrality or decreased strength of lateral preference, has been noted in a wide variety of populations with neuropathology. Those with atypical sexual preferences, specifically paedophilia, also manifest reduced rates of right-handedness. This paper uses the largest sample of phallometrically assessed men to date to establish the pattern of atypical handedness in paedophilia. Specifically, whereas prior research has largely characterized participants dichotomously as right-handed or non-right-handed and/or used self-report of writing hand, this paper expands upon such reports by using the Edinburgh Handedness Inventory's laterality quotient. Participants' handedness and phallometrically assessed sexual preference were analyzed both as continuous and categorical variables, and the responses of those scoring in the range of ambiguous-handedness were evaluated to ascertain whether they were ambiguously handed or more accurately described as mixed-handed. Results indicated those producing scores in the range of ambiguous-handedness demonstrated response patterns consistent with ambiguous-handedness, rather than mixed-handedness. Paedophiles demonstrated high rates of non-right-handedness primarily manifested as sinistrality, whereas those who had a sexual preference for pubescent children evidenced increased ambiguous-handedness. Results support a view of ambiguous-handedness as less pathological than previously hypothesized, and of a neurodevelopmental origin of paraphilic sexual preferences.

  4. An alternative theory on relaxation rates in cuprate superconductors.

    PubMed

    Luo, Nie; Miley, George H

    2009-01-14

    Transport properties of high transition temperature (high-T(c)) superconductors apparently demonstrate two distinct relaxation rates in the normal state. We propose that this superficial inconsistence can be resolved with an effective carrier (quasiparticle) density n almost linear in temperature T. Experimental evidence both for and against this explanation is analyzed and we conclude that this offers a clear yet promising scenario. Band structure calculation was utilized to determine the Fermi surface topology of the cuprate superconductor versus doping. The results demonstrate that an electron-like portion of the Fermi surface exists in a wide range of doping levels even for a p-type superconductor, exemplified by La(2-x)Sr(x)CuO(4-δ) (LSCO). Such electron-like segments have also been confirmed in recent photoemission electron spectroscopy. The Coulomb interaction between electron-like and hole-like quasiparticles then forms a bound state, similar to that of an exciton. As a result the number of charge carriers upon cooling temperature is decreased. A quantum mechanical calculation of scattering cross section demonstrates that a T(2) relaxation rate is born out of an electron-hole collision process. Above the pseudogap temperature T(*) the normal state of high-T(c) cuprates is close to a two-component Fermi liquid. It, however, assumes non-Fermi-liquid behavior below T(*).

  5. Temperature dependence for the absolute rate constant for the reaction CH/sub 2/OH + O/sub 2/. -->. HO/sub 2/ + H/sub 2/CO from 215 to 300 K

    SciTech Connect

    Nesbitt, F.L.; Payne, W.A.; Stief, L.J.

    1988-07-14

    The absolute rate constant for the reaction CH/sub 2/OH + O/sub 2/ ..-->.. HO/sub 2/ + H/sub 2/CO has been determined from 215 to 300 K in a discharge flow system at 1-Torr pressure. The decay of CH/sub 2/OH was monitored in excess O/sub 2/ by collision-free sampling mass spectrometry. The temperature dependence observed is quite different from the usual Arrhenius form. For the 215-250 K interval, an activation energy of 3.4 kcal/mol is obtained. Above 250 K, the rate constant increases at a slower rate; previous high-temperature studies (1000-2000 K) again show a faster increase in the rate constant. A possible explanation for these observations is that the reaction mechanism changes from addition at low temperature to direct abstraction at high temperatures.

  6. Higher Order Convergence Rates in Theory of Homogenization: Equations of Non-divergence Form

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sunghan; Lee, Ki-Ahm

    2016-03-01

    We establish higher order convergence rates in the theory of periodic homogenization of both linear and fully nonlinear uniformly elliptic equations of non-divergence form. The rates are achieved by involving higher order correctors which fix the errors occurring both in the interior and on the boundary layer of our physical domain. The proof is based on a viscosity method and a new regularity theory which captures the stability of the correctors with respect to the shape of our limit profile.

  7. Absolute instability of the Gaussian wake profile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hultgren, Lennart S.; Aggarwal, Arun K.

    1987-01-01

    Linear parallel-flow stability theory has been used to investigate the effect of viscosity on the local absolute instability of a family of wake profiles with a Gaussian velocity distribution. The type of local instability, i.e., convective or absolute, is determined by the location of a branch-point singularity with zero group velocity of the complex dispersion relation for the instability waves. The effects of viscosity were found to be weak for values of the wake Reynolds number, based on the center-line velocity defect and the wake half-width, larger than about 400. Absolute instability occurs only for sufficiently large values of the center-line wake defect. The critical value of this parameter increases with decreasing wake Reynolds number, thereby indicating a shrinking region of absolute instability with decreasing wake Reynolds number. If backflow is not allowed, absolute instability does not occur for wake Reynolds numbers smaller than about 38.

  8. First experimental determination of the absolute gas-phase rate coefficient for the reaction of OH with 4-hydroxy-2-butanone (4H2B) at 294 K by vapor pressure measurements of 4H2B.

    PubMed

    El Dib, Gisèle; Sleiman, Chantal; Canosa, André; Travers, Daniel; Courbe, Jonathan; Sawaya, Terufat; Mokbel, Ilham; Chakir, Abdelkhaleq

    2013-01-10

    The reaction of the OH radicals with 4-hydroxy-2-butanone was investigated in the gas phase using an absolute rate method at room temperature and over the pressure range 10-330 Torr in He and air as diluent gases. The rate coefficients were measured using pulsed laser photolysis (PLP) of H(2)O(2) to produce OH and laser induced fluorescence (LIF) to measure the OH temporal profile. An average value of (4.8 ± 1.2) × 10(-12) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) was obtained. The OH quantum yield following the 266 nm pulsed laser photolysis of 4-hydroxy-2-butanone was measured for the first time and found to be about 0.3%. The investigated kinetic study required accurate measurements of the vapor pressure of 4-hydroxy-2-butanone, which was measured using a static apparatus. The vapor pressure was found to range from 0.056 to 7.11 Torr between 254 and 323 K. This work provides the first absolute rate coefficients for the reaction of 4-hydroxy-2-butanone with OH and the first experimental saturated vapor pressures of the studied compound below 311 K. The obtained results are compared to those of the literature and the effects of the experimental conditions on the reactivity are examined. The calculated tropospheric lifetime obtained in this work suggests that once emitted into the atmosphere, 4H2B may contribute to the photochemical pollution in a local or regional scale.

  9. Chemical Reaction Rate Coefficients from Ring Polymer Molecular Dynamics: Theory and Practical Applications.

    PubMed

    Suleimanov, Yury V; Aoiz, F Javier; Guo, Hua

    2016-11-03

    This Feature Article presents an overview of the current status of ring polymer molecular dynamics (RPMD) rate theory. We first analyze the RPMD approach and its connection to quantum transition-state theory. We then focus on its practical applications to prototypical chemical reactions in the gas phase, which demonstrate how accurate and reliable RPMD is for calculating thermal chemical reaction rate coefficients in multifarious cases. This review serves as an important checkpoint in RPMD rate theory development, which shows that RPMD is shifting from being just one of recent novel ideas to a well-established and validated alternative to conventional techniques for calculating thermal chemical rate coefficients. We also hope it will motivate further applications of RPMD to various chemical reactions.

  10. Chemical Reaction Rate Coefficients from Ring Polymer Molecular Dynamics: Theory and Practical Applications

    DOE PAGES

    Suleimanov, Yury V.; Aoiz, F. Javier; Guo, Hua

    2016-11-03

    This Feature Article presents an overview of the current status of ring polymer molecular dynamics (RPMD) rate theory. We first analyze the RPMD approach and its connection to quantum transition-state theory. We then focus on its practical applications to prototypical chemical reactions in the gas phase, which demonstrate how accurate and reliable RPMD is for calculating thermal chemical reaction rate coefficients in multifarious cases. This review serves as an important checkpoint in RPMD rate theory development, which shows that RPMD is shifting from being just one of recent novel ideas to a well-established and validated alternative to conventional techniques formore » calculating thermal chemical rate coefficients. We also hope it will motivate further applications of RPMD to various chemical reactions.« less

  11. Reaction rate theory: What it was, where is it today, and where is it going?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollak, Eli; Talkner, Peter

    2005-06-01

    A brief history is presented, outlining the development of rate theory during the past century. Starting from Arrhenius [Z. Phys. Chem. 4, 226 (1889)], we follow especially the formulation of transition state theory by Wigner [Z. Phys. Chem. Abt. B 19, 203 (1932)] and Eyring [J. Chem. Phys. 3, 107 (1935)]. Transition state theory (TST) made it possible to obtain quick estimates for reaction rates for a broad variety of processes even during the days when sophisticated computers were not available. Arrhenius' suggestion that a transition state exists which is intermediate between reactants and products was central to the development of rate theory. Although Wigner gave an abstract definition of the transition state as a surface of minimal unidirectional flux, it took almost half of a century until the transition state was precisely defined by Pechukas [Dynamics of Molecular Collisions B, edited by W. H. Miller (Plenum, New York, 1976)], but even this only in the realm of classical mechanics. Eyring, considered by many to be the father of TST, never resolved the question as to the definition of the activation energy for which Arrhenius became famous. In 1978, Chandler [J. Chem. Phys. 68, 2959 (1978)] finally showed that especially when considering condensed phases, the activation energy is a free energy, it is the barrier height in the potential of mean force felt by the reacting system. Parallel to the development of rate theory in the chemistry community, Kramers published in 1940 [Physica (Amsterdam) 7, 284 (1940)] a seminal paper on the relation between Einstein's theory of Brownian motion [Einstein, Ann. Phys. 17, 549 (1905)] and rate theory. Kramers' paper provided a solution for the effect of friction on reaction rates but left us also with some challenges. He could not derive a uniform expression for the rate, valid for all values of the friction coefficient, known as the Kramers turnover problem. He also did not establish the connection between his approach

  12. Estimating Absolute Site Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Malagnini, L; Mayeda, K M; Akinci, A; Bragato, P L

    2004-07-15

    The authors use previously determined direct-wave attenuation functions as well as stable, coda-derived source excitation spectra to isolate the absolute S-wave site effect for the horizontal and vertical components of weak ground motion. They used selected stations in the seismic network of the eastern Alps, and find the following: (1) all ''hard rock'' sites exhibited deamplification phenomena due to absorption at frequencies ranging between 0.5 and 12 Hz (the available bandwidth), on both the horizontal and vertical components; (2) ''hard rock'' site transfer functions showed large variability at high-frequency; (3) vertical-motion site transfer functions show strong frequency-dependence, and (4) H/V spectral ratios do not reproduce the characteristics of the true horizontal site transfer functions; (5) traditional, relative site terms obtained by using reference ''rock sites'' can be misleading in inferring the behaviors of true site transfer functions, since most rock sites have non-flat responses due to shallow heterogeneities resulting from varying degrees of weathering. They also use their stable source spectra to estimate total radiated seismic energy and compare against previous results. they find that the earthquakes in this region exhibit non-constant dynamic stress drop scaling which gives further support for a fundamental difference in rupture dynamics between small and large earthquakes. To correct the vertical and horizontal S-wave spectra for attenuation, they used detailed regional attenuation functions derived by Malagnini et al. (2002) who determined frequency-dependent geometrical spreading and Q for the region. These corrections account for the gross path effects (i.e., all distance-dependent effects), although the source and site effects are still present in the distance-corrected spectra. The main goal of this study is to isolate the absolute site effect (as a function of frequency) by removing the source spectrum (moment-rate spectrum) from

  13. Universal Cosmic Absolute and Modern Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostro, Ludwik

    The official Sciences, especially all natural sciences, respect in their researches the principle of methodic naturalism i.e. they consider all phenomena as entirely natural and therefore in their scientific explanations they do never adduce or cite supernatural entities and forces. The purpose of this paper is to show that Modern Science has its own self-existent, self-acting, and self-sufficient Natural All-in Being or Omni-Being i.e. the entire Nature as a Whole that justifies the scientific methodic naturalism. Since this Natural All-in Being is one and only It should be considered as the own scientifically justified Natural Absolute of Science and should be called, in my opinion, the Universal Cosmic Absolute of Modern Science. It will be also shown that the Universal Cosmic Absolute is ontologically enormously stratified and is in its ultimate i.e. in its most fundamental stratum trans-reistic and trans-personal. It means that in its basic stratum. It is neither a Thing or a Person although It contains in Itself all things and persons with all other sentient and conscious individuals as well, On the turn of the 20th century the Science has begun to look for a theory of everything, for a final theory, for a master theory. In my opinion the natural Universal Cosmic Absolute will constitute in such a theory the radical all penetrating Ultimate Basic Reality and will substitute step by step the traditional supernatural personal Absolute.

  14. Gender equality and women's absolute status: a test of the feminist models of rape.

    PubMed

    Martin, Kimberly; Vieraitis, Lynne M; Britto, Sarah

    2006-04-01

    Feminist theory predicts both a positive and negative relationship between gender equality and rape rates. Although liberal and radical feminist theory predicts that gender equality should ameliorate rape victimization, radical feminist theorists have argued that gender equality may increase rape in the form of male backlash. Alternatively, Marxist criminologists focus on women's absolute socioeconomic status rather than gender equality as a predictor of rape rates, whereas socialist feminists combine both radical and Marxist perspectives. This study uses factor analysis to overcome multicollinearity limitations of past studies while exploring the relationship between women's absolute and relative socioeconomic status on rape rates in major U.S. cities using 2000 census data. The findings indicate support for both the Marxist and radical feminist explanations of rape but no support for the ameliorative hypothesis. These findings support a more inclusive socialist feminist theory that takes both Marxist and radical feminist hypotheses into account.

  15. A numerical basis for strain-gradient plasticity theory: Rate-independent and rate-dependent formulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, K. L.; Niordson, C. F.

    2014-02-01

    A numerical model formulation of the higher order flow theory (rate-independent) by Fleck and Willis [2009. A mathematical basis for strain-gradient plasticity theory - part II: tensorial plastic multiplier. Journal of the Mechanics and Physics of Solids 57, 1045-1057.], that allows for elastic-plastic loading/unloading and the interaction of multiple plastic zones, is proposed. The predicted model response is compared to the corresponding rate-dependent version of visco-plastic origin, and coinciding results are obtained in the limit of small strain-rate sensitivity. First, (i) the evolution of a single plastic zone is analyzed to illustrate the agreement with earlier published results, whereafter examples of (ii) multiple plastic zone interaction, and (iii) elastic-plastic loading/unloading are presented. Here, the simple shear problem of an infinite slab constrained between rigid plates is considered, and the effect of strain gradients, strain hardening and rate sensitivity is brought out. For clarity of results, a 1D model is constructed following a procedure suitable for generalization to 2D and 3D.

  16. Optomechanics for absolute rotation detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davuluri, Sankar

    2016-07-01

    In this article, we present an application of optomechanical cavity for the absolute rotation detection. The optomechanical cavity is arranged in a Michelson interferometer in such a way that the classical centrifugal force due to rotation changes the length of the optomechanical cavity. The change in the cavity length induces a shift in the frequency of the cavity mode. The phase shift corresponding to the frequency shift in the cavity mode is measured at the interferometer output to estimate the angular velocity of absolute rotation. We derived an analytic expression to estimate the minimum detectable rotation rate in our scheme for a given optomechanical cavity. Temperature dependence of the rotation detection sensitivity is studied.

  17. Reflectance spectroscopy: application of the Kubelka-Munk theory to the rates of photoprocesses of powders.

    PubMed

    Simmons, E L

    1976-04-01

    The Kubelka-Munk theory of reflectance spectroscopy is used to derive an approximate equation that describes the rate of the photoprocess of a powdered sample in terms of the remission function. The equation is compared with one obtained using the particle model theory of diffuse reflectance and with experimental data for the photochemical reaction of powdered K(3)[Fe(C(2)O(4))(3)]-3H(2)O.

  18. Absolute rate constants for the quenching of reactive excited states by melanin and related 5,6-dihydroxyindole metabolites: implications for their antioxidant activity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, X; Erb, C; Flammer, J; Nau, W M

    2000-05-01

    The triplet-excited state of benzophenone and the singlet-excited state of 2,3-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]oct-2-ene (Fluorazophore-P) have been employed as kinetic probes to obtain information on the antioxidant activity of the skin and eye pigment melanin and its biogenetic precursors 5,6-dihydroxyindole (DHI) and 5,6-dihydroxyindole-2-carboxylic acid (DHICA). The excited states were generated by the laser-flash photolysis technique and their reaction kinetics was examined by time-resolved transient absorption or fluorescence spectroscopy, respectively. The reaction between triplet benzophenone and DHI produced with unit efficiency the corresponding 6O-centered semiquinone radical, which was characterized by its characteristic transient absorption. The quenching rate constants for DHI (3.1-8.4 x 10(9) M-1 s-1) and DHICA (3.3-5.5 x 10(9) M-1 s-1) were near the diffusion-controlled limit, indicating excellent antioxidant properties. Kinetic solvent effects were observed. The reactivity of synthetic melanin, assessed through the quenching rate constant of Fluorazophore-P and normalized to the number of monomer units, was more than one order of magnitude lower (2.7 x 10(8) M-1 s-1) than that of its precursors. The trend of the quenching rate constants, i.e. DHI > DHICA approximately alpha-tocopherol > melanin, along with the preferential solubility of DHICA in aqueous environments, serves to account for several experimental results from biochemical studies on the inhibition of lipid peroxidation by these natural antioxidants.

  19. Absolute neutrino mass scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capelli, Silvia; Di Bari, Pasquale

    2013-04-01

    Neutrino oscillation experiments firmly established non-vanishing neutrino masses, a result that can be regarded as a strong motivation to extend the Standard Model. In spite of being the lightest massive particles, neutrinos likely represent an important bridge to new physics at very high energies and offer new opportunities to address some of the current cosmological puzzles, such as the matter-antimatter asymmetry of the Universe and Dark Matter. In this context, the determination of the absolute neutrino mass scale is a key issue within modern High Energy Physics. The talks in this parallel session well describe the current exciting experimental activity aiming to determining the absolute neutrino mass scale and offer an overview of a few models beyond the Standard Model that have been proposed in order to explain the neutrino masses giving a prediction for the absolute neutrino mass scale and solving the cosmological puzzles.

  20. Kinetics of O(1D) + H2O and O(1D) + H2: absolute rate coefficients and O(3P) yields between 227 and 453 K.

    PubMed

    Vranckx, Stijn; Peeters, Jozef; Carl, Shaun

    2010-08-28

    The rate coefficients for the crucial atmospheric reactions of O((1)D) with H(2)O and H(2), k(1) and k(2), were measured over a wide temperature range using O((1)D) detection based on the chemiluminescence reaction of O((1)D) with C(2)H. Analyzing the decays of the chemiluminescence intensities yielded a value for k(1)(T) of (1.70 x 10(-10)exp[36 K/T]) cm(3) s(-1). Multiplying or dividing k(1)(T) by a factor f(T) = 1.04 exp(5.59(|1 K/T- 1/287|)), gives the 95% confidence limits; our new determination, in good agreement with previous studies, further reduces the uncertainty in k(1). An extended study of k(2) yielded a temperature independent rate constant of (1.35 +/- 0.05) x 10(-10) cm(3) s(-1). This precise value, based on an extended set of determinations with very low scatter, is significantly larger than the current recommendations, as were two other recent k(2) determinations. Secondly, the fractions of O((1)D) quenched to O((3)P) by H(2)O and H(2), k(1b)/k(1) and k(2b)/k(2), were precisely determined from fits to chemiluminescence decays. A temperature-independent value for k(1b)/k(1) of 0.010 +/- 0.003 was found. For the quenching fraction k(2b)/k(2) a value of 0.007 +/- 0.007 was obtained at room temperature. Both determinations are significantly smaller than values and upper limits from previous studies.

  1. The absolute path command

    SciTech Connect

    Moody, A.

    2012-05-11

    The ap command traveres all symlinks in a given file, directory, or executable name to identify the final absolute path. It can print just the final path, each intermediate link along with the symlink chan, and the permissions and ownership of each directory component in the final path. It has functionality similar to "which", except that it shows the final path instead of the first path. It is also similar to "pwd", but it can provide the absolute path to a relative directory from the current working directory.

  2. Which Is Better at Predicting Quantum-Tunneling Rates: Quantum Transition-State Theory or Free-Energy Instanton Theory?

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanchuan; Stecher, Thomas; Cvitaš, Marko T; Althorpe, Stuart C

    2014-11-20

    Quantum transition-state theory (QTST) and free-energy instanton theory (FEIT) are two closely related methods for estimating the quantum rate coefficient from the free-energy at the reaction barrier. In calculations on one-dimensional models, FEIT typically gives closer agreement than QTST with the exact quantum results at all temperatures below the crossover to deep tunneling, suggesting that FEIT is a better approximation than QTST in this regime. Here we show that this simple trend does not hold for systems of greater dimensionality. We report tests on several collinear and three-dimensional reactions, in which QTST outperforms FEIT over a range of temperatures below crossover, which can extend down to half the crossover temperature (below which FEIT outperforms QTST). This suggests that QTST-based methods such as ring-polymer molecular dynamics (RPMD) may often give closer agreement with the exact quantum results than FEIT.

  3. On the quantum mechanical theory of collisional recombination rates, II. Beyond the strong collision approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, W.H.

    1995-07-01

    A quantum mechanical theory of collisional recombination (within the Lindemann mechanism, A + B {leftrightarrow} AB*, AB* + M {yields} AB + M) is presented which provides a proper quantum description of the A + B collision dynamics and treats the M + AB* inelastic scattering within the impact approximation (the quantum analog of a classical master equation treatment). The most rigorous version of the theory is similar in structure to the impact theory of spectral line broadening and involves generalized (4-index) rate constants for describing M + AB* collisions. A simplified version is also presented which involves only the normal (2-index) inelastic rate constants for M + AB* scattering but which also retains a proper quantum description of the A + B dynamics.

  4. Some Promising Early Results from a Rudimentary Latent-Trait Theory of Performance Rating.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cason, Gerald J.; Cason, Carolyn L.

    A theory is discussed in which observed performance ratings are derived from the distance between a rater reference point and subject performance point located on a postulated equal-interval scale and a postulated s-shaped rater characteristic curve, operationalized as the normal ogive. Least-squares estimates of rater (nR=47, 31, and 29) and…

  5. Experimental verification of vapor deposition rate theory in high velocity burner rigs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gokoglu, Suleyman A.; Santoro, Gilbert J.

    1985-01-01

    The main objective has been the experimental verification of the corrosive vapor deposition theory in high-temperature, high-velocity environments. Towards this end a Mach 0.3 burner-rig appartus was built to measure deposition rates from salt-seeded (mostly Na salts) combustion gases on the internally cooled cylindrical collector. Deposition experiments are underway.

  6. The Impact of Implicit Self-Theory on Rated Creativity in Third- and Sixth-Graders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brass, Jillian; Niu, Weihua

    2016-01-01

    A total of 114 3rd- and 6th-graders from a suburban elementary school participated in a study examining the influence of implicit self-theories on rated creativity in the domains of art and literature in a quasi-experiment. Creativity was measured via the Consensual Assessment Technique. Participants were divided into two groups and received…

  7. Generalization of the Activated Complex Theory of Reaction Rates. II. Classical Mechanical Treatment

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Marcus, R. A.

    1964-01-01

    In its usual classical form activated complex theory assumes a particular expression for the kinetic energy of the reacting system -- one associated with a rectilinear motion along the reaction coordinate. The derivation of the rate expression given in the present paper is based on the general kinetic energy expression.

  8. Implementation of Laminate Theory Into Strain Rate Dependent Micromechanics Analysis of Polymer Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, Robert K.

    2000-01-01

    A research program is in progress to develop strain rate dependent deformation and failure models for the analysis of polymer matrix composites subject to impact loads. Previously, strain rate dependent inelastic constitutive equations developed to model the polymer matrix were implemented into a mechanics of materials based micromechanics method. In the current work, the computation of the effective inelastic strain in the micromechanics model was modified to fully incorporate the Poisson effect. The micromechanics equations were also combined with classical laminate theory to enable the analysis of symmetric multilayered laminates subject to in-plane loading. A quasi-incremental trapezoidal integration method was implemented to integrate the constitutive equations within the laminate theory. Verification studies were conducted using an AS4/PEEK composite using a variety of laminate configurations and strain rates. The predicted results compared well with experimentally obtained values.

  9. Item response theory analyses of the parent and teacher ratings of the DSM-IV ADHD rating scale.

    PubMed

    Gomez, Rapson

    2008-08-01

    The graded response model (GRM), which is based on item response theory (IRT), was used to evaluate the psychometric properties of the inattention and hyperactivity/impulsivity symptoms in an ADHD rating scale. To accomplish this, parents and teachers completed the DSM-IV ADHD Rating Scale (DARS; Gomez et al., Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 40, 265-274, 1999) for a group of 1,475 primary school-aged children. The results for the discrimination parameters showed that all symptoms for both groups of respondents were generally good for discriminating their respective latent traits. For virtually all symptoms, their threshold values showed moderate to large increases in the level of the latent trait at each subsequent response dichotomy, with the symptoms being especially good at representing the appropriate traits from mean to moderately high trait levels. The item information function values for most symptoms indicated reasonable reliability from, approximately, the mean trait levels to moderately high trait levels. These findings indicate good psychometric properties for the parent and teacher ratings of the DARS. The implications of the findings for the use of the DARS and other similar scales are discussed.

  10. Large-scale dynamo growth rates from numerical simulations and implications for mean-field theories.

    PubMed

    Park, Kiwan; Blackman, Eric G; Subramanian, Kandaswamy

    2013-05-01

    Understanding large-scale magnetic field growth in turbulent plasmas in the magnetohydrodynamic limit is a goal of magnetic dynamo theory. In particular, assessing how well large-scale helical field growth and saturation in simulations match those predicted by existing theories is important for progress. Using numerical simulations of isotropically forced turbulence without large-scale shear with its implications, we focus on several additional aspects of this comparison: (1) Leading mean-field dynamo theories which break the field into large and small scales predict that large-scale helical field growth rates are determined by the difference between kinetic helicity and current helicity with no dependence on the nonhelical energy in small-scale magnetic fields. Our simulations show that the growth rate of the large-scale field from fully helical forcing is indeed unaffected by the presence or absence of small-scale magnetic fields amplified in a precursor nonhelical dynamo. However, because the precursor nonhelical dynamo in our simulations produced fields that were strongly subequipartition with respect to the kinetic energy, we cannot yet rule out the potential influence of stronger nonhelical small-scale fields. (2) We have identified two features in our simulations which cannot be explained by the most minimalist versions of two-scale mean-field theory: (i) fully helical small-scale forcing produces significant nonhelical large-scale magnetic energy and (ii) the saturation of the large-scale field growth is time delayed with respect to what minimalist theory predicts. We comment on desirable generalizations to the theory in this context and future desired work.

  11. Generalization of the Activated Complex Theory of Reaction Rates. I. Quantum Mechanical Treatment

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Marcus, R. A.

    1964-01-01

    In its usual form activated complex theory assumes a quasi-equilibrium between reactants and activated complex, a separable reaction coordinate, a Cartesian reaction coordinate, and an absence of interaction of rotation with internal motion in the complex. In the present paper a rate expression is derived without introducing the Cartesian assumption. The expression bears a formal resemblance to the usual one and reduces to it when the added assumptions of the latter are introduced.

  12. Electronic Absolute Cartesian Autocollimator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leviton, Douglas B.

    2006-01-01

    An electronic absolute Cartesian autocollimator performs the same basic optical function as does a conventional all-optical or a conventional electronic autocollimator but differs in the nature of its optical target and the manner in which the position of the image of the target is measured. The term absolute in the name of this apparatus reflects the nature of the position measurement, which, unlike in a conventional electronic autocollimator, is based absolutely on the position of the image rather than on an assumed proportionality between the position and the levels of processed analog electronic signals. The term Cartesian in the name of this apparatus reflects the nature of its optical target. Figure 1 depicts the electronic functional blocks of an electronic absolute Cartesian autocollimator along with its basic optical layout, which is the same as that of a conventional autocollimator. Referring first to the optical layout and functions only, this or any autocollimator is used to measure the compound angular deviation of a flat datum mirror with respect to the optical axis of the autocollimator itself. The optical components include an illuminated target, a beam splitter, an objective or collimating lens, and a viewer or detector (described in more detail below) at a viewing plane. The target and the viewing planes are focal planes of the lens. Target light reflected by the datum mirror is imaged on the viewing plane at unit magnification by the collimating lens. If the normal to the datum mirror is parallel to the optical axis of the autocollimator, then the target image is centered on the viewing plane. Any angular deviation of the normal from the optical axis manifests itself as a lateral displacement of the target image from the center. The magnitude of the displacement is proportional to the focal length and to the magnitude (assumed to be small) of the angular deviation. The direction of the displacement is perpendicular to the axis about which the

  13. Absolute airborne gravimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumann, Henri

    This work consists of a feasibility study of a first stage prototype airborne absolute gravimeter system. In contrast to relative systems, which are using spring gravimeters, the measurements acquired by absolute systems are uncorrelated and the instrument is not suffering from problems like instrumental drift, frequency response of the spring and possible variation of the calibration factor. The major problem we had to resolve were to reduce the influence of the non-gravitational accelerations included in the measurements. We studied two different approaches to resolve it: direct mechanical filtering, and post-processing digital compensation. The first part of the work describes in detail the different mechanical passive filters of vibrations, which were studied and tested in the laboratory and later in a small truck in movement. For these tests as well as for the airborne measurements an absolute gravimeter FG5-L from Micro-G Ltd was used together with an Inertial navigation system Litton-200, a vertical accelerometer EpiSensor, and GPS receivers for positioning. These tests showed that only the use of an optical table gives acceptable results. However, it is unable to compensate for the effects of the accelerations of the drag free chamber. The second part describes the strategy of the data processing. It is based on modeling the perturbing accelerations by means of GPS, EpiSensor and INS data. In the third part the airborne experiment is described in detail, from the mounting in the aircraft and data processing to the different problems encountered during the evaluation of the quality and accuracy of the results. In the part of data processing the different steps conducted from the raw apparent gravity data and the trajectories to the estimation of the true gravity are explained. A comparison between the estimated airborne data and those obtained by ground upward continuation at flight altitude allows to state that airborne absolute gravimetry is feasible and

  14. Implementation of Higher Order Laminate Theory Into Strain Rate Dependent Micromechanics Analysis of Polymer Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Heung Soo; Zhu, Linfa; Chattopadhyay, Aditi; Goldberg, Robert K.

    2004-01-01

    A procedure has been developed to investigate the nonlinear response of composite plates under large strain and high strain rate loading. A recently developed strain dependent micromechanics model is extended to account for the shear effects during impact. Four different assumptions of shear deformation effects are investigated to improve the development strain rate dependent micromechanics model. A method to determine through the thickness strain and transverse Poisson's ratio is developed. The revised micromechanics model is implemented into higher order laminate theory. Parametric studies are conducted to investigate transverse shear effects during impact.

  15. Derivation of the chemical-equilibrium rate coefficient using scattering theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mickens, R. E.

    1977-01-01

    Scattering theory is applied to derive the equilibrium rate coefficient for a general homogeneous chemical reaction involving ideal gases. The reaction rate is expressed in terms of the product of a number of normalized momentum distribution functions, the product of the number of molecules with a given internal energy state, and the spin-averaged T-matrix elements. An expression for momentum distribution at equilibrium for an arbitrary molecule is presented, and the number of molecules with a given internal-energy state is represented by an expression which includes the partition function.

  16. Generalized Rate Theory for Void and Bubble Swelling and its Application to Plutonium Metal Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, P. G.; Wolfer, W. G.

    2015-10-16

    In the classical rate theory for void swelling, vacancies and self-interstitials are produced by radiation in equal numbers, and in addition, thermal vacancies are also generated at the sinks, primarily at edge dislocations, at voids, and at grain boundaries. In contrast, due to the high formation energy of self-interstitials for normal metals and alloys, their thermal generation is negligible, as pointed out by Bullough and Perrin [1]. However, recent DFT calculations of the formation energy of self-interstitial atoms in bcc metals [2,3] have revealed that the sum of formation and migration energies for self-interstitials atoms (SIA) is of the same order of magnitude as for vacancies. This is illustrated in Fig. 1 that shows the ratio of the activation energies for thermal generation of SIA and vacancies. For fcc metals, this ratio is around three, but for bcc metals it is around 1.5. Reviewing theoretical predictions of point defect properties in δ-Pu [4], this ratio could possibly be less than one. As a result, thermal generation of SIA in bcc metals and in plutonium must be taken into considerations when modeling the growth of voids and of helium bubbles, and the classical rate theory (CRT) for void and bubble swelling must be extended to a generalized rate theory (GRT).

  17. Phenotypic engineering of sperm-production rate confirms evolutionary predictions of sperm competition theory

    PubMed Central

    Sekii, Kiyono; Vizoso, Dita B.; Kuales, Georg; De Mulder, Katrien; Ladurner, Peter; Schärer, Lukas

    2013-01-01

    Sperm production is a key male reproductive trait and an important parameter in sperm competition theory. Under sperm competition, paternity success is predicted to depend strongly on male allocation to sperm production. Furthermore, because sperm production is inherently costly, individuals should economize in sperm expenditure, and conditional adjustment of the copulation frequency according to their sperm availability may be expected. However, experimental studies showing effects of sperm production on mating behaviour and paternity success have so far been scarce, mainly because sperm production is difficult to manipulate directly in animals. Here, we used phenotypic engineering to manipulate sperm-production rate, by employing dose-dependent RNA interference (RNAi) of a spermatogenesis-specific gene, macbol1, in the free-living flatworm Macrostomum lignano. We demonstrate (i) that our novel dose-dependent RNAi approach allows us to induce high variability in sperm-production rate; (ii) that a reduced sperm-production rate is associated with a decreased copulation frequency, suggesting conditional adjustment of mating behaviour; and (iii) that both sperm production and copulation frequency are important determinants of paternity success in a competitive situation, as predicted by sperm competition theory. Our study clearly documents the potential of phenotypic engineering via dose-dependent RNAi to test quantitative predictions of evolutionary theory. PMID:23446521

  18. Origins of Deviations from Transition-State Theory: Formulating a New Kinetic Rate Law for Dissolution of Silicates

    SciTech Connect

    Andreas Luttge; Jonathan Icenhower

    2005-12-20

    Present models for dissolution of silicate minerals and glasses, based on Transition-State Theory (TST), overestimate the reaction rate as solution compositions approach saturation with respect to the rate-governing solid.

  19. Absolute-structure reports.

    PubMed

    Flack, Howard D

    2013-08-01

    All the 139 noncentrosymmetric crystal structures published in Acta Crystallographica Section C between January 2011 and November 2012 inclusive have been used as the basis of a detailed study of the reporting of absolute structure. These structure determinations cover a wide range of space groups, chemical composition and resonant-scattering contribution. Defining A and D as the average and difference of the intensities of Friedel opposites, their level of fit has been examined using 2AD and selected-D plots. It was found, regardless of the expected resonant-scattering contribution to Friedel opposites, that the Friedel-difference intensities are often dominated by random uncertainty and systematic error. An analysis of data collection strategy is provided. It is found that crystal-structure determinations resulting in a Flack parameter close to 0.5 may not necessarily be from crystals twinned by inversion. Friedifstat is shown to be a robust estimator of the resonant-scattering contribution to Friedel opposites, very little affected by the particular space group of a structure nor by the occupation of special positions. There is considerable confusion in the text of papers presenting achiral noncentrosymmetric crystal structures. Recommendations are provided for the optimal way of treating noncentrosymmetric crystal structures for which the experimenter has no interest in determining the absolute structure.

  20. Quantitative standards for absolute linguistic universals.

    PubMed

    Piantadosi, Steven T; Gibson, Edward

    2014-01-01

    Absolute linguistic universals are often justified by cross-linguistic analysis: If all observed languages exhibit a property, the property is taken to be a likely universal, perhaps specified in the cognitive or linguistic systems of language learners and users. In many cases, these patterns are then taken to motivate linguistic theory. Here, we show that cross-linguistic analysis will very rarely be able to statistically justify absolute, inviolable patterns in language. We formalize two statistical methods--frequentist and Bayesian--and show that in both it is possible to find strict linguistic universals, but that the numbers of independent languages necessary to do so is generally unachievable. This suggests that methods other than typological statistics are necessary to establish absolute properties of human language, and thus that many of the purported universals in linguistics have not received sufficient empirical justification.

  1. Factors influencing variation in physician adenoma detection rates: a theory-based approach

    PubMed Central

    Atkins, Louise; Hunkeler, Enid M.; Jensen, Christopher D.; Michie, Susan; Lee, Jeffrey K.; Doubeni, Chyke A.; Zauber, Ann G.; Levin, Theodore R.; Quinn, Virginia P.; Corley, Douglas A.

    2015-01-01

    Background & Aims Interventions to improve physician adenoma detection rates for colonoscopy have generally not been successful and there are little data on the factors contributing to variation that may be appropriate targets for intervention. We sought to identify factors that may influence variation in detection rates using theory-based tools for understanding behavior. Methods We separately studied gastroenterologists and endoscopy nurses at three Kaiser Permanente Northern California medical centers to identify potentially modifiable factors relevant to physician adenoma detection rate variability using structured group interviews (focus groups) and theory-based tools for understanding behavior and eliciting behavior change: the Capability, Opportunity, and Motivation behavior model; the Theoretical Domains Framework; and the Behavior Change Wheel. Results Nine factors potentially associated with detection rate variability were identified, including six related to capability (uncertainty about which types of polyps to remove; style of endoscopy team leadership; compromised ability to focus during an examination due to distractions; examination technique during withdrawal; difficulty detecting certain types of adenomas; and examiner fatigue and pain), two related to opportunity (perceived pressure due to the number of examinations expected per shift and social pressure to finish examinations before scheduled breaks or the end of a shift), and one related to motivation (valuing a meticulous examination as the top priority). Examples of potential intervention strategies are provided. Conclusions Using theory-based tools, this study identified several novel and potentially modifiable factors relating to capability, opportunity, and motivation that may contribute to adenoma detection rate variability and be appropriate targets for future intervention trials. PMID:26366787

  2. Non-oscillatory flux correlation functions for efficient nonadiabatic rate theory

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, Jeremy O. Thoss, Michael

    2014-08-21

    There is currently much interest in the development of improved trajectory-based methods for the simulation of nonadiabatic processes in complex systems. An important goal for such methods is the accurate calculation of the rate constant over a wide range of electronic coupling strengths and it is often the nonadiabatic, weak-coupling limit, which being far from the Born-Oppenheimer regime, provides the greatest challenge to current methods. We show that in this limit there is an inherent sign problem impeding further development which originates from the use of the usual quantum flux correlation functions, which can be very oscillatory at short times. From linear response theory, we derive a modified flux correlation function for the calculation of nonadiabatic reaction rates, which still rigorously gives the correct result in the long-time limit regardless of electronic coupling strength, but unlike the usual formalism is not oscillatory in the weak-coupling regime. In particular, a trajectory simulation of the modified correlation function is naturally initialized in a region localized about the crossing of the potential energy surfaces. In the weak-coupling limit, a simple link can be found between the dynamics initialized from this transition-state region and an generalized quantum golden-rule transition-state theory, which is equivalent to Marcus theory in the classical harmonic limit. This new correlation function formalism thus provides a platform on which a wide variety of dynamical simulation methods can be built aiding the development of accurate nonadiabatic rate theories applicable to complex systems.

  3. Non-oscillatory flux correlation functions for efficient nonadiabatic rate theory.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Jeremy O; Thoss, Michael

    2014-08-21

    There is currently much interest in the development of improved trajectory-based methods for the simulation of nonadiabatic processes in complex systems. An important goal for such methods is the accurate calculation of the rate constant over a wide range of electronic coupling strengths and it is often the nonadiabatic, weak-coupling limit, which being far from the Born-Oppenheimer regime, provides the greatest challenge to current methods. We show that in this limit there is an inherent sign problem impeding further development which originates from the use of the usual quantum flux correlation functions, which can be very oscillatory at short times. From linear response theory, we derive a modified flux correlation function for the calculation of nonadiabatic reaction rates, which still rigorously gives the correct result in the long-time limit regardless of electronic coupling strength, but unlike the usual formalism is not oscillatory in the weak-coupling regime. In particular, a trajectory simulation of the modified correlation function is naturally initialized in a region localized about the crossing of the potential energy surfaces. In the weak-coupling limit, a simple link can be found between the dynamics initialized from this transition-state region and an generalized quantum golden-rule transition-state theory, which is equivalent to Marcus theory in the classical harmonic limit. This new correlation function formalism thus provides a platform on which a wide variety of dynamical simulation methods can be built aiding the development of accurate nonadiabatic rate theories applicable to complex systems.

  4. Rate Theory Modeling and Simulation of Silicide Fuel at LWR Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Miao, Yinbin; Ye, Bei; Hofman, Gerard; Yacout, Abdellatif; Gamble, Kyle; Mei, Zhi-Gang

    2016-08-29

    As a promising candidate for the accident tolerant fuel (ATF) used in light water reactors (LWRs), the fuel performance of uranium silicide (U3Si2) at LWR conditions needs to be well understood. In this report, rate theory model was developed based on existing experimental data and density functional theory (DFT) calculations so as to predict the fission gas behavior in U3Si2 at LWR conditions. The fission gas behavior of U3Si2 can be divided into three temperature regimes. During steady-state operation, the majority of the fission gas stays in intragranular bubbles, whereas the dominance of intergranular bubbles and fission gas release only occurs beyond 1000 K. The steady-state rate theory model was also used as reference to establish a gaseous swelling correlation of U3Si2 for the BISON code. Meanwhile, the overpressurized bubble model was also developed so that the fission gas behavior at LOCA can be simulated. LOCA simulation showed that intragranular bubbles are still dominant after a 70 second LOCA, resulting in a controllable gaseous swelling. The fission gas behavior of U3Si2 at LWR conditions is benign according to the rate theory prediction at both steady-state and LOCA conditions, which provides important references to the qualification of U3Si2 as a LWR fuel material with excellent fuel performance and enhanced accident tolerance.

  5. ABSOLUTE PROPERTIES OF THE ECLIPSING BINARY STAR V335 SERPENTIS

    SciTech Connect

    Lacy, Claud H. Sandberg; Fekel, Francis C.; Claret, Antonio E-mail: fekel@evans.tsuniv.edu

    2012-08-15

    V335 Ser is now known to be an eccentric double-lined A1+A3 binary star with fairly deep (0.5 mag) partial eclipses. Previous studies of the system are improved with 7456 differential photometric observations from the URSA WebScope and 5666 from the NFO WebScope, and 67 high-resolution spectroscopic observations from the Tennessee State University 2 m automatic spectroscopic telescope. From dates of minima, the apsidal period is about 880 years. Accurate (better than 2%) masses and radii are determined from analysis of the two new light curves and the radial velocity curve. Theoretical models match the absolute properties of the stars at an age of about 380 Myr, though the age agreement for the two components is poor. Tidal theory correctly confirms that the orbit should still be eccentric, but we find that standard tidal theory is unable to match the observed asynchronous rotation rates of the components' surface layers.

  6. The Study of CIQ Inspection Rate's Setting Problem Based on Gray-fuzzy Comprehensive Evaluation Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hui, Liu; Ding, Liu Wen

    Inspection is not only one of the most significant duties, but the important prerequisite for going through Customs. Setting the inspection rate scientifically can not only solve the contradiction between the "check on" and "service" for CIQ (CHINA ENTRY-EXIT INSPECTION AND UARANTINE)site inspection personnel, but can highlight the key of inspection and enhance the ratio of discovering, achieving the optimum allocation of CIQ's limited human and material resources. In this article, from the characteristics of inspection risk evaluation themselves, considering the setting problem of check rate at from the angle of data mining, construct an index system rationally and objectively. On the basis of Fuzzy theory, evaluate the risk of the inward and outward goods with the grey-fuzzy comprehensive evaluation method, and establish the inspection rate scientifically.

  7. Absolute multilateration between spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muelaner, Jody; Wadsworth, William; Azini, Maria; Mullineux, Glen; Hughes, Ben; Reichold, Armin

    2017-04-01

    Environmental effects typically limit the accuracy of large scale coordinate measurements in applications such as aircraft production and particle accelerator alignment. This paper presents an initial design for a novel measurement technique with analysis and simulation showing that that it could overcome the environmental limitations to provide a step change in large scale coordinate measurement accuracy. Referred to as absolute multilateration between spheres (AMS), it involves using absolute distance interferometry to directly measure the distances between pairs of plain steel spheres. A large portion of each sphere remains accessible as a reference datum, while the laser path can be shielded from environmental disturbances. As a single scale bar this can provide accurate scale information to be used for instrument verification or network measurement scaling. Since spheres can be simultaneously measured from multiple directions, it also allows highly accurate multilateration-based coordinate measurements to act as a large scale datum structure for localized measurements, or to be integrated within assembly tooling, coordinate measurement machines or robotic machinery. Analysis and simulation show that AMS can be self-aligned to achieve a theoretical combined standard uncertainty for the independent uncertainties of an individual 1 m scale bar of approximately 0.49 µm. It is also shown that combined with a 1 µm m‑1 standard uncertainty in the central reference system this could result in coordinate standard uncertainty magnitudes of 42 µm over a slender 1 m by 20 m network. This would be a sufficient step change in accuracy to enable next generation aerospace structures with natural laminar flow and part-to-part interchangeability.

  8. ANALYTICAL THEORY FOR THE INITIAL MASS FUNCTION. III. TIME DEPENDENCE AND STAR FORMATION RATE

    SciTech Connect

    Hennebelle, Patrick

    2013-06-20

    The present paper extends our previous theory of the stellar initial mass function (IMF) by including time dependence and by including the impact of the magnetic field. The predicted mass spectra are similar to the time-independent ones with slightly shallower slopes at large masses and peak locations shifted toward smaller masses by a factor of a few. Assuming that star-forming clumps follow Larson-type relations, we obtain core mass functions in good agreement with the observationally derived IMF, in particular, when taking into account the thermodynamics of the gas. The time-dependent theory directly yields an analytical expression for the star formation rate (SFR) at cloud scales. The SFR values agree well with the observational determinations of various Galactic molecular clouds. Furthermore, we show that the SFR does not simply depend linearly on density, as is sometimes claimed in the literature, but also depends strongly on the clump mass/size, which yields the observed scatter. We stress, however, that any SFR theory depends, explicitly or implicitly, on very uncertain assumptions like clump boundaries or the mass of the most massive stars that can form in a given clump, making the final determinations uncertain by a factor of a few. Finally, we derive a fully time dependent model for the IMF by considering a clump, or a distribution of clumps accreting at a constant rate and thus whose physical properties evolve with time. In spite of its simplicity, this model reproduces reasonably well various features observed in numerical simulations of converging flows. Based on this general theory, we present a paradigm for star formation and the IMF.

  9. MORATE: a program for direct dynamics calculations of chemical reaction rates by semiempirical molecular orbital theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Truong, Thanh N.; Lu, Da-hong; Lynch, Gillian C.; Liu, Yi-Ping; Melissas, Vasilios S.; Stewart, James J. P.; Steckler, Rozeanne; Garrett, Bruce C.; Isaacson, Alan D.; Gonzalez-Lafont, Angels; Rai, Sachchida N.; Hancock, Gene C.; Joseph, Tomi; Truhlar, Donald G.

    1993-04-01

    We present a computer program, MORATE (Molecular Orbital RATE calculations), for direct dynamics calculations of unimolecular and bimolecular rate constants of gas-phase chemical reactions involving atoms, diatoms, or polyatomic species. The potential energies, gradients, and higher derivatives of the potential are calculated whenever needed by semiempirical molecular orbital theory without the intermediary of a global or semiglobal fit. The dynamical methods used are conventional or variational transition state theory and multidimensional semiclassical approximations for tunneling and nonclassical reflection. The computer program is conveniently interfaced package consisting of the POLYRATE program, version 4.5.1, for dynamical rate calculations, and the MOPAC program, version 5.03, for semiempirical electronic structure computations. All semiempirical methods available in MOPAC, in particular MINDO/3, MNDO, AM1, and PM3, can be called on to calculate the potential and gradient. Higher derivatives of the potential are obtained by numerical derivatives of the gradient. Variational transition states are found by a one-dimensional search of generalized-transition-state dividing surfaces perpendicular to the minimum-energy path, and tunneling probabilities are evaluated by numerical quadrature.

  10. Reaction Rate Theory in Coordination Number Space: An Application to Ion Solvation

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, Santanu; Baer, Marcel D.; Mundy, Christopher J.; Schenter, Gregory K.

    2016-04-14

    Understanding reaction mechanisms in many chemical and biological processes require application of rare event theories. In these theories, an effective choice of a reaction coordinate to describe a reaction pathway is essential. To this end, we study ion solvation in water using molecular dynamics simulations and explore the utility of coordination number (n = number of water molecules in the first solvation shell) as the reaction coordinate. Here we compute the potential of mean force (W(n)) using umbrella sampling, predicting multiple metastable n-states for both cations and anions. We find with increasing ionic size, these states become more stable and structured for cations when compared to anions. We have extended transition state theory (TST) to calculate transition rates between n-states. TST overestimates the rate constant due to solvent-induced barrier recrossings that are not accounted for. We correct the TST rates by calculating transmission coefficients using the reactive flux method. This approach enables a new way of understanding rare events involving coordination complexes. We gratefully acknowledge Liem Dang and Panos Stinis for useful discussion. This research used resources of the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center, a DOE Office of Science User Facility supported by the Office of Science of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231. SR, CJM, and GKS were supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences. MDB was supported by MS3 (Materials Synthesis and Simulation Across Scales) Initiative, a Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). PNNL is a multiprogram national laboratory operated by Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy.

  11. Perturbation theory in the catalytic rate constant of the Henri-Michaelis-Menten enzymatic reaction.

    PubMed

    Bakalis, Evangelos; Kosmas, Marios; Papamichael, Emmanouel M

    2012-11-01

    The Henry-Michaelis-Menten (HMM) mechanism of enzymatic reaction is studied by means of perturbation theory in the reaction rate constant k (2) of product formation. We present analytical solutions that provide the concentrations of the enzyme (E), the substrate (S), as well as those of the enzyme-substrate complex (C), and the product (P) as functions of time. For k (2) small compared to k (-1), we properly describe the entire enzymatic activity from the beginning of the reaction up to longer times without imposing extra conditions on the initial concentrations E ( o ) and S ( o ), which can be comparable or much different.

  12. The stochastic string model as a unifying theory of the term structure of interest rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bueno-Guerrero, Alberto; Moreno, Manuel; Navas, Javier F.

    2016-11-01

    We present the stochastic string model of Santa-Clara and Sornette (2001), as reformulated by Bueno-Guerrero et al. (2015), as a unifying theory of the continuous-time modeling of the term structure of interest rates. We provide several new results, such as: (a) an orthogonality condition for the volatilities in the Heath, Jarrow, and Morton (1992) (HJM) model, (b) the interpretation of multi-factor HJM models as approximations to a full infinite-dimensional model, (c) a result of consistency based on Hilbert spaces, and (d) a theorem for option valuation.

  13. Theory of molecular rate processes in the presence of intense laser radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, T. F.; Zimmerman, I. H.; Devries, P. L.; Yuan, J.-M.; Lam, K.-S.; Bellum, J. C.; Lee, H.-W.; Slutsky, M. S.; Lin, J.-T.

    1979-01-01

    The present paper deals with the influence of intense laser radiation on gas-phase molecular rate processes. Representations of the radiation field, the particle system, and the interaction involving these two entities are discussed from a general rather than abstract point of view. The theoretical methods applied are outlined, and the formalism employed is illustrated by application to a variety of specific processes. Quantum mechanical and semiclassical treatments of representative atom-atom and atom-diatom collision processes in the presence of a field are examined, and examples of bound-continuum processes and heterogeneous catalysis are discussed within the framework of both quantum-mechanical and semiclassical theories.

  14. Inference of emission rates from multiple sources using Bayesian probability theory.

    PubMed

    Yee, Eugene; Flesch, Thomas K

    2010-03-01

    The determination of atmospheric emission rates from multiple sources using inversion (regularized least-squares or best-fit technique) is known to be very susceptible to measurement and model errors in the problem, rendering the solution unusable. In this paper, a new perspective is offered for this problem: namely, it is argued that the problem should be addressed as one of inference rather than inversion. Towards this objective, Bayesian probability theory is used to estimate the emission rates from multiple sources. The posterior probability distribution for the emission rates is derived, accounting fully for the measurement errors in the concentration data and the model errors in the dispersion model used to interpret the data. The Bayesian inferential methodology for emission rate recovery is validated against real dispersion data, obtained from a field experiment involving various source-sensor geometries (scenarios) consisting of four synthetic area sources and eight concentration sensors. The recovery of discrete emission rates from three different scenarios obtained using Bayesian inference and singular value decomposition inversion are compared and contrasted.

  15. Theory and experiment on the cuprous-cupric electron transfer rate at a copper electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halley, J. W.; Smith, B. B.; Walbran, S.; Curtiss, L. A.; Rigney, R. O.; Sutjianto, A.; Hung, N. C.; Yonco, R. M.; Nagy, Z.

    1999-04-01

    We describe results of experiment and theory of the cuprous-cupric electron transfer rate in an aqueous solution at a copper electrode. The methods are similar to those we reported earlier for the ferrous-ferric rate. The comparison strongly suggests that, in marked distinction to the ferrous-ferric case, the electron transfer reaction is adiabatic. The model shows that the activation barrier is dominated by the energy required for the ion to approach the electrode, rather than by the energy required for rearrangement of the solvation shell, also in sharp distinction to the case of the ferric-ferrous electron transfer at a gold electrode. Calculated activation barriers based on this image agree with the experimental results reported here.

  16. Beta-decay rate and beta-delayed neutron emission probability of improved gross theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koura, Hiroyuki

    2014-09-01

    A theoretical study has been carried out on beta-decay rate and beta-delayed neutron emission probability. The gross theory of the beta decay is based on an idea of the sum rule of the beta-decay strength function, and has succeeded in describing beta-decay half-lives of nuclei overall nuclear mass region. The gross theory includes not only the allowed transition as the Fermi and the Gamow-Teller, but also the first-forbidden transition. In this work, some improvements are introduced as the nuclear shell correction on nuclear level densities and the nuclear deformation for nuclear strength functions, those effects were not included in the original gross theory. The shell energy and the nuclear deformation for unmeasured nuclei are adopted from the KTUY nuclear mass formula, which is based on the spherical-basis method. Considering the properties of the integrated Fermi function, we can roughly categorized energy region of excited-state of a daughter nucleus into three regions: a highly-excited energy region, which fully affect a delayed neutron probability, a middle energy region, which is estimated to contribute the decay heat, and a region neighboring the ground-state, which determines the beta-decay rate. Some results will be given in the presentation. A theoretical study has been carried out on beta-decay rate and beta-delayed neutron emission probability. The gross theory of the beta decay is based on an idea of the sum rule of the beta-decay strength function, and has succeeded in describing beta-decay half-lives of nuclei overall nuclear mass region. The gross theory includes not only the allowed transition as the Fermi and the Gamow-Teller, but also the first-forbidden transition. In this work, some improvements are introduced as the nuclear shell correction on nuclear level densities and the nuclear deformation for nuclear strength functions, those effects were not included in the original gross theory. The shell energy and the nuclear deformation for

  17. Rate constants of chemical reactions from semiclassical transition state theory in full and one dimension.

    PubMed

    Greene, Samuel M; Shan, Xiao; Clary, David C

    2016-06-28

    Semiclassical Transition State Theory (SCTST), a method for calculating rate constants of chemical reactions, offers gains in computational efficiency relative to more accurate quantum scattering methods. In full-dimensional (FD) SCTST, reaction probabilities are calculated from third and fourth potential derivatives along all vibrational degrees of freedom. However, the computational cost of FD SCTST scales unfavorably with system size, which prohibits its application to larger systems. In this study, the accuracy and efficiency of 1-D SCTST, in which only third and fourth derivatives along the reaction mode are used, are investigated in comparison to those of FD SCTST. Potential derivatives are obtained from numerical ab initio Hessian matrix calculations at the MP2/cc-pVTZ level of theory, and Richardson extrapolation is applied to improve the accuracy of these derivatives. Reaction barriers are calculated at the CCSD(T)/cc-pVTZ level. Results from FD SCTST agree with results from previous theoretical and experimental studies when Richardson extrapolation is applied. Results from our implementation of 1-D SCTST, which uses only 4 single-point MP2/cc-pVTZ energy calculations in addition to those for conventional TST, agree with FD results to within a factor of 5 at 250 K. This degree of agreement and the efficiency of the 1-D method suggest its potential as a means of approximating rate constants for systems too large for existing quantum scattering methods.

  18. Beyond transition state theory: Rigorous quantum approaches for determining chemical reaction rates

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, W.H.

    1995-01-01

    Transition state theory (TST) has historically been the most important and widely used theoretical approach for describing the rates of chemical reactions, and for qualitative pictures and order-of-magnitude estimates one does not expect this situation to change. However a rigorous, quantitative treatment of chemical reaction rates must go beyond TST. A rigorous description, for example, must be based on a quantum mechanical description of the molecular system, but the fundamental assumption on which TST is based - namely that the molecular dynamics is {open_quotes}direct,{close_quotes} i.e., that no trajectories re-cross a dividing surface which separates reactants and products (vide infra) - is couched inherently in the language of classical mechanics. There is no unambiguous way to quantize TST, for the various ways of trying to do so invariably require one to introduce additional assumptions about the reaction dynamics. As one tries to eliminate these {open_quotes}additional assumptions{close_quotes} one is driven ultimately to an exact quantum treatment of the reaction dynamics which is then no longer a transition state theory (i.e., approximation) but simply an exact formulation. It is such exact approaches, those without inherent approximations, that are the subject of this chapter.

  19. Efficient dynamical correction of the transition state theory rate estimate for a flat energy barrier.

    PubMed

    Mökkönen, Harri; Ala-Nissila, Tapio; Jónsson, Hannes

    2016-09-07

    The recrossing correction to the transition state theory estimate of a thermal rate can be difficult to calculate when the energy barrier is flat. This problem arises, for example, in polymer escape if the polymer is long enough to stretch between the initial and final state energy wells while the polymer beads undergo diffusive motion back and forth over the barrier. We present an efficient method for evaluating the correction factor by constructing a sequence of hyperplanes starting at the transition state and calculating the probability that the system advances from one hyperplane to another towards the product. This is analogous to what is done in forward flux sampling except that there the hyperplane sequence starts at the initial state. The method is applied to the escape of polymers with up to 64 beads from a potential well. For high temperature, the results are compared with direct Langevin dynamics simulations as well as forward flux sampling and excellent agreement between the three rate estimates is found. The use of a sequence of hyperplanes in the evaluation of the recrossing correction speeds up the calculation by an order of magnitude as compared with the traditional approach. As the temperature is lowered, the direct Langevin dynamics simulations as well as the forward flux simulations become computationally too demanding, while the harmonic transition state theory estimate corrected for recrossings can be calculated without significant increase in the computational effort.

  20. Temperature sensitivity of soil microbial communities: An application of macromolecular rate theory to microbial respiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alster, Charlotte J.; Koyama, Akihiro; Johnson, Nels G.; Wallenstein, Matthew D.; Fischer, Joseph C.

    2016-06-01

    There is compelling evidence that microbial communities vary widely in their temperature sensitivity and may adapt to warming through time. To date, this sensitivity has been largely characterized using a range of models relying on versions of the Arrhenius equation, which predicts an exponential increase in reaction rate with temperature. However, there is growing evidence from laboratory and field studies that observe nonmonotonic responses of reaction rates to variation in temperature, indicating that Arrhenius is not an appropriate model for quantitatively characterizing temperature sensitivity. Recently, Hobbs et al. (2013) developed macromolecular rate theory (MMRT), which incorporates thermodynamic temperature optima as arising from heat capacity differences between isoenzymes. We applied MMRT to measurements of respiration from soils incubated at different temperatures. These soils were collected from three grassland sites across the U.S. Great Plains and reciprocally transplanted, allowing us to isolate the effects of microbial community type from edaphic factors. We found that microbial community type explained roughly 30% of the variation in the CO2 production rate from the labile C pool but that temperature and soil type were most important in explaining variation in labile and recalcitrant C pool size. For six out of the nine soil × inoculum combinations, MMRT was superior to Arrhenius. The MMRT analysis revealed that microbial communities have distinct heat capacity values and temperature sensitivities sometimes independent of soil type. These results challenge the current paradigm for modeling temperature sensitivity of soil C pools and understanding of microbial enzyme dynamics.

  1. A Comparison of Model-Data Fit for Parametric and Nonparametric Item Response Theory Models Using Ordinal-Level Ratings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dyehouse, Melissa A.

    2009-01-01

    This study compared the model-data fit of a parametric item response theory (PIRT) model to a nonparametric item response theory (NIRT) model to determine the best-fitting model for use with ordinal-level alternate assessment ratings. The PIRT Generalized Graded Unfolding Model (GGUM) was compared to the NIRT Mokken model. Chi-square statistics…

  2. Crossover behavior of the thermal conductance and Kramers’ transition rate theory

    DOE PAGES

    Velizhanin, Kirill A.; Sahu, Subin; Chien, Chih -Chun; ...

    2015-12-04

    Kramers’ theory frames chemical reaction rates in solution as reactants overcoming a barrier in the presence of friction and noise. For weak coupling to the solution, the reaction rate is limited by the rate at which the solution can restore equilibrium after a subset of reactants have surmounted the barrier to become products. For strong coupling, there are always sufficiently energetic reactants. However, the solution returns many of the intermediate states back to the reactants before the product fully forms. Here, we demonstrate that the thermal conductance displays an analogous physical response to the friction and noise that drive themore » heat current through a material or structure. A crossover behavior emerges where the thermal reservoirs dominate the conductance at the extremes and only in the intermediate region are the intrinsic properties of the lattice manifest. Finally, not only does this shed new light on Kramers’ classic turnover problem, this result is significant for the design of devices for thermal management and other applications, as well as the proper simulation of transport at the nanoscale.« less

  3. Crossover behavior of the thermal conductance and Kramers’ transition rate theory

    PubMed Central

    Velizhanin, Kirill A.; Sahu, Subin; Chien, Chih-Chun; Dubi, Yonatan; Zwolak, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Kramers’ theory frames chemical reaction rates in solution as reactants overcoming a barrier in the presence of friction and noise. For weak coupling to the solution, the reaction rate is limited by the rate at which the solution can restore equilibrium after a subset of reactants have surmounted the barrier to become products. For strong coupling, there are always sufficiently energetic reactants. However, the solution returns many of the intermediate states back to the reactants before the product fully forms. Here, we demonstrate that the thermal conductance displays an analogous physical response to the friction and noise that drive the heat current through a material or structure. A crossover behavior emerges where the thermal reservoirs dominate the conductance at the extremes and only in the intermediate region are the intrinsic properties of the lattice manifest. Not only does this shed new light on Kramers’ classic turnover problem, this result is significant for the design of devices for thermal management and other applications, as well as the proper simulation of transport at the nanoscale. PMID:26634333

  4. Crossover behavior of the thermal conductance and Kramers' transition rate theory.

    PubMed

    Velizhanin, Kirill A; Sahu, Subin; Chien, Chih-Chun; Dubi, Yonatan; Zwolak, Michael

    2015-12-04

    Kramers' theory frames chemical reaction rates in solution as reactants overcoming a barrier in the presence of friction and noise. For weak coupling to the solution, the reaction rate is limited by the rate at which the solution can restore equilibrium after a subset of reactants have surmounted the barrier to become products. For strong coupling, there are always sufficiently energetic reactants. However, the solution returns many of the intermediate states back to the reactants before the product fully forms. Here, we demonstrate that the thermal conductance displays an analogous physical response to the friction and noise that drive the heat current through a material or structure. A crossover behavior emerges where the thermal reservoirs dominate the conductance at the extremes and only in the intermediate region are the intrinsic properties of the lattice manifest. Not only does this shed new light on Kramers' classic turnover problem, this result is significant for the design of devices for thermal management and other applications, as well as the proper simulation of transport at the nanoscale.

  5. Crossover behavior of the thermal conductance and Kramers’ transition rate theory

    SciTech Connect

    Velizhanin, Kirill A.; Sahu, Subin; Chien, Chih -Chun; Dubi, Yonatan; Zwolak, Michael

    2015-12-04

    Kramers’ theory frames chemical reaction rates in solution as reactants overcoming a barrier in the presence of friction and noise. For weak coupling to the solution, the reaction rate is limited by the rate at which the solution can restore equilibrium after a subset of reactants have surmounted the barrier to become products. For strong coupling, there are always sufficiently energetic reactants. However, the solution returns many of the intermediate states back to the reactants before the product fully forms. Here, we demonstrate that the thermal conductance displays an analogous physical response to the friction and noise that drive the heat current through a material or structure. A crossover behavior emerges where the thermal reservoirs dominate the conductance at the extremes and only in the intermediate region are the intrinsic properties of the lattice manifest. Finally, not only does this shed new light on Kramers’ classic turnover problem, this result is significant for the design of devices for thermal management and other applications, as well as the proper simulation of transport at the nanoscale.

  6. Crossover behavior of the thermal conductance and Kramers’ transition rate theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velizhanin, Kirill A.; Sahu, Subin; Chien, Chih-Chun; Dubi, Yonatan; Zwolak, Michael

    2015-12-01

    Kramers’ theory frames chemical reaction rates in solution as reactants overcoming a barrier in the presence of friction and noise. For weak coupling to the solution, the reaction rate is limited by the rate at which the solution can restore equilibrium after a subset of reactants have surmounted the barrier to become products. For strong coupling, there are always sufficiently energetic reactants. However, the solution returns many of the intermediate states back to the reactants before the product fully forms. Here, we demonstrate that the thermal conductance displays an analogous physical response to the friction and noise that drive the heat current through a material or structure. A crossover behavior emerges where the thermal reservoirs dominate the conductance at the extremes and only in the intermediate region are the intrinsic properties of the lattice manifest. Not only does this shed new light on Kramers’ classic turnover problem, this result is significant for the design of devices for thermal management and other applications, as well as the proper simulation of transport at the nanoscale.

  7. Using effort-reward imbalance theory to understand high rates of depression and anxiety among clergy.

    PubMed

    Proeschold-Bell, Rae Jean; Miles, Andrew; Toth, Matthew; Adams, Christopher; Smith, Bruce W; Toole, David

    2013-12-01

    The clergy occupation is unique in its combination of role strains and higher calling, putting clergy mental health at risk. We surveyed all United Methodist clergy in North Carolina, and 95% (n = 1,726) responded, with 38% responding via phone interview. We compared clergy phone interview depression rates, assessed using the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9), to those of in-person interviews in a representative United States sample that also used the PHQ-9. The clergy depression prevalence was 8.7%, significantly higher than the 5.5% rate of the national sample. We used logistic regression to explain depression, and also anxiety, assessed using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. As hypothesized by effort-reward imbalance theory, several extrinsic demands (job stress, life unpredictability) and intrinsic demands (guilt about not doing enough work, doubting one's call to ministry) significantly predicted depression and anxiety, as did rewards such as ministry satisfaction and lack of financial stress. The high rate of clergy depression signals the need for preventive policies and programs for clergy. The extrinsic and intrinsic demands and rewards suggest specific actions to improve clergy mental health.

  8. Surface hopping, transition state theory, and decoherence. II. Thermal rate constants and detailed balance

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, Amber; Subotnik, Joseph E.

    2015-10-07

    We investigate a simple approach to compute a non-adiabatic thermal rate constant using the fewest switches surface hopping (FSSH) dynamics. We study the effects of both decoherence (using our augmented-FSSH (A-FSSH) algorithm) and forbidden hops over a large range of parameters, including high and low friction regimes, and weak and strong electronic coupling regimes. Furthermore, when possible, we benchmark our results against exact hierarchy equations of motion results, where we usually find a maximum error of roughly a factor of two (at reasonably large temperatures). In agreement with Hammes-Schiffer and Tully, we find that a merger of transition state theory and surface hopping can be both accurate and efficient when performed correctly. We further show that detailed balance is followed approximately by A-FSSH dynamics.

  9. A permutation information theory tour through different interest rate maturities: the Libor case.

    PubMed

    Bariviera, Aurelio Fernández; Guercio, María Belén; Martinez, Lisana B; Rosso, Osvaldo A

    2015-12-13

    This paper analyses Libor interest rates for seven different maturities and referred to operations in British pounds, euros, Swiss francs and Japanese yen, during the period 2001-2015. The analysis is performed by means of two quantifiers derived from information theory: the permutation Shannon entropy and the permutation Fisher information measure. An anomalous behaviour in the Libor is detected in all currencies except euros during the years 2006-2012. The stochastic switch is more severe in one, two and three months maturities. Given the special mechanism of Libor setting, we conjecture that the behaviour could have been produced by the manipulation that was uncovered by financial authorities. We argue that our methodology is pertinent as a market overseeing instrument.

  10. Depletion: A Game with Natural Rules for Teaching Reaction Rate Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olbris, Donald J.; Herzfeld, Judith

    2002-10-01

    Depletion is a game that reinforces central concepts of reaction rate theory through simulation. Each player buys chemicals and guides them through a series of reactions, thereby earning money to buy more chemicals. The reactions occur when players roll a high enough value on two dice to overcome an activation barrier. The reactions may be accelerated by buying heat (which allows the player to roll three dice instead of two) or catalysts (which lower the activation barrier). The value of acceleration derives from the increasing price of fresh chemicals as resources are depleted and waste products accumulate. The player who nets the most money wins the game. The details of the game are presented, with a set of follow-up questions suitable for either a quiz or discussion. Student reaction to the game is also described.

  11. Rate Theory Modeling and Simulations of Silicide Fuel at LWR Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Miao, Yinbin; Ye, Bei; Mei, Zhigang; Hofman, Gerard; Yacout, Abdellatif

    2015-12-10

    Uranium silicide (U3Si2) fuel has higher thermal conductivity and higher uranium density, making it a promising candidate for the accident-tolerant fuel (ATF) used in light water reactors (LWRs). However, previous studies on the fuel performance of U3Si2, including both experimental and computational approaches, have been focusing on the irradiation conditions in research reactors, which usually involve low operation temperatures and high fuel burnups. Thus, it is important to examine the fuel performance of U3Si2 at typical LWR conditions so as to evaluate the feasibility of replacing conventional uranium dioxide fuel with this silicide fuel material. As in-reactor irradiation experiments involve significant time and financial cost, it is appropriate to utilize modeling tools to estimate the behavior of U3Si2 in LWRs based on all those available research reactor experimental references and state-of-the-art density functional theory (DFT) calculation capabilities at the early development stage. Hence, in this report, a comprehensive investigation of the fission gas swelling behavior of U3Si2 at LWR conditions is introduced. The modeling efforts mentioned in this report was based on the rate theory (RT) model of fission gas bubble evolution that has been successfully applied for a variety of fuel materials at devious reactor conditions. Both existing experimental data and DFT-calculated results were used for the optimization of the parameters adopted by the RT model. Meanwhile, the fuel-cladding interaction was captured by the coupling of the RT model with simplified mechanical correlations. Therefore, the swelling behavior of U3Si2 fuel and its consequent interaction with cladding in LWRs was predicted by the rate theory modeling, providing valuable information for the development of U3Si2 fuel as an accident

  12. Consistent thermostatistics forbids negative absolute temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunkel, Jörn; Hilbert, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Over the past 60 years, a considerable number of theories and experiments have claimed the existence of negative absolute temperature in spin systems and ultracold quantum gases. This has led to speculation that ultracold gases may be dark-energy analogues and also suggests the feasibility of heat engines with efficiencies larger than one. Here, we prove that all previous negative temperature claims and their implications are invalid as they arise from the use of an entropy definition that is inconsistent both mathematically and thermodynamically. We show that the underlying conceptual deficiencies can be overcome if one adopts a microcanonical entropy functional originally derived by Gibbs. The resulting thermodynamic framework is self-consistent and implies that absolute temperature remains positive even for systems with a bounded spectrum. In addition, we propose a minimal quantum thermometer that can be implemented with available experimental techniques.

  13. Nucleation and growth in materials and on surfaces: Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations and rate equation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Feng

    This dissertation is organized in two parts, the first part is about fundamental characteristics of multiple dimensional systems, the second part is about parallel KMC calculation of coarsening process. In Part I, we first study the fundamental characteristics of nucleation and growth in 3 dimensional (3D) systems using a simplified model of nucleation and growth. One of the main goals of this work is to compare with previous work on 2D nucleation and growth in order to understand the effects of dimensionality. The scaling of the average island-size, island density, monomer density, island-size distribution (ISD), capture number distribution (CND), and capture zone distribution (CZD) are studied as a function of the fraction of occupied sites (coverage) and the ratio D/F of the monomer hopping rate D to the (per site) monomer creation rate F. Our model may be viewed as a simple model of the early-stages of vacancy cluster nucleation and growth under irradiation. Good agreement is found between our mean-field (MF) rate-equation results for the average island and monomer densities and our simulation results. In addition, we find that due to the decreased influence of correlations and fluctuations in 3D as compared to 2D, the scaled CND depends only weakly on the island-size. As a result the scaled ISD is significantly sharper than obtained in 2D and diverges with increasing D/F. However, the scaled ISD obtained in kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) simulations appears to diverge more slowly with increasing D/F than the MF prediction while the divergence occurs at a value of the scaled island-size which is somewhat beyond the MF prediction. These results are supported by an analysis of the asymptotic CND. The final goal for understanding the mechanism of nucleation and growth is to develop a theory to concisely and precisely disclose the law underlying the nucleation and growth process. From the theoretical point view, dimension can be taken as a variable to develop theory. In

  14. Significance of vapor phase chemical reactions on CVD rates predicted by chemically frozen and local thermochemical equilibrium boundary layer theories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gokoglu, Suleyman A.

    1988-01-01

    This paper investigates the role played by vapor-phase chemical reactions on CVD rates by comparing the results of two extreme theories developed to predict CVD mass transport rates in the absence of interfacial kinetic barrier: one based on chemically frozen boundary layer and the other based on local thermochemical equilibrium. Both theories consider laminar convective-diffusion boundary layers at high Reynolds numbers and include thermal (Soret) diffusion and variable property effects. As an example, Na2SO4 deposition was studied. It was found that gas phase reactions have no important role on Na2SO4 deposition rates and on the predictions of the theories. The implications of the predictions of the two theories to other CVD systems are discussed.

  15. Kinetic performance limits of constant pressure versus constant flow rate gradient elution separations. Part I: theory.

    PubMed

    Broeckhoven, K; Verstraeten, M; Choikhet, K; Dittmann, M; Witt, K; Desmet, G

    2011-02-25

    We report on a general theoretical assessment of the potential kinetic advantages of running LC gradient elution separations in the constant-pressure mode instead of in the customarily used constant-flow rate mode. Analytical calculations as well as numerical simulation results are presented. It is shown that, provided both modes are run with the same volume-based gradient program, the constant-pressure mode can potentially offer an identical separation selectivity (except from some small differences induced by the difference in pressure and viscous heating trajectory), but in a significantly shorter time. For a gradient running between 5 and 95% of organic modifier, the decrease in analysis time can be expected to be of the order of some 20% for both water-methanol and water-acetonitrile gradients, and only weakly depending on the value of V(G)/V₀ (or equivalently t(G)/t₀). Obviously, the gain will be smaller when the start and end composition lie closer to the viscosity maximum of the considered water-organic modifier system. The assumptions underlying the obtained results (no effects of pressure and temperature on the viscosity or retention coefficient) are critically reviewed, and can be inferred to only have a small effect on the general conclusions. It is also shown that, under the adopted assumptions, the kinetic plot theory also holds for operations where the flow rate varies with the time, as is the case for constant-pressure operation. Comparing both operation modes in a kinetic plot representing the maximal peak capacity versus time, it is theoretically predicted here that both modes can be expected to perform equally well in the fully C-term dominated regime (where H varies linearly with the flow rate), while the constant pressure mode is advantageous for all lower flow rates. Near the optimal flow rate, and for linear gradients running from 5 to 95% organic modifier, time gains of the order of some 20% can be expected (or 25-30% when accounting for

  16. Evaporation of Liquid Droplet in Nano and Micro Scales from Statistical Rate Theory.

    PubMed

    Duan, Fei; He, Bin; Wei, Tao

    2015-04-01

    The statistical rate theory (SRT) is applied to predict the average evaporation flux of liquid droplet after the approach is validated in the sessile droplet experiments of the water and heavy water. The steady-state experiments show a temperature discontinuity at the evaporating interface. The average evaporation flux is evaluated by individually changing the measurement at a liquid-vapor interface, including the interfacial liquid temperature, the interfacial vapor temperature, the vapor-phase pressure, and the droplet size. The parameter study shows that a higher temperature jump would reduce the average evaporation flux. The average evaporation flux can significantly be influenced by the interfacial liquid temperature and the vapor-phase pressure. The variation can switch the evaporation into condensation. The evaporation flux is found to remain relative constant if the droplet is larger than a micro scale, while the smaller diameters in nano scale can produce a much higher evaporation flux. In addition, a smaller diameter of droplets with the same liquid volume has a larger surface area. It is suggested that the evaporation rate increases dramatically as the droplet shrinks into nano size.

  17. Clinical application of fluctuation dissipation theory - Prediction of heart rate response to spontaneous breathing trial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niestemski, Liang R.; Chen, Man; Prevost, Robert; McRae, Michael; Cholleti, Sharath; Najarro, Gabriel; Buchman, Timothy G.; Deem, Michael W.

    2013-03-01

    Contrary to the traditional view of the healthy physiological state as being a single static state, variation in physiologic variables has more recently been suggested to be a key component of the healthy state. Indeed, aging and disease are characterized by a loss of such variability. We apply the conceptual framework of fluctuation-dissipation theory (FDT) to predict the response to a common clinical intervention from historical fluctuations in physiologic time series data. The non-equilibrium FDT relates the response of a system to a perturbation to natural fluctuations in the stationary state of the system. We seek to understand with the FDT a common clinical perturbation, the spontaneous breathing trial (SBT), in which mechanical ventilation is briefly suspended while the patient breathes freely for a period of time. As a stress upon the heart of the patient, the SBT can be characterized as a perturbation of heart rate dynamics. A non-equilibrium, but steady-state FDT allows us to predict the heart rate recovery after the SBT stress. We show that the responses of groups of similar patients to the spontaneous breathing trial can be predicted by this approach. This mathematical framework may serve as part of the basis for personalized critical care.

  18. Computer Program for the Calculation of Multicomponent Convective Diffusion Deposition Rates from Chemically Frozen Boundary Layer Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gokoglu, S. A.; Chen, B. K.; Rosner, D. E.

    1984-01-01

    The computer program based on multicomponent chemically frozen boundary layer (CFBL) theory for calculating vapor and/or small particle deposition rates is documented. A specific application to perimter-averaged Na2SO4 deposition rate calculations on a cylindrical collector is demonstrated. The manual includes a typical program input and output for users.

  19. Temperature Sensitivity as a Microbial Trait Using Parameters from Macromolecular Rate Theory

    PubMed Central

    Alster, Charlotte J.; Baas, Peter; Wallenstein, Matthew D.; Johnson, Nels G.; von Fischer, Joseph C.

    2016-01-01

    The activity of soil microbial extracellular enzymes is strongly controlled by temperature, yet the degree to which temperature sensitivity varies by microbe and enzyme type is unclear. Such information would allow soil microbial enzymes to be incorporated in a traits-based framework to improve prediction of ecosystem response to global change. If temperature sensitivity varies for specific soil enzymes, then determining the underlying causes of variation in temperature sensitivity of these enzymes will provide fundamental insights for predicting nutrient dynamics belowground. In this study, we characterized how both microbial taxonomic variation as well as substrate type affects temperature sensitivity. We measured β-glucosidase, leucine aminopeptidase, and phosphatase activities at six temperatures: 4, 11, 25, 35, 45, and 60°C, for seven different soil microbial isolates. To calculate temperature sensitivity, we employed two models, Arrhenius, which predicts an exponential increase in reaction rate with temperature, and Macromolecular Rate Theory (MMRT), which predicts rate to peak and then decline as temperature increases. We found MMRT provided a more accurate fit and allowed for more nuanced interpretation of temperature sensitivity in all of the enzyme × isolate combinations tested. Our results revealed that both the enzyme type and soil isolate type explain variation in parameters associated with temperature sensitivity. Because we found temperature sensitivity to be an inherent and variable property of an enzyme, we argue that it can be incorporated as a microbial functional trait, but only when using the MMRT definition of temperature sensitivity. We show that the Arrhenius metrics of temperature sensitivity are overly sensitive to test conditions, with activation energy changing depending on the temperature range it was calculated within. Thus, we propose the use of the MMRT definition of temperature sensitivity for accurate interpretation of

  20. Temperature Sensitivity as a Microbial Trait Using Parameters from Macromolecular Rate Theory.

    PubMed

    Alster, Charlotte J; Baas, Peter; Wallenstein, Matthew D; Johnson, Nels G; von Fischer, Joseph C

    2016-01-01

    The activity of soil microbial extracellular enzymes is strongly controlled by temperature, yet the degree to which temperature sensitivity varies by microbe and enzyme type is unclear. Such information would allow soil microbial enzymes to be incorporated in a traits-based framework to improve prediction of ecosystem response to global change. If temperature sensitivity varies for specific soil enzymes, then determining the underlying causes of variation in temperature sensitivity of these enzymes will provide fundamental insights for predicting nutrient dynamics belowground. In this study, we characterized how both microbial taxonomic variation as well as substrate type affects temperature sensitivity. We measured β-glucosidase, leucine aminopeptidase, and phosphatase activities at six temperatures: 4, 11, 25, 35, 45, and 60°C, for seven different soil microbial isolates. To calculate temperature sensitivity, we employed two models, Arrhenius, which predicts an exponential increase in reaction rate with temperature, and Macromolecular Rate Theory (MMRT), which predicts rate to peak and then decline as temperature increases. We found MMRT provided a more accurate fit and allowed for more nuanced interpretation of temperature sensitivity in all of the enzyme × isolate combinations tested. Our results revealed that both the enzyme type and soil isolate type explain variation in parameters associated with temperature sensitivity. Because we found temperature sensitivity to be an inherent and variable property of an enzyme, we argue that it can be incorporated as a microbial functional trait, but only when using the MMRT definition of temperature sensitivity. We show that the Arrhenius metrics of temperature sensitivity are overly sensitive to test conditions, with activation energy changing depending on the temperature range it was calculated within. Thus, we propose the use of the MMRT definition of temperature sensitivity for accurate interpretation of

  1. THE STAR FORMATION RATE OF TURBULENT MAGNETIZED CLOUDS: COMPARING THEORY, SIMULATIONS, AND OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Federrath, Christoph; Klessen, Ralf S.

    2012-12-20

    The role of turbulence and magnetic fields is studied for star formation in molecular clouds. We derive and compare six theoretical models for the star formation rate (SFR)-the Krumholz and McKee (KM), Padoan and Nordlund (PN), and Hennebelle and Chabrier (HC) models, and three multi-freefall versions of these, suggested by HC-all based on integrals over the log-normal distribution of turbulent gas. We extend all theories to include magnetic fields and show that the SFR depends on four basic parameters: (1) virial parameter {alpha}{sub vir}; (2) sonic Mach number M; (3) turbulent forcing parameter b, which is a measure for the fraction of energy driven in compressive modes; and (4) plasma {beta}=2M{sub A}{sup 2}/M{sup 2} with the Alfven Mach number M{sub A}. We compare all six theories with MHD simulations, covering cloud masses of 300 to 4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6} M{sub Sun} and Mach numbers M=3-50 and M{sub A}=1-{infinity}, with solenoidal (b = 1/3), mixed (b = 0.4), and compressive turbulent (b = 1) forcings. We find that the SFR increases by a factor of four between M=5 and 50 for compressive turbulent forcing and {alpha}{sub vir} {approx} 1. Comparing forcing parameters, we see that the SFR is more than 10 times higher with compressive than solenoidal forcing for M=10 simulations. The SFR and fragmentation are both reduced by a factor of two in strongly magnetized, trans-Alfvenic turbulence compared to hydrodynamic turbulence. All simulations are fit simultaneously by the multi-freefall KM and multi-freefall PN theories within a factor of two over two orders of magnitude in SFR. The simulated SFRs cover the range and correlation of SFR column density with gas column density observed in Galactic clouds, and agree well for star formation efficiencies SFE = 1%-10% and local efficiencies {epsilon} = 0.3-0.7 due to feedback. We conclude that the SFR is primarily controlled by interstellar turbulence, with a secondary effect coming from magnetic fields.

  2. The Star Formation Rate of Turbulent Magnetized Clouds: Comparing Theory, Simulations, and Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Federrath, Christoph; Klessen, Ralf S.

    2012-12-01

    The role of turbulence and magnetic fields is studied for star formation in molecular clouds. We derive and compare six theoretical models for the star formation rate (SFR)—the Krumholz & McKee (KM), Padoan & Nordlund (PN), and Hennebelle & Chabrier (HC) models, and three multi-freefall versions of these, suggested by HC—all based on integrals over the log-normal distribution of turbulent gas. We extend all theories to include magnetic fields and show that the SFR depends on four basic parameters: (1) virial parameter αvir (2) sonic Mach number {M}; (3) turbulent forcing parameter b, which is a measure for the fraction of energy driven in compressive modes; and (4) plasma \\beta =2 {M}_A^2/ {M}^2 with the Alfvén Mach number {M}_A. We compare all six theories with MHD simulations, covering cloud masses of 300 to 4 × 106 M ⊙ and Mach numbers {M}=3-50 and {M}_A=1-∞, with solenoidal (b = 1/3), mixed (b = 0.4), and compressive turbulent (b = 1) forcings. We find that the SFR increases by a factor of four between {M}=5 and 50 for compressive turbulent forcing and αvir ~ 1. Comparing forcing parameters, we see that the SFR is more than 10 times higher with compressive than solenoidal forcing for {M}=10 simulations. The SFR and fragmentation are both reduced by a factor of two in strongly magnetized, trans-Alfvénic turbulence compared to hydrodynamic turbulence. All simulations are fit simultaneously by the multi-freefall KM and multi-freefall PN theories within a factor of two over two orders of magnitude in SFR. The simulated SFRs cover the range and correlation of SFR column density with gas column density observed in Galactic clouds, and agree well for star formation efficiencies SFE = 1%-10% and local efficiencies epsilon = 0.3-0.7 due to feedback. We conclude that the SFR is primarily controlled by interstellar turbulence, with a secondary effect coming from magnetic fields.

  3. Extension of a Kinetic-Theory Approach for Computing Chemical-Reaction Rates to Reactions with Charged Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liechty, Derek S.; Lewis, Mark J.

    2010-01-01

    Recently introduced molecular-level chemistry models that predict equilibrium and nonequilibrium reaction rates using only kinetic theory and fundamental molecular properties (i.e., no macroscopic reaction rate information) are extended to include reactions involving charged particles and electronic energy levels. The proposed extensions include ionization reactions, exothermic associative ionization reactions, endothermic and exothermic charge exchange reactions, and other exchange reactions involving ionized species. The extensions are shown to agree favorably with the measured Arrhenius rates for near-equilibrium conditions.

  4. Maximizing measurement efficiency of behavior rating scales using Item Response Theory: An example with the Social Skills Improvement System - Teacher Rating Scale.

    PubMed

    Anthony, Christopher J; DiPerna, James C; Lei, Pui-Wa

    2016-04-01

    Measurement efficiency is an important consideration when developing behavior rating scales for use in research and practice. Although most published scales have been developed within a Classical Test Theory (CTT) framework, Item Response Theory (IRT) offers several advantages for developing scales that maximize measurement efficiency. The current study provides an example of using IRT to maximize rating scale efficiency with the Social Skills Improvement System - Teacher Rating Scale (SSIS - TRS), a measure of student social skills frequently used in practice and research. Based on IRT analyses, 27 items from the Social Skills subscales and 14 items from the Problem Behavior subscales of the SSIS - TRS were identified as maximally efficient. In addition to maintaining similar content coverage to the published version, these sets of maximally efficient items demonstrated similar psychometric properties to the published SSIS - TRS.

  5. Cryogenic, Absolute, High Pressure Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, John J. (Inventor); Shams. Qamar A. (Inventor); Powers, William T. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A pressure sensor is provided for cryogenic, high pressure applications. A highly doped silicon piezoresistive pressure sensor is bonded to a silicon substrate in an absolute pressure sensing configuration. The absolute pressure sensor is bonded to an aluminum nitride substrate. Aluminum nitride has appropriate coefficient of thermal expansion for use with highly doped silicon at cryogenic temperatures. A group of sensors, either two sensors on two substrates or four sensors on a single substrate are packaged in a pressure vessel.

  6. The pyrolysis of 2-methylfuran: a quantum chemical, statistical rate theory and kinetic modelling study.

    PubMed

    Somers, Kieran P; Simmie, John M; Metcalfe, Wayne K; Curran, Henry J

    2014-03-21

    Due to the rapidly growing interest in the use of biomass derived furanic compounds as potential platform chemicals and fossil fuel replacements, there is a simultaneous need to understand the pyrolysis and combustion properties of such molecules. To this end, the potential energy surfaces for the pyrolysis relevant reactions of the biofuel candidate 2-methylfuran have been characterized using quantum chemical methods (CBS-QB3, CBS-APNO and G3). Canonical transition state theory is employed to determine the high-pressure limiting kinetics, k(T), of elementary reactions. Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus theory with an energy grained master equation is used to compute pressure-dependent rate constants, k(T,p), and product branching fractions for the multiple-well, multiple-channel reaction pathways which typify the pyrolysis reactions of the title species. The unimolecular decomposition of 2-methylfuran is shown to proceed via hydrogen atom transfer reactions through singlet carbene intermediates which readily undergo ring opening to form collisionally stabilised acyclic C5H6O isomers before further decomposition to C1-C4 species. Rate constants for abstraction by the hydrogen atom and methyl radical are reported, with abstraction from the alkyl side chain calculated to dominate. The fate of the primary abstraction product, 2-furanylmethyl radical, is shown to be thermal decomposition to the n-butadienyl radical and carbon monoxide through a series of ring opening and hydrogen atom transfer reactions. The dominant bimolecular products of hydrogen atom addition reactions are found to be furan and methyl radical, 1-butene-1-yl radical and carbon monoxide and vinyl ketene and methyl radical. A kinetic mechanism is assembled with computer simulations in good agreement with shock tube speciation profiles taken from the literature. The kinetic mechanism developed herein can be used in future chemical kinetic modelling studies on the pyrolysis and oxidation of 2-methylfuran

  7. Study on landslide hazard zonation based on factor weighting-rating theory in Slanic Prahova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maftei, R.-M.; Vina, G.; Filipciuc, C.

    2012-04-01

    Studying the risks caused by landslides is important in the context of its forecast triggering. This study mainly integrates the background data that are related to historical and environmental factors and also current triggering factors. The theory on zoning hazard caused by landslides, Landslide Hazard Zonation, (LHZ) appeared in the 1960s. In this period the U.S. and many European countries began to use other triggers factors, besides the slope factor, in achieving hazard zoning. This theory has progressed due to the development of remote sensing and GIS technology, which were used to develop and analys methods and techniques consisting in combining data from different sources. The study of an area involves analysing the geographical position data, estimating the surface, the type of terrain, altitude, identifing the landslides in the area and some geological summary data. Data sources. The data used in this study are: · Landsat 7 satellite images; · 30 m spatial resolution, from which is derived the vegetation index; · topographic maps 1:25 000 from which we can obtain the numerical altitude model (DEM) (used to calculate the slope and relative altitude to land) · geological maps 1:50 000. Studied factors. The main factors used and studied in achieving land slides hazard zoning are: - the rate of displacement, the angle of slope, lithology - the index of vegetation or ground coverage of vegetation (NDVI) - river network, structural factor 1. The calculation of normalized vegetation index is made based on Landsat ETM satellite images. This vegetation factor can be both a principal and a secondary trigger factor in landslides. In areas devoid of vegetation, landslides are triggered more often compared with those in which coverage is greater. 2. Factors derived from the numerical model are the slope and elevation relative altitude. This operation was made using the topographic map 1:25 000 from were the level curvs contour was extracted by digitization, and

  8. Assessing the Effects of New Reaction Rates and Convection Theory on Studies of Supernova Progenitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starrfield, Sumner

    We request funding to carry out a systematic evaluation of nuclear reaction rates and convection on the pre-explosion evolution of core-collapse (SN II) and thermonuclear (SN Ia) supernovae. We will use MESA (Modules for Experiments in Stellar Astrophysics) a new stellar evolution computer code that is co-authored by Co-PI Timmes. One goal of this proposal is to determine the effects of new thermonuclear reaction rates, taken from the next-generation library STARLIB developed by Co-PI Iliadis, on the resulting evolution. Another goal is to test the effects of the latest convection theory, microphysics changes, and numerical techniques on the results. STARLIB is a first-of-its-kind nuclear reaction rate library and, unlike all other libraries, it contains the full reaction rate probability densities at all stellar temperatures. It is publicly available as of June 2013. Consequently, we are now in a unique position to model stellar evolution and nucleosynthesis in a quantitative manner that makes predictions for key observations by NASA ground-based and satellite observatories. We will use two complementary strategies. First, we will take the modern and multiple prescriptions of convection that are implemented in MESA, together with the recommended thermonuclear reaction rates provided by STARLIB, to generate new hydrodynamic simulations of SN Ia and SN II progenitor evolution. Second, we will take the temperature-density-time trajectories from the evolutionary results and do Monte Carlo post-processing nucleosynthesis calculations by sampling over the reaction rate probability densities. This procedure could not be applied previously and has only become feasible with the availability of STARLIB. Calculations of pre-supernova evolution with the STARLIB reaction rates and new convection prescriptions will provide, for the first time, statistically rigorous estimates for both their evolutionary structures and resulting nucleosynthesis. Significant insight into pre

  9. Absolute Humidity and the Seasonality of Influenza (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaman, J. L.; Pitzer, V.; Viboud, C.; Grenfell, B.; Goldstein, E.; Lipsitch, M.

    2010-12-01

    Much of the observed wintertime increase of mortality in temperate regions is attributed to seasonal influenza. A recent re-analysis of laboratory experiments indicates that absolute humidity strongly modulates the airborne survival and transmission of the influenza virus. Here we show that the onset of increased wintertime influenza-related mortality in the United States is associated with anomalously low absolute humidity levels during the prior weeks. We then use an epidemiological model, in which observed absolute humidity conditions temper influenza transmission rates, to successfully simulate the seasonal cycle of observed influenza-related mortality. The model results indicate that direct modulation of influenza transmissibility by absolute humidity alone is sufficient to produce this observed seasonality. These findings provide epidemiological support for the hypothesis that absolute humidity drives seasonal variations of influenza transmission in temperate regions. In addition, we show that variations of the basic and effective reproductive numbers for influenza, caused by seasonal changes in absolute humidity, are consistent with the general timing of pandemic influenza outbreaks observed for 2009 A/H1N1 in temperate regions. Indeed, absolute humidity conditions correctly identify the region of the United States vulnerable to a third, wintertime wave of pandemic influenza. These findings suggest that the timing of pandemic influenza outbreaks is controlled by a combination of absolute humidity conditions, levels of susceptibility and changes in population mixing and contact rates.

  10. Calculation of doublet capture rate for muon capture in deuterium within chiral effective field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, J.; Tater, M.; Truhlík, E.; Epelbaum, E.; Machleidt, R.; Ricci, P.

    2012-03-01

    The doublet capture rate Λ1 / 2 of the negative muon capture in deuterium is calculated employing the nuclear wave functions generated from accurate nucleon-nucleon (NN) potentials constructed at next-to-next-to-next-to-leading order of heavy-baryon chiral perturbation theory and the weak meson exchange current operator derived within the same formalism. All but one of the low-energy constants that enter the calculation were fixed from pion-nucleon and nucleon-nucleon scattering data. The low-energy constant dˆR (cD), which cannot be determined from the purely two-nucleon data, was extracted recently from the triton β-decay and the binding energies of the three-nucleon systems. The calculated values of Λ1 / 2 show a rather large spread for the used values of the dˆR. Precise measurement of Λ1 / 2 in the future will not only help to constrain the value of dˆR, but also provide a highly nontrivial test of the nuclear chiral EFT framework. Besides, the precise knowledge of the constant dˆR will allow for consistent calculations of other two-nucleon weak processes, such as proton-proton fusion and solar neutrino scattering on deuterons, which are important for astrophysics.

  11. From Molecular Dynamics to Kinetic Rate Theory: A Simple Example of Multiscale Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Greenwood, L.R.; Stoller, R.E.

    1998-11-30

    Radiation damage formation in iron has been investigated using the method of molecular dynamics simulation. The MD simulations have been used to determine primary defect production parameters for cascade energies up to 50 keV at temperatures from 100 to 900K. The energy dependence of these parameters has been used to determine appropriate neutron-energy-spectrum averaged damage production cross sections for various irradiation environments. Two applications of these effective cross sections are discussed. The first is an evaluation of neutron energy spectrum effects in commercial fission reactor pressure vessels. The second example deals with the use of these cross sections in the source term of a kinetic model used to predict void swelling and microstructural evolution. The simulation of the primary damage event by MD involves times less than 100 ps and a size scale of a few tens of nm, while the kinetic simulation encompasses several years and macroscopic sizes. This use of the MD results to develop an improved source term for rate theory modeling provides a simple example of multiscale modeling.

  12. Rate of mixing controls rate and outcome of autocatalytic processes: theory and microfluidic experiments with chemical reactions and blood coagulation.

    PubMed

    Pompano, Rebecca R; Li, Hung-Wing; Ismagilov, Rustem F

    2008-08-01

    This article demonstrates that the rate of mixing can regulate the rate and outcome of both biological and nonbiological autocatalytic reaction systems that display a threshold response to the concentration of an activator. Plug-based microfluidics was used to control the timing of reactions, the rate of mixing, and surface chemistry in blood clotting and its chemical model. Initiation of clotting of human blood plasma required addition of a critical concentration of thrombin. Clotting could be prevented by rapid mixing when thrombin was added near the critical concentration, and mixing also affected the rate of clotting when thrombin was added at concentrations far above the critical concentration in two clinical clotting assays for human plasma. This phenomenon was modeled by a simple mechanism--local and global competition between the clotting reaction, which autocatalytically produces an activator, and mixing, which removes the activator. Numerical simulations showed that the Damköhler number, which describes this competition, predicts the effects of mixing. Many biological systems are controlled by thresholds, and these results shed light on the dynamics of these systems in the presence of spatial heterogeneities and provide simple guidelines for designing and interpreting experiments with such systems.

  13. Island biogeographical theory: Can it be used to predict lotic recovery rates?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gore, James A.; Milner, Alexander M.

    1990-09-01

    Classic island biogeographic theory predicts that equilibrium will be reached when immigration and extinction rates are equal. These rates are modified by number of species in source area, number of intermediate islands, distance to recipient island, and size of intermediate islands. This general model has been variously modified and proposed to be a stochastic process with minimal competitive interaction or heavily deterministic. Predictive models of recovery (regardless of the end point chosen) have been based on the appropriateness of the MacArthur-Wilson models. Because disturbance frequency, severity, and intensity vary in their effect on community dynamics, we propose that disturbance levels should first be defined before evaluating the applicability of island biogeographical theory. Thus, we suggest a classification system of four disturbance levels based on recovery patterns by primary and secondary succession and faunal organization by primary (invasion of vacant areas) and secondary (remnant of previous community remains) processes. Level 1A disturbances completely destroy communities with no upstream or downstream sources of colonizers, while some component of near surface interstitial or hyporheic flora and fauna survive level 1B disturbances. Recovery has been reported to take from five years to longer than 25 years, when most invading colonists do not have an aerial form. Level 2 disturbances destroy the communities but leave upstream and downstream colonization sources (level 2A) and, sometimes, a hyporheic pool of colonizers (level 2B). Recovery studies have indicated primary succession and faunal structuring patterns (2A) with recovery times of 90-400 days or secondary succession and faunal structuring patterns (2B) with recovery times of 40-250 days. Level 3 disturbances result in reduction in species abundance and diversity along a stream reach; level 4 disturbances result in reduction of abundance and diversity in discrete patches. Both

  14. Theory of bi-molecular association dynamics in 2D for accurate model and experimental parameterization of binding rates

    PubMed Central

    Yogurtcu, Osman N.; Johnson, Margaret E.

    2015-01-01

    The dynamics of association between diffusing and reacting molecular species are routinely quantified using simple rate-equation kinetics that assume both well-mixed concentrations of species and a single rate constant for parameterizing the binding rate. In two-dimensions (2D), however, even when systems are well-mixed, the assumption of a single characteristic rate constant for describing association is not generally accurate, due to the properties of diffusional searching in dimensions d ≤ 2. Establishing rigorous bounds for discriminating between 2D reactive systems that will be accurately described by rate equations with a single rate constant, and those that will not, is critical for both modeling and experimentally parameterizing binding reactions restricted to surfaces such as cellular membranes. We show here that in regimes of intrinsic reaction rate (ka) and diffusion (D) parameters ka/D > 0.05, a single rate constant cannot be fit to the dynamics of concentrations of associating species independently of the initial conditions. Instead, a more sophisticated multi-parametric description than rate-equations is necessary to robustly characterize bimolecular reactions from experiment. Our quantitative bounds derive from our new analysis of 2D rate-behavior predicted from Smoluchowski theory. Using a recently developed single particle reaction-diffusion algorithm we extend here to 2D, we are able to test and validate the predictions of Smoluchowski theory and several other theories of reversible reaction dynamics in 2D for the first time. Finally, our results also mean that simulations of reactive systems in 2D using rate equations must be undertaken with caution when reactions have ka/D > 0.05, regardless of the simulation volume. We introduce here a simple formula for an adaptive concentration dependent rate constant for these chemical kinetics simulations which improves on existing formulas to better capture non-equilibrium reaction dynamics from dilute

  15. Theory and experimental results of transfer-NOE experiments. 1. The influence of the off rate versus cross-relaxation rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lippens, R. M.; Cerf, C.; Hallenga, K.

    The theory of the transferred nuclear Overhauser effect is presented in the framework of an extended relaxation matrix representation. This matrix representation allows a coherent description of all one- and two-dimensional experiments. We present analytical solutions for the buildup of magnetization in the 2D transfer-NOE experiment, for all ratios of the off rate k to the cross-relaxation rates R involved. We show that systematic deviations in distance determination occur when the off rate becomes comparable to or smaller than the relaxation rates. Experimental results on the peptide/protein system oxytocin/neurophysin confirming this analysis are presented. The importance of residual mobility in the bound ligand, as demonstrated by the experimental data, is also discussed.

  16. Database applicaton for absolute spectrophotometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bochkov, Valery V.; Shumko, Sergiy

    2002-12-01

    32-bit database application with multidocument interface for Windows has been developed to calculate absolute energy distributions of observed spectra. The original database contains wavelength calibrated observed spectra which had been already passed through apparatus reductions such as flatfielding, background and apparatus noise subtracting. Absolute energy distributions of observed spectra are defined in unique scale by means of registering them simultaneously with artificial intensity standard. Observations of sequence of spectrophotometric standards are used to define absolute energy of the artificial standard. Observations of spectrophotometric standards are used to define optical extinction in selected moments. FFT algorithm implemented in the application allows performing convolution (deconvolution) spectra with user-defined PSF. The object-oriented interface has been created using facilities of C++ libraries. Client/server model with Windows Socket functionality based on TCP/IP protocol is used to develop the application. It supports Dynamic Data Exchange conversation in server mode and uses Microsoft Exchange communication facilities.

  17. VARIABLE RATE APPLICATION OF SOIL HERBICIDES IN ARABLE CROPS: FROM THEORY TO PRACTICE.

    PubMed

    Heijting, S; Kempenaar, C

    2014-01-01

    Soil herbicides are applied around crop emergence and kill germinating weeds in the surface layer of the soil. These herbicides play an important role in the chemical management of weeds in major arable crops. From an environmental point of view there is a clear need for smarter application of these chemicals. This paper presents research done in The Netherlands on Variable Rate Application (VRA) of soil herbicides by taking into account spatial variation of the soil. Herbicides adsorbed to soil parameters such as clay or organic matter are not available for herbicidal activity. Decision Support Rules (DSR) describe the relation between the soil parameter and herbicide dosage needed for effectively controlling weeds. Research methods such as greenhouse trials, models and on farm research to develop DSR are discussed and results are presented. Another important ingredient for VRA of soil herbicides is an accurate soil map of the field. Sampling and subsequent interpolation is costly. Soil scans measuring a proxy that is subsequently translated into soil properties such as clay fraction and soil organic matter content offer a quicker way to achieve such maps but validation is needed. DSR is applied to the soil map to get the variable dosage map. The farmer combines this map with the routing, spray volume and spray boom width in the Farm Management Information System (FMIS), resulting in a task file. This task file can subsequently be read by the board computer resulting in a VRA spray map. Reduction in soil herbicide depends on the DSR, the spatial variation and pattern of the soil, the spatial configuration of the routing and the technical advances of the spray equipment. Recently, within the framework the Programma Precisie Landbouw, first steps were made to test and implement this in practice. Currently, theory and practice of VRA of soil herbicides is developed within the research program IJKakker in close cooperation with pioneering farmers in The Netherlands.

  18. Absolute classification with unsupervised clustering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeon, Byeungwoo; Landgrebe, D. A.

    1992-01-01

    An absolute classification algorithm is proposed in which the class definition through training samples or otherwise is required only for a particular class of interest. The absolute classification is considered as a problem of unsupervised clustering when one cluster is known initially. The definitions and statistics of the other classes are automatically developed through the weighted unsupervised clustering procedure, which is developed to keep the cluster corresponding to the class of interest from losing its identity as the class of interest. Once all the classes are developed, a conventional relative classifier such as the maximum-likelihood classifier is used in the classification.

  19. Is the Unemployment Rate of Women Too Low? A Direct Test of the Economic Theory of Job Search.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandell, Steven H.

    To test the economic theory of job search and the rationality of job search behavior by unemployed married women, the importance of reservation wages (or wages requested for employment) was studied for its effect on the duration of unemployment and its relationship to the subsequent rate of pay upon reemployment. Models were established to explain…

  20. Item Response Theory Analyses of Adult Self-Ratings of the ADHD Symptoms in the Current Symptoms Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gomez, Rapson

    2011-01-01

    The graded response model, which is based on item response theory, was used to evaluate the psychometric properties of adult self-ratings (N = 852) of the attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder inattention, hyperactivity, and impulsivity symptoms presented in the Current Symptoms Scale. This scale has four ordered response categories. The…

  1. Diffusion of Innovation Theory and Xbox Live: Examining Minority Gamers' Responses and Rate of Adoption to Changes in Xbox Live

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Kishonna L.

    2012-01-01

    This article examines the response of minority gamers as they adopt new innovations in Xbox Live. Using diffusion of innovation theory, specific attention is given to gamers' rate of adoption of the new Xbox Live environment, which was a recent update to the Xbox Live interface. By employing virtual ethnography, observations, and interviews reveal…

  2. Absolute transition probabilities of phosphorus.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, M. H.; Roig, R. A.; Bengtson, R. D.

    1971-01-01

    Use of a gas-driven shock tube to measure the absolute strengths of 21 P I lines and 126 P II lines (from 3300 to 6900 A). Accuracy for prominent, isolated neutral and ionic lines is estimated to be 28 to 40% and 18 to 30%, respectively. The data and the corresponding theoretical predictions are examined for conformity with the sum rules.-

  3. Absolute Standards for Climate Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leckey, J.

    2016-10-01

    In a world of changing climate, political uncertainty, and ever-changing budgets, the benefit of measurements traceable to SI standards increases by the day. To truly resolve climate change trends on a decadal time scale, on-orbit measurements need to be referenced to something that is both absolute and unchanging. One such mission is the Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO) that will measure a variety of climate variables with an unprecedented accuracy to definitively quantify climate change. In the CLARREO mission, we will utilize phase change cells in which a material is melted to calibrate the temperature of a blackbody that can then be observed by a spectrometer. A material's melting point is an unchanging physical constant that, through a series of transfers, can ultimately calibrate a spectrometer on an absolute scale. CLARREO consists of two primary instruments: an infrared (IR) spectrometer and a reflected solar (RS) spectrometer. The mission will contain orbiting radiometers with sufficient accuracy to calibrate other space-based instrumentation and thus transferring the absolute traceability. The status of various mission options will be presented.

  4. Microcanonical unimolecular rate theory at surfaces. I. Dissociative chemisorption of methane on Pt(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bukoski, A.; Blumling, D.; Harrison, I.

    2003-01-01

    A model of gas-surface reactivity is developed based on the ideas that (a) adsorbate chemistry is a local phenomenon, (b) the active system energy of an adsorbed molecule and a few immediately adjacent surface atoms suffices to fix microcanonical rate constants for surface kinetic processes such as desorption and dissociation, and (c) energy exchange between the local adsorbate-surface complexes and the surrounding substrate can be modeled via a Master equation to describe the system/heat reservoir coupling. The resulting microcanonical unimolecular rate theory (MURT) for analyzing and predicting both thermal equilibrium and nonequilibrium kinetics for surface reactions is applied to the dissociative chemisorption of methane on Pt(111). Energy exchange due to phonon-mediated energy transfer between the local adsorbate-surface complexes and the surface is explored and estimated to be insignificant for the reactive experimental conditions investigated here. Simulations of experimental molecular beam data indicate that the apparent threshold energy for CH4 dissociative chemisorption on Pt(111) is E0=0.61 eV (over a C-H stretch reaction coordinate), the local adsorbate-surface complex includes three surface oscillators, and the pooled energy from 16 active degrees of freedom is available to help surmount the dissociation barrier. For nonequilibrium molecular beam experiments, predictions are made for the initial methane dissociative sticking coefficient as a function of isotope, normal translational energy, molecular beam nozzle temperature, and surface temperature. MURT analysis of the thermal programmed desorption of CH4 physisorbed on Pt(111) finds the physisorption well depth is 0.16 eV. Thermal equilibrium dissociative sticking coefficients for methane on Pt(111) are predicted for the temperature range from 250-2000 K. Tolman relations for the activation energy under thermal equilibrium conditions and for a variety of "effective activation energies" under

  5. Rate theory of solvent exchange and kinetics of Li+ - BF4-/PF6- ion pairs in acetonitrile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dang, Liem X.; Chang, Tsun-Mei

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we describe our efforts to apply rate theories in studies of solvent exchange around Li+ and the kinetics of ion pairings in lithium-ion batteries (LIBs). We report one of the first computer simulations of the exchange dynamics around solvated Li+ in acetonitrile (ACN), which is a common solvent used in LIBs. We also provide details of the ion-pairing kinetics of Li+-[BF4] and Li+-[PF6] in ACN. Using our polarizable force-field models and employing classical rate theories of chemical reactions, we examine the ACN exchange process between the first and second solvation shells around Li+. We calculate exchange rates using transition state theory and weighted them with the transmission coefficients determined by the reactive flux, Impey, Madden, and McDonald approaches, and Grote-Hynes theory. We found the relaxation times changed from 180 ps to 4600 ps and from 30 ps to 280 ps for Li+-[BF4] and Li+-[PF6] ion pairs, respectively. These results confirm that the solvent response to the kinetics of ion pairing is significant. Our results also show that, in addition to affecting the free energy of solvation into ACN, the anion type also should significantly influence the kinetics of ion pairing. These results will increase our understanding of the thermodynamic and kinetic properties of LIB systems.

  6. Rate theory of solvent exchange and kinetics of Li(+) - BF4 (-)/PF6 (-) ion pairs in acetonitrile.

    PubMed

    Dang, Liem X; Chang, Tsun-Mei

    2016-09-07

    In this paper, we describe our efforts to apply rate theories in studies of solvent exchange around Li(+) and the kinetics of ion pairings in lithium-ion batteries (LIBs). We report one of the first computer simulations of the exchange dynamics around solvated Li(+) in acetonitrile (ACN), which is a common solvent used in LIBs. We also provide details of the ion-pairing kinetics of Li(+)-[BF4] and Li(+)-[PF6] in ACN. Using our polarizable force-field models and employing classical rate theories of chemical reactions, we examine the ACN exchange process between the first and second solvation shells around Li(+). We calculate exchange rates using transition state theory and weighted them with the transmission coefficients determined by the reactive flux, Impey, Madden, and McDonald approaches, and Grote-Hynes theory. We found the relaxation times changed from 180 ps to 4600 ps and from 30 ps to 280 ps for Li(+)-[BF4] and Li(+)-[PF6] ion pairs, respectively. These results confirm that the solvent response to the kinetics of ion pairing is significant. Our results also show that, in addition to affecting the free energy of solvation into ACN, the anion type also should significantly influence the kinetics of ion pairing. These results will increase our understanding of the thermodynamic and kinetic properties of LIB systems.

  7. ABSOLUTE PROPERTIES OF THE ECLIPSING BINARY STAR BF DRACONIS

    SciTech Connect

    Sandberg Lacy, Claud H.; Torres, Guillermo; Fekel, Francis C.; Sabby, Jeffrey A.; Claret, Antonio E-mail: gtorres@cfa.harvard.edu E-mail: jsabby@siue.edu

    2012-06-15

    BF Dra is now known to be an eccentric double-lined F6+F6 binary star with relatively deep (0.7 mag) partial eclipses. Previous studies of the system are improved with 7494 differential photometric observations from the URSA WebScope and 9700 from the NFO WebScope, 106 high-resolution spectroscopic observations from the Tennessee State University 2 m automatic spectroscopic telescope and the 1 m coude-feed spectrometer at Kitt Peak National Observatory, and 31 accurate radial velocities from the CfA. Very accurate (better than 0.6%) masses and radii are determined from analysis of the two new light curves and four radial velocity curves. Theoretical models match the absolute properties of the stars at an age of about 2.72 Gyr and [Fe/H] = -0.17, and tidal theory correctly confirms that the orbit should still be eccentric. Our observations of BF Dra constrain the convective core overshooting parameter to be larger than about 0.13 H{sub p}. We find, however, that standard tidal theory is unable to match the observed slow rotation rates of the components' surface layers.

  8. Behavioral momentum theory fails to account for the effects of reinforcement rate on resurgence.

    PubMed

    Craig, Andrew R; Shahan, Timothy A

    2016-05-01

    The behavioral-momentum model of resurgence predicts reinforcer rates within a resurgence preparation should have three effects on target behavior. First, higher reinforcer rates in baseline (Phase 1) produce more persistent target behavior during extinction plus alternative reinforcement. Second, higher rate alternative reinforcement during Phase 2 generates greater disruption of target responding during extinction. Finally, higher rates of either reinforcement source should produce greater responding when alternative reinforcement is suspended in Phase 3. Recent empirical reports have produced mixed results in terms of these predictions. Thus, the present experiment further examined reinforcer-rate effects on persistence and resurgence. Rats pressed target levers for high-rate or low-rate variable-interval food during Phase 1. In Phase 2, target-lever pressing was extinguished, an alternative nose-poke became available, and nose-poking produced either high-rate variable-interval, low-rate variable-interval, or no (an extinction control) alternative reinforcement. Alternative reinforcement was suspended in Phase 3. For groups that received no alternative reinforcement, target-lever pressing was less persistent following high-rate than low-rate Phase-1 reinforcement. Target behavior was more persistent with low-rate alternative reinforcement than with high-rate alternative reinforcement or extinction alone. Finally, no differences in Phase-3 responding were observed for groups that received either high-rate or low-rate alternative reinforcement, and resurgence occurred only following high-rate alternative reinforcement. These findings are inconsistent with the momentum-based model of resurgence. We conclude this model mischaracterizes the effects of reinforcer rates on persistence and resurgence of operant behavior.

  9. Theory of activated-rate processes under shear with application to shear-induced aggregation of colloids.

    PubMed

    Zaccone, Alessio; Wu, Hua; Gentili, Daniele; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2009-11-01

    Using an approximation scheme within the convective diffusion (two-body Smoluchowski) equation framework, we unveil the shear-driven aggregation mechanism at the origin of structure formation in sheared colloidal systems. The theory, verified against numerics and experiments, explains the induction time followed by explosive (irreversible) rise of viscosity observed in charge-stabilized colloidal and protein systems under steady shear. The Arrhenius-type equation with shear derived here, extending Kramers' theory in the presence of shear, clearly demonstrates the important role of shear drive in activated-rate processes as they are encountered in soft condensed matter.

  10. Measurement Quality of the Chinese Early Childhood Program Rating Scale: An Investigation Using Multivariate Generalizability Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Dezhi; Hu, Bi Ying; Fan, Xitao; Li, Kejian

    2014-01-01

    Adapted from the Early Childhood Environment Rating Scale-Revised, the Chinese Early Childhood Program Rating Scale (CECPRS) is a culturally comparable measure for assessing the quality of early childhood education and care programs in the Chinese cultural/social contexts. In this study, 176 kindergarten classrooms were rated with CECPRS on eight…

  11. Clock time is absolute and universal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Xinhang

    2015-09-01

    A critical error is found in the Special Theory of Relativity (STR): mixing up the concepts of the STR abstract time of a reference frame and the displayed time of a physical clock, which leads to use the properties of the abstract time to predict time dilation on physical clocks and all other physical processes. Actually, a clock can never directly measure the abstract time, but can only record the result of a physical process during a period of the abstract time such as the number of cycles of oscillation which is the multiplication of the abstract time and the frequency of oscillation. After Lorentz Transformation, the abstract time of a reference frame expands by a factor gamma, but the frequency of a clock decreases by the same factor gamma, and the resulting multiplication i.e. the displayed time of a moving clock remains unchanged. That is, the displayed time of any physical clock is an invariant of Lorentz Transformation. The Lorentz invariance of the displayed times of clocks can further prove within the framework of STR our earth based standard physical time is absolute, universal and independent of inertial reference frames as confirmed by both the physical fact of the universal synchronization of clocks on the GPS satellites and clocks on the earth, and the theoretical existence of the absolute and universal Galilean time in STR which has proved that time dilation and space contraction are pure illusions of STR. The existence of the absolute and universal time in STR has directly denied that the reference frame dependent abstract time of STR is the physical time, and therefore, STR is wrong and all its predictions can never happen in the physical world.

  12. Theory of Strength and High-Rate Plasticity in BCC Metals Laser-Driven to High Pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudd, Robert E.; Barton, N. R.; Cavallo, R. M.; Hawreliak, J. A.; Maddox, B. R.; Park, H.-S.; Prisbrey, S. T.; Remington, B. A.; Comley, A. J.; Ross, P. W.; Brickner, N.

    2012-10-01

    High-rate plastic deformation is the subject of increasing experimental activity. High energy laser platforms such as those at the National Ignition Facility and the Laboratory for Laser Energetics offer the possibility to study plasticity at extremely high rates in shock waves and, importantly, in non-shock ramp-compression waves. Here we describe the theory of high-rate deformation of metals and how high energy lasers can be, and are, used to study the mechanical strength of materials under extreme conditions. Specifically, we describe how LLNL's multiscale strength model has been used to interpret the microscopic plastic flow in laser-driven Rayleigh-Taylor strength experiments, and how molecular dynamics (MD) and plasticity theory have been used to help understand in-situ diffraction based strength experiments for tantalum. The multiscale model provides information about the dislocation flow associated with plasticity and makes predictions that are compared with the experimental in-situ radiography of the Rayleigh-Taylor growth rate. We also use multi-million atom MD simulations inform the analytic theory of 1D to 3D plastic relaxation and compare to diffraction.

  13. Chimpanzee choice rates in competitive games match equilibrium game theory predictions.

    PubMed

    Martin, Christopher Flynn; Bhui, Rahul; Bossaerts, Peter; Matsuzawa, Tetsuro; Camerer, Colin

    2014-06-05

    The capacity for strategic thinking about the payoff-relevant actions of conspecifics is not well understood across species. We use game theory to make predictions about choices and temporal dynamics in three abstract competitive situations with chimpanzee participants. Frequencies of chimpanzee choices are extremely close to equilibrium (accurate-guessing) predictions, and shift as payoffs change, just as equilibrium theory predicts. The chimpanzee choices are also closer to the equilibrium prediction, and more responsive to past history and payoff changes, than two samples of human choices from experiments in which humans were also initially uninformed about opponent payoffs and could not communicate verbally. The results are consistent with a tentative interpretation of game theory as explaining evolved behavior, with the additional hypothesis that chimpanzees may retain or practice a specialized capacity to adjust strategy choice during competition to perform at least as well as, or better than, humans have.

  14. The arcing rate for a High Voltage Solar Array - Theory, experiment and predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hastings, Daniel E.; Cho, Mengu; Kuninaka, Hitoshi

    1992-01-01

    All solar arrays have biased surfaces which can be exposed to the space environment. It has been observed that when the array bias is less than a few hundred volts negative then the exposed conductive surfaces may undergo arcing in the space plasma. A theory for arcing is developed on these high voltage solar arrays which ascribes the arcing to electric field runaway at the interface of the plasma, conductor and solar cell dielectric. Experiments were conducted in the laboratory for the High Voltage Solar Array (HVSA) experiment which will fly on the Japanese Space Flyer Unit (SFU) in 1994. The theory was compared in detail to the experiment and shown to give a reasonable explanation for the data. The combined theory and ground experiments were then used to develop predictions for the SFU flight.

  15. Arcing rates for High Voltage Solar Arrays - Theory, experiment, and predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hastings, Daniel E.; Cho, Mengu; Kuninaka, Hitoshi

    1992-01-01

    All solar arrays have biased surfaces that can be exposed to the space environment. It has been observed that when the array bias is less than a few hundred volts negative, then the exposed conductive surfaces may undergo arcing in the space plasma. A theory for arcing is developed on these high voltage solar arrays that ascribes the arcing to electric field runaway at the interface of the plasma, conductor, and solar cell dielectric. Experiments were conducted in the laboratory for the High Voltage Solar Array experiment that will fly on the Japanese Space Flyer Unit (SFU) in 1994. The theory was compared in detail with the experiment and shown to give a reasonable explanation for the data. The combined theory and ground experiments were then used to develop predictions for the SFU flight.

  16. Absolute calibration of optical flats

    DOEpatents

    Sommargren, Gary E.

    2005-04-05

    The invention uses the phase shifting diffraction interferometer (PSDI) to provide a true point-by-point measurement of absolute flatness over the surface of optical flats. Beams exiting the fiber optics in a PSDI have perfect spherical wavefronts. The measurement beam is reflected from the optical flat and passed through an auxiliary optic to then be combined with the reference beam on a CCD. The combined beams include phase errors due to both the optic under test and the auxiliary optic. Standard phase extraction algorithms are used to calculate this combined phase error. The optical flat is then removed from the system and the measurement fiber is moved to recombine the two beams. The newly combined beams include only the phase errors due to the auxiliary optic. When the second phase measurement is subtracted from the first phase measurement, the absolute phase error of the optical flat is obtained.

  17. The Absolute Spectrum Polarimeter (ASP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kogut, A. J.

    2010-01-01

    The Absolute Spectrum Polarimeter (ASP) is an Explorer-class mission to map the absolute intensity and linear polarization of the cosmic microwave background and diffuse astrophysical foregrounds over the full sky from 30 GHz to 5 THz. The principal science goal is the detection and characterization of linear polarization from an inflationary epoch in the early universe, with tensor-to-scalar ratio r much greater than 1O(raised to the power of { -3}) and Compton distortion y < 10 (raised to the power of{-6}). We describe the ASP instrument and mission architecture needed to detect the signature of an inflationary epoch in the early universe using only 4 semiconductor bolometers.

  18. Physics of negative absolute temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, Eitan; Penrose, Oliver

    2017-01-01

    Negative absolute temperatures were introduced into experimental physics by Purcell and Pound, who successfully applied this concept to nuclear spins; nevertheless, the concept has proved controversial: a recent article aroused considerable interest by its claim, based on a classical entropy formula (the "volume entropy") due to Gibbs, that negative temperatures violated basic principles of statistical thermodynamics. Here we give a thermodynamic analysis that confirms the negative-temperature interpretation of the Purcell-Pound experiments. We also examine the principal arguments that have been advanced against the negative temperature concept; we find that these arguments are not logically compelling, and moreover that the underlying "volume" entropy formula leads to predictions inconsistent with existing experimental results on nuclear spins. We conclude that, despite the counterarguments, negative absolute temperatures make good theoretical sense and did occur in the experiments designed to produce them.

  19. Estimating Standard Errors of Cut Scores for Item Rating and Mapmark Procedures: A Generalizability Theory Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yin, Ping; Sconing, James

    2008-01-01

    Standard-setting methods are widely used to determine cut scores on a test that examinees must meet for a certain performance standard. Because standard setting is a measurement procedure, it is important to evaluate variability of cut scores resulting from the standard-setting process. Generalizability theory is used in this study to estimate…

  20. Social Disorganization Theory and Crime Rates on California Community College Campuses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ravalin, Tamara; Tevis, Tenisha

    2017-01-01

    Recent media attention concerning the escalation of crime on college campuses has created a sense of urgency to address how crime will impact the largest community college system in the United States, California Community Colleges. Crime can deter academic success and social engagement. This study utilizes social disorganization theory to examine…

  1. Kinetic limitations on the diffusional control theory of the ablation rate of carbon.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maahs, H. G.

    1971-01-01

    It is shown that the theoretical maximum oxidation rate is limited in many cases even at temperatures much higher than 1650 deg K, not by oxygen transport, but by the kinetics of the carbon-oxygen reaction itself. Mass-loss rates have been calculated at air pressures of 0.01 atm, 1 atm, and 100 atm. It is found that at high temperatures the rate of the oxidation reaction is much slower than has generally been assumed on the basis of a simple linear extrapolation of Scala's 'fast' and 'slow' rate expressions. Accordingly it cannot be assumed that a transport limitation inevitably must be reached at high temperatures.

  2. An Estimation of Turbulent Kinetic Energy and Energy Dissipation Rate Based on Atmospheric Boundary Layer Similarity Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, Jongil; Arya, S. Pal; Shaohua, Shen; Lin, Yuh-Lang; Proctor, Fred H. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Algorithms are developed to extract atmospheric boundary layer profiles for turbulence kinetic energy (TKE) and energy dissipation rate (EDR), with data from a meteorological tower as input. The profiles are based on similarity theory and scalings for the atmospheric boundary layer. The calculated profiles of EDR and TKE are required to match the observed values at 5 and 40 m. The algorithms are coded for operational use and yield plausible profiles over the diurnal variation of the atmospheric boundary layer.

  3. Absolute nonlocality via distributed computing without communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czekaj, Ł.; Pawłowski, M.; Vértesi, T.; Grudka, A.; Horodecki, M.; Horodecki, R.

    2015-09-01

    Understanding the role that quantum entanglement plays as a resource in various information processing tasks is one of the crucial goals of quantum information theory. Here we propose an alternative perspective for studying quantum entanglement: distributed computation of functions without communication between nodes. To formalize this approach, we propose identity games. Surprisingly, despite no signaling, we obtain that nonlocal quantum strategies beat classical ones in terms of winning probability for identity games originating from certain bipartite and multipartite functions. Moreover we show that, for a majority of functions, access to general nonsignaling resources boosts success probability two times in comparison to classical ones for a number of large enough outputs. Because there are no constraints on the inputs and no processing of the outputs in the identity games, they detect very strong types of correlations: absolute nonlocality.

  4. Role of metabolic rate and DNA-repair in Drosophila aging Implications for the mitochondrial mutation theory of aging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miquel, J.; Binnard, R.; Fleming, J. E.

    1983-01-01

    The notion that injury to mitochondrial DNA is a cause of intrinsic aging was tested by correlating the different respiration rates of several wild strains of Drosophila melanogaster with the life-spans. Respiration rate and aging in a mutant of D. melanogaster deficient in postreplication repair were also investigated. In agreement with the rate of living theory, there was an inverse relation between oxygen consumption and median life-span in flies having normal DNA repair. The mutant showed an abnormally low life-span as compared to the controls and also exhibited significant deficiency in mating fitness and a depressed metabolic rate. Therefore, the short life-span of the mutant may be due to the congenital condition rather than to accelerated aging.

  5. Predicting Offender-Generated Exchange Rates: Implications for a Theory of Sentence Severity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    May, David C.; Wood, Peter B.; Mooney, Jennifer L.; Minor, Kevin I.

    2005-01-01

    We solicited offender-generated exchange rates between prison and several noncustodial sanctions from a sample of 588 offenders currently serving community-based punishments. We then regressed these exchange rates on demographic, attitudinal, and correctional experience indicators. Males, Blacks, older offenders, offenders with prison experience,…

  6. Effects of simulated increased gravity on the rate of aging of rats - Implications for the rate of living theory of aging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Economos, A. C.; Ballard, R. C.; Blunden, M.; Miquel, J.; Lindseth, K. A.; Fleming, J.; Philpott, D. E.; Oyama, J.

    1982-01-01

    It was found that the rate of aging of 17 month old rats which had been exposed to 3.14 times normal gravity in an animal centrifuge for 8 months was larger than that of the controls as determined by the apparently elevated lipofuscin content in heart and kidney, reduced numbers and increased size of mitochondria of heart tissue, and inferior liver mitochondria respiration. Steady-state food intake per day per kg body weight, which is presumably proportional to rate of living or specific basal metabolic expenditure, was found to be about 18 percent higher than in the controls after an initial 2 month adaptation period. Although half of the centrifuged animals lived only a little shorter than the controls (average about 343 vs. 364 days on the average, statistically nonsignificant), the remaining half (longest survivors) lived on the centrifuge an average of 520 days (range 483-572) compared to an average of 574 days (range 502-615) for the controls, computed from the onset of centrifugation, or 11 percent shorter. These findings indicate that a moderate increase of the level of basal metabolism of young adult rats adapted to hypergravity compared to controls in normal gravity is accompanied by a roughly similar increase in the rate of organ aging and reduction of survival, in agreement with Pearl's (1928) rate of living theory of aging, previously experimentally demonstrated only in poikilotherms.

  7. Computing decay rates for new physics theories with FEYNRULES and MADGRAPH 5_AMC@NLO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alwall, Johan; Duhr, Claude; Fuks, Benjamin; Mattelaer, Olivier; Öztürk, Deniz Gizem; Shen, Chia-Hsien

    2015-12-01

    We present new features of the FEYNRULES and MADGRAPH 5_AMC@NLO programs for the automatic computation of decay widths that consistently include channels of arbitrary final-state multiplicity. The implementations are generic enough so that they can be used in the framework of any quantum field theory, possibly including higher-dimensional operators. We extend at the same time the conventions of the Universal FEYNRULES Output (or UFO) format to include decay tables and information on the total widths. We finally provide a set of representative examples of the usage of the new functions of the different codes in the framework of the Standard Model, the Higgs Effective Field Theory, the Strongly Interacting Light Higgs model and the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model and compare the results to available literature and programs for validation purposes.

  8. The Choice of Discount Rate Applicable to Government Resource Use: Theory and Limitations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-12-01

    and later by others in the field of growth theory. See Gale (1967). Alternative objective functions such as the Cesaro mean or 13 criterion cannot be...some. Given P(t) is the payoff in period t, the Cesaro mean is T lir [1/T] 2 P(t), and Abel limit is lim (I - 6) 2;6- P(t) t -0 t-0 14 Before leaving

  9. C2H2 absolutely optical frequency-stabilized and 40 GHz repetition-rate-stabilized, regeneratively mode-locked picosecond erbium fiber laser at 1.53 microm.

    PubMed

    Nakazawa, Masataka; Kasai, Keisuke; Yoshida, Masato

    2008-11-15

    We have succeeded in the simultaneous stabilization of the optical frequency and repetition rate of a regeneratively mode-locked picosecond erbium-doped fiber ring laser. The optical frequency was locked to the molecular absorption of C2H2 in the 1.5 microm band, and the repetition rate was stabilized to a 40 GHz synthesizer by using a microwave phase-locked loop. The optical frequency stability of the pulse train reached 2x10(-11) for tau=10-100 s. The key to success is the independent control of the repetition rate without disturbing the optical cavity condition.

  10. STS-9 Shuttle grow - Ram angle effect and absolute intensities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swenson, G. R.; Mende, S. B.; Clifton, K. S.

    1986-01-01

    Visible imagery from Space Shuttle mission STS-9 (Spacelab 1) has been analyzed for the ram angle effect and the absolute intensity of glow. The data are compared with earlier measurements and the anomalous high intensities at large ram angles are confirmed. Absolute intensities of the ram glow on the shuttle tile, at 6563 A, are observed to be about 20 times more intense than those measured on the AE-E spacecraft. Implications of these observations for an existing theory of glow involving NO2 are presented.

  11. The Modellers' Halting Foray into Ecological Theory: Or, What is This Thing Called 'Growth Rate'?

    PubMed

    Deveau, Michael; Karsten, Richard; Teismann, Holger

    2015-06-01

    This discussion paper describes the attempt of an imagined group of non-ecologists ("Modellers") to determine the population growth rate from field data. The Modellers wrestle with the multiple definitions of the growth rate available in the literature and the fact that, in their modelling, it appears to be drastically model-dependent, which seems to throw into question the very concept itself. Specifically, they observe that six representative models used to capture the data produce growth-rate values, which differ significantly. Almost ready to concede that the problem they set for themselves is ill-posed, they arrive at an alternative point of view that not only preserves the identity of the concept of the growth rate, but also helps discriminate between competing models for capturing the data. This is accomplished by assessing how robustly a given model is able to generate growth-rate values from randomized time-series data. This leads to the proposal of an iterative approach to ecological modelling in which the definition of theoretical concepts (such as the growth rate) and model selection complement each other. The paper is based on high-quality field data of mites on apple trees and may be called a "data-driven opinion piece".

  12. Examining the limits of time reweighting and Kramers' rate theory to obtain correct kinetics from accelerated molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Xin, Yao; Doshi, Urmi; Hamelberg, Donald

    2010-06-14

    Accelerated molecular dynamics simulations are routinely being used to recover the correct canonical probability distributions corresponding to the original potential energy landscape of biomolecular systems. However, the limits of time reweighting, based on transition state theory, in obtaining true kinetic rates from accelerated molecular dynamics for biomolecular systems are less obvious. Here, we investigate this issue by studying the kinetics of cis-trans isomerization of peptidic omega bond by accelerated molecular dynamics. We find that time reweighting is valid for obtaining true kinetics when the original potential is not altered at the transition state regions, as expected. When the original potential landscape is modified such that the applied boost potential alters the transition state regions, time reweighting fails to reproduce correct kinetics and the reweighted rate is much slower than the true rate. By adopting the overdamped limit of Kramers' rate theory, we are successful in recovering correct kinetics irrespective of whether or not the transition state regions are modified. Furthermore, we tested the validity of the acceleration weight factor from the path integral formalism for obtaining the correct kinetics of cis-trans isomerization. It was found that this formulation of the weight factor is not suitable for long time scale processes such as cis-trans isomerization with high energy barriers.

  13. Analytical Theory of the Destruction Terms in Dissipation Rate Transport Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubinstein, Robert; Zhou, Ye

    1996-01-01

    Modeled dissipation rate transport equations are often derived by invoking various hypotheses to close correlations in the corresponding exact equations. D. C. Leslie suggested that these models might be derived instead from Kraichnan's wavenumber space integrals for inertial range transport power. This suggestion is applied to the destruction terms in the dissipation rate equations for incompressible turbulence, buoyant turbulence, rotating incompressible turbulence, and rotating buoyant turbulence. Model constants like C(epsilon 2) are expressed as integrals; convergence of these integrals implies the absence of Reynolds number dependence in the corresponding destruction term. The dependence of C(epsilon 2) on rotation rate emerges naturally; sensitization of the modeled dissipation rate equation to rotation is not required. A buoyancy related effect which is absent in the exact transport equation for temperature variance dissipation, but which sometimes improves computational predictions, also arises naturally. Both the presence of this effect and the appropriate time scale in the modeled transport equation depend on whether Bolgiano or Kolmogorov inertial range scaling applies. A simple application of these methods leads to a preliminary, dissipation rate equation for rotating buoyant turbulence.

  14. Chemically frozen multicomponent boundary layer theory of salt and/or ash deposition rates from combustion gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosner, D. E.; Chen, B.-K.; Fryburg, G. C.; Kohl, F. J.

    1979-01-01

    There is increased interest in, and concern about, deposition and corrosion phenomena in combustion systems containing inorganic condensible vapors and particles (salts, ash). To meet the need for a computationally tractable deposition rate theory general enough to embrace multielement/component situations of current and future gas turbine and magnetogasdynamic interest, a multicomponent chemically 'frozen' boundary layer (CFBL) deposition theory is presented and its applicability to the special case of Na2SO4 deposition from seeded laboratory burner combustion products is demonstrated. The coupled effects of Fick (concentration) diffusion and Soret (thermal) diffusion are included, along with explicit corrections for effects of variable properties and free stream turbulence. The present formulation is sufficiently general to include the transport of particles provided they are small enough to be formally treated as heavy molecules. Quantitative criteria developed to delineate the domain of validity of CFBL-rate theory suggest considerable practical promise for the present framework, which is characterized by relatively modest demands for new input information and computer time.

  15. Application of decision-making theory to the regulation of muscular work rate during self-paced competitive endurance activity.

    PubMed

    Renfree, Andrew; Martin, Louise; Micklewright, Dominic; St Clair Gibson, Alan

    2014-02-01

    Successful participation in competitive endurance activities requires continual regulation of muscular work rate in order to maximise physiological performance capacities, meaning that individuals must make numerous decisions with regards to the muscular work rate selected at any point in time. Decisions relating to the setting of appropriate goals and the overall strategic approach to be utilised are made prior to the commencement of an event, whereas tactical decisions are made during the event itself. This review examines current theories of decision-making in an attempt to explain the manner in which regulation of muscular work is achieved during athletic activity. We describe rational and heuristic theories, and relate these to current models of regulatory processes during self-paced exercise in an attempt to explain observations made in both laboratory and competitive environments. Additionally, we use rational and heuristic theories in an attempt to explain the influence of the presence of direct competitors on the quality of the decisions made during these activities. We hypothesise that although both rational and heuristic models can plausibly explain many observed behaviours in competitive endurance activities, the complexity of the environment in which such activities occur would imply that effective rational decision-making is unlikely. However, at present, many proposed models of the regulatory process share similarities with rational models. We suggest enhanced understanding of the decision-making process during self-paced activities is crucial in order to improve the ability to understand regulation of performance and performance outcomes during athletic activity.

  16. Evaluation of Reaction Rate Theory and Monte Carlo Methods for Application to Radiation-Induced Microstructural Characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Stoller, Roger E; Golubov, Stanislav I; Becquart, C. S.; Domain, C.

    2007-08-01

    The multiscale modeling scheme encompasses models from the atomistic to the continuum scale. Phenomena at the mesoscale are typically simulated using reaction rate theory, Monte Carlo, or phase field models. These mesoscale models are appropriate for application to problems that involve intermediate length scales, and timescales from those characteristic of diffusion to long-term microstructural evolution (~s to years). Although the rate theory and Monte Carlo models can be used simulate the same phenomena, some of the details are handled quite differently in the two approaches. Models employing the rate theory have been extensively used to describe radiation-induced phenomena such as void swelling and irradiation creep. The primary approximations in such models are time- and spatial averaging of the radiation damage source term, and spatial averaging of the microstructure into an effective medium. Kinetic Monte Carlo models can account for these spatial and temporal correlations; their primary limitation is the computational burden which is related to the size of the simulation cell. A direct comparison of RT and object kinetic MC simulations has been made in the domain of point defect cluster dynamics modeling, which is relevant to the evolution (both nucleation and growth) of radiation-induced defect structures. The primary limitations of the OKMC model are related to computational issues. Even with modern computers, the maximum simulation cell size and the maximum dose (typically much less than 1 dpa) that can be simulated are limited. In contrast, even very detailed RT models can simulate microstructural evolution for doses up 100 dpa or greater in clock times that are relatively short. Within the context of the effective medium, essentially any defect density can be simulated. Overall, the agreement between the two methods is best for irradiation conditions which produce a high density of defects (lower temperature and higher displacement rate), and for

  17. Philosophy of the Spike: Rate-Based vs. Spike-Based Theories of the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Brette, Romain

    2015-01-01

    Does the brain use a firing rate code or a spike timing code? Considering this controversial question from an epistemological perspective, I argue that progress has been hampered by its problematic phrasing. It takes the perspective of an external observer looking at whether those two observables vary with stimuli, and thereby misses the relevant question: which one has a causal role in neural activity? When rephrased in a more meaningful way, the rate-based view appears as an ad hoc methodological postulate, one that is practical but with virtually no empirical or theoretical support. PMID:26617496

  18. Articulated Multimedia Physics, Lesson 14, Gases, The Gas Laws, and Absolute Temperature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York Inst. of Tech., Old Westbury.

    As the fourteenth lesson of the Articulated Multimedia Physics Course, instructional materials are presented in this study guide with relation to gases, gas laws, and absolute temperature. The topics are concerned with the kinetic theory of gases, thermometric scales, Charles' law, ideal gases, Boyle's law, absolute zero, and gas pressures. The…

  19. The absolute threshold of cone vision

    PubMed Central

    Koeing, Darran; Hofer, Heidi

    2013-01-01

    We report measurements of the absolute threshold of cone vision, which has been previously underestimated due to sub-optimal conditions or overly strict subjective response criteria. We avoided these limitations by using optimized stimuli and experimental conditions while having subjects respond within a rating scale framework. Small (1′ fwhm), brief (34 msec), monochromatic (550 nm) stimuli were foveally presented at multiple intensities in dark-adapted retina for 5 subjects. For comparison, 4 subjects underwent similar testing with rod-optimized stimuli. Cone absolute threshold, that is, the minimum light energy for which subjects were just able to detect a visual stimulus with any response criterion, was 203 ± 38 photons at the cornea, ∼0.47 log units lower than previously reported. Two-alternative forced-choice measurements in a subset of subjects yielded consistent results. Cone thresholds were less responsive to criterion changes than rod thresholds, suggesting a limit to the stimulus information recoverable from the cone mosaic in addition to the limit imposed by Poisson noise. Results were consistent with expectations for detection in the face of stimulus uncertainty. We discuss implications of these findings for modeling the first stages of human cone vision and interpreting psychophysical data acquired with adaptive optics at the spatial scale of the receptor mosaic. PMID:21270115

  20. Soft-Collinear Mode for Jet Rates in Soft-Collinear Effective Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Chien, Yang-Ting; Lee, Christopher; Hornig, Andrew

    2016-01-29

    We propose the addition of a new "soft-collinear" mode to soft collinear effective theory (SCET) below the usual soft scale to factorize and resum logarithms of jet radii R in jet cross sections. We consider exclusive 2-jet cross sections in e+e- collisions with an energy veto Λ on additional jets. The key observation is that there are actually two pairs of energy scales whose ratio is R: the transverse momentum QR of the energetic particles inside jets and their total energy Q, and the transverse momentum ΛR of soft particles that are cut out of the jet cones and their energy Λ. The soft-collinear mode is necessary to factorize and resum logarithms of the latter hierarchy. We show how this factorization occurs in the jet thrust cross section for cone and kT-type algorithms at O(αs) and using the thrust cone algorithm at O(α$2\\atop{s}$). We identify the presence of hard-collinear, in-jet soft, global (veto) soft, and soft-collinear modes in the jet thrust cross section. We also observe here that the in-jet soft modes measured with thrust are actually the "csoft" modes of the theory SCET+. We dub the new theory with both csoft and soft-collinear modes "SCET++". We go on to explain the relation between the "unmeasured" jet function appearing in total exclusive jet cross sections and the hard-collinear and csoft functions in measured jet thrust cross sections. We do not resum logs that are non-global in origin, arising from the ratio of the scales of soft radiation whose thrust is measured at Q${{\\tau}}$/R and of the soft-collinear radiation at 2ΛR. Their resummation would require the introduction of additional operators beyond those we consider here. The steps we outline here are a necessary part of summing logs of R that are global in nature and have not been factorized and resummed beyond leading-log level previously.

  1. Soft-Collinear Mode for Jet Rates in Soft-Collinear Effective Theory

    DOE PAGES

    Chien, Yang-Ting; Lee, Christopher; Hornig, Andrew

    2016-01-29

    We propose the addition of a new "soft-collinear" mode to soft collinear effective theory (SCET) below the usual soft scale to factorize and resum logarithms of jet radii R in jet cross sections. We consider exclusive 2-jet cross sections in e+e- collisions with an energy veto Λ on additional jets. The key observation is that there are actually two pairs of energy scales whose ratio is R: the transverse momentum QR of the energetic particles inside jets and their total energy Q, and the transverse momentum ΛR of soft particles that are cut out of the jet cones and their energy Λ. The soft-collinear mode is necessary to factorize and resum logarithms of the latter hierarchy. We show how this factorization occurs in the jet thrust cross section for cone and kT-type algorithms at O(αs) and using the thrust cone algorithm at O(αmore » $$2\\atop{s}$$). We identify the presence of hard-collinear, in-jet soft, global (veto) soft, and soft-collinear modes in the jet thrust cross section. We also observe here that the in-jet soft modes measured with thrust are actually the "csoft" modes of the theory SCET+. We dub the new theory with both csoft and soft-collinear modes "SCET++". We go on to explain the relation between the "unmeasured" jet function appearing in total exclusive jet cross sections and the hard-collinear and csoft functions in measured jet thrust cross sections. We do not resum logs that are non-global in origin, arising from the ratio of the scales of soft radiation whose thrust is measured at Q$${{\\tau}}$$/R and of the soft-collinear radiation at 2ΛR. Their resummation would require the introduction of additional operators beyond those we consider here. The steps we outline here are a necessary part of summing logs of R that are global in nature and have not been factorized and resummed beyond leading-log level previously.« less

  2. Implementation of Improved Transverse Shear Calculations and Higher Order Laminate Theory Into Strain Rate Dependent Analyses of Polymer Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Lin-Fa; Kim, Soo; Chattopadhyay, Aditi; Goldberg, Robert K.

    2004-01-01

    A numerical procedure has been developed to investigate the nonlinear and strain rate dependent deformation response of polymer matrix composite laminated plates under high strain rate impact loadings. A recently developed strength of materials based micromechanics model, incorporating a set of nonlinear, strain rate dependent constitutive equations for the polymer matrix, is extended to account for the transverse shear effects during impact. Four different assumptions of transverse shear deformation are investigated in order to improve the developed strain rate dependent micromechanics model. The validities of these assumptions are investigated using numerical and theoretical approaches. A method to determine through the thickness strain and transverse Poisson's ratio of the composite is developed. The revised micromechanics model is then implemented into a higher order laminated plate theory which is modified to include the effects of inelastic strains. Parametric studies are conducted to investigate the mechanical response of composite plates under high strain rate loadings. Results show the transverse shear stresses cannot be neglected in the impact problem. A significant level of strain rate dependency and material nonlinearity is found in the deformation response of representative composite specimens.

  3. A dual theory of price and value in a meso-scale economic model with stochastic profit rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenblatt, R. E.

    2014-12-01

    The problem of commodity price determination in a market-based, capitalist economy has a long and contentious history. Neoclassical microeconomic theories are based typically on marginal utility assumptions, while classical macroeconomic theories tend to be value-based. In the current work, I study a simplified meso-scale model of a commodity capitalist economy. The production/exchange model is represented by a network whose nodes are firms, workers, capitalists, and markets, and whose directed edges represent physical or monetary flows. A pair of multivariate linear equations with stochastic input parameters represent physical (supply/demand) and monetary (income/expense) balance. The input parameters yield a non-degenerate profit rate distribution across firms. Labor time and price are found to be eigenvector solutions to the respective balance equations. A simple relation is derived relating the expected value of commodity price to commodity labor content. Results of Monte Carlo simulations are consistent with the stochastic price/labor content relation.

  4. Age and forgetfulness: absolute versus comparison decisions about capability.

    PubMed

    Erber, J T; Prager, I G

    1997-01-01

    Perceivers were assigned to one of two decision conditions. In an absolute decision condition, perceivers rated how likely they would be to allow a young or old highly forgetful, slightly forgetful, or nonforgetful target to perform a challenging task. In a comparison decision condition, perceivers rated two targets, one young and one old, who had a similar level of forgetfulness. Separate Decision Type x Target Forgetfulness analyses of variance were conducted on ratings of the two target age groups. Young targets received higher ratings in the comparison than in the absolute condition, whereas old targets were rated the same in the two conditions. There was some preference for young targets in a comparison situation, but it was concluded that forgetfulness was a more important factor than age in perceivers' ratings.

  5. Reinvestigation of the laser-initiated Cl/sub 2//HBr chain reaction: absolute rate constants and the v = 2/v = 1 ratio from Cl + HBr. -->. HCl(v) + Br

    SciTech Connect

    Dolson, D.A.; Leone, S.R.

    1987-06-18

    The Cl/sub 2//HBr chain reaction is reinvestigated by using real time state-selected observations of ..delta..v = -1 chemiluminescence from the HCl(V) products following pulsed laser photolysis of Cl/sub 2/. These state-selected observations are analyzed with a more complete kinetic treatment to obtain room temperature rate constants for the chain propagation steps and the vibrational deactivation of HCl(V = 1,2) by HBr. The chain propagation rate constants are k/sub R1/ = (1.02 +/- 0.15) x 10/sup -11/ and k/sub R2/ = (1.1 +/- 0.4) x 10/sup -15/ cm/sup 3/ molecule/sup -1/ s/sup -1/, respectively, for Cl + HBr ..-->../sup kR1/ HCl(v) + Br and Br + Cl/sub 2/ ..-->../sup kR2/ BrCl + Cl. Rate constants for vibrational deactivation of HCl(v=1) and HCl(v=2) by HBr are k/sub V1/ = (1.06 +/- 0.16) x 10/sup -12/ and k/sub V2/ = (2.09 +/- 0.50) x 10/sup -12/ cm/sup 3/ molecule/sup -1/ s/sup -1/. Relative intensity measurements of the HCl v = 2 ..-->.. 1 and 1 ..-->.. 0 vibrational fluorescence are used to obtain an HCl(v) product branching ratio, N/sub v=2//N/sub v=1/ = 0.40 +/- 0.06. The kinetic analysis indicates that broad-band observations of infrared chemiluminescence may lead to erroneous rate constant determinations because of vibrational cascade, whereas the detection of individual vibrational states leads to correct results.

  6. The reaction NH2 + PH3 yields NH3 + PH2 - Absolute rate constant measurement and implication for NH3 and PH3 photochemistry in the atmosphere of Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bosco, S. R.; Brobst, W. D.; Nava, D. F.; Stief, L. J.

    1983-01-01

    The rate constant is measured over the temperature interval 218-456 K using the technique of flash photolysis-laser-induced fluorescence. NH2 radicals are produced by the flash photolysis of ammonia highly diluted in argon, and the decay of fluorescent NH2 photons is measured by multiscaling techniques. For each of the five temperatures employed in the study, the results are shown to be indepenent of variations in PH3 concentration, total pressure (argon), and flash intensity. It is found that the rate constant results are best represented for T between 218 and 456 K by the expression k = (1.52 + or - 0.16) x 10 to the -12th exp(-928 + or - 56/T) cu cm per molecule per sec; the error quoted is 1 standard deviation. This is the first determination of the rate constant for the reaction NH2 + PH3. The data are compared with an estimate made in order to explain results of the radiolysis of NH3-PH3 mixtures. The Arrhenius parameters determined here for NH2 + PH3 are then contrasted with those for the corresponding reactions of H and OH with PH3.

  7. The reaction NH2 + PH3 yields NH3 + PH2: Absolute rate constant measurement and implication for NH3 and PH3 photochemistry in the atmosphere of Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bosco, S. R.; Brobst, W. D.; Nava, D. F.; Stief, L. J.

    1983-01-01

    The rate constant is measured over the temperature interval 218-456 K using the technique of flash photolysis-laser-induced fluorescence. NH2 radicals are produced by the flash photolysis of ammonia highly diluted in argon, and the decay of fluorescent NH2 photons is measured by multiscaling techniques. For each of the five temperatures employed in the study, the results are shown to be independent of variations in PH3 concentration, total pressure (argon), and flash intensity. It is found that the rate constant results are best represented for T between 218 and 456 K by the expression k = (1.52 + or - 0.16) x 10 to the -12th exp(-928 + or - 56/T) cu cm per molecule per sec; the error quoted is 1 standard deviation. This is the first determination of the rate constant for the reaction NH2 + PH3. The data are compared with an estimate made in order to explain results of the radiolysis of NH3-PH3 mixtures. The Arrhenius parameters determined here for NH2 + PH3 are then constrasted with those for the corresponding reactions of H and OH with PH3.

  8. Effects of roaming trajectories on the transition state theory rates of a reduced-dimensional model of ketene isomerization.

    PubMed

    Ulusoy, Inga S; Stanton, John F; Hernandez, Rigoberto

    2013-08-15

    The rates of chemical reactions (or any activated process) are by definition determined by the flux of reactants (or initial states) that end up as products (or final states). The forward flux through any surface that divides reactants from products is a constant as long as only those trajectories that were reactants in the infinite past and products in the infinite future are included in the flux once and only once. Transition state theory (TST) ignores this last clause, thereby overestimating the rate if any of the trajectories recross the dividing surface. However, its advantage is that it replaces a dynamical calculation with a statistical integral over the TST geometry. The recent identification of roaming trajectories-those that persist for a long time as neither reactant nor product without ever visiting near the col on the energy landscape-apparently challenges the dogma that TST's only error lies in the omission of recrossing trajectories. This question is investigated using the isomerization reaction of ketene in which the experimental values are verified to be in reasonable agreement with both the exact and TST values. We have found two trajectories for the ketene isomerization that carry the signature of roaming, but their effect on the calculation of the reaction rate constant using classical transition state theory is small. Indeed, the existence of roaming trajectories is seen to impose a limitation on which dividing surfaces are appropriate for the calculation of either exact or approximate TST rates, but in this case, they do not unseat the existence of dividing surfaces that can be used safely to calculate TST rates.

  9. Application of Rate Theory to Accelerated Durability Testing of Structural Adhesives

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-03-01

    comes too late to impact on material selection or design considerations. The analytical approach, coupled with an accelerated 10 testing program, is...estimated range and then evaluating the impact of each parameter on the failure rate and expected service life. The life-limiting components and the...interest of processing economy can be identified. This information can then be fed back into the system design process and the analyses repeated to

  10. Examples of Rate-Theory Constitutive Equations Which Unify Elasticity and Plasticity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-01-01

    Yield Condit.ion, Rate-Type Constitutive Equations, Differential Equations, Non-uniqueness, Lipschitz Condition, Prandtl-Reuss 20. A11STR ACT (Coniliwa...equations. We shall show how elastic behavior can correspond to uniqueness of solutions of such equations; how nonuniqueness of solutioncan...2. Indeed, the Piccard-Lindelof uniqueness theorem3 assures us of this, since a Lipschitz condition will hold when -l//r < s < l/1V. Indeed, as long

  11. Modeling of mitochondria bioenergetics using a composable chemiosmotic energy transduction rate law: theory and experimental validation.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ivan; Heiske, Margit; Letellier, Thierry; Wallace, Douglas; Baldi, Pierre

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondrial bioenergetic processes are central to the production of cellular energy, and a decrease in the expression or activity of enzyme complexes responsible for these processes can result in energetic deficit that correlates with many metabolic diseases and aging. Unfortunately, existing computational models of mitochondrial bioenergetics either lack relevant kinetic descriptions of the enzyme complexes, or incorporate mechanisms too specific to a particular mitochondrial system and are thus incapable of capturing the heterogeneity associated with these complexes across different systems and system states. Here we introduce a new composable rate equation, the chemiosmotic rate law, that expresses the flux of a prototypical energy transduction complex as a function of: the saturation kinetics of the electron donor and acceptor substrates; the redox transfer potential between the complex and the substrates; and the steady-state thermodynamic force-to-flux relationship of the overall electro-chemical reaction. Modeling of bioenergetics with this rate law has several advantages: (1) it minimizes the use of arbitrary free parameters while featuring biochemically relevant parameters that can be obtained through progress curves of common enzyme kinetics protocols; (2) it is modular and can adapt to various enzyme complex arrangements for both in vivo and in vitro systems via transformation of its rate and equilibrium constants; (3) it provides a clear association between the sensitivity of the parameters of the individual complexes and the sensitivity of the system's steady-state. To validate our approach, we conduct in vitro measurements of ETC complex I, III, and IV activities using rat heart homogenates, and construct an estimation procedure for the parameter values directly from these measurements. In addition, we show the theoretical connections of our approach to the existing models, and compare the predictive accuracy of the rate law with our experimentally

  12. Comparing ligo merger rate observations with theory: distribution of star-forming conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Belczynski, Kryzysztof; Kopparapu, R; O' Shaughnessy, R

    2008-01-01

    Within the next decade, ground based gravitational wave detectors are in principle capable of determining the compact object merger rate per unit volume of the local universe to better than 20% with more than 30 detections. Though these measurements can constrain our models of stellar, binary, and cluster evolution in the nearby present-day and ancient universe, we argue that the universe is sufficiently heterogeneous (in age and metallicity distribution at least) and that merger rates predicted by these models can be sufficiently sensitive to those heterogeneities so that a fair comparison of models per unit similar star forming mass necessarily introduces at least an additional 30%--50% systematic error into any constraints on compact binary evolution models. Without adding new electromagnetic constraints on massive binary evolution or relying on more information from each merger (e.g. , binary masses and spins), as few as the {approx_equal}5 merger detections could exhaust the information available in a naive comparison to merger rate predictions. As a concrete example immediately relevant to analysis of initial and enhanced LIGO results, we use a nearby-universe catalog to demonstrate that no one tracer of stellar content can be consistently used to constrain merger rates without introducing a systematic error of order 0(30%) at 90% confidence (depending on the type of binary involved). For example, though binary black holes typically take many Gyr to merge, binary neutron stars often merge rapidly; different tracers of stellar content are required for these two types. More generally, we argue that theoretical binary evolution can depend sufficiently sensitively on star-forming conditions -- even assuming no uncertainty in binary evolution model -- that the distribution of star forming conditions must be incorporated to reduce the systematic error in merger rate predictions below roughly 40%. We emphasize that the degree of sensitivity to star

  13. Cosmology with negative absolute temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieira, J. P. P.; Byrnes, Christian T.; Lewis, Antony

    2016-08-01

    Negative absolute temperatures (NAT) are an exotic thermodynamical consequence of quantum physics which has been known since the 1950's (having been achieved in the lab on a number of occasions). Recently, the work of Braun et al. [1] has rekindled interest in negative temperatures and hinted at a possibility of using NAT systems in the lab as dark energy analogues. This paper goes one step further, looking into the cosmological consequences of the existence of a NAT component in the Universe. NAT-dominated expanding Universes experience a borderline phantom expansion (w < -1) with no Big Rip, and their contracting counterparts are forced to bounce after the energy density becomes sufficiently large. Both scenarios might be used to solve horizon and flatness problems analogously to standard inflation and bouncing cosmologies. We discuss the difficulties in obtaining and ending a NAT-dominated epoch, and possible ways of obtaining density perturbations with an acceptable spectrum.

  14. A mathematical biologist's guide to absolute and convective instability.

    PubMed

    Sherratt, Jonathan A; Dagbovie, Ayawoa S; Hilker, Frank M

    2014-01-01

    Mathematical models have been highly successful at reproducing the complex spatiotemporal phenomena seen in many biological systems. However, the ability to numerically simulate such phenomena currently far outstrips detailed mathematical understanding. This paper reviews the theory of absolute and convective instability, which has the potential to redress this inbalance in some cases. In spatiotemporal systems, unstable steady states subdivide into two categories. Those that are absolutely unstable are not relevant in applications except as generators of spatial or spatiotemporal patterns, but convectively unstable steady states can occur as persistent features of solutions. The authors explain the concepts of absolute and convective instability, and also the related concepts of remnant and transient instability. They give examples of their use in explaining qualitative transitions in solution behaviour. They then describe how to distinguish different types of instability, focussing on the relatively new approach of the absolute spectrum. They also discuss the use of the theory for making quantitative predictions on how spatiotemporal solutions change with model parameters. The discussion is illustrated throughout by numerical simulations of a model for river-based predator-prey systems.

  15. Does the membrane pacemaker theory of metabolism explain the size dependence of metabolic rate in marine mussels?

    PubMed

    Sukhotin, Alexey; Fokina, Natalia; Ruokolainen, Tatiana; Bock, Christian; Pörtner, Hans-Otto; Lannig, Gisela

    2017-02-02

    According to the Membrane Pacemaker Theory of metabolism (MPT) allometric scaling of metabolic rate in animals is determined by the composition of cellular and mitochondrial membranes that changes with body size in a predictable manner. MPT has been elaborated from interspecific comparisons in mammals. It projects that the degree of unsaturation of membrane phospholipids decreases in larger organisms, thereby lowering ion permeability of the membranes and making cellular and thus whole animal metabolism more efficient. Here we tested the applicability of the MPT to a marine ectotherm, the mussel Mytilus edulis at the intraspecific level. We determined effects of body mass on whole organism, tissue and cellular oxygen consumption rates, on heart rate, metabolic enzyme activities and on the lipid composition of membranes. In line with allometric patterns the organismal functions and processes such as heart rate, whole animal respiration rate and phospholipid contents showed a mass-dependent decline. However, the allometry of tissue and cellular respiration and activity of metabolic enzymes was poor; fatty acid unsaturation of membrane phospholipids of gill tissue was independent of animal size. It is thus conceivable that most of the metabolic allometry observed at the organismal level is determined by systemic functions. These whole organism patterns may be supported by energy savings associated with growing cell size but not by structural changes in membranes. Overall, the set of processes contributing to metabolic allometry in ectotherms may differ from that operative in mammals and birds, with a reduced involvement of the mechanisms proposed by the MPT.

  16. Accurate absolute GPS positioning through satellite clock error estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, S.-C.; Kwon, J. H.; Jekeli, C.

    2001-05-01

    An algorithm for very accurate absolute positioning through Global Positioning System (GPS) satellite clock estimation has been developed. Using International GPS Service (IGS) precise orbits and measurements, GPS clock errors were estimated at 30-s intervals. Compared to values determined by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, the agreement was at the level of about 0.1 ns (3 cm). The clock error estimates were then applied to an absolute positioning algorithm in both static and kinematic modes. For the static case, an IGS station was selected and the coordinates were estimated every 30 s. The estimated absolute position coordinates and the known values had a mean difference of up to 18 cm with standard deviation less than 2 cm. For the kinematic case, data obtained every second from a GPS buoy were tested and the result from the absolute positioning was compared to a differential GPS (DGPS) solution. The mean differences between the coordinates estimated by the two methods are less than 40 cm and the standard deviations are less than 25 cm. It was verified that this poorer standard deviation on 1-s position results is due to the clock error interpolation from 30-s estimates with Selective Availability (SA). After SA was turned off, higher-rate clock error estimates (such as 1 s) could be obtained by a simple interpolation with negligible corruption. Therefore, the proposed absolute positioning technique can be used to within a few centimeters' precision at any rate by estimating 30-s satellite clock errors and interpolating them.

  17. Using game theory for perceptual tuned rate control algorithm in video coding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Jiancong; Ahmad, Ishfaq

    2005-03-01

    This paper proposes a game theoretical rate control technique for video compression. Using a cooperative gaming approach, which has been utilized in several branches of natural and social sciences because of its enormous potential for solving constrained optimization problems, we propose a dual-level scheme to optimize the perceptual quality while guaranteeing "fairness" in bit allocation among macroblocks. At the frame level, the algorithm allocates target bits to frames based on their coding complexity. At the macroblock level, the algorithm distributes bits to macroblocks by defining a bargaining game. Macroblocks play cooperatively to compete for shares of resources (bits) to optimize their quantization scales while considering the Human Visual System"s perceptual property. Since the whole frame is an entity perceived by viewers, macroblocks compete cooperatively under a global objective of achieving the best quality with the given bit constraint. The major advantage of the proposed approach is that the cooperative game leads to an optimal and fair bit allocation strategy based on the Nash Bargaining Solution. Another advantage is that it allows multi-objective optimization with multiple decision makers (macroblocks). The simulation results testify the algorithm"s ability to achieve accurate bit rate with good perceptual quality, and to maintain a stable buffer level.

  18. Warming reduces metabolic rate in marine snails: adaptation to fluctuating high temperatures challenges the metabolic theory of ecology.

    PubMed

    Marshall, David J; McQuaid, Christopher D

    2011-01-22

    The universal temperature-dependence model (UTD) of the metabolic theory of ecology (MTE) proposes that temperature controls mass-scaled, whole-animal resting metabolic rate according to the first principles of physics (Boltzmann kinetics). Controversy surrounds the model's implication of a mechanistic basis for metabolism that excludes the effects of adaptive regulation, and it is unclear how this would apply to organisms that live in fringe environments and typically show considerable metabolic adaptation. We explored thermal scaling of metabolism in a rocky-shore eulittoral-fringe snail (Echinolittorina malaccana) that experiences constrained energy gain and fluctuating high temperatures (between 25°C and approximately 50°C) during prolonged emersion (weeks). In contrast to the prediction of the UTD model, metabolic rate was often negatively related to temperature over a benign range (30-40°C), the relationship depending on (i) the temperature range, (ii) the degree of metabolic depression (related to the quiescent period), and (iii) whether snails were isolated within their shells. Apparent activation energies (E) varied between 0.05 and -0.43 eV, deviating excessively from the UTD's predicted range of between 0.6 and 0.7 eV. The lowering of metabolism when heated should improve energy conservation in a high-temperature environment and challenges both the theory's generality and its mechanistic basis.

  19. Warming reduces metabolic rate in marine snails: adaptation to fluctuating high temperatures challenges the metabolic theory of ecology

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, David J.; McQuaid, Christopher D.

    2011-01-01

    The universal temperature-dependence model (UTD) of the metabolic theory of ecology (MTE) proposes that temperature controls mass-scaled, whole-animal resting metabolic rate according to the first principles of physics (Boltzmann kinetics). Controversy surrounds the model's implication of a mechanistic basis for metabolism that excludes the effects of adaptive regulation, and it is unclear how this would apply to organisms that live in fringe environments and typically show considerable metabolic adaptation. We explored thermal scaling of metabolism in a rocky-shore eulittoral-fringe snail (Echinolittorina malaccana) that experiences constrained energy gain and fluctuating high temperatures (between 25°C and approximately 50°C) during prolonged emersion (weeks). In contrast to the prediction of the UTD model, metabolic rate was often negatively related to temperature over a benign range (30–40°C), the relationship depending on (i) the temperature range, (ii) the degree of metabolic depression (related to the quiescent period), and (iii) whether snails were isolated within their shells. Apparent activation energies (E) varied between 0.05 and −0.43 eV, deviating excessively from the UTD's predicted range of between 0.6 and 0.7 eV. The lowering of metabolism when heated should improve energy conservation in a high-temperature environment and challenges both the theory's generality and its mechanistic basis. PMID:20685714

  20. Angle-dependent strong-field molecular ionization rates with tuned range-separated time-dependent density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sissay, Adonay; Abanador, Paul; Mauger, François; Gaarde, Mette; Schafer, Kenneth J.; Lopata, Kenneth

    2016-09-01

    Strong-field ionization and the resulting electronic dynamics are important for a range of processes such as high harmonic generation, photodamage, charge resonance enhanced ionization, and ionization-triggered charge migration. Modeling ionization dynamics in molecular systems from first-principles can be challenging due to the large spatial extent of the wavefunction which stresses the accuracy of basis sets, and the intense fields which require non-perturbative time-dependent electronic structure methods. In this paper, we develop a time-dependent density functional theory approach which uses a Gaussian-type orbital (GTO) basis set to capture strong-field ionization rates and dynamics in atoms and small molecules. This involves propagating the electronic density matrix in time with a time-dependent laser potential and a spatial non-Hermitian complex absorbing potential which is projected onto an atom-centered basis set to remove ionized charge from the simulation. For the density functional theory (DFT) functional we use a tuned range-separated functional LC-PBE*, which has the correct asymptotic 1/r form of the potential and a reduced delocalization error compared to traditional DFT functionals. Ionization rates are computed for hydrogen, molecular nitrogen, and iodoacetylene under various field frequencies, intensities, and polarizations (angle-dependent ionization), and the results are shown to quantitatively agree with time-dependent Schrödinger equation and strong-field approximation calculations. This tuned DFT with GTO method opens the door to predictive all-electron time-dependent density functional theory simulations of ionization and ionization-triggered dynamics in molecular systems using tuned range-separated hybrid functionals.

  1. Recombination rates and genomic shuffling in human and chimpanzee--a new twist in the chromosomal speciation theory.

    PubMed

    Farré, Marta; Micheletti, Diego; Ruiz-Herrera, Aurora

    2013-04-01

    A long-standing question in evolutionary biology concerns the effect of recombination in shaping the genomic architecture of organisms and, in particular, how this impacts the speciation process. Despite efforts employed in the last decade, the role of chromosomal reorganizations in the human-chimpanzee speciation process remains unresolved. Through whole-genome comparisons, we have analyzed the genome-wide impact of genomic shuffling in the distribution of human recombination rates during the human-chimpanzee speciation process. We have constructed a highly refined map of the reorganizations and evolutionary breakpoint regions in the human and chimpanzee genomes based on orthologous genes and genome sequence alignments. The analysis of the most recent human and chimpanzee recombination maps inferred from genome-wide single-nucleotide polymorphism data revealed that the standardized recombination rate was significantly lower in rearranged than in collinear chromosomes. In fact, rearranged chromosomes presented significantly lower recombination rates than chromosomes that have been maintained since the ancestor of great apes, and this was related with the lineage in which they become fixed. Importantly, inverted regions had lower recombination rates than collinear and noninverted regions, independently of the effect of centromeres. Our observations have implications for the chromosomal speciation theory, providing new evidences for the contribution of inversions in suppressing recombination in mammals.

  2. Recombination Rates and Genomic Shuffling in Human and Chimpanzee—A New Twist in the Chromosomal Speciation Theory

    PubMed Central

    Farré, Marta; Micheletti, Diego; Ruiz-Herrera, Aurora

    2013-01-01

    A long-standing question in evolutionary biology concerns the effect of recombination in shaping the genomic architecture of organisms and, in particular, how this impacts the speciation process. Despite efforts employed in the last decade, the role of chromosomal reorganizations in the human–chimpanzee speciation process remains unresolved. Through whole-genome comparisons, we have analyzed the genome-wide impact of genomic shuffling in the distribution of human recombination rates during the human–chimpanzee speciation process. We have constructed a highly refined map of the reorganizations and evolutionary breakpoint regions in the human and chimpanzee genomes based on orthologous genes and genome sequence alignments. The analysis of the most recent human and chimpanzee recombination maps inferred from genome-wide single-nucleotide polymorphism data revealed that the standardized recombination rate was significantly lower in rearranged than in collinear chromosomes. In fact, rearranged chromosomes presented significantly lower recombination rates than chromosomes that have been maintained since the ancestor of great apes, and this was related with the lineage in which they become fixed. Importantly, inverted regions had lower recombination rates than collinear and noninverted regions, independently of the effect of centromeres. Our observations have implications for the chromosomal speciation theory, providing new evidences for the contribution of inversions in suppressing recombination in mammals. PMID:23204393

  3. Absolute photon-flux measurements in the vacuum ultraviolet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samson, J. A. R.; Haddad, G. N.

    1974-01-01

    Absolute photon-flux measurements in the vacuum ultraviolet have extended to short wavelengths by use of rare-gas ionization chambers. The technique involves the measurement of the ion current as a function of the gas pressure in the ion chamber. The true value of the ion current, and hence the absolute photon flux, is obtained by extrapolating the ion current to zero gas pressure. Examples are given at 162 and 266 A. The short-wavelength limit is determined only by the sensitivity of the current-measuring apparatus and by present knowledge of the photoionization processes that occur in the rate gases.

  4. Learning More by Being Taught Less: A "Time-for-Self-Study" Theory Explaining Curricular Effects on Graduation Rate and Study Duration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Henk G.; Cohen-Schotanus, Janke; van der Molen, Henk T.; Splinter, Ted A. W.; Bulte, Jan; Holdrinet, Rob; van Rossum, Herman J. M.

    2010-01-01

    In this article, an alternative for Tinto's integration theory of student persistence is proposed and tested. In the proposed theory, time available for individual study is considered a major determinant of both study duration and graduation rate of students in a particular curriculum. In this view, other activities in the curriculum, in…

  5. Kinetics of the benzyl + O(3P) reaction: a quantum chemical/statistical reaction rate theory study.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Gabriel; Bozzelli, Joseph W

    2012-12-14

    The resonance stabilized benzyl radical is an important intermediate in the combustion of aromatic hydrocarbons and in polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) formation in flames. Despite being a free radical, benzyl is relatively stable in thermal, oxidizing environments, and is predominantly removed through bimolecular reactions with open-shell species other than O(2). In this study the reaction of benzyl with ground-state atomic oxygen, O((3)P), is examined using quantum chemistry and statistical reaction rate theory. C(7)H(7)O energy surfaces are generated at the G3SX level, and include several novel pathways. Transition state theory is used to describe elementary reaction kinetics, with canonical variational transition state theory applied for barrierless O atom association with benzyl. Apparent rate constants and branching ratios to different product sets are obtained as a function of temperature and pressure from solving the time-dependent master equation, with RRKM theory for microcanonical k(E). These simulations indicate that the benzyl + O reaction predominantly forms the phenyl radical (C(6)H(5)) plus formaldehyde (HCHO), with lesser quantities of the C(7)H(6)O products benzaldehyde, ortho-quinone methide, and para-quinone methide (+H), along with minor amounts of the formyl radical (HCO) + benzene. Addition of O((3)P) to the methylene site in benzyl produces a highly vibrationally excited C(7)H(7)O* adduct, the benzoxyl radical, which can β-scission to benzaldehyde + H and phenyl + HCHO. In order to account for the experimental observation of benzene as the major reaction product, a roaming radical mechanism is proposed that converts the nascent products phenyl and HCHO to benzene + HCO. Oxygen atom addition at the ortho and para ring sites in benzyl, which has not been previously considered, is shown to lead to the quinone methides + H; these species are less-stable isomers of benzaldehyde that are proposed as important combustion intermediates, but

  6. Dynamical rate theory of enzymatic reactions and triple-resonant coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microspectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Wei

    Chapters 2-7 focus on physical enzymology. Despite its long history, recent single-molecule spectroscopy, among many others techniques, has generated new quantitative data that reveal unobserved features of protein dynamics and enzyme catalysis at unprecedented levels. Much of these are beyond the classic framework of transition state theory and Michalis-Menten (MM) enzyme kinetics. Due to the complexity of the problem, theoretical developments in this area have much lagged behind experiments. After an initial experimental characterization on single-molecule protein conformational fluctuations, we then develop a dynamical rate theory for enzyme catalyzed chemical reactions, from a statistical mechanics approach. Towards this goal, we formulate a two-dimensional (2D) multi-surface free energy description of the entire catalytic process that explicitly combines the concept of "fluctuating enzymes" with the MM enzyme kinetics. The outcome of this framework has two folds. On the rate theory side, going much beyond transition state theory, it connects conformational fluctuations to catalysis, allows for the interplay between energetics (e.g. Haldane's stain energy) and dynamics (e.g. Koshland's induced fit), and predicts the time dependence of single-enzyme catalysis. On the enzyme kinetics side, it gives mechanistic and unified understanding of MM and non-MM (both positive and negative cooperativity) kinetics of monomeric enzymes, in term of non-equilibrium steady state cycle on the 2D free energy surface. Chapters 8-11 present the principle and application of a new ultra-sensitive nonlinear optical microspectroscopy, femtosecond (fs) triple-resonant coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS), in which the amplitude and phase of input fs laser pulses are optimally shaped to be in triple resonant with the molecular electronic and vibrational transitions to generate a coherent nonlinear signal beam at a new color with a highest possible efficiency. This technique

  7. Absolute GPS Positioning Using Genetic Algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramillien, G.

    A new inverse approach for restoring the absolute coordinates of a ground -based station from three or four observed GPS pseudo-ranges is proposed. This stochastic method is based on simulations of natural evolution named genetic algorithms (GA). These iterative procedures provide fairly good and robust estimates of the absolute positions in the Earth's geocentric reference system. For comparison/validation, GA results are compared to the ones obtained using the classical linearized least-square scheme for the determination of the XYZ location proposed by Bancroft (1985) which is strongly limited by the number of available observations (i.e. here, the number of input pseudo-ranges must be four). The r.m.s. accuracy of the non -linear cost function reached by this latter method is typically ~10-4 m2 corresponding to ~300-500-m accuracies for each geocentric coordinate. However, GA can provide more acceptable solutions (r.m.s. errors < 10-5 m2), even when only three instantaneous pseudo-ranges are used, such as a lost of lock during a GPS survey. Tuned GA parameters used in different simulations are N=1000 starting individuals, as well as Pc=60-70% and Pm=30-40% for the crossover probability and mutation rate, respectively. Statistical tests on the ability of GA to recover acceptable coordinates in presence of important levels of noise are made simulating nearly 3000 random samples of erroneous pseudo-ranges. Here, two main sources of measurement errors are considered in the inversion: (1) typical satellite-clock errors and/or 300-metre variance atmospheric delays, and (2) Geometrical Dilution of Precision (GDOP) due to the particular GPS satellite configuration at the time of acquisition. Extracting valuable information and even from low-quality starting range observations, GA offer an interesting alternative for high -precision GPS positioning.

  8. High metabolic demand in neural tissues: Information and control theory perspectives on the synergism between rate and stability.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Rodrick

    2016-11-21

    Evolutionary process has been selected for inherently unstable systems in higher animals that can react swiftly to changing patterns of threat or opportunity, for example blood pressure, the immune response, and gene expression. However, these require continual strict regulation: uncontrolled blood pressure is fatal, immune cells can attack 'self' tissues, and improper gene expression triggers developmental disorders. Consciousness in particular demands high rates of metabolic free energy to both operate and regulate the fundamental biological machinery: both the 'stream of consciousness' and the 'riverbanks' that confine it to useful realms are constructed and reconstructed moment-by-moment in response to highly dynamic internal and environmental circumstances. We develop powerful necessary conditions models for such phenomena based on the Data Rate Theorem linking control and information theories in the context of inherent instability. The synergism between conscious action and its regulation underlies the ten-fold higher rate of metabolic energy consumption in human neural tissues and implies a close, culturally modulated relation between sleep disorders and certain psychopathologies.

  9. Absolute calibration of forces in optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutra, R. S.; Viana, N. B.; Maia Neto, P. A.; Nussenzveig, H. M.

    2014-07-01

    Optical tweezers are highly versatile laser traps for neutral microparticles, with fundamental applications in physics and in single molecule cell biology. Force measurements are performed by converting the stiffness response to displacement of trapped transparent microspheres, employed as force transducers. Usually, calibration is indirect, by comparison with fluid drag forces. This can lead to discrepancies by sizable factors. Progress achieved in a program aiming at absolute calibration, conducted over the past 15 years, is briefly reviewed. Here we overcome its last major obstacle, a theoretical overestimation of the peak stiffness, within the most employed range for applications, and we perform experimental validation. The discrepancy is traced to the effect of primary aberrations of the optical system, which are now included in the theory. All required experimental parameters are readily accessible. Astigmatism, the dominant effect, is measured by analyzing reflected images of the focused laser spot, adapting frequently employed video microscopy techniques. Combined with interface spherical aberration, it reveals a previously unknown window of instability for trapping. Comparison with experimental data leads to an overall agreement within error bars, with no fitting, for a broad range of microsphere radii, from the Rayleigh regime to the ray optics one, for different polarizations and trapping heights, including all commonly employed parameter domains. Besides signaling full first-principles theoretical understanding of optical tweezers operation, the results may lead to improved instrument design and control over experiments, as well as to an extended domain of applicability, allowing reliable force measurements, in principle, from femtonewtons to nanonewtons.

  10. What is Needed for Absolute Paleointensity?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valet, J. P.

    2015-12-01

    Many alternative approaches to the Thellier and Thellier technique for absolute paleointensity have been proposed during the past twenty years. One reason is the time consuming aspect of the experiments. Another reason is to avoid uncertainties in determinations of the paleofield which are mostly linked to the presence of multidomain grains. Despite great care taken by these new techniques, there is no indication that they always provide the right answer and in fact sometimes fail. We are convinced that the most valid approach remains the original double heating Thellier protocol provided that natural remanence is controlled by pure magnetite with a narrow distribution of small grain sizes, mostly single domains. The presence of titanium, even in small amount generates biases which yield incorrect field values. Single domain grains frequently dominate the magnetization of glass samples, which explains the success of this selective approach. They are also present in volcanic lava flows but much less frequently, and therefore contribute to the low success rate of most experiments. However the loss of at least 70% of the magnetization at very high temperatures prior to the Curie point appears to be an essential prerequisite that increases the success rate to almost 100% and has been validated from historical flows and from recent studies. This requirement can easily be tested by thermal demagnetization while low temperature experiments can document the detection of single domain magnetite using the δFC/δZFC parameter as suggested (Moskowitz et al, 1993) for biogenic magnetite.

  11. Absolute optical metrology : nanometers to kilometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dubovitsky, Serge; Lay, O. P.; Peters, R. D.; Liebe, C. C.

    2005-01-01

    We provide and overview of the developments in the field of high-accuracy absolute optical metrology with emphasis on space-based applications. Specific work on the Modulation Sideband Technology for Absolute Ranging (MSTAR) sensor is described along with novel applications of the sensor.

  12. ON A SUFFICIENT CONDITION FOR ABSOLUTE CONTINUITY.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The formulation of a condition which yields absolute continuity when combined with continuity and bounded variation is the problem considered in the...Briefly, the formulation is achieved through a discussion which develops a proof by contradiction of a sufficiently theorem for absolute continuity which uses in its hypothesis the condition of continuity and bounded variation .

  13. Introducing the Mean Absolute Deviation "Effect" Size

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorard, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    This paper revisits the use of effect sizes in the analysis of experimental and similar results, and reminds readers of the relative advantages of the mean absolute deviation as a measure of variation, as opposed to the more complex standard deviation. The mean absolute deviation is easier to use and understand, and more tolerant of extreme…

  14. Monolithically integrated absolute frequency comb laser system

    SciTech Connect

    Wanke, Michael C.

    2016-07-12

    Rather than down-convert optical frequencies, a QCL laser system directly generates a THz frequency comb in a compact monolithically integrated chip that can be locked to an absolute frequency without the need of a frequency-comb synthesizer. The monolithic, absolute frequency comb can provide a THz frequency reference and tool for high-resolution broad band spectroscopy.

  15. Overspecification of color, pattern, and size: salience, absoluteness, and consistency

    PubMed Central

    Tarenskeen, Sammie; Broersma, Mirjam; Geurts, Bart

    2015-01-01

    The rates of overspecification of color, pattern, and size are compared, to investigate how salience and absoluteness contribute to the production of overspecification. Color and pattern are absolute and salient attributes, whereas size is relative and less salient. Additionally, a tendency toward consistent responses is assessed. Using a within-participants design, we find similar rates of color and pattern overspecification, which are both higher than the rate of size overspecification. Using a between-participants design, however, we find similar rates of pattern and size overspecification, which are both lower than the rate of color overspecification. This indicates that although many speakers are more likely to include color than pattern (probably because color is more salient), they may also treat pattern like color due to a tendency toward consistency. We find no increase in size overspecification when the salience of size is increased, suggesting that speakers are more likely to include absolute than relative attributes. However, we do find an increase in size overspecification when mentioning the attributes is triggered, which again shows that speakers tend to refer in a consistent manner, and that there are circumstances in which even size overspecification is frequently produced. PMID:26594190

  16. Hydrogen Abstraction Reactions from Phenolic Compounds by Peroxyl Radicals: Multireference Character and Density Functional Theory Rate Constants.

    PubMed

    Galano, Annia; Muñoz-Rugeles, Leonardo; Alvarez-Idaboy, Juan Raul; Bao, Junwei Lucas; Truhlar, Donald G

    2016-07-14

    An assessment of multireference character in transition states is considered to be an important component in establishing the expected reliability of various electronic structure methods. In the present work, the multireference characters of the transition states and the forming and breaking of bonds for a large set of hydrogen abstraction reactions from phenolic compounds by peroxyl radicals have been analyzed using the T1, M, B1, and GB1 diagnostics. The extent of multireference character depends on the system and on the conditions under which the reaction takes place, and some systematic trends are observed. In particular, the multireference character is found to be reduced by solvation, the size of the phenolic compound, and deprotonation in aqueous solution. However, the deviations of calculated rate constants from experimental ones are not correlated with the extent of multireference character. The performance of single-determinant density functional theory was investigated for the kinetics of these reactions by comparing calculated rate constants to experimental data; the results from these analyses showed that the M05 functional performs well for the task at hand.

  17. The Theory of Ice Nucleation by Heterogeneous Freezing of Deliquescent Mixed CCN. Part I: Critical Radius, Energy, and Nucleation Rate.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khvorostyanov, Vitaly I.; Curry, Judith A.

    2004-11-01

    This paper extends previous work on the theory of heterogenous ice nucleation. The goals of this analysis are to explain empirical observations of ice nucleation and to provide a suitable framework for modeling and parameterizing the ice nucleation process in cloud-scale and large-scale atmospheric models. Considered are the processes of heterogeneous freezing of deliquescent mixed cloud condensation nuclei that may serve as ice nuclei, and the properties of an ice germ critical radius, energy, and nucleation rate of ice crystals are examined as functions of temperature and supersaturation. Expressions for nucleation in a polydisperse aerosol for the deliquescence-freezing mode are developed. Equations are derived for the threshold and critical saturation ratios as functions of temperature and nucleation rate, and for the threshold and critical temperatures as functions of saturation ratio. Equivalence of the new formulation for the freezing point depression with traditional expressions is shown and the concepts of the effective temperature and supercooling are introduced. These new formulations are used in a companion paper for simulations of ice nucleation using a cloud parcel model.


  18. Tap density equations of granular powders based on the rate process theory and the free volume concept.

    PubMed

    Hao, Tian

    2015-02-28

    The tap density of a granular powder is often linked to the flowability via the Carr index that measures how tight a powder can be packed, under an assumption that more easily packed powders usually flow poorly. Understanding how particles are packed is important for revealing why a powder flows better than others. There are two types of empirical equations that were proposed to fit the experimental data of packing fractions vs. numbers of taps in the literature: the inverse logarithmic and the stretched exponential. Using the rate process theory and the free volume concept under the assumption that particles will obey similar thermodynamic laws during the tapping process if the "granular temperature" is defined in a different way, we obtain the tap density equations, and they are reducible to the two empirical equations currently widely used in literature. Our equations could potentially fit experimental data better with an additional adjustable parameter. The tapping amplitude and frequency, the weight of the granular materials, and the environmental temperature are grouped into this parameter that weighs the pace of the packing process. The current results, in conjunction with our previous findings, may imply that both "dry" (granular) and "wet" (colloidal and polymeric) particle systems are governed by the same physical mechanisms in term of the role of the free volume and how particles behave (a rate controlled process).

  19. Students' motivational processes and their relationship to teacher ratings in school physical education: a self-determination theory approach.

    PubMed

    Standage, Martyn; Duda, Joan L; Ntoumanis, Nikos

    2006-03-01

    In the present study, we used a model of motivation grounded in self-determination theory (Deci & Ryan, 1985, 1991; Ryan & Deci, 2000a, 2000b, 2002) to examine the relationship between physical education (PE) students' motivational processes and ratings of their effort and persistence as provided by their PE teacher. Data were obtained from 394 British secondary school students (204 boys, 189 girls, 1 gender not specified; M age = 11.97 years; SD = .89; range = 11-14 years) who responded to a multisection inventory (tapping autonomy-support, autonomy, competence, relatedness, and self-determined motivation). The students' respective PE teachers subsequently provided ratings reflecting the effort and persistence each student exhibited in their PE classes. The hypothesized relationships among the study variables were examined via structural equation modeling analysis using latent factors. Results of maximum likelihood analysis using the bootstrapping method revealed the proposed model demonstrated a good fit to the data, chi-squared (292) = 632.68, p < .001; comparative fit index = .95; incremental fit index = .95, standardized root mean square residual = .077; root mean square error of approximation (RMSEA) = .054 (90% confidence interval of RMSEA = .049 -.060). Specifically, the model showed that students who perceived an autonomy supportive environment experienced greater levels of autonomy, competence, and relatedness and had higher scores on an index of self-determination. Student-reported levels of self-determined motivation positively predicted teacher ratings of effort and persistence in PE. The findings are discussed with regard to enhancing student motivation in PE settings.

  20. Orion Absolute Navigation System Progress and Challenge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holt, Greg N.; D'Souza, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    The absolute navigation design of NASA's Orion vehicle is described. It has undergone several iterations and modifications since its inception, and continues as a work-in-progress. This paper seeks to benchmark the current state of the design and some of the rationale and analysis behind it. There are specific challenges to address when preparing a timely and effective design for the Exploration Flight Test (EFT-1), while still looking ahead and providing software extensibility for future exploration missions. The primary onboard measurements in a Near-Earth or Mid-Earth environment consist of GPS pseudo-range and delta-range, but for future explorations missions the use of star-tracker and optical navigation sources need to be considered. Discussions are presented for state size and composition, processing techniques, and consider states. A presentation is given for the processing technique using the computationally stable and robust UDU formulation with an Agee-Turner Rank-One update. This allows for computational savings when dealing with many parameters which are modeled as slowly varying Gauss-Markov processes. Preliminary analysis shows up to a 50% reduction in computation versus a more traditional formulation. Several state elements are discussed and evaluated, including position, velocity, attitude, clock bias/drift, and GPS measurement biases in addition to bias, scale factor, misalignment, and non-orthogonalities of the accelerometers and gyroscopes. Another consideration is the initialization of the EKF in various scenarios. Scenarios such as single-event upset, ground command, and cold start are discussed as are strategies for whole and partial state updates as well as covariance considerations. Strategies are given for dealing with latent measurements and high-rate propagation using multi-rate architecture. The details of the rate groups and the data ow between the elements is discussed and evaluated.

  1. Absolute quantitation of protein posttranslational modification isoform.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhu; Li, Ning

    2015-01-01

    Mass spectrometry has been widely applied in characterization and quantification of proteins from complex biological samples. Because the numbers of absolute amounts of proteins are needed in construction of mathematical models for molecular systems of various biological phenotypes and phenomena, a number of quantitative proteomic methods have been adopted to measure absolute quantities of proteins using mass spectrometry. The liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) coupled with internal peptide standards, i.e., the stable isotope-coded peptide dilution series, which was originated from the field of analytical chemistry, becomes a widely applied method in absolute quantitative proteomics research. This approach provides more and more absolute protein quantitation results of high confidence. As quantitative study of posttranslational modification (PTM) that modulates the biological activity of proteins is crucial for biological science and each isoform may contribute a unique biological function, degradation, and/or subcellular location, the absolute quantitation of protein PTM isoforms has become more relevant to its biological significance. In order to obtain the absolute cellular amount of a PTM isoform of a protein accurately, impacts of protein fractionation, protein enrichment, and proteolytic digestion yield should be taken into consideration and those effects before differentially stable isotope-coded PTM peptide standards are spiked into sample peptides have to be corrected. Assisted with stable isotope-labeled peptide standards, the absolute quantitation of isoforms of posttranslationally modified protein (AQUIP) method takes all these factors into account and determines the absolute amount of a protein PTM isoform from the absolute amount of the protein of interest and the PTM occupancy at the site of the protein. The absolute amount of the protein of interest is inferred by quantifying both the absolute amounts of a few PTM

  2. Absolute Gravity Datum in the Age of Cold Atom Gravimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Childers, V. A.; Eckl, M. C.

    2014-12-01

    increase in accuracy. Our presentation will also explore the impact of such an instrument on our theory of how to constrain the gravity datum and on how to ensure stability, repeatability, and reproducibility across different absolute gravimeter systems.

  3. Absolute limit on rotation of gravitationally bound stars

    SciTech Connect

    Glendenning, N.K.

    1994-03-01

    The authors seek an absolute limit on the rotational period for a neutron star as a function of its mass, based on the minimal constraints imposed by Einstein`s theory of relativity, Le Chatelier`s principle, causality and a low-density equation of state, uncertainties which can be evaluated as to their effect on the result. This establishes a limiting curve in the mass-period plane below which no pulsar that is a neutron star can lie. For example, the minimum possible Kepler period, which is an absolute limit on rotation below which mass-shedding would occur, is 0.33 ms for a M = 1.442 M{circle_dot} neutron star (the mass of PSR1913+16). If the limit were found to be broken by any pulsar, it would signal that the confined hadronic phase of ordinary nucleons and nuclei is only metastable, an extraordinary conclusion.

  4. Absolute limit on rotation of gravitationally bound stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glendenning, N. K.

    1994-03-01

    The authors seek an absolute limit on the rotational period for a neutron star as a function of its mass, based on the minimal constraints imposed by Einstein's theory of relativity, Le Chatelier's principle, causality, and a low-density equation of state, uncertainties which can be evaluated as to their effect on the result. This establishes a limiting curve in the mass-period plane below which no pulsar that is a neutron star can lie. For example, the minimum possible Kepler period, which is an absolute limit on rotation below which mass-shedding would occur, is 0.33 ms for a M = 1.442 solar mass neutron star (the mass of PSR1913+16). If the limit were found to be broken by any pulsar, it would signal that the confined hadronic phase of ordinary nucleons and nuclei is only metastable.

  5. The EM-POGO: A simple, absolute velocity profiler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terker, S. R.; Sanford, T. B.; Dunlap, J. H.; Girton, J. B.

    2013-01-01

    Electromagnetic current instrumentation has been added to the Bathy Systems, Inc. POGO transport sondes to produce a free-falling absolute velocity profiler called EM-POGO. The POGO is a free-fall profiler that measures a depth-averaged velocity using GPS fixes at the beginning and end of a round trip to the ocean floor (or a preset depth). The EM-POGO adds a velocity profile determined from measurements of motionally induced electric fields generated by the ocean current moving through the vertical component of the Earth's magnetic field. In addition to providing information about the vertical structure of the velocity, the depth-dependent measurements improve transport measurements by correcting for the non-constant fall-rate. Neglecting the variable fall rate results in errors O (1 cm s-1). The transition from POGO to EM-POGO included electrically isolating the POGO and electric-field-measuring circuits, installing a functional GPS receiver, finding a pressure case that provided an optimal balance among crush-depth, price and size, and incorporating the electrodes, electrode collar, and the circuitry required for the electric field measurement. The first EM-POGO sea-trial was in July 1999. In August 2006 a refurbished EM-POGO collected 15 absolute velocity profiles; relative and absolute velocity uncertainty was ˜1cms-1 and 0.5-5 cm s-1, respectively, at a vertical resolution of 25 m. Absolute velocity from the EM-POGO compared to shipboard ADCP measurements differed by ˜ 1-2 cm s-1, comparable to the uncertainty in absolute velocity from the ADCP. The EM-POGO is thus a low-cost, easy to deploy and recover, and accurate velocity profiler.

  6. Consistent set of nuclear parameters values for absolute INAA

    SciTech Connect

    Heft, R.E.

    1980-01-01

    Gamma spectral analysis of irradiated material can be used to determine absolute disintegration rates for specific radionuclides. These data, together with measured values for the thermal and epithermal neutron fluxes, and irradiation, cooling and counting time values, are all the experimental information required to do absolute Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis. The calculations required to go from product photon emission rate to target nuclide amount depend upon values used for the thermal neutron capture cross-section, the resonance absorption integral, the half-life and photon branching ratios. Values for these parameters were determined by irradiating and analyzing a series of elemental standards. The results of these measurements were combined with values reported by other workers to arrive at a set of recommended values for the constants. Values for 114 nuclides are listed.

  7. A novel approach to gravitation from fluid theory: Titius-Bode structures, flat rotation rate of galaxies, and other predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munera, Hector A.

    Following the discovery of quantum phenomena at laboratory scale (Couder & Fort 2006), de Broglie pilot wave theory (De Broglie 1962) has been revived under a hydrodynamic guise (Bush 2015). Theoretically, it boils down to solving the transport equations for the energy and linear momentum densities of a postulated fundamental fluid in terms of classical wave equations, which inherently are Lorentz-invariant and scale-invariant. Instead of the conventional harmonic solutions, for astronomical and gravitational problems the novel solutions for the homogeneous wave equation in spherical coordinates are more suitable (Munera et al. 1995, Munera & Guzman 1997, and Munera 2000). Two groups of solutions are particularly relevant: (a) The inherently-quantized helicoidal solutions that may be applicable to describe spiral galaxies, and (b) The non-harmonic solutions with time (t) and distance (r) entangled in the single variable q = Ct/r (C is the two-way local electromagnetic speed). When these functions are plotted against 1/q they manifestly depict quantum effects in the near field, and Newtonian-like gravity in the far-field. The near-field predicts quantized effects similar to ring structures and to Titius-Bode structures, both in our own solar system and in exoplanets, the correlation between predicted and observed structures being typically larger than 99 per cent. In the far-field, some non-harmonic functions have a rate of decrement with distance slower than inverse-square thus explaining the flat rotation rate of galaxies. Additional implications for Trojan orbits, and quantized effects in photon deflection were also noted.

  8. A macroscale mixture theory analysis of deposition and sublimation rates during heat and mass transfer in dry snow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, A. C.; Foslien, W. E.

    2015-09-01

    The microstructure of a dry alpine snowpack is a dynamic environment where microstructural evolution is driven by seasonal density profiles and weather conditions. Notably, temperature gradients on the order of 10-20 K m-1, or larger, are known to produce a faceted snow microstructure exhibiting little strength. However, while strong temperature gradients are widely accepted as the primary driver for kinetic growth, they do not fully account for the range of experimental observations. An additional factor influencing snow metamorphism is believed to be the rate of mass transfer at the macroscale. We develop a mixture theory capable of predicting macroscale deposition and/or sublimation in a snow cover under temperature gradient conditions. Temperature gradients and mass exchange are tracked over periods ranging from 1 to 10 days. Interesting heat and mass transfer behavior is observed near the ground, near the surface, as well as immediately above and below dense ice crusts. Information about deposition (condensation) and sublimation rates may help explain snow metamorphism phenomena that cannot be accounted for by temperature gradients alone. The macroscale heat and mass transfer analysis requires accurate representations of the effective thermal conductivity and the effective mass diffusion coefficient for snow. We develop analytical models for these parameters based on first principles at the microscale. The expressions derived contain no empirical adjustments, and further, provide self consistent values for effective thermal conductivity and the effective diffusion coefficient for the limiting cases of air and solid ice. The predicted values for these macroscale material parameters are also in excellent agreement with numerical results based on microscale finite element analyses of representative volume elements generated from X-ray tomography.

  9. Absolute pitch and pupillary response: effects of timbre and key color.

    PubMed

    Schlemmer, Kathrin B; Kulke, Franziska; Kuchinke, Lars; Van Der Meer, Elke

    2005-07-01

    The pitch identification performance of absolute pitch possessors has previously been shown to depend on pitch range, key color, and timbre of presented tones. In the present study, the dependence of pitch identification performance on key color and timbre of musical tones was examined by analyzing hit rates, reaction times, and pupillary responses of absolute pitch possessors (n = 9) and nonpossessors (n = 12) during a pitch identification task. Results revealed a significant dependence of pitch identification hit rate but not reaction time on timbre and key color in both groups. Among absolute pitch possessors, peak dilation of the pupil was significantly dependent on key color whereas the effect of timbre was marginally significant. Peak dilation of the pupil differed significantly between absolute pitch possessors and nonpossessors. The observed effects point to the importance of learning factors in the acquisition of absolute pitch.

  10. VCD to determine absolute configuration of natural product molecules: secolignans from Peperomia blanda.

    PubMed

    Felippe, Lidiane G; Batista, João M; Baldoqui, Debora C; Nascimento, Isabele R; Kato, Massuo J; He, Yanan; Nafie, Laurence A; Furlan, Maysa

    2012-06-07

    The absolute configuration and solution-state conformers of three peperomin-type secolignans isolated from Peperomia blanda (Piperaceae) are unambiguously determined by using vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) spectroscopy associated with density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Advantages of VCD over the electronic form of CD for the analysis of diastereomers are also discussed. This work extends our growing knowledge about secondary metabolites within the Piperaceae family species while providing a definitive and straightforward method to assess the absolute stereochemistry of secolignans.

  11. Absolute pressure dependence of the second ionization level of EL2 in GaAs

    SciTech Connect

    Bliss, D.E.; Walukiewicz, W.; Nolte, D.D.; Haller, E.E.

    1989-11-01

    We report the results of DLTS experiments under uniaxial stress on the second ionization level of EL2(++/+) in p-type GaAs. We measured the shift in the hole emission rate as a function of stress applied in the (100) and (110) directions. By modeling the valence band with two independently displacing bands and appropriately derived effective masses, we obtain a small absolute hydrostatic pressure derivative for the defect, 39 {plus minus} 15 MeV GPa{sup {minus}1}. The shear contribution is negligible. This result is very different than for the first ionization level, EL2(+/o) with a emission energy pressure derivative of 90 {plus minus} 15 MeV GPa{sup {minus}1}. The difference can be accounted for by the pressure dependence of the electron capture barrier of EL2(+/o), 49 {plus minus} 15 MeV GPa{sup {minus}1}. The absolute pressure derivatives of the two levels are then comparable and in good agreement with simple theory for Ga site point defects. 20 refs., 2 figs.

  12. A New Gimmick for Assigning Absolute Configuration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ayorinde, F. O.

    1983-01-01

    A five-step procedure is provided to help students in making the assignment absolute configuration less bothersome. Examples for both single (2-butanol) and multi-chiral carbon (3-chloro-2-butanol) molecules are included. (JN)

  13. Magnifying absolute instruments for optically homogeneous regions

    SciTech Connect

    Tyc, Tomas

    2011-09-15

    We propose a class of magnifying absolute optical instruments with a positive isotropic refractive index. They create magnified stigmatic images, either virtual or real, of optically homogeneous three-dimensional spatial regions within geometrical optics.

  14. The Simplicity Argument and Absolute Morality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mijuskovic, Ben

    1975-01-01

    In this paper the author has maintained that there is a similarity of thought to be found in the writings of Cudworth, Emerson, and Husserl in his investigation of an absolute system of morality. (Author/RK)

  15. Absolute cross sections of compound nucleus reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capurro, O. A.

    1993-11-01

    The program SEEF is a Fortran IV computer code for the extraction of absolute cross sections of compound nucleus reactions. When the evaporation residue is fed by its parents, only cumulative cross sections will be obtained from off-line gamma ray measurements. But, if one has the parent excitation function (experimental or calculated), this code will make it possible to determine absolute cross sections of any exit channel.

  16. Kelvin and the absolute temperature scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erlichson, Herman

    2001-07-01

    This paper describes the absolute temperature scale of Kelvin (William Thomson). Kelvin found that Carnot's axiom about heat being a conserved quantity had to be abandoned. Nevertheless, he found that Carnot's fundamental work on heat engines was correct. Using the concept of a Carnot engine Kelvin found that Q1/Q2 = T1/T2. Thermometers are not used to obtain absolute temperatures since they are calculated temperatures.

  17. Relativistic many-body Moller-Plesset perturbation theory calculations of the energy levels and transition rates in Na-like to P-like Xe ions

    SciTech Connect

    Vilkas, Marius J.; Ishikawa, Yasuyuki; Traebert, Elmar

    2008-09-15

    Relativistic multireference many-body perturbation theory calculations have been performed for Xe{sup 43+} to Xe{sup 39+} ions, resulting in energy levels, electric dipole transition rates, and level lifetimes. The second-order many-body perturbation theory calculation of energy levels included mass shifts, the frequency-dependent Breit correction, and Lamb shifts. The calculated transition energies and E1 transition rates are used to present synthetic spectra in the extreme ultraviolet range for some of the Xe ions.

  18. A novel approach to gravitation from fluid theory: Titius-Bode structures, flat rotation rate of galaxies and other predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munera, Hector A.

    2015-08-01

    The formal analogy between electromagnetism (EM) and gravitation was noted by Maxwell and Faraday, and later on by Heaviside in the 1890s; the analogy was extensively used in the gravito-magnetism of the 20th century. The connection between EM and fluid theory is explicit in Maxwell’s work, and the equivalence of Maxwell equations (ME) to various wave equations is explained in electrodynamics textbooks (say, Jackson’s) additionally, a little-known paper presented by Henri Malet to the Paris Academy of Sciences (1926), demonstrated that the validity of ME concurrently requires the validity of the vector and the scalar homogeneous wave equations.In the 1990s the present author reported in Foundations of Physics Letters the existence of novel solutions for the homogeneous wave equation in spherical coordinates; it turns out that one class of our solutions (the nonharmonic functions of the first-kind, NHFFK) is equivalent to the unified force of nature proposed around 1760 by Boscovich from philosophical considerations, but without a formal mathematical basis. Our finding is significant because it lends a mathematical foundation to Boscovich’s force, which has extremely interesting properties, as quantization in energy and distance —noted by J. J. Thomson before Bohr’s quantum theory.Associated with spherical surfaces in gravitational equilibrium, the family of even NHFFKs described here predict Titius-Body structures at different scales, as the solar system and the moons of Mars, Jupiter, Uranus, Saturn, and Neptune. Each calculated radius is compared to an average distance of moons/planets: the correlation and the R2 coefficients are quite high. The same NHFFK also predict the existence of ring structures, as those observed in Saturn, and in asteroids belts in our solar system. Newtonian gravity appears as the limit at very large distances from the center of force. The family of odd NHFFK exhibits a non-zero limit as distance tends to infinity, feature that

  19. The prognostic value of heart rate variability in the elderly, changing the perspective: from sympathovagal balance to chaos theory.

    PubMed

    Nicolini, Paola; Ciulla, Michele M; De Asmundis, Carlo; Magrini, Fabio; Brugada, Pedro

    2012-05-01

    Heart rate variability (HRV) is the temporal beat-to-beat variation in successive RR intervals on an electrocardiographic (ECG) recording and it reflects the regulation of the heart rate (HR) by the autonomic nervous system (ANS). HRV analysis is a noninvasive tool for the assessment of autonomic function that gained momentum in the late 1980s when its clinical relevance as a predictor of mortality was established by a milestone study by Kleiger et al. in patients with postacute myocardial infarction. In the last few decades, the increasing availability of commercial ECG devices offering HRV analysis has made HRV a favorite marker for risk stratification in the setting of cardiovascular disease. The rapid aging of the world population and the growing popularity of HRV have also fueled interest for the prognostic value of HRV in the elderly, outside a specific cardiological context. However, the discussion of HRV measures in the elderly is still very much centered on the rather reductionistic model of sympathovagal balance, with the orthosympathetic and parasympathetic limbs of the ANS exercising opposing effects on the heart via autonomic tone. The expanding application of nonlinear dynamics to medicine has brought to the forefront the notion of system complexity, embedded in the mathematical concepts of chaos theory and fractals, and provides an opportunity to suggest a broader interpretation for the prognostic significance of HRV, especially in the elderly. Although the use of novel indices of HRV may be hampered by practical issues, a more holistic approach to HRV may still be safeguarded if traditional time- and frequency-domain measures are viewed in terms of autonomic modulation. This review focuses on HRV in geriatric populations. It considers studies on the prognostic value of HRV in elderly subjects, discussing the potential confounding effect of erratic rhythm, and concentrates on the conceptual distinction between autonomic tone and autonomic modulation

  20. Absolute determination of local tropospheric OH concentrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armerding, Wolfgang; Comes, Franz-Josef

    1994-01-01

    Long path absorption (LPA) according to Lambert Beer's law is a method to determine absolute concentrations of trace gases such as tropospheric OH. We have developed a LPA instrument which is based on a rapid tuning of the light source which is a frequency doubled dye laser. The laser is tuned across two or three OH absorption features around 308 nm with a scanning speed of 0.07 cm(exp -1)/microsecond and a repetition rate of 1.3 kHz. This high scanning speed greatly reduces the fluctuation of the light intensity caused by the atmosphere. To obtain the required high sensitivity the laser output power is additionally made constant and stabilized by an electro-optical modulator. The present sensitivity is of the order of a few times 10(exp 5) OH per cm(exp 3) for an acquisition time of a minute and an absorption path length of only 1200 meters so that a folding of the optical path in a multireflection cell was possible leading to a lateral dimension of the cell of a few meters. This allows local measurements to be made. Tropospheric measurements have been carried out in 1991 resulting in the determination of OH diurnal variation at specific days in late summer. Comparison with model calculations have been made. Interferences are mainly due to SO2 absorption. The problem of OH self generation in the multireflection cell is of minor extent. This could be shown by using different experimental methods. The minimum-maximum signal to noise ratio is about 8 x 10(exp -4) for a single scan. Due to the small size of the absorption cell the realization of an open air laboratory is possible in which by use of an additional UV light source or by additional fluxes of trace gases the chemistry can be changed under controlled conditions allowing kinetic studies of tropospheric photochemistry to be made in open air.

  1. Jasminum flexile flower absolute from India--a detailed comparison with three other jasmine absolutes.

    PubMed

    Braun, Norbert A; Kohlenberg, Birgit; Sim, Sherina; Meier, Manfred; Hammerschmidt, Franz-Josef

    2009-09-01

    Jasminum flexile flower absolute from the south of India and the corresponding vacuum headspace (VHS) sample of the absolute were analyzed using GC and GC-MS. Three other commercially available Indian jasmine absolutes from the species: J. sambac, J. officinale subsp. grandiflorum, and J. auriculatum and the respective VHS samples were used for comparison purposes. One hundred and twenty-one compounds were characterized in J. flexile flower absolute, with methyl linolate, benzyl salicylate, benzyl benzoate, (2E,6E)-farnesol, and benzyl acetate as the main constituents. A detailed olfactory evaluation was also performed.

  2. The efficiency of behavior rating scales to assess inattentive-overactive and oppositional-defiant behaviors: applying generalizability theory to streamline assessment.

    PubMed

    Volpe, Robert J; Briesch, Amy M; Gadow, Kenneth D

    2011-02-01

    Although the efficiency with which a wide range of behavioral data can be obtained makes behavior rating scales particularly attractive tools for the purposes of screening and evaluation, feasibility concerns arise in the context of formative assessment. Specifically, informant load, or the amount of time informants are asked to contribute to the assessment process, likely has a negative impact on the quality of data over time and the informant's willingness to participate. Two important determinants of informant load in progress monitoring are the length of the rating scale (i.e., the number of items) and how frequently informants are asked to provide ratings (i.e., the number of occasions). The purpose of the current study was to investigate the dependability of the IOWA Conners Teacher Rating Scale (Loney & Milich, 1982), which is used to differentiate inattentive-overactive from oppositional-defiant behaviors. Specifically, the facets of items and occasions were examined to identify combinations of these sources of error necessary to reach an acceptable level of dependability for both absolute and relative decisions. Results from D studies elucidated a variety of possible item-occasion combinations reaching the criteria for adequate dependability. Recommendations for research and practice are discussed.

  3. Absolute Distance Measurement with the MSTAR Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lay, Oliver P.; Dubovitsky, Serge; Peters, Robert; Burger, Johan; Ahn, Seh-Won; Steier, William H.; Fetterman, Harrold R.; Chang, Yian

    2003-01-01

    The MSTAR sensor (Modulation Sideband Technology for Absolute Ranging) is a new system for measuring absolute distance, capable of resolving the integer cycle ambiguity of standard interferometers, and making it possible to measure distance with sub-nanometer accuracy. The sensor uses a single laser in conjunction with fast phase modulators and low frequency detectors. We describe the design of the system - the principle of operation, the metrology source, beamlaunching optics, and signal processing - and show results for target distances up to 1 meter. We then demonstrate how the system can be scaled to kilometer-scale distances.

  4. Absolutely relative or relatively absolute: violations of value invariance in human decision making.

    PubMed

    Teodorescu, Andrei R; Moran, Rani; Usher, Marius

    2016-02-01

    Making decisions based on relative rather than absolute information processing is tied to choice optimality via the accumulation of evidence differences and to canonical neural processing via accumulation of evidence ratios. These theoretical frameworks predict invariance of decision latencies to absolute intensities that maintain differences and ratios, respectively. While information about the absolute values of the choice alternatives is not necessary for choosing the best alternative, it may nevertheless hold valuable information about the context of the decision. To test the sensitivity of human decision making to absolute values, we manipulated the intensities of brightness stimuli pairs while preserving either their differences or their ratios. Although asked to choose the brighter alternative relative to the other, participants responded faster to higher absolute values. Thus, our results provide empirical evidence for human sensitivity to task irrelevant absolute values indicating a hard-wired mechanism that precedes executive control. Computational investigations of several modelling architectures reveal two alternative accounts for this phenomenon, which combine absolute and relative processing. One account involves accumulation of differences with activation dependent processing noise and the other emerges from accumulation of absolute values subject to the temporal dynamics of lateral inhibition. The potential adaptive role of such choice mechanisms is discussed.

  5. Comparative vs. Absolute Judgments of Trait Desirability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hofstee, Willem K. B.

    1970-01-01

    Reversals of trait desirability are studied. Terms indicating conservativw behavior appeared to be judged relatively desirable in comparative judgement, while traits indicating dynamic and expansive behavior benefited from absolute judgement. The reversal effect was shown to be a general one, i.e. reversals were not dependent upon the specific…

  6. New Techniques for Absolute Gravity Measurements.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-01-07

    Hammond, J.A. (1978) Bollettino Di Geofisica Teorica ed Applicata Vol. XX. 8. Hammond, J. A., and Iliff, R. L. (1979) The AFGL absolute gravity system...International Gravimetric Bureau, No. L:I-43. 7. Hammond. J.A. (1978) Bollettino Di Geofisica Teorica ed Applicata Vol. XX. 8. Hammond, J.A., and

  7. An Absolute Electrometer for the Physics Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Straulino, S.; Cartacci, A.

    2009-01-01

    A low-cost, easy-to-use absolute electrometer is presented: two thin metallic plates and an electronic balance, usually available in a laboratory, are used. We report on the very good performance of the device that allows precise measurements of the force acting between two charged plates. (Contains 5 footnotes, 2 tables, and 6 figures.)

  8. Stimulus Probability Effects in Absolute Identification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kent, Christopher; Lamberts, Koen

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of stimulus presentation probability on accuracy and response times in an absolute identification task. Three schedules of presentation were used to investigate the interaction between presentation probability and stimulus position within the set. Data from individual participants indicated strong effects of…

  9. Absolute Positioning Using the Global Positioning System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-04-01

    Global Positioning System ( GPS ) has becom a useful tool In providing relativ survey...Includes the development of a low cost navigator for wheeled vehicles. ABSTRACT The Global Positioning System ( GPS ) has become a useful tool In providing...technique of absolute or point positioning involves the use of a single Global Positioning System ( GPS ) receiver to determine the three-dimenslonal

  10. THE ABSOLUTE MAGNITUDES OF TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE IN THE ULTRAVIOLET

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Peter J.; Roming, Peter W. A.; Ciardullo, Robin; Gronwall, Caryl; Hoversten, Erik A.; Pritchard, Tyler; Milne, Peter; Bufano, Filomena; Mazzali, Paolo; Elias-Rosa, Nancy; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Li Weidong; Foley, Ryan J.; Hicken, Malcolm; Kirshner, Robert P.; Gehrels, Neil; Holland, Stephen T.; Immler, Stefan; Phillips, Mark M.; Still, Martin

    2010-10-01

    We examine the absolute magnitudes and light-curve shapes of 14 nearby (redshift z = 0.004-0.027) Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) observed in the ultraviolet (UV) with the Swift Ultraviolet/Optical Telescope. Colors and absolute magnitudes are calculated using both a standard Milky Way extinction law and one for the Large Magellanic Cloud that has been modified by circumstellar scattering. We find very different behavior in the near-UV filters (uvw1{sub rc} covering {approx}2600-3300 A after removing optical light, and u {approx} 3000-4000 A) compared to a mid-UV filter (uvm2 {approx}2000-2400 A). The uvw1{sub rc} - b colors show a scatter of {approx}0.3 mag while uvm2-b scatters by nearly 0.9 mag. Similarly, while the scatter in colors between neighboring filters is small in the optical and somewhat larger in the near-UV, the large scatter in the uvm2 - uvw1 colors implies significantly larger spectral variability below 2600 A. We find that in the near-UV the absolute magnitudes at peak brightness of normal SNe Ia in our sample are correlated with the optical decay rate with a scatter of 0.4 mag, comparable to that found for the optical in our sample. However, in the mid-UV the scatter is larger, {approx}1 mag, possibly indicating differences in metallicity. We find no strong correlation between either the UV light-curve shapes or the UV colors and the UV absolute magnitudes. With larger samples, the UV luminosity might be useful as an additional constraint to help determine distance, extinction, and metallicity in order to improve the utility of SNe Ia as standardized candles.

  11. Absolute Radiation Thermometry in the NIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bünger, L.; Taubert, R. D.; Gutschwager, B.; Anhalt, K.; Briaudeau, S.; Sadli, M.

    2017-04-01

    A near infrared (NIR) radiation thermometer (RT) for temperature measurements in the range from 773 K up to 1235 K was characterized and calibrated in terms of the "Mise en Pratique for the definition of the Kelvin" (MeP-K) by measuring its absolute spectral radiance responsivity. Using Planck's law of thermal radiation allows the direct measurement of the thermodynamic temperature independently of any ITS-90 fixed-point. To determine the absolute spectral radiance responsivity of the radiation thermometer in the NIR spectral region, an existing PTB monochromator-based calibration setup was upgraded with a supercontinuum laser system (0.45 μm to 2.4 μm) resulting in a significantly improved signal-to-noise ratio. The RT was characterized with respect to its nonlinearity, size-of-source effect, distance effect, and the consistency of its individual temperature measuring ranges. To further improve the calibration setup, a new tool for the aperture alignment and distance measurement was developed. Furthermore, the diffraction correction as well as the impedance correction of the current-to-voltage converter is considered. The calibration scheme and the corresponding uncertainty budget of the absolute spectral responsivity are presented. A relative standard uncertainty of 0.1 % (k=1) for the absolute spectral radiance responsivity was achieved. The absolute radiometric calibration was validated at four temperature values with respect to the ITS-90 via a variable temperature heatpipe blackbody (773 K ...1235 K) and at a gold fixed-point blackbody radiator (1337.33 K).

  12. A high sensitivity fiber optic macro-bend based gas flow rate transducer for low flow rates: theory, working principle, and static calibration.

    PubMed

    Schena, Emiliano; Saccomandi, Paola; Silvestri, Sergio

    2013-02-01

    A novel fiber optic macro-bend based gas flowmeter for low flow rates is presented. Theoretical analysis of the sensor working principle, design, and static calibration were performed. The measuring system consists of: an optical fiber, a light emitting diode (LED), a Quadrant position sensitive Detector (QD), and an analog electronic circuit for signal processing. The fiber tip undergoes a deflection in the flow, acting like a cantilever. The consequent displacement of light spot center is monitored by the QD generating four unbalanced photocurrents which are function of fiber tip position. The analog electronic circuit processes the photocurrents providing voltage signal proportional to light spot position. A circular target was placed on the fiber in order to increase the sensing surface. Sensor, tested in the measurement range up to 10 l min(-1), shows a discrimination threshold of 2 l min(-1), extremely low fluid dynamic resistance (0.17 Pa min l(-1)), and high sensitivity, also at low flow rates (i.e., 33 mV min l(-1) up to 4 l min(-1) and 98 mV min l(-1) from 4 l min(-1) up to 10 l min(-1)). Experimental results agree with the theoretical predictions. The high sensitivity, along with the reduced dimension and negligible pressure drop, makes the proposed transducer suitable for medical applications in neonatal ventilation.

  13. A high sensitivity fiber optic macro-bend based gas flow rate transducer for low flow rates: Theory, working principle, and static calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schena, Emiliano; Saccomandi, Paola; Silvestri, Sergio

    2013-02-01

    A novel fiber optic macro-bend based gas flowmeter for low flow rates is presented. Theoretical analysis of the sensor working principle, design, and static calibration were performed. The measuring system consists of: an optical fiber, a light emitting diode (LED), a Quadrant position sensitive Detector (QD), and an analog electronic circuit for signal processing. The fiber tip undergoes a deflection in the flow, acting like a cantilever. The consequent displacement of light spot center is monitored by the QD generating four unbalanced photocurrents which are function of fiber tip position. The analog electronic circuit processes the photocurrents providing voltage signal proportional to light spot position. A circular target was placed on the fiber in order to increase the sensing surface. Sensor, tested in the measurement range up to 10 l min-1, shows a discrimination threshold of 2 l min-1, extremely low fluid dynamic resistance (0.17 Pa min l-1), and high sensitivity, also at low flow rates (i.e., 33 mV min l-1 up to 4 l min-1 and 98 mV min l-1 from 4 l min-1 up to 10 l min-1). Experimental results agree with the theoretical predictions. The high sensitivity, along with the reduced dimension and negligible pressure drop, makes the proposed transducer suitable for medical applications in neonatal ventilation.

  14. A high sensitivity fiber optic macro-bend based gas flow rate transducer for low flow rates: Theory, working principle, and static calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Schena, Emiliano; Saccomandi, Paola; Silvestri, Sergio

    2013-02-15

    A novel fiber optic macro-bend based gas flowmeter for low flow rates is presented. Theoretical analysis of the sensor working principle, design, and static calibration were performed. The measuring system consists of: an optical fiber, a light emitting diode (LED), a Quadrant position sensitive Detector (QD), and an analog electronic circuit for signal processing. The fiber tip undergoes a deflection in the flow, acting like a cantilever. The consequent displacement of light spot center is monitored by the QD generating four unbalanced photocurrents which are function of fiber tip position. The analog electronic circuit processes the photocurrents providing voltage signal proportional to light spot position. A circular target was placed on the fiber in order to increase the sensing surface. Sensor, tested in the measurement range up to 10 l min{sup -1}, shows a discrimination threshold of 2 l min{sup -1}, extremely low fluid dynamic resistance (0.17 Pa min l{sup -1}), and high sensitivity, also at low flow rates (i.e., 33 mV min l{sup -1} up to 4 l min{sup -1} and 98 mV min l{sup -1} from 4 l min{sup -1} up to 10 l min{sup -1}). Experimental results agree with the theoretical predictions. The high sensitivity, along with the reduced dimension and negligible pressure drop, makes the proposed transducer suitable for medical applications in neonatal ventilation.

  15. Method of differential-phase/absolute-amplitude QAM

    DOEpatents

    Dimsdle, Jeffrey William

    2008-10-21

    A method of quadrature amplitude modulation involving encoding phase differentially and amplitude absolutely, allowing for a high data rate and spectral efficiency in data transmission and other communication applications, and allowing for amplitude scaling to facilitate data recovery; amplitude scale tracking to track-out rapid and severe scale variations and facilitate successful demodulation and data retrieval; 2.sup.N power carrier recovery; incoherent demodulation where coherent carrier recovery is not possible or practical due to signal degradation; coherent demodulation; multipath equalization to equalize frequency dependent multipath; and demodulation filtering.

  16. Method of differential-phase/absolute-amplitude QAM

    DOEpatents

    Dimsdle, Jeffrey William

    2007-07-03

    A method of quadrature amplitude modulation involving encoding phase differentially and amplitude absolutely, allowing for a high data rate and spectral efficiency in data transmission and other communication applications, and allowing for amplitude scaling to facilitate data recovery; amplitude scale tracking to track-out rapid and severe scale variations and facilitate successful demodulation and data retrieval; 2.sup.N power carrier recovery; incoherent demodulation where coherent carrier recovery is not possible or practical due to signal degradation; coherent demodulation; multipath equalization to equalize frequency dependent multipath; and demodulation filtering.

  17. Method of differential-phase/absolute-amplitude QAM

    DOEpatents

    Dimsdle, Jeffrey William

    2007-10-02

    A method of quadrature amplitude modulation involving encoding phase differentially and amplitude absolutely, allowing for a high data rate and spectral efficiency in data transmission and other communication applications, and allowing for amplitude scaling to facilitate data recovery; amplitude scale tracking to track-out rapid and severe scale variations and facilitate successful demodulation and data retrieval; 2.sup.N power carrier recovery; incoherent demodulation where coherent carrier recovery is not possible or practical due to signal degradation; coherent demodulation; multipath equalization to equalize frequency dependent multipath; and demodulation filtering.

  18. Method of differential-phase/absolute-amplitude QAM

    SciTech Connect

    Dimsdle, Jeffrey William

    2009-09-01

    A method of quadrature amplitude modulation involving encoding phase differentially and amplitude absolutely, allowing for a high data rate and spectral efficiency in data transmission and other communication applications, and allowing for amplitude scaling to facilitate data recovery; amplitude scale tracking to track-out rapid and severe scale variations and facilitate successful demodulation and data retrieval; 2.sup.N power carrier recovery; incoherent demodulation where coherent carrier recovery is not possible or practical due to signal degradation; coherent demodulation; multipath equalization to equalize frequency dependent multipath; and demodulation filtering.

  19. Method of differential-phase/absolute-amplitude QAM

    DOEpatents

    Dimsdle, Jeffrey William

    2007-07-17

    A method of quadrature amplitude modulation involving encoding phase differentially and amplitude absolutely, allowing for a high data rate and spectral efficiency in data transmission and other communication applications, and allowing for amplitude scaling to facilitate data recovery; amplitude scale tracking to track-out rapid and severe scale variations and facilitate successful demodulation and data retrieval; 2.sup.N power carrier recovery; incoherent demodulation where coherent carrier recovery is not possible or practical due to signal degradation; coherent demodulation; multipath equalization to equalize frequency dependent multipath; and demodulation filtering.

  20. Quantum bath refrigeration towards absolute zero: challenging the unattainability principle.

    PubMed

    Kolář, M; Gelbwaser-Klimovsky, D; Alicki, R; Kurizki, G

    2012-08-31

    A minimal model of a quantum refrigerator, i.e., a periodically phase-flipped two-level system permanently coupled to a finite-capacity bath (cold bath) and an infinite heat dump (hot bath), is introduced and used to investigate the cooling of the cold bath towards absolute zero (T=0). Remarkably, the temperature scaling of the cold-bath cooling rate reveals that it does not vanish as T→0 for certain realistic quantized baths, e.g., phonons in strongly disordered media (fractons) or quantized spin waves in ferromagnets (magnons). This result challenges Nernst's third-law formulation known as the unattainability principle.

  1. If the Shoe Fits: Virtue and Absolute Beauty in Fairy Tale Drama.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Melissa C.

    2000-01-01

    Examines five versions of the Cinderella story. Argues that children's fairy tale drama presents female beauty as a moral absolute, not merely as a physical characteristic. Cites feminist theories of the female body to demonstrate ways in which fairy tale drama establishes female beauty as an unchanging, "universal" concept. Considers…

  2. On a novel rate theory for transport in narrow ion channels and its application to the study of flux optimization via geometric effects.

    PubMed

    Abad, E; Reingruber, J; Sansom, M S P

    2009-02-28

    We present a novel rate theory based on the notions of splitting probability and mean first passage time to describe single-ion conduction in narrow, effectively one-dimensional membrane channels. In contrast to traditional approaches such as transition state theory or Kramers theory, transitions between different conduction states in our model are governed by rates which depend on the full geometry of the potential of mean force (PMF) resulting from the superposition of an equilibrium free energy profile and a transmembrane potential induced by a nonequilibrium constraint. If a detailed theoretical PMF is available (e.g., from atomistic molecular dynamics simulations), it can be used to compute characteristic conductance curves in the framework of our model, thereby bridging the gap between the atomistic and the mesoscopic level of description. Explicit analytic solutions for the rates, the ion flux, and the associated electric current can be obtained by approximating the actual PMF by a piecewise linear potential. As illustrative examples, we consider both a theoretical and an experimental application of the model. The theoretical example is based on a hypothetical channel with a fully symmetric sawtooth equilibrium PMF. For this system, we explore how changes in the spatial extent of the binding sites affect the rate of transport when a linear voltage ramp is applied. Already for the case of a single binding site, we find that there is an optimum size of the site which maximizes the current through the channel provided that the applied voltage exceeds a threshold value given by the binding energy of the site. The above optimization effect is shown to arise from the complex interplay between the channel structure and the applied electric field, expressed by a nonlinear dependence of the rates with respect to the linear size of the binding site. In studying the properties of current-voltage curves, we find a double crossover between sublinear and superlinear

  3. Global Uncertainty Propagation and Sensitivity Analysis in the CH3OCH2 + O2 System: Combining Experiment and Theory To Constrain Key Rate Coefficients in DME Combustion.

    PubMed

    Shannon, R J; Tomlin, A S; Robertson, S H; Blitz, M A; Pilling, M J; Seakins, P W

    2015-07-16

    Statistical rate theory calculations, in particular formulations of the chemical master equation, are widely used to calculate rate coefficients of interest in combustion environments as a function of temperature and pressure. However, despite the increasing accuracy of electronic structure calculations, small uncertainties in the input parameters for these master equation models can lead to relatively large uncertainties in the calculated rate coefficients. Master equation input parameters may be constrained further by using experimental data and the relationship between experiment and theory warrants further investigation. In this work, the CH3OCH2 + O2 system, of relevance to the combustion of dimethyl ether (DME), is used as an example and the input parameters for master equation calculations on this system are refined through fitting to experimental data. Complementing these fitting calculations, global sensitivity analysis is used to explore which input parameters are constrained by which experimental conditions, and which parameters need to be further constrained to accurately predict key elementary rate coefficients. Finally, uncertainties in the calculated rate coefficients are obtained using both correlated and uncorrelated distributions of input parameters.

  4. From Hubble's NGSL to Absolute Fluxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heap, Sara R.; Lindler, Don

    2012-01-01

    Hubble's Next Generation Spectral Library (NGSL) consists of R-l000 spectra of 374 stars of assorted temperature, gravity, and metallicity. Each spectrum covers the wavelength range, 0.18-1.00 microns. The library can be viewed and/or downloaded from the website, http://archive.stsci.edu/prepds/stisngsll. Stars in the NGSL are now being used as absolute flux standards at ground-based observatories. However, the uncertainty in the absolute flux is about 2%, which does not meet the requirements of dark-energy surveys. We are therefore developing an observing procedure that should yield fluxes with uncertainties less than 1 % and will take part in an HST proposal to observe up to 15 stars using this new procedure.

  5. Absolute measurement of length with nanometric resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apostol, D.; Garoi, F.; Timcu, A.; Damian, V.; Logofatu, P. C.; Nascov, V.

    2005-08-01

    Laser interferometer displacement measuring transducers have a well-defined traceability route to the definition of the meter. The laser interferometer is de-facto length scale for applications in micro and nano technologies. However their physical unit -half lambda is too large for nanometric resolution. Fringe interpolation-usual technique to improve the resolution-lack of reproducibility could be avoided using the principles of absolute distance measurement. Absolute distance refers to the use of interferometric techniques for determining the position of an object without the necessity of measuring continuous displacements between points. The interference pattern as produced by the interference of two point-like coherent sources is fitted to a geometric model so as to determine the longitudinal location of the target by minimizing least square errors. The longitudinal coordinate of the target was measured with accuracy better than 1 nm, for a target position range of 0.4μm.

  6. Asteroid absolute magnitudes and slope parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tedesco, Edward F.

    1991-01-01

    A new listing of absolute magnitudes (H) and slope parameters (G) has been created and published in the Minor Planet Circulars; this same listing will appear in the 1992 Ephemerides of Minor Planets. Unlike previous listings, the values of the current list were derived from fits of data at the V band. All observations were reduced in the same fashion using, where appropriate, a single basis default value of 0.15 for the slope parameter. Distances and phase angles were computed for each observation. The data for 113 asteroids was of sufficiently high quality to permit derivation of their H and G. These improved absolute magnitudes and slope parameters will be used to deduce the most reliable bias-corrected asteroid size-frequency distribution yet made.

  7. Computer processing of spectrograms for absolute intensities.

    PubMed

    Guttman, A; Golden, J; Galbraith, H J

    1967-09-01

    A computer program was developed to process photographically recorded spectra for absolute intensity. Test and calibration films are subjected to densitometric scans that provide digitally recorded densities on magnetic tapes. The nonlinear calibration data are fitted by least-squares cubic polynomials to yield a good approximation to the monochromatic H&D curves for commonly used emulsions (2475 recording film, Royal-X, Tri-X, 4-X). Several test cases were made. Results of these cases show that the machine processed absolute intensities are accurate to within 15%o. Arbitrarily raising the sensitivity threshold by 0.1 density units above gross fog yields cubic polynomial fits to the H&D curves that are radiometrically accurate within 10%. In addition, curves of gamma vs wavelength for 2475, Tri-X, and 4-X emulsions were made. These data show slight evidence of the photographic Purkinje effect in the 2475 emulsion.

  8. An absolute measure for a key currency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oya, Shunsuke; Aihara, Kazuyuki; Hirata, Yoshito

    It is generally considered that the US dollar and the euro are the key currencies in the world and in Europe, respectively. However, there is no absolute general measure for a key currency. Here, we investigate the 24-hour periodicity of foreign exchange markets using a recurrence plot, and define an absolute measure for a key currency based on the strength of the periodicity. Moreover, we analyze the time evolution of this measure. The results show that the credibility of the US dollar has not decreased significantly since the Lehman shock, when the Lehman Brothers bankrupted and influenced the economic markets, and has increased even relatively better than that of the euro and that of the Japanese yen.

  9. Probing absolute spin polarization at the nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Eltschka, Matthias; Jäck, Berthold; Assig, Maximilian; Kondrashov, Oleg V; Skvortsov, Mikhail A; Etzkorn, Markus; Ast, Christian R; Kern, Klaus

    2014-12-10

    Probing absolute values of spin polarization at the nanoscale offers insight into the fundamental mechanisms of spin-dependent transport. Employing the Zeeman splitting in superconducting tips (Meservey-Tedrow-Fulde effect), we introduce a novel spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy that combines the probing capability of the absolute values of spin polarization with precise control at the atomic scale. We utilize our novel approach to measure the locally resolved spin polarization of magnetic Co nanoislands on Cu(111). We find that the spin polarization is enhanced by 65% when increasing the width of the tunnel barrier by only 2.3 Å due to the different decay of the electron orbitals into vacuum.

  10. Absolute and relative dosimetry for ELIMED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cirrone, G. A. P.; Cuttone, G.; Candiano, G.; Carpinelli, M.; Leonora, E.; Lo Presti, D.; Musumarra, A.; Pisciotta, P.; Raffaele, L.; Randazzo, N.; Romano, F.; Schillaci, F.; Scuderi, V.; Tramontana, A.; Cirio, R.; Marchetto, F.; Sacchi, R.; Giordanengo, S.; Monaco, V.

    2013-07-01

    The definition of detectors, methods and procedures for the absolute and relative dosimetry of laser-driven proton beams is a crucial step toward the clinical use of this new kind of beams. Hence, one of the ELIMED task, will be the definition of procedures aiming to obtain an absolute dose measure at the end of the transport beamline with an accuracy as close as possible to the one required for clinical applications (i.e. of the order of 5% or less). Relative dosimetry procedures must be established, as well: they are necessary in order to determine and verify the beam dose distributions and to monitor the beam fluence and the energetic spectra during irradiations. Radiochromic films, CR39, Faraday Cup, Secondary Emission Monitor (SEM) and transmission ionization chamber will be considered, designed and studied in order to perform a fully dosimetric characterization of the ELIMED proton beam.

  11. Competing segregating effects of gravity and shear rate gradients in dense granular flows in a drum: theory and simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Kimberly; Tan, Danielle

    2012-11-01

    A well-known rule of thumb for sheared mixtures of different-sized (same density) particles is that larger particles tend to go up (toward the free surface), and the smaller particles, down, commonly referred to as the ``Brazil-nut problem'' or ``kinetic sieving.'' However, it has been recently shown that in a sheared granular mixture, larger particles may rise or fall relative to the small particles, or even rise only partway to some steady-state height in a sheared mixture. We present a theory that accounts for this complex behavior as a balance between gravity-driven segregation effects and, effectively, granular temperature gradients driven by the shear. Then, we test this theory using discrete element method simulations of different mixtures rotated in a partially-filled drum. Using the theory and simulations, we show that for all mixtures we test, the segregation fluxes are driven by the difference between the partitioning of kinetic and contact stresses among the species in the mixture subjected to a gravity-induced contact stress gradient. Specifically, all particles bear a fraction of the local contact stress equal to their local concentration in the mixture, but the smaller particles bear a higher fraction of the local kinetic stress (akin to granular temperature). This presents a new physical mechanism for kinetic sieving: even where the total granular temperature is small, the higher granular temperature of the smaller particles segregates them downward, in the direction of gravity, towards high stress and low temperature regions.

  12. Silicon Absolute X-Ray Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Seely, John F.; Korde, Raj; Sprunck, Jacob; Medjoubi, Kadda; Hustache, Stephanie

    2010-06-23

    The responsivity of silicon photodiodes having no loss in the entrance window, measured using synchrotron radiation in the 1.75 to 60 keV range, was compared to the responsivity calculated using the silicon thickness measured using near-infrared light. The measured and calculated responsivities agree with an average difference of 1.3%. This enables their use as absolute x-ray detectors.

  13. Communication: The absolute shielding scales of oxygen and sulfur revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komorovsky, Stanislav; Repisky, Michal; Malkin, Elena; Ruud, Kenneth; Gauss, Jürgen

    2015-03-01

    We present an updated semi-experimental absolute shielding scale for the 17O and 33S nuclei. These new shielding scales are based on accurate rotational microwave data for the spin-rotation constants of H217O [Puzzarini et al., J. Chem. Phys. 131, 234304 (2009)], C17O [Cazzoli et al., Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 4, 3575 (2002)], and H233S [Helgaker et al., J. Chem. Phys. 139, 244308 (2013)] corrected both for vibrational and temperature effects estimated at the CCSD(T) level of theory as well as for the relativistic corrections to the relation between the spin-rotation constant and the absolute shielding constant. Our best estimate for the oxygen shielding constants of H217O is 328.4(3) ppm and for C17O -59.05(59) ppm. The relativistic correction for the sulfur shielding of H233S amounts to 3.3%, and the new sulfur shielding constant for this molecule is 742.9(4.6) ppm.

  14. Communication: The absolute shielding scales of oxygen and sulfur revisited.

    PubMed

    Komorovsky, Stanislav; Repisky, Michal; Malkin, Elena; Ruud, Kenneth; Gauss, Jürgen

    2015-03-07

    We present an updated semi-experimental absolute shielding scale for the (17)O and (33)S nuclei. These new shielding scales are based on accurate rotational microwave data for the spin-rotation constants of H2(17)O [Puzzarini et al., J. Chem. Phys. 131, 234304 (2009)], C(17)O [Cazzoli et al., Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 4, 3575 (2002)], and H2(33)S [Helgaker et al., J. Chem. Phys. 139, 244308 (2013)] corrected both for vibrational and temperature effects estimated at the CCSD(T) level of theory as well as for the relativistic corrections to the relation between the spin-rotation constant and the absolute shielding constant. Our best estimate for the oxygen shielding constants of H2(17)O is 328.4(3) ppm and for C(17)O -59.05(59) ppm. The relativistic correction for the sulfur shielding of H2(33)S amounts to 3.3%, and the new sulfur shielding constant for this molecule is 742.9(4.6) ppm.

  15. Communication: The absolute shielding scales of oxygen and sulfur revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Komorovsky, Stanislav; Repisky, Michal; Malkin, Elena; Ruud, Kenneth; Gauss, Jürgen

    2015-03-07

    We present an updated semi-experimental absolute shielding scale for the {sup 17}O and {sup 33}S nuclei. These new shielding scales are based on accurate rotational microwave data for the spin–rotation constants of H{sub 2}{sup 17}O [Puzzarini et al., J. Chem. Phys. 131, 234304 (2009)], C{sup 17}O [Cazzoli et al., Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 4, 3575 (2002)], and H{sub 2}{sup 33}S [Helgaker et al., J. Chem. Phys. 139, 244308 (2013)] corrected both for vibrational and temperature effects estimated at the CCSD(T) level of theory as well as for the relativistic corrections to the relation between the spin–rotation constant and the absolute shielding constant. Our best estimate for the oxygen shielding constants of H{sub 2}{sup 17}O is 328.4(3) ppm and for C{sup 17}O −59.05(59) ppm. The relativistic correction for the sulfur shielding of H{sub 2}{sup 33}S amounts to 3.3%, and the new sulfur shielding constant for this molecule is 742.9(4.6) ppm.

  16. Error analysis in newborn screening: can quotients support the absolute values?

    PubMed

    Arneth, Borros; Hintz, Martin

    2017-03-01

    Newborn screening is performed using modern tandem mass spectrometry, which can simultaneously detect a variety of analytes, including several amino acids and fatty acids. Tandem mass spectrometry measures the diagnostic parameters as absolute concentrations and produces fragments which are used as markers of specific substances. Several prominent quotients can also be derived, which are quotients of two absolute measured concentrations. In this study, we determined the precision of both the absolute concentrations and the derived quotients. First, the measurement error of the absolute concentrations and the measurement error of the ratios were practically determined. Then, the Gaussian theory of error calculation was used. Finally, these errors were compared with one another. The practical analytical accuracies of the quotients were significantly higher (e.g., coefficient of variation (CV) = 5.1% for the phenylalanine to tyrosine (Phe/Tyr) quotient and CV = 5.6% for the Fisher quotient) than the accuracies of the absolute measured concentrations (mean CVs = 12%). According to our results, the ratios are analytically correct and, from an analytical point of view, can support the absolute values in finding the correct diagnosis.

  17. Negative absolute temperature for mobile particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, Simon; Ronzheimer, Philipp; Schreiber, Michael; Hodgman, Sean; Bloch, Immanuel; Schneider, Ulrich

    2013-05-01

    Absolute temperature is usually bound to be strictly positive. However, negative absolute temperature states, where the occupation probability of states increases with their energy, are possible in systems with an upper energy bound. So far, such states have only been demonstrated in localized spin systems with finite, discrete spectra. We realized a negative absolute temperature state for motional degrees of freedom with ultracold bosonic 39K atoms in an optical lattice, by implementing the attractive Bose-Hubbard Hamiltonian. This new state strikingly revealed itself by a quasimomentum distribution that is peaked at maximum kinetic energy. The measured kinetic energy distribution and the extracted negative temperature indicate that the ensemble is close to degeneracy, with coherence over several lattice sites. The state is as stable as a corresponding positive temperature state: The negative temperature stabilizes the system against mean-field collapse driven by negative pressure. Negative temperatures open up new parameter regimes for cold atoms, enabling fundamentally new many-body states. Additionally, they give rise to several counterintuitive effects such as heat engines with above unity efficiency.

  18. Measurement of absolute gravity acceleration in Firenze

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Angelis, M.; Greco, F.; Pistorio, A.; Poli, N.; Prevedelli, M.; Saccorotti, G.; Sorrentino, F.; Tino, G. M.

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports the results from the accurate measurement of the acceleration of gravity g taken at two separate premises in the Polo Scientifico of the University of Firenze (Italy). In these laboratories, two separate experiments aiming at measuring the Newtonian constant and testing the Newtonian law at short distances are in progress. Both experiments require an independent knowledge on the local value of g. The only available datum, pertaining to the italian zero-order gravity network, was taken more than 20 years ago at a distance of more than 60 km from the study site. Gravity measurements were conducted using an FG5 absolute gravimeter, and accompanied by seismic recordings for evaluating the noise condition at the site. The absolute accelerations of gravity at the two laboratories are (980 492 160.6 ± 4.0) μGal and (980 492 048.3 ± 3.0) μGal for the European Laboratory for Non-Linear Spectroscopy (LENS) and Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, respectively. Other than for the two referenced experiments, the data here presented will serve as a benchmark for any future study requiring an accurate knowledge of the absolute value of the acceleration of gravity in the study region.

  19. System for absolute measurements by interferometric sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norton, Douglas A.

    1993-03-01

    The most common problem of interferometric sensors is their inability to measure absolute path imbalance. Presented in this paper is a signal processing system that gives absolute, unambiguous reading of optical path difference for almost any style of interferometric sensor. Key components are a wide band (incoherent) optical source, a polychromator, and FFT electronics. Advantages include no moving parts in the signal processor, no active components at the sensor location, and the use of standard single mode fiber for sensor illumination and signal transmission. Actual absolute path imbalance of the interferometer is determined without using fringe counting or other inferential techniques. The polychromator extracts the interference information that occurs at each discrete wavelength within the spectral band of the optical source. The signal processing consists of analog and digital filtering, Fast Fourier analysis, and a peak detection and interpolation algorithm. This system was originally designed for use in a remote pressure sensing application that employed a totally passive fiber optic interferometer. A performance qualification was made using a Fabry-Perot interferometer and a commercially available laser interferometer to measure the reference displacement.

  20. Chemical composition of French mimosa absolute oil.

    PubMed

    Perriot, Rodolphe; Breme, Katharina; Meierhenrich, Uwe J; Carenini, Elise; Ferrando, Georges; Baldovini, Nicolas

    2010-02-10

    Since decades mimosa (Acacia dealbata) absolute oil has been used in the flavor and perfume industry. Today, it finds an application in over 80 perfumes, and its worldwide industrial production is estimated five tons per year. Here we report on the chemical composition of French mimosa absolute oil. Straight-chain analogues from C6 to C26 with different functional groups (hydrocarbons, esters, aldehydes, diethyl acetals, alcohols, and ketones) were identified in the volatile fraction. Most of them are long-chain molecules: (Z)-heptadec-8-ene, heptadecane, nonadecane, and palmitic acid are the most abundant, and constituents such as 2-phenethyl alcohol, methyl anisate, and ethyl palmitate are present in smaller amounts. The heavier constituents were mainly triterpenoids such as lupenone and lupeol, which were identified as two of the main components. (Z)-Heptadec-8-ene, lupenone, and lupeol were quantified by GC-MS in SIM mode using external standards and represents 6%, 20%, and 7.8% (w/w) of the absolute oil. Moreover, odorant compounds were extracted by SPME and analyzed by GC-sniffing leading to the perception of 57 odorant zones, of which 37 compounds were identified by their odorant description, mass spectrum, retention index, and injection of the reference compound.

  1. Constrained Least Absolute Deviation Neural Networks

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhishun; Peterson, Bradley S.

    2008-01-01

    It is well known that least absolute deviation (LAD) criterion or L1-norm used for estimation of parameters is characterized by robustness, i.e., the estimated parameters are totally resistant (insensitive) to large changes in the sampled data. This is an extremely useful feature, especially, when the sampled data are known to be contaminated by occasionally occurring outliers or by spiky noise. In our previous works, we have proposed the least absolute deviation neural network (LADNN) to solve unconstrained LAD problems. The theoretical proofs and numerical simulations have shown that the LADNN is Lyapunov-stable and it can globally converge to the exact solution to a given unconstrained LAD problem. We have also demonstrated its excellent application value in time-delay estimation. More generally, a practical LAD application problem may contain some linear constraints, such as a set of equalities and/or inequalities, which is called constrained LAD problem, whereas the unconstrained LAD can be considered as a special form of the constrained LAD. In this paper, we present a new neural network called constrained least absolute deviation neural network (CLADNN) to solve general constrained LAD problems. Theoretical proofs and numerical simulations demonstrate that the proposed CLADNN is Lyapunov stable and globally converges to the exact solution to a given constrained LAD problem, independent of initial values. The numerical simulations have also illustrated that the proposed CLADNN can be used to robustly estimate parameters for nonlinear curve fitting, which is extensively used in signal and image processing. PMID:18269958

  2. Quartz dissolution. I - Negative crystal experiments and a rate law. II - Theory of rough and smooth surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gratz, Andrew J.; Bird, Peter

    1993-01-01

    The range of the measured quartz dissolution rates, as a function of temperature and pOH, extent of saturation, and ionic strength, is extended to cover a wider range of solution chemistries, using the negative crystal methodology of Gratz et al. (1990) to measure the dissolution rate. A simple rate law describing the quartz dissolution kinetics above the point of zero charge of quartz is derived for ionic strengths above 0.003 m. Measurements were performed on some defective crystals, and the mathematics of step motion was developed for quartz dissolution and was compared with rough-face behavior using two different models.

  3. Absolute magnetic helicity and the cylindrical magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Low, B. C.

    2011-05-15

    The different magnetic helicities conserved under conditions of perfect electrical conductivity are expressions of the fundamental property that every evolving fluid surface conserves its net magnetic flux. This basic hydromagnetic point unifies the well known Eulerian helicities with the Lagrangian helicity defined by the conserved fluxes frozen into a prescribed set of disjoint toroidal tubes of fluid flowing as a permanent partition of the entire fluid [B. C. Low, Astrophys. J. 649, 1064 (2006)]. This unifying theory is constructed from first principles, beginning with an analysis of the Eulerian and Lagrangian descriptions of fluids, separating the ideas of fluid and magnetic-flux tubes and removing the complication of the magnetic vector potential's free gauge from the concept of helicity. The analysis prepares for the construction of a conserved Eulerian helicity, without that gauge complication, to describe a 3D anchored flux in an upright cylindrical domain, this helicity called absolute to distinguish it from the well known relative helicity. In a version of the Chandrasekhar-Kendall representation, the evolving field at any instant is a unique superposition of a writhed, untwisted axial flux with a circulating flux of field lines all closed and unlinked within the cylindrical domain. The absolute helicity is then a flux-weighted sum of the writhe of that axial flux and its mutual linkage with the circulating flux. The absolute helicity is also conserved if the frozen-in field and its domain are continuously deformed by changing the separation between the rigid cylinder-ends with no change of cylinder radius. This hitherto intractable cylindrical construction closes a crucial conceptual gap for the fundamentals to be complete at last. The concluding discussion shows the impact of this development on our understanding of helicity, covering (i) the helicities of wholly contained and anchored fields; (ii) the Eulerian and Lagrangian descriptions of field

  4. Absolute properties of the triple star HP Aurigae

    SciTech Connect

    Lacy, Claud H. Sandberg; Burks, Charles L.; Torres, Guillermo; Wolf, Marek E-mail: clburks@email.uark.edu E-mail: wolf@cesnet.cz

    2014-01-01

    New photometric, spectroscopic, and eclipse timing observations of the eclipsing binary star HP Aur allow for very accurate orbital determinations, even in the presence of a third body and transient starspot activity. The eclipsing binary masses are determined to an accuracy of ±0.4% and the radii to ±0.6%. The masses are 0.9543 ± 0.0041 and 0.8094 ± 0.0036 solar masses, and the radii are 1.0278 ± 0.0042 and 0.7758 ± 0.0034 solar radii, respectively. The orbital period in the outer orbit is accurately determined for the first time: 4.332 ± 0.011 yr. A comparison with current theories of stellar evolution shows that the components' absolute properties can be well-matched by the current models at an age of about 7 billion years.

  5. Absolute blood velocity measured with a modified fundus camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duncan, Donald D.; Lemaillet, Paul; Ibrahim, Mohamed; Nguyen, Quan Dong; Hiller, Matthias; Ramella-Roman, Jessica

    2010-09-01

    We present a new method for the quantitative estimation of blood flow velocity, based on the use of the Radon transform. The specific application is for measurement of blood flow velocity in the retina. Our modified fundus camera uses illumination from a green LED and captures imagery with a high-speed CCD camera. The basic theory is presented, and typical results are shown for an in vitro flow model using blood in a capillary tube. Subsequently, representative results are shown for representative fundus imagery. This approach provides absolute velocity and flow direction along the vessel centerline or any lateral displacement therefrom. We also provide an error analysis allowing estimation of confidence intervals for the estimated velocity.

  6. A SOLAR SPECTROSCOPIC ABSOLUTE ABUNDANCE OF ARGON FROM RESIK

    SciTech Connect

    Sylwester, J.; Sylwester, B.; Phillips, K. J. H.; Kuznetsov, V. D. E-mail: kjhp@mssl.ucl.ac.u

    2010-09-10

    Observations of He-like and H-like Ar (Ar XVII and Ar XVIII) lines at 3.949 A and 3.733 A, respectively, with the RESIK X-ray spectrometer on the CORONAS-F spacecraft, together with temperatures and emission measures from the two channels of GOES, have been analyzed to obtain the abundance of Ar in flare plasmas in the solar corona. The line fluxes per unit emission measure show a temperature dependence like that predicted from theory and lead to spectroscopically determined values for the absolute Ar abundance, A(Ar) = 6.44 {+-} 0.07 (Ar XVII) and 6.49 {+-} 0.16 (Ar XVIII), which are in agreement to within uncertainties. The weighted mean is 6.45 {+-} 0.06, which is between two recent compilations of the solar Ar abundance and suggests that the photospheric and coronal abundances of Ar are very similar.

  7. Absolute rotation detection by Coriolis force measurement using optomechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davuluri, Sankar; Li, Yong

    2016-10-01

    In this article, we present an application of the optomechanical cavities for absolute rotation detection. Two optomechanical cavities, one in each arm, are placed in a Michelson interferometer. The interferometer is placed on a rotating table and is moved with a uniform velocity of \\dot{\\bar{y}} with respect to the rotating table. The Coriolis force acting on the interferometer changes the length of the optomechanical cavity in one arm, while the length of the optomechanical cavity in the other arm is not changed. The phase shift corresponding to the change in the optomechanical cavity length is measured at the interferometer output to estimate the angular velocity of the absolute rotation. An analytic expression for the minimum detectable rotation rate corresponding to the standard quantum limit of measurable Coriolis force in the interferometer is derived. Squeezing technique is discussed to improve the rotation detection sensitivity by a factor of \\sqrt{{γ }m/{ω }m} at 0 K temperature, where {γ }m and {ω }m are the damping rate and angular frequency of the mechanical oscillator. The temperature dependence of the rotation detection sensitivity is studied.

  8. Nonequilibrium thermodynamics formalism for Marcus theory of heterogeneous and self-exchange electron-transfer rate constants.

    PubMed

    Sethi, Richa; Sangaranarayanan, M V

    2008-05-08

    The cross-exchange electron-transfer rate constant expression of Marcus is derived from the Flux-force formalism of non-equilibrium thermodynamics. The relationship governing the Onsager's phenomenological coefficients for cross-exchange and self-exchange electron-transfer processes is deduced. Onsager's phenomenological coefficient pertaining to the Butler-Volmer equation is derived and estimated from the experimental exchange current densities. The correlation between the heterogeneous and the homogeneous electron-transfer rate constants derived by Marcus is analyzed in terms of the corresponding phenomenological coefficients.

  9. Absolute quantum cutting efficiency of Tb3+-Yb3+ co-doped glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Qianqian; Qin, Feng; Zhao, Hua; Zhang, Zhiguo; Cao, Wenwu

    2013-12-01

    The absolute quantum cutting efficiency of Tb3+-Yb3+ co-doped glass was quantitatively measured by an integrating sphere detection system, which is independent of the excitation power. As the Yb3+ concentration increases, the near infrared quantum efficiency exhibited an exponential growth with an upper limit of 13.5%, but the visible light efficiency was reduced rapidly. As a result, the total quantum efficiency monotonically decreases rather than increases as theory predicted. In fact, the absolute quantum efficiency was far less than the theoretical value due to the low radiative efficiency of Tb3+ (<61%) and significant cross-relaxation nonradiative loss between Yb3+ ions.

  10. Theory for rates, equilibrium constants, and Brønsted slopes in F1-ATPase single molecule imaging experiments.

    PubMed

    Volkán-Kacsó, Sándor; Marcus, Rudolph A

    2015-11-17

    A theoretical model of elastically coupled reactions is proposed for single molecule imaging and rotor manipulation experiments on F1-ATPase. Stalling experiments are considered in which rates of individual ligand binding, ligand release, and chemical reaction steps have an exponential dependence on rotor angle. These data are treated in terms of the effect of thermodynamic driving forces on reaction rates, and lead to equations relating rate constants and free energies to the stalling angle. These relations, in turn, are modeled using a formalism originally developed to treat electron and other transfer reactions. During stalling the free energy profile of the enzymatic steps is altered by a work term due to elastic structural twisting. Using biochemical and single molecule data, the dependence of the rate constant and equilibrium constant on the stall angle, as well as the Børnsted slope are predicted and compared with experiment. Reasonable agreement is found with stalling experiments for ATP and GTP binding. The model can be applied to other torque-generating steps of reversible ligand binding, such as ADP and Pi release, when sufficient data become available.

  11. Item Response Theory Analyses of Parent and Teacher Ratings of the ADHD Symptoms for Recoded Dichotomous Scores

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gomez, Rapson; Vance, Alasdair; Gomez, Andre

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The two-parameter logistic model (2PLM) was used to evaluate the psychometric properties of the inattention (IA) and hyperactivity/impulsivity (HI) symptoms. Method: To accomplish this, parents and teachers completed the Disruptive Behavior Rating Scale (DBRS) for a group of 934 primary school-aged children. Results: The results for the…

  12. Absolute Radiometric Calibration of EUNIS-06

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, R. J.; Rabin, D. M.; Kent, B. J.; Paustian, W.

    2007-01-01

    The Extreme-Ultraviolet Normal-Incidence Spectrometer (EUNIS) is a soundingrocket payload that obtains imaged high-resolution spectra of individual solar features, providing information about the Sun's corona and upper transition region. Shortly after its successful initial flight last year, a complete end-to-end calibration was carried out to determine the instrument's absolute radiometric response over its Longwave bandpass of 300 - 370A. The measurements were done at the Rutherford-Appleton Laboratory (RAL) in England, using the same vacuum facility and EUV radiation source used in the pre-flight calibrations of both SOHO/CDS and Hinode/EIS, as well as in three post-flight calibrations of our SERTS sounding rocket payload, the precursor to EUNIS. The unique radiation source provided by the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) had been calibrated to an absolute accuracy of 7% (l-sigma) at 12 wavelengths covering our bandpass directly against the Berlin electron storage ring BESSY, which is itself a primary radiometric source standard. Scans of the EUNIS aperture were made to determine the instrument's absolute spectral sensitivity to +- 25%, considering all sources of error, and demonstrate that EUNIS-06 was the most sensitive solar E W spectrometer yet flown. The results will be matched against prior calibrations which relied on combining measurements of individual optical components, and on comparisons with theoretically predicted 'insensitive' line ratios. Coordinated observations were made during the EUNIS-06 flight by SOHO/CDS and EIT that will allow re-calibrations of those instruments as well. In addition, future EUNIS flights will provide similar calibration updates for TRACE, Hinode/EIS, and STEREO/SECCHI/EUVI.

  13. Achieving Climate Change Absolute Accuracy in Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wielicki, Bruce A.; Young, D. F.; Mlynczak, M. G.; Thome, K. J; Leroy, S.; Corliss, J.; Anderson, J. G.; Ao, C. O.; Bantges, R.; Best, F.; Bowman, K.; Brindley, H.; Butler, J. J.; Collins, W.; Dykema, J. A.; Doelling, D. R.; Feldman, D. R.; Fox, N.; Huang, X.; Holz, R.; Huang, Y.; Jennings, D.; Jin, Z.; Johnson, D. G.; Jucks, K.; Kato, S.; Kratz, D. P.; Liu, X.; Lukashin, C.; Mannucci, A. J.; Phojanamongkolkij, N.; Roithmayr, C. M.; Sandford, S.; Taylor, P. C.; Xiong, X.

    2013-01-01

    The Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO) mission will provide a calibration laboratory in orbit for the purpose of accurately measuring and attributing climate change. CLARREO measurements establish new climate change benchmarks with high absolute radiometric accuracy and high statistical confidence across a wide range of essential climate variables. CLARREO's inherently high absolute accuracy will be verified and traceable on orbit to Système Internationale (SI) units. The benchmarks established by CLARREO will be critical for assessing changes in the Earth system and climate model predictive capabilities for decades into the future as society works to meet the challenge of optimizing strategies for mitigating and adapting to climate change. The CLARREO benchmarks are derived from measurements of the Earth's thermal infrared spectrum (5-50 micron), the spectrum of solar radiation reflected by the Earth and its atmosphere (320-2300 nm), and radio occultation refractivity from which accurate temperature profiles are derived. The mission has the ability to provide new spectral fingerprints of climate change, as well as to provide the first orbiting radiometer with accuracy sufficient to serve as the reference transfer standard for other space sensors, in essence serving as a "NIST [National Institute of Standards and Technology] in orbit." CLARREO will greatly improve the accuracy and relevance of a wide range of space-borne instruments for decadal climate change. Finally, CLARREO has developed new metrics and methods for determining the accuracy requirements of climate observations for a wide range of climate variables and uncertainty sources. These methods should be useful for improving our understanding of observing requirements for most climate change observations.

  14. Predicting pressure-dependent unimolecular rate constants using variational transition state theory with multidimensional tunneling combined with system-specific quantum RRK theory: a definitive test for fluoroform dissociation.

    PubMed

    Bao, Junwei Lucas; Zhang, Xin; Truhlar, Donald G

    2016-06-22

    Understanding the falloff in rate constants of gas-phase unimolecular reaction rate constants as the pressure is lowered is a fundamental problem in chemical kinetics, with practical importance for combustion, atmospheric chemistry, and essentially all gas-phase reaction mechanisms. In the present work, we use our recently developed system-specific quantum RRK theory, calibrated by canonical variational transition state theory with small-curvature tunneling, combined with the Lindemann-Hinshelwood mechanism, to model the dissociation reaction of fluoroform (CHF3), which provides a definitive test for falloff modeling. Our predicted pressure-dependent thermal rate constants are in excellent agreement with experimental values over a wide range of pressures and temperatures. The present validation of our methodology, which is able to include variational transition state effects, multidimensional tunneling based on the directly calculated potential energy surface along the tunneling path, and torsional and other vibrational anharmonicity, together with state-of-the-art reaction-path-based direct dynamics calculations, is important because the method is less empirical than models routinely used for generating full mechanisms, while also being simpler in key respects than full master equation treatments and the full reduced falloff curve and modified strong collision methods of Troe.

  15. Brownian motion: Absolute negative particle mobility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ros, Alexandra; Eichhorn, Ralf; Regtmeier, Jan; Duong, Thanh Tu; Reimann, Peter; Anselmetti, Dario

    2005-08-01

    Noise effects in technological applications, far from being a nuisance, can be exploited with advantage - for example, unavoidable thermal fluctuations have found application in the transport and sorting of colloidal particles and biomolecules. Here we use a microfluidic system to demonstrate a paradoxical migration mechanism in which particles always move in a direction opposite to the net acting force (`absolute negative mobility') as a result of an interplay between thermal noise, a periodic and symmetric microstructure, and a biased alternating-current electric field. This counterintuitive phenomenon could be used for bioanalytical purposes, for example in the separation and fractionation of colloids, biological molecules and cells.

  16. Arbitrary segments of absolute negative mobility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ruyin; Nie, Linru; Chen, Chongyang; Wang, Chaojie

    2017-01-01

    In previous research work, investigators have reported only one or two segments of absolute negative mobility (ANM) in a periodic potential. In fact, many segments of ANM also occur in the system considered here. We investigate transport of an inertial particle in a gating ratchet periodic potential subjected to a constant bias force. Our numerical results show that its mean velocity can decrease with the bias force increasing, i.e. ANM phenomenon. Furthermore, the ANM can take place arbitrary segments, even up to more than thirty. Intrinsic physical mechanism and conditions for arbitrary segments of ANM to occur are discussed in detail.

  17. Absolute quantification of myocardial blood flow.

    PubMed

    Yoshinaga, Keiichiro; Manabe, Osamu; Tamaki, Nagara

    2016-07-21

    With the increasing availability of positron emission tomography (PET) myocardial perfusion imaging, the absolute quantification of myocardial blood flow (MBF) has become popular in clinical settings. Quantitative MBF provides an important additional diagnostic or prognostic information over conventional visual assessment. The success of MBF quantification using PET/computed tomography (CT) has increased the demand for this quantitative diagnostic approach to be more accessible. In this regard, MBF quantification approaches have been developed using several other diagnostic imaging modalities including single-photon emission computed tomography, CT, and cardiac magnetic resonance. This review will address the clinical aspects of PET MBF quantification and the new approaches to MBF quantification.

  18. An absolute radius scale for Saturn's rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicholson, Philip D.; Cooke, Maren L.; Pelton, Emily

    1990-01-01

    Radio and stellar occultation observations of Saturn's rings made by the Voyager spacecraft are discussed. The data reveal systematic discrepancies of almost 10 km in some parts of the rings, limiting some of the investigations. A revised solution for Saturn's rotation pole has been proposed which removes the discrepancies between the stellar and radio occultation profiles. Corrections to previously published radii vary from -2 to -10 km for the radio occultation, and +5 to -6 km for the stellar occultation. An examination of spiral density waves in the outer A Ring supports that the revised absolute radii are in error by no more than 2 km.

  19. Absolute method of measuring magnetic susceptibility

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorpe, A.; Senftle, F.E.

    1959-01-01

    An absolute method of standardization and measurement of the magnetic susceptibility of small samples is presented which can be applied to most techniques based on the Faraday method. The fact that the susceptibility is a function of the area under the curve of sample displacement versus distance of the magnet from the sample, offers a simple method of measuring the susceptibility without recourse to a standard sample. Typical results on a few substances are compared with reported values, and an error of less than 2% can be achieved. ?? 1959 The American Institute of Physics.

  20. Absolute Priority for a Vehicle in VANET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirani, Rostam; Hendessi, Faramarz; Montazeri, Mohammad Ali; Sheikh Zefreh, Mohammad

    In today's world, traffic jams waste hundreds of hours of our life. This causes many researchers try to resolve the problem with the idea of Intelligent Transportation System. For some applications like a travelling ambulance, it is important to reduce delay even for a second. In this paper, we propose a completely infrastructure-less approach for finding shortest path and controlling traffic light to provide absolute priority for an emergency vehicle. We use the idea of vehicular ad-hoc networking to reduce the imposed travelling time. Then, we simulate our proposed protocol and compare it with a centrally controlled traffic light system.

  1. Absolute objects and counterexamples: Jones-Geroch dust, Torretti constant curvature, tetrad-spinor, and scalar density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brian Pitts, J.

    James L. Anderson analyzed the novelty of Einstein's theory of gravity as its lack of "absolute objects." Michael Friedman's related work has been criticized by Roger Jones and Robert Geroch for implausibly admitting as absolute the timelike 4-velocity field of dust in cosmological models in Einstein's theory. Using Rosen-Sorkin Lagrange multiplier trick, I complete Anna Maidens's argument that the problem is not solved by prohibiting variation of absolute objects in an action principle. Recalling Anderson's proscription of "irrelevant" variables, I generalize that proscription to locally irrelevant variables that do no work in some places in some models. This move vindicates Friedman's intuitions and removes the Jones-Geroch counterexample: some regions of some models of gravity with dust are dust-free and so naturally lack a timelike 4-velocity, so diffeomorphic equivalence to (1,0,0,0) is spoiled. Torretti's example involving constant curvature spaces is shown to have an absolute object on Anderson's analysis, viz., the conformal spatial metric density. The previously neglected threat of an absolute object from an orthonormal tetrad used for coupling spinors to gravity appears resolvable by eliminating irrelevant fields. However, given Anderson's definition, GTR itself has an absolute object (as Robert Geroch has observed recently): a change of variables to a conformal metric density and a scalar density shows that the latter is absolute.

  2. Equilibrium Fermi's Golden Rule Charge Transfer Rate Constants in the Condensed Phase: The Linearized Semiclassical Method vs Classical Marcus Theory.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiang; Geva, Eitan

    2016-05-19

    In this article, we present a comprehensive comparison between the linearized semiclassical expression for the equilibrium Fermi's golden rule rate constant and the progression of more approximate expressions that lead to the classical Marcus expression. We do so within the context of the canonical Marcus model, where the donor and acceptor potential energy surface are parabolic and identical except for a shift in both the free energies and equilibrium geometries, and within the Condon region. The comparison is performed for two different spectral densities and over a wide range of frictions and temperatures, thereby providing a clear test for the validity, or lack thereof, of the more approximate expressions. We also comment on the computational cost and scaling associated with numerically calculating the linearized semiclassical expression for the rate constant and its dependence on the spectral density, temperature, and friction.

  3. Ab initio and density functional theory evidence on the rate-limiting step in the Morita-Baylis-Hillman reaction.

    PubMed

    Roy, Dipankar; Sunoj, Raghavan B

    2007-11-08

    The first ab initio and DFT studies on the mechanism of the MBH reaction show that the rate-limiting step involves an intramolecular proton transfer in the zwitterionic intermediate generated by the addition of enolate to electrophile. The activation barrier for the C-C bond-formation is found to be 20.2 kcal/mol lower than the proton-transfer step for the MBH reaction between methyl vinyl ketone and benzaldehyde catalyzed by DABCO.

  4. Organ-specific rates of cellular respiration in developing sunflower seedlings and their bearing on metabolic scaling theory.

    PubMed

    Kutschera, Ulrich; Niklas, Karl J

    2012-10-01

    Fifty years ago Max Kleiber described what has become known as the "mouse-to-elephant" curve, i.e., a log-log plot of basal metabolic rate versus body mass. From these data, "Kleiber's 3/4 law" was deduced, which states that metabolic activity scales as the three fourths-power of body mass. However, for reasons unknown so far, no such "universal scaling law" has been discovered for land plants (embryophytes). Here, we report that the metabolic rates of four different organs (cotyledons, cotyledonary hook, hypocotyl, and roots) of developing sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) seedlings grown in darkness (skotomorphogenesis) and in white light (photomorphogenesis) differ by a factor of 2 to 5 and are largely independent of light treatment. The organ-specific respiration rate (oxygen uptake per minute per gram of fresh mass) of the apical hook, which is composed of cells with densely packaged cytoplasm, is much higher than that of the hypocotyl, an organ that contains vacuolated cells. Data for cell length, cell density, and DNA content reveal that (1) hook opening in white light is caused by a stimulation of cell elongation on the inside of the curved organ, (2) respiration, cell density and DNA content are much higher in the hook than in the stem, and (3) organ-specific respiration rates and the DNA contents of tissues are statistically correlated. We conclude that, due to the heterogeneity of the plant body caused by the vacuolization of the cells, Kleiber's law, which was deduced using mammals as a model system, cannot be applied to embryophytes. In plants, this rule may reflect scaling phenomena at the level of the metabolically active protoplasmic contents of the cells.

  5. Absolute bioavailability and absorption characteristics of divalproex sodium extended-release tablets in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Sandeep; Reed, Ronald C; Cavanaugh, John H

    2004-07-01

    Conventional delayed-release, enteric-coated divalproex sodium tablet has an absolute bioavailability of approximately 100%. Divalproex sodium extended-release (ER) tablet is a novel formulation of valproic acid (VPA) designed to release the drug slowly at a constant zero-order rate. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the absolute bioavailability and absorption characteristics of divalproex ER. Healthy adult volunteers (n = 16) received divalproex ER and intravenous VPA in crossover fashion. Absolute bioavailability was calculated as the divalproex ER/intravenous VPA ratio of area under the curve extrapolated to infinity. The duration and rate of absorption of VPA from divalproex ER tablets were determined by deconvolution analysis. The geometric mean absolute bioavailability of divalproex ER was 0.896. The mean (coefficient of variation) duration of drug absorption from divalproex ER was 21.8 (17%) hours, and the zero-order absorption rate was 21.6 (24%) mg/h for a 500-mg tablet. Divalproex ER has a lower absolute bioavailability than conventional divalproex tablets but exhibits good extended-release characteristics without any dose dumping.

  6. Absolute Spectrophotometry of 237 Open Cluster Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clampitt, L.; Burstein, D.

    1994-12-01

    We present absolute spectrophotometry of 237 stars in 7 nearby open clusters: Hyades, Pleiades, Alpha Persei, Praesepe, Coma Berenices, IC 4665, and M 39. The observations were taken using the Wampler single-channel scanner (Wampler 1966) on the Crossley 0.9m telescope at Lick Observatory from July 1973 through December 1974. 21 bandpasses spanning the spectral range 3500 Angstroms to 7780 Angstroms were observed for each star, with bandwiths ranging from 32Angstroms to 64 Angstroms. Data are standardized to the Hayes--Latham (1975) system. Our measurements are compared to filter colors on the Johnson BV, Stromgren ubvy, and Geneva U V B_1 B_2 V_1 G systems, as well as to spectrophotometry of a few stars published by Gunn, Stryker & Tinsley and in the Spectrophotometric Standards Catalog (Adelman; as distributed by the NSSDC). Both internal and external comparisons to the filter systems indicate a formal statistical accuracy per bandpass of 0.01 to 0.02 mag, with apparent larger ( ~ 0.03 mag) differences in absolute calibration between this data set and existing spectrophotometry. These data will comprise part of the spectrophotometry that will be used to calibrate the Beijing-Arizona-Taipei-Connecticut Color Survey of the Sky (see separate paper by Burstein et al. at this meeting).

  7. Linear ultrasonic motor for absolute gravimeter.

    PubMed

    Jian, Yue; Yao, Zhiyuan; Silberschmidt, Vadim V

    2017-02-01

    Thanks to their compactness and suitability for vacuum applications, linear ultrasonic motors are considered as substitutes for classical electromagnetic motors as driving elements in absolute gravimeters. Still, their application is prevented by relatively low power output. To overcome this limitation and provide better stability, a V-type linear ultrasonic motor with a new clamping method is proposed for a gravimeter. In this paper, a mechanical model of stators with flexible clamping components is suggested, according to a design criterion for clamps of linear ultrasonic motors. After that, an effect of tangential and normal rigidity of the clamping components on mechanical output is studied. It is followed by discussion of a new clamping method with sufficient tangential rigidity and a capability to facilitate pre-load. Additionally, a prototype of the motor with the proposed clamping method was fabricated and the performance tests in vertical direction were implemented. Experimental results show that the suggested motor has structural stability and high dynamic performance, such as no-load speed of 1.4m/s and maximal thrust of 43N, meeting the requirements for absolute gravimeters.

  8. Why to compare absolute numbers of mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Sabine; Schulz, Sabine; Schropp, Eva-Maria; Eberhagen, Carola; Simmons, Alisha; Beisker, Wolfgang; Aichler, Michaela; Zischka, Hans

    2014-11-01

    Prompted by pronounced structural differences between rat liver and rat hepatocellular carcinoma mitochondria, we suspected these mitochondrial populations to differ massively in their molecular composition. Aiming to reveal these mitochondrial differences, we came across the issue on how to normalize such comparisons and decided to focus on the absolute number of mitochondria. To this end, fluorescently stained mitochondria were quantified by flow cytometry. For rat liver mitochondria, this approach resulted in mitochondrial protein contents comparable to earlier reports using alternative methods. We determined similar protein contents for rat liver, heart and kidney mitochondria. In contrast, however, lower protein contents were determined for rat brain mitochondria and for mitochondria from the rat hepatocellular carcinoma cell line McA 7777. This result challenges mitochondrial comparisons that rely on equal protein amounts as a typical normalization method. Exemplarily, we therefore compared the activity and susceptibility toward inhibition of complex II of rat liver and hepatocellular carcinoma mitochondria and obtained significant discrepancies by either normalizing to protein amount or to absolute mitochondrial number. Importantly, the latter normalization, in contrast to the former, demonstrated a lower complex II activity and higher susceptibility toward inhibition in hepatocellular carcinoma mitochondria compared to liver mitochondria. These findings demonstrate that solely normalizing to protein amount may obscure essential molecular differences between mitochondrial populations.

  9. [Estimation of absolute risk for fracture].

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Saeko

    2009-03-01

    Osteoporosis treatment aims to prevent fractures and maintain the QOL of the elderly. However, persons at high risk of future fracture cannot be effectively identified on the basis of bone density (BMD) alone, although BMD is used as an diagnostic criterion. Therefore, the WHO recommended that absolute risk for fracture (10-year probability of fracture) for each individual be evaluated and used as an index for intervention threshold. The 10-year probability of fracture is calculated based on age, sex, BMD at the femoral neck (body mass index if BMD is not available), history of previous fractures, parental hip fracture history, smoking, steroid use, rheumatoid arthritis, secondary osteoporosis and alcohol consumption. The WHO has just announced the development of a calculation tool (FRAX: WHO Fracture Risk Assessment Tool) in February this year. Fractures could be prevented more effectively if, based on each country's medical circumstances, an absolute risk value for fracture to determine when to start medical treatment is established and persons at high risk of fracture are identified and treated accordingly.

  10. Absolute stereochemistry of altersolanol A and alterporriols.

    PubMed

    Kanamaru, Saki; Honma, Miho; Murakami, Takanori; Tsushima, Taro; Kudo, Shinji; Tanaka, Kazuaki; Nihei, Ken-Ichi; Nehira, Tatsuo; Hashimoto, Masaru

    2012-02-01

    The absolute stereochemistry of altersolanol A (1) was established by observing a positive exciton couplet in the circular dichroism (CD) spectrum of the C3,C4-O-bis(2-naphthoyl) derivative 10 and by chemical correlations with known compound 8. Before the discussion, the relative stereochemistry of 1 was confirmed by X-ray crystallographic analysis. The shielding effect at C7'-OMe group by C1-O-benzoylation established the relative stereochemical relationship between the C8-C8' axial bonding and the C1-C4/C1'-C4' polyol moieties of alterporriols E (3), an atropisomer of the C8-C8' dimer of 1. As 3 could be obtained by dimerization of 1 in vitro, the absolute configuration of its central chirality elements (C1-C4) must be identical to those of 1. Spectral comparison between the experimental and theoretical CD spectra supported the above conclusion. Axial stereochemistry of novel C4-O-deoxy dimeric derivatives, alterporriols F (4) and G (5), were also revealed by comparison of their CD spectra to those of 2 and 3.

  11. Absolute Electron Extraction Efficiency of Liquid Xenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamdin, Katayun; Mizrachi, Eli; Morad, James; Sorensen, Peter

    2016-03-01

    Dual phase liquid/gas xenon time projection chambers (TPCs) currently set the world's most sensitive limits on weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs), a favored dark matter candidate. These detectors rely on extracting electrons from liquid xenon into gaseous xenon, where they produce proportional scintillation. The proportional scintillation from the extracted electrons serves to internally amplify the WIMP signal; even a single extracted electron is detectable. Credible dark matter searches can proceed with electron extraction efficiency (EEE) lower than 100%. However, electrons systematically left at the liquid/gas boundary are a concern. Possible effects include spontaneous single or multi-electron proportional scintillation signals in the gas, or charging of the liquid/gas interface or detector materials. Understanding EEE is consequently a serious concern for this class of rare event search detectors. Previous EEE measurements have mostly been relative, not absolute, assuming efficiency plateaus at 100%. I will present an absolute EEE measurement with a small liquid/gas xenon TPC test bed located at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.

  12. Standardization of the cumulative absolute velocity

    SciTech Connect

    O'Hara, T.F.; Jacobson, J.P. )

    1991-12-01

    EPRI NP-5930, A Criterion for Determining Exceedance of the Operating Basis Earthquake,'' was published in July 1988. As defined in that report, the Operating Basis Earthquake (OBE) is exceeded when both a response spectrum parameter and a second damage parameter, referred to as the Cumulative Absolute Velocity (CAV), are exceeded. In the review process of the above report, it was noted that the calculation of CAV could be confounded by time history records of long duration containing low (nondamaging) acceleration. Therefore, it is necessary to standardize the method of calculating CAV to account for record length. This standardized methodology allows consistent comparisons between future CAV calculations and the adjusted CAV threshold value based upon applying the standardized methodology to the data set presented in EPRI NP-5930. The recommended method to standardize the CAV calculation is to window its calculation on a second-by-second basis for a given time history. If the absolute acceleration exceeds 0.025g at any time during each one second interval, the earthquake records used in EPRI NP-5930 have been reanalyzed and the adjusted threshold of damage for CAV was found to be 0.16g-set.

  13. Swarm's Absolute Scalar Magnetometers Burst Mode Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coisson, P.; Vigneron, P.; Hulot, G.; Crespo Grau, R.; Brocco, L.; Lalanne, X.; Sirol, O.; Leger, J. M.; Jager, T.; Bertrand, F.; Boness, A.; Fratter, I.

    2014-12-01

    Each of the three Swarm satellites embarks an Absolute Scalar Magnetometer (ASM) to provide absolute scalar measurements of the magnetic field with high accuracy and stability. Nominal data acquisition of these ASMs is 1 Hz. But they can also run in a so-called "burst mode" and provide data at 250 Hz. During the commissioning phase of the mission, seven burst mode acquisition campaigns have been run simultaneously for all satellites, obtaining a total of ten days of burs-mode data. These campaigns allowed the identification of issues related to the operations of the piezo-electric motor and the heaters connected to the ASM, that do not impact the nominal 1 Hz scalar data. We analyze the burst mode data to identify high frequency geomagnetic signals, focusing the analysis in two regions: the low latitudes, where we seek signatures of ionospheric irregularities, and the high latitudes, to identify high frequency signals related to polar region currents. Since these campaigns have been conducted during the initial months of the mission, the three satellites where still close to each other, allowing to analyze the spatial coherency of the signals. Wavelet analysis have revealed 31 Hz signals appearing in the night-side in the equatorial region.

  14. Absolute memory for musical pitch: evidence from the production of learned melodies.

    PubMed

    Levitin, D J

    1994-10-01

    Evidence for the absolute nature of long-term auditory memory is provided by analyzing the production of familiar melodies. Additionally, a two-component theory of absolute pitch is presented, in which this rare ability is conceived as consisting of a more common ability, pitch memory, and a separate, less common ability, pitch labeling. Forty-six subjects sang two different popular songs, and their productions were compared with the actual pitches used in recordings of those songs. Forty percent of the subjects sang the correct pitch on at least one trial; 12% of the subjects hit the correct pitch on both trials, and 44% came within two semitones of the correct pitch on both trials. The results show a convergence with previous studies on the stability of auditory imagery and latent absolute pitch ability; the results further suggest that individuals might possess representations of pitch that are more stable and accurate than previously recognized.

  15. Absolute Binding Energies of Core Levels in Solids from First Principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozaki, Taisuke; Lee, Chi-Cheng

    2017-01-01

    A general method is presented to calculate absolute binding energies of core levels in metals and insulators, based on a penalty functional and an exact Coulomb cutoff method in the framework of density functional theory. The spurious interaction of core holes between supercells is avoided by the exact Coulomb cutoff method, while the variational penalty functional enables us to treat multiple splittings due to chemical shift, spin-orbit coupling, and exchange interaction on equal footing, both of which are not accessible by previous methods. It is demonstrated that the absolute binding energies of core levels for both metals and insulators are calculated by the proposed method in a mean absolute (relative) error of 0.4 eV (0.16%) for eight cases compared to experimental values measured with x-ray photoemission spectroscopy within a generalized gradient approximation to the exchange-correlation functional.

  16. Extracting infrared absolute reflectance from relative reflectance measurements.

    PubMed

    Berets, Susan L; Milosevic, Milan

    2012-06-01

    Absolute reflectance measurements are valuable to the optics industry for development of new materials and optical coatings. Yet, absolute reflectance measurements are notoriously difficult to make. In this paper, we investigate the feasibility of extracting the absolute reflectance from a relative reflectance measurement using a reference material with known refractive index.

  17. A Conceptual Approach to Absolute Value Equations and Inequalities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Mark W.; Bryson, Janet L.

    2011-01-01

    The absolute value learning objective in high school mathematics requires students to solve far more complex absolute value equations and inequalities. When absolute value problems become more complex, students often do not have sufficient conceptual understanding to make any sense of what is happening mathematically. The authors suggest that the…

  18. Rate Equation Theory for Island Sizes and Capture Zone Areas in Submonolayer Deposition: Realistic Treatment of Spatial Aspects of Nucleation

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, J W; Li, M; Bartelt, M C

    2002-12-05

    Extensive information on the distribution of islands formed during submonolayer deposition is provided by the joint probability distribution (JPD) for island sizes, s, and capture zone areas, A. A key ingredient determining the form of the JPD is the impact of each nucleation event on existing capture zone areas. Combining a realistic characterization of such spatial aspects of nucleation with a factorization ansatz for the JPD, we provide a concise rate equation formulation for the variation with island size of both the capture zone area and the island density.

  19. On the Theory of Oxidation-Reduction Reactions Involving Electron Transfer. V. Comparison and Properties of Electrochemical and Chemical Rate Constants

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Marcus, R. A.

    1962-01-01

    Using a theory of electron transfers which takes cognizance of reorganization of the medium outside the inner coordination shell and of changes of bond lengths inside it, relations between electrochemical and related chemical rate constants are deduced and compared with the experimental data. A correlation is found, without the use of arbitrary parameters. Effects of weak complexes with added electrolytes are included under specified conditions. The deductions offer a way of coordinating a variety of data in the two fields, internally as well as with each those in another. For example, the rate of oxidation or reduction of a series of related reactants by one reagent is correlated with that of another and with that of the corresponding electrochemical oxidation-reduction reaction, under certain specified conditions. These correlations may also provide a test for distinguishing an electron from an atom transfer mechanism. (auth)

  20. On the calculation of absolute macromolecular binding free energies

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Hengbin; Sharp, Kim

    2002-01-01

    The standard framework for calculating the absolute binding free energy of a macromolecular association reaction A + B → AB with an association constant KAB is to equate chemical potentials of the species on the left- and right-hand sides of this reaction and evaluate the chemical potentials from theory. This theory involves (usually hidden) assumptions about what constitutes the bound species, AB, and where the contribution of the solvent appears. We present here an alternative derivation that can be traced back to Bjerrum, in which the expectation value of KAB is obtained directly through the statistical mechanical method of evaluating its ensemble (Boltzmann-weighted) average. The generalized Bjerrum approach more clearly delineates: (i) the different contributions to binding; (ii) the origin of the much-discussed and somewhat controversial association entropy term; and (iii) where the solvent contribution appears. This approach also allows approximations required for practical evaluation of the binding constant in complex macromolecular systems, to be introduced in a well defined way. We provide an example, with application to test cases that illustrate a range of binding behavior. PMID:12149474

  1. A nonmusical paradigm for identifying absolute pitch possessors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, David A.; Olson, Ingrid R.; Marks, Lawrence E.; Gore, John C.

    2004-09-01

    The ability to identify and reproduce sounds of specific frequencies is remarkable and uncommon. The etiology and defining characteristics of this skill, absolute pitch (AP), have been very controversial. One theory suggests that AP requires a specific type of early musical training and that the ability to encode and remember tones depends on these learned musical associations. An alternate theory argues that AP may be strongly dependent on hereditary factors and relatively independent of musical experience. To date, it has been difficult to test these hypotheses because all previous paradigms for identifying AP have required subjects to employ knowledge of musical nomenclature. As such, these tests are insensitive to the possibility of discovering AP in either nonmusicians or musicians of non-Western training. Based on previous literature in pitch memory, a paradigm is presented that is intended to distinguish between AP possessors and nonpossessors independent of the subjects' musical experience. The efficacy of this method is then tested with 20 classically defined AP possessors and 22 nonpossessors. Data from these groups strongly support the validity of the paradigm. The use of a nonmusical paradigm to identify AP may facilitate research into many aspects of this phenomenon.

  2. Separating climate change signals into thermodynamic, lapse-rate and circulation effects: theory and application to the European summer climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kröner, Nico; Kotlarski, Sven; Fischer, Erich; Lüthi, Daniel; Zubler, Elias; Schär, Christoph

    2016-07-01

    Climate models robustly project a strong overall summer warming across Europe showing a characteristic north-south gradient with enhanced warming and drying in southern Europe. However, the processes that are responsible for this pattern are not fully understood. We here employ an extended surrogate or pseudo-warming approach to disentangle the contribution of different mechanisms to this response pattern. The basic idea of the surrogate technique is to use a regional climate model and apply a large-scale warming to the lateral boundary conditions of a present-day reference simulation, while maintaining the relative humidity (and thus implicitly increasing the specific moisture content). In comparison to previous studies, our approach includes two important extensions: first, different vertical warming profiles are applied in order to separate the effects of a mean warming from lapse-rate effects. Second, a twin-design is used, in which the climate change signals are not only added to present-day conditions, but also subtracted from a scenario experiment. We demonstrate that these extensions provide an elegant way to separate the full climate change signal into contributions from large-scale thermodynamic (TD), lapse-rate (LR), and circulation and other remaining effects (CO). The latter in particular include changes in land-ocean contrast and spatial variations of the SST warming patterns. We find that the TD effect yields a large-scale warming across Europe with no distinct latitudinal gradient. The LR effect, which is quantified for the first time in our study, leads to a stronger warming and some drying in southern Europe. It explains about 50 % of the warming amplification over the Iberian Peninsula, thus demonstrating the important role of lapse-rate changes. The effect is linked to an extending Hadley circulation. The CO effect as inherited from the driving GCM is shown to further amplify the north-south temperature change gradient. In terms of mean summer

  3. Separating climate change signals into thermodynamic, lapse-rate and circulation effects: Theory and application to the European summer climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroener, Nico; Kotlarski, Sven; Fischer, Erich; Lüthi, Daniel; Zubler, Elias; Schär, Christoph

    2016-04-01

    Climate models robustly project a strong overall summer warming across Europe showing a characteristic north-south gradient with enhanced warming and drying in southern Europe. However, the processes that are responsible for this pattern are not fully understood. We here employ an extended surrogate or pseudo-warming approach to disentangle the contribution of different mechanisms to this response pattern. The basic idea of the surrogate technique is to use a regional climate model and apply a large-scale warming to the lateral boundary conditions of a present-day reference simulation, while maintaining the relative humidity (and thus implicitly increasing the specific moisture content). In comparison to previous studies, our approach includes two important extensions: First, different vertical warming profiles are applied in order to separate the effects of a mean warming from lapse-rate effects. Second, a twin-design is used, in which the temperature change signal is not only added to present-day conditions, but also subtracted from a scenario experiment. We use the regional climate model COSMO-CLM with a grid spacing of approximately 50 km (EURO-CORDEX EUR-44 setup) using transient simulations (1950-2100) with the RCP8.5 emissions scenario. We demonstrate that the aforementioned extensions provide an elegant way to separate the full climate change signal into contributions from large-scale thermodynamics (LST), lapse-rate (LR) and large-scale circulation (LSC). In our framework the LSC effect also includes effects due to changes in land-sea contrast and the spatial variations of the SST warming pattern. We find that the LST effect yields a large-scale warming across Europe without any distinct latitudinal gradient. The LR effect, which is quantified for the first time in our study, leads to a stronger warming and some drying in Southern Europe. It explains about 50% of the warming amplification over the Iberian Peninsula, thus demonstrating the important role of

  4. Use of Absolute and Comparative Performance Feedback in Absolute and Comparative Judgments and Decisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Don A.; Klein, William M. P.

    2008-01-01

    Which matters more--beliefs about absolute ability or ability relative to others? This study set out to compare the effects of such beliefs on satisfaction with performance, self-evaluations, and bets on future performance. In Experiment 1, undergraduate participants were told they had answered 20% correct, 80% correct, or were not given their…

  5. On measuring the absolute scale of baryon acoustic oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutherland, Will

    2012-10-01

    The baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) feature in the distribution of galaxies provides a fundamental standard ruler which is widely used to constrain cosmological parameters. In most analyses, the comoving length of the ruler is inferred from a combination of cosmic microwave background (CMB) observations and theory. However, this inferred length may be biased by various non-standard effects in early universe physics; this can lead to biased inferences of cosmological parameters such as H0, Ωm and w, so it would be valuable to measure the absolute BAO length by combining a galaxy redshift survey and a suitable direct low-z distance measurement. One obstacle is that low-redshift BAO surveys mainly constrain the ratio rS/DV(z), where DV is a dilation scale which is not directly observable by standard candles. Here, we find a new approximation DV(z)≃34DL(43z)(1+43z)-1(1-0.02455 z3+0.0105 z4) which connects DV to the standard luminosity distance DL at a somewhat higher redshift; this is shown to be very accurate (relative error <0.2 per cent) for all Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe compatible Friedmann models at z < 0.4, with very weak dependence on cosmological parameters H0, Ωm, Ωk, w. This provides a route to measure the absolute BAO length using only observations at z ≲ 0.3, including Type Ia supernovae, and potentially future H0-free physical distance indicators such as gravitational lenses or gravitational wave standard sirens. This would provide a zero-parameter check of the standard cosmology at 103 ≲ z ≲ 105, and can constrain the number of relativistic species Neff with fewer degeneracies than the CMB.

  6. Application of the shock layer theory to the determination of the mass transfer rate coefficient and its concentration dependence for proteins on anion exchange columns

    SciTech Connect

    Sajonz, P. ||; Guan-Sajonz, H.; Zhong, G.; Guiochon, G. |

    1997-03-01

    The extension of the shock layer theory to systems having a slow mass transfer kinetics and a concentration-dependent rate coefficient is discussed. Experiments were carried out with bovine serum albumin on two anion exchanges, TSK-GEL-DEAE-5PW and Resource-Q. The adsorption isotherm data, determined by single-step frontal analysis, could be fitted to simplified bi-Langmuir equations with vary small residuals. A lumped kinetic model (solid film linear driving force model, with rate coefficient k{sub f}) was used to account for the mass transfer kinetics. The profile of each breakthrough curve (BC) was fitted to the curve calculated with this transport model and the rate coefficient k{sub f} obtained by identification. A linear dependence of k{sub f} on the average concentration of the step of the BC was found. The shock layer thicknesses (SLT) calculated for different relative concentrations agreed very well with the experimental results. This justifies the use of the SLT for the direct determination of rate coefficients. 19 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Using generalizability theory to estimate the relative effect of class size and number of items on the dependability of student ratings of instruction.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Ali Mohamed

    2011-08-01

    Previous research on the effect of class size on student ratings of instruction has primarily investigated the effect of class size on the favorableness of these ratings rather than its effect on their reliability (dependability). A few studies have used "generalizability theory" to demonstrate the relative effect of class size on the dependability of student ratings of instruction. The purpose of the present study was to test the validity of the findings of these studies in a different cultural setting using a different student ratings questionnaire. Using a random-effect analysis of variance to estimate the variance components for a design in which students were nested within classes and crossed with items, it was found that the variance component for class size was appreciably larger than that for items. At least 20 students were needed to obtain a generalizability coefficient for relative decisions of .70 or more. Increasing the number of students has a greater effect on generalizability coefficients than increasing the number of items.

  8. In vivo absorption spectroscopy for absolute measurement.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Hiromitsu; Fukuda, Takashi

    2012-10-01

    In in vivo spectroscopy, there are differences between individual subjects in parameters such as tissue scattering and sample concentration. We propose a method that can provide the absolute value of a particular substance concentration, independent of these individual differences. Thus, it is not necessary to use the typical statistical calibration curve, which assumes an average level of scattering and an averaged concentration over individual subjects. This method is expected to greatly reduce the difficulties encountered during in vivo measurements. As an example, for in vivo absorption spectroscopy, the method was applied to the reflectance measurement in retinal vessels to monitor their oxygen saturation levels. This method was then validated by applying it to the tissue phantom under a variety of absorbance values and scattering efficiencies.

  9. Determining Absolute Zero Using a Tuning Fork

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldader, Jeffrey D.

    2008-04-01

    The Celsius and Kelvin temperature scales, we tell our students, are related. We explain that a change in temperature of 1°C corresponds to a change of 1 Kelvin and that atoms and molecules have zero kinetic energy at zero Kelvin, -273°C. In this paper, we will show how students can derive the relationship between the Celsius and Kelvin temperature scales using a simple, well-known physics experiment. By making multiple measurements of the speed of sound at different temperatures, using the classic physics experiment of determining the speed of sound with a tuning fork and variable-length tube, they can determine the temperature at which the speed of sound is zero—absolute zero.

  10. MAGSAT: Vector magnetometer absolute sensor alignment determination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acuna, M. H.

    1981-01-01

    A procedure is described for accurately determining the absolute alignment of the magnetic axes of a triaxial magnetometer sensor with respect to an external, fixed, reference coordinate system. The method does not require that the magnetic field vector orientation, as generated by a triaxial calibration coil system, be known to better than a few degrees from its true position, and minimizes the number of positions through which a sensor assembly must be rotated to obtain a solution. Computer simulations show that accuracies of better than 0.4 seconds of arc can be achieved under typical test conditions associated with existing magnetic test facilities. The basic approach is similar in nature to that presented by McPherron and Snare (1978) except that only three sensor positions are required and the system of equations to be solved is considerably simplified. Applications of the method to the case of the MAGSAT Vector Magnetometer are presented and the problems encountered discussed.

  11. An estimate of global absolute dynamic topography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tai, C.-K.; Wunsch, C.

    1984-01-01

    The absolute dynamic topography of the world ocean is estimated from the largest scales to a short-wavelength cutoff of about 6700 km for the period July through September, 1978. The data base consisted of the time-averaged sea-surface topography determined by Seasat and geoid estimates made at the Goddard Space Flight Center. The issues are those of accuracy and resolution. Use of the altimetric surface as a geoid estimate beyond the short-wavelength cutoff reduces the spectral leakage in the estimated dynamic topography from erroneous small-scale geoid estimates without contaminating the low wavenumbers. Comparison of the result with a similarly filtered version of Levitus' (1982) historical average dynamic topography shows good qualitative agreement. There is quantitative disagreement, but it is within the estimated errors of both methods of calculation.

  12. Micron Accurate Absolute Ranging System: Range Extension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalley, Larry L.; Smith, Kely L.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to investigate Fresnel diffraction as a means of obtaining absolute distance measurements with micron or greater accuracy. It is believed that such a system would prove useful to the Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST) as a non-intrusive, non-contact measuring system for use with secondary concentrator station-keeping systems. The present research attempts to validate past experiments and develop ways to apply the phenomena of Fresnel diffraction to micron accurate measurement. This report discusses past research on the phenomena, and the basis of the use Fresnel diffraction distance metrology. The apparatus used in the recent investigations, experimental procedures used, preliminary results are discussed in detail. Continued research and equipment requirements on the extension of the effective range of the Fresnel diffraction systems is also described.

  13. Absolute measurements of fast neutrons using yttrium.

    PubMed

    Roshan, M V; Springham, S V; Rawat, R S; Lee, P; Krishnan, M

    2010-08-01

    Yttrium is presented as an absolute neutron detector for pulsed neutron sources. It has high sensitivity for detecting fast neutrons. Yttrium has the property of generating a monoenergetic secondary radiation in the form of a 909 keV gamma-ray caused by inelastic neutron interaction. It was calibrated numerically using MCNPX and does not need periodic recalibration. The total yttrium efficiency for detecting 2.45 MeV neutrons was determined to be f(n) approximately 4.1x10(-4) with an uncertainty of about 0.27%. The yttrium detector was employed in the NX2 plasma focus experiments and showed the neutron yield of the order of 10(8) neutrons per discharge.

  14. Measured and modelled absolute gravity in Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, E.; Forsberg, R.; Strykowski, G.

    2012-12-01

    Present day changes in the ice volume in glaciated areas like Greenland will change the load on the Earth and to this change the lithosphere will respond elastically. The Earth also responds to changes in the ice volume over a millennial time scale. This response is due to the viscous properties of the mantle and is known as Glaical Isostatic Adjustment (GIA). Both signals are present in GPS and absolute gravity (AG) measurements and they will give an uncertainty in mass balance estimates calculated from these data types. It is possible to separate the two signals if both gravity and Global Positioning System (GPS) time series are available. DTU Space acquired an A10 absolute gravimeter in 2008. One purpose of this instrument is to establish AG time series in Greenland and the first measurements were conducted in 2009. Since then are 18 different Greenland GPS Network (GNET) stations visited and six of these are visited more then once. The gravity signal consists of three signals; the elastic signal, the viscous signal and the direct attraction from the ice masses. All of these signals can be modelled using various techniques. The viscous signal is modelled by solving the Sea Level Equation with an appropriate ice history and Earth model. The free code SELEN is used for this. The elastic signal is modelled as a convolution of the elastic Greens function for gravity and a model of present day ice mass changes. The direct attraction is the same as the Newtonian attraction and is calculated as this. Here we will present the preliminary results of the AG measurements in Greenland. We will also present modelled estimates of the direct attraction, the elastic and the viscous signals.

  15. Absolute bioavailability of quinine formulations in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Babalola, C P; Bolaji, O O; Ogunbona, F A; Ezeomah, E

    2004-09-01

    This study compared the absolute bioavailability of quinine sulphate as capsule and as tablet against the intravenous (i.v.) infusion of the drug in twelve male volunteers. Six of the volunteers received intravenous infusion over 4 h as well as the capsule formulation of the drug in a cross-over manner, while the other six received the tablet formulation. Blood samples were taken at predetermined time intervals and plasma analysed for quinine (QN) using reversed-phase HPLC method. QN was rapidly absorbed after the two oral formulations with average t(max) of 2.67 h for both capsule and tablet. The mean elimination half-life of QN from the i.v. and oral dosage forms varied between 10 and 13.5 hr and were not statistically different (P > 0.05). On the contrary, the maximum plasma concentration (C(max)) and area under the curve (AUC) from capsule were comparable to those from i.v. (P > 0.05), while these values were markedly higher than values from tablet formulation (P < 0.05). The therapeutic QN plasma levels were not achieved with the tablet formulation. The absolute bioavailability (F) were 73% (C.l., 53.3 - 92.4%) and 39 % (C.I., 21.7 - 56.6%) for the capsule and tablet respectively and the difference was significant (P < 0.05). The subtherapeutic levels obtained from the tablet form used in this study may cause treatment failure during malaria and caution should be taken when predictions are made from results obtained from different formulations of QN.

  16. Market entry decisions: effects of absolute and relative confidence.

    PubMed

    Bolger, Fergus; Pulford, Briony D; Colman, Andrew M

    2008-01-01

    In a market entry game, the number of entrants usually approaches game-theoretic equilibrium quickly, but in real-world markets business start-ups typically exceed market capacity, resulting in chronically high failure rates and suboptimal industry profits. Excessive entry has been attributed to overconfidence arising when expected payoffs depend partly on skill. In an experimental test of this hypothesis, 96 participants played 24 rounds of a market entry game, with expected payoffs dependent partly on skill on half the rounds, after their confidence was manipulated and measured. The results provide direct support for the hypothesis that high levels of confidence are largely responsible for excessive entry, and they suggest that absolute confidence, independent of interpersonal comparison, rather than confidence about one's abilities relative to others, drives excessive entry decisions when skill is involved.

  17. Estimation of reliability and dynamic property for polymeric material at high strain rate using SHPB technique and probability theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dong Hyeok; Lee, Ouk Sub; Kim, Hong Min; Choi, Hye Bin

    2008-11-01

    A modified Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar technique with aluminum pressure bars and a pulse shaper technique to achieve a closer impedance match between the pressure bars and the specimen materials such as hot temperature degraded POM (Poly Oxy Methylene) and PP (Poly Propylene). The more distinguishable experimental signals were obtained to evaluate the more accurate dynamic deformation behavior of materials under a high strain rate loading condition. A pulse shaping technique is introduced to reduce the non-equilibrium on the dynamic material response by modulation of the incident wave during a short period of test. This increases the rise time of the incident pulse in the SHPB experiment. For the dynamic stress strain curve obtained from SHPB experiment, the Johnson-Cook model is applied as a constitutive equation. The applicability of this constitutive equation is verified by using the probabilistic reliability estimation method. Two reliability methodologies such as the FORM and the SORM have been proposed. The limit state function(LSF) includes the Johnson-Cook model and applied stresses. The LSF in this study allows more statistical flexibility on the yield stress than a paper published before. It is found that the failure probability estimated by using the SORM is more reliable than those of the FORM/ It is also noted that the failure probability increases with increase of the applied stress. Moreover, it is also found that the parameters of Johnson-Cook model such as A and n, and the applied stress are found to affect the failure probability more severely than the other random variables according to the sensitivity analysis.

  18. An effective rate equation approach to reaction kinetics in small volumes: theory and application to biochemical reactions in nonequilibrium steady-state conditions.

    PubMed

    Grima, R

    2010-07-21

    regions of parameter space in which there are maximum differences between the solutions of the master equation and the corresponding rate equations. We show that these differences depend sensitively on the Fano factors and on the inherent structure and topology of the chemical network. The theory of effective mesoscopic rate equations generalizes the conventional rate equations of physical chemistry to describe kinetics in systems of mesoscopic size such as biological cells.

  19. Absolute Dimensions of the Unevolved B-Type Eclipsing Binary GG Orionis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, Guillermo; Lacy, Claud H. Sandberg; Claret, Antonio; Sabby, Jeffrey A.

    2000-12-01

    We present photometric observations in B and V, as well as spectroscopic observations of the detached, eccentric 6.6 day double-lined eclipsing binary GG Ori, a member of the Orion OB1 association. Absolute dimensions of the components, which are virtually identical, are determined to high accuracy (better than 1% in the masses and better than 2% in the radii) for the purpose of testing various aspects of theoretical modeling. We obtain MA=2.342+/-0.016 Msolar and RA=1.852+/-0.025 Rsolar for the primary, and MB=2.338+/-0.017 Msolar and RB=1.830+/-0.025 Rsolar for the secondary. The effective temperature of both stars is 9950+/-200 K, corresponding to a spectral type of B9.5. GG Ori is very close to the zero-age main sequence, and comparison with current stellar evolution models gives ages of 65-82 Myr or 7.7 Myr, depending on whether the system is considered to be burning hydrogen on the main sequence or still in the final stages of pre-main-sequence contraction. Good agreement is found in both scenarios for a composition close to solar. We have detected apsidal motion in the binary at a rate of ω=0.00061d+/-0.00025d cycle-1, corresponding to an apsidal period of U=10,700+/-4500 yr. A substantial fraction of this (~70%) is due to the contribution from general relativity, and our measurement is entirely consistent with theory. The eccentric orbit of GG Ori is well explained by tidal evolution models, but both theory and our measurements of the rotational velocity of the components are as yet inconclusive as to whether the stars are synchronized with the orbital motion. Some of the observations reported here were obtained with the Multiple Mirror Telescope, a joint facility of the Smithsonian Institution and the University of Arizona.

  20. How to compare scores from different depression scales: equating the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ) and the ICD-10-Symptom Rating (ISR) using Item Response Theory.

    PubMed

    Fischer, H Felix; Tritt, Karin; Klapp, Burghard F; Fliege, Herbert

    2011-12-01

    A wide range of questionnaires for measuring depression are available. Item Response Theory models can help to evaluate the questionnaires exceeding the boundaries of Classical Test Theory and provide an opportunity to equate the questionnaires. In this study after checking for unidimensionality, a General Partial Credit Model was applied to data from two different depression scales [Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) and ICD-10-Symptom Rating (ISR)] obtained in clinical settings from a consecutive sample, including 4517 observations from a total of 2999 inpatients and outpatients of a psychosomatic clinic. The precision of each questionnaire was compared and the model was used to transform scores based on the assumed underlying latent trait. Both instruments were constructed to measure the same construct and their estimates of depression severity are highly correlated. Our analysis showed that the predicted scores provided by the conversion tables are similar to the observed scores in a validation sample. The PHQ-9 and ISR depression scales measure depression severity across a broad range with similar precision. While the PHQ-9 shows advantages in measuring low or high depression severity, the ISR is more parsimonious and also suitable for clinical purposes. Furthermore, the equation tables derived in this study enhance the comparability of studies using either one of the instruments, but due to substantial statistical spread the comparison of individual scores is imprecise.

  1. Deformed transition-state theory: Deviation from Arrhenius behavior and application to bimolecular hydrogen transfer reaction rates in the tunneling regime.

    PubMed

    Carvalho-Silva, Valter H; Aquilanti, Vincenzo; de Oliveira, Heibbe C B; Mundim, Kleber C

    2017-01-30

    A formulation is presented for the application of tools from quantum chemistry and transition-state theory to phenomenologically cover cases where reaction rates deviate from Arrhenius law at low temperatures. A parameter d is introduced to describe the deviation for the systems from reaching the thermodynamic limit and is identified as the linearizing coefficient in the dependence of the inverse activation energy with inverse temperature. Its physical meaning is given and when deviation can be ascribed to quantum mechanical tunneling its value is calculated explicitly. Here, a new derivation is given of the previously established relationship of the parameter d with features of the barrier in the potential energy surface. The proposed variant of transition state theory permits comparison with experiments and tests against alternative formulations. Prescriptions are provided and implemented to three hydrogen transfer reactions: CH4  + OH → CH3  + H2 O, CH3 Cl + OH → CH2 Cl + H2 O and H2  + CN → H + HCN, widely investigated both experimentally and theoretically. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Item response theory analysis of the Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Functional Rating Scale-Revised in the Pooled Resource Open-Access ALS Clinical Trials Database.

    PubMed

    Bacci, Elizabeth D; Staniewska, Dorota; Coyne, Karin S; Boyer, Stacey; White, Leigh Ann; Zach, Neta; Cedarbaum, Jesse M

    2016-01-01

    Our objective was to examine dimensionality and item-level performance of the Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Functional Rating Scale-Revised (ALSFRS-R) across time using classical and modern test theory approaches. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) and Item Response Theory (IRT) analyses were conducted using data from patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) Pooled Resources Open-Access ALS Clinical Trials (PRO-ACT) database with complete ALSFRS-R data (n = 888) at three time-points (Time 0, Time 1 (6-months), Time 2 (1-year)). Results demonstrated that in this population of 888 patients, mean age was 54.6 years, 64.4% were male, and 93.7% were Caucasian. The CFA supported a 4* individual-domain structure (bulbar, gross motor, fine motor, and respiratory domains). IRT analysis within each domain revealed misfitting items and overlapping item response category thresholds at all time-points, particularly in the gross motor and respiratory domain items. Results indicate that many of the items of the ALSFRS-R may sub-optimally distinguish among varying levels of disability assessed by each domain, particularly in patients with less severe disability. Measure performance improved across time as patient disability severity increased. In conclusion, modifications to select ALSFRS-R items may improve the instrument's specificity to disability level and sensitivity to treatment effects.

  3. Determination of low pressure broadening and shift rates for K, Rb, and Cs collisions with rare gases from Anderson Tallman theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hager, Gordon D.; Rotondaro, Matthew D.; Perram, Glen P.

    2012-11-01

    A mathematical method is described to compute the pressure dependent spectrum of the D1 and D2 lines of atomic cesium in the presence of argon. The method is based on the Anderson Tallman unified theory of pressure broadening in which the spectrum is determined form the Fourier transform of the auto-correlation function. The method uses modified potential energy surfaces of the ground and excited states that correlate to the 2S1/2 ground state and the 2P1/2 and 2P3/2excited states at large inter-nuclear separation. These surfaces are used to form interaction difference potentials to determine the auto-correlation function. In addition to being able to compute pressure dependent spectra that exhibit symmetry and far wing structure the method also allows us to compute the low pressure shift and broadening rates of the Lorentzian line core.

  4. Application of the Zero-Order Reaction Rate Model and Transition State Theory to predict porous Ti6Al4V bending strength.

    PubMed

    Reig, L; Amigó, V; Busquets, D; Calero, J A; Ortiz, J L

    2012-08-01

    Porous Ti6Al4V samples were produced by microsphere sintering. The Zero-Order Reaction Rate Model and Transition State Theory were used to model the sintering process and to estimate the bending strength of the porous samples developed. The evolution of the surface area during the sintering process was used to obtain sintering parameters (sintering constant, activation energy, frequency factor, constant of activation and Gibbs energy of activation). These were then correlated with the bending strength in order to obtain a simple model with which to estimate the evolution of the bending strength of the samples when the sintering temperature and time are modified: σY=P+B·[lnT·t-ΔGa/R·T]. Although the sintering parameters were obtained only for the microsphere sizes analysed here, the strength of intermediate sizes could easily be estimated following this model.

  5. Elevation correction factor for absolute pressure measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panek, Joseph W.; Sorrells, Mark R.

    1996-01-01

    With the arrival of highly accurate multi-port pressure measurement systems, conditions that previously did not affect overall system accuracy must now be scrutinized closely. Errors caused by elevation differences between pressure sensing elements and model pressure taps can be quantified and corrected. With multi-port pressure measurement systems, the sensing elements are connected to pressure taps that may be many feet away. The measurement system may be at a different elevation than the pressure taps due to laboratory space or test article constraints. This difference produces a pressure gradient that is inversely proportional to height within the interface tube. The pressure at the bottom of the tube will be higher than the pressure at the top due to the weight of the tube's column of air. Tubes with higher pressures will exhibit larger absolute errors due to the higher air density. The above effect is well documented but has generally been taken into account with large elevations only. With error analysis techniques, the loss in accuracy from elevation can be easily quantified. Correction factors can be applied to maintain the high accuracies of new pressure measurement systems.

  6. Gyrokinetic Statistical Absolute Equilibrium and Turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Jian-Zhou Zhu and Gregory W. Hammett

    2011-01-10

    A paradigm based on the absolute equilibrium of Galerkin-truncated inviscid systems to aid in understanding turbulence [T.-D. Lee, "On some statistical properties of hydrodynamical and magnetohydrodynamical fields," Q. Appl. Math. 10, 69 (1952)] is taken to study gyrokinetic plasma turbulence: A finite set of Fourier modes of the collisionless gyrokinetic equations are kept and the statistical equilibria are calculated; possible implications for plasma turbulence in various situations are discussed. For the case of two spatial and one velocity dimension, in the calculation with discretization also of velocity v with N grid points (where N + 1 quantities are conserved, corresponding to an energy invariant and N entropy-related invariants), the negative temperature states, corresponding to the condensation of the generalized energy into the lowest modes, are found. This indicates a generic feature of inverse energy cascade. Comparisons are made with some classical results, such as those of Charney-Hasegawa-Mima in the cold-ion limit. There is a universal shape for statistical equilibrium of gyrokinetics in three spatial and two velocity dimensions with just one conserved quantity. Possible physical relevance to turbulence, such as ITG zonal flows, and to a critical balance hypothesis are also discussed.

  7. Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leckey, John P.

    2015-01-01

    The Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO) is a mission, led and developed by NASA, that will measure a variety of climate variables with an unprecedented accuracy to quantify and attribute climate change. CLARREO consists of three separate instruments: an infrared (IR) spectrometer, a reflected solar (RS) spectrometer, and a radio occultation (RO) instrument. The mission will contain orbiting radiometers with sufficient accuracy, including on orbit verification, to calibrate other space-based instrumentation, increasing their respective accuracy by as much as an order of magnitude. The IR spectrometer is a Fourier Transform spectrometer (FTS) working in the 5 to 50 microns wavelength region with a goal of 0.1 K (k = 3) accuracy. The FTS will achieve this accuracy using phase change cells to verify thermistor accuracy and heated halos to verify blackbody emissivity, both on orbit. The RS spectrometer will measure the reflectance of the atmosphere in the 0.32 to 2.3 microns wavelength region with an accuracy of 0.3% (k = 2). The status of the instrumentation packages and potential mission options will be presented.

  8. Absolute flux measurements for swift atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fink, M.; Kohl, D. A.; Keto, J. W.; Antoniewicz, P.

    1987-01-01

    While a torsion balance in vacuum can easily measure the momentum transfer from a gas beam impinging on a surface attached to the balance, this measurement depends on the accommodation coefficients of the atoms with the surface and the distribution of the recoil. A torsion balance is described for making absolute flux measurements independent of recoil effects. The torsion balance is a conventional taut suspension wire design and the Young modulus of the wire determines the relationship between the displacement and the applied torque. A compensating magnetic field is applied to maintain zero displacement and provide critical damping. The unique feature is to couple the impinging gas beam to the torsion balance via a Wood's horn, i.e., a thin wall tube with a gradual 90 deg bend. Just as light is trapped in a Wood's horn by specular reflection from the curved surfaces, the gas beam diffuses through the tube. Instead of trapping the beam, the end of the tube is open so that the atoms exit the tube at 90 deg to their original direction. Therefore, all of the forward momentum of the gas beam is transferred to the torsion balance independent of the angle of reflection from the surfaces inside the tube.

  9. Swarm Absolute Scalar Magnetometers first in-orbit results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fratter, Isabelle; Léger, Jean-Michel; Bertrand, François; Jager, Thomas; Hulot, Gauthier; Brocco, Laura; Vigneron, Pierre

    2016-04-01

    The ESA Swarm mission will provide the best ever survey of the Earth's magnetic field and its temporal evolution. This will be achieved by a constellation of three identical satellites, launched together on the 22nd of November 2013. In order to observe the magnetic field thoroughly, each satellite carries two magnetometers: a Vector Field Magnetometer (VFM) coupled with a star tracker camera, to measure the direction of the magnetic field in space, and an Absolute Scalar Magnetometer (ASM), to measure its intensity. The ASM is the French contribution to the Swarm mission. This new generation instrument was designed by CEA-Leti and developed in close partnership with CNES, with scientific support from IPGP. Its operating principle is based on the atomic spectroscopy of the helium 4 metastable state. It makes use of the Zeeman's effect to transduce the magnetic field into a frequency, the signal being amplified by optical pumping. The primary role of the ASM is to provide absolute measurements of the magnetic field's strength at 1 Hz, for the in-flight calibration of the VFM. As the Swarm magnetic reference, the ASM scalar performance is crucial for the mission's success. Thanks to its innovative design, the ASM offers the best precision, resolution and absolute accuracy ever attained in space, with similar performance all along the orbit. In addition, thanks to an original architecture, the ASM implements on an experimental basis a capacity for providing simultaneously vector measurements at 1 Hz. This new feature makes it the first instrument capable of delivering both scalar and vector measurements simultaneously at the same point. Swarm offers a unique opportunity to validate the ASM vector data in orbit by comparison with the VFM's. Furthermore, the ASM can provide scalar data at a much higher sampling rate, when run in "burst" mode at 250 Hz, with a 100 Hz measurement bandwidth. An analysis of the spectral content of the magnetic field above 1 Hz becomes thus

  10. Thorough subcells diagnosis in a multi-junction solar cell via absolute electroluminescence-efficiency measurements.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shaoqiang; Zhu, Lin; Yoshita, Masahiro; Mochizuki, Toshimitsu; Kim, Changsu; Akiyama, Hidefumi; Imaizumi, Mitsuru; Kanemitsu, Yoshihiko

    2015-01-16

    World-wide studies on multi-junction (tandem) solar cells have led to record-breaking improvements in conversion efficiencies year after year. To obtain detailed and proper feedback for solar-cell design and fabrication, it is necessary to establish standard methods for diagnosing subcells in fabricated tandem devices. Here, we propose a potential standard method to quantify the detailed subcell properties of multi-junction solar cells based on absolute measurements of electroluminescence (EL) external quantum efficiency in addition to the conventional solar-cell external-quantum-efficiency measurements. We demonstrate that the absolute-EL-quantum-efficiency measurements provide I-V relations of individual subcells without the need for referencing measured I-V data, which is in stark contrast to previous works. Moreover, our measurements quantify the absolute rates of junction loss, non-radiative loss, radiative loss, and luminescence coupling in the subcells, which constitute the "balance sheets" of tandem solar cells.

  11. Absolute nuclear material assay using count distribution (LAMBDA) space

    DOEpatents

    Prasad, Mano K.; Snyderman, Neal J.; Rowland, Mark S.

    2015-12-01

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  12. Absolute nuclear material assay using count distribution (LAMBDA) space

    DOEpatents

    Prasad, Manoj K [Pleasanton, CA; Snyderman, Neal J [Berkeley, CA; Rowland, Mark S [Alamo, CA

    2012-06-05

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  13. Positioning, alignment and absolute pointing of the ANTARES neutrino telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fehr, F.; Distefano, C.; Antares Collaboration

    2010-01-01

    A precise detector alignment and absolute pointing is crucial for point-source searches. The ANTARES neutrino telescope utilises an array of hydrophones, tiltmeters and compasses for the relative positioning of the optical sensors. The absolute calibration is accomplished by long-baseline low-frequency triangulation of the acoustic reference devices in the deep-sea with a differential GPS system at the sea surface. The absolute pointing can be independently verified by detecting the shadow of the Moon in cosmic rays.

  14. Kinetics of solute adsorption at solid/solution interfaces: a theoretical development of the empirical pseudo-first and pseudo-second order kinetic rate equations, based on applying the statistical rate theory of interfacial transport.

    PubMed

    Rudzinski, Wladyslaw; Plazinski, Wojciech

    2006-08-24

    For practical applications of solid/solution adsorption processes, the kinetics of these processes is at least as much essential as their features at equilibrium. Meanwhile, the general understanding of this kinetics and its corresponding theoretical description are far behind the understanding and the level of theoretical interpretation of adsorption equilibria in these systems. The Lagergren empirical equation proposed at the end of 19th century to describe the kinetics of solute sorption at the solid/solution interfaces has been the most widely used kinetic equation until now. This equation has also been called the pseudo-first order kinetic equation because it was intuitively associated with the model of one-site occupancy adsorption kinetics governed by the rate of surface reaction. More recently, its generalization for the two-sites-occupancy adsorption was proposed and called the pseudo-second-order kinetic equation. However, the general use and the wide applicability of these empirical equations during more than one century have not resulted in a corresponding fundamental search for their theoretical origin. Here the first theoretical development of these equations is proposed, based on applying the new fundamental approach to kinetics of interfacial transport called the Statistical Rate Theory. It is shown that these empirical equations are simplified forms of a more general equation developed here, for the case when the adsorption kinetics is governed by the rate of surface reactions. The features of that general equation are shown by presenting exhaustive model investigations, and the applicability of that equation is tested by presenting a quantitative analysis of some experimental data reported in the literature.

  15. Absolute and Convective Instability of a Liquid Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, S. P.; Hudman, M.; Chen, J. N.

    1999-01-01

    The existence of absolute instability in a liquid jet has been predicted for some time. The disturbance grows in time and propagates both upstream and downstream in an absolutely unstable liquid jet. The image of absolute instability is captured in the NASA 2.2 sec drop tower and reported here. The transition from convective to absolute instability is observed experimentally. The experimental results are compared with the theoretical predictions on the transition Weber number as functions of the Reynolds number. The role of interfacial shear relative to all other relevant forces which cause the onset of jet breakup is explained.

  16. Absolute properties of the eclipsing binary star AP Andromedae

    SciTech Connect

    Sandberg Lacy, Claud H.; Torres, Guillermo; Fekel, Francis C.; Muterspaugh, Matthew W. E-mail: gtorres@cfa.harvard.edu E-mail: matthew1@coe.tsuniv.edu

    2014-06-01

    AP And is a well-detached F5 eclipsing binary star for which only a very limited amount of information was available before this publication. We have obtained very extensive measurements of the light curve (19,097 differential V magnitude observations) and a radial velocity curve (83 spectroscopic observations) which allow us to fit orbits and determine the absolute properties of the components very accurately: masses of 1.277 ± 0.004 and 1.251 ± 0.004 M {sub ☉}, radii of 1.233 ± 0.006 and 1.1953 ± 0.005 R {sub ☉}, and temperatures of 6565 ± 150 K and 6495 ± 150 K. The distance to the system is about 400 ± 30 pc. Comparison with the theoretical properties of the stellar evolutionary models of the Yonsei-Yale series of Yi et al. shows good agreement between the observations and the theory at an age of about 500 Myr and a slightly sub-solar metallicity.

  17. Alignment and absolute wavelength calibration of imaging Bragg spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertschinger, G.; Marchuk, O.; Barnsley, R.

    2016-11-01

    In the present and the next generation of fusion devices, imaging Bragg spectrometers are key diagnostics to measure plasma parameters in the hot core, especially ion temperature and plasma rotation. The latter quantities are routinely obtained using the Doppler-width and -shift of the emitted spectral lines, respectively. Line shift measurements require absolute accuracies Δλ/λ of about 10 ppm, where λ-is the observed wavelength. For ITER and the present fusion devices, spectral lines of He-and H-like argon, iron, and krypton as well as Ne-like tungsten are foreseen for the measurements. For these lines, Kα lines can be found, some in higher order, which fit into the narrow energy window of the spectrometers. For arbitrary wavelength settings, Kα lines are also used to measure the miscut of the spherical crystals; afterwards the spectrometers can be set according to the geometrical imaging properties using coordinate measurement machines. For the spectrometers measuring Lyα lines of H-like ions, fluorescence targets can provide in situ localized calibration lines on the spectra. The fluorescence targets are used best in transmission and are excited by the thermal x-ray radiation of the plasma. An analytic theory of fluorescence is worked out.

  18. Absolute Plate Velocities from Seismic Anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreemer, Corné; Zheng, Lin; Gordon, Richard

    2015-04-01

    The orientation of seismic anisotropy inferred beneath plate interiors may provide a means to estimate the motions of the plate relative to the sub-asthenospheric mantle. Here we analyze two global sets of shear-wave splitting data, that of Kreemer [2009] and an updated and expanded data set, to estimate plate motions and to better understand the dispersion of the data, correlations in the errors, and their relation to plate speed. We also explore the effect of using geologically current plate velocities (i.e., the MORVEL set of angular velocities [DeMets et al. 2010]) compared with geodetically current plate velocities (i.e., the GSRM v1.2 angular velocities [Kreemer et al. 2014]). We demonstrate that the errors in plate motion azimuths inferred from shear-wave splitting beneath any one tectonic plate are correlated with the errors of other azimuths from the same plate. To account for these correlations, we adopt a two-tier analysis: First, find the pole of rotation and confidence limits for each plate individually. Second, solve for the best fit to these poles while constraining relative plate angular velocities to consistency with the MORVEL relative plate angular velocities. The SKS-MORVEL absolute plate angular velocities (based on the Kreemer [2009] data set) are determined from the poles from eight plates weighted proportionally to the root-mean-square velocity of each plate. SKS-MORVEL indicates that eight plates (Amur, Antarctica, Caribbean, Eurasia, Lwandle, Somalia, Sundaland, and Yangtze) have angular velocities that differ insignificantly from zero. The net rotation of the lithosphere is 0.25±0.11° Ma-1 (95% confidence limits) right-handed about 57.1°S, 68.6°E. The within-plate dispersion of seismic anisotropy for oceanic lithosphere (σ=19.2° ) differs insignificantly from that for continental lithosphere (σ=21.6° ). The between-plate dispersion, however, is significantly smaller for oceanic lithosphere (σ=7.4° ) than for continental

  19. Thermal rate constants for the O(3P) + HBr and O(3P) + DBr reactions: transition-state theory and quantum mechanical calculations.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira-Filho, Antonio G S; Ornellas, Fernando R; Peterson, Kirk A; Mielke, Steven L

    2013-12-05

    The O((3)P) + HBr → OH + Br and O((3)P) + DBr → OD + Br reactions are studied on a recent high-quality ab initio-based potential energy surface. Thermal rate constants over the 200-1000 K temperature range, calculated using variational transition-state theory (VTST) with the small-curvature tunneling (SCT) correction and quantum mechanical methods with the J-shifting approximation (QM/JS) for zero total angular momentum (J = 0), are reported. These results are compared to the available experimental data, which lie in the ranges of 221-554 and 295-419 K for O + HBr and O + DBr, respectively. The rate constants, in cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) and at 298 K, for the O + HBr reaction are 3.66 × 10(-14) for VTST, 3.80 × 10(-14) for QM/JS, and 3.66 × 10(-14) for the average of eight experimental measurements.

  20. Derivation of a true (t → 0+) quantum transition-state theory. II. Recovery of the exact quantum rate in the absence of recrossing.

    PubMed

    Althorpe, Stuart C; Hele, Timothy J H

    2013-08-28

    In Paper I [T. J. H. Hele and S. C. Althorpe, J. Chem. Phys. 138, 084108 (2013)] we derived a quantum transition-state theory (TST) by taking the t → 0+ limit of a new form of quantum flux-side time-correlation function containing a ring-polymer dividing surface. This t → 0+ limit appears to be unique in giving positive-definite Boltzmann statistics, and is identical to ring-polymer molecular dynamics (RPMD) TST. Here, we show that quantum TST (i.e., RPMD-TST) is exact if there is no recrossing (by the real-time quantum dynamics) of the ring-polymer dividing surface, nor of any surface orthogonal to it in the space describing fluctuations in the polymer-bead positions along the reaction coordinate. In practice, this means that RPMD-TST gives a good approximation to the exact quantum rate for direct reactions, provided the temperature is not too far below the cross-over to deep tunnelling. We derive these results by comparing the t → ∞ limit of the ring-polymer flux-side time-correlation function with that of a hybrid flux-side time-correlation function (containing a ring-polymer flux operator and a Miller-Schwarz-Tromp side function), and by representing the resulting ring-polymer momentum integrals as hypercubes. Together with Paper I, the results of this article validate a large number of RPMD calculations of reaction rates.

  1. Theoretical study of the ammonia nitridation rate on an Fe (100) surface: A combined density functional theory and kinetic Monte Carlo study

    SciTech Connect

    Yeo, Sang Chul; Lee, Hyuck Mo; Lo, Yu Chieh; Li, Ju

    2014-10-07

    Ammonia (NH{sub 3}) nitridation on an Fe surface was studied by combining density functional theory (DFT) and kinetic Monte Carlo (kMC) calculations. A DFT calculation was performed to obtain the energy barriers (E{sub b}) of the relevant elementary processes. The full mechanism of the exact reaction path was divided into five steps (adsorption, dissociation, surface migration, penetration, and diffusion) on an Fe (100) surface pre-covered with nitrogen. The energy barrier (E{sub b}) depended on the N surface coverage. The DFT results were subsequently employed as a database for the kMC simulations. We then evaluated the NH{sub 3} nitridation rate on the N pre-covered Fe surface. To determine the conditions necessary for a rapid NH{sub 3} nitridation rate, the eight reaction events were considered in the kMC simulations: adsorption, desorption, dissociation, reverse dissociation, surface migration, penetration, reverse penetration, and diffusion. This study provides a real-time-scale simulation of NH{sub 3} nitridation influenced by nitrogen surface coverage that allowed us to theoretically determine a nitrogen coverage (0.56 ML) suitable for rapid NH{sub 3} nitridation. In this way, we were able to reveal the coverage dependence of the nitridation reaction using the combined DFT and kMC simulations.

  2. Effect of carbon on irradiation-induced grain-boundary phosphorus segregation in reactor pressure vessel steels using first-principles-based rate theory model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebihara, Ken-ichi; Yamaguchi, Masatake; Nishiyama, Yutaka; Onizawa, Kunio; Matsuzawa, Hiroshi

    2011-07-01

    In this paper, we incorporated the effect of carbon atoms on the irradiation-induced grain-boundary phosphorus segregation into the rate theory model by considering a carbon atom as a trap site of vacancies and self-interstitial atoms, and simulated the grain-boundary phosphorus coverage in the reactor pressure vessel steels, A533B steels which were neutron-irradiated using the Halden reactor. As a result, by selecting the sink strength of vacancies and self-interstitial atoms, the simulation reproduced the experimental grain-boundary phosphorus coverage that was measured using the scanning Auger electron microprobe analysis. It was observed that the grain-boundary phosphorus coverage does not depend on the dose rate regardless of the presence of carbon atoms. Furthermore, it was confirmed that vacancies scarcely transport phosphorus atoms to grain-boundaries as compared to the transport by self-interstitial atoms and it was found that carbon atoms influence the irradiation-induced phosphorus segregation by mainly suppressing the migration of vacancies.

  3. Radical scavenging ability of gallic acid toward OH and OOH radicals. Reaction mechanism and rate constants from the density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Marino, Tiziana; Galano, Annia; Russo, Nino

    2014-09-04

    Gallic acid is a ubiquitous compound, widely distributed in the vegetal kingdom and frequently found in the human diet. In the present work, its primary antioxidant activity has been investigated using the density functional theory (DFT), and the quantum mechanics-based test for overall free radical scavenging activity (QM-ORSA) protocol. It was found that gallic acid is a better antioxidant than the reference compound, Trolox, regardless of the polarity of the environment. In addition, gallic acid is predicted to be among the best peroxyl radical scavengers identified so far in nonpolar (lipid) media. This compound is capable of scavenging hydroxyl radicals at diffusion-limited rates, and hydroperoxyl radicals with rate constants in the order of 10(5) M(-1) s(-1). The deprotonation of gallic acid, in aqueous solution, is predicted to increase the protective action of this compound against oxidative stress. Gallic acid was also identified as a versatile scavenger, capable of rapidly deactivating a wide variety of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) via electron transfer at physiological pH.

  4. Evaluation of the Absolute Regional Temperature Potential

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shindell, D. T.

    2012-01-01

    The Absolute Regional Temperature Potential (ARTP) is one of the few climate metrics that provides estimates of impacts at a sub-global scale. The ARTP presented here gives the time-dependent temperature response in four latitude bands (90-28degS, 28degS-28degN, 28-60degN and 60-90degN) as a function of emissions based on the forcing in those bands caused by the emissions. It is based on a large set of simulations performed with a single atmosphere-ocean climate model to derive regional forcing/response relationships. Here I evaluate the robustness of those relationships using the forcing/response portion of the ARTP to estimate regional temperature responses to the historic aerosol forcing in three independent climate models. These ARTP results are in good accord with the actual responses in those models. Nearly all ARTP estimates fall within +/-20%of the actual responses, though there are some exceptions for 90-28degS and the Arctic, and in the latter the ARTP may vary with forcing agent. However, for the tropics and the Northern Hemisphere mid-latitudes in particular, the +/-20% range appears to be roughly consistent with the 95% confidence interval. Land areas within these two bands respond 39-45% and 9-39% more than the latitude band as a whole. The ARTP, presented here in a slightly revised form, thus appears to provide a relatively robust estimate for the responses of large-scale latitude bands and land areas within those bands to inhomogeneous radiative forcing and thus potentially to emissions as well. Hence this metric could allow rapid evaluation of the effects of emissions policies at a finer scale than global metrics without requiring use of a full climate model.

  5. Absolute Radiometric Calibration of KOMPSAT-3A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, H. Y.; Shin, D. Y.; Kim, J. S.; Seo, D. C.; Choi, C. U.

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents a vicarious radiometric calibration of the Korea Multi-Purpose Satellite-3A (KOMPSAT-3A) performed by the Korea Aerospace Research Institute (KARI) and the Pukyong National University Remote Sensing Group (PKNU RSG) in 2015.The primary stages of this study are summarized as follows: (1) A field campaign to determine radiometric calibrated target fields was undertaken in Mongolia and South Korea. Surface reflectance data obtained in the campaign were input to a radiative transfer code that predicted at-sensor radiance. Through this process, equations and parameters were derived for the KOMPSAT-3A sensor to enable the conversion of calibrated DN to physical units, such as at-sensor radiance or TOA reflectance. (2) To validate the absolute calibration coefficients for the KOMPSAT-3A sensor, we performed a radiometric validation with a comparison of KOMPSAT-3A and Landsat-8 TOA reflectance using one of the six PICS (Libya 4). Correlations between top-of-atmosphere (TOA) radiances and the spectral band responses of the KOMPSAT-3A sensors at the Zuunmod, Mongolia and Goheung, South Korea sites were significant for multispectral bands. The average difference in TOA reflectance between KOMPSAT-3A and Landsat-8 image over the Libya 4, Libya site in the red-green-blue (RGB) region was under 3%, whereas in the NIR band, the TOA reflectance of KOMPSAT-3A was lower than the that of Landsat-8 due to the difference in the band passes of two sensors. The KOMPSAT-3Aensor includes a band pass near 940 nm that can be strongly absorbed by water vapor and therefore displayed low reflectance. Toovercome this, we need to undertake a detailed analysis using rescale methods, such as the spectral bandwidth adjustment factor.

  6. Effects of confining pressure, pore pressure and temperature on absolute permeability. SUPRI TR-27

    SciTech Connect

    Gobran, B.D.; Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Brigham, W.E.

    1981-10-01

    This study investigates absolute permeability of consolidated sandstone and unconsolidated sand cores to distilled water as a function of the confining pressure on the core, the pore pressure of the flowing fluid and the temperature of the system. Since permeability measurements are usually made in the laboratory under conditions very different from those in the reservoir, it is important to know the effect of various parameters on the measured value of permeability. All studies on the effect of confining pressure on absolute permeability have found that when the confining pressure is increased, the permeability is reduced. The studies on the effect of temperature have shown much less consistency. This work contradicts the past Stanford studies by finding no effect of temperature on the absolute permeability of unconsolidated sand or sandstones to distilled water. The probable causes of the past errors are discussed. It has been found that inaccurate measurement of temperature at ambient conditions and non-equilibrium of temperature in the core can lead to a fictitious permeability reduction with temperature increase. The results of this study on the effect of confining pressure and pore pressure support the theory that as confining pressure is increased or pore pressure decreased, the permeability is reduced. The effects of confining pressure and pore pressure changes on absolute permeability are given explicitly so that measurements made under one set of confining pressure/pore pressure conditions in the laboratory can be extrapolated to conditions more representative of the reservoir.

  7. Characterizing absolute piezoelectric microelectromechanical system displacement using an atomic force microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, J. Chapman, S.

    2014-08-14

    Piezoresponse Force Microscopy (PFM) is a popular tool for the study of ferroelectric and piezoelectric materials at the nanometer level. Progress in the development of piezoelectric MEMS fabrication is highlighting the need to characterize absolute displacement at the nanometer and Ångstrom scales, something Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) might do but PFM cannot. Absolute displacement is measured by executing a polarization measurement of the ferroelectric or piezoelectric capacitor in question while monitoring the absolute vertical position of the sample surface with a stationary AFM cantilever. Two issues dominate the execution and precision of such a measurement: (1) the small amplitude of the electrical signal from the AFM at the Ångstrom level and (2) calibration of the AFM. The authors have developed a calibration routine and test technique for mitigating the two issues, making it possible to use an atomic force microscope to measure both the movement of a capacitor surface as well as the motion of a micro-machine structure actuated by that capacitor. The theory, procedures, pitfalls, and results of using an AFM for absolute piezoelectric measurement are provided.

  8. Influences of molecular packing on the charge mobility of organic semiconductors: from quantum charge transfer rate theory beyond the first-order perturbation.

    PubMed

    Nan, Guangjun; Shi, Qiang; Shuai, Zhigang; Li, Zesheng

    2011-05-28

    The electronic coupling between adjacent molecules is an important parameter for the charge transport properties of organic semiconductors. In a previous paper, a semiclassical generalized nonadiabatic transition state theory was used to investigate the nonperturbative effect of the electronic coupling on the charge transport properties, but it is not applicable at low temperatures due to the presence of high-frequency modes from the intramolecular conjugated carbon-carbon stretching vibrations [G. J. Nan et al., J. Chem. Phys., 2009, 130, 024704]. In the present paper, we apply a quantum charge transfer rate formula based on the imaginary-time flux-flux correlation function without the weak electronic coupling approximation. The imaginary-time flux-flux correlation function is then expressed in terms of the vibrational-mode path average and is evaluated by the path integral approach. All parameters are computed by quantum chemical approaches, and the mobility is obtained by kinetic Monte-Carlo simulation. We evaluate the intra-layer mobility of sexithiophene crystal structures in high- and low-temperature phases for a wide range of temperatures. In the case of strong coupling, the quantum charge transfer rates were found to be significantly smaller than those calculated using the weak electronic coupling approximation, which leads to reduced mobility especially at low temperatures. As a consequence, the mobility becomes less dependent on temperature when the molecular packing leads to strong electronic coupling in some charge transport directions. The temperature-independent charge mobility in organic thin-film transistors from experimental measurements may be explained from the present model with the grain boundaries considered. In addition, we point out that the widely used Marcus equation is invalid in calculating charge carrier transfer rates in sexithiophene crystals.

  9. Moral absolutism and abortion: Alan Donagan on the hysterectomy and craniotomy cases.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Terrence

    1985-07-01

    Reynolds argues that the nonconsequentialist moral theory proposed by Alan Donagan in his book The Theory of Morality (University of Chicago Press; 1977) does not resolve the cases in which craniotomy or removal of a cancerous uterus appears necessary to save the life of a pregnant woman. Donagan's absolute prohibition against the murder of the innocent and his rejection of the principle of double effect have led him to view the fetus as a pursuer or assailant or to assert the theory of proleptic agreement--that in risk taking ventures the parties may agree that killing one person to save the lives of the others will be accepted. Reynolds holds these arguments to be inapplicable in therapeutic abortions involving craniotomy or hysterectomy and concludes that Donagan's absolutist theory must be reexamined.

  10. Determination of Absolute Zero Using a Computer-Based Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amrani, D.

    2007-01-01

    We present a simple computer-based laboratory experiment for evaluating absolute zero in degrees Celsius, which can be performed in college and undergraduate physical sciences laboratory courses. With a computer, absolute zero apparatus can help demonstrators or students to observe the relationship between temperature and pressure and use…

  11. A Global Forecast of Absolute Poverty and Employment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopkins, M. J. D.

    1980-01-01

    Estimates are made of absolute poverty and employment under the hypothesis that existing trends continue. Concludes that while the number of people in absolute poverty is not likely to decline by 2000, the proportion will fall. Jobs will have to grow 3.9% per year in developing countries to achieve full employment. (JOW)

  12. Novalis' Poetic Uncertainty: A "Bildung" with the Absolute

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mika, Carl

    2016-01-01

    Novalis, the Early German Romantic poet and philosopher, had at the core of his work a mysterious depiction of the "absolute." The absolute is Novalis' name for a substance that defies precise knowledge yet calls for a tentative and sensitive speculation. How one asserts a truth, represents an object, and sets about encountering things…

  13. Absolute radiometric calibration of advanced remote sensing systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, P. N.

    1982-01-01

    The distinction between the uses of relative and absolute spectroradiometric calibration of remote sensing systems is discussed. The advantages of detector-based absolute calibration are described, and the categories of relative and absolute system calibrations are listed. The limitations and problems associated with three common methods used for the absolute calibration of remote sensing systems are addressed. Two methods are proposed for the in-flight absolute calibration of advanced multispectral linear array systems. One makes use of a sun-illuminated panel in front of the sensor, the radiance of which is monitored by a spectrally flat pyroelectric radiometer. The other uses a large, uniform, high-radiance reference ground surface. The ground and atmospheric measurements required as input to a radiative transfer program to predict the radiance level at the entrance pupil of the orbital sensor are discussed, and the ground instrumentation is described.

  14. A developmental study of latent absolute pitch memory.

    PubMed

    Jakubowski, Kelly; Müllensiefen, Daniel; Stewart, Lauren

    2017-03-01

    The ability to recall the absolute pitch level of familiar music (latent absolute pitch memory) is widespread in adults, in contrast to the rare ability to label single pitches without a reference tone (overt absolute pitch memory). The present research investigated the developmental profile of latent absolute pitch (AP) memory and explored individual differences related to this ability. In two experiments, 288 children from 4 to12 years of age performed significantly above chance at recognizing the absolute pitch level of familiar melodies. No age-related improvement or decline, nor effects of musical training, gender, or familiarity with the stimuli were found in regard to latent AP task performance. These findings suggest that latent AP memory is a stable ability that is developed from as early as age 4 and persists into adulthood.

  15. Absolute Position Encoders With Vertical Image Binning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leviton, Douglas B.

    2005-01-01

    Improved optoelectronic patternrecognition encoders that measure rotary and linear 1-dimensional positions at conversion rates (numbers of readings per unit time) exceeding 20 kHz have been invented. Heretofore, optoelectronic pattern-recognition absoluteposition encoders have been limited to conversion rates <15 Hz -- too low for emerging industrial applications in which conversion rates ranging from 1 kHz to as much as 100 kHz are required. The high conversion rates of the improved encoders are made possible, in part, by use of vertically compressible or binnable (as described below) scale patterns in combination with modified readout sequences of the image sensors [charge-coupled devices (CCDs)] used to read the scale patterns. The modified readout sequences and the processing of the images thus read out are amenable to implementation by use of modern, high-speed, ultra-compact microprocessors and digital signal processors or field-programmable gate arrays. This combination of improvements makes it possible to greatly increase conversion rates through substantial reductions in all three components of conversion time: exposure time, image-readout time, and image-processing time.

  16. Noninvasive absolute cerebral oximetry with frequency-domain near-infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallacoglu, Bertan

    Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) measurements of absolute concentrations of oxy-hemoglobin and deoxy-hemoglobin in the human brain can provide critical information about cerebral physiology in terms of cerebral blood volume, blood flow, oxygen delivery, and metabolic rate of oxygen. We developed several frequency domain NIRS data acquisition and analysis methods aimed at absolute measurements of hemoglobin concentration and saturation in cerebral tissue of adult human subjects. Extensive experimental investigations were carried out in various homogenous and two-layered tissue-mimicking phantoms, and biological tissues. The advantages and limitations of commonly used homogenous models and inversion strategies were thoroughly investigated. Prior to human subjects, extensive studies were carried out in in vivo animal models. In rabbits, absolute hemoglobin oxygen desaturation was shown to depend strongly on surgically induced testicular torsion. Methods developed in this study were then adapted for measurements in the rat brain. Absolute values were demonstrated to discern cerebrovascular impairment in a rat model of diet-induced vascular cognitive impairment. These results facilitated the development of clinically useful optical measures of cerebrovascular health. In a large group of human subjects, employing a homogeneous model for absolute measurements was shown to be reliable and robust. However, it was also shown to be limited due to the relatively thick extracerebral tissue. The procedure we develop in this work and the thesis thereof performs a nonlinear inversion procedure with six unknown parameters with no other prior knowledge for the retrieval of the optical coefficients and top layer thickness with high accuracy on two-layered media. Our absolute measurements of cerebral hemoglobin concentration and saturation are based on the discrimination of extracerebral and cerebral tissue layers, and they can enhance the impact of NIRS for cerebral hemodynamics and

  17. Absolute Geodetic Rotation Measurement Using Atom Interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Stockton, J. K.; Takase, K.; Kasevich, M. A.

    2011-09-23

    We demonstrate a cold-atom interferometer gyroscope which overcomes accuracy and dynamic range limitations of previous atom interferometer gyroscopes. We show how the instrument can be used for precise determination of latitude, azimuth (true north), and Earth's rotation rate. Spurious noise terms related to multiple-path interferences are suppressed by employing a novel time-skewed pulse sequence. Extended versions of this instrument appear capable of meeting the stringent requirements for inertial navigation, geodetic applications of Earth's rotation rate determination, and tests of general relativity.

  18. Absolute calorimetric calibration of low energy brachytherapy sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stump, Kurt E.

    In the past decade there has been a dramatic increase in the use of permanent radioactive source implants in the treatment of prostate cancer. A small radioactive source encapsulated in a titanium shell is used in this type of treatment. The radioisotopes used are generally 125I or 103Pd. Both of these isotopes have relatively short half-lives, 59.4 days and 16.99 days, respectively, and have low-energy emissions and a low dose rate. These factors make these sources well suited for this application, but the calibration of these sources poses significant metrological challenges. The current standard calibration technique involves the measurement of ionization in air to determine the source air-kerma strength. While this has proved to be an improvement over previous techniques, the method has been shown to be metrologically impure and may not be the ideal means of calbrating these sources. Calorimetric methods have long been viewed to be the most fundamental means of determining source strength for a radiation source. This is because calorimetry provides a direct measurement of source energy. However, due to the low energy and low power of the sources described above, current calorimetric methods are inadequate. This thesis presents work oriented toward developing novel methods to provide direct and absolute measurements of source power for low-energy low dose rate brachytherapy sources. The method is the first use of an actively temperature-controlled radiation absorber using the electrical substitution method to determine total contained source power of these sources. The instrument described operates at cryogenic temperatures. The method employed provides a direct measurement of source power. The work presented here is focused upon building a metrological foundation upon which to establish power-based calibrations of clinical-strength sources. To that end instrument performance has been assessed for these source strengths. The intent is to establish the limits of

  19. Multireference - Møller-Plesset Perturbation Theory Results on Levels and Transition Rates in Al-like Ions of Iron Group Elements

    SciTech Connect

    Santana, J A; Ishikawa, Y; Tr�abert, E

    2009-02-26

    Ground configuration and low-lying levels of Al-like ions contribute to a variety of laboratory and solar spectra, but the available information in databases are neither complete not necessarily correct. We have performed multireference Moeller-Plesset perturbation theory calculations that approach spectroscopic accuracy in order to check the information that databases hold on the 40 lowest levels of Al-Like ions of iron group elements (K through Ge), and to provide input for the interpretation of concurrent experiments. Our results indicate problems of the database holdings on the levels of the lowest quartet levels in the lighter elements of the range studied. The results of our calculations of the decay rates of five long-lived levels (3s{sup 2}3p {sup 2}p{sup o}{sub 3/2}, 3s3p{sup 2} {sup 4}P{sup o} J and 3s3p3d {sup 4}F{sup o}{sub 9/2}) are compared with lifetime data from beam-foil, electron beam ion trap and heavy-ion storage ring experiments.

  20. Observation and rate theory modeling of grain boundary segregation in Σ3 twin boundaries in ion-irradiated stainless steel 316

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Gyeong-Geun; Jin, Hyung-Ha; Lee, Yong-Bok; Kwon, Junhyun

    2014-06-01

    Radiation-induced segregation (RIS) is the phenomenon of compositional change at point defect sinks in alloys irradiated at a moderate temperature. Owing to the potential relevance of RIS by way of the susceptibility of structural materials to irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking, basic research on austenitic stainless steels used in nuclear reactors has been carried out in recent years. In this work, commercial stainless steel 316 specimens were irradiated with Fe ions, and the resulting changes in Cr and Ni compositions were characterized using transmission electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The samples with various grain boundary orientations, including the special Σ3 orientation, were analyzed. The ledges of a few special Σ3 twin boundaries showed significantly higher RIS compared to the coherent regions. The RIS behavior of a parallel twin pair was observed, and two profiles of RIS were found in them. The inner twins in multi-twins showed considerably lower RIS compared to the outer twins. For the calculation of RIS, time-dependent differential equations based on the rate theory were established and numerically integrated. An additional variable, representing the sink strength of the grain boundary, was introduced in the differential equations, and the concentration profiles of the Σ3 twins were calculated. The calculated results were in good agreement with the experimental results.

  1. Realized volatility and absolute return volatility: a comparison indicating market risk.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Zeyu; Qiao, Zhi; Takaishi, Tetsuya; Stanley, H Eugene; Li, Baowen

    2014-01-01

    Measuring volatility in financial markets is a primary challenge in the theory and practice of risk management and is essential when developing investment strategies. Although the vast literature on the topic describes many different models, two nonparametric measurements have emerged and received wide use over the past decade: realized volatility and absolute return volatility. The former is strongly favored in the financial sector and the latter by econophysicists. We examine the memory and clustering features of these two methods and find that both enable strong predictions. We compare the two in detail and find that although realized volatility has a better short-term effect that allows predictions of near-future market behavior, absolute return volatility is easier to calculate and, as a risk indicator, has approximately the same sensitivity as realized volatility. Our detailed empirical analysis yields valuable guidelines for both researchers and market participants because it provides a significantly clearer comparison of the strengths and weaknesses of the two methods.

  2. Structure and absolute configuration of hydroxy-bis-dihydrofarinosin from Encelia farinosa.

    PubMed

    Ortega, Alfredo R; Ortiz-Pastrana, Naytzé; Quijano, Leovigildo; Becerra-Martínez, Elvia; Olmedo-Aguirre, José O; Joseph-Nathan, Pedro

    2016-11-16

    The structure of the dimeric eudesmanolide hydroxy-bis-dihydrofarinosin (1) from Encelia farinosa followed after contrasting their (1) H and (13) C NMR spectra with those of encelin (6), hydroxy-bis-dihydroencelin (3), and farinosin (4). Structure 1 was verified by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis, which further provided the stereochemistry of the hydroxy group at C-4. Comparison of the experimental vibrational circular dichroism spectrum of its derived diacetate 2 with that calculated by density functional theory provided the absolute configuration, which resulted the same as that of its biogenetic precursor 4. Evaluation of several chemical shift differences between the two eudesmanolide fragments of 1 and 3 allows also ascertaining the yet not reported absolute configuration of the C-4 stereogenic center of 3. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Entrenched Geographical and Socioeconomic Disparities in Child Mortality: Trends in Absolute and Relative Inequalities in Cambodia

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez-Soto, Eliana; Durham, Jo; Hodge, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Background Cambodia has made considerable improvements in mortality rates for children under the age of five and neonates. These improvements may, however, mask considerable disparities between subnational populations. In this paper, we examine the extent of the country's child mortality inequalities. Methods Mortality rates for children under-five and neonates were directly estimated using the 2000, 2005 and 2010 waves of the Cambodian Demographic Health Survey. Disparities were measured on both absolute and relative scales using rate differences and ratios, and where applicable, slope and relative indices of inequality by levels of rural/urban location, regions and household wealth. Findings Since 2000, considerable reductions in under-five and to a lesser extent in neonatal mortality rates have been observed. This mortality decline has, however, been accompanied by an increase in relative inequality in both rates of child mortality for geography-related stratifying markers. For absolute inequality amongst regions, most trends are increasing, particularly for neonatal mortality, but are not statistically significant. The only exception to this general pattern is the statistically significant positive trend in absolute inequality for under-five mortality in the Coastal region. For wealth, some evidence for increases in both relative and absolute inequality for neonates is observed. Conclusion Despite considerable gains in reducing under-five and neonatal mortality at a national level, entrenched and increased geographical and wealth-based inequality in mortality, at least on a relative scale, remain. As expected, national progress seems to be associated with the period of political and macroeconomic stability that started in the early 2000s. However, issues of quality of care and potential non-inclusive economic growth might explain remaining disparities, particularly across wealth and geography markers. A focus on further addressing key supply and demand side

  4. Absolute Paleointensity Techniques: Developments in the Last 10 Years (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowles, J. A.; Brown, M. C.

    2009-12-01

    The ability to determine variations in absolute intensity of the Earth’s paleomagnetic field has greatly enhanced our understanding of geodynamo processes, including secular variation and field reversals. Igneous rocks and baked clay artifacts that carry a thermal remanence (TRM) have allowed us to study field variations over timescales ranging from decades to billions of years. All absolute paleointensity techniques are fundamentally based on repeating the natural process by which the sample acquired its magnetization, i.e. a laboratory TRM is acquired in a controlled field, and the ratio of the natural TRM to that acquired in the laboratory is directly proportional to the ancient field. Techniques for recovering paleointensity have evolved since the 1930s from relatively unsophisticated (but revolutionary for their time) single step remagnetizations to the various complicated, multi-step procedures in use today. These procedures can be broadly grouped into two categories: 1) “Thellier-type” experiments that step-wise heat samples at a series of temperatures up to the maximum unblocking temperature of the sample, progressively removing the natural remanence (NRM) and acquiring a laboratory-induced TRM; and 2) “Shaw-type” experiments that combine alternating field demagnetization of the NRM and laboratory TRM with a single heating to a temperature above the sample’s Curie temperature, acquiring a total TRM in one step. Many modifications to these techniques have been developed over the years with the goal of identifying and/or accommodating non-ideal behavior, such as alteration and multi-domain (MD) remanence, which may lead to inaccurate paleofield estimates. From a technological standpoint, perhaps the most significant development in the last decade is the use of microwave (de)magnetization in both Thellier-type and Shaw-type experiments. By using microwaves to directly generate spin waves within the magnetic grains (rather than using phonons

  5. Weighted Wilcoxon-type Smoothly Clipped Absolute Deviation Method

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lan; Li, Runze

    2009-01-01

    Summary Shrinkage-type variable selection procedures have recently seen increasing applications in biomedical research. However, their performance can be adversely influenced by outliers in either the response or the covariate space. This paper proposes a weighted Wilcoxon-type smoothly clipped absolute deviation (WW-SCAD) method, which deals with robust variable selection and robust estimation simultaneously. The new procedure can be conveniently implemented with the statistical software R. We establish that the WW-SCAD correctly identifies the set of zero coefficients with probability approaching one and estimates the nonzero coefficients with the rate n−1/2. Moreover, with appropriately chosen weights the WW-SCAD is robust with respect to outliers in both the x and y directions. The important special case with constant weights yields an oracle-type estimator with high efficiency at the presence of heavier-tailed random errors. The robustness of the WW-SCAD is partly justified by its asymptotic performance under local shrinking contamination. We propose a BIC-type tuning parameter selector for the WW-SCAD. The performance of the WW-SCAD is demonstrated via simulations and by an application to a study that investigates the effects of personal characteristics and dietary factors on plasma beta-carotene level. PMID:18647294

  6. Cosmic backgrounds of relic gravitons and their absolute normalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giovannini, Massimo

    2014-11-01

    Provided the consistency relations are not violated, the recent BICEP2 observations pin down the absolute normalization, the spectral slope and the maximal frequency of the cosmic graviton background produced during inflation. The properly normalized spectra are hereby computed from the lowest frequencies (of the order of the present Hubble rate) up to the highest frequency range in the GHz region. Deviations from the conventional paradigm cannot be excluded and are examined by allowing for different physical possibilities including, in particular, a running of the tensor spectral index, an explicit breaking of the consistency relations and a spike in the high-frequency tail of the spectrum coming either from a post-inflationary phase dominated by a stiff fluid or from the contribution of waterfall fields in a hybrid inflationary context. The direct determinations of the tensor to scalar ratio at low frequencies, if confirmed by the forthcoming observations, will also affect and constrain the high-frequency uncertainties. The limits on the cosmic graviton backgrounds coming from wide-band interferometers (such as LIGO/Virgo, LISA and BBO/DECIGO) together with a more accurate scrutiny of the tensor B-mode polarization at low frequencies will set direct bounds on the post-inflationary evolution and on other unconventional completions of the standard lore.

  7. Mini-implants and miniplates generate sub-absolute and absolute anchorage.

    PubMed

    Consolaro, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    The functional demand imposed on bone promotes changes in the spatial properties of osteocytes as well as in their extensions uniformly distributed throughout the mineralized surface. Once spatial deformation is established, osteocytes create the need for structural adaptations that result in bone formation and resorption that happen to meet the functional demands. The endosteum and the periosteum are the effectors responsible for stimulating adaptive osteocytes in the inner and outer surfaces. Changes in shape, volume and position of the jaws as a result of skeletal correction of the maxilla and mandible require anchorage to allow bone remodeling to redefine morphology, esthetics and function as a result of spatial deformation conducted by orthodontic appliances. Examining the degree of changes in shape, volume and structural relationship of areas where mini-implants and miniplates are placed allows us to classify mini-implants as devices of subabsolute anchorage and miniplates as devices of absolute anchorage.

  8. The microscopic approach to the rates of radioactive decay by emission of heavy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivaşcu, M.; Silişteanu, I.

    1988-08-01

    We have applied a simple microscopic decay theory to the analysis of the rare decay modes. The absolute decay rates are estimated by using the shell model and resonance formation factors and optical model penetrabilities. The resonance formation factors are deduced from the strong interaction form of the theory where the wave function in the internal region is represented in terms of compound nucleus decay. In order to account fully for the data, the implication of internal degrees of freedom was found to be necessary, but no adjustment of Gamow factor was needed. The results have been discussed in the light of the previously reported results and data.

  9. Absolute dose verifications in small photon fields using BANGTM gel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheib, S. G.; Schenkel, Y.; Gianolini, S.

    2004-01-01

    Polymer gel dosimeters change their magnetic resonance (MR) and optical properties with the absorbed dose when irradiated and are suitable for narrow photon beam dosimetry in radiosurgery. Such dosimeters enable relative and absolute 3D dose verifications in order to check the entire treatment chain from imaging to dose application during commissioning and quality assurance. For absolute 3D dose verifications in radiosurgery using Gamma Knife B, commercially available BANGTM Gels (BANG 25 Gy and BANG 3 Gy) together with dedicated phantoms were chosen in order to determine the potential of absolute gel dosimetry in radiosurgery.

  10. Measuring the absolute magnetic field using high-Tc SQUID

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, D. F.; Itozaki, H.

    2006-06-01

    SQUID normally can only measure the change of magnetic field instead of the absolute value of magnetic field. Using a compensation method, a mobile SQUID, which could keep locked when moving in the earth's magnetic field, was developed. Using the mobile SQUID, it was possible to measure the absolute magnetic field. The absolute value of magnetic field could be calculated from the change of the compensation output when changing the direction of the SQUID in a magnetic field. Using this method and the mobile SQUID, we successfully measured the earth's magnetic field in our laboratory.

  11. Absolute Antenna Calibration at the US National Geodetic Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mader, G. L.; Bilich, A. L.

    2012-12-01

    Geodetic GNSS applications routinely demand millimeter precision and extremely high levels of accuracy. To achieve these accuracies, measurement and instrument biases at the centimeter to millimeter level must be understood. One of these biases is the antenna phase center, the apparent point of signal reception for a GNSS antenna. It has been well established that phase center patterns differ between antenna models and manufacturers; additional research suggests that the addition of a radome or the choice of antenna mount can significantly alter those a priori phase center patterns. For the more demanding GNSS positioning applications and especially in cases of mixed-antenna networks, it is all the more important to know antenna phase center variations as a function of both elevation and azimuth in the antenna reference frame and incorporate these models into analysis software. Determination of antenna phase center behavior is known as "antenna calibration". Since 1994, NGS has computed relative antenna calibrations for more than 350 antennas. In recent years, the geodetic community has moved to absolute calibrations - the IGS adopted absolute antenna phase center calibrations in 2006 for use in their orbit and clock products, and NGS's CORS group began using absolute antenna calibration upon the release of the new CORS coordinates in IGS08 epoch 2005.00 and NAD 83(2011,MA11,PA11) epoch 2010.00. Although NGS relative calibrations can be and have been converted to absolute, it is considered best practice to independently measure phase center characteristics in an absolute sense. Consequently, NGS has developed and operates an absolute calibration system. These absolute antenna calibrations accommodate the demand for greater accuracy and for 2-dimensional (elevation and azimuth) parameterization. NGS will continue to provide calibration values via the NGS web site www.ngs.noaa.gov/ANTCAL, and will publish calibrations in the ANTEX format as well as the legacy ANTINFO

  12. Absolute distance measurement by dual-comb nonlinear asynchronous optical sampling.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongyuan; Wei, Haoyun; Wu, Xuejian; Yang, Honglei; Li, Yan

    2014-03-24

    A dual-comb nonlinear asynchronous optical sampling method is proposed to simplify determination of the time interval and extend the non-ambiguity range in absolute length measurements. Type II second harmonic generation facilitates curve fitting in determining the time interval between adjacent pulses. Meanwhile, the non-ambiguity range is extended by adjusting the repetition rate of the signal laser. The performance of the proposed method is compared with a heterodyne interferometer. Results show that the system achieves a maximum residual of 100.6 nm and an uncertainty of 1.48 μm in a 0.5 ms acquisition time. With longer acquisition time, the uncertainty can be reduced to 166.6 nm for 50 ms and 82.9 nm for 500 ms. Moreover, the extension of the non-ambiguity range is demonstrated by measuring an absolute distance beyond the inherent range determined by the fixed repetition rate.

  13. Absolute And Convective Instability and Splitting of a Liquid Jet at Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, S. P.

    2001-01-01

    The objective is to establish a definitive role of the capillary, viscous, and inertial forces at a liquid-gas interface in the absence of gravity by using the fluid dynamics problem of the stability of a liquid jet as a vehicle. The objective is achieved by reexamining known theories and new theories that can be verified completely only in microgravity. The experiments performed in the microgravity facility at NASA Glenn Research Center enable the verification of the theory with experimental data. Of particular interest are (1) to capture for the first time the image of absolute instability, (2) to elucidate the fundamental difference in the physical mechanism of the drop and spray formation from a liquid jet, and (3) to find the origin of the newly discovered phenomenon of jet splitting on earth and in space.

  14. Monochromator-Based Absolute Calibration of Radiation Thermometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keawprasert, T.; Anhalt, K.; Taubert, D. R.; Hartmann, J.

    2011-08-01

    A monochromator integrating-sphere-based spectral comparator facility has been developed to calibrate standard radiation thermometers in terms of the absolute spectral radiance responsivity, traceable to the PTB cryogenic radiometer. The absolute responsivity calibration has been improved using a 75 W xenon lamp with a reflective mirror and imaging optics to a relative standard uncertainty at the peak wavelength of approximately 0.17 % ( k = 1). Via a relative measurement of the out-of-band responsivity, the spectral responsivity of radiation thermometers can be fully characterized. To verify the calibration accuracy, the absolutely calibrated radiation thermometer is used to measure Au and Cu freezing-point temperatures and then to compare the obtained results with the values obtained by absolute methods, resulting in T - T 90 values of +52 mK and -50 mK for the gold and copper fixed points, respectively.

  15. Gibbs Paradox Revisited from the Fluctuation Theorem with Absolute Irreversibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murashita, Yûto; Ueda, Masahito

    2017-02-01

    The inclusion of the factor ln (1 /N !) in the thermodynamic entropy proposed by Gibbs is shown to be equivalent to the validity of the fluctuation theorem with absolute irreversibility for gas mixing.

  16. Absolute Value Boundedness, Operator Decomposition, and Stochastic Media and Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adomian, G.; Miao, C. C.

    1973-01-01

    The research accomplished during this period is reported. Published abstracts and technical reports are listed. Articles presented include: boundedness of absolute values of generalized Fourier coefficients, propagation in stochastic media, and stationary conditions for stochastic differential equations.

  17. Orion Absolute Navigation System Progress and Challenges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holt, Greg N.; D'Souza, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    strategies for whole and partial state updates as well as covariance considerations. Strategies are given for dealing with latent measurements and high-rate propagation using multi-rate architecture. The details of the rate groups and the data ow between the elements is discussed and evaluated.

  18. Observing Gravity Change in the Fennoscandian Uplift Area with the Hanover Absolute Gravimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timmen, Ludger; Gitlein, Olga; Klemann, Volker; Wolf, Detlef

    2012-08-01

    The Nordic countries Norway, Sweden, Finland and Denmark are a key study region for research of glacial isostasy. In addition, such research offers a unique opportunity for absolute gravimetry to show its capability as a geodetic tool for geophysical research. Within a multi-national cooperation, annual absolute gravity measurements have been performed in Fennoscandia by IfE since 2003. For the Hanover gravimeter FG5-220, overall accuracy of ±30 nm/s2 is indicated for a single station determination. First results of linear gravity changes are derived for ten stations in the central and southern part of the uplift area. Comparing with the rates predicted by glacial rebound modelling, the gravity trends of the absolute measurements differ by 3.8 nm/s2 per year (root-mean-square discrepancy) from the uplift model. The mean difference between observed and predicted rates is 0.8 nm/s2 per year only. A proportionality factor of -1.63 ± 0.20 nm/s2 per mm has been obtained, which describes the mean ratio between the observational gravity and height rates.

  19. Effect of the absolute statistic on gene-sampling gene-set analysis methods.

    PubMed

    Nam, Dougu

    2015-03-02

    Gene-set enrichment analysis and its modified versions have commonly been used for identifying altered functions or pathways in disease from microarray data. In particular, the simple gene-sampling gene-set analysis methods have been heavily used for datasets with only a few sample replicates. The biggest problem with this approach is the highly inflated false-positive rate. In this paper, the effect of absolute gene statistic on gene-sampling gene-set analysis methods is systematically investigated. Thus far, the absolute gene statistic has merely been regarded as a supplementary method for capturing the bidirectional changes in each gene set. Here, it is shown that incorporating the absolute gene statistic in gene-sampling gene-set analysis substantially reduces the false-positive rate and improves the overall discriminatory ability. Its effect was investigated by power, false-positive rate, and receiver operating curve for a number of simulated and real datasets. The performances of gene-set analysis methods in one-tailed (genome-wide association study) and two-tailed (gene expression data) tests were also compared and discussed.

  20. Responses of absolute and specific soil enzyme activities to long term additions of organic and mineral fertilizer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinyu; Dong, Wenyi; Dai, Xiaoqin; Schaeffer, Sean; Yang, Fengting; Radosevich, Mark; Xu, Lili; Liu, Xiyu; Sun, Xiaomin

    2015-12-01

    Long-term phosphorus (P) and nitrogen (N) applications may seriously affect soil microbial activity. A long-term field fertilizer application trial was established on reddish paddy soils in the subtropical region of southern China in 1998. We assessed the effects of swine manure and seven different rates or ratios of NPK fertilizer treatments on (1) the absolute and specific enzyme activities per unit of soil organic carbon (SOC) or microbial biomass carbon (MBC) involved in C, N, and P transformations and (2) their relationships with soil environmental factors and soil microbial community structures. The results showed that manure applications led to increases in the absolute and specific activities of soil β-1,4-glucosidase(βG), β-1,4-N-acetylglucosaminidase (NAG), and leucine aminopeptidase (LAP). The absolute and specific acid phosphatase (AP) activities decreased as mineral P fertilizer application rates and ratios increased. Redundancy analysis (RDA) showed that there were negative correlations between absolute and specific AP activities, pH, and total P contents, while there were positive correlations between soil absolute and specific βG, NAG, and LAP enzyme activities, and SOC and total N contents. RDA showed that the contents of actinomycete and Gram-positive bacterium PLFA biomarkers are more closely related to the absolute and specific enzyme activities than the other PLFA biomarkers (P<0.01). Our results suggest that both the absolute and specific enzyme activities could be used as sensitive soil quality indicators that provide useful linkages with the microbial community structures and environmental factors. To maintain microbial activity and to minimize environmental impacts, P should be applied as a combination of inorganic and organic forms, and total P fertilizer application rates to subtropical paddy soils should not exceed 44 kg P ha(-1) year(-1).

  1. Passive absolute age and temperature history sensor

    DOEpatents

    Robinson, Alex; Vianco, Paul T.

    2015-11-10

    A passive sensor for historic age and temperature sensing, including a first member formed of a first material, the first material being either a metal or a semiconductor material and a second member formed of a second material, the second material being either a metal or a semiconductor material. A surface of the second member is in contact with a surface of the first member such that, over time, the second material of the second member diffuses into the first material of the first member. The rate of diffusion for the second material to diffuse into the first material depends on a temperature of the passive sensor. One of the electrical conductance, the electrical capacitance, the electrical inductance, the optical transmission, the optical reflectance, or the crystalline structure of the passive sensor depends on the amount of the second material that has diffused into the first member.

  2. Absolute flux calibration of optical spectrophotometric standard stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colina, Luis; Bohlin, Ralph C.

    1994-01-01

    A method based on Landolt photometry in B and V is developed to correct for a wavelength independent offset of the absolute flux level of optical spectrophotometric standards. The method is based on synthetic photometry techniques in B and V and is accurate to approximately 1%. The correction method is verified by Hubble Space Telescope Faint Object Spectrograph absolute fluxes for five calibration stars, which agree with Landolt photometry to 0.5% in B and V.

  3. Nucleation theory using equations of state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obeidat, Abdalla A.

    Various equations of state (EOS) have been used with the most general Gibbsian form (P-form) of classical nucleation theory ( CNT) to see if any improvement could be realized in predicted rates for vapor-to-liquid nucleation. The standard or S-form of CNT relies on the assumption of an incompressible liquid droplet. With the use of realistic EOSs, this assumption is no longer needed. The P-form results for water and heavy water were made using the highly accurate IAPWS-95 EOS and the CREOS. The P-form successfully predicted the temperature (T) supersaturation (S ) dependence of the nucleation rate, although the absolute value was in error by roughly a factor of 100. The results for methanol and ethanol using a less accurate CPHB EOS showed little improvement over the S-form results. Gradient theory (GT), a form of density functional theory (DFT), was applied to water and alcohols using the CPHB EOS. The water results showed an improved T dependence, but the S dependence was slightly poorer compared to the S-form of CNT. The methanol and ethanol results were improved by several orders of magnitude in the predicted rates. GT and P-form CNT were also found to be in good agreement with a single high T molecular dynamics rate for TIP4P water. The P-form of binary nucleation theory was studied for a fictitious water-ethanol system whose properties were generated from DFT and a mean-field EOS for a hard sphere Yukawa fluid. The P-form was not successful in removing the unphysical behavior predicted by binary CNT in its simplest form. The DFT results were greatly superior to all forms of classical theory.

  4. Absolute calibration of 10Be AMS standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiizumi, Kunihiko; Imamura, Mineo; Caffee, Marc W.; Southon, John R.; Finkel, Robert C.; McAninch, Jeffrey

    2007-05-01

    The increased detection sensitivity offered by AMS has dramatically expanded the utility of 10Be. As these applications become more sophisticated attention has focused on the accuracy of the 10Be standards used to calibrate the AMS measurements. In recent years it has become apparent that there is a discrepancy between two of the most widely used 10Be AMS standards, the ICN 10Be standard and the NIST 10Be standard. The ICN (ICN Chemical & Radioisotope Division) 10Be AMS standard was calibrated by radioactive decay counting. Dilutions, ranging from 5 × 10 -13 to 3 × 10 -1110Be/Be, have been prepared and are extensively used in many AMS laboratories. The NIST 10Be standard, prepared at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), is calibrated by mass spectrometric isotope ratio measurements. To provide an independent calibration of the 10Be standards we implanted a known number of 10Be atoms in both Si detectors and Be foil targets. The 10Be concentrations in these targets were measured by AMS. The results were compared with both the ICN and NIST AMS standards. Our 10Be measurements indicate that the 10Be/ 9Be isotopic ratio of the ICN AMS standard, which is based on a 10Be half-life of 1.5 × 10 6 yr, is 1.106 ± 0.012 times lower than the nominal value. Since the decay rate of the ICN standard is well determined, the decrease in 10Be/ 9Be ratio requires that the 10Be half-life be reduced to (1.36 ± 0.07) × 10 6 yr. The quoted uncertainty includes a ±5% uncertainty in the activity measurement carried out by ICN. In a similar fashion, we determined that the value of the NIST 10Be standard (SRM4325) is (2.79 ± 0.03) × 10 -1110Be/ 9Be, within error of the certified value of (2.68 ± 0.14) × 10 -11. The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) internal standards were also included in this study. We conclude that the 9Be(n, γ) neutron cross section is 7.8 ± 0.23 mb, without taking into account the uncertainty in the neutron irradiation.

  5. Auditory working memory predicts individual differences in absolute pitch learning.

    PubMed

    Van Hedger, Stephen C; Heald, Shannon L M; Koch, Rachelle; Nusbaum, Howard C

    2015-07-01

    Absolute pitch (AP) is typically defined as the ability to label an isolated tone as a musical note in the absence of a reference tone. At first glance the acquisition of AP note categories seems like a perceptual learning task, since individuals must assign a category label to a stimulus based on a single perceptual dimension (pitch) while ignoring other perceptual dimensions (e.g., loudness, octave, instrument). AP, however, is rarely discussed in terms of domain-general perceptual learning mechanisms. This is because AP is typically assumed to depend on a critical period of development, in which early exposure to pitches and musical labels is thought to be necessary for the development of AP precluding the possibility of adult acquisition of AP. Despite this view of AP, several previous studies have found evidence that absolute pitch category learning is, to an extent, trainable in a post-critical period adult population, even if the performance typically achieved by this population is below the performance of a "true" AP possessor. The current studies attempt to understand the individual differences in learning to categorize notes using absolute pitch cues by testing a specific prediction regarding cognitive capacity related to categorization - to what extent does an individual's general auditory working memory capacity (WMC) predict the success of absolute pitch category acquisition. Since WMC has been shown to predict performance on a wide variety of other perceptual and category learning tasks, we predict that individuals with higher WMC should be better at learning absolute pitch note categories than individuals with lower WMC. Across two studies, we demonstrate that auditory WMC predicts the efficacy of learning absolute pitch note categories. These results suggest that a higher general auditory WMC might underlie the formation of absolute pitch categories for post-critical period adults. Implications for understanding the mechanisms that underlie the

  6. Absolutely nondestructive discrimination of Huoshan Dendrobium nobile species with miniature near-infrared (NIR) spectrometer engine.

    PubMed

    Hu, Tian; Yang, Hai-Long; Tang, Qing; Zhang, Hui; Nie, Lei; Li, Lian; Wang, Jin-Feng; Liu, Dong-Ming; Jiang, Wei; Wang, Fei; Zang, Heng-Chang

    2014-10-01

    As one very precious traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), Huoshan Dendrobium has not only high price, but also significant pharmaceutical efficacy. However, different species of Huoshan Dendrobium exhibit considerable difference in pharmaceutical efficacy, so rapid and absolutely non-destructive discrimination of Huoshan Dendrobium nobile according to different species is crucial to quality control and pharmaceutical effect. In this study, as one type of miniature near-infrared (NIR) spectrometer, MicroNIR 1700 was used for absolutely nondestructive determination of NIR spectra of 90 batches of Dendrobium from five species of differ- ent commodity grades. The samples were intact and not smashed. Soft independent modeling of class analogy (SIMCA) pattern recognition based on principal component analysis (PCA) was used to classify and recognize different species of Dendrobium samples. The results indicated that the SIMCA qualitative models established with pretreatment method of standard normal variate transformation (SNV) in the spectra range selected by Qs method had 100% recognition rates and 100% rejection rates. This study demonstrated that a rapid and absolutely non-destructive analytical technique based on MicroNIR 1700 spectrometer was developed for successful discrimination of five different species of Huoshan Dendrobium with acceptable accuracy.

  7. Absolute positioning by multi-wavelength interferometry referenced to the frequency comb of a femtosecond laser.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guochao; Jang, Yoon-Soo; Hyun, Sangwon; Chun, Byung Jae; Kang, Hyun Jay; Yan, Shuhua; Kim, Seung-Woo; Kim, Young-Jin

    2015-04-06

    A multi-wavelength interferometer utilizing the frequency comb of a femtosecond laser as the wavelength ruler is tested for its capability of ultra-precision positioning for machine axis control. The interferometer uses four different wavelengths phase-locked to the frequency comb and then determines the absolute position through a multi-channel scheme of detecting interference phases in parallel so as to enable fast, precise and stable measurements continuously over a few meters of axis-travel. Test results show that the proposed interferometer proves itself as a potential candidate of absolute-type position transducer needed for next-generation ultra-precision machine axis control, demonstrating linear errors of less than 61.9 nm in peak-to-valley over a 1-meter travel with an update rate of 100 Hz when compared to an incremental-type He-Ne laser interferometer.

  8. Absolute magnitude estimation and relative judgement approaches to subjective workload assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vidulich, Michael A.; Tsang, Pamela S.

    1987-01-01

    Two rating scale techniques employing an absolute magnitude estimation method, were compared to a relative judgment method for assessing subjective workload. One of the absolute estimation techniques used was an unidimensional overall workload scale and the other was the multidimensional NASA-Task Load Index technique. Thomas Saaty's Analytic Hierarchy Process was the unidimensional relative judgment method used. These techniques were used to assess the subjective workload of various single- and dual-tracking conditions. The validity of the techniques was defined as their ability to detect the same phenomena observed in the tracking performance. Reliability was assessed by calculating test-retest correlations. Within the context of the experiment, the Saaty Analytic Hierarchy Process was found to be superior in validity and reliability. These findings suggest that the relative judgment method would be an effective addition to the currently available subjective workload assessment techniques.

  9. A Liquid-Helium-Cooled Absolute Reference Cold Load forLong-Wavelength Radiometric Calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Bensadoun, M.; Witebsky, C.; Smoot, George F.; De Amici,Giovanni; Kogut, A.; Levin, S.

    1990-05-01

    We describe a large (78-cm) diameter liquid-helium-cooled black-body absolute reference cold load for the calibration of microwave radiometers. The load provides an absolute calibration near the liquid helium (LHe) boiling point, accurate to better than 30 mK for wavelengths from 2.5 to 25 cm (12-1.2 GHz). The emission (from non-LHe temperature parts of the cold load) and reflection are small and well determined. Total corrections to the LHe boiling point temperature are {le} 50 mK over the operating range. This cold load has been used at several wavelengths at the South Pole and at the White Mountain Research Station. In operation, the average LHe loss rate was {le} 4.4 l/hr. Design considerations, radiometric and thermal performance and operational aspects are discussed. A comparison with other LHe-cooled reference loads including the predecessor of this cold load is given.

  10. Absolute pressure dependence of the second ionization level of EL2 in GaAs

    SciTech Connect

    Bliss, D.E.; Nolte, D.D.; Walukiewicz, W.; Haller, E.E. Department of Materials Science and Mineral Engineering, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94720 ); Lagowski, J. )

    1990-03-19

    We report the results of deep level transient spectroscopy experiments with the second ionization level of the double donor defect (EL2) under uniaxial stress in {ital p}-type GaAs. We measure the shift in the hole emission rate as a function of stress applied in the (100) and (110) directions. By modeling the valence band with two independently displacing bands and appropriately derived effective masses, we determine the absolute hydrostatic pressure derivative of the defect to be 39{plus minus}15 meV GPa{sup {minus}1}. The shear contribution is negligible. These results are very different from those obtained for the first ionization level, which has a much higher absolute pressure derivative of 90 meV GPa{sup {minus}1}.

  11. Rate theory of solvent exchange and kinetics of Li+ - BF4-/PF6- ion pairs in acetonitrile

    SciTech Connect

    Dang, Liem X.; Chang, Tsun-Mei

    2016-09-02

    In this paper, we describe our efforts to apply rate theories in studies of solvent exchange around Li+(aq) and the kinetics of ion pairings in lithium-ion batteries (LIB). We report one of the first computer simulations of the exchange dynamics around hydrated Li+ in acetonitrile (ACN), which is common solvent used in LIBs. We also provide details of the ion-pairing kinetics of Li+-[BF4] and Li+-[PF6] in ACN. Using our polarizable force-field models and employing classical rate theories of chemical reactions, we examine the ACN exchange process between the first and second solvation shells around Li+(aq). We calculate exchange rates using transition state theory and weighted them with transmission coefficients determined by the reactive flux and Impey, Madden, and McDonald approaches and Grote-Hynes theory. We found the relaxation times changed from 180 ps to 4600 ps and from 30 ps to 280 ps for Li+-[BF4] and Li+-[PF6] ion pairs, respectively. These results confirm that the solvent response to the kinetics of ion pairing is significant. Our results also show that, in addition to affecting the free energy of solvation into ACN, the anion type also should significantly influence the kinetics of ion pairing. These results will increase our understanding of the thermodynamic and kinetic properties of LIB systems.

  12. Absolute and relative family affluence and psychosomatic symptoms in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Elgar, Frank J; De Clercq, Bart; Schnohr, Christina W; Bird, Phillippa; Pickett, Kate E; Torsheim, Torbjørn; Hofmann, Felix; Currie, Candace

    2013-08-01

    Previous research on the links between income inequality and health and socioeconomic differences in health suggests that relative differences in affluence impact health and well-being more than absolute affluence. This study explored whether self-reported psychosomatic symptoms in adolescents relate more closely to relative affluence (i.e., relative deprivation or rank affluence within regions or schools) than to absolute affluence. Data on family material assets and psychosomatic symptoms were collected from 48,523 adolescents in eight countries (Austria, Belgium, Canada, Norway, Scotland, Poland, Turkey, and Ukraine) as part of the 2009/10 Health Behaviour in School-aged Children study. Multilevel regression analyses of the data showed that relative deprivation (Yitzhaki Index, calculated in regions and in schools) and rank affluence (in regions) (1) related more closely to symptoms than absolute affluence, and (2) related to symptoms after differences in absolute affluence were held constant. However, differences in family material assets, whether they are measured in absolute or relative terms, account for a significant variation in adolescent psychosomatic symptoms. Conceptual and empirical issues relating to the use of material affluence indices to estimate socioeconomic position are discussed.

  13. High speed image acquisition system of absolute encoder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Jianxiang; Chen, Xin; Chen, Xindu; Zhang, Fangjian; Wang, Han

    2017-01-01

    Absolute optical encoder as a product of optical, mechanical and electronic integration has been widely used in displacement measuring fields. However, how to improve the measurement velocity and reduce the manufacturing cost of absolute optical encoder is the key problem to be solved. To improve the measurement speed, a novel absolute optical encoder image acquisition system is proposed. The proposed acquisition system includes a linear CCD sensor is applied for capturing coding pattern images, an optical magnifying system is used for enlarging the grating stripes, an analog-digital conversion(ADC) module is used for processing the CCD analogy signal, a field programmable gate array(FPGA) device and other peripherals perform driving task. An absolute position measurement experiment was set up to verify and evaluate the proposed image acquisition system. The experimental result indicates that the proposed absolute optical encoder image acquisition system has the image acquisition speed of more than 9500fp/s with well reliability and lower manufacture cost.

  14. Absolute irradiance of the Moon for on-orbit calibration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stone, T.C.; Kieffer, H.H.; ,

    2002-01-01

    The recognized need for on-orbit calibration of remote sensing imaging instruments drives the ROLO project effort to characterize the Moon for use as an absolute radiance source. For over 5 years the ground-based ROLO telescopes have acquired spatially-resolved lunar images in 23 VNIR (Moon diameter ???500 pixels) and 9 SWIR (???250 pixels) passbands at phase angles within ??90 degrees. A numerical model for lunar irradiance has been developed which fits hundreds of ROLO images in each band, corrected for atmospheric extinction and calibrated to absolute radiance, then integrated to irradiance. The band-coupled extinction algorithm uses absorption spectra of several gases and aerosols derived from MODTRAN to fit time-dependent component abundances to nightly observations of standard stars. The absolute radiance scale is based upon independent telescopic measurements of the star Vega. The fitting process yields uncertainties in lunar relative irradiance over small ranges of phase angle and the full range of lunar libration well under 0.5%. A larger source of uncertainty enters in the absolute solar spectral irradiance, especially in the SWIR, where solar models disagree by up to 6%. Results of ROLO model direct comparisons to spacecraft observations demonstrate the ability of the technique to track sensor responsivity drifts to sub-percent precision. Intercomparisons among instruments provide key insights into both calibration issues and the absolute scale for lunar irradiance.

  15. Absolute Instability in Swept Leading-Edge Boundary Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, R.-S.; Li, F.; Malik, M. R.

    1997-11-01

    Absolute instabilities in the swept Hiemenz flow and flows over Poll's swept cylinder are studied. It is assumed that the span is infinite and the laminar flow field is subjected to a line impulsive excitation so that the spanwise wavenumber (β) is taken to be real, which is akin to the rotating disk study made by Lingwood.footnote Lingwood, R. J., J. Fluid Mech., 299, 17, 1995. We found that these flows can be absolutely unstable in the chordwise (x) direction. The pinch-point singularities formed by the coalescence of two distinct spatial branches can lie either below or above the real α-axis. The pinch points with a positive αi imply the existence of an unstable disturbance propagating against the mainstream, which has never been observed before. It is found that singularities of pinch type occur in a region very close to the leading edge, therefore the attachment-line Reynolds number is used to correlate the onset of absolute instability. The critical Reynolds number for absolute instability is found to be about R=540 compared to 583 for the attachment-line instability. Provided the non-linear behavior of this absolute instability is sufficient to trigger the laminar to turbulent transition, then it would cause a complete loss of laminar flow on a swept wing as does the attachment-line instability.

  16. Solids flow rate measurement in dense slurries

    SciTech Connect

    Porges, K.G.; Doss, E.D.

    1993-09-01

    Accurate and rapid flow rate measurement of solids in dense slurries remains an unsolved technical problem, with important industrial applications in chemical processing plants and long-distance solids conveyance. In a hostile two-phase medium, such a measurement calls for two independent parameter determinations, both by non-intrusive means. Typically, dense slurries tend to flow in laminar, non-Newtonian mode, eliminating most conventional means that usually rely on calibration (which becomes more difficult and costly for high pressure and temperature media). These issues are reviewed, and specific solutions are recommended in this report. Detailed calculations that lead to improved measuring device designs are presented for both bulk density and average velocity measurements. Cross-correlation, chosen here for the latter task, has long been too inaccurate for practical applications. The cause and the cure of this deficiency are discussed using theory-supported modeling. Fluid Mechanics are used to develop the velocity profiles of laminar non-Newtonian flow in a rectangular duct. This geometry uniquely allows the design of highly accurate `capacitive` devices and also lends itself to gamma transmission densitometry on an absolute basis. An absolute readout, though of less accuracy, is also available from a capacitive densitometer and a pair of capacitive sensors yields signals suitable for cross-correlation velocity measurement.

  17. Approximating relational observables by absolute quantities: a quantum accuracy-size trade-off

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyadera, Takayuki; Loveridge, Leon; Busch, Paul

    2016-05-01

    The notion that any physical quantity is defined and measured relative to a reference frame is traditionally not explicitly reflected in the theoretical description of physical experiments where, instead, the relevant observables are typically represented as ‘absolute’ quantities. However, the emergence of the resource theory of quantum reference frames as a new branch of quantum information science in recent years has highlighted the need to identify the physical conditions under which a quantum system can serve as a good reference. Here we investigate the conditions under which, in quantum theory, an account in terms of absolute quantities can provide a good approximation of relative quantities. We find that this requires the reference system to be large in a suitable sense.

  18. System and method for calibrating a rotary absolute position sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Donald R. (Inventor); Permenter, Frank Noble (Inventor); Radford, Nicolaus A (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A system includes a rotary device, a rotary absolute position (RAP) sensor generating encoded pairs of voltage signals describing positional data of the rotary device, a host machine, and an algorithm. The algorithm calculates calibration parameters usable to determine an absolute position of the rotary device using the encoded pairs, and is adapted for linearly-mapping an ellipse defined by the encoded pairs to thereby calculate the calibration parameters. A method of calibrating the RAP sensor includes measuring the rotary position as encoded pairs of voltage signals, linearly-mapping an ellipse defined by the encoded pairs to thereby calculate the calibration parameters, and calculating an absolute position of the rotary device using the calibration parameters. The calibration parameters include a positive definite matrix (A) and a center point (q) of the ellipse. The voltage signals may include an encoded sine and cosine of a rotary angle of the rotary device.

  19. Absolute distance sensing by two laser optical interferometry.

    PubMed

    Thurner, Klaus; Braun, Pierre-François; Karrai, Khaled

    2013-11-01

    We have developed a method for absolute distance sensing by two laser optical interferometry. A particularity of this technique is that a target distance is determined in absolute and is no longer limited to within an ambiguity range affecting usually multiple wavelength interferometers. We implemented the technique in a low-finesse Fabry-Pérot miniature fiber based interferometer. We used two diode lasers, both operating in the 1550 nm wavelength range. The wavelength difference is chosen to create a 25 μm long periodic beating interferometric pattern allowing a nanometer precise position measurement but limited to within an ambiguity range of 25 μm. The ambiguity is then eliminated by scanning one of the wavelengths over a small range (3.4 nm). We measured absolute distances in the sub-meter range and this with just few nanometer repeatability.

  20. Method and apparatus for two-dimensional absolute optical encoding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leviton, Douglas B. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    This invention presents a two-dimensional absolute optical encoder and a method for determining position of an object in accordance with information from the encoder. The encoder of the present invention comprises a scale having a pattern being predetermined to indicate an absolute location on the scale, means for illuminating the scale, means for forming an image of the pattern; and detector means for outputting signals derived from the portion of the image of the pattern which lies within a field of view of the detector means, the field of view defining an image reference coordinate system, and analyzing means, receiving the signals from the detector means, for determining the absolute location of the object. There are two types of scale patterns presented in this invention: grid type and starfield type.